WorldWideScience

Sample records for meant involving patients

  1. Organizing Patient Involvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brehm Johansen, Mette

    hospitals. During the last 25 years, patient involvement and quality improvement have become connected in Danish healthcare policy. However, the ideal of involving patients in quality improvement is described in very general terms and with only few specific expectations of how it is to be carried out...... in practice, as I show in the thesis. In the patient involvement literature, the difficulties of getting patient involvement in quality improvement to have in an impact on the planning and development of healthcare services is, for example, ascribed to conceptual vagueness of patient involvement, differences...... in perspectives, values and understandings between patients and healthcare professionals, or the lack of managerial attention and prioritization....

  2. User interface and patient involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreassen, Hege Kristin; Lundvoll Nilsen, Line

    2013-01-01

    Increased patient involvement is a goal in contemporary health care, and of importance to the development of patient oriented ICT. In this paper we discuss how the design of patient-user interfaces can affect patient involvement. Our discussion is based on 12 semi-structured interviews with patient users of a web-based solution for patient--doctor communication piloted in Norway. We argue ICT solutions offering a choice of user interfaces on the patient side are preferable to ensure individual accommodation and a high degree of patient involvement. When introducing web-based tools for patient--health professional communication a free-text option should be provided to the patient users.

  3. Patient involvement in hospital architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herriott, Richard

    2017-01-01

    the structure of the design process, identification and ranking of stakeholders, the methods of user-involvement and approaches to accessibility. The paper makes recommendations for a change of approach to user-participation in large-scale, long-duration projects. The paper adds new insight on an under...

  4. Osseous involvement in AIDS patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchiori, Edson; Pereira, Abercio Arantes

    1995-01-01

    The radiological findings of eight patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) who developed bone lesions were analyzed in conjunction with twelve similar published cases. Our series included three patients with lymphoma, two with bacillary angiomatosis, two with tuberculosis and one with staphylococcal osteomyelitis. All the lesions were lithic regardless of the etiology. Both in our cases and in those previously published bone repair was only seen in cases of bacillary angiomatosis treated with erythromycin. No pathognomonic findings were observed. However, the association of skin and bone lesions in immuno deficient patients should always bring the consideration of bacillary angiomatosis in the differential diagnosis. This is particularly relevant since this a condition amenable to treatment once correctly identified. The radiological findings in the lymphoma and tuberculosis patients have not been described previously. (author). 9 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs

  5. Patient involvement in Danish health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vrangbaek, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this paper is to investigate different types of patient involvement in Denmark, and to discuss the potential implications of pursuing several strategies for patient involvement simultaneously. DESIGN/METHODOLOGY/APPROACH: The paper presents a preliminary framework for anal......PURPOSE: The purpose of this paper is to investigate different types of patient involvement in Denmark, and to discuss the potential implications of pursuing several strategies for patient involvement simultaneously. DESIGN/METHODOLOGY/APPROACH: The paper presents a preliminary framework...... for analysis of patient involvement in health care. This framework is used to analyze key governance features of patient involvement in Denmark based on previous research papers and reports describing patient involvement in Danish health care. FINDINGS: Patient involvement is important in Denmark...... be identified when pursuing the strategies at the same time. RESEARCH LIMITATIONS/IMPLICATIONS: Because of the chosen research approach, the research results may lack generalizability. Therefore, researchers are encouraged to test the proposed framework further. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: The paper includes...

  6. Patient empowerment and involvement in telemedicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konge Nielsen, Marie; Johannessen, Helle

    2018-01-01

    Basic ideas of empowerment and user involvement in relation to telemedicine are presented, as is a case implying user resistance to telemedicine. Four logics of empowerment are employed to identify the underlying rationale of specific cases of telemedicine. The article concludes, that although...... telemedicine is acknowledged as relevant, the approach to it is often too mechanical to imply empowerment of the patient. Some patient groups may not feel safe by using telemedicine, and user involvement and empowerment will not be possible....

  7. Involving patients with E-health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Karen Dam

    2015-01-01

    With e-health technologies, patients are invited as co-producers of data and information. The invitation sparks new expectations, yet often results in disappointments. With persistent ambitions to involve patients by means of e-health, it seems crucial to gain a better understanding of the nature......, sources and workings of the expectations that come with being invited. I analyse the use of an e-health system for ICD-patients, focusing on how patients sought to serve as information providers. Continuing STS-research on invisible work in technology use, I show how using the system involved complex work...... that understanding the dialogic dynamics and ‘overflows’ of information filtration work can help unpack the challenges of facilitating (patient) participation with e-health and other filtration devices....

  8. Patient involvement in research priorities (PIRE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piil, Karin; Jarden, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Patient involvement in healthcare has expanded from the clinical practice setting to include collaboration during the research process. There has been a growing international interest in patient and public involvement in setting research priorities to reduce the risk of discrepancy...... between what patients with cancer and their relatives experience as important unanswered questions and those which are actually researched. This study aims to challenge the conventional research process by inviting patients with life-threatening cancer (primary malignant brain tumours or acute leukaemia......), relatives and patient organisations to join forces with clinical specialists and researchers to identify, discuss and prioritise supportive care and rehabilitation issues in future research. Methods and analysis: This is an exploratory qualitative study comprising two sets of three focus group interviews...

  9. Emerging versions of patient involvement with Patient Reported Outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langstrup, Henriette

    It is a central argument in the growing Danish PRO-arena, that a large-scale collection of PRO from patients in the Danish Healthcare system will pave the way for more genuine patient involvement in clinical decision-making, quality management and governance of the health services. In this paper I...... discuss how patient involvement is being (re)configured when increasingly connected to national visions of participatory healthcare. A central discussion centers on ‘meaningful use’ of patient-generated data promoting patients’ expectations and experiences as a criterion for how to proceed...... with the national use of PRO. But how do assumptions of what constitutes meaning for patients interact with the kinds of roles that patients are expected to take on with PROtools? What forms of participation are assumed to be meaningful and thus good and which are not? In sketching emerging versions of patient...

  10. Involving South Asian patients in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain-Gambles, M; Leese, B; Atkin, K; Brown, J; Mason, S; Tovey, P

    2004-10-01

    To investigate how South Asian patients conceptualise the notion of clinical trials and to identify key processes that impact on trial participation and the extent to which communication difficulties, perceptions of risk and attitudes to authority influence these decisions. Also to identify whether 'South Asian' patients are homogeneous in these issues, and which factors differ between different South Asian subgroups and finally how professionals regard the involvement of South Asian patients and their views on strategies to increase participation. A review of the literature on minority ethnic participation in clinical trials was followed by three qualitative interview studies. Interviews were taped and transcribed (and translated if required) and subjected to framework analysis. Face-to-face interviews were conducted with 25 health professionals; 60 South Asian lay people who had not taken part in a trial and 15 South Asian trial participants. Motivations for trial participation were identified as follows: to help society, to improve own health or that of family and friends, out of obligation to the doctor and to increase scientific knowledge. Deterrents were concerns about drug side-effects, busy lifestyles, language, previous bad experiences, mistrust and feelings of not belonging to British society. There was no evidence of antipathy amongst South Asians to the concept of clinical trials and, overall, the younger respondents were more knowledgeable than the older ones. Problems are more likely to be associated with service delivery. Lack of being approached was a common response. Lay-reported factors that might affect South Asian participation in clinical trials include age, language, social class, feeling of not belonging/mistrust, culture and religion. Awareness of clinical trials varied between each group. There are more similarities than differences in attitudes towards clinical trial participation between the South Asian and the general population

  11. Did You Hear What I Meant to Say?

    OpenAIRE

    Dennis J. Baumgardner

    2017-01-01

    The author introduces Volume 4, Issue 1 of Journal of Patient-Centered Research and Reviews by acknowledging the importance of communication between patient and caregiver in the clinical setting. Failure to communicate effectively can have a negative impact on a patient's well-being, therefore efforts to improve communication skills among clinicians, researchers and health practice administrators should be undertaken with regularity.

  12. Patient involvement in mental health care: culture, communication and caution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Samson; Tang, Jessica; Kan, Alice

    2015-02-01

    Patient or service user involvement in mental health services (MHS) is a hallmark of the recovery approach. In this viewpoint article, we review Tambuyzer et al. paper 'Patient involvement in mental health care: One size does not fit all' in order to express our opinion of their work. We also suggest specific actions that may enhance the implementation of patient involvement in MHS. We make three main points about Tambuyzer et al. model. First, the cultural dimension of patient involvement seems underemphasized in the model. Second, the model might be improved if the increasing role of communications technology in patient involvement is taken into consideration. Third, it is important to acknowledge that the process of patient involvement is not linear, and participation is not a homogeneous experience. We suggest that the model be expanded and that further work be carried out on the implementation of patient involvement in MHS. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Did You Hear What I Meant to Say?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis J. Baumgardner

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The author introduces Volume 4, Issue 1 of Journal of Patient-Centered Research and Reviews by acknowledging the importance of communication between patient and caregiver in the clinical setting. Failure to communicate effectively can have a negative impact on a patient's well-being, therefore efforts to improve communication skills among clinicians, researchers and health practice administrators should be undertaken with regularity.

  14. What is meant by control of childhood asthma?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    attempt should be made to test the validity of these claims. The latest ... Many reasons for this phenomenon have been defined in research settings and include poor patient knowledge of .... The reliability coefficient for comparison of the larger ...

  15. Patient Involvement in Patient Safety: A Qualitative Study of Nursing Staff and Patient Perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Andrea C; Macdonald, Marilyn

    2017-06-01

    The risk associated with receiving health care has called for an increased focus on the role of patients in helping to improve safety. Recent research has highlighted that patient involvement in patient safety practices may be influenced by patient perceptions of patient safety practices and the perceptions of their health care providers. The objective of this research was to describe patient involvement in patient safety practices by exploring patient and nursing staff perceptions of safety. Qualitative focus groups were conducted with a convenience sample of nursing staff and patients who had previously completed a patient safety survey in 2 tertiary hospital sites in Eastern Canada. Six focus groups (June 2011 to January 2012) were conducted and analyzed using inductive thematic analysis. Four themes were identified: (1) wanting control, (2) feeling connected, (3) encountering roadblocks, and (4) sharing responsibility for safety. Both patient and nursing staff participants highlighted the importance of building a personal connection as a precursor to ensuring that patients are involved in their care and safety. However, perceptions of provider stress and nursing staff workload often reduced the ability of the nursing staff and patient participants to connect with one another and promote involvement. Current strategies aimed at increasing patient awareness of patient safety may not be enough. The findings suggest that providing the context for interaction to occur between nursing staff and patients as well as targeted interventions aimed at increasing patient control may be needed to ensure patient involvement in patient safety.

  16. Patient and family involvement in contemporary health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angood, Peter; Dingman, Jennifer; Foley, Mary E; Ford, Dan; Martins, Becky; O'Regan, Patti; Salamendra, Arlene; Sheridan, Sue; Denham, Charles R

    2010-03-01

    The objective of this article was to provide a guide to health care providers on patient and family involvement in health care. This article evaluated the latest published studies for patient and family involvement and reexamined the objectives, the requirements for achieving these objectives, and the evidence of how to involve patients and families. Critical components for patient safety include changing the organizational culture; including patients and families on teams; listening to patients and families; incorporating their input into leadership structures and systems; providing full detail about treatment, procedures, and medication adverse effects; involving them on patient safety and performance improvement committees; and disclosing medical errors. The conclusion of this article is that, for the future, patient and family involvement starts with educating patients and families and ends with listening to them and taking them seriously. If patient and family input is emphatically built into systems of performance improvement, and if patients and families are taken seriously and are respected for their valuable perspectives about how care can be improved, then organizations can improve at improving. Resources in health care are in short supply, yet the resources of patient and family help and time are almost limitless, are ready to be tapped, and can have a huge impact on improving the reliability and overall success for any health care organization.

  17. Patient involvement in health care decision making: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahdat, Shaghayegh; Hamzehgardeshi, Leila; Hessam, Somayeh; Hamzehgardeshi, Zeinab

    2014-01-01

    Patient participation means involvement of the patient in decision making or expressing opinions about different treatment methods, which includes sharing information, feelings and signs and accepting health team instructions. Given the importance of patient participation in healthcare decision making which empowers patients and improves services and health outcomes, this study was performed to review previous studies on patient participation in healthcare decision making. To prepare this narrative review article, researchers used general and specific search engines, as well as textbooks addressing this subject for an in-depth study of patient involvement in healthcare decision-making. As a result, 35 (out of 100 relevant) articles and also two books were selected for writing this review article. BASED ON THE REVIEW OF ARTICLES AND BOOKS, TOPICS WERE DIVIDED INTO SIX GENERAL CATEGORIES: definition of participation, importance of patient participation, factors influencing participation of patients in healthcare decisions, method of patient participation, tools for evaluating participation, and benefits and consequences of patient participation in health care decision-making. IN MOST STUDIES, FACTORS INFLUENCING PATIENT PARTICIPATION CONSISTED OF: factors associated with health care professionals such as doctor-patient relationship, recognition of patient's knowledge, allocation of sufficient time for participation, and also factors related to patients such as having knowledge, physical and cognitive ability, and emotional connections, beliefs, values and their experiences in relation to health services.

  18. Interventions for improving older patients' involvement in primary care episodes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wetzels, R.V.; Harmsen, M.; Weel, C. van; Grol, R.P.T.M.; Wensing, M.J.P.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is a growing expectation among patients that they should be involved in the delivery of medical care. Accumulating evidence from empirical studies shows that patients of average age who are encouraged to participate more actively in treatment decisions have more favourable health

  19. Patient involvement in own rehabilitation after early discharge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hørdam, Britta; Boolsen, Merete Watt

    2017-01-01

    _en.pdf). Recent research suggests that patient involvement after hip replacement is a very effective strategy in older adults with regard to improving walking ability and reducing pain and thereby lessening loss of physical, mental and social aspects of the quality of life. The growing number of older adults all...... hospital and home. Population: Empirical data were collected by carrying out three randomised clinical trials (RCT) focusing on self-rated health and involvement of patients undergoing total hip replacement in three Danish orthopaedic clinics. Based on power calculation, 260 patients (mean age 67.5 years...

  20. Cardiovascular involvement by osteosarcoma: an analysis of 20 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yedururi, Sireesha; Morani, Ajaykumar C.; Gladish, Gregory W. [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Houston, TX (United States); Vallabhaneni, Srilakshmi [Medstar Harbor Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Anderson, Peter M. [Levine Children' s Hospital/Levine Cancer Institute, Department of Pediatrics Hematology/Oncology/BMT, Carolinas Healthcare System, Charlotte, NC (United States); Hughes, Dennis; Daw, Najat C. [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Division of Pediatrics, Houston, TX (United States); Wang, Wei-Lien [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Pathology, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Although hematogenous spread of osteosarcoma is well known, the imaging findings of cardiovascular involvement by osteosarcoma are seldom reported and can be difficult to recognize. The enhanced resolution of modern CT and MRI scanners may lead to better detection of cardiovascular involvement. To describe the key imaging findings and clinical behavior of cardiovascular involvement by osteosarcoma. We retrospectively reviewed the imaging findings and clinical characteristics of 20 patients with cardiovascular involvement by osteosarcoma identified by two pediatric radiologists from a review of imaging studies at our institution from 2007 to 2013. At initial diagnosis, the median age of the patients was 15.1 years (range 4.8-24.6 years), and 7 (35%) patients had detectable metastases. Median time to detection of cardiovascular metastases was 1.8 years (range 0-7.3 years). Sixteen patients died of disease; 4 have survived a median of 7.4 years since initial diagnosis. The sites of cardiovascular involvement were the systemic veins draining the primary and metastatic osteosarcoma, pulmonary arteries, pulmonary veins draining the pulmonary metastases, and heart. A dilated and mineralized terminal pulmonary arteriole is an early sign of metastatic osteosarcoma in the lung. Unfamiliarity with the imaging features resulted in under-recognition and misinterpretation of intravascular tumor thrombus as bland thrombus. Knowledge of imaging findings in the era of modern imaging modalities has enhanced our ability to detect cardiovascular involvement and lung metastases early and avoid misinterpreting tumor thrombus in draining systemic veins or pulmonary arteries as bland thrombus. (orig.)

  1. Cardiovascular involvement by osteosarcoma: an analysis of 20 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yedururi, Sireesha; Morani, Ajaykumar C.; Gladish, Gregory W.; Vallabhaneni, Srilakshmi; Anderson, Peter M.; Hughes, Dennis; Daw, Najat C.; Wang, Wei-Lien

    2016-01-01

    Although hematogenous spread of osteosarcoma is well known, the imaging findings of cardiovascular involvement by osteosarcoma are seldom reported and can be difficult to recognize. The enhanced resolution of modern CT and MRI scanners may lead to better detection of cardiovascular involvement. To describe the key imaging findings and clinical behavior of cardiovascular involvement by osteosarcoma. We retrospectively reviewed the imaging findings and clinical characteristics of 20 patients with cardiovascular involvement by osteosarcoma identified by two pediatric radiologists from a review of imaging studies at our institution from 2007 to 2013. At initial diagnosis, the median age of the patients was 15.1 years (range 4.8-24.6 years), and 7 (35%) patients had detectable metastases. Median time to detection of cardiovascular metastases was 1.8 years (range 0-7.3 years). Sixteen patients died of disease; 4 have survived a median of 7.4 years since initial diagnosis. The sites of cardiovascular involvement were the systemic veins draining the primary and metastatic osteosarcoma, pulmonary arteries, pulmonary veins draining the pulmonary metastases, and heart. A dilated and mineralized terminal pulmonary arteriole is an early sign of metastatic osteosarcoma in the lung. Unfamiliarity with the imaging features resulted in under-recognition and misinterpretation of intravascular tumor thrombus as bland thrombus. Knowledge of imaging findings in the era of modern imaging modalities has enhanced our ability to detect cardiovascular involvement and lung metastases early and avoid misinterpreting tumor thrombus in draining systemic veins or pulmonary arteries as bland thrombus. (orig.)

  2. Characteristics of Patients Involved in Psychotherapy in Bosnia and Herzegovina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Alispahić

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to determine the demographic and clinical characteristics of Bosnian and Herzegovinian patients involved in psychotherapeutic treatments in order to explore the current situation of psychotherapy in Bosnia and Herzegovina.Methods: The study included 213 patients (154 women and 47 men undergoing diverse psychotherapeutic treatments. Data about demographic and clinical characteristics were collected by questionnaire. Following characteristics were documented: age, sex, education, employment status, marital status, specific problem that got the client involved in psychotherapy, type of psychotherapy, and use of psychopharmacology.Results: Majority of the patients undergoing psychotherapy are age up to 40 and female. They are by vast majority holding a university degree and are employed. Nearly equal number of patients is living in partnership or marriage compared to single or never been married. Most frequent reasons for getting involved in the psychotherapy treatment are of the intrapersonal nature (depression, anxiety and panic attacks. Majority of the patients were involved in gestalt and cognitive behavioral psychotherapy, and at the same time majority of those were not prescribed medicaments.Conclusions: We point out and overview some of the most prominent socio-demographic traits of patients undergoing psychotherapy, the ones that could be important in the future research with the higher degree of control. In the terms of personal initiative, psychotherapy stops being a taboo in Bosnia and Herzegovina. However, there is still a long path until it reaches integration in daily life of the people.

  3. Colorectal cancer patients' attitudes towards involvement in decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaver, Kinta; Campbell, Malcolm; Craven, Olive; Jones, David; Luker, Karen A; Susnerwala, Shabbir S

    2009-03-01

    To design and administer an attitude rating scale, exploring colorectal cancer patients' views of involvement in decision making. To examine the impact of socio-demographic and/or treatment-related factors on decision making. To conduct principal components analysis to determine if the scale could be simplified into a number of factors for future clinical utility. An attitude rating scale was constructed based on previous qualitative work and administered to colorectal cancer patients using a cross-sectional survey approach. 375 questionnaires were returned (81.7% response). For patients it was important to be informed and involved in the decision-making process. Information was not always used to make decisions as patients placed their trust in medical expertise. Women had more positive opinions on decision making and were more likely to want to make decisions. Written information was understood to a greater degree than verbal information. The scale could be simplified to a number of factors, indicating clinical utility. Few studies have explored the attitudes of colorectal cancer patients towards involvement in decision making. This study presents new insights into how patients view the concept of participation; important when considering current policy imperatives in the UK of involving service users in all aspects of care and treatment.

  4. Active patient involvement in the education of health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towle, Angela; Bainbridge, Lesley; Godolphin, William; Katz, Arlene; Kline, Cathy; Lown, Beth; Madularu, Ioana; Solomon, Patricia; Thistlethwaite, Jill

    2010-01-01

    Patients as educators (teaching intimate physical examination) first appeared in the 1960s. Since then, rationales for the active involvement of patients as educators have been well articulated. There is great potential to promote the learning of patient-centred practice, interprofessional collaboration, community involvement, shared decision making and how to support self-care. We reviewed and summarised the literature on active patient involvement in health professional education. A synthesis of the literature reveals increasing diversity in the ways in which patients are involved in education, but also the movement's weaknesses. Most initiatives are 'one-off' events and are reported as basic descriptions. There is little rigorous research or theory of practice or investigation of behavioural outcomes. The literature is scattered and uses terms (such as 'patient'!) that are contentious and confusing. We propose future directions for research and development, including a taxonomy to facilitate dialogue, an outline of a research strategy and reference to a comprehensive bibliography covering all health and human services.

  5. Alzheimer Europe's position on involving people with dementia in research through PPI (patient and public involvement)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gove, Dianne; Diaz-Ponce, Ana; Georges, Jean

    2018-01-01

    This paper reflects Alzheimer Europe's position on PPI (patient and public involvement) in the context of dementia research and highlights some of the challenges and potential risks and benefits associated with such meaningful involvement. The paper was drafted by Alzheimer Europe in collaboration...... with members of INTERDEM and the European Working Group of People with Dementia. It has been formally adopted by the Board of Alzheimer Europe and endorsed by the Board of INTERDEM and by the JPND working group 'Dementia Outcome Measures - Charting New Territory'. Alzheimer Europe is keen to promote...

  6. Decisions and involvement of cancer patient survivors: a moral imperative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pravettoni G

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Gabriella Pravettoni,1,2 Ilaria Cutica,1,2 Simona Righetti,1 Ketti Mazzocco1,2 1Department of Oncology and Hematology, University of Milan, 2Applied Research Division for Cognitive and Psychological Science, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy Purpose: The aim of this study was to review the experiences of direct involvement in patient survivorship for treatment and research. Methods: This is a narrative-focused review of the following two recent experiences of patient involvement: the Chordoma Foundation and the Triple Negative Breast Cancer Foundation. Results: These two examples represent concrete experiences that patients have built to favor a real involvement in the care and treatment of tumors. These experiences are profoundly modifying how cancer research is conducted and draw attention to the psychosocial dimensions of health care. Conclusion: These examples represent the new scenario in which modern medicine faces completely new challenges, copes with new needs, and cooperates with new health care professionals. Implications: Involving patients in a new perspective raises practical and ethical challenges for organizations to work together, for health providers to be professionally skilled and for the government to promote safeguarding policies. Keywords: patient empowerment, patients’ association, empowerment, skills, codesign ­techniques, cancer

  7. Patient Involvement in Safe Delivery: A Qualitative Study

    OpenAIRE

    Olfati, Forozun; Asefzadeh, Saeid; Changizi, Nasrin; Keramat, Afsaneh; Yunesian, Masud

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Patient involvement in safe delivery planning is considered important yet not widely practiced. The present study aimed at identifythe factors that affect patient involvementin safe delivery, as recommended by parturient women. Methods: This study was part of a qualitative research conducted by content analysis method and purposive sampling in 2013. The data were collected through 63 semi-structured interviews in4 hospitalsand analyzed using thematic content analysis. The partic...

  8. The benefits of patient involvement for translational research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Scheer, Lieke; Garcia, Elisa; van der Laan, A.L.; van der Burg, Simone; Boenink, Marianne

    The question we raise in this paper is, whether patient involvement might be a beneficial way to help determine and achieve the aims of translational (TR) research and, if so, how to proceed. TR is said to ensure a more effective movement (‘translation’) of basic scientific findings to relevant and

  9. The Benefits of Patient Involvement for Translational Research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheer, L. van der; Garcia, E.; Laan, A.L. van der; Burg, S. van der; Boenink, M.

    2017-01-01

    The question we raise in this paper is, whether patient involvement might be a beneficial way to help determine and achieve the aims of translational (TR) research and, if so, how to proceed. TR is said to ensure a more effective movement ('translation') of basic scientific findings to relevant and

  10. Renal involvement in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis: Ultrasound findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasiwimonphan, Kewalee; Gorman, Brian; Kawashima, Akira; Chari, Suresh T.; Takahashi, Naoki

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of our study was to retrospectively evaluate the ultrasound findings of renal involvement in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis. Methods: 15 patients with autoimmune pancreatitis (15 male, 0 female, mean age 66 years old, range 44–85) who had renal involvement documented on CT or MR and had abdominal ultrasound within 1 month were included. Ultrasound images were retrospectively reviewed for presence or absence of renal involvement. Shape and echogenicity of the renal lesions were recorded. Results: In 8 out of 15 patients, at least one renal lesion was identified on ultrasound with a total of 9 kidneys. In 7 kidneys, lesions appeared as ill-defined, non-mass like areas of decreased echogenicity. Three lesions showed associated irregular lobular thickening of the renal parenchyma with bulging contour and 1 showed focal area of parenchymal loss. In 2 kidneys, the lesions were seen as solitary or multiple hypoechoic mass-like areas. Ill-defined, non-mass like lesions on ultrasound corresponded to well-circumscribed wedge-shaped lesions in all but one case on CT or MR. Mass-like lesions on ultrasound corresponded to well-circumscribed round lesions on CT or MR. Conclusion: Most common ultrasound findings of renal involvement in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis were ill-defined area of decreased echogenicity.

  11. MR imaging features of foot involvement in patients with psoriasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdem, C. Zuhal [Department of Radiology, Zonguldak Karaelmas University, School of Medicine, Zonguldak (Turkey)], E-mail: sunarerdem@yahoo.com; Tekin, Nilgun Solak [Department of Dermatology, Zonguldak Karaelmas University, School of Medicine, Zonguldak (Turkey); Sarikaya, Selda [Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation, Zonguldak Karaelmas University, School of Medicine, Zonguldak (Turkey); Erdem, L. Oktay; Gulec, Sezen [Department of Radiology, Zonguldak Karaelmas University, School of Medicine, Zonguldak (Turkey)

    2008-09-15

    Objective: To determine alterations of the soft tissues, tendons, cartilage, joint spaces, and bones of the foot using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in patients with psoriasis. Materials and methods: Clinical and MR examination of the foot was performed in 26 consecutive patients (52 ft) with psoriasis. As a control group, 10 healthy volunteers (20 ft) were also studied. Joint effusion/synovitis, retrocalcaneal bursitis, retroachilles bursitis, Achilles tendonitis, soft-tissue edema, para-articular enthesophytes, bone marrow edema, sinus tarsi syndrome, enthesopathy at the Achilles attachment and at the plantar fascia attachment, plantar fasciitis, tenosynovitis, subchondral cysts, and bone erosions, joint space narrowing, subchondral signal changes, osteolysis, luxation, and sub-luxation were examined. Results: Clinical signs and symptoms (pain and swelling) due to foot involvement were present in none of the patients while frequency of involvement was 92% (24/26) by MR imaging. The most common MR imaging findings were Achilles tendonitis (acute and peritendinitis) (57%), retrocalcaneal bursitis (50%), joint effusion/synovitis (46%), soft-tissue edema (46%), and para-articular enthesophytes (38%). The most commonly involved anatomical region was the hindfoot (73%). Conclusion: Our data showed that the incidence of foot involvement was very high in asymptomatic patients with psoriasis on MR imaging. Further MR studies are needed to confirm these data. We conclude that MR imaging may be of importance especially in early diagnosis and treatment of inflammatory changes in the foot.

  12. MR imaging features of foot involvement in patients with psoriasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erdem, C. Zuhal; Tekin, Nilgun Solak; Sarikaya, Selda; Erdem, L. Oktay; Gulec, Sezen

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To determine alterations of the soft tissues, tendons, cartilage, joint spaces, and bones of the foot using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in patients with psoriasis. Materials and methods: Clinical and MR examination of the foot was performed in 26 consecutive patients (52 ft) with psoriasis. As a control group, 10 healthy volunteers (20 ft) were also studied. Joint effusion/synovitis, retrocalcaneal bursitis, retroachilles bursitis, Achilles tendonitis, soft-tissue edema, para-articular enthesophytes, bone marrow edema, sinus tarsi syndrome, enthesopathy at the Achilles attachment and at the plantar fascia attachment, plantar fasciitis, tenosynovitis, subchondral cysts, and bone erosions, joint space narrowing, subchondral signal changes, osteolysis, luxation, and sub-luxation were examined. Results: Clinical signs and symptoms (pain and swelling) due to foot involvement were present in none of the patients while frequency of involvement was 92% (24/26) by MR imaging. The most common MR imaging findings were Achilles tendonitis (acute and peritendinitis) (57%), retrocalcaneal bursitis (50%), joint effusion/synovitis (46%), soft-tissue edema (46%), and para-articular enthesophytes (38%). The most commonly involved anatomical region was the hindfoot (73%). Conclusion: Our data showed that the incidence of foot involvement was very high in asymptomatic patients with psoriasis on MR imaging. Further MR studies are needed to confirm these data. We conclude that MR imaging may be of importance especially in early diagnosis and treatment of inflammatory changes in the foot

  13. Primary extradural leiomyosarcoma involving cavernous sinus in an immunocompetent patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanni V Gulwani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial leiomyosarcoma (LMS are uncommon malignancies and usually encountered after systemic metastases. Limited cases of primary intracranial LMSs have been reported in the literature. It mostly affects immunocompromised individuals in association with Epstein-Barr virus infection. This is the unusual first case being reported of primary LMS in immunocompetent patient with involvement of cavernous sinus.

  14. Patient Involvement in Safe Delivery: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olfati, Forozun; Asefzadeh, Saeid; Changizi, Nasrin; Keramat, Afsaneh; Yunesian, Masud

    2015-09-28

    Patient involvement in safe delivery planning is considered important yet not widely practiced. The present study aimed at identifythe factors that affect patient involvementin safe delivery, as recommended by parturient women. This study was part of a qualitative research conducted by content analysis method and purposive sampling in 2013.The data were collected through 63 semi-structured interviews in4 hospitalsand analyzed using thematic content analysis. The participants in this research were women before discharge and after delivery. Findings were analyzed using Colaizzi's method. Four categories of factors that could affect patient involvement in safe delivery emerged from our analysis: patient-related (true and false beliefs, literacy, privacy, respect for patient), illness-related (pain, type of delivery, patient safety incidents), health care professional-relatedand task-related factors (behavior, monitoring &training), health care setting-related (financial aspects, facilities). More research is needed to explore the factors affecting the participation of mothers. It is therefore, recommended to: 1) take notice of mother education, their husbands, midwives and specialists; 2) provide pregnant women with insurance coverage from the outset of pregnancy, especially during prenatal period; 3) form a labor pain committee consisting of midwives, obstetricians, and anesthesiologists in order to identify the preferred painless labor methods based on the existing facilities and conditions, 4) carry out research on observing patients' privacy and dignity; 5) pay more attention on the factors affecting cesarean.

  15. Patients' involvement in improvement initiatives: a qualitative systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van, Claire; McInerney, Patricia; Cooke, Richard

    2015-10-01

    Over the last 20 years, quality improvement in health has become an important strategy in health services in many countries. With the emphasis on quality health care, there has been a shift in social paradigms towards including service users in their own health on different levels. There is growing evidence in literature on the positive impact on health outcomes where patients are active participants in their personal care. There is however less information available on the broader influence of users on improvement in systems. The objective of this review was to identify the barriers and enablers to patients being involved in quality improvement efforts directed towards their own health care. This review considered studies that included adults and children of any age experiencing any health problem.The review considered studies that explored patient or user participation in quality improvement and the factors enabling and hindering this processThe qualitative component of this review considered studies that focused on qualitative data, including, but not limited to, designs such as phenomenology, grounded theory, ethnography, action research and feminist research. Other texts such as opinion papers and reports were also considered. The search strategy aimed to find both published and unpublished studies. A three-step search strategy was utilized in this review. The searches using all identified keywords and index terms included the databases PubMed, PsycINFO, Medline, Scopus, EBSCOhost and CINAHL.Qualitative, text and opinion papers were considered for inclusion in this review.Closely related concepts like community involvement, family involvement, patients' involvement in their own care (for example, in the case of shared decision making), and patient centeredness in the context of a consultation were excluded. Qualitative and textual papers selected for retrieval were assessed by two independent reviewers for authenticity prior to inclusion in the review using

  16. Computer-supported patient involvement in heart rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kensing, Finn

    2017-01-01

    are being collected through artifact and document analysis, and by interviews and observations in patients’ homes and in nurses’ offices over so far 6 months. The analysis is informed by medical phenomenology and by conceptual frameworks developed in earlier projects conducted by the author’s research group......Two of the five Danish regions, covering close to half of the population, are in the process of implementing a new EHR system. One of its sub-systems is a patient portal. The work-in-progress reported here is an exploratory study and a first level of analysis concerned with why, how and with which...... effects patients start to orient themselves towards this subsystem, and the degree to which this has an effect on the clinicians’ work. The overall approach is a multi-site ethnographic study involving 5 patients and 3 nurses responsible for a rehabilitation program for ischemic heart patients. Data...

  17. Ischemic Stroke Due to Cardiac Involvement: Emery Dreifuss Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ersin Kasım Ulusoy

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD is a hereditary disease. It is characterized by early-onset contractures, slowly progressive weakness, fatigue related to skapulo-humero-peroneal muscle weakness, cardiomyopathy which develops in adulthood and cardiac conduction system block. Cardiac involvement has a prognostic significance in patients with EDMD and even sudden cardiac death may be the first clinical presentation. In this article, an EDMD patient with ischemic stroke clinic who didn’t have regular cardiac follow-up was reported and the importance of the treatment of cardiac diseases which could play a role in ischemic stroke etiology and the implantation of pace-maker was mentioned.

  18. The Importance of Patient Involvement in Stroke Rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Hanne Kaae; Tistad, Malin; Koch, Lena von

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the perceived needs for health services by persons with stroke within the first year after rehabilitation, and associations between perceived impact of stroke, involvement in decisions regarding care/treatment, and having health services needs met. METHOD: Data...... was collected, through a mail survey, from patients with stroke who were admitted to a university hospital in 2012 and had received rehabilitation after discharge from the stroke unit. The rehabilitation lasted an average of 2 to 4.6 months. The Stroke Survivor Needs Survey Questionnaire was used to assess....... CONCLUSIONS: The results highlight the importance of involving patients in making decisions on stroke rehabilitation, as it appears to be associated with meeting their health services needs....

  19. CNS Involvement in AML Patient Treated with 5-Azacytidine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diamantina Vasilatou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Central nervous system (CNS involvement in acute myeloid leukemia (AML is a rare complication of the disease and is associated with poor prognosis. Sometimes the clinical presentation can be unspecific and the diagnosis can be very challenging. Here we report a case of CNS infiltration in a patient suffering from AML who presented with normal complete blood count and altered mental status.

  20. Cardiovascular involvement in patients with different causes of hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biondi, Bernadette; Kahaly, George J

    2010-08-01

    Various clinical disorders can cause hyperthyroidism, the effects of which vary according to the patient's age, severity of clinical presentation and association with other comorbidities. Hyperthyroidism is associated with increased morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease, although whether the risk of specific cardiovascular complications is related to the etiology of hyperthyroidism is unknown. This article will focus on patients with Graves disease, toxic adenoma and toxic multinodular goiter, and will compare the cardiovascular risks associated with these diseases. Patients with toxic multinodular goiter have a higher cardiovascular risk than do patients with Graves disease, although cardiovascular complications in both groups are differentially influenced by the patient's age and the cause of hyperthyroidism. Atrial fibrillation, atrial enlargement and congestive heart failure are important cardiac complications of hyperthyroidism and are prevalent in patients aged > or = 60 years with toxic multinodular goiter, particularly in those with underlying cardiac disease. An increased risk of stroke is common in patients > 65 years of age with atrial fibrillation. Graves disease is linked with autoimmune complications, such as cardiac valve involvement, pulmonary arterial hypertension and specific cardiomyopathy. Consequently, the etiology of hyperthyroidism must be established to enable correct treatment of the disease and the cardiovascular complications.

  1. Patients' preferences for involvement in treatment decision making in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimbo Takuro

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of previous studies have suggested that the Japanese have few opportunities to participate in medical decision-making, as a result both of entrenched physician paternalism and national characteristics of dependency and passivity. The hypothesis that Japanese patients would wish to participate in treatment decision-making if adequate information were provided, and the decision to be made was clearly identified, was tested by interview survey. Methods The subjects were diabetic patients at a single outpatient clinic in Kyoto. One of three case study vignettes (pneumonia, gangrene or cancer was randomly assigned to each subject and, employing face-to-face interviews, the subjects were asked what their wishes would be as patients, for treatment information, participation in decision-making and family involvement. Results 134 patients participated in the study, representing a response rate of 90%. The overall proportions of respondents who preferred active, collaborative, and passive roles were 12%, 71%, and 17%, respectively. Respondents to the cancer vignette were less likely to prefer an active role and were more likely to prefer family involvement in decision-making compared to non-cancer vignette respondents. If a physician's recommendation conflicted with their own wishes, 60% of the respondents for each vignette answered that they would choose to respect the physician's opinion, while few respondents would give the family's preference primary importance. Conclusions Our study suggested that a majority of Japanese patients have positive attitudes towards participation in medical decision making if they are fully informed. Physicians will give greater patient satisfaction if they respond to the desire of patients for participation in decision-making.

  2. The Importance of Patient Involvement in Stroke Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the perceived needs for health services by persons with stroke within the first year after rehabilitation, and associations between perceived impact of stroke, involvement in decisions regarding care/treatment, and having health services needs met. Method Data was collected, through a mail survey, from patients with stroke who were admitted to a university hospital in 2012 and had received rehabilitation after discharge from the stroke unit. The rehabilitation lasted an average of 2 to 4.6 months. The Stroke Survivor Needs Survey Questionnaire was used to assess the participants' perceptions of involvement in decisions on care or treatment and needs for health services in 11 problem areas: mobility, falls, incontinence, pain, fatigue, emotion, concentration, memory, speaking, reading, and sight. The perceived impact of stroke in eight areas was assessed using the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS) 3.0. Eleven logistic regression models were created to explore associations between having health services needs met in each problem area respectively (dependent variable) and the independent variables. In all models the independent variables were: age, sex, SIS domain corresponding to the dependent variable, or stroke severity in cases when no corresponding SIS domain was identified, and involvement in decisions on care and treatment. Results The 63 participants who returned the questionnaires had a mean age of 72 years, 33 were male and 30 were female. Eighty percent had suffered a mild stroke. The number of participants who reported problems varied between 51 (80%, mobility) and 24 (38%, sight). Involvement in decisions on care and treatment was found to be associated with having health services needs met in six problem areas: falls, fatigue, emotion, memory, speaking, and reading. Conclusions The results highlight the importance of involving patients in making decisions on stroke rehabilitation, as it appears to be associated with meeting their health

  3. PMS2 involvement in patients suspected of Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niessen, Renée C; Kleibeuker, Jan H; Westers, Helga; Jager, Paul O J; Rozeveld, Dennie; Bos, Krista K; Boersma-van Ek, Wytske; Hollema, Harry; Sijmons, Rolf H; Hofstra, Robert M W

    2009-04-01

    It is well-established that germline mutations in the mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6 cause Lynch syndrome. However, mutations in these three genes do not account for all Lynch syndrome (suspected) families. Recently, it was shown that germline mutations in another mismatch repair gene, PMS2, play a far more important role in Lynch syndrome than initially thought. To explore this further, we determined the prevalence of pathogenic germline PMS2 mutations in a series of Lynch syndrome-suspected patients. Ninety-seven patients who had early-onset microsatellite instable colorectal or endometrial cancer, or multiple Lynch syndrome-associated tumors and/or were from an Amsterdam Criteria II-positive family were selected for this study. These patients carried no pathogenic germline mutation in MLH1, MSH2, or MSH6. When available, tumors were investigated for immunohistochemical staining (IHC) for PMS2. PMS2 was screened in all patients by exon-by-exon sequencing. We identified four patients with a pathogenic PMS2 mutation (4%) among the 97 patients we selected. IHC of PMS2 was informative in one of the mutation carriers, and in this case, the tumor showed loss of PMS2 expression. In conclusion, our study confirms the finding of previous studies that PMS2 is more frequently involved in Lynch syndrome than originally expected.

  4. Patient involvement in blood transfusion safety: patients' and healthcare professionals' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, R; Murphy, M F; Sud, A; Noel, S; Moss, R; Asgheddi, M; Abdur-Rahman, I; Vincent, C

    2012-08-01

    Blood transfusion is one of the major areas where serious clinical consequences, even death, related to patient misidentification can occur. In the UK, healthcare professional compliance with pre-transfusion checking procedures which help to prevent misidentification errors is poor. Involving patients at a number of stages in the transfusion pathway could help prevent the occurrence of these incidents. To investigate patients' willingness to be involved and healthcare professionals' willingness to support patient involvement in pre-transfusion checking behaviours. A cross-sectional design was employed assessing willingness to participate in pre-transfusion checking behaviours (patient survey) and willingness to support patient involvement (healthcare professional survey) on a scale of 1-7. One hundred and ten patients who had received a transfusion aged between 18 and 93 (60 male) and 123 healthcare professionals (doctors, nurses and midwives) involved in giving blood transfusions to patients. Mean scores for patients' willingness to participate in safety-relevant transfusion behaviours and healthcare professionals' willingness to support patient involvement ranged from 4.96-6.27 to 4.53-6.66, respectively. Both groups perceived it most acceptable for patients to help prevent errors or omissions relating to their hospital identification wristband. Neither prior experience of receiving a blood transfusion nor professional role of healthcare staff had an effect on attitudes towards patient participation. Overall, both patients and healthcare professionals view patient involvement in transfusion-related behaviours quite favourably and appear in agreement regarding the behaviours patients should adopt an active role in. Further work is needed to determine the effectiveness of this approach to improve transfusion safety. © 2012 The Authors. Transfusion Medicine © 2012 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  5. [Central Nervous Involvement in Patients with Fukuyama Congenital Muscular Dystrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishigaki, Keiko

    2016-02-01

    Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD), the second most common muscular dystrophy in the Japanese population, is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the fukutin (FKTN) gene. The main features of FCMD are a combination of infantile-onset hypotonia, generalized muscle weakness, eye abnormalities and central nervous system involvement with mental retardation and seizures associated with cortical migration defects. The FKTN gene product is thought to be necessary for maintaining migrating neurons in an immature state during migration, and for supporting migration via α-dystroglycan in the central nervous system. Typical magnetic resonance imaging findings in FCMD patients are cobblestone lissencephaly and cerebellar cystic lesions. White matter abnormalities with hyperintensity on T(2)-weighted images are seen especially in younger patients and those with severe phenotypes. Most FCMD patients are mentally retarded and the level is moderate to severe, with IQs ranging from 30 to 50. In our recent study, 62% of patients developed seizures. Among them, 71% had only febrile seizures, 6% had afebrile seizures from the onset, and 22% developed afebrile seizures following febrile seizures. Most patients had seizures that were controllable with just 1 type of antiepileptic drug, but 18% had intractable seizures that must be treated with 3 medications.

  6. Industrial research on the quality of brake shoes meant for rolling stock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popa, E.; Pascu, L.; Socalici, A.; Lascufoni, A.

    2016-02-01

    Brake shoes wear appears as a normal exploitation process and depends both on the braking force and on the material the shoe is made of. Brake shoes are made of molded sulfurous cast iron. The industrial research and experiments aim at determining the specific characteristics of the phosphorous cast iron (chemical and structural homogeneity, hardness) and their optimization in view of improving the quality of the brake shoes meant for the rolling stock

  7. Investigating the use of patient involvement and patient experience in quality improvement in Norway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiig, Siri; Storm, Marianne; Aase, Karina

    2013-01-01

    -fold: 1) to describe and analyze how governmental organizations expect acute hospitals to incorporate patient involvement and patient experiences into their quality improvement (QI) efforts and 2) to analyze how patient involvement and patient experiences are used by hospitals to try to improve...... the quality of care they provide. METHODS: This multi-level case study combines analysis of national policy documents and regulations at the macro level with semi-structured interviews and non-participant observation of key meetings and shadowing of staff at the meso and micro levels in two purposively...... in hospitals. The expectations span from systematic collection of patients' and family members' experiences for the purpose of improving service quality through establishing patient-oriented arenas for ongoing collaboration with staff to the support of individual involvement in decision making. However...

  8. Considering patient values and treatment preferences enhances patient involvement in rectal cancer treatment decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunneman, Marleen; Marijnen, Corrie A M; Baas-Thijssen, Monique C M; van der Linden, Yvette M; Rozema, Tom; Muller, Karin; Geijsen, Elisabeth D; Stiggelbout, Anne M; Pieterse, Arwen H

    2015-11-01

    The shared decision making (SDM) model states that patients' values and preferences should be clarified to choose a strategy that best fits the patient. This study aimed to assess whether values and preferences of rectal cancer patients are voiced and considered in deciding about preoperative radiotherapy (PRT), and whether this makes patients feel more involved in treatment decision making. Pre-treatment consultations of radiation oncologists and patients eligible for PRT were audiotaped (N=90). Tapes were transcribed and coded to identify patients' values and treatment preferences. Patients filled in a post-consultation questionnaire on their perceived involvement in decision making (N=60). Patients' values were voiced for 62/611 of benefits/harms addressed (10%), in 38/90 consultations (42%; maximum 4 values per consultation), and most often related to major long-term treatment outcomes. Patients' treatment preferences were discussed in 20/90 consultations (22%). In 16/90 consultations (18%), the oncologists explicitly indicated to consider patients' values or preferences. Patients perceived a significantly more active role in decision making if their values or preferences had been voiced or considered. Patients' values and treatment preferences are voiced or considered in a minority of consultations. If they are, this increases patients' perceived involvement in the decision making process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Visual System Involvement in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Parkinson Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrigo, Alessandro; Calamuneri, Alessandro; Milardi, Demetrio; Mormina, Enricomaria; Rania, Laura; Postorino, Elisa; Marino, Silvia; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe; Anastasi, Giuseppe Pio; Ghilardi, Maria Felice; Aragona, Pasquale; Quartarone, Angelo; Gaeta, Michele

    2017-12-01

    Purpose To assess intracranial visual system changes of newly diagnosed Parkinson disease in drug-naïve patients. Materials and Methods Twenty patients with newly diagnosed Parkinson disease and 20 age-matched control subjects were recruited. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (T1-weighted and diffusion-weighted imaging) was performed with a 3-T MR imager. White matter changes were assessed by exploring a white matter diffusion profile by means of diffusion-tensor imaging-based parameters and constrained spherical deconvolution-based connectivity analysis and by means of white matter voxel-based morphometry (VBM). Alterations in occipital gray matter were investigated by means of gray matter VBM. Morphologic analysis of the optic chiasm was based on manual measurement of regions of interest. Statistical testing included analysis of variance, t tests, and permutation tests. Results In the patients with Parkinson disease, significant alterations were found in optic radiation connectivity distribution, with decreased lateral geniculate nucleus V2 density (F, -8.28; P Parkinson disease and that the entire intracranial visual system can be involved. © RSNA, 2017 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  10. Involving patients in setting priorities for healthcare improvement: a cluster randomized trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boivin, A.; Lehoux, P.; Lacombe, R.; Burgers, J.; Grol, R.P.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients are increasingly seen as active partners in healthcare. While patient involvement in individual clinical decisions has been extensively studied, no trial has assessed how patients can effectively be involved in collective healthcare decisions affecting the population. The goal

  11. Missed opportunities for impact in patient and carer involvement: a mixed methods case study of research priority setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, R; Crocker, J C; Crowe, S

    2015-01-01

    (including patients, carers, healthcare professionals and voluntary organisations) were invited to submit suggested research questions about the treatment of type 1 diabetes, via a national online and paper survey. The partnership followed formal protocols that defined a researchable question. This meant that many respondents' suggested research questions were rejected at the start of the process. We analysed survey submissions to find out which groups of respondents were most likely to have their suggestions rejected and what these suggestions were about. Results Five hundred eighty-three respondents submitted 1143 suggested research questions, of which 249 (21.8 %) were rejected at the first stage. Respondents with lived experience of this long-term condition (patients and carers) were more likely than those without lived experience to submit a research question that would be rejected (35.6 vs. 16.5 %; p  researchable question restricted patients' and carers' contributions to priority setting. When discussions about a project's remit take place before service users are involved, researchers risk distorting the potential impact of involvement. Impact assessments should consider not only the differences patients and carers make to research but also the differences they could have made in the absence of systemic barriers. We recommend that initiatives aimed at involving patients and carers in identifying research questions involve them as early as possible, including in decisions about how and why suggested research questions are selected or rejected.

  12. Forced migrants involved in setting the agenda and designing research to reduce impacts of complex emergencies: combining Swarm with patient and public involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brainard, Julii Suzanne; Al Assaf, Enana; Omasete, Judith; Leach, Steve; Hammer, Charlotte C; Hunter, Paul R

    2017-01-01

    The UK's National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Health Protection Research Unit in Emergency Preparedness and Response was asked to undertake research on how to reduce the impact of complex national/international emergencies on public health. How to focus the research and decide on priority topics was challenging, given the nature of complex events. Using a type of structured brain-storming, the researchers identified the ongoing UK, European and international migration crisis as both complex and worthy of deeper research. To further focus the research, two representatives of forced migrant communities were invited to join the project team as patient and public (PPI) representatives. They attended regular project meetings, insightfully contributed to and advised on practical aspects of potential research areas. The representatives identified cultural obstacles and community needs and helped choose the final research study design, which was to interview forced migrants about their strategies to build emotional resilience and prevent mental illness. The representatives also helped design recruitment documents, and undertake recruitment and interviewer training. Many events with wide-ranging negative health impacts are notable for complexity: lack of predictability, non-linear feedback mechanisms and unexpected consequences. A multi-disciplinary research team was tasked with reducing the public health impacts from complex events, but without a pre-specified topic area or research design. This report describes using patient and public involvement within an adaptable but structured development process to set research objectives and aspects of implementation. An agile adaptive development approach, sometimes described as swarm , was used to identify possible research areas. Swarm is meant to quickly identify strengths and weaknesses of any candidate project, to accelerate early failure before resources are invested. When aspects of the European migration crisis

  13. Involvement of patients with cancer in patient safety: a qualitative study of current practices, potentials and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Helle Max; Navne, Laura Emdal; Lipczak, Henriette

    2013-10-01

    Patient involvement in patient safety is widely advocated but knowledge regarding implementation of the concept in clinical practice is sparse. To investigate existing practices for patient involvement in patient safety, and opportunities and barriers for further involvement. A qualitative study of patient safety involvement practices in patient trajectories for prostate, uterine and colorectal cancer in Denmark. Observations from four hospital wards and interviews with 25 patients with cancer, 11 hospital doctors, 10 nurses, four general practitioners and two private practicing gynaecologists were conducted using ethnographic methodology. Patient safety was not a topic of attention for patients or dominant in communication between patients and healthcare professionals. The understanding of patient safety in clinical practice is almost exclusively linked to disease management. Involvement of patients is not systematic, but healthcare professionals and patients express willingness to engage. Invitation and encouragement of patients to become involved could be further systematised and developed. Barriers include limited knowledge of patient safety, of specific patient safety involvement techniques and concern regarding potential negative impact on doctor-patient relationship. Involvement of patients in patient safety must take into account that despite stated openness to the idea of involvement, patients and health professionals may not in practice show immediate concern. Lack of systematic involvement can also be attributed to limited knowledge about how to implement involvement beyond the focus of self-monitoring and compliance and a concern about the consequences of patient involvement for treatment outcomes. To realise the potential of patients' and health professionals' shared openness towards involvement, there is a need for more active facilitation and concrete guidance on how involvement can be practiced by both parties.

  14. Arthritis patients' motives for (not) wanting to be involved in medical decision-making and the factors that hinder or promote patient involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nota, Ingrid; Drossaert, Constance H C; Taal, Erik; van de Laar, Mart A F J

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study is to gain insight into arthritis patients' motives for (not) wanting to be involved in medical decision-making (MDM) and the factors that hinder or promote patient involvement. In-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with 29 patients suffering from Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). Many patients perceived the questions about involvement in MDM as difficult, mostly because they were unaware of having a choice. Shared decision-making (SDM) was generally preferred, but the preferred level of involvement varied between and within individuals. Preference regarding involvement may vary according to the type of treatment and the severity of the complaints. A considerable group of respondents would have liked more participation than they had experienced in the past. Perceived barriers could be divided into doctor-related (e.g. a paternalistic attitude), patient-related (e.g. lack of knowledge) and context-related (e.g. too little time to decide) factors. This study demonstrates the complexity of predicting patients' preferences regarding involvement in MDM: most RA patients prefer SDM, but their preference may vary according to the situation they are in and the extent to which they experience barriers in getting more involved. Unawareness of having a choice is still a major barrier for patient participation. The attending physician seems to have an important role as facilitator in enhancing patient participation by raising awareness and offering options, but implementing SDM is a shared responsibility; all parties need to be involved and educated.

  15. Extrapulmonary involvement in patients with sarcoidosis and comparison of routine laboratory and clinical data to pulmonary involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurkova, Monika; Kolek, Vitezslav; Tomankova, Tereza; Kriegova, Eva

    2014-12-01

    Patients with pulmonary and pulmonary plus extrapulmonary sarcoidosis differ in symptom severity and health status impairment. To date there is no information on differences in clinical and laboratory parameters between these phenotypes and limited information on extrapulmonary involvement in Czech sarcoidosis patients exists. We therefore compared clinical data (age, gender, organ involvement, lung function tests) and laboratory data (blood counts, bronchoalveolar fluid (BAL) cellular profile, serum levels of CRP, SACE, sIL-2R, neopterin) between patients with newly diagnosed pulmonary sarcoidosis (n=107) and those with pulmonary plus extrapulmonary sarcoidosis (n=54). Extrapulmonary sarcoidosis was diagnosed in 33% of patients, mostly affecting lymph nodes and skin and having hypercalciuria. There was no difference in the prevalence of extrapulmonary sarcoidosis between genders. Patients with extrapulmonary sarcoidosis were older and mostly non-smokers when compared to those with limited pulmonary form. X-ray Stage I and erythema nodosum were less frequent in extrapulmonary disease. Serum levels of CRP, SACE, sIL-2R and neopterin and BAL cellular profile did not differ between both phenotypes. We observed lower platelets, FEV1, VC, and BAL CD19+ in females with extrapulmonary involvement than in those with pulmonary disease. Affected lymph nodes, skin and hypercalciuria were the most common in sarcoidosis patients with extrapulmonary involvement. Pulmonary sarcoidosis did not differ in clinical and routine laboratory parameters from pulmonary plus extrapulmonary sarcoidosis. Observation of low platelets, VC, FEV1 and BAL CD19+ in females with extrapulmonary sarcoidosis needs further verification in larger cohort.

  16. From actors to authors: a first account about the involvement of patients in the informed consent governance of a major Italian translational research hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casati, Sara; Monti, Paolo; Bonino, Ferruccio

    2010-01-01

    From 2007 to 2009 Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, one of the major public research hospitals in Italy, has invested on a participatory action to promote a good practice of informed consent. The project focused on the improvement and innovation of informed consent considered as a participated act through the involvement of all the actors at stake. The main purpose was to improve the informative practices through the participatory innovation of institutional and organizational elements as conditions of possibility. Therefore the project has pursued the involvement of managers, healthcare professionals, patients and their associations in the institutional governance of informed consent. The involvement of citizens and patients within the whole process meant to put them in charge not just as actors or final evaluators of a good practice, but as co-authors in defining standards, tools and conditions for a good practice. Several actions were taken, including a phase of analysis which involved 20 patients from 8 Associations, a phase of innovation and education where 113 patients and citizens worked together with clinicians from 53 Units in deliberative laboratories, the institution of a multidisciplinary committee inclusive of representatives from 6 associations of patients.The project has produced different outcomes: new institutional guidelines adopted by the hospital; the renewal of consent forms and procedures as part of an explicit shared informative process; an increased implementation of institutional standards of good informative practice; the measure and communication of the outcomes of care and their bench-marking; bottom-up building of paths of validation; the creation of participatory electronic tools; an innovative education on the field for patients and clinicians.

  17. Amplifying Each Patient's Voice: A Systematic Review of Multi-criteria Decision Analyses Involving Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Kevin; Caro, J Jaime; Hamed, Alaa; Zaiser, Erica

    2017-04-01

    Qualitative methods tend to be used to incorporate patient preferences into healthcare decision making. However, for patient preferences to be given adequate consideration by decision makers they need to be quantified. Multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) is one way to quantify and capture the patient voice. The objective of this review was to report on existing MCDAs involving patients to support the future use of MCDA to capture the patient voice. MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched in June 2014 for English-language papers with no date restriction. The following search terms were used: 'multi-criteria decision*', 'multiple criteria decision*', 'MCDA', 'benefit risk assessment*', 'risk benefit assessment*', 'multicriteri* decision*', 'MCDM', 'multi-criteri* decision*'. Abstracts were included if they reported the application of MCDA to assess healthcare interventions where patients were the source of weights. Abstracts were excluded if they did not apply MCDA, such as discussions of how MCDA could be used; or did not evaluate healthcare interventions, such as MCDAs to assess the level of health need in a locality. Data were extracted on weighting method, variation in patient and expert preferences, and discussion on different weighting techniques. The review identified ten English-language studies that reported an MCDA to assess healthcare interventions and involved patients as a source of weights. These studies reported 12 applications of MCDA. Different methods of preference elicitation were employed: direct weighting in workshops; discrete choice experiment surveys; and the analytical hierarchy process using both workshops and surveys. There was significant heterogeneity in patient responses and differences between patients, who put greater weight on disease characteristics and treatment convenience, and experts, who put more weight on efficacy. The studies highlighted cognitive challenges associated with some weighting methods, though patients' views on their

  18. Systematic patient involvement for homebased outpatient administration of complex chemotherapy in acute leukemia and lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fridthjof, Katrine S; Kampmann, Peter; Dünweber, Anne

    2018-01-01

    Based on experience with comprehensive patient involvement, we present data from implementation of portable, programmable infusion pumps (PPP) for home-based chemotherapy administration in patients with acute leukaemia and in lymphoma patients receiving (carmustine, etoposide, cytarabine, melphalan...

  19. NMO in pediatric patients: brain involvement and clinical expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquín A. Peña

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze the clinical, neuroimaging characteristics and positivity of the acquaporin water channel (NMO-IgG in pediatric patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO. This disorder could have a variable clinical expression. To address such variability, the term NMO spectrum has been suggested. METHOD: We evaluated six pediatric patients, with a median age of 11 years at the time of the study, with the diagnosis of NMO by the Wingerchuck criteria. RESULTS: All the cases exhibited bilateral optic neuritis (ON. Four patients had abnormalities on brain MRI from the onset,although only three of them developed symptoms correlated to those lesions during the course of their disorder. NMO-IgG was positive in 80%. CONCLUSION: Optic neuropathy is the most impaired feature in NMO patients. Brain MRI lesions are not compatible with multiple sclerosis and positivity of the NMO-IgG are also present in NMO pediatric patients, confirming the heterogeneity in the expression of this disorder.

  20. Family Involvement in Managing Violence of Mental Health Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontio, Raija; Lantta, Tella; Anttila, Minna; Kauppi, Kaisa; Välimäki, Maritta

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to explore relatives' perceptions of violent episodes and their suggestions on managing violence. Qualitative design with focus groups including relatives (n = 8) was carried out. Data were analyzed using inductive content analysis. The relatives described patient violence in different contexts: at home, in a psychiatric hospital, and after discharge from the psychiatric hospital. They suggested interventions to achieve safer and more humane management of violent episodes. Relatives are a valuable source of information in developing strategies to manage patient violence humanely. Their views on developing the quality of psychiatric care merit more attention. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Peripheral nervous system involvement in patients with diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. R. Kamchatnov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a widespread disease often affecting peripheral nervous system. This include diabetic autonomous neuropathy that can endanger the patient's life. Timely detection of complications of diabetes mellitus as well as its adequate therapy can improve prognosis of the disease. The possibilities of Milgamma and Tiogamma for pathogenic therapy in patients with diabetic polyneuropathy are considered in this paper. Gabagamma can be effectively relieve neuropathic pain and used together with other drugs that normalize nerve tissue metabolism.

  2. Medication Administration Errors Involving Paediatric In-Patients in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    In-Patients in a Hospital in Ethiopia. Yemisirach Feleke ... Purpose: To assess the type and frequency of medication administration errors (MAEs) in the paediatric ward of .... prescribers, does not go beyond obeying ... specialists, 43 general practitioners, 2 health officers ..... Medication Errors, International Council of Nurses.

  3. The assessment of depressive patients' involvement in decision making in audio-taped primary care consultations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loh, A.; Simon, D.; Hennig, K.; Hennig, B.; Harter, M.; Elwyn, G.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In primary care of depression treatment options such as antidepressants, counseling and psychotherapy are reasonable. Patient involvement could foster adherence and clinical outcome. However, there is a lack of empirical information about the extent to which general practitioners involve

  4. Appendiceal involvement in a patient with Gaucher disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocic, Marija; Djuricic, Slavisa M; Djordjevic, Maja; Savic, Djordje; Kecman, Bozica; Sarajlija, Adrijan

    2018-02-01

    Almost any anatomical compartment may be involved in Gaucher disease (GD). Abdominal lymphadenopathy occurred during enzyme replacement therapy in more than a dozen children with GD so far. A fourteen-year-old boy from Serbia developed clinical signs of acute appendicitis six years after the onset of GD type 3 related abdominal lymphadenopathy. Ultrasound examination showed diffuse thickening of the intestinal wall in the ileocoecal region with periappendicular infiltration. An appendectomy was performed four months after conservative treatment with antibiotics. Histopathology revealed macrophages with cytological characteristics of Gaucher cells densely crammed in mesoappendiceal adipose tissue. Also the multifocal replacement of subserosal tissue by Gaucher cells and their infiltration to a variable depth of muscularis propria of the appendix were verified. Frank infiltration of the vermiform appendix with Gaucher cells represents a novel observation in a wide spectrum of manifestations reported in GD. A possible causative relationship of this infiltration with appendicitis is considered. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Involving patients in setting priorities for healthcare improvement: a cluster randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, Antoine; Lehoux, Pascale; Lacombe, Réal; Burgers, Jako; Grol, Richard

    2014-02-20

    Patients are increasingly seen as active partners in healthcare. While patient involvement in individual clinical decisions has been extensively studied, no trial has assessed how patients can effectively be involved in collective healthcare decisions affecting the population. The goal of this study was to test the impact of involving patients in setting healthcare improvement priorities for chronic care at the community level. Cluster randomized controlled trial. Local communities were randomized in intervention (priority setting with patient involvement) and control sites (no patient involvement). Communities in a canadian region were required to set priorities for improving chronic disease management in primary care, from a list of 37 validated quality indicators. Patients were consulted in writing, before participating in face-to-face deliberation with professionals. Professionals established priorities among themselves, without patient involvement. A total of 172 individuals from six communities participated in the study, including 83 chronic disease patients, and 89 health professionals. The primary outcome was the level of agreement between patients' and professionals' priorities. Secondary outcomes included professionals' intention to use the selected quality indicators, and the costs of patient involvement. Priorities established with patients were more aligned with core generic components of the Medical Home and Chronic Care Model, including: access to primary care, self-care support, patient participation in clinical decisions, and partnership with community organizations (p Priorities established by professionals alone placed more emphasis on the technical quality of single disease management. The involvement intervention fostered mutual influence between patients and professionals, which resulted in a 41% increase in agreement on common priorities (95%CI: +12% to +58%, p priorities. Patient involvement can change priorities driving healthcare

  6. Case study: an ethical dilemma involving a dying patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacsi, Alsacia L

    2008-01-01

    Nursing often deals with ethical dilemmas in the clinical arena. A case study demonstrates an ethical dilemma faced by healthcare providers who care for and treat Jehovah's Witnesses who are placed in a critical situation due to medical life-threatening situations. A 20-year-old, pregnant, Black Hispanic female presented to the Emergency Department (ED) in critical condition following a single-vehicle car accident. She exhibited signs and symptoms of internal bleeding and was advised to have a blood transfusion and emergency surgery in an attempt to save her and the fetus. She refused to accept blood or blood products and rejected the surgery as well. Her refusal was based on a fear of blood transfusion due to her belief in Bible scripture. The ethical dilemma presented is whether to respect the patient's autonomy and compromise standards of care or ignore the patient's wishes in an attempt to save her life. This paper presents the clinical case, identifies the ethical dilemma, and discusses virtue ethical theory and principles that apply to this situation.

  7. Involvement of central airways in vibroacoustic disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Reis Ferreira

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Vibroacoustic disease (VAD is the whole-body pathology caused by excessive exposure to LFN. For the past 25 years, it has been know that low frequency noise (LFN, <500 Hz, including infrasound targets the respiratory system. In LFN-exposed rodents, the morphological changes of respiratory tract tissue partially explained some respiratory symptoms reported by VAD patients. However, many questions remain unanswered. Recently, some volunteer VAD patients underwent bronchoscopy in order to ascertain possible damage that could be associated with their respiratory complaints. Methods. Fourteen fully-informed and volunteer VAD patients were submitted to bronchoscopy, and biopsies were removed for analysis. Results. All patients exhibited small submucosal vascular-like lesions near the spurs, consisting of increased collagen and elastin fibres. Histology disclosed cilliary abnormalities, basal membrane hyperplasia, and thickening of vessel walls. In five patients, collagen bundles appeared degenerative and disrupted. No inflammatory process was ever identified, and no differences were seen between smokers and non-smokers. Discussion. Data is in accordance with what was observed in LFN-exposed animal models and also in 8 VAD patients who developed lung tumours. Collagen disruption and degeneration was also observed in electron microscopy images of the respiratory tract of LFN-exposed rodents. Thickened blood and lymphatic vessel walls have been consistently seen in images of VAD patients and of LFN-exposed rodents. During bronchoscopy performed by other reasons, this sort of structural aspects is not frequently seen. Taken together, it is strongly suggested that these findings could be VAD-specific. Resumo: Nos últimos vinte cinco anos constatou-se que o aparelho respiratório constitui um alvo do ruído de baixa frequência (RFB <500Hz, incluindo infra-sons. Denomina-se doença vibroacústica (VAD a patologia sistémica causada pela

  8. Is perceived patient involvement in mental health care associated with satisfaction and empowerment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambuyzer, Else; Van Audenhove, Chantal

    2015-08-01

    Patients increasingly assume active roles in their mental health care. While there is a growing interest in patient involvement and patient-reported outcomes, there is insufficient research on the outcomes of patient involvement. The research questions in this study are as follows: 'To what extent is perceived patient involvement associated with satisfaction and empowerment?'; 'What is the nature of the relationship between satisfaction and empowerment?'; and 'To what extent are background variables associated with satisfaction and empowerment?'. We assumed that a higher degree of patient involvement is associated with higher satisfaction and empowerment scores and that satisfaction and empowerment are positively associated. Data were gathered using surveys of 111 patients of 36 multidisciplinary care networks for persons with serious and persistent mental illness. Demographic characteristics, patient involvement and satisfaction were measured using a new questionnaire. Empowerment was assessed using the Dutch Empowerment Scale. Descriptive, univariate (Pearson's r and independent-samples t-tests), multivariate (hierarchical forced entry regression) and mixed-model analyses were conducted. The hypotheses of positive associations between patient involvement, satisfaction and empowerment are confirmed. The demographics are not significantly related to satisfaction or empowerment, except for gender. Men reported higher empowerment scores than did women. Making patient involvement a reality is more than just an ethical imperative. It provides an opportunity to enhance patient-reported outcomes such as satisfaction and empowerment. Future research should focus on the nature of the association between satisfaction and empowerment. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. The influence of the cast iron structure upon the hardness of brake shoes meant for the rolling sock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Socalici, A; Pascu, L; Popa, E; Hepuţ, T

    2015-01-01

    An important characteristic with a high impact upon the exploitation durability of the brake shoes is hardness. The paper introduces the influence of the phosphorous cast iron structure upon the hardness of the brake shoes meant for the tractive and trailing rolling stock. The results presented show the variation of hardness on the surface and the cross section of the braking shoe (paper)

  10. What Is Meant by Inclusion? An Analysis of European and North American Journal Articles with High Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilholm, Claes; Göransson, Kerstin

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to further our knowledge about what is meant by inclusion in research addressing the topic. While it is common to remark that inclusion is defined in different ways in research, few attempts have been made to map and analyse different types of definitions and whether there are patterns to be find in how the concept is…

  11. The Missing Stakeholder Group: Why Patients Should be Involved in Health Economic Modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Voorn, George A K; Vemer, Pepijn; Hamerlijnck, Dominique; Ramos, Isaac Corro; Teunissen, Geertruida J; Al, Maiwenn; Feenstra, Talitha L

    2016-04-01

    Evaluations of healthcare interventions, e.g. new drugs or other new treatment strategies, commonly include a cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) that is based on the application of health economic (HE) models. As end users, patients are important stakeholders regarding the outcomes of CEAs, yet their knowledge of HE model development and application, or their involvement therein, is absent. This paper considers possible benefits and risks of patient involvement in HE model development and application for modellers and patients. An exploratory review of the literature has been performed on stakeholder-involved modelling in various disciplines. In addition, Dutch patient experts have been interviewed about their experience in, and opinion about, the application of HE models. Patients have little to no knowledge of HE models and are seldom involved in HE model development and application. Benefits of becoming involved would include a greater understanding and possible acceptance by patients of HE model application, improved model validation, and a more direct infusion of patient expertise. Risks would include patient bias and increased costs of modelling. Patient involvement in HE modelling seems to carry several benefits as well as risks. We claim that the benefits may outweigh the risks and that patients should become involved.

  12. Patient and family involvement in decision making for management of cancer patients at a centre in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Jia An; Quah, Yan Ling; Yang, Grace Meijuan; Menon, Sumytra; Radha Krishna, Lalit Kumar

    2015-12-01

    The practice of patient autonomy within the prevailing bioethical framework in the West appears increasingly at odds with the prominent influence of the family in medical decision making in the Asian culture. The actual extent of involvement of patient versus the family in the decision making process for cancer management in clinical practice is largely unknown in Asia. (1) To describe patient and family involvement in healthcare decision making in actual practice, and to determine whether those practices are consistent with Singapore law; and (2) to act as a pilot for a larger prospective study examining the preferences of cancer patients on the decision making process, and the reasons for excluding patients from that process. A retrospective review of patients who died in an oncology ward in Singapore General Hospital from February to April 2011. Patient and family involvement in discussions on (1) disclosure of diagnosis, (2) initial treatment decisions and (3) initiation of a 'maximum ward management' order was evaluated by reviewing case notes completed by healthcare professionals. Data were collected for 55 patients. Involvement of patients and families at first disclosure of diagnosis was noted in 61% and 64% of cases, respectively. In 12% of cases, the family requested withholding of the diagnosis from the patient. 86% of patients were involved in the initial treatment decisions, and their family was involved in 65% of cases. Only 9% of the 32 alert patients were consulted in end of life decisions. Factors associated with lower patient involvement were advanced age and inability to speak English. While most cancer patients are involved in the healthcare decision making process during the early phase, familial involvement gains prominence as the disease progresses. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  13. Has patients' involvement in the decision-making process changed over time?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink-Muinen, A. van den; Dulmen, A.M. van; Haes, H.C.J.M. de; Visser, A.P.; Schellevis, F.G.; Bensing, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To get insight into the changes over time of patients' involvement in the decision-making process, and into the factors contributing to patients' involvement and general practitioners' (GPs) communication related to the Medical Treatment Act (MTA) Issues: information about treatment,

  14. Patient involvement in a scientific advisory process: setting the research agenda for medical products.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elberse, J.E.; Pittens, C.A.C.M.; de Cock Buning, J.T.; Broerse, J.E.W.

    2012-01-01

    Patient involvement in scientific advisory processes could lead to more societally relevant advice. This article describes a case study wherein the Health Council of the Netherlands involved patient groups in an advisory process with a predefined focus: setting a research agenda for medical products

  15. Candida Parapsilosis Arthritis Involving the Ankle in a Diabetes Patient: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, Jin Kyeong; Chun, Kyung Ah

    2011-01-01

    Candida parapsilosis is a rare opportunistic fungal pathogen of the musculoskeletal region. Immune function of almost all patients is severely disturbed. Most reported cases of septic arthritis of joints by Candida involve the knee, especially Candida parapsilosis. To our knowledge, there has been only one case report of Candida parapsilosis involving the ankle presented on only plain radiography. We report a case of Candida parapsilosis arthritis involving the ankle in a diabetes patient which was shown on MR imaging.

  16. Candida Parapsilosis Arthritis Involving the Ankle in a Diabetes Patient: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Jin Kyeong; Chun, Kyung Ah [Dept. of Radiology, The Catholic University of Korea Uijeongbu St. Mary' s Hospital, Uijeongbu (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-06-15

    Candida parapsilosis is a rare opportunistic fungal pathogen of the musculoskeletal region. Immune function of almost all patients is severely disturbed. Most reported cases of septic arthritis of joints by Candida involve the knee, especially Candida parapsilosis. To our knowledge, there has been only one case report of Candida parapsilosis involving the ankle presented on only plain radiography. We report a case of Candida parapsilosis arthritis involving the ankle in a diabetes patient which was shown on MR imaging.

  17. Multidetector CT Patterns of Peritoneal Involvement in Patients with Abdominopelvic Malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yawar, B.; Babar, S.; Rehman, I.; Sana, F.; Javed, F.; Chaudhary, M. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the patterns of peritoneal involvement in patients with abdominopelvic malignancies. Study Design:Retrospective observational study. Place and Duration of Study: Shifa International Hospital, Islamabad, Pakistan, from May 2004 to May 2012. Methodology: Two hundred and three patients with histopathologically proven abdominopelvic malignancies with peritoneal involvement who underwent contrast-enhanced CT abdomen and pelvis were identified through electronic data base system and were included in this study after ethical committee approval. Peritoneal disease pattern, predominant sites of involvement and associated findings of ascites, lymph nodes and metastasis were assessed. Patients with tuberculosis and lymphoproliferative disorders were excluded. Results: The malignancies showing peritoneal involvement, in decreasing order of frequency, were ovarian cancer (n=118), colorectal cancer (n=45), pancreatic cancer (n=11), gastric cancer (n=7), endometrial cancer (n=6), gallbladder/ challenge-carcinoma and hepatocellular cancer (n=5 each), cervical cancer (n=3), renal cell carcinoma (n=2) and transitional cell urinary bladder cancer (n=1). The most common pattern of peritoneal involvement was mixed in 79 patients (39 percentage), omental caking in 74 patients (37 percentage) and nodular deposits in 50 patients (24 percentage). The most common sites of peritoneal involvement were pelvic peritoneum followed by greater omentum. Conclusion: Peritoneal involvement is the commonest with ovarian and colorectal carcinoma. Mixed pattern of peritoneal disease was most frequently seen in these patients followed by omental caking and nodular peritoneal deposits. (author)

  18. Two distinct clinical courses of renal involvement in rheumatoid patients with AA amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uda, Hiroshi; Yokota, Akira; Kobayashi, Kumiko; Miyake, Tadao; Fushimi, Hiroaki; Maeda, Akira; Saiki, Osamu

    2006-08-01

    We conducted a prospective study to investigate whether a correlation exists between the clinical course of renal involvement and the pathological findings of renal amyloidosis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Patients with RA of more than 5 years' duration and who did not show renal manifestations were selected and received a duodenal biopsy for the diagnosis of amyloidosis. After the diagnosis of AA amyloidosis, patients received a renal biopsy, and patterns of amyloid deposition were examined. We followed the renal functions (serum levels of blood urea nitrogen and creatinine) of patients diagnosed with AA amyloidosis for 5 years. We diagnosed 53 patients with AA amyloidosis and monitored the renal function of 38 of them for > 5 years. The histological patterns were examined; in the 38 patients there were appreciable variations in the patterns of amyloid deposition. In 27 patients, amyloid deposits were found exclusively in the glomerulus (type 1). In the other 11 patients, however, amyloid deposits were found selectively around blood vessels and were totally absent in the glomerulus (type 2). In type 1 patients with glomerular involvement, renal function deteriorated rapidly regardless of disease state; most patients received hemodialysis. In type 2 patients with purely vascular involvement, however, renal function did not deteriorate significantly. In patients with RA and AA amyloidosis, 2 distinct clinical courses in terms of renal involvement were identified. It is suggested that renal function does not deteriorate when amyloid deposition is totally lacking in the glomerulus.

  19. Use of patient-reported outcomes in outpatient settings as a means of patient involvement and self-management support

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mejdahl, Caroline; Nielsen, Berit Kjærside; Hjøllund, Niels Henrik Ingvar

    2016-01-01

    Rationale, aims and objectives: Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are being implemented in clinical practice across different healthcare settings with varying purposes. Involving patients in reporting outcomes may increase their attention to symptoms and thereby support their self-management. The ...... to strengthen patient involvement and securing benefit from PROs.......Rationale, aims and objectives: Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are being implemented in clinical practice across different healthcare settings with varying purposes. Involving patients in reporting outcomes may increase their attention to symptoms and thereby support their self......-management. The aim of the present study was to describe patients’ experiences with a web-based PRO system where patients complete a PRO questionnaire at home or in the outpatient clinic prior to a consultation. Moreover, the study aimed to explore how PROs influenced the interaction between patients and clinicians...

  20. Involving patients in patient safety programmes: A scoping review and consensus procedure by the LINNEAUS collaboration on patient safety in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trier, Hans; Valderas, Jose M; Wensing, Michel; Martin, Helle Max; Egebart, Jonas

    2015-09-01

    Patient involvement has only recently received attention as a potentially useful approach to patient safety in primary care. To summarize work conducted on a scoping review of interventions focussing on patient involvement for patient safety; to develop consensus-based recommendations in this area. Scoping review of the literature 2006-2011 about methods and effects of involving patients in patient safety in primary care identified evidence for previous experiences of patient involvement in patient safety. This information was fed back to an expert panel for the development of recommendations for healthcare professionals and policy makers. The scoping review identified only weak evidence in support of the effectiveness of patient involvement. Identified barriers included a number of patient factors but also the healthcare workers' attitudes, abilities and lack of training. The expert panel recommended the integration of patient safety in the educational curricula for healthcare professionals, and expected a commitment from professionals to act as first movers by inviting and encouraging the patients to take an active role. The panel proposed a checklist to be used by primary care clinicians at the point of care for promoting patient involvement. There is only weak evidence on the effectiveness of patient involvement in patient safety. The recommendations of the panel can inform future policy and practice on patient involvement in safety in primary care.

  1. Involving patients in patient safety programmes: A scoping review and consensus procedure by the LINNEAUS collaboration on patient safety in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trier, H.; Valderas, J.M.; Wensing, M.; Martin, H.M.; Egebart, J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patient involvement has only recently received attention as a potentially useful approach to patient safety in primary care. OBJECTIVE: To summarize work conducted on a scoping review of interventions focussing on patient involvement for patient safety; to develop consensus-based

  2. Pulmonary involvement of hypereosinophilic syndrome : high-resolution CT finding in three patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Eun Young; Lee, Mee Ran; Shim, Jae Jeong [Korea Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-09-01

    Hypereosinophilic syndrome is a rare entity of eosinophilic lung disease characterized by idiopathic prolonged eosinophilia of marked degree and variable organ involvement. Pulmonary involvement of hypereosinophilic syndrome occurs in up to 40% of patients. We report HRCT findings of three patients with pulmonary involvement of hypereosinophilic syndrome diagnosed by clinical manifestation, bronchoalveolar lavage and transbronchial lung biopsy. On HRCT, several small nodules were seen in both lungs, especially in peripheral lung areas of the three patients. One had nodules with ground-glass attenuation halo and also focal areas of ground-glass attenuation in this area.

  3. A patient and public involvement (PPI) toolkit for meaningful and flexible involvement in clinical trials - a work in progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagley, Heather J; Short, Hannah; Harman, Nicola L; Hickey, Helen R; Gamble, Carrol L; Woolfall, Kerry; Young, Bridget; Williamson, Paula R

    2016-01-01

    Funders of research are increasingly requiring researchers to involve patients and the public in their research. Patient and public involvement (PPI) in research can potentially help researchers make sure that the design of their research is relevant, that it is participant friendly and ethically sound. Using and sharing PPI resources can benefit those involved in undertaking PPI, but existing PPI resources are not used consistently and this can lead to duplication of effort. This paper describes how we are developing a toolkit to support clinical trials teams in a clinical trials unit. The toolkit will provide a key 'off the shelf' resource to support trial teams with limited resources, in undertaking PPI. Key activities in further developing and maintaining the toolkit are to: ● listen to the views and experience of both research teams and patient and public contributors who use the tools; ● modify the tools based on our experience of using them; ● identify the need for future tools; ● update the toolkit based on any newly identified resources that come to light; ● raise awareness of the toolkit and ● work in collaboration with others to either develop or test out PPI resources in order to reduce duplication of work in PPI. Background Patient and public involvement (PPI) in research is increasingly a funder requirement due to the potential benefits in the design of relevant, participant friendly, ethically sound research. The use and sharing of resources can benefit PPI, but available resources are not consistently used leading to duplication of effort. This paper describes a developing toolkit to support clinical trials teams to undertake effective and meaningful PPI. Methods The first phase in developing the toolkit was to describe which PPI activities should be considered in the pathway of a clinical trial and at what stage these activities should take place. This pathway was informed through review of the type and timing of PPI activities within

  4. Cardioembolism and Involvement of the Insular Cortex in Patients with Ischemic Stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihoon Kang

    Full Text Available To evaluate whether topographical characteristics of insular involvement in ischemic stroke are associated with cardioembolism.A consecutive series of patients hospitalized for ischemic stroke within 7 days of symptom onset were identified. Based on diffusion-weighted imaging, we included those who had ischemic lesions in the middle cerebral artery (MCA territory. Each patient was assigned to one of two groups based on the presence or absence of insular involvement. The primary outcome was the frequency of cardioembolism, which was compared based on insular involvement. Of 1,311 patients with ischemic stroke in the MCA territory, 112 had insular involvement (8.5%. The frequency of cardioembolism in patients with insular involvement (52.7% was significantly higher than that in patients without insular involvement (30.4%, P < 0.001. Although insular involvement was associated with a severe baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score (13 vs. 4, it did not independently affect the 3-month functional outcome.In cases of stroke in the MCA territory, involvement of the insular cortex may be associated with a risk of cardioembolism.

  5. Pancreatic involvement in Korean patients with von Hippel-Lindau disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kwang-Hyuck; Lee, Jae-Seung; Kim, Bum-Jin; Lee, Jong-Kyun; Kim, Seong-Hyun; Kim, Seung-Hoon; Lee, Kyu-Taek

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe pancreatic involvement in von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease and to document the changes that occur in pancreatic lesions. We retrospectively analyzed the medical records and CT scans of 18 VHL patients who were diagnosed between 1994 and 2007 at the Samsung Medical Center. The clinical history with a detailed family history, biochemical test results, and imaging studies of the pancreas, adrenal glands, and kidneys were reviewed. Genetic analysis was performed in 12 patients. The changes in pancreatic lesions, such as an increase in cystic lesions, calcifications, and dilatation of the pancreatic duct, were analyzed in patients who had CT scans at least 1 year apart. Pancreatic lesions existed in 89% (16/18) of the patients. All 16 patients had multiple cystic lesions. Two patients had co-existing neuroendocrine tumors (NET), and two patients had co-existing serous cystadenomas (SCA). At least one of three features of pancreatic lesions (cystic lesions, calcifications, and dilatation of the pancreatic duct) progressed in all nine patients who had CT scans 1 year apart. Pancreatic involvement in VHL disease was relatively common in Korean patients. The most common type of pancreatic involvement was a multiple cystic lesion. NET and SCA existed in approximately 10% of VHL patients with pancreatic involvement. Pancreatic lesions in VHL disease progressed, at least according to radiological images. (author)

  6. Disentangling patient and public involvement in healthcare decisions: why the difference matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredriksson, Mio; Tritter, Jonathan Q

    2017-01-01

    Patient and public involvement has become an integral aspect of many developed health systems and is judged to be an essential driver for reform. However, little attention has been paid to the distinctions between patients and the public, and the views of patients are often seen to encompass those of the general public. Using an ideal-type approach, we analyse crucial distinctions between patient involvement and public involvement using examples from Sweden and England. We highlight that patients have sectional interests as health service users in contrast to citizens who engage as a public policy agent reflecting societal interests. Patients draw on experiential knowledge and focus on output legitimacy and performance accountability, aim at typical representativeness, and a direct responsiveness to individual needs and preferences. In contrast, the public contributes with collective perspectives generated from diversity, centres on input legitimacy achieved through statistical representativeness, democratic accountability and indirect responsiveness to general citizen preferences. Thus, using patients as proxies for the public fails to achieve intended goals and benefits of involvement. We conclude that understanding and measuring the impact of patient and public involvement can only develop with the application of a clearer comprehension of the differences. © 2016 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness.

  7. A vignette study to examine health care professionals' attitudes towards patient involvement in error prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwappach, David L B; Frank, Olga; Davis, Rachel E

    2013-10-01

    Various authorities recommend the participation of patients in promoting patient safety, but little is known about health care professionals' (HCPs') attitudes towards patients' involvement in safety-related behaviours. To investigate how HCPs evaluate patients' behaviours and HCP responses to patient involvement in the behaviour, relative to different aspects of the patient, the involved HCP and the potential error. Cross-sectional fractional factorial survey with seven factors embedded in two error scenarios (missed hand hygiene, medication error). Each survey included two randomized vignettes that described the potential error, a patient's reaction to that error and the HCP response to the patient. Twelve hospitals in Switzerland. A total of 1141 HCPs (response rate 45%). Approval of patients' behaviour, HCP response to the patient, anticipated effects on the patient-HCP relationship, HCPs' support for being asked the question, affective response to the vignettes. Outcomes were measured on 7-point scales. Approval of patients' safety-related interventions was generally high and largely affected by patients' behaviour and correct identification of error. Anticipated effects on the patient-HCP relationship were much less positive, little correlated with approval of patients' behaviour and were mainly determined by the HCP response to intervening patients. HCPs expressed more favourable attitudes towards patients intervening about a medication error than about hand sanitation. This study provides the first insights into predictors of HCPs' attitudes towards patient engagement in safety. Future research is however required to assess the generalizability of the findings into practice before training can be designed to address critical issues. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. What role does health literacy play in patients' involvement in medical decision-making?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brabers, A.E.M.; Rademakers, J.J.D.J.M.; Groenewegen, P.P.; Dijk, L. van; Jong, J.D. de

    2017-01-01

    Patients vary in their preferences towards involvement in medical decision-making. Previous research, however, gives no clear explanation for this observed variation in their involvement. One possible explanation might be health literacy. Health literacy refers to personal characteristics and social

  9. Treatment preferences and involvement in treatment decision making of patients with endometrial cancer and clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunneman, M; Pieterse, A H; Stiggelbout, A M; Nout, R A; Kamps, M; Lutgens, L C H W; Paulissen, J; Mattheussens, O J A; Kruitwagen, R F P M; Creutzberg, C L

    2014-08-12

    Vaginal brachytherapy (VBT) in high-intermediate-risk endometrial cancer (EC) provides a significant reduction in the risk of local cancer recurrence, but without survival benefit and with increased mucosal atrophy. Five-year local control is estimated to be similar for VBT and a watchful waiting policy (WWP), in which patients receive VBT combined with external radiation in case of a recurrence. Our aim was to assess treatment preferences of EC patients and clinicians regarding VBT and WWP, and to evaluate their preferred and perceived involvement in treatment decision making. Interviews were held with 95 treated EC patients. The treatment trade-off method was used to assess the minimally desired benefit from VBT in local control. Patients' preferred and perceived involvement in decision making were assessed using a questionnaire. Seventy-seven clinicians completed a questionnaire assessing their minimally desired benefit and preferred involvement in decision making. Minimally desired benefit of VBT was significantly lower for patients than for clinicians (median=0 vs 8%, Pdecision about VBT. However, irradiated patients indicated low perceived involvement in actual treatment decision making. We found variations between and within patients and clinicians in minimally desired benefit from VBT. However, the recurrence risk at which patients preferred VBT was low. Our results showed that patients consider active participation in decision making essential.

  10. Patient involvement in patient safety: Protocol for developing an intervention using patient reports of organisational safety and patient incident reporting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armitage Gerry

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients have the potential to provide a rich source of information on both organisational aspects of safety and patient safety incidents. This project aims to develop two patient safety interventions to promote organisational learning about safety - a patient measure of organisational safety (PMOS, and a patient incident reporting tool (PIRT - to help the NHS prevent patient safety incidents by learning more about when and why they occur. Methods To develop the PMOS 1 literature will be reviewed to identify similar measures and key contributory factors to error; 2 four patient focus groups will ascertain practicality and feasibility; 3 25 patient interviews will elicit approximately 60 items across 10 domains; 4 10 patient and clinician interviews will test acceptability and understanding. Qualitative data will be analysed using thematic content analysis. To develop the PIRT 1 individual and then combined patient and clinician focus groups will provide guidance for the development of three potential reporting tools; 2 nine wards across three hospital directorates will pilot each of the tools for three months. The best performing tool will be identified from the frequency, volume and quality of reports. The validity of both measures will be tested. 300 patients will be asked to complete the PMOS and PIRT during their stay in hospital. A sub-sample (N = 50 will complete the PMOS again one week later. Health professionals in participating wards will also be asked to complete the AHRQ safety culture questionnaire. Case notes for all patients will be reviewed. The psychometric properties of the PMOS will be assessed and a final valid and reliable version developed. Concurrent validity for the PIRT will be assessed by comparing reported incidents with those identified from case note review and the existing staff reporting scheme. In a subsequent study these tools will be used to provide information to wards/units about their

  11. The Oesophageal Involvement of Pemphigus Vulgaris Patients and Comparison with Skin Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sıla Şeremet

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: The pemphigus family includes a number of disease which feature intraepidermal blisters with acantholysis. Pemphigus vulgaris(PV is the most common form of pemphigus, affects the skin and mucous membranes. Although oral mucosa is the most commonly affected site, all stratified squamous epithelium can be involved like pharynx, larynx, oesophagus, conjunctiva, vaginal, penile, and anal mucosa. We planned our study aiming to find frequency of oesophagus involvement in PV patients and to compare them immunohistopathologically with skin findings.Material and Method: Twenty three female and seven male patients, who were admitted to The Health Ministry Vakıf Gureba Education and Research Hospital, Dermatology Clinic, in between January 2004 and March 2005, and were accepted as PV according to clinical and immunohistopathological findings. Mucosal biopsies were taken by oesophagoscopy from patients in the same time with skin biopsies for DIF examination. Antibody titers in serum was detected by indirect immunofluorescein method.Results: DIF was positive in twenty eight patients while two patients had negative results. During oesophagoscopy, macroscopically nine patients (%30 had esophageal lesions supporting pemphigus vulgaris.When a relationship were examined between dysphagia with endoscopic pemphigus vulgaris findings, skin involvement, oral mucosal involvement, genital mucosal involvement, skin DIF positivity, oesophagus DIF positivity, IIF positivity, no meaningful difference was found istatistically. In our study, four patients had endoscopic findings and nineteen patients had positive DIF results although they did not have gastrointestinal symptoms. When relationship between oesophageal DIF positivity and skin DIF positivity was examined, there was a positive correlation meaningfully. Conclusion: According to our article we believe that upper GI endoscopy is a useful and neccessary diagnostic method in pemphigus vulgaris

  12. Gastrointestinal involvement secondary to non-Hodgkins lymphoma in HIV+patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bueno, P.; Hernandez. L.; Ruiz, P.; Fernandez, C.; Porto, C.

    1996-01-01

    We present the clinical and radiological findings in 12 HIV-positive patients with gastrointestinal involvement secondary to non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, focusing on the value of the different diagnostic techniques employed (barium studies, ultrasonography and CT) and the differential diagnosis in view of our findings in these patients. We have reviewed the case histories of 58 HIV-positive patients diagnosed as having non-Hodgkin's lymphoma focusing on the results of barium studies, ultrasonography and CT scanning. According to barium studies, ultrasonography and CT, 12 patients (21%) presented gastrointestinal involvement, located in stomach (n=3D5), duodenum (n=3D2), small bowel (n=3D4), mesentery (n=3D1) and perianal region ( n=3D1). Enlarged abdominal lymph nodes were detected in 10 patients (83%). Six patients (50%) presented extraintestinal lymphomatous involvement and four (30%) had extraabdominal involment. Barium studies and CT were useful in the detection of the lesions of all the patients in whom these techniques were performed. CT also allowed the assessment of extraintestinal involvement. Ultrasonography showed poor sensitivity in the study of gastrointestinal involvement, but was effective in the detection of adenophathy. (Author) 27 refs

  13. Progression of cardiac involvement in patients with limb-girdle type 2 and Becker muscular dystrophies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petri, Helle; Sveen, Marie-Louise; Thune, Jens Jakob

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess the degree and progression of cardiac involvement in patients with limb-girdle type 2 (LGMD2) and Becker muscular dystrophies (BMD). METHODS: A follow-up study of 100 LGMD2 (types A-L) and 30 BMD patients assessed by electrocardiogram (ECG) and echocardiography, supplemented...

  14. Prognostic significance of extracapsular lymph node involvement in patients with adenocarcinoma of the ampulla of Vater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Gaag, N. A.; ten Kate, F. J. W.; Lagarde, S. M.; Busch, O. R. C.; van Gulik, T. M.; Gouma, D. J.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Lymphatic dissemination is an important predictor of survival in patients with adenocarcinoma of the ampulla of Vater. The incidence and clinical consequences of extracapsular lymph node involvement (LNI) in patients who undergo resection are unknown. Methods: In a consecutive series of

  15. Involving patients in care decisions improves satisfaction: an outcomes-based quality improvement project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leff, Ellen W

    2004-05-01

    A home care agency used quality improvement processes to improve patient satisfaction survey ratings. The focus was on involving patients in decisions about their care. A multidisciplinary team developed creative strategies to increase staff awareness and enhance customer service skills, which had dramatic results.

  16. MR imaging of abdominopelvic involvement in neurofibromatosis type 1: a review of 43 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zacharia, T. Thomas [Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Jaramillo, Diego [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Poussaint, Tina Young [Children' s Hospital Boston, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Korf, Bruce [University of Alabama at Birmingham Hospital, Department of Genetics, Birmingham, AL (United States)

    2005-03-01

    Plexiform neurofibromas are a frequent complication of neurofibromatosis type 1. This article discusses MR imaging findings and distribution of plexiform neurofibromas in the abdomen and pelvis. To define the most prevalent patterns of involvement and MR imaging findings in abdominopelvic neurofibromatosis type 1. We reviewed the MR appearance of abdominopelvic lesions in 23 male and 20 female patients (median age: 16 years) with type 1 neurofibromatosis. The patients were part of a multi-institutional study of 300 patients. Imaging included coronal or sagittal, and axial short tau inversion recovery images. The most common abdominopelvic involvement was in the abdominopelvic wall (n=28, 65%) and lumbosacral plexus (n=27, 63%). Retroperitoneal involvement was frequent (n=15, 35%). Lesions were less often intraperitoneal (21%) (P=0.001). Pelvic disease (n=27, 63%), neural canal involvement (n=18, 42%), and hydronephrosis (n=4, 9%) were also noted. Target-like appearance of plexiform lesions was noted in more than half the patients. Abdominopelvic involvement in neurofibromatosis type 1 is primarily extraperitoneal. Although lesions are most prevalent in the abdominopelvic wall and lumbosacral plexus, retroperitoneal and pelvic involvement is common and usually affects important organs. MR imaging added information in the initial and follow-up clinical evaluation of these patients. (orig.)

  17. Involved-node radiotherapy (INRT) in patients with early Hodgkin lymphoma: concepts and guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Girinsky, Theodore; van der Maazen, Richard; Specht, Lena

    2006-01-01

    are designed to irradiate the initially involved lymph nodes exclusively and to encompass their initial volume. In some cases, radiation fields are slightly modified to avoid unnecessary irradiation of muscles or organs at risk. CONCLUSIONS: The concept of involved-node radiotherapy (INRT) described here......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To describe new concepts for radiation fields in patients with early stage Hodgkin lymphoma treated with a combined modality. PATIENTS AND MATERIALS: Patients receiving combined modality therapy with at least 2 or 3 cycles of chemotherapy prior to radiotherapy. Pre...

  18. Inapparent lung involvement in patients with the subacute juvenile type of paracoccidioidomycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Restrepo

    1989-02-01

    Full Text Available Three patients with the diagnosis of subacute juvenile paracoccidioidomycosis who, at the time of their first visit, had no signs or symptoms of lung involvement, were studied. Initially the diagnosis was confirmed by the observation of P. brasiliensis in biopsy material obtained from clinically involved lymphadenopathies. The lung X-rays done in all patients, did not reveal pathologic changes, although it was possible to observe and isolate the fungus from sputum samples obtained from the three patients. This fact reinforces the pulmonary genesis of the mycosis and proofs the existence of a pulmonary primary infection, even in patients with the juvenile manifestations, in whom the lung component is obscured by the predominant lymph node involvement.

  19. Outcomes following treatment for patients with cranial nerve involvement from nasopharyngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yap, Mei Ling; Choo, Bok Ai; Chan, Yiong Huak; Lu, Jay Jiade; Lee, Khai Mun; Tham, Ivan WK

    2012-01-01

    Patients with locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) commonly present with cranial nerve (CN) involvement, which can cause significant morbidity. We aimed to characterise the pattern of involvement and outcomes of these patients, as well as determine if these differed according to the mode of diagnosis. Patients were included if they had non-distant metastatic NPC, presented with CN involvement and completed radiotherapy treatment between 2002 and 2008. The clinical response was categorised as complete response, partial response, stable or progressive disease. The radiological response was assessed using the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors criteria. The loco-regional control and disease-free survival rates were estimated with the Kaplan–Meier method. Forty-seven patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria. CN lesions were diagnosed on clinical examination in 15% of patients, radiologically in 40% and both clinically and radiologically in 45% of patients. A complete or partial response of the CN lesions was seen clinically in 82% and radiologically in 95% of patients. The 3-year local relapse free survival was 64.3%, distant metastasis-free survival was 46.1% and overall survival was 82.8%. There were no differences in outcomes between patients with clinically versus radiologically detected CN lesions. Most of these patients are likely to undergo clinical and/or radiological resolution of the nerve lesions following chemoradiotherapy, but the outcome was not determined by the mode of diagnosis (radiological or clinical).

  20. Involving patients in health technology funding decisions: stakeholder perspectives on processes used in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Edilene; Street, Jackie; Carter, Drew; Merlin, Tracy

    2016-04-01

    Governments use a variety of processes to incorporate public perspectives into policymaking, but few studies have evaluated these processes from participants' point of view. The objective of this study was twofold: to understand the perspectives of selected stakeholders with regard to involvement processes used by Australian Advisory Committees to engage the public and patients; and to identify barriers and facilitators to participation. Twelve semi-structured interviews were conducted with representatives of different stakeholder groups involved in health technology funding decisions in Australia. Data were collected and analysed using a theoretical framework created by Rowe and Frewer, but adapted to more fully acknowledge issues of power and influence. Stakeholder groups disagreed as to what constitutes effective and inclusive patient involvement. Barriers reported by interviewees included poor communication, a lack of transparency, unworkable deadlines, and inadequate representativeness. Also described were problems associated with defining the task for patients and their advocates and with the timing of patient input in the decision-making process. Interviewees suggested that patient participation could be improved by increasing the number of patient organizations engaged in processes and including those organizations at different stages of decision making, especially earlier. The different evaluations made by stakeholder groups appear to be underpinned by contrasting conceptions of public involvement and its value, in line with Graham Martin's work which distinguishes between 'technocratic' and 'democratic' public involvement. Understanding stakeholders' perspectives and the contrasting conceptions of public involvement could foster future agreement on which processes should be used to involve the public in decision making. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. The impact of patients' involvement in cooking on their mortality and morbidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jandorf, Sofie; Siersma, Volkert; Køster-Rasmussen, Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    measures. This study analysed the association between involvement in cooking and each of seven pre-specified outcomes was analysed in Cox regression models with stepwise adjustment for possible confounders and mediators. Results. 92% of the patients with T2DM consumed a warm main meal  five times per week......, 1348 patients newly diagnosed with T2DM gave information on how frequently they consumed a warm main meal and how often they cooked it themselves. The selected patients were followed up for 19 years in the Danish National Patient Registry and the Danish Register of Causes of Death. Main outcome...... for the outcomes investigated. Conclusions. In patients newly diagnosed with T2DM and with a regular intake of warm main meals, infrequent involvement in cooking was associated with an increased risk of diabetes-related death and stroke for women, but not for men. General practitioners should pay special attention...

  2. Health literacy, numeracy, and other characteristics associated with hospitalized patients' preferences for involvement in decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goggins, Kathryn M; Wallston, Kenneth A; Nwosu, Samuel; Schildcrout, Jonathan S; Castel, Liana; Kripalani, Sunil

    2014-01-01

    Little research has examined the association of health literacy and numeracy with patients' preferred involvement in the problem-solving and decision-making process in the hospital. Using a sample of 1,249 patients hospitalized with cardiovascular disease from the Vanderbilt Inpatient Cohort Study (VICS), we assessed patients' preferred level of involvement using responses to two scenarios of differing symptom severity from the Problem-Solving Decision-Making Scale. Using multivariable modeling, we determined the relationship of health literacy, subjective numeracy, and other patient characteristics with preferences for involvement in decisions, and how this differed by scenario. The authors found that patients with higher levels of health literacy desired more participation in the problem-solving and decision-making process, as did patients with higher subjective numeracy skills, greater educational attainment, female gender, less perceived social support, or greater health care system distrust (pparticipate more in the decision-making process when the hypothetical symptom they were experiencing was less severe (i.e., they deferred more to their physician when the hypothetical symptom was more severe). These findings underscore the role that patient characteristics, especially health literacy and numeracy, play in decisional preferences among hospitalized patients.

  3. The Prognostic Value of Circumferential Resection Margin Involvement in Patients with Extraperitoneal Rectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dong Woo; Shin, Jin Yong; Oh, Sung Jin; Park, Jong Kwon; Yu, Hyeon; Ahn, Min Sung; Bae, Ki Beom; Hong, Kwan Hee; Ji, Yong Il

    2016-04-01

    The prognostic influence of circumferential resection margin (CRM) status in extraperitoneal rectal cancer probably differs from that of intraperitoneal rectal cancer because of its different anatomical and biological behaviors. However, previous reports have not provided the data focused on extraperitoneal rectal cancer. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the prognostic significance of the CRM status in patients with extraperitoneal rectal cancer. From January 2005 to December 2008, 248 patients were treated for extraperitoneal rectal cancer and enrolled in a prospectively collected database. Extraperitoneal rectal cancer was defined based on tumors located below the anterior peritoneal reflection, as determined intraoperatively by a surgeon. Cox model was used for multivariate analysis to examine risk factors of recurrence and mortality in the 248 patients, and multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify predictors of recurrence and mortality in 135 patients with T3 rectal cancer. CRM involvement for extraperitoneal rectal cancer was present in 29 (11.7%) of the 248 patients, and was the identified predictor of local recurrence, overall recurrence, and death by multivariate Cox analysis. In the 135 patients with T3 cancer, CRM involvement was found to be associated with higher probability of local recurrence and mortality. In extraperitoneal rectal cancer, CRM involvement is an independent risk factor of recurrence and survival. Based on the results of the present study, it seems that CRM involvement in extraperitoneal rectal cancer is considered an indicator for (neo)adjuvant therapy rather than conventional TN status.

  4. Nailfold capillaroscopy abnormalities correlate with cutaneous and visceral involvement in systemic sclerosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Lucy T; Kayser, Cristiane; Andrade, Luís E C

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to correlate quantitative and semiquantitative nailfold capillaroscopy (NFC) parameters with the extent of cutaneous and visceral involvement in systemic sclerosis (SSc) patients. The presence of clinical and serological alterations was evaluated retrospectively and correlated with NFC findings (number of capillary loops/mm, vascular deletion score and number of enlarged and giant capillary loops). For evaluation of disease extension five manifestations were analyzed: finger pad lesions, skin involvement, esophageal involvement, interstitial lung disease, and pulmonary hypertension. There were 105 NFC examinations in 92 patients, 13 of whom were evaluated at two different time points. Patients with diffuse cutaneous SSc had a higher vascular deletion score than patients with limited cutaneous SSc, sine scleroderma SSc, and overlap syndrome (1.67+/-0.91 vs 0.99+/-0.82; p=0.0005). Modified Rodnan's skin score correlated positively with capillary deletion, evaluated by the vascular deletion score and the number of capillary loops/mm (p<0.001 and p=0.012; respectively). Patients with three or more involved tracts presented lower number of capillary loops/mm (8.00+/-1.69 vs 9.23+/-1.31 capillary loops/mm; p=0.025) and a higher vascular deletion score (1.41+/-0.95 vs 0.73+/-0.76; p=0.027) when compared to patients with less than three affected tracts. Vascular deletion score was significantly higher in patients with anti-Scl-70 antibodies that in patients without anti-Scl-70 antibodies (p=0.02). NFC abnormalities correlated positively with the diffuse form of SSc, the degree of cutaneous involvement, the number of affected tracts, and the presence of anti-Scl-70 antibodies.

  5. Shared decision making and the concept of equipoise: the competences of involving patients in healthcare choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwyn, G; Edwards, A; Kinnersley, P; Grol, R

    2000-11-01

    Involving patients in healthcare decisions makes a potentially significant and enduring difference to healthcare outcomes. One difficulty (among many) is that the 'involvement' of patients in decisions has been left undefined. It is usually conceptualised as 'patient centredness', which is a broad and variably interpreted concept that is difficult to assess using current tools. This paper attempts to gauge general practitioners' (GPs') attitudes to patient involvement in decision making and their views about the contextual factors, competences, and stages required to achieve shared decisions within consultations. To explore and understand what constitutes the appropriate involvement of patients in decision making within consultations, to consider previous theory in this field, and to propose a set of competences (skills) and steps that would enable clinical practitioners (generalists) to undertake 'shared decision making' in their clinical environment. Qualitative study using focus group interviews of key informants. Experienced GPs with educational roles have positive attitudes to the involvement of patients in decisions, provided the process matches the role individuals wish to play. They perceive some clinical problems as being more suited to a cooperative approach to decision making and conceptualised the existence of professional equipoise towards the existence of legitimate treatment options as an important facilitative factor. A sequence of skills was proposed as follows: 1) implicit or explicit involvement of patients in the decision-making process; 2) explore ideas, fears, and expectations of the problem and possible treatments; 3) portrayal of equipoise and options; 4) identify preferred data format and provide tailor-made information; 5) checking process: understanding of information and reactions (e.g. ideas, fears, and expectations of possible options); 6) acceptance of process and decision making role preference; 7) make, discuss or defer decisions; 8

  6. The Service Pledge for Breast Cancer – Improving services through patient involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, Shauna; Kester, Ross; Greenbrook, Sally; O’Connor, Ruairi; Rawlings, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    A guiding principle for today’s National Health Service is for services to reflect the needs and choices of patients and carers. There is evidence that meaningful patient involvement and engagement of people in their own care supports relationships with NHS professionals, and improves the quality and experience of healthcare. This paper reviews the Service Pledge for Breast Cancer, developed by the charity Breakthrough Breast Cancer as a tried and tested route to delivering effective patient involvement and examines some implications for radiotherapy services. The Service Pledge, which has benefitted an estimated 19,000 patients across the UK, is a tool that enables healthcare professionals and patients to work in partnership to improve local breast cancer services. Based on the results of a patient survey and in depth interviews to determine to what extent standards of care are being met at each participating hospital, improvement goals are identified helping turn the patient voice into constructive action. Improvement goals resulting from the Service Pledge range from small changes that make a real difference to patients, through to much larger changes to local breast services. To date, there has been limited involvement of radiotherapy staff in the Service Pledge, yet radiographers play an important role in the treatment of breast cancer as most patients will be offered radiotherapy. However, radiotherapy services have been criticised for not being patient -centred and for not providing enough information, psychological and emotional support before, during and after treatment. It is contended that radiographers are ideally placed to address many of these concerns and engage further with patients through projects such as the Service Pledge, empowering their patients to voice what is most important to them and driving the quality improvements that emerge.

  7. Patient involvement in rheumatology outpatient service design and delivery: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Savia; Galloway, James; Simpson, Carol; Chura, Radka; Dobson, Joanne; Gullick, Nicola J; Steer, Sophia; Lempp, Heidi

    2017-06-01

    Patient involvement is increasingly recognized as important within the UK National Health Service to ensure that services delivered are relevant to users' needs. Organizations are encouraged to work with service users to achieve excellence in care. Patient education can improve health outcomes and reduce health-care costs. Mobile technologies could play a vital role in this. Patient-centred development of innovative strategies to improve the experience of rheumatology outpatients. The Group Rheumatology Initiative Involving Patients (GRIIP) project was set up in 2013 as a joint venture between patients, clinicians, academics and management at a London hospital. The project saw (i) the formation of an independent patient group which provided suggestions for service improvement - outcomes included clearer signs in the outpatient waiting area, extended phlebotomy opening hours and better access to podiatry; (ii) a rolling patient educational evening programme initiated in 2014 with topics chosen by patient experts - feedback has been positive and attendance continues to grow; and (iii) a mobile application (app) co-designed with patients launched in 2015 which provides relevant information for outpatient clinic attendees and data capture for clinicians - downloads have steadily increased as users adopt this new technology. Patients can effectively contribute to service improvement provided they are supported, respected as equals, and the organization is willing to undergo a cultural change. © 2016 The Authors. Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Risk factors of circumferential resection margin involvement in the patients with extraperitoneal rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Sung Jin; Shin, Jin Yong

    2012-03-01

    Currently, circumferential resection margins (CRM) are used as a clinical endpoint in studies on the prognosis of rectal cancer. Although the concept of a circumferential resection margin in extraperitoneal rectal cancer differs from that in intraperitoneal rectal cancer due to differences in anatomical and biologic behaviors, previous reports have provided information on CRM involvement in all types of rectal cancer including intraperitoneal lesions. Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyze risk factors of CRM involvement in extraperitoneal rectal cancer. From January 2005 to December 2008, 306 patients with extraperitoneal rectal cancer were enrolled in a prospectively collected database. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify predictors of CRM involvement. The overall rate of CRM involvement was found to be 16.0%. Multivariate analysis showed that male sex, larger tumor size (≥4 cm), stage higher than T3, nodal metastasis, tumor perforation and non-sphincter preserving proctectomy (NSPP) were risk factors for CRM involvement. Male sex, larger tumor size (≥4 cm), advanced T stage, nodal metastasis, tumor perforation, and NSPP are significant risk factors of CRM involvement in extraperitoneal rectal cancer. Given that postoperative chemoradiotherapy is recommended for patients with a positive CRM, further oncologic studies are warranted to ascertain which patients with these risk factors would require adjuvant therapy.

  9. Nail involvement in patients with moderate-to-severe alopecia areata treated with oral tofacitinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Su; Huh, Chang-Hun; Kwon, Ohsang; Yoon, Hyun-Sun; Cho, Soyun; Park, Hyun-Sun

    2018-05-07

    A few anecdotal case reports demonstrated that tofacitinib improved nail changes associated with AA. To investigate nail changes in patients with AA treated with tofacitinib and evaluate the relationship between nail and hair responses to tofacitinib. This is a retrospective study of 33 adult patients with moderate-to-severe AA treated with oral tofacitinib monotherapy for at least 4 months. Fifteen patients had nail involvement and demonstrated more severe hair loss than those without nail involvement (p = .040). However, there was no significant difference in hair regrowth between two groups. Of 15 patients with nail involvement, 11 (73.3%) showed improvement regardless of type of nail change; the first improvement was observed at a median of 5 months (range, 1-11) after administration. Nail improvement was associated with neither initial severity of hair loss nor hair response to tofacitinib. Nail improvement tended to occur later than hair regrowth. Oral tofacitinib monotherapy improves nail involvement associated with AA. Nail involvement is not a poor prognosis factor in hair regrowth with tofacitinib treatment and there is no evident relationship between nail and hair responses.

  10. Multimodality assessment of cardiac involvement in Churg-Strauss syndrome patients in clinical remission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szczeklik, W.; Miszalski-Jamka, T.; Mastalerz, L.; Sokolowska, B.; Dropinski, J.; Musial, J.; Banys, R.; Hor, K.N.; Mazur, W.

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac involvement in Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS) is not uncommon, but its frequency varies widely and may depend on the activity of the disease. Therefore, the cardiac involvement in CSS patients in clinical remission was assessed in the present study. In 20 CSS patients in remission and 20 sex- and age-matched healthy controls, an electrocardiogram (ECG) stress test, echocardiography, and 24-h ECG Holter monitoring were performed, together with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI). Cardiac involvement was present in 90% (18/20) of CSS patients. Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was on average lower in the CSS group than in controls (P<0.05), with 7 patients showing systolic heart failure (LVEF <50%). cMRI changes included late gadolinium enhancement lesions in the LV in 89% of patients (17/19), present in all layers of the myocardium. Signs of ongoing inflammation (early gadolinium enhancement) and edema (T2-weighted imaging) were present in 6/19 patients. Holter monitoring revealed both supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias more frequently in CSS patients when compared with controls (P<0.05). Absolute eosinophil count before the initiation of treatment was higher in rhythm disturbances (P<0.05), and inversely correlated with LV systolic function (rho -0.65). Heart involvement in CSS patients who are in clinical remission is very common. It is characterized not only by fibrosis, but also by an active inflammatory process. The latter finding might influence therapeutic decisions in CSS patients in full clinical remission. (author)

  11. Multimodality assessment of cardiac involvement in Churg-Strauss syndrome patients in clinical remission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szczeklik, W; Miszalski-Jamka, T; Mastalerz, L; Sokolowska, B; Dropinski, J; Musial, J [Medical Coll., Jagiellonian Univ., Krakow (Poland); Banys, R [John Paul II Hospital, Krakow (Poland); Hor, K N [Cincinnati Children' s Medical Center, OH (United States); Mazur, W [Heart and Vascular Center at The Christ Hospitals, OH (United States)

    2011-02-15

    Cardiac involvement in Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS) is not uncommon, but its frequency varies widely and may depend on the activity of the disease. Therefore, the cardiac involvement in CSS patients in clinical remission was assessed in the present study. In 20 CSS patients in remission and 20 sex- and age-matched healthy controls, an electrocardiogram (ECG) stress test, echocardiography, and 24-h ECG Holter monitoring were performed, together with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI). Cardiac involvement was present in 90% (18/20) of CSS patients. Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was on average lower in the CSS group than in controls (P<0.05), with 7 patients showing systolic heart failure (LVEF <50%). cMRI changes included late gadolinium enhancement lesions in the LV in 89% of patients (17/19), present in all layers of the myocardium. Signs of ongoing inflammation (early gadolinium enhancement) and edema (T2-weighted imaging) were present in 6/19 patients. Holter monitoring revealed both supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias more frequently in CSS patients when compared with controls (P<0.05). Absolute eosinophil count before the initiation of treatment was higher in rhythm disturbances (P<0.05), and inversely correlated with LV systolic function (rho -0.65). Heart involvement in CSS patients who are in clinical remission is very common. It is characterized not only by fibrosis, but also by an active inflammatory process. The latter finding might influence therapeutic decisions in CSS patients in full clinical remission. (author)

  12. Primary epidural lymphoma without vertebral involvement in a HIV-positive patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, M. O.; Grive, E.; Quiroga, S.; Rovira, A.

    1999-01-01

    Epidural involvement is rarely associated with lymphoma, it being more typical of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in advanced stages of the disease. The invasion of the epidural space is usually caused by the extension of a paravertebral mass or by the affected vertebrae. However, the epidural space alone can be involved. We present a case of epidural lymphoma in a patient who presented with clinical evidence of spinal cord compression. Magnetic resonance disclosed the existence of an epidural mass compressing and displacing the spinal cord without involving the adjacent vertebra or the associated paravertebral mass. (Author) 9 refs

  13. PATIENT AND PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT IN EARLY AWARENESS AND ALERT ACTIVITIES: AN EXAMPLE FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Sue; Cook, Alison; Miles, Kathryn

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study is to report on the experiences, benefits, and challenges of patient and public involvement and engagement (PPIE) from a publicly funded early awareness and alert (EAA) system in the United Kingdom. Using email, telephone, a Web site portal, Twitter and focus groups, patients and the public were involved and engaged in the recognized stages of an EAA system: identification, filtration, prioritization, early assessment, and dissemination. Approaches for PPIE were successfully integrated into all aspects of the National Institute for Health Research Horizon Scanning Research and Intelligence Centre's EAA system. Input into identification activities was not as beneficial as involvement in prioritization and early assessment. Patients gave useful insight into the Centre's Web site and engaging patients using Twitter has enabled the Centre to disseminate outputs to a wider audience. EAA systems should consider involving and engaging with patients and the public in identification, prioritization, and assessment of emerging health technologies where practicable. Further research is required to examine the value and impact of PPIE in EAA activities and in the early development of health technologies.

  14. The power of symbolic capital in patient and public involvement in health research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locock, Louise; Boylan, Anne-Marie; Snow, Rosamund; Staniszewska, Sophie

    2017-10-01

    Policy-makers and health research funders increasingly require researchers to demonstrate that they have involved patients in the design and conduct of research. However, the extent to which patients and public have the power to get involved on an equal footing is dependent on their economic, cultural, social and symbolic capital. To explore power relations in patient and public involvement (PPI) in research, particularly how patients may wield symbolic capital to develop a more equal relationship. Narrative interviews with a maximum variation sample of 38 people involved as patients, carers or public in health research, analysed thematically. Symbolic capital may be demonstrated in a range of ways (sometimes alongside or in the absence of other forms of capital): illness experience, technical illness knowledge and the challenging outsider. Symbolic capital is unstable and dependent on others for recognition and legitimacy. Nonetheless, participants identify a gradual shift in power relations over time. Research into PPI has been conceptually and theoretically poor, limiting our understanding of its mechanisms and wider contextual elements. Our findings demonstrate the importance of reflecting on the forms of power and capital wielded by the health research community, and of acknowledging the way in which PPI is challenging the status quo. As one of the first papers to conceptualize how different forms of symbolic capital operate and their critical role in challenging the balance of power, our findings may help researchers better plan their PPI activities and reflect on their own power. © 2016 The Authors. Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Patient Perceptions of Whom is Most Involved in Their Care with Successive Duty Hour Limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Vineet M; Prochaska, Micah T; Farnan, Jeanne M; Meltzer, David O

    2015-09-01

    Although direct patient care is necessary for experiential learning during residency, inpatient perceptions of the roles of resident and attending physicians in their care may have changed with residency duty hours. We aimed to assess if patients' perceptions of who is most involved in their care changed with residency duty hours. This was a prospective observational study over 12 years at a single institution. Participants were 22,408 inpatients admitted to the general medicine teaching service from 2001 to 2013, who completed a 1-month follow-up phone interview. Percentage of inpatients who reported an attending, resident, or intern as most involved in their care by duty hour period (pre-2003, post-2003-pre-2011, post-2011). With successive duty hour limits, the percentage of patients who reported the attending as most involved in their care increased (pre-2003 20 %, post-2003-pre-2011 29 %, post-2011 37 %, p care (pre-2003 20 %, post-2003-pre-2011 17 %, post-2011 12 %, p duty hours limits, hospitalized patients were more likely to report the attending physician and less likely to report the resident or intern as most involved in their hospital care. Given the importance of experiential learning to the formation of clinical judgment for independent practice, further study on the implications of these trends for resident education and patient safety is warranted.

  16. The application of MR imaging in the detection of hip involvement in patients with ankylosing spondylitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Zhen-Guo; Zhang, Xue-Zhe; Hong, Wen; Wang, Guo-Chun; Zhou, Hui-Qiong; Lu, Xin; Wang, Wu

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the changes in hip MR imaging, evaluate the frequency of hip involvement and compare the value of clinical symptoms, radiographs, and MR imaging in the detection of hip involvement in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Methods: Anteroposterior radiographs of the pelvis, MR imaging of the hip and clinical evaluation were undertaken in 58 patients with definite AS. All patients were followed up 3 years. Annual radiographs and clinical evaluation were carried out. The imaging data were independently assessed by two experienced radiologists who were blinded to patient identity and clinical characteristics. Based on the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Radiology Hip Index (BASRI-hip) scoring system, BASRI-hip scores ≥2 were defined as radiological hip involvement. On MR imaging, both acute and chronic inflammatory changes were considered positive signs for hip involvement. Symptomatic hip involvement was defined as current or past pain or limitation of the hip movement. The statistical analysis was performed using the χ 2 test for comparison of sensitivity among clinical symptoms, radiographs, and MR imaging in the detection of hip involvement and the Student's t-test for comparison of disease duration between with and without hip involvement. A P value <0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. For interpreting MRI and radiographs, the percentage of agreement between the two assessors and the kappa coefficients were calculated. Results: On MR imaging, positive changes were detected in 86 (74.1%) hips among 116 hips in all 58 patients. Joint effusion was observed in 73 (62.9%) hips; 23 out of 27 patients who underwent fat-saturated contrast-enhanced T 1 -weighted sequences had abnormal synovial enhancement in bilateral hips. The other abnormal MR findings included subchondral bone marrow edema in 35 (30.2%) hips, enthesitis in 22 (19.0%) hips, fatty accumulation of the bone marrow in 28 (24.1%) hips, bone erosive

  17. 'Mervayle What Hit Meant'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McCausland, Elly

    2016-01-01

    Appearances of the pained, wounded knightly body in Malory’s Morte Darthur are relatively rare. Consequently, they are frequently loaded with interpretive significance. Reading these bodies reveals how pain functions as an instrument of masculine control, order, and self-fashioning within...

  18. Novel deletions involving the USH2A gene in patients with Usher syndrome and retinitis pigmentosa

    OpenAIRE

    García-García, Gema; Aller, Elena; Jaijo, Teresa; Aparisi, Maria J.; Larrieu, Lise; Faugère, Valérie; Blanco-Kelly, Fiona; Ayuso, Carmen; Roux, Anne-Francoise; Millán, José M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the present work was to identify and characterize large rearrangements involving the USH2A gene in patients with Usher syndrome and nonsyndromic retinitis pigmentosa. Methods The multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) technique combined with a customized array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) analysis was applied to 40 unrelated patients previously screened for point mutations in the USH2A gene in which none or only one pathologic mutation was...

  19. Patient Involvement Can Affect Clinicians’ Perspectives and Practices of Infection Prevention and Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Wyer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study, set in a mixed, adult surgical ward of a metropolitan teaching hospital in Sydney, Australia, used a novel application of video-reflexive ethnography (VRE to engage patients and clinicians in an exploration of the practical and relational complexities of patient involvement in infection prevention and control (IPC. This study included individual reflexive sessions with eight patients and six group reflexive sessions with 35 nurses. VRE usually involves participants reflecting on video footage of their own (and colleagues’ practices in group reflexive sessions. We extended the method here by presenting, to nurses, video clips of their clinical interactions with patients, in conjunction with footage of the patients themselves analyzing the videos of their own care, for infection risks. We found that this novel approach affected the nurses’ capacities to recognize, support, and enable patient involvement in IPC and to reflect on their own, sometimes inconsistent, IPC practices from patients’ perspectives. As a “post-qualitative” approach, VRE prioritizes participants’ roles, contributions, and learning. Invoking affect as an explanatory lens, we theorize that a “safe space” was created for participants in our study to reflect on and reshape their assumptions, positionings, and practices.

  20. The image ofan ideal psychiatrist inthe eyes of medical students, patients and doctors involved inpsychiatric care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Margulska

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the study was to determine differences in the image of ideal psychiatrist (IIP among patients, doctors involved in psychiatric care and medical students and also between individuals with different work experience (doctors vs. students. The psychiatrist’s personality seems an important factor in supporting therapeutic process; therefore it is worth searching for the patient’s needs. Materials and methods: Three groups participated in the study: patients of the psychiatric units, medical students of 6th year and psychiatrists. The Gough and Heilbrun ACL (Adjective Check List – based on Mur‑ ray’s theory of needs – was used to assess IIP. Results: Data analysis revealed statistically significant differences among patients, doctors and students involving five scales: Nurturance, Aggression, Change, Succorance and Deference. Patients had lower scores on Change scale than doctors and higher scores on the Nurturance, Succurance and Deference than stu‑ dents. Psychiatrists had higher scores on Nurturance and Deference scale and lower score on Aggression scale than students. Conclusions: The findings showed differences in the expectations of patients compared to those of students and doctors. The most significant difference that was observed involved the Change. It may indicate that patients prefer order, conventional approach and stability in psychiatrist’s personality traits more commonly than doctors. Study findings suggest that work experience has impact on IIP: with increasing work experience, opinion about IIP comes closer to patients’ expectations.

  1. Central nervous system involvement in adult patients with invasive infection caused by Streptococcus agalactiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyanguren, B; Esteban, L; Guillán, M; de Felipe, A; Alonso Cánovas, A; Navas, E; Quereda, C; Corral, I

    2015-04-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae is frequently an asymptomatic coloniser and a cause of neonatal and puerperal sepsis. Infections in nonpregnant adults are uncommon. The frequency of neurological complications caused by invasive infection with this microorganism in adults remains unknown. Here, we study the frequency and characteristics of central nervous system (CNS) involvement in adults with invasive S. agalactiae infection. Review of all adults with invasive S. agalactiae infection between 2003 and 2011 in a tertiary hospital. S. agalactiae was isolated from blood, CSF or synovial fluid in 75 patients. Among them, 7 (9,3%) displayed neurological involvement: 5 men and 2 nonpregnant women, aged between 20 and 62 years. Diagnoses were spinal epidural abscess due to spondylodiscitis with spinal cord compression; acute bacterial meningitis; ischemic stroke as presentation of bacterial endocarditis (2 patients each); and meningoventriculitis after neurosurgery and ventricular shunting. One patient with endocarditis caused by S. agalactiae and S. aureus died in the acute phase, and another died 3 months later from metastatic cancer. The other patients recovered without sequelae. All patients had systemic predisposing factors for infection and 5 (71,4%) had experienced disruption of the mucocutaneous barrier as a possible origin of the infection. CNS involvement is not uncommon in adult patients with invasive infection caused by S. agalactiae. Isolating S. agalactiae, especially in cases of meningitis, should lead doctors to search for predisposing systemic disease and causes of mucocutaneous barrier disruption. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. Late-onset and rare far-advanced pulmonary involvement in patients with sarcoidosis in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Chia-Wei; Chen, Der-Yuan; Lan, Joung-Liang

    2006-04-01

    Sarcoidosis is still considered a rare multisystem disorder in Taiwan, and data on the disease course and outcome are limited. We analyzed the clinical manifestations, disease course and complications in Taiwanese patients with sarcoidosis. A retrospective cohort design was used. Fifty-six patients with sarcoidosis diagnosed between 1985 and 2004 were included. Their clinical features, laboratory findings at initial presentation, disease course, and complications were analyzed. Forty-three patients (76.8%) were female. The mean age at symptom onset was 47 years. The most common clinical symptoms were pulmonary (82.1%), cutaneous (23.2%), ophthalmic (19.6%), and articular (17.8%). Only two patients presented with Löfgren's syndrome. There was a seasonal variation in disease onset, with higher incidence in winter and early spring. No advanced pulmonary involvement was noted. Elevated levels of serum angiotensin converting enzyme (sACE) were found in 72.5% (29/40) of patients with active sarcoidosis, and significantly higher levels of sACE were found in patients with lung involvement (27.98+/-1.71 IU/L vs. 18.2+/-2.76 IU/L; psACE levels declined significantly in parallel with clinical remission (24.75+/-1.53 IU/L vs. 16.33+/-1.21 IU/L; psACE might be a marker of pulmonary involvement that is also useful in monitoring disease activity.

  3. Evaluation of cardiac involvement using radionuclide myuocardial imaging in patients with Takayasu arteritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Minfu; Guo Xinhua; He Zuoxiang; Jiang Xiongjing; Dou Kefei

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the study was to assess the value of radionuclide myocardial imaging in the evaluation of cardiac involvement in patients with Takayasu arteritis (TA). Methods: The 99 Tc m -methoxyisobutylisonitrile myocardial perlusion imaging (MIBI-MPI) and (or) 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET imaging findings in 12 TA patients [3 men and 9 women, mean age (35 ± 15) years] with coronary lesions (CL; n=8) or aortic insufficiency (AI; n=4) were retrospectively reviewed and analysed. Of the 4 AI-TA patients, 1 underwent exercise MIBI-MPI, 1 underwent pharmacologic stress MIBI-MPI and 2 un- derwent resting MIBI-MPI. Of the 8 CL-TA patients, 4 pnderwent MIBI-MPI (2 stress and 2 rest) and 4 un- derwent a dual-isotope simultaneous acquisition (DISA) SPECT protocol after injection of MIBI and FDG. Results: All 4 AI-TA patients showed left ventricular enlargement but no peffusion abnormalities. In 3 CL- TA patients with no documented infarct, MPI or DISA showed stress ischemia (n=2) or mismatched perfusion-metabolism defects (n=1). In the remaining 5 CL-TA patients with documented infarcts, 2 showed large perfusion defects on resting MIBI and 3 showed matched perfusion-metabolism defects on DISA SPECT. Conclusion: Radionuclide imaging is useful in providing a comprehensive functional evaluation for TA patients with cardiac involvement. (authors)

  4. Revolution or evolution: the challenges of conceptualizing patient and public involvement in a consumerist world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tritter, Jonathan Q.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background  Changing the relationship between citizens and the state is at the heart of current policy reforms. Across England and the developed world, from Oslo to Ontario, Newcastle to Newquay, giving the public a more direct say in shaping the organization and delivery of healthcare services is central to the current health reform agenda. Realigning public services around those they serve, based on evidence from service user’s experiences, and designed with and by the people rather than simply on their behalf, is challenging the dominance of managerialism, marketization and bureaucratic expertise. Despite this attention there is limited conceptual and theoretical work to underpin policy and practice. Objective  This article proposes a conceptual framework for patient and public involvement (PPI) and goes on to explore the different justifications for involvement and the implications of a rights‐based rather than a regulatory approach. These issues are highlighted through exploring the particular evolution of English health policy in relation to PPI on the one hand and patient choice on the other before turning to similar patterns apparent in the United States and more broadly. Conclusions  A framework for conceptualizing PPI is presented that differentiates between the different types and aims of involvement and their potential impact. Approaches to involvement are different in those countries that adopt a rights‐based rather than a regulatory approach. I conclude with a discussion of the tension and interaction apparent in the globalization of both involvement and patient choice in both policy and practice. PMID:19754691

  5. Cardiac involvement in patients with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2 and Becker muscular dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sveen, Marie-Louise; Thune, Jens Jakob; Køber, Lars

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the extent of cardiac involvement in patients with 1 of the 12 groups of recessively inherited limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2 (LGMD2A-L) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD). DESIGN: Prospective screening. SETTING: Neuromuscular Clinic and Department of Cardiology...

  6. Selective patient and public involvement: The promise and perils of pharmaceutical intervention for autism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Russell, Ginny; Starr, Sandy; Rodogno, Raffaele

    2017-01-01

    was to scrutinize patient and public involvement (PPI) by a pan-European biomedical consortium working to develop drugs to treat autism. We aimed to use this as an example to illustrate how PPI has been utilized in biomedical research. Setting, participants and analysis: Two public events, one in the UK and one...

  7. Patient and public involvement in scope development for a palliative care health technology assessment in europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brereton, L.; Goyder, E.; Ingleton, C.; Gardiner, C.; Chilcott, J.; Wilt, G.J. van der; Oortwijn, W.; Mozygemba, K.; Lysdahl, K.B.; Sacchini, D.; Lepper, W.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patient and Public Involvement (PPI) helps to ensure that study findings are useful to end users but is under-developed in Health Technology Assessment (HTA). "INTEGRATE-HTA, (a co-funded European Union project -grant agreement 30614) is developing new methods to assess complex health

  8. Involved-node radiotherapy (INRT) in patients with early Hodgkin lymphoma: Concepts and guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girinsky, Theodore; Maazen, Richard van der; Specht, Lena; Aleman, Berthe; Poortmans, Philip; Lievens, Yolande; Meijnders, Paul; Ghalibafian, Mithra; Meerwaldt, Jacobus; Noordijk, Evert

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: To describe new concepts for radiation fields in patients with early stage Hodgkin lymphoma treated with a combined modality. Patients and materials: Patients receiving combined modality therapy with at least 2 or 3 cycles of chemotherapy prior to radiotherapy. Pre- and postchemotherapy cervical and thoracic CT scans are mandatory and should be performed, whenever possible, in the treatment position with the use of image fusion capabilities. A pre-chemotherapy PET scan is strongly recommended to increase the detection of involved lymph nodes. Results: Radiation fields are designed to irradiate the initially involved lymph nodes exclusively and to encompass their initial volume. In some cases, radiation fields are slightly modified to avoid unnecessary irradiation of muscles or organs at risk. Conclusions: The concept of involved-node radiotherapy (INRT) described here is the first attempt to reduce the size of radiation fields compared to the classic involved fields used in adult patients. Proper implementation of INRT requires adequate training and an efficient prospective or early retrospective quality assurance program

  9. Disseminated Cryptococcosis With Brain Involvement in Patients With Chronic Lymphoid Malignancies on Ibrutinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, Julia A; Maziarz, Eileen K; Spec, Andrej; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P; Perfect, John R

    2017-01-01

    We report 2 cases of disseminated cryptococcosis with central nervous system involvement in patients with chronic lymphoid malignancies occurring within 1 month of starting on ibrutinib. Characteristically, in both cases, no inflammation was seen in the cerebrospinal fluid. Central nervous system mycoses should be considered as a potential complication of ibrutinib.

  10. Disseminated Cryptococcosis With Brain Involvement in Patients With Chronic Lymphoid Malignancies on Ibrutinib

    OpenAIRE

    Messina, Julia A.; Maziarz, Eileen K.; Spec, Andrej; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P.; Perfect, John R.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract We report 2 cases of disseminated cryptococcosis with central nervous system involvement in patients with chronic lymphoid malignancies occurring within 1 month of starting on ibrutinib. Characteristically, in both cases, no inflammation was seen in the cerebrospinal fluid. Central nervous system mycoses should be considered as a potential complication of ibrutinib.

  11. Late-onset and Rare Far-advanced Pulmonary Involvement in Patients with Sarcoidosis in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Wei Hsieh

    2006-01-01

    Conclusion: In this series, the mean age of disease onset was in middle age (mean, 47 years old, there was a low incidence of Löfgren's syndrome (3.6%, and no patients had advanced pulmonary syndrome. The results of this study also suggest that sACE might be a marker of pulmonary involvement that is also useful in monitoring disease activity.

  12. COMPARISON OF PATHWAY AND CENTER OF GRAVITY OF THE CALCANEUS ON NON-INVOLVED AND INVOLVED SIDES ACCORDING TO ECCENTRIC AND CONCENTRIC STRENGTHENING IN PATIENTS WITH ACHILLES TENDINOPATHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JaeHo Yu

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This study compares the changes in pathway and center of gravity (COG on the calcaneus of non-involved and involved sides according to eccentric and concentric strengthening in patients with unilateral Achilles tendinopathy. The goal was to define the biomechanical changes according to eccentric strengthening for the development of clinical guidelines. Eighteen patients with Achilles tendinopathy were recruited at the K Rehabilitation Hospital in Seoul. The subjects were instructed to perform 5 sessions of concentric strengthening. The calcaneal pathway was measured using a three-dimensional (3D motion analyzer, and COG was measured by a force plate. Subsequently, eccentric strengthening was implemented, and identical variables were measured. Concentric and eccentric strengthening was carried out on both the involved and non-involved sides. There was no significant difference in the calcaneal pathway in patients with Achilles tendinopathy during concentric and eccentric strengthening. However, during eccentric strengthening, the calcaneal pathway significantly increased on the involved side compared to the non-involved side for all variables excluding the z-axis. COG significantly decreased on the involved side when compared to the non-involved side in patients with Achilles tendinopathy during eccentric and concentric strengthening. During concentric strengthening, all variables of the COG significantly increased on the involved side compared to the non-involved side. Compared with eccentric strengthening, concentric strengthening decreased the stability of ankle joints and increased the movement distance of the calcaneus in patients with Achilles tendinopathy. Furthermore, eccentric strengthening was verified to be an effective exercise method for prevention of Achilles tendinopathy through the reduction of forward and backward path length of foot pressure. The regular application of eccentric strengthening was found to be effective in the

  13. The influence of contextual factors on patient involvement during follow-up consultations after colorectal cancer surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Thora G; Soelver, Lisbeth; Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi

    2017-01-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To identify the contextual factors that influence individual patient involvement during colorectal cancer surgical follow-up consultations. BACKGROUND: The healthcare system is subject to the requirement and expectation of greater involvement of patients and relatives...... the identification of current contextual factors. RESULTS: The results showed five contextual factors that seemed to have an impact on patient involvement. The first, 'Two dimensions of patient involvement: treatment-oriented and person-oriented' highlighted a dual interpretation of patient involvement....... Increased patient involvement requires the development and implementation of new communication initiatives. Research shows that it is also necessary to consider the contextual circumstances surrounding patient involvement in specific situations. DESIGN: Case study of a single Danish outpatient clinic, which...

  14. Involvement of patients' perspectives on treatment with noninvasive ventilation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Helle Marie; Huniche, Lotte; Titlestad, Ingrid L

    2018-01-01

    and hospitalisation. CONCLUSION: Investigation of patient perspectives generated results that were highly productive in facilitating multidisciplinary collaboration and in developing and sustaining new management strategies. Critical psychological practice research facilitated ongoing development of clinical practice...... is needed to develop treatment practices in respiratory medicine. METHOD: This study is based on critical psychological practice research. DESIGN: A co-researcher group comprising diverse health professionals was set up and headed by the principal researcher. The group convened seven times over 12 months......AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To clarify chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients' perspectives on treatment with noninvasive ventilation and develop management strategies for the treatment based on these perspectives. BACKGROUND: The effect of treating chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients...

  15. Hypereosinophilic syndrome: Clinical, laboratory, and imaging manifestations in patients with hepatic involvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gi Beom; Lee, Jong Min; Sung, Yeong Soon; Kang, Duk Sik [Kyungpook Natioanl University College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ok Hwoa [Dongkang general Hospital, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-07-15

    The hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) commonly involves liver and spleen but only a few literature has reported the imaging features. In this article, we present the imaging features of the liver and spleen in HES patients together with clinical and laboratory features. This study included 5 HES patients with hepatic involvement. Extensive laboratory tests including multiple hematologic, serologic, parasitological, and immunologic examinations were performed. Imaging studies included CT, ultrasound (US)of upper abdomen and hepatosplenic scintigraphy. All patients were periodically examined by laboratory and imaging studies for 4 to 24 months. The common clinical presentations were weakness, mild fever, and dry cough. All patients revealed leukocytosis with eosinophilia of 40 to 80% and benign eosinophilic hyperplasia of the bone marrow. The percutaneous biopsy of the hepatic focal lesions performed in 2 patients showed numerous benigin eosinophilic infiltrates and one of them revealed combined calibration necrosis of hepatocytes. All cases revealed hepatomegaly with multiple focal lesions on at least on of CT, US, or scintigraphy. These findings completely disappeared in 2 to 6 months following medication of corticosteroid or antihistamines. The HES involved the liver and CT, US, or scintigraphic studies showed hepatic multifocal lesions with hepatomegaly. Differential diagnosis of these findings should include metastatic disease, lymphoma, leukemia, candidiasis or other opportunistic infections.

  16. Hypereosinophilic syndrome: Clinical, laboratory, and imaging manifestations in patients with hepatic involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Gi Beom; Lee, Jong Min; Sung, Yeong Soon; Kang, Duk Sik; Kim, Ok Hwoa

    1993-01-01

    The hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) commonly involves liver and spleen but only a few literature has reported the imaging features. In this article, we present the imaging features of the liver and spleen in HES patients together with clinical and laboratory features. This study included 5 HES patients with hepatic involvement. Extensive laboratory tests including multiple hematologic, serologic, parasitological, and immunologic examinations were performed. Imaging studies included CT, ultrasound (US)of upper abdomen and hepatosplenic scintigraphy. All patients were periodically examined by laboratory and imaging studies for 4 to 24 months. The common clinical presentations were weakness, mild fever, and dry cough. All patients revealed leukocytosis with eosinophilia of 40 to 80% and benign eosinophilic hyperplasia of the bone marrow. The percutaneous biopsy of the hepatic focal lesions performed in 2 patients showed numerous benigin eosinophilic infiltrates and one of them revealed combined calibration necrosis of hepatocytes. All cases revealed hepatomegaly with multiple focal lesions on at least on of CT, US, or scintigraphy. These findings completely disappeared in 2 to 6 months following medication of corticosteroid or antihistamines. The HES involved the liver and CT, US, or scintigraphic studies showed hepatic multifocal lesions with hepatomegaly. Differential diagnosis of these findings should include metastatic disease, lymphoma, leukemia, candidiasis or other opportunistic infections

  17. Renal pathological implications in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with renal involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Zhang, Xiuhui; Li, Zhicheng; Zhang, Rui; Guo, Ruikun; Yin, Qinghua; Yang, Lichuan; Yue, Rongzheng; Su, Baihai; Huang, Songmin; Xu, Huan; He, Cijiang; Liu, Fang

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the renal pathological implications in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with renal involvement. A total of 328 type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients with renal involvement who underwent a renal biopsy and received follow-up for at least one year were recruited in our study. The patients were divided into the diabetic nephropathy (DN), non-diabetic renal disease (NDRD), and NDRD superimposed on DN groups based on the pathological diagnosis. Renal outcomes were defined by the initiation of renal replacement therapy or doubling of the serum creatinine. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to compare renal survival, and Cox proportional hazard analysis was used to determine the predictors of renal outcomes in the DN group. Renal biopsy findings revealed that 188 patients (57.32%) had pure DN, 121 patients (36.89%) had NDRD alone, and 19 patients (5.79%) had NDRD superimposed on DN. The most frequent subclassification of NDRD was membranous nephropathy (MN). Compared with the NDRD and NDRD superimposed on DN groups, patients with pure DN had poorer renal function and lower renal survival rates. In the DN group, the five-year renal survival rates of glomerular classes of I, IIa, IIb, III and IV were 100%, 84.62%, 60%, 47.5% and 33.33%, respectively. Multivariate Cox proportional hazard analysis showed that the glomerular lesions, proteinuria and serum creatinine were independent risk factors for renal outcomes, while interstitial fibrosis/inflammation and arteriolar hyalinosis were not independently associated with renal outcomes in the DN group. Making an accurate pathologic diagnosis by renal biopsy is crucial for diabetes mellitus (DM) patients with renal involvement. The findings of our present study indicated that patients with pure DN had poorer renal outcomes than patients with NDRD or NDRD superimposed on DN. The classification of glomerular lesions, proteinuria and serum creatinine were independent risk factors for renal outcomes in the DN group

  18. F-18 FDG PET scan findings in patients with pulmonary involvement in the hypereosinophilic syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Hoon; Kim, Tae Hoon; Yun, Mi Jin [College of Medicine, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2005-08-15

    Hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) is an infiltrative disease of eosinophils affecting multiple organs including the lung. F-18 2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (F-18 FDG) may accumulate at sites of inflammation or infection, making interpretation of whole body PET scan difficult in patients with cancer. This study was to evaluate the PET findings of HES with lung involvement and to find out differential PET features between lung malignancy and HES with lung involvement. F-18 FDG PET and low dose chest CT scan was performed for screening of lung cancer. Eight patients who showed ground-glass attenuation (GGA) and consolidation on chest CT scan with peripheral blood eosinophilia were included in this study. The patients with history of parasite infection, allergy and collagen vascular disease were excluded. CT features and FDG PET findings were meticulously evaluated for the distribution of GGA and consolidation and nodules on CT scan and mean and maximal SUV of abnormalities depicted on F-18 FDG PET scan. In eight patients, follow-up chest CT scan and FDG PET scan were done one or two weeks after initial study. F-18 FDG PET scan identified metabolically active lesions in seven out of eight patients. Maximal SUV was ranged from 2.8 to 10.6 and mean SUV was ranged from 2.2 to 7.2. Remaining one patient had maximal SUV of 1.3. On follow-up FDG PET scan taken on from one to four weeks later showed decreased degree of initially noted FDG uptakes or migration of previously noted abnormal FDG uptakes. Lung involvement in the HES might be identified as abnormal uptake foci on FDG PET scan mimicking lung cancer. Follow-up FDG PET and CT scan for the identification of migration or resolution of abnormalities and decrement of SUV would be of help for the differentiation between lung cancer and HES with lung involvement.

  19. F-18 FDG PET scan findings in patients with pulmonary involvement in the hypereosinophilic syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae Hoon; Kim, Tae Hoon; Yun, Mi Jin

    2005-01-01

    Hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) is an infiltrative disease of eosinophils affecting multiple organs including the lung. F-18 2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (F-18 FDG) may accumulate at sites of inflammation or infection, making interpretation of whole body PET scan difficult in patients with cancer. This study was to evaluate the PET findings of HES with lung involvement and to find out differential PET features between lung malignancy and HES with lung involvement. F-18 FDG PET and low dose chest CT scan was performed for screening of lung cancer. Eight patients who showed ground-glass attenuation (GGA) and consolidation on chest CT scan with peripheral blood eosinophilia were included in this study. The patients with history of parasite infection, allergy and collagen vascular disease were excluded. CT features and FDG PET findings were meticulously evaluated for the distribution of GGA and consolidation and nodules on CT scan and mean and maximal SUV of abnormalities depicted on F-18 FDG PET scan. In eight patients, follow-up chest CT scan and FDG PET scan were done one or two weeks after initial study. F-18 FDG PET scan identified metabolically active lesions in seven out of eight patients. Maximal SUV was ranged from 2.8 to 10.6 and mean SUV was ranged from 2.2 to 7.2. Remaining one patient had maximal SUV of 1.3. On follow-up FDG PET scan taken on from one to four weeks later showed decreased degree of initially noted FDG uptakes or migration of previously noted abnormal FDG uptakes. Lung involvement in the HES might be identified as abnormal uptake foci on FDG PET scan mimicking lung cancer. Follow-up FDG PET and CT scan for the identification of migration or resolution of abnormalities and decrement of SUV would be of help for the differentiation between lung cancer and HES with lung involvement

  20. Examining chronic care patient preferences for involvement in health-care decision making: the case of Parkinson's disease patients in a patient-centred clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zizzo, Natalie; Bell, Emily; Lafontaine, Anne-Louise; Racine, Eric

    2017-08-01

    Patient-centred care is a recommended model of care for Parkinson's disease (PD). It aims to provide care that is respectful and responsive to patient preferences, values and perspectives. Provision of patient-centred care should entail considering how patients want to be involved in their care. To understand the participation preferences of patients with PD from a patient-centred care clinic in health-care decision-making processes. Mixed-methods study with early-stage Parkinson's disease patients from a patient-centred care clinic. Study involved a modified Autonomy Preference Index survey (N=65) and qualitative, semi-structured in-depth interviews, analysed using thematic qualitative content analysis (N=20, purposefully selected from survey participants). Interviews examined (i) the patient preferences for involvement in health-care decision making; (ii) patient perspectives on the patient-physician relationship; and (iii) patient preferences for communication of information relevant to decision making. Preferences for participation in decision making varied between individuals and also within individuals depending on decision type, relational and contextual factors. Patients had high preferences for communication of information, but with acknowledged limits. The importance of communication in the patient-physician relationship was emphasized. Patient preferences for involvement in decision making are dynamic and support shared decision making. Relational autonomy corresponds to how patients envision their participation in decision making. Clinicians may need to assess patient preferences on an on-going basis. Our results highlight the complexities of decision-making processes. Improved understanding of individual preferences could enhance respect for persons and make for patient-centred care that is truly respectful of individual patients' wants, needs and values. © 2016 The Authors. Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. 'You're there because you are unprofessional': patient and public involvement as liminal knowledge spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Kath; Britten, Nicky

    2018-03-01

    Patient and public involvement in health research and care has been repeatedly theorised using the metaphor of spaces, knowledge spaces and participatory citizenship spaces. Drawing on data from a three year qualitative study of people involved in health research with organisations across England, this article explores where these spaces fit in a wider social, political and historical landscape. It outlines a theme recurring frequently in the study data: a unified public/patient/service-user perspective in opposition to a professional/clinical/academic view. This is discussed in relation to Habermas's division between the lifeworld and system. Patient and public involvement is mapped as spaces between these spheres, therefore between the social norms pertaining to them. In this way, involvement spaces are seen as liminal, in-between or threshold spaces; this concept provides us with new insights on both the opportunities and the conflicts that are integral in the ambiguous, complex interactions which take place in these spaces. © 2017 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness.

  2. Why orphan drug coverage reimbursement decision-making needs patient and public involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Conor M W; Wilcox, Elizabeth; Burgess, Michael; Lynd, Larry D

    2015-05-01

    Recently there has been an increase in the active involvement of publics and patients in healthcare and research, which is extending their roles beyond the passive recipients of medicines. However, there has been noticeably less work engaging them into decision-making for healthcare rationing exercises, priority setting, health technology assessment, and coverage decision-making. This is particularly evident in reimbursement decision-making for 'orphan drugs' or drugs for rare diseases. Medicinal products for rare disease offer particular challenges in coverage decision-making because they often lack the 'evidence of efficacy' profiles of common drugs that have been trialed on larger populations. Furthermore, many of these drugs are priced in the high range, and with limited health care budgets the prospective opportunity costs of funding them means that those resources cannot be allocated elsewhere. Here we outline why decision-making for drugs for rare diseases could benefit from increased levels of publics and patients involvement, suggest some possible forms that involvement could take, and advocate for empirical experimentation in this area to evaluate the effects of such involvement. Focus is given to the Canadian context in which we are based; however, potentialities and challenges relating to involvement in this area are likely to be similar elsewhere. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Hypereosinophilic syndrome: CT findings in patients with hepatic lobar or segmental involvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Jae Hoon; Lee, Won Jae [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dong Ho [Kyunghee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Kyung Jin [Donga University College of Medicine, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the CT findings of hepatic hypereosinophilic syndrome in which hepatic lobes or segments were involved. Seven patients with hypereosinophilic syndrome with hepatic lobar or segmental involvement were included in our study. In all seven, diagnosis was based on liver biopsy and the results of corticosteroid treatment. CT findings were retrospectively reviewed by three radiologists, who reached a consensus. Biopsy specimens were examined, with special reference to portal and periportal inflammation. CT demonstrated well-defined, homogeneous or heterogeneous low attenuation with a straight margin limited to a hepatic lobe (n = 2), segments (n = 3), or subsegments (n = 2), particularly during the portal phase. Where there was subsegmental involvement, lesions were multiple, ovoid or wedge-shaped, and showed low attenuation. In two patients with lobar or segmental involvement, segmental portal vein narrowing was observed. Histopathologic examination disclosed eosinophilic infiltration in the periportal area, sinusoids and central veins, as well as portal phlebitis. Hypereosinophilic syndrome may involve the presence of hepatic lobar, segmental, or subsegmental low-attenuated lesions, as seen on CT images. Their presence may be related to damage of the liver parenchyma and to portal phlebitis.

  4. Hypereosinophilic syndrome: CT findings in patients with hepatic lobar or segmental involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Jae Hoon; Lee, Won Jae; Lee, Dong Ho; Nam, Kyung Jin

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the CT findings of hepatic hypereosinophilic syndrome in which hepatic lobes or segments were involved. Seven patients with hypereosinophilic syndrome with hepatic lobar or segmental involvement were included in our study. In all seven, diagnosis was based on liver biopsy and the results of corticosteroid treatment. CT findings were retrospectively reviewed by three radiologists, who reached a consensus. Biopsy specimens were examined, with special reference to portal and periportal inflammation. CT demonstrated well-defined, homogeneous or heterogeneous low attenuation with a straight margin limited to a hepatic lobe (n = 2), segments (n = 3), or subsegments (n = 2), particularly during the portal phase. Where there was subsegmental involvement, lesions were multiple, ovoid or wedge-shaped, and showed low attenuation. In two patients with lobar or segmental involvement, segmental portal vein narrowing was observed. Histopathologic examination disclosed eosinophilic infiltration in the periportal area, sinusoids and central veins, as well as portal phlebitis. Hypereosinophilic syndrome may involve the presence of hepatic lobar, segmental, or subsegmental low-attenuated lesions, as seen on CT images. Their presence may be related to damage of the liver parenchyma and to portal phlebitis

  5. [Therapeutic education in oncology: involving patient in the management of cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérol, David; Toutenu, Pauline; Lefranc, Anne; Régnier, Véronique; Chvetzoff, Gisèle; Saltel, Pierre; Chauvin, Franck

    2007-03-01

    The notion of therapeutic education was only recently introduced in cancer. Although the term is commonly used, no standard definition exists for the concept and principles of therapeutic education and its efficacy remains to be assessed. Therapeutic education is complementary to the healthcare approach and aims to get the patients more involved in their disease and the treatment decision-making process. This discipline, placed at the interface of human and social sciences, was first developed for the management of chronic diseases (diabetes, asthma). It derives from the principle that involving patients in their own care and management can help them better adjust to life with a chronic disease. The lengthening survival time of cancer patients, which contributes to making cancer a chronic disease, as well as changes in the patient-caregiver relationship contribute to the development of therapeutic education in cancer. Pilot studies, conducted principally in the United States, evaluating the side effects of chemotherapy and the management of pain, have demonstrated that such educational programs could improve patient quality of life and decrease the side effects of treatments. The success of these programs depends on several parameters: taking into account patient's opinion in the elaboration and preparation of the programs; involving skilled multidisciplinary teams engaged in iterative educational actions; having recourse to methodological tools to evaluate the impact of implemented programs. Consistent with the World Health Organization guidelines, research should be conducted in France in order to elaborate and implement cancer-specific education programs and evaluate their potential benefit. Patient education programs on pain, fatigue, nutrition and treatment compliance are currently being developed at Saint-Etienne Regional Resource Centre for cancer information, prevention and education, within the framework of the Canceropole Lyon Auvergne Rhône-Alpes.

  6. SECONDARY AMYLOIDOSIS WITH LUNG INVOLVEMENT INA FEMALE PATIENT WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Mikhailovna Marusenko

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the problem of secondary amyloidosis that more frequently occurs in patients with various arthritides, both seropositive and seronegative. According to the data available in the literature, the most common manifestations of secondary amyloidosis are involvements of the kidney, liver, nervous system, and, less frequently, the lung. The authors describe their own observation of secondary amyloidosis in rheumatoid arthritis, which is accompanied by the involvement of the lung, kidney, and intestine, resulting in fatal outcome. The lifetime diagnosis of amyloidosis was histologically verified.

  7. 'Finding a balance' in involving patients in goal setting early after stroke: a physiotherapy perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, A; Roberts, A R; Freeman, J A

    2014-09-01

    Collaborative goal setting (between patient and professional) confers benefits within stroke and neurological rehabilitation, and is recommended in clinical guidelines. However, evidence suggests that patient participation in rehabilitation goal setting is not maximized, particularly within the hospital setting. The purpose of this study was to investigate physiotherapists' perceptions about their experiences of collaborative goal setting with patients in the sub-acute stages after stroke, in the hospital setting. This qualitative study employed constructivist grounded theory methodology. Nine physiotherapists, of varying experience, were selected using purposive then theoretical sampling from three National Health Service hospital stroke units in England. Semi-structured interviews were conducted, audio-recorded and transcribed. Transcripts were coded and analysed using the constant comparative method of grounded theory to find common themes. Three themes emerged from the data: 1) 'coming to terms with stroke' - the individual patient journey; 2) the evolution of goal setting skill - the individual physiotherapist journey; and 3) 'finding a balance' - managing expectations and negotiating interactions. A provisional grounded theory was constructed, which highlighted that, from the physiotherapists' perspective, collaboration with patients within goal setting early after stroke involved finding a balance between numerous different drivers, which have the potential to compete. Patient-directed and therapist-directed goal setting approaches could be viewed as opposite ends of a continuum, along which patient-centred goal setting is possible. Physiotherapists perceived that collaborating with patients in goal setting was important but challenging. Goal setting interactions with other professionals, patients and families were perceived as complex, difficult and requiring significant effort. The importance of individuality and temporality were recognized suggesting that

  8. Evaluation of patient involvement in a systematic review and meta-analysis of individual patient data in cervical cancer treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vale Claire L

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In April 2005, researchers based at the Medical Research Council Clinical Trials Unit, set out to involve women affected by cervical cancer in a systematic review and meta-analysis of individual patient data to evaluate treatments for this disease. Each of the women had previously been treated for cervical cancer. Following completion of the meta-analysis, we aimed to evaluate the process of involvement from the researcher and research partner perspective. Methods An advisory group was first established to give advice on recruiting, supporting and involving women and led to efforts to recruit women to take part in the systematic review using different approaches. Evaluation of the process and outcomes of the partnership between the systematic reviewers and the patients, in respect to what the partnership achieved; what worked well and what were the difficulties; what was learned and the resource requirements, took place during the conduct of the meta-analysis and again after completion of the project. Results Six women, each of whom had received treatments for cervical cancer, were recruited as Patient Research Partners and five of these women subsequently took part in a variety of activities around the systematic review. They attended progress meetings and all but one attended a meeting at which the first results of the review were presented to all collaborators and gave feedback. Three of the women also became involved in a further related research project which led to an editorial publication from the patient perspective and also participated, along with two lead researchers, in the evaluation of the process and outcomes. While they were generally positive about the experience, one Patient Research Partner questioned the extent of the impact patients could make to the systematic review process. Conclusions In general, researchers and patient research partners felt that they had learned a lot from the process and considered

  9. Involvement in decisions about intravenous treatment for nursing home patients: nursing homes versus hospital wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klomstad, Kristin; Pedersen, Reidar; Førde, Reidun; Romøren, Maria

    2018-05-08

    Many of the elderly in nursing homes are very ill and have a reduced quality of life. Life expectancy is often hard to predict. Decisions about life-prolonging treatment should be based on a professional assessment of the patient's best interest, assessment of capacity to consent, and on the patient's own wishes. The purpose of this study was to investigate and compare how these types of decisions were made in nursing homes and in hospital wards. Using a questionnaire, we studied the decision-making process for 299 nursing home patients who were treated for dehydration using intravenous fluids, or for bacterial infections using intravenous antibiotics. We compared the 215 (72%) patients treated in nursing homes to the 84 (28%) nursing home patients treated in the hospital. The patients' capacity to consent was considered prior to treatment in 197 (92%) of the patients treated in nursing homes and 56 (67%) of the patients treated in hospitals (p nursing homes than in hospital (90% vs. 52%). Next of kin and other health personnel were also more rarely involved when the nursing home patient was treated in hospital. Whether advance care planning had been carried out, was more often unknown in the hospital (69% vs. 17% in nursing homes). Hospital doctors expressed more doubt about the decision to admit the patient to the hospital than about the treatment itself. This study indicates a potential for improvement in decision-making processes in general, and in particular when nursing home patients are treated in a hospital ward. The findings corroborate that nursing home patients should be treated locally if adequate health care and treatment is available. The communication between the different levels of health care when hospitalization is necessary, must be better. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01023763 (12/1/09) [The registration was delayed one month after study onset due to practical reasons].

  10. Consumer satisfaction among patients and their general practitioners about involving nurse specialists in primary care for patients with urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers-Heitner, Pytha; Winkens, Ron; Berghmans, Bary; Joore, Manuela; Nieman, Fred; Severens, Johan; Lagro-Janssen, Toine

    2013-06-01

    Urinary incontinence (UI) is a very common problem, but existing guidelines on UI are not followed. To bring care in line with guidelines, we planned an intervention to involve nurse specialists on UI in primary care and assessed this in a randomised controlled trial. Alongside this intervention, we assessed consumer satisfaction among patients and general practitioners (GPs). Patients' satisfaction with the care provided by either nurse specialists (intervention group) or GPs (control group), respectively, was measured with a self-completed questionnaire. GPs' views on the involvement of nurse specialists were measured in a structured telephone interview. The patient satisfaction score on the care offered by nurse specialists was 8.4 (scale 1-10), vs. 6.7 for care-as-usual by GPs. Over 85% of patients would recommend nurse specialist care to their best friends and 77% of the GPs considered the role of the nurse specialist to be beneficial, giving it a mean score of 7.2. Although the sample was relatively small and the stability of the results only provisionally established, substituting UI care from GP to nurse specialist appears to be welcomed by both patients and GPs. Small changes like giving additional UI-specific information and devoting more attention to UI (which had been given little attention before) would provide a simple instrument to stimulate patients to change their behaviour in the right direction. © 2012 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  11. Added value of involving patients in the first step of multidisciplinary guideline development: a qualitative interview study among infertile patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Breejen, Elvira M E; Hermens, Rosella P M G; Galama, Wienke H; Willemsen, Wim N P; Kremer, Jan A M; Nelen, Willianne L D M

    2016-06-01

    Patient involvement in scoping the guideline is emphasized, but published initiatives actively involving patients are generally limited to the writing and reviewing phase. To assess patients' added value to the scoping phase of a multidisciplinary guideline on infertility. Qualitative interview study. We conducted interviews among 12 infertile couples and 17 professionals. We listed and compared the couples' and professionals' key clinical issues (=care aspects that need improvement) to be addressed in the guideline according to four domains: current guidelines, professionals, patients and organization of care. Main key clinical issues suggested by more than three quarters of the infertile couples and/or at least two professionals were identified and compared. Overall, we identified 32 key clinical issues among infertile couples and 23 among professionals. Of the defined main key clinical issues, infertile couples mentioned eight issues that were not mentioned by the professionals. These main key clinical issues mainly concerned patient-centred (e.g. poor information provision and poor alignment of care) aspects of care on the professional and organizational domain. Both groups mentioned two main key clinical issues collectively that were interpreted differently: the lack of emotional support and respect for patients' values. Including patients from the first phase of the guideline development process leads to valuable additional main key clinical issues for the next step of a multidisciplinary guideline development process and broadens the scope of the guideline, particularly regarding patient-centredness and organizational issues from a patients' perspective. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care; all rights reserved.

  12. Factors associated with oncology patients' involvement in shared decision making during chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colley, Alexis; Halpern, Jodi; Paul, Steven; Micco, Guy; Lahiff, Maureen; Wright, Fay; Levine, Jon D; Mastick, Judy; Hammer, Marilyn J; Miaskowski, Christine; Dunn, Laura B

    2017-11-01

    Oncology patients are increasingly encouraged to play an active role in treatment decision making. While previous studies have evaluated relationships between demographic characteristics and decision-making roles, less is known about the association of symptoms and psychological adjustment characteristics (eg, coping styles and personality traits) and decision-making roles. As part of a larger study of symptom clusters, patients (n = 765) receiving chemotherapy for breast, gastrointestinal, gynecological, or lung cancer provided information on demographic, clinical, symptom, and psychological adjustment characteristics. Patient-reported treatment decision-making roles (ie, preferred role and role actually played) were assessed using the Control Preferences Scale. Differences among patients, who were classified as passive, collaborative, or active, were evaluated using χ 2 analyses and analyses of variance. Over half (56.3%) of the patients reported that they both preferred and actually played a collaborative role. Among those patients with concordant roles, those who were older, those with less education and lower income, and those who were less resilient were more likely to prefer a passive role. Several psychological adjustment characteristics were associated with decision-making role, including coping style, personality, and fatalism. Oncology patients' preferences for involvement in treatment decision making are associated with demographic characteristics as well as with symptoms and psychological adjustment characteristics, such as coping style and personality. These results reaffirm the complexities of predicting patients' preferences for involvement in decision making. Further study is needed to determine if role or coping style may be influenced by interventions designed to teach adaptive coping skills. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Somatic involvement assessed through a cumulative score of clinical severity in patients with eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanelli, Giovanni; Gualandi, Malvina; Simoni, Marzia; Manzato, Emilia

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate the overall somatic involvement in patients with eating disorders (EDs). The medical records of 206 patients (age 15-56 years, 96.1% females) with diagnosis of anorexia nervosa (AN, n = 63, 30.6%), bulimia nervosa (BN, n = 78, 37.9%), or eating disorder not otherwise specified (EDNOS, n = 65, 31.6 %) were analyzed. A cumulative score of clinical severity (SCS) was computed according to the presence of physical, instrumental, and laboratory abnormalities, as well as to their prognostic impact. Based on the tertile distribution of SCS, three levels of severity were defined: low, medium, and high. A medium/high level of severity was found in 63% of the whole sample, 89% of AN, 49% of BN, and 55% of EDNOS. In the whole sample, the risk of medium/high SCS was significantly and inversely related to the body mass index (BMI) and to the lifetime minimum BMI. The severity level was significantly and positively associated with diagnosis of AN, duration of amenorrhea C1 year, and presence of ED-related symptoms. EDNOS patients showed a higher risk for increased SCS than BN patients, although not significantly. The non-negligible frequency of a relevant somatic involvement in patients with EDNOS suggests that a transdiagnostic scoring system might be helpful to identify ED cases at risk of medical complications.

  14. Data collection using open access technology in multicentre operational research involving patient interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shewade, H D; Chadha, S S; Gupta, V; Tripathy, J P; Satyanarayana, S; Sagili, K; Mohanty, S; Bera, O P; Pandey, P; Rajeswaran, P; Jayaraman, G; Santhappan, A; Bajpai, U N; Mamatha, A M; Maiser, R; Naqvi, A J; Pandurangan, S; Nath, S; Ghule, V H; Das, A; Prasad, B M; Biswas, M; Singh, G; Mallick, G; Jeyakumar Jaisingh, A J; Rao, R; Kumar, A M V

    2017-03-21

    Conducting multicentre operational research is challenging due to issues related to the logistics of travel, training, supervision, monitoring and troubleshooting support. This is even more burdensome in resource-constrained settings and if the research includes patient interviews. In this article, we describe an innovative model that uses open access tools such as Dropbox, TeamViewer and CamScanner for efficient, quality-assured data collection in an ongoing multicentre operational research study involving record review and patient interviews. The tools used for data collection have been shared for adaptation and use by other researchers.

  15. A Paradigm Shift Towards Patient Involvement in Medicines Development and Regulatory Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup, Gitte; Bach, Karin Friis; Schmiegelow, Merete

    2016-01-01

    to become educated. A much better organized and stronger involvement of patients was called for. However, this should not only rely on goodwill, but should preferably be implemented by legal requirements, so as to secure compliance by all stakeholders. An independent platform with the purpose of providing...... access to patient experience was proposed. A research and educational center such as CORS, which was founded on cross-sectorial and cross-disciplinary cooperation, is an example of an institution that could be a good starting point for hosting such a platform....

  16. Biomedical research involving patients with disorders of consciousness: ethical and legal dimensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Farisco

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The directive 2001/20/UE and the research involving patients with docs. Research involving patients with disorders of consciousness (DOCs deserves special ethical and legal attention because of its Janus-faced nature. On the one hand, it raises concerns about the risk to expose the involved subjects to disproportionate risks not respecting their individual dignity, particularly their right to be cared for; on the other hand, research is an essential tool in order to improve the clinical condition of patients with DOCs. The present paper concerns the ethical and legal dimensions of biomedical research involving patients with disorders of consciousness. In particular, it focuses on informed consent to experimental treatments, which is a challenging issue both from an ethical and legal point of view. The first part reads the Directive 2001/20/EU in the light of the experimentation of patients with DOCs, and suggests a revision in order to better assess the issue of informed consent. The particular case of informed consent for observational studies of non-communicative patients. The second part presents an informed consent form for studies through video-recording of patients unable to communicate their own consent. This form has been elaborated by the bioethics unit of the project "Review of the nosography of vegetative states: application of methods of behavioral analysis to individuals in coma or vegetative state" developed at the Italian National Institute of Health. Relevance of the suggested form. The paper describes the conceptual framework of the form for informed consent to studies through video-recoding, which is a relevant example of what issues should be included in an informed consent for any type of studies through video-recording of patients unable to express their own consent. The article has been sent on November the 7th 2013, before the adoption of the Regulation (EU no. 536/2014 (and consequent abrogation of the Directive 2001

  17. Public and Patient Involvement and the Right to Health: Reflections from England

    OpenAIRE

    Stuttaford, Maria Clasina; Boulle, Therese; Haricharan, Hanne Jensen; Sofayiya, Zingisa

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we reflect on public and patient involvement (PPI), the right to health and how human rights principles provide values for implementing mechanisms of participation and accountability. Globally, new models of formalized participation, imposed top-down by State institutions, have emerged in recent health system reforms. There is an on-going challenge to ensure that the prescribed mechanisms, or procedural rights, for implementing the substantive right to heath influence social ac...

  18. Iron Malabsorption in a Patient With Large Cell Lymphoma Involving the Duodenum

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    hemoglobin. The lymphomas (5-7). The presenting symptoms mimic chest radiograph in May demonstrated an anterior me- those of celiac disease and include...compounded the anemia in a pa- tion in celiac disease were reversible by the institution tient with diffuse large cell lymphoma involving the of a gluten...etiologies (usually 2-3 h) is expected in patients who are iron (e.g., celiac disease , pancreatic insufliciency). however, deficient and have normal

  19. Culture influence and predictors for behavioral involvement in patient safety among hospital nurses in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Hui-Ying; Lin, Shu-Yuan; Hsiao, Ya-Chu; Chang, Yuanmay

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the effects of incident reporting culture and willingness of incident reporting on behavioral involvement in patient safety (BIPS) by surveying 1049 hospital nurses in Taiwan. The highest areas of BIPS were handoff communication and discussion on error prevention. Yet, sharing information about human factors toward safety awareness was less frequent. Results indicated that the reporting culture, willingness to report, tenure of work, and reporting rate contributed positively to BIPS.

  20. Neurofibromatosis type 1 with external genitalia involvement presentation of 4 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual-Castroviejo, Ignacio; Lopez-Pereira, Pedro; Savasta, Salvatore; Lopez-Gutierrez, Juan Carlos; Lago, Carlos Míguelez; Cisternino, Mariangela

    2008-11-01

    Genitourinary neurofibromas with clitoral involvement in neurofibromatosis type 1 are rare, and even more infrequent are the neurofibromas involving genitalia in males. The most frequent presenting sign of neurofibroma in females is clitoromegaly with pseudopenis, and enlarged penis is the most common sign in males. Labium majus neurofibroma not associated with clitoral involvement is extremely rare. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstration of the neurofibromas has seldom been reported. We report 4 children, 3 girls and 1 boy, with plexiform neurofibromas involving the external genitalia. Three of the 4 patients had histologic confirmation of neurofibroma. Two girls with clitoral hypertrophy had a neurofibroma that infiltrated the clitoris and extended unilaterally to the lower bladder wall. One girl had a plexiform neurofibroma that affected a labium. One boy with asymmetric penile hypertrophy since 2 years of age and ipsilateral gluteal hypertrophy had plexiform neurofibromas that extended between the left lumbogluteal and penile regions, infiltrating the left rectum wall and bladder with compression of both structures, the left prostate, and the left half of the cavernous corpi with hypertrophy of this part and asymmetry of the penis. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated in all patients that external genitalia and plexiform neurofibroma formed images of nondetachable structures. However, hermaphroditism was discarded by chromosomal study in all 3 girls before ratifying the diagnosis of external genitalia neurofibroma.

  1. Hyaline cartilage involvement in patients with gout and calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease. An ultrasound study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippucci, E; Riveros, M Gutierrez; Georgescu, D; Salaffi, F; Grassi, W

    2009-02-01

    The main aim of the present study was to determine the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of ultrasonography (US) in detecting monosodium urate and calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals deposits at knee cartilage level using clinical definite diagnosis as standard reference. A total of 32 patients with a diagnosis of gout and 48 patients with pyrophosphate arthropathy were included in the study. Fifty-two patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis or osteoarthritis (OA) were recruited as disease controls. All diagnoses were made using an international clinical criterion. US examinations were performed by an experienced sonographer, blind to clinical and laboratory data. Hyaline cartilage was assessed to detect two US findings recently indicated as indicative of crystal deposits: hyperechoic enhancement of the superficial margin of the hyaline cartilage and hyperechoic spots within the cartilage layer not generating a posterior acoustic shadow. Hyperechoic enhancement of the chondrosynovial margin was found in at least one knee of 14 out of 32 (43.7%) patients with gout and in a single knee of only one patient affected by pyrophosphate arthropathy (specificity=99%). Intra-cartilaginous hyperechoic spots were detected in at least one knee of 33 out of 48 (68.7%) patients with pyrophosphate arthropathy and in two disease controls one with OA and the second with RA (specificity=97.6%). The results of the present study indicate that US may play a relevant role in distinguishing cartilage involvement in patients with crystal-related arthropathy. The selected US findings were found to be highly specific.

  2. Nurses' involvement in the care of patients requesting euthanasia: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bal, Nele; Gastmans, Chris; Dierckx de Casterlè, Bernadette

    2008-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to thoroughly examine the involvement and experiences of nurses in the care of mentally competent, adult patients requesting euthanasia (i.e. administration of lethal drugs by someone other than the person concerned with the explicit intention of ending a patient's life, at the latter's explicit request) by means of a literature review. A keyword search was used to identify relevant journal articles and books published between 1990 and 2007. Manual searches of review article bibliographies were also conducted as well as searches of archives and collections of key journals. The electronic databases Medline, Cinahl, PsycINFO, The Cochrane Library, Social Sciences Citation Index, and Invert were searched using a combination of keywords and carefully constructed inclusion criteria. Forty-two publications of empirical research were identified and included in the present study after critical appraisal. The included publications represented 35 separated studies (20 quantitative, 11 qualitative and 4 mixed-method publications) and 28 different research samples. Analysis of these studies revealed that nurses across diverse geographic and clinical settings play a major role in caring for and showing a personal interest in patients requesting euthanasia. The nurses' feelings about euthanasia and their involvement are extremely complex. Descriptions of personal conflict, moral uncertainty, frustration, fear, secrecy,and guilt appear to reflect a complex array of personal and professional values as well as social, religious, and legal rules. Nurses can make a significant contribution to the quality of care by assisting and counseling patients and their families, physicians, and their nursing colleagues in a professional manner, even in countries where euthanasia is not legal. However, research on nurses' involvement in euthanasia has methodological and terminological problems,leading to our recommendation for more carefully designed qualitative studies

  3. The Risk of Upper Urinary Tract Involvement in Patients With Ketamine-Associated Uropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Hang Yee

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose The aims of this study were to investigate the prevalence of upper tract involvement in ketamine-associated uropathy, and to determine the predictors of hydronephrosis in patients with a history of ketamine abuse. Methods This was a cross-sectional study of a prospective cohort of patients with ketamine-associated uropathy. Data including demographics, pattern of ketamine abuse, pelvic pain and urgency or frequency (PUF symptom score, uroflowmetry (UFM parameters, serum renal function, and liver function tests were collected. Upon consultation, ultrasonography was performed to assess the function of the urinary system. Results From December 2011 to October 2015, we treated 572 patients with ketamine-associated uropathy. Of these patients, 207 (36.2% had managed to achieve abstinence at the time of their first consultation. Ninety-six patients (16.8% in the cohort were found to have hydronephrosis on ultrasonography. Univariate analysis identified age, duration of ketamine abuse, PUF symptom score, voided volume on UFM, serum creatinine levels >100 μmol/L, and an abnormal serum liver enzyme profile as factors associated with hydronephrosis. Logistic regression revealed the following parameters to be statistically related to hydronephrosis: age (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 1.090; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.020–1.166; P=0.012, functional bladder capacity (adjusted OR, 0.997; 95% CI, 0.995–0.999; P=0.029, serum creatinine >100 μmol/L (adjusted OR, 3.107; 95% CI, 1.238–7.794; P=0.016, and an abnormal serum liver enzyme profile (adjusted OR, 1.967; 95% CI, 1.213–3.187; P=0.006. Conclusions Ketamine-associated uropathy can involve the upper urinary tract. Patient demographics as well as investigations of UFM, renal function tests, and liver function tests may allow us to identify at-risk patients.

  4. Involvement of hypothalamus autoimmunity in patients with autoimmune hypopituitarism: role of antibodies to hypothalamic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bellis, A; Sinisi, A A; Pane, E; Dello Iacovo, A; Bellastella, G; Di Scala, G; Falorni, A; Giavoli, C; Gasco, V; Giordano, R; Ambrosio, M R; Colao, A; Bizzarro, A; Bellastella, A

    2012-10-01

    Antipituitary antibodies (APA) but not antihypothalamus antibodies (AHA) are usually searched for in autoimmune hypopituitarism. Our objective was to search for AHA and characterize their hypothalamic target in patients with autoimmune hypopituitarism to clarify, on the basis of the cells stained by these antibodies, the occurrence of autoimmune subclinical/clinical central diabetes insipidus (CDI) and/or possible joint hypothalamic contribution to their hypopituitarism. We conducted a cross-sectional cohort study. Ninety-five APA-positive patients with autoimmune hypopituitarism, 60 without (group 1) and 35 with (group 2) lymphocytic hypophysitis, were studied in comparison with 20 patients with postsurgical hypopituitarism and 50 normal subjects. AHA by immunofluorescence and posterior pituitary function were evaluated; then AHA-positive sera were retested by double immunofluorescence to identify the hypothalamic cells targeted by AHA. AHA were detected at high titer in 12 patients in group 1 and in eight patients in group 2. They immunostained arginine vasopressin (AVP)-secreting cells in nine of 12 in group 1 and in four of eight in group 2. All AVP cell antibody-positive patients presented with subclinical/clinical CDI; in contrast, four patients with GH/ACTH deficiency but with APA staining only GH-secreting cells showed AHA targeting CRH- secreting cells. The occurrence of CDI in patients with lymphocytic hypophysitis seems due to an autoimmune hypothalamic involvement rather than an expansion of the pituitary inflammatory process. To search for AVP antibody in these patients may help to identify those of them prone to develop an autoimmune CDI. The detection of AHA targeting CRH-secreting cells in some patients with GH/ACTH deficiency but with APA targeting only GH-secreting cells indicates that an autoimmune aggression to hypothalamus is jointly responsible for their hypopituitarism.

  5. Correlation between clinical and radiographic findings on the occurrence of furcation involvement in patients with periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusmão, Estela Santos; Picarte, Ana Carolina Lessa Cavalcanti; Ben Barbosa, Maria Bernadete Cavalcanti; Rösing, Cassiano Kuchenbecker; Cimoes, Renata

    2014-01-01

    Aim : The aim of the present study was to determine the occurrence of furcation involvement in the molars of patients with chronic periodontitis and correlate clinical and radiographic findings. Seventy subjects aged 35-69 years enrolled for treatment at a periodontics specialization program in Pernambuco, Brazil (EAP-SCDP-ABO/PE) participated in the study, comprising a total of 350 molars examined. The clinical diagnosis of furcation involvement was performed with a horizontal Nabers probe, whereas the radiographic examination was performed with periapical and bite-wing radiographs. The images were analyzed with an X-ray viewer at 3× magnification. The Chi-square test was used, with the level of significance set at 5%. A total of 64.5% individuals presented with furcation involvement, 43.1% of whom had degree II furcation. A significant association (P = 0.0060) was found between tooth type and frequency of furcation involvement. The first lower and upper molars were affected in 64.5 and 58.5% of cases, respectively. Adequate agreement (0.65) was observed between the clinical and radiographic findings. Taking into consideration the method employed and the results obtained, it may be concluded that the clinical and radiographic examinations performed are effective tools for diagnosing furcation involvement in teeth affected with periodontal disease.

  6. Strategies to enhance patient recruitment and retention in research involving patients with a first episode of mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furimsky, Ivana; Cheung, Amy H; Dewa, Carolyn S; Zipursky, Robert B

    2008-11-01

    Recruitment and retention of research participants is often the most labor-intensive and difficult component of clinical trials. Poor recruitment and retention frequently pose as a major barrier in the successful completion of clinical trials. In fact, many studies are prematurely terminated, or their findings questioned due to low recruitment and retention rates. The conduct of clinical trials involving youth with a first episode of mental illness comes with additional challenges in recruitment and retention including barriers associated with engagement and family involvement. To develop effective early interventions for first episode mental illness, it is necessary to develop strategies to enhance recruitment and retention in this patient population. This article presents the recruitment and retention challenges experienced in two clinical trials: one involving participants experiencing a first episode of depression and one involving participants experiencing a first episode psychosis. Challenges with recruitment and retention are identified and reviewed at both the patient level and clinician level. Strategies that were implemented to enhance recruitment and retention in these two studies are also discussed. Finally, ethical issues to consider when implementing these strategies are also highlighted.

  7. Involvement of vascular endothelial growth factor in nasal obstruction in patients with nasal allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuji Yamashita

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available It has recently been shown that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF enhances vascular permeability and that mast cells produce VEGF, suggesting the involvement of VEGF in allergic diseases. In the present study we quantitatively analyzed VEGF in the nasal lavage fluid of patients with nasal allergy. We performed nasal antigen challenge with Japanese cedar pollen antigen in 10 healthy adult volunteers and in 10 cedar pollen IgE-positive patients with nasal allergy. In all patients with nasal allergy, VEGF and histamine levels in the nasal lavage fluid reached a peak 30 min after antigen challenge, then returned to prechallenge values 2 h after antigen challenge. In these patients, the histamine level increased three-fold, while the VEGF level increased 10-fold. However, in all healthy adult volunteers, VEGF and histamine levels did not increase. A stronger correlation was noted between the ratio of decreased nasal cavity volume and the ratio of increased VEGF levels (R = 0.823; P < 0.001 than between the ratio of nasal cavity volume and the ratio of increased histamine levels (R = 0.660; P < 0.01. These results suggest that VEGF may contribute to the pathogenesis of nasal obstruction in the early phase of nasal allergy as a new factor involved in increasing vascular permeability.

  8. Novel deletions involving the USH2A gene in patients with Usher syndrome and retinitis pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-García, Gema; Aller, Elena; Jaijo, Teresa; Aparisi, Maria J; Larrieu, Lise; Faugère, Valérie; Blanco-Kelly, Fiona; Ayuso, Carmen; Roux, Anne-Francoise; Millán, José M

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to identify and characterize large rearrangements involving the USH2A gene in patients with Usher syndrome and nonsyndromic retinitis pigmentosa. The multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) technique combined with a customized array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) analysis was applied to 40 unrelated patients previously screened for point mutations in the USH2A gene in which none or only one pathologic mutation was identified. We detected six large deletions involving USH2A in six out of the 40 cases studied. Three of the patients were homozygous for the deletion, and the remaining three were compound heterozygous with a previously identified USH2A point mutation. In five of these cases, the patients displayed Usher type 2, and the remaining case displayed nonsyndromic retinitis pigmentosa. The exact breakpoint junctions of the deletions found in USH2A in four of these cases were characterized. Our study highlights the need to develop improved efficient strategies of mutation screening based upon next generation sequencing (NGS) that reduce cost, time, and complexity and allow simultaneous identification of all types of disease-causing mutations in diagnostic procedures.

  9. Insular cortex involvement in declarative memory deficits in patients with post-traumatic stress disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Lingjiang

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuroimaging studies have proved that hippocampus relate to the deficient of memory in patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD. Many studies in healthy subjects also shown that insular cortex (IC be involved in the declarative memory. This study was designed to investigate whether insular cortex is involved in declarative memory deficits in patients with PTSD. Methods Twelve subjects with PTSD and 12 subjects without PTSD victims underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance imaging. All subjects performed encoding and retrieval memory tasks during the fMRI session. Voxel-based morphometry method was used to analyze gray-matter volume, and the Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM2 was used to analyze activated brain areas when performing tasks. Results Grey matter volume was significantly reduced bilaterally in the insular cortex of PTSD subjects than non-PTSD. PTSD group also had lower level of activation in insular cortex when performing word encoding and retrieval tasks than non-PTSD group. Conclusion The study provides evidence on structural and function abnormalities of the insular cortex in patients with PTSD. Reduced grey-matter volume in insular cortex may be associated with declarative memory deficits in patients with PTSD.

  10. Getting on the same page: Communication, patient involvement and shared understanding of "decisions" in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppin, Aaron L; Kunneman, Marleen; Hathaway, Julie; Fernandez, Cara; Montori, Victor M; Tilburt, Jon C

    2018-02-01

    Patients and clinicians do not often agree on whether a decision has been made about cancer care. This could be explained by factors related to communication quality and/or the type of decision being made. We used a self-developed coding scheme to code a random sample of 128 encounters in which patients and clinicians either agreed (n=64) or disagreed (n=64) that a cancer care decision was made and tested for associations between concordance and key communication behaviours. We also identified and characterized cancer care decisions by topic and level of patient involvement and looked for trends. We identified 378 cancer care decisions across 128 encounters. Explicit decisions were most commonly made about topics wherein decision control could be easily delegated to a clear and present expert (eg either the patient or the clinician). Related to this, level of patient involvement varied significantly by decision topic. Explicit decisions were rarely made in an observable way about social, non-clinical or self-management related topics, although patients and clinicians both reported having made a cancer care decision in encounters where no decisions were observed. We found no association between communication behaviours and concordance in our sample. What counts as a "decision" in cancer care may be constructed within disparate social roles that leave many agendas unaddressed and decisions unmade. Changing the content of conversations to encourage explicit decisions about self-management and life context-related topics may have greater value in enabling shared understanding than promoting communication behaviours among already high-performing communicators. © 2017 The Authors Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Early and delayed Tc-99m ECD brain SPECT in SLE patients with CNS involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikukawa, Kaoru; Toyama, Hiroshi; Katayama, Masao

    2000-01-01

    We compared early and delayed Tc-99m ECD SPECT scans in 32 SLE patients (Group 1, definite neuropsychiatric disorders; Group 2, minor neurologic symptoms or normal) with those of normal controls by visual inspection and semi-quantitative evaluation. With visual interpretation, 13 out of 14 patients in Group 1 (93%) and 7 out of 18 patients in Group 2 (39%) had diffuse uneven decrease in early scans. Seven patients in Group 2 (39%) who had normal early scans demonstrated focal decrease in the medial frontal lobe in delayed scans. With cerebral region to cerebellar ratios, in early scans, the medial frontal lobe in Group 1 and Group 2 was significantly lower than in normal controls, and lateral frontal lobe and occipital lobes in Group 1 were significantly lower than in normal controls. Nevertheless, in delayed scans, every cortical region except for the parietal lode in Groups 1 and 2 was significantly lower than in normal controls. The retention rates in all regions in SLE patients were significantly lower than in normal controls. No case showed SPECT improvement on follow-up studies in either group in spite of clinical improvement. Delayed Tc-99m ECD brain SPECT of high sensitivity might be useful in detecting CNS involvement. Although the SPECT findings did not correlate with the neuropsychiatric symptoms, early and delayed Tc-99m ECD SPECT seems to provide useful objective diagnostic information in SLE patients. (author)

  12. Towards a pedagogy for patient and public involvement in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan de Bere, Sam; Nunn, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a critique of current knowledge on the engagement of patients and the public, referred to here as patient and public involvement (PPI), and calls for the development of robust and theoretically informed strategies across the continuum of medical education. The study draws on a range of relevant literatures and presents PPI as a response process in relation to patient-centred learning agendas. Through reference to original research it discusses three key priorities for medical educators developing early PPI pedagogies, including: (i) the integration of evidence on PPI relevant to medical education, via a unifying corpus of literature; (ii) conceptual clarity through shared definitions of PPI in medical education, and (iii) an academically rigorous approach to managing complexity in the evaluation of PPI initiatives. As a response to these challenges, the authors demonstrate how activity modelling may be used as an analytical heuristic to provide an understanding of a number of PPI systems that may interact within complex and dynamic educational contexts. The authors highlight the need for a range of patient voices to be evident within such work, from its generation through to dissemination, in order that patients and the public are partners and not merely objects of this endeavour. To this end, this paper has been discussed with and reviewed by our own patient and public research partners throughout the writing process. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Attitudes Toward Family Involvement in Cancer Treatment Decision Making: The Perspectives of Patients, Family Caregivers, and Their Oncologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dong Wook; Cho, Juhee; Roter, Debra L; Kim, So Young; Yang, Hyung Kook; Park, Keeho; Kim, Hyung Jin; Shin, Hee-Young; Kwon, Tae Gyun; Park, Jong Hyock

    2017-06-01

    To investigate how cancer patients, family caregiver, and their treating oncologist view the risks and benefits of family involvement in cancer treatment decision making (TDM) or the degree to which these perceptions may differ. A nationwide, multicenter survey was conducted with 134 oncologists and 725 of their patients and accompanying caregivers. Participant answered to modified Control Preferences Scale and investigator-developed questionnaire regarding family involvement in cancer TDM. Most participants (>90%) thought that family should be involved in cancer TDM. When asked if the oncologist should allow family involvement if the patient did not want them involved, most patients and caregivers (>85%) thought they should. However, under this circumstance, only 56.0% of oncologists supported family involvement. Patients were significantly more likely to skew their responses toward patient rather than family decisional control than were their caregivers (P family decisional control than caregivers (P family involvement is helpful and neither hamper patient autonomy nor complicate cancer TDM process. Oncologists were largely positive, but less so in these ratings than either patients or caregivers (P family caregivers, and, to a lesser degree, oncologists expect and valued family involvement in cancer TDM. These findings support a reconsideration of traditional models focused on protection of patient autonomy to a more contextualized form of relational autonomy, whereby the patient and family caregivers can be seen as a unit for autonomous decision. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Patient and public involvement in primary care research - an example of ensuring its sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinks, Clare; Carter, Pam; Rhodes, Carol; Taylor, Robert; Beech, Roger; Dziedzic, Krysia; Blackburn, Steven; Hughes, Rhian; Ong, Bie Nio

    2016-01-01

    The international literature on patient and public involvement (PPI) in research covers a wide range of issues, including active lay involvement throughout the research cycle; roles that patients/public can play; assessing impact of PPI and recommendations for good PPI practice. One area of investigation that is less developed is the sustainability and impact of PPI beyond involvement in time-limited research projects. This paper focuses on the issues of sustainability, the importance of institutional leadership and the creation of a robust infrastructure in order to achieve long-term and wide-ranging PPI in research strategy and programmes. We use the case of a Primary Care Research Centre to provide a historical account of the evolution of PPI in the Centre and identified a number of key conceptual issues regarding infrastructure, resource allocation, working methods, roles and relationships. The paper concludes about the more general applicability of the Centre's model for the long-term sustainability of PPI in research.

  15. Whole-body muscle MRI in 20 patients suffering from late onset Pompe disease: Involvement patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlier, Robert-Yves; Laforet, Pascal; Wary, Claire; Mompoint, Dominique; Laloui, Kenza; Pellegrini, Nadine; Annane, Djillali; Carlier, Pierre G; Orlikowski, David

    2011-11-01

    To describe muscle involvement on whole-body MRI scans in adult patients at different stages of late-onset Pompe disease. Twenty patients aged 37 to 75 were examined. Five were bedridden and required ventilatory support. Axial and coronal T1 turbo-spin-echo sequences were performed on 1.5T or 3T systems. MRI was scored for 47 muscles using Mercuri's classification. Whole-body scans were obtained with a mean in-room time of 29 min. Muscle changes consisted of internal bright signals of fatty replacement without severe retraction of the muscles' corpus. Findings were consistent with previous descriptions of spine extensors and pelvic girdle, but also provided new information on recurrent muscle changes particularly in the tongue and subscapularis muscle. Moreover thigh involvement was more heterogeneous than previously described, in terms of distribution across muscles as well as with respect to the overall clinical presentation. Whole-body MRI provides a very evocative description of muscle involvement in Pompe disease in adults. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The influence of contextual factors on patient involvement during follow-up consultations after colorectal cancer surgery: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Thora G; Soelver, Lisbeth; Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi

    2017-11-01

    To identify the contextual factors that influence individual patient involvement during colorectal cancer surgical follow-up consultations. The healthcare system is subject to the requirement and expectation of greater involvement of patients and relatives. Increased patient involvement requires the development and implementation of new communication initiatives. Research shows that it is also necessary to consider the contextual circumstances surrounding patient involvement in specific situations. Case study of a single Danish outpatient clinic, which allows the issues and circumstances involved in an everyday situation to be captured. 12 nonparticipative observations of outpatient visits and, subsequently, seven in-depth patient interviews. Content analysis based on a dialogical, interactive framework, which underpinned the identification of current contextual factors. The results showed five contextual factors that seemed to have an impact on patient involvement. The first, 'Two dimensions of patient involvement: treatment-oriented and person-oriented' highlighted a dual interpretation of patient involvement in the consultation situation. The two dimensions seemed to be influenced by four additional factors: 'Doctors leading the agenda', 'Traditional health professional roles', 'Unclear responsibilities' and 'Guidance primarily focused on treatment'. The results showed how patient involvement in clinical practice could be understood as a two-way movement, in which patients are invited to participate in clinical practice, while health professionals are invited to participate in the patients' lives. The movement will change from situation to situation and is influenced by several contextual factors. The results can help doctors and nurses to navigate using a goal-oriented approach towards patient involvement. The study makes visible the need for research-based development of the independent role of the nursing profession in cancer care follow-up, with a view to

  17. Novel participatory methods of involving patients in research: naming and branding a longitudinal cohort study, BRIGHTLIGHT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Rachel M; Mohain, Jasjeet; Gibson, Faith; Solanki, Anita; Whelan, Jeremy; Fern, Lorna A

    2015-03-14

    Patient and public involvement (PPI) is central to research and service planning. Identifying effective, meaningful ways of involvement is challenging. The cohort study 'Do specialist services for teenagers and young adults with cancer add value?' follows young people for three years, examining outcomes associated with specialist care. Participant retention in longitudinal research can be problematic potentially jeopardising study completion. Maximising study awareness through high impact branding and publicity may improve study retention. Study names are typically generated by researchers rather than designed with patients. We aimed to involve young people in developing a brand identity and name to 'Do specialist services for teenagers and young adults with cancer add value?'. Nine young people aged 17-26 years diagnosed with cancer when aged 14-25 years participated in a one day workshop with further data collection at a patient conference. Methodology was similar to conventional branding and naming exercises and was divided into six stages. The workshop comprised five stages. Stage 1: 'What's in a brand' allowed young people to enquire why brands/logos are important, Stage 2: 'Brand Transformation' identified what young people needed to know and believe about the study when approached about participation, Stage 3: 'Brand Essence' determined how we wanted the study to be perceived by young people, Stage 4: 'What's in a name' identified potential names for the study. Stage 5: 'Logo creation' assembled the mood and feel of logos. Stage 6 was logo design and an electronic survey of 249 young people attending a patient conference. BRIGHTLIGHT was the final study name and the brand essence (or study personality) was friendly, supportive and inspiring. Four logos were designed and the final logo received 47% (n = 115) of votes. Acceptance and retention to BRIGHTLIGHT is higher than anticipated (80% versus 60%), this may be related to our integral PPI strategy. We

  18. Adiponectin but not leptin is involved in early hepatic disease in morbidly obese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindle, Anna Katharine; Edwards, Claire; Mendonsa, Alisha; Rojkind, Marcos; McCaffrey, Tim; Fu, Sidney; Brody, Fred

    2010-07-01

    Pathologic changes in the liver are common in morbidly obese patients, and insulin resistance may potentiate the progression of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis to fibrosis and cirrhosis. This study investigates the impact of leptin and adiponectin in morbidly obese diabetic and nondiabetic patients with regard to histopathologic changes in the liver. Thirty-seven morbidly obese patients who underwent bariatric surgery with liver biopsies were enrolled in the study. Fourteen were diabetic and 23 were nondiabetic. Intraoperative liver tissue was sent for histopathologic analysis and extraneous intraoperative tissue was snap-frozen in liquid nitrogen. Total RNA was extracted and RNA was reverse transcribed to cDNA. Real-time quantitative PCR was performed to determine relative gene expression levels. The data were analyzed using a logarithmic transformation and normalized by 18S ribosome expression. Student's t test was used for statistical analysis with p < or = 0.05 as significant. Adiponectin expression was downregulated 4.4-fold (p < or = 0.05) in liver samples with evidence of inflammation on pathology. When hepatic inflammation was evaluated separately, there were no statistically significant differences in adiponectin levels between the diabetic and nondiabetic patients. However, overall adiponectin levels in hepatic samples of diabetic patients were 3.8-fold higher than those of nondiabetic patients (p < or = 0.05). There were no significant differences in leptin levels regardless of hepatic pathology or diabetic status. This study illustrates that there is a downregulation of adiponectin in morbidly obese patients with inflammatory infiltrates in the liver. Variations in adiponectin levels could be an indicator of disease progression since inflammatory infiltrates are commonly associated with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) in morbidly obese patients. Currently, we are using human myofibroblasts derived from livers of morbidly obese people to further

  19. [Involving patients, the insured and the general public in healthcare decision making].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühlbacher, Axel C; Juhnke, Christin

    2016-01-01

    No doubt, the public should be involved in healthcare decision making, especially when decision makers from politics and self-government agencies are faced with the difficult task of setting priorities. There is a general consensus on the need for a stronger patient centeredness, even in HTA processes, and internationally different ways of public participation are discussed and tested in decision making processes. This paper describes how the public can be involved in different decision situations, and it shows how preference measurement methods are currently being used in an international context to support decision making. It distinguishes between different levels of decision making on health technologies: approval, assessment, pricing, and finally utilization. The range of participation efforts extends from qualitative surveys of patients' needs (Citizen Councils of NICE in the UK) to science-based documentation of quantitative patient preferences, such as in the current pilot projects of the FDA in the US and the EMA at the European level. Possible approaches for the elicitation and documentation of preference structures and trade-offs in relation to alternate health technologies are decision aids, such as multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA), that provide the necessary information for weighting and prioritizing decision criteria. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  20. Myocardial involvement in diabetic patients evaluated by exercise thallium-201 scintigraphy and cardiac catheterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuno, Sumio; Genda, Akira; Nakayama, Akira; Igarashi, Yutaka; Takeda, Ryoyu

    1985-01-01

    To evaluate myocardial involvement in diabetes mellitus, we studied 39 patients with negative double-Master's test and without hypertension by exercise thallium-201 (Tl-201) myocardial scintigraphy using a bicycle ergometer. Among the 39 patients, 12 (30.8 %) showed filling defects in the scintigrams (positive cases), including eight with stress-induced defects and four with fixed defects. The positive cases had higher scores of diabetic complications (3.6 +- 2.4 vs 2.1 +- 1.8; p < 0.05) and longer durations of diabetes as compared with those of the negative cases. The frequency of insulin therapy was also greater in the positive cases. Eleven patients (5 positive and 6 negative cases) who underwent cardiac catheterization had no significant stenotic lesions of their coronary arteries. However, all of the positive cases showed abnormal wall motion, mainly hypokinesis, by left ventriculography (LVG). The abnormalities of the LVG corresponded to the findings of the scintigrams (i.e. filling defects and decrease in washout ratios by circumferential profile analysis). These results suggest that in some diabetics myocardial involvement exists in the early stage without overt cardiac disease and exercise Tl-201 scintigraphy is useful in detecting pre-clinical cardiomyopathy. Cardiomyopathy in diabetics seems to be due to disturbances of the myocardial microcirculation. (author)

  1. Brain MRI screening showing evidences of early central nervous system involvement in patients with systemic sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Reem Hamdy A; Sabry, Yousriah Y; Nasef, Amr A

    2011-05-01

    Systemic sclerosis is a multisystem autoimmune collagen disease where structural and functional abnormalities of small blood vessels prevail. Transient ischemic attacks, ischemic stroke, and hemorrhage have been reported as primary consequence of vascular central nervous system affection in systemic sclerosis. Magnetic resonance imaging is considered to be the most sensitive diagnostic technique for detecting symptomatic and asymptomatic lesions in the brain in cases of multifocal diseases. The objective of this study is to detect subclinical as well as clinically manifest cerebral vasculopathy in patients with systemic sclerosis using magnetic resonance imaging. As much as 30 female patients with systemic sclerosis aged 27-61 years old, with disease duration of 1-9 years and with no history of other systemic disease or cerebrovascular accidents, were enrolled. Age-matched female control group of 30 clinically normal subjects, underwent brain magnetic resonance examination. Central nervous system (CNS) involvement in the form of white matter hyperintense foci of variable sizes were found in significantly abundant forms in systemic sclerosis patients on magnetic resonance evaluation than in age-related control group, signifying a form of CNS vasculopathy. Such foci showed significant correlation to clinical features of organic CNS lesion including headaches, fainting attacks and organic depression as well as to the severity of peripheral vascular disease with insignificant correlation with disease duration. In conclusion, subclinical as well as clinically manifest CNS ischemic vasculopathy is not uncommon in systemic sclerosis patients and magnetic resonance imaging is considered a sensitive noninvasive screening tool for early detection of CNS involvement in patients with systemic sclerosis.

  2. Detection of HTLV-III RNA in lungs of patients with AIDS and pulmonary involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chayt, K.J.; Harper, M.E.; Marselle, L.M.; Lewin, E.B.; Rose, R.M.; Oleske, J.M.; Epstein, L.G.; Wong-Staal, F.; Gallo, R.C.

    1986-01-01

    A majority of pediatric patients and rare adult patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) develop a chronic respiratory disorder referred to as lymphocytic interstitial pneumonitis (LIP). Efforts to identify an infectious agent responsible for this process so far have failed. In this study, frozen sections of lungs from patients with AIDS and pulmonary disease were tested by in situ molecular hybridization for the presence of cells infected with human T-cell lymphotropic virus type III (HTLV-III) and expressing viral RNA. In the case of an infant with LIP, a relatively high frequency (0.1%) of cells in the lung were found to be positive for HTLV-III RNA. This number is the lower limit of total cells infected since the in situ hybridization technique as applied in this study depends on expression of HTLV-III genes, and previous evidence indicates that a proportion of cells infected with HTLV-III may not express viral RNA. Moreover, this degree of infection of the lung is likely limited to LIP, since in ten patients with AIDS and pulmonary diseases other than LIP, only 0% to 0.002% of cells in lung were positive for viral RNA expression. Thus, HTLV-III may play a direct causal role in the development of LIP in infected patients, implicating its involvement in yet another of the diverse clinical diseases associated with this virus

  3. Development of Clinical Pharmacy in Switzerland: Involvement of Community Pharmacists in Care for Older Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersberger, Kurt E; Messerli, Markus

    2016-03-01

    The role of the community pharmacist in primary care has been undergoing change in Switzerland in parallel to international developments: it has become more clinically and patient oriented. Special services of community pharmacists to older patients taking long-term or multiple medications, discharged from hospitals or experiencing cognitive impairment or disability have been developed. These services require more clinical knowledge and skills from community pharmacists and are based on, for example, 'simple or intermediate medication reviews' focused primarily to improve medication adherence and rational drug use by a patient. Reflecting the new role of community pharmacies, this article describes the current services provided by community pharmacies in Switzerland, e.g., 'polymedication check', 'weekly pill organizer', and 'services for chronic patients', as well as new Swiss educational and reimbursement systems supporting development of these services. In the international context, involvement of community pharmacists in patient-oriented care is growing. This review summarizes positive and negative experiences from implementation of community pharmacy services in Switzerland and provides examples for the development of such services in other countries.

  4. Assessing the possibilities and challenges of patient involvement in sexual, reproductive and HIV/AIDS services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyrick, Jane; Gray, Debra; Jones, Abigail

    2016-06-01

    Patient and public involvement (PPI) is a key feature of healthcare services in the UK. Sexual and reproductive health and HIV (SRHH) services face unique PPI challenges, as the anonymity and confidentiality required by service users can be a barrier to attracting patient input. PPI could improve sexual health services, through increased trust in services and the ability to tackle sexual health inequalities. However, specific practical guidance on how to address PPI in sexual health and the evidence to support it is sparse. This research aims to begin building an evidence base for PPI in sexual health services through: 1) an audit of PPI in SRHH in the Bristol region; and 2) a parallel survey of potential users of sexual health services about their experiences of PPI. For the audit, 18 SRHH organisations from all those in the region invited complete a short online survey, representing a range of different service providers. For the survey, participants, through a convenience sample via the University of the West of England and social media, were invited to complete an anonymous online survey of their experiences of PPI in SSRHs; 96 people responded. Reliance on customer satisfaction approaches and patients not being asked for feedback or what PP is for are reported. Services cite under-resourcing and a lack of time as barriers. Improving the use of patient's voice in SRHH could be supported through clarity of purpose (measured against outcomes), better communication with patients, and the need for flexible methods.

  5. Central nervous system involvement in patients with HCV-related cryoglobulinemia: review and a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Canesi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Few well-documented cases of central nervous system involvement in patients with mixed cryoglobulinemia and/or HCV infection have been reported. We can distinguish between acute or subacute diffuse and focal lesions (transient ischemic attack-like syndromes and cerebrovascular accidents. Methods: A search of two electronic databases (Medline and EMBASE was conducted from the year of their inception (1966 for Medline and 1988 for EMBASE to September 2000. The search strategy employed entailed combining these terms: Cryoglobulinemia, Central Nervous System, Hepatitis C, chronic hepatitis. Cryoglobulinemia and Central Nervous System were also used as free test words. We analysed articles with case reports and the most frequent articles on the references list. Pathogenesis: The main pathophysiologic mechanism of cerebral involvement is ischemia (or rarely hemorrhage due to diffuse or segmental vasculitis of the small cerebral vessels. In these cases a brain MRI usually shows single or multiple increased T2 signals. Furthermore an occasional occlusive vasculopathy without vasculitis was documented histologically. In these patients ischemia could be started or enhanced by the engorgement of the microvasculature by clumps of red cells and by aggregates of cryoglobulins. In the same patients vasculitis and hemoreological abnormalities can affect the clinical picture of the cerebral involvement in mixed cryoglobulinemia. Finally, the detection of HCV in the lesions induces a hypothesis that, in some cases, CNS involvement could be directly related to chronic HCV infection, even in the absence of cryoglobulin production. Case report: We describe a 63 year-old woman with acute severe encephalopathy. Laboratory evaluation revealed a high positive test result for rheumatoid factor (3390 U/ml and hypocomplementemia (C4 less than 1.67 mg/dl. Protein immunofixation electrophoresis demonstrated 5% monoclonal proteins (IgM/k and IgG/k, 3

  6. Cardiac involvement in genotype-positive Fabry disease patients assessed by cardiovascular MR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozor, Rebecca; Grieve, Stuart M; Tchan, Michel C; Callaghan, Fraser; Hamilton-Craig, Christian; Denaro, Charles; Moon, James C; Figtree, Gemma A

    2016-02-15

    Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) has the potential to provide early detection of cardiac involvement in Fabry disease. We aimed to gain further insight into this by assessing a cohort of Fabry patients using CMR. Fifty genotype-positive Fabry subjects (age 45±2 years; 50% male) referred for CMR and 39 matched controls (age 40±2 years; 59% male) were recruited. Patients had a mean Mainz severity score index of 15±2 (range 0-46), reflecting an overall mild degree of disease severity. Compared with controls, Fabry subjects had a 34% greater left ventricular mass (LVM) index (82±5 vs 61±2 g/m(2), p=0.001) and had a significantly greater papillary muscle contribution to total LVM (13±1 vs 6±0.5%, pgadolinium enhancement (LGE) was present in 15 Fabry subjects (9/21 males and 6/23 females). The most common site for LGE was the basal inferolateral wall (93%, 14/15). There was a positive association between LVM index and LGE. Despite this, there were two males and three females with no LVH that displayed LGE. Of Fabry subjects who were not on enzyme replacement therapy at enrolment (n=28), six were reclassified as having cardiac involvement (four LVH-negative/LGE-positive, one LVH-positive/LGE-positive and one LVH-positive/LGE-negative). CMR was able to detect cardiac involvement in 48% of this Fabry cohort, despite the overall mild disease phenotype of the cohort. Of those not on ERT, 21% were reclassified as having cardiac involvement allowing improved risk stratification and targeting of therapy. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  7. Metastatic involvement of the pituitary gland: a systematic review with pooled individual patient data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wenzhuan; Chen, Fangxiang; Dalm, Brian; Kirby, Patricia A; Greenlee, Jeremy D W

    2015-02-01

    To report a rare case of pituitary metastasis (PM) from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and help better understand the incidence of PM and its most common presenting symptoms through a pooled individual patient data analysis. Literature regarding PM was systematically reviewed with a pooled individual patient data analysis conducted. Pooled individual data analysis result is also compared with the result in a most recent systematic review. Our results demonstrate that the incidence of PM among all intracranial metastases is 0.87% (95% CI 0.56, 1.18); it is 1.9% (95% CI 1.46, 2.34) among all autopsied cancer cases; it is 11.56% (95% CI 7.08, 16.04) among all breast cancer patients who had hypophysectomies and 12.83% (95% CI 10.5, 15.16) among all autopsied breast cancer patients. The fixed effect model showed that the incidence of PM in breast cancer patients group is significantly higher (p anterior hypopituitarism (23.68 vs 39.66%, p = 0.015), visual deterioration (27.89 vs 41.38%, p = 0.039), cranial nerve palsies (21.58 vs 41.38%, p = 0.003) and headaches (15.79 vs 32.76%, p = 0.005) were reported significantly higher than previously described in the literature. Pituitary metastasis is rare in patients with cancer, and the pituitary gland is an uncommonly involved location in patients with intracranial metastases. With advanced diagnostic imaging techniques and increased awareness about the manifestation of sellar lesions, the incidence of cranial nerve palsies and anterior pituitarism are higher than reported. This information may allow earlier diagnosis of PM.

  8. MO-E-213-02: Medical Physicist Involvement in Implementing Patient Protection Standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seibert, J.

    2015-01-01

    The focus of work of medical physicists in 1980’s was on quality control and quality assurance. Radiation safety was important but was dominated by occupational radiation protection. A series of over exposures of patients in radiotherapy, nuclear medicine and observation of skin injuries among patients undergoing interventional procedures in 1990’s started creating the need for focus on patient protection. It gave medical physicists new directions to develop expertise in patient dosimetry and dose management. Publications creating awareness on cancer risks from CT in early part of the current century and over exposures in CT in 2008 brought radiation risks in public domain and created challenging situations for medical physicists. Increasing multiple exposures of individual patient and patient doses of few tens of mSv or exceeding 100 mSv are increasing the role of medical physicists. Expansion of usage of fluoroscopy in the hands of clinical professionals with hardly any training in radiation protection shall require further role for medical physicists. The increasing publications in journals, recent changes in Safety Standards, California law, all increase responsibilities of medical physicists in patient protection. Newer technological developments in dose efficiency and protective devices increase percentage of time devoted by medical physicists on radiation protection activities. Without radiation protection, the roles, responsibilities and day-to-day involvement of medical physicists in diagnostic radiology becomes questionable. In coming years either medical radiation protection may emerge as a specialty or medical physicists will have to keep major part of day-to-day work on radiation protection. Learning Objectives: To understand how radiation protection has been increasing its role in day-to-day activities of medical physicist To be aware about international safety Standards, national and State regulations that require higher attention to radiation

  9. MO-E-213-02: Medical Physicist Involvement in Implementing Patient Protection Standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seibert, J. [UC Davis Medical Center (United States)

    2015-06-15

    The focus of work of medical physicists in 1980’s was on quality control and quality assurance. Radiation safety was important but was dominated by occupational radiation protection. A series of over exposures of patients in radiotherapy, nuclear medicine and observation of skin injuries among patients undergoing interventional procedures in 1990’s started creating the need for focus on patient protection. It gave medical physicists new directions to develop expertise in patient dosimetry and dose management. Publications creating awareness on cancer risks from CT in early part of the current century and over exposures in CT in 2008 brought radiation risks in public domain and created challenging situations for medical physicists. Increasing multiple exposures of individual patient and patient doses of few tens of mSv or exceeding 100 mSv are increasing the role of medical physicists. Expansion of usage of fluoroscopy in the hands of clinical professionals with hardly any training in radiation protection shall require further role for medical physicists. The increasing publications in journals, recent changes in Safety Standards, California law, all increase responsibilities of medical physicists in patient protection. Newer technological developments in dose efficiency and protective devices increase percentage of time devoted by medical physicists on radiation protection activities. Without radiation protection, the roles, responsibilities and day-to-day involvement of medical physicists in diagnostic radiology becomes questionable. In coming years either medical radiation protection may emerge as a specialty or medical physicists will have to keep major part of day-to-day work on radiation protection. Learning Objectives: To understand how radiation protection has been increasing its role in day-to-day activities of medical physicist To be aware about international safety Standards, national and State regulations that require higher attention to radiation

  10. Prognostic value of MRI-derived masticator space involvement in IMRT-treated nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, Youping; Pan, Jianji; Chen, Yunbin; Lin, Shaojun; Chen, Ying; Zong, Jingfeng; Fang, Yanhong; Guo, Qiaojuan; Chen, Bijuan; Tang, Linbo

    2015-01-01

    This retrospective study reassessed nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), to determine the significance how magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-derived masticator space involvement (MSI) affected patients’ prognosis. One thousand one hundred ninety seven NPC patients who had complete set of MRI and medical records were enrolled. Basing on their MRI findings, the T-categories of tumors were identified according to the seventh edition of American Joint Committee on Cancer staging system, which considers MSI a prognostic indicator for NPCs. Rates of overall survival (OS), local relapse-free survival (LRFS), regional relapse-free survival (RRFS) and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) were analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier method, and the Log-Rank test compared their differences. Cox regression analysis was employed to evaluate various prognostic factors systematically. Statistical analyses were conducted with SPSS 18.0 software, P value < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Medial pterygoid muscle (MPM) was involved in 283 (23.64 %) cases, of which lateral pterygoid muscle (LPM) was concurrently affected in 181 (15.12 %) and infratemporal fossa (ITF) in 19 (1.59 %). Generally, MSI correlated with an OS, LRFS, and DMFS consistent with a T4-stage diagnosis (P > 0.05). Although different degrees of MSI presented a similar OS and DMFS (P > 0.1), tumors involving LPM had a relatively poorer LRFS than those affected the MPM only (P = 0.027), even for subgroup of patients composed of T3 and T4 classifications (P = 0.035). A tumor involving MPM brought an LRFS consistent with a T2 or T3-stage disease (P > 0.1). If the tumor affected LPM or ITF concurrently, the survival outcomes were more consistent with a T4-stage disease (P > 0.1). Nevertheless, compared to tumor infiltrating MPM, those invading LPM or ITF more frequently spread into other concurrent sites that earned higher T-staging categories. Moreover

  11. Treatment Sequencing in a Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Patient with Central Nervous System Involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipa Mousinho

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Early-stage chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL with neurologic involvement is a rare condition and should require a careful follow-up. Although no standard protocol exists for this condition, intrathecal chemotherapy, combined with systemic chemoimmunotherapy, has been used previously. This case describes the treatment of a patient with CLL and symptomatic compromise of the central nervous system. Our results suggest that a combination of chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and ibrutinib, administered sequentially over a 2-year period, led to a near-complete resolution of the cerebral spinal fluid neoplastic infiltration. Importantly, this response has been maintained with ibrutinib monotherapy for more than 12 months.

  12. Cardiac involvement in a patient with clinical and serological evidence of African tick-bite fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ave Anne

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myocarditis and pericarditis are rare complications of rickettsiosis, usually associated with Rickettsia rickettsii and R. conorii. African tick-bite fever (ATBF is generally considered as a benign disease and no cases of myocardial involvement due to Rickettsia africae, the agent of ATBF, have yet been described. Case presentation The patient, that travelled in an endemic area, presented typical inoculation eschars, and a seroconversion against R. africae, was admitted for chest pains and increased cardiac enzymes in the context of an acute myocarditis. Conclusion Our findings suggest that ATBF, that usually presents a benign course, may be complicated by an acute myocarditis.

  13. High prevalence of cardiac involvement in patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petri, Helle; Witting, Nanna; Ersbøll, Mads Kristian

    2014-01-01

    of controls. Thus, the optimal strategy for assessing cardiac involvement in DM1 is unclear. METHOD: In this large single-centre study, we evaluated 129 unselected DM1 patients (49.6% men), mean (SD) age 44 (14.7) years with family history, physical examination, electrocardiogram (ECG), echocardiography......) arrhythmias: atrial fibrillation/flutter (4.1%), other supraventricular tachyarrhythmia (7.3%) and non-sustained ventricular tachycardia (4.1%); and 3) structural abnormalities: left ventricular systolic dysfunction (20.6%) and reduced global longitudinal strain (21.7%). A normal ECG was not significantly...

  14. The impact of involved node, involved field and mantle field radiotherapy on estimated radiation doses and risk of late effects for pediatric patients with Hodgkin lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maraldo, M. V.; Jorgensen, M.; Brodin, N. P.

    2014-01-01

    –II classical HL patients 4 x 2 plans for each patient. The lifetime excess risks of cardiac morbidity, cardiac mortality, lung, breast, and thyroid cancer with each technique were estimated. The estimated excess risks attributable to RT were based on HL series with long-term follow......IFRT), and Involved Node RT (INRT) and the risk of radiation-induced cardiovascular disease, secondary cancers, and the corresponding Life Years Lost (LYL) is estimated with each technique. PROCEDURE: INRT, mIFRT, IFRT, and MF plans (20 and 30 Gy) were simulated for 10 supradiaphragmatic, clinical stage I...... to the heart, lungs, breasts, and thyroid compared to past,extended fields, even for patients with mediastinal disease. This translated into a significantly reduced estimated risk of cardiovascular disease, secondary cancers, and LYL. CONCLUSIONS: Involved Node Radiotherapy should be considered for pediatric...

  15. OPTION(5) versus OPTION(12) instruments to appreciate the extent to which healthcare providers involve patients in decision-making

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stubenrouch, Fabienne E.; Pieterse, Arwen H.; Falkenberg, Rijan; Santema, T. Katrien B.; Stiggelbout, Anne M.; van der Weijden, Trudy; Aarts, J. Annemijn W. M.; Ubbink, Dirk T.

    2016-01-01

    The 12-item "observing patient involvement" (OPTION(12))-instrument is commonly used to assess the extent to which healthcare providers involve patients in health-related decision-making. The five-item version (OPTION(5)) claims to be a more efficient measure. In this study we compared the Dutch

  16. OPTION(5) versus OPTION(12) instruments to appreciate the extent to which healthcare providers involve patients in decision-making

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stubenrouch, F.E.; Pieterse, A.H.; Falkenberg, R.; Santema, T.K.; Stiggelbout, A.M.; Weijden, G.D.E.M. van der; Aarts, J.W.M.; Ubbink, D.T.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The 12-item "observing patient involvement" (OPTION(12))-instrument is commonly used to assess the extent to which healthcare providers involve patients in health-related decision-making. The five-item version (OPTION(5)) claims to be a more efficient measure. In this study we compared

  17. Patient involvement in research programming and implementation: a responsive evaluation of the Dialogue Model for research agenda setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abma, T.A.; Pittens, C.A.C.M.; Visse, M.; Elberse, J.E.; Broerse, J.E.W.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The Dialogue Model for research agenda-setting, involving multiple stakeholders including patients, was developed and validated in the Netherlands. However, there is little insight into whether and how patient involvement is sustained during the programming and implementation of research

  18. [Cooperation according to French Law "hospital, patients, health and territories": Pharmacists' involvement in Aquitaine region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Elbée, M; Baumevieille, M; Dumartin, C

    2017-06-01

    In 2009, the French Act "Hospital, Patients, Health and Territories" (loi "Hôpital, Patients, Santé et Territoires") reorganized the outpatient care pathway and defined missions aimed at improving cooperation between pharmaceutical and medical professionals. Five years later, we conducted a survey among community pharmacists in order to assess the appropriation of these missions and the way cooperation was implemented. We also aimed to investigate factors that could hamper or ease the development of these activities in order to identify actions needed to improve pharmacists' involvement. In partnership with the local health authorities "Agence régionale de santé", we conducted a survey via an online questionnaire sent to pharmacy holders in July 2014 in Aquitaine region. Information was collected about the pharmacies, involvement in collaborative activities, and barriers to cooperation. Overall, 20% (249) of pharmacists responded to the survey. They owned predominantly rural pharmacies (46%) or neighborhood pharmacies (41%), with two pharmacists per pharmacy (48%). Regarding collaborative activities, the majority of pharmacists (78%) had conducted interviews with their patients taking vitamin K antagonist therapy and they were willing to continue (87%). The implication was less common concerning other actions such as referent pharmacist for nursing homes (19%) or activities relating to therapeutic educational programs for patients with chronic conditions (34%). The vast majority of respondents (85%) were not aware of opportunities to become a correspondent pharmacist. The main obstacles for engaging in these activities were the lack of time, lack of knowledge about these missions and the lack of remuneration. We identified differences in pharmacists' involvement in collaborative activities depending on selected characteristics of the pharmacies. The findings of this survey underlined pharmacists' acceptance of these missions and suggest that better information

  19. Increasing patient involvement in the diabetic foot pathway: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, E; Hacking, B; O'Carroll, R; Young, M; Jahr, J; Borthwick, C; Callander, A; Berrada, Z

    2016-11-01

    This pilot study aimed to explore whether the use of an intervention to increase shared decision-making (Decision Navigation) increased decision self-efficacy and foot-treatment adherence in patients with a diabetic foot ulcer. Fifty-six patients with a diabetic foot ulcer were randomized to receive Decision Navigation (N = 30) or usual care (N = 26). Primary outcomes included decision self-efficacy, adherence to foot treatment as reported by the participant and adherence to foot treatment as reported by the clinician. Secondary outcomes included foot ulcer healing rate, health-related quality of life, decision conflict and decision regret. Despite participants rating Decision Navigation as very helpful, mixed analyses of variance revealed no differences in decision self-efficacy or adherence between those receiving Decision Navigation and those receiving usual care. There were no differences between groups with regards to the secondary outcomes, with the exception of decision conflict which increased over time (12 weeks) for those receiving Decision Navigation. An intervention that facilitated patient involvement in treatment decisions did not have any impact on decisional confidence or adherence to foot treatment. This does not provide support for the suggestion that personalized care can improve health-related outcomes at this progressed stage of the patient's disease trajectory. We suggest that the diabetic foot population may benefit from interventions aimed at increasing motivation to engage with care pathways, centred on challenging personal controllability beliefs. © 2016 Diabetes UK.

  20. Management of Patients with Graves’ Disease and Orbital Involvement: Role of Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Bruscolini

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate the role of choroidal thickness evaluation with spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT and enhanced depth imaging (EDI technique in the management of patients with Graves’ disease and orbitopathy (GO. Methods. Thirty-six eyes of 18 patients with GO and 36 eyes of 18 age-matched control subjects were included in this retrospective observational study. All the subjects underwent a complete ophthalmological evaluation, including clinical activity score (CAS and exophthalmometry. The SDOCT images of the choroid were obtained by EDI modality. Results. Choroidal thickness was significantly increased in GO than in control eyes (p<0.01. A significant correlation was found between choroidal thickness and CAS, proptosis, and the duration of disease (p<0.05. Conclusion. This study shows that choroidal thickness, evaluated with EDI-OCT, is significantly increased in patients with GO and correlates with the activity of the disease, proptosis, and duration of the disease. The choroidal thickening may reflect the ocular hemodynamic changes, and enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography may be a useful tool for the evaluation of orbital congestion and management of patients with Graves’ disease and orbital involvement.

  1. Physiopathological approach to infective endocarditis in chronic hemodialysis patients: left heart versus right heart involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentata, Yassamine

    2017-11-01

    Infectious endocarditis (IE), a complication that is both cardiac and infectious, occurs frequently and is associated with a heavy burden of morbidity and mortality in chronic hemodialysis patients (CHD). About 2-6% of chronic hemodialysis patients develop IE and the incidence is 50-60 times higher among CHD patients than in the general population. The left heart is the most frequent location of IE in CHD and the different published series report a prevalence of left valve involvement varying from 80% to 100%. Valvular and perivalvular abnormalities, alteration of the immune system, and bacteremia associated with repeated manipulation of the vascular access, particularly central venous catheters, comprise the main factors explaining the left heart IE in CHD patients. While left-sided IE develops in altered valves in a high-pressure system, right-sided IE on the contrary, generally develops in healthy valves in a low-pressure system. Right-sided IE is rare, with its incidence varying from 0% to 26% depending on the study, and the tricuspid valve is the main location. Might the massive influx of pathogenic and virulent germs via the central venous catheter to the right heart, with the tricuspid being the first contact valve, have a role in the physiopathology of IE in CHD, thus facilitating bacterial adhesion? While the physiopathology of left-sided IE entails multiple and convincing mechanisms, it is not the case for right-sided IE, for which the physiopathological mechanism is only partially understood and remains shrouded in mystery.

  2. Psychological characteristics of systemic sclerosis patients and their correlation with major organ involvement and disease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golemati, Christina V; Moutsopoulos, Haralampos M; Vlachoyiannopoulos, Panayiotis G

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to assess the psychological characteristics of personality, depression, anxiety, social support and coping strategies of systemic sclerosis (SSc) patients, their inter-correlations and their association with clinical symptoms. Patients with SSc (n=85) were interviewed and compared to rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients (n=120) and healthy controls (HCs [n=125]). Psychological characteristics were assessed by the following psychometric scales: centre of epidemiological studies of depression (CES-D), hospital anxiety and depression scale (HAD), Eysenck personality questionnaire (EPQ), short form of social support (SSq), life experiences survey (LES) and ways of coping (WoC). Clinical data were collected at the same time of the interview. Both control groups were matched to SSc patients in terms of gender, age and educational status. Data were analysed with SPSS software. Compared to control groups, SSc patients expressed more symptoms of depression and anxiety, showed less extraversion and reported more negative life events. They coped less often with positive reappraisal, problem solving, seeking of support and assertiveness, while they sought more often divine help, and they expressed wishing and denial. Inactive disease was associated with a lower probability of reporting depressive symptoms and negative life events and with a higher probability of positively reevaluating a problem. Lung dysfunction, skin involvement, esophageal problems and oral aperture correlated with psychological features. Complications in psychological well-being characterise patients with SSc. This finding, as well as that of psychological characteristics correlating with organic factors, is an indication for designing supportive psycho-educational programmes as complementary therapies.

  3. Neuropsychiatric Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Involvement: Towards a Tailored Approach to Our Patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Raquel; Gonçalves, João; Dias, Rita

    2017-01-30

    Neuropsychiatric involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus (NPSLE) is a complex condition that remains poorly understood, and includes heterogeneous manifestations involving both the central and peripheral nervous system, with disabling effects. There are several models to improve NPSLE diagnosis when a neurological syndrome is present. In the last couple of years, the growing knowledge of the role of cytokines and antibodies in NPSLE, as well as the development of new functional imaging techniques, has brought some insights into the physiopathology of the disease, but their validation for clinical use remains undetermined. Furthermore, besides the classic clinical approach, a new tool for screening the 19 NPSLE syndromes has also been developed. Regarding NPSLE therapeutics, there is still no evidence-based treatment approach, but some data support the safety of biological medication when classic treatment fails. Despite the tendency to reclassify SLE patients in clinical and immunological subsets, we hope that these data will inspire medical professionals to approach NPSLE in a manner more tailored to the individual patient.

  4. Aspergillus Spondylitis involving the Cervico-Thoraco-Lumbar Spine in an Immunocompromised Patient: a Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Jeong-Min; Jee, Won-Hee; Jung, Chan-Kwon; Kim, Sang-Il; Ha, Kee-Yong

    2007-01-01

    Aspergillosis is a rare cause of spondylitis. Moreover, early diagnosis by MR imaging and adequate treatment can prevent the serious complications of fungal infection. To our knowledge, the MR findings of multilevel aspergillus spondylitis in the cervico-thoraco-lumbar spine have not been previously described. Here, we report the MR findings of aspergillus spondylitis involving the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine in a liver transplant recipient. spergillosis is a rare cause of spondylitis, and early diagnosis by MR imaging and adequate treatment are essential for a good outcome. Although the MR findings of bacterial spondylitis have been fully described, the findings of aspergillus spondylitis have been rarely described, and to the best of our knowledge multilevel involvement of cervico-thoraco-lumbar spine has not been previously reported. Here, we report the MR imaging findings of aspergillus spondylitis involving the cervico-thoraco-lumbar spine in a liver transplant recipient. In conclusion, aspergillus spondylitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of immunocompromised patients with MR findings resembling those of tuberculous spondylitis

  5. Factors associated with involvement of four or more axillary nodes for sentinel lymph node-positive patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katz, Angela; Niemierko, Andrzej; Gage, Irene; Evans, Sheila; Shaffer, Margaret; Smith, Frederick P.; Taghian, Alphonse; Magnant, Colette

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Sentinel lymph node-positive (SLN+) patients who are unlikely to have 4 or more involved axillary nodes might be treated with less extensive regional nodal radiation. The purpose of this study was to define possible predictors of having 4 or more involved axillary nodes. Methods and Materials: The records of 224 patients with breast cancer and 1 to 3 involved SLNs, who underwent completion axillary dissection without neoadjuvant chemotherapy or hormonal therapy were reviewed. Factors associated with the presence of 4 or more involved axillary nodes (SLNs plus non-SLNs) were evaluated by Pearson chi-square test of association and by simple and multiple logistic-regression analysis. Results: Of 224 patients, 42 had involvement of 4 or more axillary nodes. On univariate analysis, the presence of 4 or more involved axillary nodes was positively associated with increased tumor size, lobular histology, lymphovascular space invasion (LVSI), increased number of involved SLNs, decreased number of uninvolved SLNs, and increased size of SLN metastasis. On multivariate analysis, the presence of 4 or more involved axillary nodes was associated with LVSI, increased number of involved SLNs, increased size of SLN metastasis, and lobular histology. Conclusions: Patients with 1 or more involved SLN, LVSI, or SLN macrometastasis should be treated to the supraclavicular fossa/axillary apex if they do not undergo completion axillary dissection. Other SLN+ patients might be adequately treated with less extensive radiation fields

  6. Thalamic involvement in the regulation of alpha EEG activity in psychiatric patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirazi, S.P.; Pakula, J.; Young, I.J.; Crayton, J.W.; Konopka, L.M.; Rybak, M.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: The thalamus is considered to be an important sub-cortical system involved in modulation of cortical activities. A relationship between thalamic activity and surface EEG was recently reported. In this study we evaluated a group of patients with psychiatric disorders who presented with asymmetric perfusion of the thalamus based on brain SPECT HMPAO studies. We predicted that asymmetrical activity of the thalamus would have asymmetrically distributed surface qEEG activity patterns. Materials and Methods: Twenty-three male psychiatric patients (age 54±14) with a primary diagnosis of depression and co-morbid substance abuse (83%) were studied with qEEG and HMPAO brain SPECT. The HMPAO ligand was administered while the EEG activity was being recorded. The SPECT analysis was conducted by means of ROI and SPM. ROI regions were determined based on the Talairach atlas coordinate system. ROI locations were verified by the automated utility, Talairach Demon. QEEG data was analyzed by a standardized protocol involving the NxLink database. Correlations between SPECT findings and qEEG absolute power were calculated. Results: Patients were divided into two groups based on thalamic perfusion patterns. Group 1 (Gr 1) had decreased perfusion to the right thalamus whereas Group 2 (Gr 2) had decreased perfusion to the left thalamus. SPM comparison of the patient groups to normal control subjects indicated significant findings. Comparison of Gr 1 to controls showed increased activity in the left temporal lobe and vermis. Decreased activity was observed in the left and right medial frontal lobes (right Brodmann 9;left Brodmann 6) as well as the left (Brodmann 30) and right (Brodmann 24) cingulate. Gr 2 comparison showed increased activity in the right middle frontal gyrus (Brodmann 10) and left inferior parietal lobe. Decreased activity was found in the left inferior frontal lobe (Brodmann 47). A positive correlation between alpha power and thalamic perfusion was identified in Gr

  7. Health literacy, numeracy, and other characteristics associated with hospitalized patients' preferences for involvement in decision-making

    OpenAIRE

    Goggins, KM; Wallston, KA; Nwosu, S; Schildcrout, JS; Castel, L; Kripalani, S

    2014-01-01

    Little research has examined the association of health literacy and numeracy with patients' preferred involvement in the problem-solving and decision-making process in the hospital. Using a sample of 1,249 patients hospitalized with cardiovascular disease from the Vanderbilt Inpatient Cohort Study (VICS), we assessed patients' preferred level of involvement using responses to two scenarios of differing symptom severity from the Problem-Solving Decision-Making (PSDM) Scale. Using multivariable...

  8. An industry perspective on Canadian patients' involvement in Medical Tourism: implications for public health

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The medical tourism industry, which assists patients with accessing non-emergency medical care abroad, has grown rapidly in recent years. A lack of reliable data about medical tourism makes it difficult to create policy, health system, and public health responses to address the associated risks and shortcomings, such as spread of infectious diseases, associated with this industry. This article addresses this knowledge gap by analyzing interviews conducted with Canadian medical tourism facilitators in order to understand Canadian patients' involvement in medical tourism and the implications of this involvement for public health. Methods Semi-structured phone interviews were conducted with 12 medical facilitators from 10 companies in 2010. An exhaustive recruitment strategy was used to identify interviewees. Questions focused on business dimensions, information exchange, medical tourists' decision-making, and facilitators' roles in medical tourism. Thematic analysis was undertaken following data collection. Results Facilitators helped their Canadian clients travel to 11 different countries. Estimates of the number of clients sent abroad annually varied due to demand factors. Facilitators commonly worked with medical tourists aged between 40 and 60 from a variety of socio-economic backgrounds who faced a number of potential barriers including affordability, fear of the unfamiliar, and lack of confidence. Medical tourists who chose not to use facilitators' services were thought to be interested in saving money or have cultural/familial connections to the destination country. Canadian doctors were commonly identified as barriers to securing clients. Conclusions No effective Canadian public health response to medical tourism can treat medical tourists as a unified group with similar motivations for engaging in medical tourism and choosing similar mechanisms for doing so. This situation may be echoed in other countries with patients seeking care abroad

  9. An industry perspective on Canadian patients' involvement in Medical Tourism: implications for public health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snyder Jeremy

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The medical tourism industry, which assists patients with accessing non-emergency medical care abroad, has grown rapidly in recent years. A lack of reliable data about medical tourism makes it difficult to create policy, health system, and public health responses to address the associated risks and shortcomings, such as spread of infectious diseases, associated with this industry. This article addresses this knowledge gap by analyzing interviews conducted with Canadian medical tourism facilitators in order to understand Canadian patients' involvement in medical tourism and the implications of this involvement for public health. Methods Semi-structured phone interviews were conducted with 12 medical facilitators from 10 companies in 2010. An exhaustive recruitment strategy was used to identify interviewees. Questions focused on business dimensions, information exchange, medical tourists' decision-making, and facilitators' roles in medical tourism. Thematic analysis was undertaken following data collection. Results Facilitators helped their Canadian clients travel to 11 different countries. Estimates of the number of clients sent abroad annually varied due to demand factors. Facilitators commonly worked with medical tourists aged between 40 and 60 from a variety of socio-economic backgrounds who faced a number of potential barriers including affordability, fear of the unfamiliar, and lack of confidence. Medical tourists who chose not to use facilitators' services were thought to be interested in saving money or have cultural/familial connections to the destination country. Canadian doctors were commonly identified as barriers to securing clients. Conclusions No effective Canadian public health response to medical tourism can treat medical tourists as a unified group with similar motivations for engaging in medical tourism and choosing similar mechanisms for doing so. This situation may be echoed in other countries with patients

  10. An industry perspective on Canadian patients' involvement in medical tourism: implications for public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Rory; Crooks, Valorie A; Adams, Krystyna; Snyder, Jeremy; Kingsbury, Paul

    2011-05-31

    The medical tourism industry, which assists patients with accessing non-emergency medical care abroad, has grown rapidly in recent years. A lack of reliable data about medical tourism makes it difficult to create policy, health system, and public health responses to address the associated risks and shortcomings, such as spread of infectious diseases, associated with this industry. This article addresses this knowledge gap by analyzing interviews conducted with Canadian medical tourism facilitators in order to understand Canadian patients' involvement in medical tourism and the implications of this involvement for public health. Semi-structured phone interviews were conducted with 12 medical facilitators from 10 companies in 2010. An exhaustive recruitment strategy was used to identify interviewees. Questions focused on business dimensions, information exchange, medical tourists' decision-making, and facilitators' roles in medical tourism. Thematic analysis was undertaken following data collection. Facilitators helped their Canadian clients travel to 11 different countries. Estimates of the number of clients sent abroad annually varied due to demand factors. Facilitators commonly worked with medical tourists aged between 40 and 60 from a variety of socio-economic backgrounds who faced a number of potential barriers including affordability, fear of the unfamiliar, and lack of confidence. Medical tourists who chose not to use facilitators' services were thought to be interested in saving money or have cultural/familial connections to the destination country. Canadian doctors were commonly identified as barriers to securing clients. No effective Canadian public health response to medical tourism can treat medical tourists as a unified group with similar motivations for engaging in medical tourism and choosing similar mechanisms for doing so. This situation may be echoed in other countries with patients seeking care abroad. Therefore, a call for a comprehensive public

  11. Completing the third person's perspective on patients' involvement in medical decision-making: approaching the full picture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Jürgen; Hoffmann, Frauke; Heesen, Christoph; Köpke, Sascha; Geiger, Friedemann

    2012-01-01

    Shared decision making is based on the idea of cooperation and partnership between patients and doctors. In this concept both parties may initiate and perform specific decision-making steps. However, the common observation-based instruments focus solely on doctors' behaviour. Content and quality of information provided to involve patients in medical decisions are hardly considered in evaluation of SDM. This study investigates the advantages of a revised observer inventory taking into account these aspects. Based on the OPTION scale, a more comprehensive observation-based inventory was developed, additionally considering both the patient-sided indicators for patient involvement and the criteria of evidence-based patient information. The inventory comprises three scales (doctor, patient, doctor-patient dyad) and 15 indicators each. Rater training and re-analyses of 76 consultations previously analysed using the OPTION scale were conducted. Convergent validities were calculated between the observer-based scales and the patients' ratings on the Shared Decision Making Questionnaire, the Decisional Conflict Scale and the Control Preference Scale. Interrater reliabilities of the revised scales were high (r=.87 to .74) and even higher when only the dyadic perspective was coded (.86). The revised inventory provided additional information on the involvement taking place. No substantive correlations were found between observation-based and patients' subjective judgments. The observers' perspective on patient involvement needs to consider patient activities. Inconsistencies of patients' and observers' judgements concerning patient participation need further investigation. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  12. Bone involvement in adult patients affected with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eller-Vainicher, C; Bassotti, A; Imeraj, A; Cairoli, E; Ulivieri, F M; Cortini, F; Dubini, M; Marinelli, B; Spada, A; Chiodini, I

    2016-08-01

    The Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is characterized by abnormal connective tissue but bone involvement is debated. We found a reduced BMD and bone quality and increased prevalence of asymptomatic vertebral fractures in eugonadal patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. These findings suggest the need of a bone health evaluation in these patients. The Ehlers-Danlos (EDS) syndrome is characterized by abnormalities of the connective tissue leading to ligamentous laxity and skin and tissue fragility. We evaluated the bone metabolism, bone mineral density (BMD) and bone quality (measured by trabecular bone score, TBS), and the prevalence of vertebral fractures (VFx) in a group of eugonadal adult EDS patients. Fifty consecutive Caucasian patients, aged 30-50 years (36 females, 14 males) with classical or hypermobility EDS and 50 age-, gender-, and body mass index (BMI)-matched control subjects were enrolled. In all subjects' calcium-phosphorous metabolism, bone turnover, BMD at the lumbar spine (LS) and femur (femoral neck, FN and total femur, FT) and TBS by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and the VFx presence by spine radiograph were assessed. Patients showed reduced BMD (Z-scores LS -0.45 ± 1.00, FN -0.56 ± 1.01, FT -0.58 ± 0.92) and TBS (1.299 ± 0.111) and increased prevalence of morphometric VFx (32 %) than controls (Z-scores LS 0.09 ± 1.22, FN 0.01 ± 0.97, FT 0.08 ± 0.89; TBS 1.382 ± 0.176; VFx 8 %, p <0.05 for all comparisons), while vitamin D levels, calcium-phosphorous metabolism, and bone turnover were comparable. Fractured EDS patients showed lower TBS values than non-fractured ones (1.245 ± 0.138 vs 1.325 ± 0.086, p < 0.05), despite comparable BMD. In EDS patients, the VFx presence was significantly associated with TBS even after adjusting for sex, age, BMD, EDS type, and falls frequency. EDS patients have reduced BMD and bone quality (as measured by TBS) and increased prevalence of VFx.

  13. Distinctive serum protein profiles involving abundant proteins in lung cancer patients based upon antibody microarray analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Wei-Min; Haab, Brian B; Hanash, Samir M; Kuick, Rork; Orchekowski, Randal P; Misek, David E; Qiu, Ji; Greenberg, Alissa K; Rom, William N; Brenner, Dean E; Omenn, Gilbert S

    2005-01-01

    Cancer serum protein profiling by mass spectrometry has uncovered mass profiles that are potentially diagnostic for several common types of cancer. However, direct mass spectrometric profiling has a limited dynamic range and difficulties in providing the identification of the distinctive proteins. We hypothesized that distinctive profiles may result from the differential expression of relatively abundant serum proteins associated with the host response. Eighty-four antibodies, targeting a wide range of serum proteins, were spotted onto nitrocellulose-coated microscope slides. The abundances of the corresponding proteins were measured in 80 serum samples, from 24 newly diagnosed subjects with lung cancer, 24 healthy controls, and 32 subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Two-color rolling-circle amplification was used to measure protein abundance. Seven of the 84 antibodies gave a significant difference (p < 0.01) for the lung cancer patients as compared to healthy controls, as well as compared to COPD patients. Proteins that exhibited higher abundances in the lung cancer samples relative to the control samples included C-reactive protein (CRP; a 13.3 fold increase), serum amyloid A (SAA; a 2.0 fold increase), mucin 1 and α-1-antitrypsin (1.4 fold increases). The increased expression levels of CRP and SAA were validated by Western blot analysis. Leave-one-out cross-validation was used to construct Diagonal Linear Discriminant Analysis (DLDA) classifiers. At a cutoff where all 56 of the non-tumor samples were correctly classified, 15/24 lung tumor patient sera were correctly classified. Our results suggest that a distinctive serum protein profile involving abundant proteins may be observed in lung cancer patients relative to healthy subjects or patients with chronic disease and may have utility as part of strategies for detecting lung cancer

  14. Involving patients in a multidisciplinary European consensus process and in the development of a 'patient summary of the consensus document for colon and rectal cancer care'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boelens, Petra G; Taylor, Claire; Henning, Geoffrey; Marang-van de Mheen, Perla J; Espin, Eloy; Wiggers, Theo; Gore-Booth, Jola; Moss, Barbara; Valentini, Vincenzo; van de Velde, Cornelis J H

    2014-01-01

    High-quality cancer care should be accessible for patients and healthcare professionals. Involvement of patients as partners in guideline formation and consensus processes is still rarely found. EURECCA, short for European Registration of Cancer Care, is the platform to improve outcomes of cancer care by reducing variation in the diagnostic and treatment process. EURECCA acknowledges the important role of patients in implementation of consensus information in clinical practice. The aim of this article is to describe the process of involving patients in the consensus process and in developing the patient summary of the consensus for colon and rectal cancer care. The Delphi method for achieving consensus was used. Three online voting rounds and one tele-voting round were offered to an expert panel of oncology professionals and patient representatives. At four different stages, patients and/or patient representatives were involved in the process: (1) during the consensus process, (2) lecturing about the role of the patient, (3) development of the patient summary, and (4) testing the patient summary. Representatives were invited to the voting and commenting rounds of this process and given an equal vote. Although patients were not consulted during the planning stages of this process, patient involvement increased following the panel's discussion of the implementation of the consensus among the patient population. After the consensus meeting, the patient summary was written by patient representatives, oncologists and nurses. A selection of proactive patients reviewed the draft patient summary; responses were positive and several patient-reported outcomes were added. Questionnaires to evaluate the use and implementation of the patient summary in daily practice are currently being developed and tested. Patient consultation will be needed in future planning for selection of topics. The present study may function as a model for future consensus processes to involve patients

  15. The involvement of galectin-3 in skin injury in systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Z; Meng, Z; Han, Y; Cao, C; Tan, G; Wang, L

    2018-04-01

    Objective Our previous research suggested that anti-galectin-3 antibody was highly associated with the development of lupus skin lesions in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In this study we aimed to investigate the involvement of galectin-3 in SLE skin damage. Methods The study consisted of 49 patients with SLE, 16 with dermatomyositis and 11 with systemic scleroderma and 20 healthy controls. Galectin-3 was examined by ELISA and immunohistochemical staining in serum and skin, respectively. Results Serum galectin-3 was significantly higher in patients with SLE than in those with dermatomyositis ( P  0.05). As for subtypes of skin lesions in SLE, galectin-3 expression was lower in chronic cutaneous lupus erythematosus than in acute cutaneous lupus erythematosus ( P = 0.0439). Conclusion Serum galectin-3 is unlikely to play a role in the pathogenesis of lupus skin damage, but can be a potential biomarker for the measurement of SLE disease activity. Galectin-3 is greatly reduced in patients with lupus lesions compared with healthy controls, which may contribute to the recruitment of inflammatory cells in the skin.

  16. The impact of involved node, involved field and mantle field radiotherapy on estimated radiation doses and risk of late effects for pediatric patients with Hodgkin lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maraldo, M V; Jørgensen, M; Brodin, N P

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The use of radiotherapy (RT) is debated for pediatric patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) due to the late effects of treatment. Radiation doses to the thyroid, heart, lungs, and breasts are compared with the extensive mantle field (MF), Involved Field RT(IFRT), Modified IFRT (m......IFRT), and Involved Node RT (INRT) and the risk of radiation-induced cardiovascular disease, secondary cancers, and the corresponding Life Years Lost (LYL) is estimated with each technique. PROCEDURE: INRT, mIFRT, IFRT, and MF plans (20 and 30 Gy) were simulated for 10 supradiaphragmatic, clinical stage I......–II classical HL patients lung, breast, and thyroid cancer with each technique were estimated. The estimated excess risks attributable to RT were based on HL series with long-term follow...

  17. Abdominal and pelvic lymph node involvement in non-Hodgkin lymphoma: CT manifestations in Chinese patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Ning; Liu Ying; Chen Yu; Lin Dongmei; Shi Mulan

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the CT manifestations of abdominal and pelvic lymph nodes in non- Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) of Chinese patients, and to investigate their correlation with pathology subtypes. Methods: The CT images of 241 patients with enlargement of abdominal and pelvic lymph nodes involved by NHL were reviewed. Of them, 96 patients whose clinical and imaging data fulfilled the requirement for analysis were included. According to the Clinical Schema for the Lymphoid System, patients were divided into 3 subtypes, indolent lymphoma (IL; n=31), aggressive lymphoma (AL; n=61), very aggressive lymphoma (VAL; n=2), and unclassified lymphoma (UCL; n=2), respectively. Abdominal and pelvic CT scans were undertaken in 46 patients, abdominal CT only in 47 cases, and pelvic CT only in 3 cases. CT with iv contrast administration was obtained in 80 patients. Anatomic sites involved were nominated as retroperitoneal (i.e. paraaortic), abdominal (including paracardiac, gastrohepatic, hepatic hilar, and mesenteric etc), retrocrural, diaphragmatic, common iliac, internal iliac, external iliac, and inguinal nodes, respectively. Size, number, discreteness, and density of the nodal lesions were analyzed, and correlated with pathology subtypes. The minimal dimension of the largest node was measured. Results: (1) Size: Most of the nodes were ≤2 cm in size, 60.5% (219/362 sites) in IL and AL, 56.6% (77/136 sites) in IL, and 62.8%(142/226 sites) in AL, respectively. There was no statistical significant difference of the nodal size between IL and AL in each location (χ 2 =0.341, P=0.559). (2) Number: Mesentery had the largest number of node involvement (6.5 vs 5 nodes on an median, IL vs AL), with retroperitoneum placed second (4 vs 4 nodes, IL vs AL. (3) Discreteness: Most of the nodes were discrete with an incidence of 77.1% (279/362 sites, IL and AL), and 74.3% (101/136 sites) in IL, 78.8% (178/226 sites) in AL, respectively. No statistical significant discrepancy was found between

  18. Patient Involvement in Geriatric Care – Results and Experiences from a Mixed Models Design Study within Project INTEGRATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joern Kiselev

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patient involvement is a core component of an integrated care approach. While the benefits and prerequisites of patient involvement have been described in general and additionally for some target populations, little is known about the views and experiences of older people regarding this matter. Methods: A study with a mixed-methods design was conducted to gain a better understanding about patient involvement in geriatric care. A questionnaire on shared decision-making was administered within a group of older adults in Germany. Additionally, 7 focus groups with health professionals and geriatric patients in Germany and Estonia were held to deepen the insight of the questionnaire and discussing experiences and barriers of patient involvement. Results: Older people without an actual medical problem expressed a significantly higher desire to participate in shared decisions than those requiring actual medical care. No significant differences could be found for the desire to be informed as part of the care process. No correlation between patients’ desire and experiences on shared decision-making could be observed. In the focus groups, patients demanded a comprehensive and understandable information and education process while the health professionals’ view was very task-specific. This conflict led to a loss of trust by the patients. Conclusions: There is a gap between patients’ and health professionals’ views on patient involvement in older people. The involvement process should therefore be comprehensive and should take into account different levels of health literacy.

  19. Religion involvement and quality of life in patients with schizophrenia in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caqueo-Urízar, Alejandra; Urzúa, Alfonso; Boyer, Laurent; Williams, David R

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the relationship between religion involvement (RI) and quality of life (QoL) in patients with schizophrenia from three countries in Latin America, while considering key confounding factors such as socio-demographic and clinical characteristics. This cross-sectional study was conducted in the public mental health services in La Paz, Bolivia; Arica, Chile; and Tacna, Peru. The data collected included RI, socio-demographic information, clinical characteristics, type of treatment and QoL using the S-QoL 18 questionnaire. A multivariate analysis using multiple linear regressions was performed to determine variables associated with QoL levels. Two hundred and fifty-three patients with schizophrenia were enrolled in our study. Significant positive associations were found between RI and QoL (the S-QoL 18 index: β = 0.13; p = 0.048; autonomy dimension: β = 0.15; p = 0.027). Other socio-cultural and economic factors were also associated with low QoL level: being a woman, older patient, low education level and being Aymara. Severity of the psychotic symptoms was associated to a lower QoL for all the dimension (β from 0.15 to 0.31), except for the resilience. Our study found that socio-cultural and economic factors including RI were associated with QoL in patients with schizophrenia in Latin America, suggesting that these factors may influence positively health outcome. However, these relationships were moderate in strength, especially in comparison to symptoms severity which remained the most important features associated with QoL.

  20. Primary care physicians' willingness to disclose oncology errors involving multiple providers to patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazor, Kathleen; Roblin, Douglas W; Greene, Sarah M; Fouayzi, Hassan; Gallagher, Thomas H

    2016-10-01

    Full disclosure of harmful errors to patients, including a statement of regret, an explanation, acceptance of responsibility and commitment to prevent recurrences is the current standard for physicians in the USA. To examine the extent to which primary care physicians' perceptions of event-level, physician-level and organisation-level factors influence intent to disclose a medical error in challenging situations. Cross-sectional survey containing two hypothetical vignettes: (1) delayed diagnosis of breast cancer, and (2) care coordination breakdown causing a delayed response to patient symptoms. In both cases, multiple physicians shared responsibility for the error, and both involved oncology diagnoses. The study was conducted in the context of the HMO Cancer Research Network Cancer Communication Research Center. Primary care physicians from three integrated healthcare delivery systems located in Washington, Massachusetts and Georgia; responses from 297 participants were included in these analyses. The dependent variable intent to disclose included intent to provide an apology, an explanation, information about the cause and plans for preventing recurrences. Independent variables included event-level factors (responsibility for the event, perceived seriousness of the event, predictions about a lawsuit); physician-level factors (value of patient-centred communication, communication self-efficacy and feelings about practice); organisation-level factors included perceived support for communication and time constraints. A majority of respondents would not fully disclose in either situation. The strongest predictors of disclosure were perceived personal responsibility, perceived seriousness of the event and perceived value of patient-centred communication. These variables were consistently associated with intent to disclose. To make meaningful progress towards improving disclosure; physicians, risk managers, organisational leaders, professional organisations and

  1. Patterns of failure of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patients after involved-site radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holzhaeuser, Eva; Berlin, Maximilian; Bezold, Thomas; Mayer, Arnulf; Schmidberger, Heinz [University Medical Center Mainz, Department of Radiation Oncology and Radiotherapy, Mainz (Germany); Wollschlaeger, Daniel [University Medical Center Mainz, Institute for Medical Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Informatics, Mainz (Germany); Hess, Georg [University Medical Center Mainz, Department of Internal Medicine, Mainz (Germany)

    2017-12-15

    Radiotherapy (RT) in combination with chemoimmunotherapy is highly efficient in the treatment of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). This retrospective analysis evaluated the efficacy of the treatment volume and the dose concept of involved-site RT (ISRT). We identified 60 histologically confirmed stage I-IV DLBCL patients treated with multimodal cytotoxic chemoimmunotherapy and followed by consolidative ISRT from 2005-2015. Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were estimated by Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate analyses were performed by log-rank test and Mann-Whitney U-test. After initial chemoimmunotherapy (mostly R-CHOP; rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisolone), 19 (36%) patients achieved complete response (CR), 34 (64%) partial response (PR) or less. Excluded were 7 (12%) patients with progressive disease after chemoimmunotherapy. All patients underwent ISRT with a dose of 40 Gy. After a median follow-up of 44 months, 79% of the patients remained disease free, while 21% presented with failure, progressive systemic disease, or death. All patients who achieved CR after chemoimmunotherapy remained in CR. Of the patients achieving PR after chemotherapy only 2 failed at the initial site within the ISRT volume. No marginal relapse was observed. Ann Arbor clinical stage I/II showed significantly improved PFS compared to stage III/IV (93% vs 65%; p ≤ 0.021). International Prognostic Index (IPI) score of 0 or 1 compared to 2-5 has been associated with significantly increased PFS (100% vs 70%; p ≤ 0.031). Postchemoimmunotherapy status of CR compared to PR was associated with significantly increased PFS (100% vs 68%; p ≤ 0.004) and OS (100% vs 82%; p ≤ 0.026). Only 3 of 53 patients developed grade II late side effects, whereas grade III or IV side effects have not been observed. These data suggest that a reduction of the RT treatment volume from involved-field (IF) to involved-site (IS) is sufficient because

  2. Genes and genetic variations involved in the development of hypertension: focusing on a Greek patient cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouremenos, Nikolaos; Zacharopoulou, Ioanna V; Triantafyllidi, Helen; Zacharopoulos, Georgios V; Mornos, Cristian; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Lekakis, John; Kremastinos, Dimitrios; Manolis, Athanasios I; Gavras, Haralambos

    2014-01-01

    Essential hypertension (HTN) is a multifactorial disease involving environmental, genetic and other factors. Over the past years, genetic studies of essential HTN have increased dramatically but the molecular mechanisms involved are still unknown. As part of a research program coordinated by Boston university (USA), we studied the role of various genes and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the inheritance or the onset of HTN in African-American, Caucasian-American and Greek families. Among 128 Greek families with a history of HTN, we studied 1474 people. Of the total examined, 273 men and 286 women were hypertensive. Based on 410 DNA samples from the hypertensive subjects, different SNPs were examined. An overall meta-analysis of the results from the Greek families, as well as a comparison with the 2 other groups (African-Americans and Caucasian-Americans), was performed. We report SNPs that are associated with the inheritance of HTN and are located either at the promoters of N-methyltransferase and catalase genes, or within the coding region of NEDD4L ubiquitin ligase gene, or SNPs in mitochondrial DNA of hypertensive probands. Furthermore, we clarified the role of hereditary predisposition in the development of HTN, showing that the presence of maternal HTN was significantly higher in African-Americans and Greeks compared to Caucasian-Americans (81.7%, 84.8%, and 65%), while the paternal HTN showed no such difference (50%, 48.3% and 44.9%), respectively. Although genetic factors that were correlated with HTN were identified, it was not possible to identify a single gene that should be targeted for the treatment of HTN. Nevertheless, the important role of the maternal hereditary predisposition to HTN in the Greek patients and the responsible genetic factors involved should be further examined.

  3. Occurrence and prognostic value of circumferential resection margin involvement for patients with rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cun; Zhou, Zong-guang; Yu, Yong-yang; Shu, Ye; Li, Yuan; Yang, Lie; Li, Li

    2009-04-01

    Total mesorectal excision (TME) was advocated owning to the reduction in local failure, while deficiency in pathologic details limited monitoring of surgical quality assurance. Here, we aimed to examine circumferential resection margin (CRM) by large tissue slice, discussing its rule in occurrence and relationship with prognosis, thus providing proof for the adoption of TME principles and the application of adjuvant therapy. Specimens of 106 patients with rectal cancer, who underwent potentially curative resection from December 2001 to September 2002, were examined. Follow-up data were collected. Altogether, 2,068 mesorectal nodes were examined with 272 involved by tumor. CRM involvement (CRMI) was examined in 20 specimens. In these 20 cases, seven, nine, and four were caused by tumor infiltration, lymph node metastasis, and both, respectively. Occurrence of CRMI was more common for lower-located cancers while also statistically related to tumor differentiation, infiltration, and lymph node metastasis. The difference in local recurrence rate, general recurrence rate, disease-free survival rate, and overall survival rate between the group with CRMI and the group without were all proven to be significant. Detailed pathologic examination, including status of CRM, is advocated since it provides accurate prognostic information. Surgeons could maximize the probability of cure by following the principle of TME. Preoperative adjuvant therapy was essential for advanced staged and lower-located lesions, which implied likelihood of CRMI.

  4. Cardiac involvement in myotonic muscular dystrophy (Steinert's disease): a prospective study of 25 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perloff, J.K.; Stevenson, W.G.; Roberts, N.K.; Cabeen, W.; Weiss, J.

    1984-01-01

    The presence, degree and frequency of disorders of cardiac conduction and rhythm and of regional or global myocardial dystrophy or myotonia have not previously been studied prospectively and systematically in the same population of patients with myotonic dystrophy. Accordingly, 25 adults with classic Steinert's disease underwent electrocardiography, 24-hour ambulatory electrocardiography, vectorcardiography, chest x-rays, echocardiography, electrophysiologic studies, and technetium-99m angiography. Clinically important cardiac manifestations of myotonic dystrophy reside in specialized tissues rather than in myocardium. Involvement is relatively specific, primarily assigned to the His-Purkinje system. The cardiac muscle disorder takes the form of dystrophy rather than myotonia, and is not selective, appearing with approximately equal distribution in all 4 chambers. Myocardial dystrophy seldom results in clinically overt ventricular failure, but may be responsible for atrial and ventricular arrhythmias. Since myotonic dystrophy is genetically transmitted, a primary biochemical defect has been proposed with complete expression of the gene toward striated muscle tissue, whether skeletal or cardiac. Specialized cardiac tissue and myocardium have close, if not identical, embryologic origins, so it is not surprising that the genetic marker affects both. Cardiac involvement is therefore an integral part of myotonic dystrophy, targeting particularly the infranodal conduction system, to a lesser extent the sinus node, and still less specifically, the myocardium

  5. Developing a conceptual model for the application of patient and public involvement in the healthcare system in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azmal, Mohammad; Sari, Ali Akbari; Foroushani, Abbas Rahimi; Ahmadi, Batoul

    2016-06-01

    Patient and public involvement is engaging patients, providers, community representatives, and the public in healthcare planning and decision-making. The purpose of this study was to develop a model for the application of patient and public involvement in decision making in the Iranian healthcare system. A mixed qualitative-quantitative approach was used to develop a conceptual model. Thirty three key informants were purposely recruited in the qualitative stage, and 420 people (patients and their companions) were included in a protocol study that was implemented in five steps: 1) Identifying antecedents, consequences, and variables associated with the patient and the publics' involvement in healthcare decision making through a comprehensive literature review; 2) Determining the main variables in the context of Iran's health system using conceptual framework analysis; 3) Prioritizing and weighting variables by Shannon entropy; 4) designing and validating a tool for patient and public involvement in healthcare decision making; and 5) Providing a conceptual model of patient and the public involvement in planning and developing healthcare using structural equation modeling. We used various software programs, including SPSS (17), Max QDA (10), EXCEL, and LISREL. Content analysis, Shannon entropy, and descriptive and analytic statistics were used to analyze the data. In this study, seven antecedents variable, five dimensions of involvement, and six consequences were identified. These variables were used to design a valid tool. A logical model was derived that explained the logical relationships between antecedent and consequent variables and the dimensions of patient and public involvement as well. Given the specific context of the political, social, and innovative environments in Iran, it was necessary to design a model that would be compatible with these features. It can improve the quality of care and promote the patient and the public satisfaction with healthcare and

  6. Priorities for methodological research on patient and public involvement in clinical trials: A modified Delphi process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, Anna; Williamson, Paula; Young, Bridget; Bagley, Heather; Gamble, Carrol; Denegri, Simon; Muir, Delia; Simon, Natalie A; Thomas, Stephen; Elliot, Jim T; Bulbeck, Helen; Crocker, Joanna C; Planner, Claire; Vale, Claire; Clarke, Mike; Sprosen, Tim; Woolfall, Kerry

    2017-12-01

    Despite increasing international interest, there is a lack of evidence about the most efficient, effective and acceptable ways to implement patient and public involvement (PPI) in clinical trials. To identify the priorities of UK PPI stakeholders for methodological research to help resolve uncertainties about PPI in clinical trials. A modified Delphi process including a two round online survey and a stakeholder consensus meeting. In total, 237 people registered of whom 219 (92%) completed the first round. One hundred and eighty-seven of 219 (85%) completed the second; 25 stakeholders attended the consensus meeting. Round 1 of the survey comprised 36 topics; 42 topics were considered in round 2 and at the consensus meeting. Approximately 96% of meeting participants rated the top three topics as equally important. These were as follows: developing strong and productive working relationships between researchers and PPI contributors; exploring PPI practices in selecting trial outcomes of importance to patients; and a systematic review of PPI activity to improve the accessibility and usefulness of trial information (eg participant information sheets) for participants. The prioritized methodological research topics indicate important areas of uncertainty about PPI in trials. Addressing these uncertainties will be critical to enhancing PPI. Our findings should be used in the planning and funding of PPI in clinical trials to help focus research efforts and minimize waste. © 2017 The Authors Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Involvement of mast cells by the malignant process in patients with Philadelphia chromosome negative myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J; Ishii, T; Zhang, W; Sozer, S; Dai, Y; Mascarenhas, J; Najfeld, V; Zhao, Z J; Hoffman, R; Wisch, N; Xu, M

    2009-09-01

    The Philadelphia chromosome negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) are clonal hematologic malignancies frequently characterized by a mutation in JAK2 (JAK2V617F). Peripheral blood (PB) CD34(+) cells from patients with polycythemia vera (PV) and primary myelofibrosis (PMF) generated in vitro significantly fewer mast cells (MCs) than normal PB CD34(+) cells. The numbers of MC progenitors assayed from MPN CD34(+) cells were, however, similar to that assayed from normal CD34(+) cells. A higher percentage of the cultured MPN MCs expressed FcvarepsilonRIalpha, CD63 and CD69 than normal MCs, suggesting that cultured MPN MCs are associated with an increased state of MC activation. Further analysis showed that a higher proportion of cultured PV and PMF MCs underwent apoptosis in vitro. By using JAK2V617F, MplW515L and chromosomal abnormalities as clonality markers, we showed that the malignant process involved MPN MCs. JAK2V617F-positive MC colonies were assayable from the PB CD34(+) cells of each of the 17 JAK2V617F positive MPN patients studied. Furthermore, erlotinib, a JAK2 inhibitor, was able to inhibit JAK2V617F-positive PV MC progenitor cells, indicating that malignant MC progenitor cells are a potential cellular target for such JAK2 inhibitor-directed therapy.

  8. Distinctive serum protein profiles involving abundant proteins in lung cancer patients based upon antibody microarray analysis

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    Rom William N

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer serum protein profiling by mass spectrometry has uncovered mass profiles that are potentially diagnostic for several common types of cancer. However, direct mass spectrometric profiling has a limited dynamic range and difficulties in providing the identification of the distinctive proteins. We hypothesized that distinctive profiles may result from the differential expression of relatively abundant serum proteins associated with the host response. Methods Eighty-four antibodies, targeting a wide range of serum proteins, were spotted onto nitrocellulose-coated microscope slides. The abundances of the corresponding proteins were measured in 80 serum samples, from 24 newly diagnosed subjects with lung cancer, 24 healthy controls, and 32 subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Two-color rolling-circle amplification was used to measure protein abundance. Results Seven of the 84 antibodies gave a significant difference (p Conclusion Our results suggest that a distinctive serum protein profile involving abundant proteins may be observed in lung cancer patients relative to healthy subjects or patients with chronic disease and may have utility as part of strategies for detecting lung cancer.

  9. Patients' and observers' perceptions of involvement differ. Validation study on inter-relating measures for shared decision making.

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    Kasper, Jürgen; Heesen, Christoph; Köpke, Sascha; Fulcher, Gary; Geiger, Friedemann

    2011-01-01

    Patient involvement into medical decisions as conceived in the shared decision making method (SDM) is essential in evidence based medicine. However, it is not conclusively evident how best to define, realize and evaluate involvement to enable patients making informed choices. We aimed at investigating the ability of four measures to indicate patient involvement. While use and reporting of these instruments might imply wide overlap regarding the addressed constructs this assumption seems questionable with respect to the diversity of the perspectives from which the assessments are administered. The study investigated a nested cohort (N = 79) of a randomized trial evaluating a patient decision aid on immunotherapy for multiple sclerosis. Convergent validities were calculated between observer ratings of videotaped physician-patient consultations (OPTION) and patients' perceptions of the communication (Shared Decision Making Questionnaire, Control Preference Scale & Decisional Conflict Scale). OPTION reliability was high to excellent. Communication performance was low according to OPTION and high according to the three patient administered measures. No correlations were found between observer and patient judges, neither for means nor for single items. Patient report measures showed some moderate correlations. Existing SDM measures do not refer to a single construct. A gold standard is missing to decide whether any of these measures has the potential to indicate patient involvement. Pronounced heterogeneity of the underpinning constructs implies difficulties regarding the interpretation of existing evidence on the efficacy of SDM. Consideration of communication theory and basic definitions of SDM would recommend an inter-subjective focus of measurement. Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN25267500.

  10. Primary Amyloidosis With Renal Involvement: Outcomes in 77 Consecutive Patients at a Single Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Sandy W; Toskic, Denis; Warner, Melissa; Varga, Cindy; Moreno-Koehler, Alejandro; Fein, Daniel; Fogaren, Teresa; Lee, Lisa; Oliver, Colin M; Guthrie, Spencer D; Comenzo, Raymond L

    2017-11-01

    Outcomes in primary amyloid renal patients are of interest as the era of monoclonal antibody therapies begins. We studied 77 consecutive primary amyloid renal patients (58% men) for renal progression (end stage renal disease [ESRD]), renal response (RR), and overall survival (OS). At diagnosis median age was 63 (range, 35-81) years, estimated glomerular filtration rate 70 mL/min (range, 5-114), difference between involved and uninvolved free light chains 127 mg/L (range, 1-9957), ESRD 4%, renal stage 2 and 3 78%, and cardiac stage 2 and 3 56%. Ninety-six percent received bortezomib and 44% stem cell transplantation as well as bortezomib, 68% achieved complete or very good partial hematologic response (CR/VGPR), 34% had ESRD, and 39% RR. Median times to ESRD and RR were 18 (range, 3-81) and 12 (range, 2-30) months, respectively. Median OS was not reached in this cohort and was not reached from onset of ESRD. More than two-thirds of patients with ESRD also achieved CR/VGPR. In those without ESRD at diagnosis, baseline creatinine and absent RR predicted progression to ESRD in multivariate Cox regression analysis, whereas CR/VGPR predicted RR. In multivariate Cox regression analysis, cardiac stage and achievement of CR/VGPR predicted OS, enabling construction of a prognostic model. Anti-plasma cell therapies provide a definite albeit limited benefit and new approaches to amyloid-related organ dysfunction are needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. SEMA3A, a gene involved in axonal pathfinding, is mutated in patients with Kallmann syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanchate, Naresh Kumar; Giacobini, Paolo; Lhuillier, Pierre; Parkash, Jyoti; Espy, Cécile; Fouveaut, Corinne; Leroy, Chrystel; Baron, Stéphanie; Campagne, Céline; Vanacker, Charlotte; Collier, Francis; Cruaud, Corinne; Meyer, Vincent; García-Piñero, Alfons; Dewailly, Didier; Cortet-Rudelli, Christine; Gersak, Ksenija; Metz, Chantal; Chabrier, Gérard; Pugeat, Michel; Young, Jacques; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; Prevot, Vincent; Dodé, Catherine

    2012-08-01

    Kallmann syndrome (KS) associates congenital hypogonadism due to gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) deficiency and anosmia. The genetics of KS involves various modes of transmission, including oligogenic inheritance. Here, we report that Nrp1(sema/sema) mutant mice that lack a functional semaphorin-binding domain in neuropilin-1, an obligatory coreceptor of semaphorin-3A, have a KS-like phenotype. Pathohistological analysis of these mice indeed showed abnormal development of the peripheral olfactory system and defective embryonic migration of the neuroendocrine GnRH cells to the basal forebrain, which results in increased mortality of newborn mice and reduced fertility in adults. We thus screened 386 KS patients for the presence of mutations in SEMA3A (by Sanger sequencing of all 17 coding exons and flanking splice sites) and identified nonsynonymous mutations in 24 patients, specifically, a frameshifting small deletion (D538fsX31) and seven different missense mutations (R66W, N153S, I400V, V435I, T688A, R730Q, R733H). All the mutations were found in heterozygous state. Seven mutations resulted in impaired secretion of semaphorin-3A by transfected COS-7 cells (D538fsX31, R66W, V435I) or reduced signaling activity of the secreted protein in the GN11 cell line derived from embryonic GnRH cells (N153S, I400V, T688A, R733H), which strongly suggests that these mutations have a pathogenic effect. Notably, mutations in other KS genes had already been identified, in heterozygous state, in five of these patients. Our findings indicate that semaphorin-3A signaling insufficiency contributes to the pathogenesis of KS and further substantiate the oligogenic pattern of inheritance in this developmental disorder.

  12. SEMA3A, a gene involved in axonal pathfinding, is mutated in patients with Kallmann syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naresh Kumar Hanchate

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Kallmann syndrome (KS associates congenital hypogonadism due to gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH deficiency and anosmia. The genetics of KS involves various modes of transmission, including oligogenic inheritance. Here, we report that Nrp1(sema/sema mutant mice that lack a functional semaphorin-binding domain in neuropilin-1, an obligatory coreceptor of semaphorin-3A, have a KS-like phenotype. Pathohistological analysis of these mice indeed showed abnormal development of the peripheral olfactory system and defective embryonic migration of the neuroendocrine GnRH cells to the basal forebrain, which results in increased mortality of newborn mice and reduced fertility in adults. We thus screened 386 KS patients for the presence of mutations in SEMA3A (by Sanger sequencing of all 17 coding exons and flanking splice sites and identified nonsynonymous mutations in 24 patients, specifically, a frameshifting small deletion (D538fsX31 and seven different missense mutations (R66W, N153S, I400V, V435I, T688A, R730Q, R733H. All the mutations were found in heterozygous state. Seven mutations resulted in impaired secretion of semaphorin-3A by transfected COS-7 cells (D538fsX31, R66W, V435I or reduced signaling activity of the secreted protein in the GN11 cell line derived from embryonic GnRH cells (N153S, I400V, T688A, R733H, which strongly suggests that these mutations have a pathogenic effect. Notably, mutations in other KS genes had already been identified, in heterozygous state, in five of these patients. Our findings indicate that semaphorin-3A signaling insufficiency contributes to the pathogenesis of KS and further substantiate the oligogenic pattern of inheritance in this developmental disorder.

  13. Prohibitin Is Involved in Patients with IgG4 Related Disease.

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    Hongwu Du

    Full Text Available IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD is a chronic systemic disease involved in many organs and tissues. As only limited autoantigens have been found since the beginning of this century, the aim of this study was to reveal new candidate autoantigens of IgG4-RD.Multiple cell lines including HT-29, EA.hy926, HEK 293 and HepG2 were used to test the binding ability of circulating autoantibodies from IgG4-RD sera. The amino-acid sequence was then analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight tandem (MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. After the cloning and expression of recombinant putative autoantigen in a bacterial expression system, the corresponding immuno assay was set up and utilized to observe the prevalence of serum autoantibodies in a large set of confirmed clinical samples.One positive autoantigen was identified as prohibitin. ELISA analysis showed that a majority of patients with IgG4-RD have antibodies against prohibitin. Anti-prohibitin antibodies were present in the sera of patients with definite autoimmune pancreatitis (25/34; 73.5%, Mikulicz's disease (8/15; 53.3%, retroperitoneal fibrosis (6/11; 54.5%, other probable IgG4-RD (26/29; 89.7% and Sjögren's syndrome (4/30; 13.3% but not in apparently healthy donors (1/70; 1.4%.An association between prohibitin and patients with some IgG4-RD was observed, although the results were quite heterogeneous among different individuals within autoimmune pancreatitis, Mikulicz's disease and retroperitoneal fibrosis.

  14. Cerebral involvement in a patient with Goodpasture's disease due to shortened induction therapy: a case report

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    Preul Christoph

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Goodpasture's disease is a rare immunological disease with formation of pathognomonic antibodies against renal and pulmonary basement membranes. Cerebral involvement has been reported in several cases in the literature, yet the pathogenetic mechanism is not entirely clear. Case presentation A 21-year-old Caucasian man with Goodpasture's disease and end-stage renal disease presented with two generalized seizures after a period of mild cognitive disturbance. Blood pressure and routine laboratory tests did not exceed the patient's usual values, and examination of cerebrospinal fluid was unremarkable. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI revealed multiple cortical and subcortical lesions on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequences. Since antiglomerular basement membrane antibodies were found to be positive with high titers, plasmapheresis was started. In addition, cyclophosphamide pulse therapy was given on day 13. Encephalopathy and MRI lesions disappeared during this therapy, and antiglomerular basement membrane antibodies were significantly reduced. Previous immunosuppressive therapy was performed without corticosteroids and terminated early after 3 months. The differential diagnostic considerations were cerebral vasculitis and posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. Vasculitis could be seen as an extrarenal manifestation of the underlying disease. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome, on the other hand, can be triggered by immunosuppressive therapy and may appear without a hypertensive crisis. Conclusion A combination of central nervous system symptoms with a positive antiglomerular basement membrane test in a patient with Goodpasture's disease should immediately be treated as an acute exacerbation of the disease with likely cross-reactivity of antibodies with the choroid plexus. In our patient, a discontinuous strategy of immunosuppressive therapy may have favored recurrence of Goodpasture's disease.

  15. Contemporary management of TMJ involvement in JIA patients and its orofacial consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niibo, Priit; Pruunsild, Chris; Voog-Oras, Ülle; Nikopensius, Tiit; Jagomägi, Triin; Saag, Mare

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is the most common chronic rheumatic condition during childhood. Temporomandibular joint arthritis is frequently asymptomatic. When it takes place during childhood, it may affect condylar growth; therefore, these children are at risk of unfavorable long-term outcomes from the associated joint damage. The etiology is not completely understood, but it is considered as multifactorial with both genetic and environmental factors involved. The standardized examination and imaging protocols serve important purpose to diagnose temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthritis not only to establish an early interventional strategy but also to assess craniofacial growth and the progression of signs and symptoms in those patients. Although the treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) has changed dramatically over the last decades due to new therapeutic options, TMJ arthritis still can develop during the course of the disease. In clinical experience, TMJs appear to respond less well to the standard of care used to treat other joints. More individualized approach to the patient's treatment serves as the main goal of personalized medicine. It could be achieved by adopting new methods of medical imaging such as conebeam computer tomography as well as developing reliable biomarkers which may assist with predicting disease type, course, or severity and predicting response to medication. This article provides an overview of current information on orofacial complications in JIA and its management. Based on information provided in this review, more precise diagnosis, proper tools for recognizing people at risk, and more efficient treatment approaches could be implemented. This may lead to more personalized treatment management strategies of TMJ complications of JIA patients.

  16. Experienced emotional burden in caregivers: psychometric properties of the Involvement Evaluation Questionnaire in caregivers of brain injured patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurtsen, Gert J.; Meijer, Ron; van Heugten, Caroline M.; Martina, Juan D.; Geurts, Alexander C. H.

    2010-01-01

    To examine the psychometric properties (internal consistency, discriminant validity, and responsiveness) of the Involvement Evaluation Questionnaire for Brain Injury measuring emotional burden in caregivers of patients with chronic acquired brain injury. Inception cohort study. Caregivers of chronic

  17. Experienced emotional burden in caregivers: psychometric properties of the Involvement Evaluation Questionnaire in caregivers of brain injured patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurtsen, G.J.; Meijer, R.; Heugten, C.M. van; Martina, J.D.; Geurts, A.C.H.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the psychometric properties (internal consistency, discriminant validity, and responsiveness) of the Involvement Evaluation Questionnaire for Brain Injury measuring emotional burden in caregivers of patients with chronic acquired brain injury. DESIGN: Inception cohort study.

  18. T1 and T2 mapping for evaluation of myocardial involvement in patients with ANCA-associated vasculitides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greulich, Simon; Mayr, Agnes; Kitterer, Daniel; Latus, Joerg; Henes, Joerg; Steubing, Hannah; Kaesemann, Philipp; Patrascu, Alexandru; Greiser, Andreas; Groeninger, Stefan; Braun, Niko; Alscher, M Dominik; Sechtem, Udo; Mahrholdt, Heiko

    2017-01-06

    Myocardial involvement in AAV patients might be silent, presenting with no or nonspecific symptoms, normal ECG, and preserved left-ventricular ejection fraction (LV-EF). Since up to 50% of deaths in these patients may be due to myocardial involvement, a reliable diagnostic tool is warranted. In contrast to LGE-CMR, which has its strengths in detecting focal inflammatory or fibrotic processes, recent mapping techniques are able to detect even subtle, diffuse inflammatory or fibrotic processes. Our study sought to investigate ANCA (antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody) associated vasculitides (AAV) patients for myocardial involvement by a cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) protocol, including late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) and mapping sequences. Thirty seven AAV patients were prospectively enrolled and underwent CMR imaging. Twenty healthy volunteers served as controls. Mean LV-EF was 64%; LGE prevalence of the AAV patients was 43%. AAV patients had higher median native T1 (988 vs. 952 ms, p T2 (53 vs. 49 ms, p T2 in AAV patients showed the highest prevalence of abnormally increased values beyond the 95% percentile of controls. AAV patients demonstrated increased T1, ECV, and T2 values, with native T1 and T2 showing the highest prevalence of values beyond the 95% percentile of normal. Since these findings seem to be independent of LGE, mapping techniques may provide complementary information to LGE-CMR in the assessment of myocardial involvement in patients with AAV.

  19. Evaluating patient and public involvement in health research: from theoretical model to practical workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Andy; Welsman, Jo; Britten, Nicky

    2017-10-01

    There is a growing literature on evaluating aspects of patient and public involvement (PPI). We have suggested that at the core of successful PPI is the dynamic interaction of different forms of knowledge, notably lay and professional. We have developed a four-dimensional theoretical framework for understanding these interactions. We explore the practical utility of the theoretical framework as a tool for mapping and evaluating the experience of PPI in health services research. We conducted three workshops with different PPI groups in which participants were invited to map their PPI experiences on wall charts representing the four dimensions of our framework. The language used to describe the four dimensions was modified to make it more accessible to lay audiences. Participants were given sticky notes to indicate their own positions on the different dimensions and to write explanatory comments if they wished. Participants' responses were then discussed and analysed as a group. The three groups were distinctive in their mapped responses suggesting different experiences in relation to having a strong or weak voice in their organization, having few or many ways of getting involved, addressing organizational or public concerns and believing that the organization was willing to change or not. The framework has practical utility for mapping and evaluating PPI interactions and is sensitive to differences in PPI experiences within and between different organizations. The workshops enabled participants to reflect collaboratively on their experiences with a view to improving PPI experiences and planning for the future. © 2017 The Authors Health Expectations published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Pleuropulmonary involvement in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus from a Latin American inception cohort (GLADEL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haye Salinas, M J; Caeiro, F; Saurit, V; Alvarellos, A; Wojdyla, D; Scherbarth, H R; de O E Silva, A C; Tavares Brenol, J C; Lavras Costallat, L T; Neira, O J; Iglesias Gamarra, A; Vásquez, G; Reyes Llerena, G A; Barile-Fabris, L A; Silveira, L H; Sauza Del Pozo, M J; Acevedo Vásquez, E M; Alfaro Lozano, J L; Esteva Spinetti, M H; Alarcón, G S; Pons-Estel, B A

    2017-11-01

    Objectives The objectives of this study were to examine the demographic and clinical features associated with the occurrence of pleuropulmonary manifestations, the predictive factors of their occurrence and their impact on mortality in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients. Materials and methods The association of pleuropulmonary manifestations with demographic and clinical features, the predictive factors of their occurrence and their impact on mortality were examined in GLADEL patients by appropriate univariable and multivariable analyses. Results At least one pleuropulmonary manifestation occurred in 421 of the 1480 SLE patients (28.4%), pleurisy being the most frequent (24.0%). Age at SLE onset ≥30 years (OR 1.42; 95% CI 1.10-1.83), the presence of lower respiratory tract infection (OR 3.19; 95% CI 2.05-4.96), non-ischemic heart disease (OR 3.17; 95% CI 2.41-4.18), ischemic heart disease (OR 3.39; 95% CI 2.08-5.54), systemic (OR 2.00; 95% CI 1.37-2.91), ocular (OR 1.58; 95% CI 1.16-2.14) and renal manifestations (OR 1.44; 95% CI 1.09-1.83) were associated with pleuropulmonary manifestations, whereas cutaneous manifestations were negatively associated (OR 0.47; 95% CI 0.29-0.76). Non-ischemic heart disease (HR 2.24; 95% CI 1.63-3.09), SDI scores ≥1 (OR 1.54; 95% CI 1.10-2.17) and anti-La antibody positivity (OR 2.51; 95% CI 1.39-4.57) independently predicted their subsequent occurrence. Cutaneous manifestations were protective of the subsequent occurrence of pleuropulmonary manifestations (HR 0.62; 95% CI 0.43-0.90). Pleuropulmonary manifestations independently contributed a decreased survival (HR: 2.79 95% CI 1.80-4.31). Conclusion Pleuropulmonary manifestations are frequent in SLE, particularly pleuritis. Older age, respiratory tract infection, cardiac, systemic and renal involvement were associated with them, whereas cutaneous manifestations were negatively associated. Cardiac compromise, SDI scores ≥1 and anti-La positivity at disease onset were

  1. An overview of patient involvement in healthcare decision-making: a situational analysis of the Malaysian context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Chirk-Jenn; Lee, Ping-Yein; Lee, Yew-Kong; Chew, Boon-How; Engkasan, Julia P; Irmi, Zarina-Ismail; Hanafi, Nik-Sherina; Tong, Seng-Fah

    2013-10-11

    Involving patients in decision-making is an important part of patient-centred care. Research has found a discrepancy between patients' desire to be involved and their actual involvement in healthcare decision-making. In Asia, there is a dearth of research in decision-making. Using Malaysia as an exemplar, this study aims to review the current research evidence, practices, policies, and laws with respect to patient engagement in shared decision-making (SDM) in Asia. In this study, we conducted a comprehensive literature review to collect information on healthcare decision-making in Malaysia. We also consulted medical education researchers, key opinion leaders, governmental organisations, and patient support groups to assess the extent to which patient involvement was incorporated into the medical curriculum, healthcare policies, and legislation. There are very few studies on patient involvement in decision-making in Malaysia. Existing studies showed that doctors were aware of informed consent, but few practised SDM. There was limited teaching of SDM in undergraduate and postgraduate curricula and a lack of accurate and accessible health information for patients. In addition, peer support groups and 'expert patient' programmes were also lacking. Professional medical bodies endorsed patient involvement in decision-making, but there was no definitive implementation plan. In summary, there appears to be little training or research on SDM in Malaysia. More research needs to be done in this area, including baseline information on the preferred and actual decision-making roles. The authors have provided a set of recommendations on how SDM can be effectively implemented in Malaysia.

  2. Regulatory T Cells in Peripheral Blood and Cerebrospinal Fluid of Syphilis Patients with and without Neurological Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kang; Wang, Cuini; Lu, Haikong; Gu, Xin; Guan, Zhifang; Zhou, Pingyu

    2013-01-01

    Background Syphilis, a sexually transmitted disease caused by spirochetal bacterium Treponema pallidum, can progress to affect the central nervous system, causing neurosyphilis. Accumulating evidence suggest that regulatory T cells (Tregs) may play an important role in the pathogenesis of syphilis. However, little is known about Treg response in neurosyphilis. Methodology/Principal Findings We analyzed Treg frequencies and Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGF-β) levels in the blood and CSF of 431 syphilis patients without neurological involvement, 100 neurosyphilis patients and 100 healthy donors. Suppressive function of Tregs in peripheral blood was also assessed. Among syphilis patients without neurological involvement, we found that secondary and serofast patients had increased Treg percentages, suppressive function and TGF-β levels in peripheral blood compared to healthy donors. Serum Rapid Plasma Reagin (RPR) titers were positively correlated with Treg numbers in these patients. Compared to these syphilis patients without neurological involvement, neurosyphilis patients had higher Treg frequency in peripheral blood. In the central nervous system, neurosyphilis patients had higher numbers of leukocytes in CSF compared to syphilis patients without neurological involvement. CD4+ T cells were the predominant cell type in the inflammatory infiltrates in CSF of neurosyphilis patients. Interestingly, among these neurosyphilis patients, a significant decrease in CSF CD4+ CD25high Treg percentage and number was observed in symptomatic neurosyphilis patients compared to those of asymptomatic neurosyphilis patients, which may be associated with low CSF TGF-β levels. Conclusions Our findings suggest that Tregs might play an important role in both bacterial persistence and neurologic compromise in the pathogenesis of syphilis. PMID:24244772

  3. The incidence of parametrial tumor involvement in select patients with early cervix cancer is too low to justify parametrectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stegeman, M.; Louwen, M.; van der Velden, J.; ten Kate, F. J. W.; den Bakker, M. A.; Burger, C. W.; Ansink, A. C.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the incidence of parametrial involvement in a select group of patients with early cervical cancer. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the records of patients with cervical cancer and a maximum tumor diameter of 2 cm, infiltration depth <10 mm and negative pelvic lymph nodes

  4. The Relation Between Ocular/Nasal Bacterial Distribution, Staphylococcus aureus Colonization and Ocular and Nasal Involvement in Atopic Dermatitis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nida Kaçar

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: It was aimed to determine bacteria distribution and S.aureus colonization in nares, fornix and eyelid margin of patients with atopic dermatitis (AD compared to controls and to investigate it?s relationship with skin and eye involvement. Methods: Patients dermatological and opthalmologic examinations were done. The standart tear break-up time and Schirmer tests were performed. Samples were taken from fornix, eyelid margin and nares for bacterial culture. Results: Tweenty seven patients and 28 controls were included. There was no difference between the patients with and without eye involvement with respect to dry eye (p>0.05. The bacteria was more frequently isolated in patients (85.2% than controls (60.7%, however S.aureus colonization (51.9%, 50.0% respectively didn?t differ in both groups (p=0.042, p>0.05. The disease severity was positively correlated with S.aureus colonization (p=0.031. There was no difference between the patients with and without eye involvement with respect to S.aureus colonization and presence of bacteria (p>0.05. No bacteria was isolated from patients whom tear function analyses were performed. Conclusions: It wasn?t established an increased percent of S.aureus colonization in AD patients compared with controls. There was no association between dry eye and eye involvement. No comment could be remarked about the possible relation between dry eye and bacterial colonization.

  5. Power relations and contrasting conceptions of evidence in patient-involvement processes used to inform health funding decisions in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Edilene; Carter, Drew; Street, Jackie

    2015-06-01

    We collected and analysed views of key stakeholders on the processes used to involve patient organisations in health care funding decision making in Australia. We conducted 12 semi-structured interviews with patient organisation representatives and members of Advisory Committees that provide advice to the Australian Department of Health and employ Health Technology Assessment (HTA) as an evaluation framework. Using two theoretical frameworks, we analysed structural and contextual elements pertaining to the involvement processes. The findings reported in this article relate to interviewees' perspectives on contextual elements, analysed using a Foucauldian lens. These elements include: the perspectives of marginalised voices; the diversity of views on what ought to be considered valid evidence in a HTA setting; and the relationships between stakeholders, along with how these relationships impact on involvement processes and the outcomes of those processes. The findings demonstrate that the involvement processes currently used are deemed inadequate by both patient organisation representatives and Advisory Committee members, but for different reasons connected to how different stakeholders conceptualise evidence. Advisory Committee members viewed evidence as encompassing clinical outcomes and patient preferences, whereas patient organisation representatives tended to view evidence as encompassing aspects not directly related to a disease entity, such as the social and emotional aspects of patients' experiences in living with illness. Patient organisation representatives reported interacting with other stakeholders (especially industry) to increase the influence of their conception of evidence on decision making. The use of this strategy by interviewees illustrates how power struggles occur in government decision-making processes which involve both medical expertise and patients' accounts. Such struggles, and the power differentials they reflect, need to be considered

  6. Public and patient involvement in quantitative health research: A statistical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannigan, Ailish

    2018-06-19

    The majority of studies included in recent reviews of impact for public and patient involvement (PPI) in health research had a qualitative design. PPI in solely quantitative designs is underexplored, particularly its impact on statistical analysis. Statisticians in practice have a long history of working in both consultative (indirect) and collaborative (direct) roles in health research, yet their perspective on PPI in quantitative health research has never been explicitly examined. To explore the potential and challenges of PPI from a statistical perspective at distinct stages of quantitative research, that is sampling, measurement and statistical analysis, distinguishing between indirect and direct PPI. Statistical analysis is underpinned by having a representative sample, and a collaborative or direct approach to PPI may help achieve that by supporting access to and increasing participation of under-represented groups in the population. Acknowledging and valuing the role of lay knowledge of the context in statistical analysis and in deciding what variables to measure may support collective learning and advance scientific understanding, as evidenced by the use of participatory modelling in other disciplines. A recurring issue for quantitative researchers, which reflects quantitative sampling methods, is the selection and required number of PPI contributors, and this requires further methodological development. Direct approaches to PPI in quantitative health research may potentially increase its impact, but the facilitation and partnership skills required may require further training for all stakeholders, including statisticians. © 2018 The Authors Health Expectations published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Polymorphisms of XRCC4 are involved in reduced colorectal cancer risk in Chinese schizophrenia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Tao

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic factors related to the regulation of apoptosis in schizophrenia patients may be involved in a reduced vulnerability to cancer. XRCC4 is one of the potential candidate genes associated with schizophrenia which might induce colorectal cancer resistance. Methods To examine the genetic association between colorectal cancer and schizophrenia, we analyzed five SNPs (rs6452526, rs2662238, rs963248, rs35268, rs2386275 covering ~205.7 kb in the region of XRCC4. Results We observed that two of the five genetic polymorphisms showed statistically significant differences between 312 colorectal cancer subjects without schizophrenia and 270 schizophrenia subjects (rs6452536, p = 0.004, OR 0.61, 95% CI 0.44-0.86; rs35268, p = 0.028, OR 1.54, 95% CI 1.05-2.26. Moreover, the haplotype which combined all five markers was the most significant, giving a global p = 0.0005. Conclusions Our data firstly indicate that XRCC4 may be a potential protective gene towards schizophrenia, conferring reduced susceptibility to colorectal cancer in the Han Chinese population.

  8. The involvement of audio-motor coupling in the music-supported therapy applied to stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Fornells, Antoni; Rojo, Nuria; Amengual, Julià L; Ripollés, Pablo; Altenmüller, Eckart; Münte, Thomas F

    2012-04-01

    Music-supported therapy (MST) has been developed recently to improve the use of the affected upper extremity after stroke. MST uses musical instruments, an electronic piano and an electronic drum set emitting piano sounds, to retrain fine and gross movements of the paretic upper extremity. In this paper, we first describe the rationale underlying MST, and we review the previous studies conducted on acute and chronic stroke patients using this new neurorehabilitation approach. Second, we address the neural mechanisms involved in the motor movement improvements observed in acute and chronic stroke patients. Third, we provide some recent studies on the involvement of auditory-motor coupling in the MST in chronic stroke patients using functional neuroimaging. Finally, these ideas are discussed and focused on understanding the dynamics involved in the neural circuit underlying audio-motor coupling and how functional connectivity could help to explain the neuroplastic changes observed after therapy in stroke patients. © 2012 New York Academy of Sciences.

  9. Safety and efficacy of high-dose melphalan and auto-SCT in patients with AL amyloidosis and cardiac involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girnius, S; Seldin, D C; Meier-Ewert, H K; Sloan, J M; Quillen, K; Ruberg, F L; Berk, J L; Doros, G; Sanchorawala, V

    2014-03-01

    In Ig light chain (AL) amyloidosis, cardiac involvement is associated with worse prognosis and increased treatment-related complications. In this retrospective cohort study, we assessed survival, hematologic and cardiac responses to high-dose melphalan and auto-SCT (HDM/SCT) in patients with AL amyloidosis and cardiac involvement, stratified by cardiac biomarkers brain natriuretic peptide and Troponin I, analogous to the Mayo cardiac staging. Forty-seven patients underwent HDM/SCT based upon functional measures; six patients had modified cardiac stage I disease, seventeen had modified cardiac stage II disease and twenty-four had modified cardiac stage III disease. Treatment-related mortality was 4% for all patients and 8% for patients with stage III disease. Three-year survival was 88% and EFS was 47%; these did not differ by stage. By intention-to-treat analysis, 27% of patients achieved a hematologic complete response and 32% a very good partial response, of whom 70 and 45%, respectively, have not required additional therapy at 36 months. Cardiac response was achieved in 53% of patients. We conclude that with appropriate patient selection and a risk-adapted treatment approach, HDM/SCT is safe and effective in patients with AL amyloidosis and cardiac involvement.

  10. Pattern of failures in gastric cancer patients with lymph node involvement treated by surgery, intraoperative and external beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glehen, O.; Peyrat, P.; Beaujard, A.C.; Chapet, O.; Romestaing, P.; Sentenac, I.; Francois, Y.; Vignal, J.; Gerard, J.P.; Gilly, F.N.

    2003-01-01

    Aims: High local failure rates in gastric cancer have been reported, up to 67%. To achieve a better local control, we evaluated intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) and external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in association with surgery for gastric cancer patients with lymph node involvement. We report here the analysis of the patterns of failure for patients involved in this IORT protocol. Material and methods: Forty-two positive lymph node (N+) gastric cancer patients were operated on (31 total, three subtotal and eight extended gastrectomies) with IORT procedure between 1985 and 1997 (33 males, nine females, mean age 61.3 years). IORT was focused on coeliac area (mean dose 15 Gy), followed by EBRT (46 Gy) in 36 patients. Ten patients were pN1 and 32 were pN2. A concurrent systemic chemotherapy (five Fluoro-Uracil and Cisplatinum) was performed in 14 patients. Results: One patient died postoperatively. Actuarial pN+ 10 year survival rate was 44.8%. The 5 year actuarial local control and disease-free survival rates were 78.8 and 47.5%, respectively. As far as patterns of failure were explored, 5 patients have a local coeliac recurrence (12%) and 12 have distant metastases with no evidence of coeliac recurrence. Conclusion: This retrospective analysis suggests a potential effect of IORT and/or EBRT in promoting local control and long-term survival in gastric cancer patients with lymph node involvement

  11. Patients' perception of their involvement in shared treatment decision making: Key factors in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veilleux, Sophie; Noiseux, Isabelle; Lachapelle, Nathalie; Kohen, Rita; Vachon, Luc; Guay, Brian White; Bitton, Alain; Rioux, John D

    2018-02-01

    This study aims to characterize the relationships between the quality of the information given by the physician, the involvement of the patient in shared decision making (SDM), and outcomes in terms of satisfaction and anxiety pertaining to the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). A Web survey was conducted among 200 Canadian patients affected with IBD. The theoretical model of SDM was adjusted using path analysis. SAS software was used for all statistical analyses. The quality of the knowledge transfer between the physician and the patient is significantly associated with the components of SDM: information comprehension, patient involvement and decision certainty about the chosen treatment. In return, patient involvement in SDM is significantly associated with higher satisfaction and, as a result, lower anxiety as regards treatment selection. This study demonstrates the importance of involving patients in shared treatment decision making in the context of IBD. Understanding shared decision making may motivate patients to be more active in understanding the relevant information for treatment selection, as it is related to their level of satisfaction, anxiety and adherence to treatment. This relationship should encourage physicians to promote shared decision making. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Prognostic value of bone involvement in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the external and middle ear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiga, Hideaki; Ito, Makoto; Uramoto, Naoki; Hatano, Miyako; Miwa, Takaki; Furukawa, Mitsuru

    2007-01-01

    The incidence of the external and middle ear squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is extremely rare in the head and neck cancer with less than 1%. Therefore, the correlation between the staging classification and the prognosis has not been clear. Prognostic factors for patients with the external and middle ear SCC were assessed in the initial clinical symptoms and radiographic imaging. 13 patients with the external and middle ear SCC (5 male and 8 female) that had been treated at the Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Kanazawa University hospital from 2000 to 2006 were selected for this study. The radiation therapy followed surgery in ten patients. One patient received the radical cure irradiation before surgery. Two patients received a surgical excision alone. The temporal bone involvement and the parotid gland involvement in the radiographic image (computed tomography imaging and/or magnetic resonance imaging) were assessed. Clinical symptoms (otalgia, hearing disturbance, tinnitus, vertigo and facial nerve palsy) before treatment were reviewed based on the medical record. The correlation of those clinical factors and T staging in the Pittsburgh classification with overall survival was statistically assessed. The temporal bone involvement significantly correlated with worse prognosis. However, parotid gland involvement did not influence the prognosis. Moreover, statistically significant difference in T staging of the Pittsburgh classification (T1·T2 vs. T3·T4) was not found. The temporal bone involvement in the radiographic image was a prognostic factor for patients with the external and middle ear SCC. Pittsburgh classification needs to be modified because the bony part of the external auditory canal involvement is considered as T2 stage and the soft tissue involvement is defined as T4 stage. (author)

  13. Prognostic value of bone involvement in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the external and middle ear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiga, Hideaki; Ito, Makoto; Uramoto, Naoki; Hatano, Miyako; Miwa, Takaki; Furukawa, Mitsuru [Kanazawa Univ., Graduate School of Medical Science, Kanazawa, Ishikawa (Japan)

    2007-05-15

    The incidence of the external and middle ear squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is extremely rare in the head and neck cancer with less than 1%. Therefore, the correlation between the staging classification and the prognosis has not been clear. Prognostic factors for patients with the external and middle ear SCC were assessed in the initial clinical symptoms and radiographic imaging. 13 patients with the external and middle ear SCC (5 male and 8 female) that had been treated at the Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Kanazawa University hospital from 2000 to 2006 were selected for this study. The radiation therapy followed surgery in ten patients. One patient received the radical cure irradiation before surgery. Two patients received a surgical excision alone. The temporal bone involvement and the parotid gland involvement in the radiographic image (computed tomography imaging and/or magnetic resonance imaging) were assessed. Clinical symptoms (otalgia, hearing disturbance, tinnitus, vertigo and facial nerve palsy) before treatment were reviewed based on the medical record. The correlation of those clinical factors and T staging in the Pittsburgh classification with overall survival was statistically assessed. The temporal bone involvement significantly correlated with worse prognosis. However, parotid gland involvement did not influence the prognosis. Moreover, statistically significant difference in T staging of the Pittsburgh classification (T1{center_dot}T2 vs. T3{center_dot}T4) was not found. The temporal bone involvement in the radiographic image was a prognostic factor for patients with the external and middle ear SCC. Pittsburgh classification needs to be modified because the bony part of the external auditory canal involvement is considered as T2 stage and the soft tissue involvement is defined as T4 stage. (author)

  14. Patients' and observers' perceptions of involvement differ. Validation study on inter-relating measures for shared decision making.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Kasper

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Patient involvement into medical decisions as conceived in the shared decision making method (SDM is essential in evidence based medicine. However, it is not conclusively evident how best to define, realize and evaluate involvement to enable patients making informed choices. We aimed at investigating the ability of four measures to indicate patient involvement. While use and reporting of these instruments might imply wide overlap regarding the addressed constructs this assumption seems questionable with respect to the diversity of the perspectives from which the assessments are administered. METHODS: The study investigated a nested cohort (N = 79 of a randomized trial evaluating a patient decision aid on immunotherapy for multiple sclerosis. Convergent validities were calculated between observer ratings of videotaped physician-patient consultations (OPTION and patients' perceptions of the communication (Shared Decision Making Questionnaire, Control Preference Scale & Decisional Conflict Scale. RESULTS: OPTION reliability was high to excellent. Communication performance was low according to OPTION and high according to the three patient administered measures. No correlations were found between observer and patient judges, neither for means nor for single items. Patient report measures showed some moderate correlations. CONCLUSION: Existing SDM measures do not refer to a single construct. A gold standard is missing to decide whether any of these measures has the potential to indicate patient involvement. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Pronounced heterogeneity of the underpinning constructs implies difficulties regarding the interpretation of existing evidence on the efficacy of SDM. Consideration of communication theory and basic definitions of SDM would recommend an inter-subjective focus of measurement. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN25267500.

  15. Primary Care Physician Involvement in Shared Decision Making for Critically Ill Patients and Family Satisfaction with Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kevin B; Weber, Urs; Johnson, Jennifer; Anderson, Nathanial; Knies, Andrea K; Nhundu, Belinda; Bautista, Cynthia; Poskus, Kelly; Sheth, Kevin N; Hwang, David Y

    2018-01-01

    An intensive care unit (ICU) patient's primary care physician (PCP) may be able to assist family with certain ICU shared medical decisions. We explored whether families of patients in nonopen ICUs who nevertheless report involvement of a patient's PCP in medical decision making are more satisfied with ICU shared decision making than families who do not. Between March 2013 and December 2015, we administered the Family Satisfaction in the ICU 24 survey to family members of adult neuroscience ICU patients. We compared the mean score for the survey subsection regarding shared decision making (graded on a 100-point scale), as well as individual survey items, between those who reported the patient's PCP involvement in any medical decision making versus those who did not. Among 263 respondents, there was no difference in mean overall decision-making satisfaction scores for those who reported involvement (81.1; SD = 15.2) versus those who did not (80.1; SD = 12.8; P = .16). However, a higher proportion reporting involvement felt completely satisfied with their 1) inclusion in the ICU decision making process (75.9% vs 61.4%; P = .055), and 2) control over the care of the patient (73.6% vs 55.6%; P = .02), with no difference regarding consistency of clinical information provided by the medical team (64.8% vs 63.5%; P = 1.00). Families who report involvement of a patient's PCP in medical decision making for critically ill patients may be more satisfied than those who do not with regard to specific aspects of ICU decision making. Further research would help understand how best to engage PCPs in shared decisions. © Copyright 2018 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  16. Impact of Pathologist Involvement in Sarcoma and Rare Tumor Patient Support Groups on Facebook: A Survey of 542 Patients and Family Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, Jasmine; David, Marjorie Parker; Lee, Nathan E; Shalin, Sara C; Gardner, Jerad M

    2018-01-29

    - Patients with rare tumors have difficulty finding reliable information about their disease. Facebook patient support groups allow patients to educate one another. - To investigate how these patients perceive the value of pathologists, both in Facebook groups and real-world patient care. - Survey links were posted in 12 Facebook patient groups: 6 with an active pathologist member (angiosarcoma, epithelioid hemangioendothelioma, epithelioid sarcoma, dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans [×2], and desmoid fibromatosis), and 6 without "active" pathologist involvement (aggressive angiomyxoma, chondrosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, leiomyosarcoma, liposarcoma, and osteosarcoma). - A total of 542 people responded (403 were patients): 264 from groups with a pathologist, and 278 from groups without active pathologist involvement. Of groups with an active pathologist, respondents agreed the pathologist's posts helped them better understand their disease (107 of 119; 90%) and relieved some of their disease-related anxiety (92 of 119; 77%). And for these groups 98% (117 of 119) of respondents agreed that having a pathologist in their group was a good thing; 83% (192 of 232) wanted more pathologists involved. More respondents from groups with an active pathologist (219 of 236; 93%) than without one (215 of 252; 85%) agreed: "pathologists are an important part of the patient care team for patients with cancer and other rare tumors" ( P = .008). - This study is the first to evaluate the impact of pathologist interaction with Facebook patient support groups and to assess perceptions about the specialty of pathology from a large group of patients with rare tumors. Pathologist involvement in Facebook patient groups appears to positively influence patient perception of the importance of pathologists. We hope these data will encourage more pathologists to participate in Facebook patient support groups.

  17. "What is meant by public?": Stakeholder views on strengthening impacts of public reporting of hospital performance data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canaway, Rachel; Bismark, Marie; Dunt, David; Prang, Khic-Houy; Kelaher, Margaret

    2018-04-01

    Public reporting of hospital performance data is a developing area that is gaining increased attention. This is the first study to explore a range of stakeholder opinions on how such public reporting could be strengthened in Australia. Thirty-four semi-structured interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of expert healthcare consumer, provider and purchaser informants who worked in a variety of senior roles and had knowledge of or involvement in public reporting of hospital data within the public or private healthcare sectors. Informants from all Australian states, territory and national jurisdictions participated. Thematic analysis was used to gain an overview of experts' opinions to inform policy and systems-development for strengthening foundational frameworks for public reporting of health services performance. Themes arising were synthesised to generate explanatory figures to highlight key areas for strengthening public reporting. Our findings suggest that in Australia there is a lack of agreement on what the objectives and who the audience are for public reporting of hospital performance data. Without this shared understanding it is difficult to strengthen frameworks and impacts of public reporting. When developing frameworks for public reporting of hospital data in Australia, more explicit definition of what or who are the 'public' is needed along with identification of barriers, desired impacts, data needs, and data collection/reporting/feedback mechanisms. All relevant stakeholders should be involved in design of public reporting frameworks. Offering multiple systems of public reporting, each tailored to particular audiences, might enable greater impact of reporting towards improved hospital quality and safety, and consumer knowledge to inform treatment decisions. This study provides an overview of perspectives, but further research is warranted to develop PR frameworks that can generate greatest impacts for the needs of various audiences

  18. Involvement of peripheral III nerve in multiple sclerosis patient: Report of a new case and discussion of the underlying mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shor, Natalia; Amador, Maria Del Mar; Dormont, Didier; Lubetzki, Catherine; Bertrand, Anne

    2017-04-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic disorder that affects the central nervous system myelin. However, a few radiological cases have documented an involvement of peripheral cranial nerves, within the subarachnoid space, in MS patients. We report the case of a 36-year-old female with a history of relapsing-remitting (RR) MS who consulted for a subacute complete paralysis of the right III nerve. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination showed enhancement and thickening of the cisternal right III nerve, in continuity with a linear, mesencephalic, acute demyelinating lesion. Radiological involvement of the cisternal part of III nerve has been reported only once in MS patients. Radiological involvement of the cisternal part of V nerve occurs more frequently, in almost 3% of MS patients. In both situations, the presence of a central demyelinating lesion, in continuity with the enhancement of the peripheral nerve, suggests that peripheral nerve damage is a secondary process, rather than a primary target of demyelination.

  19. Sonographic Screening for Abdominal Organ Involvement in Sickle Cell AnemiaA Step towards Better Patient Care

    OpenAIRE

    Bhushita B. Lakhkar; Bhushan N. Lakhkar; Bhavana B. Lakhkar

    2017-01-01

    Background: Sickle cell disease is characterized by repeated crisis and need for frequent transfusions. Abdominal crisis are common and potentially can damage any abdominal organ. Screening for organ involvement will lead to early detection and better patient care. Aim and Objectives: To see whether ultrasound can be a better noninvasive technique for early detection of organ involvement. Material and Methods: Prospective cross sectional observational study done on ...

  20. Sonographic Screening for Abdominal Organ Involvement in Sickle Cell AnemiaA Step towards Better Patient Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhushita B. Lakhkar

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sickle cell disease is characterized by repeated crisis and need for frequent transfusions. Abdominal crisis are common and potentially can damage any abdominal organ. Screening for organ involvement will lead to early detection and better patient care. Aim and Objectives: To see whether ultrasound can be a better noninvasive technique for early detection of organ involvement. Material and Methods: Prospective cross sectional observational study done on patients admitted in pediatric ward of a medical college. Total of 150 patients, already diagnosed to have sickle cell anemia (homozygous 110 and heterozygous 40 was included in the study. All the patients were in steady state. Demographic, clinical biochemical details were noted and were subjected to ultrasonography. Renal artery, Being end artery, Doppler study was also done. All the modalities were compared for early detection. Results: Majority of patients (77% were between 1 to 30 years with male female ratio of 2:1. Recurrent fever (64% and recurrent abdominal pain (47% were most common symptoms and anemia (66%, hepatomegaly (62%, splenomegaly (21% were most common signs. When clinical examination, biochemical tests and ultrasonography were compared for organ detection, ultrasound significantly detected more patients (p=<0.05. Ultrasonography of kidney included renal doppler also. Renal involvement by microalbuminuria measurement was of same as ultrasonography. Organ involvement increased with age. Conclusion: Ultrasonography was good noninvasive technique for organ detection but kidneysyield was better with Doppler study. Most common organ found to be affected was liver. Involvement increased with age. Early detection helps clinicians to avoid drugs toxic to involved organs.

  1. Organ involvement in Argentinian systemic sclerosis patients with "late" pattern as compared to patients with "early/active" pattern by nailfold capillaroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino Claverie, Lucila; Knobel, Elizabeth; Takashima, Lorena; Techera, Lorena; Oliver, Marina; Gonzalez, Paula; Romanini, Félix E; Fonseca, María L; Mamani, Marta N

    2013-06-01

    Changes in nailfold capillaroscopy in systemic sclerosis patients could be related to the disease severity. The aim of this study was to investigate whether patients with "late" scleroderma (SD) pattern have more organ involvement than patients with "early/active" SD pattern. Forty-six Argentinian patients (44 women and 2 men), with a diagnosis of systemic sclerosis, were distributed in two groups based on the presence of late and early/active patterns. Organ involvement was assessed as follows: pulmonary function by chest radiography, high-resolution chest tomography (HRCT), lung volume tests, and diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO); esophageal involvement by manometry; and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) by Doppler echocardiography and six-minute walk test. Honeycombing of the lungs evaluated by HRCT was more frequently present in patients with late pattern compared with early/active patients (p = 0.01). We also found statistically significant differences in lung volume tests (p = 0.03) and DLCO (p = 0.02) between the two SD pattern groups. Esophageal manometry showed a significantly higher frequency of motility disorders in the group with late pattern (p = 0.0024). In this study, patients with late pattern had higher frequency of pulmonary and esophageal involvement compared with patients with early/active pattern.

  2. [Healthcare management of an epilepsy clinic: factors involved in the demand for health care and clinical situation of patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Martín, Guillermina; Martín-Reyes, Guillermina; Dawid-Milner, Marc Stefan; Chamorro-Muñoz, M Isabel; Pérez-Errazquin, Francisco; Romero-Acebal, Manuel

    2013-05-16

    Epilepsy is a chronic illness that requires a long-term periodic follow-up of the patient and this means that as time goes by the number of patients attended increases, with the ensuing added cost for the healthcare system. To determine the factors involved in the time until an epileptic patient's next visit. Our sample consisted of a selection of patients who visited the epilepsy clinic at our hospital consecutively during one year. Their clinical situation and relationship with the medical advice they were given, together with the factors involved in the time elapsed until the next visit, were analysed by means of predictive econometric models. There is a clear association between the patient's clinical situation and the modification of the treatment proposed by the neurologist in the previous visit. The factors involved in the time until the next visit were the frequency of seizures, adverse side effects from medicines -above all those that affect cognition- and the medical advice given to the patient. Polytherapy, psychoaffective disorders or the patient's social situation were not found to be significant. Follow-up visits in a specific epilepsy clinic improves the patient's situation. This is the first analysis of the demand for healthcare in patients with epilepsy conducted by means of econometric methods and from a mixed physician-patient perspective. Since the factors that determine the time until the next visit can be modified, the number of visits per year could be reduced, thus improving patients' clinical situation. We suggest a greater amount of time should be spent per visit so as to be able to have a bearing on it and thereby cut costs in the long term.

  3. Tamoxifen with and without radiation after partial mastectomy in patients with involved nodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooke, Andrew L; Perera, Francisco; Fisher, Barbara; Opeitum, Abiola; Yu, Norman

    1995-02-15

    Purpose: To determine the effect of tamoxifen on local control after partial mastectomy with and without adjuvant breast irradiation. Methods and Materials: A retrospective study of 97 node positive patients identified from the records of the London Regional Cancer Center included 44 patients who received tamoxifen and breast irradiation (40 or 50 Gy plus booster dose) after partial mastectomy, and 53 patients who received tamoxifen only after partial mastectomy. Base line characteristics of the two groups were similar. Results: At 39 months actuarial follow-up there was a breast tumor recurrence (BTR) in 5% vs. 21% of patients when radiation was omitted (p = 0.0388), but there was no difference in the cause-specific mortality of the two treatment groups. Cox Regression analysis (on only 10 BTR) showed age and adjuvant radiation as significant predictors of BTR. In patients not receiving radiation, no BTR was seen in 22 patients {>=}70 years of age at diagnosis vs. 8 BTR in 31 patients <70 years (p = 0.0130). All BTR occurred while patients were receiving tamoxifen. Conclusion: Tamoxifen alone with omission of radiation after partial mastectomy provides inferior breast tumor control in node positive patients. This is especially true for patients under 70 years of age. Patients aged 70 years or older at the time of diagnosis of breast cancer who receive tamoxifen have a low rate of breast tumor recurrence when radiation is omitted. These patients represent a group for whom radiation might not be necessary.

  4. If It Is Meant to Be, Let It Be: Risk communication among Bosnian Refugees Resettled in the U.S.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Xin

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to explore and understand how a Bosnian refugee community perceives and responds to the potential risk of a natural disaster in order to identify tailored approaches to improve risk communication. This is a qualitative study. Participants resettled in St Louis, Missouri were identified through criterion and snowball sampling. Thirty-three face-to-face interviews were conducted using a semi-structured interview guide. Data were analyzed using both content and thematic analysis. Findings indicate that due to their war experiences, cultural and religious understanding of natural disaster, and social influence on their risk interpretation, participants tended to underestimate the potential threat of natural disaster. Media was the main communication methods in times of potential natural disaster. Lack of organizational support during risk communication was a major concern. Ethnic radio stations and word of mouth were rated as the most popular communication channels for disseminating messages in preparation of a natural disaster. Using a community-based participatory approach to identify community needs and involve Bosnian community partners in risk communication planning, implementation, and evaluation, is vital for a Bosnian community.

  5. Altered brain rhythms and functional network disruptions involved in patients with generalized fixation-off epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Solana Sánchez, Ana Beatriz; Hernández Tamames, J.A.; Molina, E.; Martínez, K.; Pineda Pardo, José Ángel; Bruña Fernandez, Ricardo; Toledano, Rafael; San Antonio-Arce, Victoria; Garcia Morales, Irene; Gil Nagel, Antonio; Alfayate, E.; Álvarez Linera, Juan; Pozo Guerrero, Francisco del

    2012-01-01

    Fixation-off sensitivity (FOS) denotes the forms of epilepsy elicited by elimination of fixation. FOS-IGE patients are rare cases [1]. In a previous work [2] we showed that two FOS-IGE patients had different altered EEG rhythms when closing eyes; only beta band was altered in patient 1 while theta, alpha and beta were altered in patient 2. In the present work, we explain the relationship between the altered brain rhythms in these patients and the disruption in functional brain net...

  6. Primary myelofibrosis with or without mutant MPL: comparison of survival and clinical features involving 603 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardanani, A; Guglielmelli, P; Lasho, T L; Pancrazzi, A; Finke, C M; Vannucchi, A M; Tefferi, A

    2011-12-01

    MPL and JAK2V617F mutation analysis was performed in 603 patients with primary myelofibrosis (PMF) seen at the Mayo Clinic, USA (n=329) or University of Florence, Italy (n=274). Mutant MPL was detected in 49 (8.1%) patients and JAK2V617F in 350 (58%); 4 patients showed both mutations. MPLW515L/K was the commonest mutation; 2 patients showed novel mutations (L513ins and Q516-P518insAAAA). The US and Italy patient cohorts were separately analyzed for comparison of survival and clinical features between MPL-mutated, JAK2-mutated and JAK2/MPL-unmutated cases. JAK2/MPL-unmutated patients were significantly younger than their JAK2-mutated counterparts, in both patient cohorts (PMPL was associated with older age (PMPL has narrow and inconsistent phenotypic effect in PMF and does not influence overall or leukemia-free survival.

  7. Relapsing and Progressive Tumefactive Demyelinating Form of Central Nervous System Involvement in a Patient with Progressive Systemic Sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ho Kyun; Lee, Hui Joong

    2013-01-01

    White matter hyper intensities (WMHI) on MRI are not rare in patients with progressive systemic sclerosis (PSS). In this presentation, WMHI were developed in both middle cerebellar peduncles and temporal white matter in a patient with PSS, and regressed after medication of high dose steroid. However, new lesions were developed in the subcortices of both precentral gyri, and progressed rapidly to tumefactive hyperintensity on MRI. We report an unusual relapsing and progressive tumefactive demyelinating form of central nervous system involvement in PSS.

  8. Thermal and pressure pain sensitivity in patients with unilateral shoulder pain: comparison of involved and uninvolved sides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronado, Rogelio A; Kindler, Lindsay L; Valencia, Carolina; George, Steven Z

    2011-03-01

    Cross-sectional. In the examination of patients with unilateral shoulder pain, pain provocation testing to compare the involved and uninvolved sides has been considered useful. However, side-to-side comparisons of experimental pain sensitivity in patients with unilateral shoulder pain are not widely reported in the literature. To compare experimental pain sensitivity between the involved and uninvolved sides in patients with unilateral shoulder pain. In consecutive patients seeking operative treatment for shoulder pain, sensitivity measures of bilateral pressure pain threshold at the shoulder and forearm, and thermal pain threshold, tolerance, and temporal summation at the forearm, were examined. Pressure sensitivity was tested with a Fischer pressure algometer, and thermal sensitivity with a computer-controlled Medoc neurosensory analyzer. The involved and uninvolved sides were compared with an analysis of variance. Influence of sex and location of testing were considered as covariates in the analysis. Fifty-nine consecutively recruited participants completed experimental pain sensitivity testing. Participants reported significantly lower pressure pain thresholds in the involved side compared to the uninvolved side (F1,56 = 4.96, P = .030). In addition, female compared to male participants demonstrated lower pressure pain thresholds in the bilateral shoulder regions (F1,56 = 10.84, P = .002). There was no difference in thermal pain sensitivity between sides. Average clinical pain intensity was negatively correlated with pressure pain threshold at the involved local site (r = -0.284, P = .029), indicating an influence of clinical pain intensity on local pressure pain. The results of this study provide evidence for higher experimental pressure pain sensitivity in the involved side of patients with unilateral shoulder pain and no difference between sides for thermal pain sensitivity. Females demonstrated higher pain sensitivity than males to pressure stimuli at the

  9. Correlation between clinical and radiographic findings on the occurrence of furcation involvement in patients with periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estela Santos Gusmão

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Taking into consideration the method employed and the results obtained, it may be concluded that the clinical and radiographic examinations performed are effective tools for diagnosing furcation involvement in teeth affected with periodontal disease.

  10. Exercise-induced ventricular arrhythmias and vagal dysfunction in Chagas disease patients with no apparent cardiac involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique Silveira Costa

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION : Exercise-induced ventricular arrhythmia (EIVA and autonomic imbalance are considered as early markers of heart disease in Chagas disease (ChD patients. The objective of the present study was to verify the differences in the occurrence of EIVA and autonomic maneuver indexes between healthy individuals and ChD patients with no apparent cardiac involvement. METHODS : A total of 75 ChD patients with no apparent cardiac involvement, aged 44.7 (8.5 years, and 38 healthy individuals, aged 44.0 (9.2 years, were evaluated using echocardiography, symptom-limited treadmill exercise testing and autonomic function tests. RESULTS : The occurrence of EIVA was higher in the chagasic group (48% than in the control group (23.7% during both the effort and the recovery phases. Frequent ventricular contractions occurred only in the patient group. Additionally, the respiratory sinus arrhythmia index was significantly lower in the chagasic individuals compared with the control group. CONCLUSIONS : ChD patients with no apparent cardiac involvement had a higher frequency of EIVA as well as more vagal dysfunction by respiratory sinus arrhythmia. These results suggest that even when asymptomatic, ChD patients possess important arrhythmogenic substrates and subclinical disease.

  11. [Evaluation of bronchial mucosa involvement in sarcoidosis patients using ¹⁸F-FDG PET-CT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunyang; Feng, Huasong; Zhang, Yan; Lei, Xiao; Liang, Yingkui; Ding, Xinmin; Meng, Jiguang; Han, Zhihai

    2014-11-01

    To explore the value of ¹⁸F-FDG PET-CT in evaluating bronchial mucosa involvement in patients with saroidosis. A retrospective analysis was conducted among 6 sarcoidosis patients with and 14 patients without bronchial mucosa involvement to collect the data including the standard uptake value (SUVMax/Mean) of ¹⁸F-FDG, serum angiotensin converting enzyme (sACE), and proportion of lymphocytes and CD4⁺/CD8 ⁺ T lymphocyte ratio in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). The lung focal SUV(Max/Mean) was higher in patients with bronchial mucosa involvement than those without (7.04 ± 5.83/5.00 ± 4.69 vs 5.68 ± 3.66/3.82 ± 2.39), but such differences were not statistically significant (P=0.565/0.495). The SUV(Max/Mean) of the hilum of the lung and the mediastina lymph nodes were significantly higher in patients with bronchial mucosa involvement (13.28 ± 5.57/10.48 ± 4.43 vs 6.20 ± 1.77/4.52 ± 1.43, P=0.0003/0.0002; 13.84 ± 4.35/9.69 ± 2.74 vs 7.16 ± 2.52/5.28 ± 1.77, P=0.0004/0.0004). The level of sACE and CD4⁺/CD8 ⁺ T lymphocyte ratio in BALF were also significantly higher in patients with bronchial mucosa involvement (60.58 ± 16.3 vs 49.16 ± 13.3 IU/L, P=0.045; 7.30 ± 5.0 vs 2.90 ± 3.1, P=0.026). The proportion of lymphocytes in BALF was comparable between the patients with and without bronchial mucosa involvement (44.10 ± 10.3% vs 35.30 ± 12.5%, P=0.148). For patients with saroidosis, ¹⁸F-FDG PET-CT is useful in evaluating bronchial mucosa involvement, which is one of the key features of active sarcoidosis.

  12. Cardiac involvement in patients with Becker muscular dystrophy: new diagnostic and pathophysiological insights by a CMR approach

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    Thiene Gaetano

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Becker-Kiener muscular dystrophy (BMD represents an X-linked genetic disease associated with myocardial involvement potentially resulting in dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM. Early diagnosis of cardiac involvement may permit earlier institution of heart failure treatment and extend life span in these patients. Both echocardiography and nuclear imaging methods are capable of detecting later stages of cardiac involvement characterised by wall motion abnormalities. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR has the potential to detect cardiac involvement by depicting early scar formation that may appear before onset of wall motion abnormalities. Methods In a prospective two-center-study, 15 male patients with BMD (median age 37 years; range 11 years to 56 years underwent comprehensive neurological and cardiac evaluations including physical examination, echocardiography and CMR. A 16-segment model was applied for evaluation of regional wall motion abnormalities (rWMA. The CMR study included late gadolinium enhancement (LGE imaging with quantification of myocardial damage. Results Abnormal echocardiographic results were found in eight of 15 (53.3% patients with all of them demonstrating reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF and rWMA. CMR revealed abnormal findings in 12 of 15 (80.0% patients (p = 0.04 with 10 (66.6% having reduced LVEF (p = 0.16 and 9 (64.3% demonstrating rWMA (p = 0.38. Myocardial damage as assessed by LGE-imaging was detected in 11 of 15 (73.3% patients with a median myocardial damage extent of 13.0% (range 0 to 38.0%, an age-related increase and a typical subepicardial distribution pattern in the inferolateral wall. Ten patients (66.7% were in need of medical heart failure therapy based on CMR results. However, only 4 patients (26.7% were already taking medication based on clinical criteria (p = 0.009. Conclusion Cardiac involvement in patients with BMD is underdiagnosed by echocardiographic methods resulting

  13. Disseminated cryptococcosis with splenic and meningeal involvement in a patient with AIDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lizarazo, Jairo; Parra, Edgar; Parada, Oscar

    2010-01-01

    We present the case of a 37-year-old woman with a recent diagnosis of HIV-infection. The patient consulted because of headache, diarrhea, vomit and fever of two weeks' evolution. The patient had a wasting syndrome, and severe splenomegaly. Cerebral spinal fluid study showed meningitis by Cryptococcus neoformans. CT-scan revealed splenomegaly with focal lesions. Percutaneous biopsy with 18-gauge needle from one of the focal lesions confirmed cryptococcosis. The treatment was initiated with amphotericin B, followed by fluconazole. The patient's evolution has been satisfactory. Splenic lesions resolved and the patient is now asymptomatic and on secondary prophylaxis with fluconazole and antiretroviral treatment

  14. Ramsay Hunt syndrome with unilateral polyneuropathy involving cranial nerves V, VII, VIII, and XII in a diabetic patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei-Lian; Yan, Jian-Liang; Chen, Li-Li

    2011-01-01

    Ramsay Hunt syndrome is a rare complication of the varicella zoster virus, defined as a peripheral facial palsy that typically results from involvement of the facial and auditory nerves. Ramsay Hunt syndrome can be associated with cranial nerves V, VI, IX, and X but rarely with XII. We describe an atypical case of Ramsay Hunt syndrome with multiple cranial nerve involvement of nerves V, VII, VIII, and XII. Antiviral drugs, antibiotics, insulin, and traditional Chinese drugs were administered immediately after admission. After 3 months of combination therapy, the patient had recovered satisfactorily. Herpes zoster can cause severe infections in diabetic patients and should be treated as soon after detection as possible. Ramsay Hunt syndrome should be recognized as a polycranial neuritis characterized by damage to sensory and motor nerves. In addition to facial and vestibular nerve paralysis, Ramsay Hunt syndrome may also involve cranial nerves V and XII.

  15. Analysis of risk factors of involvement of seminal vesicles in patients with prostate cancer undergoing radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos F. Dall'Oglio

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine through preoperative serum PSA level, Gleason score on biopsy and percentage of fragments affected by tumor on biopsy, the probability of involvement of the seminal vesicles. MATERIALS AND METHODS: During the period between March 1991 to December 2002, we selected 899 patients undergoing radical prostatectomy for treatment of localized prostate adenocarcinoma. The analyzed preoperative variables were PSA, percentage of positive fragments and Gleason score on the biopsy. Pre-operative PSA was divided in scales from 0 to 4.0 ng/mL, 4.1 to 10 ng/mL, 10.1 to 20 ng/mL and > 20 ng/mL, Gleason score was categorized in scales from 2 to 6. 7 and 8 to 10, and the percentage of affected fragments was divided in 0 to 25%, 25.1% to 50%, 50.1% to 75%, and 75.1% to 100%. All these variables were correlated with the involvement of seminal vesicles in the surgical specimen. RESULTS: Of the 899 patients under study, approximately 11% (95% CI, [9% - 13%] had involvement of seminal vesicles. On the multivariate analysis, when PSA was < 4, the Gleason score was 2 to 6, and less than 25% of fragments were involved on the biopsy, only 3.6%, 7.6% and 6.2% of patients respectively, had involvement of seminal vesicles. On the multivariate analysis, we observed that PSA, Gleason score and the percentage of involved fragments were independent prognostic factors for invasion of seminal vesicles. CONCLUSION: The preoperative variables used in the present study allow the identification of men with minimal risk (lower than 5% if involvement of seminal vesicles.

  16. SMARCB1 involvement in the development of leiomyoma in a patient with schwannomatosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulsebos, Theo J. M.; Kenter, Susan; Siebers-Renelt, Ulrike; Hans, Volkmar; Wesseling, Pieter; Flucke, Uta

    2014-01-01

    Germline SMARCB1 mutations predispose in schwannomatosis patients to the development of multiple benign schwannomas and, in some cases, meningiomas. Here, we report on a 34-year-old female patient who developed multiple schwannomas at various locations and in addition a leiomyoma of the cervix

  17. SMARCB1 Involvement in the Development of Leiomyoma in a Patient With Schwannomatosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulsebos, T.J.M.; Kenter, S.; Siebers-Renelt, U.; Hans, V.; Wesseling, P.; Flucke, U.E.

    2014-01-01

    Germline SMARCB1 mutations predispose in schwannomatosis patients to the development of multiple benign schwannomas and, in some cases, meningiomas. Here, we report on a 34-year-old female patient who developed multiple schwannomas at various locations and in addition a leiomyoma of the cervix

  18. Reasons for failure to identify positive sentinel nodes in breast cancer patients with significant nodal involvement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Kanter, A. Y.; Menke-Pluijmers, M. B. E.; Henzen-Logmans, S. C.; van Geel, A. N.; van Eijck, C. J. H.; Wiggers, T.; Eggermont, A. M. M.

    Aim: To analyse causes of failure of sentinel node (SN) procedures in breast cancer patients and assess the role of pre-operative ultrasound examination of the axilla. Methods: In 138 consecutive clinically node negative breast cancer patients with the primary turnout in situ a SN procedure with

  19. Subtle involvement of the parasympathetic nervous system in patients with irritable bowel syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Orshoven, Narender P.; Andriesse, Gunnar I.; van Schelven, Leonard J.; Smout, André J.; Akkermans, Louis M. A.; Oey, P. Liam

    2006-01-01

    This study comprises assessment of autonomic function in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients, focusing on meal-related changes. In 18 IBS patients (4 males, mean age 45+/-3.0 [SEM] years) and 19 healthy volunteers (6 males, mean age 41+/-3.5 years) blood pressure, heart rate, heart rate

  20. Unrevealed Depression Involves Dysfunctional Coping Strategies in Crohn’s Disease Patients in Clinical Remission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caterina Viganò

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims. This study investigated the proportion of CD patients in clinical remission with clinical depression, and coping strategies in those with severe depressive disorders. Materials and Methods. One hundred consecutive CD patients in clinical remission were screened for anxiety and depression by using Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and patients with depressive symptoms were further investigated by means of Cognitive Behavioural Assessment 2.0 and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. Afterwards the coping strategies were assessed through the Brief-COPE questionnaire. Results. Twenty-one patients had anxious symptoms and 16 had depressive symptoms with or without anxiety. Seven of these patients (43.8% showed significant depressive symptoms. Compared to patients without psychiatric disorders, these patients showed significant lower score in “positive reframing” (p: 0.017 and in “planning” (p: 0.046 and higher score in “use of instrumental social support” (p<0.001, in “denial” scale (p: 0.001, and in “use of emotional social support” (p: 0.003. Conclusions. Depressed CD patients in clinical remission may have dysfunctional coping strategies, meaning that they may not be able to implement functional strategies to manage at best stress related with their disease.

  1. High serum levels of YKL-40 in patients with systemic sclerosis are associated with pulmonary involvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordenbaek, C; Johansen, J S; Halberg, P

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: YKL-40, a growth factor of connective tissue cells, is elevated in sera from patients with diseases characterized by inflammation, tissue remodelling, or fibrosis. The aim of the study was to determine serum YKL-40 levels in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) and to explore any po...

  2. Nocardia brasiliensis primary pulmonary nocardiosis with subcutaneous involvement in an immunocompetent patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amatya, R; Koirala, R; Khanal, B; Dhakal, S S

    2011-01-01

    This is a report of an unusual case of Nocardia brasiliensis causing primary pulmonary nocardiosis with disseminated subcutaneous lesions in an immunocompetent patient. This case highlights the importance of considering nocardiosis as a differential diagnosis in patients with pulmonary and cutaneous lesions and the need for vigorous management for complete cure.

  3. Nocardia brasiliensis primary pulmonary nocardiosis with subcutaneous involvement in an immunocompetent patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Amatya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a report of an unusual case of Nocardia brasiliensis causing primary pulmonary nocardiosis with disseminated subcutaneous lesions in an immunocompetent patient. This case highlights the importance of considering nocardiosis as a differential diagnosis in patients with pulmonary and cutaneous lesions and the need for vigorous management for complete cure.

  4. The importance of surgeon involvement in the evaluation of non-accidental trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larimer, Emily L; Fallon, Sara C; Westfall, Jaimee; Frost, Mary; Wesson, David E; Naik-Mathuria, Bindi J

    2013-06-01

    Non-Accidental Trauma (NAT) is a significant cause of childhood morbidity and mortality, causing 50% of trauma-related deaths at our institution. Our purpose was to evaluate the necessity of primary surgical evaluation and admission to the trauma service for children presenting with NAT. We reviewed all NAT patients from 2007-2011. Injury types, demographic data, and hospitalization information were collected. Comparisons to accidental trauma (AT) patients were made using Wilcoxon rank sum and Student's t tests. We identified 267 NAT patients presenting with 473 acute injuries. Injuries in NAT patients were more severe than in AT patients, and Injury Severity Scores, ICU admission rates, and mortality were all significantly (pinjury were seen in patients with closed head injuries (72%), extremity fractures (51%), rib fractures (82%), and abdominal/thoracic trauma (80%). Despite these complex injury patterns, only 56% received surgical consults, resulting in potential delays in diagnosis, as 24% of abdominal CT scans were obtained >12 hours after hospitalization. Given the high incidence of polytrauma in NAT patients, prompt surgical evaluation is necessary to determine the scope of injury. Admission to the trauma service and a thorough tertiary survey should be considered for all patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Pattern of mri brain abnormalities in rheumatic patients with neurological involvement: a tertiary care teaching hospital experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parvez, K.; Arfaj, A.; Naseeb, F.; Daif, A.K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To explore the pattern of abnormalities seen on MRI in rheumatic patients with neurological manifestations and to interpret the findings in relation to clinical picture. Study Design: Descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Rheumatology unit, King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia from January 2013 to February 2014. Patients and Methods: We prospectively included rheumatic patients with neurological symptoms and signs. The clinical data were correlated with MRI findings by a team comprising of a rheumatologist, neurologist and neuro-radiologist. Data was analyzed using simple statistical analysis. Results: Fifty patients were recruited with a mean age of 36.4 ± 10.76 years (range 17-62). Among SLE patients with seizures, focal deficit and headache white matter hyperintensities were found in 9 (64.28%), 4 (50%), 4 (80%) patients respectively. Out of seven SLE patients with global dysfunction, 3 (42.85%) had brain atrophy and 2 (28.57%) normal MRI. In Behcet disease with focal deficit, 3 (75%) patients had white matter hyperintensities and 1 (25%) had brainstem involvement. In Behcet disease with headache, 2 (50%) had normal MRI, 1 (25%) brainstem hyper-intensities and 1 (25%) had subacute infarct. Two (66%) of three Primary APS patients had white matter hyperintensities while third (33%) had old infarct. Both patients of polyarteritisnodosa, had white matter hyperintensities. Out of two Wegener granulomatosis one had white matter hyperintensities and other had ischemic changes in optic nerves. The only one scleroderma patient had white matter hyperintensities. Conclusion: We found that white matter hyperintensities was the most common MRI abnormality in our study group which in most of the cases had poor clinical correlation. No distinct pattern of CNS involvement on MRI was observed in various rheumatic disorders. (author)

  6. Comparison of three radiographic methods in screening of temporomandibular joint involvement in patients with psoriatic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenoenen, M.; Kilpinen, E.

    1990-01-01

    Fifty-three randomly selected subjects with psoriatic arthritis (PA) were examined radiographically by means of orthopantomography, transcranial radiography, and transmaxillary radiography. Two examiners graded the radiographic signs of flattening, osteophytes, erosion, and sclerosis. The findings obtained were then compared to determine the best technique for screening of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) bone changes. Together the techniques showed definite (24%) and possible (6%) changes, suggesting TMJ involvement in 31 of 106 joints. In all projections, radiographic signs suggesting TMJ involvement were most frequent in the condyle. Erosion in the condyle was the most frequent finding. Agreement with regard to definite changes in the condyle was found in only one-third to half of the cases. It is concluded that in radiography of the TMJ in subjects with PA, a combination of radiographic techniques should be used to obtain maximum information. However, orthopantomography is well suited for screening of TMJ involvement in subjects with PA. 30 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  7. Joint involvement in patients affected by systemic lupus erythematosus: application of the swollen to tender joint count ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Cipriano

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Joint involvement is a common manifestation in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. According to the SLE disease activity index 2000 (SLEDAI-2K, joint involvement is present in case of ≥2 joints with pain and signs of inflammation. However this definition could fail to catch all the various features of joint involvement. Alternatively the Swollen to Tender joint Ratio (STR could be used. This new index, which was originally proposed for rheumatoid arthritis (RA patients, is based on the count of 28 swollen and tender joints. Our study is, therefore, aimed to assess joint involvement in a SLE cohort using the STR. SLE patients with joint symptoms (≥1 tender joint were enrolled over a period of one month. Disease activity was assessed by SLEDAI-2K. We performed the swollen and tender joint count (0-28 and calculated the STR. Depending on the STR, SLE patients were grouped into three categories of disease activity: low (STR1.0. We also calculated the disease activity score based on a 28-joint count and the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (DAS28-ESR. We enrolled 100 SLE patients [F/M 95/5, mean±standard deviation (SD age 46.3±10.6 years, mean±SD disease duration 147.1±103.8 months]. The median of tender and swollen joints was 4 (IQR 7 and 1 (IQR 2.5, respectively. The median STR value was 0.03 (IQR 0.6. According to the STR, disease activity was low in 70 patients, moderate in 23 and high in 7. A significant correlation was identified between STR values and DAS28 (r=0.33, p=0.001. The present study suggests a correlation between STR and DAS28, allowing an easier and faster assessment of joint involvement with the former index.

  8. Fluoroscopically guided transforaminal epidural steroid injections at a quaternary-care teaching institution: effect of trainee involvement and patient body mass index on fluoroscopy time and patient dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiegs-Heiden, C.A.; Murthy, N.S.; Geske, J.R.; Diehn, F.E.; Schueler, B.A.; Wald, J.T.; Kaufmann, T.J.; Lehman, V.T.; Carr, C.M.; Amrami, K.K.; Morris, J.M.; Thielen, K.R.; Maus, T.P.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To investigate whether there are differences in fluoroscopy time and patient dose for fluoroscopically guided lumbar transforaminal epidural steroid injections (TFESIs) performed by staff radiologists versus with trainees and to evaluate the effect of patient body mass index (BMI) on fluoroscopy time and patient dose, including their interactions with other variables. Materials and methods: Single-level lumbar TFESIs (n=1844) between 1 January 2011 and 31 December 2013 were reviewed. Fluoroscopy time, reference point air kerma (K_a_,_r), and kerma area product (KAP) were recorded. BMI and trainee involvement were examined as predictors of fluoroscopy time, K_a_,_r, and KAP in models adjusted for age and gender in multivariable linear models. Stratified models of BMI groups by trainee presence were performed. Results: Increased age was the only significant predictor of increased fluoroscopy time (p<0.0001). K_a_,_r and KAP were significantly higher in patients with a higher BMI (p<0.0001 and p=0.0009). When stratified by BMI, longer fluoroscopy time predicted increased K_a_,_r and KAP in all groups (p<0.0001). Trainee involvement was not a statistically significant predictor of fluoroscopy time or K_a_,_r in any BMI category. KAP was lower with trainees in the overweight group (p=0.0009) and higher in male patients for all BMI categories (p<0.02). Conclusion: Trainee involvement did not result in increased fluoroscopy time or patient dose. BMI did not affect fluoroscopy time; however, overweight and obese patients received significantly higher K_a_,_r and KAP. Male patients received a higher KAP in all BMI categories. Limiting fluoroscopy time and good collimation practices should be reinforced in these patients. - Highlights: • Trainee involvement did not contribute to increased fluoroscopy time or dose. • BMI did not affect fluoroscopy time. • Overweight and obese patients received significantly higher Ka,r and KAP.

  9. Correlation of Endostatin and Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinases 2 (TIMP2 Serum Levels With Cardiovascular Involvement in Systemic Sclerosis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bozena Dziankowska-Bartkowiak

    2005-01-01

    pathogenesis of SSc. Heart fibrosis is one of the most important prognostic factors in SSc patients. So, the aim of our study was to examine cardiovascular dysfunction in SSc patients and its correlation with serum levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, endostatin, and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 2 (TIMP2. The study group comprised 34 patients (19 with limited scleroderma (lSSc and 15 with diffuse scleroderma (dSSc. The control group consisted of 20 healthy persons, age and sex matched. Internal organ involvement was assessed on the basis of specialist procedures. Serum VEGF, endostatin, and TIMP2 levels were evaluated by ELISA. We found cardiovascular changes in 15 patients with SSc (8 with lSSc and 7 with dSSc. The observed symptoms were of different characters and also coexisted with each other. Higher endostatin serum levels in all systemic sclerosis patients in comparison to the control group were demonstrated (P<.05. Also higher serum levels of endostatin and TIMP2 were observed in patients with cardiovascular changes in comparison to the patients without such changes (P<.05. The obtained results support the notion that angiogenesis and fibrosis disturbances may play an important role in SSc. Evaluation of endostatin and TIMP2 serum levels seems to be one of the noninvasive, helpful examinations of heart involvement in the course of systemic sclerosis.

  10. Esophageal involvement is frequent in lichen planus: study in 32 patients with suggestion of clinicopathologic diagnostic criteria and therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Johannes S; Technau-Hafsi, Kristin; Schwacha, Henning; Kuhlmann, Jan; Hirsch, Gunther; Brass, Volker; Deibert, Peter; Schmitt-Graeff, Anette; Kreisel, Wolfgang

    2016-12-01

    Lichen planus (LP) is a classic skin disease that can involve the skin, hair, and nails, as well as the oral and genital mucosa. Histopathology is characterized by a T-lymphocytic, lichenoid, and interface dermatitis. Multiple case reports and small case series have shown that LP can involve the esophagus. However, the diagnostic criteria, incidence, and best treatment options remain uncertain. This study aimed to refine the diagnostic criteria, estimate prevalence, and present an outlook on treatment options to prevent long-term sequelae. Thirty-two consecutive patients with LP of the skin, hair, nails, oral mucosa, and/or genital mucosa underwent a comprehensive clinicopathologic assessment. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy was performed, and biopsies were evaluated histologically, immunohistochemically, and by direct immunofluorescence. Patients diagnosed with esophageal lichen planus (ELP) were followed up prospectively where possible. In total, 20 of 32 patients had ELP. Ten of these 20 patients were classified as having proven ELP, with clear-cut endoscopically visible lesions; the other 10 were classified as having probable ELP. Eight of 10 patients with proven ELP were started on new or additional therapy because of esophageal findings. Treatment with a topical budesonide formulation or systemic corticosteroids was successful in most patients with proven ELP and reversed functional esophageal stenosis. ELP can be found in more than 50% of patients with proven mucocutaneous LP when clinical and pathologic findings are correlated carefully. Topical or systemic corticosteroids are the first-line therapy for ELP. Timely medical therapy seems to prevent scarring stenosis of the esophagus.

  11. The challenge of involving elderly patients in primary care using an electronic communication tool with their professionals : A mixed methods study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jong, Catharina C.; Ros, Wynand J.G.; Van Leeuwen, Mia; Schrijvers, Guus

    2017-01-01

    Background: Elderly patients in primary care often have multiple health problems, with different healthcare professionals involved. For consistency in care, it is required that communication amongst professionals and patient-systems (patient and informal-carers) be well tuned.

  12. Framing patient consent for student involvement in pelvic examination: a dual model of autonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson-Stevens, Andrew; Davies, Myfanwy M; Jones, Rhiain; Chik, Aiman D Pawan; Robbé, Iain J; Fiander, Alison N

    2013-11-01

    Patient consent has been formulated in terms of radical individualism rather than shared benefits. Medical education relies on the provision of patient consent to provide medical students with the training and experience to become competent doctors. Pelvic examination represents an extreme case in which patients may legitimately seek to avoid contact with inexperienced medical students particularly where these are male. However, using this extreme case, this paper will examine practices of framing and obtaining consent as perceived by medical students. This paper reports findings of an exploratory qualitative study of medical students and junior doctors. Participants described a number of barriers to obtaining informed consent. These related to misunderstandings concerning student roles and experiences and insufficient information on the nature of the examination. Participants reported perceptions of the negative framing of decisions on consent by nursing staff where the student was male. Potentially coercive practices of framing of the decision by senior doctors were also reported. Participants outlined strategies they adopted to circumvent patients' reasons for refusal. Practices of framing the information used by students, nurses and senior doctors to enable patients to decide about consent are discussed in the context of good ethical practice. In the absence of a clear ethical model, coercion appears likely. We argue for an expanded model of autonomy in which the potential tension between respecting patients' autonomy and ensuring the societal benefit of well-trained doctors is recognised. Practical recommendations are made concerning information provision and clear delineations of student and patient roles and expectations.

  13. Abnormal findings of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus involving the brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishikawa, Akira; Okada, Jun; Kondo, Hirobumi (Kitasato Univ., Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan). School of Medicine); Kashiwazaki, Sadao

    1992-06-01

    To elucidate the clinical significance of MRI on central nervous system systemic lupus erythematosus (CNS-SLE), MRI and CT scans were performed in 35 patients with SLE, of 18 patients who had CNS manifestations at the time of MRI examinations. The investigations were also carried out in 17 patients without CNS-SLE. The rate of detection of abnormal findings on MRI in patients with CNS-SLE was 77.2% (14/18), which was high, as compared with the rate of those on CT scans (50%: 9/18). Especially, all of 4 patients with seizure and 3 patients with encephalopathy showed abnormal MRI findings, although respectively 50% and 33.3% of them had abnormal CT scan findings. MRI findings were classified into 4 groups below: (1) Large focal are as increased signal intensity at T2 weighted image. These were observed in 2 of 4 patients with seizure and 1 of 3 patients with encephalopathy, which were completely resolved after treatment. (2) Patchy subcortical foci of increased signal intensity at T2 weighted image. These were observed in 11 of 18 CNS-SLE and 7 of 17 without CNS-SLE, which were not detected by CT scan. (3) All of six patients with cerebral infarctions showed high signal intensity areas at T2 weighted image and low signal intensity areas at T1 weighted image. (4) Normal findings were observed in 4 of 18 CNS-SLE (22.2%). We concluded that MRI is useful for the evaluation of CNS-SLE and provides more information than CT scan. (author).

  14. Abnormal findings of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus involving the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Akira; Okada, Jun; Kondo, Hirobumi; Kashiwazaki, Sadao.

    1992-01-01

    To elucidate the clinical significance of MRI on central nervous system systemic lupus erythematosus (CNS-SLE), MRI and CT scans were performed in 35 patients with SLE, of 18 patients who had CNS manifestations at the time of MRI examinations. The investigations were also carried out in 17 patients without CNS-SLE. The rate of detection of abnormal findings on MRI in patients with CNS-SLE was 77.2% (14/18), which was high, as compared with the rate of those on CT scans (50%: 9/18). Especially, all of 4 patients with seizure and 3 patients with encephalopathy showed abnormal MRI findings, although respectively 50% and 33.3% of them had abnormal CT scan findings. MRI findings were classified into 4 groups below: 1) Large focal are as increased signal intensity at T2 weighted image. These were observed in 2 of 4 patients with seizure and 1 of 3 patients with encephalopathy, which were completely resolved after treatment. 2) Patchy subcortical foci of increased signal intensity at T2 weighted image. These were observed in 11 of 18 CNS-SLE and 7 of 17 without CNS-SLE, which were not detected by CT scan. 3) All of six patients with cerebral infarctions showed high signal intensity areas at T2 weighted image and low signal intensity areas at T1 weighted image. 4) Normal findings were observed in 4 of 18 CNS-SLE (22.2%). We concluded that MRI is useful for the evaluation of CNS-SLE and provides more information than CT scan. (author)

  15. Traumatic events involving elderly patients treated with anticoagulants for atrial fibrillation: the downside of stroke prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Riccardi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A group of oral anticoagulant-treated patients affected by permanent atrial fibrillation was evaluated after their access to the emergency room as a result of a traumatic accident. In these patients, the re-evaluation of their risk of thromboembolism and bleeding was performed together with the evaluation of their risk of falling and institutionalization. Results show that the emergency department identifies a cohort of very elderly frail patients, who should be carefully reconsidered for anticoagulant therapy after a traumatic event.

  16. Patients' preferences for involvement in the decision-making process for treating diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marahrens, Lydia; Kern, Raimar; Ziemssen, Tjalf; Fritsche, Andreas; Martus, Peter; Ziemssen, Focke; Roeck, Daniel

    2017-08-09

    To assess factors associated with the preferred role of the attending ophthalmologist in the decision-making processes before treating diabetic retinopathy (DR). Cross-sectional study of 810 adults attending secondary diabetes care centers (NCT02311504). Diabetes patients were classified using a validated questionnaire in an ophthalmologist-dominant decision-making (ODM), shared decision-making (SDM) and patient-dominant decision-making (PDM) style. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to determine factors associated with the decision-making process. A majority of 74.3% patients preferred SDM between ophthalmologist and patient, 17.4% patients wanted ODM, delegating the decision-making process to the ophthalmologist, 8.3% preferred the autonomous style of PDM. Patients wanting ODM were older (OR = 1.2 per decade, p = 0.013), had a lower level of education (OR = 1.4, p = 0.001) and had a higher frequency of consultations per year (OR = 1.3, p = 0.022). Patients with better basic knowledge in DR and memorizing their HbA 1 c level showed a higher propensity for SDM (OR = 1.1, p = 0.037). Patients wanting PDM had a significantly higher education (OR = 1.3, p = 0.036) and a greater desire for receiving information from self-help groups (OR = 1.3, p = 0.015). The first evaluation of the general patient wishes for the treatment of DR confirmed the concept of SDM, which was favored by three quarters. In particular, older patients with low educational attainment wanted to delegate the decision-making process to the ophthalmologist. Amelioration of ophthalmologic education in diabetic programs might take up patients' propensity for SDM. Regardless of the decision-making group, nearly all patients wanted the medical and scientific information to be transferred by and shared with the ophthalmologist. The study was registered on www.clinicaltrials.gov (identifier: NCT02311504) on December 4th 2014.

  17. Dr. Tulp attends the soft machine: patient simulators, user involvement and intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClimens, Alex; Lewis, Robin; Brewster, Jacqui

    2012-09-01

    Simulation as a way to teach clinical skills attracts much critical attention. Its benefits, however, might be significantly reduced when the simulation model used relies exclusively on patient simulators. This is particularly true if the intended patient population for students taught is characterized by intellectual disability. Learning to care for people with intellectual disability might be better supplemented when the simulation model used incorporates input from 'real' people. If these people themselves have intellectual disabilities then the verisimilitude of the simulation will be higher and the outcomes for learners and potential patients will also be improved.

  18. Disseminated Rhodococcus equi infection in a kidney transplant patient without initial pulmonary involvement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rahamat-Langendoen, Janette C.; van Meurs, Matijs; Zijlstra, Jan G.; Lo-Ten-Foe, Jerome R.

    2009-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is increasingly recognized as an opportunistic pathogen in solid organ transplant recipients. Primary pulmonary involvement is the most common finding. We report a case of a 42-year-old female kidney transplant recipient who developed multiple disseminated abscesses caused by R.

  19. Risk Perceptions in Diabetic Patients Who Have Experienced Adverse Events: Implications for Patient Involvement in Regulatory Decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachs, Mikkel Lindskov; Sporrong, Sofia Kälvemark; Colding-Jørgensen, Morten; Frokjaer, Sven; Helboe, Per; Jelic, Katarina; Kaae, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    Increasingly, patients are expected to influence decisions previously reserved for regulatory agencies, pharmaceutical companies, and healthcare professionals. Individual patients have previously represented their patient population when rare, serious adverse events (AEs) were weighed as part of a benefit-risk assessment. However, the degree of heterogeneity of the patient population is critical for how accurately they can be represented by individuals. This study aims to explore patients' risk perception of rare, serious adverse effects of medicines with regard to blood glucose-lowering antidiabetics used by the individual patient. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 18 patients with diabetes with self-perceived serious, but not necessarily rare, AEs (e.g. stroke or valve or bypass surgery). The interviews explored the patients' history of disease, perceptions of the terms rare and serious, and overall levels of risk aversion. A thematic analysis of the interviews, including a consensus discussion, was carried out. Interestingly, respondents rarely made a clear distinction between medicines-induced AEs and complications related to disease progression. Concerns regarding AEs were apparently diverse but were systematically related to the personal experiences of the respondents. Respondents routinely ignored information about possible rare, serious AEs, unless it could be related to personal experience. In the absence of experience, concerns were focused on common and less serious AEs, thus disregarding rare and more serious events. The study suggests that experience of AEs, related to either medicines or disease, constitutes an important factor of patient risk perception. We therefore propose that serious adverse experiences should be added to the traditional panel of socioeconomic factors that are accounted for when patients are invited to give input on regulatory decisions.

  20. Osseous involvement in AIDS patients; Comprometimento osseo no paciente com sindrome da imunodeficiencia adquirida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchiori, Edson [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Radiologia]|[Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Pereira, Abercio Arantes [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina

    1995-07-01

    The radiological findings of eight patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) who developed bone lesions were analyzed in conjunction with twelve similar published cases. Our series included three patients with lymphoma, two with bacillary angiomatosis, two with tuberculosis and one with staphylococcal osteomyelitis. All the lesions were lithic regardless of the etiology. Both in our cases and in those previously published bone repair was only seen in cases of bacillary angiomatosis treated with erythromycin. No pathognomonic findings were observed. However, the association of skin and bone lesions in immuno deficient patients should always bring the consideration of bacillary angiomatosis in the differential diagnosis. This is particularly relevant since this a condition amenable to treatment once correctly identified. The radiological findings in the lymphoma and tuberculosis patients have not been described previously. (author). 9 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Involving patients in checking the validity of the NHS shared record: a single practice pilot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally Al-Agilly

    2008-01-01

    Conclusion Only a minority of patients chose to view and offer comment on their core clinical summaries. The majority of summaries were deemed to be accurate but there was a worrying level of omission and inaccuracy, including medication. It might be a better use of time to support doctors and patients working together to construct and check summaries rather than on information technology (IT and the complex ethical debate surrounding the core clinical Spine.

  2. Pulmonary Involvement in Patients with Guillain-Barré Syndrome in Subacute Phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, Meeka; Rawat, Nidhi; Gupta, Anupam; Nagappa, Madhu; Taly, Arun B; Rukmani, M R; Sathyaprabha, T N; Haldar, Partha

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the pulmonary function in Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) patients in subacute phase and find clinical correlates of pulmonary dysfunction. This was a single-center, prospective, cross-sectional, hospital-based study in GBS patients performed in Department of Neurological Rehabilitation at a tertiary care institute. Clinical examination for pulmonary function was done by measuring chest expansion. The pulmonary function tests were carried out by Spirometry kit Microquark Cosmed, Italy. Fatigue was assessed by Fatigue Severity Scale, disability status by Hughes Disability Scale (HDS), and muscle weakness by Medical Research Council sum scores. Statistical analysis was performed by Stata 11. The significance of P value was adjudged against an alpha of 0.05. Twenty-eight patients were included with 17 (61%) men and mean age of 31 years. Median duration of symptoms was 16.5 days. There were 10 (36%) demyelinating and 18 (64%) axonal variants. Twenty-six (93%) patients scored more than 2 on HDS. All study participants reported fatigue. Twenty-two (78.6%) patients had chest expansion of <2.5 cm. Spirometry showed restrictive pulmonary dysfunction in 23 (79%) patients. Significant correlation was found between abnormal pulmonary function test and chest expansion ( P = 0.003). Pulmonary dysfunction in GBS is common even during subacute phase. It needs to be identified and managed appropriately for better clinical outcome.

  3. Pulmonary involvement in patients with Guillain–Barré syndrome in subacute phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meeka Khanna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the pulmonary function in Guillain–Barre syndrome (GBS patients in subacute phase and find clinical correlates of pulmonary dysfunction. Methods: This was a single-center, prospective, cross-sectional, hospital-based study in GBS patients performed in Department of Neurological Rehabilitation at a tertiary care institute. Clinical examination for pulmonary function was done by measuring chest expansion. The pulmonary function tests were carried out by Spirometry kit Microquark Cosmed, Italy. Fatigue was assessed by Fatigue Severity Scale, disability status by Hughes Disability Scale (HDS, and muscle weakness by Medical Research Council sum scores. Statistical Analysis: Statistical analysis was performed by Stata 11. The significance of P value was adjudged against an alpha of 0.05. Results: Twenty-eight patients were included with 17 (61% men and mean age of 31 years. Median duration of symptoms was 16.5 days. There were 10 (36% demyelinating and 18 (64% axonal variants. Twenty-six (93% patients scored more than 2 on HDS. All study participants reported fatigue. Twenty-two (78.6% patients had chest expansion of <2.5 cm. Spirometry showed restrictive pulmonary dysfunction in 23 (79% patients. Significant correlation was found between abnormal pulmonary function test and chest expansion (P = 0.003. Conclusion: Pulmonary dysfunction in GBS is common even during subacute phase. It needs to be identified and managed appropriately for better clinical outcome.

  4. Pulmonary Involvement in Patients with Guillain–Barré Syndrome in Subacute Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, Meeka; Rawat, Nidhi; Gupta, Anupam; Nagappa, Madhu; Taly, Arun B.; Rukmani, M. R.; Sathyaprabha, T. N.; Haldar, Partha

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the pulmonary function in Guillain–Barre syndrome (GBS) patients in subacute phase and find clinical correlates of pulmonary dysfunction. Methods: This was a single-center, prospective, cross-sectional, hospital-based study in GBS patients performed in Department of Neurological Rehabilitation at a tertiary care institute. Clinical examination for pulmonary function was done by measuring chest expansion. The pulmonary function tests were carried out by Spirometry kit Microquark Cosmed, Italy. Fatigue was assessed by Fatigue Severity Scale, disability status by Hughes Disability Scale (HDS), and muscle weakness by Medical Research Council sum scores. Statistical Analysis: Statistical analysis was performed by Stata 11. The significance of P value was adjudged against an alpha of 0.05. Results: Twenty-eight patients were included with 17 (61%) men and mean age of 31 years. Median duration of symptoms was 16.5 days. There were 10 (36%) demyelinating and 18 (64%) axonal variants. Twenty-six (93%) patients scored more than 2 on HDS. All study participants reported fatigue. Twenty-two (78.6%) patients had chest expansion of <2.5 cm. Spirometry showed restrictive pulmonary dysfunction in 23 (79%) patients. Significant correlation was found between abnormal pulmonary function test and chest expansion (P = 0.003). Conclusion: Pulmonary dysfunction in GBS is common even during subacute phase. It needs to be identified and managed appropriately for better clinical outcome. PMID:28694622

  5. Dipyridamole thallium imaging for detecting cardiac involvement in patients with systemic sclerosis (scleroderma)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishida, Yoshio; Matsubara, Noboru; Tani, Akihiro; Morozumi, Takakazu; Hori, Masatsugu; Kitabatake, Akira; Kamada, Takenobu; Kimura, Kazufumi; Kozuka, Takahiro (Osaka Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1990-02-01

    Dipyridamole thallium-201 imaging was carried out in 21 patients with progressive systemic sclerosis (PSS) to assess its value in detecting impaired myocardium and coronary microcirculation associated with PSS. Depending upon the degree of cardiac function, the patients were classified as having either ejection fraction of 50% or more (Group I, n=17) or less than 50% (Group II, n=4). In Group I, four patients had transient defect in which perfusion defects were seen on early images but not seen on delayed images; three had reverse redistribution in which defects were not seen on early images but seen on delayed images; and three had persistent defects which were seen on both early and delayed images. A decreased washout of thallium-201 was seen in 9 patients. In an analysis of both perfusion defects and washout rate, 13 patients (76%) in Group I were found to have abnormal findings. This suggests that disturbed coronary microcirculation or impaired myocardium may frequently develop even when EF is normal. All of the patients categorized as having a decreased cardiac function (Group II) had perfusion defect, suggesting the presence of myocardial fibrosis. In PSS, deterioration of cardiac function seemed to be associated with progression of myocardial fibrosis. Dipyridamole thallium imaging may be a sensitive method for detecting cardiac lesions in PSS. It also has the potential for detecting decreased coronary flow reserve or slightly impaired myocardium even without decreased EF. (N.K.).

  6. A resilience intervention involving mindfulness training for transplant patients and their caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stonnington, Cynthia M; Darby, Betty; Santucci, Angela; Mulligan, Pamela; Pathuis, Patricia; Cuc, Andrea; Hentz, Joseph G; Zhang, Nan; Mulligan, David; Sood, Amit

    2016-11-01

    Solid organ and stem cell transplant patients and their caregivers report a substantial level of distress. Mindfulness-based stress reduction has been shown to alleviate distress associated with transplant, but there is limited experience in this population with other mindfulness-based interventions, or with combined transplant patient and caregiver interventions. We evaluated a novel, 6-week mindfulness-based resilience training (MBRT) class for transplant patients and their caregivers that incorporates mindfulness practice, yoga, and neuroscience of stress and resilience. Thirty-one heart, liver, kidney/pancreas, and stem cell transplant patients and 18 caregivers at Mayo Clinic in Arizona participated. Measures of stress, resilience, depression, anxiety, health-related quality of life, positive and negative affect, and sleep were completed at baseline, 6 weeks, and 3 months postintervention. At 6 weeks and 3 months, patients demonstrated significant (Presilience and manage stress for transplant patients and their caregivers. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Comparative study of radiography, CT and MRI in the identification of hip involvement in patients with ankylosing spondylitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Zhenguo; Zhang Xuezhe; Hu Libin; Wang Guochun; Zhou Huiqiong; Lu Xin; Wang Wu

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To study the imaging findings of hip involvement and to compare the sensitivity of radiography, CT, and MRI in the identification of hip involvement in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Methods: Anteroposterior radiography of the pelvis and MRI of hip were performed in 55 patients with AS. CT scan of hip was performed in 29 of 55 patients. T 1 -weighted, T 2 -weighted, short tau inversion recovery (STIR) and three dimensional balanced turbo field echo with water selective excitation (3D-BTFE-WATS) coronal sequences of hips were obtained in all patients, of which fat-saturated contrast-enhanced T 1 -weighted sequence was performed in 24 patients. The imaging data of 55 patients were analyzed. The chi-square test was used to analyze the sensitivity in the identification of hip involvement among radiography, CT, and MRI. Results: Among 110 hips in all 55 patients, abnormal changes were detected in 13 hips by radiography, 85 hips by MRI. The findings of radiography included bone erosions in 13 hips, joint space narrowing in 4 hips,syndesmophytes in 5 hips. MRI revealed bone erosive destruction in 31 hips, joint space narrowing in 4 hips, joint effusion in 80 hips, subchondral bone marrow edema in 32 hips, fat accumulation of bone marrow in 28 hips, enthesitis in 21 hips. Bilateral synovial enhancement was showed in 19 of 24 patients who underwent fat-saturated contrast-enhanced T 1 -weighted sequence. Of the 58 hip joints in 29 patients who underwent CT examination, not only did CT show all bone erosions detected by radiography and MRI, but CT revealed bone erosive destruction that were not identified by radiography in 10 hips and by MRI in 1 hip as well. Abnormal changes were detected in 10.3% (6/58)by radiography, 27.6% (16/58) by CT, and 77.6% (45/58) by MRI. The sensitivity of MRI in the identification of hip involvement is higher than that of radiography and CT (χ 2 =53.22 and 29.08, P<0.05). In addition to chronic bone structural changes, MRI

  8. Pathologic margin involvement and the risk of recurrence in patients treated with breast-conserving therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gage, Irene; Nixon, Asa J.; Schnitt, Stuart J.; Recht, Abram; Gelman, Rebecca; Silver, Barbara; Connolly, James L.; Harris, Jay R.

    1995-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess the relationship between microscopic margin status and recurrence after breast-conserving therapy for tumors with or without an extensive intraductal component (EIC). MATERIALS AND METHODS: During the years 1968 to 1986, 1865 women with unilateral clinical stage I or II breast cancer were treated with radiation therapy for breast conservation. Of these, 340 received ≥60 Gy to the tumor bed and had margins that were evaluable on review of their pathologic slides; these constitute the study population. The median follow-up was 109 months. All available slides were reviewed by one of the study pathologists (SS, JC). Final radial margins of excision were classified as negative >1 mm (no invasive or ductal carcinoma in-situ within 1 mm of the inked margin), negative ≤1 mm (any carcinoma ≤1 mm of the inked margin but not at ink) or positive (any carcinoma at the inked margin). A focally positive margin was defined as any invasive or in-situ carcinoma at the margin in ≤3 LPF. The extent of positivity was not evaluable in 2 patients and the distance of the tumor from the margin was not evaluable in 48 patients with a negative margin. Thirty-nine percent of EIC-negative and 46% of EIC-positive patients underwent a re-excision and, for these, the final margin analyzed was from the re-excised specimen. The median dose to the tumor bed was 63 Gy for patients with positive margins and 62 Gy for patients with negative margins. Recurrent disease was classified as ipsilateral breast recurrence (IBR) or distant metastasis/regional nodal failure (DM/RNF). RESULTS: Five year crude rates for the first site of recurrence were calculated for 340 patients evaluable at 5 years. Results were tabulated separately for all patients, EIC-negative and EIC-positive. All p-values tested for differences in the distribution of sites of first failure. CONCLUSIONS: The risk of ipsilateral breast recurrence is equally low for patients with close (≤1 mm) or negative (>1 mm

  9. Heart and Cardiovascular Involvement in Patients with Mucopolysaccharidosis Type IVA (Morquio-A Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Kampmann

    Full Text Available Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS IVA is a rare lysosomal storage disorder with multiple skeletal and non-skeletal abnormalities requiring multiple surgical interventions. It is well known that patients with MPS IVA suffer from tachycardia, but cardiac and hemodynamic alterations have not been reported to date. We investigated the cardiovascular and hemodynamic alterations in patients with MPS IVA and developed a possible patho-mechanism for cardiovascular deterioration during anesthesia.In this observational study, serial cardiac examinations were performed in 54 patients with MPS IVA who were followed at the Children's Hospital of the Mainz Medical University (Mainz, Germany between 1991 and 2014 (follow-up 1-24 years; median 5.8 years. Results were compared with data from a large central European cohort of more than 2000 healthy infants and children.None of the patients had arterial hypertension, but 4% had evidence of increased pulmonary artery pressure. Patients developed aortic root extension up to 6.9 standard deviations above normal. Left-sided valve leaflet thickening occurred in 26 patients (five with valve disease. Patients had lower left ventricular dimensions (z: -1.02±0.1, lower stroke volumes (z: -2.3±0.17, lower left ventricular mass (z: -1.5±0.21, but higher wall thickness (z: +0.8±0.16, and higher work index (z: +2.5±0.2 compared to healthy control subjects. Cardiac output was preserved by an increase in heart rate of 21%. Sixty % of patients showed impaired diastolic filling; heart rate (99.0±1.8 vs. 92.0±2.1 bpm, age (18.0±1.8 vs. 14.2±1 years, and cardiothoracic ratio (61.6±3.6% vs. 55±4.2% of these patients were higher compared to those with normal filling.The results of this study suggest an age-progressive disproportion of the intra-thoracic organs of patients with MPS IVA, which is accompanied by aortic root extension and thickened left ventricles, with reduced stroke volumes, impaired diastolic filling patterns, and

  10. Cavernous sinus thrombosis syndrome and brainstem involvement in patient with leptospirosis: Two rare complications of leptospirosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahriyar Alian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Leptospirosis is a bacterial disease that is caused by pathogenic spirochetes of the genus Leptospira. It can affect humans and animals. In humans, it can lead to a wide spectrum of symptoms. It is known as the most common zoonosis in the world. The typical presentation of the disease is an acute biphasic febrile illness with or without jaundice. Less common clinical manifestations may result from involvement of different human body systems. In many places, this disease may be under-diagnosed, especially when associated with neurological complications. Moreover, without treatment, leptospirosis can lead to organ damages, and even death. Neurological complications are uncommon and are reported in a few cases. Cavernous sinus thrombosis syndrome and brainstem involvement are rare complications of leptospirosis and are associated with a high mortality risk. To our knowledge, no such cases have been reported in the literature.

  11. HPA antibodies in Algerian multitransfused patients: Prevalence and involvement in platelet refractoriness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouk, Hacene; Bertrand, Gérald; Zitouni, Selma; Djenouni, Amel; Martageix, Corinne; Griffi, Fatiha; Kaplan, Cecile; Ouelaa, Hanifa

    2015-06-01

    Patients receiving cellular blood components may form HLA or HPA antibodies. The frequency and the specificity of HPA antibodies after a series of blood transfusions have never been reported in the Algerian population which is ethnically diverse and runs a higher risk of platelet alloimmunization due to high b allelic frequencies observed for the HPA systems. 117 polytransfused patients were included in this study; the detection of HPA antibodies was performed by the Monoclonal Antibody-specific Immobilization of Platelet Antigens method (MAIPA). Post-transfusion platelet effectiveness was evaluated by the calculation of corrected count increment (CCI). The antibodies against platelets were detected in 10.26% of the patients. In this study, the platelet systems concerned by the alloimmunizations were specifically HPA-1, -3 and -5 with particular predominance of HPA-1. Twenty two patients were refractory to platelet transfusion, as assessed by a CCI; in which 64% have factors associated with increased platelet consumption. Platelet Immunization was found in 14% of platelet refractoriness (PTR) cases. 03 Anti-platelet antibodies were directed against GPIb-IX (n = 1), anti-HPA-1b (n = 1) and anti HPA-5b (n = 1) associated with anti-HLA antibodies in two cases. HLA and HPA alloimmunization is common among chronically transfused patients. PTR detection, identification of the underlying causes, and selection of the appropriate product for transfusion are fundamental to reduce the risk of major bleedings. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Sites of extranodal involvement are prognostic in patients with stage 1 follicular lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shastri, Aditi; Janakiram, Murali; Mantzaris, Ioannis; Yu, Yiting; Londono, Jaime S; Verma, Amit K; Barta, Stefan K

    2017-10-03

    Follicular lymphoma (FL) is the most common indolent B cell lymphoma in the United States and a quarter of patients present with stage I disease. The objective of this study was to examine if primary site of disease influences survival in early stage lymphoma. The most common extranodal primary sites were the integumentary system (8%), followed by the GI tract (6.4%) and head & neck (5.6%). We stratified patients into a pre-rituximab era (1983-1998) and the rituximab era (1999-2011). In multivariable analysis, integumentary disease was associated with better overall survival (Hazard Ratio [HR], 0.77; Confidence Interval [CI], 0.66-0.9) while primary site FL of the nervous system (HR, 2.40; CI, 1.72-3.38) and the musculoskeletal system (HR, 2.14; CI, 1.44-3.18) were associated with worse overall survival when compared to primary nodal FL. Treatment in the pre-rituximab era, male gender and older age at diagnosis were associated with worse survival. We queried the SEER database from 1983 to 2011. We included all adult patients (>18 years) with histologically confirmed stage I FL, active follow-up, and a single primary tumor. A total of 9,865 patients met eligibility criteria, with 2520 (25%) having an extranodal primary site. We classified the primary sites by organ or anatomic location into 11 sites. Primary site of disease is a prognostic factor for patients with early stage FL and may help identify subsets of patients that could benefit from early, aggressive treatment.

  13. Myocardium of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy presents altered expression of genes involved in thyroid hormone biosynthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Gil-Cayuela

    Full Text Available The association between dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM and low thyroid hormone (TH levels has been previously described. In these patients abnormal thyroid function is significantly related to impaired left ventricular (LV function and increased risk of death. Although TH was originally thought to be produced exclusively by the thyroid gland, we recently reported TH biosynthesis in the human ischemic heart.Based on these findings, we evaluated whether the genes required for TH production are also altered in patients with DCM.Twenty-three LV tissue samples were obtained from patients with DCM (n = 13 undergoing heart transplantation and control donors (n = 10, and used for RNA sequencing analysis. The number of LV DCM samples was increased to 23 to determine total T4 and T3 tissue levels by ELISA.We found that all components of TH biosynthesis are expressed in human dilated heart tissue. Expression of genes encoding thyroperoxidase (-2.57-fold, P < 0.05 and dual oxidase 2 (2.64-fold, P < 0.01, the main enzymatic system of TH production, was significantly altered in patients with DCM and significantly associated with LV remodeling parameters. Thyroxine (T4 cardiac tissue levels were significantly increased (P < 0.01, whilst triiodothyronine (T3 levels were significantly diminished (P < 0.05 in the patients.Expression of TH biosynthesis machinery in the heart and total tissue levels of T4 and T3, are altered in patients with DCM. Given the relevance of TH in cardiac pathology, our results provide a basis for new gene-based therapeutic strategies for treating DCM.

  14. Squamous cell carcinoma of the skin with bone involvement in a patient with hereditary dystrophic epidermiolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuebler, W.

    1982-01-01

    A report is given about a patient with a documented case history of hereditary dystrophic epidermiolysis for 43 years. The patient showed the rare malignant mutation resulting from chronic changes of the skin leading to a squamous cell carcinoma of the skin. The tibial bone under the affected skin area was attacked. The X-ray morphological findings of the osteolytic destruction of the tibia resulting in a pathological fracture and the changes in the skin, which are typical for the diesease will be discussed. (orig.)

  15. Ureteral Involvement Within an Incarcerated Inguinal Hernia in a Patient With Crossed-fused Renal Ectopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udit Singhal

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Crossed-fused renal ectopy is an uncommon abnormality of the genitourinary tract that results from errors during embryological development. Ureteral herniation represents another rare anatomic event and can often occur from spontaneous, postoperative, and congenital causes (Allam, Johnson, Grewal & Johnson 2015; Pollack, Popky & Blumberg 1975. Here, we discuss the complex clinical course of a patient with crossed-fused renal ectopia who presents with symptoms due to ureteroinguinal herniation and provide a brief overview of the literature. We highlight the clinical considerations in the management of this patient and provide a potential anatomical and embryological explanation for his presentation.

  16. Sites of extranodal involvement are prognostic in patients with stage 1 follicular lymphoma

    OpenAIRE

    Shastri, Aditi; Janakiram, Murali; Mantzaris, Ioannis; Yu, Yiting; Londono, Jaime S.; Verma, Amit K.; Barta, Stefan K.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Follicular lymphoma (FL) is the most common indolent B cell lymphoma in the United States and a quarter of patients present with stage I disease. The objective of this study was to examine if primary site of disease influences survival in early stage lymphoma. Results The most common extranodal primary sites were the integumentary system (8%), followed by the GI tract (6.4%) and head & neck (5.6%). We stratified patients into a pre-rituximab era (1983-1998) and the rituximab era (1...

  17. CAN TIMI RISK SCORE PREDICT ANGIOGRAPHIC INVOLVEMENT IN PATIENTS WITH ST-ELEVATION MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allahyar Golabchi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In most studies, the agreeable risk scores for ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI consist of thrombolytic in myocardial infarction (TIMI risk score and modified Gensini risk score. Researchers showed significant relations between TIMI with angiography scores in patients with UA/NSTEMI. We studied this relation in patients with STEMI.    METHODS: We studied CCU patients with STEMI hospitalized in several hospitals of Isfahan, Iran from September 2007 to June 2008. Sampling method of 240 patients was random and simple. Exclusion criteria were incomplete history, nonspecific electrocardiogram changes, left bundle branch block and not accomplished angiography or accomplished angiography after 2 months of STEMI. Questionnaire indices collected on the basis of TIMI (0-14 points. Echocardiography and angiography were done and then, we used Gensini (0-400 points to review films of angiography. Spearman`s rank test and Pearson correlation coefficient were used to study the relation between these scores.    RESULTS: One hundred and sixty one patients were male and their average age was 60.02 years. Averages of TIMI and Gensini scores were 6.30 ± 2.5 and 120.77 ± 50.4, respectively. Study showed significant relation between TIMI, age and LVEF (P <0.001, r=-0.46. Also, between Gensini and age, gender and LVEF significant relation was found (P <0.001. But, a meaningful correlation didn’t exist between TIMI and the gender (P =0.08. Our study proved direct relation between TIMI risk scores and modified Gensini scores (P <0.001, r=0.55.     CONCLUSION: We may decide quickly and correctly in emergency room to distinguish which patients with STEMI could derive a benefit from invasive strategies using TIMI score. Also, TIMI risk score can be a good predictor to determine the extension of coronary artery disease in patients with STEMI. As a result, we suggest determination of TIMI score for any patient entered emergency room. Also

  18. Physicians report on patient encounters involving direct-to-consumer advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissman, Joel S; Blumenthal, David; Silk, Alvin J; Newman, Michael; Zapert, Kinga; Leitman, Robert; Feibelmann, Sandra

    2004-01-01

    We surveyed a national sample of 643 physicians on events associated with visits during which patients discussed an advertised drug. Physicians perceived improved communication and education but also thought that direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA) led patients to seek unnecessary treatments. Physicians prescribed the advertised drug in 39 percent of DTCA visits but also recommended lifestyle changes and suggested other treatments. Referring to visits when the DTCA drug was prescribed, 46 percent said that it was the most effective drug, and 48 percent said that others were equally effective. Prescribing DTCA drugs when other effective drugs are available warrants further study.

  19. Spinal motor neuron involvement in a patient with homozygous PRUNE mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacomino, Michele; Fiorillo, Chiara; Torella, Annalaura; Severino, Mariasavina; Broda, Paolo; Romano, Catia; Falsaperla, Raffaele; Pozzolini, Giulia; Minetti, Carlo; Striano, Pasquale; Nigro, Vincenzo; Zara, Federico

    2018-05-01

    In the last few years, whole exome sequencing (WES) allowed the identification of PRUNE mutations in patients featuring a complex neurological phenotype characterized by severe neurodevelopmental delay, microcephaly, epilepsy, optic atrophy, and brain or cerebellar atrophy. We describe an additional patient with homozygous PRUNE mutation who presented with spinal muscular atrophy phenotype, in addition to the already known brain developmental disorder. This novel feature expands the clinical consequences of PRUNE mutations and allow to converge PRUNE syndrome with previous descriptions of neurodevelopmental/neurodegenerative disorders linked to altered microtubule dynamics. Copyright © 2017 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. DISSEMINATED FUNGAL INFECTION WITH ADRENAL INVOLVEMENT: REPORT OF TWO HIV NEGATIVE BRAZILIAN PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graziella Hanna PEREIRA

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Paracoccidioidomycosis and histoplasmosis are systemic fungal infections endemic in Brazil. Disseminated clinical forms are uncommon in immunocompetent individuals. We describe two HIV-negative patients with disseminated fungal infections, paracoccidioidomycosis and histoplasmosis, who were diagnosed by biopsies of suprarenal lesions. Both were treated for a prolonged period with oral antifungal agents, and both showed favorable outcomes.

  1. The Missing Stakeholder Group : Why Patients Should be Involved in Health Economic Modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Voorn, George A K; Vemer, Pepijn; Hamerlijnck, Dominique; Ramos, Isaac Corro; Teunissen, Geertruida J; Al, Maiwenn; Feenstra, Talitha L

    Evaluations of healthcare interventions, e.g. new drugs or other new treatment strategies, commonly include a cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) that is based on the application of health economic (HE) models. As end users, patients are important stakeholders regarding the outcomes of CEAs, yet their

  2. HIV: An Epidemiologic study on Head and Neck Involvement in 50 Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Bakhshaee

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS is a worldwide infection. Because of the vast array of manifestations of AIDS and its many atypical presentations, it is becoming increasingly challenging for clinicians to accurately diagnose new lesions. Materials and Methods: In a descriptive cross-sectional study conducted from 2007 to 2010, 50 patients with a proven human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection were evaluated. Based on the findings of a physical examination and paraclinic tests, HIV signs and symptoms were recorded.   Results: The mean (range age of the patients was 35.45 ±5.24 (5–55 years. Forty-two (84% cases were male and eight were female. The mean duration of carrying the virus was 4.51 ±1.03 years. Oral manifestations were the most common (94%, followed by rhinologic (88%, otologic (66%, and finally neck (44% manifestations.   Conclusion:  Head and neck presentations are very common in HIV patients; therefore otolaryngologists, as the first physicians who may encounter such patients, should be aware of this condition.  

  3. Getting on the same page: Communication, patient involvement and shared understanding of "decisions" in oncology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leppin, Aaron L.; Kunneman, Marleen; Hathaway, Julie; Fernandez, Cara; Montori, Victor M.; Tilburt, Jon C.

    2018-01-01

    BackgroundPatients and clinicians do not often agree on whether a decision has been made about cancer care. This could be explained by factors related to communication quality and/or the type of decision being made. MethodsWe used a self-developed coding scheme to code a random sample of 128

  4. Patients' feelings about ward nursing regimes and involvement in rule construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, J

    2006-10-01

    This study compared two acute psychiatric ward nursing regimes, focusing on ward rules as a means of investigating the relationship between the flexibility/inflexibility of the regimes and patient outcomes. Previous studies identified an association between ward rules and patient aggression. A link between absconding and nurses' attitudes towards rule enforcement has also been explored. However, an in-depth exploration of ward rules from the perspective of nurses and patients had not been undertaken previously. The study aimed to discover the content of rules within acute psychiatric wards; to explore patients' responses to the rules; to evaluate the impact of rules and rule enforcement on nurse-patient relationships and on ward events; and to investigate the relationship between ward rules, ward atmosphere and ward design. The relevance of sociological theory emerged from the data analysis. During this process, the results were moved up to another conceptual level to represent the meaning of lived experience at the level of theory. For example, nurses' descriptions of their feelings in relation to rule enforcement were merged as role ambivalence. This concept was supported by examples from the transcripts. Other possible explanations for the data and the connections between them were checked by returning to each text unit in the cluster and ensuring that it fitted with the emergent theory. The design centred on a comparative interview study of 30 patients and 30 nurses within two acute psychiatric wards in different hospitals. Non-participant observations provided a context for the interview data. Measures of the Ward Atmosphere Scale, the Hospital-Hostel Practices Profile, ward incidents and levels of as required (PRN) medication were obtained. The analysis of the quantitative data was assisted by spss, and the qualitative analysis by QSR *NUDIST. Thematic and interpretative phenomenological methods were used in the analysis of the qualitative data. A series of

  5. Involvement of CD244 in regulating CD4+ T cell immunity in patients with active tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingfen Yang

    Full Text Available CD244 (2B4 is a member of the signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM family of immune cell receptors and it plays an important role in modulating NK cell and CD8(+ T cell immunity. In this study, we investigated the expression and function of CD244/2B4 on CD4(+ T cells from active TB patients and latent infection individuals. Active TB patients had significantly elevated CD244/2B4 expression on M. tuberculosis antigen-specific CD4(+ T cells compared with latent infection individuals. The frequencies of CD244/2B4-expressing antigen-specific CD4(+ T cells were significantly higher in retreatment active TB patients than in new active TB patients. Compared with CD244/2B4-dull and -middle CD4(+ T cells, CD244/2B4-bright CD4(+ T cell subset had significantly reduced expression of IFN-γ, suggesting that CD244/2B4 expression may modulate IFN-γ production in M. tuberculosis antigen-responsive CD4(+ T cells. Activation of CD244/2B4 signaling by cross-linking led to significantly decreased production of IFN-γ. Blockage of CD244/2B4 signaling pathway of T cells from patients with active TB resulted in significantly increased production of IFN-γ, compared with isotype antibody control. In conclusion, CD244/2B4 signaling pathway has an inhibitory role on M. tuberculosis antigen-specific CD4(+ T cell function.

  6. The clinical significance of adjacent rib involvement on MRI in patients with acute osteoporotic compression fractures of the thoracic spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun Joo; Kim, Jae Hyun; Kwon, Kui Hyang; Choi, Deuk Lin; Goo, Dong Erk; Suh, You Sung; Bae, Won Kyung

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the significance of the presence of adjacent rib involvement in osteoporotic compression fractures. All the patients with acute osteoporotic compression fractures of the thoracic spine on thoracic spine MRI that presented to our clinic between September 2003 and January 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. All the vertebrae were divided into two groups: those that showed signal intensity change in the rib adjacent to the compression fracture and those that did not. We compared the results between the two groups to determine if there were differences in the degree of osteoporosis, the compression fracture level and the age of patients between the two groups. We calculated the degree of correlation between the MRI and the bone scan images of these patients. We also reviewed whether percutaneous vertebroplasty relieved symptoms or not. Signal intensity changes were found in the adjacent rib(s) in 12 of the 60 patients and in 14 of the 94 levels (the total number of levels). The MRI and bone scan showed significant correlation (p < 0.001). There was a statistically significant difference in the incidence of pain at the one month outpatient follow up between the two groups (p = 0.0215). The radiologist should comment on the presence or absence of adjacent rib involvement when reporting on the thoracic spine MRI of patients suffering from osteoporotic compression fractures in order to more accurately determine prognosis

  7. The clinical significance of adjacent rib involvement on MRI in patients with acute osteoporotic compression fractures of the thoracic spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Joo; Kim, Jae Hyun; Kwon, Kui Hyang; Choi, Deuk Lin; Goo, Dong Erk; Suh, You Sung [Soonchunhyang Univ. Seoul Hospital/Soonchunhyang Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Won Kyung [Soonchunhyang Univ. Cheonan Hospital/Soonchunhyang Univ. College of Medicine, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the significance of the presence of adjacent rib involvement in osteoporotic compression fractures. All the patients with acute osteoporotic compression fractures of the thoracic spine on thoracic spine MRI that presented to our clinic between September 2003 and January 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. All the vertebrae were divided into two groups: those that showed signal intensity change in the rib adjacent to the compression fracture and those that did not. We compared the results between the two groups to determine if there were differences in the degree of osteoporosis, the compression fracture level and the age of patients between the two groups. We calculated the degree of correlation between the MRI and the bone scan images of these patients. We also reviewed whether percutaneous vertebroplasty relieved symptoms or not. Signal intensity changes were found in the adjacent rib(s) in 12 of the 60 patients and in 14 of the 94 levels (the total number of levels). The MRI and bone scan showed significant correlation (p < 0.001). There was a statistically significant difference in the incidence of pain at the one month outpatient follow up between the two groups (p = 0.0215). The radiologist should comment on the presence or absence of adjacent rib involvement when reporting on the thoracic spine MRI of patients suffering from osteoporotic compression fractures in order to more accurately determine prognosis.

  8. Patients with low back pain differ from those who also have leg pain or signs of nerve root involvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsted, Alice; Kent, Peter; Albert, Hanne

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Leg pain associated with low back pain (LBP) is recognized as a risk factor for a poor prognosis, and is included as a component in most LBP classification systems. The location of leg pain relative to the knee and the presence of a positive straight leg raise test have been...... only, 2) LBP and pain above the knee, 3) LBP and pain below the knee, and 4) LBP and signs of nerve root involvement. METHODS: Analysis of routine clinical data from an outpatient department. Based on patient reported data and clinical findings, patients were allocated to the QTF subgroups...

  9. Inhomogeneous dose escalation increases expected local control for NSCLC patients with lymph node involvement without increased mean lung dose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Tine B; Hansen, Olfred; Schytte, Tine

    2014-01-01

    in mediastinum, and the thorax wall. The dose was escalated using a TCP model implemented into the planning system. The difference in TCP values between the homogeneous and inhomogeneous plans were evaluated using two different TCP models. RESULTS: Dose escalation was possible for all patients. TCP values based...... to the mediastinum were observed: 2.5 Gy for aorta, 4.4 Gy for the connective tissue, 1.6 Gy for the heart, and 2.6 Gy for trachea + bronchi. CONCLUSION: Increased target doses and TCP values using inhomogeneous dose distributions could be achieved for all patients, regardless of lymph node involvement, tumour stage...

  10. The usefulness of bone and bone-marrow scintigraphy in the detection of bone involvement in patients with multiple myeloma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsuka, Nobuaki; Fukunaga, Masao; Sone, Teruki

    1986-01-01

    We used a combination of bone and bone-marrow scintigraphy to evaluate bone involvement in 15 patients with multiple myeloma (7 in untreated group and 8 in chemotherapy group). Of the 3 cases in untreated group whose 99m Tc-methylene diphosphonate (MDP) bone scans showed no abnormality, one had abnormal 99m Tc-suffer colloid bone-marrow scintigraphy. In other 4 cases of untreated group whose bone scan showed cold defects, bone-marrow scintigraphy delineated clearly the areas of tumor-cell invasion. On the other hand, in all chemotherapy cases, multiple hot spots were observed on bone scintigram, but on bone-marrow scintigram abnormalities were not recognized. In conclusion, the combination scintigraphy of bone and bone-marrow was a useful method in evluating bone involvement in patients with multiple myeloma. (author)

  11. Classification of the pattern of pulmonary involvement by computed tomography in patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Jiro; Nagai, Masami; Nakamura, Hiroyuki

    1990-01-01

    The diagnostic value of computed tomography (CT) was assessed in 17 patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. CT was performed to evaluate the localization and types of pulmonary involvement caused by non-Hodgin's lymphoma. Using CT, it was possible to classify types of pulmonary involvements as hilar and/or mediastinum-nodular (13 cases), hilar and/or mediastinum-diffuse (4 cases), pleural effusion (5 cases), parenchymal-diffuse (1 case), and parenchymal-tumor (1 case). The pattern of hilar and/or mediastinum-diffuse seemed to be specific for lymphoblastic lymphoma. CT is useful to distinguish hilar and/or mediastinum-nodular to hilar and/or mediastinum-diffuse, and to provide better definition of the specific anatomic location of pulmonary involvements. (author)

  12. Development of Prescription Drug Information Leaflets: Impact of Cognitive Effort and Patient Involvement on Prescription Medication Information Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Harshali K; Bapat, Shweta S; Bhansali, Archita H; Sansgiry, Sujit S

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a one-page (1-page) prescription drug information leaflet (PILs) and assess their impact on the information processing variables, across 2 levels of patient involvement. One-page PILs were developed using cognitive principles to lower mental effort and improve comprehension. An experimental, 3 × 2 repeated measures study was conducted to determine the impact of cognitive effort, manipulated using leaflet type on comprehension across 2 levels (high/low) of patient involvement. Adults (≥18 years) in a university setting in Houston were recruited for the study. Each participant was exposed to 3 different types of prescription drug information leaflet (the current practice, preexisting 1-page text-only, and 1-page PILs) for the 3 drugs (Celebrex, Ventolin HFA, Prezista) for a given involvement scenario. A prevalidated survey instrument was used to measure product knowledge, attitude toward leaflet, and intention to read. Multivariate analysis of variance indicated significant positive effect of cognitive effort, involvement, and their interaction effect across all measured variables. Mean scores for product knowledge, attitude toward leaflet, and intention to read were highest for PILs ( P information processing for consumers by reducing their cognitive effort.

  13. Neurological soft signs in psychoses. II: an explorative study of structural involvement amongst drug naive first episode patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranjal Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aims and objective of the study was to find out the different structural involvement in the three study groups, namely brief psychotic disorder, schizophreniform psychosis, and schizophrenia as reflected by the neurological soft signs (NSS. Material and methods: The study was conducted in the Department of Psychiatry, Silchar Medical College and Hospital, Silchar, Cachar, Assam. In this study, we had further classified the soft signs into groups related to their corresponding brain structures as per the aims and objectives. Results: Our study consisted of 30 patients distributed into three case groups, namely brief psychotic disorder having 14 cases, schizophrenia having 12 cases, and only four cases in the schizophreniform group. We have made a novel attempt to establish a functional relationship between the structural involvement and the three groups of disorders under study through the evaluation of NSS at the onset of symptoms, which at times may not be possible to diagnose through currently available radio-imaging techniques. We have definitely found a predominant involvement of the cerebellum in the brief psychotic disorder and schizophrenia groups, and the involvement of parietal lobe in the schizophreniform psychosis group; although the results were not statistically significant. Conclusion: We hope that in future larger studies with more number of patients will shed definite lights in the present study findings.

  14. Prognostic impact of the level of nodal involvement: retrospective analysis of patients with advanced oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, R; Nakayama, H; Semba, A; Hiraki, A; Nagata, M; Kawahara, K; Shiraishi, S; Hirai, T; Uozumi, H; Yamashita, Y

    2017-01-01

    We retrospectively evaluated the prognostic impact of the level of nodal involvement in patients with advanced oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Between 2005 and 2010, 105 patients with clinical stage III or IV oral SCC had chemoradiotherapy preoperatively. Clinical (cN) and pathological nodal (pN) involvement was primarily at levels Ib and II. We defined nodal involvement at levels Ia and III-V as anterior and inferior extensions, respectively, and recorded such findings as extensive. With respect to pretreatment variables (age, clinical stage, clinical findings of the primary tumour, and nodal findings), univariate analysis showed that extensive cN was the only significant factor for overall survival (hazard ratio [HR], 3.27; 95% CI 1.50 to 7.13; p=0.001). Univariate analysis showed that all pN findings, including the nodal classification (invaded nodes, multiple, and contralateral) and extensive involvement were significant, and multivariate analysis confirmed that extensive pN (HR 4.71; 95% CI 1.85 to 11.97; p=0.001) and multiple pN (HR 2.59; 95% CI 1.10 to 6.09; p=0.029) were independent predictors of overall survival. Assessment based on the level of invaded neck nodes may be a better predictor of survival than the current nodal classification. Copyright © 2016 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The drug taking and the treatment in patients that are involved in illegal activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Sanabria Carretero

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available The study focuses on the assessment of the implications that criminal behavior has, not only at the start of treatment for drug taking but also during its development and results. With this aim in mind a sample of 209 patients who had applied for treatment were selected and assessed inthe principal object areas of analysis over a period of ayear anda half at six monthly intervals.The results indicate that time spent in a therapeutic centre significantly reduces criminal behaviour. However, those patients with a greater past history present more difficulties and give a poorer initial response, although during the period of follow-up these differences tend to disappear.

  16. An Industry Perspective on Canadian Patients' Involvement in Medical Tourism: Implications for Public Health

    OpenAIRE

    Johnston, Rory; Crooks, Valorie A.; Adams, Krystyna; Kingsbury, Paul; Snyder, Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The medical tourism industry, which assists patients with accessing non-emergency medical care abroad, has grown rapidly in recent years. A lack of reliable data about medical tourism makes it difficult to create policy, health system, and public health responses to address the associated risks and shortcomings, such as spread of infectious diseases, associated with this industry. This article addresses this knowledge gap by analyzing interviews conducted with Canadian med...

  17. Simultaneous involvement of third and sixth cranial nerve in a patient with Lyme disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lell, M.; Schmid, A.; Tomandl, B.F. [Division of Neuroradiology, Department of Neurosurgery, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Schwabachanlage 6, 91054, Erlangen (Germany); Stemper, B.; Maihoefner, C.; Heckmann, J.G. [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Schwabachanlage 6, 91054, Erlangen (Germany)

    2003-02-01

    We report a 57-year-old woman with neuroborreliosis presenting with headache, shoulder muscle pain and double vision. MRI demonstrated enhancement of the right third and sixth cranial nerves. A 3D MP-RAGE sequence was used to perform multiplanar reformations to show this more graphically. The patient was free of symptoms 1 month after completion of therapy, when thickening and contrast enhancement of the nerves were less pronounced. (orig.)

  18. Simultaneous involvement of third and sixth cranial nerve in a patient with Lyme disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lell, M.; Schmid, A.; Tomandl, B.F.; Stemper, B.; Maihoefner, C.; Heckmann, J.G.

    2003-01-01

    We report a 57-year-old woman with neuroborreliosis presenting with headache, shoulder muscle pain and double vision. MRI demonstrated enhancement of the right third and sixth cranial nerves. A 3D MP-RAGE sequence was used to perform multiplanar reformations to show this more graphically. The patient was free of symptoms 1 month after completion of therapy, when thickening and contrast enhancement of the nerves were less pronounced. (orig.)

  19. [Multiple digestive involvement in visceral leishmaniasis in a patient with HIV infection: favourable course with itraconazole].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béchade, D; Seurat, L; Discamps, G; Tanière, P H; Du Bourguet, F

    1996-01-01

    We report a case of visceral leishmaniasis due to Leishmania infantum in a 35 year-old patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome who complained of chronic diarrhea. Biopsy specimens of gastric and duodenal mucosa and bone marrow aspirate led to the diagnosis. Enterocytozoon bieneusi, fortuitously found in the duodenal mucosa, did not seem to be the causative agent of diarrhea in this case, but its association with visceral leishmaniasis is rare. A treatment with itraconazole brought about a sustained clinical remission.

  20. Temporomandibular joint involvement in rheumatoid arthritis patients: association between clinical and tomographic data

    OpenAIRE

    Cordeiro, Patrícia C. F; Guimaraes, Josemar P; de Souza, Viviane A; Dias, Isabela M; Silva, Jesca N. N; Devito, Karina L; Bonato, Leticia L

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease characterized by chronic inflammation and synovial hyperplasia, which usually affects multiple joints. The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) becomes susceptible to the development of changes resulting from RA. The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of TMD and degenerative bone changes in TMJ in patients diagnosed with RA (rheumatoid arthritis). The Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/ TMD) questio...

  1. Helical tomotherapy for extramedullary hematopoiesis involving the pericardium in a patient with chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toms, Daniel R; Cannick, Leander; Stuart, Robert K; Jenrette, Joseph M; Terwiliger, Lacy

    2010-07-01

    Extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH) refers to the development of foci of hematopoiesis outside its normal location in the bone marrow. This occurs normally during fetal development but is abnormal postpartum. The most common sites of EMH are the spleen and liver. The phenomenon occurs in a number of disease states, notably in myelofibrosis, thalassemia, immune thrombocytopenic purpura, sickle cell anemia, polycythemia vera, and myelodysplastic syndrome. Affected patients often develop symptoms related to the location of the EMH. Reported treatments include red blood cell transfusions, surgical excision, decompressive laminectomy in cases of cord compression, chemotherapy, and irradiation. Radiation therapy is highly effective for treating hematopoietic tissue because such tissues are extremely radiosensitive. Megavoltage helical tomotherapy is a technical advance in the delivery of radiation therapy, allowing more conformal and precise treatments. The present case report describes a patient with the diagnosis of atypical chronic myeloid leukemia and myelofibrosis who subsequently developed EMH of the pericardium with effusion and tamponade. By utilizing tomotherapy we were able to treat the pericardium while sparing much of the myocardium. The patient tolerated treatment well without acute adverse effects. His symptoms were alleviated, but he died approximately 1 year later.

  2. Identification of novel target genes involved in Indian Fanconi anemia patients using microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyamsunder, Pavithra; Ganesh, Kripa S; Vidyasekar, Prasanna; Mohan, Sheila; Verma, Rama Shanker

    2013-12-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetic disorder characterized by progressive bone marrow failure and a predisposition to cancers. Mutations have been documented in 15 FA genes that participate in the FA-BRCA DNA repair pathway, a fundamental pathway in the development of the disease and the presentation of its characteristic symptoms. Certain symptoms such as oxygen sensitivity, hematological abnormalities and impaired immunity suggest that FA proteins could participate in or independently control other pathways as well. In this study, we identified 9 DNA repair genes that were down regulated in a genome wide analysis of 6 Indian Fanconi anemia patients. Functional clustering of a total of 233 dysregulated genes identified key biological processes that included regulation of transcription, DNA repair, cell cycle and chromosomal organization. Microarray data revealed the down regulation of ATXN3, ARID4A and ETS-1, which were validated by RTPCR in a subsequent sample set of 9 Indian FA patients. Here we report for the first time a gene expression profile of Fanconi anemia patients from the Indian population and a pool of genes that might aid in the acquisition and progression of the FA phenotype. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. From the best results of medical research to therapy involving the context of an individual patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata K. Szerla

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Contextualisation is the process of identifying specific factors of a patient’s life situation, which is focused on individualised care. In the light of reference books, contextualisation is an integral part of therapy with an active participation of the patient and/or his/her carers. Among many factors that constitute the functioning of a person, family and socio-material situation, access to professional health care, and the ability to exercise self-care are major contextual factors of the patient’s health situation. The purpose of this article is to draw attention to the fact that the limiting oneself exclusively to algorithms as procedures based on the best evidence (best evidence medical research – BEMR may raise the specific danger of underestimating the variability of individual responses of the human body under the influence of factors forming a personal context. The phenomenon of contextualisation in the treatment of an individual patient is still not adequately disseminated, although it is an important element in the decision-making process, with proven impact on the efficiency and quality of care and satisfaction of a patient.

  4. Involvement of the thoracic duct in liver cirrhosis patients with ascites. Using MR lymphography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuboyama, Shin-ichi; Ishii, Kunihide; Koga, Hiroyuki

    2003-01-01

    To elucidate whether the morphological changes of the thoracic duct are observed in patients with liver cirrhosis and ascites, the thoracic duct was examined at magnetic resonance (MR) lymphography without contrast agent. In 7 healthy volunteers, the thoracic duct was clearly visualized as an intermittent or continuous straight line along the thoracic aorta (its mean diameter was 3.9 mm). In 20 liver cirrhosis without ascites, its mean diameter was 3.6 mm. In 6 liver cirrhosis with refractory ascites, the thoracic duct was visualized as straight or slightly tortuous and slender line (its mean diameter was 2.5 mm). On the other hand, 7 cases with ascites which respond well to the administration of diuretics showed tortuous and dilated thoracic duct (its mean diameter was 4.3 mm). In cases with refractory ascites, mean diameter of the thoracic duct was significantly reduced, compared with the cases without ascites and with ascites that respond well to the administration of diuretics. Thus, it was found that the morphological differences of the thoracic duct depend on the response to the diuretics in liver cirrhosis patients with ascites. To elucidate whether the morphological changes of the thoracic duct are observed in patients with liver cirrhosis and ascites, the thoracic duct was examined at magnetic resonance lymphography without contrast agent. In cases with refractory ascites, mean diameter of the thoracic duct was significantly reduced, compared with the cases without ascites and with ascites that respond well to the administration of diuretics. (author)

  5. Tumour-associated osteomalacia and hypoglycaemia in a patient with prostate cancer: is Klotho involved?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latifyan, Sofiya Bedo; Vanhaeverbeek, Michel; Klastersky, Jean

    2014-11-17

    Tumour-associated osteomalacia is a paraneoplastic syndrome caused by renal phosphate wasting, leading to severe hypophosphataemia. Excess of circulating fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) is the likely cause, acting via the FGF23/α-Klotho coreceptor, a critical regulator of phosphate metabolism. The other possible effects of that complex in humans are still under investigation. We present a case of an 84-year-old Belgian man, presenting prostate cancer with bone metastases. From June 2010 to March 2013, he presented three episodes of disease progression. From January 2012, the patient developed a progressively marked dorsal kyphosis with significant hypophosphataemia. The calculated TRP (tubular reabsorption of phosphate) was decreased and the FGF23 increased. Mid-March 2013, the patient died after a profound unconsciousness due to hypoglycaemia with hypothermia. We hypothesised that the two paraneoplastic manifestations of this patient (tumour-associated osteomalacia and refractory hypoglycaemia) were due to one cause chain with two main nodes-FGF23 and its coreceptor Klotho.. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  6. OPTION(5) versus OPTION(12) instruments to appreciate the extent to which healthcare providers involve patients in decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubenrouch, Fabienne E; Pieterse, Arwen H; Falkenberg, Rijan; Santema, T Katrien B; Stiggelbout, Anne M; van der Weijden, Trudy; Aarts, J Annemijn W M; Ubbink, Dirk T

    2016-06-01

    The 12-item "observing patient involvement" (OPTION(12))-instrument is commonly used to assess the extent to which healthcare providers involve patients in health-related decision-making. The five-item version (OPTION(5)) claims to be a more efficient measure. In this study we compared the Dutch versions of the OPTION-instruments in terms of inter-rater agreement and correlation in outpatient doctor-patient consultations in various settings, to learn if we can safely switch to the shorter OPTION(5)-instrument. Two raters coded 60 audiotaped vascular surgery and oncology patient consultations using OPTION(12) and OPTION(5). Unweighted Cohen's kappa was used to compute inter-rater agreement on item-level. The association between the total scores of the two OPTION-instruments was investigated using Pearson's correlation coefficient (r) and a Bland & Altman plot. After fine-tuning the OPTION-manuals, inter-rater agreement for OPTION(12) and OPTION(5) was good to excellent (kappa range 0.69-0.85 and 0.63-0.72, respectively). Mean total scores were 23.7 (OPTION(12); SD=7.8) and 39.3 (OPTION(5); SD=12.7). Correlation between the total scores was high (r=0.71; p=0.01). OPTION(5) scored systematically higher with a wider range than OPTION(12). Both OPTION-instruments had a good inter-rater agreement and correlated well. OPTION(5) seems to differentiate better between various levels of patient involvement. The OPTION(5)-instrument is recommended for clinical application. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Learning to care: medical students’ reported value and evaluation of palliative care teaching involving meeting patients and reflective writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica Borgstrom

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over recent years there has been an increase in teaching of both palliative care and reflective practice in UK medical schools. The palliative care teaching at the University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine is multi-faceted and involves students writing reflective essays after individually meeting patients approaching the end of life during their final year general practice and hospital medicine placements. This paper draws on two studies examining this teaching element to analyse what the students found valuable about it and to comment on the practice of meeting patients and subsequent reflective writing. Methods Two studies have explored students’ perceptions of these course components. The first was a thematic analysis of 234 reflective essays from 123 students written in 2007-2008, including examining what students wrote about the exercise itself. The second project involved a semi-structured questionnaire that students completed anonymously; this paper reports on the free text elements of that study [sample size =107]. Since similar themes were found in both studies, the coding structures from each project were compared and combined, enabling triangulation of the findings around what the students found valuable from the palliative care teaching involving meeting patients and reflective writing. Results Overall, students reported that these components of the palliative care teaching are valuable. Four main themes were identified as aspects that students valued: (1 dedicated time with patients, (2 learning about wider elements of treatment and holistic care, (3 practicing communication skills, and (4 learning about themselves through reflective writing. Some students expressed a dislike for having to formally write a reflective essay. Conclusion It is possible to arrange for all of the medical students to individually meet at least two patients receiving palliative or end of life care. Students found these

  8. Fractionated stereotactic radiosurgery for patients with skull base metastases from systemic cancer involving the anterior visual pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minniti, Giuseppe; Osti, Mattia Falchetto; Maurizi Enrici, Riccardo; Esposito, Vincenzo; Clarke, Enrico; Scaringi, Claudia; Bozzao, Alessandro; Falco, Teresa; De Sanctis, Vitaliana; Enrici, Maurizio Maurizi; Valeriani, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the tumor control, survival outcomes, and toxicity after stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for skull base metastases from systemic cancer involving the anterior visual pathway. We have analyzed 34 patients (23 females and 11 males, median age 59 years) who underwent multi-fraction SRS for a skull base metastasis compressing or in close proximity of optic nerves and chiasm. All metastases were treated with frameless LINAC-based multi-fraction SRS in 5 daily fractions of 5 Gy each. Local control, distant failure, and overall survival were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method calculated from the time of SRS. Prognostic variables were assessed using log-rank and Cox regression analyses. At a median follow-up of 13 months (range, 2–36.5 months), twenty-five patients had died and 9 were alive. The 1-year and 2-year local control rates were 89% and 72%, and respective actuarial survival rates were 63% and 30%. Four patients recurred with a median time to progression of 12 months (range, 6–27 months), and 17 patients had new brain metastases at distant brain sites. The 1-year and 2-year distant failure rates were 50% and 77%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, a Karnofsky performance status (KPS) >70 and the absence of extracranial metastases were prognostic factors associated with lower distant failure rates and longer survival. After multi-fraction SRS, 15 (51%) out of 29 patients had a clinical improvement of their preexisting cranial deficits. No patients developed radiation-induced optic neuropathy during the follow-up. Multi-fraction SRS (5 x 5 Gy) is a safe treatment option associated with good local control and improved cranial nerve symptoms for patients with a skull base metastasis involving the anterior visual pathway

  9. Painful tonic spasms and brainstem involvement in a patient with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman-Filip, Corina; Ungureanu, Aurelian; Cernuşcă-Miţaru, Mihaela

    2016-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an inflammatory-demyelinating disease of the central nervous system classically characterized by optic neuritis and severe myelitis. New diagnostic criteria defined neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder as limited forms of NMO or diverse neurologic presentations in the presence of specific antiaquaporin-4 antibodies. We report the case of a 57-year-old woman admitted in our department for recurrent attacks of optic neuritis, tetraparesis with severe painful tonic spasms of the left limbs and brainstem involvement. Painful tonic spasms have been described as movement disorders associated with multiple sclerosis, but a growing number of reports describe them in cases of NMO. Copyright © 2015 Polish Neurological Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  10. Patient involvement in the decision-making process improves satisfaction and quality of life in postmastectomy breast reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Azra A; Colakoglu, Salih; Nguyen, John T; Anastasopulos, Alexandra J; Ibrahim, Ahmed M S; Yueh, Janet H; Lin, Samuel J; Tobias, Adam M; Lee, Bernard T

    2013-09-01

    The patient-physician relationship has evolved from the paternalistic, physician-dominant model to the shared-decision-making and informed-consumerist model. The level of patient involvement in this decision-making process can potentially influence patient satisfaction and quality of life. In this study, patient-physician decision models are evaluated in patients undergoing postmastectomy breast reconstruction. All women who underwent breast reconstruction at an academic hospital from 1999-2007 were identified. Patients meeting inclusion criteria were mailed questionnaires at a minimum of 1 y postoperatively with questions about decision making, satisfaction, and quality of life. There were 707 women eligible for our study and 465 completed surveys (68% response rate). Patients were divided into one of three groups: paternalistic (n = 18), informed-consumerist (n = 307), shared (n = 140). There were differences in overall general satisfaction (P = 0.034), specifically comparing the informed group to the paternalistic group (66.7% versus 38.9%, P = 0.020) and the shared to the paternalistic group (69.3% versus 38.9%, P = 0.016). There were no differences in aesthetic satisfaction. There were differences found in the SF-12 physical component summary score across all groups (P = 0.033), and a difference was found between the informed and paternalistic groups (P mental component score (P = 0.42). Women undergoing breast reconstruction predominantly used the informed model of decision making. Patients who adopted a more active role, whether using an informed or shared approach, had higher general patient satisfaction and physical component summary scores compared with patients whose decision making was paternalistic. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Vimentin may reflect areas of pathologic involvement in biopsies from patients with autoimmune skin diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Abreu Velez

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Autoimmune bullous skin diseases (ABDs represent a group of disorders of the skin and mucosa commonly associated with deposits of immunoglobulins, complement and fibrinogen, and usually directed against distinct adhesion molecules. After studing these diseases for many years, we noted alterations not only between the cells junctions of the epidermis and/or the dermal/epidermal junction, but also in dermal skin appendageal structures and in mesenchymal tissue around the blisters. Based on our findings, we wanted to determine if the observed patterns of autoimmunity correlated with cutaneous vimentin expression. Materials and Methods: Archival biopsies previously diagnosed with ABDs by clinical, hematoxylin and eosin (H&E and direct and/or immunofluorescence data were stained with antibodies directed against vimentin via immunohistochemistry (IHC. We tested 30 patients affected by endemic pemphigus, 30 controls from the endemic area, and 15 normal controls. We also tested 30 biopsies from patients with bullous pemphigoid (BP, 20 with pemphigus vulgaris (PV, 8 with pemphigus foliaceus, 14 with dermatitis herpetiformis (DH and 3 with Senear-Usher syndrome. Results: The H&E, DIF and vimentin patterns of positivity in the different ABDs confirmed that vimentin was compartmentalized around areas of dermal inflammation, around skin appendages and in epidermal, dermal and mesenchymal cell junction areas. Conclusion: Vimentin may be a useful tool for highlighting patterns of microenvironmental tissue alteration in multiple ABDs. The vimentin staining pattern observed was analogous to that we have previously described for proteases and protease inhibitors in patients affected by ABDs, expanding the concept that the autoimmune process extends beyond cell junctions.

  12. Social involvement issues in patients with Becker muscular dystrophy: A questionnaire survey of subjects from a patient registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori-Yoshimura, Madoka; Mizuno, Yukio; Yoshida, Sumiko; Minami, Narihiro; Yonemoto, Naohiro; Takeuchi, Fumi; Nishino, Ichizo; Murata, Miho; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Takahashi, Yuji; Kimura, En

    2018-04-01

    Little is known about the relationship between Becker Muscular Dystrophy (BMD) and developmental problems, school life, employment, and mental problems. We aimed to clarify whether BMD is a risk factor for developmental disorders, problematic behavior, psychiatric diseases, and other social difficulties in school life and employment. Adults with genetically or immunohistochemically confirmed BMD from the Registry of Muscular Dystrophy in Japan (REMUDY) were asked to complete a questionnaire regarding patient history, school life, employment, and mental problems. In total, 125 (68.3%) of 183 participants with BMD (median age, 37.2 years) completed the questionnaire. Of these, ten had developmental disorders (mental retardation, autism, and speech disturbance). Fifty-eight (44%) experienced bullying in school, and 39 felt the reason for bullying was physical handicap. Sixteen participants experienced problematic behavior such as cutting class, domestic violence, violent incidents, suicide attempts, or self-mutilation. Employment histories were noted by 92 (73%), of whom 15 could not continue to work due to physical handicaps. Fifteen participants had psychiatric disorders, with 5, 3 and 1 having neurosis, depression, and bipolar disorder, respectively. The other 6 participants with psychiatric disorders did not specify their diagnoses. Patients carrying a Dp140 expression change had significantly more incidences of developmental disorders, but not bullying, problematic behavior, workplace difficulties, or psychiatric disorders. Patients with BMD risk bullying and workplace difficulties, as well as developing psychiatric disorders. Parents, teachers, and supporters should be mindful of the daily environment of BMD patients and provide support to help them cope with stress. Copyright © 2017 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Improving Patient Involvement in the Drug Development Process: Case Study of Potential Applications from an Online Peer Support Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Amrutha; Brandwood, Helen Jane; Jameson Evans, Matt

    2017-11-01

    To date, social media has been used predominantly by the pharmaceutical industry to market products and to gather feedback and comments on products from consumers, a process termed social listening. However, social media has only been used cautiously in the drug development cycle, mainly because of regulations, restrictions on engagement with patients, or a lack of guidelines for social media use from regulatory bodies. Despite this cautious approach, there is a clear drive, from both the industry and consumers, for increased patient participation in various stages of the drug development process. The authors use the example of HealthUnlocked, one of the world's largest health networks, to illustrate the potential applications of online health communities as a means of increasing patient involvement at various stages of the drug development process. Having identified the willingness of the user population to be involved in research, numerous ways to engage users on the platform have been identified and explored. This commentary describes some of these approaches and reports how online health networks that encourage people to share their experiences in managing their health can, in turn, enable rapid patient engagement for clinical research within the constraints of industry regulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Laryngeal and phrenic nerve involvement in a patient with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortese, A; Piccolo, G; Lozza, A; Schreiber, A; Callegari, I; Moglia, A; Alfonsi, E; Pareyson, D

    2016-07-01

    Lower cranial and phrenic nerve involvement is exceptional in hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP). Here we report the occurrence of reversible laryngeal and phrenic nerve involvement in a patient with HNPP. The patient recalled several episodes of reversible weakness and numbness of his feet and hands since the age of 30 years. His medical history was uneventful, apart from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). At age 44, following severe weight loss, he presented with progressive dysphonia and hoarseness. EMG of cricoarytenoid and thyroarytenoid muscles and laryngeal fibroscopy confirmed vocal cord paralysis. These speech disturbances gradually regressed. Two years later, he reported rapidly worsening dyspnea. Electroneurography showed increased distal latency of the right phrenic nerve and diaphragm ultrasonography documented reduced right hemi-diaphragm excursion. Six months later and after optimization of CODP treatment, his respiratory function had improved and both phrenic nerve conduction and diaphragm excursion were completely restored. We hypothesize that chronic cough and nerve stretching in the context of CODP, together with severe weight loss, may have triggered the nerve paralysis in this patient. Our report highlights the need for optimal management of comorbidities such as CODP as well as careful control of weight in HNPP patients to avoid potentially harmful complications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Online social networks for patient involvement and recruitment in clinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Gemma Sinead

    2013-01-01

    To review current literature and discuss the potential of online social networking to engage patients and the public and recruit and retain participants in clinical research. Online social networking is becoming a large influence on people's daily lives. Clinical research faces several challenges, with an increasing need to engage with patients and the public and for studies to recruit and retain increasing numbers of participants, particularly in under-served, under-represented and hard to reach groups and communities. Searches were conducted using EMBASE, BNI, ERIC, CINAHL, PSYCHinfo online databases and Google Scholar to identify any grey or unpublished literature that may be available. Review methods This is a methodology paper. Online social networking is a successful, cost-effective and efficient method by which to target and recruit a wide range of communities, adolescents, young people and underserved populations into quantitative and qualitative research. Retention of participants in longitudinal studies could be improved using social networks such as Facebook. Evidence indicates that a mixed approach to recruitment using social networking and traditional methods is most effective. Further research is required to strengthen the evidence available, especially in dissemination of research through online social networks. Researchers should consider using online social networking as a method of engaging the public, and also for the recruitment and follow up of participants.

  16. Brain american trypanosomiasis: chagoma with involvement of the corpus callosum in a patient with aids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, Sonia; Sanz Margarita M; Aponte Milena

    2009-01-01

    Chagas's disease affects 7% of the Colombian population and is an uncommonly diagnosed disease due to its non-specific symptoms. In the acute phase of the disease, direct invasion of the brain can be present, with acute eningoencephalitis. In the chronic phase, there can be a residual meningoencephalitis or ischemic events related to cardiomyopathy. In acute reactivation,there is parasitaemia due to an immunosuppressed state with necrotizing meningoencephalitis and formation of cerebral masses, also called chagomas. There are no pathognomonic findings for chagomas, which consist of solitary or multiple nodular lesions, located in the white matter,basal ganglia, corpus callosum, cerebellum, brainstem or spinal cord. They present an irregular and peripheral gadolinium enhancement pattern. The main differential diagnoses include Toxoplasma gondii infection and neoplasms. This article presents a case of a 74-year-old female HIV + patient,with progressive walking impairment, presented with a corpus callosum and left periventricular white matter mass on MRI. The histological study revealed amastigotes. She had positive serum titles for Trypanosoma cruzi, confirming the diagnosis of a chagoma in a patient with AIDS.

  17. A Meta-analytic Review of Religious or Spiritual Involvement and Social Health among Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Allen C; Merluzzi, Thomas V; Pustejovsky, James E; Park, Crystal L; George, Login; Fitchett, George; Jim, Heather SL; Munoz, Alexis R; Danhauer, Suzanne C; Snyder, Mallory A; Salsman, John M

    2015-01-01

    Background Religion and spirituality (R/S) play an important role in the daily lives of many cancer patients. There has been great interest in determining whether R/S factors are related to clinically-relevant health outcomes. This meta-analytic review examined associations between dimensions of R/S and social health (e.g., social roles and relationships). Methods A systematic search of PubMed, PsycInfo, Cochrane Library, and CINAHL databases was conducted, and data were extracted by four pairs of investigators. Bivariate associations between specific R/S dimensions and social health outcomes were examined in a meta-analysis using a generalized estimating equation (GEE) approach. Results A total of 78 independent samples encompassing 14,277 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Social health was significantly associated with overall R/S (Fisher z effect size = .20, Pcancer. Further research is needed to examine the temporal nature of these associations and the mechanisms that underlie them. PMID:26258730

  18. Real time Monte Carlo simulation for evaluation of patient doses involved in radiological examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fulea, D.; Cosma, C.

    2006-01-01

    In order to apply the Monte Carlo simulation technique for usual radiological examinations we developed a Pc program, 'IradMed', written entirely in Java. The main purpose of this program is to compute the organ doses and the effective dose of patients, which are exposed at a X-ray beam having photon energies in 10 to 150 keV radiodiagnostic range. Three major radiological procedures are considered, namely mammography, radiography and CT. The fluoroscopy implies an irregular geometry and therefore it is neglected. Nevertheless, a gross estimation of patient doses can be made taking into account the fluoroscopy as being composed of several radiographic examinations applied in different anatomical regions. The interactions between radiation and matter are well-known, and the accuracy of the calculation is limited by the accuracy of the anatomical model used to describe actual patients and by characterisation of the radiation field applied. In this version of IradMed, it is assumed that the absorbed dose is equal with kerma for all tissues. No procedure has been used to take account of the finite range of the secondary electrons that are produced by photoelectric or Compton interactions. These ranges are small compared with the dimensions of the organs, and the absorbed dose will not change abruptly with distance except at boundary where composition and density change. However these boundary effects would have little effect in the determination of the average doses to almost all organs, except the active bone marrow which is treated separately. Another justification for this kerma approximation is the fact that the sum of all electron energies that exit the organ is statistically equal with the sum of all electron energies that enter in that particular organ. In this version of program, it is considered the following interactions: the Rayleigh scattering, the Compton scattering and the photoelectric effect. The Compton scattering is modeled by several methods which

  19. Real time Monte Carlo simulation for evaluation of patient doses involved in radiological examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fulea, D [Institute of Public Health ' Prof.Dr.Iuliu Moldovan' , Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Cosma, C [Babes-Bolyai Univ., Faculty of Physics, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2006-07-01

    In order to apply the Monte Carlo simulation technique for usual radiological examinations we developed a Pc program, 'IradMed', written entirely in Java. The main purpose of this program is to compute the organ doses and the effective dose of patients, which are exposed at a X-ray beam having photon energies in 10 to 150 keV radiodiagnostic range. Three major radiological procedures are considered, namely mammography, radiography and CT. The fluoroscopy implies an irregular geometry and therefore it is neglected. Nevertheless, a gross estimation of patient doses can be made taking into account the fluoroscopy as being composed of several radiographic examinations applied in different anatomical regions. The interactions between radiation and matter are well-known, and the accuracy of the calculation is limited by the accuracy of the anatomical model used to describe actual patients and by characterisation of the radiation field applied. In this version of IradMed, it is assumed that the absorbed dose is equal with kerma for all tissues. No procedure has been used to take account of the finite range of the secondary electrons that are produced by photoelectric or Compton interactions. These ranges are small compared with the dimensions of the organs, and the absorbed dose will not change abruptly with distance except at boundary where composition and density change. However these boundary effects would have little effect in the determination of the average doses to almost all organs, except the active bone marrow which is treated separately. Another justification for this kerma approximation is the fact that the sum of all electron energies that exit the organ is statistically equal with the sum of all electron energies that enter in that particular organ. In this version of program, it is considered the following interactions: the Rayleigh scattering, the Compton scattering and the photoelectric effect. The Compton scattering is modeled by several methods which

  20. Real time Monte Carlo simulation for evaluation of patient doses involved in radiological examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fulea, D. [Institute of Public Health ' Prof.Dr.Iuliu Moldovan' , Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Cosma, C. [Babes-Bolyai Univ., Faculty of Physics, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2006-07-01

    In order to apply the Monte Carlo simulation technique for usual radiological examinations we developed a Pc program, 'IradMed', written entirely in Java. The main purpose of this program is to compute the organ doses and the effective dose of patients, which are exposed at a X-ray beam having photon energies in 10 to 150 keV radiodiagnostic range. Three major radiological procedures are considered, namely mammography, radiography and CT. The fluoroscopy implies an irregular geometry and therefore it is neglected. Nevertheless, a gross estimation of patient doses can be made taking into account the fluoroscopy as being composed of several radiographic examinations applied in different anatomical regions. The interactions between radiation and matter are well-known, and the accuracy of the calculation is limited by the accuracy of the anatomical model used to describe actual patients and by characterisation of the radiation field applied. In this version of IradMed, it is assumed that the absorbed dose is equal with kerma for all tissues. No procedure has been used to take account of the finite range of the secondary electrons that are produced by photoelectric or Compton interactions. These ranges are small compared with the dimensions of the organs, and the absorbed dose will not change abruptly with distance except at boundary where composition and density change. However these boundary effects would have little effect in the determination of the average doses to almost all organs, except the active bone marrow which is treated separately. Another justification for this kerma approximation is the fact that the sum of all electron energies that exit the organ is statistically equal with the sum of all electron energies that enter in that particular organ. In this version of program, it is considered the following interactions: the Rayleigh scattering, the Compton scattering and the photoelectric effect. The Compton scattering is modeled by several

  1. Mobile Health Technology for Atrial Fibrillation Management Integrating Decision Support, Education, and Patient Involvement: mAF App Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yutao; Chen, Yundai; Lane, Deirdre A; Liu, Lihong; Wang, Yutang; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2017-12-01

    Mobile Health technology for the management of patients with atrial fibrillation is unknown. The simple mobile AF (mAF) App was designed to incorporate clinical decision-support tools (CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc [Congestive heart failure, Hypertension, Age ≥75 years, Diabetes Mellitus, Prior Stroke or TIA, Vascular disease, Age 65-74 years, Sex category], HAS-BLED [Hypertension, Abnormal renal/liver function, Stroke, Bleeding history or predisposition, Labile INR, Elderly, Drugs/alcohol concomitantly], SAMe-TT 2 R 2 [Sex, Age Mobile Health technology in patients with atrial fibrillation, demonstrating that the mAF App, integrating clinical decision support, education, and patient-involvement strategies, significantly improved knowledge, drug adherence, quality of life, and anticoagulation satisfaction. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Concurrent Urodynamic Testing Identifies Brain Structures Involved in Micturition Cycle in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khavari, Rose; Karmonik, Christof; Shy, Michael; Fletcher, Sophie; Boone, Timothy

    2017-02-01

    Neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction, which is common in patients with multiple sclerosis, has a significant impact on quality of life. In this study we sought to determine brain activity processes during the micturition cycle in female patients with multiple sclerosis and neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction. We report brain activity on functional magnetic resonance imaging and simultaneous urodynamic testing in 23 ambulatory female patients with multiple sclerosis. Individual functional magnetic resonance imaging activation maps at strong desire to void and at initiation of voiding were calculated and averaged at Montreal Neuroimaging Institute. Areas of significant activation were identified in these average maps. Subgroup analysis was performed in patients with elicitable neurogenic detrusor overactivity or detrusor-sphincter dyssynergia. Group analysis of all patients at strong desire to void yielded areas of activation in regions associated with executive function (frontal gyrus), emotional regulation (cingulate gyrus) and motor control (putamen, cerebellum and precuneus). Comparison of the average change in activation between previously reported healthy controls and patients with multiple sclerosis showed predominantly stronger, more focal activation in the former and lower, more diffused activation in the latter. Patients with multiple sclerosis who had demonstrable neurogenic detrusor overactivity and detrusor-sphincter dyssynergia showed a trend toward distinct brain activation at full urge and at initiation of voiding respectively. We successfully studied brain activation during the entire micturition cycle in female patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction and multiple sclerosis using a concurrent functional magnetic resonance imaging/urodynamic testing platform. Understanding the central neural processes involved in specific parts of micturition in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction may identify areas

  3. Cardiac Involvement in Myotonic Dystrophy Type 2 Patients With Preserved Ejection Fraction: Detection by Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmacht, Luisa; Traber, Julius; Grieben, Ulrike; Utz, Wolfgang; Dieringer, Matthias A; Kellman, Peter; Blaszczyk, Edyta; von Knobelsdorff-Brenkenhoff, Florian; Spuler, Simone; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette

    2016-07-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) is a genetic disorder characterized by skeletal muscle symptoms, metabolic changes, and cardiac involvement. Histopathologic alterations of the skeletal muscle include fibrosis and fatty infiltration. The aim of this study was to investigate whether subclinical cardiac involvement in DM2 is already detectable in preserved left ventricular function by cardiovascular magnetic resonance. Twenty-seven patients (mean age, 54±10 years; 20 females) with a genetically confirmed diagnosis of DM2 were compared with 17 healthy age- and sex-matched controls using a 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging. For myocardial tissue differentiation, T1 and T2 mapping, fat/water-separated imaging, focal fibrosis imaging (late gadolinium enhancement [LGE]), and (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopy were performed. Extracellular volume fraction was calculated. Conduction abnormalities were diagnosed based on Groh criteria. LGE located subepicardial basal inferolateral was detectable in 22% of the patients. Extracellular volume was increased in this region and in the adjacent medial inferolateral segment (P=0.03 compared with healthy controls). In 21% of patients with DM2, fat deposits were detectable (all women). The control group showed no abnormalities. Myocardial triglycerides were not different in LGE-positive and LGE-negative subjects (P=0.47). Six patients had indicators for conduction disease (60% of LGE-positive patients and 12.5% of LGE-negative patients). In DM2, subclinical myocardial injury was already detectable in preserved left ventricular ejection fraction. Extracellular volume was also increased in regions with no focal fibrosis. Myocardial fibrosis was related to conduction abnormalities. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. DEFB1 polymorphisms are involved in susceptibility to human papillomavirus infection in Brazilian gynaecological patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludovica Segat

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The human beta defensin 1 (hBD-1 antimicrobial peptide is a member of the innate immune system known to act in the first line of defence against microorganisms, including viruses such as human papillomavirus (HPV. In this study, five functional polymorphisms (namely g-52G>A, g-44C>G and g-20G>A in the 5’UTR and c.*5G>A and c.*87A>G in the 3’UTR in the DEFB1 gene encoding for hBD-1 were analysed to investigate the possible involvement of these genetic variants in susceptibility to HPV infection and in the development of HPV-associated lesions in a population of Brazilian women. The DEFB1 g-52G>A and c.*5G>A single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and the GCAAA haplotype showed associations with HPV-negative status; in particular, the c.*5G>A SNP was significantly associated after multiple test corrections. These findings suggest a possible role for the constitutively expressed beta defensin-1 peptide as a natural defence against HPV in the genital tract mucosa.

  5. Associations Among Depressive Symptoms, Wellness, Patient Involvement, Provider Cultural Competency, and Treatment Nonadherence: A Pilot Study Among Community Patients Seen at a University Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Lisa M; Huffman, Lauren E; Higginbotham, John C; Mugoya, George C T; Smith, Annie K; Dumas, Tia N

    2018-02-01

    Treatment nonadherence is a pernicious problem associated with increasing rates of chronic diseases, escalating healthcare costs, and rising mortality in some patients. Although researchers have suggested numerous factors related to treatment nonadherence, several understudied aspects warrant attention, such as primary-care settings, provider cultural competence, and patient involvement. Adding to the research base, the present pilot study examined 88 primarily Black American and White American community patients from a large university medical center in the southern part of the United States. The study explored two research questions: (a) To what extent are there associations among depressive symptoms, wellness, patient involvement, cultural competency, and treatment nonadherence in a racially diverse community patient population? And (b) to what extent do the study exploratory variables and background characteristics predict treatment nonadherence, both separately and jointly? Depressive symptoms, the patient's perception of a provider's cultural competence, and marital/partnered status were found to be statistically significantly associated with treatment nonadherence, but not entirely in the directions expected.

  6. Nursing involvement in risk and patient safety management in Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronado-Vázquez, Valle; García-López, Ana; López-Sauras, Susana; Turón Alcaine, José María

    Patient safety and quality of care in a highly complex healthcare system depends not only on the actions of professionals at an individual level, but also on interaction with the environment. Proactive risk management in the system to prevent incidents and activities targeting healthcare teams is crucial in establishing a culture of safety in centres. Nurses commonly lead these safety strategies. Even though safety incidents are relatively infrequent in primary care, since the majority are preventable, actions at this level of care are highly effective. Certification of services according to ISO standard 9001:2008 focuses on risk management in the system and its use in certifying healthcare centres is helping to build a safety culture amongst professionals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Factors involved in patient choice of oral or vaginal treatment for vulvovaginal candidiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sobel JD

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Jack D SobelDivision of Infectious Diseases, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI, USAAbstract: Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC is an extremely common cause of vaginal symptoms in women. Multiple antifungal products are available by either the oral or vaginal route, although no new drugs have become available for two decades. Given the therapeutic equivalence of the antimycotic agents and their routes of administration, the specific drug and formulation selected is entirely arbitrary in relation to final treatment outcome. Nevertheless, multiple factors affecting preference, both practitioner-dependent and patient-dependent, impact on selection of a specific drug and route of administration.Keywords: antifungal drugs, antimycotics, Candida vaginitis, vulvovaginal candidiasis

  8. Tea, talk and technology: patient and public involvement to improve connected health 'wearables' research in dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Lamiece; Swarbrick, Caroline; Sanders, Caroline; Parker, Angela; Machin, Matt; Tully, Mary P; Ainsworth, John

    2017-01-01

    There are a growing number of mobile phones, watches and electronic devices which can be worn on the body to track aspects of health and well-being, such as daily steps, sleep and exercise. Dementia researchers think that these devices could potentially be used as part of future research projects, for example to help spot changes in daily activity that may signal the early symptoms of dementia. We asked a range of older people, including people living with dementia and their carers, to participate in interactive discussions about how future participants might find using these devices as part of research projects. We also invited volunteers to borrow a range of devices to test at home, giving them further insights. Discussions revealed that people were generally supportive of this type of research, provided they gave informed consent and that devices were discreet, comfortable and easy to use. They also valued technical support and regular feedback on study progress to encourage ongoing participation. These findings were used to develop a pool of devices for researchers, with computer software and written guidance to help plan, design and support studies. Our work shows that when given the right opportunities, people who are affected by dementia can provide valuable insights that can enhance the design, delivery and quality of future research. Background Increasingly, researchers are recognising the potential for connected health devices, including smartphones and smartwatches, to generate high resolution data about patterns of daily activity and health outcomes. One aim of the Dementias Platform UK (DPUK) project is to provide researchers with a secure means to collect, collate and link data generated by such devices, thereby accelerating this type of research in the field of dementia. We aimed to involve members of the public in discussions about the acceptability and feasibility of different devices and research designs to inform the development of a device pool

  9. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ANKLE-BRACHIAL INDEX AND NUM-BER OF INVOLVED CORONARIES IN PATIENTS WITH STABLE ANGINA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh Sadeghi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Atherosclerosis is the commonest cause of vascular disease which can involve peripheral and/or cardiac vessels. This study was conducted to evaluate the possible link between Ankle-Brachial Index (ABI and coronary vessel involvement in patients with stable angina.    METHODS: This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2008 on 120 individuals who were hospitalized in Chamran Heart Center and underwent coronary angiography. A questionnaire was completed to obtain demographic information, history of previous heart disease and smoking. Body height and weight, as blood pressure on hand and foot were measured. The patients underwent angiography and the extent of coronary involvement (> 75% was determined. After12-14-hour of fasting, blood sugar was obtained to measure total cholesterol, triglyceride, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C. The Ankle Brachial Pressure Index (ABI was calculated as the ratio of the blood pressure in the ankles to the blood pressure in the arms. The data were analyzed by SPSS-15 using ANOVA, T-Student test, Spearman's rank correlation coefficient, and discriminant analysis.    RESULTS: Samples were 46 women (38.33% and 74 men (61.67% with a mean age of 55.50 ± 10.49. Mean and SD of ABI in men and women was 0.72 ± 0.20 and 0.80 ± 0.19 with no significant difference (p = 0.012. The correlation between ABI and extent of coronary involvement was 0.47 (p < 0.0001. The group with lower ABI had the highest levels of coronary involvement (triple vessel, p < 0.05.     CONCLUSION: ABI had a significant relationship with the degree of coronary involvement and a significant predictive value. Therefore ABI seems to be a reliable indicator of high coronary risk.      Keywords: Ankle to brachial index, Coronary involvement, Stable angina.  

  10. [Current situation on fertility preservation in cancer patients in Spain: Level of knowledge, information, and professional involvement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido-Colino, Carmen; Lassaletta, Alvaro; Vazquez, María Ángeles; Echevarria, Aizpea; Gutierrez, Ignacio; Andión, Maitane; Berlanga, Pablo

    2017-07-01

    The estimated risks of infertility in childhood cancer due to radiation, chemotherapy and surgery are well known. The involvement of professionals and advances in the different methods of preservation are increasing. However, many patients do not receive information or perform any method of preservation. Questionnaires to paediatric onco-haematology institutions throughout Spain. The questionnaire consisted of 22 questions assessing their usual practices and knowledge about fertility preservation. Fifty members of the Spanish Society of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology, representing 24 of 43 centres, responded. These represented 82% of centres that treated higher numbers of patients. The effect of treatment on fertility was known by 78% of those who responded, with 76% admitting not knowing any guideline on fertility in children or adolescents. As for the ideal time and place to inform the patient and/or family, only 14% thought it should be done in the same cancer diagnosis interview. In clinical practice, 12% of those surveyed never referred patients to Human Reproduction Units, another 12% only did so if the patients showed interest, and 38% only refer patients in puberty. Just over one-third (34%) of those referrals were going to receive highly gonadotoxic treatment. There are clear differences between pre-puberty and puberty patients. The frequency with which some method of fertility preservation is performed in patients is low. All respondents believe that the existence of national guidelines on the matter would be of interest. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Health-related quality of life for patients with rheumatoid arthritis foot involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickman, Amy M; Pinzur, Michael S; Kadanoff, Ruth; Juknelis, Dainius

    2004-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a common disabling form of arthritis that frequently affects the hands and feet. With time, the majority of affected individuals will become disabled. Sixty-nine consecutively selected mild to moderately affected individuals with rheumatoid arthritis provided demographic data and agreed to complete the Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment (SFMA) instrument. Focus group subjects selectively used minimally adaptive nonprescription footwear. Control subjects had similar disease expression, but did not alter their choice of footwear due to their disease. Adult patients with rheumatoid arthritis demonstrate a significant negative impact on their quality of life with mild or moderate disease expression, as evidenced by poor scores in all six domains of the SFMA. Subjects who used even mildly adaptive nonprescription footwear demonstrated a statistically significant negative impact in mobility (p expression. Focus subjects also demonstrated a trend to less favorable scores in the arm and hand domain. Mean scores of the daily activity, emotional status, and bother index domains fared worse than population norms, but there was no statistical difference between subjects using, or not using, adaptive footwear. Individuals affected with mild to moderate rheumatoid arthritis are disabled as compared with the general population. There is a severe negative impact on mobility and functional capacity when the disease process begins to affect their feet.

  12. Invasive cervical resorption following orthodontic treatment: Two cases involving the same patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshpe, Margarita; Kaufman, Arieh; Lin, Shaul; Gabay, Eran; Einy, Shmuel

    2016-01-01

    Invasive cervical resorption (ICR), a destructive form of external root resorption, is characterized by invasion of the fibrovascular tissue. This phenomenon is very rare and appears in 0.02% of the general population where the leading factors are orthodontics in addition to trauma, restorations, and bleaching. Heavy orthodontic force may increase the incidence to 1%. One of the main concerns regarding ICR is that it is often misdiagnosed with conventional diagnostic tools. In recent decades, a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging technique has become more common and can lead to a more accurate diagnosis and treatment plan. This case report describes a possible association between orthodontic treatment and ICR of a 14-year-old male, 18 months post orthodontic treatment. ICR in the mandibular right canine was diagnosed and verified by CBCT, and underwent combined endodontic-periodontal treatment. However, after orthodontic forced eruption was performed on this tooth to improve the bone defect, ICR was diagnosed on the mandibular right second premolar. The possible association between orthodontic treatment and ICR is discussed, as ICR was noted following orthodontic treatment on both occasions. This case report stresses the importance of ICR early detection by close attention to periodic radiographic checkups during orthodontic treatment. The use of modern diagnostic tools is highly recommended in suspicious cases. A case is described in which the patient underwent two types of orthodontic treatment in the mandible at different time periods and developed ICR in two different teeth.

  13. Analysis of Factors and Medical Errors Involved in Patient Complaints in a European Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Haroutunian

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patients’ complaints from Emergency Departments (ED are frequent and can be used as a quality assurance indicator. Objective: Factors contributing to patients’ complaints (PCs in the emergency department were analyzed.  Methods: It was a retrospective cohort study, the qualitative variables of patients’ complaints visiting ED of a university hospital were compared with Chi-Square and t test tests. Results: Eighty-five PC were analyzed. The factors contributing to PC were: communication (n=26, length of stay (LOS (n=24, diagnostic errors (n=21, comfort and privacy issues (n=7, pain management (n=6, inappropriate treatment (n=6, delay of care and billing issues (n=3. PCs were more frequent when patients were managed by residents, during night shifts, weekends, Saturdays, Mondays, January and June. Moreover, the factors contributing to diagnostic errors were due to poor communication, non-adherence to guidelines and lack of systematic proofreading of X-rays. In 98% of cases, disputes were resolved by apology and explanation and three cases resulted in financial compensation. Conclusion: Poor communication, LOS and medical errors are factors contributing to PCs. Improving communication, resolving issues leading to slow health care provision, adequate staffing and supervision of trainees may reduce PCs.

  14. HPV Involvement in Head and Neck Cancers: Comprehensive Assessment of Biomarkers in 3680 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellsagué, Xavier; Alemany, Laia; Quer, Miquel; Halec, Gordana; Quirós, Beatriz; Tous, Sara; Clavero, Omar; Alòs, Llúcia; Biegner, Thorsten; Szafarowski, Tomasz; Alejo, Maria; Holzinger, Dana; Cadena, Enrique; Claros, Edith; Hall, Gillian; Laco, Jan; Poljak, Mario; Benevolo, Maria; Kasamatsu, Elena; Mehanna, Hisham; Ndiaye, Cathy; Guimerà, Núria; Lloveras, Belen; León, Xavier; Ruiz-Cabezas, Juan C; Alvarado-Cabrero, Isabel; Kang, Chang-Suk; Oh, Jin-Kyoung; Garcia-Rojo, Marcial; Iljazovic, Ermina; Ajayi, Oluseyi F; Duarte, Flora; Nessa, Ashrafun; Tinoco, Leopoldo; Duran-Padilla, Marco A; Pirog, Edyta C; Viarheichyk, Halina; Morales, Hesler; Costes, Valérie; Félix, Ana; Germar, Maria Julieta V; Mena, Marisa; Ruacan, Arzu; Jain, Asha; Mehrotra, Ravi; Goodman, Marc T; Lombardi, Luis Estuardo; Ferrera, Annabelle; Malami, Sani; Albanesi, Estela I; Dabed, Pablo; Molina, Carla; López-Revilla, Rubén; Mandys, Václav; González, Manuel E; Velasco, Julio; Bravo, Ignacio G; Quint, Wim; Pawlita, Michael; Muñoz, Nubia; de Sanjosé, Silvia; Xavier Bosch, F

    2016-06-01

    We conducted a large international study to estimate fractions of head and neck cancers (HNCs) attributable to human papillomavirus (HPV-AFs) using six HPV-related biomarkers of viral detection, transcription, and cellular transformation. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded cancer tissues of the oral cavity (OC), pharynx, and larynx were collected from pathology archives in 29 countries. All samples were subject to histopathological evaluation, DNA quality control, and HPV-DNA detection. Samples containing HPV-DNA were further subject to HPV E6*I mRNA detection and to p16(INK4a), pRb, p53, and Cyclin D1 immunohistochemistry. Final estimates of HPV-AFs were based on HPV-DNA, HPV E6*I mRNA, and/or p16(INK4a) results. A total of 3680 samples yielded valid results: 1374 pharyngeal, 1264 OC, and 1042 laryngeal cancers. HPV-AF estimates based on positivity for HPV-DNA, and for either HPV E6*I mRNA or p16(INK4a), were 22.4%, 4.4%, and 3.5% for cancers of the oropharynx, OC, and larynx, respectively, and 18.5%, 3.0%, and 1.5% when requiring simultaneous positivity for all three markers. HPV16 was largely the most common type. Estimates of HPV-AF in the oropharynx were highest in South America, Central and Eastern Europe, and Northern Europe, and lowest in Southern Europe. Women showed higher HPV-AFs than men for cancers of the oropharynx in Europe and for the larynx in Central-South America. HPV contribution to HNCs is substantial but highly heterogeneous by cancer site, region, and sex. This study, the largest exploring HPV attribution in HNCs, confirms the important role of HPVs in oropharyngeal cancer and drastically downplays the previously reported involvement of HPVs in the other HNCs. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Hepatic and pancreatic involvement in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia: quantitative and qualitative evaluation with 64-section CT in asymptomatic adult patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barral, Matthias; Sirol, Marc; Hamzi, Lounis; Gayat, Etienne; Boudiaf, Mourad [Hopital Lariboisiere-APHP, Department of Abdominal Imaging, Paris (France); Place, Vinciane [Hopital Lariboisiere-APHP, Department of Abdominal Imaging, Paris (France); Universite Diderot-Paris 7, UFR de Medecine, Paris (France); Borsik, Michel [Hopital Lariboisiere-APHP, Deparment of Ear, Nose and Throat, Paris (France); Soyer, Philippe [Hopital Lariboisiere-APHP, Department of Abdominal Imaging, Paris (France); Universite Diderot-Paris 7, UFR de Medecine, Paris (France); Unite 965 INSERM/Paris7, Hopital Lariboisiere-APHP, Paris (France)

    2012-01-15

    To analyse quantitatively and qualitatively asymptomatic hepatic and pancreatic involvement in hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) using 64-section helical CT. The 64-section helical CT examinations of 19 patients with HHT (8 men, 11 women; mean age, 58.6 years) were quantitatively and qualitatively analysed and compared to those of 19 control subjects who were matched for age and sex. Comparisons were made using univariate analysis. Dilated and tortuous intrahepatic arterial branches was the most discriminating independent variable (P < 0.0001) and had the highest specificity (100%; 19/19; 95%CI: 82%-100%) and accuracy (97%; 37/38; 95%CI: 86%-100%) for the diagnosis of HHT. Heterogeneous enhancement of hepatic parenchyma, intrahepatic telangiectases, hepatic artery to hepatic vein shunting, hepatic artery enlargement (i.e. diameter > 6.5 mm) and portal vein enlargement (i.e. diameter > 13 mm) were other variables that strongly correlated with the presence of HHT. Intrapancreatic telangiectases and arteriovenous malformations were found in 42% and 16% of patients with HHT, respectively. Liver and pancreatic involvement in asymptomatic HHT patients is associated with myriad suggestive findings on 64-section helical CT. It can be anticipated that familiarity with these findings would result in more confident diagnosis of HHT. (orig.)

  16. Role of imagining diagnostics in assessing the involvement of the cervical spine in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cyrylowski, L.; Walecka, A.; Koryzma, A.; Brzosko, M.; Brzosko, I.; Prajs, K.

    2005-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a polyarthritis caused by inflammatory overgrowth of synnovium known as pannus. Small joints of hands and feet are most frequently involved, followed by cervical spine, particularly the craniocervical junction. The cervical spine involvement may be a cause of a range of neurological complications. Imaging diagnostics of the spine in RA patients include radiograms, CT and MRI. Their purposes is to evaluate type, extension and advancing of the changes. The following lesions can be found in the cervical spine at least in 30% of RA patients with disease duration more than 10 years: subaxial subluxations, apophyseal joint erosions, odontoid erosions, apophyseal joint sclerosis, intervertebral space narrowing, and osteophytosis.These lesions can be easily detected with radiographic examinations whereas the presence of the pannus can be found only with MRI or contrast enhanced CT. The most dangerous complication of RA in the cervical spine is atlantoaxial subluxation. It can be well demonstrated with MRI.Even it is frequently asymptomatic, there is always the possibility of neurological symptoms from compression of the spinal cord by the odontoid process. Therefore, MRI of the cervical spine should be considered in all RA patients. (author)

  17. WikiBuild: A New Application to Support Patient and Health Care Professional Involvement in the Development of Patient Support Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Active patient and public involvement as partners in their own health care and in the development of health services is key to achieving a health care system that is responsive to patients’ needs and values. It promotes better use of the health care system, and improves health outcomes, quality of life and patient satisfaction. By involving patients and health care professionals as partners in the creation and updating of patient health support tools, wikis—highly accessible, interactive vehicles of communication—have the potential to empower users to implement these support tools in daily life. Acknowledging the potential of wikis, and recognizing that they capitalize on the free and open access to information, scientists, opinion leaders and patient advocates have suggested that wikis could help decision-making constituencies improve the delivery of health care. They might also decrease its cost and improve access to knowledge within developing countries. However, little is known about the efficacy of wikis in helping to attain these goals. There is also a need to know more about the intention of patients and health care workers to use wikis, in what circumstances and what factors will influence their use of wikis. In this issue of the Journal of Medical Internet Research, Gupta et al describe how they developed and tested a new wiki-inspired application to improve asthma care. The researchers involved patients with asthma, primary care physicians, pulmonologists and certified asthma educators in the construction of an asthma action plan. Their paper—entitled “WikiBuild: a new online collaboration process for multistakeholder tool development and consensus building”—is the first description of a wiki-inspired technology built to involve patients and health care professionals in the development of a patient support tool. This innovative study has made important contributions toward how wikis could be generalized to involve multiple stakeholders in

  18. Involving Latina/o parents in patient-centered outcomes research: Contributions to research study design, implementation and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Jolles, Mónica; Martinez, Maria; Garcia, San Juanita; Stein, Gabriela L; Thomas, Kathleen C

    2017-10-01

    Comparative effectiveness research (CER) is supported by policymakers as a way to provide service providers and patients with evidence-based information to make better health-care decisions and ultimately improve services for patients. However, Latina/o patients are rarely involved as study advisors, and there is a lack of documentation on how their voices contribute to the research process when they are included as collaborators. The purpose of this article was to contribute to the literature by presenting concrete contributions of Latina/o parent involvement to study design, implementation and outcomes in the context of a CER study called Padres Efectivos (Parent Activation). Researchers facilitated a collaborative relationship with parents by establishing a mentor parent group. The contributions of parent involvement in the following stages of the research process are described: (i) proposal development, (ii) implementation of protocols, (iii) analysis plan and (iv) dissemination of results. Mentor parents' contributions helped tailor the content of the intervention to their needs during proposal, increased recruitment, validated the main outcome measure and added two important outcome measures, emphasized the importance of controlling for novice treatment status and developed innovative dissemination strategies. Mentor parents' guidance to the researchers has contributed to reaching recruitment goals, strengthened the study protocol, expanded findings, supported broad ownership of study implications and enriched the overall study data collection efforts. These findings can inform future research efforts seeking an active Latino parent collaboration and the timely incorporation of parent voices in each phase of the research process. © 2017 The Authors Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. The degree of cardiac baroreflex involvement during active standing is associated with the quality of life in fibromyalgia patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Roberto Zamunér

    Full Text Available Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS is a rheumatologic disorder characterized by chronic widespread pain, fatigue and other symptoms. Baroreflex dysfunction has been observed in women with FMS. However, it is unknown whether the limited involvement of the baroreflex control during an orthostatic stimulus has some impact on the quality of life of the FMS patient. Therefore, the aim of the study is evaluate the relationship between the quality of life of the FMS patient and indexes of the cardiovascular autonomic control as estimated from spontaneous fluctuations of heart period (HP and systolic arterial pressure (SAP. We enrolled 35 women with FMS (age: 48.8±8.9 years; body mass index: 29.3±4.3 Kg/m2. The electrocardiogram, non-invasive finger blood pressure and respiratory activity were continuously recorded during 15 minutes at rest in supine position (REST and in orthostatic position during active standing (STAND. Traditional cardiovascular autonomic control markers were assessed along with a Granger causality index assessing the strength of the causal relation from SAP to HP (CRSAP→HP and measuring the degree of involvement of the cardiac baroreflex. The impact of FMS on quality of life was quantified by the fibromyalgia impact questionnaire (FIQ and visual analog score for pain (VAS pain. No significant linear association was found between FIQ scores and the traditional cardiovascular indexes both at REST and during STAND (p>0.05. However, a negative relationship between CRSAP→HP during STAND and FIQ score was found (r = -0.56, p<0.01. Similar results were found with VAS pain. In conclusion, the lower the degree of cardiac baroreflex involvement during STAND in women with FMS, the higher the impact of FMS on the quality of life, thus suggesting that Granger causality analysis might be clinically helpful in assessing the state of the FMS patient.

  20. Ototoxicity evaluation in medulloblastoma patients treated with involved field boost using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT): a retrospective review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Wilson Albieri; Nadalin, Wladimir; Odone Filho, Vicente; Petrilli, Antonio Sergio; Weltman, Eduardo; Chen, Michael Jenwei; Silva, Nasjla Saba da; Cappellano, Andrea Maria; Pereira, Liliane Desgualdo; Gonçalves, Maria Ines Rabelo; Ferrigno, Robson; Hanriot, Rodrigo Morais

    2014-01-01

    Ototoxicity is a known side effect of combined radiation therapy and cisplatin chemotherapy for the treatment of medulloblastoma. The delivery of an involved field boost by intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) may reduce the dose to the inner ear when compared with conventional radiotherapy. The dose of cisplatin may also affect the risk of ototoxicity. A retrospective study was performed to evaluate the impact of involved field boost using IMRT and cisplatin dose on the rate of ototoxicity. Data from 41 medulloblastoma patients treated with IMRT were collected. Overall and disease-free survival rates were calculated by Kaplan-Meier method Hearing function was graded according to toxicity criteria of Pediatric Oncology Group (POG). Doses to inner ear and total cisplatin dose were correlated with hearing function by univariate and multivariate data analysis. After a mean follow-up of 44 months (range: 14 to 72 months), 37 patients remained alive, with two recurrences, both in spine with CSF involvement, resulting in a disease free-survival and overall survival of 85.2% and 90.2%, respectively. Seven patients (17%) experienced POG Grade 3 or 4 toxicity. Cisplatin dose was a significant factor for hearing loss in univariate analysis (p < 0.03). In multivariate analysis, median dose to inner ear was significantly associated with hearing loss (p < 0.01). POG grade 3 and 4 toxicity were uncommon with median doses to the inner ear bellow 42 Gy (p < 0.05) and total cisplatin dose of less than 375 mg/m 2 (p < 0.01). IMRT leads to a low rate of severe ototoxicity. Median radiation dose to auditory apparatus should be kept below 42 Gy. Cisplatin doses should not exceed 375 mg/m 2

  1. Role of FDG-PET in the Implementation of Involved-Node Radiation Therapy for Hodgkin Lymphoma Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girinsky, Théodore; Aupérin, Anne; Ribrag, Vincent; Elleuch, Manel; Fermé, Christophe; Bonniaud, Guillaume; Ruelle, Claude; Alberini, Jean-Louis; Celebic, Aljosa; Edeline, Véronique

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study examines the role of 18 F-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in the implementation of involved-node radiation therapy (INRT) in patients treated for clinical stages (CS) I/II supradiaphragmatic Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). Methods and Material: Patients with untreated CS I/II HL enrolled in the randomized EORTC/LYSA/FIL Intergroup H10 trial and participating in a real-time prospective quality assurance program were prospectively included in this study. Data were electronically obtained from 18 French cancer centers. All patients underwent APET-computed tomography (PET-CT) and a post-chemotherapy planning CT scanning. The pre-chemotherapy gross tumor volume (GTV) and the postchemotherapy clinical target volume (CTV) were first delineated on CT only by the radiation oncologist. The planning PET was then co-registered, and the delineated volumes were jointly analyzed by the radiation oncologist and the nuclear medicine physician. Lymph nodes undetected on CT but FDG-avid were recorded, and the previously determined GTV and CTV were modified according to FDG-PET results. Results: From March 2007 to February 2010, 135 patients were included in the study. PET-CT identified at least 1 additional FDG-avid lymph node in 95 of 135 patients (70.4%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 61.9%-77.9%) and 1 additional lymph node area in 55 of 135 patients (40.7%; 95% CI: 32.4%-49.5%). The mean increases in the GTV and CTV were 8.8% and 7.1%, respectively. The systematic addition of PET to CT led to a CTV increase in 60% of the patients. Conclusions: Pre-chemotherapy FDG-PET leads to significantly better INRT delineation without necessarily increasing radiation volumes

  2. Brucellosis With Multi-Organ Involvement in a Patient With History of Composite Aortic Graft and Hepatitis B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghan Manshadi, Seyed Ali; Rezahosseini, Omid; Abdi Liaei, Zahra

    2016-11-01

    The brucellosis with multi-organ involvement in a patient with a history of the composite aortic graft (Bentall procedure) and Hepatitis B infection is rare. A 35-year-old man presented to us with fever and loss of consciousness. Four years ago, he was IDU and underwent cardiac surgery because of endocarditis. Recently lumbar spondylodiscitis was diagnosed. The Wright (1/320) and Coombs Wright tests (1/640) were positive. After CNS imaging, lumbar puncture was done. The CSF pleocytosis was lymphocyte dominant. In cardiac echocardiography, large vegetation on prosthetic aortic valve leaflets was seen. The brain MRI was reported abnormal. Treatment of brucellosis started with Ceftriaxone, Doxycycline, Rifampin and Gentamycin. After 4 days, he became oriented, and fever was disappeared then we continued the treatment for 16 days. The patient discharged and followed by daily phone calls. As symptoms of abdominal pain and jaundice were presented on the fifth day, he re-admitted. The patient expired because of hepatorenal and cardiac insufficiency. Drug side effects, activation of Hepatitis B and embolism of cardiac vegetation to other organs were suspected causes of death. We do not suggest medical therapy without cardiac surgery in such cases. When combination therapy is necessary for brucellosis in an HBsAg-positive patient, hepatitis virus activity should be assess by HBV-DNA PCR and the dose of drugs with known hepatotoxic effects such as rifampin and co-trimoxazole should be adjust. Combination therapy with quinolones instead of hepatoxic drugs is one of our suggustions.

  3. Skeletal involvement in Gaucher disease: An observational multicenter study of prognostic factors in the Argentine Gaucher disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drelichman, Guillermo; Fernández Escobar, Nicolás; Basack, Nora; Aversa, Luis; Larroude, María Silvia; Aguilar, Gabriela; Szlago, Marina; Schenone, Andrea; Fynn, Alcyra; Cuello, María Fernanda; Aznar, Marcela; Fernández, Ramiro; Ruiz, Alba; Reichel, Paola; Guelbert, Norberto; Robledo, Hugo; Watman, Nora; Bolesina, Moira; Elena, Graciela; Veber, S Ernesto; Pujal, Graciela; Galván, Graciela; Chain, Juan José; Arizo, Adriana; Bietti, Julieta; Bar, Daniel; Dragosky, Marta; Marquez, Marisa; Feldman, Leonardo; Muller, Katja; Zirone, Sandra; Buchovsky, Greogorio; Lanza, Victoria; Sanabria, Alba; Fernández, Ignacio; Jaureguiberry, Rossana; Contte, Marcelo; Barbieri María, Angie; Maro, Alejandra; Zárate, Graciela; Fernández, Gabriel; Rapetti, María Cristina; Donato, Hugo; Degano, Adriana; Kantor, Gustavo; Albina, Roberto; Á Lvarez Bollea, María; Brun, María; Bacciedoni, Viviana; Del Río, Francis; Soberón, Bárbara; Boido, Nazario; Schweri, Maya; Borchichi, Sandra; Welsh, Victoria; Corrales, Marcela; Cedola, Alejandra; Carvani, Analía; Diez, Blanca; Richard, Lucía; Baduel, Ccecilia; Nuñez, Gabriela; Colimodio, Rubén; Barazzutti, Lucía; Medici, Hugo; Meschengieser, Susana; Damiani, Germán; Nucifora, María; Girardi, Beatriz; Gómez, Sergio; Papucci, Maura; Verón, David; Quiroga, Luis; Carro, Gustavo; De Ambrosio, Patricia; Ferro, José; Pujol, Marcelo; Castella, Cristina Cabral; Franco, Liliana; Nisnovich, Gisela; Veloso, María; Pacheco, Isabel; Savarino, Mario; Marino, Andrés; Saavedra, José Luis

    2016-10-01

    Patients with Gaucher type 1 (GD1) throughout Argentina were enrolled in the Argentine bone project to evaluate bone disease and its determinants. We focused on presence and predictors of bone lesions (BL) and their relationship to therapeutic goals (TG) with timing and dose of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT). A total of 124 patients on ERT were enrolled in a multi-center study. All six TG were achieved by 82% of patients: 70.1% for bone pain and 91.1% for bone crisis. However, despite the fact that bone TGs were achieved, residual bone disease was present in 108 patients on ERT (87%) at time 0. 16% of patients showed new irreversible BL (bone infarcts and avascular osteonecrosis) despite ERT, suggesting that they appeared during ERT or were not detected at the moment of diagnosis. We observed 5 prognostic factors that predicted a higher probability of being free of bone disease: optimal ERT compliance; early diagnosis; timely initiation of therapy; ERT initiation dose ≥45 UI/kg/EOW; and the absence of history of splenectomy. Skeletal involvement was classified into 4 major phenotypic groups according to BL: group 1 (12.9%) without BL; group 2 (28.2%) with reversible BL; group 3 (41.9%) with reversible BL and irreversible chronic BL; and group 4 (16.9%) with acute irreversible BL. Our study identifies prognostic factors for achieving best therapeutic outcomes, introduces new risk stratification for patients and suggests the need for a redefinition of bone TG. Am. J. Hematol. 91:E448-E453, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Diagnosis of myocardial involvement in patients with systemic myopathies with 15-(p-[I-123]iodophenyl) pentadecanoic acid (IPPA) SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kropp, J.; Briele, B.; Smekal, A.V.; Hotze, A.L.; Biersack, H.J.; Koehler, U.; Zierz, St. [Bonn Univ. (Germany); Knapp, F.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1992-03-01

    Involvement of the myocardium in non-infectious myopathies presents in most cases as systolic dysfunction or a disturbed cardiac rhythm. We are interested in exploring how often cardiac involvement can be evaluated with various diagnostic techniques in patients with proven myopathy. We investigated 41 patients with myopathies of various etiology, including mitochondrial and congenital myopathies, Curshmann-Steinert disease, muscular dystrophy, and others. Myopathy was proven by muscular biopsy usually from the bicep. Fatty acid imaging was performed with 15-(p-[I-123]iodophenyl)pentadecanoic acid (IP-PA) and sequential SPECT-scintigraphy with a 180 deg. rotation starting at the 45 deg. RAO position. 190 MBq were injected at the maximal stage of a submaximal exercise. Filtered backprojection and reorientation of the slices were achieved by standard techniques. The quantitative comparison of the oblique slices (bulls-eye technique) of the SPECT-studies revealed turnover-rates as a qualitative measure of {beta}-oxidation. Serum levels of lactate (L), pyruvate (P), glucose (G) and triglycerides (TG) were measured at rest and stress. Ventricular function was investigated by radionuclide ventriculography (MUGA) at rest and under stress with Tc-99m labeled red blood cells. In addition, ECG, 24 hour-ECG, and echocardiography were also performed with standard techniques.

  5. Diagnosis of myocardial involvement in patients with systemic myopathies with 15-(p-(I-123)iodophenyl) pentadecanoic acid (IPPA) SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kropp, J.; Briele, B.; Smekal, A.V.; Hotze, A.L.; Biersack, H.J.; Koehler, U.; Zierz, St. (Bonn Univ. (Germany)); Knapp, F.F. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Involvement of the myocardium in non-infectious myopathies presents in most cases as systolic dysfunction or a disturbed cardiac rhythm. We are interested in exploring how often cardiac involvement can be evaluated with various diagnostic techniques in patients with proven myopathy. We investigated 41 patients with myopathies of various etiology, including mitochondrial and congenital myopathies, Curshmann-Steinert disease, muscular dystrophy, and others. Myopathy was proven by muscular biopsy usually from the bicep. Fatty acid imaging was performed with 15-(p-(I-123)iodophenyl)pentadecanoic acid (IP-PA) and sequential SPECT-scintigraphy with a 180 deg. rotation starting at the 45 deg. RAO position. 190 MBq were injected at the maximal stage of a submaximal exercise. Filtered backprojection and reorientation of the slices were achieved by standard techniques. The quantitative comparison of the oblique slices (bulls-eye technique) of the SPECT-studies revealed turnover-rates as a qualitative measure of {beta}-oxidation. Serum levels of lactate (L), pyruvate (P), glucose (G) and triglycerides (TG) were measured at rest and stress. Ventricular function was investigated by radionuclide ventriculography (MUGA) at rest and under stress with Tc-99m labeled red blood cells. In addition, ECG, 24 hour-ECG, and echocardiography were also performed with standard techniques.

  6. The natural history of hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy with proximal dominant involvement (HMSN-P) in 97 Japanese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujisaki, Natsumi; Suwazono, Shugo; Suehara, Masahito; Nakachi, Ryo; Kido, Miwako; Fujiwara, Yoshihisa; Oshiro, Saki; Tokashiki, Takashi; Takashima, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Masanori

    2018-02-01

    Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy with proximal dominant involvement (HMSN-P) is a motor and sensory neuronopathy with autosomal dominant inheritance, adult onset, slowly progressive course, and is associated with TRK-fused gene (TFG) mutation. At advanced stages, respiratory failure and dysphagia becomes life-threatoning, and patients typically die by their 70s. Although there is currently no evidence for effective treatment, a therapy may be found by elucidation of the function of TFG. Recently its pathomechanism has been proposed to be associated with abnormalities in protein transfer from the endoplasmic reticulum. Such pathomechanisms might involve a similar process in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis; thus, its pathomechanisms and treatment strategy might make it a good model for neurodegenerative disorders. It is of great value to clarify the natural history of HMSN-P, in oder to judge the treatment effect. By evaluating 97 patients (79 out of 97 were examined and all confirmed with p.Pro 285 Leu mutation) in this study, it was confirmed that this disease follows a uniform course in the earlier stages, and there are individual differences in the onset between 20 and 30 years. Such uniformity might be due to the proposed single gene abnormality. At advanced stages, there are larger individual differences in the progression, but the reasons for these are unknown. Longer survival might be achieved with a better care for respiratory failure and dysphagia if such cares were undertaken at appropriate times.

  7. Diagnosis of myocardial involvement in patients with systemic myopathies with 15-(p-[I-123]iodophenyl) pentadecanoic acid (IPPA) SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kropp, J.; Briele, B.; Smekal, A.V.; Hotze, A.L.; Biersack, H.J.; Koehler, U.; Zierz, St.; Knapp, F.F.

    1992-01-01

    Involvement of the myocardium in non-infectious myopathies presents in most cases as systolic dysfunction or a disturbed cardiac rhythm. We are interested in exploring how often cardiac involvement can be evaluated with various diagnostic techniques in patients with proven myopathy. We investigated 41 patients with myopathies of various etiology, including mitochondrial and congenital myopathies, Curshmann-Steinert disease, muscular dystrophy, and others. Myopathy was proven by muscular biopsy usually from the bicep. Fatty acid imaging was performed with 15-(p-[I-123]iodophenyl)pentadecanoic acid (IP-PA) and sequential SPECT-scintigraphy with a 180 deg. rotation starting at the 45 deg. RAO position. 190 MBq were injected at the maximal stage of a submaximal exercise. Filtered backprojection and reorientation of the slices were achieved by standard techniques. The quantitative comparison of the oblique slices (bulls-eye technique) of the SPECT-studies revealed turnover-rates as a qualitative measure of β-oxidation. Serum levels of lactate (L), pyruvate (P), glucose (G) and triglycerides (TG) were measured at rest and stress. Ventricular function was investigated by radionuclide ventriculography (MUGA) at rest and under stress with Tc-99m labeled red blood cells. In addition, ECG, 24 hour-ECG, and echocardiography were also performed with standard techniques

  8. Development and testing of a medline search filter for identifying patient and public involvement in health research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Morwenna; Bethel, Alison; Boddy, Kate

    2017-06-01

    Research involving the public as partners often proves difficult to locate due to the variations in terms used to describe public involvement, and inability of medical databases to index this concept effectively. To design a search filter to identify literature where patient and public involvement (PPI) was used in health research. A reference standard of 172 PPI papers was formed. The references were divided into a development set and a test set. Search terms were identified from common words, phrases and synonyms in the development set. These terms were combined as a search strategy for medline via OvidSP, which was then tested for sensitivity against the test set. The resultant search filter was then assessed for sensitivity, specificity and precision using a previously published systematic review. The search filter was found to be highly sensitive 98.5% in initial testing. When tested against results generated by a 'real-life' systematic review, the filter had a specificity of 81%. However, sensitivity dropped to 58%. Adjustments to the population group of terms increased the sensitivity to 73%. The PPI filter designed for medline via OvidSP could aid information specialists and researchers trying to find literature specific to PPI. © 2016 Health Libraries Group.

  9. A quality assessment of patient leaflets on misoprostol induced labour – does written information adhere to international standards for patient involvement and informed consent?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Jette Aaroe; Juul, Mette; Rydahl, Eva

    Objectives: The need for thorough patient information is increasing as maternity care becomes more medicalised. The aim was to assess the quality of written patient information on labour induction. In most Danish hospitals misoprostol is the first-choice drug for induction in low-risk pregnancies......). Design: Patient leaflets were evaluated according to a validated scoring tool (IPDAS), core elements in The Danish Health Act, and items regarding off-label use and non-registered medication. Two of the authors scored all leaflets independently. Outcome measures: Women’s involvement in decision making......, and information on benefits and harms associated with the treatment, other justifiable treatment options, and non-registered treatment. Results: Generally, the hospitals scored low on the IPDAS checklist. No hospitals encouraged women to consider their preferences. Information on side-effects and adverse outcomes...

  10. The degree of cardiac baroreflex involvement during active standing is associated with the quality of life in fibromyalgia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamunér, Antonio Roberto; Porta, Alberto; Andrade, Carolina Pieroni; Forti, Meire; Marchi, Andrea; Furlan, Raffaello; Barbic, Franca; Catai, Aparecida Maria; Silva, Ester

    2017-01-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is a rheumatologic disorder characterized by chronic widespread pain, fatigue and other symptoms. Baroreflex dysfunction has been observed in women with FMS. However, it is unknown whether the limited involvement of the baroreflex control during an orthostatic stimulus has some impact on the quality of life of the FMS patient. Therefore, the aim of the study is evaluate the relationship between the quality of life of the FMS patient and indexes of the cardiovascular autonomic control as estimated from spontaneous fluctuations of heart period (HP) and systolic arterial pressure (SAP). We enrolled 35 women with FMS (age: 48.8±8.9 years; body mass index: 29.3±4.3 Kg/m2). The electrocardiogram, non-invasive finger blood pressure and respiratory activity were continuously recorded during 15 minutes at rest in supine position (REST) and in orthostatic position during active standing (STAND). Traditional cardiovascular autonomic control markers were assessed along with a Granger causality index assessing the strength of the causal relation from SAP to HP (CRSAP→HP) and measuring the degree of involvement of the cardiac baroreflex. The impact of FMS on quality of life was quantified by the fibromyalgia impact questionnaire (FIQ) and visual analog score for pain (VAS pain). No significant linear association was found between FIQ scores and the traditional cardiovascular indexes both at REST and during STAND (p>0.05). However, a negative relationship between CRSAP→HP during STAND and FIQ score was found (r = -0.56, pquality of life, thus suggesting that Granger causality analysis might be clinically helpful in assessing the state of the FMS patient.

  11. Perspectives on care and communication involving incurably ill Turkish and Moroccan patients, relatives and professionals: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaff, Fuusje M; Mistiaen, Patriek; Devillé, Walter Ljm; Francke, Anneke L

    2012-09-18

    as the decision to withdraw or withhold treatments. The diagnosis, prognosis and end-of-life decisions are seldom discussed with the patient, and communication about pain and mental problems is often limited. Language barriers and the dominance of the family may exacerbate communication problems. This review confirms the view that family members of patients with a Turkish or Moroccan background have a central role in care, communication and decision making at the end of life. This, in combination with their continuing hope for the patient's recovery may inhibit open communication between patients, relatives and professionals as partners in palliative care. This implies that organizations and professionals involved in palliative care should take patients' socio-cultural characteristics into account and incorporate cultural sensitivity into care standards and care practices.

  12. The medical student as a patient: attitudes towards involvement in the quality and safety of health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Rachel E; Joshi, Devavrata; Patel, Krishan; Briggs, M; Vincent, Charles A

    2013-10-01

    In recent years, factors that affect patients' willingness and ability to participate in safety-relevant behaviours have been investigated. However, how trained healthcare professionals or medical students would feel participating in safety-relevant behaviours as a patient in hospital remains largely unexplored. To investigate medical students' willingness to participate in behaviours related to the quality and safety of their health care. A cross-sectional exploratory study using a survey that addressed willingness to participate in different behaviours recommended by current patient safety initiatives. Three types of interactional behaviours (asking factual or challenging questions, notifying doctors or nurses of errors/problems) and three non-interactional behaviours (choosing a hospital based on the safety record, bringing medicines and a list of allergies into hospital, and reporting an error to a national reporting system) were assessed. One hundred and seventy-nine medical students from an inner city London teaching hospital participated in the study. Students' willingness to participate was affected (P interactional behaviours) whether the patient was engaging in the specific action with a doctor or nurse. Students were least willing to ask 'challenging' questions to doctors and nurses and to report errors to a national reporting system. Doctors' and nurses' encouragement appeared to increase self-reported willingness to participate in behaviours where baseline willingness was low. Similar to research on lay patient populations; medical students do not view involvement in safety-related behaviours equally. Interventions should be tailored at encouraging students to participate in behaviours they are less inclined to take on an active role in. Future research is required to examine students' motivations for participation in this important but heavily under-researched area. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Clinically significant drug–drug interactions involving opioid analgesics used for pain treatment in patients with cancer: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotlinska-Lemieszek A

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aleksandra Kotlinska-Lemieszek,1 Pål Klepstad,2,3,6 Dagny Faksvåg Haugen2,4,5 1Palliative Medicine Chair and Department, University Hospital of the Lord’s Transfiguration, Karol Marcinkowski University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland; 2European Palliative Care Research Centre, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology,Trondheim, Norway; 3Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, St Olavs Hospital, Trondheim, Norway; 4Regional Centre of Excellence for Palliative Care, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway; 5Department of Clinical Medicine K1, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; 6Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway Background: Opioids are the most frequently used drugs to treat pain in cancer patients. In some patients, however, opioids can cause adverse effects and drug–drug interactions. No advice concerning the combination of opioids and other drugs is given in the current European guidelines. Objective: To identify studies that report clinically significant drug–drug interactions involving opioids used for pain treatment in adult cancer patients. Design and data sources: Systematic review with searches in Embase, MEDLINE, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials from the start of the databases (Embase from 1980 through January 2014. In addition, reference lists of relevant full-text papers were hand-searched. Results: Of 901 retrieved papers, 112 were considered as potentially eligible. After full-text reading, 17 were included in the final analysis, together with 15 papers identified through hand-searching of reference lists. All of the 32 included publications were case reports or case series. Clinical manifestations of drug–drug interactions involving opioids were grouped as follows: 1 sedation and respiratory depression, 2 other central nervous system symptoms, 3 impairment of pain

  14. [Retrospective evaluation of sarcoidosis patients 1970-1979 at the Bad Berka Central Clinic for Heart and Lung Diseases for the detection of possible heart involvement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsten, D; Schaedel, H; Kessler, G

    1984-01-01

    Cardiac involvement in pulmonary sarcoidosis was found in a higher percentage than formerly reported, by careful observation. In a retrospective analysis of 1 236 patients with pulmonary sarcoidosis we found a possible cardiac involvement in 15.1%. In cases of pulmonary sarcoidosis or lymph node sarcoidosis combined with sarcoid lesions in other organs (liver, eyes, skin etc.) cardiac involvement is possible. Heart sarcoidosis was found in all roentgenographic stages and without sex difference. Patients with possible heart sarcoidosis suffer from dyspnoe , thoracical pain, heart discomfort, or angina pectoris in a higher part than without it. Enlargement of the heart and/or cardiac failure are signs of sarcoid involvement in patient with sarcoidosis, also in elderly patients. There are some difficulties in differential diagnosis of sarcoid cardiac involvement and ischaemic heart disease.

  15. Exploring the theory, barriers and enablers for patient and public involvement across health, social care and patient safety: a protocol for a systematic review of reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocloo, Josephine; Garfield, Sarah; Dawson, Shoba; Dean Franklin, Bryony

    2017-10-24

    The emergence of patient and public involvement (PPI) in healthcare in the UK can be traced as far back as the 1970s. More recently, campaigns by harmed patients and their relatives have emerged as a result of clinical failings in the NHS, challenging paternalistic healthcare, which have led to a new focus on PPI in quality and safety, nationally and internationally. Evidence suggests that PPI within patient safety is often atheoretical and located within a biomedical discourse. This review will explore the literature on PPI across patient safety, healthcare and social care to identify theory, barriers and enablers that can be used to develop PPI in patient safety. Systematic searches of three electronic bibliographic databases will be conducted, using both MeSH and free-text terms to identify empirical literature published from database inception to May 2017. The screening process will involve input from at least two researchers and any disagreement will be resolved through discussion with a third reviewer. Initial inclusion and exclusion criteria have been developed and will be refined iteratively throughout the process. Data extraction from included articles will be conducted by at least two researchers using a data extraction form. Extracted information will be analysed using a narrative review approach, which synthesises data using a descriptive method. No ethical approval is required for this review as no empirical data were collected. We believe that the findings and recommendations from this review will be particularly relevant for an audience of academics and policymakers. The findings will, therefore, be written up and disseminated in international peer-reviewed journals and academic conferences with a health focus. They will also be disseminated to leading health policy organisations in the NHS, such as NHS England and NHS Improvement and national policy bodies such as the Health Foundation. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise

  16. Evolving the multiple roles of 'patients' in health-care research: reflections after involvement in a trial of shared decision-making.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thornton, H.; Edwards, A.; Elwyn, G.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This paper offers 'consumer-led' reflections by steering group members of a patient-centred research study involving consumer advocates, patients' associations and patients, throughout the whole study, from pre- to post-study phases. ORIGINAL STUDY DESIGN: The study: 'Shared decision

  17. Health promotion in primary care: How should we intervene? A qualitative study involving both physicians and patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cortada Josep M

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effects of tobacco, physical exercise, diet, and alcohol consumption on morbidity and mortality underline the importance of health promotion and prevention (HPP at the primary health care (PHC level. Likewise, the deficiencies when putting such policies into practice and assessing their effectiveness are also widely recognised. The objectives of this research were: a to gain an in-depth understanding of general practitioners' (GPs and patients' perceptions about HPP in PHC, and b to define the areas that could be improved in future interventions. Methods Qualitative methodology focussed on the field of health services research. Information was generated on the basis of two GP-based and two patient-based discussion groups, all of which had previously participated in two interventions concerning healthy lifestyle promotion (tobacco and physical exercise. Transcripts and field notes were analysed on the basis of a sociological discourse-analysis model. The results were validated by triangulation between researchers. Results GPs and patients' discourses about HPP in PHC were different in priorities and contents. An overall explanatory framework was designed to gain a better understanding of the meaning of GP-patient interactions related to HPP, and to show the main trends that emerged from their discourses. GPs linked their perceptions of HPP to their working conditions and experience in health services. The dimensions in this case involved the orientation of interventions, the goal of actions, and the evaluation of results. For patients, habits were mainly related to ways of life particularly influenced by close contexts. Health conceptions, their role as individuals, and the orientation of their demands were the most important dimensions in patients' sphere. Conclusions HPP activities in PHC need to be understood and assessed in the context of their interaction with the conditioning trends in health services and patients

  18. Health information technology to facilitate communication involving health care providers, caregivers, and pediatric patients: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentles, Stephen James; Lokker, Cynthia; McKibbon, K Ann

    2010-06-18

    Pediatric patients with health conditions requiring follow-up typically depend on a caregiver to mediate at least part of the necessary two-way communication with health care providers on their behalf. Health information technology (HIT) and its subset, information communication technology (ICT), are increasingly being applied to facilitate communication between health care provider and caregiver in these situations. Awareness of the extent and nature of published research involving HIT interventions used in this way is currently lacking. This scoping review was designed to map the health literature about HIT used to facilitate communication involving health care providers and caregivers (who are usually family members) of pediatric patients with health conditions requiring follow-up. Terms relating to care delivery, information technology, and pediatrics were combined to search MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CINAHL for the years 1996 to 2008. Eligible studies were selected after three rounds of duplicate screening in which all authors participated. Data regarding patient, caregiver, health care provider, HIT intervention, outcomes studied, and study design were extracted and maintained in a Microsoft Access database. Stage of research was categorized using the UK's Medical Research Council (MRC) framework for developing and evaluating complex interventions. Quantitative and qualitative descriptive summaries are presented. We included 104 eligible studies (112 articles) conducted in 17 different countries and representing 30 different health conditions. The most common conditions were asthma, type 1 diabetes, special needs, and psychiatric disorder. Most studies (88, 85%) included children 2 to 12 years of age, and 73 (71%) involved home care settings. Health care providers operated in hospital settings in 96 (92%) of the studies. Interventions featured 12 modes of communication (eg, Internet, intranets, telephone, video conferencing, email, short message service [SMS], and

  19. Can patient involvement improve patient safety? A cluster randomised control trial of the Patient Reporting and Action for a Safe Environment (PRASE) intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, Rebecca; O'Hara, Jane Kathryn; Sheard, Laura; Armitage, Gerry; Cocks, Kim; Buckley, Hannah; Corbacho, Belen; Reynolds, Caroline; Marsh, Claire; Moore, Sally; Watt, Ian; Wright, John

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of the Patient Reporting and Action for a Safe Environment intervention. A multicentre cluster randomised controlled trial. Clusters were 33 hospital wards within five hospitals in the UK. All patients able to give informed consent were eligible to take part. Wards were allocated to the intervention or control condition. The ward-level intervention comprised two tools: (1) a questionnaire that asked patients about factors contributing to safety (patient measure of safety (PMOS)) and (2) a proforma for patients to report both safety concerns and positive experiences (patient incident reporting tool). Feedback was considered in multidisciplinary action planning meetings. Primary outcomes were routinely collected ward-level harm-free care (HFC) scores and patient-level feedback on safety (PMOS). Intervention uptake and retention of wards was 100% and patient participation was high (86%). We found no significant effect of the intervention on any outcomes at 6 or 12 months. However, for new harms (ie, those for which the wards were directly accountable) intervention wards did show greater, though non-significant, improvement compared with control wards. Analyses also indicated that improvements were largest for wards that showed the greatest compliance with the intervention. Adherence to the intervention, particularly the implementation of action plans, was poor. Patient safety outcomes may represent too blunt a measure. Patients are willing to provide feedback about the safety of their care. However, we were unable to demonstrate any overall effect of this intervention on either measure of patient safety and therefore cannot recommend this intervention for wider uptake. Findings indicate promise for increasing HFC where wards implement ≥75% of the intervention components. ISRCTN07689702; pre-results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  20. Comparison of qualitative and quantitative CT and MRI parameters for monitoring of longitudinal spine involvement in patients with multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horger, M; Fritz, J; Thaiss, W M; Ditt, H; Weisel, K; Haap, M; Kloth, Christopher

    2018-03-01

    To compare qualitative and quantitative computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) parameters for longitudinal disease monitoring of multiple myeloma (MM) of the axial skeleton. We included 31 consecutive patients (17 m; mean age 59.20 ± 8.08 years) with MM, who underwent all baseline (n = 31) and at least one or more (n = 47) follow-up examinations consisting of multi-parametric non-enhanced whole-body MRI ( WB MRI) and non-enhanced whole-body reduced-dose thin-section MDCT (NEWBMDCT) between 06/2013 and 09/2016. We classified response according to qualitative CT criteria into progression (PD), stable(SD), partial/very good partial (PR/VGPR) and complete response(CR), grouping the latter three together for statistical analysis because CT cannot reliably assess PR and CR. Qualitative MR-response criteria were defined and grouped similarly to CT using longitudinal quantification of signal-intensity changes on T1w/STIR/ T2*w and calculating ADC-values. Standard of reference was the hematological laboratory (M-gradient). Hematological response categories were CR (14/47, 29.7%), PR (2/47, 4.2%), SD (16/47, 34.0%) and PD (15/47, 29.9%). Qualitative-CT-evaluation showed PD in 12/47 (25.5%) and SD/PR/VGPR/CR in 35/47 (74.5%) cases. These results were confirmed by quantitative-CT in all focal lytic lesions (p Quantitative-CT at sites with diffuse bone involvement showed significant increase of maximum bone attenuation (p Quantitative MRI diagnosis showed a statistically significant decrease in signal intensity on short tau inversion recovery sequences (STIR) in bone marrow in patients with diffuse bone marrow involvement achieving SD/PR/VGPR/CR (p quantitative parameters with either CT or MRI.

  1. Altered expression pattern of molecular factors involved in colonic smooth muscle functions: an immunohistochemical study in patients with diverticular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattii, Letizia; Ippolito, Chiara; Segnani, Cristina; Battolla, Barbara; Colucci, Rocchina; Dolfi, Amelio; Bassotti, Gabrio; Blandizzi, Corrado; Bernardini, Nunzia

    2013-01-01

    The pathogenesis of diverticular disease (DD) is thought to result from complex interactions among dietary habits, genetic factors and coexistence of other bowel abnormalities. These conditions lead to alterations in colonic pressure and motility, facilitating the formation of diverticula. Although electrophysiological studies on smooth muscle cells (SMCs) have investigated colonic motor dysfunctions, scarce attention has been paid to their molecular abnormalities, and data on SMCs in DD are lacking. Accordingly, the main purpose of this study was to evaluate the expression patterns of molecular factors involved in the contractile functions of SMCs in the tunica muscularis of colonic specimens from patients with DD. By means of immunohistochemistry and image analysis, we examined the expression of Cx26 and Cx43, which are prominent components of gap junctions in human colonic SMCs, as well as pS368-Cx43, PKCps, RhoA and αSMA, all known to regulate the functions of gap junctions and the contractile activity of SMCs. The immunohistochemical analysis revealed significant abnormalities in DD samples, concerning both the expression and distribution patterns of most of the investigated molecular factors. This study demonstrates, for the first time, that an altered pattern of factors involved in SMC contractility is present at level of the tunica muscularis of DD patients. Moreover, considering that our analysis was conducted on colonic tissues not directly affected by diverticular lesions or inflammatory reactions, it is conceivable that these molecular alterations may precede and predispose to the formation of diverticula, rather than being mere consequences of the disease.

  2. Proteomic biomarkers predicting lymph node involvement in serum of cervical cancer patients. Limitations of SELDI-TOF MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Gorp Toon

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lymph node status is not part of the staging system for cervical cancer, but provides important information for prognosis and treatment. We investigated whether lymph node status can be predicted with proteomic profiling. Material & methods Serum samples of 60 cervical cancer patients (FIGO I/II were obtained before primary treatment. Samples were run through a HPLC depletion column, eliminating the 14 most abundant proteins ubiquitously present in serum. Unbound fractions were concentrated with spin filters. Fractions were spotted onto CM10 and IMAC30 surfaces and analyzed with surface-enhanced laser desorption time of flight (SELDI-TOF mass spectrometry (MS. Unsupervised peak detection and peak clustering was performed using MASDA software. Leave-one-out (LOO validation for weighted Least Squares Support Vector Machines (LSSVM was used for prediction of lymph node involvement. Other outcomes were histological type, lymphvascular space involvement (LVSI and recurrent disease. Results LSSVM models were able to determine LN status with a LOO area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC of 0.95, based on peaks with m/z values 2,698.9, 3,953.2, and 15,254.8. Furthermore, we were able to predict LVSI (AUC 0.81, to predict recurrence (AUC 0.92, and to differentiate between squamous carcinomas and adenocarcinomas (AUC 0.88, between squamous and adenosquamous carcinomas (AUC 0.85, and between adenocarcinomas and adenosquamous carcinomas (AUC 0.94. Conclusions Potential markers related with lymph node involvement were detected, and protein/peptide profiling support differentiation between various subtypes of cervical cancer. However, identification of the potential biomarkers was hampered by the technical limitations of SELDI-TOF MS.

  3. MECHANISMS IN ENDOCRINOLOGY: Kidney involvement in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism: an update on clinical and molecular aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdelli, C; Corbetta, S

    2017-01-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) is the third most common endocrine disease. Kidney is a target of both chronic elevated PTH and calcium in PHPT. The classic PHPT complications of symptomatic kidney stones and nephrocalcinosis have become rare and the PHPT current presentation is asymptomatic with uncertain and long-lasting progression. Nonetheless, the routine use of imaging and of biochemical determinations have revealed the frequent occurrence of asymptomatic kidney stones, hypercalciuria and reduced kidney function in asymptomatic PHPT patients. Though the pathogenesis is far from being elucidated, PHPT is associated with reduced renal function, in terms of estimated glomerular filtration rate, and related increased morbidity and mortality. In the last decade, the effort of the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) panel of experts highlighted that even mild reduction of kidney function is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. These considerations provided the basis for the Fourth Workshop recommendations of a more extensive diagnostic workout about kidney features and of wider criteria for parathyroid surgery including asymptomatic kidney disease. Moreover, kidney involvement in PHPT is likely to be affected by variants of genes coding the key molecules regulating the calcium and ions renal handling; these features might have clinical relevance and should be considered both during diagnostic workout and follow-up. Finally, the effects of parathyroid surgery and of medical treatment on kidney involvement of PHPT are reviewed. © 2017 European Society of Endocrinology.

  4. Atypical rapid progression of osteoarticular amyloidosis involving the hip in a patient on hemodialysis using polyacrylonitrile membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kenneth S. [University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, WI (United States); Holsbeeck, Marnix T. van [Wayne State School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI (United States); Abbud, Alexander [Wayne State School of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2010-01-15

    Amyloidosis related to dialysis is a well-known complication affecting many organ systems, in particular the musculoskeletal system. In 1985 Shirahama et al. (Biochem Biophys Res Commun 53:705-709, 1985) identified beta-2 microglobulin (MG) as the offending constituent by using protein purification techniques. Amyloidosis has been increasing in prevalence because of longer life spans and increased chronic medical conditions such as end-stage renal disease. When dialysis-related amyloidosis involves the musculoskeletal system, it affects the shoulder girdle, the so called shoulder pad sign, the wrist, hip, knee, and spine (Resnick, Diagnosis of bone and joint disorders, 4th edn., pp. 2054-2058 and 2176-2183, 2002). Other osteoarticular manifestations of amyloidosis include osteoporosis, lytic lesions, and pathologic fractures. It has been well documented that the prevalence of amyloid is dependent on duration of dialysis - over 90% in patients on dialysis for over 7 years (Jadoul, Nephrol Dial Transplant 13:61-64, 1998). However, a recent changeover to high-flux membranes used in hemofiltration has been reported to delay its onset (Campistol et al., Contrib Nephrol 125:76-85, 1999). We report on the radiographic, nuclear medicine, and computed tomography (CT) findings of osteoarticular amyloidosis involving the hip, and sequence its atypical rapid onset. The imaging, histopathological findings, and differential diagnosis are discussed. (orig.)

  5. Pre-treatment hemodynamic features involved with long-term survival of cirrhotic patients after embolization of gastric fundal varices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Hitoshi; Okugawa, Hidehiro; Kobayashi, Satoshi; Yoshizumi, Hiroaki; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To clarify the pre-treatment hemodynamic features involved in the long-term survival of cirrhotic patients with gastric fundal varices (FV) after balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (B-RTO). Materials and methods: Eighty-one cirrhotic patients with medium- or large-grade FV treated by B-RTO were enrolled in this retrospective study. Pre-treatment flow volume ratio between gastric vein and portal trunk (GP-R) was obtained by Doppler ultrasound. Results: The cumulative survival rate was 90% at 1 year, 74.8% at 3 years, 57.2% at 5 years, and 45.8% at 7 years without recurrence in a median period of 1148.5 days The survival was poorer in patients with HCC (47% at 3 years, 9.4% at 5 years, p < 0.0001) than without (89.2% at 3 years, 81.9% at 5 years, 67.5% at 7 years), in patients with Child B/C (57.7% at 3 years, 42.1% at 5 years, 28.1% at 7 years, p = 0.0016) than with Child A (91.8% at 3 years, 71.5% at 5 years, 62.1% at 7 years), and in patients with GP-R ≥ 1.0 (58.9% at 3 years, p = 0.0485) than with GP-R < 1.0 (76.3% at 3 years, 62% at 5 years, 49.6% at 7 years). Multivariate analysis identified the presence of HCC (hazard ratio, 12.486; 95% CI, 4.08-38.216; p < 0.0001), Child B/C (hazard ratio, 3.41; 95% CI, 1.594-7.15; p = 0.0051) and GP-R ≥ 1.0 (hazard ratio, 2.701; 95% CI, 1.07-6.15; p = 0.0221) as independent factors for poor prognosis. Conclusion: GP-R ≥ 1.0 on Doppler ultrasound before B-RTO may be a predictive indicator for poor prognosis in cirrhotic patients with FV after B-RTO, in addition to the presence of HCC and severe liver damage.

  6. Perspectives on care and communication involving incurably ill Turkish and Moroccan patients, relatives and professionals: a systematic literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Graaff Fuusje M

    2012-09-01

    often quite influential in end-of-life decisions, such as the decision to withdraw or withhold treatments. The diagnosis, prognosis and end-of-life decisions are seldom discussed with the patient, and communication about pain and mental problems is often limited. Language barriers and the dominance of the family may exacerbate communication problems. Conclusions This review confirms the view that family members of patients with a Turkish or Moroccan background have a central role in care, communication and decision making at the end of life. This, in combination with their continuing hope for the patient’s recovery may inhibit open communication between patients, relatives and professionals as partners in palliative care. This implies that organizations and professionals involved in palliative care should take patients’ socio-cultural characteristics into account and incorporate cultural sensitivity into care standards and care practices.

  7. Pre-treatment hemodynamic features involved with long-term survival of cirrhotic patients after embolization of gastric fundal varices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maruyama, Hitoshi, E-mail: maru-cib@umin.ac.j [Department of Medicine and Clinical Oncology, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1, Inohana, Chuou-ku, Chiba, 260-8670 (Japan); Okugawa, Hidehiro, E-mail: hideun@yahoo.co.j [Department of Medicine and Clinical Oncology, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1, Inohana, Chuou-ku, Chiba, 260-8670 (Japan); Kobayashi, Satoshi, E-mail: kobakobakopa@yahoo.co.j [Department of Medicine and Clinical Oncology, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1, Inohana, Chuou-ku, Chiba, 260-8670 (Japan); Yoshizumi, Hiroaki, E-mail: yossih04@yahoo.co.j [Department of Medicine and Clinical Oncology, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1, Inohana, Chuou-ku, Chiba, 260-8670 (Japan); Yokosuka, Osamu, E-mail: yokosukao@faculty.chiba-u.j [Department of Medicine and Clinical Oncology, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1, Inohana, Chuou-ku, Chiba, 260-8670 (Japan)

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: To clarify the pre-treatment hemodynamic features involved in the long-term survival of cirrhotic patients with gastric fundal varices (FV) after balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (B-RTO). Materials and methods: Eighty-one cirrhotic patients with medium- or large-grade FV treated by B-RTO were enrolled in this retrospective study. Pre-treatment flow volume ratio between gastric vein and portal trunk (GP-R) was obtained by Doppler ultrasound. Results: The cumulative survival rate was 90% at 1 year, 74.8% at 3 years, 57.2% at 5 years, and 45.8% at 7 years without recurrence in a median period of 1148.5 days The survival was poorer in patients with HCC (47% at 3 years, 9.4% at 5 years, p < 0.0001) than without (89.2% at 3 years, 81.9% at 5 years, 67.5% at 7 years), in patients with Child B/C (57.7% at 3 years, 42.1% at 5 years, 28.1% at 7 years, p = 0.0016) than with Child A (91.8% at 3 years, 71.5% at 5 years, 62.1% at 7 years), and in patients with GP-R {>=} 1.0 (58.9% at 3 years, p = 0.0485) than with GP-R < 1.0 (76.3% at 3 years, 62% at 5 years, 49.6% at 7 years). Multivariate analysis identified the presence of HCC (hazard ratio, 12.486; 95% CI, 4.08-38.216; p < 0.0001), Child B/C (hazard ratio, 3.41; 95% CI, 1.594-7.15; p = 0.0051) and GP-R {>=} 1.0 (hazard ratio, 2.701; 95% CI, 1.07-6.15; p = 0.0221) as independent factors for poor prognosis. Conclusion: GP-R {>=} 1.0 on Doppler ultrasound before B-RTO may be a predictive indicator for poor prognosis in cirrhotic patients with FV after B-RTO, in addition to the presence of HCC and severe liver damage.

  8. Single-organ gallbladder vasculitis: characterization and distinction from systemic vasculitis involving the gallbladder. An analysis of 61 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Rodríguez, José; Tan, Carmela D; Rodríguez, E René; Hoffman, Gary S

    2014-11-01

    Systemic vasculitis (SV) involving abdominal structures usually has a poor prognosis. Gallbladder vasculitis (GV) has been reported as part of SV (GB-SV) and focal single-organ vasculitis (GB-SOV). We analyzed clinical and histologic characteristics of patients with GV to identify features that differentiate GB-SOV from the systemic forms of GV. To identify affected patients with GV we used pathology databases from our institution and an English-language PubMed search. Clinical manifestations, laboratory and histologic features, treatment administered, and outcomes were recorded. Patients were divided in 2 groups, GB-SOV and GB-SV. As in previous studies of single-organ vasculitis, GB-SOV was only considered to be a sustainable diagnosis if disease beyond the gallbladder was not apparent after a follow-up period of at least 6 months. Sixty-one well-characterized patients with GV were included (6 from our institution). There was no significant sex bias (32 female patients, 29 male). Median age was 52 years (range, 18-94 yr). GB-SOV was found in 20 (33%) and GB-SV in 41 (67%) patients. No differences were observed in age, sex frequency, or duration of gallbladder symptoms between groups. Past episodes of recurrent right-upper quadrant or abdominal pain and lithiasic cholecystitis were more frequent in GB-SOV patients, whereas acalculous cholecystitis occurred more often in GB-SV. In GB-SV, gallbladder-related symptoms occurred more often concomitantly with or after the systemic features, but they sometimes appeared before SV was fully developed (13.5%). Constitutional and musculoskeletal symptoms were reported only in GB-SV patients. Compared to GB-SOV, GB-SV patients presented more often with fever (62.5% vs 20%; p = 0.003) and exhibited higher erythrocyte sedimentation rate levels (80 ± 28 vs 37 ± 25 mm/h, respectively; p = 0.006). All GB-SV patients required glucocorticoids and 50% of them also received cytotoxic agents. Mortality in GB-SV was

  9. Patients at the centre: methodological considerations for evaluating evidence from health interventions involving patients use of web-based information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Elizabeth; Turner, Paul

    2010-09-15

    Building an evidence base for healthcare interventions has long been advocated as both professionally and ethically desirable. By supporting meaningful comparison amongst different approaches, a good evidence base has been viewed as an important element in optimising clinical decision-making and the safety and quality of care. Unsurprisingly, medical research has put considerable effort into supporting the development of this evidence base, and the randomised controlled trial has become the dominant methodology. Recently however, a body of research has begun to question, not just this methodology per se, but also the extent to which the evidence it produces may marginalise individual patient experiences, priorities and perceptions.Simultaneously, the widespread adoption and utilisation of information systems (IS) in health care has also prompted initiatives to develop a stronger base of evidence about their impacts. These calls have been stimulated both by numerous system failures and research expressing concerns about the limitations of information systems methodologies in health care environments. Alongside the potential of information systems to produce positive, negative and unintended consequences, many measures of success, impact or benefit appear to have little to do with improvements in care, health outcomes or individual patient experiences.Combined these methodological concerns suggest the need for more detailed examination. This is particularly the case, given the prevalence within contemporary clinical and IS discourses on health interventions advocating the need to put the 'patient at the centre' by engaging them in their own care and/or 'empowering' them through the use of information systems.This paper aims to contribute to these on-going debates by focusing on the socio-technical processes by which patients' interests and outcomes are measured, defined and evaluated within health interventions that involve them using web-based information systems

  10. How can the practice nurse be more involved in the care of the chronically ill? The perspectives of GPs, patients and practice nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heiderhoff Marc

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Background A well established "midlevel" of patient care, such as nurse practitioners and/or physician assistants, exits in many countries like the US, Canada, and Australia. In Germany, however there is only one kind of profession assisting the physician in practices, the practice nurse. Little is known about the present involvement of practice nurses in patients' care in Germany and about the attitudes of GPs, assistants and patients concerning an increased involvement. The aim of our study was to get qualitative information on the extent to which practice nurses are currently involved in the treatment of patients and about possibilities of increased involvement as well as on barriers of increased involvement. Methods We performed qualitative, semi-structured interviews with 20 GPs, 20 practice nurses and 20 patients in the Heidelberg area. The interviews were digitally recorded, transcribed and content-analysed with ATLAS.ti. Results Practice nurses are only marginally involved in the treatment of patients. GPs as well as patients were very sceptical about increased involvement in care. Patients were sceptical about nurses' professional background and feared a worsening of the patient doctor relationship. GPs also complained about the nurses' deficient education concerning medical knowledge. They feared a lack of time as well as a missing reimbursement for the efforts of an increased involvement. Practice nurses were mostly willing to be more involved, regarding it as an appreciation of their role. Important barriers were lack of time, overload with administrative work, and a lack of professional knowledge. Conclusion Practice nurses were only little involved in patient care. GPs were more sceptical than patients regarding an increased involvement. One possible area, accepted by all interviewed groups, was patient education as for instance dietary counselling. New treatment approaches as the chronic care model will require a team approach

  11. Intraoperative Radiation Therapy Reduces Local Recurrence Rates in Patients With Microscopically Involved Circumferential Resection Margins After Resection of Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberda, Wijnand J.; Verhoef, Cornelis [Department of Surgery, Division of Surgical Oncology, Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Nuyttens, Joost J. [Department of Radiotherapy, Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Meerten, Esther van [Department of Medical Oncology, Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Rothbarth, Joost [Department of Surgery, Division of Surgical Oncology, Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Wilt, Johannes H.W. de [Department of Surgery, Division of Surgical Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Burger, Jacobus W.A., E-mail: j.burger@erasmusmc.nl [Department of Surgery, Division of Surgical Oncology, Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) is advocated by some for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) who have involved or narrow circumferential resection margins (CRM) after rectal surgery. This study evaluates the potentially beneficial effect of IORT on local control. Methods and Materials: All surgically treated patients with LARC treated in a tertiary referral center between 1996 and 2012 were analyzed retrospectively. The outcome in patients treated with IORT with a clear but narrow CRM (≤2 mm) or a microscopically involved CRM was compared with the outcome in patients who were not treated with IORT. Results: A total of 409 patients underwent resection of LARC, and 95 patients (23%) had a CRM ≤ 2 mm. Four patients were excluded from further analysis because of a macroscopically involved resection margin. In 43 patients with clear but narrow CRMs, there was no difference in the cumulative 5-year local recurrence-free survival of patients treated with (n=21) or without (n=22) IORT (70% vs 79%, P=.63). In 48 patients with a microscopically involved CRM, there was a significant difference in the cumulative 5-year local recurrence-free survival in favor of the patients treated with IORT (n=31) compared with patients treated without IORT (n=17) (84 vs 41%, P=.01). Multivariable analysis confirmed that IORT was independently associated with a decreased local recurrence rate (hazard ratio 0.24, 95% confidence interval 0.07-0.86). There was no significant difference in complication rate of patients treated with or without IORT (65% vs 52%, P=.18) Conclusion: The current study suggests that IORT reduces local recurrence rates in patients with LARC with a microscopically involved CRM.

  12. Value of Tc99m-DTPA alveolar permeability in lung involvement detection of patients with HIV infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massardo Vega, Teresa; Jofre Manieu, Maria Josefina; Cabello Araya, Hernan; Sepulveda Carvajal, Cecilia; Ruiz Carmona, Mauricio; Moyano Schlegel, Leonor; Fica Cubillos, Alberto; Alay Perez, Rita

    2001-01-01

    We studied 35 HIV patients in order to know the value of Tc99mDTPA in the assessment of pulmonary lung involvement, especially pneumocystis carinii (PC) infection. Lung DTPA clearance measures increased alveolar permeability. Twenty patients with respiratory symptoms were included, 4 with systemic symptoms and also 11 asymptomatics, with similar immune condition (CD4 lymphocytes <400) as a control group. Smoking habit was suspended prior the test. Clinical follow up, chest film, induced sputum and/or fibrobronchoscopy were obtained. There was histological confirmation of PC presence or absence in 16 symptomatics and 3 asymptomatics. DTPA sensitivity for PC detection was 78%, specificity 40% and accuracy 58%; the values were 85%, 60% and 79%, respectively, for inflammatory lung processes. There were 4/6 cases false positive for PC detection with respiratory features explaining DTPA abnormalities. Concluding, Tc99m-DTPA is sensitive but not specific for detecting PC pneumonia but its value is higher for pulmonary inflammatory processes (Au)

  13. A patient with cerebral Whipple disease with gastric involvement but no gastrointestinal symptoms: a consequence of local protective immunity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prüss, Harald; Katchanov, Juri; Zschenderlein, Rolf; Loddenkemper, Christoph; Schneider, Thomas; Moos, Verena

    2007-08-01

    Whipple disease is a granulomatous infectious disease caused by Tropheryma whipplei. The bacteria accumulate within macrophages, preferentially in the intestinal mucosa. Disease manifestation seems to be linked to immunological abnormalities of macrophages. We describe a patient with cerebral Whipple disease who presented with changes in mental status, confusion, inverse sleep-wake cycle, bilateral ptosis and vertical gaze palsy. Endoscopic biopsy sampling revealed Whipple disease in the gastric antrum but not in the duodenum. Whole blood stimulation displayed reactivity to T. whipplei that was at the lower end of healthy controls while reactivity of duodenal lymphocytes was not diminished. We propose that in cases of neurological symptoms suspicious of Whipple disease with normal duodenal and jenunal findings, biopsy sampling should be extended to the gastric mucosa. The robust reactivity of duodenal lymphocytes may have prevented our patient from developing small bowel disease, whereas the impaired reactivity in peripheral blood lymphocytes might yet explain the bacterial spreading to the central nervous system leading to the rare case of predominant neurological symptoms without relevant systemic involvement.

  14. Developing effective animal-assisted intervention programs involving visiting dogs for institutionalized geriatric patients: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Alessandra; Borgi, Marta; Terranova, Livia; Chiarotti, Flavia; Alleva, Enrico; Cirulli, Francesca

    2012-09-01

    An ever increasing interest in the therapeutic aspects of the human-animal bond has led to a proliferation of animal-assisted interventions (AAI) involving dogs. However, most of these programs lack a solid methodological structure, and basic evaluative research is needed. The purpose of this study was to test the value of dog-assisted interventions as an innovative tool to increase quality of life in the geriatric population. Nineteen patients (men and women) with a mean age of 85 years participated in the study. Interactions between patients and visiting dogs occurred either in a social situation (socialization sessions) or in a therapeutic context (physical therapy sessions). We derived and characterized a specific ethogram of elderly-dog interactions aimed at evaluating the effectiveness of visiting dogs in improving mood, catalyzing social interactions and reducing their everyday apathetic state. Cortisol levels were also measured in the saliva, and depressive state was evaluated. Overall, results show a time-dependent increase in social behaviour and spontaneous interactions with the dogs. Dog-mediated interactions affected the daily increase in cortisol levels, thus having an 'activational effect', in contrast to the apathetic state of institutionalized elderly. Dog-mediated intervention programs appear to be promising tools to improve the social skills and enrich the daily activities of the institutionalized elderly. © 2012 The Authors. Psychogeriatrics © 2012 Japanese Psychogeriatric Society.

  15. Primary Effusion Lymphoma Involving both Pleural and Abdominal Cavities in a Patient with Hepatitis B Virus-related Liver Cirrhosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Ying Hsieh

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL is an unusual form of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, which is characterized by lymphomatous effusion in body cavities, but no associated mass lesions. It is usually associated with an immunodeficient state most often with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. We describe a 54-year-old man with HIV-negative PEL, with a history of hepatitis B virus-related liver cirrhosis. Both abdominal and pleural cavities were involved; no solid tumor masses were found and bone marrow investigations were normal. The ascites and pleural effusion contained numerous pleomorphic lymphoid cells. Immunophenotyping was positive for CD138. Chromosome study showed complex cytogenetics. The genomic human herpesvirus-8 was detected in the lymphoma cells. It is postulated that the immuno-suppressed state in this patient may have been caused by cirrhosis. The patient received four cycles of chemotherapy of CHOP and Picibanil (OK-432 intraperitoneal administration. However, no durable remission was achieved. Adefovir failed to halt the progressive liver failure after the development of YMDD mutant related to lamivudine. He died of sepsis and hepatic failure.

  16. The dangers of involving children as family caregivers of palliative home-based-care to advanced HIV/AIDS patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S M Kang′ethe

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research paper is to explore the dangers of involving children as family caregivers of palliative care and home-based-care to advanced HIV/AIDS patients, while its objective is to discuss the dangers or perfidiousness that minors especially the girl children face as they handle care giving of advanced HIV/AIDS patients. The article has relied on eclectic data sources. The research has foundminors disadvantaged by the following: being engulfed by fear and denied rights through care giving; being emotionally and physiologically overwhelmed; being oppressed and suppressed by caring duties; being at risk of contracting HIV/AIDS; and having their education compromised by care giving. The paper recommends: (1 strengthening and emphasizing on children′s rights; (2 maintaining gender balance in care giving; (3 implementation and domestication of the United Nations conventions on the rights of children; (4 community awareness on equal gender co participation in care giving; (5 and fostering realization that relying on child care giving is a negative score in fulfilling global Millennium Development Goals.

  17. MR findings of central nervous system involvement in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patient : a report of two cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Hye Suk; Kim, Dong Ik; Lee, Byeong Hee; Jeong, Sun Yang

    1996-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) manifestations in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients are an early and common feature. The spectrum of AIDS-related CNS diseases are encephalitis caused by the human immunodeficiency virus(HIV) itself, opportunistic infection, infarct and malignancy. We experienced two cases of CNS involvement in AIDS and they were serologically diagnosed as HIV encephalitis and CNS toxoplasmosis, respectively. In the case of the HIV encephalitis patient, brain MRI showed a non-enhancing lesion with high signal intensity on T2WI and low signal on T1WI and there was no mass effect on the right frontal lobe, periventricular white matter, splenium of the corpus callosum or bilateral basal ganglia. In the other case of CNS toxoplasmosis, MR showed multiple nodular and rim enhanced mass lesions in the right basal ganglia, thalamus and periventricular white matter, which were of low signal intensity on T1WI and of high intensity on T2WI. We thus report the related MRI findings

  18. The extent, quality and impact of patient and public involvement in primary care research: a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, Steven; McLachlan, Sarah; Jowett, Sue; Kinghorn, Philip; Gill, Paramjit; Higginbottom, Adele; Rhodes, Carol; Stevenson, Fiona; Jinks, Clare

    2018-01-01

    In the UK, more patients go to primary care than other parts of the health service. Therefore it is important for research into primary care to include the insights and views of people who receive these services. To explore the extent, quality and impact of patient and public involvement (PPI) in primary care research, we examined documents of 200 projects and surveyed 191 researchers.We found that about half of studies included PPI to develop research ideas and during the study itself. Common activities included designing study materials, advising on methods, and managing the research. Some studies did not undertake the PPI activities initially planned and funded for. PPI varied by study design, health condition and study population. We found pockets of good practice: having a PPI budget, supporting PPI contributors, and PPI informing recruitment issues. However, good practice was lacking in other areas. Few projects offered PPI contributors training, used PPI to develop information for participants about study progress and included PPI to advise on publishing findings.Researchers reported beneficial impacts of PPI. Most impact was reported when the approach to PPI included more indicators of good practice. The main cost of PPI for researchers was their time. Many reported difficulties providing information about PPI.In partnership with PPI contributors, we have used these findings to develop:a new Cost and Consequences Framework for PPI highlighting financial and non-financial costs, benefits and harms of PPIFifteen co-produced recommendations to improve the practice and delivery of PPI. Background: To improve the lives of patients in primary care requires the involvement of service users in primary care research. We aimed to explore the extent, quality and impact of patient and public involvement (PPI) in primary care research. Methods: We extracted information about PPI from grant applications, reports and an electronic survey of researchers of studies funded

  19. An International Collaborative Study of Outcome and Prognostic Factors in Patients with Secondary CNS Involvement By Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Galaly, Tarec Christoffer; Cheah, Chan Yoon; Bendtsen, Mette Dahl

    2016-01-01

    ) determine prognostic factors after SCNS.Patients and methods: We performed a retrospective study of patients diagnosed with SCNS during or after frontline immunochemotherapy (R-CHOP or equivalently effective regimens). SCNS was defined as new involvement of the CNS (parenchymal, leptomeningeal, and/or eye......Background: Secondary CNS involvement (SCNS) is a detrimental complication seen in ~5% of patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) treated with modern immunochemotherapy. Data from older series report short survival following SCNS, typically lt;6 months. However, data in patients...

  20. Making patient and public involvement in cancer and palliative research a reality: academic support is vital for success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Karen; Boote, Jonathan; Ardron, David; Gath, Jacqui; Green, Tracy; Ahmedzai, Sam H

    2015-06-01

    Patient and public involvement (PPI) has become an established theme within the UK health research policy and is recognised as an essential force in the drive to improve the quality of services and research. These developments have been particularly rapid in the cancer field. This paper outlines a model of PPI in research (known as the North Trent Cancer Research Network Consumer Research Panel, NTCRN CRP; comprising 38 cancer and palliative care patients/carers) and the key benefits and challenges to effective PPI in cancer research. The PPI model has become a sustainable, inclusive and effective way of implementing PPI within the cancer context. Challenges include (1) a lack of time and funding available to support the PPI model; (2) tensions between different stakeholder groups when developing and conducting health research; (3) panel members finding it difficult to effectively integrate into research meetings when their role and contribution is not made clear at the outset or when unfamiliar language and jargon are used and not explained; (4) some professionals remain unclear about the role and practical implications of PPI in research. However, notwithstanding its financial and organisational challenges, the way that the NTCRN CRP is supported has provided a solid base for it to flourish. PPI provides considerable opportunities for patients and the public to work collaboratively with professionals to influence the cancer research agenda, with the contribution of PPI to the research process being integral to the entire process from the outset, rather than appended to it. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  1. Liver upregulation of genes involved in cortisol production and action is associated with metabolic syndrome in morbidly obese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrecilla, Esther; Fernández-Vázquez, Gumersindo; Vicent, David; Sánchez-Franco, Franco; Barabash, Ana; Cabrerizo, Lucio; Sánchez-Pernaute, Andrés; Torres, Antonio J; Rubio, Miguel Angel

    2012-03-01

    Hepatic 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1) activity, which converts cortisone (inactive) to cortisol, is downregulated in obesity. However, this compensation fails in obese with metabolic abnormalities, such as diabetes. To further characterize the tissue-specific cortisol regeneration in obesity, we have investigated the mRNA expression of genes related to local cortisol production, i.e., 11β-HSD1, hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (H6PDH) and cortisol action, glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and a cortisol target gene, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) in the liver, and visceral (VAT) and subcutaneous (SAT) adipose tissues from morbidly obese patients with and without metabolic syndrome (MS). Fifty morbidly obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery, 14 men (mean age, 41.3 ± 3.5 years; BMI, 48.0 ± 3.6 kg/m(2)) and 36 women (mean age, 44.6 ± 1.9 years; BMI, 44.9 ± 1.2 kg/m(2)), were classified as having MS (MS+, n = 20) or not (MS-, n = 30). Tissue mRNA levels were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Hepatic mRNA levels of these genes were higher in obese patients with MS (11β-HSD1, P = 0.002; H6PDH, P = 0.043; GR, P = 0.033; PEPCK, P = 0.032) and positively correlated with the number of clinical characteristics that define the MS. The expression of the four genes positively correlated among them. In contrast to the liver, these genes were not differently expressed in VAT or SAT, when MS+ and MS- obese patients were compared. Coordinated liver-specific upregulation of genes involved in local cortisol regeneration and action support the concept that local hepatic hypercortisolism contributes to development of MS in morbidly obese patients.

  2. A role of multimodality bladder-preserving therapy in patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer plus hydronephrosis with or without pelvic nodal involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Chiang

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: With trimodality treatment involving visually complete transurethral resection of bladder tumor, cisplatin-based induction chemotherapy, and CCRT, patients with unfavorable factors maintained satisfactory bladder preservation but not systemic control.

  3. An Untapped Resource: Patient and Public Involvement in Implementation Comment on "Knowledge Mobilization in Healthcare Organizations: A View From the Resource-Based View of the Firm".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Christopher; Rycroft-Malone, Jo

    2015-08-07

    This commentary considers the potential role of patient and public involvement in implementation. Developing an analytical thread from the resource-based view of the Firm, we argue that this involvement may create unique resources that have the capacity to enhance the impact of implementation activity for healthcare organisations. © 2015 by Kerman University of Medical Sciences.

  4. Recommendations for the Involvement of Patient Research Partners (PRP) in OMERACT Working Groups. A Report from the OMERACT 2014 Working Group on PRP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Peter P; de Wit, Maarten; Bingham, Clifton O; Kirwan, John R; Leong, Amye; March, Lyn M; Montie, Pam; Scholte-Voshaar, Marieke; Gossec, Laure

    2016-01-01

    Patient participation in research is increasing; however, practical guidelines to enhance this participation are lacking. Specifically within the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) organization, although patients have participated in OMERACT meetings since 2002, consensus about the procedures for involving patients in working groups has not been formalized. The objective is to develop a set of recommendations regarding patient research partner (PRP) involvement in research working groups. We conducted a systematic literature review on recommendations/guidelines of PRP involvement in research; elaborated a structured consensus process involving multiple participants to develop a set of recommendations; and sought endorsement of recommendations by OMERACT. In the 18 articles included in the literature review, there was general agreement on the broad concepts for recommendations covering PRP involvement in research although they were heterogeneous in detail. Most considered PRP involvement in all phases of research with early engagement, training, and support important, but details on the content were scarce. This review informed a larger consensus-building process regarding PRP inclusion in OMERACT research. Three overarching principles and 8 recommendations were developed, discussed, and refined at OMERACT 2014. The guiding principles were endorsed during the OMERACT plenary session. These recommendations for PRP involvement in OMERACT research reinforce the importance of patient participation throughout the research process as integral members. Although the applicability of the recommendations in other research contexts should be assessed, the generalizability is expected to be high. Future research should evaluate their implementation and their effect on outcome development.

  5. Patients at the Centre: Methodological Considerations for Evaluating Evidence from Health Interventions Involving Patients Use of Web-Based Information Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Elizabeth; Turner, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Building an evidence base for healthcare interventions has long been advocated as both professionally and ethically desirable. By supporting meaningful comparison amongst different approaches, a good evidence base has been viewed as an important element in optimising clinical decision-making and the safety and quality of care. Unsurprisingly, medical research has put considerable effort into supporting the development of this evidence base, and the randomised controlled trial has become the dominant methodology. Recently however, a body of research has begun to question, not just this methodology per se, but also the extent to which the evidence it produces may marginalise individual patient experiences, priorities and perceptions. Simultaneously, the widespread adoption and utilisation of information systems (IS) in health care has also prompted initiatives to develop a stronger base of evidence about their impacts. These calls have been stimulated both by numerous system failures and research expressing concerns about the limitations of information systems methodologies in health care environments. Alongside the potential of information systems to produce positive, negative and unintended consequences, many measures of success, impact or benefit appear to have little to do with improvements in care, health outcomes or individual patient experiences. Combined these methodological concerns suggest the need for more detailed examination. This is particularly the case, given the prevalence within contemporary clinical and IS discourses on health interventions advocating the need to put the ‘patient at the centre’ by engaging them in their own care and/or ‘empowering’ them through the use of information systems. This paper aims to contribute to these on-going debates by focusing on the socio-technical processes by which patients’ interests and outcomes are measured, defined and evaluated within health interventions that involve them using web

  6. Hypocretin-1 levels in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with Percheron artery infarction with or without midbrain involvement: A case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Keisuke; Miyamoto, Tomoyuki; Miyamoto, Masayuki; Maeda, Hiroto; Nokura, Kazuya; Tohyama, Jun; Hirata, Koichi; Shimizu, Tetsuo; Kanbayashi, Takashi

    2016-07-01

    Bilateral paramedian thalamic infarctions (BPTIs) due to artery of Percheron occlusion are known to cause hypersomnia. However, the role of hypocretin-1, a wake-promoting peptide that is located at the lateral hypothalamus, in hypersomnia in these patients remains unclear. To clarify the role of hypocretin-1 in hypersomnia in patients with BPTIs, hypocretin-1 levels in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were measured in 6 patients with BPTIs: 2 with rostral midbrain involvement (BPT+RMI) and 4 without midbrain involvement (BPT-MI). CSF hypocretin-1 levels were decreased in 2 patients with BPT+RMI and were within normal ranges in 4 patients with BPT-MI. Hypersomnia was noted in all the patients. In one BPT+RMI patient, hypersomnia was improved within 2 weeks and decreased CSF hypocretin-1 levels were reversed (acute phase (on day 9), 109.2 pg/mL; chronic phase (at 3 months), 323 pg/mL), whereas another BPT+RMI patient who displayed coma in the acute phase had decreased CSF orexin levels (107 pg/mL) at day 49 and exhibited severe disability. Hypocretin deficiency was not involved in hypersomnia observed in BPT-MI patients; however, CSF hypocretin-1 levels were reduced in BPT+RMI patients. Reduced CSF hypocretin-1 levels in the chronic phase may possibly predict a poor clinical outcome in patients with Percheron artery infarction.

  7. Vincristine-induced neuropathy in pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in Oman: Frequent autonomic and more severe cranial nerve involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazir, Hanan F; AlFutaisi, Amna; Zacharia, Mathew; Elshinawy, Mohamed; Mevada, Surekha T; Alrawas, Abdulhakim; Khater, Doaa; Jaju, Deepali; Wali, Yasser

    2017-12-01

    Vincristine (VCR) induced peripheral neuropathy is a common complication in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). A retrospective data analysis over an interval of 10 years (2006-2016) of all children with ALL seen at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital was carried out. Electronic medical records of eligible patients were reviewed. Patients with clinical evidence of neuropathy and abnormal nerve conduction studies (NCSs) were included in the study. Nineteen (nine females and 10 males) out of 103 pediatric patients developed VCR-related neuropathy, and their age ranged between 2.5 and 14 years. Symptoms started after 2-11 doses of VCR. All 19 patients had documented peripheral neuropathy on NCSs. The autonomic nervous system and cranial nerves affection was relatively common in our patients; two presented with bradycardia, two patients with unexplained tachycardia, and five had abdominal pain and constipation, complicated by typhlitis in two patients. One patient developed unilateral hearing loss. Two patients developed severe life-threatening cranial nerve involvement with bilateral ptosis and recurrent laryngeal nerve involvement presented as vocal cord paralysis, hoarseness of voice, frequent chocking, and aspiration episodes. Peripheral neuropathy was the commonest form of VCR-related neuropathy. Autonomic neuropathy was relatively common in our patients. Cranial neuropathy is a serious side effect of VCR that can be severe, involving multiple cranial nerves and needs prompt recognition and management. Concomitant administration of pyridoxine and pyridostigmine does not seem to protect against further neurological damage in some patients. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Comparison of qualitative and quantitative CT and MRI parameters for monitoring of longitudinal spine involvement in patients with multiple myeloma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horger, M.; Thaiss, W.M.; Fritz, J.; Ditt, H.; Weisel, K.; Haap, M.; Kloth, Christopher

    2018-01-01

    To compare qualitative and quantitative computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) parameters for longitudinal disease monitoring of multiple myeloma (MM) of the axial skeleton. We included 31 consecutive patients (17 m; mean age 59.20 ± 8.08 years) with MM, who underwent all baseline (n = 31) and at least one or more (n = 47) follow-up examinations consisting of multi-parametric non-enhanced whole-body MRI ( WB MRI) and non-enhanced whole-body reduced-dose thin-section MDCT (NEWBMDCT) between 06/2013 and 09/2016. We classified response according to qualitative CT criteria into progression (PD), stable(SD), partial/very good partial (PR/VGPR) and complete response(CR), grouping the latter three together for statistical analysis because CT cannot reliably assess PR and CR. Qualitative MR-response criteria were defined and grouped similarly to CT using longitudinal quantification of signal-intensity changes on T1w/STIR/ T2*w and calculating ADC-values. Standard of reference was the hematological laboratory (M-gradient). Hematological response categories were CR (14/47, 29.7%), PR (2/47, 4.2%), SD (16/47, 34.0%) and PD (15/47, 29.9%). Qualitative-CT-evaluation showed PD in 12/47 (25.5%) and SD/PR/VGPR/CR in 35/47 (74.5%) cases. These results were confirmed by quantitative-CT in all focal lytic lesions (p < 0.001). Quantitative-CT at sites with diffuse bone involvement showed significant increase of maximum bone attenuation (p < 0.001*) and significant decrease of minimal bone (p < 0.002*) in the SD/PR/VGPR/CR group. Qualitative MRI showed PD in 14/47 (29.7%) and SD/PR/VGPR/CR in 33/47 (70.3%). Quantitative MRI diagnosis showed a statistically significant decrease in signal intensity on short tau inversion recovery sequences (STIR) in bone marrow in patients with diffuse bone marrow involvement achieving SD/PR/VGPR/CR (p < 0.001*). Imaging response monitoring using MRI is superior to CT only if qualitative parameters are used, whereas there was no

  9. Comparison of qualitative and quantitative CT and MRI parameters for monitoring of longitudinal spine involvement in patients with multiple myeloma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horger, M.; Thaiss, W.M. [Eberhard-Karls-University Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Fritz, J. [Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Ditt, H. [Siemens AG Healthcare, Sector Imaging and Interventional Radiology, Forchheim (Germany); Weisel, K. [Eberhard-Karls-University Tuebingen, Department of Internal Medicine II, Tuebingen (Germany); Haap, M. [Eberhard-Karls-University Tuebingen, Department of Internal Medicine IV, Tuebingen, (Germany); Kloth, Christopher [University Hospital Ulm, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Ulm (Germany)

    2018-03-15

    To compare qualitative and quantitative computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) parameters for longitudinal disease monitoring of multiple myeloma (MM) of the axial skeleton. We included 31 consecutive patients (17 m; mean age 59.20 ± 8.08 years) with MM, who underwent all baseline (n = 31) and at least one or more (n = 47) follow-up examinations consisting of multi-parametric non-enhanced whole-body MRI ({sub WB}MRI) and non-enhanced whole-body reduced-dose thin-section MDCT (NEWBMDCT) between 06/2013 and 09/2016. We classified response according to qualitative CT criteria into progression (PD), stable(SD), partial/very good partial (PR/VGPR) and complete response(CR), grouping the latter three together for statistical analysis because CT cannot reliably assess PR and CR. Qualitative MR-response criteria were defined and grouped similarly to CT using longitudinal quantification of signal-intensity changes on T1w/STIR/ T2*w and calculating ADC-values. Standard of reference was the hematological laboratory (M-gradient). Hematological response categories were CR (14/47, 29.7%), PR (2/47, 4.2%), SD (16/47, 34.0%) and PD (15/47, 29.9%). Qualitative-CT-evaluation showed PD in 12/47 (25.5%) and SD/PR/VGPR/CR in 35/47 (74.5%) cases. These results were confirmed by quantitative-CT in all focal lytic lesions (p < 0.001). Quantitative-CT at sites with diffuse bone involvement showed significant increase of maximum bone attenuation (p < 0.001*) and significant decrease of minimal bone (p < 0.002*) in the SD/PR/VGPR/CR group. Qualitative MRI showed PD in 14/47 (29.7%) and SD/PR/VGPR/CR in 33/47 (70.3%). Quantitative MRI diagnosis showed a statistically significant decrease in signal intensity on short tau inversion recovery sequences (STIR) in bone marrow in patients with diffuse bone marrow involvement achieving SD/PR/VGPR/CR (p < 0.001*). Imaging response monitoring using MRI is superior to CT only if qualitative parameters are used, whereas there was

  10. Memory for Spatial Locations in a Patient with Near Space Neglect and Optic Ataxia: Involvement of the Occipitotemporal Stream

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Chieffi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies suggested that the occipitoparietal stream orients attention toward the near/lower space and is involved in immediate reaching, whereas the occipitotemporal stream orients attention toward the far/upper space and is involved in delayed reaching. In the present study, we investigated the role of the occipitotemporal stream in attention orienting and delayed reaching in a patient (GP with bilateral damage to the occipitoparietal areas and optic ataxia. GP and healthy controls took part in three experiments. In the experiment 1, the participants bisected lines oriented along radial, vertical, and horizontal axes. GP bisected radial lines farther, and vertical lines more above, than the controls, consistent with an attentional bias toward the far/upper space and near/lower space neglect. The experiment 2 consisted of two tasks: (1 an immediate reaching task, in which GP reached target locations under visual control and (2 a delayed visual reaching task, in which GP and controls were asked to reach remembered target locations visually presented. We measured constant and variable distance and direction errors. In immediate reaching task, GP accurately reached target locations. In delayed reaching task, GP overshot remembered target locations, whereas the controls undershot them. Furthermore, variable errors were greater in GP than in the controls. In the experiment 3, GP and controls performed a delayed proprioceptive reaching task. Constant reaching errors did not differ between GP and the controls. However, variable direction errors were greater in GP than in the controls. We suggest that the occipitoparietal damage, and the relatively intact occipitotemporal region, produced in GP an attentional orienting bias toward the far/upper space (experiment 1. In turns, the attentional bias selectively shifted toward the far space remembered visual (experiment 2, but not proprioceptive (experiment 3, target locations. As a whole, these

  11. Extent, quality and impact of patient and public involvement in antimicrobial drug development research: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, David; Bird, Emma; Gibson, Andy; Grier, Sally; Chin, Teh Li; Stoddart, Margaret; MacGowan, Alasdair

    2018-02-01

    Patient and public involvement (PPI) is increasingly recognized as bringing a range of benefits to clinical and health services research. Recent systematic reviews have identified and synthesized many benefits (eg higher recruitment rates) and some costs (eg extra time need). Much of the literature focuses on PPI in long-term conditions rather than more acute health care in which the majority of microbiological research is undertaken. The aim was to identify the extent, quality and impact of PPI in antimicrobial drug development research. Objectives were to identify any relevant reporting of PPI in antimicrobial research; appraise the quality of reporting on PPI using recognized PPI reporting and critical appraisal tools; and extract and synthesize data on the impact of PPI. A systematic review was undertaken with a search strategy based on four word groups (PPI, patients, antimicrobial drug development and outcomes). Eight online databases were searched. English language publication, publication between 1996 and 2016 and studies describing PPI in antimicrobial drug development research. No studies were found through online searching that met the search strategy and inclusion criteria. One relevant protocol paper with a brief mention of PPI was identified through expert recommendation. Commentary papers recommending PPI were identified through website searching and expert opinion. Despite strong policy guidance encouraging PPI at the international and national levels, and anecdotal accounts of PPI taking place, evidence for the extent, quality and impact of PPI in antimicrobial drug development research has not yet appeared in the peer-reviewed literature. © 2017 The Authors Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. The Relation Between Ocular/Nasal Bacterial Distribution, Staphylococcus aureus Colonization and Ocular and Nasal Involvement in Atopic Dermatitis Patients - Original Article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berna Şanlı Erdoğan

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: It was aimed to determine bacteria distribution and S.aureus colonization in nares, fornix and eyelid margin of patients with atopic dermatitis (AD compared to controls and to investigate it’s relationship with skin and eye involvement. Methods: Patients dermatological and opthalmologic examinations were done. The standart tear break-up time and Schirmer tests were performed. Samples were taken from fornix, eyelid margin and nares for bacterial culture. Results: Tweenty seven patients and 28 controls were included. There was no difference between the patients with and without eye involvement with respect to dry eye (p>0.05. The bacteria was more frequently isolated in patients (85.2% than controls (60.7%, however S.aureus colonization (51.9%, 50.0% respectively didn’t differ in both groups (p=0.042, p>0.05. The disease severity was positively correlated with S.aureus colonization (p=0.031. There was no difference between the patients with and without eye involvement with respect to S.aureus colonization and presence of bacteria (p>0.05. No bacteria was isolated from patients whom tear function analyses were performed. Conclusions: It wasn’t established an increased percent of S.aureus colonization in AD patients compared with controls. There was no association between dry eye and eye involvement. No comment could be remarked about the possible relation between dry eye and bacterial colonization.

  13. Serum Amyloid A as a Marker of Persistent Inflammation and an Indicator of Cardiovascular and Renal Involvement in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bożena Targońska-Stępniak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a systemic, inflammatory disease. Serum amyloid A (SAA is an acute-phase protein, involved in pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. The aim of the study was to assess serum concentration of SAA in RA patients, with reference to other inflammatory parameters and markers of extra-articular involvement. Methods. The study population consisted of 140 RA patients, low/moderate disease activity (L/MDA in 98 (70% patients and high disease activity (HDA in 42 (30%. Comprehensive clinical and laboratory assessment was performed with evaluation of electrocardiogram and carotid intima-media thickness. Results. The mean SAA concentration [327.0 (263.4 mg/L] was increased highly above the normal value, even in patients with L/MDA. Simultaneously, SAA was significantly higher in patients with HDA versus L/MDA. The mean SAA concentration was significantly higher in patients treated with glucocorticoids, was inversely associated with QTc duration, and was markedly higher in patients with atherosclerotic plaques, emphasizing increased CV risk. SAA was significantly higher in patients with increased cystatin-C level. Conclusions. In RA patients, high serum SAA concentration was strongly associated with activity of the disease and risk of CV and renal involvement. Recurrent assessment of SAA may facilitate searching patients with persistent inflammation and risk of extra-articular complications.

  14. What Difference Does Patient and Public Involvement Make and What Are Its Pathways to Impact? Qualitative Study of Patients and Researchers from a Cohort of Randomised Clinical Trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Dudley

    Full Text Available Patient and public involvement (PPI is advocated in clinical trials yet evidence on how to optimise its impact is limited. We explored researchers' and PPI contributors' accounts of the impact of PPI within trials and factors likely to influence its impact.Semi-structured qualitative interviews with researchers and PPI contributors accessed through a cohort of randomised clinical trials. Analysis of transcripts of audio-recorded interviews was informed by the principles of the constant comparative method, elements of content analysis and informant triangulation.We interviewed 21 chief investigators, 10 trial managers and 17 PPI contributors from 28 trials. The accounts of informants within the same trials were largely in agreement. Over half the informants indicted PPI had made a difference within a trial, through contributions that influenced either an aspect of a trial, or how researchers thought about a trial. According to informants, the opportunity for PPI to make a difference was influenced by two main factors: whether chief investigators had goals and plans for PPI and the quality of the relationship between the research team and the PPI contributors. Early involvement of PPI contributors and including them in responsive (e.g. advisory groups and managerial (e.g. trial management groups roles were more likely to achieve impact compared to late involvement and oversight roles (e.g. trial steering committees.Those seeking to enhance PPI in trials should develop goals for PPI at an early stage that fits the needs of the trial, plan PPI implementation in accordance with these goals, invest in developing good relationships between PPI contributors and researchers, and favour responsive and managerial roles for contributors in preference to oversight-only roles. These features could be used by research funders in judging PPI in trial grant applications and to inform policies to optimise PPI within trials.

  15. Taking patient and public involvement online: qualitative evaluation of an online forum for palliative care and rehabilitation research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brighton, Lisa Jane; Pask, Sophie; Benalia, Hamid; Bailey, Sylvia; Sumerfield, Marion; Witt, Jana; de Wolf-Linder, Susanne; Etkind, Simon Noah; Murtagh, Fliss E M; Koffman, Jonathan; Evans, Catherine J

    2018-01-01

    Patient and public involvement (PPI) is increasingly recognised as important in research. Most PPI takes place face-to-face, but this can be difficult for people who are unwell or have caring responsibilities. As these challenges are particularly common in palliative care and rehabilitation research, we developed an online forum for PPI: www.csipublicinvolvement.co.uk. In this study, we explored how well the online forum worked, if it is a suitable method for PPI, and how PPI members and researchers reacted to using it. We used an existing theory about online interventions to help choose the 'right' questions to ask participants. We invited PPI members and researchers who had used the online forum to participate in focus groups, and identified the most important themes discussed. Within this study, PPI members have helped with the interview questions, analysis, and write up. Overall, four PPI members and five researchers participated in the focus groups. Participants felt the online forum worked well and had multiple benefits. From the discussions, we identified four key questions to consider when developing online methods for PPI: how does the forum work, how does it engage people, how does it empower people, and what is the impact? Participants suggested the forum could be improved by being more PPI and less researcher focused. We conclude that when developing online methods of PPI, a functioning forum is not enough: it also needs to be engaging and empowering to have an impact. Future work can use these four domains when developing their own online PPI methods. Patient and public involvement (PPI) in research is increasingly recognised as important. Most PPI activities take place face-to-face, yet this can be difficult for people with ill health or caring responsibilities, and may exclude people from hard-to-reach populations (e.g. living in vulnerable social circumstances and/or remote geographical locations). These challenges are particularly pertinent in

  16. Functional Outcome With Percutaneous Ilio-sacral Screw Fixation For Posterior Pelvic Ring Injuries In Patients Involved In Heavy Manual Laboring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek SM

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Unstable posterior pelvic ring injuries are best treated with operative methods due to better post-op functional score. Our patient cohort was involved in heavy manual laboring frequently required ground level work in their activities of daily living. There are very few outcome studies dealing exclusively with such patients. Materials & Methods: Forty one patients who were treated with percutaneous sacroiliac screw fixation under fluoroscopic guidance and were followed-up for at least one year were analyzed retrospectively for functional outcome using the Majeed score. Results: Twenty one (51.22% and thirteen (31.70% patients were found to be in excellent and good categories respectively and majority of the patients (thirty/73.17% were able to return to their original occupation with or without minor adjustments. Conclusion: Percutaneous ilio-sacral screw fixation for posterior pelvic unstable injuries is an acceptable mode of treatment in patients involved in heavy manual laboring.

  17. Assessment of a Revised Management Strategy for Patients With Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasms Involving the Main Pancreatic Duct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Motokazu; Elliott, Irmina A; Nguyen, Andrew H; Kim, Stephen; Muthusamy, V Raman; Watson, Rabindra; Hines, O Joe; Dawson, David W; Reber, Howard A; Donahue, Timothy R

    2017-01-18

    According to the 2012 International Consensus Guidelines, the diagnostic criterion of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) involving the main duct (MD IPMNs) or the main and branch ducts (mixed IPMNs) of the pancreatic system is a main pancreatic duct (MPD) diameter of 5.0 mm or greater on computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, surgical resection is recommended for patients with an MPD diameter of 10.0 mm or greater, which is characterized as a high-risk stigma. An MPD diameter of 5.0 to 9.0 mm is not an indication for immediate resection. To determine an appropriate cutoff (ie, one with high sensitivity and negative predictive value) of the MPD diameter on CT or MRI as a prognostic factor for malignant disease and to propose a new management algorithm for patients with MD or mixed IPMNs. This retrospective cohort study included 103 patients who underwent surgical resection for a preoperative diagnosis of MD or mixed IPMN and in whom IPMN was confirmed by surgical pathologic findings at a single institution from July 1, 1996, to December 31, 2015. Malignant disease was defined as high-grade dysplasia or invasive adenocarcinoma on results of surgical pathologic evaluation. An appropriate MPD diameter on preoperative CT or MRI to predict malignant disease was determined using a receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. The prognostic value of the new management algorithm that incorporated the new MPD diameter cutoff was evaluated. Among the 103 patients undergoing resection for an MD or mixed IPMN (59 men [57.3%]; 44 women [42.7%]; median [range] age, 71 [48-86] years), 64 (62.1%) had malignant disease. Diagnostic accuracy for malignant neoplasms was highest at an MPD diameter cutoff of 7.2 mm (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.59-0.81). An MPD diameter of 7.2 mm or greater was also an independent prognostic factor for malignant neoplasms (odds ratio, 12.76; 95% CI, 2

  18. Diabetes, cardiac disorders and asthma as risk factors for severe organ involvement among adult dengue patients: A matched case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Junxiong; Hsu, Jung Pu; Yeo, Tsin Wen; Leo, Yee Sin; Lye, David C

    2017-01-03

    Progression to severe organ involvement due to dengue infection has been associated with severe dengue disease, intensive care treatment, and mortality. However, there is a lack of understanding of the impact of pre-existing comorbidities and other risk factors of severe organ involvement among dengue adults. The aim of this retrospective case-control study is to characterize and identify risk factors that predispose dengue adults at risk of progression with severe organ involvement. This study involved 174 dengue patients who had progressed with severe organ involvement and 865 dengue patients without severe organ involvement, matched by the year of presentation of the cases, who were admitted to Tan Tock Seng Hospital between year 2005 and 2008. Age group of 60 years or older, diabetes, cardiac disorders, asthma, and having two or more pre-existing comorbidities were independent risk factors of severe organ involvement. Abdominal pain, clinical fluid accumulation, and hematocrit rise and rapid platelet count drop at presentation were significantly associated with severe organ involvement. These risk factors, when validated in a larger study, will be useful for triage by clinicians for prompt monitoring and clinical management at first presentation, to minimize the risk of severe organ involvement and hence, disease severity.

  19. Evolving the multiple roles of 'patients' in health-care research: reflections after involvement in a trial of shared decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Hazel; Edwards, Adrian; Elwyn, Glyn

    2003-09-01

    This paper offers 'consumer-led' reflections by steering group members of a patient-centred research study involving consumer advocates, patients' associations and patients, throughout the whole study, from pre- to post-study phases. ORIGINAL STUDY DESIGN: The study: 'Shared decision making and risk communication in general practice' incorporated systematic reviews, psychometric evaluation of outcome measures, and quantitative, qualitative and health economic analyses of a cluster randomized trial of professional skill development, all informed by consumer and patient engagement. The work was produced by a wide collaboration led by researchers from the Department of General Practice, University of Wales College of Medicine, Cardiff, including a consumers' advisory group and a patients' association. The study participants were 20 general practitioners from Gwent, their practice staff, and almost 800 patients at these practices. Consumers and patients contributed to several stages of the research from inception and design, securing of funding, implementation of the protocol, and interpretation and dissemination of the findings. 'Patient involvement' research initiatives that include an equally wide variety of 'user' participants as 'health-professional' participants, accountable to a 'Health in Partnership' funded project, require a user-led viewpoint to be presented and disseminated. This paper presents reflections on the processes of the research, the interpretations of study findings by the involved parties, and notes how this model is fundamental to effective research in the field of patient-centred health care if future practice, policy and research are to change.

  20. The involvement of osteopontin and matrix metalloproteinase- 9 in the migration of endometrial epithelial cells in patients with endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mei; Jiang, Chunfan; Chen, Hua; Nian, Yan; Bai, Zhimiao; Ha, Chunfang

    2015-08-20

    Endometriosis, which shares certain characteristics with cancers, may cause abnormal expression of proteins involved in cell migration. Endometrial epithelial cells (EECs) are believed to play an important role in endometriotic migration. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the expression of osteopontin (OPN) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) in endometriotic migration. We performed primary culture of EECs and investigated the expression of OPN and MMP-9 in EECs regulated by 17beta-estradiol (E2). OPN-specific siRNA interference was used to down-regulate OPN and to explore the corresponding change in MMP-9 expression. Real-time RT-PCR, western blot analysis and flow cytometry were used to determine the expression levels of OPN and MMP-9. Gelatin zymography was performed to observe the enzymatic activity of MMP-9 in conditioned media. Transwell and wound scratch assays were performed to investigate the migration ability of EECs. The expression levels of OPN and MMP-9 in normal EECs (NEECs) were inferior to those in EECs from patients with endometriosis (EEECs). The expression levels of OPN and MMP-9 from stage III/IV EEECs and secretory-phase EECs were higher than those of stage I/II EEECs or proliferative-phase EECs. The expression levels of OPN and MMP-9 in EEECs were increased by E2 treatment and remarkably decreased by siRNA interference. Active MMP-9 expression increased with E2 treatment and decreased with siRNA treatment in EEECs compared with the same treatments in NEECs. The migratory abilities of EEECs were enhanced after cells were treated with E2; in contrast, these abilities were reduced by siRNA interference. In NEECs, active MMP-9 and cellular migration abilities were only minimally influenced by E2 and siRNA treatment. The present study suggests that the up-regulation of MMP-9 via activation of OPN induced by estrogen may correlate with the migration of endometrial epithelial cells in patients with endometriosis.

  1. Correlation of atherosclerotic changes in peripheral arteries with pathological involvement of aortic arch in coronary bypass patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eshraghi N

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: A correlation between coronary artery disease (CAD and atherosclerosis of peripheral arteries and the determination of noninvasive indexes for its existence and extent have been sought by many researchers. Some studies report that the intima-media thickness (IMT of peripheral arteries could play this role. This study evaluated the correlation between the IMTs of common carotid and common femoral arteries and the degree of atherosclerosis in aort