WorldWideScience

Sample records for measured emission rates

  1. Rate amplification of the two photon emission from para-hydrogen toward the neutrino mass measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, Takahiko; Hara, Hideaki; Miyamoto, Yuki; Kuma, Susumu; Nakano, Itsuo; Ohae, Chiaki; Sasao, Noboru; Tanaka, Minoru; Uetake, Satoshi; Yoshimi, Akihiro; Yoshimura, Koji; Yoshimura, Motohiko

    2015-01-01

    We recently reported an experiment which focused on demonstrating the macro-coherent amplification mechanism. This mechanism, which was proposed for neutrino mass measurements, indicates that a multi-particle emission rate should be amplified by coherence in a suitable medium. Using a para-hydrogen molecule gas target and the adiabatic Raman excitation method, we observed that the two photon emission rate was amplified by a factor of more than 10 15 from the spontaneous emission rate. This paper briefly summarizes the previous experimental result and presents the current status and the future prospect

  2. Rate amplification of the two photon emission from para-hydrogen toward the neutrino mass measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masuda, Takahiko, E-mail: masuda@okayama-u.ac.jp; Hara, Hideaki; Miyamoto, Yuki [Okayama University, Research Core for Extreme Quantum World (Japan); Kuma, Susumu [Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics Laboratory, RIKEN (Japan); Nakano, Itsuo [Okayama University, Research Core for Extreme Quantum World (Japan); Ohae, Chiaki [University of Electro-Communications, Department of Engineering Science (Japan); Sasao, Noboru [Okayama University, Research Core for Extreme Quantum World (Japan); Tanaka, Minoru [Osaka University, Department of Physics (Japan); Uetake, Satoshi [Okayama University, Research Center of Quantum Universe (Japan); Yoshimi, Akihiro; Yoshimura, Koji [Okayama University, Research Core for Extreme Quantum World (Japan); Yoshimura, Motohiko [Okayama University, Research Center of Quantum Universe (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    We recently reported an experiment which focused on demonstrating the macro-coherent amplification mechanism. This mechanism, which was proposed for neutrino mass measurements, indicates that a multi-particle emission rate should be amplified by coherence in a suitable medium. Using a para-hydrogen molecule gas target and the adiabatic Raman excitation method, we observed that the two photon emission rate was amplified by a factor of more than 10{sup 15} from the spontaneous emission rate. This paper briefly summarizes the previous experimental result and presents the current status and the future prospect.

  3. Gaussian model for emission rate measurement of heated plumes using hyperspectral data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grauer, Samuel J.; Conrad, Bradley M.; Miguel, Rodrigo B.; Daun, Kyle J.

    2018-02-01

    This paper presents a novel model for measuring the emission rate of a heated gas plume using hyperspectral data from an FTIR imaging spectrometer. The radiative transfer equation (RTE) is used to relate the spectral intensity of a pixel to presumed Gaussian distributions of volume fraction and temperature within the plume, along a line-of-sight that corresponds to the pixel, whereas previous techniques exclusively presume uniform distributions for these parameters. Estimates of volume fraction and temperature are converted to a column density by integrating the local molecular density along each path. Image correlation velocimetry is then employed on raw spectral intensity images to estimate the volume-weighted normal velocity at each pixel. Finally, integrating the product of velocity and column density along a control surface yields an estimate of the instantaneous emission rate. For validation, emission rate estimates were derived from synthetic hyperspectral images of a heated methane plume, generated using data from a large-eddy simulation. Calculating the RTE with Gaussian distributions of volume fraction and temperature, instead of uniform distributions, improved the accuracy of column density measurement by 14%. Moreover, the mean methane emission rate measured using our approach was within 4% of the ground truth. These results support the use of Gaussian distributions of thermodynamic properties in calculation of the RTE for optical gas diagnostics.

  4. Measurement of Gross Alpha and Beta Emission Rates from Ceramic Tiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wudthicharoonpun, Piyasak; Chankow, Nares

    2007-08-01

    Full text: Ceramic tiles normally used to cover floors and walls contain naturally occurring radioactive elements i.e. potassium-40, uranium, thorium and their daughters from raw materials. Thus, radioactivity was dependent upon source of raw materials and the amount used. The objective of this research was to measure gross alpha and beta emission rates to be used as a database for safety assessment and for selection of rooms to measure radioactive radon-222 gas

  5. Air/Superfund National Technical Guidance Study Series. Data Base of emission-rate-measurement projects. Technical note

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eklund, B.; Petrinec, C.; Ranum, D.; Howlett, L.

    1991-06-01

    A compilation and evaluation of Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) emission rate data was performed. The three primary objectives were (1) to determine typical averages and ranges of emissions for various types of sources; (2) to determine the degree of correlation between emission rate results from different sampling methods; and (3) to examine the effects of different variables on measured emission rates. Emission rate data are presented for 33 studies covering 13 types of emission sources. The sources include landfills, surface impoundments, waste water treatment systems, leaking underground storage tanks, soil piles and landfarms. The emission rate data were obtained by using the Emission Isolation Flux Chamber, Downhole Emissions Isolation Flux Chamber, the Concentration Profile method and the Transect method. For each source, the total non-methane hydrocarbon and benzene emission rates are reported along with three other compounds that had the highest emission rate. Source concentration data (e.g. concentration in soil or waste water) are also reported for comparison to the measured emission rates.

  6. Isoprene emission rates and fluxes measured above a Mediterranean oak ( Quercus pubescens) forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, V.; Dumergues, L.; Bouchou, P.; Torres, L.; Lopez, A.

    2005-03-01

    The present work, carried out as part of the European fiEld experimentS to COnstrain Models of atmospheric Pollution and Transport of Emissions project (ESCOMPTE), brings a new contribution to the inventory of the main natural hydrocarbons sources that are liable to participate in the production of ozone. The measurement campaign was conducted in Montmeyan, a site close to Marseilles (France), with the aim of quantifying the terpenic emission pattern and the behaviour of Quercus pubescens, an important Mediterranean tree species. Biogenic emissions by Q. pubescens were determined by the enclosure of an intact branch of this tree in a Teflon cuvette. The total monoterpenic emission rates thus recorded were found to reach maximum values ranged between 40 and 350 μg g Dry Weight-1 h -1. Emissions were correlated strongly with leaf temperature and Photosynthetic Active Radiation (PAR). The fluxes were also determined by extrapolating the results of the enclosure method and by using aerodynamic gradient method. They reach around 73 mg m -2 h -1 with the first method and 55 mg m -2 h -1 with the second one. The obtained values fit with a maximal ratio of 2.

  7. Sequential multi-nuclide emission rate estimation method based on gamma dose rate measurement for nuclear emergency management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xiaole; Raskob, Wolfgang; Landman, Claudia; Trybushnyi, Dmytro; Li, Yu

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Sequentially reconstruct multi-nuclide emission using gamma dose rate measurements. • Incorporate a priori ratio of nuclides into the background error covariance matrix. • Sequentially augment and update the estimation and the background error covariance. • Suppress the generation of negative estimations for the sequential method. • Evaluate the new method with twin experiments based on the JRODOS system. - Abstract: In case of a nuclear accident, the source term is typically not known but extremely important for the assessment of the consequences to the affected population. Therefore the assessment of the potential source term is of uppermost importance for emergency response. A fully sequential method, derived from a regularized weighted least square problem, is proposed to reconstruct the emission and composition of a multiple-nuclide release using gamma dose rate measurement. The a priori nuclide ratios are incorporated into the background error covariance (BEC) matrix, which is dynamically augmented and sequentially updated. The negative estimations in the mathematical algorithm are suppressed by utilizing artificial zero-observations (with large uncertainties) to simultaneously update the state vector and BEC. The method is evaluated by twin experiments based on the JRodos system. The results indicate that the new method successfully reconstructs the emission and its uncertainties. Accurate a priori ratio accelerates the analysis process, which obtains satisfactory results with only limited number of measurements, otherwise it needs more measurements to generate reasonable estimations. The suppression of negative estimation effectively improves the performance, especially for the situation with poor a priori information, where it is more prone to the generation of negative values.

  8. Sequential multi-nuclide emission rate estimation method based on gamma dose rate measurement for nuclear emergency management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiaole, E-mail: zhangxiaole10@outlook.com [Institute for Nuclear and Energy Technologies, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe, D-76021 (Germany); Institute of Public Safety Research, Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China); Raskob, Wolfgang; Landman, Claudia; Trybushnyi, Dmytro; Li, Yu [Institute for Nuclear and Energy Technologies, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe, D-76021 (Germany)

    2017-03-05

    Highlights: • Sequentially reconstruct multi-nuclide emission using gamma dose rate measurements. • Incorporate a priori ratio of nuclides into the background error covariance matrix. • Sequentially augment and update the estimation and the background error covariance. • Suppress the generation of negative estimations for the sequential method. • Evaluate the new method with twin experiments based on the JRODOS system. - Abstract: In case of a nuclear accident, the source term is typically not known but extremely important for the assessment of the consequences to the affected population. Therefore the assessment of the potential source term is of uppermost importance for emergency response. A fully sequential method, derived from a regularized weighted least square problem, is proposed to reconstruct the emission and composition of a multiple-nuclide release using gamma dose rate measurement. The a priori nuclide ratios are incorporated into the background error covariance (BEC) matrix, which is dynamically augmented and sequentially updated. The negative estimations in the mathematical algorithm are suppressed by utilizing artificial zero-observations (with large uncertainties) to simultaneously update the state vector and BEC. The method is evaluated by twin experiments based on the JRodos system. The results indicate that the new method successfully reconstructs the emission and its uncertainties. Accurate a priori ratio accelerates the analysis process, which obtains satisfactory results with only limited number of measurements, otherwise it needs more measurements to generate reasonable estimations. The suppression of negative estimation effectively improves the performance, especially for the situation with poor a priori information, where it is more prone to the generation of negative values.

  9. Study on the Measurement of Valve Leak Rate Using Acoustic Emission Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang-Guk; Park, Jong-Hyuck; Yoo, Keun-Bae; Lee, Sun-Ki; Hong, Sung-Yull

    2006-01-01

    This study is to estimate the feasibility of acoustic emission(AE) method for the internal leak from the valves. In this study, 4 inch ball water valve leak tests using three different leak path and various leak rates were performed in order to analyze AE properties when leaks arise in valve seat. As a result of leak test for specimens simulated valve seat, we conformed that leak sound amplitude increased in proportion to the increase of leak rate, and leak rates were plotted versus peak acoustic amplitudes recorded within those two narrow frequency bands on each spectrum plot. The resulting plots of leak rate versus peak AE amplitude were the primary basis for determining the feasibility of quantifying leak acoustically. The large amount of data attained also allowed a favorable investigation of the effects of different leak paths, leak rates, pressure differentials and AE sensors on the AE amplitude spectrum. From the experimental results, it was suggested that the AE method for monitoring of leak was feasible. This paper describes quantitative measurements of fluid valve leak rates by the analysis of AE. Experimental apparatus were fabricated to accept a variety of leaking water valves in order to determine what characteristics of AE signal change with leak rate. The data for each valve were generated by varying the leak rate and recording the time averaged amplitude of AE versus frequency. Leak rates were varied by modifying the valve seating surfaces in ways designed to simulate actual defects observed in service. Most of the data analysis involved plotting the leak rate versus signal amplitude at a specific frequency to determine how well the two variables correlate in terms of accuracy, resolution, and repeatability

  10. Observed Barium Emission Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Wescott, E. M.; Hallinan, T. J.

    1993-01-01

    The barium releases from the CRRES satellite have provided an opportunity for verifying theoretically calculated barium ion and neutral emission rates. Spectra of the five Caribbean releases in the summer of 1991 were taken with a spectrograph on board a U.S. Air Force jet aircraft. Because the line of sight release densities are not known, only relative rates could be obtained. The observed relative rates agree well with the theoretically calculated rates and, together with other observations, confirm the earlier detailed theoretical emission rates. The calculated emission rates can thus with good accuracy be used with photometric observations. It has been postulated that charge exchange between neutral barium and oxygen ions represents a significant source for ionization. If so. it should be associated with emissions at 4957.15 A and 5013.00 A, but these emissions were not detected.

  11. Development of a direct measurement system for the standardization of neutron emission rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogheard, Florestan

    2012-01-01

    The manganese bath technique is the reference method for neutron source emission rates calibration. It is used to calibrate neutron sources using radionuclides (AmBe, PuBe, "2"5"2Cf,...) in terms of neutron emission rate under 4π sr. As a complement to this technique, the anisotropy of the source is measured using a rotating source holder and a neutron long counter. The neutron source to be measured is immersed in a manganese sulphate solution whereby the emitted neutrons are captured within the bath contents. In a typical configuration (a 1 m diameter sphere and a concentrated solution), approximately half of the neutrons lead to the creation of "5"6Mn via the "5"5Mn(n, γ) capture reaction. The "5"6Mn radionuclide has a half-life of approximately 2.6 hours and the bath reaches saturation when the number of nuclei decaying is equal to the number of nuclei created per unit time. The neutron emission rate from the source can then be deduced from the "5"6Mn activity at saturation, assuming proper modelling of the nuclear reactions occurring in the bath. The manganese bath facility at LNE-LNHB has been recently refurbished in order to comply with appropriate safety and radioprotection regulations. This has lead to the upgrading of both the measurement methodology and the modelling of the bath, and a study on the development of a new detector for the on-line measurement of the manganese activity was started. This new detector uses the β-γ coincidence measurement method. The beta channel consists of two photomultipliers tubes which allow the detection of Cerenkov light, and the gamma channel uses a solid scintillation detector. The advantage of this measurement method is that it allows the determination of the bath activity without any prior calibration, unlike the former method which uses a gamma-ray detector calibrated using a high activity manganese source. The principle of the Cerenkov-gamma coincidence measurement has been validated by a prototype of the

  12. Comparisons of MOVES Light-duty Gasoline NOx Emission Rates with Real-world Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, D.; Sonntag, D.; Warila, J.

    2017-12-01

    Recent studies have shown differences between air quality model estimates and monitored values for nitrogen oxides. Several studies have suggested that the discrepancy between monitored and modeled values is due to an overestimation of NOx from mobile sources in EPA's emission inventory, particularly for light-duty gasoline vehicles. EPA's MOtor Vehicle Emission Simulator (MOVES) is an emission modeling system that estimates emissions for cars, trucks and other mobile sources at the national, county, and project level for criteria pollutants, greenhouse gases, and air toxics. Studies that directly measure vehicle emissions provide useful data for evaluating MOVES when the measurement conditions are properly accounted for in modeling. In this presentation, we show comparisons of MOVES2014 to thousands of real-world NOx emissions measurements from individual light-duty gasoline vehicles. The comparison studies include in-use vehicle emissions tests conducted on chassis dynamometer tests in support of Denver, Colorado's Vehicle Inspection & Maintenance Program and remote sensing data collected using road-side instruments in multiple locations and calendar years in the United States. In addition, we conduct comparisons of MOVES predictions to fleet-wide emissions measured from tunnels. We also present details on the methodology used to conduct the MOVES model runs in comparing to the independent data.

  13. Effects of mass airflow rate through an open-circuit gas quantification system when measuring carbon emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunter, Stacey A; Bradford, James A; Moffet, Corey A

    2017-01-01

    Methane (CH) and carbon dioxide (CO) represent 11 and 81%, respectively, of all anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. Agricultural CH emissions account for approximately 43% of all anthropogenic CH emissions. Most agricultural CH emissions are attributed to enteric fermentation within ruminant livestock; hence, the heightened interest in quantifying and mitigating this source. The automated, open-circuit gas quantification system (GQS; GreenFeed, C-Lock, Inc., Rapid City, SD) evaluated here can be placed in a pasture with grazing cattle and can measure their CH and CO emissions with spot sampling. However, improper management of the GQS can have an erroneous effect on emission estimates. One factor affecting the quality of emission estimates is the airflow rates through the GQS to ensure a complete capture of the breath cloud emitted by the animal. It is hypothesized that at lower airflow rates this cloud will be incompletely captured. To evaluate the effect of airflow rate through the GQS on emission estimates, a data set was evaluated with 758 CO and CH emission estimates with a range in airflows of 10.7 to 36.6 L/s. When airflow through the GQS was between 26.0 and 36.6 L/s, CO and CH emission estimates were not affected ( = 0.14 and 0.05, respectively). When airflow rates were less than 26.0 L/s, CO and CH emission estimates were lower and decreased as airflow rate decreased ( emissions are underestimated. Maintaining mass airflow through a GQS at rates greater than 26 L/s is important for producing high quality CO and CH emission estimates.

  14. Brain metabolism in autism. Resting cerebral glucose utilization rates as measured with positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rumsey, J.M.; Duara, R.; Grady, C.; Rapoport, J.L.; Margolin, R.A.; Rapoport, S.I.; Cutler, N.R.

    1985-05-01

    The cerebral metabolic rate for glucose was studied in ten men (mean age = 26 years) with well-documented histories of infantile autism and in 15 age-matched normal male controls using positron emission tomography and (F-18) 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose. Positron emission tomography was completed during rest, with reduced visual and auditory stimulation. While the autistic group as a whole showed significantly elevated glucose utilization in widespread regions of the brain, there was considerable overlap between the two groups. No brain region showed a reduced metabolic rate in the autistic group. Significantly more autistic, as compared with control, subjects showed extreme relative metabolic rates (ratios of regional metabolic rates to whole brain rates and asymmetries) in one or more brain regions.

  15. Brain metabolism in autism. Resting cerebral glucose utilization rates as measured with positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rumsey, J.M.; Duara, R.; Grady, C.; Rapoport, J.L.; Margolin, R.A.; Rapoport, S.I.; Cutler, N.R.

    1985-01-01

    The cerebral metabolic rate for glucose was studied in ten men (mean age = 26 years) with well-documented histories of infantile autism and in 15 age-matched normal male controls using positron emission tomography and (F-18) 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose. Positron emission tomography was completed during rest, with reduced visual and auditory stimulation. While the autistic group as a whole showed significantly elevated glucose utilization in widespread regions of the brain, there was considerable overlap between the two groups. No brain region showed a reduced metabolic rate in the autistic group. Significantly more autistic, as compared with control, subjects showed extreme relative metabolic rates (ratios of regional metabolic rates to whole brain rates and asymmetries) in one or more brain regions

  16. Improving and Assessing Aircraft-based Greenhouse Gas Emission Rate Measurements at Indianapolis as part of the INFLUX project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimburger, A. M. F.; Shepson, P. B.; Stirm, B. H.; Susdorf, C.; Cambaliza, M. O. L.

    2015-12-01

    Since the Copenhagen accord in 2009, several countries have affirmed their commitment to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions. The United States and Canada committed to reduce their emissions by 17% below 2005 levels, by 2020, Europe by 14% and China by ~40%. To achieve such targets, coherent and effective strategies in mitigating atmospheric carbon emissions must be implemented in the next decades. Whether such goals are actually achieved, they require that reductions are "measurable", "reportable", and "verifiable". Management of greenhouse gas emissions must focus on urban environments since ~74% of CO2 emissions worldwide will be from cities, while measurement approaches are highly uncertain (~50% to >100%). The Indianapolis Flux Experiment (INFLUX) was established to develop, assess and improve top-down and bottom-up quantifications of urban greenhouse gas emissions. Based on an aircraft mass balance approach, we performed a series of experiments focused on the improvement of CO2, CH4 and CO emission rates quantification from Indianapolis, our final objective being to drastically improve the method overall uncertainty from the previous estimate of 50%. In November-December 2014, we conducted nine methodologically identical mass balance experiments in a short period of time (24 days, one downwind distance) for assumed constant total emission rate conditions, as a means to obtain an improved standard deviation of the mean determination. By averaging the individual emission rate determinations, we were able to obtain a method precision of 17% and 16% for CO2 and CO, respectively, at the 95%C.L. CH4 emission rates are highly variable day to day, leading to precision of 60%. Our results show that repetitive sampling can enable improvement in precision of the aircraft top-down methods through averaging.

  17. Quantification of Greenhouse Gas Emission Rates from strong Point Sources by Airborne IPDA-Lidar Measurements: Methodology and Experimental Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehret, G.; Amediek, A.; Wirth, M.; Fix, A.; Kiemle, C.; Quatrevalet, M.

    2016-12-01

    We report on a new method and on the first demonstration to quantify emission rates from strong greenhouse gas (GHG) point sources using airborne Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) Lidar measurements. In order to build trust in the self-reported emission rates by countries, verification against independent monitoring systems is a prerequisite to check the reported budget. A significant fraction of the total anthropogenic emission of CO2 and CH4 originates from localized strong point sources of large energy production sites or landfills. Both are not monitored with sufficiently accuracy by the current observation system. There is a debate whether airborne remote sensing could fill in the gap to infer those emission rates from budgeting or from Gaussian plume inversion approaches, whereby measurements of the GHG column abundance beneath the aircraft can be used to constrain inverse models. In contrast to passive sensors, the use of an active instrument like CHARM-F for such emission verification measurements is new. CHARM-F is a new airborne IPDA-Lidar devised for the German research aircraft HALO for the simultaneous measurement of the column-integrated dry-air mixing ratio of CO2 and CH4 commonly denoted as XCO2 und XCH4, respectively. It has successfully been tested in a serious of flights over Central Europe to assess its performance under various reflectivity conditions and in a strongly varying topography like the Alps. The analysis of a methane plume measured in crosswind direction of a coal mine ventilation shaft revealed an instantaneous emission rate of 9.9 ± 1.7 kt CH4 yr-1. We discuss the methodology of our point source estimation approach and give an outlook on the CoMet field experiment scheduled in 2017 for the measurement of anthropogenic and natural GHG emissions by a combination of active and passive remote sensing instruments on research aircraft.

  18. Assessing the optimized precision of the aircraft mass balance method for measurement of urban greenhouse gas emission rates through averaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexie M. F. Heimburger

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available To effectively address climate change, aggressive mitigation policies need to be implemented to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Anthropogenic carbon emissions are mostly generated from urban environments, where human activities are spatially concentrated. Improvements in uncertainty determinations and precision of measurement techniques are critical to permit accurate and precise tracking of emissions changes relative to the reduction targets. As part of the INFLUX project, we quantified carbon dioxide (CO2, carbon monoxide (CO and methane (CH4 emission rates for the city of Indianapolis by averaging results from nine aircraft-based mass balance experiments performed in November-December 2014. Our goal was to assess the achievable precision of the aircraft-based mass balance method through averaging, assuming constant CO2, CH4 and CO emissions during a three-week field campaign in late fall. The averaging method leads to an emission rate of 14,600 mol/s for CO2, assumed to be largely fossil-derived for this period of the year, and 108 mol/s for CO. The relative standard error of the mean is 17% and 16%, for CO2 and CO, respectively, at the 95% confidence level (CL, i.e. a more than 2-fold improvement from the previous estimate of ~40% for single-flight measurements for Indianapolis. For CH4, the averaged emission rate is 67 mol/s, while the standard error of the mean at 95% CL is large, i.e. ±60%. Given the results for CO2 and CO for the same flight data, we conclude that this much larger scatter in the observed CH4 emission rate is most likely due to variability of CH4 emissions, suggesting that the assumption of constant daily emissions is not correct for CH4 sources. This work shows that repeated measurements using aircraft-based mass balance methods can yield sufficient precision of the mean to inform emissions reduction efforts by detecting changes over time in urban emissions.

  19. Dynamics, OH distributions and UV emission of a gliding arc at various flow-rates investigated by optical measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jiajian; Sun, Zhiwei; Li, Zhongshan

    2014-01-01

    -state OH were investigated using planar laser-induced fluorescence. The results show that the shape, height, intensity and thickness of ground-state OH distribution vary significantly with air flow rates. Finally, UV emission of the gliding arc is measured using optical emission spectroscopy......We demonstrate a plasma discharge which is generated between two diverging electrodes and extended into a gliding arc in non-equilibrium condition by an air flow at atmospheric pressure. Effects of the air flow rates on the dynamics, ground-state OH distributions and spectral characterization of UV...

  20. Monte Carlo calculation of correction factors for radionuclide neutron source emission rate measurement by manganese bath method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Chunjuan; Liu Yi'na; Zhang Weihua; Wang Zhiqiang

    2014-01-01

    The manganese bath method for measuring the neutron emission rate of radionuclide sources requires corrections to be made for emitted neutrons which are not captured by manganese nuclei. The Monte Carlo particle transport code MCNP was used to simulate the manganese bath system of the standards for the measurement of neutron source intensity. The correction factors were calculated and the reliability of the model was demonstrated through the key comparison for the radionuclide neutron source emission rate measurements organized by BIPM. The uncertainties in the calculated values were evaluated by considering the sensitivities to the solution density, the density of the radioactive material, the positioning of the source, the radius of the bath, and the interaction cross-sections. A new method for the evaluation of the uncertainties in Monte Carlo calculation was given. (authors)

  1. Areal-averaged trace gas emission rates from long-range open-path measurements in stable boundary layer conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Schäfer

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of land-surface emission rates of greenhouse and other gases at large spatial scales (10 000 m2 are needed to assess the spatial distribution of emissions. This can be readily done using spatial-integrating micro-meteorological methods like flux-gradient methods which were evaluated for determining land-surface emission rates of trace gases under stable boundary layers. Non-intrusive path-integrating measurements are utilized. Successful application of a flux-gradient method requires confidence in the gradients of trace gas concentration and wind, and in the applicability of boundary-layer turbulence theory; consequently the procedures to qualify measurements that can be used to determine the flux is critical. While there is relatively high confidence in flux measurements made under unstable atmospheres with mean winds greater than 1 m s−1, there is greater uncertainty in flux measurements made under free convective or stable conditions. The study of N2O emissions of flat grassland and NH3 emissions from a cattle lagoon involves quality-assured determinations of fluxes under low wind, stable or night-time atmospheric conditions when the continuous "steady-state" turbulence of the surface boundary layer breaks down and the layer has intermittent turbulence. Results indicate that following the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory (MOST flux-gradient methods that assume a log-linear profile of the wind speed and concentration gradient incorrectly determine vertical profiles and thus flux in the stable boundary layer. An alternative approach is considered on the basis of turbulent diffusivity, i.e. the measured friction velocity as well as height gradients of horizontal wind speeds and concentrations without MOST correction for stability. It is shown that this is the most accurate of the flux-gradient methods under stable conditions.

  2. Dynamics, OH distributions and UV emission of a gliding arc at various flow-rates investigated by optical measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Jiajian; Sun, Zhiwei; Li, Zhongshan; Ehn, Andreas; Aldén, Marcus; Salewski, Mirko; Leipold, Frank; Kusano, Yukihiro

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a plasma discharge which is generated between two diverging electrodes and extended into a gliding arc in non-equilibrium condition by an air flow at atmospheric pressure. Effects of the air flow rates on the dynamics, ground-state OH distributions and spectral characterization of UV emission of the gliding arc were investigated by optical methods. High-speed photography was utilized to reveal flow-rate dependent dynamics such as ignitions, propagation, short-cutting events, extinctions and conversions of the discharge from glowtype to spark-type. Short-cutting events and ignitions occur more frequently at higher flow rates. The anchor points of the gliding arc are mostly steady at the top of the electrodes at lower flow rates whereas at higher flow rates they glide up along the electrodes most of the time. The afterglow of fully developed gliding arcs is observed to decay over hundreds of microseconds after being electronically short-cut by a newly ignited arc. The extinction time decreases with the increase of the flow rate. The frequency of the conversion of a discharge from glow-type to spark-type increases with the flow rate. Additionally, spatial distributions of ground-state OH were investigated using planar laser-induced fluorescence. The results show that the shape, height, intensity and thickness of ground-state OH distribution vary significantly with air flow rates. Finally, UV emission of the gliding arc is measured using optical emission spectroscopy and it is found that the emission intensity of NO γ (A-X), OH (A-X) and N 2 (C-B) increase with the flow rates showing more characteristics of spark-type arcs. The observed phenomena indicate the significance of the interaction between local turbulence and the gliding arc. (paper)

  3. Dynamics, OH distributions and UV emission of a gliding arc at various flow-rates investigated by optical measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jiajian; Sun, Zhiwei; Li, Zhongshan; Ehn, Andreas; Aldén, Marcus; Salewski, Mirko; Leipold, Frank; Kusano, Yukihiro

    2014-07-01

    We demonstrate a plasma discharge which is generated between two diverging electrodes and extended into a gliding arc in non-equilibrium condition by an air flow at atmospheric pressure. Effects of the air flow rates on the dynamics, ground-state OH distributions and spectral characterization of UV emission of the gliding arc were investigated by optical methods. High-speed photography was utilized to reveal flow-rate dependent dynamics such as ignitions, propagation, short-cutting events, extinctions and conversions of the discharge from glowtype to spark-type. Short-cutting events and ignitions occur more frequently at higher flow rates. The anchor points of the gliding arc are mostly steady at the top of the electrodes at lower flow rates whereas at higher flow rates they glide up along the electrodes most of the time. The afterglow of fully developed gliding arcs is observed to decay over hundreds of microseconds after being electronically short-cut by a newly ignited arc. The extinction time decreases with the increase of the flow rate. The frequency of the conversion of a discharge from glow-type to spark-type increases with the flow rate. Additionally, spatial distributions of ground-state OH were investigated using planar laser-induced fluorescence. The results show that the shape, height, intensity and thickness of ground-state OH distribution vary significantly with air flow rates. Finally, UV emission of the gliding arc is measured using optical emission spectroscopy and it is found that the emission intensity of NO γ (A-X), OH (A-X) and N2 (C-B) increase with the flow rates showing more characteristics of spark-type arcs. The observed phenomena indicate the significance of the interaction between local turbulence and the gliding arc.

  4. New proposal to measure NO2 formation rate from NO emissions in the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frins, Erna; Osorio, MatIas; Casaballe, Nicolas; Wagner, Thomas; Platt, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    As result from combustion processes, SO 2 , NO, NO 2 and other substances are emitted in the atmosphere. We present a new method to measure the formation rate of a trace gas (e.g., NO 2 ), whose precursor (NO) was emitted in the atmosphere by a source like a stack. In the case under study, the presence of ozone determines the formation of NO 2 . We will demonstrate that measuring the slant column densities across the emitted plume and knowing the flux of another trace gas (e.g. SO 2 ), also emitted by the source but that could be considered stable under the conditions of the observation, it is possible to monitor remotely (from an arbitrary location) the formation rate of NO 2 due to conversion of NO to NO 2 .

  5. Measuring Star-Formation Rates of AGNs and QSOs using a new calibration from Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papovich, Casey

    Understanding the coevolution of star-formation and supermassive black hole accretion is one of the key questions in galaxy formation theory. This relation is important for understanding why at present the mass in galaxy bulges (on scales of kpc) correlates so tightly with the mass of galaxy central supermassive blackholes (on scales of AU). Feedback from supermassive black hole accretion may also be responsible for heating or expelling cold gas from galaxies, shutting off the fuel for star-formation and additional black hole growth. Did bulges proceed the formation of black holes, or vice versa, or are they contemporaneous? Therefore, understanding the exact rates of star-formation and supermassive black hole growth, and how they evolve with time and galaxy mass has deep implications for how galaxies form. It has previously been nearly impossible to study simultaneously both star-formation and accretion onto supermassive black holes in galaxies because the emission from black hole accretion contaminates nearly all diagnostics of star-formation. The "standard" diagnostics for the star-formation rate (the emission from hydrogen, UV emission, midIR emission, far-IR emission, etc) are not suitable for measuring star-formation rates in galaxies with actively accreting supermassive blackholes. In this proposal, the researchers request NASA/ADP funding for an archival study using spectroscopy with the Spitzer Space Telescope to measure simultaneously the star-formation rate (SFR) and bolometric emission from accreting supermassive blackholes to understand the complex relation between both processes. The key to this study is that they will develop a new calibrator for SFRs in galaxies with active supermassive black holes based on the molecular emission from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which emit strongly in the mid-IR (3 - 20 micron) and are very strong in spectra from the Spitzer Space Telescope. The PAH molecules exist near photo-dissociation regions, and

  6. Emissions & Measurements - Black Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emissions and Measurement (EM) research activities performed within the National Risk Management Research Lab NRMRL) of EPA's Office of Research and Development (ORD) support measurement and laboratory analysis approaches to accurately characterize source emissions, and near sour...

  7. Measurement of Ozone Emission and Particle Removal Rates from Portable Air Purifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mang, Stephen A.; Walser, Maggie L.; Nizkorodov, Sergey A.; Laux, John M.

    2009-01-01

    Portable air purifiers are popular consumer items, especially in areas with poor air quality. Unfortunately, most users of these air purifiers have minimal understanding of the factors affecting their efficiency in typical indoor settings. Emission of the air pollutant ozone (O[subscript 3]) by certain air purifiers is of particular concern. In an…

  8. Simultaneous and multi-point measurement of ammonia emanating from human skin surface for the estimation of whole body dermal emission rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Shota; Sekine, Yoshika; Kimura, Keita; Umezawa, Kazuo; Asai, Satomi; Miyachi, Hayato

    2017-05-15

    Ammonia is one of the members of odor gases and a possible source of odor in indoor environment. However, little has been known on the actual emission rate of ammonia from the human skin surface. Then, this study aimed to estimate the whole-body dermal emission rate of ammonia by simultaneous and multi-point measurement of emission fluxes of ammonia employing a passive flux sampler - ion chromatography system. Firstly, the emission fluxes of ammonia were non-invasively measured for ten volunteers at 13 sampling positions set in 13 anatomical regions classified by Kurazumi et al. The measured emission fluxes were then converted to partial emission rates using the surface body areas estimated by weights and heights of volunteers and partial rates of 13 body regions. Subsequent summation of the partial emission rates provided the whole body dermal emission rate of ammonia. The results ranged from 2.9 to 12mgh -1 with an average of 5.9±3.2mgh -1 per person for the ten healthy young volunteers. The values were much greater than those from human breath, and thus the dermal emission of ammonia was found more significant odor source than the breath exhalation in indoor environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Mass-ablation-rate measurements in direct-drive cryogenic implosions using x-ray self-emission images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, A. K., E-mail: adavi@lle.rochester.edu; Michel, D. T.; Hu, S. X.; Craxton, R. S.; Epstein, R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Sangster, T. C.; Froula, D. H. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14636 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    A technique to measure the mass ablation rate in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion implosions using a pinhole x-ray framing camera is presented. In target designs consisting of two layers of different materials, two x-ray self-emission peaks from the coronal plasma were measured once the laser burned through the higher-Z outer layer. The location of the inner peak is related to the position of the ablation front and the location of the outer peak corresponds to the position of the interface of the two layers in the plasma. The emergence of the second peak was used to measure the burnthrough time of the outer layer, giving the average mass ablation rate of the material and instantaneous mass remaining. By varying the thickness of the outer layer, the mass ablation rate can be obtained as a function of time. Simulations were used to validate the methods and verify that the measurement techniques are not sensitive to perturbation growth at the ablation surface.

  10. Measures of star formation rates from infrared (Herschel) and UV (GALEX) emissions of galaxies in the HerMES fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buat, V.; Giovannoli, E.; Burgarella, D.; Altieri, B.; Amblard, A.; Arumugam, V.; Aussel, H.; Babbedge, T.; Blain, A.; Bock, J.; Boselli, A.; Castro-Rodríguez, N.; Cava, A.; Chanial, P.; Clements, D. L.; Conley, A.; Conversi, L.; Cooray, A.; Dowell, C. D.; Dwek, E.; Eales, S.; Elbaz, D.; Fox, M.; Franceschini, A.; Gear, W.; Glenn, J.; Griffin, M.; Halpern, M.; Hatziminaoglou, E.; Heinis, S.; Ibar, E.; Isaak, K.; Ivison, R. J.; Lagache, G.; Levenson, L.; Lonsdale, C. J.; Lu, N.; Madden, S.; Maffei, B.; Magdis, G.; Mainetti, G.; Marchetti, L.; Morrison, G. E.; Nguyen, H. T.; O'Halloran, B.; Oliver, S. J.; Omont, A.; Owen, F. N.; Page, M. J.; Pannella, M.; Panuzzo, P.; Papageorgiou, A.; Pearson, C. P.; Pérez-Fournon, I.; Pohlen, M.; Rigopoulou, D.; Rizzo, D.; Roseboom, I. G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Sánchez Portal, M.; Schulz, B.; Seymour, N.; Shupe, D. L.; Smith, A. J.; Stevens, J. A.; Strazzullo, V.; Symeonidis, M.; Trichas, M.; Tugwell, K. E.; Vaccari, M.; Valiante, E.; Valtchanov, I.; Vigroux, L.; Wang, L.; Ward, R.; Wright, G.; Xu, C. K.; Zemcov, M.

    2010-11-01

    The reliability of infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV) emissions to measure star formation rates (SFRs) in galaxies is investigated for a large sample of galaxies observed with the Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE) and the Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) instruments on Herschel as part of the Herschel Multi-Tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES) project. We build flux-limited 250-μm samples of sources at redshift z 500 μm. Dust attenuation is discussed on the basis of commonly used diagnostics: the LIR/LUV ratio and the slope, β, of the UV continuum. A mean dust attenuation AUV of mag is measured in the samples. LIR/LUV is found to correlate with LIR. Galaxies with and 0.5 recipe commonly applied to local starbursts is found to overestimate the dust attenuation correction in our galaxy sample by a factor of ~2-3. The SFRs deduced from LIR are found to account for about 90 per cent of the total SFR; this percentage drops to 71 per cent for galaxies with (or ). For these faint objects, one needs to combine UV and IR emissions to obtain an accurate measure of the SFR.

  11. A 6.13MeV gamma reference source, measurement of the emission rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robert, Andre; Blondel, Maurice; Morel, Jean; Thomas, Claude.

    1977-08-01

    A 6.13MeV γ reference source has been produced by using 13 C(α, nγ) 16 O reaction occurring in an intimate 13 C and 238 Pu mixture. With two walls made leak proof this standard source is easy handled and convenient to the calibration of detectors. The 6.13MeV gamma ray is emitted without Doeppler effect, is measured with an uncertainty of 6% by three independent methods [fr

  12. Joint release rate estimation and measurement-by-measurement model correction for atmospheric radionuclide emission in nuclear accidents: An application to wind tunnel experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinpeng; Li, Hong; Liu, Yun; Xiong, Wei; Fang, Sheng

    2018-03-05

    The release rate of atmospheric radionuclide emissions is a critical factor in the emergency response to nuclear accidents. However, there are unavoidable biases in radionuclide transport models, leading to inaccurate estimates. In this study, a method that simultaneously corrects these biases and estimates the release rate is developed. Our approach provides a more complete measurement-by-measurement correction of the biases with a coefficient matrix that considers both deterministic and stochastic deviations. This matrix and the release rate are jointly solved by the alternating minimization algorithm. The proposed method is generic because it does not rely on specific features of transport models or scenarios. It is validated against wind tunnel experiments that simulate accidental releases in a heterogonous and densely built nuclear power plant site. The sensitivities to the position, number, and quality of measurements and extendibility of the method are also investigated. The results demonstrate that this method effectively corrects the model biases, and therefore outperforms Tikhonov's method in both release rate estimation and model prediction. The proposed approach is robust to uncertainties and extendible with various center estimators, thus providing a flexible framework for robust source inversion in real accidents, even if large uncertainties exist in multiple factors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Measuring and predicting the emission rate of phthalate plasticizer from vinyl flooring in a specially-designed chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ying; Liu, Zhe; Park, Jinsoo; Clausen, Per A; Benning, Jennifer L; Little, John C

    2012-11-20

    The emission of di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) from vinyl flooring (VF) was measured in specially designed stainless steel chambers. In duplicate chamber studies, the gas-phase concentration in the chamber increased slowly and reached a steady state level of 0.8-0.9 μg/m(3) after about 20 days. By increasing the area of vinyl flooring and decreasing that of the stainless steel surface within the chamber, the time to reach steady state was significantly reduced, compared to a previous study (1 month versus 5 months). The adsorption isotherm of DEHP on the stainless steel chamber surfaces was explicitly measured using solvent extraction and thermal desorption. The strong partitioning of DEHP onto the stainless steel surface was found to follow a simple linear relationship. Thermal desorption resulted in higher recovery than solvent extraction. Investigation of sorption kinetics showed that it takes several weeks for the sorption of DEHP onto the stainless steel surface to reach equilibrium. The content of DEHP in VF was measured at about 15% (w/w) using pressurized liquid extraction. The independently measured or calculated parameters were used to validate an SVOC emission model, with excellent agreement between model prediction and the observed gas-phase DEHP chamber concentrations.

  14. Reconciliation of Measured and TRANSP-calculated Neutron Emission Rates in the National Spherical Torus Experiment: Circa 2002-2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medley, S.S.; Darrow, D.S.; Roquemore, A.L.

    2005-01-01

    A change in the response of the neutron detectors on the National Spherical Torus Experiment occurred between the 2002-2003 and 2004 experimental run periods. An analysis of this behavior by investigating the neutron diagnostic operating conditions and comparing measured and TRANSP-calculated neutron rates is presented. Also a revised procedure for cross calibration of the neutron scintillator detectors with the fission chamber detectors was implemented that delivers good agreement amongst the measured neutron rates for all neutron detectors and all run periods. For L-mode discharges, the measured and TRANSP-calculated neutron rates now match closely for all run years. For H-mode discharges over the entire 2002-2004 period, the 2FG scintillator and fission chamber measurements match each other but imply a neutron deficit of 11.5% relative to the TRANSP-calculated neutron. The results of this report impose a modification on all of the previously used calibration factors for the entire neutron detector suite over the 2002-2004 period. A tabular summary of the new calibration factors is provided including certified calibration factors for the 2005 run

  15. Quantification of Greenhouse Gas Emission Rates from strong Point Sources by Space-borne IPDA Lidar Measurements: Results from a Sensitivity Analysis Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehret, G.; Kiemle, C.; Rapp, M.

    2017-12-01

    The practical implementation of the Paris Agreement (COP21) vastly profit from an independent, reliable and global measurement system of greenhouse gas emissions, in particular of CO2, in order to complement and cross-check national efforts. Most fossil-fuel CO2 emitters emanate from large sources such as cities and power plants. These emissions increase the local CO2 abundance in the atmosphere by 1-10 parts per million (ppm) which is a signal that is significantly larger than the variability from natural sources and sinks over the local source domain. Despite these large signals, they are only sparsely sampled by the ground-based network which calls for satellite measurements. However, none of the existing and forthcoming passive satellite instruments, operating in the NIR spectral domain, can measure CO2 emissions at night time or in low sunlight conditions and in high latitude regions in winter times. The resulting sparse coverage of passive spectrometers is a serious limitation, particularly for the Northern Hemisphere, since these regions exhibit substantial emissions during the winter as well as other times of the year. In contrast, CO2 measurements by an Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) Lidar are largely immune to these limitations and initial results from airborne application look promising. In this study, we discuss the implication for a space-borne IPDA Lidar system. A Gaussian plume model will be used to simulate the CO2-distribution of large power plants downstream to the source. The space-borne measurements are simulated by applying a simple forward model based on Gaussian error distribution. Besides the sampling frequency, the sampling geometry (e.g. measurement distance to the emitting source) and the error of the measurement itself vastly impact on the flux inversion performance. We will discuss the results by incorporating Gaussian plume and mass budget approaches to quantify the emission rates.

  16. International key comparison of measurements of neutron source emission rate (1999-2005): CCRI(III)-K9.AmBe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, N.J.; Jones, L.N. [National Physical Laboratory (NPL), Teddington, (United Kingdom); Wang, Z.; Liu, Y.; Wang, Q.; Chen, X.; Luo, H.; Rong, C. [China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE), Beijing (China); Kralik, M. [Czech Metrology Institute (CMI), Praha, (Czech Republic); Park, H.; Choi, K.O. [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS), Daejeon, (Korea, Republic of); Pereira, W.W.; Da Fonseca, E.S. [National Laboratory of Metrology of Ionizing Radiation (LNMRI), Rio de Janeiro, (Brazil); Cassette, P. [Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel (LNE-LNHB), Paris, (France); Dewey, M.S. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD, (United States); Moiseev, N.N.; Kharitonov, I.A. [D I Mendeleyev Institute for Metrology (VNIIM), St Petersburg, (Russian Federation)

    2011-07-01

    Section III (neutron measurements) of the Comite Consultatif des Rayonnements Ionisants, CCRI, conducted a key comparison of primary measurements of the neutron emission rate of an {sup 241}Am-Be({alpha},n) radionuclide source. A single {sup 241}Am-Be({alpha},n) source was circulated to all the participants between 1999 and 2005. Eight laboratories participated - the CIAE (China), CMI (Czech Republic), KRISS (Republic of Korea), LNMRI (Brazil), LNE-LNHB (France), NIST (USA), NPL (UK) and the VNIIM (Russian Federation) - with the NPL making their measurements at the start and repeating them near the end of the exercise to verify the stability of the source. Each laboratory reported the emission rate into 4{pi} sr together with a detailed uncertainty budget. All participants used the manganese bath technique, with the VNIIM also making measurements using an associated particle technique. The CMI, KRISS, VNIIM, and later the NPL, also measured the anisotropy of the source although this was not a formal part of the comparison. The first draft report was released in May 2006 and having been discussed and modified by the participants and subsequently reviewed by the CCRI(III), the present paper is now the final report of the comparison. (authors)

  17. Tabulated Neutron Emission Rates for Plutonium Oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shores, Erik Frederick [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-07-24

    This work tabulates neutron emission rates for 80 plutonium oxide samples as reported in the literature. Plutonium-­238 and plutonium-­239 oxides are included and such emission rates are useful for scaling tallies from Monte Carlo simulations and estimating dose rates for health physics applications.

  18. The European Emission Trading System and competition. Anticompetitive measures beyond reach? An assessment of the grandfathering allocation method and the Performance Standard Rate system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weishaar, S.

    2006-10-01

    The center piece of the European Climate Change Program is the ambitious Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trading Scheme (EU ETS, Directive 2003/87/EC) which helps Member States to fulfill their Kyoto commitments. It particularly facilitates the old EU 15 Member States to make progress towards meeting their particular greenhouse gas emissions reduction goals committed under the Burden Sharing Agreement. EU Member States have developed national greenhouse gas allowances allocation plans and distributed these allowances to around 5000 operators with approximately 12.000 installations. Differences between allocations can give rise to severe anticompetitive effects. Undue interventions by Member States are largely contained through the application of the four freedoms, while EC Competition law (Articles 81 and 82) is geared to the containment of competitive distortions arising in particular from undue behavior of firms. State involvement in infringements is addressed through Articles 87 (State aid) and 86 (public undertakings) and the 'joint application doctrine' (Articles 10(2), 3(g), 81 and 82) which was developed by the ECJ upon recognition that State measures can undermine the effectiveness of the EC Treaty. The paper examines how anticompetitive distortions originating from Member State action under National Allocation Plans in general and by application of (historical) grandfathering and the (hypothetical) Performance Standard Rate (PSR) allocation format in particular are dealt with under European competition law rules. The PSR System is a relative benchmark system with an intended cap for all participants but without a cap for individual operators. This alternative approach has been developed and is actually in use for the Dutch NOx Emission Trading System. An interdisciplinary industrial economic and competition law framework is chosen to formulate an economic critique. After the introductory part the anticompetitive effects originating in State measures are examined

  19. Field Measurements of PCB emissions from Building Surfaces Using a New Portable Emission Test Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyng, Nadja; Haven, Rune; Gunnarsen, Lars Bo

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to measure PCB-emission rates from indoor surfaces on-site in contaminated buildings using a newly developed portable emission test cell. Emission rates were measured from six different surfaces; three untreated surfaces and three remediated surfaces in a contaminated...

  20. Emissivity measurements on aeronautical alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campo, L. del; Perez-Saez, R.B.; Gonzalez-Fernandez, L.; Esquisabel, X.; Fernandez, I.; Gonzalez-Martin, P.; Tello, M.J.

    2010-01-01

    The emissivity of three Ni and Co based aeronautical alloys is analyzed in this paper. These alloys are employed in high temperature environments whenever good corrosion resistance, high temperature resistance and high strength are essential. Thus, apart from the aeronautical industry, these alloys are also used in other technological applications, as for example, aerospace, nuclear reactors, and tooling. The results in this paper extend the emissivity data for these alloys available in the literature. Emissivity dependence on the radiation wavelength (2-22 μm), sample temperature (200-650 o C) and emission angle (0-85 o ) has been investigated. In addition, the effect of surface finish and oxidation has also been taken into consideration. The data in this paper have several applications, as temperature measurement of a target by pyrometry, low observability of airplanes and thermal radiation heat transfer simulation in airplane nozzles or furnaces.

  1. Emissivity measurements on aeronautical alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campo, L. del, E-mail: leire.del-campo@cnrs-orleans.f [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnologia, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Barrio Sarriena s/n, 48940 Leioa, Bizkaia (Spain); Perez-Saez, R.B., E-mail: raul.perez@ehu.e [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnologia, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Barrio Sarriena s/n, 48940 Leioa, Bizkaia (Spain); Instituto de Sintesis y Estudio de Materiales, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Apdo. 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain); Gonzalez-Fernandez, L. [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnologia, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Barrio Sarriena s/n, 48940 Leioa, Bizkaia (Spain); Esquisabel, X.; Fernandez, I. [Industria de Turbo Propulsores, S.A., Planta de Zamudio, Edificio 300, 48170 Zamudio, Bizkaia (Spain); Gonzalez-Martin, P. [Industria de Turbo Propulsores, S.A., Parque empresarial San Fernando, Avda. Castilla 2, 28830 San Fernando de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Tello, M.J. [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnologia, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Barrio Sarriena s/n, 48940 Leioa, Bizkaia (Spain); Instituto de Sintesis y Estudio de Materiales, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Apdo. 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain)

    2010-01-21

    The emissivity of three Ni and Co based aeronautical alloys is analyzed in this paper. These alloys are employed in high temperature environments whenever good corrosion resistance, high temperature resistance and high strength are essential. Thus, apart from the aeronautical industry, these alloys are also used in other technological applications, as for example, aerospace, nuclear reactors, and tooling. The results in this paper extend the emissivity data for these alloys available in the literature. Emissivity dependence on the radiation wavelength (2-22 {mu}m), sample temperature (200-650 {sup o}C) and emission angle (0-85{sup o}) has been investigated. In addition, the effect of surface finish and oxidation has also been taken into consideration. The data in this paper have several applications, as temperature measurement of a target by pyrometry, low observability of airplanes and thermal radiation heat transfer simulation in airplane nozzles or furnaces.

  2. Emissions & Measurements - Black Carbon | Science ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emissions and Measurement (EM) research activities performed within the National Risk Management Research Lab NRMRL) of EPA's Office of Research and Development (ORD) support measurement and laboratory analysis approaches to accurately characterize source emissions, and near source concentrations of air pollutants. They also support integrated Agency research programs (e.g., source to health outcomes) and the development of databases and inventories that assist Federal, state, and local air quality managers and industry implement and comply with air pollution standards. EM research underway in NRMRL supports the Agency's efforts to accurately characterize, analyze, measure and manage sources of air pollution. This pamphlet focuses on the EM research that NRMRL researchers conduct related to black carbon (BC). Black Carbon is a pollutant of concern to EPA due to its potential impact on human health and climate change. There are extensive uncertainties in emissions of BC from stationary and mobile sources. Emissions and Measurement (EM) research activities performed within the National Risk Management Research Lab NRMRL) of EPA's Office of Research and Development (ORD)

  3. A process-based model to estimate gas exchange and monoterpene emission rates in the mediterranean maquis - comparisons between modelled and measured fluxes at different scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, M.; Matteucci, G.; Fares, S.; Davison, B.

    2009-02-01

    This paper concerns the application of a process-based model (MOCA, Modelling of Carbon Assessment) as an useful tool for estimating gas exchange, and integrating the empirical algorithms for calculation of monoterpene fluxes, in a Mediterranean maquis of central Italy (Castelporziano, Rome). Simulations were carried out for a range of hypothetical but realistic canopies of the evergreen Quercus ilex (holm oak), Arbutus unedo (strawberry tree) and Phillyrea latifolia. More, the dependence on total leaf area and leaf distribution of monoterpene fluxes at the canopy scale has been considered in the algorithms. Simulation of the gas exchange rates showed higher values for P. latifolia and A. unedo (2.39±0.30 and 3.12±0.27 gC m-2 d-1, respectively) with respect to Q. ilex (1.67±0.08 gC m-2 d-1) in the measuring campaign (May-June). Comparisons of the average Gross Primary Production (GPP) values with those measured by eddy covariance were well in accordance (7.98±0.20 and 6.00±1.46 gC m-2 d-1, respectively, in May-June), although some differences (of about 30%) were evident in a point-to-point comparison. These differences could be explained by considering the non uniformity of the measuring site where diurnal winds blown S-SW direction affecting thus calculations of CO2 and water fluxes. The introduction of some structural parameters in the algorithms for monoterpene calculation allowed to simulate monoterpene emission rates and fluxes which were in accord to those measured (6.50±2.25 vs. 9.39±4.5μg g-1DW h-1 for Q. ilex, and 0.63±0.207μg g-1DW h-1 vs. 0.98±0.30μg g-1DW h-1 for P. latifolia). Some constraints of the MOCA model are discussed, but it is demonstrated to be an useful tool to simulate physiological processes and BVOC fluxes in a very complicated plant distributions and environmental conditions, and necessitating also of a low number of input data.

  4. Measurements of VOC/SVOC emission factors from burning incenses in an environmental test chamber: influence of temperature, relative humidity, and air exchange rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoukian, A; Buiron, D; Temime-Roussel, B; Wortham, H; Quivet, E

    2016-04-01

    This study investigates the influence of three environmental indoor parameters (i.e., temperature, relative humidity, and air exchange rate) on the emission of 13 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) during incense burning. Experiments have been carried out using an environmental test chamber. Statistical results from a classical two-level full factorial design highlight the predominant effect of ventilation on emission factors. The higher the ventilation, the higher the emission factor. Moreover, thanks to these results, an estimation of the concentration range for the compounds under study can be calculated and allows a quick look of indoor pollution induced by incense combustion. Carcinogenic substances (i.e., benzene, benzo(a)pyrene, and formaldehyde) produced from the incense combustion would be predicted in typical living indoors conditions to reach instantaneous concentration levels close to or higher than air quality exposure threshold values.

  5. Measurement of temporal regional cerebral perfusion with single-photon emission tomography predicts rate of decline in language function and survival in early Alzheimer`s disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claus, J.J.; Walstra, G.J.M.; Hijdra, A.; Gool, W.A. van [Department of Neurology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Royen, E.A. van [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Verbeeten, B. Jr. [Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1999-03-01

    We determined the relationship between regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) measured with single-photon emission tomography (SPET) and decline in cognitive function and survival in Alzheimer`s disease. In a prospective follow-up study, 69 consecutively referred patients with early probable Alzheimer`s disease (NINCDS/ADRDA criteria) underwent SPET performed at the time of initial diagnosis using technetium-99m-labelled hexamethylpropylene amine oxime. Neuropsychological function was assessed at baseline and after 6 months and survival data were available on all patients, extending to 5.5 years of follow-up. Lower left temporal (P<0.01) and lower left parietal (P<0.01) rCBF were statistically significantly related to decline in language function after 6 months. The association between left temporal rCBF and survival was also statistically significant (P<0.05) using Cox proportional hazards regression analysis. Performing analysis with quartiles of the distribution, we found a threshold effect for low left temporal rCBF (rCBF<73.7%, P<0.01) and high risk of mortality. In this lowest quartile, median survival time was 2.7 years (follow-up to 5.2 years), compared with 4.4 years in the other quartiles (follow-up to 5.5 years). Kaplan-Meier survival curves showed statistically significant (P<0.05, log rank test) survival curves for the lowest versus other quartiles of left temporal rCBF. All results were unaffected by adjustment for age, sex, dementia severity, duration of symptoms, education and ratings of local cortical atrophy. We conclude that left temporal rCBF predicts decline in language function and survival in patients with early probable Alzheimer`s disease, with a threshold effect of low rCBF and high risk of mortality. (orig.) With 3 figs., 3 tabs., 44 refs.

  6. Measurement of temporal regional cerebral perfusion with single-photon emission tomography predicts rate of decline in language function and survival in early Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claus, J.J.; Walstra, G.J.M.; Hijdra, A.; Gool, W.A. van; Royen, E.A. van; Verbeeten, B. Jr.

    1999-01-01

    We determined the relationship between regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) measured with single-photon emission tomography (SPET) and decline in cognitive function and survival in Alzheimer's disease. In a prospective follow-up study, 69 consecutively referred patients with early probable Alzheimer's disease (NINCDS/ADRDA criteria) underwent SPET performed at the time of initial diagnosis using technetium-99m-labelled hexamethylpropylene amine oxime. Neuropsychological function was assessed at baseline and after 6 months and survival data were available on all patients, extending to 5.5 years of follow-up. Lower left temporal (P<0.01) and lower left parietal (P<0.01) rCBF were statistically significantly related to decline in language function after 6 months. The association between left temporal rCBF and survival was also statistically significant (P<0.05) using Cox proportional hazards regression analysis. Performing analysis with quartiles of the distribution, we found a threshold effect for low left temporal rCBF (rCBF<73.7%, P<0.01) and high risk of mortality. In this lowest quartile, median survival time was 2.7 years (follow-up to 5.2 years), compared with 4.4 years in the other quartiles (follow-up to 5.5 years). Kaplan-Meier survival curves showed statistically significant (P<0.05, log rank test) survival curves for the lowest versus other quartiles of left temporal rCBF. All results were unaffected by adjustment for age, sex, dementia severity, duration of symptoms, education and ratings of local cortical atrophy. We conclude that left temporal rCBF predicts decline in language function and survival in patients with early probable Alzheimer's disease, with a threshold effect of low rCBF and high risk of mortality. (orig.)

  7. Chemical emission rates from personal computers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nakagawa, T.; Wargocki, Pawel; Tanabe, S.

    2003-01-01

    Chemical emission measurements from different brands of personal computers (PCs) were conducted in a 1 m3 glass chamber. Eight PCs were tested individually. Each consisted of the same brand of PC tower and one of the 4 different brands of PC monitors. Within each brand both cathode-ray tube (CRT...

  8. Thermal history regulates methylbutenol basal emission rate in Pinus ponderosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Dennis W; Goldstein, Allen H; Lerdau, Manuel T

    2006-07-01

    Methylbutenol (MBO) is a 5-carbon alcohol that is emitted by many pines in western North America, which may have important impacts on the tropospheric chemistry of this region. In this study, we document seasonal changes in basal MBO emission rates and test several models predicting these changes based on thermal history. These models represent extensions of the ISO G93 model that add a correction factor C(basal), allowing MBO basal emission rates to change as a function of thermal history. These models also allow the calculation of a new emission parameter E(standard30), which represents the inherent capacity of a plant to produce MBO, independent of current or past environmental conditions. Most single-component models exhibited large departures in early and late season, and predicted day-to-day changes in basal emission rate with temporal offsets of up to 3 d relative to measured basal emission rates. Adding a second variable describing thermal history at a longer time scale improved early and late season model performance while retaining the day-to-day performance of the parent single-component model. Out of the models tested, the T(amb),T(max7) model exhibited the best combination of day-to-day and seasonal predictions of basal MBO emission rates.

  9. Apparatus for measuring radioactive emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohme, R.C.; Lazerson, M.M.

    1984-01-01

    Apparatus for measuring radioactive emissions from moving radioactive material comprises at least one radiation detector in a housing serving as a first radiation shield and in which at least one groove is formed to expose at least a portion of a receptor surface of the detector. The groove extends transverse to the direction of movement of the material over the detector. A second radiation shield may be located between at least a portion of the first shield and the detector. The material of the second shield is inherently less contaminated and emits secondary excitation radiation of lower energy than the first material. (author)

  10. Apparatus and procedure to characterize the surface quality of conductors by measuring the rate of cathode emission as a function of surface electric field strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestayer, Mac; Christo, Steve; Taylor, Mark

    2014-10-21

    A device and method for characterizing quality of a conducting surface. The device including a gaseous ionizing chamber having centrally located inside the chamber a conducting sample to be tested to which a negative potential is applied, a plurality of anode or "sense" wires spaced regularly about the central test wire, a plurality of "field wires" at a negative potential are spaced regularly around the sense, and a plurality of "guard wires" at a positive potential are spaced regularly around the field wires in the chamber. The method utilizing the device to measure emission currents from the conductor.

  11. Methyl chavicol: characterization of its biogenic emission rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouvier-Brown, N.C.; Goldstein, A.H.; Worton, D.R.; Matross, D.M.; Gilman, J.B.; Kuster, W.C.; Welsh-Bon, D.; Warneke, C.; de Gouw, J.A.; Cahill, M.J.; Holzinger, R.

    2009-01-01

    We report measurements of ambient atmospheric mixing ratios for methyl chavicol and determine its biogenic emission rate. Methyl chavicol, a biogenic oxygenated aromatic compound, is abundant within and above Blodgett Forest, a ponderosa pine forest in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California.

  12. Lidar method to estimate emission rates from extended sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currently, point measurements, often combined with models, are the primary means by which atmospheric emission rates are estimated from extended sources. However, these methods often fall short in their spatial and temporal resolution and accuracy. In recent years, lidar has emerged as a suitable to...

  13. Estimating marginal CO2 emissions rates for national electricity systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkes, A.D.

    2010-01-01

    The carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions reduction afforded by a demand-side intervention in the electricity system is typically assessed by means of an assumed grid emissions rate, which measures the CO 2 intensity of electricity not used as a result of the intervention. This emissions rate is called the 'marginal emissions factor' (MEF). Accurate estimation of MEFs is crucial for performance assessment because their application leads to decisions regarding the relative merits of CO 2 reduction strategies. This article contributes to formulating the principles by which MEFs are estimated, highlighting the strengths and weaknesses in existing approaches, and presenting an alternative based on the observed behaviour of power stations. The case of Great Britain is considered, demonstrating an MEF of 0.69 kgCO 2 /kW h for 2002-2009, with error bars at +/-10%. This value could reduce to 0.6 kgCO 2 /kW h over the next decade under planned changes to the underlying generation mix, and could further reduce to approximately 0.51 kgCO 2 /kW h before 2025 if all power stations commissioned pre-1970 are replaced by their modern counterparts. Given that these rates are higher than commonly applied system-average or assumed 'long term marginal' emissions rates, it is concluded that maintenance of an improved understanding of MEFs is valuable to better inform policy decisions.

  14. Improving the accuracy of S02 column densities and emission rates obtained from upward-looking UV-spectroscopic measurements of volcanic plumes by taking realistic radiative transfer into account

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Christoph; Deutschmann, Tim; Werner, Cynthia; Sutton, A. Jeff; Elias, Tamar; Kelly, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Sulfur dioxide (SO2) is monitored using ultraviolet (UV) absorption spectroscopy at numerous volcanoes around the world due to its importance as a measure of volcanic activity and a tracer for other gaseous species. Recent studies have shown that failure to take realistic radiative transfer into account during the spectral retrieval of the collected data often leads to large errors in the calculated emission rates. Here, the framework for a new evaluation method which couples a radiative transfer model to the spectral retrieval is described. In it, absorption spectra are simulated, and atmospheric parameters are iteratively updated in the model until a best match to the measurement data is achieved. The evaluation algorithm is applied to two example Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) measurements conducted at Kilauea volcano (Hawaii). The resulting emission rates were 20 and 90% higher than those obtained with a conventional DOAS retrieval performed between 305 and 315 nm, respectively, depending on the different SO2 and aerosol loads present in the volcanic plume. The internal consistency of the method was validated by measuring and modeling SO2 absorption features in a separate wavelength region around 375 nm and comparing the results. Although additional information about the measurement geometry and atmospheric conditions is needed in addition to the acquired spectral data, this method for the first time provides a means of taking realistic three-dimensional radiative transfer into account when analyzing UV-spectral absorption measurements of volcanic SO2 plumes.

  15. Emissivity Measurements of Additively Manufactured Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, Robert Vaughn [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Reid, Robert Stowers [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Baker, Andrew M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lucero, Briana [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bernardin, John David [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-01-25

    The emissivity of common 3D printing materials such as ABS and PLA were measured using a reflectivity meter and have the measured value of approximately 0.92. Adding a conductive material to the filament appears to cause a decrease in the emissivity of the surface. The angular dependence of the emissivity and the apparent temperature was measured using a FLIR infrared camera showing that the emissivity does not change much for shallow angles less than 40 angular degrees, and drops off dramatically after 70 angular degrees.

  16. [Investigation of emission characteristics for light duty vehicles with a portable emission measurement system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hai-Kun; Fu, Li-Xin; Zhou, Yu; Lin, Xin; Chen, Ai-Zhong; Ge, Wei-hu; Du, Xuan

    2008-10-01

    Emission from 7 typical light-duty vehicles under actual driving conditions was monitored using a portable emission measurement system to gather data for characterization of the real world vehicle emission in Shenzhen, including the effects of driving modes on vehicle emission, comparison of fuel consumption based emission factors (g x L(-1) with mileage based emission factors (g x km(-1)), and the average emission factors of the monitored vehicles. The acceleration and deceleration modes accounted for 66.7% of total travel time, 80.3% of traveling distance and 74.6%-79.2% of vehicle emission; the acceleration mode contributed more than other driving modes. The fuel based emission factors were less dependent on the driving speed; they may be utilized in building macro-scale vehicle emission inventory with smaller sensitivity to the vehicle driving conditions. The effect of vehicle technology on vehicle emission was significant; the emission factors of CO, HC and NO(x) of carbureted vehicles were 19.9-20.5, 5.6-26.1 and 1.8-2.0 times the more advanced vehicles of Euro II, respectively. Using the ECE + EUDC driving cycle would not produce the desired real-world emission rates of light duty vehicles in a typical Chinese city.

  17. Methane Emission Estimates from Landfills Obtained with Dynamic Plume Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hensen, A.; Scharff, H.

    2001-01-01

    Methane emissions from 3 different landfills in the Netherlands were estimated using a mobile Tuneable Diode Laser system (TDL). The methane concentration in the cross section of the plume is measured downwind of the source on a transect perpendicular to the wind direction. A gaussian plume model was used to simulate the concentration levels at the transect. The emission from the source is calculated from the measured and modelled concentration levels.Calibration of the plume dispersion model is done using a tracer (N 2 O) that is released from the landfill and measured simultaneously with the TDL system. The emission estimates for the different locations ranged from 3.6 to 16 m 3 ha -1 hr -1 for the different sites. The emission levels were compared to emission estimates based on the landfill gas production models. This comparison suggests oxidation rates that are up to 50% in spring and negligible in November. At one of the three sites measurements were performed in campaigns in 3 consecutive years. Comparison of the emission levels in the first and second year showed a reduction of the methane emission of about 50% due to implementation of a gas extraction system. From the second to the third year emissions increased by a factor of 4 due to new land filling. Furthermore measurements were performed in winter when oxidation efficiency was reduced. This paper describes the measurement technique used, and discusses the results of the experimental sessions that were performed

  18. Supernova rates, galaxy emission, and Hubble type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Den Bergh, S.

    1991-01-01

    Supernova discovery frequency is found to correlate with emission-line (H-alpha + forbidden N II line) equivalent width, except for the most active galaxies in which some supernovae might be hidden by dust. SNII occur preferentially in active galaxies with emission-line EW not less than 20 A, whereas SNIa favor less active galaxies with EW less than 20 A. The intrinsic frequency of supernovae is found to be an order of magnitude higher in Sc galaxies than it is in early type spirals. The relatively high frequency of SNIa in late-type galaxies suggests that not all such objects have old progenitors. 13 refs

  19. Comparison of real-world and certification emission rates for light duty gasoline vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Tanzila; Frey, H Christopher

    2018-05-01

    U.S. light duty vehicles are subject to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) emission standards. Emission compliance is determined by certification testing of selected emissions from representative vehicles on standard driving cycles using chassis dynamometers. Test results are also used in many emission inventories. The dynamometer based emission rates are adjusted to provide the certification levels (CL), which must be lower than the standards for compliance. Although standard driving cycles are based on specific observations of real-world driving, they are not necessarily real-world representative. A systematic comparison of the real-world emission rates of U.S. light duty gasoline vehicles (LDGVs) versus CL, and emission standards has not been previously reported. The purpose of this work is to compare regulatory limits (both CLs and emission standards) and the real-world emissions of LDGVs. The sensitivity of the comparisons to cold start emission was assessed. Portable Emission Measurement Systems (PEMS) were used to measure hot stabilized exhaust emissions of 122 LDGVs on a specified 110 mile test route. Cold start emissions were measured with PEMS for a selected vehicle sample of 32 vehicles. Emissions were measured for carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbons (HC) and nitrogen oxides (NO x ). For each vehicle, a Vehicle Specific Power (VSP) modal emission rate model was developed. The VSP modal rates were weighted by the standard driving cycles and real-world driving cycles to estimate the respective cycle average emission rates (CAERs). Measured vehicles were matched with certification test vehicles for comparison. For systematic trends in comparison, vehicles were classified into four groups based on the Tier 1 and Tier 2 emission regulation, and the vehicle type such as passenger car and passenger truck. Depending on the cycle-pollutant and the vehicle groups, hot stabilized CAERs are on average either statistically

  20. Seasonal variations in VOC emission rates from gorse (Ulex europaeus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boissard, C.; Cao, X.-L.; Juan, C.-Y.; Hewitt, C. N.; Gallagher, M.

    Seasonal variations of biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emission rates and standardised emission factors from gorse (Ulex europaeus) have been measured at two sites in the United Kingdom, from October 1994 to September 1995, within temperature and PAR conditions ranging from 3 to 34°C and 10-1300 μmol m-2 s-1, respectively. Isoprene was the dominant emitted compound with a relative composition fluctuating from 7% of the total VOC (winter) to 97% (late summer). The monoterpenes α-pinene, camphene, sabinene, β-pinene, myrcene, limonene, trans-ocimene and γ-terpinene were also emitted, with α-pinene being the dominant monoterpene during most the year. Trans-ocimene represented 33-66% of the total monoterpene during the hottest months from June to September. VOC emissions were found to be accurately predicted using existing algorithms. Standard (normalised) emission factors of VOCs from gorse were calculated using experimental parameters measured during the experiment and found to fluctuate with season, from 13.3±2.1 to 0.1±0.1 μg C (g dwt)-1 h-1 in August 1995 and January 1995, respectively, for isoprene, and from 2.5±0.2 to 0.4±0.2 μg C (g dwt)-1 h-1 in July and November 1995, respectively, for total monoterpenes. No simple clear relation was found to allow prediction of these seasonal variations with respect to temperature and light intensity. The effects of using inappropriate algorithms to derive VOC fluxes from gorse were assessed for isoprene and monoterpenes. Although on an annual basis the discrepancies are not significant, monthly estimation of isoprene were found to be overestimated by more than a factor of 50 during wintertime when the seasonality of emission factors is not considered.

  1. Accoustic emission measurements during phase change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tensi, H M; Radtke, W [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Werkstoff- und Verarbeitungswissenschaften

    1978-07-01

    Acoustic emission measurements during solidification and melting of metals are heavily disturbed by noise originating from frictional movements between crucible and specimen. These disturbances may be cancelled by means of specially arranged crucibles. Thus it was possible to use acoustic emission generated during solidification of residual eutectic liquid for real-time judgement of macrosegregation and microsegregation. With the help of crucibles made of silicone tubes the effect of melting velocity and concentration on acoustic emission generated by melting of bismuth and bismuth alloys was measured.

  2. Measurement of PCB emissions from building surfaces using a novel portable emission test cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyng, Nadja; Gunnarsen, Lars Bo; Andersen, Helle Vibeke

    2016-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were used in building materials like caulks and paints from 1930 e1970s and in some cases that caused elevated PCB concentrations in the indoor air at levels considered harmful to occupant health. PCBs are semivolatile organic compounds and capable of spreading from...... and there is a need to prioritise remediation measures on different materials. An inexpensive and portable emission test cell was developed to resemble indoor conditions in relation to the area specific ventilation rate. Emissions were measured using the test cell in the laboratory on freshly made PCB paint. Further......, the chamber was used for determining emissions from PCB-containing building materials in the field as well as remediated walls. The measurements showed that sorption of PCBs to chamber walls was insignificant after 2-4 days of exposure to the source. Over a period of two weeks emission rates did not change...

  3. Research on Acoustic Emission and Electromagnetic Emission Characteristics of Rock Fragmentation at Different Loading Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujun Zhao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationships among the generation of acoustic emission, electromagnetic emission, and the fracture stress of rock grain are investigated, which are based on the mechanism of acoustic emission and electromagnetic emission produced in the process of indenting rock. Based on the relationships, the influence of loading rate on the characteristics of acoustic emission and electromagnetic emission of rock fragmentation is further discussed. Experiment on rock braking was carried out with three loading rates of 0.001 mm/s, 0.01 mm/s, and 0.1 mm/s. The results show that the phenomenon of acoustic emission and electromagnetic emission is produced during the process of loading and breaking rock. The wave forms of the two signals and the curve of the cutter indenting load show jumping characteristics. Both curves have good agreement with each other. With the increase of loading rate, the acoustic emission and electromagnetic emission signals are enhanced. Through analysis, it is found that the peak count rate, the energy rate of acoustic emission, the peak intensity, the number of pulses of the electromagnetic emission, and the loading rate have a positive correlation with each other. The experimental results agree with the theoretical analysis. The proposed studies can lead to an in-depth understanding of the rock fragmentation mechanism and help to prevent rock dynamic disasters.

  4. Micrometeorological methods for measurements of mercury emissions over contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K.H.; Lindberg, S.E.; Hanson, P.J.; Owens, J.; Myers, T.P.

    1993-01-01

    As part of a larger study involving development and application of field and laboratory methods (micrometeorological, dynamic enclosure chamber, and controlled laboratory chamber methods) to measure the air/surface exchange of Hg vapor, we performed a series of preliminary measurements over contaminated soils. From March--April 1993, we used the modified Bowen ratio (MBR) method to measure emission rates of mercury over a floodplain contaminated with mercury near Oak Ridge, TN. The mercury emission rates measured from contaminated EFPC soils using the MBR method during early spring show that (1) in all cases, the contaminated soils acted as a source of mercury to the atmosphere with source strengths ranging from 17 to 160 ng m -2 h -1 ; and (2) the strengths of mercury emissions can be greatly influenced by the combined effects of surface soil temperature, residence time of air masses over the source area, and turbulence conditions. The mercury fluxes measured in a controlled flow chamber indicate that contaminated soils can exhibit up to an order of magnitude higher emission rates of Hg under conditions of elevated soil temperature, soil structure disturbance, and high turbulence. Mercury emissions from contaminated soils exceeded emissions from background soils by one to two orders of magnitude

  5. On-road particulate emission measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoleni, Claudio

    Particulate matter (PM) suspended in the atmosphere has harmful health effects, contributes to visibility impairment, and affects atmospheric radiative transfer, thereby contributing to global change. Vehicles contribute substantially to the ambient PM concentration in urban areas, yet the fraction of ambient PM originating from vehicle emissions is poorly characterized because suitable measurement methods have not been available. This dissertation describes the development and the use of a new vehicle emission remote sensing system (VERSS) for the on-road measurement of PM emission factors for vehicles. The PM VERSS measures PM by ultraviolet backscattering and transmission. PM backscattering and transmission mass efficiencies have been calculated from Mie theory based on an homogeneous spherical model for gasoline particles and on a two-layers, spherical model for diesel particles. The VERSS was used in a large-scale study in Las Vegas, NV. A commercial gaseous VERSS was used for the measurement of gaseous emission factors (i.e., carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons, and nitrogen oxide). Speed and acceleration were also measured for each vehicle. A video image of each vehicle's rear license plate was acquired and license plate numbers were matched with the Clark County department of motor vehicle database to retrieve vehicle information such as model year, vehicle weight category and engine ignition type. PM VERSS has precisely estimated PM fleet average emission factors and clearly shown the dependence of PM emission factors on vehicle model year. Under mostly hot-stabilized operation, diesel vehicle PM emission factors are about 25 times higher than those of gasoline vehicles. Furthermore, the fleet frequency distributions of PM emission factors are highly skewed, meaning that most of the fleet emission factor is accounted for by a small portion of the fleet. The PM VERSS can measure PM emission factors for these high emitting vehicles on an individual basis. PM

  6. True mean rate measuring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichenlaub, D.P.

    1980-01-01

    A digital radiation-monitoring system for nuclear power plants uses digital and microprocessor circuitry to enable rapid processing of pulse information from remote radiation monitors. The pulse rates are analyzed to determine whether new pulse-rate information is statisticaly the same as that previously received and to determine the best possible averaging time, which can be changed so that the statistical error remains below a specified level while the system response time remains short. Several data modules each process the pulse-rate information from several remote radiation monitors. Each data module accepts pulse data from each radiation monitor and measures the true average or mean pulse rate of events occurring with a Poisson distribution to determine the radiation level. They then develop digital output signals which indciate the respective radiation levels and which can be transmitted via multiplexer circuits for additional processing and display. The data modules can accept signals from remote control stations or computer stations via the multiplexer circuit to change operating thresholds and alarm levels in their memories. A check module scans the various data modules to determine whether the output signals are valid. It also acts as a redundant data module and will automatically replace an inoperative unit. (DN)

  7. Deuterium measurement by emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemann, E.G.; Heilig, K.; Dumke, I.

    1978-01-01

    The method makes it possible to determine the relative deuterium content of enriched water samples. For this, the relative intensities of the Hα and Dα lines are measured which are emitted by a high-frequency discharge in water vapour. Although the method is not as exact as mass spectrometry, it has the following advantages: - Easy sample preparation (no reduction necessary); - samples of highly different enrichment can be measured one after the other without the danger of memory effects; - much lower apparatus and cost expenditure. The necessary sample size is about the same in both methods. (orig.) [de

  8. Evidence for ubiquitous high-equivalent-width nebular emission in z ∼ 7 galaxies: toward a clean measurement of the specific star-formation rate using a sample of bright, magnified galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smit, R.; Bouwens, R. J.; Labbé, I. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Zheng, W.; Lemze, D.; Ford, H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Bradley, L.; Coe, D.; Postman, M. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21208 (United States); Donahue, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Moustakas, J. [Siena College, 515 Loudon Road, Loudonville, NY 12211 (United States); Umetsu, K. [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, P. O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Zitrin, A.; Bartelmann, M. [Institut fur Theoretische Astrophysik, ZAH, Albert-Ueberle-Straß e 2, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Gonzalez, V. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Benítez, N.; Jimenez-Teja, Y. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia (CSIC), C/Camino Bajo de Huetor 24, Granada 18008 (Spain); Broadhurst, T. [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of the Basque Country, P. O. Box 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain); Grillo, C. [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Infante, L. [Departamento de Astronoia y Astrofisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, V. Mackenna 4860, Santiago 22 (Chile); and others

    2014-03-20

    Growing observational evidence indicates that nebular line emission has a significant impact on the rest-frame optical fluxes of z ∼ 5-7 galaxies. This line emission makes z ∼ 5-7 galaxies appear more massive, with lower specific star-formation rates (sSFRs). However, corrections for this line emission have been difficult to perform reliably because of huge uncertainties on the strength of such emission at z ≳ 5.5. In this paper, we present the most direct observational evidence thus far for ubiquitous high-equivalent-width (EW) [O III] + Hβ line emission in Lyman-break galaxies at z ∼ 7, and we present a strategy for an improved measurement of the sSFR at z ∼ 7. We accomplish this through the selection of bright galaxies in the narrow redshift window z ∼ 6.6-7.0 where the Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) 4.5 μm flux provides a clean measurement of the stellar continuum light, in contrast with the 3.6 μm flux, which is contaminated by the prominent [O III] + Hβ lines. To ensure a high signal-to-noise ratio for our IRAC flux measurements, we consider only the brightest (H {sub 160} < 26 mag) magnified galaxies we have identified behind galaxy clusters. It is remarkable that the mean rest-frame optical color for our bright seven-source sample is very blue, [3.6]-[4.5] = –0.9 ± 0.3. Such blue colors cannot be explained by the stellar continuum light and require that the rest-frame EW of [O III] + Hβ is greater than 637 Å for the average source. The four bluest sources from our seven-source sample require an even more extreme EW of 1582 Å. We can also set a robust lower limit of ≳ 4 Gyr{sup –1} on the sSFR of our sample based on the mean spectral energy distribution.

  9. Protein synthesis rate measured with l-[1-11C]tyrosine positron emission tomography correlates with mitotic activity and MIB-1 antibody-detected proliferation in human soft tissue sarcomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plaat, B.; Mastik, M.; Molenaar, W.; Kole, A.; Vaalburg, W.; Hoekstra, H.

    1999-01-01

    Protein synthesis rate (PSR) can be assessed in vivo using positron emission tomography with l-[1- 11 C]tyrosine (TYR-PET). Biological activity of soft tissue sarcomas (STS) can be measured in vitro by the mitotic rate and number of proliferating cells. In STS the grade of malignancy, in which the mitotic index plays a major role, is considered to be the major standard in predicting biological tumour behaviour. This study was designed to test the validity of TYR-PET in relation to different histopathological features. In 21 patients with untreated STS, the PSR was measured using TYR-PET. The number of mitoses was counted and tumours were graded according to the grading system of Coindre et al. (Cancer 1986; 58:306-309). Proliferative activity was assessed by immunohistological detection of the Ki-67 nuclear antigen using MIB-1 monoclonal antibody. To test the association between the PSR and these tumour parameters, a correlation analysis was performed. A significant (P<0.05) correlation was found between PSR and the Ki-67 proliferation index (R = 0.54), and between PSR and mitotic rate (R = 0.64). There was no correlation between PSR and tumour grade. The present study in malignant soft tissue tumours relates in vivo tumour metabolism as established with TYR-PET to tumour activity measured in vitro and indicates that the non-invasive method of TYR-PET can estimate the mitotic and proliferative activity in STS. (orig.)

  10. Measurement of regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose in the human subject with (F-18)-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-d-glucose and emission computed tomography: validation of the method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phelps, M.E.; Huang, S.C.; Hoffman, E.J.; Selin, C.; Kuhl, D.E.

    1977-01-01

    Tracer techniques and models of in vitro quantitative autoradiography and tissue counting for the measure of regional metabolic rates (rMR) are combined with emission computed tomography (ECT). This approach, Physiologic Tomography (PT), provides atraumatic and analytical measurements of rMR. PT is exemplified with the regional measurement of the cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (CMRGlu) in man with ( 18 F)-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) and positron ECT. Our model incorporates a k 4 * mediated hydrolysis of FDG-6-PO 4 to FDG which then competes with phosphorylation (k 3 *) of FDG back to FDG-6-PO 4 and reverse transport (k 2 *) back to blood. Although small, k 4 * is found to be significant. The ECAT positron tomograph was used to measure the rate constants (k 1 *→k 4 *), lumped constant (LC), stability, and reproducibility of the model in man. Since these parameters have not been measured for FDG in any species, comparisons are made to values for DG in rat and monkey. Compartmental concentrations of FDG and FDG-6-PO 4 were determined and show that cerebral FDG-6-PO 4 steadily accumulates for about 100 mins, plateaus and then slowly decreases due to hydrolysis. Cerebral blood FDG concentration was determined to be a minor contribution to tissue activity after 10 min. Regional CMRGlu measurements are reproducible to +- 5.5% over 5 hrs. PT allows the in vivo study ofregional biochemistry and physiology in normal and pathophysiologic states in man with a unique and fundamental capability

  11. Measurement of light emission in scintillation vials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duran Ramiro, M. Teresa; Garcia-Torano, Eduardo

    2005-01-01

    The efficiency and energy resolution of liquid scintillation counting (LSC) systems are strongly dependent on the optical characteristics of scintillators, vials, and reflectors. This article presents the results of measurements of the light-emission profile of scintillation vials. Two measurement techniques, autoradiographs and direct measurements with a photomultiplier tube, have been used to obtain light-emission distribution for standard vials of glass, etched glass and polyethylene. Results obtained with both techniques are in good agreement. For the first time, the effect of the meniscus in terms of light contribution has been numerically estimated. These results can help design LSC systems that are more efficient in terms of light collection

  12. Measurement and prediction of enteric methane emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sejian, Veerasamy; Lal, Rattan; Lakritz, Jeffrey; Ezeji, Thaddeus

    2011-01-01

    The greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the agricultural sector account for about 25.5% of total global anthropogenic emission. While CO2 receives the most attention as a factor relative to global warming, CH4, N2O and chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) also cause significant radiative forcing. With the relative global warming potential of 25 compared with CO2, CH4 is one of the most important GHGs. This article reviews the prediction models, estimation methodology and strategies for reducing enteric CH4 emissions. Emission of CH4 in ruminants differs among developed and developing countries, depending on factors like animal species, breed, pH of rumen fluid, ratio of acetate:propionate, methanogen population, composition of diet and amount of concentrate fed. Among the ruminant animals, cattle contribute the most towards the greenhouse effect through methane emission followed by sheep, goats and buffalos, respectively. The estimated CH4 emission rate per cattle, buffaloe, sheep and goat in developed countries are 150.7, 137, 21.9 and 13.7 (g/animal/day) respectively. However, the estimated rates in developing countries are significantly lower at 95.9 and 13.7 (g/animal/day) per cattle and sheep, respectively. There exists a strong interest in developing new and improving the existing CH4 prediction models to identify mitigation strategies for reducing the overall CH4 emissions. A synthesis of the available literature suggests that the mechanistic models are superior to empirical models in accurately predicting the CH4 emission from dairy farms. The latest development in prediction model is the integrated farm system model which is a process-based whole-farm simulation technique. Several techniques are used to quantify enteric CH4 emissions starting from whole animal chambers to sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) tracer techniques. The latest technology developed to estimate CH4 more accurately is the micrometeorological mass difference technique. Because the conditions under which

  13. Radiation dose rate measuring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorber, R.

    1987-01-01

    A portable device is described for in-field usage for measuring the dose rate of an ambient beta radiation field, comprising: a housing, substantially impervious to beta radiation, defining an ionization chamber and having an opening into the ionization chamber; beta radiation pervious electrically-conductive window means covering the opening and entrapping, within the ionization chamber, a quantity of gaseous molecules adapted to ionize upon impact with beta radiation particles; electrode means disposed within the ionization chamber and having a generally shallow concave surface terminating in a generally annular rim disposed at a substantially close spacing to the window means. It is configured to substantially conform to the window means to define a known beta radiation sensitive volume generally between the window means and the concave surface of the electrode means. The concave surface is effective to substantially fully expose the beta radiation sensitive volume to the radiation field over substantially the full ambient area faced by the window means

  14. Measurement of Emissivity of Porous Ceramic Materials

    OpenAIRE

    BÜYÜKALACA, Orhan

    1998-01-01

    In this study, measurements of spectral and total emissivities of seven different porous ceramic materials and one ceramic fibre material are reported. Measurements were made for wavelength range from 1.2 µm to 20 µm and temperature range from 200 °C to 700 °C. It was found that total emissivity increases with increase of pore size but decreases with increase of temperature. The results showed all the porous ceramic materials tested to be much better than ceramic fibre in terms of total em...

  15. Test Method for High β Particle Emission Rate of 63Ni Source Plate

    OpenAIRE

    ZHANG Li-feng

    2015-01-01

    For the problem of measurement difficulties of β particle emission rate of Ni-63 source plate used for Ni-63 betavoltaic battery, a relative test method of scintillation current method was erected according to the measurement principle of scintillation detector.β particle emission rate of homemade Ni-63 source plate was tested by the method, and the test results were analysed and evaluated, it was initially thought that scintillation current method was a feasible way of testing β particle emi...

  16. Measurements of emission rates of hydrocarbons from sunflower as a function of temperature, light intensity and stress (ozone levels); Bestimmung von Emissionsraten pflanzlicher Kohlenwasserstoffe bei Sonnenblumen in Abhaengigkeit von Temperatur, Lichtintensitaet und Stress, insbesondere von der Belastung mit Ozon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuh, G.; Wildt, J.; Kley, D.

    1996-08-01

    The emission rates of isoprene, mono- and sesquiterpenes from sunflower (Helianthus annuus L. cv. giganteus) were determined in an environmental chamber, a continuously stirred tank reactor. {alpha}-pinene, {beta}-caryophyllene and two oxygenated compounds were emitted. The emission rates of all terpenes increased exponentially with temperature. Substance specific differences of the rate of increase of the emission rates were observed. For all substances the dependence of their emission rates on temperature increased with increasing light intensity. Increasing lightflux resulted in an increase of the emission rates for all substances. The raise of emission rates with lightflux was dependent on temperature and increased with increasing temperature. During periods without plant stress the emission rates exhibited a good correlation with the rate of transpiration as well as with the rate of net photosynthesis. Sunflowers emitted higher amounts of terpenes when they were stressed by mechanical, wounding and ozone treatment as well as nutrient- or water deficiency. The emission rates increased by a factor of 5-300. Exposure with ozone had an effect on hydrocarbon emission rates with a delay-time. 3-4 h after exposure with 25-120 ppb ozone the emission rates increased by factor of 5-100. This increase was only observed on the first day of exposure. Nutrient deficiency resulted in an increase of emission rates by a factor of 10-300. In situations of mechanical, wounding and ozone stress, substance specific changes in the emission spectrum were observed. A model was developed to explain the observed phenomena. The main pathway of ozone loss in the chamber is caused by the uptake through the stomata of the plants. However, up to 50% of the ozone loss must be explained by other processes indirectly caused by the plants. (orig./MG) [Deutsch] In Laborversuchen wurden Emissionsraten biogener Kohlenwasserstoffe von Sonnenblumen gemessen. Die groessten Emissionsraten wiesen die

  17. Assessment of real driving emissions via portable emission measurement system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clenci, A.; Sălan, V.; Niculescu, R.; Iorga-Simăn, V.; Zaharia, C.

    2017-10-01

    The European Commission approved a so-called Real Driving Emission (RDE) test in response to the criticisms to the current driving cycle used at chassis dyno for homologation purpose (NEDC): it is considered outdated and misleading since air pollutants in real driving conditions are considerably higher than the certification thresholds. So, what’s at stake is the air quality which degraded continuously despite the ever-increasing severity of the regulations during the last almost three decades. Thus, from September 2017, the RDE test will become part of the type approval process for all cars sold in Europe. As its name points out, it will include “real world driving” using a portable emissions measurement system (PEMS). The paper presents the RDE features (PEMS mounting, testing environment, boundary conditions, driving dynamics) and presents a case study on the influence of the driving style upon the tail-pipe emissions under the RDE testing. The results presented in the paper issued from the existing cooperation on this topic between University of Pitesti and Renault Technologie Roumanie

  18. Protein synthesis rate measured with l-[1-{sup 11}C]tyrosine positron emission tomography correlates with mitotic activity and MIB-1 antibody-detected proliferation in human soft tissue sarcomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plaat, B.; Mastik, M.; Molenaar, W. [Department of Pathology, University Hospital Groningen (Netherlands); Kole, A.; Vaalburg, W. [PET Centre, University Hospital Groningen (Netherlands); Hoekstra, H. [Department of Surgical Oncology, University Hospital Groningen (Netherlands)

    1999-04-29

    Protein synthesis rate (PSR) can be assessed in vivo using positron emission tomography with l-[1-{sup 11}C]tyrosine (TYR-PET). Biological activity of soft tissue sarcomas (STS) can be measured in vitro by the mitotic rate and number of proliferating cells. In STS the grade of malignancy, in which the mitotic index plays a major role, is considered to be the major standard in predicting biological tumour behaviour. This study was designed to test the validity of TYR-PET in relation to different histopathological features. In 21 patients with untreated STS, the PSR was measured using TYR-PET. The number of mitoses was counted and tumours were graded according to the grading system of Coindre et al. (Cancer 1986; 58:306-309). Proliferative activity was assessed by immunohistological detection of the Ki-67 nuclear antigen using MIB-1 monoclonal antibody. To test the association between the PSR and these tumour parameters, a correlation analysis was performed. A significant (P<0.05) correlation was found between PSR and the Ki-67 proliferation index (R = 0.54), and between PSR and mitotic rate (R = 0.64). There was no correlation between PSR and tumour grade. The present study in malignant soft tissue tumours relates in vivo tumour metabolism as established with TYR-PET to tumour activity measured in vitro and indicates that the non-invasive method of TYR-PET can estimate the mitotic and proliferative activity in STS. (orig.) With 2 figs., 2 tabs., 30 refs.

  19. Modeling emission rates and exposures from outdoor cooking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Rufus; Princevac, Marko; Weltman, Robert; Ghasemian, Masoud; Arora, Narendra K.; Bond, Tami

    2017-09-01

    Approximately 3 billion individuals rely on solid fuels for cooking globally. For a large portion of these - an estimated 533 million - cooking is outdoors, where emissions from cookstoves pose a health risk to both cooks and other household and village members. Models that estimate emissions rates from stoves in indoor environments that would meet WHO air quality guidelines (AQG), explicitly don't account for outdoor cooking. The objectives of this paper are to link health based exposure guidelines with emissions from outdoor cookstoves, using a Monte Carlo simulation of cooking times from Haryana India coupled with inverse Gaussian dispersion models. Mean emission rates for outdoor cooking that would result in incremental increases in personal exposure equivalent to the WHO AQG during a 24-h period were 126 ± 13 mg/min for cooking while squatting and 99 ± 10 mg/min while standing. Emission rates modeled for outdoor cooking are substantially higher than emission rates for indoor cooking to meet AQG, because the models estimate impact of emissions on personal exposure concentrations rather than microenvironment concentrations, and because the smoke disperses more readily outdoors compared to indoor environments. As a result, many more stoves including the best performing solid-fuel biomass stoves would meet AQG when cooking outdoors, but may also result in substantial localized neighborhood pollution depending on housing density. Inclusion of the neighborhood impact of pollution should be addressed more formally both in guidelines on emissions rates from stoves that would be protective of health, and also in wider health impact evaluation efforts and burden of disease estimates. Emissions guidelines should better represent the different contexts in which stoves are being used, especially because in these contexts the best performing solid fuel stoves have the potential to provide significant benefits.

  20. Measuring techniques in emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, K.; Knoop, B.

    1988-01-01

    The chapter reviews the historical development of the emission computed tomography and its basic principles, proceeds to SPECT and PET, special techniques of emission tomography, and concludes with a comprehensive discussion of the mathematical fundamentals of the reconstruction and the quantitative activity determination in vivo, dealing with radon transformation and the projection slice theorem, methods of image reconstruction such as analytical and algebraic methods, limiting conditions in real systems such as limited number of measured data, noise enhancement, absorption, stray radiation, and random coincidence. (orig./HP) With 111 figs., 6 tabs [de

  1. Measurement of air pollutant emissions from Lome, Cotonou and Accra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, James; Vaughan, Adam; Nelson, Bethany; Young, Stuart; Evans, Mathew; Morris, Eleanor; Ladkin, Russel

    2017-04-01

    High concentrations of airborne pollutants (e.g. the oxides of nitrogen, sulphur dioxide and carbon monoxide) in existing and evolving cities along the Guinea Coast cause respiratory diseases with potentially large costs to human health and the economic capacity of the local workforce. It is important to understand the rate of emission of such pollutants in order to model current and future air quality and provide guidance to the potential outcomes of air pollution abatement strategies. Often dated technologies and poor emission control strategies lead to substantial uncertainties in emission estimates calculated from vehicle and population number density statistics. The unreliable electrical supply in cities in the area has led to an increased reliance on small-scale diesel powered generators and these potentially present a significant source of emissions. The uncontrolled open incineration of waste adds a further very poorly constrained emission source within the cities. The DACCIWA (Dynamics-Aerosol-Chemistry-Cloud Interactions in West Africa) project involved a field campaign which used highly instrumented aircraft capable of in situ measurements of a range of air pollutants. Seven flights using the UK British Antarctic Survey's Twin Otter aircraft specifically targeted air pollution emissions from cities in West Africa (4 x Accra, Ghana; 2 x Lome, Togo and 1 x Cotonou, Benin). Measurements of NO, NO2, SO2, CO, CH4 and CO2 were made at multiple altitudes upwind and downwind of the cities, with the mass balance technique used to calculate emission rates. These are then compared to the Emissions Database for Global Atmospheric Research (EDGAR) estimates. Ultimately the data will be used to inform on and potentially improve the emission estimates, which in turn should lead to better forecasting of air pollution in West African cities and help guide future air pollution abatement strategy.

  2. “Comprehensive emission measurements from prescribed ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simultaneous aerial- and ground-based emission sampling was conducted during prescribed burns at Eglin Air Force Base in November 2012 on a short grass/shrub field and a pine forest. Cumulative emission samples for volatile organic comounds, elemental carbon, organic carbon, chlorinated dioxins and furans, and PM2.5 and continuous samples for black carbon, particle size, and CO2 were taken. Aerial instruments were lofted using a 5 m diameter, helium-filled aerostat that was maneuvered with two remotely-controlled tethers mounted on all-terrain vehicles. A parallel set of instruments on the ground made simultaneous measurements, allowing for a comparison of ground level versus elevated measurements. Ground instruments were supplemented by additional measurements of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and particle aerosol absorption and light scattering. Raw biomass was also gathered on site and tested in a laboratory combustion facility using the same array of instruments. This work compares emissions derived from aerial and ground sampling as well as field and laboratory results. This abstract will likely be the first ever prescribed burn study to compare laboratory and field emission results with results from aerial and and ground sampling. As such it will inform sampling methods for future events and determine the ability of laboratory simulations to mimic events inthe field.

  3. Acoustic Emission Stethoscope - Measurements with Acoustic Emission on Wind Turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krystof Kryniski [AaF Infrastructure, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-02-15

    A remote ultrasonic stethoscope, designed on mobile devices to help a maintenance team in diagnosing drive train problems, has been demonstrated. By implementing an acoustic emission technology, the operating conditions of wind turbines have been assessed by trending techniques and ultrasonic acoustic emission converted into audible sound. The new approach has been developed and tested and compared to other monitoring techniques. Acoustic emission has generally been shown to provide a number of advantages over vibration and shock pulse methods because the system is operating in a substantially higher frequency range (100 kHz) and therefore it is more immune to operation of surrounding machines and components. Quick attenuation of ultrasonic propagation waves in the drive-train structure helps to pin-point the origin of any fault as the signals are sharper and more pronounced. Further, with the intensity measurements a direction of the source of ultrasonic energy can be identified. Using a high frequency thus makes the method suitable for measuring local effects and to determine local defects since the disturbing signals from other parts are damped. Recently developed programmable sensors capable of processing signals onboard, producing quality outputs with extremely low noise-to-signal ratio, have been used. It is discussed how the new approach can lower the cost of a wind-turbine monitoring system, while at the same time making it simple and more reliable, see Appendix A. The method has been tested on rotating parts of wind-turbines, including traditionally difficult areas such as low speed main bearings and planetary gearboxes. The method developed in the project was designed to see physical processes such as friction, impacts and metal removal, occurring when machinery degrades, can be detected and notified with the developed notification system. Apart from reporting the status and displaying the changes of the pre-defined parameters or symptoms, the system has

  4. Impacts of Aging Emission Control Systems on In-Use Heavy-Duty Diesel Truck Emission Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preble, C.; Cados, T.; Harley, R.; Kirchstetter, T.

    2017-12-01

    Heavy-duty diesel trucks are a major source of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and black carbon (BC) in urban environments, contributing to persistent ozone and particulate matter air quality problems. Recently, diesel particle filter (DPF) and selective catalytic reduction (SCR) emission control systems have become standard equipment on new trucks. Particle filters can also be installed as a retrofit on older engines. Prior work has shown that exhaust filters and SCR systems effectively reduce BC and NOx emission rates by up to 90 and 80%, respectively (Preble et al., ES&T 2015). There is concern, however, that DPFs may promote the formation of ultrafine particles (UFP) and increase tailpipe emissions of nitrogen dioxide (NO2). Additionally, urea-based SCR systems for NOx control may form nitrous oxide (N2O), an important contributor to stratospheric ozone depletion. The effectiveness of these emission controls has been thoroughly evaluated in the laboratory, but the long-term durability of in-use systems and their impacts on co-emitted species have not been well characterized. To evaluate the in-use performance of DPF and SCR systems, pollutant emissions from thousands of diesel trucks were measured over several years at the Port of Oakland and the Caldecott Tunnel in the San Francisco Bay Area. Pollutants present in the exhaust plumes of individual trucks were measured at high time resolution (≥1 Hz) as trucks passed under a mobile lab stationed on an overpass. Fuel-based emission factors (g pollutant emitted per kg fuel burned) were calculated for individual trucks and linked via recorded license plates to vehicle attributes, including engine model year and installed emission control systems. Use of DPFs reduced the BC emission rate by up to 95% at both locations. SCR systems were more effective at reducing NOx emissions under the uphill, highway driving conditions at the Caldecott Tunnel. The emission rates of co-emitted species NO2, UFP, and N2O depended on driving

  5. Measuring and controlling greenhouse gas emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourrier, Herve; LAFONT, Bruno; Fischer, Severin; Leonard, Damien; Tutenuit, Claire

    2011-05-01

    As providing a reporting of their greenhouse gas emissions has become mandatory for a large number of French companies, this publication proposes a methodology to perform an assessment or measurement, and a control of such emissions. In its first part, it explains why measurements are required: indication of concerned gases, international consensus to limit temperature rise, definition and chronology of the main steps adopted at the international level and which must be considered in the approach adopted by enterprises in this respect. It outlines the benefits of such a measurement for the enterprise in terms of competitiveness, personnel commitment, new markets and products, image, compliance with the law, operational and financial aspects, and so on. It identifies the various stakeholders to be informed: civil society, financial community, public authorities, clients and consumers, personnel, suppliers. It outlines the diversity and evolution of legal frameworks at the international level as well as at national levels. While evoking many examples of French companies (SNCF, EDF, Seche Environnement, RTE, Michelin, Arcelormittal, AREVA, Air France, EADS-Airbus, AXA, Veolia, and so on), the next part addresses how to measure emissions. It outlines the complexity of the methodological landscape with its various criteria, evokes the various existing standards, outlines the distinction between organisation-based, product-based and project-based approaches, and the distinction between direct and indirect emissions in relationship with the notion of scope. It comments the existence of sector-based methodologies and guidelines, and discusses some difficulties and methodological decisions. The third part proposes some lessons learned from the experience which could lead to a harmonisation of methodologies, proposes a synthesis of reporting approaches, outlines risks and opportunities related to communication

  6. Transient particle emission measurement with optical techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermúdez, Vicente; Luján, José M.; Serrano, José R.; Pla, Benjamín

    2008-06-01

    Particulate matter is responsible for some respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. In addition, it is one of the most important pollutants of high-speed direct injection (HSDI) passenger car engines. Current legislation requires particulate dilution tunnels for particulate matter measuring. However for development work, dilution tunnels are expensive and sometimes not useful since they are not able to quantify real-time particulate emissions during transient operation. In this study, the use of a continuous measurement opacimeter and a fast response HFID is proven to be a good alternative to obtain instantaneous particle mass emissions during transient operation (due to particulate matter consisting mainly of soot and SOF). Some methods and correlations available from literature, but developed for steady conditions, are evaluated during transient operation by comparing with mini-tunnel measurements during the entire MVEG-A transient cycle. A new correlation was also derived from this evaluation. Results for soot and SOF (obtained from the new correlation proposed) are compared with soot and SOF captured with particulate filters, which have been separated by means of an SOF extraction method. Finally, as an example of ECU design strategies using these sort of correlations, the EGR valve opening is optimized during transient operation. The optimization is performed while simultaneously taking into account instantaneous fuel consumption, particulate emissions (calculated with the proposed correlation) and other regulated engine pollutants.

  7. Emission trading in Europe with an exchange rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klassen, G.A.J.; Amann, M.; Foersund, F.R.

    1994-01-01

    The analytical and empirical properties of a new method for emission trading according to a fixed exchange rate are explored. The exchange rate is based on the ratios of the marginal costs of abatement in the optimal solution in order to account for the impact of the location of emission sources on the deposition. It is shown that, generally, this system will not achieve the optimal solution and does not guarantee that environmental deposition constraints are not violated, although total abatement costs are always reduced. A routine was developed to mimic trading as a bilateral, sequential process, subject to an exchange rate. Use has been made of an adapted version of the optimization module in the RAINS (REgional Acidification INformation and Simulation) model. In the example used, results for SO 2 emissions in Europe show that, starting from a uniform reduction, exchange-rate trading achieves higher cost savings than one-to-one trading, without achieving the cost minimum. Sulfur deposition targets are not violated since the initial emission allocation overfulfilled targets at many places. The results are sensitive to: pre-trade emission levels, the transaction costs, the availability of information on potential cost savings and assumptions made on the behavior of trading partners. 6 figs., 3 tabs., 28 refs

  8. Acidifier application rate impacts on ammonia emissions from US roaster chicken houses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Sanjay B.; Grimes, Jesse L.; Oviedo-Rondón, Edgar O.; Westerman, Philip W.

    2014-08-01

    Due to its potential environmental and public health impacts, emissions of ammonia (NH3) as well as several other gases from US livestock farms may be regulated. Broiler houses are important sources of NH3 emissions. However, there are no emissions data from roaster (8-12 wk old broilers, ˜4 kg ea.) houses. Producers treat the litter in broiler houses with acidifiers, such as sodium bisulfate (SBS, NaHSO4) to reduce ammonia production and protect bird health. However, there is very little data on the effect of acidifiers, particularly at high application rates on ammonia emissions. The impact of different SBS application rates [High (0.95-1.46 kg m-2, whole house), Medium (0.73 kg m-2, whole house), Low (0.37-0.49 kg m-2, whole house), and Control (0.37-0.49 kg m-2, brood chamber)] on ammonia emissions was evaluated in commercial roaster houses over 22 months spanning eight flocks. Ammonia emission from each fan was measured with an acid scrubber that operated only when the fan operated. Emissions were calculated using >95% measured data with the rest being estimated using robust methods. Exhaust ammonia-N concentrations were inversely correlated with the SBS application rates. Emission rates on animal unit (AU, where 1 AU = 500 kg live-mass) basis (ER, g d-1 AU-1) were reduced by 27, 13, and 5%, respectively, in the High, Medium, and Low treatments vs. the Control treatment (mean: 100 g d-1 AU-1, range: 86-114 g d-1 AU-1). Emission rates for the Control treatment measured in this study on roasters were mostly higher than ERs in the literature. Differences in ERs are not only due to diet, environmental and management conditions, but also due to measurement methods.

  9. Estimates of CO2 traffic emissions from mobile concentration measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maness, H. L.; Thurlow, M. E.; McDonald, B. C.; Harley, R. A.

    2015-03-01

    We present data from a new mobile system intended to aid in the design of upcoming urban CO2-monitoring networks. Our collected data include GPS probe data, video-derived traffic density, and accurate CO2 concentration measurements. The method described here is economical, scalable, and self-contained, allowing for potential future deployment in locations without existing traffic infrastructure or vehicle fleet information. Using a test data set collected on California Highway 24 over a 2 week period, we observe that on-road CO2 concentrations are elevated by a factor of 2 in congestion compared to free-flow conditions. This result is found to be consistent with a model including vehicle-induced turbulence and standard engine physics. In contrast to surface concentrations, surface emissions are found to be relatively insensitive to congestion. We next use our model for CO2 concentration together with our data to independently derive vehicle emission rate parameters. Parameters scaling the leading four emission rate terms are found to be within 25% of those expected for a typical passenger car fleet, enabling us to derive instantaneous emission rates directly from our data that compare generally favorably to predictive models presented in the literature. The present results highlight the importance of high spatial and temporal resolution traffic data for interpreting on- and near-road concentration measurements. Future work will focus on transport and the integration of mobile platforms into existing stationary network designs.

  10. Sensory ratings of emissions from nontraditional building materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krejcirikova, Barbora; Kolarik, Jakub; Peuhkuri, Ruut

    2016-01-01

    Twenty-five subjects assessed the emissions from building materials: linoleum, cement mortar with and without fly ash, gypsum board and tiles with air cleaning properties and natural organic sheep wool. The ratings were made at different material loadings and in combinations with linoleum....... The results showed that except for natural organic product, increasing loading and combining materials with linoleum increased intensity of odor....

  11. Acoustic emission measurement during instrumented impact tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crostack, H.A.; Engelhardt, A.H.

    1983-01-01

    Results of instrumented impact tests are discussed. On the one hand the development of the loading process at the hammer tup was recorded by means of a piezoelectric transducer. This instrumentation supplied a better representation of the load versus time than the conventional strain gauges. On the other hand the different types of acoustic emission occurring during a test could be separated. The acoustic emission released at the impact of the hammer onto the specimen is of lower frequency and its spectrum is strongly decreasing with increasing frequency. Plastic deformation also emits signals of lower frequency that are of quasi-continuous character. Both signal types can be discriminated by filtering. As a consequence typical burst signal were received afterwards that can be correlated with crack propagation. Their spectra exhibit considerable portions up to about 1.9 MHz. The development in time of the burst signals points to the kind of crack propagation resp. its sequence of appearance. However, definitive comparison between load and acoustic emission should become possible, only when the disadvantages of the common load measurement can be reduced, e.g. by determining the load directly at the specimen instead of the hammer tup

  12. Development and application of a mobile laboratory for measuring emissions from diesel engines. 1. Regulated gaseous emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocker, David R; Shah, Sandip D; Johnson, Kent; Miller, J Wayne; Norbeck, Joseph M

    2004-04-01

    Information about in-use emissions from diesel engines remains a critical issue for inventory development and policy design. Toward that end, we have developed and verified the first mobile laboratory that measures on-road or real-world emissions from engines at the quality level specified in the U.S. Congress Code of Federal Regulations. This unique mobile laboratory provides information on integrated and modal regulated gaseous emission rates and integrated emission rates for speciated volatile and semivolatile organic compounds and particulate matter during real-world operation. Total emissions are captured and collected from the HDD vehicle that is pulling the mobile laboratory. While primarily intended to accumulate data from HDD vehicles, it may also be used to measure emission rates from stationary diesel sources such as back-up generators. This paper describes the development of the mobile laboratory, its measurement capabilities, and the verification process and provides the first data on total capture gaseous on-road emission measurements following the California Air Resources Board (ARB) 4-mode driving cycle, the hot urban dynamometer driving schedule (UDDS), the modified 5-mode cycle, and a 53.2-mi highway chase experiment. NOx mass emission rates (g mi(-1)) for the ARB 4-mode driving cycle, the hot UDDS driving cycle, and the chase experimentwerefoundto exceed current emission factor estimates for the engine type tested by approximately 50%. It was determined that congested traffic flow as well as "off-Federal Test Procedure cycle" emissions can lead to significant increases in per mile NOx emission rates for HDD vehicles.

  13. Measurement and model of the infrared two-photon emission spectrum of GaAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayat, Alex; Ginzburg, Pavel; Orenstein, Meir

    2009-07-10

    Two-photon emission from semiconductors was recently observed, but not fully interpreted. We develop a dressed-state model incorporating intraband scattering-related level broadening, yielding nondivergent emission rates. The spectrum calculations for high carrier concentrations including the time dependence of the screening buildup correspond well to our measured two-photon emission spectrum from GaAs.

  14. Atmospheric modeling to assess wind dependence in tracer dilution method measurements of landfill methane emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Diane M; Chow, Fotini K; Delkash, Madjid; Imhoff, Paul T

    2018-03-01

    The short-term temporal variability of landfill methane emissions is not well understood due to uncertainty in measurement methods. Significant variability is seen over short-term measurement campaigns with the tracer dilution method (TDM), but this variability may be due in part to measurement error rather than fluctuations in the actual landfill emissions. In this study, landfill methane emissions and TDM-measured emissions are simulated over a real landfill in Delaware, USA using the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) for two emissions scenarios. In the steady emissions scenario, a constant landfill emissions rate is prescribed at each model grid point on the surface of the landfill. In the unsteady emissions scenario, emissions are calculated at each time step as a function of the local surface wind speed, resulting in variable emissions over each 1.5-h measurement period. The simulation output is used to assess the standard deviation and percent error of the TDM-measured emissions. Eight measurement periods are simulated over two different days to look at different conditions. Results show that standard deviation of the TDM- measured emissions does not increase significantly from the steady emissions simulations to the unsteady emissions scenarios, indicating that the TDM may have inherent errors in its prediction of emissions fluctuations. Results also show that TDM error does not increase significantly from the steady to the unsteady emissions simulations. This indicates that introducing variability to the landfill emissions does not increase errors in the TDM at this site. Across all simulations, TDM errors range from -15% to 43%, consistent with the range of errors seen in previous TDM studies. Simulations indicate diurnal variations of methane emissions when wind effects are significant, which may be important when developing daily and annual emissions estimates from limited field data. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Measurements of nitrous oxide emissions from vegetable production in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Zhengqin; Xie, Yingxin; Xing, Guangxi; Zhu, Zhaoliang; Butenhoff, Chris

    Nitrous oxide (N 2O) emissions resulting from Chinese vegetable production were measured. A site in suburban Nanjing (East coast; Jiangsu Province) was monitored from November 2001 to January 2003, in which five consecutive vegetable crops were sown. The crops consisted of radish, baby bok choy, lettuce, second planting of baby bok choy, and finally celery. Results suggested that N 2O emission events occur in pulses. The average N 2O-N flux for all five crops was 148±9 μg N m -2 h -1 and the average emission rate was 12±0.7 kg N ha -1. The average seasonal emission fluxes ranged from 37 μg N m -2 h -1 in the radish plot to 300 μg N m -2 h -1 in the celery plot. The celery field produced the greatest cumulative emission of 5.8 kg N ha -1 while the baby bok choy field had the lowest rate of 0.96-1.0 kg N ha -1. In total, 0.73% of applied fertilizer N was emitted as N 2O-N as a whole. The lettuce field had the largest emission factor of 2.2%. Results indicate that emissions from vegetable field are a potential source of national N 2O inventory. Temporal variation is much greater than spatial variation and the corresponding CV averaged 115% and 22%, respectively. Under the same total sampling quantity, increasing sampling frequency is more important than increasing spatial replicates.

  16. Dust from southern Africa: rates of emission and biogeochemical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattachan, A.; D'Odorico, P.; Zobeck, T. M.; Okin, G. S.; Dintwe, K.

    2012-12-01

    The stabilized linear dunefields in the southern Kalahari show signs of reactivation due to reduced vegetation cover owing to drought and/or overgrazing. It has been demonstrated with a laboratory dust generator that the southern Kalahari soils are good emitters of dust and that large-scale dune reactivation can potentially make the region an important dust source in the relatively low-dust Southern Hemisphere. We show that emergence of the southern Kalahari as a new dust source may affect ocean biogeochemistry as the soils are rich in soluble iron and the dust from the southern Kalahari commonly reaches the Southern Ocean. We investigate the biogeochemical properties of the fine fraction of soil from the Kalahari dunes and compare them to those of currently active dust sources such as the Makgadikgadi and the Etosha pans as well as other smaller pans in the region. Using field measurements of sediment fluxes and satellite images, we calculate the rates of dust emission from the southern Kalahari under different land cover scenarios. To assess the reversibility of dune reactivation in the southern Kalahari, we investigate the resilience of dunefield vegetation by looking at changes in soil nutrients, fine soil fractions, and seed bank in areas affected by intense denudation.

  17. Does nitrogen fertilizer application rate to corn affect nitrous oxide emissions from the rotated soybean crop?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Javed; Mitchell, David C; Barker, Daniel W; Miguez, Fernando; Sawyer, John E; Pantoja, Jose; Castellano, Michael J

    2015-05-01

    Little information exists on the potential for N fertilizer application to corn ( L.) to affect NO emissions during subsequent unfertilized crops in a rotation. To determine if N fertilizer application to corn affects NO emissions during subsequent crops in rotation, we measured NO emissions for 3 yr (2011-2013) in an Iowa, corn-soybean [ (L.) Merr.] rotation with three N fertilizer rates applied to corn (0 kg N ha, the recommended rate of 135 kg N ha, and a high rate of 225 kg N ha); soybean received no N fertilizer. We further investigated the potential for a winter cereal rye ( L.) cover crop to interact with N fertilizer rate to affect NO emissions from both crops. The cover crop did not consistently affect NO emissions. Across all years and irrespective of cover crop, N fertilizer application above the recommended rate resulted in a 16% increase in mean NO flux rate during the corn phase of the rotation. In 2 of the 3 yr, N fertilizer application to corn (0-225 kg N ha) did not affect mean NO flux rates from the subsequent unfertilized soybean crop. However, in 1 yr after a drought, mean NO flux rates from the soybean crops that received 135 and 225 kg N ha N application in the corn year were 35 and 70% higher than those from the soybean crop that received no N application in the corn year. Our results are consistent with previous studies demonstrating that cover crop effects on NO emissions are not easily generalizable. When N fertilizer affects NO emissions during a subsequent unfertilized crop, it will be important to determine if total fertilizer-induced NO emissions are altered or only spread across a greater period of time. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  18. Emission Rates of Multiple Air Pollutants Generated from Chinese Residential Cooking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chen; Zhao, Yuejing; Zhao, Bin

    2018-02-06

    Household air pollution generated from cooking is severe, especially for Chinese-style cooking. We measured the emission rates of multiple air pollutants including fine particles (PM 2.5 ), ultrafine particles (UFPs), and volatile organic compounds (VOCs, including formaldehyde, benzene, and toluene) that were generated from typical Chinese cooking in a residential kitchen. The experiment was designed through five-factor and five-level orthogonal testing. The five key factors were cooking method, ingredient weight, type of meat, type of oil, and meat/vegetable ratio. The measured emission rates (mean value ± standard deviation) of PM 2.5 , UFPs, formaldehyde, total volatile organic compounds (TVOCs), benzene, and toluene were 2.056 ± 3.034 mg/min, 9.102 ± 6.909 × 10 12 #/min, 1.273 ± 0.736 mg/min, 1.349 ± 1.376 mg/min, 0.074 ± 0.039 mg/min, and 0.004 ± 0.004 mg/min. Cooking method was the most influencing factor for the emission rates of PM 2.5 , UFPs, formaldehyde, TVOCs, and benzene but not for toluene. Meanwhile, the emission rate of PM 2.5 was also significantly influenced by ingredient weight, type of meat, and meat/vegetable ratio. Exhausting the range hood decreased the emission rates by approximately 58%, with a corresponding air change rate of 21.38/h for the kitchen room.

  19. Characteristics of On-road Diesel Vehicles: Black Carbon Emissions in Chinese Cities Based on Portable Emissions Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xuan; Wu, Ye; Jiang, Jingkun; Zhang, Shaojun; Liu, Huan; Song, Shaojie; Li, Zhenhua; Fan, Xiaoxiao; Fu, Lixin; Hao, Jiming

    2015-11-17

    Black carbon (BC) emissions from heavy-duty diesel vehicles (HDDVs) are rarely continuously measured using portable emission measurement systems (PEMSs). In this study, we utilize a PEMS to obtain real-world BC emission profiles for 25 HDDVs in China. The average fuel-based BC emissions of HDDVs certified according to Euro II, III, IV, and V standards are 2224 ± 251, 612 ± 740, 453 ± 584, and 152 ± 3 mg kg(-1), respectively. Notably, HDDVs adopting mechanical pump engines had significantly higher BC emissions than those equipped with electronic injection engines. Applying the useful features of PEMSs, we can relate instantaneous BC emissions to driving conditions using an operating mode binning methodology, and the average emission rates for Euro II to Euro IV diesel trucks can be constructed. From a macroscopic perspective, we observe that average speed is a significant factor affecting BC emissions and is well correlated with distance-based emissions (R(2) = 0.71). Therefore, the average fuel-based and distance-based BC emissions on congested roads are 40 and 125% higher than those on freeways. These results should be taken into consideration in future emission inventory studies.

  20. Electron cyclotron emission measurements at the stellarator TJ-K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sichardt, Gabriel; Ramisch, Mirko [Institut fuer Grenzflaechenverfahrenstechnik und Plasmatechnologie, Universitaet Stuttgart (Germany); Koehn, Alf [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Electron temperature (T{sub e}) measurements in the magnetised plasmas of the stellarator TJ-K are currently performed by means of Langmuir probes. The use of these probes is restricted to relatively low temperatures and the measurement of temperature profiles requires the acquisition of the local current-voltage characteristics which limits strongly the sampling rate. As an alternative, T{sub e} can be measured using the electron cyclotron emission (ECE) that is generated by the gyration of electrons in magnetised plasmas. Magnetic field gradients in the plasma lead to a spatial distribution of emission frequencies and thus the measured intensity at a given frequency can be related to its point of origin. The T{sub e} dependence of the intensity then leads to a temperature profile along the line of sight for Maxwellian velocity distributions. A diagnostic system for T{sub e} measurements using ECE is currently being set up at TJ-K. When non-thermal electrons are present the emission spectrum changes dramatically. Therefore, the ECE can also be used to investigate the contribution of fast electrons to previously observed toroidal net currents in TJ-K. Simulations are used to examine the role of electron drift orbits in generating these currents.

  1. Odour emission inventory of German wastewater treatment plants--odour flow rates and odour emission capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frechen, F-B

    2004-01-01

    Wastewater Treatment plants can cause odour emissions that may lead to significant odour annoyance in their vicinity. Thus, over the past 20 years, several measurements were taken of the odour emissions that occur at WWTPs of different sizes, treatment technology, plant design and under different operating conditions. The specific aspects of odour sampling and measurement have to be considered. I presented some of the results of my odour emission measurements 11 years ago. However, it is now necessary to update the figures by evaluating newer measurement results obtained from measurements taken from 1994 to 2003. These are presented in this paper. Also, the paper highlights the odour emission capacity (OEC) measurement technique which characterises liquids and can be used to assess the results achieved by different types of treatment in the liquid phase, e.g. in a sewerage system. In addition, the OEC is a suitable parameter to set standards for the odorant content of industrial wastewaters that are discharged into the publicly owned sewerage system.

  2. Measurement of inertial confinement fusion reaction rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Xiaoshi; Wang Feng; Tang Daorun; Liu Shenye; Huang Tianxuan; Liu Yonggang; Xu Tao; Chen Ming; Mei Yu

    2011-01-01

    Fusion reaction rate is an important parameter for measuring compression during the implosion in inertial confinement fusion experiment. We have developed a system for fusion reaction history measurement with high temporal resolution. The system is composed of plastic scintillator and nose cone, optical system and streak camera. We have applied this system on the SG-III prototype for fusion reaction rate measuring. For the first time, fusion reaction rate history have been measured for deuterium-tritium filled targets with neutrons yields about 10 10 . We have analyzed possible influence factor during fusion reaction rate measuring. It indicates that the instrument measures fusion reaction bang time at temporal resolutions as low as 30 ps.(authors)

  3. Measurement of particle emission in automobil exhaust - application of continuous radiometric aerosol measurement to the emission of diesel engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasenbrink, A.; Georgi, B.

    1989-01-01

    The well-known method of measuring continuously dust by β-absorption is transferred to the problem of particle emission in automobile exhaust. With two similar dust-monitors FH62 having different sampling air flow rates and two low-pressure impactors the reliability of radiometric mass determination was verified. First static experiments with diesel soot showed the necessity of a dilution system, a new mass calibration with regard to the changed β-absorptivity and a quicker calculation of concentration for realtime measurements. (orig.) [de

  4. Emission of formaldehyde by particleboard : effect of ventilation rate and loading on air-contamination levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    George E. Myers; Muneo Nagaoka

    1981-01-01

    Dynamic tests for determining the formaldehyde emission behavior of UF-bonded boards involve the measurement of formaldehyde concentration in the air within a vessel which contains a specified board loading L (m2 of board area per m3 of vessel free volume) and is being ventilated at a specified air exchange rate N (hr.-1). Such tests constitute a primary...

  5. Mercury emission, control and measurement from coal combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Wei-Ping [North China Electric Power Univ., Beijing (China). School of Energy and Power Engineering; Western Kentucky Univ., Bowling Green, KY (United States). Inst. for Combustion Science and Environmental Technology; Cao, Yan [Western Kentucky Univ., Bowling Green, KY (United States). Inst. for Combustion Science and Environmental Technology; Zhang, Kai [North China Electric Power Univ., Beijing (China). School of Energy and Power Engineering

    2013-07-01

    Coal-fired electric power generation accounts for 65% of U.S. emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO2), 22% of nitrogen oxides (NOx), and 37% of mercury (Hg). The proposed Clear Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) and Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) will attempt to regulate these emissions using a cap-and-trade program to replace a number of existing regulatory requirements that will impact this industry over the next decade. Mercury emissions remain the largest source that has not yet been efficiently controlled, in part because this is one of the most expensive to control. Mercury is a toxic, persistent pollutant that accumulates in the food chain. During the coal combustion process, when both sampling and accurate measurements are challenging, we know that mercury is present in three species: elemental, oxidized and particulate. There are three basic types of mercury measurement methods: Ontario Hydro Method, mercury continuous emission monitoring systems (CEMS) and sorbent-based monitoring. Particulate mercury is best captured by electrostatic precipitators (ESP). Oxidized mercury is best captured in wet scrubbers. Elemental mercury is the most difficult to capture, but selective catalytic reduction units (SCRs) are able to convert elemental mercury to oxidized mercury allowing it to be captured by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD). This works well for eastern coals with high chlorine contents, but this does not work well on the Wyoming Powder River Basin (PRB) coals. However, no good explanation for its mechanism, correlations of chlorine content in coal with SCR performance, and impacts of higher chlorine content in coal on FGD re-emission are available. The combination of SCR and FGD affords more than an 80% reduction in mercury emissions in the case of high chlorine content coals. The mercury emission results from different coal ranks, boilers, and the air pollution control device (APCD) in power plant will be discussed. Based on this UAEPA new regulation, most power plants

  6. Leak rate measurements and detection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupperman, D.; Shack, W.J.; Claytor, T.

    1983-10-01

    A research program is under way to evaluate and develop improve leak detection systems. The primary focus of the work has been on acoustic emission detection of leaks. Leaks from artificial flaws, laboratory-generated IGSCCs and thermal fatigue cracks, and field-induced intergranular stress corrosion cracks (IGSCCs) from reactor piping have been examined. The effects of pressure, temperature, and leak rate and geometry on the acoustic signature are under study. The use of cross-correlation techniques for leak location and pattern recognition and autocorrelation for source discrimination is also being considered

  7. Effects of diurnal emission patterns and sampling frequency on precision of measurement methods for daily ammonia emissions from animal houses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Estelles, F.; Calvet, S.; Ogink, N.W.M.

    2010-01-01

    Ammonia concentrations and airflow rates are the main parameters needed to determine ammonia emissions from animal houses. It is possible to classify their measurement methods into two main groups according to the sampling frequency: semi-continuous and daily average measurements. In the first

  8. Comparing facility-level methane emission rate estimates at natural gas gathering and boosting stations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy L. Vaughn

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Coordinated dual-tracer, aircraft-based, and direct component-level measurements were made at midstream natural gas gathering and boosting stations in the Fayetteville shale (Arkansas, USA. On-site component-level measurements were combined with engineering estimates to generate comprehensive facility-level methane emission rate estimates (“study on-site estimates (SOE” comparable to tracer and aircraft measurements. Combustion slip (unburned fuel entrained in compressor engine exhaust, which was calculated based on 111 recent measurements of representative compressor engines, accounts for an estimated 75% of cumulative SOEs at gathering stations included in comparisons. Measured methane emissions from regenerator vents on glycol dehydrator units were substantially larger than predicted by modelling software; the contribution of dehydrator regenerator vents to the cumulative SOE would increase from 1% to 10% if based on direct measurements. Concurrent measurements at 14 normally-operating facilities show relative agreement between tracer and SOE, but indicate that tracer measurements estimate lower emissions (regression of tracer to SOE = 0.91 (95% CI = 0.83–0.99, R2 = 0.89. Tracer and SOE 95% confidence intervals overlap at 11/14 facilities. Contemporaneous measurements at six facilities suggest that aircraft measurements estimate higher emissions than SOE. Aircraft and study on-site estimate 95% confidence intervals overlap at 3/6 facilities. The average facility level emission rate (FLER estimated by tracer measurements in this study is 17–73% higher than a prior national study by Marchese et al.

  9. Measurement of fugitive emissions from gas processing plants in Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambers, A. [Alberta Research Council, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    This paper presents a new gas visualization camera created to detect leaks. An outline of the device's projected entry into the oil and gas industry was provided, and included: a demonstration of Differential Absorption Light Detection and Ranging (DIAL) and leak cameras to measure and reduce fugitive emissions; a comparison of DIAL measured emissions with estimated emissions; and a review of methods to measure particulate emissions. In addition, a background of gas leak visualisation technology was presented along with an an overview of DIAL and its results from sour gas plants. The results of a survey conducted in 2003 were presented, including leaks identified and repaired as well as a follow up leak survey. An analysis of pre and post-repair hydrocarbon emissions from the Deepcut area revealed a 60 per cent reduction with savings of $140,000 as well as additional savings from reduced carbon emissions. A similar survey conducted in another plant measured emissions from condensate tanks before and after cooler installation as well as from surrounding well sites, quantifying an 80 per cent reduction in methane emissions. Tasks identified for future research concerned particulate emissions and the development of Lidar methods which can currently identify particulates, but are not yet able to quantify them. Other tasks included a complete DIAL data workup and reporting; the quantification of both methane and carbon emissions reduction at a sour gas plant; a comparison of measured emissions with methods that estimate fugitives; and a complete review of particulate measurements. tabs, figs.

  10. Variability of OH(3-1) and OH(6-2) emission altitude and volume emission rate from 2003 to 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teiser, Georg; von Savigny, Christian

    2017-08-01

    In this study we report on variability in emission rate and centroid emission altitude of the OH(3-1) and OH(6-2) Meinel bands in the terrestrial nightglow based on spaceborne nightglow measurements with the SCIAMACHY (SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY) instrument on the Envisat satellite. The SCIAMACHY observations cover the time period from August 2002 to April 2012 and the nighttime observations used in this study are performed at 10:00 p.m. local solar time. Characterizing variability in OH emission altitude - particularly potential long-term variations - is important for an appropriate interpretation of ground-based OH rotational temperature measurements, because simultaneous observations of the vertical OH volume emission rate profile are usually not available for these measurements. OH emission altitude and vertically integrated emission rate time series with daily resolution for the OH(3-1) band and monthly resolution for the OH(6-2) band were analyzed using a standard multilinear regression approach allowing for seasonal variations, QBO-effects (Quasi-Biennial Oscillation), solar cycle (SC) variability and a linear long-term trend. The analysis focuses on low latitudes, where SCIAMACHY nighttime observations are available all year. The dominant sources of variability for both OH emission rate and altitude are the semi-annual and annual variations, with emission rate and altitude being highly anti-correlated. There is some evidence for a 11-year solar cycle signature in the vertically integrated emission rate and in the centroid emission altitude of both the OH(3-1) and OH(6-2) bands.

  11. MEASURING TINY MASS ACCRETION RATES ONTO YOUNG BROWN DWARFS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herczeg, Gregory J.; Cruz, Kelle L.; Hillenbrand, Lynne A.

    2009-01-01

    We present low-resolution Keck I/LRIS spectra spanning from 3200 to 9000 A of nine young brown dwarfs and three low-mass stars in the TW Hya Association and in Upper Sco. The optical spectral types of the brown dwarfs range from M5.5 to M8.75, though two have near-IR spectral types of early L dwarfs. We report new accretion rates derived from excess Balmer continuum emission for the low-mass stars TW Hya and Hen 3-600A and the brown dwarfs 2MASS J12073347-3932540, UScoCTIO 128, SSSPM J1102-3431, USco J160606.29-233513.3, DENIS-P J160603.9-205644, and Oph J162225-240515B, and upper limits on accretion for the low-mass star Hen 3-600B and the brown dwarfs UScoCTIO 112, Oph J162225-240515A, and USco J160723.82-221102.0. For the six brown dwarfs in our sample that are faintest at short wavelengths, the accretion luminosity or upper limit is measurable only when the image is binned over large wavelength intervals. This method extends our sensitivity to accretion rate down to ∼10 -13 M sun yr -1 for brown dwarfs. Since the ability to measure an accretion rate from excess Balmer continuum emission depends on the contrast between excess continuum emission and the underlying photosphere, for objects with earlier spectral types the upper limit on accretion rate is much higher. Absolute uncertainties in our accretion rate measurements of ∼3-5 include uncertainty in accretion models, brown dwarf masses, and distance. The accretion rate of 2 x 10 -12 M sun yr -1 onto 2MASS J12073347-3932540 is within 15% of two previous measurements, despite large changes in the Hα flux.

  12. 40 CFR 75.83 - Calculation of Hg mass emissions and heat input rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Calculation of Hg mass emissions and... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITORING Hg Mass Emission Provisions § 75.83 Calculation of Hg mass emissions and heat input rate. The owner or operator shall calculate Hg mass emissions...

  13. Effects of soil water content and elevated CO2 concentration on the monoterpene emission rate of Cryptomeria japonica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, Tomoki; Amagai, Takashi; Tani, Akira

    2018-04-11

    Monoterpenes emitted from plants contribute to the formation of secondary pollution and affect the climate system. Monoterpene emission rates may be affected by environmental changes such as increasing CO 2 concentration caused by fossil fuel burning and drought stress induced by climate change. We measured monoterpene emissions from Cryptomeria japonica clone saplings grown under different CO 2 concentrations (control: ambient CO 2 level, elevated CO 2 : 1000μmolmol -1 ). The saplings were planted in the ground and we did not artificially control the SWC. The relationship between the monoterpene emissions and naturally varying SWC was investigated. The dominant monoterpene was α-pinene, followed by sabinene. The monoterpene emission rates were exponentially correlated with temperature for all measurements and normalized (35°C) for each measurement day. The daily normalized monoterpene emission rates (E s0.10 ) were positively and linearly correlated with SWC under both control and elevated CO 2 conditions (control: r 2 =0.55, elevated CO 2 : r 2 =0.89). The slope of the regression line of E s0.10 against SWC was significantly higher under elevated CO 2 than under control conditions (ANCOVA: P<0.01), indicating that the effect of CO 2 concentration on monoterpene emission rates differed by soil water status. The monoterpene emission rates estimated by considering temperature and SWC (Improved G93 algorithm) better agreed with the measured monoterpene emission rates, when compared with the emission rates estimated by considering temperature alone (G93 algorithm). Our results demonstrated that the combined effects of SWC and CO 2 concentration are important for controlling the monoterpene emissions from C. japonica clone saplings. If these relationships can be applied to the other coniferous tree species, our results may be useful to improve accuracy of monoterpene emission estimates from the coniferous forests as affected by climate change in the present and

  14. Comparative use of different emission measurement approaches to determine methane emissions from a biogas plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinelt, Torsten; Delre, Antonio; Westerkamp, Tanja

    2017-01-01

    (corresponding to a methane loss of 0.6 and 2.1%) from team to team, depending on the number of measured emission points, operational state during the measurements and the measurement method applied. Taking the operational conditions into account, the deviation between different approaches and teams could......A sustainable anaerobic biowaste treatment has to mitigate methane emissions from the entire biogas production chain, but the exact quantification of these emissions remains a challenge. This study presents a comparative measurement campaign carried out with on-site and ground-based remote sensing...... measurement approaches conducted by six measuring teams at a Swedish biowaste treatment plant. The measured emissions showed high variations, amongst others caused by different periods of measurement performance in connection with varying operational states of the plant. The overall methane emissions measured...

  15. Study of brittle crack jump rate using acoustic emission method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasnij, P.V.; Pokrovskij, V.V.; Strizhalo, V.A.; Dobrovol'skij, Yu.V.

    1987-01-01

    A new peocedure is elaborated to detect brittle jumps of small length (0.1...5mm) occuring both inside the specimen and along the crack front under static and cyclic loading using the phenomena of acoustic emission (AE). Recording of the crack start and stop moments with an AE sensor as well as evaluation of the brittle crack jump length by the after-failure specimen fracture make it possible to find the mean crack propagation rate. Experimental dependences are obtained for the crack propagation rate with a brittle crack jump in steel 15Kh2MFA (σ B =1157 MPa, σ 0.2 =100 MPa) at 293 K and under cyclic loading as a function of the jump length and also as a function of the critical stress intensity factor K jc i corresponding to the crack jump

  16. Glass dissolution rate measurement and calculation revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fournier, Maxime, E-mail: maxime.fournier@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DTCD, SECM, F-30207, Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Ull, Aurélien; Nicoleau, Elodie [CEA, DEN, DTCD, SECM, F-30207, Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Inagaki, Yaohiro [Department of Applied Quantum Physics & Nuclear Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, 819-0395 (Japan); Odorico, Michaël [ICSM-UMR5257 CEA/CNRS/UM2/ENSCM, Site de Marcoule, BP17171, F-30207, Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Frugier, Pierre; Gin, Stéphane [CEA, DEN, DTCD, SECM, F-30207, Bagnols sur Cèze (France)

    2016-08-01

    Aqueous dissolution rate measurements of nuclear glasses are a key step in the long-term behavior study of such waste forms. These rates are routinely normalized to the glass surface area in contact with solution, and experiments are very often carried out using crushed materials. Various methods have been implemented to determine the surface area of such glass powders, leading to differing values, with the notion of the reactive surface area of crushed glass remaining vague. In this study, around forty initial dissolution rate measurements were conducted following static and flow rate (SPFT, MCFT) measurement protocols at 90 °C, pH 10. The international reference glass (ISG), in the forms of powders with different particle sizes and polished monoliths, and soda-lime glass beads were examined. Although crushed glass grains clearly cannot be assimilated with spheres, it is when using the samples geometric surface (S{sub geo}) that the rates measured on powders are closest to those found for monoliths. Overestimation of the reactive surface when using the BET model (S{sub BET}) may be due to small physical features at the atomic scale—contributing to BET surface area but not to AFM surface area. Such features are very small compared with the thickness of water ingress in glass (a few hundred nanometers) and should not be considered in rate calculations. With a S{sub BET}/S{sub geo} ratio of 2.5 ± 0.2 for ISG powders, it is shown here that rates measured on powders and normalized to S{sub geo} should be divided by 1.3 and rates normalized to S{sub BET} should be multiplied by 1.9 in order to be compared with rates measured on a monolith. The use of glass beads indicates that the geometric surface gives a good estimation of glass reactive surface if sample geometry can be precisely described. Although data clearly shows the repeatability of measurements, results must be given with a high uncertainty of approximately ±25%. - Highlights: • Initial dissolution

  17. Assessment of high to low frequency variations of isoprene emission rates using a neural network approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boissard, C.; Chervier, F.; Dutot, A. L.

    2007-08-01

    Using a statistical approach based on artificial neural networks, an emission algorithm (ISO_LF) accounting for high (instantaneous) to low (seasonal) frequency variations was developed for isoprene. ISO_LF was optimised using an isoprene emission data base (ISO-DB) specifically designed for this work. ISO-DB consists of 1321 emission rates collected in the literature, together with 34 environmental variables, measured or assessed using NCDC (National Climatic Data Center) or NCEP (National Centers for Environmental Predictions) meteorological databases. ISO-DB covers a large variety of emitters (25 species) and environmental conditions (10° S to 60° N). When only instantaneous environmental regressors (air temperature and photosynthetic active radiation, PAR) were used, a maximum of 60% of the overall isoprene variability was assessed and the highest emissions were underestimated. Considering a total of 9 high (instantaneous) to low (up to 3 weeks) frequency regressors, ISO_LF accounts for up to 91% of the isoprene emission variability, whatever the emission range, species or climate. Diurnal and seasonal variations are correctly reproduced for textit{Ulex europaeus} with a maximum factor of discrepancy of 4. ISO-LF was found to be mainly sensitive to air temperature cumulated over 3 weeks T21 and to instantaneous light L0 and air temperature T0 variations. T21, T0 and L0 only accounts for 76% of the overall variability. The use of ISO-LF for non stored monoterpene emissions was shown to give poor results.

  18. Large emissions of sesquiterpenes and methyl chavicol quantified from branch enclosure measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouvier-Brown, N.C.; Holzinger, R.; Palitzsch, K.; Goldstein, A.H.

    2009-01-01

    Multiple field studies have suggested chemistry within a forest canopy is poorly understood due to inadequate detection and quantification of reactive biogenic emissions, such as terpenes. To measure emission rates of terpenes at Blodgett Forest, a coniferous forest in the Sierra Nevada mountains of

  19. [Measurement model of carbon emission from forest fire: a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hai-Qing; Wei, Shu-Jing; Jin, Sen; Sun, Long

    2012-05-01

    Forest fire is the main disturbance factor for forest ecosystem, and an important pathway of the decrease of vegetation- and soil carbon storage. Large amount of carbonaceous gases in forest fire can release into atmosphere, giving remarkable impacts on the atmospheric carbon balance and global climate change. To scientifically and effectively measure the carbonaceous gases emission from forest fire is of importance in understanding the significance of forest fire in the carbon balance and climate change. This paper reviewed the research progress in the measurement model of carbon emission from forest fire, which covered three critical issues, i. e., measurement methods of forest fire-induced total carbon emission and carbonaceous gases emission, affecting factors and measurement parameters of measurement model, and cause analysis of the uncertainty in the measurement of the carbon emissions. Three path selections to improve the quantitative measurement of the carbon emissions were proposed, i. e., using high resolution remote sensing data and improving algorithm and estimation accuracy of burned area in combining with effective fuel measurement model to improve the accuracy of the estimated fuel load, using high resolution remote sensing images combined with indoor controlled environment experiments, field measurements, and field ground surveys to determine the combustion efficiency, and combining indoor controlled environment experiments with field air sampling to determine the emission factors and emission ratio.

  20. Real-world fuel use and gaseous emission rates for flex fuel vehicles operated on E85 versus gasoline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delavarrafiee, Maryam; Frey, H Christopher

    2018-03-01

    Flex fuel vehicles (FFVs) typically operate on gasoline or E85, an 85%/15% volume blend of ethanol and gasoline. Differences in FFV fuel use and tailpipe emission rates are quantified for E85 versus gasoline based on real-world measurements of five FFVs with a portable emissions measurement system (PEMS), supplemented chassis dynamometer data, and estimates from the Motor Vehicle Emission Simulator (MOVES) model. Because of inter-vehicle variability, an individual FFV may have higher nitrogen oxide (NO x ) or carbon monoxide (CO) emission rates on E85 versus gasoline, even though average rates are lower. Based on PEMS data, the comparison of tailpipe emission rates for E85 versus gasoline is sensitive to vehicle-specific power (VSP). For example, although CO emission rates are lower for all VSP modes, they are proportionally lowest at higher VSP. Driving cycles with high power demand are more advantageous with respect to CO emissions, but less advantageous for NO x . Chassis dynamometer data are available for 121 FFVs at 50,000 useful life miles. Based on the dynamometer data, the average difference in tailpipe emissions for E85 versus gasoline is -23% for NO x , -30% for CO, and no significant difference for hydrocarbons (HC). To account for both the fuel cycle and tailpipe emissions from the vehicle, a life cycle inventory was conducted. Although tailpipe NO x emissions are lower for E85 versus gasoline for FFVs and thus benefit areas where the vehicles operate, the life cycle NO x emissions are higher because the NO x emissions generated during fuel production are higher. The fuel production emissions take place typically in rural areas. Although there are not significant differences in the total HC emissions, there are differences in HC speciation. The net effect of lower tailpipe NO x emissions and differences in HC speciation on ozone formation should be further evaluated. Reported comparisons of flex fuel vehicle (FFV) tailpipe emission rates for E85 versus

  1. HANARO core channel flow-rate measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Heon Il; Chae, Hee Tae; Im, Don Soon; Kim, Seon Duk [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-06-01

    HANARO core consists of 23 hexagonal flow tubes and 16 cylindrical flow tubes. To get the core flow distribution, we used 6 flow-rate measuring dummy fuel assemblies (instrumented dummy fuel assemblies). The differential pressures were measured and converted to flow-rates using the predetermined relationship between AP and flow-rate for each instrumented dummy fuel assemblies. The flow-rate for the cylindrical flow channels shows +-7% relative errors and that for the hexagonal flow channels shows +-3.5% relative errors. Generally the flow-rates of outer core channels show smaller values compared to those of inner core. The channels near to the core inlet pipe and outlet pipes also show somewhat lower flow-rates. For the lower flow channels, the thermal margin was checked by considering complete linear power histories. From the experimental results, the gap flow-rate was estimated to be 49.4 kg/s (cf. design flow of 50 kg/s). 15 tabs., 9 figs., 10 refs. (Author) .new.

  2. Comparative use of different emission measurement approaches to determine methane emissions from a biogas plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinelt, Torsten; Delre, Antonio; Westerkamp, Tanja; Holmgren, Magnus A; Liebetrau, Jan; Scheutz, Charlotte

    2017-10-01

    A sustainable anaerobic biowaste treatment has to mitigate methane emissions from the entire biogas production chain, but the exact quantification of these emissions remains a challenge. This study presents a comparative measurement campaign carried out with on-site and ground-based remote sensing measurement approaches conducted by six measuring teams at a Swedish biowaste treatment plant. The measured emissions showed high variations, amongst others caused by different periods of measurement performance in connection with varying operational states of the plant. The overall methane emissions measured by ground-based remote sensing varied from 5 to 25kgh -1 (corresponding to a methane loss of 0.6-3.0% of upgraded methane produced), depending on operating conditions and the measurement method applied. Overall methane emissions measured by the on-site measuring approaches varied between 5 and 17kgh -1 (corresponding to a methane loss of 0.6 and 2.1%) from team to team, depending on the number of measured emission points, operational state during the measurements and the measurement method applied. Taking the operational conditions into account, the deviation between different approaches and teams could be explained, in that the two largest methane-emitting sources, contributing about 90% of the entire site's emissions, were found to be the open digestate storage tank and a pressure release valve on the compressor station. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Estimating permissible /sup 129/I-emission rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huebschmann, W G

    1976-06-01

    A mathematical method of iodine release limitation is presented which, in assessing the radiological effectiveness of /sup 129/I, takes advantage of the fact that the chemical behaviour of /sup 129/I resembles that of /sup 131/I and relies on the already extensive knowledge of the chemical and biological behaviour of /sup 131/I. If this method is used for calculating permissible /sup 129/I emission rates it is stated that no unnecessary restrictions need be imposed on a fuel reprocessing plant and that the grazing season for the pasture-cow-milk pathway can be taken into account. The concept is currently in use at the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center and seems to be appropriate for licensing of nuclear fuel reprocessing plants.

  4. Estimating air emissions from a remediation of a petroleum sump using direct measurement and modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, C.E.

    1991-01-01

    A technical approach was developed for the remediation of a petroleum sump near a residential neighborhood. The approach evolved around sludge handling/in-situ solidification and on-site disposal. As part of the development of the engineering approach, a field investigation and modeling program was conducted to predict air emissions from the proposed remediation. Field measurements using the EPA recommended surface isolation flux chamber were conducted to represent each major activity or air exposure involving waste at the site. Air emissions from freshly disturbed petroleum waste, along with engineering estimates were used to predict emissions from each phase of the engineering approach. This paper presents the remedial approach and the measurement/modeling technologies used to predict air toxic emissions from the remediation. Emphasis will be placed on the measurement approaches used in obtaining the emission rate data and the assumptions used in the modeling to estimate emissions from engineering scenarios

  5. Airborne measurements of isoprene and monoterpene emissions from southeastern U.S. forests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Haofei; Guenther, Alex; Gu, Dasa; Warneke, Carsten; Geron, Chris; Goldstein, Allen; Graus, Martin; Karl, Thomas; Kaser, Lisa; Misztal, Pawel; Yuan, Bin

    2017-10-01

    Isoprene and monoterpene emission rates are essential inputs for atmospheric chemistry models that simulate atmospheric oxidant and particle distributions. Process studies of the biochemical and physiological mechanisms controlling these emissions are advancing our understanding and the accuracy of model predictions but efforts to quantify regional emissions have been limited by a lack of constraints on regional distributions of ecosystem emission capacities. We used an airborne wavelet-based eddy covariance measurement technique to characterize isoprene and monoterpene fluxes with high spatial resolution during the 2013 SAS (Southeast Atmosphere Study) in the southeastern United States. The fluxes measured by direct eddy covariance were comparable to emissions independently estimated using an indirect inverse modeling approach. Isoprene emission factors based on the aircraft wavelet flux estimates for high isoprene chemotypes (e.g., oaks) were similar to the MEGAN2.1 biogenic emission model estimates for landscapes dominated by oaks. Aircraft flux measurement estimates for landscapes with fewer isoprene emitting trees (e.g., pine plantations), were about a factor of two lower than MEGAN2.1 model estimates. The tendency for high isoprene emitters in these landscapes to occur in the shaded understory, where light dependent isoprene emissions are diminished, may explain the lower than expected emissions. This result demonstrates the importance of accurately representing the vertical profile of isoprene emitting biomass in biogenic emission models. Airborne measurement-based emission factors for high monoterpene chemotypes agreed with MEGAN2.1 in landscapes dominated by pine (high monoterpene chemotype) trees but were more than a factor of three higher than model estimates for landscapes dominated by oak (relatively low monoterpene emitting) trees. This results suggests that unaccounted processes, such as floral emissions or light dependent monoterpene emissions, or

  6. Airborne measurements of isoprene and monoterpene emissions from southeastern U.S. forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haofei; Guenther, Alex; Gu, Dasa; Warneke, Carsten; Geron, Chris; Goldstein, Allen; Graus, Martin; Karl, Thomas; Kaser, Lisa; Misztal, Pawel; Yuan, Bin

    2017-10-01

    Isoprene and monoterpene emission rates are essential inputs for atmospheric chemistry models that simulate atmospheric oxidant and particle distributions. Process studies of the biochemical and physiological mechanisms controlling these emissions are advancing our understanding and the accuracy of model predictions but efforts to quantify regional emissions have been limited by a lack of constraints on regional distributions of ecosystem emission capacities. We used an airborne wavelet-based eddy covariance measurement technique to characterize isoprene and monoterpene fluxes with high spatial resolution during the 2013 SAS (Southeast Atmosphere Study) in the southeastern United States. The fluxes measured by direct eddy covariance were comparable to emissions independently estimated using an indirect inverse modeling approach. Isoprene emission factors based on the aircraft wavelet flux estimates for high isoprene chemotypes (e.g., oaks) were similar to the MEGAN2.1 biogenic emission model estimates for landscapes dominated by oaks. Aircraft flux measurement estimates for landscapes with fewer isoprene emitting trees (e.g., pine plantations), were about a factor of two lower than MEGAN2.1 model estimates. The tendency for high isoprene emitters in these landscapes to occur in the shaded understory, where light dependent isoprene emissions are diminished, may explain the lower than expected emissions. This result demonstrates the importance of accurately representing the vertical profile of isoprene emitting biomass in biogenic emission models. Airborne measurement-based emission factors for high monoterpene chemotypes agreed with MEGAN2.1 in landscapes dominated by pine (high monoterpene chemotype) trees but were more than a factor of three higher than model estimates for landscapes dominated by oak (relatively low monoterpene emitting) trees. This results suggests that unaccounted processes, such as floral emissions or light dependent monoterpene emissions, or

  7. Improvement of depressive symptoms in patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis treated with ustekinumab: an open label trial validated using beck depression inventory, Hamilton depression rating scale measures and 18fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seong-Jang; Park, Min-Young; Pak, Kyoungjune; Han, Junhee; Kim, Gun-Wook; Kim, Hoon-Soo; Ko, Hyun-Chang; Kim, Moon-Bum; Kim, Byung-Soo

    2018-05-07

    Psoriasis is a chronic skin disease associated with psychiatric co-morbidities, especially depression. Early detection of psychological vulnerability in patients with psoriasis seems to be of great clinical importance and significantly impacts the quality of life of the patients. We sought to clarify the association between psoriasis and depressive symptoms in patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis, and to determine the risk factors for depressive symptoms and analyze the effect of ustekinumab on the symptoms. We also aimed to evaluate the changes in glucose metabolism using 18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (FDG-PET). Fifteen patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis scheduled to be treated with ustekinumab were enrolled. At baseline and after achieving a 75% reduction in the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) score (PASI75), all patients underwent a psychiatric interview and FDG-PET. Fifteen healthy volunteers were enrolled for comparison. Patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis were more depressed than those in the control group were (p Inventory and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale psychiatric interviews (p < .05). However, FDG-PET of the brain showed no significant difference before and after PASI75 achievement using ustekinumab injection. Patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis are at an increased risk for depressive symptoms, and treatment with ustekinumab may be beneficial. FDG-PET does not reflect the changes in depressive symptoms in such patients.

  8. Experiences in integrated leak rate measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirk, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    During a hypothetical design basis accident for nuclear power plants, the reactor containment system is relied upon to maintain radioactive exposure limits below acceptable limits. Integrated leak rate testing is a means of verifying that the leakage of radioactivity material from the reactor containment will be below allowable limits. Leakage rate computations are based on the ideal gas law. The absolute method of leakage rate testing utilizing mass point method of data analysis is recommended. Integrated leak rate testing data is obtained from pressure, drybulb temperature, dewpoint temperature, and flow measuring systems. Test data does not support the usual leakage (flow) - pressure square root relationship. The major source of potential leakage from the reactor containment is reactor containment isolation valves

  9. Real-world volatile organic compound emission rates from seated adults and children for use in indoor air studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stönner, C; Edtbauer, A; Williams, J

    2018-01-01

    Human beings emit many volatile organic compounds (VOCs) of both endogenous (internally produced) and exogenous (external source) origin. Here we present real-world emission rates of volatile organic compounds from cinema audiences (50-230 people) as a function of time in multiple screenings of three films. The cinema location and film selection allowed high-frequency measurement of human-emitted VOCs within a room flushed at a known rate so that emissions rates could be calculated for both adults and children. Gas-phase emission rates are analyzed as a function of time of day, variability during the film, and age of viewer. The average emission rates of CO 2 , acetone, and isoprene were lower (by a factor of ~1.2-1.4) for children under twelve compared to adults while for acetaldehyde emission rates were equivalent. Molecules influenced by exogenous sources such as decamethylcyclopentasiloxanes and methanol tended to decrease over the course of day and then rise for late evening screenings. These results represent average emission rates of people under real-world conditions and can be used in indoor air quality assessments and building design. Averaging over a large number of people generates emission rates that are less susceptible to individual behaviors. © 2017 The Authors. Indoor Air published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Evaluation of mobile emissions contributions to Mexico City's emissions inventory using on-road and cross-road emission measurements and ambient data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavala, M.; Herndon, S. C.; Wood, E. C.; Onasch, T. B.; Knighton, W. B.; Marr, L. C.; Kolb, C. E.; Molina, L. T.

    2009-09-01

    Mobile emissions represent a significant fraction of the total anthropogenic emissions burden in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) and, therefore, it is crucial to use top-down techniques informed by on-road exhaust measurements to evaluate and improve traditional bottom-up official emissions inventory (EI) for the city. We present the measurements of on-road fleet-average emission factors obtained using the Aerodyne mobile laboratory in the MCMA in March 2006 as part of the MILAGRO/MCMA-2006 field campaign. A comparison of our on-road emission measurements with those obtained in 2003 using essentially the same measurement techniques and analysis methods indicates that, in the three year span, NO emission factors remain within the measured variability ranges whereas emission factors of aldehydes and aromatics species were reduced for all sampled driving conditions. We use a top-down fuel-based approach to evaluate the mobile emissions from the gasoline fleet estimated in the bottom-up official 2006 MCMA mobile sources. Within the range of measurement uncertainties, we found probable slight overpredictions of mean EI estimates on the order of 20-28% for CO and 14-20% for NO. However, we identify a probable EI discrepancy of VOC mobile emissions between 1.4 and 1.9; although estimated benzene and toluene mobile emissions in the inventory seem to be well within the uncertainties of the corresponding emissions estimates. Aldehydes mobile emissions in the inventory, however, seem to be underpredicted by factors of 3 for HCHO and 2 for CH3CHO. Our on-road measurement-based estimate of annual emissions of organic mass from PM1 particles suggests a severe underprediction (larger than a factor of 4) of PM2.5 mobile emissions in the inventory. Analyses of ambient CO, NOx and CO/NOx concentration trends in the MCMA indicate that the early morning ambient CO/NOx ratio has decreased at a rate of about 1.9 ppm/ppm/year over the last two decades due to reductions in CO

  11. Problems in continuous dose rate measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshioka, Mitsuo

    1983-01-01

    The system of continuous dose rate measurement in Fukui Prefecture is described. A telemeter system was constructed in October, 1976, and it has been operated since 1977. Observation has been made at 11 observation stations in the Prefecture. In addition to the continuous measurement of dose rate by using NaI(T1)-DBM systems, the ionization chambers for high dose rate were installed, and also meteorological data have been collected. The detectors are covered with 1 mm thick aluminum designed so that the absorption of external radiation is kept as small as possible. To keep the environmental temperature of the detectors constant, constant temperature wind blow is made. With these consideration, the measurement of Xe-133 is possible, and the standard deviation of yearly dose is around 0.4 mR/Y. By measuring DBM transmission rate, the contribution of Xe-133, which comes from the exhaust pumps in power plants, can be detected. The problems of this system are as follows. First of all, the characteristics of the system must meet the purpose of dose monitoring. The system must detect the dose less than the target value to be achieved. The second is the selection of measuring systems to be set. The system is still not unified, and it is difficult to exchange data between different stations. Finally, the method of data analysis is not yet unified. Manuals or guide-books for this purpose are necessary for the mutual comparison of the data from the stations in different districts. (Kato, T.)

  12. Influence of satellite-derived photolysis rates and NOx emissions on Texas ozone modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, W.; Cohan, D. S.; Pour-Biazar, A.; Lamsal, L. N.; White, A. T.; Xiao, X.; Zhou, W.; Henderson, B. H.; Lash, B. F.

    2015-02-01

    Uncertain photolysis rates and emission inventory impair the accuracy of state-level ozone (O3) regulatory modeling. Past studies have separately used satellite-observed clouds to correct the model-predicted photolysis rates, or satellite-constrained top-down NOx emissions to identify and reduce uncertainties in bottom-up NOx emissions. However, the joint application of multiple satellite-derived model inputs to improve O3 state implementation plan (SIP) modeling has rarely been explored. In this study, Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) observations of clouds are applied to derive the photolysis rates, replacing those used in Texas SIP modeling. This changes modeled O3 concentrations by up to 80 ppb and improves O3 simulations by reducing modeled normalized mean bias (NMB) and normalized mean error (NME) by up to 0.1. A sector-based discrete Kalman filter (DKF) inversion approach is incorporated with the Comprehensive Air Quality Model with extensions (CAMx)-decoupled direct method (DDM) model to adjust Texas NOx emissions using a high-resolution Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) NO2 product. The discrepancy between OMI and CAMx NO2 vertical column densities (VCDs) is further reduced by increasing modeled NOx lifetime and adding an artificial amount of NO2 in the upper troposphere. The region-based DKF inversion suggests increasing NOx emissions by 10-50% in most regions, deteriorating the model performance in predicting ground NO2 and O3, while the sector-based DKF inversion tends to scale down area and nonroad NOx emissions by 50%, leading to a 2-5 ppb decrease in ground 8 h O3 predictions. Model performance in simulating ground NO2 and O3 are improved using sector-based inversion-constrained NOx emissions, with 0.25 and 0.04 reductions in NMBs and 0.13 and 0.04 reductions in NMEs, respectively. Using both GOES-derived photolysis rates and OMI-constrained NOx emissions together reduces modeled NMB and NME by 0.05, increases the model

  13. Examination of Environmental Factors Influencing the Emission Rates of Semivolatile Organic Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunwoo Lee

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Some types of semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs that are emitted from plastics used in building materials and household appliances have been associated with health risks, even at low concentrations. It has been reported that di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP—one of the most commonly used plasticizers—causes asthma and allergic symptoms in children at home. The amount of emitted DEHP, which is classified as a SVOC, can be measured using a microchamber by the thermal desorption test chamber method. To accurately measure the SVOC emission rates, the relation between SVOC and environmental factors should be clarified. Herein, we examined the effects of the temperature, relative humidity, concentration of airborne particles, and flow field in the microchamber on SVOC emission rates. The flow fields inside the microchamber were analyzed via computational fluid dynamics (CFD. The emission rate of SVOC released from PVC flooring increased under high temperatures and at high concentrations of airborne particles but did not depend on the relative humidity. From an evaluation performed using an index of air change efficiency, such as the air age and the coefficient of air change performance, we found that a fixed air exchange rate of 1.5 h−1 in the microchamber is desirable.

  14. Effects of air pollutants on the carbon dioxide (CO2) emission rate of human subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bako-Biro, Zsolt; Wargocki, Pawel; Wyon, David

    2004-01-01

    Several laboratory studies have shown the negative effects of emissions from typical indoor pollution sources on perceived air quality, SBS symptoms and the performance of office work. The subjects performed typical office tasks at their own pace while they were exposed for several hours to diffe...... to different air quality conditions. A re-analysis of the CO2 measurements obtained in two independent studies showed that human CO2 emission rates were affected by air quality (P......Several laboratory studies have shown the negative effects of emissions from typical indoor pollution sources on perceived air quality, SBS symptoms and the performance of office work. The subjects performed typical office tasks at their own pace while they were exposed for several hours...

  15. Heartbeat Rate Measurement from Facial Video

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haque, Mohammad Ahsanul; Irani, Ramin; Nasrollahi, Kamal

    2016-01-01

    Heartbeat Rate (HR) reveals a person’s health condition. This paper presents an effective system for measuring HR from facial videos acquired in a more realistic environment than the testing environment of current systems. The proposed method utilizes a facial feature point tracking method...... by combining a ‘Good feature to track’ and a ‘Supervised descent method’ in order to overcome the limitations of currently available facial video based HR measuring systems. Such limitations include, e.g., unrealistic restriction of the subject’s movement and artificial lighting during data capture. A face...

  16. Emission rates of sulfur dioxide, trace gases and metals from Mount Erebus, Antartica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyle, P.R.; Meeker, K. (New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro (USA)); Finnegan, D. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA))

    1990-11-01

    SO{sub 2} emission rates have been measured annually since 1983 at Mount Erebus, Antarctica by correlation spectrometer (COSPEC V). Following a 4 month period of sustained strombolian activity in late 1984, SO{sub 2} emissions declined from 230 Mg/day in 1983 to 25 Mg/day and then slowly increased from 16 Mg/day in 1985 to 51 Mg/day in 1987. Nine sets of filter packs containing partcle and {sup 7}LiOH treated filters were collected in the plume in 1986 and analyzed by neutron activation. Using the COSPEC data and measured element/S ratios on the filters, emission rates have been determined for trace gases and metals. The authors infer HCl and HF emissions in 1983 to be about 1200 and 500 Mg/day, respectively. Mt Erebus has therefore been an important source of halogens to the Anarctic atmosphere and could be responsible for excess Cl found in Central Antarctica snow.

  17. On-board measurements of emissions from light-duty gasoline vehicles in three mega-cities of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Hong; Yao, Zhiliang; Zhang, Yingzhi; Shen, Xianbao; Zhang, Qiang; Ding, Yan; He, Kebin

    2012-03-01

    This paper is the second in a series of three papers aimed at understanding the emissions of vehicles in China by conducting on-board emission measurements. This paper focuses on light-duty gasoline vehicles. In this study, we measured 57 light-duty gasoline vehicles (LDGVs) in three Chinese mega-cites (Beijing, Guangzhou, and Shenzhen), covering Euro 0 through Euro IV technologies, and generated CO, HC, and NOx emission factors and deterioration rates for each vehicle technology. The results show that the vehicle emission standards have played a significant role in reducing vehicle emission levels in China. The vehicle emission factors are reduced by 47-81%, 53-64%, 46-71%, and 78-82% for each phase from Euro I to Euro IV. Euro 0 vehicles have a considerably high emission level, which is hundreds of times larger than that of Euro IV vehicles. Three old taxis and four other Euro I and Euro II LDGVs are also identified as super emitters with equivalent emission levels to Euro 0 vehicles. Of the measured fleet, 23% super emitters were estimated to contribute 50-80% to total emissions. Besides vehicle emission standards, measures for restricting super emitters are equally important to reduce vehicle emissions. This study is intended to improve the understanding of the vehicle emission levels in China, but some key issues such as emission deterioration rates are yet to be addressed with the presence of a sufficient amount of vehicle emission measurements.

  18. Rocket-borne EUV-visible emission measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidtke, G.; Baker, K.D.; Stasek, G.

    1982-01-01

    Two rocket-borne experiments for measuring EUV atmospheric emissions have been conducted. The first measured emissions at 391.4 nm and 557.7 nm, and the second measured emissions in the range from 50 to 650 nm. Height profiles of selected auroral emissions from atomic oxygen at 130.4 nm (exhibiting resonant radiation diffusion) and from atomic oxygen at 557.7 nm, and from neutral and ionized molecular nitrogen are shown. Some details of the recorded spectra are given. In the shorter wavelength regions, emissions from atomic oxygen and nitrogen dominate. Over 140 nm, Lyman-Birge-Hopfield bands, second positive bands and Vegard-Kaplan bands of molecular nitrogen contribute most strongly except for some atomic lines. The Lyman-Birge-Hopfield bands of molecular nitrogen are relatively weak during the auroral arc as compared to the diffuse aurora

  19. High dose rate brachytherapy source measurement intercomparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poder, Joel; Smith, Ryan L; Shelton, Nikki; Whitaker, May; Butler, Duncan; Haworth, Annette

    2017-06-01

    This work presents a comparison of air kerma rate (AKR) measurements performed by multiple radiotherapy centres for a single HDR 192 Ir source. Two separate groups (consisting of 15 centres) performed AKR measurements at one of two host centres in Australia. Each group travelled to one of the host centres and measured the AKR of a single 192 Ir source using their own equipment and local protocols. Results were compared to the 192 Ir source calibration certificate provided by the manufacturer by means of a ratio of measured to certified AKR. The comparisons showed remarkably consistent results with the maximum deviation in measurement from the decay-corrected source certificate value being 1.1%. The maximum percentage difference between any two measurements was less than 2%. The comparisons demonstrated the consistency of well-chambers used for 192 Ir AKR measurements in Australia, despite the lack of a local calibration service, and served as a valuable focal point for the exchange of ideas and dosimetry methods.

  20. Particle emission rates during electrostatic spray deposition of TiO2 nanoparticle-based photoactive coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivisto, Antti J; Jensen, Alexander C Ø; Kling, Kirsten I; Kling, Jens; Budtz, Hans Christian; Koponen, Ismo K; Tuinman, Ilse; Hussein, Tareq; Jensen, Keld A; Nørgaard, Asger; Levin, Marcus

    2018-01-05

    Here, we studied the particle release rate during Electrostatic spray deposition of anatase-(TiO 2 )-based photoactive coating onto tiles and wallpaper using a commercially available electrostatic spray device. Spraying was performed in a 20.3m 3 test chamber while measuring concentrations of 5.6nm to 31μm-size particles and volatile organic compounds (VOC), as well as particle deposition onto room surfaces and on the spray gun user hand. The particle emission and deposition rates were quantified using aerosol mass balance modelling. The geometric mean particle number emission rate was 1.9×10 10 s -1 and the mean mass emission rate was 381μgs -1 . The respirable mass emission-rate was 65% lower than observed for the entire measured size-range. The mass emission rates were linearly scalable (±ca. 20%) to the process duration. The particle deposition rates were up to 15h -1 for deposited particles consisted of mainly TiO 2 , TiO 2 mixed with Cl and/or Ag, TiO 2 particles coated with carbon, and Ag particles with size ranging from 60nm to ca. 5μm. As expected, no significant VOC emissions were observed as a result of spraying. Finally, we provide recommendations for exposure model parameterization. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Sensory emission rates from personal computers and television sets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wargocki, Pawel; Bako-Biro, Zsolt; Baginska, S.

    2003-01-01

    Sensory emissions from personal computers (PCs), PC monitors + PC towers, and television sets (TVs) having been in operation for 50, 400 and 600 h were assessed by a panel of 48 subjects. One brand of PC tower and four brands of PC monitors were tested. Within each brand, cathode-ray tube (CRT......) and thin-flat-transistor (TFT) monitors were selected. Two brands of TVs were tested. All brands are prevalent on the world market. The assessments were conducted in low-polluting 40 m3 test offices ventilated with a constant outdoor air change rate of 1.3 ± 0.2 h–1 corresponding to 7 L/s per PC or TV...... with two units placed at a time in the test offices; air temperature was controlled at 22 ± 0.1°C and relative humidity at 41 ± 0.5%. The subjects entered the offices individually and immediately assessed the air quality. They did not see the PCs or TVs that were placed behind a screen and were...

  2. VOC emission rates over London and South East England obtained by airborne eddy covariance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Adam R; Lee, James D; Shaw, Marvin D; Misztal, Pawel K; Metzger, Stefan; Vieno, Massimo; Davison, Brian; Karl, Thomas G; Carpenter, Lucy J; Lewis, Alastair C; Purvis, Ruth M; Goldstein, Allen H; Hewitt, C Nicholas

    2017-08-24

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) originate from a variety of sources, and play an intrinsic role in influencing air quality. Some VOCs, including benzene, are carcinogens and so directly affect human health, while others, such as isoprene, are very reactive in the atmosphere and play an important role in the formation of secondary pollutants such as ozone and particles. Here we report spatially-resolved measurements of the surface-to-atmosphere fluxes of VOCs across London and SE England made in 2013 and 2014. High-frequency 3-D wind velocities and VOC volume mixing ratios (made by proton transfer reaction - mass spectrometry) were obtained from a low-flying aircraft and used to calculate fluxes using the technique of eddy covariance. A footprint model was then used to quantify the flux contribution from the ground surface at spatial resolution of 100 m, averaged to 1 km. Measured fluxes of benzene over Greater London showed positive agreement with the UK's National Atmospheric Emissions Inventory, with the highest fluxes originating from central London. Comparison of MTBE and toluene fluxes suggest that petroleum evaporation is an important emission source of toluene in central London. Outside London, increased isoprene emissions were observed over wooded areas, at rates greater than those predicted by a UK regional application of the European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme model (EMEP4UK). This work demonstrates the applicability of the airborne eddy covariance method to the determination of anthropogenic and biogenic VOC fluxes and the possibility of validating emission inventories through measurements.

  3. Mass transfer inside a flux hood for the sampling of gaseous emissions from liquid surfaces - Experimental assessment and emission rate rescaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prata, Ademir A.; Lucernoni, Federico; Santos, Jane M.; Capelli, Laura; Sironi, Selena; Le-Minh, Nhat; Stuetz, Richard M.

    2018-04-01

    This study assesses the mass transfer of compounds inside the US EPA flux hood, one of the enclosure devices most commonly employed for the direct measurement of atmospheric emissions from liquid surfaces in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). Experiments comprised the evaporation of water and the volatilisation of a range of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Special attention was given to the evaluation of the mass transfer coefficients in the microenvironment created by the flux hood and the effects of concentration build up in the hood's headspace. The VOCs emission rates and the water evaporation rates generally increased with the sweep air flow rate, as did the mass transfer coefficients for all compounds. The emission of compounds whose volatilisation is significantly influenced by the gas phase was greatly affected by concentration build up, whereas this effect was not significant for liquid phase-controlled compounds. The gas-film mass transfer coefficient (kG) estimated inside the US EPA flux hood was of the same order as the respective kG reported in the literature for wind tunnel-type devices, but the emission rates measured by the flux hood can be expected to be lower, due to the concentration build-up. Compared against an emission model for the passive surfaces in WWTPs, the mass transfer of acetic acid (representing a gas phase-dominated compound) inside the US EPA flux hood was equivalent to conditions of wind speeds at 10 m height (U10) of 0.27, 0.51 and 0.99 m s-1, respectively, for sweep air flow rates of 2, 5 and 10 L min-1. On the other hand, for higher wind speeds, the emission rates of gas phase-controlled compounds obtained with the flux hood can be considerably underestimated: for instance, at U10 = 5 m s-1, the emission rates of acetic acid inside the flux hood would be approximately 23, 12 and 6 times lower than the emission rates in the field, for sweep air flow rates of 2, 5 and 10 L min-1, respectively. A procedure is presented in

  4. Sulfur Dioxide Emission Rates of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, 1979-1997

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Tamar; Sutton, A.J.; Stokes, J.B.; Casadevall, T.J.

    1998-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Sulfur dioxide (SO2) emission rates from Kilauea Volcano were first measured by Stoiber and Malone (1975) and have been measured on a regular basis since 1979 (Casadevall and others, 1987; Greenland and others, 1985; Elias and others, 1993; Elias and Sutton, 1996). The purpose of this report is to present a compilation of Kilauea SO2 emission rate data from 1979 through 1997 with ancillary meteorological data (wind speed and wind direction). We have included measurements previously reported by Casadevall and others (1987) for completeness and to improve the usefulness of this current database compilation. Kilauea releases SO2 gas predominantly from its summit caldera and rift zones (fig. 1). From 1979 through 1982, vehicle-based COSPEC measurements made within the summit caldera were adequate to quantify most of the SO2 emitted from the volcano. Beginning in 1983. the focus of SO2 release shifted from the summit to the east rift zone (ERZ) eruption site at Pu'u 'O'o and, later, Kupaianaha. Since 1984, the Kilauea gas measurement effort has been augmented with intermittent airborne and tripod-based surveys made near the ERZ eruption site. In addition, beginning in 1992 vehicle-based measurements have been made along a section of Chain of Craters Road approximately 9 km downwind of the eruption site. These several types of COSPEC measurements continue to the present.

  5. Air Monitoring, Measuring, and Emissions Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Measurement research is advancing the ability to determine the composition of sources of air pollution, conduct exposure assessments, improve monitoring capabilities and support public health research.

  6. Diurnal Variation in the Basal Emission Rate of Isoprene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennifer Funk; Clive G. Jones; Christine J. Baker; Heather M. Fuller; Christian P. Giardina; Manuel T. Lerdua

    2003-01-01

    Isoprene is emitted from numerous plant species and profoundly influences tropospheric chemistry. Due to the short lifetime of isoprene in the atmosphere, developing an understanding of emission patterns at small time scales is essential for modeling regional atmospheric chemistry processes. Previous studies suggest that diurnal fluctuations in isoprene emission may be...

  7. Measurement of leach rates: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendel, J.E.

    1982-01-01

    A historical perspective of the techniques that can be used to measure the leach rate of radioactive waste forms is presented. The achievement of leach rates that are as low as possible has been an important goal ever since the development of solidification processes for liquid radioactive wastes began in the 1950's. Leach tests can be divided into two major categories, dynamic and static, based on whether or not the leachant in contact with the test specimen is changed during the course of the test. Both types of tests have been used extensively. The results of leach tests can be used to compare waste forms, and that has been a major purpose of leach data heretofore; increasingly, however, the data now are needed for predicting long-term leaching behavior during geologic disposal. This requirement is introducing new complexities into leach testing methodology. 3 figures, 2 tables

  8. Flow rate measurement in a volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galvez, Cristhian

    2018-04-17

    A system for measuring flow rate within a volume includes one or more transmission devices that transmit one or more signals through fluid contained within the volume. The volume may be bounded, at least in part, by an outer structure and by an object at least partially contained within the outer structure. A transmission device located at a first location of the outer structure transmits a first signal to a second location of the outer structure. A second signal is transmitted through the fluid from the second location to a third location of the outer structure. The flow rate of the fluid within the volume may be determined based, at least in part, on the time of flight of both the first signal and the second signal.

  9. A pilot study to determine medical laser generated air contaminant emission rates for a simulated surgical procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippert, Julia F; Lacey, Steven E; Lopez, Ramon; Franke, John; Conroy, Lorraine; Breskey, John; Esmen, Nurtan; Liu, Li

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) estimates that half a million health-care workers are exposed to laser surgical smoke each year. The purpose of this study was to establish a methodology to (1) estimate emission rates of laser-generated air contaminants (LGACs) using an emission chamber, and to (2) perform a screening study to differentiate the effects of three laser operational parameters. An emission chamber was designed, fabricated, and assessed for performance to estimate the emission rates of gases and particles associated with LGACs during a simulated surgical procedure. Two medical lasers (Holmium Yttrium Aluminum Garnet [Ho:YAG] and carbon dioxide [CO2]) were set to a range of plausible medical laser operational parameters in a simulated surgery to pyrolyze porcine skin generating plume in the emission chamber. Power, pulse repetition frequency (PRF), and beam diameter were evaluated to determine the effect of each operational parameter on emission rate using a fractional factorial design. The plume was sampled for particulate matter and seven gas phase combustion byproduct contaminants (benzene, ethylbenzene, toluene, formaldehyde, hydrogen cyanide, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide): the gas phase emission results are presented here. Most of the measured concentrations of gas phase contaminants were below their limit of detection (LOD), but detectable measurements enabled us to determine laser operation parameter influence on CO2 emissions. Confined to the experimental conditions of this screening study, results indicated that beam diameter was statistically significantly influential and power was marginally statistically significant to emission rates of CO2 when using the Ho:YAG laser but not with the carbon dioxide laser; PRF was not influential vis-a-vis emission rates of these gas phase contaminants.

  10. Superthermal electron distribution measurements from polarized electron cyclotron emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luce, T.C.; Efthimion, P.C.; Fisch, N.J.

    1988-06-01

    Measurements of the superthermal electron distribution can be made by observing the polarized electron cyclotron emission. The emission is viewed along a constant magnetic field surface. This simplifies the resonance condition and gives a direct correlation between emission frequency and kinetic energy of the emitting electron. A transformation technique is formulated which determines the anisotropy of the distribution and number density of superthermals at each energy measured. The steady-state distribution during lower hybrid current drive and examples of the superthermal dynamics as the runaway conditions is varied are presented for discharges in the PLT tokamak. 15 refs., 8 figs

  11. Modelling of N21P emission rates in aurora using various cross sections for excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Jokiaho

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of N21P auroral emissions from the (4,1 and (5,2 bands have been made at high temporal and spatial resolution in the region of the magnetic zenith. The instrument used was the auroral imager ASK, situated at Ramfjordmoen, Norway (69.6 N, 19.2 E on 22 October 2006. Measurements from the European Incoherent Scatter Radar (EISCAT have been combined with the optical measurements, and incorporated into an ionospheric model to obtain height profiles of electron density and emission rates of the N21P bands. The radar data provide essential verification that the energy flux used in the model is correct. One of the most important inputs to the model is the cross section for excitation to the B3Πg electronic state, as well as the cross sections to higher states from which cascading into the B state occurs. The balance equations for production and loss of the populations of all levels in each state are solved in order to find the cascade contributions. Several sets of cross sections have been considered, and selected cross sections have been used to construct "emission" cross sections for the observed bands. The resulting brightnesses are compared with those measured by ASK. The importance of specific contributions from cascading is found, with more than 50% of the total brightness resulting from cascading. The cross sections used are found to produce a range of brightnesses well within the uncertainty of both the modelled and measured values.

  12. Measurement of undisturbed di-nitrogen emissions from aquatic ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Shuping, Clough, Timothy, Lou, Jiafa; Hu, Chunsheng; Oenema, Oene; Wrage-Mönnig, Nicole; Zhang, Yuming

    2016-04-01

    Increased production of reactive nitrogen (Nr) from atmospheric di-nitrogen (N2) during the last century has greatly contributed to increased food production1-4. However, enriching the biosphere with Nr through N fertilizer production, combustion, and biological N2 fixation has also caused a series of negative effects on global ecosystems 5,6, especially aquatic ecosystems7. The main pathway converting Nr back into the atmospheric N2 pool is the last step of the denitrification process, i.e., the reduction of nitrous oxide (N2O) into N2 by micro-organisms7,8. Despite several attempts9,10, there is not yet an accurate, fast and direct method for measuring undisturbed N2 fluxes from denitrification in aquatic sediments at the field scale11-14. Such a method is essential to study the feedback of aquatic ecosystems to Nr inputs1,2,7. Here we show that the measurement of both N2O emission and its isotope signature can be used to infer the undisturbed N2 fluxes from aquatic ecosystems. The microbial reduction of N2O increases the natural abundance of 15N-N2O relative to 14N-N2O (δ15N-N2O). We observed linear relationships between δ15N-N2O and the logarithmic transformed N2O/(N2+N2O) emission ratios. Through independent measurements, we verified that the undisturbed N2 flux from aquatic ecosystems can be inferred from measurements of N2O emissions and the δ15N-N2O signature. Our method allows the determination of field-scale N2 fluxes from undisturbed aquatic ecosystems, and thereby allows model predictions of denitrification rates to be tested. The undisturbed N2 fluxes observed are almost one order of magnitude higher than those estimated by the traditional method, where perturbation of the system occurs, indicating that the ability of aquatic ecosystems to remove Nr may have been severely underestimated.

  13. Electron cyclotron emission measurement in Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Javon, C.

    1991-06-01

    Electron cyclotron radiation from Tore-Supra is measured with Michelson and Fabry-Perot interferometers. Calibration methods, essential for this diagnostic, are developed allowing the determination of electron temperature in the plasma. In particular the feasibility of Fabry-Perot interferometer calibration by an original method is demonstrated. A simulation code is developed for modelling non-thermal electron population in these discharges using measurements in non-inductive current generation regime [fr

  14. Fast Plasma Potential Measurements Using an Emissive Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ready, Amanda; Clark, Michael; Endrizzi, Douglass; Forest, Cary; Peterson, Ethan

    2017-10-01

    A heated emissive probe was developed for making direct plasma potential (Vp) measurements in rapidly fluctuating plasmas. Previous experiments on the Big Red Ball (BRB) were hindered by sudden potential drops, making Langmuir measurements of the plasma potential difficult. DC heating of a tungsten filament to emission allowed for fast (4 MHz) floating potential measurements that closely matched Vp. Two BRB experiments currently use the emissive probe. The investigation of unmagnetized, collisionless shocks used plasma potential measurements to study the sub-structure of strong plasma shocks. A separate investigation of emulated magnetospheres in laboratory plasmas used the plasma potential to map the equilibria and instabilities in the electric field of such structures. Results showing electric field measurements and comparison with cold Langmuir measurements will be presented. Future plans for probe modifications and applications to other experiments on the BRB will also be shown.

  15. Drivers of CO2 Emission Rates from Dead Wood Logs of 13 Tree Species in the Initial Decomposition Phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiemo Kahl

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Large dead wood is an important structural component of forest ecosystems and a main component of forest carbon cycles. CO2 emissions from dead wood can be used as a proxy for actual decomposition rates. The main drivers of CO2 emission rates for dead wood of temperate European tree species are largely unknown. We applied a novel, closed chamber measurement technique to 360 dead wood logs of 13 important tree species in three regions in Germany. We found that tree species identity was with 71% independent contribution to the model (R2 = 0.62 the most important driver of volume-based CO2 emission rates, with angiosperms having on average higher rates than conifers. Wood temperature and fungal species richness had a positive effect on CO2 emission rates, whereas wood density had a negative effect. This is the first time that positive fungal species richness—wood decomposition relationship in temperate forests was shown. Certain fungal species were associated with high or low CO2 emission rates. In addition, as indicated by separate models for each tree species, forest management intensity, study region, and the water content as well as C and N concentration of dead wood influenced CO2 emission rates.

  16. Measurements of fusion product emission profiles in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strachan, J.D.; Heidbrink, W.W.; Hendel, H.W.; Lovberg, J.; Murphy, T.J.; Nieschmidt, E.B.; Tait, G.D.; Zweben, S.J.

    1986-11-01

    The techniques and results of fusion product emission profile measurements are reviewed. While neutron source strength profile measurements have been attempted by several methods, neutron scattering is a limitation to the results. Profile measurements using charged fusion products have recently provided an alternative since collimation is much easier for the charged particles

  17. What could have caused pre-industrial biomass burning emissions to exceed current rates?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. R. van der Werf

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies based on trace gas mixing ratios in ice cores and charcoal data indicate that biomass burning emissions over the past millennium exceeded contemporary emissions by up to a factor of 4 for certain time periods. This is surprising because various sources of biomass burning are linked with population density, which has increased over the past centuries. We have analysed how emissions from several landscape biomass burning sources could have fluctuated to yield emissions that are in correspondence with recent results based on ice core mixing ratios of carbon monoxide (CO and its isotopic signature measured at South Pole station (SPO. Based on estimates of contemporary landscape fire emissions and the TM5 chemical transport model driven by present-day atmospheric transport and OH concentrations, we found that CO mixing ratios at SPO are more sensitive to emissions from South America and Australia than from Africa, and are relatively insensitive to emissions from the Northern Hemisphere. We then explored how various landscape biomass burning sources may have varied over the past centuries and what the resulting emissions and corresponding CO mixing ratio at SPO would be, using population density variations to reconstruct sources driven by humans (e.g., fuelwood burning and a new model to relate savanna emissions to changes in fire return times. We found that to match the observed ice core CO data, all savannas in the Southern Hemisphere had to burn annually, or bi-annually in combination with deforestation and slash and burn agriculture exceeding current levels, despite much lower population densities and lack of machinery to aid the deforestation process. While possible, these scenarios are unlikely and in conflict with current literature. However, we do show the large potential for increased emissions from savannas in a pre-industrial world. This is mainly because in the past, fuel beds were probably less fragmented compared to the

  18. An assessment of the real-world driving gaseous emissions from a Euro 6 light-duty diesel vehicle using a portable emissions measurement system (PEMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luján, José M.; Bermúdez, Vicente; Dolz, Vicente; Monsalve-Serrano, Javier

    2018-02-01

    Recent investigations demonstrated that real-world emissions usually exceed the levels achieved in the laboratory based type approval processes. By means of on-board emissions measurements, it has been shown that nitrogen oxides emitted by diesel engines substantially exceed the limit imposed by the Euro 6 regulation. Thus, with the aim of complementing the worldwide harmonized light vehicles test cycle, the real driving emissions cycle will be introduced after 1 September 2017 to regulate the vehicle emissions in real-world driving situations. This paper presents on-board gaseous emissions measurements from a Euro 6 light-duty diesel vehicle in a real-world driving route using a portable emissions measurement system. The test route characteristics follow the requirements imposed by the RDE regulation. The analysis of the raw emissions results suggests that the greatest amount of nitrogen oxides and nitrogen dioxide are emitted during the urban section of the test route, confirming that lower speeds with more accelerations and decelerations lead to higher nitrogen oxides emissions levels than constant high speeds. Moreover, the comparison of the two calculation methods proposed by the real driving emissions regulation has revealed emissions rates differences ranging from 10% to 45% depending on the pollutant emission and the trip section considered (urban or total). Thus, the nitrogen oxides emissions conformity factor slightly varies from one method to the other.

  19. Spontaneous Emission and Energy Transfer Rates Near a Coated Metallic Cylinder

    OpenAIRE

    BRADLEY, LOUISE

    2014-01-01

    PUBLISHED The spontaneous emission and energy transfer rates of quantum systems in proximity to a dielectrically coated metallic cylinder are investigated using a Green's tensor formalism. The excitation of surface plasmon modes can significantly modify these rates. The spontaneous emission and energy transfer rates are investigated as a function of the material and dimensions of the core and coating, as well as the emission wavelength of the donor. For the material of the core we consider...

  20. Ellisoidal reflector for measuring otoacoustic emissions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Epp, Bastian; Heiskanen, Vesa; Pulkki, Ville Topias

    2016-01-01

    ear canal. This study presents the design and evaluation of a truncated prolate ellipsoidal reflector in combination with a large-diaphragm low-noise microphone to measure OAEs in the open ear canal of human listeners. The reflector was designed to gain information about BM processing at low...

  1. Gamma-ray emission profile measurements during JET ICRH discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarvis, O N; Marcus, F B; Sadler, G; Van Belle, P [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Howarth, P J.A. [Birmingham Univ. (United Kingdom); Adams, J M; Bond, D S [UKAEA Harwell Lab. (United Kingdom). Energy Technology Div.

    1994-07-01

    Gamma-ray emission from plasma-impurity reactions caused by minority ICRH accelerating fuel ions to MeV energies has been measured using the JET neutron profile monitor. A successful data analysis technique has been used to isolate the RF-induced gamma-ray emission that was detected, enabling profiles of gamma-ray emission to be obtained. The 2-d gamma-ray emission profiles show that virtually all the radiation originates from the low field side of the RF resonance layer, as expected from RF-induced pitch angle diffusion. The emission profiles indicate the presence of a small population of resonant {sup 3}He ions that possess orbits lying near the passing-trapped boundary. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Regional cerebral glucose metabolic rate in human sleep assessed by positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchsbaum, M.S.; Wu, J.; Hazlett, E.; Sicotte, N.; Bunney, W.E. Jr.; Gillin, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    The cerebral metabolic rate of glucose was measured during nighttime sleep in 36 normal volunteers using positron emission tomography and fluorine-18-labeled 2-deoxyglucose (FDG). In comparison to waking controls, subjects given FDG during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep showed about a 23% reduction in metabolic rate across the entire brain. This decrease was greater for the frontal than temporal or occipital lobes, and greater for basal ganglia and thalamus than cortex. Subjects in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep tended to have higher cortical metabolic rates than walking subjects. The cingulate gyrus was the only cortical structure to show a significant increase in glucose metabolic rate in REM sleep in comparison to waking. The basal ganglia were relatively more active on the right in REM sleep and symmetrical in NREM sleep

  3. Measurement of emission and deposition patterns of ammonia from urine in grass swards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, C. A.; Jarvis, S. C.

    Currently, legislation is being considered to reduce NH3 emissions in the UK. The major sources of NH3 and their relative contributions are well known, however, the processes that control the rates of emission are still poorly defined. A series of wind-tunnel experiments has been carried out to determine the effects of various management practices on NH3 losses. The tunnels were modified to enable NH3 emission and subsequent deposition to the adjacent swards in the field to be measured. The wind-tunnels were used to examine the effects of herbage length, cutting and N status on rates of NH3 fluxes, which together with the prevailing environmental conditions affected the rates of NH3 emission and deposition. Results showed that between 20 and 60% of the NH3 emitted was deposited within 2 m. Compensation points of between 1.0 and 2.3 μg m-3 were calculated for the grass sward.

  4. Diesel bus emissions measured in a tunnel study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamriska, Milan; Morawska, Lidia; Thomas, Steven; He, Congrong

    2004-12-15

    The emission factors of a bus fleet consisting of approximately 300 diesel-powered buses were measured in a tunnel study under well-controlled conditions during a 2-d monitoring campaign in Brisbane. Particle number and mass concentration levels of submicrometer particles and PM2.5 were monitored by SMPS and DustTrak instruments at the tunnel's entrance and exit, respectively. Correlation between DustTrak and TEOM response to diesel emissions was assessed, and the DustTrak results were recalculated into TEOM equivalent data. The mean value of the number and mass emission factors was (3.11+/-2.41) x 10(14) particles km(-1) for submicrometer particles and 583+/-451 mg km(-1) for PM2.5 (DustTrak), respectively. TEOM PM2.5 equivalent emission factor was 267+/-207 mg km(-1). The results are in good agreement with the emission factors determined from steady-state dynamometer testing of 12 buses from the same Brisbane City bus fleet. The results indicate that when carefully designed, both approaches, the dynamometer and on-road studies, can provide comparable results, applicable for the assessment of the effect of traffic emissions on airborne particle pollution. A brief overview of emission factors determined from other on-road and dynamometer studies reported in the literature as well as with the regulatory values used for the vehicle emission inventory assessment is presented and compared with the results obtained in this study.

  5. Combining rate-based and cap-and-trade emissions policies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, Carolyn

    2003-12-01

    Rate-based emissions policies (like tradable performance standards, TPS) fix average emissions intensity, while cap-and-trade (CAT) policies fix total emissions. This paper shows that unfettered trade between rate-based and cap-and-trade programs always raises combined emissions, except when product markets are related in particular ways. Gains from trade are fully passed on to consumers in the rate-based sector, resulting in more output and greater emissions allocations. We consider several policy options to offset the expansion, including a tax, an 'exchange rate' to adjust for relative permit values, output-based allocation (OBA) for the rate-based sector, and tightening the cap. A range of combinations of tighter allocations could improve situations in both sectors with trade while holding emissions constant

  6. Measuring Carbon Emissions of Pavement Construction in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youliang Huang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available While various methodologies for quantifying carbon emissions of pavement construction are developed worldwide, adopting and promoting the existing tools to China’s market is found fairly challenging due to institutional constraints. Therefore, the objectives of this study are to propose a methodology for measuring carbon emissions of pavement construction compatible with the fixed pricing systems prevalent in China; and develop an automatic tool for carbon estimations. The total carbon emissions are measured by aggregating emissions of energy consumption and materials used along with four stages, namely material manufacture, transportation, construction, and disposal. A set of composite carbon emission factors for energy and materials was calculated based on existing emission factors with the consideration of the boundaries concerned. The quantity of energy and materials used in pavement construction are obtained through bills of quantity and the fixed price system. The database of the emission factors for energy and materials was embedded into a C# based tool, and validated in a real case.

  7. New spectrometric measurement of atmospheric 60 micron emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossmann, K.U.; Barthol, P.; Frings, W.; Hennig, R.; Offermann, D.

    1982-01-01

    Absolute zenith intensities of the atomic oxygen fine structure emission at 63 microns measured above Kiruna, Sweden, on December 9, 1981, in the altitude range of 85 km to 237 km are discussed. The data obtained are compared with theoretical predictions for this emission. For the model intensity calculations, both local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and non-LTE conditions are assumed. The significance of the 63-micron emission as a cooling mechanism of the thermosphere is briefly discussed. It is noted that the geomagnetic field before and during the flight was very quiet

  8. Analysis of recent results of electron cyclotron emission measurements on T.F.R

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-05-01

    Recently reported measurements of the electron cyclotron emission from the TFR Tokamak plasma are analyzed and compared to theoretical predictions. The line shape of an optically thick harmonic in a vertical observation is explained by wall reflections, plasma-detector arrangement and reabsorption. Non thermal emission at the electron plasma frequency is related to the presence of a high energy tail in the electron distribution function and might be the cause of the observed reduced runaway creation rate

  9. Measurement of neurotransmitters with positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laruelle, M.; Erritzoe, D.; Abi-Dargham, A.; Huang, Y. [Columbia Univ., Coll. of Physicians and Surgeons, Dept. of Psychiatry and Radiology, New York, NY (United States)

    2003-09-01

    Over the last decade several groups have provided evidence that PET and SPECT neuro-receptor imaging techniques might be applied to measure fluctuations of dopamine (DA) synaptic concentrations in the living human brain. It is generally believed that changes in the in vivo binding of radioligands following acute changes in transmitter levels are driven by binding competition. These techniques have been very successful in giving dynamic information regarding DA transmission. However, the development of similar techniques to study other neurotransmitter systems has proven difficult. This review paper first summarizes endogenous competition studies performed in animals and humans. The validity of the model underlying the interpretation of these data is critically assessed. Emerging data suggest that simple binding competition might not be the only phenomenon involved in these interactions; receptor trafficking might play an important role. A better understanding of the radioligand properties that determine sensitivity to endogenous molecules might facilitate the selective development of this type of radiotracer. (authors)

  10. Ellipsoidal reflector for measuring oto-acoustic emissions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Epp, Bastian; Pulkki, Ville; Heiskanen, Vesa

    2014-01-01

    A truncated prolate ellipsoidal reflector having the ear canal of a listener at one focal point and large- diaphragm low-noise microphone at the other focal point is proposed for free-field recordings of oto-acoustic emissions. A prototype reflector consisting of three pieces is presented, which...... enables measuring the response of the system with different truncations. The response of the system is measured with a miniature loud- speaker, and proof-of-concept measurements of oto-acoustic emissions are presented. The effect of truncation and other physical parameters to the performance of the system...

  11. Measurement of sulfur dioxide oxidation rates in wintertime orographic clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snider, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    SO2-reaction studies in the clouds are examined and summarized to experimentally confirm model predictions and previous field studies regarding dominant SO2-reaction pathways. Controlled amounts of SO2 were released into nonprecipitating orographic clouds, and sulfate yields are compared to oxidant depletions. The sulfate yields were taken from cloud-water samples and liquid-water-concentration measurements, and oxidant-depletion data were generated from continuous gas-phase measurements. Comparisons of Y sub SO4 and D sub H2O2 suggest that H2O2 is the dominant oxidant, and the in-cloud reaction between H2O2 and the bisulfite ion can be expressed by a simple rate that agrees with predictions and laboratory results. The rate measurements are found to be inconsistent with the rate law proposed by Hegg and Hobbs (1982) and with some observational data. The present conclusions are of interest to evaluating the effects of sulfur dioxide emissions on sulfuric acid deposition. 30 refs

  12. Methyl chavicol: characterization of its biogenic emission rate, abundance, and oxidation products in the atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. C. Bouvier-Brown

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available We report measurements of ambient atmospheric mixing ratios for methyl chavicol and determine its biogenic emission rate. Methyl chavicol, a biogenic oxygenated aromatic compound, is abundant within and above Blodgett Forest, a ponderosa pine forest in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California. Methyl chavicol was detected simultaneously by three in-situ instruments – a gas chromatograph with mass spectrometer detector (GC-MS, a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS, and a thermal desorption aerosol GC-MS (TAG – and found to be abundant within and above Blodgett Forest. Methyl chavicol atmospheric mixing ratios are strongly correlated with 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO, a light- and temperature-dependent biogenic emission from the ponderosa pine trees at Blodgett Forest. Scaling from this correlation, methyl chavicol emissions account for 4–68% of the carbon mass emitted as MBO in the daytime, depending on the season. From this relationship, we estimate a daytime basal emission rate of 0.72–10.2 μgCg−1 h−1, depending on needle age and seasonality. We also present the first observations of its oxidation products (4-methoxybenzaldehyde and 4-methyoxy benzene acetaldehyde in the ambient atmosphere. Methyl chavicol is a major essential oil component of many plant species. This work suggests that methyl chavicol plays a significant role in the atmospheric chemistry of Blodgett Forest, and potentially other sites, and should be included explicitly in both biogenic volatile organic carbon emission and atmospheric chemistry models.

  13. REVIEW ARTICLE: Emission measurement techniques for advanced powertrains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Masayuki

    2000-10-01

    Recent developments in high-efficiency low-emission powertrains require the emission measurement technologies to be able to detect regulated and unregulated compounds with very high sensitivity and a fast response. For example, levels of a variety of nitrogen compounds and sulphur compounds should be analysed in real time in order to develop aftertreatment systems to decrease emission of NOx for the lean burning powertrains. Also, real-time information on the emission of particulate matter for the transient operation of diesel engines and direct injection gasoline engines is invaluable. The present paper reviews newly introduced instrumentation for such emission measurement that is demanded for the developments in advanced powertrain systems. They include Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, mass spectrometry and fast response flame ionization detection. In addition, demands and applications of the fuel reformer developments for fuel cell electric vehicles are discussed. Besides the detection methodologies, sample handling techniques for the measurement of concentrations emitted from low emission vehicles for which the concentrations of the pollutants are significantly lower than the concentrations present in ambient air, are also described.

  14. A simple method for the measurement of reflective foil emissivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballico, M. J.; Ham, E. W. M. van der

    2013-01-01

    Reflective metal foil is widely used to reduce radiative heat transfer within the roof space of buildings. Such foils are typically mass-produced by vapor-deposition of a thin metallic coating onto a variety of substrates, ranging from plastic-coated reinforced paper to 'bubble-wrap'. Although the emissivity of such surfaces is almost negligible in the thermal infrared, typically less than 0.03, an insufficiently thick metal coating, or organic contamination of the surface, can significantly increase this value. To ensure that the quality of the installed insulation is satisfactory, Australian building code AS/NZS 4201.5:1994 requires a practical agreed method for measurement of the emissivity, and the standard ASTM-E408 is implied. Unfortunately this standard is not a 'primary method' and requires the use of specified expensive apparatus and calibrated reference materials. At NMIA we have developed a simple primary technique, based on an apparatus to thermally modulate the sample and record the apparent modulation in infra-red radiance with commercially available radiation thermometers. The method achieves an absolute accuracy in the emissivity of approximately 0.004 (k=2). This paper theoretically analyses the equivalence between the thermal emissivity measured in this manner, the effective thermal emissivity in application, and the apparent emissivity measured in accordance with ASTM-E408

  15. A simple method for the measurement of reflective foil emissivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballico, M. J.; van der Ham, E. W. M.

    2013-09-01

    Reflective metal foil is widely used to reduce radiative heat transfer within the roof space of buildings. Such foils are typically mass-produced by vapor-deposition of a thin metallic coating onto a variety of substrates, ranging from plastic-coated reinforced paper to "bubble-wrap". Although the emissivity of such surfaces is almost negligible in the thermal infrared, typically less than 0.03, an insufficiently thick metal coating, or organic contamination of the surface, can significantly increase this value. To ensure that the quality of the installed insulation is satisfactory, Australian building code AS/NZS 4201.5:1994 requires a practical agreed method for measurement of the emissivity, and the standard ASTM-E408 is implied. Unfortunately this standard is not a "primary method" and requires the use of specified expensive apparatus and calibrated reference materials. At NMIA we have developed a simple primary technique, based on an apparatus to thermally modulate the sample and record the apparent modulation in infra-red radiance with commercially available radiation thermometers. The method achieves an absolute accuracy in the emissivity of approximately 0.004 (k=2). This paper theoretically analyses the equivalence between the thermal emissivity measured in this manner, the effective thermal emissivity in application, and the apparent emissivity measured in accordance with ASTM-E408.

  16. Acoustic emission measurements in petroleum-related rock mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unander, Tor Erling

    2002-07-01

    Acoustic emission activity in rock has usually been studied in crystalline rock, which reflects that rock mechanics has also mostly been occupied with such rocks in relations to seismology, mining and tunneling. On the other hand, petroleum-related rock mechanics focuses on the behaviour of sedimentary rock. Thus, this thesis presents a general study of acoustic emission activity in sedimentary rock, primarily in sandstone. Chalk, limestone and shale have also been tested, but to much less degree because the AE activity in these materials is low. To simplify the study, pore fluids have not been used. The advent of the personal computer and computerized measuring equipment have made possible new methods both for measuring and analysing acoustic emissions. Consequently, a majority of this work is devoted to the development and implementation of new analysis techniques. A broad range of topics are treated: (1) Quantification of the AE activity level, assuming that the event rate best represents the activity. An algorithm for estimating the event rate and a methodology for objectively describing special changes in the activity e.g., onset determination, are presented. (2) Analysis of AE waveform data. A new method for determining the source energy of an AE event is presented, and it is shown how seismic source theory can be used to analyze even intermediate quality data. Based on these techniques, it is shown that a major part of the measured AE activity originates from a region close to the sensor, not necessarily representing the entire sample. (3) An improved procedure for estimating source locations is presented. The main benefit is a procedure that better handles arrival time data with large errors. Statistical simulations are used to quantify the uncertainties in the locations. The analysis techniques are developed with the application to sedimentary rock in mind, and in two articles, the techniques are used in the study of such materials. The work in the first

  17. 47 CFR 2.1511 - Measurements of radiated emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... TREATY MATTERS; GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS FCC Procedure for Testing Class A, B and S Emergency... 243 MHz. Step (9) Compute the peak effective radiated power for the maximum level of each measured emission using the following formula: EC03JN91.001 where: dBmmeas is the measured receiver reading in dBm...

  18. MEASUREMENT OF FUGITIVE EMISSIONS AT REGION I LANDFILL

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report discusses a new measurement technology for characterizing emissions from large area sources. This work was funded by EPA's Monitoring and Measurement for the 21st Century Initiative, or 21M2. The site selected for demonstrating this technology is a superfund landfil...

  19. Dose rate measuring device and dose rate measuring method using the same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urata, Megumu; Matsushita, Takashi; Hanazawa, Sadao; Konno, Takahiro; Chiba, Yoshinori; Yumitate, Tadahiro

    1998-01-01

    The device of the present invention comprises a scintillation fiber scope having a shape elongated in the direction of the height of a pressure vessel and emitting light by incident of radiation to detect radiation, a radioactivity measuring device for measuring a dose rate based on the detection of the fiber scope and a reel means for dispensing and taking up the fiber scope, and it constituted such that the dose rate of the pressure vessel and that of a shroud are determined independently. Then, when the taken out shroud is contained in an container, excessive shielding is not necessary, in addition, this device can reliably be inserted to or withdrawn from complicated places between the pressure vessel and the shroud, and further, the dose rate of the pressure vessel and that of the shroud can be measured approximately accurately even when the thickness of them is different greatly. (N.H.)

  20. Dose rate measuring device and dose rate measuring method using the same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urata, Megumu; Matsushita, Takashi; Hanazawa, Sadao; Konno, Takahiro; Chiba, Yoshinori; Yumitate, Tadahiro

    1998-11-13

    The device of the present invention comprises a scintillation fiber scope having a shape elongated in the direction of the height of a pressure vessel and emitting light by incident of radiation to detect radiation, a radioactivity measuring device for measuring a dose rate based on the detection of the fiber scope and a reel means for dispensing and taking up the fiber scope, and it constituted such that the dose rate of the pressure vessel and that of a shroud are determined independently. Then, when the taken out shroud is contained in an container, excessive shielding is not necessary, in addition, this device can reliably be inserted to or withdrawn from complicated places between the pressure vessel and the shroud, and further, the dose rate of the pressure vessel and that of the shroud can be measured approximately accurately even when the thickness of them is different greatly. (N.H.)

  1. TRANSIT BUS LOAD-BASED MODAL EMISSION RATE MODEL DEVELOPMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heavy-duty diesel vehicles (HDDVs) operations are a major source of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) emissions in metropolitan area nationwide. Although HD¬DVs constitute a small portion of the on-road fleet, they typically contribute more than 45% of NOx and ...

  2. Measurement of ethylene emission from Japanese red pine (Pinus densiflora) under field conditions in NOx-polluted areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kume, A.; Nakatani, N.; Tsuboi, N.; Nakane, K.; Sakurai, N.; Nakagawa, N.; Sakugawa, H.

    2001-01-01

    Emission of ethylene from the needles of Japanese red pine, Pinus densiflora, was measured in air-polluted areas in Hiroshima, Japan. We applied a suitable protocol to determine the rate of ethylene emission from the excised needles. The influence of excision of needles on ethylene emission was not detected during the first 4 h of incubation at 20degC. Ethylene emissions were low in the unpolluted (Clean) areas regardless of the altitude or season. The emission of stress ethylene increased with the atmospheric NO 2 concentration, suggesting that atmospheric NO x or related substances induced the higher ethylene emission in the polluted areas (near urban and industrial areas). In all cases, 1-year-old needles emitted significantly larger amounts of ethylene than the current needles. Ethylene emission did not increase evenly in the polluted areas, but the frequency of trees emitting high ethylene increased. Therefore, threshold rates for the baseline ethylene emission were proposed. (Author)

  3. Reactivity and neutron emission measurements of burnt PWR fuel rod samples in LWR-PROTEUS phase II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, M. F.; Jatuff, F.; Grimm, P.; Seiler, R.; Brogli, R.; Meier, G.; Berger, H. D.; Chawla, R.

    2004-01-01

    Measurements have been made of the reactivity effects and the neutron emission rates of uranium oxide and mixed oxide burnt fuel samples having a wide range of burnup values and coming from a Pressurised Water Reactor (PWR). The reactivity measurements have been made in a PWR lattice moderated in turn with: water, a water and heavy water mixture, and water containing boron. An interesting relationship has been found between the neutron emission rate and the measured reactivity. (authors)

  4. Something from nothing: Estimating consumption rates using propensity scores, with application to emissions reduction policies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Bardsley

    Full Text Available Consumption surveys often record zero purchases of a good because of a short observation window. Measures of distribution are then precluded and only mean consumption rates can be inferred. We show that Propensity Score Matching can be applied to recover the distribution of consumption rates. We demonstrate the method using the UK National Travel Survey, in which c.40% of motorist households purchase no fuel. Estimated consumption rates are plausible judging by households' annual mileages, and highly skewed. We apply the same approach to estimate CO2 emissions and outcomes of a carbon cap or tax. Reliance on means apparently distorts analysis of such policies because of skewness of the underlying distributions. The regressiveness of a simple tax or cap is overstated, and redistributive features of a revenue-neutral policy are understated.

  5. Plant-integrated measurement of greenhouse gas emissions from a municipal wastewater treatment plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoshida, Hiroko; Mønster, Jacob; Scheutz, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    experiencing operational problems, such as during foaming events in anaerobic digesters and during sub-optimal operation of biological nitrogen removal in the secondary treatment of wastewater. Methane emissions detected during measurement campaigns corresponded to 2.07-32.7% of the methane generated......Wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) contribute to anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Due to its spatial and temporal variation in emissions, whole plant characterization of GHG emissions from WWTPs face a number of obstacles. In this study, a tracer dispersion method was applied...... in the plant. As high as 4.27% of nitrogen entering the WWTP was emitted as nitrous oxide under the sub-optimal operation of biological treatment processes. The study shows that the unit process configuration, as well as the operation of the WWTP, determines the rate of GHG emission. The applied plant...

  6. Measuring a fair and ambitious climate agreement using cumulative emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, Glen P; Andrew, Robbie M; Solomon, Susan; Friedlingstein, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Policy makers have called for a ‘fair and ambitious’ global climate agreement. Scientific constraints, such as the allowable carbon emissions to avoid exceeding a 2 °C global warming limit with 66% probability, can help define ambitious approaches to climate targets. However, fairly sharing the mitigation challenge to meet a global target involves human values rather than just scientific facts. We develop a framework based on cumulative emissions of carbon dioxide to compare the consistency of countries’ current emission pledges to the ambition of keeping global temperatures below 2 °C, and, further, compare two alternative methods of sharing the remaining emission allowance. We focus on the recent pledges and other official statements of the EU, USA, and China. The EU and US pledges are close to a 2 °C level of ambition only if the remaining emission allowance is distributed based on current emission shares, which is unlikely to be viewed as ‘fair and ambitious’ by others who presently emit less. China’s stated emissions target also differs from measures of global fairness, owing to emissions that continue to grow into the 2020s. We find that, combined, the EU, US, and Chinese pledges leave little room for other countries to emit CO 2 if a 2 °C limit is the objective, essentially requiring all other countries to move towards per capita emissions 7 to 14 times lower than the EU, USA, or China by 2030. We argue that a fair and ambitious agreement for a 2 °C limit that would be globally inclusive and effective in the long term will require stronger mitigation than the goals currently proposed. Given such necessary and unprecedented mitigation and the current lack of availability of some key technologies, we suggest a new diplomatic effort directed at ensuring that the necessary technologies become available in the near future. (letter)

  7. METEV: Measurement Technologies for Emissions from Ethanol Fuelled Vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandtroem-Dahl, Charlotte

    2009-11-15

    The interest of using alcohols, and especially ethanol, as vehicle fuel is high in Sweden. The advantages are many, such as; being renewable, the ethanol can be produced locally and it is easily mixed with gasoline. Alcohol fuels are considered to be a substantial part of the alternative fuel market, especially in Brazil, USA and Sweden. With this growing interest it is of most importance to investigate the emission performance of vehicles fuelled with alcohols. The focus in this study is on measurement and calculation of hydrocarbon emissions. The emission regulations in different countries have different ways to treat alcohol fuelled vehicles. When alcohols are used as blending components in gasoline, uncombusted alcohols from the fuel are emitted in the exhaust in various amounts. If a Flame Ionization Detector (FID) is used to measure hydrocarbons, the uncombusted alcohol will be included in the measurement. The alcohol is, per definition, however not a hydrocarbon (hydrocarbons contains only hydrogen and carbon). In the US regulations, the alcohol content is measured separately, and the FID measurement is adjusted for the alcohol part. This is not performed in the European regulations. The aim of this project is to highlight the need for a discussion regarding the methodology for measuring hydrocarbon and alcohol emissions from flexible fuelled vehicles operating on alcohol fuel blends.

  8. Measuring the costs of exchange rate volatility

    OpenAIRE

    Paul R. Bergin

    2004-01-01

    Many countries go to great lengths to manage their exchange rates. Probably the most prominent recent example is the European Monetary Union, where all the members abandoned their national currencies and adopted the euro. A number of developing countries maintain other kinds of regimes of managed exchange rates, even though they face potent market pressures to let their exchange rates float. One of the main motives for these arrangements stems from the extreme volatility of exchange rates. Th...

  9. Measuring Implicit Rental Rates for Farm Capital

    OpenAIRE

    Hrubovcak, James

    1986-01-01

    Developing implicit rental rates for capital inputs is an Important step in understanding the Impact of tax law changes on agricultural investments This article develops a methodology for estimating implicit rental rates and presents annual estimates of rental rates for seven categories of farm equipment and structures from 1955 to 1979 This article also compares these rental rates With those estimated under a no-tax alternative The author developed a method for estimating marginal Federal In...

  10. Comparison of exhaust emission on the basis of Real Driving Emissions measurements and simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nowak Mateusz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Designing of modern transport systems involves the need to meet a large number of requirements. The influence of designed road infrastructure on the environment is very wide and important. The most valid aspect in this case is the reduction of emissions of harmful compounds by increasing the fluency of vehicles flow and building collision free road intersections. But it should be started from establishing the initial emission level of harmful compounds. This paper presents a methodology for determining exhaust emissions from vehicles moving on the national road no. 50 in area of Zyrardow. Modern measuring tools such as the PEMS and the microscopic road simulation software, using the application to determine exhaust emissions, were used for this purpose.

  11. Natural gas fugitive emissions rates constrained by global atmospheric methane and ethane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwietzke, Stefan; Griffin, W Michael; Matthews, H Scott; Bruhwiler, Lori M P

    2014-07-15

    The amount of methane emissions released by the natural gas (NG) industry is a critical and uncertain value for various industry and policy decisions, such as for determining the climate implications of using NG over coal. Previous studies have estimated fugitive emissions rates (FER)--the fraction of produced NG (mainly methane and ethane) escaped to the atmosphere--between 1 and 9%. Most of these studies rely on few and outdated measurements, and some may represent only temporal/regional NG industry snapshots. This study estimates NG industry representative FER using global atmospheric methane and ethane measurements over three decades, and literature ranges of (i) tracer gas atmospheric lifetimes, (ii) non-NG source estimates, and (iii) fossil fuel fugitive gas hydrocarbon compositions. The modeling suggests an upper bound global average FER of 5% during 2006-2011, and a most likely FER of 2-4% since 2000, trending downward. These results do not account for highly uncertain natural hydrocarbon seepage, which could lower the FER. Further emissions reductions by the NG industry may be needed to ensure climate benefits over coal during the next few decades.

  12. Linearity between temperature peak and bio-energy CO2 emission rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherubini, Francesco; Bright, Ryan M.; Stromman, Anders H.; Gasser, Thomas; Ciais, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Many future energy and emission scenarios envisage an increase of bio-energy in the global primary energy mix. In most climate impact assessment models and policies, bio-energy systems are assumed to be carbon neutral, thus ignoring the time lag between CO 2 emissions from biomass combustion and CO 2 uptake by vegetation. Here, we show that the temperature peak caused by CO 2 emissions from bio-energy is proportional to the maximum rate at which emissions occur and is almost insensitive to cumulative emissions. Whereas the carbon-climate response (CCR) to fossil fuel emissions is approximately constant, the CCR to bio-energy emissions depends on time, biomass turnover times, and emission scenarios. The linearity between temperature peak and bio-energy CO 2 emission rates resembles the characteristic of the temperature response to short-lived climate forcers. As for the latter, the timing of CO 2 emissions from bio-energy matters. Under the international agreement to limit global warming to 2 C by 2100, early emissions from bio-energy thus have smaller contributions on the targeted temperature than emissions postponed later into the future, especially when bio-energy is sourced from biomass with medium (50-60 years) or long turnover times (100 years). (authors)

  13. Emission rates of regulated pollutants from on-road heavy-duty diesel vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Sandip D.; Johnson, Kent C.; Wayne Miller, J.; Cocker, David R.

    Emissions from heavy-duty diesel (HDD) vehicles are affected by many factors. Changes in engine technology, operating mode, fuel properties, vehicle speed and ambient conditions can have significant effects on emission rates of regulated species. This paper presents the results of on-road emissions testing of 11 HDD vehicles (model years 1996-2000) over the ARB Four Phase driving schedule and the urban dynamometer driving schedule (UDDS). Emission rates were found to be highly dependent on vehicle operating mode. Per mile NO x emission rates for vehicle operation at low speeds, in simulated congested traffic, were three times higher per mile emissions then while cruising on the freeway. Comparisons of NO x emission factors to EMFAC baseline emission factors were within 5-40% for vehicles of various model years tested over the UDDS. A comparison of NO x emission factors for a weighted average of the ARB four phase driving schedule yielded values within 17-57% of EMFAC values. Generally, particulate matter (PM) emission rates were lower than EMFAC values.

  14. MEASURING THE EVOLUTIONARY RATE OF COOLING OF ZZ Ceti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukadam, Anjum S.; Fraser, Oliver; Riecken, T. S.; Kronberg, M. E. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Bischoff-Kim, Agnes [Georgia College and State University, Milledgeville, GA 31061 (United States); Corsico, A. H. [Facultad de Ciencias Astronomicas y Geofisicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata (Argentina); Montgomery, M. H.; Winget, D. E.; Hermes, J. J.; Winget, K. I.; Falcon, Ross E.; Reaves, D. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78759 (United States); Kepler, S. O.; Romero, A. D. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre 91501-970, RS (Brazil); Chandler, D. W. [Meyer Observatory, Central Texas Astronomical Society, 3409 Whispering Oaks, Temple, TX 76504 (United States); Kuehne, J. W. [McDonald Observatory, Fort Davis, TX 79734 (United States); Sullivan, D. J. [Victoria University of Wellington, P.O. Box 600, Wellington (New Zealand); Von Hippel, T. [Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, 600 South Clyde Morris Boulevard, Daytona Beach, FL 32114 (United States); Mullally, F. [SETI Institute, NASA Ames Research Center, MS 244-30, Moffet Field, CA 94035 (United States); Shipman, H. [Delaware Asteroseismic Research Center, Mt. Cuba Observatory, Greenville, DE 19807 (United States); and others

    2013-07-01

    We have finally measured the evolutionary rate of cooling of the pulsating hydrogen atmosphere (DA) white dwarf ZZ Ceti (Ross 548), as reflected by the drift rate of the 213.13260694 s period. Using 41 yr of time-series photometry from 1970 November to 2012 January, we determine the rate of change of this period with time to be dP/dt = (5.2 {+-} 1.4) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -15} s s{sup -1} employing the O - C method and (5.45 {+-} 0.79) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -15} s s{sup -1} using a direct nonlinear least squares fit to the entire lightcurve. We adopt the dP/dt obtained from the nonlinear least squares program as our final determination, but augment the corresponding uncertainty to a more realistic value, ultimately arriving at the measurement of dP/dt = (5.5 {+-} 1.0) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -15} s s{sup -1}. After correcting for proper motion, the evolutionary rate of cooling of ZZ Ceti is computed to be (3.3 {+-} 1.1) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -15} s s{sup -1}. This value is consistent within uncertainties with the measurement of (4.19 {+-} 0.73) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -15} s s{sup -1} for another similar pulsating DA white dwarf, G 117-B15A. Measuring the cooling rate of ZZ Ceti helps us refine our stellar structure and evolutionary models, as cooling depends mainly on the core composition and stellar mass. Calibrating white dwarf cooling curves with this measurement will reduce the theoretical uncertainties involved in white dwarf cosmochronometry. Should the 213.13 s period be trapped in the hydrogen envelope, then our determination of its drift rate compared to the expected evolutionary rate suggests an additional source of stellar cooling. Attributing the excess cooling to the emission of axions imposes a constraint on the mass of the hypothetical axion particle.

  15. High temperature spectral emissivity measurement using integral blackbody method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yijie; Dong, Wei; Lin, Hong; Yuan, Zundong; Bloembergen, Pieter

    2016-10-01

    Spectral emissivity is a critical material's thermos-physical property for heat design and radiation thermometry. A prototype instrument based upon an integral blackbody method was developed to measure material's spectral emissivity above 1000 °. The system was implemented with an optimized commercial variable-high-temperature blackbody, a high speed linear actuator, a linear pyrometer, and an in-house designed synchronization circuit. A sample was placed in a crucible at the bottom of the blackbody furnace, by which the sample and the tube formed a simulated blackbody which had an effective total emissivity greater than 0.985. During the measurement, the sample was pushed to the end opening of the tube by a graphite rod which was actuated through a pneumatic cylinder. A linear pyrometer was used to monitor the brightness temperature of the sample surface through the measurement. The corresponding opto-converted voltage signal was fed and recorded by a digital multi-meter. A physical model was proposed to numerically evaluate the temperature drop along the process. Tube was discretized as several isothermal cylindrical rings, and the temperature profile of the tube was measurement. View factors between sample and rings were calculated and updated along the whole pushing process. The actual surface temperature of the sample at the end opening was obtained. Taking advantages of the above measured voltage profile and the calculated true temperature, spectral emissivity under this temperature point was calculated.

  16. FAST DIFFERENTIAL EMISSION MEASURE INVERSION OF SOLAR CORONAL DATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plowman, Joseph; Kankelborg, Charles; Martens, Petrus [Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    We present a fast method for reconstructing differential emission measures (DEMs) using solar coronal data. The method consists of a fast, simple regularized inversion in conjunction with an iteration scheme for removal of residual negative emission measure. On average, it computes over 1000 DEMs s{sup -1} for a sample active region observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory, and achieves reduced chi-squared of order unity with no negative emission in all but a few test cases. The high performance of this method is especially relevant in the context of AIA, which images of order one million solar pixels per second. This paper describes the method, analyzes its fidelity, compares its performance and results with other DEM methods, and applies it to an active region and loop observed by AIA and by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer on Hinode.

  17. Continuous measurements of N2O emissions from arable fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallman, Magdalena; Lammirato, Carlo; Rütting, Tobias; Delin, Sofia; Weslien, Per; Klemedtsson, Leif

    2017-04-01

    Agriculture represents 59 % of the anthropogenic nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions, according to the IPCC (Ciais et al. 2013). N2O emissions are typically irregular and vary widely in time and space, which makes it difficult to get a good representation of the emissions (Henault et al. 2012), particularly if measurements have low frequency and/or cover only a short time period. Manual measurements are, for practical reasons, often short-term and low-frequent, or restricted to periods where emissions are expected to be high, e.g. after fertilizing. However, the nature of N2O emissions, being largely unpredictable, calls for continuous or near-continuous measurements over long time periods. So far, rather few long-term, high resolution measurements of N2O emissions from arable fields are reported; among them are Flessa et al. (2002) and Senapati et al. (2016). In this study, we have a two-year data set (2015-2017) with hourly measurements from ten automatic chambers, covering unfertilized controls as well as different nitrogen fertilizer treatments. Grain was produced on the field, and effects of tillage, harvest and other cropping measures were covered. What we can see from the experiment is that (a) the unfertilized control plots seem to follow the same emission pattern as the fertilized plots, at a level similar to the standard mineral fertilized plots (120 kg N ha-1 yr-1) and (b) freeze/thaw emissions are comparable in size to emissions after fertilizing. These two findings imply that the importance of fertilizing to the overall N2O emissions from arable soils may be smaller than previously expected. References: Ciais, P., C. Sabine, G. Bala, L. Bopp, V. Brovkin, J. Canadell et al. 2013: Carbon and Other Biogeochemical Cycles. In: Climate Change 2013: The Physical Science Basis. Contribution of Working Group I to the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change [Stocker, T.F., D. Qin, G.-K. Plattner, M. Tignor, S.K. Allen, J. Boschung et

  18. Multi-year remote-sensing measurements of gasoline light-duty vehicle emissions on a freeway ramp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sjoedin, A.; Andreasson, K.

    2000-01-01

    On-road optical remote-sensing measurements of gasoline light-duty vehicle (LDV) emissions - CO, HC, NO - were conducted on a freeway ramp in Gothenburg, Sweden, in 1991, 1995 and 1998. Based on almost 30,000 emission measurements, the results show that both catalyst cars and non-catalyst cars emissions deteriorate over time, but also that the emission performance of new TWC-cars has improved significantly in recent years. Furthermore, it was found that fleet age rather than model year determines the rate of emission deterioration for TWC-cars for both CO and NO. The study demonstrates that remote sensing may constitute a powerful tool to evaluate real-world LDV emissions; however, daily field calibration procedures need to be developed in order to assure that the evolution in fleet average emissions can be accurately measured. (author)

  19. Direct measurements of methane emissions from abandoned oil and gas wells in Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Mary; Kanno, Cynthia M; Reid, Matthew C; Zhang, Xin; Mauzerall, Denise L; Celia, Michael A; Chen, Yuheng; Onstott, Tullis C

    2014-12-23

    Abandoned oil and gas wells provide a potential pathway for subsurface migration and emissions of methane and other fluids to the atmosphere. Little is known about methane fluxes from the millions of abandoned wells that exist in the United States. Here, we report direct measurements of methane fluxes from abandoned oil and gas wells in Pennsylvania, using static flux chambers. A total of 42 and 52 direct measurements were made at wells and at locations near the wells ("controls") in forested, wetland, grassland, and river areas in July, August, October 2013 and January 2014, respectively. The mean methane flow rates at these well locations were 0.27 kg/d/well, and the mean methane flow rate at the control locations was 4.5 × 10(-6) kg/d/location. Three out of the 19 measured wells were high emitters that had methane flow rates that were three orders of magnitude larger than the median flow rate of 1.3 × 10(-3) kg/d/well. Assuming the mean flow rate found here is representative of all abandoned wells in Pennsylvania, we scaled the methane emissions to be 4-7% of estimated total anthropogenic methane emissions in Pennsylvania. The presence of ethane, propane, and n-butane, along with the methane isotopic composition, indicate that the emitted methane is predominantly of thermogenic origin. These measurements show that methane emissions from abandoned oil and gas wells can be significant. The research required to quantify these emissions nationally should be undertaken so they can be accurately described and included in greenhouse gas emissions inventories.

  20. Particulate emission rates from light-duty vehicles in the South Coast Air Quality Management District

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durbin, T.D.; Norbeck, J.M.; Smith, M.R.; Truex, T.J.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a particulate emission rate study conducted on 129 light-duty gasoline and 19 light-duty diesel vehicles for the Coordinating Research Council's (CRC's) Project E-24-2. Total particulate emission rates for newer gasoline vehicles were low with modest increases with vehicle age and older technology. Average FTP particulate emission rates as a function of model year for gasoline vehicles were found to be 2.5 mg/mi for 1991 and newer models, 14.4 mg/mi for 1986--1990 models, 49.0 mg/mi for 1981--1985 models, and 33.8 mg/mi for 1980 and older models. High gaseous emitters were found to have approximately 5--10 times the particulate emission rates of normal emitters. The diesel vehicles had an average particulate emission rate of 561 mg/mi. It should be noted that the light-duty diesel vehicles were predominantly older, pre-1985 vehicles; the 1985 and newer diesel vehicles had substantially lower particulate emissions, i.e., less than 100 mg/mi. Emission inventory estimates in the South Coast Air Basin based on the fleet emission rates were higher than those obtained using the default values in EMFAC7G, due primarily to the contribution of high emitters

  1. Improved passive flux samplers for measuring ammonia emissions from animal houses, part 1: Basic principles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtens, R.; Hol, J.M.G.; Wagemans, M.J.M.; Phillips, V.R.

    2003-01-01

    At present, precise, expensive and laborious methods with a high resolution in time are needed, to determine ammonia emission rates from animal houses. The high costs for equipment, maintenance and labour limit the number of sites that can be measured. This study examines a new, simpler concept for

  2. Optimal sensor locations for the backward Lagrangian stochastic technique in measuring lagoon gas emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study evaluated the impact of gas concentration and wind sensor locations on the accuracy of the backward Lagrangian stochastic inverse-dispersion technique (bLS) for measuring gas emission rates from a typical lagoon environment. Path-integrated concentrations (PICs) and 3-dimensional (3D) wi...

  3. Measuring heart rate with optical sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barachi, M. (Mitra)

    2014-01-01

    The problem addressed in this report is to verify the possibility of using an optical sensor in the SaxShirt in order to extract the heart rate. There are specifically three questions that we try to address. 1) How is it possible to extract heart rate (BPM) from the optical sensor? 2) Is it

  4. Developments in Emission Measurements Using Lightweight Sensors and Samplers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightweight emission measurement systems making use of miniaturized sensors and samplers have been developed for portable and aerial sampling for an array of pollutants. Shoebox-sized systems called “Kolibri”, weighing 3-5 kg, have been deployed on NASA-flown unmanned...

  5. Measurement of absolute bone blood flow by positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nahmias, C.; Cockshott, W.P.; Garnett, E.S.; Belbeck, L.W.

    1986-03-01

    A method of measuring bone blood flow has been developed using /sup 18/F sodium fluoride and positron emission tomography. The blood flow levels are in line with those obtained experimentally from microsphere embolisation. This investigative method could be applied to elucidate a number of clinical questions involving bone perfusion.

  6. GHG emission mitigation measures and technologies in the Czech Republic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tichy, M. [Energy Efficiency Center, Prague (Czech Republic)

    1996-12-31

    The paper presents a short overview of main results in two fields: projection of GHG emission from energy sector in the Czech Republic and assessment of technologies and options for GHG mitigation. The last part presents an overview of measures that were prepared for potential inclusion to the Czech Climate Change Action Plan.

  7. Accuracy of exhaust emission factor measurements on chassis dynamometer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joumard, R.; Laurikko, J.; Han, T.L.; Geivanidis, S.; Samaras, Z.; Merétei, T.; Devaux, P.; André, J.-M.; Cornelis, E.; Lacour, S.; Prati, M.V.; Vermeulen, R.; Zallinger, M.

    2009-01-01

    The influence of 20 parameters on the measurement of light-vehicle emission factors on chassis dynamometer based on driving patterns, vehicle-related parameters, vehicle sampling, and laboratory-related parameters, was studied. The results were based on literature synthesis, ≈ 2700 specific tests

  8. Thermal conductivity and emissivity measurements of uranium carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corradetti, S.; Manzolaro, M.; Andrighetto, A.; Zanonato, P.; Tusseau-Nenez, S.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermal conductivity and emissivity measurements of uranium carbides were performed. • The tested materials are candidates as targets for radioactive ion beam production. • The results are correlated with the materials composition and microstructure. - Abstract: Thermal conductivity and emissivity measurements on different types of uranium carbide are presented, in the context of the ActiLab Work Package in ENSAR, a project within the 7th Framework Program of the European Commission. Two specific techniques were used to carry out the measurements, both taking place in a laboratory dedicated to the research and development of materials for the SPES (Selective Production of Exotic Species) target. In the case of thermal conductivity, estimation of the dependence of this property on temperature was obtained using the inverse parameter estimation method, taking as a reference temperature and emissivity measurements. Emissivity at different temperatures was obtained for several types of uranium carbide using a dual frequency infrared pyrometer. Differences between the analyzed materials are discussed according to their compositional and microstructural properties. The obtainment of this type of information can help to carefully design materials to be capable of working under extreme conditions in next-generation ISOL (Isotope Separation On-Line) facilities for the generation of radioactive ion beams.

  9. Objective Measure of Nasal Air Emission Using Nasal Accelerometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cler, Meredith J.; Lien, Yu-An, S.; Braden, Maia N.; Mittleman, Talia; Downing, Kerri; Stepp, Cara, E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This article describes the development and initial validation of an objective measure of nasal air emission (NAE) using nasal accelerometry. Method: Nasal acceleration and nasal airflow signals were simultaneously recorded while an expert speech language pathologist modeled NAEs at a variety of severity levels. In addition, microphone and…

  10. MEASUREMENT OF FUGITIVE EMISSIONS AT A BIOREACTOR LANDFILL

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report focuses on three field campaigns performed in 2002 and 2003 to measure fugitive emissions at a bioreactor landfill in Louisville, KY, using an open-path Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. The study uses optical remote sensing-radial plume mapping. The horizontal...

  11. Results of measurements of emission from internal combustion engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimitrovski, Mile; Jovanovska, Vangelica

    1999-01-01

    A mathematical model for solving the emission from internal combustion engines on the cross roads are made. The exhausted pipes from vehicles are substituted with a pipe in a centre of the cross road. This model is proved with measurement made on vehicles in the city of Bitola (Macedonia). (Author)

  12. Virtual Instrument for Emissions Measurement of Internal Combustion Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Armando; Montero, Gisela; Coronado, Marcos; García, Conrado; Pérez, Rubén

    2016-01-01

    The gases emissions measurement systems in internal combustion engines are strict and expensive nowadays. For this reason, a virtual instrument was developed to measure the combustion emissions from an internal combustion diesel engine, running with diesel-biodiesel mixtures. This software is called virtual instrument for emissions measurement (VIEM), and it was developed in the platform of LabVIEW 2010® virtual programming. VIEM works with sensors connected to a signal conditioning system, and a data acquisition system is used as interface for a computer in order to measure and monitor in real time the emissions of O2, NO, CO, SO2, and CO2 gases. This paper shows the results of the VIEM programming, the integrated circuits diagrams used for the signal conditioning of sensors, and the sensors characterization of O2, NO, CO, SO2, and CO2. VIEM is a low-cost instrument and is simple and easy to use. Besides, it is scalable, making it flexible and defined by the user. PMID:27034893

  13. Virtual Instrument for Emissions Measurement of Internal Combustion Engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Armando; Ramos, Rogelio; Montero, Gisela; Coronado, Marcos; García, Conrado; Pérez, Rubén

    2016-01-01

    The gases emissions measurement systems in internal combustion engines are strict and expensive nowadays. For this reason, a virtual instrument was developed to measure the combustion emissions from an internal combustion diesel engine, running with diesel-biodiesel mixtures. This software is called virtual instrument for emissions measurement (VIEM), and it was developed in the platform of LabVIEW 2010® virtual programming. VIEM works with sensors connected to a signal conditioning system, and a data acquisition system is used as interface for a computer in order to measure and monitor in real time the emissions of O2, NO, CO, SO2, and CO2 gases. This paper shows the results of the VIEM programming, the integrated circuits diagrams used for the signal conditioning of sensors, and the sensors characterization of O2, NO, CO, SO2, and CO2. VIEM is a low-cost instrument and is simple and easy to use. Besides, it is scalable, making it flexible and defined by the user.

  14. Effects of Injection Rate Profile on Combustion Process and Emissions in a Diesel Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuqiang Bai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available When multi-injection is implemented in diesel engine via high pressure common rail injection system, changed interval between injection pulses can induce variation of injection rate profile for sequential injection pulse, though other control parameters are the same. Variations of injection rate shape which influence the air-fuel mixing and combustion process will be important for designing injection strategy. In this research, CFD numerical simulations using KIVA-3V were conducted for examining the effects of injection rate shape on diesel combustion and emissions. After the model was validated by experimental results, five different shapes (including rectangle, slope, triangle, trapezoid, and wedge of injection rate profiles were investigated. Modeling results demonstrate that injection rate shape can have obvious influence on heat release process and heat release traces which cause different combustion process and emissions. It is observed that the baseline, rectangle (flat, shape of injection rate can have better balance between NOx and soot emissions than the other investigated shapes. As wedge shape brings about the lowest NOx emissions due to retarded heat release, it produces the highest soot emissions among the five shapes. Trapezoid shape has the lowest soot emissions, while its NOx is not the highest one. The highest NOx emissions were produced by triangle shape due to higher peak injection rate.

  15. Measurement of brain pH with positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buxton, R.B.; Alpert, N.M.; Ackerman, R.H.; Wechsler, L.R.; Elmaleh, D.R.; Correia, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    With positron emission tomography (PET) it is now possible to measure local brain pH noninvasively in humans. The application of PET to the determination of pH is relatively new, so only a handful of papers on the subject have appeared in print. This chapter reviews the current strategies for measuring brain pH with PET, discuss methodological problems, and present initial results

  16. Measurement of liver volume by emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kan, M.K.; Hopkins, G.B.

    1979-01-01

    In 22 volunteers without clinical or laboratory evidence of liver disease, liver volume was determined using single-photon emission computed tomography (ECT). This technique provided excellent object contrast between the liver and its surroundings and permitted calculation of liver volume without geometric assumptions about the liver's configuration. Reproducibility of results was satisfactory, with a root-mean-square error of less than 6% between duplicate measurements in 15 individuals. The volume measurements were validated by the use of phantoms

  17. Acoustic emission measurements on type 316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, I.G.; Holt, J.; Goddard, D.J.

    1976-01-01

    Acoustic emission measurements have been made on Type 316 stainless steel in the solution treated condition, as part of a feasibility study for the monitoring of fast reactor components. The work involved testing both plain tensile specimens and precracked compact tension specimens in the temperature range 20-200 deg C. At 20 deg C plastic deformation was a quiet process but ductile crack growth was accompanied by high amplitude emissions capable of detection on plant. At 200 deg C both plastic deformation and ductile crack growth were quiet

  18. Analysis and Measurement of NOx Emissions in Port Auxiliary Vessels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    German de Melo Rodriguez

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper is made NOx pollution emitted by port auxiliary vessels, specifically by harbour tugs, due to its unique operating characteristics of operation, require a large propulsion power changes discontinuously, also possess some peculiar technical characteristics, large tonnage and high propulsive power, that differentiate them from other auxiliary vessels of the port. Taking into account all the above features, there are no studies of the NOx emission engines caused by different working regimes of power because engine manufacturers have not measured these emissions across the range of operating power, but usually we only report the pollution produced by its engines to a maximum continuous power.

  19. MASER: Measuring, Analysing, Simulating low frequency Radio Emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecconi, B.; Le Sidaner, P.; Savalle, R.; Bonnin, X.; Zarka, P. M.; Louis, C.; Coffre, A.; Lamy, L.; Denis, L.; Griessmeier, J. M.; Faden, J.; Piker, C.; André, N.; Genot, V. N.; Erard, S.; King, T. A.; Mafi, J. N.; Sharlow, M.; Sky, J.; Demleitner, M.

    2017-12-01

    The MASER (Measuring, Analysing and Simulating Radio Emissions) project provides a comprehensive infrastructure dedicated to low frequency radio emissions (typically Radioastronomie de Nançay and the CDPP deep archive. These datasets include Cassini/RPWS, STEREO/Waves, WIND/Waves, Ulysses/URAP, ISEE3/SBH, Voyager/PRA, Nançay Decameter Array (Routine, NewRoutine, JunoN), RadioJove archive, swedish Viking mission, Interball/POLRAD... MASER also includes a Python software library for reading raw data.

  20. Measurements of Protein Crystal Face Growth Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorti, S.

    2014-01-01

    Protein crystal growth rates will be determined for several hyperthermophile proteins.; The growth rates will be assessed using available theoretical models, including kinetic roughening.; If/when kinetic roughening supersaturations are established, determinations of protein crystal quality over a range of supersaturations will also be assessed.; The results of our ground based effort may well address the existence of a correlation between fundamental growth mechanisms and protein crystal quality.

  1. Exploring a suitable nitrogen fertilizer rate to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and ensure rice yields in paddy fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Yiming; Wang, Xiaopeng; Yang, Jingping, E-mail: jpyang@zju.edu.cn; Zhao, Xing; Ye, Xinyi

    2016-09-15

    The application rate of nitrogen fertilizer was believed to dramatically influence greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from paddy fields. Thus, providing a suitable nitrogen fertilization rate to ensure rice yields, reducing GHG emissions and exploring emission behavior are important issues for field management. In this paper, a two year experiment with six rates (0, 75, 150, 225, 300, 375 kg N/ha) of nitrogen fertilizer application was designed to examine GHG emissions by measuring carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), methane (CH{sub 4}), nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) flux and their cumulative global warming potential (GWP) from paddy fields in Hangzhou, Zhejiang in 2013 and 2014. The results indicated that the GWP and rice yields increased with an increasing application rate of nitrogen fertilizer. Emission peaks of CH{sub 4} mainly appeared at the vegetative phase, and emission peaks of CO{sub 2}, and N{sub 2}O mainly appeared at reproductive phase of rice growth. The CO{sub 2} flux was significantly correlated with soil temperature, while the CH{sub 4} flux was influenced by logging water remaining period and N{sub 2}O flux was significantly associated with nitrogen application rates. This study showed that 225 kg N/ha was a suitable nitrogen fertilizer rate to minimize GHG emissions with low yield-scaled emissions of 3.69 (in 2013) and 2.23 (in 2014) kg CO{sub 2}-eq/kg rice yield as well as to ensure rice yields remained at a relatively high level of 8.89 t/ha in paddy fields. - Highlights: • Exploiting co-benefits of rice yield and reduction of greenhouse gas emission. • Global warming potential and rice yield increased with nitrogen fertilizer rate up. • Emission peaks of CH{sub 4,} CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O appeared at vegetative and reproductive phase. • 225 kg N/ha rate benefits both rice yields and GWP reduction.

  2. GLOBAL STAR FORMATION RATES AND DUST EMISSION OVER THE GALAXY INTERACTION SEQUENCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanz, Lauranne; Zezas, Andreas; Smith, Howard A.; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Fazio, Giovanni G.; Hernquist, Lars [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Brassington, Nicola [School of Physics, Astronomy and Mathematics, University of Hertfordshire, College Lane, Hatfield, AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Da Cunha, Elisabete [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy (MPIA), Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117, Heidelberg (Germany); Hayward, Christopher C. [Heidelberger Institut fuer Theoretische Studien, Schloss-Wolfsbrunnenweg 35, D-69118, Heidelberg (Germany); Jonsson, Patrik, E-mail: llanz@head.cfa.harvard.edu [Space Exploration Technologies, 1 Rocket Road, Hawthorne, CA 90250 (United States)

    2013-05-01

    We measured and modeled spectral energy distributions (SEDs) in 28 bands from the ultraviolet to the far-infrared (FIR) for 31 interacting galaxies in 14 systems. The sample is drawn from the Spitzer Interacting Galaxy Survey, which probes a range of galaxy interaction parameters at multiple wavelengths with an emphasis on the infrared bands. The subset presented in this paper consists of all galaxies for which FIR Herschel SPIRE observations are publicly available. Our SEDs combine the Herschel photometry with multi-wavelength data from Spitzer, GALEX, Swift UVOT, and 2MASS. While the shapes of the SEDs are broadly similar across our sample, strongly interacting galaxies typically have more mid-infrared emission relative to their near-infrared and FIR emission than weakly or moderately interacting galaxies. We modeled the full SEDs to derive host galaxy star formation rates (SFRs), specific star formation rates (sSFRs), stellar masses, dust temperatures, dust luminosities, and dust masses. We find increases in the dust luminosity and mass, SFR, and cold (15-25 K) dust temperature as the interaction progresses from moderately to strongly interacting and between non-interacting and strongly interacting galaxies. We also find increases in the SFR between weakly and strongly interacting galaxies. In contrast, the sSFR remains unchanged across all the interaction stages. The ultraviolet photometry is crucial for constraining the age of the stellar population and the SFR, while dust mass is primarily determined by SPIRE photometry. The SFR derived from the SED modeling agrees well with rates estimated by proportionality relations that depend on infrared emission.

  3. Standardization in dust emission measurement; Mesure des emissions de poussieres normalisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perret, R. [INERIS, 60 - Verneuil-en-Halatte, (France)

    1996-12-31

    The European Standardization Committee (CEN TC 264WG5) is developing a new reference method for measuring particulate emissions, suitable for concentrations inferior to 20 mg/m{sup 3} and especially for concentrations around 5 mg/m{sup 3}; the measuring method should be applicable to waste incinerator effluents and more generally to industrial effluents. Testing protocols and data analysis have been examined and repeatability and reproducibility issues are discussed

  4. Variability in Light-Duty Gasoline Vehicle Emission Factors from Trip-Based Real-World Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bin; Frey, H Christopher

    2015-10-20

    Using data obtained with portable emissions measurements systems (PEMS) on multiple routes for 100 gasoline vehicles, including passenger cars (PCs), passenger trucks (PTs), and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), variability in tailpipe emission rates was evaluated. Tier 2 emission standards are shown to be effective in lowering NOx, CO, and HC emission rates. Although PTs are larger, heavier vehicles that consume more fuel and produce more CO2 emissions, they do not necessarily produce more emissions of regulated pollutants compared to PCs. HEVs have very low emission rates compared to tier 2 vehicles under real-world driving. Emission factors vary with cycle average speed and road type, reflecting the combined impact of traffic control and traffic congestion. Compared to the slowest average speed and most congested cycles, optimal emission rates could be 50% lower for CO2, as much as 70% lower for NOx, 40% lower for CO, and 50% lower for HC. There is very high correlation among vehicles when comparing driving cycles. This has implications for how many cycles are needed to conduct comparisons between vehicles, such as when comparing fuels or technologies. Concordance between empirical and predicted emission rates using the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's MOVES model was also assessed.

  5. High energy effects on D-brane and black hole emission rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, S.; Dasgupta, A.; Sarkar, T.

    1997-01-01

    We study the emission of scalar particles from a class of near-extremal five-dimensional black holes and the corresponding D-brane configuration at high energies. We show that the distribution functions and the black hole greybody factors are modified in the high energy tail of the Hawking spectrum in such a way that the emission rates exactly match. We extend the results to charged scalar emission and to four dimensions. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  6. Final Report: Wireless Instrument for Automated Measurement of Clean Cookstove Usage and Black Carbon Emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukac, Martin [Cirrus Sense LLC, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Ramanathan, Nithya [Cirrus Sense LLC, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Graham, Eric [Cirrus Sense LLC, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2013-09-10

    Black carbon (BC) emissions from traditional cooking fires and other sources are significant anthropogenic drivers of radiative forcing. Clean cookstoves present a more energy-efficient and cleaner-burning vehicle for cooking than traditional wood-burning stoves, yet many existing cookstoves reduce emissions by only modest amounts. Further research into cookstove use, fuel types, and verification of emissions is needed as adoption rates for such stoves remain low. Accelerated innovation requires techniques for measuring and verifying such cookstove performance. The overarching goal of the proposed program was to develop a low-cost, wireless instrument to provide a high-resolution profile of the cookstove BC emissions and usage in the field. We proposed transferring the complexity of analysis away from the sampling hardware at the measurement site and to software at a centrally located server to easily analyze data from thousands of sampling instruments. We were able to build a low-cost field-based instrument that produces repeatable, low-cost estimates of cookstove usage, fuel estimates, and emission values with low variability. Emission values from our instrument were consistent with published ranges of emissions for similar stove and fuel types.

  7. Validated analytical modeling of diesel engine regulated exhaust CO emission rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waleed F Faris

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Albeit vehicle analytical models are often favorable for explainable mathematical trends, no analytical model has been developed of the regulated diesel exhaust CO emission rate for trucks yet. This research unprecedentedly develops and validates for trucks a model of the steady speed regulated diesel exhaust CO emission rate analytically. It has been found that the steady speed–based CO exhaust emission rate is based on (1 CO2 dissociation, (2 the water–gas shift reaction, and (3 the incomplete combustion of hydrocarbon. It has been found as well that the steady speed–based CO exhaust emission rate based on CO2 dissociation is considerably less than the rate that is based on the water–gas shift reaction. It has also been found that the steady speed–based CO exhaust emission rate based on the water–gas shift reaction is the dominant source of CO exhaust emission. The study shows that the average percentage of deviation of the steady speed–based simulated results from the corresponding field data is 1.7% for all freeway cycles with 99% coefficient of determination at the confidence level of 95%. This deviation of the simulated results from field data outperforms its counterpart of widely recognized models such as the comprehensive modal emissions model and VT-Micro for all freeway cycles.

  8. Measuring Change with the Rating Scale Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludlow, Larry H.; And Others

    The Rehabilitation Research and Development Laboratory at the United States Veterans Administration Hines Hospital is engaged in a long-term evaluation of blind rehabilitation. One aspect of the evaluation project focuses on the measurement of attitudes toward blindness. Our aim is to measure changes in attitudes toward blindness from…

  9. Electron bunchlength measurement from analysis of fluctuations in spontaneous emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catravas, P.; Leemans, W.P.; Wurtele, J.S.; Zolotorev, M.S.; Babzien, M.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Segalov, Z.; Wang, X.; Yakimenko, V.

    1999-01-01

    A statistical analysis of fluctuations in the spontaneous emission of a single bunch of electrons is shown to provide a new bunchlength diagnostic. This concept, originally proposed by Zolotorev and Stupakov [1], is based on the fact that shot noise from a finite bunch has a correlation length defined by the bunchlength, and therefore has a spiky spectrum. Single shot spectra of wiggler spontaneous emission have been measured at 632 nm from 44 MeV single electron bunches of 1 - 5 ps. The scaling of the spectral fluctuations with frequency resolution and the scaling of the spectral intensity distribution with bunchlength are studied. Bunchlength was extracted in a single shot measurement. Agreement was obtained between the experiment and a theoretical model, and with independent time integrated measurements. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  10. Measurement of the deuterium Balmer series line emission on EAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, C. R.; Xu, Z.; Jin, Z.; Zhang, P. F. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1126, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Science Island Branch of Graduate School, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Huang, J., E-mail: juan.huang@ipp.ac.cn; Gao, W.; Gao, W.; Chang, J. F.; Xu, J. C.; Duan, Y. M.; Chen, Y. J.; Zhang, L.; Wu, Z. W.; Li, J. G. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1126, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Hou, Y. M. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1126, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2016-11-15

    Volume recombination plays an important role towards plasma detachment for magnetically confined fusion devices. High quantum number states of the Balmer series of deuterium are used to study recombination. On EAST (Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak), two visible spectroscopic measurements are applied for the upper/lower divertor with 13 channels, respectively. Both systems are coupled with Princeton Instruments ProEM EMCCD 1024B camera: one is equipped on an Acton SP2750 spectrometer, which has a high spectral resolution ∼0.0049 nm with 2400 gr/mm grating to measure the D{sub α}(H{sub α}) spectral line and with 1200 gr/mm grating to measure deuterium molecular Fulcher band emissions and another is equipped on IsoPlane SCT320 using 600 gr/mm to measure high-n Balmer series emission lines, allowing us to study volume recombination on EAST and to obtain the related line averaged plasma parameters (T{sub e}, n{sub e}) during EAST detached phases. This paper will present the details of the measurements and the characteristics of deuterium Balmer series line emissions during density ramp-up L-mode USN plasma on EAST.

  11. The ranking of negative-cost emissions reduction measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, Simon

    2012-01-01

    A flaw has been identified in the calculation of the cost-effectiveness in marginal abatement cost curves (MACCs). The problem affects “negative-cost” emissions reduction measures—those that produce a return on investment. The resulting ranking sometimes favours measures that produce low emissions savings and is therefore unreliable. The issue is important because incorrect ranking means a potential failure to achieve the best-value outcome. A simple mathematical analysis shows that not only is the standard cost-effectiveness calculation inadequate for ranking negative-cost measures, but there is no possible replacement that satisfies reasonable requirements. Furthermore, the concept of negative cost-effectiveness is found to be unsound and its use should be avoided. Among other things, this means that MACCs are unsuitable for ranking negative-cost measures. As a result, MACCs produced by a range of organizations including UK government departments may need to be revised. An alternative partial ranking method has been devised by making use of Pareto optimization. The outcome can be presented as a stacked bar chart that indicates both the preferred ordering and the total emissions saving available for each measure without specifying a cost-effectiveness. - Highlights: ► Marginal abatement cost curves (MACCs) are used to rank emission reduction measures. ► There is a flaw in the standard ranking method for negative-cost measures. ► Negative values of cost-effectiveness (in £/tC or equivalent) are invalid. ► There may be errors in published MACCs. ► A method based on Pareto principles provides an alternative ranking method.

  12. Automated Speech Rate Measurement in Dysarthria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Heidi; Dekens, Tomas; Van Nuffelen, Gwen; Latacz, Lukas; Verhelst, Werner; De Bodt, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, a new algorithm for automated determination of speech rate (SR) in dysarthric speech is evaluated. We investigated how reliably the algorithm calculates the SR of dysarthric speech samples when compared with calculation performed by speech-language pathologists. Method: The new algorithm was trained and tested using Dutch…

  13. Methods and techniques for measuring gas emissions from agricultural and animal feeding operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Enzhu; Babcock, Esther L; Bialkowski, Stephen E; Jones, Scott B; Tuller, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Emissions of gases from agricultural and animal feeding operations contribute to climate change, produce odors, degrade sensitive ecosystems, and pose a threat to public health. The complexity of processes and environmental variables affecting these emissions complicate accurate and reliable quantification of gas fluxes and production rates. Although a plethora of measurement technologies exist, each method has its limitations that exacerbate accurate quantification of gas fluxes. Despite a growing interest in gas emission measurements, only a few available technologies include real-time, continuous monitoring capabilities. Commonly applied state-of-the-art measurement frameworks and technologies were critically examined and discussed, and recommendations for future research to address real-time monitoring requirements for forthcoming regulation and management needs are provided.

  14. Evaluating measurements of carbon dioxide emissions using a precision source--A natural gas burner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Rodney; Bundy, Matthew; Zong, Ruowen

    2015-07-01

    A natural gas burner has been used as a precise and accurate source for generating large quantities of carbon dioxide (CO2) to evaluate emissions measurements at near-industrial scale. Two methods for determining carbon dioxide emissions from stationary sources are considered here: predicting emissions based on fuel consumption measurements-predicted emissions measurements, and direct measurement of emissions quantities in the flue gas-direct emissions measurements. Uncertainty for the predicted emissions measurement was estimated at less than 1%. Uncertainty estimates for the direct emissions measurement of carbon dioxide were on the order of ±4%. The relative difference between the direct emissions measurements and the predicted emissions measurements was within the range of the measurement uncertainty, therefore demonstrating good agreement. The study demonstrates how independent methods are used to validate source emissions measurements, while also demonstrating how a fire research facility can be used as a precision test-bed to evaluate and improve carbon dioxide emissions measurements from stationary sources. Fossil-fuel-consuming stationary sources such as electric power plants and industrial facilities account for more than half of the CO2 emissions in the United States. Therefore, accurate emissions measurements from these sources are critical for evaluating efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. This study demonstrates how a surrogate for a stationary source, a fire research facility, can be used to evaluate the accuracy of measurements of CO2 emissions.

  15. Final report for measurement of primary particulate matter emissions from light-duty motor vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norbeck, J. M.; Durbin, T. D.; Truex, T. J.

    1998-12-31

    This report describes the results of a particulate emissions study conducted at the University of California, Riverside, College of Engineering-Center for Environmental Research and Technology (CE-CERT) from September of 1996 to August of 1997. The goal of this program was to expand the database of particulate emissions measurements from motor vehicles to include larger numbers of representative in-use vehicles. This work was co-sponsored by the Coordinating Research Council (CRC), the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD), and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and was part of a larger study of particulate emissions being conducted in several states under sponsorship by CRC. For this work, FTP particulate mass emission rates were determined for gasoline and diesel vehicles, along with the fractions of particulates below 2.5 and 10 microns aerodynamic diameter. A total of 129 gasoline-fueled vehicles and 19 diesel-fueled vehicles were tested as part of the program.

  16. Mass attenuation coefficients in the range 3.8⩽E⩽11 keV, K fluorescence yield and Kβ/Kα relative X-ray emission rate for Ti, V, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu and Zn measured with a tunable monochromatic X-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ménesguen, Y.; Lépy, M.-C.

    2010-08-01

    This work presents new measurements of mass attenuation coefficients in the range 3.8⩽E⩽11 keV, K-absorption jump-ratios, Kα and Kβ fluorescence yields for Ti, V, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu and Zn. We use the experimental facility SOLEX, a tunable monochromatic X-ray source combined with an energy-dispersive high-purity germanium detector. The results are compared with theoretical values as well as with other experimental data and show a relatively good agreement. However, the derived K-jump-ratios appear larger than those widely used in the XCOM database. The Kα and Kβ fluorescence yields and the corresponding relative emission rates Kβ/Kα are also derived, which was made possible by the use of energy-dispersive detectors with good spectral resolution.

  17. Volatile Organic Compound Concentrations and Emission Rates in New Manufactured and Site-Built Houses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armin Rudd

    2008-10-30

    This study was conducted with the primary objective of characterizing and comparing the airborne concentrations and the emission rates of total VOCs and selected individual VOCs, including formaldehyde, among a limited number of new manufactured and site-built houses.

  18. Determination of Summertime VOC Emission Rates from Produced Water Ponds in the Uintah Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, R. S.; Woods, C.; Lyman, S.

    2013-12-01

    The observance of excess ozone concentrations in Utah's Uintah Basin over past several years has prompted several investigations into the extent and causes of the elevated ozone. Among these is the assessment of potential emissions of reactive VOCs. Evaporation ponds, used a remediation technique for treatment of contaminated production and other waters, are one potential source of significant VOC emissions and is estimated that there are around 160 such ponds within the Uintah Basin's oil and gas production areas. In June 2012 VOC emission rates for several reactive VOCs were derived for an evaporation facility consisting of a small inlet pond (≈0.03 acres) and two larger, serial ponds (≈4.3 acres each). The emission rates were determined over three sampling periods using an inverse modeling approach. Under this methodology, ambient VOC concentrations are determined at several downwind locations through whole-air collection into SUMMA canisters, followed by GC/MS quantification and compared with predicted concentrations using an EPA-approved dispersion model, AERMOD. The presumed emission rates used within the model were then adjusted until the modeled concentrations approach the observed concentrations. The derived emission rates for the individual VOCs were on the order of 10-3 g/s/m2 from the inlet pond and 10-6 g/s/m2 from the larger ponds. The emissions from the 1st pond in series after the inlet pond were about 3-4x the emissions from the 2nd pond. These combined emission rates are about an order of magnitude those reported for a single study in Colorado (Thoma, 2009). It should be noted, however, that the variability about each of the VOC emission rates was significant (often ×100% at the 95% confidence interval). Extrapolating these emission rates to the estimated total areas of all the evaporation ponds within Basin resulted in calculated Basin-wide VOC emissions 292,835 tons/yr. However, Bar-Ilan et al. (2009) estimated 2012 VOC oil and gas related

  19. Modeling air pollutant emissions from Indian auto-rickshaws: Model development and implications for fleet emission rate estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieshop, Andrew P.; Boland, Daniel; Reynolds, Conor C. O.; Gouge, Brian; Apte, Joshua S.; Rogak, Steven N.; Kandlikar, Milind

    2012-04-01

    Chassis dynamometer tests were conducted on 40 Indian auto-rickshaws with 3 different fuel-engine combinations operating on the Indian Drive Cycle (IDC). Second-by-second (1 Hz) data were collected and used to develop velocity-acceleration look-up table models for fuel consumption and emissions of CO2, CO, total hydrocarbons (THC), oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) for each fuel-engine combination. Models were constructed based on group-average vehicle activity and emissions data in order to represent the performance of a 'typical' vehicle. The models accurately estimated full-cycle emissions for most species, though pollutants with more variable emission rates (e.g., PM2.5) were associated with larger errors. Vehicle emissions data showed large variability for single vehicles ('intra-vehicle variability') and within the test group ('inter-vehicle variability'), complicating the development of a single model to represent a vehicle population. To evaluate the impact of this variability, sensitivity analyses were conducted using vehicle activity data other than the IDC as model input. Inter-vehicle variability dominated the uncertainty in vehicle emission modeling. 'Leave-one-out' analyses indicated that the model outputs were relatively insensitive to the specific sample of vehicles and that the vehicle samples were likely a reasonable representation of the Delhi fleet. Intra-vehicle variability in emissions was also substantial, though had a relatively minor impact on model performance. The models were used to assess whether the IDC, used for emission factor development in India, accurately represents emissions from on-road driving. Modeling based on Global Positioning System (GPS) activity data from real-world auto-rickshaws suggests that, relative to on-road vehicles in Delhi, the IDC systematically under-estimates fuel use and emissions; real-word auto-rickshaws consume 15% more fuel and emit 49% more THC and 16% more PM2.5. The models

  20. Covariation of binaural, concurrently-measured spontaneous otoacoustic emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penner, M J; Brauth, S E; Jastreboff, P J

    1994-03-01

    Simultaneous recordings of binaural spontaneous otoacoustic emissions (SOAEs) were made for 2 female subjects. For SOAEs below about 3.6 kHz measured within a testing session, the frequencies of nearby monaural and binaural SOAEs tended to move in tandem, whereas widely separated SOAEs did not. Across many testing sessions spanning a menstrual cycle, all monaural and binaural SOAE frequencies shifted in tandem. Possible mechanisms consistent with these results are discussed.

  1. Determination of the emission rate for the 14 MeV neutron generator with the use of radio-yttrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laszynska Ewa

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The neutron emission rate is a crucial parameter for most of the radiation sources that emit neutrons. In the case of large fusion devices the determination of this parameter is necessary for a proper assessment of the power release and the prediction for the neutron budget. The 14 MeV neutron generator will be used for calibration of neutron diagnostics at JET and ITER facilities. The stability of the neutron generator working parameters like emission and angular homogeneity affects the accuracy of calibration other neutron diagnostics. The aim of our experiment was to confirm the usefulness of yttrium activation method for monitoring of the neutron generator SODERN Model: GENIE 16. The reaction rate induced by neutrons inside the yttrium sample was indirectly measured by activation of the yttrium sample, and then by means of the γ-spectrometry method. The pre-calibrated HPGe detector was used to determine the yttrium radioactivity. The emissivity of neutron generator calculated on the basis of the measured radioactivity was compared with the value resulting from its electrical settings, and both of these values were found to be consistent. This allowed for a positive verification of the reaction cross section that was used to determine the reaction rate (6.45 × 10−21 reactions per second and the neutron emission rate (1.04 × 108 n·s−1. Our study confirms usefulness of the yttrium activation method for monitoring of the neutron generator.

  2. Greenhouse gas emission rate estimates from airborne remote sensing in the short-wave infrared

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krings, Thomas

    2013-01-30

    The quantification of emissions of the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and methane (CH{sub 4}) is essential for attributing the roles of anthropogenic activity and natural phenomena in global climate change. The current measurement systems and networks, whilst having improved during the last decades, are deficient in many respects. For example, the emissions from localised and point sources such as fossil fuel exploration sites are not readily assessed. A tool developed to better understand point sources of CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} is the optical remote sensing instrument MAMAP, operated from aircraft. With a ground scene size of the order of 50m and a relative accuracy of the column-averaged dry air mole fractions of about 0.3% for XCO{sub 2} and less than 0.4% for XCH{sub 4}, MAMAP can make a significant contribution in this respect. Detailed sensitivity studies showed that the modified WFM-DOAS retrieval algorithm used for MAMAP has an approximate accuracy of about 0.24% for XCH{sub 4} and XCO{sub 2} in typical atmospheric conditions. At the example of CO{sub 2} plumes from two different power plants and CH{sub 4} plumes from coal mine ventilation shafts, two inversion approaches to obtain emission rates were developed and tested. One is based on an optimal estimation scheme to fit Gaussian plume models from multiple sources to the data and the other is based on a simple Gaussian integral method. Compared to CO{sub 2} emission estimates as reported by the power plants' operator within the framework of emission databases (24 and 13 MtCO{sub 2} yr{sup -1}), the results of the individual inversion techniques were within ±10% with uncertainties of ±20-30% mainly due to insufficient wind information and non-stationary atmospheric conditions. Measurements at the coal mine included on-site wind observations by an aircraft turbulence probe that could be utilised to calibrate the wind model. In this case, the inversion results have a bias of less than 1

  3. Measuring Transpiration to Regulate Winter Irrigation Rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samuelson, Lisa [Auburn University

    2006-11-08

    Periodic transpiration (monthly sums) in a young loblolly pine plantation between ages 3 and 6 was measured using thermal dissipation probes. Fertilization and fertilization with irrigation were better than irrigation alone in increasing transpiration of young loblolly pines during winter months, apparently because of increased leaf area in fertilized trees. Irrigation alone did not significantly increase transpiration compared with the non-fertilized and non-irrigated control plots.

  4. Measurement of photoemission and secondary emission from laboratory dust grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazelton, Robert C.; Yadlowsky, Edward J.; Settersten, Thomas B.; Spanjers, Gregory G.; Moschella, John J.

    1995-01-01

    The overall goal of this project is experimentally determine the emission properties of dust grains in order to provide theorists and modelers with an accurate data base to use in codes that predict the charging of grains in various plasma environments encountered in the magnetospheres of the planets. In general these modelers use values which have been measured on planar, bulk samples of the materials in question. The large enhancements expected due to the small size of grains can have a dramatic impact upon the predictions and the ultimate utility of these predictions. The first experimental measurement of energy resolved profiles of the secondary electron emission coefficient, 6, of sub-micron diameter particles has been accomplished. Bismuth particles in the size range of .022 to .165 micrometers were generated in a moderate pressure vacuum oven (average size is a function of oven temperature and pressure) and introduced into a high vacuum chamber where they interacted with a high energy electron beam (0.4 to 20 keV). Large enhancements in emission were observed with a peak value, delta(sub max) = 4. 5 measured for the ensemble of particles with a mean size of .022 micrometers. This is in contrast to the published value, delta(sub max) = 1.2, for bulk bismuth. The observed profiles are in general agreement with recent theoretical predictions made by Chow et al. at UCSD.

  5. Acoustic emission measurement on large scale coils at JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, K.; Hattori, Y.; Nishi, M.F.; Shimamoto, S.; Tsuji, H.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of acoustic emission measurement at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) is an establishment of a general diagnostic method for superconducting magnet systems. Output of strain and displacement gages can not cover a whole system in monitoring premonitory phenomena of a magnet system s failure, because these sensors are mounted on points and therefore localized. Acoustic emissions can be transmitted to sensors through structural materials without electrical noise. Monitoring of acoustic emission will be one of the methods to predict a serious failure of magnet systems in a vacuum vessel. For this purpose, several sensors were installed on the Japanese LCT coil and the Test Module Coil (TMC). Some of acoustic activity was similar as seen in these coils. The correlation between voltage spikes and acoustic events is excellent during single coil charging mode, but poorer during out of plane force mode. There are no indicative acoustical phenomena before a magnet quench or during normal zone generation. The conditioning of acoustic events and voltage spikes can be seen after any cooling down. The localization of electrical insulation damage with the acoustic emission technique is one of its most useful applications

  6. Spectral emission measurements of lithium on the lithium tokamak experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, T. K.; Biewer, T. M.; Maingi, R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Boyle, D. P.; Granstedt, E. M.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R. P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    There has been a long-standing collaboration between ORNL and PPPL on edge and boundary layer physics. As part of this collaboration, ORNL has a large role in the instrumentation and interpretation of edge physics in the lithium tokamak experiment (LTX). In particular, a charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CHERS) diagnostic is being designed and undergoing staged testing on LTX. Here we present results of passively measured lithium emission at 5166.89 A in LTX in anticipation of active spectroscopy measurements, which will be enabled by the installation of a neutral beam in 2013. Preliminary measurements are made in transient LTX plasmas with plasma current, I{sub p} < 70 kA, ohmic heating power, P{sub oh}{approx} 0.3 MW and discharge lifetimes of 10-15 ms. Measurements are made with a short focal length spectrometer and optics similar to the CHERS diagnostics on NSTX [R. E. Bell, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 68(2), 1273-1280 (1997)]. These preliminary measurements suggest that even without the neutral beam for active spectroscopy, there is sufficient passive lithium emission to allow for line-of-sight profile measurements of ion temperature, T{sub i}; toroidal velocity and v{sub t}. Results show peak T{sub i} = 70 eV and peak v{sub t} = 45 km/s were reached 10 ms into the discharge.

  7. Time interval measurement between to emission: a systematics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bizard, G.; Bougault, R.; Brou, R.; Colin, J.; Durand, D.; Genoux-Lubain, A.; Horn, D.; Kerambrun, A.; Laville, J.L.; Le Brun, C.; Lecolley, J.F.; Lopez, O.; Louvel, M.; Mahi, M.; Meslin, C.; Steckmeyer, J.C.; Tamain, B.; Wieloch, A.

    1998-01-01

    A systematic study of the evolution of intervals of fragment emission times as a function of the energy deposited in the compound system was performed. Several measurements, Ne at 60 MeV/u, Ar at 30 and 60 MeV/u and two measurements for Kr at 60 MeV/u (central and semi-peripheral collisions) are presented. In all the experiments the target was Au and the mass of the compounds system was around A = 200. The excitation energies per nucleon reached in the case of these heavy systems cover the range of 3 to 5.5 MeV/u. The method used to determine the emission time intervals is based on the correlation functions associated to the relative angle distributions. The gaps between the data and simulations allow to evaluate the emission times. A rapid decrease of these time intervals was observed when the excitation energy increased. This variation starts at 500 fm/c which corresponds to a sequential emission. This relatively long time which indicates a weak interaction between fragments, corresponds practically to the measurement threshold. The shortest intervals (about 50 fm/c) are associated to a spontaneous multifragmentation and were observed in the case of central collisions at Ar+Au and Kr+Au at 60 MeV/u. Two interpretations are possible. The multifragmentation process might be viewed as a sequential process of very short time-separation or else, one can separate two zones heaving in mind that the multifragmentation is predominant from 4,5 MeV/u excitation energy upwards. This question is still open and its study is under way at LPC. An answer could come from the study of the rupture process of an excited nucleus, notably by the determination of its life-time

  8. Effect of limiter recycling on measured poloidal impurity emission profiles in Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogan, J.; DeMichelis, C.; Monier-Garbet, P.; Becoulet, M.; Bush, C.; Ghendrih, P.; Guirlet, R.; Hess, W.; Mattioli, M.; Vallet, J.C.

    2001-01-01

    Poloidal impurity emission profiles measured with the Tore Supra grazing incidence duochromator exhibit a complex spatial structure during ergodic divertor operation with an outboard poloidal guard limiter. As previous measurements with inboard-wall limited plasmas have shown that these profiles give important information about the ergodic field structure, so the contribution of local neon recycling from the limiter-induced plume has been modeled. This permits a discrimination of edge and core transport effects. The BBQ 3D scrape-off layer code calculates the asymmetric contribution to the emission and MIST 1D simulation gives the symmetric part. A systematic increase is observed in the decay rate of neon emission after injection as the ergodic divertor strength is increased. The calculations permit identification of the limiter plume contribution to the profile structure, and, with this identification, the effect of the divertor to enhance impurity efflux can be seen from the decay data

  9. Mobile measurement of methane emissions from natural gas developments in northeastern British Columbia, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atherton, Emmaline; Risk, David; Fougère, Chelsea; Lavoie, Martin; Marshall, Alex; Werring, John; Williams, James P.; Minions, Christina

    2017-10-01

    North American leaders recently committed to reducing methane emissions from the oil and gas sector, but information on current emissions from upstream oil and gas developments in Canada are lacking. This study examined the occurrence of methane plumes in an area of unconventional natural gas development in northwestern Canada. In August to September 2015 we completed almost 8000 km of vehicle-based survey campaigns on public roads dissecting oil and gas infrastructure, such as well pads and processing facilities. We surveyed six routes 3-6 times each, which brought us past over 1600 unique well pads and facilities managed by more than 50 different operators. To attribute on-road plumes to oil- and gas-related sources we used gas signatures of residual excess concentrations (anomalies above background) less than 500 m downwind from potential oil and gas emission sources. All results represent emissions greater than our minimum detection limit of 0.59 g s-1 at our average detection distance (319 m). Unlike many other oil and gas developments in the US for which methane measurements have been reported recently, the methane concentrations we measured were close to normal atmospheric levels, except inside natural gas plumes. Roughly 47 % of active wells emitted methane-rich plumes above our minimum detection limit. Multiple sites that pre-date the recent unconventional natural gas development were found to be emitting, and we observed that the majority of these older wells were associated with emissions on all survey repeats. We also observed emissions from gas processing facilities that were highly repeatable. Emission patterns in this area were best explained by infrastructure age and type. Extrapolating our results across all oil and gas infrastructure in the Montney area, we estimate that the emission sources we located (emitting at a rate > 0.59 g s-1) contribute more than 111 800 t of methane annually to the atmosphere. This value exceeds reported bottom

  10. Control of spontaneous emission rate in luminescent resonant diamond particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savelev, R.; Zalogina, A.; Kudryashov, S.; Ivanova, A.; Levchenko, A.; Makarov, S.; Zuev, D.; Shadrivov, I.

    2018-01-01

    We study the properties of luminescent diamond particles of different sizes (up to ~1.5 μm) containing multiple NV-centers. We theoretically predict that the average liftetime in such particles is decreased by several times as compared to optically small subwavelength nanodiamonds. In our experiments, samples were obtained by milling the plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited diamond film, and characterized by Raman spectroscopy and dark- field spectroscopy methods. Time-resolved luminescence measurements of the excited state of NV-centers showed that their average lifetime varies from 10 to 17 ns in different samples. By comparing this data to the values of the lifetime of the NV-centers in optically small nanodiamonds, known from literature, we confirm a severalfold decrease of the lifetime in resonant particles.

  11. Preliminary results of rocket attitude and auroral green line emission rate in the DELTA campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwagami, Naomoto; Komada, Sayaka; Takahashi, Takao

    2006-09-01

    The attitude of a sounding rocket launched in the DELTA (Dynamics and Energetics of the Lower Thermosphere in Aurora) campaign was determined with IR horizon sensors and geomagnetic sensors. Since the payload was separated into two portions, two sets of attitude sensors were needed. A new IR sensor was developed for the present experiment, and found the zenith-angle of the spin-axis of the rocket with an accuracy of 2°. By combining information obtained by both type of sensors, the absolute attitudes were determined. The auroral green line emission rate was measured by a photometer on board the same rocket launched under active auroral conditions, and the energy flux of the auroral particle precipitation was estimated.

  12. Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Emissions from California based on 2010 CalNex Airborne Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, B.; Miller, S.; Kort, E. A.; Santoni, G. W.; Daube, B.; Commane, R.; Angevine, W. M.; Ryerson, T. B.; Trainer, M.; Andrews, A. E.; Nehrkorn, T.; Tian, H.; Wofsy, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important gas for climate and for stratospheric chemistry, with an atmospheric lifetime exceeding 100 years. Global concentrations have increased steadily since the 18th century, apparently due to human-associated emissions, principally from application of nitrogen fertilizers. However, quantitative studies of agricultural emissions at large spatial scales are lacking, inhibited by the difficulty of measuring small enhancements of atmospheric concentrations. Here we derive regional emission rates for N2O in the Central Valley of California, based on analysis of in-situ airborne atmospheric observations collected using a quantum cascade laser spectrometer. The data were obtained on board the NOAA P-3 research aircraft during the CalNex (California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change) program in May and June, 2010. We coupled WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting) model to STILT (Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport) to link our in-situ observations to surface emissions, and then used a variety of statistical methods to identify source areas and to extract optimized emission rates from the inversion. Our results support the view that fertilizer application is the largest source of N2O in the Central Valley. But the spatial distribution of derived surface emissions, based on California land use and activity maps, was very different than indicated in the leading emissions inventory (EDGAR 4.0), and our estimated total emission flux of N2O for California during the study period was 3 - 4 times larger than EDGAR and other inventories.

  13. Update on NOx measuring methods and emission levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, N.; Desprets, M.

    1997-01-01

    The survey was carried out in 1995 to update the NO x report prepared for presentation at the 19th World Gas Conference held in Milan in 1994 and drawn out on the basis of the information obtained through the survey carried out in 1992. Over the past three years the work on standard developments and/or improvements on NO x emissions has progressed in several IGU member countries. For example, in Europe a report on 'Determination of emissions from appliances burning gaseous fuels during type-testing' was drafted by European Committee for Standardization (CEN) in March 1994 as 'CR 1404 : 1994'. This report is based on the work so far carried out within MARCOGAZ, and it is expected that the NO x measuring methods specified in this report would be finally introduced into relevant gas appliance standards issued by CEN for type-testing of gas appliances covered by this report. (au)

  14. The Indianapolis Flux Experiment (INFLUX: A test-bed for developing urban greenhouse gas emission measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth J. Davis

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the Indianapolis Flux Experiment (INFLUX is to develop, evaluate and improve methods for measuring greenhouse gas (GHG emissions from cities. INFLUX’s scientific objectives are to quantify CO2 and CH4 emission rates at 1 km2 resolution with a 10% or better accuracy and precision, to determine whole-city emissions with similar skill, and to achieve high (weekly or finer temporal resolution at both spatial resolutions. The experiment employs atmospheric GHG measurements from both towers and aircraft, atmospheric transport observations and models, and activity-based inventory products to quantify urban GHG emissions. Multiple, independent methods for estimating urban emissions are a central facet of our experimental design. INFLUX was initiated in 2010 and measurements and analyses are ongoing. To date we have quantified urban atmospheric GHG enhancements using aircraft and towers with measurements collected over multiple years, and have estimated whole-city CO2 and CH4 emissions using aircraft and tower GHG measurements, and inventory methods. Significant differences exist across methods; these differences have not yet been resolved; research to reduce uncertainties and reconcile these differences is underway. Sectorally- and spatially-resolved flux estimates, and detection of changes of fluxes over time, are also active research topics. Major challenges include developing methods for distinguishing anthropogenic from biogenic CO2 fluxes, improving our ability to interpret atmospheric GHG measurements close to urban GHG sources and across a broader range of atmospheric stability conditions, and quantifying uncertainties in inventory data products. INFLUX data and tools are intended to serve as an open resource and test bed for future investigations. Well-documented, public archival of data and methods is under development in support of this objective.

  15. Steep Hard-X-ray Spectra Indicate Extremely High Accretion Rates in Weak Emission-Line Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlar, Andrea; Shemmer, Ohad; Anderson, Scott F.; Brandt, W. Niel; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Fan, Xiaohui; Luo, Bin; Plotkin, Richard; Richards, Gordon T.; Schneider, Donald P.; Wu, Jianfeng

    2018-06-01

    We present XMM-Newton imaging spectroscopy of ten weak emission-line quasars (WLQs) at 0.928 ≤ z ≤ 3.767, six of which are radio quiet and four which are radio intermediate. The new X-ray data enabled us to measure the hard-X-ray power-law photon index (Γ) in each source with relatively high accuracy. These measurements allowed us to confirm previous reports that WLQs have steeper X-ray spectra, therefore indicating higher accretion rates with respect to "typical" quasars. A comparison between the Γ values of our radio-quiet WLQs and those of a carefully-selected, uniform sample of 84 quasars shows that the first are significantly higher, at the ≥ 3σ level. Collectively, the four radio-intermediate WLQs have lower Γ values with respect to the six radio-quiet WLQs, as may be expected if the spectra of the first group are contaminated by X-ray emission from a jet. These results suggest that, in the absence of significant jet emission along our line of sight, WLQs constitute the extreme high end of the accretion rate distribution in quasars. We detect soft excess emission in our lowest-redshift radio-quiet WLQ, in agreement with previous findings suggesting that the prominence of this feature is associated with a high accretion rate. We have not detected signatures of Compton reflection, Fe Kα lines, or strong variability between two X-ray epochs in any of our WLQs.

  16. Heat-induced electron emission in paraelectric phase of triglycine sulfate heated with great rate

    CERN Document Server

    Sidorkin, A A; Rogazinskaya, O V; Milovidova, S D

    2002-01-01

    One recorded experimentally heat-induced electron emission in ferroelectric triglycine sulfate (TGS) crystal within temperature range exceeding the Curie point by 10-15 K. One studied cases of q = dT/dt various rates of linear heating of specimens of TGS nominally pure crystal and TGS crystal with chromium impurity. Increase of heating rate is shown to result in increase of emission current density within the whole investigated range of temperatures. Temperature of emission occurrence depends on q rate negligibly. At the same time, temperature of emission disappearance monotonically increases with q growth. At q below 1 K/min it is localized below the Curie point. At q = 4-5 K/min the mentioned temperature reaches 60-65 deg C. In TGS crystal with chromium impurity the temperature of emission occurrence is close to the case of pure TGS. In this case, the range of emission drawing in paraphase here is by about 2 times narrower in contrast to the case of pure TGS heated with the same rate

  17. Multi-decadal satellite measurements of passive and eruptive volcanic SO2 emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carn, Simon; Yang, Kai; Krotkov, Nickolay; Prata, Fred; Telling, Jennifer

    2015-04-01

    strongest volcanic SO2 sources between 2004 and 2015. OMI measurements are most sensitive to SO2 emission rates on the order of ~1000 tons/day or more, and thus the satellite data provide new constraints on the location and persistence of major volcanic SO2 sources. We find that OMI has detected non-eruptive SO2 emissions from at least ~60 volcanoes since 2004. Results of our analysis reveal the emergence of several major tropospheric SO2 sources that are not prominent in existing inventories (Ambrym, Nyiragongo, Turrialba, Ubinas), the persistence of some well-known sources (Etna, Kilauea) and a possible decline in emissions at others (e.g., Lascar). The OMI measurements provide particularly valuable information in regions lacking regular ground-based monitoring such as Indonesia, Melanesia and Kamchatka. We describe how the OMI measurements of SO2 total column, and their probability density function, can be used to infer SO2 emission rates for compatibility with existing emissions data and assimilation into chemical transport models. The satellite-derived SO2 emission rates are in good agreement with ground-based measurements from frequently monitored volcanoes (e.g., from the NOVAC network), but differ for other volcanoes. We conclude that some ground-based SO2 measurements may be biased high if collected during periods of elevated unrest, and hence may not be representative of long-term average emissions.

  18. Real-time emission factor measurements of isocyanic acid from light duty gasoline vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, James M; Crisp, Timia A; Collier, Sonya; Kuwayama, Toshihiro; Forestieri, Sara D; Perraud, Véronique; Zhang, Qi; Kleeman, Michael J; Cappa, Christopher D; Bertram, Timothy H

    2014-10-07

    Exposure to gas-phase isocyanic acid (HNCO) has been previously shown to be associated with the development of atherosclerosis, cataracts and rheumatoid arthritis. As such, accurate emission inventories for HNCO are critical for modeling the spatial and temporal distribution of HNCO on a regional and global scale. To date, HNCO emission rates from light duty gasoline vehicles, operated under driving conditions, have not been determined. Here, we present the first measurements of real-time emission factors of isocyanic acid from a fleet of eight light duty gasoline-powered vehicles (LDGVs) tested on a chassis dynamometer using the Unified Driving Cycle (UC) at the California Air Resources Board (CARB) Haagen-Smit test facility, all of which were equipped with three-way catalytic converters. HNCO emissions were observed from all vehicles, in contrast to the idealized laboratory measurements. We report the tested fleet averaged HNCO emission factors, which depend strongly on the phase of the drive cycle; ranging from 0.46 ± 0.13 mg kg fuel(-1) during engine start to 1.70 ± 1.77 mg kg fuel(-1) during hard acceleration after the engine and catalytic converter were warm. The tested eight-car fleet average fuel based HNCO emission factor was 0.91 ± 0.58 mg kg fuel(-1), within the range previously estimated for light duty diesel-powered vehicles (0.21-3.96 mg kg fuel(-1)). Our results suggest that HNCO emissions from LDGVs represent a significant emission source in urban areas that should be accounted for in global and regional models.

  19. Instrument for benzene and toluene emission measurements of glycol regenerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanyecz, Veronika; Szabó, Gábor; Mohácsi, Árpád; Puskás, Sándor; Vágó, Árpád

    2013-01-01

    We introduce an in-field and in-explosive atmosphere useable instrument, which can measure the benzene and toluene concentration in two gas and two glycol samples produced by natural gas dehydration units. It is a two-phase, on-line gas chromatograph with a photoacoustic spectroscopy based detector. The time resolution is 10 min per cycle and the minimum detectable concentrations are 2 mg m −3 for benzene, 3 mg m −3 for toluene in natural gas, and 5 g m −3 for benzene and 6 g m −3 for toluene in glycol. Test measurements were carried out at a dehydration plant belonging to MOL Hungarian Oil and Gas Company. Benzene and toluene emissions of gas dehydration unit are calculated from the measured values based on mass balance of a glycol regenerator. The relationship between the outdoor temperature and the measured concentration was observed which is caused by temperature-dependent operation of the whole dehydration unit. Emission decreases with increase of outdoor temperature. (paper)

  20. Measurements and modeling to quantify emissions of methane and VOCs from shale gas operations: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Presto, Albert A [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2017-06-30

    The objectives of the project were to determine the leakage rates of methane and ozone-forming Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) and the emission rates of air toxics from Marcellus shale gas activities. Methane emissions in the Marcellus Shale region were differentiated between “newer” sources associated with shale gas development and “older” sources associated with coal or conventional natural gas exploration. This project conducted measurements of methane and VOC emissions from both shale and non-shale natural gas resources. The initial scope of the project was the Marcellus Shale basin, and measurements were conducted in both the western wet gas regions (southwest PA and WV) and eastern dry gas region (northeast PA) of the basin. During this project, we obtained additional funding from other agencies to expand the scope of measurements to include additional basins. The data from both the Marcellus and other basins were combined to construct a national analysis of methane emissions from oil & gas production activities.

  1. Implementation of Portable Emissions Measurement Systems (PEMS) for the Real-driving Emissions (RDE) Regulation in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giechaskiel, Barouch; Vlachos, Theodoros; Riccobono, Francesco; Forni, Fausto; Colombo, Rinaldo; Montigny, Francois; Le-Lijour, Philippe; Carriero, Massimo; Bonnel, Pierre; Weiss, Martin

    2016-12-04

    Vehicles are tested in controlled and relatively narrow laboratory conditions to determine their official emission values and reference fuel consumption. However, on the road, ambient and driving conditions can vary over a wide range, sometimes causing emissions to be higher than those measured in the laboratory. For this reason, the European Commission has developed a complementary Real-Driving Emissions (RDE) test procedure using the Portable Emissions Measurement Systems (PEMS) to verify gaseous pollutant and particle number emissions during a wide range of normal operating conditions on the road. This paper presents the newly-adopted RDE test procedure, differentiating six steps: 1) vehicle selection, 2) vehicle preparation, 3) trip design, 4) trip execution, 5) trip verification, and 6) calculation of emissions. Of these steps, vehicle preparation and trip execution are described in greater detail. Examples of trip verification and the calculations of emissions are given.

  2. Prescribed Grassland Burning Smoke Emission Measurements in the Northern Flint Hills Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, J. L.; Baker, K. R.; Landis, M.; Aurell, J.; Gullett, B.

    2017-12-01

    Historically, frequent wildfires were essential for the maintenance of native prairie fire adapted ecosystems. Today prescribed fires are used to control invasive woody species and potentially improve forage production in these same prairie ecosystems for the beef-cattle industry. The emission of primary particulate matter, secondary aerosol, ozone precursors, and air toxics from prescribed grassland burning operations has been implicated as drivers of downwind air quality problems across a multi-state area. A field study has been planned to quantify prescribed burn smoke emissions using both surface and aerial sampling platforms to better constrain emissions rates for organic and inorganic pollutants. Multiple prescribed burns on tallgrass prairie fields in the northern Flint Hills ecoregion are planned for March 2017 at the Konza Prairie Biological Station in Kansas. An array of measurement systems will be deployed to quantify a suite of continuous and integrated air pollution parameters, combustion conditions, meteorological parameters, and plume dynamics to calculate more accurate and condition-specific emission factors that will be used to better predict primary and secondary pollutants both locally and regionally. These emissions measurements will allow for evaluation and improvement of the U.S. Forest Service's Bluesky modeling framework which includes the Fire Emission Production Simulator (FEPS) and Fuel characterization classification system (FCCS). Elucidating grassland prescribed burning emission factors based on fuel type, loading, and environmental conditions is expected to provide an improved understanding of the impact of this land management practice on air quality in the greater Flint Hills region. It is also expected that measurements will be made to help constrain and develop better routines for fire plume rise, vertical allocation, and smoke optical properties.

  3. A global gas flaring black carbon emission rate dataset from 1994 to 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kan; Fu, Joshua S.

    2016-11-01

    Global flaring of associated petroleum gas is a potential emission source of particulate matters (PM) and could be notable in some specific regions that are in urgent need of mitigation. PM emitted from gas flaring is mainly in the form of black carbon (BC), which is a strong short-lived climate forcer. However, BC from gas flaring has been neglected in most global/regional emission inventories and is rarely considered in climate modeling. Here we present a global gas flaring BC emission rate dataset for the period 1994-2012 in a machine-readable format. We develop a region-dependent gas flaring BC emission factor database based on the chemical compositions of associated petroleum gas at various oil fields. Gas flaring BC emission rates are estimated using this emission factor database and flaring volumes retrieved from satellite imagery. Evaluation using a chemical transport model suggests that consideration of gas flaring emissions can improve model performance. This dataset will benefit and inform a broad range of research topics, e.g., carbon budget, air quality/climate modeling, and environmental/human exposure.

  4. Differential neutrino rates and emissivities from the plasma process in astrophysical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratkovic, Sasa; Iyer Dutta, Sharada; Prakash, Madappa

    2003-01-01

    The differential rates and emissivities of neutrino pairs from an equilibrium plasma are calculated for the wide range of density and temperature encountered in astrophysical systems. New analytical expressions are derived for the differential emissivities which yield total emissivities in full agreement with those previously calculated. The photon and plasmon pair production and absorption kernels in the source term of the Boltzmann equation for neutrino transport are provided. The appropriate Legendre coefficients of these kernels, in forms suitable for multi-group flux-limited diffusion schemes are also computed

  5. The ARTEMIS European driving cycles for measuring car pollutant emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, Michel

    2004-12-01

    In the past 10 years, various work has been undertaken to collect data on the actual driving of European cars and to derive representative real-world driving cycles. A compilation and synthesis of this work is provided in this paper. In the frame of the European research project: ARTEMIS, this work has been considered to derive a set of reference driving cycles. The main objectives were as follows: to derive a common set of reference real-world driving cycles to be used in the frame of the ARTEMIS project but also in the frame of on-going national campaigns of pollutant emission measurements, to ensure the compatibility and integration of all the resulting emission data in the European systems of emission inventory; to ensure and validate the representativity of the database and driving cycles by comparing and taking into account all the available data regarding driving conditions; to include in three real-world driving cycles (urban, rural road and motorway) the diversity of the observed driving conditions, within sub-cycles allowing a disaggregation of the emissions according to more specific driving conditions (congested and free-flow urban). Such driving cycles present a real advantage as they are derived from a large database, using a methodology that was widely discussed and approved. In the main, these ARTEMIS driving cycles were designed using the available data, and the method of analysis was based to some extent on previous work. Specific steps were implemented. The study includes characterisation of driving conditions and vehicle uses. Starting conditions and gearbox use are also taken into account.

  6. Multi-source SO2 emission retrievals and consistency of satellite and surface measurements with reported emissions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fioletov, V.; McLinden, C.A.; Kharol, S.K.; Krotkov, N.A.; Li, C.; Joiner, J.; Moran, M.D.; Vet, R.; Visschedijk, A.J.H.; Denier Van Der Gon, H.A.C.

    2017-01-01

    Reported sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions from US and Canadian sources have declined dramatically since the 1990s as a result of emission control measures. Observations from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on NASA's Aura satellite and ground-based in situ measurements are examined to verify

  7. Comparison of facility-level methane emission rates from natural gas production well pads in the Marcellus, Denver-Julesburg, and Uintah Basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omara, M.; Li, X.; Sullivan, M.; Subramanian, R.; Robinson, A. L.; Presto, A. A.

    2015-12-01

    The boom in shale natural gas (NG) production, brought about by advances in horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing, has yielded both economic benefits and concerns about environmental and climate impacts. In particular, leakages of methane from the NG supply chain could substantially increase the carbon footprint of NG, diminishing its potential role as a transition fuel between carbon intensive fossil fuels and renewable energy systems. Recent research has demonstrated significant variability in measured methane emission rates from NG production facilities within a given shale gas basin. This variability often reflect facility-specific differences in NG production capacity, facility age, utilization of emissions capture and control, and/or the level of facility inspection and maintenance. Across NG production basins, these differences in facility-level methane emission rates are likely amplified, especially if significant variability in NG composition and state emissions regulations are present. In this study, we measured methane emission rates from the NG production sector in the Marcellus Shale Basin (Pennsylvania and West Virginia), currently the largest NG production basin in the U.S., and contrast these results with those of the Denver-Julesburg (Colorado) and Uintah (Utah) shale basins. Facility-level methane emission rates were measured at 106 NG production facilities using the dual tracer flux (nitrous oxide and acetylene), Gaussian dispersion simulations, and the OTM 33A techniques. The distribution of facility-level average methane emission rate for each NG basin will be discussed, with emphasis on how variability in NG composition (i.e., ethane-to-methane ratios) and state emissions regulations impact measured methane leak rates. While the focus of this presentation will be on the comparison of methane leak rates among NG basins, the use of three complimentary top-down methane measurement techniques provides a unique opportunity to explore the

  8. Measurements of the Spectral Light Emission from Decaying High Pressure Helium Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevefelt, J; Johansson, J

    1971-04-15

    The rate of electron density decay has been determined in a helium pulsed discharge plasma at pressures ranging from 100 to 600 Torr, primarily during the early afterglow where the electron density is from 1019 to 2 x 1017/m3. Measurements of the electrical conductivity and the absolute intensity of the light emission were made. The effective recombination rate coefficient was found to increase faster than linearly with gas pressure. The total photon emission rate was significantly lower than the effective recombination rate. Below 400 Torr pressure the afterglow was dominated by He-bands, which were related to the recombination of He{sub 2+} and He{sub 3+} ions. At higher pressures the appearance of intense lines originating from the atomic n = 3 and 23 P states is proposed to result from the He{sub 4+} recombination. Absorption measurements of the atomic metastable concentration gave evidence for recombination directly into the 23 S state. The concentration of molecular metastables was surprisingly low. The light emission had a Techi dependence, with 0 < chi < 0.35 for the intense atomic lines and 0.78 < chi < 1.10 for the molecular bands

  9. Measurements of the Spectral Light Emission from Decaying High Pressure Helium Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevefelt, J.; Johansson, J.

    1971-04-01

    The rate of electron density decay has been determined in a helium pulsed discharge plasma at pressures ranging from 100 to 600 Torr, primarily during the early afterglow where the electron density is from 10 19 to 2 x 10 17 /m 3 . Measurements of the electrical conductivity and the absolute intensity of the light emission were made. The effective recombination rate coefficient was found to increase faster than linearly with gas pressure. The total photon emission rate was significantly lower than the effective recombination rate. Below 400 Torr pressure the afterglow was dominated by He-bands, which were related to the recombination of He 2 + and He 3 + ions. At higher pressures the appearance of intense lines originating from the atomic n = 3 and 2 3 P states is proposed to result from the He 4 + recombination. Absorption measurements of the atomic metastable concentration gave evidence for recombination directly into the 2 3 S state. The concentration of molecular metastables was surprisingly low. The light emission had a T e χ dependence, with 0 < χ < 0.35 for the intense atomic lines and 0.78 < χ < 1.10 for the molecular bands

  10. Measurement of amplified spontaneous emission at 200 A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceglio, N.M.

    1985-01-01

    Recent interest in the production of laser radiation at soft x-ray wavelengths makes appropriate the discussion of diagnostic considerations and techniques for the measurement of same. A source of soft x-ray ASE has a number of characteristics which drive the design of diagnostic instruments: (1) the anisotropy of the ASE makes target alignment a critical part of the diagnosis, and couples collection solid angle to S/N considerations in the measurement; (2) the narrow linewidth of the amplified emission and its long wavelength put a high S/N premium on spectroscopic instrumentation of high spectral resolution and good higher-order discrimination; (3) the specialized plasma conditions required to produce gain are typically short lived, requiring time-resolved or at least time-discriminating spectroscopy; (4) the nonlinear nature of the threshold processes involved in ASE requires instrumentation of large dynamic range, broad angular acceptance, and large field of view and depth of focus. Of the many possible methods for gain verification of the x-ray source, five are discussed: (1) probe amplification; (2) spatial coherence measurement (as a function of gain length); (3) output intensity measurement (absolute measurement and nonlinear variation with gain length); (4) divergence measurement; and (5) cavity formation. In addition, recent soft x-ray laser experiments at LLNL are discussed along with descriptions of the instruments used to measure the ASE. Diagnostic design suggestions for future soft x-ray laser experiments are also presented

  11. Characterization of emissions from a desktop 3D printer and indoor air measurements in office settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinle, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Emissions from a desktop 3D printer based on fused deposition modeling (FDM) technology were measured in a test chamber and indoor air was monitored in office settings. Ultrafine aerosol (UFA) emissions were higher while printing a standard object with polylactic acid (PLA) than with acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) polymer (2.1 × 10(9) vs. 2.4 × 10(8) particles/min). Prolonged use of the printer led to higher emission rates (factor 2 with PLA and 4 with ABS, measured after seven months of occasional use). UFA consisted mainly of volatile droplets, and some small (100-300 nm diameter) iron containing and soot-like particles were found. Emissions of inhalable and respirable dust were below the limit of detection (LOD) when measured gravimetrically, and only slightly higher than background when measured with an aerosol spectrometer. Emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) were in the range of 10 µg/min. Styrene accounted for more than 50% of total VOC emitted when printing with ABS; for PLA, methyl methacrylate (MMA, 37% of TVOC) was detected as the predominant compound. Two polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), fluoranthene and pyrene, were observed in very low amounts. All other analyzed PAH, as well as inorganic gases and metal emissions except iron (Fe) and zinc (Zn), were below the LOD or did not differ from background without printing. A single 3D print (165 min) in a large, well-ventilated office did not significantly increase the UFA and VOC concentrations, whereas these were readily detectable in a small, unventilated room, with UFA concentrations increasing by 2,000 particles/cm(3) and MMA reaching a peak of 21 µg/m(3) and still being detectable in the room even 20 hr after printing.

  12. Methods of Temperature and Emission Measure Determination of Coronal Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirtain, J. W.; Schmelz, J. T.; Martens, P. C. H.

    2002-05-01

    Recent observational results from both SOHO-EIT and TRACE indicate that coronal loops are isothermal along their length (axially). These results are obtained from a narrowband filter ratio method that assumes that the plasma is isothermal along the line of sight (radially). However, these temperatures vary greatly from those derived from differential emission measure (DEM) curves produced from spectral lines recorded by SOHO-CDS. The DEM results indicate that the loops are neither axially nor radially isothermal. This discrepancy was investigated by Schmelz et al. (2001). They chose pairs of iron lines from the same CDS data set to mimic the EIT and TRACE loop results. Ratios of different lines gave different temperatures, indicating that the plasma was not radially isothermal. In addition the results indicated that the loop was axially isothermal, even though the DEM analysis of the same data showed this result to be false. Here we have analyzed the EIT data for the CDS loop published by Schmelz et al. (2001). We took the ratios of the 171-to-195 and 195-to-284 filter data, and made temperature maps of the loop. The results indicate that the loop is axially isothermal, but different temperatures were found for each pair of filters. Both ratio techniques force the resultant temperature to lie within the range where the response functions (for filters) or the emissivity functions (for lines) overlap; isothermal loops are therefore a byproduct of the analysis. This conclusion strengthens support for the idea that temperature and emission measure results from filter ratio methods may be misleading or even drastically wrong. This research was funded in part by the NASA/TRACE MODA grant for Montana State University. Solar physics research at the University of Memphis is supported by NASA grant NAG5-9783.

  13. Vehicle-specific emissions modeling based upon on-road measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, H Christopher; Zhang, Kaishan; Rouphail, Nagui M

    2010-05-01

    Vehicle-specific microscale fuel use and emissions rate models are developed based upon real-world hot-stabilized tailpipe measurements made using a portable emissions measurement system. Consecutive averaging periods of one to three multiples of the response time are used to compare two semiempirical physically based modeling schemes. One scheme is based on internally observable variables (IOVs), such as engine speed and manifold absolute pressure, while the other is based on externally observable variables (EOVs), such as speed, acceleration, and road grade. For NO, HC, and CO emission rates, the average R(2) ranged from 0.41 to 0.66 for the former and from 0.17 to 0.30 for the latter. The EOV models have R(2) for CO(2) of 0.43 to 0.79 versus 0.99 for the IOV models. The models are sensitive to episodic events in driving cycles such as high acceleration. Intervehicle and fleet average modeling approaches are compared; the former account for microscale variations that might be useful for some types of assessments. EOV-based models have practical value for traffic management or simulation applications since IOVs usually are not available or not used for emission estimation.

  14. The case for refining bottom-up methane emission inventories using top-down measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Bryce F. J.; Iverach, Charlotte P.; Ginty, Elisa; Bashir, Safdar; Lowry, Dave; Fisher, Rebecca E.; France, James L.; Nisbet, Euan G.

    2017-04-01

    Bottom-up global methane emission estimates are important for guiding policy development and mitigation strategies. Such inventories enable rapid and consistent proportioning of emissions by industrial sectors and land use at various scales from city to country to global. There has been limited use of top-down measurements to guide refining emission inventories. Here we compare the EDGAR gridmap data version 4.2 with over 5000 km of daytime ground level mobile atmospheric methane surveys in eastern Australia. The landscapes and industries surveyed include: urban environments, dryland farming, intensive livestock farming (both beef and lamb), irrigation agriculture, open cut and underground coal mining, and coal seam gas production. Daytime mobile methane surveys over a 2-year period show that at the landscape scale there is a high level of repeatability for the mole fraction of methane measured in the ground level atmosphere. Such consistency in the mole fraction of methane indicates that these data can be used as a proxy for flux. A scatter plot of the EDGAR emission gridmap Log[ton substance / 0.1 degree x 0.1 degree / year] versus the median mole fraction of methane / 0.1 degree x 0.1 degree in the ground level atmosphere highlights that the extent of elevated methane emissions associated with coal mining in the Hunter coalfields, which covers an area of 56 km by 24 km, has been under-represented in the EDGAR input data. Our results also show that methane emissions from country towns (population poor information on the extent of urban gas leaks. Given the uncertainties associated with the base land use and industry data for each country, we generalise the Australian observations to the global inventory with caution. The extensive comparison of top-down measurements versus the EDGAR version 4.2 methane gridmaps highlights the need for adjustments to the base resource data and/or the emission factors applied for coal mining, especially emissions from underground

  15. Emission Rate of Particulate Matter and Its Removal Efficiency by Precipitators in Under-Fired Charbroiling Restaurants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Bok Lee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to explore the potent role of meat cooking processes as the emission sources of particulate matter (PM, emission rates and the associated removal efficiency by precipitators were estimated based on the on-site measurements made at five under-fired charbroiling (UFC restaurants. The emission patterns of PM for these five restaurants were compared after having been sorted into the main meat types used for cooking: beef (B, chicken (C, intestines (I, and pork (P: two sites. The mass concentrations (μg m-3 of three PM fractions (PM2.5/PM10/TSP measured from these restaurants were 15,510/15,701/17,175 (C; 8,525/10,760/12,676 (B; 11,027/13,249/13,488 (P; and 22,409/22,412/22,414 (I. Emission factors (g kg-1 for those PM fractions were also estimated as 3.23/4.08/4.80 (B, 3.07/3.82/3.87 (P, 8.12/8.22/8.99 (C, and 6.59/6.59/6.59 (I. If the annual emission rate of PM10 is extrapolated by combining its emission factor, population, activity factor, etc., it is estimated as 500 ton year-1, which corresponds to 2.4% of the PM10 budget in Seoul, Korea. Removal efficiencies of PM10 via precipitators, such as an electrostatic precipitator (ESP, bag filter (BF, and the combination system (ESP + catalyst, installed in those UFC restaurants ranged between 54.76 and 98.98%. The removal efficiency of PM by this control system was the least effective for particles with <0.4 μm, although those in the range of 0.4–10 μm were the most effective.

  16. Functional requirements document for measuring emissions of airborne radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glissmeyer, J.A.; Alvarez, J.L.; Hoover, M.D.; Newton, G.C.; McFarland, A.R.; Rodgers, J.C.

    1994-11-01

    This document states the general functional requirements for systems and procedures for measuring emissions of airborne radioactive materials from facilities administered by the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The following issues are addressed in this document: lg-bullet definition of the program objectives lg-bullet selection of the overall approach to collecting the samples lg-bullet sampling equipment design lg-bullet sampling equipment maintenance and quality assurance issues. The following issues are not addressed in this document: lg-bullet air sampling in work areas or containments lg-bullet selection of specific on-line sample monitoring instrumentation lg-bullet analyzing collected samples lg-bullet reporting and interpreting results. The document provides equipment design guidance that is performance based rather than prescriptive. Locations from which samples are obtained should exhibit mixing of the contaminants with the airstream and acceptable air flow characteristics. Sample collection equipment and effluent and sample flow elements should meet defined performance standards. Quality control and assurance requirements specific to sample collection, equipment inspection, and calibration are presented. Key sample collection performance requirements are summarized in Section 5.4. The intent of this document is to assist WHC in demonstrating a high quality of air emission measurements with verified system performance based on documented system design, testing, inspection, and maintenance

  17. Plant-specific volatile organic compound emission rates from young and mature leaves of Mediterranean vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracho-Nunez, Araceli; Welter, Saskia; Staudt, Michael; Kesselmeier, Jürgen

    2011-08-01

    The seasonality of vegetation, i.e., developmental stages and phenological processes, affects the emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Despite the potential significance, the contributions of seasonality to VOC emission quality and quantity are not well understood and are therefore often ignored in emission simulations. We investigated the VOC emission patterns of young and mature leaves of several Mediterranean plant species in relation to their physiological and developmental changes during the growing period and estimated Es. Foliar emissions of isoprenoids and oxygenated VOCs like methanol and acetone were measured online by means of a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) and offline with gas chromatography coupled with a mass spectrometer and flame ionization detector. The results suggest that VOC emission is a developmentally regulated process and that quantitative and qualitative variability is plant species specific. Leaf ontogeny clearly influenced both the VOC Es and the relative importance of different VOCs. Methanol was the major compound contributing to the sum of target VOC emissions in young leaves (11.8 ± 10.4 μg g-1 h-1), while its contribution was minor in mature leaves (4.1 ± 4.1 μg g-1 h-1). Several plant species showed a decrease or complete subsidence of monoterpene, sesquiterpene, and acetone emissions upon maturity, perhaps indicating a potential response to the higher defense demands of young emerging leaves.

  18. Road salt emissions: A comparison of measurements and modelling using the NORTRIP road dust emission model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denby, B. R.; Ketzel, M.; Ellermann, T.; Stojiljkovic, A.; Kupiainen, K.; Niemi, J. V.; Norman, M.; Johansson, C.; Gustafsson, M.; Blomqvist, G.; Janhäll, S.; Sundvor, I.

    2016-09-01

    De-icing of road surfaces is necessary in many countries during winter to improve vehicle traction. Large amounts of salt, most often sodium chloride, are applied every year. Most of this salt is removed through drainage or traffic spray processes but a certain amount may be suspended, after drying of the road surface, into the air and will contribute to the concentration of particulate matter. Though some measurements of salt concentrations are available near roads, the link between road maintenance salting activities and observed concentrations of salt in ambient air is yet to be quantified. In this study the NORTRIP road dust emission model, which estimates the emissions of both dust and salt from the road surface, is applied at five sites in four Nordic countries for ten separate winter periods where daily mean ambient air measurements of salt concentrations are available. The model is capable of reproducing many of the salt emission episodes, both in time and intensity, but also fails on other occasions. The observed mean concentration of salt in PM10, over all ten datasets, is 4.2 μg/m3 and the modelled mean is 2.8 μg/m3, giving a fractional bias of -0.38. The RMSE of the mean concentrations, over all 10 datasets, is 2.9 μg/m3 with an average R2 of 0.28. The mean concentration of salt is similar to the mean exhaust contribution during the winter periods of 2.6 μg/m3. The contribution of salt to the kerbside winter mean PM10 concentration is estimated to increase by 4.1 ± 3.4 μg/m3 for every kg/m2 of salt applied on the road surface during the winter season. Additional sensitivity studies showed that the accurate logging of salt applications is a prerequisite for predicting salt emissions, as well as good quality data on precipitation. It also highlights the need for more simultaneous measurements of salt loading together with ambient air concentrations to help improve model parameterisations of salt and moisture removal processes.

  19. Pressurized transient otoacoustic emissions measured using click and chirp stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Douglas H; Patrick Feeney, M; Hunter, Lisa L; Fitzpatrick, Denis F; Sanford, Chris A

    2018-01-01

    Transient-evoked otoacoustic emission (TEOAE) responses were measured in normal-hearing adult ears over frequencies from 0.7 to 8 kHz, and analyzed with reflectance/admittance data to measure absorbed sound power and the tympanometric peak pressure (TPP). The mean TPP was close to ambient. TEOAEs were measured in the ear canal at ambient pressure, TPP, and fixed air pressures from 150 to -200 daPa. Both click and chirp stimuli were used to elicit TEOAEs, in which the incident sound pressure level was constant across frequency. TEOAE levels were similar at ambient and TPP, and for frequencies from 0.7 to 2.8 kHz decreased with increasing positive and negative pressures. At 4-8 kHz, TEOAE levels were larger at positive pressures. This asymmetry is possibly related to changes in mechanical transmission through the ossicular chain. The mean TEOAE group delay did not change with pressure, although small changes were observed in the mean instantaneous frequency and group spread. Chirp TEOAEs measured in an adult ear with Eustachian tube dysfunction and TPP of -165 daPa were more robust at TPP than at ambient. Overall, results demonstrate the feasibility and clinical potential of measuring TEOAEs at fixed pressures in the ear canal, which provide additional information relative to TEOAEs measured at ambient pressure.

  20. Heart Rate Measures of Flight Test and Evaluation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bonner, Malcolm A; Wilson, Glenn F

    2001-01-01

    .... Because flying is a complex task, several measures are required to derive the best evaluation. This article describes the use of heart rate to augment the typical performance and subjective measures used in test and evaluation...

  1. Mechanical seal monitoring technique by acoustic emission measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kataoka, Tadashi; Fujita, Yoshihiro; Kawaguchi, Kazunori; Saito, Kazuhiro; Yokota, Setsuo; Hisada, Yasuhide; Masahiro, Komatsu

    1987-09-20

    This report describes a technique for mechanical seal monitoring through acoustic emission (AE) measurement. The equipment consists of an AE sensor, preamplifier, multiplexer, main amplifier, effective value transducer and computer system. When the sealed liquid pressure undergoes a large change, the seal surface configuration is monitored and evaluated accurately through AE measurement. If the mechanical seal surface id damaged or worn, the AE level is kept high or continues to fluctuate largely for a rather long period. When leak occurs, the AE value shows great fluctuations either at extremely low levels or at high levels. The former trend is considered to result from a decrease in solid contact due to an excessive amount of liquid film being formed at the seal surface during leak. In the latter case, the leak is attributed to severe damage to the seal surface. (18 figs, 1 tab, 5 photos, 3 refs)

  2. Air pollutant emission rates for sources at the Davis Canyon Repository site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-11-01

    This document summarizes the air-quality source terms used for the Davis Canyon, Utah environmental assessment report and explains their derivation. The engineering data supporting these source terms appear as appendixes to the report and include summary equipment lists for the repository (December, 1984) and detailed equipment lists for the exploratory shaft (June and July, 1985). Although substantial work has been performed in establishing the current repository design, a greater effort will be required for the final design. Consequently, the repository emission rates presented here should be considered as preliminary estimates. Another set of air pollutant emission rates will be calculated after design data are more firmly established. 19 refs., 18 tabs

  3. Air pollutant emission rates for sources at the Deaf Smith County repository site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-11-01

    This document summarizes the air-quality source terms used for the Deaf Smith County, Texas environmental assessment report and explains their derivation. The engineering data supporting these source terms appear as appendixes to this report and include summary equipment lists for the repository and detailed equipment lists for the exploratory shaft. Although substantial work has been performed in establishing the current repository design, a greater effort will be required for the final design. Consequently, the repository emission rates presented here should be considered as preliminary estimates. Another set of air pollution emission rates will be calculated after design data are more firmly established. 18 refs., 15 tabs

  4. Cavity-enhanced spontaneous emission rates for rhodamine 6-G in levitated microdroplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, M.D.; Whitten, W.B.; Ramsey, J.M.; Arnold, S.

    1992-01-01

    Fluorescence decay kinetics of Rhodamine 6-G molecules in levitated glycerol microdroplets (4--20 microns in diameter) have been investigated to determine the effects of spherical cavity resonances on spontaneous emission rates. For droplet diameters greater than 10 microns, the fluorescence lifetime is essentially the same as in bulk glycerol. As the droplet diameter is decreased below 10 microns, bi-exponential decay behavior is observed with a slow component whose rate is similar to bulk glycerol, and a fast component whose rate is as much as a factor of 10 larger than the bulk decay rate. This fast component is attributed to cavity enhancement of the spontaneous emission rate and, within the weak coupling approximation, a value for the homogeneous linewidth at room temperature can be estimated from the fluorescence lifetime data

  5. Development of an instrument for direct ozone production rate measurements: measurement reliability and current limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sklaveniti, Sofia; Locoge, Nadine; Stevens, Philip S.; Wood, Ezra; Kundu, Shuvashish; Dusanter, Sébastien

    2018-02-01

    Ground-level ozone (O3) is an important pollutant that affects both global climate change and regional air quality, with the latter linked to detrimental effects on both human health and ecosystems. Ozone is not directly emitted in the atmosphere but is formed from chemical reactions involving volatile organic compounds (VOCs), nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2) and sunlight. The photochemical nature of ozone makes the implementation of reduction strategies challenging and a good understanding of its formation chemistry is fundamental in order to develop efficient strategies of ozone reduction from mitigation measures of primary VOCs and NOx emissions. An instrument for direct measurements of ozone production rates (OPRs) was developed and deployed in the field as part of the IRRONIC (Indiana Radical, Reactivity and Ozone Production Intercomparison) field campaign. The OPR instrument is based on the principle of the previously published MOPS instrument (Measurement of Ozone Production Sensor) but using a different sampling design made of quartz flow tubes and a different Ox (O3 and NO2) conversion-detection scheme composed of an O3-to-NO2 conversion unit and a cavity attenuated phase shift spectroscopy (CAPS) NO2 monitor. Tests performed in the laboratory and in the field, together with model simulations of the radical chemistry occurring inside the flow tubes, were used to assess (i) the reliability of the measurement principle and (ii) potential biases associated with OPR measurements. This publication reports the first field measurements made using this instrument to illustrate its performance. The results showed that a photo-enhanced loss of ozone inside the sampling flow tubes disturbs the measurements. This issue needs to be solved to be able to perform accurate ambient measurements of ozone production rates with the instrument described in this study. However, an attempt was made to investigate the OPR sensitivity to NOx by adding NO inside the instrument

  6. Measurement of regional cerebral blood flow by positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herscovitch, P.; Powers, W.J.

    1987-01-01

    The principal advantage of positron emission tomography over other methods for measuring cerebral blood flow stems from the accurate, quantitative three-dimensional measurements of regional brain radioactivity that are possible with this technique. As a result, accurate quantitative measurements of regional cerebral blood flow can be obtained for both superficial and deep cerebral structures. The value of PET for investigating central nervous system physiology and pathology extends far beyond this, however. Through the use of different radiotracers and appropriate mathematical models, PET can be applied to the measurement of a wide variety of physiologic variables. Measurements of rCBF tell only part of the story. Experience with PET and with a variety of other techniques has taught us that rCBF is at times a poor indicator of the metabolic, functional, and biochemical status of cerebral tissue. It is only by understanding the interaction of all of these factors that our understanding of neurologic disease can advance. It is in the investigation of these complex relationships that the real value of PET resides

  7. Airborne remote sensing and in situ measurements of atmospheric CO2 to quantify point source emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krings, Thomas; Neininger, Bruno; Gerilowski, Konstantin; Krautwurst, Sven; Buchwitz, Michael; Burrows, John P.; Lindemann, Carsten; Ruhtz, Thomas; Schüttemeyer, Dirk; Bovensmann, Heinrich

    2018-02-01

    Reliable techniques to infer greenhouse gas emission rates from localised sources require accurate measurement and inversion approaches. In this study airborne remote sensing observations of CO2 by the MAMAP instrument and airborne in situ measurements are used to infer emission estimates of carbon dioxide released from a cluster of coal-fired power plants. The study area is complex due to sources being located in close proximity and overlapping associated carbon dioxide plumes. For the analysis of in situ data, a mass balance approach is described and applied, whereas for the remote sensing observations an inverse Gaussian plume model is used in addition to a mass balance technique. A comparison between methods shows that results for all methods agree within 10 % or better with uncertainties of 10 to 30 % for cases in which in situ measurements were made for the complete vertical plume extent. The computed emissions for individual power plants are in agreement with results derived from emission factors and energy production data for the time of the overflight.

  8. Methane Emission By Grazing Livestock. A Synopsis Of 1000 Direct Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lassey, K.R. [National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA), Wellington (New Zealand); Ulyatt, M.J. [New Zealand Pastoral Agriculture Research Institute (AgResearch), Palmerston North (New Zealand)

    2000-07-01

    In a series of field campaigns since 1995, a team of atmospheric and ruminant-nutrition scientists have measured methane emissions directly from individual ruminant livestock freely grazing representative New Zealand pastures. The technique collects integrated 'breath' samples during grazing, using an implanted SF6 source as a conservative calibrated tracer, an approach pioneered by Johnson et al. [1994]. Most of these measurements have been on grazing sheep (942 animal-days to Aug 1999), others on grazing dairy cows (283), with some measurements also on sheep under controlled feeding conditions (305) [eg, Lassey et al., 1997; Ulyatt et al., 1999]. The aim is to characterise the variability of emission rates, including their dependence on pasture quality and physiological condition. The research goal is two-fold: (1) to provide a better scientific basis for assessing the national emissions inventory; and (2) to investigate options for mitigating livestock emissions. Here, we discuss the research strategy and overview the principal research findings. We note in particular, that as a source of enterically fermented methane, sheep may not be merely 'small cattle'. 5 refs.

  9. Eddy-current flow rate meter for measuring sodium flow rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knaak, J.

    1976-01-01

    For safety reasons flow rate meters for monitoring coolant flow rates are inserted in the core of sodium-cooled fast breeder reactors. These are so-called eddy-current flow rate meters which can be mounted directly above the fuel elements. In the present contribution the principle of measurement, the mechanical construction and the circuit design of the flow rate measuring device are described. Special problems and their solution on developing the measuring system are pointed out. Finally, results of measurement and experience with the apparatus in several experiments are reported, where also further possibilities of application were tested. (orig./TK) [de

  10. Device accurately measures and records low gas-flow rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branum, L. W.

    1966-01-01

    Free-floating piston in a vertical column accurately measures and records low gas-flow rates. The system may be calibrated, using an adjustable flow-rate gas supply, a low pressure gage, and a sequence recorder. From the calibration rates, a nomograph may be made for easy reduction. Temperature correction may be added for further accuracy.

  11. Absolute production rate measurements of nitric oxide by an atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pipa, A V; Bindemann, T; Foest, R; Kindel, E; Roepcke, J; Weltmann, K-D

    2008-01-01

    Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) has been applied to measure the absolute production rate of NO molecules in the gas phase of an atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) operating at rf (13.56 MHz) in argon with small (up to 1%) admixtures of air. The resulting NO production rates were found to be in the range (0.1-80) x 10 -3 sccm or (0.05-35) x 10 18 molecules s -1 depending on the experimental conditions. Maximum rates were obtained at 0.2% air. For TDLAS measurements the APPJ was arranged inside an astigmatic multi-pass cell of Herriott type with 100 m absorption length. The insertion into a closed volume differs slightly from the normal, open operation with the jet propagating freely into air. Therefore, the measuring results are compared with optical emission of the open jet to verify equivalent experimental conditions. The dependence of the optical emission of NO (237 nm) on power and gas mixture has been measured. The similar shape of the dependence of absorption and emission signals gives evidence that the comparability of experimental conditions is sufficiently satisfied. It is concluded that the NO production rate of the APPJ in ambient air can be characterized using TDLAS and provides reliable results in spite of differing experimental conditions due to the set-up.

  12. Vehicle emission factors of solid nanoparticles in the laboratory and on the road using Portable Emission Measurement Systems (PEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barouch eGiechaskiel

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Emission inventories are used to quantify sources and identify trends in the emissions of air pollutants. They use vehicle-specific emission factors that are typically determined in the laboratory, through remote-sensing, vehicle chasing experiments and, more recently, on-board Portable Emission Measurement Systems (PEMS. Although PEMS is widely applied to measure gaseous pollutants, their application to Solid Particle Number (SPN emissions is new. In this paper, we discuss the current status of determining SPN emission factors both on the chassis dynamometer and on-road using PEMS-SPN. First, we determine the influence of the measurement equipment, ambient temperature, driving style and cycle characteristics, and the extra mass of the PEMS equipment on the SPN emissions. Afterward, we present the SPN emissions under type-approval conditions as well as on the road of two heavy-duty diesel vehicles equipped with Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF (one Euro VI, two light-duty diesel vehicles equipped with DPF, one light-duty vehicle equipped with a Port Fuel Injection engine (PFI, and seven Gasoline Direct Injection (GDI passenger cars (two Euro 6. We find that cold-start and strong accelerations tend to substantially increase SPN emissions. The two heavy-duty vehicles showed emissions around 2×10^13 p/km (Euro V truck and 6×10^10 p/km (Euro VI truck, respectively. One of the DPF-equipped light-duty vehicles showed emissions of 8×10^11 p/km, while the other one had one order of magnitude lower emissions. The PFI car had SPN emissions slightly higher than 1×10^12 p/km. The emissions of GDI cars spanned approximately from 8×10^11 p/km to 8×10^12 p/km. For the cars without DPF, the SPN emissions remained within a factor of two of the laboratory results. This factor was on average around 0.8 for the Euro 6 and 1.6 for the Euro 5 GDIs. The DPF equipped vehicles showed a difference of almost one order of magnitude between laboratory and on-road tests

  13. Direct Measurement of the Supernova Rate in Starburst Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bregman, Jesse D.; Temi, Pasquale; Rank, David; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Supernovae play a key role in the dynamics, structure, and chemical evolution of galaxies. The massive stars that end their lives as supernovae live for short times. Many are still associated with dusty star formation regions when they explode, making them difficult to observe at visible wavelengths. In active star forming regions (galactic nuclei and starburst regions), dust extintion is especially severe. Thus, determining the supernova rate in the active star forming regions of galaxies, where the supernova rate can be one or two orders of magnitude higher than the average, has proven to be difficult. From observations of SN1987A, we know that the [NiII] 6.63 micron emission line was the strongest line in the infrared spectrum for a period of a year and a half after the explosion. Since dust extintion is much less at 6.63 pm than at visible wavelengths (A(sub 6.63)/A(sub V) = 0.025), the NiII line can be used as a sensitive probe for the detection of recent supernovae. We have observed a sample of starburst galaxies at 6.63 micron using ISOCAM to search for the NiII emission line characteristic of recent supernovae. We did not detect any NiII line emission brighter than a 5sigma limit of 5 mJy. We can set upper limits to the supernova rate in our sample, scaled to the rate in M82, of less than 0.3 per year at the 90% confidence level using Bayesian methods. Assuming that a supernova would have a NiII with the same luminosity as observed in SN1987A, we find less than 0.09 and 0.15 per year at the 50% and 67% confidence levels. These rates are somewhat less if a more normal type II supernovae has a NiII line luminosity greater than the line in SN1987A.

  14. Resistive Wall Growth Rate Measurements in the Fermilab Recycler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ainsworth, R. [Fermilab; Adamson, P. [Fermilab; Burov, A. [Fermilab; Kourbanis, I. [Fermilab

    2016-10-05

    Impedance could represent a limitation of running high intensity beams in the Fermilab recycler. With high intensity upgrades foreseen, it is important to quantify the impedance. To do this,studies have been performed measuring the growth rate of presumably the resistive wall instability. The growth rates at varying intensities and chromaticities are shown. The measured growth rates are compared to ones calculated with the resistive wall impedance.

  15. Emissions of sulfur gases from marine and freshwater wetlands of the Florida Everglades: Rates and extrapolation using remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Mark E.; Pelletier, Ramona E.; Crill, Patrick M.

    1992-01-01

    Rates of emissions of the biogenic sulfur (S) gases carbonyl sulfide (COS), methyl mercaptan (MSH), dimethyl sulfide (DMS), and carbon disulfide (CS2) were measured in a variety of marine and freshwater wetland habitats in the Florida Everglades during a short duration period in October using dynamic chambers, cryotrapping techniques, and gas chromatography. The most rapid emissions of greater than 500 nmol/m(sup -2)h(sup -1) occurred in red mangrove-dominated sites that were adjacent to open seawater and contained numerous crab burrows. Poorly drained red mangrove sites exhibited lower fluxes of approximately 60 nmol/m(sup -2)h(sup -1) which were similar to fluxes from the black mangrove areas which dominated the marine-influenced wetland sites in the Everglades. DMS was the dominant organo-S gas emitted especially in the freshwater areas. Spectral data from a scene from the Landsat thematic mapper were used to map habitats in the Everglades. Six vegetation categories were delineated using geographical information system software and S gas emission were extrapolated for the entire Everglades National Park. The black mangrove-dominated areas accounted for the largest portion of S gas emissions to the area. The large area extent of the saw grass communities (42 percent) accounted for approximately 24 percent of the total S emissions.

  16. Reactivity and neutron emission measurements of highly burnt PWR fuel rod samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, M.F.; Jatuff, F.; Grimm, P.; Seiler, R.; Brogli, R.; Meier, G.; Berger, H.-D.; Chawla, R.

    2006-01-01

    Fuel rods with burnup values beyond 50 GWd/t are characterised by relatively large amounts of fission products and a high abundance of major and minor actinides. Of particular interest is the change in the reactivity of the fuel as a function of burnup and the capability of modern codes to predict this change. In addition, the neutron emission from burnt fuel has important implications for the design of transport and storage facilities. Measurements have been made of the reactivity effects and the neutron emission rates of highly burnt uranium oxide and mixed oxide fuel rod samples coming from a pressurised water reactor (PWR). The reactivity measurements have been made in a PWR lattice in the PROTEUS zero-energy reactor moderated in turn with: water, a water and heavy water mixture and water containing boron. A combined transport flask and sample changer was used to insert the 400 mm long burnt fuel rod segments into the reactor. Both control rod compensation and reactor period methods were used to determine the reactivities of the samples. For the range of burnup values investigated, an interesting exponential relationship has been found between the neutron emission rate and the measured reactivity

  17. Linearized spectrum correlation analysis for line emission measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishizawa, T; Nornberg, M D; Den Hartog, D J; Sarff, J S

    2017-08-01

    A new spectral analysis method, Linearized Spectrum Correlation Analysis (LSCA), for charge exchange and passive ion Doppler spectroscopy is introduced to provide a means of measuring fast spectral line shape changes associated with ion-scale micro-instabilities. This analysis method is designed to resolve the fluctuations in the emission line shape from a stationary ion-scale wave. The method linearizes the fluctuations around a time-averaged line shape (e.g., Gaussian) and subdivides the spectral output channels into two sets to reduce contributions from uncorrelated fluctuations without averaging over the fast time dynamics. In principle, small fluctuations in the parameters used for a line shape model can be measured by evaluating the cross spectrum between different channel groupings to isolate a particular fluctuating quantity. High-frequency ion velocity measurements (100-200 kHz) were made by using this method. We also conducted simulations to compare LSCA with a moment analysis technique under a low photon count condition. Both experimental and synthetic measurements demonstrate the effectiveness of LSCA.

  18. EFFECTS OF BURN RATE, WOOD SPECIES, MOISTURE CONTENT AND WEIGHT OF WOOD LOADED ON WOODSTOVE EMISSIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of tests of four woodstove operating parameters (burn rate, wood moisture, wood load, and wood species) at two levels each using a half factorial experimental test design to determine statistically significant effects on the emission components CO, CO2, p...

  19. Fine and Coarse Particle Mass Concentrations and Emission Rates in the Workplace of a Detergent Industry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Glytsos, T.; Ondráček, Jakub; Džumbová, Lucie; Eleftheriadis, K.; Lazaridis, M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 6 (2014), s. 881-889 ISSN 1420-326X Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : emission rates * PM 10 * PM2,5 * mass balance model Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.225, year: 2014

  20. Fugitive emission rates assessment of PM2.5 and PM10 from open storage piles in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yiqi; Liu, Tao; He, Jiao

    2018-03-01

    An assessment of the fugitive emission rates of PM2.5 and PM10 from an open static coal and mine storage piles. The experiment was conducted at a large union steel enterprises in the East China region to effectively control the fugitive particulate emissions pollution on daily work and extreme weather conditions. Wind tunnel experiments conducted on the surface of static storage piles, and it generated specific fugitive emission rates (SERs) at ground level of between ca.10-1 and ca.102 (mg/m2·s) for PM2.5 and between ca.101 and ca.103 (mg/m2·s) for PM10 under the u*(wind velocity) between ca.3.0 (m/s) and 10.0 (m/s). Research results show that SERs of different materials differ a lot. Material particulate that has lower surface moisture content generate higher SER and coal material generate higher SER than mine material. For material storage piles with good water infiltrating properties, aspersion is a very effective measure for control fugitive particulate emission.

  1. Study of Acoustic Emission and Mechanical Characteristics of Coal Samples under Different Loading Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huamin Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To study the effect of loading rate on mechanical properties and acoustic emission characteristics of coal samples, collected from Sanjiaohe Colliery, the uniaxial compression tests are carried out under various levels of loading rates, including 0.001 mm/s, 0.002 mm/s, and 0.005 mm/s, respectively, using AE-win E1.86 acoustic emission instrument and RMT-150C rock mechanics test system. The results indicate that the loading rate has a strong impact on peak stress and peak strain of coal samples, but the effect of loading rate on elasticity modulus of coal samples is relatively small. When the loading rate increases from 0.001 mm/s to 0.002 mm/s, the peak stress increases from 22.67 MPa to 24.99 MPa, the incremental percentage is 10.23%, and under the same condition the peak strain increases from 0.006191 to 0.007411 and the incremental percentage is 19.71%. Similarly, when the loading rate increases from 0.002 mm/s to 0.005 mm/s, the peak stress increases from 24.99 MPa to 28.01 MPa, the incremental percentage is 12.08%, the peak strain increases from 0.007411 to 0.008203, and the incremental percentage is 10.69%. The relationship between acoustic emission and loading rate presents a positive correlation, and the negative correlation relation has been determined between acoustic emission cumulative counts and loading rate during the rupture process of coal samples.

  2. Wide angle Michelson Doppler imaging interferometer. [measuring atmospheric emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, G. G.

    1980-01-01

    The optical system, stepping control, phase and modulation depth, array detector, and directions sensor are described for a specialized type of Michelson interferometer which works at sufficiently high resolution to measure the line widths and Doppler shifts of naturally occurring atmospheric emissions. With its imaging capability, the instrument can potentially supply this data independently for each element of the 100 x 100 detector array. The experiment seeks: (1) to obtain vertical profiles of atmospheric winds and temperatures as functions of latitude by observing near the limb; (2) to acquire exploratory wind and temperature data on smaller scale structures in airglow irregularities and in auroral forms; and (3) to collaborate with other Spacelab experiments, such as barium cloud releases, in providing wind and temperature data.

  3. Measurement of trace emissions and combustion characteristics for a mass fire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susott, R.A.; Ward, D.E.; Babbitt, R.E.; Latham, D.J.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented of a continuing study of research that was started in 1988. A new sampling system was designed to provide fire dynamics data from within the fire. This chapter describes the sampling system, the measurements it provided on one biomass fire, and some valuable parameters that can be calculated such as emission factors, combustion efficiency, and rate of fuel consumption. The large prescribed fire in Ontario, Canada, provided a practical test of this package that can be used to assess the application of the monitoring concept to a broad range of biomass fires. Measurements of wind vectors, temperature, and emissions of CO 2 , CO and particulates are reported for a 40-minute period from ignition through the critical period of maximum release of heat to the near extinction of the smoldering combustion phase

  4. Effects of mix ratio, moisture content and aeration rate on sulfur odor emissions during pig manure composting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Bing; Li, Shuyan; Michel, Frederick; Li, Guoxue; Luo, Yuan; Zhang, Difang; Li, Yangyang

    2016-10-01

    Sulfur compounds in swine manure can cause odor emissions during composting if conditions are not conducive to their rapid oxidation and degradation. In this study, the effects of controllable composting process variables on sulfur odor emissions were investigated. These included pig manure to corn stalk mix ratio (0.7:1, 1.5:1 and 2.2:1dw basis), initial moisture content (60%, 65%, 70% and 75%) and aeration rate (1.0, 2.0, 3.0 and 4.0m(3)m(-3)h(-1)). The compounds measured were carbonyl sulfide, carbon disulfide, hydrogen sulfide, methyl mercaptan, ethyl mercaptan, diethyl sulfide, dimethyl sulfide (Me2S) and dimethyl disulfide (Me2SS). The results showed that total sulfur losses ranged from 3.9% to 18.3% after 26days of composting. Me2S and Me2SS were the primary (>59.61%) sulfur compounds released during this period. After turning, emission rates of both Me2S and Me2SS increased. Emissions of the other six sulfur compounds were low and inconsistent during composting. Within the compost, feedstock mix ratio significantly influenced the concentration of Me2SS, while aeration rate significantly affected Me2S concentration (pMoisture content did not have a significant effect on the concentrations of either of these two compounds. Concentrations of sulfur odor compounds were the lowest at the highest aeration rate. Therefore, high aeration rates during the thermophilic phase, especially after turning, are recommended to minimize sulfur odors produced during swine manure composting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. In situ measurements of dose rates from terrestrial gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horng, M.C.; Jiang, S.H.

    2002-01-01

    A portable, high purity germanium (HPGe) detector was employed for the performance of in situ measurements of radionuclide activity concentrations in the ground in Taiwan, at altitudes ranging from sea level to 3900 m. The absolute peak efficiency of the HPGe detector for a gamma-ray source uniformly distributed in the semi-infinite ground was determined using a semi-empirical method. The gamma-ray dose rates from terrestrial radionuclides were calculated from the measured activity levels using recently published dose rate conversion factors. The absorbed dose rate in air due to cosmic rays was derived by subtracting the terrestrial gamma-ray dose rate from the overall absorbed dose rate in air measured using a high-pressure ionization chamber. The cosmic-ray dose rate calculated as a function of altitude, was found to be in good agreement with the data reported by UNSCEAR. (orig.)

  6. Volatile organic compounds from vegetation in southern Yunnan Province, China: Emission rates and some potential regional implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geron, Chris; Owen, Sue; Guenther, Alex; Greenberg, Jim; Rasmussen, Rei; Hui Bai, Jian; Li, Qing-Jun; Baker, Brad

    Little information is currently available regarding emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) in southern Asia. To address the need for BVOC emission estimates in regional atmospheric chemistry simulations, 95 common plant species were screened for emissions of BVOC in and near the Xishuangbanna Tropical Biological Gardens in southern Yunnan Province, Peoples' Republic of China in February 2003. In situ measurements with leaf cuvettes and branch bag enclosures were used in combination with portable gas chromatography, flame ionization, photoionization, and mass spectral detection to identify and quantify BVOC emissions. Forty-four of the species examined emitted isoprene at rates exceeding 20 μg C g -1 (leaf dry weight) h -1. An emphasis was placed on the genus Ficus, which is important in the region and occupies a wide range of ecological niches. Several species in the footprint of a nearby flux tower were also examined. Several palm species and an abundant fern ( Cyclosorus parasiticus) emitted substantial amounts of isoprene, and probably accounted for observed daytime mean isoprene fluxes from the understory of a Hevea brasiliensis plantation of 1.0 and 0.15 mg C m -2 h -1 during the wet and dry seasons, respectively. These measurements verify that both the forest floor and canopy in this region can be sources of isoprene. Monoterpene emissions exceeded 1.0 μg-C g -1 (leaf dry weight) h -1 from only 4 of 38 species surveyed, including some Ficus species and H. brasiliensis. However most of the trees of the latter species were sparsely foliated due to dry season senescence, and emission factors are approximately an order of magnitude lower than those reported during the wet season. BVOC emission rates and physiology of many species are impacted by reduced moisture availability, especially Mangifera indica. South Asia is a region undergoing rapid landuse change and forest plantation establishment, with large increases in area of high BVOC

  7. Optimal carbon emissions trajectories when damages depend on the rate or level of global warming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peck, S.C.; Teisberg, T.J.

    1994-01-01

    The authors extend earlier work with the Carbon Emissions Trajectory Assessment model (CETA) to consider a number of issues relating to the nature of optimal carbon emissions trajectories. They first explore model results when warming costs are associated with the rate of temperature rise, rather than with its level, as in earlier work. It is found that optimal trajectories are more strongly affected by the degree of non-linearity in the warming cost function than by whether the cost function is driven by the warming level or the warming rate. The authors briefly explore the implications of simple uncertainty and risk aversion for optimal emissions trajectories to be somewhat lower, but that the effect is not noticeable in the near term and not dramatic in the long term; the long term effect on the shadow price of carbon is more marked, however. Finally, they experiment with scaling up the warming cost functions until optimal policies are approximately the same as a policy of stabilising emissions at the 1990 level. Based on the results of this experiment, it is concluded that damages would have to be very high to justify anything like a stabilization policy; and even in this case, a policy allowing intertemporal variation in emissions would be better. 18 refs., 15 figs

  8. Aquatic respiration rate measurements at low oxygen concentrations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moritz Holtappels

    Full Text Available Despite its huge ecological importance, microbial oxygen respiration in pelagic waters is little studied, primarily due to methodological difficulties. Respiration measurements are challenging because of the required high resolution of oxygen concentration measurements. Recent improvements in oxygen sensing techniques bear great potential to overcome these limitations. Here we compare 3 different methods to measure oxygen consumption rates at low oxygen concentrations, utilizing amperometric Clark type sensors (STOX, optical sensors (optodes, and mass spectrometry in combination with (18-18O2 labeling. Oxygen concentrations and consumption rates agreed well between the different methods when applied in the same experimental setting. Oxygen consumption rates between 30 and 400 nmol L(-1 h(-1 were measured with high precision and relative standard errors of less than 3%. Rate detection limits in the range of 1 nmol L(-1 h(-1 were suitable for rate determinations in open ocean water and were lowest at the lowest applied O2 concentration.

  9. Quantitative Evaluation of MODIS Fire Radiative Power Measurement for Global Smoke Emissions Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichoku, Charles; Ellison, Luke

    2011-01-01

    Satellite remote sensing is providing us tremendous opportunities to measure the fire radiative energy (FRE) release rate or power (FRP) from open biomass burning, which affects many vegetated regions of the world on a seasonal basis. Knowledge of the biomass burning characteristics and emission source strengths of different (particulate and gaseous) smoke constituents is one of the principal ingredients upon which the assessment, modeling, and forecasting of their distribution and impacts depend. This knowledge can be gained through accurate measurement of FRP, which has been shown to have a direct relationship with the rates of biomass consumption and emissions of major smoke constituents. Over the last decade or so, FRP has been routinely measured from space by both the MODIS sensors aboard the polar orbiting Terra and Aqua satellites, and the SEVIRI sensor aboard the Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) geostationary satellite. During the last few years, FRP has steadily gained increasing recognition as an important parameter for facilitating the development of various scientific studies and applications relating to the quantitative characterization of biomass burning and their emissions. To establish the scientific integrity of the FRP as a stable quantity that can be measured consistently across a variety of sensors and platforms, with the potential of being utilized to develop a unified long-term climate data record of fire activity and impacts, it needs to be thoroughly evaluated, calibrated, and validated. Therefore, we are conducting a detailed analysis of the FRP products from MODIS to evaluate the uncertainties associated with them, such as those due to the effects of satellite variable observation geometry and other factors, in order to establish their error budget for use in diverse scientific research and applications. In this presentation, we will show recent results of the MODIS FRP uncertainty analysis and error mitigation solutions, and demonstrate

  10. NOAA Mobile Laboratory Measures Oil and Gas Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofler, J. D.; Petron, G.; Dube, W. P.; Edwards, P. M.; Brown, S. S.; Geiger, F.; Patrick, L.; Crepinsek, S.; Chen, H.; Miller, B. R.; Montzka, S. A.; Lang, P. M.; Newberger, T.; Higgs, J. A.; Sweeney, C.; Guenther, D.; Karion, A.; Wolter, S.; Williams, J.; Jordan, A.; Tans, P. P.; Schnell, R. C.

    2012-12-01

    A van capable of continuous real time measurements of CH4 , CO2, CO, Water Vapor, Ozone, NO, NO2, Volatile Organic Compounds VOCs including aromatics and other traces gases was driven in the oil and gas fields of the Uintah Basin in northeastern Utah. Compressor Stations, processing plants, oil and gas well heads. Separators, condensate tanks, evaporation pond disposal facilities, holding tanks, hydraulic fracturing sites, gas pipelines and more were studied using the van. The mobile measurements provide a powerful tool to get to the source of the emissions and reveal the unique chemical signature of each of the stages and components of oil and gas production as well as the overall basin and background gas concentrations. In addition to a suite of gas analyzers, the van includes a meteorological system (temperature, humidity, and wind speed and direction), GPS tracking, flask sampling system and a batter power system. Aspects of the vans hardware, sampling methods and operations are discussed along with a few highlights of the measurements.

  11. Evaluating the use of electrical resistivity imaging technique for improving CH4 and CO2 emission rate estimations in landfills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgaki, I.; Soupios, P.; Sakkas, N.; Ververidis, F.; Trantas, E.; Vallianatos, F.; Manios, T.

    2008-01-01

    In order to improve the estimation of surface gas emissions in landfill, we evaluated a combination of geophysical and greenhouse gas measurement methodologies. Based on fifteen 2D electrical resistivity tomographies (ERTs), longitudinal cross section images of the buried waste layers were developed, identifying place and cross section size of organic waste (OW), organic waste saturated in leachates (SOW), low organic and non-organic waste. CH 4 and CO 2 emission measurements were then conducted using the static chamber technique at 5 surface points along two tomographies: (a) across a high-emitting area, ERT no. 2, where different amounts of relatively fresh OW and SOW were detected, and (b) across the oldest (at least eight years) cell in the landfill, ERT no. 6, with significant amounts of OW. Where the highest emission rates were recorded, they were strongly affected by the thickness of the OW and SOW fraction underneath each gas sampling point. The main reason for lower than expected values was the age of the layered buried waste. Lower than predicted emissions were also attributed to soil condition, which was the case at sampling points with surface ponding, i.e. surface accumulation of leachate (or precipitated water)

  12. Rating PV Power and Energy: Cell, Module, and System Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emery, Keith

    2016-06-02

    A summary of key points related to research-level measurements of current vs. voltage measurement theory including basic PV operation, equivalent circuit, and concept of spectral error; PV power performance including PV irradiance sensors, simulators and commercial and generic I-V systems; PV measurement artifacts, intercomparisons, and alternative rating methods.

  13. Summit CO2 emission rates by the CO2/SO2 ratio method at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawaiʻi, during a period of sustained inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hager, S.A.; Gerlach, T.M.; Wallace, P.J.

    2008-01-01

    The emission rate of carbon dioxide escaping from the summit of Kīlauea Volcano, Hawaiʻi, proved highly variable, averaging 4900 ± 2000 metric tons per day (t/d) in June–July 2003 during a period of summit inflation. These results were obtained by combining over 90 measurements of COSPEC-derived SO2emission rates with synchronous CO2/SO2 ratios of the volcanic gas plume along the summit COSPEC traverse. The results are lower than the CO2 emission rate of 8500 ± 300 t/d measured by the same method in 1995–1999 during a period of long-term summit deflation [Gerlach, T.M., McGee, K.A., Elias, T., Sutton, A.J. and Doukas, M.P., 2002. Carbon dioxide emission rate of Kīlauea Volcano: Implications for primary magma and the summit reservoir. Journal of Geophysical Research-Solid Earth, 107(B9): art. no.-2189.]. Analysis of the data indicates that the emission rates of the present study likely reflect changes in the magma supply rate and residence time in the summit reservoir. It is also likely that emission rates during the inflation period were heavily influenced by SO2 pulses emitted adjacent to the COSPEC traverse, which biased CO2/SO2 ratios towards low values that may be unrepresentative of the global summit gas plume. We conclude that the SO2 pulses are consequences of summit re-inflation under way since 2003 and that CO2 emission rates remain comparable to, but more variable than, those measured prior to re-inflation.

  14. A model to relate wind tunnel measurements to open field odorant emissions from liquid area sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucernoni, F.; Capelli, L.; Busini, V.; Sironi, S.

    2017-05-01

    Waste Water Treatment Plants are known to have significant emissions of several pollutants and odorants causing nuisance to the near-living population. One of the purposes of the present work is to study a suitable model to evaluate odour emissions from liquid passive area sources. First, the models describing volatilization under a forced convection regime inside a wind tunnel device, which is the sampling device that typically used for sampling on liquid area sources, were investigated. In order to relate the fluid dynamic conditions inside the hood to the open field and inside the hood a thorough study of the models capable of describing the volatilization phenomena of the odorous compounds from liquid pools was performed and several different models were evaluated for the open field emission. By means of experimental tests involving pure liquid acetone and pure liquid butanone, it was verified that the model more suitable to describe precisely the volatilization inside the sampling hood is the model for the emission from a single flat plate in forced convection and laminar regime, with a fluid dynamic boundary layer fully developed and a mass transfer boundary layer not fully developed. The proportionality coefficient for the model was re-evaluated in order to account for the specific characteristics of the adopted wind tunnel device, and then the model was related with the selected model for the open field thereby computing the wind speed at 10 m that would cause the same emission that is estimated from the wind tunnel measurement furthermore, the field of application of the proposed model was clearly defined for the considered models during the project, discussing the two different kinds of compounds commonly found in emissive liquid pools or liquid spills, i.e. gas phase controlled and liquid phase controlled compounds. Lastly, a discussion is presented comparing the presented approach for emission rates recalculation in the field, with other approaches

  15. Driving cycles for measuring passenger car emissions on roads with traffic calming measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulter, P.G.; Latham, S.; Ainge, M.

    1999-01-01

    Although local authorities in the UK need to be aware of any air quality impacts resulting from their traffic calming operations, there is little information relating to the effects of different traffic calming measures. The effects on air quality on this scale are complex, and so TRL is providing guidance by developing performance indices for different measures based on their effects on vehicle emissions. The emissions indices for passenger cars are based on tests conducted on a chassis dynamometer, and this paper describes the development of the methodology for constructing the driving cycles to be used. The technique involves the measurement of the speed profiles of a large number of vehicles using a roadside LIDAR system, and the determination of typical gear selections using three-instrumented cars

  16. Experiments to Evaluate and Implement Passive Tracer Gas Methods to Measure Ventilation Rates in Homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lunden, Melissa [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Faulkner, David [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Heredia, Elizabeth [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Cohn, Sebastian [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Dickerhoff, Darryl [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Noris, Federico [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Logue, Jennifer [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Hotchi, Toshifumi [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Singer, Brett [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sherman, Max H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-10-01

    This report documents experiments performed in three homes to assess the methodology used to determine air exchange rates using passive tracer techniques. The experiments used four different tracer gases emitted simultaneously but implemented with different spatial coverage in the home. Two different tracer gas sampling methods were used. The results characterize the factors of the execution and analysis of the passive tracer technique that affect the uncertainty in the calculated air exchange rates. These factors include uncertainties in tracer gas emission rates, differences in measured concentrations for different tracer gases, temporal and spatial variability of the concentrations, the comparison between different gas sampling methods, and the effect of different ventilation conditions.

  17. Emission Spectroscopy and Radiometric Measurements in the NASA Ames IHF Arc Jet Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Michael W.; Raiche, George A.; Prabhu, Dinesh K.

    2012-01-01

    Plasma diagnostic measurement campaigns in the NASA Ames Interaction Heating Facility (IHF) have been conducted over the last several years with a view towards characterizing the flow in the arc jet facility by providing data necessary for modeling and simulation. Optical emission spectroscopy has been used in the plenum and in the free jet of the nozzle. Radiation incident over a probe surface has also been measured using radiometry. Plenum measurements have shown distinct radial profiles of temperature over a range of operating conditions. For cases where large amounts of cold air are added radially to the main arc-heated stream, the temperature profiles are higher by as much as 1500 K than the profiles assumed in flow simulations. Optical measurements perpendicular to the flow direction in the free jet showed significant contributions to the molecule emission through inverse pre-dissociation, thus allowing determination of atom number densities from molecular emission. This has been preliminarily demonstrated with the N2 1st Positive System. Despite the use of older rate coefficients, the resulting atom densities are reasonable and surprisingly close to flow predictions.

  18. Methane Emission Estimates in the Canadian Bakken Oil Fields from Mobile Lab Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staebler, R. M.; Li, S. M.; Liggio, J.; Worthy, D.; Lopez, M.; Narayan, J.; Darlington, A.

    2017-12-01

    Over the last few years, the progress in hydraulic fracturing methods to retrieve oil and gas from previously economically unviable sources has resulted in rapid expansion of the exploitation of fossil fuel containing shale plays across North America. These developments are associated with an increase in direct, local emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs), including leakage from pipelines, wells and storage tanks. Several studies have been conducted, primarily in the US, to quantify these emissions both from the ground and from the air. In the fall of 2015, Environment and Climate Change Canada conducted a project with its mobile air quality lab CRUISER, instrumented with a suite of trace gas and aerosol instrumentation, in the southern Saskatchewan Bakken play, to investigate local emissions of GHGs. Measurement excursions were performed between 20/10/2015 and 17/11/2015 with a total driving time of 177 hours, for a total driving distance of 4897 km in the target area, potentially capturing 8822 wells and 480 tanks of the registered 28355 wells and 1666 tanks (31% and 29% respectively). Instrumentation relevant to this analysis included cavity ring-down and off-axis integrated cavity output spectrometers (Picarro Model G2201 and Los Gatos Research Model 9013 respectively), and ultrasonic anemometers mounted on the front and roof of CRUISER. Point source emission rates were estimated with two types of dispersion model, based on inputs of measured downwind concentration peaks above background and the measured wind speed and direction. Calibrated releases of N2O were conducted next to suspected CH4 sources in 228 cases to evaluate this approach. 50% of these cases reproduced the known N2O emission rate within a factor of 0.63 to 1.25. The associated CH4 emission rates were heavily skewed / nearly lognormal (25th, 50th and 75th percentiles: 1.2, 4.4 and 44 kg/h), confirming previously published findings that a few large emitters contribute the majority of the CH4

  19. Measurement of the attosecond emission from aligned molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutu, W.; Merdji, H.; Fitour, R.; Monchicourt, P.; Breger, P.; Carre, B.; Salieres, P.

    2006-01-01

    Complete test of publication follows. Recently, a number of papers have demonstrated the interest of high-order harmonic generation (HHG) from molecules aligned with respect to the laser polarization. Itatani et al. (Nature 432, 867 (2004)) have shown that a precise characterization of the harmonic emission allows performing a tomographic reconstruction of the molecular orbitals that radiate. Kanai et al. (Nature 435, 470 (2005)) have evidenced quantum interferences in the recombination process of HHG that are directly related to the molecular structure. In all of these papers, only the HHG intensity was measured. The relative harmonic phase, though more difficult to measure, contains important information on the interference process, and is needed for an ab initio tomographic reconstruction. Finally, while the attosecond emission from atoms has been thoroughly studied, in particular by our group (Mairesse et al., Science (302, 1540 (2003)), it has not been investigated in molecules. In a first experiment (Wabnitz et al., EPJD (2006)), we measured the amplitude and relative phase of harmonics radiated by un-aligned nitrogen molecules. Small but reproducible deviations from the phase of harmonics generated in argon (same ionization potential as nitrogen) were measured for low orders. In a recent experiment, we have measured, up to high order, the harmonic amplitude and relative phase for aligned molecules (N 2 and CO 2 ). In order to align the molecules, we used the so-called nonadiabatic technique: a rotational wavepacket is created by a strong enough and short aligning pulse, so that a field-free alignment is obtained at the revival (a few ps after the aligning pulse). The measurement of phase locking between neighboring harmonics was performed through the photoionization of a target gas by the harmonic beam in presence of a sufficiently intense 'dressing' laser beam (RABITT technique). The harmonic phase measured when the CO 2 molecules are aligned parallel to

  20. Fission rate measurements in fuel plate type assembly reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    The methods, materials and equipment have been developed to allow extensive and precise measurement of fission rate distributions in water moderated, U-Al fuel plate assembly type reactor cores. Fission rate monitors are accurately positioned in the reactor core, the reactor is operated at a low power for a short time, the fission rate monitors are counted with detectors incorporating automated sample changers and the measurements are converted to fission rate distributions. These measured fission rate distributions have been successfully used as baseline information related to the operation of test and experimental reactors with respect to fission power and distribution, fuel loading and fission experiments for approximately twenty years at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). 7 refs., 8 figs

  1. Sodium flow rate measurement method of annular linear induction pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araseki, Hideo

    2011-01-01

    This report describes a method for measuring sodium flow rate of annular linear induction pumps arranged in parallel and its verification result obtained through an experiment and a numerical analysis. In the method, the leaked magnetic field is measured with measuring coils at the stator end on the outlet side and is correlated with the sodium flow rate. The experimental data and the numerical result indicate that the leaked magnetic field at the stator edge keeps almost constant when the sodium flow rate changes and that the leaked magnetic field change arising from the flow rate change is small compared with the overall leaked magnetic field. It is shown that the correlation between the leaked magnetic field and the sodium flow rate is almost linear due to this feature of the leaked magnetic field, which indicates the applicability of the method to small-scale annular linear induction pumps. (author)

  2. Comparative study of radiometric and calorimetric methods for total hemispherical emissivity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monchau, Jean-Pierre; Hameury, Jacques; Ausset, Patrick; Hay, Bruno; Ibos, Laurent; Candau, Yves

    2018-05-01

    Accurate knowledge of infrared emissivity is important in applications such as surface temperature measurements by infrared thermography or thermal balance for building walls. A comparison of total hemispherical emissivity measurement was performed by two laboratories: the Laboratoire National de Métrologie et d'Essais (LNE) and the Centre d'Études et de Recherche en Thermique, Environnement et Systèmes (CERTES). Both laboratories performed emissivity measurements on four samples, chosen to cover a large range of emissivity values and angular reflectance behaviors. The samples were polished aluminum (highly specular, low emissivity), bulk PVC (slightly specular, high emissivity), sandblasted aluminum (diffuse surface, medium emissivity), and aluminum paint (slightly specular surface, medium emissivity). Results obtained using five measurement techniques were compared. LNE used a calorimetric method for direct total hemispherical emissivity measurement [1], an absolute reflectometric measurement method [2], and a relative reflectometric measurement method. CERTES used two total hemispherical directional reflectometric measurement methods [3, 4]. For indirect techniques by reflectance measurements, the total hemispherical emissivity values were calculated from directional hemispherical reflectance measurement results using spectral integration when required and directional to hemispherical extrapolation. Results were compared, taking into account measurement uncertainties; an added uncertainty was introduced to account for heterogeneity over the surfaces of the samples and between samples. All techniques gave large relative uncertainties for a low emissive and very specular material (polished aluminum), and results were quite scattered. All the indirect techniques by reflectance measurement gave results within ±0.01 for a high emissivity material. A commercial aluminum paint appears to be a good candidate for producing samples with medium level of emissivity

  3. Amplified spontaneous emission measurements on the Aurora large aperture module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oertel, J.A.; Czuchlewski, S.J.; Leland, W.T.; Turner, T.P.

    1990-01-01

    The large aperture module (LAM) of the Aurora KrF laser can be used to address a number of issues that relate to the scaling of KrF amplifiers to larger ICF systems. Perhaps foremost among these are the possible effects of amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) on laser performance. To assess this problem a 3-D computer code has been developed to model these ASE effects. The code uses an iterative procedure to arrive at a self-consistent steady state solution to the 3-D distribution of coherent and incoherent fluxes within the amplifier. Two-pass energy extraction, wall reflectivity, and nonuniform excitation are included in the model. The authors previously reported the effects of ASE on the small signal gains measured in the 1- x 1- x 2-m 3 LAM. The code also makes quantitative predictions of the ASE that should be generated in the amplifier. This paper indicates the radiance expected for a medium of uniform gain in terms of the (g - ν)L product and the parameter g/a. The quantity (g - ν)L is the product of the net gain and the path length along the direction of observation. The present experiments compare values of ASE measured at various locations around the LAM with the code predictions. The impact of ASE on amplifier output, is also discussed

  4. Measurements of the Secondary Electron Emission of Some Insulators

    CERN Document Server

    Bozhko, Y.; Hilleret, N.

    2013-01-01

    Charging up the surface of an insulator after beam impact can lead either to reverse sign of field between the surface and collector of electrons for case of thick sample or appearance of very high internal field for thin films. Both situations discard correct measurements of secondary electron emission (SEE) and can be avoided via reducing the beam dose. The single pulse method with pulse duration of order of tens microseconds has been used. The beam pulsing was carried out by means of an analog switch introduced in deflection plate circuit which toggles its output between "beam on" and "beam off" voltages depending on level of a digital pulse. The error in measuring the beam current for insulators with high value of SEE was significantly reduced due to the use for this purpose a titanium sample having low value of the SEE with DC method applied. Results obtained for some not coated insulators show considerable increase of the SEE after baking out at 3500C what could be explained by the change of work functi...

  5. Velocity field measurement in micro-bubble emission boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Daisuke; Saito, Yasushi; Natazuka, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Liquid inlet behavior to a heat surface in micro-bubble emission boiling (MEB) was investigated by flow measurement using particle image velocimetry (PIV). Subcooled pool boiling experiments under atmospheric pressure were carried out using a heat surface with a diameter of 10 mm. An upper end of a heater block made of copper was used as the heat surface. Working fluid was the deionized water and the subcooling was varied from 40 K to 70 K. Three K-type thermocouples were installed in the copper block to measure the temperature gradient, and the heat flux and wall superheat were estimated from these temperature data to make a boiling curve. The flow visualization around the heat surface was carried out using a high-speed video camera and a light sheet. The microbubbles generated in the MEB were used as tracer particles and the velocity field was obtained by PIV analysis of the acquired image sequence. As a result, the higher heat fluxes than the critical heat flux could be obtained in the MEB region. In addition, the distribution characteristics of the velocity in MEB region were studied using the PIV results and the location of the stagnation point in the velocity fields was discussed. (author)

  6. Natural stream flow-rates measurements by tracer techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuellar Mansilla, J.

    1982-01-01

    This paper presents the study of the precision obtained measuring the natural stream flow rates by tracer techniques, especially when the system presents a great slope and a bed constituted by large and extended particle size. The experiences were realized in laboratory pilot channels with flow-rates between 15 and 130 [1/s]; and in natural streams with flow-rates from 1 to 25 m 3 /s. Tracer used were In-133m and Br-82 for laboratory and field measurements respectively. In both cases the tracer was injected as a pulse and its dilution measured collecting samples in the measured section, at constant flow-rates, of 5[1] in laboratory experiences and 60[1] of water in field experiences. Precisions obtained at a 95% confidence level were about 2% for laboratory and 3% for field. (I.V.)

  7. Process control of high rate microcrystalline silicon based solar cell deposition by optical emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilper, T.; Donker, M.N. van den; Carius, R.; Rech, B.; Braeuer, G.; Repmann, T.

    2008-01-01

    Silicon thin-film solar cells based on microcrystalline silicon (μc-Si:H) were prepared in a 30 x 30 cm 2 plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition reactor using 13.56 or 40.68 MHz plasma excitation frequency. Plasma emission was recorded by optical emission spectroscopy during μc-Si:H absorber layer deposition at deposition rates between 0.5 and 2.5 nm/s. The time course of SiH * and H β emission indicated strong drifts in the process conditions particularly at low total gas flows. By actively controlling the SiH 4 gas flow, the observed process drifts were successfully suppressed resulting in a more homogeneous i-layer crystallinity along the growth direction. In a deposition regime with efficient usage of the process gas, the μc-Si:H solar cell efficiency was enhanced from 7.9 % up to 8.8 % by applying process control

  8. Real-world operation conditions and on-road emissions of Beijing diesel buses measured by using portable emission measurement system and electric low-pressure impactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhihua; Ge, Yunshan; Johnson, Kent C; Shah, Asad Naeem; Tan, Jianwei; Wang, Chu; Yu, Linxiao

    2011-03-15

    On-road measurement is an effective method to investigate real-world emissions generated from vehicles and estimate the difference between engine certification cycles and real-world operating conditions. This study presents the results of on-road measurements collected from urban buses which propelled by diesel engine in Beijing city. Two widely used Euro III emission level buses and two Euro IV emission level buses were chosen to perform on-road emission measurements using portable emission measurement system (PEMS) for gaseous pollutant and Electric Low Pressure Impactor (ELPI) for particulate matter (PM) number emissions. The results indicate that considerable discrepancies of engine operating conditions between real-world driving cycles and engine certification cycles have been observed. Under real-world operating conditions, carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrocarbon (HC) emissions can easily meet their respective regulations limits, while brake specification nitrogen oxide (bsNO(x)) emissions present a significant deviation from its corresponding limit. Compared with standard limits, the real-world bsNO(x) emission of the two Euro III emission level buses approximately increased by 60% and 120% respectively, and bsNO(x) of two Euro IV buses nearly twice standard limits because Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) system not active under low exhaust temperature. Particle mass were estimated via particle size distribution with the assumption that particle density and diameter is liner. The results demonstrate that nanometer size particulate matter make significant contribution to total particle number but play a minor role to total particle mass. It is suggested that specific certified cycle should be developed to regulate bus engines emissions on the test bench or use PEMS to control the bus emissions under real-world operating conditions. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Absolute rate measurement by light modulation - ESR technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choo, K Y; Gaspar, P P

    1977-01-01

    A rate constant is deduced for the reaction of tert-butoxy radicals and trimethylsilane from the measurement of the phase shift between the modulated light source and the ESR signal of trimethylsilyl radical. The rate constant was found to be 3 x 10/sup -2/M/sup -1/. sec/sup -1/ at -50/sup 0/C.

  10. Surgical Space Suits Increase Particle and Microbiological Emission Rates in a Simulated Surgical Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijaysegaran, Praveen; Knibbs, Luke D; Morawska, Lidia; Crawford, Ross W

    2018-05-01

    The role of space suits in the prevention of orthopedic prosthetic joint infection remains unclear. Recent evidence suggests that space suits may in fact contribute to increased infection rates, with bioaerosol emissions from space suits identified as a potential cause. This study aimed to compare the particle and microbiological emission rates (PER and MER) of space suits and standard surgical clothing. A comparison of emission rates between space suits and standard surgical clothing was performed in a simulated surgical environment during 5 separate experiments. Particle counts were analyzed with 2 separate particle counters capable of detecting particles between 0.1 and 20 μm. An Andersen impactor was used to sample bacteria, with culture counts performed at 24 and 48 hours. Four experiments consistently showed statistically significant increases in both PER and MER when space suits are used compared with standard surgical clothing. One experiment showed inconsistent results, with a trend toward increases in both PER and MER when space suits are used compared with standard surgical clothing. Space suits cause increased PER and MER compared with standard surgical clothing. This finding provides mechanistic evidence to support the increased prosthetic joint infection rates observed in clinical studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Oil palm and the emission of greenhouse gasses- from field measurements in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Niharika; Bruun, Thilde Bech; Giller, Ken E.; Magid, Jakob; van de Ven, Gerrie; de Neergaard, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Palm oil from the oil palm (Elaeis guianensis) has in recent years become the world's most important vegetable oil. The increasing demand for palm oil has led to expansion of oil palm plantations, which has caused environmental controversies associated with carbon losses and the use of large amounts of mineral fertilizers. Efforts to increase sustainability of oil palm cultivation, include recycling of oil-mill residues and pruning's, but with this comes increased potential for methane emission from the plantations. Until now no field-based data on greenhouse gas emissions from oil palm plantations have been reported. Here for the first time we present data from a long term (360 days) field trial in Bah Lias Research Station, North Sumatra, Indonesia on greenhouse gas emissions from an oil palm plantation with various treatments of recycled oil palm waste products, fertilizers and simulated rainfall. The first experiment was conducted over a full year (dry + wet season) with mineral fertilizer treatments including urea and ammonium sulphate, and organic fertilizer treatments constituting: empty fruit bunches (EFB), enriched mulch (EFB + palm oil mill effluent (POME) ) and pruned oil palm fronds (OPF). Treatment doses represent the current management in Indonesian plantations and the higher doses that are expected in the imminent future. For the organic treatments several methods of application (applied in inter-rows, piles, patches or bands) were evaluated. The second experiment investigated effects of soil water saturation on GHG emissions through adding 25 mm simulated rainfall per day for 21 days. Each palm tree received 1 kg of N fertilizer as urea or ammonium sulphate and enriched mulch. The gas fluxes in the fields was measured by a large static-chamber (1.8 m x 1.2 m) method and CH4 and N2O concentrations were determined using gas chromatographs. We found that emissions were significantly affected by the type and dose of mineral fertilizers. Application of

  12. Highly-controlled, reproducible measurements of aerosol emissions from African biomass combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslett, Sophie; Thomas, J. Chris; Morgan, William; Hadden, Rory; Liu, Dantong; Allan, James; Williams, Paul; Sekou, Keïta; Liousse, Catherine; Coe, Hugh

    2017-04-01

    Particulate emissions from biomass burning can alter the atmosphere's radiative balance and cause significant harm to human health. However, the relationship between these emissions and fundamental combustion processes is, to date, poorly characterised. In atmospheric models, aerosol emissions are represented by emission factors based on mass loss, which are averaged over an entire combustion event for each particulate species. This approach, however, masks huge variability in emissions during different phases of the combustion period. Laboratory tests have shown that even small changes to the burning environment can lead to huge variation in observed aerosol emission factors (Akagi et al., 2011). In order to address this gap in understanding, in this study, small wood samples sourced from Côte D'Ivoire were burned in a highly-controlled laboratory environment. The shape and mass of samples, available airflow and surrounding heat were carefully regulated. Organic aerosol and refractory black carbon emissions were measured in real-time using an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer and a Single Particle Soot Photometer, respectively. Both of these instruments are used regularly to measure aerosol concentrations in the field. This methodology produced remarkably repeatable results, allowing three different phases of combustion to be identified by their emissions. Black carbon was emitted predominantly during flaming combustion; organic aerosols were emitted during pyrolysis before ignition and from smouldering-dominated behaviour near the end of combustion. During the flaming period, there was a strong correlation between the emission of black carbon and the rate of mass loss, which suggests there is value in employing a mass-based emission factor for this species. However, very little correlation was seen between organic aerosol and mass loss throughout the tests. As such, results here suggest that emission factors averaged over an entire combustion event are unlikely to be

  13. Acoustic emission measurements at the pressure vessel ZB2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tirbonod, B.; Hanacek, L.

    1990-01-01

    The work presented here is the Swiss contribution to the project 'Zwischenbehaelter 2 (ZB2)' hosted by the 'Bundesministerium fuer Forschung und Technologie' of the Federal Republic of Germany. One of the crack-like defects introduced at the inside surface of the thick-walled pressure vessel ZB2 was locally monitored by acoustic emission. The measurement system was broadband (0.5 - 5 MHz) and allowed a threedimensional location of the source. The vessel was subjected to different tests. Signals were recorded during the second series of hydrotests, fast pressure cycles and fatigue test at 50 C. About 1 signal per hydrotest or cycle was recorded. For the hydrotests the signals were recorded generally at loading in the intermediate range of pressure; the sources were located in the artificial defect. Recurrent and non recurrent signals were recorded during the fatigue test. At loading, signals were captured up to the maximum pressure and for the recurrent signals at well defined pressure ranges. All the sources (except one, located in the base material ahead of the artificial defect) were situated in the artificial defect. The pressure and location depended on the loading phase and on the cycle range. The measurements were discussed by describing the signals by measurement, signal and source parameters. The goal was to identify the source mechanism and to assess the growth of the defect. For the hydrotests the identification of the mechanism at loading remains open. For the fatigue test the source situated in the base material was attributed to a primary mechanism; this source could assess the growth of the defect on the basis of linear elastic fracture mechanics. A secondary mechanism was suggested for recurrent sources active at loading. For all the tests, the sources active at unloading were attributed to a secondary mechanism. (author)

  14. Measurement of flow rate in the third loop of PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Shufan.

    1986-01-01

    The range of flow rate was 14000-50000 m 3 /h. The diameter of main tube was 2.6 m. A special made pitot set was placed on the main tube in order to accurately measure the flow rate. A cross slideway and a guide devicc were used to prevent the pitot vibration. Method of equal annular area was used in the measurement. The error was less than 4.2%. A pitot cylinder flowmeter was set also on the main tube to supervise the total flow rate of the third loop

  15. Nitrogen rate strategies for reducing yield-scaled nitrous oxide emissions in maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xu; Nafziger, Emerson D.; Pittelkow, Cameron M.

    2017-12-01

    Mitigating nitrogen (N) losses from agriculture without negatively impacting crop productivity is a pressing environmental and economic challenge. Reductions in N fertilizer rate are often highlighted as a solution, yet the degree to which crop yields and economic returns may be impacted at the field-level remains unclear, in part due to limited data availability. Farmers are risk averse and potential yield losses may limit the success of voluntary N loss mitigation protocols, thus understanding field-level yield tradeoffs is critical to inform policy development. Using a case study of soil N2O mitigation in the US Midwest, we conducted an ex-post assessment of two economic and two environmental N rate reduction strategies to identify promising practices for maintaining maize yields and economic returns while reducing N2O emissions per unit yield (i.e. yield-scaled emissions) compared to an assumed baseline N input level. Maize yield response data from 201 on-farm N rate experiments were combined with an empirical equation predicting N2O emissions as a function of N rate. Results indicate that the economic strategy aimed at maximizing returns to N (MRTN) led to moderate but consistent reductions in yield-scaled N2O emissions with small negative impacts on yield and slight increases in median returns. The economic optimum N rate strategy reduced yield-scaled N2O emissions in 75% of cases but increased them otherwise, challenging the assumption that this strategy will automatically reduce environmental impacts per unit production. Both environmental strategies, one designed to increase N recovery efficiency and one to balance N inputs with grain N removal, further reduced yield-scaled N2O emissions but were also associated with negative yield penalties and decreased returns. These results highlight the inherent tension between achieving agronomic and economic goals while reducing environmental impacts which is often overlooked in policy discussions. To enable the

  16. Assessment of salivary flow rate: biologic variation and measure error.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongerius, P.H.; Limbeek, J. van; Rotteveel, J.J.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the applicability of the swab method in the measurement of salivary flow rate in multiple-handicap drooling children. To quantify the measurement error of the procedure and the biologic variation in the population. STUDY DESIGN: Cohort study. METHODS: In a repeated

  17. Analysis and Visualization of Urban Emission Measurements in Smart Cities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlers, Dirk; Kraemer, Frank Alexander; Braten, Anders Eivind

    2018-01-01

    Cities worldwide aim to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions and improve air quality for their citizens. Therefore, there is a need to implement smart city approaches to monitor, model, and understand local emissions to better guide these actions. We present our approach that deploys a number of...

  18. Locomotive emissions measurements for various blends of biodiesel fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this project was to assess the effects of various blends of biodiesel on locomotive engine exhaust emissions. The : emission tests were conducted on two locomotive models, a Tier 2 EMD SD70ACe and a Tier 1 Plus GE Dash9-44CW, using t...

  19. Acoustic emission signal measurements in pressure vessel testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peter, A.

    1984-01-01

    The number of acoustic emission events per plastically deformed unit of volume caused by artificial notches in real pressure vessels has been calculated taking into account reference voltage, distance between acoustic emission source and sensor as well as the effect of noise background. A test performed at a 100 m 3 gasholder verifies the theoretical considerations. (author)

  20. Database of normal human cerebral blood flow, cerebral blood volume, cerebral oxygen extraction fraction and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen measured by positron emission tomography with {sup 15}O-labelled carbon dioxide or water, carbon monoxide and oxygen: a multicentre study in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Hiroshi [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Akita Research Institute of Brain and Blood Vessels, Akita (Japan); Department of Nuclear Medicine and Radiology, Division of Brain Sciences, Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer, Tohoku University, 4-1 Seiryo-Machi, 980-8575, Aoba-Ku, Sendai (Japan); Kanno, Iwao [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Akita Research Institute of Brain and Blood Vessels, Akita (Japan); Kato, Chietsugu [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hokkaido University School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Sasaki, Toshiaki [Cyclotoron Research Center, Iwate Medical University, Morioka (Japan); Ishii, Kenji [Positron Medical Center, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, Tokyo (Japan); Ouchi, Yasuomi [Positron Medical Center, Hamamatsu Medical Center, Hamakita (Japan); Iida, Akihiko [Nagoya City Rehabilitation Center, Nagoya (Japan); Okazawa, Hidehiko [PET Unit, Research Institute, Shiga Medical Center, Moriyama (Japan); Hayashida, Kohei [Department of Radiology, National Cardiovascular Center, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Tsuyuguchi, Naohiro [Department of Neurosurgery, Osaka City University Medical School, Osaka (Japan); Ishii, Kazunari [Division of Imaging Research, Hyogo Institute for Aging Brain and Cognitive Disorders, Himeji, Hyogo (Japan); Kuwabara, Yasuo [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Senda, Michio [Department of Image-based Medicine, Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Kobe (Japan)

    2004-05-01

    Measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), cerebral oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO{sub 2}) by positron emission tomography (PET) with oxygen-15 labelled carbon dioxide (C{sup 15}O{sub 2}) or {sup 15}O-labelled water (H{sub 2}{sup 15}O), {sup 15}O-labelled carbon monoxide (C{sup 15}O) and {sup 15}O-labelled oxygen ({sup 15}O{sub 2}) is useful for diagnosis and treatment planning in cases of cerebrovascular disease. The measured values theoretically depend on various factors, which may differ between PET centres. This study explored the applicability of a database of {sup 15}O-PET by examining between-centre and within-centre variation in values. Eleven PET centres participated in this multicentre study; seven used the steady-state inhalation method, one used build-up inhalation and three used bolus administration of C{sup 15}O{sub 2} (or H{sub 2}{sup 15}O) and {sup 15}O{sub 2}. All used C{sup 15}O for measurement of CBV. Subjects comprised 70 healthy volunteers (43 men and 27 women; mean age 51.8{+-}15.1 years). Overall mean{+-}SD values for cerebral cortical regions were: CBF=44.4{+-}6.5 ml 100 ml{sup -1} min{sup -1}; CBV=3.8{+-}0.7 ml 100 ml{sup -1}; OEF=0.44{+-}0.06; CMRO{sub 2}=3.3{+-}0.5 ml 100 ml{sup -1} min{sup -1}. Significant between-centre variation was observed in CBV, OEF and CMRO{sub 2} by one-way analysis of variance. However, the overall inter-individual variation in CBF, CBV, OEF and CMRO{sub 2} was acceptably small. Building a database of normal cerebral haemodynamics obtained by the{sup 15}O-PET methods may be practicable. (orig.)

  1. Greenhouse gas emissions from wastewater treatment plants: measurements and carbon footprint assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delre, Antonio

    evaluation of WWTPs. Fair agreement of the plant-integrated CH4 emission rates was obtained when three analytical instruments, with different detection frequencies and precisions, were used in a simultaneous MTDM application at a WWTP. Emission rates differed between 1 and 18% from the mean emission rate...... quantified by all instruments. In the same campaign, the importance of a high plume signal within a plume traverse was shown, as this resulted in more reliable plant-integrated emission quantifications. An estimation of the MTDM detection limit was introduced by using inverse Gaussian plume modelling...

  2. Use of a Monte Carlo technique to complete a fragmented set of H2S emission rates from a wastewater treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauberger, Günther; Piringer, Martin; Baumann-Stanzer, Kathrin; Knauder, Werner; Petz, Erwin

    2013-12-15

    The impact of ambient concentrations in the vicinity of a plant can only be assessed if the emission rate is known. In this study, based on measurements of ambient H2S concentrations and meteorological parameters, the a priori unknown emission rates of a tannery wastewater treatment plant are calculated by an inverse dispersion technique. The calculations are determined using the Gaussian Austrian regulatory dispersion model. Following this method, emission data can be obtained, though only for a measurement station that is positioned such that the wind direction at the measurement station is leeward of the plant. Using the inverse transform sampling, which is a Monte Carlo technique, the dataset can also be completed for those wind directions for which no ambient concentration measurements are available. For the model validation, the measured ambient concentrations are compared with the calculated ambient concentrations obtained from the synthetic emission data of the Monte Carlo model. The cumulative frequency distribution of this new dataset agrees well with the empirical data. This inverse transform sampling method is thus a useful supplement for calculating emission rates using the inverse dispersion technique. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. On-chip plasmonic cavity-enhanced spontaneous emission rate at the zero-phonon line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siampour, Hamidreza; Kumar, Shailesh; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    Highly confined surface plasmon polariton (SPP) modes can be utilized to enhance light-matter interaction at the single emitter level of quantum optical systems [1-4]. Dielectric-loaded SPP waveguides (DLSPPWs) confine SPPs laterally with relatively low propagation loss, enabling to benefit both ...... and an up to 42-fold spontaneous emission rate enhancement at the zero-phonon line (a ∼7-fold resonance enhancement in addition to a ∼6-fold broadband enhancement) is achieved, revealing the potential of our approach for on-chip realization of quantum-optical networks....... from a large Purcell factor and from a large radiative efficiency (low quenching rates) [1, 2]. In this work, we present a DLSPPW-based Bragg cavity resonator to direct emission from a single diamond nitrogen vacancy (NV) center into the zero-phonon line (Fig. 1). A quality factor of ∼70 for the cavity...

  4. Gathering pipeline methane emissions in Fayetteville shale pipelines and scoping guidelines for future pipeline measurement campaigns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J. Zimmerle

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Gathering pipelines, which transport gas from well pads to downstream processing, are a sector of the natural gas supply chain for which little measured methane emissions data are available. This study performed leak detection and measurement on 96 km of gathering pipeline and the associated 56 pigging facilities and 39 block valves. The study found one underground leak accounting for 83% (4.0 kg CH4/hr of total measured emissions. Methane emissions for the 4684 km of gathering pipeline in the study area were estimated at 402 kg CH4/hr [95 to 1065 kg CH4/hr, 95% CI], or 1% [0.2% to 2.6%] of all methane emissions measured during a prior aircraft study of the same area. Emissions estimated by this study fall within the uncertainty range of emissions estimated using emission factors from EPA’s 2015 Greenhouse Inventory and study activity estimates. While EPA’s current inventory is based upon emission factors from distribution mains measured in the 1990s, this study indicates that using emission factors from more recent distribution studies could significantly underestimate emissions from gathering pipelines. To guide broader studies of pipeline emissions, we also estimate the fraction of the pipeline length within a basin that must be measured to constrain uncertainty of pipeline emissions estimates to within 1% of total basin emissions. The study provides both substantial insight into the mix of emission sources and guidance for future gathering pipeline studies, but since measurements were made in a single basin, the results are not sufficiently representative to provide methane emission factors at the regional or national level.

  5. QT measurement and heart rate correction during hypoglycemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Toke Folke; Randløv, Jette; Christensen, Leif Engmann

    2010-01-01

    induced by intravenous injection of two insulin types in a cross-over design. QT measurements were done using the slope-intersect (SI) and manual annotation (MA) methods. Heart rate correction was done using Bazett's (QTcB) and Fridericia's (QTcF) formulas. Results. The SI method showed significant......Introduction. Several studies show that hypoglycemia causes QT interval prolongation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of QT measurement methodology, heart rate correction, and insulin types during hypoglycemia. Methods. Ten adult subjects with type 1 diabetes had hypoglycemia...... prolongation at hypoglycemia for QTcB (42(6) ms; P measuring the QT interval has...

  6. Measuring Outdoor Air Intake Rates into Existing Building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisk, William; Sullivan, Douglas; Cohen, Sebastian; Han, Hwataik

    2009-04-16

    Practical and accurate technologies are needed for continuously measuring and controlling outdoor air (OA) intake rates in commercial building heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. This project evaluated two new measurement approaches. Laboratory experiments determined that OA flow rates were measurable with errors generally less than 10 percent using electronic air velocity probes installed between OA intake louver blades or at the outlet face of louvers. High accuracy was maintained with OA flow rates as low as 15 percent of the maximum for the louvers. Thus, with this measurement approach HVAC systems do not need separate OA intakes for minimum OA supply. System calibration parameters are required for each unique combination of louver type and velocity sensor location but calibrations are not necessary for each system installation. The research also determined that the accuracy of measuring OA flow rates with velocity probes located in the duct downstream of the intake louver was not improved by installing honeycomb airflow straighteners upstream of the probes. Errors varied with type of upstream louver, were as high as 100 percent, and were often greater than 25 percent. In conclusion, use of electronic air velocity probes between the blades of OA intake louvers or at the outlet face of louvers is a highly promising means of accurately measuring rates of OA flow into HVAC systems. The use of electronic velocity probes downstream of airflow straighteners is less promising, at least with the relatively small OA HVAC inlet systems employed in this research.

  7. Fiber optical dose rate measurement based on the luminescence of beryllium oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teichmann Tobias

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a fiber optical dose rate measurement system based on the radioluminescence and optically stimulated luminescence of beryllium oxide. The system consists of a small, radiation sensitive probe which is coupled to a light detection unit with a long and flexible light guide. Exposing the beryllium oxide probe to ionizing radiation results in the emission of light with an intensity which is proportional to the dose rate. Additionally, optically stimulated luminescence can be used to obtain dose and dose rate information during irradiation or retrospectively. The system is capable of real time dose rate measurements in fields of high dose rates and dose rate gradients and in complex, narrow geometries. This enables the application for radiation protection measurements as well as for quality control in radiotherapy. One inherent drawback of fiber optical dosimetry systems is the generation of Cherenkov radiation and luminescence in the light guide itself when it is exposed to ionizing radiation. This so called “stem” effect leads to an additional signal which introduces a deviation in the dose rate measurement and reduces the spatial resolution of the system, hence it has to be removed. The current system uses temporal discrimination of the effect for radioluminescence measurements in pulsed radiation fields and modulated optically stimulated luminescence for continuous irradiation conditions. This work gives an overview of the major results and discusses new-found obstacles of the applied methods of stem discrimination.

  8. Increased Ratio of Electron Transport to Net Assimilation Rate Supports Elevated Isoprenoid Emission Rate in Eucalypts under Drought1[W][OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dani, Kaidala Ganesha Srikanta; Jamie, Ian McLeod; Prentice, Iain Colin; Atwell, Brian James

    2014-01-01

    Plants undergoing heat and low-CO2 stresses emit large amounts of volatile isoprenoids compared with those in stress-free conditions. One hypothesis posits that the balance between reducing power availability and its use in carbon assimilation determines constitutive isoprenoid emission rates in plants and potentially even their maximum emission capacity under brief periods of stress. To test this, we used abiotic stresses to manipulate the availability of reducing power. Specifically, we examined the effects of mild to severe drought on photosynthetic electron transport rate (ETR) and net carbon assimilation rate (NAR) and the relationship between estimated energy pools and constitutive volatile isoprenoid emission rates in two species of eucalypts: Eucalyptus occidentalis (drought tolerant) and Eucalyptus camaldulensis (drought sensitive). Isoprenoid emission rates were insensitive to mild drought, and the rates increased when the decline in NAR reached a certain species-specific threshold. ETR was sustained under drought and the ETR-NAR ratio increased, driving constitutive isoprenoid emission until severe drought caused carbon limitation of the methylerythritol phosphate pathway. The estimated residual reducing power unused for carbon assimilation, based on the energetic status model, significantly correlated with constitutive isoprenoid emission rates across gradients of drought (r2 > 0.8) and photorespiratory stress (r2 > 0.9). Carbon availability could critically limit emission rates under severe drought and photorespiratory stresses. Under most instances of moderate abiotic stress levels, increased isoprenoid emission rates compete with photorespiration for the residual reducing power not invested in carbon assimilation. A similar mechanism also explains the individual positive effects of low-CO2, heat, and drought stresses on isoprenoid emission. PMID:25139160

  9. Assessment of Methane Emissions from Oil and Gas Production Pads using Mobile Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal Article Abstract --- "A mobile source inspection approach called OTM 33A was used to quantify short-term methane emission rates from 218 oil and gas production pads in Texas, Colorado, and Wyoming from 2010 to 2013. The emission rates were log-normally distributed with ...

  10. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 266 - Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride III Appendix III to Part 266 Protection of Environment... to Part 266—Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride Terrain...

  11. Natural gas facility methane emissions: measurements by tracer flux ratio in two US natural gas producing basins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara I. Yacovitch

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Methane (CH4 emission rates from a sample of natural gas facilities across industry sectors were quantified using the dual tracer flux ratio methodology. Measurements were conducted in study areas within the Fayetteville shale play, Arkansas (FV, Sept–Oct 2015, 53 facilities, and the Denver-Julesburg basin, Colorado, (DJ, Nov 2014, 21 facilities. Distributions of methane emission rates at facilities by type are computed and statistically compared with results that cover broader geographic regions in the US (Allen et al., 2013, Mitchell et al., 2015. DJ gathering station emission rates (kg CH4 hr–1 are lower, while FV gathering and production sites are statistically indistinguishable as compared to these multi-basin results. However, FV gathering station throughput-normalized emissions are statistically lower than multi-basin results (0.19% vs. 0.44%. This implies that the FV gathering sector is emitting less per unit of gas throughput than would be expected from the multi-basin distribution alone. The most common emission rate (i.e. mode of the distribution for facilities in this study is 40 kg CH4 hr–1 for FV gathering stations, 1.0 kg CH4 hr–1 for FV production pads, and 11 kg CH4 hr–1 for DJ gathering stations. The importance of study design is discussed, including the benefits of site access and data sharing with industry and of a scientist dedicated to measurement coordination and site choice under evolving wind conditions.

  12. Nitrous oxide emissions from a beech forest floor measured by eddy covariance and soil enclosure techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihlatie, M.; Rinne, J.; Ambus, P.

    2005-01-01

    Spring time nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from an old beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) forest were measured with eddy covariance (EC) and chamber techniques. The aim was to obtain information on the spatial and temporal variability in N2O emissions and link the emissions to soil environmental parameters...

  13. Methods for measuring gas emissions from naturally ventilated livestock buildings: Developments over the last decade and perspectives for improvement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ogink, N.W.M.; Mosquera Losada, J.; Calvet, S.; Zhang, G.

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this paper are: 1) to give an overview of the development of methods for measuring emission rates from naturally ventilated livestock buildings over the last decade, 2) to identify and evaluate strengths and weaknesses, 3) to summarise and conclude the current state-of-art of

  14. Gamma-ray emission profile measurements during JET ICRH discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howarth, P.J.A. [Birmingham Univ. (United Kingdom); Adams, J.M.; Bond, D.S.; Watkins, N. [AEA Technology, Harwell (United Kingdom); Jarvis, O.N.; Marcus, F.B.; Sadler, G.; Belle, P. van [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking

    1994-12-31

    Ion Cyclotron Resonant Heating (ICRH) that is tuned to minority fuel ions can induce an energy diffusion of the heated species and create high energy tail temperatures of {approx} 1 MeV. The most energetic of these accelerated minority ions can undergo nuclear reactions with impurity Be and C that produces {gamma}-ray emission from the decay of the excited product nuclei. This RF-induced {gamma}-ray emission has been recorded using the JET neutron emission profile diagnostic which is capable of distinguishing neutrons and {gamma}-rays. Appropriate data processing has enabled the RF-induced {gamma}-ray emission signals to be isolated from the {gamma}-ray emission signals associated with neutron interactions in the material surrounding the profile monitor. The 2-d {gamma}-ray emission profiles show that virtually all the radiation originates from the low field side of the RF resonance layer, as expected from RF-induced pitch angle diffusion. The emission profiles indicate the presence of a small population of resonant {sup 3}He ions that possess orbits lying near the passing-trapped boundary. (author) 6 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Development of Standardized Mobile Tracer Correlation Approach for Large Area Emission Measurements (DRAFT UNDER EPA REVIEW)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster-wittig, T. A.; Thoma, E.; Green, R.; Hater, G.; Swan, N.; Chanton, J.

    2013-12-01

    Improved understanding of air emissions from large area sources such as landfills, waste water ponds, open-source processing, and agricultural operations is a topic of increasing environmental importance. In many cases, the size of the area source, coupled with spatial-heterogeneity, make direct (on-site) emission assessment difficult; methane emissions, from landfills for example, can be particularly complex [Thoma et al, 2009]. Recently, whole-facility (remote) measurement approaches based on tracer correlation have been utilized [Scheutz et al, 2011]. The approach uses a mobile platform to simultaneously measure a metered-release of a conservative gas (the tracer) along with the target compound (methane in the case of landfills). The known-rate tracer release provides a measure of atmospheric dispersion at the downwind observing location allowing the area source emission to be determined by a ratio calculation [Green et al, 2010]. Although powerful in concept, the approach has been somewhat limited to research applications due to the complexities and cost of the high-sensitivity measurement equipment required to quantify the part-per billion levels of tracer and target gas at kilometer-scale distances. The advent of compact, robust, and easy to use near-infrared optical measurement systems (such as cavity ring down spectroscopy) allow the tracer correlation approach to be investigated for wider use. Over the last several years, Waste Management Inc., the U.S. EPA, and collaborators have conducted method evaluation activities to determine the viability of a standardized approach through execution of a large number of field measurement trials at U.S. landfills. As opposed to previous studies [Scheutz et al, 2011] conducted at night (optimal plume transport conditions), the current work evaluated realistic use-scenarios; these scenarios include execution by non-scientist personnel, daylight operation, and full range of atmospheric condition (all plume transport

  16. Accuracy of real time radiography burning rate measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaniyi, Bisola

    The design of a solid propellant rocket motor requires the determination of a propellant's burning-rate and its dependency upon environmental parameters. The requirement that the burning-rate be physically measured, establishes the need for methods and equipment to obtain such data. A literature review reveals that no measurement has provided the desired burning rate accuracy. In the current study, flash x-ray modeling and digitized film-density data were employed to predict motor-port area to length ratio. The pre-fired port-areas and base burning rate were within 2.5% and 1.2% of their known values, respectively. To verify the accuracy of the method, a continuous x-ray and a solid propellant rocket motor model (Plexiglas cylinder) were used. The solid propellant motor model was translated laterally through a real-time radiography system at different speeds simulating different burning rates. X-ray images were captured and the burning-rate was then determined. The measured burning rate was within 1.65% of the known values.

  17. Validating a new device for measuring tear evaporation rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohit, Athira; Ehrmann, Klaus; Naduvilath, Thomas; Willcox, Mark; Stapleton, Fiona

    2014-01-01

    To calibrate and validate a commercially available dermatology instrument to measure tear evaporation rate of contact lens wearers. A dermatology instrument was modified by attaching a swim goggle cup such that the cup sealed around the eye socket. Results for the unmodified instrument are dependent on probe area and enclosed volume. Calibration curves were established using a model eye, to account for individual variations in chamber volume and exposed area. Fifteen participants were recruited and the study included a contact lens wear and a no contact lens wear stage. Day and diurnal variation of the measurements were assessed by taking the measurement three times a day over 2 days. The coefficient of repeatability of the measurement was calculated and a linear mixed model assessed the influence of humidity, temperature, contact lens wear, day and diurnal variations on tear evaporation rate. The associations between variables were assessed using Pearson correlation coefficient. Absolute evaporation rates with and without contact lens wear were calculated based on the new calibration. The measurements were most repeatable during the evening with no lens wear (COR = 49 g m⁻² h) and least repeatable during the evening with contact lens wear (COR = 93 g m⁻² h). Humidity (p = 0.007), and contact lens wear (p evaporation rate. However, temperature (p = 0.54) diurnal variation (p = 0.85) and different days (p = 0.65) had no significant effect after controlling for humidity. Tear evaporation rates can be measured using a modified dermatology instrument. Measurements were higher and more variable with lens wear consistent with previous literature. Control of environmental conditions is important as a higher humidity results in a reduced evaporation rate. © 2013 The Authors Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics © 2013 The College of Optometrists.

  18. Study on Emission Measurement of Vehicle on Road Based on Binomial Logit Model

    OpenAIRE

    Aly, Sumarni Hamid; Selintung, Mary; Ramli, Muhammad Isran; Sumi, Tomonori

    2011-01-01

    This research attempts to evaluate emission measurement of on road vehicle. In this regard, the research develops failure probability model of vehicle emission test for passenger car which utilize binomial logit model. The model focuses on failure of CO and HC emission test for gasoline cars category and Opacity emission test for diesel-fuel cars category as dependent variables, while vehicle age, engine size, brand and type of the cars as independent variables. In order to imp...

  19. A review of chamber experiments for determining specific emission rates and investigating migration pathways of flame retardants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauert, Cassandra; Lazarov, Borislav; Harrad, Stuart; Covaci, Adrian; Stranger, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    The widespread use of flame retardants (FRs) in indoor products has led to their ubiquitous distribution within indoor microenvironments with many studies reporting concentrations in indoor air and dust. Little information is available however on emission of these compounds to air, particularly the measurement of specific emission rates (SERs), or the migration pathways leading to dust contamination. Such knowledge gaps hamper efforts to develop understanding of human exposure. This review summarizes published data on SERs of the following FRs released from treated products: polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs), tetrabromobisphenol-A (TBBPA), novel brominated flame retardants (NBFRs) and organophosphate flame retardants (PFRs), including a brief discussion of the methods used to derive these SERs. Also reviewed are published studies that utilize emission chambers for investigations/measurements of mass transfer of FRs to dust, discussing the chamber configurations and methods used for these experiments. A brief review of studies investigating correlations between concentrations detected in indoor air/dust and possible sources in the microenvironment is included along with efforts to model contamination of indoor environments. Critical analysis of the literature reveals that the major limitations with utilizing chambers to derive SERs for FRs arise due to the physicochemical properties of FRs. In particular, increased partitioning to chamber surfaces, airborne particles and dust, causes loss through “sink” effects and results in long times to reach steady state conditions inside the chamber. The limitations of chamber experiments are discussed as well as their potential for filling gaps in knowledge in this area.

  20. Improved optical flow velocity analysis in SO2 camera images of volcanic plumes - implications for emission-rate retrievals investigated at Mt Etna, Italy and Guallatiri, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gliß, Jonas; Stebel, Kerstin; Kylling, Arve; Sudbø, Aasmund

    2018-02-01

    Accurate gas velocity measurements in emission plumes are highly desirable for various atmospheric remote sensing applications. The imaging technique of UV SO2 cameras is commonly used to monitor SO2 emissions from volcanoes and anthropogenic sources (e.g. power plants, ships). The camera systems capture the emission plumes at high spatial and temporal resolution. This allows the gas velocities in the plume to be retrieved directly from the images. The latter can be measured at a pixel level using optical flow (OF) algorithms. This is particularly advantageous under turbulent plume conditions. However, OF algorithms intrinsically rely on contrast in the images and often fail to detect motion in low-contrast image areas. We present a new method to identify ill-constrained OF motion vectors and replace them using the local average velocity vector. The latter is derived based on histograms of the retrieved OF motion fields. The new method is applied to two example data sets recorded at Mt Etna (Italy) and Guallatiri (Chile). We show that in many cases, the uncorrected OF yields significantly underestimated SO2 emission rates. We further show that our proposed correction can account for this and that it significantly improves the reliability of optical-flow-based gas velocity retrievals. In the case of Mt Etna, the SO2 emissions of the north-eastern crater are investigated. The corrected SO2 emission rates range between 4.8 and 10.7 kg s-1 (average of 7.1 ± 1.3 kg s-1) and are in good agreement with previously reported values. For the Guallatiri data, the emissions of the central crater and a fumarolic field are investigated. The retrieved SO2 emission rates are between 0.5 and 2.9 kg s-1 (average of 1.3 ± 0.5 kg s-1) and provide the first report of SO2 emissions from this remotely located and inaccessible volcano.

  1. Measurement of viscosity of slush at high shear rates

    OpenAIRE

    小林, 俊一; 川村, 公之; 津川, 圭一; 和泉, 薫; Kobayashi, Shun'ichi; Kawamura, Kimiyuki; Tugawa, Keiichi; Izumi, Kaoru

    1988-01-01

    Measurements of viscosity of slush were carried out using a method of flow along an inclined smooth surface in a 0℃cold room. The method was used to get the values of viscosity under high shear rates (25 and 75s^). From our experiments two important results were obtained: 1) the viscosity of slush decreases with increasing shear rates; 2) The fluid behavior is pseudoplastic that the values of non-Newtonian index of viscosity were less than unity.

  2. Acoustic Emission Measurements for Tool Wear Evaluation in Drilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Martín P.; Migliori, Julio; Ruzzante, José E.; D'Attellis, Carlos E.

    2009-03-01

    In this work, the tool condition in a drilling process of SAE 1040 steel samples was studied by means of acoustic emission. The studied drill bits were modified with artificial and real failures, such as different degrees of wear in the cutting edge and in the outer corner. Some correlation between mean power of the acoustic emission parameters and the drill bit wear condition was found.

  3. Development of nondestructive measurement of cold work rate, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamimura, Hideaki; Igarashi, Miyuki; Satoh, Masakazu; Miura, Makoto

    1978-01-01

    Cold-worked type 316 stainless steel will be used as fuel cladding material for the proto-type fast reactor MONJU. Cold work rate is an important parameter in swelling behavior of fuel cladding. It has been shown that austenitic stainless steel undergoes martensitic transformation during cold working. Nondestructive evaluation of cold work rate will be expected by measuring residual magnetism produced in the presence of martensitic phase when cold worked austenitic stainless steel is magnetized. In the previous work, the residual magnetism of cladding tubes of type 316 stainless steel was measured. The results have shown high degree of the correlation between residual magnetism and cold work rate. This paper reports the results of measurement on cold-rolled type 316 stainless steel plate samples. Dimensions of the specimens are 100 mm long and 3.5 and 7 mm wide. The apparatus and experimental procedures were similar to the previous work. Good agreement was found between the estimated cold work rate obtained in the previous work and that for cold rolled plate specimens. Measurement of residual magnetism in identical direction with magnetization showed smaller dispersion of data as compared with that in transverse direction. The residual magnetism near specimen surface hardly decreased when the surface of specimen was chemically removed. The reason for the comparative decrease in residual magnetism at 10% and 15% cold work rate is not clear. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  4. Estimating average glandular dose by measuring glandular rate in mammograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Sachiko; Azuma, Yoshiharu; Sumimoto, Tetsuhiro; Eiho, Shigeru

    2003-01-01

    The glandular rate of the breast was objectively measured in order to calculate individual patient exposure dose (average glandular dose) in mammography. By employing image processing techniques and breast-equivalent phantoms with various glandular rate values, a conversion curve for pixel value to glandular rate can be determined by a neural network. Accordingly, the pixel values in clinical mammograms can be converted to the glandular rate value for each pixel. The individual average glandular dose can therefore be calculated using the individual glandular rates on the basis of the dosimetry method employed for quality control in mammography. In the present study, a data set of 100 craniocaudal mammograms from 50 patients was used to evaluate our method. The average glandular rate and average glandular dose of the data set were 41.2% and 1.79 mGy, respectively. The error in calculating the individual glandular rate can be estimated to be less than ±3%. When the calculation error of the glandular rate is taken into consideration, the error in the individual average glandular dose can be estimated to be 13% or less. We feel that our method for determining the glandular rate from mammograms is useful for minimizing subjectivity in the evaluation of patient breast composition. (author)

  5. Rapid Measurement of Neutron Dose Rate for Transport Index

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, R.L.

    2000-01-01

    A newly available neutron dose equivalent remmeter with improved sensitivity and energy response has been put into service at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS). This instrument is being used to expedite measurement of the Transport Index and as an ALARA tool to identify locations where slightly elevated neutron dose equivalent rates exist. The meter is capable of measuring dose rates as low as 0.2 μSv per hour (20 μrem per hour). Tests of the angular response and energy response of the instrument are reported. Calculations of the theoretical instrument response made using MCNPtrademark are reported for materials typical of those being shipped

  6. Three-dimensional spatial imaging in multiphoton ionization rate measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bredy, Richard; Camp, Howard A.; Nguyen, Hai; Awata, Takaaki; Shan Bing; Chang Zhenghu; DePaola, B.D.

    2004-01-01

    An experiment is described in which an apparatus is used to demonstrate the feasibility of measuring multiphoton photoionization rates in the interaction of short pulsed lasers with atoms or molecules. With this methodology, the ionization rate is measured as a function of the spatial position in the beam-waist region of the laser through the direct three-dimensional spatial imaging of the ionization events. Thus, if the spatial dependence of the laser beam intensity were known, a series of experiments could yield the intensity dependence of multiphoton ionization without the assumptions or errors that are generally inherent in the integration over one or more dimensions in the laser focal volume

  7. Measurement of thoron exhalation rates from building materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de With, G; de Jong, P; Röttger, A

    2014-09-01

    Thoron (220Rn) exhalation from building materials has become increasingly recognized as a potential source for radiation exposure in dwellings. However, contrary to radon (220Rn), limited information on thoron exposure is available. The purpose of this study is to develop a test method for the determination of the thoron exhalation rate from building materials. The method is validated, and subsequently the thoron exhalation rates from 10 widely-applied concretes, gypsums, brick, limestone, and mortar are determined. The measured thoron exhalation rates of these materials range from 0.01 Bq m-2 s-1 to 0.43 Bq m-2 s-1, with relative standard uncertainties between 6% to 14%.

  8. Laser Measurements of the H Atom + Ozone Rate Constant at Atmospheric Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Smith, G. P.; Peng, J.; Reppert, K. J.; Callahan, S. L.

    2015-12-01

    The exothermic H + O3 reaction produces OH(v) Meinel band emissions, used to derive mesospheric H concentrations and chemical heating rates. We have remeasured its rate constant to reduce resulting uncertainties and the measurement extend to lower mesospheric temperatures using modern laser techniques. H atoms are produced by pulsed ultraviolet laser trace photolysis of O3, followed by reaction of O(D) with added H2. A second, delayed, frequency-mixed dye laser measures the reaction decay rate with the remaining ozone by laser induced fluorescence. We monitor either the H atom decay by 2 photon excitation at 205 nm and detection of red fluorescence, or the OH(v=9) product time evolution with excitation of the B-X (0,9) band at 237 nm and emission in blue B-A bands. By cooling the enclosed low pressure flow cell we obtained measurements from 146-305 K. Small kinetic modeling corrections are made for secondary regeneration of H atoms. The results fully confirm the current NASA JPL recommendation for this rate constant, and establish its extrapolation down to the lower temperatures of the mesosphere. This work was supported by the NSF Aeronomy Program and an NSF Physics summer REU student grant.

  9. Flow Rate Measurement in Multiphase Flow Rig: Radiotracer and Conventional

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazrul Hizam Yusoff; Noraishah Othman; Nurliyana Abdullah; Amirul Syafiq Mohd Yunos; Rasif Mohd Zain; Roslan Yahya

    2015-01-01

    Applications of radiotracer technology are prevalent throughout oil refineries worldwide, and this industry is one of the main users and beneficiaries of the technology. Radioactive tracers have been used to a great extent in many applications i.e. flow rate measurement, RTD, plant integrity evaluation and enhancing oil production in oil fields. Chemical and petrochemical plants are generally continuously operating and technically complex where the radiotracer techniques are very competitive and largely applied for troubleshooting inspection and process analysis. Flow rate measurement is a typical application of radiotracers. For flow measurements, tracer data are important, rather than the RTD models. Research is going on in refining the existing methods for single phase flow measurement, and in developing new methods for multiphase flow without sampling. The tracer techniques for single phase flow measurements are recognized as ISO standards. This paper presents technical aspect of laboratory experiments, which have been carried out using Molybdenum-99 - Mo99 (radiotracer) to study and determine the flow rate of liquid in multiphase flow rig. The multiphase flow rig consists of 58.7 m long and 20 cm diameter pipeline that can accommodate about 0.296 m 3 of liquid. Tap water was used as liquid flow in pipeline and conventional flow meters were also installed at the flow rig. The flow rate results; radiotracer and conventional flow meter were compared. The total count method was applied for radiotracer technique and showed the comparable results with conventional flow meter. (author)

  10. Regional cerebral glucose consumption measured by positron emission tomography in patients with Wilson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuwert, T.; Scholz, D.; Milz, M.; Herzog, H.; Feinendegen, L.E.; Hefter, H.; Weiss, P.; Arendt, G.; Loken, M.; Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis, MN; Hennerici, M.

    1992-01-01

    Using positron emission tomography (PET), the regional cerebral metabolic rate of glucose consumption (rCMRGlc) was measured in 14 patients with Wilson's disease (WD) and 23 normal subjects. In WD patients, cerebellar, striatal and - to a lesser extent - cortical and thalamic rCMRGlc were significantly decreased compared with controls. Striatal rCMRGlc was significantly reduced in those 4 patients who had recently started decoppering therapy as compared with striatal rCMRGlc measured in those 10 patients with longer duration of medication. Caudate rCMRGlc correlated significantly with various signs of extrapyramidal dysfunction. Cerebellar, thalamic and cortical rCMRGlc correlated significantly with the severity of pyramidal signs. These data indicate that the PET measurement of rCMRGlc may be a useful tool to evaluate cerebral involvement in WD and to monitor the response to treatment. (orig.)

  11. Measuring Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks Across California Land Cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, M. L.

    2017-12-01

    Significant reductions in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are needed to limit rising planetary temperatures that will otherwise limit Earth's capacity to support life, introducing geopolitical instability. To help mitigate this threat, California has legislated landmark reductions in state-level greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions that set an example for broader action. Beginning with relatively assured reduction of current emissions to 1990 levels by 2020, future goals are much more challenging with 40% and 80% reductions below 1990 emissions by 2030 and 2050, respectively. While the majority of the reductions must focus on fossil fuels, inventory estimates of non-CO2 GHG emissions (i.e., CH4, N2O, and industrial compounds) constitute 15% of the total, suggesting reductions are required across multiple land use sectors. However, recent atmospheric inversion studies show methane and nitrous oxide (CH4 & N2O) emissions exceed current inventory estimates by factors of 1.2-1.8 and 1.6-2.6 (at 95% confidence), respectively, perhaps constituting up to 30% of State total emissions. The discrepancy is likely because current bottom-up models used for inventories do not accurately capture important management or biophysical factors. In the near term, process level experiments and sector-specific inversions are being planned to quantify the factors controlling non-CO2 GHG emissions for several of the dominant emission sectors. For biosphere carbon, California forests lands, which also depend on the combination of management, climate, and weather, lost above ground carbon from 2001-2010, and may be expected to lose soil and root carbon as a longer-term result. Here, it is important to identify and apply the best principles in forestry and agriculture to increase carbon stocks in depleted forest and agricultural areas, focusing on approaches that provide resilience to future climate and weather variations. Taken together, improved atmospheric, plant, and soil observations, together

  12. Correlation measurements of sodium flow rate with magnetic sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kebadze, B.V.; Krasnoyarov, N.V.; Adamovskij, L.A.; Golushko, V.V.; Sroelov, V.S.

    1978-01-01

    The results of bench-mark experiments and those carried out at the BOR-60 reactor to measure the sodium coolant flow rate by a correlation method are presented. The method is based on detecting the eddy type flow hydraulic nonuniformities using magnetic flowmeters. The measurements were fulfilled in a broad range of flow rates (G=10-10 4 m 3 /h, Re=2x10 5 -2x10 7 ). The measured and calculated mutual correlation functions are presented with parallel and perpendicular orientations of the flowmeters magnetic fields. A good accord is stated. Prerequirements to the arrangement of the measuring systems are formulated. As an important advantage of the correlation method a possibility of the flowmeter calibration in situ is hydhlighted

  13. Indoor acrolein emission and decay rates resulting from domestic cooking events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaman, Vincent Y.; Bennett, Deborah H.; Cahill, Thomas M.

    2009-12-01

    Acrolein (2-propenal) is a common constituent of both indoor and outdoor air, can exacerbate asthma in children, and may contribute to other chronic lung diseases. Recent studies have found high indoor levels of acrolein and other carbonyls compared to outdoor ambient concentrations. Heated cooking oils produce considerable amounts of acrolein, thus cooking is likely an important source of indoor acrolein. A series of cooking experiments were conducted to determine the emission rates of acrolein and other volatile carbonyls for different types of cooking oils (canola, soybean, corn and olive oils) and deep-frying different food items. Similar concentrations and emission rates of carbonyls were found when different vegetable oils were used to deep-fry the same food product. The food item being deep-fried was generally not a significant source of carbonyls compared to the cooking oil. The oil cooking events resulted in high concentrations of acrolein that were in the range of 26.4-64.5 μg m -3. These concentrations exceed all the chronic regulatory exposure limits and many of the acute exposure limits. The air exchange rate and the decay rate of the carbonyls were monitored to estimate the half-life of the carbonyls. The half-life for acrolein was 14.4 ± 2.6 h, which indicates that indoor acrolein concentrations can persist for considerable time after cooking in poorly-ventilated homes.

  14. Analysis of Emission Effects Related to Drivers’ Compliance Rates for Cooperative Vehicle-Infrastructure System at Signalized Intersections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruohua Liao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Unknown remaining time of signal phase at a signalized intersection generally results in extra accelerations and decelerations that increase variations of operating conditions and thus emissions. A cooperative vehicle-infrastructure system can reduce unnecessary speed changes by establishing communications between vehicles and the signal infrastructure. However, the environmental benefits largely depend on drivers’ compliance behaviors. To quantify the effects of drivers’ compliance rates on emissions, this study applied VISSIM 5.20 (Planung Transport Verkehr AG, Karlsruhe, Germany to develop a simulation model for a signalized intersection, in which light duty vehicles were equipped with a cooperative vehicle-infrastructure system. A vehicle-specific power (VSP-based model was used to estimate emissions. Based on simulation data, the effects of different compliance rates on VSP distributions, emission factors, and total emissions were analyzed. The results show the higher compliance rate decreases the proportion of VSP bin = 0, which means that the frequencies of braking and idling were lower and light duty vehicles ran more smoothly at the intersection if more light duty vehicles complied with the cooperative vehicle-infrastructure system, and emission factors for light duty vehicles decreased significantly as the compliance rate increased. The case study shows higher total emission reductions were observed with higher compliance rate for all of CO2, NOx, HC, and CO emissions. CO2 was reduced most significantly, decreased by 16% and 22% with compliance rates of 0.3 and 0.7, respectively.

  15. Analysis of Emission Effects Related to Drivers' Compliance Rates for Cooperative Vehicle-Infrastructure System at Signalized Intersections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Ruohua; Chen, Xumei; Yu, Lei; Sun, Xiaofei

    2018-01-12

    Unknown remaining time of signal phase at a signalized intersection generally results in extra accelerations and decelerations that increase variations of operating conditions and thus emissions. A cooperative vehicle-infrastructure system can reduce unnecessary speed changes by establishing communications between vehicles and the signal infrastructure. However, the environmental benefits largely depend on drivers' compliance behaviors. To quantify the effects of drivers' compliance rates on emissions, this study applied VISSIM 5.20 (Planung Transport Verkehr AG, Karlsruhe, Germany) to develop a simulation model for a signalized intersection, in which light duty vehicles were equipped with a cooperative vehicle-infrastructure system. A vehicle-specific power (VSP)-based model was used to estimate emissions. Based on simulation data, the effects of different compliance rates on VSP distributions, emission factors, and total emissions were analyzed. The results show the higher compliance rate decreases the proportion of VSP bin = 0, which means that the frequencies of braking and idling were lower and light duty vehicles ran more smoothly at the intersection if more light duty vehicles complied with the cooperative vehicle-infrastructure system, and emission factors for light duty vehicles decreased significantly as the compliance rate increased. The case study shows higher total emission reductions were observed with higher compliance rate for all of CO₂, NO x , HC, and CO emissions. CO₂ was reduced most significantly, decreased by 16% and 22% with compliance rates of 0.3 and 0.7, respectively.

  16. Analysis of Emission Effects Related to Drivers’ Compliance Rates for Cooperative Vehicle-Infrastructure System at Signalized Intersections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Ruohua; Yu, Lei; Sun, Xiaofei

    2018-01-01

    Unknown remaining time of signal phase at a signalized intersection generally results in extra accelerations and decelerations that increase variations of operating conditions and thus emissions. A cooperative vehicle-infrastructure system can reduce unnecessary speed changes by establishing communications between vehicles and the signal infrastructure. However, the environmental benefits largely depend on drivers’ compliance behaviors. To quantify the effects of drivers’ compliance rates on emissions, this study applied VISSIM 5.20 (Planung Transport Verkehr AG, Karlsruhe, Germany) to develop a simulation model for a signalized intersection, in which light duty vehicles were equipped with a cooperative vehicle-infrastructure system. A vehicle-specific power (VSP)-based model was used to estimate emissions. Based on simulation data, the effects of different compliance rates on VSP distributions, emission factors, and total emissions were analyzed. The results show the higher compliance rate decreases the proportion of VSP bin = 0, which means that the frequencies of braking and idling were lower and light duty vehicles ran more smoothly at the intersection if more light duty vehicles complied with the cooperative vehicle-infrastructure system, and emission factors for light duty vehicles decreased significantly as the compliance rate increased. The case study shows higher total emission reductions were observed with higher compliance rate for all of CO2, NOx, HC, and CO emissions. CO2 was reduced most significantly, decreased by 16% and 22% with compliance rates of 0.3 and 0.7, respectively. PMID:29329214

  17. Comparison of two models for phonon assisted tunneling field enhanced emission from defects in Ge measured by DLTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pienaar, J., E-mail: jac_pienaar@hotmail.com [Department of Physics, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa); Meyer, W.E.; Auret, F.D.; Coelho, S.M.M. [Department of Physics, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa)

    2012-05-15

    Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS) was used to measure the field enhanced emission rate from a defect introduced in n-type Ge. The defect was introduced through low energy ({+-}80 eV) inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etching using Ar. The defect, named EP{sub 0.31}, had an energy level 0.31 eV below the conduction band. Models of Pons and Makram-Ebeid (1979) and Ganichev and Prettl (1997) , which describe emission due to phonon assisted tunneling, were fitted to the observed electric field dependence of the emission rate. The model of Pons and Makram-Ebeid fitted the measured emission rate more accurately than Ganichev and Prettl. However the model of Ganichev and Prettl has only two parameters, while the model of Pons and Makram-Ebeid has four. Both models showed a transition in the dominant emission mechanism from a weak electron-phonon coupling below 152.5 K to a strong electron-phonon coupling above 155 K. After the application of a {chi}{sup 2} goodness of fit test, it was determined that the model of Pons and Makram-Ebeid describes the data well, while that of Ganichev and Prettl does not.

  18. Measurement of droplet vaporization rate enhancement caused by acoustic disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, T. J.; Winter, M.

    1992-10-01

    Advanced laser diagnostics are being applied to quantify droplet vaporization enhancement in the presence of acoustic fields which can lead to instability in liquid-fueled rockets. While models have been developed to describe the interactions between subcritical droplet vaporization and acoustic fields in the surrounding gases, they have not been verified experimentally. In the super critical environment of a rocket engine combustor, little is understood about how the injected fluid is distributed. Experiments in these areas have been limited because of the lack of diagnostic techniques capable of providing quantitative results. Recently, however, extremely accurate vaporization rate measurements have been performed on droplets in a subcritical environment using morphology-dependent resonances (MDR's) in which fluorescence from an individual droplet provides information about its diameter. Initial measurements on methanol droplets behind a pressure pulse with a pressure ratio of 1.2 indicated that the evaporation rate in the first few microsec after wave passage was extremely high. Subsequent measurements have been made to validate these results using MDR's acquired from similarly-sized droplets using a pulse with a 1.1 pressure ratio. A baseline measurement was also made using a non evaporative fluid under similar Weber and Reynolds number conditions. The MDR technique employed for these measurements is explained and the facilities are described. The evaporation measurement results are shown and the rates observed from different droplet materials and different wave strengths are compared.

  19. Assessing Rates of Global Warming Emissions from Port- Fuel Injection and Gasoline Direct Injection Engines in Light-Duty Passenger Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, D.; , D., Vi; Durbin, T.; Karavalakis, G.; Asa-Awuku, A. A.

    2013-12-01

    Passenger vehicles are known emitters of climate warming pollutants. CO2 from automobile emissions are an anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) and a large contributor to global warming. Worldwide, CO2 emissions from passenger vehicles are responsible for 11% of the total CO2 emissions inventory. Black Carbon (BC), another common vehicular emission, may be the second largest contributor to global warming (after CO2). Currently, 52% of BC emissions in the U.S are from the transportation sector, with ~10% originating from passenger vehicles. The share of pollutants from passenger gasoline vehicles is becoming larger due to the reduction of BC from diesel vehicles. Currently, the majority of gasoline passenger vehicles in the United States have port- fuel injection (PFI) engines. Gasoline direct injection (GDI) engines have increased fuel economy compared to the PFI engine. GDI vehicles are predicted to dominate the U.S. passenger vehicle market in the coming years. The method of gasoline injection into the combustion chamber is the primary difference between these two technologies, which can significantly impact primary emissions from light-duty vehicles (LDV). Our study will measure LDV climate warming emissions and assess the impact on climate due to the change in U.S vehicle technologies. Vehicles were tested on a light- duty chassis dynamometer for emissions of CO2, methane (CH4), and BC. These emissions were measured on F3ederal and California transient test cycles and at steady-state speeds. Vehicles used a gasoline blend of 10% by volume ethanol (E10). E10 fuel is now found in 95% of gasoline stations in the U.S. Data is presented from one GDI and one PFI vehicle. The 2012 Kia Optima utilizes GDI technology and has a large market share of the total GDI vehicles produced in the U.S. In addition, The 2012 Toyota Camry, equipped with a PFI engine, was the most popular vehicle model sold in the U.S. in 2012. Methane emissions were ~50% lower for the GDI technology

  20. Measurement of rates of cholesterol synthesis using tritiated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietschy, J.M.; Spady, D.K.

    1984-01-01

    Rates of sterol synthesis in various tissues commonly are assessed by assaying levels of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase on isolated microsomes or by measuring the rates of incorporation of various 14 C-labeled substrates or [ 3 H]water into cholesterol by whole cell preparations in vitro or by the tissues of the whole animal in vivo. While measurement of activities of HMG-CoA reductase or rates of incorporation of 14 C-labeled substrates into cholesterol give useful relative rates of sterol production, neither method yields absolute rates of cholesterol synthesis. The use of [ 3 H]water circumvents the problem of variable and unknown dilution of the specific activity of the precursor pool encountered when 14 C-labeled substrates are used and does yield absolute rates of cholesterol synthesis provided that the 3 H/C incorporation ratio is known for a particular tissue. In 12 different experimental situations it has been found that from 21 to 27 micrograms atoms of 3 H are incorporated into cholesterol from [ 3 H]water in different tissues of several animal species, so that the 3 H/C incorporation ratio is similar under nearly all experimental conditions and varies from 0.78 to 1.00. When administered in vivo, [ 3 H]water rapidly equilibrates with intracellular water and is incorporated into sterols within the various organs at rates that are linear with respect to time. From such data it is possible to obtain absolute rates of cholesterol synthesis in the whole animal and in the various organs of the animal. Current data suggest, therefore, that use of [ 3 H]water yields the most accurate rates of cholesterol synthesis both in vitro and in vivo

  1. Heart rate measurement based on face video sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fang; Zhou, Qin-Wu; Wu, Peng; Chen, Xing; Yang, Xiaofeng; Yan, Hong-jian

    2015-03-01

    This paper proposes a new non-contact heart rate measurement method based on photoplethysmography (PPG) theory. With this method we can measure heart rate remotely with a camera and ambient light. We collected video sequences of subjects, and detected remote PPG signals through video sequences. Remote PPG signals were analyzed with two methods, Blind Source Separation Technology (BSST) and Cross Spectral Power Technology (CSPT). BSST is a commonly used method, and CSPT is used for the first time in the study of remote PPG signals in this paper. Both of the methods can acquire heart rate, but compared with BSST, CSPT has clearer physical meaning, and the computational complexity of CSPT is lower than that of BSST. Our work shows that heart rates detected by CSPT method have good consistency with the heart rates measured by a finger clip oximeter. With good accuracy and low computational complexity, the CSPT method has a good prospect for the application in the field of home medical devices and mobile health devices.

  2. Sodium flow rate measurement method of annular linear induction pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araseki, Hideo; Kirillov, Igor R.; Preslitsky, Gennady V.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We found a new method of flow rate monitoring of electromagnetic pump. ► The method is very simple and does not require a large space. ► The method was verified with an experiment and a numerical analysis. ► The experimental data and the numerical results are in good agreement. - Abstract: The present paper proposes a method for measuring sodium flow rate of annular linear induction pumps. The feature of the method lies in measuring the leaked magnetic field with measuring coils near the stator end on the outlet side and in correlating it with the sodium flow rate. This method is verified through an experiment and a numerical analysis. The data obtained in the experiment reveals that the correlation between the leaked magnetic field and the sodium flow rate is almost linear. The result of the numerical analysis agrees with the experimental data. The present method will be particularly effective to sodium flow rate monitoring of each one of plural annular linear induction pumps arranged in parallel in a vessel which forms a large-scale pump unit.

  3. In-situ virtual metrology for the silicon-dioxide etch rate by using optical emission spectroscopy data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Boomsoo; Hong, Sangjeen

    2014-01-01

    As a useful tool for process control in a high volume semiconductor manufacturing environment, virtual metrology for the etch rate in a plasma etch process is investigated using optical emission spectroscopy (OES) data. Virtual metrology is a surrogate measurement taken from the process instead of from direct measurement, and it can provide in-situ metrology of a wafer's geometry from a predictive model. A statistical regression model that correlates the selected wavelengths of the optical emission spectra to the etch rate is established using the OES data collected over 20 experimental runs. In addition, an argon actinometry study is employed to quantify the OES data, and it provides valuable insight into the analysis of the OES data. The established virtual metrology model is further verified with an additional 20 runs of data. As a result, the virtual metrology model with both process recipe tool data and in-situ data shows higher prediction accuracy by as much as 56% compared with either the process recipe tool data or the in-situ data alone.

  4. Preliminary evaluation of a method using an FID (flame ionization detector) for measurement of methanol in auto emissions. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabele, P.A.; Ray, W.D.; Duncan, J.; Burton, C.

    1987-09-01

    This report evaluates a simplified technique for estimating methanol emission rates in auto exhaust. The technique, referred to as the FID Bubbled Method or FBM, is based in principle on the fact that, while hydrocarbons are not readily absorbed in water, methanol is. Hence, by using a heated flame ionization detector to measure the organic mass in samples before and after bubbling them in water, the quantity of methanol originally present can be estimated by taking the difference between the measurements. Evaluation of the method was done by comparing methanol measurements using the FBM with measurements made using an established reference method. Results showed poor to fair agreement between the two methods. The FBM appeared better at estimating methanol emission rates from evaporative tests than from exhaust tests and also exhibited better accuracy for samples containing higher levels of methanol

  5. Inter-Observer Agreement in Measuring Respiratory Rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Louise Gramstrup; Folkestad, Lars; Brodersen, Jacob Broder

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Respiratory rate (RR) is an important vital sign which is strongly correlated with in-hospital mortality. At the same time, RR is the most likely vital sign to be omitted when assessing a patient. We believe that one reason for this could be the difficulty in measure the RR, since...

  6. High-temperature rate constant measurements for OH+xylenes

    KAUST Repository

    Elwardani, Ahmed Elsaid; Badra, Jihad; Farooq, Aamir

    2015-01-01

    The overall rate constants for the reactions of hydroxyl (OH) radicals with o-xylene (k 1), m-xylene (k 2), and p-xylene (k 3) were measured behind reflected shock waves over 890-1406K at pressures of 1.3-1.8atm using OH laser absorption near 306

  7. Intercalibration of mussel Mytilus edulis clearance rate measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kjerulf Petersen, J.; Bougrier, S.; Smaal, A.C.; Garen, P.; Robert, S.; Larsen, J.E.N.; Brummelhuis, E.B.M.

    2004-01-01

    Clearance rate (CR) was measured in blue mussels Mytilus edulis L. from Aiguillon Bay and the Oosterschelde using 3 different methods: the flow-through method, the bio-deposition method and the indirect or clearance method. CR differed significantly as a function of the method used and of the origin

  8. Apparatus to measure emissivities of metallic films between 90K and room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bekeris, V I [Nunez Univ. Nacional (Argentina). Faculdad de Ciencias Exactas Y Naturales; Ramos, E D [Santa Rosa Univ. Nacional (Argentina). Facultad de Ciencias Exactas Y Naturales; Sanchez, D H [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina). Centro Atomico Bariloche

    1975-09-01

    The development of multilayer insulations is aerospace and cryogenic required to know the emissivity of the metallic films used as reflective layers. This work describes an emissometer that measures the total hemispherical emissivity of metallic films evaporated on polyester substrates. The apparatus works at liquid oxigen temperatures and permits to get emissivities from 90K to room temperatures within a 15% precision. The emissometer construction and operation are described in detail. Results of measurements done on Single Aluminized Mylar are presented.

  9. Apparatus to measure emissivities of metallic films between 90K and room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekeris, V.I.; Ramos, E.D.; Sanchez, D.H.

    1975-01-01

    The development of multilayer insulations is aerospace and cryogenic required to know the emissivity of the metallic films used as reflective layers. This work describes an emissometer that measures the total hemispherical emissivity of metallic films evaporated on polyester substrates. The apparatus works at liquid oxigen temperatures and permits to get emissivities from 90K to room temperatures within a 15% precision. The emissometer construction and operation are described in detail. Results of measurements done on Single Aluminized Mylar are presented [pt

  10. Construction and Operation of a Ventilated Hood System for Measuring Greenhouse Gas and Volatile Organic Compound Emissions from Cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjing Zhao

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent interest in greenhouse gas emissions from ruminants, such as cattle, has spawned a need for affordable, precise, and accurate methods for the measurement of gaseous emissions arising from enteric fermentation. A new head hood system for cattle designed to capture and quantify emissions was recently developed at the University of California, Davis. The system consists of two head hoods, two vacuum pumps, and an instrumentation cabinet housing the required data collection equipment. This system has the capability of measuring carbon dioxide, methane, ethanol, methanol, water vapor, nitrous oxide, acetic acid emissions and oxygen consumption in real-time. A unique aspect of the hoods is the front, back, and sides are made of clear polycarbonate sheeting allowing the cattle a full range of vision during gas sampling. Recovery rates for these slightly negative pressure chambers were measured ranging from 97.6 to 99.3 percent. This system can capture high quality data for use in improving emission inventories and evaluating gaseous emission mitigation strategies.

  11. Ventilation rate in equilibrium factor measurements with solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil, L.R.; Leitao, R.M.S.; Marques, A.; Rivera, A.

    1994-08-01

    Ventilation rate values are calculated from track density measurements in solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD), both when ventilation is the main cause of radioactive disequilibrium in radon progeny and when it shares importance with other agents. The method consists in exposing a SSNTD of high intrinsic efficiency (CR-39) in filtered and unfiltered conditions and, in addition, covered with a thin Aluminium foil, to stop alpha particles from 218 Po and 222 Rn. No calibrations are required but, when necessary, independent measurements of the loss rates of radioactivity to aerosol and to walls have to perform. Ventilation rates depend upon geometry detection efficiencies for alpha particles, here obtained by Monte Carlo simulation, taking into account the space distribution of emission positions. This may lead to sizeable corrections in ventilation and equilibrium factor values. Since geometric detection efficiencies depend upon alpha-particle ranges in air, the influences of barometric variables are also discussed. (author). 7 refs

  12. Positron emission tomography suggests that the rate of progression of idiopathic parkinsonism is slow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatt, M.H.; Snow, B.J.; Martin, W.R.; Pate, B.D.; Ruth, T.J.; Calne, D.B.

    1991-01-01

    The authors performed sequential positron emission tomography scans with 6-[18F]fluoro-L-dopa in 9 patients with idiopathic parkinsonism and 7 age-matched normal control subjects to compare changes in the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway over time. The mean interval between the scans was 3.3 years for the group with idiopathic parkinsonism and 3.9 years for the control subjects. The scans were analyzed by calculating the ratio of striatal to background radioactivity. Both groups showed statistically significant reductions of striatal uptake over the interval. The rate of decrease was almost identical in each group (p = 0.6). They infer that the usual rate of loss of integrity of the dopaminergic nigrostriatal pathway in patients with idiopathic parkinsonism is slow and the rate of change between the two groups was comparable

  13. Waste tank ventilation rates measured with a tracer gas method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Evans, J.C.; Sklarew, D.S.; Mitroshkov, A.V.

    1998-08-01

    Passive ventilation with the atmosphere is used to prevent accumulation of waste gases and vapors in the headspaces of 132 of the 177 high-level radioactive waste Tanks at the Hanford Site in Southeastern Washington State. Measurements of the passive ventilation rates are needed for the resolution of two key safety issues associated with the rates of flammable gas production and accumulation and the rates at which organic salt-nitrate salt mixtures dry out. Direct measurement of passive ventilation rates using mass flow meters is not feasible because ventilation occurs va multiple pathways to the atmosphere (i.e., via the filtered breather riser and unsealed tank risers and pits), as well as via underground connections to other tanks, junction boxes, and inactive ventilation systems. The tracer gas method discussed in this report provides a direct measurement of the rate at which gases are removed by ventilation and an indirect measurement of the ventilation rate. The tracer gas behaves as a surrogate of the waste-generated gases, but it is only diminished via ventilation, whereas the waste gases are continuously released by the waste and may be subject to depletion mechanisms other than ventilation. The fiscal year 1998 tracer studies provide new evidence that significant exchange of air occurs between tanks via the underground cascade pipes. Most of the single-shell waste tanks are connected via 7.6-cm diameter cascade pipes to one or two adjacent tanks. Tracer gas studies of the Tank U-102/U-103 system indicated that the ventilation occurring via the cascade line could be a significant fraction of the total ventilation. In this two-tank cascade, air evidently flowed from Tank U-103 to Tank U-102 for a time and then was observed to flow from Tank U-102 to Tank U-103

  14. Increasing sensitivity of methane emission measurements in rice through deployment of ‘closed chambers’ at nighttime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassmann, Reiner; Alberto, Ma. Carmelita; Tirol-Padre, Agnes; Hoang, Nghia Trong; Romasanta, Ryan; Centeno, Caesar Arloo; Sander, Bjoern Ole

    2018-01-01

    This study comprises field experiments on methane emissions from rice fields conducted with an Eddy-Covariance (EC) system as well as test runs for a modified closed chamber approach based on measurements at nighttime. The EC data set covers 4 cropping seasons with highly resolved emission rates (raw data in 10 Hz frequency have been aggregated to 30-min records). The diel patterns were very pronounced in the two dry seasons with peak emissions at early afternoon and low emissions at nighttime. These diel patterns were observed at all growing stages of the dry seasons. In the two wet seasons, the diel patterns were only visible during the vegetative stages while emission rates during reproductive and ripening stages remained within a fairly steady range and did not show any diel patterns. In totality, however, the data set revealed a very strong linear relationship between nocturnal emissions (12-h periods) and the full 24-h periods resulting in an R2-value of 0.8419 for all data points. In the second experiment, we conducted test runs for chamber measurements at nighttime with much longer deployment times (6 h) as compared to measurements at daylight (typically for 30 min). Conducting chamber measurements at nighttime excluded drastic changes of temperatures and CO2 concentrations. The data also shows that increases in CH4 concentrations remained on linear trajectory over a 6h period at night. While end CH4 concentrations were consistently >3.5 ppm, this long-term enclosure represents a very robust approach to quantify emissions as compared to assessing short-term concentration increases over time near the analytical detection limit. Finally, we have discussed the potential applications of this new approach that would allow emission measurements even when conventional (daytime) measurements will not be suitable. Nighttime chamber measurements offer an alternative to conventional (daytime) measurements if either (i) baseline emissions are at a very low level, (ii

  15. Time interval measurement between two emissions: Ar + Au

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bizard, G.; Bougault, R.; Brou, R.; Buta, A.; Durand, D.; Genoux-Lubain, A.; Hamdani, T.; Horn, D.; Laville, J.L.; Le Brun, C.; Lecolley, J.F.; Louvel, M.; Peter, J.; Regimbart, R.; Steckmeyer, J.C.; Tamain, B.

    1998-01-01

    The Ar + Au system was studied at two bombarding energies, 30 and 60 A.MeV. The comparison of the distributions of fragment emission angles in central collisions was carried out by means of a simulation allowing the emission time interval variation. It was found that this interval depends on the bombarding energy (i.e. deposed excitation energy).For 30 A.MeV this interval is 500 fm/c (0.33 · 10 -23 s), while for 60 A.MeV it is so short that the multifragmentation concept can be used

  16. Experimental characterization of true spontaneous emission rate of optically-pumped InGaAs/GaAs quantum-well laser structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q.-N. Yu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an experimental approach to acquiring true spontaneous emission rate of optically-pumped InGaAs/GaAs quantum-well laser structure is described. This method is based on a single edge-emitting laser chip with simple sample processing. The photoluminescence spectra are measured at both facets of the edge-emitting device and transformed to the spontaneous emission rate following the theory described here. The unusual double peaks appearing in the spontaneous emission rate spectra are observed for the InGaAs/GaAs quantum-well structure. The result is analyzed in terms of Indium-rich island and Model-Solid theories. The proposed method is suitable for electrically-pumped quantum-well laser structures, as well.

  17. Measurement for the Leak Rate enhanced by a Improved Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Sang-Hoon; Choi, Young-San; Kim, Young-Ki; Lee, Yong-Sub; Jung, Hoan-Sung

    2007-01-01

    The leak rate measurement of the HANARO such as a research reactor that adopts a confinement concept for a reactor hall is very important one during a period inspection. This test verifies whether the reactor building could maintain the negative pressure or not when radiation is perceived by abnormal accidents. Of course, this may not cause a problem in a reactor operation only if it can satisfy the design requirement, but it is necessary to have some margin of a limitation value because a reactor hall should be managed more conservatively than the design reference. To meet the requirements of this strict design condition, previous method was changed to a new type of test with more stable and robust measuring method. The new leak rate measurement method is briefly introduced and the merits of this proposed method are shown through the data analyzed for last 3 years

  18. Rates of volcanic CO2 degassing from airborne determinations of SO2 Emission rates and plume CO2SO2: test study at Pu′u ′O′o Cone, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlach, Terrence M.; McGee, Kenneth A.; Sutton, A. Jefferson; Elias, Tamar

    1998-01-01

    We present an airborne method that eliminates or minimizes several disadvantages of the customary plume cross-section sampling method for determining volcanic CO2 emission rates. A LI-COR CO2analyzer system (LICOR), a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer system (FTIR), and a correlation spectrometer (COSPEC) were used to constrain the plume CO2/SO2 and the SO2 emission rate. The method yielded a CO2 emission rate of 300 td−1 (metric tons per day) for Pu′u ′O′o cone, Kilauea volcano, on 19 September 1995. The CO2/SO2 of 0.20 determined from airborne LICOR and FTIR plume measurements agreed with the CO2/SO2 of 204 ground-based samples collected from vents over a 14-year period since the Pu′u ′O′o eruption began in January 1983.

  19. Field test of available methods to measure remotely SOx and NOx emissions from ships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balzani Lööv, J.M.; Alfoldy, B.; Gast, L.F.L.; Hjorth, J.; Lagler, F.; Mellqvist, J.; Beecken, J.; Berg, N.; Duyzer, J.; Westrate, H.; Swart, D.P.J.; Berkhout, A.J.C.; Jalkanen, J.P.; Prata, A.J.; Van Der Hoff, G.R.; Borowiak, A.

    2014-01-01

    Methods for the determination of ship fuel sulphur content and NOx emission factors based on remote measurements have been compared in the harbour of Rotterdam and compared to direct stack emission measurements on the ferry Stena Hollandica. The methods were selected based on a review of the

  20. High-temperature rate constant measurements for OH+xylenes

    KAUST Repository

    Elwardani, Ahmed Elsaid

    2015-06-01

    The overall rate constants for the reactions of hydroxyl (OH) radicals with o-xylene (k 1), m-xylene (k 2), and p-xylene (k 3) were measured behind reflected shock waves over 890-1406K at pressures of 1.3-1.8atm using OH laser absorption near 306.7nm. Measurements were performed under pseudo-first-order conditions. The measured rate constants, inferred using a mechanism-fitting approach, can be expressed in Arrhenius form as:k1=2.93×1013exp(-1350.3/T)cm3mol-1s-1(890-1406K)k2=3.49×1013exp(-1449.3/T)cm3mol-1s-1(906-1391K)k3=3.5×1013exp(-1407.5/T)cm3mol-1s-1(908-1383K)This paper presents, to our knowledge, first high-temperature measurements of the rate constants of the reactions of xylene isomers with OH radicals. Low-temperature rate-constant measurements by Nicovich et al. (1981) were combined with the measurements in this study to obtain the following Arrhenius expressions, which are applicable over a wider temperature range:k1=2.64×1013exp(-1181.5/T)cm3mol-1s-1(508-1406K)k2=3.05×109exp(-400/T)cm3mol-1s-1(508-1391K)k3=3.0×109exp(-440/T)cm3mol-1s-1(526-1383K) © 2015 The Combustion Institute.

  1. In-wire measurement of the neutron dose rate on patients with 238Pu pacemakers implanted

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piesch, E.; Burgkhardt, B.; Kollmeier, W.

    1975-01-01

    In-vivo measurements of the neutron dose on Medtronic pacemakers have been performed by using a proportional counter and a scintillation counter. The paper discusses the technique of free air and phantom calibration and the method of in-vivo measurement of the neutron fluence and the estimation of the dose equivalent. The neutron dose equivalent rate measured on seven patients with 238 Pu pacemakers implanted were found to be (5.6+-0.1) mRem/h at the surface of the pacemaker in 1.25 cm distance from the center of the source corresponding to a neutron emission rate of 940 ns -1 . The results are in good agreement with results of other methods reported by different authors. (Auth.)

  2. Components of Particle Emissions from Light-Duty Spark-Ignition Vehicles with Varying Aromatic Content and Octane Rating in Gasoline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Daniel Z; Vu, Diep; Durbin, Thomas D; Karavalakis, Georgios; Asa-Awuku, Akua

    2015-09-01

    Typical gasoline consists of varying concentrations of aromatic hydrocarbons and octane ratings. However, their impacts on particulate matter (PM) such as black carbon (BC) and water-soluble and insoluble particle compositions are not well-defined. This study tests seven 2012 model year vehicles, which include one port fuel injection (PFI) configured hybrid vehicle, one PFI vehicle, and six gasoline direct injection (GDI) vehicles. Each vehicle was driven on the Unified transient testing cycle (UC) using four different fuels. Three fuels had a constant octane rating of 87 with varied aromatic concentrations at 15%, 25%, and 35%. A fourth fuel with higher octane rating, 91, contained 35% aromatics. BC, PM mass, surface tension, and water-soluble organic mass (WSOM) fractions were measured. The water-insoluble mass (WIM) fraction of the vehicle emissions was estimated. Increasing fuel aromatic content increases BC emission factors (EFs) of transient cycles. BC concentrations were higher for the GDI vehicles than the PFI and hybrid vehicles, suggesting a potential climate impact for increased GDI vehicle production. Vehicle steady-state testing showed that the hygroscopicity of PM emissions at high speeds (70 mph; κ > 1) are much larger than emissions at low speeds (30 mph; κ < 0.1). Iso-paraffin content in the fuels was correlated to the decrease in WSOM emissions. Both aromatic content and vehicle speed increase the amount of hygroscopic material found in particle emissions.

  3. Measurements of N2O emissions at the landscape scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schelde, Kirsten; Cellier, P.; Bertolini, T.

    2011-01-01

    Nitrous oxide emissions from agricultural land are variable at the landscape scale due to variability in land use, management, soil type, and topography. A field experiment was carried out in a typical mixed farming landscape near Bjerringbro, Denmark, to investigate the main sources of variations...

  4. Methods for Measuring and Estimating Methane Emission from Ruminants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jørgen Madsen

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a brief introduction to the different methods used to quantify the enteric methane emission from ruminants. A thorough knowledge of the advantages and disadvantages of these methods is very important in order to plan experiments, understand and interpret experimental results, and compare them with other studies. The aim of the paper is to describe the principles, advantages and disadvantages of different methods used to quantify the enteric methane emission from ruminants. The best-known methods: Chambers/respiration chambers, SF6 technique and in vitro gas production technique and the newer CO2 methods are described. Model estimations, which are used to calculate national budget and single cow enteric emission from intake and diet composition, are also discussed. Other methods under development such as the micrometeorological technique, combined feeder and CH4 analyzer and proxy methods are briefly mentioned. Methods of choice for estimating enteric methane emission depend on aim, equipment, knowledge, time and money available, but interpretation of results obtained with a given method can be improved if knowledge about the disadvantages and advantages are used in the planning of experiments.

  5. Measurement of acoustic emission signal energy. Calibration and tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chretien, N.; Bernard, P.; Fayolle, J.

    1975-01-01

    The possibility of using an Audimat W device for analyzing the electric energy of signals delivered by a piezo-electric sensor for acoustic emission was investigated. The characteristics of the prototype device could be improved. The tests performed revealed that the 7075-T651 aluminium alloy can be used as a reference material [fr

  6. Characterization of the emissions impacts of hybrid excavators with a portable emissions measurement system (PEMS)-based methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Tanfeng; Russell, Robert L; Durbin, Thomas D; Cocker, David R; Burnette, Andrew; Calavita, Joseph; Maldonado, Hector; Johnson, Kent C

    2018-04-13

    Hybrid engine technology is a potentially important strategy for reduction of tailpipe greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and other pollutants that is now being implemented for off-road construction equipment. The goal of this study was to evaluate the emissions and fuel consumption impacts of electric-hybrid excavators using a Portable Emissions Measurement System (PEMS)-based methodology. In this study, three hybrid and four conventional excavators were studied for both real world activity patterns and tailpipe emissions. Activity data was obtained using engine control module (ECM) and global positioning system (GPS) logged data, coupled with interviews, historical records, and video. This activity data was used to develop a test cycle with seven modes representing different types of excavator work. Emissions data were collected over this test cycle using a PEMS. The results indicated the HB215 hybrid excavator provided a significant reduction in tailpipe carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions (from -13 to -26%), but increased diesel particulate matter (PM) (+26 to +27%) when compared to a similar model conventional excavator over the same duty cycle. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Precedents For Authorization Of Contents Using Dose Rate Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramczyk, G.; Bellamy, S.; Nathan, S.; Loftin, B.

    2012-01-01

    For the transportation of Radioactive Material (RAM) packages, the requirements for the maximum allowed dose rate at the package surface and in its vicinity are given in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Section 71.47. The regulations are based on the acceptable dose rates to which the public, workers, and the environment may be exposed. As such, the regulations specify dose rates, rather than quantity of radioactive isotopes and require monitoring to confirm the requirements are met. 10CFR71.47 requires that each package of radioactive materials offered for transportation must be designed and prepared for shipment so that under conditions normally incident to transportation the radiation level does not exceed 2 mSv/h (200 mrem/h) at any point on the external Surface of the package, and the transport index does not exceed 10. Before shipment, the dose rate of the package is determined by measurement, ensuring that it conforms to the regulatory limits, regardless of any analyses. This is the requirement for all certified packagings. This paper discusses the requirements for establishing the dose rates when shipping RAM packages and the precedents for meeting these requirements by measurement.

  8. Greenhouse gas emission controls : differentiated vs. flat rate targets : impacts and concerts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heydanek, D.

    1997-01-01

    Continuing the discussion on differentiation in greenhouse gas emission targets and timetables for all nations, the different implications of differentiation vs. flat rate controls were examined. A scenario of how different targets for different countries based on national circumstances might be implemented, was presented. Implications of differentiation for the Dow Chemical Company were also reviewed. For more than 20 years, Dow has practiced leading edge energy efficiency in environmental management systems and has committed to a series of environmental, health and safety goals. The company believes that at the international level, fully differentiated targets and timetables need to be negotiated, party by party, by the 150 nations who agreed to stabilize greenhouse gas emissions at 1990 levels by year 2000. It was suggested that a strong disincentive exists to delivering energy efficiency beyond compliance. It was predicted that despite efficiency, the energy intensive assets in place today in Annex I countries will be disadvantaged and prematurely retired as the costs of greenhouse gas emission controls grow and exert pressure to move productive capacity offshore

  9. Estimation of intersubject variability of cerebral blood flow measurements using MRI and positron emission tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Otto Mølby; Larsson, Henrik B W; Hansen, Adam E

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the within and between subject variability of quantitative cerebral blood flow (CBF) measurements in normal subjects using various MRI techniques and positron emission tomography (PET). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Repeated CBF measurements were performed in 17 healthy, young...

  10. Examination of the optimal operation of building scale combined heat and power systems under disparate climate and GHG emissions rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, B.; Modi, V.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • CHP attributable reductions, not viable by electric generation alone, are defined. • Simplified operating strategy heuristics are optimal under specific circumstances. • Phosphoric acid fuel cells yield the largest reductions except in the extremes. • Changes in baseline emissions affect the optimal system capacity and operating hours. - Abstract: This work aims to elucidate notions concerning the ideal operation and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions benefits of combined heat and power (CHP) systems by investigating how various metrics change as a function of the GHG emissions from the underlying electricity source, building use type and climate. Additionally, a new term entitled “CHP Attributable” reductions is introduced to quantify the benefits from the simultaneous use of thermal and electric energy, removing benefits achieved solely from fuel switching and generating electricity more efficiently. The GHG emission benefits from implementing internal combustion engine, microturbines, and phosphoric acid (PA) fuel cell based CHP systems were evaluated through an optimization approach considering energy demands of prototypical hospital, office, and residential buildings in varied climates. To explore the effect of electric GHG emissions rates, the ideal operation of the CHP systems was evaluated under three scenarios: “High” GHG emissions rates, “Low” GHG emissions rates, and “Current” GHG emissions rate for a specific location. The analysis finds that PA fuel cells achieve the highest GHG emission reductions in most cases considered, though there are exceptions. Common heuristics, such as electric load following and thermal load following, are the optimal operating strategy under specific conditions. The optimal CHP capacity and operating hours both vary as a function of building type, climate and GHG emissions rates from grid electricity. GHG emissions reductions can be as high as 49% considering a PA fuel cell for a

  11. Methods for measurements of energy and emissions related to motor vehicles: Identification of needs for improvements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karl-Erik Egebaeck, K.E. [Luleaa Univ. of Technology, Luleaa (Sweden). Dept. of Environmental Technology; Karlsson, Hua L. [MTC AB, Haninge (Sweden); Westerholm, R. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Analytical Chemistry

    2002-01-01

    The official methods in use today for emission testing of vehicles and engines were primarily developed for the characterisation of exhaust emissions from motor vehicles fuelled with petrol or diesel oil. The setting of new lower emission standards will make it difficult to obtain sufficient accuracy, using the present systems, for the quantification of exhaust emissions in the future. Development of new emission control technology and improved fuels has made it possible to meet these more stringent standards. Consequently new emission standards will lead to a need for new and improved methodologies and new instrumentation for the characterisation of the emissions from vehicles/engines/fuels. The present report comprises a discussion and comments on questions related to improved methods for emission measurements. The report is based on a study of the literature, site visits to laboratories and research institutes etc in the US and a meeting with representatives of the EU Commission, carried out during the spring of 2001. The conclusions and recommendations in the pre-study report are summarised in sub titles: General, regulated emissions, unregulated emissions, greenhouse gases and fuel consumption. Since the questions and problems discussed have an international connection they should be discussed in an international forum. However, before such discussions can be organised the problems related to measurement of emissions and fuel consumption must be more extensively studied than in this pre-study.

  12. Evaporation rate measurement in the pool of IEAR-1 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, Walmir Maximo; Cegalla, Miriam A.; Baptista Filho, Benedito Dias

    2000-01-01

    The surface water evaporation in pool type reactors affects the ventilation system operation and the ambient conditions and dose rates in the operation room. This paper shows the results of evaporation rate experiment in the pool of IEA-R1 research reactor. The experiment is based on the demineralized water mass variation inside cylindrical metallic recipients during a time interval. Other parameters were measured, such as: barometric pressure, relative humidity, environmental temperature, water temperature inside the recipients and water temperature in the reactor pool. The pool level variation due to water contraction/expansion was calculated. (author)

  13. Particulate matter emission from livestock houses: measurement methods, emission levels and abatement systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winkel, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Animal houses are extremely dusty environments. Airborne particulate matter (PM) poses a health threat not only to the farmer and the animals, but, as a result of emissions from ventilation systems, also to residents living in livestock farming areas. In relation to this problem, the objectives

  14. Three-dimensional modeling of beam emission spectroscopy measurements in fusion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guszejnov, D.; Pokol, G. I. [Department of Nuclear Techniques, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Association EURATOM, H-1111 Budapest (Hungary); Pusztai, I. [Nuclear Engineering, Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden); Refy, D.; Zoletnik, S. [MTA Wigner FK RMI, Association EURATOM, Pf. 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Lampert, M. [Department of Nuclear Techniques, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Association EURATOM, H-1111 Budapest (Hungary); MTA Wigner FK RMI, Association EURATOM, Pf. 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Nam, Y. U. [National Fusion Research Institute, Gwahangno 113, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    One of the main diagnostic tools for measuring electron density profiles and the characteristics of long wavelength turbulent wave structures in fusion plasmas is beam emission spectroscopy (BES). The increasing number of BES systems necessitated an accurate and comprehensive simulation of BES diagnostics, which in turn motivated the development of the Rate Equations for Neutral Alkali-beam TEchnique (RENATE) simulation code that is the topic of this paper. RENATE is a modular, fully three-dimensional code incorporating all key features of BES systems from the atomic physics to the observation, including an advanced modeling of the optics. Thus RENATE can be used both in the interpretation of measured signals and the development of new BES systems. The most important components of the code have been successfully benchmarked against other simulation codes. The primary results have been validated against experimental data from the KSTAR tokamak.

  15. Determination of radon emission rate with regard to energetic reconstruction of buildings; Bestimmung der Radonquellstaerke im Zusammenhang mit Massnahmen zur energetischen Sanierung von Gebaeuden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neugebauer, Thomas; Grund, A.L.; Hingmann, H.; Buermeyer, J.; Grimm, V.; Breckow, J. [Technische Hochschule Mittelhessen (THM), Giessen (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Physik und Strahlenschutz (IMPS)

    2015-07-01

    In frame of a project funded by the Federal Office for Radiation Protection (BfS) the influence of meteorological and room climate parameters and energetic reconstruction on the radon concentration inside buildings has been investigated. For this purpose parameters like temperature, air pressure, relative humidity and carbon dioxide concentration have been measured. The daily and seasonal variations of the radon concentration were influenced by the behaviour of the residents. A parameter less influenced by this behaviour is the radon emission rate. Complementary to the above mentioned project the method of determination of the radon emission rate has been developed in frame of a project funded by the Ministry of the Environment of Hesse (HMUKLV). With the improved method, it is possible to determine the radon emission rate on a continuous base. Therefore both, the radon concentration and the air exchange rate of a building have to be determined. For the verification of the method simulations and measurements have been performed. Additionally meteorological parameters have been recorded in order to evaluate possible influences on the radon emission rate.

  16. Field measurement and interpretation of beta doses and dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selby, J.M.; Swinth, K.L.; Hooker, C.D.; Kenoyer, J.L.

    1983-01-01

    A wide variety of portable survey instruments employing GM, ionization chamber and scintillation detectors exist for the measurement of gamma exposure rates. Often these same survey instruments are used for monitoring beta fields. This is done by making measurements with and without a removable shield which is intended to shield out the non-penetrating component (beta) of the radiation field. The difference does not correspond to an absorbed dose rate for the beta field due to a variety of factors. Among these factors are the dependence on beta energy, source-detector geometries, mixed fields and variable ambient conditions. Attempting to use such measurements directly can lead to errors as high as a factor of 100. In many instances correction factors have been derived, that if properly applied, can reduce these errors substantially. However, this requires some knowledge of the beta spectra, calibration techniques and source geometry. This paper discusses some aspects of the proper use of instruments for beta measurements including the application of appropriate correction factors. Ionization type instruments are commonly used to measure beta dose rates. Through design and calibration these instruments will give an accurate reading only for uniform irradiation of the detection volume. Often in the field it is not feasible to meet these conditions. Large area uniform distributions of activity are not generally encountered and it is not possible to use large source-to-detector distances due to beta particle absorption in air. An example of correction factors required for various point sources is presented when a cutie pie ionization chamber is employed. The instrument reading is multiplied by the appropriate correction factor to obtain the dose rate at the window. When a different detector is used or for other geometries, a different set of correction factors must be used

  17. Annual cycle of methane emission from a boreal fen measured by the eddy covariance technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinne, Janne.; Pihlatie, Mari; Haapanala, Sami; Vesala, Timo; Riutta, Terhi; Tuittila, Eeva-Stiina; Aurela, Mika; Tuovinen, Juha-Pekka

    2007-01-01

    The northern wetlands are one of the major sources of methane into the atmosphere. We measured annual methane emission from a boreal minerotrophic fen, Siikaneva, by the eddy covariance method. The average wintertime emissions were below 1 mg/m 2 /h, and the summertime emissions about 3.5 mg/m 2 /h. The water table depth did have any clear effect on methane emissions. During most of the year the emission depended on the temperature of peat below the water table. However, during the high and late summer the emission was independent on peat temperature as well. No diurnal cycle of methane flux was found. The total annual emission from the Siikaneva site was 12.6 g/m 2 . The emissions of the snow free period contributed 91% to the annual emission. The emission pulse during the snow melting period was clearly detectable but of minor importance adding only less than 3% to the annual emission. Over 20% of the carbon assimilated during the year as carbon dioxide was emitted as methane. Thus methane emission is an important component of the carbon balance of the Siikaneva fen. This indicates need of taking methane into account when studying carbon balances of northern fen ecosystems

  18. The annual ammonia budget of fertilised cut grassland – Part 1: Micrometeorological flux measurements and emissions after slurry application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Spirig

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Two commercial ammonia (NH3 analysers were customised to allow continuous measurements of vertical concentration gradients. The gradients were used to derive ammonia exchange fluxes above a managed grassland site at Oensingen (Switzerland by application of the aerodynamic gradient method. The measurements from July 2006 to October 2007 covered five complete growth-cut cycles and included six applications of liquid cattle slurry. The average accuracy of the flux measurements during unstable and near-neutral conditions was 20% and the detection limit was 10 ng NH3 m−2 s−1. Hence the flux measurements are considered sufficiently accurate for studying typical NH3 deposition rates over growing vegetation. Quantifying the overall emissions after slurry applications required the application of elaborate interpolations because of difficulties capturing the initial emissions during broadspreading of liquid manure. The emissions were also calculated with a mass balance method yielding similar fluxes. NH3 losses after slurry application expressed as percentage of emitted nitrogen versus applied total ammoniacal nitrogen (TAN varied between 4 and 19%, which is roughly a factor of three lower than the values for broadspreading of liquid manure in emission inventories. The comparatively low emission factors appear to be a consequence of the low dry matter content of the applied slurry and soil properties favouring ammonium adsorption.

  19. Emission Characteristics of Gas-Fired Boilers based on Category-Specific Emission Factor from Field Measurements in Beijing, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itahashi, S.; Yan, X.; Song, G.; Yan, J.; Xue, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Gas-fired boilers will become the main stationary sources of NOx in Beijing. However, the knowledge of gas-fired boilers in Beijing is limited. In the present study, the emission characteristics of NOx, SO2, and CO from gas-fired boilers in Beijing were established using category-specific emission factors (EFs) from field measurements. In order to obtain category-specific EFs, boilers were classified through influence analysis. Factors such as combustion mode, boiler type, and installed capacity were considered critical for establishing EFs because they play significant roles in pollutant formation. The EFs for NOx, CO, and SO2 ranged from 1.42-6.86 g m-3, 0.05-0.67 g m-3 and 0.03-0.48 g m-3. The emissions of NOx, SO2, and CO for gas-fired boilers in Beijing were 11121 t, 468 t, and 222 t in 2014, respectively. The emissions were spatially allocated into grid cells with a resolution of 1 km × 1 km, and the results indicated that top emitters were in central Beijing. The uncertainties were quantified using a Monte Carlo simulation. The results indicated high uncertainties in CO (-157% to 154%) and SO2 (-127% to 182%) emissions, and relatively low uncertainties (-34% to 34%) in NOx emission. Furthermore, approximately 61.2% and 96.8% of the monitored chamber combustion boilers (CCBs) met the standard limits for NOx and SO2, respectively. Concerning NOx, low-NOx burners and NOx emission control measures are urgently needed for implementing of stricter standards. Adopting terminal control measures is unnecessary for SO2, although its concentration occasionally exceeds standard limits, because reduction of its concentration can be achieved thorough control of the sulfur content of natural gas at a stable low level. Furthermore, the atmospheric combustion boilers (ACBs) should be substituted with CCBs, because ACBs have a higher emission despite lower gross installed capacity. The results of this study will enable in understanding and controlling emissions from gas

  20. Methane emissions from a Californian landfill, determined from airborne remote sensing and in situ measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krautwurst, Sven; Gerilowski, Konstantin; Jonsson, Haflidi H.; Thompson, David R.; Kolyer, Richard W.; Iraci, Laura T.; Thorpe, Andrew K.; Horstjann, Markus; Eastwood, Michael; Leifer, Ira; Vigil, Samuel A.; Krings, Thomas; Borchardt, Jakob; Buchwitz, Michael; Fladeland, Matthew M.; Burrows, John P.; Bovensmann, Heinrich

    2017-09-01

    Fugitive emissions from waste disposal sites are important anthropogenic sources of the greenhouse gas methane (CH4). As a result of the growing world population and the recognition of the need to control greenhouse gas emissions, this anthropogenic source of CH4 has received much recent attention. However, the accurate assessment of the CH4 emissions from landfills by modeling and existing measurement techniques is challenging. This is because of inaccurate knowledge of the model parameters and the extent of and limited accessibility to landfill sites. This results in a large uncertainty in our knowledge of the emissions of CH4 from landfills and waste management. In this study, we present results derived from data collected during the research campaign COMEX (CO2 and MEthane eXperiment) in late summer 2014 in the Los Angeles (LA) Basin. One objective of COMEX, which comprised aircraft observations of methane by the remote sensing Methane Airborne MAPper (MAMAP) instrument and a Picarro greenhouse gas in situ analyzer, was the quantitative investigation of CH4 emissions. Enhanced CH4 concentrations or CH4 plumes were detected downwind of landfills by remote sensing aircraft surveys. Subsequent to each remote sensing survey, the detected plume was sampled within the atmospheric boundary layer by in situ measurements of atmospheric parameters such as wind information and dry gas mixing ratios of CH4 and carbon dioxide (CO2) from the same aircraft. This was undertaken to facilitate the independent estimation of the surface fluxes for the validation of the remote sensing estimates. During the COMEX campaign, four landfills in the LA Basin were surveyed. One landfill repeatedly showed a clear emission plume. This landfill, the Olinda Alpha Landfill, was investigated on 4 days during the last week of August and first days of September 2014. Emissions were estimated for all days using a mass balance approach. The derived emissions vary between 11.6 and 17.8 kt CH4 yr-1

  1. Laboratory and field measurements of enantiomeric monoterpene emissions as a function of chemotype, light and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, W.; Staudt, M.; Bourgeois, I.; Williams, J.

    2014-03-01

    Plants emit significant amounts of monoterpenes into the earth's atmosphere, where they react rapidly to form a multitude of gas phase species and particles. Many monoterpenes exist in mirror-image forms or enantiomers. In this study the enantiomeric monoterpene profile for several representative plants (Quercus ilex L., Rosmarinus officinalis L., and Pinus halepensis Mill.) was investigated as a function of chemotype, light and temperature both in the laboratory and in the field. Analysis of enantiomeric monoterpenes from 19 Quercus ilex individuals from Southern France and Spain revealed four regiospecific chemotypes (genetically fixed emission patterns). In agreement with previous work, only Quercus ilex emissions increased strongly with light. However, for all three plant species no consistent enantiomeric variation was observed as a function of light, and the enantiomeric ratio of α-pinene was found to vary by less than 20% from 100 and 1000 μmol m-2 s-1 PAR (photosynthetically active radiation). The rate of monoterpene emission increased with temperature from all three plant species, but little variation in the enantiomeric distribution of α-pinene was observed with temperature. There was more enantiomeric variability between individuals of the same species than could be induced by either light or temperature. Field measurements of α-pinene enantiomer mixing ratios in the air, taken at a Quercus ilex forest in Southern France, and several other previously reported field enantiomeric ratio diel cycle profiles are compared. All show smoothly varying diel cycles (some positive and some negative) even over changing wind directions. This is surprising in comparison with variations of enantiomeric emission patterns shown by individuals of the same species.

  2. Dosimetric measurement of the disintegration rate of fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solymosi, J.; Nagy, L.G.; Zagyvai, P.

    1992-01-01

    Investigations on the disintegration rate of fission products of 238 U and 239 Pu are presented. The intensity of the β-and γ-radiation of fission products were measured continously in an interval of 1-1300 hours following the fission, offering the possibility for determining the general and specific characteristics of the individual fission products. A universal measuring procedure was elaborated for the rapid in situ determination of the dosimetric features of fission products, which is suitable for the accurate evaluation and prediction of external absorbed dose even in case of fission products of various origin and unknown composition. (author) 6 refs.; 7 figs.; 1 tab

  3. Spatially resolved flux measurements of NOx from London suggest significantly higher emissions than predicted by inventories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Adam R; Lee, James D; Misztal, Pawel K; Metzger, Stefan; Shaw, Marvin D; Lewis, Alastair C; Purvis, Ruth M; Carslaw, David C; Goldstein, Allen H; Hewitt, C Nicholas; Davison, Brian; Beevers, Sean D; Karl, Thomas G

    2016-07-18

    To date, direct validation of city-wide emissions inventories for air pollutants has been difficult or impossible. However, recent technological innovations now allow direct measurement of pollutant fluxes from cities, for comparison with emissions inventories, which are themselves commonly used for prediction of current and future air quality and to help guide abatement strategies. Fluxes of NOx were measured using the eddy-covariance technique from an aircraft flying at low altitude over London. The highest fluxes were observed over central London, with lower fluxes measured in suburban areas. A footprint model was used to estimate the spatial area from which the measured emissions occurred. This allowed comparison of the flux measurements to the UK's National Atmospheric Emissions Inventory (NAEI) for NOx, with scaling factors used to account for the actual time of day, day of week and month of year of the measurement. The comparison suggests significant underestimation of NOx emissions in London by the NAEI, mainly due to its under-representation of real world road traffic emissions. A comparison was also carried out with an enhanced version of the inventory using real world driving emission factors and road measurement data taken from the London Atmospheric Emissions Inventory (LAEI). The measurement to inventory agreement was substantially improved using the enhanced version, showing the importance of fully accounting for road traffic, which is the dominant NOx emission source in London. In central London there was still an underestimation by the inventory of 30-40% compared with flux measurements, suggesting significant improvements are still required in the NOx emissions inventory.

  4. Modelling of energy / technology actions and measures for reducing greenhouse gas emissions in the industrial sector (the industry challenge)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyboer, J.; Bailie, A.J.; Sadownik, B.

    2001-01-01

    The potential in Canadian industry for the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions is assessed in this report. The analysis is aimed at providing a comprehensive and integrated evaluation of a wide spectrum of technology and energy actions available to the industrial sector in Canada, providing estimates of greenhouse gas emissions reductions, costs and cost effectiveness for different actions by 2010, and simulating industry response to defined measures approved by representatives of the industry sector sub-table. The impacts of a set of measures was determined using in-house models. Four measures were tested against several actions including primary fossil and electricity consumption, using regionally specific energy prices, a discount rate approximating 40 per cent and growth rates derived from the Analysis and Modelling Group. Enhancement of voluntary initiatives, enhanced cogeneration, financial incentives for capital investment to improve efficiency and carbon dioxide emissions reduction, and a set of cost-of-carbon-dioxide simulations were the measures tested. Total energy consumption and carbon dioxide emissions by sector and in aggregate are provided as well as the costs. An indication of the total cost of reduction per tonne, some sense of the cost of the permit and the quantity of a subsidy required to induce decision-makers to purchase the more efficient technology are also provided. 9 refs., tabs

  5. Miniature electron bombardment evaporation source: evaporation rate measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nehasil, V.; Masek, K.; Matolin, V.; Moreau, O.

    1997-01-01

    Miniature electron beam evaporation sources which operate on the principle of vaporization of source material, in the form of a tip, by electron bombardment are produced by several companies specialized in UHV equipment. These sources are used primarily for materials that are normally difficult to deposit due to their high evaporation temperature. They are appropriate for special applications such as heteroepitaxial thin film growth requiring a very low and well controlled deposition rate. A simple and easily applicable method of evaporation rate control is proposed. The method is based on the measurement of ion current produced by electron bombardment of evaporated atoms. The absolute evaporation flux values were measured by means of the Bayard-Alpert ion gauge, which enabled the ion current vs evaporation flux calibration curves to be plotted. (author). 1 tab., 4 figs., 6 refs

  6. In situ measurements of thoron exhalation rate in Okinawa (Japan)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiroma, Y.; Isa, N.; Hosoda, M.; Sorimachi, A.; Ishikawa, T.; Tokonami, S.; Furukawa, M.

    2010-01-01

    Thoron exhalation rates from the ground surface were measured at 57 sites on Okinawa Island (Japan), using a ZnS(Ag) scintillation detector equipped with photomultiplier. The arithmetic means ± SD, median ± SD, minimum and maximum of the rates (unit: Bq m -2 s -1 ) were estimated to be 1.9 ± 1.4, 1.6 ± 0.3, 0.04 and 6.2, respectively. The soils distributed on the island are generally classified into dark red soils, residual regosols, as well as red and yellow soils. While it was assumed that the soils were originated from the bedrock, recent studies suggested that the main material of dark red soils is the East Asian eolian dust. In the dark red soils area, the exhalation rate is relatively higher than that in the other areas. This suggested that the eolian dust was an enhancer for the environmental thoron concentration on Okinawa Island. (authors)

  7. Time value of emission and technology discounting rate for off-grid electricity generation in India using intermediate pyrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Amit; Sarkar, Prabir; Tyagi, Himanshu; Singh, Harpreet

    2016-01-01

    The environmental impact assessment of a process over its entire operational lifespan is an important issue. Estimation of life cycle emission helps in predicting the contribution of a given process to abate (or to pollute) the environmental emission scenario. Considering diminishing and time-dependent effect of emission, assessment of the overall effect of emissions is very complex. The paper presents a generalized methodology for arriving at a single emission discounting number for a process option, using the concept of time value of carbon emission flow. This number incorporates the effect of the emission resulting from the process over the entire operational lifespan. The advantage of this method is its quantitative aspect as well as its flexible nature. It can be applied to any process. The method is demonstrated with the help of an Intermediate Pyrolysis process when used to generate off-grid electricity and opting biochar route for disposing straw residue. The scenarios of very high net emission to very high net carbon sequestration is generated using process by careful selection of process parameters for different scenarios. For these different scenarios, the process discounting rate was determined and its outcome is discussed. The paper also proposes a process specific eco-label that mentions the discounting rates. - Highlight: • Methodology to obtain emission discounting rate for a process is proposed. • The method includes all components of life cycle emission converts into a time dependent discounting number. • A case study of Intermediate Pyrolysis is used to obtain such number for a range of processes. • The method is useful to determine if the effect from the operation of a process will lead to a net absorption of emission or net accumulation of emission in the environment.

  8. Time value of emission and technology discounting rate for off-grid electricity generation in India using intermediate pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Amit, E-mail: amitrp@iitrpr.ac.in [Indian Institute of Technology Ropar, Nangal Road, Rupnagar 140001, Punjab (India); Faculty of Technology and Engineering, The Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda, Vadodara 390001, Gujarat (India); Sarkar, Prabir; Tyagi, Himanshu; Singh, Harpreet [Indian Institute of Technology Ropar, Nangal Road, Rupnagar 140001, Punjab (India)

    2016-07-15

    The environmental impact assessment of a process over its entire operational lifespan is an important issue. Estimation of life cycle emission helps in predicting the contribution of a given process to abate (or to pollute) the environmental emission scenario. Considering diminishing and time-dependent effect of emission, assessment of the overall effect of emissions is very complex. The paper presents a generalized methodology for arriving at a single emission discounting number for a process option, using the concept of time value of carbon emission flow. This number incorporates the effect of the emission resulting from the process over the entire operational lifespan. The advantage of this method is its quantitative aspect as well as its flexible nature. It can be applied to any process. The method is demonstrated with the help of an Intermediate Pyrolysis process when used to generate off-grid electricity and opting biochar route for disposing straw residue. The scenarios of very high net emission to very high net carbon sequestration is generated using process by careful selection of process parameters for different scenarios. For these different scenarios, the process discounting rate was determined and its outcome is discussed. The paper also proposes a process specific eco-label that mentions the discounting rates. - Highlight: • Methodology to obtain emission discounting rate for a process is proposed. • The method includes all components of life cycle emission converts into a time dependent discounting number. • A case study of Intermediate Pyrolysis is used to obtain such number for a range of processes. • The method is useful to determine if the effect from the operation of a process will lead to a net absorption of emission or net accumulation of emission in the environment.

  9. Comparison between Medgem and Deltatrac resting metabolic rate measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compher, C; Hise, M; Sternberg, A; Kinosian, B P

    2005-10-01

    The primary aims of this trial were to evaluate the reproducibility of a portable handheld calorimeter (Medgem) in a clinical population, and to compare its measures with a calorimeter in typical use with these patients. Cross-sectional clinical validation study. Outpatient Clinical Research Center. A total of 24 stable home nutrition support patients. In random order three measures of resting metabolic rate (RMR) were taken after a 4-h fast, 15 min rest and 2-h abstention from exercise. Two measures were taken with the same Medgem (MG) and one with the traditional calorimeter (Deltatrac). Reproducibility of MG measures and their comparability to a Deltatrac measure were assessed by Bland-Altman analysis, with >+/-250 kcal/day established a priori as a clinically unacceptable error. In addition, disagreement between the two types of measures was defined as greater than 10% difference. The mean difference between two MG measures was -6.8 kcal/day, with limits of agreement between 233 and -247 kcal/day and clinically acceptable. The mean difference between the Deltatrac and mean of two MG measures was -162 kcal/day, with limits of agreement between 577 and -253 kcal/day and clinically unacceptable. In all, 80% of the repeated MG RMR measures agreed within 10%, and the mean MG reading agreed with the Deltatrac in 60% of cases. RMR obtained using the MG calorimeter has an acceptable degree of reproducibility, and is acceptable to patients. The MG measures, however, are frequently lower than traditional measures and require further validation prior to application to practice in this vulnerable patient group.

  10. Obsidian hydration profiles measured by sputter-induced optical emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsong, I S; Houser, C A; Yusef, N A; Messier, R F; White, W B; Michels, J W

    1978-07-28

    The variation of concentrations of hydrogen, sodium, potassium, lithium, calcium, magnesium, silicon, and aluminum as a function of depth in the hydration layer of obsidian artifacts has been determined by sputter-induced optical emission. The surface hydration is accompanied by dealkalization, and there is a buildup of alkaline earths, calcium and magnesium in the outermost layers. These results have clarified the phenomena underlying the obsidian hydration dating technique.

  11. Electron Bernstein Wave Coupling and Emission Measurements on NSTX

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Taylor, G.; Diem, S.J.; Caughman, J.; Efthimion, P.; Harvey, R.W.; LeBlanc, B.P.; Philips, C.K.; Preinhaelter, Josef; Urban, Jakub

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 7 (2006), s. 177 ISSN 0003-0503. [Annual Meeting of the Division of Plasma Physics/48th./. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania , 30.10.2006-3.11.2006] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Conversion * Emission * Tokamaks * Electron Bernstein waves * Simulation * MAST * NSTX Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics http://www.aps.org/meet/DPP06/baps/all_DPP06.pdf

  12. Thermal Electron Bernstein Wave Emission Measurements on NST

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Diem, S.J.; Taylor, G.; Efthimion, P.; LeBlanc, B.P.; Philips, C.K.; Caughman, J.; Wilgen, J.B.; Harvey, R.W.; Preinhaelter, Josef; Urban, Jakub

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 7 (2006), s. 134 ISSN 0003-0503. [Annual Meeting of the Division of Plasma Physics/48th./. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania , 30.10.2006-3.11.2006] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Conversion * Emission * Tokamaks * Electron Bernstein waves * Simulation * MAST * NSTX Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics http://www.aps.org/meet/DPP06/baps/all_DPP06.pdf

  13. Future needs for ship emission abatement and technical measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa ANTES

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The International Maritime Organization (IMO has revised air pollution regulations in MARPOL Annex VI. In 2012 Emission Control Areas (ECA will limit fuel sulphur content to 1% and from 2015 to 0.1%. NOx emissions based on ships engine speed are also reduced for new vessels (2012 & 2016. Facing this legislation, ship owners have the alternative either to operate ships with costly low-sulphur fuels, or to keep using HFO but together with a gas cleaning equipment at the ship stack in order to reduce the rejected amount of SO2 gas in the atmosphere. To achieve this requirement, research and development organizations came out with proposing a solution that uses a device for cleaning exhaust gas of marine diesel engines. The paper presents a short communication about the DEECON project, which aim is to create a novel on-board after-treatment unit more advanced than any currently available. Each sub-unit of the system will be optimized to remove a specific primary pollutant. In particular, the technology within the DEECON system is based on novel or improved abatement techniques for reducing SOx, NOx, Particulate Matter (PM, CO and Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC. Some of these technologies are completely new for the maritime sector and they will represent a breakthrough in the reduction of the atmospheric emissions of ships, moving forward the performance of exhaust gas cleaning systems and fostering and anticipating the adoption of future and tighter regulatory requirements. In addition, an after-treatment strategy enables the possible adoption of alternative fuels, which often have their own emissions characteristics.

  14. Nitrous oxide emissions from high rate algal ponds treating domestic wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcántara, Cynthia; Muñoz, Raúl; Norvill, Zane; Plouviez, Maxence; Guieysse, Benoit

    2015-02-01

    This study investigated the generation of N2O by microcosms withdrawn from 7-L high rate algal ponds (HRAPs) inoculated with Chlorella vulgaris and treating synthetic wastewater. Although HRAPs microcosms demonstrated the ability to generate algal-mediated N2O when nitrite was externally supplied under darkness in batch assays, negligible N2O emissions rates were consistently recorded in the absence of nitrite during 3.5-month monitoring under 'normal' operation. Thereafter, HRAP A and HRAP B were overloaded with nitrate and ammonium, respectively, in an attempt to stimulate N2O emissions via nitrite in situ accumulation. Significant N2O production (up to 5685±363 nmol N2O/g TSS h) was only recorded from HRAP B microcosms externally supplied with nitrite in darkness. Although confirmation under full-scale outdoors conditions is needed, this study provides the first evidence that the ability of microalgae to synthesize N2O does not affect the environmental performance of wastewater treatment in HRAPs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Measurement of soluble nuclide dissolution rates from spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, C.N.; Gray, W.J.

    1990-01-01

    Gaining a better understanding of the potential release behavior of water-soluble radionuclides is the focus of new laboratory spent fuel dissolution studies being planned in support of the Yucca Mountain Project. Previous studies have suggested that maximum release rates for actinide nuclides, which account for most of the long-term radioactivity in spent fuel, should be solubility-limited and should not depend on the characteristics or durability of the spent fuel waste form. Maximum actinide concentrations should be sufficiently low to meet the NRC (Nuclear Regulatory Commission) annual release limits. Potential release rates for soluble nuclides such as 99 Tc, 135 Cs, 14 C and 129 I, which account for about 1-2% of the activity in spent fuel at 1,000 years, are less certain and may depend on processes such as oxidation of the fuel in the repository air environment. Dissolution rates for several soluble nuclides have been measured from spent fuel specimens using static and semi-static methods. However, such tests do not provide a direct measurement of fuel matrix dissolution rates that may ultimately control soluble-nuclide release rates. Flow-through tests are being developed as a potential supplemental method for determining the matrix component of soluble-nuclide dissolution. Advantages and disadvantages of both semi-static and flow-through methods are discussed. Tests with fuel specimens representing a range of potential fuel states that may occur in the repository, including oxidized fuel, are proposed. Preliminary results from flow-through tests with unirradiated UO 2 suggesting that matrix dissolution rates are very sensitive to water composition are also presented

  16. Electric field enhancement of electron emission rates from Z1/2 centers in 4H-SiC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evwaraye, A. O.; Smith, S. R.; Mitchel, W. C.; Farlow, G. C.

    2009-01-01

    Z 1/2 defect centers were produced by irradiating 4H-SiC bulk samples with 1 MeV electrons at room temperature. The emission rate dependence on the electric field in the depletion region was measured using deep level transient spectroscopy and double-correlation deep level transient spectroscopy. It is found that the Z 1/2 defect level shows a strong electric field dependence with activation energy decreasing from E c -0.72 eV at zero field to E c -0.47 eV at 6.91x10 5 V/cm. The phonon assisted tunneling model of Karpus and Perel [Sov. Phys. JETP 64, 1376 (1986)] completely describes the experimental data. This model describes the dependence of the emission rate on electric field F as e n (F)=e no exp(F 2 /F c 2 ), where F c is the characteristic field that depends on the phonon assisted tunneling time τ 2 . The values of F c and τ 2 were determined and the analysis of the data leads to the suggestion that Z 1/2 may be a substitutional point defect.

  17. NOVAE WITH LONG-LASTING SUPERSOFT EMISSION THAT DRIVE A HIGH ACCRETION RATE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, Bradley E.; Collazzi, Andrew C.

    2010-01-01

    We identify a new class of novae characterized by the post-eruption quiescent light curve being more than roughly a factor of 10 brighter than the pre-eruption light curve. Eight novae (V723 Cas, V1500 Cyg, V1974 Cyg, GQ Mus, CP Pup, T Pyx, V4633 Sgr, and RW UMi) are separated out as being significantly distinct from other novae. This group shares a suite of uncommon properties, characterized by the post-eruption magnitude being much brighter than before eruption, short orbital periods, long-lasting supersoft emission following the eruption, a highly magnetized white dwarf (WD), and secular declines during the post-eruption quiescence. We present a basic physical picture which shows why all five uncommon properties are causally connected. In general, novae show supersoft emission due to hydrogen burning on the WD in the final portion of the eruption, and this hydrogen burning will be long-lasting if new hydrogen is poured onto the surface at a sufficient rate. Most novae do not have adequate accretion for continuous hydrogen burning, but some can achieve this if the companion star is nearby (with short orbital period) and a magnetic field channels the matter onto a small area on the WD so as to produce a locally high accretion rate. The resultant supersoft flux irradiates the companion star and drives a higher accretion rate (with a brighter post-eruption phase), which serves to keep the hydrogen burning and the supersoft flux going. The feedback loop cannot be perfectly self-sustaining, so the supersoft flux will decline over time, forcing a decline in the accretion rate and the system brightness. We name this new group after the prototype, V1500 Cyg. V1500 Cyg stars are definitely not progenitors of Type Ia supernovae. The V1500 Cyg stars have similar physical mechanisms and appearances as predicted for nova by the hibernation model, but with this group accounting for only 14% of novae.

  18. Time interval measurement between two emissions: Kr + Au

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aboufirassi, M; Bougault, R.; Brou, R.; Colin, J.; Durand, D.; Genoux-Lubain, A.; Horn, D.; Laville, J.L.; Le Brun, C.; Lecolley, J.F.; Lefebvres, F.; Lopez, O.; Louvel, M.; Mahi, M.; Steckmeyer, J.C.; Tamain, B.

    1998-01-01

    To indicate the method allowing the determination of the emission intervals, the results obtained with the Kr + Au system at 43 and 60 A.MeV are presented. The experiments were performed with the NAUTILUS exclusive detectors. Central collisions were selected by means of a relative velocity criterion to reject the events containing a forward emitted fragment. For the two bombardment energies the data analysis shows that the formation of a compound of mass around A = 200. By comparing the fragment dynamical variables with simulations one can conclude about the simultaneity of the compound deexcitation processes. It was found that a 5 MeV/A is able to reproduce the characteristics of the detected fragments. Also, it was found that to reproduce the dynamical characteristics of the fragments issued from central collisions it was not necessary to superimpose a radial collective energy upon the Coulomb and thermal motion. The distribution of the relative angles between detected fragments is used here as a chronometer. For simultaneous ruptures the small relative angles are forbidden by the Coulomb repulsion, while for sequential processes this interdiction is the more lifted the longer the interval between the two emissions is. For the system discussed here the comparison between simulation and data has been carried out for the extreme cases, i.e. for a vanishing and infinite time interval between the two emissions, respectively. More sophisticated simulations to describe angular distributions between the emitted fragments were also developed

  19. Studies on the hepatosplenic volume and the accumulation rate of 99mTc Sn colloid in patients with liver cirrhosis by using single photon emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Shizou; Mimura, Hisashi; Noda, Takuo; Hamazaki, Keisuke; Takakura, Norio; Tsuge, Hiroshi; Awai, Sachio; Hiraki, Yoshio; Orita, Kunzo

    1988-01-01

    The method using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) for measurement of the hepatosplenic volume and the accumulation rate of 99m Tc Sn colloid was studied, and applied to patients with liver cirrhosis. The hepatosplenic volume calculated by this method was well correlated with that by computed tomography (r = 0.938). The accumulation rate obtained by this method was almost equal to that by whole body scintigraphy. In liver cirrhosis (Child B and C group) the liver volume was atrophic and the splenic volume hypertrophic. The liver accumulation rate was decreased corresponding with the degree of liver cirrhosis, but the accumulation rate per volume was decreased in Child B and C. The splenic accumulation rate was increased in Child B and C, but the accumulation rate per volume was not significant between control group and liver cirrhosis. The measurement of the hepatosplenic volume and accumulation rate by SPECT is useful to evaluate the hepatosplenic function. (author)

  20. Determination of the disintegration rate and gamma emission probabilities per decay of 182 Ta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Eliezer Antonio da

    2008-01-01

    In this work the procedure developed for the standardization of 182 Ta sources produced by irradiation at the IPEN IEA-R1 research reactor is presented. The 182 Ta decays with a half-life of 114 days by β - emission, populating the excited levels of 182 W. It emits gamma rays with several energies mainly between 31 keV and 264 keV and between 1001 keV and 1453 keV. The measurements were performed in a 4πβ-γ coincidence system by using the extrapolation technique. The coincidence system is composed of a 4 π proportional counter coupled to a NaI(Tl) cristal. The measurements were undertaken selecting two windows in the γ-channel, in order to check the consistency of the results. A Monte Carlo calculation was performed in order to predict the behavior of the observed activity as a function of 4πβ the detector efficiency and the results were compared to experimental values. The most intense gamma-ray emission probabilities of 182 Ta were determined by means of an HPGe gamma spectrometer, the germanium efficiency curve was obtained by using sources 152 Eu, 241 Am, 60 Co, 133 Ba and 166m Ho standardized in a primary system. The uncertainties involved in the measurements were treated by the covariance methodology. The results obtained are in good agreement with the experimental uncertainty compared with literature values. (author)

  1. System for quantitative measurements of methane emission from dairy cattle in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellwing, Anne Louise Frydendahl; Lund, Peter; Johannes, Maike

    The methane emission from the digestive tract of cattle in Denmark accounts for 45% of the total methane emission based on the assumption that 6% of the gross energy is metabolized to methane. There is a lack of newer experimental data available for Danish cattle; therefore we have built a unit...... expectations for a system for exact measurements of methane emission in dairy cows at production level under close to natural in barn conditions, where cows’ behavior can be expected to be natural....

  2. Real-world and specific to vehicle driving cycles for measuring car pollutant emissions

    OpenAIRE

    ANDRE, M; JOUMARD, R

    2004-01-01

    In the frame of the European research project ARTEMIS, a set of representative real-world driving cycles has been developed, to ensure a coherency between the pollutant emissions measurements conducted in the frame of the ARTEMIS project and of on-going national campaigns and to enable the integration of all the resulting emission data in the European systems of emission inventory. The 3 real-world ARTEMIS driving cycles (urban, rural road and motorway) represent the observed European drivi...

  3. Relative measurement of the excitation rate coefficients of the FeXI ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marotta, A.

    1982-01-01

    The collision rate coefficients for the iron atoms are measured through the hot plasma obtainment. The physical model used in this determination is the crown stationary model which consider that the excitation by electronic collisions is balanced by the spontaneous emission. This work was realized in a 15Kj theta pinch device, of high pulse reproductibility. The iron-pentacarbonyl [Fe(Co) 5 ] was used as the impurity source of a hydrogen gas. The temperature and density were determined by the scattering light analysis of a rubi laser using the Thomson scattering. (L.C.) [pt

  4. Half-life measurements and photon emission probabilities of frequently applied radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoetzig, U.; Schrader, H.

    1998-09-01

    It belongs to the duties of the PTB department for 'Radioactivity' to determine the radioactivity emitted by radioactive radiation sources and publish their specific decay data, also called ''standards'', so that appliers of such sources may calibrate their equipment accordingly, as e.g. photon detectors. Further data required for proper calibration are those defining the photon emission probability per decay, P(E), at the relevant photon energy E. The emission rate R(E) is derived from the activity A, by the calculus R(E)=A x P(E), and the half-lives of decay, T 1 /2, together with the standards are used for determining the time of measurement. The calibration quality essentially is determined by those two parameters and the incertainties involved. The PTB 'Radioactivity' department therefore publishes for users recommended decay data elaborated and used by the experts at PTB. The tabulated data are either measured at PTB, or critically selected from data compilations of other publication sources. The tabulated decay data presented here are intended to serve as a source of reference for laboratory work and should be used in combination with the comprehensive data collections available (see the bibliography of this document: 86BRFI, 91TECD, 96FI, Nuclear Data Sheets, e.g. 98ND84). (orig./CB) [de

  5. Improving the limits of detection of low background alpha emission measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, Brendan D.; Coleman, Stuart; Harris, Jack T.; Warburton, William K.

    2018-01-01

    Alpha particle emission - even at extremely low levels - is a significant issue in the search for rare events (e.g., double beta decay, dark matter detection). Traditional measurement techniques require long counting times to measure low sample rates in the presence of much larger instrumental backgrounds. To address this, a commercially available instrument developed by XIA uses pulse shape analysis to discriminate alpha emissions produced by the sample from those produced by other surfaces of the instrument itself. Experience with this system has uncovered two residual sources of background: cosmogenics and radon emanation from internal components. An R&D program is underway to enhance the system and extend the pulse shape analysis technique further, so that these residual sources can be identified and rejected as well. In this paper, we review the theory of operation and pulse shape analysis techniques used in XIA's alpha counter, and briefly explore data suggesting the origin of the residual background terms. We will then present our approach to enhance the system's ability to identify and reject these terms. Finally, we will describe a prototype system that incorporates our concepts and demonstrates their feasibility.

  6. Comparison of measured and modeled gas-puff emissions on Alcator C-Mod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Seung-Gyou; Terry, J. L.; Stotler, D. P.; Labombard, B. L.; Brunner, D. F.

    2017-10-01

    Understanding neutral transport in tokamak boundary plasmas is important because of its possible effects on the pedestal and scrape-off layer (SOL). On Alcator C-Mod, measured neutral line emissions from externally-puffed deuterium and helium gases are compared with the synthetic results of a neutral transport code, DEGAS 2. The injected gas flow rate and the camera response are absolutely calibrated. Time-averaged SOL density and temperature profiles are input to a steady-state simulation. An updated helium atomic model is employed in DEGAS2. Good agreement is found for the D α peak brightness and profile shape. However, the measured helium I line brightness is found to be lower than that in the simulation results by a roughly a factor of three over a wide range of density particularly in the far SOL region. Two possible causes for this discrepancy are reviewed. First, local cooling due to gas puff may suppress the line emission. Second, time-dependent turbulence effect may impact the helium neutral transport. Unlike deuterium atoms that gain energy from charge exchange and dissociation processes, helium neutrals remain cold and have a relatively short mean free path, known to make them prone to turbulence based on the Kubo number criterion. Supported by USDoE awards: DE-FC02-99ER54512, DE-SC0014251, and DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  7. Measurement of blowdown flow rates using load cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolas, P.K.; Venkat Raj, V.; Ghosh, A.K.; Murty, L.G.K.; Muralidhar Rao, S.

    1980-01-01

    To establish a reliable method for measuring two-phase flow, experiments were planned for measurement of transient single phase flow rates from vessels using load cells. Suitability of lead-zirconate-titanate piezoelectric ceramic discs was examined. Discharge time constant of the disc used was low, leading to large measurement errors. Subsequently, experiments were carried out using strain gauge load cells and these were found satisfactory. The unsteady flow equation has been derived for the system under investigation. The equation has been solved numerically using the fourth order Runge-Kutta method and also by integrating it analytically. The experimental results are compared with the theoretical results and presented in this report. (auth.)

  8. Constrained independent component analysis approach to nonobtrusive pulse rate measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsouri, Gill R.; Kyal, Survi; Dianat, Sohail; Mestha, Lalit K.

    2012-07-01

    Nonobtrusive pulse rate measurement using a webcam is considered. We demonstrate how state-of-the-art algorithms based on independent component analysis suffer from a sorting problem which hinders their performance, and propose a novel algorithm based on constrained independent component analysis to improve performance. We present how the proposed algorithm extracts a photoplethysmography signal and resolves the sorting problem. In addition, we perform a comparative study between the proposed algorithm and state-of-the-art algorithms over 45 video streams using a finger probe oxymeter for reference measurements. The proposed algorithm provides improved accuracy: the root mean square error is decreased from 20.6 and 9.5 beats per minute (bpm) for existing algorithms to 3.5 bpm for the proposed algorithm. An error of 3.5 bpm is within the inaccuracy expected from the reference measurements. This implies that the proposed algorithm provided performance of equal accuracy to the finger probe oximeter.

  9. Field measurement and interpretation of beta doses and dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selby, J.M.; Swinth, K.L.; Hooker, C.D.; Kenoyer, J.L.

    1983-01-01

    A large number of portable survey instruments employing G.M., ionization chamber, and scintillation detectors used for gamma measurements are also used for monitoring in beta fields by using removable shields to separate the beta and gamma components of the radiation field. The difference does not correspond to an absorbed dose rate for the beta field due to a variety of factors. Among these factors are the dependence on beta energy, source-detector geometries, mixed fields and variable ambient conditions. Attempting to use such measurements directly can lead to errors as high as a factor of 100. Appropriate calibrations and correction factors can be used to reduce the errors in beta measurements to a tolerable level

  10. Measuring ammonia concentrations and emissions from agricultural land and liquid surfaces: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Sanjay B; Westerman, Philip W; Arogo, Jactone

    2006-07-01

    Aerial ammonia concentrations (Cg) are measured using acid scrubbers, filter packs, denuders, or optical methods. Using Cg and wind speed or airflow rate, ammonia emission rate or flux can be directly estimated using enclosures or micrometeorological methods. Using nitrogen (N) recovery is not recommended, mainly because the different gaseous N components cannot be separated. Although low cost and replicable, chambers modify environmental conditions and are suitable only for comparing treatments. Wind tunnels do not modify environmental conditions as much as chambers, but they may not be appropriate for determining ammonia fluxes; however, they can be used to compare emissions and test models. Larger wind tunnels that also simulate natural wind profiles may be more useful for comparing treatments than micrometeorological methods because the latter require larger plots and are, thus, difficult to replicate. For determining absolute ammonia flux, the micrometeorological methods are the most suitable because they are nonintrusive. For use with micrometeorological methods, both the passive denuders and optical methods give comparable accuracies, although the latter give real-time Cg but at a higher cost. The passive denuder is wind weighted and also costs less than forced-air Cg measurement methods, but it requires calibration. When ammonia contamination during sample preparation and handling is a concern and separating the gas-phase ammonia and aerosol ammonium is not required, the scrubber is preferred over the passive denuder. The photothermal interferometer, because of its low detection limit and robustness, may hold potential for use in agriculture, but it requires evaluation. With its simpler theoretical basis and fewer restrictions, the integrated horizontal flux (IHF) method is preferable over other micrometeorological methods, particularly for lagoons, where berms and land-lagoon boundaries modify wind flow and flux gradients. With uniform wind flow, the ZINST

  11. Estimation of time-varying pollutant emission rates in a ventilated enclosure: inversion of a reduced model obtained by experimental application of the modal identification method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girault, M; Maillet, D; Bonthoux, F; Galland, B; Martin, P; Braconnier, R; Fontaine, J R

    2008-01-01

    A method is proposed for the estimation of time-varying emission rates of pollutant sources in a ventilated enclosure, through the resolution of an inverse forced convection problem. Unsteady transport–diffusion of the pollutant is considered, with the assumption of a stationary velocity field remaining unchanged during emission (passive contaminant). The pollutant transport equation is therefore linear with respect to concentration. The source's location is also supposed to be known. As the first step, a reduced model (RM) linking concentrations at a set of control points to emission rates of sources is identified from experimental data by using the modal identification method (MIM). This parameter estimation problem uses transient contaminant concentration measurements made at control points inside the ventilated enclosure, corresponding to increasing and decreasing steps of emission rates. Such experimental modelling allows us to avoid dealing with a CFD code involving turbulence modelling and to get rid of uncertainties about sensors position. In a second step, the identified RM is used to solve an inverse forced convection problem: from contaminant concentration measured at the same control points, rates of sources emitting simultaneously are estimated with a sequential in time algorithm using future time steps

  12. Measurements of astrophysical reaction rates for radioactive samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koehler, P.E.; O'Brien, H.A.; Bowman, C.D.

    1987-01-01

    Reaction rates for both big-bang and stellar nucleosynthesis can be obtained from the measurement of (n,p) and (n,γ) cross sections for radioactive nuclei. In the past, large backgrounds associated with the sample activity limited these types of measurements to radioisotopes with very long half lives. The advent of the low-energy, high-intensity neutron source at the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering CEnter (LANSCE) has greatly increased the number of nuclei which can be studied. Results of (n,p) measurements on samples with half lives as short as fifty-three days will be given. The astrophysics to be learned from these data will be discussed. Additional difficulties are encountered when making (n,γ) rather than (n,p) measurements. However, with a properly designed detector, and with the high peak neutron intensities now available, (n,γ) measurements can be made for nuclei with half lives as short as several weeks. Progress on the Los Alamos (n,γ) cross-section measurement program for radioactive samples will be discussed. 25 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  13. Measurement of emission diameter as a function of time on foam z- pinch plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazier, S.E.; Barber, T.L.; Derzon, M.S.; Kellogg, J.W.

    1996-01-01

    We have developed a streaked imaging capability to make time-resolved measurements of the emission size for low density foam z-pinches. By lens coupling visible emission from the z-pinch target to an array of fiber optics we obtained the emission profile in the visible as a function of time with radial resolution of 300 μm. To measure the emission at temperatures greater than ∼40 eV the source was slit-imaged or pin-hole imaged onto an x-ray filtered scintillator. Non-uniformities in both visible and x-ray emission were observed. We describe the diagnostics, the image unfold process, and results from the instrument for both visible and x-ray measurements

  14. A new high rate positron lifetime measurement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedwell, M.O.; Paulus, T.J.

    1979-01-01

    Positron lifetime measuring system, a technique to perform non-destructive studies on the internal structure of materials, has many components common to those used for nuclear time spectroscopy systems. In each case, a timing coincidence curve is measured for the energy range of interest, and this is accomplished in a typical timing coincidence system. The paper first describes the conventional timing coincidence system, then a new fast timing system is introduced. Comparing to the conventional fast/slow timing system, the fast timing technique offers reduced complexity, lower system cost, and improved high data rate capability. Experimental results show that the FWHM timing resolution ranges from 190 ps for a 1.1 : 1 dynamic range to 337 ps for a 100 : 1 dynamic range of signals with 60 Co. As for the timing resolution as a function of energy, the FWHM resolution for each channel ranges from 124 ps at 1 MeV to 400 ps at 100 keV. Since the excellent timing performance is maintained even at very high input rate, the experimenters can use much more active sources to increase the true coincidence rate and reduce data accumulation time. This method has the added advantage of minimizing long term drift effects since the experiments can be conducted in less time. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  15. Measurements of waste tank passive ventilation rates using tracer gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Olsen, K.B.; Sklarew, D.S.; Evans, J.C.; Remund, K.M.

    1997-09-01

    This report presents the results of ventilation rate studies of eight passively ventilated high-level radioactive waste tanks using tracer gases. Head space ventilation rates were determined for Tanks A-101, AX-102, AX-103, BY-105, C-107, S-102, U-103, and U-105 using sulfur hexafluoride (SF 6 ) and/or helium (He) as tracer gases. Passive ventilation rates are needed for the resolution of several key safety issues. These safety issues are associated with the rates of flammable gas production and ventilation, the rates at which organic salt-nitrate salt mixtures dry out, and the estimation of organic solvent waste surface areas. This tracer gas study involves injecting a tracer gas into the tank headspace and measuring its concentration at different times to establish the rate at which the tracer is removed by ventilation. Tracer gas injection and sample collection were performed by SGN Eurisys Service Corporation and/or Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation, Characterization Project Operations. Headspace samples were analyzed for He and SF 6 by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The tracer gas method was first demonstrated on Tank S-102. Tests were conducted on Tank S-102 to verify that the tracer gas was uniformly distributed throughout the tank headspace before baseline samples were collected, and that mixing was sufficiently vigorous to maintain an approximately uniform distribution of tracer gas in the headspace during the course of the study. Headspace samples, collected from a location about 4 in away from the injection point and 15, 30, and 60 minutes after the injection of He and SF 6 , indicated that both tracer gases were rapidly mixed. The samples were found to have the same concentration of tracer gases after 1 hour as after 24 hours, suggesting that mixing of the tracer gas was essentially complete within 1 hour

  16. Te(R,t) Measurements using Electron Bernstein Wave Thermal Emission on NSTX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diem, S.J.; Taylor, G.; Efthimion, P.C.; LeBlanc, B.P.; Carter, M.; Caughman, J.; Wilgen, J.B.; Harvey, R.W.; Preinhaelter, J.; Urban, J.

    2006-01-01

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) routinely studies overdense plasmas with n e of (1-5) x 10 19 m -3 and total magnetic field of e measurement. A significant upgrade to the previous NSTX EBW emission diagnostic to measure thermal EBW emission via the oblique B-X-O mode conversion process has been completed. The new EBW diagnostic consists of two remotely steerable, quad-ridged horn antennas, each of which is coupled to a dual channel radiometer. Fundamental (8-18 GHz) and second and third harmonic (18-40 GHz) thermal EBW emission and polarization measurements can be obtained simultaneously.

  17. Measuring the respiratory gas exchange of grazing cattle using the GreenFeed emissions monitoring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruminants are a significant source of enteric methane, which has been identified as a powerful greenhouse gas that contributes to climate change. With interest in developing technologies to decrease enteric methane emission, systems are currently being developed to measure the methane emission by c...

  18. Development of the Flame Test Concept Inventory: Measuring Student Thinking about Atomic Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretz, Stacey Lowery; Murata Mayo, Ana Vasquez

    2018-01-01

    This study reports the development of a 19-item Flame Test Concept Inventory, an assessment tool to measure students' understanding of atomic emission. Fifty-two students enrolled in secondary and postsecondary chemistry courses were interviewed about atomic emission and explicitly asked to explain flame test demonstrations and energy level…

  19. (n,p) emission channeling measurements on ion-implanted beryllium

    CERN Multimedia

    Jakubek, J; Uher, J

    2007-01-01

    We propose to perform emission-channeling measurements using thermal neutron induced proton emission from ion-implanted $^{7}$Be. The physics questions addressed concern the beryllium doping of III-V and II-VI semiconductors and the host dependence of the electron capture half-life of $^{7}$Be.

  20. Aerosol emissions from prescribed fires in the United States: A synthesis of laboratory and aircraft measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. A. May; G. R. McMeeking; T. Lee; J. W. Taylor; J. S. Craven; I. Burling; A. P. Sullivan; S. Akagi; J. L. Collett; M. Flynn; H. Coe; S. P. Urbanski; J. H. Seinfeld; R. J. Yokelson; S. M. Kreidenweis

    2014-01-01

    Aerosol emissions from prescribed fires can affect air quality on regional scales. Accurate representation of these emissions in models requires information regarding the amount and composition of the emitted species. We measured a suite of submicron particulate matter species in young plumes emitted from prescribed fires (chaparral and montane ecosystems in California...

  1. Advanced Quadrupole Ion Trap Instrumentation for Low Level Vehicle Emissions Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLuckey, S.A.

    1997-01-01

    Quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry has been evaluated for its potential use in vehicle emissions measurements in vehicle test facilities as an analyzer for the top 15 compounds contributing to smog generation. A variety of ionization methods were explored including ion trap in situ chemical ionization, atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization, and nitric oxide chemical ionization in a glow discharge ionization source coupled with anion trap mass spectrometer. Emphasis was placed on the determination of hydrocarbons and oxygenated hydrocarbons at parts per million to parts per billion levels. Ion trap in situ water chemical ionization and atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization were both shown to be amendable to the analysis of arenes, alcohols, aldehydes and, to some degree, alkenes. Atmospheric sampling glow discharge also generated molecular ions of methy-t-butyl ether (MTBE). Neither of these ionization methods, however, were found to generate diagnostic ions for the alkanes. Nitric oxide chemical ionization, on the other hand, was found to yield diagnostic ions for alkanes, alkenes, arenes, alcohols, aldehydes, and MTBE. The ability to measure a variety of hydrocarbons present at roughly 15 parts per billion at measurement rates of 3 Hz was demonstrated. All of the ions with potential to serve as parent ions in a tandem mass spectrometry experiment were found to yield parent-to-product conversion efficiencies greater than 75%. The flexibility afforded to the ion trap by use of tailored wave-forms applied to the end-caps allows parallel monitoring schemes to be devised that provide many of the advantages of tandem mass spectrometry without major loss in measurement rate. A large loss in measurement rate would ordinarily result from the use of conventional tandem mass spectrometry experiments carried out in series for a large number of targeted components. These results have demonstrated that the ion trap has an excellent combination of

  2. Estimation of methane emission rate changes using age-defined waste in a landfill site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Kazuei; Furuichi, Toru

    2013-09-01

    Long term methane emissions from landfill sites are often predicted by first-order decay (FOD) models, in which the default coefficients of the methane generation potential and the methane generation rate given by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) are usually used. However, previous studies have demonstrated the large uncertainty in these coefficients because they are derived from a calibration procedure under ideal steady-state conditions, not actual landfill site conditions. In this study, the coefficients in the FOD model were estimated by a new approach to predict more precise long term methane generation by considering region-specific conditions. In the new approach, age-defined waste samples, which had been under the actual landfill site conditions, were collected in Hokkaido, Japan (in cold region), and the time series data on the age-defined waste sample's methane generation potential was used to estimate the coefficients in the FOD model. The degradation coefficients were 0.0501/y and 0.0621/y for paper and food waste, and the methane generation potentials were 214.4 mL/g-wet waste and 126.7 mL/g-wet waste for paper and food waste, respectively. These coefficients were compared with the default coefficients given by the IPCC. Although the degradation coefficient for food waste was smaller than the default value, the other coefficients were within the range of the default coefficients. With these new coefficients to calculate methane generation, the long term methane emissions from the landfill site was estimated at 1.35×10(4)m(3)-CH(4), which corresponds to approximately 2.53% of the total carbon dioxide emissions in the city (5.34×10(5)t-CO(2)/y). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Impacts of temporary traffic control measures on vehicular emissions during the Asian games in Guangzhou, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhiliang; Zhang, Yingzhi; Shen, Xianbao; Wang, Xintong; Wu, Ye; He, Kebin

    2013-01-01

    To guarantee good traffic and air quality during the 16th Asian Games in Guangzhou, China, the government carried out two traffic control Drills before the Games and adopted traffic control measures during the Games. Vehicle activities before and during the first and second Drills, and during the Games, were surveyed. Based on the data under investigation, the impacts of control measures on traffic volumes and driving characteristics were analyzed during the first and second Drills, and the Games. The emission reduction of traffic control measures was also evaluated during the three stages using the MOBILE-China model. The results show that there were significant effects of implementing temporary traffic control measures on transportation activity and vehicular emissions. During the first and second Drills, and the Games, the average traffic volumes in monitored roads decreased, and the average speed of vehicles increased significantly The co-effects of traffic flow reduction, traffic congestion improvement, and the banning of high-emitting vehicles helped to greatly reduce the estimated emissions from motor vehicles in Guangzhou during the first and second Drills, and the Games. Estimated vehicular emissions were reduced by 38-52% during the first Drill and 28-36% for the second Drill. During the Asian Games, vehicular emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbon (HC), oxides of nitrogen (NO), and particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter vehicular emissions of CO, HC, NOx, and PM10. Motor vehicles have become the most prevalent source of emissions and subsequently air pollution within Chinese cities. Understanding the impacts that different control measures have on vehicular emissions is very important in order to be able to control vehicle emissions. The results of this study will be very helpful for the further control of vehicle emissions in Guangzhou in the future. In addition, the effects of temporary transportation control measures will provide

  4. Establishment of national emission measurement activity in neighbouring areas of Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aunela, L.; Larjava, K.; Jormanainen, P. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland). Environmental Technology; Muurinen, M. [Enemi Ltd, Lahti (Finland); Hietamaeki, M. [Ministry of the Environment, Helsinki (Finland)

    1995-12-31

    Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania (the Baltic countries) and the Republic State of Carelia, Russia belong to the so-called nearby areas of Finland. All being part of the former Soviet Union, they are now undergoing the establishment of their own environment- managing systems. Finland has shown a great amount of interest in supporting the efforts of these areas to solve their environmental problems. In 1993 VTT started, at the request of the East European Project of the Finnish Ministry of the Environment, a four year project aiming at the establishment of national atmospheric emission measurement systems in the Baltic countries and the Republic state of Carelia (later: the counterpart countries). Proper national emission measurement systems were regarded important in order to provide reliable data on the emission situation for national and international use. The main target of the work is to raise the level of the emission measurements in the counterpart countries to the international level. Two aspects were considered to be required to achieve this goal; (1) delivery of proper emission measurement equipment, (2) training of the emission measurement personnel. It was estimated that within three to four years these counterpart countries could join the Finnish quality assurance system in emission measurements if desired. (author)

  5. Establishment of national emission measurement activity in neighbouring areas of Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aunela, L; Larjava, K; Jormanainen, P [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland). Environmental Technology; Muurinen, M [Enemi Ltd, Lahti (Finland); Hietamaeki, M [Ministry of the Environment, Helsinki (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania (the Baltic countries) and the Republic State of Carelia, Russia belong to the so-called nearby areas of Finland. All being part of the former Soviet Union, they are now undergoing the establishment of their own environment- managing systems. Finland has shown a great amount of interest in supporting the efforts of these areas to solve their environmental problems. In 1993 VTT started, at the request of the East European Project of the Finnish Ministry of the Environment, a four year project aiming at the establishment of national atmospheric emission measurement systems in the Baltic countries and the Republic state of Carelia (later: the counterpart countries). Proper national emission measurement systems were regarded important in order to provide reliable data on the emission situation for national and international use. The main target of the work is to raise the level of the emission measurements in the counterpart countries to the international level. Two aspects were considered to be required to achieve this goal; (1) delivery of proper emission measurement equipment, (2) training of the emission measurement personnel. It was estimated that within three to four years these counterpart countries could join the Finnish quality assurance system in emission measurements if desired. (author)

  6. Scale factor measure method without turntable for angular rate gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Fangyi; Han, Xuefei; Yao, Yanqing; Xiong, Yuting; Huang, Yuqiong; Wang, Hua

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, a scale factor test method without turntable is originally designed for the angular rate gyroscope. A test system which consists of test device, data acquisition circuit and data processing software based on Labview platform is designed. Taking advantage of gyroscope's sensitivity of angular rate, a gyroscope with known scale factor, serves as a standard gyroscope. The standard gyroscope is installed on the test device together with a measured gyroscope. By shaking the test device around its edge which is parallel to the input axis of gyroscope, the scale factor of the measured gyroscope can be obtained in real time by the data processing software. This test method is fast. It helps test system miniaturized, easy to carry or move. Measure quarts MEMS gyroscope's scale factor multi-times by this method, the difference is less than 0.2%. Compare with testing by turntable, the scale factor difference is less than 1%. The accuracy and repeatability of the test system seems good.

  7. Process Measurement Deviation Analysis for Flow Rate due to Miscalibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Eunsuk; Kim, Byung Rae; Jeong, Seog Hwan; Choi, Ji Hye; Shin, Yong Chul; Yun, Jae Hee [KEPCO Engineering and Construction Co., Deajeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    An analysis was initiated to identify the root cause, and the exemption of high static line pressure correction to differential pressure (DP) transmitters was one of the major deviation factors. Also the miscalibrated DP transmitter range was identified as another major deviation factor. This paper presents considerations to be incorporated in the process flow measurement instrumentation calibration and the analysis results identified that the DP flow transmitter electrical output decreased by 3%. Thereafter, flow rate indication decreased by 1.9% resulting from the high static line pressure correction exemption and measurement range miscalibration. After re-calibration, the flow rate indication increased by 1.9%, which is consistent with the analysis result. This paper presents the brief calibration procedures for Rosemount DP flow transmitter, and analyzes possible three cases of measurement deviation including error and cause. Generally, the DP transmitter is required to be calibrated with precise process input range according to the calibration procedure provided for specific DP transmitter. Especially, in case of the DP transmitter installed in high static line pressure, it is important to correct the high static line pressure effect to avoid the inherent systematic error for Rosemount DP transmitter. Otherwise, failure to notice the correction may lead to indicating deviation from actual value.

  8. Measurement of gastric emptying rate in humans. Simplified scanning method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holt, S.; Colliver, J.; Guram, M.; Neal, C.; Verhulst, S.J.; Taylor, T.V. (Univ. of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia (USA))

    1990-11-01

    Simultaneous measurements of the gastric emptying rate of the solid and liquid phase of a dual-isotope-labeled test meal were made using a gamma camera and a simple scintillation detector, similar to that used in a hand-held probe. A simple scanning apparatus, similar to that used in a hand-held scintillation probe, was compared with simultaneous measurements made by a gamma camera in 16 healthy males. A dual-labeled test meal was utilized to measure liquid and solid emptying simultaneously. Anterior and posterior scans were taken at intervals up to 120 min using both a gamma camera and the scintillation probe. Good relative agreement between the methods was obtained both for solid-phase (correlation range 0.92-0.99, mean 0.97) and for liquid-phase data (correlation range 0.93-0.99, mean 0.97). For solid emptying data regression line slopes varied from 0.75 to 1.03 (mean 0.84). Liquid emptying data indicated that slopes ranged from 0.71 to 1.06 (mean 0.87). These results suggested that an estimate of the gamma measurement could be obtained by multiplying the scintillation measurement by a factor of 0.84 for the solid phase and 0.87 for the liquid phase. Correlation between repeat studies was 0.97 and 0.96 for solids and liquids, respectively. The application of a hand-held probe technique provides a noninvasive and inexpensive method for accurately assessing solid- and liquid-phase gastric emptying from the human stomach that correlates well with the use of a gamma camera, within the range of gastric emptying rate in the normal individuals in this study.

  9. Measurement of gastric emptying rate in humans. Simplified scanning method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, S.; Colliver, J.; Guram, M.; Neal, C.; Verhulst, S.J.; Taylor, T.V.

    1990-01-01

    Simultaneous measurements of the gastric emptying rate of the solid and liquid phase of a dual-isotope-labeled test meal were made using a gamma camera and a simple scintillation detector, similar to that used in a hand-held probe. A simple scanning apparatus, similar to that used in a hand-held scintillation probe, was compared with simultaneous measurements made by a gamma camera in 16 healthy males. A dual-labeled test meal was utilized to measure liquid and solid emptying simultaneously. Anterior and posterior scans were taken at intervals up to 120 min using both a gamma camera and the scintillation probe. Good relative agreement between the methods was obtained both for solid-phase (correlation range 0.92-0.99, mean 0.97) and for liquid-phase data (correlation range 0.93-0.99, mean 0.97). For solid emptying data regression line slopes varied from 0.75 to 1.03 (mean 0.84). Liquid emptying data indicated that slopes ranged from 0.71 to 1.06 (mean 0.87). These results suggested that an estimate of the gamma measurement could be obtained by multiplying the scintillation measurement by a factor of 0.84 for the solid phase and 0.87 for the liquid phase. Correlation between repeat studies was 0.97 and 0.96 for solids and liquids, respectively. The application of a hand-held probe technique provides a noninvasive and inexpensive method for accurately assessing solid- and liquid-phase gastric emptying from the human stomach that correlates well with the use of a gamma camera, within the range of gastric emptying rate in the normal individuals in this study

  10. Automatic emissive probe apparatus for accurate plasma and vacuum space potential measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jianquan, LI; Wenqi, LU; Jun, XU; Fei, GAO; Younian, WANG

    2018-02-01

    We have developed an automatic emissive probe apparatus based on the improved inflection point method of the emissive probe for accurate measurements of both plasma potential and vacuum space potential. The apparatus consists of a computer controlled data acquisition card, a working circuit composed by a biasing unit and a heating unit, as well as an emissive probe. With the set parameters of the probe scanning bias, the probe heating current and the fitting range, the apparatus can automatically execute the improved inflection point method and give the measured result. The validity of the automatic emissive probe apparatus is demonstrated in a test measurement of vacuum potential distribution between two parallel plates, showing an excellent accuracy of 0.1 V. Plasma potential was also measured, exhibiting high efficiency and convenient use of the apparatus for space potential measurements.

  11. A novel field measurement method for determining fine particle and gas emissions from residential wood combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tissari, Jarkko; Hytönen, Kati; Lyyränen, Jussi; Jokiniemi, Jorma

    Emission data from residential wood combustion are usually obtained on test stands in the laboratory but these measurements do not correspond to the operational conditions in the field because of the technological boundary conditions (e.g. testing protocol, environmental and draught conditions). The field measurements take into account the habitual practice of the operators and provide the more reliable results needed for emission inventories. In this study, a workable and compact method for measuring emissions from residential wood combustion in winter conditions was developed. The emissions for fine particle, gaseous and PAH compounds as well as particle composition in real operational conditions were measured from seven different appliances. The measurement technique worked well and was evidently suitable for winter conditions. It was easy and fast to use, and no construction scaffold was needed. The dilution of the sample with the combination of a porous tube diluter and an ejector diluter was well suited to field measurement. The results indicate that the emissions of total volatile organic carbon (TVOC) (17 g kg -1 (of dry wood burned)), carbon monoxide (CO) (120 g kg -1) and fine particle mass (PM 1) (2.7 g kg -1) from the sauna stove were higher than in the other measured appliances. In the masonry heaters, baking oven and stove, the emissions were 2.9-9 g kg -1 TVOC, 28-68 g kg -1 CO and 0.6-1.6 g kg -1 PM 1. The emission of 12 PAHs (PAH 12) from the sauna stove was 164 mg kg -1 and consisted mainly of PAHs with four benzene rings in their structure. PAH 12 emission from other appliances was, on average, 21 mg kg -1 and was dominated by 2-ring PAHs. These results indicate that despite the non-optimal operational practices in the field, the emissions did not differ markedly from the laboratory measurements.

  12. The stratigraphic filter and bias in measurement of geologic rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumer, Rina; Jerolmack, Douglas; McElroy, Brandon

    2011-01-01

    Erosion and deposition rates estimated from the stratigraphic record frequently exhibit a power-law dependence on measurement interval. This dependence can result from a power-law distribution of stratigraphic hiatuses. By representing the stratigraphic filter as a stochastic process called a reverse ascending ladder, we describe a likely origin of power-law hiatuses, and thus, rate scaling. While power-law hiatuses in certain environments can be a direct result of power-law periods of stasis (no deposition or erosion), they are more generally the result of randomness in surface fluctuations irrespective of mean subsidence or uplift. Autocorrelation in fluctuations can make hiatuses more or less heavy-tailed, but still exhibit power-law characteristics. In addition we show that by passing stratigraphic data backward through the filter, certain statistics of surface kinematics from their formative environments can be inferred.

  13. Emissivity-corrected power loss calibration for lock-in thermography measurements on silicon solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasemann, Martin; Walter, Benjamin; Meinhardt, Christoph; Ebser, Jan; Kwapil, Wolfram; Warta, Wilhelm

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes power loss calibration procedures with implemented emissivity correction. The determination of our emissivity correction matrix does neither rely on blackbody reference measurements nor on the knowledge of any sample temperatures. To describe the emissivity-corrected power calibration procedures in detail, we review the theory behind lock-in thermography and show experimentally that the lock-in signal is proportional to the power dissipation in the solar cell. Experiments show the successful application of our emissivity correction procedure, which significantly improves the informative value of lock-in thermography imag