WorldWideScience

Sample records for measure rocks derived

  1. Laboratory measurements of rock thermal properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bording, Thue Sylvester; Balling, N.; Nielsen, S.B.

    The thermal properties of rocks are key elements in understanding and modelling the temperature field of the subsurface. Thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity can be measured in the laboratory if rock samples can be provided. We have introduced improvements to the divided bar and needle...... probe methods to be able to measure both thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity. The improvements we implement include, for both methods, a combination of fast numerical finite element forward modelling and a Markov Chain Monte Carlo inversion scheme for estimating rock thermal parameters...

  2. Laboratory measurements of rock thermal properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bording, Thue Sylvester; Balling, N.; Nielsen, S.B.

    The thermal properties of rocks are key elements in understanding and modelling the temperature field of the subsurface. Thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity can be measured in the laboratory if rock samples can be provided. We have introduced improvements to the divided bar and needle...... probe methods to be able to measure both thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity. The improvements we implement include, for both methods, a combination of fast numerical finite element forward modelling and a Markov Chain Monte Carlo inversion scheme for estimating rock thermal parameters...

  3. Engineering properties of coal measure rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thill, R.E.; Jessop, J.A.

    1982-04-01

    Engineering properties of rock are essential in most phases of mining from site reconaissance through mineral processing. Review of the literature indicates, however, that property data is scarce for most coal measure rocks in the United States. The Bureau of Mines has undertaken a wide-ranging testing program to provide more complete property data for coal strata in the U.S. coal basins. The property data are expected to have applications in geophysical exploration, development of premining and hazard detection probes and instrumentation, mine design, engineering and rock mass classification, subsidence engineering, and ground control. This paper describes the comprehensive program encompassing in situ geological, geophysical, and geotechnical properties and laboratory determinations of acoustic, electromagnetic, physical, mechanical, and index properties and discusses results for 500 feet of coal measures at a mine site in the northern Appalachian, eastern coal province.

  4. Permeability Measurements On Hot Rock Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, S.; Spieler, O.; Scheu, B.; Dingwell, D. B.

    Gas permeability is an important issue with regards to the explosive behaviour of Si- rich volcanoes. It directly affects the gas pressure within the volcano which influences the eruptive behaviour of the volcano. To date permeability measurements have only been performed on cold porous rocks (e.g. Eichelberger et al. 1986, Klug &Cashman 1996), because measurements with higher temperatures are not possible with common gas permeameters. Investigating the permeability of volcanic rocks in a hot state (up to 850 C) provides a better insight into the degassing processes under natural condi- tions. Therefore, any new experimental setup is expected to yield information about the temperature dependency of permeability in volcanic rocks. The present experi- ments have been performed on samples with a wide range of porosities. The samples were collected from block-and-ash flows on Merapi (Indonesia), Unzen (Japan) and pumices on Lipari Island (Italy). Permeabiltiy was measured using a modified setup of the fragmentation apparatus. A cylindrical rock sample (Æ = 25mm, l = 60 mm), glued gas tight in a sample container, was placed in a steel autoclave. Below the sample was a defined volume of argon gas at a known pressure. After the rupture of a diaphragm, the pressure above the sample drops rapidly to atmospheric conditions and the pres- surized gas flows through the porous rock sample until the pressure is equalized. The length of time from the beginning of the pressure drop to equilization delivers the basis for the calculation of the gas flow rate. The measurements we have performed at room temperature and at 850C to study the temperature dependency of the permeability.

  5. Resources of Kaolinite Rocks in China Coal Measures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The proved reserve of kaolinite rocks in China coal measures is about 1. 673 billion tons. The types of kaolinite rocks contain tonstein, flintclay and soft kaolin. Their origin modes include alteration of volcanic ash, terrigenous clay deposit and weathering of coal and adjacent rocks. The organic matter and organic acid play an important role in the formation of kaolinite rocks of coal measures. The difference in properties between kaolinite rock and traditional kaolin requires different processing technologies.

  6. The advance and development of damage measurement technique of rock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Geng-she(杨更社)

    2003-01-01

    The key problem of rock damage mechanics is that determination of the variable of rock damage and the establishment of damage constitutive relation of rock, which is inevitable involved in the measurement problem of rock. In this paper, the measurement technology and method of rock damage are comprehensively narrated, analyzed and studied. On the basis of the narrating the former study, a new method (Computerized Tomography,CT for short) is introduced, which is applied to rock damage measurement. On the other hand, some newest study results and laws in the field are also introduced, which are from some scholars, the author of this paper.

  7. Respirable dust measured downwind during rock dust application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, M L; Organiscak, J; Klima, S; Perera, I E

    2017-05-01

    The Pittsburgh Mining Research Division of the U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) conducted underground evaluations in an attempt to quantify respirable rock dust generation when using untreated rock dust and rock dust treated with an anticaking additive. Using personal dust monitors, these evaluations measured respirable rock dust levels arising from a flinger-type application of rock dust on rib and roof surfaces. Rock dust with a majority of the respirable component removed was also applied in NIOSH's Bruceton Experimental Mine using a bantam duster. The respirable dust measurements obtained downwind from both of these tests are presented and discussed. This testing did not measure miners' exposure to respirable coal mine dust under acceptable mining practices, but indicates the need for effective continuous administrative controls to be exercised when rock dusting to minimize the measured amount of rock dust in the sampling device.

  8. Volumetric measurement of rock movement using photogrammetry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Benton Donovan J.; Iverson Stephen R.; Martin Lewis A.; Johnson Jeffrey C.; Raffaldi Michael J

    2016-01-01

    NIOSH ground control safety research program at Spokane, Washington, is exploring applications of pho-togrammetry to rock mass and support monitoring. This paper describes two ways photogrammetric techniques are being used. First, photogrammetric data of laboratory testing is being used to correlate energy input and support deformation. This information can be used to infer remaining support toughness after ground deformation events. This technique is also demonstrated in a field application. Second, field photogrammetric data is compared to crackmeter data from a deep underground mine. Accuracies were found to average 8 mm, but have produced results within 0.2 mm of true displacement, as measured by crackmeters. Application of these techniques consists of monitoring overall fault activity by monitoring multiple points around the crackmeter. A case study is provided in which a crackmeter is clearly shown to have provided insufficient information regarding overall fault ground deformation. Photogrammetry is proving to be a useful ground monitoring tool due to its unobtrusiveness and ease of use.

  9. Electrical resistivity measurements to predict abrasion resistance of rock aggregates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sair Kahraman; Mustafa Fener

    2008-04-01

    The prediction of Los Angeles (LA) abrasion loss from some indirect tests is useful for practical applications. For this purpose, LA abrasion, electrical resistivity, density and porosity tests were carried out on 27 different rock types. LA abrasion loss values were correlated with electrical resistivity and a good correlation between the two parameters was found. To see the effect of rock class on the correlation, regression analysis was repeated for igneous rocks, metamorphic rocks and sedimentary rocks, respectively. It was seen that correlation coefficients were increased for the rock classes. In addition, the data were divided into two groups according to porosity and density, respectively. After repeating regression analysis for these porosity and density groups, stronger correlations were obtained compared to the equation derived for all rocks. The validity of the derived equations was statistically tested and it was shown that all derived equations were significant. Finally, it can be said that all derived equations can alternatively be used for the estimation of LA abrasion loss from electrical resistivity.

  10. Electrical resistivity measurement to predict uniaxial compressive and tensile strength of igneous rocks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sair Kahraman; Tekin Yeken

    2010-12-01

    Electrical resistivity values of 12 different igneous rocks were measured on core samples using a resistivity meter in the laboratory. The resistivity tests were conducted on the samples fully saturated with brine (NaCl solution) and the uniaxial compressive strength (UCS), Brazilian tensile strength, density and porosity values of the samples were determined in the laboratory. The test results were evaluated using simple and multiple regression analysis. It was seen that the UCS and tensile strength values were linearly correlated with the electrical resistivity. The correlation coefficients are generally higher for the multiple regression models than that of the simple regression models. It was concluded that the UCS and tensile strength of igneous rocks can be estimated from electrical resistivity. However, the derived relations are purely empirical and they should be checked for other igneous rocks. The effect of rock types such as sedimentary and metamorphic rocks on the derived equations also needs to be investigated.

  11. Measurements of water potential and water content in unsaturated crystalline rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneebeli, Martin; Flühler, Hannes; Gimmi, Thomas; Wydler, Hannes; LäSer, Hans-Peter; Baer, Toni

    1995-08-01

    A water desaturation zone develops around a tunnel in water-saturated rock when the evaporative water loss at the rock surface is larger than the water flow from the surrounding saturated region of restricted permeability. We describe the methods with which such water desaturation processes in rock materials can be quantified. The water retention characteristic θ (ψ) of crystalline rock samples was determined with a pressure membrane apparatus. The negative water potential, identical to the capillary pressure, ψ, below the tensiometric range (ψ drilled into the granodiorite as a measuring chamber. The water potentials observed in a cylindrical granodiorite monolith ranged between -0.1 and -3.0 MPa; those near the wall in a ventilated tunnel between -0.1 and -2.2 MPa. Two types of three-rod TDR probes were used, one as a depth probe inserted into the rock, the other as a surface probe using three copper stripes attached to the surface for detecting water content changes in the rock-to-air boundary. The TDR signal was smoothed with a low-pass filter, and the signal length determined based on the first derivative of the trace. Despite the low porosity of crystalline rock these standard methods are applicable to describe the unsaturated zone in solid rock and may also be used in other consolidated materials such as concrete.

  12. Spatially resolved measurement of rock core porosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marica, F; Chen, Q; Hamilton, A; Hall, C; Al, T; Balcom, B J

    2006-01-01

    Density weighted, centric scan, Conical SPRITE MRI techniques are applied in the current work for local porosity measurements in fluid saturated porous media. The methodology is tested on a series of sandstone core samples. These samples vary in both porosity and degree of local heterogeneity due to bedding plane structure. The MRI porosity measurement is in good agreement with traditional gravimetric measurements of porosity. Spatially resolved porosity measurements reveal significant porosity variation in some samples. This novel MRI technique should have applications to the characterization of local porosity in a wide variety of porous media.

  13. Evaluation of garnet discrimination diagrams using geochemical data of garnets derived from various host rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krippner, Anne; Meinhold, Guido; Morton, Andrew C.; von Eynatten, Hilmar

    2014-06-01

    This work is an attempt to evaluate six different garnet discrimination diagrams (one binary diagram and five ternary diagrams) commonly used by many researchers. The mineral chemistry of detrital garnet is a useful tool in sedimentary provenance studies, yet there is no clear-cut understanding of what garnet type originates from which host lithology. Several discrimination diagrams exist for garnet showing distinct compositional fields, separated by strict boundaries that are thought to reflect specific types of source rocks. For this study, a large dataset was compiled (N = 3532) encompassing major element compositions of garnets derived from various host lithologies, including metamorphic, igneous, and mantle-derived rocks, in order to test the applicability of the various discrimination schemes. The dataset contains mineral chemical data collected from the literature complemented with some new data (N = 530) from garnet-bearing metamorphic and ultramafic rocks in Austria and Norway. Discrimination of the tested diagrams only works for a small group of garnets derived from mantle rocks, granulite-facies metasedimentary rocks, and felsic igneous rocks. For other garnet types, the assignment to a certain type of host rock remains ambiguous. This is considered insufficient and therefore the evaluated diagrams should be used with great care. We further apply compositional biplot analysis to derive some hints towards future perspectives in detrital garnet discrimination.

  14. Field Geologist: An Android App for Measuring Rock Outcroppings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, J.; Chiu, M. T.; Huang, X.; de Lanerolle, T. R.; Morelli, R.; Gourley, J. R.

    2011-12-01

    Field geologist is a mobile Android app that measures, plots, and exports strike and data in the field. When the phone is placed on the steepest part of the rock, it automatically detects dip, string, latitude and longitude. It includes a drop-down menu to record the type of rock. The app's initial screen displays a compass with an interior dip/strike symbol that always points toward the dip direction. Tapping the compass stores a data point in the phone's database. The points can be displayed on a Google map and uploaded to a server, from where they can be retrieved in CSV format and imported into a spreadsheet.

  15. Acoustic emission measurements in petroleum-related rock mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unander, Tor Erling

    2002-07-01

    Acoustic emission activity in rock has usually been studied in crystalline rock, which reflects that rock mechanics has also mostly been occupied with such rocks in relations to seismology, mining and tunneling. On the other hand, petroleum-related rock mechanics focuses on the behaviour of sedimentary rock. Thus, this thesis presents a general study of acoustic emission activity in sedimentary rock, primarily in sandstone. Chalk, limestone and shale have also been tested, but to much less degree because the AE activity in these materials is low. To simplify the study, pore fluids have not been used. The advent of the personal computer and computerized measuring equipment have made possible new methods both for measuring and analysing acoustic emissions. Consequently, a majority of this work is devoted to the development and implementation of new analysis techniques. A broad range of topics are treated: (1) Quantification of the AE activity level, assuming that the event rate best represents the activity. An algorithm for estimating the event rate and a methodology for objectively describing special changes in the activity e.g., onset determination, are presented. (2) Analysis of AE waveform data. A new method for determining the source energy of an AE event is presented, and it is shown how seismic source theory can be used to analyze even intermediate quality data. Based on these techniques, it is shown that a major part of the measured AE activity originates from a region close to the sensor, not necessarily representing the entire sample. (3) An improved procedure for estimating source locations is presented. The main benefit is a procedure that better handles arrival time data with large errors. Statistical simulations are used to quantify the uncertainties in the locations. The analysis techniques are developed with the application to sedimentary rock in mind, and in two articles, the techniques are used in the study of such materials. The work in the first

  16. Acoustic emission measurements in petroleum-related rock mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unander, Tor Erling

    2002-07-01

    Acoustic emission activity in rock has usually been studied in crystalline rock, which reflects that rock mechanics has also mostly been occupied with such rocks in relations to seismology, mining and tunneling. On the other hand, petroleum-related rock mechanics focuses on the behaviour of sedimentary rock. Thus, this thesis presents a general study of acoustic emission activity in sedimentary rock, primarily in sandstone. Chalk, limestone and shale have also been tested, but to much less degree because the AE activity in these materials is low. To simplify the study, pore fluids have not been used. The advent of the personal computer and computerized measuring equipment have made possible new methods both for measuring and analysing acoustic emissions. Consequently, a majority of this work is devoted to the development and implementation of new analysis techniques. A broad range of topics are treated: (1) Quantification of the AE activity level, assuming that the event rate best represents the activity. An algorithm for estimating the event rate and a methodology for objectively describing special changes in the activity e.g., onset determination, are presented. (2) Analysis of AE waveform data. A new method for determining the source energy of an AE event is presented, and it is shown how seismic source theory can be used to analyze even intermediate quality data. Based on these techniques, it is shown that a major part of the measured AE activity originates from a region close to the sensor, not necessarily representing the entire sample. (3) An improved procedure for estimating source locations is presented. The main benefit is a procedure that better handles arrival time data with large errors. Statistical simulations are used to quantify the uncertainties in the locations. The analysis techniques are developed with the application to sedimentary rock in mind, and in two articles, the techniques are used in the study of such materials. The work in the first

  17. In situ gamma radiation measurements in the Neoproterozoic rocks of Sirohi region, NW India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lars Scharfenberg; Helga De Wall; Stefan Schöbel; Alexander Minor; Marcel Maurer; Manoj K Pandit; Kamal K Sharma

    2015-08-01

    Natural gamma ray measurements using a portable device were performed at 157 sites in the area around Sirohi town and Sindreth village in Rajasthan (NW India). This region comprises sedimentary rocks, metasediments, granites and gneisses that bear characteristic GR dose values and U/Th ratios corresponding with their specific geological history. A-type Malani granites and rhyolitic derivates, also referred as high heat production granites, show distinct differences as compared to the S-type Erinpura and Balda granites, most prominent in a high Th content of the former (up to 90 ppm). Sedimentary rocks in the Sirohi and Sindreth area are variable in their signatures reflecting their variable source rocks. In the area between the Balda and Paladi villages, northeast of Sirohi, measurements in vicinity of a N–S running shear zone, have shown U enrichment up to 8 ppm. This shear zone has been synkinematically mineralized with quartz and shows evidence of fluid infiltration into the host rocks in the vicinity of the shear zone. Erinpura granites have been altered due to fluid activity and show a light depletion of K (3.96%) and Th (20.11 ppm) as compared to the unaltered rocks (K, 4.06; Th 24.46 ppm). Enrichment of U (with a mean value of 13 ppm) has also been recorded in the lower clastic unit of the Sindreth Basin, especially within gritty conglomerates wherein migration and precipitation along fault planes is proposed.

  18. Rock Physics: Getting What We Want From What We Measure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, R. J.

    2016-12-01

    Rock physics is the field of study that determines, through laboratory and field observations, and through numerical and theoretical modeling, the relationship between the geophysical parameters that we measure (e.g., electrical resistivity, dielectric constant, elastic wave velocities) and the material properties that we want (e.g., porosity, lithology, fluid saturation, hydraulic conductivity). Over the past 30 years there has been increasing use of geophysical methods for characterizing hydrogeologic systems, and the emergence of the field of hydrogeophysics. The historical path of rock physics in hydrogeophysics, as in all fields of study, has been one of introducing increasing complexity into the way we consider, and model, the geophysical response of multicomponent systems. There has been a progression from incorporating information about volume fractions and then geometries of components, to incorporating information about interfaces and interactions between components. The multicomponent systems that we study range from small-scale (centimeters) samples where measurements are made directly in the laboratory, to large-scale (meters to tens of meters) field samples probed remotely using surface-based and airborne geophysical methods. The components, geometries, interfaces and interactions that must be incorporated into our rock physics relationships change in scale; and the physics needs to be upscaled accordingly. Laboratory experiments still provide the starting point for observing and understanding the key mechanisms linking the geophysical measurement to the material properties. But numerical experiments, with digital rocks, can now allow us to explore a range of sample conditions and types not previously feasible. Integration with other forms of data and data acquisition at well-characterized sites are starting to provide what we really need to interpret our geophysical measurements of hydrogeologic systems: the up-scaled rock physics relationships that

  19. Rock Goes to School on Screen: A Model for Teaching Non-"Learned" Musics Derived from the Films "School of Rock" (2003) and "Rock School" (2005)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Michael

    2007-01-01

    What can be learned from two films with "rock" and "school" in their titles, about rock in school and about music and schooling more broadly? "School of Rock" (2003), a "family comedy," and "Rock School" (2005), a documentary, provoke a range of questions, ideological and otherwise, surrounding the inclusion of rock in formal instructional…

  20. A fractional derivative approach to full creep regions in salt rock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, H. W.; Wang, C. P.; Mishnaevsky, Leon

    2013-01-01

    Based on the definition of the constant-viscosity Abel dashpot, a new creep element, referred to as the variable-viscosity Abel dashpot, is proposed to characterize damage growth in salt rock samples during creep tests. Ultrasonic testing is employed to determine a formula of the variable viscosity...... coefficient, indicating that the change of the variable viscosity coefficient with the time meets a negative exponent law. In addition, by replacing the Newtonian dashpot in the classical Nishihara model with the variable-viscosity Abel dashpot, a damage-mechanism-based creep constitutive model is proposed...... rock. Furthermore, a sensitivity study is carried out, showing the effects of stress level, fractional derivative order and viscosity coefficient exponent on creep strain of salt rock. It is indicated that the fractional derivative creep model proposed in the paper provides a precise description...

  1. Evaluating petrophysical relationships in fractured rock using geophysical measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, J.; Slater, L. D.; Keating, K.; Parker, B. L.; Rose, C.; Meyer, J. R.; Johnson, C. D.; Robinson, T.; Pehme, P.; Chapman, S.; Day-Lewis, F. D.

    2015-12-01

    Quantification of the pore geometric properties controlling mass transfer rates in fractured rock aquifers is a challenging characterization problem, especially given the scales of heterogeneity. The efficiency of in-situ remediation efforts that target hydraulically connected and dead-end fracture zones is limited, in part, due to the diffusion of aqueous phase contaminants into and out of the less-mobile pore spaces in the matrix surrounding fractures. Two geophysical technologies, complex resistivity (CR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) are sensitive to pore geometry and may provide key information on transport parameters where diffusion can be a limiting factor in and around boreholes. We present laboratory CR and NMR data from cores collected from field sites with variable lithologies and examine the sensitivity of these measurements to less-mobile versus mobile porosity. Supporting data include surface area measurements using the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) method, pore size distributions from mercury porosimetry, gravimetric measurements of matrix total porosity and gas permeability. We examine the predictive capability of CR and NMR to determine these pore scale properties as a function of geological setting. The petrophysical relationships illustrate the potential for use of new borehole logging tools to determine the spatial variability of physical properties controlling mass transfer close to fractures. The correlations of measurements to rock-type specific relations indicate that minimal core measurements might be needed to calibrate the results to a specific site.

  2. The evaluation of rock permeability with streaming current measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Hu, Hengshan; Guan, Wei

    2016-09-01

    Rock permeability is an important parameter for the formation evaluation. In this paper, a new method with streaming current is proposed to determine the sample permeability based on the electrokinetic effects, and is proved by the experimental measurements. Corresponding to this method, we have designed an experimental setup and a test system, then performed the streaming current (potential) and electro-osmosis pressure experiments with 23 sandstone samples at 0.05 mol l-1 NaCl solution. The streaming current (potential) coefficient and electro-osmosis pressure coefficient are obtained, respectively, with the experimental data at low frequencies with AC lock-in technique. The electrokinetic permeabilities are further calculated with these coefficients. The results are consistent well with the gas permeability measured with Darcy's law, which verifies the current method for estimating rock permeability. Our measurements are also analysed and compared with previous measurements. The results indicate that our method can reflect the essence of electrokinetic effects better and simplify the electrokinetic measurements as well. In addition, we discuss the influences of experimental artefacts (core holder and confining pressure installation) on the electrokinetic data. The results show that the trough phenomenon, appeared in frequency curves of streaming current (potential) coefficients, is induced by the resonance of the core-holder/vibrator system. This is important for the design of electrokinetic setup and the analysis of low-frequency response of the electrokinetic coupling coefficients.

  3. MiR-124 Promote Neurogenic Transdifferentiation of Adipose Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Partly through RhoA/ROCK1, but Not ROCK2 Signaling Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Wang

    Full Text Available Some recent studies suggest that multiple miRNAs might regulate neurogenic transdifferentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs. In the present study, we hypothesized that the miR-124 can repress the expression of RhoA upon the neurogenesis of adipose derived MSCs (ADMSCs.MiRNA expression dynamics during neurogenic transdifferentiation of ADMSCs were measured. The expression of neuron-specific enolase (NSE, Tuj-1 (Neuron-specific class III beta-tubulin and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, as well as electrophysiological properties, were detected after neurogenic transdifferentiation. The targeting of miR-124 over RhoA was verified by dual luciferase assay, qRT-PCR and western blot. The functions of miR-124 and the RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway were studied using gain and loss of function experiments in vitro.MiR-124 is significantly upregulated during neurogenic transdifferentiation of ADMSCs. Knockdown of endogenous miR-124 hampered neurogenic transdifferentiation and the acquired electrophysiological properties. MiR-124 could directly target RHOA mRNA and repress its expression, through which it increased the proportion of transdifferentiated (transdiff. cells with positive NSE, Tuj-1 and GFAP. RhoA/ROCK1, but not ROCK2 is a downstream signaling pathway of miR-124 in the process of transdifferentiation.MiR-124 is an important miRNA modulating neurogenic transdifferentiation of ADMSCs at least partly via the miR-124/RhoA/ROCK1 signaling pathway. These findings provided some fundamental information for future use of ADMSCs as an agent for regenerative medicine and cell therapy for neurological diseases.

  4. An Estimation Method of Stress in Soft Rock Based on In-situ Measured Stress in Hard Rock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Wen-ping; LI Xiao-qin; SUN Ru-hua

    2007-01-01

    The law of variation of deep rock stress in gravitational and tectonic stress fields is analyzed based on the Hoek-Brown strength criterion. In the gravitational stress field, the rocks in the shallow area are in an elastic state and the deep, relatively soft rock may be in a plastic state. However, in the tectonic stress field, the relatively soft rock in the shallow area is in a plastic state and the deep rock in an elastic state. A method is proposed to estimate stress values in coal and soft rock based on in-situ measurements of hard rock. Our estimation method relates to the type of stress field and stress state. The equations of rock stress in various stress states are presented for the elastic, plastic and critical states. The critical state is a special stress state, which indicates the conversion of the elastic to the plastic state in the gravitational stress field and the conversion of the plastic to the elastic state in the tectonic stress field. Two cases studies show that the estimation method is feasible.

  5. Manure derived biochar can successfully replace phosphate rock amendment in peatland restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouliot, Rémy; Hugron, Sandrine; Rochefort, Line; Godbout, Stéphane; Palacios, Joahnn H; Groeneveld, Elisabeth; Jarry, Isabelle

    2015-07-01

    Phosphate rock fertilization is commonly used in peatland restoration to promote the growth of Polytrichum strictum, a nurse plant which aids the establishment of Sphagnum mosses. The present study tested whether 1) phosphorus fertilization facilitates the germination of P. strictum spores and 2) biochar derived from local pig manure can replace imported phosphate rock currently used in peatland restoration. Various doses of biochar were compared to phosphate rock to test its effect directly on P. strictum stem regeneration (in Petri dishes in a growth chamber) and in a simulation of peatland restoration with the moss layer transfer technique (in mesocoms in a greenhouse). Phosphorus fertilization promoted the germination of P. strictum spores as well as vegetative stem development. Biochar can effectively replace phosphate rock in peatland restoration giving a new waste management option for rural regions with phosphorus surpluses. As more available phosphorus was present in biochar, an addition of only 3-9 g m(-2) of pig manure biochar is recommended during the peatland restoration process, which is less than the standard dose of phosphate rock (15 g m(-2)). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Pulse-mode measurement of harmonic generation in rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, P.A.; Meegan, G.D.; McCall, K.R.; Shankland, T.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Guyer, R.A. [Massachusetts Univ., Amherst, MA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Bonner, B.P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-04-01

    One goal in our research is to quantify frequency content modification caused by nonlinear elasticity that may take place during seismic wave propagation. To this end, we have conducted ultrasonic experiments in rock, analogous to those conducted in gas, for study of spectral changes from harmonic generation that take place along the wave path. For a material with cubic anharmonicity, the amplitude of the 2{omega} harmonic is shown to be proportional to xk{sup 2}U{sup 2}, where {omega} is the angular frequency, x is the propagation distance, k is the wave vector, and U is the displacement amplitude at {omega}. Experiments in sandstone focused on confirming this result showed that U{sub 2{omega}} was linearly proportional to distance x. At fixed x, the amplitude of {omega} scaled as frequency squared (k{sup 2}) and as sourceamplitude squared (U{sup 2}). Thus the fundamental prediction of the 2{omega} harmonic in rock with cubic anharmonicity was confirmed. The compressional nonlinear modulus {Beta} was measured to be {minus}7{times}10{sup 3}+/{minus}23%.

  7. Discovery and its geological significance of the mantle-derived helium in the inclusions of the Ordovician oil-bearing reservoir rocks in the Huanghua depression, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiaobao; XU Yongchang; SUN Mingliang; CHENG Keming; LIU Wenhui; LI Xiufen; MA Liyuan

    2004-01-01

    The values of the helium isotopes in the inclusions of the Ordovician reservoir rocks in the Kongxi buried hill belt in the Huanghua depression were first measured and the source of helium and its geological significance were investigated in comparison with those of the helium isotopes in the conclusions in the Ordovician rocks in the Ordos basin and the Tarim basin. The input of the mantle-derived helium into the inclusions in the carbonate reservoir rocks was found from the Konggu 3 well, the Konggu 4 well, and the Konggu 7 well in the Kongxi buried hill belt. The 3He/4He and R/Ra in the conclusions in the Ordovician oil-bearing reservoir rocks in the Konggu 7 well average 2.54×10-6(3) (sample quantity, the same below) and 1.82(3), respectively. The percent of the mantle-derived helium in the inclusions of the reservoir rocks in the Konggu 7 well reaches up to an average of 23.0%(3). The age of the contribution of the mantle-derived helium to the inclusions in the Kongxi buried hill belt is in the Late Triassic or the Early Tertiary. The finding of the mantle-derived helium shows that the interaction of the deep crust with mantle and the activity of deep faults occurred, the terrestrial heat flow value was high, and mantle-derived inorganic gas pools might be formed in the Kongxi buried hill belt. The finding of the mantle-derived helium in the inclusions of oil-bearing reservoir rocks also provides a new way for researching the activity of mantle-derived matter and its associated geological problems.

  8. Comparison of laboratory, in situ, and rock mass measurements of the hydraulic conductivity of metamorphic rock at the Savannah River Plant near Aiken, South Carolina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marine, I W

    1980-01-01

    In situ testing of exploratory wells in metamorphic rock indicates that two types of fracturing occur in the rock mass. Rock containing small openings that permit only extremely slow movement of water is termed virtually impermeable rock. Rock containing openings of sufficient size to permit transmission of water at a significantly faster rate is termed hydraulically transmissive rock. Laboratory methods are unsuitable for measuring hydraulic conductivity in hydraulically transmissive rock; however, for the virtually impermeable rock, values comparable to the in situ tests are obtained. The hydraulic conductivity of the rock mass over a large region is calculated by using the hydraulic gradient, porosity, and regional velocity. This velocity is determined by dividing the inferred travel distance by the age of water which is determined by the helium content of the water. This rock mass hydraulic conductivity value is between the values measured for the two types of fractures, but is closer to the measured value for the virtually impermeable rock. This relationship is attributed to the control of the regional flow rate by the virtually impermeable rock where the discrete fractures do not form a continuous open connection through the entire rock mass. Thus, laboratory methods of measuring permeability in metamorphic rock are of value if they are properly applied.

  9. Comparison of Laboratory, in Situ, and Rock Mass Measurements of the Hydraulic Conductivity of Metamorphic Rock at the Savannah River Plant Near Aiken, South Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marine, I. Wendell

    1981-06-01

    In situ testing of exploratory wells in metamorphic rock indicates that two types of fracturing occur in the rock mass. Rock containing small openings that permit only extremely slow movement of water is termed virtually impermeable rock. Rock containing openings of sufficient size to permit transmission of water at a significantly faster rate is termed hydraulically transmissive rock. Laboratory methods are unsuitable for measuring hydraulic conductivity in hydraulically transmissive rock; however, for the virtually impermeable rock, values comparable to those of the in situ tests are obtained. The hydraulic conductivity of the rock mass over a large region is calculated by using the hydraulic gradient, porosity, and regional velocity. This velocity is determined by dividing the inferred travel distance by the age of water, which is determined by the helium content of the water. This rock mass hydraulic conductivity value is between the values measured for the two types of fractures but is closer to the measured value for the virtually impermeable rock. This relationship is attributed to the control of the regional flow rate by the virtually impermeable rock where the discrete fractures do not form a continuous open connection through the entire rock mass. Thus laboratory methods of measuring permeability in metamorphic rock are of value if they are properly applied.

  10. RADIATION CHEMICAL CONVERSION OF OIL DERIVED FROM OIL-BITUMEN ROCK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lala Jabbarova

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The results of research in the radiation processing of synthetic oil derived from oil–bitumen rock of the Balakhany deposit in Azerbaijan are presented. The study has been conducted on a 60Co gamma-source at a dose rate of P = 0.5 Gy/s and various absorbed doses of D = 43–216 kGy. Samples of synthetic oil from natural bitumen rocks have been analyzed by chromatography, gas chromatography–mass spectrometry, and IR-spectroscopy, and their radiation resistance has been evaluated. The results of the study allow for both assessment of the feasibility of manufacturing petrochemicals for various applications by radiation processing and use of these materials for isolating radioactive sources to preclude their impact on the environment.

  11. A theoretical derivation of the HoekeBrown failure criterion for rock materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianping Zuo; Huihai Liu; Hongtao Li

    2015-01-01

    This study uses a three-dimensional crack model to theoretically derive the HoekeBrown rock failure criterion based on the linear elastic fracture theory. Specifically, we argue that a failure characteristic factor needs to exceed a critical value when macro-failure occurs. This factor is a product of the micro-failure orientation angle (characterizing the density and orientation of damaged micro-cracks) and the changing rate of the angle with respect to the major principal stress (characterizing the microscopic stability of damaged cracks). We further demonstrate that the factor mathematically leads to the empirical HoekeBrown rock failure criterion. Thus, the proposed factor is able to successfully relate the evolution of microscopic damaged crack characteristics to macro-failure. Based on this theoretical development, we also propose a quantitative relationship between the brittleeductile transition point and confining pressure, which is consistent with experimental observations.

  12. The thin section rock physics: Modeling and measurement of seismic wave velocity on the slice of carbonates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wardaya, P. D., E-mail: pongga.wardaya@utp.edu.my; Noh, K. A. B. M., E-mail: pongga.wardaya@utp.edu.my; Yusoff, W. I. B. W., E-mail: pongga.wardaya@utp.edu.my [Petroleum Geosciences Department, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Tronoh, Perak, 31750 (Malaysia); Ridha, S. [Petroleum Engineering Department, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Tronoh, Perak, 31750 (Malaysia); Nurhandoko, B. E. B. [Wave Inversion and Subsurface Fluid Imaging Research Laboratory (WISFIR), Dept. of Physics, Institute of Technology Bandung, Bandung, Indonesia and Rock Fluid Imaging Lab, Bandung (Indonesia)

    2014-09-25

    This paper discusses a new approach for investigating the seismic wave velocity of rock, specifically carbonates, as affected by their pore structures. While the conventional routine of seismic velocity measurement highly depends on the extensive laboratory experiment, the proposed approach utilizes the digital rock physics view which lies on the numerical experiment. Thus, instead of using core sample, we use the thin section image of carbonate rock to measure the effective seismic wave velocity when travelling on it. In the numerical experiment, thin section images act as the medium on which wave propagation will be simulated. For the modeling, an advanced technique based on artificial neural network was employed for building the velocity and density profile, replacing image's RGB pixel value with the seismic velocity and density of each rock constituent. Then, ultrasonic wave was simulated to propagate in the thin section image by using finite difference time domain method, based on assumption of an acoustic-isotropic medium. Effective velocities were drawn from the recorded signal and being compared to the velocity modeling from Wyllie time average model and Kuster-Toksoz rock physics model. To perform the modeling, image analysis routines were undertaken for quantifying the pore aspect ratio that is assumed to represent the rocks pore structure. In addition, porosity and mineral fraction required for velocity modeling were also quantified by using integrated neural network and image analysis technique. It was found that the Kuster-Toksoz gives the closer prediction to the measured velocity as compared to the Wyllie time average model. We also conclude that Wyllie time average that does not incorporate the pore structure parameter deviates significantly for samples having more than 40% porosity. Utilizing this approach we found a good agreement between numerical experiment and theoretically derived rock physics model for estimating the effective seismic

  13. Influence of laser scanner range measurement noise on the quantification of rock surface roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshelham, Kourosh; Altundag, Dogan

    2010-05-01

    The roughness of rock surfaces is traditionally measured by using manual tools such as carpenter's comp and compass and disc clinometers. The manual measurements are limited to small samples at accessible parts of the rock. Terrestrial laser scanning is an attractive alternative measurement technique, which offers large coverage, high resolution, and the ability to reach inaccessible high rock faces. The application of laser scanning to the study of rock surface roughness faces a major challenge: the inherent range imprecision hinders the quantification of roughness parameters. In practice, when roughness is in millimeter scale it is often lost in the range measurement noise. The parameters derived from the data, therefore, reflect noise rather than the actual roughness of the surface. In this paper, we investigate the influence of laser scanner range measurement noise on the quantification of rock surfaces roughness. We show that measurement noise leads to the overestimation of roughness parameters. We also demonstrate the application of wavelet de-noising method to eliminating noise from laser scanner data and deriving realistic roughness parameters. A slightly metamorphosed limestone rock in the east bank of the Meuse River in southern Belgium was scanned with a Faro LS880 terrestrial laser scanner. The scanner was positioned at approximately 5 meters distance to the rock surface, and operated at the highest possible angular resolution, i.e. 0.009 degrees. The resulting point cloud contained about 1.2 million points on the rock surface with a point-spacing of 1 mm on average. According to the technical specifications of the laser scanner, the nominal range precision at a perpendicular incidence angle, which was roughly the case in our scan, is between 0.7 mm and 5.2 mm respectively for objects of 90% and 10% reflectivity at a distance of 10 m. To serve as reference roughness data were also collected manually along three profiles on the rock surface by using a

  14. A measurement method and system of the thermal properties of rocks under high pressure without heat source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoqiu; Lin, Weiren; Tadai, Osamu; Zeng, Xin; Xu, Ziying; Shi, Xiaobin; Yu, Chuanhai

    2016-04-01

    Thermal properties of rocks under high pressure are very important for us to understand the thermal structure and state of earth. Basing on the classical thermo-elastic theory, we can know that the temperature of an elastic substance will change when it is compressed or stretched under adiabatic condition. Our measurement results show that the adiabatic stress derivative of temperature (dT/dP) of rocks ranges from 1 to 6 mK/MPa. But the result of silicone oil is up to about 140 mK/MPa. So, we developed a measurement method and system of the thermal properties of rocks under high pressure. In the hydrostatic compression system, the confining pressure can rapidly increase to high pressure within 1~2 s by controlling the value. By monitoring the temperature changes in center and on surface of rock sample during the rapidly loading process, the thermal properties, including thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity and volumetric heat capacity, can be resolved by our finite element numerical inversion method. We measured several representative rocks from Longmenshan Fault Zone and Chelungpu Fault Zone (TCDP Hole-A), such as sandstone, siltstone, limestone, granite, basalt, tuff and so on. The results indicate that this method and system is suitable for thermal properties measurement under high pressure even though there is without heat source.

  15. Actuarial risk measures for financial derivative pricing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Goovaerts; R.J.A. Laeven

    2008-01-01

    We present an axiomatic characterization of price measures that are superadditive and comonotonic additive for normally distributed random variables. The price representation derived involves a probability measure transform that is closely related to the Esscher transform, and we call it the Esscher

  16. Final Report: Geothermal dual acoustic tool for measurement of rock stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Normann, Randy A. [Perma Works LLC, Pattonville, TX (United States)

    2014-12-01

    This paper outlines the technology need for a rock formation stress measurement in future EGS wells. This paper reports on the results of work undertaken under a Phase I, DOE/SBIR on the feasibility to build an acoustic well logging tool for measuring rock formation stress.

  17. Final Report. Geothermal Dual Acoustic Tool for Measurement of Rock Stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Normann, Randy A [Perma Works LLC, Pattonville, TX (United States)

    2014-12-01

    This paper outlines the technology need for a rock formation stress measurement in future EGS wells. This paper reports on the results of work undertaken under a Phase I, DOE/SBIR on the feasibility to build an acoustic well logging tool for measuring rock formation stress.

  18. Instruction manual for the use of CSIR triaxial rock stress measuring equipment

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Coetzer, SJ

    1998-08-01

    Full Text Available This is an updated version of CSIR Report no ME 1763 entitled "Instruction manual for the use for the CSIR triaxial rock stress measuring equipment" by F A Vreede. The manual contains a detailed description of CSIR Triaxial rock stress measuring...

  19. Final Report: Geothermal Dual Acoustic Tool for Measurement of Rock Stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Normann, Randy A.

    2014-12-01

    This paper outlines the technology need for a rock formation stress measurement in future EGS wells. This paper reports on the results of work undertaken under a Phase I, DOE/SBIR on the feasibility to build an acoustic well logging tool for measuring rock formation stress.

  20. Single-borehole measuring method for broken rock zone in gently inclined thin layer weakness structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Qing-fa; ZHOU Ke-ping; LONG Teng-teng; GAO Feng

    2008-01-01

    According to the structural characteristics of gently inclined thin layer rock mass in which lots of weak interlayer existed, the concept of gently inclined thin layer weakness structure was proposed. If single-borehole measuring method of the acoustic along the conventional arrangement mode was used in measuring the broken rock zone in this structure, the change of the relationship curves (Vp-L) between acoustic p-wave velocity (Vp) and borehole depth (L) would present the irregular feature due to the mechanical characteristics of layered rock mass and harmful effects of weak interlayers, and the scope of broken rock zone couldn't be defined quickly. Based on the analysis of the mechanical characteristics of layered rock mass, the propagation rule of acoustic and distributions characteristics of plastic zone and slip zone in layered rock mass, new arrangement mode of acoustic measuring boreholes for broken rock zone in gently inclined thin layer weakness structure was proposed. Namely, the measuring boreholes in two sides were parallel to the strata, the measuring boreholes in the roof and floor perpendicular to the strata. Besides the controlling depth of the measuring boreholes in the scope of the large plastic zones or the large slip zones should be increased. Engineering exampleshowed that new acoustic measuring boreholes arrangement mode had the better applicability and could determine the scope of the broken rock zone in the gently inclined thin layer weakness structure quickly.

  1. Measured sections and analyses of uranium host rocks of the Dockum Group, New Mexico and Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickson, R.E.; Drake, D.P.; Reese, T.J.

    1977-02-01

    This report presents 27 measured sections from the Dockum Group of Late Triassic age, in the southern High Plains of eastern New Mexico and northwestern Texas. Many of the measured sections are only partial; the intent in those cases was to measure the parts of sections that had prominent sandstone/conglomerate beds or that had uranium deposits. No attempt was made to relate rock color to a rock color chart; rock colors are therefore approximate. Modal analyses (by thin-section examination) of sandstone and conglomerate samples and gamma-ray spectrometric analyses of the samples are presented in appendices. (DLC)

  2. Time-resolved Rocking Curve Measurement Method using Laboratory X-ray Source

    OpenAIRE

    林, 雄二郎; 佐藤, 真伸; 古賀, 三井; 佃, 昇; 蔵元, 英一

    2005-01-01

    Fast x-ray detectors and fast signal processing devices have enabled to measure time dependence of x-ray diffraction intensity. Using a fast x-ray detection system, we have developed a time-resolved measurement method of rocking curves with a laboratory x-ray source. The method has been demonstrated for time-resolved rocking curves from an ultrasound-vibrated silicon crystal in MHz range. The measured rocking curves have been consistent with simulated curves based on the dynamical diffraction...

  3. Gold Content of Mantle-Derived Rocks from Eastern China and Its Implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Ying; DONG Zhenxin; YUE Kefen; ZHANG Zhanjun; WANG Xin

    2003-01-01

    We have analyzed the gold content of 65 samples of mantle-derived xenoliths and their host rocks from eastern China, which is found to be inhomogeneous, falling in the ranges of 1.0×10-9-8.2×10-9 (averaging 3.8 ×10-9) and 0.2×10-9-5.3×10-9 (averaging 2.7×10-9) in the mantle-derived xenoliths and the host basalts respectively. Except the samples from Wanquan County of Hebei Province and Anding County of Hainan Province, the gold content is the highest on the margins of the North China platform and decreases spatially towards the north and south, and temporally the samples of the Tertiary have a higher gold content than those of the Quaternary. The gold content of the mantle-derived xenoliths and the host Paleozoic kimberlites is 3.8×10-9-180×10-9 and 0.1×10-9-38.0×10-9 respectively, which are higher than that in the mantle-derived xenoliths in basalt and the host Cenozoic basalts. The mantle-derived xenoliths have a higher gold content than the host rocks, but their relativity is not very clear, suggesting that the genetic relationship between them is complex. Our data indicate that the average gold content of the lithospheric mantle in eastern China is approximately equal to or approaching 3.8×10-9, which is lower than the average abundance of the upper mantle (5.0×10-9), higher than the average abundance of the continental crust (3.0×10-9) and only slightly higher than the average abundance of the lower continental crust (3.4×10-9). Except the samples from Hainan Province, the mantle-derived xenoliths in basalts with a high gold content are distributed on the two margins of the North China platform, corresponding to the gold deposits-concentrated districts in northwest Hebei Province and Shandong Province, showing the control by the old continental lithospheric mantle and the lower continental crust on the margins of the North China platform. The gold content of the mantle-derived xenoliths from Hainan Province ranges from 7.1×10-9 to 15×10

  4. ROCK Inhibition Promotes Attachment, Proliferation, and Wound Closure in Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Retinal Pigmented Epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croze, Roxanne H; Thi, William J; Clegg, Dennis O

    2016-11-01

    Nonexudative (dry) age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of blindness in the elderly, is associated with the loss of retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) cells and the development of geographic atrophy, which are areas devoid of RPE cells and photoreceptors. One possible treatment option would be to stimulate RPE attachment and proliferation to replace dying/dysfunctional RPE and bring about wound repair. Clinical trials are underway testing injections of RPE cells derived from pluripotent stem cells to determine their safety and efficacy in treating AMD. However, the factors regulating RPE responses to AMD-associated lesions are not well understood. Here, we use cell culture to investigate the role of RhoA coiled coil kinases (ROCKs) in human embryonic stem cell-derived RPE (hESC-RPE) attachment, proliferation, and wound closure. H9 hESC were spontaneously differentiated into RPE cells. hESC-RPE cells were treated with a pan ROCK1/2 or a ROCK2 only inhibitor; attachment, and proliferation and cell size within an in vitro scratch assay were examined. Pharmacological inhibition of ROCKs promoted hESC-RPE attachment and proliferation, and increased the rate of closure of in vitro wounds. ROCK inhibition decreased phosphorylation of cofilin and myosin light chain, suggesting that regulation of the cytoskeleton underlies the mechanism of action of ROCK inhibition. ROCK inhibition promotes attachment, proliferation, and wound closure in H9 hESC-RPE cells. ROCK isoforms may have different roles in wound healing. Modulation of the ROCK-cytoskeletal axis has potential in stimulating wound repair in transplanted RPE cells and attachment in cellular therapies.

  5. ROCK Inhibition Promotes Attachment, Proliferation, and Wound Closure in Human Embryonic Stem Cell–Derived Retinal Pigmented Epithelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croze, Roxanne H.; Thi, William J.; Clegg, Dennis O.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Nonexudative (dry) age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of blindness in the elderly, is associated with the loss of retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) cells and the development of geographic atrophy, which are areas devoid of RPE cells and photoreceptors. One possible treatment option would be to stimulate RPE attachment and proliferation to replace dying/dysfunctional RPE and bring about wound repair. Clinical trials are underway testing injections of RPE cells derived from pluripotent stem cells to determine their safety and efficacy in treating AMD. However, the factors regulating RPE responses to AMD-associated lesions are not well understood. Here, we use cell culture to investigate the role of RhoA coiled coil kinases (ROCKs) in human embryonic stem cell–derived RPE (hESC-RPE) attachment, proliferation, and wound closure. Methods H9 hESC were spontaneously differentiated into RPE cells. hESC-RPE cells were treated with a pan ROCK1/2 or a ROCK2 only inhibitor; attachment, and proliferation and cell size within an in vitro scratch assay were examined. Results Pharmacological inhibition of ROCKs promoted hESC-RPE attachment and proliferation, and increased the rate of closure of in vitro wounds. ROCK inhibition decreased phosphorylation of cofilin and myosin light chain, suggesting that regulation of the cytoskeleton underlies the mechanism of action of ROCK inhibition. Conclusions ROCK inhibition promotes attachment, proliferation, and wound closure in H9 hESC-RPE cells. ROCK isoforms may have different roles in wound healing. Translational Relevance Modulation of the ROCK-cytoskeletal axis has potential in stimulating wound repair in transplanted RPE cells and attachment in cellular therapies. PMID:27917311

  6. Investigations of some rock stress measuring techniques and the stress field in Norway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanssen, Tor Harald

    1997-12-31

    Rock stresses are important to the safe construction and operation of all man-made structures in rock, whether In mining, civil or petroleum engineering. The crucial issue is their relative magnitude and orientation. This thesis develops equipment and methods for further rock stress assessment and reevaluates existing overcoring rock stress measurements, and relates this information to the present geological setting. Both laboratory work and field work are involved. In the field, rock stresses are measured by the overcoring and the hydraulic fracturing technique. An observation technique for assessing likely high stresses is developed. The field data refer to several hydropower projects and to some offshore hydrocarbon fields. The principal sections are: (1) Tectonic setting in the western Fennoscandia, (2) Triaxial rock stress measurements by overcoring using the NTH cell (a strain gauge cell developed at the Norwegian technical university in Trondheim and based on the CSIR cell of the South African Council for Scientific and Industrial Research), (3) Laboratory testing of the NTH cell, (4) Quality ranking of stresses measured by the NTH cell, (4) Recalculated rock stresses and implications to the regional stress field, (5) Hydraulic fracturing stress measurements. 113 refs., 98 figs., 62 tabs.

  7. A load measuring anchor plate for rock bolt using fiber optic sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Siu Chun Michael; Li, Weijie; Wang, Bo; Song, Gangbing

    2017-05-01

    Rock bolts are the devices that used to reinforce the rock masses in mining tunnels and underground excavation structures. The loading level of the rock bolt indicates the reinforcing efficiency and is able to ensure safe underground operation by giving warnings to the underground miners prior to any accidents. Therefore, it is very important to monitor the load level of the rock bolts. In this short communication, we propose a smart anchor plate, a simple but effective device that uses fiber Bragg gratings (FBG) type optic sensor, to monitor the load level of the rock bolt. Instead of measuring the stress/strain on the rock bolt, which adds more complexity, the proposed method monitors the rock bolt load by measuring the load experience on the rock bolt anchor plate. Such a configuration has the advantages of simple structure and flexible implementation. In experimental observation, the FBG instrumented anchor plate is able to observe the load of the plate with good repeatability. This test will lead to further in-depth studies involving finite element analysis as well as more complex applications.

  8. Measurements of brain-derived neurotrophic factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trajkovska, Viktorija; Klein, Anders Bue; Vinberg, Maj;

    2007-01-01

    Although numerous studies have dealt with changes in blood brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), methodological issues about BDNF measurements have only been incompletely resolved. We validated BDNF ELISA with respect to accuracy, reproducibility and the effect of storage and repeated freezing...... reproducibility. Female gender is associated with higher whole blood BDNF concentrations whereas age, thrombocyte count and BDNF Val66Met polymorphism were un-associated....

  9. Rock stress measurements. Preparatory stage of the equipment development project; Kallioperaen jaennitystilan mittaaminen. Laitekehityshankkeen valmisteluvaihe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mononen, S.; Hakala, M.; Mikkola, P

    2002-07-01

    In recent years the rock stress measurement methods used in Finland have been overcoring and hydraulic fracturing. There have been mainly two companies involved in these measurements, namely Suomen Malmi Oy (Smoy) and SwedPower AB. Smoy has done measurements for mines and for rock engineering projects, whereas SwedPower AB has mainly been involved in nuclear waste disposal investigations and conducted hydraulic fracturing measurements in deep boreholes. Smoy together with its partners started in February 2001 a project named JTM, which was a preliminary stage for a future project, which aims to develop a device most suitable for rock stress measurements in Finland. The partners in the project were HUT Rock Engineering, Posiva Oy, Saanio and Riekkola Oy, Gridpoint Finland Oy and Geopros Oy. Tekes, the National Technology Agency, provided almost half of the project funding. In the management group of the project were Pekka Mikkola (chairman) and Tero Laurila from Smoy, Pekka Saerkkae and Sakari Mononen (full-time researcher) from HUT, Aimo Hautojaervi (Posiva Oy), Erik Johansson (Saanio and Riekkola Oy), Matti Hakala (Gridpoint Finland Oy) and Heikki Haemaelaeinen (Geopros Oy). The aim of the JTM-project was to find out the needs for the development of a device most suitable for rock stress measurements in Finnish mines and rock engineering projects. During the project work was done to find out the range of rock stress measurement devices available, to find out the needs for measurements, and to get acquainted to the measurements done in Scandinavia. Also a report of the most suitable methods for Finnish rock conditions was done based on literature and on interviews of rock stress experts. Based on all the information collected during the project a clear picture of the needs for rock stress measurements in Finland could be formed and a preliminary plan of a future project was done. The aim of the suggested project is to build a device based on hydraulic fracturing

  10. The distribution of the oil derived from Cambrian source rocks in Lunnan area, the Tarim Basin, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    There are great differences in biomarks between Cambrian oil and Middle-Upper Ordoviclan oil. In this stuty, the authors analyzed 40 oils found in Lunnan area by GC-MS and calculated the content of Cambrian oil in the 40 oils according to the steroid indexes of typical oil mixture and match experiment. The results show that it is a general phenomenon in Ordovician reservoir that the oil derived from Cambrian source rock mixed with the oil derived from Middle-Upper Ordovician source rock in Lunnan area, the mixture degree of the two oils is lower in Carboniferous reservoir than in Ordovician reservoir, and the oils kept in Triassic reservoir have single source, Middle-Upper Ordovician source rock. The mixture oils mainly composed of Cambrian oil (>50%) distributed in Sangtamu fault zone, and the oils found in Lunnan fault zone are Middle-Upper Ordovician oil. This distribution of oils in Lunnan area is owing to that Lunnan fault zone is located in anticline axis part, Lunnan fault zone underwent serious erosion, and the oils from Cambrian source rock accumulated in Lunnan fault zone were degraded completely during Caledonian-Hercynian movement. But the Cambrian oil accumulated in Sangtamu fault zone was not degraded completely and some of them were left for the location of Sangtamu fault zone is lower than Lunnan fault zone. Later, the oil derived from Middle-Upper Ordovician source rock mixed with the remained Cambrian oil, and the mixture oil formed in Sangtamu fault zone.

  11. Characterization and classification of two soils derived from basic rocks in Pernambuco State Coast, Northeast Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira Lindomário Barros de

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Geomorphic surfaces that present soils derived from basic rocks under warm and humid climate are unique scenarios for studying tropical soils. This paper aimed to characterize and classify two pedons derived from basalt at the Atlantic Forest Zone, Pernambuco State, Northeastern coast of Brazil. Two representative pedons (P1 and P2 were selected on a hillslope at the Cabo de Santo Agostinho municipality. Field macromorphological descriptions were carried out and soil horizon were sampled for physical, chemical, mineralogical and micromorphological characterization. The soils were classified, according to the Brazilian System of Soil Classification (and US Soil Taxonomy as: "Latossolo Vermelho-Amarelo distroférrico argissólico" (Typic Hapludox (P1 and "Nitossolo Vermelho distroférrico típico" (Rhodic Paleudult (P2. Pedon 1 differs from Pedon 2 in some aspects. For instance, P1 presents more yellowish colors, absence of clay illuviation, more friable consistence and the prismatic structure undergoes transformation to angular and subangular blocks. Pedon 2 presents ferri-argilans and leptocutans which indicate that vertical and lateral illuviation of clay is an active process in their formation. These chemically poor and mineralogically uniform soils are a result of the high temperature and rainfall of the studied area.

  12. Measurement of nonlinear elastic response in rock by the resonant bar method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, P.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Rasolofosaon, P.; Zinszner, B. [Institut Francais du Petrole (IFP), 92 - Rueil-Malmaison (France)

    1993-04-01

    In this work we are studying the behavior of the fundamental (Young`s) mode resonant peak as a function of drive amplitude in rock samples. Our goal from these studies is to obtain nonlinear moduli for many rock types, and to study the nonlinear moduli as a function of water saturation and other changes in physical properties. Measurements were made on seven different room dry rock samples. For one sample measurements were taken at 16 saturation levels between 1 and 98%. All samples display a ``softening`` nonlinearity, that is, the resonant frequency shifts downward with increasing drive amplitude. In extreme cases, the resonant frequency changes by as much as 25% over a strain interval of 10{sup {minus}7} to {approximately}4 {times} 10{sup {minus}5}. Measurements indicate that the nonlinear response is extremely sensitive to saturation. Estimates of a combined cubic and quartic nonlinear parameter {Gamma} range from approximately {minus}300 to {minus}10{sup 9} for the rock samples.

  13. Pulse-mode measurement of harmonic generation in rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, P.A.; Meegan, G.D.; McCall, K.R.; Shankland, T.J. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Guyer, R.A. (Massachusetts Univ., Amherst, MA (United States). Dept. of Physics); Bonner, B.P. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States))

    1993-01-01

    One goal in our research is to quantify frequency content modification caused by nonlinear elasticity that may take place during seismic wave propagation. To this end, we have conducted ultrasonic experiments in rock, analogous to those conducted in gas, for study of spectral changes from harmonic generation that take place along the wave path. For a material with cubic anharmonicity, the amplitude of the 2[omega] harmonic is shown to be proportional to xk[sup 2]U[sup 2], where [omega] is the angular frequency, x is the propagation distance, k is the wave vector, and U is the displacement amplitude at [omega]. Experiments in sandstone focused on confirming this result showed that U[sub 2[omega

  14. Spatio-temporal measurements and analysis of snow depth in a rock face

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Wirz

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Snow in rock faces plays a key role in the alpine environment for permafrost distribution, snow water storage or runoff in spring. However, a detailed assessment of snow depths in steep rock walls has never been attempted. To understand snow distribution in rock faces a high-resolution terrestrial laser scanner (TLS, including a digital camera, was used to obtain interpolated snow depth (HS data with a grid resolution of one metre. The mean HS, the snow covered area and their evolution in the rock face were compared to a neighbouring smoother catchment and a flat field station at similar elevation. Further we analyzed the patterns of HS distribution in the rock face after different weather periods and investigated the main factors contributing to those distributions.

    In a first step we could show that with TLS reliable information on surface data of a steep rocky surface can be obtained. In comparison to the flatter sites in the vicinity, mean HS in the rock face was lower during the entire winter, but trends of snow depth changes were similar. We observed repeating accumulation and ablation patterns in the rock face, while maximum snow depth loss always occurred at those places with maximum snow depth gain. Further analysis of the main factors contributing to the snow depth distribution in the rock face revealed terrain-wind-interaction processes to be dominant. Processes related to slope angle seem to play a role, but no simple relationship between slope angle and snow depth was found.

    Further analyses should involve measurements in rock faces with other characteristics and higher temporal resolutions to be able to distinguish individual processes better. Additionally, the relation of spatial and temporal distribution of snow depth to terrain – wind interactions should be tested.

  15. Spatio-temporal measurements and analysis of snow depth in a rock face

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Wirz

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Snow in rock faces plays a key role in the alpine environment for permafrost distribution, snow water storage or run off in spring. However, a detailed assessment of snow depths in steep rock walls has never been attempted. To understand snow distribution in rock walls a high-resolution terrestrial laser scanner (TLS, including a digital camera, was used to obtain snow depth (HS data with a resolution of one metre. The mean HS, the snow covered area and their evolution in the rock face were compared to a neighbouring smoother catchment and a flat field station at similar elevation. Further we analyzed the patterns of HS distribution in the rock face after different periods and investigated the main factors contributing to them.

    In a first step we could show that with TLS reliable information on surface data of a steep rocky surface can be obtained. In comparison to the flatter sites in the vicinity, mean HS in the rock face was lower during the entire winter, but trends of snow depth changes were similar. We observed repeating accumulation and ablation patterns in the rock face, while maximum snow depth loss always occurred at those places with maximum snow depth gain. Further analysis of the main factors contributing to the snow depth distribution in the rock face revealed terrain-wind-interaction processes to be dominant. Processes related to slope angle seem to play a role, but no linear function of slope angle and snow depth was found.

    Further analyses should involve measurements in rock faces with other characteristics and higher temporal resolutions to be able to distinguish individual processes better. Additionally the relation of spatial and temporal distribution of snow depth to terrain-wind interactions should be tested.

  16. Magma-derived gas influx and water-rock interactions in the volcanic aquifer of Mt. Vesuvius, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federico, C.; Aiuppa, A.; Allard, P.; Bellomo, S.; Jean-Baptiste, P.; Parello, F.; Valenza, M.

    2002-03-01

    We report in this paper a systematic investigation of the chemical and isotopic composition of groundwaters flowing in the volcanic aquifer of Mt. Vesuvius during its current phase of dormancy, including the first data on dissolved helium isotope composition and tritium content. The relevant results on dissolved He and C presented in this paper reveal that an extensive interaction between rising magmatic volatiles and groundwaters currently takes place at Vesuvius. Vesuvius groundwaters are dilute (mean TDS ˜ 2800 mg/L) hypothermal fluids ( mean T = 17.7°C) with a prevalent alkaline-bicarbonate composition. Calcium-bicarbonate groundwaters normally occur on the surrounding Campanian Plain, likely recharged from the Apennines. δD and δ 18O data evidence an essentially meteoric origin of Vesuvius groundwaters, the contribution from either Tyrrhenian seawater or 18O-enriched thermal water appearing to be small or negligible. However, the dissolution of CO 2-rich gases at depth promotes acid alteration and isochemical leaching of the permeable volcanic rocks, which explains the generally low pH and high total carbon content of waters. Attainment of chemical equilibrium between the rock and the weathering solutions is prevented by commonly low temperature (10 to 28°C) and acid-reducing conditions. The chemical and isotope (C and He) composition of dissolved gases highlights the magmatic origin of the gas phase feeding the aquifer. We show that although the pristine magmatic composition may vary upon gas ascent because of either dilution by a soil-atmospheric component or fractionation processes during interaction with the aquifer, both 13C/ 12C and 3He/ 4He measurements indicate the contribution of a magmatic component with a δ 13C ˜ 0‰ and R/R a of ˜2.7, which is consistent with data from Vesuvius fumaroles and phenocryst melt inclusions in olivine phenocrysts. A main control of tectonics on gas ascent is revealed by data presented in this paper. For example

  17. High‐frequency induced polarization measurements of hydrocarbon‐bearing rocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burtman, Vladimir; Endo, Masashi; Zhdanov, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    We have investigated induced polarization (IP) effects in hydrocarbon‐bearing artificial rocks at frequencies greater than 100 Hz. We have examined the instrumental and electrode phase responses of Zonge International's complex resistivity (CR) system, and optimized the performance of the Zonge...... system for IP measurements over the 1 mHz to 10 kHz frequency range. The reliability of the high‐frequency IP measurements were confirmed by independent measurement of the same samples using the Novocontrol BDS 80 system. Our results confirm the presence of IP effects in hydrocarbon‐bearing rocks...

  18. Laboratory measurements of seismic attenuation in partially saturated rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Samuel; Tisato, Nicola; Quintal, Beatriz; Holliger, Klaus

    2014-05-01

    Laboratory measurements of seismic attenuation and transient pore fluid pressure are performed on partially saturated Berea sandstone and synthetic borosilicate samples. Various degrees of water (liquid) and nitrogen (gas) saturation are considered. These measurements are carried out at room temperature and under confining pressures varying from ambient conditions up to 25 MPa. The cylindrical samples are 25 cm long and have a diameter of 7.6 cm. In the context of the experimental setup, the solid frames of both the Berea sandstone and the borosilicate samples can be considered homogenous, which in turn allows for isolating and exploring the effects of partial saturation on seismic attenuation. We employ the sub-resonance method, which is based on the application of a time-harmonic vertical stress to the top of the sample and the measurement of the thus resulting strain. For any given frequency, the attenuation is then inferred as the tangent of the phase shift between the applied stress and the observed strain. Using five equally spaced sensors along the central axis of the cylindrical sample, we measure the transient fluid pressure induced by the application of a step-function-type vertical stress to the top of the sample. Both the sensors and the sample are sealed off with the regard to the confining environment. Together with the numerical results from corresponding compressibility tests based on the quasi-static poroelastic equations, these transient fluid pressure measurements are then used to assist the interpretation of the seismic attenuation measurements.

  19. Measurements of viscosity and permeability of two phase miscible fluid flow in rock cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J L; Taylor, D G

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the application of 1H magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to the measurement of fluid viscosity and rock core plug permeability during two phase miscible displacements in certain rock types. The core plug permeability was determined by monitoring glycerol solutions displacing D2O. Simple physical principles were used to calculate the core permeability from the measured displacement angle for a set of Lochaline sandstone core plugs. In a further experiment the viscosity of polyacrylamide solution 1500 ppm was determined in the core plug. The permeability and viscosity results compared well to conventional core analysis methods.

  20. Developments in wireline in-situ rock stress measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedroso, Carlos [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Canas, Jesus A.; Holzberg, Bruno; Gmach, Helmut [Schlumberger Servicos de Petroleo Ltda., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    This paper presents recent developments of in-situ stress measurements with wireline tools. The stress measurements are based on the micro hydraulic techniques that can be initialized when an interval is pressurized by pumping fluid until a tensile fracture begins or by packers fracturing (sleeve fracturing). Ultrasonic and Micro-resistivity borehole image logs (before and after the testes) are used as a complement, in order to observe the fractures created by the tests, evaluating the mechanical behavior of the formation. An offshore case study is presented, where shales and tight sandstones at depths deeper than 4500 meters depth were successfully evaluated. A workflow to succeed on stress measurements on such environments is proposed, what includes a planning phase: where breakdown pressures ranges are estimated and compared with the capacity of the tools, a Real Time Monitoring phase, where a decision tree is proposed to help on quick decisions while testing, and an interpretation phase, where appropriate techniques are indicated to evaluate the results. Also, the paper presents the main operational needs to succeed on such environments. Basically, such tests require an entirely software controlled, motorized and modular design tool consisting of dual packer (DP), pump out and flow control modules (Figure 1). These modules were upgraded for the present environment: conditions such as temperatures above 300 deg F, formation pressures above 10,000 psia, very low formation permeability, high pressure differential need and oil based mud (OBM) environment. (author)

  1. Comparative experimental study on several methods for measuring elastic wave velocities in rocks at high pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE; Hongsen(谢鸿森); ZHOU; Wenge; 周文戈); LIU; Yonggang; (刘永刚); GUO; Jie; (郭捷); HOU; Wei; (侯渭); ZHAO; Zhidan(赵志丹)

    2002-01-01

    To measure elastic wave velocities in rocks at high temperature and high pressure is an important way to acquire the mechanics and thermodynamics data of rocks in the earth's interior and also a substantial approach to studying the structure and composition of materials there. In recent years, a rapid progress has been made in methodology pertaining to the measurements of elastic wave velocities in rocks at high temperature and high pressure with solids as the pressure-transfer media. However, no strict comparisons have been made of the elastic wave velocity data of rocks measured at high temperature and high pressure by various laboratories. In order to compare the experimental results from various laboratories, we have conducted a comparative experimental study on three measuring methods and made a strict comparison with the results obtained by using the transmission method with fluid as the pressure-transfer medium. Our experimental results have shown that the measurements obtained by the three methods are comparable in the pressure ranges of their application. The cubic sample pulse transmission method used by Kern is applicable to measuring elastic wave velocities in crustal rocks at lower temperature and lower pressure. The prism sample pulse reflection-transmission method has some advantages in pressure range, heating temperature and measuring precision. Although the measurements obtained under relatively low pressure conditions by the prism sample pulse transmission method are relatively low in precision, the samples are large in length and their assemblage is simple. So this method is suitable to the experiments that require large quantities of samples and higher pressures. Therefore, in practical application the latter two methods are usually recommended because their measurements can be mutually corrected and supplemented.

  2. Direct measurement of relative permeability in rocks from unsteady-state saturation profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kianinejad, Amir; Chen, Xiongyu; DiCarlo, David A.

    2016-08-01

    We develop a method to measure liquid relative permeability in rocks directly from transient in situ saturation profiles during gravity drainage experiments. Previously, similar methods have been used for sandpacks; here, this method is extended to rocks by applying a slight overpressure of gas at the inlet. Relative permeabilities are obtained in a 60 cm long vertical Berea sandstone core during gravity drainage, directly from the measured unsteady-state in situ saturations along the core at different times. It is shown that for obtaining relative permeability using this method, if certain criteria are met, the capillary pressure of the rock can be neglected. However, it is essential to use a correct gas pressure gradient along the core. This involves incorporating the pressure drop at the outlet of the core due to capillary discontinuity effects. The method developed in this work obtains relative permeabilities in unsteady-state fashion over a wide range of saturations quickly and accurately.

  3. Acid neutralizing capacity and leachate results for igneous rocks, with associated carbon contents of derived soils, Animas River AML site, Silverton, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager, Douglas B.; Stanton, Mark R.; Choate, LaDonna M.; Burchell,

    2009-01-01

    mine waste used in the kinetic reaction vessel test. This finding suggests that mine waste and not ANC rock may generate the majority of leachable metals in a field scenario. The organic carbon content of naturally reclaimed soils derived from weathering of propylitically-altered andesite was determined in catchments where ANC studies were initiated. Soils were found to have total carbon concentrations (TOC) that exceed global average soil TOC abundances by as much as 1.5 – 5 times. These data support an environmental management system involving use of ANC rocks as part of life-cycle mine planning to reduce post-mine closure acid mitigation measures. Carbon contents of undisturbed soils in mined catchments can possibly be used to validate post-reclamation success and help quantify carbon sequestration for CO2 emission offset trading as carbon markets mature.

  4. A New Natural Gamma Radiation Measurement System for Marine Sediment and Rock Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Vasiliev, M. A.; Blum, P; Chubarian, G.; Olsen, R.; Bennight, C.; Cobine, T.; Fackler, D.; Hastedt, M.; Houpt, D.; Mateo, Z.; Vasilieva, Y. B.

    2010-01-01

    A new high-efficiency and low-background system for the measurement of natural gamma radioactivity in marine sediment and rock cores retrieved from beneath the seabed was designed, built, and installed on the JOIDES Resolution research vessel. The system includes eight large NaI(Tl) detectors that measure adjacent intervals of the core simultaneously, maximizing counting times and minimizing statistical error for the limited measurement times available during drilling expeditions. Effect to b...

  5. Instruction manual for the use of the CSIR triaxial rock stress measuring equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vreede, F. A.

    1982-06-01

    A guide is presented for users of an instrument designed to measure the state of stress at any one point in a rock mass. The overscoring technique used to determine the absolute stress is described as well as equipment components. A computer program for processing the data is discussed and the equations on which the program is based are given.

  6. Capabilities for measuring physical and chemical properties of rocks at high pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durham, W.B. (comp.)

    1990-01-01

    The Experimental Geophysics Group of the Earth Sciences Department at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has experimental equipment that measures a variety of physical properties and phase equilibria and kinetics on rocks and minerals at extreme pressures (to 500 GPa) and temperatures (from 10 to 2800 K). These experimental capabilities are described in this report in terms of published results, photographs, and schematic diagrams.

  7. Measurement of group-velocity dispersion of Bloch modes in photonic-crystal-fiber rocking filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, G K L; Zang, L; Kang, M S; Russell, P St J

    2010-12-01

    We use low-coherence interferometry to measure the group-velocity dispersion (GVD) of the fast and slow Bloch modes of structural rocking filters, produced by twisting a highly birefringent photonic crystal fiber to and fro while scanning a focused CO(2) laser beam along it. The GVD curves in the vicinity of the resonant wavelength differ dramatically from those of the unperturbed fiber, suggesting that rocking filters could be used in the optimization of, e.g., four-wave mixing and supercontinuum generation. Excellent agreement is obtained between theory and experiment.

  8. Fluid-dependent anisotropy and experimental measurements in synthetic porous rocks with controlled fracture parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Pinbo; Di, Bangrang; Wei, Jianxin; Li, Xiangyang; Deng, Yinghua

    2014-02-01

    In this study, we analyse the influence of fluid on P- and S-wave anisotropy in a fractured medium. Equivalent medium theories are used to describe the relationship between the fluid properties and the rock physics characteristics in fractured rocks, and P-wave and S-wave velocities and anisotropy are considered to be influenced by fluid saturation. However, these theoretical predictions require experimental measurement results for calibration. A new construction method was used to create synthetic rock samples with controlled fracture parameters. The new construction process provides synthetic rocks that have a more realistic mineral composition, porous structure, cementation and pressure sensitivity than samples used in previous research on fractured media. The synthetic rock samples contain fractures which have a controlled distribution, diameter, thickness and fracture density. In this study, the fracture diameter was about 4 mm, the thickness of fractures was about 0.06 mm, and the fracture density in the two fractured rock samples was about 3.45%. SEM images show well-defined penny-shaped fractures of 4 mm in length and 0.06 mm in width. The rock samples were saturated with air, water and oil, and P- and S-wave velocities were measured in an ultrasonic measurement system. The laboratory measurement results show that the P-wave anisotropy is strongly influenced by saturated fluid, and the P-wave anisotropy parameter, ɛ, has a much larger value in air saturation than in water and oil saturations. The S-wave anisotropy decreases when the samples are saturated with oil, which can be caused by high fluid viscosity. In the direction perpendicular to the fractures (the 0° direction), shear-wave splitting is negligible, and is similar to the blank sample without fractures, as expected. In the direction parallel to the fractures (the 90° direction) shear-wave splitting is significant. The fractured rock samples show significant P- and S-wave anisotropy caused by

  9. Application of a modified method of ultrasonic measurements for determination of elastic moduli of rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zel, I. Yu.; Ivankina, T. I., E-mail: ivangreat2009@gmail.com [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Levin, D. M. [Tula State University (Russian Federation); Lokajicek, T. [Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Institute of Geology (Czech Republic)

    2015-07-15

    The velocities of elastic waves with quasi-longitudinal and quasi-transverse polarizations in a spherical rock sample have been measured. The experimental values of velocities are used to calculate 21 elastic moduli of the sample. For comparison, the effective elastic properties of the sample are simulated based on the data on the crystallographic textures of rock-forming minerals obtained by neutron diffraction. It is shown that the largest discrepancy between the model predictions and experimental velocity values is observed for transversely polarized waves.

  10. Measurement of nonlinear elastic response in rock by the resonant bar method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, P.A. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Rasolofosaon, P.; Zinszner, B. (Institut Francais du Petrole (IFP), 92 - Rueil-Malmaison (France))

    1993-01-01

    In this work we are studying the behavior of the fundamental (Young's) mode resonant peak as a function of drive amplitude in rock samples. Our goal from these studies is to obtain nonlinear moduli for many rock types, and to study the nonlinear moduli as a function of water saturation and other changes in physical properties. Measurements were made on seven different room dry rock samples. For one sample measurements were taken at 16 saturation levels between 1 and 98%. All samples display a softening'' nonlinearity, that is, the resonant frequency shifts downward with increasing drive amplitude. In extreme cases, the resonant frequency changes by as much as 25% over a strain interval of 10[sup [minus]7] to [approximately]4 [times] 10[sup [minus]5]. Measurements indicate that the nonlinear response is extremely sensitive to saturation. Estimates of a combined cubic and quartic nonlinear parameter [Gamma] range from approximately [minus]300 to [minus]10[sup 9] for the rock samples.

  11. Performance Evaluation of Button Bits in Coal Measure Rocks by Using Multiple Regression Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Okan

    2016-02-01

    Electro-hydraulic and jumbo drills are commonly used for underground coal mines and tunnel drives for the purpose of blasthole drilling and rock bolt installations. Not only machine parameters but also environmental conditions have significant effects on drilling. This study characterizes the performance of button bits during blasthole drilling in coal measure rocks by using multiple regression analyses. The penetration rate of jumbo and electro-hydraulic drills was measured in the field by employing bits in different diameters and the specific energy of the drilling was calculated at various locations, including highway tunnels and underground roadways of coal mines. Large block samples were collected from each location at which in situ drilling measurements were performed. Then, the effects of rock properties and machine parameters on the drilling performance were examined. Multiple regression models were developed for the prediction of the specific energy of the drilling and the penetration rate. The results revealed that hole area, impact (blow) energy, blows per minute of the piston within the drill, and some rock properties, such as the uniaxial compressive strength (UCS) and the drilling rate index (DRI), influence the drill performance.

  12. Solid Inclusions in Au-nuggets, genesis and derivation from alkaline rocks of the Guli Massif, Northern Siberia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dvorani Sami N.

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A total of 112 Au-nuggets, collected from alluvial placer deposits of the Ingarinda River from the Guli massif, located in northem Siberia, Russia, were investigated. The Guli massif consists of a huge dunite-clinopyroxenite complex (the largest complex in the world, an alkaline to highly alkaline rock suite (melilite, nephelinite, ijolite enveloping the dunite and carbonatite intrusions, associated with disseminated schlieren type chromitite and Au-Ag, Pt placer deposits. The nuggets are characterized by various sizes and shapes and show chemical compositions Au, Au-Ag and AuCu, typical for a derivate of carbon-atites and/or ultramafic complexes. A great variety of oxide, silicate, REE-minerals, carbonate and sulphide inclusions have been detected in the nuggets, which are identical in mineralogy and chemical composition to mineral constituents of the alkaline to highly alkaline rock suite surrounding the Guli dunite core complex thus, considered as the source for Au-nuggets.

  13. Rock blocks

    OpenAIRE

    Turner, W.

    2007-01-01

    Consider representation theory associated to symmetric groups, or to Hecke algebras in type A, or to q-Schur algebras, or to finite general linear groups in non-describing characteristic. Rock blocks are certain combinatorially defined blocks appearing in such a representation theory, first observed by R. Rouquier. Rock blocks are much more symmetric than general blocks, and every block is derived equivalent to a Rock block. Motivated by a theorem of J. Chuang and R. Kessar in the case of sym...

  14. Electrical derivative measurement of quantum cascade lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Dingkai; Cheng, Liwei; Chen, Xing; Choa, Fow-Sen; Fan, Jenyu; Worchesky, Terry

    2011-02-01

    The electrical derivative characteristics of quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) are investigated to test the QCL threshold, leakage current, and possibly explore carrier transport. QCL thresholds can be identified by searching for the slope peak of the first derivative of the I-V curves and can be further confirmed with its alignment to the peak of the second derivative of the I-V curves. Leakage current in QCLs with oxide-blocked ridge waveguides and buried heterostructure (BH) waveguides are studied and compared. The oxide-blocking structures provide the lowest leakage current although the capped-mesa-BH (CMBH) QCLs provide the toughest durability under highly stressful operations. The leakage current of CMBH QCLs are also compared at different temperatures.

  15. Measured Sections of Upper Paleozoic to Early Tertiary Rocks, Demarcation Point Quadrangle, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detterman, Robert L.

    1984-01-01

    Introduction Twelve sections of upper Paleozoic to early Tertiary rocks from the Demarcation Point quadrangle and the northern edge of the Table Mountain quadrangle are presented. These measured sections include the type sections for the Joe Creek Member of the Echooka Formation (Section 11), the Bathtub Graywacke and Kongakut Formation (Section 9), and the unnamed early Tertiary rocks (Section 1). The early Tertiary rocks correlate closely with the Moose Channel Formation in the MacKenzie Delta, Candada (Detterman and Spicer, 1981). The sections were measured with a Jacob's staff during the geologic investigations of the Demarcation Point quadrangle in 1969 to 1971. The geologic map is published in generalized form (Detterman, 1974, 1976; Detterman and others, 1975). The sections are at a scale of 1 in to 100 ft, except for section 1, which is at 1 in to 200 ft. The location map shows the year and station number for each station. Fossils collected from these rocks and marked by and asterisk (*) are included in Detterman and others, 1975 (p. 42-45). A double asterisk (**) indicates they are included in the list below. All other fossil indicators mean fossils are present, but not collected.

  16. Predicting thermal conductivity of rocks from the Los Azufres geothermal field, Mexico, from easily measurable properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Alfonso; Contreras, Enrique; Dominquez, Bernardo A.

    1988-01-01

    A correlation is developed to predict thermal conductivity of drill cores from the Los Azufres geothermal field. Only andesites are included as they are predominant. Thermal conductivity of geothermal rocks is in general scarce and its determination is not simple. Almost all published correlations were developed for sedimentary rocks. Typically, for igneous rocks, chemical or mineral analyses are used for estimating conductivity by using some type of additive rule. This requires specialized analytical techniques and the procedure may not be sufficiently accurate if, for instance, a chemical analysis is to be changed into a mineral analysis. Thus a simple and accurate estimation method would be useful for engineering purposes. The present correlation predicts thermal conductivity from a knowledge of bulk density and total porosity, properties which provide basic rock characterization and are easy to measure. They may be determined from drill cores or cuttings, and the procedures represent a real advantage given the cost and low availability of cores. The multivariate correlation proposed is a quadratic polynomial and represents a useful tool to estimate thermal conductivity of igneous rocks since data on this property is very limited. For porosities between 0% and 25%, thermal conductivity is estimated with a maximum deviation of 22% and a residual mean square deviation of 4.62E-3 n terms of the log{sub 10}(k{rho}{sub b}) variable. The data were determined as part of a project which includes physical, thermal and mechanical properties of drill cores from Los Azufres. For the correlation, sixteen determinations of thermal conductivity, bulk density and total porosity are included. The conductivity data represent the first determinations ever made on these rocks.

  17. Using Resistivity Measurements to Determine Anisotropy in Soil and Weathered Rock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Soto-Caban

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This study uses electrical resistivity measurements of soils and weathered rock to perform a fast and reliable evaluation of field anisotropy. Two test sites at New Concord, Ohio were used for the study. These sites are characterized by different landform and slightly east dipping limestone and siltstone formations of Pennsylvanian age. The measured resistivity ranged from 19 Ω∙m to 100 ��∙m, and varied with depth, landform, and season. The anisotropy was determined by a comparison of resistance values along the directions of strike and the dip. Measurements showed that the orientation of electrical anisotropy in the shallow ground may vary due to fluid connection, which is determined by the pore geometry in soil and rock, as well as by the direction of fluid movement. Results from this study indicated that a portable electrical resistivity meter is sensitive and reliable enough to be used for shallow ground fluid monitoring.

  18. Measurements of high-frequency acoustic scattering from glacially-eroded rock outcrops

    CERN Document Server

    Olson, Derek R; Sæbo, Torstein

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of acoustic backscattering from glacially-eroded rock outcrops were made off the coast of Sandefjord, Norway using a high-frequency synthetic aperture sonar (SAS) system. A method by which scattering strength can be estimated from data collected by a SAS system is detailed, as well as a method to estimate an effective calibration parameter for the system. Scattering strength measurements from very smooth areas of the rock outcrops agree with predictions from both the small-slope approximation and perturbation theory, and range between -33 and -26 dB at 20$^\\circ$ grazing angle. Scattering strength measurements from very rough areas of the rock outcrops agree with the sine-squared shape of the empirical Lambertian model and fall between -30 and -20 dB at 20$^\\circ$ grazing angle. Both perturbation theory and the small-slope approximation are expected to be inaccurate for the very rough area, and overestimate scattering strength by 8 dB or more for all measurements of very rough surfaces. Supportin...

  19. New method for measuring compressibility and poroelasticity coefficients in porous and permeable rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimienta, Lucas; Fortin, Jérôme; Guéguen, Yves

    2017-04-01

    Over the last decades, a large understanding has been gained on the elastic properties of rocks. Rocks are, however, porous materials, which properties depend on both response of the bulk material and of the pores. Because in that case both the applied external pressure and the fluid pressure play a role, different poroelasticity coefficients exist. While theoretical relations exist, measuring precisely those different coefficients remains an experimental challenge. Accounting for the different experimental complexities, a new methodology is designed that allows attaining accurately a large set of compressibility and poroelasticity coefficients in porous and permeable rocks. This new method relies on the use of forced confining or pore fluid pressure oscillations. In total, seven independent coefficients have been measured using three different boundary conditions. Because the usual theories predict only four independent coefficients, this overdetermined set of data can be checked against existing thermodynamic relations. Measurements have been performed on a Bentheim sandstone under, water- and glycerine-saturated conditions for different values of confining and pore fluid pressure. Consistently with the poroelasticity theory, the effect of the fluid bulk modulus is observed under undrained conditions but not under drained ones. Using thermodynamic relations, (i) the unjacketed, quartz, and skeleton (Zimmerman's relation) bulk moduli fit, (ii) the drained and undrained properties fit, and (iii) it is directly inferred from the measurements that the pore skeleton compressibility Cϕ is expected to be constant with pressure and to be exceedingly near the bulk skeleton Cs and mineral Cm compressibility coefficients.

  20. Measurements and predictions of surface gas fluxes and actual evaporation on mine waste rock dump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabwe, L.K.; Wilson, G.W. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Mining and Mineral Process Engineering

    2006-07-01

    Long-term closure issues with respect to the mining industry and acid rock drainage (ARD) management require accurate measurements, predictions and monitoring of surface gas fluxes and actual evaporation on mine waste-rock dumps. This study uses a technique, called the dynamic closed chamber system (DCC) that measures the oxygen flux into mine waste dumps. The technique was used with an oxygen gas analyzer to directly measure the change in the oxygen concentration in the headspace of the chamber installed at the surface of the waste dumps. A SoilCover model was also used to predict evaporation fluxes on a waste-rock pile after heavy rainfall events. Measurement of actual evaporation across the surfaces of waste dumps is important in the design of soil covers. The paper discussed the site locations including the Key Lake uranium mine located at the southern rim of the Athabasca Basin in north central Saskatchewan as well as the Syncrude Canada Ltd. mine, located 30 km north of Fort McMurray, Alberta. Materials and methods used in the study as well as results and subsequent discussion were also presented. The effect of relative humidity and the effect of soil cover system on oxygen diffusion was reviewed. It was concluded that the SoilCover numerical model can be a useful tool for prediction of actual evaporation on mine waste dumps. 21 refs., 4 figs.

  1. Numerical simulation and analysis for low-frequency rock physics measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chunhui; Tang, Genyang; Wang, Shangxu; He, Yanxiao

    2017-10-01

    In recent years, several experimental methods have been introduced to measure the elastic parameters of rocks in the relatively low-frequency range, such as differential acoustic resonance spectroscopy (DARS) and stress-strain measurement. It is necessary to verify the validity and feasibility of the applied measurement method and to quantify the sources and levels of measurement error. Relying solely on the laboratory measurements, however, we cannot evaluate the complete wavefield variation in the apparatus. Numerical simulations of elastic wave propagation, on the other hand, are used to model the wavefield distribution and physical processes in the measurement systems, and to verify the measurement theory and analyze the measurement results. In this paper we provide a numerical simulation method to investigate the acoustic waveform response of the DARS system and the quasi-static responses of the stress-strain system, both of which use axisymmetric apparatus. We applied this method to parameterize the properties of the rock samples, the sample locations and the sensor (hydrophone and strain gauges) locations and simulate the measurement results, i.e. resonance frequencies and axial and radial strains on the sample surface, from the modeled wavefield following the physical experiments. Rock physical parameters were estimated by inversion or direct processing of these data, and showed a perfect match with the true values, thus verifying the validity of the experimental measurements. Error analysis was also conducted for the DARS system with 18 numerical samples, and the sources and levels of error are discussed. In particular, we propose an inversion method for estimating both density and compressibility of these samples. The modeled results also showed fairly good agreement with the real experiment results, justifying the effectiveness and feasibility of our modeling method.

  2. First measurement of low intensity fast neutron background from rock at the Boulby Underground Laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Tziaferi, E; Kudryavtsev, V A; Lerner, R; Lightfoot, P K; Paling, S M; Robinson, M; Spooner, N J C

    2006-01-01

    A technique to measure low intensity fast neutron flux has been developed. The design, calibrations, procedure for data analysis and interpretation of the results are discussed in detail. The technique has been applied to measure the neutron background from rock at the Boulby Underground Laboratory, a site used for dark matter and other experiments, requiring shielding from cosmic ray muons. The experiment was performed using a liquid scintillation detector. A 6.1 litre volume stainless steel cell was filled with an in-house made liquid scintillator loaded with Gd to enhance neutron capture. A two-pulse signature (proton recoils followed by gammas from neutron capture) was used to identify the neutron events from much larger gamma background from PMTs. Suppression of gammas from the rock was achieved by surrounding the detector with high-purity lead and copper. Calibrations of the detector were performed with various gamma and neutron sources. Special care was taken to eliminate PMT afterpulses and correlated...

  3. Measuring the dynamic compression and release behavior of rocks and grouts associated with HYDROPLUS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furnish, M.D.

    1993-10-01

    Gas-gun impact tests were performed on twelve rocks and rock simulants pertinent to the HYDROPLUS nuclear yield measurement program: A variety of tuffs, rhyolites, carbonates, grouts, an epoxy-alumina mixture and quartzite permafrost samples recovered in an apparently preserved frozen state from northern Canada. The present report presents results for all of these materials except for the carbonates. Two classes of impact techniques were employed for measuring equation-of-state properties for these materials. Both use velocity interferometry diagnostics. One, employing a sample-in-projectile geometry, provides high-precision Hugoniot data and continuous release trajectories for dry or water-saturated materials. The majority of the experiments were performed with this geometry. The other, employing a sample-in-target geometry, provides loading path and Hugoniot data as well as limited release data. Uncertainties in the results have been estimated by analyzing the effects of errors in observables and ancillary material properties.

  4. Measuring and Modeling of P- and S-Wave Velocities on Crustal Rocks: A Key for the Interpretation of Seismic Reflection and Refraction Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartmut Kern

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Lithologic interpretations of the earth crust from seismic wave velocities are non-unique so that inferences about composition can not be drawn. In order to evaluate how elastic properties of rock materials are controlled by lithology at in situ pressures and temperatures, compressional (Vp, shear wave velocities (Vs and velocity anisotropy of crustal rocks were measured at conditions of greater depth. The first part deals with the interdependence of elastic wave propagation and the physical and lithological parameters. In the second part data from laboratory seismic measurements and theoretical calculations are used to interpret (1 a shallow seismic reflection line (SE Finland and (2 a refraction profile of a deep crust (Central China. The comparison of the calculated velocities with the experimentally-derived in situ velocities of the Finnish crustal rocks give hints that microcracks have an important bearing on the in situ seismic velocities, velocity anisotropy and the reflectivity observed at relative shallow depth. The coupling of the experimentally-derived in situ velocities of P- and S-wave and corresponding Poisson's ratios of relevant exhumed high-grade metamorphic crustal rocks from Central China with respective data from seismic refraction profiling provided a key for the lithologic interpretation of a deep seismic crustal structure.

  5. Orientation Uncertainty of Structures Measured in Cored Boreholes: Methodology and Case Study of Swedish Crystalline Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stigsson, Martin

    2016-11-01

    Many engineering applications in fractured crystalline rocks use measured orientations of structures such as rock contact and fractures, and lineated objects such as foliation and rock stress, mapped in boreholes as their foundation. Despite that these measurements are afflicted with uncertainties, very few attempts to quantify their magnitudes and effects on the inferred orientations have been reported. Only relying on the specification of tool imprecision may considerably underestimate the actual uncertainty space. The present work identifies nine sources of uncertainties, develops inference models of their magnitudes, and points out possible implications for the inference on orientation models and thereby effects on downstream models. The uncertainty analysis in this work builds on a unique data set from site investigations, performed by the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co. (SKB). During these investigations, more than 70 boreholes with a maximum depth of 1 km were drilled in crystalline rock with a cumulative length of more than 34 km including almost 200,000 single fracture intercepts. The work presented, hence, relies on orientation of fractures. However, the techniques to infer the magnitude of orientation uncertainty may be applied to all types of structures and lineated objects in boreholes. The uncertainties are not solely detrimental, but can be valuable, provided that the reason for their presence is properly understood and the magnitudes correctly inferred. The main findings of this work are as follows: (1) knowledge of the orientation uncertainty is crucial in order to be able to infer correct orientation model and parameters coupled to the fracture sets; (2) it is important to perform multiple measurements to be able to infer the actual uncertainty instead of relying on the theoretical uncertainty provided by the manufacturers; (3) it is important to use the most appropriate tool for the prevailing circumstances; and (4) the single most

  6. The New England Batholith: constraints on its derivation from Nd and Sr isotopic studies of granitoids and country rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mensel, H. D.; McCulloch, M. T.; Chappell, B. W.

    1985-02-01

    Nd and Sr isotopic compositions are reported for the granitic suites which comprise the late Palaeozoic to earliest Mesozoic New England Batholith of eastern Australia. Some of the granitic suites are typically I-type in their mineralogy, chemistry and isotopic compositions, implying a derivation from igneous (infracrustal) source rocks, whereas other suites have characteristics consistent with a derivation from a protolith which was predominantly sedimentary and relatively felsic (S-types). The I-type granitoids of the Nundle Suite have ɛNd values (+3.3 to +6.1) that are amongst the most primitive yet documented for a relatively felsic (SiO 2 ~ 65%) plutonic suite and these values imply a derivation from either a depleted upper mantle source or, more probably, a complex source region involving both volcanic-arc rocks and detrital material. Their compositions are distinctly more primitive than those of the New England Super-Suite which constitutes the Permian 'core' of the batholith. This extensive Super-Suite (comprising granitoids traditionally designated as I-type) has an overall range in initial Nd and Sr isotopic compositions of -1.7 to +4.6 and 0.70458 to 0.70624 respectively, although the majority of plutons have initial Nd isotopic compositions which fall into a very narrow range (+1.0 ±1.5 ɛunits). This limited range is remarkable considering the extreme lithological diversity and range in chemical composition of the analysed samples (SiO 2 47%-74%) and implies a source region of considerable volume having reasonably uniform isotopic compositions but variation in chemistry. A similarly uniform source isotopically is also indicated for the S-type granitoids of the Carboniferous Hillgrove Suite and Carboniferous-Permian Bundarra Suite with initial ɛNd values of +0.8 to +2.3 and initial 87Sr /86Sr compositions of 0.70474 to 0.70577 showing only limited ranges. Five pelites, three 'felsic' and four 'mafic' greywackes, representing typical country rocks

  7. Real-time setup to measure radon emission during rock deformation: implications for geochemical surveillance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuccimei, P.; Mollo, S.; Soligo, M.; Scarlato, P.; Castelluccio, M.

    2015-05-01

    Laboratory experiments can represent a valid approach to unravel the complex interplay between the geochemical behaviour of radon and rock deformation mechanisms. In light of this, we present a new real-time experimental setup for analysing in continuum the alpha-emitting 222Rn and 220Rn daughters over variable stress-strain regimes. The most innovative segment of this setup consists of the radon accumulation chamber obtained from a tough and durable material that can host large cylindrical rock samples. The accumulation chamber is connected, in a closed-loop configuration, to a gas-drying unit and to a RAD7 radon monitor. A recirculating pump moves the gas from the rock sample to a solid-state detector for alpha counting of radon and thoron progeny. The measured radon signal is enhanced by surrounding the accumulation chamber with a digitally controlled heating belt. As the temperature is increased, the number of effective collisions of radon atoms increases favouring the diffusion of radon through the material and reducing the analytical uncertainty. The accumulation chamber containing the sample is then placed into a uniaxial testing apparatus where the axial deformation is measured throughout a linear variable displacement transducer. A dedicated software allows obtaining a variety of stress-strain regimes from fast deformation rates to long-term creep tests. Experiments conducted with this new real-time setup have important ramifications for the interpretation of geochemical anomalies recorded prior to volcanic eruptions or earthquakes.

  8. Development of Helium-Mass-Spectrometry-Permeameter for the Measurement of Permeability of Near-Impermeable Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Moo Y.; Bauer, Stephen J.

    2016-12-01

    A helium leakage detection system was modified to measure gas permeability on extracted cores of nearly impermeable rock. The Helium-Mass-Spectrometry-Permeameter (HMSP) is duplicating the classic Darcy's experiment with a constant pressure differential and steady-state flow through a sample using helium gas. Under triaxial stress condition, the newly developed HMSP can measure hydraulic permeability of rocks and geomaterials down to the nanoDarcy scale (10-21 m2). The extension of measuring the lower end of the permeability scale may help answer important questions regarding the permeability of rock at great depth where fractures may close completely under high lithostatic stress.

  9. Borehole camera technology for measuring the relaxation zone of surrounding rock: mechanism and application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jing Hong-wen; Li Yuan-hai; Liang Jun-qi; Yu De-cheng [China University of Mining & Technology, Xuzhou (China). State Key Laboratory for Geomechanics & Deep Underground Engineering

    2009-05-15

    A panoramic borehole camera technology (BCT) and digital image processing method was developed by constructing a system composed of hardware and software. The technology was used for measuring the relaxation zone of surrounding rock with the borehole camera. The hardware consists of a mini CCD camera and a high-pressure sealed magnetic compass that is used for camera positioning. The software includes real-time image monitoring and a processing program that includes the procedure for analysis of the relaxation zone. The roundness of cracks in the boreholes is taken as the index for identifying the relaxation zone. The system was used to measure the relaxation zone of a deep roadway in the Qiwu coal mine of Shandong province. The distribution of the relaxation zone around the roadway was obtained. The results show that the thickness of the broken rock zone varies with the measuring position within a cross section of the roadway. The reliability of the measuring method was tested and verified by comparing the data from BCT with those measured by an ultrasonic method; the difference is less than 3.5%. The system provides a new method for the measurement of the relaxation zone when engineering deep underground. 6 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Proposed apparatus for measuring internal friction in rocks at high temperatures and pressures: a design analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonner, B.P.

    1977-10-03

    An apparatus is described that measures internal friction in rocks at high temperatures (approximately 800/sup 0/C) and pressures (approximately 1.0 GPa). Steady oscillations (approximately 1.0 Hz) are induced in a jacketed sample while coaxial capacitive transducers monitor the resulting radial strain. Sample strains are continuously compared to the deformation of a low-loss standard, which acts as a stress transducer. The stress state produced is uniaxial stress. We use the theory of viscoelasticity to partition the loss into components depending on pure shear and dilatation. The theoretical results emphasize the importance of ultimately measuring each loss independently.

  11. Phosphate Rock Fertilizer in Acid Soil:Comparing Phosphate Extraction Methods for Measuring Dissolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    T.S.ANSUMANA-KAWA; WANGGUANGHUO

    1998-01-01

    Three phosphate extraction methods were used to investigate the dissolution,availability and transfo-mation of Kunyang phosphate rock(KPR) in two surface acid soils.Dissolution was determined by measuring the increase in the amounts of soluble and adsorbed inorganic phosphate fractions,and did not differ signifi-cantly among the three methods.Significant correlations were obtained among P fractions got by the three extraction methods.Dissolution continued until the end of the 90-day incubation period.At the end of the period,much of the applied phosphate recovered in both soils were in the Al- and Fe-P or in the hydroxide-and bicarbonate-extractable inorganic P fractions.The dissolution of KPR in the two soils was also similar: increased addition of phosphate rock resulted in decreased dissolution.The similarity in the order and extent of dissolution in the two soils was probably due to the similarity in each soil of several factors that are known to influence phosphate rock dissolution,namely low CEC,pH,P level,and base status;and high clay and free iron and aluminum oxide contents.The results suggested that KPR could be an aternative P source in the soils are not limiting.

  12. A simulation of the measurement of electrical conductivity in randomly generated two-phase rocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandolesi, Eric; Moorkamp, Max; Jones, Alan G.

    2014-05-01

    Geological models of the subsurface require detailed data, often unavailable from direct observation or well logs. Hence imaging the subsurface relies on models obtained by interpretation of geophysical data. Several electromagnetic (EM) geophysical methods focus on the EM properties of rocks and sediments to determine a reliable image of the subsurface, while the same electromagnetic properties are directly measured in laboratories. Often these laboratory measurements return equivocal results that are difficult to reconcile with field observations. Recently different numerical approaches have been investigated in order to understand the effects of the geometry and continuity of interconnected pathways of conductors on EM field measurements, often restricting the studies to direct current (DC) sources. Bearing in mind the time-varying nature of the natural electromagnetic sources that play a role in field measurements, we numerically simulate the effects of such EM sources on the conductivity measured on the surface of a randomly generated three-dimensional body embedded in a uniform host by using electromagnetic induction equations, thus simulating a magnetotelluric (MT) survey. A key point in such a simulation is the scalability of the problem: the deeper the target, the longer the period of the EM source is needed. On the other hand, a long period signal ignores small heterogeneous conductors in the target bulk of the material, averaging the different conductivities in a median value. Since most real rocks are poor conductors, we have modeled a two-phase mixture of rock and interconnected conductive elements (representing melts, saline fluids, sulphidic, carbonitic, or metallic sediments, etc.), randomly generated within the background host. We have compared the results from the simulated measurements with the target rock embedded at different depths with electrical conductivity predicted by both Hashin-Shtrikman (HS) bounds and an updated multi-phase Archie

  13. Development of a Highly Portable Plate Loading Device and In Situ Modulus Measurements in Weak Rock Masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallu, Raj R.; Keffeler, Evan R.; Watters, Robert J.; Warren, Sean N.

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, underground mines in Nevada are increasingly exploiting in weak mineralized zones at greater depths that are intensely fractured and highly altered. The mechanical behavior of these rock masses ranges between weak rock and very stiff soil. A common limitation for design of underground mining excavations in these types of rock masses is absence of in situ geotechnical data. This limitation is generally overcome by estimating in situ mechanical behavior from empirical relationships so that the continuum-based numerical methods can be used to evaluate ground support designs. Because of the cost, time, and specialized equipment involved, historically in situ tests have not been performed in these underground mines. Predictive rock mass modulus relationships that are currently available in the literature are derived from field testing of predominantly good-quality rock masses. Consequently, there is limited confidence in using these models for rock masses with Rock Mass Ratings less than 45. In order to overcome some of these limitations, a portable plate loading device (PPLD) was designed and fabricated. The PPLD allows one to perform low cost and relatively quick in situ deformability tests to be performed on weak rock masses in underground mines. Test procedures and data reduction methods were developed to limit potential sources of error associated with the PPLD test. A total of fourteen plate loading tests were performed in weak rock masses at two different active underground mines in Nevada, USA. The resulting the test data were compared to eight published empirical rock mass modulus relationships to determine which, if any, of these relationships are sufficiently accurate for estimating modulus in similar geotechnical conditions. Only two of these relationships were found to be sufficient for first-order estimations of in situ modulus.

  14. A transient method for measuring the DC streaming potential coefficient of porous and fractured rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, E.; Glover, P. W. J.; Ruel, J.

    2014-02-01

    High-quality streaming potential coupling coefficient measurements have been carried out using a newly designed cell with both a steady state methodology and a new pressure transient approach. The pressure transient approach has shown itself to be particularly good at providing high-quality streaming potential coefficient measurements as each transient increase or decrease allows thousands of measurements to be made at different pressures to which a good linear regression can be fitted. Nevertheless, the transient method can be up to 5 times as fast as the conventional measurement approaches because data from all flow rates are taken in the same transient measurement rather than separately. Test measurements have been made on samples of Berea and Boise sandstone as a function of salinity (approximately 18 salinities between 10-5 mol/dm3 and 2 mol/dm3). The data have also been inverted to obtain the zeta potential. The streaming potential coefficient becomes greater (more negative) for fluids with lower salinities, which is consistent with existing measurements. Our measurements are also consistent with the high-salinity streaming potential coefficient measurements made by Vinogradov et al. (2010). Both the streaming potential coefficient and the zeta potential have also been modeled using the theoretical approach of Glover (2012). This modeling allows the microstructural, electrochemical, and fluid properties of the saturated rock to be taken into account in order to provide a relationship that is unique to each particular rock sample. In all cases, we found that the experimental data were a good match to the theoretical model.

  15. Geochemical research on C-O and Sr-Nd isotopes of mantle-derived rocks from Shandong Province, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jianming; ZHANG Hongfu; SUN Jinggui; YE Jie

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents systematic studies on the C-O and Sr-Nd isotopic compositions for Cretaceous Badou carbonatites, Fangcheng basalts, and Jiaodong lamprophyres and Paleozoic Mengyin kimberlites in Shandong Province, China. Paleozoic kimberlites have normal and uniform C-O isotopic compositions with δ13C and δ18O in the range of -4.8‰--7.6‰ and +9.9‰-+13.2‰, respectively. However, Cretaceous three different types of mantle-derived rocks have quite different C-O isotopic compositions, indicating that the mantle sources are probably partially contaminated with organic carbon-bearing crustal materials. These Cretaceous rocks show uniform and EMII-like Sr-Nd isotopic compositions and also indicate that the mantle sources were affected by recycled crustal materials. Comparative studies of C-O and Sr-Nd isotopes reveal that the lithospheric mantle beneath the eastern North China Craton had different isotope characteristics in the Paleozoic, the early Cretaceous, and the Tertiary time. This demonstrates that the lithospheric mantle beneath the region underwent at least twice reconstructions since the Paleozoic. Available data imply that the first reconstruction mainly happened during the Triassic-Jurassic time with gradual changes and the second in the Cretaceous with abrupt changes. Results also show that the early Cretaceous (especially at 120-130 Ma) was perhaps the key period leading to the dramatic change of the Mesozoic geodynamics on the eastern North China Craton.

  16. A New Natural Gamma Radiation Measurement System for Marine Sediment and Rock Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Vasiliev, M A; Chubarian, G; Olsen, R; Bennight, C; Cobine, T; Fackler, D; Hastedt, M; Houpt, D; Mateo, Z; Vasilieva, Y B

    2010-01-01

    A new high-efficiency and low-background system for the measurement of natural gamma radioactivity in marine sediment and rock cores retrieved from beneath the seabed was designed, built, and installed on the JOIDES Resolution research vessel. The system includes eight large NaI(Tl) detectors that measure adjacent intervals of the core simultaneously, maximizing counting times and minimizing statistical error for the limited measurement times available during drilling expeditions. Effect to background ratio is maximized with passive lead shielding, including both ordinary and low-activity lead. Large-area plastic scintillator active shielding filters background associated with the high-energy part of cosmic radiation. The new system has at least an order of magnitude higher statistical reliability and significantly enhances data quality compared to other offshore natural gamma radiation (NGR) systems designed to measure geological core samples. Reliable correlations and interpretations of cored intervals are ...

  17. A new natural gamma radiation measurement system for marine sediment and rock analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiliev, M. A.; Blum, P.; Chubarian, G.; Olsen, R.; Bennight, C.; Cobine, T.; Fackler, D.; Hastedt, M.; Houpt, D.; Mateo, Z.; Vasilieva, Y. B.

    2011-11-01

    A new high-efficiency and low-background system for the measurement of natural gamma radioactivity in marine sediment and rock cores retrieved from beneath the seabed was designed, built, and installed on the JOIDES Resolution research vessel. The system includes eight large NaI(Tl) detectors that measure adjacent intervals of the core simultaneously, maximizing counting times and minimizing statistical error for the limited measurement times available during drilling expeditions. Effect to background ratio is maximized with passive lead shielding, including both ordinary and low-activity lead. Large-area plastic scintillator active shielding filters background associated with the high-energy part of cosmic radiation. The new system has at least an order of magnitude higher statistical reliability and significantly enhances data quality compared to other offshore natural gamma radiation (NGR) systems designed to measure geological core samples. Reliable correlations and interpretations of cored intervals are possible at rates of a few counts per second.

  18. Carbon isotopic characteristics of hydrocarbon gases from coal-measure source rocks--A thermal simulation experiment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Jianjing; HU Huifang; SUN Guoqiang; JI Limin

    2006-01-01

    Gaseous hydrocarbon geochemistry research through a thermal simulation experiment in combination with the natural evolution process in which natural gases were formed from coal-measure source rocks revealed that the δ13C1 values of methane vary from light to heavy along with the increase of thermal evolution degree of coal-measure source rocks, and the δ13C2 values of ethane range from -28.3‰ to -20‰ (PDB). δ13C2 value was -28‰± ( Ro= 0.45% - 0.65%) at the lower thermal evolution stage of coal-measure source rocks. After the rocks entered the main hydrocarbon-generating stage (Ro=0.65% - 1.50%), δ13C2 values generally varied within the range of -26‰ - -23‰±; with further thermal evolution of the rocks the carbon isotopes of ethane became heavier and heavier, but generally less than - 20‰.The partial carbon isotope sequence inversion of hydrogen gases is a characteristic feature of mixing of natural gases of different origins. Under the condition of specially designated type of organic matter, hydrogen source rocks may show this phenomenon via their own evolution.In the lower evolution stages of the rocks, it is mainly determined by organic precursors that gaseous hydrocarbons display partial inversion of the carbon isotope sequence and the carbon isotopic values of ethane are relatively low. These characteristic features also are related to the geochemical composition of primary soluble organic matter.

  19. Gamma-ray measurements of naturally occurring radioactive samples from Cyprus characteristic geological rocks

    CERN Document Server

    Tzortzis, M; Christofides, S; Christodoulides, G

    2003-01-01

    Using high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy, the terrestrial gamma radiation in all the predominant types of geological rock formations appearing in Cyprus was measured. Soil samples were collected from each rock type, sealed in 1-litre plastic Marinelli beakers, and measured in the laboratory for 24 hours each. From the measured gamma-ray spectra, activity concentrations were determined for Th-232 (range from 1.3 to 52.8 Bq/kg), U-238 (from 0.9 to 90.3 Bq/kg) and K-40 (from 13 to 894 Bq/kg). Elemental concentrations mean values of (2.8 +- 0.7) ppm, (1.3 +- 0.3) ppm and (0.6 +- 0.1) % were extracted, for thorium, uranium and potassium, respectively. Absorbed dose rates in air outdoors were calculated to be in the range of 0.1-50 nGy/h, depending on the geological features, with an overall mean value of (14.7 +- 7.3) nGy/h. The corresponding effective dose rates per person outdoors were estimated to be between 0.1 and 61.4 microSv/y, assuming a 20% occupancy factor.

  20. Gamma radiation measurements and dose rates in commercially-used natural tiling rocks (granites)

    CERN Document Server

    Tzortzis, M; Christofides, S; Christodoulides, G

    2003-01-01

    The gamma radiation in samples of a variety of natural tiling rocks (granites) imported in Cyprus for use in the building industry was measured, employing high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy. The rock samples were pulverized, sealed in 1 litre plastic Marinelli beakers, and measured in the laboratory with a live-time between 10 and 14 hours each. From the measured gamma-ray spectra, activity concentrations were determined for Th-232 (range from 1 to 906 Bq/kg), U-238 (from 1 to 588 Bq/kg) and K-40 (from 50 to 1606 Bq/kg). Elemental concentrations mean values of (35.2 +- 8.4) ppm, (6.2 +- 1.8) ppm and (4.0 +- 0.2) % were deduced, for thorium, uranium and potassium, respectively. The total absorbed dose rates in air calculated from the concentrations of the three radionuclides, Th-232 and U-238 series and K-40, ranged from 7 to 1209 nGy/h for full utilization of the materials, from 4 to 605 nGy/h for half utilization and from 2 to 302 nGy/h for one quarter utilization. The total effective dose rates per pers...

  1. Unsteady surface pressure measurements on a slender delta wing undergoing limit cycle wing rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arena, Andrew S., Jr.; Nelson, Robert C.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental investigation of slender wing limit cycle motion known as wing rock was investigated using two unique experimental systems. Dynamic roll moment measurements and visualization data on the leading edge vortices were obtained using a free to roll apparatus that incorporates an airbearing spindle. In addition, both static and unsteady surface pressure data was measured on the top and bottom surfaces of the model. To obtain the unsteady surface pressure data a new computer controller drive system was developed to accurately reproduce the free to roll time history motions. The data from these experiments include, roll angle time histories, vortex trajectory data on the position of the vortices relative to the model's surface, and surface pressure measurements as a function of roll angle when the model is stationary or undergoing a wing rock motion. The roll time history data was numerically differentiated to determine the dynamic roll moment coefficient. An analysis of these data revealed that the primary mechanism for the limit cycle behavior was a time lag in the position of the vortices normal to the wing surface.

  2. Ultrasonic Derivative Measurements of Bone Strain During Exercise Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Luna Innovations, Inc., in collaboration with the SUNY Stony Brook, proposes to extend ultrasonic pulsed phase locked loop (PPLL) derivative measurements to the...

  3. Adjusting central and eastern North America ground-motion intensity measures between sites with different reference-rock site conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boore, David; Campbell, Kenneth W.

    2017-01-01

    Adjustment factors are provided for converting ground‐motion intensity measures between central and eastern North America (CENA) sites with different reference‐rock site conditions (VS30=760, 2000, and 3000  m/s) for moment magnitudes ranging from 2 to 8, rupture distances ranging from 2 to 1200 km, Fourier amplitude spectra (FAS) for frequencies ranging from 0.01 to 100 Hz, response spectra for periods ranging from 0.01 to 10.0 s, peak ground acceleration, and peak ground velocity. The adjustment factors are given for a wide range of the site diminution parameters (κ0) for sites with VS30=760  m/s and for a κ0 of 0.006 s for two harder rock sites. Fourteen CENA velocity profiles with VS30 values within a factor of 1.1 of 760  m/s were used to derive average FAS amplification factors as a function of frequency, which were then used in simulations of peak ground‐motion parameters and response spectra to derive the adjustment factors. The amplification function differs from that used in western North America (e.g., Campbell and Boore, 2016) in having a peak near 9 Hz, due to the resonance of motions in the relatively thin low‐velocity material over hard rock that characterizes many CENA sites with VS30 near 760  m/s. We call these B/C sites, because this velocity marks the boundary between National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program site classes B and C (Building Seismic Safety Council, 2004). The adjustments for short‐period motions are sensitive to the value of κ0, but there are very few if any determinations of κ0 for CENA B/C sites. For this reason, we determined κ0from multiple recordings at Pinyon Flat Observatory (PFO), California, which has a velocity‐depth profile similar to those of CENA B/C sites. The PFO and other results from the literature suggest that appropriate values of κ0 for CENA B/C sites are expected to lie between 0.01 and 0.03 s.

  4. Measurement of field-saturated hydraulic conductivity on fractured rock outcrops near Altamura (Southern Italy) with an adjustable large ring infiltrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputo, M.C.; de Carlo, L.; Masciopinto, C.; Nimmo, J.R.

    2010-01-01

    Up to now, field studies set up to measure field-saturated hydraulic conductivity to evaluate contamination risks, have employed small cylinders that may not be representative of the scale of measurements in heterogeneous media. In this study, a large adjustable ring infiltrometer was designed to be installed on-site directly on rock to measure its field-saturated hydraulic conductivity. The proposed device is inexpensive and simple to implement, yet also very versatile, due to its large adjustable diameter that can be fixed on-site. It thus allows an improved representation of the natural system's heterogeneity, while also taking into consideration irregularities in the soil/rock surface. The new apparatus was tested on an outcrop of karstic fractured limestone overlying the deep Murge aquifer in the South of Italy, which has recently been affected by untreated sludge disposal, derived from municipal and industrial wastewater treatment plants. The quasi-steady vertical flow into the unsaturated fractures was investigated by measuring water levels during infiltrometer tests. Simultaneously, subsurface electrical resistivity measurements were used to visualize the infiltration of water in the subsoil, due to unsaturated water flow in the fractures. The proposed experimental apparatus works well on rock outcrops, and allows the repetition of infiltration tests at many locations in order to reduce model uncertainties in heterogeneous media. ?? 2009 Springer-Verlag.

  5. Special core analyses and relative permeability measurement on Almond formation reservoir rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maloney, D.; Doggett, K.; Brinkmeyer, A.

    1993-02-01

    This report describes the results from special core analyses and relative permeability measurements conducted on samples of rock from the Almond Formation in Greater Green River Basin of southwestern Wyoming. The core was from Arch Unit Well 121 of Patrick Draw field. Samples were taken from the 4,950 to 4,965 ft depth interval. Thin section evaluation, X-ray diffraction, routine permeability and porosity, capillary pressure and wettability tests were performed to characterize the samples. Fluid flow capacity characteristics were measured during two-phase unsteady- and steady-state and three-phase steady-state relative permeability tests. Test results are presented in tables and graphs. Relative permeability results are compared with those of a 260-mD, fired Berea sandstone sample which was previously subjected to similar tests. Brine relative permeabilities were similar for the two samples, whereas oil and gas relative permeabilities for the Almond formation rock were higher at equivalent saturation conditions compared to Berea results. Most of the tests described in this report were conducted at 74{degrees}F laboratory temperature. Additional tests are planned at 150{degrees}F temperature. Equipment and procedural modifications to perform the elevated temperature tests are described.

  6. Special core analyses and relative permeability measurement on Almond formation reservoir rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maloney, D.; Doggett, K.; Brinkmeyer, A.

    1993-02-01

    This report describes the results from special core analyses and relative permeability measurements conducted on samples of rock from the Almond Formation in Greater Green River Basin of southwestern Wyoming. The core was from Arch Unit Well 121 of Patrick Draw field. Samples were taken from the 4,950 to 4,965 ft depth interval. Thin section evaluation, X-ray diffraction, routine permeability and porosity, capillary pressure and wettability tests were performed to characterize the samples. Fluid flow capacity characteristics were measured during two-phase unsteady- and steady-state and three-phase steady-state relative permeability tests. Test results are presented in tables and graphs. Relative permeability results are compared with those of a 260-mD, fired Berea sandstone sample which was previously subjected to similar tests. Brine relative permeabilities were similar for the two samples, whereas oil and gas relative permeabilities for the Almond formation rock were higher at equivalent saturation conditions compared to Berea results. Most of the tests described in this report were conducted at 74[degrees]F laboratory temperature. Additional tests are planned at 150[degrees]F temperature. Equipment and procedural modifications to perform the elevated temperature tests are described.

  7. Accelerator Measurements of the Askaryan effect in Rock Salt: A Roadmap Toward Teraton Underground Neutrino Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Gorham, P W; Field, R C; Guillian, E; Milincic, R; Walz, D; Williams, D

    2004-01-01

    We report on further SLAC measurements of the Askaryan effect: coherent radio emission from charge asymmetry in electromagnetic cascades. We used synthetic rock salt as the dielectric medium, with cascades produced by GeV bremsstrahlung photons at the Final Focus Test Beam. We extend our prior discovery measurements to a wider range of parameter space and explore the effect in a dielectric medium of great potential interest to large scale ultra-high energy neutrino detectors: rock salt (halite), which occurs naturally in high purity formations containing in many cases hundreds of cubic km of water-equivalent mass. We observed strong coherent pulsed radio emission over a frequency band from 0.2-15 GHz. A grid of embedded dual-polarization antennas was used to confirm the high degree of linear polarization and track the change of direction of the electric-field vector with azimuth around the shower. Coherence was observed over 4 orders of magnitude of shower energy. The frequency dependence of the radiation was...

  8. Measurements of Coherent Cherenkov Radiation in Rock Salt: Implications for GZK Neutrino Underground Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Milincic, R; Saltzberg, D; Field, R C; Guillian, G; Walz, D; Williams, D

    2005-01-01

    We report on further SLAC measurements of the Askaryan effect: coherent radio emission from charge asymmetry in electromagnetic cascades. We used synthetic rock salt as the dielectric medium, with cascades produced by GeV bremsstrahlung photons at the Final Focus Test Beam. We extend our prior discovery measurements to a wider range of parameter space and explore the effect in a dielectric medium of great potential interest to large scale ultra-high energy neutrino detectors: rock salt. We observed strong coherent pulsed radio emission over a frequency band from 0.2-15 GHz. A grid of embedded dual-polarization antennas was used to confirm the linear polarization and track the change of direction of the electric-field vector around the shower. Coherence was observed over 4 orders of magnitude of shower energy. The frequency dependence of the radiation was tested over two orders of magnitude of UHF and microwave frequencies. Based on these results we have performed a simulation of a realistic GZK neutrino teles...

  9. Natural Radioactivity Measurements and Radiation Dose Estimation in Some Sedimentary Rock Samples in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Akkurt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The natural radioactivity existed since creation of the universe due to the long life time of some radionuclides. This natural radioactivity is caused by γ-radiation originating from the uranium and thorium series and 40K. In this study, the gamma radiation has been measured to determine natural radioactivity of 238U, 232Th, and 40K in collected sedimentary rock samples in different places of Turkey. The measurements have been performed using γ-ray spectrometer containing NaI(Tl detector and multichannel analyser (MCA. Absorbed dose rate (D, annual effective dose (AED, radium equivalent activities (Raeq, external hazard index (Hex, and internal hazard index (Hin associated with the natural radionuclide were calculated to assess the radiation hazard of the natural radioactivity in the sedimentary rock samples. The average values of absorbed dose rate in air (D, annual effective dose (AED, radium equivalent activity (Raeq, external hazard index (Hex, and internal hazard index (Hin were calculated and these were 45.425 nGy/h, 0.056 mSv/y, 99.014 Bq/kg, 0.267, and 0.361, respectively.

  10. Accelerator Measurments of the Askaryan Effect in Rock Salt: A Roadmap Toward Teraton Underground Neutrino Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorham, P.

    2004-12-15

    We report on further SLAC measurements of the Askaryan effect: coherent radio emission from charge asymmetry in electromagnetic cascades. We used synthetic rock salt as the dielectric medium, with cascades produced by GeV bremsstrahlung photons at the Final Focus Test Beam. We extend our prior discovery measurements to a wider range of parameter space and explore the effect in a dielectric medium of great potential interest to large scale ultra-high energy neutrino detectors: rock salt (halite), which occurs naturally in high purity formations containing in many cases hundreds of cubic km of water-equivalent mass. We observed strong coherent pulsed radio emission over a frequency band from 0.2-15 GHz. A grid of embedded dual-polarization antennas was used to confirm the high degree of linear polarization and track the change of direction of the electric-field vector with azimuth around the shower. Coherence was observed over 4 orders of magnitude of shower energy. The frequency dependence of the radiation was tested over two orders of magnitude of UHF and microwave frequencies. We have also made the first observations of coherent transition radiation from the Askaryan charge excess, and the result agrees well with theoretical predictions. Based on these results we have performed detailed and conservative simulation of a realistic GZK neutrino telescope array within a salt-dome, and we find it capable of detecting 10 or more contained events per year from even the most conservative GZK neutrino models.

  11. Rock stress orientation measurements using induced thermal spalling in slim boreholes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakami, Eva [Geosigma AB, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2011-05-15

    In the planning and design of a future underground storage for nuclear waste based on the KBS-3 method, one of the aims is to optimize the layout of deposition tunnels such that the rock stresses on the boundaries of deposition holes are minimized. Previous experiences from heating of larger scale boreholes at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (AHRL) gave rise to the idea that induced borehole breakouts using thermal loading in smaller diameter boreholes, could be a possible way of determining the stress orientation. Two pilot experiments were performed, one at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory and one at ONKALO research site in Finland. An acoustic televiewer logger was used to measure the detailed geometrical condition of the borehole before and after heating periods. The acoustic televiewer gives a value for each 0.7 mm large pixel size around the borehole periphery. The results from the loggers are presented as images of the borehole wall, and as curves for the maximum, mean and minimum values at each depth. Any changes in the borehole wall geometry may thus be easily detected by comparisons of the logging result images. In addition, using an optical borehole televiewer a good and detailed realistic colour picture of the borehole wall is obtained. From these images the character of the spalls identified may be evaluated further. The heating was performed in a 4 m long section, using a heating cable centred in an 8 m deep vertical borehole, drilled from the floor of the tunnels. For the borehole in the Q-tunnel of AHRL the results from the loggings of the borehole before the heating revealed that breakouts existed even before this pilot test due to previous heating experiments at the site (CAPS). Quite consistent orientation and the typical shape of small breakouts were observed. After the heating the spalling increased slightly at the same locations and a new spalling location also developed at a deeper location in the borehole. At ONKALO three very small changes

  12. Measurement of the relative permittivities of rock for georadar exploration in mega-hertz band

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Ho; Chung, Seung Hwan; Cho, In Ky [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-10-31

    The relative permittivities of rocks sampled in Korea were measured in the mega-hertz frequency band to provide the basic physical property for the georadar exploration. Measurements were done by using the system of BGR (Budesanstalt fur Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe) of Germany. The measurement system is based on the principle of the resonance phenomena of simple RLC circuitry. The permittivities measured in 10-20 MHz band are presented for Cretaceous Bulguksa granite, Jurassic Daebo granite, gneiss, quartzite, limestone, shale, and Hwangsan tuff. Owing to the preparation of tested samples cut in two mutually orthogonal planes, we could measure the anisotropy. Shale and gneiss are revealed to be highly anisotropic and granite shows nearly isotropic. Measurements using various frequencies showed the dependence of permittivities on the frequency variation. The permittivities of shale and tuff changed greatly more than 40 % when frequenc= y varied from 1 to 70 MHz. Those of granite, gneiss, and limestone also showed the dependence on the frequency, but negligible within the measuring frequency band. Based on the permittivity measurements, the radar wave velocities were estimated for the georadar survey using the antenna with the central frequencies of 20 and 50 MHz. (author). 7 refs., 4 tabs., 8 figs.

  13. Self-oscillation acoustic system destined to measurement of stresses in mass rocks

    CERN Document Server

    Kwasniewski, Janusz; Dominik, Ireneusz; Dorobczynski, Lech

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents an electronic self-oscillation acoustic system (SAS) destined to measure of stresses variations in the elastic media. The system consists of piezoelectric detector, amplifier-limiter, pass-band filter, piezoelectric exciter and the frequency meter. The mass rock plays a role of delaying element, in which variations in stresses causing the variations of acoustic wave velocity of propagation, and successive variation in frequency of oscillations generated by system. The laboratory test permitted to estimate variations in frequency caused by variations in stresses of elastic medium. The principles of selection of frequency and other parameters of the electronic system in application to stresses measurement in condition of the mine were presented.

  14. Three-dimensional distortion measurements by section rocking curve imaging: Application to ice crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kluender, Rafael T.; Baruchel, Jose [ESRF, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble (France); Philip, Armelle; Meyssonnier, Jacques [LGGE, UJF-CNRS UMR 5183, 54 rue Moliere, 38402 St. Martin d' Heres (France)

    2011-11-15

    We present a new method to measure distortions in the entire crystal volume, down to a scale of 50 x 50 x 50 {mu}m{sup 3} elementary volume. The method combines rocking curve imaging (RCI), section- and pinhole diffraction topography. As results we obtain three-dimensional (3D) maps providing the integrated diffracted beam intensity and the fields of angular lattice misorientation. Angular misorientations down to 10{sup -5}-10{sup -6} have been measured. In this paper the method is applied to one of the grains of a three-grained ice polycrystal (tri-crystal). (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. Electrical conductivity of lunar surface rocks - Laboratory measurements and implications for lunar interior temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwerer, F. C.; Huffman, G. P.; Fisher, R. M.; Nagata, T.

    1974-01-01

    Results are reported for laboratory measurements of the dc and low-frequency ac electrical conductivity of three lunar rocks with ferrous iron contents of 5 to 26 wt %. The measurements were made at temperatures ranging from 20 to 1000 C, and Mossbauer spectroscopy was used to determine the dependence of electrical conductivity on furnace atmosphere. It is found that the magnitude of electrical conductivity generally increases with increasing iron content. A comparison of the data on these samples with data on terrestrial olivines and pyroxenes shows that the electrical conductivity of anhydrous silicate minerals is influenced primarily by the concentration, oxidation state, and distribution of iron, while the silicate crystal structure is only of secondary importance. Lunar interior temperatures are deduced from experimental lunar conductivity profiles, and the resulting temperature-depth profiles are found to be consistent with those calculated for two different lunar evolutionary models as well as with various experimental constraints.

  16. Measurements of I-129 in meteorites and lunar rock by tandem accelerator mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizhiizumi, K.; Arnold, J. R.; Elmore, D.; Gove, H. E.; Honda, M.

    1983-01-01

    Precise measurements of the half-life of I-129 in three different meteorites and one lunar surface rock are reported. The meteorite source of I-129 was produced by cosmic ray secondary neutron reactions on Te, while the source in lunar materials in spallation on barium and rare earth elements. The Abee, Allende, and Dhajala meteorites were examined, together with the lunar rock 14310. Details of the process used to extract the iodine are provided. The Abee and Allende samples exhibited a production of 0.5 atom/min per gm of Te from the (n,2n) reaction and 0.05 atom/min/gm for the (n,gamma) reaction. The I-129 is concluded to be a viable tool for long-lived cosmogenic nuclide studies. Further work to extend the data to include the constancy of the cosmic ray flux, the meteorite bombardment history, and the cosmic exposure age dating by means of the I-129 and Xe-129 method is indicated.

  17. Rock property measurements guide interpretation of electromagnetic, magnetic and gravity models at Mts. Adams, Baker, Rainier and St. Helens (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, C.; Bedrosian, P. A.; Horton, R.; Polster, S.

    2010-12-01

    Hydrothermally altered rocks, particularly if water saturated, can weaken volcanoes, thereby increasing the potential for catastrophic sector collapses that can lead to far-traveled, destructive debris flows. Such alteration significantly reduces the electrical resistivity, magnetization and density of volcanic rocks, resulting in a clear distinction between altered and unaltered rock in geophysical survey measurements. We measured electrical resistivity, susceptibility and density of rock samples to help constrain models of the three-dimensional distribution of water saturated, hydrothermally altered sections of several Cascade Volcanoes, Washington, critical for understanding volcanic landslide hazards. Samples ranged from fresh, massive andesite and dacite to completely altered powders composed of opal, alunite, kaolinite, and montmorillonite. The resistivity of each sample was measured over 11 frequencies ranging from 100 to 100,000 Hz for dry and wet samples. Almost all dry sample resistivities typically exceed 5000 ohm-m. Water saturation levels vary from 2 to 33 wt% in the rocks samples and surpass 50% for the powders. Fresh andesite resistivity values exceed 1500 ohm-m, even when saturated. Resistivities of saturated, moderately altered samples and an intensely altered, low-porosity (~5%) opal and alunite sample are greater than 450 ohm m. Values less than 100 ohm-m are associated with saturated (>50%), intensely altered opal + alunite powders. Magnetic susceptibilities for the fresh volcanic rocks range from 4-25 x 10-3 SI while those of altered andesites range from 0 to 0.35 x 10-3 SI. Densities for the fresh rocks range from about 2200 - 2600 kg/m3 and 1300-1900 kg/m3 for the altered rocks. The combination of the rock property measurements, geophysical data and geological mapping, indicates the presence of appreciable thicknesses (>500 m) of altered rock west of the modern summit of Mt. Rainier in the Sunset Amphitheater region and in the central core of

  18. Slab-derived adakites and subslab asthenosphere-derived OIB-type rocks at 156 ± 2 Ma from the north of Gerze, central Tibet: Records of the Bangong-Nujiang oceanic ridge subduction during the Late Jurassic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shi-Min; Zhu, Di-Cheng; Wang, Qing; Zhao, Zhidan; Zhang, Liang-Liang; Liu, Sheng-Ao; Chang, Qing-Song; Lu, Ying-Huai; Dai, Jin-Gen; Zheng, Yuan-Chuan

    2016-10-01

    This paper reports zircon U-Pb age and Hf isotope, whole-rock major and trace element, and whole-rock Sr-Nd-Hf isotope data of the dacites from Rena Tso and mafic rocks (diabases and basalts) from Duobuza, north of Gerze, central Tibet. These data reveal the presence of a distinct rock association of slab-derived adakites (154 ± 1 Ma) and subslab asthenosphere-derived OIB-type (oceanic island basalt) mafic rocks (157.6 ± 1.4 Ma). The medium-K calc-alkaline dacites (SiO2 = 66-69 wt.%) from Rena Tso are enriched in Sr (520-1083 ppm) and depleted in heavy rare earth elements (HREEs) and Y (9.8-10.8 ppm), resembling adakites. These adakitic dacites have low whole-rock initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios of 0.7043-0.7046, positive εNd(t) (+ 1.0 to + 3.4), εHf(t) (+ 6.4 to + 7.0), and zircon εHf(t) (+ 1.9 to + 7.6) values, indicating an oceanic slab origin (crust and sediment). Considering the low Mg# (32-53) and (La/Yb)N (19-23), the adakitic dacites are most likely derived from the partial melting of the subducting slab at shallow depths and the subsequent interaction with peridotite in a thin mantle wedge during magma ascent. The diabases and basalts (SiO2 = 49-53 wt.%) from Duobuza show an alkali signature with enrichment of high field strength elements (HFSEs) (e.g., Zr = 213-285 ppm) and exhibit positive Nb-Ta-Ti anomalies that are geochemically comparable to those of OIB. These samples show positive whole-rock εNd(t) values of + 3.3 to + 3.7, εHf(t) values of + 4.7 to + 5.7, and negative to positive zircon εHf(t) values of - 1.5 to + 5.2. These OIB-type mafic samples are interpreted as the products of low-degree decompression melting of the upwelling subslab asthenosphere with a minor contribution from the sub-continental lithospheric mantle (SCLM). Our new data indicate the presence of a distinct rock association of coeval slab-derived adakites and subslab asthenosphere-derived OIB-type rocks. Such an association along with the normal arc rocks further to the north

  19. Critical study of the method of calculating virgin rock stresses from measurement results of the CSIR triaxial strain cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vreede, F. A.

    1981-05-01

    The manual of instructions for the user of the CSIR triaxial rock stress measuring equipment is critically examined. It is shown that the values of the rock stresses can be obtained from the strain gauge records by means of explicit formulae, which makes the manual's computer program obsolete. Furthermore statistical methods are proposed to check for faulty data and inhomogeneity in rock properties and virgin stress. The possibility of non-elastic behavior of the rock during the test is also checked. A new computer program based on the explicit functions and including the check calculations is presented. It is much more efficient than the one in the manual since it does not require computer sub-routines, allowing it to be used directly on any modern computer. The output of the new program is in a format suitable for direct inclusion in the report of an investigation using strain cell results.

  20. Preliminary study on soil to rock spectral ratio method of microtremor measurement in Taipei Basin, Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jyun Yan; Wen, Kuo Liang; Te Chen, Chun; Chang, Shun Chiang

    2014-05-01

    Taipei city is the capital of Taiwan which located in Taipei basin and covered with hundreds meter of alluvial layer that might cause serious damage during huge earthquake. Prediction of possible strong motion levels occurred in the basin then became popular. Engineers most like to use Ground Motion Prediction Equation (GMPEs) as common tool for seismic hazard calculation but GMPEs were usually debated that it can only give one prediction value (PGA, PGV, Sa etc.) rather than time history or spectrum. Seismologists tried theoretical simulation (1D, 2D, 3D method) but could only give low frequency (usually less than 1 Hz) results restricted to that the shallow structures were not clear enough. Resent years, wide frequency simulation techniques such as empirical green's function added stochastic simulation method (hybrid method) were applied to several different purposes but site effect still plays an important role that need to be considered. Traditionally soil to rock spectral ratio of shear wave (denoted as S/R) was widely applied to check basin effect for decades but the technique needs lots of permanent stations and several years to get enough records. If some site located within strong motion network but not close enough to the strong motion stations, interpolate or extrapolate results needed to be used. Wen and Huang (2012) conducted a dense microtremor measurement network in whole Taiwan and applied microtremor H/V to discuss dominant frequency with traditional transfer functions from earthquake shear wave and found good agreement between them. Furthermore, in this study, the ability of soil to rock spectral ratio of microtremor (denoted as MS/R) measurement was tested in Taipei basin. The preliminary results showed MS/R had good agreement with S/R between 0.2 to 5 Hz. And distance from soil site to reference rock site should no greater than 8 to 10 km base on degree of spectrum difference (DSPD) calculation. If the MS/R works that site effect study from this

  1. Measurements of electrical impedance and elastic wave velocity of reservoir rock under fluid-flow test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawayama, Kazuki; Kitamura, Keigo; Fujimitsu, Yasuhiro

    2017-04-01

    The estimation of water saturation under the ground is essential in geothermal fields, particularly for EGS (enhanced geothermal system). To estimate water saturation, recently, electromagnetic exploration using Magnetotelluric (MT) method has been applied in the geothermal fields. However, the relationship between electrical impedance obtained from this method and water saturation in the reservoir rock has not been well known. Our goal is to elucidate this basic relationship by fluid-flow experiments. As our first step to this goal, we developed the technique to measure and analyze the electrical impedance of the cracked rock in the geothermal reservoir. The fluid-flow test has been conducted as following procedures. At first, reservoir rock sample (pyroxene andesite, Makizono lava formation, Japan) was filled with nitrogen gas (Pp = 10 MPa) under 20 MPa of confining pressure. This nitrogen gas imitates the overheated steam in the geothermal fields. Then, brine (1wt.%-KCl, 1.75 S/m) which imitates the artificial recharge to the reservoir was injected to the samples. After flow rate of drainage fluid becomes stable, injection pressure was increased (11, 12, 14, 16, 18 MPa) and decreased (18, 16, 14, 12, 11 MPa) to vary the water saturation in the samples. During the test, water saturation, permeability, electrical impedance (10-2-105 Hz of frequency) and elastic wave velocity were measured. As a result of andesite, electrical impedance dramatically decreased from 105 to 103 Ω and P-wave velocity increased by 2% due to the brine injection. This remarkable change of the electrical impedance could be due to the replacement of pre-filled nitrogen gas to the brine. After the brine injection, electrical impedance decreased with injection pressure (small change of water saturation) by up to 40% while P-wave velocity was almost constant (less than 1%). This decrease of electrical impedance with injection pressure could be related to the flow to the narrow path (microcrack

  2. Equivalent elastic compliance tensor for rock mass with multiple persistent joint sets:Exact derivation via modified crack tensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔洁; 江权; 冯夏庭; 李邵军; 高红; 李帅军

    2016-01-01

    Discontinuities constitute an integral part of rock mass and inherently affect its anisotropic deformation behavior. This work focuses on the equivalent elastic deformation of rock mass with multiple persistent joint sets. A new method based on the space geometric and mechanical properties of the modified crack tensor is proposed, providing an analytical solution for the equivalent elastic compliance tensor of rock mass. A series of experiments validate the capability of the compliance tensor to accurately represent the deformation of rock mass with multiple persistent joint sets, based on conditions set by the basic hypothesis. The spatially varying rules of the equivalent elastic parameters of rock mass with a single joint set are analyzed to reveal the universal law of the stratified rock mass.

  3. Failure mechanism and supporting measures for large deformation of Tertiary deep soft rock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Zhibiao; Wang Jiong; Zhang Yuelin

    2015-01-01

    The Shenbei mining area in China contains typical soft rock from the Tertiary Period. As mining depths increase, deep soft rock roadways are damaged by large deformations and constantly need to be repaired to meet safety requirements, which is a great security risk. In this study, the characteristics of deformation and failure of typical roadway were analyzed, and the fundamental reason for the roadway deformation was that traditional support methods and materials cannot control the large deformation of deep soft rock. Deep soft rock support technology was developed based on constant resistance energy absorption using constant resistance large deformation bolts. The correlative deformation mechanisms of surrounding rock and bolt were analyzed to understand the principle of constant resistance energy absorption. The new technology works well on-site and provides a new method for the excavation of roadways in Tertiary deep soft rock.

  4. Nd-isotopes in selected mantle-derived rocks and minerals and their implications for mantle evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, A.R.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1980-01-01

    The Sm-Nd systematics in a variety of mantle-derived samples including kimberlites, alnoite, carbonatite, pyroxene and amphibole inclusions in alkali basalts and xenolithic eclogites, granulites and a pyroxene megacryst in kimberlites are reported. The additional data on kimberlites strengthen our earlier conclusion that kimberlites are derived from a relatively undifferentiated chondritic mantle source. This conclusion is based on the observation that the e{open}Nd values of most of the kimberlites are near zero. In contrast with the kimberlites, their garnet lherzolite inclusions show both time-averaged Nd enrichment and depletion with respect to Sm. Separated clinopyroxenes in eclogite xenoliths from the Roberts Victor kimberlite pipe show both positive and negative e{open}Nd values suggesting different genetic history. A whole rock lower crustal scapolite granulite xenolith from the Matsoku kimberlite pipe shows a negative e{open}Nd value of -4.2, possibly representative of the base of the crust in Lesotho. It appears that all inclusions, mafic and ultramafic, in kimberlites are unrelated to their kimberlite host. The above data and additional Sm-Nd data on xenoliths in alkali basalts, alpine peridotite and alnoite-carbonatites are used to construct a model for the upper 200 km of the earth's mantle - both oceanic and continental. The essential feature of this model is the increasing degree of fertility of the mantle with depth. The kimberlite's source at depths below 200 km in the subcontinental mantle is the most primitive in this model, and this primitive layer is also extended to the suboceanic mantle. However, it is clear from the Nd-isotopic data in the xenoliths of the continental kimberlites that above 200 km the continental mantle is distinctly different from their suboceanic counterpart. ?? 1980 Springer-Verlag.

  5. Laboratory measurements of the relative permeability of cataclastic fault rocks: An important consideration for production simulation modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Hinai, Suleiman; Fisher, Quentin J. [School of Earth and Environment, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Al-Busafi, Bader [Petroleum Development of Oman, MAF, Sultanate of Oman, Muscat (Oman); Guise, Phillip; Grattoni, Carlos A. [Rock Deformation Research Limited, School of Earth and Environment, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

    2008-06-15

    It is becoming increasingly common practice to model the impact of faults on fluid flow within petroleum reservoirs by applying transmissibility multipliers, calculated from the single-phase permeability of fault rocks, to the grid-blocks adjacent to faults in production simulations. The multi-phase flow properties (e.g. relative permeability and capillary pressure) of fault rocks are not considered because special core analysis has never previously been conducted on fault rock samples. Here, we partially fill this knowledge gap by presenting data from the first experiments that have measured the gas relative permeability (k{sub rg}) of cataclastic fault rocks. The cataclastic faults were collected from an outcrop of Permo-Triassic sandstone in the Moray Firth, Scotland; the fault rocks are similar to those found within Rotliegend gas reservoirs in the UK southern North Sea. The relative permeability measurements were made using a gas pulse-decay technique on samples whose water saturation was varied using vapour chambers. The measurements indicate that if the same fault rocks were present in gas reservoirs from the southern Permian Basin they would have k{sub rg} values of <0.02. Failure to take into account relative permeability effects could therefore lead to an overestimation of the transmissibility of faults within gas reservoirs by several orders of magnitude. Incorporation of these new results into a simplified production simulation model can explain the pressure evolution from a compartmentalised Rotliegend gas reservoir from the southern North Sea, offshore Netherlands, which could not easily be explained using only single-phase permeability data from fault rocks. (author)

  6. Porosities and permeability of Paleozoic sandstones derived from Nuclear Magnetic Resonance measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorand, Rachel; Koch, Andreas; Mohnke, Oliver; Klitzsch, Norbert; Clauser, Christoph

    2010-05-01

    A major obstacle for an increased use of geothermal energy often lies in the high success risk for the development of geothermal reservoirs due to the unknown rock properties. In general, the ranges of porosity and permeability in existing compilations of rock properties are too large to be useful to constrain properties for specific sites. Usually, conservative assumptions are made about these properties, resulting in greater drilling depth and increased exploration cost. In this study, data from direct measurements on thirty-three sandstones from different borehole locations and depths enable to derive statistical values of the desired hydraulic properties for selected sandstones in the German subsurface. We used Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) measurements to estimate the porosity and the permeability of sandstones from North Rhine-Westphalia (Germany). Besides NMR standard poro-perm-measurements were performed on the samples to obtain independent data sets for comparison. Porosity was measured by Archimedes principle and pore-size distribution by mercury injection. Also permeability was determined by gas flow measurements taking into account the Klinkenberg effect. The porosities of the studied samples vary between 0 % and 16 %. NMR yields suitable porosity results whereas the porosities obtain by T1 relaxation measurements fit better to the Archimedes porosities than the porosities obtained by T2 relaxation measurements. For porosities up to 10 %, T2 relaxation measurements overestimate the porosity. Furthermore, we calculate the effective porosity using a cutoff time of 3 ms. This effective porosity agrees much better with Archimedes porosities, particularly for the low porosity samples. The gas permeability of studied sandstones varies between 10-21 m2 and 2.10-17 m2. A large number of empirical relationships between relaxation times and gas permeability have been published. We have applied several of these relationships to select the appropriate law for

  7. Deep-derived enclaves (belonging to middle-lower crust metamorphic rocks) in the Liuhe-Xiangduo area,eastern Tibet: Evidence from petrogeochemistry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Qirong; LI Dewei; ZHENG Jianping; WANG Jianghai

    2006-01-01

    Petrological and geochemical studies of deep-derived enclaves from the Liuhe-Xiangduo area, eastern Tibet, showed that the enclaves involve five types of rocks, i. e. , garnet diopsidite, garnet amphibolite, garnet hornblendite, amphibolite and hornblendite, whose main mineral assemblages are Grt+Di + Hbl, Grt+ Pl + Hbl + Di, Grt + Hbl + Pl, Pl + Hbl, and Hbl + Bt, respectively. The enclaves exhibit typical crystalloblastic texture, and growth zones are well developed in garnet (Grt) in the enclaves. In view of major element geochemistry, the deep-derived enclaves are characterized by high MgO and FeO * ,ranging from 12.00% to 12.30% and 8.15% to 10.94%, respectively. The protolith restoration of metamorphic rocks revealed that the enclaves belong to ortho-metamorphic rocks. The REE abundances vary over a wide range, and ∑ REE ranges from 53.39 to 129.04 μg/g. The REE patterns slightly incline toward the HREE side with weak LREE enrichment. The contents of Rb, Sr, and Ba range from 8.34 to 101μg/g, 165 to 1485 μg/g, and 105 to 721 μg/g, respectively. The primitive mantle-normalized spider diagrams of trace elements show obvious negative Nb, Ta, Zr and Hf anomalies. Sr-Nd isotopic compositions of the enclaves indicated that the potential source of deep-derived enclaves is similar to the depletedmantle, and their (87Sr/86Sr) i ratios vary from 0.706314 to 0.707198, (147Nd/144Nd)i ratios from 0.512947 to 0.513046, and εNd(T) values from + 7.0 to +9.0, respectively. The potential source of the enclaves is obviously different from the EM2-type mantle from which high-K igneous rocks stemmed(the host rocks), i.e. , there is no direct genetic relationship between the enclaves and the host rocks.Deep-derived enclaves in the host rocks belong to mafic xenoliths, and those in the Liuhe-Xiangduo area,eastern Tibet, are some middle-lower crust ortho-metamorphic rocks which were accidentally captured at20-50 km level by rapidly entrained high-temperature high-K magma

  8. Measuring crustal convergence using rock exhumation along the complex glaciated Chugach Mountains, southeast Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spotila, J. A.; Buscher, J.

    2002-12-01

    Rates of rock uplift often constrain magnitudes of convergent plate motion in collisional settings. In complex orogenic belts, however, these rates can be difficult to measure. In southeast Alaska, a rapidly-evolving mountain system is centered at a syntaxial bend in the Pacific-North American plate boundary. Rugged topography of the Chugach Mountains stretches for more than 500 km along the hanging wall of the Aleutian Trench, above a colliding microplate, and as coast ranges along the Queen Charlotte-Fairweather transform fault. At each segment of the plate boundary, crustal convergence within North America should vary according to the obliquity of plate motion and the degree of underthrusting. Geodetic and neotectonic studies of rapidly-eroding structures have yet to define rates of horizontal plate motion partitioning. Surface uplift studies, based on short term geodesy or Holocene motion of coastal landforms, are also complicated by megathrust elastic strain accumulation cycles and the viscoelastic response to recent glacial ice thinning. It is thus important to measure exhumation and the erosional transfer of mass as a proxy for the degree of upper crustal convergence accommodated by rock uplift. We have attempted to determine exhumation pattern where the highly-deformed, oceanic and continental rocks of the Yakutat microplate collide with North America. Although the total shortening rate between this microplate and North America is of the order ~3-5 cm/yr, an unconstrained magnitude of shortening is absorbed by imbricate thrust faults within it, the suture between it and North America, and within the previously accreted terranes that form the edge of the continent. We have constrained rock cooling histories as a proxy for exhumation on samples along a dense grid that spans major structural elements, including the Pamplona and Chugach-St. Elias fault systems. Apatite and zircon radiogenic helium ages provide a range in temperature sensitivity that can be used

  9. Peano on derivative of measures, strict derivative of distributive set functions

    CERN Document Server

    Greco, Gabriele H; Pagani, Enrico M

    2010-01-01

    By retracing research on coexistent magnitudes (grandeurs coexistantes) by Cauchy (1841), Peano in "Applicazioni geometriche del calcolo infinitesimale" (1887) defines the "density" (strict derivative) of a "mass" (a distributive set function) with respect to a "volume" (a positive distributive set function), proves its continuity (whenever the strict derivative exists) and shows the validity of the mass-density paradigm: "mass" is recovered from "density" by integration with respect to "volume". It is remarkable that Peano's strict derivative provides a consistent mathematical ground to the concept of "infinitesimal ratio" between two magnitudes, successfully used since Kepler. In this way the classical (i.e., pre-Lebesgue) measure theory reaches a complete and definitive form in Peano's Applicazioni geometriche. A primary aim of the present paper is a detailed exposition of Peano's work of 1887 leading to the concept of strict derivative of distributive set functions and their use. Moreover, we compare Pean...

  10. Measurements of the Suitability of Large Rock Salt Formations for Radio Detection of High Energy Neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Gorham, P W; Odian, A; Williams, D; Besson, D; Frichter, G; Tantawi, S G; Gorham, Peter; Saltzberg, David; Odian, Allen; Williams, Dawn; Besson, David; Frichter, George; Tantawi, Sami

    2002-01-01

    We have investigated the possibility that large rock salt formations might be suitable as target masses for detection of neutrinos of energies about 10 PeV and above. In neutrino interactions at these energies, the secondary electromagnetic cascade produces a coherent radio pulse well above ambient thermal noise via the Askaryan effect. We describe measurements of radio-frequency attenuation lengths and ambient thermal noise in two salt formations. Measurements in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), located in an evaporite salt bed in Carlsbad, NM yielded short attenuation lengths, 3-7 m over 150-300 MHz. However, measurements at United Salt's Hockley mine, located in a salt dome near Houston, Texas yielded attenuation lengths in excess of 250 m at similar frequencies. We have also analyzed early ground-penetrating radar data at Hockley mine and have found additional evidence for attenuation lengths in excess of several hundred meters at 440 MHz. We conclude that salt domes, which may individually contain...

  11. Measurement of dynamic magnetization induced by a pulsed field: Proposal for a new rock magnetism method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Kazuto

    2015-02-01

    This study proposes a new method for measuring transient magnetization of natural samples induced by a pulsed field with duration of 11 ms using a pulse magnetizer. An experimental system was constructed, consisting of a pair of differential sensing coils connected with a high-speed digital oscilloscope for data acquisition. The data were transferred to a computer to obtain an initial magnetization curve and a descending branch of a hysteresis loop in a rapidly changing positive field. This system was tested with synthetic samples (permalloy ribbon, aluminum plate, and nickel powder) as well as two volcanic rock samples. Results from the synthetic samples showed considerable differences from those measured by a quasi-static method using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). These differences were principally due to the time-dependent magnetic properties or to electromagnetic effects, such as magnetic viscosity, eddy current loss, or magnetic relaxation. Results from the natural samples showed that the transient magnetization-field curves were largely comparable to the corresponding portions of the hysteresis loops. However, the relative magnetization (scaled to the saturation magnetization) at the end of a pulse was greater than that measured by a VSM. This discrepancy, together with the occurrence of rapid exponential decay after a pulse, indicates magnetic relaxations that could be interpreted in terms of domain wall displacement. These results suggest that with further developments, the proposed technique can become a useful tool for characterizing magnetic particles contained in a variety of natural materials.

  12. Measurement of dynamic magnetization induced by a pulsed field: Proposal for a new rock magnetism method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuto eKodama

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes a new method for measuring transient magnetization of natural samples induced by a pulsed field with duration of 11 ms using a pulse magnetizer. An experimental system was constructed, consisting of a pair of differential sensing coils connected with a high-speed digital oscilloscope for data acquisition. The data were transferred to a computer to obtain an initial magnetization curve and a descending branch of a hysteresis loop in a rapidly changing positive field. This system was tested with synthetic samples (permalloy ribbon, aluminum plate, and nickel powder as well as two volcanic rock samples. Results from the synthetic samples showed considerable differences from those measured by a quasi-static method using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM. These differences were principally due to the time-dependent magnetic properties or to electromagnetic effects, such as magnetic viscosity, eddy current loss, or magnetic relaxation. Results from the natural samples showed that the transient magnetization–field curves were largely comparable to the corresponding portions of the hysteresis loops. However, the relative magnetization (scaled to the saturation magnetization at the end of a pulse was greater than that measured by a VSM. This discrepancy, together with the occurrence of rapid exponential decay after a pulse, indicates magnetic relaxations that could be interpreted in terms of domain wall displacement. These results suggest that with further developments, the proposed technique can become a useful tool for characterizing magnetic particles contained in a variety of natural materials.

  13. Investigations of safety measures against rock bursts in Stara Jama of the brown coal mine 'Zenica'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osmanagic, M.; Kocar, F.; Petkovic, L.; Teskeredzic, S.

    1979-01-01

    This paper provides a detailed historical review, with charts, illustrations and formulae used, of the cause, effect, research done, and safety measures taken concerning rock bursts in the Stara Jama seam of the Zenica brown coal mine in Yugoslavia. The geological conditions of the seam, with high calorific value and strength lying in very hard and elastic limestone and limestone marls, are reviewed. From 1962 onward, systematic recording and classification of rock burst frequency, size, intensity, and location have been carried out. Some observations are: regular mining of the relaxed overlaying seam without leaving pillars proved effective relative to reducing rock burst danger; rate of advance considerably affects the number and intensity of rock bursts; breaking of the basic hanging wall is an important factor; coal pillars between two goafs is dangerous for mining. Partial success has been achieved in forecasting and artificially provoking rock bursts. Stress relaxation by blasting has proved to be the most effective measure. Advances have also been made in reducing stored energy by water injection under high pressure. (14 refs.) (In English)

  14. Gamma-ray measurements of natural radioactivity in sedimentary rocks from Egypt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure concentrations and distributions of natural radionuclides occurring mentary rock samples from Eastern Desert (Um El-Huetat), Nile Valley (Gebel Owina) and from southwest Sinai (Wadi Ghweiba) were measured using a high-purity germanium detector. The samples under investigation (clay, shale and sandstone) were used as raw materials in the construction industry (bricks, ceramics, cement, fillers, etc.). Though the sediments of Egypt have already been investigated in the geological and mineralogical aspects, it is necessary to investigate the natural radioactivity in order to complete their classification. The average concentration values of 226Ra, 232Th, 40K in the surveyed samples were 47 ± 7,21± 5, 393±19 Bq.kg-1 (clay); 23 ± 5, 30 ± 6, 563 ± 24 Bq.kg-1(shale); and 17 ± 4, 14 ± 4, 299 ± 17 Bq.kg-1 (sandstone), respectively. All sediment samples have radium equivalent natural radionuclides present in the samples have been computed and compared with the global averages. In terms of the radiation safety, the natural radioactivity of the sediment in Egypt is below the recommended limits of the gamma dose rate. Therefore, they can be used for all kinds of public buildings.

  15. Reservoir condition special core analyses and relative permeability measurements on Almond formation and Fontainebleu sandstone rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maloney, D.

    1993-11-01

    This report describes the results from special core analyses and relative permeability measurements conducted on Almond formation and Fontainebleu sandstone plugs. Almond formation plug tests were performed to evaluate multiphase, steady-state,reservoir-condition relative permeability measurement techniques and to examine the effect of temperature on relative permeability characteristics. Some conclusions from this project are as follows: An increase in temperature appeared to cause an increase in brine relative permeability results for an Almond formation plug compared to room temperature results. The plug was tested using steady-state oil/brine methods. The oil was a low-viscosity, isoparaffinic refined oil. Fontainebleu sandstone rock and fluid flow characteristics were measured and are reported. Most of the relative permeability versus saturation results could be represented by one of two trends -- either a k{sub rx} versus S{sub x} or k{sub rx} versus Sy trend where x and y are fluid phases (gas, oil, or brine). An oil/surfactant-brine steady-state relative permeability test was performed to examine changes in oil/brine relative permeability characteristics from changes in fluid IFTS. It appeared that, while low interfacial tension increased the aqueous phase relative permeability, it had no effect on the oil relative permeability. The BOAST simulator was modified for coreflood simulation. The simulator was useful for examining effects of variations in relative permeability and capillary pressure functions. Coreflood production monitoring and separator interface level measurement techniques were developed using X-ray absorption, weight methods, and RF admittance technologies. The three types of separators should be useful for routine and specialized core analysis applications.

  16. Measuring a Measure: Absolute Time as a Factor for Determining Bar Lengths and Meter in Pop/Rock Music

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Trevor de Clercq

    2016-01-01

      The prevailing approach to bar lengths in pop/rock music uses the standard rock drum beat as a model, whereby the kick is assigned to beats 1 and 3 and the snare to beats 2 and 4 in a bar of 4 4 meter...

  17. Measuring dynamic fracture toughness of cement rock using a short rod specimen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    As Daqing Oilfield is developing oil layer with a big potential,the requirement for the quality of well cementation is higher than ever before.Cement rock is a brittle material containing a great number of microcracks and defects.In order to reduce the damage to cement ring and improve sealed cementing property at the interface,it is necessary to conduct research on the modification of the cement rock available.According to the principle of super mixed composite materials,various fillers are added to the ingredients of cement rock.Dynamic fracture toughness of cement rock will be changed under the influence of filler.In this paper,short rod specimens of cement rock are employed in the experiments to investigate the dynamic fracture toughness of cement rocks with different ingredients using split Hopkinson Pressure Bar,and partial experimental results are given.The results indicate that fiber reinforcement is an effective way to improve the impact resistance of cement rock.

  18. Power measures derived from the sequential query process

    CERN Document Server

    Pritchard, Geoffrey; Wilson, Mark C

    2012-01-01

    We study a basic sequential model for the discovery of winning coalitions in a simple game, well known from its use in defining the Shapley-Shubik power index. We derive in a uniform way a family of measures of collective and individual power in simple games, and show that, as for the Shapley-Shubik index, they extend naturally to measures for TU-games. In particular, the individual measures include all weighted semivalues. We single out the simplest measure in our family for more investigation, as it is new to the literature as far as we know. Although it is very different from the Shapley value, it is closely related in several ways, and is the natural analogue of the Shapley value under a nonstandard, but natural, definition of simple game. We illustrate this new measure by calculating its values on some standard examples.

  19. The density of the rock covering Gran Sasso Laboratories in Central Apennines, Italy by underground gravity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capuano, P.; De Luca, G.; Di Sena, F.; Gasparini, P.; Scarpa, R.

    1998-05-01

    Various nuclear physics experiments are being carried out in the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Laboratories that have been excavated in the Gran Sasso Massif in the Italian Apennines. These experiments make use of the shield effect provided by a 1400-m-thick rock cover that absorb cosmic rays. It is important to know the real density of the rock cover and the extent of its lateral variation. The density of different sections of the rock cover was determined using the correlation between measured underground gravity data and thickness of the rock cover. Observed gravity was corrected using a 3D model, for the mass deficiency covered by excavation of highway tunnels and the cavities that house the laboratories. The average density of the rock cover was found to be 2720±50 kg m -3. Lateral variations are contained within the uncertainty for most of the sections, except for two sections where densities are lowered by as much as 11% because of the presence of a shallow layer formed by loose Quaternary sediments.

  20. Measuring the dynamic compression and release behavior of rocks associated with HYDROPLUS (Part 2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furnish, M.D.

    1995-07-01

    Three sets of rock samples have been subjected to planar impact to characterize loading, Hugoniot and release responses. A slate form Pennsylvania was tested over the stress range of 5 GPa to 140 GPa. Phyllite from the Lupin Mine (Canada) was tested over the 14--50 GPa stress region. Finally, granite samples from the SHIST test site (New Mexico) were tested over the 10--20 GPa stress region. The granite tests included a transmitted-wave experiment at about 10 GPa. In 12 of the 13 tests, a reverse-ballistic configuration (optimized for Hugoniot and release measurements) was used. The remaining test (conducted on the granite) provided a transmitted waveform from which precursor, Hugoniot and release properties were obtained. Velocity interferometry (VISAR) was used as the primary diagnostic throughout. The slate data showed an unexpected inflection downward in the Hugoniot at around 8 GPa. The slate and granite showed release paths lying below the Hugoniot for lower stress levels (below {approx} 60 GPa), while the slate release paths were ``normal`` (above the Hugoniot) at higher stress levels. In addition, the granite releases were found to lie substantially below the Hugoniot in the 30--40 GPa region; this may be related to the quartz-stishovite transition. The present results are generally consistent with earlier work.

  1. A comparison of experimental methods for measuring water permeability of porous building rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galvan, S.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper compares different experimental methods for measuring water permeability in 17 different porous building rocks. Both commercial apparatus and specially made designed permeameters are used for characterising intrinsic permeability and hydraulic conductivity, k, of rocks in the range of 10−12 to 10−4 m/s (~ 10−19−10−11 m2 or ~ 10−4−104 mD. We use both falling head and constant head permeameter methods including the triaxial and modified triaxial tests and a classical constant head permeameter. Results showed that for very low and low permeability samples (k−6 m/s, triaxial conditions were found the most accurate procedures and they provided similar or slightly lower permeability values than constant and falling head methods. The latter techniques were highly recommended for permeable and high permeable porous building materials. Water permeability values were also linked to effective porosity and interpreted in terms of interparticle and vugs porosity. Finally, some modifications in the apparatus and procedures were carried out in order to assess water permeability in soft materials, which involve the use of non-saturated samples.Se comparan diferentes métodos experimentales para la medida de la permeabilidad al agua en rocas porosas usadas como material de construcción. Se usaron diferentes permeabilímetros, (comerciales y desarrollados específicamente empleando los métodos triaxial, triaxial modificado, carga constante y carga variable. Se caracterizó la permeabilidad intrínseca y conductividad hidráulica, k, con valores que var.an desde 10−12 a 10−4 m/s (~ 10−19−10−11 m2 or ~ 10−4−104 mD. Para muestras poco y muy poco permeables el ensayo con célula triaxial fue el mas reproducible. Los ensayos de carga constante son muy recomendables para rocas porosas de construcción permeables y muy permeables. Además, se definen los parámetros experimentales más apropiados para caracterizar la

  2. MINING INDUCED INFLUENCE ON THE ROADWAYS IN WEAK SURROUNDING ROCK AND ITS CONTROLLING MEASURES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆士良; 王悦汉

    1991-01-01

    The application of destressing method can change the distribution patterns of the stress field in the weak rock surrounding openings, locate the openings in the zone of low stress level, thus improve their loading and maintaining conditions. Such method is considered as a new way of opening maintenance in weak rock and has caused extensive interests in mining industry both at home and abroad. The results of theoretic research and lab experiments of utilizing topdestresslng trough to maintain the opening affected by mining activities in weak rock, as well as its practical application in a coal mine are introduced in this paper. The research results indicate that the deformation and floor heaving of the opening in weak rock can be effectively controlled, and long-term stability of the opening can be realized by applying destressing method as long as the destressing plan and concerned parameters are carefully determined.

  3. Temporal distribution of mantle-derived potassic rocks and carbonatites linked to stabilization of mantle lithosphere and redox states during subduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, S. F.

    2014-12-01

    Mantle-derived potassic igneous rocks and carbonatites first appear in the geological record in the late Archean, coinciding with major crust-forming events on most continents. The compositions of potassic rocks require sources including discrete ultramafic rocks with phlogopite and pyroxenes, whereas carbonatites and ultramafic lamprophyres (carbonate-rich potassic rocks) require oxidizing conditions in which carbonate is stable. The presence of these source rocks from this time is probably related to the stabilization of mantle lithosphere. If mantle lithosphere had not been stable for considerable periods of time, then melting would be restricted to peridotite, which is not a viable option for strongly potassic rocks. The phlogopite-rich source-rock assemblages that are necessary precursors for potassic melts could be introduced into the lithosphere by either subduction processes or by multiple stages of low-degree melting. Many modern examples involve subducted sedimentary material, which concentrates potassium by the stabilization of micas in subduction metamorphism. Subduction involves a great variety of redox states, but the bulk effect is the return of oxidized material from the surface into the mantle. However, we cannot apply uniformitarianism unthinkingly, because subduction processes at and before 2.7 Ga may have had different redox states. Before the Great Oxidation Event the distribution and abundances of geological formations such as banded iron formations, red beds, and uraninites indicate that geological reservoirs became gradually oxidized, preventing an earlier increase in atmospheric oxygen. This means that the function of the subduction process to oxidize the upper mantle by the return of oxidized rocks from the surface was much weaker in the early Earth. Early continental mantle lithosphere was, therefore, likely to accumulate carbon in reduced form, which would be more easily remobilized in melts through low-temperature redox melting much

  4. Measurement of the stress field of a tunnel through its rock EMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Liming; Wang, Enyuan; Song, Dazhao; Liu, Zhentang; Shen, Rongxi; Lv, Ganggang; Xu, Zhaoyong

    2017-08-01

    In order to quantitatively study the relationship between the disturbance stress of coal mine roadways and the electromagnetic radiation (EMR) of rocks, and further evaluate their internal stress distributions, we first examined the characteristics of EMR signals emitted from rock mass under uniaxial compression, analyzed the relationship between the stress inside the rock mass and its emitted EMR intensity, and put forward a new disturbance stress testing method by monitoring the EMR from the rock mass to retrieve its surrounding stress field. Then, we applied the method to monitor EMR intensity from the no.11803 rock roadway of the Nuodong coal mine, China, and inversely retrieved its stress field. Lastly, we analyzed the causes of local stress anomalies in the Nuodong area by testing the EMR intensity of its nearby areas, and we examined the geology of the whole region. The results showed that: (1) in the rock roadway and the surrounding area of the Nuodong coal mine, the disturbance stress was in the range of 4.8 ∼ 9.1 MPa, the angle between the direction of the stress field and the horizontal plane of the roadway was 35 ± 2.5°, the lateral pressure coefficient was 1.30 ∼ 1.57 (2) the Laoguishan and Yulong anticlines in the vicinity of the Nuodong coal mine caused great horizontal tectonic stress in the region, and the existence of the auxiliary roadway and F12 normal fault resulted in the formation of two high stress zones in the no.11803 rock roadway. Overall, monitoring the EMR from rock mass could ascertain the state, direction, size and distribution of disturbance stress in a roadway and further obtain the distribution of the stress field of an underground structure.

  5. Spectral derivative analysis of solar spectroradiometric measurements: Theoretical basis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansell, R. A.; Tsay, S.-C.; Pantina, P.; Lewis, J. R.; Ji, Q.; Herman, J. R.

    2014-07-01

    Spectral derivative analysis, a commonly used tool in analytical spectroscopy, is described for studying cirrus clouds and aerosols using hyperspectral, remote sensing data. The methodology employs spectral measurements from the 2006 Biomass-burning Aerosols in Southeast Asia field study to demonstrate the approach. Spectral peaks associated with the first two derivatives of measured/modeled transmitted spectral fluxes are examined in terms of their shapes, magnitudes, and positions from 350 to 750 nm, where variability is largest. Differences in spectral features between media are mainly associated with particle size and imaginary term of the complex refractive index. Differences in derivative spectra permit cirrus to be conservatively detected at optical depths near the optical thin limit of ~0.03 and yield valuable insight into the composition and hygroscopic nature of aerosols. Biomass-burning smoke aerosols/cirrus generally exhibit positive/negative slopes, respectively, across the 500-700 nm spectral band. The effect of cirrus in combined media is to increase/decrease the slope as cloud optical thickness decreases/increases. For thick cirrus, the slope tends to 0. An algorithm is also presented which employs a two model fit of derivative spectra for determining relative contributions of aerosols/clouds to measured data, thus enabling the optical thickness of the media to be partitioned. For the cases examined, aerosols/clouds explain ~83%/17% of the spectral signatures, respectively, yielding a mean cirrus cloud optical thickness of 0.08 ± 0.03, which compared reasonably well with those retrieved from a collocated Micropulse Lidar Network Instrument (0.09 ± 0.04). This method permits extracting the maximum informational content from hyperspectral data for atmospheric remote sensing applications.

  6. Identifying unstable rock blocks by measuring micro-tremors and vibration on cliffs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, H.; Fujisawa, K.; Asai, K.

    2008-01-01

    It is important to identify unstable rock blocks and take countermeasures to prevent sudden rock fall disasters. However, identifying such blocks visually is extremely difficult, so an identification method using peculiar features of unstable blocks must be developed. The method reported here uses a vibrometer, which is inexpensive and easy to operate. In order to assess the feasibility of the method, a field experiment was carried out on rock cliffs in three regions of Japan where unstable blocks are likely to exist. Vibrometers were set up on the cliffs to capture two types of vibration waves in three dimensions, i.e., micro-tremor and reactive vibration. The former type naturally exists all the time, while the latter is generated only by applying stimulation waves. At least one of the vibrometers was installed on stable baserock to compare the results with the wave patterns of unstable rock blocks. In addition to conventional items (amplitude, frequency spectrum, vibration particle trace), trace accumulation length, that is the accumulation of the trace length of a vibrating particle for ten seconds, was introduced to analyze the patterns for both types of wave. As a result, unstable rock blocks were found to generate higher amplitudes of vibration waves than stable rock blocks, and different patterns of frequency spectrum, direction of vibration particle trace, and trace accumulation length. Hence, vibrators were shown to be useful for identifying unstable rock blocks. In particular, by using trace accumulation length as an indicator, the stability of a block can be evaluated without generating stimulative waves, providing a direction for developing a cost-effective simple method for identifying unstable blocks in future.

  7. Tight Reservoir Properties Derived by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Mercury Porosimetry and Computed Microtomography Laboratory Techniques. Case Study of Palaeozoic Clastic Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krakowska, Paulina I.; Puskarczyk, Edyta

    2015-06-01

    Results of the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) investigations, mercury porosimetry measurements (MP) and computed microtomography (micro-CT), applied to the tight Palaeozoic rocks from the depths lower than 3000 m, were presented to estimate their reservoir potential. NMR signal analysis and interpretation were performed. Based on NMR driven models, permeability and Free Fluid Index were calculated for data sets divided into homogeneous clusters. Computerized mercury porosimetry results visualization and processing provided useful information, as the automatically determined Swanson parameter is correlated with petrophysical properties of rocks. Micro-CT enriched the image of porous space in qualitative and quantitative ways. Homogeneity of pore space structure was discussed using micro-CT approach. Integration of the results in the frame of reservoir parameters from standard laboratory methods and the modern ones resulted in the improvement of methodology for determining the old, deep-seated, hard sedimentary rocks reservoir potential.

  8. Measurement and Visualization of Tight Rock Exposed to CO2 Using NMR Relaxometry and MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haitao; Lun, Zengmin; Lv, Chengyuan; Lang, Dongjiang; Ji, Bingyu; Luo, Ming; Pan, Weiyi; Wang, Rui; Gong, Kai

    2017-03-01

    Understanding mechanisms of oil mobilization of tight matrix during CO2 injection is crucial for CO2 enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and sequestration engineering design. In this study exposure behavior between CO2 and tight rock of the Ordos Basin has been studied experimentally by using nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation time (NMR T2) spectrum and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) under the reservoir pressure and temperature. Quantitative analysis of recovery at the pore scale and visualization of oil mobilization are achieved. Effects of CO2 injection, exposure times and pressure on recovery performance have been investigated. The experimental results indicate that oil in all pores can be gradually mobilized to the surface of rock by CO2 injection. Oil mobilization in tight rock is time-consuming while oil on the surface of tight rock can be mobilized easily. CO2 injection can effectively mobilize oil in all pores of tight rock, especially big size pores. This understanding of process of matrix exposed to CO2 could support the CO2 EOR in tight reservoirs.

  9. A new peak shear strength criterion for rock joints which includes spectral parameters as roughness measures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulatilake, P.H.S.W.; Shou, G. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Huang, T.H. [National Taiwan Univ., Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China)

    1996-04-01

    Most of the natural rock joint surface profiles do not belong to the self similar fractal category. In general, roughness profiles of rock joints consist of non-stationary and stationary components. At the simplest level, only one parameter is sufficient to quantify non-stationary joint roughness. The average inclination angle I, along with the direction considered for the joint surface, is suggested to capture the non-stationary roughness. It is shown that even though the fractal dimension D is a useful parameter, it alone is insufficient to quantify the stationary roughness of non-self similar profiles.

  10. Determination of elastic anisotropy of rocks from P- and S-wave velocities: numerical modelling and lab measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svitek, Tomáš; Vavryčuk, Václav; Lokajíček, Tomáš; Petružálek, Matěj

    2014-12-01

    The most common type of waves used for probing anisotropy of rocks in laboratory is the direct P wave. Information potential of the measured P-wave velocity, however, is limited. In rocks displaying weak triclinic anisotropy, the P-wave velocity depends just on 15 linear combinations of 21 elastic parameters, called the weak-anisotropy parameters. In strong triclinic anisotropy, the P-wave velocity depends on the whole set of 21 elastic parameters, but inversion for six of them is ill-conditioned and these parameters are retrieved with a low accuracy. Therefore, in order to retrieve the complete elastic tensor accurately, velocities of S waves must also be measured and inverted. For this purpose, we developed a lab facility which allows the P- and S-wave ultrasonic sounding of spherical rock samples in 132 directions distributed regularly over the sphere. The velocities are measured using a pair of P-wave sensors with the transmitter and receiver polarized along the radial direction and using two pairs of S-wave sensors with the transmitter and receiver polarized tangentially to the spherical sample in mutually perpendicular directions. We present inversion methods of phase and ray velocities for elastic parameters describing general triclinic anisotropy. We demonstrate on synthetic tests that the inversion becomes more robust and stable if the S-wave velocities are included. This applies even to the case when the velocity of the S waves is measured in a limited number of directions and with a significantly lower accuracy than that of the P wave. Finally, we analyse velocities measured on a rock sample from the Outokumpu deep drill hole, Finland. We present complete sets of elastic parameters of the sample including the error analysis for several levels of confining pressure ranging from 0.1 to 70 MPa.

  11. Multiparametric surveillance of conservation measures at subterranean rock-art sites: case of Altamira cave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Anton, E.; Cuezva, S.; Fernandez-Cortes, A.; Sanchez-Moral, S.; Canaveras, J. C.

    2012-04-01

    Altamira cave (North of Spain) contains one of the most worldwide important representations of Palaeolithic art. Changes introduced in the cave environment due to the numerous conditioning projects and massive amounts of visitors in the past led in severe disruptions on the pattern of energy-matter exchange with the external atmosphere. Once the Altamira Cave was definitely closed to visitors in 2002, several conservation actions were progressively carried out with the aim to reinforce the isolation of the main cave emplacement with rock art (Polychrome Hall) and, therefore, limiting the dispersion of microorganisms and the supply of nutrients by airflow, water condensation on rock surfaces or seepage water. Main preservation measure was the installation of new access doors equipped with a thermal insulation system. Multi-annual instrumental monitoring of the atmosphere-soil-cave system has allowed us to control the degree of environmental recovery of cave environment and its trend towards the equilibrium and quasi-natural conditions. The monitoring program was focused on the main microclimatic parameters (air temperature, relative humidity, carbon dioxide, radon, air velocity, among others) in several profiles from floor to ceiling along the main rooms of the cave. Since the entrance system was modified in 2008 several changes in cave environment have been registered. Absolute annual values of temperature, velocity of air and their annual ranges variation have progressively been reduced. Observed 222Rn and CO2 convective short period fluctuations have been reduced, mainly during the winter season. The beginning of the degassing period in the cave has been delayed. Differences between inner and outer zones of the cavity have increased reaching the maximum value during the summer season (period of greater connexion with outside environment). For instance: in Polychrome Hall the range temperature falls from 1.41oC in 2007-2008 to 1.28oC in 2010-2011; in Crossing Hall

  12. On the use of borehole radar measurements for 3D assessment of structures in rock volumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiren, S.A. [GEOSIGMA AB, Uppsala (Sweden)

    1998-09-01

    Construction of a three-dimensional model of an area, for example a site for radioactive waste disposal, requires subsurface extrapolation of surface data and interpolation of subsurface and surface data. Such structural interpretation is based on local information in the perspective of the regional structural setting of the site. The SKB borehole radar, which can detect structures within a radius of 15 to 25 m around the borehole, is one of the most important sources of geometrical information from boreholes. Directional borehole radar measurements produce information on the angle ({alpha}) at which a feature intersects the borehole and the location (azimuth) relative to the borehole. Although the azimuthal information is important for the subsequent interpretation, the critical parameter that determines whether the feature is detected by the radar appears to be the {alpha}-angle. In this paper, the performance of the radar tool concerning {alpha}-angles is studied. The reason for undertaking the study was that predicted low angle intersections between boreholes and structures were not identified. This suggests that the relationship between the sampled population and the target population needs to be investigated. The analysed data sets comprise 307 reflectors from the Romuvaara site in Finland and 307 reflectors from the cored boreholes in the Hard Rock Laboratory at Aespoe. In the Aespoe bedrock, the shape of the frequency histogram displaying the {alpha}-angles is very consistent throughout the area. A brief comparison of amplitudes and reflectivity shows that the shape of the frequency histogram is tool-dependent rather than depending on the physical properties of the zones. The potential of the borehole radar to detect structures intersecting the borehole at very high angles is low due to the transmitter-receiver configuration of the tool. In the Aespoe radar data, the range of the borehole radar appears to be narrower than expected, with very few radar

  13. Environmental effects of radon and its progeny from uranium waste rock piles. Pt. 1. Measurements by passive and continuous monitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishimori, Yuu; Ito, Kimio; Furuta, Sada-aki [Ningyo Toge Works, Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation, Kamisaibara, Okayama (Japan)

    1998-12-31

    The radon concentration in atmosphere on and around the uranium waste rock pile sites has been measured by integrating passive monitors since 1989. In fiscal 1996, except for the Katamo-shimo 1, the average concentration of radon on the sites, around the sites and in control areas, ranged from 11 to 194 Bq/m{sup 3} (average: 45 Bq/m{sup 3}), from 8 to 75 Bq/m{sup 3} (average: 26 Bq/m{sup 3}), and from 9 to 77 Bq/m{sup 3} (average: 30 Bq/m{sup 3}), respectively. Additionally, the typical daily and seasonal variations of radon concentration, radon progeny concentration and radon exhalation rate are observed with continuous or automatic monitors. According to the measurement results by passive monitors and continuous monitors, the environmental effects of radon and its progeny from the waste rock pile sites are estimated small in residential regions around the sites. (author)

  14. Pore space characterization in carbonate rocks - Approach to combine nuclear magnetic resonance and elastic wave velocity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Huber, Edith; Schön, Jürgen; Börner, Frank

    2016-04-01

    Pore space features influence petrophysical parameters such as porosity, permeability, elastic wave velocity or nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Therefore they are essential to describe the spatial distribution of petrophysical parameters in the subsurface, which is crucial for efficient reservoir characterization especially in carbonate rocks. While elastic wave velocity measurements respond to the properties of the solid rock matrix including pores or fractures, NMR measurements are sensitive to the distribution of pore-filling fluids controlled by rock properties such as the pore-surface-to-pore-volume ratio. Therefore a combination of both measurement principles helps to investigate carbonate pore space using complementary information. In this study, a workflow is presented that delivers a representative average semi-axis length of ellipsoidal pores in carbonate rocks based on the pore aspect ratio received from velocity interpretation and the pore-surface-to-pore-volume ratio Spor as input parameters combined with theoretical calculations for ellipsoidal inclusions. A novel method to calculate Spor from NMR data based on the ratio of capillary-bound to movable fluids and the thickness of the capillary-bound water film is used. To test the workflow, a comprehensive petrophysical database was compiled using micritic and oomoldic Lower Muschelkalk carbonates from Germany. The experimental data indicate that both mud-dominated and grain-dominated carbonates possess distinct ranges of petrophysical parameters. The agreement between the predicted and measured surface-to-volume ratio is satisfying for oomoldic and most micritic samples, while pyrite or significant sample heterogeneity may lead to deviations. Selected photo-micrographs and scanning electron microscope images support the validity of the estimated representative pore dimensions.

  15. How Heavy Is My Rock? An Exploration of Students' Understanding of the Measurement of Weight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Michael

    2013-01-01

    New Zealand and Australian curricula require students to learn about weight/mass for at least six years. However, little research identifies what should be taught. This study reports cognitive interviews with 17 Year 9 students who were asked "how heavy is my rock?" Only one student demonstrated some understanding of how to use analogue…

  16. Fracture toughness properties of rocks in Olkiluoto: Laboratory measurements 2008-2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siren, T.

    2012-05-15

    In Olkiluoto an underground rock characterization facility (ONKALO) for the final disposal site of spent nuclear fuel has been under thorough research many years, but further knowledge is needed on fracture toughness parameters. Fracture toughness parameters are important for example in fracture mechanics prediction for Posiva's Olkiluoto Spalling Experiment (POSE). This working report describes a laboratory campaign that was done between 2008 and 2009. The campaign aimed at determining the fracture mechanics parameters as well as density and ultrasonic velocities for Olkiluoto rocks. The specimens delivered were selected by Posiva; the core showed no damage and the quality of the delivered cores was good with varying sample diameter. Most of the test samples (9 out of 12) are gneissic rock. The Mode I fracture toughness was determined using two different methods to account for two different fracturing directions. The methods are the Chevron Bend (CB) test as proposed in the ISRM Suggested Method and a method based on the Brazilian Disk (BD) experiment. The Mode II fracture toughness was determined using the Punch-Through Shear with Confining Pressure experiment on the remaining pieces from the CB testing. The scatter in the results is very large, even within one piece of core sample. Usually the scatter of results is less than 5 %. The high scatter in the data at hand is believed to be due to the very inhomogeneous nature of the rock material. The magnitude of the determined Mode I fracture toughness compares well with available reported data for medium to coarse grained granitoide rocks. However the scatter of the mode II fracture toughness values is higher than experienced on other rock types, but the variability is reasonable for the inhomogeneous rock type. Distinguishing the fracture toughness values for different anisotropy directions would require more thorough testing with quality samples at different anisotropy directions. However since fracture

  17. Water-Rock Differentiation on Ceres as Derived From Numerical Studies: Late Water Separation and Thick Undifferentiated Crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Wladimir Otto; Breuer, Doris; Spohn, Tilman

    2016-10-01

    Water-rock separation is a major factor in discriminating between models of Ceres' present-day state. We calculate differentiation models of Ceres to investigate how water-rock separation and convection influence its evolution. We expand on the presence of liquids and the possibility of cryovolcanism in order to explain surface features observed by Dawn[1,2].The model[3] includes accretion, reduction of the dust porosity, latent heat of ice melting, compaction driven water-rock separation, accretional heating, hydrothermal circulation, solid-state convection of ice, and convection in a water ocean.Accretion times considered cover 1-10 Ma rel. to CAIs. Compaction of the dust pores starts with ice at T≈180-240 K and proceeds with rock minerals at temperatures of up to 730 K. Sub-surface remains too cold to close these pores. The water-rock separation proceeds by water percolation in a rock matrix. Differentiation timing depends on the matrix deformation and no differentiation occurs in layers with leftover dust porosity. Compaction takes several hundred million years due to a slow temperature increase. The differentiation is extended according to this time scale even though liquid water is produced early. While the radionuclides are concentrated in the core no heat is produced in the ocean. If convection is neglected, the ocean is heated by the core and cooled through the crust, and remains totally liquid until the present day. Convection keeps the ocean cold and results in a colder present-day crust. Only a thin basal part of the ocean remains liquid, while the upper part freezes.In our models, a water ocean starts forming within 10 Ma after CAIs, but its completion is retarded relative to the melting of ice by up to O(0.1 Ga). The differentiation is partial and a porous outer layer is retained. Present-day temperatures calculated indicate that hydrated salts can be mobile at a depth of ≥1.5-5 km implying buoyancy of ice and salt-enriched crustal reservoirs. The

  18. Regional analysis techniques for integrating experimental and numerical measurements of transport properties of reservoir rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, S. M.; Latham, S.; Middleton, J.; Limaye, A.; Senden, T. J.; Arns, C. H.

    2017-02-01

    Assessing the mechanisms of micro-structural change and their effect on transport properties using digital core analysis requires balancing field of view and resolution. This typically leads to the compromise of working with relatively small samples, where boundary effects can be substantial. A direct comparison with experiment, as e.g. desirable to eliminate unknown parameters and integrate numerical and physical experiments, needs to consider these boundary effects. Here we develop a workflow to define measuring windows within a sample where these boundary effects are minimised allowing the integration of physical and numerical experiment. We consider in particular sleeve leakage and use a radial partitioning of the solutions to various transport equations to derive relevant regional measures, which may be used for the development of cross-correlations between physical properties. Samples of Bentheimer and Castlegate sandstone as well as Mt. Gambier limestone and a sucrosic dolomite are considered. The sample plugs are encased in rubber sleeves and micro-CT images acquired at ambient conditions. Using these high-resolution images we calculate transport properties, namely permeability and electrical conductivity, and analyse the resulting field solutions with regard to flux across different regions of interest. The latter are selected on the basis of distance to the sample sleeve inner surface. Clear bypassing at the sleeve-sample interface in terms of elevated fluxes is observed for all samples, although to different extent. We consider different sleeve boundary conditions to define a measuring window minimising these effects, use the procedure to compare flux averages defined over these measuring windows with conventional choices of simulation domains, and compare resulting physical cross-correlations.

  19. Neural assembly models derived through nano-scale measurements.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Hongyou; Branda, Catherine; Schiek, Richard Louis; Warrender, Christina E.; Forsythe, James Chris

    2009-09-01

    This report summarizes accomplishments of a three-year project focused on developing technical capabilities for measuring and modeling neuronal processes at the nanoscale. It was successfully demonstrated that nanoprobes could be engineered that were biocompatible, and could be biofunctionalized, that responded within the range of voltages typically associated with a neuronal action potential. Furthermore, the Xyce parallel circuit simulator was employed and models incorporated for simulating the ion channel and cable properties of neuronal membranes. The ultimate objective of the project had been to employ nanoprobes in vivo, with the nematode C elegans, and derive a simulation based on the resulting data. Techniques were developed allowing the nanoprobes to be injected into the nematode and the neuronal response recorded. To the authors's knowledge, this is the first occasion in which nanoparticles have been successfully employed as probes for recording neuronal response in an in vivo animal experimental protocol.

  20. Monte Carlo evaluation of derivative-based global sensitivity measures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kucherenko, S. [Centre for Process Systems Engineering, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)], E-mail: s.kucherenko@ic.ac.uk; Rodriguez-Fernandez, M. [Process Engineering Group, Instituto de Investigaciones Marinas, Spanish Council for Scientific Research (C.S.I.C.), C/ Eduardo Cabello, 6, 36208 Vigo (Spain); Pantelides, C.; Shah, N. [Centre for Process Systems Engineering, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-15

    A novel approach for evaluation of derivative-based global sensitivity measures (DGSM) is presented. It is compared with the Morris and the Sobol' sensitivity indices methods. It is shown that there is a link between DGSM and Sobol' sensitivity indices. DGSM are very easy to implement and evaluate numerically. The computational time required for numerical evaluation of DGSM is many orders of magnitude lower than that for estimation of the Sobol' sensitivity indices. It is also lower than that for the Morris method. Efficiencies of Monte Carlo (MC) and quasi-Monte Carlo (QMC) sampling methods for calculation of DGSM are compared. It is shown that the superiority of QMC over MC depends on the problem's effective dimension, which can also be estimated using DGSM.

  1. An isotopic neutron source method for measuring the thermal neutron absorption cross section of rocks using small samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreft, A.; Bolewski, A. Jr.; Ciechanowski, M. (Institute of Physics and Nuclear Techniques, Cracow (Poland))

    1989-01-01

    An improved isotopic neutron source technique for measuring {Sigma}{sub a} of rocks is presented. A {sup 252}Cf source emitting roughly 4.10{sup 6} n/s and a miniature BF{sub 3}-filled detector are inserted in an annular sample placed in a large polyethylene block. Only one calibration sample is needed. No sample preparation, except grinding, is required. The attainable relative standard deviation on the measured value is about 10% for 25 cm{sup 3} samples and about 3% for 300 cm{sup 3} samples, respectively, both for 1 h counting times. (author).

  2. Managing Rock and Paleomagnetic Data Flow with the MagIC Database: from Measurement and Analysis to Comprehensive Archive and Visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppers, A. A.; Minnett, R. C.; Tauxe, L.; Constable, C.; Donadini, F.

    2008-12-01

    The Magnetics Information Consortium (MagIC) is commissioned to implement and maintain an online portal to a relational database populated by rock and paleomagnetic data. The goal of MagIC is to archive all measurements and derived properties for studies of paleomagnetic directions (inclination, declination) and intensities, and for rock magnetic experiments (hysteresis, remanence, susceptibility, anisotropy). Organizing data for presentation in peer-reviewed publications or for ingestion into databases is a time-consuming task, and to facilitate these activities, three tightly integrated tools have been developed: MagIC-PY, the MagIC Console Software, and the MagIC Online Database. A suite of Python scripts is available to help users port their data into the MagIC data format. They allow the user to add important metadata, perform basic interpretations, and average results at the specimen, sample and site levels. These scripts have been validated for use as Open Source software under the UNIX, Linux, PC and Macintosh© operating systems. We have also developed the MagIC Console Software program to assist in collating rock and paleomagnetic data for upload to the MagIC database. The program runs in Microsoft Excel© on both Macintosh© computers and PCs. It performs routine consistency checks on data entries, and assists users in preparing data for uploading into the online MagIC database. The MagIC website is hosted under EarthRef.org at http://earthref.org/MAGIC/ and has two search nodes, one for paleomagnetism and one for rock magnetism. Both nodes provide query building based on location, reference, methods applied, material type and geological age, as well as a visual FlashMap interface to browse and select locations. Users can also browse the database by data type (inclination, intensity, VGP, hysteresis, susceptibility) or by data compilation to view all contributions associated with previous databases, such as PINT, GMPDB or TAFI or other user

  3. NOx emission trends in megacities derived from satellite measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalov, Igor; Beekmann, Matthias; Richter, Andreas

    2010-05-01

    The effects of air pollutant emissions on both local air quality in megacities and composition of the atmosphere on regional and global scales are currently an important issue of atmospheric researches. In order to properly evaluate these effects, atmospheric models should be provided with accurate information on emissions of major air pollutants. However, such information is frequently very uncertain, as it is documented in literature. The quantification of emissions and related effects is an especially difficult task in the case of developing countries. Recently, it has been demonstrated that satellite measurements of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) can be used as a source of independent information on NOx emissions. In particular, the satellite measurements were used in our earlier studies to improve spatial allocation of NOx emissions, to estimate multi-annual changes of NOx emissions on regional scales and to validate data of traditional emission inventories (see Ref. 1, 2). The goals of the present study are (1) developing an efficient method for estimation of NOx emissions trend in megacity regions by using satellite measurements and an inverse modeling technique and (2) obtaining independent estimates of NOx emission trends in several megacities in Europe and the Middle East in the period from 1996 to 2008. The study is based on the synergetic use of the data for tropospheric NO2 column amounts derived from the long-term GOME and SCIAMACHY measurements and simulations performed by the CHIMERE chemistry transport model. We performed the analysis involving methods of different complexity ranging from estimation of linear trends in the tropospheric NO2 columns retrieved from satellite measurements to evaluation of nonlinear trends in NOx emission estimates obtained with the inverse modeling approach, which, in the given case, involves only very simple and transparent formulations. The most challenging part of the study is the nonlinear trend estimation, which is

  4. Rock strength measurements on Archaean basement granitoids recovered from scientific drilling in the active Koyna seismogenic zone, western India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Deepjyoti; Akkiraju, Vyasulu V.; Misra, Surajit; Roy, Sukanta; Singh, Santosh K.; Sinha, Amalendu; Gupta, Harsh; Bansal, B. K.; Nayak, Shailesh

    2017-08-01

    Reservoir triggered earthquakes have been occurring in the Koyna area, western India for the past five decades. Triaxial tests carried out on 181 core samples of Archaean granitoids underlying the Deccan Traps provide valuable constraints on rock strength properties in the Koyna seismogenic zone for the first time. The data include measurements on granite gneiss, granite, migmatitic gneiss and mylonitised granite gneiss obtained from boreholes KBH-3, KBH-4A, KBH-5 and KBH-7 located in the western and eastern margins of the seismic zone. Salient results are as follows. (i) Increase of rock strength with increasing confining pressure allow determination of the linearized failure envelopes from which the cohesive strength and angle of internal friction are calculated. (ii) Variable differential stresses at different depths are the manifestations of deformation partitioning in close association of fault zone(s) or localized fracture zones. (iii) Fractures controlled by naturally developed weak planes such as cleavage and fabric directly affect the rock strength properties, but the majority of failure planes developed during triaxial tests is not consistent with the orientations of pre-existing weak planes. The failure planes may, therefore, represent other planes of weakness induced by ongoing seismic activity. (iv) Stress-strain curves confirm that axial deformation is controlled by the varying intensity of pre-existing shear in the granitoids, viz., mylonite, granite gneiss and migmatitic gneiss. (v) Frequent occurrences of low magnitude earthquakes may be attributed to low and variable rock strength of the granitoids, which, in turn, is modified by successive seismic events.

  5. Eddy heat fluxes from direct current measurements of the Antarctic Polar Front in Shag Rocks Passage

    OpenAIRE

    Walkden, GJ; Heywood, Kj; Stevens, DP

    2008-01-01

    Determining meridional heat flux in the Southern Ocean is critical to the accurate understanding and model simulation of the global ocean. Mesoscale eddies provide a significant but poorly-defined contribution to this transport. An eighteen-month deep-water current meter array deployment in Shag Rocks Passage (53°S, 48°W) between May 2003 and November 2004 provides estimates of the eddy flux of heat across the Polar Front. We calculate a statistically nonzero (99% level), vertically coherent ...

  6. Using terrestrial laser scanning for differential measurement of interannual rock glacier movement in the Argentine Dry Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Renato R.

    Argentina has recently implemented laws to protect glaciers and buried ice in the Andes to improve the sustainability of scarce, long-term water resources. Therefore, all glaciers and buried ice terrains must be located and avoided in any commercial alterations of the landscape. Buried ice in this remote and often dangerous terrain typically is located via the use of remote-sensing techniques. This thesis applies one such technique, Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) in the form of Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS), to detect rock glacier movement that is indicative of flowing, buried ice not visible in near surface excavations. TLS surveys were completed at two locales, Los Azules and El Altar, in both AD 2013 and AD 2014 on landscapes where buried ice is suspected to have produced the current surface forms. Multiple TLS scans were co-registered with the use of benchmarks, both between scans and between years, which introduced quantifiable positional errors. Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) were derived from the point cloud data by standardizing the spacing of the points in the horizontal direction, creating 0.1 m by 0.1 m cells with elevation as the cell value. The DEMs for each year were subtracted from each other to yield a change in elevation. The surface roughness of the rock glaciers (vertical variability within each cell) was empirically determined and evaluated as a threshold for results. Both sites showed sub-decimeter interannual movements, and the direction of their movement is typical of forms with buried ice. The results of the study were validated using independent GPS data showing annual movement rates. Despite the downslope movement of these rock glaciers, the volume of ice contained within them remains unclear, and further study is required to assess the volume of water contained.

  7. Variations in hydraulic conductivity with scale of measurement during aquifer tests in heterogeneous, porous carbonate rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze-Makuch, Dirk; Cherkauer, Douglas S.

    Previous studies have shown that hydraulic conductivity of an aquifer seems to increase as the portion of the aquifer tested increases. To date, such studies have all relied on different methods to determine hydraulic conductivity at each scale of interest, which raises the possibility that the observed increase in hydraulic conductivity is due to the measurement method, not to the scale. This study analyzes hydraulic conductivity with respect to scale during individual aquifer tests in porous, heterogeneous carbonate rocks in southeastern Wisconsin, USA. Results from this study indicate that hydraulic conductivity generally increases during an individual test as the volume of aquifer impacted increases, and the rate of this increase is the same as the rate of increase determined by using different measurement methods. Thus, scale dependence of hydraulic conductivity during single tests does not depend on the method of measurement. This conclusion is supported by 22 of 26 aquifer tests conducted in porous-flow-dominated carbonate units within the aquifer. Instead, scale dependency is probably caused by heterogeneities within the aquifer, a conclusion supported by digital simulation. All of the observed types of hydraulic-conductivity variations with scale during individual aquifer tests can be explained by a conceptual model of a simple heterogeneous aquifer composed of high-conductivity zones within a low-conductivity matrix. Résumé Certaines études ont montré que la conductivité hydraulique d'un aquifère semble augmenter en même temps que la partie testée de l'aquifère s'étend. Jusqu'à présent, ces études ont toutes reposé sur des méthodes de détermination de la conductivité hydraulique différentes pour chaque niveau d'échelle, ce qui a conduit à penser que l'augmentation observée de la conductivité hydraulique pouvait être due aux méthodes de mesure et non à l'effet d'échelle. Cette étude analyse la conductivité hydraulique par

  8. Natural radioactivity measurements in the granite rock of quarry sites, Johor, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnour, I. A.; Wagiran, H.; Ibrahim, N.; Laili, Z.; Omar, M.; Hamzah, S.; Idi, Bello. Y.

    2012-12-01

    This study was conducted to determine the concentration of natural radionuclides in the granite rocks of selected quarry sites in Johor state, Malaysia and their possible radiological effects. The activity concentrations of 238U, 232Th and 40K in the areas of study indicated varying values of 238U, 232Th and 40K. The highest values of 238U and 232Th concentrations (67±1 and 85±2 Bq kg-1, respectively) were observed at Kamad Quarry (IJM), whereas the highest value of 40K concentration (722±18 Bq kg-1) was detected in Kim Seng Quarry, while the values of activity concentration are lower in Hanson Quarry Products (Kulai) (25±0.5 for 238U, 24±0.5 for 232Th and 429±11 for 40K). Overall, 40K has the highest concentration in the granite rocks of the quarry sites, followed by 232Th and the least for 238U. The radium equivalent activity concentration was found in the range between 94 and 239 Bq kg-1, the absorbed dose rate was found to be in the range between 47 and 112 nGy h-1, and effective dose ranged from 58 to 137 μSv h-1. Moreover, the internal and external hazard index values were given in results lower than unity.

  9. Two stage mantle-derived granitic rocks and the onset of the Brasiliano orogeny: Evidence from Sr, Nd, and O isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Thyego R.; Ferreira, Valderez P.; Lima, Mariucha Maria C.; Sial, Alcides N.

    2016-11-01

    The elongate Monteirópolis batholith (270 km2) is composed of alkali feldspar granite to granodiorite, it is part of the Águas Belas-Canindé composite batholith and it intruded rocks of the Pernambuco-Alagoas Domain, northeastern Brazil. This batholith is bounded by the NNE-SSW-trending Jacaré dos Homens transpressional shear zone on its southwestern margin, and displays low-angle foliation, coeval to the development of a regional flat-lying foliation. Microgranular dioritic enclaves and amphibole-rich clots are abundant. The mineralogy of this pluton comprises biotite and amphibole as major accessory phases, and titanite and magmatic epidote as trace minerals. Major and trace element chemistry shows high SiO2, total alkalis, Ba and Sr, low Fe# and Nb contents, all of these conferring a high-K calc-alkaline character. The rocks are enriched in LREE and LILE and depleted in HFSE, and show fractionated chondrite-normalized REE patterns with Eu/Eu* = 0.67 to 1.25. Chondrite-normalized spidergrams show marked negative Nb-Ta and Ti anomalies, typical of subduction-related magmas. U-Pb SHRIMP zircon data yielded a crystallization age of 626 ± 4 Ma. Regional structures and U-Pb geochronological data for the Jacaré dos Homens transpressional shear zone suggest that shearing was initiated at ca. 640 Ma. Dilatational movements along this shear zone opened space for magma emplacement. The rocks in this batholith are characterized by slightly negative to slightly positive εNd values (- 0.78 to + 1.06), average Nd-model age of 1.0 Ga, low initial 87Sr/86Sr(626 Ma) values of 0.7050 to 0.7052, and low δ18O values (zircon) of + 5.00 to + 5.94‰ V-SMOW. A possible protolith, Tonian mantle-derived rocks in the lower continental crust, could have been partially melted by underplating of mantle-derived mafic magma during collision of the São Francisco Craton and the Pernambuco-Alagoas Domain during onset of the Brasiliano orogeny.

  10. Velocity field measurements in sedimentary rock cores by magnetization prepared 3D SPRITE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanenko, Konstantin; Xiao, Dan; Balcom, Bruce J

    2012-10-01

    A time-efficient MRI method suitable for quantitative mapping of 3-D velocity fields in sedimentary rock cores, and granular samples is discussed. The method combines the 13-interval Alternating-Pulsed-Gradient Stimulated-Echo (APGSTE) scheme and three-dimensional Single Point Ramped Imaging with T(1) Enhancement (SPRITE). Collecting a few samples near the q-space origin and employing restricted k-space sampling dramatically improves the performance of the imaging method. The APGSTE-SPRITE method is illustrated through mapping of 3-D velocity field in a macroscopic bead pack and heterogeneous sandstone and limestone core plugs. The observed flow patterns are consistent with a general trend for permeability to increase with the porosity. Domains of low permeability obstruct the flow within the core volume. Water tends to flow along macroscopic zones of higher porosity and across zones of lower porosity.

  11. In-situ measure to internal stress of shotcrete layer in soft-rock roadway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shulin Fang; Jian Zhang

    2014-01-01

    In order to solve the difficult conditions of soft rock, water-trickling and hard-maintain of main air-return roadway in Tarangaole Colliery, high pretensioned stress and intensive bolt-shotcrete support program was designed and mechanical property of shotcrete layer was specially monitored through utilizing a type of concrete stress meter with oscillating chord after the program was carried out. It was indicated that, due to rock pressure and support resistance, the interior of shotcrete layer would emerge diverse stresses in axial, radial and tangential directions. With time passing internal stresses in three directions, whose average values were-0.061, 0.043 and 0.517 MPa respectively, fluctuated first and then tended to stability slowly. The axial and radial stresses were relatively smaller than tangential stress which was 11, 12 times the two formers respectively. Along the section of roadway, axial and tangential stresses distributed symmetri-cally and increased gradually from the top of arch to the waist of wall, but reduced at the foot of wall. Radial stresses reduced from the top of arch to the waist of arch first, and then increased in the waist of wall. Axial stresses were tensile substantially, except for stresses in arch vault tending to compressive, but all the radial stresses were compressive. Nevertheless, tangential stresses in the wall were compressive and tangential stresses in the arch were tensile. During the period of roadway excavating, the stress of shotcrete layer was less than its ultimate bearing capacity, with no significant stress concentration. At the end of this article, some suggests are given to shotcrete support design.

  12. Elastic anisotropy of layered rocks: Ultrasonic measurements of plagioclase-biotite-muscovite (sillimanite) gneiss versus texture-based theoretical predictions (effective media modeling)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivankina, T. I.; Zel, I. Yu.; Lokajicek, T.; Kern, H.; Lobanov, K. V.; Zharikov, A. V.

    2017-08-01

    In this paper we present experimental and theoretical studies on a highly anisotropic layered rock sample characterized by alternating layers of biotite and muscovite (retrogressed from sillimanite) and plagioclase and quartz, respectively. We applied two different experimental methods to determine seismic anisotropy at pressures up to 400 MPa: (1) measurement of P- and S-wave phase velocities on a cube in three foliation-related orthogonal directions and (2) measurement of P-wave group velocities on a sphere in 132 directions The combination of the spatial distribution of P-wave velocities on the sphere (converted to phase velocities) with S-wave velocities of three orthogonal structural directions on the cube made it possible to calculate the bulk elastic moduli of the anisotropic rock sample. On the basis of the crystallographic preferred orientations (CPOs) of major minerals obtained by time-of-flight neutron diffraction, effective media modeling was performed using different inclusion methods and averaging procedures. The implementation of a nonlinear approximation of the P-wave velocity-pressure relation was applied to estimate the mineral matrix properties and the orientation distribution of microcracks. Comparison of theoretical calculations of elastic properties of the mineral matrix with those derived from the nonlinear approximation showed discrepancies in elastic moduli and P-wave velocities of about 10%. The observed discrepancies between the effective media modeling and ultrasonic velocity data are a consequence of the inhomogeneous structure of the sample and inability to perform long-wave approximation. Furthermore, small differences between elastic moduli predicted by the different theoretical models, including specific fabric characteristics such as crystallographic texture, grain shape and layering were observed. It is shown that the bulk elastic anisotropy of the sample is basically controlled by the CPO of biotite and muscovite and their volume

  13. Self-Assembled Tetrahedral DNA Nanostructures Promote Adipose-Derived Stem Cell Migration via lncRNA XLOC 010623 and RHOA/ROCK2 Signal Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Sirong; Peng, Qiang; Shao, Xiaoru; Xie, Jing; Lin, Shiyu; Zhang, Tao; Li, Qianshun; Li, Xiaolong; Lin, Yunfeng

    2016-08-03

    Self-assembled tetrahedral DNA nanostructures (TDNs) with precise sizes have been extensively applied in various fields owing to their exceptional mechanical rigidity, structural stability, and modification versatility. In addition, TDNs can be internalized by mammalian cells and remain mainly intact within the cytoplasm by escaping degradation by nucleases. Here, we studied the effects of TDNs on cell migration and the underlying molecular mechanisms. TDNs remarkably enhanced the migration of rat adipose-derived stem cells and down-regulated the long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) XLOC 010623 to activate the mRNA expression of Tiam1 and Rac1. Furthermore, TDNs highly up-regulated the mRNA and protein expression of RHOA, ROCK2, and VCL. These results indicate that TDNs suppressed the transcription of lncRNA XLOC 010623 and activated the TIAM1/RAC1 and RHOA/ROCK2 signaling pathways to promote cell migration. On the basis of these findings, TDNs show a high potential for application in tissue repair and regenerative medicine as a functional three-dimensional DNA nanomaterial.

  14. Hyperspectral Signatures (400 to 2500 nm) of Vegetation, Minerals, Soils, Rocks, and Cultural Features: Laboratory and Field Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-12-01

    disappearance or appearance of certain minerals. The rocks formed, in increasing temperature, are greenschist, amphibolite, and granulite . Greenschist and...amphibolite facies rocks are often schistose; granulite facies rocks are usually gneissic in texture. E. Cultural and Man-made Features (C). Spectra

  15. Estimating Liquid Fluxes in Thermally Perturbed Fractured Rock Using Measured Temperature Profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.T. Birkholzer

    2005-02-14

    A new temperature-profile method was recently developed for analyzing perturbed flow conditions in superheated porous media. The method uses high-resolution temperature data to estimate the magnitude of the heat-driven liquid and gas fluxes that form as a result of boiling, condensation, and recirculation of pore water. In this paper, we evaluate the applicability of this new method to the more complex flow behavior in fractured formations with porous rock matrix. In such formations, with their intrinsic heterogeneity, the porous but low-permeable matrix provides most of the mass and heat storage capacity, and dominates conductive heat transfer, Fractures, on the other hand, offer highly effective conduits for gas and liquid flow, thereby generating significant convective heat transfer. After establishing the accuracy of the temperature-profile method for fractured porous formations, we apply the method in analyzing the perturbed flow conditions in a large-scale underground heater test conducted in unsaturated fractured porous tuff. The flux estimates for this test indicate a significant reflux of water near the heat source, on the order of a few hundred millimeter per year-much larger than the ambient percolation flux of only a few millimeter per year.

  16. Measuring memory with the order of fractional derivative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Maolin; Wang, Zaihua; Hu, Haiyan

    2013-12-01

    Fractional derivative has a history as long as that of classical calculus, but it is much less popular than it should be. What is the physical meaning of fractional derivative? This is still an open problem. In modeling various memory phenomena, we observe that a memory process usually consists of two stages. One is short with permanent retention, and the other is governed by a simple model of fractional derivative. With the numerical least square method, we show that the fractional model perfectly fits the test data of memory phenomena in different disciplines, not only in mechanics, but also in biology and psychology. Based on this model, we find that a physical meaning of the fractional order is an index of memory.

  17. Collecting Rocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙铮

    2007-01-01

    My hobby is collecting rocks.It is very special,isn’t it?I began to collect rocks about four years ago.I usually go hiking in the mountains,or near the river to look for rocks.When I find a rock,I pick it up and clean it with the brush and water.Then I put it into my bag.Most of the rocks I have collected are quartzite~*.They are really

  18. Workshop on hydrology of crystalline basement rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, S.N. (comp.)

    1981-08-01

    This workshop covered the following subjects: measurements in relatively shallow boreholes; measurement and interpretation of data from deep boreholes; hydrologic properties of crystalline rocks as interpreted by geophysics and field geology; rock mechanics related to hydrology of crystalline rocks; the possible contributions of modeling to the understanding of the hydrology of crystalline rocks; and geochemical interpretations of the hydrology of crystalline rocks. (MHR)

  19. A new device for characterizing fracture networks and measuring groundwater and contaminant fluxes in fractured rock aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klammler, Harald; Hatfield, Kirk; Newman, Mark A.; Cho, Jaehyun; Annable, Michael D.; Parker, Beth L.; Cherry, John A.; Perminova, Irina

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents the fundamental theory and laboratory test results on a new device that is deployed in boreholes in fractured rock aquifers to characterize vertical distributions of water and contaminant fluxes, aquifer hydraulic properties, and fracture network properties (e.g., active fracture density and orientation). The device, a fractured rock passive flux meter (FRPFM), consists of an inflatable core assembled with upper and lower packers that isolate the zone of interest from vertical gradients within the borehole. The outer layer of the core consists of an elastic fabric mesh equilibrated with a visible dye which is used to provide visual indications of active fractures and measures of fracture location, orientation, groundwater flux, and the direction of that flux. Beneath the outer layer is a permeable sorbent that is preloaded with known amounts of water soluble tracers which are eluted at rates proportional to groundwater flow. This sorbent also captures target contaminants present in intercepted groundwater. The mass of contaminant sorbed is used to quantify cumulative contaminant flux; whereas, the mass fractions of resident tracers lost are used to provide measures of water flux. In this paper, the FRPFM is bench tested over a range of fracture velocities (2-20 m/day) using a single fracture flow apparatus (fracture aperture = 0.5 mm). Test results show a discoloration in visible dye corresponding to the location of the active fracture. The geometry of the discoloration can be used to discern fracture orientation as well as direction and magnitude of flow in the fracture. Average contaminant fluxes were measured within 16% and water fluxes within 25% of known imposed fluxes.

  20. Measurement and study of the distributing law of in-situ stresses in rock mass at great depth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    To solve the technical cruxes of the conventional system in deep rock mass, an automatic testing system for hydraulic fracturing that includes a single tube for hydraulic loop, a pressure-relief valve, central-tubeless packers, and a multichannel real-time data acquisition system was used for in-situ stresses measurement at great depths (over 1000 m) in a coalfield in Juye of Northern China.The values and orientations of horizontal principal stresses were determined by the new system. The virgin stress field and its distributing law were decided by the linear regression from the logged 37 points in seven boreholes. Besides, the typical boreholes arranged in both the adjacent zone and far away zone of the faults were analyzed, respectively. The results show that a stress concentration phenomenon and a deflection in the orientation of the maximal horizontal stress exist in the adjacent zone of the faults, which further provides theoretical basis for design and optimization of mining.

  1. Experimental Measurements of Permeability Evolution During Brittle Deformation of Crystalline Rocks and Implications for Fluid Flow in Fault Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, T.; Faulkner, D.

    2007-12-01

    Detailed experimental studies of the development of permeability of crustal rock during deformation are essential in helping to understand fault mechanics and constrain larger scale models that predict bulk fluid flow within the crust. The strength, permeability and pore fluid volume evolution of initially intact crystalline rock (Westerly granite and Cerro Cristales granodiorite) under increasing differential load leading to macroscopic failure has been measured in a triaxial deformation apparatus. Experiments were run under pore water pressures of 50 MPa and varying effective pressures from 10 to 50 MPa. Permeability is seen to increase by up to and over two orders of magnitude prior to macroscopic failure, from 3.5 x 10-21 to 9 x 10-19 m2 with the greatest increase seen at lowest effective pressures. Post-failure permeability is shown to be over 3 orders of magnitude higher than initial intact permeabilities, as high as 4 x 10-18 m2, and approaches lower the limit of measurements of in situ bulk crustal permeabilities. Increasing amplitude cyclic loading tests show permeability-stress hysteresis, with high permeabilities maintained as differential stress is reduced. The largest permeability increases are seen between 90-99% of the failure stress. Under hydrothermal conditions without further loading, it is suggested that much of this permeability can be recovered, and pre-macroscopic failure fracture damage may heal relatively faster than post-failure macroscopic fractures. Pre-failure permeabilities are nearly seven to nine orders of magnitude lower than that predicted by some high pressure diffusive models suggesting that microfracture matrix flow cannot dominate, and agrees with inferences that bulk fluid flow and dilatancy must be dominated by larger scale structures, such as macrofractures. It is suggested that the permeability of a highly stressed fault tip process zone in low-permeability crystalline rocks could increase by more than 2 orders of magnitude

  2. Meridional Winds derived from ionosonde measurements: comparison of different models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katamzi, Zama; Bosco Habarulema, John; Aruliah, Anasuya

    2016-07-01

    Thermospheric meridional winds are derived from ionospheric F2 region peak parameters (i.e. F2 maximum density, NmF2, and F2 peak height, hmF2) obtained using South African ionosonde for solar maximum (2001 and 2014) and solar minimum (2009). The study uses several different techniques and models to investigate the climatology behaviour of the winds in order to understand wind variability over South Africa. Detailed solar cycle, seasonal and diurnal trends will help establish how the winds influence ionospheric behaviour at this latitude. Comparisons of ionosonde derived neutral winds with empirical and numerical models such as the Coupled Middle Atmosphere Thermosphere Model (CMAT2) and Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIE-GCM) are important to understand the validity of theoretical and empirical models.

  3. Research on Mechanism of Rock Burst Generation and Development for High Stress Rock Tunnels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高全臣; 赫建明; 王代华

    2001-01-01

    Through the investigation and analysis of high stress distribution in surrounding rock during the excavation of rock tunnels,the key factors to cause rock burst and the mechanism of rock burst generation and development are researched. The result shows that the scale and range of rock burst are related with elastic deformation energy storied in rock mass and the characteristics of unloading stress waves. The measures of preventing from rock burst for high stress rock tunnels are put forward.

  4. Reliable practical technique for in-situ rock stress measurements in deep gold mines.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Stacey, TR

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available The proposed primary output of this research project is the development of a set of equipment and method of in situ stress measurements in a high stress environment typical of the deep level gold mines....

  5. Application of water jet assisted drag bit and pick cutter for the cutting of coal measure rocks. Final technical report. [Tests of combination in different rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ropchan, D.; Wang, F.D.; Wolgamott, J.

    1980-04-01

    A laboratory investigation was made of the effects of high pressure water jets on the cutting forces of drag bit cutters in sedimentary rocks. A hard and soft sandstone, shale and limestone were tested with commercially obtainable conical and plow type drag bits on the EMI linear cutting machine. About 1200 cuts were made at different bit penetration, jet orientation, and water pressure to determine the reduction of cutting forces on the bit from the use of the water jet. Both independent and interactive cutting was used. The greatest reduction in cutting forces were with both of the sandstones; the drag forces were reduced about 30 percent and the normal forces about 60 percent at 5000 psi water pressure with the nozzle behind the bit. The method was less effective in the shale, except at 10,000 psi water pressure the reduction in drag force was about 55 percent. Of the rocks tested, the limestone was least affected by the water jet. The cutting forces for the plow bit showed continuous change with wear so a machined conical bit was used for most of the testing. Tests with the plow bit did show a large reduction in cutting forces by using the water jet with worn bits. An economic analysis of equipping a drag bit tunnel boring machine indicated that the water jet system could reduce costs per foot in sandstone by up to 40 percent.

  6. Carbon Isotope Measurements of Experimentally-Derived Hydrothermal Mineral-Catalyzed Organic Products by Pyrolysis-Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socki, Richard A.; Fu, Qi; Niles, Paul B.

    2011-01-01

    We report results of experiments to measure the C isotope composition of mineral catalyzed organic compounds derived from high temperature and high pressure synthesis. These experiments make use of an innovative pyrolysis technique designed to extract and measure C isotopes. To date, our experiments have focused on the pyrolysis and C isotope ratio measurements of low-molecular weight intermediary hydrocarbons (organic acids and alcohols) and serve as a proof of concept for making C and H isotope measurements on more complicated mixtures of solid-phase hydrocarbons and intermediary products produced during high temperature and high pressure synthesis on mineral-catalyzed surfaces. The impetus for this work stems from recently reported observations of methane detected within the Martian atmosphere [1-4], coupled with evidence showing extensive water-rock interaction during Martian history [5-7]. Methane production on Mars could be the result of synthesis by mineral surface-catalyzed reduction of CO2 and/or CO by Fischer-Tropsch Type (FTT) reactions during serpentization reactions [8,9]. Others have conducted experimental studies to show that FTT reactions are plausible mechanisms for low-molecular weight hydrocarbon formation in hydrothermal systems at mid-ocean ridges [10-12]. Further, recent experiments by Fu et al. [13] focus on examining detailed C isotope measurements of hydrocarbons produced by surface-catalyzed mineral reactions. Work described in this paper details the experimental techniques used to measure intermediary organic reaction products (alcohols and organic acids).

  7. Measurements of radio propagation in rock salt for the detection of high-energy neutrinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Amy; Goodhue, Abigail; Miki, Christian; Nichol, Ryan; Saltzberg, David

    2009-02-01

    We present measurements of the transmission of radio/microwave pulses through salt in the Cote Blanche salt mine operated by the North American Salt Company in St. Mary Parish, Louisiana. These results are from data taken in the southwestern region of the 1500 ft (457 m) deep level of the mine on our third and most recent visit to the mine. We transmitted and received a fast, high-power, broadband pulse from within three vertical boreholes that were drilled to depths of 100 ft (30 m) and 200 ft below the 1500 ft level using three different pairs of dipole antennas whose bandwidths span 125-900 MHz. By measuring the relative strength of the received pulses between boreholes with separations of 50 and 169 m, we deduce the attenuation of the signal attributed to the salt medium. We fit the frequency dependence of the attenuation to a power law and find the best fit field attenuation lengths to be 93±7m at 150 MHz, 63±3m at 300 MHz, and 36±2m at 800 MHz. This is the most precise measurement of radio attenuation in a natural salt formation to date. We assess the implications of this measurement for a future neutrino detector in salt.

  8. Low to Extremely Low Water Abundances Measured in Nominally Anhydrous Minerals in Mafic to Granitic Apollo Rock Clasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, J. I.; Christoffersen, R.; Wang, J.; Alexander, C. M. O'D.; Mills, R. D.; Hauri, E. H.

    2017-01-01

    Lunar sample-based volatile studies have focused on assessing the inventory and distribution of water in the Moon. Some have focused on the relatively young mare basalts and pyroclastic glasses, which result from partial melting of the relatively young lunar mantle. Less certain is the water inventory for the oldest materials available, which have the greater potential to record the earliest history of volatiles in the Moon (and thus provide evidence for the "wet" vs. "dry" accretion hypotheses of the Earth-Moon system. Studies of volatiles in ancient lunar rocks have largely focused on apatite. One recent FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared Radiometer) study of plagioclase reported a relatively "wet" (approximately 320 parts per million) magma for primordial ferroan anorthosites (FANs). Another, a NanoSIMS study of alkali feldspar, reported a "wet" (approximately 1 weight percentage) felsic magma, but due to the differentiation processes required for silicic magmatism in the lunar crust, predicted an essentially "dry" (less than 100 parts per million) bulk Moon. Thus, despite evidence that appears to complicate the early "dry" Moon paradigm, there is no apparent unanimity among the measurements, even those on apatite. This disparity is clearly seen by the order of magnitude different water estimates for lunar "alkali-rich suite rocks" (Fig. 1). Some of the apparent differences may be explained by recent improvements in the apatite-based water estimates that better account for relative compatibilities of OH-, Cl, and F. In the present work, we seek to expand our understanding of the volatile abundances in early formed lunar magmas, their source reservoirs, and to address the potential role that felsic magmas play on the lunar hydrogen budget over time by employing NanoSIMS analysis of nominally anhydrous minerals.

  9. Cyclic loading experiments to measure material response over a broad frequency range: from tickling of rocks to squeezing of moons

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, C.; Takei, Y.; Cooper, R. F.; Savage, H. M.

    2014-12-01

    Seismology provides powerful methods for imaging the interior of the Earth, not only through differences in seismic velocities, but also through attenuation contrasts. As seismic waves travel through the Earth they are attenuated in accordance with the viscoelastic properties of the material through which they pass. With proper constraints, we will someday be able to use seismic attenuation data as a prospecting tool to determine the grain size, temperature, pressure, melt content, and water content of the material along the ray path. Furthermore, it should be possible to determine active deformation structure, such as crystallographic preferred orientations that form in response to far-field natural tectonic loading. Laboratory studies are striving to provide these needed constraints. Using analogues to mantle rock, we isolate and scrutinize the physics of how microstructural elements affect macroscopic properties of attenuation and steady-state viscosity. An organic analogue, borneol, was used to measure the effects of grain size, temperature, and melt content over a broad frequency range. In these experiments, grain boundary processes were found to play a major role. Polycrystalline ice, which can be considered a rock analogue, has been used to explore the effect of accumulated strain on attenuation, particularly in material that is actively deforming via dislocation creep. Here, defect concentration and substructure are important. I will discuss the use of cyclic loading experiments on borneol and on polycrystalline ice to probe material response from seismic to tidal frequencies, from 10 Hz to 10-4 Hz respectively. These experiments, then, inform our knowledge of viscoelastic behavior of geologic materials at not only seismic frequencies, but also the tidal forcing frequencies experienced by tidewater glaciers and icy satellites.

  10. Aerosol Optical Thickness Derived From Atmospheric Transmittance Using Spectroradiometer Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwee San, Hslim; Matjafri, M. Z.; Abdullah, Abdul K.; Chow Jeng, C. J.

    section The objective of this study was to test the feasibility of hand held spectroradiometer measurements for the retrieval AOT values Twenty-six stations were chosen randomly around Penang Island and the atmospheric transmittance measurements were collected using a handheld spectroradiometer The corresponding PM10 concentrations were measured using a portable DustTrak Aerosol Monitor 8520 simultaneously with the measurements of the transmittance data The AOT values were calculated using the Beer-Lambert-Bouguer law Linear relationship was found between AOT and PM10 values in this study Finally a PM10 map was created using Kriging interpolation technique The result of the study showed the potential of a spectroradiometer data for the retrieval of AOT and PM10 to provide the air pollution information

  11. Aqueous solubilities of phenol derivatives by conductivity measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Achard, C.; Jaoui, M.; Schwing, M.; Rogalski, M. [Univ. de Metz (France). Lab. de Thermodynamique et d`Analyse Chimique

    1996-05-01

    The aqueous solubilities of five chlorophenols and three nitrophenols were measured by conductimetry at temperatures between 15 and 48C. The solubilities of 2-chlorophenol, 4-chlorophenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol, pentachlorophenol, 2-nitrophenol, 4-nitrophenol, and 2,4-dinitrophenol were studied. Automatic conductivity measurements allow the determination of the solute concentration and, hence, the determination of the solubility. Emulsion formation can also be followed. Results obtained are in good agreement with literature values.

  12. Rock Stars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张国平

    2000-01-01

    Around the world young people are spending unbelievable sums of money to listen to rock music. Forbes Magazine reports that at least fifty rock stars have incomes between two million and six million dollars per year.

  13. KREEP Rocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹永廖; 徐琳; 欧阳自远

    2004-01-01

    KREEP rocks with high contents of K, REE and P were first recognized in Apollo-12 samples, and it was confirmed later that there were KREEP rock fragments in all of the Apollo samples, particularly in Apollo-12 and-14 samples. The KREEP rocks distributed on the lunar surface are the very important objects of study on the evolution of the moon, as well as to evaluate the utilization prospect of REE in KREEP rocks. Based on previous studies and lunar exploration data, the authors analyzed the chemical and mineral characteristics of KREEP rocks, the abundance of Th on the lunar surface materials, the correlation between Th and REE of KREEP rocks in abundance, studied the distribution regions of KREEP rocks on the lunar surface, and further evaluated the utilization prospect of REE in KREEP rocks.

  14. A dynamic control and measuring system for synchrotron X-ray rocking curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krolzig, A.; Materlik, G.; Zegenhagen, J.

    1983-04-01

    An electronic system has been designed and tested to measure and control the angular changes of the two goniometers in a double crystal diffractometer. The precision which was achieved is ≲0.02 arc sec. The elongation of a piezoelectric micropositioner which sets the exact angle is monitored via a capacitor transducer. Linear changes of the capacitor plate distance of ≲40 Å are easily resolved. The system also compensates for thermal drifts and mechanical disturbances of the relative alignment.

  15. Measurement of in-situ stress in salt and rock using NQR techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schempp, E.; Hirschfeld, T.; Klainer, S.

    1980-12-01

    A discussion of how stress and strain affect the quantities which can be measured in an NQR experiment shows that, for stresses of the magnitude to be expected at depths up to about 10,000 feet, quadrupole coupling constants will fall in the range of 1 to 10 kHz for both the sodium and chloride ions in NaCl. The most promising system involves pulsed nuclear double resonance detection; and alterative is to observe the quadrupolar splitting of the NMR signal. Choices to be made in the measurement and mapping techniques are discussed. The well-known perturbation of the homogenous stress field in the neighborhood of a borehole is shown to be advantageous from the point of view of obtaining directional information on the stress. Construction and operation of a borehole stress sensor are considered. The NQR technique seems feasible for measuring the magnitude and direction of underground stress with a resolution of about 25 psi, or 2.5% at 1000 psi. Downhole instrumentation suitable for in-situ determinations of stress appears within the state of the art. Additional tasks required on the project are identified.

  16. Rock Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henn, Cynthia A.

    2004-01-01

    There are many interpretations for the symbols that are seen in rock art, but no decoding key has ever been discovered. This article describes one classroom's experiences with a lesson on rock art--making their rock art and developing their own personal symbols. This lesson allowed for creativity, while giving an opportunity for integration…

  17. Rock Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henn, Cynthia A.

    2004-01-01

    There are many interpretations for the symbols that are seen in rock art, but no decoding key has ever been discovered. This article describes one classroom's experiences with a lesson on rock art--making their rock art and developing their own personal symbols. This lesson allowed for creativity, while giving an opportunity for integration…

  18. Rock Finding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rommel-Esham, Katie; Constable, Susan D.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss a literature-based activity that helps students discover the importance of making detailed observations. In an inspiring children's classic book, "Everybody Needs a Rock" by Byrd Baylor (1974), the author invites readers to go "rock finding," laying out 10 rules for finding a "perfect" rock. In this way, the…

  19. Combining chemical and isotopic measurements to estimate pesticide degradation rates in a fractured-rock aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farlin, Julien; Gallé, Tom; Bayerle, Michael; Pittois, Denis; El-Khabbaz, Hassanya; Schreglmann, Kathrin; Höche, Martina; Elsner, Martin

    2013-04-01

    Encouraged by new regulatory requirements for pesticide registration and authorization, the transport and environmental fate of these compounds in the different environmental compartments has been studied extensively. Degradation rates vary widely depending on hydraulic and chemical characteristics, with the strongest degradation usually occuring in the topsoil. Nonetheless, significant pesticide attenuation may still take place during transport in the aquifer, since residence times are generally much longer than in the soil. Ideally, pesticide transformation in the aquifer needs to be determined under real field conditions. Mass balance calculations however are complicated by the fact that the initial pesticide mass leached from the soil is often not known precisely enough. In this study, isotopic and classical pesticide concentration measurements were combined with groundwater dating techniques to assess the degradation rate of atrazine and its metabolite desethylatrazine in a fractured sandstone. The mass balance problem was solved by introducing the desethylatrazine to atrazine ratio, a relative measure which was used to quantify the advancement of atrazine degradation with increasing transport time in the subsurface. The extent of transformation of the parent compound was finally estimated from the shift in the isotopic signal between soil application and the outlet of the groundwater system.

  20. Measurements of radio propagation in rock salt for the detection of high-energy neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Connolly, Amy; Miki, Christian; Nichol, Ryan; Saltzberg, David

    2008-01-01

    We present measurements of the transmission of radio/microwave pulses through salt in the Cote Blanche salt mine operated by the North American Salt Company in St. Mary Parish, Louisiana. These results are from data taken in the southwestern region of the 1500 ft. (457 m) deep level of the mine on our third and most recent visit to the mine. We transmitted and received a fast, high-power, broadband pulse from within three vertical boreholes that were drilled to depths of 100 ft. (30 m) and 200 ft. below the 1500 ft. level using three different pairs of dipole antennas whose bandwidths span 125 to 900 MHz. By measuring the relative strength of the received pulses between boreholes with separations of 50 m and 169 m, we deduce the attenuation of the signal attributed to the salt medium. We fit the frequency dependence of the attenuation to a power law and find the best fit field attenuation lengths to be 93 \\pm 7 m at 150 MHz, 63 \\pm 3 m at 300 MHz, and 36 \\pm 2 m at 800 MHz. This is the most precise measuremen...

  1. Laboratory measurements of Vp and Vs in a porosity-developed crustal rock: Experimental investigation into the effects of porosity at deep crustal pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Masahiro; Arima, Makoto; Tatsumi, Yoshiyuki

    2016-05-01

    In order to evaluate the influence of porosity on the elastic properties of crustal rocks at deep crustal pressures, we performed laboratory measurements of compressional-wave (Vp) and shear-wave (Vs) velocities in a porosity-developed gabbro sample up to 1.0 GPa at room temperature. Based on the measured Vp and Vs data, we evaluated the changes in velocities, Vp/Vs, Poisson's ratio (σ), and total porosity of the rock as a function of pressure. Compared with the 'porosity-free' intrinsic elastic values of the gabbro sample, our results suggest that the development of porosity in crustal rocks lowers their Vp, Vs, Vp/Vs, and Poisson's ratio. Deviations (ΔVp, ΔVs, ΔVp/Vs, and Δσ) of the measured values from the intrinsic values are enhanced with increasing porosity. We evaluated the ΔVp from previous experimental study on the rocks of Tanzawa plutonic complex providing constraints on interpretation of the seismic velocity profiles of the Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) arc and found a large negative ΔVp (up to - 22.7%) at lower pressures. The intrinsic velocity combined with the measured velocity data at in situ pressure conditions suggest that the ranges of Vp (6.0-6.5 km/s) in the middle crust of the IBM arc reflect the presence of considerable porosity and its closure in intermediate rocks and/or the change of composition from felsic to intermediate in mid-crustal rocks.

  2. Advances in Fast Response Acoustically Derived Air Temperature Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogoev, Ivan; Jacobsen, Larry; Horst, Thomas; Conrad, Benjamin

    2016-04-01

    Fast-response accurate air-temperature measurements are required when estimating turbulent fluxes of heat, water and carbon dioxide by open-path eddy-covariance technique. In comparison with contact thermometers like thermocouples, ultra-sonic thermometers do not suffer from solar radiation loading, water vapor condensation and evaporative cooling effects. Consequently they have the potential to provide more accurate true air temperature measurements. The absolute accuracy of the ultrasonic thermometer is limited by the following parameters: the distance between the transducer pairs, transducer delays associated with the electrical-acoustic signal conversion that vary with temperature, components of the wind vector that are normal to the ultrasonic paths, and humidity. The distance between the transducer pairs is commonly obtained by coordinate measuring machine. Improved accuracy demonstrated in this study results from increased stiffness in the anemometer head to better maintain the ultrasonic path-length distances. To further improve accuracy and account for changes in transducer delays and distance as a function of temperature, these parameters are characterized in a zero-wind chamber over the entire operating temperature range. When the sonic anemometer is combined with a co-located fast-response water vapor analyzer, like in the IRGASON instrument, speed of sound can be compensated for humidity effects on a point-by-point basis resulting in a true fast-response air temperature measurement. Laboratory test results show that when the above steps are implemented in the calibration of the ultrasonic thermometer air-temperature accuracy better than ±0.5 degrees Celsius can be achieved over the entire operating range. The approach is also validated in a field inter-comparison with an aspirated thermistor probe mounted in a radiation shield.

  3. Fluorescence lifetime measurements of boronate derivatives to determine glucose concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gable, J H

    2000-06-01

    A novel investigation into the fluorescence lifetimes of molecules, both established and newly designed, was performed. These molecules are the basis of a continuous, minimally invasive, glucose sensor based on fluorescence lifetime measurements. This sensor, if coupled with an automated insulin delivery device, would effectively create an artificial pancreas allowing for the constant monitoring and control of glucose levels in a person with diabetes. The proposed sensor includes a fluorescent molecule that changes its' fluorescence properties upon binding selectively and reversibly to glucose. One possible sensor molecule is N-methyl-N-(9-methylene anthryl)-2-methylenephenylboronic acid (AB). The fluorescence intensity of AB was shown to change in response to changing glucose concentrations. (James, 1994) James proposed that when glucose binds to AB the fluorescence intensity increases due to an enhancement of the N{yields}B dative bond which prevents photoinduced electron transfer (PET). PET from the amine (N) to the fluorophore (anthracene) quenches the fluorescence. The dative bond between the boron and the amine can prevent PET by involving the lone pair of electrons on the amine in interactions with the boron rather than allowing them to be transferred to the fluorophore. Results of this research show the average fluorescence lifetime of AB also changes with glucose concentration. It is proposed that fluorescence is due to two components: (1) AB with an enhanced N{yields}B interaction, and no PET, and (2) AB with a weak N{yields}B interaction, resulting in fluorescence quenching by PET. Lifetime measurements of AB as a function of both the pH of the solvent and glucose concentration in the solution were made to characterize this two component system and investigate the nature of the N{yields}B bond. Measurements of molecules similar to AB were also performed in order to isolate behavior of specific AB constituents. These molecules are 9

  4. Aqueous history of Mars as inferred from landed mission measurements of rocks, soils, and water ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvidson, Raymond E.

    2016-09-01

    The missions that have operated on the surface of Mars acquired data that complement observations acquired from orbit and provide information that would not have been acquired without surface measurements. Data from the Viking Landers demonstrated that soils have basaltic compositions, containing minor amounts of salts and one or more strong oxidants. Pathfinder with its rover confirmed that the distal portion of Ares Vallis is the site of flood-deposited boulders. Spirit found evidence for hydrothermal deposits surrounding the Home Plate volcanoclastic feature. Opportunity discovered that the hematite signature on Meridiani Planum as seen from orbit is due to hematitic concretions concentrated on the surface as winds eroded sulfate-rich sandstones that dominate the Burns formation. The sandstones originated as playa muds that were subsequently reworked by wind and rising groundwater. Opportunity also found evidence on the rim of the Noachian Endurance Crater for smectites, with extensive leaching along fractures. Curiosity acquired data at the base of Mount Sharp in Gale Crater that allows reconstruction of a sustained fluvial-deltaic-lacustrine system prograding into the crater. Smectites and low concentrations of chlorinated hydrocarbons have been identified in the lacustrine deposits. Phoenix, landing above the Arctic Circle, found icy soils, along with low concentrations of perchlorate salt. Perchlorate is considered to be a strong candidate for the oxidant found by the Viking Landers. It is also a freezing point depressant and may play a role in allowing brines to exist at and beneath the surface in more modern periods of time on Mars.

  5. Analysis of the behavior of sedimentary rocks under impact loading

    OpenAIRE

    Millon, O.; Ruiz Ripoll, M.L.; Hoerth, T.

    2016-01-01

    In multiple engineering fields such as rock drilling or building constructions or extreme events like earthquakes or impacts, the dynamic properties of rock play an important role. A way to model these events and define measures to minimize the damage derived from these events is created by means of numerical analysis. Hence, the knowledge of the dynamic material behavior is essential for studying the effects of such a loading scenario. Solid geological materials, from the family of the sedim...

  6. Monitoring Surface Climate With its Emissivity Derived From Satellite Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Daniel K.; Larar, Allen M.; Liu, Xu

    2012-01-01

    Satellite thermal infrared (IR) spectral emissivity data have been shown to be significant for atmospheric research and monitoring the Earth fs environment. Long-term and large-scale observations needed for global monitoring and research can be supplied by satellite-based remote sensing. Presented here is the global surface IR emissivity data retrieved from the last 5 years of Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) measurements observed from the MetOp-A satellite. Monthly mean surface properties (i.e., skin temperature T(sub s) and emissivity spectra epsilon(sub v) with a spatial resolution of 0.5x0.5-degrees latitude-longitude are produced to monitor seasonal and inter-annual variations. We demonstrate that surface epsilon(sub v) and T(sub s) retrieved with IASI measurements can be used to assist in monitoring surface weather and surface climate change. Surface epsilon(sub v) together with T(sub s) from current and future operational satellites can be utilized as a means of long-term and large-scale monitoring of Earth 's surface weather environment and associated changes.

  7. Oil and gas potential assessment for coal measure source rocks on absolute concentration of n-alkanes and aromatic hydrocarbons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Absolute concentration of normal alkanes(n-alkanes) and aromatic hydrocarbons in bitumen extracted from source rocks in the period of thermodegradation from Turpan-Hami Basin suggests that aromatic hydrocarbons are dominant in coal and carbargilite while n-alkanes are dominant in mudstones. Bulkrock analysis and gas chromatograph/mass spectrum(GC-MS) of source rocks shows aromatic hydrocarbons are dominant in total ion chromatograms(TIC) of samples with poor perhydrous macerals while n-alkanes are dominant in TICs of samples with abundant perhydrous macerals. The identification of oil-prone and gas prone property based on GC-MS of bitumen "A" together with bulkrock analysis indicates that source rocks from Shengbei area are more oil-prone while source rocks from Qiudong and Xiaocaohu areas are more gas-prone,coinciding with the distribution of oil and gas reservoirs in Taibei Sag. Ratios used to identify oil-prone and gas-prone property for source rocks from Turpan Basin are proposed:n-alkanes >110 μg·mg-1,aromatics <15 μg·mg-1,and n-alkanes/aromatics >8 for oil-prone source rock bitumen while n-alkanes<82 μg·mg-1,aromatics >40 μg·mg-1,and n-alkanes/aromatics <1.5 for gas-prone source rock bitumen.

  8. Measured versus calculated thermal conductivity of high-grade metamorphic rocks – inferences on the thermal properties of the lower crust at ambient and in-situ conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ray, Labani; Förster, Hans-Jürgen; Förster, Andrea

    The bulk thermal conductivity (TC) of 26 rock samples representing felsic, intermediate and mafic granulites, from the Southern Granulite Province, India, is measured at dry and saturated conditions with the optical-scanning method. Thermal conductivity is also calculated from modal mineralogy (d...

  9. Range sections as rock models for intensity rock scene segmentation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mkwelo, S

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents another approach to segmenting a scene of rocks on a conveyor belt for the purposes of measuring rock size. Rock size estimation instruments are used to monitor, optimize and control milling and crushing in the mining industry...

  10. 'Escher' Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Chemical Changes in 'Endurance' Rocks [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1 This false-color image taken by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows a rock dubbed 'Escher' on the southwestern slopes of 'Endurance Crater.' Scientists believe the rock's fractures, which divide the surface into polygons, may have been formed by one of several processes. They may have been caused by the impact that created Endurance Crater, or they might have arisen when water leftover from the rock's formation dried up. A third possibility is that much later, after the rock was formed, and after the crater was created, the rock became wet once again, then dried up and developed cracks. Opportunity has spent the last 14 sols investigating Escher, specifically the target dubbed 'Kirchner,' and other similar rocks with its scientific instruments. This image was taken on sol 208 (Aug. 24, 2004) by the rover's panoramic camera, using the 750-, 530- and 430-nanometer filters. The graph above shows that rocks located deeper into 'Endurance Crater' are chemically altered to a greater degree than rocks located higher up. This chemical alteration is believed to result from exposure to water. Specifically, the graph compares ratios of chemicals between the deep rock dubbed 'Escher,' and the more shallow rock called 'Virginia,' before (red and blue lines) and after (green line) the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity drilled into the rocks. As the red and blue lines indicate, Escher's levels of chlorine relative to Virginia's went up, and sulfur down, before the rover dug a hole into the rocks. This implies that the surface of Escher has been chemically altered to a greater extent than the surface of Virginia. Scientists are still investigating the role water played in influencing this trend. These data were taken by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

  11. 'Escher' Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Chemical Changes in 'Endurance' Rocks [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1 This false-color image taken by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows a rock dubbed 'Escher' on the southwestern slopes of 'Endurance Crater.' Scientists believe the rock's fractures, which divide the surface into polygons, may have been formed by one of several processes. They may have been caused by the impact that created Endurance Crater, or they might have arisen when water leftover from the rock's formation dried up. A third possibility is that much later, after the rock was formed, and after the crater was created, the rock became wet once again, then dried up and developed cracks. Opportunity has spent the last 14 sols investigating Escher, specifically the target dubbed 'Kirchner,' and other similar rocks with its scientific instruments. This image was taken on sol 208 (Aug. 24, 2004) by the rover's panoramic camera, using the 750-, 530- and 430-nanometer filters. The graph above shows that rocks located deeper into 'Endurance Crater' are chemically altered to a greater degree than rocks located higher up. This chemical alteration is believed to result from exposure to water. Specifically, the graph compares ratios of chemicals between the deep rock dubbed 'Escher,' and the more shallow rock called 'Virginia,' before (red and blue lines) and after (green line) the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity drilled into the rocks. As the red and blue lines indicate, Escher's levels of chlorine relative to Virginia's went up, and sulfur down, before the rover dug a hole into the rocks. This implies that the surface of Escher has been chemically altered to a greater extent than the surface of Virginia. Scientists are still investigating the role water played in influencing this trend. These data were taken by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

  12. Rock size-frequency distributions analysis at lunar landing sites based on remote sensing and in-situ imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Ling, Zongcheng; Zhang, Jiang; Chen, Jian

    2017-10-01

    Rock populations can supply fundamental geological information about origin and evolution of a planet. In this paper, we used Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) narrow-angle camera (NAC) images to identify rocks at the lunar landing sites (including Chang'e 3 (CE-3), Apollo and Surveyor series). The diameter and area of each identified rock were measured to generate distributions of rock cumulative fractional area and size-frequency on a log-log plot. The two distributions both represented the same shallow slopes at smaller diameters followed by steeper slopes at larger diameters. A reasonable explanation for the lower slopes may be the resolution and space weathering effects. By excluding the smaller diameters, rock populations derived from NAC images showed approximately linear relationships and could be fitted well by power laws. In the last, the entire rock populations derived from both NAC and in-situ imagery could be described by one power function at the lunar landing sites except the CE-3 and Apollo 11 landing sites. This may be because that the process of a large rock breaking down to small rocks even fine particles can be modeled by fractal theories. Thus, rock populations on lunar surfaces can be extrapolated along the curves of rock populations derived from NAC images to smaller diameters. In the future, we can apply rock populations from remote sensing images to estimate the number of rocks with smaller diameters to select the appropriate landing sites for the CE-4 and CE-5 missions.

  13. Colloid investigations of acid rock drainage solution from an abandoned Zn-Pb-Ag mine by ultrafiltration and PCS measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richter, W.; Zaenker, H.

    2002-05-01

    Acid rock drainage (ARD) solution from an abandoned ore mine was investigated by photon correlation spectroscopy, ultrafiltration and ICP-MS. A colloid concentration of about 1 g/L was found. The prevailing particle size was < 5 nm. (orig.)

  14. Microthermometric measurement of fluid inclusions and its constraints on genesis of PGE-polymetallic deposits in Lower Cambrian black rock series, southern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Min; SUN Xiaoming; MA Mingyang

    2005-01-01

    Systematic microthermometric measurements of fluid inclusions in the PGE-polymetallic deposits hosted in the Lower Cambrian black rock series in southern China were performed, and the results suggest: (1) there exist two types of fluid inclusions. TypeⅠis of NaCl-H2O system with low-medium salinity, and its homogenization temperatures (Th) and salinities are 106.9- 286.4℃ and ( 0.8- 21.8) wt%NaCl eq. respectively; TypeⅡ is of CaCl2-NaCl-H2O system with medium-high salinities, and its homogenization temperatures and salinities range from 120.1℃ to 269.6℃ and ( 11.4- 31.4) wt%NaCl eq., respectively. The typeⅡ fluid inclusions have been discovered for the first time in this kind of deposits; (2) two generations of ore-forming fluids were recognized. Characteristics of fluid inclusions in the PGE-polymetallic ores and carbonate-quartz stockworks in the underlying phosphorites are almost of no difference, they may represent ore-forming fluids at the main metallogenic stage. The peak value of homogenization temperature of those fluid inclusions is about 170℃, while their salinities possess a remarkable bimodal distribution pattern with two peak values of (27-31) wt%NaCl eq. and (4-6) wt%NaCl eq. On the contrary, fluid inclusions in the carbonate-quartz veins in the hanging wall may represent ore-forming fluids at the post-metallogenetic stage. The homogenization temperatures and the peak values of salinities are mostly 130-170℃ and (12-14) wt%NaCl eq., respectively; (3) nobel gas isotopic composition analyses in combination with the microthermometric measurements of fluid inclusions suggest that the ore-forming fluids at the main metallogenetic stage were probably derived from mixing of basinal hot brines with the CaCl2-NaCl-H2O system and seawater with the NaCl-H2O system; (4) in the Early Cambrian, the basinal hot brines were trapped in the Caledonian basins, which were distributed along the southern margin of the Yangtze Craton, and where giant thick

  15. 'Earhart' Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    This false-color image taken by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows a rock informally named 'Earhart' on the lower slopes of 'Endurance Crater.' The rock was named after the pilot Amelia Earhart. Like 'Escher' and other rocks dotting the bottom of Endurance, scientists believe fractures in Earhart could have been formed by one of several processes. They may have been caused by the impact that created Endurance Crater, or they might have arisen when water leftover from the rock's formation dried up. A third possibility is that much later, after the rock was formed, and after the crater was created, the rock became wet once again, then dried up and developed cracks. Rover team members do not have plans to investigate Earhart in detail because it is located across potentially hazardous sandy terrain. This image was taken on sol 219 (Sept. 4) by the rover's panoramic camera, using its 750-, 530- and 430-nanometer filters.

  16. Cranny density parameters and porosity measured by elastic wave method in quasi-isotropic cranny rock masses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hong-tu; JIA Jian-qing; LI Xiao-hong; XIAN Xue-fu; HU Guo-zhong

    2006-01-01

    According to the characteristic of elastic waves propagation in medium and the application of elastic waves method in rock mass engineering, the cranny mass with random crannies was regarded as quasi-isotropic cranny mass. In accordance with the rock rupture mechanics, principle of energy balance and Castiglano's theorem, the relationship of effective dynamic parameters of elasticity ((E),(v),(G)) and cranny density parameters or porosity was put forward. On this basis, through the theory of elastic waves propagation in isotropic medium, the relationship between the elastic wave velocity and cranny density parameters and porosity was set up. The theoretical research results show that, in this kind of cranny rock masses, there is nonlinear relationships between the effective dynamic parameters of elasticity and wave velocities and the cranny density parameter or porosity; and with the increase of cranny density parameter or porosity of cranny rock masses, the effective dynamic modulus and the elastic wave velocities of cranny rock masses will decrease; and at the same time, when the cranny density parameter or porosity is very small, the effective dynamic modulus of elasticity and the elastic wave velocities change with the cranny density parameter, which can explain the sensitivity of effective elastic parameters and elastic wave velocities to cranny rock masses.

  17. Rock Art

    OpenAIRE

    Huyge, Dirk

    2009-01-01

    Rock art, basically being non-utilitarian, non-textual anthropic markings on natural rock surfaces, was an extremely widespread graphical practice in ancient Egypt. While the apogee of the tradition was definitely the Predynastic Period (mainly fourth millennium BCE), examples date from the late Palaeolithic (c. 15,000 BCE) until the Islamic era. Geographically speaking, “Egyptian” rock art is known from many hundreds of sites along the margins of the Upper Egyptian and Nubian Nile Valley and...

  18. Deformation associated with the denudation of mantle-derived rocks at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge 13°-15°N: The role of magmatic injections and hydrothermal alteration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picazo, Suzanne; Cannat, Mathilde; Delacour, AdéLie; EscartíN, Javier; RouméJon, StéPhane; Silantyev, Sergei

    2012-09-01

    Outcrops of deeply derived ultramafic rocks and gabbros are widespread along slow spreading ridges where they are exposed in the footwall of detachment faults. We report on the microstructural and petrological characteristics of a large number of samples from ultramafic exposures in the walls of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) axial valley at three distinct locations at lat. 13°N and 14°45'N. One of these locations corresponds to the footwall beneath a corrugated paleo-fault surface. Bearing in mind that dredging and ROV sampling may not preserve the most fragile lithologies (fault gouges), this study allows us to document a sequence of deformation, and the magmatic and hydrothermal history recorded in the footwall within a few hundred meters of the axial detachment fault. At the three sampled locations, we find that tremolitic amphiboles have localized deformation in the ultramafic rocks prior to the onset of serpentinization. We interpret these tremolites as hydrothermal alteration products after evolved gabbroic rocks intruded into the peridotites. We also document two types of brittle deformation in the ultramafic rocks, which we infer could produce the sustained low magnitude seismicity recorded at ridge axis detachment faults. The first type of brittle deformation affects fresh peridotite and is associated with the injection of the evolved gabbroic melts, and the second type affects serpentinized peridotites and is associated with the injection of Si-rich hydrothermal fluids that promote talc crystallization, leading to strain localization in thin talc shear zones. We also observed chlorite + serpentine shear zones but did not identify samples with serpentine-only shear zones. Although the proportion of magmatic injections in the ultramafic rocks is variable, these characteristics are found at each investigated location and are therefore proposed as fundamental components of the deformation in the footwall of the detachment faults associated with denudation of

  19. Determination of the thermal conductivity of sediment rock from measurements on cuttings; Ermittlung der Gesteinswaermeleitfaehigkeit von Sedimentgesteinen aus Messungen am Bohrklein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troschke, B.; Burkhardt, H. [Technische Univ. Berlin (Germany). Fachgebiet Angewandte Goephysik

    1997-12-01

    Due to high costs core recovery in many wells is strongly restricted. To determine thermal conductivity in these cases measurements on cuttings are necessary, since in situ measurements are expensive and protracted, too. Therefore cores from three hydrogeothermal wells of the north-east part of the German sedimentary basin were grinded to compare the results of measurements on cuttings with known values of thermal conductivity from the original cores. By a suitable model of the two-phase-system cuttings-water it is possible to calculate the thermal conductivity of the rock-matrix. On the basis of this value and a suitable rock-model an average thermal conductivity for the water saturated rock can be estimated. Certainly all influences of the texture (anisotropy, grain bond) and of the characteristics of the porespace (porosity, internal surface, saturation, permeability) are lost with measurements on cuttings. Therefore for the different systems cuttings-water and rock-porefluid as well as for different rock types different models are necessary. (orig.) [Deutsch] In vielen Bohrungen werden aus Kostengruenden keine Kerne gezogen. Fuer die Ermittlung der Waermeleitfaehigkeit koennen deshalb nur in-situ-Messungen, die ebenfalls zeit- und kostenintensiv sind, oder Messungen am Bohrklein herangezogen werden. Es wurden daher Kerne aus drei Hydrogeothermalbohrungen des nordostdeutschen Beckens aufgemahlen, um so vergleichende Messungen am `Bohrklein` aus Kernen mit bekannter Waermeleitfaehigkeit durzhzufuehren. Durch eine geeignete Modellvorstellung des Zwei-Phasen-Systems Bohrklein/Wasser laesst sich die Waermeleitfaehigkeit der Gesteinsmatrix bestimmen und aus dieser durch ein Gesteinsmodell auch eine mittlere Waermeleitfaehigkeit des wassergesaettigten Festgesteins berechnen. Klar ist, dass bei Messungen am Bohrklein Einfluesse, die durch Gefuege (Anisotropie, Kornbindung) und Porenraumeigenschaften (Porositaet, Saettigung, Permeabilitaet) hervorgerufen werden

  20. Uranium favorability of tertiary sedimentary rocks of the Pend Oreille River valley, Washington. [Measurement and sampling of surface sections, collection of samples from isolated outcrops, chemical and mineralogical analyses of samples, and examination of available water logs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marjaniemi, D.K.; Robins, J.W.

    1975-08-01

    Tertiary sedimentary rocks in the Pend Oreille River valley were investigated in a regional study to determine the favorability for potential uranium resources of northeastern Washington. This project involved measurement and sampling of surface sections, collection of samples from isolated outcrops, chemical and mineralogical analyses of samples, and examination of available water well logs. The Box Canyon Dam area north of Ione is judged to have very high favorability. Thick-bedded conglomerates interbedded with sandstones and silty sandstones compose the Tiger Formation in this area, and high radioactivity levels are found near the base of the formation. Uranophane is found along fracture surfaces or in veins. Carbonaceous material is present throughout the Tiger Formation in the area. Part of the broad Pend Oreille valley surrounding Cusick, Washington, is an area of high favorability. Potential host rocks in the Tiger Formation, consisting of arkosic sandstones interbedded with radioactive shales, probably extend throughout the subsurface part of this area. Carbonaceous material is present and some samples contain high concentrations of uranium. In addition, several other possible chemical indicators were found. The Tiger-Lost Creek area is rated as having medium favorability. The Tiger Formation contains very hard, poorly sorted granite conglomerate with some beds of arkosic sandstone and silty sandstone. The granite conglomerate was apparently derived from source rocks having relatively high uranium content. The lower part of the formation is more favorable than the upper part because of the presence of carbonaceous material, anomalously high concentrations of uranium, and other possible chemical indicators. The area west of Ione is judged to have low favorability, because of the very low permeability of the rocks and the very low uranium content. (auth)

  1. Alaskan permafrost groundwater storage changes derived from GRACE and ground measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reginald R. Muskett; Vladimir E. Romanovsky

    2011-01-01

    The Arctic is in transition from climate-driven thawing of permafrost. We investigate satellite-derived water equivalent mass changes, snow water equivalent with in situ measurements of runoff and ground-survey derived geoid models from 1999 through 2009. The Alaskan Arctic coastal plain groundwater storage (including wetland bog, thaw pond and lake) is increasing by 1...

  2. Measurement of a Phase of a Radio Wave Reflected from Rock Salt and Ice Irradiated by an Electron Beam for Detection of Ultra-High-Energy Neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Chiba, Masami; Tanikawa, Takahiro; Yano, Hiroyuki; Yabuki, Fumiaki; Yasuda, Osamu; Chikashige, Yuichi; Kon, Tadashi; Shimizu, Yutaka; Watanabe, Souichirou; Utsumi, Michiaki; Fujii, Masatoshi

    2013-01-01

    We have found a radio-wave-reflection effect in rock salt for the detection of ultra-high energy neutrinos which are expected to be generated in Greisen, Zatsepin, and Kuzmin (GZK) processes in the universe. When an UHE neutrino interacts with rock salt or ice as a detection medium, a shower is generated. That shower is formed by hadronic and electromagnetic avalanche processes. The energy of the UHE neutrino shower converts to thermal energy through ionization processes. Consequently, the temperature rises along the shower produced by the UHE neutrino. The refractive index of the medium rises with temperature. The irregularity of the refractive index in the medium leads to a reflection of radio waves. This reflection effect combined with the long attenuation length of radio waves in rock salt and ice would yield a new method to detect UHE neutrinos. We measured the phase of the reflected radio wave under irradiation with an electron beam on ice and rock salt powder. The measured phase showed excellent consis...

  3. A technique for estimating one-dimensional diffusion coefficients in low-permeability sedimentary rock using X-ray radiography: comparison with through-diffusion measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavé, Lisa; Al, Tom; Xiang, Yan; Vilks, Peter

    2009-01-07

    The measurement of diffusive properties of low-permeability rocks is of interest to the nuclear power industry, which is considering the option of deep geologic repositories for management of radioactive waste. We present a simple, non-destructive, constant source in-diffusion method for estimating one-dimensional pore diffusion coefficients (D(p)) in geologic materials based on X-ray radiography. Changes in X-ray absorption coefficient (Deltamicro) are used to quantify changes in relative concentration (C/C(0)) of an X-ray attenuating iodide tracer as the tracer solution diffuses through the rock pores. Estimated values of D(p) are then obtained by fitting an analytical solution to the measured concentration profiles over time. Measurements on samples before and after saturation with iodide can also be used to determine iodide-accessible porosity (phi(I)). To evaluate the radiography method, results were compared with traditional steady-state through-diffusion measurements on two rock types: shale and limestone. Values of D(p) of (4.8+/-2.5)x10(-11) m(2).s(-1) (mean+/-standard deviation) were measured for samples of Queenston Formation shale and (2.6+/-1.0)x10(-11) m(2).s(-1) for samples of Cobourg Formation limestone using the radiography method. The range of results for each rock type agree well with D(p) values of (4.6+/-2.0)x10(-11) m(2).s(-1) for shale and (3.5+/-1.8)x10(-11) m(2).s(-1) for limestone, calculated from through-diffusion experiments on adjacent rock samples. Low porosity (0.01 to 0.03) and heterogeneous distribution of porosity in the Cobourg Formation may be responsible for the slightly poorer agreement between radiography and through-diffusion results for limestones. Mean values of phi(I) for shales (0.060) and limestones (0.028) were close to mean porosity measurements made on bulk samples by the independent water loss technique (0.062 and 0.020 for shales and limestones, respectively). Radiography measurements offer the advantage of time

  4. Derivation of a proxy measure of suicidal ideation from the Suicide Opinion Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, David

    2004-12-01

    Scores for a 13-item scale, derived from Domino's Suicide Opinion Questionnaire correlated with scores from Reynolds' Suicide Ideation Questionnaire for 81 undergraduates and may be useful as a proxy measure of suicidal ideation.

  5. Derivation of a proxy measure of death anxiety from the suicide opinion questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, David

    2003-08-01

    A 10-item scale was derived from scores on Domino's Suicide Opinion Questionnaire which correlated with scores from Templer's Death Anxiety Scale and may prove useful as a proxy measure of death anxiety.

  6. Suspended sediment profiles derived from spectral attenuation coefficients measurements using neural network method

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Varkey, G.; Suresh, T.; Matondkar, S.G.P.; Desa, E.; Kamath, S.S.

    total suspended matter values from water samples obtained at discrete depths at the same location. An artificial neural network (ANN) model has been used to derive suspended matter from the spectral values of beam attenuation coefficients measured using...

  7. Colon cancer cell-derived 12(S)-HETE induces the retraction of cancer-associated fibroblast via MLC2, RHO/ROCK and Ca(2+) signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, Serena; Nguyen, Chi Huu; Schachner, Helga; Milovanovic, Daniela; Holzner, Silvio; Brenner, Stefan; Eichsteininger, Julia; Stadler, Mira; Senfter, Daniel; Krenn, Liselotte; Schmidt, Wolfgang M; Huttary, Nicole; Krieger, Sigurd; Koperek, Oskar; Bago-Horvath, Zsuzsanna; Brendel, Konstantin Alexander; Marian, Brigitte; de Wever, Oliver; Mader, Robert M; Giessrigl, Benedikt; Jäger, Walter; Dolznig, Helmut; Krupitza, Georg

    2016-12-24

    Retraction of mesenchymal stromal cells supports the invasion of colorectal cancer cells (CRC) into the adjacent compartment. CRC-secreted 12(S)-HETE enhances the retraction of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and therefore, 12(S)-HETE may enforce invasivity of CRC. Understanding the mechanisms of metastatic CRC is crucial for successful intervention. Therefore, we studied pro-invasive contributions of stromal cells in physiologically relevant three-dimensional in vitro assays consisting of CRC spheroids, CAFs, extracellular matrix and endothelial cells, as well as in reductionist models. In order to elucidate how CAFs support CRC invasion, tumour spheroid-induced CAF retraction and free intracellular Ca(2+) levels were measured and pharmacological- or siRNA-based inhibition of selected signalling cascades was performed. CRC spheroids caused the retraction of CAFs, generating entry gates in the adjacent surrogate stroma. The responsible trigger factor 12(S)-HETE provoked a signal, which was transduced by PLC, IP3, free intracellular Ca(2+), Ca(2+)-calmodulin-kinase-II, RHO/ROCK and MYLK which led to the activation of myosin light chain 2, and subsequent CAF mobility. RHO activity was observed downstream as well as upstream of Ca(2+) release. Thus, Ca(2+) signalling served as central signal amplifier. Treatment with the FDA-approved drugs carbamazepine, cinnarizine, nifedipine and bepridil HCl, which reportedly interfere with cellular calcium availability, inhibited CAF-retraction. The elucidation of signalling pathways and identification of approved inhibitory drugs warrant development of intervention strategies targeting tumour-stroma interaction.

  8. Seismic Absorption and Modulus Measurements in Porous Rocks Under Fluid and Gas Flow-Physical and Chemical Effects: a Laboratory Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmut Spetzler

    2005-11-28

    This paper describes the culmination of a research project in which we investigated the complex modulus change in partially fluid saturated porous rocks. The investigation started with simple flow experiments over ''clean'' and ''contaminated'' surfaces, progressed to moduli measurements on partially filled single cracks, to measurements in ''clean'' and ''contaminated'' porous rocks and finally to a feasibility study in the field. For the experiments with the simple geometries we were able to measure fundamental physical properties such as contact angles of the meniscus and time dependent forces required to get the meniscus moving and to keep it moving at various velocities. From the data thus gathered we were able to interpret the complex elastic moduli data we measured in the partially saturated single cracks. While the geometry in real rocks is too complex to make precise calculations we determined that we had indeed identified the mechanisms responsible for the changes in the moduli we had measured. Thus encouraged by the laboratory studies we embarked on a field experiment in the desert of Arizona. The field site allowed for controlled irrigation. Instrumentation for fluid sampling and water penetration were already in place. The porous loosely consolidated rocks at the site were not ideal for finding the effects of the attenuation mechanism we had identified in the lab, but for logistic and cost constraint reasons we chose to field test the idea at that site. Tiltmeters and seismometers were installed and operated nearly continuously for almost 3 years. The field was irrigated with water in the fall of 2003 and with water containing a biosurfactant in the fall of 2004. We have indications that the biosurfactant irrigation has had a notable effect on the tilt data.

  9. High Precision 142Nd/144Nd and 143Nd/144Nd Isotope Ratio Measurements in Rock Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, A.; Srinivasan, G.

    2009-05-01

    The long-lived 147Sm-143Nd system with a half-life (T1/2) of 106 Gyr is generally used for geochronology. The short-lived 146Sm-142Nd system (T1/2= 103 Myr) is used as a geological tracer to track early (˜500 Ma) silicate differentiation [1] events in different planetary bodies. The isotope composition measurements by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) require purification of Nd using chemical separation methods. This is important as an impure sample will give both a very poor ion yield and cause beam instability in the mass spectrometer, potentially resulting in a poor analysis [2]. The separation of Nd for 143Nd isotope measurement is, fairly straightforward because there is no isobaric interference of any other REE. While 142Nd isotope analysis needs chemically separated Nd fraction to be ˜100% Ce-free as latter is composed of a substantial amount of 142Ce isotope. A 4-steps technique, modified from Caro et al., [3], for the separation of Nd is established at the Cosmochemistry Laboratory of University of Toronto, Canada and applied to the measurement of Nd isotope ratios in geological reference sample BCR-2 (USGS, Columbia River basalt) using TIMS. Results of the isotopic ratios obtained for BCR-2 are in good agreement with published values [e.g., 4]. Analytical work on the samples discovered as the oldest rocks on Earth [5] from Nuvvuagittuq greenstone belt in Québec, Canada and various meteorites is in progress. An account of the procedures involved is briefly described here. All working solutions and acids were prepared using >18.2 MΩ.cm-1 H2O from a Milli-Q water system. Experiments were performed under Class 100 clean work bench with acid-cleaned apparatus and plastic-ware. The whole rock powders were weighed (20-30 mg) and dissolved in a mixture of HF and HNO3 using PFA vials and heated at 110°C. Further decomposition was done in Teflon bomb in the oven at 205°C. Later on contents of the Teflon bomb were transferred to vials and fluorides

  10. Art Rocks with Rock Art!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickett, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses rock art which was the very first "art." Rock art, such as the images created on the stone surfaces of the caves of Lascaux and Altimira, is the true origin of the canvas, paintbrush, and painting media. For there, within caverns deep in the earth, the first artists mixed animal fat, urine, and saliva with powdered minerals…

  11. Art Rocks with Rock Art!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickett, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses rock art which was the very first "art." Rock art, such as the images created on the stone surfaces of the caves of Lascaux and Altimira, is the true origin of the canvas, paintbrush, and painting media. For there, within caverns deep in the earth, the first artists mixed animal fat, urine, and saliva with powdered minerals…

  12. Characteristics, causes and control measures of disasters for the soft-rock tunnels in the Wenchuan seismic regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Li, Tianbin; He, Chuan; Zhou, Yi

    2016-08-01

    The Guang(yuan)-Gan(su) Expressway is located in the core areas where the Wenchuan earthquake occurred. The surrounding soft-rocks of several tunnels in this region, such as the Dujiashan and Yangjiashan tunnels, are mainly broken into phyllites due to the severe action of the earthquake. Through analyzing the effects of large deformations, lining damage and collapses, which happen frequently in the soft-rock tunnels in the Guang-Gan Expressway, the characteristics and causes of such geological disasters are obtained. It is demonstrated that the large deformation and collapse occur near the vault and tunnel face. The poor mechanical properties and weak self-bearing capacity of the surrounding rock and the softening caused by groundwater are important contributing factors to these disasters. The lack of experience in the design and construction of tunnels in the meizoseismal area, as well as the aftershocks are other important factors to consider. Field test results indicate that the three-bench and the reserved core soil construction method should be applied to control the stability of broken phyllite tunnels, and that this key technology should be strictly controlled during its construction. In particular, increasing the stiffness of the supporting structure and enclosing of the lining in time are efficient methods to control large deformations and collapses in soft-rock tunnels in the meizoseismal area.

  13. Pore Structure Characteristics and Permeability of Deep Sedimentary Rocks Determined by Mercury Intrusion Porosimetry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Na Zhang; Manchao He; Bo Zhang; Fengchao Qiao; Hailong Sheng; Qinhong Hu

    2016-01-01

    Pore structure characteristics of rock are a great concern for researchers and practitio-ners in rock mechanics and rock engineering fields. In this study, mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) was used to measure pore size distribution, as well as several important index parameters of pore structure, for seven common types of deep sedimentary rocks with a total of fifty rock samples. Results show a similar pore size distribution pattern of the rock samples in the same lithological group, but remarkable differences among different lithological groups. Among seven investigated rock types, mudstone has the smallest porosity of 3.37%, while conglomerate has the largest value of 18.8%. It is also found that the porosity of rock types with finer grain size is lower than those with coarser grain size. Meanwhile, a comparison of frequency distribution at ten intervals of pore-throat diameter among seven types of sedimentary rocks reveals that different rock types have different dominant pore-size ranges. Furthermore, permeability of the investigated sedimentary rock samples was derived based on MIP data using reported theoretical equations. Among seven rock types, mudstone has the lowest averaged permeability (3.64×10-6mD) while conglomerate has the highest one (8.59×10-4 mD). From mudstone to conglomerate, rock permeability increases with an increase of grain size, with only an exception of siltstone which has a relatively larger porosity value. Finally, regression analysis show that there is a good fitting (R2=0.95) between permeability and porosity which could be easily used to derive reliable permeability values of similar kinds of engineering rocks.

  14. ROCK ON

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thomas Grose

    2014-01-01

    ..., however, was music - especially the high-pitched sounds of pop and rock, which boosted energy output by up to 40 percent. By contrast, classical music's lower pitches barely raised effectiveness. O...

  15. The physics of rock failure and earthquakes

    CERN Document Server

    Ohnaka, Mitiyasu

    2013-01-01

    Despite significant advances in the understanding of earthquake generation processes and derivation of underlying physical laws, controversy remains regarding the constitutive law for earthquake ruptures and how it should be formulated. Laboratory experiments are necessary to obtain high-resolution measurements that allow the physical nature of shear rupture processes to be deduced, and to resolve the controversy. This important book provides a deeper understanding of earthquake processes from nucleation to their dynamic propagation. Its key focus is a deductive approach based on laboratory-derived physical laws and formulae, such as a unifying constitutive law, a constitutive scaling law, and a physical model of shear rupture nucleation. Topics covered include: the fundamentals of rock failure physics, earthquake generation processes, physical scale dependence, and large-earthquake generation cycles. Designed for researchers and professionals in earthquake seismology, rock failure physics, geology and earthq...

  16. In-situ stress measurements of rock mass: dome effect of the Peribonka project; Mesure des contraintes en rocher : effet de dome, project Peribonka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babin, D.; Bouchard, R. [Techmat Inc., Jonquiere, PQ (Canada); Whalen, A. [Hydro-Quebec, Montreal, PQ (Canada). Geology and Rock Mechanics

    2006-07-01

    In order to determine the state of stress that exists perpendicular to natural planes found within the anorthositic rock mass at the site of the future Peribonka project, 43 hydrojacking tests were conducted in 2003 and 2004. The future project is currently under construction 200 km north of the town of Saguenay, Quebec. The primary objective was to determine the minimum stress field near the proposed headrace tunnels in order to calculate the required length of steel lining. Rock mass in-situ stress measurements were determined from geotechnical studies of boreholes. They were used to validate the optimal location of the headrace tunnels and the underground powerhouse. Seven different methods were used measure the state of stress. The rock mass, being dome shaped, affected the results in as they were consistently below the expected value. However, the value was sufficient to sustain the water pressure generated inside the headrace tunnels for the future powerhouse. Due to the topographical effects of the land, values were affected by the presence of two major shear zones, along the Peribonka and Manouane rivers. Therefore, the minimum stress field decreased significantly towards these structures. The results of the preliminary testing identified the ideal location of the future hydroelectric powerhouse. The results will also help reduce costs of future construction and minimize risks. 11 refs., 1 tab., 6 figs.

  17. Revisited the mathematical derivation wall thickness measurement of pipe for radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamzah, A.R.; Amir, S.M.M. [Non Destructive Testing(NDT) Group, Industrial Technology Div., Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2007-07-01

    Wall thickness measurement of pipe is very important of the structural integrity of the industrial plant. However, the radiography method has an advantage because the ability of penetrating the insulated pipe. This will have economic benefit for industry. Moreover, the era of digital radiography has more advantages because the speed of radiographic work, less exposure time and no chemical used for film development. Either the conventional radiography or digital radiology, the wall thickness measurement is using the tangential radiography technique (TRT). In case, of a large diameter, pipe (more than inches) the determination maximum penetration wall thickness must be taken into the consideration. This paper is revisited the mathematical derivation of the determination of wall thickness measurement based on tangential radiography technique (TRT). The mathematical approach used in this derivation is the Pythagoras theorem and geometrical principles. In order to derive the maximum penetration wall thickness a similar approach is used. (authors)

  18. Radiation damage measurements on rock salt and other minerals for waste disposal applications. Quarterly report, January 1, 1980-March 31, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swyler, K J; Loman, J M; Teutonico, L J; Elgort, G E; Levy, P W

    1980-04-10

    Different aspects of radiation damage in both synthetic NaCl crystals and various natural rock salt samples as well as granite, basalt and other minerals which will be important for radioactive waste disposal applications are being investigated. The principal means of measuring radiation damage is the determination of F-center concentrations, and the concentration and size of sodium metal colloid particles. Formation of these and other defects during irradiation and the annealing of defects and characterization of other processes occurring after irradiation are being studied as a function of dose rate, total dose, sample temperature during irradiation, strain applied prior to and during irradiation, etc. Measurements are being made on synthetic NaCl and natural rock salt samples from different geological locations, including some potential repository sites. It will be necessary to determine if radiation damage in the minerals from different localities is similar. If non-negligible differences are observed a detailed study must be made for each locality under consideration. Almost all current studies are being made on rock salt but other minerals particularly granite and basalt are being phased into the program. It is now established that radiation damage formation in both natural and synthetic rock salt is strongly dependent on strain. The strain related effects strongly indicate that the damage formation processes and in particular the colloid nucleation processes are related to the strain induced disolcations. A temporary theoretical effort has been started to determine which dislocation related effects are important for radiation damage processes and, most importantly, what dislocation interactions are most likely to create nucleation sites for colloid particles. If these preliminary studies indicate that additional theoretical studies will be useful an effort will be made to have them extended.

  19. Damage Model of Brittle Coal-Rock and Damage Energy Index of Rock Burst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹光志; 张东明; 魏作安; 李东伟

    2003-01-01

    Based on the mechanical experiment of brittle coal-rock and the damage mechanical theory, a damage model was established. Coal-Rock damage mechanical characteristic was researched. Furthermore, interior energy transformation mechanism of rock was analyzed from the point of view of damage mechanics and damage energy release rate of brittle coal rock was derived. By analyzing the energy transformation of rock burst, a new conception, damage energy index of rock burst, was put forward. The condition of rock burst was also established.

  20. Paratingent Derivative Applied to the Measure of the Sensitivity in Multiobjective Differential Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. García

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyse the sensitivity of differential programs of the form subject to where and are maps whose respective images lie in ordered Banach spaces. Following previous works on multiobjective programming, the notion of -optimal solution is used. The behaviour of some nonsingleton sets of -optimal solutions according to changes of the parameter in the problem is analysed. The main result of the work states that the sensitivity of the program is measured by a Lagrange multiplier plus a projection of its derivative. This sensitivity is measured by means of the paratingent derivative.

  1. Metasomatic Origin of Some of the Eclogite—Bearing Carbonate Rocks in the Dabie Mountain Region,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾连兴; 杜建国; 等

    1999-01-01

    Carbonate rocks are one of the major hosts to eclogite in the Mt.Dabie region.Eclogite bodies enclosed in the carbonate rocks occur mostly as knobs,ovoids and lenses measuring centimeters to tens of centimeters in size.The bodies have been intensely carbonatized and usually have transitional contacts with their carbonate hosts.The carbonate rocks have abundant relics of eclogite minerals and their tetrogressive derivatives.The REE patterns of the carbonate rocks are characterized by the absence of negative Ce anomaly.These features suggest that a considerable portion of the eclogite-bearing carbonate rocks in the Mt .Dabie region was produced by carbonatization of eclogites and their retrogressive derivatives.These carbonate rocks suffered deformation and recrystllization after their formation.

  2. Tensile rock mass strength estimated using InSAR

    KAUST Repository

    Jonsson, Sigurjon

    2012-11-01

    The large-scale strength of rock is known to be lower than the strength determined from small-scale samples in the laboratory. However, it is not well known how strength scales with sample size. I estimate kilometer-scale tensional rock mass strength by measuring offsets across new tensional fractures (joints), formed above a shallow magmatic dike intrusion in western Arabia in 2009. I use satellite radar observations to derive 3D ground displacements and by quantifying the extension accommodated by the joints and the maximum extension that did not result in a fracture, I put bounds on the joint initiation threshold of the surface rocks. The results indicate that the kilometer-scale tensile strength of the granitic rock mass is 1–3 MPa, almost an order of magnitude lower than typical laboratory values.

  3. 'Wopmay' Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    This approximate true-color image taken by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows an unusual, lumpy rock informally named 'Wopmay' on the lower slopes of 'Endurance Crater.' The rock was named after the Canadian bush pilot Wilfrid Reid 'Wop' May. Like 'Escher' and other rocks dotting the bottom of Endurance, scientists believe the lumps in Wopmay may be related to cracking and alteration processes, possibly caused by exposure to water. The area between intersecting sets of cracks eroded in a way that created the lumpy appearance. Rover team members plan to drive Opportunity over to Wopmay for a closer look in coming sols. This image was taken by the rover's panoramic camera on sol 248 (Oct. 4, 2004), using its 750-, 530- and 480-nanometer filters.

  4. Study on the Reinforcement Measures and Control Effect of the Surrounding Rock Stability Based on the Shield Tunneling Under Overpass Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian-cheng Fang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available To study the stability of surrounding rocks for shield tunneling under overpass structures and the safety of existing bridge structures, a practical example of the method was cited through a shield tunneling project under the overpass structure between K1+110 and K1+700 on Line 2 of Shenyang Subway, China. The sub-area reinforcement was proposed according to surrounding rock deformation characteristics during shield tunnel excavation. The bridge foundation (i.e., the clear spacing to the shield tunnel is less than 2 m was reinforced by steel support, the bridge foundation (the clear spacing is about 2~7m used “jet grouting pile” reinforcement, whereas the bridge foundation (the clear spacing is greater than 7 m did not adopt any reinforcement measures for the moment. For this study, the mean value and material heterogeneity models were established to evaluate the reinforcement effect from several aspects, such as surrounding rock deformation, plastic zone development, and safety factor. The simulation results were consistent with those of field monitoring. After reinforcement, the maximum deformation values of the surrounding rock were reduced by 4.9%, 12.2%, and 48.46%, and the maximum values of surface subsidence were decreased by 5.6%, 72.2%, and 88.64%. By contrast, the overall safety factor was increased by 4.1%, 55.46%, and 55.46%. This study posited that this reinforcement method can be adopted to solve tunnel construction problems in engineering-geological conditions effectively. References for evaluating similar projects are provided.

  5. The instantaneous rate dependence in low temperature laboratory rock friction and rock deformation experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeler, N.M.; Tullis, T.E.; Kronenberg, A.K.; Reinen, L.A.

    2007-01-01

    Earthquake occurrence probabilities that account for stress transfer and time-dependent failure depend on the product of the effective normal stress and a lab-derived dimensionless coefficient a. This coefficient describes the instantaneous dependence of fault strength on deformation rate, and determines the duration of precursory slip. Although an instantaneous rate dependence is observed for fracture, friction, crack growth, and low temperature plasticity in laboratory experiments, the physical origin of this effect during earthquake faulting is obscure. We examine this rate dependence in laboratory experiments on different rock types using a normalization scheme modified from one proposed by Tullis and Weeks [1987]. We compare the instantaneous rate dependence in rock friction with rate dependence measurements from higher temperature dislocation glide experiments. The same normalization scheme is used to compare rate dependence in friction to rock fracture and to low-temperature crack growth tests. For particular weak phyllosilicate minerals, the instantaneous friction rate dependence is consistent with dislocation glide. In intact rock failure tests, for each rock type considered, the instantaneous rate dependence is the same size as for friction, suggesting a common physical origin. During subcritical crack growth in strong quartzofeldspathic and carbonate rock where glide is not possible, the instantaneous rate dependence measured during failure or creep tests at high stress has long been thought to be due to crack growth; however, direct comparison between crack growth and friction tests shows poor agreement. The crack growth rate dependence appears to be higher than the rate dependence of friction and fracture by a factor of two to three for all rock types considered. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  6. Source rock

    OpenAIRE

    Abubakr F. Makky; Mohamed I. El Sayed; Ahmed S. Abu El-Ata; Ibrahim M. Abd El-Gaied; Mohamed I. Abdel-Fattah; Zakaria M. Abd-Allah

    2014-01-01

    West Beni Suef Concession is located at the western part of Beni Suef Basin which is a relatively under-explored basin and lies about 150 km south of Cairo. The major goal of this study is to evaluate the source rock by using different techniques as Rock-Eval pyrolysis, Vitrinite reflectance (%Ro), and well log data of some Cretaceous sequences including Abu Roash (E, F and G members), Kharita and Betty formations. The BasinMod 1D program is used in this study to construct the burial history ...

  7. Calc-alkali rocks derived from tholeiite magma in Hakone volcano; pyroxene crystallization trends and pyroxene geothermometry to estimate the magma temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, T.

    2012-12-01

    Calc-alkali rocks are widely distributed in the island arcs. The several models of their magma-genesis were proposed by many geoscientists (e.g. Kuno 1950, Osborn 1959, Sakuyama 1981, Tatsumi 2011) on the bases of precise petrological investigations. Crystallization trends of rock forming minerals (pyroxene, feldspar etc.) in the individual lava flow of the hydrous tholeiitic magma are represented by chemical zoning from phenocryst through microphenocryst to the groundmass in each lava. Those trends indicate degassing (or dehydrating) trends of erupted lava (Ishii 1991). Crystallization trend of minerals of hydrous magma in the subvolcanic magma reservoir is represented by core of phenocrysts throughout lava-flow strata in each volcano. Those trends indicate water-enrichment (or hydrating) trend in the magma reservoir. On the bases of the detailed analyses of the pyroxene crystallization sequences as well as estimated magmatic temperatures using pyroxene geothermometer, for calc-alkali rocks from the Central Cone (CC) in the Hakone volcano, the following working hypothesis is suggested, i.e. those calc-alkali rocks are induced by magma mixing between high temperature (about 1120 Degree Centigrade) tholeiite magma and low temperature (about 970 Degree Centigrade) magma, the latter is originated from fractional crystallization of the primitive high temperature hydras island-arc tholeiite magma within magma reservoir under closed environment for water. Reference Ishii, T., 1991. Lava-flow and subvolcanic magma reservoir composition trends in the Ca-poor pyroxenes of Hakone Volcano, Japan. Jour. Petrol., 32, 429-450 Kuno, H., 1950. Petrology of Hakone volcano and the adjacent areas, Japan. Bull. Geol. Soc. Am., 61, 957-1019. Sakuyama, M., 1981. Petrological study of the Myoko and Kurohime volcanoes, Japan: crystallization sequence and evidence for magma mixing. Jour. Petrol., 22, 553-583. Osborn, E. F., 1959. Role of oxygen pressure in the crystallization and

  8. Deriving the surface composition from particle measurements in orbit around Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurz, P.; Rohner, U.; Whitby, J.; Lammer, H.; Massetti, S.; Orsini, S.

    We combine our three recent theoretical models (exopsheric density profiles, particle precipitation, and sputtering of minerals) to directly connect neutral particle densities measured in the exosphere with their respective surface densities. In addition, by reasonably constraining the number of minerals on Mercury's surface we can derive a mineralogical composition from the measured exospheric densities. The potential of this approach will be demonstrated using the existing data for the exospheric densities of H, O, Na, K, and Ca.

  9. Isotope abundances of solar coronal material derived from solar energetic particle measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewaldt, R. A.; Stone, E. C.

    1989-01-01

    Coronal isotopic abundances for the elements He, C, N, O, Ne, and Mg are derived from previously published measurements of the isotopic composition of solar energetic particles by first measuring, and then correcting for, the charge-to-mass-dependent fractionation due to solar flare acceleration and propagation processes. The resulting coronal composition generally agrees with that of other samples of solar system material, but the previously noted difference between the solar flare and solar wind Ne-22/Ne-20 ratios remains unresolved.

  10. Sensitivity to Change of Objectively-Derived Measures of Sedentary Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chastin, Sebastien F. M.; Winkler, Elisabeth A. H.; Eakin, Elizabeth G.; Gardiner, Paul A.; Dunstan, David W.; Owen, Neville; Healy, Genevieve N.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the sensitivity to change of measures of sedentary behavior derived from body worn sensors in different intervention designs. Results from two intervention studies: "Stand up for Your Health" (pre-post home-based study with older adults not in paid employment) and "Stand Up Comcare"…

  11. Nonlinear least square estimation using difference quotient instead of derivative containing different classes of measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶华学; 郭金运

    2002-01-01

    Using difference quotient instead of derivative, the paper presents the solution method and procedure of the nonlinear least square estimation containing different classes of measurements. In the meantime, the paper shows several practical cases, which indicate the method is very valid and reliable.

  12. THE EFFECT OF SUBMAXIMAL INHALATION ON MEASURES DERIVED FROM FORCED EXPIRATORY SPIROMETRY

    Science.gov (United States)

    THE EFFECT OF SUBMAXIMAL INHALATION ON MEASURES DERIVED FROM FORCED EXPIRATORY SPIROMETRY. William F. McDonnell Human Studies Division, NHEERL, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, RTP, NC 27711. Short-term exposure to ozone results in a neurally-mediated decrease in the ab...

  13. Energy expenditure in rock/pop drumming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Rue, S E; Draper, S B; Potter, C R; Smith, M S

    2013-10-01

    Despite the vigorous nature of rock/pop drumming, there are no precise data on the energy expenditure of this activity. The aim of this study was to quantify the energy cost of rock/pop drumming. Fourteen male drummers (mean±SD; age 27±8 yrs.) completed an incremental drumming test to establish the relationship between energy expenditure and heart rate for this activity and a ramped cycle ergometer test to exhaustion as a criterion measure for peak values (oxygen uptake and heart rate). During live concert performance heart rate was continuously measured and used to estimate energy expenditure (from the energy expenditure vs. heart rate data derived from the drumming test). During concert performance, estimated energy expenditure (mean±SD) was 623±168 kcal.h⁻¹ (8.1±2.2 METs) during performances of 38.6±15.6 min, and drummers achieved a peak heart rate of 186±16 b.min⁻¹. During the drumming test participants attained 78.7±8.3% of the cycle ergometer peak oxygen uptake. Rock/pop drumming represents a relatively high-intensity form of physical activity and as such involves significant energy expenditure. Rock/pop drumming should be considered as a viable alternative to more traditional forms of physical activity.

  14. Techniques for Elastic Properties Measurements of Partial Molten Rocks, Hydrous Minerals and Melts in Gas Pressure Vessels and Multi-Anvil Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, H. J.; Roetzler, K.; Schilling, F. R.; Wehber, M.; Lathe, C.

    2008-12-01

    The interpretation of highly resolved seismic data from Earth's deep interior require measurements of the physical properties of Earth materials under experimental simulated mantle conditions. For deep crustal to uppermost mantle conditions high performance gas pressure vessels enable a virtually unrestricted optimization of the measuring configurations for high p-T-conditions [1]. Exhumed high pressure rocks can be used as representative samples. The paper presents transient measurements of elastic wave velocities for granulite facies rocks under partial melting conditions. Despite the compact natural rock samples as a result of long-term experiments exceeding pressures of 1.5 GPa and temperatures of 1,000°C newly-formed garnets, orthopyroxenes and potash feldspars could be found in the samples after the experiments. Discovering the huge water storage capacity of nominally anhydrous minerals (NAMs) under high pressure conditions dramatically changed our image of state and dynamics of Earth's deep interior [2]. The simulation of these in situ conditions require using of diamond anvil cells (DAC) and multi-anvil devices (MAD) as well as mostly synthetical samples. MADs are more limited in pressure, but provide sample volumes 3 to 7 orders of magnitude bigger. They offer small and even adjustable temperature gradients over the whole sample. The bigger samples make anisotropy and structural effects in complex systems accessible for measurements in principle. Using ultrasonic interferometry the measurement of both elastic wave velocities have no limits for opaque and encapsulated samples. Using the 6 to 8 anvils of a MAD as buffers allow the simultaneous recording of acoustic emissions from different directions of space and consequently the localization of the spikes during ongoing phase transitions and dehydration. The recent development of deformation-DIA MADs (D-DIA) make not only deformation measurements under simulated mantle conditions possible, but also the

  15. Occurrence, thermal evolution and primary migration processes derived from studies of organic matter in the Lucaogou source rock at the southern margin of the Junggar Basin, NW China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The Lucaogou Formation carbonate-rich oil shale source rock is exposed at the southern margin of the Junggar Basin, Xinjiang, NW China. We have sampled it in detail and conducted microstructural, mineralogical and geochemical studies, including thin section petrography, UV fluorescence petrography, X-ray diffraction, vitrinite reflectance, bitumen reflectance, fluid inclusion analysis and Raman spectroscopy. Organic matter is disseminated through the carbonate-bearing siltstone source rocks and concentrated in numerous bedding parallel stylolites and in two sets of carbonate veins, one along bedding parallel fractures and the other cross-cutting stylolites and bedding. The research about maturity of organic matter finds vitrinite reflectance values increase from the dispersed kerogen (0.64%) to the stylolites (the one of oriented vitrinite is 0.72% and the one of migrated bitumen is 2.38%); Homogenization temperatures of fluid inclusions in veins containing hydrocarbon fluid inclusions show an increase from 178.5℃ in the bedding parallel veins to 222℃ in the cross-cutting veins, confirmed by Raman spectroscopy. These results support a model of progressive heating accompanied by fluid loss during later stages of thermal maturation of source rock and the onset of primary migration. Obviously, the occurrence of organic matter is the trace of hydrocarbon primary migration, and the bedding lamination surfaces and cross-cutting fissures are the principal pathways of hydrocarbon-bearing fluids migration. Bedding lamination surfaces evolved into stylolites along the earliest primary migration pathways, followed by bedding parallel and cross-cutting fissures.

  16. Rock Paintings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Julienne Edwards

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the integration of art and academics in a fifth-grade instructional unit on Native American culture. Describes how students studied Native American pictographs, designed their own pictographs, made their own tools, and created rock paintings of their pictographs using these tools. Provides a list of references on Native American…

  17. Ayers Rock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王慧茹

    2002-01-01

    Ayers Rock is right in the centre of Australia.It's nearly two thousand kilometres______Sydney.So we flew most of the way.h was rather cloudy______But after we left the mountains behind us, there was hardly a cloud in thesky.

  18. Intellektuaalne rock

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2007-01-01

    Briti laulja-helilooja ja näitleja Toyah Willcox ning Bill Rieflin ansamblist R.E.M. ja Pat Mastelotto King Krimsonist esinevad koos ansamblitega The Humans ja Tuner 25. okt. Tallinnas Rock Cafés ja 27. okt Tartu Jaani kirikus

  19. Intellektuaalne rock

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2007-01-01

    Briti laulja-helilooja ja näitleja Toyah Willcox ning Bill Rieflin ansamblist R.E.M. ja Pat Mastelotto King Krimsonist esinevad koos ansamblitega The Humans ja Tuner 25. okt. Tallinnas Rock Cafés ja 27. okt Tartu Jaani kirikus

  20. Alkaline Rocks and Geodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    BONIN, Bernard

    1998-01-01

    Origin of A-type alkali feldspar granites is currently the subject of a world-wide debate. Contrasting hypotheses have been proposed, which range from an entirely crustal origin to an almost complete mantle derivation. A-type alkali feldspar granites belong to either unimodal granite (rhyolite)-dominated association, or bimodal gabbro (basalt)-granite (rhyolite) suite. It is argued that (i) the ultimate mantle origin of basic to intermediate rocks is beyond doubt, (ii) highly evolved felsi...

  1. Seasonal variability of cloud optical depth over northwestern China derived from CERES/MODIS satellite measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yonghang Chen; Hongtao Bai; Jianping Huang; Hua Zhang; Jinming Ge; Xiaodan Guan; Xiaoqin Mao

    2008-01-01

    The seasonal variability of cloud optical depth over northwestern China derived from Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Single Scanner Footprint (SSF) Aqua Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Edition 1B data from July 2002 to June 2004 is presented. The regions of interest are those with Asia monsoon influence, the Tianshan and Qilian Mountains, and the Taklimakan Desert. The results show that the instantaneous measurements presented here are much higher than the previous results derived from International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) D2 monthly mean data. Generally the measurements of cloud optical depth are the highest in summer and the lowest in winter, however, Taklimakan Desert has the lowest measurements in autumn. The regional variation is quite significant over northwestern China.

  2. Tropical tropospheric ozone derived using Clear-Cloudy Pairs (CCP) of TOMS measurements

    OpenAIRE

    M.J. Newchurch; Sun, D.; Kim, J. H.; Liu, X.

    2003-01-01

    Using TOMS total-ozone measurements over high-altitude cloud locations and nearby paired clear locations, we describe the Clear-Cloudy Pairs (CCP) method for deriving tropical tropospheric ozone. The high-altitude clouds are identified by measured 380 nm reflectivities greater than 80% and Temperature Humidity InfraRed (THIR) measured cloud-top pressures less than 200 hPa. To account for locations without high-altitude clouds, we apply a zonal sine fitting to the stratospheric ozone deri...

  3. Density and velocity relationships for digital sonic and density logs from coastal Washington and laboratory measurements of Olympic Peninsula mafic rocks and greywackes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocher, Thomas M.; Christensen, Nikolas I.

    2001-01-01

    for each well log. We also present two-way traveltimes for 15 of the wells calculated from the sonic velocities. Average velocities and densities for the wells having both logs can be reasonably well related using a modified Gardner’s rule, with p=1825v1/4, where p is the density (in kg/m3) and v is the sonic velocity (in km/s). In contrast, a similar analysis of published well logs from Puget Lowland is best matched by a Gardner’s rule of p=1730v1/4, close to the p=1740v1/4 proposed by Gardner et al. (1974). Finally, we present laboratory measurements of compressional-wave velocity, shear-wave velocity, and density for 11 greywackes and 29 mafic rocks from the Olympic Peninsula and Puget Lowland. These units have significance for earthquake-hazard investigations in Puget Lowland as they dip eastward beneath the Lowland, forming the “bedrock” beneath much of the lowland. Average Vp/Vs ratios for the mafic rocks, mainly Crescent Formation volcanics, lie between 1.81 and 1.86. Average Vp/Vs ratios for the greywackes from the accretionary core complex in the Olympic Peninsula show greater scatter but lie between 1.77 and 1.88. Both the Olympic Peninsula mafic rocks and greywackes have lower shear-wave velocities than would be expected for a Poisson solid (Vp/Vs=1.732). Although the P-wave velocities and densities in the greywackes can be related by a Gardner’s rule of p=1720v1/4, close to the p=1740v1/4 proposed by Gardner et al. (1974), the velocities and densities of the mafic rocks are best related by a Gardner’s rule of p=1840v1/4. Thus, the density/velocity relations are similar for the Puget Lowland well logs and greywackes from the Olympic Peninsula. Density/velocity relations are similar for the Washington coastal well logs and mafic rocks from the Olympic Peninsula, but differ from those of the Puget Lowland well logs and greywackes from the Olympic Peninsula.

  4. Patient-derived measures of GI endoscopy: a meta-narrative review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Sally; Bevan, Roisin; Rubin, Greg; Nixon, Catherine; Dunn, Simon; Panter, Simon; Rees, Colin J

    2015-05-01

    GI endoscopy (GIE) is widely performed, with 1 in 3 people requiring an endoscopic procedure at some point. Patient experience of medical procedures is important, but, to date, experience measures of GIE are derived from clinician opinion rather than from patients themselves. In this meta-narrative review, the literature on methods of assessing patient experience in GIE is reported. ScienceDirect, MEDLINE, Web of Knowledge, Web of Science, CINAHL, and PsycINFO were searched to November 2013 using meta-narrative standards. Search terms included those related to endoscopic procedures, combined with those related to patient experience. A total of 3688 abstracts were identified and reviewed for relevance. A total of 3549 were excluded, leaving 139 for full-text review. We subsequently included 48 articles. Three sub-groups of studies were identified--those developing original measures of endoscopy-specific patient experience (27 articles), those modifying existing measures (10 articles), and those testing existing measures for reliability or validity (11 articles). Most measures focused on pain, discomfort, anxiety, and embarrassment. Three studies explored wider aspects of experience, including preparation, unit organization, and endoscopist preference. Likert scales, visual analog scale scores, and questionnaires were used most commonly. The Global Rating Scale was validated for use in 2 studies, confirming that those domains cover all aspects of endoscopy experience. Other measures were modified to assess endoscopic experience, such as the modified Group Health Association of America survey (mGHAA-9) (modified by 5 studies). No patient-derived and validated endoscopy-specific experience measures were found. Patient-derived and validated experience measures should be developed and used to model optimal healthcare delivery. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Improved SAR Amplitude Image Offset Measurements for Deriving Three-Dimensional Coseismic Displacements

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Teng

    2015-02-03

    Offsets of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images have played an important role in deriving complete three-dimensional (3-D) surface displacement fields in geoscientific applications. However, offset maps often suffer from multiple outliers and patch-like artifacts, because the standard offset-measurement method is a regular moving-window operation that does not consider the scattering characteristics of the ground. Here, we show that by focusing the offset measurements on predetected strong reflectors, the reliability and accuracy of SAR offsets can be significantly improved. Application to the 2011 Van (Turkey) earthquake reveals a clear deformation signal from an otherwise decorrelated interferogram, making derivation of the 3-D coseismic displacement field possible. Our proposed method can improve mapping of coseismic deformation and other ground displacements, such as glacier flow and landslide movement when strong reflectors exist.

  6. χ measurements in Schiff’s base derivatives: Effect of metal nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudheesh, P.; Chandrasekharan, K.

    2012-02-01

    The third-order nonlinear optical properties of Schiff's base derivatives and the effect of metal nanoparticles (Ag & Au) on their nonlinear optical response were studied. Colloidal metal nanoparticles were prepared by laser ablation. Z-scan technique with a 7ns Nd:YAG laser pulses at 532 nm were employed for the measurements. The compounds exhibit good optical limiting properties at the wavelength used. The materials used in the present work indicate that these materials are promising candidates for photonics applications.

  7. Comparison of advanced Arctic Ocean model sea ice fields to satellite derived measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Dimitriou, David S.

    1998-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited Numerical models have proven integral to the study of climate dynamics. Sea ice models are critical to the improvement of general circulation models used to study the global climate. The object of this study is to evaluate a high resolution ice-ocean coupled model by comparing it to derived measurements from SMMR and SSM/I satellite observations. Utilized for this study was the NASA Goddard Space Flight (GSFC) Sea Ice Concentration Dat...

  8. Discovery of bis-aryl urea derivatives as potent and selective Limk inhibitors: Exploring Limk1 activity and Limk1/ROCK2 selectivity through a combined computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jiaxin; Ding, Mei; Deng, Wei; Yin, Yan; Wang, Zhonghua; Zhou, Hong; Sun, Guofeng; Jiang, Yu; Feng, Yangbo

    2015-12-01

    Lim kinase (Limk), a proline/serine-rich sequence, can regulate the polymerization of the actin filaments by phosphorylating, and it is found to be highly involved in various human diseases. In this paper, 47 reported Limk1 inhibitors with bis-aryl urea scaffold were used to design potent and selective Limk inhibitors by computational approaches. Firstly, the structure-Limk1 activity relationship models (3D-QSAR) and structure-Limk1/ROCK2 selectivity relationship models (3D-QSSR) were developed and both 3D-QSAR and 3D-QSSR models showed good correlative and predictive abilities. Then, the molecular docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were employed to validate the optimal docking conformation and explore the binding affinities. Finally, five new compounds were designed and all of them exhibited good Limk1 inhibition and Limk1/ROCK2 selectivity after synthesis and biological evaluation, which demonstrated that the obtained information from computational studies were valuable to guide Limk inhibitors' design.

  9. Predictive value of derived calcium figures based on the measurement of ionised calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, M D; Dryburgh, F J; Fyffe, J A; Jenkins, A S

    1981-03-01

    The algorithms used in this hospital to assess calcium status are calculated ionised serum calcium and the serum calcium concentration adjusted for albumin. In order to establish their clinical usefulness, they were compared with the ionised calcium concentration measured on the Nova 2 instrument in patients with various calcium and protein abnormalities. Good correlation was found between the measured and calculated values. The predictive values for the calculated results and for total serum calcium concentrations are presented. In this series, the derived values were useful in predicting the serum ionised calcium concentration of the patients studied.

  10. Derivation of the respiratory rate from directly and indirectly measured respiratory signals using autocorrelation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schrumpf Fabian

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The estimation of respiratory rates from contineous respiratory signals is commonly done using either fourier transformation or the zero-crossing method. This paper introduces another method which is based on the autocorrelation function of the respiratory signal. The respiratory signals can be measured either directly using a flow sensor or chest strap or indirectly on the basis of the electrocardiogram (ECG. We compare our method against other established methods on the basis of real-world ECG signals and use a respiration-based breathing frequency as a reference. Our method achieved the best agreement between respiration rates derived from directly and indirectly measured respiratory signals.

  11. Measurement of rock-core capillary pressure curves using a single-speed centrifuge and one-dimensional magnetic-resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Quan; Balcom, Bruce J

    2005-06-01

    Capillary pressure curves are widely used in materials, soil, and environmental sciences, and especially in the petroleum industry. The traditional (Hassler-Brunner) interpretation of centrifugal capillary pressure data is based on several assumptions. These assumptions are known to lead to significant errors in the measurement of capillary pressure curves. In this work, we propose a new "single-shot" method to measure the capillary pressure curve of a long sedimentary rock core using a single-speed centrifuge experiment and magnetic-resonance imaging to directly determine the water saturation distribution along the length of the sample. Since only a single moderate centrifuge speed is employed, the effect of gravity can be ignored and the outlet boundary condition of the core plug was maintained. The capillary pressure curve obtained by the single-shot method is remarkably consistent with results determined with conventional mercury-intrusion methods. The proposed method is much faster and more precise than traditional centrifuge methods.

  12. Stratospheric CH4 and CO2 profiles derived from SCIAMACHY solar occultation measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Noël

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Stratospheric profiles of methane (CH4 and carbon dioxide (CO2 have been derived from solar occultation measurements of the SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY. The retrieval is performed using a method called "Onion Peeling DOAS" (ONPD which combines an onion peeling approach with a weighting function DOAS (Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy fit. By use of updated pointing information and optimisation of the data selection and of the retrieval approach the altitude range for reasonable CH4 could be extended to about 17 to 45 km. Furthermore, the quality of the derived CO2 has been assessed such that now the first stratospheric profiles of CO2 from SCIAMACHY are available. Comparisons with independent data sets yield an estimated accuracy of the new SCIAMACHY stratospheric profiles of about 5–10 % for CH4 and 2–3 % for CO2. The accuracy of the products is currently mainly restricted by the appearance of unexpected vertical oscillations in the derived profiles which need further investigation. Using the improved ONPD retrieval, CH4 and CO2 stratospheric data sets covering the whole SCIAMACHY time series (August 2002–April 2012 and the latitudinal range between about 50 and 70° N have been derived. Based on these time series, CH4 and CO2 trends have been estimated, which are in reasonable agreement with total column trends for these gases. This shows that the new SCIAMACHY data sets can provide valuable information about the stratosphere.

  13. Deriving mechanisms and thresholds for cliff retreat in soft-rock cliffs under changing climates: Rapidly retreating cliffs of the Suffolk coast, UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, S. M.; Spencer, T.; Boreham, S.

    2012-06-01

    Understanding changing thresholds and mechanisms for retreat in soft rock cliffs is important under changing climates. This can be achieved through combining detailed field observation, long-term process and morphological monitoring and numerical modelling. The cliffs of the Suffolk coast, southern North Sea have exhibited long-term (1883-2010) recession rates of 3.5 m a- 1, rising to 4.7 m a- 1 in the period 1993-2010. Annual to biannual ground survey data, and the application of GIS techniques to digitised records of changing shoreline position from historic maps and aerial photography, reveal considerable decadal-scale variations in cliff recession, within which are nested inter-annual fluctuations in rates of retreat. Archival datasets on significant periods of onshore winds and their interaction with high water levels (including the incidence of storm surges) and rainstorm events are used to determine thresholds for cliff base erosion and its propagation upwards through the cliff profile. In addition, the ‘GEO-Slope' dynamic coupled hydrology-stability model is used to establish thresholds for cliff face failures driven by variations in rainfall inputs. Retreat mechanisms are complex, governed by cliff geology, both as a primary control on suction loss and through its interaction with basal marine conditions. The study allows a general model of cliff retreat for soft rock cliffs to be put forward, whereby a resistant basal platform is overlain by more erodible, weakly and moderately cemented sands and gravels. In this model, the varying balance between marine and terrestrial forcing factors are reflected in low ( 7 m a- 1) modes of cliff retreat.

  14. Theoretical study of rock mass investigation efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmen, Johan G.; Outters, Nils [Golder Associates, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2002-05-01

    The study concerns a mathematical modelling of a fractured rock mass and its investigations by use of theoretical boreholes and rock surfaces, with the purpose of analysing the efficiency (precision) of such investigations and determine the amount of investigations necessary to obtain reliable estimations of the structural-geological parameters of the studied rock mass. The study is not about estimating suitable sample sizes to be used in site investigations.The purpose of the study is to analyse the amount of information necessary for deriving estimates of the geological parameters studied, within defined confidence intervals and confidence level In other words, how the confidence in models of the rock mass (considering a selected number of parameters) will change with amount of information collected form boreholes and surfaces. The study is limited to a selected number of geometrical structural-geological parameters: Fracture orientation: mean direction and dispersion (Fisher Kappa and SRI). Different measures of fracture density (P10, P21 and P32). Fracture trace-length and strike distributions as seen on horizontal windows. A numerical Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) was used for representation of a fractured rock mass. The DFN-model was primarily based on the properties of an actual fracture network investigated at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. The rock mass studied (DFN-model) contained three different fracture sets with different orientations and fracture densities. The rock unit studied was statistically homogeneous. The study includes a limited sensitivity analysis of the properties of the DFN-model. The study is a theoretical and computer-based comparison between samples of fracture properties of a theoretical rock unit and the known true properties of the same unit. The samples are derived from numerically generated boreholes and surfaces that intersect the DFN-network. Two different boreholes are analysed; a vertical borehole and a borehole that is

  15. Digital carbonate rock physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saenger, Erik H.; Vialle, Stephanie; Lebedev, Maxim; Uribe, David; Osorno, Maria; Duda, Mandy; Steeb, Holger

    2016-08-01

    Modern estimation of rock properties combines imaging with advanced numerical simulations, an approach known as digital rock physics (DRP). In this paper we suggest a specific segmentation procedure of X-ray micro-computed tomography data with two different resolutions in the µm range for two sets of carbonate rock samples. These carbonates were already characterized in detail in a previous laboratory study which we complement with nanoindentation experiments (for local elastic properties). In a first step a non-local mean filter is applied to the raw image data. We then apply different thresholds to identify pores and solid phases. Because of a non-neglectable amount of unresolved microporosity (micritic phase) we also define intermediate threshold values for distinct phases. Based on this segmentation we determine porosity-dependent values for effective P- and S-wave velocities as well as for the intrinsic permeability. For effective velocities we confirm an observed two-phase trend reported in another study using a different carbonate data set. As an upscaling approach we use this two-phase trend as an effective medium approach to estimate the porosity-dependent elastic properties of the micritic phase for the low-resolution images. The porosity measured in the laboratory is then used to predict the effective rock properties from the observed trends for a comparison with experimental data. The two-phase trend can be regarded as an upper bound for elastic properties; the use of the two-phase trend for low-resolution images led to a good estimate for a lower bound of effective elastic properties. Anisotropy is observed for some of the considered subvolumes, but seems to be insignificant for the analysed rocks at the DRP scale. Because of the complexity of carbonates we suggest using DRP as a complementary tool for rock characterization in addition to classical experimental methods.

  16. Classification of Debris-Covered Glaciers and Rock Glaciers in the Andes of Central Chile - An Approach Integrating Field Measurements, High-Resolution Satellite Imagery, and Coring Data to Estimate Water Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janke, J. R.; Bellisario, A. C.; Ferrando, F. A.

    2014-12-01

    In the Dry Andes of Chile (17 to 35° S), debris-covered glaciers and rock glaciers are differentiated from "true" glaciers based on the percentage of surface debris cover, thickness of surface debris, and ice content. These landforms are more numerous than glaciers in the Central Andes; however, there are often omitted from inventories. Glaciers, debris covered glaciers, and rock glaciers are being removed by mining, while agricultural expansion and population growth have placed an additional demand on water resources. As a result, it is important to identify and locate these features to implement sustainable solutions. The objective of this study is to develop a classification system to identify debris-covered glaciers and rock glaciers based on satellite imagery interpretation. The classification system is linked to field observations and measurements of ice content. Debris covered glaciers have three subclasses: surface coverage of semi (Class 1) and fully covered (Class 2) glaciers differentiates the first two forms, whereas debris thickness is critical for Class 3 when glaciers become buried with more than 3 m of surface debris. The amount of ice decreases from more than 85%, to 65-85%, to 45-65% for semi, fully, and buried debris-covered glaciers, respectively. Rock glaciers are characterized by three stages. Class 4 rock glaciers have pronounced transverse ridges and furrows that arch across the surface, which indicate flow produce via ice. Class 5 rock glaciers have ridges and furrows that appear linear in the direction of flow, and Class 6 rock glaciers have subdued surface topography that has been denudated as the rock glacier ceases movement. Ice content decreases from 25-45% ice, to 10-25% ice, to less than 10% ice from Class 4 to 6, respectively. The classification scheme can be used to identify and map debris covered glaciers and rock glaciers to create an inventory to better estimate available water resources at the basin-wide scale.

  17. Surface settlements during the tunnel drivage in loose rock. Prognosis, measurement and impact; Oberflaechensetzungen beim Tunnelvortrieb im Lockergestein. Prognose, Messung und Beeinflussung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fillibeck, Jochen [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Zentrum fuer Geotechnik

    2012-11-01

    The realistic prediction of supplement in tunnel construction is essential to secure the acceptance of the construction measure in the population. In addition to numerical calculations particularly empirical processes are suitable whose input variables are derived from previous experiences. Empirical methods use the Gaussian function for the description of the settlement trough arising from the tunnelling at the surface. The contribution under consideration describes the method of Fillibeck allowing the determination of the input parameters for shotcrete drivages and shield drivages. This empirical method was derived from a large number of carefully selected and inspected measuring cross-sections.

  18. Minimizing the statistical error of resonance parameters and cross-sections derived from transmission measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Danon, Y

    2002-01-01

    Total neutron cross-sections are usually measured by a transmission experiment. In this experiment the transmission through a sample is measured by taking the ratio of the background corrected counts measured with and without the sample in the beam. This procedure can be optimized to reduce the statistical error in the measured cross-section. The objective is to find the optimal sample thickness and time split between the open beam, sample and background measurements. An optimization procedure for constant cross-section measurement is derived and extended to the area under the total cross-section curve of an isolated resonance. The minimization of the statistical error in the measured area also minimizes the statistical error in the inferred neutron width. Comparison of the analytical expression developed in this paper and resonance parameters obtained from the SAMMY (Updated users' guide for SAMMY: Multilevel R-Matrix fits to neutron data using Bays' equation, version m2, ORNTL/TM/-9179/R4) code is shown. Th...

  19. Seismic properties of polyphase rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qin

    2005-11-01

    Knowledge about the seismic properties of polyphase rocks is fundamental for interpreting seismic refraction and reflection data and for establishing lithospheric structure and composition models. This study aims to obtain more precise relationships between seismic properties of rocks and controlling factors (e.g., pressure, temperature, mineralogical and chemical compositions, microstructure of rocks), particularly for those rocks imprinted by ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) metamorphism. These relationships will be very helpful to extrapolate calculated and measured seismic properties of rocks to depths of interest and to engender interpretations relevant to petrological composition and tectonic process. An Internet Database of Rock Seismic Properties (DRSP) was set up and a Handbook of Seismic Properties of Minerals, Rocks and Ores was published. They comprise almost all data available in the literature during the past 4 decades and can serve as a convenient, comprehensive and concise information source on physical properties of rocks to the earth sciences and geotechnical communities. Statistical results of the DRSP reveal the dependence of seismic properties on density, porosity, humidity, and mineralogical and chemical compositions. Using 16 different averaging methods, we calculated P-wave velocities of 696 dry samples according to the volume fraction and elastic constants of each constituent mineral. Although only 22 common minerals were taken into account in the computation, the calculated P-wave velocities agree well with laboratory values measured at about 300 MPa, where most microcracks are closed and the mean Vp of a polymineralic rock is exclusively controlled by its modal composition. However, none of these mixture rules can simultaneously fit measured P-wave velocities for all lithologies or at all pressures. Therefore, more prudence is required in selecting an appropriate mixture rule for calculation of seismic velocities of different rock types.

  20. New approaches in the indirect quantification of thermal rock properties in sedimentary basins: the well-log perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuchs, Sven; Balling, Niels; Förster, Andrea

    Numerical temperature models generated for geodynamic studies as well as for geothermal energy solutions heavily depend on rock thermal properties. Best practice for the determination of those parameters is the measurement of rock samples in the laboratory. Given the necessity to enlarge databases...... capacity in sedimentary rocks derived from data provided by standard geophysical well logs. The approach is based on a data set of synthetic sedimentary rocks (clastic rocks, carbonates and evaporates) composed of mineral assemblages with variable contents of 15 major rock-forming minerals and porosities......, hydrogen index, volume fraction of shale and photoelectric absorption index) on a regression sub set of data (70% of data) (Fuchs et al., 2015). Prediction quality was quantified on the remaining test sub set (30% of data). The combination of three to five well-log parameters results in predictions...

  1. Rock.XML - Towards a library of rock physics models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Erling Hugo; Hauge, Ragnar; Ulvmoen, Marit; Johansen, Tor Arne; Drottning, Åsmund

    2016-08-01

    Rock physics modelling provides tools for correlating physical properties of rocks and their constituents to the geophysical observations we measure on a larger scale. Many different theoretical and empirical models exist, to cover the range of different types of rocks. However, upon reviewing these, we see that they are all built around a few main concepts. Based on this observation, we propose a format for digitally storing the specifications for rock physics models which we have named Rock.XML. It does not only contain data about the various constituents, but also the theories and how they are used to combine these building blocks to make a representative model for a particular rock. The format is based on the Extensible Markup Language XML, making it flexible enough to handle complex models as well as scalable towards extending it with new theories and models. This technology has great advantages as far as documenting and exchanging models in an unambiguous way between people and between software. Rock.XML can become a platform for creating a library of rock physics models; making them more accessible to everyone.

  2. Ozone loss derived from balloon-borne tracer measurements in the 1999/2000 Arctic winter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Robinson

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Balloon-borne measurements of CFC11 (from the DIRAC in situ gas chromatograph and the DESCARTES grab sampler, ClO and O3 were made during the 1999/2000 Arctic winter as part of the SOLVE-THESEO 2000 campaign, based in Kiruna (Sweden. Here we present the CFC11 data from nine flights and compare them first with data from other instruments which flew during the campaign and then with the vertical distributions calculated by the SLIMCAT 3D CTM. We calculate ozone loss inside the Arctic vortex between late January and early March using the relation between CFC11 and O3 measured on the flights. The peak ozone loss (~1200ppbv occurs in the 440-470K region in early March in reasonable agreement with other published empirical estimates. There is also a good agreement between ozone losses derived from three balloon tracer data sets used here. The magnitude and vertical distribution of the loss derived from the measurements is in good agreement with the loss calculated from SLIMCAT over Kiruna for the same days.

  3. Ozone loss derived from balloon-borne tracer measurements and the SLIMCAT CTM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Robinson

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Balloon-borne measurements of CFC-11 (on flights of the DIRAC in situ gas chromatograph and the DESCARTES grab sampler, ClO and O3 were made during the 1999/2000 winter as part of the SOLVE-THESEO 2000 campaign. Here we present the CFC-11 data from nine flights and compare them first with data from other instruments which flew during the campaign and then with the vertical distributions calculated by the SLIMCAT 3-D CTM. We calculate ozone loss inside the Arctic vortex between late January and early March using the relation between CFC-11 and O3 measured on the flights, the peak ozone loss (1200 ppbv occurs in the 440–470 K region in early March in reasonable agreement with other published empirical estimates. There is also a good agreement between ozone losses derived from three independent balloon tracer data sets used here. The magnitude and vertical distribution of the loss derived from the measurements is in good agreement with the loss calculated from SLIMCAT over Kiruna for the same days.

  4. The effect of test dose and first IR stimulation temperature on post-IR IRSL measurements of rock slices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Jinfeng; Murray, Andrew; Sohbati, Reza

    2016-01-01

    lies close to the laboratory saturation levels only for higher first IR stimulation temperatures e.g. 200°C or 250°C. Our data confirm earlier suggestions based on sand-grain measurements that, for older sam-ples, accurate measurements close to saturation require that a higher first IR temperature...

  5. The use of phospholipid fatty acid analysis to measure impact of acid rock drainage on microbial communities in sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-David, E A; Holden, P J; Stone, D J M; Harch, B D; Foster, L J

    2004-10-01

    The impact of acid rock drainage (ARD) and eutrophication on microbial communities in stream sediments above and below an abandoned mine site in the Adelaide Hills, South Australia, was quantified by PLFA analysis. Multivariate analysis of water quality parameters, including anions, soluble heavy metals, pH, and conductivity, as well as total extractable metal concentrations in sediments, produced clustering of sample sites into three distinct groups. These groups corresponded with levels of nutrient enrichment and/or concentration of pollutants associated with ARD. Total PLFA concentration, which is indicative of microbial biomass, was reduced by >70% at sites along the stream between the mine site and as far as 18 km downstream. Further downstream, however, recovery of the microbial abundance was apparent, possibly reflecting dilution effect by downstream tributaries. Total PLFA was >40% higher at, and immediately below, the mine site (0-0.1 km), compared with sites further downstream (2.5-18 km), even after accounting for differences in specific surface area of different sediment samples. The increased microbial population in the proximity of the mine source may be associated with the presence of a thriving iron-oxidizing bacteria community as a consequence of optimal conditions for these organisms while the lower microbial population further downstream corresponded with greater sediments' metal concentrations. PCA of relative abundance revealed a number of PLFAs which were most influential in discriminating between ARD-polluted sites and the rest of the sites. These PLFA included the hydroxy fatty acids: 2OH12:0, 3OH12:0, 2OH16:0; the fungal marker: 18:2omega6; the sulfate-reducing bacteria marker 10Me16:1omega7; and the saturated fatty acids 12:0, 16:0, 18:0. Partial constrained ordination revealed that the environmental parameters with the greatest bearing on the PLFA profiles included pH, soluble aluminum, total extractable iron, and zinc. The study

  6. In-situ control of oxygen fugacity for laboratory measurements of electrical conductivity of minerals and rocks in a multi-anvil press

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dai Li-Dong; Li He-Ping; Hu Hai-Ying; Shan Shuang-Ming

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a new of oxygen fugacity controltechnique that can be widely applied to in-situ measurement of the grain interior electrical conductivities of minerals and rocks is presented for high temperature and high pressure. Inside the sample assembly, a metal and corresponding metal oxide form a solid oxygen buffer. The principle of this technique is to randomly monitor and adjust oxygen fugacity in the large-volume multi-anvil press by changing the types of solid oxygen buffer, metal shielding case and electrodes. At a pressure of up to 5.0 GPa and a temperature of up to 1423 K,the electrical conductivities of the dry peridotite are tested under the conditions of different oxygen fugacities. By virtue of this new technique, more and more reasonable and accurate laboratory electrical property data will be successfully obtained under controlled thermodynamic conditions.

  7. Derivation of stochastic differential equations for scrape-off layer plasma fluctuations from experimentally measured statistics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mekkaoui, A. [Institute for Energy and Climate Research-Plasma Physics, Research Center Juelich GmbH, Association FZJ-Euratom, D-52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2013-01-15

    A stochastic differential equation for intermittent plasma density dynamics in magnetic fusion edge plasma is derived, which is consistent with the experimentally measured gamma distribution and the theoretically expected quadratic nonlinearity. The plasma density is driven by a multiplicative Wiener process and evolves on the turbulence correlation time scale, while the linear growth is quadratically damped by the fluctuation level. The sensitivity of intermittency to the nonlinear dynamics is investigated by analyzing the nonlinear Langevin representation of the beta process, which leads to a root-square nonlinearity.

  8. Lunar meteoritic gardening rate derived from in situ LADEE/LDEX measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szalay, Jamey R.; Horányi, Mihály

    2016-05-01

    The Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) orbited the Moon for approximately 6 months, taking data with the Lunar Dust Experiment (LDEX). LDEX was uniquely equipped to characterize the current rate of lunar impact gardening as it measured the very particles taking part in this process. By deriving an average lunar dust density distribution, we calculate the rate at which exospheric dust rains back down onto the lunar surface. Near the equatorial plane, we find that approximately 40 μm/Myr of lunar regolith, with a cumulative size distribution index of 2.7, is redistributed due to meteoritic bombardment, a process which occurs predominantly on the lunar apex hemisphere.

  9. DERIVATIVE OF SET MEASURE FUNCTIONS AND ITS APPLICATION (THEORETICAL BASES OF INVESTMENT OBJECTIVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Bosov

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. It is necessary to develop the theoretical fundamentals for solving the investment objectives presented in the form of set function as vector optimization tasks or tasks of constrained extremum. Methodology. Set functions and their derivatives of measure are used as research of investment objectives. Necessary condition of set function minimum is proved. In the tasks for constrained extremum the method of Lagrange is used. It is shown that this method can also be used for the set function. It is used the measure for proof, which generalizes the Lebesgue measure, and the concept of set sequence limit is introduced. It is noted that the introduced limit over a measure coincides with the classical Borel limit and can be used in order to prove the existence of derivative from set function over a measure on convergent of sets sequence. Findings. An algorithm of solving the investment objective for constrained extremum in relation to investment objectives was offered. Originality. Scientific novelty lies in the fact that in multivariate objects for constrained extremum one can refuse from immediate enumeration. One can use the proposed algorithm of constructing (selection of options that allow building a convex linear envelope of Pareto solutions. This envelope will let the person who makes a decision (DM, select those options that are "better" from a position of DM, and consider some of the criteria, the formalization of which are difficult or can not be described in mathematical terms. Practical value. Results of the study provide the necessary theoretical substantiation of decision-making in investment objectives, when there is a significant number of an investment objects and immediate enumeration of options is very difficult on time costs even for modern computing techniques.

  10. A nonlinear model coupling rockfall and rainfall intensity based ewline on a four year measurement in a high Alpine rock wall (Reintal, German Alps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Krautblatter

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available A total of more than 140 000 kg of small-magnitude rockfall deposits was measured in eight rockfall collectors of altogether 940 m2 in size between 1999–2003 below a 400–600 m high rock face in the Reintal, German Alps. Measurements were conducted with a temporal resolution up to single days to attribute rockfall intensity to observed triggering events. Precipitation was assessed by a rain gauge and high-resolution precipitation radar. Intense rainstorms triggered previously unreported rockfall intensities of up to 300 000 g/(m2h that we term "secondary rockfall event." In comparison to dry periods without frost (10−2g/(m2h, rockfall deposition increased by 2–218 times during wet freeze-thaw cycles and by 56-thousand to 40-million times during secondary rockfall events. We obtained three nonlinear logistic growth models that relate rockfall intensity [g/(m2h] to rainfall intensity [mm/h]. The models account for different rock wall intermediate storage volumes, triggering thresholds and storage depletion. They apply to all rockfall collector positions with correlations from R2=0.89 to 0.99. Thus, the timing of more than 90% of the encountered rockfall is explained by the triggering factor rainfall intensity. A combination of rockfall response models with radar-supported storm cell forecast could be used to anticipate hazardous rockfall events, and help to reduce the exposure of individuals and mobile structures (e.g. cable cars to the hazard. According to meteorological recordings, the frequency of these intense rockfall events is likely to increase in response to global warming.

  11. Written Type and Token Frequency Measures of Fifty Spanish Derivational Morphemes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lázaro, Miguel; Acha, Joana; Illera, Víctor; Sainz, Javier S

    2016-11-08

    Several databases of written language exist in Spanish that manage important information on the lexical and sublexical characteristics of words. However, there is no database with information on the productivity and frequency of use of derivational suffixes: sublexical units with an essential role in the formation of orthographic representations and lexical access. This work examines these two measures, known as type and token frequencies, for a series of 50 derivational suffixes and their corresponding orthographic endings. Derivational suffixes are differentiated from orthographic endings by eliminating pseudoaffixed words from the list of orthographic endings (cerveza [beer] is a simple word despite its ending in -eza). We provide separate data for child and adult populations, using two databases commonly accessed by psycholinguists conducting research in Spanish. We describe the filtering process used to obtain descriptive data that will provide information for future research on token and type frequencies of morphemes. This database is an important development for researchers focusing on the role of morphology in lexical acquisition and access.

  12. Transmembrane pH gradients in vivo: measurements using fluorinated vitamin B6 derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, R P

    1999-06-01

    It is well recognized that pH plays a significant regulatory role in most cellular processes. Increasingly, there is interest in transmembrane pH gradients, particularly with respect to tumor growth and response to therapy. NMR offers a non-invasive approach to monitoring cellular pH and detecting changes in response to interventions. This review will consider the strengths of various approaches to measuring pH with particular focus on the reporter molecules designed to interrogate the cellular milieu. In particular, fluorinated vitamin B6 derivatives (6-fluoropyridoxol and 6-fluoropyridoxamine) will be described, which for the first time provide a practical non-destructive method to measure simultaneously intra- and extracellular pH, i.e., the transmembrane pH gradient in animals in vivo based on a single reporter molecule.

  13. Rock and mineral magnetism

    CERN Document Server

    O’Reilly, W

    1984-01-01

    The past two decades have witnessed a revolution in the earth sciences. The quantitative, instrument-based measurements and physical models of. geophysics, together with advances in technology, have radically transformed the way in which the Earth, and especially its crust, is described. The study of the magnetism of the rocks of the Earth's crust has played a major part in this transformation. Rocks, or more specifically their constituent magnetic minerals, can be regarded as a measuring instrument provided by nature, which can be employed in the service of the earth sciences. Thus magnetic minerals are a recording magnetometer; a goniometer or protractor, recording the directions of flows, fields and forces; a clock; a recording thermometer; a position recorder; astrain gauge; an instrument for geo­ logical surveying; a tracer in climatology and hydrology; a tool in petrology. No instrument is linear, or free from noise and systematic errors, and the performance of nature's instrument must be assessed and ...

  14. Relative and absolute reliability of measures of linoleic acid-derived oxylipins in human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouveia-Figueira, Sandra; Bosson, Jenny A; Unosson, Jon; Behndig, Annelie F; Nording, Malin L; Fowler, Christopher J

    2015-09-01

    Modern analytical techniques allow for the measurement of oxylipins derived from linoleic acid in biological samples. Most validatory work has concerned extraction techniques, repeated analysis of aliquots from the same biological sample, and the influence of external factors such as diet and heparin treatment upon their levels, whereas less is known about the relative and absolute reliability of measurements undertaken on different days. A cohort of nineteen healthy males were used, where samples were taken at the same time of day on two occasions, at least 7 days apart. Relative reliability was assessed using Lin's concordance correlation coefficients (CCC) and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC). Absolute reliability was assessed by Bland-Altman analyses. Nine linoleic acid oxylipins were investigated. ICC and CCC values ranged from acceptable (0.56 [13-HODE]) to poor (near zero [9(10)- and 12(13)-EpOME]). Bland-Altman limits of agreement were in general quite wide, ranging from ±0.5 (12,13-DiHOME) to ±2 (9(10)-EpOME; log10 scale). It is concluded that relative reliability of linoleic acid-derived oxylipins varies between lipids with compounds such as the HODEs showing better relative reliability than compounds such as the EpOMEs. These differences should be kept in mind when designing and interpreting experiments correlating plasma levels of these lipids with factors such as age, body mass index, rating scales etc.

  15. Statistically Based Inference of Physical Rock Properties of Main Rock Types in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, A.; Jorand, R.; Clauser, C.

    2009-12-01

    A major obstacle for an increased use of geothermal energy often lies in the high success risk for the development of geothermal reservoirs due to the unknown rock properties. In general, the ranges of thermal and hydraulic properties (thermal conductivity, volumetric heat capacity, porosity, permeability) in existing compilations of rock properties are too large to be useful to constrain properties for specific sites. Usually, conservative assumptions are made about these properties, resulting in greater drilling depth and increased exploration cost. In this study, data from direct measurements on more than 600 core samples from different borehole locations and depths enable to derive statistical moments of the desired properties for selected main rock types in the German subsurface. Using modern core scanning technology allowed measuring rapidly thermal conductivity, sonic velocity, and gamma density with high resolution on a large number of samples. In addition, we measured porosity, bulk density, and matrix density based on Archimedes’ principle and pycnometer analysis. Tests on a smaller collection of samples also include specific heat capacity, hydraulic permeability, and radiogenic heat production rate. In addition, we complemented the petrophysical measurements by quantitative mineralogical analysis. The results reveal that even for the same main rock type the results differ significantly depending on geologic age, origin, compaction, and mineralogical composition. For example, water saturated thermal conductivity of tight Palaeozoic sandstones from the Lower Rhine Embayment and the Ruhr Area is 4.0±0.7 W m-1 K-1 and 4.6±0.6 W m-1 K-1, respectively, which is nearly identical to values for the Lower Triassic Bunter sandstone in Southwest-Germany (high in quartz showing an average value of 4.3±0.4 W m-1 K-1). In contrast, saturated thermal conductivity of Upper Triassic sandstone in the same area is considerably lower at 2.5±0.1 W m-1 K-1 (Schilf

  16. The conversion of biomass to ethanol using geothermal energy derived from hot dry rock to supply both the thermal and electrical power requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, D.W.

    1997-10-01

    The potential synergism between a hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal energy source and the power requirements for the conversion of biomass to fuel ethanol is considerable. In addition, combining these two renewable energy resources to produce transportation fuel has very positive environmental implications. One of the distinct advantages of wedding an HDR geothermal power source to a biomass conversion process is flexibility, both in plant location and in operating process is flexibility, both in plant location and in operating conditions. The latter obtains since an HDR system is an injection conditions of flow rate, pressure, temperature, and water chemistry are under the control of the operator. The former obtains since, unlike a naturally occurring geothermal resource, the HDR resource is very widespread, particularly in the western US, and can be developed near transportation and plentiful supplies of biomass. Conceptually, the pressurized geofluid from the HDR reservoir would be produced at a temperature in the range of 200{degrees} to 220{degrees}c. The higher enthalpy portion of the geofluid thermal energy would be used to produce a lower-temperature steam supply in a countercurrent feedwater-heater/boiler. The steam, following a superheating stage fueled by the noncellulosic waste fraction of the biomass, would be expanded through a turbine to produce electrical power. Depending on the lignin fraction of the biomass, there would probably be excess electrical power generated over and above plant requirements (for slurry pumping, stirring, solids separation, etc.) which would be available for sale to the local power grid. In fact, if the hybrid HDR/biomass system were creatively configured, the power plant could be designed to produce daytime peaking power as well as a lower level of baseload power during off-peak hours.

  17. Bulk δ(15) N measurements of organic-rich rock samples by elemental analyzer/isotope ratio mass spectrometry with enhanced oxidation ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Wennian; Feng, Lianjun; Li, Hongwei; Liu, Wei

    2017-01-15

    Elemental analyzer/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (EA/IRMS) has been widely used for nitrogen isotope ratio determination in various organic and inorganic samples. However, the extent of the redox reaction in the EA reaction tube can greatly affect the accuracy and precision of measurements, especially in the case of complex geological samples. It is therefore necessary to determine the appropriate reaction conditions to reach a high recovery of nitrogen by complete combustion or thermal decomposition and quantitative reduction. The conventional Dumas dual-inlet method was used to determine the bulk nitrogen isotope composition of SGR-1 (an organic-rich standard sample), which then was analyzed by EA/IRMS under different EA reaction conditions to study the influence of the redox environment on the δ(15) N measurements. The measured data together with the results reported by previous researchers were used to evaluate the effectiveness of the nitrogen extraction for organic-rich rock samples. Our results demonstrated that with the Dumas dual-inlet method more oxidizing agent (CuO) addition to SGR-1 would yield a higher nitrogen content of 0.91% than the recommended content (0.81%) although a δ(15) N value of 17.39 ± 0.09‰ was consistent with the recommended value by USGS. Using EA/IRMS, when more O2 was injected in the reaction tube, a high nitrogen content (0.92 ± 0.01%) and a δ(15) N value (17.43 ± 0.17‰) close to that of the Dumas dual-inlet method were obtained. The addition of V2 O5 or CuO in a continuous-flow system of EA/IRMS could not effectively enable the complete combustion of SGR-1. When measuring the nitrogen isotope composition of organic-rich rock sample dominated by reduced substances with EA/IRMS, greater O2 injection will enable more complete combustion to obtain reliable nitrogen yields compared with the addition of V2 O5 or CuO. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Current situation of the study on Kaiser effect of rock acoustic emission in in-situ stress measurement%声发射Kaiser效应在地应力测量中的应用现状

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李利峰; 邹正盛; 张庆

    2011-01-01

    Based on periodical literature, the statistics of papers on accoustic emission since recent twenty years were made. The principle and mechanism of acoustic emission, space positioning for the samples were presented.With the theory of elastic mechanics, six direction and four direction methods in space for in-sim measurement using the rock acoustic emission were derived. There are two sampling methods according to the different methods.Influence factors of acoustic emission in in-sim stress measurement, determining method of Kaiser Point and treatment technique for signal and noise were systematically expounded. Two methods which are different from the traditional in-situ measurement are introduced. Problems and research trend of the in-situ stress measurement using acoustic emission were analyzed.%对近20年来岩石声发射测量地应力的研究现状进行了分析,介绍了声发射的原理和机理及试样的空间定位方法.利用弹性力学原理推导了声发射方法测定地应力的空间6向和4向的计算过程,对应有两种常用的取样方式.系统地阐述了影响声发射地应力测量的因素、Kaiser点的确定方法以及信噪处理技术,简单介绍了不同于传统利用声发射测量地应力的另外两种方法.对声发射测量地应力中存在的问题和研究趋势进行了分析.

  19. Alteration of immature sedimentary rocks on Earth and Mars. Recording Aqueous and Surface-atmosphere Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cannon, Kenneth M. [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States); Mustard, John F. [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States); Salvatore, Mark R. [Arizona State Univ., Mesa, AZ (United States)

    2015-03-05

    The rock alteration and rind formation in analog environments like Antarctica may provide clues to rock alteration and therefore paleoclimates on Mars. Clastic sedimentary rocks derived from basaltic sources have been studied in situ by martian rovers and are likely abundant on the surface of Mars. Moreover, how such rock types undergo alteration when exposed to different environmental conditions is poorly understood compared with alteration of intact basaltic flows. Here we characterize alteration in the chemically immature Carapace Sandstone from Antarctica, a terrestrial analog for martian sedimentary rocks. We employ a variety of measurements similar to those used on previous and current Mars missions. Laboratory techniques included bulk chemistry, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), hyperspectral imaging and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Through these methods we find that primary basaltic material in the Carapace Sandstone is pervasively altered to hydrated clay minerals and palagonite as a result of water–rock interaction. A thick orange rind is forming in current Antarctic conditions, superimposing this previous aqueous alteration signature. The rind exhibits a higher reflectance at visible-near infrared wavelengths than the rock interior, with an enhanced ferric absorption edge likely due to an increase in Fe3+ of existing phases or the formation of minor iron (oxy)hydroxides. This alteration sequence in the Carapace Sandstone results from decreased water–rock interaction over time, and weathering in a cold, dry environment, mimicking a similar transition early in martian history. This transition may be recorded in sedimentary rocks on Mars through a similar superimposition mechanism, capturing past climate changes at the hand sample scale. These results also suggest that basalt-derived sediments could have sourced significant volumes of hydrated minerals on early Mars due to their greater permeability compared with intact igneous rocks.

  20. Observation of deficit in NuMI neutrino-induced rock and non-fiducial muons in MINOS Far Detector and measurement of neutrino oscillation parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGowan, Aaron Michael [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2007-08-01

    The MINOS (Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search) experiment has observed muon neutrino disappearance consistent with the oscillation hypothesis tested by Super-Kamiokande and K2K. The survival probability for vμ is given approximately by 1 - sin22θ23sin2(1.27Δm$2\\atop{32}$L/E), whereθ23 and Δm$2\\atop{32}$ are the mixing angle and difference in mass squared in eV2/c4 between the mass eigenstates v3 and v2, L is the distance traveled in km, and E is the neutrino energy in GeV. In the Near Detector at Fermilab, a measurement of the energy spectrum of the NuMI neutrino beam is made 1 km from the beam target. The neutrinos travel to the Far Detector in the Soudan Underground Laboratory, where another measurement of the energy spectrum is made 735 km from the target. MINOS measures |Δm$2\\atop{32}$| and sin223 by comparing the ND and FD neutrino energy spectra. In this dissertation, a n alternate method is presented that utilizes rock muons, a class of events that occur when a vμ interaction takes place in the rock surrounding the FD. Many muons that result from these interactions penetrate the rock and reach the detector. Muon events from vμ interactions in the non-fiducial volume of the FD are also used in this analysis. The distribution of reconstructed muon momentum and direction relative to the beam is predicted by Monte Carlo simulation, normalized by the measured vμ energy spectrum at the ND. In the first year of NuMI running (an exposure of 1.27x1020 protons on target) 117 selected events are observed below 3.0 GeV/c, where 150.2±16.1 events are expected. When a fit is performed to events below 10.0 GeV/c, the null (no disappearance) hypothesis is ruled out at significance level α = 4.2 x 10-3. The data are consistent with the oscillation hypothesis given parameter

  1. CERN Rocks

    CERN Document Server

    2004-01-01

    The 15th CERN Hardronic Festival took place on 17 July on the terrace of Rest 3 (Prévessin). Over 1000 people, from CERN and other International Organizations, came to enjoy the warm summer night, and to watch the best of the World's High Energy music. Jazz, rock, pop, country, metal, blues, funk and punk blasted out from 9 bands from the CERN Musiclub and Jazz club, alternating on two stages in a non-stop show.  The night reached its hottest point when The Canettes Blues Band got everybody dancing to sixties R&B tunes (pictured). Meanwhile, the bars and food vans were working at full capacity, under the expert management of the CERN Softball club, who were at the same time running a Softball tournament in the adjacent "Higgs Field". The Hardronic Festival is the main yearly CERN music event, and it is organized with the support of the Staff Association and the CERN Administration.

  2. Measurement of the Length of Installed Rock Bolt Based on Stress Wave Reflection by Using a Giant Magnetostrictive (GMS) Actuator and a PZT Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Mingzhang; Li, Weijie; Wang, Bo; Fu, Qingqing; Song, Gangbing

    2017-01-01

    Rock bolts, as a type of reinforcing element, are widely adopted in underground excavations and civil engineering structures. Given the importance of rock bolts, the research outlined in this paper attempts to develop a portable non-destructive evaluation method for assessing the length of installed rock bolts for inspection purposes. Traditionally, piezoelectric elements or hammer impacts were used to perform non-destructive evaluation of rock bolts. However, such methods suffered from many major issues, such as the weak energy generated and the requirement for permanent installation for piezoelectric elements, and the inconsistency of wave generation for hammer impact. In this paper, we proposed a portable device for the non-destructive evaluation of rock bolt conditions based on a giant magnetostrictive (GMS) actuator. The GMS actuator generates enough energy to ensure multiple reflections of the stress waves along the rock bolt and a lead zirconate titantate (PZT) sensor is used to detect the reflected waves. A new integrated procedure that involves correlation analysis, wavelet denoising, and Hilbert transform was proposed to process the multiple reflection signals to determine the length of an installed rock bolt. The experimental results from a lab test and field tests showed that, by analyzing the instant phase of the periodic reflections of the stress wave generated by the GMS transducer, the length of an embedded rock bolt can be accurately determined. PMID:28241503

  3. Measurement of the Length of Installed Rock Bolt Based on Stress Wave Reflection by Using a Giant Magnetostrictive (GMS) Actuator and a PZT Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Mingzhang; Li, Weijie; Wang, Bo; Fu, Qingqing; Song, Gangbing

    2017-02-23

    Rock bolts, as a type of reinforcing element, are widely adopted in underground excavations and civil engineering structures. Given the importance of rock bolts, the research outlined in this paper attempts to develop a portable non-destructive evaluation method for assessing the length of installed rock bolts for inspection purposes. Traditionally, piezoelectric elements or hammer impacts were used to perform non-destructive evaluation of rock bolts. However, such methods suffered from many major issues, such as the weak energy generated and the requirement for permanent installation for piezoelectric elements, and the inconsistency of wave generation for hammer impact. In this paper, we proposed a portable device for the non-destructive evaluation of rock bolt conditions based on a giant magnetostrictive (GMS) actuator. The GMS actuator generates enough energy to ensure multiple reflections of the stress waves along the rock bolt and a lead zirconate titantate (PZT) sensor is used to detect the reflected waves. A new integrated procedure that involves correlation analysis, wavelet denoising, and Hilbert transform was proposed to process the multiple reflection signals to determine the length of an installed rock bolt. The experimental results from a lab test and field tests showed that, by analyzing the instant phase of the periodic reflections of the stress wave generated by the GMS transducer, the length of an embedded rock bolt can be accurately determined.

  4. The D/H Ratio of the Martian Water That Formed the Yellowknife Bay Mudstone Rocks Measured By the MSL-SAM Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaffy, P. R.; Webster, C. R.; Brunner, A.; McAdam, A.; Flesch, G.; Stern, J. C.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Conrad, P. G.; Pavlov, A.; Malespin, C.; Atreya, S. K.; Blank, J. G.; Owen, T. C.

    2014-12-01

    Martian atmospheric loss processes change the isotopic composition of H, C, O, N, and Ar. Escape process to space enrich heavier isotopes in the atmosphere over geological time. The SAM instrument on the Curiosity rover has measured these isotopes in H2O, CO2, N2, and Ar multiple times over the course of the mission. In addition to this present record, volatiles extracted from ancient rocks such as the clays sampled in Yellowknife Bay mudstones of Gale crater may be able to reveal the isotopic composition of light elements much earlier in martian history. Small samples of mudstone rocks acquired by the Curiosity drill were analyzed by SAM for their volatile content. The SAM Tunable Laser Spectrometer (TLS) measured the D/H ratio in water and the Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer (QMS) determined the D/H ratio in hydrogen released from these samples by stepwise heating. Clay materials on Earth are known to contain water in several forms. Molecular water bound loosely in pore spaces may be removed by drying under ambient conditions. Water also may be adsorbed on the surface of clay mineral surfaces or reside in interlayer positions or within structural channels in the clays. Finally, clay minerals contain hydroxyl units bound structurally in the minerals that at elevated temperatures (>~ 450°C) produce water and hydrogen of dehydroxylation; this high-temperature component is most likely to reflect the isotopic composition of water (and atmosphere) present at the time of clay formation. We have designed and implemented a stepped extraction protocol to more precisely measure the D/H ratio in both the low and high temperature water in martian clays. The D/H in the high temperature water reflects the D/H of the water that formed these clay minerals. We will discuss the implications for water loss over the past 3+Ga and compare our findings with those of related martian meteorite studies. This research was supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  5. Statistical Analysis of Instantaneous Frequency Scaling Factor as Derived From Optical Disdrometer Measurements At KQ Bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemba, Michael; Nessel, James; Houts, Jacquelynne; Luini, Lorenzo; Riva, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    The rain rate data and statistics of a location are often used in conjunction with models to predict rain attenuation. However, the true attenuation is a function not only of rain rate, but also of the drop size distribution (DSD). Generally, models utilize an average drop size distribution (Laws and Parsons or Marshall and Palmer. However, individual rain events may deviate from these models significantly if their DSD is not well approximated by the average. Therefore, characterizing the relationship between the DSD and attenuation is valuable in improving modeled predictions of rain attenuation statistics. The DSD may also be used to derive the instantaneous frequency scaling factor and thus validate frequency scaling models. Since June of 2014, NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) and the Politecnico di Milano (POLIMI) have jointly conducted a propagation study in Milan, Italy utilizing the 20 and 40 GHz beacon signals of the Alphasat TDP#5 Aldo Paraboni payload. The Ka- and Q-band beacon receivers provide a direct measurement of the signal attenuation while concurrent weather instrumentation provides measurements of the atmospheric conditions at the receiver. Among these instruments is a Thies Clima Laser Precipitation Monitor (optical disdrometer) which yields droplet size distributions (DSD); this DSD information can be used to derive a scaling factor that scales the measured 20 GHz data to expected 40 GHz attenuation. Given the capability to both predict and directly observe 40 GHz attenuation, this site is uniquely situated to assess and characterize such predictions. Previous work using this data has examined the relationship between the measured drop-size distribution and the measured attenuation of the link]. The focus of this paper now turns to a deeper analysis of the scaling factor, including the prediction error as a function of attenuation level, correlation between the scaling factor and the rain rate, and the temporal variability of the drop size

  6. New approaches in the indirect quantification of thermal rock properties in sedimentary basins: the well-log perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Sven; Balling, Niels; Förster, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Numerical temperature models generated for geodynamic studies as well as for geothermal energy solutions heavily depend on rock thermal properties. Best practice for the determination of those parameters is the measurement of rock samples in the laboratory. Given the necessity to enlarge databases of subsurface rock parameters beyond drill core measurements an approach for the indirect determination of these parameters is developed, for rocks as well a for geological formations. We present new and universally applicable prediction equations for thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity and specific heat capacity in sedimentary rocks derived from data provided by standard geophysical well logs. The approach is based on a data set of synthetic sedimentary rocks (clastic rocks, carbonates and evaporates) composed of mineral assemblages with variable contents of 15 major rock-forming minerals and porosities varying between 0 and 30%. Petrophysical properties are assigned to both the rock-forming minerals and the pore-filling fluids. Using multivariate statistics, relationships then were explored between each thermal property and well-logged petrophysical parameters (density, sonic interval transit time, hydrogen index, volume fraction of shale and photoelectric absorption index) on a regression sub set of data (70% of data) (Fuchs et al., 2015). Prediction quality was quantified on the remaining test sub set (30% of data). The combination of three to five well-log parameters results in predictions on the order of Journal International 203, 1977-2000, doi: 10.1093/gji/ggv403

  7. Comparative Study of Ground Measured, Satellite-Derived, and Estimated Global Solar Radiation Data in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boluwaji M. Olomiyesan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the performance of three global solar radiation models and the accuracy of global solar radiation data derived from three sources were compared. Twenty-two years (1984–2005 of surface meteorological data consisting of monthly mean daily sunshine duration, minimum and maximum temperatures, and global solar radiation collected from the Nigerian Meteorological (NIMET Agency, Oshodi, Lagos, and the National Aeronautics Space Agency (NASA for three locations in North-Western region of Nigeria were used. A new model incorporating Garcia model into Angstrom-Prescott model was proposed for estimating global radiation in Nigeria. The performances of the models used were determined by using mean bias error (MBE, mean percentage error (MPE, root mean square error (RMSE, and coefficient of determination (R2. Based on the statistical error indices, the proposed model was found to have the best accuracy with the least RMSE values (0.376 for Sokoto, 0.463 for Kaduna, and 0.449 for Kano and highest coefficient of determination, R2 values of 0.922, 0.938, and 0.961 for Sokoto, Kano, and Kaduna, respectively. Also, the comparative study result indicates that the estimated global radiation from the proposed model has a better error range and fits the ground measured data better than the satellite-derived data.

  8. Derivation of stochastic differential equations for scrape-off layer plasma fluctuations from experimentally measured statistics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mekkaoui, Abdessamad [IEK-4 Forschungszentrum Juelich 52428 (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    A method to derive stochastic differential equations for intermittent plasma density dynamics in magnetic fusion edge plasma is presented. It uses a measured first four moments (mean, variance, Skewness and Kurtosis) and the correlation time of turbulence to write a Pearson equation for the probability distribution function of fluctuations. The Fokker-Planck equation is then used to derive a Langevin equation for the plasma density fluctuations. A theoretical expectations are used as a constraints to fix the nonlinearity structure of the stochastic differential equation. In particular when the quadratically nonlinear dynamics is assumed, then it is shown that the plasma density is driven by a multiplicative Wiener process and evolves on the turbulence correlation time scale, while the linear growth is quadratically damped by the fluctuation level. Strong criteria for statistical discrimination of experimental time series are proposed as an alternative to the Kurtosis-Skewness scaling. This scaling is broadly used in contemporary literature to characterize edge turbulence, but it is inappropriate because a large family of distributions could share this scaling. Strong criteria allow us to focus on the relevant candidate distribution and approach a nonlinear structure of edge turbulence model.

  9. The Slowly Varying Corona. I. Daily Differential Emission Measure Distributions Derived from EVE Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schonfeld, S. J.; White, S. M.; Hock-Mysliwiec, R. A.; McAteer, R. T. J.

    2017-08-01

    Daily differential emission measure (DEM) distributions of the solar corona are derived from spectra obtained by the Extreme-ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) over a 4 yr period starting in 2010 near solar minimum and continuing through the maximum of solar cycle 24. The DEMs are calculated using six strong emission features dominated by Fe lines of charge states viii, ix, xi, xii, xiv, and xvi that sample the nonflaring coronal temperature range 0.3-5 MK. A proxy for the non-Fe xviii emission in the wavelength band around the 93.9 Å line is demonstrated. There is little variability in the cool component of the corona (T 2.0 MK) varies by more than an order of magnitude. A discontinuity in the behavior of coronal diagnostics in 2011 February-March, around the time of the first X-class flare of cycle 24, suggests fundamentally different behavior in the corona under solar minimum and maximum conditions. This global state transition occurs over a period of several months. The DEMs are used to estimate the thermal energy of the visible solar corona (of order 1031 erg), its radiative energy loss rate ((2.5-8) × {10}27 erg s-1), and the corresponding energy turnover timescale (about an hour). The uncertainties associated with the DEMs and these derived values are mostly due to the coronal Fe abundance and density and the CHIANTI atomic line database.

  10. Alaskan Permafrost Groundwater Storage Changes Derived from GRACE and Ground Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir E. Romanovsky

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The Arctic is in transition from climate-driven thawing of permafrost. We investigate satellite-derived water equivalent mass changes, snow water equivalent with in situ measurements of runoff and ground-survey derived geoid models from 1999 through 2009. The Alaskan Arctic coastal plain groundwater storage (including wetland bog, thaw pond and lake is increasing by 1.15 ± 0.65 km3/a (area-average 1.10 ± 0.62 cm/a, and Yukon River watershed groundwater storage is decreasing by 7.44 ± 3.76 km3/a (area‑average 0.79 ± 0.40 cm/a. Geoid changes show increases within the Arctic coastal region and decreases within the Yukon River watershed. We hypothesize these changes are linked to the development of new predominately closed- and possibly open-talik in the continuous permafrost zone under large thaw lakes with increases of lakes and new predominately open-talik and reduction of permafrost extent in the discontinuous and sporadic zones with decreases of thaw lakes.

  11. Understanding compressible turbulence in the solar wind with multipoint density measurements derived from spacecraft potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Owen

    2016-04-01

    Measurements of spacecraft potential can often be used to derive the electron number density with higher time resolution than is typically available with plasma instruments. On board the Cluster spacecraft the potential is measured with the Electric Fields and Waves instrument (EFW) which consists of four booms in the spin plane of the spacecraft. Consequently the potential measurement is affected by spin and wake effects. This makes the study of frequencies larger than the spin frequency challenging. To overcome these caveats a statistical model of the potential is obtained as a function of the angle the spacecraft is facing. When this variation is known it can be removed from the potential data, resulting in a much more accurate determination of the electron density and a cleaner power spectrum. Spikes at harmonics of the spin frequency can be removed without the need to use a notch filter on the time series. The treated data can then be used as an input to the k-filtering technique, which has previously been applied to the incompressible components of the magnetic field. This allows determination of the three dimensional power distribution in wave space as well as the wavevectors and plasma frame frequencies. Results for the compressible component (using electron density and magnitude of the magnetic field as inputs) and the incompressible component (three components of the magnetic field) will be compared.

  12. Odour Pollution Measurement from Refuse Derive Fuel Operations Using Odour Concentration Meter (OCM XP-329

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaini Sakawi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Odour perception is subjective and difficult to be accurately measured between individuals. Hence many studies on odour issues are more commonly pertain to its intensity, concentration, types, standards, measurement methods, law and impacts on physical and human environments. Nevertheless, odour analysis can be conducted empirically or based on human sensorial. Among major sources of odour pollution are animal rearing, oil palm and rubber mills, dumpsites, industries and sewage treatments. This study attempted to measure odour pollution generated by Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF operation. The analysis was conducted at different times of day (morning, evening and night and weather conditions (normal days and after rains. 10 sampling stations were selected for observations using the Odour Concentration Meter Siri XP-329 III.The results indicated that there existed different level of odour concentrations on normal days and after rains due to the influence of meteorological environment. Distance factors also influenced the odour concentrations, whereby gradually, the stations further from RDF operation recorded higher odour concentrations

  13. Measuring inbreeding and inbreeding depression on pig growth from pedigree or SNP-derived metrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silió, L; Rodríguez, M C; Fernández, A; Barragán, C; Benítez, R; Óvilo, C; Fernández, A I

    2013-10-01

    Multilocus homozygosity, measured as the proportion of the autosomal genome in homozygous genotypes or in runs of homozygosity, was compared with the respective pedigree inbreeding coefficients in 64 Iberian pigs genotyped using the Porcine SNP60 Beadchip. Pigs were sampled from a set of experimental animals with a large inbreeding variation born in a closed strain with a completely recorded multi-generation genealogy. Individual inbreeding coefficients calculated from pedigree were strongly correlated with the different SNP-derived metrics of homozygosity (r = 0.814-0.919). However, unequal correlations between molecular and pedigree inbreeding were observed at chromosomal level being mainly dependent on the number of SNPs and on the correlation between heterozygosities measured across different loci. A panel of 192 SNPs of intermediate frequencies was selected for genotyping 322 piglets to test inbreeding depression on postweaning growth performance (daily gain and weight at 90 days). The negative effects on these traits of homozygosities calculated from the genotypes of 168 quality-checked SNPs were similar to those of inbreeding coefficients. The results support that few hundreds of SNPs may be useful for measuring inbreeding and inbreeding depression, when the population structure or the mating system causes a large variance of inbreeding. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  14. A simple derivation and classification of common probability distributions based on information symmetry and measurement scale

    CERN Document Server

    Frank, Steven A

    2010-01-01

    Commonly observed patterns typically follow a few distinct families of probability distributions. Over one hundred years ago, Karl Pearson provided a systematic derivation and classification of the common continuous distributions. His approach was phenomenological: a differential equation that generated common distributions without any underlying conceptual basis for why common distributions have particular forms and what explains the familial relations. Pearson's system and its descendants remain the most popular systematic classification of probability distributions. Here, we unify the disparate forms of common distributions into a single system based on two meaningful and justifiable propositions. First, distributions follow maximum entropy subject to constraints, where maximum entropy is equivalent to minimum information. Second, different problems associate magnitude to information in different ways, an association we describe in terms of the relation between information invariance and measurement scale....

  15. Gauges and functional measures in quantum gravity II: Higher derivative gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Ohta, N; Pereira, A D

    2016-01-01

    We compute the one-loop divergences in a higher-derivative theory of gravity including Ricci tensor squared and Ricci scalar squared terms, in addition to the Hilbert and cosmological terms, on an (generally off-shell) Einstein background. We work with a two-parameter family of path integral measures, corresponding to different ways of parametrizing the graviton field, and a two-parameter family of gauges. Only the logarithmic divergences are independent of these choices, but there are some choices of gauge or parametrization that reduce the dependence on the remaining parameters. The results are invariant under a recently discovered "duality" that involves the replacement of the densitized metric by a densitized inverse metric as the fundamental quantum variable.

  16. A new approach to the derivation of dynamic information from ionosonde measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Liu

    Full Text Available A new approach is developed to derive dynamic information near the peak of the ionospheric F-layer from ionosonde measurements. This approach avoids deducing equivalent winds from the displacement of the observed peak height from a no-wind equilibrium height, so it need not determine the no-wind equilibrium height which may limit the accuracy of the deduced winds, as did the traditional servo theory. This approach is preliminarily validated with comparisons of deduced equivalent winds with the measurements from the Fabry-Perot interferometer, the Millstone Hill incoherent scatter radar and with previous works. Examples of vertical components of equivalent winds (VEWs, over Wuhan (114.4° E, 30.6° N, 45.2° dip, China in December 2000 are derived from Wuhan DGS-256 Digisonde data. The deduced VEWs show large day-to-day variations during the winter, even in low magnetic activity conditions. The diurnal pattern of average VEWs is more complicated than that predicted by the empirical Horizontal Wind Model (HWM. Using an empirical electric field model based on the observations from Jicamarca radar and satellites, we investigate the contributions to VEWs from neutral winds and from electric fields at the F-layer peak. If the electric field model is reasonable for Wuhan during this period, the neutral winds contribute mostly to the VEWs, and the contribution from the E × B drifts is insignificant.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (thermospheric dynamics – Ionosphere (ionosphere-atmosphere interaction; instrument and techniques

  17. "Cloud Slicing" : A New Technique to Derive Tropospheric Ozone Profile Information from Satellite Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemke, J. R.; Chandra, S.; Bhartia, P. K.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A new technique denoted cloud slicing has been developed for estimating tropospheric ozone profile information. All previous methods using satellite data were only capable of estimating the total column of ozone in the troposphere. Cloud slicing takes advantage of the opaque property of water vapor clouds to ultraviolet wavelength radiation. Measurements of above-cloud column ozone from the Nimbus 7 total ozone mapping spectrometer (TOMS) instrument are combined together with Nimbus 7 temperature humidity and infrared radiometer (THIR) cloud-top pressure data to derive ozone column amounts in the upper troposphere. In this study tropical TOMS and THIR data for the period 1979-1984 are analyzed. By combining total tropospheric column ozone (denoted TCO) measurements from the convective cloud differential (CCD) method with 100-400 hPa upper tropospheric column ozone amounts from cloud slicing, it is possible to estimate 400-1000 hPa lower tropospheric column ozone and evaluate its spatial and temporal variability. Results for both the upper and lower tropical troposphere show a year-round zonal wavenumber 1 pattern in column ozone with largest amounts in the Atlantic region (up to approx. 15 DU in the 100-400 hPa pressure band and approx. 25-30 DU in the 400-1000 hPa pressure band). Upper tropospheric ozone derived from cloud slicing shows maximum column amounts in the Atlantic region in the June-August and September-November seasons which is similar to the seasonal variability of CCD derived TCO in the region. For the lower troposphere, largest column amounts occur in the September-November season over Brazil in South America and also southern Africa. Localized increases in the tropics in lower tropospheric ozone are found over the northern region of South America around August and off the west coast of equatorial Africa in the March-May season. Time series analysis for several regions in South America and Africa show an anomalous increase in ozone in the lower

  18. Using total beta-activity measurements in milk to derive thyroid doses from Chernobyl fallout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozdovitch, V; Germenchuk, M; Bouville, A

    2006-01-01

    Following the Chernobyl accident, more than 200 childhood thyroid cancer cases have been observed in Brest Oblast of Belarus in territories slightly contaminated with 137Cs, but with suspected relatively high 131I fallout. The most helpful measurements available that can be used to estimate thyroid doses for the population of Brest Oblast are the total beta-activity measurements in cow's milk performed using DP-100 device within a few weeks after the accident. The 131I concentrations in milk were derived from the total beta-activity measurements on the basis of (1) a radioecological model used to estimate the variation with time of the radionuclide composition in milk and (2) the determination of the calibration factors of the DP-100 device for the most important radionuclides present in milk. As a result, 131I concentrations in milk were reconstructed for territories with different levels of 137Cs deposition. A non-linear dependence of the 131I concentration in milk on the 137Cs deposition density was obtained; it was used to estimate the thyroid doses from the consumption of 131I-contaminated cow's milk by the population of Brest Oblast. The average individual thyroid doses have been estimated to be 0.15, 0.18, 0.12, 0.06, 0.04 and 0.03 Gy for newborn, children aged 1, 5, 10 and 15 y and adults, respectively. The collective thyroid dose for the entire population of Brest Oblast is estimated to be 64,500 man Gy, the contribution from the adult population being about one half of the total. The methodology that is described could be applied in the framework of epidemiological studies of the relationship between radiation exposure to the thyroid gland and thyroid cancer in areas where numerous total beta-activity measurements in cow's milk were performed within a few weeks after the accident.

  19. Analysis of the Behavior of Sedimentary Rocks Under Impact Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millon, Oliver; Ruiz-Ripoll, Maria Luisa; Hoerth, Tobias

    2016-11-01

    In multiple engineering fields such as rock drilling or building constructions or extreme events like earthquakes or impacts, the dynamic properties of rock play an important role. A way to model these events and define measures to minimize the damage derived from these events is created by means of numerical analysis. Hence, the knowledge of the dynamic material behavior is essential for studying the effects of such a loading scenario. Solid geological materials, from the family of the sedimentary rocks, have been analyzed under quasi-static loads. However, there is a lack of knowledge when high strain rate loadings are involved. Within this context, the paper focuses on the experimental characterization of two sedimentary rocks, sandstone and limestone, under impact loading using the Hopkinson-Bar spallation and compression tests. The analysis encompasses the determination of the tensile and compressive properties as well as the comparison between the quasi-static and dynamic behavior (dynamic increase factors). The paper fills the gap of information existing about dynamic behavior of sedimentary rocks under strain rates between 100 and 5.2 × 102 s-1. Furthermore, the fragmentation under different strain rates is investigated and conclusions with respect to energy absorption capacity are drawn.

  20. Comparison of Northern Ireland radon maps based on indoor radon measurements and geology with maps derived by predictive modelling of airborne radiometric and ground permeability data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleton, J D; Miles, J C H; Young, M

    2011-03-15

    Publicly available information about radon potential in Northern Ireland is currently based on indoor radon results averaged over 1-km grid squares, an approach that does not take into account the geological origin of the radon. This study describes a spatially more accurate estimate of the radon potential of Northern Ireland using an integrated radon potential mapping method based on indoor radon measurements and geology that was originally developed for mapping radon potential in England and Wales. A refinement of this method was also investigated using linear regression analysis of a selection of relevant airborne and soil geochemical parameters from the Tellus Project. The most significant independent variables were found to be eU, a parameter derived from airborne gamma spectrometry measurements of radon decay products in the top layer of soil and exposed bedrock, and the permeability of the ground. The radon potential map generated from the Tellus data agrees in many respects with the map based on indoor radon data and geology but there are several areas where radon potential predicted from the airborne radiometric and permeability data is substantially lower. This under-prediction could be caused by the radon concentration being lower in the top 30 cm of the soil than at greater depth, because of the loss of radon from the surface rocks and soils to air. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Petrologic and REE Geochemical Characters of Burnt Rocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Lei; LIU Chiyang; YANG Lei; ZHAO Junfeng; FANG Jianjun

    2008-01-01

    The study of burnt rocks is beneficial to the discussion on the tectonic movement,paleoclimate and paleogeography that coal seams are subjected to after they were formed. In order to obtain the basic data on the features of the burnt rocks, a systematic study of petrology and REE geochemistry on burnt rocks in Shenmu, Northern Shaanxi Province has been done, using the methods of SEM, EDS, susceptibility measurements and ICP-MS. The burnt rocks are divided into two series in the section: the melted rocks and the baked rocks. SEM and EDS analyses reveal that all the minerals show burnt and melted traces, and there are no clay minerals except iliite found in the burnt rocks. Susceptibility measurements reveal that the burnt rocks have abnormally high susceptibility values,whereas a geochemical analysis shows that the REE distribution pattern of burnt rocks is similar to that of sedimentary rocks (initial rocks). In the longitudinal section, with increasing degree of burning (from baked rocks to melted rocks), the ΣREE gradually decreases, and the total REE of melted rocks is obviously lower than that of baked rocks. Besides, the melted rocks show apparent negative Ce anomalies, while the baked rocks show no anomaly of Ce, and sometimes even show positive anomalies.

  2. Seasonal variation of the O3-CO correlation derived from remote sensing measurements over western Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohyama, Hirofumi; Kawakami, Shuji; Uchino, Osamu; Sakai, Tetsu; Morino, Isamu; Nagai, Tomohiro; Shiomi, Kei; Sakashita, Masanori; Akaho, Taiga; Okumura, Hiroshi; Arai, Kohei

    2016-12-01

    We used a lower tropospheric ozone column (LTOC) and column-averaged dry-air mole fraction of carbon monoxide (XCO) data observed in the area around Saga, which is located in western Japan and is close to the Asian continent, with an aim to investigate whether these data can characterize the seasonal variation of the photochemical ozone (O3) formation in the northeast Asian Pacific rim region. The LTOC data after April 2009 were retrieved from thermal infrared spectra measured by the Thermal and Near Infrared Sensor for Carbon Observation-Fourier Transform Spectrometer (TANSO-FTS) onboard the Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT). The XCO data after July 2011 were obtained from ground-based high-resolution FTS measurements at Saga. The retrieved LTOCs were validated with those derived from a differential absorption lidar for O3 at Saga. The LTOCs showed a distinct seasonal variation that reached a maximum in late spring (May or June) and a local minimum in winter. In addition to the general seasonal pattern, we observed pronounced minimums in July or August. The XCO concentrations showed a maximum in spring and a minimum in summer. These seasonal patterns are consistent with those observed from mountainous sites in Japan. The origins of the air masses reaching Saga were characterized for each season according to backward trajectories, and the factors causing the temporal variations of the LTOCs and the XCO were identified based on the transport paths of the air masses. The enhancement of the LTOC relative to the XCO (ΔO3/ΔCO ratio) reveals significant positive correlations in the spring and summer seasons with slopes of 0.21 and 0.45 ppb/ppb, respectively. The effects of stratospheric air intrusion on the observed ΔO3/ΔCO ratio in spring were investigated using meteorological data (backward trajectory and potential vorticity) and column-averaged hydrogen fluoride data derived from the ground-based FTS measurements. It was found that there was little

  3. Surface radiation at sea validation of satellite-derived data with shipboard measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hein Dieter Behr

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Quality-controlled and validated radiation products are the basis for their ability to serve the climate and solar energy community. Satellite-derived radiation fluxes are well preferred for this task as they cover the whole research area in time and space. In order to monitor the accuracy of these data, validation with well maintained and calibrated ground based measurements is necessary. Over sea, however, long-term accurate reference data sets from calibrated instruments recording radiation are scarce. Therefore data from research vessels operating at sea are used to perform a reasonable validation. A prerequisite is that the instruments on board are maintained as well as land borne stations. This paper focuses on the comparison of radiation data recorded on board of the German Research Vessel "Meteor" during her 13 months cruise across the Mediterranean and the Black Sea with CM-SAF products using NOAA- and MSG-data (August 2006-August 2007: surface incoming short-wave radiation (SIS and surface downward long-wave radiation (SDL. Measuring radiation fluxes at sea causes inevitable errors, e.g.shadowing of fields of view of the radiometers by parts of the ship. These ship-inherent difficulties are discussed at first. A comparison of pairs of ship-recorded and satellite-derived mean fluxes for the complete measuring period delivers a good agreement: the mean bias deviation (MBD for SIS daily means is −7.6 W/m2 with a median bias of −4 W/m2 and consistently the MBD for monthly means is −7.3 W/m2, for SDL daily means the MBD is 8.1 and 6 W/m2 median bias respectively. The MBD for monthly means is 8.2 W/m2. The variances of the daily means (ship and satellite have the same annual courses for both fluxes. No significant dependence of the bias on the total cloud cover recorded according to WMO (1969 has been found. The results of the comparison between ship-based observations and satellite retrieved surface radiation reveal the good accuracy

  4. Synthesis, measurements, and theoretical analysis of carbazole derivatives with high-triplet-energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Jianli; Mi Xiaoyun; Wan Yuchun [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Changchun University of Science and Technology, Changchun 130022 (China); Si Zhenjun, E-mail: szj@cust.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Changchun University of Science and Technology, Changchun 130022 (China); Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry, Czech Academy of Science, Praha 6 16610 (Czech Republic); Sun Haiying; Duan Qian [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Changchun University of Science and Technology, Changchun 130022 (China); He Xingquan [School of Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Changchun University of Science and Technology, Changchun 130022 (China); Yan Dong; Wan Sha [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Changchun University of Science and Technology, Changchun 130022 (China)

    2012-05-15

    In order to obtain the blue light-emitting organic materials with high triplet state energy, two 3,5-diphenyl-4H-1,2,4-triazole (Tz) containing carbazole (Cz) derivatives of 9-(4-(3,5-diphenyl-4H-1,2,4-triazol-4-yl)phenyl)-9H-carbazole (TzCz1) and 3,6-di-tert-butyl-9-(4-(3,5-diphenyl-4H-1,2,4-triazol-4-yl)phenyl) -9H-carbazole (TzCz2) are synthesized using Cz acting as the starting material, as well as characterized by the {sup 1}H NMR spectra, ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) absorption spectra, and the IR absorption spectra. The luminescence quantum yields (LQYs) of TzCz1 and TzCz2 are measured in CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} solution to be 32.1% and 47.5%, respectively. The electrochemical analysis and the photophysical measurements suggest that the triplet energy levels and the energy gaps of the highest-occupied orbital and the lowest-unoccupied orbital are 2.83 eV and 3.59 eV for TzCz1, and 2.80 eV and 3.43 eV for TzCz2. At last, the theoretical analyses of their ground state geometries and the simulated UV-vis absorption spectra are carried out at B3LYP1/6-31G Low-Asterisk level. The studies mentioned above indicate that both TzCz1 and TzCz2 are suitable for the host materials of blue light-emitting diodes. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Synthesis of two blue light-emitting Carbazole derivatives. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Photophysical and electrochemical properties are systematically studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Theoretical analysis of geometry of the ground states and the UV-vis absorption are performed with Firefly package. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The triplet energy levels are measured to be ca. 2.83 eV.

  5. Earth's gravity field modelling based on satellite accelerations derived from onboard GPS phase measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, X.; Ditmar, P.; Zhao, Q.; Klees, R.; Farahani, H. H.

    2017-09-01

    GPS data collected by satellite gravity missions can be used for extracting the long-wavelength part of the Earth's gravity field. We propose a new data processing method which makes use of the `average acceleration' approach to gravity field modelling. In this method, satellite accelerations are directly derived from GPS carrier phase measurements with an epoch-differenced scheme. As a result, no ambiguity solutions are needed and the systematic errors that do not change much from epoch to epoch are largely eliminated. The GPS data collected by the Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) satellite mission are used to demonstrate the added value of the proposed method. An analysis of the residual accelerations shows that accelerations derived in this way are more precise, with noise being reduced by about 20 and 5% at the cross-track component and the other two components, respectively, as compared to those based on kinematic orbits. The accelerations obtained in this way allow the recovery of the gravity field to a slightly higher maximum degree compared to the solution based on kinematic orbits. Furthermore, the gravity field solution has an overall better performance. Errors in spherical harmonic coefficients are smaller, especially at low degrees. The cumulative geoid height error is reduced by about 15 and 5% up to degree 50 and 150, respectively. An analysis in the spatial domain shows that large errors along the geomagnetic equator, which are caused by a high electron density coupled with large short-term variations, are substantially reduced. Finally, the new method allows for a better observation of mass transport signals. In particular, sufficiently realistic signatures of regional mass anomalies in North America and south-west Africa are obtained.

  6. Earth's gravity field modelling based on satellite accelerations derived from onboard GPS phase measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, X.; Ditmar, P.; Zhao, Q.; Klees, R.; Farahani, H. H.

    2017-02-01

    GPS data collected by satellite gravity missions can be used for extracting the long-wavelength part of the Earth's gravity field. We propose a new data processing method which makes use of the `average acceleration' approach to gravity field modelling. In this method, satellite accelerations are directly derived from GPS carrier phase measurements with an epoch-differenced scheme. As a result, no ambiguity solutions are needed and the systematic errors that do not change much from epoch to epoch are largely eliminated. The GPS data collected by the Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) satellite mission are used to demonstrate the added value of the proposed method. An analysis of the residual accelerations shows that accelerations derived in this way are more precise, with noise being reduced by about 20 and 5% at the cross-track component and the other two components, respectively, as compared to those based on kinematic orbits. The accelerations obtained in this way allow the recovery of the gravity field to a slightly higher maximum degree compared to the solution based on kinematic orbits. Furthermore, the gravity field solution has an overall better performance. Errors in spherical harmonic coefficients are smaller, especially at low degrees. The cumulative geoid height error is reduced by about 15 and 5% up to degree 50 and 150, respectively. An analysis in the spatial domain shows that large errors along the geomagnetic equator, which are caused by a high electron density coupled with large short-term variations, are substantially reduced. Finally, the new method allows for a better observation of mass transport signals. In particular, sufficiently realistic signatures of regional mass anomalies in North America and south-west Africa are obtained.

  7. Rollerjaw Rock Crusher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Gregory; Brown, Kyle; Fuerstenau, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    The rollerjaw rock crusher melds the concepts of jaw crushing and roll crushing long employed in the mining and rock-crushing industries. Rollerjaw rock crushers have been proposed for inclusion in geological exploration missions on Mars, where they would be used to pulverize rock samples into powders in the tens of micrometer particle size range required for analysis by scientific instruments.

  8. Enhanced osteogenesis of human alveolar bone-derived mesenchymal stem cells for tooth tissue engineering using fluid shear stress in a rocking culture method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Ki-Taek; Kim, Jangho; Seonwoo, Hoon; Chang, Jung Uk; Choi, Hwajung; Hexiu, Jin; Cho, Woo Jae; Choung, Pill-Hoon; Chung, Jong Hoon

    2013-02-01

    This study instituted a simple approach to stimulate alveolar bone regeneration for tooth tissue engineering by controlling effects of low fluid dynamic shear stress (LFDSS) on growth and differentiation in vitro. Human alveolar bone-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hABMSCs) harvested from human mandibular alveolar bone were cultured with LFDSS to generate cultures containing bone-like formations. To distinguish between osteodifferentiation and bone-like formation, cells were cultured either with or without fluid shear stress. The calcium content and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity of hABMSCs were used as indicators of osteogenesis. Cell viability and proliferation after stimulating with LFDSS for 10-60 min/day were higher than with longer stimulations. Mineralized nodules formed when osteoblasts were cultured with an induction medium, a marker of osteogenic differentiation. ALP activity tended to increase after 10 and 60 min/day of stimulation. In addition, LFDSS conditions also increased gene expression of IBSP, RUNX2, COL-I, ALP, OCN, and OPN, as shown by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. From the results of a proteomics array, LFDSS groups were intensely expressed with several factors (EGF, HGF, IGF, TGF, and PDGF). Furthermore, CD146 and Stro-1 expression increased in cells treated with 30 min/day and decreased in cells treated with 120 min/day, as determined by cell surface antigen analysis by fluorescence-activated cell-sorting analysis. These results strongly showed that LFDSS at the proper intensity and time enhanced the differentiation and maturation of hABMSCs. In conclusion, an appropriate level of LFDSS can potently and positively modulate proliferation and differentiation in hABMSCs.

  9. Southern Ocean variability derived from GRACE retrievals, model simulations and in-situ measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böning, C.; Timmermann, R.; Macrander, A.; Schröter, J.; Boebel, O.

    2009-04-01

    The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) provides estimates of the Earth's static and time-variant gravity field. Solutions from various processing centres (GFZ, CSR, GRGS, JPL etc.) enable us to determine mass redistributions on the globe. Given that land signals are generally large compared to anomalies over the ocean, an assessment of the latter requires a particularly careful filtering of the data. We utilized the Finite Element Sea-Ice Ocean Model (FESOM) to develop a filtering algorithm which relies on the spatial coherency of ocean bottom pressure (OBP) anomalies. Taking large-scale circulation patterns into account, the new filter yields an improved representation of OBP (i.e. ocean mass) variability in the filtered GRACE data. In order to investigate the representation of Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) variability in the pattern-filtered GRACE retrievals, an analysis of OBP anomalies in FESOM results and in-situ measurements has been performed. A bottom pressure recorder array in the ACC region south of Africa (36°S-58°S, 1°W-7°E) provides data from 2002-2008. Based on anomalies of OBP gradients between individual instruments, these in-situ measurements give an estimate of the overall transport variability as well as of the movement of ACC fronts and transport redistribution between different sectors of the ACC. The validation of simulated and satellite-derived OBP anomaly gradients against these data yields a measure for the representation of this variability in FESOM and GRACE. Furthermore, model simulations are used to assess the relation between transport variations in individual filaments of the Southern Ocean and total transport variability in this and other sectors of the ACC.

  10. In Situ Evaluation of Water-Rock Reactions during Carbon Dioxide Injection in Basaltic and Metasedimentary Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matter, J. M.; Assayag, N.; Goldberg, D.; Takahashi, T.

    2006-12-01

    Large differences between laboratory and field derived mineral reaction rates underscore the importance of evaluating mineral-fluid reactions under in situ conditions in a natural environment. This study investigates the extent of in situ water-rock reactions in basaltic and metasedimentary rocks (rich in Ca, Mg silicates) after the injection of CO2 enriched water, with the objective of providing information pertinent to permanent storage of anthropogenic CO2 in geologic reservoirs. CO2 injections were conducted using a single-well push-pull testing strategy. CO2 saturated water (pH 3.5) was injected into a hydraulically isolated and permeable aquifer in a 300-m experimental borehole. Water samples were retrieved after the CO2 injection. Mass transfer terms for Ca, Mg, Na, and Si were determined by using the measured ion concentrations. Using the mass balance, the weeks-long incubation time of the injected solution, and geometric estimates of the reactive surface area of the host rocks, in situ bulk rock dissolution rates of aquifer material were estimated. In addition, δ13C data coupled with total CO2 concentration were used as a tracer to quantitatively evaluate processes such as carbonate dissolution and precipitation, oxidation of organic matter and biological activity within the aquifer. Results show that the injected CO2 was neutralized within several days by two processes; mixing with aquifer water, and rock-water reactions. Calculated bulk rock dissolution rates decrease with increasing pH. The pH dependence of the dissolution rate for Ca is twice as large as for Mg, strongly favoring Ca release and possibly suggesting an additional source of Ca besides silicate minerals. Analyses of δ13C on water and rock samples confirm dissolution of calcium carbonates within the aquifer.

  11. Searching for Rich Uranium Layers of Volcanic Rocks by Measuring Potential Difference%测定电位差圈定火山岩富铀层位

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁富蕴; 刘峰

    2000-01-01

    (2.岩石的电位差(△Eh)控制着变价元素的地球化学行为,用差减电位法对330铀矿区393个火山岩△Eh值测量结果表明:火山岩的△Eh值可以准确地圈出铀的富集层位,铀矿化只产在△Eh值高的岩石中。%The potential difference(P.D) of rocks controls geochemical behavior of the element whose valence can change.393volcanic rocks are survied in the 330 uranium ore district by the potential difference method. The result shows: volcanic rocks P.D. accuratly the concetration place of uranium accumtly and uranium mineralize only in the rocks where P.D. value is high.

  12. Curriculum-Based Measurement of Oral Reading: Evaluation of Growth Estimates Derived with Pre-Post Assessment Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christ, Theodore J.; Monaghen, Barbara D.; Zopluoglu, Cengiz; Van Norman, Ethan R.

    2013-01-01

    Curriculum-based measurement of oral reading (CBM-R) is used to index the level and rate of student growth across the academic year. The method is frequently used to set student goals and monitor student progress. This study examined the diagnostic accuracy and quality of growth estimates derived from pre-post measurement using CBM-R data. A…

  13. Geophysical, geochemical, mineralogical, and enivronmental data for rock samples collected in a mineralized volcanic environment, upper Animas River watershed, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCafferty, A.E.; Horton, R.J.; Stanton, M.R.; McDougal, R.R.; Fey, D.L.

    2011-01-01

    This report provides analyses of 90 rock samples collected in the upper Animas River watershed near Silverton, Colo., from 2001 to 2007. The samples are analyzed for geophysical, geochemical, mineralogical, and environmental rock properties of acid neutralizing capacity and net acid production. The database is derived from both published (n=68) and unpublished (n=32) data. New for all samples are geophysical measurements of electrical resistivity, density, and porosity. Rock samples were acquired from 12 geologic units that include key Tertiary volcanic and plutonic lithologies, all with varying degrees of alteration.

  14. African dust phosphorus fertilizing the Amazon and the Atlantic Ocean is derived from marine sediments and igneous rocks - no indication for Bodélé diatomite contribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Avner; Castido, Danilo; Pio, Casimero; Angert, Alon

    2013-04-01

    signatures. The diatomite in the Bodélé depression have lower P concentrations (550-900 µg P g/dust) and fall off the mixing line describe by our samples. These findings implies that the bio-available P delivered by dust from West Africa to the Central Atlantic Ocean and later to the Amazon basin is derived from a mixture of igneous origin and marine sedimentary origin, and that in contrast to previous claims, the Bodélé diatomite is not a major dust-P source. In addition, we found that African dust-P concentrations are between 2 folds to 10 folds higher then generally accounted for in modeling studies.

  15. An Assessment of Differences in Tree Cover Measurements between Landsat and Lidar-derived Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, H.; Song, X. P.; Armston, J.; Hancock, S.; Duncanson, L.; Zhao, F. A.; Schaaf, C.; Strahler, A. H.; Huang, C.; Hansen, M.; Goetz, S. J.; Dubayah, R.

    2016-12-01

    Tree cover is one of the most important canopy structural variables describe interactions between atmosphere and biosphere, and is also linked to the function and quality of ecosystem services. Large-area tree cover measurements are traditionally based on multispectral satellite imagery, and there are several global products available at high to medium spatial resolution (30m-1km). Recent developments in lidar remote sensing, including the upcoming Global Ecosystem Dynamics Investigation (GEDI) lidar, offers an alternative means to map tree cover over broad geographical extents. However, differences in the definition of tree cover and the retrieval method can result in large discrepancies between products derived from multispectral imagery and lidar data, and can potentially impact their further use in ecosystem modelling and above-ground biomass mapping. To separate the effects of cover definition and retrieval method, we first conducted a meta-analysis of several tree cover data sets across different biogeographic regions using three publicly available Landsat-based tree cover products (GLCF, NLCD and GLAD), and two waveform and discrete return airborne lidar products. We found that, whereas Landsat products had low-moderate agreements (up to 40% mean difference) on tree cover estimates particularly at the high end (e.g. >80%), airborne lidar can provide more accurate and consistent measurements (mean difference definitions of tree cover (e.g. crown cover vs. fractional cover). We further recommended the use of lidar data as a complement or alternative to ultra-fine resolution images in training/validating Landsat-class images for large-area tree cover mapping.

  16. Deriving aerosol properties from measurements of the Atmosphere-Surface Radiation Automatic Instrument (ASRAI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hua; Li, Donghui; Li, Zhengqiang; Zheng, Xiaobing; Li, Xin; Xie, Yisong; Liu, Enchao

    2015-10-01

    The Atmosphere-surface Radiation Automatic Instrument (ASRAI) is a newly developed hyper-spectral apparatus by Anhui Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (AIOFM, CAS), measuring total spectral irradiance, diffuse spectral irradiance of atmosphere and reflected radiance of the land surface for the purpose of in-situ calibration. The instrument applies VIS-SWIR spectrum (0.4~1.0 μm) with an averaged spectral resolution of 0.004 μm. The goal of this paper is to describe a method of deriving both aerosol optical depth (AOD) and aerosol modes from irradiance measurements under free cloudy conditions. The total columnar amounts of water vapor and oxygen are first inferred from solar transmitted irradiance at strong absorption wavelength. The AOD together with total columnar amounts of ozone and nitrogen dioxide are determined by a nonlinear least distance fitting method. Moreover, it is able to infer aerosol modes from the spectral dependency of AOD because different aerosol modes have their inherent spectral extinction characteristics. With assumption that the real aerosol is an idea of "external mixing" of four basic components, dust-like, water-soluble, oceanic and soot, the percentage of volume concentration of each component can be retrieved. A spectrum matching technology based on Euclidean-distance method is adopted to find the most approximate combination of components. The volume concentration ratios of four basic components are in accordance with our prior knowledge of regional aerosol climatology. Another advantage is that the retrievals would facilitate the TOA simulation when applying 6S model for satellite calibration.

  17. Velocity derivative skewness in isotropic turbulence and its measurement with hot wires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burattini, Paolo [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Physique Statistique et des Plasmas, Brussels (Belgium); University of Newcastle, Discipline of Mechanical Engineering, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Lavoie, Philippe [Imperial College London, Department of Aeronautics, London (United Kingdom); Antonia, Robert A. [University of Newcastle, Discipline of Mechanical Engineering, Newcastle, NSW (Australia)

    2008-09-15

    We investigate the effect of the hot wire resolution on the measurement of the velocity derivative skewness in homogeneous isotropic turbulence. Single- and cross-wire configurations (with different lengths and separations of the wires, and temporal sampling resolution) are considered. Predictions of the attenuation on the basis of a model for the energy spectrum are compared to experimental and numerical data in grid and box turbulence, respectively. It is shown that the model-based correction is accurate for the single wire but not for the cross-wire. In the latter case, the effect of the separation between the wires is opposite to that found in the experiments and simulations. Moreover, the attenuation predicted by the numerical data is in good agreement with that observed in the experiment. For both probe configurations, the sampling resolution has a sizeable attenuation effect, but, for the X-probe, the impact of the separation between the wires is more important. In both cases, the length of the wires has only a minor effect, in the non-dimensional range of wire length investigated. Finally, the present experimental data support the conclusion that the skewness is constant with the Reynolds number, in agreement with Kolmogorov's 41 theory. (orig.)

  18. Validation of the Thorpe scale-derived vertical diffusivities against microstructure measurements in the Kerguelen region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.-H. Park

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The Thorpe scale is an energy containing vertical overturning scale of large eddies associated with shear generated turbulence. We make here indirect estimates of vertical diffusivities from the Thorpe scale method in the Polar Front region east of the Kerguelen Islands based on fine scale density profiles gathered during the 2011 KEOPS2 cruise. These are validated in comparison with diffusivities estimated from the turbulence dissipation rate directly measured via a TurboMAP microprofiler. The results are sensitive to the choice of the diffusivity parameterization and the Gargett and Garner's (2008 overturn ratio Ro, with the optimal results showing an agreement within a factor of 4, on average, having been obtained from the parameterization by Shih et al. (2005 and the Ro = 0.25 criterion. The Thorpe scale-derived diffusivities in the KEOPS2 region show a high degree of spatial variability, ranging from a canonical value of O(10−5 m2 s−1 in the Winter Water layer and in the Subantarctic surface waters immediately north of the Polar Front to a high value of O(10−4 m2 s−1 in the seasonal thermocline just below the surface mixed layer. The latter values are found especially over the shallow plateau southeast of the Kerguelen Islands and in the Antarctic surface waters associated with the Polar Front attached to the escarpment northeast of the islands.

  19. Are there urban signatures in the tropospheric ozone column products derived from satellite measurements?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kar

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In view of the proposed geostationary satellite missions to monitor air quality from space, it is important to first assess the capability of the current suite of satellite instruments to provide information on the urban scale pollution. We explore the possibility of detecting urban signatures in the tropospheric column ozone data derived from Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS/Solar Backscattered Ultraviolet (SBUV and Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI/Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS satellite data. We find that distinct isolated plumes of tropospheric ozone near several large and polluted cities around the world may be detected in these data sets. The ozone plumes generally correspond with the tropospheric column NO2 plumes around these cities as observed by the Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography (SCIAMACHY instrument. Similar plumes are also seen in tropospheric mean ozone mixing ratio distribution after accounting for the surface and tropopause pressure variations. The total column ozone retrievals indicate fairly significant sensitivity to the lower troposphere over the polluted land areas, which might help explain these detections. These results indicate that ultraviolet (UV measurements may, in principle, be able to capture the urban signatures and may have implications for future missions using geostationary satellites.

  20. A Global Climatology of Tropospheric and Stratospheric Ozone Derived from Aura OMI and MLS Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemke, J.R.; Chandra, S.; Labow, G.; Bhartia, P. K.; Froidevaux, L.; Witte, J. C.

    2011-01-01

    A global climatology of tropospheric and stratospheric column ozone is derived by combining six years of Aura Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) ozone measurements for the period October 2004 through December 2010. The OMI/MLS tropospheric ozone climatology exhibits large temporal and spatial variability which includes ozone accumulation zones in the tropical south Atlantic year-round and in the subtropical Mediterranean! Asia region in summer months. High levels of tropospheric ozone in the northern hemisphere also persist in mid-latitudes over the eastern North American and Asian continents extending eastward over the Pacific Ocean. For stratospheric ozone climatology from MLS, largest ozone abundance lies in the northern hemisphere in the latitude range 70degN-80degN in February-April and in the southern hemisphere around 40degS-50degS during months August-October. The largest stratospheric ozone abundances in the northern hemisphere lie over North America and eastern Asia extending eastward across the Pacific Ocean and in the southern hemisphere south of Australia extending eastward across the dateline. With the advent of many newly developing 3D chemistry and transport models it is advantageous to have such a dataset for evaluating the performance of the models in relation to dynamical and photochemical processes controlling the ozone distributions in the troposphere and stratosphere.

  1. An empirical model of ion plasma in the inner magnetosphere derived from CRRES/MICS measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claudepierre, S. G.; Chen, M. W.; Roeder, J. L.; Fennell, J. F.

    2016-12-01

    We describe an empirical model of energetic ion plasma (˜20-400 keV/q) that is constructed from measurements taken by the Magnetospheric Ion Composition Spectrometer (MICS) instrument that flew on the CRRES spacecraft. This is a unique data set in that it provides energetic ion composition in the near-equatorial ring current region during a very active solar maximum. The model database is binned by energy, equatorial pitch angle, L shell, and magnetic local time and provides unidirectional, differential number fluxes of the major ionic constituents of the inner magnetosphere, such as protons (H+), singly charged oxygen (O+), and singly charged helium (He+). The H+ and O+ model fluxes are examined in detail and are consistent with well-known particle transport effects (e.g., adiabatic heating). We also validate these model fluxes against a number of other ion plasma models that are available in the literature. The primary finding is the elevated levels of energetic O+ flux during the CRRES era. We attribute this to a solar cycle effect, related to the enhanced upwelling and oxygen outflow from the ionosphere that occurs during solar maximum, driven by elevated solar extreme ultraviolet radiation. We briefly discuss the implications that the enhanced O+ environment during the CRRES era may have for other results derived from CRRES observations (e.g., statistical wave distributions).

  2. Evidence for a meteoritic component in impact melt rock from the Chicxulub structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeberl, Christian; Sharpton, Virgil L.; Schuraytz, Benjamin C.; Shirey, Steven B.; Blum, Joel D.; Marin, Luis E.; Koeberl, Christian

    1994-03-01

    The Chicxulub structure in Yucatan, Mexico, has recently been recognized as a greater than 200-km diameter multi-ring impact crater of K-T boundary age. Crystalline impact melt rocks and breccias from within the crater, which have compositions similar to those of normal continental crustal rocks and which show shock metamorphic effects, have been studied for trace element and Re-Os isotope compositions. A melt rock sample shows elevated iridium concentrations, an osmium concentration of 25 ppb, and a low Os-187/Os-188 ratio of 0.113, which are incompatible with derivation from the continental crust. Even though the Os-187/Os-188 ratio is slightly lower than the range so far measured in meteorites, a mantle origin seems unlikely for mass balance reasons and because the cratering event is unlikely to have excavated mantle material. The data support the hypothesis of a heterogeneously distributed meteoritic component in the Chicxulub melt rock.

  3. Neutron capture effects in lunar gadolinium and the irradiation histories of some lunar rocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugmair, G. W.; Marti, K.

    1971-01-01

    The Gd isotopic composition in 19 lunar rock and soil samples from three Apollo sites is reported. The analytical techniques and the high precision mass spectrometric measurements are discussed. Enrichments in the Gd-158 oxide to G-157 oxide ratio due to neutron capture range up to 0.75%. Integrated 'thermal' neutron fluxes derived from the isotopic anomalies of Gd are compared with spallation Kr data from aliquot samples to construct a model which gives both average cosmic-ray irradiation depths and effective neutron exposure ages for some rocks. Rock 14310 is the first lunar sample where Kr anomalies due to resonance neutron capture in Br are observed. A Kr-81/Kr exposure age of 262 (plus or minus 7)m.y. is calculated for this rock.

  4. Distinct roles for ROCK1 and ROCK2 in the regulation of cell detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jianjian; Wu, Xiangbing; Surma, Michelle; Vemula, Sasidhar; Zhang, Lumin; Yang, Yu; Kapur, Reuben; Wei, Lei

    2013-02-07

    This study, using mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells derived from ROCK1(-/-) and ROCK2(-/-) mice, is designed to dissect roles for ROCK1 and ROCK2 in regulating actin cytoskeleton reorganization induced by doxorubicin, a chemotherapeutic drug. ROCK1(-/-) MEFs exhibited improved actin cytoskeleton stability characterized by attenuated periphery actomyosin ring formation and preserved central stress fibers, associated with decreased myosin light chain 2 (MLC2) phosphorylation but preserved cofilin phosphorylation. These effects resulted in a significant reduction in cell shrinkage, detachment, and predetachment apoptosis. In contrast, ROCK2(-/-) MEFs showed increased periphery membrane folding and impaired cell adhesion, associated with reduced phosphorylation of both MLC2 and cofilin. Treatment with inhibitor of myosin (blebbistatin), inhibitor of actin polymerization (cytochalasin D), and ROCK pan-inhibitor (Y27632) confirmed the contributions of actomyosin contraction and stress fiber instability to stress-induced actin cytoskeleton reorganization. These results support a novel concept that ROCK1 is involved in destabilizing actin cytoskeleton through regulating MLC2 phosphorylation and peripheral actomyosin contraction, whereas ROCK2 is required for stabilizing actin cytoskeleton through regulating cofilin phosphorylation. Consequently, ROCK1 and ROCK2 can be functional different in regulating stress-induced stress fiber disassembly and cell detachment.

  5. Rock-property changes during reservoir compaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morita, N. (Conoco, Inc., Ponca City, OK (United States)); Gray, K.E. (Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States)); Srouji, F.A.A.; Jogi, P.N. (Teleco Oilfield Services Inc., Meviden, CT (US))

    1992-09-01

    Deformations, absolute permeability, electrical resistivity, PV change, and compressional- and shear-wave velocities were measured for Berea sandstone under various loading paths at temperatures from 70 to 380{degrees} F. The experimental behavior was subdivided into five categories. The experimental results were analyzed for each category, and the analysis was used to construct semianalytical rock-property equations, are expressed in terms of strain components. This formalism is practical because strains are more directly related to rock properties that are stress components. This paper presents unique rock-property data, including axial and radial measurements with various loading paths and temperatures; semianalytical equations that accurately simulate rock properties under various loading paths up to rock failure; and realistic predictions of rock-property changes during reservoir compaction.

  6. Early carboniferous wrenching, exhumation of high-grade metamorphic rocks and basin instability in SW Iberia: Constraints derived from structural geology and U-Pb and 40Ar-39Ar geochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, M. Francisco; Chichorro, Martim; Silva, J. Brandão; Ordóñez-Casado, Berta; Lee, James K. W.; Williams, Ian S.

    2012-08-01

    New U-Pb and 40Ar-39Ar geochronology and structural data from high- to medium grade metamorphic shear zones of the Ossa-Morena Zone, and structural data from Early Carboniferous basins (Ossa-Morena Zone and South-Portuguese Zone), place additional constraints on the Variscan tectonics in SW Iberia. A zircon U-Pb age of 465 ± 14 Ma (Middle Ordovician) measured on migmatite from the Coimbra-Cordoba shear zone is interpreted as the age of protolith crystallization. This age determination revises the information contained in the geological map of Portugal, in which these rocks were considered to be Proterozoic in age. This paper describes the evolution of Variscan wrench tectonics related to the development of shear zones, exhumation of deep crustal rocks and emplacement of magma in the Ossa-Morena Zone basement. In the Coimbra-Cordoba shear zone (transpressional), migmatites were rapidly exhumed from a depth of 42.5 km to 16.6 km over a period of ca. 10 Ma in the Viséan (ca. 340-330 Ma), indicating oblique slip exhumation rates of 8.5 to 10.6 mm/yr (Campo Maior migmatites) and 3.2 mm/yr (Ouguela gneisses) respectively. In the Évora Massif, the gneisses of the Boa Fé shear zone (transtensional) were exhumed from 18.5 to 7.4 km depth in the period ca. 344-334 Ma (Viséan), with exhumation oblique slip rates of 2.8 to 4.2 mm/yr. At the same time, the Early Carboniferous basins of SW Iberia were filled by turbidites and olistoliths, composed mostly of Devonian rocks. The presence of olistoliths indicates significant tectonic instability during sedimentation with large-scale mass movement, probably in the form of gravity slides. Deformation and metamorphism dated at 356 ± 12 Ma, 321 ± 13 Ma and 322 ± 29 Ma respectively suggests that Variscan wrench movements were active in SW Iberia during the Early Carboniferous for a period of at least 35 Ma.

  7. Measurements of the ion velocity distribution in an ultracold neutral plasma derived from a cold, dense Rydberg gas

    OpenAIRE

    S. D. Bergeson; Lyon, M

    2016-01-01

    We report measurements of the ion velocity distribution in an ultracold neutral plasma derived from a dense, cold Rydberg gas in a MOT. The Rydberg atoms are excited using a resonant two-step excitation pathway with lasers of 4 ns duration. The plasma forms spontaneously and rapidly. The rms width of the ion velocity distribution is determined by measuring laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of the ions. The measured excitation efficiency is compared with a Monte-Carlo wavefunction calculation, ...

  8. The thermal state of the Arabian plate derived from heat flow measurements in Oman and Yemen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolandone, Frederique; Lucazeau, Francis; Leroy, Sylvie; Mareschal, Jean-Claude; Jorand, Rachel; Goutorbe, Bruno; Bouquerel, Hélène

    2013-04-01

    The dynamics of the Afar plume and the rifting of the Red Sea and the Gulf of Aden affect the present-day thermal regime of the Arabian plate. However, the Arabian plate is a Precambrian shield covered on its eastern part by a Phanerozoic platform and its thermal regime, before the plume and rifting activities, should be similar to that of other Precambrian shields with a thick and stable lithosphere. The first heat flow measurements in the shield, in Saudi Arabia, yielded low values (35-44 mW/m2), similar to the typical shields values. Recent heat flow measurements in Jordan indicate higher values (56-66 mW/m2). As part of the YOCMAL project (YOung Conjugate MArgins Laboratory), we have conducted heat flow measurements in southern and northern Oman to obtain 10 new heat flux values in the eastern Arabian plate. We also derived 20 heat flux values in Yemen and Oman by processing thermal data from oil exploration wells. The surface heat flux in these different locations is uniformly low (45 mW/m2). The heat production in samples from the Dhofar and Socotra Precambrian basement is also low (0.7 µW/m3). Differences in heat flow between the eastern (60 mW/m2) and the western (45 mW/m2) parts of Arabia reflect differences in crustal heat production as well as a higher mantle heat flux in the west. We have calculated a steady state geotherm for the Arabian platform that intersects the isentropic temperature profile at a depth of about 150 km, consistent with the seismic observations. Seismic tomography studies of the mantle beneath Arabia also show this east-west contrast. Seismic studies have shown that the lithosphere is rather thin, 100 km or less below the shield and 150 km below the platform. The lithospheric thickness for the Arabian plate is 150 km, and the progressive thinning near the Red Sea, caused by the thermal erosion of the plume material, is too recent to be detected at the surface. The Afar plume mostly affects the base of the Arabian lithosphere along

  9. Distributed snow and rock temperature modelling in steep rock walls using Alpine3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberkorn, Anna; Wever, Nander; Hoelzle, Martin; Phillips, Marcia; Kenner, Robert; Bavay, Mathias; Lehning, Michael

    2017-02-01

    In this study we modelled the influence of the spatially and temporally heterogeneous snow cover on the surface energy balance and thus on rock temperatures in two rugged, steep rock walls on the Gemsstock ridge in the central Swiss Alps. The heterogeneous snow depth distribution in the rock walls was introduced to the distributed, process-based energy balance model Alpine3D with a precipitation scaling method based on snow depth data measured by terrestrial laser scanning. The influence of the snow cover on rock temperatures was investigated by comparing a snow-covered model scenario (precipitation input provided by precipitation scaling) with a snow-free (zero precipitation input) one. Model uncertainties are discussed and evaluated at both the point and spatial scales against 22 near-surface rock temperature measurements and high-resolution snow depth data from winter terrestrial laser scans.In the rough rock walls, the heterogeneously distributed snow cover was moderately well reproduced by Alpine3D with mean absolute errors ranging between 0.31 and 0.81 m. However, snow cover duration was reproduced well and, consequently, near-surface rock temperatures were modelled convincingly. Uncertainties in rock temperature modelling were found to be around 1.6 °C. Errors in snow cover modelling and hence in rock temperature simulations are explained by inadequate snow settlement due to linear precipitation scaling, missing lateral heat fluxes in the rock, and by errors caused by interpolation of shortwave radiation, wind and air temperature into the rock walls.Mean annual near-surface rock temperature increases were both measured and modelled in the steep rock walls as a consequence of a thick, long-lasting snow cover. Rock temperatures were 1.3-2.5 °C higher in the shaded and sunny rock walls, while comparing snow-covered to snow-free simulations. This helps to assess the potential error made in ground temperature modelling when neglecting snow in steep bedrock.

  10. A particle-tracking approach for accurate material derivative measurements with tomographic PIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novara, Matteo; Scarano, Fulvio

    2013-08-01

    The evaluation of the instantaneous 3D pressure field from tomographic PIV data relies on the accurate estimate of the fluid velocity material derivative, i.e., the velocity time rate of change following a given fluid element. To date, techniques that reconstruct the fluid parcel trajectory from a time sequence of 3D velocity fields obtained with Tomo-PIV have already been introduced. However, an accurate evaluation of the fluid element acceleration requires trajectory reconstruction over a relatively long observation time, which reduces random errors. On the other hand, simple integration and finite difference techniques suffer from increasing truncation errors when complex trajectories need to be reconstructed over a long time interval. In principle, particle-tracking velocimetry techniques (3D-PTV) enable the accurate reconstruction of single particle trajectories over a long observation time. Nevertheless, PTV can be reliably performed only at limited particle image number density due to errors caused by overlapping particles. The particle image density can be substantially increased by use of tomographic PIV. In the present study, a technique to combine the higher information density of tomographic PIV and the accurate trajectory reconstruction of PTV is proposed (Tomo-3D-PTV). The particle-tracking algorithm is applied to the tracers detected in the 3D domain obtained by tomographic reconstruction. The 3D particle information is highly sparse and intersection of trajectories is virtually impossible. As a result, ambiguities in the particle path identification over subsequent recordings are easily avoided. Polynomial fitting functions are introduced that describe the particle position in time with sequences based on several recordings, leading to the reduction in truncation errors for complex trajectories. Moreover, the polynomial regression approach provides a reduction in the random errors due to the particle position measurement. Finally, the acceleration

  11. The contribution of satellite SAR-derived displacement measurements in landslide risk management practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raspini, Federico; Bardi, Federica; Bianchini, Silvia; Ciampalini, Andrea; Del Ventisette, Chiara; Farina, Paolo; Ferrigno, Federica; Solari, Lorenzo; Casagli, Nicola

    2017-04-01

    Landslides are common phenomena that occur worldwide and are a main cause of loss of life and damage to property. The hazards associated with landslides are a challenging concern in many countries, including Italy. With 13% of the territory prone to landslides, Italy is one of the European countries with the highest landslide hazard, and on a worldwide scale, it is second only to Japan among the technologically advanced countries. Over the last 15 years, an increasing number of applications have aimed to demonstrate the applicability of images captured by space-borne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) sensors in slope instability investigations. InSAR (SAR Interferometry) is currently one of the most exploited techniques for the assessment of ground displacements, and it is becoming a consolidated tool for Civil Protection institutions in addressing landslide risk. We present a subset of the results obtained in Italy within the framework of SAR-based programmes and applications intended to test the potential application of C- and X-band satellite interferometry during different Civil Protection activities (namely, prevention, prevision, emergency response and post-emergency phases) performed to manage landslide risk. In all phases, different benefits can be derived from the use of SAR-based measurements, which were demonstrated to be effective in the field of landslide analysis. Analysis of satellite-SAR data is demonstrated to play a major role in the investigation of landslide-related events at different stages, including detection, mapping, monitoring, characterization and prediction. Interferometric approaches are widely consolidated for analysis of slow-moving slope deformations in a variety of environments, and exploitation of the amplitude data in SAR images is a somewhat natural complement for rapid-moving landslides. In addition, we discuss the limitations that still exist and must be overcome in the coming years to manage the transition of satellite SAR

  12. A derived transfer of eliciting emotional functions using differences among electroencephalograms as a dependent measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amd, Micah; Barnes-Holmes, Dermot; Ivanoff, Jason

    2013-05-01

    Emotional responses have specific electroencephalographic (EEG) signatures that arise within a few hundred milliseconds post-stimulus onset. In this experiment, EEG measures were employed to assess for transfer of emotional functions across three 3-member equivalence classes in an extension of Dougher, Auguston, Markham, Greenway, & Wulfert's (1994) seminal work on the transfer of arousal functions. Specifically, 12 human participants were trained in the following match-to-sample performances A1 = B1, A2 = B2, A3 = B3 and B1 = C1, B2 = C2, B3 = C3. After successfully testing for the emergence of symmetry relations (B1 = A1, B2 = A2, B3 = A3 and C1 = B1, C2 = B2, C3 = B3), visual images depicting emotionally positive and emotionally negative content were presented with A1 and A3, respectively, using a mixed stimulus pairing-compounding procedure. A2 was paired with emotionally neutral images. Next, EEG data were recorded as participants were exposed to a forced-choice recognition task with stimuli A1, B1, C1, A2, B2, C2, A3, B3, C3 and three novel stimuli A4, B4 and C4. Results yielded differential EEG effects for stimuli paired directly with emotional versus neutral images. Critically, differential EEG effects were also recorded across the C stimuli that were equivalently related to the A stimulus set. The EEG data coincide with previous reports of emotion-specific EEG effects, indicating that the initial emotional impact of a stimulus may emerge based on direct stimulus pairing and derived stimulus relations. © Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.

  13. Geotechnical Descriptions of Rock and Rock Masses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-04-01

    weathering is presented by Dornbusch (1982). 39. Mechanical, or physical, weathering of rock occurs primarily by (a) freeze expansion (or frost wedging...34Engineering Classifica- tion of In-Situ Rock," Technical Report No. AFWL-TR-67-144, Air Force Weapons Laboratory, Kirtland Air Force Base, N. Mex. Dornbusch , W

  14. Particle number emissions of motor traffic derived from street canyon measurements in a Central European city

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klose, S.; Birmili, W.; Voigtländer, J.; Tuch, T.; Wehner, B.; Wiedensohler, A.; Ketzel, M.

    2009-02-01

    A biennial dataset of ambient particle number size distributions (diameter range 4-800 nm) collected in urban air in Leipzig, Germany, was analysed with respect to the influence of traffic emissions. Size distributions were sampled continuously in 2005 and 2006 inside a street canyon trafficked by ca. 10 000 motor vehicles per day, and at a background reference site distant at 1.5 km. Auto-correlation analysis showed that the impact of fresh traffic emissions could be seen most intensely below particle sizes of 60 nm. The traffic-induced concentration increment at roadside was estimated by subtracting the urban background values from the street canyon measurement. To describe the variable dispersion conditions inside the street canyon, micro-meteorological dilution factors were calculated using the Operational Street Pollution Model (OSPM), driven by above-roof wind speed and wind direction observations. The roadside increment concentrations, dilution factor, and real-time traffic counts were used to calculate vehicle emission factors (aerosol source rates) that are representative of the prevailing driving conditions, i.e. stop-and-go traffic including episodes of fluent traffic flow at speeds up to 40 km h-1. The size spectrum of traffic-derived particles was essentially bimodal - with mode diameters around 12 and 100 nm, while statistical analysis suggested that the emitted number concentration varied with time of day, wind direction, particle size and fleet properties. Significantly, the particle number emissions depended on ambient temperature, ranging between 4.8 (±1.8) and 7.8 (±2.9).1014 p. veh-1 km-1 in summer and winter, respectively. A separation of vehicle types according to vehicle length suggested that lorry-like vehicles emit about 80 times more particle number than passenger car-like vehicles. Using nitrogen oxide (NOx) measurements, specific total particle number emissions of 338 p. (pg NOx)-1 were inferred. The calculated traffic emission factors

  15. The structures of noncrystalline rocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The structural studies of noncrystalline rocks by total radial distribution function (RDF) which was derived from the wide angular X-ray scattering (WAXS) have been reported. In order to make a further study of the structural features shown by RDF, the unsymmetric peaks in total RDF were separated into the approximately symmetric peaks by the multi-peaks separation processing. By analyzing the relationship of the peak parameters with the compositions, the information of further structures has been discussed.

  16. Fossils, rocks, and time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Lucy E.; Pojeta, John

    1999-01-01

    We study our Earth for many reasons: to find water to drink or oil to run our cars or coal to heat our homes, to know where to expect earthquakes or landslides or floods, and to try to understand our natural surroundings. Earth is constantly changing--nothing on its surface is truly permanent. Rocks that are now on top of a mountain may once have been at the bottom of the sea. Thus, to understand the world we live on, we must add the dimension of time. We must study Earth's history. When we talk about recorded history, time is measured in years, centuries, and tens of centuries. When we talk about Earth history, time is measured in millions and billions of years. Time is an everyday part of our lives. We keep track of time with a marvelous invention, the calendar, which is based on the movements of Earth in space. One spin of Earth on its axis is a day, and one trip around the Sun is a year. The modern calendar is a great achievement, developed over many thousands of years as theory and technology improved. People who study Earth's history also use a type of calendar, called the geologic time scale. It looks very different from the familiar calendar. In some ways, it is more like a book, and the rocks are its pages. Some of the pages are torn or missing, and the pages are not numbered, but geology gives us the tools to help us read this book.

  17. Lichenometric age measured on rock-falls related to historic seismicity affecting Lorca and its surroundings (Murcia, SE Spain); Datacion mediante liquenometria de los desprendimientos rocosos asociados a la sismicidad historica en Lorca (Murcia, SE de Espana)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Lopez, R.; Martin-Gonzalez, F.; Martinez-Diaz, J. J.; Rodriguez-Pascua, M. A.

    2012-11-01

    During the earthquake at Lorca (Murcia, SE Spain) in 2011 (5.2 Mw, 4km depth) several rock-falls occurred, mobilizing an estimated volume of close to 2,000 m3. All these rock-falls took place within the Estancias and La Tercia mountain ranges, the topography of which is composed of Tortonian calcarenitic sandstones with steep scarps more than 30 m in height. We have conducted a lichenometric study to obtain the age of the ancient rock-falls within the Las Estancias Range. We have assumed an annual growth rate of 0.24 mm for lichen species classified as calcicolous and related to warm climatic conditions. Our aim was to corroborate the hypothesis that seismic events triggered these massive rock-falls. The city of Lorca had experienced two nearfield historic earthquakes (1674 EMS VIII and 1818 EMS VI) and one far-field tremor during the great Lisbon earthquake in 1755 (EMS VI). Results obtained here indicate that the earthquakes of 1674 and 2011 were quite similar, except that the 1674 one mobilised a greater quantity and twenty times the volume of blocks mobilised during the 2011 earthquake. Therefore, we conclude that the size of the earthquake of 1674 was possibly between 6.0 < M < 6.8, assuming similar focal and seismotectonic conditions to those of the instrumentally measured earthquake of 2011. (Author) 34 refs.

  18. The Rock Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Raman J.; Bushee, Jonathan

    1977-01-01

    Presents a rock cycle diagram suitable for use at the secondary or introductory college levels which separates rocks formed on and below the surface, includes organic materials, and separates products from processes. (SL)

  19. Radiometry rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, James E.

    2012-10-01

    Professor Bill Wolfe was an exceptional mentor for his graduate students, and he made a major contribution to the field of optical engineering by teaching the (largely ignored) principles of radiometry for over forty years. This paper describes an extension of Bill's work on surface scatter behavior and the application of the BRDF to practical optical engineering problems. Most currently-available image analysis codes require the BRDF data as input in order to calculate the image degradation from residual optical fabrication errors. This BRDF data is difficult to measure and rarely available for short EUV wavelengths of interest. Due to a smooth-surface approximation, the classical Rayleigh-Rice surface scatter theory cannot be used to calculate BRDFs from surface metrology data for even slightly rough surfaces. The classical Beckmann-Kirchhoff theory has a paraxial limitation and only provides a closed-form solution for Gaussian surfaces. Recognizing that surface scatter is a diffraction process, and by utilizing sound radiometric principles, we first developed a linear systems theory of non-paraxial scalar diffraction in which diffracted radiance is shift-invariant in direction cosine space. Since random rough surfaces are merely a superposition of sinusoidal phase gratings, it was a straightforward extension of this non-paraxial scalar diffraction theory to develop a unified surface scatter theory that is valid for moderately rough surfaces at arbitrary incident and scattered angles. Finally, the above two steps are combined to yield a linear systems approach to modeling image quality for systems suffering from a variety of image degradation mechanisms. A comparison of image quality predictions with experimental results taken from on-orbit Solar X-ray Imager (SXI) data is presented.

  20. Tautochrone and Brachistochrone Shape Solutions for Rocking Rigid Bodies

    CERN Document Server

    Glaschke, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Rocking rigid bodies appear in several shapes in everyday life: As furniture like rocking chairs and rocking cradles or as toys like rocking horses or tilting dolls. The familiar rocking motion of these objects, a non-linear combination of a rigid rotation and a translation of the center of mass, gives rise to a number of interesting dynamical properties. However, their study has received little attention in the literature. This work presents a comprehensive introduction to the dynamics of rocking rigid bodies, including a concise derivation of the equations of motion as well as a general inversion procedure to construct rocking rigid body shapes with specified dynamical properties. Moreover, two novel rigid body shapes are derived - the tautochrone shape and the brachistochrone shape - which represent an intriguing generalization of the well-know tautochrone and brachistochrone curves. In particular, tautochrone shapes offer an alternative construction of a tautochrone pendulum, in addition to Huygens' cyclo...

  1. My Pet Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lark, Adam; Kramp, Robyne; Nurnberger-Haag, Julie

    2008-01-01

    Many teachers and students have experienced the classic pet rock experiment in conjunction with a geology unit. A teacher has students bring in a "pet" rock found outside of school, and the students run geologic tests on the rock. The tests include determining relative hardness using Mohs scale, checking for magnetization, and assessing luster.…

  2. My Pet Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lark, Adam; Kramp, Robyne; Nurnberger-Haag, Julie

    2008-01-01

    Many teachers and students have experienced the classic pet rock experiment in conjunction with a geology unit. A teacher has students bring in a "pet" rock found outside of school, and the students run geologic tests on the rock. The tests include determining relative hardness using Mohs scale, checking for magnetization, and assessing luster.…

  3. The influence of the segmentation process on 3D measurements from cone beam computed tomography-derived surface models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelbrecht, Willem P.; Fourie, Zacharias; Damstra, Janalt; Gerrits, Peter O.; Ren, Yijin

    2013-01-01

    To compare the accuracy of linear and angular measurements between cephalometric and anatomic landmarks on surface models derived from 3D cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) with two different segmentation protocols was the aim of this study. CBCT scans were made of cadaver heads and 3D surface mod

  4. Deriving Equations of State for Specific Lakes and Inland Seas from Laboratory Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrulionis, Natalia; Zavialov, Ivan; Zavialov, Peter; Osadchiev, Alexander; Kolokolova, Alexandra; Alukaeva, Alevtina; Izhitskiy, Alexander; Izhitskaya, Elena

    2017-04-01

    The equation of state is the dependence of water density on temperature, salinity, and pressure. It is important in many respects, in particular, for numerical modeling of marine systems. The widely used UNESCO equation of state, as well as the more recent and general TEOS-10 equation, are intended for the ocean waters. Hence, they are confined to salinities below 40 ‰ and, even more restrictively, valid only for ionic salt composition characteristic for the ocean. Both conditions do not hold for many lakes. Moreover, significant deviations of the ionic composition from the oceanic one have been documented for coastal zones, especially those exposed to river discharges. Therefore, the objective of this study was to find equations of state for areas or water bodies with non-oceanic ionic salt composition. In order to obtain the required equations, we analyzed water samples obtained in expeditions of 2014-2016 from the Black Sea, the Aral Sea, Lake Issyk-Kul and Caspian Sea. The filtered samples were submitted to high accuracy (up to 0.00001 g/cm3) density measurements in laboratory using the Anton Paar DMA 5000M in the temperature range from 1 to 29°C. The absolute salinity values of the initial samples were obtained through the dry residue method. Further, we diluted the samples by purified deionized water to produce different salinities. To control the accuracy of the dilution process, we used a reference sample of standard IAPSO-certified seawater at 35‰. The density versus salinity and temperature data obtained thereby were then approximated by a best fitting 2-order polynomial surface using the least squares method. This procedure yielded the approximate empirical equations of state for the selected marine areas (the Russian Black Sea shelf) and inland water bodies (the Aral Sea, the Lake Issyk-Kul, the Caspian Sea). The newly derived equations - even the one for the Black Sea shelf - are different from the oceanic equation significantly within the

  5. Rock Music and Korean Adolescent's Antisocial Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Inkyung; Kwak, Keumjoo; Chang, Geunyoung; Yang, Jinyoung

    The relationship between rock music preference and antisocial behavior among Korean adolescents was examined. The Korean versions of the Sensation Seeking Scale and the Antisocial Behavior Checklist were used to measure sensation seeking motivation and delinquency. Adolescents (N=1,079) were categorized as "rock/metal,""dance,"…

  6. Acoustics in rock and pop music halls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Niels Werner; Thompson, Eric Robert; Gade, Anders Christian

    2007-01-01

    The existing body of literature regarding the acoustic design of concert halls has focused almost exclusively on classical music, although there are many more performances of rhythmic music, including rock and pop. Objective measurements were made of the acoustics of twenty rock music venues...

  7. Rock Music and Korean Adolescent's Antisocial Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Inkyung; Kwak, Keumjoo; Chang, Geunyoung; Yang, Jinyoung

    The relationship between rock music preference and antisocial behavior among Korean adolescents was examined. The Korean versions of the Sensation Seeking Scale and the Antisocial Behavior Checklist were used to measure sensation seeking motivation and delinquency. Adolescents (N=1,079) were categorized as "rock/metal,""dance," or "ballad" based…

  8. Features Resembling Pseudotachylyte at Enchanted Rock Batholith, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, P. C.; Degenhardt, J. J., Jr.; Reid, A. M.

    1995-09-01

    Enchanted Rock batholith in central Texas is a granitic pluton of ~250 km^2 area [1]. The batholith intrudes Precambrian metamorphic rocks and is dated by Rb-Sr at 1,048+/-34 m.y. [2]. Plutonic rocks are exposed in a series of exfoliation domes located along the southeastern edge of the batholith. Numerous subvertical fractures occur along the outer margins of the intrusion and, in a few cases, between exfoliation domes. A number of these fractures contain veins described as pseudotachylytes by Barnes [3]. In hand specimen, the veins resemble pseudotachylytes, forming a branching network and containing angular fragments of local country rock in a fine-grained matrix that locally exhibits an apparent flow texture. Some smaller veins appear to have been injected into host rock. The veins range in width up to ~30 cm with boundaries which are sharp and smooth with undulating surfaces. Thin (~4-5 cm) aplite dikes cut the granite and generally show small amounts of displacement where intersected by the fracture veins (maximum measured apparent displacement ~75 cm). Matrix material in veins includes fragments of quartz, feldspar, biotite, and opaques. Matrix biotite is generally associated with opaques and occurs as numerous, tiny, oriented flakes between fragments of feldspar and quartz in areas which are darker than surrounding matrix. The flow-like textures of matrix materials are defined by these darker areas which are elongated subparallel to fracture direction. The finer-grained matrix biotite apparently derives from comminution of larger grains from host rock. Larger clasts include rock fragments and fragments of alkali feldspar and quartz, with a tendency for the larger fragments to concentrate in the centers of veins. Clasts are irregular in shape and are commonly angular and rarely contorted. Rock fragments are derived from host rock and also include "breccia within breccia" fragments. Single-mineral fragments display evidence of strain; quartz commonly shows

  9. Mechanic behavior of unloading fractured rock mass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Ke; ZHANG Yongxing; WU Hanhui

    2003-01-01

    Under tension and shear conditions related to unloading of rock mass, a jointed rock mass model of linear elastic fracture mechanics is established. According to the model, the equations of stresses, strains and displacements of the region influenced by the crack but relatively faraway the crack (the distance between the research point and the center of the crack is longer than the length of crack) are derived. They are important for evaluating the deformation of cracked rock. It is demonstrated by the comparison between computational results of these theoretical equations and the observed data from unloading test that they are applicable for actual engineering.

  10. Comparing measurement-derived (3DVH) and machine log file-derived dose reconstruction methods for VMAT QA in patient geometries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Neelam; Yang, Kai; Yan, Di

    2014-07-08

    The purpose of this study was to compare the measurement-derived (3DVH) dose reconstruction method with machine log file-derived dose reconstruction method in patient geometries for VMAT delivery. A total of ten patient plans were selected from a regular fractionation plan to complex SBRT plans. Treatment sites in the lung and abdomen were chosen to explore the effects of tissue heterogeneity on the respective dose reconstruction algorithms. Single- and multiple-arc VMAT plans were generated to achieve the desired target objectives. Delivered plan in the patient geometry was reconstructed by using ArcCHECK Planned Dose Perturbation (ACPDP) within 3DVH software, and by converting the machine log file to Pinnacle3 9.0 treatment plan format and recalculating dose with CVSP algorithm. In addition, delivered gantry angles between machine log file and 3DVH 4D measurement were also compared to evaluate the accuracy of the virtual inclinometer within the 3DVH. Measured ion chamber and 3DVH-derived isocenter dose agreed with planned dose within 0.4% ± 1.2% and -1.0% ± 1.6%, respectively. 3D gamma analysis showed greater than 98% between log files and 3DVH reconstructed dose. Machine log file reconstructed doses and TPS dose agreed to within 2% in PTV and OARs over the entire treatment. 3DVH reconstructed dose showed an average maximum dose difference of 3% ± 1.2% in PTV, and an average mean difference of -4.5% ± 10.5% in OAR doses. The average virtual inclinometer error (VIE) was -0.65° ± 1.6° for all patients, with a maximum error of -5.16° ± 4.54° for an SRS case. The time averaged VIE was within 1°-2°, and did not have a large impact on the overall accuracy of the estimated patient dose from ACPDP algorithm. In this study, we have compared two independent dose reconstruction methods for VMAT QA. Both methods are capable of taking into account the measurement and delivery parameter discrepancy, and display the delivered dose in CT patient geometry rather than

  11. Rock Plasticity from Microtomography and Upscaling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie Liu; Reem Freij-Ayoub; Klaus Regenauer-Lieb

    2015-01-01

    We present a workflow for upscaling of rock properties using microtomography and percolation theory. In this paper we focus on a pilot study for assessing the plastic strength of rocks from a digital rock image. Firstly, we determine the size of mechanical representative volume ele-ment (RVE) by using upper/lower bound dissipation computations in accordance with thermody-namics. Then the mechanical RVE is used to simulate the rock failure at micro-scale using FEM. Two cases of different pressures of linear Drucker-Prager plasticity of rocks are computed to com-pute the macroscopic cohesion and the angle of internal friction of the rock. We also detect the criti-cal exponents of yield stress for scaling laws from a series of derivative models that are created by a shrinking/expanding algorithm. We use microtomographic data sets of two carbonate samples and compare the results with previous results. The results show that natural rock samples with irregular structures may have the critical exponent of yield stress different from random models. This unex-pected result could have significant ramifications for assessing the stability of solid materials with internal structure. Therefore our pilot study needs to be extended to investigate the scaling laws of strength of many more natural rocks with irregular microstructure.

  12. Rock History and Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalez, Éric

    2013-01-01

    Two ambitious works written by French-speaking scholars tackle rock music as a research object, from different but complementary perspectives. Both are a definite must-read for anyone interested in the contextualisation of rock music in western popular culture. In Une histoire musicale du rock (i.e. A Musical History of Rock), rock music is approached from the point of view of the people – musicians and industry – behind the music. Christophe Pirenne endeavours to examine that field from a m...

  13. Deriving welfare measures from discrete choice experiments: inconsistency between current methods and random utility and welfare theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancsar, Emily; Savage, Elizabeth

    2004-09-01

    Discrete choice experiments (DCEs) are being used increasingly in health economics to elicit preferences for products and programs. The results of such experiments have been used to calculate measures of welfare or more specifically, respondents' 'willingness to pay' (WTP) for products and programs and their 'marginal willingness to pay' (MWTP) for the attributes that make up such products and programs. In this note we show that the methods currently used to derive measures of welfare from DCEs in the health economics literature are not consistent with random utility theory (RUT), or with microeconomic welfare theory more generally. The inconsistency with welfare theory is an important limitation on the use of such WTP estimates in cost-benefit analyses. We describe an alternative method of deriving measures of welfare (compensating variation) from DCEs that is consistent with RUT and is derived using welfare theory. We demonstrate its use in an empirical application to derive the WTP for asthma medication and compare it to the results elicited from the method currently used in the health economics literature.

  14. The function of Rho-dependent kinases ROCK1 and ROCK2 in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svenja eHartmann

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Rho-associated kinases ROCK1 and ROCK2 are serine/threonine kinases that are downstream targets of the small GTPases RhoA, RhoB, and RhoC. ROCKs are involved in diverse cellular activities including actin cytoskeleton organization, cell adhesion and motility, proliferation and apoptosis, remodeling of the extracellular matrix and smooth muscle cell contraction. The role of ROCK1 and ROCK2 has long been considered to be similar; however, it is now clear that they do not always have the same functions. Moreover, depending on their subcellular localization, activation, and other environmental factors, ROCK signaling can have different effects on cellular function. With respect to the heart, findings in isoform-specific knockout mice argue for a role of ROCK1 and ROCK2 in the pathogenesis of cardiac fibrosis and cardiac hypertrophy, respectively. Increased ROCK activity could play a pivotal role in processes leading to cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension, pulmonary hypertension, angina pectoris, vasospastic angina, heart failure, and stroke, and thus ROCK activity is a potential new biomarker for heart disease. Pharmacological ROCK inhibition reduces the enhanced ROCK activity in patients, accompanied with a measurable improvement in medical condition. In this review, we focus on recent findings regarding ROCK signaling in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease, with a special focus on differences between ROCK1 and ROCK2 function.

  15. The Function of Rho-Associated Kinases ROCK1 and ROCK2 in the Pathogenesis of Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Svenja; Ridley, Anne J; Lutz, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Rho-associated kinases ROCK1 and ROCK2 are serine/threonine kinases that are downstream targets of the small GTPases RhoA, RhoB, and RhoC. ROCKs are involved in diverse cellular activities including actin cytoskeleton organization, cell adhesion and motility, proliferation and apoptosis, remodeling of the extracellular matrix and smooth muscle cell contraction. The role of ROCK1 and ROCK2 has long been considered to be similar; however, it is now clear that they do not always have the same functions. Moreover, depending on their subcellular localization, activation, and other environmental factors, ROCK signaling can have different effects on cellular function. With respect to the heart, findings in isoform-specific knockout mice argue for a role of ROCK1 and ROCK2 in the pathogenesis of cardiac fibrosis and cardiac hypertrophy, respectively. Increased ROCK activity could play a pivotal role in processes leading to cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension, pulmonary hypertension, angina pectoris, vasospastic angina, heart failure, and stroke, and thus ROCK activity is a potential new biomarker for heart disease. Pharmacological ROCK inhibition reduces the enhanced ROCK activity in patients, accompanied with a measurable improvement in medical condition. In this review, we focus on recent findings regarding ROCK signaling in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease, with a special focus on differences between ROCK1 and ROCK2 function.

  16. Electrical resistivity of rock and its correlation to engineering properties; Ganseki {center{underscore}dot} ganban no hiteiko to sono kogakuteki seishitsu tono kankei ni tsuite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimaki, Hitoshi; Sekine, Ichiro [Toda Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Saito, Akira [Mitsui Mineral Development Engineering Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Yoshinaka, Ryunoshin [Saitama University, Saitama (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1999-04-01

    In order to interpret resistivity profiles derived from electrical and electromagnetic surveys, it is necessary to study the correlation between electrical resistivity of rock and engineering properties. In this paper, we investigate the electrical resistivity of rock and its correlation to engineering properties. The experiments reveal the importance of electric surface conduction for studying those problems. These results suggest that resistivity measurements can be used as a quantitative guide in evaluating an area as to its engineering properties. (author)

  17. Interpreting measurements of cardiac function using vendor-independent speckle tracking echocardiography in children: a prospective, blinded comparison with catheter-derived measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudar, Suma P; Baker, G Hamilton; Chowdhury, Shahryar M; Reid, Kimberly J; Shirali, Girish; Scheurer, Mark A

    2016-12-01

    Adult studies demonstrate that echocardiographic measurements of cardiac function using speckle tracking correlate with invasive measurements, but such data in the pediatric population are sparse. Our aim was to compare speckle-derived measures of cardiac function to measurements routinely obtained by cardiac catheterization in children. Echocardiograms were performed on the day of cardiac catheterization. Using Tomtec 2D Cardiac Performance Analysis, longitudinal strain (LS), longitudinal strain rate (LSR), early diastolic LSR, and ejection fraction (EF) for the right and left ventricle (RV and LV) were calculated via speckle tracking. Global LS and LSR were calculated for the LV. These results were compared to cardiac index, maximum ventricular dp/dt (max dp/dt), ventricular end-diastolic pressure (EDP), and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) obtained by fluid-filled catheters. A blinded observer performed all echo measurements. Fifty studies were performed on 28 patients ages 4 months to 20 years old. Their diagnoses included cardiac transplant (48 studies), repaired AV septal defect (1), and dilated cardiomyopathy (1). RVEDP ranged from 2 to 22 mm Hg (median=6) and PCWP ranged from 6 to 32 mmHg (median 10). LV global LS and LV 2-chamber LSR by speckle-tracking negatively correlated with LV max dp/dt (LV global LS R=-.83, P=.001; LV 2-chamber LSR R=-.69, P=.009). RV LS weakly correlated with max dp/dt (R=.363, P=.002). Early diastolic strain rate did not correlate with EDP in either ventricle. Speckle-derived measurements of function in the LV have stronger correlation than the RV to catheter-derived measures. LV global LS has the strongest correlation with invasive function measures in children. © 2016, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Characteristics of fluid substitution in porous rocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Shengjie

    2009-01-01

    Analysis of the effect of changes in fluid properties of rocks on the compressional-wave velocity VP and shear-wave velocity Vs is very important for understanding the rock physical properties, especially in oilfield exploration and development.The fluid substitution process was analyzed by using ultrasonic measurement and theoretical calculations.The results showed that the effect of fluid substitution on the rock elastic modulus was mainly controlled by fluid properties, saturation, and confining pressure.For a rock with specific properties and porosity, the result of theoretical prediction for fluid substitution accorded with the experimental result under high confining pressure (higher than 60 MPa for our experimental data), but failed to describe the trend of experimental result under low confining pressure and VP predicted by Gassmann's equation was higher than that measured by experiment.A higher porosity resulted in stronger sensitivity of the bulk modulus of saturated rocks to the change of fluid properties.

  19. Meteorite Linked to Rock at Meridiani

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    This meteorite, a basalt lava rock nearly indistinguishable from many Earth rocks, provided the first strong proof that meteorites could come from Mars. Originally weighing nearly 8 kilograms (17.6 pounds), it was collected in 1979 in the Elephant Moraine area of Antarctica. The side of the cube at the lower left in this image measures 1 centimeter (0.4 inches). This picture shows a sawn face of this fine-grained gray rock. (The vertical stripes are saw marks.) The black patches in the rock are melted rock, or glass, formed when a large meteorite hit Mars near the rock. The meteorite impact probably threw this rock, dubbed 'EETA79001,' off Mars and toward Antarctica on Earth. The black glass contains traces of martian atmosphere gases. The Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity has discovered that a rock dubbed 'Bounce' at Meridiani Planum has a very similar mineral composition to this meteorite and likely shares common origins. Bounce itself is thought to have originated outside the area surrounding Opportunity's landing site; an impact or collision likely threw the rock away from its primary home.

  20. A Novel Mobile Testing Equipment for Rock Cuttability Assessment: Vertical Rock Cutting Rig (VRCR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasar, Serdar; Yilmaz, Ali Osman

    2017-04-01

    In this study, a new mobile rock cutting testing apparatus was designed and produced for rock cuttability assessment called vertical rock cutting rig (VRCR) which was designed specially to fit into hydraulic press testing equipment which are available in almost every rock mechanics laboratory. Rock cutting trials were initiated just after the production of VRCR along with calibration of the measuring load cell with an external load cell to validate the recorded force data. Then, controlled rock cutting tests with both relieved and unrelieved cutting modes were implemented on five different volcanic rock samples with a standard simple-shaped wedge tool. Additionally, core cutting test which is an important approach for roadheader performance prediction was simulated with VRCR. Mini disc cutters and point attack tools were used for execution of experimental trials. Results clearly showed that rock cutting tests were successfully realized and measuring system is delicate to rock strength, cutting depth and other variables. Core cutting test was successfully simulated, and it was also shown that rock cutting tests with mini disc cutters and point attack tools are also successful with VRCR.

  1. Methods of rock burst prediction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genkin, V.A.; Minin, Yu.Ya.; Morozov, G.D.; Proskuryakov, V.M.; Cmirnov, V.A.

    1979-07-01

    Some methods of predicting rock bursts in underground coal and iron ore mines are evaluated: using BP-18 indenters and the MGD indenter with automatic recording; seismic method consisting in measuring the speed of shock waves travelling through various layers (apparatus SB-20 is designed for use in coal mines); electrometric method (measuring resistance between two electrodes when electric currents flow through coal and rocks). The design of the AEhSSh-1 measuring instrument, used in the electrometric method in coal mines is also described. Each of the methods is described and mathematical fomulae used as their theoretical basis are presented. The calculating process is explained and brief information on the design and use of the measuring instrument is given. The methods are evaluated from the viewpoint of precision. (In Russian)

  2. Rock avalanches: significance and progress (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, T. R.

    2013-12-01

    1. The probability distribution of landslide volumes follows a power-law indicating that large rock avalanches dominate the terrestrial sediment supply from mountains, and that their source area morphologies dominate mountain topography. 2. Large rock slope failures (~ 106 m3 or greater) often mobilise into rock avalanches, which can travel extraordinarily long distances with devastating effect. This hypermobility has been the subject of many investigations; we have demonstrated that it can be explained quantitatively and accurately by considering the energetics of the intense rock fragmentation that always occurs during motion of a large rock mass. 3. Study of rock avalanche debris psd shows that the energy used in creating new rock surface area during fragmentation is not lost to surface energy, but is recycled generating a high-frequency elastic energy field that reduces the frictional resistance to motion during runout. 4. Rock avalanches that deposit on glaciers can eventually form large terminal moraines that have no connection with any climatic event; unless these are identified as rock-avalanche-influenced they can confuse palaeoclimatic inferences drawn from moraine ages. Rock-avalanche-derived fines, however, can be identified in moraine debris up to ten thousand years old by the characteristic micron-scale agglomerates that form during intense fragmentation, and which are absent from purely climatically-induced moraines; there is thus a strong case for re-examining existing palaeoclimatic databases to eliminate potentially rock-avalanche-influenced moraine ages. 5. Rock avalanches (especially coseismic ones) are a serious hazard, being very destructive in their own right; they also block river valleys, forming landslide dams and potentially devastating dambreak floods, and subsequent severe decade-scale aggradation of downstream fans and floodplains. Rock avalanches falling into lakes or fiords can cause catastrophic tsunami that pose a serious risk to

  3. Relation Between Coronal Hole Areas and Solar Wind Speeds Derived from Interplanetary Scintillation Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokumaru, Munetoshi; Satonaka, Daiki; Fujiki, Ken'ichi; Hayashi, Keiji; Hakamada, Kazuyuki

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the relation between coronal hole (CH) areas and solar wind speeds during 1995 - 2011 using the potential field (PF) model analysis of magnetograph observations and interplanetary scintillation (IPS) observations by the Institute for Space-Earth Environmental Research (formerly Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory) of Nagoya University. We obtained a significant positive correlation between the CH areas (A) derived from the PF model calculations and solar wind speeds (V) derived from the IPS observations. The correlation coefficients between them are usually high, but they drop significantly in solar maxima. The slopes of the A - V relation are roughly constant except for the period around solar maximum, when flatter or steeper slopes are observed. The excursion of the correlation coefficients and slopes at solar maxima is ascribed partly to the effect of rapid structural changes in the coronal magnetic field and solar wind, and partly to the predominance of small CHs. It is also demonstrated that V is inversely related to the flux expansion factor (f) and that f is closely related to A^{-1/2}; hence, V ∝ A^{1/2}. A better correlation coefficient is obtained from the A^{1/2} - V relation, and this fact is useful for improving space weather predictions. We compare the CH areas derived from the PF model calculations with He i 1083 nm observations and show that the PF model calculations provide reliable estimates of the CH area, particularly for large A.

  4. Principles of rock mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turchaninov, I.A.; Iofis, M.A.; Kasparyan, E.V.

    1979-01-01

    This book presents the principles of rock mechanics in a systematic way, reflecting both the historic development and the contemporary status of theoretical and experimental techniques used for the determination of the properties and stress state of rock masses, calculation of elements of systems for exploitation of useful mineral deposits and the design of mine openings. The subject of rock mechanics is discussed and methods and basic approaches are analyzed. The most widely used methods for determining the properties of rock in specimens and in situ are described. Problems of determining the stress strain state of the rock around mine openings by both experimental and analytic methods are discussed. The primary results of the study of the stress state of rock around main, development and production openings are presented. Problems of the movement of rock due to extraction of minerals are analyzed in detail, as are the conditions and causes of the development of rock bursts and sudden release of rock and gas in both surface and underground mines. Procedures for preventing or localizing rock bursts or sudden outbursts are described. (313 refs.)

  5. Mechanism of zonal disintegration in surrounding rock mass around deep rock engineering and its application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The mechanical behaviors of deep rock mass are different from those of shallow rock mass.Through cases of Jinping II Hydropower Station,the special phenomenon of zonal disintegration in the surrounding rock mass around the diversion tunnels,is analyzed.On the basis of fracture mechanics,a new strength criterion for deep rock mass is derived.The new nonlinear strength criterion that is relative to the rock mass rating classification can be applied to the study of the tensile failure of deep rock mass.Subsequently,zonal disintegration model is established,and the radius of fractured zone and none-fractured zone of deep surrounding rock mass around cylindrical tunnel are obtained,their exact positions and the evolution law of zonal disintegration of surrounding rock mass is determined.To validate the present model,comparison between calculation results and the experiment observation on facture and failure around underground openings is carried out.It is found that the numerical simulation result is in good agreement with the experimental one on failure modes around the hole.Through sensitivity analysis,the effects of stress condition,cohesion and the angle of internal friction on the phenomenon of zonal disintegration are determined.Finally,the present model is adopted in the analysis of the zonal disintegration in the surrounding rock mass around the diversion tunnels in Jinping II Hydropower Station.Meanwhile,the magnitude and distributions of fractured zones are determined by numerical simulation.

  6. Bra band size measurements derived from three-dimensional scans are not accurate in women with large, ptotic breasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGhee, Deirdre E; Ramsay, Lauren G; Coltman, Celeste E; Gho, Sheridan A; Steele, Julie R

    2017-07-12

    This study investigated differences in standard measurements used to determine bra size, under-bust chest circumference (UBCC) and over-bust chest circumference (OBCC), measured from a three-dimensional scan (hand-held scanner) compared to the direct measurement in 111 women (age 21-56 years; right breast volume 57-1672 mL; bra size 10A-18G). Bland-Altman plots of UBCC measurements showed a large positive bias and wide limits of agreement (12 cm; -4.6 to 28 cm), which increased as band size increased but decreased when the breasts were digitally removed from the scan prior to the UBCC measurement. The difference in UBCC measurements determined from scans compared to direct measurement had a strong positive correlation with breast volume and breast ptotis. The OBCC measurements showed a small positive bias (2.4 cm; -3.4 to 8.4), consistent across the range of bra sizes. Bra band size measurements determined from three-dimensional scans can be inaccurate in women with large, ptotic breasts. Practitioner Summary: We investigated potential errors in anthropometric data derived from three-dimensional scans used for bra design and fit. Bra band size measurements taken from three-dimensional scans were over-estimated in women with large breasts, whereas bra cup size measurements were accurate to within one-cup size across the entire range of bra sizes.

  7. Calibration of GOES-derived solar radiation data using a distributed network of surface measurements in Florida, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumner, David M.; Pathak, Chandra S.; Mecikalski, John R.; Paech, Simon J.; Wu, Qinglong; Sangoyomi, Taiye; Babcock, Roger W.; Walton, Raymond

    2008-01-01

    Solar radiation data are critically important for the estimation of evapotranspiration. Analysis of visible-channel data derived from Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) using radiative transfer modeling has been used to produce spatially- and temporally-distributed datasets of solar radiation. An extensive network of (pyranometer) surface measurements of solar radiation in the State of Florida has allowed refined calibration of a GOES-derived daily integrated radiation data product. This refinement of radiation data allowed for corrections of satellite sensor drift, satellite generational change, and consideration of the highly-variable cloudy conditions that are typical of Florida. To aid in calibration of a GOES-derived radiation product, solar radiation data for the period 1995–2004 from 58 field stations that are located throughout the State were compiled. The GOES radiation product was calibrated by way of a three-step process: 1) comparison with ground-based pyranometer measurements on clear reference days, 2) correcting for a bias related to cloud cover, and 3) deriving month-by-month bias correction factors. Pre-calibration results indicated good model performance, with a station-averaged model error of 2.2 MJ m–2 day–1 (13 percent). Calibration reduced errors to 1.7 MJ m–2 day–1 (10 percent) and also removed time- and cloudiness-related biases. The final dataset has been used to produce Statewide evapotranspiration estimates.

  8. Authentication of Radial Versus Femoral Arterial Pressure Waveform-Derived Cardiac Output With Transesophageal Echocardiography-Derived Cardiac Output Measurements in Patients Undergoing On-Pump Coronary Bypass Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddali, Madan Mohan; Waje, Niranjan Dilip; Sathiya, Panchatcharam Murthi

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to ascertain if arterial waveform-derived cardiac output measurements from radial and femoral cannulation sites were reliable as compared with transesophageal echocardiography (TEE)-derived cardiac output (CO) values, and which of the CO measurements derived from radial and the femoral arterial pressure waveforms closely tracked simultaneously measured TEE-derived CO values. This study also aimed to ascertain if cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) would impact the accuracy of arterial pressure-derived CO values from either of the 2 sites. A prospective observational study. Tertiary care cardiac center. Cardiac surgical patients undergoing on-pump primary coronary artery bypass surgery. Waveform-derived CO monitoring through radial and femoral artery cannulation using a FloTrac/Vigileo system. Twenty-seven consecutive cardiac surgical patients undergoing on-pump primary coronary artery bypass surgery were included in the study. Cardiac output was measured sequentially by the arterial pressure waveform analysis method from radial and femoral arterial sites and compared with simultaneously measured TEE-derived CO. Cardiac output data were obtained in triplicate at 6 predefined time intervals: before and after sternotomy, 5, 15, and 30 minutes after separation from CPB and prior to shifting the patient out of the operating room. The overall bias of the study was 0.11 and 0.27, the percentage error was 19.31 and 18.45, respectively, for radial and femoral arterial waveform-derived CO values as compared with TEE-derived CO measurements. The overall precision as compared with the TEE-derived CO values was 16.94 and 15.95 for the radial and femoral cannulation sites, respectively. The bias calculated by the Bland-Altman method suggested that CO measurements from the radial arterial site were in closer agreement with TEE-derived CO values at all time periods, and the relation was not affected by CPB. However, percentage error and precision calculations

  9. ROCK PROPERTIES MODEL ANALYSIS MODEL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clinton Lum

    2002-02-04

    The purpose of this Analysis and Model Report (AMR) is to document Rock Properties Model (RPM) 3.1 with regard to input data, model methods, assumptions, uncertainties and limitations of model results, and qualification status of the model. The report also documents the differences between the current and previous versions and validation of the model. The rock properties models are intended principally for use as input to numerical physical-process modeling, such as of ground-water flow and/or radionuclide transport. The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in the appropriate text sections that follow. This work was conducted in accordance with the following planning documents: WA-0344, ''3-D Rock Properties Modeling for FY 1998'' (SNL 1997, WA-0358), ''3-D Rock Properties Modeling for FY 1999'' (SNL 1999), and the technical development plan, Rock Properties Model Version 3.1, (CRWMS M&O 1999c). The Interim Change Notice (ICNs), ICN 02 and ICN 03, of this AMR were prepared as part of activities being conducted under the Technical Work Plan, TWP-NBS-GS-000003, ''Technical Work Plan for the Integrated Site Model, Process Model Report, Revision 01'' (CRWMS M&O 2000b). The purpose of ICN 03 is to record changes in data input status due to data qualification and verification activities. These work plans describe the scope, objectives, tasks, methodology, and implementing procedures for model construction. The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in the appropriate text sections that follow. The work scope for this activity consists of the following: (1) Conversion of the input data (laboratory measured porosity data, x-ray diffraction mineralogy, petrophysical calculations of bound water, and petrophysical calculations of porosity) for each borehole into stratigraphic coordinates; (2) Re-sampling and merging of data sets; (3

  10. Stresses and Displacements in Steel-Lined Pressure Tunnels and Shafts in Anisotropic Rock Under Quasi-Static Internal Water Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachoud, Alexandre J.; Schleiss, Anton J.

    2016-04-01

    Steel-lined pressure tunnels and shafts are constructed to convey water from reservoirs to hydroelectric power plants. They are multilayer structures made of a steel liner, a cracked backfill concrete layer, a cracked or loosened near-field rock zone and a sound far-field rock zone. Designers often assume isotropic behavior of the far-field rock, considering the most unfavorable rock mass elastic modulus measured in situ, and a quasi-static internal water pressure. Such a conventional model is thus axisymmetrical and has an analytical solution for stresses and displacements. However, rock masses often have an anisotropic behavior and such isotropic assumption is usually conservative in terms of quasi-static maximum stresses in the steel liner. In this work, the stresses and displacements in steel-lined pressure tunnels and shafts in anisotropic rock mass are studied by means of the finite element method. A quasi-static internal water pressure is considered. The materials are considered linear elastic, and tied contact is assumed between the layers. The constitutive models used for the rock mass and the cracked layers are presented and the practical ranges of variation of the parameters are discussed. An extensive systematic parametric study is performed and stresses and displacements in the steel liner and in the far-field rock mass are presented. Finally, correction factors are derived to be included in the axisymmetrical solution which allow a rapid estimate of the maximum stresses in the steel liners of pressure tunnels and shafts in anisotropic rock.

  11. Rock size-frequency distribution analysis at the Chang'E-3 landing site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Kaichang; Xu, Bin; Peng, Man; Yue, Zongyu; Liu, Zhaoqin; Wan, Wenhui; Li, Lichun; Zhou, Jianliang

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive analysis of the rock size-frequency distribution at the Chang'E-3 landing site. Using 84 Navcam stereo images acquired at 7 waypoints by the Yutu rover and an interactive stereo image processing system, a total of 582 rocks larger than 0.05 m in diameter were identified and measured. The statistical results of the size-frequency distribution show that the cumulative fractional area covered by rocks versus their diameter follows a simple exponential function and has a convex-up shape on log-log graphs with the slope increasing with diameter. The cumulative number of rocks versus diameter derived by numerically integrating the cumulative fractional area also shows a good fit with the data. A diameter-height relationship was also determined from height and diameter ratios. The observed rock statistics were also compared with those from other lunar missions, including the Surveyor, Apollo, and Lunokhod missions; results suggest that the rock distribution at the Chang'E-3 landing site is similar to that found by Surveyor III.

  12. Evidence for a Meteoritic Component in Impact Melt Rock from the Chicxulub Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeberl, Christian; Sharpton, Virgil L.; Schuraytz, Benjamin C.; Shirey, Steven B.; Blum, Joel D.; Marin, Luis E.

    1994-01-01

    The Chicxulub structure in Yucatan, Mexico, has recently been recognized as a greater then 200-km-diameter multi-ring impact crater of K-T boundary age. Crystalline impact melt rocks and breccias from within the crater, which have compositions similar to those of normal continental crustal rocks and which show shock metamorphic effects, have been studied for trace element and Re-Os isotope compositions. Re-Os isotope systematics allow the sensitive and selective determination of an extraterrestrial component in impact-derived rocks. A melt rock sample shows elevated iridium concentrations, an osmium concentration of 25 ppb, and a low Os-187/Os-188 ratio of 0.113, which are incompatible with derivation from the continental crust. Even though the Os-187/Os-188 ratio is slightly lower than the range so far measured in meteorites, a mantle origin seems unlikely for mass balance reasons and because the cratering event is unlikely to have excavated mantle material. The data support the hypothesis of a heterogeneously distributed meteoritic component in the Chicxulub melt rock. A sample of impact glass from the Haitian K-T boundary at Beloc yielded about 0.1 ppb osmium and an Os-187/0s-188 ratio of 0.251, indicating the presence of a small meteoritic component in the impact ejecta as well.

  13. Hydrogen isotope composition of natural gases from the Tarim Basin and its indication of depositional environments of the source rocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU QuanYou; DAI JinXing; LI Jian; ZHOU QingHua

    2008-01-01

    By measuring carbon and hydrogen isotope compositions for C1, C2 and C3 of 74 gas samples, natural gases from the Tarim Basin can be divided into six groups on the basis of their origins: (1) coal-type gas derived from coal measures; (2) coal-type gas generated from the T-J lacustrine mudstones; (3) oil-type gas derived from the Cambrian and low Ordovician marine source rocks; (4) oil-type gas from the source rocks deposited in the marine -transitional facies; (5) mixing gas between gas derived from the Carboniferous transitional source rocks and the Mesozoic humic gas, and (6) mixing gases of of methane in natural gases originating from different type kerogens are affected by both palaeo-environments of the source rock formation (kerogen types) and thermal maturity, with sedimentary environment (kerogen type) as the main controlling factor. Under the similar thermal maturity, the hydrogen isotope composition of methane is more enriched in deuterium in marine environments than lacustrine one. With the increase of thermal maturity and the increase of carbon atomic numbers of environment of the source rock formation. The partial reversal of hydrogen isotopes for gaseous alkanes would be related to the microbial oxidation, mixing of sapropelic and humic gases and / or mixing of gases from similar kerogen sources with various thermal maturities. In the oil-type gas, the sul

  14. Uranium series, volcanic rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, Jorge A.

    2014-01-01

    Application of U-series dating to volcanic rocks provides unique and valuable information about the absolute timing of crystallization and differentiation of magmas prior to eruption. The 238U–230Th and 230Th-226Ra methods are the most commonly employed for dating the crystallization of mafic to silicic magmas that erupt at volcanoes. Dates derived from the U–Th and Ra–Th methods reflect crystallization because diffusion of these elements at magmatic temperatures is sluggish (Cherniak 2010) and diffusive re-equilibration is insignificant over the timescales (less than or equal to 10^5 years) typically associated with pre-eruptive storage of nearly all magma compositions (Cooper and Reid 2008). Other dating methods based on elements that diffuse rapidly at magmatic temperatures, such as the 40Ar/39Ar and (U–Th)/He methods, yield dates for the cooling of magma at the time of eruption. Disequilibrium of some short-lived daughters of the uranium series such as 210Po may be fractionated by saturation of a volatile phase and can be employed to date magmatic gas loss that is synchronous with volcanic eruption (e.g., Rubin et al. 1994).

  15. Benefits Derived From Laser Ranging Measurements for Orbit Determination of the GPS Satellite Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Bryan W.

    2007-01-01

    While navigation systems for the determination of the orbit of the Global Position System (GPS) have proven to be very effective, the current research is examining methods to lower the error in the GPS satellite ephemerides below their current level. Two GPS satellites that are currently in orbit carry retro-reflectors onboard. One notion to reduce the error in the satellite ephemerides is to utilize the retro-reflectors via laser ranging measurements taken from multiple Earth ground stations. Analysis has been performed to determine the level of reduction in the semi-major axis covariance of the GPS satellites, when laser ranging measurements are supplemented to the radiometric station keeping, which the satellites undergo. Six ground tracking systems are studied to estimate the performance of the satellite. The first system is the baseline current system approach which provides pseudo-range and integrated Doppler measurements from six ground stations. The remaining five ground tracking systems utilize all measurements from the current system and laser ranging measurements from the additional ground stations utilized within those systems. Station locations for the additional ground sites were taken from a listing of laser ranging ground stations from the International Laser Ranging Service. Results show reductions in state covariance estimates when utilizing laser ranging measurements to solve for the satellite s position component of the state vector. Results also show dependency on the number of ground stations providing laser ranging measurements, orientation of the satellite to the ground stations, and the initial covariance of the satellite's state vector.

  16. Seismic anisotropy in the lower crust: The link between rock composition, microstructure, texture and seismic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czaplinska, Daria; Piazolo, Sandra; Almqvist, Bjarne

    2015-04-01

    Seismic anisotropy observed in Earth's interior is caused by the presence of aligned anisotropic minerals (crystallographic and shape preferred orientation; CPO and SPO respectively), and fluid and/or melt inclusions related to deformation. Therefore, the variations in seismic anisotropy carry valuable information about the structure of the mantle and crust. For example, anisotropy observed in the upper mantle is mainly attributed to the CPO of olivine, and provides strong evidence for the flow within the upper mantle. Seismic anisotropy in the crust is still poorly constrained, mostly due to the much larger heterogeneity of the crustal rocks in comparison with the more homogenous mantle. Anisotropy in the crust will be affected by the variations in rock composition, microstructure, texture (presence or lack of CPO), brittle structures (e.g. fracture systems) and chemical composition of the minerals. However, once the relationships between those variables and seismic properties of the crustal rocks are established, seismic anisotropy can be used to derive characteristics of rocks otherwise out of reach. Our study focuses on two sets of samples of middle to lower crustal rocks collected in Fiordland (New Zealand) and in Sweden. Samples from Fiordland represent a root of a thick (ca. 80 km) magmatic arc and comprise igneous rocks, which crystallized at high P and T conditions and were subsequently metamorphosed and deformed. Samples from Sweden are derived from a metasedimentary nappe in the Caledonian orogenic belt, which is mostly composed of gneisses, amphibolites and calc-silicates that have experienced different amounts of strain. We use large area EBSD mapping to measure the CPO of the constituent phases and record the geometric relationships of the rock microstructure. Data is then used to calculate the elastic properties of the rock from single-crystal stiffnesses. Here, we utilize the EBSD GUI software (Cook et al., 2013), which offers varied homogenization

  17. Acoustics in rock and pop music halls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adelman-Larsen, Niels Werner; Thompson, Eric Robert; Gade, Anders Christian

    2007-01-01

    The existing body of literature regarding the acoustic design of concert halls has focused almost exclusively on classical music, although there are many more performances of rhythmic music, including rock and pop. Objective measurements were made of the acoustics of twenty rock music venues in D...... frequency sounds are typically highly amplified, they play an important role in the subjective ratings and the 63-Hz-band must be included in objective measurements and recommendations....

  18. In situ x-ray diffraction of solution-derived ferroelectric thin films for quantitative phase and texture evolution measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nittala, Krishna; Mhin, Sungwook; Jones, Jacob L.; Robinson, Douglas S.; Ihlefeld, Jon F.; Brennecka, Geoff L.

    2012-11-01

    An in situ measurement technique is developed and presented, which utilizes x-rays from a synchrotron source with a two-dimensional detector to measure thin film microstructural and crystallographic evolution during heating. A demonstration experiment is also shown wherein the measured diffraction patterns are used to describe phase and texture evolution during heating and crystallization of solution-derived thin films. The diffraction images are measured sequentially while heating the thin film with an infrared lamp. Data reduction methodologies and representations are also outlined to extract phase and texture information from the diffraction images as a function of time and temperature. These techniques and data reduction methods are demonstrated during crystallization of solution-derived lead zirconate titanate ferroelectric thin films heated at a rate of 30 °C/min and using an acquisition time of 8 s. During heating and crystallization, a PtxPb type phase was not observed. A pyrochlore phase was observed prior to the formation and growth of the perovskite phase. The final crystallized films are observed to have both 111 and 100 texture components. The in situ measurement methodology developed in this work allows for acquiring diffraction images in times as low as 0.25 s and can be used to investigate changes during crystallization at faster heating rates. Moreover, the experiments are shown to provide unique information during materials processing.

  19. A simple calculation algorithm to separate high-resolution CH4 flux measurements into ebullition and diffusion-derived components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Mathias; Schulz-Hanke, Maximilian; Garcia Alba, Joana; Jurisch, Nicole; Hagemann, Ulrike; Sachs, Torsten; Sommer, Michael; Augustin, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Processes driving methane (CH4) emissions in wetland ecosystems are highly complex. Especially, the separation of CH4 emissions into ebullition and diffusion derived flux components, a perquisite for the mechanistic process understanding and identification of potential environmental driver is rather challenging. We present a simple calculation algorithm, based on an adaptive R-script, which separates open-water, closed chamber CH4 flux measurements into diffusion- and ebullition-derived components. Hence, flux component specific dynamics are revealed and potential environmental driver identified. Flux separation is based on a statistical approach, using ebullition related sudden concentration changes obtained during high resolution CH4 concentration measurements. By applying the lower and upper quartile ± the interquartile range (IQR) as a variable threshold, diffusion dominated periods of the flux measurement are filtered. Subsequently, flux calculation and separation is performed. The algorithm was verified in a laboratory experiment and tested under field conditions, using flux measurement data (July to September 2013) from a flooded, former fen grassland site. Erratic ebullition events contributed 46% to total CH4 emissions, which is comparable to values reported by literature. Additionally, a shift in the diurnal trend of diffusive fluxes throughout the measurement period, driven by the water temperature gradient, was revealed.

  20. Optically stimulated luminescence dating of rock surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sohbati, Reza

    There are many examples of rock surfaces, rock art and stone structures whose ages are of great importance to the understanding of various phenomena in geology, climatology and archaeology. Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating is a well-established chronological tool that has successfully...... of rock surfaces is successfully tested by application to two different quartz-rich rock types (sandstone and quartzite). Together with the measurement of infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL) signals as a function of depth into the surface of different granites it is clear that both OSL and IRSL can....... Based on the studies of residual luminescence as a function of depth into a rock surface discussed above, a model is developed that relates this increase in residual luminescence to the exposure time. The model is then further developed using the quartz OSL signal from buried quartzite cobbles...

  1. Optically stimulated luminescence dating of rock surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sohbati, Reza

    There are many examples of rock surfaces, rock art and stone structures whose ages are of great importance to the understanding of various phenomena in geology, climatology and archaeology. Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating is a well-established chronological tool that has successfully...... determined the depositional age of a wide variety of fine-grained sediments, from several years to several hundred thousands of years. However, there is no routine OSL dating method applicable to larger clasts such as cobbles, boulders and other rock surfaces. Here the application of quartz OSL to the dating...... of rock surfaces is successfully tested by application to two different quartz-rich rock types (sandstone and quartzite). Together with the measurement of infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL) signals as a function of depth into the surface of different granites it is clear that both OSL and IRSL can...

  2. 2008 Rock Deformation GRC - Conference August 3-8, 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James G. Hirth

    2009-09-21

    The GRC on Rock Deformation highlights the latest research in brittle and ductile rock mechanics from experimental, field and theoretical perspectives. The conference promotes a multi-disciplinary forum for assessing our understanding of rock strength and related physical properties in the Earth. The theme for the 2008 conference is 'Real-time Rheology'. Using ever-improving geophysical techniques, our ability to constrain the rheological behavior during earthquakes and post-seismic creep has improved significantly. Such data are used to investigate the frictional behavior of faults, processes responsible for strain localization, the viscosity of the lower crust, and viscous coupling between the crust and mantle. Seismological data also provide information on the rheology of the lower crust and mantle through analysis of seismic attenuation and anisotropy. Geologists are improving our understanding of rheology by combining novel analyses of microstructures in naturally deformed rocks with petrologic data. This conference will bring together experts and students in these research areas with experimentalists and theoreticians studying the same processes. We will discuss and assess where agreement exists on rheological constraints derived at different length/time scales using different techniques - and where new insight is required. To encompass the elements of these topics, speakers and discussion leaders with backgrounds in geodesy, experimental rock deformation, structural geology, earthquake seismology, geodynamics, glaciology, materials science, and mineral physics will be invited to the conference. Thematic sessions will be organized on the dynamics of earthquake rupture, the rheology of the lower crust and coupling with the upper mantle, the measurement and interpretation of seismic attenuation and anisotropy, the dynamics of ice sheets and the coupling of reactive porous flow and brittle deformation for understanding geothermal and chemical

  3. Spatio-temporal variability of satellite derived aerosol optical thickness and ground measurements over East China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fei; Shi, Tongguang

    2016-04-01

    Two-year records of Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Intermediate Product (IP) data on the aerosol optical thickness (AOT) at 550 nm were evaluated by comparing them with sun-sky radiometer measurements from the Chinese sun hazemeter network (CSHNET) and the aerosol robotic network (AERONET). The monthly and seasonal variations in the aerosol optical properties over eastern China were then investigated using collocated VIIRS IP data and CSHNET and AERONET measurements.Results show that the performances of the current VIIRS IP AOT retrievals at the provisional stage were consistent with ground measurements. Similar characteristics of seasonal and monthly variations were found among the measurements, though the observational methodologies were different, showing maxima in the summer and spring and minima in the winter and autumn.

  4. Electrical and magnetic properties of rock and soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, J.H.

    1983-01-01

    Field and laboratory measurements have been made to determine the electrical conductivity, dielectric constant, and magnetic permeability of rock and soil in areas of interest in studies of electromagnetic pulse propagation. Conductivity is determined by making field measurements of apparent resisitivity at very low frequencies (0-20 cps), and interpreting the true resistivity of layers at various depths by curve-matching methods. Interpreted resistivity values are converted to corresponding conductivity values which are assumed to be applicable at 10^2 cps, an assumption which is considered valid because the conductivity of rock and soil is nearly constant at frequencies below 10^2 cps. Conductivity is estimated at higher frequencies (up to 10^6 cps) by using statistical correlations of three parameters obtained from laboratory measurements of rock and soil samples: conductivity at 10^2 cps, frequency and conductivity measured over the range 10^2 to 10^6 cps. Conductivity may also be estimated in this frequency range by using field measurements of water content and correlations of laboratory sample measurements of the three parameters: water content, frequency, and conductivity measured over the range 10^2 to 10^6 cps. This method is less accurate because nonrandom variation of ion concentration in natural pore water introduces error. Dielectric constant is estimated in a similar manner from field-derived conductivity values applicable at 10^2 cps and statistical correlations of three parameters obtained from laboratory measurements of samples: conductivity measured at 10^2 cps, frequency, and dielectric constant measured over the frequency range 10^2 to 10^6 cps. Dielectric constant may also be estimated from field measurements of water content and correlations of laboratory sample measurements of the three parameters: water content, frequency, and dielectric constant measured from 10^2 to 10^6 cps, but again, this method is less accurate because of variation of

  5. Experimental measurements of permeability evolution during triaxial compression of initially intact crystalline rocks and implications for fluid flow in fault zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, T. M.; Faulkner, D. R.

    2008-11-01

    Detailed experimental studies of the development of permeability of crustal rock during deformation are essential in helping to understand fault mechanics and constrain larger-scale models that predict bulk fluid flow within the crust. Permeability is particularly enhanced in the damage zone of faults, where microfracture damage accumulates under stress less than that required for macroscopic failure. Experiments performed in the prefailure region can provide data directly applicable to these zones of microfracture damage surrounding faults. The strength, permeability, and pore fluid volume evolution of initially intact crystalline rocks (Cerro Cristales granodiorite and Westerly granite) under increasing differential load leading to macroscopic failure has been determined at water pore pressures of 50 MPa and varying effective pressures from 10 to 50 MPa. Permeability is seen to increase by up to, and over, 2 orders of magnitude prior to macroscopic failure, with the greatest increase seen at lowest effective pressures. Postfailure permeability is shown to be over 3 orders of magnitude higher than initial intact permeabilities and approaches the lower limit of predicted in situ bulk crustal permeabilities. Increasing amplitude cyclic loading tests show permeability-stress hysteresis, with high permeabilities maintained as differential stress is reduced and the greatest permeability increases are seen between 90 and 99% of the failure stress. Prefailure permeabilities are nearly 7 to 9 orders of magnitude lower than that predicted by some high-pressure diffusive models suggesting that if these models are correct, microfracture matrix flow cannot dominate, and that bulk fluid flow must be dominated by larger-scale structures such as macrofractures. We present a model, based on our data, in which the permeability of a highly stressed fault tip process zone in low-permeability crystalline rocks increases by more than 2 orders of magnitude. Stress reduction related to

  6. A computer-assisted rock type data catalogue for gas formations; Ein rechnergestuetzter Gesteinsdatenkatalog fuer Gasformationen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reitenbach, V.; Pusch, G.; Moeller, M.; Koll, S. [TU Clausthal (Germany). Inst. fuer Erdoel- und Erdgastechnik; Constantini, A.; Junker, A.; Anton, H. [RWE Dea AG, Hamburg (Germany)

    2007-09-13

    Modern reservoir management commonly requires versatile reservoir data which are neces-sary for integrated reservoir characterization, evaluation and development planning. The rock data necessary for numerical reservoir simulation studies often have to be collected from different sources, analysed and sorted with a considerable effort. In a framework of DGMK research program (DGMK project 593-9/4), the Institute of Petro-leum Engineering (Clausthal University of Technology) and RWE DEA AG have developed a new tool named Rock Data Catalogue, which is capable of managing large amounts of rock data more efficiently and deriving new specific correlations for European rock types. The use of Rock Data Catalogue can facilitate the essential input data generation and proc-essing procedure for reservoir simulation studies. The Rock Data Catalogue is comprised of a Data Base Module of digitalized reservoir rock data and an interactive Data Correlation Module. Both modules are built-up as an interface to common reservoir simulation software. The universal structure of the software also makes it possible to exchange the data with other rock data information systems. The Data Correlation Module implements a ''Decision-Structure'' module, which helps the reservoir engineer to select the rock data for analysis and correlation depending on its litho-facial type and permeability class. The Data Base Module enables a quick search of appro-priated data sets and their export into the correlation module. The open source data of the North German Rotliegend gas formations as well as the data of measurements on Rotliegend core samples performed at the ITE in course of the DGMK tight gas projects were implemented in the rock data base. Correlations of poro/perm data, two-phase flow and capillary pressure functions of the Rotliegend sandstones with the per-meability range between 20 and 0.01 mD are implemented in the rock data base and serve for quality checking of the

  7. Measurement of the Depth of Penetration of UV Photons into Mars Relevant Rock Samples to Constrain Habitability and Limits of Detection for the SHERLOC Mars 2020 Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrier, B. L.; Beegle, L. W.; Bhartia, R.; Abbey, W. J.

    2015-12-01

    We report on the depth of penetration of UV photons into a suite of Mars relevant materials in order to better characterize what constitutes a habitable environment on Mars, as well as to characterize the sensitivities of the Scanning Habitable Environments with Raman and Luminescence for Organics and Chemicals (SHERLOC) instrument on the Mars 2020 payload. To date, UV transparency of these rock types have not been fully characterized, and we have performed a systematic study to better constrain the UV attenuation over a wide range of materials relevant to Mars. At one point during the history of Mars, the surface may have been habitable, with flowing liquid water and access to food and energy sources. As surface conditions changed, it is not unreasonable to assume that life would have migrated into the protected interior of porous rocks, veins, fissures, and the subsurface as a means to protect itself from harsh surface conditions, such as the UV flux that we observe today. Given geological time, the depth that UV light penetrates into the subsurface will play a role in altering and/or effecting the preservation of organic molecule containing biosignatures. However, the extent to which various rock types can shield organic material currently is not well understood. In addition to constraining the UV-driven habitable "zone", the data also helps constrain the SHERLOC instrument limits of detection. SHERLOC is a deep UV fluorescence and Raman imaging instrument. This is achieved by spatially scanning a deep UV laser at 248.6 nm to stimulate fluorescence emissions and Raman scattering from the sample. Specifically, fluorescence is generated from electronic transition from aromatic organics and Raman scatter is generated from vibrational bonds from both organics and minerals. Given the excitation wavelength, and the emission/scattering wavelengths (250-350), the mineral transparency will affect the interrogation volume of analysis and thus constrain the limits of

  8. Treatment measures for underground water leakage during construction of tunnel in metamorphic soft rock%变质软岩隧道施工中地下水渗漏处治措施

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李皓晖; 左昌群; 唐霞; 丁少林; 刘代国

    2015-01-01

    Due to the metamorphic soft rock characteristics of water softening and disintegration,there is the phenomenon such as groundwater seepage and water inflow in tunnel construction,which could bring huge hidden danger to the tunnel construction safety. T aking the typical groundwater seepage zone of W udang group schist tunnel in Shiyan-fangxian expressway as research object,in this paper,the groundwater seepage effect in metamorphic soft rock tunnel construction w as analyzed from the aspects including groundw ater seepage characteristics of disaster section,water rationality of surrounding rock,physical mechanics function of groundwater,and put forward the specific control measures of groundwater. T he practice showed that the measures presented in this paper has good control effect on groundw ater leakage of soft rock tunnel,w hich could provide a reference for w atery section safe construction of similar soft rock tunnel.%由于变质软岩具有遇水软化、崩解的特征,在隧道施工过程中易出现地下水渗漏、涌水等,给隧道施工安全带来巨大隐患。以十堰至房县高速公路武当群片岩隧道中典型地下水渗漏区段为主要研究对象,从灾害段地下水渗漏特征、围岩的水理性、地下水的物理力学作用等方面阐述了变质软岩隧道施工中地下水渗漏的影响,并提出了有针对性的地下水控制措施。实践证明,该措施对软岩隧道地下水渗漏具有较好的控制作用,可为类似软岩隧道富水段安全施工提供参考。

  9. Insolation data for solar energy conversion derived from satellite measurements of earth radiance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thekaekara, M. P.

    1976-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of the irradiance of the sun at ground locations is essential for the design and evaluation of solar energy conversion systems. The primary source of such data is the global network of weather stations. Such stations are often too far apart and for most locations the data available are only daily total irradiance or monthly averages. Solar energy conversion programs require insolation data with considerably higher geographical and temporal resolution. Meteorological satellites gather routinely extensive data on the energy reflected and scattered into space by the earth-atmosphere system. A program has been initiated to use such data for deriving ground insolation for energy conversion. Some of the preliminary results of this program will be discussed.

  10. Estrus Traits Derived from Activity Measurements are Heritable and Closely Related to Conventional

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ismael, Ahmed Ismael Sayed; Kargo, Morten; Fogh, Anders

    This study was aimed at assessing the genetic parameters for fertility-related traits, comparing the interval from calving to first insemination (ICF) to physical activity traits, especially days from calving to first high activity, DFHA. Data from commercial Holstein herds included insemination...... dates of 11,363 cows for ICF. The activity traits were derived from electronic activity tags for 3533 Holstein cows. Estimates of heritability were 0.05 for ICF and 0.15 for DFHA. The genetic correlation between ICF and DFHA was strong (0.92). The high heritability estimate and the strong genetic...... correlation between ICF and DFHA suggest that genetic gain in ICF can be improved by including DFHA as a supplementary trait in the genetic evaluation of female fertility...

  11. The Way We Measure: Comparison of Methods to Derive Radial Surface Brightness Profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Peters, S P C; de Jong, R S

    2016-01-01

    The breaks and truncations in the luminosity profile of face-on spiral galaxies offer valuable insights in their formation history. The traditional method of deriving the surface photometry profile for face-on galaxies is to use elliptical averaging. In this paper, we explore the question whether elliptical averaging is the best way to do this. We apply two additional surface photometry methods, one new: principle axis summation, and one old that has become seldom used: equivalent profiles. These are compared to elliptically averaged profiles using a set of 29 face-on galaxies. We find that the equivalent profiles match extremely well with elliptically averaged profiles, confirming the validity of using elliptical averaging. The principle axis summation offers a better comparison to edge-on galaxies.

  12. Dynamic Validation of Envisat ASAR Derived Ocean Swell Against Directional Buoy Measurements in Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, He; Mouche, Alexis; Husson, Romain; Chapron, Bertrand

    2016-08-01

    Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) in wave mode aboard Envisat satellite from ESA provides the unique 10-years swell spectra dataset on a continuous and global basis for scientific community. In this paper, a method of a dynamical validation approach for SAR swell spectra is developed, in which the in situ buoy spectra are reconstructed, partitioned, and retro- propagated to the vicinity of satellite observation along the great circle based upon the linear wave theory. More than 40,000 ASAR-buoy swell partitions are dynamically collocated for the full mission of Envisat, making this study the first to provide detailed quality assessment for ASAR derived ocean swell spectra. Comparison results show a general statistics of 0.40 m, 44.99 m and 16.89 ̊ for swell height, peak wavelength and direction RMSE, indicating a good agreement with buoy in-situ in Pacific Ocean.

  13. Evaluation of Five Sedimentary Rocks Other Than Salt for Geologic Repository Siting Purposes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croff, A.G.; Lomenick, T.F.; Lowrie, R.S.; Stow, S.H.

    2003-11-15

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), in order to increase the diversity of rock types under consideration by the geologic disposal program, initiated the Sedimary ROck Program (SERP), whose immediate objectiv eis to evaluate five types of secimdnary rock - sandstone, chalk, carbonate rocks (limestone and dolostone), anhydrock, and shale - to determine the potential for siting a geologic repository. The evaluation of these five rock types, together with the ongoing salt studies, effectively results in the consideration of all types of relatively impermeable sedimentary rock for repository purposes. The results of this evaluation are expressed in terms of a ranking of the five rock types with respect to their potential to serve as a geologic repository host rock. This comparative evaluation was conducted on a non-site-specific basis, by use of generic information together with rock evaluation criteria (RECs) derived from the DOE siting guidelines for geologic repositories (CFR 1984). An information base relevant to rock evaluation using these RECs was developed in hydrology, geochemistry, rock characteristics (rock occurrences, thermal response, rock mechanics), natural resources, and rock dissolution. Evaluation against postclosure and preclosure RECs yielded a ranking of the five subject rocks with respect to their potential as repository host rocks. Shale was determined to be the most preferred of the five rock types, with sandstone a distant second, the carbonate rocks and anhydrock a more distant third, and chalk a relatively close fourth.

  14. Comparisons of venus surface compositions with terrestrial ocean floor rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garvin, J.B.; Bryan, W.B.

    1987-10-01

    Statistical comparison of Venera and Vega lander x-ray fluorescence spectrometer measurements of the composition of the Venus surface with an extensive database of compositional data for terrestrial ocean floor rocks indicates that the Venera 14 data matches certain tholeiitic basalts from the Kane Fracture Zone (KFZ) in the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (22-25/sup 0/N) at high confidence levels. The tholeiites most similar to the Venera measurements are very primitive, low-calcium, high-alumina pillow basalts depleted in clinopyroxene, and are relatively unique to certain fracture zones in oceanic regions. If the Venera 14 analogy is valid, the implication is that certain Venus basaltic magmas have lost clinopyroxene at relatively high pressures by fractionation, perhaps within a deep source region. Comparisons of Venera 13 and Vega 2 data with oceanic rocks yield poorer matches. Venera 13 matches Loihi seamount alkali basalts, as well as potassic mafic rocks from oceanic island such as Tristan de Cunha. The best analogy to Vega 2 may be altered gabbros or basic lavas from terrestrial basic intrusions such as the Troodos ophiolite. The close similarity of a representative sample of Venera 14 material with distinctive ocean floor tholeiitic basalts suggests that deep magma storage regions exist on Venus, and that derivation of both tholeiitic and alkalic magmas from a single primitive parent may be an important process on Venus.

  15. Quantification of rock fall processes on recently deglaciated rock slopes, Gepatsch glacier, Tyrol (Austria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vehling, Lucas; Rohn, Joachim; Moser, Michael

    2014-05-01

    The recently deglaciated area in alpine glacier forefields is characterized by intensified mass movement processes in particular debris flows, shallow landslides and rockfalls. Due to enhanced geomorphic activity, rock slopes adjacent to shrinking glaciers contribute in a substantial way to the sediment budget. In this study, direct measurements of rock fall intensity are conducted by rock fall collector nets and natural sediment traps. The study area is a high mountain (1750-3520m a.s.l) catchment, which is recently about 30% glaciated. The extension of the Gepatsch glacier has been reducing since the little ice age maximum in the mid of the 19th century with an average annual shrinking rate of a few decameters at its tongue. The first results of the direct measurements demonstrate that on the recently deglaciated rock slopes, rock fall intensity is at least one order of magnitude higher (2,38-6,64 g/m2/d - corresponding backweathering rate: 0,3-0,9 mm/a) than on rock slopes which had has ice free since the last Pleistocene deglaciation (0,04-0,38 g/m2/d - backweathering rate: 0,005-0,05 mm/a). The highest rock fall intensity is attributed to the recent deglaciated rock slopes which are located close to larger fault systems (>60 g/m2/d - backweathering rate: >8 mm/a). Rock fall intensity shows also considerable intra-annual variations which are related to cold climate weathering processes and rainstorm activity.

  16. Soft rocks in Argentina

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giambastiani; Mauricio

    2014-01-01

    Soft rocks are a still fairly unexplored chapter in rock mechanics. Within this category are the clastic sedimentary rocks and pyroclastic volcanic rocks, of low to moderate lithification (consolidation, cemen-tation, new formed minerals), chemical sedimentary rocks and metamorphic rocks formed by minerals with Mohs hardness less than 3.5, such as limestone, gypsum, halite, sylvite, between the first and phyllites, graphitic schist, chloritic shale, talc, etc., among the latter. They also include any type of rock that suffered alteration processes (hydrothermal or weathering). In Argentina the study of low-strength rocks has not received much attention despite having extensive outcrops in the Andes and great impact in the design criteria. Correlation between geomechanical properties (UCS, deformability) to physical index (porosity, density, etc.) has shown promising results to be better studied. There are many studies and engineering projects in Argentina in soft rock geological environments, some cited in the text (Chihuído dam, N. Kirchner dam, J. Cepernic Dam, etc.) and others such as International Tunnel in the Province of Mendoza (Corredor Bioceánico), which will require the valuable contribution from rock mechanics. The lack of consistency between some of the physical and mechanical parameters explored from studies in the country may be due to an insufficient amount of information and/or non-standardization of criteria for testing materials. It is understood that more and better academic and professional efforts in improv-ing techniques will result in benefits to the better understanding of the geomechanics of weak rocks.

  17. Dynamics of mineral crystallization at inclusion-garnet interface from precipitated slab-derived fluid phase: first in-situ synchrotron x-ray measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaspina, Nadia; Alvaro, Matteo; Campione, Marcello; Nestola, Fabrizio

    2015-04-01

    Remnants of the fluid phase at ultrahigh pressure (UHP) in subduction environments may be preserved as primary multiphase inclusions in UHP minerals. These inclusions are frequently hosted by minerals stable at mantle depths, such as garnet, and show the same textural features as fluid inclusions. The mineral infillings of the solid multiphase inclusions are generally assumed to have crystallized by precipitation from the solute load of dense supercritical fluids equilibrating with the host rock. Notwithstanding the validity of this assumption, the mode of crystallization of daughter minerals during precipitation within the inclusion and/or the mechanism of interaction between the fluid at supercritical conditions and the host mineral are still poorly understood from a crystallographic point of view. A case study is represented by garnet orthopyroxenites from the Maowu Ultramafic Complex (China) deriving from harzburgite precursors metasomatised at ~ 4 GPa, 750 °C by a silica- and incompatible trace element-rich fluid phase. This metasomatism produced poikilitic orthopyroxene and inclusion-rich garnet porphyroblasts. Solid multiphase primary inclusions in garnet display a size within a few tens of micrometers and negative crystal shapes. Infilling minerals (spinel: 10-20 vol.%; amphibole, chlorite, talc, mica: 80- 90 vol.%) occur with constant volume ratios and derive from trapped solute-rich aqueous fluids. To constrain the possible mode of precipitation of daughter minerals, we performed for the first time a single-crystal X-ray diffraction experiment by means of Synchrotron Radiation at DLS-Diamond Light Source. In combination with electron probe microanalyses, this measurement allowed the unique identification of each mineral phase and their reciprocal orientations. We demonstrated the epitaxial relationship between spinel and garnet and between some hydrous minerals. Epitaxy drives a first-stage nucleation of spinel under near-to-equilibrium conditions

  18. Particle concentrations and number size distributions in the planetary boundary layer derived from airship based measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillmann, Ralf; Zhao, Defeng; Ehn, Mikael; Hofzumahaus, Andreas; Holland, Frank; Rohrer, Franz; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Wahner, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    Atmospheric particles play a key role for regional and global climate due to their direct and indirect radiative forcing effects. The concentration and size of the particles are important variables to these effects. Within the continental planetary boundary layer (PBL) the particle number size distribution is influenced by meteorological parameters, local sinks and sources resulting in variable spatial distributions. However, measurements of particle number size distributions over a broad vertical range of the PBL are rare. The airship ZEPPELIN NT is an ideal platform to measure atmospheric aerosols on a regional scale within an altitude range up to 1000 m. For campaigns in the Netherlands, Northern Italy and South Finland in 2012 and 2013 the airship was deployed with a wide range of instruments, including measurements of different trace gases, short lived radicals, solar radiation, aerosols and meteorological parameters. Flights were carried out at different times of the day to investigate the influence of the diurnal evolution of the PBL on atmospheric trace gases and aerosols. During night and early morning hours the concentration and size distribution of atmospheric particles were found to be strongly influenced by the layered structure of the PBL, i.e. the nocturnal boundary layer and the residual layer. Within the residual layer particle concentrations stay relatively constant as this layer is decoupled from ground sources. The particles persist in the accumulation mode as expected for an aged aerosol. In the nocturnal boundary layer particle concentrations and size are more dynamic with higher concentrations than in the residual layer. A few hours after sunrise, the layered structure of the PBL intermixes. During daytime the PBL is well mixed and a negative concentration gradient with increasing height is observed. Several height profiles at different times of the day and at different locations in Europe were measured. The aerosol measurements will be

  19. Do GIS-derived measures of fast food retailers convey perceived fast food opportunities? Implications for food environment assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Timothy L; Colabianchi, Natalie; Freedman, Darcy A; Bell, Bethany A; Liese, Angela D

    2017-01-01

    Geographic information systems (GISs) have been used to define fast food availability, with higher availability perhaps promoting poorer quality diets. Alternative measures involve perceptions; however, few studies have examined associations between GIS-derived and perceived measures of the food environment. Telephone surveys of 705 participants within an eight-county region in South Carolina were analyzed using logistic regression to examine relationships between geographic presence of and distance to various types of food retailers and perceived fast food availability. The mean distance to the nearest fast food restaurant was 6.1 miles, with 16% of participants having a fast food restaurant within 1 mile of home. The geographic presence of and distance to all food retailer types were significantly associated with perceived availability of fast food in unadjusted models. After adjustment, only the presence of a fast food restaurant or pharmacy was significantly associated with greater odds of higher perceived availability of fast food. Greater odds of lower perceived availability of fast food were observed with the presence of a dollar store and increasing distance to the nearest supermarket or pharmacy. Measures of fast food availability, whether objective or perceived, may not be interchangeable. Researchers should carefully decide on the appropriate measurement tool-GIS-derived or perceived-in food environment studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. An Abel transform for deriving line-of-sight wind profiles from LEO-LEO infrared laser occultation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syndergaard, S.; Kirchengast, G.

    2016-03-01

    We have developed a formula for the retrieval of the line-of-sight (l.o.s.) wind speed from future low Earth orbit (LEO) satellite-to-satellite infrared laser occultation measurements. The formula involves an Abelian integral transform akin to the Abel transform widely used for deriving refractive index from bending angle in Global Navigation Satellite System radio occultation measurements. Besides the Abelian integral transform, the formula is derived from a truncated series expansion of the volume absorption coefficient as a function of frequency and includes a simple absorption-line-asymmetry correction term. A first-order formulation (referred to as the standard formula) is complemented by higher-order terms that can be used for high-accuracy computations. Under the assumptions of spherical symmetry and perfect knowledge of spectroscopy, the residual l.o.s. wind error from using the standard formula rather than the high-accuracy formula is assessed to be small compared to that anticipated from measurement errors in a real experiment. Applying the new formula just in standard form to future infrared laser transmission profiles would therefore enable the retrieval of l.o.s. stratospheric wind profiles with an accuracy limited mainly by measurement errors, residual spectroscopic errors, and deviations from spherical symmetry.

  1. Airborne spectral radiation measurements to derive solar radiative forcing of Saharan dust mixed with biomass burning smoke particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, S.; Bierwirth, E.; Wendisch, M. (Leipzig Inst. for Meteorology (LIM), Univ. of Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany)), e-mail: s.bauer@uni-leipzig.de; Esselborn, M.; Petzold, A.; Trautmann, T. (Deutsches Zentrum fur Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR), Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany)); Macke, A. (Leibniz Inst. for Tropospheric Research (IfT) (Germany))

    2011-09-15

    Airborne measurements of upward solar spectral irradiances were performed during the second Saharan Mineral dUst experiMent (SAMUM-2) campaign based on the Cape Verde Islands. Additionally, airborne high resolution lidar measurements of vertical profiles of particle extinction coefficients were collected in parallel to the radiation data. Aerosol layers of Saharan dust, partly mixed with biomass-burning smoke, were probed. With corresponding radiative transfer simulations the single scattering albedo and the asymmetry parameter of the aerosol particles were derived although with high uncertainty. The broad-band aerosol solar radiative forcing at the top of atmosphere was calculated and examined as a function of the aerosol types. However, due to uncertainties in both the measurements and the calculations the chemical composition cannot be identified. In addition, a mostly measurement-based method to derive the broad-band aerosol solar radiative forcing was used. This approach revealed clear differences of broad-band net irradiances as a function of the aerosol optical depth. The data were used to identify different aerosol types from different origins. Higher portions of biomass-burning smoke lead to larger broad-band net irradiances

  2. Fade-durations derived from land-mobile-satellite measurements in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hase, Yoshihiro; Vogel, Wolfhard J.; Goldhirsh, Julius

    1991-01-01

    Transmissions from the Japanese ETS-V geostationary satellite were measured at L band (1.5 GHz) in a vehicle driving on roads of southeastern Australia. The measurements were part of a program designed to characterize propagation effects due to roadside trees and terrain for mobile satellite service. It is shown that the cumulative distributions of fade and nonfade durations follow a lognormal and power law, respectively. At 1 percent probability, fades last 2-8 m, and nonfades 10-100 m, depending on the degree of shadowing. Phase fluctuations are generally small, allowing the channel characteristics to be estimated from levels only.

  3. A global climatology of stratospheric OClO derived from GOMOS measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Tétard

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The Global Ozone Monitoring by Occultation of Stars (GOMOS instrument on board the European platform ENVISAT was dedicated to the study of the atmosphere of the Earth using the stellar occultation technique. The spectral range of the GOMOS spectrometer extends from the UV to the near infrared, allowing for the retrieval of species such as O3, NO2, NO3, H2O, O2, air density, aerosol extinction and OClO. Nevertheless, OClO can not be retrieved using a single GOMOS measurement because of the weak signal-to-noise ratio and the small optical thickness associated with this molecule. We present here the method used to detect this molecule by using several GOMOS measurements. It is based on a two-step approach. First, several co-located measurements are combined in a statistical way to build an averaged measurement with a higher signal-to-noise ratio. Then, a Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS method is applied to retrieve OClO slant column densities. The statistics of the sets of GOMOS measurements used to build the averaged measurement and the spectral window selection are analyzed. The obtained retrievals are compared to results from two balloon-borne instruments. It appears that the inter-comparisons of OClO are generally satisfying. Then, two nighttime climatologies of OClO slant column densities based on GOMOS averaged measurements are presented. The first depicts annual global pictures of OClO from 2003 to 2011. From this climatology, the presence of an OClO layer in the equatorial region at about 35 km is confirmed and strong concentrations of OClO in both polar regions are observed, a sign of chlorine activation. The second climatology is a monthly time series. It clearly shows the chlorine activation of the lower stratosphere during winter. Moreover the equatorial OClO layer is observed during all the years without any significant variations. Finally, the anti-correlation between OClO and NO2 is highlighted. This very promising

  4. The challenging measurement of protein in complex biomass-derived samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haven, M.O.; Jørgensen, H.

    2014-01-01

    and fast protein measurement on this type of samples was the ninhydrin assay. This method has also been used widely for this purpose, but with two different methods for protein hydrolysis prior to the assay - alkaline or acidic hydrolysis. In samples containing glucose or ethanol, there was significant......Measurement of the protein content in samples from production of lignocellulosic bioethanol is an important tool when studying the adsorption of cellulases. Several methods have been used for this, and after reviewing the literature, we concluded that one of the most promising assays for simple...

  5. An Approach to Automatic Detection and Hazard Risk Assessment of Large Protruding Rocks in Densely Forested Hilly Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhatkuli, S.; Kawamura, K.; Manno, K.; Satoh, T.; Tachibana, K.

    2016-06-01

    Rock-fall along highways or railways presents one of the major threats to transportation and human safety. So far, the only feasible way to detect the locations of such protruding rocks located in the densely forested hilly region is by physically visiting the site and assessing the situation. Highways or railways are stretched to hundreds of kilometres; hence, this traditional approach of determining rock-fall risk zones is not practical to assess the safety throughout the highways or railways. In this research, we have utilized a state-of-the-art airborne LiDAR technology and derived a workflow to automatically detect protruding rocks in densely forested hilly regions and analysed the level of hazard risks they pose. Moreover, we also performed a 3D dynamic simulation of rock-fall to envisage the event. We validated that our proposed technique could automatically detect most of the large protruding rocks in the densely forested hilly region. Automatic extraction of protruding rocks and proper risk zoning could be used to identify the most crucial place that needs the proper protection measures. Hence, the proposed technique would provide an invaluable support for the management and planning of highways and railways safety, especially in the forested hilly region.

  6. Statistical Analysis of Instantaneous Frequency Scaling Factor as Derived from Optical Disdrometer Measurements at V/W Bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemba, Michael; Nessel, James; Tarasenko, Nicholas; Lane, Steven

    2017-01-01

    Since October 2015, NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) and the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) have collaboratively operated an RF terrestrial link in Albuquerque, New Mexico to characterize atmospheric propagation phenomena at 72 and 84 GHz. The W/V-band Terrestrial Link Experiment (WTLE) consists of coherent transmitters at each frequency on the crest of the Sandia Mountains and a corresponding pair of receivers in south Albuquerque. The beacon receivers provide a direct measurement of the link attenuation, while concurrent weather instrumentation provides a measurement of the atmospheric conditions. Among the available weather instruments is an optical disdrometer which yields an optical measurement of rain rate, as well as droplet size and velocity distributions (DSD, DVD). In particular, the DSD can be used to derive an instantaneous scaling factor (ISF) by which the measured data at one frequency can be scaled to another - for example, scaling the 72 GHz to an expected 84 GHz timeseries. Given the availability of both the DSD prediction and the directly observed 84 GHz attenuation, WTLE is thus uniquely able assess DSD-derived instantaneous frequency scaling at the V/W-bands. Previous work along these lines has investigated the DSD-derived ISF at Ka and Q-band (20 GHz to 40 GHz) using a satellite beacon receiver experiment in Milan, Italy. This work will expand the investigation to terrestrial links in the V/W-bands, where the frequency scaling factor is lower and where the link is also much more sensitive to attenuation by rain, clouds, and other atmospheric effects.

  7. Comparison of measured and satellite-derived spectral diffuse attenuation coefficients for the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Suresh, T.; Talaulikar, M.; Desa, E.; Matondkar, S.G.P.; Mascarenhas, A.

    bands. The performance of the data-driven empirical methods was found to be consistent in all the bands, except at the red band of 670 nm, which is uncorrelated with the measured values and has large errors. The performances of the empirical methods...

  8. Derivation and use of simple relationships between aerodynamic and optical particle measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    A simple relationship, referred to as a mass conversion factor (MCF), is presented to convert optically based particle measurements to mass concentration. It is calculated from filter-based samples and optical particle counter (OPC) data on a daily or sample period basis. The MCF allows for greater ...

  9. Derivation of the radiation budget at ground level from satellite measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raschke, E.

    1982-01-01

    Determination of the Earth radiaton budget and progress in measurement of the budget components and in the treatment of imaging data from satellites are described. Methods for calculating the radiation budget in a general circulation model, radiative transfer characteristics of clouds, computation of solar radiation at ground level using meteorological data and development of a 10-channel radiometer are discussed.

  10. Range and number-of-levels effects in derived and stated measures of attribute importance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verlegh, PWJ; Schifferstein, HNJ; Wittink, DR

    2002-01-01

    We study how the range of variation and the number of ttribute levels affect five measures of attribute importance: full profile conjoint estimates, ranges in attribute level attractiveness ratings. regression coefficients. graded paired comparisons. and self-reported ratings, We find that all impor

  11. Thematic Analysis: An Empirically Derived Measure of the Effects of Liberal Arts Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, David G.; McClelland, David C.

    1978-01-01

    The development and validation of the Test of Thematic Analysis (TTA) are described. The TTA measures the effects of liberal education as distinct from other kinds of education and general maturation. Scores were higher among seniors than freshmen at traditional liberal arts colleges. No significant differences were obtained at two vocationally…

  12. Thematic Analysis: An Empirically Derived Measure of the Effects of Liberal Arts Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, David G.; McClelland, David C.

    1978-01-01

    The development and validation of the Test of Thematic Analysis (TTA) are described. The TTA measures the effects of liberal education as distinct from other kinds of education and general maturation. Scores were higher among seniors than freshmen at traditional liberal arts colleges. No significant differences were obtained at two vocationally…

  13. Role of induced electrical polarization to identify soft ground/fractured rock conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jinho; Lee, Kang-Hyun; Seo, Hyungjoon; Ryu, Jinwoo; Lee, In-Mo

    2017-02-01

    This study attempted to evaluate the role and effectiveness of induced polarization (IP) along with electrical resistivity to identify soft ground/fractured rock. Theoretical studies as well as laboratory-scale experiments were conducted for this purpose. The theoretical study involved deriving the functional relationship between chargeability and influential variables. This was followed by performing a sensitivity analysis using the derived relationship to reveal that the size of narrow pores (r1) exerted the greatest influence on the chargeability followed by the salinity of the pore water (C0). In the laboratory test, a small-scale fractured rock zone was modeled using sandstone as a parent rock. The chargeability and resistivity were measured by changing the size of the joint aperture filled with tap water and/or sea water, the location of the fractured zone, and the thickness of the soil layer in a soil-rock multi-layered ground. The experimental study modeled the jointed zone between competent sandstone layers and indicated that the chargeability was mostly controlled by the size of the narrow pore (r1) of the surface sandstone and not by the porosity of the jointed zone. Hence, it was concluded that the chargeability did not significantly depend on the fractured characteristics of the jointed rock. It could be difficult to clearly distinguish as to whether the low resistivity value is caused by the sea water intrusion or by the increase in porosity of the fractured ground. However, the IP exploration can be effectively utilized to identify sea water intrusion since the chargeability decreased as the salinity of pore water increased. The experimental study on a soil-rock multi-layered ground indicated that the measured chargeability was controlled by the percentage of current flow that passed through the competent rock as well as by the narrow pore size of the rock itself. In conclusion, the ground condition could be easily identified by measuring the IP in

  14. Rock Cycle Roulette.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Stan M.; Palmer, Courtney

    2000-01-01

    Introduces an activity on the rock cycle. Sets 11 stages representing the transitions of an earth material in the rock cycle. Builds six-sided die for each station, and students move to the stations depending on the rolling side of the die. Evaluates students by discussing several questions in the classroom. Provides instructional information for…

  15. The Slicing Theory of Quantum Measurement: Derivation of Transient Many Worlds Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chafin C.

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available An emergent theory of quantum measurement arises directly b y considering the partic- ular subset of many body wavefunctions that can be associate d with classical condensed matter and its interaction with delocalized wavefunctions . This transfers questions of the “strangeness” of quantum mechanics from the wavefuncti on to the macroscopic ma- terial itself. An e ff ectively many-worlds picture of measurement results for lo ng times and induces a natural arrow of time. The challenging part is t hen justifying why our macroscopic world is dominated by such far-from-eigenstat e matter. Condensing cold mesoscopic clusters provide a pathway to a partitioning of a highly correlated many body wavefunction to long lasting islands composed of class ical-like bodies widely separated in Fock space. Low mass rapidly delocalizing matt er that recombines with the solids “slice” the system into a set of nearby yet very wea kly interacting subsystems weighted according to the Born statistics and yields a kind o f many worlds picture but with the possibility of revived phase interference on itera tive particle desorption, delo- calization and readsorption. A proliferation of low energy photons competes with such a possibility. Causality problems associated with correla ted quantum measurement are resolved and conserved quantities are preserved for the ove rall many body function de- spite their failure in each observer’s bifurcating “slice- path”. The necessity of such a state for a two state logic and reliable discrete state machi ne suggests that later stages of the universe’s evolution will destroy the physical underpi nnings required for conscious- ness and the arrow of time even without heat-death or atomic d estruction. Some exotic possibilities outside the domain of usual quantum measurem ent are considered such as measurement with delocalized devices and revival of inform ation from past measure- ments.

  16. Cross-sectional associations of objectively measured physical activity with brain-derived neurotrophic factor in adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Tao; Gejl, Anne Kær; Tarp, Jakob

    2017-01-01

    .035). In girls, mean physical activity and MVPA were not associated with serum BDNF. Without adjustment for wear time, sedentary time was not associated with serum BDNF in either sex. CONCLUSION: These findings indicate that higher physical activity is associated with lower serum BDNF in boys, but not in girls.......OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to examine the associations between objectively measured physical activity and serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in adolescents. METHODS: Cross-sectional analyses were performed using data from 415 adolescents who participated in the 2015 follow......-up of the Childhood Health Activity and Motor Performance School Study Denmark (the CHAMPS-study DK). Physical activity was objectively measured by accelerometry monitors. Serum BDNF levels were analyzed using the Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Anthropometrics and pubertal status were measured using...

  17. Measurements of the ion velocity distribution in an ultracold neutral plasma derived from a cold, dense Rydberg gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeson, Scott; Lyon, Mary

    2016-05-01

    We report measurements of the ion velocity distribution in an ultracold neutral plasma derived from a dense, cold Rydberg gas in a MOT. The Rydberg atoms are excited using a resonant two-step excitation pathway with lasers of 4 ns duration. The plasma forms spontaneously and rapidly. The rms width of the ion velocity distribution is determined by measuring laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of the ions. The measured excitation efficiency is compared with a Monte-Carlo wavefunction calculation, and significant differences are observed. We discuss the conditions for blockaded Rydberg excitation and the subsequent spatial ordering of Rydberg atom domains. While the blockade interaction is greater than the Rabi frequency in portions of the atomic sample, no evidence for spatial ordering is observed. This research is supported in part by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (Grant No. FA9950-12- 0308) and by the National Science Foundation (Grant No. PHY-1404488).

  18. Measurements of the ion velocity distribution in an ultracold neutral plasma derived from a cold, dense Rydberg gas

    CERN Document Server

    Bergeson, S D

    2016-01-01

    We report measurements of the ion velocity distribution in an ultracold neutral plasma derived from a dense, cold Rydberg gas in a MOT. The Rydberg atoms are excited using a resonant two-step excitation pathway with lasers of 4 ns duration. The plasma forms spontaneously and rapidly. The rms width of the ion velocity distribution is determined by measuring laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of the ions. The measured excitation efficiency is compared with a Monte-Carlo wavefunction calculation, and significant differences are observed. We discuss the conditions for blockaded Rydberg excitation and the subsequent spatial ordering of Rydberg atom domains. While the blockade interaction is greater than the Rabi frequency in portions of the atomic sample, no evidence for spatial ordering is observed.

  19. Derivation of Cumulus Cloud Dimensions and Shape from the Airborne Measurements by the Research Scanning Polarimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrov, Mikhail D.; Cairns, Brian; Emde, Claudia; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Ottaviani, Matteo; Wasilewski, Andrzej P.

    2016-01-01

    The Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP) is an airborne instrument, whose measurements have been extensively used for retrievals of microphysical properties of clouds. In this study we show that for cumulus clouds the information content of the RSP data can be extended by adding the macroscopic parameters of the cloud, such as its geometric shape, dimensions, and height above the ground. This extension is possible by virtue of the high angular resolution and high frequency of the RSP measurements, which allow for geometric constraint of the cloud's 2D cross section between a number of tangent lines of view. The retrieval method is tested on realistic 3D radiative transfer simulations and applied to actual RSP data.

  20. Derivation of Cumulus Cloud Dimensions and Shape from the Airborne Measurements by the Research Scanning Polarimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrov, Mikhail D.; Cairns, Brian; Emde, Claudia; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Ottaviani, Matteo; Wasilewski, Andrzej P.

    2016-01-01

    The Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP) is an airborne instrument, whose measurements have been extensively used for retrievals of microphysical properties of clouds. In this study we show that for cumulus clouds the information content of the RSP data can be extended by adding the macroscopic parameters of the cloud, such as its geometric shape, dimensions, and height above the ground. This extension is possible by virtue of the high angular resolution and high frequency of the RSP measurements, which allow for geometric constraint of the cloud's 2D cross section between a number of tangent lines of view. The retrieval method is tested on realistic 3D radiative transfer simulations and applied to actual RSP data.

  1. Towards an integrated measure of need affiliation and agreeableness derived from the Operant Motive Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DAVID SCHEFFER

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The Operant Motive Test (OMT has been conceptionalized to measure the amalgam of aroused needs and motive-relevant traits which specifies an implementation strategy of the motive. Therefore the OMT differs conceptionally from the TAT. In Study 1 we found empirical evidence for this interaction hypothesis. The OMT, but not the TAT, was a function of a significant interaction effect of an aroused affiliation need and agreeableness. The overall correlation between OMT and TAT was small and only marginally significant in an experimental arousal condition. Study 1 also yielded evidence that the OMT measure of affiliation (i.e. m affiliation has construct validity. Study 2 gave indirect evidence for stability of OMT m affiliation. In Study 3 the OMT predicted peer ratings of customer service orientation.

  2. The Diffuse Approximation: a derivative tool dedicated to full-field measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Villon P.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes a filtering tool based on the diffuse approximation, in order to reconstruct strain fields from full-field displacement measurements. The question of the filtering of the noise is adressed and an alternative approach based on space-time filtering is proposed. The methods are then applied to the detection of early damage detection on a tensile test on an interlock composite.

  3. Advances in Fast-response Acoustically Derived Air-temperature Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogoev, I.; Jacobsen, L.; Horst, T. W.; Conrad, B.

    2015-12-01

    Fast-response accurate air-temperature measurements are required when estimating turbulent fluxes of heat, water and carbon dioxide by open-path eddy-covariance technique. In comparison with contact thermometers like thermocouples, ultra-sonic thermometers do not suffer from solar radiation loading, water vapor condensation and evaporative cooling effects. Consequently they have the potential to provide more accurate true air temperature measurements. The absolute accuracy of the ultrasonic thermometer is limited by the following parameters: the distance between the transducer pairs, transducer delays associated with the electrical-acoustic signal conversion that vary with temperature, components of the wind vector that are normal to the ultrasonic paths, and humidity.The distance between the transducer pairs is commonly obtained by coordinate measuring machine. Improved accuracy demonstrated in this study results from increased stiffness in the anemometer head to better maintain the ultrasonic path-length distances. To further improve accuracy and account for changes in transducer delays and distance as a function of temperature, these parameters are characterized in a zero-wind chamber over the entire operating temperature range. When the sonic anemometer is combined with a co-located fast-response water vapor analyzer, like in the IRGASON instrument, speed of sound can be compensated for humidity effects on a point-by-point basis resulting in a true fast-response air temperature measurement. Laboratory test results show that when the above steps are implemented in the calibration of the ultrasonic thermometer air-temperature accuracy better than ±0.5 degrees Celsius can be achieved over the entire operating range. The approach is also validated in a field inter-comparison with an aspirated thermistor probe mounted in a radiation shield.

  4. On the relationship between executive functions of working memory and components derived from fluid intelligence measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xuezhu; Schweizer, Karl; Wang, Tengfei; Chu, Pei; Gong, Qin

    2017-09-14

    The aim of the current study is to provide new insights into the relationship between executive functions and intelligence measures in considering the item-position effect observed in intelligence items. Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices (APM) and Horn's LPS reasoning test were used to assess fluid intelligence which served as criterion in investigating the relationship between intelligence and executive functions. A battery of six experimental tasks measured the updating, shifting, and inhibition processes of executive functions. Data were collected from 205 university students. Fluid intelligence showed substantial correlations with the updating and inhibition processes and no correlation with the shifting process without considering the item-position effect. Next, the fixed-link model was applied to APM and LPS data separately to decompose them into an ability component and an item-position component. The results of relating the components to executive functions showed that the updating and shifting processes mainly contributed to the item-position component whereas the inhibition process was mainly associated with the ability component of each fluid intelligence test. These findings suggest that improvements in the efficiency of updating and shifting processes are likely to occur during the course of completing intelligence measures and inhibition is important for intelligence in general. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Reliable measurements for an image-derived sample volume in an open-configuration MR system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bong Soo; Lee, Man Woo; Hong, Cheolpyo

    2016-11-01

    Open-configuration magnetic resonance (MR) systems are becoming desirable for volume measurements of off-center samples due to their non-claustrophobic system configuration, excellent soft-tissue contrast, high efficiency, and low-cost. However, geometric distortion is produced by the unwanted background magnetic field and hinders volume measurements. The present study describes the characteristics of geometric distortion in off-center samples such as the thigh muscle and adipose tissue measurements using an open-type MR system. The American Association of Physicists in Medicine uniformity and linearity phantom was used for the detection and the evaluation of the geometric distortion. The geometric distortion decreased near the isocenter and increased toward the off-center. A cylindrical phantom image was acquired at the isocenter and was used as the distortion-free, reference image. Two cylindrical phantoms were scanned off-center at a position analogous to that of the human thigh. The differences between the two cylindrical phantom volumes and the reference volume were 1.62 % ± 0.16 and 5.18 % ± 0.14. Off-center-related MR imaging requires careful consideration for image interpretation and volumetric assessment of tissue.

  6. Nature of the Venus thermosphere derived from satellite drag measurements (solicited paper)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, G.; Theriot, M.; Bougher, S.

    2008-09-01

    From drag measurements obtained by Pioneer Venus and Magellan, the Venus upper atmosphere was discovered to be much colder than Earth's, even though Venus is much closer to the Sun than the Earth. On the dayside, exospheric temperatures are near 300K compared to Earth's of near 1200K [1]. This is thought to result principally from 15 micron excitation of carbon dioxide by atomic oxygen resulting in very strong 15 micron emission to space, cooling off the upper atmosphere [2]. On the nightside the Venus upper atmosphere is near 100K [3], compared to Earth where temperatures are near 900K. The nightside Venus temperatures drop with altitude contrary to a thermosphere where temperatures rise with altitude. As a result, the very cold nightside is called a "cryosphere" rather than a thermosphere. This is the first cryosphere discovered in the solar system [1]. Temperatures sharply drop near the terminator. Apparently, heat is somehow blocked near the terminator from being significantly transported to the nightside [4]. Recently, drag studies were performed on a number of Earth satellites to establish whether the rise of carbon dioxide on Earth was cooling the Earth's thermosphere similar to the dayside of Venus. Keating et al. [5] discovered that a 10 percent drop in density near 350km at solar minimum occurred globally over a period of 20 years with a 10 per cent rise in carbon dioxide. This should result in about a factor of 2 decline in density from 1976 values, by the end of the 21st century brought on by thermospheric cooling. Subsequent studies have confirmed these results. Thus we are beginning to see the cooling of Earth's upper atmosphere apparently from the same process cooling the Venus thermosphere. Fig. 1 VIRA Exospheric Temperatures Atmospheric drag data from the Pioneer Venus Orbiter and Magellan were combined to generate an improved version of the Venus International Reference Atmosphere (VIRA) [6], [7]. A "fountain effect" was discovered where the

  7. CO2 column-averaged volume mixing ratio derived over Tsukuba from measurements by commercial airlines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Matsueda

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Column-averaged volume mixing ratios of carbon dioxide (XCO2 during the period from January 2007 to May 2008 over Tsukuba, Japan, were derived by using CO2 concentration data observed by Japan Airlines Corporation (JAL commercial airliners, based on the assumption that CO2 profiles over Tsukuba and Narita were the same. CO2 profile data for 493 flights on clear-sky days were analysed in order to calculate XCO2 with an ancillary dataset: Tsukuba observational data (by rawinsonde and a meteorological tower or global meteorological data (NCEP and CIRA-86. The amplitude of seasonal variation of XCO2 (Tsukuba observational from the Tsukuba observational data was determined by least-squares fit using a harmonic function to roughly evaluate the seasonal variation over Tsukuba. The highest and lowest values of the obtained fitted curve in 2007 for XCO2 (Tsukuba observational were 386.4 and 381.7 ppm in May and September, respectively. The dependence of XCO2 on the type of ancillary dataset was evaluated. The average difference between XCO2 (global from global climatological data and XCO2 (Tsukuba observational, i.e., the bias of XCO2 (global based on XCO2 (Tsukuba observational, was found to be -0.621 ppm with a standard deviation of 0.682 ppm. The uncertainty of XCO2 (global based on XCO2 (Tsukuba observational was estimated to be 0.922 ppm. This small uncertainty suggests that the present method of XCO2 calculation using data from airliners and global climatological data can be applied to the validation of GOSAT products for XCO2 over airports worldwide.

  8. Real-Time Visualization of Tissue Surface Biochemical Features Derived From Fluorescence Lifetime Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorpas, Dimitris; Ma, Dinglong; Bec, Julien; Yankelevich, Diego R; Marcu, Laura

    2016-08-01

    Fiber based fluorescence lifetime imaging has shown great potential for intraoperative diagnosis and guidance of surgical procedures. Here we describe a novel method addressing a significant challenge for the practical implementation of this technique, i.e., the real-time display of the quantified biochemical or functional tissue properties superimposed on the interrogated area. Specifically, an aiming beam (450 nm) generated by a continuous-wave laser beam was merged with the pulsed fluorescence excitation light in a single delivery/collection fiber and then imaged and segmented using a color-based algorithm. We demonstrate that this approach enables continuous delineation of the interrogated location and dynamic augmentation of the acquired frames with the corresponding fluorescence decay parameters. The method was evaluated on a fluorescence phantom and fresh tissue samples. Current results demonstrate that 34 frames per second can be achieved for augmenting videos of 640 × 512 pixels resolution. Also we show that the spatial resolution of the fluorescence lifetime map depends on the tissue optical properties, the scanning speed, and the frame rate. The dice similarity coefficient between the fluorescence phantom and the reconstructed maps was estimated to be as high as 93%. The reported method could become a valuable tool for augmenting the surgeon's field of view with diagnostic information derived from the analysis of fluorescence lifetime data in real-time using handheld, automated, or endoscopic scanning systems. Current method provides also a means for maintaining the tissue light exposure within safety limits. This study provides a framework for using an aiming beam with other point spectroscopy applications.

  9. Acoustics in rock and pop music halls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adelman-Larsen, Niels Werner; Thompson, Eric Robert; Gade, Anders Christian

    2007-01-01

    The existing body of literature regarding the acoustic design of concert halls has focused almost exclusively on classical music, although there are many more performances of rhythmic music, including rock and pop. Objective measurements were made of the acoustics of twenty rock music venues...... in Denmark and a questionnaire was used in a subjective assessment of those venues with professional rock musicians and sound engineers. Correlations between the objective and subjective results lead, among others, to a recommendation for reverberation time as a function of hall volume. Since the bass...

  10. Using in situ airborne measurements to evaluate three cloud phase products derived from CALIPSO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesana, G.; Chepfer, H.; Winker, D.; Getzewich, B.; Cai, X.; Jourdan, O.; Mioche, G.; Okamoto, H.; Hagihara, Y.; Noel, V.; Reverdy, M.

    2016-05-01

    We compare the cloud detection and cloud phase determination of three independent climatologies based on Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) to airborne in situ measurements. Our analysis of the cloud detection shows that the differences between the satellite and in situ measurements mainly arise from three factors. First, averaging CALIPSO Level l data along track before cloud detection increases the estimate of high- and low-level cloud fractions. Second, the vertical averaging of Level 1 data before cloud detection tends to artificially increase the cloud vertical extent. Third, the differences in classification of fully attenuated pixels among the CALIPSO climatologies lead to differences in the low-level Arctic cloud fractions. In another section, we compare the cloudy pixels detected by colocated in situ and satellite observations to study the cloud phase determination. At midlatitudes, retrievals of homogeneous high ice clouds by CALIPSO data sets are very robust (more than 94.6% of agreement with in situ). In the Arctic, where the cloud phase vertical variability is larger within a 480 m pixel, all climatologies show disagreements with the in situ measurements and CALIPSO-General Circulation Models-Oriented Cloud Product (GOCCP) report significant undefined-phase clouds, which likely correspond to mixed-phase clouds. In all CALIPSO products, the phase determination is dominated by the cloud top phase. Finally, we use global statistics to demonstrate that main differences between the CALIPSO cloud phase products stem from the cloud detection (horizontal averaging, fully attenuated pixels) rather than the cloud phase determination procedures.

  11. Derivation of Inter-Atomic Force Constants of Cu2O from Diffuse Neutron Scattering Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Makhsun

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Neutron scattering intensity from Cu2O compound has been measured at 10 K and 295 K with High Resolution Powder Diffractometer at JRR-3 JAEA. The oscillatory diffuse scattering related to correlations among thermal displacements of atoms was observed at 295 K. The correlation parameters were determined from the observed diffuse scattering intensity at 10 and 295 K. The force constants between the neighboring atoms in Cu2O were estimated from the correlation parameters and compared to those of Ag2O

  12. Rock Cracking Indices for Improved Tunnel Support Design: A Case Study for Columnar Jointed Rock Masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xia-Ting; Hao, Xian-Jie; Jiang, Quan; Li, Shao-jun; Hudson, John A.

    2016-06-01

    Measurements indicate that the development of cracking is a key feature relating to the strength and collapse of a columnar jointed rock mass. In this context, a new support design method utilising rock cracking indices for columnar jointed rock mass under high stress is proposed to restrain the development of cracking in the surrounding rock mass. The method involves limiting the cracking evolution of the surrounding rock mass by designing the appropriate parameters and time of installation of the support system. Two indices are suggested: the allowable depth of the excavation damaged zone (EDZ); and the allowable damage extent of the rock mass in the EDZ. The method involves limiting the evolution of cracking in the surrounding rock mass by designing the parameters and time of installation of the support system. The support system should have a suitable stiffness and installation time so as to restrain the evolution of the depth and damage extent of the EDZ within the surrounding rock. Therefore, the depth and damage extent of the EDZ, as well as the axial stress in the anchor bolts, are calculated at different distances between the support location and the tunnel working face to find the appropriate stiffness and installation time of the support system. The method has been successfully adopted to determine the thickness of shotcrete, the arrangement and installation time of rockbolts, and other parameters, for five large diversion tunnels at the Baihetan hydropower station, China, which were excavated in columnar jointed rock masses.

  13. Petrophysical Characteristics of Rocks in Girei Local Government ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Petrophysical measurements namely; electrical resistivity, density, porosity, electrical resistivity anisotropy and water saturation were performed on ... information required for determining the electrical conductivity mechanism of these rocks.

  14. Distribution of icy particles across Enceladus' surface as derived from Cassini-VIMS measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaumann, R.; Stephan, K.; Hansen, G.B.; Clark, R.N.; Buratti, B.J.; Brown, R.H.; Baines, K.H.; Newman, S.F.; Bellucci, G.; Filacchione, G.; Coradini, A.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Griffith, C.A.; Hibbitts, C.A.; McCord, T.B.; Nelson, R.M.; Nicholson, P.D.; Sotin, Christophe; Wagner, R.

    2008-01-01

    The surface of Enceladus consists almost completely of water ice. As the band depths of water ice absorptions are sensitive to the size of particles, absorptions can be used to map variations of icy particles across the surface. The Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) observed Enceladus with a high spatial resolution during three Cassini flybys in 2005 (orbits EN 003, EN 004 and EN 011). Based on these data we measured the band depths of water ice absorptions at 1.04, 1.25, 1.5, and 2 ??m. These band depths were compared to water ice models that represent theoretically calculated reflectance spectra for a range of particle diameters between 2 ??m and 1 mm. The agreement between the experimental (VIMS) and model values supports the assumption that pure water ice characterizes the surface of Enceladus and therefore that variations in band depth correspond to variations in water ice particle diameters. Our measurements show that the particle diameter of water ice increases toward younger tectonically altered surface units with the largest particles exposed in relatively "fresh" surface material. The smallest particles were generally found in old densely cratered terrains. The largest particles (???0.2 mm) are concentrated in the so called "tiger stripes" at the south pole. In general, the particle diameters are strongly correlated with geologic features and surface ages, indicating a stratigraphic evolution of the surface that is caused by cryovolcanic resurfacing and impact gardening. ?? 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Development of novel electrical characterization methods and measurements of G4-DNA and DNA Derivatives

    CERN Document Server

    Livshits, Gideon I

    2015-01-01

    This dissertation presents an investigation into the electrical properties of two types of G4-DNA and several DNA-based molecules, targeting them as candidates for molecular wires and devices. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) comparison of co-deposited tetra- and intra-molecular G4-DNA reveals variations in morphology and different sensitivity to the applied electric field, suggesting that the folding orientation of the strands affects the molecular structure, i.e. either the tetrad unit or the tetrad-tetrad stacking or both, and therefore the charge mobility. Tetra-molecular G4-DNA is found to be twice as polarizable as intra-molecular G4-DNA, suggesting it has greater charge mobility. These promising results motivated direct electrical transport measurements on tetra-molecular G4-DNA using a special conductive AFM setup, profiling the conductance along the molecule. Reproducible currents of tens to over 100 pA were measured in many tetra-molecular G4-DNA molecules over ...

  16. Deriving global structure of the Galactic Magnetic Field from Faraday Rotation Measures of extragalactic sources

    CERN Document Server

    Pshirkov, M S; Kronberg, P P; Newton-McGee, K J

    2011-01-01

    We made use of the two latest sets of Rotational Measures (RMs) of extra-galactic radio sources, namely the NRAO VLA Sky Survey otation Measures Catalogue, and a compilation by Kronberg&Newton-McGee(2011), to infer the global structure of the Galactic Magnetic Field (GMF). We have checked that these two data sets are consistent with each other. Motivated by clear patterns in the observed distribution of RMs over the sky, we considered GMF models consisting of the two components: disk (spiral or ring) and halo. The parameters of these components were determined by fitting different model field geometries to the observed RMs. We found that the model consisting of a symmetric (with respect to the Galactic plane) spiral disk and anti-symmetric halo fits the data best, and reproduces the observed distribution of RMs over the sky very well. We confirm that ring disk models are disfavored. Our results favor small pitch angles around -5 degrees and an increased vertical scale of electron distribution, in agreemen...

  17. Surface force measurements and simulations of mussel-derived peptide adhesives on wet organic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Zachary A; Rapp, Michael V; Wei, Wei; Mullen, Ryan Gotchy; Wu, Chun; Zerze, Gül H; Mittal, Jeetain; Waite, J Herbert; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Shea, Joan-Emma

    2016-04-19

    Translating sticky biological molecules-such as mussel foot proteins (MFPs)-into synthetic, cost-effective underwater adhesives with adjustable nano- and macroscale characteristics requires an intimate understanding of the glue's molecular interactions. To help facilitate the next generation of aqueous adhesives, we performed a combination of surface forces apparatus (SFA) measurements and replica-exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations on a synthetic, easy to prepare, Dopa-containing peptide (MFP-3s peptide), which adheres to organic surfaces just as effectively as its wild-type protein analog. Experiments and simulations both show significant differences in peptide adsorption on CH3-terminated (hydrophobic) and OH-terminated (hydrophilic) self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), where adsorption is strongest on hydrophobic SAMs because of orientationally specific interactions with Dopa. Additional umbrella-sampling simulations yield free-energy profiles that quantitatively agree with SFA measurements and are used to extract the adhesive properties of individual amino acids within the context of MFP-3s peptide adhesion, revealing a delicate balance between van der Waals, hydrophobic, and electrostatic forces.

  18. Individually customised fetal weight charts derived from ultrasound measurements: the Generation R Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaillard, Romy; de Ridder, Maria A J; Verburg, Bero O; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Mackenbach, Johan P; Moll, Henriëtte A; Hofman, Albert; Steegers, Eric A P; Jaddoe, Vincent W V

    2011-12-01

    Maternal and fetal characteristics are important determinants of fetal growth potential, and should ideally be taken into consideration when evaluating fetal growth variation. We developed a model for individually customised growth charts for estimated fetal weight, which takes into account physiological maternal and fetal characteristics known at the start of pregnancy. We used fetal ultrasound data of 8,162 pregnant women participating in the Generation R Study, a prospective, population-based cohort study from early pregnancy onwards. A repeated measurements regression model was constructed, using backward selection procedures for identifying relevant maternal and fetal characteristics. The final model for estimating expected fetal weight included gestational age, fetal sex, parity, ethnicity, maternal age, height and weight. Using this model, we developed individually customised growth charts, and their corresponding standard deviations, for fetal weight from 18 weeks onwards. Of the total of 495 fetuses who were classified as small size for gestational age (measurements in a large population-based study to fit a model to construct individually customised growth charts, taking into account physiological maternal and fetal characteristics. These charts might be useful for use in epidemiological studies and in clinical practice.

  19. Measurement of anterior and posterior circulation flow contributions to cerebral blood flow. An ultrasound-derived volumetric flow analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyajian, R A; Schwend, R B; Wolfe, M M; Bickerton, R E; Otis, S M

    1995-01-01

    Ultrasound-derived volumetric flow analysis may be useful in answering questions of basic physiological interest in the cerebrovascular circulation. Using this technique, the authors have sought to describe quantitatively the complete concurrent flow relations among all four arteries supplying the brain. The aim of this study of normal subjects was to determine the relative flow contributions of the anterior (internal carotid arteries) and posterior (vertebral arteries) cerebral circulation. Comparisons between the observed and theoretically expected anterior and posterior flow distribution would provide an opportunity to assess traditional rheological conceptions in vivo. Pulsed color Doppler ultrasonography was used to measure mean flow rates in the internal carotid and vertebral arteries in 21 normal adults. The anterior circulation (internal carotid arteries bilaterally) carried 82% of the brain's blood supply and comprised 67% of the total vascular cross-sectional area. These values demonstrate precise concordance between observations in vivo and the theoretically derived (Hagen-Poiseuille) expected flow distribution. These cerebrovascular findings support the traditional conception of macroscopic blood flow. Further studies using ultrasound-derived volumetric analysis of the brain's arterial flow relations may illuminate the vascular pathophysiology underlying aging, cerebral ischemia, and dementias.

  20. Statistically significant data base of rock properties for geothermal use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, A.; Jorand, R.; Clauser, C.

    2009-04-01

    The high risk of failure due to the unknown properties of the target rocks at depth is a major obstacle for the exploration of geothermal energy. In general, the ranges of thermal and hydraulic properties given in compilations of rock properties are too large to be useful to constrain properties at a specific site. To overcome this problem, we study the thermal and hydraulic rock properties of the main rock types in Germany in a statistical approach. An important aspect is the use of data from exploration wells that are largely untapped for the purpose of geothermal exploration. In the current project stage, we have been analyzing mostly Devonian and Carboniferous drill cores from 20 deep boreholes in the region of the Lower Rhine Embayment and the Ruhr area (western North Rhine Westphalia). In total, we selected 230 core samples with a length of up to 30 cm from the core archive of the State Geological Survey. The use of core scanning technology allowed the rapid measurement of thermal conductivity, sonic velocity, and gamma density under dry and water saturated conditions with high resolution for a large number of samples. In addition, we measured porosity, bulk density, and matrix density based on Archimedes' principle and pycnometer analysis. As first results we present arithmetic means, medians and standard deviations characterizing the petrophysical properties and their variability for specific lithostratigraphic units. Bi- and multimodal frequency distributions correspond to the occurrence of different lithologies such as shale, limestone, dolomite, sandstone, siltstone, marlstone, and quartz-schist. In a next step, the data set will be combined with logging data and complementary mineralogical analyses to derive the variation of thermal conductivity with depth. As a final result, this may be used to infer thermal conductivity for boreholes without appropriate core data which were drilled in similar geological settings.

  1. Size specific indoor aerosol deposition measurements and derived I/O concentrations ratios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fogh, C.L.; Byrne, M.A.; Roed, Jørn;

    1997-01-01

    The process of aerosol deposition on indoor surfaces has implications for human exposure to particulate contaminants of both indoor and outdoor origin. In the radiological context, current accident models assume a uniform Dose Reduction Factor (DRF) of 0.5 for indoor residence during the outdoor...... and dispersed in unfurnished and furnished rooms; the decay rate of the particles was then inferred from analysis of sequential air samples. Allowing for the differences in furnishing and level of occupancy between the tests, consistent aerosol deposition velocities were determined and, for furnished rooms...... with previous measurements of I/O ratios for fine and coarse particles. It was concluded that, for realistic dose estimates, a radioisotope-specific factor may be merited. (C) 1997 Elsevier Science Ltd....

  2. The freshwater composition of the Fram Strait outflow derived from a decade of tracer measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dodd, Paul A.; Rabe, Benjamin; Hansen, Edmond

    2012-01-01

    are also the first to show positive fractions of sea ice meltwater at the surface near the core of the EGC. Sections from September 2009–2011 show an increased input of sea ice meltwater at the surface relative to older September sections. This suggests that more sea ice now melts back into the surface...... meltwater inventories, suggesting that meteoric water and brine may be delivered to Fram Strait together from a common source. We find that the freshwater outflow at Fram Strait exhibits a similar meteoric water to net sea ice meltwater ratio as the central Arctic Ocean and Siberian shelves, suggesting......The composition of the Fram Strait freshwater outflow is investigated by comparing 10 sections of concurrent salinity, δ18O, nitrate and phosphate measurements collected between 1997 and 2011. The largest inventories of net sea ice meltwater are found in 2009, 2010 and 2011. The 2009–2011 sections...

  3. The link between ozone and temperature as derived from sonde measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortuin, J.P.F. [Royal Netherlands Meteorological Inst., De Bilt (Netherlands)

    1995-12-31

    The current study is based on ozone and temperature measurements, recorded at 8 ozonesonde stations over the period 1971 -1991. The ozonesonde and raw instruments are attached to the same balloon, which has the advantage that datasets are truly synoptic. The ozonesonde stations are located in Canada (Resolute, Edmonton, Churchill and Goose Bay), Japan (Sapporo, Tateno and Kagoshima U.S.) (Wallops Island). The ozone and temperature datasets are submitted to a multiple linear regression analysis. The predictors are time cycle, solar flux at 10.7 cm, quasi-biennial oscillation (equatorial wind at 30 hPa where available), the wind direction recorded during the same balloon flight. To account possible changes in ozonesonde instruments, a step function is used. The El Chichon volcanic eruption is accounted for using the 9-season window technique. Results are presented for the warm and cold half year periods of the annual cycle

  4. Comparison of columnar water vapor over northern China derived from ground-based measurements and MODIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chaoshun; Shi, Runhe; Gao, Wei; Bai, Kaixu

    2011-09-01

    Water vapor represents a small but environmentally significant constituent of the atmosphere. This study retrieved columnar water vapor (CWV) with the 939.3 nm band of a Multi-filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) using the modified Langley technique from September 23, 2004 to June 20, 2005 at the XiangHe site.To improve the credibility, the MFRSR results were compared with those obtained from the AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) CIMEL sun-photometer measurements, co-located at the XiangHe site, and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Near-Infrared Total Precipitable Water Product (MOD05), respectively. These comparisons show a good agreement in terms of correlation coefficients, slopes, and offsets, revealing that the accuracy of CWV estimation using the MFRSR instrument is reliable and suitable for extended studies in northern China.

  5. Derivation of armature displacement and movement disturbances from current and voltage measurements on solenoid operated valves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louati, Iskander Alexandre [AREVA NP GmbH (Germany). Service Sector Germany

    2009-07-01

    As part of the electric drive mechanisms of the safety system in nuclear power plants safety related solenoid operated valves (SOVs) are subject to design control, commissioning tests and periodical in-service inspections. AREVA has developed and qualified many methods and tools that have been embedded into as software tools called DAM for diagnosis and evaluation of the valve performance according to the KTA requirements. In the special case of COVs tracing the electric measurements with ADAM helps to detect anomalies at the SOVs and esp. those related to disturbances of the armature moved. The disturbances to be tested are divided into electrical and mechanical disturbances: voltage insufficiency, switch chattering; degradation of spring load, friction collaterally to armature displacement, partial or total obstruction of the armature.

  6. CRITERIA FOR ROCK ENGINEERING FAILURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUDeren; ZHANGYuzhuo

    1995-01-01

    A great number of underground rock projects are maintained in the rock mass which is subject to rock damage and failure development. In many cases, the rock. engineering is still under normal working conditions even though rock is already fails to some extent. This paper introduces two different concepts: rock failure and rock engineering failure. Rock failure is defined as a mechanical state under which an applicable characteristic is changed or lost.However, the rock engineering failure is an engineering state under which an applicable function is changed or lost. The failure of surrounding rocks is the major reason of rock engineering failure. The criterion of rock engineering failure depends on the limit of applicable functions. The rock engineering failure state possesses a corresponding point in rock failure state. In this paper, a description of rock engineering failure criterion is given by simply using a mechanical equation or expression. It is expected that the study of rock engineering failure criterion will be an optimal approach that combines research of rock mechanics with rock engineering problems.

  7. Prediction uncertainty of plume characteristics derived from a small number of measuring points

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, H. K.; van der Zee, S. E. A. T. M.; Leijnse, A.

    A small number of measuring points may inflict a bias on the characterisation of flow and transport based on field experiments in the unsaturated zone. Simulation of pure advective transport of a Gaussian plume through a setup of 30 regularly placed measuring points revealed regular temporal fluctuations about the real spatial moments. An irregular setup predicted both irregular fluctuations and larger discrepancies from the real value. From these considerations, a regular setup is recommended. Spatial moments were sensitive to the plume size relative to the distance between individual measuring points. To reduce prediction errors of the variance, the distance between the measuring points should be less than twice the standard deviation of the examined plume. The total size of the setup should cover several standard deviations of the plume to avoid mass being lost from the monitored area. Numerical simulations of a dispersing plume (comparing calculations based on 9000 nodes with 30 measuring points) revealed that vertical and horizontal centres of mass were predicted well at all degrees of heterogeneity, and the same was the case for horizontal variances. Vertical variances were more susceptible to prediction errors, but estimates were of the same order of magnitude as the real values. Résumé Lorsque l'on cherche à caractériser l'écoulement et le transport à partir d'expériences de terrain dans la zone saturée, il arrive qu'un petit nombre de points introduisent un biais. La simulation d'un transport purement advectif d'un panache gaussien au travers d'un ensemble de 30 points de mesures espacés régulièrement fait apparaître des variations temporelles régulières autour des moments spatiaux réels. Un ensemble irrégulier conduit à prédire à la fois des variations irrégulières et de plus grandes divergences par rapport à la valeur réelle. A partir de ces constations, un ensemble régulier est recommandé. Les moments spatiaux sont apparus

  8. In situ estimation of roof rock strength using sonic logging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oyler, David C.; Mark, Christopher; Molinda, Gregory M. [NIOSH-Pittsburgh Research Laboratory, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Sonic travel time logging of exploration boreholes is routinely used in Australia to obtain estimates of coal mine roof rock strength. Because sonic velocity logs are relatively inexpensive and easy to obtain during exploration, the technique has provided Australian underground coal mines with an abundance of rock strength data for use in all aspects of ground control design. However, the technique depends upon reliable correlations between the uniaxial compressive strength (UCS) and the sonic velocity. This paper describes research recently conducted by NIOSH aimed at developing a correlation for use by the U.S. mining industry. From two coreholes in Illinois, two from Pennsylvania, and one each from Colorado, western Kentucky and southern West Virginia, sonic velocity logs were compared with UCS values derived from Point Load tests for a broad range of coal measure rock types. For the entire data set, the relationship between UCS and sonic travel time is expressed by an exponential equation relating the UCS in psi to the travel time of the P-wave in {mu}s/ft. The coefficient of determination or R-squared for this equation is 0.72, indicating that a relatively high reliability can be achieved with this technique. The strength estimates obtained from the correlation equation may be used to help design roof support systems. The paper also addresses the steps that are necessary to ensure that high-quality sonic logs are obtained for use in estimating UCS. (author)

  9. A Method to Estimate Shear Quality Factor of Hard Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Cai, Ming

    2017-07-01

    Attenuation has a large influence on ground motion intensity. Quality factors are used to measure wave attenuation in a medium and they are often difficult to estimate due to many factors such as the complex geology and underground mining environment. This study investigates the effect of attenuation on seismic wave propagation and ground motion using an advanced numerical tool—SPECFEM2D. A method, which uses numerical modeling and site-specific scaling laws, is proposed to estimate the shear quality factor of hard rocks in underground mines. In the numerical modeling, the seismic source is represented by a moment tensor model and the considered medium is isotropic and homogeneous. Peak particle velocities along the strongest wave motion direction are compared with that from a design scaling law. Based on the field data that were used to derive a semi-empirical design scaling law, it is demonstrated that a shear quality factor of 60 seems to be a representative for the hard rocks in deep mines to consider the attenuation effect of seismic wave propagation. Using the proposed method, reasonable shear quality factors of hard rocks can be obtained and this, in turn, will assist accurate ground motion determination for mine design.

  10. Climatological and radiative properties of midlatitude cirrus clouds derived by automatic evaluation of lidar measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kienast-Sjögren, Erika; Rolf, Christian; Seifert, Patric; Krieger, Ulrich K.; Luo, Bei P.; Krämer, Martina; Peter, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Cirrus, i.e., high, thin clouds that are fully glaciated, play an important role in the Earth's radiation budget as they interact with both long- and shortwave radiation and affect the water vapor budget of the upper troposphere and stratosphere. Here, we present a climatology of midlatitude cirrus clouds measured with the same type of ground-based lidar at three midlatitude research stations: at the Swiss high alpine Jungfraujoch station (3580 m a.s.l.), in Zürich (Switzerland, 510 m a.s.l.), and in Jülich (Germany, 100 m a.s.l.). The analysis is based on 13 000 h of measurements from 2010 to 2014. To automatically evaluate this extensive data set, we have developed the Fast LIdar Cirrus Algorithm (FLICA), which combines a pixel-based cloud-detection scheme with the classic lidar evaluation techniques. We find mean cirrus optical depths of 0.12 on Jungfraujoch and of 0.14 and 0.17 in Zürich and Jülich, respectively. Above Jungfraujoch, subvisible cirrus clouds (τ change in cloud morphology at Jungfraujoch above ˜ 13 km, possibly because high particle number densities form in the observed cirrus clouds, when many ice crystals nucleate in the high supersaturations following rapid uplifts in lee waves above mountainous terrain. The retrieved optical properties are used as input for a radiative transfer model to estimate the net cloud radiative forcing, CRFNET, for the analyzed cirrus clouds. All cirrus detected here have a positive CRFNET. This confirms that these thin, high cirrus have a warming effect on the Earth's climate, whereas cooling clouds typically have cloud edges too low in altitude to satisfy the FLICA criterion of temperatures below -38 °C. We find CRFNET = 0.9 W m-2 for Jungfraujoch and 1.0 W m-2 (1.7 W m-2) for Zürich (Jülich). Further, we calculate that subvisible cirrus (τ < 0.03) contribute about 5 %, thin cirrus (0.03 < τ < 0.3) about 45 %, and opaque cirrus (0.3 < τ) about 50 % of the total cirrus radiative forcing.

  11. Characteristics of the global thermal tropopause derived from multiple radio occultation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Yuan, Yun-bin; Chai, Yan-Ju; Liou, Yuei-An; Ou, Ji-kun; Zhong, Shi-ming

    2017-03-01

    Thermal tropopause represents the region of the atmosphere where the environmental lapse rate changes from tropospheric positive to stratospheric negative. It also defines the altitude of the atmosphere beneath which significant weather perturbations occur except occasional overshooting thunderstorms in the tropical regions. Accordingly, how the temporal and spatial variability of thermal tropopause behaves is of great concern in atmospheric research and, hence, investigated in this study by using radio occultation (RO) observations obtained from seven space missions during the period from May 2001 to April 2013 (with a total of 6,075,359 occultations). While RO observations have been demonstrated to provide precise measurements of temperature profiles of the atmosphere, their results are inter-compared before further use in our analysis, showing expected high-precision observations with mean differences < 0.06 K and standard deviations < 1.6 K in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. Given a rather large data set of multi- space-mission RO measurements taken globally, a very detailed description of spatial structure and variability of the tropopause is revealed, and monthly mean zonal mean tropopause parameters in each 2° latitude band from 90°S to 90°N can be obtained. Many interesting features of seasonal cycle, spatial distribution, interannual variation, and diurnal variation of the thermal tropopause are observed. For examples, except for the primary minimum in January, the equatorial tropopause temperature exhibits a secondary minimum in April, possibly caused by the strongly combined wave forcing from two hemispheres; During the boreal winter over the tropics, the distribution of tropopause temperature extrema do not totally coincide with the altitude extrema spatially, and the former has a better agreement with the locations of strong tropical convection systems; Notable zonal asymmetries in interannual characteristics are observed in both

  12. Item response theory-based measure of global disability in multiple sclerosis derived from the Performance Scales and related items.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamot, Eric; Kister, Ilya; Cutter, Gary R

    2014-10-03

    The eight Performance Scales and three assimilated scales (PS) used in North American Research Committee on Multiple Sclerosis (NARCOMS) registry surveys cover a broad range of neurologic domains commonly affected by multiple sclerosis (mobility, hand function, vision, fatigue, cognition, bladder/bowel, sensory, spasticity, pain, depression, and tremor/coordination). Each scale consists of a single 6-to-7-point Likert item with response categories ranging from "normal" to "total disability". Relatively little is known about the performances of the summary index of disability derived from these scales (the Performance Scales Sum or PSS). In this study, we demonstrate the value of a combination of classical and modern methods recently proposed by the Patient-Reported Outcome Measurement Information System (PROMIS) network to evaluate the psychometric properties of the PSS and derive an improved measure of global disability from the PS. The study sample included 7,851adults with MS who completed a NARCOMS intake questionnaire between 2003 and 2011. Factor analysis, bifactor modeling, and item response theory (IRT) analysis were used to evaluate the dimension(s) of disability underlying the PS; calibrate the 11 scales; and generate three alternative summary scores of global disability corresponding to different model assumptions and practical priorities. The construct validity of the three scores was compared by examining the magnitude of their associations with participant's background characteristics, including unemployment. We derived structurally valid measures of global disability from the PS through the proposed methodology that were superior to the PSS. The measure most applicable to clinical practice gives similar weight to physical and mental disability. Overall reliability of the new measure is acceptable for individual comparisons (0.87). Higher scores of global disability were significantly associated with older age at assessment, longer disease duration

  13. Derivation of confidence intervals of service measures in a base-stock inventory control system with low-frequent demand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Christian

    We explore a base-stock system with backlogging where the demand process is a compound renewal process and the compound element is a delayed geometric distribution. For this setting it is proven in [4] that the long-run average service measures order fill rate (OFR) and volume fill rate (VFR......) are equal in values. In [4] it is also demonstrated that although equal ex ante one will ex post observe differences as actual sample paths are different. By including a low-frequency assumption in the model, we are able to derive mathematical expressions of the confidence intervals one will get if OFR...... and VFR are estimated in a simulation using the regenerative method. Through numerical examples we show that of the two service measures it is OFR that can be estimated most accurately. However, simulation results show that the opposite conclusion holds if we instead consider finitehorizon service...

  14. Derivation of a new parametric impulse response matrix utilized for nodal wind load identification by response measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi Amiri, A; Bucher, C

    2015-05-26

    This paper provides new formulations to derive the impulse response matrix, which is then used in the problem of load identification with application to wind induced vibration. The applied loads are inversely identified based on the measured structural responses by solving the associated discrete ill-posed problem. To this end - based on an existing parametric structural model - the impulse response functions of acceleration, velocity and displacement have been computed. Time discretization of convolution integral has been implemented according to an existing and a newly proposed procedure, which differ in the numerical integration methods. The former was evaluated based on a constant rectangular approximation of the sampled data and impulse response function in a number of steps corresponding to the sampling rate, while the latter interpolates the sampled data in an arbitrary number of sub-steps and then integrates over the sub-steps and steps. The identification procedure was implemented for a simulation example as well as an experimental laboratory case. The ill-conditioning of the impulse response matrix made it necessary to use Tikhonov regularization to recover the applied force from noise polluted measured response. The optimal regularization parameter has been obtained by L-curve and GCV method. The results of simulation represent good agreement between identified and measured force. In the experiments the identification results based on the measured displacement as well as acceleration are provided. Further it is shown that the accuracy of experimentally identified load depends on the sensitivity of measurement instruments over the different frequency ranges.

  15. Peripheral nerve MRI: precision and reproducibility of T2*-derived measurements at 3.0-T. A feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tagliafico, Alberto [University of Genoa, Institute of Anatomy, Department of Experimental Medicine, Genoa (Italy); Bignotti, Bianca; Martinoli, Carlo [University of Genoa, Radiology Department, Genoa, Genova (Italy); Tagliafico, Giulio [CNR-IMATI, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto di Matematica Applicata e Tecnologie Informatiche, Genova (Italy)

    2015-05-01

    To prospectively evaluate the precision and reproducibility of T2*-derived measurements of the peripheral nerves. The study was approved by the local ethics committee and written informed consent was obtained. Bilateral upper and lower limb MRI examination was performed in 40 healthy subjects on a 3.0-T scanner. MRI protocol included T1-turbo spin-echo, T2-turbo spin-echo with fat suppression, and multiecho gradient recalled echo. Measurements of T2* times on T2* maps at different anatomical levels were performed. Three authors measured independently and in different sessions at baseline and after 4 weeks. Non-parametric tests and Bland-Altman statistics were used. Minimum and maximum percentage variability were 10 % and 19 % for T2* (84-91 % of reproducibility). Maximum values of minimum detectable differences between limbs was 16 % (with 95 % CI: 2-37). Intra- and inter-observer agreement of the three radiologists for T2* was considered good. Evaluating the combined influence of the observer and of the repeated measurements the reproducibility was 87-98 %. T2* measurement of the peripheral nerves is precise and reproducible. The healthy contralateral side can be used as an internal control. Variations in T2* values up to 16 % have to be considered. (orig.)

  16. The Role of T1-Weighted Derived Measures of Neurodegeneration for Assessing Disability Progression in Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocca, Maria A; Comi, Giancarlo; Filippi, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is characterised by the accumulation of permanent neurological disability secondary to irreversible tissue loss (neurodegeneration) in the brain and spinal cord. MRI measures derived from T1-weighted image analysis (i.e., black holes and atrophy) are correlated with pathological measures of irreversible tissue loss. Quantifying the degree of neurodegeneration in vivo using MRI may offer a surrogate marker with which to predict disability progression and the effect of treatment. This review evaluates the literature examining the association between MRI measures of neurodegeneration derived from T1-weighted images and disability in MS patients. A systematic PubMed search was conducted in January 2017 to identify MRI studies in MS patients investigating the relationship between "black holes" and/or atrophy in the brain and spinal cord, and disability. Results were limited to human studies published in English in the previous 10 years. A large number of studies have evaluated the association between the previous MRI measures and disability. These vary considerably in terms of study design, duration of follow-up, size, and phenotype of the patient population. Most, although not all, have shown that there is a significant correlation between disability and black holes in the brain, as well as atrophy of the whole brain and grey matter. The results for brain white matter atrophy are less consistently positive, whereas studies evaluating spinal cord atrophy consistently showed a significant correlation with disability. Newer ways of measuring atrophy, thanks to the development of segmentation and voxel-wise methods, have allowed us to assess the involvement of strategic regions of the CNS (e.g., thalamus) and to map the regional distribution of damage. This has resulted in better correlations between MRI measures and disability and in the identification of the critical role played by some CNS structures for MS clinical manifestations. The

  17. ESR dating of fault rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hee Kwon [Kangwon National Univ., Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-03-15

    Past movement on faults can be dated by measurement of the intensity of ESR signals in quartz. These signals are reset by local lattice deformation and local frictional heating on grain contacts at the time of fault movement. The ESR signals then trow back as a result of bombardment by ionizing radiation from surrounding rocks. The age is obtained from the ratio of the equivalent dose, needed to produce the observed signal, to the dose rate. Fine grains are more completely reset during faulting, and a plot of age vs grain size shows a plateau for grains below critical size : these grains are presumed to have been completely zeroed by the last fault activity. We carried out ESR dating of fault rocks collected from the Yangsan fault system. ESR dates from the this fault system range from 870 to 240 ka. Results of this research suggest that long-term cyclic fault activity continued into the pleistocene.

  18. Charge carrier effective mass and concentration derived from combination of Seebeck coefficient and 125Te NMR measurements in complex tellurides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, E. M.

    2016-06-01

    Thermoelectric materials utilize the Seebeck effect to convert heat to electrical energy. The Seebeck coefficient (thermopower), S , depends on the free (mobile) carrier concentration, n , and effective mass, m*, as S ˜m*/n2 /3 . The carrier concentration in tellurides can be derived from 125Te nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin-lattice relaxation measurements. The NMR spin-lattice relaxation rate, 1 /T1 , depends on both n and m* as 1 /T1˜(m*)3/2n (within classical Maxwell-Boltzmann statistics) or as 1 /T1˜(m*)2n2 /3 (within quantum Fermi-Dirac statistics), which challenges the correct determination of the carrier concentration in some materials by NMR. Here it is shown that the combination of the Seebeck coefficient and 125Te NMR spin-lattice relaxation measurements in complex tellurides provides a unique opportunity to derive the carrier effective mass and then to calculate the carrier concentration. This approach was used to study A gxS bxG e50-2xT e50 , well-known GeTe-based high-efficiency tellurium-antimony-germanium-silver thermoelectric materials, where the replacement of Ge by [Ag+Sb] results in significant enhancement of the Seebeck coefficient. Values of both m* and n derived using this combination show that the enhancement of thermopower can be attributed primarily to an increase of the carrier effective mass and partially to a decrease of the carrier concentration when the [Ag+Sb] content increases.

  19. Validation of MODIS-derived bidirectional reflectivity retrieval algorithm in mid-infrared channel with field measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Bo-Hui