WorldWideScience

Sample records for meanings practices projects

  1. R&P: the multiple meaning of a research project in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visentin, Giorgio

    2005-08-01

    Rischio e Prevenzione (Risk and Prevention) is a research project that is becoming the paradigm of the Italian research on General Practice. It started from a survey showing that treatment and control of cardiovascular risk is still far from optimal even in very high-risk patients. A group of general practitioners, coordinated by Istituto Mario Negri, wrote the protocol of the study with various proposals: Creating a research network. Building research infrastructure with good research capacity. Building a 'therapeutic alliance' with the patient while presenting the research, not only obtaining their signature for a 'bureaucratic' informed consent. Having the 'Collaborative Group' as the 'sponsor' of a research even if the funds are coming from Pharmaceutical Industry. It is a randomised controlled trial (RCT) carried out in primary care with the normal patient of our daily work, so transferability is very possible. The way to enroll the patients and the request to specify the reason for not joining the project of the outcome study are a kind of participatory research. The outcome study can become a model for implementing new strategy on cardiovascular risk. A specific questionnaire will enquire the different point of view of the patient and of the general practitioner/researcher. The result of this project will help us understand the phenomenon of the poor compliance of the high-risk patients. First results during enrollment allow some optimism.

  2. Pre-service teachers’ meaning-making when collaboratively analysing video from school practice for the bachelor project at college

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Birgitte Lund

    2015-01-01

    The study follows a group of student teachers (STs) facilitated in collaboratively analysing video recordings of their school practice experiences, required for their bachelor projects. Their meaning-making is examined in terms of what they experienced as outcomes, how they constructed...... understanding and how their interpretation of classroom experiences developed. The findings reveal that the structured collaborative analysis supported the STs in a more nuanced consideration of concrete incidents and in reconstructing their experiences with a focus on student learning. They noted the benefit...... of the peer support and had a positive view of the structured approach. Additionally, they emphasised insights gained by starting from a fine-grained analysis of concrete problems encountered in their school practice before applying theory. They did, however, resort to more general abstractions...

  3. Practical Android Projects

    CERN Document Server

    Jordan, Lucas

    2011-01-01

    Take a practical approach to becoming a leading-edge Android developer, learning by example while combining the many technologies needed to create a successful, up-to-date web app. Practical Android Projects introduces the Android software development kit and development tools of the trade, and then dives into building cool-looking and fun apps that put Android's amazing capabilities to work. Android is the powerful, full-featured, open source mobile platform that powers phones like Google Nexus, Motorola Droid, Samsung Galaxy S, and a variety of HTC phones and tablet computers. This book help

  4. only: A Case Study In Projective Meaning

    OpenAIRE

    Craige Roberts

    2010-01-01

    I offer an integrated theory of the meaning of only in which the prejacent, while not presupposed, is both entailed and backgrounded, hence tends to project (following a general proposal about projection due to Simons et al. 2010). Moreover, I argue, contra Beaver & Brady (2008), that only is not conventionally associated with focus, the focus effects arising instead pragmatically. But I do adopt aspects of their semantics for only, including the presupposition of a pre-order over the ele...

  5. The Interplay of Text, Meaning and Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kärreman, Dan; Levay, Charlotta

    2017-01-01

    Context: The study of discourses (i.e. verbal interactions or written accounts) is increasingly used in social sciences to gain insight into issues connected to discourse, such as meanings, behaviours and actions. This paper situates discourse analysis in medical education, based on a framework...... settings, with a particular focus on the field of medical education. Methods: The study is based on a literature analysis of discourse analysis approaches published in Medical Education. Results: Findings suggest that empirical studies through discourse analysis can be heuristically understood in terms...... of the links between text, practices and meaning. Conclusions: Discourse analysis provides a more strongly supported argument when it is possible to defend claims on three levels: practice, using observational data; meaning, using ethnographic data, and text, using conversational and textual data....

  6. Practical Django projects

    CERN Document Server

    Bennett, James

    2009-01-01

    Build a django content management system, blog, and social networking site with James Bennett as he introduces version 1.1 of the popular Django framework. You'll work through the development of each project, implementing and running the applications while learning new features along the way. Web frameworks are playing a major role in the creation of today's most compelling web applications, because they automate many of the tedious tasks, allowing developers to instead focus on providing users with creative and powerful features. Python developers have been particularly fortunate in this area

  7. Changing Pedagogical Means in Project Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsson, Uffe

    1998-01-01

    Presentation of two parts in a new concept for changing education in a university course in project management. First part concern running the couse as a project. Second part concern integrated use of Internet.......Presentation of two parts in a new concept for changing education in a university course in project management. First part concern running the couse as a project. Second part concern integrated use of Internet....

  8. only: A Case Study In Projective Meaning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craige Roberts

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available I offer an integrated theory of the meaning of only in which the prejacent, while not presupposed, is both entailed and backgrounded, hence tends to project (following a general proposal about projection due to Simons et al. 2010. Moreover, I argue, contra Beaver & Brady (2008, that only is not conventionally associated with focus, the focus effects arising instead pragmatically. But I do adopt aspects of their semantics for only, including the presupposition of a pre-order over the elements of its domain.ReferencesAbbott, B. 2000. ‘Presuppositions as non-assertions’. Journal of Pragmatics 32: 1419–37.http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0378-2166(9900108-3Abbott, B. 2008. ‘Presuppositions and common ground’. Linguistics and Philosophy 31: 523–538.http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10988-008-9048-8Amaral, P. 2010. ‘Entailment, assertion, and textual coherence: the case of almost and barely’. Linguistics 48, no. 3: 525–545.http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/LING.2010.016Amaral, P., Roberts, C. & Allyn Smith, E. 2008. ‘Review of The Logic of Conventional Implicature by Chris Potts’. Linguistics and Philosophy 30: 707–749.http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10988-008-9025-2Atlas, J. D. 1993. ‘The importance of being “only”: testing the neo-Gricean versus neoentailment paradigms’. Journal of Semantics 10: 301–18.http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jos/10.4.301Beaver, D. 2001. Presupposition and Assertion in Dynamic Semantics. CSLI Publications, Stanford, CA.Beaver, D. 2010. ‘Handout from a talk on projective meaning’. Stuttgart, Germany.Beaver, D. & Brady, C. 2003. ‘Always and Only: Why not all focus sensitive operators are alike’. Natural Language Semantics 11: 323–62.http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/A:1025542629721Beaver, D. & Brady, C. 2008. Sense and Sensitivity. Blackwell.http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/9781444304176Beckman, M. E. & Ayers, G. M. 1994. ‘Guidelines for ToBI labeling guide, ver. 2.0’. On-line at The Ohio State University: www

  9. Lead user projects in practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brem, Alexander; Gutstein, Adele

    2018-01-01

    Earlier research on the lead user method is focused on individual case studies and how the method was applied in a specific context. In this paper, we take a broader approach, analyzing a sample of 24 lead user projects, which included working with 188 lead users. These projects were analyzed....... Moreover, crowdsourcing contests and netnography proved to be of significant value for the need, trend, and lead user identification phases. This paper concludes by discussing theoretical and practical implications, the limitations of this study, and recommendations for future studies....

  10. Understanding the Meaning of “Project Success”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goparaju Purna Sudhakar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Fortune 500 organizations are executing their tasks using projects. Project management is the area of concentration across the world. Different stakeholders have a different perspective about project success. The meaning of project success had been explained in this article. In addition, the Project Critical Success Factors (CSFs were mentioned. The research of Standish Group on project success and project success metrics was presented. Earlier research on the meaning of project success and project critical success factors was highlighted. The works of Jeffery K. Pinto and Dennis P. Slevin, David and Adam, DeLone and McLean, and The Standish Group Research were discussed in this article. The methodology included secondary research based on literature view of prominent empirical studies and the literature reviews by making note of findings and observations from those studies. The initial literature collected led to further search of articles based on their references. The research findings indicate that the top of the most success factors for many projects include project objective, top management commitment, competent project team, and user involvement.

  11. Knowledge Management Practice on Construction Project ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Likewise, the results further indicated 19 benefits of KM practice for improving construction project performance and include: improve project quality, cost and time; practice and process improvement; encourage effective teamwork and innovation; improve the client satisfaction; boost productivity of employees and processes; ...

  12. Lead user projects in practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brem, Alexander; Gutstein, Adele

    2018-01-01

    Earlier research on the lead user method is focused on individual case studies and how the method was applied in a specific context. In this paper, we take a broader approach, analyzing a sample of 24 lead user projects, which included working with 188 lead users. These projects were analyzed...

  13. Culture care meanings, beliefs, and practices in Rural Dominican Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Gretchen

    2010-04-01

    This ethnonursing study explored the meanings, beliefs, and practices of care for rural Dominicans in the Dominican Republic. Leininger's culture care diversity and universality theory, ethnonursing, and four-phase analysis method guided the study. Interviews were conducted with 19 general and 10 key informants. Analysis of interviews revealed three main themes: (a) family presence is essential for meaningful care experiences and care practices, (b) respect and attention are central to the meaning of care and care practices, and (c) rural Dominicans value and use both generic (folk) and professional care practices. Implications and recommendations for nursing practice, education, and research are described.

  14. Team and Project Work in Engineering Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Buch

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we investigate teamwork amongst professionals in engineering consultancy companies in order to discern how teamwork affects the collaboration and work practices of the professionals. The article investigates how professional engineering practices are enacted in two engineering consultancy companies in Denmark where teamwork has been or is an ideal for organizing work. Through a practice-based lens, the article sets out to investigate, firstly, how discourses about team and project work affect engineering work practices; secondly, how technologymediated management is reconciled in teamwork practices; and thirdly, how team and project work affect engineering professionalism and collaborative work practices. A practice theoretical framework informs the analysis. Teamwork is investigated as a phenomenon enacted through the sayings, doings and relatings of practitioners in landscapes of practices and the interconnectedness of the practices is traced through the setup of specific ecologies in the sites.

  15. Team- and project work in engineering practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch, Anders; Andersen, Vibeke

    2015-01-01

    in teamwork practices, and, thirdly, how team- and project work affect engineering professionalism and collaborative work practices. A practice theoretical framework informs the analysis. Teamwork is investigated as a phenomenon enacted through the sayings, doings and relatings of practitioners in landscapes......In this paper we investigate teamwork amongst professionals in engineering consultancy companies in order to discern how teamwork affects the collaboration and work practices of the professionals. The paper investigates how professional engineering practices are enacted in two engineering...... consultancy companies in Denmark where teamwork has been or is an ideal for organizing work. Through a practice-based lens the article sets out to investigate, firstly, how discourses about teamand project work affect engineering work practices, secondly, how technology-mediated management is reconciled...

  16. Practical project management: tips, tactics, and tools

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Levine, Harvey A

    2002-01-01

    ... Elements of Resource Management 4.2 Role-based Needs for Managing Resources in a Project-driven Organization 4.3 Resource Leveling and Games of Chance 4.4 Practical Resource Scheduling 117 119 12...

  17. Guide of good practices for methanization projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delatte, Constant; Orozco-Souel, Paola; Rouxel, Anaick; Tanneau, Patrick; Schreiber, Konrad; Jaubert, Jean Noel; Micone, Philippe; Dionne, Denis; Renner, Christophe; Ollivier, Denis

    2011-12-01

    This guide aims at providing project holders with guidance on factors which may influence social acceptability of methanization projects and with recommendations regarding communication and dialogue for a better project integration, with a technical support in order to guarantee project quality for a minimised environmental impact, and at convincing and reassuring local communities which plan to implement a methanization project, notably with respect to issues like odours, safety or landscape integration. The guide first outlines the importance of a serious and credible approach, and aims project holders at demonstrating an actual reasonable economic control of energy, environmental and social issues related to their project. The second part proposes technical solutions regarding the limitation of impact on air quality, preservation and restoration of soil quality and water resources, landscape integration, transport management and noise prevention. Feedbacks on experiences with different types of installations (agricultural, industrial, and so on) are also provided. A good practice charter is finally proposed

  18. Adapting Project Management Practices to Research-Based Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahr, P.; Baker, T.; Corbin, B.; Keith, L.; Loerch, L.; Mullenax, C.; Myers, R.; Rhodes, B.; Skytland, N.

    2007-01-01

    From dealing with the inherent uncertainties in outcomes of scientific research to the lack of applicability of current NASA Procedural Requirements guidance documentation, research-based projects present challenges that require unique application of classical project management techniques. If additionally challenged by the creation of a new program transitioning from basic to applied research in a technical environment often unfamiliar with the cost and schedule constraints addressed by project management practices, such projects can find themselves struggling throughout their life cycles. Finally, supplying deliverables to a prime vehicle customer, also in the formative stage, adds further complexity to the development and management of research-based projects. The Biomedical Research and Countermeasures Projects Branch at NASA Johnson Space Center encompasses several diverse applied research-based or research-enabling projects within the newly-formed Human Research Program. This presentation will provide a brief overview of the organizational structure and environment in which these projects operate and how the projects coordinate to address and manage technical requirements. We will identify several of the challenges (cost, technical, schedule, and personnel) encountered by projects across the Branch, present case reports of actions taken and techniques implemented to deal with these challenges, and then close the session with an open forum discussion of remaining challenges and potential mitigations.

  19. Ambiguous meanings of projects as facilitators of sensegiving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunkka, Nina; Suhonen, Marjo

    2015-10-01

    To describe mid-level nurse managers' experiences of sensegiving in the context of hospital projects. Sensegiving is about shaping and affecting how employees see themselves, their work and issues related to their work. It has been little studied in the context of hospital projects from mid-level nurse managers' point of view. Mid-level nurse managers (n = 10) were interviewed about their experiences of projects from the viewpoint of sensegiving during change processes. Data was analysed using discourse analysis. Three repertoires were constructed from the data: the repertoires of regeneration, control and humane. Projects were considered as appropriate ways for sensegiving in hospitals from the viewpoint of mid-level nurse managers. In order to use projects effectively in hospitals as means for change management mid-level nurse managers ought to enhance their role as interpreters during the change process (i.e. strengthen their visioning, talk and dialogue skills). Training on the nature of change as a social and interactive process could deepen mid-level nurse managers' understanding of the change process in the context of hospital projects. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Ventriloquism as Early Literacy Practice: Making Meaning in Pretend Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, Amanda

    2018-01-01

    This article discusses how children in New Zealand make meaning in their spontaneous pretend play from kindergarten (four years old) through to their first year of primary school (five years old). The findings discussed here are taken from a wider project investigating children's storytelling where 12 child participants were video recorded during…

  1. Visualizing Practices in Project-based Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whyte, Jennifer; Tryggestad, Kjell; Comi, Alice

    2016-01-01

    Project-based design involves a variety of visual representations, which are evolved to make decisions and accomplish project objectives. Yet, such mediated and distributed ways of working are difficult to capture through ethnographies that examine situated design. A novel approach is developed t...... representations enabled participants in project-based design to develop and share understanding. The complexity of projects and their distributed and mediated nature makes this approach timely and important in addressing new research questions and practical challenges.......Project-based design involves a variety of visual representations, which are evolved to make decisions and accomplish project objectives. Yet, such mediated and distributed ways of working are difficult to capture through ethnographies that examine situated design. A novel approach is developed...... of situated design. This allows the researcher to be nimble, tracing connections across complex engineering projects; reconstructing practices through their visual representations; and observing their effects. Second, it articulates how, in these empirical cases, interaction with a cascade of visual...

  2. Understanding students' epistemologies: Examining practice and meaning in community contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Megan Elisabeth

    There is a great need to raise the levels of science achievement for those groups of children who have traditionally underperformed. Prior cognitive research with Native people suggests that problems with achievement for Native students may be more complicated then simple problems with knowing or not knowing content knowledge. This dissertation hypothesizes that Native Americans engage in practices and have funds of knowledge that facilitate sophisticated reasoning in the domain of science. However, the knowledge and patterns of reasoning are not elicited, acceptable, or recognized in classroom science, or perhaps are in conflict with classroom science. Furthermore the divergence is not simply in the details of what is known; there is discord at the level of epistemology, in the fundamental ways in which Native people conceptualize knowledge of the natural world. This work proposes a new framework, Micro-practice epistemology, for understanding epistemology. I propose that epistemology should be understood as implicitly and explicitly imbedded in the worldviews, values, beliefs and practices of our everyday lives. Using both qualitative and quantitative methods this work investigates the everyday practices related to nature, the epistemological stances and biological knowledge embedded in those practices in a 3X3 model (age cohort: child, adult, elder X community). The three communities involved in this work include: Chicago urban Indian community, Menominee reservation community, and a rural working poor white community. I find significant differences in all three areas across communities. Native communities tend to participate in practices in which some aspect of nature is fore-grounded while non-Native participants tended to participate in practices in which nature is the back-grounded. These findings are extended to explore the ways in which worldviews and values are connected to practice and knowledge about the natural world. I find significant differences in

  3. PROJECTS EDUCATION RESEARCH: PRACTICAL EXPERIENCED IN A SCHOOL IN / FIELD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenilde Nogueira Paniago

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study discusses an investigation done with teachers of a public school, located on countryside, city of Água Boa, Mato Grosso, with a view to looking for new alternatives to the teaching practice on school, by means of using the collaborative realization of projects and researches as pedagogical alternatives. As qualitative approach, the investigation has developed by means of the study of benchmarks, that discuss the research on teaching formation, on teaching practice, education on/of the countryside and, of the projects’ realization of teaching and research with and by teachers. The work enabled to get closer relationship between school and community, to articulate the theoretical knowledge, studied on school, and the life of countryside students, showing the necessity of theoretico-methodological formation with collective engagement of teachers and public politics that propitiate the emergence of conditions to the new practices of teaching on school on/of the countryside by the bias of search.

  4. Science teachers' meaning-making when involved in a school-based professional development project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Birgitte Lund

    2012-01-01

    A group of teachers' meaning-making when they are collaboratively analyzing artifacts from practice in local science classrooms in a school-based professional development (PD) project is examined through repeated interviews and represented as meaning-makig maps. The interpretation of the teachers......' meaning-making includes both their reference to outcomes from the project and their expressed ideas about teaching and learning of science. All four teachers refer to experiences from experimenting in their classrooms and interpret the collected artifacts in relation to students' learning. Furthermore......, they all felt encouraged to continue collaboration around science. During the interviews, the teachers emphasize various elements apparently connected to concrete challenges they each experience in their professional work. Implications in relation to the design of PD are discussed....

  5. Gaming practices in everyday life. An analytical operationalization of field theory by means of practice theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claus Toft-Nielsen

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates digital game play (gaming as a specific media field (Bourdieu, 1984, p. 72, in which especially gaming capital (Consalvo, 2007 functions as a theoretical lens. We aim to analyse the specific practices that constitute and are constituted in and around gaming. This multitude of practices is theoretically qualified by the second generation of practice theorists, including (Bruchler & Postill, 2010; Reckwitz, 2002; Schatzki, 2008; Warde, 2005. The empirical data are drawn from qualitative studies of gamers and gaming practices (focus groups as well as participant observations, and function as exemplary cases that illustrate our theoretical arguments. Our purpose is to analytically operationalize field theory, by means of practice theory, to enhance our understanding of digital games as new media and the specific contexts and media practices herein.

  6. Gaming practices in everyday life. An analytical operationalization of field theory by means of practice theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft-Nielsen, Claus; Krogager, Stinne Gunder Strøm

    2015-01-01

    This article investigates digital game play (gaming) as a specific media field (Bourdieu, 1984, p. 72), in which especially gaming capital (Consalvo, 2007) functions as a theoretical lens. We aim to analyse the specific practices that constitute and are constituted in and around gaming....... This multitude of practices is theoretically qualified by the second generation of practice theorists, including (Bruchler & Postill, 2010; Reckwitz, 2002; Schatzki, 2008; Warde, 2005). The empirical data are drawn from qualitative studies of gamers and gaming practices (focus groups as well as participant...... observations), and function as exemplary cases that illustrate our theoretical arguments. Our purpose is to analytically operationalize field theory, by means of practice theory, to enhance our understanding of digital games as new media and the specific contexts and media practices herein....

  7. Practical means for decontamination 9 years after a nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roed, J.; Andersson, K.G.; Prip, H.

    1995-12-01

    Nine years after the Chernobyl accident, the contamination problems of the most severely affected areas remain unsolved. As a consequence of this, large previously inhabited areas and areas of farmland now lie deserted. An international group of scientists funded by the EU European Collaboration Programme (ECP/4) has investigated in practice a great number of feasible means to solve the current problems. The basic results of this work group are presented in this report that was prepared in a format which facilitates an intercomparison (cost-benefit analysis) of the individual examined techniques for decontamination or dose reduction in various different types of environmental scenarios. Each file containing information on a method or procedure was created by the persons and institutes responsible for the practical trial. Although the long period that has elapsed since the contamination took place has added to the difficulties in removing the radioactive matter, it could be concluded that many of the methods are still capable of reducing the dose level substantially. (au)

  8. How Participatory Budgeting Changes the Meaning and Practices of Citizenship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Rios Alves Nunes da Costa

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1677-2954.2013v12n2p301   What does it mean to be a citizen today? In an era where boundaries are being questioned, where identities are being transformed, where social and political claims are being updated from the traditional ‘recognition’ or ‘redistribution’ discourse to a more globalized discourse supported by a theoretical appeal to human rights, it is important to clarify where the ‘citizen’ stands, morally and politically speaking. This paper is supported by a a strong moral and political reading of citizenship, echoing some republican tradition where citizenship is associated with virtue; and b the assumption that there is a strong correlation between virtuous citizens and a virtuous republic or ‘democracy’. In order to reflect upon the transformations of the concept of citizenship I will look at some of the practices it involves, more precisely, I will look into the participatory budgeting experience in Portugal trying to show how the progressive implementation of such measure promises to bring Portuguese’s democracy to a new level with a more robust practice of citizenship. This paper has three moments: first, I will situate myself from a theoretical standpoint, regarding the concept of citizenship I want to defend. I will show how the way in which we conceive citizenship a will determine the forms and shapes democracy can take and b will influence the future of democracy, insofar it can contribute, enhance or undermine democratic aspirations and goals. Second, after arguing for an active sense of citizenship I will advance the argument that the future of democracy lies in participatory practices, in which the citizen plays a key role. Third, I will turn to a case study in order to illuminate my theoretical argument. Having participatory budgeting experiment in Portugal as paradigmatic case of analysis, I will identify some elements present in the Portuguese case that corroborate our

  9. Project management in practice : Evaluating a case project through project management theories

    OpenAIRE

    Uusitalo, Jenni

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to evaluate a case project and to study whether it was carried out in a correct manner; meaning that did the case project follow the project management models. In addition, part of the study was to determine what could have been improved in the management of the case project. The case project was about creating and launching a communication channel based on a social media service, on a blog platform called Tumblr, for Team Finland in Spain network. The network p...

  10. Science teachers' meaning-making when involved in a school-based professional development project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Birgitte Lund

    2012-01-01

    A group of teachers’ meaning-making when they are collaboratively analyzing artifacts from practice in local science classrooms in a school-based professional development (PD) project is examined through repeated interviews and represented as meaning-making maps. The interpretation of the teachers......’ meaningmaking includes both their reference to outcomes from the project and their expressed ideas about teaching and learning of science. All four teachers refer to experiences from experimenting in their classrooms and interpret the collected artifacts in relation to students’ learning. Furthermore, they all...... felt encouraged to continue collaboration around science. During the interviews, the teachers emphasize various elements apparently connected to concrete challenges they each experience in their professional work. Implications in relation to the design of PD are discussed....

  11. Knowledge Utilization in Projects – a Practice-based

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Christian

    Drawing upon Practice-based theorizing in general and Actor Network Theory and theories of Communities of Practices in particular the paper develops an analytical strategy for understanding “life” in projects. The analytical strategy is applied on empirical material from an 18-month ethnographic...... study of a construction project. The project is interpreted as constellation of networked practices, which always is in the making. Participation in this project is a learning process where existing practices are reproduced and developed. This understanding of “life” in the project, frames a concluding...... analysis and discussion of the utilization of knowledge in the project....

  12. Forty project management strategies for the medical practice staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Laura Sachs

    2010-01-01

    Most every medical practice will embark at one time or another on a large and complex new project. The practice may, for instance, undertake a project in office construction or renovation, practice expansion, new technology, or a new large-scale event. The medical practice staff may find itself creating the project plan, overseeing its execution, and working through the plan day to day until its completion. In short, the staff may find itself responsible for project management. This article contains 40 specific, easy-to-implement project management strategies medical practice employees can use to manage both the large and small projects they undertake on behalf of the practice. It suggests effective project management strategies the staff can use before the onset of a new project as well as strategies to help define the project, to deliver the project, and to close and review the project. This article also describes five reasons medical practices often fail at project management and suggests more effective approaches that will ensure that the projects the medical practice undertakes are completed well, on time, and within budget.

  13. Mapping Best and Emerging Practices of Project Management

    OpenAIRE

    Thuesen, Christian; Aaris Boas, Charlotte; Thorslund, Michael V.; Marmier, Francois; Grex, Sara; Lybecker, Søren

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents results of a study of the connection between Best and Emerging practices of project management. Drawing upon network mapping as an analytical strategy, cases of Best and Emerging practices is analysed and juxtaposed. The case of Best practice is represented by the newly published ISO 21500 standard and the case for the Emerging practices by a deconstruction of the practices of a group of experienced project managers. The network analysis reveals a substantial difference be...

  14. Online Sequential Projection Vector Machine with Adaptive Data Mean Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Jia, Ji-Ting; Zhang, Qiong; Deng, Wan-Yu; Wei, Wei

    2016-01-01

    We propose a simple online learning algorithm especial for high-dimensional data. The algorithm is referred to as online sequential projection vector machine (OSPVM) which derives from projection vector machine and can learn from data in one-by-one or chunk-by-chunk mode. In OSPVM, data centering, dimension reduction, and neural network training are integrated seamlessly. In particular, the model parameters including (1) the projection vectors for dimension reduction, (2) the input weights, biases, and output weights, and (3) the number of hidden nodes can be updated simultaneously. Moreover, only one parameter, the number of hidden nodes, needs to be determined manually, and this makes it easy for use in real applications. Performance comparison was made on various high-dimensional classification problems for OSPVM against other fast online algorithms including budgeted stochastic gradient descent (BSGD) approach, adaptive multihyperplane machine (AMM), primal estimated subgradient solver (Pegasos), online sequential extreme learning machine (OSELM), and SVD + OSELM (feature selection based on SVD is performed before OSELM). The results obtained demonstrated the superior generalization performance and efficiency of the OSPVM.

  15. Online Sequential Projection Vector Machine with Adaptive Data Mean Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a simple online learning algorithm especial for high-dimensional data. The algorithm is referred to as online sequential projection vector machine (OSPVM which derives from projection vector machine and can learn from data in one-by-one or chunk-by-chunk mode. In OSPVM, data centering, dimension reduction, and neural network training are integrated seamlessly. In particular, the model parameters including (1 the projection vectors for dimension reduction, (2 the input weights, biases, and output weights, and (3 the number of hidden nodes can be updated simultaneously. Moreover, only one parameter, the number of hidden nodes, needs to be determined manually, and this makes it easy for use in real applications. Performance comparison was made on various high-dimensional classification problems for OSPVM against other fast online algorithms including budgeted stochastic gradient descent (BSGD approach, adaptive multihyperplane machine (AMM, primal estimated subgradient solver (Pegasos, online sequential extreme learning machine (OSELM, and SVD + OSELM (feature selection based on SVD is performed before OSELM. The results obtained demonstrated the superior generalization performance and efficiency of the OSPVM.

  16. 2012 Dewey Lecture: Making Meaning Together beyond Theory and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, Jim

    2013-01-01

    Educators frequently fret over how to bridge the gap between theory and practice. In an important sense, it is a false problem. Theory is simply the thoughtful, reflective phase of good practice. We will approach Dewey's philosophy as one of continuous creation and re-creation or even more precisely, social co-creation, that requires making…

  17. Identifying challenges in project consultants engagement practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariffuddin, Nadia Alina Amir; Abidin, Nazirah Zainul

    2017-10-01

    Construction projects, green or conventional, involve multi-faceted disciplines engaged with the goal of delivering products i.e. building, infrastructure etc. at the best quality within stipulated budgets. For green projects, additional attention is added for environmental quality. Due to the various responsibilities and liabilities involved as well as the complexity of the construction process itself, formal engagement of multi-disciplinary professionals i.e. project consultants is required in any construction project. Poor selection of project consultants will lead to a multitude of complications resulting in delay, cost escalation, conflicts and poor quality. This paper explores the challenges that occur during the engagement of project consultants in a green project. As the engagement decision involves developers and architects, these two groups of respondents with green project backgrounds were approached qualitatively using interview technique. The challenges identified are limited experience and knowledge, consultants' fee vs. quality, green complexity, conflicts of interest, clients' extended expectation and less demand in green projects. The construction shifts to green project demands engagement of project consultants with added skills. It is expected that through the identification of challenges, better management and administration can be created which would give impact to the overall process of engagement in green projects.

  18. Negotiation of pedagogical design patterns as a means to enhance communities of practice in university teaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    May, Michael

    and learning, specifically in the context of technology enhanced learning (”e-learning patterns”). In a competence development project for teachers across our university, the negotiation of design patterns sketched by teachers themselves was used as a means to enhance communities of practice around the sharing...... of ideas and experiences with teaching and learning. Rather than a formal pattern language aimed at a database of design patterns, the real potency of the methodology arises from the very process of negotiating suggested patterns and the resulting elaboration of teachers’ conceptions about problems...

  19. Constructivism and the projective assessment of meaning in Rorschach administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raskin, J D

    2001-08-01

    Constructivist perspectives on the Rorschach are outlined. I discuss ways in which constructivism complements and adds to existing Rorschach methodologies. It is suggested hat the constructivist emphasis on personally and socially constructed meanings is very consistent with many of the ways the Rorschach has been used and resonates with recent emphases on the Rorschach as a representational task. Furthermore, constructivist perspectives on Rorschach also provide an opportunity to supplement Exner's (1993, 1995) efforts to standardize and norm the Rorschach in a way that maintains the instrument's historic and admirable attention to relational elements of assessment and psychotherapy. I present a variety of meaning-based techniques for conducting Rorschach assessment, incorporating both the constructivist and social constructionist perspective.

  20. The meaning-making of science teachers participating in a school-based PD project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Birgitte Lund

    The meaning-making of four science teachers involved in collaboratively analyzing video and other artifacts from practice in local science classrooms in a school-based professional development project is examined through repeated interviews and represented as meaning-making maps. The research aim...... is to examine how these collaborative inquiries make sense to the teachers: what they identify as outcomes, how they make use of inputs and support in their classrooms and in collegial interactions and how their ideas about teaching and learning of science might play a role. An adapted version...... learning of science in concrete situations. They refer to outcomes from sharing experiments with new tools and materials and refer to being encouraged to continue collaboration around science at the school. Beside this the teachers emphasize various outcomes apparently for each of them in areas where...

  1. The meaning-making of science teachers participating in as school based PD project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Birgitte Lund

    The meaning-making of four science teachers involved in collaboratively analyzing video and other artifacts from practice in local science classrooms in a school-based professional development project is examined through repeated interviews and represented as meaning-making maps. The research aim...... is to examine how these collaborative inquiries make sense to the teachers: what they identify as outcomes, how they make use of inputs and support in their classrooms and in collegial interactions and how their ideas about teaching and learning of science might play a role. An adapted version...... learning of science in concrete situations. They refer to outcomes from sharing experiments with new tools and materials and refer to being encouraged to continue collaboration around science at the school. Beside this the teachers emphasize various outcomes apparently for each of them in areas where...

  2. Mapping Best and Emerging Practices of Project Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Christian; Aaris Boas, Charlotte; Thorslund, Michael V.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents results of a study of the connection between Best and Emerging practices of project management. Drawing upon network mapping as an analytical strategy, cases of Best and Emerging practices is analysed and juxtaposed. The case of Best practice is represented by the newly...... published ISO 21500 standard and the case for the Emerging practices by a deconstruction of the practices of a group of experienced project managers. The network analysis reveals a substantial difference between the Best and Emerging practices. Only two central concepts where shared namely Communication...... and Planning. Of these two concepts Communication where found to be the most central to both the Emerging and Best practices. The analysis further reveals a soft side of project management that is central in the Emerging practice but absent from the Best practices. Although this soft side might be interpreted...

  3. Benchmarking Sustainability Practices Use throughout Industrial Construction Project Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungmin Yun

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite the efforts for sustainability studies in building and infrastructure construction, the sustainability issues in industrial construction remain understudied. Further, few studies evaluate sustainability and benchmark sustainability issues in industrial construction from a management perspective. This study presents a phase-based benchmarking framework for evaluating sustainability practices use focusing on industrial facilities project. Based on the framework, this study quantifies and assesses sustainability practices use, and further sorts the results by project phase and major project characteristics, including project type, project nature, and project delivery method. The results show that sustainability practices were implemented higher in the construction and startup phases relative to other phases, with a very broad range. An assessment by project type and project nature showed significant differences in sustainability practices use, but no significant difference in practices use by project delivery method. This study contributes to providing a benchmarking method for sustainability practices in industrial facilities projects at the project phase level. This study also discusses and provides an application of phase-based benchmarking for sustainability in industrial construction.

  4. Machinima as a Practice of Meaning-making

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølunde, Lisbeth

    into their stated inspirational resources. The theoretical approach is dialogic communication research and mediated discourse analysis, which aims to uncover the nexus of dynamic creative processes as fundamentally social and polyphonic. Therefore, the study examines the dynamics and significance of the complex...... interactions, relationships, cultural identities, and tools which constitute and sustain machinima activities. This is done by asking questions regarding meaningfulness; what meanings the machinimators ascribe to finished films, how these meanings might have transformed during specific creative processes...

  5. Quantity versus Quality in Project Based Learning Practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Keegan (Anne); J.R. Turner (Rodney)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractIn the midst of the turbulence wrought by the global economy, it has become common to see projects as an essential medium for achieving change. However, project based learning practices - as a subset of organizational learning practices- have not kept pace with this development. To

  6. Constructing new working practices through project narratives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenswijk, M.B.; Berendse, M.

    2008-01-01

    In this article we focus on the (internal and external) dynamics of New Public Management (NPM) in the daily life of project management. We concentrate on the ways NPM concepts work out in the realities of project actors. Based on recent research within the Dutch infrastructure sector, we analyse

  7. Communities of practices as means to develop creativity at work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Rasmus; Edwards, Kasper

    2017-01-01

    P with the organization. We propose a method to develop CoP and the method is tested in a blood analysis unit at ‘Nordsjællands Hospital’ in Denmark and the effect on creativity is evaluated. In order to develop the CoP the following interventions took place: The manager was introduced to CoP theory. The practice...... their practice. CoP are known for inducing a propensity to develop knowledge and foster creativity as practitioners interact and build relations, share ideas and discuss experiences. Communities of Practice are often developed as a part of knowledge management initiatives. However, knowledge about how to develop...... CoP is still incomplete. This papers reports on an intervention study that contributes to the CoP field through the design and test of a method for CoP development within operations. The study contributes with knowledge about the design of a CoP start-up process and about connecting the Co...

  8. Complexity or Meaning in Health Professional Education and Practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Wendy Anne

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Discourses of complexity have entered health professional education. This paper explores the meaning of complexity by asking how health professionals are educated and some of the consequences of that education. Design: A qualitative study was carried out drawing on reflexivity, discourse analysis and grounded methodology. Setting: Two…

  9. The project of model practices in family medicine in Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonka Poplas Susič

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Primary health care has undergone great changes as a consequence of demographic changes, growing patients’ awareness and organizational changes in the healthcare system. Declining interest in family medicine specialization further worsens the situation. In the period of lack of GPs and their overloading, it is necessary to include a diploma graduate nurse in the team of GPs and to define competencies and activities in such a way that encourage more active approach to the patients, meeting the indicators of quality.The purpose of the article is to describe the project of model practice in Slovenia and to present some results.Methods: A model practice introduces a new concept in the areas of human resource standards (to existing team, a diploma graduate nurse is included on a part-time basis; work competences (use of protocols for the treatment of chronic patients, extended and well-defined preventive screenings, establishing registers of chronic patients and assessing quality by means of quality indicators and work management (redistribution of workload .Results: Due to great interest of general practitioners, a total of 271 model practices were introduced in 2011 and 2012. MPs have been distributed evenly through different regions inSlovenia. Registers of patients with chronic diseases (COPD, asthma and diabetes have been established and during the preventive screening, on average 2 patients with a chronic disease and 15 patients with risk factors have been detected. Patients are treated actively according to their needs rather than their preferences.Conclusions: The project of MPs enables a high quality and cost effectiveness of patients’ treatment in family medicine. With a gradual introducing of new MPs, a well planed and monitored patients’ care will be implemented in the practice. In a long run, disburdening of a secondary care level and more rational consumption of drugs are expected

  10. Practical experience with a data collection project: the OREDA project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandtorv, Helge A.; Hokstad, Per; Thompson, David W.

    1996-01-01

    Experience data on the reliability of equipment has become vital to many types of engineering and maintenance analyses. The consequences of incorrect design or poor maintenance may adversely affect: safety, the environment or cost in most categories of process industries, and, in particular, offshore exploration and production industries. The OREDA project is a data collection programme for the offshore industry which has been operating since the early 80's. A high level of knowledge has been gained from this programme on: specification of data, data collection methods and the utilization of data. Some of the results and the knowledge gained from this project are presented in this paper

  11. An Examination of Assistant Professors' Project Management Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpert, Shannon Atkinson; Hartshorne, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research was to identify factors that influence the use of project management in higher education research projects by investigating the project management practices of assistant professors. Design/methodology/approach: Using a grounded theory approach that included in-depth, semi-structured interviews with 22…

  12. Transportation engineering project management : survey of practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Utah Department of Transportation (UDOT) project managers (PMs) have identified inefficiencies in the legacy : system electronic Program Management (ePM) used to manage consultant contracts and invoices. To help UDOT : prepare for potential system im...

  13. Practical statistics a handbook for business projects

    CERN Document Server

    Buglear, John

    2013-01-01

    Practical Statistics is a hands-on guide to statistics, progressing by complexity of data (univariate, bivariate, multivariate) and analysis (portray, summarise, generalise) in order to give the reader a solid understanding of the fundamentals and how to apply them.

  14. RISK MANAGEMENT APPROACHES AND PRACTICES IN IT PROJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BRANDAS Claudiu

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Risk is identified in project management literature as an important factor influencing IT projects success, and it is relevant for both academic and practitionersn#8217; communities. The paper presents the past and current approaches to risk management in IT projects. The objective of this paper is to compare the different approaches and relate them to existing practices. Project management literature and practice have brought different approaches to risk management, and as a result, many projects ended in failure. We present how risk management is considered in the literature, and we compare the main two approaches: the evaluation approach and the management approach. The contingency approach does not consider risk management to be a specific process as it is an embedded process in the other project management processes. Then, we present the main practices in risk management. The methodology applied is based on documentary study review and analysis of the concepts used by the literature. We analyzed the literature published between 1978 and 2011 from the main journals for IT project management and found out that the essence of project management is risk management. The risk management practices have a considerable influence on stakeholdersn#8217; perception of project success. But, regardless of the chosen approach, a standard method for identifying, assessing, and responding to risks should be included in any project as this influences the outcome of the project.

  15. From linear to nonlinear control means: a practical progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhiqiang

    2002-04-01

    With the rapid advance of digital control hardware, it is time to take the simple but effective proportional-integral-derivative (PID) control technology to the next level of performance and robustness. For this purpose, a nonlinear PID and active disturbance rejection framework are introduced in this paper. It complements the existing theory in that (1) it actively and systematically explores the use of nonlinear control mechanisms for better performance, even for linear plants; (2) it represents a control strategy that is rather independent of mathematical models of the plants, thus achieving inherent robustness and reducing design complexity. Stability analysis, as well as software/hardware test results, are presented. It is evident that the proposed framework lends itself well in seeking innovative solutions to practical problems while maintaining the simplicity and the intuitiveness of the existing technology.

  16. Beyond the Myth of Best Practice in Project Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihály Görög

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available It is broadly accepted that projects are temporary endeavours that create some unique ‘products’. That is, projects are also unique. Yet the best practice approach postulates that projects are basically same, and that one project management tool is better than another. Thus, believers of best practice accept that project management is an avowal of faith. Consequently, project management is just an occupation. However, projects are different both in terms of their inherent characteristics and organisational context. We thus need to apply the project management toolkit in a context-related manner. This latter approach is far beyond the best practice approach and implies that project management is a profession. This paper aims to shed light on what lies behind the best practice approach and also aims to reveal the way in which the professional community may find what should be beyond the myth of best practice. The paper provides what is basically an exploratory journey based on previous research.

  17. Pilot Projects in Water Management : Practicing Change and Changing Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vreugdenhil, H.S.I.

    2010-01-01

    Pilot projects are widely applied in water management. They can be used to test risky innovations at confined scale, but can also be used to delay policy decisions or to advocate a particular innovation. In this book the phenomenon ‘pilot project’ is explored both theoretically and empirically. A

  18. On Best Practices for Risk Management in Complex Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan BENTA

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Risk management shall be proactive. This is one of the key preliminaries to cope with the challenges of complex projects. An overarching and consistent view on project risks and uncertainties is necessary to follow a holistic approach in project risk management. Uncertainty is inevitable since projects are unique and temporary undertakings based on assumptions and constraints, delivering project results to multiple stakeholders with different requirements. Project management can be seen as an attempt to control this uncertain environment, through the use of structured and disciplined techniques such as estimating, planning, cost control, task allocation, earned value analysis, monitoring, and review meetings. Each of these elements of project management has a role in defining or controlling inherent variability in projects. Project risk management provides approaches by which uncertainty can be understood, assessed, and managed within projects. A number of associations (e.g., Project Management Institute – PMI®, International Project Management Association – IPMA,or Network of Nordic Project Management Associations - NORDNET work constantly in acquiring, improving, and standardizing best practices in project management.Based on the industrial practice, this paper outlines strategies to identify, prioritize, and mitigate risks for achievement of project’ or organizational objectives.

  19. Socio-economic project evaluation in practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, A.

    1995-01-01

    The theoretical basis for a socio-economic project evaluation can be doubtful and specific analyses can involve quite essential uncertainty. Among serious theoretical problems of the energy sector there should be named the price distortions, due to various taxes. The choice of the presumed calculation interest can be difficult, due to the extremely long-range energy-political planning. (EG) 10 refs

  20. Human Rights Practice: A Means to Environmental Ends?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Donald

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Can human rights practice in its current dominant forms tackle the challenge of climate change and global environmental degradation? This article argues that although there is now increased recognition of the links between human rights and the environment, and while human rights tools and principles can contribute in some concrete ways in moving forward the environmental agenda, their potential for doing is so far largely unrealised. The article analyses three different approaches used by advocates and activists in this field, before discussing potential alternatives and examples of radical or hybrid approaches, with a view to articulating a strategy for activism and praxis that can capture the real and lived inter-connectedness of human rights enjoyment and environmental factors more meaningfully. ¿Puede la práctica de los derechos humanos en sus formas dominantes actuales hacer frente al desafío del cambio climático y la degradación global del medio ambiente? Este artículo sostiene que, aunque ahora hay un mayor reconocimiento de los vínculos entre los derechos humanos y el medio ambiente, y mientras que las herramientas y principios de los derechos humanos pueden contribuir en avanzar de manera concreta la agenda ambiental, su potencial se encuentra frustrado en gran parte hasta el momento. El artículo analiza tres enfoques diferentes utilizados por los defensores y activistas en este campo, antes de discutir alternativas y ejemplos de enfoques radicales o híbridos, con el fin de articular una estrategia para el activismo y la praxis que pueda capturar de manera más significativa la interconexión real y vivida del disfrute de los derechos humanos y de los factores medioambientales.

  1. Evaluation of Sustainable Practices within Project Management Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah Satya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research study is to investigate some of the sustainable practices within projects with a focus on social projects. The different research methodologies applied through this research consisted both primary and secondary research, including literature review and through case study. The stakeholder’s behavioural needs towards acting and implementing sustainable practices led to the adoption of sustainable practices within projects which are managed across profit and non-profit organisations. Nevertheless, lack of sustainable behaviour was outlined, and henceforth the integration of sustainable development within social projects is crucially important as such projects were identified as the drivers toward educating the society in order to help to produce generations of people who would be more sustainably aware. Currently, sustainable development is very often taken into account when it comes to managing projects. Nevertheless, if the adoption of sustainable practices is well established in some sectors such as construction, literature tends to demonstrate a lack of information regarding other sectors, especially within social projects. This research aims to investigate the adoption of sustainable practices within social projects and therefore to satisfy a literature gap.

  2. Risk reduction of international mining projects by means of investor consortia and diversification of external financing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchner, C.

    1982-01-01

    Investors and creditors of international mining projects bear specific risks which may be reduced by means of forming investor and financing consortia. Risk is defined for each actor separately. Project risk and investor risk respectively credit risk are useful categories in order to analyze risk reduction. In each case formation of consortia has a positive influence on the economic viability of the project, and thus reduces the project risk. Furthermore, formation of consortia leads to better compliance of the host country of the mining project with the project and financing agreements. Thus, investor and credit risk may be reduced. (orig.) [de

  3. Effects of Risk Management Practices on IT Project Success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pimchangthong Daranee

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Successful management of an information technology (IT project is the most desirable for all organisations and stakeholders. Many researchers elaborated that risk management is a key part of project management for any project size. Risk management is so critical because it provides project managers with a forward-looking view of both threats and opportunities to improve the project success. The objectives of this research are to explore organisational factors affecting IT project success and risk management practices influencing IT project success. Risk management practices include risk identification, risk analysis, risk response planning, and risk monitoring and control. The IT project success is measured by process performance and product performance. Data are collected from 200 project managers, IT managers, and IT analysts in IT firms through questionnaires and analysed using Independent Sample t-test, One-way ANOVA, and Multiple Linear Regression at the statistical significance level of 0.05. The results show that the differences in organisational types affect IT project success in all aspects, while the differences on organisational sizes affect IT project success in the aspect of product performance and total aspects. Risk identification and risk response planning influence the process performance and the total aspects of IT project success. Risk identification has the highest positive influence on product performance, followed closely by risk response, while risk analysis negatively influences product performance.

  4. Symbolic Meanings of High and Low Impact Daily Consumption Practices in Different Cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ger, Güliz; Wilhite, Harold; Halkier, Bente

    1998-01-01

    . They influence our choices and practices whether it is by motivating or impeding them. In this study we will look at the symbolic meanings of high and low environmental impact consumption practices. In order to create desirable social markers for environmentally-friendly practices and/or to change high impact...... practices, we need to understand emergent practices and their existing cultural meanings. Thus we have chosen three fields of daily consumption practices - food consumption, transport and hygiene - and sorted out the relatively environmentally friendly (low impact) and the relatively environmentally...

  5. Defining Project Purchasing Activities - Exemplified by the Purchasing Practices in Offshore Wind Farm Projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lutz, Salla

    and limited learning outcomes from one project to another. Furthermore, the study reveals the importance of a more holistic approach to project purchasing practices by focusing on the entire life cycle of a project. Managerially it helps selling companies to understand the peculiar buying phases...

  6. The process of selecting technology development projects: a practical framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herps, Joost M.J.; van Mal, Herman H.; Halman, Johannes I.M.; Martens, Jack H.M.; Borsboom, Ron H.M.

    2003-01-01

    In this article a practical framework is proposed, that can be used to organise the activities related to the selection-process of technology development projects. The framework is based upon recent literature and application at DAF Trucks Company. A technology development project has a long way to

  7. The process of selecting technology development projects : a practical framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herps, J.M.J.; Mal, van H.H.; Halman, J.I.M.; Martens, J.H.M.; Borsboom, R.H.M.

    2003-01-01

    In this article a practical framework is proposed, that can be used to organise the activities related to the selection-process of technology development projects. The framework is based upon recent literature and application at DAF Trucks Company. A technology development project has a long way to

  8. The human genome project and the future of medical practice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Contrary to the scepticism that characterised the planning stages of the human genome project, the technology and sequence data resulting from the project are set to revolutionise medical practice for good. The expected benefits include: enhanced discovery of disease genes, which will lead to improved knowledge on the ...

  9. Navigating Evidence-Based Practice Projects: The Faculty Role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moch, Susan D; Quinn-Lee, Lisa; Gallegos, Cara; Sortedahl, Charlotte K

    : An innovative way to facilitate evidence-based practice (EBP) learning and to get evidence into practice is through academic-clinical agency projects involving faculty, undergraduate students, and agency staff. The central role of the faculty is key to successful academic-clinical agency partnerships. Faculty navigate the often difficult process of focusing students and engaging busy staff through initiating, maintaining, and evaluating projects. Students learn valuable EBP skills, staff become engaged in EBP, and the projects are rated highly by agency administrators.

  10. Linking Strategy-As-Practice Knowledge and Multi-Stakeholder Brand Meaning Co-Creation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vallaster, Christine; von Wallpach, Sylvia

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we adopt a strategy-as-practice perspective and establish a link to the practices of brand meaning cocreation. We contribute empirical insights gained in the context of a small, non-commercial institution. The results show that brand meaning co-creation is a fluid, social phenomenon...

  11. Your Project Management Coach Best Practices for Managing Projects in the Real World

    CERN Document Server

    Biafore, Bonnie

    2012-01-01

    A pragmatic approach to project management Many projects fail to deliver on time or on budget, or even to deliver a workable product that satisfies the customer. While good project management goes a long way towards ensuring success, managers often fail to follow the plans they implement. This unique guide helps you understand and successfully handle project management, once and for all. Covering practical ways to solve problems you'll typically face when managing actual projects, this pragmatic book takes you through a full project management lifecycle. You'll find ample tips, tricks, and bes

  12. Use of safety management practices for improving project performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Eddie W L; Kelly, Stephen; Ryan, Neal

    2015-01-01

    Although site safety has long been a key research topic in the construction field, there is a lack of literature studying safety management practices (SMPs). The current research, therefore, aims to test the effect of SMPs on project performance. An empirical study was conducted in Hong Kong and the data collected were analysed with multiple regression analysis. Results suggest that 3 of the 15 SMPs, which were 'safety committee at project/site level', 'written safety policy', and 'safety training scheme' explained the variance in project performance significantly. Discussion about the impact of these three SMPs on construction was provided. Assuring safe construction should be an integral part of a construction project plan.

  13. Investigating the Practical Impact of Agile Practices on the Quality of Software Projects in Continuous Delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Olumide Akerele; Muthu Ramachandran; Mark Dixon

    2014-01-01

    Various factors affect the impact of agile factors on the continuous delivery of software projects. This is a major reason why projects perform differently- some failing and some succeeding- when they implement some agile practices in various environments. This is not helped by the fact that many projects work within limited budget while project plans also change-- making them to fall into some sort of pressure to meet deadline when they fall behind in their planned work. This study investiga...

  14. The Evocative Power of Projective Techniques for the Elicitation of Meaning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Porr PhD

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A unique project was undertaken by doctoral and postdoctoral students, and their mentor, from diverse backgrounds in health and social sciences to explore their past experiences as participants in a qualitative research training initiative called EQUIPP (Enhancing Qualitative Understanding of Illness Processes and Prevention. The purpose of the project was to create a symbolic representation of the EQUIPP program through the use of projective techniques. The authors examined the meaning of engaging in qualitative research training through images and conceptual metaphors that were subsequently consolidated thematically and then portrayed in the form of a newly constructed logo that was developed with the assistance of a professional graphic designer. Projective techniques proved to be a powerful, evocative tool for eliciting meaning and translating concrete experiences into visual discourse. In this paper, the authors discuss how projective techniques were operationalized and consider their broad implications for qualitative research.

  15. Project Management as a means of knowledge communication for the Information economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampf, Constance

    Currently Project Management as a field is understood from an engineering and management perspective as a system of planning, managing and monitoring work processes involved in projects.  The systems focus does not preclude communication as an important element, but it does not synthesize...... communication concepts with project management practices. Understanding Project Management from a communication perspective entails synthesizing key concepts from Knowledge Communication, Knowledge Management and Rhetoric.  From Knowledge Communication, key concepts include Wenger's Communities of Practice...... (1998), Nonaka & Takeuchi´s' SECI model describing the relationship between tacit and explicit knowledge in the context of knowledge creation (1995), and Davenport & Prusak's problematization of knowledge definitions in Working Knowledge (1998, 2000).  From a Knowledge Management Perspective, key...

  16. Introducing Principles of Land Surveying by Assigning a Practical Project

    OpenAIRE

    Introducing Principles of Land Surveying by Assigning a Practical Project

    2016-01-01

    A practical project is used in an engineering surveying course to expose sophomore and junior civil engineering students to several important issues related to the use of basic principles of land surveying. The project, which is the design of a two-lane rural highway to connect between two arbitrary points, requires students to draw the profile of the proposed highway along with the existing ground level. Areas of all cross-sections are then computed to enable quantity computations between th...

  17. Meaning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harteveld, Casper

    The second world to be considered concerns Meaning. In contrast to Reality and Play, this world relates to the people, disciplines, and domains that are focused on creating a certain value. For example, if this value is about providing students knowledge about physics, it involves teachers, the learning sciences, and the domains education and physics. This level goes into the aspects and criteria that designers need to take into account from this perspective. The first aspect seems obvious when we talk of “games with a serious purpose.” They have a purpose and this needs to be elaborated on, for example in terms of what “learning objectives” it attempts to achieve. The subsequent aspect is not about what is being pursued but how. To attain a value, designers have to think about a strategy that they employ. In my case this concerned looking at the learning paradigms that have come into existence in the past century and see what they have to tell us about learning. This way, their principles can be translated into a game environment. This translation involves making the strategy concrete. Or, in other words, operationalizing the plan. This is the third aspect. In this level, I will further specifically explain how I derived requirements from each of the learning paradigms, like reflection and exploration, and how they can possibly be related to games. The fourth and final aspect is the context in which the game is going to be used. It matters who uses the game and when, where, and how the game is going to be used. When designers have looked at these aspects, they have developed a “value proposal” and the worth of it may be judged by criteria, like motivation, relevance, and transfer. But before I get to this, I first go into how we human beings are meaning creators and what role assumptions, knowledge, and ambiguity have in this. I will illustrate this with some silly jokes about doctors and Mickey Mouse, and with an illusion.

  18. A Project Management Approach to Applying Best Practices to Online CS/MIS Experiential Learning Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwieger, Dana; Surendran, Ken

    2015-01-01

    The value of experiential learning projects (which are usually major assessments in courses) in education has been touted since the early 1900s (Dewey, 1938). These projects have the potential to deepen students' understanding of course topics by allowing them to put concepts into practice and watch the results develop. However, experiential…

  19. The Philosophy of Practice for Comprehensive Medication Management: Evaluating Its Meaning and Application by Practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestka, Deborah L; Sorge, Lindsay A; McClurg, Mary Roth; Sorensen, Todd D

    2018-01-01

    Philosophy of practice is the foundation of any patient care practice because it provides a set of professional values and beliefs that guide actions and decisions in practice. Study objectives were to understand how pharmacists providing comprehensive medication management (CMM) describe their philosophy of practice and compare how participants' philosophies align with predefined tenets of a CMM philosophy of practice. An instrument with closed and open-ended items was developed and administered online to the lead pharmacist at 36 clinics participating in a large CMM study. Participants were asked to describe their philosophy of practice, rate how well their current practice activities align with five predefined CMM philosophy of practice tenets, and provide examples of how they carry out each tenet and how they could improve. Responses were coded, and descriptive analysis was used to calculate participants' practice alignment with the five philosophy of practice tenets. Thirty pharmacists completed the instrument. Twelve codes emerged that participants used to describe their philosophy of practice. These codes were mapped to five predefined tenets of a philosophy of practice. Only 3 (10%) participants included all five tenets in their philosophy of practice, 8 (26.7%) included four, 8 (26.7%) included three, 6 (20%) included two, and 5 (16.7%) included one tenet. Overall, participants rated their alignment with the five tenets highly. "Embracing a patient-centered approach" received the highest mean score of 9.17/10; "Meeting a societal need" had the lowest mean score of 8.37/10. Participants described their philosophy of practice with significant variability. CMM requires a single and consistently applied philosophy of practice to guide practice and the role of the practitioner. We propose five core tenets that resulted from this assessment to be embraced by pharmacists providing CMM and included in their philosophy of practice. © 2017 Pharmacotherapy

  20. An Assessment of risk response strategies practiced in software projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanita Bhoola

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Risk management and success in projects are highly intertwined – better approaches to project risk management tend to increase chances of project success in terms of achieving scope & quality, schedule and cost targets. The process of responding to risk factors during a project’s life cycle is a crucial aspect of risk management referred to as risk response strategies, in this paper. The current research explores the status of risk response strategies applied in the software development projects in India. India provides a young IT-savvy English-speaking population, which is also cost effective. Other than the workforce, the environment for implementation of software projects in India is different from the matured economies. Risk management process is a commonly discussed theme, though its implementation in practice has a huge scope for improvement in India. The paper talks about four fundamental treatments to risk response – Avoidance, Transference, Mitigation and Acceptance (ATMA. From a primary data of 302 project managers, the paper attempts to address the risk response factors that lead to successful achievement of project scope & quality, schedule and cost targets, by using a series of regressions followed with Seemingly Unrelated Regression Equations (SURE modelling. Mitigation emerged as the most significant risk response strategy to achieve project targets. Acceptance, transference, and avoidance of risk were mostly manifested in the forms of transparency in communication across stakeholders, careful study of the nature of risks and close coordination between project team, customers/end-users and top management.

  1. Practical Ruby projects ideas for the eclectic programmer

    CERN Document Server

    Cyll, Topher

    2008-01-01

    Cyll brings several imaginative projects to this book, ranging from making generative music, animations, and turn-based games to implementing simulations, algorithms, and even an implementation of Lisp. Each chapter looks at solving tricky development problems, enforces best practices, and encourages creative thinking.

  2. Uncovering the Hidden Dimensions of Meaning in Descriptions of Educational Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Ilene B.

    Descriptions of educational practice offer an array of important, but typically hidden dimensions of meaning which provide potentially rich resources for understanding the practices. This paper illustrates: (1) how analysis, interpretations, and assessments interpenetrate what appear to be descriptions and suggest how readers can tease out these…

  3. Power supply projects a collection of innovative and practical design projects

    CERN Document Server

    Maplin

    1996-01-01

    Using circuit diagrams, PCB layouts, parts lists and clear construction and installation details, this book provides everything someone with a basic knowledge of electronics needs to know in order to put that knowledge into practice.This latest collection of Maplin projects are a variety of power supply projects, the necessary components for which are readily available from the Maplin catalogue or any of their high street shops. Projects include, laboratory power supply projects for which there are a wide range of applications for the hobbyist, from servicing portable audio and video equipment

  4. Project management practice and its effects on project success in Malaysian construction industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haron, N. A.; Devi, P.; Hassim, S.; Alias, A. H.; Tahir, M. M.; Harun, A. N.

    2017-12-01

    The rapid economic development has increased the demand for construction of infrastructure and facilities globally. Sustainable development and globalization are the new ‘Zeitgeist’ of the 21st century. In order to implement these projects successfully and to meet the functional aim of the projects within their lifetime, an efficient project management practice is needed. The aim of this study is to identify the critical success factors (CSFs) and the extent of use of project management practice which affects project success, especially during the implementation stage. Data were obtained from self-administered questionnaires with 232 respondents. A mixed method of data collection was adopted using semi-structured interview and questionnaire approach. The result of the analysis of data obtained showed that new and emerging criteria such as customer satisfaction, competency of the project team, and performance of subcontractors/suppliers are becoming measures of success in addition to the classic iron triangle’s view of time, cost and quality. An insight on the extent of use of different project management practice in the industry was also achieved from the study.

  5. Project-Based Method as an Effective Means of Interdisciplinary Interaction While Teaching a Foreign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondar, Irina Alekseevna; Kulbakova, Renata Ivanovna; Svintorzhitskaja, Irina Andreevna; Pilat, Larisa Pavlovna; Zavrumov, Zaur Aslanovich

    2016-01-01

    The article explains how to use a project-based method as an effective means of interdisciplinary interaction when teaching a foreign language on the example of The Institute of service, tourism and design (branch) of the North Caucasus Federal University (Pyatigorsk, Stavropol Territory Russia). The article holds the main objectives of the…

  6. Multi-mission mean sea surface and geoid models for ocean monitoring within the GOCINA project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, O. B.; Knudsen, P.; Anne, V. L.

    2004-05-01

    A major goal of the EU project GOCINA (Geoid and Ocean Circulation In the North Atlantic) is to develop tools for ocean monitoring using satellite altimetry combined with satellite gravimetry. Furthermore, the project will determine an accurate geoid in the region between Greenland and the UK and, hereby, create a platform for validation of future GOCE Level 2 data and higher order scientific products. The central quantity bridging the geoid and the ocean circulation is the mean dynamic topography, which is the difference between the mean sea surface and the geoid. The mean dynamic topography provides the absolute reference surface for the ocean circulation. The improved determination of the mean circulation will advance the understanding of the role of the ocean mass and heat transport in climate change. To calculate the best possible synthetic mean dynamic topographies a new mean sea surface (KMS03) has been derived from nine years of altimetric data (1993-2001). The regional geoid has furthermore being updated using GRACE and gravimetric data from a recent airborne survey. New synthetic mean dynamic topography models have been computed from the best available geoid models (EGM96, GRACE, GOCINA) and the present mean sea surface models (i.e. CLS01, GSFC00, KMS03). These models will be compared with state of the art hydrodynamic mean dynamic topography models in the North Atlantic GOCINA area. An extended comparison in the Artic Ocean will also be presented to demonstrate the impact of improved geoid and mean sea surface modeling. Particularly using the GRACE derived geoid models, and the KMS03 mean sea surface.

  7. Practical Arduino Cool Projects for Open Source Hardware

    CERN Document Server

    Oxer, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    Create your own Arduino-based designs, gain in-depth knowledge of the architecture of Arduino, and learn the user-friendly Arduino language all in the context of practical projects that you can build yourself at home. Get hands-on experience using a variety of projects and recipes for everything from home automation to test equipment. Arduino has taken off as an incredibly popular building block among ubicomp (ubiquitous computing) enthusiasts, robotics hobbyists, and DIY home automation developers. Authors Jonathan Oxer and Hugh Blemings provide detailed instructions for building a wide range

  8. The seed of change in society. Diffusion of solar cell systems in housing by means of pilot projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Mierlo, B.C.

    2002-01-01

    The central question in this thesis is: in what way can pilot projects contribute to the diffusion of new sustainable technologies, in particular solar cell systems in housing units. The reason for this is, in the first place, that trials, demonstration projects, practical experiments and market introduction projects are often launched by firms and subsidised by the state. The objective of such projects, referred to here as pilot projects, is in general to prepare the market introduction of new technologies. However, these projects are often realised and financed without much information being available on how they operate: about how they could prepare the market launch and how this function could be optimised. The second reason is that since the end of the 1980s the expectations in the Netherlands in respect of solar cell systems (PV systems) connected to the electricity grid have been high. These systems could have great advantages for the environment and after 2010 could be the most important source of sustainable energy. The government sees housing as the most promising market segment for these systems. It is recognised that certain major bottlenecks have to be solved before a large-scale diffusion is possible. According to the niche approach, the basic starting point of this thesis, this means that the existing social-technological regime needs to change: the rules and infrastructure according to which the existing technologies are, as it were, considered self-evident, and which hinder the introduction of new technologies. Subsidised pilot projects form a protected market niche that can stimulate a change in the regime by learning and by the social embedding of the learning experiences. According to this approach, a protected market niche is a necessary component of state-supported innovation policy if market niches do not arise spontaneously. It is, however, a limited instrument since the ultimate impact on existing regimes depends mainly on external factors

  9. Uav Photogrammetry: a Practical Solution for Challenging Mapping Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadatseresht, M.; Hashempour, A. H.; Hasanlou, M.

    2015-12-01

    We have observed huge attentions to application of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) in aerial mapping since a decade ago. Though, it has several advantages for handling time/cost/quality issues, there are a dozen of challenges in working with UAVs. In this paper, we; as the Robotic Photogrammetry Research Group (RPRG), will firstly review these challenges then show its advantages in three special practical projects. For each project, we will share our experiences through description of the UAV specifications, flight settings and processing steps. At the end, we will illustrate final result of each project and show how this technology could make unbelievable benefits to clients including 3D city realistic model in decimetre level, ultra high quality map production in several centimetre level, and accessing to a high risk and rough relief area for mapping aims.

  10. Best Practices in NASA's Astrophysics Education and Public Outreach Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, H.; Smith, D.

    2015-11-01

    NASA's Astrophysics Education and Public Outreach (EPO) program has partnered scientists and educators since its inception almost twenty years ago, leading to authentic STEM experiences and products widely used by the education and outreach community. We present examples of best practices and representative projects. Keys to success include effective use of unique mission science/technology, attention to audience needs, coordination of effort, robust partnerships and publicly accessible repositories of EPO products. Projects are broadly targeted towards audiences in formal education, informal education, and community engagement. All NASA programs are evaluated for quality and impact. New technology is incorporated to engage young students being raised in the digital age. All projects focus on conveying the excitement of scientific discoveries from NASA's Astrophysics missions, advancing scientific literacy, and engaging students in science and technology careers.

  11. Approaching the Practice Quality Improvement Project in Interventional Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Stephen P; White, Benjamin; Sutphin, Patrick D; Pillai, Anil K; Kalva, Sanjeeva P; Toomay, Seth M

    2015-12-01

    An important component of maintenance of certification and quality improvement in radiology is the practice quality improvement (PQI) project. In this article, the authors describe several methodologies for initiating and completing PQI projects. Furthermore, the authors illustrate several tools that are vital in compiling, analyzing, and presenting data in an easily understandable and reproducible manner. Last, they describe two PQI projects performed in an interventional radiology division that have successfully improved the quality of care for patients. Using the DMAIC (define, measure, analyze, improve, control) quality improvement framework, interventional radiology throughput has been increased, to lessen mediport wait times from 43 to 8 days, and mediport infection rates have decreased from more than 2% to less than 0.4%. Copyright © 2015 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Project Management Practices as a Subject of Research for CSCW

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bossen, Claus; Leimbach, Timo

    2017-01-01

    The ‘project’ is a prevalent form for organising endeavours of construction, innovation, IT development and organisational change. ‘Projects’ involve coordination and cooperation between colocated and distributed actors, and are relevant for CSCW (computer supported cooperative work) research...... as a particular kind of cooperative work. A survey of CSCW publications only identified 26 papers that explicitly address project management (PM), of which most primarily focus on IT development. We argue that CSCW’s conceptual and methodological tools can make significant contributions to PM research, practice...... on computational support for project work and management. In all, we argue that CSCW can advance our understanding of project work and management and the design of adequate computational support....

  13. Managing the Right Projects: Best Practices to Align Project and Corporate Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Bobby

    2012-01-01

    If there's a human endeavor that exemplifies teamwork, it is space exploration. And that teamwork absolutely cannot happen effectively if the boots on the ground the people doing the work - don't understand how their work aligns with the larger goal. This presentation will discuss some best management practices from NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center that have succeeded in helping employees become informed, engaged and committed to the space agency's important missions. Specific topics include: Alignment Criteria: Linking Projects To Corporate Strategy. Resource Management: Best Practices For Resource Management. Strategic Analysis: Supporting Decision Making In A Changing Environment. Communication Strategies: Best Practices To Communicate Change. Benefits Achieved And Lessons Learned.

  14. Discovery of the Meanings, Expressions, and Practices Related to Malaria Care Among the Maasai.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strang, Cecily W; Mixer, Sandra J

    2016-07-01

    Although malaria is preventable and treatable, morbidity and mortality from this disease continue among the Maasai of Southern Kenya. Prior to this study, the Maasai's generic and professional malaria care/cure practices were largely unknown. The purpose of this study was to discover, describe, and systematically analyze meanings, expressions, and practices that promote culturally congruent malaria care among this population. The qualitative, ethnonursing research method was used to conduct in-depth examination of the Maasai ethnohistory and culture relevant to malaria care and analyze data from 48 interviews conducted in Maasailand. Guided by the "culture care theory," four themes were discovered related to Maasai community, traditional, spiritual, and professional care/cure practices. These significant findings filled a research gap and contribute to nursing knowledge and caring practice. These study findings have implications for culturally congruent malaria care education, practice, research, policy, and partnership with traditional and professional caregivers. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. Literature on theory and practice on unethical practices in the construction of projects: A case of an emerging economy

    OpenAIRE

    Chipo Mellania Maseko

    2017-01-01

    The construction of projects is mostly symbolised by the extraordinary levels of unethical practices and this has ruined the image of the industry. The delivery of good quality infrastructure projects in some emerging economies is continuously, disrupted because of unethical practices. This paper was, initiated to identify the most dominant unethical practices in the construction of projects, using most recent and comprehensive literature ranging from 2011 to 2017. Twenty unethical practices ...

  16. Entering medical practice for the very first time : emotional talk, meaning and identity development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmich, Esther; Bolhuis, Sanneke; Dornan, Tim; Laan, Roland; Koopmans, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    Medical Education 2012: 46: 10741087 CONTEXT During early clinical exposure, medical students have many emotive experiences. Through participation in social practice, they learn to give personal meaning to their emotional states. This meaningful social act of participation may lead to a sense of

  17. Entering medical practice for the very first time: emotional talk, meaning and identity development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmich, E.; Bolhuis, S.; Dornan, T.; Laan, R.F.; Koopmans, R.T.

    2012-01-01

    Medical Education 2012: 46: 1074-1087 CONTEXT During early clinical exposure, medical students have many emotive experiences. Through participation in social practice, they learn to give personal meaning to their emotional states. This meaningful social act of participation may lead to a sense of

  18. Big game hunting practices, meanings, motivations and constraints: a survey of Oregon big game hunters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh K. Shrestha; Robert C. Burns

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a self-administered mail survey in September 2009 with randomly selected Oregon hunters who had purchased big game hunting licenses/tags for the 2008 hunting season. Survey questions explored hunting practices, the meanings of and motivations for big game hunting, the constraints to big game hunting participation, and the effects of age, years of hunting...

  19. Mutual expectation compacts: a means to link practice culture and vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, Ivo; Slomski, Carol

    2007-01-01

    We describe the development of a mutual expectation compact in an academic department of surgery as a means of reinforcing the department's vision document and promoting cultural change. The compact makes explicit those implicit agreements that exist between a physician and his or her practice. It strengthens the relationship by avoiding the misunderstandings that can arise when agreements are implicit.

  20. Experiencing (Im)Potentiality: Bollnow and Agamben on the Educational Meaning of School Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlieghe, Joris

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the uses of Agamben's philosophy for understanding the educational meaning of practices that typically take/took place at school, such as the collective rehearsal of the alphabet or the multiplication tables. More precisely, I propose that these forms of "practising" show what schooling, as a particular and historically…

  1. Empowering Teachers and their Practices of Inclusion through Digital Dialogic Negotiation of Meaning in Learning Communities of Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voldborg, Hanne; Sorensen, Elsebeth Korsgaard

    2016-01-01

    framework was developed. Through collaborative knowledge building and an Educational Design Research (EDR) method this study reports on a collaborative attempt to improve inclusive teaching/learning in ways that install ownership, reflection, and awareness of eLearning-to-Learn (eL2L). In the current study......The purpose of this paper is to develop and further refine a digital dialogic concept for the establishment of an including educational practice for teachers. The concept is inherently based on the view of teachers as co-researchers and with a view on inclusion as an endeavour best supported...... by digital dialogic negotiation of meaning in learning communities of practice (CoPs). The study is a continuation of an earlier study on establishing a digital dialogic architecture to fostering shared understanding and sustainable competence development in teacher practices of inclusion. A theoretical...

  2. Buying in and Checking out: Identity Development and Meaning Making in the Practice of Mathematics Homework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara Landers

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents findings from an ethnographic study of the role and meaning of mathematics homework in the lives of middle school students. The study conceptualizes and examines homework as a social practice, with a focus on how students make meaning out of their experiences and the role of identity development in meaning making. Specifically, the study examines how middle school students come to value or reject mathematics homework. Case study analyses revealed two ways of characterizing students’ experiences with homework. Students who buy into homework develop aspects of their identities related to school, math and homework that support them in valuing homework. Students who check out develop aspects of their identities that support them in rejecting homework. The concepts of buying in and checking out have implications for theory development around motivation and identity and for school practices around homework.

  3. Experiences of practice facilitators working on the Improved Delivery of Cardiovascular Care project: Retrospective case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddy, Clare; Rowan, Margo; Valiquette-Tessier, Sophie-Claire; Drosinis, Paul; Crowe, Lois; Hogg, William

    2018-01-01

    To examine the barriers to and facilitators of practice facilitation experienced by participants in the Improving Delivery of Cardiovascular Care (IDOCC) project. Case studies of practice facilitators' narrative reports. Eastern Ontario. Primary care practices that participated in the IDOCC project. Cases were identified by calculating sum scores in order to determine practices' performance relative to their peers. Two case exemplars were selected that scored within ± 1 SD of the total mean score, and a qualitative analysis of practice facilitators' narrative reports was conducted using a 5-factor implementation framework to identify barriers and facilitators. Narratives were divided into 3 phases: planning, implementation, and sustainability. Barriers and facilitators fluctuated over the intervention's 3 phases. Site A reported more barriers (n = 47) than facilitators (n = 38), while site B reported a roughly equal number of barriers (n = 144) and facilitators (n = 136). In both sites, the most common barriers involved organizational and provider factors and the most common facilitators were associated with innovation and structural factors. Both practices encountered various barriers and facilitators throughout the IDOCC's 3 phases. The case studies reveal the complex interactions of these factors over time, and provide insight into the implementation of practice facilitation programs. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  4. A practical drug discovery project at the undergraduate level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fray, M Jonathan; Macdonald, Simon J F; Baldwin, Ian R; Barton, Nick; Brown, Jack; Campbell, Ian B; Churcher, Ian; Coe, Diane M; Cooper, Anthony W J; Craven, Andrew P; Fisher, Gail; Inglis, Graham G A; Kelly, Henry A; Liddle, John; Maxwell, Aoife C; Patel, Vipulkumar K; Swanson, Stephen; Wellaway, Natalie

    2013-12-01

    In this article, we describe a practical drug discovery project for third-year undergraduates. No previous knowledge of medicinal chemistry is assumed. Initial lecture workshops cover the basic principles; then students, in teams, seek to improve the profile of a weakly potent, insoluble phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase delta (PI3Kδ) inhibitor (1) through compound array design, molecular modelling, screening data analysis and the synthesis of target compounds in the laboratory. The project benefits from significant industrial support, including lectures, student mentoring and consumables. The aim is to make the learning experience as close as possible to real-life industrial situations. In total, 48 target compounds were prepared, the best of which (5b, 5j, 6b and 6ap) improved the potency and aqueous solubility of the lead compound (1) by 100-1000 fold and ≥tenfold, respectively. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Moving Science Off the ``Back Burner'': Meaning Making Within an Action Research Community of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodnough, Karen

    2008-02-01

    In this study, the participants conceptualized and implemented an action research project that focused on the infusion of inquiry principles into a neglected science curriculum. Specific objectives were to find (a) What factors challenge and support the evolution of an action research community of practice? (b) How are teachers’ beliefs about science teaching and learning transformed? and (c) How does teachers’ knowledge of curriculum, instruction, assessment, and student learning change as a result of learning within a community of practice? In this instrumental case study (Stake 2000, In N. K. Denzin, & Y. S. Lincoln (Eds.), Handbook of qualitative research (pp. 435-454). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage), a range of data collection sources and methods were adopted. Outcomes focus on how the design principles for cultivating a community of practice emerged in the action research group, as well as the types of teacher learning that occurred by engaging in action research.

  6. Processes of negotiation of meanings on algebraic thinking in a community of practice of pre-service mathematics teacher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Cristina de Costa Trindade Cyrino

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We presented in this paper results of a research which aimed to investigate how the community of practice context of pre-service mathematics teacher education collaborates for learning on algebraic thinking by these future teachers. We analyzed, taking into account the Social Theory of Learning developed by Wenger (1998 as a theoretical frame, processes of negotiation of meanings present in participants' algebraic thinking in the development of tasks in one of the actions of the project "Mathematical Education of Teachers of Mathematics" inside the program "Universidade sem Fronteiras". This analysis allowed us to define some forms of member participation and explicit reification of algebraic thinking, due to some interactions in the processes of negotiation of meanings, which revealed changes in the identity of participants in become teachers of mathematics.

  7. Projected Changes in Seasonal Mean Temperature and Rainfall (2011-2040) in Cagayan Valley, Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basconcillo, J. Q.; Lucero, A. J. R.; Solis, A. S.; Kanamaru, H.; Sandoval, R. S.; Bautista, E. U.

    2014-12-01

    Among Filipinos, a meal is most often considered incomplete without rice. There is a high regard for rice in the entire archipelago that in 2012, the country's rice production was accounted to more than 18 million tons with an equivalent harvested area of 4.7 million hectares. This means that from the 5.4 million hectares of arable land in the Philippines, 11 percent are found and being utilized for rice production in Cagayan Valley (CV). In the same year, more than 13 percent of the country's total annual rice production was produced in CV. Rice production also provides employment to 844,000 persons (out of 1.4 million persons) which suggest that occupation and livelihood in Cagayan Valley are strongly anchored in rice production. These figures outline the imaginable vulnerability of rice production in CV amidst varying issues such as land conversion, urbanization, increase in population, retention of farming households, and climate change. While all these issues are of equal importance, this paper is directed towards the understanding the projected changes in seasonal rainfall and mean temperature (2011-2040). It is envisioned by this study that a successful climate change adaptation starts with the provision of climate projections hence this paper's objective to investigate on the changes in climate patterns and extreme events. Projected changes are zonally limited to the Provinces of Cagayan, Isabela, Nueva Vizcaya, and Quirino based on the statistical downscaling of three global climate models (BCM2, CNCM3, and MPEH5) and two emission scenarios (A1B and A2). With the idea that rainfall and temperature varies with topography, the AURELHY technique was utilized in interpolating climate projections. Results obtained from the statistical downscaling showed that there will be significant climate changes from 2011-2040 in terms of rainfall and mean temperature. There are also indications of increasing frequency of extreme 24-hour rainfall and number of dry days

  8. Points of Influence for Lethal Means Counseling and Safe Gun Storage Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runyan, Carol W; Brooks-Russell, Ashley; Betz, Marian E

    2018-06-07

    Counseling about reducing access to lethal means of suicide, especially firearms, is a recommended practice in emergency departments (EDs) but does not occur routinely. Understanding influencers of decisions makers in health care (ED nurse leaders, mental health providers) and temporary firearm storage (law enforcement and gun retailers) could enhance practice. We surveyed these 4 groups in the 8-state region of the Mountain West. For ED nurse leaders (n = 190), hospital legal, risk management, and quality improvement representatives, and the ED nursing director were most often cited as influential, whereas mental health providers (n = 67) cited their own team. Law enforcement officials (n = 448) identified the overall community and leaders of mental health or general health organizations as influential. Firearm retailers (n = 95) cited local law enforcement and national firearm organizations. Advocacy from influential groups may encourage efforts to provide lethal means counseling and temporary off-site storage of firearms for suicide prevention.

  9. Continuity and change in interorganizational project practices : The Dutch shipbuilding industry, 1950-2010

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levering, R.C.; Ligthart, R.; Noorderhaven, N.G.; Oerlemans, L.A.G.

    2013-01-01

    The Dutch shipbuilding industry has a longstanding tradition in project-based production. Recently, industry actors have acknowledged a serious misfit between interorganizational project practices, defined as behaviors related to collaboration, and interorganizational project demands, defined as

  10. Clinical education in private practice: an interdisciplinary project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doubt, Lorna; Paterson, Margo; O'Riordan, Anne

    2004-01-01

    Education of rehabilitation professionals traditionally has occurred in acute care hospitals, rehabilitation centres, and other publicly funded institutions, but increasing numbers of rehabilitation professionals are now working in the community in private agencies and clinics. These privately owned clinics and community agencies represent underutilized resources for the clinical training of students. Historically, private practitioners have been less likely to participate in clinical education because of concerns over patient satisfaction and quality of care, workload, costs, and liability. Through a program funded by the Ministry of Health of Ontario, we conducted a series of interviews and focus groups with private practitioners, which identified that several incentives could potentially increase the numbers of clinical placements in private practices, including participation in the development of student learning objectives related to private practice, professional recognition, and improved relationships with the university departments. Placement in private practices can afford students skills in administration, business management, marketing and promotion, resource development, research, consulting, networking, and medical-legal assessments and processes. This paper presents a discussion of clinical education issues from the perspective of private practitioners, based on the findings of a clinical education project undertaken at Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, and previous literature.

  11. What does it mean to use a method? Towards a practice theory for software engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dittrich, Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    Context Methods and processes, along with the tools to support them, are at the heart of software engineering as a discipline. However, as we all know, that often the use of the same method neither impacts software projects in a comparable manner nor the software they result in. What is lacking...... software development and teaching are indicated. Conclusion The theoretical/philosophical concepts allow the explaining of heterogeneity in application of software engineering methods in line with empirical research results....... is an understanding of how methods affect software development. Objective The article develops a set of concepts based on the practice-concept in philosophy of sociology as a base to describe software development as social practice, and develop an understanding of methods and their application that explains...

  12. High-resolution projections of mean and extreme precipitations over China through PRECIS under RCPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jinxin; Huang, Gordon; Wang, Xiuquan; Cheng, Guanhui; Wu, Yinghui

    2018-06-01

    The impact of global warming on the characteristics of mean and extreme precipitations over China is investigated by using the Providing REgional Climate Impacts for Studies (PRECIS) model. The PRECIS model was driven by the Hadley Centre Global Environment Model version 2 with Earth System components and coupling (HadGEM2-ES). The results of both models are analyzed in terms of mean precipitation and indices of precipitation extremes (R95p, R99p, SDII, WDF, and CWD) over China at the resolution of 25 km under the Representative Concentration Pathways 4.5 and 8.5 (RCP4.5 and RCP8.5) scenarios for the baseline period (1976-2005) and two future periods (2036-2065 and 2070-2099). With improved resolution, the PRECIS model is able to better represent the fine-scale physical process than HadGEM2-ES. It can provide reliable spatial patterns of precipitation and its related extremes with high correlations to observations. Moreover, there is a notable improvement in temporal patterns simulation through the PRECIS model. The PRECIS model better reproduces the regional annual cycle and frequencies of daily precipitation intensity than its driving GCM. Under RCP4.5 and RCP8.5, both the HadGEM2-ES and the precis project increasing annual precipitation over the entire country for two future periods. Precipitation increase in winter is greater than the increase in summer. The results suggest that increased radiative forcing from RCP4.5 to RCP8.5 would further intensify the magnitude of projected precipitation changes by both PRECIS and HadGEM2-ES. For example, some parts of south China with decreased precipitation under RCP4.5 would expect even less precipitation under RCP8.5; regions (northwest, northcentral and northeast China) with increased precipitation under RCP4.5 would expect more precipitation under RCP8.5. Apart from the projected increase in annual total precipitation, the results also suggest that there will be an increase in the days with precipitation higher than

  13. Practice Patterns and Projections for the US Pediatric Otolaryngology Workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Jason R; Ruch-Ross, Holly; Hotaling, Andrew J

    2016-09-01

    This study represents up-to-date information on the current status of and future projections for the pediatric otolaryngology workforce. To provide an update on the practice patterns of and projections for the US pediatric otolaryngology workforce. An online survey was sent to all 172 members of the American Academy of Pediatrics Section on Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery and fielded from May 29, 2014, to September 17, 2014. Current status of and perceived trends in the pediatric otolaryngology workforce. Eighty-four (48.8%) of the 172 members responded to the survey. Not all respondents answered all questions, and so totals and percentages might not reflect a total of 84 for any given response. The demographics and practice characteristics of the responding pediatric otolaryngologists were similar to those noted in a 1997 workforce survey. Fifty-four percent of respondents (n = 38) planned to continue full-time work over the next 5 years, and 47% (n = 31) believed that the number of patients in their practice was increasing. The proportion of those who believed that the need for pediatric otolaryngologists in their community was increasing (31%; n = 21) or decreasing (13%; n = 9) remained relatively constant from the 1997 survey (34% and 12%, respectively). Forty-nine percent (n = 35) reported believing that the number of pediatric otolaryngologists being trained was appropriate and that the need in their community was stable. Eighty-three percent (n = 55) reported believing that employment opportunities for pediatric otolaryngologists in the United States would be plentiful in the near future. The overall state of the pediatric otolaryngology workforce appears stable. The perceived current and future needs for pediatric otolaryngologists appear to be met by the current number of trainees. Employment opportunities appear promising for future pediatric otolaryngologists based on our respondents' opinions. This represents up

  14. Updating temperature and salinity mean values and trends in the Western Mediterranean: The RADMED project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Yáñez, M.; García-Martínez, M. C.; Moya, F.; Balbín, R.; López-Jurado, J. L.; Serra, M.; Zunino, P.; Pascual, J.; Salat, J.

    2017-09-01

    The RADMED project is devoted to the implementation and maintenance of a multidisciplinary monitoring system around the Spanish Mediterranean waters. This observing system is based on periodic multidisciplinary cruises covering the coastal waters, continental shelf and slope waters and some deep stations (>2000 m) from the Westernmost Alboran Sea to Barcelona in the Catalan Sea, including the Balearic Islands. This project was launched in 2007 unifying and extending some previous monitoring projects which had a more reduced geographical coverage. Some of the time series currently available extend from 1992, while the more recent ones were initiated in 2007. The present work updates the available time series up to 2015 (included) and shows the capability of these time series for two main purposes: the calculation of mean values for the properties of main water masses around the Spanish Mediterranean, and the study of the interannual and decadal variability of such properties. The data set provided by the RADMED project has been merged with historical data from the MEDAR/MEDATLAS data base for the calculation of temperature and salinity trends from 1900 to 2015. The analysis of these time series shows that the intermediate and deep layers of the Western Mediterranean have increased their temperature and salinity with an acceleration of the warming and salting trends from 1943. Trends for the heat absorbed by the water column for the 1943-2015 period, range between 0.2 and 0.6 W/m2 depending on the used methodology. The temperature and salinity trends for the same period and for the intermediate layer are 0.002 °C/yr and 0.001 yr-1 respectively. Deep layers warmed and increased their salinity at a rate of 0.004 °C/yr and 0.001 yr-1.

  15. Entering medical practice for the very first time: emotional talk, meaning and identity development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmich, Esther; Bolhuis, Sanneke; Dornan, Tim; Laan, Roland; Koopmans, Raymond

    2012-11-01

    During early clinical exposure, medical students have many emotive experiences. Through participation in social practice, they learn to give personal meaning to their emotional states. This meaningful social act of participation may lead to a sense of belonging and identity construction. The aim of this study was to broaden and deepen our understanding of the interplay between those experiences and students' identity development. Our research questions asked how medical students give meaning to early clinical experiences and how that affects their professional identity development. Our method was phenomenology. Within that framework we used a narrative interviewing technique. Interviews with 17 medical students on Year 1 attachments to nurses in hospitals and nursing homes were analysed by listening to audio-recordings and reading transcripts. Nine transcripts, which best exemplified the students' range of experiences, were purposively sampled for deeper analysis. Two researchers carried out a systematic analysis using qualitative research software. Finally, cases representing four paradigms were chosen to exemplify the study findings. Students experienced their relationships with the people they met during early clinical experiences in very different ways, particularly in terms of feeling and displaying emotions, adjusting, role finding and participation. The interplay among emotions, meaning and identity was complex and four different 'paradigms' of lived experience were apparent: feeling insecure; complying; developing, and participating. We found large differences in the way students related to other people and gave meaning to their first experiences as doctors-to-be. They differed in their ability to engage in ward practices, the way they experienced their roles as medical students and future doctors, and how they experienced and expressed their emotions. Medical educators should help students to be sensitive to their emotions, offer space to explore different

  16. Standardised mean difference in metaanalyses - How reliable is it in practice?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tendal, Britta

    The use of the standardised mean difference (SMD) is common in meta‐analyses, as it allows outcomes of a similar nature, but measured on different scales, to be combined. The application of SMDs, compared with that of the raw mean difference, can be complex. Despite this complexity, there have been...... few studies of the reliability of this effect measure in practice. The aims of this PhD were to investigate the difficulties that may arise when researchers use SMD as an effect measure and to determine the scope for reviewer bias. Three studies were undertaken in order to fulfil these aims....... In the first study, we evaluated the reproducibility of meta‐analyses using SMDs. In the second study, we determined the observer variation when extracting data for the computation of SMDs. In the third study, we investigated the range of SMDs that could be calculated based on the same outcomes from the same...

  17. The extended meanings of medical terms. Difficulties in the practice of translation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corina Lungu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Taking into account that the structure of a specialized field is never homogeneous, in order to interpret or translate a term, we should define and know its different possible "semantic manifestations" (Martin, 1972: 125. In order to facilitate understanding and to ensure translation accuracy, we analyze - from the perspective of an internal polysemy - the terms of the medical lexicon which constitute a specific and restrictive use of the common language lexicon. Through the study of a selection of terms extracted from a specialized dictionary (Dicţionar Medical, Rusu V. 2010, this communication illustrates the restrictions and the extensions of meaning in a double translation: the terms taken from the common language with a restrictive meaning in the specialized field; the terms belonging to related disciplines and various fields adopting a specific meaning in the medical area. All these directions of change of meaning are thus envisaged to facilitate the practice of translation which raises both general and specific difficulties.

  18. The social meaning and function of humour in physiotherapy practice: An ethnography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Di

    2010-01-01

    An ethnographic study was undertaken over a period of 8 months to explore the social meaning and function of humour in the practice of a team of physiotherapists in a UK National Health Service hospital. Interviews were carried out following the observations to gain the therapists' perspectives in an open critical exploration of assumptions and ideas. The analysis was iterative and followed a systematic recognised ethnographic approach. The findings revealed explicit and implicit meanings of the team's humorous interactions. Explicitly, they appeared light-hearted and enhanced camaraderie but implicitly they demonstrated the team leadership and management skills of the most senior member of the team who had an authoritative influence on the other members, and facilitated this explicit marker of membership. By hiding their concerns in humour, the team members were able to avoid a real confrontation with issues of authority and hierarchy that underscored these activities. Humour, in this instance, was used as a stabilising force to give the team a sense of certainty juxtaposed by the prevailing unpredictability of their daily activities; it was part of their professional culture to allow them to handle stressful situations and to build up a socialisation process. By creating a collective identity, the individual members came to understand the team's underlying philosophy of practice. As a resource, humour was seen to be used as a vehicle of negotiation and a catalyst for change.

  19. Exploring the meaning of practicing classroom inquiry from the perspectives of National Board Certified Science Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaman, Ayhan

    Inquiry has been one of the most prominent terms of the contemporary science education reform movement (Buck, Latta, & Leslie-Pelecky, 2007; Colburn, 2006; Settlage, 2007). Practicing classroom inquiry has maintained its central position in science education for several decades because science education reform documents promote classroom inquiry as the potential savior of science education from its current problems. Likewise, having the capabilities of teaching science through inquiry has been considered by National Board for Professional Teaching Standards [NBPTS] as one of the essential elements of being an accomplished science teacher. Successful completion of National Board Certification [NBC] assessment process involves presenting a clear evidence of enacting inquiry with students. Despite the high-profile of the word inquiry in the reform documents, the same is not true in schools (Crawford, 2007). Most of the science teachers do not embrace this type of approach in their everyday teaching practices of science (Johnson, 2006; Luera, Moyer, & Everett, 2005; Smolleck, Zembal-Saul, & Yoder, 2006; Trumbull, Scarano, & Bonney, 2006). And the specific meanings attributed to inquiry by science teachers do not necessarily match with the original intentions of science education reform documents (Matson & Parsons, 2006; Wheeler, 2000; Windschitl, 2003). Unveiling the various meanings held by science teachers is important in developing better strategies for the future success of science education reform efforts (Jones & Eick, 2007; Keys & Bryan, 2001). Due to the potential influences of National Board Certified Science Teachers [NBCSTs] on inexperienced science teachers as their mentors, examining inquiry conceptions of NBCSTs is called for. How do these accomplished practitioners understand and enact inquiry? The purpose of this dissertation research study was twofold. First, it investigated the role of NBC performance assessment process on the professional development

  20. The content and meaning of administrative work: a qualitative study of nursing practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Lucie; Waelli, Mathias; Allen, Davina; Minvielle, Etienne

    2017-09-01

    To investigate the content and meaning of nurses' administrative work. Nurses often report that administrative work keeps them away from bedside care. The content and meaning of this work remains insufficiently explored. Comparative case studies. The investigation took place in 2014. It was based on 254 hours of observations and 27 interviews with nurses and staff in two contrasting units: intensive care and long-term care. A time and motion study was also performed over a period of 96 hours. Documentation and Organizational Activities is composed of six categories; documenting the patient record, coordination, management of patient flow, transmission of information, reporting quality indicators, ordering supplies- stock management Equal amounts of time were spent on these activities in each case. Nurses did not express complaints about documentation in intensive care, whereas they reported feeling frustrated by it in long-term care. These differences reflected the extent to which these activities could be integrated into nurses' clinical work and this is in turn was related to several factors: staff ratios, informatics, and relevance to nursing work. Documentation and Organizational Activities are a main component of care. The meaning nurses attribute to them is dependent on organizational context. These activities are often perceived as competing with bedside care, but this does not have to be the case. The challenge for managers is to fully integrate them into nursing practice. Results also suggest that nurses' Documentation and Organizational Activities should be incorporated into informatics strategies. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. The Educational Project as a pivotal framework for pedagogical practice: reflections and proposals for action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier ARGOS GONZÁLEZ

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The basic features of an educational task are sufficiently complex to demand their «construction» from theoretical-pedagogical frameworks that are consistent, rigorous and ethically founded. To achieve this end, the coherence and meaning of such a task become transformed into indispensable elements which need to be projected, both into the school and into the classroom, which, in the last resort, is where the important pedagogical formulae that have been adopted on consensus are given shape. Taking these considerations into account, we analyse in the present research the importance of the educational School Project, as a text which upholds the pedagogical task, before going on to formulate a series of postulates which should be upheld in our professional practice. Thus elements such as the pedagogy of listening, unhurried learning, and intuition, creativity, curiosity and pleasure in learning emerge and are visible in the pedagogical scene.

  2. Practice and innovation on safety management of Haiyang Nuclear Power Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Guohu

    2011-01-01

    From the perspective of owner, this article has introduced the safety management model and practice of Haiyang Nuclear Power Project, one of AP1000 Self-reliance Program supporting projects of China. And the article has summarized characteristics of the safety management of Haiyang Project for reference and communication with nuclear or other projects. (author)

  3. Present and projected future mean radiant temperature for three European cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsson, Sofia; Rayner, David; Lindberg, Fredrik; Monteiro, Ana; Katzschner, Lutz; Lau, Kevin Ka-Lun; Campe, Sabrina; Katzschner, Antje; Konarska, Janina; Onomura, Shiho; Velho, Sara; Holmer, Björn

    2017-09-01

    Present-day and projected future changes in mean radiant temperature, T mrt in one northern, one mid-, and one southern European city (represented by Gothenburg, Frankfurt, and Porto), are presented, and the concept of hot spots is adopted. Air temperature, T a , increased in all cities by 2100, but changes in solar radiation due to changes in cloudiness counterbalanced or exacerbated the effects on T mrt. The number of days with high T mrt in Gothenburg was relatively unchanged at the end of the century (+1 day), whereas it more than doubled in Frankfurt and tripled in Porto. The use of street trees to reduce daytime radiant heat load was analyzed using hot spots to identify where trees could be most beneficial. Hot spots, although varying in intensity and frequency, were generally confined to near sunlit southeast-southwest facing walls, in northeast corner of courtyards, and in open spaces in all three cities. By adding trees in these spaces, the radiant heat load can be reduced, especially in spaces with no or few trees. A set of design principles for reducing the radiant heat load is outlined based on these findings and existing literature.

  4. Contour-Based Corner Detection and Classification by Using Mean Projection Transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mostafa Mousavi Kahaki

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Image corner detection is a fundamental task in computer vision. Many applications require reliable detectors to accurately detect corner points, commonly achieved by using image contour information. The curvature definition is sensitive to local variation and edge aliasing, and available smoothing methods are not sufficient to address these problems properly. Hence, we propose Mean Projection Transform (MPT as a corner classifier and parabolic fit approximation to form a robust detector. The first step is to extract corner candidates using MPT based on the integral properties of the local contours in both the horizontal and vertical directions. Then, an approximation of the parabolic fit is calculated to localize the candidate corner points. The proposed method presents fewer false-positive (FP and false-negative (FN points compared with recent standard corner detection techniques, especially in comparison with curvature scale space (CSS methods. Moreover, a new evaluation metric, called accuracy of repeatability (AR, is introduced. AR combines repeatability and the localization error (Le for finding the probability of correct detection in the target image. The output results exhibit better repeatability, localization, and AR for the detected points compared with the criteria in original and transformed images.

  5. Enabling the publication of practice based experiences and projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Dewing

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Welcome to a new issue of the IPDJ. Although the journal team is already working on our next issue – a special issue with an in-depth analysis of the caring system in Norway led by colleagues in Bergen at the Western Norway University of Applied Sciences – we are taking a pause to reflect on this issue and to acknowledge its rich vein of contents. The variety of the articles we publish in each issue never ceases to amaze me. Some submissions come in from previously unknown sources, as is the way with most academic journals. Others originate from emails sent by authors asking whether the IPDJ might be interested in a particular topic or project. Then, there are those that come via the members of the International Practice Development Collaborative (IPDC and the IPDJ editorial board. In addition, our editorial board members are expected to submit an article every two years – not too arduous, you might think, but time passes quickly and the board members, like other authors, have other publishing obligations to meet. As the journal’s academic editor and a practice developer, focused on person-centred processes and outcomes, it is a highlight of my role to see someone who has sent their first tentative email enquiring about the possibility of publication then going on to be published. I like to imagine the joy this brings to the novice authors, their family and colleagues. In this issue, for example, I am especially delighted that one of Queen Margaret University’s final year BSc nursing students is being published. A great time in one’s career to achieve a first publication, and something I would never have considered when I was a student nurse. Indeed, I can recall being seriously deterred from publishing by receiving quite unfriendly and hostile reviews as I began my own journey of writing for publication. One review is etched in my memory for all the wrong reasons; this reviewer told me I could not write and should not bother trying

  6. Pre-contract project scoping processes : synthesis of practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Scoping is the process of developing a projects objectives, need, preliminary cost estimate, and preliminary schedule based on a : recognized need that the project is intended to address. This study (INDOT/JTRP SPR-3944) was launched by the Indian...

  7. Project management best practices: forging win-win partnerships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livet, B.

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews various aspects of management of renewable energy projects. It outlines contracting strategies, major cost impacts on balance of plants construction and permitting a wind farm project. It concludes by recommending a careful evaluation of the contracting strategy which best fits the circumstances, consideration of site and balance of plant issues in developing a realistic cost model for the project and making an early contact with authorities to ascertain the permitting required for the project

  8. The Collaborative Project Owner in Theory and Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Signe Hedeboe; Svejvig, Per

    is complex characterized by information asymmetry and potential mistrust. Studies also show that top managers may actually be reluctant to play an active role during the project life cycle. In this paper, we examine how the involvement of project owners unfolds in the project process, when given explicit...

  9. The Healthy Skin Project: changing nursing practice to prevent and treat hospital-acquired pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour-Burton, Teri; Fields, Willa; Outlaw, Lanie; Deleon, Elvira

    2013-06-01

    Hospital-acquired pressure ulcers are serious clinical complications that can lead to increased length of stay, pain, infection, and, potentially, death. The surgical progressive care unit at Sharp Grossmont Hospital, San Diego, California, developed the multidisciplinary Healthy Skin Project to decrease the prevalence of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers. The previous treatment plan was reviewed and modified according to current evidence-based practice. The project consisted of 3 components: creation of a position for a unit-based wound liaison nurse, staff education, and involvement of the nursing assistants. The wound liaison nurse developed and conducted bimonthly skin audits, which revealed inconsistencies in clinical practice and documentation. Education for the staff was accomplished via a self-learning module, case presentations, and 1-on-1 training. In addition, a pressure ulcer algorithm tool was developed to demonstrate step-by-step wound management and documentation. From Spring 2003 through Summer 2006, the prevalence of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers ranged from 0.0% to 18.92%, with a mean of 4.85%. After implementation of the project, the prevalence decreased to 0.0% for 17 of 20 quarters, through 2011. Prevention and a multidisciplinary approach are effective in reducing the occurrence of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers.

  10. Controlling food, controlling relationships: exploring the meanings and dynamics of family food practices through the diary-interview approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Sarah; Murphy, Simon; Elliott, Eva

    2018-04-06

    Potential merits of a social practice perspective for examining the meanings and dynamics of family food include moving beyond individual behaviour, and exploring how practices emerge, develop and change. However, researchers have struggled to encourage reflection on mundane practices, and how to understand associated meanings. Drawing on a study of families in South Wales, this article reflects on the value of the diary-interview approach in addressing these methodological challenges, and aims to explore and understand the dynamics of control across family contexts. Contemporary practice theories distinguish between practices as 'performances' and practices as 'entities' and the diary-interview method facilitated an examination of these dimensions. Detailed accounts of daily 'performances' (through diaries), alongside reflection on underlying contexts and 'entities' (through interviews), illustrated the entanglement of control, practices and context. The article adds further complexity to the concept of practice 'bundles' which facilitated an understanding of how food was interrelated with other practices - across family contexts and across generations. Sociological approaches with a practices perspective at the core, offer potential for developing public health interventions by acknowledging: the relational meaning of food; the embeddedness of food within everyday practices; and the need to consider interventions across a range of policy areas. © 2018 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness.

  11. Project management best practices: forging win-win partnerships and mitigating power project risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trowsdale, R.

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses aspects of project management to mitigate power project risk. end-to-end project development involves development phase, permitting phase, implementation phase, and operational phase. Each phase involves a number of different elements. In renewable energy project good management requires maintaining project discipline and schedule throughout all phases. Project success requires commercial competitiveness, fuel availability, power sales contracts, stake holder support, permitting, effective execution, construction and good technical performance

  12. Project finance and photovoltaic power plants : a theoretical and practical perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Aasgaard, Anne Kristine

    2010-01-01

    Project finance is a defined structure for developing new activity which involves establishing the project as a separate unit. The review of literature exhibits the distinctive characteristics of project finance and provides a rationale of this form of financing. Project finance entails financial modelling, risk management, legal aspects and the creation of a financial structure. The thesis explores practical use of project finance in a case study of a photovoltaic power plant and presents a ...

  13. [Darius Staliūnas. Making Russians : meaning and practice of russification in Lithuania and Belarus after 1863

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Woodworth, Bradley D., 1963-

    2011-01-01

    Arvustus: Darius Staliūnas. Making Russians. Meaning and practice of russification in Lithuania and Belarus after 1863. On the boundary of two worlds: identity, freedom, and moral imagination in the Baltica, 11. (Amsterdam : Rodopi, 2007)

  14. Canadian Pharmacy Practice Residents’ Projects: Publication Rates and Study Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Michelle; Duffett, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Background: Research projects are a key component of pharmacy residents’ education. Projects represent both a large investment of effort for each resident (up to 10 weeks over the residency year) and a large body of research (given that there are currently over 150 residency positions in Canada annually). Publication of results is a vital part of the dissemination of information gleaned from these projects. Objectives: To determine the publication rate for research projects performed under the auspices of accredited English-language hospital pharmacy residency programs in Canada and to describe the study characteristics of residency projects performed in Ontario from 1999/2000 to 2008/2009. Methods: Lists of residents and project titles for the period of interest were obtained from residency coordinators. PubMed, CINAHL, the Canadian Journal of Hospital Pharmacy, and Google were searched for evidence of publication of each project identified, as an abstract or presentation at a meeting, a letter to the editor, or a full-text manuscript. The library holdings of the University of Toronto were reviewed to determine study characteristics of the Ontario residency projects. Results: For the objective of this study relating to publication rate, 518 projects were included. The overall publication rate was 32.2% (60 [35.9%] as abstracts and 107 [64.1%] as full-text manuscripts). Publication in pharmacy-specific journals (66 [61.7%] of 107 full-text manuscripts) was more frequent than publication in non-pharmacy-specific journals. The publication rate of projects as full-text manuscripts remained stable over time. Of the 202 Ontario residency projects archived in the University of Toronto’s library, most were cohort studies (83 [41.1%]), and the most common topic was efficacy and/or safety of a medication (46 [22.8%]). Conclusions: Most hospital pharmacy residents’ projects were unpublished, and the publication rate of projects as full-text manuscripts has not

  15. Canadian pharmacy practice residents' projects: publication rates and study characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Michelle; Duffett, Mark

    2013-03-01

    Research projects are a key component of pharmacy residents' education. Projects represent both a large investment of effort for each resident (up to 10 weeks over the residency year) and a large body of research (given that there are currently over 150 residency positions in Canada annually). Publication of results is a vital part of the dissemination of information gleaned from these projects. To determine the publication rate for research projects performed under the auspices of accredited English-language hospital pharmacy residency programs in Canada and to describe the study characteristics of residency projects performed in Ontario from 1999/2000 to 2008/2009. Lists of residents and project titles for the period of interest were obtained from residency coordinators. PubMed, CINAHL, the Canadian Journal of Hospital Pharmacy, and Google were searched for evidence of publication of each project identified, as an abstract or presentation at a meeting, a letter to the editor, or a full-text manuscript. The library holdings of the University of Toronto were reviewed to determine study characteristics of the Ontario residency projects. For the objective of this study relating to publication rate, 518 projects were included. The overall publication rate was 32.2% (60 [35.9%] as abstracts and 107 [64.1%] as full-text manuscripts). Publication in pharmacy-specific journals (66 [61.7%] of 107 full-text manuscripts) was more frequent than publication in non-pharmacy-specific journals. The publication rate of projects as full-text manuscripts remained stable over time. Of the 202 Ontario residency projects archived in the University of Toronto's library, most were cohort studies (83 [41.1%]), and the most common topic was efficacy and/or safety of a medication (46 [22.8%]). Most hospital pharmacy residents' projects were unpublished, and the publication rate of projects as full-text manuscripts has not increased over time. Most projects were observational studies

  16. Literature on theory and practice on unethical practices in the construction of projects: A case of an emerging economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chipo Mellania Maseko

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The construction of projects is mostly symbolised by the extraordinary levels of unethical practices and this has ruined the image of the industry. The delivery of good quality infrastructure projects in some emerging economies is continuously, disrupted because of unethical practices. This paper was, initiated to identify the most dominant unethical practices in the construction of projects, using most recent and comprehensive literature ranging from 2011 to 2017. Twenty unethical practices in the construction of projects were, identified. From this, the study observed that the most dominant unethical practices are corruption, bribery and collusive tendering. The least unethical practices revealed by this study are the lack of safety, overstatement of capacity and falsification of experience. Findings indicate that in order to redesign the future landscape of the industry, there is need to educate the workforce on the effects of unethical practices as well as the need to implement stronger policies. Based on these findings, further empirical studies are necessary. This article also presents recent challenges and trends of unethical behaviour that needs acknowledgement in order to assist the construction industry. In conclusion, this study proposes twelve possible solutions that could assist the construction community in the reduction of unethical practices

  17. Innovative Work Practices and Lessons Learned at the N Area Deactivation Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Day, R.S.

    1999-01-01

    This report identifies many of the lessons learned, innovations,and effective work practices that derived from activities supporting the N Area Deactivation Project at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site. The work practices discussed in this report may be applicable and beneficial to similar projects throughout the DOE complex

  18. Using Action Research Projects to Examine Teacher Technology Integration Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Kara

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the technology integration practices of teachers involved in a statewide initiative via one cycle of action research. It differs from other studies of teacher technology integration practices because it simultaneously involved and provided direct benefits to teachers and researchers. The study used thematic analysis to provide…

  19. Compilation Of An Econometric Human Resource Efficiency Model For Project Management Best Practices

    OpenAIRE

    G. van Zyl; P. Venier

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to introduce a human resource efficiency model in order to rank the most important human resource driving forces for project management best practices. The results of the model will demonstrate how the human resource component of project management acts as the primary function to enhance organizational performance, codified through improved logical end-state programmes, work ethics and process contributions. Given the hypothesis that project management best practices i...

  20. Critical management practices influencing on-site waste minimization in construction projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajayi, Saheed O; Oyedele, Lukumon O; Bilal, Muhammad; Akinade, Olugbenga O; Alaka, Hafiz A; Owolabi, Hakeem A

    2017-01-01

    As a result of increasing recognition of effective site management as the strategic approach for achieving the required performance in construction projects, this study seeks to identify the key site management practices that are requisite for construction waste minimization. A mixed methods approach, involving field study and survey research were used as means of data collection. After confirmation of construct validity and reliability of scale, data analysis was carried out through a combination of Kruskal-Wallis test, descriptive statistics and exploratory factor analysis. The study suggests that site management functions could significantly reduce waste generation through strict adherence to project drawings, and by ensuring fewer or no design changes during construction process. Provision of waste skips for specific materials and maximisation of on-site reuse of materials are also found to be among the key factors for engendering waste minimization. The result of factor analysis suggests four factors underlying on-site waste management practices with 96.093% of total variance. These measures include contractual provisions for waste minimization, waste segregation, maximisation of materials reuse and effective logistic management. Strategies through which each of the underlying measures could be achieved are further discussed in the paper. Findings of this study would assist construction site managers and other site operatives in reducing waste generated by construction activities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Multiregional demographic projections in practice: a metropolitan example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congdon, P

    1992-01-01

    "This paper examines options for local and regional projections which reflect both demographic interdependencies with jobs and housing at this area scale, and the inapplicability of traditional demographic projection methods to population or areal subdivisions. This context for local demographic projections requires constraints (for example, to job and housing forecasts or to higher area totals), the use of proxy or explanatory indicators to predict demographic rates or totals, and parameterization of demographic schedules, to facilitate comparison across numerous localities and to set future assumptions about demographic components. The traditional framework of self-contained projection by deterministic cohort survival is therefore widened to include regio-scientific and stochastic modelling concepts. The framework for empirical analysis is London [England] and its boroughs." (SUMMARY IN FRE AND GER) excerpt

  2. PEOPLE RETRIEVAL BY MEANS OF COMPOSITE PICTURES: METHODS, SYSTEMS AND PRACTICAL DECISIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Kukharev

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the problem of people retrieval by means of composite pictures and methods of its practical realization. Earlier on, the problem was posed in the previous paper by the authors, and this paper deals with its further development. The starting premise here is that for the successful search of people by their sketches it is necessary to transform these sketches into sets of populations of sketches imitating evidence of «group of witnesses» and evidence with incomplete information in verbal portraits. Variants of structures for benchmark «photo-sketch» databases are presented, intended for modeling and practical realization of original photos retrieval by sketches, which new component is a population of sketches. Problems of preprocessing for initial sketches and original photos and its influence on the result of their comparison are discussed. Simple sketch recognition systems (Simple FaRetSys and a problem of original photos retrieval by the sketches are considered. Shortcomings of such systems are shown and new decisions on extending and development of simple systems (Extended FaRetSys are presented. Experiments on searching of original photos by sketches in the CUFS database of sketches and similar experiments on widely known FERET and CUFSF facial databases are presented. Three frameworks are offered for retrieval performance improvement. In the first one, original sketches are transformed into populations, and then in these populations the sketch similar to the given sketch (Forensic Sketch is already defined. The class of the sketch found in a population «by definition» unambiguously corresponds to a class of the original photo. In the second framework, the Forensic Sketch is transformed to a population of sketches, and all original sketches in a benchmarking database are compared to sketches from populations of the Forensic Sketch. The class of matches is determined in the same manner as in the first framework. The third

  3. CULTURAL IMPACT OF THE ORGANIZATIONAL VALUES IN THE ADOPTION OF PROJECT MANAGEMENT PRACTICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariza-Aguilera, Dora A.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Project management is a knowledge area that counts with the definition of best practices and methodologies, around the world. However, the use of these practices, is affected by social norms within an organization (Alavi, Kayworth & Leidner, 2005 and by the interpretation made by individuals, about the usefulness of these practices (Stare, 2012. This work seeks to establish the cultural effect of the values in the extent to which people adopt the project management practices in organizations. From the literature review, honesty, formalization, responsibility and justice were identified as values associated to behaviors that include the use of project management practices. A questionnaire was administered to a random sample of 55 companies located in Bogotá, Colombia, from various sectors of industry. Positive relationships between cultural values and the adoption of project management practices was evidenced. It was found that the extent, to which these practices are adopted, is a function of formalization. The theoretical contribution of this research is to provide empirical evidence of the relationship between cultural values and project management practices, since there are no studies about this relation. Its utility is to provide guidance to organizations on the need to promote the formalization as cultural value, to increase the use of project management practices. This integration lead to greater effectiveness (Rosenthal & Masarech, 2003.

  4. Beyond the relativistic mean-field approximation. II. Configuration mixing of mean-field wave functions projected on angular momentum and particle number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niksic, T.; Vretenar, D.; Ring, P.

    2006-01-01

    The framework of relativistic self-consistent mean-field models is extended to include correlations related to the restoration of broken symmetries and to fluctuations of collective variables. The generator coordinate method is used to perform configuration mixing of angular-momentum and particle-number projected relativistic wave functions. The geometry is restricted to axially symmetric shapes, and the intrinsic wave functions are generated from the solutions of the relativistic mean-field+Lipkin-Nogami BCS equations, with a constraint on the mass quadrupole moment. The model employs a relativistic point-coupling (contact) nucleon-nucleon effective interaction in the particle-hole channel, and a density-independent δ-interaction in the pairing channel. Illustrative calculations are performed for 24 Mg, 32 S, and 36 Ar, and compared with results obtained employing the model developed in the first part of this work, i.e., without particle-number projection, as well as with the corresponding nonrelativistic models based on Skyrme and Gogny effective interactions

  5. Comparative study of meanings, beliefs, and practices of female circumcision among three Nigerian tribes in the United States and Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anuforo, Prisca O; Oyedele, Lola; Pacquiao, Dula F

    2004-04-01

    The study was conducted to gain insight into the meanings, beliefs, and practices of female circumcision among three Nigerian tribes in the United States and Nigeria. Participant-observations occurred in three sites in Nigeria (Ibadan, Lagos, and Owerri) and in Essex County, New Jersey (Newark, Irvington, and East Orange). A total of 50 informants included adult males and females from the three main Nigerian ethnic tribes: Igbo, Yoruba, and Hausa. Leininger's culture care theory of diversity and universality was the study framework. Findings revealed existence of similarities and differences in the cultural meanings, beliefs, and practices among the tribes. Religion, education, and occupation were significant factors influencing informants' attitudes toward continuation of the practice. Government-sponsored public education and influence by the media were found to increase informants' awareness of complications of female circumcision. Changes in attitudes toward the practice and use of alternative practices were evident.

  6. School Autonomy: perspectives and practices in the development of political projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora Gluz

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available State programs promoting school autonomy have been developed within the neo-liberal project and its state reform policies characterized by decentralization and privatization of social services. These programs were fostered as strategies to improve educational quality and equity, in the midst of the redefinition of the role of the state as guarantor of education as a social right. Disputing the neo-liberal view which led to the dismantlement of the welfare state, social movements arising from marginal sectors of society have implemented their own education projects, often working in collaboration with academia. In these projects, school autonomy is seen as a strategy to challenge existing social relations. In this paper, we compare and contrast the meanings attached to the notion of “school autonomy” and the characteristics of the social practices fostered by the educational programs promoted by two different agents, i.e. the state and social movements. Thus, we analyze in the case of Argentina a nation-wide program implemented by the National Ministry of Education (Programa Nueva Escuela Argentina para el Siglo XXI as well as an educational program developed by a social movement (the Movimiento Nacional de Empresas Recuperadas.

  7. Accommodating practical constraints for intensity modulated radiation therapy by means of compensators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, Juergen

    2002-01-01

    The thesis deals with the practical implementation of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) generated by means of patient specific metal compensators. An elaborate comparison between several compensator-machining techniques, with respect to their suitability for production within a hospital workshop, is presented. The limitations associated with the selected compensator manufacturing technique are identified and implemented as constraints in an existing inverse treatment-planning algorithm. In order to obtain the profile of a compensator, which produces a desired intensity distribution, inverse modeling of the radiation attenuation within the compensator is required. Two novel and independent approaches, based on deconvolution and system identification, are proposed to accomplish this. To compare the approach with the 'rival' state of the art beam modulation technique, a theoretical and experimental examination of the modulated fields generated by manufactured compensators and multileaf collimators is presented. This comparison focused on the achievable resolution of the intensity modulated beams in lateral and longitudinal directions. To take into account the characteristics of a clinical environment the suitability of the most common commercially available treatment couch systems for IMRT treatments is studied. An original rule based advisory system is developed to alert the operator of any potential collision of the beam with the movable supporting structures of the treatment couch. The system is capable of finding alternative positions for the supporting frames and, if necessary, can suggest alternative beam directions. Finally, a head and neck phantom is designed for gel dosimetry to assess IMRT treatment delivery techniques. The phantom is based on a simplistic but realistic design and contains the main anatomical features

  8. Good Practice Lessons from the Urban Traffic Project, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flyvbjerg, Bent

    2002-01-01

    In 1990, as the first government in the world, the Danish Cabinet approved a national action plan for sustainable transport. In 1992, as part of the implementation of this plan, the Urban Traffic Project was set up with the EPA. The policy situation was one of a state agency trying to motivate...... urban municipalities to work with T&E (transport and environment) integration, i.e. integration of concerns for safety, energy, air quality, noise etc. in urban traffic planning. 50 major urban municipalities participated in the project. The most important lessons to be learned from the project are: (1......) With a fairly modest investment (DKK 150 million in seed money) it has been possible on a voluntary basis to motivate the majority of urban municipalities to work with T&E integration. (2) The top motivating factor for municipalities to participate was a desire for organisational and professional learning. (3...

  9. Defining Investment Additionality for CDM projects - practical approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greiner, Sandra; Michaelowa, Axel

    2003-01-01

    The environmental integrity of the CDM under the Kyoto Protocol depends on the possibility to avoid giving emission credits to projects that would have happened anyway. Whether and how 'Investment Additionality' of CDM projects has to be determined is currently a part of climate negotiations. We discuss the rationale of companies to invest in projects and analyse possible criteria to determine Investment Additionality from a theoretical point of view. Differences in the type of investment call for the application of different criteria. Although some criteria are better than others, no single criterion can outweigh the others in all respects. We therefore suggest a scheme for additionality testing that aims at matching types of investment and criteria in a sensible way. Criteria are evaluated on the grounds of robustness to manipulation, degree of coverage and appropriateness for testing the investment decision under consideration

  10. Bio nitrate Project: a new technology for water nitrate elimination by means of ionic exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arellano Ortiz, J.

    2009-01-01

    The use of ion exchange resins for nitrate elimination from water generates a waste containing a sodium chloride mixture plus the retained nitrates. this waste must be correctly disposed. In this project, the resin ionic form is modified to be regenerated with other compounds, different from the common salt, which are interesting because of the presence of mineral nutrition. So, with Bio nitrate Project, nitrates are recovered and the regeneration waste is apt to be use as fertilizer, for agricultural uses, or as complementary contribution of nutrients in biological water treatment. (Author) 27 refs.

  11. Photography and Oral History as a Means of Chronicling the Homeless in Miami: The "StreetWays" Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provenzo, Eugene F.; Ameen, Edward; Bengochea, Alain; Doorn, Kristen; Pontier, Ryan; Sembiante, Sabrina

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the use of Photography and Oral History research methods as part of a collaborative research project on homelessness in Miami. Issues involving the use of documentary photography and oral history as a means of creating greater social awareness in the general public are explored, as well as broader issues of Social Justice.…

  12. A study of best management practices for enhancing productivity in building projects: construction methods perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Argaw Tarekegn Gurmu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This research investigates management practices that have the potential to enhance productivity in building projects by focusing on construction methods. In phase 1 of the study, face-to-face interviews with nineteen experts were conducted to identify the best management practices for construction methods. The qualitative data analysis reached saturation and resulted in a list of best practices for construction methods that are relevant to the local industry. The second phase used an industry-wide survey to prioritize the best practices. Accordingly, project start-up plan, traffic control plan, machinery positioning strategy, project completion plan, and dynamic site layout plan were shown to be the top five best practices for construction methods. The study also revealed that high levels of implementation of best practices are associated with low levels of project delays. The use of best practices also varied according to the project costs. There were no discernible differences between the top five best practices. The authors suggest that they should be implemented jointly to improve productivity in building projects. Contractors could use the logistic regression model developed, to predict the probability of exceeding a baseline productivity factor and, on that basis, implement corrective actions to achieve the desired level of productivity.

  13. The Flat Stanley Project. Another Means of Approaching Writing in the English Class

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pollyanna Opris

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Reaching out to children from all over the world, sharing your culture, knowledge, historical and geographical facts about your own country, about the fiction you read can be an excellent way of keeping in touch with reality. This can be done with students in your school in the nicest manner possible by getting them involved in project work.

  14. Hacking events. Project development practices and technology use at hackathons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richterich, Annika

    2017-01-01

    Hackathons are techno-creative events during which participants get together in a physical location. They may be hosted by civic communities, corporations or public institutions. Working individually or in teams, usually for several days, participants develop projects such as hardware or software

  15. The Construction Site Project: Transforming Early Childhood Teacher Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNaughton, Kathryn; Krentz, Caroline

    2007-01-01

    The work of Malaguzzi (in Edwards, Gandini, & Forman, 1998; Fraser, 2006) has made the fundamentals of the preschools of Reggio Emilia familiar to many early childhood educators. The article describes an authentic project that enhanced undergraduate and postgraduate participants' understanding of the impact of collaboration, conversation, and…

  16. Mapping practices of project management – merging top-down and bottom-up perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Christian

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a new methodology for studying different accounts of project management practices based on network mapping and analysis. Drawing upon network mapping and visualization as an analytical strategy top-down and bottom-up accounts of project management practice are analysed...... and compared. The analysis initially reveals a substantial difference between the top-down and bottom-up accounts of practice. Furthermore it identifies a soft side of project management that is central in the bottom-up account but absent from the top-down. Finally, the study shows that network mapping...

  17. Best practices for preparing vessel internals segmentation projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boucau, Joseph; Segerud, Per; Sanchez, Moises

    2016-01-01

    Westinghouse has been involved in reactor internals segmentation activities in the U.S. and Europe for 30 years. Westinghouse completed in 2015 the segmentation of the reactor vessel and reactor vessel internals at the Jose Cabrera nuclear power plant in Spain and a similar project is on-going at Chooz A in France. For all reactor dismantling projects, it is essential that all activities are thoroughly planned and discussed up-front together with the customer. Detailed planning is crucial for achieving a successful project. One key activity in the preparation phase is the 'Segmentation and Packaging Plan' that documents the sequential steps required to segment, separate, and package each individual component, based on an activation analysis and component characterization study. Detailed procedures and specialized rigging equipment have to be developed to provide safeguards for preventing certain identified risks. The preparatory work can include some plant civil structure modifications for making the segmentation work easier and safer. Some original plant equipment is sometimes not suitable enough and need to be replaced. Before going to the site, testing and qualification are performed on full scale mock-ups in a specially designed pool for segmentation purposes. The mockup testing is an important step in order to verify the function of the equipment and minimize risk on site. This paper is describing the typical activities needed for preparing the reactor internals segmentation activities using under water mechanical cutting techniques. It provides experiences and lessons learned that Westinghouse has collected from its recent projects and that will be applied for the new awarded projects. (authors)

  18. Accounting for dynamics of mean precipitation in drought projections: A case study of Brazil for the 2050 and 2070 periods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mpelasoka, Freddie; Awange, Joseph L; Goncalves, Rodrigo Mikosz

    2018-05-01

    Changes in drought around the globe are among the most daunting potential effects of climate change. However, changes in droughts are often not well distinguished from changes in aridity levels. As drought constitutes conditions of aridity, the projected declines in mean precipitation tend to override changes in drought. This results in projections of more dire changes in drought than ever. The overestimate of changes can be attributed to the use of 'static' normal precipitation in the derivation of drought events. The failure in distinguishing drought from aridity is a conceptual problem of concern, particularly to drought policymakers. Given that the key objective of drought policies is to determine drought conditions, which are rare and so protracted that they are beyond the scope of normal risk management, for interventions. The main objective of this Case Study of Brazil is to demonstrate the differences between projections of changes in drought based on 'static' and '30-year dynamic' precipitation normal conditions. First we demonstrate that the 'static' based projections suggest 4-fold changes in the probability of drought-year occurrences against changes by the dynamic normal precipitation. The 'static-normal mean precipitation' based projections tend to be monotonically increasing in magnitude, and were arguably considered unrealistic. Based on the '30-year dynamic' normal precipitation conditions, the 13-member GCM ensemble median projection estimates of changes for 2050 under rcp4.5 1 and rcp8.5 2 suggest: (i) Significant differences between changes associated with rcp4.5 and rcp8.5, and are more noticeable for droughts at long than short timescales in the 2070; (ii) Overall, the results demonstrate more realistic projections of changes in drought characteristics over Brazil than previous projections based on 'static' normal precipitation conditions. However, the uncertainty of response of droughts to climate change in CMIP5 simulations is still large

  19. Adoption Level of IFAD Project Recommended Farming Practices ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    E M IGBOKWE

    the respondents respectively identified low counterpart funding, untimely disbursement of funds and inadequate mobility of extension staff as the major constraints to the effective implementation of the programme. Generally, there was a high level of adoption of the recommended farming practices among the participating.

  20. Storytelling Practices in Project Management : Exploratory study in new business process implementation in Information and Communication Technology projects

    OpenAIRE

    Abdubaliev, Ulukbek; Akysheva, Aizhan

    2017-01-01

    Stories have always been present in the life of people as a part of their culture, it is a rather ancient narrative technique. The message delivered in a form of a story is specifically appealing to listeners, which makes it a powerful communication tool. The thesis explores storytelling practices in project management by answering the question: “How project managers use storytelling in new business process implementation in ICT projects?” The choice of the topic was driven by the gap in the ...

  1. Environmental impact assessment by means of a procedure based on fuzzy logic: A practical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peche, Roberto; Rodriguez, Esther

    2011-01-01

    This study shows the practical application of the EIA method based on fuzzy logic proposed by the authors (Peche and Rodriguez, 2009) to a simplified case of study-the activity of a petrol station throughout its exploitation. The intensity (p 1 ), the extent (p 2 ) and the persistence (p 3 ) were the properties selected to describe the impacts and their respective assessment functions v-bar i =f(p-bar i ) were determined. The main actions (A) and potentially affected environmental factors (F) were selected. Every impact was identified by a pair A-F and the values of the three impact properties were estimated for each of them by means of triangular fuzzy numbers. Subsequently, the fuzzy estimation of every impact was carried out, the estimation of the impact A 1 -F 2 (V-bar 1 ) being explained in detail. Every impact was simultaneously represented by its corresponding generalised confidence interval and membership function. Since the membership functions of all impacts were similar to triangular fuzzy numbers, a triangular approach (TA) was used to describe every impact. A triangular approach coefficient (TAC) was introduced to quantify the similarity of each fuzzy number and its corresponding triangular approach, where TAC (V-bar ) element of (0, 1] and TAC being 1 when the fuzzy number is triangular. The TACs-ranging from 0.96 to 0.99-proved that TAs were valid in all cases. Next, the total positive and negative impacts-TV-bar + and TV-bar - were calculated and later, the fuzzy value of the total environmental impact TV-bar was determined from them. Finally, the defuzzification of TV-bar led to the punctual impact estimator TV (1) = -88.50 and its corresponding uncertainty interval [δ l (TV-bar),δ r (TV-bar)]=[6.52,6.96], which represent the total value of the EI. In conclusion, the EIA method enabled the integration of heterogeneous impacts, which exerted influence on environmental factors of a very diverse nature in very different ways, into a global impact

  2. [An individualized life project: from theory to practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombard, Marie; Léchenet, Martine; Dupuis, Justine; Milleret, Marianne; Weyrich, Alain; Jasmin, Jaon

    2012-01-01

    A life project defines the conditions of personalised treatment and support. The main objective is to consider the human being from an ethical perspective, to respect an individual's dignity and rights despite the dependency, as well as to provide a decent quality of life for the user. It mobilises all the caregivers, refocusing their actions on the resident, in accordance with his or her wishes and those of the family.

  3. A Global Review of Sustainable Construction Project Financing: Policies, Practices, and Research Efforts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Shan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite the increasing investment in sustainable development over the past decade, a systematic review of sustainable construction project financing is lacking. The objectives of this paper are to conduct a systematic review to examine the policies, practices, and research efforts in the area of sustainable construction project financing, and to explore the potential opportunities for the future research. To achieve these goals, this paper first reviewed the sustainable construction project financing practices implemented by four representative developed economies including the United Kingdom, the United States, Singapore, and Australia. Then, this paper reviewed the efforts and initiatives launched by three international organizations including the United Nations, the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, and International Finance Corporation. After that, this paper reviewed the research efforts of sustainable construction project financing published in peer-review journals and books. This paper identified four major research themes within this area, which are the review of financial stakeholders and market of sustainable construction, benefits and barriers to sustainable construction project financing, financial vehicles for sustainable construction projects, innovative models and mechanisms for sustainable construction project financing. Additionally, this paper revealed five directions for the future research of sustainable construction project financing, which are the identification of financial issues in sustainable construction projects, the investigation of financial vehicles for sustainable construction projects in terms of their strengths, limitations, and performances, the examination of critical drivers for implementing sustainable construction project financing, the development of a knowledge-based decision support system for implementing sustainable construction financing, and the development of best practices for

  4. What should we mean by empirical validation in hypnotherapy: evidence-based practice in clinical hypnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alladin, Assen; Sabatini, Linda; Amundson, Jon K

    2007-04-01

    This paper briefly surveys the trend of and controversy surrounding empirical validation in psychotherapy. Empirical validation of hypnotherapy has paralleled the practice of validation in psychotherapy and the professionalization of clinical psychology, in general. This evolution in determining what counts as evidence for bona fide clinical practice has gone from theory-driven clinical approaches in the 1960s and 1970s through critical attempts at categorization of empirically supported therapies in the 1990s on to the concept of evidence-based practice in 2006. Implications of this progression in professional psychology are discussed in the light of hypnosis's current quest for validation and empirical accreditation.

  5. Changing practices and shifting meanings of female genital cutting among the Maasai of Arusha and Manyara regions of Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bavel, Hannelore; Coene, Gily; Leye, Els

    2017-12-01

    Using mixed methods that combined participant observation and semi-structured in-depth interviews, this study looked at changing practices and shifting meanings of female genital cutting among the Maasai people in Tanzania. The findings suggest that an increasing social pressure to abandon female genital cutting has inspired the hiding of the practice, causing the actual cutting to become detached from its traditional ceremonial connotations. This detaching of cutting from ceremony has created a shift in meanings: the ceremony still carries the meaning of passage into adulthood, while the cutting seems to function as a way of inscribing Maasai identity into the body. The detaching of genital cutting from ceremony offers those willing to continue the practice the opportunity to do so without being prosecuted, and those unwilling to undergo or perform the practice the opportunity to evade it by faking the cutting without being socially sanctioned for it. Findings also suggest changing attitudes towards the practice among the younger generation as the result of education. Maasai culture and the practice of female genital cutting are not static but actively challenged and reinterpreted from within the community, with formally schooled and women taking up leading roles in reshaping gender norms.

  6. A genome-wide association scan (GWAS) for mean telomere length within the COGS project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pooley, Karen A; Bojesen, Stig E; Weischer, Maren

    2013-01-01

    Mean telomere length (TL) in blood cells is heritable and has been reported to be associated with risks of several diseases, including cancer. We conducted a meta-analysis of three GWAS for TL (total n=2240) and selected 1629 variants for replication via the "iCOGS" custom genotyping array. All...

  7. Communities of practice: A means to support occupational therapists’ continuing professional development. A literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barry, Margot; Kuijer-Siebelink, Wietske; Nieuwenhuis, Loek; Scherpbier-de Haan, Nynke

    2018-01-01

    Background: This literature review investigates what research reports about the contribution that communities of practice (CoPs) can make in the continuing professional development (CPD) of qualified occupational therapists. Methods: Academic databases (CINAHL, MEDLINE and ERIC) were searched

  8. Connective capacity in water governance practices: The meaning of trust and boundary spanning for integrated performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Edelenbos (Jurian); I.F. van Meerkerk (Ingmar)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ This article deals with water governance to face institutional fragmentation in water management practices. In this holistic approach the connective capacity with domains, levels, scales, organizations and actors is emphasized. Recent literature and empirical research

  9. Classification of shoulder complaints in general practice by means of nonmetric multidimensional scaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenier, KH; Winters, JC; Meyboom-de Jong, B

    Objectives: To determine if a classification of shoulder complaints in general practice can be made from variables of medical history and physical examination with nonmetric multidimensional scaling and to investigate the reproducibility of results from an earlier hierarchical cluster analysis.

  10. Effective teaching in the contexts of Internet science projects: American and Russian teachers' perspectives of best practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumma, Brian

    Statement of the problem. Science education literature had agreed that an important goal in students' learning is the development of scientific and technological literacy. One effort that teachers have integrated into their practices for addressing this goal has been teaching within the contexts of Internet Science Projects. Greater awareness of teachers' perspectives of their best practices and their beliefs and reasons for these practices in the contexts of Internet Science Projects can improve the quality of science education programs. Methods. A series of pilot interviews was conducted during the 2000--2001 school year to develop the guiding questions for inquiring into teachers' perspectives of their best practices within the contexts of Internet Science Projects. This series of interviews resulted in the understanding of the need to select teachers with experiences with Internet Science Projects and to conduct in-depth phenomenological interviews for learning from their voices. Two teachers were purposefully selected as the participant-informants for this study, one an American elementary teacher from Walker County, Georgia, and one a Russian teacher from St. Petersburg, Russia. The study was conducted from October through December 2001. The data collected for this qualitative study consisted of a series of in-depth phenomenological interviews, classroom observations, and the collection and analysis of various artifacts including teacher journals, student products, and e-mail/bulletin board transcripts. The interview structure was based upon a modification of expanding Seidman's (1998) three interview series into multiple interviews concluded upon the determination of saturation of the topic. The series of interviews were composed of (1) life history focus; (2) the details of the experience of teaching within the contexts of Internet Science Projects; and (3) reflection on the meanings. The data analysis consisted of applying Strauss & Corbin's (1990) open

  11. Use of the geometric mean of opposing planar projections in pre-reconstruction restoration of SPECT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulfelfel, D.; Rangayyan, R.M.; Hahn, L.J.; Kloiber, R.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a restoration scheme for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images that performs restoration before reconstruction (pre-reconstruction restoration) from planar (projection) images. In this scheme, the pixel-by-pixel geometric mean of each pair of opposing (conjugate) planar projections is computed prior to the reconstruction process. The averaging process is shown to help in making the degradation phenomenon less dependent on the distance of each point of the object from the camera. The restoration filters investigated are the Wiener and power spectrum equalization filters. (author)

  12. A practical data processing workflow for multi-OMICS projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohl, Michael; Megger, Dominik A; Trippler, Martin; Meckel, Hagen; Ahrens, Maike; Bracht, Thilo; Weber, Frank; Hoffmann, Andreas-Claudius; Baba, Hideo A; Sitek, Barbara; Schlaak, Jörg F; Meyer, Helmut E; Stephan, Christian; Eisenacher, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Multi-OMICS approaches aim on the integration of quantitative data obtained for different biological molecules in order to understand their interrelation and the functioning of larger systems. This paper deals with several data integration and data processing issues that frequently occur within this context. To this end, the data processing workflow within the PROFILE project is presented, a multi-OMICS project that aims on identification of novel biomarkers and the development of new therapeutic targets for seven important liver diseases. Furthermore, a software called CrossPlatformCommander is sketched, which facilitates several steps of the proposed workflow in a semi-automatic manner. Application of the software is presented for the detection of novel biomarkers, their ranking and annotation with existing knowledge using the example of corresponding Transcriptomics and Proteomics data sets obtained from patients suffering from hepatocellular carcinoma. Additionally, a linear regression analysis of Transcriptomics vs. Proteomics data is presented and its performance assessed. It was shown, that for capturing profound relations between Transcriptomics and Proteomics data, a simple linear regression analysis is not sufficient and implementation and evaluation of alternative statistical approaches are needed. Additionally, the integration of multivariate variable selection and classification approaches is intended for further development of the software. Although this paper focuses only on the combination of data obtained from quantitative Proteomics and Transcriptomics experiments, several approaches and data integration steps are also applicable for other OMICS technologies. Keeping specific restrictions in mind the suggested workflow (or at least parts of it) may be used as a template for similar projects that make use of different high throughput techniques. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Computational Proteomics in the Post

  13. A retrospective review of required projects in systems-based practice in a single anesthesiology residency: a 10-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Tetsuro; Emerick, Trent D; Patel, Rita M

    2015-09-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education has emphasized in its core competencies and more recently, in its Milestones Project, that residents understand the importance of systems-based practice (SBP). The objectives of the study are to evaluate the quality of residents' SBP projects and to determine the degrees that were subsequently implemented. A retrospective educational observational study. A university-based anesthesiology training institution. One hundred forty-nine anesthesiology residents in their final (postgraduate year 4) year of training who completed SBP projects for the last 10 years (2004-2013). A structured SBP course was provided for postgraduate year 4 anesthesiology residents with deadlines set such as project identification, data collection, and proposal draft. Each resident's written SBP proposal received inputs by 2 members of the department executive steering committee. The SBP projects concluded with oral presentations by each resident to the department executive steering committee, who provided overall scores. All SBP projects were categorized into 7 categories: safety initiatives, economic analysis, process analysis, policy change recommendations, education initiatives, teamwork/communication, and operating room efficiency. Evaluation scores using a Likert scale (1-9, where 9 is the best) were analyzed. The rate of implementation of project ideas within the department based on the presentations to the executive committee was examined. Of 149 projects, policy change recommendations was the most frequently chosen category (46 projects; 30.9%), followed by process analysis (36 projects; 24.2%). The overall evaluation score was 7.6 ± 0.6 (mean ± SD). A total of 53 projects (35.6%) were implemented in the department. There was no statistical difference between SBPs with implementation vs SBPs without implementation in terms of evaluation scores, year of the presentation, or categories. This SBP project has given residents the

  14. Geomatics engineering a practical guide to project design

    CERN Document Server

    Ogaja, Clement A

    2010-01-01

    OVERVIEWProject Design ProcessUnderstanding Project RequirementsInformation GatheringDesign ApproachesScheduling and Cost EstimatingWriting ProposalsBibliographyExercises CONTEMPORARY ISSUESStandards and SpecificationsDefinitionsApplication Modes of a StandardUnits of MeasureAccuracy versus PrecisionEquipment SpecificationsLimits of ClosureLeast Squares AnalysisMapping and GIS StandardsClassical Surveying StandardsGPS Surveying StandardsOther StandardsBibliography ExercisesProfessional and Ethical ResponsibilitiesKnow What You DoEthics and Professional Conduct Individual and Team Responsibilit

  15. The Ilac-Project Supporting Ancient Coin Classification by Means of Image Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavelar, A.; Zambanini, S.; Kampel, M.; Vondrovec, K.; Siegl, K.

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents the ILAC project, which aims at the development of an automated image-based classification system for ancient Roman Republican coins. The benefits of such a system are manifold: operating at the suture between computer vision and numismatics, ILAC can reduce the day-to-day workload of numismatists by assisting them in classification tasks and providing a preselection of suitable coin classes. This is especially helpful for large coin hoard findings comprising several thousands of coins. Furthermore, this system could be implemented in an online platform for hobby numismatists, allowing them to access background information about their coin collection by simply uploading a photo of obverse and reverse for the coin of interest. ILAC explores different computer vision techniques and their combinations for the use of image-based coin recognition. Some of these methods, such as image matching, use the entire coin image in the classification process, while symbol or legend recognition exploit certain characteristics of the coin imagery. An overview of the methods explored so far and the respective experiments is given as well as an outlook on the next steps of the project.

  16. THE ILAC-PROJECT: SUPPORTING ANCIENT COIN CLASSIFICATION BY MEANS OF IMAGE ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kavelar

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the ILAC project, which aims at the development of an automated image-based classification system for ancient Roman Republican coins. The benefits of such a system are manifold: operating at the suture between computer vision and numismatics, ILAC can reduce the day-to-day workload of numismatists by assisting them in classification tasks and providing a preselection of suitable coin classes. This is especially helpful for large coin hoard findings comprising several thousands of coins. Furthermore, this system could be implemented in an online platform for hobby numismatists, allowing them to access background information about their coin collection by simply uploading a photo of obverse and reverse for the coin of interest. ILAC explores different computer vision techniques and their combinations for the use of image-based coin recognition. Some of these methods, such as image matching, use the entire coin image in the classification process, while symbol or legend recognition exploit certain characteristics of the coin imagery. An overview of the methods explored so far and the respective experiments is given as well as an outlook on the next steps of the project.

  17. Future projection of mean and variability of the Asian Summer Monsoon and Indian Ocean Climate systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annamalai, H. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    2014-09-15

    The overall goal of this project is to assess the ability of the CMIP3/5 models to simulate the Indian-Ocean monsoon systems. The PI along with post-docs investigated research issues ranging from synoptic systems to long-term trends over the Asian monsoon region. The PI applied diagnostic tools such as moist static energy (MSE) to isolate: the moist and radiative processes responsible for extended monsoon breaks over South Asia, precursors in the ENSO-monsoon association, reasons for the drying tendency over South Asia and the possible effect on tropical Indian Ocean climate anomalies influencing certain aspects of ENSO characteristics. By diagnosing various observations and coupled model simulations, we developed working hypothesis and tested them by carrying out sensitivity experiments with both linear and nonlinear models. Possible physical and dynamical reasons for model sensitivities were deduced. On the teleconnection front, the ability of CMIP5 models in representing the monsoon-desert mechanism was examined recently. Further more, we have applied a suite of diagnostics and have performed an in depth analysis on CMIP5 integrations to isolate the possible reasons for the ENSO-monsoon linkage or lack thereof. The PI has collaborated with Dr. K.R. Sperber of PCMDI and other CLIVAR Asian-Australian monsoon panel members in understanding the ability of CMIP3/5 models in capturing monsoon and its spectrum of variability. The objective and process-based diagnostics aided in selecting models that best represent the present-day monsoon and its variability that are then employed for future projections. Two major highlights were an invitation to write a review on present understanding monsoons in a changing climate in Nature Climate Change, and identification of an east-west shift in observed monsoon rainfall (more rainfall over tropical western Pacific and drying tendency over South Asia) in the last six decades and attributing that shift to SST rise over the tropical

  18. Practical considerations of reservoir heterogeneities on SAGD projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, R.; Fong, C.; Li, T. [Epic Consulting Services Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada); Bowes, C.; Toews, M. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada)

    2008-10-15

    Significant emphasis has been placed on developing cost-effective strategies for the production of large heavy oil and bitumen reserves located in western Canada and around the world. An effective method that has been proven to be effective in this regard is steam-assisted gravity drainage (SAGD). However, determining the optimum and cost-effective strategy is a challenge to any SAGD reservoir. Average rock quality and reservoir heterogeneities have a significant impact on steam chamber development and the overall volumetric sweep. As well, the approach to SAGD simulation varies as heterogeneity changes. This paper examined two well pairs with different degrees of heterogeneity in the Surmont pilot project. The paper also addressed potential geological risk through analogy and the amount of heterogeneity that must be accounted for when developing a representative simulation. The paper provided background information on the Surmont pilot project, which consists of three horizontal SAGD well pairs in the Athabasca oil sands of northeast Alberta. The reservoir simulation model was then described. Results and conclusions were offered. It was concluded that careful production controls and strategy must be applied particular to the reservoir to ensure that the SAGD well pairs were capable of draining the mobilized oil. 5 refs., 1 tab., 25 figs.

  19. A three-year teacher research–to–practice collaborative professional development project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilton, Annette; Hilton, Geoff; Zeuschner, Michael

    The theme is successful implementation of a research-to-practice collaborative teacher professional development project aimed at enhancing the teaching and learning of proportional reasoning. The objectives are to outline the project goals, provide an overview of the key research findings regardi...

  20. Building Bridges: Using the Office Consultation Project to Connect Students to Theory and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawrzynski, Korine Steinke; Jessup-Anger, Jody E.

    2014-01-01

    The Office Consultation Project is an innovative capstone project that partners graduate students in student affairs preparation programs with academic and student affairs practitioners. It provides an opportunity for students to apply research and scholarship to practical settings, while giving practitioners new insight into their units,…

  1. Integrating Portfolio Management and Simulation Concepts in the ERP Project Estimation Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daneva, Maia; Paech, B.; Rolland, C

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a two-site case study on requirements-based effort estimation practices in enterprise resource planning projects. Specifically, the case study investigated the question of how to handle qualitative data and highly volatile values of project context characteristics. We counterpart

  2. Configuration mixing of mean-field wave functions projected on angular momentum and particle number: Application to 24Mg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valor, A.; Heenen, P.-H.; Bonche, P.

    2000-01-01

    We present in this paper the general framework of a method which permits to restore the rotational and particle number symmetries of wave functions obtained in Skyrme HF + BCS calculations. This restoration is nothing but a projection of mean-field intrinsic wave functions onto good particle number and good angular momentum. The method allows us also to mix projected wave functions. Such a configuration mixing is discussed for sets of HF + BCS intrinsic states generated in constrained calculations with suitable collective variables. This procedure gives collective states which are eigenstates of the particle number and the angular momentum operators and between which transition probabilities are calculated. An application to 24 Mg is presented, with mean-field wave functions generated by axial quadrupole constraints. Theoretical spectra and transition probabilities are compared to the experiment

  3. Constructing Meaning from Letterforms: Reflections on the Development of a Practice-Based Research Proposal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phil Jones

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Research paradigms are only starting to emerge in relation to art and design practice. Consequently, research design in this domain often employs perspectives and methods developed in other disciplines. This paper traces the development of a proposal that combines theories from cognitive linguistics with graphic design practice. It describes the resulting challenges to and transformations of my long-held assumptions and understanding about graphic design and the communication process. It also outlines the way in which semantic analysis (a method from cognitive linguistics will be used in conjunction with different forms of visualisation--with visualisation used as a method to generate data for analysis as well as to present findings. Finally, it argues for an engagement by designers with conceptual metaphor theory and conceptual blending theory, as a way to facilitate reflection on design practice.

  4. Poland - Electricity and gas marked development study and practical guidelines for using EU funds. Practical guidelines for using EU funds for energy projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-12-01

    The present report is prepared as part of the project 'Poland - Electricity and gas market development study and practical guidelines for using EU - funds'. The EU structural and cohesion funds are presently considered the most relevant funds concerning support to energy projects. In general, the Polish administration of the EU structural funds is strongly decentralized. The eligible project types to be supported from the various structural funds are described in a number of sector programmes. The sector programmes are described in vertical view, meaning that it is difficult to assess what kind of energy projects are eligible for support and, if eligible, then under which programme. This report presents a horizontal view of the various programmes in order to give an overview of the possibilities of support to energy related projects. The background for this report is a study of the following sector programmes: 1. Improvement of the competitiveness of enterprises. 2. Human resources development. 3. Restructuring and modernization of food sector and rural development. 4. Fisheries and fish processing. 5. Transport - maritime economy. 6. Integrated regional operational programme. 7. Technical assistance. Based on this review, it can be stated that energy projects in general have a low priority but can be supported under various measures within the programmes. (BA)

  5. Rescue dose orders as an alternative to range orders: an evidence-based practice project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Cassia

    2015-06-01

    Relief of pain is a fundamental aspect of optimal patient care. However, pain management in the inpatient setting is often constrained by concerns related to regulatory oversight, particularly with regard to the use of opioid dose range orders. These concerns can inadvertently result in the development of policies and practices that can negatively impact the health care team's ability to deliver optimal and individualized pain management. An evidence-based practice project was undertaken to address concerns about regulatory oversight of pain management processes by changing the way pain was managed in a large academic hospital setting. A novel pain management approach using rescue dose medications was established as an alternative to opioid dose range orders. The use of the rescue dose protocol was successfully implemented. Outcomes included an overall reduction in the administration of inappropriate intravenous opioids and opioid-acetaminophen combination medications, with a subsequent increase in single-entity first-line opioid analgesics. Rescue dose protocols may offer an alternative to opioid dose range orders as a means of effectively managing pain. Copyright © 2015 American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Project Integration Architecture: A Practical Demonstration of Information Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, William Henry

    2005-01-01

    One of the goals of the Project Integration Architecture (PIA) effort is to provide the ability to propagate information between disparate applications. With this ability, applications may then be formed into an application graph constituting a super-application. Such a super-application would then provide all of the analysis appropriate to a given technical system. This paper reports on a small demonstration of this concept in which a Computer Aided Design (CAD) application was connected to an inlet analysis code and geometry information automatically propagated from one to the other. The majority of the work reported involved not the technology of information propagation, but rather the conversion of propagated information into a form usable by the receiving application.

  7. Armenia: Nation-Building, Imperial Practices and Ethnic Nationalism as Means of Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Михаил Васильевич Космачев

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the phenomenon of hybrid political space of post-Soviet Armenia, combining institutions of the nation state and the imperial practices. In the article, the author analyzes the experience of building a modern state in Armenia on the basis of security concerns and as an actor in international politics. In this context the hybrid political space, allow to face foreign and domestic challenges. However, such a hybrid system leads to the erosion of state and the expansion of traditional (pre-modern practices.

  8. Meaning and challenges in the practice of multiple therapeutic massage modalities: a combined methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcino, Antony J; Boon, Heather S; Page, Stacey A; Verhoef, Marja J

    2011-09-20

    Therapeutic massage and bodywork (TMB) practitioners are predominantly trained in programs that are not uniformly standardized, and in variable combinations of therapies. To date no studies have explored this variability in training and how this affects clinical practice. Combined methods, consisting of a quantitative, population-based survey and qualitative interviews with practitioners trained in multiple therapies, were used to explore the training and practice of TMB practitioners in Alberta, Canada. Of the 5242 distributed surveys, 791 were returned (15.1%). Practitioners were predominantly female (91.7%), worked in a range of environments, primarily private (44.4%) and home clinics (35.4%), and were not significantly different from other surveyed massage therapist populations. Seventy-seven distinct TMB therapies were identified. Most practitioners were trained in two or more therapies (94.4%), with a median of 8 and range of 40 therapies. Training programs varied widely in number and type of TMB components, training length, or both. Nineteen interviews were conducted. Participants described highly variable training backgrounds, resulting in practitioners learning unique combinations of therapy techniques. All practitioners reported providing individualized patient treatment based on a responsive feedback process throughout practice that they described as being critical to appropriately address the needs of patients. They also felt that research treatment protocols were different from clinical practice because researchers do not usually sufficiently acknowledge the individualized nature of TMB care provision. The training received, the number of therapies trained in, and the practice descriptors of TMB practitioners are all highly variable. In addition, clinical experience and continuing education may further alter or enhance treatment techniques. Practitioners individualize each patient's treatment through a highly adaptive process. Therefore, treatment

  9. Giving meaning to the concept of sustainability in architectural design practices : Setting out the analytical framework of translation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schröder, Torsten

    2018-01-01

    The question of how to give meaning to the concept of sustainability in architectural design practices is highly contested today. Although architects, engineers, clients, politicians, and others seem to agree that sustainability must be addressed, behind this apparent consensus many ambiguities,

  10. The Project Approach in Organization of Foreign Economic Activity as a Means of Increasing Competitiveness of Industrial Enterprise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazarenko Vladimir Ye.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is aimed at studying the organization of foreign economic activity of industrial enterprise in case of introduction of project approach to its management. New conditions of doing business in terms of aircraft building enterprises, consisting in the transition to production according to international standards, require a modern approach to the solution of the range of issues. In conditions of limited internal financial resources of company and high expenses connected with entering the foreign market, it is extremely important to define the priority directions of foreign economic activity and the most optimal mechanisms of its organization and management. The functioning of the sphere of foreign economic activity of industrial enterprise in case of introduction of project approach to management has been analyzed. The essence, features and the main parameters of project approach as a means of increasing the competitiveness of enterprise have been defined. Priorities of the large-scale enterprise development strategy have been analyzed and suggested by means of carrying out the project method of organization of foreign economic activity.

  11. ANALYSIS OF THE SPECIAL CASE IN FLIGHT BY MEANS OF THE PROJECT NETWORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Т. Шмельова

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Reasons of aviation events the last decade does  not change practically: 70-80% failures and  catastrophes take a place through fault of human factor and only 15-20 % – from the structurally production lacks of aviation technique . For the timely diagnosing of hit of air ship (AS in  supernumerary flight situations,  operatively to render  prognostication of their development and  possibility the proper help the operator of the aviation  ергатичної system the model of  decision-making P-O of AES is developed. Supernumerary situation most rationally, in opinion of authors, to give as the network graph the analysis of which makes basis for the construction of the system of support of making a decision P-O in case of occurring of supernumerary situation on wing. On the basis of analysis of printing sources the most widespread reasons of aviation engine failure and possible consequences  of it are evidently given. Work of crew is described from a  moment an engine failure on flight and to the decision-making about continuation/breaking of flight by the construction of fragment of the network graph. The practical value of the conducted  researches consists in that application of the given method in the system of support of making a  decision aviation operator at an action in special case on wing will enable high-quality and in  number to analyse supernumerary flight situations with the purpose of increase of safety of flights

  12. The Meaning Structures of Muslim Bereavements in Israel: Religious Traditions, Mourning Practices, and Human Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasien-Esmael, Hend; Rubin, Simon Shimshon

    2005-01-01

    The grief and mourning of Muslim citizens in Israel are considered. First, a series of mourning customs spanning the period from notification of death until post-mourning are presented from 3 perspectives: (a) the requirements of the Islamic Sunni tradition; (b) the manner in which Islamic mourning rituals are practiced; and (c) the authors'…

  13. Enhancement of medical student performance through narrative reflective practice: a pilot project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Thomson

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Narrative Reflective Practice (NRP is a process that helps medical students become better listeners and physicians. We hypothesized that NRP would enhance students’ performance on multiple choice question exams (MCQs, on objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs, and on subjective clinical evaluations (SCEs. Methods: The MCQs, OSCEs and SCEs test scores from 139 third year University of Alberta medical students from the same class doing their Internal Medicine rotation were collected over a 12 month period. All preceptors followed the same one-hour clinical teaching format, except for the single preceptor who incorporated 2 weeks of NRP in the usual clinical teaching of 16 students. The testing was done at the end of each 8-week rotation, and all students within each cohort received the same MCQs, OSCE and SCEs Results: Independent t-tests were used to assess group differences in the mean MCQ, OSCE and SCE scores. The group receiving NRP training scored 4.7 % higher on the MCQ component than those who did not. The mean differences for OSCE and SCE scores were non-significant. Conclusions: Two weeks NRP exposure produced an absolute increase in students’ MCQ score. Longer periods of NRP exposure may also increase the OSCE and SCE scores. This promising pilot project needs to be confirmed using several trained preceptors and trainees at different levels of their clinical experience.

  14. Implications of applying solar industry best practice resource estimation on project financing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacudan, Romeo

    2016-01-01

    Solar resource estimation risk is one of the main solar PV project risks that influences lender’s decision in providing financing and in determining the cost of capital. More recently, a number of measures have emerged to mitigate this risk. The study focuses on solar industry’s best practice energy resource estimation and assesses its financing implications to the 27 MWp solar PV project study in Brunei Darussalam. The best practice in resource estimation uses multiple data sources through the measure-correlate-predict (MCP) technique as compared with the standard practice that rely solely on modelled data source. The best practice case generates resource data with lower uncertainty and yields superior high-confidence energy production estimate than the standard practice case. Using project financial parameters in Brunei Darussalam for project financing and adopting the international debt-service coverage ratio (DSCR) benchmark rates, the best practice case yields DSCRs that surpass the target rates while those of standard practice case stay below the reference rates. The best practice case could also accommodate higher debt share and have lower levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) while the standard practice case would require a lower debt share but having a higher LCOE. - Highlights: •Best practice solar energy resource estimation uses multiple datasets. •Multiple datasets are combined through measure-correlate-predict technique. •Correlated data have lower uncertainty and yields superior high-confidence energy production. •Best practice case yields debt-service coverage ratios (DSCRs) that surpass the benchmark rates. •Best practice case accommodates high debt share and have low levelized cost of electricity.

  15. A study of best management practices for enhancing productivity in building projects: construction methods perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Gurmu, Argaw Tarekegn; Aibinu, Ajibade Ayodeji; Chan, Toong Khuan

    2016-01-01

    This research investigates management practices that have the potential to enhance productivity in building projects by focusing on construction methods. In phase 1 of the study, face-to-face interviews with nineteen experts were conducted to identify the best management practices for construction methods. The qualitative data analysis reached saturation and resulted in a list of best practices for construction methods that are relevant to the local industry. The second phase used an industry...

  16. Open access and knowledge sharing: reflections on the Pathfinder projects and Open Access Good Practice initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah DeGroff

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The following article provides a selection of reflections from a number of higher education institutions and their staff about participation in the UK-wide Pathfinder project scheme. These nine projects (comprising 30 institutions form the core of the Jisc-funded Open Access Good Practice initiative. They have produced a wide range of outputs which endorse and encourage best practice when implementing open access across institutions. Each project has a blog where progress and outputs can be tracked. Details are listed at the end of this article.

  17. Compilation Of An Econometric Human Resource Efficiency Model For Project Management Best Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. van Zyl

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to introduce a human resource efficiency model in order to rank the most important human resource driving forces for project management best practices. The results of the model will demonstrate how the human resource component of project management acts as the primary function to enhance organizational performance, codified through improved logical end-state programmes, work ethics and process contributions. Given the hypothesis that project management best practices involve significant human resource and organizational changes, one would reasonably expect this process to influence and resonate throughout all the dimensions of an organisation.

  18. Meanings of sex, concepts of risk and sexual practices among migrant coal miners in Quang Ninh, Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Tuan, Ta

    2010-08-01

    The study explores the meanings of sex among migrant coal miners in Vietnam and identifies contextual factors influencing engagement in unsafe sexual practices. Findings reveal that sex carries a number of social meanings in the lives of migrant miners: sex is relaxation and reward for their risk and hard work; access to sex is an incentive for miners to continue working in the mine; sex strengthens identity and social networks; sex helps miners to affirm manhood, group membership and masculinity; and sex workers are confidants with whom they can share their problems. Facing accidents at work on a daily basis, miners are less inclined to worry about the long-term risks of HIV infection. In addition, being excluded from access to relevant information, miners feel distant from HIV infection. Findings suggest that interventions on sexual behaviour and practices should be sensitive to the concepts of risk and meanings of sex among migrant groups such as coal miners.

  19. Alternative strategies: A means for saving money and time on the Yucca Mountain Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilder, D.G.

    1993-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is undertaking studies to determine the suitability of Yucca Mountain (YM) as a potential site for disposal of high level nuclear waste. Yucca Mountain is located in an arid environment. Many processes that could contribute to mobilization of radionuclides are either absent or minimized in a dry site. Therefore, Yucca Mountain should have the potential of being a veryfavorable site for disposal of waste. The determination of suitability has no precedence, and the characterization of an and site is complex, requiring intensive studies to determine suitability. The studies undertaken by the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) are very costly. By a process called performance allocation, the YMP determined strategies to satisfy regulations or meet performance while minimizing costs and schedules. Those involved recognized that allocations should be reviewed as additional information became available. The allocation has not been reviewed nor revised since the initial allocation in the Site Characterization Plan (SCP). The purpose of this paper is to outline alternative allocations that the author feels should be considered based on the additional information that is available at this time

  20. Leadership for ethical policy and practice (LEPP): participatory action project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storch, Janet; Rodney, Patricia; Varcoe, Colleen; Pauly, Bernadette; Starzomski, Rosalie; Stevenson, Lynne; Best, Lynette; Mass, Heather; Fulton, Thomas Reilly; Mildon, Barbara; Bees, Fiona; Chisholm, Anne; MacDonald-Rencz, Sandra; McCutcheon, Amy Sanchez; Shamian, Judith; Thompson, Charlotte; Makaroff, Kara Schick; Newton, Lorelei

    2009-01-01

    Within Canada's fast-paced, ever-changing healthcare environment, providers are experiencing difficulty practising according to their professional ethical standards, leading many to experience moral or ethical distress. Limited attention has been paid to improvements in the ethical climate in healthcare settings in research focusing on nurses' workplaces. In this three-year study, we focused on how the ethical climate in healthcare delivery can be improved and how the use of participatory action research methods can lead to continued enhancements and lasting changes in services delivery. Together, we developed strategies for taking action, aimed at improving the quality of the work environment. This action involved both nurses in direct care and those in key leadership positions (CNOs or their equivalents). Through the active participation of those for whom the research-based change was intended, these strategies were tested in various sites across British Columbia and can be used as templates or designs for use in other settings. A key component of the success of the projects and action plans that were created was the integral involvement of nurse leaders through all phases.

  1. The comprehensive care project: measuring physician performance in ambulatory practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmboe, Eric S; Weng, Weifeng; Arnold, Gerald K; Kaplan, Sherrie H; Normand, Sharon-Lise; Greenfield, Sheldon; Hood, Sarah; Lipner, Rebecca S

    2010-12-01

    To investigate the feasibility, reliability, and validity of comprehensively assessing physician-level performance in ambulatory practice. Ambulatory-based general internists in 13 states participated in the assessment. We assessed physician-level performance, adjusted for patient factors, on 46 individual measures, an overall composite measure, and composite measures for chronic, acute, and preventive care. Between- versus within-physician variation was quantified by intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC). External validity was assessed by correlating performance on a certification exam. Medical records for 236 physicians were audited for seven chronic and four acute care conditions, and six age- and gender-appropriate preventive services. Performance on the individual and composite measures varied substantially within (range 5-86 percent compliance on 46 measures) and between physicians (ICC range 0.12-0.88). Reliabilities for the composite measures were robust: 0.88 for chronic care and 0.87 for preventive services. Higher certification exam scores were associated with better performance on the overall (r = 0.19; pmeasures and by sampling feasible numbers of patients for each condition. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  2. Developing sustainable models of interprofessional learning in practice--the TUILIP project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armitage, Helen; Connolly, Jim; Pitt, Richard

    2008-07-01

    This paper will describe the background and development of the Trent Universities Interprofessional Learning in Practice Project (TUILIP). It will review some of the contributing literature on recent policy initiatives for interprofessional learning (IPL) and in particular the literature that supports the case for IPL to be embedded in the practice learning environment. The impact of IPL on health outcomes is discussed and on team working in practice. The modernisation of the National Health Service in the UK is explained and how the East Midlands Strategic Health Authority has commissioned the TUILIP project that will promote and facilitate the interprofessional skills of students through collaborative working within the practice setting. The TUILIP project is described, in particular, staff development for practitioners, the centrality of service users and the innovative approach of IPL Facilitators in pilot sites across the Trent region.

  3. The health meanings and practices of older Greek-Canadian widows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, J N

    1991-11-01

    Folk health and illness beliefs and practices were abstracted from a large-scale study of older Greek-Canadian widows conceptualized within Leininger's theory of Cultural Care Diversity and Universality using ethnographic, ethnonursing, and life health-care history methods. Data were collected using observation-participation and interviews in three Greek-Canadian communities with 12 widowed key informants and 30 general informants. Interview inquiry guides, Leininger's Life History Health Care Protocol, and field journal recordings assisted data collection. Data were analysed using Leininger's phases of analysis for qualitative data. A major health theme which was abstracted from the raw data and patterns was: health for Greek-Canadian widows meant a state of well-being, ability to perform daily role activities, and avoidance of pain and illness. The findings, which also included folk health care and illness beliefs and practices, will stimulate future nursing research related to health and nursing care of people of diverse cultures.

  4. The nature of ethical conflicts and the meaning of moral community in oncology practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlish, Carol; Brown-Saltzman, Katherine; Jakel, Patricia; Fine, Alyssa

    2014-03-01

    To explore ethical conflicts in oncology practice and the nature of healthcare contexts in which ethical conflicts can be averted or mitigated. Ethnography. Medical centers and community hospitals with inpatient and outpatient oncology units in southern California and Minnesota. 30 oncology nurses, 6 ethicists, 4 nurse administrators, and 2 oncologists. 30 nurses participated in six focus groups that were conducted using a semistructured interview guide. Twelve key informants were individually interviewed. Coding, sorting, and constant comparison were used to reveal themes. Most ethical conflicts pertained to complex end-of-life situations. Three factors were associated with ethical conflicts: delaying or avoiding difficult conversations, feeling torn between competing obligations, and the silencing of different moral perspectives. Moral communities were characterized by respectful team relationships, timely communication, ethics-minded leadership, readily available ethics resources, and provider awareness and willingness to use ethics resources. Moral disagreements are expected to occur in complex clinical practice. However, when they progress to ethical conflicts, care becomes more complicated and often places seriously ill patients at the epicenter. Practice environments as moral communities could foster comfortable dialogue about moral differences and prevent or mitigate ethical conflicts and the moral distress that frequently follows.

  5. Human Rights: Its Meaning and Practice in Social Work Field Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen, Julie A; Mann, Mary; Restivo, Nichole; Mazany, Shellene; Chapple, Reshawna

    2017-01-01

    The goal of the study reported in this article was to explore the conceptualizations of human rights and human rights practice among students and supervisors in social work field settings. Data were collected from 35 students and 48 supervisors through an online survey system that featured two open-ended questions regarding human rights issues in their agency and human rights practice tasks. Responses suggest that participants encountered human rights issues related to poverty, discrimination, participation/self-determination/autonomy, violence, dignity/respect, privacy, and freedom/liberty. They saw human rights practice as encompassing advocacy, service provision, assessment, awareness of threats to clients' rights, and the nature of the worker-client relationship. These results have implications for the social work profession, which has an opportunity to focus more intently on change efforts that support clients' rights. The study points to the possibilities of expanding the scope of the human rights competency within social work education and addressing the key human rights issues in field education. © 2016 National Association of Social Workers.

  6. Meaning and Spirituality in Adolescence: Practices and Perspectives of School Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Jill Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Adolescence is a crucial life stage involving aspects of identity development and decision-making that have potential life-long consequences. Researchers have found that a sense of meaning and purpose is related to a number of beneficial factors during adolescence, including resilience, healthy self-esteem, academic engagement, and overall…

  7. Young Students' Aesthetic Experiences and Meaning-Making Processes in an Outdoor Environmental School Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manni, Annika; Ottander, Christina; Sporre, Karin

    2017-01-01

    This study uses John Dewey's theoretical concept of "aesthetic experience" in empirically exploring expressions of cognition and emotion in students' meaning-making processes. A case study was conducted in one class of Grade 6 students during a single school semester. This article reports results from five outdoor days. The empirical…

  8. Faculty Prayer in Catholic Schools: A Survey of Practices and Meaning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayotte, Gail

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a research study that utilized a web-based survey to gather data about the communal prayer experiences of faculty members in Catholic elementary and secondary schools in the United States and the meaning that such prayer holds to its participants. Key findings show that faculty prayer experiences take place readily, though…

  9. Means of determining the condition of insanity in administrative proceedings based on the court practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana Mikhailovna Sekretareva

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective in the absence in the Russian administrative legislation of the provisions on the procedure and the ways to detect the condition of insanity of a physical person who has committed an administrative wrongful act there is a variety of lawenforcement acts for the resolution of these issues. In order to further systematize the enforcement acts for the resolution of these issues we consider it necessary to assess the practical application of the provisions of Article 2.8 quotInsanityquot of the Administrative Code by the courts in different Russian regions. Methods the methodological basis of research is the general scientific dialectic method of cognition the author used methods such as analysis synthesis description explanation. Results the author has conducted an analysis of practice of application of the provisions of Article 2.8 quotInsanityquot of the Administrative Code by courts of the Russian Federation. On the basis of this analysis it is found that courts use different methods of establishing the state of insanity of the person who committed the violation of the legislation on administrative offences. This is due to the fact that the courts base on a variety of actual data when establishing the state of insanity in the resolution of specific cases. These actual data were combined into 4 groups. Each method for establishing the state of insanity was evaluated which allowed to conclude about the need to organize the actions of individuals considering the cases on administrative offences aimed at defining the state of insanity of the offender and to offer one of the possible options for resolving the identified problems. Scientific novelty for the first time the analysis of practice of application of Article 2.8 quotInsanityquot of the Administrative Code was made and the author39s assessment of its provisions is given. Practical value the results of the study can be used for the generalization of judicial practice at the level of

  10. Experience and meaning of user involvement: some explorations from a community mental health project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truman, Carole; Raine, Pamela

    2002-05-01

    With an increased interest in and policy commitment to involving service users in the planning and delivery of health service provision, there is a clear need to explore both the rhetoric and realities of what user involvement entails. In the present paper, by drawing upon an evaluation of a community-based exercise facility for people with mental health problems, the authors explore ways in which the reality of user involvement is subject to a range of configurations within health services. The paper describes a piece of qualitative research that was undertaken within a participatory framework to explore the nature of user involvement within the facility. The data have been analysed using a grounded theory approach to provide insights into: the organisational context in which user involvement takes place; factors which encourage meaningful participation on the part of service users; perceived barriers to user involvement; and issues of sustainability and continuity. This research approach has enabled the authors to explore the views and experiences of users, service providers and referral agencies in relation to the nature and potential for user involvement. The findings illustrate ways in which user involvement may take place under both flexible and formal arrangements across a variety of activities. The present paper provides an account of some of the meanings and experiences of what 'successful' user participation may involve and the conditions which underpin 'success'. The authors conclude that successful and meaningful user involvement should enable and support users to recognise their existing skills, and to develop new ones, at a pace that suits their particular circumstances and personal resources. This process may require adaptation not only by organisations, but also by service providers and non-involved users.

  11. An acute stroke evaluation app: a practice improvement project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Mark N; Fugate, Jennifer E; Barrett, Kevin M; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; Flemming, Kelly D

    2015-04-01

    A point-of-care workflow checklist in the form of an iOS (iPhone Operating System) app for use by stroke providers was introduced with the objective of standardizing acute stroke evaluation and documentation at 2 affiliated academic medical centers. Providers used the app in unselected, consecutive patients undergoing acute stroke evaluation in an emergency department or hospital setting between August 2012 and January 2013 and August 2013 and February 2014. Satisfaction surveys were prospectively collected pre- and postintervention from residents, staff neurologists, and clinical data specialists. Residents (20 preintervention and 16 postintervention), staff neurologists (6 pre and 5 post), and clinical data specialists (4 pre and 4 post) participated in this study. All 16 (100%) residents had increased satisfaction with their ability to perform an acute stroke evaluation postintervention but only 9 (56%) of 16 felt the app was more help than hindrance. Historical controls aligned with preintervention results. Staff neurologists conveyed increased satisfaction with resident presentations and decision making when compared to preintervention surveys. Stroke clinical data specialists estimated a 50% decrease in data abstraction when the app data were used in the clinical note. Concomitant effect on door-to-needle (DTN) time at 1 site, although not a primary study measure, was also evaluated. At that 1 center, the mean DTN time decreased by 16 minutes when compared to the corresponding months from the year prior. The point-of-care acute stroke workflow checklist app may assist trainees in presenting findings in a standardized manner and reduce data abstraction time. The app may help reduce DTN time, but this requires further study.

  12. Science teachers' meaning-making of teaching practice, collaboration and professional development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Birgitte Lund

    The aims of the research presented in the thesis are three-fold: 1) To gain an insight into challenges and needs related to Danish science teachers professional development (PD), 2) to understand Danish science teachers’ meaning-making when involved in PD designed according to criteria from...... international research and 3) a research methodological perspective: to adapt, and discuss the use of a specific tool for analysis and representation of the teachers’ meaning-making. A mixed method approach is taken: The empirical research includes a cohort-survey of graduating science teachers repeated...... to lack of confidence. The case-studies provide examples where science teachers’ develop a growing confidence, and begin to focus on students’ learning by manipulating both science ideas and equipment. The teachers involved in artifact-mediated interactions refer to gaining insight into students...

  13. Teaching grammar, structure and meaning exploring theory and practice for post-16 English language teachers

    CERN Document Server

    Giovanelli, Marcello

    2014-01-01

    Teaching Grammar, Structure and Meaning introduces teachers to some basic ideas from the increasingly popular field of cognitive linguistics as a way of explaining and teaching key grammatical concepts. Particularly suitable for those teaching post-16 English Language, this book offers a methodology for teaching key aspects of linguistic form and an extensive set of learning activities. Written by an experienced linguist and teacher, this book contains:· an evaluation of current approaches to the teaching of grammar and linguistic form· a revised pedagogy based on principles from cognitive sci

  14. Practical Aspects of Outsourcing as a Mean of Security Service Provision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.B. Frolov

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The article highlights the implementation of outsourcing as a mean of service for security provision. Analysis is performed to describe the current issues affecting the management decision in favor of outsourcing. Investigation covers the processes of physical, information and economical security. The main recommendations to use outsourcing for security provision are described in the conclusion. With the development of mobile technology protecting of user data becomes more and more important. The article is dedicated to the vulnerability of devices running on the iOS platform, potentially allowing an attacker to obtain information about the movements of their owners, and suggests ways to protect against these attacks.

  15. What do social processes mean for quality of human resource practice?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kjeld; Pedersen, Louise Møller

    2014-01-01

    Well implemented Human Resource Practice (HRP) is linked to increased performance, innovation, and the well-being of both managers and employees. In the literature, a distinction between the hard and the soft HRM-models is drawn: the hard model focuses on employees as a cost, whereas the soft HRM......-model treats them as a potential (Nielsen 2008a). However, little is known about the informal aspects of HRP and which social processes actually lead to implementation success or failure. The purpose of this paper is to develop a concept of social processes between managers and employees which can increase...... of the quality of HRP. Moreover, a good psychological working environment and systematic priority of HRP are essential contextual factors which can enable or hinder social processes. Otherwise, production pressure and power relations between managers and employees can hinder the implementation of the new concept...

  16. WHAT MEANS HIGH PERFORMANCE WORK PRACTICES FOR HUMAN RESOURCES IN AN ORGANIZATION?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANCA-IOANA MUNTEANU

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper focused on an overview of the different approaches in the literature to the concept of high performance work practices (HPWP, showing how this term evolves over time. Analyzing the literature, the significance of this term are seen as an evolved with customer requirements. Organizations need employees easily adaptable, able to meet customer needs in a timely manner. Therefore, organizations must on the one hand to satisfy their customers, on the other hand, employees, those in which firms can achieve their goals. Currently have placed particular emphasis on employee motivation, training, their involvement in decision making, delegation of authority, remuneration based on performance, rewarding loyalty. All above are considered HPWP and the AMO model is representative of these. The implementation of HPWP is a current problem for organizations wishing to achieve a sustainable competitive advantage. In this sense, this article may provide information of interest to business.

  17. Improving evidence based practice in postgraduate nursing programs: A systematic review: Bridging the evidence practice gap (BRIDGE project).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickman, Louise D; DiGiacomo, Michelle; Phillips, Jane; Rao, Angela; Newton, Phillip J; Jackson, Debra; Ferguson, Caleb

    2018-04-01

    The nursing profession has a significant evidence to practice gap in an increasingly complex and dynamic health care environment. To evaluate effectiveness of teaching and learning strategies related to a capstone project within a Masters of Nursing program that encourage the development of evidence based practice capabilities. Systematic review that conforms to the PRISMA statement. Master's Nursing programs that include elements of a capstone project within a university setting. MEDLINE, CINAHL, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, ERIC and PsycInfo were used to search for RCT's or quasi experimental studies conducted between 1979 and 9 June 2017, published in a peer reviewed journal in English. Of 1592 studies, no RCT's specifically addressed the development of evidence based practice capabilities within the university teaching environment. Five quasi-experimental studies integrated blended learning, guided design processes, small group work, role play and structured debate into Masters of Nursing research courses. All five studies demonstrated some improvements in evidence based practice skills and/or research knowledge translation, with three out of five studies demonstrating significant improvements. There is a paucity of empirical evidence supporting the best strategies to use in developing evidence based practice skills and/or research knowledge translation skills for Master's Nursing students. As a profession, nursing requires methodologically robust studies that are discipline specific to identify the best approaches for developing evidence-based practice skills and/or research knowledge translation skills within the university teaching environment. Provision of these strategies will enable the nursing profession to integrate the best empirical evidence into nursing practice. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Localizing NIPT: Practices and meanings of non-invasive prenatal testing in China, Italy, Brazil and the UK

    OpenAIRE

    Zeng, Xiaofan; Zannoni, Letizia; Löwy, Ilana; Camporesi, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    This paper is the result of a collaborative work between researchers based in UK, Italy, China and Brazil, and aims at providing a comprehensive review of practices and meanings of Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing (NIPT) in these countries, while also highlighting the ethical implications that NIPT poses. In the first part of this paper we describe how the technology is being integrated into the ‘moral economy’ of prenatal testing in the different countries we analysed. In the second section of ...

  19. Is hockey just a game? Contesting meanings of the ice hockey life projects through a career-threatening injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ronkainen, Noora J.; Ryba, Tatiana V.

    2017-01-01

    This study is situated within an existential–narrative theoretical framework to examine the impact of career-threatening injury on professional ice hockey players’ well-being and career construction. Professional ice hockey culture is construed as a privileged space characterised by hegemonic...... masculinity, fierce competition as well as high-risk behaviours often resulting in sports injuries. In this paper, we analyse two players’ life stories with a particular focus on injury as a boundary situation involving social and temporal breakdown and re-evaluation of meaning of sporting life projects...

  20. [Identification of Good-Practice Projects in Promoting Physical Activity - Methods, Pitfalls and Sampled Outcomes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henn, Annette; Karger, Claudia; Wöhlken, Katrin; Meier, Diana; Ungerer-Röhrich, Ulrike; Graf, Christine; Woll, Alexander

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to identify and show examples of good practice of public health promotion. For this, uniform quality criteria were worked out under consideration of national and international scientific literature.For the identification of examples of good practice, a comparison of different quality criteria was carried out and combined with each other in a first step. In the following step, examples of good practice were identified after a comprehensive search. The choice of the "good-practice" projects is exemplary and lays no claim to completeness.6 main quality criteria (QC) of programs promoting physical activity could be identified in the national and international context. The analysis showed altogether 10 projects which can exemplarily be classified as examples of good practice of the target groups of children and teenagers, adults, older people and people with pre-existing illnesses. These projects, however, show major differences in their (methodological) quality.The analysis reports a lack of "Good-Practice" examples. Deficits lie mainly in documentation and sustainability. Because of incomplete documentation, an assessment as a "Good-Practice" example is only possible to a limited extent; a lot of information, particularly in the evaluation, is missing. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. IT Mangement for Transforming Local Government - a Danish Collaborative Practice Research Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kræmmergaard, Pernille; Agger Nielsen, Jeppe

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the methodology and preliminary findings from an on-going Danish collaborative practice research project concerning IT-Management in Transformational e-Government - DISIMIT. The ambition of the DISIMIT project is to improve IT management in local governments...... (municipalities) and to contribute with knowledge about IT-Management to the IS literature in general and to the e-government literature in particular. The paper reports on the process of conducting collaborative practice research and the selected findings from the empirical research activities. Up till now...... of eGovernment maturity and diagnosed the six main challenges faced by local governments in their efforts of realizing transformational e-Government. From these challenges, the project chose three challenges to investigate further according to the principles from Collaborative Practice Research...

  2. An empirical identification and categorisation of training best practices for ERP implementation projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteves, Jose Manuel

    2014-11-01

    Although training is one of the most cited critical success factors in Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems implementations, few empirical studies have attempted to examine the characteristics of management of the training process within ERP implementation projects. Based on the data gathered from a sample of 158 respondents across four stakeholder groups involved in ERP implementation projects, and using a mixed method design, we have assembled a derived set of training best practices. Results suggest that the categorised list of ERP training best practices can be used to better understand training activities in ERP implementation projects. Furthermore, the results reveal that the company size and location have an impact on the relevance of training best practices. This empirical study also highlights the need to investigate the role of informal workplace trainers in ERP training activities.

  3. Implementing Effective Mission Systems Engineering Practices During Early Project Formulation Phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moton, Tryshanda

    2016-01-01

    Developing and implementing a plan for a NASA space mission can be a complicated process. The needs, goals, and objectives of any proposed mission or technology must be assessed early in the Project Life Cycle. The key to successful development of a space mission or flight project is the inclusion of systems engineering in early project formulation, namely during Pre-phase A, Phase A, and Phase B of the NASA Project Life Cycle. When a space mission or new technology is in pre-development, or "pre-Formulation", feasibility must be determined based on cost, schedule, and risk. Inclusion of system engineering during project formulation is key because in addition to assessing feasibility, design concepts are developed and alternatives to design concepts are evaluated. Lack of systems engineering involvement early in the project formulation can result in increased risks later in the implementation and operations phases of the project. One proven method for effective systems engineering practice during the pre-Formulation Phase is the use of a mission conceptual design or technology development laboratory, such as the Mission Design Lab (MDL) at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). This paper will review the engineering process practiced routinely in the MDL for successful mission or project development during the pre-Formulation Phase.

  4. MATURITY IN PROJECT MANAGEMENT: A STUDY OF EXISTING PRACTICES IN GOVERNMENT BODIES PERNAMBUCO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio de Souza Silva Júnior

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Targets able to conquer the organization's business strategy give rise to projects that run the organization. And success in managing these projects is related to the skill level of the organization to manage them. With this, organizations need mature in the science and art of project management. This article is a case of study which seeks to identify the level of maturity and the management practices of public institutions in Pernambuco State. Therefore we conducted a quantitative survey to assess the level 2 of the Project Management Maturity Model, proposed by Kerzner (2006, and qualitative research in order to identify the management practices of the projects in the state. It can be concluded that public agencies in the State of Pernambuco did not reach the level 2 (common procedure of maturity in project management. The structured project management approach is not widely used yet. In many projects, the management is done empirically, with little interaction between the stakeholders, with no training for team work and proper risks treatment.

  5. [Taking personal responsibility in practice: what does it mean?--Insights into daily clinical routines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Leonhard

    2012-01-01

    In our society, taking personal responsibility is basically regarded as a key step to adopting a more active lifestyle. In health care, however, personal responsibility is primarily equated with higher levels of financial contribution from patients. Obviously, the individual's responsibility for his or her health and towards the mutually supportive community is a highly emotional and ideological issue, so the debate is usually rather heated. This is, however, at odds with the "empowered patient" concept. In the present paper "personal responsibility in practice" will be understood to include both physician and patient responsibility. Examples will be employed to demonstrate that, on an individual level, physicians are responsible for diagnosing and treating their patients as indicated and that, on a collective level, they are expected to make responsible use of the resources allocated. Here, patient responsibility will be defined as both taking care for one's own health and the individual's obligation to contribute to the maintenance of our solidarity-based health care system. The tensions between solidarity and subsidiarity and personal responsibility, respectively, will be outlined, and a readjustment of the relation between external support and individual strengths, between solidarity and personal responsibility in terms of Sect. 1 of the Social Book Code V will be advocated. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  6. What do Social Processes mean for Quality of Human Resource Practice?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kjeld Nielsen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Well implemented human resource practice (HRP is linked to increased performance, innovation, and the well-being of both managers and employees. In the literature, a distinction between the hard and the soft HRM-models is drawn: the hard model focuses on employees as a cost, whereas the soft HRM-model treats them as a potential Nielsen (2008a. However, little is known about the informal aspects of HRP and which social processes actually lead to implementation success or failure. The purpose of this paper is to develop a concept of social processes between managers and employees that can increase the implementation and quality of HR-performance Two studies of HRP within two manufacturing companies are used to illustrate the pros and cons of this new theoretical concept from a performance perspective. Involvement, commitment, and competence development are identified as key aspects of the quality of HRP. Moreover, a good psychological working environment and systematic priority of HRP are essential contextual factors that can enable or hinder social processes. Otherwise, production pressure and power relations between managers and employees can hinder the implementation of the new concept. The concept of social processes can help HRP to contribute on social processes between managers and employees as important aspects of quality in work with human resources. However, the influence of team organization and the social processes between employees needs to be explored further.

  7. A REFLECTION OF THE MAIN BEING BY MEANS OF THE ONLY EXPERIENCE OF THE TEACHING PRACTICE.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breydy Dayanna Álvarez Mahecha

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The current dynamics that involve biology teachers in a particular context, try to recreate a subject with an externalized profile setting aside each one of the teacher’s particularities and experiences that can built outside and inside the classroom. Given the above and the reflected on during the academic formation process in the biology department, it is consider important develop a research work inside the pedagogical practices about the biology teacher’s being and to-do in a scholar context. Such task developed in construction with the research line: “pathways and happenings. Studies of teacher’s being and to-do from the pedagogy” initiating a personal relation with the author formative interest. Finally, it is established as final considerations that biology teachers even in a scholar context with stablished dynamics by the institution, can recreate their diary tasks as subjects of change taking pedagogy as way a thought that question the intent of giving the teacher a profile.

  8. Meaning and Practice of Palliative Care for Hospitalized Older Adults with Life Limiting Illnesses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bethel Ann Powers

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To illustrate distinctions and intersections of palliative care (PC and end-of-life (EOL services through examples from case-centered data of older adults cared for during a four-year ethnographic study of an acute care hospital palliative care consultation service. Methods. Qualitative narrative and thematic analysis. Results. Description of four practice paradigms (EOL transitions, prognostic uncertainty, discharge planning, and patient/family values and preferences and identification of the underlying structure and communication patterns of PC consultation services common to them. Conclusions. Consistent with reports by other researchers, study data support the need to move beyond equating PC with hospice or EOL care and the notion that EOL is a well-demarcated period of time before death. If professional health care providers assume that PC services are limited to assisting with and helping patients and families prepare for dying, they miss opportunities to provide care considered important to older individuals confronting life-limiting illnesses.

  9. Using Project Performance to Measure Effectiveness of Quality Management System Maintenance and Practices in Construction Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Tiong Kung Leong; Norhayati Zakuan; Muhamad Zameri Mat Saman; Mohd. Shoki Md. Ariff; Choy Soon Tan

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposed seven existing and new performance indicators to measure the effectiveness of quality management system (QMS) maintenance and practices in construction industry. This research is carried out with a questionnaire based on QMS variables which are extracted from literature review and project performance indicators which are established from project management's theory. Data collected was analyzed using correlation and regression analysis. The findings indicate that client sat...

  10. Develop a practical means to monitor the criticality of the TMI-2 core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.S.; Levine, S.H.; Imel, G.

    1984-06-01

    A method has been developed to monitor the subcritical reactivity and unfold the k/sub infinity/ distribution of a degraded reactor core. The method uses several fixed neutron detectors and a Cf-252 neutron source placed sequentially in multiple positions in the core. It is called the Asymmetric Multiple Position Neutron Source (AMPNS) method. The AMPNS method employs the nucleonic codes to analyze in two dimensions the neutron multiplication of a Cf-252 neutron source. Experiments were performed on the Penn State Breazeale TRIGA Reactor (PSBR). The first set of experiments calibrates the k/sub infinity/'s of the fuel elements moved during the second set of experiments. The second set of experiments provides a means for both developing and validating the AMPNS method. Several test runs of optimization calculations have been made on the PSBR core assuming one of the subcritical configurations is a damaged core. Test runs of the AMPNS method reveals that when the core cell size and source position are correctly chosen, the solution converges to the correct k/sub eff/ and k/sub infinity/ distribution without any oscillations or instabilities. Application of the AMPNS method to the degraded TMI-2 core has been studied to provide some initial insight into this problem

  11. How Social Software Supports Cooperative Practices in a Globally Distributed Software Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giuffrida, Rosalba; Dittrich, Yvonne

    2014-01-01

    In Global Software Development (GSD), the lack of face- to-face communication is a major challenge and effective computer-mediated practices are necessary. This paper analyzes cooperative practices supported by Social Software (SoSo) in a GSD student project. The empirical results show...... that the role of SoSo is to support informal communication, enabling social talks and metawork, both necessary for establishing and for maintaining effective coordination mechanisms, thus successful cooperation....

  12. Articulating current service development practices: a qualitative analysis of eleven mental health projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Gyuchan Thomas; Morrison, Cecily; Clarkson, P John

    2014-01-17

    The utilisation of good design practices in the development of complex health services is essential to improving quality. Healthcare organisations, however, are often seriously out of step with modern design thinking and practice. As a starting point to encourage the uptake of good design practices, it is important to understand the context of their intended use. This study aims to do that by articulating current health service development practices. Eleven service development projects carried out in a large mental health service were investigated through in-depth interviews with six operation managers. The critical decision method in conjunction with diagrammatic elicitation was used to capture descriptions of these projects. Stage-gate design models were then formed to visually articulate, classify and characterise different service development practices. Projects were grouped into three categories according to design process patterns: new service introduction and service integration; service improvement; service closure. Three common design stages: problem exploration, idea generation and solution evaluation - were then compared across the design process patterns. Consistent across projects were a top-down, policy-driven approach to exploration, underexploited idea generation and implementation-based evaluation. This study provides insight into where and how good design practices can contribute to the improvement of current service development practices. Specifically, the following suggestions for future service development practices are made: genuine user needs analysis for exploration; divergent thinking and innovative culture for idea generation; and fail-safe evaluation prior to implementation. Better training for managers through partnership working with design experts and researchers could be beneficial.

  13. GreyGuide - Guide to Good Practice in Grey Literature: A Community Driven Open Resource Project

    OpenAIRE

    Biagioni, Stefania (ISTI-CNR); Carlesi, Carlo (ISTI-CNR); Schopfel, Joachim (University of Lille); Farace, Dominic J. (GreyNet); Frantzen, Jerry (GreyNet); GreyNet, Grey Literature Network Service

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this project is to develop an open source repository of good practices in the field of grey literature. That which originated in monographic form will now open and expand to include content from the global grey literature community. Such practices will range from the production and processing of grey literature through to its distribution, uses, and preservation. The repository will contain guidelines such as those in handling theses and dissertations, how to write research report...

  14. Developing a general practice library: a collaborative project between a GP and librarian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, D; Rossall, H

    2001-12-01

    The authors report on a self-completed questionnaire study from a North Yorkshire based general practice regarding the information needs of its clinicians. The work was carried out with a particular focus on the practice library, and the findings identified that a new approach to maintaining and developing the library was needed. The literature regarding the information needs of primary care clinicians and the role of practice libraries is considered, and compared to those of the clinicians at the practice. Discussion follows on how a collaborative project was set up between the practice and a librarian based at the local NHS Trust library in order to improve the existing practice library. Difficulties encountered and issues unique to the project are explored, including training implications presented by the implementation of electronic resources. Marketing activities implemented are discussed, how the library will operate in its new capacity, and how ongoing support and maintenance of the library will be carried out. It is concluded that although scepticism still exists regarding librarian involvement in practice libraries, collaboration between clinicians and librarians is an effective approach to the successful development and maintenance of a practice library, and recommendations are therefore made for similar collaborative work.

  15. Influence of Projection Operator on Oxygen Line Shapes and its effect on Rosseland-Mean Opacity in Stellar Interiors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Thomas; Nagayama, Taisukue; Kilcrease, David; Hansen, Stephanie; Montgomery, Mike; Winget, Don

    2018-01-01

    The Rosseland-Mean opacity (RMO) is an important quantity in determining radiation transport through stars. The solar-convection-zone boundary predicted by the standard solar model disagrees with helioseismology measurements by many sigma; a 14% increase in the RMO would resolve this discrepancy. Experiments at Sandia National Laboratories are now measuring iron opacity at solar-interior conditions, and significant discrepancies are already observed. Highly-ionized oxygen is one of the dominant contributions to the RMO. The strongest line, Lyman alpha, is at the peak of the Rosseland weighting function. The accuracy of line-broadening calculations has been called into question due to various experimental results and comparisons between theory. We have developed an ab-initio calculation to explore different physical effects, our current focus is treating penetrating collisions explicitly. The equation of motion used to calculate line shapes within the relaxation and unified theories includes a projection operator, which performs an average over plasma electron states; this is neglected due to past calculations approximate treatment of penetrations. We now include this projection term explicitly, which results in a significant broadening of spectral lines from highly-charged ions (low-Z elements are not much affected). The additional broadening raises the O Ly-alpha wing opacity by a factor of 5; we examine the consequences of this additional broadening on the Rosseland mean.

  16. Profilometry of discontinuous solids by means of co-phased demodulation of projected fringes with RGB encoding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, J. M.; Servin, M.; Garnica, G.

    2015-05-01

    Here we describe a 2-projectors and 1-camera setup for profilometry of discontinuous solids by means of co-phased demodulation of projected fringes and red, green, and blue (RGB) multichannel operation. The dual projection configuration for this profilometer is proposed to solve efficiently specular regions and self-occluding shadows due to discontinuities, which are the main drawbacks for a 1-projector 1-camera configuration. This is because the regions where shadows and specular reflections are generated, and the fringe contrast drops to zero, are in general different for each projection direction; thus, the resulting fringe patterns will have complementary phase information. Multichannel RGB operation allows us to work simultaneously with both projectors and to record independently the complementary fringe patterns phase-modulated by the 3D profile of the object under study. In other words, color encoding/decoding reduces the acquisition time respect to one-at-a-time grayscale operation and, in principle, enables the study of dynamic phenomena. The co-phased demodulation method implemented in this work benefits from the complex (analytic) nature of the output signals estimated with most phase demodulation methods (such as the Fourier method, and temporal phaseshifting algorithms). This allowed us to straightforwardly generate a single phase-map well-defined for the entire area of interest. Finally we assessed our proposed profilometry setup by measuring a fractured spherical cap made of (uncoated) expanded polystyrene. The results were satisfactory but in the authors' opinion this must be considered a preliminary report.

  17. Best practice guidelines for stroke in Cameroon: An innovative and participatory knowledge translation project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynn Cockburn

    2014-11-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this article is to describe how a group of front-line practitioners collaborated with academics and students to develop best practice guidelines (BPG for the management and rehabilitation of stroke in adult patients in Cameroon. Method: A working group was established and adapted internationally recognised processes for the development of best practice guidelines. The group determined the scope of the guidelines, documented current practices, and critically appraised evidence to develop guidelines relevant to the Cameroon context. Results: The primary result of this project is best practice guidelines which provided an overview of the provision of stroke rehabilitation services in the region, and made 83 practice recommendations to improve these services. We also report on the successes and challenges encountered during the process, and the working group’s recommendations aimed at encouraging others to consider similar projects. Conclusion: This project demonstrated that there is interest and capacity for improving stroke rehabilitation practices and for stroke guideline development in Africa.

  18. Improving student midwives’ practice learning in Uganda through action research: the MOMENTUM project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joy Kemp

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and context: The Royal College of Midwives is engaged in a long-term twinning partnership with the Uganda Private Midwives Association. Uganda is one of the poorest countries in the world and only 27% of women and newborns have their needs met (UNFPA, 2014. A well-skilled, competent midwifery workforce is required to meet these needs yet Ugandan student midwives often receive poor-quality clinical education. The Ugandan Nurses and Midwives Council approached the Royal College of Midwives for assistance in designing a system of mentorship for Ugandan midwifery to address this gap. The project was funded by UK-Aid through the Tropical Health and Education Trust. Aims of the project: MOMENTUM was a 20-month action research project that aimed to develop and pilot a model of mentorship for student midwives in Uganda. This article focuses on one workstream relating to practice development, a twinning project that used workbased learning and appreciative inquiry, embedded in an action research approach, to facilitate practice development. Conclusions: This project added to the body of knowledge about midwifery twinning for building capacity in mentorship, research, and cross-cultural competence. MOMENTUM created a powerful community of practice that was enabling, fulfilling and transformative. Replication of this would require funding, management capacity and sufficient lead time for participatory planning and piloting. MOMENTUM’s audit tool was a bespoke design for this pilot project and so may not be transferable to other settings without further development, testing and validation. Implications for practice: •\tTwinning, action research, appreciative enquiry and workbased learning can be effective in enabling practice development •\tThe impact of midwifery twinning on leadership development requires further investigation, together with greater evidence on the reciprocal impact of twinning on the sending country

  19. Stimulation sites in the subthalamic nucleus projected onto a mean 3-D atlas of the thalamus and basal ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarnthein, Johannes; Péus, Dominik; Baumann-Vogel, Heide; Baumann, Christian R; Sürücü, Oguzkan

    2013-09-01

    In patients with severe forms of Parkinson's disease (PD), deep brain stimulation (DBS) commonly targets the subthalamic nucleus (STN). Recently, the mean 3-D Morel-Atlas of the basal ganglia and the thalamus was introduced. It combines information contained in histological data from ten post-mortem brains. We were interested whether the Morel-Atlas is applicable for the visualization of stimulation sites. In a consecutive PD patient series, we documented preoperative MRI planning, intraoperative target adjustment based on electrophysiological and neurological testing, and perioperative CT target reconstruction. The localization of the DBS electrodes and the optimal stimulation sites were projected onto the Morel-Atlas. We included 20 patients (median age 62 years). The active contact had mean coordinates Xlat = ±12.1 mm, Yap = -1.8 mm, Zvert = -3.2 mm. There was a significant difference between the initially planned site and the coordinates of the postoperative active contact site (median 2.2 mm). The stimulation site was, on average, more anterior and more dorsal. The electrode contact used for optimal stimulation was found within the STN of the atlas in 38/40 (95 %) of implantations. The cluster of stimulation sites in individual patients-as deduced from preoperative MR, intraoperative electrophysiology and neurological testing-showed a high degree of congruence with the atlas. The mean 3D Morel Atlas is thus a useful tool for postoperative target visualization. This represents the first clinical evaluation of the recently created atlas.

  20. Knowledge Translation of Interprofessional Collaborative Patient-Centred Practice: The Working Together Project Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Colla J.; Archibald, Douglas; Stodel, Emma; Chambers, Larry W.; Hall, Pippa

    2008-01-01

    The Working Together (WT) project involved the design and delivery of an online learning resource for healthcare teams in long-term care (LTC) so that knowledge regarding interprofessional collaborative patient-centred practice (ICPCP) could be readily accessed and then transferred to the workplace. The purpose of this paper is to better…

  1. Hierarchy of Study Designs for Evaluating the Effectiveness of a STEM Education Project or Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coalition for Evidence-Based Policy, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This document contains a narrative overview of the hierarchy, followed by a one-page graphic summary. The purpose of the hierarchy is to help agency/program officials assess which study designs are capable of producing scientifically-valid evidence on the effectiveness of a STEM education project or practice ("intervention"). More specifically,…

  2. The PREEV project of the Latin American Forum.Regulatory practices on aging and life extension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueras, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    The American Forum Plenary approved in 2008 the PREEV project, Regulatory Practices in Aging and Life Extension, whose main objective is to improve the regulatory action with regard to the management programs of life and long-term operation of nuclear power plants in the countries of the region Latin American.

  3. OPPA Project: Modernization of practical education of CTU FNSPE Nuclear Engineering students - two selected exercises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prusa, P.; Musilek, L.

    2014-01-01

    The project under the title OPPA CZ.2.17/3.1.00/36038 'Modernization of Practical Education of CTU FNSPE Nuclear Engineering students' provides an opportunity to innovate existing exercises and set up new experimental exercises. The Department of Dosimetry and Application of Ionising Radiation has prepared or innovated the exercises which are described. (authors)

  4. Novice Supervisors' Practices and Dilemmatic Space in Supervision of Student Research Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vereijken, Mayke W. C.; van der Rijst, Roeland M.; van Driel, Jan H.; Dekker, Friedo W.

    2018-01-01

    Growing interest in student research projects in higher education has led to an emphasis on research supervision. We focus in this study on novice supervisors' approaches to research supervision as they explore their practices and experience difficulties supervising medical-students. Teacher noticing was used as a sensitising concept and relations…

  5. INFUSING INDUSTRY PRACTICES INTO AN ENGINEERING CAPTSONE PROJECT: A LEARNING OUTCOME ATTAINMENT CASE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SATESH NAMASIVAYAM

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A capstone project in current engineering education is often introduced to enable the holistic attainment of engineering knowledge by an engineering undergraduate. Essentially project-based in nature, there exists a need to ensure that part of the attainment process involves key industry practices – such practices being necessary in attaining the status of a professional engineer. Herein lies the synergy that can be made use of between industry and academia. By exposing engineering undergraduates to a project which addresses an engineering challenge and providing them with the opportunity to learn from professional engineers who are experts in the fields of safety, sustainability, quality management, ethics and project management, this culminates in the implementation of a prototype design which incorporates the amalgamation of knowledge from industry and academia. This paper presents the unique curriculum developed in a capstone project module, incorporating learning sessions from professional engineers in the five (5 key areas of industry practice highlighted above and how these have contributed to significantly enhancing the learning outcome and hence programme outcome attainment of the engineering undergraduates who have experienced the module.

  6. Exploration and practice for engineering innovative talents training based on project-driven

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yishen; Lv, Qingsong; Ye, Yan; Wu, Maocheng; Gu, Jihua

    2017-08-01

    As one of the "excellent engineer education program" of the Ministry of Education and one of the characteristic majors of Jiangsu Province, the major of optoelectronic information science and engineering in Soochow University has a long history and distinctive features. In recent years, aiming to the talents training objective of "broad foundation, practiceoriented, to be creative", education and teaching reforms have been carried out, which emphasize basis of theoretical teaching, carrier of practical training, promotion of projects and discussion, and development of second class. By optimizing the teaching contents and course system of the theoretical courses, the engineering innovative talents training mode based on the project-driven has been implemented with playing a practical training carrier role and overall managing the second class teaching for cultivating students' innovative spirit and practical ability. Meanwhile, the evaluation mechanism of the students' comprehensive performance mainly based on "scores of theory test" is being gradually changed, and the activities such as scientific research, discipline competitions and social practices are playing an increasing important role in the students' comprehensive assessment. The produced achievements show that the proposed training model based on project-driven could stimulate the students' enthusiasm and initiative to participate in research activities and promote the training of students' ability of engineering practice and consciousness of innovation.

  7. Practical implementation of joint projects for offshore wind; Praktiskt genomfoerande av gemensamma projekt foer havsbaserad vindkraft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-09-01

    Cooperation mechanisms are part of the renewable s directive and aims to member countries to cooperate on renewable energy to meet their national targets a cost effective way. The Energy Agency has in previous assignments analyzed the possibilities and limitations of cooperation mechanisms and other countries' interest in the cooperation mechanisms. In the Appropriation Directions for 2013, the Energy Agency has been asked to contribute to the continued analysis and practical preparations for a possible cooperation with other member countries. The assignment covers several different types of cooperation. This report represents the Agency's accounting of the part of the commission on cooperation through joint projects. This part include, in consultation with the industry to develop a proposal for the practical use for the implementation of possible joint projects for offshore wind power. The mission aims to create greater clarity and facilitate the possible implementation of joint projects.

  8. Using Project Performance to Measure Effectiveness of Quality Management System Maintenance and Practices in Construction Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Tiong Kung; Ariff, Mohd. Shoki Md.

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposed seven existing and new performance indicators to measure the effectiveness of quality management system (QMS) maintenance and practices in construction industry. This research is carried out with a questionnaire based on QMS variables which are extracted from literature review and project performance indicators which are established from project management's theory. Data collected was analyzed using correlation and regression analysis. The findings indicate that client satisfaction and time variance have positive and significant relationship with QMS while other project performance indicators do not show significant results. Further studies can use the same project performance indicators to study the effectiveness of QMS in different sampling area to improve the generalizability of the findings. PMID:24701182

  9. Using Project Performance to Measure Effectiveness of Quality Management System Maintenance and Practices in Construction Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiong Kung Leong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposed seven existing and new performance indicators to measure the effectiveness of quality management system (QMS maintenance and practices in construction industry. This research is carried out with a questionnaire based on QMS variables which are extracted from literature review and project performance indicators which are established from project management's theory. Data collected was analyzed using correlation and regression analysis. The findings indicate that client satisfaction and time variance have positive and significant relationship with QMS while other project performance indicators do not show significant results. Further studies can use the same project performance indicators to study the effectiveness of QMS in different sampling area to improve the generalizability of the findings.

  10. Using project performance to measure effectiveness of quality management system maintenance and practices in construction industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Tiong Kung; Zakuan, Norhayati; Mat Saman, Muhamad Zameri; Ariff, Mohd Shoki Md; Tan, Choy Soon

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposed seven existing and new performance indicators to measure the effectiveness of quality management system (QMS) maintenance and practices in construction industry. This research is carried out with a questionnaire based on QMS variables which are extracted from literature review and project performance indicators which are established from project management's theory. Data collected was analyzed using correlation and regression analysis. The findings indicate that client satisfaction and time variance have positive and significant relationship with QMS while other project performance indicators do not show significant results. Further studies can use the same project performance indicators to study the effectiveness of QMS in different sampling area to improve the generalizability of the findings.

  11. Implementing practice management strategies to improve patient care: the EPIC project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attwell, David; Rogers-Warnock, Leslie; Nemis-White, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    Healthcare gaps, the difference between usual care and best care, are evident in Canada, particularly with respect to our aging, ailing population. Primary care practitioners are challenged to identify, prevent and close care gaps in their practice environment given the competing demands of informed, litigious patients with complex medical needs, ever-evolving scientific evidence with new treatment recommendations across many disciplines and an enhanced emphasis on quality and accountability in healthcare. Patient-centred health and disease management partnerships using measurement, feedback and communication of practice patterns and outcomes have been shown to narrow care gaps. Practice management strategies such as the use of patient registries and recall systems have also been used to help practitioners better understand, follow and proactively manage populations of patients in their practice. The Enhancing Practice to Improve Care project was initiated to determine the impact of a patient-centred health and disease management partnership using practice management strategies to improve patient care and outcomes for patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Forty-four general practices from four regions of British Columbia participated and, indeed, demonstrated that care and outcomes for patients with CKD could be improved via the implementation of practice management strategies in a patient-centred partnership measurement model of health and disease management.

  12. A Psychometric Approach to Theory-Based Behavior Change Intervention Development: Example From the Colorado Meaning-Activity Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, Kevin S; Ross, Kaile M; Hooker, Stephanie A; Wooldridge, Jennalee L

    2018-05-18

    There has been a notable disconnect between theories of behavior change and behavior change interventions. Because few interventions are both explicitly and adequately theory-based, investigators cannot assess the impact of theory on intervention effectiveness. Theory-based interventions, designed to deliberately engage the theory's proposed mechanisms of change, are needed to adequately test theories. Thus, systematic approaches to theory-based intervention development are needed. This article will introduce and discuss the psychometric method of developing theory-based interventions. The psychometric approach to intervention development utilizes basic psychometric principles at each step of the intervention development process in order to build a theoretically driven intervention to, subsequently, be tested in process (mechanism) and outcome studies. Five stages of intervention development are presented as follows: (i) Choice of theory; (ii) Identification and characterization of key concepts and expected relations; (iii) Intervention construction; (iv) Initial testing and revision; and (v) Empirical testing of the intervention. Examples of this approach from the Colorado Meaning-Activity Project (COMAP) are presented. Based on self-determination theory integrated with meaning or purpose, and utilizing a motivational interviewing approach, the COMAP intervention is individually based with an initial interview followed by smart phone-delivered interventions for increasing daily activity. The psychometric approach to intervention development is one method to ensure careful consideration of theory in all steps of intervention development. This structured approach supports developing a research culture that endorses deliberate and systematic operationalization of theory into behavior change intervention from the outset of intervention development.

  13. Improving regulatory practices through the OECD-NEA Stress Corrosion Cracking and Cable Ageing Project (SCAP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, A.; Huerta, A.; Sekimura, N.; Gott, K.; Koshy, T.

    2012-01-01

    For regulatory authorities, it is important to verify the adequacy of ageing management methods applied by the licensees, based on reliable technical evidence. In order to achieve that goal, 14 NEA member countries joined the SCAP (Project) in 2006 to share knowledge and three more countries joined during the course of the project. The project focused on two important safety issues, the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and the degradation of cable insulation, due to their relevance for plant ageing assessments and their implication on inspection practices. The commendable practices identified in the project are intended to strengthen technical approaches to optimize ageing management in the areas of SCC and cable ageing. The SCAP SCC and Cable data- and knowledge bases provided extensive information to benefit all stakeholders in designing, constructing, operating and regulating Nuclear Power Plants and also provide commendable practices applicable to new reactors. The paper presents the product of SCAP work resulting from 4 years of technical interactions and shared knowledge from all participants from June 2006 to June 2010. (author)

  14. Case Flow Management net-project – The Practical Value for Civil Justice in the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas de Weers

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The problem of court delays has caused a widespread need for fast and efficient civil procedures that are able to maintain a high standard of quality. The EU-funded research project – ‘CFMnet: Towards European Caseflow Management development network – Identifying, developing and sharing best practices’ – wants to meet this need with a collection of European (CFM practices in a handbook and an online platform. Does the CFMnet-project have an added value for the judiciary in the Netherlands? The Netherlands is currently reforming the judiciary in a major transformation called Quality and Innovation (Kwaliteit en Innovatie. The flexible methodology of this project pre-eminently allows for the inclusion of new ideas. This research shows that the CFMnet-project provides both relevant and irrelevant information for the Netherlands. On the one hand, there are some important practices in the CFMnet handbook that are currently unused in the Netherlands, for instance the centralised management of court experts, real-time case management and certain ICT tools. On the other hand, the Dutch jurisdiction is already familiar with a surprisingly high number of practices that are proposed in the handbook, such as summary proceedings and the division of labour between the court clerk and

  15. Using implementation science as the core of the doctor of nursing practice inquiry project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riner, Mary E

    2015-01-01

    New knowledge in health care needs to be implemented for continuous practice improvement. Doctor of nursing practice (DNP) programs are designed to increase clinical practice knowledge and leadership skills of graduates. This article describes an implementation science course developed in a DNP program focused on advancing graduates' capacity for health systems leadership. Curriculum and course development are presented, and the course is mapped to depict how the course objectives and assignments were aligned with DNP Essentials. Course modules with rational are described, and examples of how students implemented assignments are provided. The challenges of integrating this course into the life of the school are discussed as well as steps taken to develop faculty for this capstone learning experience. This article describes a model of using implementation science to provide DNP students an experience in designing and managing an evidence-based practice change project. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Shared meanings of success, happiness, and health among adults with cerebral palsy and physiotherapists: implications for practice and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gannotti, Mary E; Blanchard, Yvette; Blumberg, Lisa; LaRocco, Diana

    2018-01-25

    To describe shared meanings of success, happiness, and health of adults with cerebral palsy and physiotherapists. Ethnography employed open ended/semi-structured interviews and structured questionnaires (Satisfaction with Life Scale, Beck Depression Inventory-II ® , Oxford Happiness Questionnaire, Life Habits Questionnaire, Medical Outcomes Study-Social Support Survey, and PROMIS ® Pain Interference Scale). Content analysis of qualitative data and principal components analysis of questionnaire responses identified shared meanings. Fourteen adults with cerebral palsy and 15 physiotherapists (median age 46) had similar levels of education. For both groups, social achievements, personal goals, employment, and supporting a family defined success. Adults with cerebral palsy more frequently identified tenacity and persistence as important for success. Both groups described happiness as spending time with loved ones, recreational activities, and having purpose in life. Adults with cerebral palsy identified the importance of self-acceptance for happiness. For both, health included self-care of mind/spirit, cardiovascular and musculoskeletal wellness, and physical fitness (the ability to perform physical tasks). Analysis of questionnaire responses identified shared meanings (eigenvalue 41, 95% explained variance). Adults with cerebral palsy and physiotherapists share similar experiences, behaviors, and feelings about success, happiness, and health. This knowledge may improve communication, enhance evidence-based practice, and foster services to support wellbeing. Implications for rehabilitation Cerebral palsy is a life-long condition, but we know little about social and physical outcomes for adults with cerebral palsy. Lack of understanding about meanings of success, happiness, and health may be a barrier for consumers accessing and for providers delivering evidence-based services. Physiotherapists and adults with cerebral palsy share similar meanings (feelings

  17. Playing with the team: The Development of Communities of Practice in a Digital Storytelling Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter John Westman

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Since its emergence in the early 1990's, digital storytelling has been variouslyidentified as a new media practice, a consumer and community-led movement,and a textual system. However, given its relative nascent status, there remainsthe need for further academic research focusing on the different forms it hasassumed. During the spring/summer of 2011, I conducted an examination ofTaking the Field (TTF, a digital storytelling project that aims to celebrategrassroots cricket in the UK through the construction of stories by village andcounty-level clubs. In contrast to most previous projects that aim to have theparticipants “speak” by constructing their own stories, TTF stories are researchedand constructed by project staff with the assistance of the clubs.My research centers on the experiences of two clubs in the project, Blaina CC andSpondon CC, through interviews and elicitation techniques with club andcommunity members using the completed stories and the artifacts used in theirconstruction. Through the theoretical framework of Gell's anthropology of art, Iconsider how digital stories act as objects that mediate social agency during theircreation and how the structure of this type of project contributes to the formationof communities of practice in the 'performance' of collective identity.

  18. Practical experience with digital I and C retrofit projects gathered by independent experts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeck, Kurt; Schildheuer, Reinhard; Weich, Alfred

    2005-01-01

    As independent experts, we have accompanied a series of major projects where plant control systems have been retrofitted with digital I and C technology. As General Expert Inspectors of our authority, we have investigated, inspected and certified such projects - from defining the tasks at hand trough planning, approving, implementing and commissioning down to the regular operation of the equipment. Our special focus has been on the proper adherence to the relevant safety issues in nuclear plants in accordance with the current state-of-the-art in science and technology, and to the applicable codes of practice. In September 2004, at the international 'Nuclear Plant Instrumentation, Control and Human Machine Interface Technology' meeting in Columbus/Ohio, we presented some major retrofit projects and reported about how we, as independent official experts, accompany and monitor the activities of retrofitting plants with advanced digital safety I and C equipment, from the safety point of view. With current report, we would like to provide more detailed information about the practical experience gained with digital safety I and C retrofits and the conclusions drawn for currently ongoing retrofit projects. We will look at both the technical and licensing aspects of implementing such projects

  19. Case Flow Management net-project – The Practical Value for Civil Justice in the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas de Weers

    2016-01-01

    The problem of court delays has caused a widespread need for fast and efficient civil procedures that are able to maintain a high standard of quality. The EU-funded research project – ‘CFMnet: Towards European Caseflow Management development network – Identifying, developing and sharing best practices’ – wants to meet this need with a collection of European (CFM) practices in a handbook and an online platform. Does the CFMnet-project have an added value for the judiciary in the Netherlands? T...

  20. New teaching methods for practical training in nursing within the project Tempus IV – CCNURCA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Kuriplachová

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to present new teaching methods for practical training in nursing within the project Tempus IV – CCNURCA (Competency based Curriculum Reform in Nursing and Healthcare in Western Balkan Universities No. 544169-TEMPUS-1-2013-1-BE-TEMPUS-JPCR. Implementation of new practical teaching methods, such as learning with simulator mannequins, practical workshop, nursing process, mind mapping, case studies and problem-based learning (PBL in practical training could help to improve the quality of the educational process in nursing at Universities of Western Balkan countries that have been involved in this project. The realistic conditions in simulation laboratories are reflecting real hospital and patient´s care, communication with patient and hospital staff, discussion and analysis of all student´s activities. The methods of next nursing generation in practical training that can help nurses to get used to the recognition and management of patients by using of simulated real life situations.

  1. Multi-model Mean Nitrogen and Sulfur Deposition from the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP): Evaluation Historical and Projected Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamarque, J.-F.; Dentener, F.; McConnell, J.; Ro, C.-U.; Shaw, M.; Vet, R.; Bergmann, D.; Cameron-Smith, P.; Doherty, R.; Faluvegi, G.; hide

    2013-01-01

    We present multi-model global datasets of nitrogen and sulfate deposition covering time periods from 1850 to 2100, calculated within the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP). The computed deposition fluxes are compared to surface wet deposition and ice-core measurements. We use a new dataset of wet deposition for 2000-2002 based on critical assessment of the quality of existing regional network data. We show that for present-day (year 2000 ACCMIP time-slice), the ACCMIP results perform similarly to previously published multi-model assessments. For this time slice, we find a multi-model mean deposition of 50 Tg(N) yr1 from nitrogen oxide emissions, 60 Tg(N) yr1 from ammonia emissions, and 83 Tg(S) yr1 from sulfur emissions. The analysis of changes between 1980 and 2000 indicates significant differences between model and measurements over the United States but less so over Europe. This difference points towards misrepresentation of 1980 NH3 emissions over North America. Based on ice-core records, the 1850 deposition fluxes agree well with Greenland ice cores but the change between 1850 and 2000 seems to be overestimated in the Northern Hemisphere for both nitrogen and sulfur species. Using the Representative Concentration Pathways to define the projected climate and atmospheric chemistry related emissions and concentrations, we find large regional nitrogen deposition increases in 2100 in Latin America, Africa and parts of Asia under some of the scenarios considered. Increases in South Asia are especially large, and are seen in all scenarios, with 2100 values more than double 2000 in some scenarios and reaching 1300 mg(N) m2 yr1 averaged over regional to continental scale regions in RCP 2.6 and 8.5, 3050 larger than the values in any region currently (2000). The new ACCMIP deposition dataset provides novel, consistent and evaluated global gridded deposition fields for use in a wide range of climate and ecological studies.

  2. Developing a project-based computational physics course grounded in expert practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Christopher J.; Atherton, Timothy J.

    2017-04-01

    We describe a project-based computational physics course developed using a backwards course design approach. From an initial competency-based model of problem solving in computational physics, we interviewed faculty who use these tools in their own research to determine indicators of expert practice. From these, a rubric was formulated that enabled us to design a course intended to allow students to learn these skills. We also report an initial implementation of the course and, by having the interviewees regrade student work, show that students acquired many of the expert practices identified.

  3. Best practices of Building Information Modelling (BIM) implementation in design phase for construction project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasim, N.; Zainal Abidin, N. A.; Zainal, R.; Sarpin, N.; Rahim, M. H. I. Abd; Saikah, M.

    2017-11-01

    Implementation of Building Information Modelling (BIM) was expected to bring improvement in current practices of Malaysian construction industry. In the design phase, there is a lack of a ready pool of skilled workers who are able to develop BIM strategic plan and effectively utilise it. These create boundaries for BIM nature in Malaysian construction industry specifically in the design phase to achieve its best practices. Therefore, the objectives of this research are to investigate the current practices of BIM implementation in the design phase as well as the best practices factors of BIM implementation in the design phase. The qualitative research approach is carried out through semi-structured interviews with the designers of different organisations which adopt BIM in the design phase. Data collection is analysed by executing content analysis method. From the findings, the best practices factors of BIM implementation in design phase such as the incentive for BIM training, formal approach to monitoring automated Level of Detailing (LOD), run a virtual meeting and improve Industry Foundation Class (IFC). Thus, best practices factors which lead to practices improvements in the design phase of project development which subsequently improves the implementation of BIM in the design phase of Malaysian construction industry.

  4. Enhancing project-oriented learning by joining communities of practice and opening spaces for relatedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, R.

    2010-03-01

    This article describes an extension to project-oriented learning to increase social construction of knowledge and learning. The focus is on: (a) maximising opportunities for students to share their knowledge with practitioners by joining communities of practice, and (b) increasing their intrinsic motivation by creating conditions for student's relatedness. The case study considers a last year capstone course in Mechanical Engineering. The work addresses innovative practices of active learning and beyond project-oriented learning through: (a) the development of a web-based decision support system, (b) meetings between the communities of students, maintenance engineers and academics, and (c) new off-campus group instances. The author hypothesises that this multi-modal approach increases deep learning and social impact of the educational process. Surveys to the actors support a successful achievement of the educational goals. The methodology can easily be extended to further improve the learning process.

  5. The application and practical benefits of “C theory” in project management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kao I-Chan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study regarded adult in-service students who are familiar with project management courses as the subjects and collected data through questionnaires for confirmatory factor analysis and reliability analysis. The aim is to construct a “C Theory” questionnaire scale that encompasses the essence of Chinese management philosophy like decision-making of Taoism, leadership of Legalism, tactics of School of Military Strategists, creativity of Mohism, and coordination of Confucianism. Furthermore, management performance scales were constructed for learning and growth, internal operation, customer satisfaction, and financial control, while the questionnaires and statistical analyses were expected to probe into the impact of “C Theory” on project management performance. This study found that the application and practice of “C Theory” have a high and positive correlation with project management and a significant influence on the improvement of performance. It is therefore suggested that management methods in “C Theory” be appropriately used in project management in order to enhance the efficiency of project management and facilitate the achievement of project management targets.

  6. The work and recovery project: changing organizational culture and practice in New York City outpatient services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascaris, Alysia; Shields, Leslie Reed; Wolf, Jessica

    2008-01-01

    Complex and multiple barriers confront out-patient programs in promoting recovery and addressing mental health recipients' work-related goals. This article describes a focused organizational change project utilizing intensive consultation and technical assistance within five New York City outpatient psychiatric services. The project aimed to increase staff exposure to, understanding and use of work-related and recovery-based concepts to promote consumers' recovery and attainment of employment goals. Tailored assessment, curriculum delivery, and identification and implementation of change objectives were useful strategies in promoting change. This change model can serve to assist programs in their efforts to integrate new approaches and to better understand changes among leadership, staff and consumers, and changes in organizational culture and practice required to support a work and recovery-oriented service paradigm. The project experience suggests that adopting and embracing new practices takes time. Varied and incremental steps toward programmatic and operational changes can be significant and can reap authentic sustainable change occurring in the process of learning, experiencing, internalizing and adjusting to new methods of practice.

  7. The impact of a community mobilization project on health-related knowledge and practices in Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babalola, S; Sakolsky, N; Vondrasek, C; Mounlom, D; Brown, J; Tchupo, J P

    2001-12-01

    The analyses presented in this paper document the impact of a community mobilization effort in Cameroon. Between 1997 and 1998, a local non-governmental organization worked with community associations, Njangi, in one urban and one rural location to promote knowledge and positive practices concerning family planning, sexually transmitted diseases, and treatment of common childhood diseases. Based on a multi-tiered structure, the project involved selecting and training two prominent and influential members of each community as "relais" or middlemen. The "relais" then trained mobilizers from participating Njangis to provide relevant information and help to mobilize their fellow members in favor of the positive attitudes and practices promoted by the project. The project was evaluated using baseline and follow-up measurement of pertinent indicators, and service statistics. Results suggest that the intervention had significant influence in the rural location with noticeable positive effects on knowledge and practices of family planning, knowledge and attitudes about HIV/AIDS and STIs, and use of health services. In the urban location, for programmatic and extraneous factors, the intervention was not effective. The paper discusses the lessons learnt from the intervention and offers pertinent suggestions for replicating the intervention in rural settings.

  8. Academic and Institutional Review Board Collaboration to Ensure Ethical Conduct of Doctor of Nursing Practice Projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foote, Jan M; Conley, Virginia; Williams, Janet K; McCarthy, Ann Marie; Countryman, Michele

    2015-07-01

    Navigating the regulations to protect human subjects and private health information for Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) projects can be a formidable task for students, faculty, and the institutional review board (IRB). Key stakeholders from the University of Iowa College of Nursing and the Human Subjects Office developed a standardized process for DNP students to follow, using a decision algorithm, a student orientation to the human subjects review process conducted by faculty and IRB chairs and staff, and a brief Human Subjects Research Determination form. Over 2 years, 109 students completed the process, and 96.3% of their projects were deemed not to be human subjects research. Every student submitted documentation of adherence to the standardized process. Less time was spent by students, faculty, and the IRB in preparing and processing review requests. The interprofessional collaboration resulted in a streamlined process for the timely review of DNP projects. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. Empowering Students in Information Literacy Practices Using a Collaborative Digital Library for School Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abrizah Abdullah

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the affordances that a collaborative digital library (CDL can bring to bear on supporting information literacy practices in the digital information environment. It suggests that the digital library can contribute to student empowerment in information literacy practices while searching, using and collaboratively building the digital library resources. To illustrate this, the authors have been experimenting with the implementation of an integrated information literacy model based on Eisenberg and Berkowitz’ Big 6 Model and describes the CDL features in association with the information literacy dimensions in this model. The CDL focuses on the project-based learning approach to conduct students’ project, which supports specific information behaviors that underpin research and learning such as information seeking, browsing, encountering, foraging, sharing, gathering, filtering, and using. Findings regarding teachers’ reception of the digital library are encouraging as they feel the relevance of the digital library to the current requirement of the students’ project and its potential to entrench information and resource study skills through project-based learning.

  10. Introduction of conditional mean spectrum and conditional spectrum in the practice of seismic safety evaluation in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Kun; Bouaanani, Najib; Wen, Ruizhi; Ren, Yefei

    2018-05-01

    This paper aims at implementing and introducing the use of conditional mean spectrum (CMS) and conditional spectrum (CS) as the main input parameters in the practice of seismic safety evaluation (SSE) in China, instead of the currently used uniform hazard spectrum (UHS). For this purpose, a procedure for M-R-epsilon seismic hazard deaggregation in China was first developed. For illustration purposes, two different typical sites in China, with one to two dominant seismic zones, were considered as examples to carry out seismic hazard deaggregation and illustrate the construction of CMS/CS. Two types of correlation coefficients were used to generate CMS and the results were compared over a vibration period range of interest. Ground motion records were selected from the NSMONS (2007-2015) and PEER NGA-West2 databases to correspond to the target CMS and CS. Hazard consistency of the spectral accelerations of the selected ground motion records was evaluated and validated by computing the annual exceedance probability rate of the response spectra and comparing the results to the hazard curve corresponding to each site of concern at different periods. The tools developed in this work and their illustrative application to specific case studies in China are a first step towards the adoption of CMS and CS into the practice of seismic safety evaluation in this country.

  11. Emotions in “the world”: cultural practices, products, and meanings of anger and shame in two individualist cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiger, Michael; Deyne, Simon De; Mesquita, Batja

    2013-01-01

    Three studies tested the idea that people’s cultural worlds are structured in ways that promote and highlight emotions and emotional responses that are beneficial in achieving central goals in their culture. Based on the idea that U.S. Americans strive for competitive individualism, while (Dutch-speaking) Belgians favor a more egalitarian variant of individualism, we predicted that anger and shame, as well as their associated responses, would be beneficial to different extents in these two cultural contexts. A questionnaire study found that cultural practices promote beneficial emotions (anger in the United States, shame in Belgium) and avoid harmful emotions (shame in the United States): emotional interactions were perceived to occur more or less frequently to the extent that they elicited culturally beneficial or harmful emotions. Similarly, a cultural product analysis showed that popular children’s books from the United States and Belgium tend to portray culturally beneficial emotions more than culturally harmful emotions. Finally, a word-association study of the shared cultural meanings surrounding anger and shame provided commensurate evidence at the level of the associated response. In each language network, anger and shame were imbued with meanings that reflected the cultural significance of the emotion: while culturally consistent emotions carried relatively stronger connotations of emotional yielding (e.g., giving in to anger and aggressing against the offender in the United States), culturally inconsistent emotions carried relatively stronger connotations of emotional containment (e.g., a stronger emphasis on suppressing or transforming shame in the United States). PMID:24367340

  12. Collaborative Action Research as a Tool for Generating Formative Feedback on Teachers' Classroom Assessment Practice: The KREST Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Christine

    2013-01-01

    This paper sets out to explore science teachers' classroom assessment practices and outlines some of the tensions and synergies in changing assessment practices. It describes episodes from a collaborative action research project with science teachers designed to support the strengthening of classroom assessment practices--the King's Researching…

  13. Social meanings and understandings in patient-nurse interaction in the community practice setting: a grounded theory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stoddart Kathleen M

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The patient-nurse relationship is a traditional concern of healthcare research. However, patient-nurse interaction is under examined from a social perspective. Current research focuses mostly on specific contexts of care delivery and experience related to medical condition or illness, or to nurses’ speciality. Consequentially, this paper is about the social meanings and understandings at play within situated patient-nurse interaction in the community practice setting in a transforming healthcare service. Methods Grounded theory methodology was used and the research process was characterised by principles of theoretical sensitivity and constant comparative analysis. The field of study was four health centres in the community. The participants were patients and nurses representative of those attending or working in the health centres and meeting there by scheduled appointment. Data collection methods were observations, informal interviews and semi-structured interviews. Results Key properties of ‘Being a good patient, being a good nurse’, ‘Institutional experiences’ and ‘Expectations about healthcare’ were associated with the construction of a category entitled ‘Experience’. Those key properties captured that in an evolving healthcare environment individuals continually re-constructed their reality of being a patient or nurse as they endeavoured to perform appropriately; articulation of past and present healthcare experiences was important in that process. Modus operandi in role as patient was influenced by past experiences in healthcare and by those in non-healthcare institutions in terms of engagement and involvement (or not in interaction. Patients’ expectations about interaction in healthcare included some uncertainly as they strived to make sense of the changing roles and expertise of nurses and, differentiating between the roles and expertise of nurses and doctors. Conclusions The importance of social

  14. INTERDISCIPLINARITY IN PUBLIC SPACE PARTICIPATIVE PROJECTS: METHODS AND RESULTS IN PRACTICE AND TEACHING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Brandão

    2015-06-01

    • In the development of design practice and studio teaching methods We shall see in this paper how interdisciplinary approaches correspond to new and complex urban transformations, focusing on the importance of actors’ interaction processes, combining professional and non-professional knowledge and theory-practice relations. Therefore, we aim at a deepening in public space area of knowledge under the growing complexity of urban life. We see it as a base for further development of collaborative projects and their implications on community empowerment and urban governance at local level. Motivations of this line of work are persistent in several ongoing research projects, aiming to: - Understand public space as a cohesion factor both in urban life and urban form - Manage processes and strategies as elements of urban transformation, - Stimulate the understanding of actors’ roles in urban design practices. - Favoring the questioning of emerging aspects of urban space production… The paper presents and analyses processes, methods and results from civic participation projects developed in the neighbourhood of Barò de Viver (Barcelona and in the District of Marvila (Lisbon. In the first case, a long process initiated in 2004 and partially completed in 2011, neighbours developed the projects "Memory Wall" and Ciutat d'Asuncion Promenade as part of identity construction in public space, in collaboration  with a team of facilitators from CrPolis group. In the second case, different participatory processes dated from 2001 and 2003 have resulted in the implementation of a specific identity urban brand and communication system with an ongoing project of "maps" construction according to the neighbours perception and representation systems. We may conclude that processes of urban governance require more active participation of citizens in projects regarding the improvement of quality of life. At the same time, the implementation of these processes requires a clear

  15. Violence prevention in schools: Resilience promotion in the framework of a European practice research project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Rauh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The following article presents the theoretical background, design and evaluation results of the international practice research project Strong implementing strategies of violence prevention in schools by means of resilience promotion. After presenting the results from the quantitative and qualitative results briefly, success factors for the implementation of a prevention strategy are highlighted. Este artigo apresenta o quadro teórico, a conceção e a avaliação dos resultados do projeto internacional Strong de investigação prática no que à implementação de estratégias de prevenção da violência nas escolas diz respeito através da promoção da resiliência. Após a apresentação breve dos resultados quantitativos e qualitativos, serão realçados os fatores de sucesso de uma estratégia de prevenção. En este artículo se presenta el marco teórico, el diseño y la evaluación de los resultados del proyecto internacional de investigación práctica Strong de la implementación de estrategias para prevenir la violencia en las escuelas mediante la promoción de la resiliencia. Después de la breve presentación de los resultados cuantitativos y cualitativos se destacarán los factores de éxito de una estrategia de prevención. Cet article présente le cadre théorique, la conception et l'évaluation des résultats du projet international de recherche pratique Strong dans la mise en œuvre de stratégies visant à prévenir la violence dans les écoles préoccupations en favorisant la résilience. Après la brève présentation des résultats quantitatifs et qualitatifs seront mis en évidence les facteurs de réussite d'une stratégie de prévention

  16. A Best Practices Notebook for Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate Change Adaptation: Guidance and Insights for Policy and Practice from the CATALYST Project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hare, M.; Bers, van C.; Mysiak, J.; Calliari, E.; Haque, A.; Warner, K.; Yuzva, K.; Zissener, M.; Jaspers, A.M.J.; Timmerman, J.G.

    2014-01-01

    This publication, A Best Practices Notebook for Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate Change Adaptation: Guidance and Insights for Policy and Practice from the CATALYST Project is one of two main CATALYST knowledge products that focus on the transformative approaches and measures that can support

  17. Survey of siting practices for selected management projects in seven countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardin, E.; Aahagen, H.

    1992-06-01

    This paper surveys siting practices for deep geologic disposal in seven countries, and attempts to formulate generalizations which could be useful for the upcoming review of the Swedish plan for siting the SFL repository (R and D 92). Comparison of projects in different countries is done with full appreciation of the technical, legal, and cultural differences. The seven countries were selected for experience with siting in crystalline rock, similarity of siting practices to Sweden, and the availability of published information. Local governments have demonstrated effective veto power in each of the seven countries surveyed, although this power is exercised in different ways. This paper shows how the siting strategy itself affects the ability and the inclination of localities to block the project. It shows by example that public involvement, parallel vs. sequential characterization, schedule for siting activities, and the existence of interim waste storage capability have an impact on the success of siting. The focus of this paper is deep geologic disposal. Shallow land disposal and non-radioactive wastes are not discussed in detail, with three exceptions: LLW disposal siting in the U.S. and Canada, and the SAKAB incinerator projects in Sweden. These provide insight into siting approaches and demonstrate that conclusions regarding deep geologic disposal are supported by other experience. (114 refs.) (au)

  18. Towards Integrated Team Practice: A Case of Malaysian Industrialised Building System (IBS Construction Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Nawi Mohd Nasrun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Problems associated with fragmentation in the traditional construction process, such as isolation of professionals, lack of co-ordination between design and construction, and the sequential manner of its processes, has impacted on construction performance leading to a lack of integration, wastage, low productivity and efficiency. Integrated team practice is perceived as paramount. Unfortunately, there has a limitation of study focus on the dimension of fully integrated team especially for Malaysian Industrialised Building System (IBS projects. Accordingly, this research paper explores and identifies the dimension of fully integrated team from the traditional approach and conduct a validation process for implementing it in Malaysian IBS projects. The research presented uses interviews case study to obtain qualitative data. It was found that the dimension of fully integrated team from the traditional construction process could apply to the Malaysian IBS projects. Suggestions on how an integrated team practice in IBS design and construction process in order to minimise the fragmentation gaps will be concluded.

  19. Oncology nurses and the experience of participation in an evidence-based practice project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridman, Mary; Frederickson, Keville

    2014-07-01

    To illuminate the experiences of oncology nurses who participated in an evidence-based practice (EBP) project in an institution with an EBP organizational structure. A descriptive phenomenologic approach and in-depth interviews with each participant. An oncology-focused academic medical center with an established organizational infrastructure for EBP. 12 RNs working in an oncology setting who participated in an EBP project. Descriptive, qualitative phenomenologic approach through use of interviews and analysis of interview text. Four essential themes (i.e., support, challenges, evolution, and empowerment) and 11 subthemes emerged that reflected nurses' professional and personal growth, as well as the creation of a culture of EBP in the workplace. The participants described the EBP project as a positive, empowering personal and professional evolutionary experience with supports and challenges that resulted in improvements in patient care. To the authors' knowledge, the current study is the first qualitative study to demonstrate improved nursing outcomes (e.g., professional growth, improved nursing performance) and nurses' perception of improved patient outcomes (e.g., ongoing healthcare collaboration, evidence-based changes in practice).

  20. Project-oriented management of industrial production of fire and rescue equipment by means of geometric modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Rak, Iu; Bondarenko, V.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the research is to develop a method based on the geometric modelling for the purpose of improving the effectiveness of fire protection project management in industrial production of fire protection technology systems. Methods: The theoretical inheritance mode of effective management in project-organizational structure of fire protection and specialized technical equipment production using geometric modelling. Results: Mathematical and geometric models of project ma...

  1. Use of a structured template to facilitate practice-based learning and improvement projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClain, Elizabeth K; Babbott, Stewart F; Tsue, Terance T; Girod, Douglas A; Clements, Debora; Gilmer, Lisa; Persons, Diane; Unruh, Greg

    2012-06-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requires residency programs to meet and demonstrate outcomes across 6 competencies. Measuring residents' competency in practice-based learning and improvement (PBLI) is particularly challenging. We developed an educational tool to meet ACGME requirements for PBLI. The PBLI template helped programs document quality improvement (QI) projects and supported increased scholarly activity surrounding PBLI learning. We reviewed program requirements for 43 residency and fellowship programs and identified specific PBLI requirements for QI activities. We also examined ACGME Program Information Form responses on PBLI core competency questions surrounding QI projects for program sites visited in 2008-2009. Data were integrated by a multidisciplinary committee to develop a peer-protected PBLI template guiding programs through process, documentation, and evaluation of QI projects. All steps were reviewed and approved through our GME Committee structure. An electronic template, companion checklist, and evaluation form were developed using identified project characteristics to guide programs through the PBLI process and facilitate documentation and evaluation of the process. During a 24 month period, 27 programs have completed PBLI projects, and 15 have reviewed the template with their education committees, but have not initiated projects using the template. The development of the tool generated program leaders' support because the tool enhanced the ability to meet program-specific objectives. The peer-protected status of this document for confidentiality and from discovery has been beneficial for program usage. The document aggregates data on PBLI and QI initiatives, offers opportunities to increase scholarship in QI, and meets the ACGME goal of linking measures to outcomes important to meeting accreditation requirements at the program and institutional level.

  2. The Qatar genome project: translation of whole-genome sequencing into clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zayed, Hatem

    2016-10-01

    Qatar Genome Project was launched in 2013 with the intent to sequence the genome of each Qatari citizen in an effort to protect Qataris from the high rate of indigenous genetic diseases by allowing the mapping of disease-causing variants/rare variants and establishing a Qatari reference genome. Indeed, this project is expected to have numerous global benefits because the elevated homogeneity of the Qatari population, that will make Qatar an excellent genetic laboratory that will generate a wealth of data that will allow us to make sense of the genotype-phenotype correlations of many diseases, especially the complex multifactorial diseases, and will pave the way for changing the traditional medical practice of looking first at the phenotype rather than the genotype. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. The book, the stories, the people: an ongoing dialogic narrative inquiry study combining a practice development project. Part 2: the practice development context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, A; Biley, F C; Leigh-Phippard, H; Walker, H

    2012-12-01

    This paper is the second part of a two-article practice development report. It builds on the first part by introducing and discussing a Writing for Recovery practice development project, conducted at two UK sites. The paper begins by briefly describing the project within the context of helping mental health users, carers and survivors develop skills in creative writing in order to engage in the process of narrative re-storying in line with preferred identity. A selective overview of broad and focal background literature relevant to the project is then provided in order to position it within a values-based mental health nursing practice. Following this, the specific plan for running the project is briefly summarized, covering actual and anticipated ethical issues. The paper ends with a discussion of dissemination aims. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing.

  4. PRACTICE OF DRAFTING AND IMPLEMENTING OF FINANCING PROJECTS IN NON-FORMAL EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BUZOIANU Daniela Angela

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In Petroleum and Gas University, besides teaching and research activities, a priority is non-formal education area. In the academic center of Ploiesti, the activities of non-formal education take place through Center for Porjects, Programs and Cultural - Artistic events (CPPECA and Student’s Culture House, located in the University campus (CCS. The mission of the Center for Projects, Programs and Cultural - Artistic events and Student’s Culture House is: - To offer a big diversity of activities in non-formal education area for students and teachers; - To become an essential and defining pillar in continous formation of young people. The purpose is to promote excellence also in non-formal education fied , starting from the value and tradition of university education in Romanian oil area The Center for Project, Programs and Cultural - Artistic events (CPPECA and Student’s House of Culture have: • An educational function; • A real multidirectional cultural vocation through: - initiating,implementing and developing cultural projects and programs; - organizing and developing specific events like shows, festivals, national and international contests. The paper presents practical aspects in development and implementation of financing projects in non-formal education field.

  5. Realizing energy infrastructure projects – A qualitative empirical analysis of local practices to address social acceptance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedl, Christina; Reichl, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    The federal state of Upper Austria, at a crossing point for European energy grids, provides large-scale resources for storage of natural gas and is among the top infrastructures in this regard in Europe. Considering the ambitious plans for enhancements of energy infrastructures in this region, the issue of social acceptance of energy infrastructure is crucial. To foster an understanding of the challenges inherent in this issue we present an analysis concentrating on the social acceptance of energy infrastructure projects in Upper Austria. This paper addresses the issues with realizing energy infrastructure projects and analyzes the problems and benefits based on an empirical–qualitative study comprising expert interviews, discussions with stakeholders, and a round table workshop integrating the disparate viewpoints. The aim of the process was to integrate different attitudes, perspectives and positions of relevant stakeholders, members of citizens’ initiatives, environmental organizations and of the national government and local authorities. The results presented are based on both the analysis of the empirical–qualitative data and the existing studies and literature on social acceptance. The qualitative research compares experiences and current practices with social acceptance issues (like frameworks, participation, communication strategies) in a set of considered energy infrastructure projects. - Highlights: • Relates evidence of the effects of local resistance to Upper Austrian infrastructure projects. • We use a qualitative analysis to gain a holistic understanding of the social acceptance issue. • Acceptance is hampered by political, legal, institutional and procedural frameworks. • The issues of participation and communication play a key role.

  6. Learning from the innovative open practices of three international health projects: IACAPAP, VCPH and Physiopedia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Coughlan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Open educational resources and open educational practices are being increasingly used around the globe to train and support professionals in areas where funding and resources are scarce. This paper evaluates the open educational practices (OEP of three global health projects operating outside academia - the International Association for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Allied Professions (IACAPAP, the Virtual Campus of Public Health (VCPH, and Physiopedia. Each project aims to pool and share professional expertise, to the particular benefit of practitioners in low-income countries. This form of online knowledge-sharing appears to offer huge advantages to the health/public health sector, especially when conducted in the open, at a time when there is a huge global shortfall of healthcare workers and a need for cost-effective, high quality training.We evaluated the three projects using two frameworks –the OPAL open educational practices maturity matrix, and Vrieling’s OEP social configuration framework. We identified numerous innovative OEP from which academia, and indeed public health professionals around the world could learn, for example IACAPAP’s open textbook, VCPH’s trilingual OER repository, and Physiopedia’s wiki and use of open badges. However, some OEP –for example localisation of resources– are not accommodated by either of the frameworks we used.  We argue that an extended OEP evaluation and impact framework is needed in order to better encompass OEP outside formal education. http://dx.doi.org/10.5944/openpraxis.7.2.188

  7. Mathematical Practices and Arts Integration in an Activity-Based Projective Geometry Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernest, Jessica Brooke

    It is a general assumption that the mathematical activity of students in school should, at least to some degree, parallel the practices of professional mathematicians (Brown, Collins, Duguid, 1989; Moschkovich, 2013). This assumption is reflected in the Common Core State Standards (CCSSI, 2010) and National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM, 2000) standards documents. However, the practices included in these standards documents, while developed to reflect the practices of professional mathematicians, may be idealized versions of what mathematicians actually do (Moschkovich, 2013). This might lead us to question then: "What is it that mathematicians do, and what practices are not being represented in the standards documents?" In general, the creative work of mathematicians is absent from the standards and, in turn, from school mathematics curricula, much to the dismay of some mathematicians and researchers (Lockhart, 2009; Rogers, 1999). As a result, creativity is not typically being fostered in mathematics students. As a response to this lack of focus on fostering creativity (in each of the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics disciplines--the STEM disciplines), a movement to integrate the arts emerged. This movement, called the STEAM movement--introducing the letter A into the acronym STEM to signify incorporating the arts--has been gaining momentum, yet limited research has been carried out on the efficacy of integrating the arts into mathematics courses. My experiences as the co-instructor for an activity-based course focused on projective geometry led me to consider the course as a setting for investigating both mathematical practices and arts integration. In this work, I explored the mathematical practices in which students engaged while working to develop an understanding of projective geometry through group activities. Furthermore, I explored the way in which students' learning experiences were enriched through artistic engagement in the

  8. Laboratory projects using inquiry-based learning: an application to a practical inorganic course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José G. Carriazo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports how laboratory projects (LP coupled to inquiry-based learning (IBL were implemented in a practical inorganic chemistry course. Several coordination compounds have been successfully synthesised by students according to the proposed topics by the LP-IBL junction, and the chemistry of a number of metals has been studied. Qualitative data were collected from written reports, oral presentations, lab-notebook reviews and personal discussions with the students through an experimental course with undergraduate second-year students at the Universidad Nacional de Colombia during the last 5 years. Positive skills production was observed by combining LP and IBL. Conceptual, practical, interpretational, constructional (questions, explanations, hypotheses, communicational, environmental and application abilities were revealed by the students throughout the experimental course.

  9. A system of innovation to activate practices on open data: The Open4Citizens project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morelli, Nicola; Götzen, Amalia De; Simeone, Luca

    2018-01-01

    The increasing production of data is encouraging government institutions to consider the potential of open data as a public resource and to publish a large number of public datasets. This is configuring a new scenario in which open data are likely to play an important role for democracy...... and transparen-cy and for new innovation possibilities, in relation to the creation of a new generation of public services based on open data. In this context, though, it is possible to observe an asymmetry between the supply side of open data and the demand side. While more and more insti-tutions are producing...... and publishing data, there is no public awareness of the way in which such data can be used, nor is there a diffuse practice to work with those data. The definition of a practice for a large use of data is the aim of the Open4Citizens project, which promoted initiatives at different levels: at the level...

  10. Implementation of targeted medication adherence interventions within a community chain pharmacy practice: The Pennsylvania Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacci, Jennifer L; McGrath, Stephanie Harriman; Pringle, Janice L; Maguire, Michelle A; McGivney, Melissa Somma

    2014-01-01

    To identify facilitators and barriers to implementing targeted medication adherence interventions in community chain pharmacies, and describe adaptations of the targeted intervention and organizational structure within each individual pharmacy practice. Qualitative study. Central and western Pennsylvania from February to April 2012. Rite Aid pharmacists staffed at the 118 Pennsylvania Project intervention sites. Qualitative analysis of pharmacists' perceptions of facilitators and barriers experienced, targeted intervention and organizational structure adaptations implemented, and training and preparation prior to implementation. A total of 15 key informant interviews were conducted from February to April 2012. Ten pharmacists from "early adopter" practices and five pharmacists from "traditionalist" practices were interviewed. Five themes emerged regarding the implementation of targeted interventions, including all pharmacists' need to understand the relationship of patient care programs to their corporation's vision; providing individualized, continual support and mentoring to pharmacists; anticipating barriers before implementation of patient care programs; encouraging active patient engagement; and establishing best practices regarding implementation of patient care services. This qualitative analysis revealed that there are a series of key steps that can be taken before the execution of targeted interventions that may promote successful implementation of medication therapy management in community chain pharmacies.

  11. What Does It Mean to Be a Friendly Outsider? Critical Reflection on Finding a Role as an Action Researcher with Communities Developing Renewable Energy Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Jennifer; Convery, Ian; Simmons, Eunice; Weatherall, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    This paper is a reflective account exploring the value of using action research in a relatively new context in the United Kingdom; the development of community renewable-energy projects. There is a strong rationale for using action research in this setting due to the synergies between the principles and practice of action research and localised…

  12. Study On The Multi-Project Management Practices for Complex Investments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mircea Sandru

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper highlights the results of a study carried out during the doctoral research in case of multi project Engineering, Procurement, Construction, Commissioning (EPCC investment types. The objective of this study was to improve the project portfolio management. The methodology used in the research presented in this paper is focused on the analysis of the authors related to the approaches debated in literature and theirs applicability in EPCC type investment programs. In this sense were analyzed 11 international projects in petrochemical and refinery field and also 7 investments in other different areas of chemical industry. The research highlighted that the management process of these investments can be improved trough the correct project integration, being able to provide a performing working environment able to sustain the management team in identifying the investment program criticalities and congestion points in order to be able to manage them in an efficient manner in order to assure the reach of the investment goal. Having as consequence the possibility to significant reduction of execution period, up to 16% and in the mean time also the delays related risks through a more efficient investment managerial act.

  13. The Meaning of Social Participation for Daily Mobility in Later Life: an Ethnographic Case Study of a Senior Project in a Swedish Urban Neighbourhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stjernborg, Vanessa

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents an ethnographic case study that aims to understand the meaning of social participation in a neighbourhood for daily mobility in later life. In the study, the mobility of the participants of a senior-citizen project was monitored over 18 months. The project was founded as a result of a municipal district's targeting of social sustainability. The results show that social participation had positive effects on the daily mobility of the participants. The implementation of broad-minded thinking from the municipality and the cooperation of various municipal actors were shown to be essential for the positive outcome of this project.

  14. Championing mental health at work: emerging practice from innovative projects in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Mark; Tilford, Sylvia; Branney, Peter; Kinsella, Karina

    2014-09-01

    This paper examines the value of participatory approaches within interventions aimed at promoting mental health and wellbeing in the workplace. Specifically the paper explores data from the thematic evaluation of the Mental Health and Employment project strand within the Altogether Better programme being implemented in England in the Yorkshire and Humber region, which was funded through the BIG Lottery and aimed to empower people across the region to lead better lives. The evaluation combined a systematic evidence review with semi-structured interviews across mental health and employment projects. Drawing on both evaluation elements, the paper examines the potential of workplace-based 'business champions' to facilitate organizational culture change within enterprises within a deprived regional socio-economic environment. First, the paper identifies key policy drivers for interventions around mental health and employment, summarizes evidence review findings and describes the range of activities within three projects. The role of the 'business champion' emerged as crucial to these interventions and therefore, secondly, the paper examines how champions' potential to make a difference depends on the work settings and their existing roles, skills and motivation. In particular, champions can proactively coordinate project strands, embed the project, encourage participation, raise awareness, encourage changes to work procedures and strengthen networks and partnerships. The paper explores how these processes can facilitate changes in organizational culture. Challenges of implementation are identified, including achieving leverage with senior management, handover of ownership to fellow employees, assessing impact and sustainability. Finally, implications for policy and practice are discussed, and conclusions drawn concerning the roles of champions within different workplace environments. © The Author (2013). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For

  15. Developing collaborative person-centred practice: a pilot project on a palliative care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Pippa; Weaver, Lynda; Gravelle, Debbie; Thibault, Hélène

    2007-02-01

    Maximizing interprofessional collaborative patient-centred practice holds promise for improving patient care and creating satisfying work roles. In Canada's evolving health care system, there are demands for increased efficiency, cost-effectiveness, and quality improvement. Interprofessional collaboration warrants re-examination because maximizing interprofessional collaboration, especially nurse-physician collaboration, holds promise for improving patient care and creating satisfying work roles. A palliative care team seized the opportunity to pilot a different approach to patient and family care when faced with a reduction in medical staff. Grounded in a collaborative patient-centred practice approach, the Canadian Hospice Palliative Care Association's National Model to Guide Hospice Palliative Care (2002), and outcomes from program retreats and workgroups, a collaborative person-centred model of care was developed for a 12-bed pilot project. Preliminary findings show that the pilot project team perceived some specific benefits in continuity of care and interprofessional collaboration, while the presence of the physician was reduced to an average of 3.82 hours on the pilot wing, compared with 8 hours on the non-pilot wings. This pilot study suggests that a person-centred model, when focused on the physician-nurse dyad, may offer improved efficiency, job satisfaction and continuity of care on a palliative care unit. Incorporating all team members and developing strategies to successfully expand the model across the whole unit are the next challenges. Further research into the impact of these changes on the health care professionals, management and patients and families is essential.

  16. Outcomes of an infection prevention project focusing on hand hygiene and isolation practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragon, Daleen; Sole, Mary Lou; Brown, Scott

    2005-01-01

    Nosocomial infections are a major health problem for hospitalized patients and their families. Since the 1800s, hand hygiene has been recognized as the single best method to prevent the spread of pathogens and nosocomial infections. Despite this fact, many healthcare workers do not adhere to hand hygiene policies. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued a guideline for hand hygiene practices in 2002. Multifaceted approaches to improve hand hygiene have been shown to increase compliance among healthcare workers and subsequently reduce infections. A performance improvement project was initiated to implement this guideline and other strategies to prevent nosocomial infection. This article summarizes the performance improvement processes and the preliminary outcomes on adherence to infection prevention policies related to hand hygiene and isolation practices. Clinically and statistically significant increases were noted for hand hygiene prior to patient care and in wearing masks when indicated. Nurses and patient care technicians had the greatest increases in compliance. Increases in hand hygiene after patient contact and wearing of gown and gloves were also noted, but results were not statistically significant. Nosocomial infection rates from antibiotic-resistant organisms decreased in the first surveillance, but rates increased during the 1-year surveillance. Consumption of alcohol-based foam disinfectant doubled from baseline. Findings are consistent with other published studies. The project will continue with further reinforcement and education over the second year.

  17. Study protocol: Audit and Best Practice for Chronic Disease Extension (ABCDE Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thompson Sandra

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A growing body of international literature points to the importance of a system approach to improve the quality of care in primary health care settings. Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI concepts and techniques provide a theoretically coherent and practical way for primary care organisations to identify, address, and overcome the barriers to improvements. The Audit and Best Practice for Chronic Disease (ABCD study, a CQI-based quality improvement project conducted in Australia's Northern Territory, has demonstrated significant improvements in primary care service systems, in the quality of clinical service delivery and in patient outcomes related to chronic illness care. The aims of the extension phase of this study are to examine factors that influence uptake and sustainability of this type of CQI activity in a variety of Indigenous primary health care organisations in Australia, and to assess the impact of collaborative CQI approaches on prevention and management of chronic illness and health outcomes in Indigenous communities. Methods/design The study will be conducted in 40–50 Indigenous community health centres from 4 States/Territories (Northern Territory, Western Australia, New South Wales and Queensland over a five year period. The project will adopt a participatory, quality improvement approach that features annual cycles of: 1 organisational system assessment and audits of clinical records; 2 feedback to and interpretation of results with participating health centre staff; 3 action planning and goal setting by health centre staff to achieve system changes; and 4 implementation of strategies for change. System assessment will be carried out using a System Assessment Tool and in-depth interviews of key informants. Clinical audit tools include two essential tools that focus on diabetes care audit and preventive service audit, and several optional tools focusing on audits of hypertension, heart disease, renal

  18. The Hybrid Management Model: Influences of Organizational Structure and IT Project Management Practices on the Performance of Federal IT Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Celine A.

    2012-01-01

    The federal government spends much money on information technology (IT) projects each year, yet numerous IT projects continue to underperform. For instance, in Fiscal Year 2008, OMB and federal agencies identified approximately 413 IT projects ($25.2 billion) as being poorly planned, poorly performing, or both. Agencies struggle to implement sound…

  19. People's knowledge and practice about dengue, its vectors, and control means in Brasilia (DF), Brazil: its relevance with entomological factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dégallier, N; Vilarinhos, P T; de Carvalho, M S; Knox, M B; Caetano, J

    2000-06-01

    In South America, the epidemiology and ecology of dengue fever are strongly associated with human habits because the vector Aedes aegypti is strictly urban. Thus, the evaluation of people's knowledge and practice (PKP) is of great importance to improve integrated control measures. A PKP evaluation has been done in a suburb of Brasilia. Thirty questions were submitted to 130 habitants about income level, education, sources of information, specific knowledge about dengue, vector biology, and control measures applied. Other questions were about the responsibility of dengue control and the opportunity of applying a fine to people who would not cooperate with the control measures. Level of PKP was fairly high, either for housekeepers, workers, or students. The mosquito bite was cited as source of infection by 60.8% of interviewed people but 22.3% had no knowledge about this topic. The most cited symptoms in association with dengue were fever (73.1%), headache (66.2%), and rash (35.4%). Knowledge about mosquito biology and control was also fairly accurate, as demonstrated by 96.9% of answers. Elimination of water containers was the most efficient means according to 73% of people. Such action should be done mainly by the citizen (75.3% of answers). Despite the good PKP, correlations existed only between the PKP about vector biology and presence of potential breeding containers in March, and between the PKP about the disease and potential breeding containers in April. In conclusion, global educational campaigns may have a real impact on the PKP but this did not result in effective control of the mosquito breeding containers by the people.

  20. Advances and Best Practices in Airborne Gravimetry from the U.S. GRAV-D Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Theresa; Childers, Vicki; Preaux, Sandra; Holmes, Simon; Weil, Carly

    2013-04-01

    The Gravity for the Redefinition of the American Vertical Datum (GRAV-D) project, an official policy of the U.S. National Geodetic Survey as of 2007, is working to survey the entire U.S. and its holdings with high-altitude airborne gravimetry. The goal of the project is to provide a consistent, high-quality gravity dataset that will become the cornerstone of a new gravimetric geoid and national vertical datum in 2022. Over the last five years, the GRAV-D project has surveyed more than 25% of the country, accomplishing almost 500 flights on six different aircraft platforms and producing more than 3.7 Million square km of data thus far. This wealth of experience has led to advances in the collection, processing, and evaluation of high-altitude (20,000 - 35,000 ft) airborne gravity data. This presentation will highlight the most important practical and theoretical advances of the GRAV-D project, giving an introduction to each. Examples of innovation include: 1. Use of navigation grade inertial measurement unit data and precise lever arm measurements for positioning; 2. New quality control tests and software for near real-time analysis of data in the field; 3. Increased accuracy of gravity post-processing by reexamining assumptions and simplifications that were inconsistent with a goal of 1 mGal precision; and 4. Better final data evaluation through crossovers, additional statistics, and inclusion of airborne data into harmonic models that use EGM08 as a base model. The increases in data quality that resulted from implementation of the above advances (and others) will be shown with a case study of the GRAV-D 2008 southern Alaska survey near Anchorage, over Cook Inlet. The case study's statistics and comparisons to global models illustrate the impact that these advances have had on the final airborne gravity data quality. Finally, the presentation will summarize the best practices identified by the project from its last five years of experience.

  1. Reconstruction of computed tomographic image from a few x-ray projections by means of accelerative gradient method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Fujio; Yamaguchi, Shoichiro

    1982-01-01

    A method of the reconstruction of computed tomographic images was proposed to reduce the exposure dose to X-ray. The method is the small number of X-ray projection method by accelerative gradient method. The procedures of computation are described. The algorithm of these procedures is simple, the convergence of the computation is fast, and the required memory capacity is small. Numerical simulation was carried out to conform the validity of this method. A sample of simple shape was considered, projection data were given, and the images were reconstructed from 6 views. Good results were obtained, and the method is considered to be useful. (Kato, T.)

  2. Quality improvement training for core medical and general practice trainees: a pilot study of project participation, completion and journal publication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNab, Duncan; McKay, John; Bowie, Paul

    2015-11-01

    Small-scale quality improvement projects are expected to make a significant contribution towards improving the quality of healthcare. Enabling doctors-in-training to design and lead quality improvement projects is important preparation for independent practice. Participation is mandatory in speciality training curricula. However, provision of training and ongoing support in quality improvement methods and practice is variable. We aimed to design and deliver a quality improvement training package to core medical and general practice specialty trainees and evaluate impact in terms of project participation, completion and publication in a healthcare journal. A quality improvement training package was developed and delivered to core medical trainees and general practice specialty trainees in the west of Scotland encompassing a 1-day workshop and mentoring during completion of a quality improvement project over 3 months. A mixed methods evaluation was undertaken and data collected via questionnaire surveys, knowledge assessment, and formative assessment of project proposals, completed quality improvement projects and publication success. Twenty-three participants attended the training day with 20 submitting a project proposal (87%). Ten completed quality improvement projects (43%), eight were judged as satisfactory (35%), and four were submitted and accepted for journal publication (17%). Knowledge and confidence in aspects of quality improvement improved during the pilot, while early feedback on project proposals was valued (85.7%). This small study reports modest success in training core medical trainees and general practice specialty trainees in quality improvement. Many gained knowledge of, confidence in and experience of quality improvement, while journal publication was shown to be possible. The development of educational resources to aid quality improvement project completion and mentoring support is necessary if expectations for quality improvement are to be

  3. Massachusetts Institute of Technology School of Chemical Engineering Practice, Brookhaven station: Summary of projects, 1983-1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-11-01

    The MIT Graduate School of Chemical Engineering Practice stresses engineering problem solving. The Practice School program, as it is commonly called, develops in a unique and particularly effective way the student's ability to apply fundamentals to problems in the chemical industry and thus accelerates one's professional development. The themes of atomization, emthanol production and utilization, hydrogen production and compression, localized electrochemical corrosion and biochemical engineering reflect some of the major programs at the Laboratory. The titles of all the projects are listed in chronological order in the index at the end of this document. Brief summaries are presented for each project with related projects grouped together

  4. Assessing the Potential of Social Networks as a Means for Information Diffusion the Weatherization Experiences (WE) Project.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, Erin M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hawkins, Beth A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-04-01

    In April 2009, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) formally tasked Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) with conducting two impact and process evaluations of DOE’s Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP), known as the retrospective and American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) period evaluations, respectively. The former focused on WAP Program Year (PY) 2008, which covers the period from April 2008 to June 2009. The latter focused on PY 2010. This report presents in-depth analyses from ORNL’s social network study, the Weatherization Experiences (WE) Project, an exploratory study conducted as part of the ARRA period WAP evaluation. The WE Project explored the potential for WAP recipients and staff to influence energy savings beyond their homes and day jobs. Several studies conducted through ORNL’s evaluation of WAP found that the program has the ability to profoundly impact the lives of the people it serves (Tonn et al. 2014b). Recipients of WAP provided statements ranging from the newfound ability to pay utility bills and prescription medication to reduced emergency department visits for asthma and medical conditions associated with thermal stress. Through this exploratory research project, the stories of hundreds of weatherization recipients and providers were documented. The WE Project was designed to further investigate whether or not shared experiences with weatherization have the power to stimulate home energy saving action within an individual’s social network.

  5. How Christians reconcile their personal political views and the teachings of their faith: projection as a means of dissonance reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ross, L.D.; Lelkes, Y.; Russell, A.G.

    2012-01-01

    The present study explores the dramatic projection of one's own views onto those of Jesus among conservative and liberal American Christians. In a large-scale survey, the relevant views that each group attributed to a contemporary Jesus differed almost as much as their own views. Despite such

  6. A survey of quality assurance practices in biomedical open source software projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koru, Günes; El Emam, Khaled; Neisa, Angelica; Umarji, Medha

    2007-05-07

    Open source (OS) software is continuously gaining recognition and use in the biomedical domain, for example, in health informatics and bioinformatics. Given the mission critical nature of applications in this domain and their potential impact on patient safety, it is important to understand to what degree and how effectively biomedical OS developers perform standard quality assurance (QA) activities such as peer reviews and testing. This would allow the users of biomedical OS software to better understand the quality risks, if any, and the developers to identify process improvement opportunities to produce higher quality software. A survey of developers working on biomedical OS projects was conducted to examine the QA activities that are performed. We took a descriptive approach to summarize the implementation of QA activities and then examined some of the factors that may be related to the implementation of such practices. Our descriptive results show that 63% (95% CI, 54-72) of projects did not include peer reviews in their development process, while 82% (95% CI, 75-89) did include testing. Approximately 74% (95% CI, 67-81) of developers did not have a background in computing, 80% (95% CI, 74-87) were paid for their contributions to the project, and 52% (95% CI, 43-60) had PhDs. A multivariate logistic regression model to predict the implementation of peer reviews was not significant (likelihood ratio test = 16.86, 9 df, P = .051) and neither was a model to predict the implementation of testing (likelihood ratio test = 3.34, 9 df, P = .95). Less attention is paid to peer review than testing. However, the former is a complementary, and necessary, QA practice rather than an alternative. Therefore, one can argue that there are quality risks, at least at this point in time, in transitioning biomedical OS software into any critical settings that may have operational, financial, or safety implications. Developers of biomedical OS applications should invest more effort

  7. Project delivery system (PDS)

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    As business environments become increasingly competitive, companies seek more comprehensive solutions to the delivery of their projects. "Project Delivery System: Fourth Edition" describes the process-driven project delivery systems which incorporates the best practices from Total Quality and is aligned with the Project Management Institute and ISO Quality Standards is the means by which projects are consistently and efficiently planned, executed and completed to the satisfaction of clients and customers.

  8. The experience of Australian project leaders in encouraging practitioners to adopt research evidence in their clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Amanda J; Davies, Jan; Willet, Michaela R

    2006-11-01

    This paper describes a qualitative program evaluation which sought to identify factors that either assist or impede the adoption of clinical evidence in everyday practice. Thirteen Australian projects were funded in a competitive grant program to adopt innovative strategies to improve the uptake of research evidence in everyday clinical practice. Project leaders' reports were analysed to collate common themes related to 1) critical elements in successful application of research knowledge, 2) barriers to implementing evidence, and 3) lessons for other organisations that might implement a similar project. Despite the diversity of the methods used to establish projects and the range of topics and clinical settings, many similarities were identified in the perceived critical success elements, barriers, and lessons for adopting clinical evidence. Eighteen themes emerged across the data including: leadership support; key stakeholder involvement; practice changes; communication; resources; education of staff; evaluation of outcomes; consumers; knowledge gaps; adoption/implementing staff; access to knowledge; risk assessment; collaboration; effectiveness of clinical research evidence; structure/organisation; cultural barriers; previous experiences; and information technology. Leaders of projects to adopt evidence in clinical practice identified barriers, critical success elements and lessons that impacted on their projects. A range of influences on the adoption of evidence were identified, and this knowledge can be used to assist others undertaking similar projects.

  9. Empowerment in practice - insights from CITI-SENSE project in Ljubljana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Johanna; Kocman, David; Smolnikar, Miha; Mohorčič, Miha; Horvat, Milena

    2014-05-01

    We present specifics of the citizen empowerment and crowd sourced citizen science conducted in Ljubljana, Slovenia, as one of the case study cities within the ongoing EU-project CITI-SENSE. CITI-SENSE addresses urban air quality and rests on three pillars: technological platforms for distributed monitoring; novel information and communication technologies; and citizen participation. In the project, empowerment initiatives are conducted, enabling citizens to participate in various aspects of urban air quality, both outdoor and indoor at schools affecting everyday life of societal groups. Each participating country runs its own citizen empowerment campaign adapting to local circumstances. In addition to Ljubljana, local campaigns have been initiated in Barcelona, Belgrade, Edinburgh, Haifa, Ljubljana, Oslo, Ostrava, Vienna and in Vitoria. Poor air quality has been recognized as an important factor affecting the quality of life, especially in urban environments. In Ljubljana specifically, the main air pollution sources are traffic-related emissions, individual house heating devices including increased use of coal and biomass in recent years, and to a limit extent industrial point sources and waste disposal sites. Air quality can be occasionally very poor due to specific climatic conditions owing partially to its location in a basin and on the marshes, resulting in a very complex circulation of air masses, temperature inversions and formation of urban heat island. By recognizing this, we established the main stakeholders in the city who are responsible for monitoring the quality of air in Ljubljana. Based on full stakeholder analysis we consider co-operation with local governmental- and non-governmental institutions with already established means of communications with citizens, as a tool for empowerment. Since we spend over 90% of our time indoors, the indoor air quality is of great importance. It is why the CITI-SENSE project empowerment initiatives also cover this

  10. Radiological release criteria at the Fernald Environmental Management Project theory and practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehrter, R.W.

    1995-01-01

    As environmental restoration activities progress at the DOE's Fernald site, and across the country, large volumes of radioactive scrap metal (RSM) are being generated. Despite the existence of ''free-release'' guidelines from DOE. The strategy of onsite decontamination and release of RSM for unrestricted use has been generally overlooked in recent years. A pilot project was completed at Fernald in which 120 tons of RSM were decontaminated onsite and released for unrestricted use. This paper compares that strategy to more traditional DOE RSM management practices. Many options exist for managing RSM. DOE orders dictate that contractors demonstrate flexibility in utilizing a combination of techniques to optimize the benefits of waste management activates. The FERMCO Recycling Department led an effort to provide their customer with an economical alternative to the traditional approach of burying contaminated metal as LLW, based on established DOE free-release guidelines

  11. Ecology, ethics, and professional environmental practice: The Yucca Mountain, Nevada, project as a case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malone, C.R.

    1995-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to develop a geologic repository for disposing of high-level nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. In this commentary, the ecology program for the DOE's Yucca Mountain Project is discussed from the perspective of state-of-the-art ecosystem analysis, environmental ethics, and standards of professional practice. Specifically at issue is the need by the Yucca Mountain ecology program to adopt an ecosystem approach that encompasses the current strategy based on population biology and community ecology alone. The premise here is that an ecosystem approach is essential for assessing the long-term potential environmental impacts at Yucca Mountain in light of the thermal effects expected to be associated with heat from radioactive decay

  12. Contribution of the ARCAL XX/IAEA project to improvement of radiation safety in medical practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina Gironzini, E.

    2001-01-01

    The objectives of the ARCAL XX Project: 'Guidelines on Control of Radiation Sources' (1997-2000) are to promote an effective control of the radiation sources used in medicine, industrial and research applications, harmonising and updating existing procedures within Latin American, adopting the International Basic Safety Standards, in order to avoid unnecessary expositions limiting the probability of accidents occurrence. Nine countries participate with experts in the development of guidelines based in the regional experience. The guidelines contain Radiological Safety Requirements, Guide for Authorisation Application and Inspections Procedures. At this moment, there are guidelines for Radiotherapy, Nuclear Medicine and Diagnostic Radiology. The implementation of these guidelines will improve the effectiveness of regulatory control of radiation sources in Latin American and the radiological protection in aspects of occupational, medical, public and potential exposure. This document presents the experience in the development of these guidelines and their contribution for elaborating national regulations in medical practices. (author) [es

  13. A practical introduction to tensor networks: Matrix product states and projected entangled pair states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orús, Román, E-mail: roman.orus@uni-mainz.de

    2014-10-15

    This is a partly non-technical introduction to selected topics on tensor network methods, based on several lectures and introductory seminars given on the subject. It should be a good place for newcomers to get familiarized with some of the key ideas in the field, specially regarding the numerics. After a very general introduction we motivate the concept of tensor network and provide several examples. We then move on to explain some basics about Matrix Product States (MPS) and Projected Entangled Pair States (PEPS). Selected details on some of the associated numerical methods for 1d and 2d quantum lattice systems are also discussed. - Highlights: • A practical introduction to selected aspects of tensor network methods is presented. • We provide analytical examples of MPS and 2d PEPS. • We provide basic aspects on several numerical methods for MPS and 2d PEPS. • We discuss a number of applications of tensor network methods from a broad perspective.

  14. Practical Insights from Initial Studies Related to Human Error Analysis Project (HEAP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Follesoe, Knut; Kaarstad, Magnhild; Droeivoldsmo, Asgeir; Hollnagel, Erik; Kirwan; Barry

    1996-01-01

    This report presents practical insights made from an analysis of the three initial studies in the Human Error Analysis Project (HEAP), and the first study in the US NRC Staffing Project. These practical insights relate to our understanding of diagnosis in Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) emergency scenarios and, in particular, the factors that influence whether a diagnosis will succeed or fail. The insights reported here focus on three inter-related areas: (1) the diagnostic strategies and styles that have been observed in single operator and team-based studies; (2) the qualitative aspects of the key operator support systems, namely VDU interfaces, alarms, training and procedures, that have affected the outcome of diagnosis; and (3) the overall success rates of diagnosis and the error types that have been observed in the various studies. With respect to diagnosis, certain patterns have emerged from the various studies, depending on whether operators were alone or in teams, and on their familiarity with the process. Some aspects of the interface and alarm systems were found to contribute to diagnostic failures while others supported performance and recovery. Similar results were found for training and experience. Furthermore, the availability of procedures did not preclude the need for some diagnosis. With respect to HRA and PSA, it was possible to record the failure types seen in the studies, and in some cases to give crude estimates of the failure likelihood for certain scenarios. Although these insights are interim in nature, they do show the type of information that can be derived from these studies. More importantly, they clarify aspects of our understanding of diagnosis in NPP emergencies, including implications for risk assessment, operator support systems development, and for research into diagnosis in a broader range of fields than the nuclear power industry. (author)

  15. Cultivating Critical Reflection: Educators Making Sense and Meaning of Professional Identity and Relational Dynamics in Complex Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Ann

    2017-01-01

    Critical reflection underpins socially just and inclusive practices that are distinguishing features of democratic learning communities. Critical reflection supports educators' interrogation of the underlying assumptions, intentions, values and beliefs that shape their worldview and sociocultural standpoint. Dominant sociocultural norms…

  16. Practical implications of procedures developed in IDEA project - Comparison with traditional methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrasi, A.; Bouvier, C.; Brandl, A.; De Carlan, L.; Fischer, H.; Franck, D.; Hoellriegl, V.; Li, W. B.; Oeh, U.; Ritt, J.; Roth, P.; Schlagbauer, M.; Schmitzer, Ch; Wahl, W.; Zombori, P.

    2007-01-01

    The idea of the IDEA project aimed to improve assessment of incorporated radionuclides through developments of more reliable and possibly faster in vivo and bioassay monitoring techniques and making use of such enhancements for improvements in routine monitoring. In direct in vivo monitoring technique the optimum choice of the detectors to be applied for different monitoring tasks has been investigated in terms of material, size and background in order to improve conditions namely to increase counting efficiency and reduce background. Detailed studies have been performed to investigate the manifold advantageous applications and capabilities of numerical simulation method for the calibration and optimisation of in vivo counting systems. This calibration method can be advantageously applied especially in the measurement of low-energy photon emitting radionuclides, where individual variability is a significant source of uncertainty. In bioassay measurements the use of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) can improve considerably both the measurement speed and the lower limit of detection currently achievable with alpha spectrometry for long-lived radionuclides. The work carried out in this project provided detailed guidelines for optimum performance of the technique of ICP-MS applied mainly for the determination of uranium and thorium nuclides in the urine including sampling procedure, operational parameters of the instruments and interpretation of the measured data. The paper demonstrates the main advantages of investigated techniques in comparison with the performances of methods commonly applied in routine monitoring practice. (authors)

  17. A proposal to improve ecological compensation practice in road and railway projects in Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villarroya, Ana, E-mail: avillarroya@alumni.unav.es; Puig, Jordi, E-mail: jpbaguer@unav.es

    2013-09-15

    To reduce ecological impacts caused by development projects, avoidance, minimization and compensation techniques have to be taken together into consideration along Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) procedures. This paper explores the particular role that ecological compensation has had in recent road and railway EIA procedures in Spain, as seen through the review of a set of recent EIA Records of Decision (RODs) that confirms precedent findings. Noticing that residual impacts are not paid much attention, and that there is no evidence of a solid public participation in ecological impact evaluation, it proposes to increase the awareness on residual impacts, as a way to make easier public access to the allegedly most sensitive moment of EIA implementation: (residual) impact evaluation. -- Highlights: ► Ecological compensation practice in Spain is much lower than avoidance or mitigation. ► Residual impacts are overlooked in EIA processes and public participation is low. ► An increased awareness of residual impacts may also promote public participation. ► Current context needs these small steps to move towards better compensation practice.

  18. Preoperative fasting among burns patients in an acute care setting: a best practice implementation project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliani, Sara; McArthur, Alexa; Greenwood, John

    2015-11-01

    Major burn injury patients commonly fast preoperatively before multiple surgical procedures. The Societies of Anesthesiology in Europe and the United States recommend fasting from clear fluids for two hours and solids for six to eight hours preoperatively. However, at the Royal Adelaide Hospital, patients often fast from midnight proceeding the day of surgery. This project aims to promote evidence-based practice to minimize extended preoperative fasting in major burn patients. A baseline audit was conducted measuring the percentage compliance with audit criteria, specifically on preoperative fasting documentation and appropriate instructions in line with evidence-based guidelines. Strategies were then implemented to address areas of non-compliance, which included staff education, development of documentation tools and completion of a perioperative feeding protocol for major burn patients. Following this, a post implementation audit assessed the extent of change compared with the baseline audit results. Education on evidence-based fasting guidelines was delivered to 54% of staff. This resulted in a 19% improvement in compliance with fasting documentation and a 52% increase in adherence to appropriate evidence-based instructions. There was a notable shift from the most common fasting instruction being "fast from midnight" to "fast from 03:00 hours", with an overall four-hour reduction in fasting per theater admission. These results demonstrate that education improves compliance with documentation and preoperative fasting that is more reflective of evidence-based practice. Collaboration with key stakeholders and a hospital wide fasting protocol is warranted to sustain change and further advance compliance with evidence-based practice at an organizational level.

  19. Mean and extreme temperatures in a warming climate: EURO CORDEX and WRF regional climate high-resolution projections for Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Rita M.; Soares, Pedro M. M.; Lima, Daniela C. A.; Miranda, Pedro M. A.

    2018-02-01

    Large temperature spatio-temporal gradients are a common feature of Mediterranean climates. The Portuguese complex topography and coastlines enhances such features, and in a small region large temperature gradients with high interannual variability is detected. In this study, the EURO-CORDEX high-resolution regional climate simulations (0.11° and 0.44° resolutions) are used to investigate the maximum and minimum temperature projections across the twenty-first century according to RCP4.5 and RCP8.5. An additional WRF simulation with even higher resolution (9 km) for RCP8.5 scenario is also examined. All simulations for the historical period (1971-2000) are evaluated against the available station observations and the EURO-CORDEX model results are ranked in order to build multi-model ensembles. In present climate models are able to reproduce the main topography/coast related temperature gradients. Although there are discernible differences between models, most present a cold bias. The multi-model ensembles improve the overall representation of the temperature. The ensembles project a significant increase of the maximum and minimum temperatures in all seasons and scenarios. Maximum increments of 8 °C in summer and autumn and between 2 and 4 °C in winter and spring are projected in RCP8.5. The temperature distributions for all models show a significant increase in the upper tails of the PDFs. In RCP8.5 more than half of the extended summer (MJJAS) has maximum temperatures exceeding the historical 90th percentile and, on average, 60 tropical nights are projected for the end of the century, whilst there are only 7 tropical nights in the historical period. Conversely, the number of cold days almost disappears. The yearly average number of heat waves increases by seven to ninefold by 2100 and the most frequent length rises from 5 to 22 days throughout the twenty-first century. 5% of the longest events will last for more than one month. The amplitude is overwhelming

  20. Evidence utilisation project: Management of inadvertent perioperative hypothermia. The challenges of implementing best practice recommendations in the perioperative environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munday, Judy; Hines, Sonia Jane; Chang, Anne M

    2013-12-01

    The prevention of inadvertent perioperative hypothermia (IPH) remains an important issue in perioperative healthcare. The aims of this project were to: (i) assess current clinical practice in the management of IPH and (ii) promote best practice in the management of IPH in adult operating theatres. This project from August 2010 to March 2012 utilised a system of audit and feedback to implement best practice recommendations. Data were collected via chart audits against criteria developed from best practice recommendations for managing IPH. Evidence-based best practices, such as consistent temperature monitoring and patient warming, were implemented using multifaceted interventions. Perioperative records for 73 patients (baseline) and 72 patients (post-implementation) were audited. Post-implementation audit showed an increase in patients with temperatures >36°C admitted to the post-anaesthetic care unit (PACU) (8%) and discharged from PACU (28%). The percentage of patients receiving preoperative temperature monitoring increased (38%); however, low levels of intraoperative monitoring remained (31% of patients with surgery of 30 min or longer duration). Small increases were found in patient warming of 5% intraoperatively and 8% postoperatively. Preoperative warming was not successfully implemented during this phase of the project. Temperature monitoring, warming and rates of normothermia improved; however, barriers to best practice of IPH management were experienced, which negatively impacted on the project. Further stages of implementation and audit were added to further address IPH management in this department. © 2013 The Authors. International Journal of Evidence-Based Healthcare © 2013 The Joanna Briggs Institute.

  1. Assessment and management of burn pain at the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital: a best practice implementation project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayuo, Jonathan; Munn, Zachary; Campbell, Jared

    2017-09-01

    Pain management is a significant issue in health facilities in Ghana. For burn patients, this is even more challenging as burn pain has varied facets. Despite the existence of pharmacological agents for pain management, complaints of pain still persist. The aim of this project was to identify pain management practices in the burns units of Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, compare these approaches to best practice, and implement strategies to enhance compliance to standards. Ten evidence-based audit criteria were developed from evidence summaries. Using the Joanna Briggs Institute Practical Application of Clinical Evidence Software (PACES), a baseline audit was undertaken on a convenience sample of ten patients from the day of admission to the seventh day. Thereafter, the Getting Research into Practice (GRiP) component of PACES was used to identify barriers, strategies, resources and outcomes. After implementation of the strategies, a follow-up audit was undertaken using the same sample size and audit criteria. The baseline results showed poor adherence to best practice. However, following implementation of strategies, including ongoing professional education and provision of assessment tools and protocols, compliance rates improved significantly. Atlhough the success of this project was almost disrupted by an industrial action, collaboration with external bodies enabled the successful completion of the project. Pain management practices in the burns unit improved at the end of the project which reflects the importance of an audit process, education, providing feedback, group efforts and effective collaboration.

  2. How Christians reconcile their personal political views and the teachings of their faith: Projection as a means of dissonance reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Lee D.; Lelkes, Yphtach; Russell, Alexandra G.

    2012-01-01

    The present study explores the dramatic projection of one's own views onto those of Jesus among conservative and liberal American Christians. In a large-scale survey, the relevant views that each group attributed to a contemporary Jesus differed almost as much as their own views. Despite such dissonance-reducing projection, however, conservatives acknowledged the relevant discrepancy with regard to “fellowship” issues (e.g., taxation to reduce economic inequality and treatment of immigrants) and liberals acknowledged the relevant discrepancy with regard to “morality” issues (e.g., abortion and gay marriage). However, conservatives also claimed that a contemporary Jesus would be even more conservative than themselves on the former issues whereas liberals claimed that Jesus would be even more liberal than themselves on the latter issues. Further reducing potential dissonance, liberal and conservative Christians differed markedly in the types of issues they claimed to be more central to their faith. A concluding discussion considers the relationship between individual motivational processes and more social processes that may underlie the present findings, as well as implications for contemporary social and political conflict. PMID:22308413

  3. How Christians reconcile their personal political views and the teachings of their faith: projection as a means of dissonance reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Lee D; Lelkes, Yphtach; Russell, Alexandra G

    2012-03-06

    The present study explores the dramatic projection of one's own views onto those of Jesus among conservative and liberal American Christians. In a large-scale survey, the relevant views that each group attributed to a contemporary Jesus differed almost as much as their own views. Despite such dissonance-reducing projection, however, conservatives acknowledged the relevant discrepancy with regard to "fellowship" issues (e.g., taxation to reduce economic inequality and treatment of immigrants) and liberals acknowledged the relevant discrepancy with regard to "morality" issues (e.g., abortion and gay marriage). However, conservatives also claimed that a contemporary Jesus would be even more conservative than themselves on the former issues whereas liberals claimed that Jesus would be even more liberal than themselves on the latter issues. Further reducing potential dissonance, liberal and conservative Christians differed markedly in the types of issues they claimed to be more central to their faith. A concluding discussion considers the relationship between individual motivational processes and more social processes that may underlie the present findings, as well as implications for contemporary social and political conflict.

  4. Multi-model Mean Nitrogen and Sulfur Deposition from the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP): Evaluation of Historical and Projected Future Changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Dentener, Frank; McConnell, J.R.; Ro, C-U; Shaw, Mark; Vet, Robert; Bergmann, D.; Cameron-Smith, Philip; Dalsoren, S.; Doherty, R.; Faluvegi, G.; Ghan, Steven J.; Josse, B.; Lee, Y. H.; MacKenzie, I. A.; Plummer, David; Shindell, Drew; Skeie, R. B.; Stevenson, D. S.; Strode, S.; Zeng, G.; Curran, M.; Dahl-Jensen, D.; Das, S.; Fritzsche, D.; Nolan, M.

    2013-08-20

    We present multi-model global datasets of nitrogen and sulfate deposition covering time periods from 1850 to 2100, calculated within the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP). The computed deposition fluxes are compared to surface wet deposition and ice-core measurements. We use a new dataset of wet deposition for 2000-2002 based on critical assessment of the quality of existing regional network data. We show that for present-day (year 2000 ACCMIP time-slice), the ACCMIP results perform similarly to previously published multi-model assessments. The analysis of changes between 1980 and 2000 indicates significant differences between model and measurements over the United States, but less so over Europe. This difference points towards misrepresentation of 1980 NH3 emissions over North America. Based on ice-core records, the 1850 deposition fluxes agree well with Greenland ice cores but the change between 1850 and 2000 seems to be overestimated in the Northern Hemisphere for both nitrogen and sulfur species. Using the Representative Concentration Pathways to define the projected climate and atmospheric chemistry related emissions and concentrations, we find large regional nitrogen deposition increases in 2100 in Latin America, Africa and parts of Asia under some of the scenarios considered. Increases in South Asia are especially large, and are seen in all scenarios, with 2100 values more than double 2000 in some scenarios and reaching >1300 mgN/m2/yr averaged over regional to continental scale regions in RCP 2.6 and 8.5, ~30-50% larger than the values in any region currently (2000). Despite known issues, the new ACCMIP deposition dataset provides novel, consistent and evaluated global gridded deposition fields for use in a wide range of climate and ecological studies.

  5. Groundwork for Kant’s Practical Philosophy: Construction and Meaning of the Work "Groundwork for the Metaphysics of Morals"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Gretić

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In the article, the author provides a systematic analysis and interpretation of Kant’s major work ‘Groundwork for the Metaphysics of Morals’. The author demonstrates that Kant viewed his programme of founding a new kind of metaphysics as a distinctive unity of the practical and theoretical part of philosophy, i.e. a unity of pure practical reason with speculative reason. It is already manifested in the original common assumption of the ‘Groundwork’, because ‘at the end there can only be one and the same reason that can be diff erent only in its application’.

  6. Dialogue on dialogues Multi-voiced dialogues (dialogism) as means for the co-production of knowledge in and on leadership communicative practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bager, Ann

    2013-01-01

    The article elaborates on a theoretical understanding of dialogue as a means for the co-production of knowledge in and on leadership communicative practices through ongoing research collaboration that involves leaders, researchers and master students at Aalborg University. Dialogue is viewed from...

  7. Identification of individual features in areal surface topography data by means of template matching and the ring projection transform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senin, Nicola; Moretti, Michele; Blunt, Liam A

    2014-01-01

    Starting from areal surface topography data as provided by current commercial three-dimensional (3D) profilometers and 3D digital microscopes, this work investigates the problem of automatically identifying and extracting functionally relevant, individual features within the acquisition area. Feature identification is achieved by adopting an original template-matching algorithmic procedure, based on applying the ring projection transform in combination with a parametric template. The proposed algorithmic procedure addresses in particular template-matching scenarios where significant variability may be associated with the features to be compared to the reference template. The algorithm is applied to a test case involving the characterization of the surface texture of a superabrasive polishing tool used in hard-disk manufacturing. (paper)

  8. Reconstruction of tomographic images from projections of a small number of views by means of mathematical programming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Fujio; Yamaguchi, Shoichiro

    1985-01-01

    Fundamental studies have been made on the application of mathematical programming to the reconstruction of tomographic images from projections of a small number of views without requiring any circular symmetry nor periodicity. Linear programming and quadratic programming were applied to minimize the quadratic sum of the residue and to finally obtain optimized reconstruction images. The mathematical algorithms were verified by the method of computer simulation, and the relationship between the number of picture elements and the number of iterations necessary for convergence was also investigated. The methods of linear programming and quadratic programming require fairly simple mathematical procedures, and strict solutions can be obtained within a finite number of iterations. Their only draw back is the requirement of a large quantity of computer memory. But this problem will be desolved by the advent of large fast memory devices in the near future. (Aoki, K.)

  9. Using cultural-historical activity theory to analyze social service practices evolving from the Norwegian HUSK projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foot, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    The HUSK projects catalyzed innovation in the practices of providing social services that could yield useful insights both within and outside of Norway if analyzed in these two ways: (a) retrospective analysis of the development of individual HUSK projects in light of their cultural-historical contexts, and (b) comparative analysis of the efforts to advance multi-sector collaboration in some of the HUSK projects. Such analyses require a practice-based research approach that takes into account culture and history. In this article the author explains how cultural-historical activity theory provides such an approach, illustrated via several HUSK cases. The author suggests five questions for future analyses of the HUSK projects and argues that insights gleaned from such analyses could contribute significantly to research on-and the provision of-social services.

  10. "Being an Artist You Kind of, I Mean, You Get Used to Excellence": Identity, Values and Fine Art Assessment Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Susan

    2011-01-01

    In this article I report on a study into fine art lecturers' assessment practices in higher education. This study explores the ways that lecturers bring themselves into the act of assessment (Hand & Clewes 2000). I interviewed twelve fine art lecturers who worked across six English universities. Lecturers were asked to relate to me how they…

  11. More than Social Media: Using Twitter with Preservice Teachers as a Means of Reflection and Engagement in Communities of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benko, Susanna L.; Guise, Megan; Earl, Casey E.; Gill, Witny

    2016-01-01

    English teacher education programs often look for ways to help preservice teachers engage in critical reflection, participate in communities of practice, and write for authentic audiences in order to be able to teach in the 21st century. In this article, the authors describe how they used Twitter to provide opportunities for reflection and…

  12. Climate change projections of West Nile virus infections in Europe: implications for blood safety practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenza, Jan C; Tran, Annelise; Espinosa, Laura; Sudre, Bertrand; Domanovic, Dragoslav; Paz, Shlomit

    2016-03-08

    West Nile virus (WNV) is transmitted by mosquitoes in both urban as well as in rural environments and can be pathogenic in birds, horses and humans. Extrinsic factors such as temperature and land use are determinants of WNV outbreaks in Europe, along with intrinsic factors of the vector and virus. With a multivariate model for WNV transmission we computed the probability of WNV infection in 2014, with July 2014 temperature anomalies. We applied the July temperature anomalies under the balanced A1B climate change scenario (mix of all energy sources, fossil and non-fossil) for 2025 and 2050 to model and project the risk of WNV infection in the future. Since asymptomatic infections are common in humans (which can result in the contamination of the donated blood) we estimated the predictive prevalence of WNV infections in the blood donor population. External validation of the probability model with 2014 cases indicated good prediction, based on an Area Under Curve (AUC) of 0.871 (SD = 0.032), on the Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve (ROC). The climate change projections for 2025 reveal a higher probability of WNV infection particularly at the edges of the current transmission areas (for example in Eastern Croatia, Northeastern and Northwestern Turkey) and an even further expansion in 2050. The prevalence of infection in (blood donor) populations in the outbreak-affected districts is expected to expand in the future. Predictive modelling of environmental and climatic drivers of WNV can be a valuable tool for public health practice. It can help delineate districts at risk for future transmission. These areas can be subjected to integrated disease and vector surveillance, outreach to the public and health care providers, implementation of personal protective measures, screening of blood donors, and vector abatement activities.

  13. Suicide and attempted suicide: epidemiological surveillance as a crucial means of a local suicide prevention project in Trento's Province.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Napoli, Wilma Angela; Della Rosa, Alberto

    2015-09-01

    The World Health Organization identifies suicide among the top 10 causes of death in many countries with an overall mortality rate of 16 per 100,000 inhabitants. Furthermore suicide attempts present a frequency 4-10 times greater than the suicidal events, representing also one of the main risk factors to lead to recurrent attempts of suicide. In 2008 the Autonomous Province of Trento launched a suicide prevention pogram called "Invitation to Life" which includes various interventions intended to counter the phenomenon of suicide in the region. Actually the epidemiological research upon the phenomenon of suicide in Trentino region is one of the main pillars of the project: it represents a fundamental requirement to identify risk and protective factors in the population in order to adopt more specific and effective preventive strategies. This article aims to present methods and instruments for epidemiological monitoring of suicide and attempted suicide which are applied in Trentino and to describe results after seven years from the beginning of the local prevention program "Invitation to life".

  14. The Bistrup Project: a comparison of floor-tiles from Medieval churches by means of neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Als Hansen, B.; Aaman Soerensen, M.; Heydorn, K.; Hoejslet Christensen, L.; Mejdahl, V.; Winther-Nielsen, M.; Conradsen, K.

    1982-01-01

    Medieval, decorated floor-tiles from a number of churches in and around Roskilde, Denmark, have been compared with identically ornamented wasters of floor-tiles found inside two kilns excavated at Bistrup near Roskilde and with clay from Bistrup and Oroe. For each sample the concentrations of 14 elements were determined by means of neutron activation analysis, and the results were submitted to a stepwise discriminant analysis. All floor-tile groups showed a distinct similarity to the groups of wasters and clay from Bistrup, and the result is thus compatible with the archaeological view that during the Medieval period Bistrup functioned as a production centre for tiles impregnated with these particular ornamentations. (author)

  15. What does it mean to be a 'picky eater'? A qualitative study of food related identities and practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Claire; Cummins, Steven; Brown, Tim; Kyle, Rosemary

    2015-01-01

    Picky eaters are defined as those who consume an inadequate variety of food through rejection of a substantial amount of food stuffs that are both familiar and unfamiliar. Picky eating is a relatively recent theoretical concept and while there is increasing concern within public health over the lack of diversity in some children's diets, adult picky eaters remain an under researched group. This paper reports on the findings of a qualitative study on the routine food choices and practices of 26 families in Sandwell, West Midlands, UK. Photo elicitation and go-along interview data collection methods were used to capture habitual food related behaviours and served to describe the practices of nine individuals who self identified or were described as picky eaters. A thematic analysis revealed that those with the food related identity of picky eater had very restricted diets and experienced strong emotional and physical reactions to certain foods. For some this could be a distressing and alienating experience that hindered their ability to engage in episodes of social eating. Further research is needed to illuminate the specific practices of adult picky eaters, how this impacts on their lives, and how possible interventions might seek to address the challenges they face. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Developing a research and practice tool to measure walkability: a demonstration project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles-Corti, Billie; Macaulay, Gus; Middleton, Nick; Boruff, Bryan; Bull, Fiona; Butterworth, Iain; Badland, Hannah; Mavoa, Suzanne; Roberts, Rebecca; Christian, Hayley

    2014-12-01

    Growing evidence shows that higher-density, mixed-use, pedestrian-friendly neighbourhoods encourage active transport, including transport-related walking. Despite widespread recognition of the benefits of creating more walkable neighbourhoods, there remains a gap between the rhetoric of the need for walkability and the creation of walkable neighbourhoods. Moreover, there is little objective data to benchmark the walkability of neighbourhoods within and between Australian cities in order to monitor planning and design intervention progress and to assess built environment and urban policy interventions required to achieve increased walkability. This paper describes a demonstration project that aimed to develop, trial and validate a 'Walkability Index Tool' that could be used by policy makers and practitioners to assess the walkability of local areas; or by researchers to access geospatial data assessing walkability. The overall aim of the project was to develop an automated geospatial tool capable of creating walkability indices for neighbourhoods at user-specified scales. The tool is based on open-source software architecture, within the Australian Urban Research Infrastructure Network (AURIN) framework, and incorporates key sub-component spatial measures of walkability (street connectivity, density and land use mix). Using state-based data, we demonstrated it was possible to create an automated walkability index. However, due to the lack of availability of consistent of national data measuring land use mix, at this stage it has not been possible to create a national walkability measure. The next stage of the project is to increase useability of the tool within the AURIN portal and to explore options for alternative spatial data sources that will enable the development of a valid national walkability index. AURIN's open-source Walkability Index Tool is a first step in demonstrating the potential benefit of a tool that could measure walkability across Australia. It

  17. Rapid biochemical functionalization of technical surfaces by means of a photobleaching-based maskless projection lithography process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldbaur, Ansgar; Waterkotte, Björn; Leuthold, Juerg; Schmitz, Katja; Rapp, Bastian E.

    2013-03-01

    MEMS/MOEMS based systems are increasingly applied in the biological and biomedical context, e.g. in form of biosensors or substrates for monitoring biological responses such as cell migration. For such applications, technical surfaces have to be provided with suitable biochemical functionalization. Typical functionalization procedures include wet-chemical techniques based on self-assembled monolayers of thiols on gold or silanes on glass. These processes create binary patterns and are often of limited use if spatially constrained non-binary patterns like surface bound biochemical gradients have to be provided. In order to create gradients or patterns, methods such as direct spotting or dip pen nanolithography can be used. Here, gradients can be emulated by varying the spot density or the concentration of the solutions employed. However, these methods are serial in nature and are thus of limited use if large surface areas have to be patterned. We present a technique to generate gradients of biochemical function by a photobleaching-based process allowing fast large-scale patterning. The process is based on photobleaching resulting in light-induced coupling of a fluorescently tagged biomolecule to a technical surface by concerted bleaching of the fluorophore. We custom designed a maskless projection lithography system based on a digital mirror device that allows the rapid creation of 8-bit grayscale protein patterns on any technical surface from digital data (e.g. bitmap files). We demonstrate how this process can be used to obtain patterns of several cm2 lateral size at micrometer resolution within minutes.

  18. Laboratorio di Comunicazione Militante, Isola Art Centre, and MACAO: enhancing autonomous social organisation through artistic means and rethinking the radical imaginary and the radical imagination in curatorial practice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aria Spinelli

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This article analyses the relation between curatorial practice and political theory, through a recuperation and proposal of the philosophical work of Greek-French philosopher Cornelius Castoriadis. In it, I will isolated the terms the radical imaginary and the radical imagination, and argue that their relation to curatorial practice is exemplified in the politics of cultural spaces that use autonomous social organisation as their means for artistic production. In his writings, specifically in his manuscript The Imaginary Institution of Society (1998, Castoriadis uses the terms to describe the capacity of socialized human beings to rethink and criticize social structures, and sees the radical imaginary and the radical imagination as means of a radical social transformation towards autonomy, or rather towards autonomous social organisation. Within this framework, this article proposes a historical parallelism between three self-organised platforms for art and activism from Milan, such as Laboratorio di Comunicazione Militante, Isola Art Centre, and MACAO, arguing that they are three cases in which autonomous social organisation is a means for artistic and curatorial production. This historical parallelism, constructed around the concepts of the radical imaginary and the radical imagination, demonstrates how the work of Castoriadis is a valuable resource for contextualising and analysing processes politicization of artistic, curatorial and cultural practices. Based on his writings, this article wants to also highlight the importance of autonomous social organisation as a functional framework capable unpacking the complexity of the relation between artistic, curatorial and cultural practices and political and social activism.

  19. How Is the Practice of Yoga Related to Weight Status? Population-Based Findings From Project EAT-IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne; MacLehose, Richard F; Watts, Allison W; Eisenberg, Marla E; Laska, Melissa N; Larson, Nicole

    2017-12-01

    Yoga may provide a strategy for healthy weight management in young adults. This study examined prevalence and characteristics of young adults' yoga practice and associations with changes in body mass index. Surveys were completed by 1830 young adults (31.1 ± 1.6 y) participating in Project EAT-IV. Cross-sectional and 5-year longitudinal analyses were conducted stratified by initial weight status. Two-thirds (66.5%) of nonoverweight women and 48.9% of overweight women reported ever doing yoga, while 27.2% of nonoverweight women and 16.4% of overweight women practiced regularly (≥30 min/wk). Fewer men practiced yoga. Among young adults practicing regularly (n = 294), differences were identified in intensity, type, and location of yoga practice across weight status. Young adults who were overweight and practiced yoga regularly showed a nonsignificant 5-year decrease in their body mass index (-0.60 kg/m 2 ; P = .49), whereas those not practicing regularly had significant increases in their body mass index (+1.37 kg/m 2 ; P yoga was inversely associated with weight gain among both overweight and nonoverweight young adults practicing yoga regularly. Young adults of different body sizes practice yoga. Yoga was associated with less weight gain over time, particularly in overweight young adults. Practicing yoga on a regular basis may help with weight gain prevention.

  20. PHOTOCITYTEX - A LIFE project on the air pollution treatment in European urban environments by means of photocatalytic textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ródenas, Milagros; Fages, Eduardo; Fatarella, Enrico; Herrero, David; Castagnoli, Lidia; Borrás, Esther; Vera, Teresa; Gómez, Tatiana; Carreño, Javier; López, Ramón; Gimeno, Cristina; Catota, Marlon; Muñoz, Amalia

    2016-04-01

    In urban areas, air pollution from traffic is becoming a growing problem. In recent years the use of titanium dioxide (TiO2) based photocatalytic self-cleaning and de-polluting materials has been considered to remove these pollutants. TiO2 is now commercially available and used in construction material or paints for environmental purposes. Further work, however, is still required to clarify the potential impacts from wider TiO2 use. Specific test conditions are required to provide objective and accurate knowledge. Under the LIFE PHOTOCITYTEX project, the effectiveness of using TiO2-based photocatalytic nanomaterials in building textiles as a way of improving the air quality in urban areas will be assessed. Moreover, information on secondary products formed during the tests will be obtained, yielding a better overall understanding of the whole process and its implications. For this purpose, a series of demonstrations are foreseen, comprising 1. lab-test and development of textile prototypes at lab scale, 2. larger scale demonstration of the use of photocatalytic textiles in the depollution of urban environments employing the EUPHORE chambers to simulate a number of environmental conditions of various European cities and 3. field demonstrations installing the photocatalytic textiles in two urban locations in Quart de Poblet, a tunnel and a school. A one-year extensive passive dosimetric campaign has already being carried out to characterize the selected urban sites before the installation of the photocatalytic textile prototypes, and a similar campaign after their installation is ongoing. Also, more comprehensive intensive active measurement campaigns have been conducted to account for winter and summer conditions. In parallel, lab-tests have already been completed to determine optimal photocatalytic formulations on textiles, followed by experiments at EUPHORE. Information on the deployment of the campaigns is given together with laboratory conclusions and first

  1. Understanding surface-water availability in the Central Valley as a means to projecting future groundwater storage with climate variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, J. P.; Cayan, D. R.

    2017-12-01

    surface water data are compiled. We can then develop groundwater pumping and storage predictions in real time, and make them available to water managers. In addition, we are working toward future projections by coupling the regional CVHM to downscaled GCM output to assess future scenarios of water availability in this critical region.

  2. Cost-Effective Business Practices of Schools in Massachusetts. A Collaborative Dissemination Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrimack Education Center, Chelmsford, MA.

    The verified successful business practices described in this booklet were being used by Massachusetts schools in the late 1970s. The practices have resulted in cost savings, are generally easy to replicate, and usually do not require major capital outlay. The practices listed are largely conservation practices or relate to food service management,…

  3. Prevention of DNA contamination during forensic medical examinations in a clinical forensic medical service: A best practice implementation project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Tasha

    2015-01-01

    Contamination of forensic specimens can have significant and detrimental effects on cases presented in court. In 2010 a wrongful conviction in Australia resulted in an inquiry with 25 recommendations to minimize the risk of DNA contamination of forensic specimens. DNA decontamination practices in a clinical forensic medical service currently attempt to comply with these recommendations. Evaluation of these practices has not been undertaken. The aim of this project was to audit the current DNA decontamination practices of forensic medical and nursing examiners in the forensic medical examination process and implement changes based on the audit findings. A re-audit following implementation would be undertaken to identify change and inform further research. The Joanna Briggs Institute's Practical Application of Clinical Evidence System and Getting Research into Practice were used as the audit tool in this project. A baseline audit was conducted; analysis of this audit process was then undertaken. Following education and awareness training targeted at clinicians, a re-audit was completed. There were a total of 24 audit criteria; the baseline audit reflected 20 of these criteria had 100% compliance. The remaining 4 audit criteria demonstrated compliance between 65% and 90%. Education and awareness training resulted in improved compliance in 2 of the 4 audit criteria, with the remaining 2 having unchanged compliance. The findings demonstrated that education and raising awareness can improve clinical practice; however there are also external factors outside the control of the clinicians that influence compliance with best practice.

  4. Students enabling students in a Student Partnership Project: A case study emerging from the OLT Transforming Practice Project on Student Partnerships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Kek

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This emerging initiative stemmed from an Office for Learning and Teaching Project (OLT project, Transforming Practice Programme 2016: Student Engagement: Students as Partners in Teaching and Learning. The initiative, trialed in semester two, 2016, involved the selection and training of two experienced students to be leaders of a Closed Facebook ‘students-only’ community which provided advice and triaged queries to appropriate channels. The evaluative processes comprised a participatory action research methodology. Two student leaders who facilitated the Closed Facebook and four academic staff of the project were the participants. The findings demonstrate that the Closed Facebook students-only site provided a safe space, outside the formal learning/classroom environment, where student participants were able to ask and share knowledge. The informal student-for-student learning community complemented the formal structure by facilitating the opportunity for students to become ‘experts’ as university students as they move-through their learning journey.

  5. Evaluation of a novel 7-joint ultrasound score in daily rheumatologic practice: a pilot project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backhaus, M; Ohrndorf, S; Kellner, H; Strunk, J; Backhaus, T M; Hartung, W; Sattler, H; Albrecht, K; Kaufmann, J; Becker, K; Sörensen, H; Meier, L; Burmester, G R; Schmidt, W A

    2009-09-15

    To introduce a new standardized ultrasound score based on 7 joints of the clinically dominant hand and foot (German US7 score) implemented in daily rheumatologic practice. The ultrasound score included the following joints of the clinically dominant hand and foot: wrist, second and third metacarpophalangeal and proximal interphalangeal, and second and fifth metatarsophalangeal joints. Synovitis and synovial/tenosynovial vascularity were scored semiquantitatively (grade 0-3) by gray-scale (GS) and power Doppler (PD) ultrasound. Tenosynovitis and erosions were scored for presence. The scoring range was 0-27 for GS synovitis, 0-39 for PD synovitis, 0-7 for GS tenosynovitis, 0-21 for PD tenosynovitis, and 0-14 for erosions. Patients with arthritis were examined at baseline and after the start or change of disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) and/or tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) inhibitor therapy 3 and 6 months later. C-reactive protein level, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, rheumatoid factor, anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide, Disease Activity Score in 28 joints (DAS28), and radiographs of the hands and feet were performed. One hundred twenty patients (76% women) with rheumatoid arthritis (91%) and psoriatic arthritis (9%) were enrolled. In 52 cases (43%), erosions were seen in radiography at baseline. Patients received DMARDs (41%), DMARDs plus TNFalpha inhibitors (41%), or TNFalpha inhibitor monotherapy (18%). At baseline, the mean DAS28 was 5.0 and the synovitis scores were 8.1 in GS ultrasound and 3.3 in PD ultrasound. After 6 months of therapy, the DAS28 significantly decreased to 3.6 (Delta = 1.4), and the GS and PD ultrasound scores significantly decreased to 5.5 (-32%) and 2.0 (-39%), respectively. The German US7 score is a viable tool for examining patients with arthritis in daily rheumatologic practice because it significantly reflects therapeutic response.

  6. Gaps between Beliefs, Perceptions, and Practices: The Every Teacher Project on LGBTQ-Inclusive Education in Canadian Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Catherine G.; Meyer, Elizabeth J.; Peter, Tracey; Ristock, Janice; Short, Donn; Campbell, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    The Every Teacher Project involved large-scale survey research conducted to identify the beliefs, perspectives, and practices of Kindergarten to Grade 12 educators in Canadian public schools regarding lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ)-inclusive education. Comparisons are made between LGBTQ and cisgender heterosexual…

  7. Reworking Practice through an AfL Project: An Analysis of Teachers' Collaborative Engagement with New Assessment Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermansen, Hege; Nerland, Monika

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the concept of Assessment for Learning (AfL) has travelled across countries, giving rise to a range of educational policy initiatives and school development projects. While researchers have focused on issues such as how formative assessment can support student learning and lead to more efficient classroom practices, less attention…

  8. Learning More about Those Who Play in Session: The National Play Therapy in Counseling Practices Project (Phase I)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Simone F.; LeBlanc, Michael; Mullen, Jodi Ann; Ray, Dee; Baggerly, Jennifer; White, JoAnna; Kaplan, David

    2007-01-01

    Through a joint research committee sponsored by the Association for Play Therapy (APT) and the American Counseling Association (ACA), The National Play Therapy in Counseling Practices Project conducted the first phase of investigation. Findings offered a snapshot of mental health providers of play therapy, regarding the nature of who they are and…

  9. Distance Learning Engineering Students Languish under Project-Based Learning, but Thrive in Case Studies and Practical Workshops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swart, Arthur James

    2016-01-01

    The International Engineering Alliance lists 12 important graduate attributes that students must demonstrate during their higher educational career. One of these important graduate attributes is the ability to solve problems, which can be demonstrated by the use of project-based learning, case studies, and practical workshops. The purpose of this…

  10. Meaning-making from CPD - developing practice in own classroom and as a peer in the local science PLC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Birgitte Lund

    . A multiple methods design with repeated observations and interviews was applied. Findings reveal a development over time with the teacher’s reflections in relation to teaching primary science growing to be more confident and personalized, including experiences from inquiry based projects in her own class......Continuous Professional Development (CPD) can be crucial in qualifying teaching, and student learning. Extant research suggests consensus pertaining to the core features of effective continuing professional development including content focus, active learning, coherence, duration, collaborative...... activities and collective participation. This paper present findings from a case-study in the frames of a a large scale, long term CPD program designed according to these criteria. Science teachers from 42 schools/5 municipalities participated from 2012-15 in CPD-activities changing rhythmically between...

  11. Exploring the Meanings that Dietitians Associate with their Role of Mother and Dietitian and How They Translate into Child-feeding Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, Rebecca; Lordly, Daphne

    2015-03-01

    To explore the meanings that dietitians associate with their role of mother and dietitian and how they translate into child-feeding practices. The ideological case-study approach of Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis, a qualitative research design, was utilized. A convenience sample of 3 dietitians was recruited from the faculty of a university nutrition department. Dietitians participated in semi-structured interviews that were voice-recorded and transcribed. Data were thematically organized and interpreted using the theory of Symbolic Interactionism. Five themes were developed: the evolution of food-related practices, tensions between the role of dietitian and mother, mealtime interaction, integration of dietetic values in child-feeding practices, and the individuality of the mother. Dietitian mothers used various parenting styles when interacting with their children. Their beliefs about best practice in child-feeding correspond with the recommendations of their dietetic profession. Their perception of what it meant to be a good mother was influenced by their identity as a dietitian. Dietitian mothers need to be aware of the influence of professional discourse; professional thoughts can influence personal thoughts and actions related to child-feeding practices. Further exploration of the topic including maternal and child-feeding practices from the child's perspective is warranted.

  12. Best practices for effective partnerships with Aboriginal groups : lessons learned from major Canadian projects in mining and forestry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, C. [Labrador Inuit Association, NF (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    This PowerPoint presentation provided an update on effective partnerships and best practices reported in Canadian mining, forestry and energy projects. The forestry and mining industries have provided most of the models and best practices for natural resource projects. This presentation described the approach to negotiations for the Voisey's Bay Nickel Project and future steps for commercial success. The lessons learned were also discussed with particular reference to corporate agendas that help advance Aboriginal participation. The presentation outlined the expected results from Voisey's Bay Nickel Company Impact Benefit Agreement with the Labrador Inuit Association and the Innu Nation. The issue of responsible environmental management was also discussed along with long-term opportunities for jobs, education and business opportunities for Newfoundland and Labrador residents. figs.

  13. A practical tablet-based hearing aid configuration as an exemplar project for students of instrumentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Simeoni

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the configuration and digital signal processing details of a tablet-based hearing aid transmitting wirelessly to standard earphones, whereby the tablet performs full sound processing rather than solely providing a means of setting adjustment by streaming to conventional digital hearing aids. The presented device confirms the recognized advantages of this tablet-based approach (e.g., in relation to cost, frequency domain processing, amplification range, versatility of functionality, component battery rechargeability, and flags the future wider-spread availability of such hearing solutions within mainstream healthcare. The use of a relatively high sampling frequency was found to be beneficial for device performance, while the use of optional off-the-shelf add-on components (e.g., data acquisition device, high fidelity microphone, compact wireless transmitter/ receiver, wired headphones are also discussed in relation to performance optimization. The easy-to-follow configuration utilized is well suited to student learning/research instrumentation projects within the health and biomedical sciences. In this latter regard, the presented device was pedagogically integrated into a flipped classroom approach for the teaching of bioinstrumentation within an Allied Health Sciences School, with the subsequent establishment of positive student engagement outcomes.

  14. A Practical Tablet-Based Hearing Aid Configuration as an Exemplar Project for Students of Instrumentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeoni, Ricardo

    2015-06-11

    This paper presents the configuration and digital signal processing details of a tablet-based hearing aid transmitting wirelessly to standard earphones, whereby the tablet performs full sound processing rather than solely providing a means of setting adjustment by streaming to conventional digital hearing aids. The presented device confirms the recognized advantages of this tablet-based approach (e.g., in relation to cost, frequency domain processing, amplification range, versatility of functionality, component battery rechargeability), and flags the future wider-spread availability of such hearing solutions within mainstream healthcare. The use of a relatively high sampling frequency was found to be beneficial for device performance, while the use of optional off-the-shelf add-on components (e.g., data acquisition device, high fidelity microphone, compact wireless transmitter/receiver, wired headphones) are also discussed in relation to performance optimization. The easy-to-follow configuration utilized is well suited to student learning/research instrumentation projects within the health and biomedical sciences. In this latter regard, the presented device was pedagogically integrated into a flipped classroom approach for the teaching of bioinstrumentation within an Allied Health Sciences School, with the subsequent establishment of positive student engagement outcomes.

  15. Quality improvement project in cervical cancer screening: practical measures for monitoring laboratory performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarkkanen, Jussi; Geagea, Antoine; Nieminen, Pekka; Anttila, Ahti

    2003-01-01

    We conducted a quality improvement project in a cervical cancer screening programme in Helsinki in order to see if detection of precancerous lesions could be influenced by external (participation rate) and internal (laboratory praxis) quality measures. In order to increase the participation rate, a second personal invitation to Pap-test was mailed to nonparticipants of the first call. In order to improve the quality of screening, the cytotechnicians monitored their performance longitudinally by recording the number of slides reviewed per day, the pick-up rate of abnormal smears, the report of the consulting cytopathologist, and the number of histologically verified lesions detected from the cases that they had screened. Regular sessions were held to compare the histological findings with the cytological findings of all cases referred for colposcopy. No pressure was applied on the cytotechnicians to ensure that they felt comfortable with their daily workload. A total of 110 000 smears were screened for cervical cancer at the Helsinki City Hospital during 1996-99. Initially, the overall participation rate increased from 62% to 71%. The number of histologically confirmed precancerous lesions (CIN 1-3) more than doubled and their detection rate increased from 0.32% to 0.72%. Continuous education and feedback from daily work performance were important, yet rather inexpensive means in increasing laboratory performance. Additional measures are needed to further increase the participation rate. Impact of the quality measures on cancer incidence needs to be assessed later on.

  16. Meaning processes in related “pasta base” consumption practices. Tales of “Gárgolas” and “Latas”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Eira Charquero

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper collects conclusions and reflections from a research held in Montevideo (Uruguay between 2007 and 2009, about several narrations associated with the use of pasta Base.  This name seems to refer to a substance that not necessary is coincident with the cocaine paste. The compilation sought to meet the semiotization strategies building that make these practices intelligible for the studied population. In order to do that, conceptual categories coming from the theoretic tool box usually identified with the post-structuralism were used. In the first section, an approach to the topic is proposed within the territory studied, as well as the political representation that has been acquired. In the second section, an historical contextualization of the operative moment is proposed, directly related with the third section in which, an approach to the problem is proposed. In the fourth section, an orientation to the narrations is sought. Finally, reflections are set as fifth section. 

  17. Sustainable, alternative farming practices as a means to simultaneously secure food production and reduce air pollution in East Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, A. P. K.; Fung, K. M.; Yong, T.; Liu, X.

    2015-12-01

    Proper agricultural land management is essential for securing food supply and minimizing damage to the environment. Among available farming practices, relay strip intercropping and fertilizer application are commonly used, but to study their wider environmental implications and possible feedbacks we require an Earth system modeling framework. In this study, the effectiveness of a maize-soybean relay strip intercropping system and fertilizer reduction is investigated using a multi-model method. The DNDC (DeNitrification-DeComposition) model is used to simulate agricultural activities and their impacts on the environment through nitrogen emissions and changes in soil chemical composition. Crop yield, soil nutrient content and nitrogen emissions to the atmosphere in major agricultural regions of China are predicted under various cultivation scenarios. The GEOS-Chem global chemical transport model is then used to estimate the effects on downwind particle and ozone air pollution. We show that relay strip intercropping and optimal fertilization not only improve crop productivity, but also retain soil nutrients, reduce ammonia emission and mitigate downwind air pollution. By cutting 25% fertilization inputs but cultivating maize and soybean together in a relay strip intercropping system used with field studies, total crop production was improved slightly by 4.4% compared to monoculture with conventional amount of fertilizers. NH3 volatilization decreases by 29%, equivalent to saving the pollution-induced health damage costs by about US$2.5 billion per year. The possible feedback effects from atmospheric nitrogen deposition onto the croplands are also investigated. We show that careful management and better quantitative understanding of alternative farming practices hold huge potential in simultaneously addressing different global change issues including the food crisis, air pollution and climate change, and calls for greater collaboration between scientists, farmers and

  18. The Project of the Telemedicine System for a Family Doctors' Practices

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Puchala, E

    2001-01-01

    ...). The project offers the potential to improve: access to high-quality primary health care, education of family doctors and patients, This is a project which is realised in collaboration of two scientific partners...

  19. Narrowing the gap between theory and practice? Interactive knowledge development in a coastal defense project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seijger, Chris; van Tatenhove, J.; Dewulf, Geert P.M.R.; Otter, Henriëtte; Javernick-Will, A.; Chinowsky, P.

    2012-01-01

    Coastal defence projects intend to develop solutions in a highly dynamic environment. The coastal zone is characterized by expanding cities, rising flood risks, economic activity, and a threatened natural environment. Developing relevant knowledge for solutions in coastal defence projects is

  20. Linking Theory with Practice: Undergraduate Project Management with School-Age Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkenberg, Loren; Russell, Randy; Ricker, Lynne

    2000-01-01

    Management students taught basic business concepts to sixth graders and managed business projects with them. The management students applied knowledge of marketing, human resources, and operations management and developed reflective learning skills through project reports and coaching sessions. (SK)

  1. Practice of implementation of innovative means of teaching in forming of preventive thinking in students of higher medical educational establisments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biletska E.M.

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The problem of construction of a holistic methodological system of training future doctors considered in the article, is impossible outside the context of integration processes taking place in modern education and needs a careful study of international experience. The research aim is to develop a system of innovative means of education for the formation of preventive thinking in students of higher medical educational establishment, concerning professionally oriented undergraduate preparation of doctors. Analysis of the results allowed to determine the characteristic features of innovative means, forms and teaching methods, specificity of their use in interactive educational environment, this against the background of meticulous work of the teaching staff of the department of general hygiene of Dnepropetrovsk Medical Academy provides the efficiency of educational process which integrates personal, creative, social and educational purposes. The suggested innovative methods are involved in the general system of modern education in higher school being effectively used for providing a high level of professional training in teaching of academic subject area "Hygiene and Ecology".

  2. IDENTIFICATION OF EXAMPLES OF GOOD PRACTICE IN ABSORPTION OF STRUCTURAL FUNDS, CASE STUDY PROJECT "CHRISTIAN DAY CENTER"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CEAUSESCU IONUT

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this study is to capture the practical point of view, the main issues in examples of best practices in the application for funding for the project "Christian Day Center- Support for young people and adults with disabilities" project benefited the City Council Târgu Jiu, is a project which was realized in the Regional Operational Programme, Priority Axis 3 DMI 3.2 - "Rehabilitation / modernization / development and equipping of social services", the total value of the project was 3,373,722.72 lei, of which non-repayable funding over was worth 2,592,251.08 lei. Through its general objective, the project "Day Center Christian - Support for young people and adults with disabilities" aims to contribute to improving the quality of infrastructure for social services by ensuring equal access of citizens of Tg-Jiu such services. Christian Day Center- support for young people and adults with physical disabilities, musculoskeletal, neuro, somatic and visual has already proposed to the idea of the project, to be a center which will ensure the social inclusion of these vulnerable and contribute to increasing the quality of life, improve communication and information on the rights and benefits of social services to improve the management and organization of the system of providing social services and facilitating the participation of all stakeholders in the development of social services.

  3. The Influence of Trust on Project Management Practice within the Construction Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Strahorn, Scott; Brewer, Graham; Gajendran, Thayaparan

    2017-01-01

    Given that any construction project is inherently a human endeavour, it follows that issues of trust are significant in terms of the stakeholder interactions that deliver eventual project outcomes.  Previous research indicates that the relational basis upon which projects are undertaken are intended to influence the likelihood of trusting relationships between stakeholders.  Thus, experiences of trust in a construction project environment are likely to be influenced by the contextual specific...

  4. Developing Communities of Practice around e-Learning and Project Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laxton, Ruth; Applebee, Andrelyn Cheryl

    2010-01-01

    In 2007-8 the Australian Catholic University (ACU National), undertook a project to develop new resources to provide training and support in eLearning for staff and students. The project was undertaken by a multidisciplinary team drawn from all six campuses and was led by an externally contracted Project Manager/eLearning specialist. This…

  5. Deep geothermal energy probe Heubach. Project plan and facility planning by using a practical example; Tiefen-Erdwaermesonde Heubach. Projektablauf und Anlagenplanung anhand eines Praxisbeispiels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuntz, David; Kuebert, Markus; Walker-Hertkorn, Simone [tewag GmbH, Starzach-Felldorf (Germany); Lemes, Zijad [HEAG Suedhessische Energie AG (HSE), Darmstadt (Germany). Q100 Regenerative Energien; Fritsche, Johann-Gerhard; Koett, Anne [Hessisches Landesamt fuer Umwelt und Geologie (HLUG), Wiesbaden (Germany)

    2012-10-16

    For the decentralized supply of an industrial company in Heubach nearby Gross-Umbach (Federal Republic of Germany) with geothermal energy for heating and cooling, the first geothermal deep drilling was performed in the German federal state of Hesse. The concept of a sustainable energy supply is based on the utilization of heat and cold from near-surface geothermal energy as well as on the heat production from an 800 metre coaxial deep geothermal probe (K-TEWS). HEAG Suedhessische Energie AG (Darmstadt, Bundesrepublik Deutschland) is the project manager. The company H. Anger's Soehne (Hessisch Lichtenau, Federal Republic of Germany) as a project partner is responsible for the execution of the drilling. Due to the innovative character and the outstanding importance for the future utilization of the geothermal energy for the energy supply, this project was promoted by the Hessian Ministry for the Environment, Energy, Agriculture and Consumer Protection (Wiesbaden, Federal Republic of Germany). The Hessian Agency for the Environment and Geology (Wiesbaden, Federal Republic of Germany) as well as the University Kassel (Kassel, Federal Republic of Germany) serve as scientific counterparts. Tewag GmbH (Regensburg, Federal Republic of Germany) is the technical planner of the geotechnical component of the execution of construction work, and is in charge of the thermal simulation and elaboration of the optimal extension concept. By means of this research and demonstration project, experiences on the heat supply using TEWS systems as well as on the project plan have to be acquired. Furthermore, experiences on the optimization in the planning and implementation are to be acquired in order to evaluate the transferability and economic efficiency at future locations practically. After presentation of the project, the authors of the contribution under consideration describe the planning phases of the project, some aspects of the public relations, the planning approaches, the

  6. Design and implementation of projects with Xilinx Zynq FPGA: a practical case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travaglini, R.; D'Antone, I.; Meneghini, S.; Rignanese, L.; Zuffa, M.

    The main advantage when using FPGAs with embedded processors is the availability of additional several high-performance resources in the same physical device. Moreover, the FPGA programmability allows for connect custom peripherals. Xilinx have designed a programmable device named Zynq-7000 (simply called Zynq in the following), which integrates programmable logic (identical to the other Xilinx "serie 7" devices) with a System on Chip (SOC) based on two embedded ARM processors. Since both parts are deeply connected, the designers benefit from performance of hardware SOC and flexibility of programmability as well. In this paper a design developed by the Electronic Design Department at the Bologna Division of INFN will be presented as a practical case of project based on Zynq device. It is developed by using a commercial board called ZedBoard hosting a FMC mezzanine with a 12-bit 500 MS/s ADC. The Zynq FPGA on the ZedBoard receives digital outputs from the ADC and send them to the acquisition PC, after proper formatting, through a Gigabit Ethernet link. The major focus of the paper will be about the methodology to develop a Zynq-based design with the Xilinx Vivado software, enlightening how to configure the SOC and connect it with the programmable logic. Firmware design techniques will be presented: in particular both VHDL and IP core based strategies will be discussed. Further, the procedure to develop software for the embedded processor will be presented. Finally, some debugging tools, like the embedded Logic Analyzer, will be shown. Advantages and disadvantages with respect to adopting FPGA without embedded processors will be discussed.

  7. Translating sickle cell guidelines into practice for primary care providers with Project ECHO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa M. Shook

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Approximately 100,000 persons with sickle cell disease (SCD live in the United States, including 15,000 in the Midwest. Unfortunately, many patients experience poor health outcomes due to limited access to primary care providers (PCPs who are prepared to deliver evidence-based SCD care. Sickle Treatment and Outcomes Research in the Midwest (STORM is a regional network established to improve care and outcomes for individuals with SCD living in Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, and Wisconsin. Methods: STORM investigators hypothesized that Project ECHO® methodology could be replicated to create a low-cost, high-impact intervention to train PCPs in evidence-based care for pediatric and young adult patients with SCD in the Midwest, called STORM TeleECHO. This approach utilizes video technology for monthly telementoring clinics consisting of didactic and case-based presentations focused on the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI evidence-based guidelines for SCD. Results: Network leads in each of the STORM states assisted with developing the curriculum and are recruiting providers for monthly clinics. To assess STORM TeleECHO feasibility and acceptability, monthly attendance and satisfaction data are collected. Changes in self-reported knowledge, comfort, and practice patterns will be compared with pre-participation, and 6 and 12 months after participation. Conclusions: STORM TeleECHO has the potential to increase implementation of the NHLBI evidence-based guidelines, especially increased use of hydroxyurea, resulting in improvements in the quality of care and outcomes for children and young adults with SCD. This model could be replicated in other pediatric chronic illness conditions to improve PCP knowledge and confidence in delivering evidence-based care.

  8. Research methods courses as a means of developing academic general practice. Fifteen years' experience from Sweden and Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Håkansson, Anders; Beckman, Anders; Hansson, Eva Ekvall; Merlo, Juan; Månsson, Nils-Ove

    2005-09-01

    Since 1989, the authors have given courses in research methodology, and these courses are now given at six venues in southern Sweden, as well as in Denmark. The course corresponds to half a year's full-time study, with half the time devoted to lectures and studies of literature, while the rest is spent on an individual project under supervision. To enable part-time study, the course extends over 1(1/2) years. In 15 years roughly 1000 people, mainly physicians, have been given training in basic research methods. The course model has been appreciated by clinically active colleagues, who have been able to attend a course and simultaneously work with patients. Among the GPs in the region, one in five has taken this course, and one in five has then gone on to start formal PhD studies. The authors have thus succeeded in their goal of giving basic scientific schooling to many physicians and recruiting some for further research.

  9. The meaning and value of traditional occupational practice: a Karen woman's story of weaving in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Yda J; Stephenson, Stephanie; Gibson-Satterthwaite, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    This case study sought to understand the meaning of restoring traditional weaving as an occupation among Karen women from Burma who now live in an urban city in the United States and to examine the impact of weaving on their daily lives in terms of identity, empowerment, social support, and opportunities for entrepreneurship. The story of one Karen woman, Paw Law Eh, is described. Her story exemplifies the negative consequences of restricted access to familiar and meaningful daily activities, or "occupations", the relationship between occupation and self-identity, how participation in valued occupations can enhance social networks, and the restorative effects that are possible when engagement in meaningful occupations are maintained or restored. Her story demonstrates that occupational therapists have the skills and opportunity to contribute significantly to the well-being of Karen women by supporting the restoration of the occupation of weaving.

  10. Projection of future climate change conditions using IPCC simulations, neural networks and Bayesian statistics. Part 2: Precipitation mean state and seasonal cycle in South America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boulanger, Jean-Philippe [LODYC, UMR CNRS/IRD/UPMC, Tour 45-55/Etage 4/Case 100, UPMC, Paris Cedex 05 (France); University of Buenos Aires, Departamento de Ciencias de la Atmosfera y los Oceanos, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Martinez, Fernando; Segura, Enrique C. [University of Buenos Aires, Departamento de Computacion, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2007-02-15

    Evaluating the response of climate to greenhouse gas forcing is a major objective of the climate community, and the use of large ensemble of simulations is considered as a significant step toward that goal. The present paper thus discusses a new methodology based on neural network to mix ensemble of climate model simulations. Our analysis consists of one simulation of seven Atmosphere-Ocean Global Climate Models, which participated in the IPCC Project and provided at least one simulation for the twentieth century (20c3m) and one simulation for each of three SRES scenarios: A2, A1B and B1. Our statistical method based on neural networks and Bayesian statistics computes a transfer function between models and observations. Such a transfer function was then used to project future conditions and to derive what we would call the optimal ensemble combination for twenty-first century climate change projections. Our approach is therefore based on one statement and one hypothesis. The statement is that an optimal ensemble projection should be built by giving larger weights to models, which have more skill in representing present climate conditions. The hypothesis is that our method based on neural network is actually weighting the models that way. While the statement is actually an open question, which answer may vary according to the region or climate signal under study, our results demonstrate that the neural network approach indeed allows to weighting models according to their skills. As such, our method is an improvement of existing Bayesian methods developed to mix ensembles of simulations. However, the general low skill of climate models in simulating precipitation mean climatology implies that the final projection maps (whatever the method used to compute them) may significantly change in the future as models improve. Therefore, the projection results for late twenty-first century conditions are presented as possible projections based on the &apos

  11. Taking stock of project value creation: A structured literature review with future directions for research and practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Markus; Svejvig, Per

    2016-01-01

    This paper aims to take stock of what we know about project value creation and to present future directions for research and practice. We performed an explorative and unstructured literature review, which was subsequently paired with a structured literature review. We join several research areas...... by adopting the project value creation perspective on literature relating to benefits, value, performance, and success in projects. Our review includes 111 contributions analyzed through both an inductive and deductive approach. We find that relevant literature dates back to the early 1980s, and the still...... developing value-centric view has been the subject of many publications in recent years. We contribute to research on project value creation through four directions for future research: rejuvenating value management through combining value, benefits, and costs; supplementing value creation with value capture...

  12. Experience of IAEA UPSAT mission to Tanzanian uranium sites as a means of sustaining best practice for uranium production in Tanzania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mwalongo, D.; Kileo, A.

    2014-01-01

    Utilization of nuclear power has been escalating, hence the growing demand for Uranium for the world nuclear power worldwide and in particular Asia and Middle East. This has influenced uranium exploration, development and investment in different countries in the world. In 2007, Tanzania witnessed extensive uranium exploration investment and discovery of several sites with economically viable uranium deposits at Bahi, Manyoni and Mkuju River. The most advanced project is Mkuju River Project located in the Selous Game Reserve, which is a classified UNESCO World Heritage site. At a time of discovery, the country had no previous experience managing uranium production cycle, hence the necessity for cooperation with national and international stakeholders to ensure safe, secure and safeguarded Uranium mining. This development pressed a need to quickly and efficiently setting up of an internationally accepted best practice for uranium mining in the country. Preparations and stakeholder involvement in setting regulatory framework for uranium mining were initiated. Therefore, the request was submitted to International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Uranium Production Site Appraisal Team (UPSAT) mission to review the country’s regulatory readiness for uranium governance. The review mission aimed at appraising the country’s preparedness for overseeing the Uranium Production Cycle in general and with emphasis on the planned Mkuju River Project (MRP) in the south of the country in particular. The mission comprehensively reviewed the regulatory system, sustainable uranium production life cycle, health, safety and environment, social licensing and capacity building and gave objective recommendations based on best practice. Therefore, this paper briefly reviews the impact of the first UPSAT mission in African soil for fostering sustainable best practice for uranium life cycle in Tanzania. (author)

  13. Solid recovered fuels in the cement industry--semi-automated sample preparation unit as a means for facilitated practical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldrian, Alexia; Sarc, Renato; Pomberger, Roland; Lorber, Karl E; Sipple, Ernst-Michael

    2016-03-01

    One of the challenges for the cement industry is the quality assurance of alternative fuel (e.g., solid recovered fuel, SRF) in co-incineration plants--especially for inhomogeneous alternative fuels with large particle sizes (d95⩾100 mm), which will gain even more importance in the substitution of conventional fuels due to low production costs. Existing standards for sampling and sample preparation do not cover the challenges resulting from these kinds of materials. A possible approach to ensure quality monitoring is shown in the present contribution. For this, a specially manufactured, automated comminution and sample divider device was installed at a cement plant in Rohožnik. In order to prove its practical suitability with methods according to current standards, the sampling and sample preparation process were validated for alternative fuel with a grain size >30 mm (i.e., d95=approximately 100 mm), so-called 'Hotdisc SRF'. Therefore, series of samples were taken and analysed. A comparison of the analysis results with the yearly average values obtained through a reference investigation route showed good accordance. Further investigations during the validation process also showed that segregation or enrichment of material throughout the comminution plant does not occur. The results also demonstrate that compliance with legal standards regarding the minimum sample amount is not sufficient for inhomogeneous and coarse particle size alternative fuels. Instead, higher sample amounts after the first particle size reduction step are strongly recommended in order to gain a representative laboratory sample. © The Author(s) 2016.

  14. The use of a commercial vegetable juice as a practical means to increase vegetable intake: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoy, Sonia F; Kazaks, Alexandra G; Holt, Roberta R; Chen, Hsin Ju; Winters, Barbara L; Khoo, Chor San; Poston, Walker S C; Haddock, C Keith; Reeves, Rebecca S; Foreyt, John P; Gershwin, M Eric; Keen, Carl L

    2010-09-17

    Recommendations for daily dietary vegetable intake were increased in the 2005 USDA Dietary Guidelines as consumption of a diet rich in vegetables has been associated with lower risk of certain chronic health disorders including cardiovascular disease. However, vegetable consumption in the United States has declined over the past decade; consequently, the gap between dietary recommendations and vegetable intake is widening. The primary aim of this study is to determine if drinking vegetable juice is a practical way to help meet daily dietary recommendations for vegetable intake consistent with the 2005 Dietary Guidelines and the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet. The secondary aim is to assess the effect of a vegetable juice on measures of cardiovascular health. We conducted a 12-week, randomized, controlled, parallel-arm study consisting of 3 groups of free-living, healthy volunteers who participated in study visits at the Ragle Human Nutrition Research Center at the University of California, Davis. All subjects received education on the DASH diet and 0, 8 or 16 fluid ounces of vegetable juice daily. Assessments were completed of daily vegetable servings before and after incorporation of vegetable juice and cardiovascular health parameters including blood pressure. Without the juice, vegetable intake in all groups was lower than the 2005 Dietary Guidelines and DASH diet recommendations. The consumption of the vegetable juice helped participants reach recommended intake. In general, parameters associated with cardiovascular health did not change over time. However, in the vegetable juice intervention groups, subjects who were pre-hypertensive at the start of the study showed a significant decrease in blood pressure during the 12-week intervention period. Including 1-2 cups of vegetable juice daily was an effective and acceptable way for healthy adults to close the dietary vegetable gap. Increase in daily vegetable intake was associated with a

  15. Technology Development as a Normative Practice: A Meaning-Based Approach to Learning About Values in Engineering-Damming as a Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nia, Mahdi G; Harandi, Mehdi F; de Vries, Marc J

    2017-11-10

    Engineering, as a complex and multidimensional practice of technology development, has long been a source of ethical concerns. These concerns have been approached from various perspectives. There are ongoing debates in the literature of the philosophy of engineering/technology about how to organize an optimized view of the values entailed in technology development processes. However, these debates deliver little in the way of a concrete rationale or framework that could comprehensively describe different types of engineering values and their multi-aspect interrelations in real engineering practices. Approaching engineering values from a meaning-based perspective, as in this paper, can be a reliable method of tackling such a controversial problem. This paper therefore proposes that technology development be considered a systemic normative practice and attempts to provide a comprehensive view of various built-in values, their different origins and features, and a way of prioritizing them in real engineering processes. Studying two cases of the Zayandeh Rood Dam and the Abbasi Dam will lead to practical insights into how to understand norms in technology development and incorporate them into engineering practice.

  16. Best practice in the management of clinical coding services: Insights from a project in the Republic of Ireland, Part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Beth A; Ridoutt, Lee; O'Connor, Paul; Murphy, Deirdre

    2017-09-01

    This is the second of two articles about best practice in the management of coding services. The best practice project was part of a year-long project conducted in the Republic of Ireland to review the quality of the Hospital Inpatient Enquiry data for its use in activity-based funding. The four methods used to address the best practice aspect of the project were described in detail in Part 1. The results included in this article are those relating to the coding manager's background, preparation and style, clinical coder (CC) workforce adequacy, the CC workforce structure and career pathway, and the physical and psychological work environment for the clinical coding service. Examples of best practice were found in the study hospitals but there were also areas for improvement. Coding managers would benefit from greater support in the form of increased opportunities for management training and a better method for calculating CC workforce numbers. A career pathway is needed for CCs to progress from entry to expert CC, mentor, manager and quality controller. Most hospitals could benefit from investment in infrastructure that places CCs in a physical environment that tells them they are an important part of the hospital and their work is valued.

  17. Community-based management of multiple drug resistant tuberculosis in a tertiary hospital in Tanzania: a best practice implementation project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelly, Isaya; Peters, Micah D J

    2017-12-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) has prioritized collaboration with communities in its 2016 "End TB" implementation strategy. Acknowledging the difficulties that some communities face in gaining access to health facilities due to barriers such as stigma, discrimination, healthcare expenditure, transport and income loss, partnering with communities in the roll-out of community-based TB management activities is vital. The aim of this project was to make a contribution to promoting evidence-based practice with regards to the community-based management of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) at Kibong'oto National Infectious Disease Hospital, Tanzania, and thereby supporting improvements in patient outcomes and resource utilization. The project utilized the Joanna Briggs Institute Practical Application of Clinical Evidence System (JBI PACES) program to facilitate the collection of pre- and post-audit data. The Getting Research into Practice (GRiP) module was also used to analyze the potential barriers and for designing the final action plan. This project was conducted in three phases over a three-month period at the MDR-TB unit in a referral hospital in Northern Tanzania. The project showed that there were significant improvements in compliance rates in staff education and documentation of patients' suitability and preferences in receiving community-based care for MDR-TB. The compliance rate of criterion 2, which was already 100% at baseline, was slightly lower at follow-up. The project achieved significant improvements in the delivery of evidence-based practice with regards to community-based management of MDR-TB.

  18. Infrastructure for large-scale quality-improvement projects: early lessons from North Carolina Improving Performance in Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Warren P; Lefebvre, Ann; Donahue, Katrina E; Bacon, Thomas; Dobson, Allen

    2010-01-01

    Little is known regarding how to accomplish large-scale health care improvement. Our goal is to improve the quality of chronic disease care in all primary care practices throughout North Carolina. Methods for improvement include (1) common quality measures and shared data system; (2) rapid cycle improvement principles; (3) quality-improvement consultants (QICs), or practice facilitators; (4) learning networks; and (5) alignment of incentives. We emphasized a community-based strategy and developing a statewide infrastructure. Results are reported from the first 2 years of the North Carolina Improving Performance in Practice (IPIP) project. A coalition was formed to include professional societies, North Carolina AHEC, Community Care of North Carolina, insurers, and other organizations. Wave One started with 18 practices in 2 of 9 regions of the state. Quality-improvement consultants recruited practices. Over 80 percent of practices attended all quarterly regional meetings. In 9 months, almost all diabetes measures improved, and a bundled asthma measure improved from 33 to 58 percent. Overall, the magnitude of improvement was clinically and statistically significant (P = .001). Quality improvements were maintained on review 1 year later. Wave Two has spread to 103 practices in all 9 regions of the state, with 42 additional practices beginning the enrollment process. Large-scale health care quality improvement is feasible, when broadly supported by statewide leadership and community infrastructure. Practice-collected data and lack of a control group are limitations of the study design. Future priorities include maintaining improved sustainability for practices and communities. Our long-term goal is to transform all 2000 primary-care practices in our state.

  19. The use of a commercial vegetable juice as a practical means to increase vegetable intake: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reeves Rebecca S

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recommendations for daily dietary vegetable intake were increased in the 2005 USDA Dietary Guidelines as consumption of a diet rich in vegetables has been associated with lower risk of certain chronic health disorders including cardiovascular disease. However, vegetable consumption in the United States has declined over the past decade; consequently, the gap between dietary recommendations and vegetable intake is widening. The primary aim of this study is to determine if drinking vegetable juice is a practical way to help meet daily dietary recommendations for vegetable intake consistent with the 2005 Dietary Guidelines and the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH diet. The secondary aim is to assess the effect of a vegetable juice on measures of cardiovascular health. Methods We conducted a 12-week, randomized, controlled, parallel-arm study consisting of 3 groups of free-living, healthy volunteers who participated in study visits at the Ragle Human Nutrition Research Center at the University of California, Davis. All subjects received education on the DASH diet and 0, 8 or 16 fluid ounces of vegetable juice daily. Assessments were completed of daily vegetable servings before and after incorporation of vegetable juice and cardiovascular health parameters including blood pressure. Results Without the juice, vegetable intake in all groups was lower than the 2005 Dietary Guidelines and DASH diet recommendations. The consumption of the vegetable juice helped participants reach recommended intake. In general, parameters associated with cardiovascular health did not change over time. However, in the vegetable juice intervention groups, subjects who were pre-hypertensive at the start of the study showed a significant decrease in blood pressure during the 12-week intervention period. Conclusion Including 1-2 cups of vegetable juice daily was an effective and acceptable way for healthy adults to close the dietary vegetable

  20. Transportation risk management : international practices for program development and project delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Managing transportation networks, including agency : management, program development, and project : delivery, is extremely complex and fraught with : uncertainty. Administrators, planners, and engineers : coordinate a multitude of organizational and ...

  1. Investigation of the Practical Possibility of Solving Problems on Generalized Cellular Automata Associated with Cryptanalysis by Mean Algebraic Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. G. Klyucharev

    2017-01-01

    problems was possible. Using a Python language program, random 6-regular Ramanujan graphs with the appropriate number of vertices were generated. For each graph, was generated a system of equations that describes the k steps of the corresponding generalized cellular automaton. For the systems obtained, the Grebner bases were constructed using the Fouger algorithm F4, the Magma system v2.21-5, and the Polybori 0.8.3 library. The experiments were carried out both for the inversion task and for the key recovery task. We used a 16-core 16 GB RAM Intel Xeon E5-2690 computer, OS Linux.The article presents the results of experiments that confirm that the algebraic cryptanalysis of block ciphers and hash functions based on generalized cellular automata with the number of cells used in practice (of the order of several hundred or more available tool based on the use of Gröbner bases, is impossible.

  2. Feasibility of a virtual learning collaborative to implement an obesity QI project in 29 pediatric practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Tamara; Morton, Michaela; Weissman, Mark; O'Brien, Ellen; Hamburger, Ellen; Hancock, Yolandra; Moon, Rachel Y

    2014-04-01

    Quality improvement (QI) activities are required to maintain board certification in pediatrics. However, because of lack of training and resources, pediatricians may feel overwhelmed by the need to implement QI activities. Pediatricians also face challenges when caring for overweight and obese children. To create a virtual (online) QI learning collaborative through which pediatric practices could easily develop and implement a continuous QI process. Prospective cohort. Pediatric practices that were part of the Children's National Health Network were invited to participate, with the option to receive continuing medical education and maintenance of certification credits. s) Practices conducted baseline and monthly chart audits, participated in educational webinars and selected monthly practice changes, using Plan-Do-Study-Act cycles. Practices reported activities monthly and periodic feedback was provided to practices about their performance. s) Improvement in (i) body mass index (BMI) percentile documentation, (ii) appropriate nutritional and activity counseling and (iii) follow-up management for high-risk patients. Twenty-nine practices (120 providers) participated, and 24 practices completed all program activities. Monthly chart audits demonstrated continuous improvement in documentation of BMI, abnormal weight diagnosis, nutrition and activity screening and counseling, weight-related health messages and follow-up management of overweight and obese patients. Impact of QI activities on visit duration and practice efficiency was minimal. A virtual learning collaborative was successful in providing a framework for pediatricians to implement a continuous QI process and achieve practice improvements. This format can be utilized to address multiple health issues.

  3. Projectables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Troels A.; Merritt, Timothy R.

    2017-01-01

    CNC cutting machines have become essential tools for designers and architects enabling rapid prototyping, model-building and production of high quality components. Designers often cut from new materials, discarding the irregularly shaped remains. We introduce ProjecTables, a visual augmented...... reality system for interactive packing of model parts onto sheet materials. ProjecTables enables designers to (re)use scrap materials for CNC cutting that would have been previously thrown away, at the same time supporting aesthetic choices related to wood grain, avoiding surface blemishes, and other...... relevant material properties. We conducted evaluations of ProjecTables with design students from Aarhus School of Architecture, demonstrating that participants could quickly and easily place and orient model parts reducing material waste. Contextual interviews and ideation sessions led to a deeper...

  4. Project Based Learning (PjBL) Practices at Politeknik Kota Bharu, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md. Baharuddin Haji Abdul; Daud, Khairul Azhar Mat; Jusoff, Kamaruzaman; Ghani, Nik Azida Abd

    2009-01-01

    This study explores the utilization of Project-based Learning module in the subject of project development for the Mechanical Engineering students at Politeknik Kota Bharu. This study focuses on the development of the PjBL module based on socio-constructivist approach. The objective of this study is to explore the influence of the utilization of…

  5. A World of Learning: Practical Manual. Enhancing the Multiplier Effect of the Associated Schools Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France).

    This manual presents the major lessons learned about how national authorities, individual institutions, and individual educators can work to increase the impact of the Associated Schools Project (ASP) schools and spread it to other parts of the educational system. ASP is a project of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural…

  6. Case Studies in Application of System Engineering Practices to Capstone Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Gloria; vanSusante, Paul; Carmen, Christina; Morris, Tommy; Schmidt, Peter; Zalewski, Janusz

    2011-01-01

    The Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD) of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) sponsors a faculty fellowship program that engages researchers with interests aligned with current ESMD development programs. The faculty-members are committed to run a capstone senior design project based- on the materials and experience gained during the fellowship. For the 2010 - 2011 academic year, 5 projects were approved. These projects are in the areas of mechanical and electrical hardware design and optimization, fault prediction and extra planetary civil site preparation. This work summarizes the projects, describes the student teams performing the work, and comments on the integration of Systems Engineering principles into the projects, as well as the affected course curriculums.

  7. Synthesis of the european national requirements and practices for recycling in HMA and WMA (DIRECT_MAT PROJECT)

    OpenAIRE

    IPAVEC , Aleksander; Marsac , Paul; Mollenhauer , Konrad

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the 2009-2011 European project DIsmantling and RECycling Techniques for road MATerials is to contribute to the waste minimization in road maintenance and construction by sharing and disseminating, at a European level, the national know-how and sustainable practices regarding the dismantling of the pavements and the recycling of the reclaimed materials. In the framework of the DIRECT_MAT subproject Asphalt materials, the present paper gives a broad overview of the European polic...

  8. Investigating School-Wide Antecedents of Good Practice Dissemination from Individual Subject Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christophersen, Knut-Andreas; Elstad, Eyvind; Turmo, Are

    2012-01-01

    Good practice dissemination is an unsolved problem in education. This article describes how clear and "soft" leadership and perceptions of social and economic exchange operate in the bottom-up processes of school reforms and examines the relative impact of these factors on school-wide good practice dissemination and discusses how…

  9. Transgressive Practices in Participatory Action Research within the Context of Projects as a System of Governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhlin, Sharmila Maria Holmstrøm; Thingstrup, Signe Hvid

    2012-01-01

    institutional and discursive presence of projects in people’s everyday lives affects the possibilities of action research to engage in meaningful democratic and transgressive practises with its participants. When does participatory action research become yet another social technique and when does it have...... the potential to challenge dominating social hierarchies and contribute to social change? We will discuss these questions based on findings from two empirical action research projects from our own work in the multicultural field. In one project, teachers and researcher engage in the development of multicultural...

  10. Expediting Clinician Adoption of Safety Practices: The UCSF Venous Access Patient Safety Interdisciplinary Education Project

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Donaldson, Nancy E; Plank, Rosemary K; Williamson, Ann; Pearl, Jeffrey; Kellogg, Jerry; Ryder, Marcia

    2005-01-01

    ...) Venous Access Device (VAD) Patient Safety Interdisciplinary Education Project was to develop a 30-hour/one clinical academic unit VAD patient safety course with the aim of expediting clinician adoption of critical concepts...

  11. Means of knowledge sharing in information technology projects Meios de compartilhamento do conhecimento no contexto de projetos de tecnologia da informação

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarissa Carneiro Mussi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false PT-BR X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Tabela normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0cm; mso-para-margin-right:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0cm; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} This study tried to investigate in what ways the knowledge sharing among the parts involved in the implementation project of an integrated information system (SAP R/3 in a higher education institution of the Santa Catarina State was configured. Specifically, the work obeyed the following disposition: description of how the implementation process occurred and identification of the individuals involved in it; investigation of the means of knowledge sharing utilized, objectives and influence in the project. Considering the objectives proposed, the approach of this research is qualitative, case study type. The research data were collected through semi-structured interviews, open questionnaires and documental analysis. The treatment and interpretation given to the data are predominantly qualitative. Among the main conclusions we may cite the significant influence of knowledge sharing in the project of the system implementation. We can observe the utilization of various potential means of sharing both explicit and tacit knowledge that contributed to the knowledge conversion. Finally the data analysis provided the understanding that the

  12. PC tools for project management: Programs and the state-of-the-practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Peter C.; Freedman, Glenn B.; Dede, Christopher J.; Lidwell, William; Learned, David

    1990-01-01

    The use of microcomputer tools for NASA project management; which features are the most useful; the impact of these tools on job performance and individual style; and the prospects for new features in project management tools and related tools are addressed. High, mid, and low end PM tools are examined. The pro's and con's of the tools are assessed relative to various tasks. The strengths and weaknesses of the tools are presented through cases and demonstrations.

  13. Trend analysis of watershed-scale precipitation over Northern California by means of dynamically-downscaled CMIP5 future climate projections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, K; Gorguner, M; Ercan, A; Trinh, T; Kavvas, M L

    2017-08-15

    The impacts of climate change on watershed-scale precipitation through the 21st century were investigated over eight study watersheds in Northern California based on dynamically downscaled CMIP5 future climate projections from three GCMs (CCSM4, HadGEM2-ES, and MIROC5) under the RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 future climate scenarios. After evaluating the modeling capability of the WRF model, the six future climate projections were dynamically downscaled by means of the WRF model over Northern California at 9km grid resolution and hourly temporal resolution during a 94-year period (2006-2100). The biases in the model simulations were corrected, and basin-average precipitation over the eight study watersheds was calculated from the dynamically downscaled precipitation data. Based on the dynamically downscaled basin-average precipitation, trends in annual depth and annual peaks of basin-average precipitation during the 21st century were analyzed over the eight study watersheds. The analyses in this study indicate that there may be differences between trends of annual depths and annual peaks of watershed-scale precipitation during the 21st century. Furthermore, trends in watershed-scale precipitation under future climate conditions may be different for different watersheds depending on their location and topography even if they are in the same region. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Management of dexamethasone-induced hyperglycemia in patients undergoing chemotherapy in an outpatient setting: a best practice implementation project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinaga, Gery; de Koeijer, Elizabeth

    2018-04-01

    The objective of this project was to implement best practice in an outpatient clinical setting in order to increase both nursing staff and patients' knowledge and awareness on the importance of blood sugar management during chemotherapy and to show that through compliance with best practice, the incidence of dexamethasone-induced hyperglycemia during chemotherapy can be minimized. Steroid-induced hyperglycemia is a commonly neglected symptom in cancer treatment, contributing to poor patient prognosis and extended hospital stay. Evidence shows that controlled blood sugar during chemotherapy is associated with improved patient outcomes and better tolerance to cancer treatment. For the purpose of this paper steroid-induced hyperglycemia will be referred to as dexamethasone-induced hyperglycemia. This project utilized the Joanna Briggs Institute Practical Application of Clinical Evidence System (JBI-PACES) and Getting Research into Practice (GRiP) audit tools to promote compliance in the clinical setting. Thirty patients participated in the audit, which was executed by nursing staff in the Medical Oncology Outpatient Unit at the Cancer Ambulatory and Community Health Support Department at the Canberra Hospital. The baseline audit revealed large gaps between best practice and current practice. This underlined the need for more education for both nursing staff and patients. Other barriers such as the absence of assessment and documentation by the clinicians and the minimum number of potential referrals to the diabetes educator were addressed by encouraging patients to speak about their diabetes, and also in the development of a simplified referral process in order to have patients reviewed by the Diabetes Educator in a timely manner. There were significant improvements after more information sessions were held and more resources made available to both nursing staff and patients, but there were also minimal to zero compliance drop on parts of the follow-up audit. In an

  15. Teachers' meanings regarding educational practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, R.M. van den

    2002-01-01

    In this article, a number of scientific schools of thought and research results are reviewed and found to show the importance of identifying the existential attributions of teachers. Important points of anchor are existential phenomenology and symbolic interactionism, the approach to organizations

  16. Energy-efficient projecting and purchasing and means of promoting the use of energy efficient equipment within industry; Energieffektiv projektering og indkoeb samt vaerktoejer til fremme af energieffektivt udstyr til erhvervsvirksomheder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-01

    The first aim was to identify the barriers to energy efficient projecting and related purchasing in businesses and to suggest means to remove these barriers. It is stated that if energy consumption is taken into consideration in the first planning phase and before making purchases, energy-saving can be achieved at a reasonable investment. Examples are given to illustrate this point. As a result of interviews and discussions with involved persons, it was found that constraints are not only economical but also take the form of lack of sufficient time, procrastination on the part of decision-makers, lack of relevant information and a certain reluctance to experiment with new ideas. A three-phased decision process is suggested. It was found that energy-saving was not always given very high priority. Consultants should point out the relation between energy saving and environmental protection. Training and campaigning activities are essential. Consultants should be able to produce documentation to prove their theories on energy saving within industry. An effective organisation of consultancy services is essential. Clients` attitudes to energy savings must be influenced. A sequence of practical goals should be set up during the planning process. Cost-benefit analyses were carried out in relation to seven of the suggested plans for breaking down the barriers to energy-effective projecting. (AB) (16 refs.)

  17. The impact on healthcare, policy and practice from 36 multi-project research programmes: findings from two reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanney, Steve; Greenhalgh, Trisha; Blatch-Jones, Amanda; Glover, Matthew; Raftery, James

    2017-03-28

    We sought to analyse the impacts found, and the methods used, in a series of assessments of programmes and portfolios of health research consisting of multiple projects. We analysed a sample of 36 impact studies of multi-project research programmes, selected from a wider sample of impact studies included in two narrative systematic reviews published in 2007 and 2016. We included impact studies in which the individual projects in a programme had been assessed for wider impact, especially on policy or practice, and where findings had been described in such a way that allowed them to be collated and compared. Included programmes were highly diverse in terms of location (11 different countries plus two multi-country ones), number of component projects (8 to 178), nature of the programme, research field, mode of funding, time between completion and impact assessment, methods used to assess impact, and level of impact identified. Thirty-one studies reported on policy impact, 17 on clinician behaviour or informing clinical practice, three on a combined category such as policy and clinician impact, and 12 on wider elements of impact (health gain, patient benefit, improved care or other benefits to the healthcare system). In those multi-programme projects that assessed the respective categories, the percentage of projects that reported some impact was policy 35% (range 5-100%), practice 32% (10-69%), combined category 64% (60-67%), and health gain/health services 27% (6-48%). Variations in levels of impact achieved partly reflected differences in the types of programme, levels of collaboration with users, and methods and timing of impact assessment. Most commonly, principal investigators were surveyed; some studies involved desk research and some interviews with investigators and/or stakeholders. Most studies used a conceptual framework such as the Payback Framework. One study attempted to assess the monetary value of a research programme's health gain. The widespread

  18. Report: EPA Needs to Improve Management Practices to Ensure a Successful Customer Technology Solutions Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report #10-P-0194, August 23, 2010. Although EPA indicated it could avoid spending more than $115.4 million over 8.5 years by consolidating the desktop computing environment, improved management practices are needed.

  19. Potential of best practice to reduce impacts from oil and gas projects in the Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finer, Matt; Jenkins, Clinton N; Powers, Bill

    2013-01-01

    The western Amazon continues to be an active and controversial zone of hydrocarbon exploration and production. We argue for the urgent need to implement best practices to reduce the negative environmental and social impacts associated with the sector. Here, we present a three-part study aimed at resolving the major obstacles impeding the advancement of best practice in the region. Our focus is on Loreto, Peru, one of the largest and most dynamic hydrocarbon zones in the Amazon. First, we develop a set of specific best practice guidelines to address the lack of clarity surrounding the issue. These guidelines incorporate both engineering-based criteria and key ecological and social factors. Second, we provide a detailed analysis of existing and planned hydrocarbon activities and infrastructure, overcoming the lack of information that typically hampers large-scale impact analysis. Third, we evaluate the planned activities and infrastructure with respect to the best practice guidelines. We show that Loreto is an extremely active hydrocarbon front, highlighted by a number of recent oil and gas discoveries and a sustained government push for increased exploration. Our analyses reveal that the use of technical best practice could minimize future impacts by greatly reducing the amount of required infrastructure such as drilling platforms and access roads. We also document a critical need to consider more fully the ecological and social factors, as the vast majority of planned infrastructure overlaps sensitive areas such as protected areas, indigenous territories, and key ecosystems and watersheds. Lastly, our cost analysis indicates that following best practice does not impose substantially greater costs than conventional practice, and may in fact reduce overall costs. Barriers to the widespread implementation of best practice in the Amazon clearly exist, but our findings show that there can be great benefits to its implementation.

  20. Potential of best practice to reduce impacts from oil and gas projects in the Amazon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt Finer

    Full Text Available The western Amazon continues to be an active and controversial zone of hydrocarbon exploration and production. We argue for the urgent need to implement best practices to reduce the negative environmental and social impacts associated with the sector. Here, we present a three-part study aimed at resolving the major obstacles impeding the advancement of best practice in the region. Our focus is on Loreto, Peru, one of the largest and most dynamic hydrocarbon zones in the Amazon. First, we develop a set of specific best practice guidelines to address the lack of clarity surrounding the issue. These guidelines incorporate both engineering-based criteria and key ecological and social factors. Second, we provide a detailed analysis of existing and planned hydrocarbon activities and infrastructure, overcoming the lack of information that typically hampers large-scale impact analysis. Third, we evaluate the planned activities and infrastructure with respect to the best practice guidelines. We show that Loreto is an extremely active hydrocarbon front, highlighted by a number of recent oil and gas discoveries and a sustained government push for increased exploration. Our analyses reveal that the use of technical best practice could minimize future impacts by greatly reducing the amount of required infrastructure such as drilling platforms and access roads. We also document a critical need to consider more fully the ecological and social factors, as the vast majority of planned infrastructure overlaps sensitive areas such as protected areas, indigenous territories, and key ecosystems and watersheds. Lastly, our cost analysis indicates that following best practice does not impose substantially greater costs than conventional practice, and may in fact reduce overall costs. Barriers to the widespread implementation of best practice in the Amazon clearly exist, but our findings show that there can be great benefits to its implementation.

  1. The evolution of a doctor of nursing practice capstone process: programmatic revisions to improve the quality of student projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Joan M; Cook, Paul F; Raterink, Ginger

    2013-01-01

    The past several years have seen explosive growth in the number of doctor of nursing practice (DNP) degree programs offered by colleges of nursing in the United States. Through a process of trial and error since 2005, the faculty at the University of Colorado, College of Nursing, have revised the course structure and procedures related to the DNP capstone project to improve the quality and usefulness of these student projects. Efforts have focused on educating and involving all nursing faculty in the DNP capstone process, distinguishing between competencies for our PhD and DNP projects, clearly aligning the DNP capstone project with quality improvement methods rather than with research, working with our campus institutional review board to clarify regulatory review requirements for quality improvement studies, developing a review committee to oversee DNP students' projects, and structuring our sequential course requirements to encourage students' professional presentations and publications. Our current capstone process reflects 7 years of iterative work, which we summarize in this article in hopes that it will help institutions currently in the process of developing a DNP program. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Private Finance Initiative (PFI for Road Projects in UK: Current Practice with a Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rifat Akbiyikli

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The long-term sustainable provision of new and high quality maintained road stock is vitally important, especially in times of economic constraint such as Europe is currently experiencing. The Private Finance Initiative (PFI is one method of financing such large-scale, capital intensive projects. An important aspect of this form of financing projects is that the risks are borne not only by the sponsors but are shared by different types of investors such as equity holders, debt providers, and quasi-equity investors. Consequently, a comprehensive and heuristic risk management process is essential for the success of the project. The proposition made within this paper is that the PFI mechanism provides a Value-for-Money and effective mechanism to achieve this. The structure of this PFI finance and investment on a particular road project therefore enables all project stakeholders to take a long-term perspective. This long-term perspective is reflected in the mechanism of a case study of UK – Class A trunk roads which are examined in detail. This paper presents a novel solution to a modern dilemma.

  3. Theoretical and practical fundamentals of scientific and educational projects: a case of Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olena Bilovodska

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Development of educational and scientific spheres in general and project activity of universities in particular, acquire foreground importance in the modern world. In the article approaches to rendering a term “project” and its basic characteristics are analyzed. Scientific and educational projects are a special type: although they represent a subsidiary activity, they are vital to the image, rankings, prosperity and at some point to competitiveness. The major funding opportunities for scientific and educational projects are generalized. The authors have analyzed the official figures of the State Statistics Service of Ukraine which show the levels of cost funding of scientific and educational projects and describe its main sources in 2010-2015. A study of impact factors on the funding levels of Ukrainian scientific and educational projects by foreign sources was conducted using the method of correlation analysis. According to the results of the conducted analysis, it was determined that activity of international mobility of Ukrainian scientists doesn’t influence the levels of international funding. It was also established that there is a strong inverse relationship between such factors as a share of expenditures on scientific and scientific-technical activities in GDP, a number of organizations involved in scientific and scientific-technical activities and a number of grants for scientific research received from international funds.

  4. Gardening practices in a rural village in South Africa 10 years after completion of a home garden project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimpita, Tisungeni; Biggs, Chara; Faber, Mieke

    2015-03-01

    Few studies have documented whether the behavior changes produced by home garden projects have been maintained after completion of the projects. To determine the benefits and challenges affecting production and consumption of β-carotene-rich vegetables and fruits in a rural South African village 10 years after completion of a home garden project. This cross-sectional survey assessed gardening practices and household consumption of β-carotene-rich vegetables and fruits using a questionnaire (n = 186). Benefits and challenges affecting production and consumption of β-carotene-rich vegetables and fruits were assessed through focus group discussions. Thirty-nine percent of the households currently planted β-carotene-rich vegetables and fruits. Major challenges included lack of fencing, animals eating crops, and lack or shortage of water. Planting materials for β-carotene-rich vegetables were sourced from the community nursery, while papaya was grown from its own seed. Shops were the most likely alternative sources of β-carotene-rich vegetables. The frequency of consumption of orange-fleshed sweet potato, butternut, spinach, and papaya when in season differed significantly, with households planting β-carotene-rich vegetables and fruits having more frequent consumption than households not planting these vegetables and fruits. Households planting β-carotene-rich vegetables and fruits were perceived as "well-to-do" and "healthy" households and as "givers". This study showed that 10 years after the endline evaluation of a home garden project, approximately one-third of the households in the village planted β-carotene-rich vegetables and fruits, which is very similar to the proportion at project completion and a postintervention study that was done 6 years later, despite various challenges, indicating that the practice of planting these vegetables and fruits was continued over the years.

  5. Improving pharmacy practice through public health programs: experience from Global HIV/AIDS initiative Nigeria project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oqua, Dorothy; Agu, Kenneth Anene; Isah, Mohammed Alfa; Onoh, Obialunamma U; Iyaji, Paul G; Wutoh, Anthony K; King, Rosalyn C

    2013-01-01

    The use of medicines is an essential component of many public health programs (PHPs). Medicines are important not only for their capacity to treat and prevent diseases. The public confidence in healthcare system is inevitably linked to their confidence in the availability of safe and effective medicines and the measures for ensuring their rational use. However, pharmacy services component receives little or no attention in most public health programs in developing countries. This article describes the strategies, lessons learnt, and some accomplishments of Howard University Pharmacists and Continuing Education (HU-PACE) Centre towards improving hospital pharmacy practice through PHP in Nigeria. In a cross-sectional survey, 60 hospital pharmacies were randomly selected from 184 GHAIN-supported health facilities. The assessment was conducted at baseline and repeated after at least 12 months post-intervention using a study-specific instrument. Interventions included engagement of stakeholders; provision of standards for infrastructural upgrade; development of curricula and modules for training of pharmacy personnel; provision of job aids and tools amongst others. A follow-up hands-on skill enhancement based on identified gaps was conducted. Chi-square was used for inferential statistics. All reported p-values were 2-tailed at 95% confidence interval. The mean duration of service provision at post-intervention assessment was 24.39 (95% CI, 21.70-27.08) months. About 16.7% of pharmacies reported been trained in HIV care at pre-intervention compared to 83.3% at post-intervention. The proportion of pharmacies with audio-visual privacy for patient counseling increased significantly from 30.9% at pre-intervention to 81.4% at post-intervention. Filled prescriptions were cross-checked by pharmacist (61.9%) and pharmacy technician (23.8%) before dispensing at pre-intervention compared to pharmacist (93.1%) and pharmacy technician (6.9%) at post intervention. 40.0% of

  6. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report 31: The technical communications practices of US aerospace engineers and scientists: Results of the phase 1 SME mail survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. government technical report is a primary means by which the results of federally funded research and development (R&D) are transferred to the U.S. aerospace industry. However, little is known about this information product in terms of its actual use, importance, and value in the transfer of federally funded R&D. To help establish a body of knowledge, the U.S. government technical report is being investigated as part of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. In this report, we summarize the literature on technical reports and provide a model that depicts the transfer of federally funded aerospace R&D via the U.S. government technical report. We present results from our investigation of aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis the U.S. government technical communications practices of U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists affiliated with, not necessarily belonging to, the Society of Manufacturing Engineers (SME).

  7. Managing RTP Console Upgrading Project: Best Practice for Nuclear Malaysia as TSO in Supporting NPP Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurfarhana Ayuni Joha; Syahirah Abdul Rahman; Izhar Abu Hussin

    2011-01-01

    Human Resource Development (HRD) is required for Nuclear Power Programme (NPP). To be a Technical Support Organisation (TSO) for NPP, Nuclear Malaysia should be ready to take the responsibility in supporting Nuclear Regulatory Agency (NRA) and NPP Operators. In nurturing Nuclear Malaysia as TSO, the prime important and focus of HRD for the NPP is the reactor engineering technology. Nuclear Malaysia gives various phases of supports needed to build NPP such as during siting, design, planning, licensing, construction, commissioning, operation and maintenance in its own way and capability. The current Nuclear Malaysia unique approach is the TRIGA PUSPATI reactor (RTP) upgrading project. Research reactor plays an important role in Research and Developpement organization as a nuclear facility to assist the development of NPP. Therefore, upgrading the research reactor is needed to build the skills and gain knowledge of workers to work safely. After 29 years of operation, the RTP system is facing aging problems due to many components in the reactor are outdated. Therefore, immediate action should be carried out to mitigate the aging factor of the reactor to prevent the worsening of the aging problem, and to prevent untoward incident from happening. Action should also cover short and long term planning to prevent current situation from recurring. Currently, RTP is upgrading its console from analog to digital system. One of the achievements in this console upgrading project is the development and implementation of project management. This paper comprises the overview on the RTP console upgrading project, the project management and how this project can lead Nuclear Malaysia to be a good TSO for the development of NPP. (author)

  8. The Transmission of Family Food and Mealtime Practices From Adolescence to Adulthood: Longitudinal Findings From Project EAT-IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Allison; Berge, Jerica M; Loth, Katie; Larson, Nicole; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2018-02-01

    To determine whether family food and mealtime practices experienced in adolescence are carried forward into parenthood. Baseline (Project Eating and Activity in Teens and Young Adults [EAT]-I) and 15-year follow-up (EAT-IV) survey data from a population-based cohort study (Project EAT). Cohort members identified as parents at follow-up (n = 727). To gain additional data about the practices of both parents in the household, significant others completed surveys at EAT-IV (n = 380). Frequency of family meals, healthfulness of foods at home, frequency of meals in front of the television, and expectations of being home for dinner. Linear regression models tested associations between parent food and mealtime practices reported at baseline and follow-up controlling for demographics. Healthy and unhealthy home food availability, expectations to be home for dinner, and eating in front of the television in adolescence predicted similar outcomes 15 years later among female parents (effect sizes range: β = .2-.3; P < .001), and to a lesser extent among males. Families ate more frequent family meals when either 1 or both parents reported frequent family meals as an adolescent compared with when neither parent reported frequent family meals as an adolescent. It is important to invest in parenting interventions that target healthful family food and mealtime practices because of the potential long-term impact on their own children's parenting practices. Copyright © 2017 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparative analysis of structural concrete quality assurance practices on nine nuclear power plant construction projects. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willenbrock, J.H.; Thomas, H.R. Jr.; Burati, J.L. Jr.

    1978-06-01

    The basic objective of this research effort was to perform a comparative analysis of the Quality Assurance practices related to the structural concrete phase on nine nuclear power plant projects which are (or have been) under construction in the United States in the past ten years. This analysis identified the response of each Quality Assurance program to the applicable criteria of 10 CFR Part 50, Appendix B as well as to the pertinent regulatory requirements and industry standards. The major emphasis was placed on the construction aspects of the structural concrete phase of each project. The engineering and design aspects were examined whenever they interfaced with the construction aspects. For those aspects of the Quality Assurance system which can be considered managerial in nature (i.e., organizational relationships, types of Quality Assurance programs, corrective action procedures, etc.) an attempt has been made to present the alternative approaches that were identified. For those aspects of the Quality Assurance system which are technical in nature (i.e., the frequency of testing for slump, compressive strength, etc.) an attempt has been made to present a comparative analysis between projects and in relation to the recommended or mandated practices presented in the appropriate industry codes and standards.

  10. Comparative analysis of structural concrete quality assurance practices on nine nuclear power plant construction projects. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willenbrock, J.H.; Thomas, H.R. Jr.; Burati, J.L. Jr.

    1978-06-01

    The basic objective of this research effort was to perform a comparative analysis of the Quality Assurance practices related to the structural concrete phase on nine nuclear power plant projects which are (or have been) under construction in the United States in the past ten years. This analysis identified the response of each Quality Assurance program to the applicable criteria of 10 CFR Part 50, Appendix B as well as to the pertinent regulatory requirements and industry standards. The major emphasis was placed on the construction aspects of the structural concrete phase of each project. The engineering and design aspects were examined whenever they interfaced with the construction aspects. For those aspects of the Quality Assurance system which can be considered managerial in nature (i.e., organizational relationships, types of Quality Assurance programs, corrective action procedures, etc.) an attempt has been made to present the alternative approaches that were identified. For those aspects of the Quality Assurance system which are technical in nature (i.e., the frequency of testing for slump, compressive strength, etc.) an attempt has been made to present a comparative analysis between projects and in relation to the recommended or mandated practices presented in the appropriate industry codes and standards

  11. Assessing customs performance in the Mediterranean ports. KPI selection and Best practices identification as part of the MEDNET project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales Fusco, P.; Sauri Marchan, S.; Lekka, A.M.; Karousos, I.

    2016-07-01

    The seamless flow of goods, people and investments across the Mediterranean necessitates a well-functioning port and transport system. More efficient port operations enhance seamless logistics and promote safety, efficiency, interoperability and interconnectivity of transport networks in the Mediterranean area.To promote the exchange of knowledge and expertise relevant to port and customs procedures and simplification of clearance for vessels and cargoes in the Mediterranean, the MEDNET project was launched. As part of the project a common evaluation framework for the performance of ports in the form of a set of Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) together with a list of the best practices in terms of operations and customs procedures was developed.In total, 50 ports were analyzed and given a KPI regarding traffic, financial, operational and human resources, sustainability and customs procedures. The values were latter crossed with the current good practices on operation in terms of customs procedures. And a small correlation between KPIs performance and implantation degree of good practices in customs procedures was found. This presentation exposes the methodology to assess the ports’ performance and the best. (Author)

  12. Current industrial practice of managing risks in product development project portfolios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weng, R.; Oehmen, Josef; Ben-Daya, M.

    2013-01-01

    Managing portfolios of development and engineering projects currently presents significant challenges to companies. This is even more the case in the management of portfolio risks, where both industry and academia currently lack a clear conceptual understanding of what portfolio risks are and what...

  13. Unilever's Shakti Project: Empowering Rural Indian Women: Bottom of the Pyramid in Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loman, B.

    2010-01-01

    This research is on the positive and negative aspects of Unilever's Shakti-project, a prime example of marketing to the ‘Bottom of the Pyramid’ as put forward by C.K. Prahalad (2006). Poor rural Indian women are recruited to become small-scale entrepreneurs by Hindustan Lever, the Indian subsidiary

  14. A Practice-Centered Approach to Professional Development: Teacher-Librarian Collaboration in Capstone Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Violet H.

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on a professional development initiative that targeted teams of teachers and librarians working with high school students on strengthening an inquiry approach to capstone projects. While much has been written about student-focused models for information search and use, little has been reported on how training for the…

  15. MBA Program Trends and Best Practices in Teaching Sustainability: Live Project Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sroufe, Robert; Ramos, Diane

    2011-01-01

    This study offers a model for incorporating live sustainability consulting projects in an MBA curriculum to nurture cross-functional faculty collaboration while offering students proving ground for solving contemporary challenges related to ethical management of all forms of capital. We attempt to first lay a foundation for the recent evolution of…

  16. Practicing Learner-Centered Teaching: Pedagogical Design and Assessment of a Second Life Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Shu Z.

    2009-01-01

    Guided by the principles of learner-centered teaching methodology, a Second Life project is designed to engage students in active learning of virtual commerce through hands-on experiences and teamwork in a virtual environment. More importantly, an assessment framework is proposed to evaluate the learning objectives and learning process of the…

  17. Increase Student Engagement through Project-Based Learning. Best Practices Newsletter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2015

    2015-01-01

    We learn by doing. This simple philosophy is at the heart of project-based learning in the 21st-century classroom. It is grounded in the belief that the stand and lecture approach to teaching, worksheets and rote memorization are not enough to move students down a path to the deep learning necessary for success in college and careers. Essential…

  18. Guide of good practices Tempus Corinthiam : PROJECT NO. 159186-2009-1-BE-SMGR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beelen, Jos; Boddington, Anne; Bruns, Birgit; Glogar, Martin; Machado, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    The development of international relations and the implementation of the Bologna Process have been increasingly given attention by Higher Education Institutions in the Middle East region through the TEMPUS and Erasmus Mundus programmes. The project partners were keen to learn about elements of the

  19. Teaching Research Methodology Using a Project-Based Three Course Sequence Critical Reflections on Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braguglia, Kay H.; Jackson, Kanata A.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a reflective analysis of teaching research methodology through a three course sequence using a project-based approach. The authors reflect critically on their experiences in teaching research methods courses in an undergraduate business management program. The introduction of a range of specific techniques including student…

  20. Consistent Practices for the Probability of Detection (POD) of Fracture Critical Metallic Components Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughitt, Brian; Generazio, Edward (Principal Investigator); Nichols, Charles; Myers, Mika (Principal Investigator); Spencer, Floyd (Principal Investigator); Waller, Jess (Principal Investigator); Wladyka, Jordan (Principal Investigator); Aldrin, John; Burke, Eric; Cerecerez, Laura; hide

    2016-01-01

    NASA-STD-5009 requires that successful flaw detection by NDE methods be statistically qualified for use on fracture critical metallic components, but does not standardize practices. This task works towards standardizing calculations and record retention with a web-based tool, the NNWG POD Standards Library or NPSL. Test methods will also be standardized with an appropriately flexible appendix to -5009 identifying best practices. Additionally, this appendix will describe how specimens used to qualify NDE systems will be cataloged, stored and protected from corrosion, damage, or loss.

  1. The Influence of Trust on Project Management Practice within the Construction Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Strahorn

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Given that any construction project is inherently a human endeavour, it follows that issues of trust are significant in terms of the stakeholder interactions that deliver eventual project outcomes.  Previous research indicates that the relational basis upon which projects are undertaken are intended to influence the likelihood of trusting relationships between stakeholders.  Thus, experiences of trust in a construction project environment are likely to be influenced by the contextual specifics of respective transactional and relational contracting (RC procurement mechanisms, given the divergent theoretical principles upon which they are founded.  The influence of trust has therefore been examined through the lived experiences of construction practitioners.  A phenomenological interview study consisting of thirty-five (35 participants was conducted with sensitivity to the procurement of experiences being recounted. Issues of trust were shown to be integral to stakeholder experiences in both procurement environments, with the benefits of trust acknowledged in many instances.  However, little understanding was evident regarding methods for building and maintaining trust, nor for repairing trust when problems arose. Importantly, despite the differing principles that underpin transactional and relational procurement, and particularly the contention that relational procurement would increase trust between trading partners, this was not evident; with individual personalities and appropriate risk apportionment shown to be greater influences upon the likelihood of trusting relationships.  It is reasonable to conjecture that relational contracts actually diminish the need for trust, given that the objective is to reduce uncertainty through formulaic approaches to risk distribution and reward; the absence of risk negates the need for trust.  Ultimately, the potential to deliver improved project outcomes as a result of proactive approaches to

  2. Integrating Public Health and Health Promotion Practice in the Medical Curriculum: A Self-Directed Team-Based Project Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldine Kershaw

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Preparing health professionals in health promotion (HP and disease prevention is essential for improvement of population health, community HP, and better health care for individuals. The aim of this article is to describe an HP project in the form of a major self-directed project-based learning task integrated within the curriculum in the second year of the medical degree program at United Arab Emirates University. The project introduces students to public health and HP practice and develops students’ literature searching, writing, presentation skills, and team work. Students learn the principles underlying behavioral change, and the design of HP programs and materials, through a lecture format. Small groups of students each choose a specific health topic for their project. Over 11 weeks, students obtain information about their topic from appropriate sources (library, PubMed, Google Scholar, credible health sources such as World Health Organization. Using the principles learned in the lectures, they develop appropriate materials for their target audience: for example, posters, a pamphlet, social media content, or a video or radio message. Students seek advice from specialist faculty as needed. In week 12, each team presents their project background, rationale, and materials to their colleagues in a seminar format open to all faculty. They then submit the materials they developed for assessment. Group marks are assigned for presentations and materials. Key concepts are assessed by multiple choice questions in comprehensive course examinations. By participation in the HP project, many students develop a solid background in prevention. The information retrieval, writing, and presentation skills, as well as experience of team work, are valuable both for the remaining years of their training and their future careers.

  3. Good practices and health policy analysis in European sports stadia: results from the 'Healthy Stadia' project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drygas, Wojciech; Ruszkowska, Joanna; Philpott, Matthew; Björkström, Olav; Parker, Mike; Ireland, Robin; Roncarolo, Federico; Tenconi, Maria

    2013-06-01

    Sport plays an important role within society and sports stadia provide significant settings for public health strategies. In addition to being places of mass gathering, stadia are often located in less affluent areas and are traditionally attended by 'harder to reach' communities. Unfortunately sports stadia and the clubs they host are rarely perceived as places that promote healthy lifestyles. Fast food, alcohol and tobacco are commonly advertized, served and consumed during sports games giving the spectators and TV fans contradictory messages concerning healthy choices. As part of a wider programme of work part-funded by the European Union, a study was therefore designed to explore current 'good practice' relating to positive health interventions in sports stadia across a number of European countries. Using a specially designed questionnaire, information about health policies and good practices relating to food offerings in stadia, physical activity promotion among local communities, tobacco policy, positive mental health initiatives, environmental sustainability practices and social responsibility policies were collected in 10 European countries (England and Northern Ireland, Finland, Georgia, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Poland, Spain and Sweden) involving 88 stadia. The audit results show that stadia health policies differ considerably between specific countries and sports. Based on the literature analysed, the examples of good practices collected through the study, and the subsequent instigation of a European Healthy Stadia Network, it shows that there is considerable potential for stadia to become health promoting settings.

  4. Hidrogym practice effects: The perception of Wellness of participants in a Community Outreach project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiana de Paula e Silva

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aims of the study were to identify the effects of improvement perceived by hidrogym practitioners and to verify possible associations between these and the time and age of practice. 62 people with average age of 50,80 years old (+ 14,05 participated of this study. An instrument built for this research was used for data collection. The content analysis and the non-parametric testes U the Mann Whitney and Kruskal Wallis were used for data analysis. The results showed that the indicator "disposition" presented the best perception of wellness, though the physical-functional aspects presented more number of cited indicators. The weight diminution indicator did not show index of "much improvement". The participants who had practiced at least six months evidenced better scores in: mood, sleep quality, stress levels and occupational relationship. The participants who were 61 years old or more showed worse perceptions in stress level and articulate pain. In conclusion, hidrogym practice helps to the wellness perception improvement in the psychological, physical-functional and social aspects. Furthermore, aspects related to age group and time of practice could interfere in wellness perception.

  5. "Playing with the Team": The Development of Communities of Practice in a Digital Storytelling Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westman, Peter John

    2012-01-01

    Since its emergence in the early 1990's, digital storytelling has been variously identified as a new media practice, a consumer and community-led movement, and a textual system. However, given its relative nascent status, there remains the need for further academic research focusing on the different forms it has assumed. During the spring/summer…

  6. Identification of good practices for teachers and students training activity in the ENVRIPLUS project

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Addezio, Giuliana; Marsili, Antonella; Beranzoli, Laura

    2016-04-01

    We elaborated basic guiding principles that will be used to improve the content of the ENVRIPLUS e-Training Platform for multimedia education of Secondary School level teachers and students. The purpose is to favour teacher training and consequently students training on selected scientific themes faced within the ENVRIPLUS Research Infrastructures. "Best practices" could positively impacts on students by providing motivation on promoting scientific research and to increase the awareness of the Earth System complexity and Environmental challenges for its preservation and sustainability. Best practice teaching strategies represent an inherent part of a curriculum that exemplifies the connection and relevance identified in education research. The actions are designed to develop thinking and problem-solving skill through integration and active learning. Relationships are built though opportunities for communication and teamwork. Best practices motivate, engage and prompt student to learn and achieve. A starting list of principles is discussed in respect of the following main Best Practices pillars: • Identify the conceptual framework of the subject of the dissemination • Increase personal awareness of the individual potential • Easy personal elaboration and the connection of the subject with the school curriculum.

  7. Projecting the bird community response resulting from the adoption of shelterbelt agroforestry practices in Eastern Nebraska

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. A., II Pierce; D. T. Farrand; W. B. Kurtz

    2001-01-01

    Evolving agricultural policies have influenced management practices within agroecosystems, impacting available habitats for many species of wildlife. Enhancing wildlife habitat has become an explicit objective of existing agricultural policy. Thus, there is renewed focus on field borders and the use of shelterbelt agroforestry systems to achieve conservation goals in...

  8. Health transformation project and defensive medicine practice among neurosurgeons in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solaroglu, Ihsan; Izci, Yusuf; Yeter, H Gokce; Metin, M Mert; Keles, G Evren

    2014-01-01

    The term "Defensive" medicine was coined in the early 1970's and has been an important topic of scientific investigation and professional debate ever since. The aim of this study was to investigate the characteristics of defensive medicine, its reasons, and the extent to which it is practiced in the Turkish health care system. This is the first national survey to study the practice of defensive medicine among neurosurgeons in Turkey. The present cross-sectional study on defensive medicine assessed neurosurgeons registered at the Turkish Neurosurgical Society, who are actively working in various centers and hospitals within the Turkish health care system. A 40-question survey was adapted from existing measures described in the literature and was completed by a total of 404 neurosurgeons, representing 36.7% of the neurosurgeons registered at the Turkish Neurosurgical Society. Seventy-two percent of the participants in the current study reported practicing defensive medicine. This practice was mainly reported among inexperienced neurosurgeons (74.4%). Most were younger than 40 years of age (75.2%), working in state hospitals/universities (72.7%), and living in the Marmara region (38%). Respondents reported engaging in defensive medicine by avoiding high-risk surgery (62.6%), ordering additional imaging studies (60.9%) and laboratory tests (33.7%), and referring patients to consultants (31.2%). Most participants consider every patient as a potential threat in terms of a medical lawsuit (68.3%) and do not believe the courts can distinguish malpractice from complications (89.6%). Concerns and perceptions about medical liability lead neurosurgeons to practice defensive medicine. By avoiding high-risk surgery, ordering unnecessary diagnostic tests, and referring the patients to consultants, neurosurgeons try to minimize the risk of malpractice and protect themselves from legal risks, resulting in higher healthcare expenditure and longer treatment periods.

  9. Mastering data-intensive collaboration and decision making research and practical applications in the dicode project

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This book reports on cutting-edge research carried out within the context of the EU-funded Dicode project, which aims at facilitating and augmenting collaboration and decision making in data-intensive and cognitively complex settings. Whenever appropriate, Dicode builds on prominent high-performance computing paradigms and large data processing technologies to meaningfully search, analyze, and aggregate data from diverse, extremely large, and rapidly evolving sources. The Dicode approach and services are fully explained, and particular emphasis is placed on deepening insights regarding the exploitation of big data, as well as on collaboration and issues relating to sense-making support. Building on current advances, the solution developed in the Dicode project brings together the reasoning capabilities of both the machine and humans. It can be viewed as an innovative “workbench” incorporating and orchestrating a set of interoperable services that reduce the data intensiveness and complexity overload at cr...

  10. Recent progress in flow control for practical flows results of the STADYWICO and IMESCON projects

    CERN Document Server

    Barakos, George; Luczak, Marcin

    2017-01-01

    This book explores the outcomes on flow control research activities carried out within the framework of two EU-funded projects focused on training-through-research of Marie Sklodowska-Curie doctoral students. The main goal of the projects described in this monograph is to assess the potential of the passive- and active-flow control methods for reduction of fuel consumption by a helicopter. The research scope encompasses the fields of structural dynamics, fluid flow dynamics, and actuators with control. Research featured in this volume demonstrates an experimental and numerical approach with a strong emphasis on the verification and validation of numerical models. The book is ideal for engineers, students, and researchers interested in the multidisciplinary field of flow control. Provides highly relevant and up-to-date information on the topic of flow control; Includes assessments of a wide range of flow-control technologies and application examples for fixed and rotary-wing configurations; Reinforces reader u...

  11. Project Octo-Pills - A practice model engaging community pharmacists in the care of patients from a tertiary hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Kheng Yong; Chung, Wing Lam; Mamun, Kaysar; Chen, Li Li

    2017-10-13

    Even while pharmacy practice evolves to a more patient-centric mode of practice, local hospitals, due to high patient load as well as space and resource constraints, find it challenging to conduct thorough medication review and physical medication reconciliation for all patients. In light of this, optimizing the local current healthcare system to involve community pharmacists in the care of patients from public hospitals could potentially better cater to the healthcare needs of the older population. Due to easy accessibility, community pharmacies are often the first point of contact in the healthcare system. Project Octo-Pills aims to engage community pharmacists in the collaborative care of patients from a tertiary hospital, providing patients with quality medication reconciliation and review services from a more convenient location within their neighborhood. This paper describes the model for this pilot initiative. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Governance model for integrating organizational project management (OPM with corporate practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amr Mossalam

    2017-12-01

    Having proposed the model, it needed validation, which was done through implementing the model in organizations through automation projects. The implementation resulted in some changes in the model to achieve the required levels of accountability, responsibility, and transparency. These changes were incorporated into the model and were reflected in its modified version. Finally, the paper highlighted the recommended improvements that would enhance the future implementation of the model.

  13. THE PRACTICE OF EVALUATING THE ECONOMIC EFFICIENCY OF THE INNOVATIVE PROJECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Vorobiev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available At the present stage of development of the society of scientific and technical activities is the most important factor in the intensification of production and the growth of its economic performance. It is therefore important now gets to determine the effectiveness of research and development activities, improving the measurement methods of economic evaluation of innovative projects and innovation. For informed decision-making requires a deep study and objective assessment of the real situation. This is due to changes in economic relations between the producers and consumers of scientific and technical products. Earlier in this activity involved only state scientific institution and the enterprise, then now they are gradually joining financial institutions, commercial and non-profit organizations. The adoption of innovative solutions should be preceded by thorough and comprehensive analysis of the economic feasibility of the innovative project. In this paper we propose to consider how business is costing innovative projects and determine their effectiveness for the enterprise business hotel.

  14. Teaching trainers to incorporate evidence-based medicine (EBM) teaching in clinical practice: the EU-EBM project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thangaratinam, Shakila; Barnfield, Gemma; Weinbrenner, Susanne; Meyerrose, Berit; Arvanitis, Theodoros N; Horvath, Andrea R; Zanrei, Gianni; Kunz, Regina; Suter, Katja; Walczak, Jacek; Kaleta, Anna; Oude Rengerink, Katrien; Gee, Harry; Mol, Ben W J; Khan, Khalid S

    2009-09-10

    applicability to clinical practice. Once fully implemented, the ultimate outcome of this pilot project will be a European qualification in teaching EBM, which will be used by doctors, hospitals, professional bodies responsible for postgraduate qualifications and continuing medical education.

  15. Quality of Work and Team- and Project Based Work Practices in Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch, Anders; Andersen, Vibeke

    2015-01-01

    It is the aim of this paper to investigate teamwork amongst professionals in engineering consultancy companies in order to discern how teamwork affects the collaboration and work practices of the professionals and eventually their quality of work. The paper investigates how professional engineering...... ractices are enacted in two engineering consultancy companies in Denmark where ‘teamwork’ has been or is an ideal for organizing work....

  16. Project Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Project Management Theory Meets Practice contains the proceedings from the 1st Danish Project Management Research Conference (DAPMARC 2015), held in Copenhagen, Denmark, on May 21st, 2015.......Project Management Theory Meets Practice contains the proceedings from the 1st Danish Project Management Research Conference (DAPMARC 2015), held in Copenhagen, Denmark, on May 21st, 2015....

  17. The Synergies research-practice partnership project: a 2020 Vision case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, John H.; Dierking, Lynn D.; Staus, Nancy L.; Wyld, Jennifer N.; Bailey, Deborah L.; Penuel, William R.

    2016-03-01

    This paper, describes Synergies, an on-going longitudinal study and design effort, being conducted in a diverse, under-resourced community in Portland, Oregon, with the goal of measurably improving STEM learning, interest and participation by early adolescents, both in school and out of school. Authors examine how the work of this particular research-practice partnership is attempting to accommodate the six principles outlined in this issue: (1) to more accurately reflect learning as a lifelong process occurring across settings, situations and time frames; (2) to consider what STEM content is worth learning; (3) to examine learning as a cultural process, involving varied repertoires of practice across learners' everyday lives; (4) to directly involve practitioners (and learners) in the research process; (5) to document how existing and emerging technologies and new media are, and will continue, to shape and redefine the content and practice of STEM learning research; and, (6) to take into account the broader socio-cultural-political contexts of the needs and concerns of the larger global society.

  18. Offshore wind power fundaments. Practical experience from the projects London Array and Dan Tysk; Offshore Windkraft Fundamente. Praxiserfahrung aus den Projekten London Array und DanTysk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horn, Moritz [Bilfinger Berger Ingenieurbau GmbH, Hamburg (Germany). Ingenieurwasserbau

    2012-11-01

    Based on a collection of diagrams and images the authors of the contribution under consideration report on practical experiences resulting from the project London Array and Dan Tysk with respect to the foundations of offshore wind turbines.

  19. Representational Practices in Extra-Curricular Science Inquiry Projects: A Study with Asian Primary Pupils

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Winnie W. M.

    2016-01-01

    Data collection, organization, and analysis are indispensable means of seeking solutions during the process of inquiry. Representations (called inscriptions by some educators) including graphs, tables, photographs, and equations are powerful ways of arranging and displaying data in visual form. This study aims to analyze quantitatively the use of…

  20. Relating long-term studies to conservation practice: the case of the Serengeti Cheetah Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durant, Sarah M; Bashir, Sultana; Maddox, Thomas; Laurenson, M Karen

    2007-06-01

    Although detailed, long-term scientific studies provide potentially crucial information for conservation, they are rare. Moreover, there is often a disjunction between scientists and managers that can affect whether scientific results are applied to help solve conservation problems. Long-term studies can promote increased communication between scientists and managers and hence offer an opportunity for constructive engagement between the two groups. We examined direct and indirect impacts of a 30-year study, the Serengeti Cheetah Project (SCP). Much of what is currently known about wild cheetahs comes from the SCP. In particular, the SCP has demonstrated that cheetahs have a combination of semisociality and ranging patterns that is unique among mammals. This system arises because cheetahs need to be mobile to avoid predators and competitors, yet maintain access to prey; this results in densities much lower than for other large carnivores and a requirement for large areas of heterogenous and connected habitat. The SCP started as a research project, but expanded into a national program, developing capacity for carnivore conservation within Tanzania. Long-term studies such as the SCP are uniquely placed to establish effective working relationships between scientists and managers, engage local and national institutions, and strengthen national capacity for biodiversity conservation. This process is best realized through the establishment of frameworks for conservation that seek to align scientific research with management needs. Long-term studies also play an important role in identifying international priorities for conservation. Nonetheless, the integration of science and management in conservation is a two-way process that requires concerted efforts by both sides to improve and maintain dialogue. Ultimately, conservation depends on people, and maintaining a commitment to a particular area over many years-such as through implementation of a long-term research project

  1. Social impact assessment in mining projects in Northern Finland: Comparing practice to theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suopajärvi, Leena, E-mail: leena.suopajarvi@ulapland.fi

    2013-09-15

    The paper discusses social impact assessments (SIA) for mining projects in light of the international principles and guidelines for such assessments and the academic literature in the field. The data consist of environmental impact assessment (EIA) programmes and reports for six mining projects that have started up in northern Finland in the 2000s. A first observation is that the role of the SIAs in the EIA programmes and reports studied was quite minor: measured in number of pages, the assessments account for three or four percent of the total. This study analyses the data collection, research methodology and conceptual premises used in the SIAs. It concludes that the assessments do not fully meet the high standards of the international principles and guidelines set out for them: for example, elderly men are over-represented in the data and no efforts were made to identify and bring to the fore vulnerable groups. Moreover, the reliability of the assessments is difficult to gauge, because the qualitative methods are not described and where quantitative methods were used, details such as non-response rates to questionnaires are not discussed. At the end of the paper, the SIAs are discussed in terms of Jürgen Habermas' theory of knowledge interests, with the conclusion that the assessments continue the empirical analytical tradition of the social sciences and exhibit a technical knowledge interest. -- Highlights: • Paper investigates social impact assessments in Finnish mining projects. • Role of social impact assessment is minor in whole EIA-process. • Mining SIAs give the voice for elderly men, vulnerable groups are not identified. • Assessment of SIAs is difficult because of lacking transparency in reporting. • SIAs belong to empirical analytical tradition with technical knowledge interest.

  2. Social impact assessment in mining projects in Northern Finland: Comparing practice to theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suopajärvi, Leena

    2013-01-01

    The paper discusses social impact assessments (SIA) for mining projects in light of the international principles and guidelines for such assessments and the academic literature in the field. The data consist of environmental impact assessment (EIA) programmes and reports for six mining projects that have started up in northern Finland in the 2000s. A first observation is that the role of the SIAs in the EIA programmes and reports studied was quite minor: measured in number of pages, the assessments account for three or four percent of the total. This study analyses the data collection, research methodology and conceptual premises used in the SIAs. It concludes that the assessments do not fully meet the high standards of the international principles and guidelines set out for them: for example, elderly men are over-represented in the data and no efforts were made to identify and bring to the fore vulnerable groups. Moreover, the reliability of the assessments is difficult to gauge, because the qualitative methods are not described and where quantitative methods were used, details such as non-response rates to questionnaires are not discussed. At the end of the paper, the SIAs are discussed in terms of Jürgen Habermas' theory of knowledge interests, with the conclusion that the assessments continue the empirical analytical tradition of the social sciences and exhibit a technical knowledge interest. -- Highlights: • Paper investigates social impact assessments in Finnish mining projects. • Role of social impact assessment is minor in whole EIA-process. • Mining SIAs give the voice for elderly men, vulnerable groups are not identified. • Assessment of SIAs is difficult because of lacking transparency in reporting. • SIAs belong to empirical analytical tradition with technical knowledge interest

  3. Main issues in research and practice of environmental protection for water conservancy and hydropower projects in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ang Chen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we generally summarize the main issues in the operational period of water conservancy and hydropower projects in China over the past several decades. First, the adverse impacts of these projects since the technical guidelines were proposed in 2006 are analyzed. Then, combined with projects and experience from 2006 to 2014, the four main issues are summarized: (1 There exist many questions in the design and construction of fishways, which are useful for fish migration, and the migration effects are not as expected. (2 Temperature stratification affecting the downstream fish is the major impact of temperature, and alters fish spawning in the reproduction season. (3 Ecological base flow has been one of the primary questions of the last 30 years in China, the greatest related difficulty being quantification of the amount and flow process necessary to satisfy fish life history. (4 Fish habitat protection and restoration are popular topics in recent years with the development of river ecosystem restoration. Fish habitat loss due to the impacts of dam construction and habitat fragmentation has become more and more serious. These four issues are now the main difficulties in water project management, and interact with one another to bear combined effects on river ecosystems. The issues of eco-hydraulic consideration in the design period are the key factors. Finally, future priorities for research and practice of environmental protection for water conservancy and hydropower projects in China are proposed. The main purpose of this paper is to enhance the scientific research, monitoring, and assessment of operating effectiveness.

  4. Elder mediation in theory and practice: study results from a national caregiver mediation demonstration project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crampton, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    Mediation is a process through which a third party facilitates discussion among disputing parties to help them identify interests and ideally reach an amicable solution. Elder mediation is a growing subspecialty to address conflicts involving older adults, primarily involving caregiving or finances. Mediation is theorized to empower participants but critics argue that it can exacerbate power imbalances among parties and coerce consensus. These contested claims are examined through study of a national caregiver mediation demonstration project. Study implications underscore the importance of gerontological social work expertise to ensure the empowerment of vulnerable older adults in mediation sessions.

  5. 'Unstructured Data' Practices in Polar Institutions and Networks: a Case Study with the Arctic Options Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Arthur Berkman

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Arctic Options: Holistic Integration for Arctic Coastal-Marine Sustainability is a new three-year research project to assess future infrastructure associated with the Arctic Ocean regarding: (1 natural and living environment; (2 built environment; (3 natural resource development; and (4 governance. For the assessments, Arctic Options will generate objective relational schema from numeric data as well as textual data. This paper will focus on the ‘long tail of smaller, heterogeneous, and often unstructured datasets’ that ‘usually receive minimal data management consideration’,as observed in the 2013 Communiqué from the International Forum on Polar Data Activities in Global Data Systems.

  6. The master builders : LAIRAH research on good practice in the construction of digital humanities projects.

    OpenAIRE

    Warwick, C.; Terras, M.; Huntington, P.; Pappa, N.; Galina, I.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the results of research carried out during the LAIRAH (Log analysis of Internet Resources in the Arts and Humanities) project (http://www.ucl.ac.uk/slais/circah/lairah/) which is based at UCL’s School of Library Archive and Information Studies. It was a fifteen month study (reporting in October 2006) to discover what influences the long-term sustainability and use of digital resources in the humanities through the analysis and evaluation of real-time use. At Digital Human...

  7. Software project effort estimation foundations and best practice guidelines for success

    CERN Document Server

    Trendowicz, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Software effort estimation is one of the oldest and most important problems in software project management, and thus today there are a large number of models, each with its own unique strengths and weaknesses in general, and even more importantly, in relation to the environment and context in which it is to be applied.Trendowicz and Jeffery present a comprehensive look at the principles of software effort estimation and support software practitioners in systematically selecting and applying the most suitable effort estimation approach. Their book not only presents what approach to take and how

  8. Evidence into practice: evaluating a child-centred intervention for diabetes medicine management The EPIC Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rycroft-Malone Joanne

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a lack of high quality, child-centred and effective health information to support development of self-care practices and expertise in children with acute and long-term conditions. In type 1 diabetes, clinical guidelines indicate that high-quality, child-centred information underpins achievement of optimal glycaemic control with the aim of minimising acute readmissions and reducing the risk of complications in later life. This paper describes the development of a range of child-centred diabetes information resources and outlines the study design and protocol for a randomized controlled trial to evaluate the information resources in routine practice. The aim of the diabetes information intervention is to improve children and young people's quality of life by increasing self-efficacy in managing their type 1 diabetes. Methods/Design We used published evidence, undertook qualitative research and consulted with children, young people and key stakeholders to design and produce a range of child-centred, age-appropriate children's diabetes diaries, carbohydrate recording sheets, and assembled child-centred, age-appropriate diabetes information packs containing published information in a folder that can be personalized by children and young people with pens and stickers. Resources have been designed for children/young people 6-10; 11-15; and 16-18 years. To evaluate the information resources, we designed a pragmatic randomized controlled trial to assess the effectiveness, cost effectiveness, and implementation in routine practice of individually tailored, age-appropriate diabetes diaries and information packs for children and young people age 6-18years, compared with currently available standard practice. Children and young people will be stratified by gender, length of time since diagnosis ( 2years and age (6-10; 11-15; and 16-18 years. The following data will be collected at baseline, 3 and 6 months: PedsQL (generic

  9. Increasing the occupational therapy mental health workforce through innovative practice education: a pilot project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodger, Sylvia; Thomas, Yvonne; Holley, Sue; Springfield, Elizabeth; Edwards, Ann; Broadbridge, Jacqui; Greber, Craig; McBryde, Cathy; Banks, Rebecca; Hawkins, Rachel

    2009-12-01

    This paper describes the evaluation of a pilot trial of two innovative placement models in the area of mental health, namely role emerging and collaborative supervision. The Queensland Occupational Therapy Fieldwork Collaborative conducted this trial in response to workforce shortages in mental health. Six occupational therapy students and eight practice educators were surveyed pre- and post-placements regarding implementation of these innovative models. Students participating in these placements reported that they were highly likely to work in mental health upon graduation, and practice educators were positive about undertaking innovative placements in future. An overview of the placement sites, trials, outcomes and limitations of this pilot trial is provided. Though limited by its small sample size, this pilot trial has demonstrated the potential of innovative placement models to provide valuable student learning experiences in mental health. The profession needs to develop expertise in the use of innovative placement models if students are to be adequately prepared to work with the mental health issues of the Australian community now and in the future.

  10. How do we help students as newcomers to create and develop better communities of practice for learning in a Project based learning environment?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Peter

    2007-01-01

    The question for debate in this paper, is how to help students creating and developing good communities of practice for learning in a Project based learning environment? At Aalborg University it has proven very helpful for students to have both a course addressing communication, collaboration......, learning and project management (CLP) and a reflection on these issues in a written process analysis....

  11. Virtual projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svejvig, Per; Commisso, Trine Hald

    2012-01-01

    that the best practice knowledge has not permeated sufficiently to the practice. Furthermore, the appropriate application of information and communication technology (ICT) remains a big challenge, and finally project managers are not sufficiently trained in organizing and conducting virtual projects....... The overall implications for research and practice are to acknowledge virtual project management as very different to traditional project management and to address this difference.......Virtual projects are common with global competition, market development, and not least the financial crisis forcing organizations to reduce their costs drastically. Organizations therefore have to place high importance on ways to carry out virtual projects and consider appropriate practices...

  12. Family presence during trauma activations and medical resuscitations in a pediatric emergency department: an evidence-based practice project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingsnorth, Jennifer; O'Connell, Karen; Guzzetta, Cathie E; Edens, Jacki Curreri; Atabaki, Shireen; Mecherikunnel, Anne; Brown, Kathleen

    2010-03-01

    The existing family presence literature indicates that implementation of a family presence policy can result in positive outcomes. The purpose of our evidence-based practice project was to evaluate a family presence intervention using the 6 A's of the evidence cycle (ask, acquire, appraise, apply, analyze, and adopt/adapt). For step 1 (ask), we propose the following question: Is it feasible to implement a family presence intervention during trauma team activations and medical resuscitations in a pediatric emergency department using national guidelines to ensure appropriate family member behavior and uninterrupted patient care? Regarding steps 2 through 4 (acquire, appraise, and apply), our demonstration project was conducted in a pediatric emergency department during the implementation of a new family presence policy. Our family presence intervention incorporated current appraisal of literature and national guidelines including family screening, family preparation, and use of family presence facilitators. We evaluated whether it was feasible to implement the steps of our intervention and whether the intervention was safe in ensuring uninterrupted patient care. With regard to step 5 (analyze), family presence was evaluated in 106 events, in which 96 families were deemed appropriate and chose to be present. Nearly all families (96%) were screened before entering the room, and all were deemed appropriate candidates. Facilitators guided the family during all events. One family presence event was terminated. In all cases patient care was not interrupted. Regarding step 6 (adopt/adapt), our findings document the feasibility of implementing a family presence intervention in a pediatric emergency department while ensuring uninterrupted patient care. We have adopted family presence as a standard practice. This project can serve as the prototype for others. Copyright (c) 2010 Emergency Nurses Association. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A practical guide to applying lean tools and management principles to health care improvement projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Ross W; Canacari, Elena G

    2012-01-01

    Manufacturing organizations have used Lean management principles for years to help eliminate waste, streamline processes, and cut costs. This pragmatic approach to structured problem solving can be applied to health care process improvement projects. Health care leaders can use a step-by-step approach to document processes and then identify problems and opportunities for improvement using a value stream process map. Leaders can help a team identify problems and root causes and consider additional problems associated with methods, materials, manpower, machinery, and the environment by using a cause-and-effect diagram. The team then can organize the problems identified into logical groups and prioritize the groups by impact and difficulty. Leaders must manage action items carefully to instill a sense of accountability in those tasked to complete the work. Finally, the team leaders must ensure that a plan is in place to hold the gains. Copyright © 2012 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Operational research within a Global Fund supported tuberculosis project in India: why, how and its contribution towards change in policy and practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagili, Karuna D; Satyanarayana, Srinath; Chadha, Sarabjit S; Wilson, Nevin C; Kumar, Ajay M V; Oeltmann, John E; Chadha, Vineet K; Nagaraja, Sharath Burugina; Ghosh, Smita; Q Lo, Terrence; Volkmann, Tyson; Willis, Matthew; Shringarpure, Kalpita; Reddy, Ravichandra Chinnappa; Kumar, Prahlad; Nair, Sreenivas A; Rao, Raghuram; Yassin, Mohammed; Mwangala, Perry; Zachariah, Rony; Tonsing, Jamhoih; Harries, Anthony D; Khaparde, Sunil

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: The Global Fund encourages operational research (OR) in all its grants; however very few reports describe this aspect. In India, Project Axshya was supported by a Global Fund grant to improve the reach and visibility of the government Tuberculosis (TB) services among marginalised and vulnerable communities. OR was incorporated to build research capacity of professionals working with the national TB programme and to generate evidence to inform policies and practices. Objectives: To describe how Project Axshya facilitated building OR capacity within the country, helped in addressing several TB control priority research questions, documented project activities and their outcomes, and influenced policy and practice. Methods: From September 2010 to September 2016, three key OR-related activities were implemented. First, practical output-oriented modular training courses were conducted (n = 3) to build research capacity of personnel involved in the TB programme, co-facilitated by The Union, in collaboration with the national TB programme, WHO country office and CDC, Atlanta. Second, two large-scale Knowledge, Attitude and Practice (KAP) surveys were conducted at baseline and mid-project to assess the changes pertaining to TB knowledge, attitudes and practices among the general population, TB patients and health care providers over the project period. Third, studies were conducted to describe the project’s core activities and outcomes. Results: In the training courses, 44 participant teams were supported to develop research protocols on topics of national priority, resulting in 28 peer-reviewed scientific publications. The KAP surveys and description of project activities resulted in 14 peer-reviewed publications. Of the published papers at least 12 have influenced change in policy or practice. Conclusions: OR within a Global Fund supported TB project has resulted in building OR capacity, facilitating research in areas of national priority and

  15. Sex-related differences in coronary revascularization practices: the perspective from a Canadian queue management project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, C D; Levinton, C M

    1993-10-01

    To assess sex-related differences in coronary revascularization practices in a Canadian setting. Prospective analytic cohort study. Regional referral office in Toronto. A selected but consecutive group of 131 women and 440 men referred by cardiologists for revascularization procedures between Jan. 3, 1989, and June 30, 1991. Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) or percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA). Nurse-coordinators placed the referral with a surgeon or interventional cardiologist at one of three hospitals, who then communicated directly with the referring cardiologist. Symptom status at referral, procedures requested and performed, and time from referral to procedure. Although the women were more likely than the men to have unstable angina at the time of referral (odds ratio [OR] 2.28, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.38 to 3.79, p = 0.0006), more women than men (16.8% v. 12.1%) were turned down for a procedure. Significant sex-related differences in practice patterns (p management; sex was the only other significant variable (p = 0.016). The referring physicians requested CABG more often for men than for women (p = 0.009), and the men accepted for a procedure were much more likely to undergo CABG than the women (OR 2.40, CI 1.47 to 3.93, p = 0.0002). Although the women undergoing CABG waited shorter periods than the men (p = 0.0035), this difference was attributable to their more severe symptoms. In this selected group women had more serious symptoms before referral but were turned down for revascularization more often than men. Reduced use of CABG rather than PTCA largely accounted for the sex-related differences in revascularization. Once accepted for a procedure women had shorter waiting times, which was appropriate given their more severe symptoms.

  16. Project studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geraldi, Joana; Söderlund, Jonas

    2018-01-01

    Project organising is a growing field of scholarly inquiry and management practice. In recent years, two important developments have influenced this field: (1) the study and practice of projects have extended their level of analysis from mainly focussing on individual projects to focussing on micro......, and of the explanations of project practices they could offer. To discuss avenues for future research on projects and project practice, this paper suggests the notion of project studies to better grasp the status of our field. We combine these two sets of ideas to analyse the status and future options for advancing...... project research: (1) levels of analysis; and (2) type of research. Analysing recent developments within project studies, we observe the emergence of what we refer to as type 3 research, which reconciles the need for theoretical development and engagement with practice. Type 3 research suggests pragmatic...

  17. Conclusions and recommendations of the European ORAMED project for practical interventional radiology and nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikodemova, Denisa; Fueloep, Marko; Cabanekova, Helena

    2012-01-01

    The results of the recently published doses obtained by medical staff working in pulsed radiation fields, and performing interventional radiology (IR) or interventional cardiology (IC) procedures, as well as applications of radionuclides in nuclear medicine (NM), have shown significantly high levels of exposure, mainly to the hands and other parts of their bodies uncovered by protective equipment. The coordinated project ORAMED (Optimization of Radiation Protection of Medical Staff) was set-up by participation of 12 European countries and 34 IR/IC and NM departments, with the 5 main tasks: (i) optimization of radiation protection in IR and IC,with the aim to standardize a unified method of extremities and eye lens doses estimation, for 3 cardiac and 5 interventional diagnostic and therapeutic examinations; (ii) verification of the possibilities to use active personal dosemeters for typical pulsed radiation fields used in IR and IC; (iii) contribution to the extremities and eye lens dose reduction in nuclear medicine; (iv) development and application of a suitable eye lens dosemeter; and (v) elaboration of training materials and guidelines for radiation protection issues at IR, IC and NM workplaces. The present study presents some important results and recommendations for dose reduction and avoidance of some typical failures during work near ionizing radiation sources. (P.A.)

  18. Data-driven modelling of structured populations a practical guide to the integral projection model

    CERN Document Server

    Ellner, Stephen P; Rees, Mark

    2016-01-01

    This book is a “How To” guide for modeling population dynamics using Integral Projection Models (IPM) starting from observational data. It is written by a leading research team in this area and includes code in the R language (in the text and online) to carry out all computations. The intended audience are ecologists, evolutionary biologists, and mathematical biologists interested in developing data-driven models for animal and plant populations. IPMs may seem hard as they involve integrals. The aim of this book is to demystify IPMs, so they become the model of choice for populations structured by size or other continuously varying traits. The book uses real examples of increasing complexity to show how the life-cycle of the study organism naturally leads to the appropriate statistical analysis, which leads directly to the IPM itself. A wide range of model types and analyses are presented, including model construction, computational methods, and the underlying theory, with the more technical material in B...

  19. Applying Formal Methods to NASA Projects: Transition from Research to Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othon, Bill

    2009-01-01

    NASA project managers attempt to manage risk by relying on mature, well-understood process and technology when designing spacecraft. In the case of crewed systems, the margin for error is even tighter and leads to risk aversion. But as we look to future missions to the Moon and Mars, the complexity of the systems will increase as the spacecraft and crew work together with less reliance on Earth-based support. NASA will be forced to look for new ways to do business. Formal methods technologies can help NASA develop complex but cost effective spacecraft in many domains, including requirements and design, software development and inspection, and verification and validation of vehicle subsystems. To realize these gains, the technologies must be matured and field-tested so that they are proven when needed. During this discussion, current activities used to evaluate FM technologies for Orion spacecraft design will be reviewed. Also, suggestions will be made to demonstrate value to current designers, and mature the technology for eventual use in safety-critical NASA missions.

  20. Using projective techniques to consider the societal dimension of healthy practices: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherrier, Hélène

    2012-01-01

    A photo-elicitation and a collage construction technique provide insights into citizens of the United Arab Emirates' (UAE) awareness of the negative effects of fast-food consumption, the relationship between awareness and UAE fast-food consumption, and the discourses used by the UAE when resisting fast-food consumption. The study draws on two disciplinary backdrops: risk awareness and resistance to behavioral change. The findings show that risk awareness campaigns should not solely be linked to bodily concerns but need to develop messages that relate to the target audience within its social, political, and economic context. What this means conceptually is that health is no longer restricted to the individual microlevel dimension but rather emerges from the dialectical interplay between taking care of one's self and taking care of one's society.

  1. Detecting God in practices: Theology in an empirical–theological research project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rein Brouwer

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available What is the nature of reality in theological research and how can this ‘theological’ reality be known? Can we empirically research God’s performance in reality? This article tries to find some common ground on this contested issue by presenting a debate between three Dutch practical theologians: Van der Ven, Immink, and Ganzevoort. Their positions on the theological dimension of empirical reality are traced, followed by some thoughts on critical realism and on a ‘cataphysic’ approach to empirical theological research, inspired by the theologian Alister McGrath and the philosopher of science Roy Bhaskar. This results in three concluding remarks. Firstly, realisme and social constructionism are not excluding options. Social constructions presuppose the existence of reality. Secondly, a stratified model of reality, perceiving the nature of reality as emergent, layered, and complex, points in the direction of multidisciplinary discourses and helps to avoid forms of reductionism. Thirdly, prioritizing the ontology of a stratified reality that reflects revelation, creates a common ground for the debate on the nature of theological reality.

  2. Alaska Tundra Travel Modeling Project and implications for seismic best management practices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, G. [Alaska Dept. of Natural Resources, Anchorage, AK (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Much of the oil and gas exploration in the Alaskan North Slope depends on winter off-road travel to gain access to remote exploration areas. A study was conducted to relate vehicular off-road travel to tundra disturbance. Four types of vehicles were driven on the tundra on specific plots at various times throughout early to mid winter in an effort to determine if travel could occur earlier than current practice without impacting tundra integrity. Variables were measured the summer before travel, at the time of travel and the summers following travel. The results were used to develop a management tool to determine when conditions are adequate to allow winter vehicular off-road travel. It was determined that the soil temperature should be 5 degrees C or colder at a depth of 30 cm, with snow depths of 15 cm in coastal sedge tundra or 23 cm in foothills tussock tundra. This presentation also discussed the implications for managing off-road travel associated with seismic operations and recent changes in the types of vehicles used for these operations. figs.

  3. Is Mindfulness a Useful Practice for Music Therapists? A Research Project Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aglaïa Maria Mika

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the familiarity and usefulness of mindfulness to music therapists who work in a clinical setting, and it aims to examine plausible similarities between presently known concepts of mindfulness and the conventionally established therapeutic attitude as portrayed in this paper. Seven music therapists working in London took part in this study. Four attended a focus group and three were interviewed over the telephone. The findings show that most participants were familiar with the concept and had some experience of mindfulness, and stated that it enhanced their clinical work. Participants described some practices they do to prepare themselves for sessions, and they explained how they experienced silences as well as nonmusical components within music therapy. Their opinions about the familiarity of mindfulness in their profession varied. The findings suggest an overall positive view on mindfulness; however, as the sample number is small, I would suggest that my research questions and findings could be used as a platform for future research initiatives.

  4. Teaching trainers to incorporate evidence-based medicine (EBM teaching in clinical practice: the EU-EBM project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaleta Anna

    2009-09-01

    situations to teach various steps of EBM and demonstrate their applicability to clinical practice. Once fully implemented, the ultimate outcome of this pilot project will be a European qualification in teaching EBM, which will be used by doctors, hospitals, professional bodies responsible for postgraduate qualifications and continuing medical education.

  5. Creating an Interest in Research and Development as a Means of Reducing the Gap between Theory and Practice in Primary Care: An Interventional Study Based on Strategic Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morténius, Helena

    2014-01-01

    Today, healthcare professionals are faced with the challenge of implementing research results in an optimal way. It is therefore important to create a climate that is conducive to research and development (R&D). For this reason, new strategies are required to enhance healthcare professionals’ interest in innovative thinking and R&D. Strategic communication with roots in sociology, psychology and political science was employed as a means of achieving long-term behavioural change. The aim of this study was to describe, follow up and evaluate a primary care intervention based on strategic communication intended to increase healthcare professionals’ interest in R&D over time. An interventional cohort study comprising all staff members (N = 1276) in a Swedish primary care area was initiated in 1997 and continued for 12 years. The intention to engage in R&D was measured on two occasions; at 7 and 12 years. Both descriptive statistics and bivariate analyses were employed. The results demonstrated that the positive attitude to R&D increased over time, representing a first step towards new thinking and willingness to change work practices for the benefit of the patient. Strategic communication has not been previously employed as a scientific tool to create a long-term interest in R&D within primary care. PMID:25162708

  6. Creating an Interest in Research and Development as a Means of Reducing the Gap between Theory and Practice in Primary Care: An Interventional Study Based on Strategic Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Morténius

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Today, healthcare professionals are faced with the challenge of implementing research results in an optimal way. It is therefore important to create a climate that is conducive to research and development (R&D. For this reason, new strategies are required to enhance healthcare professionals’ interest in innovative thinking and R&D. Strategic communication with roots in sociology, psychology and political science was employed as a means of achieving long-term behavioural change. The aim of this study was to describe, follow up and evaluate a primary care intervention based on strategic communication intended to increase healthcare professionals’ interest in R&D over time. An interventional cohort study comprising all staff members (N = 1276 in a Swedish primary care area was initiated in 1997 and continued for 12 years. The intention to engage in R&D was measured on two occasions; at 7 and 12 years. Both descriptive statistics and bivariate analyses were employed. The results demonstrated that the positive attitude to R&D increased over time, representing a first step towards new thinking and willingness to change work practices for the benefit of the patient. Strategic communication has not been previously employed as a scientific tool to create a long-term interest in R&D within primary care.

  7. Creating an interest in research and development as a means of reducing the gap between theory and practice in primary care: an interventional study based on strategic communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morténius, Helena

    2014-08-26

    Today, healthcare professionals are faced with the challenge of implementing research results in an optimal way. It is therefore important to create a climate that is conducive to research and development (R&D). For this reason, new strategies are required to enhance healthcare professionals' interest in innovative thinking and R&D. Strategic communication with roots in sociology, psychology and political science was employed as a means of achieving long-term behavioural change. The aim of this study was to describe, follow up and evaluate a primary care intervention based on strategic communication intended to increase healthcare professionals' interest in R&D over time. An interventional cohort study comprising all staff members (N = 1276) in a Swedish primary care area was initiated in 1997 and continued for 12 years. The intention to engage in R&D was measured on two occasions; at 7 and 12 years. Both descriptive statistics and bivariate analyses were employed. The results demonstrated that the positive attitude to R&D increased over time, representing a first step towards new thinking and willingness to change work practices for the benefit of the patient. Strategic communication has not been previously employed as a scientific tool to create a long-term interest in R&D within primary care.

  8. The Dynamics of Connecting Universities, Non-Governmental Organizations and Community Members by Means of Academic Projects Directed at People in Need

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arantes do Amaral, João Alberto; Matsusaki, Cristina Toshie Motohashi

    2017-01-01

    In this article we discuss an action research experience that took place from 2002 to 2015. We analyze the inception and progress of several project-based learning-centered academic courses that were aimed at developing the project management skills of graduate and undergraduate students. The experience involved approximately 1,800 students from…

  9. The role of the Stripa phase 3 project in the development of practical discrete fracture modelling technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dershowitz, W.S.

    1994-01-01

    The Stripa project has played a major role in developing discrete fracture analysis from a theoretical research topic to a practical repository evaluation tool. The Site Characterization and Validation (SCV) program positively answered questions regarding: (1) the validation of discrete fracture models, (2) the feasibility of collecting data for discrete fracture models, (3) the ability of discrete fracture models to simulate flow in a rock volume of approximately 10 6 cubic meters using modest computing resources, and (4) the ability to model transport in discrete fractures. The SCV program also made progress on such continuing issues as the importance of in-plane fracture heterogeneity and coupled effects. (author). 16 refs., 2 tabs., 6 figs

  10. Chapter 21: Estimating Net Savings - Common Practices. The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurnik, Charles W [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Violette, Daniel M. [Navigant, Boulder, CO (United States); Rathbun, Pamela [Tetra Tech, Madison, WI (United States)

    2017-11-02

    This chapter focuses on the methods used to estimate net energy savings in evaluation, measurement, and verification (EM and V) studies for energy efficiency (EE) programs. The chapter provides a definition of net savings, which remains an unsettled topic both within the EE evaluation community and across the broader public policy evaluation community, particularly in the context of attribution of savings to a program. The chapter differs from the measure-specific Uniform Methods Project (UMP) chapters in both its approach and work product. Unlike other UMP resources that provide recommended protocols for determining gross energy savings, this chapter describes and compares the current industry practices for determining net energy savings but does not prescribe methods.

  11. E-Procurement, from Project to Practice: Empirical Evidence from the French Public Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauvallet, Godefroy; Boughzala, Younès; Assar, Saïd

    Public procurement constitutes a significant portion of national PIB in all countries and electronic platforms for supporting public transactions are an important application of e-government. In France, new regulations since 2005 are pushing public and private actors to adopt electronic means for handling all steps of the purchase process in public organisations. Based on quantitative and qualitative surveys made between 2005 and 2008, this chapter presents the general topic of e-procurement and specifically discusses the problem of e-procurement adoption in public institutions in France. The conclusions of these investigations spanning a three years period, are that public e-procurement is constantly progressing, although difficulties related to insufficient technical skills and the complexity of the juridical context hinder seriously its full adoption. They also show that a digital and an organisational divide is appearing between big administrations which have the adequate resources and skills to fully adopt e-procurement, and small administration (i.e. local authorities) which are still reluctant or unable to conduct a purchase in a digital manner.

  12. Healthcare for migrants, participatory health research and implementation science--better health policy and practice through inclusion. The RESTORE project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacFarlane, Anne; O'Reilly-de Brún, Mary; de Brún, Tomas; Dowrick, Christopher; O'Donnell, Catherine; Mair, Frances; Spiegel, Wolfgang; van den Muijsenbergh, Maria; van Weel Baumgarten, Evelyn; Lionis, Christos; Clissmann, Ciaran

    2014-06-01

    This is a time of unprecedented mobility across the globe. Healthcare systems need to adapt to ensure that primary care is culturally and linguistically appropriate for migrants. Evidence-based guidelines and training interventions for cultural competence and the use of professional interpreters are available across European healthcare settings. However, in real-world practice migrants and their healthcare providers 'get by' with a range of informal and inadequate strategies. RESTORE is an EU FP7 funded project, which is designed to address this translational gap. The objective of RESTORE is to investigate and support the implementation of guidelines and training initiatives to support communication in cross-cultural consultations in selected European primary care settings. RESTORE is a qualitative, participatory health project running from 2011-2015. It uses a novel combination of normalization process theory and participatory learning and action research to follow and shape the implementation journeys of relevant guidelines and training initiatives. Research teams in Ireland, England, the Netherlands, Austria and Greece are conducting similar parallel qualitative case study fieldwork, with a complementary health policy analysis led by Scotland. In each setting, key stakeholders, including migrants, are involved in participatory data generation and analysis. RESTORE will provide knowledge about the levers and barriers to the implementation of guidelines and training initiatives in European healthcare settings and about successful, transferrable strategies to overcome identified barriers. RESTORE will elucidate the role of policy in shaping these implementation journeys; generate recommendations for European policy driving the development of culturally and linguistically appropriate healthcare systems.

  13. Improving outcomes for patients with type 2 diabetes using general practice networks: a quality improvement project in east London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Sally; Chowdhury, Tahseen A; Mathur, Rohini; Robson, John

    2014-02-01

    Structured diabetes care can improve outcomes and reduce risk of complications, but improving care in a deprived, ethnically diverse area can prove challenging. This report evaluates a system change to enhance diabetes care delivery in a primary care setting. All 35 practices in one inner London Primary Care Trust were geographically grouped into eight networks of four to five practices, each supported by a network manager, clerical staff and an educational budget. A multidisciplinary team developed a 'care package' for type 2 diabetes management, with financial incentives based on network achievement of targets. Monthly electronic performance dashboards enabled networks to track and improve performance. Network multidisciplinary team meetings including the diabetic specialist team supported case management and education. Key measures for improvement included the number of diabetes care plans completed, proportion of patients attending for digital retinal screen and proportions of patients achieving a number of biomedical indices (blood pressure, cholesterol, glycated haemoglobin). Between 2009 and 2012, completed care plans rose from 10% to 88%. The proportion of patients attending for digital retinal screen rose from 72% to 82.8%. The proportion of patients achieving a combination of blood pressure ≤ 140/80 mm Hg and cholesterol ≤ 4 mmol/L rose from 35.3% to 46.1%. Mean glycated haemoglobin dropped from 7.80% to 7.66% (62-60 mmol/mol). Investment of financial, organisational and education resources into primary care practice networks can achieve clinically important improvements in diabetes care in deprived, ethnically diverse communities. This success is predicated on collaborative working between practices, purposively designed high-quality information on network performance and engagement between primary and secondary care clinicians.

  14. Applying the Creativity in Oder to Generate Innovation Projects: the Practical Case Study of a Didactic Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Maria dos Santos Pereira Alves

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A current challenge in teaching practice is to transform classrooms into laboratories to exchange experiences in courses whose goal is to enhance the professional skills in a practical and meaningful way. The search for improvement demonstrates that, increasingly, professionals become aware that organizations coexist in highly competitive environments, seeking to conquer more markets based on sustainable competitive advantages demanding fast responses of its employees. Considering that the process of creativity can be stimulated through the establishment of a suitable environment, this study aims to discuss the application of a didactic strategy developed for this purpose. Using the single case study methodology, it was used the technique of unstructured observation (informal or single to carry out the collection and the recording of events that occurred during the strategy application. It discusses elements such as identifying opportunities, creativity, innovation and entrepreneurship, seeking their relationships to understand how it is possible to motivate the generation of proposals for innovative projects in educational environments. As a result, it is presented the perceptions of teachers on the didactic strategy applied, emphasizing that a suitable environment for the development of ideas encourages the student to propose solutions for the improbabilities, creating innovative alternatives to the identified needs.

  15. "Academic drug-detailing": from project to practice in a Swedish urban area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundborg, C S; Hensjö, L O; Gustafsson, L L

    1997-01-01

    To develop and test the long-term feasibility of an interdisciplinary independent drug information service providing both written and oral drug information to physicians in an urban area of Sweden (> 400,000 inhabitants). A drug information service was developed encouraging a cooperative approach between a department of clinical pharmacology, general practitioners (GPs), pharmacists, and Drug and Therapeutic Committees. Scientifically-based drug information was condensed and interpreted by a team and presented in both written and oral form. In one part of the area, both oral and written information was provided, while in another part of the area, only written information was distributed. Questionnaires and one prescription survey were performed to elucidate the knowledge and attitudes of the GPs regarding drug treatment of one condition (urinary tract infection, UTI, and norfloxacin were used as examples), as well as their opinion of our services. Over a period of 10 years, 75 issues of a drug bulletin (2000 copies) were distributed. Oral producer-independent drug information, provided jointly by a GP and a pharmacist, was given on 16 occasions in each of 30 health centres (150 GPs). Around 80% of the GPs participated in the meetings. Of these GPs, 75% found the service important for their daily work. A majority of the GPs had prescribed the test drug, norfloxacin, not a first-line drug according to local recommendations, 1 year after approval. A significantly lower proportion of prescribers were observed in the area where the GPs had been provided with both written and oral information regarding recommended treatment (including first-line drugs) for uncomplicated cystitis. The approximate cost for this service in 1995 was SEK 0.685 million (USD 0.1 million); the prescribing costs of the 150 GPs were estimated at SEK 255 million per year. This means that the cost of the service per GP is only around 0.3% of normal prescribing costs. Over a period of 10 years the

  16. Addressing host community issues through enhancing community well-being: a practical framework for siting major nuclear projects in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stemeroff, M.; Richardson, D.; Wlodarczyk, T.L. [AECOM Canada Limited, Markham, ON (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    Any major project development, including those related to nuclear activities in Canada, will certainly impose a wide range of effects and consequences for a host community and region. These wide ranging effects can be positive as well as negative and last for varying time periods. However, the challenge is not to simply identify effects of a project and then mitigate and/or compensate for them. Rather, we have witnessed a transition in recent years that gaining community social acceptance for projects has taken on new meaning. Specifically, communities have taken a 'longer view' of themselves and are more interested in how the project will enhance their long-term well-being. There is considerable evidence to suggest that assessing and demonstrating effects on community well-being has become the focal point for community understanding and decision-making about how to proceed with any new development. This paper will examine what the term 'community well-being' is and how it applies to gaining social acceptance for major nuclear projects in Canada. Insights and examples will be gathered from a range of cases in Canada and elsewhere to demonstrate its diverse meaning and application. A discussion of its application to gaining social acceptance for nuclear projects will be generic in nature and provide a useful framework that can be adapted to the meet the needs in unique situations. There is extensive literature with a cornucopia of subject headers including: community well-being, sustainable development, sustainability, social capital, social well-being, participatory development, and so on. In many cases, these and other terms are used interchangeably or applied as a sub-set to another term. There is no distinct rule or collective wisdom regarding which term to use under different circumstances or situations. Suffice it to say that the notion of community well-being, sustainable development and the like are not new terms or concepts, even in

  17. Addressing host community issues through enhancing community well-being: a practical framework for siting major nuclear projects in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stemeroff, M.; Richardson, D.; Wlodarczyk, T.L.

    2011-01-01

    Any major project development, including those related to nuclear activities in Canada, will certainly impose a wide range of effects and consequences for a host community and region. These wide ranging effects can be positive as well as negative and last for varying time periods. However, the challenge is not to simply identify effects of a project and then mitigate and/or compensate for them. Rather, we have witnessed a transition in recent years that gaining community social acceptance for projects has taken on new meaning. Specifically, communities have taken a 'longer view' of themselves and are more interested in how the project will enhance their long-term well-being. There is considerable evidence to suggest that assessing and demonstrating effects on community well-being has become the focal point for community understanding and decision-making about how to proceed with any new development. This paper will examine what the term 'community well-being' is and how it applies to gaining social acceptance for major nuclear projects in Canada. Insights and examples will be gathered from a range of cases in Canada and elsewhere to demonstrate its diverse meaning and application. A discussion of its application to gaining social acceptance for nuclear projects will be generic in nature and provide a useful framework that can be adapted to the meet the needs in unique situations. There is extensive literature with a cornucopia of subject headers including: community well-being, sustainable development, sustainability, social capital, social well-being, participatory development, and so on. In many cases, these and other terms are used interchangeably or applied as a sub-set to another term. There is no distinct rule or collective wisdom regarding which term to use under different circumstances or situations. Suffice it to say that the notion of community well-being, sustainable development and the like are not new terms or concepts, even in

  18. Addressing host community issues through enhancing community well-being: a practical framework for siting major nuclear projects in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stemeroff, M.; Richardson, D.; Wlodarczyk, T. L. [AECOM Canada Limited, Markham, ON (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    Any major project development, including those related to nuclear activities in Canada, will certainly impose a wide range of effects and consequences for a host community and region. These wide ranging effects can be positive as well as negative and last for varying time periods. However, the challenge is not to simply identify effects of a project and then mitigate and/or compensate for them. Rather, we have witnessed a transition in recent years that gaining community social acceptance for projects has taken on new meaning. Specifically, communities have taken a 'longer view' of themselves and are more interested in how the project will enhance their long-term well-being. There is considerable evidence to suggest that assessing and demonstrating effects on community well-being has become the focal point for community understanding and decision-making about how to proceed with any new development. This paper will examine what the term 'community well-being' is and how it applies to gaining social acceptance for major nuclear projects in Canada. Insights and examples will be gathered from a range of cases in Canada and elsewhere to demonstrate its diverse meaning and application. A discussion of its application to gaining social acceptance for nuclear projects will be generic in nature and provide a useful framework that can be adapted to the meet the needs in unique situations. There is extensive literature with a cornucopia of subject headers including: community well-being, sustainable development, sustainability, social capital, social well-being, participatory development, and so on. In many cases, these and other terms are used interchangeably or applied as a sub-set to another term. There is no distinct rule or collective wisdom regarding which term to use under different circumstances or situations. Suffice it to say that the notion of community well-being, sustainable development and the like are not new terms or concepts, even in Canada. Despite the wide

  19. Practical Sun Power: 5 Projects to Help Free You from Depending on Any Fuel Other Than the Sun.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankins, William H., III; Wilson, David A.

    This publication describes in detail projects for using solar energy; five major projects and five mini-projects. The major projects are: (1) Parabolic reflectors, both cylindrical and spherical; (2) Solar oven; (3) Hot water heater; (4) House heating; and (5) Conversion to electricity. Mini-projects investigate: (1) Solar computers; (2) Fresnel…

  20. The Meaning of Meaning, Etc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, Don L. F.

    This paper attempts to dispel a number of misconceptions about the nature of meaning, namely that: (1) synonyms are words that have the same meanings, (2) antonyms are words that have opposite meanings, (3) homonyms are words that sound the same but have different spellings and meanings, (4) converses are antonyms rather than synonyms, (5)…

  1. Interprofessional practice in health care: an educational project with four learning sequences for students from six study programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Anna Christina; Klimke-Jung, Kathrin; Schäfer, Thorsten; Reif, Karl

    2016-01-01

    In response to demographic changes and the growing complexity of healthcare demands, national and international organizations are requiring greater cooperation among the health professions. Implementation of interprofessional learning programs within study programs in medicine, midwifery, nursing, and therapy is still rare. The first projects are currently underway in Germany. This paper presents the experience gathered by the organizers as interprofessional courses for six study programs were implemented. As part of the collaborative project "Interprofessional Practice in Health Care" between the Medical School at the Ruhr University in Bochum and the Department for Applied Health Sciences at the Hochschule für Gesundheit, interprofessional curricular units were developed, taught and evaluated with the aim of establishing permanent and joint curricular structures at the two German universities. Imparting communication skills, knowledge of and appreciation for the work performed by the other health professions, as well as having students reflect on their own professional roles and responsibilities, were the focus of four curricular units. Students worked together in small interprofessional groups. A total of 220 students enrolled in occupational therapy, midwifery, speech therapy, medicine, nursing, and physiotherapy participated in small-group seminars. When conducting and implementing the seminars, administrative and methodological challenges became apparent, and this should be taken into consideration in regard to any future development of interprofessional courses. Integration into existing curricula, along with finding time in the various schedules and appropriate classroom space for small groups, were among the challenges faced. For over 86% of the students it was important that students from all six of the degree programs involved participated in the project. A detailed analysis of the content and evaluation will follow. The value of the project's aim to

  2. GP-support by means of AGnES-practice assistants and the use of telecare devices in a sparsely populated region in Northern Germany – proof of concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scriba Sibylle

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In many rural regions in Germany, the proportion of the elderly population increases rapidly. Simultaneously, about one-third of the presently active GPs will retire until 2010. Often it is difficult to find successors for vacant GP-practices. These regions require innovative concepts to avoid the imminent shortage in primary health care. The AGnES-concept comprises the delegation of GP-home visits to qualified AGnES-practice assistants (AGnES: GP-supporting, community-based, e-health-assisted, systemic intervention. Main objectives were the assessment of the acceptance of the AGnES-concept by the participating GPs, patients, and AGnES-practice assistants, the kind of delegated tasks, and the feasibility of home telecare in a GP-practice. Methods In this paper, we report first results of the implementation of this concept in regular GP-practices, conducted November 2005 – March 2007 on the Island of Rügen, Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania, Germany. This study was meant as a proof of concept. The GP delegated routine home-visits to qualified practice employees (here: registered nurses. Eligible patients were provided with telecare-devices to monitor disease-related physiological values. All delegated tasks, modules conducted and questionnaire responses were documented. The participating patients were asked for their acceptance based on standardized questionnaires. The GPs and AGnES-practice assistants were asked for their judgement about different project components, the quality of health care provision and the competences of the AGnES-practice assistants. Results 550 home visits were conducted. 105 patients, two GPs and three AGnES-practice assistants (all registered nurses participated in the project. 48 patients used telecare-devices to monitor health parameters. 87.4% of the patients accepted AGnES-care as comparable to common GP-care. In the course of the project, the GPs delegated an increasing number of both monitoring

  3. Meaning in mathematics education

    CERN Document Server

    Valero, Paola; Hoyles, Celia; Skovsmose, Ole

    2005-01-01

    What does it mean to know mathematics? How does meaning in mathematics education connect to common sense or to the meaning of mathematics itself? How are meanings constructed and communicated and what are the dilemmas related to these processes? There are many answers to these questions, some of which might appear to be contradictory. Thus understanding the complexity of meaning in mathematics education is a matter of huge importance. There are twin directions in which discussions have developed - theoretical and practical - and this book seeks to move the debate forward along both dimensions while seeking to relate them where appropriate. A discussion of meaning can start from a theoretical examination of mathematics and how mathematicians over time have made sense of their work. However, from a more practical perspective, anybody involved in teaching mathematics is faced with the need to orchestrate the myriad of meanings derived from multiple sources that students develop of mathematical knowledge.

  4. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report 24: The technical communications practices of US aerospace engineers and scientists: Results of the phase 1 SAE mail survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. government technical report is a primary means by which the results of federally funded research and development (R&D) are transferred to the U.S. aerospace industry. However, little is known about this information product in terms of its actual use, importance, and value in the transfer of federally funded R&D. To help establish a body of knowledge, the U.S. government technical report is being investigated as part of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. In this report, we summarize the literature on technical reports and provide a model that depicts the transfer of federally funded aerospace R&D via the U.S. government technical report. We present results from our investigation of aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis the U.S. government technical report, and present the results of research that investigated aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis the technical communications practices of U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists affiliated with the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE).

  5. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report 33: The technical communications practices of US aerospace engineers and scientists: Results of the phase 1 AIAA mail survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. government technical report is a primary means by which the results of federally funded research and development (R&D) are transferred to the U.S. aerospace industry. However, little is known about this information product in terms of its actual use, importance, and value in the transfer of federally funded R&D. To help establish a body of knowledge, the U.S. government technical report is being investigated as part of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. In this report, we summarize the literature on technical reports and provide a model that depicts the transfer of federally funded aerospace R&D via the U.S. government technical report. We present results from our investigation of aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis the U.S. government technical report, and present the results of research that investigated aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis the technical communications practices of U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists who are members of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA).

  6. University of Colorado CubeSat Student Projects as Successful Model for Teaching Students about Engineering Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palo, S. E.; Li, X.; Woods, T. N.; Kohnert, R.

    2014-12-01

    There is a long history of cooperation between students at the University of Colorado, Boulder and professional engineers and scientists at LASP, which has led to many successful space missions with direct student involvement. The recent student-led missions include the Student Nitric Oxide Explorer (SNOE, 1998 - 2002), the Student Dust Counter (SDC) on New Horizons (2006 - present), the Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment (CSSWE), being a very successful NSF CubeSat that launched in September 2012, and the NASA Miniature X-ray Solar Spectrometer (MinXSS) CubeSat (launch will be in early 2015). Students are involved in all aspects of the design, and they experience the full scope of the mission process from concept, to fabrication and test, and mission operations. A significant part of the student involvement in the CubeSat projects is gained by using the CubeSat development as a focal point for an existing two-semester course sequence in CU's Aerospace Engineering Sciences (AES) Department: the Space Hardware Design section of Graduate Projects I & II (ASEN 5018 & ASEN 6028). The goal of these courses is to teach graduate students how to design and build systems using a requirement-based approach and fundamental systems engineering practices. The two-semester sequence takes teams of about 15 students from requirements definition and preliminary design through manufacturing, integration, and testing. In addition to the design process, students learn key professional skills such as working effectively in groups, finding solutions to open-ended problems, and actually building a system to their own set of specifications. The partnership between AES and LASP allows us to include engineering professionals in the mix, thus more effectively training science and engineering students for future roles in the civilian or commercial space industry. The mentoring process with LASP engineers helps to mitigate risk of the inexperience of the students and ensures consistent

  7. The project Digital Medellín and how to examine the triad of ICT, practice, and learning through change processes with an ethnographic case study approach

    OpenAIRE

    Christer Olsson, Jan Ove

    2013-01-01

    The main goal of this article is to describe the investigation conducted in themasters’ thesis project: Digital Medellín – communities of practice and informationand communication technology for organizational development. This is done by givinga description of the background, problem area, the method and theories suchas ethnography, a socio-cultural perspective and the concept of communitiesof practice. Two case studies are presented and discussed. The findings of theresearch are stated in t...

  8. The project Digital Medellín and how to examine the triad of ICT, practice, and learning through change processes with an ethnographic case study approach

    OpenAIRE

    Christer Olsson, Jan-Ove

    2013-01-01

    The main goal of this article is to describe the investigation conducted in the masters' thesis project: Digital Medellín - communities of practice and information and communication technology for organizational development. This is done by giving a description of the background, problem area, the method and theories such as ethnography, a socio-cultural perspective and the concept of communities of practice. Two case studies are presented and discussed. The findings of the research are state...

  9. Re-mastering the Master's Tools: Recognizing and affirming the life experiences and cultural practices of urban youth in critical computational literacy through a video game project

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Clifford

    2012-01-01

    This study examines how a video game project that focuses on students' lived experiences and cultural practices teach critical literacies and computational thinking. Specifically, this research looked at how the pedagogy, processes, and student products demonstrated culturally relevant pedagogy practices, critical literacy, and computational thinking. This design-based research study utilizes critical literacy, sociocultural learning theory, and culturally relevant pedagogy in the framing, st...

  10. A Practical Recycling Project . . .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durant, Raymond H.; Mikuska, James M.

    1973-01-01

    Descirbes a school district's recycling program of aluminum lunch trays that are collected after their use. The trays are used as scrap metal in industrial education workshop and used for sand castings. (PS)

  11. Project ethics

    CERN Document Server

    Jonasson, Haukur Ingi

    2013-01-01

    How relevant is ethics to project management? The book - which aims to demystify the field of ethics for project managers and managers in general - takes both a critical and a practical look at project management in terms of success criteria, and ethical opportunities and risks. The goal is to help the reader to use ethical theory to further identify opportunities and risks within their projects and thereby to advance more directly along the path of mature and sustainable managerial practice.

  12. ORGANIZATIONAL PROJECT MANAGEMENT MATURITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yana Derenskaya

    2017-11-01

    , and documenting best practices and potential difficulties. Practical implications. For the purposes of the present research, the level of organizational project management maturity of the enterprise in question is evaluated according to the three-level model developed by H. Кеrzner. The conclusion is made that project management maturity of this enterprise corresponds to maturity level 2. Besides, the defined maturity level is specified in more detail along the life cycle phases in order to determine more precisely the position of project management activity of the enterprise within the maturity model. Potential problems (the so-called “bottlenecks” of the enterprise in the field of project management are identified. Based on the results of the analysis, a number of recommendations are suggested for further development of the corporate system of project management at the given enterprise. The results of the research showed that in order to achieve a higher level of maturity, it is necessary to create a project team, organize a project office, and distribute project management functions among the team members, develop a procedure of involving experts with different professional backgrounds into the project implementation, improve the procedure of creating project teams, ensure the accumulation of best practices of project implementation, establish the corporate standard of project management, and improve the strategic planning for project management, project implementation control, managing changes, labour resources and communication. The suggested guidelines are expected to facilitate the achievement of a higher level of maturity. They also envisage the terms of this transition and the responsible executives. Further enhancement of maturity level is achieved by means of performing a set of activities for improving and aligning various project management sub-processes aimed at managing costs, time, quality, and risks. Another important condition of enhancing

  13. What Does It Mean for Something to Be "Scientific"? Community Understandings of Science, Educational Attainment, and Community Representation Among a Sample of 25 CBPR Projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spears Johnson, Chaya R; Kraemer Diaz, Anne E; Arcury, Thomas A

    2017-04-01

    Community-based participatory research (CBPR) seeks to conduct relevant, sustainable research that is tailored to the needs of the communities with which it is engaged through equitable collaboration between community representatives and professional researchers. Like other participatory approaches to research and planning, CBPR has been criticized for the potential to engage a biased sample of community representatives and, thereby, undermine the fundamental purpose of the approach. Moreover, the varying educational levels and areas of expertise, especially regarding science literacy, among those participating in CBPR has raised concern about the ability for true collaboration to exist within CBPR projects. This article presents findings from a qualitative study of 25 CBPR research projects and explores matters of science literacy, community representation, and the nature of CBPR. Ultimately, it is suggested that those who engage in CBPR should carefully consider the potential for biased community representation and seek to purposely and mindfully avoid any partiality.

  14. Nutrition and Physical Activity Policies and Practices in Family Child Care Homes in Oregon: Baseline Findings from the Healthy Home Child Care Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunter, Katherine B.; Rice, Kelly R.; Trost, Stewart G.

    2012-01-01

    Baseline findings from the Healthy Home Child Care Project include data from Family Child Care Providers (FCCPs) in Oregon (n=53) who completed assessments of nutrition and physical activity policies and practices and BMI data for children in the care of FCCPs (n=205). Results show that a significant percentage of FCCPs failed to meet child care…

  15. Working group reports: Evaluation of the evidence to support practice guidelines for nutritional care of preterm infants-the Pre-B Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    The "Evaluation of the Evidence to Support Practice Guidelines for the Nutritional Care of Preterm Infants: The Pre-B Project" is the first phase in a process to present the current state of knowledge and to support the development of evidence-informed guidance for the nutritional care of preterm an...

  16. The Inter-Life Project: Inter-Cultural Spaces for Young People to Use Creative Practices and Research to Assist with Life Changes and Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lally, Vic; Sclater, Madeleine

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the Inter-Life Project was to investigate the use of virtual worlds and creative practices to support the acquisition of transition skills for young people to enhance their management of important life events. In particular, the authors have been investigating the role of the Inter-Life virtual worlds in supporting the development of…

  17. Accelerating Software Development through Agile Practices--A Case Study of a Small-Scale, Time-Intensive Web Development Project at a College-Level IT Competition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuesong; Dorn, Bradley

    2012-01-01

    Agile development has received increasing interest both in industry and academia due to its benefits in developing software quickly, meeting customer needs, and keeping pace with the rapidly changing requirements. However, agile practices and scrum in particular have been mainly tested in mid- to large-size projects. In this paper, we present…

  18. Use of evidence-based practices in pregnancy and childbirth: South East Asia Optimising Reproductive and Child Health in Developing Countries project.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Laopaiboon

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The burden of mortality and morbidity related to pregnancy and childbirth remains concentrated in developing countries. SEA-ORCHID (South East Asia Optimising Reproductive and Child Health In Developing countries is evaluating whether a multifaceted intervention to strengthen capacity for research synthesis, evidence-based care and knowledge implementation improves adoption of best clinical practice recommendations leading to better health for mothers and babies. In this study we assessed current practices in perinatal health care in four South East Asian countries and determined whether they were aligned with best practice recommendations.We completed an audit of 9550 medical records of women and their 9665 infants at nine hospitals; two in each of Indonesia, Malaysia and The Philippines, and three in Thailand between January-December 2005. We compared actual clinical practices with best practice recommendations selected from the Cochrane Library and the World Health Organization Reproductive Health Library. Evidence-based components of the active management of the third stage of labour and appropriately treating eclampsia with magnesium sulphate were universally practiced in all hospitals. Appropriate antibiotic prophylaxis for caesarean section, a beneficial form of care, was practiced in less than 5% of cases in most hospitals. Use of the unnecessary practices of enema in labour ranged from 1% to 61% and rates of episiotomy for vaginal birth ranged from 31% to 95%. Other appropriate practices were commonly performed to varying degrees between countries and also between hospitals within the same country.Whilst some perinatal health care practices audited were consistent with best available evidence, several were not. We conclude that recording of clinical practices should be an essential step to improve quality of care. Based on these findings, the SEA-ORCHID project team has been developing and implementing interventions aimed at increasing

  19. Natural Resources Management on Corps of Engineers Water Resources Development Projects: Practices, Challenges, and Perspectives on the Future

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kasual, Richard

    1998-01-01

    Natural resources management on U.S. Army Corps of Engineers water resources development projects was documented from the responses of management personnel to a detailed questionnaire mailed to a stratified random sample of projects...

  20. General practitioners in Styria - who is willing to take part in research projects and why? : A survey by the Institute of General Practice and Health Services Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggenburg, Stephanie; Reinisch, Manuel; Höfler, Reinhild; Stigler, Florian; Avian, Alexander; Siebenhofer, Andrea

    2017-11-01

    Increasing recognition of general practice is reflected in the growing number of university institutes devoted to the subject and Health Services Research (HSR) is flourishing as a result. In May 2015 the Institute of General Practice and Evidence-based Health Services Research, Medical University of Graz, initiated a survey of Styrian GPs. The aim of the survey was to determine the willingness to take part in HSR projects, to collect sociodemographic data from GPs who were interested and to identify factors affecting participation in research projects. Of the 1015 GPs who received the questionnaire, 142 (14%) responded and 135 (13%) were included in the analysis. Overall 106 (10%) GPs indicated their willingness to take part in research projects. Factors inhibiting participation were lack of time, administrative workload, and lack of assistance. Overall, 10% of Styrian GPs were willing to participate in research projects. Knowledge about the circumstances under which family doctors are prepared to participate in HSR projects will help in the planning of future projects.