WorldWideScience

Sample records for mb-02 mutz-8 set-2

  1. English vocabulary set #2 interactive flashcards book

    CERN Document Server

    REA, The Editors of

    2013-01-01

    REA's Interactive Flashcard books represent a novel approach which combines the merits of flash cards with the ease of using a book. One side of each page includes questions to be answered, with space for writing in one's answers - a feature not usually found on flash cards. The flip side of the same page contains the correct answers, much as flash cards do. English Vocabulary (Set #2) is fully indexed making it easy to locate topics for study. Thanks to the book form, there is no need to look for and fish out appropriate questions from a box and put them back in the proper order, and ther

  2. FvSet2 regulates fungal growth, pathogenicity, and secondary metabolism in Fusarium verticillioides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Qin; Wang, Zhenzhong; Sun, Xiao; Ji, Tiantian; Huang, Hai; Yang, Yang; Zhang, Hao; Tahir, Hafiz Abdul Samad; Wu, Liming; Wu, Huijun; Gao, Xuewen

    2017-10-01

    Histone H3 lysine 36 methylation (H3K36me) is generally associated with activation of gene expression in most eukaryotic cells. However, the function of H3K36me in filamentous fungi is largely unknown. Set2 is the sole lysine histone methyltransferase (KHMTase) enzyme responsible for the methylation of H3K36 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In the current study, we identified a single ortholog of S. cerevisiae Set2 in Fusarium verticillioides. We report that FvSet2 is responsible for the trimethylation of H3K36 (H3K36me3). The FvSET2 deletion mutant (ΔFvSet2) showed significant defects in vegetative growth, FB 1 biosynthesis, pigmentation, and fungal virulence. Furthermore, trimethylation of H3K36 was found to be important for active transcription of genes involved in FB 1 and bikaverin biosyntheses. These data indicate that FvSet2 plays an important role in the regulation of secondary metabolism, vegetative growth and fungal virulence in F. verticillioides. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Set2 Methyltransferase Facilitates DNA Replication and Promotes Genotoxic Stress Responses through MBF-Dependent Transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Chen-Chun; Kishkevich, Anastasiya; Deegan, Rachel S; Keszthelyi, Andrea; Folkes, Lisa; Kearsey, Stephen E; De León, Nagore; Soriano, Ignacio; de Bruin, Robertus Antonius Maria; Carr, Antony M; Humphrey, Timothy C

    2017-09-12

    Chromatin modification through histone H3 lysine 36 methylation by the SETD2 tumor suppressor plays a key role in maintaining genome stability. Here, we describe a role for Set2-dependent H3K36 methylation in facilitating DNA replication and the transcriptional responses to both replication stress and DNA damage through promoting MluI cell-cycle box (MCB) binding factor (MBF)-complex-dependent transcription in fission yeast. Set2 loss leads to reduced MBF-dependent ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) expression, reduced deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) synthesis, altered replication origin firing, and a checkpoint-dependent S-phase delay. Accordingly, prolonged S phase in the absence of Set2 is suppressed by increasing dNTP synthesis. Furthermore, H3K36 is di- and tri-methylated at these MBF gene promoters, and Set2 loss leads to reduced MBF binding and transcription in response to genotoxic stress. Together, these findings provide new insights into how H3K36 methylation facilitates DNA replication and promotes genotoxic stress responses in fission yeast. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Set2 Methyltransferase Facilitates DNA Replication and Promotes Genotoxic Stress Responses through MBF-Dependent Transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Chun Pai

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin modification through histone H3 lysine 36 methylation by the SETD2 tumor suppressor plays a key role in maintaining genome stability. Here, we describe a role for Set2-dependent H3K36 methylation in facilitating DNA replication and the transcriptional responses to both replication stress and DNA damage through promoting MluI cell-cycle box (MCB binding factor (MBF-complex-dependent transcription in fission yeast. Set2 loss leads to reduced MBF-dependent ribonucleotide reductase (RNR expression, reduced deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate (dNTP synthesis, altered replication origin firing, and a checkpoint-dependent S-phase delay. Accordingly, prolonged S phase in the absence of Set2 is suppressed by increasing dNTP synthesis. Furthermore, H3K36 is di- and tri-methylated at these MBF gene promoters, and Set2 loss leads to reduced MBF binding and transcription in response to genotoxic stress. Together, these findings provide new insights into how H3K36 methylation facilitates DNA replication and promotes genotoxic stress responses in fission yeast.

  5. Integrated Data Collection Analysis (IDCA) Program - RDX Standard Data Set 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandstrom, Mary M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Brown, Geoffrey W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Preston, Daniel N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pollard, Colin J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Warner, Kirstin F. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Sorensen, Daniel N. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Remmers, Daniel L. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Phillips, Jason J. [Air Force Research Lab. (AFRL), Tyndall Air Force Base, FL (United States); Shelley, Timothy J. [Applied Research Associates, Tyndall Air Force Base, FL (United States); Reyes, Jose A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hsu, Peter C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Reynolds, John G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2013-02-20

    The Integrated Data Collection Analysis (IDCA) program is conducting a proficiency study for Small- Scale Safety and Thermal (SSST) testing of homemade explosives (HMEs). Described here are the results for impact, friction, electrostatic discharge, and differential scanning calorimetry analysis of the RDX Type II Class 5 standard, from testing the second time in the Proficiency Test. This RDX testing (Set 2) compared to the first (Set 1) was found to have about the same impact sensitivity, have more BAM friction sensitivity, less ABL friction sensitivity, similar ESD sensitivity, and same DSC sensitivity.

  6. [Dot1 and Set2 Histone Methylases Control the Spontaneous and UV-Induced Mutagenesis Levels in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Yeasts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozhina, T N; Evstiukhina, T A; Peshekhonov, V T; Chernenkov, A Yu; Korolev, V G

    2016-03-01

    In the Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts, the DOT1 gene product provides methylation of lysine 79 (K79) of hi- stone H3 and the SET2 gene product provides the methylation of lysine 36 (K36) of the same histone. We determined that the dot1 and set2 mutants suppress the UV-induced mutagenesis to an equally high degree. The dot1 mutation demonstrated statistically higher sensitivity to the low doses of MMC than the wild type strain. The analysis of the interaction between the dot1 and rad52 mutations revealed a considerable level of spontaneous cell death in the double dot1 rad52 mutant. We observed strong suppression of the gamma-in- duced mutagenesis in the set2 mutant. We determined that the dot1 and set2 mutations decrease the sponta- neous mutagenesis rate in both single and d ouble mutants. The epistatic interaction between the dot1 and set2 mutations and almost similar sensitivity of the corresponding mutants to the different types of DNA damage allow one to conclude that both genes are involved in the control of the same DNA repair pathways, the ho- mologous-recombination-based and the postreplicative DNA repair.

  7. Recruitment of PfSET2 by RNA polymerase II to variant antigen encoding loci contributes to antigenic variation in P. falciparum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uchechi E Ukaegbu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Histone modifications are important regulators of gene expression in all eukaryotes. In Plasmodium falciparum, these epigenetic marks regulate expression of genes involved in several aspects of host-parasite interactions, including antigenic variation. While the identities and genomic positions of many histone modifications have now been cataloged, how they are targeted to defined genomic regions remains poorly understood. For example, how variant antigen encoding loci (var are targeted for deposition of unique histone marks is a mystery that continues to perplex the field. Here we describe the recruitment of an ortholog of the histone modifier SET2 to var genes through direct interactions with the C-terminal domain (CTD of RNA polymerase II. In higher eukaryotes, SET2 is a histone methyltransferase recruited by RNA pol II during mRNA transcription; however, the ortholog in P. falciparum (PfSET2 has an atypical architecture and its role in regulating transcription is unknown. Here we show that PfSET2 binds to the unphosphorylated form of the CTD, a property inconsistent with its recruitment during mRNA synthesis. Further, we show that H3K36me3, the epigenetic mark deposited by PfSET2, is enriched at both active and silent var gene loci, providing additional evidence that its recruitment is not associated with mRNA production. Over-expression of a dominant negative form of PfSET2 designed to disrupt binding to RNA pol II induced rapid var gene expression switching, confirming both the importance of PfSET2 in var gene regulation and a role for RNA pol II in its recruitment. RNA pol II is known to transcribe non-coding RNAs from both active and silent var genes, providing a possible mechanism by which it could recruit PfSET2 to var loci. This work unifies previous reports of histone modifications, the production of ncRNAs, and the promoter activity of var introns into a mechanism that contributes to antigenic variation by malaria parasites.

  8. Volcanoes in Eruption - Set 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The word volcano is used to refer to the opening from which molten rock and gas issue from Earth's interior onto the surface, and also to the cone, hill, or mountain...

  9. Mono(p-tolyl)platinum(II) and bis(p-tolyl)platinum(II) complexes of diethylsulfide as reagents for organoplatinum synthesis. Structures of [Pt(p-Tol)2(µ-SEt2)]2 and PtCl(p-Tol)(bpy) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koten, G. van; Casado Lacabra, M.A.; Canty, A.J.; Lutz, M.H.; Patel, J.; Spek, A.L.; Sun, H.

    2001-01-01

    The complex trans-PtCl(p-Tol)(SEt{2}){2} is obtained from the reaction of [Pt(p-Tol){2}(SEt{2})]{2} with PtCl{2}(SEt{2}){2} and SEt{2} in mole ratio 1:2:2. The mono(p-tolyl)platinum(II) and bis(p-tolyl)platinum(II) complexes of diethylsulfide react with 2, 2'-bipyridine to form the complexes

  10. Managing Caesarean Scar Pregnancy in low Resource Settings: 2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    ultrasound guided approach with dilatation of uterine cervix and subsequent evacuation of uterine ... Keywords: caesarean scar pregnancy, transrectal ultrasound guided surgical approach. ... a viable embryo with a crown rump length (CRL).

  11. Hand Hygiene in Healthcare Settings 2 PSA (:30)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This 30 second PSA encourages people to wash their hands often while in the hospital or visiting someone in the hospital. It also encourages them to remind their healthcare providers to wash their hands, too.

  12. Sodium Tetraphenylborate Catalyst Identification: Preliminary Studies Set 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, M.J.

    1997-05-01

    This document details the results of these tests and represents the second report of the task designed to identify soluble NaTPB decomposition catalysts. This task, performed as part of the DNFSB Recommendation 96-1 Implementation Plan, partially fulfills the request by High Level Waste Engineering and the ITP Flow Sheet Team in task Technical Request HLW-TTR-97008

  13. Hand Hygiene in Healthcare Settings 2 PSA (:30)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-08-19

    This 30 second PSA encourages people to wash their hands often while in the hospital or visiting someone in the hospital. It also encourages them to remind their healthcare providers to wash their hands, too.  Created: 8/19/2010 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 8/19/2010.

  14. Temporal and Geographic variation in the validity and internal consistency of the Nursing Home Resident Assessment Minimum Data Set 2.0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mor, Vincent; Intrator, Orna; Unruh, Mark Aaron; Cai, Shubing

    2011-04-15

    The Minimum Data Set (MDS) for nursing home resident assessment has been required in all U.S. nursing homes since 1990 and has been universally computerized since 1998. Initially intended to structure clinical care planning, uses of the MDS expanded to include policy applications such as case-mix reimbursement, quality monitoring and research. The purpose of this paper is to summarize a series of analyses examining the internal consistency and predictive validity of the MDS data as used in the "real world" in all U.S. nursing homes between 1999 and 2007. We used person level linked MDS and Medicare denominator and all institutional claim files including inpatient (hospital and skilled nursing facilities) for all Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries entering U.S. nursing homes during the period 1999 to 2007. We calculated the sensitivity and positive predictive value (PPV) of diagnoses taken from Medicare hospital claims and from the MDS among all new admissions from hospitals to nursing homes and the internal consistency (alpha reliability) of pairs of items within the MDS that logically should be related. We also tested the internal consistency of commonly used MDS based multi-item scales and examined the predictive validity of an MDS based severity measure viz. one year survival. Finally, we examined the correspondence of the MDS discharge record to hospitalizations and deaths seen in Medicare claims, and the completeness of MDS assessments upon skilled nursing facility (SNF) admission. Each year there were some 800,000 new admissions directly from hospital to US nursing homes and some 900,000 uninterrupted SNF stays. Comparing Medicare enrollment records and claims with MDS records revealed reasonably good correspondence that improved over time (by 2006 only 3% of deaths had no MDS discharge record, only 5% of SNF stays had no MDS, but over 20% of MDS discharges indicating hospitalization had no associated Medicare claim). The PPV and sensitivity levels of Medicare hospital diagnoses and MDS based diagnoses were between .6 and .7 for major diagnoses like CHF, hypertension, diabetes. Internal consistency, as measured by PPV, of the MDS ADL items with other MDS items measuring impairments and symptoms exceeded .9. The Activities of Daily Living (ADL) long form summary scale achieved an alpha inter-consistency level exceeding .85 and multi-item scale alpha levels of .65 were achieved for well being and mood, and .55 for behavior, levels that were sustained even after stratification by ADL and cognition. The Changes in Health, End-stage disease and Symptoms and Signs (CHESS) index, a summary measure of frailty was highly predictive of one year survival. The MDS demonstrates a reasonable level of consistency both in terms of how well MDS diagnoses correspond to hospital discharge diagnoses and in terms of the internal consistency of functioning and behavioral items. The level of alpha reliability and validity demonstrated by the scales suggest that the data can be useful for research and policy analysis. However, while improving, the MDS discharge tracking record should still not be used to indicate Medicare hospitalizations or mortality. It will be important to monitor the performance of the MDS 3.0 with respect to consistency, reliability and validity now that it has replaced version 2.0, using these results as a baseline that should be exceeded.

  15. JST Thesaurus Headwords and Synonyms: 生体力学 [MeCab user dictionary for science technology term[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available MeCab user dictionary for science technology term 生体力学 名詞 一般 * * * * 生体力学 セイタイリキガク セイタイリキガク Thesaurus2015 200906018714461381 C MB02 MULTI_WORD 生体 力学

  16. JST Thesaurus Headwords and Synonyms: 生物力学 [MeCab user dictionary for science technology term[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available MeCab user dictionary for science technology term 生物力学 名詞 一般 * * * * 生体力学 セイタイリキガク セイタイリキガク Thesaurus2015 200906018714461381 V MB02 MULTI_WORD 生物 力学

  17. JST Thesaurus Headwords and Synonyms: 生体医用工学 [MeCab user dictionary for science technology term[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available MeCab user dictionary for science technology term 生体医用工学 名詞 一般 * * * * 医用工学 イヨウコウガク イヨーコウガク Thesaurus2015 200906026585377142 V MB02 MULTI_WORD 生体 医用 工学

  18. JST Thesaurus Headwords and Synonyms: 生物医学工学 [MeCab user dictionary for science technology term[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available MeCab user dictionary for science technology term 生物医学工学 名詞 一般 * * * * 医用工学 イヨウコウガク イヨーコウガク Thesaurus2015 200906026585377142 V MB02 MULTI_WORD 生物 医学 工学

  19. JST Thesaurus Headwords and Synonyms: 医工学 [MeCab user dictionary for science technology term[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available MeCab user dictionary for science technology term 医工学 名詞 一般 * * * * 医用工学 イヨウコウガク イヨーコウガク Thesaurus2015 200906026585377142 V MB02 MULTI_WORD 医 工学

  20. JST Thesaurus Headwords and Synonyms: 医用生体工学 [MeCab user dictionary for science technology term[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available MeCab user dictionary for science technology term 医用生体工学 名詞 一般 * * * * 医用工学 イヨウコウガク イヨーコウガク Thesaurus2015 200906026585377142 V MB02 MULTI_WORD 医用 生体 工学

  1. JST Thesaurus Headwords and Synonyms: 生体工学 [MeCab user dictionary for science technology term[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available MeCab user dictionary for science technology term 生体工学 名詞 一般 * * * * 生体工学 セイタイコウガク セイタイコーガク Thesaurus2015 200906080093603397 C MB02 MULTI_WORD 生体 工学

  2. JST Thesaurus Headwords and Synonyms: 生体医工学 [MeCab user dictionary for science technology term[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available MeCab user dictionary for science technology term 生体医工学 名詞 一般 * * * * 医用工学 イヨウコウガク イヨーコウガク Thesaurus2015 200906026585377142 V MB02 MULTI_WORD 生体 医 工学

  3. JST Thesaurus Headwords and Synonyms: 医用工学 [MeCab user dictionary for science technology term[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available MeCab user dictionary for science technology term 医用工学 名詞 一般 * * * * 医用工学 イヨウコウガク イヨーコウガク Thesaurus2015 200906026585377142 C MB02 MULTI_WORD 医用 工学

  4. JST Thesaurus Headwords and Synonyms: 医療工学 [MeCab user dictionary for science technology term[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available MeCab user dictionary for science technology term 医療工学 名詞 一般 * * * * 医用工学 イヨウコウガク イヨーコウガク Thesaurus2015 200906026585377142 V MB02 MULTI_WORD 医療 工学

  5. JST Thesaurus Headwords and Synonyms: 生医学技術 [MeCab user dictionary for science technology term[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available MeCab user dictionary for science technology term 生医学技術 名詞 一般 * * * * 医用工学 イヨウコウガク イヨーコウガク Thesaurus2015 200906026585377142 V MB02 MULTI_WORD 生 医学 技術

  6. JST Thesaurus Headwords and Synonyms: バイオバルブ [MeCab user dictionary for science technology term[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available MeCab user dictionary for science technology term バイオバルブ 名詞 一般 * * * * 生体弁 セイタイベン セイタイベン Thesaurus2015 200906054216724126 V MB02/LS54 MULTI_WORD バイオ バルブ

  7. J-GLOBAL MeSH Dictionary: バイオ人工臓器 [MeCab user dictionary for science technology term[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available MeCab user dictionary for science technology term バイオ人工臓器 名詞 一般 * * * * バイオ人工臓器 ... MeSH D021522 200906012752742418 C MB02 MULTI_WORD バイオ 人工 臓器

  8. JST Thesaurus Headwords and Synonyms: 化学刺激 [MeCab user dictionary for science technology term[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available MeCab user dictionary for science technology term 化学刺激 名詞 サ変接続 * * * * 化学刺激 カガクシゲキ カガクシゲキ Thesaurus2015 200906078327019185 C MB02 MULTI_WORD 化学 刺激

  9. Bim and Mcl-1 exert key roles in regulating JAK2V617F cell survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubert, Joëlle; Qian, Zhiyan; Andraos, Rita; Guthy, Daniel A; Radimerski, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The JAK2 V617F mutation plays a major role in the pathogenesis of myeloproliferative neoplasms and is found in the vast majority of patients suffering from polycythemia vera and in roughly every second patient suffering from essential thrombocythemia or from primary myelofibrosis. The V617F mutation is thought to provide hematopoietic stem cells and myeloid progenitors with a survival and proliferation advantage. It has previously been shown that activated JAK2 promotes cell survival by upregulating the anti-apoptotic STAT5 target gene Bcl-xL. In this study, we have investigated the role of additional apoptotic players, the pro-apoptotic protein Bim as well as the anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1. Pharmacological inhibition of JAK2/STAT5 signaling in JAK2 V617F mutant SET-2 and MB-02 cells was used to study effects on signaling, cell proliferation and apoptosis by Western blot analysis, WST-1 proliferation assays and flow cytometry. Cells were transfected with siRNA oligos to deplete candidate pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins. Co-immunoprecipitation assays were performed to assess the impact of JAK2 inhibition on complexes of pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins. Treatment of JAK2 V617F mutant cell lines with a JAK2 inhibitor was found to trigger Bim activation. Furthermore, Bim depletion by RNAi suppressed JAK2 inhibitor-induced cell death. Bim activation following JAK2 inhibition led to enhanced sequestration of Mcl-1, besides Bcl-xL. Importantly, Mcl-1 depletion by RNAi was sufficient to compromise JAK2 V617F mutant cell viability and sensitized the cells to JAK2 inhibition. We conclude that Bim and Mcl-1 have key opposing roles in regulating JAK2 V617F cell survival and propose that inactivation of aberrant JAK2 signaling leads to changes in Bim complexes that trigger cell death. Thus, further preclinical evaluation of combinations of JAK2 inhibitors with Bcl-2 family antagonists that also tackle Mcl-1, besides Bcl-xL, is warranted to assess the therapeutic potential

  10. JST Thesaurus Headwords and Synonyms: 生物学的システム [MeCab user dictionary for science technology term[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available MeCab user dictionary for science technology term 生物学的システム 名詞 一般 * * * * 生体系 セイタイケイ セイタイケイ Thesaurus2015 200906091203269503 V MB02/LS31 MULTI_WORD 生物 学 的 システム

  11. JST Thesaurus Headwords and Synonyms: 生物学的モデル [MeCab user dictionary for science technology term[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available MeCab user dictionary for science technology term 生物学的モデル 名詞 一般 * * * * 生体モデル セイタイモデル セイタイモデル Thesaurus2015 200906087604462589 V MB02 MULTI_WORD 生物 学 的 モデル

  12. JST Thesaurus Headwords and Synonyms: 生物学的シグナル [MeCab user dictionary for science technology term[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available MeCab user dictionary for science technology term 生物学的シグナル 名詞 一般 * * * * 生体信号 セイタイシンゴウ セイタイシンゴー Thesaurus2015 200906090131541150 V MB02 MULTI_WORD 生物 学 的 シグナル

  13. JST Thesaurus Headwords and Synonyms: 多層知覚 [MeCab user dictionary for science technology term[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available MeCab user dictionary for science technology term 多層知覚 名詞 サ変接続 * * * * 多層パーセプトロン タソ...ウパーセプトロン タソーパーセプトロン Thesaurus2015 200906077461818837 V MB02 MULTI_WORD 多層 知覚

  14. JST Thesaurus Headwords and Synonyms: 医用電子工学 [MeCab user dictionary for science technology term[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available MeCab user dictionary for science technology term 医用電子工学 名詞 一般 * * * * 医用エレクトロニクス イ...ヨウエレクトロニクス イヨーエレクトロニクス Thesaurus2015 200906019425559884 V MB02 MULTI_WORD 医用 電子 工学

  15. JST Thesaurus Headwords and Synonyms: ME工学 [MeCab user dictionary for science technology term[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available MeCab user dictionary for science technology term ME工学 名詞 一般 * * * * 医用エレクトロニクス イヨウ...エレクトロニクス イヨーエレクトロニクス Thesaurus2015 200906019425559884 C MB02 MULTI_WORD M E 工学

  16. JST Thesaurus Headwords and Synonyms: バイオメトリクス認証 [MeCab user dictionary for science technology term[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available MeCab user dictionary for science technology term バイオメトリクス認証 名詞 サ変接続 * * * * バイオメトリクス バイオメトリクス バイオ...メトリクス Thesaurus2015 200906027043003358 V MB02 UNKNOWN_2 バイオメトリクス 認証

  17. JST Thesaurus Headwords and Synonyms: バイオエンジニアリング [MeCab user dictionary for science technology term[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available MeCab user dictionary for science technology term バイオエンジニアリング 名詞 一般 * * * * 生体工学 セイ...タイコウガク セイタイコーガク Thesaurus2015 200906080093603397 V MB02 MULTI_WORD バイオ エンジニアリング

  18. JST Thesaurus Headwords and Synonyms: バイオメトリック認証 [MeCab user dictionary for science technology term[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available MeCab user dictionary for science technology term バイオメトリック認証 名詞 サ変接続 * * * * バイオメトリクス バイオメトリクス バイオ...メトリクス Thesaurus2015 200906027043003358 V MB02 UNKNOWN_2 バイオメトリック 認証

  19. JST Thesaurus Headwords and Synonyms: バイオメトリ [MeCab user dictionary for science technology term[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available MeCab user dictionary for science technology term バイオメトリ 名詞 一般 * * * * 生体計測 セイタイケイソク セイタイケイソク Thesaurus2015 200906054253608829 V MB02 UNKNOWN_1 バイオメトリ

  20. JST Thesaurus Headwords and Synonyms: バイオメトリー [MeCab user dictionary for science technology term[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available MeCab user dictionary for science technology term バイオメトリー 名詞 一般 * * * * 生体計測 セイタイケイソク セイタイケイソク Thesaurus2015 200906054253608829 V MB02 UNKNOWN_1 バイオメトリー

  1. JST Thesaurus Headwords and Synonyms: バイオメトリクス [MeCab user dictionary for science technology term[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available MeCab user dictionary for science technology term バイオメトリクス 名詞 一般 * * * * バイオメトリクス バイオメトリクス バイオメトリクス Thesaurus2015 200906027043003358 C MB02 UNKNOWN_1 バイオメトリクス

  2. JST Thesaurus Headwords and Synonyms: バイオメカニクス [MeCab user dictionary for science technology term[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available MeCab user dictionary for science technology term バイオメカニクス 名詞 一般 * * * * 生体力学 セイタイリキガク セイタイリキガク Thesaurus2015 200906018714461381 V MB02 UNKNOWN_1 バイオメカニクス

  3. JST Thesaurus Headwords and Synonyms: バイオメカニックス [MeCab user dictionary for science technology term[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available MeCab user dictionary for science technology term バイオメカニックス 名詞 一般 * * * * 生体力学 セイタイリキガク セイタイリキガク Thesaurus2015 200906018714461381 V MB02 UNKNOWN_1 バイオメカニックス

  4. Dynamic mechanisms of cardiac oxygenation during brief ischemia and reperfusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsons, W.J.; Rembert, J.C.; Bauman, R.P.; Greenfield, J.C. Jr.; Piantadosi, C.A.

    1990-01-01

    Myocardial oxygenation may be altered markedly by changes in tissue blood flow. During brief ischemia and reperfusion produced by transient occlusion of the left anterior descending artery in 10 open-chest dogs, changes in the oxygenation of tissue hemoglobin (Hb) plus myoglobin (Mb) and the oxidation-reduction (redox) state of mitochondrial cytochrome aa3 were monitored continuously using near-infrared spectroscopy. The nondestructive optical technique indicated that coronary occlusion produced an abrupt drop in tissue oxygen stores (tHb02 + Mb02), tissue blood volume (tBV), and the oxidation level of cytochrome aa3. Changes in the cytochrome oxidation state were related inversely to transmural collateral blood flow within the ischemic region (r = 0.77) measured with radiolabeled microspheres. Furthermore, there was a direct relationship (r = 0.91) between collateral blood flow and the tissue level of desaturated Hb and Mb (tHb + Mb). Reperfusion after 2 min of ischemia led to a synchronous overshoot of baseline in coronary flow and tBV followed by supranormal increases in tHb + Mb02 and the oxidation level of cytochrome aa3. The tHb + Mb level increased transiently during reperfusion. This response correlated inversely with collateral flow during ischemia (r = 0.91). Accordingly, the time required to reach peak tHb + Mb levels was shortest in dogs with high collateral flows (r = 0.75). Thus collateral blood flow partially sustains myocardial oxygenation during coronary artery occlusion and influences tissue reoxygenation early during reperfusion

  5. Recombinant human parvovirus B19 vectors: erythroid cell-specific delivery and expression of transduced genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponnazhagan, S; Weigel, K A; Raikwar, S P; Mukherjee, P; Yoder, M C; Srivastava, A

    1998-06-01

    A novel packaging strategy combining the salient features of two human parvoviruses, namely the pathogenic parvovirus B19 and the nonpathogenic adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV), was developed to achieve erythroid cell-specific delivery as well as expression of the transduced gene. The development of such a chimeric vector system was accomplished by packaging heterologous DNA sequences cloned within the inverted terminal repeats of AAV and subsequently packaging the DNA inside the capsid structure of B19 virus. Recombinant B19 virus particles were assembled, as evidenced by electron microscopy as well as DNA slot blot analyses. The hybrid vector failed to transduce nonerythroid human cells, such as 293 cells, as expected. However, MB-02 cells, a human megakaryocytic leukemia cell line which can be infected by B19 virus following erythroid differentiation with erythropoietin (N. C. Munshi, S. Z. Zhou, M. J. Woody, D. A. Morgan, and A. Srivastava, J. Virol. 67:562-566, 1993) but lacks the putative receptor for AAV (S. Ponnazhagan, X.-S. Wang, M. J. Woody, F. Luo, L. Y. Kang, M. L. Nallari, N. C. Munshi, S. Z. Zhou, and A. Srivastava, J. Gen. Virol. 77:1111-1122, 1996), were readily transduced by this vector. The hybrid vector was also found to specifically target the erythroid population in primary human bone marrow cells as well as more immature hematopoietic progenitor cells following erythroid differentiation, as evidenced by selective expression of the transduced gene in these target cells. Preincubation with anticapsid antibodies against B19 virus, but not anticapsid antibodies against AAV, inhibited transduction of primary human erythroid cells. The efficiency of transduction of primary human erythroid cells by the recombinant B19 virus vector was significantly higher than that by the recombinant AAV vector. Further development of the AAV-B19 virus hybrid vector system should prove beneficial in gene therapy protocols aimed at the correction of inherited and

  6. Recombinant Human Parvovirus B19 Vectors: Erythroid Cell-Specific Delivery and Expression of Transduced Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponnazhagan, Selvarangan; Weigel, Kirsten A.; Raikwar, Sudhanshu P.; Mukherjee, Pinku; Yoder, Mervin C.; Srivastava, Arun

    1998-01-01

    A novel packaging strategy combining the salient features of two human parvoviruses, namely the pathogenic parvovirus B19 and the nonpathogenic adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV), was developed to achieve erythroid cell-specific delivery as well as expression of the transduced gene. The development of such a chimeric vector system was accomplished by packaging heterologous DNA sequences cloned within the inverted terminal repeats of AAV and subsequently packaging the DNA inside the capsid structure of B19 virus. Recombinant B19 virus particles were assembled, as evidenced by electron microscopy as well as DNA slot blot analyses. The hybrid vector failed to transduce nonerythroid human cells, such as 293 cells, as expected. However, MB-02 cells, a human megakaryocytic leukemia cell line which can be infected by B19 virus following erythroid differentiation with erythropoietin (N. C. Munshi, S. Z. Zhou, M. J. Woody, D. A. Morgan, and A. Srivastava, J. Virol. 67:562–566, 1993) but lacks the putative receptor for AAV (S. Ponnazhagan, X.-S. Wang, M. J. Woody, F. Luo, L. Y. Kang, M. L. Nallari, N. C. Munshi, S. Z. Zhou, and A. Srivastava, J. Gen. Virol. 77:1111–1122, 1996), were readily transduced by this vector. The hybrid vector was also found to specifically target the erythroid population in primary human bone marrow cells as well as more immature hematopoietic progenitor cells following erythroid differentiation, as evidenced by selective expression of the transduced gene in these target cells. Preincubation with anticapsid antibodies against B19 virus, but not anticapsid antibodies against AAV, inhibited transduction of primary human erythroid cells. The efficiency of transduction of primary human erythroid cells by the recombinant B19 virus vector was significantly higher than that by the recombinant AAV vector. Further development of the AAV-B19 virus hybrid vector system should prove beneficial in gene therapy protocols aimed at the correction of inherited

  7. Histone H3 lysine 36 methyltransferase mobilizes NER factors to regulate tolerance against alkylation damage in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Kim Kiat; Nguyen, Thi Thuy Trang; Li, Adelicia Yongling; Yeo, Yee Phan; Chen, Ee Sin

    2018-04-09

    The Set2 methyltransferase and its target, histone H3 lysine 36 (H3K36), affect chromatin architecture during the transcription and repair of DNA double-stranded breaks. Set2 also confers resistance against the alkylating agent, methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), through an unknown mechanism. Here, we show that Schizosaccharomyces pombe (S. pombe) exhibit MMS hypersensitivity when expressing a set2 mutant lacking the catalytic histone methyltransferase domain or a H3K36R mutant (reminiscent of a set2-null mutant). Set2 acts synergistically with base excision repair factors but epistatically with nucleotide excision repair (NER) factors, and determines the timely nuclear accumulation of the NER initiator, Rhp23, in response to MMS. Set2 facilitates Rhp23 recruitment to chromatin at the brc1+ locus, presumably to repair alkylating damage and regulate the expression of brc1+ in response to MMS. Set2 also show epistasis with DNA damage checkpoint proteins; regulates the activation of Chk1, a DNA damage response effector kinase; and acts in a similar functional group as proteins involved in homologous recombination. Consistently, Set2 and H3K36 ensure the dynamicity of Rhp54 in DNA repair foci formation after MMS treatment. Overall, our results indicate a novel role for Set2/H3K36me in coordinating the recruitment of DNA repair machineries to timely manage alkylating damage.

  8. NOAA South Carolina oyster mapping orthoimagery, collection subset 2 of 5, 2003-2005 (NODC Accession 0084749)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set, 2 of 5 archived at the NODC, contains digital orthophotography. The data set presents information that represented conditions for the specified...

  9. 77 FR 9256 - Design and Methodology for Postmarket Surveillance Studies Under Section 522 of the Federal Food...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-16

    ... postmarket setting. 2. Who is the target audience for this public workshop? Who should attend this public workshop? This workshop is open to all interested parties. The target audience is professionals in the...

  10. The StreamCat Dataset: Accumulated Attributes for NHDPlusV2 (Version 2.1) Catchments for the Conterminous United States: State Soil Geographic Database (STATSGO)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset (STATSGO_Set1 and STATSGO_Set2) represents the soil characteristics within individual, local NHDPlusV2 catchments and upstream, contributing watersheds...

  11. MR imaging of the knee using fat suppression technique: a preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Jin Suck; Kim, Mi Hye; Cho, Jae Hyun; Park, Chang Yun; Lee, Yeon Hee [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Soo [Inje University College of Medicine, Kimhae (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-03-15

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the usefulness of fat suppression technique for MR imaging of the knee. Twenty-eight knees of 26 patients were imaged at a 1.5 T MR system. Sagittal and coronal T2-weighted spin echo imaged (SET2) and sagittal fat suppression SET2(FSSE) were obtained in all cases. We used a chemical shift imaging method for fat suppression. We compared FSSE with SET2 in terms of the conspicuity of lesions of menisci, cruciate ligaments, cartilage, bone and soft tissue of the knee. Meniscal lesions were detected on FSSE and SET2 as well. FSSE depicted the lesion more conspicuously in 6 cases. For the depiction of ACL tear, SET2 was superior to FSSE in 5 cases. FSSE was better for the visualization of the normal structure of cartilage and it also depicted the cartilaginous lesions more conspicuously in 3 cases. Though bone bruise could be detected on both techniques, FSSE was better. FSSE could provide the improved delineation of menisci, cartilage, bone bruise and other soft tissues except the injuries of anterior cruciate ligament. Although FSSE is a reliable method, it can not replace SET2. It may be used as a complemental method in the imaging of the knee.

  12. H3K36 Methylation Regulates Nutrient Stress Response in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by Enforcing Transcriptional Fidelity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen L. McDaniel

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Set2-mediated histone methylation at H3K36 regulates diverse activities, including DNA repair, mRNA splicing, and suppression of inappropriate (cryptic transcription. Although failure of Set2 to suppress cryptic transcription has been linked to decreased lifespan, the extent to which cryptic transcription influences other cellular functions is poorly understood. Here, we uncover a role for H3K36 methylation in the regulation of the nutrient stress response pathway. We found that the transcriptional response to nutrient stress was dysregulated in SET2-deleted (set2Δ cells and was correlated with genome-wide bi-directional cryptic transcription that originated from within gene bodies. Antisense transcripts arising from these cryptic events extended into the promoters of the genes from which they arose and were associated with decreased sense transcription under nutrient stress conditions. These results suggest that Set2-enforced transcriptional fidelity is critical to the proper regulation of inducible and highly regulated transcription programs.

  13. Captodatively Stabilized Biradicaloids as Chromophores for Singlet Fission

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wen, Jin; Havlas, Zdeněk; Michl, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 137, č. 1 (2015), s. 165-172 ISSN 0002-7863 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : molecular wave functions * ANO basis sets * 2nd order perturbation theory Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 13.038, year: 2015

  14. Baseball Stadium Design: Teaching Engineering Economics and Technical Communication in a Multi-Disciplinary Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahm, Kevin; Newell, James

    2001-01-01

    Reports on a course at Rowan University, based on the economic design of a baseball stadium, that offers an introduction to multidisciplinary engineering design linked with formal training in technical communication. Addresses four pedagogical goals: (1) developing public speaking skills in a realistic, business setting; (2) giving students…

  15. 77 FR 69604 - Applications for New Awards; Model Demonstration Projects on Promoting Reentry Success Through...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-20

    ...\\ provided in those settings; (2) establishing a strong program infrastructure to support and improve... credential, 1 in 3 black men, 1 in 8 white men, and 1 in 14 Hispanic men are incarcerated.\\8\\ Formerly incarcerated men earn approximately 40 percent less per year than those who have never been incarcerated.\\9...

  16. 75 FR 22165 - Publication of Open Government Directive

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-27

    ... MERIT SYSTEMS PROTECTION BOARD Publication of Open Government Directive AGENCY: U.S. Merit Systems... specific actions are: (1) Publication of three high- value data sets; (2) designation of a senior agency... Open Government Web page; and (4) development and publication of an Open Government Plan. The Directive...

  17. Ramping up to the Biology Workbench: A Multi-Stage Approach to Bioinformatics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Kathleen; Donovan, Sam

    2005-01-01

    In the process of designing and field-testing bioinformatics curriculum materials, we have adopted a three-stage, progressive model that emphasizes collaborative scientific inquiry. The elements of the model include: (1) context setting, (2) introduction to concepts, processes, and tools, and (3) development of competent use of technologically…

  18. Predicting Diagnosed Depression and Anti-depressant Treatment in Institutionalized Older Adults by Symptom Profiles: A Closer Look at Anhedonia and Dysphoria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stones, Michael J.; Clyburn, Leah D.; Gibson, Margaret C.; Woodbury, M. Gail

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships of diagnosis and treatment of depression with anhedonic and dysphoric symptom presentation, using the Minimum Data Set 2.0. Participants were from two sectors of longterm care: 70 nursing home residents and 92 residents in a Veterans' Care Service. The samples differed in their sex…

  19. 10 CFR 960.5-2-11 - Tectonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... REPOSITORY Preclosure Guidelines Ease and Cost of Siting, Construction, Operation, and Closure § 960.5-2-11... of active faulting within the geologic setting. (2) Historical earthquakes or past man-induced... repository construction, operation, and closure may be larger then predicted from historical seismicity. (d...

  20. Educational Technology: Effective Leadership and Current Initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courville, Keith

    2011-01-01

    (Purpose) This article describes the basis for effective educational technology leadership and a few of the current initiatives and impacts that are a result of the aforementioned effective leadership. (Findings) Topics addressed in this paper include: (1) the role of the educational technology leader in an educational setting; (2) an examination…

  1. Added value of Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced Hepatobiliary phase MR imaging in evaluation of focal solid hepatic lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haimerl, Michael; Wächtler, Max; Platzek, Ivan; Müller-Wille, Rene; Niessen, Christoph; Hoffstetter, Patrick; Schreyer, Andreas Georg; Stroszczynski, Christian; Wiggermann, Philipp

    2013-01-01

    Correct characterization of focal solid hepatic lesions has always been a challenge and is of great diagnostic and therapeutic relevance. The purpose of this study was to determine the added value of hepatobiliary phase images in Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for differentiating focal solid hepatic lesions. In this retrospective trial 84 consecutive patients underwent Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MR examinations. MRI was conducted for 64 patients with malignant focal hepatic lesions (34 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), 30 metastases) and for 20 patients with benign hepatic lesions (14 focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH), 3 adenoma, 3 hemangioma). Five radiologists independently reviewed three sets of MR images by means of a 5-point confidence scale from score 1 (definitely benign) to score 5 (definitely malignant): set 1: unenhanced images; set 2: unenhanced and Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced dynamic images; set 3: hepatobiliary phase images in addition to set 2. Accuracy was assessed by the alternative free-response receiver operating characteristic curve (A z ) and the index of diagnostic performance was calculated. Diagnostic accuracy was significantly improved by the addition of Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced dynamic images: A z in set 1 was 0.708 and 0.833 in set 2 (P = 0.0002). The addition of hepatobiliary phase images increased the A z value to 0.941 in set 3 (set 3 vs set 2, P < 0.0001; set 3 vs set 1, P < 0.0001). The index of diagnostic performance was lowest in set 1 (45%), improved in set 2 (71%), and highest in set 3 (94%). Hepatobiliary phase images obtained after Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced dynamic MRI improve the differentiation of focal solid hepatic lesions

  2. Features of cryptic promoters and their varied reliance on bromodomain-containing factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha G Pattenden

    Full Text Available The Set2-Rpd3S pathway is important for the control of transcription memory. Mutation of components of this pathway results in cryptic transcription initiation within the coding region of approximately 30% of yeast genes. Specifically, deletion of the Set2 histone methyltransferase or Rco1, a component of the Rpd3S histone deacetylase complex leads to hyperacetylation of certain open reading frames (ORFs. We used this mutant as a system to study the role of histone modifications and co-activator recruitment in preinitiation complex (PIC formation. Specifically, we looked at the dependence of promoters on the bromodomain-containing RSC complex and the Bdf1 protein. We found that the dependence of cryptic promoters for these proteins varied. Overall, our data indicate that cryptic promoters are independently regulated, and their activation is dependent on factors that govern gene activation at canonical promoters.

  3. Installation Restoration Program. Phase II, Stage 1. Problem Confirmation Study, Luke Air Force Base, Glendale, Arizona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-11-01

    potable water in LAFB. Surface water from the Central Arizona Project (CAP) is available to the Base, but at a significantly higher cost than that of...available supplies of potable water which currently support the Base mission at LAFB. 1-16 1-16 SECTION 2 ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING 2.1 REGIONAL GEOLOGY Luke Air...the northern portion of the Base discharges toward the nearest natural surface water feature, the Agua Fria River. Figure 2-1 summarizes surface

  4. System architecture and operational analysis of medium displacement unmanned surface vehicle sea hunter as a surface warfare component of distributed lethality

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    systems would be easy to implement given that all they need is electrical power and a SATCOM feed so the human supervisor could arm the system and set...2 Figure 1. ACTUV during Initial Testing. Source: Jontz (2016). A. PURPOSE This thesis is a response to a general study topic request from the...based system engineering. For the purpose of this thesis , a specific system (the MDUSV) is presented as a solution. As such, there will not be the

  5. l-Amino acid oxidase isolated from Calloselasma rhodostoma snake venom induces cytotoxicity and apoptosis in JAK2V617F-positive cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Tavares

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Myeloproliferative neoplasms are Philadelphia chromosome-negative diseases characterized by hyperproliferation of mature myeloid cells, associated or not with the Janus kinase 2 tyrosine kinase mutation, JAK2V617F. As there is no curative therapy, researchers have been investigating new drugs to treat myeloproliferative neoplasms, including l-amino acid oxidase from Calloselasma rhodostoma snake venom (CR-LAAO, which is a toxin capable of eliciting apoptosis in several tumor cell lines. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of l-amino acid oxidase from C. rhodostoma snake venom in the apoptotic machinery of JAK2-mutated cell lines. METHODS: The HEL 92.1.7 and SET-2 cell lines were cultured with l-amino acid oxidase and catalase for 12 h at 37 °C in 5% carbon dioxide. The cell viability was assessed by the multi-table tournament method, the level of apoptosis was measured by flow cytometry, and the expression of cysteine-dependent aspartate-specific proteases and cleaved Poly(ADP-ribose polymerase were analyzed by Western blotting. RESULTS: l-Amino acid oxidase from C. rhodostoma snake venom was cytotoxic to HEL 92.1.7 and SET-2 cells (50% inhibitory concentration = 0.15 µg/mL and 1.5 µg/mL, respectively and induced apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner. Cell treatment with catalase mitigated the l-amino acid oxidase toxicity, indicating that hydrogen peroxide is a key component of its cytotoxic effect.The activated caspases 3 and 8 expression and cleaved PARP in HEL 92.1.7 and SET-2 cells confirmed the apoptosis activation by CR-LAAO. CONCLUSIONS: l-Amino acid oxidase from C. rhodostoma snake venom is a potential antineoplastic agent against HEL 92.1.7 and SET-2 JAK2V617F-positive cells as it activates the extrinsic apoptosis pathway.

  6. Contextual reminders fail to trigger memory reconsolidation in aged rats and aged humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Bethany J; Pest, Stacey M; Vargas, Iliana M; Glisky, Elizabeth L; Fellous, Jean-Marc

    2015-04-01

    There is strong evidence that hippocampal memory returns to a labile state upon reactivation, initiating a reconsolidation process that restabilizes it and allows for its updating. Normal aging is associated with deficits in episodic memory processes. However, the effects of aging on memory reconsolidation and its neural substrate remain largely unknown, and an animal model is lacking. In this study we investigated the effects of aging on context-dependent reconsolidation using an episodic set-learning task in humans and an analogous set-learning spatial task in rats. In both tasks, young and older subjects learned a set of objects (humans) or feeder locations (rats; Set 1) in Context A on Day 1. On Day 2, a different set (Set 2) was learned in either Context A (Reminder condition) or Context B (No Reminder condition). On Day 3, subjects were instructed (humans) or cued (rats) to recall Set 1. Young rats and humans in the Reminder condition falsely recalled significantly more items from Set 2 than those in the No Reminder condition, suggesting that the reminder context triggered a reactivation of Set 1 on Day 2 and allowed the integration of Set 2 items into Set 1. In both species, older subjects displayed a different pattern of results than young subjects. In aged rats, there was no difference between conditions in the level of falsely recalled Set 2 items (intrusions). Older humans in the No Reminder condition made significantly more intrusions than those in the Reminder condition. Follow-up control experiments in aged rats suggested that intrusions in older animals reflected general interference, independent of context manipulations. We conclude that contextual reminders are not sufficient to trigger memory updating in aged rats or aged humans, unlike in younger individuals. Future studies using this animal model should further our understanding of the role of the hippocampus in memory maintenance and updating during normal aging. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc

  7. Cumulative query method for influenza surveillance using search engine data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Dong-Woo; Jo, Min-Woo; Sohn, Chang Hwan; Shin, Soo-Yong; Lee, JaeHo; Yu, Maengsoo; Kim, Won Young; Lim, Kyoung Soo; Lee, Sang-Il

    2014-12-16

    Internet search queries have become an important data source in syndromic surveillance system. However, there is currently no syndromic surveillance system using Internet search query data in South Korea. The objective of this study was to examine correlations between our cumulative query method and national influenza surveillance data. Our study was based on the local search engine, Daum (approximately 25% market share), and influenza-like illness (ILI) data from the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A quota sampling survey was conducted with 200 participants to obtain popular queries. We divided the study period into two sets: Set 1 (the 2009/10 epidemiological year for development set 1 and 2010/11 for validation set 1) and Set 2 (2010/11 for development Set 2 and 2011/12 for validation Set 2). Pearson's correlation coefficients were calculated between the Daum data and the ILI data for the development set. We selected the combined queries for which the correlation coefficients were .7 or higher and listed them in descending order. Then, we created a cumulative query method n representing the number of cumulative combined queries in descending order of the correlation coefficient. In validation set 1, 13 cumulative query methods were applied, and 8 had higher correlation coefficients (min=.916, max=.943) than that of the highest single combined query. Further, 11 of 13 cumulative query methods had an r value of ≥.7, but 4 of 13 combined queries had an r value of ≥.7. In validation set 2, 8 of 15 cumulative query methods showed higher correlation coefficients (min=.975, max=.987) than that of the highest single combined query. All 15 cumulative query methods had an r value of ≥.7, but 6 of 15 combined queries had an r value of ≥.7. Cumulative query method showed relatively higher correlation with national influenza surveillance data than combined queries in the development and validation set.

  8. Effect of Beta alanine and sodium bicarbonate supplementation on repeated-sprint performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducker, Kagan J; Dawson, Brian; Wallman, Karen E

    2013-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate if combining beta alanine (BA) and sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) supplementation could lead to enhanced repeated-sprint performance in team-sport athletes, beyond what is possible with either supplement alone. Participants (n = 24) completed duplicate trials of a repeated-sprint test (3 sets; 6 × 20 m departing every 25 seconds, 4 minutes active recovery between sets) and were then allocated into 4 groups as follows: BA only (n = 6; 28 days BA, acute sodium chloride placebo); NaHCO3 only (n = 6; 28 days glucose placebo, acute NaHCO3); BA/NaHCO3 (n = 6; 28 days BA, acute NaHCO3); placebo only (n = 6; 28 days glucose placebo, acute sodium chloride placebo), then completed duplicate trials postsupplementation. Sodium bicarbonate alone resulted in moderate effect size (d = 0.40-0.71) and "likely" and "very likely" benefit for overall total sprint times (TST) and for each individual set and for first sprint (sets 2 and 3) and best sprint time (sets 2 and 3). Combining BA and NaHCO3 resulted in "possible" to "likely" benefits for overall TST and for sets 2 and 3. First sprint (set 3) and best sprint time (sets 2 and 3) also showed "likely" benefit after this trial. The BA and placebo groups showed no differences in performance after supplementation. In conclusion, these results indicate that supplementation with acute NaHCO3 improved repeated-sprint performance more than either a combination of NaHCO3 and BA or BA alone.

  9. Synthesis and reactivity towards diiodine of palladium(II) and platinum(II) complexes with non-cyclic and cyclic ligands (C6H3{CH=NR1R2}2-2,6)-. End-on diiodine-platinum(II) bonding in macrocyclic [PtI(C6H3{CH2NMe(CH2)7MeNCH2}-2,6)(h1-I2)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koten, G. van; Beek, J.A.M. van; Dekker, G.P.C.M.; Wissing, E.; Zoutberg, M.C.; Stam, C.H.

    1990-01-01

    Several new organo-platinum(II) and -palladium(II) complexes [MX(C{6}H{3}{CH{2}NR}1{R}2{}{2}-2, 6)] (X = halide, M = Pt, Pd; R}1{ = R}2{ = Et; R}2{ = Me, R}1{ = }t{Bu, M = Pt: R}2{ = Me, R}1{ = Ph) have been synthesized from [PtCl{2}(SEt{2}){2}] or [PdCl{2}(COD)] (COD = 1, 5-cyclooctadiene) by

  10. Point Analysis in Java applied to histological images of the perforant pathway: A user’s account

    OpenAIRE

    Scorcioni, Ruggero; Wright, Susan N.; Card, J. Patrick; Ascoli, Giorgio A.; Barrionuevo, Germán

    2008-01-01

    The freeware Java tool PAJ, created to perform 3D point analysis, was tested in an independent laboratory setting. The input data consisted of images of the hippocampal perforant pathway from serial immunocytochemical localizations of the rat brain in multiple views at different resolutions. The low magnification set (2× objective) comprised the entire perforant pathway, while the high magnification set (100× objective) allowed the identification of individual fibers. A preliminary stereologi...

  11. Critical Review Of Ethnographic Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Nurani, Lusia Marliana

    2008-01-01

    There are two basic characteristics of ethnography: (1) the observation takes place in natural setting, (2) researchers must understand how an event is perceived and interpreted by the people in a speech community. In other words, the researchers try to interpret the situation being observed from the perspective of the participants. Ethnography also relies on observations of interactions and interviews with participants in naturally occurring situation. The next characteristic of ethnography ...

  12. Using nationwide ‘big data’ from linked electronic health records to help improve outcomes in cardiovascular diseases:33 studies using methods from epidemiology, informatics, economics and social science in the ClinicAl disease research using LInked Bespoke studies and Electronic health Records (CALIBER) programme

    OpenAIRE

    Hemingway, Harry; Feder, Gene; Fitzpatrick, Natalie; Denaxas, Spiros; Shah, Amit; Timmis, A D

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Electronic health records (EHRs), when linked across primary and secondary care and curated for research use, have the potential to improve our understanding of care quality and outcomes.OBJECTIVE:To evaluate new opportunities arising from linked EHRs for improving quality of care and outcomes for patients at risk of or with coronary disease across the patient journey.DESIGN:Epidemiological cohort, health informatics, health economics and ethnographic approaches were used.SETTING:2...

  13. THE DYNAMICAL EVOLUTION OF LOW-MASS HYDROGEN-BURNING STARS, BROWN DWARFS, AND PLANETARY-MASS OBJECTS FORMED THROUGH DISK FRAGMENTATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yun; Kouwenhoven, M. B. N. [Department of Astronomy, School of Physics, Peking University, Yiheyuan Lu 5, Haidian Qu, Beijing 100871 (China); Stamatellos, D. [Jeremiah Horrocks Institute for Mathematics, Physics and Astronomy, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); Goodwin, S. P., E-mail: yunli@pku.edu.cn [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Sheffield, Hicks Building, Hounsfield Road, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-01

    Theory and simulations suggest that it is possible to form low-mass hydrogen-burning stars, brown dwarfs (BDs), and planetary-mass objects (PMOs) via disk fragmentation. As disk fragmentation results in the formation of several bodies at comparable distances to the host star, their orbits are generally unstable. Here, we study the dynamical evolution of these objects. We set up the initial conditions based on the outcomes of the smoothed-particle hydrodynamics simulations of Stamatellos and Whitworth, and for comparison we also study the evolution of systems resulting from lower-mass fragmenting disks. We refer to these two sets of simulations as set 1 and set 2, respectively. At 10 Myr, approximately half of the host stars have one companion left, and approximately 22% (set 1) to 9.8% (set 2) of the host stars are single. Systems with multiple secondaries in relatively stable configurations are common (about 30% and 44%, respectively). The majority of the companions are ejected within 1 Myr with velocities mostly below 5 km s{sup −1}, with some runaway escapers with velocities over 30 km s{sup −1}. Roughly 6% (set 1) and 2% (set 2) of the companions pair up into very low-mass binary systems, resulting in respective binary fractions of 3.2% and 1.2%. The majority of these pairs escape as very low-mass binaries, while others remain bound to the host star in hierarchical configurations (often with retrograde inner orbits). Physical collisions with the host star (0.43 and 0.18 events per host star for set 1 and set 2, respectively) and between companions (0.08 and 0.04 events per host star for set 1 and set 2, respectively) are relatively common and their frequency increases with increasing disk mass. Our study predicts observable properties of very low-mass binaries, low-mass hierarchical systems, the BD desert, and free-floating BDs and PMOs in and near young stellar groupings, which can be used to distinguish between different formation scenarios of very low

  14. Uncertainties of statistical downscaling from predictor selection: Equifinality and transferability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Guobin; Charles, Stephen P.; Chiew, Francis H. S.; Ekström, Marie; Potter, Nick J.

    2018-05-01

    The nonhomogeneous hidden Markov model (NHMM) statistical downscaling model, 38 catchments in southeast Australia and 19 general circulation models (GCMs) were used in this study to demonstrate statistical downscaling uncertainties caused by equifinality to and transferability. That is to say, there could be multiple sets of predictors that give similar daily rainfall simulation results for both calibration and validation periods, but project different amounts (or even directions of change) of rainfall changing in the future. Results indicated that two sets of predictors (Set 1 with predictors of sea level pressure north-south gradient, u-wind at 700 hPa, v-wind at 700 hPa, and specific humidity at 700 hPa and Set 2 with predictors of sea level pressure north-south gradient, u-wind at 700 hPa, v-wind at 700 hPa, and dewpoint temperature depression at 850 hPa) as inputs to the NHMM produced satisfactory results of seasonal rainfall in comparison with observations. For example, during the model calibration period, the relative errors across the 38 catchments ranged from 0.48 to 1.76% with a mean value of 1.09% for the predictor Set 1, and from 0.22 to 2.24% with a mean value of 1.16% for the predictor Set 2. However, the changes of future rainfall from NHMM projections based on 19 GCMs produced projections with a different sign for these two different sets of predictors: Set 1 predictors project an increase of future rainfall with magnitudes depending on future time periods and emission scenarios, but Set 2 predictors project a decline of future rainfall. Such divergent projections may present a significant challenge for applications of statistical downscaling as well as climate change impact studies, and could potentially imply caveats in many existing studies in the literature.

  15. Neurophysiological criteria in the diagnosis of different clinical types of Guillain-Barre syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalita, J; Misra, U K; Das, M

    2008-03-01

    The diagnostic yield of various neurophysiological criteria may vary in different subforms of Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS), whose prevalence varies in different geographical areas. To evaluate the sensitivity of various neurophysiological criteria in different clinical subtypes of GBS, and their relationship with severity, duration and outcome. Consecutive patients with GBS underwent detailed clinical evaluation. Severity was graded on a scale from 0 to 10. Motor and sensory nerve conductions and F wave studies were performed. The diagnostic sensitivity of Albers et al (set 1), Cornblath (set 2), Ho et al (set 3), Dutch GBS study group (set 4), Italian GBS study group (set 5) and Albers and Kelly (set 6) criteria were evaluated and correlated with clinical subtypes of GBS, duration, severity and outcome. There were 51 patients. Mean disability was 6.8; 34 patients were bedridden and five needed a ventilator. Clinical presentation was pure motor in 31, motorsensory in 18 and pure sensory in two patients. The sensitivity of nerve conduction study in the diagnosis of GBS was highest in set 1 (88.2%) followed by set 3 (86.3%) and set 4 (82.4%) and lowest in set 2 (39.2%). The diagnostic yield of sets 1, 3 and 4 were also higher than sets 2, 5 and 6 in different clinical subtypes of GBS. As per Ho et al, patients could be categorised into acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (44 (86.3%)), acute motor axonal neuropathy (4 (7.8%)) and acute motor sensory axonal neuropathy (3 (5.9%)). One (2%) patient died, 22.4% had complete, 57.1% partial and 18.4% poor recovery at 3 months. Outcome was related to severity of illness and compound muscle action potential (CMAP) amplitude. The sensitivity of different neurophysiological criteria in the diagnosis of Indian GBS patients varied from 39.2% to 88.2%. The outcome was related to severity of illness and CMAP amplitude.

  16. PREVIEW Behavior Modification Intervention Toolbox (PREMIT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kahlert, Daniela; Unyi-Reicherz, Annelie; Stratton, Gareth

    2016-01-01

    and feasible to evaluate. PREMIT is part of an intervention trial, which aims to prevent the onset of type-2 diabetes in pre-diabetics in eight clinical centers across the world by guiding them in changing their physical activity and dietary behavior through a group counseling approach. METHODS: The program...... development took five progressive steps, in line with the Public Health Action Cycle: (1) Summing-up the intervention goal(s), target group and the setting, (2) uncovering the generative psychological mechanisms, (3) identifying behavior change techniques and tools, (4) preparing for evaluation and (5...

  17. Propagation of Porro "petal" beams through a turbulent atmosphere

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Burger, L

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available . Construct a series of pseudo–random phase screens from the basis. 3. Implement optical wavefront changes from the pseudo–random phase screens. 4. Propagate the resulting beam to the far field and measure …. Page 11 Phase screen construction 20 40 60 80... constant h is height asl k is the wave number Atmospheric propagation Kolmogorov Turbulence Model Page 10 Atmospheric propagation How to measure turbulence 1. Decompose the turbulence model into a series of orthogonal functions (basis set). 2...

  18. 49 CFR Appendix B to Part 229 - Schedule of Civil Penalties 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...) 15/8″ or more 5,000 7,000 (i) Tire thickness 2,500 5,000 (j) Rim thickness: (1) Less than 1″ in road... 229.73Wheel sets 2,500 5,000 229.75Wheel and tire defects: (a),(d) Slid flat or shelled spot(s): (1... thickness of: (1) 7/8″ or less but more than 13/16″ 2,500 5,000 (2) 13/16″ or less 5,000 7,500 (g) Tread...

  19. Application of machine learning methods in bioinformatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haoyu; An, Zheng; Zhou, Haotian; Hou, Yawen

    2018-05-01

    Faced with the development of bioinformatics, high-throughput genomic technology have enabled biology to enter the era of big data. [1] Bioinformatics is an interdisciplinary, including the acquisition, management, analysis, interpretation and application of biological information, etc. It derives from the Human Genome Project. The field of machine learning, which aims to develop computer algorithms that improve with experience, holds promise to enable computers to assist humans in the analysis of large, complex data sets.[2]. This paper analyzes and compares various algorithms of machine learning and their applications in bioinformatics.

  20. Rehabilitation of balance-impaired stroke patients through audio-visual biofeedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gheorghe, Cristina; Nissen, Thomas; Juul Rosengreen Christensen, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    This study explored how audio-visual biofeedback influences physical balance of seven balance-impaired stroke patients, between 33–70 years-of-age. The setup included a bespoke balance board and a music rhythm game. The procedure was designed as follows: (1) a control group who performed a balance...... training exercise without any technological input, (2) a visual biofeedback group, performing via visual input, and (3) an audio-visual biofeedback group, performing via audio and visual input. Results retrieved from comparisons between the data sets (2) and (3) suggested superior postural stability...

  1. The Culture of General Palliative Nursing Care in Medical Departments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergenholtz, Heidi; Jarlbæk, Lene; Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi

    2015-01-01

    in medical departments. Methods: An ethnographic study, using Spradley's 12-step method, with observational field studies and interviews with nurses from three medical departments in a Danish regional hospital. Findings: Three cultural themes emerged from the analysis, focusing on the setting, the practice...... and the nurses' reflections on GPNC: (1) GPNC provided in a treatment setting, (2) transition to loving care and the licence to perform palliative care (PC) and (3) potential for team improvement. Conclusions: GPNC as a culture in medical departments seemed to be embedded in a setting not suited for dying...

  2. Monofractal or multifractal: a case study of spatial distribution of mining-induced seismic activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Eneva

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Using finite data sets and limited size of study volumes may result in significant spurious effects when estimating the scaling properties of various physical processes. These effects are examined with an example featuring the spatial distribution of induced seismic activity in Creighton Mine (northern Ontario, Canada. The events studied in the present work occurred during a three-month period, March-May 1992, within a volume of approximate size 400 x 400 x 180 m3. Two sets of microearthquake locations are studied: Data Set 1 (14,338 events and Data Set 2 (1654 events. Data Set 1 includes the more accurately located events and amounts to about 30 per cent of all recorded data. Data Set 2 represents a portion of the first data set that is formed by the most accurately located and the strongest microearthquakes. The spatial distribution of events in the two data sets is examined for scaling behaviour using the method of generalized correlation integrals featuring various moments q. From these, generalized correlation dimensions are estimated using the slope method. Similar estimates are made for randomly generated point sets using the same numbers of events and the same study volumes as for the real data. Uniform and monofractal random distributions are used for these simulations. In addition, samples from the real data are randomly extracted and the dimension spectra for these are examined as well. The spectra for the uniform and monofractal random generations show spurious multifractality due only to the use of finite numbers of data points and limited size of study volume. Comparing these with the spectra of dimensions for Data Set 1 and Data Set 2 allows us to estimate the bias likely to be present in the estimates for the real data. The strong multifractality suggested by the spectrum for Data Set 2 appears to be largely spurious; the spatial distribution, while different from uniform, could originate from a monofractal process. The spatial

  3. The Goat (Capra hircus) Mammary Gland Mitochondrial Proteome: A Study on the Effect of Weight Loss Using Blue-Native PAGE and Two-Dimensional Gel Electrophoresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cugno, Graziano; Parreira, José R.; Ferlizza, Enea

    2016-01-01

    ). The study used Majorera and Palmera dairy goats, divided in 4 sets, 2 for each breed: underfed group fed on wheat straw (restricted diet, so their body weight would be 15–20% reduced by the end of experiment), and a control group fed with an energy-balanced diet. At the end of the experimental period (22...... days), mammary gland biopsies were obtained for all experimental groups. The proteomic analysis of the mitochondria enabled the resolution of a total of 277 proteins, and 148 (53%) were identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. Some of the proteins were identified as subunits of the glutamate...

  4. Comparison of gingival depigmentation with Er,Cr:YSGG laser and surgical stripping, a 12-month follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholami, Leila; Moghaddam, Somayeh Ansari; Rigi Ladiz, Mohammad Ayoub; Molai Manesh, Zohreh; Hashemzehi, Hadi; Fallah, Alireza; Gutknecht, Norbert

    2018-04-13

    Gingival melanin hyperpigmentation is an esthetic concern for many individuals. In this study, we compared the standard surgical removal method with two different Er,Cr:YSGG laser settings in order to find the best treatment method. In 33 dental arches, the following three treatment groups were comparatively evaluated: (1) surgical stripping, (2) removal with laser setting 1 (4.5 W, 50 Hz, 100% water, 80% air, 60 μs, 800 μm Tip; MZ8), and (3) laser setting 2 (2.5 W, 50 Hz, 20% water, 40% air, 700 μs, 800 μm Tip; MZ8). We comparatively evaluated pain, patient satisfaction and wound healing, treatment time, and the amount of bleeding. Re-pigmentation was evaluated after 1 and 12 months by Hedin and Dummet pigmentation scores. Laser setting 1 had the best results regarding pain and patient satisfaction, although not statistically significant (P > 0.05). Wound healing results were better using lasers compared to surgical stripping (P Laser setting 1 was a faster procedure with mild amounts of bleeding. The least amount of bleeding was seen with laser setting 2. After 1 month, only two cases of the laser setting 2-treated areas showed an isolated pigmented area in the papilla; at 12 months, the mean Hedin indexes were still less than 2 and mean Dummett index less than 1 in all treatment techniques, with the lowest scores seen in the laser setting 1 sites. Based on our results, Er,Cr:YSGG laser can be more convenient for gingival depigmentation compared to surgical blade. Although not statistically significant, laser setting 1 with shorter pulse duration and higher water spray showed better overall results. However, laser setting 2, with longer pulse duration and less water spray, resulted in better coagulative effects and can be used to control bleeding wherever necessary in clinical practice.

  5. Added value of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging for the detection of pancreatic fluid collection infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borens, Bruno [Polyclinique Santa Maria, Nice (France); Arvanitakis, Marianna; Eisendrath, Pierre; Toussaint, Emmanuel; Deviere, Jacques [Erasme Hospital, Department of Gastroenterology, Brussels (Belgium); Absil, Julie; Matos, Celso; Bali, Maria Antonietta [Erasme Hospital, Department of Radiology, Brussels (Belgium); El Bouchaibi, Said [Epicura, Ath (Belgium)

    2017-03-15

    To investigate the added value of diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the detection of infection in pancreatic fluid collections (PFC). Forty-patients with PFC requiring endoscopic-transmural drainage underwent conventional-MR and DW-MR imaging (b = 1000 s/mm{sup 2}) before endoscopy. MR images were divided into two sets (set1, conventional-MR; set2, conventional-MR, DW-MR and ADC maps) and randomized. Two independent readers performed qualitative and quantitative (apparent diffusion coefficient, ADC) image analysis. Bacteriological analysis of PFC content was the gold standard. Non-parametric tests were used for comparisons. Sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value (NPV), positive predictive value (PPV) and accuracy were calculated for the two sets for both readers. Receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC) were drawn to assess quantitative DW-MR imaging diagnostic performance. For both readers, sensitivity, specificity, NPV, PPV and accuracy for infected PFCs were higher for set2 (P >.05). ADC were lower in infected versus non-infected PFCs (P ≤.031). Minimum ADC cut-off: 1,090 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s for reader 1 and 1,012 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s for reader 2 (sensitivity and specificity 67 % and 96 % for both readers). Qualitative information provided by DW-MR may help to assess PFCs infection. Infected PFCs show significantly lower ADCs compared to non-infected ones. (orig.)

  6. Added value of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging for the detection of pancreatic fluid collection infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borens, Bruno; Arvanitakis, Marianna; Eisendrath, Pierre; Toussaint, Emmanuel; Deviere, Jacques; Absil, Julie; Matos, Celso; Bali, Maria Antonietta; El Bouchaibi, Said

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the added value of diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the detection of infection in pancreatic fluid collections (PFC). Forty-patients with PFC requiring endoscopic-transmural drainage underwent conventional-MR and DW-MR imaging (b = 1000 s/mm"2) before endoscopy. MR images were divided into two sets (set1, conventional-MR; set2, conventional-MR, DW-MR and ADC maps) and randomized. Two independent readers performed qualitative and quantitative (apparent diffusion coefficient, ADC) image analysis. Bacteriological analysis of PFC content was the gold standard. Non-parametric tests were used for comparisons. Sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value (NPV), positive predictive value (PPV) and accuracy were calculated for the two sets for both readers. Receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC) were drawn to assess quantitative DW-MR imaging diagnostic performance. For both readers, sensitivity, specificity, NPV, PPV and accuracy for infected PFCs were higher for set2 (P >.05). ADC were lower in infected versus non-infected PFCs (P ≤.031). Minimum ADC cut-off: 1,090 x 10"-"3 mm"2/s for reader 1 and 1,012 x 10"-"3 mm"2/s for reader 2 (sensitivity and specificity 67 % and 96 % for both readers). Qualitative information provided by DW-MR may help to assess PFCs infection. Infected PFCs show significantly lower ADCs compared to non-infected ones. (orig.)

  7. Development of a Web Tool for Escherichia coli Subtyping Based on fimH Alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roer, Louise; Tchesnokova, Veronika; Allesøe, Rosa; Muradova, Mariya; Chattopadhyay, Sujay; Ahrenfeldt, Johanne; Thomsen, Martin C F; Lund, Ole; Hansen, Frank; Hammerum, Anette M; Sokurenko, Evgeni; Hasman, Henrik

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to construct a valid publicly available method for in silico fimH subtyping of Escherichia coli particularly suitable for differentiation of fine-resolution subgroups within clonal groups defined by standard multilocus sequence typing (MLST). FimTyper was constructed as a FASTA database containing all currently known fimH alleles. The software source code is publicly available at https://bitbucket.org/genomicepidemiology/fimtyper, the database is freely available at https://bitbucket.org/genomicepidemiology/fimtyper_db, and a service implementing the software is available at https://cge.cbs.dtu.dk/services/FimTyper FimTyper was validated on three data sets: one containing Sanger sequences of fimH alleles of 42 E. coli isolates generated prior to the current study (data set 1), one containing whole-genome sequence (WGS) data of 243 third-generation-cephalosporin-resistant E. coli isolates (data set 2), and one containing a randomly chosen subset of 40 E. coli isolates from data set 2 that were subjected to conventional fimH subtyping (data set 3). The combination of the three data sets enabled an evaluation and comparison of FimTyper on both Sanger sequences and WGS data. FimTyper correctly predicted all 42 fimH subtypes from the Sanger sequences from data set 1 and successfully analyzed all 243 draft genomes from data set 2. FimTyper subtyping of the Sanger sequences and WGS data from data set 3 were in complete agreement. Additionally, fimH subtyping was evaluated on a phylogenetic network of 122 sequence type 131 (ST131) E. coli isolates. There was perfect concordance between the typology and fimH -based subclones within ST131, with accurate identification of the pandemic multidrug-resistant clonal subgroup ST131- H 30. FimTyper provides a standardized tool, as a rapid alternative to conventional fimH subtyping, highly suitable for surveillance and outbreak detection. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  8. International comparison of interpolation procedures for the efficiency of germanium gamma-ray spectrometers (GAM83 exercise)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zijp, W.L.; Polle, A.N.; Nolthenius, H.J.

    1986-01-01

    Results are presented for the outcome of an international intercomparison of a particular gamma-ray spectrometric procedure. Laboratories were asked to determine full energy peak efficiencies and activities by means of their own procedures, starting from supplied peak-efficiency data. Four data sets for four different conditions of germanium detectors were distributed. The sets comprised: a high accuracy- (uncertainty > 1%) data set with a relatively large number of measured data (SET 1); a low accuracy- (uncertainty 3-5%) data set with a relatively small number of measured data (SET 2); a low energy-data set (SET 3); a high accuracy-data set with a relatively small number of measured data (SET 4). The intercomparison (coded GAM83) was organized and analyzed under auspices of the International Committee for Radionuclide Metrology (ICRM). The results comprise the analysis of the contributions of 41 participants

  9. Simulations of smog-chamber experiments using the two-dimensional volatility basis set: linear oxygenated precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacon-Madrid, Heber J; Murphy, Benjamin N; Pandis, Spyros N; Donahue, Neil M

    2012-10-16

    We use a two-dimensional volatility basis set (2D-VBS) box model to simulate secondary organic aerosol (SOA) mass yields of linear oxygenated molecules: n-tridecanal, 2- and 7-tridecanone, 2- and 7-tridecanol, and n-pentadecane. A hybrid model with explicit, a priori treatment of the first-generation products for each precursor molecule, followed by a generic 2D-VBS mechanism for later-generation chemistry, results in excellent model-measurement agreement. This strongly confirms that the 2D-VBS mechanism is a predictive tool for SOA modeling but also suggests that certain important first-generation products for major primary SOA precursors should be treated explicitly for optimal SOA predictions.

  10. Targeted Prostate Biopsy: Lessons Learned Midst the Evolution of a Disruptive Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassiri, Nima; Natarajan, Shyam; Margolis, Daniel J; Marks, Leonard S

    2015-09-01

    Lessons learned during a 6-year experience with more than 1200 patients undergoing targeted prostate biopsy via MRI/ultrasound fusion are reported: (1) the procedure is safe and efficient, requiring some 15-20 minutes in an office setting; (2) MRI is best performed by a radiologist with specialized training, using a transabdominal multiparametric approach and preferably a 3T magnet; (3) grade of MRI suspicion is the most powerful predictor of biopsy results, eg, Grade 5 usually represents cancer; (4) some potentially important cancers (15%-30%) are MRI-invisible; (5) Targeted biopsies provide >80% concordance with whole-organ pathology. Early enthusiasm notwithstanding, cost-effectiveness is yet to be resolved, and the technologies remain in evolution. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Expansion of Viral Load Testing and the Potential Impact on HIV Drug Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raizes, Elliot; Hader, Shannon; Birx, Deborah

    2017-12-01

    The US President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) supports aggressive scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in high-burden countries and across all genders and populations at risk toward global human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic control. PEPFAR recognizes the risk of HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) as a consequence of aggressive ART scale-up and is actively promoting 3 key steps to mitigate the impact of HIVDR: (1) routine access to routine viral load monitoring in all settings; (2) optimization of ART regimens; and (3) routine collection and analysis of HIVDR data to monitor the success of mitigation strategies. The transition to dolutegravir-based regimens in PEPFAR-supported countries and the continuous evolution of HIVDR surveillance strategies are essential elements of PEPFAR implementation. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  12. Properties of Formula 127 glass prepared with radioactive zirconia calcine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staples, B.A.; Pavlica, D.A.; Cole, H.S.

    1982-09-01

    Formula 127 glass has been developed to immobilize ICPP zirconia calcine. This glass has been prepared remotely on a laboratory scale basis with actual radioactive zirconia calcine retrieved after ten years of storage from Bin Set 2. The aqueous leachability of the glass produced was investigated and compared through application of the MCC-1, MCC-2 and Soxhlet leach tests with that of Formula 127 glass prepared with simulated calcine. The solid state properties of the glasses prepared with actual and simulated calcines were also measured by electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA) and scanning electron microscopy energy dispersive x-ray (SEM-EDX). Based on the application of these leaching tests and analysis techniques the properties measured in this study are similar for 127 glass prepared with either simulated or radioactive calcine. 13 figures, 16 tables

  13. Classification of adulterated honeys by multivariate analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiry, Saber; Esmaiili, Mohsen; Alizadeh, Mohammad

    2017-06-01

    In this research, honey samples were adulterated with date syrup (DS) and invert sugar syrup (IS) at three concentrations (7%, 15% and 30%). 102 adulterated samples were prepared in six batches with 17 replications for each batch. For each sample, 32 parameters including color indices, rheological, physical, and chemical parameters were determined. To classify the samples, based on type and concentrations of adulterant, a multivariate analysis was applied using principal component analysis (PCA) followed by a linear discriminant analysis (LDA). Then, 21 principal components (PCs) were selected in five sets. Approximately two-thirds were identified correctly using color indices (62.75%) or rheological properties (67.65%). A power discrimination was obtained using physical properties (97.06%), and the best separations were achieved using two sets of chemical properties (set 1: lactone, diastase activity, sucrose - 100%) (set 2: free acidity, HMF, ash - 95%). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Fourier phase retrieval with a single mask by Douglas-Rachford algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pengwen; Fannjiang, Albert

    2018-05-01

    The Fourier-domain Douglas-Rachford (FDR) algorithm is analyzed for phase retrieval with a single random mask. Since the uniqueness of phase retrieval solution requires more than a single oversampled coded diffraction pattern, the extra information is imposed in either of the following forms: 1) the sector condition on the object; 2) another oversampled diffraction pattern, coded or uncoded. For both settings, the uniqueness of projected fixed point is proved and for setting 2) the local, geometric convergence is derived with a rate given by a spectral gap condition. Numerical experiments demonstrate global, power-law convergence of FDR from arbitrary initialization for both settings as well as for 3 or more coded diffraction patterns without oversampling. In practice, the geometric convergence can be recovered from the power-law regime by a simple projection trick, resulting in highly accurate reconstruction from generic initialization.

  15. Seismic Experiment at North Arizona To Locate Washington Fault - 3D Data Interpolation

    KAUST Repository

    Hanafy, Sherif M.

    2008-10-01

    The recorded data is interpolated using sinc technique to create the following two data sets 1. Data Set # 1: Here, we interpolated only in the receiver direction to regularize the receiver interval to 1 m, however, the source locations are the same as the original data (2 and 4 m source intervals). Now the data contains 6 lines, each line has 121 receivers and a total of 240 shot gathers. 2. Data Set # 2: Here, we used the result from the previous step, and interpolated only in the shot direction to regularize the shot interval to 1 m. Now, both shot and receivers has 1 m interval. The data contains 6 lines, each line has 121 receivers and a total of 726 shot gathers.

  16. Clinical application of a modern high-definition head-mounted display in sonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshita, Hideki; Kihara, Kazunori; Yoshida, Soichiro; Higuchi, Saori; Ito, Masaya; Nakanishi, Yasukazu; Kijima, Toshiki; Ishioka, Junichiro; Matsuoka, Yoh; Numao, Noboru; Saito, Kazutaka; Fujii, Yasuhisa

    2014-08-01

    Because of the remarkably improved image quality and wearability of modern head-mounted displays, a monitoring system using a head-mounted display rather than a fixed-site monitor for sonographic scanning has the potential to improve the diagnostic performance and lessen the examiner's physical burden during a sonographic examination. In a preclinical setting, 2 head-mounted displays, the HMZ-T2 (Sony Corporation, Tokyo, Japan) and the Wrap1200 (Vuzix Corporation, Rochester, NY), were found to be applicable to sonography. In a clinical setting, the feasibility of the HMZ-T2 was shown by its good image quality and acceptable wearability. This modern device is appropriate for clinical use in sonography. © 2014 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  17. Sensitivity Analysis of Dousing Spray Trip on Radioactive Release in Pressure Tube Rupture Accident with Both End Fitting Failures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, M. S.; Kang, H. S; Kim, S. R. [NESS, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    We analyzed the sensitivity analysis of dousing spray trip conditions on radioactive release. In terms of conservativeness, the set 1 trip would be more appropriate in RR analysis than set 2 trip, which is the general condition of RR analysis. Radioactive releases from the containment building is related to containment air pressure, which increases by the coolant discharge from loss of coolant accident and the actuation conditions of dousing spray and so on. In LOCA analysis, the dousing spray trip conditions are set for the analysis objectives; for peak pressure (PP), for pressure signal (PS), for radioactive release (RR) and etc. In RR analysis, we would determine the dousing spray trip condition to increase radioactive release to the public for conservatism. Therefore, we carried out the sensitivity analysis of dousing spray trip condition on radioactive release from containment building using GOTHIC and SMART program for CANDU.

  18. Quality Improvement of Clinical Handover in a Liaison Psychiatry Department: A Three-Phase Audit

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Alexander, L

    2018-06-01

    Clinical handover has been identified as a period of high risk in healthcare, with increased incidence of adverse outcomes and near-misses. The purpose of handover is to communicate relevant information between medical professionals, with emphasis on completing management tasks and preventing patients from ‘falling through the cracks’1. Poor handover practices contribute to catastrophic but avoidable adverse events in healthcare. In Ireland, one such high profile incident has been a particular catalyst in the development of comprehensive handover guidelines in maternity settings2. Other specialities have yet to follow suit and there remains a dearth of guidance on handover practices, particularly guidance that can be applied to highly specialised and logistically unique areas, such as psychiatry

  19. Hanford facility dangerous waste permit application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This document, Set 2, the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Part B Permit Application, consists of 15 chapters that address the content of the Part B checklists prepared by the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology 1987) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (40 CFR 270), with additional information requirements mandated by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of 1984 and revisions of WAC 173-303. For ease of reference, the Washington State Department of Ecology checklist section numbers, in brackets, follow the chapter headings and subheadings. This permit application contains ''umbrella- type'' documentation with overall application to the Hanford Facility. This documentation is broad in nature and applies to all TSD units that have final status under the Hanford Facility Permit

  20. Understanding the Knowledge Gap Experienced by U.S. Safety Net Patients in Teleretinal Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Sheba M; Hayes, Erin Moran; Fish, Allison; Daskivich, Lauren Patty; Ogunyemi, Omolola I

    2016-01-01

    Safety-net patients' socioeconomic barriers interact with limited digital and health literacies to produce a "knowledge gap" that impacts the delivery of healthcare via telehealth technologies. Six focus groups (2 African- American and 4 Latino) were conducted with patients who received teleretinal screening in a U.S. urban safety-net setting. Focus groups were analyzed using a modified grounded theory methodology. Findings indicate that patients' knowledge gap is primarily produced at three points during the delivery of care: (1) exacerbation of patients' pre-existing personal barriers in the clinical setting; (2) encounters with technology during screening; and (3) lack of follow up after the visit. This knowledge gap produces confusion, potentially limiting patients' perceptions of care and their ability to manage their own care. It may be ameliorated through delivery of patient education focused on both disease pathology and specific role of telehealth technologies in disease management.

  1. Explanation of Significant Differences Between Models used to Assess Groundwater Impacts for the Disposal of Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste and Greater-Than-Class C-Like Waste Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0375-D) and the

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annette Schafer; Arthur S. Rood; A. Jeffrey Sondrup

    2011-08-01

    Models have been used to assess the groundwater impacts to support the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Disposal of Greater-Than-Class C (GTCC) Low-Level Radioactive Waste and GTCC-Like Waste (DOE-EIS 2011) for a facility sited at the Idaho National Laboratory and the Environmental Assessment for the INL Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project (INL 2011). Groundwater impacts are primarily a function of (1) location determining the geologic and hydrologic setting, (2) disposal facility configuration, and (3) radionuclide source, including waste form and release from the waste form. In reviewing the assumptions made between the model parameters for the two different groundwater impacts assessments, significant differences were identified. This report presents the two sets of model assumptions and discusses their origins and implications for resulting dose predictions. Given more similar model parameters, predicted doses would be commensurate.

  2. Tensile and fracture toughness characteristics of Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, H. C.; Kim, Y. S.; Ahn, S. B.; Kim, S. S.; Im, K. S.

    2004-01-01

    The object of this study is to evaluate the characteristics of tensile and fracture toughness of Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube. The transverse tensile tests were performed at various temperatures and the fracture toughness tests were carried out at room temperature using the CCT (curved compact tension) specimen. These specimens were directly machined from the pressure tube retaining original curvatures. Also, the fracture toughness of two sets of Zr-2.5Nb manufactured at different time was compared. The chemical analysis and the Vicker's hardness tests were performed at two sets of Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube. The Vicker's hardness value of SET-2 containing more oxygen and carbon relatively was higher about 11 than that of SET-1

  3. Predictability and Prediction for an Experimental Cultural Market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colbaugh, Richard; Glass, Kristin; Ormerod, Paul

    Individuals are often influenced by the behavior of others, for instance because they wish to obtain the benefits of coordinated actions or infer otherwise inaccessible information. In such situations this social influence decreases the ex ante predictability of the ensuing social dynamics. We claim that, interestingly, these same social forces can increase the extent to which the outcome of a social process can be predicted very early in the process. This paper explores this claim through a theoretical and empirical analysis of the experimental music market described and analyzed in [1]. We propose a very simple model for this music market, assess the predictability of market outcomes through formal analysis of the model, and use insights derived through this analysis to develop algorithms for predicting market share winners, and their ultimate market shares, in the very early stages of the market. The utility of these predictive algorithms is illustrated through analysis of the experimental music market data sets [2].

  4. New statistical methodology, mathematical models, and data bases relevant to the assessment of health impacts of energy technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginevan, M.E.; Collins, J.J.; Brown, C.D.; Carnes, B.A.; Curtiss, J.B.; Devine, N.

    1981-01-01

    The present research develops new statistical methodology, mathematical models, and data bases of relevance to the assessment of health impacts of energy technologies, and uses these to identify, quantify, and pedict adverse health effects of energy related pollutants. Efforts are in five related areas including: (1) evaluation and development of statistical procedures for the analysis of death rate data, disease incidence data, and large scale data sets; (2) development of dose response and demographic models useful in the prediction of the health effects of energy technologies; (3) application of our method and models to analyses of the health risks of energy production; (4) a reanalysis of the Tri-State leukemia survey data, focusing on the relationship between myelogenous leukemia risk and diagnostic x-ray exposure; and (5) investigation of human birth weights as a possible early warning system for the effects of environmental pollution

  5. Development and application of a unified balancing approach with multiple constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorzi, E. S.; Lee, C. C.; Giordano, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    The development of a general analytic approach to constrained balancing that is consistent with past influence coefficient methods is described. The approach uses Lagrange multipliers to impose orbit and/or weight constraints; these constraints are combined with the least squares minimization process to provide a set of coupled equations that result in a single solution form for determining correction weights. Proper selection of constraints results in the capability to: (1) balance higher speeds without disturbing previously balanced modes, thru the use of modal trial weight sets; (2) balance off-critical speeds; and (3) balance decoupled modes by use of a single balance plane. If no constraints are imposed, this solution form reduces to the general weighted least squares influence coefficient method. A test facility used to examine the use of the general constrained balancing procedure and application of modal trial weight ratios is also described.

  6. Multidimensional evaluation of a radio frequency identification wi-fi location tracking system in an acute-care hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoniewska, Barbara; Graham, Alecia; Gavrilova, Marina; Wah, Dannel; Gilgen, Jonathan; Coke, Jason; Burden, Jack; Nayyar, Shikha; Kaunda, Joseph; Yergens, Dean; Baylis, Barry; Ghali, William A

    2012-01-01

    Real-time locating systems (RTLS) have the potential to enhance healthcare systems through the live tracking of assets, patients and staff. This study evaluated a commercially available RTLS system deployed in a clinical setting, with three objectives: (1) assessment of the location accuracy of the technology in a clinical setting; (2) assessment of the value of asset tracking to staff; and (3) assessment of threshold monitoring applications developed for patient tracking and inventory control. Simulated daily activities were monitored by RTLS and compared with direct research team observations. Staff surveys and interviews concerning the system's effectiveness and accuracy were also conducted and analyzed. The study showed only modest location accuracy, and mixed reactions in staff interviews. These findings reveal that the technology needs to be refined further for better specific location accuracy before full-scale implementation can be recommended.

  7. An integral metallic-fueled and lead-cooled reactor concept for the 4th generation reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Adimir dos; Nascimento, Jamil Alves do

    2002-01-01

    An Integral Lead Reactor (ILR) concept is proposed for the 4th generation reactor to be used in the future. The ILR is loaded with metallic fuel and cooled by lead. It was evaluated in the 300-1500 MWe power range with the Japanese Fast Set 2 cross sections library. This set was tested against several fast benchmarks and the criticality uncertainty was found to be 0.51 %Δk. The reactor is started with U-Zr and changes to the U-TRU-Zr-RE fuel in a stepwise way. In the equilibrium cycle, the burnup reactivity is less than β eff for a core of the order of 300 MWe, pin diameter of 10.4 mm and a pin-pinch to diameter ratio of 1.308. The lead void reactivity is negative for reactor power less than 750 MWe. There is a need to improve the nuclear data for the major actinides. (author)

  8. Chancroid detected by polymerase chain reaction--Jackson, Mississippi, 1994-1995.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-08-04

    Chancroid is a sexually transmitted disease (STD) caused by infection with Haemophilus ducreyi and is characterized by genital ulceration. Chancroid is underreported in the United States (1), reflecting, in part, difficulties in diagnosis because of clinical similarities between chancroid and other ulcerative STDs. In addition, laboratory confirmation by culture is 53%-84% sensitive and often is unavailable in clinical settings (2). In September 1994, clinicians at the District V STD clinic of the Mississippi State Department of Health (MSDH) in Jackson reported examining patients with genital ulcers characteristic of chancroid but lacked capacity to confirm the diagnosis. To determine the cause of the ulcers, MSDH, in conjunction with CDC, conducted an investigation of all patients with genital ulcers examined at the Jackson STD clinic during October 20, 1994-February 1, 1995. This report summarizes the findings of the investigation.

  9. Resource allocation in health care and the role of personal autonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandjour, A

    2015-03-01

    Resource allocation decisions in health care require the consideration of ethical values. Major ethical theories include Amartya Sen's capability approach, Norman Daniels's theory of justice for health, and preference utilitarian theory. This paper argues that while only preference utilitarian theory explicitly considers the impact of an individual's actions on others, all 3 theories agree in terms of providing individual autonomy. Furthermore, it shows that all 3 theories emphasise the role of informed preferences in securing individual autonomy. Still, stressing personal autonomy has limited direct implications for priority setting. 2 priority rules for resource allocation could be identified: 1) to give priority to patients with mental disability (over those with pure physical disability); and 2) to give priority to patients with a large expected loss of autonomy without treatment. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. An integral metallic-fueled and lead-cooled reactor concept for the 4th generation reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, A. dos; Nascimento, J.A. do

    2002-01-01

    An Integral Lead Reactor (ILR) concept is proposed for the 4th generation reactor to be used in the future. The ILR is loaded with metallic fuel and cooled by lead. It was evaluated in the 300-1500 MWe power range with the Japanese Fast Set 2 cross sections library. This set was tested against several fast benchmarks and the criticality uncertainty was found to be 0.51 % Δk. The reactor is started with U-Zr and changes to the U-TRU-Zr-RE fuel in a stepwise way. In the equilibrium cycle, the burnup reactivity is less than β eff for a core of the order of 300 MWe, pin diameter of 10.4 mm and a pin-pitch to diameter ratio of 1.308. The lead void reactivity is negative for reactor power less than 750 MWe. There is a need to improve the nuclear data for the major actinides. (author)

  11. Retroperitoneal fibrosis: findings with MR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez Rodrigo, J.; Marti-Bonnati, L.; Diago, T.; Ferrer, M.D.; Aleixandre, A.; Morote, V.

    1993-01-01

    Retroperitoneal fibrosis (RF) is an uncommon disease characterized by the presence of a chronic inflammatory reaction, with the formation of fibrous tissue that replaces the normal retroperitoneal tissue, trapping vessels and/or ureters. We present a retrospective review of 3 cases of idiopathic RF studied by means of ultrasound, CT scan and MR imaging, and we assess the features of the MR image, as well as its capacity for characterizing the lesion. We compare the findings obtained with 3 imaging techniques, describing the utility of each one, and their advantages and disadvantages in the assessment of this pathology. In MR, idiopathic RF appears as a hypodense mass in SET1, SE-T2 and STIR sequences. (Author) 9 ref

  12. Design of Long Period Pseudo-Random Sequences from the Addition of m -Sequences over 𝔽 p

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ren Jian

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudo-random sequence with good correlation property and large linear span is widely used in code division multiple access (CDMA communication systems and cryptology for reliable and secure information transmission. In this paper, sequences with long period, large complexity, balance statistics, and low cross-correlation property are constructed from the addition of m -sequences with pairwise-prime linear spans (AMPLS. Using m -sequences as building blocks, the proposed method proved to be an efficient and flexible approach to construct long period pseudo-random sequences with desirable properties from short period sequences. Applying the proposed method to 𝔽 2 , a signal set ( ( 2 n − 1 ( 2 m − 1 , ( 2 n + 1 ( 2 m + 1 , ( 2 ( n + 1 / 2 + 1 ( 2 ( m + 1 / 2 + 1 is constructed.

  13. Status of the R and D activities on fast reactors and accelerators driven system in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maiorino, J.R.

    2002-01-01

    An Integral Lead Reactor (ILR) concept is proposed for the 4th generation reactor to be used in the future. The ILR is loaded with metallic fuel and cooled by lead. It was evaluated in the 300-1500 MWe power range with the Japanese Fast Set 2 cross sections library. This set was tested against several fast benchmarks and the criticality uncertainty was found to be 0.51 % Δk. The reactor is started with U-Zr and changes to the U-TRU-Zr-RE fuel in a stepwise way. In the equilibrium cycle, the burnup reactivity is less than β eff for a core of the order of 300 MWe, pin diameter of 10.4 mm and a pin-pitch to diameter ratio of 1.308. The lead void reactivity is negative for reactor power less than 750 MWe. There is a need to improve the nuclear data for the major actinides. (author)

  14. Exploratory and Confirmatory Factor Analyses of Delirium Symptoms in a Sample of Nursing Home Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyo, Patience; Huang, Ting-Ying; Simoni-Wastila, Linda; Harrington, Donna

    2018-02-01

    This study examined the latent constructs of delirium symptoms among nursing home (NH) residents in the United States. Cross-sectional NH assessment data (Minimum Data Set 2.0) from the 2009 Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey were used. Data from two independent, randomly selected subsamples of residents ≥65 years were analyzed using exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). There were 367 and 366 individuals in the EFA and CFA, respectively. Assessment of multiple model fit statistics in CFA indicated that the two-factor structure provided better fit for the data than a one-factor solution. The two factors represented cognitive and behavioral latent constructs as suggested by the related literature. A correlation of .72 between these constructs suggested moderate discriminant validity. This finding emphasizes the importance of health care providers to be attentive to both cognitive and behavioral symptoms when diagnosing, treating, and managing delirium.

  15. Tetraploidy Determination in Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss Based on Erythrocytes Dimensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan Bencsik

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Tetraploidy induction at fish is characterized by modification of normal diploid chromosome set (2n into tetraploid set (4n. Experiments were carried out on biological material from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mikiss during the natural breeding season. Polyploidy was induced by exposing the eggs to heat shock. Blood smear was used as a technical method, to determine diploid and tetraploid status. Staining of blood smear was performed by Pappenhein method. The erythrocytes area and perimeter measurements done comparatively on tetraploid and diploid individuals may represent an indicator to determine the ploidy level of individuals. Erythrocytes area for tetraploid individuals is 2.18 times higher than at diploid individuals, and perimeter 1.45 times higher than in diploid individuals.

  16. Computer land management : New programs and systems wind along revolutionary roads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsters, S.

    1998-01-01

    New advances in computer software programs and systems that are used to prepare maps that display detailed up-to-date lease and drilling activities in Western Canada were discussed. Petroleum Information/Dwights Canada Ltd. has changed its land database from a mainframe-based system into an Oracle database. The conversion allows the company to offer a more comprehensive storage medium, a more flexible delivery system, and more complete data. PI/Dwights supplies land data to software and mapping vendors such as geoLOGIC Systems Ltd. and AccuMap Enerdata Ltd. The company has also developed a CD-ROM-based electronic atlas which combines land data with pipelines and facilities, unit boundaries and well locations. The open system has the ability to integrate or import data sets. 2 figs

  17. Genetic variation of metabolite and hormone concentration in UK Holstein-Frisian calves and the genetic relationship with economically important traits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hayhurst, C; Flint, A P F; Løvendahl, P

    2009-01-01

    The decline of dairy cattle fertility worldwide remains a major concern, with conception rates to first service commonly below 40%. The length and severity of negative energy balance postpartum are unfavorably correlated with fertility, suggesting that the length and severity of negative energy...... balance and fertility are linked via several hormones or metabolites. These compounds therefore have the potential to predict fertility at a genetic level. The addition of a predictor trait for fertility into present fertility indices would accelerate genetic gain, particularly if it was expressed before...... of free fatty acids (FFA), glucose, growth hormone (GH), insulin, and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) in male and female UK Holstein-Friesian dairy calves (average age ± SD; 126 ± 12.7 d) were analyzed during 2 studies: data set 1 (n = 496 females; 1996-2001; 7 commercial dairy herds) and data set 2...

  18. Non-Cooperative Facial Recognition Video Dataset Collection Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, Marcia L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Erikson, Rebecca L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lombardo, Nicholas J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-08-31

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) will produce a non-cooperative (i.e. not posing for the camera) facial recognition video data set for research purposes to evaluate and enhance facial recognition systems technology. The aggregate data set consists of 1) videos capturing PNNL role players and public volunteers in three key operational settings, 2) photographs of the role players for enrolling in an evaluation database, and 3) ground truth data that documents when the role player is within various camera fields of view. PNNL will deliver the aggregate data set to DHS who may then choose to make it available to other government agencies interested in evaluating and enhancing facial recognition systems. The three operational settings that will be the focus of the video collection effort include: 1) unidirectional crowd flow 2) bi-directional crowd flow, and 3) linear and/or serpentine queues.

  19. Using drawings to bridge the transition from student to future teacher of mathematics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Eun Lee

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study examines a group of prospective teachers’ reflections upon the way they were taught (Set 1 and the way they want to teach (Set 2 through drawings which respectively describe their past learning experiences as students and their future plans as teachers. The purpose of this study is to identify: (a the emerging themes that appear in each set of drawing data, (b the possible factors that influence prospective teachers’ drawings, and (c the implications for mathematics teacher educators. Overall, prospective teachers showed predominantly negative or mixed feelings about their past experiences as mathematics students. In response to their own past negative experiences and struggles, the prospective teachers tended to highlight emotionally supportive classroom environment and versatile instructional teaching strategies in their future plans. This study suggests that this activity of reflecting past experience and planning future teaching assimilates prospective teachers’ identities as math students and math teachers and provides a window into the thinking of others.

  20. Using Drawings to Bridge the Transition from Student to Future Teacher of Mathematics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Eun LEE

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study examines a group of prospective teachers’ reflections upon the way they were taught (Set 1 and the way they want to teach (Set 2 through drawings which respectively describe their past learning experiences as students and their future plans as teachers. The purpose of this study is to identify: (a the emerging themes that appear in each set of drawing data, (b the possible factors that influence prospective teachers’ drawings, and (c the implications for mathematics teacher educators. Overall, prospective teachers showed predominantly negative or mixed feelings about their past experiences as mathematics students. In response to their own past negative experiences and struggles, the prospective teachers tended to highlight emotionally supportive classroom environment and versatile instructional teaching strategies in their future plans. This study suggests that this activity of reflecting past experience and planning future teaching assimilates prospective teachers’ identities as math students and math teachers and provides a window into the thinking of others.

  1. Rotavirus vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Catherine; Tate, Jacqueline E; Hyde, Terri B; Cortese, Margaret M; Lopman, Benjamin A; Jiang, Baoming; Glass, Roger I; Parashar, Umesh D

    2014-01-01

    Rotavirus is the leading cause of severe diarrhea among children rotavirus vaccines have been efficacious and effective, with many countries reporting substantial declines in diarrheal and rotavirus-specific morbidity and mortality. However, the full public health impact of these vaccines has not been realized. Most countries, including those with the highest disease burden, have not yet introduced rotavirus vaccines into their national immunization programs. Research activities that may help inform vaccine introduction decisions include (1) establishing effectiveness, impact, and safety for rotavirus vaccines in low-income settings; (2) identifying potential strategies to improve performance of oral rotavirus vaccines in developing countries, such as zinc supplementation; and (3) pursuing alternate approaches to oral vaccines, such as parenteral immunization. Policy- and program-level barriers, such as financial implications of new vaccine introductions, should be addressed to ensure that countries are able to make informed decisions regarding rotavirus vaccine introduction. PMID:24755452

  2. Polymorphisms in stromal genes and susceptibility to serous epithelial ovarian cancer: a report from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernest K Amankwah

    Full Text Available Alterations in stromal tissue components can inhibit or promote epithelial tumorigenesis. Decorin (DCN and lumican (LUM show reduced stromal expression in serous epithelial ovarian cancer (sEOC. We hypothesized that common variants in these genes associate with risk. Associations with sEOC among Caucasians were estimated with odds ratios (OR among 397 cases and 920 controls in two U.S.-based studies (discovery set, 436 cases and 1,098 controls in Australia (replication set 1 and a consortium of 15 studies comprising 1,668 cases and 4,249 controls (replication set 2. The discovery set and replication set 1 (833 cases and 2,013 controls showed statistically homogeneous (P(heterogeneity≥0.48 decreased risks of sEOC at four variants: DCN rs3138165, rs13312816 and rs516115, and LUM rs17018765 (OR = 0.6 to 0.9; P(trend = 0.001 to 0.03. Results from replication set 2 were statistically homogeneous (P(heterogeneity≥0.13 and associated with increased risks at DCN rs3138165 and rs13312816, and LUM rs17018765: all ORs = 1.2; P(trend≤0.02. The ORs at the four variants were statistically heterogeneous across all 18 studies (P(heterogeneity≤0.03, which precluded combining. In post-hoc analyses, interactions were observed between each variant and recruitment period (P(interaction≤0.003, age at diagnosis (P(interaction = 0.04, and year of diagnosis (P(interaction = 0.05 in the five studies with available information (1,044 cases, 2,469 controls. We conclude that variants in DCN and LUM are not directly associated with sEOC, and that confirmation of possible effect modification of the variants by non-genetic factors is required.

  3. Randomized, blinded, controlled trial on effectiveness of photobiomodulation therapy and exercise training in the fibromyalgia treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Mariana Moreira; Albertini, Regiane; de Tarso Camillo de Carvalho, Paulo; Leal-Junior, Ernesto Cesar Pinto; Bussadori, Sandra Kalil; Vieira, Stella Sousa; Bocalini, Danilo Sales; de Oliveira, Luis Vicente Franco; Grandinetti, Vanessa; Silva, José Antonio; Serra, Andrey Jorge

    2018-02-01

    This study evaluated the role of the phototherapy and exercise training (EXT) as well as the combined treatment in general symptoms, pain, and quality of life in women suffering from fibromyalgia (FM). A total of 160 women were enrolled and measures were carried out in two sets: it was sought to identify the acute effect for a single phototherapy and EXT session (Set 1); long-term effect (10 weeks) of the interventions (Set 2). Phototherapy irradiation was performed at 11 locations in their bodies, employing a cluster with nine diodes (one super-pulsed infrared 905 nm, four light-emitting diodes [LEDs] of 640 nm, and four LEDs of 875 nm, 39.3 J per location). Algometry and VAS instrument were applied to evaluate pain. The FM symptoms were evaluated with Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) and Research Diagnostic Criteria (RDC) instruments. Quality of life was assessed through SF-36 survey. Set 1: pain threshold was improved with the phototherapy, and EXT improved the pain threshold for temporomandibular joint (right and left body side) and occipital site (right body side). Set 2: there was improved pain threshold in several tender points with the phototherapy and EXT. There was an overlap of therapies to reduce the tender point numbers, anxiety, depression, fatigue, sleep, and difficulty sleeping on FIQ/RDC scores. Moreover, quality of life was improved with both therapies. The phototherapy and EXT improved the pain threshold in FM women. A more substantial effect was noticed for the combined therapy, in which pain relief was accomplished by improving VAS and FIQ scores as well as quality of life.

  4. Nitrite accumulation from simultaneous free-ammonia and free-nitrous-acid inhibition and oxygen limitation in a continuous-flow biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seongjun; Chung, Jinwook; Rittmann, Bruce E; Bae, Wookeun

    2015-01-01

    To achieve nitrite accumulation for shortcut biological nitrogen removal (SBNR) in a biofilm process, we explored the simultaneous effects of oxygen limitation and free ammonia (FA) and free nitrous acid (FNA) inhibition in the nitrifying biofilm. We used the multi-species nitrifying biofilm model (MSNBM) to identify conditions that should or should not lead to nitrite accumulation, and evaluated the effectiveness of those conditions with experiments in continuous flow biofilm reactors (CFBRs). CFBR experiments were organized into four sets with these expected outcomes based on the MSNBM as follows: (i) Control, giving full nitrification; (ii) oxygen limitation, giving modest long-term nitrite build up; (iii) FA inhibition, giving no long-term nitrite accumulation; and (iv) FA inhibition plus oxygen limitation, giving major long-term nitrite accumulation. Consistent with MSNBM predictions, the experimental results showed that nitrite accumulated in sets 2-4 in the short term, but long-term nitrite accumulation was maintained only in sets 2 and 4, which involved oxygen limitation. Furthermore, nitrite accumulation was substantially greater in set 4, which also included FA inhibition. However, FA inhibition (and accompanying FNA inhibition) alone in set 3 did not maintained long-term nitrite accumulation. Nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) activity batch tests confirmed that little NOB or only a small fraction of NOB were present in the biofilms for sets 4 and 2, respectively. The experimental data supported the previous modeling results that nitrite accumulation could be achieved with a lower ammonium concentration than had been required for a suspended-growth process. Additional findings were that the biofilm exposed to low dissolved oxygen (DO) limitation and FA inhibition was substantially denser and probably had a lower detachment rate. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. The importance of the accuracy of the experimental data for the prediction of solubility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SLAVICA ERIĆ

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Aqueous solubility is an important factor influencing several aspects of the pharmacokinetic profile of a drug. Numerous publications present different methodologies for the development of reliable computational models for the prediction of solubility from structure. The quality of such models can be significantly affected by the accuracy of the employed experimental solubility data. In this work, the importance of the accuracy of the experimental solubility data used for model training was investigated. Three data sets were used as training sets – data set 1, containing solubility data collected from various literature sources using a few criteria (n = 319, data set 2, created by substituting 28 values from data set 1 with uniformly determined experimental data from one laboratory (n = 319, and data set 3, created by including 56 additional components, for which the solubility was also determined under uniform conditions in the same laboratory, in the data set 2 (n = 375. The selection of the most significant descriptors was performed by the heuristic method, using one-parameter and multi-parameter analysis. The correlations between the most significant descriptors and solubility were established using multi-linear regression analysis (MLR for all three investigated data sets. Notable differences were observed between the equations corresponding to different data sets, suggesting that models updated with new experimental data need to be additionally optimized. It was successfully shown that the inclusion of uniform experimental data consistently leads to an improvement in the correlation coefficients. These findings contribute to an emerging consensus that improving the reliability of solubility prediction requires the inclusion of many diverse compounds for which solubility was measured under standardized conditions in the data set.

  6. Neutronic calculations for the reactor pressure vessel of Atucha I nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerner, Ana M.; Madariaga, Marcelo R.

    1999-01-01

    In 1974 a surveillance program for the Atucha I nuclear power plant pressure vessel was initiated which included the construction of different types of specimens, distributed in 30 irradiation capsules located under the core at the lower part of some of the fuel channels. The capsules containing the irradiated specimens were withdrawn in two stages; the first set (SET 1) of 15 specimens in 1980 and the second one (SET 2) of the remaining 15, in 1987. Both fracture mechanic tests and dosimetry analysis were carried out by the designer (KWU) for SET1 and by the owner National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) for SET2. The calculations performed in the case of SET1 showed that there was a significant spectrum difference between the position where the specimens had been and the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) - inner surface (IS). It was established that the ratio of thermal flux (E 1 MeV) varied, approximately, from 1000 to 10 from the irradiation position to the RPV- IS. The purpose of this report is to show the calculations recently performed at the Nuclear Regulatory Authority, with particular emphasis on the difference in the results generated by the modification to sightly enriched fuel. A simplified 1-D calculations show that there is a slight increase (4% approximately) in the flux along the whole energy range. As it has already been mentioned, this is due, more than to the isotopic composition of the new fuel, to the difference in power density spatial distribution, which is a consequence of a different fuel management, necessary to preserve operational limits below their maximum allowed values with the same total thermal power generated. More detailed calculations are nevertheless foreseen in order to verify these first results. (author)

  7. Velocity Drives Greater Power Observed During Back Squat Using Cluster Sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Jonathan M; Kreutzer, Andreas; Jenke, Shane C; Phillips, Melody D; Mitchell, Joel B; Jones, Margaret T

    2016-01-01

    This investigation compared the kinetics and kinematics of cluster sets (CLU) and traditional sets (TRD) during back squat in trained (RT) and untrained (UT) men. Twenty-four participants (RT = 12, 25 ± 1 year, 179.1 ± 2.2 cm, 84.6 ± 2.1 kg; UT = 12, 25 ± 1 year, 180.1 ± 1.8 cm, 85.4 ± 3.8 kg) performed TRD (4 × 10, 120-second rest) and CLU (4 × (2 × 5) 30 seconds between clusters; 90 seconds between sets) with 70% one repetition maximum, randomly. Kinematics and kinetics were sampled through force plate and linear position transducers. Resistance-trained produced greater overall force, velocity, and power; however, similar patterns were observed in all variables when comparing conditions. Cluster sets produced significantly greater force in isolated repetitions in sets 1-3, while consistently producing greater force due to a required reduction in load during set 4 resulting in greater total volume load (CLU, 3302.4 ± 102.7 kg; TRD, 3274.8 ± 102.8 kg). Velocity loss was lessened in CLU resulting in significantly higher velocities in sets 2 through 4. Furthermore, higher velocities were produced by CLU during later repetitions of each set. Cluster sets produced greater power output for an increasing number of repetitions in each set (set 1, 5 repetitions; sets 2 and 3, 6 repetitions; set 4, 8 repetitions), and the difference between conditions increased over subsequent sets. Time under tension increased over each set and was greater in TRD. This study demonstrates greater power output is driven by greater velocity when back squatting during CLU; therefore, velocity may be a useful measure by which to assess power.

  8. Visible spectroscopy calibration transfer model in determining pH of Sala mangoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yahaya, O.K.M.; MatJafri, M.Z.; Aziz, A.A.; Omar, A.F.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the efficiency of calibration transfer procedures between three spectrometers involving two Ocean Optics Inc. spectrometers, namely, QE65000 and Jaz, and also, ASD FieldSpec 3 in measuring the pH of Sala mango by visible reflectance spectroscopy. This study evaluates the ability of these spectrometers in measuring the pH of Sala mango by applying similar calibration algorithms through direct calibration transfer. This visible reflectance spectroscopy technique defines a spectrometer as a master instrument and another spectrometer as a slave. The multiple linear regression (MLR) of calibration model generated using the QE65000 spectrometer is transferred to the Jaz spectrometer and vice versa for Set 1. The same technique is applied for Set 2 with QE65000 spectrometer is transferred to the FieldSpec3 spectrometer and vice versa. For Set 1, the result showed that the QE65000 spectrometer established a calibration model with higher accuracy than that of the Jaz spectrometer. In addition, the calibration model developed on Jaz spectrometer successfully predicted the pH of Sala mango, which was measured using QE65000 spectrometer, with a root means square error of prediction RMSEP = 0.092 pH and coefficients of determination R 2  = 0.892. Moreover, the best prediction result is obtained for Set 2 when the calibration model developed on QE65000 spectrometer is successfully transferred to FieldSpec 3 with R 2  = 0.839 and RMSEP = 0.16 pH

  9. Enhancing communication in dental clinics with linguistically different patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Michael L

    2008-01-01

    The United States is becoming substantially more diverse in its citizenry, with numerous racial and ethnic cultural groups and immigrants living and working in this country. In addition, there has been an increase in the number of languages other than English spoken in homes, as well as an increase in the number of individuals with limited English-speaking abilities. Given the emerging racial, ethnic, and cultural trends in U.S. society, it is important that dental students as future practitioners have knowledge of interpreter services, working with professionally trained interpreters, and the legal responsibilities and requirements of interpretation. The purposes of this study were to 1) describe the role of interpreters in dental health care settings; 2) identify challenges they face; and 3) propose approaches and strategies to improve communication between dental students as future practitioners and non-English-speaking patients. Data were collected through a series of individual in-depth, face-to-face interviews using a semi-structured open-question format and email communications with three key informants who were purposefully selected to participate in this study based on their comprehensive knowledge and experience as interpreters. The qualitative analysis revealed themes or stories related to the following areas of this study: 1) the role of professional interpreters in dental and other health care settings; 2) challenges faced by interpreters and providers working with patients with limited English-speaking ability; and 3) strategies and approaches used to improve communication and address challenges. By understanding the unique interpreting needs of non- or limited English-speaking patients, dental students have an opportunity to broaden their cultural competency skills. Dental schools have an obligation to ensure that students, faculty, and staff know and understand the legal rights of patients and health care providers to communicate effectively when

  10. Detection and Genotyping of Human Papillomavirus in Self-Obtained Cervicovaginal Samples by Using the FTA Cartridge: New Possibilities for Cervical Cancer Screening ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenselink, Charlotte H.; de Bie, Roosmarie P.; van Hamont, Dennis; Bakkers, Judith M. J. E.; Quint, Wim G. V.; Massuger, Leon F. A. G.; Bekkers, Ruud L. M.; Melchers, Willem J. G.

    2009-01-01

    This study assesses human papillomavirus (HPV) detection and genotyping in self-sampled genital smears applied to an indicating FTA elute cartridge (FTA cartridge). The study group consisted of 96 women, divided into two sample sets. All samples were analyzed by the HPV SPF10-Line Blot 25. Set 1 consisted of 45 women attending the gynecologist; all obtained a self-sampled cervicovaginal smear, which was applied to an FTA cartridge. HPV results were compared to a cervical smear (liquid based) taken by a trained physician. Set 2 consisted of 51 women who obtained a self-sampled cervicovaginal smear at home, which was applied to an FTA cartridge and to a liquid-based medium. DNA was obtained from the FTA cartridges by simple elution as well as extraction. Of all self-obtained samples of set 1, 62.2% tested HPV positive. The overall agreement between self- and physician-obtained samples was 93.3%, in favor of the self-obtained samples. In sample set 2, 25.5% tested HPV positive. The overall agreement for high-risk HPV presence between the FTA cartridge and liquid-based medium and between DNA elution and extraction was 100%. This study shows that HPV detection and genotyping in self-obtained cervicovaginal samples applied to an FTA cartridge is highly reliable. It shows a high level of overall agreement with HPV detection and genotyping in physician-obtained cervical smears and liquid-based self-samples. DNA can be obtained by simple elution and is therefore easy, cheap, and fast. Furthermore, the FTA cartridge is a convenient medium for collection and safe transport at ambient temperatures. Therefore, this method may contribute to a new way of cervical cancer screening. PMID:19553570

  11. Detection and genotyping of human papillomavirus in self-obtained cervicovaginal samples by using the FTA cartridge: new possibilities for cervical cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenselink, Charlotte H; de Bie, Roosmarie P; van Hamont, Dennis; Bakkers, Judith M J E; Quint, Wim G V; Massuger, Leon F A G; Bekkers, Ruud L M; Melchers, Willem J G

    2009-08-01

    This study assesses human papillomavirus (HPV) detection and genotyping in self-sampled genital smears applied to an indicating FTA elute cartridge (FTA cartridge). The study group consisted of 96 women, divided into two sample sets. All samples were analyzed by the HPV SPF(10)-Line Blot 25. Set 1 consisted of 45 women attending the gynecologist; all obtained a self-sampled cervicovaginal smear, which was applied to an FTA cartridge. HPV results were compared to a cervical smear (liquid based) taken by a trained physician. Set 2 consisted of 51 women who obtained a self-sampled cervicovaginal smear at home, which was applied to an FTA cartridge and to a liquid-based medium. DNA was obtained from the FTA cartridges by simple elution as well as extraction. Of all self-obtained samples of set 1, 62.2% tested HPV positive. The overall agreement between self- and physician-obtained samples was 93.3%, in favor of the self-obtained samples. In sample set 2, 25.5% tested HPV positive. The overall agreement for high-risk HPV presence between the FTA cartridge and liquid-based medium and between DNA elution and extraction was 100%. This study shows that HPV detection and genotyping in self-obtained cervicovaginal samples applied to an FTA cartridge is highly reliable. It shows a high level of overall agreement with HPV detection and genotyping in physician-obtained cervical smears and liquid-based self-samples. DNA can be obtained by simple elution and is therefore easy, cheap, and fast. Furthermore, the FTA cartridge is a convenient medium for collection and safe transport at ambient temperatures. Therefore, this method may contribute to a new way of cervical cancer screening.

  12. Automatic food detection in egocentric images using artificial intelligence technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Wenyan; Li, Yuecheng; Qu, Ruowei; Baranowski, Thomas; Burke, Lora E; Zhang, Hong; Bai, Yicheng; Mancino, Juliet M; Xu, Guizhi; Mao, Zhi-Hong; Sun, Mingui

    2018-03-26

    To develop an artificial intelligence (AI)-based algorithm which can automatically detect food items from images acquired by an egocentric wearable camera for dietary assessment. To study human diet and lifestyle, large sets of egocentric images were acquired using a wearable device, called eButton, from free-living individuals. Three thousand nine hundred images containing real-world activities, which formed eButton data set 1, were manually selected from thirty subjects. eButton data set 2 contained 29 515 images acquired from a research participant in a week-long unrestricted recording. They included both food- and non-food-related real-life activities, such as dining at both home and restaurants, cooking, shopping, gardening, housekeeping chores, taking classes, gym exercise, etc. All images in these data sets were classified as food/non-food images based on their tags generated by a convolutional neural network. A cross data-set test was conducted on eButton data set 1. The overall accuracy of food detection was 91·5 and 86·4 %, respectively, when one-half of data set 1 was used for training and the other half for testing. For eButton data set 2, 74·0 % sensitivity and 87·0 % specificity were obtained if both 'food' and 'drink' were considered as food images. Alternatively, if only 'food' items were considered, the sensitivity and specificity reached 85·0 and 85·8 %, respectively. The AI technology can automatically detect foods from low-quality, wearable camera-acquired real-world egocentric images with reasonable accuracy, reducing both the burden of data processing and privacy concerns.

  13. Effect of bioaugmentation by cellulolytic bacteria enriched from sheep rumen on methane production from wheat straw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozbayram, E Gozde; Kleinsteuber, Sabine; Nikolausz, Marcell; Ince, Bahar; Ince, Orhan

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the potential of bioaugmentation with cellulolytic rumen microbiota to enhance the anaerobic digestion of lignocellulosic feedstock. An anaerobic cellulolytic culture was enriched from sheep rumen fluid using wheat straw as substrate under mesophilic conditions. To investigate the effects of bioaugmentation on methane production from straw, the enrichment culture was added to batch reactors in proportions of 2% (Set-1) and 4% (Set-2) of the microbial cell number of the standard inoculum slurry. The methane production in the bioaugmented reactors was higher than in the control reactors. After 30 days of batch incubation, the average methane yield was 154 mL N CH 4 g VS -1 in the control reactors. Addition of 2% enrichment culture did not enhance methane production, whereas in Set-2 the methane yield was increased by 27%. The bacterial communities were examined by 454 amplicon sequencing of 16S rRNA genes, while terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) fingerprinting of mcrA genes was applied to analyze the methanogenic communities. The results highlighted that relative abundances of Ruminococcaceae and Lachnospiraceae increased during the enrichment. However, Cloacamonaceae, which were abundant in the standard inoculum, dominated the bacterial communities of all batch reactors. T-RFLP profiles revealed that Methanobacteriales were predominant in the rumen fluid, whereas the enrichment culture was dominated by Methanosarcinales. In the batch rectors, the most abundant methanogens were affiliated to Methanobacteriales and Methanomicrobiales. Our results suggest that bioaugmentation with sheep rumen enrichment cultures can enhance the performance of digesters treating lignocellulosic feedstock. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Submaximal exercise training, more than dietary selenium supplementation, improves antioxidant status and ameliorates exercise-induced oxidative damage to skeletal muscle in young equine athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, S H; Warren, L K

    2017-02-01

    Exercise is associated with increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as metabolism is upregulated to fuel muscle activity. If antioxidant systems become overwhelmed, ROS can negatively affect health and performance. Adaptation to exercise through regular training has been shown to improve defense against oxidative insult. Given selenium's role as an antioxidant, we hypothesized that increased Se intake would further enhance skeletal muscle adaptations to training. Quarter Horse yearlings (18 ± 0.2 mo; 402 ± 10 kg) were randomly assigned to receive either 0.1 or 0.3 mg Se/kg DM and placed in either an untrained or a trained (30 min walk-trot-canter, 4 d/wk) group for 14 wk. Phase 1 (wk 1 to 8) consisted of 4 treatments: trained and fed 0.1 mg Se/kg DM through wk 14 (CON-TR; n = 10), trained and fed 0.3 mg Se/kg DM through wk 14 (HIGH-TR; n = 10), untrained and fed 0.1 mg Se/kg DM through wk 14 (CON-UN; n = 5), or untrained and fed 0.3 mg Se/kg DM through wk 14 (HIGH-UN; n = 5). During Phase 2 (wk 9 to 14), dietary Se level in half of the trained horses was reversed, resulting in 6 treatments: CON-TR (n = 5), trained and fed 0.1 mg/kg Se in Phase 1 and then switched to 0.3 mg/kg Se for Phase 2 (ADD-TR; n = 5), trained and fed 0.3 mg/kg Se in Phase 1 and then switched to 0.1 mg/kg Se for Phase 2 (DROP-TR; n = 5), HIGH-TR (n = 5), CON-UN (n = 5), or HIGH-UN (n = 5). All horses underwent a 120-min submaximal exercise test (SET) at the end of Phase 1 (SET 1) and 2 (SET 2). Blood samples and biopsies from the middle gluteal muscle were collected before and after each phase of the study and in response to each SET and analyzed for markers of oxidative damage and antioxidant enzyme activity. In both phases, serum Se was higher (P creatine kinase (CK) activity was lower in trained horses than in untrained horses (P < 0.0001), indicating less muscle damage, but plasma lipid hydroperoxides (LPO) and muscle GPx and SOD activities were unaffected by training or Se

  15. Diagnostic and prognostic value of long noncoding RNAs as biomarkers in urothelial carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droop, Johanna; Szarvas, Tibor; Schulz, Wolfgang A; Niedworok, Christian; Niegisch, Günter; Scheckenbach, Kathrin; Hoffmann, Michèle J

    2017-01-01

    Many long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are deregulated in cancer and contribute to oncogenesis. In urothelial carcinoma (UC), several lncRNAs have been reported to be overexpressed and proposed as biomarkers. As most reports have not been confirmed independently in large tissue sets, we aimed to validate the diagnostic and prognostic value of lncRNA upregulation in independent cohorts of UC patients. Thus, expression of seven lncRNA candidates (GAS5, H19, linc-UBC1, MALAT1, ncRAN, TUG1, UCA1) was measured by RT-qPCR in cell lines and tissues and correlated to clinicopathological parameters including follow-up data (set 1: N n = 10; T n = 106). Additionally, publicly available TCGA data was investigated for differential expression in UC tissues (set 2: N n = 19; T n = 252,) and correlation to overall survival (OS). All proposed candidates tended to be upregulated in tumour tissues, with the exception of MALAT1, which was rather diminished in cancer tissues of both data sets. However, strong overexpression was generally limited to individual tumour tissues and statistically significant overexpression was only observed for UCA1, TUG1, ncRAN and linc-UBC1 in tissue set 2, but for no candidate in set 1. Altered expression of individual lncRNAs was associated with overall survival, but not consistently between both patient cohorts. Interestingly, lower expression of TUG1 in a subset of UC patients with muscle-invasive tumours was significantly correlated with worse OS in both cohorts. Further analysis revealed that tumours with low TUG1 expression are characterized by a basal-squamous-like subtype signature accounting for the association with poor outcome. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that overexpression of the candidate lncRNAs is found in many UC cases, but does not occur consistently and strongly enough to provide reliable diagnostic or prognostic value as an individual biomarker. Subtype-dependent expression patterns of lncRNAs like TUG1 could become useful to

  16. MO-FG-CAMPUS-TeP2-03: Multi-Criteria Optimization Using Taguchi Method for SRS of Multiple Lesions by Single Isocenter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alani, S; Honig, N; Schlocker, A; Corn, B [Tel Aviv Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: This study utilizes the Taguchi Method to evaluate the VMAT planning parameters of single isocenter treatment plans for multiple brain metastases. An optimization model based on Taguchi and utility concept is employed to optimize the planning parameters including: arc arrangement, calculation grid size, calculation model, and beam energy on multiple performance characteristics namely conformity index and dose to normal brain. Methods: Treatment plans, each with 4 metastatic brain lesions were planned using single isocenter technique. The collimator angles were optimized to avoid open areas. In this analysis four planning parameters (a–d) were considered: (a)-Arc arrangements: set1: Gantry 181cw179 couch0; gantry179ccw0, couch315; and gantry0ccw181, couch45. set2: set1 plus additional arc: Gantry 0cw179, couch270. (b)-Energy: 6-MV; 6MV-FFF (c)-Calculation grid size: 1mm; 1.5mm (d)-Calculation models: AAA; Acuros Treatment planning was performed in Varian Eclipse (ver.11.0.30). A suitable orthogonal array was selected (L8) to perform the experiments. After conducting the experiments with the combinations of planning parameters the conformity index (CI) and the normal brain dose S/N ratio for each parameter was calculated. Optimum levels for the multiple response optimizations were determined. Results: We determined that the factors most affecting the conformity index are arc arrangement and beam energy. These tests were also used to evaluate dose to normal brain. In these evaluations, the significant parameters were grid size and calculation model. Using the utility concept we determined the combination of each of the four factors tested in this study that most significantly influence quality of the resulting treatment plans: (a)-arc arrangement-set2, (b)-6MV, (c)-calc.grid 1mm, (d)-Acuros algorithm. Overall, the dominant significant influences on plan quality are (a)-arcarrangement, and (b)-beamenergy. Conclusion: Results were analyzed using ANOVA and

  17. Diagnostic and prognostic value of long noncoding RNAs as biomarkers in urothelial carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Droop

    Full Text Available Many long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs are deregulated in cancer and contribute to oncogenesis. In urothelial carcinoma (UC, several lncRNAs have been reported to be overexpressed and proposed as biomarkers. As most reports have not been confirmed independently in large tissue sets, we aimed to validate the diagnostic and prognostic value of lncRNA upregulation in independent cohorts of UC patients. Thus, expression of seven lncRNA candidates (GAS5, H19, linc-UBC1, MALAT1, ncRAN, TUG1, UCA1 was measured by RT-qPCR in cell lines and tissues and correlated to clinicopathological parameters including follow-up data (set 1: N n = 10; T n = 106. Additionally, publicly available TCGA data was investigated for differential expression in UC tissues (set 2: N n = 19; T n = 252, and correlation to overall survival (OS. All proposed candidates tended to be upregulated in tumour tissues, with the exception of MALAT1, which was rather diminished in cancer tissues of both data sets. However, strong overexpression was generally limited to individual tumour tissues and statistically significant overexpression was only observed for UCA1, TUG1, ncRAN and linc-UBC1 in tissue set 2, but for no candidate in set 1. Altered expression of individual lncRNAs was associated with overall survival, but not consistently between both patient cohorts. Interestingly, lower expression of TUG1 in a subset of UC patients with muscle-invasive tumours was significantly correlated with worse OS in both cohorts. Further analysis revealed that tumours with low TUG1 expression are characterized by a basal-squamous-like subtype signature accounting for the association with poor outcome. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that overexpression of the candidate lncRNAs is found in many UC cases, but does not occur consistently and strongly enough to provide reliable diagnostic or prognostic value as an individual biomarker. Subtype-dependent expression patterns of lncRNAs like TUG1 could

  18. "Functional" Inspiratory and Core Muscle Training Enhances Running Performance and Economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Tomas K; McConnell, Alison K; Lin, Hua; Nie, Jinlei; Zhang, Haifeng; Wang, Jiayuan

    2016-10-01

    Tong, TK, McConnell, AK, Lin, H, Nie, J, Zhang, H, and Wang, J. "Functional" inspiratory and core muscle training enhances running performance and economy. J Strength Cond Res 30(10): 2942-2951, 2016-We compared the effects of two 6-week high-intensity interval training interventions. Under the control condition (CON), only interval training was undertaken, whereas under the intervention condition (ICT), interval training sessions were followed immediately by core training, which was combined with simultaneous inspiratory muscle training (IMT)-"functional" IMT. Sixteen recreational runners were allocated to either ICT or CON groups. Before the intervention phase, both groups undertook a 4-week program of "foundation" IMT to control for the known ergogenic effect of IMT (30 inspiratory efforts at 50% maximal static inspiratory pressure [P0] per set, 2 sets per day, 6 days per week). The subsequent 6-week interval running training phase consisted of 3-4 sessions per week. In addition, the ICT group undertook 4 inspiratory-loaded core exercises (10 repetitions per set, 2 sets per day, inspiratory load set at 50% post-IMT P0) immediately after each interval training session. The CON group received neither core training nor functional IMT. After the intervention phase, global inspiratory and core muscle functions increased in both groups (p ≤ 0.05), as evidenced by P0 and a sport-specific endurance plank test (SEPT) performance, respectively. Compared with CON, the ICT group showed larger improvements in SEPT, running economy at the speed of the onset of blood lactate accumulation, and 1-hour running performance (3.04% vs. 1.57%, p ≤ 0.05). The changes in these variables were interindividually correlated (r ≥ 0.57, n = 16, p ≤ 0.05). Such findings suggest that the addition of inspiratory-loaded core conditioning into a high-intensity interval training program augments the influence of the interval program on endurance running performance and that this may be

  19. A Clustered Repeated-Sprint Running Protocol for Team-Sport Athletes Performed in Normobaric Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Morrison, Chris McLellan, Clare Minahan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study compared the performance (peak speed, distance, and acceleration of ten amateur team-sport athletes during a clustered (i.e., multiple sets repeated-sprint protocol, (4 sets of 4, 4-s running sprints; i.e., RSR444 in normobaric normoxia (FiO2 = 0.209; i.e., RSN with normobaric hypoxia (FiO2 = 0.140; i.e., RSH. Subjects completed two separate trials (i. RSN, ii. RSH; randomised order between 48 h and 72 h apart on a non-motorized treadmill. In addition to performance, we examined blood lactate concentration [La-] and arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2 before, during, and after the RSR444. While there were no differences in peak speed or distance during set 1 or set 2, peak speed (p = 0.04 and 0.02, respectively and distance (p = 0.04 and 0.02, respectively were greater during set 3 and set 4 of RSN compared with RSH. There was no difference in the average acceleration achieved in set 1 (p = 0.45, set 2 (p = 0.26, or set 3 (p = 0.23 between RSN and RSH; however, the average acceleration was greater in RSN than RSH in set 4 (p < 0.01. Measurements of [La-] were higher during RSH than RSN immediately after Sprint 16 (10.2 ± 2.5 vs 8.6 ± 2.6 mM; p = 0.02. Estimations of SpO2 were lower during RSH than RSN, respectively, immediately prior to the commencement of the test (89.0 ± 2.0 vs 97.2 ± 1.5 %, post Sprint 8 (78.0 ± 6.3 vs 93.8 ± 3.6 % and post Sprint 16 (75.3 ± 6.3 vs 94.5 ± 2.5 %; all p < 0.01. In summary, the RSR444 is a practical protocol for the implementation of a hypoxic repeated-sprint training intervention into the training schedules of team-sport athletes. However, given the inability of amateur team-sport athletes to maintain performance in hypoxic (FiO2 = 0.140 conditions, the potential for specific training outcomes (i.e. speed to be achieved will be compromised, thus suggesting that the RSR444 should be used with caution.

  20. Quantitative structure-retention relationships of pesticides in reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography based on WHIM and GETAWAY molecular descriptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Archivio, Angelo Antonio [Dipartimento di Chimica, Ingegneria Chimica e Materiali, Universita degli Studi di L' Aquila, Via Vetoio, 67010 Coppito, L' Aquila (Italy)], E-mail: darchivi@univaq.it; Maggi, Maria Anna; Mazzeo, Pietro; Ruggieri, Fabrizio [Dipartimento di Chimica, Ingegneria Chimica e Materiali, Universita degli Studi di L' Aquila, Via Vetoio, 67010 Coppito, L' Aquila (Italy)

    2008-11-03

    The ability of the Weighted Holistic Invariant Molecular (WHIM) and GEometry, Topology, and Atom-Weights AssemblY (GETAWAY) descriptors to represent the effect of molecular structure on the retention of pesticides in reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) is investigated. To this end, two retention data sets previously collected in water-acetonitrile mobile phase are re-examined. The first data set (data-set-1) consists of retention data of 26 neutral compounds belonging to widely used pesticide classes, collected within the mobile phase composition range 40-65% (v/v) acetonitrile. The second data set (data-set-2) describes retention of phenoxy acid herbicides and structurally related compounds (benzoic acid and phenylacetic acid derivatives), as a whole covering the pK{sub a} range 2.3-4.3, as a function of mobile phase composition, ranging between 30 and 70% (v/v) acetonitrile, and pH, ranging between 2 and 5. For each data set, the mobile phase attributes are combined with WHIM or GETAWAY descriptors into 'mixed' predictive models in order to attempt retention modelling within the whole mobile phase composition range of analytical interest. Six- or seven-dimensional multilinear models, preliminarily selected using a genetic algorithm, were improved using a multi-layer artificial neural network (ANN) learned by back propagation. ANN performance was tested on three molecules not used in the learning stage and by leave-more-out cross validation. The results reveal that while WHIM descriptors seem not adequate to model retention of solutes of data-set-1, GETAWAY descriptors provide a satisfactory retention model. On the other hand WHIM and GETAWAY descriptors applied to data-set-2 provide a similar performance, even if slightly worse as compared with the above case. Accuracy of retention modelling in these cases is comparable or slightly poorer as compared with the results previously obtained by combining quantum chemical

  1. Possible influence of clay contamination on B isotope geochemistry of carbonaceous samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deyhle, Annette; Kopf, Achim

    2004-01-01

    The authors report results from an experimental study on mixtures of pure endmembers of natural clay and carbonate. The scientific rationale is an evaluation as to what extent B contents and B isotopes of carbonate samples may be obscured as a result of contamination with clay, particularly since both authigenic carbonates and biogenic carbonates (e.g. microfossil tests) often contain some clay. Three aliquots of a series of samples (each containing 0, 20, 40, 60, 80, 100% clay) were analyzed. Set 1 was washed with distilled, de-ionized water; for set 2 the HCl soluble parts were dissolved in 2 M HCl after washing; set 3 was completely digested with 30M HF prior to a series of ion exchanges. Isotope data of the endmembers are 6.6 per mille (100% marble) and -4.6%o (100% clay), with the clay being the dominant B source (ca. 50 ppm compared with 11 B adsorbed =12.9-14.1%o±0.5%o), while no B was mobilized from the carbonate. The HCl-dissolvable B in washed samples of set 2 show slightly increasing B contents with higher clay contents, suggesting that dissolution of the marble as well as B mobilization from the clay account for this trend. δ 11 B isotopes tend towards more negative values when clay content increases, indicating that some structurally-bound B is lost from the sheets of linked (Si, Al)O 4 tetrahedra of the clay mineral. This result shows that not only B adsorption, but possibly diffusion or weathering of broken edges of clay minerals releases some structurally bound B of clay minerals. Set 3, where bulk samples were completely HF-digested, shows as expected a linear increase in B concentrations and decreasing δ 11 B ratios with increasing clay content. The overall results suggest that relatively small amounts of clay (e.g. as contamination in a microfossil test) have no significant impact on the B content and δ 11 B measured for the carbonate, but that care has to be taken if clay exceeds 10wt.% (e.g. carbonate concretions, chimneys, etc.)

  2. Single-shot echo-planar MR sequences in the diagnosis of intracranial infectious diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchiya, Kazuhiro; Katase, Shichiro; Yoshino, Ayako; Yamakami, Norio; Hachiya, Junichi

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to present our preliminary experience in the application of echo-planar-imaging (EPI) MR sequences for the diagnosis of intracranial infectious diseases and to assess the value of these sequences. We reviewed single-shot EPI MR images obtained at 1.5 T in 17 patients and compared these images with conventional or fast spin-echo (SE) or fluid attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) images. The clinical diagnoses for the 17 patients were meningitis (2 patients), encephalitis or meningoencephalitis (7 patients), brain abscess (5 patients), epidural empyema (2 patients) and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (1 patient). We obtained EPI-T 2 -weighted (T 2 W) images in 8 patients, EPI-FLAIR images in 13 patients and EPI-diffusion-weighted (DW) images in 14 patients. Among the 8 patients for whom EPI-T 2 W imaging was performed, EPI-T 2 W imaging yielded superior results compared with SE-T 2 W imaging in 3 patients as a consequence of patient motion and equal results compared with SE-T 2 W imaging in 5 patients. Among the 13 patients for whom EPI-FLAIR imaging was performed, the EPI-FLAIR images were superior to conventional FLAIR images in 3 unstable patients. In the remaining 10 patients for whom EPI-FLAIR imaging was performed, EPI-FLAIR images were equivalent or inferior to conventional FLAIR images. In 6 patients with encephalitis or meningoencephalitis, the encephalitic lesions showed hyperintensity in EPI-DW images to a greater extent than in images obtained with the other techniques. In 3 patients, EPI-DW images also demonstrated hyperintensity for the contents of abscesses or areas of empyema that was not seen with the other imaging techniques. The value of EPI-T 2 W and EPI-FLAIR imaging is limited in uncooperative patients. EPI-DW imaging was found to be of value for the evaluation of several intracranial infectious diseases. (author)

  3. Acceleration of Age-Associated Methylation Patterns in HIV-1-Infected Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehl, Mary; Sinsheimer, Janet S.; Hultin, Patricia M.; Hultin, Lance E.; Quach, Austin; Martínez-Maza, Otoniel; Horvath, Steve; Vilain, Eric; Jamieson, Beth D.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with treated HIV-1-infection experience earlier occurrence of aging-associated diseases, raising speculation that HIV-1-infection, or antiretroviral treatment, may accelerate aging. We recently described an age-related co-methylation module comprised of hundreds of CpGs; however, it is unknown whether aging and HIV-1-infection exert negative health effects through similar, or disparate, mechanisms. We investigated whether HIV-1-infection would induce age-associated methylation changes. We evaluated DNA methylation levels at >450,000 CpG sites in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of young (20-35) and older (36-56) adults in two separate groups of participants. Each age group for each data set consisted of 12 HIV-1-infected and 12 age-matched HIV-1-uninfected samples for a total of 96 samples. The effects of age and HIV-1 infection on methylation at each CpG revealed a strong correlation of 0.49, pmodules; module 3 (ME3) was significantly correlated with age (cor=0.70) and HIV-1 status (cor=0.31). Older HIV-1+ individuals had a greater number of hypermethylated CpGs across ME3 (p=0.015). In a multivariate model, ME3 was significantly associated with age and HIV status (Data set 1: βage= 0.007088, p=2.08 x 10-9; βHIV= 0.099574, p=0.0011; Data set 2: βage= 0.008762, p=1.27x 10-5; βHIV= 0.128649, p= 0.0001). Using this model, we estimate that HIV-1 infection accelerates age-related methylation by approximately 13.7 years in data set 1 and 14.7 years in data set 2. The genes related to CpGs in ME3 are enriched for polycomb group target genes known to be involved in cell renewal and aging. The overlap between ME3 and an aging methylation module found in solid tissues is also highly significant (Fisher-exact p=5.6 x 10-6, odds ratio=1.91). These data demonstrate that HIV-1 infection is associated with methylation patterns that are similar to age-associated patterns and suggest that general aging and HIV-1 related aging work through some common cellular

  4. Quantitative structure-retention relationships of pesticides in reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography based on WHIM and GETAWAY molecular descriptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Archivio, Angelo Antonio; Maggi, Maria Anna; Mazzeo, Pietro; Ruggieri, Fabrizio

    2008-01-01

    The ability of the Weighted Holistic Invariant Molecular (WHIM) and GEometry, Topology, and Atom-Weights AssemblY (GETAWAY) descriptors to represent the effect of molecular structure on the retention of pesticides in reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) is investigated. To this end, two retention data sets previously collected in water-acetonitrile mobile phase are re-examined. The first data set (data-set-1) consists of retention data of 26 neutral compounds belonging to widely used pesticide classes, collected within the mobile phase composition range 40-65% (v/v) acetonitrile. The second data set (data-set-2) describes retention of phenoxy acid herbicides and structurally related compounds (benzoic acid and phenylacetic acid derivatives), as a whole covering the pK a range 2.3-4.3, as a function of mobile phase composition, ranging between 30 and 70% (v/v) acetonitrile, and pH, ranging between 2 and 5. For each data set, the mobile phase attributes are combined with WHIM or GETAWAY descriptors into 'mixed' predictive models in order to attempt retention modelling within the whole mobile phase composition range of analytical interest. Six- or seven-dimensional multilinear models, preliminarily selected using a genetic algorithm, were improved using a multi-layer artificial neural network (ANN) learned by back propagation. ANN performance was tested on three molecules not used in the learning stage and by leave-more-out cross validation. The results reveal that while WHIM descriptors seem not adequate to model retention of solutes of data-set-1, GETAWAY descriptors provide a satisfactory retention model. On the other hand WHIM and GETAWAY descriptors applied to data-set-2 provide a similar performance, even if slightly worse as compared with the above case. Accuracy of retention modelling in these cases is comparable or slightly poorer as compared with the results previously obtained by combining quantum chemical descriptors or usual

  5. Associations between chewing and swallowing problems and physical and psychosocial health status of long-term care residents in taiwan: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tze-Fang; Chen, I-Ju; Li, I-Chuan

    2012-01-01

    Oral health is often overlooked in institutional elder care but may have an impact on general health and ability to communicate. We aimed to determine the factor associated with chewing and swallowing problems among long-term care residents in Taiwan. Staff nurses trained to evaluate oral health assessed 781 residents using relevant sections of the Minimum Data Set 2.1 for nursing homes (Chinese version), including the Cognitive Performance Scale, Index of Social Engagement, and Activities of Daily Living Scale. Individuals with chewing and swallowing problems (n = 345) tended to be women (odds ratio [OR] = 1.51, P = .019) in smaller facilities (OR = 4.18, P broken, loose, or carious teeth (OR = 1.74, P = .042); and with more frequently inflamed gums (OR = 2.72, P = .025) than residents without chewing and swallowing problems (n = 436). Residents' chewing and swallowing problems were significantly associated with parenteral/enteral intake, oral health status, nutritional status, concomitant disease and infection, cognitive function, and social engagement. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluation of one-dimensional and two-dimensional volatility basis sets in simulating the aging of secondary organic aerosol with smog-chamber experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bin; Wang, Shuxiao; Donahue, Neil M; Chuang, Wayne; Hildebrandt Ruiz, Lea; Ng, Nga L; Wang, Yangjun; Hao, Jiming

    2015-02-17

    We evaluate the one-dimensional volatility basis set (1D-VBS) and two-dimensional volatility basis set (2D-VBS) in simulating the aging of SOA derived from toluene and α-pinene against smog-chamber experiments. If we simulate the first-generation products with empirical chamber fits and the subsequent aging chemistry with a 1D-VBS or a 2D-VBS, the models mostly overestimate the SOA concentrations in the toluene oxidation experiments. This is because the empirical chamber fits include both first-generation oxidation and aging; simulating aging in addition to this results in double counting of the initial aging effects. If the first-generation oxidation is treated explicitly, the base-case 2D-VBS underestimates the SOA concentrations and O:C increase of the toluene oxidation experiments; it generally underestimates the SOA concentrations and overestimates the O:C increase of the α-pinene experiments. With the first-generation oxidation treated explicitly, we could modify the 2D-VBS configuration individually for toluene and α-pinene to achieve good model-measurement agreement. However, we are unable to simulate the oxidation of both toluene and α-pinene with the same 2D-VBS configuration. We suggest that future models should implement parallel layers for anthropogenic (aromatic) and biogenic precursors, and that more modeling studies and laboratory research be done to optimize the "best-guess" parameters for each layer.

  7. A regression approach for Zircaloy-2 in-reactor creep constitutive equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yung Liu, Y.; Bement, A.L.

    1977-01-01

    In this paper the methodology of multiple regressions as applied to Zircaloy-2 in-reactor creep data analysis and construction of constitutive equation are illustrated. While the resulting constitutive equation can be used in creep analysis of in-reactor Zircaloy structural components, the methodology itself is entirely general and can be applied to any creep data analysis. The promising aspects of multiple regression creep data analysis are briefly outlined as follows: (1) When there are more than one variable involved, there is no need to make the assumption that each variable affects the response independently. No separate normalizations are required either and the estimation of parameters is obtained by solving many simultaneous equations. The number of simultaneous equations is equal to the number of data sets. (2) Regression statistics such as R 2 - and F-statistics provide measures of the significance of regression creep equation in correlating the overall data. The relative weights of each variable on the response can also be obtained. (3) Special regression techniques such as step-wise, ridge, and robust regressions and residual plots, etc., provide diagnostic tools for model selections. Multiple regression analysis performed on a set of carefully selected Zircaloy-2 in-reactor creep data leads to a model which provides excellent correlations for the data. (Auth.)

  8. Experimental Investigation on Damping Property of Coarse Aggregate Replaced Rubber Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugapriya, P.; Ramkrishnan, R.; Keerthana, G.; Saravanamurugan, S.

    2018-02-01

    Rubber has good damping and vibrational characteristics and can reduce cracking significantly due to its elastic nature. This property of rubber can be incorporated in concrete to control vibrations and create better pavements. Crumb Rubber on being dumped in landfills has serious repercussions and causes soil and land pollution. An innovative use of waste tires is shredding them into small pieces and using them as a replacement for coarse aggregate. Crumb rubber is obtained by chopping scrap tires, and in this study it was added in two different sets named SET 1 - Treated Crumb Rubber and concrete, and SET 2 - Treated Crumb rubber with Ultra Fine GGBS as admixture in concrete. Coarse aggregate replaces Rubber in each of the 2 SET’s in proportions of 5, 10, 15 and 20%. Properties like Compressive Strength, Young’s Modulus, Direct and Semi direct Ultrasonic Pulse Velocity, Sorptivity, Damping ratio and Frequency were found out. Deformation and mode shape were studied with modal analysis and static analysis by applying a uniform pressure corresponding to the highest compressive strength of the slab, using ANSYS.

  9. Impact of adaptation algorithm, timing, and stopping boundaries on the performance of Bayesian response adaptive randomization in confirmative trials with a binary endpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yunyun; Zhao, Wenle; Durkalski-Mauldin, Valerie

    2017-11-01

    Despite the concerns of time trend in subject profiles, the use of Bayesian response adaptive randomization (BRAR) in large multicenter phase 3 confirmative trials has been reported in recent years, motivated by the potential benefits in subject ethics and/or trial efficiency. However three issues remain unclear to investigators: 1) among several BRAR algorithms, how to choose one for the specific trial setting; 2) when to start and how frequently to update the allocation ratio; and 3) how to choose the interim analyses stopping boundaries to preserve the type 1 error. In this paper, three commonly used BRAR algorithms are evaluated based on type 1 error, power, sample size, the proportion of subjects assigned to the better performing arm, and the total number of failures, under two specific trial settings and different allocation ratio update timing and frequencies. Simulation studies show that for two-arm superiority trials, none of the three BRAR algorithms has predominant benefits in both patient ethics and trial efficiency when compared to fixed equal allocation design. For a specific trial aiming to identify the best or the worst among three treatments, a properly selected BRAR algorithm and its implementation parameters are able to gain ethical and efficiency benefits simultaneously. Although the simulation results come from a specific trial setting, the methods described in this paper are generally applicable to other trials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Application of decision tree technique to sensitivity analysis for results of radionuclide migration calculations. Research documents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Kunihiko; Makino, Hitoshi

    2005-03-01

    Uncertainties are always present in the parameters used for the nuclide migration analysis in the geological disposal system. These uncertainties affect the result of such analyses, e.g., and the identification of dominant nuclides. It is very important to identify the parameters causing the significant impact on the results, and to investigate the influence of identified parameters in order to recognize R and D items with respect to the development of geological disposal system and understanding of the system performance. In our study, the decision tree analysis technique was examined in the sensitivity analysis as a method for investigation of the influences of the parameters and for complement existing sensitivity analysis. As a result, results obtained from Monte Carlo simulation with parameter uncertainties could be distinguished with not only important parameters but also with their quantitative conditions (e.g., ranges of parameter values). Furthermore, information obtained from the decision tree analysis could be used 1) to categorize the results obtained from the nuclide migration analysis for a given parameter set, 2) to show prospective effect of reduction to parameter uncertainties on the results. (author)

  11. Accurate Depth of Radiofrequency-Induced Lesions in Renal Sympathetic Denervation Based on a Fine Histological Sectioning Approach in a Porcine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaoka, Atsushi; Terao, Hisako; Nakamura, Shintaro; Hagiwara, Hitomi; Furukawa, Toshihito; Matsumura, Kiyoshi; Sakakura, Kenichi

    2018-02-01

    Ablation lesion depth caused by radiofrequency-based renal denervation (RDN) was limited to radiofrequency-RDN cannot ablate a substantial percentage of renal sympathetic nerves. We aimed to define the true lesion depth achieved with radiofrequency-RDN using a fine sectioning method and to investigate biophysical parameters that could predict lesion depth. Radiofrequency was delivered to 87 sites in 14 renal arteries from 9 farm pigs at various ablation settings: 2, 4, 6, and 9 W for 60 seconds and 6 W for 120 seconds. Electric impedance and electrode temperature were recorded during ablation. At 7 days, 2470 histological sections were obtained from the treated arteries. Maximum lesion depth increased at 2 to 6 W, peaking at 6.53 (95% confidence interval, 4.27-8.78) mm under the 6 W/60 s condition. It was not augmented by greater power (9 W) or longer duration (120 seconds). There were statistically significant tendencies at 6 and 9 W, with higher injury scores in the media, nerves, arterioles, and fat. Maximum lesion depth was positively correlated with impedance reduction and peak electrode temperature (Pearson correlation coefficients were 0.59 and 0.53, respectively). Lesion depth was 6.5 mm for radiofrequency-RDN at 6 W/60 s. The impedance reduction and peak electrode temperature during ablation were closely associated with lesion depth. Hence, these biophysical parameters could provide prompt feedback during radiofrequency-RDN procedures in the clinical setting. © 2018 The Authors.

  12. The geometry of pull-apart basins in the southern part of Sumatran strike-slip fault zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aribowo, Sonny

    2018-02-01

    Models of pull-apart basin geometry have been described by many previous studies in a variety tectonic setting. 2D geometry of Ranau Lake represents a pull-apart basin in the Sumatran Fault Zone. However, there are unclear geomorphic traces of two sub-parallel overlapping strike-slip faults in the boundary of the lake. Nonetheless, clear geomorphic traces that parallel to Kumering Segment of the Sumatran Fault are considered as inactive faults in the southern side of the lake. I demonstrate the angular characteristics of the Ranau Lake and Suoh complex pull-apart basins and compare with pull-apart basin examples from published studies. I use digital elevation model (DEM) image to sketch the shape of the depression of Ranau Lake and Suoh Valley and measure 2D geometry of pull-apart basins. This study shows that Ranau Lake is not a pull-apart basin, and the pull-apart basin is actually located in the eastern side of the lake. Since there is a clear connection between pull-apart basin and volcanic activity in Sumatra, I also predict that the unclear trace of the pull-apart basin near Ranau Lake may be covered by Ranau Caldera and Seminung volcanic products.

  13. TU-D-201-01: 2016 Economics Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontenot, J [Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Fuss, W [Health Policy Solutions, Delray Beach, FL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    The purpose of this session is to introduce attendees to the healthcare reimbursement system and how it applies to the clinical work of a medical physicist. This will include general information about the different categories of payers and payees, how work is described by CPT codes, and how various payers set values for this work in different clinical settings. 2016 is another year of significant changes to the payment system. This presentation will describe the work encompassed in these codes and will give attendees an overview of the changes for 2016 as they apply to radiation oncology. Finally, some insight into what can be expected during 2017 will be presented. This includes what information is typically released by the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services (CMS) during the year and how we as an organization respond. This will include ways members can interact with the AAPM professional economics committee and other resources members may find helpful. Learning objectives1) Basics of how Medicare is structured and how reimbursement rates are set.2) Basic understanding of proposed changes to the 2016 Medicare rules.3) Describe economics and policy resources that are available from the AAPM and how to interact with the professional economics committee.

  14. PIV Study of Aeration Efficient of Stepped Spillway System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abas, M. A.; Jamil, R.; Rozainy, M. R.; Zainol, M. A.; Adlan, M. N.; Keong, C. W.

    2017-06-01

    This paper investigates the three-dimensional (3D) simulation of Cascade aerator system using Lattice Boltzmann simulation and laboratory experiment was carried out to investigate the flow, aeration and cavitation in the spillway. Different configurations of stepped spillway are designed in this project in order to investigate the relationship between the configurations of stepped spillway and cavitation in the flow. The aeration in the stepped spillway will also be investigated. The experimental result will be compared with the simulated result at the end of this project. The figure of flow pattern at the 3rd step in simulation and experiment for Set 1 and Set 2 are look similar between LBM simulation and the experiment findings. This will provide a better understanding of the cavitation, aeration and flow in different configurations of the stepped spillway. In addition the occurrence of negative pressure region in the stepped spillway, increases the possibility of cavitation to occur. The cavitation will damage the structure of the stepped spillway. Furthermore, it also founds that increasing in barrier thickness of the stepped spillway will improve the aeration efficiency and reduce the cavitation in stepped spillway.

  15. Online self-expression and experimentation as 'reflectivism': Using text analytics to examine the participatory forum Hello Sunday Morning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carah, Nicholas; Meurk, Carla; Angus, Daniel

    2017-03-01

    Hello Sunday Morning is an online health promotion organisation that began in 2009. Hello Sunday Morning asks participants to stop consuming alcohol for a period of time, set a goal and document their progress on a personal blog. Hello Sunday Morning is a unique health intervention for three interrelated reasons: (1) it was generated outside a clinical setting, (2) it uses new media technologies to create structured forms of participation in an iterative and open-ended way and (3) participants generate a written record of their progress along with demographic, behavioural and engagement data. This article presents a text analysis of the blog posts of Hello Sunday Morning participants using the software program Leximancer. Analysis of blogs illustrates how participants' expressions change over time. In the first month, participants tended to set goals, describe their current drinking practices in individual and cultural terms, express hopes and anxieties and report on early efforts to change. After month 1, participants continued to report on efforts to change and associated challenges and reflect on their place as individuals in a drinking culture. In addition to this, participants evaluated their efforts to change and presented their 'findings' and 'theorised' them to provide advice for others. We contextualise this text analysis with respect to Hello Sunday Morning's development of more structured forms of online participation. We offer a critical appraisal of the value of text analytics in the development of online health interventions.

  16. Magnetoresistance in single-electron transistors comprising a superconducting island with ferromagnetic leads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizugaki, Yoshinao; Takiguchi, Masashi; Tamura, Nobuyuki; Shimada, Hiroshi

    2018-03-01

    We report electric and magnetic field responses of single-electron transistors (SETs) comprising a superconducting island with ferromagnetic (FM) leads. We fabricated two SETs, one of which had relatively high resistance and the other had relatively low resistance. The SETs had two states for the gate charge: SET-ON or SET-OFF. They also had two states for the FM lead magnetization: parallel (P) or anti-parallel (AP) configuration. Current-voltage characteristics of four SET states (“P & SET-ON,” “P & SET-OFF,” “AP & SET-ON,” and “AP & SET-OFF”) were measured at approximately 0.1 K in a compact dilution refrigerator. Magnetoresistance ratio (MRR) values were obtained for the SET-ON and SET-OFF states, respectively. The higher-resistance SET1 exhibited positive MRR values for all measured bias voltages. The MRR enhancement was confirmed for the SET-OFF state, which agreed well with the co-tunneling model. The lower-resistance SET2, on the other hand, exhibited negative and positive MRR values for higher and lower bias voltage conditions, respectively. The bias voltage for the MRR polarity reversal was changed by the gate voltage. It was also confirmed that the co-tunneling model was partially valid for negative MRR values.

  17. A goal attainment pain management program for older adults with arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Gail C; White, Terri L

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to test a pain management intervention that integrates goal setting with older adults (age > or =65) living independently in residential settings. This preliminary testing of the Goal Attainment Pain Management Program (GAPMAP) included a sample of 17 adults (mean age 79.29 years) with self-reported pain related to arthritis. Specific study aims were to: 1) explore the use of individual goal setting; 2) determine participants' levels of goal attainment; 3) determine whether changes occurred in the pain management methods used and found to be helpful by GAPMAP participants; and 4) determine whether changes occurred in selected pain-related variables (i.e., experience of living with persistent pain, the expected outcomes of pain management, pain management barriers, and global ratings of perceived pain intensity and success of pain management). Because of the small sample size, both parametric (t test) and nonparametric (Wilcoxon signed rank test) analyses were used to examine differences from pretest to posttest. Results showed that older individuals could successfully participate in setting and attaining individual goals. Thirteen of the 17 participants (76%) met their goals at the expected level or above. Two management methods (exercise and using a heated pool, tub, or shower) were used significantly more often after the intervention, and two methods (exercise and distraction) were identified as significantly more helpful. Two pain-related variables (experience of living with persistent pain and expected outcomes of pain management) revealed significant change, and all of those tested showed overall improvement.

  18. Polymorphisms in stromal genes and susceptibility to serous epithelial ovarian cancer: a report from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amankwah, Ernest K; Wang, Qinggang; Schildkraut, Joellen M

    2011-01-01

    Alterations in stromal tissue components can inhibit or promote epithelial tumorigenesis. Decorin (DCN) and lumican (LUM) show reduced stromal expression in serous epithelial ovarian cancer (sEOC). We hypothesized that common variants in these genes associate with risk. Associations with sEOC among...... and replication set 1 (833 cases and 2,013 controls) showed statistically homogeneous (P(heterogeneity)≥0.48) decreased risks of sEOC at four variants: DCN rs3138165, rs13312816 and rs516115, and LUM rs17018765 (OR = 0.6 to 0.9; P(trend) = 0.001 to 0.03). Results from replication set 2 were statistically...... homogeneous (P(heterogeneity)≥0.13) and associated with increased risks at DCN rs3138165 and rs13312816, and LUM rs17018765: all ORs = 1.2; P(trend)≤0.02. The ORs at the four variants were statistically heterogeneous across all 18 studies (P(heterogeneity)≤0.03), which precluded combining. In post...

  19. Effect of biosurfactant and fertilizer on biodegradation of crude oil by marine isolates of Bacillus megaterium, Corynebacterium kutscheri and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thavasi, Rengathavasi; Jayalakshmi, Singaram; Banat, Ibrahim M

    2011-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of fertilizers and biosurfactants on biodegradation of crude oil by three marine bacterial isolates; Bacillus megaterium, Corynebacterium kutscheri and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Five sets of experiments were carried out in shake flask and microcosm conditions with crude oil as follows: Set 1-only bacterial cells added (no fertilizer and biosurfactant), Set 2-with additional fertilizer only, Set 3-with additional biosurfactant only, Set 4-with added biosurfactant+fertilizer, Set 5-with no bacterial cells added (control), all the above experimental sets were incubated for 168 h. The biosurfactant+fertilizer added Set 4, resulted in maximum crude oil degradation within shake flask and microcosm conditions. Among the three bacterial isolates, P. aeruginosa and biosurfactant produced by this strain resulted in maximum crude oil degradation compared to the other two bacterial strains investigated. Interestingly, when biosurfactant and bacterial cells were used (Set 3), significant oil biodegradation activity occurred and the difference between this treatment and that in Set 4 with added fertilizer+biosurfactant were only 4-5% higher degradation level in shake flask and 3.2-7% in microcosm experiments for all three bacterial strains used. It is concluded that, biosurfactants alone capable of promoting biodegradation to a large extent without added fertilizers, which will reduce the cost of bioremediation process and minimizes the dilution or wash away problems encountered when water soluble fertilizers used during bioremediation of aquatic environments. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Pola Spasial Permukiman Tradisional Bali Aga di Desa Sekardadi, Kintamani

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Ketut Agusintadewi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The Bayung Gede village has derived smaller traditional settlements around Kintamani. Sekardadi is one of these settlements that has an inherent consociates with the village of origin, or the Bayung Gede. Despite the fact that the Sekardadi has a uniqueness on spatial pattern and house lay out, this village has not been welldocumented as an old village in Bali. These uniqueness are interesting to be indepth explored. It is not only on the basic philosophy of the house pattern, but also how this pattern to be physical implemented. This study aims to describe some characteristics of the village, both physical and nonphysical aspects, through the way of descriptive exploratory qualitative approach. According to the theory housing pattern of Habraken (1978 and Turgut (2001, research variables are determined into three variables: 1 Cultural setting; 2 Behavioural setting; and 3 Spatial setting. The result shows that macro spatial pattern of the Sekardadi village is divided into three zones: 1 Utama Mandala locates in the north of the village; 2 Madya Mandala is in the middle of the village, and 3 Nista Mandala in the south. Spatial pattern follows the hulu-teben conception or linear pattern with the main road as a cardinal orientation. Higher land means a sacred area (parahyangan that is characterized by the existence of Pura Puseh. Meanwhile, the opposite is defined as a profane area (palemahan with the presence of graves; and in the middle is the settlement (pawongan. Keywords: spatial pattern; traditional settlement; Sekardadi village

  1. Qualitative and quantitative reliability analysis of safety systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karimi, R.; Rasmussen, N.; Wolf, L.

    1980-05-01

    A code has been developed for the comprehensive analysis of a fault tree. The code designated UNRAC (UNReliability Analysis Code) calculates the following characteristics of an input fault tree: (1) minimal cut sets; (2) top event unavailability as point estimate and/or in time dependent form; (3) quantitative importance of each component involved; and, (4) error bound on the top event unavailability. UNRAC can analyze fault trees, with any kind of gates (EOR, NAND, NOR, AND, OR), up to a maximum of 250 components and/or gates. The code is benchmarked against WAMCUT, MODCUT, KITT, BIT-FRANTIC, and PL-MODT. The results showed that UNRAC produces results more consistent with the KITT results than either BIT-FRANTIC or PL-MODT. Overall it is demonstrated that UNRAC is an efficient easy-to-use code and has the advantage of being able to do a complete fault tree analysis with this single code. Applications of fault tree analysis to safety studies of nuclear reactors are considered

  2. A time series study of drug sales and turbidity of tap water in Le Havre, France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudeau, Pascal; Le Tertre, Alain; Zeghnoun, Abdelkrim; Zanobetti, Antonella; Schwartz, Joel

    2012-06-01

    The 80,000 inhabitants of the lower part of Le Havre obtain their water supply from two karstic springs, Radicatel and Saint-Laurent. Until 2000, the Radicatel water was settled when turbidity exceeded 3 NTU, then filtered and chlorinated, whereas the Saint-Laurent water was simply chlorinated. Our study aimed to characterize the link between water turbidity and the incidence of acute gastroenteritis (AGE). Records on drug sales used for the treatment of AGE were collected from January 1994 to June 1996 (period 1) and from March 1997 to July 2000 (period 2). Daily counts of drug sales were modeled using a Poisson Regression. We used data set 2 as a discovery set, identifying relevant (i.e. both significant and plausible) exposure covariates and lags. We then tested this model on period 1 as a replication dataset. In period 2, the daily drug sales correlated with finished water turbidity at both resources. Settling substantially modified the risk related to turbidity of both raw and finished waters at Radicatel. Correlations were reproducible in period 1 for water from the Radicatel spring. Timeliness of treatment adaptation to turbidity conditions appears to be crucial for reducing the infectious risk due to karstic waters.

  3. Both H4K20 mono-methylation and H3K56 acetylation mark transcription-dependent histone turnover in fission yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Hanna; Kwon, Chang Seob; Choi, Yoonjung; Lee, Daeyoup

    2016-01-01

    Nucleosome dynamics facilitated by histone turnover is required for transcription as well as DNA replication and repair. Histone turnover is often associated with various histone modifications such as H3K56 acetylation (H3K56Ac), H3K36 methylation (H3K36me), and H4K20 methylation (H4K20me). In order to correlate histone modifications and transcription-dependent histone turnover, we performed genome wide analyses for euchromatic regions in G2/M-arrested fission yeast. The results show that transcription-dependent histone turnover at 5′ promoter and 3′ termination regions is directly correlated with the occurrence of H3K56Ac and H4K20 mono-methylation (H4K20me1) in actively transcribed genes. Furthermore, the increase of H3K56Ac and H4K20me1 and antisense RNA production was observed in the absence of the histone H3K36 methyltransferase Set2 and histone deacetylase complex (HDAC) that are involved in the suppression of histone turnover within the coding regions. These results together indicate that H4K20me1 as well as H3K56Ac are bona fide marks for transcription-dependent histone turnover in fission yeast.

  4. If We Build It, Will They Come? A Qualitative Study of Key Stakeholder Opinions on the Implementation of a Videogame Intervention for Risk Reduction in Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendergrass, Tyra M; Hieftje, Kimberly; Crusto, Cindy A; Montanaro, Erika; Fiellin, Lynn E

    2016-08-01

    Serious games are emerging as important tools that offer an innovative approach to teach adolescents behavioral skills to avoid risky situations. PlayForward: Elm City Stories, an interactive videogame targeting risk reduction, is currently undergoing evaluation. Collecting stakeholder data on its acceptability and real-life implementation strategies is critical for successful dissemination. We collected interview data from four stakeholder groups regarding incorporating PlayForward into settings with adolescents. Transcripts were coded, creating a comprehensive code structure for each stakeholder group. We conducted 40 semi-structured interviews that included 14 adolescents (aged 12-15 years; 10 boys), eight parents/guardians (all women), 12 after-school/school coordinators (nine women), and 14 community partners (13 women). We identified four themes that reflected stakeholders' perceptions about how the videogame might be implemented in real-world settings. (1) Stakeholder groups expressed that the topics of sex, alcohol, and drugs were not being taught in an educational setting. (2) Stakeholder groups saw a videogame as a viable option to teach about sex, alcohol, and drugs. (3) Stakeholder groups thought that the videogame would fit well into other settings, such as after-school programs or community organizations. (4) Some stakeholder groups highlighted additional tools that could help with implementation, such as manuals, homework assignments, and group discussion questions. Stakeholder groups supported the game as a delivery vehicle for targeted content, indicating high acceptability but highlighting additional tools that would aid in implementation.

  5. Challenges in Soft Computing: Case Study with Louisville MSD CSO Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormsbee, L.; Tufail, M.

    2005-12-01

    The principal constituents of soft computing include fuzzy logic, neural computing, evolutionary computation, machine learning, and probabilistic reasoning. There are numerous applications of these constituents (both individually and combination of two or more) in the area of water resources and environmental systems. These range from development of data driven models to optimal control strategies to assist in more informed and intelligent decision making process. Availability of data is critical to such applications and having scarce data may lead to models that do not represent the response function over the entire domain. At the same time, too much data has a tendency to lead to over-constraining of the problem. This paper will describe the application of a subset of these soft computing techniques (neural computing and genetic algorithms) to the Beargrass Creek watershed in Louisville, Kentucky. The application include development of inductive models as substitutes for more complex process-based models to predict water quality of key constituents (such as dissolved oxygen) and use them in an optimization framework for optimal load reductions. Such a process will facilitate the development of total maximum daily loads for the impaired water bodies in the watershed. Some of the challenges faced in this application include 1) uncertainty in data sets, 2) model application, and 3) development of cause-and-effect relationships between water quality constituents and watershed parameters through use of inductive models. The paper will discuss these challenges and how they affect the desired goals of the project.

  6. Comment on "Beyond the SCS-CN method: A theoretical framework for spatially lumped rainfall-runoff response" by M. S. Bartlett et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogden, Fred L.; Hawkins, Richard Pete; Walter, M. Todd; Goodrich, David C.

    2017-07-01

    Bartlett et al. (2016) performed a re-interpretation and modification of the space-time lumped USDA NRCS (formerly SCS) Curve Number (CN) method to extend its applicability to forested watersheds. We believe that the well documented limitations of the CN method severely constrains the applicability of the modifications proposed by Bartlett et al. (2016). This forward-looking comment urges the research communities in hydrologic science and engineering to consider the CN method as a stepping stone that has outlived its usefulness in research. The CN method fills a narrow niche in certain settings as a parsimonious method having utility as an empirical equation to estimate runoff from a given amount of rainfall, which originated as a static functional form that fits rainfall-runoff data sets. Sixty five years of use and multiple reinterpretations have not resulted in improved hydrological predictability using the method. We suggest that the research community should move forward by (1) identifying appropriate dynamic hydrological model formulations for different hydro-geographic settings, (2) specifying needed model capabilities for solving different classes of problems (e.g., flooding, erosion/sedimentation, nutrient transport, water management, etc.) in different hydro-geographic settings, and (3) expanding data collection and research programs to help ameliorate the so-called "overparameterization" problem in contemporary modeling. Many decades of advances in geo-spatial data and processing, computation, and understanding are being squandered on continued focus on the static CN regression method. It is time to truly "move beyond" the Curve Number method.

  7. Energy conservation in agriculture sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maggo, J.N.

    1991-01-01

    The annual production of foodgrains in India rose from 50.8 million tonnes in 1950-51 to 178 million tonnes in 1989-90. One of the factors which led to this impressive growth is the continued increase in input of mechanization and energy in the agricultural sector by way of tractors running on diesel and pumps (for water supply) based on diesel and electricity. Electricity consumption in agricultural sector rose from 833 million kWh in 1960-61 to 47000 million kWh in 1990-91 and is further expected to rise to 81.8 TWH in 1999-2000. Considering the heavy investments required for production and supply of energy, it has become imperative to avoid wasteful use of energy and to use energy more efficiently. This can be done by : (1) Changing the electricity tariff structure from the present horse power related rates to energy consumption related rates. This will induce farmers to avoid waste in energy use. (2) Adopting energy efficiency measures. These measures are : (1) replacement of inefficient foot valves, suction pipes and delivery pipes of the pump sets, (2) increasing power factor of electric motors used for pumps sets, (3) reducing distribution losses over LT lines, and (4) optimizing use of fertilizers. This optimization will indirectly conserve energy by reducing electricity consumption by fertilizer industry. (M.G.B.). 5 refs., 4 tabs

  8. The role of short messaging service in supporting the delivery of healthcare: An umbrella systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Househ, Mowafa

    2016-06-01

    Short messaging service (SMS) messages may present a convenient and cost-effective method to support healthcare interventions. This work assesses the effects of short messaging service on various healthcare interventions found in systematic reviews. The search strategy was based on two key concepts: short messaging service and healthcare delivery. The initial search was conducted in December 2012 and was updated in June 2013. Of the 550 identified references, 13 systematic reviews met the inclusion criteria, of which 8 were published in peer-reviewed journals and 5 were retrieved from the Cochrane library. Data analysis shows that low to moderate research evidence exists on the benefits of short messaging service interventions for appointment reminders, promoting health in developing countries and preventive healthcare. In many interventions, however, there were a few studies that were of high quality, and most of the studies were rated from low to moderate quality or had no rating at all. Healthcare organizations, policy makers, or clinicians using short messaging service messages to support healthcare interventions should (1) implement interventions that have been found to work in healthcare settings, (2) continue evaluating short messaging service interventions that have not been adequately assessed, and (3) improve collaboration between various healthcare entities to develop studies targeted at specific populations to evaluate the long-term impact of short messaging service on healthcare outcomes. © The Author(s) 2014.

  9. Closing the gap between the inside and the outside: interoceptive sensitivity and social distances.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Ferri

    Full Text Available Humans' ability to represent their body state from within through interoception has been proposed to predict different aspects of human cognition and behaviour. We focused on the possible contribution of interoceptive sensitivity to social behaviour as mediated by adaptive modulation of autonomic response. We, thus, investigated whether interoceptive sensitivity to one's heartbeat predicts participants' autonomic response at different social distances. We measured respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA during either a Social or a Non-social task. In the Social task each participant viewed an experimenter performing a caress-like movement at different distances from their hand. In the Non-social task a metal stick was moved at the same distances from the participant's hand. We found a positive association between interoceptive sensitivity and autonomic response only for the social setting. Moreover, only good heartbeat perceivers showed higher autonomic response 1 in the social compared to the non-social setting, 2 specifically, when the experimenter's hand was moving at boundary of their peripersonal space (20 cm from the participant's hand. Our findings suggest that interoceptive sensitivity might contribute to interindividual differences concerning social attitudes and interpersonal space representation via recruitment of different adaptive autonomic response strategies.

  10. Reduction of artefacts due to missing projections using OSEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutton, B.F.; Kyme, A.; Choong, K.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: It is well recognised that missing or corrupted projections can result in artefacts. This occasionally occurs due to errors in data transfer from acquisition memory to disk. A possible approach for reducing these artefacts was investigated, Using ordered subsets expectation maximization (OSEM) the iterative reconstruction proceeds by progressively including additional projections until a single iteration is complete. Clinically useful results can be obtained using a small subset size in a single iteration. Stopping prior to the complete iteration so as to avoid inclusion of missing or corrupted data should provide a 'partial' reconstruction with minimal artefacts. To test this hypothesis projections were selectively removed from a complete data set (2, 4, 8, 12 adjacent projections) and reconstructions were performed using both filtered back projection (FBP) and OSEM. To maintain a constant number of sub-iterations in OSEM an equal number of duplicate projections were substituted for the missing projections. Both 180 and 360 degrees reconstructions with missing data were compared with reconstruction for the complete data using sum of absolute differences. Results indicate that missing data causes artefacts for both FBP and OSEM however the severity of artefacts is significantly reduced using OSEM. The effect of missing data is generally greater for 180 degrees acquisition. OSEM is recommended for minimising reconstruction artefacts due to missing projections. Copyright (2002) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  11. Carotid artery B-mode ultrasound image segmentation based on morphology, geometry and gradient direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunarya, I. Made Gede; Yuniarno, Eko Mulyanto; Purnomo, Mauridhi Hery; Sardjono, Tri Arief; Sunu, Ismoyo; Purnama, I. Ketut Eddy

    2017-06-01

    Carotid Artery (CA) is one of the vital organs in the human body. CA features that can be used are position, size and volume. Position feature can used to determine the preliminary initialization of the tracking. Examination of the CA features can use Ultrasound. Ultrasound imaging can be operated dependently by an skilled operator, hence there could be some differences in the images result obtained by two or more different operators. This can affect the process of determining of CA. To reduce the level of subjectivity among operators, it can determine the position of the CA automatically. In this study, the proposed method is to segment CA in B-Mode Ultrasound Image based on morphology, geometry and gradient direction. This study consists of three steps, the data collection, preprocessing and artery segmentation. The data used in this study were taken directly by the researchers and taken from the Brno university's signal processing lab database. Each data set contains 100 carotid artery B-Mode ultrasound image. Artery is modeled using ellipse with center c, major axis a and minor axis b. The proposed method has a high value on each data set, 97% (data set 1), 73 % (data set 2), 87% (data set 3). This segmentation results will then be used in the process of tracking the CA.

  12. Effect of Concrete Waste Form Properties on Radionuclide Migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Bovaird, Chase C.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Skinner, De'Chauna J.; Cordova, Elsa A.; Wood, Marcus I.

    2009-01-01

    Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 waste cement grouts for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e., sorption or precipitation) the mechanism of contaminant release, the significance of contaminant release pathways, how waste form performance is affected by the full range of environmental conditions within the disposal facility, the process of waste form aging under conditions that are representative of processes occurring in response to changing environmental conditions within the disposal facility, the effect of waste form aging on chemical, physical, and radiological properties and the associated impact on contaminant release. This knowledge will enable accurate prediction of radionuclide fate when the waste forms come in contact with groundwater. Numerous sets of tests were initiated in fiscal years (FY) 2006-2009 to evaluate (1) diffusion of iodine (I) and technetium (Tc) from concrete into uncontaminated soil after 1 and 2 years, (2) I and rhenium (Re) diffusion from contaminated soil into fractured concrete, (3) I and Re (set 1) and Tc (set 2) diffusion from fractured concrete into uncontaminated soil, (4) evaluate the moisture distribution profile within the sediment half-cell, (5) the reactivity and speciation of uranium (VI) (U(VI)) compounds in concrete porewaters, (6) the rate of dissolution of concrete monoliths, and (7) the diffusion of simulated tank waste into concrete.

  13. EST Express: PHP/MySQL based automated annotation of ESTs from expression libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robin P; Buchser, William J; Lemmon, Marcus B; Pardinas, Jose R; Bixby, John L; Lemmon, Vance P

    2008-04-10

    Several biological techniques result in the acquisition of functional sets of cDNAs that must be sequenced and analyzed. The emergence of redundant databases such as UniGene and centralized annotation engines such as Entrez Gene has allowed the development of software that can analyze a great number of sequences in a matter of seconds. We have developed "EST Express", a suite of analytical tools that identify and annotate ESTs originating from specific mRNA populations. The software consists of a user-friendly GUI powered by PHP and MySQL that allows for online collaboration between researchers and continuity with UniGene, Entrez Gene and RefSeq. Two key features of the software include a novel, simplified Entrez Gene parser and tools to manage cDNA library sequencing projects. We have tested the software on a large data set (2,016 samples) produced by subtractive hybridization. EST Express is an open-source, cross-platform web server application that imports sequences from cDNA libraries, such as those generated through subtractive hybridization or yeast two-hybrid screens. It then provides several layers of annotation based on Entrez Gene and RefSeq to allow the user to highlight useful genes and manage cDNA library projects.

  14. Selective encryption for H.264/AVC video coding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Tuo; King, Brian; Salama, Paul

    2006-02-01

    Due to the ease with which digital data can be manipulated and due to the ongoing advancements that have brought us closer to pervasive computing, the secure delivery of video and images has become a challenging problem. Despite the advantages and opportunities that digital video provide, illegal copying and distribution as well as plagiarism of digital audio, images, and video is still ongoing. In this paper we describe two techniques for securing H.264 coded video streams. The first technique, SEH264Algorithm1, groups the data into the following blocks of data: (1) a block that contains the sequence parameter set and the picture parameter set, (2) a block containing a compressed intra coded frame, (3) a block containing the slice header of a P slice, all the headers of the macroblock within the same P slice, and all the luma and chroma DC coefficients belonging to the all the macroblocks within the same slice, (4) a block containing all the ac coefficients, and (5) a block containing all the motion vectors. The first three are encrypted whereas the last two are not. The second method, SEH264Algorithm2, relies on the use of multiple slices per coded frame. The algorithm searches the compressed video sequence for start codes (0x000001) and then encrypts the next N bits of data.

  15. Emerging roles for biomedical librarians: a survey of current practice, challenges, and changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crum, Janet A; Cooper, I Diane

    2013-10-01

    This study is intended to (1) identify emerging roles for biomedical librarians and determine how common these roles are in a variety of library settings, (2) identify barriers to taking on new roles, and (3) determine how librarians are developing the capacity to take on new roles. A survey was conducted of librarians in biomedical settings. Most biomedical librarians are taking on new roles. The most common roles selected by survey respondents include analysis and enhancement of user experiences, support for social media, support for systematic reviews, clinical informationist, help for faculty or staff with authorship issues, and implementation of researcher profiling and collaboration tools. Respondents in academic settings are more likely to report new roles than hospital librarians are, but some new roles are common in both settings. Respondents use a variety of methods to free up time for new roles, but predominant methods vary between directors and librarians and between academic and hospital respondents. Lack of time is the biggest barrier that librarians face when trying to adopt new roles. New roles are associated with increased collaboration with individuals and/or groups outside the library. This survey documents the widespread incorporation of new roles in biomedical libraries in the United States, as well as the barriers to adopting these roles and the means by which librarians are making time for them. The results of the survey can be used to inform strategic planning, succession planning, library education, and career development for biomedical librarians.

  16. MRD Testing in Multiple Myeloma: From a Surrogate Marker of Clinical Outcomes to an Every-Day Clinical Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landgren, Ola

    2018-01-01

    Minimal residual disease (MRD) testing in multiple myeloma is here to stay. Studies show that MRD negativity is consistently associated with longer progression-free survival (PFS). It is just a matter of time until MRD negativity will become a regulatory endpoint for drug approval. Until that can happen, more analysis will be required to define the exact details of MRD in the regulatory setting. For example, for randomized studies there is need to define the amount of improvement in MRD negativity between the experimental arm and the control arm at a given time-point for a drug to obtain regulatory accelerated approval. Such efforts are underway. For the multiple myeloma field as a whole, important tasks for the (near) coming future are as follows: (1) to conduct or finalize the expanded analysis to define the exact details of MRD in the regulatory setting, (2) to develop new and better MRD assays-both more sensitive MRD assays for bone marrow aspirates and nonbone marrow aspirate-based assays (eg, blood-based and imaging-based MRD assays), and (3) to design novel clinical studies to formally assess the effect of MRD negativity in clinical decision making. The aim with this issue of the Journal is to provide a deep and comprehensive summary of the latest MRD knowledge in the field, and to outline future directions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The ecology of team science: understanding contextual influences on transdisciplinary collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokols, Daniel; Misra, Shalini; Moser, Richard P; Hall, Kara L; Taylor, Brandie K

    2008-08-01

    Increased public and private investments in large-scale team science initiatives over the past two decades have underscored the need to better understand how contextual factors influence the effectiveness of transdisciplinary scientific collaboration. Toward that goal, the findings from four distinct areas of research on team performance and collaboration are reviewed: (1) social psychological and management research on the effectiveness of teams in organizational and institutional settings; (2) studies of cyber-infrastructures (i.e., computer-based infrastructures) designed to support transdisciplinary collaboration across remote research sites; (3) investigations of community-based coalitions for health promotion; and (4) studies focusing directly on the antecedents, processes, and outcomes of scientific collaboration within transdisciplinary research centers and training programs. The empirical literature within these four domains reveals several contextual circumstances that either facilitate or hinder team performance and collaboration. A typology of contextual influences on transdisciplinary collaboration is proposed as a basis for deriving practical guidelines for designing, managing, and evaluating successful team science initiatives.

  18. Exploring linear algebra labs and projects with Mathematica

    CERN Document Server

    Arangala, Crista

    2014-01-01

    Matrix Operations Lab 0: An Introduction to Mathematica Lab 1: Matrix Basics and Operations Lab 2: A Matrix Representation of Linear Systems Lab 3: Powers, Inverses, and Special Matrices Lab 4: Graph Theory and Adjacency Matrices Lab 5: Permutations and Determinants Lab 6: 4 x 4 Determinants and Beyond Project Set 1 Invertibility Lab 7: Singular or Nonsingular? Why Singularity Matters Lab 8: Mod It Out, Matrices with Entries in ZpLab 9: It's a Complex World Lab 10: Declaring Independence: Is It Linear? Project Set 2 Vector Spaces Lab 11: Vector Spaces and SubspacesLab 12: Basing It All on Just a Few Vectors Lab 13: Linear Transformations Lab 14: Eigenvalues and Eigenspaces Lab 15: Markov Chains, An Application of Eigenvalues Project Set 3 Orthogonality Lab 16: Inner Product Spaces Lab 17: The Geometry of Vector and Inner Product SpacesLab 18: Orthogonal Matrices, QR Decomposition, and Least Squares Regression Lab 19: Symmetric Matrices and Quadratic Forms Project Set 4 Matrix Decomposition with Applications L...

  19. Projecting Homes: Domestic Spaces in Three Filipino Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tito R. Quiling Jr.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The house is a fundamental space for a character’s consciousness, and this structure is a familiar image in Filipino f ilms. This particular space as a setting in which the narrative and the characters are able to move in, is essential. This paper analyzes the influence of domestic spaces and the characteristics of home, which correspond to the characters’ consciousness and the narrative. These are presented in the selected films: Oro, Plata, Mata (1982 by Peque Gallaga, “Hellow, Soldier,” the second episode in Lino Brocka’s Tatlo, Dalawa, Isa (1975, and Kisapmata (1981 by Mike De Leon. The method for assessment consists of three parts: (1 the background in which the films are set, (2 the influence of the house using Gaston Bachelard’s notion of the house in The Poetics of Space (1994 as a framework, (3 and the behavior of the characters as portrayed in the films. The significance of domestic spaces to a character’s experience is illustrated in the selected texts.

  20. A major trauma course based on posters, audio-guides and simulation improves the management skills of medical students: Evaluation via medical simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuisinier, Adrien; Schilte, Clotilde; Declety, Philippe; Picard, Julien; Berger, Karine; Bouzat, Pierre; Falcon, Dominique; Bosson, Jean Luc; Payen, Jean-François; Albaladejo, Pierre

    2015-12-01

    Medical competence requires the acquisition of theoretical knowledge and technical skills. Severe trauma management teaching is poorly developed during internship. Nevertheless, the basics of major trauma management should be acquired by every future physician. For this reason, the major trauma course (MTC), an educational course in major traumatology, has been developed for medical students. Our objective was to evaluate, via a high fidelity medical simulator, the impact of the MTC on medical student skills concerning major trauma management. The MTC contains 3 teaching modalities: posters with associated audio-guides, a procedural workshop on airway management and a teaching session using a medical simulator. Skills evaluation was performed 1 month before (step 1) and 1 month after (step 3) the MTC (step 2). Nineteen students were individually evaluated on 2 different major trauma scenarios. The primary endpoint was the difference between steps 1 and 3, in a combined score evaluating: admission, equipment, monitoring and safety (skill set 1) and systematic clinical examinations (skill set 2). After the course, the combined primary outcome score improved by 47% (P<0.01). Scenario choice or the order of use had no significant influence on the skill set evaluations. This study shows improvement in student skills for major trauma management, which we attribute mainly to the major trauma course developed in our institution. Copyright © 2015 Société française d’anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. The quality and impact of computer supported collaborative learning (CSCL) in radiology case-based learning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kourdioukova, Elena V.; Verstraete, Koenraad L.; Valcke, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this research was to explore (1) clinical years students' perceptions about radiology case-based learning within a computer supported collaborative learning (CSCL) setting, (2) an analysis of the collaborative learning process, and (3) the learning impact of collaborative work on the radiology cases. Methods: The first part of this study focuses on a more detailed analysis of a survey study about CSCL based case-based learning, set up in the context of a broader radiology curriculum innovation. The second part centers on a qualitative and quantitative analysis of 52 online collaborative learning discussions from 5th year and nearly graduating medical students. The collaborative work was based on 26 radiology cases regarding musculoskeletal radiology. Results: The analysis of perceptions about collaborative learning on radiology cases reflects a rather neutral attitude that also does not differ significantly in students of different grade levels. Less advanced students are more positive about CSCL as compared to last year students. Outcome evaluation shows a significantly higher level of accuracy in identification of radiology key structures and in radiology diagnosis as well as in linking the radiological signs with available clinical information in nearly graduated students. No significant differences between different grade levels were found in accuracy of using medical terminology. Conclusion: Students appreciate computer supported collaborative learning settings when tackling radiology case-based learning. Scripted computer supported collaborative learning groups proved to be useful for both 5th and 7th year students in view of developing components of their radiology diagnostic approaches.

  2. TU-D-201-01: 2016 Economics Update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontenot, J; Fuss, W

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this session is to introduce attendees to the healthcare reimbursement system and how it applies to the clinical work of a medical physicist. This will include general information about the different categories of payers and payees, how work is described by CPT codes, and how various payers set values for this work in different clinical settings. 2016 is another year of significant changes to the payment system. This presentation will describe the work encompassed in these codes and will give attendees an overview of the changes for 2016 as they apply to radiation oncology. Finally, some insight into what can be expected during 2017 will be presented. This includes what information is typically released by the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services (CMS) during the year and how we as an organization respond. This will include ways members can interact with the AAPM professional economics committee and other resources members may find helpful. Learning objectives1) Basics of how Medicare is structured and how reimbursement rates are set.2) Basic understanding of proposed changes to the 2016 Medicare rules.3) Describe economics and policy resources that are available from the AAPM and how to interact with the professional economics committee.

  3. Understanding the digital divide in the clinical setting: the technology knowledge gap experienced by US safety net patients during teleretinal screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Sheba; Moran, Erin; Fish, Allison; Ogunyemi, Lola

    2013-01-01

    Differential access to everyday technology and healthcare amongst safety net patients is associated with low technological and health literacies, respectively. These low rates of literacy produce a complex patient "knowledge gap" that influences the effectiveness of telehealth technologies. To understand this "knowledge gap", six focus groups (2 African-American and 4 Latino) were conducted with patients who received teleretinal screenings in U.S. urban safety-net settings. Findings indicate that patients' "knowledge gap" is primarily produced at three points: (1) when patients' preexisting personal barriers to care became exacerbated in the clinical setting; (2) through encounters with technology during screening; and (3) in doctor-patient follow-up. This "knowledge gap" can produce confusion and fear, potentially affecting patients' confidence in quality of care and limiting their disease management ability. In rethinking the digital divide to include the consequences of this knowledge gap faced by patients in the clinical setting, we suggest that patient education focus on both their disease and specific telehealth technologies deployed in care delivery.

  4. New design of care: Assessment of an interdisciplinary orthopaedic clinic with a pivot nurse in the province of Quebec.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poder, Thomas G; Bellemare, Christian; Bédard, Suzanne K; He, Jie; Lemieux, Renald

    2010-01-01

    New designs of care in orthopaedic clinics are needed to cope with the shortage of orthopaedic surgeons and the lengthening of waiting times. To assess the effectiveness of an interdisciplinary orthopaedic clinic with a pivot nurse in the Canadian province of Quebec with regard to accessibility, quality of care, efficacy and efficiency of the clinic, and patient's quality of life. Two strategies were developed: (1) a selected cohort of new patients attending an orthopaedic service from February to September 2008 were entered into a database recording patient details, source of referral, diagnosis, satisfaction, and quality of life (36-Item Short Form Health Survey version 2). In this setting, 2 sets of questionnaires were administered to the patients: the first one during the first visit and the second one, 2 months later. A total of 243 patients from the case control were compared with 89 patients of the case study, where an interdisciplinary orthopaedic clinic with a pivot nurse has been developed; (2) costs per patient were calculated using the staff timesheets provided by the two orthopaedic clinics. The results showed a significant reduction in the waiting-list duration (accessibility) in the case study clinic owing to a strong decrease in the inappropriate consultations with the orthopaedic consultant. The quality of care remained high, and the target surgeries for total hip and knee replacement were reached, despite a strong shortage of orthopaedic doctors. Interdisciplinary orthopaedic clinic with a pivot nurse is a new approach in the province of Quebec and first results are encouraging.

  5. The diagnosis of MR and CT scan for myofascitis of connective tissue disease: comparison with biopsy examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Jianrong; Zhou Yan; Chai Weimin; Yao Qiuying; Li Lei; Li Lan; Li Zhengyang

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the utility of MRI, CT and biopsy examinations in detecting myofascitis lesions of connective tissue disease. Methods: The study group consisted of 22 patients proven by clinical features and laboratory examination, including 8 cases of dermatomyositis (DM), 12 cases of polymyositis (PM), and 2 cases of eosinophilic fascitis. All patients received CT scan, SE-T 1 WI, SE-T 2 WI, SPIR, and CT guiding biopsy at the thigh region. Results: Biopsy detected muscular diseases in 17 cases and fascitis in 5 cases. MRI detected muscular diseases in 14 and fascitis in 9. CT detected muscular diseases in 5 and fascitis in 9. Myositis, amyotrophy, and fascitis may be alone or united in one case. Myositis (9 cases) appeared as low signal on T 1 WI and high signal on T 2 WI or SPIR. Amyotrophy (9 cases) presented hyperintensity on both T 1 WI and T 2 WI. SPIR was more sensitive in detecting myositis than CT and T 1 WI, P < 0.05. Myositis was more frequent in cases with DM(6/8) than in cases with PM (3/12), P < 0.05. Also, myositis was more frequently encountered in active phase (7/11) than in quiescent phase (2/11). Conclusion: MRI and CT appear to be valuable in quantitatively and qualitatively estimating myofascitis of connective tissue diseases

  6. Smartphone Use by Nurses in Acute Care Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Greir Ander Huck; Polivka, Barbara; Behr, Jodi Herron

    2018-03-01

    The use of smartphones in acute care settings remains controversial due to security concerns and personal use. The purposes of this study were to determine (1) the current rates of personal smartphone use by nurses in acute care settings, (2) nurses' preferences regarding the use of smartphone functionality at work, and (3) nurse perceptions of the benefits and drawbacks of smartphone use at work. An online survey of nurses from six acute care facilities within one healthcare system assessed the use of personal smartphones in acute care settings and perceptions of the benefits and drawbacks of smartphone use at work. Participants (N = 735) were primarily point-of-care nurses older than 31 years. Most participants (98%) used a smartphone in the acute care setting. Respondents perceived the most common useful and beneficial smartphone functions in acute care settings as allowing them to access information on medications, procedures, and diseases. Participants older than 50 years were less likely to use a smartphone in acute care settings and to agree with the benefits of smartphones. There is a critical need for recognition that smartphones are used by point-of-care nurses for a variety of functions and that realistic policies for smartphone use are needed to enhance patient care and minimize distractions.

  7. SUBSURFACE EMPLACEMENT TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, T.; Novotny, R.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this analysis is to identify issues and criteria that apply to the design of the Subsurface Emplacement Transportation System (SET). The SET consists of the track used by the waste package handling equipment, the conductors and related equipment used to supply electrical power to that equipment, and the instrumentation and controls used to monitor and operate those track and power supply systems. Major considerations of this analysis include: (1) Operational life of the SET; (2) Geometric constraints on the track layout; (3) Operating loads on the track; (4) Environmentally induced loads on the track; (5) Power supply (electrification) requirements; and (6) Instrumentation and control requirements. This analysis will provide the basis for development of the system description document (SDD) for the SET. This analysis also defines the interfaces that need to be considered in the design of the SET. These interfaces include, but are not limited to, the following: (1) Waste handling building; (2) Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) surface site layout; (3) Waste Emplacement System (WES); (4) Waste Retrieval System (WRS); (5) Ground Control System (GCS); (6) Ex-Container System (XCS); (7) Subsurface Electrical Distribution System (SED); (8) MGR Operations Monitoring and Control System (OMC); (9) Subsurface Facility System (SFS); (10) Subsurface Fire Protection System (SFR); (11) Performance Confirmation Emplacement Drift Monitoring System (PCM); and (12) Backfill Emplacement System (BES)

  8. AKT is a therapeutic target in myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, I; Huang, Z; Wen, Q; Stankiewicz, M J; Gilles, L; Goldenson, B; Schultz, R; Diebold, L; Gurbuxani, S; Finke, C M; Lasho, T L; Koppikar, P; Pardanani, A; Stein, B; Altman, J K; Levine, R L; Tefferi, A; Crispino, J D

    2013-09-01

    The majority of patients with BCR-ABL1-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) harbor mutations in JAK2 or MPL, which lead to constitutive activation of the JAK/STAT, PI3K and ERK signaling pathways. JAK inhibitors by themselves are inadequate in producing selective clonal suppression in MPN and are associated with hematopoietic toxicities. MK-2206 is a potent allosteric AKT inhibitor that was well tolerated, including no evidence of myelosuppression, in a phase I study of solid tumors. Herein, we show that inhibition of PI3K/AKT signaling by MK-2206 affected the growth of both JAK2V617F- or MPLW515L-expressing cells via reduced phosphorylation of AKT and inhibition of its downstream signaling molecules. Moreover, we demonstrate that MK-2206 synergizes with ruxolitinib in suppressing the growth of JAK2V617F-mutant SET2 cells. Importantly, MK-2206 suppressed colony formation from hematopoietic progenitor cells in patients with primary myelofibrosis and alleviated hepatosplenomegaly and reduced megakaryocyte burden in the bone marrows, livers and spleens of mice with MPLW515L-induced MPN. Together, these findings establish AKT as a rational therapeutic target in the MPNs.

  9. Examinations of Factors Influencing Survival of Liver Transplantation for Hepatocellular Carcinoma: A Single-Center Experience From Budapest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piros, L; Fehérvári, I; Görög, D; Nemes, B; Szabó, J; Gerlei, Z; Végső, G; Kóbori, L; Máthé, Z

    2015-09-01

    survival for the entire group at 1, 3, and 5 years after transplantation was 73.48%, 65.2%, and 50.08%, respectively. Using pretransplant imaging, 34 tumors (69.3%) were within Milan criteria, 8 (16.3%) were beyond Milan but within UCSF criteria, and 7 (14.3%) exceeded UCSF criteria. Based on explant pathology, 30 tumors (61.2%) were within Milan criteria, 7 (14,3%) were beyond Milan but within UCSF criteria, and 12 (24.3%) exceeded UCSF criteria. New onset, non-HCC malignant tumor developed in 2 cases (4%). There was no significant difference between the surgical techniques or the immunosuppressive strategies. Using the Cox analysis in our series, it can be seen that mortality was higher with tumors exceeding Milan criteria but within UCSF criteria compared with tumors within Milan criteria (Coef. = 0.5749 in Setting 1 and 0.1226 in Setting 2), and even higher with tumors beyond UCSF criteria compared with tumors within Milan criteria (Coef. = 0.7228 in Setting 1 and 0.1456 in Setting 2). Recurrence of the tumor causes higher mortality (Coef. = 1.709 in Setting 1 and 1.0256 in Setting 2). It seems that using an mTOR inhibitor has a beneficial impact on mortality (Coef. = -1.409 in Setting 1). Vascular invasion was associated with higher mortality (Coef. = 0.6581in Setting 1). Higher AFP levels correlated with higher mortality but not significantly (Coef. = 0.0002 in Setting 2). In our series, survival after OLT for HCC was best with tumors within Milan criteria comparing those exceeded Milan criteria (odds ratio = 4.000). According to our findings, the Milan criteria are still the safest criteria system; however, slightly expanded criteria do not have significantly worse results. Preoperative imaging methods sometimes show fewer or smaller tumors, and the explant histology reports the exact staging of HCC at the time of OLT. Histological examination especially of the lymphovascular invasion is mandatory to assess the estimated prognosis. Extremely high levels of

  10. Estimation of global solar radiation on horizontal surfaces in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Sebaii, A.A.; Al-Ghamdi, A.A.; Al-Hazmi, F.S.; Faidah, Adel S.

    2009-01-01

    The measured data of global solar radiation on a horizontal surface, as well as the number of sunshine hours, mean daily ambient temperature, maximum and minimum ambient temperatures, relative humidity and amount of cloud cover, for Jeddah (latitude 21 deg. 42'37''N, longitude 39 deg. 11'12''E), Saudi Arabia for the period 1996-2006 are analyzed. The data are divided into two sets. The sub-data set 1 (1996-2004) are employed to develop empirical correlations between the monthly average of daily global solar radiation fraction (H/H 0 ) and various meteorological parameters. The nonlinear Angstroem type model developed by Sen and the trigonometric function model proposed by Bulut and Bueyuekalaca are also evaluated. New empirical constants for these two models have been obtained for Jeddah. The sub-data set 2 (2005, 2006) are then used to evaluate the derived correlations. Comparisons between measured and calculated values of H have been performed. It is indicated that, the Sen and Bulut and Bueyuekalaca models satisfactorily describe the horizontal global solar radiation for Jeddah. All the proposed correlations are found to be able to predict the annual average of daily global solar radiation with excellent accuracy. Therefore, the long term performance of solar energy devices can be estimated.

  11. Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC) : FY10 development and integration.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Criscenti, Louise Jacqueline; Sassani, David Carl; Arguello, Jose Guadalupe, Jr.; Dewers, Thomas A.; Bouchard, Julie F.; Edwards, Harold Carter; Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Wang, Yifeng; Schultz, Peter Andrew

    2011-02-01

    This report describes the progress in fiscal year 2010 in developing the Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC) in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Campaign. The goal of the Waste IPSC is to develop an integrated suite of computational modeling and simulation capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive waste storage or disposal system. The Waste IPSC will provide this simulation capability (1) for a range of disposal concepts, waste form types, engineered repository designs, and geologic settings, (2) for a range of time scales and distances, (3) with appropriate consideration of the inherent uncertainties, and (4) in accordance with robust verification, validation, and software quality requirements. Waste IPSC activities in fiscal year 2010 focused on specifying a challenge problem to demonstrate proof of concept, developing a verification and validation plan, and performing an initial gap analyses to identify candidate codes and tools to support the development and integration of the Waste IPSC. The current Waste IPSC strategy is to acquire and integrate the necessary Waste IPSC capabilities wherever feasible, and develop only those capabilities that cannot be acquired or suitably integrated, verified, or validated. This year-end progress report documents the FY10 status of acquisition, development, and integration of thermal-hydrologic-chemical-mechanical (THCM) code capabilities, frameworks, and enabling tools and infrastructure.

  12. EST Express: PHP/MySQL based automated annotation of ESTs from expression libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pardinas Jose R

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several biological techniques result in the acquisition of functional sets of cDNAs that must be sequenced and analyzed. The emergence of redundant databases such as UniGene and centralized annotation engines such as Entrez Gene has allowed the development of software that can analyze a great number of sequences in a matter of seconds. Results We have developed "EST Express", a suite of analytical tools that identify and annotate ESTs originating from specific mRNA populations. The software consists of a user-friendly GUI powered by PHP and MySQL that allows for online collaboration between researchers and continuity with UniGene, Entrez Gene and RefSeq. Two key features of the software include a novel, simplified Entrez Gene parser and tools to manage cDNA library sequencing projects. We have tested the software on a large data set (2,016 samples produced by subtractive hybridization. Conclusion EST Express is an open-source, cross-platform web server application that imports sequences from cDNA libraries, such as those generated through subtractive hybridization or yeast two-hybrid screens. It then provides several layers of annotation based on Entrez Gene and RefSeq to allow the user to highlight useful genes and manage cDNA library projects.

  13. CONTRIBUTION OF HAMSTRING FATIGUE TO QUADRICEPS INHIBITION FOLLOWING LUMBAR EXTENSION EXERCISE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph M. Hart

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the contribution of hamstrings and quadriceps fatigue to quadriceps inhibition following lumbar extension exercise. Regression models were calculated consisting of the outcome variable: quadriceps inhibition and predictor variables: change in EMG median frequency in the quadriceps and hamstrings during lumbar fatiguing exercise. Twenty-five subjects with a history of low back pain were matched by gender, height and mass to 25 healthy controls. Subjects performed two sets of fatiguing isometric lumbar extension exercise until mild (set 1 and moderate (set 2 fatigue of the lumbar paraspinals. Quadriceps and hamstring EMG median frequency were measured while subjects performed fatiguing exercise. A burst of electrical stimuli was superimposed while subjects performed an isometric maximal quadriceps contraction to estimate quadriceps inhibition after each exercise set. Results indicate the change in hamstring median frequency explained variance in quadriceps inhibition following the exercise sets in the history of low back pain group only. Change in quadriceps median frequency explained variance in quadriceps inhibition following the first exercise set in the control group only. In conclusion, persons with a history of low back pain whose quadriceps become inhibited following lumbar paraspinal exercise may be adapting to the fatigue by using their hamstring muscles more than controls

  14. Photon up-conversion increases biomass yield in Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Kavya R; Jose, Steffi; Suraishkumar, Gadi K

    2014-12-01

    Photon up-conversion, a process whereby lower energy radiations are converted to higher energy levels via the use of appropriate phosphor systems, was employed as a novel strategy for improving microalgal growth and lipid productivity. Photon up-conversion enables the utilization of regions of the solar spectrum, beyond the typical photosynthetically active radiation, that are usually wasted or are damaging to the algae. The effects of up-conversion of red light by two distinct sets of up-conversion phosphors were studied in the model microalgae Chlorella vulgaris. Up-conversion by set 1 phosphors led to a 2.85 fold increase in biomass concentration and a 3.2 fold increase in specific growth rate of the microalgae. While up-conversion by set 2 phosphors resulted in a 30% increase in biomass and 12% increase in specific intracellular neutral lipid, while the specific growth rates were comparable to that of the control. Furthermore, up-conversion resulted in higher levels of specific intracellular reactive oxygen species in C. vulgaris. Up-conversion of red light (654 nm) was shown to improve biomass yields in C. vulgaris. In principle, up-conversion can be used to increase the utilization range of the electromagnetic spectrum for improved cultivation of photosynthetic systems such as plants, algae, and microalgae. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Parents' common pitfalls of discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witoonchart, Chatree; Fangsa-ard, Thitiporn; Chaoaree, Supamit; Ketumarn, Panom; Kaewpornsawan, Titawee; Phatthrayuttawat, Sucheera

    2005-11-01

    Problems of discipline are common among parents. These may be the results of the parents' pitfalls in disciplining their children. To find out common pitfalls of parents in disciplining their children. Parents of students with ages ranged between 60-72 months old in Bangkok-Noi district, Bangkok, were selected by random sampling. Total number of 1947 children ages between 60-72 months were recruited. Parents of these children were interviewed with a questionnaire designed to probe into problems in child rearing. There hindered and fifty questionnaires were used for data analyses. Parents had high concerns about problems in discipline their children and needed support from professional personnel. They had limited knowledge and possessed lots of wrong attitude towards discipline. Common pitfalls on the topics were problems in, 1) limit setting 2) rewarding and punishment 3) supervision on children watching TV and bedtime routines. Parents of children with ages 60-72 months old in Bangkok-Noi district, Bangkok, had several common pitfalls in disciplining their children, including attitude, knowledge and practice.

  16. Fast imaging of live organisms with sculpted light sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielewski, Aleksander K.; Kyrsting, Anders; Mahou, Pierre; Wayland, Matthew T.; Muresan, Leila; Evers, Jan Felix; Kaminski, Clemens F.

    2015-04-01

    Light-sheet microscopy is an increasingly popular technique in the life sciences due to its fast 3D imaging capability of fluorescent samples with low photo toxicity compared to confocal methods. In this work we present a new, fast, flexible and simple to implement method to optimize the illumination light-sheet to the requirement at hand. A telescope composed of two electrically tuneable lenses enables us to define thickness and position of the light-sheet independently but accurately within milliseconds, and therefore optimize image quality of the features of interest interactively. We demonstrated the practical benefit of this technique by 1) assembling large field of views from tiled single exposure each with individually optimized illumination settings; 2) sculpting the light-sheet to trace complex sample shapes within single exposures. This technique proved compatible with confocal line scanning detection, further improving image contrast and resolution. Finally, we determined the effect of light-sheet optimization in the context of scattering tissue, devising procedures for balancing image quality, field of view and acquisition speed.

  17. The Effect of Conceptual Change Model in the Senior High School Students’ Understanding and Character in Learning Physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santyasa I Wayan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Learning physics for senior high school (SMA students is often coloured by misconceptions that hinder students in achieving deep understanding. So a relevant learning model is needed. This study aims to examine the effect of conceptual change model (CCM compared with direct instruction model (DIM on the students’ conceptual understanding and character in the subject area of motion and force. This quasi-experimental research using a non-equivalence pre-test post-test control groups design. The population is 20 classes (738 students of grade X consisted of 8 classes (272 students of SMA 1 Amlapura, 8 classes (256 students of SMA 2 Amlapura, and 6 classes (210 students of SMA 1 Manggis in Karangasem regency in Bali. The random assignment technique is used to assign 6 classes (202 students, or 26.5% of the population. In each school there are set 2 classes each as a CCM group and DIM groups. The data of students’ conceptual understanding is collected by tests, while the characters by questionnaires. To analyse the data a one way MANCOVA statistics was used. The result of the analysis showed that there was a significant difference of effect between CCM group and DIM group on the students’ conceptual understanding and character. The effect of the CCM group is higher than the DIM group on the students’ conceptual understanding and character in learning subject area of motion and force.

  18. The effect of lexical factors on recall from working memory: Generalizing the neighborhood size effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derraugh, Lesley S; Neath, Ian; Surprenant, Aimée M; Beaudry, Olivia; Saint-Aubin, Jean

    2017-03-01

    The word-length effect, the finding that lists of short words are better recalled than lists of long words, is 1 of the 4 benchmark phenomena that guided development of the phonological loop component of working memory. However, previous work has noted a confound in word-length studies: The short words used had more orthographic neighbors (valid words that can be made by changing a single letter in the target word) than long words. The confound is that words with more neighbors are better recalled than otherwise comparable words with fewer neighbors. Two experiments are reported that address criticisms of the neighborhood-size account of the word-length effect by (1) testing 2 new stimulus sets, (2) using open rather than closed pools of words, and (3) using stimuli from a language other than English. In both experiments, words from large neighborhoods were better recalled than words from small neighborhoods. The results add to the growing number of studies demonstrating the substantial contribution of long-term memory to what have traditionally been identified as working memory tasks. The data are more easily explained by models incorporating the concept of redintegration rather than by frameworks such as the phonological loop that posit decay offset by rehearsal. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Instabilities constraint and relativistic mean field parametrization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulaksono, A.; Kasmudin; Buervenich, T.J.; Reinhard, P.-G.; Maruhn, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    Two parameter sets (Set 1 and Set 2) of the standard relativistic mean field (RMF) model plus additional vector isoscalar nonlinear term, which are constrained by a set of criteria 20 determined by symmetric nuclear matter stabilities at high densities due to longitudinal and transversal particle–hole excitation modes are investigated. In the latter parameter set, δ meson and isoscalar as well as isovector tensor contributions are included. The effects in selected finite nuclei and nuclear matter properties predicted by both parameter sets are systematically studied and compared with the ones predicted by well-known RMF parameter sets. The vector isoscalar nonlinear term addition and instability constraints have reasonably good effects in the high-density properties of the isoscalar sector of nuclear matter and certain finite nuclei properties. However, even though the δ meson and isovector tensor are included, the incompatibility with the constraints from some experimental data in certain nuclear properties at saturation point and the excessive stiffness of the isovector nuclear matter equation of state at high densities as well as the incorrect isotonic trend in binding the energies of finite nuclei are still encountered. It is shown that the problem may be remedied if we introduce additional nonlinear terms not only in the isovector but also in the isoscalar vectors. (author)

  20. Emotional-motivational barriers to blood donation among Togolese adults: a structural approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alinon, K; Gbati, K; Sorum, P C; Mullet, E

    2014-02-01

    Although the number of blood donors has been rapidly increasing in Togo since 2003, it is nevertheless insufficient to cover the demand. To increase needed blood donation in Togo, it is necessary to understand why most people are reluctant to do it. A sample of 400 adult volunteers in Lomé, mostly university educated, rated, on a scale of 0-10, the relevance to them of a comprehensive list of reasons that might deter people from donating blood. The ratings of 250 participants were subjected to factor analysis, and the resulting factorial structure was confirmed on the ratings of the other 150 participants. The resulting six factors were labelled (in order of their ratings of a representative sample of items): Lack of Courage and Lack of Information (mean 5·43 of 10), Concerns about the Use of Blood (4·72), Risk Aversion (4·37), Fear of Medical Settings (2·41), Conformity with Tradition (1·88) and Indifference to Others and Hostility to the Procedure (1·69). To increase blood donation, a public information campaign should address the emotional-motivational barriers found even in the most educated segment of Togolese society. © 2013 The Authors. Transfusion Medicine © 2013 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  1. Three-dimensional black-blood contrast-enhanced MRI improves detection of intraluminal thrombi in patients with acute ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Won; Kwak, Hyo Sung; Chung, Gyung Ho; Hwang, Seung Bae

    2018-03-19

    This study evaluated the utility of three-dimensional (3D), black-blood (BB), contrast-enhanced, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the detection of intraluminal thrombi in acute stroke patients. Forty-seven patients with acute stroke involving the anterior circulation underwent MRI examination within 6 h of clinical onset. Cerebral angiography was used as the reference standard. In a blinded manner, two neuroradiologists interpreted the following three data sets: (1) diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) + 3D BB contrast-enhanced MRI; (2) DWI + susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI); (3) DWI + 3D BB contrast-enhanced MRI + SWI. Of these patients, 47 had clots in the middle cerebral artery and four had clots in the anterior cerebral artery. For both observers, the area under the curve (Az) for data sets 1 and 3, which included 3D BB contrast-enhanced MRI, was significantly greater than it was for data set 2, which did not include 3D BB contrast-enhanced MR imaging (observer 1, 0.988 vs 0.904, p = 0.001; observer 2, 0.988 vs 0.894, p = 0.000). Three-dimensional BB contrast-enhanced MRI improves detection of intraluminal thrombi compared to conventional MRI methods in patients with acute ischaemic stroke. • BB contrast-enhanced MRI helps clinicians to assess the intraluminal clot • BB contrast-enhanced MRI improves detection of intraluminal thrombi • BB contrast-enhanced MRI for clot detection has a higher sensitivity.

  2. Construction and engineering report for advanced nuclear fuel development facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, S. W.; Park, J. S.; Kwon, S.J.; Lee, K. W.; Kim, I. J.; Yu, C. H.

    2003-09-01

    The design and construction of the fuel technology development facility was aimed to accommodate general nuclear fuel research and development for the HANARO fuel fabrication and advanced fuel researches. 1. Building size and room function 1) Building total area : approx. 3,618m 2 , basement 1st floor, ground 3th floor 2) Room function : basement floor(machine room, electrical room, radioactive waste tank room), 1st floor(research reactor fuel fabrication facility, pyroprocess lab., metal fuel lab., nondestructive lab., pellet processing lab., access control room, sintering lab., etc), 2nd floor(thermal properties measurement lab., pellet characterization lab., powder analysis lab., microstructure analysis lab., etc), 3rd floor(AHU and ACU Room) 2. Special facility equipment 1) Environmental pollution protection equipment : ACU(2sets), 2) Emergency operating system : diesel generator(1set), 3) Nuclear material handle, storage and transport system : overhead crane(3sets), monorail hoist(1set), jib crane(2sets), tank(1set) 4) Air conditioning unit facility : AHU(3sets), packaged air conditioning unit(5sets), 5) Automatic control system and fire protection system : central control equipment(1set), lon device(1set), fire hose cabinet(3sets), fire pump(3sets) etc

  3. MOCUS, Minimal Cut Sets and Minimal Path Sets from Fault Tree Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fussell, J.B.; Henry, E.B.; Marshall, N.H.

    1976-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: From a description of the Boolean failure logic of a system, called a fault tree, and control parameters specifying the minimal cut set length to be obtained MOCUS determines the system failure modes, or minimal cut sets, and the system success modes, or minimal path sets. 2 - Method of solution: MOCUS uses direct resolution of the fault tree into the cut and path sets. The algorithm used starts with the main failure of interest, the top event, and proceeds to basic independent component failures, called primary events, to resolve the fault tree to obtain the minimal sets. A key point of the algorithm is that an and gate alone always increases the number of path sets; an or gate alone always increases the number of cut sets and increases the size of path sets. Other types of logic gates must be described in terms of and and or logic gates. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Output from MOCUS can include minimal cut and path sets for up to 20 gates

  4. Identification and Analysis of the SET-Domain Family in Silkworm, Bombyx mori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hailong Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As an important economic insect, Bombyx mori is also a useful model organism for lepidopteran insect. SET-domain-containing proteins belong to a group of enzymes named after a common domain that utilizes the cofactor S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM to achieve methylation of its substrates. Many SET-domain-containing proteins have been shown to display catalytic activity towards particular lysine residues on histones, but emerging evidence also indicates that various nonhistone proteins are specifically targeted by this clade of enzymes. To explore their diverse functions of SET-domain superfamily in insect, we identified, cloned, and analyzed the SET-domains proteins in silkworm, Bombyx mori. Firstly, 24 genes containing SET domain from silkworm genome were characterized and 17 of them belonged to six subfamilies of SUV39, SET1, SET2, SUV4-20, EZ, and SMYD. Secondly, SET domains of silkworm SET-domain family were intraspecifically and interspecifically conserved, especially for the catalytic core “NHSC” motif, substrate binding site, and catalytic site in the SET domain. Lastly, further analyses indicated that silkworm SET-domain gene BmSu(var3-9 owned different characterization and expression profiles compared to other invertebrates. Overall, our results provide a new insight into the functional and evolutionary features of SET-domain family.

  5. Reactions of teachers versus non-teachers toward people who stutter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Arnold, Hayley S

    2015-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to assess whether kindergarten through twelfth grade teachers differ from people in non-teaching occupations in their reactions to people who stutter (PWS). Taking differences in age and education into account, we compared reactions to PWS between 263 teachers and 1336 non-teachers in the United States based on their responses on the Public Opinion Survey on Human Attributes-Stuttering (POSHA-S, St. Louis, 2012). Findings indicated that teachers use a greater number and variety of information sources about PWS than the general public and that male teachers do so even more than female teachers. With regard to the other POSHA-S components, accommodating/helping, knowledge/experience, and sympathy/social distancing of PWS, teachers' responses were not significantly different from their non-teaching counterparts. Regardless of occupation, women reported reactions to PWS that are considered more accommodating and helpful to PWS than the reported reactions of men. Readers should be able to: (1) identify the challenges that students who stutter encounter in the K-12 school setting, (2) identify recommended ways teachers can react to their students who stutter, (3) summarize findings regarding teachers' reactions to people who stutter (PWS), and (4) identify key variables that are associated with reactions to PWS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A Child's Concept of Pain: An International Survey of Pediatric Pain Experts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pate, Joshua W; Hush, Julia M; Hancock, Mark J; Moseley, G Lorimer; Butler, David S; Simons, Laura E; Pacey, Verity

    2018-01-15

    A child's 'concept of pain' refers to how they understand what pain actually is, what function pain serves, and what biological processes are thought to underpin it. We aimed to determine pediatric pain experts' opinions of: (1) the importance and usefulness of assessing a child's concept of pain in clinical and/or research settings; (2) the usefulness of the content of items within currently published adult-targeted resources for assessing a child's concept of pain; and (3) important domains of a child's concept of pain to assess. Forty-nine pediatric pain experts (response rate = 75.4%) completed an online survey. Descriptive statistics and frequency of responses were analyzed. Experts from all included disciplines reported that assessing a child's concept of pain is important and useful both clinically and in a research setting (>80% reported very or extremely useful for each item). Experts considered that the content of 13 items from currently published adult-targeted resources was useful, but the wording was too complex for children aged 8-12 years. Experts considered that all seven of the proposed domains of a child's concept of pain was important to assess. The findings can be used to inform the development of an assessment tool for a child's concept of pain.

  7. Evidence for SU(3) symmetry breaking from hyperon production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Jianjun

    2002-01-01

    We examine the SU(3) symmetry breaking in hyperon semileptonic decays (HSD) by considering two typical sets of quark contributions to the spin content of the octet baryons: set 1 with SU(3) flavor symmetry and set 2 with SU(3) flavor symmetry breaking in the HSD. The quark distributions of the octet baryons are calculated with a successful statistical model. Using an approximate relation between the quark fragmentation functions and the quark distributions, we predict the polarizations of the octet baryons produced in e + e - annihilation and semi-inclusive deep lepton-nucleon scattering in order to reveal the SU(3) symmetry breaking effect on the spin structure of the octet baryons. We find that the SU(3) symmetry breaking significantly affects the hyperon polarization. The available experimental data on the Λ polarization seem to favor the theoretical predictions with SU(3) symmetry breaking. We conclude that there is a possibility to get collateral evidence for SU(3) symmetry breaking from hyperon production. The theoretical errors for our predictions are discussed

  8. Consistency of blood pressure differences between the left and right arms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eguchi, Kazuo; Yacoub, Mona; Jhalani, Juhee; Gerin, William; Schwartz, Joseph E; Pickering, Thomas G

    2007-02-26

    It is unclear to what extent interarm blood pressure (BP) differences are reproducible vs the result of random error. The present study was designed to resolve this issue. We enrolled 147 consecutive patients from a hypertension clinic. Three sets of 3 BP readings were recorded, first using 2 oscillometric devices simultaneously in the 2 arms (set 1); next, 3 readings were taken sequentially for each arm using a standard mercury sphygmomanometer (set 2); finally, the readings as performed for set 1 were repeated (set 3). The protocol was repeated at a second visit for 91 patients. Large interarm systolic BP differences were consistently seen in 2 patients with obstructive arterial disease. In the remaining patients, the systolic BP and the diastolic BP, respectively, were slightly higher in the right arm than in the left arm by 2 to 3 mm Hg and by 1 mm Hg for all 3 sets (Pdifference of more than 5 mm Hg were 11 (7.5%) and 4 (2.7%) across all 3 sets of readings. Among patients who repeated the test, none had a consistent interarm BP difference of more than 5 mm Hg across the 2 visits. The interarm BP difference was consistent only when obstructive arterial disease was present. Although BP in the right arm tended to be higher than in the left arm, clinically meaningful interarm differences were not reproducible in the absence of obstructive arterial disease and are attributable to random variation.

  9. The multi-resolution capability of Tchebichef moments and its applications to the analysis of fluorescence excitation-emission spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bao Qiong; Wang, Xue; Li Xu, Min; Zhai, Hong Lin; Chen, Jing; Liu, Jin Jin

    2018-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy with an excitation-emission matrix (EEM) is a fast and inexpensive technique and has been applied to the detection of a very wide range of analytes. However, serious scattering and overlapping signals hinder the applications of EEM spectra. In this contribution, the multi-resolution capability of Tchebichef moments was investigated in depth and applied to the analysis of two EEM data sets (data set 1 consisted of valine-tyrosine-valine, tryptophan-glycine and phenylalanine, and data set 2 included vitamin B1, vitamin B2 and vitamin B6) for the first time. By means of the Tchebichef moments with different orders, the different information in the EEM spectra can be represented. It is owing to this multi-resolution capability that the overlapping problem was solved, and the information of chemicals and scatterings were separated. The obtained results demonstrated that the Tchebichef moment method is very effective, which provides a promising tool for the analysis of EEM spectra. It is expected that the applications of Tchebichef moment method could be developed and extended in complex systems such as biological fluids, food, environment and others to deal with the practical problems (overlapped peaks, unknown interferences, baseline drifts, and so on) with other spectra.

  10. Voice gender discrimination provides a measure of more than pitch-related perception in cochlear implant users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tianhao; Fu, Qian-Jie

    2011-08-01

    (1) To investigate whether voice gender discrimination (VGD) could be a useful indicator of the spectral and temporal processing abilities of individual cochlear implant (CI) users; (2) To examine the relationship between VGD and speech recognition with CI when comparable acoustic cues are used for both perception processes. VGD was measured using two talker sets with different inter-gender fundamental frequencies (F(0)), as well as different acoustic CI simulations. Vowel and consonant recognition in quiet and noise were also measured and compared with VGD performance. Eleven postlingually deaf CI users. The results showed that (1) mean VGD performance differed for different stimulus sets, (2) VGD and speech recognition performance varied among individual CI users, and (3) individual VGD performance was significantly correlated with speech recognition performance under certain conditions. VGD measured with selected stimulus sets might be useful for assessing not only pitch-related perception, but also spectral and temporal processing by individual CI users. In addition to improvements in spectral resolution and modulation detection, the improvement in higher modulation frequency discrimination might be particularly important for CI users in noisy environments.

  11. Evaluating psychiatric nursing competencies applied to emergency settings: A pilot role delineation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, Joanna J; Bell, Janice F; Siegel, Elena O; Ward, Deborah H

    2016-03-01

    Despite increasing emergency department (ED) use for psychiatric emergencies, limited evidence exists to clearly identify the competencies necessary of emergency nurses to care for this population. 1. To define the specialized skill and knowledge of emergency nurses by examining the frequency with which recommended psychiatric nursing competencies are performed in the ED setting. 2. To assess emergency nurses' rankings of importance and self-efficacy related to recommended psychiatric nursing competencies in order to explore their relevance to emergency nursing. Emergency nurses (n = 75) completed a survey ranking the frequency, importance and self-efficacy of 15 psychiatric nursing competencies. Data analysis revealed competency relevance and regression analysis demonstrated factors that may contribute to self-efficacy. Nurses reported performing psychiatric competencies frequently (mean scores of 0.64 to 3.04). Importance rankings were highest (mean scores of 1.81 to 3.67). Self-efficacy mean scores ranged from 0.89 to 3.47. Frequency and importance of activities predicted higher self-efficacy scores. Younger age and competencies often, and existing competencies appear applicable. As frequency and importance of competencies influence self-efficacy, practice and interventions to underscore the importance of competencies may improve self-efficacy. Younger and less experienced nurses might require more support. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Gas--steam turbine combined cycle power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, J.E.

    1978-10-01

    The purpose of this technology evaluation is to provide performance and cost characteristics of the combined gas and steam turbine, cycle system applied to an Integrated Community Energy System (ICES). To date, most of the applications of combined cycles have been for electric power generation only. The basic gas--steam turbine combined cycle consists of: (1) a gas turbine-generator set, (2) a waste-heat recovery boiler in the gas turbine exhaust stream designed to produce steam, and (3) a steam turbine acting as a bottoming cycle. Because modification of the standard steam portion of the combined cycle would be necessary to recover waste heat at a useful temperature (> 212/sup 0/F), some sacrifice in the potential conversion efficiency is necessary at this temperature. The total energy efficiency ((electric power + recovered waste heat) divided by input fuel energy) varies from about 65 to 73% at full load to 34 to 49% at 20% rated electric power output. Two major factors that must be considered when installing a gas--steam turbine combines cycle are: the realiability of the gas turbine portion of the cycle, and the availability of liquid and gas fuels or the feasibility of hooking up with a coal gasification/liquefaction process.

  13. Common Variants of Homocysteine Metabolism Pathway Genes and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes and Related Traits in Indians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganesh Chauhan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperhomocysteinemia, a risk factor for cardiovascular disorder, obesity, and type 2 diabetes, is prevalent among Indians who are at high risk of these metabolic disorders. We evaluated association of common variants of genes involved in homocysteine metabolism or its levels with type 2 diabetes, obesity, and related traits in North Indians. We genotyped 90 variants in initial phase (2.115 subjects and replicated top signals in an independent sample set (2.085 subjects. The variant MTHFR-rs1801133 was the top signal for association with type 2 diabetes (OR=0.78 (95%  CI=0.67–0.92, P=0.003 and was also associated with 2 h postload plasma glucose (P=0.04, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (P=0.004, and total cholesterol (P=0.01 in control subjects. These associations were neither replicated nor significant after meta-analysis. Studies involving a larger study population and different ethnic groups are required before ruling out the role of these important candidate genes in type 2 diabetes, obesity, and related traits.

  14. Neutron spectra unfolding in Bonner spheres spectrometry using neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kardan, M.R.; Setayeshi, S.; Koohi-Fayegh, R.; Ghiassi-Nejad, M.

    2003-01-01

    The neural network method has been used for the unfolding of neutron spectra in neutron spectrometry by Bonner spheres. A back propagation algorithm was used for training of neural networks 4mm x 4 mm bare LiI(Eu) and in a polyethylene sphere set: 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 12, 18 inch diameter have been used for unfolding of neutron spectra. Neural networks were trained by 199 sets of neutron spectra, which were subdivided into 6, 8, 10, 12, 15 and 20 energy bins and for each of them an appropriate neural network was designed and trained. The validation was performed by the 21 sets of neutron spectra. A neural network with 10 energy bins which had a mean value of error of 6% for dose equivalent estimation of spectra in the validation set showed the best results. The obtained results show that neural networks can be applied as an effective method for unfolding neutron spectra especially when the main target is neutron dosimetry. (author)

  15. Characterization of a biosurfactant produced by Pseudomonas cepacia CCT6659 in the presence of industrial wastes and its application in the biodegradation of hydrophobic compounds in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Elias J; Rocha e Silva, Nathália Maria P; Rufino, Raquel D; Luna, Juliana M; Silva, Ricardo O; Sarubbo, Leonie A

    2014-05-01

    The bacterium Pseudomonas cepacia CCT6659 cultivated with 2% soybean waste frying oil and 2% corn steep liquor as substrates produced a biosurfactant with potential application in the bioremediation of soils. The biosurfactant was classified as an anionic biomolecule composed of 75% lipids and 25% carbohydrates. Characterization by proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H and (13)C NMR) revealed the presence of carbonyl, olefinic and aliphatic groups, with typical spectra of lipids. Four sets of biodegradation experiments were carried out with soil contaminated by hydrophobic organic compounds amended with molasses in the presence of an indigenous consortium, as follows: Set 1-soil+bacterial cells; Set 2-soil+biosurfactant; Set 3-soil+bacterial cells+biosurfactant; and Set 4-soil without bacterial cells or biosurfactant (control). Significant oil biodegradation activity (83%) occurred in the first 10 days of the experiments when the biosurfactant and bacterial cells were used together (Set 3), while maximum degradation of the organic compounds (above 95%) was found in Sets 1-3 between 35 and 60 days. It is evident from the results that the biosurfactant alone and its producer species are both capable of promoting biodegradation to a large extent. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The empirical basis of substance use disorders diagnosis: research recommendations for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition (DSM-V).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuckit, Marc A; Saunders, John B

    2006-09-01

    This paper presents the recommendations, developed from a 3-year consultation process, for a program of research to underpin the development of diagnostic concepts and criteria in the Substance Use Disorders section of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) and potentially the relevant section of the next revision of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD). A preliminary list of research topics was developed at the DSM-V Launch Conference in 2004. This led to the presentation of articles on these topics at a specific Substance Use Disorders Conference in February 2005, at the end of which a preliminary list of research questions was developed. This was further refined through an iterative process involving conference participants over the following year. Research questions have been placed into four categories: (1) questions that could be addressed immediately through secondary analyses of existing data sets; (2) items likely to require position papers to propose criteria or more focused questions with a view to subsequent analyses of existing data sets; (3) issues that could be proposed for literature reviews, but with a lower probability that these might progress to a data analytic phase; and (4) suggestions or comments that might not require immediate action, but that could be considered by the DSM-V and ICD 11 revision committees as part of their deliberations. A broadly based research agenda for the development of diagnostic concepts and criteria for substance use disorders is presented.

  17. Eating frequency, food intake, and weight: a systematic review of human and animal experimental studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hollie eRaynor

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Eating frequently during the day, or grazing, has been proposed to assist with managing food intake and weight. This systematic review assessed the effect of greater eating frequency (EF on intake and anthropometrics in human and animal experimental studies. Studies were identified through the PubMed electronic database. To be included, studies needed to be conducted in controlled settings or use methods that carefully monitored food intake, and measure food intake or anthropometrics. Studies using human or animal models of disease states (i.e., conditions influencing glucose or lipid metabolism, aside from being overweight or obese, were not included. The 25 reviewed studies (15 human and 10 animal studies contained varying study designs, EF manipulations (1 to 24 eating occasions per day, lengths of experimentation (230 min to 28 weeks, and sample sizes (3 to 56 participants/animals per condition. Studies were organized into four categories for reporting results: 1 human studies conducted in laboratory/metabolic ward settings; 2 human studies conducted in field settings; 3 animal studies with experimental periods 1 month. Out of the 13 studies reporting on consumption, 8 (61.5% found no significant effect of EF. Seventeen studies reported on anthropometrics, with 11 studies (64.7% finding no significant effect of EF. Future, adequately powered, studies should examine if other factors (i.e., disease states, physical activity, energy balance and weight status, long-term increased EF influence the relationship between increased EF and intake and/or anthropometrics.

  18. Both H4K20 mono-methylation and H3K56 acetylation mark transcription-dependent histone turnover in fission yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Hanna [Department of Biological Sciences, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34141 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Chang Seob [Department of Chemistry and Biology, Korea Science Academy of KAIST, Busan, 614-822 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yoonjung, E-mail: jjungii@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Biological Sciences, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34141 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Daeyoup, E-mail: daeyoup@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Biological Sciences, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34141 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-05

    Nucleosome dynamics facilitated by histone turnover is required for transcription as well as DNA replication and repair. Histone turnover is often associated with various histone modifications such as H3K56 acetylation (H3K56Ac), H3K36 methylation (H3K36me), and H4K20 methylation (H4K20me). In order to correlate histone modifications and transcription-dependent histone turnover, we performed genome wide analyses for euchromatic regions in G2/M-arrested fission yeast. The results show that transcription-dependent histone turnover at 5′ promoter and 3′ termination regions is directly correlated with the occurrence of H3K56Ac and H4K20 mono-methylation (H4K20me1) in actively transcribed genes. Furthermore, the increase of H3K56Ac and H4K20me1 and antisense RNA production was observed in the absence of the histone H3K36 methyltransferase Set2 and histone deacetylase complex (HDAC) that are involved in the suppression of histone turnover within the coding regions. These results together indicate that H4K20me1 as well as H3K56Ac are bona fide marks for transcription-dependent histone turnover in fission yeast.

  19. Phlebotomine Vector Ecology in the Domestic Transmission of American Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in Chaparral, Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, Cristina; Marín, Dairo; Góngora, Rafael; Carrasquilla, María C.; Trujillo, Jorge E.; Rueda, Norma K.; Marín, Jaime; Valderrama-Ardila, Carlos; Alexander, Neal; Pérez, Mauricio; Munstermann, Leonard E.; Ocampo, Clara B.

    2011-01-01

    Phlebotomine vector ecology was studied in the largest recorded outbreak of American cutaneous leishmaniasis in Colombia in 2004. In two rural townships that had experienced contrasting patterns of case incidence, this study evaluated phlebotomine species composition, seasonal abundance, nocturnal activity, blood source, prevalence of Leishmania infection, and species identification. CDC miniature light traps were used to trap the phlebotomines. Traps were set indoors, peridomestically, and in woodlands. Natural infection was determined in pools by polymerase chain reaction–Southern blot, and blood sources and species identification were determined by sequencing. Large differences were observed in population abundance between the two townships evaluated. Lutzomyia longiflocosa was the most abundant species (83.1%). Abundance was higher during months with lower precipitation. Nocturnal activity was associated with human domestic activity. Blood sources identified were mainly human (85%). A high prevalence of infection was found in L. longiflocosa indoors (2.7%) and the peridomestic setting (2.5%). L. longiflocosa was responsible for domestic transmission in Chaparral. PMID:22049038

  20. Comparison of Colonoscopy Quality Measures Across Various Practice Settings and the Impact of Performance Scorecards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inra, Jennifer A; Nayor, Jennifer; Rosenblatt, Margery; Mutinga, Muthoka; Reddy, Sarathchandra I; Syngal, Sapna; Kastrinos, Fay

    2017-04-01

    Quality performance measures for screening colonoscopy vary among endoscopists. The impact of practice setting is unknown. We aimed to (1) compare screening colonoscopy performance measures among three different US practice settings; (2) evaluate factors associated with adenoma detection; and (3) assess a scorecard intervention on performance metrics. This multi-center prospective study compared patient, endoscopist, and colonoscopy characteristics performed at a tertiary care hospital (TCH), community-based hospital (CBH), and private practice group (PPG). Withdrawal times (WT), cecal intubation, and adenoma detection rates (ADR) were compared by site at baseline and 12 weeks following scorecard distribution. Generalized linear mixed models identified factors associated with adenoma detection. Twenty-eight endoscopists performed colonoscopies on 1987 asymptomatic, average-risk individuals ≥50 years. Endoscopist and patient characteristics were similar across sites. The PPG screened more men (TCH: 42.8%, CBH: 45.0%, PPG: 54.2%; p scorecard distribution. Adenoma detection was associated with increasing patient age, male gender, WT, adequate preparation, but not practice setting. Each practice performed high-quality screening colonoscopy. Scorecards did not improve performance metrics. Preparation quality varies among practice settings and can be modified to improve adenoma detection.

  1. AN ANALYSIS OF TEN YEARS OF THE FOUR GRAND SLAM MEN'S SINGLES DATA FOR LACK OF INDEPENDENCE OF SET OUTCOMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denny Meyer

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to use data from the highest level in men's tennis to assess whether there is any evidence to reject the hypothesis that the two players in a match have a constant probability of winning each set in the match. The data consists of all 4883 matches of grand slam men's singles over a 10 year period from 1995 to 2004. Each match is categorised by its sequence of win (W or loss (L (in set 1, set 2, set 3,... to the eventual winner. Thus, there are several categories of matches from WWW to LLWWW. The methodology involves fitting several probabilistic models to the frequencies of the above ten categories. One four-set category is observed to occur significantly more often than the other two. Correspondingly, a couple of the five-set categories occur more frequently than the others. This pattern is consistent when the data is split into two five-year subsets. The data provides significant statistical evidence that the probability of winning a set within a match varies from set to set. The data supports the conclusion that, at the highest level of men's singles tennis, the better player (not necessarily the winner lifts his play in certain situations at least some of the time

  2. Navigating Bioethical Waters: Two Pilot Projects in Problem-Based Learning for Future Bioscience and Biotechnology Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Roberta M; Levine, Aaron D; Kirkman, Robert; Blake, Laura Palucki; Drake, Matthew

    2016-12-01

    We believe that the professional responsibility of bioscience and biotechnology professionals includes a social responsibility to contribute to the resolution of ethically fraught policy problems generated by their work. It follows that educators have a professional responsibility to prepare future professionals to discharge this responsibility. This essay discusses two pilot projects in ethics pedagogy focused on particularly challenging policy problems, which we call "fractious problems". The projects aimed to advance future professionals' acquisition of "fractious problem navigational" skills, a set of skills designed to enable broad and deep understanding of fractious problems and the design of good policy resolutions for them. A secondary objective was to enhance future professionals' motivation to apply these skills to help their communities resolve these problems. The projects employed "problem based learning" courses to advance these learning objectives. A new assessment instrument, "Skills for Science/Engineering Ethics Test" (SkillSET), was designed and administered to measure the success of the courses in doing so. This essay first discusses the rationale for the pilot projects, and then describes the design of the pilot courses and presents the results of our assessment using SkillSET in the first pilot project and the revised SkillSET 2.0 in the second pilot project. The essay concludes with discussion of observations and results.

  3. The impact of ordinate scaling on the visual analysis of single-case data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dart, Evan H; Radley, Keith C

    2017-08-01

    Visual analysis is the primary method for detecting the presence of treatment effects in graphically displayed single-case data and it is often referred to as the "gold standard." Although researchers have developed standards for the application of visual analysis (e.g., Horner et al., 2005), over- and underestimation of effect size magnitude is not uncommon among analysts. Several characteristics have been identified as potential contributors to these errors; however, researchers have largely focused on characteristics of the data itself (e.g., autocorrelation), paying less attention to characteristics of the graphic display which are largely in control of the analyst (e.g., ordinate scaling). The current study investigated the impact that differences in ordinate scaling, a graphic display characteristic, had on experts' accuracy in judgments regarding the magnitude of effect present in single-case percentage data. 32 participants were asked to evaluate eight ABAB data sets (2 each presenting null, small, moderate, and large effects) along with three iterations of each (32 graphs in total) in which only the ordinate scale was manipulated. Results suggest that raters are less accurate in their detection of treatment effects as the ordinate scale is constricted. Additionally, raters were more likely to overestimate the size of a treatment effect when the ordinate scale was constricted. Copyright © 2017 Society for the Study of School Psychology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluation of the use of color-set geometry during lattice physics constants generation for boiling water reactor simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, S.; Ivanov, K.

    2013-01-01

    Current methods for BWR nuclear design and analysis consist of using lattice physics neutron transport methods to generate the two-group homogenized cross-sections that are then used in a nodal diffusion theory code. The lattice transport solutions are performed for a single assembly with reflective boundary conditions, which is a practical approximation. A method is developed to account for assembly exposure distributions (environment) in the core within the lattice transport calculations with the use of color-sets (2x2) geometry. The loading pattern is examined and an appropriate number of characteristic color-set cells are selected for analysis. Treatment of the co-resident exposed fuel within this method is also presented. The calculation process was followed for a recent BWR cycle design with comparisons being performed on both a lattice and core-wide basis to evaluate the proposed method. The lattice based comparisons show noticeable differences in the pin power distribution predictions, which require further investigation to see how this translates into core performance calculations. The core-wide comparisons show minor differences and are generally in a good agreement, which is expected with this small perturbation. A slight improvement was noticed in the reduction of the power distribution uncertainty. However, given the additional amount of work and computer run time increase, further evaluation, especially of core pin power predictions, is needed to consider this method for production level design and safety analysis calculations. (authors)

  5. Effect of Concrete Wasteform Properties on Radionuclide Migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Bovaird, Chase C.; Mattigod, Shas V.; Parker, Kent E.; Ermi, Ruby M.; Wood, Marcus I.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to initiate numerous sets of concrete-soil half-cell tests to quantify (1) diffusion of I and Tc from concrete into uncontaminated soil after 1 and 2 years, (2) I and Re (set 1) and Tc (set 2) diffusion from fractured concrete into uncontaminated soil, and (3) evaluate the moisture distribution profile within the sediment half-cell. These half-cells will be section in FY2009 and FY2010. Additionally, (1) concrete-soil half-cells initiated during FY2007 using fractured prepared with and without metallic iron, half of which were carbonated using carbonated, were sectioned to evaluate the diffusion of I and Re in the concrete part of the half-cell under unsaturated conditions (4%, 7%, and 15% by wt moisture content), (2) concrete-soil half cells containing Tc were sectioned to measure the diffusion profile in the soil half-cell unsaturated conditions (4%, 7%, and 15% by wt moisture content), and (3) solubility measurements of uranium solid phases were completed under concrete porewater conditions. The results of these tests are presented.

  6. State of the science on postacute rehabilitation: setting a research agenda and developing an evidence base for practice and public policy: an introduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heinemann Allen W

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Measuring Rehabilitation Outcomes and Effectiveness along with academic, professional, provider, accreditor and other organizations, sponsored a 2-day State-of-the-Science of Post-Acute Rehabilitation Symposium in February 2007. The aim of this symposium was to serve as a catalyst for expanded research on postacute care (PAC rehabilitation so that health policy is founded on a solid evidence base. The goals were to: (1 describe the state of our knowledge regarding utilization, organization and outcomes of postacute rehabilitation settings, (2 identify methodologic and measurement challenges to conducting research, (3 foster the exchange of ideas among researchers, policymakers, industry representatives, funding agency staff, consumers and advocacy groups, and (4 identify critical questions related to setting, delivery, payment and effectiveness of rehabilitation services. Plenary presentation and state-of-the-science summaries were organized around four themes: (1 the need for improved measurement of key rehabilitation variables and methods to collect and analyze this information, (2 factors that influence access to postacute rehabilitation care, (3 similarities and differences in quality and quantity of services across PAC settings, and (4 effectiveness of postacute rehabilitation services. The full set of symposium articles, including recommendations for future research, appear in Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation.

  7. A Systematic Review of Physician Leadership and Emotional Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintz, Laura Janine; Stoller, James K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective This review evaluates the current understanding of emotional intelligence (EI) and physician leadership, exploring key themes and areas for future research. Literature Search We searched the literature using PubMed, Google Scholar, and Business Source Complete for articles published between 1990 and 2012. Search terms included physician and leadership, emotional intelligence, organizational behavior, and organizational development. All abstracts were reviewed. Full articles were evaluated if they addressed the connection between EI and physician leadership. Articles were included if they focused on physicians or physicians-in-training and discussed interventions or recommendations. Appraisal and Synthesis We assessed articles for conceptual rigor, study design, and measurement quality. A thematic analysis categorized the main themes and findings of the articles. Results The search produced 3713 abstracts, of which 437 full articles were read and 144 were included in this review. Three themes were identified: (1) EI is broadly endorsed as a leadership development strategy across providers and settings; (2) models of EI and leadership development practices vary widely; and (3) EI is considered relevant throughout medical education and practice. Limitations of the literature were that most reports were expert opinion or observational and studies used several different tools for measuring EI. Conclusions EI is widely endorsed as a component of curricula for developing physician leaders. Research comparing practice models and measurement tools will critically advance understanding about how to develop and nurture EI to enhance leadership skills in physicians throughout their careers. PMID:24701306

  8. DCT-based iris recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monro, Donald M; Rakshit, Soumyadip; Zhang, Dexin

    2007-04-01

    This paper presents a novel iris coding method based on differences of discrete cosine transform (DCT) coefficients of overlapped angular patches from normalized iris images. The feature extraction capabilities of the DCT are optimized on the two largest publicly available iris image data sets, 2,156 images of 308 eyes from the CASIA database and 2,955 images of 150 eyes from the Bath database. On this data, we achieve 100 percent Correct Recognition Rate (CRR) and perfect Receiver-Operating Characteristic (ROC) Curves with no registered false accepts or rejects. Individual feature bit and patch position parameters are optimized for matching through a product-of-sum approach to Hamming distance calculation. For verification, a variable threshold is applied to the distance metric and the False Acceptance Rate (FAR) and False Rejection Rate (FRR) are recorded. A new worst-case metric is proposed for predicting practical system performance in the absence of matching failures, and the worst case theoretical Equal Error Rate (EER) is predicted to be as low as 2.59 x 10(-4) on the available data sets.

  9. Monte Carlo simulation of small field electron beams for small animal irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chung-Chi; Chen, Ai-Mei; Tung, Chuan-Jong; Chao, Tsi-Chian

    2011-01-01

    The volume effect of detectors in the dosimetry of small fields for photon beams has been well studied due to interests in radiosurgery and small beamlets used in IMRT treatments; but there is still an unexplored research field for small electron beams used in small animal irradiation. This study proposes to use the BEAM Monte Carlo (MC) simulation to assess characteristics of small electron beams (4, 6, 14, 30 mm in diameter) with the kinetic energies of 6 and 18 MeV. Three factors influencing beam characteristics were studied (1) AE and ECUT settings, (2) photon jaw settings and (3) simulation pixel sizes. Study results reveal that AE/ECUT settings at 0.7 MeV are adequate for linear accelerator treatment head simulation, while 0.521 MeV is more favorable to be used for the phantom study. It is also demonstrated that voxel size setting at 1/4 of the simulation field width in all directions is sufficient to achieve accurate results. As for the photon jaw setting, it has great impact on the absolute output of different field size setting (i.e. output factor) but with minimum effect on the relative lateral distribution.

  10. Empowerment evaluation of a Swedish gender equity plan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios Gavriilidis

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Empowerment is essential for gender equity and health. The city of Malmö, Sweden, has formulated a development plan for gender equity integration (GEIDP. A ‘Policy Empowerment Index’ (PEI was previously developed to assess the empowerment potential of policies. Objectives: To pilot-evaluate the GEIDP's potential for empowerment and to test the PEI for future policy evaluations. Design: The GEIDP was analyzed and scored according to electronically retrieved evidence on constituent opinion, participation, capacity development, evaluation–adaptation, and impact. Results: The plan's PEI score was 64% (CI: 48–78 and was classified as ‘enabling’, ranging between ‘enabling’ and ‘supportive’. The plan's strengths were: 1 constituent knowledge and concern; 2 peripheral implementation; 3 protection of vulnerable groups; and 4 evaluation/adaptation procedures. It scored average on: 1 policy agenda setting; 2 planning; 3 provisions for education; 4 network formation; 5 resource mobilization. The weakest point was regarding promotion of employment and entrepreneurship. Conclusions: The PEI evaluation highlighted the plan's potential of constituency empowerment and proposed how it could be augmented.

  11. Issues and Solutions for Bringing Heterogeneous Water Cycle Data Sets Together

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acker, James; Kempler, Steven; Teng, William; Belvedere, Deborah; Liu, Zhong; Leptoukh, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    The water cycle research community has generated many regional to global scale products using data from individual NASA missions or sensors (e.g., TRMM, AMSR-E); multiple ground- and space-based data sources (e.g., Global Precipitation Climatology Project [GPCP] products); and sophisticated data assimilation systems (e.g., Land Data Assimilation Systems [LDAS]). However, it is often difficult to access, explore, merge, analyze, and inter-compare these data in a coherent manner due to issues of data resolution, format, and structure. These difficulties were substantiated at the recent Collaborative Energy and Water Cycle Information Services (CEWIS) Workshop, where members of the NASA Energy and Water cycle Study (NEWS) community gave presentations, provided feedback, and developed scenarios which illustrated the difficulties and techniques for bringing together heterogeneous datasets. This presentation reports on the findings of the workshop, thus defining the problems and challenges of multi-dataset research. In addition, the CEWIS prototype shown at the workshop will be presented to illustrate new technologies that can mitigate data access roadblocks encountered in multi-dataset research, including: (1) Quick and easy search and access of selected NEWS data sets. (2) Multi-parameter data subsetting, manipulation, analysis, and display tools. (3) Access to input and derived water cycle data (data lineage). It is hoped that this presentation will encourage community discussion and feedback on heterogeneous data analysis scenarios, issues, and remedies.

  12. Telemetric system for hydrology and water quality monitoring in watersheds of northern New Mexico, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Michael L; Huey, Greg M

    2006-05-01

    This study utilized telemetric systems to sample microbes and pathogens in forest, burned forest, rangeland, and urban watersheds to assess surface water quality in northern New Mexico. Four sites included remote mountainous watersheds, prairie rangelands, and a small urban area. The telemetric system was linked to dataloggers with automated event monitoring equipment to monitor discharge, turbidity, electrical conductivity, water temperature, and rainfall during base flow and storm events. Site data stored in dataloggers was uploaded to one of three types of telemetry: 1) radio in rangeland and urban settings; 2) a conventional phone/modem system with a modem positioned at the urban/forest interface; and 3) a satellite system used in a remote mountainous burned forest watershed. The major variables affecting selection of each system were site access, distance, technology, and cost. The systems were compared based on operation and cost. Utilization of telecommunications systems in this varied geographic area facilitated the gathering of hydrologic and water quality data on a timely basis.

  13. Modes and Approaches of Groundwater Governance: A Survey of Lessons Learned from Selected Cases across the Globe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert G. Varady

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The crucial role of groundwater and the centrality of water governance in accommodating growing water demands sustainably are becoming well recognized. We review 10 case studies of groundwater governance—representing diverse global regions and local contexts—from the perspective of four well-established elements: (1 institutional setting; (2 availability and access to information and science; (3 robustness of civil society; and (4 economic and regulatory frameworks. For institutional setting, we find that governing is often a thankless task that paradoxically requires popularity; legislation does not always translate to implementation; conflict resolution is central to governance; and funding is critical for governance. In terms of information access, we see: a need for research for natural systems, social systems, and institutions; trust as an essential element in research; and that urbanized landscapes are critical components of groundwater governance. Looking at civil society robustness, we observe that equity is an essential element for governance; community-based governance requires intention; and leaders can play a powerful role in uniting stakeholders. As for frameworks, the cases suggest that economic incentives sometimes yield unintended results; “indirect” management should be used cautiously; and economic incentives’ effectiveness depends on the system employed. Collectively, the lessons speak to the need for shared governance capacities on the part of governments at multiple levels and civil society actors.

  14. Practice settings and dentists' job satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Sasso, Anthony T; Starkel, Rebecca L; Warren, Matthew N; Guay, Albert H; Vujicic, Marko

    2015-08-01

    The nature and organization of dental practice is changing. The aim of this study was to explore how job satisfaction among dentists is associated with dental practice setting. A survey measured satisfaction with income, benefits, hours worked, clinical autonomy, work-life balance, emotional exhaustion, and overall satisfaction among dentists working in large group, small group, and solo practice settings; 2,171 dentists responded. The authors used logistic regression to measure differences in reported levels of satisfaction across practice settings. Dentists working in small group settings reported the most satisfaction overall. Dentists working in large group settings reported more satisfaction with income and benefits than dentists in solo practice, as well as having the least stress. Findings suggest possible advantages and disadvantages of working in different types of practice settings. Dentists working in different practice settings reported differences in satisfaction. These results may help dentists decide which practice setting is best for them. Copyright © 2015 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Application of the Trend Filtering Algorithm for Photometric Time Series Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalan, Giri; Plavchan, Peter; van Eyken, Julian; Ciardi, David; von Braun, Kaspar; Kane, Stephen R.

    2016-08-01

    Detecting transient light curves (e.g., transiting planets) requires high-precision data, and thus it is important to effectively filter systematic trends affecting ground-based wide-field surveys. We apply an implementation of the Trend Filtering Algorithm (TFA) to the 2MASS calibration catalog and select Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) photometric time series data. TFA is successful at reducing the overall dispersion of light curves, however, it may over-filter intrinsic variables and increase “instantaneous” dispersion when a template set is not judiciously chosen. In an attempt to rectify these issues we modify the original TFA from the literature by including measurement uncertainties in its computation, including ancillary data correlated with noise, and algorithmically selecting a template set using clustering algorithms as suggested by various authors. This approach may be particularly useful for appropriately accounting for variable photometric precision surveys and/or combined data sets. In summary, our contributions are to provide a MATLAB software implementation of TFA and a number of modifications tested on synthetics and real data, summarize the performance of TFA and various modifications on real ground-based data sets (2MASS and PTF), and assess the efficacy of TFA and modifications using synthetic light curve tests consisting of transiting and sinusoidal variables. While the transiting variables test indicates that these modifications confer no advantage to transit detection, the sinusoidal variables test indicates potential improvements in detection accuracy.

  16. Diurnal rhythms in the human urine metabolome during sleep and total sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giskeødegård, Guro F; Davies, Sarah K; Revell, Victoria L; Keun, Hector; Skene, Debra J

    2015-10-09

    Understanding how metabolite levels change over the 24 hour day is of crucial importance for clinical and epidemiological studies. Additionally, the association between sleep deprivation and metabolic disorders such as diabetes and obesity requires investigation into the links between sleep and metabolism. Here, we characterise time-of-day variation and the effects of sleep deprivation on urinary metabolite profiles. Healthy male participants (n = 15) completed an in-laboratory study comprising one 24 h sleep/wake cycle prior to 24 h of continual wakefulness under highly controlled environmental conditions. Urine samples were collected over set 2-8 h intervals and analysed by (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Significant changes were observed with respect to both time of day and sleep deprivation. Of 32 identified metabolites, 7 (22%) exhibited cosine rhythmicity over at least one 24 h period; 5 exhibiting a cosine rhythm on both days. Eight metabolites significantly increased during sleep deprivation compared with sleep (taurine, formate, citrate, 3-indoxyl sulfate, carnitine, 3-hydroxyisobutyrate, TMAO and acetate) and 8 significantly decreased (dimethylamine, 4-DTA, creatinine, ascorbate, 2-hydroxyisobutyrate, allantoin, 4-DEA, 4-hydroxyphenylacetate). These data indicate that sampling time, the presence or absence of sleep and the response to sleep deprivation are highly relevant when identifying biomarkers in urinary metabolic profiling studies.

  17. Effects of absenteeism feedback and goal-setting interventions on nurses' fairness perceptions, discomfort feelings and absenteeism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudine, Alice; Saks, Alan M; Dawe, Doreen; Beaton, Marilyn

    2013-04-01

    A longitudinal field experiment was conducted to test the effects of absenteeism feedback and goal-setting interventions on nurses' (1) fairness perceptions, (2) discomfort feelings and (3) absenteeism. Nurses' obstacles to reducing absenteeism were also explored. Absenteeism is a significant issue in health care and there is a need to avoid interventions that are seen to be negative, punitive or lead to sick nurses coming to work. Sixty-nine nurses working in a hospital in Eastern Canada received either: (1) absenteeism feedback with individual goal-setting, (2) absenteeism feedback with group goal-setting, or (3) no intervention, and were asked questions about how they could reduce their absenteeism. There was a significant decrease in the total number of days absent but no decrease in absent episodes, and a significant effect on fairness perceptions and discomfort feelings for the nurses in the absenteeism feedback conditions. Six categories of obstacles to reducing absenteeism were identified. The interventions made nurses feel their absence rate was less fair and to experience greater feelings of discomfort. The study's interventions may lead to a reduction in absence without the negative outcomes of a harsh absenteeism policy. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Proverb preferences across cultures: dialecticality or poeticality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Mike; Chen, Hsin-Chin; Vaid, Jyotsna

    2006-04-01

    Peng and Nisbett (1999) claimed that members of Asian cultures show a greater preference than Euro-Americans for proverbs expressing paradox (so-called dialectical proverbs; e.g., Too humble is half proud). The present research sought to replicate this claim with the same set of stimuli used in Peng and Nisbett's Experiment 2 and a new set of dialectical and nondialectical proverbs that were screened to be comparably pleasing in phrasing. Whereas the proverbs were rated as more familiar and (in Set 1) more poetic by Chinese than by American participants, no group differences were found in relation to proverb dialecticality. Both the Chinese and Americans in our study rated the dialectical proverbs from Peng and Nisbett's study as more likable, higher in wisdom, and higher in poeticality than the nondialectical proverbs. For Set 2, both groups found the dialectical proverbs to be as likable, wise, and poetic as the nondialectical proverbs. When poeticality was covaried out, dialectical proverbs were liked better than nondialectical proverbs across both stimulus sets by the Chinese and the Americans alike, and when wisdom was covaried out, the effect of dialecticality was reduced in both sets and groups. Our findings indicate that caution should be taken in ascribing differences in proverb preferences solely to cultural differences in reasoning.

  19. Impact of domain knowledge on blinded predictions of binding energies by alchemical free energy calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mey, Antonia S. J. S.; Jiménez, Jordi Juárez; Michel, Julien

    2018-01-01

    The Drug Design Data Resource (D3R) consortium organises blinded challenges to address the latest advances in computational methods for ligand pose prediction, affinity ranking, and free energy calculations. Within the context of the second D3R Grand Challenge several blinded binding free energies predictions were made for two congeneric series of Farsenoid X Receptor (FXR) inhibitors with a semi-automated alchemical free energy calculation workflow featuring FESetup and SOMD software tools. Reasonable performance was observed in retrospective analyses of literature datasets. Nevertheless, blinded predictions on the full D3R datasets were poor due to difficulties encountered with the ranking of compounds that vary in their net-charge. Performance increased for predictions that were restricted to subsets of compounds carrying the same net-charge. Disclosure of X-ray crystallography derived binding modes maintained or improved the correlation with experiment in a subsequent rounds of predictions. The best performing protocols on D3R set1 and set2 were comparable or superior to predictions made on the basis of analysis of literature structure activity relationships (SAR)s only, and comparable or slightly inferior, to the best submissions from other groups.

  20. Job satisfaction in nursing: a concept analysis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y; Aungsuroch, Y; Yunibhand, J

    2016-03-01

    This study aims to undertake a concept analysis of job satisfaction in the nursing profession. Around current global shortage of nurses, it is important to stabilize the nursing workforce. Nurses' job satisfaction has been found to be related to intention to leave. In the nursing profession, there is a lack of evidence to support the attributes of nurses' job satisfaction. Walker and Avant's approach of concept analysis was used. The main attributes of job satisfaction from this study are (1) fulfillment of desired needs within the work settings, (2) happiness or gratifying emotional responses towards working conditions, and (3) job value or equity. These attributes are influenced by antecedent conditions like demographic, emotional, work characteristics and environmental variables. Additionally, the consequences of nurses' job satisfaction have a significant impact on both nurses and patients. This study integrated both the content and process of motivational theories to generate the attributes of job satisfaction in nursing that overcome the limitation of the previous studies, which looked only at the definitions of nurses' job satisfaction based on content motivational theories. The findings of this study can facilitate both nursing researchers to develop a cultural adaption instrument and policy makers to improve clinical nursing practice. This analysis provides nurse managers with a new perspective to deal with nurses' job satisfaction by taking into account all the attributes that influence it in the nursing field. © 2015 International Council of Nurses.

  1. Computer Program for Calculation of Complex Chemical Equilibrium Compositions and Applications II. Users Manual and Program Description. 2; Users Manual and Program Description

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Bonnie J.; Gordon, Sanford

    1996-01-01

    This users manual is the second part of a two-part report describing the NASA Lewis CEA (Chemical Equilibrium with Applications) program. The program obtains chemical equilibrium compositions of complex mixtures with applications to several types of problems. The topics presented in this manual are: (1) details for preparing input data sets; (2) a description of output tables for various types of problems; (3) the overall modular organization of the program with information on how to make modifications; (4) a description of the function of each subroutine; (5) error messages and their significance; and (6) a number of examples that illustrate various types of problems handled by CEA and that cover many of the options available in both input and output. Seven appendixes give information on the thermodynamic and thermal transport data used in CEA; some information on common variables used in or generated by the equilibrium module; and output tables for 14 example problems. The CEA program was written in ANSI standard FORTRAN 77. CEA should work on any system with sufficient storage. There are about 6300 lines in the source code, which uses about 225 kilobytes of memory. The compiled program takes about 975 kilobytes.

  2. The Bone Marrow-Mediated Protection of Myeloproliferative Neoplastic Cells to Vorinostat and Ruxolitinib Relies on the Activation of JNK and PI3K Signalling Pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno A Cardoso

    Full Text Available The classical BCR-ABL-negative Myeloproliferative Neoplasms (MPN are a group of heterogeneous haematological diseases characterized by constitutive JAK-STAT pathway activation. Targeted therapy with Ruxolitinib, a JAK1/2-specific inhibitor, achieves symptomatic improvement but does not eliminate the neoplastic clone. Similar effects are seen with histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi, albeit with poorer tolerance. Here, we show that bone marrow (BM stromal cells (HS-5 protected MPN-derived cell lines (SET-2; HEL and UKE-1 and MPN patient-derived BM cells from the cytotoxic effects of Ruxolitinib and the HDACi Vorinostat. This protective effect was mediated, at least in part, by the secretion of soluble factors from the BM stroma. In addition, it correlated with the activation of signalling pathways important for cellular homeostasis, such as JAK-STAT, PI3K, JNK, MEK-ERK and NF-κB. Importantly, the pharmacological inhibition of JNK and PI3K pathways completely abrogated the BM protective effect on MPN cell lines and MPN patient samples. Our findings shed light on mechanisms of tumour survival and may indicate novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of MPN.

  3. The Bone Marrow-Mediated Protection of Myeloproliferative Neoplastic Cells to Vorinostat and Ruxolitinib Relies on the Activation of JNK and PI3K Signalling Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Bruno A.; Belo, Hélio; Barata, João T.; Almeida, António M.

    2015-01-01

    The classical BCR-ABL-negative Myeloproliferative Neoplasms (MPN) are a group of heterogeneous haematological diseases characterized by constitutive JAK-STAT pathway activation. Targeted therapy with Ruxolitinib, a JAK1/2-specific inhibitor, achieves symptomatic improvement but does not eliminate the neoplastic clone. Similar effects are seen with histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi), albeit with poorer tolerance. Here, we show that bone marrow (BM) stromal cells (HS-5) protected MPN-derived cell lines (SET-2; HEL and UKE-1) and MPN patient-derived BM cells from the cytotoxic effects of Ruxolitinib and the HDACi Vorinostat. This protective effect was mediated, at least in part, by the secretion of soluble factors from the BM stroma. In addition, it correlated with the activation of signalling pathways important for cellular homeostasis, such as JAK-STAT, PI3K, JNK, MEK-ERK and NF-κB. Importantly, the pharmacological inhibition of JNK and PI3K pathways completely abrogated the BM protective effect on MPN cell lines and MPN patient samples. Our findings shed light on mechanisms of tumour survival and may indicate novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of MPN. PMID:26623653

  4. The dark and bright sides of self-efficacy in predicting learning, innovative and risky performances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salanova, Marisa; Lorente, Laura; Martínez, Isabel M

    2012-11-01

    The objective of this study is to analyze the different role that efficacy beliefs play in the prediction of learning, innovative and risky performances. We hypothesize that high levels of efficacy beliefs in learning and innovative performances have positive consequences (i.e., better academic and innovative performance, respectively), whereas in risky performances they have negative consequences (i.e., less safety performance). To achieve this objective, three studies were conducted, 1) a two-wave longitudinal field study among 527 undergraduate students (learning setting), 2) a three-wave longitudinal lab study among 165 participants performing innovative group tasks (innovative setting), and 3) a field study among 228 construction workers (risky setting). As expected, high levels of efficacy beliefs have positive or negative consequences on performance depending on the specific settings. Unexpectedly, however, we found no time x self-efficacy interaction effect over time in learning and innovative settings. Theoretical and practical implications within the social cognitive theory of A. Bandura framework are discussed.

  5. Rat allotransplantation of epigastric microsurgical flaps: a study of rejection and the immunosuppressive effect of cyclosporin A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carramaschi Fábio R.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The rejection of allotransplantation of epigastric microsurgical flaps and the effect of immunosuppression have been studied in 58 rats. Three sets of experiments were planned: (1 Wistar Furth isogenic donors and receptors (control set; (2 Brown Norway donors and Wistar Furth receptors (rejection set; and (3 Brown Norway donors and Wistar Furth immunosuppressed receptors (cyclosporin A set. Cyclosporin A (10 mg/kg/d treated rats had a transplantation survival rate of up to 30 days: 83.3% among isogenic animals and 60% among allogeneic. There was 100% rejection by the 9th day after the transplantation in allogeneic non-immunosuppressed rats. Biopsies embedded with historesin were taken from the flap and normal contralateral skin (used as control on the 3rd, 7th, 15th, and 30th days after the surgery. A quantitative study of infiltrating lymphocytes in the flaps, with and without cyclosporin A, was done by evaluating the local inflammatory infiltrate. A significant increase in the number of lymphocytes among the rejection and immunosuppressed groups was seen, as compared to the isogenic set. Local lymphocytosis in allogeneic non-immunosuppressed transplantations reached its highest level on the 3rd day after surgery, before gross findings of rejection, which could only be seen by naked eye on the 5th or 6th day. Therefore, we conclude that cyclosporin A is effective in preserving allogenic transplantation in rats. Biopsies of transplanted areas may contribute to earlier diagnosis of the need for immunosuppressive therapy.

  6. Preschool physics: Using the invisible property of weight in causal reasoning tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhidan; Williamson, Rebecca A; Meltzoff, Andrew N

    2018-01-01

    Causal reasoning is an important aspect of scientific thinking. Even young human children can use causal reasoning to explain observations, make predictions, and design actions to bring about specific outcomes in the physical world. Weight is an interesting type of cause because it is an invisible property. Here, we tested preschool children with causal problem-solving tasks that assessed their understanding of weight. In an experimental setting, 2- to 5-year-old children completed three different tasks in which they had to use weight to produce physical effects-an object displacement task, a balance-scale task, and a tower-building task. The results showed that the children's understanding of how to use object weight to produce specific object-to-object causal outcomes improved as a function of age, with 4- and 5-year-olds showing above-chance performance on all three tasks. The younger children's performance was more variable. The pattern of results provides theoretical insights into which aspects of weight processing are particularly difficult for preschool children and why they find it difficult.

  7. Implications of the law on video recording in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henken, Kirsten R; Jansen, Frank Willem; Klein, Jan; Stassen, Laurents P S; Dankelman, Jenny; van den Dobbelsteen, John J

    2012-10-01

    Technological developments allow for a variety of applications of video recording in health care, including endoscopic procedures. Although the value of video registration is recognized, medicolegal concerns regarding the privacy of patients and professionals are growing. A clear understanding of the legal framework is lacking. Therefore, this research aims to provide insight into the juridical position of patients and professionals regarding video recording in health care practice. Jurisprudence was searched to exemplify legislation on video recording in health care. In addition, legislation was translated for different applications of video in health care found in the literature. Three principles in Western law are relevant for video recording in health care practice: (1) regulations on privacy regarding personal data, which apply to the gathering and processing of video data in health care settings; (2) the patient record, in which video data can be stored; and (3) professional secrecy, which protects the privacy of patients including video data. Practical implementation of these principles in video recording in health care does not exist. Practical regulations on video recording in health care for different specifically defined purposes are needed. Innovations in video capture technology that enable video data to be made anonymous automatically can contribute to protection for the privacy of all the people involved.

  8. Phlebotomine vector ecology in the domestic transmission of American cutaneous leishmaniasis in Chaparral, Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, Cristina; Marín, Dairo; Góngora, Rafael; Carrasquilla, María C; Trujillo, Jorge E; Rueda, Norma K; Marín, Jaime; Valderrama-Ardila, Carlos; Alexander, Neal; Pérez, Mauricio; Munstermann, Leonard E; Ocampo, Clara B

    2011-11-01

    Phlebotomine vector ecology was studied in the largest recorded outbreak of American cutaneous leishmaniasis in Colombia in 2004. In two rural townships that had experienced contrasting patterns of case incidence, this study evaluated phlebotomine species composition, seasonal abundance, nocturnal activity, blood source, prevalence of Leishmania infection, and species identification. CDC miniature light traps were used to trap the phlebotomines. Traps were set indoors, peridomestically, and in woodlands. Natural infection was determined in pools by polymerase chain reaction-Southern blot, and blood sources and species identification were determined by sequencing. Large differences were observed in population abundance between the two townships evaluated. Lutzomyia longiflocosa was the most abundant species (83.1%). Abundance was higher during months with lower precipitation. Nocturnal activity was associated with human domestic activity. Blood sources identified were mainly human (85%). A high prevalence of infection was found in L. longiflocosa indoors (2.7%) and the peridomestic setting (2.5%). L. longiflocosa was responsible for domestic transmission in Chaparral.

  9. Prospective and retrospective timing by pigeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetterman, J Gregor; Killeen, P Richard

    2010-05-01

    Pigeons discriminated between two pairs of durations: a short set (2.5 and 5 sec) and a long set (5 and 10 sec). The pairs were intermixed within sessions and identified by the colors on the signal and choice keys. Once the task was learned, the pigeons experienced the following three conditions seriatim: (1) The signal key was made ambiguous about the test change, but the choice keys were informative (retrospective); (2) the signal key identified the test range, but the choice keys did not (prospective); (3) probe trials were introduced in which the color of the center key signaled one test range, but the color of the choice keys signaled the other test range (inconsistent). Accuracy of choice decreased in the retrospective condition and, returned to baseline levels, was higher under the prospective condition than under the retrospective condition. In a final condition, referred to as conflict trials, the center-key color signified one test range and the choice-key colors the other range. The results from these conflict-inconsistent tests indicate that choice behavior was largely controlled by the signal-key color and not by the choice-key color. We relate these findings to different approaches to timing in animals.

  10. Analyzing in rotating asynchronous machine MG set synchronising fault

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Mingyang; Li Bo; Liu Yu; Fang Yinping

    2014-01-01

    In the commissioning work for MG set at FQNPC Unit l, MG-set l and MG-set 2 can not be synchronized lead to all two generator circuit breakers tripped. The description of the wave in the commissioning and the principle in phase compound excitation are all mentioned in this paper. After wave analysis and theory comparison, the direct cause of this problem is the reactive current in the two parallel synchronous generators, the real reason is parallel excitation contactor operation failed. Which could occur by these single failures, as follows, The synchronizing relay broken. The parallel excitation contactor occur the functional failure. The synchronizing signal trigger, and the order of execution about the breaker of generator and the parallel excitation contactor error. In order to solve these problem, regulating the voltage of generator is necessary. Redundant excitation contactor and relay is also need. After the maintenance, before the generator synchronized must test and verify the parallel excitation contactor works well. (authors)

  11. A comparison study of single and double layer repositories for high level radioactive wastes within a saturated and discontinuous granitic rock mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jhin Wung; Choi, Jong Won; Bae, Dae Suk

    2004-02-01

    The present study is to analyze and compare a long term thermohydro mechanical interaction behavior of a single layer and a double layer repository for high level radioactive wastes within a saturated and discontinuous granitic rock mass, and then to contribute this understanding to the development of a Korean disposal concept. The model includes a saturated and discontinuous granitic rock mass, PWR spent nuclear fuel in a disposal canister surrounded by compacted bentonite inside a deposition hole, and mixed bentonite backfilled in the rest of the space within a repository cavern. It is assumed that two joint sets exist within the model. Joint set 1 includes joints of 56 .deg. dip angle, spaced at 20 m, and joint set 2 is in the perpendicular direction to joint set 1 and includes joints of .deg. dip angle, spaced at 20 m. The two dimensional distinct element code, UDEC is used for the analysis. To understand the joint behavior adjacent to the repository cavern, Barton-Bandis joint model is used. Effect of the decay heat from PWR spent fuels on the repository model has been analyzed, and a steady state flow algorithm is used for the hydraulic analysis

  12. Safe and effective one-session fractional skin resurfacing using a carbon dioxide laser device in super-pulse mode: a clinical and histologic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trelles, Mario A; Shohat, Michael; Urdiales, Fernando

    2011-02-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO(2)) laser ablative fractional resurfacing produces skin damage, with removal of the epidermis and variable portions of the dermis as well as associated residual heating, resulting in new collagen formation and skin tightening. The nonresurfaced epidermis helps tissue to heal rapidly, with short-term postoperative erythema. The results for 40 patients (8 men and 32 women) after a single session of a fractional CO(2) resurfacing mode were studied. The treatments included resurfacing of the full face, periocular upper lip, and residual acne scars. The patients had skin prototypes 2 to 4 and wrinkle degrees 1 to 3. The histologic effects, efficacy, and treatment safety in various clinical conditions and for different phototypes are discussed. The CO(2) laser for fractional treatment is used in super-pulse mode. The beam is split by a lens into several microbeams, and super-pulse repetition is limited by the pulse width. The laser needs a power adaptation to meet the set fluence per microbeam. Laser pulsing can operate repeatedly on the same spot or be moved randomly over the skin, using several passes to achieve a desired residual thermal effect. Low, medium, and high settings are preprogrammed in the device, and they indicate the strength of resurfacing. A single treatment was given with the patient under topical anesthesia. However, the anesthesia was injected on areas of scar tissue. Medium settings (2 Hz, 30 W, 60 mJ) were used, and two passes were made for dark skins and degree 1 wrinkles. High settings (2 Hz, 60 W, 120 mJ) were used, and three passes were made for degree 3 wrinkles and scar tissue. Postoperatively, resurfaced areas were treated with an ointment of gentamycin, Retinol Palmitate, and DL-methionine (Novartis; Farmaceutics, S.A., Barcelona, Spain). Once epithelialization was achieved, antipigment and sun protection agents were recommended. Evaluations were performed 15 days and 2 months after treatment by both patients and

  13. An attempt at predicting blood β-hydroxybutyrate from Fourier-transform mid-infrared spectra of milk using multivariate mixed models in Polish dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belay, T K; Dagnachew, B S; Kowalski, Z M; Ådnøy, T

    2017-08-01

    Fourier transform mid-infrared (FT-MIR) spectra of milk are commonly used for phenotyping of traits of interest through links developed between the traits and milk FT-MIR spectra. Predicted traits are then used in genetic analysis for ultimate phenotypic prediction using a single-trait mixed model that account for cows' circumstances at a given test day. Here, this approach is referred to as indirect prediction (IP). Alternatively, FT-MIR spectral variable can be kept multivariate in the form of factor scores in REML and BLUP analyses. These BLUP predictions, including phenotype (predicted factor scores), were converted to single-trait through calibration outputs; this method is referred to as direct prediction (DP). The main aim of this study was to verify whether mixed modeling of milk spectra in the form of factors scores (DP) gives better prediction of blood β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) than the univariate approach (IP). Models to predict blood BHB from milk spectra were also developed. Two data sets that contained milk FT-MIR spectra and other information on Polish dairy cattle were used in this study. Data set 1 (n = 826) also contained BHB measured in blood samples, whereas data set 2 (n = 158,028) did not contain measured blood values. Part of data set 1 was used to calibrate a prediction model (n = 496) and the remaining part of data set 1 (n = 330) was used to validate the calibration models, as well as to evaluate the DP and IP approaches. Dimensions of FT-MIR spectra in data set 2 were reduced either into 5 or 10 factor scores (DP) or into a single trait (IP) with calibration outputs. The REML estimates for these factor scores were found using WOMBAT. The BLUP values and predicted BHB for observations in the validation set were computed using the REML estimates. Blood BHB predicted from milk FT-MIR spectra by both approaches were regressed on reference blood BHB that had not been used in the model development. Coefficients of determination in cross

  14. Acceleration of age-associated methylation patterns in HIV-1-infected adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tammy M Rickabaugh

    Full Text Available Patients with treated HIV-1-infection experience earlier occurrence of aging-associated diseases, raising speculation that HIV-1-infection, or antiretroviral treatment, may accelerate aging. We recently described an age-related co-methylation module comprised of hundreds of CpGs; however, it is unknown whether aging and HIV-1-infection exert negative health effects through similar, or disparate, mechanisms. We investigated whether HIV-1-infection would induce age-associated methylation changes. We evaluated DNA methylation levels at >450,000 CpG sites in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC of young (20-35 and older (36-56 adults in two separate groups of participants. Each age group for each data set consisted of 12 HIV-1-infected and 12 age-matched HIV-1-uninfected samples for a total of 96 samples. The effects of age and HIV-1 infection on methylation at each CpG revealed a strong correlation of 0.49, p<1 x 10(-200 and 0.47, p<1 x 10(-200. Weighted gene correlation network analysis (WGCNA identified 17 co-methylation modules; module 3 (ME3 was significantly correlated with age (cor=0.70 and HIV-1 status (cor=0.31. Older HIV-1+ individuals had a greater number of hypermethylated CpGs across ME3 (p=0.015. In a multivariate model, ME3 was significantly associated with age and HIV status (Data set 1: βage=0.007088, p=2.08 x 10(-9; βHIV=0.099574, p=0.0011; Data set 2: βage=0.008762, p=1.27 x 10(-5; βHIV=0.128649, p=0.0001. Using this model, we estimate that HIV-1 infection accelerates age-related methylation by approximately 13.7 years in data set 1 and 14.7 years in data set 2. The genes related to CpGs in ME3 are enriched for polycomb group target genes known to be involved in cell renewal and aging. The overlap between ME3 and an aging methylation module found in solid tissues is also highly significant (Fisher-exact p=5.6 x 10(-6, odds ratio=1.91. These data demonstrate that HIV-1 infection is associated with methylation patterns that

  15. Chronic and acute inspiratory muscle loading augment the effect of a 6-week interval program on tolerance of high-intensity intermittent bouts of running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Tom K; Fu, Frank H; Eston, Roger; Chung, Pak-Kwong; Quach, Binh; Lu, Kui

    2010-11-01

    This study examined the hypothesis that chronic (training) and acute (warm-up) loaded ventilatory activities applied to the inspiratory muscles (IM) in an integrated manner would augment the training volume of an interval running program. This in turn would result in additional improvement in the maximum performance of the Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test in comparison with interval training alone. Eighteen male nonprofessional athletes were allocated to either an inspiratory muscle loading (IML) group or control group. Both groups participated in a 6-week interval running program consisting of 3-4 workouts (1-3 sets of various repetitions of selected distance [100-2,400 m] per workout) per week. For the IML group, 4-week IM training (30 inspiratory efforts at 50% maximal static inspiratory pressure [P0] per set, 2 sets·d-1, 6 d·wk-1) was applied before the interval program. Specific IM warm-up (2 sets of 30 inspiratory efforts at 40% P0) was performed before each workout of the program. For the control group, neither IML was applied. In comparison with the control group, the interval training volume as indicated by the repeatability of running bouts at high intensity was approximately 27% greater in the IML group. Greater increase in the maximum performance of the Yo-Yo test (control: 16.9 ± 5.5%; IML: 30.7 ± 4.7% baseline value) was also observed after training. The enhanced exercise performance was partly attributable to the greater reductions in the sensation of breathlessness and whole-body metabolic stress during the Yo-Yo test. These findings show that the combination of chronic and acute IML into a high-intensity interval running program is a beneficial training strategy for enhancing the tolerance to high-intensity intermittent bouts of running.

  16. The quality-of-life burden of knee osteoarthritis in New Zealand adults: A model-based evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Haxby Abbott

    Full Text Available Knee osteoarthritis is a leading global cause of health-related quality of life loss. The aim of this project was to quantify health losses arising from knee osteoarthritis in New Zealand (NZ in terms of quality-adjusted life years (QALYs lost.The Osteoarthritis Policy Model (OAPol, a validated Monte Carlo computer simulation model, was used to estimate QALYs lost due to knee osteoarthritis in the NZ adult population aged 40-84 over their lifetimes from the base year of 2006 until death. Data were from the NZ Health Survey, NZ Burden of Diseases, NZ Census, and relevant literature. QALYs were derived from NZ EQ-5D value set 2. Sensitivity to health state valuation, disease and pain prevalence were assessed in secondary analyses.Based on NZ EQ-5D health state valuations, mean health losses due to knee osteoarthritis over people's lifetimes in NZ are 3.44 QALYs per person, corresponding to 467,240 QALYs across the adult population. Average estimated per person QALY losses are higher for non-Māori females (3.55 than Māori females (3.38, and higher for non-Māori males (3.34 than Māori males (2.60. The proportion of QALYs lost out of the total quality-adjusted life expectancy for those without knee osteoarthritis is similar across all subgroups, ranging from 20 to 23 percent.At both the individual and population levels, knee osteoarthritis is responsible for large lifetime QALY losses. QALY losses are higher for females than males due to greater prevalence of knee osteoarthritis and higher life expectancy, and lower for Māori than non-Māori due to lower life expectancy. Large health gains are potentially realisable from public health and policy measures aimed at decreasing incidence, progression, pain, and disability of osteoarthritis.

  17. Application of class-modelling techniques to infrared spectra for analysis of pork adulteration in beef jerkys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuswandi, Bambang; Putri, Fitra Karima; Gani, Agus Abdul; Ahmad, Musa

    2015-12-01

    The use of chemometrics to analyse infrared spectra to predict pork adulteration in the beef jerky (dendeng) was explored. In the first step, the analysis of pork in the beef jerky formulation was conducted by blending the beef jerky with pork at 5-80 % levels. Then, they were powdered and classified into training set and test set. The second step, the spectra of the two sets was recorded by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy using atenuated total reflection (ATR) cell on the basis of spectral data at frequency region 4000-700 cm(-1). The spectra was categorised into four data sets, i.e. (a) spectra in the whole region as data set 1; (b) spectra in the fingerprint region (1500-600 cm(-1)) as data set 2; (c) spectra in the whole region with treatment as data set 3; and (d) spectra in the fingerprint region with treatment as data set 4. The third step, the chemometric analysis were employed using three class-modelling techniques (i.e. LDA, SIMCA, and SVM) toward the data sets. Finally, the best result of the models towards the data sets on the adulteration analysis of the samples were selected and the best model was compared with the ELISA method. From the chemometric results, the LDA model on the data set 1 was found to be the best model, since it could classify and predict 100 % accuracy of the sample tested. The LDA model was applied toward the real samples of the beef jerky marketed in Jember, and the results showed that the LDA model developed was in good agreement with the ELISA method.

  18. Comparative study analysing women's childbirth satisfaction and obstetric outcomes across two different models of maternity care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conesa Ferrer, Ma Belén; Canteras Jordana, Manuel; Ballesteros Meseguer, Carmen; Carrillo García, César; Martínez Roche, M Emilia

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To describe the differences in obstetrical results and women's childbirth satisfaction across 2 different models of maternity care (biomedical model and humanised birth). Setting 2 university hospitals in south-eastern Spain from April to October 2013. Design A correlational descriptive study. Participants A convenience sample of 406 women participated in the study, 204 of the biomedical model and 202 of the humanised model. Results The differences in obstetrical results were (biomedical model/humanised model): onset of labour (spontaneous 66/137, augmentation 70/1, p=0.0005), pain relief (epidural 172/132, no pain relief 9/40, p=0.0005), mode of delivery (normal vaginal 140/165, instrumental 48/23, p=0.004), length of labour (0–4 hours 69/93, >4 hours 133/108, p=0.011), condition of perineum (intact perineum or tear 94/178, episiotomy 100/24, p=0.0005). The total questionnaire score (100) gave a mean (M) of 78.33 and SD of 8.46 in the biomedical model of care and an M of 82.01 and SD of 7.97 in the humanised model of care (p=0.0005). In the analysis of the results per items, statistical differences were found in 8 of the 9 subscales. The highest scores were reached in the humanised model of maternity care. Conclusions The humanised model of maternity care offers better obstetrical outcomes and women's satisfaction scores during the labour, birth and immediate postnatal period than does the biomedical model. PMID:27566632

  19. OPTICAL POLARIZATION AND SPECTRAL VARIABILITY IN THE M87 JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perlman, Eric S.; Cara, Mihai; Bourque, Matthew; Simons, Raymond C. [Department of Physics and Space Sciences, 150 W. University Blvd., Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, FL 32901 (United States); Adams, Steven C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30605 (United States); Harris, D. E. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Madrid, Juan P. [Center for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia); Clausen-Brown, Eric [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Cheung, C. C. [National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC 20001 (United States); Stawarz, Lukasz [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, JAXA, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Georganopoulos, Markos [Department of Physics, University of Maryland-Baltimore County, 1000 Hilltop Circle, Baltimore, MD 21250 (United States); Sparks, William B.; Biretta, John A., E-mail: eperlman@fit.edu [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2011-12-20

    During the last decade, M87's jet has been the site of an extraordinary variability event, with one knot (HST-1) increasing by over a factor 100 in brightness. Variability has also been seen on timescales of months in the nuclear flux. Here we discuss the optical-UV polarization and spectral variability of these components, which show vastly different behavior. HST-1 shows a highly significant correlation between flux and polarization, with P increasing from {approx}20% at minimum to >40% at maximum, while the orientation of its electric vector stayed constant. HST-1's optical-UV spectrum is very hard ({alpha}{sub UV-O} {approx} 0.5, F{sub {nu}}{proportional_to}{nu}{sup -{alpha}}), and displays 'hard lags' during epochs 2004.9-2005.5, including the peak of the flare, with soft lags at later epochs. We interpret the behavior of HST-1 as enhanced particle acceleration in a shock, with cooling from both particle aging and the relaxation of the compression. We set 2{sigma} upper limits of 0.5{delta} pc and 1.02c on the size and advance speed of the flaring region. The slight deviation of the electric vector orientation from the jet position angle (P.A.) makes it likely that on smaller scales the flaring region has either a double or twisted structure. By contrast, the nucleus displays much more rapid variability, with a highly variable electric vector orientation and 'looping' in the (I, P) plane. The nucleus has a much steeper spectrum ({alpha}{sub UV-O} {approx} 1.5) but does not show UV-optical spectral variability. Its behavior can be interpreted as either a helical distortion to a steady jet or a shock propagating through a helical jet.

  20. RISK FACTOR EPIDEMIOLOGY OF ECTOPIC PREGNANCY AND SUCCESS OF NONSURGICAL MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayan C.P

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Ectopic pregnancies are increasing in number and proportions. Real increase and better detection methods are contributing for this rise. All the cases diagnosed now are not surgical emergencies. Medical management and expectant line of management are possible. Revised clinical guidelines are there for the selection of cases for nonsurgical management. Knowledge about the risk factors is good for prophylaxis and to have a high suspicion about ectopic pregnancy in high-risk individuals. Knowing the success rate is absolutely essential for counselling before starting the therapy. Aim of the study- 1. To study the risk factor profile of ectopic pregnancies and to compare them with the old data of the study setting. 2. To follow up the cases receiving nonsurgical treatment and to assess the success rate. MATERIALS AND METHODS Study Setting- Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Government Medical College, Kottayam. It is a tertiary care centre with 1500 beds and catering for the population of five districts of Kerala. Study Design- Observational Study Study Period- This study was completed by eighteen months from April 2014 to September 2015. RESULTS 219 cases of ectopic pregnancies were diagnosed during the study period. The ratio of this number with the total number of deliveries during that period is 3.48% and this is three times higher than that of the ratio twenty years ago (1.23%. Risk factor profile is also showing changes over this period. 15.1% had medical treatment and 11% had expectant line of therapy. Success rates are 87.87% and 95.65%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS Incidence and detection of ectopic pregnancies are increasing and the risk factor profile is changing. In properly selected cases, the success of nonsurgical management is excellent.

  1. Comparison of plain radiography and magnetic resonance in the evaluation of the sacroiliac joint in patients with sacroiliitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marti-Bonmati, L.; Ybanez, D.; Sarti, M.A.; Belloch, V.

    1996-01-01

    The Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is an inflammatory disease involving joints and ligaments. plain radiography is an indispensable diagnostic technique in the evaluation of the sacroiliac joint, while the role of magnetic resonance (MR) is yet to be defined. Our purpose is to compare the diagnostic efficacy of plain radiography and MR in the evaluation of sacroiliac joint inflammation. We have carried out a prospective study of 43 individuals, 12 healthy volunteers (control group) and 31 patients with sacroiliitis (18 cases of confirmed AS, 11 of probable AS and 2 of condensing osteitis of the ilium). All the subjects underwent anteroposterior X-ray of pelvis and an MR study that provided two transversal sequences (SE-T2 and SE-PD) and two coronal sequences (SE-T1 and GE-T2). MR was significantly more sensitive than radiography in detecting the loss definition of the joint margins and cortical erosion (P<0.01). It was also more sensitive, although not significantly so, in the detection of subchondral sclerosis, osseous bridges and bone fusion. Erosion revealed by radiography would probably also be detected with MR(p<0.01). Despite the greater sensitivity of MR, plain X-ray should still be considered the technique of choice given its lower cost and greater availability. MR is indicated in patients without radiographic abnormalities in whom there is an evident clinical suspicion of AS. It is yet to be determined whether the greater sensitivity of MR in the detection of abnormality has any prognostic or therapeutic impact in AS patients. 15 refs

  2. Hospitalization for uncomplicated hypertension: an ambulatory care sensitive condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Robin L; Chen, Guanmin; McAlister, Finlay A; Campbell, Norm R C; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R; Dixon, Elijah; Ghali, William; Rabi, Doreen; Tu, Karen; Jette, Nathalie; Quan, Hude

    2013-11-01

    Hospitalizations for ambulatory care sensitive conditions (ACSC) represent an indirect measure of access and quality of community care. This study explored hospitalization rates for 1 ACSC, uncomplicated hypertension, and the factors associated with hospitalization. A cohort of patients with incident hypertension, and their covariates, was defined using validated case definitions applied to International Classification of Disease administrative health data in 4 Canadian provinces between fiscal years 1997 and 2004. We applied the Canadian Institute for Health Information's case definition to detect all patients who had an ACSC hospitalization for uncomplicated hypertension. We employed logistic regression to assess factors associated with an ACSC hospitalization for uncomplicated hypertension. The overall rate of hospitalizations for uncomplicated hypertension in the 4 provinces was 3.7 per 1000 hypertensive patients. The risk-adjusted rate was lowest among those in an urban setting (2.6 per 1000; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.3-2.7), the highest income quintile (3.4 per 1000; 95% CI, 2.8-4.2), and those with no comorbidities (3.6 per 1000; 95% CI, 3.2-3.9). Overall, Newfoundland had the highest adjusted rate (5.7 per 1000; 95% CI, 4.9-6.7), and British Columbia had the lowest (3.7 per 1000; 95% CI, 3.4-4.2). The adjusted rate declined from 5.9 per 1000 in 1997 to 3.7 per 1000 in 2004. We found that the rate of hospitalizations for uncomplicated hypertension has decreased over time, which might reflect improvements in community care. Geographic variations in the rate of hospitalizations indicate disparity among the provinces and those residing in rural regions. Copyright © 2013 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Attention and Recall of Point-of-sale Tobacco Marketing: A Mobile Eye-Tracking Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maansi Bansal-Travers

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available  Introduction: As tobacco advertising restrictions have increased, the retail ‘power wall’ behind the counter is increasingly invaluable for marketing tobacco products. Objective: The primary objectives of this pilot study were 3-fold: (1 evaluate the attention paid/fixations on the area behind the cash register where tobacco advertising is concentrated and tobacco products are displayed in a real-world setting, (2 evaluate the duration (dwell-time of these fixations, and (3 evaluate the recall of advertising displayed on the tobacco power wall. Methods: Data from 13 Smokers (S and 12 Susceptible or non-daily Smokers (SS aged 180–30 from a mobile eye-tracking study. Mobile-eye tracking technology records the orientation (fixation and duration (dwell-time of visual attention. Participants were randomized to one of three purchase tasks at a convenience store: Candy bar Only (CO; N = 10, Candy bar + Specified cigarette Brand (CSB; N = 6, and Candy bar + cigarette Brand of their Choice (CBC; N = 9. A post-session survey evaluated recall of tobacco marketing. Key outcomes were fixations and dwell-time on the cigarette displays at the point-of-sale. Results: Participants spent a median time of 44 seconds during the standardized time evaluated and nearly three-quarters (72% fixated on the power wall during their purchase, regardless of smoking status (S: 77%, SS: 67% or purchase task (CO: 44%, CSB: 71%, CBC: 100%. In the post session survey, nearly all participants (96% indicated they noticed a cigarette brand and 64% were able to describe a specific part of the tobacco wall or recall a promotional offer. Conclusions: Consumers are exposed to point-of-sale tobacco marketing, regardless of smoking status. FDA should consider regulations that limit exposure to point-of-sale tobacco marketing among consumers.

  4. Soft pomerons and the forward LHC data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broilo, M.; Luna, E. G. S.; Menon, M. J.

    2018-06-01

    Recent data from LHC13 by the TOTEM Collaboration on σtot and ρ have indicated disagreement with all the Pomeron model predictions by the COMPETE Collaboration (2002). On the other hand, as recently demonstrated by Martynov and Nicolescu (MN), the new σtot datum and the unexpected decrease in the ρ value are well described by the maximal Odderon dominance at the highest energies. Here, we discuss the applicability of Pomeron dominance through fits to the most complete set of forward data from pp and p bar p scattering. We consider an analytic parameterization for σtot (s) consisting of non-degenerated Regge trajectories for even and odd amplitudes (as in the MN analysis) and two Pomeron components associated with double and triple poles in the complex angular momentum plane. The ρ parameter is analytically determined by means of dispersion relations. We carry out fits to pp and p bar p data on σtot and ρ in the interval 5 GeV-13 TeV (as in the MN analysis). Two novel aspects of our analysis are: (1) the dataset comprises all the accelerator data below 7 TeV and we consider three independent ensembles by adding: either only the TOTEM data (as in the MN analysis), or only the ATLAS data, or both sets; (2) in the data reductions to each ensemble, uncertainty regions are evaluated through error propagation from the fit parameters, with 90% CL. We argument that, within the uncertainties, this analytic model corresponding to soft Pomeron dominance, does not seem to be excluded by the complete set of experimental data presently available.

  5. Preventing construction worker injury incidents through the management of personal stress and organizational stressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Mei-yung; Chan, Isabelle Yee Shan; Yu, Jingyu

    2012-09-01

    Construction workers (CWs) are positioned at the lowest level of an organization and thus have limited control over their work. For this reason, they are often deprived of their due rewards and training or sometimes are even compelled to focus on production at the expense of their own safety. These organizational stressors not only cause the CWs stress but also impair their safety behaviors. The impairment of safety behaviors is the major cause of CW injury incidents. Hence, to prevent injury incidents and enhance safety behaviors of CWs, the current study aimed to identify the impact of various organizational stressors and stress on CW safety behaviors and injury incidents. To achieve this aim, we surveyed 395 CWs. Using factor analysis, we identified five organizational stressors (unfair reward and treatment, inappropriate safety equipment, provision of training, lack of goal setting, and poor physical environment), two types of stress (emotional and physical), and safety behaviors. The results of correlation and regression analyses revealed the following: (1) injury incidents were minimized by safety behaviors but escalated by a lack of goal setting, (2) safety behaviors were maximized by moderate levels of emotional stress (i.e., an inverted U-shape relationship between these two variables) and increased in line with physical stress and inappropriate safety equipment, (3) emotional stress was positively predicted by the provision of training and inappropriate safety equipment, and (4) physical stress was predicted only by inappropriate safety equipment. Based on these results, we suggest various recommendations to construction stakeholders on how to prevent CW injury incidents. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Fine-scale linkage mapping reveals a small set of candidate genes influencing honey bee grooming behavior in response to Varroa mites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel E Arechavaleta-Velasco

    Full Text Available Populations of honey bees in North America have been experiencing high annual colony mortality for 15-20 years. Many apicultural researchers believe that introduced parasites called Varroa mites (V. destructor are the most important factor in colony deaths. One important resistance mechanism that limits mite population growth in colonies is the ability of some lines of honey bees to groom mites from their bodies. To search for genes influencing this trait, we used an Illumina Bead Station genotyping array to determine the genotypes of several hundred worker bees at over a thousand single-nucleotide polymorphisms in a family that was apparently segregating for alleles influencing this behavior. Linkage analyses provided a genetic map with 1,313 markers anchored to genome sequence. Genotypes were analyzed for association with grooming behavior, measured as the time that individual bees took to initiate grooming after mites were placed on their thoraces. Quantitative-trait-locus interval mapping identified a single chromosomal region that was significant at the chromosome-wide level (p<0.05 on chromosome 5 with a LOD score of 2.72. The 95% confidence interval for quantitative trait locus location contained only 27 genes (honey bee official gene annotation set 2 including Atlastin, Ataxin and Neurexin-1 (AmNrx1, which have potential neurodevelopmental and behavioral effects. Atlastin and Ataxin homologs are associated with neurological diseases in humans. AmNrx1 codes for a presynaptic protein with many alternatively spliced isoforms. Neurexin-1 influences the growth, maintenance and maturation of synapses in the brain, as well as the type of receptors most prominent within synapses. Neurexin-1 has also been associated with autism spectrum disorder and schizophrenia in humans, and self-grooming behavior in mice.

  7. Weight Care Project: Health professionals' attitudes and ability to assess body weight status - Study protocol

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moorhead, Anne

    2011-03-31

    Abstract Background Health professionals working in primary care and public health have opportunities to address body weight status issues with their patients through face-to-face contact. The objectives of this all-Ireland project are: 1. to assess the attitudes, current practices\\/behaviours and knowledge of key health professional groups on body weight status; 2. to assess the health professional groups\\' ability to identify body weight status in both adults and children. The health professional groups are: (a) community related public health nurses; (b) school public health nurses; (c) GPs and practice nurses (primary care); and (d) occupational health nurses (workplace) from both Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland. Methods\\/Design This all-Ireland multi-disciplinary project follows a mixed methods approach using both quantitative and qualitative methodologies, and consists of four components: 1. Literature review - to explore the role of health professionals in managing obesity through spontaneous intervention in a variety of health promotion settings. 2. Telephone interviews and focus groups - to gain an in-depth insight into the views of health professionals in assessing body weight status. 3. Survey (primarily online but also paper-based) - to determine the attitudes, current practices\\/behaviours and knowledge of health professionals in assessing body weight status. 4. Online evaluation study - an online interactive programme will be developed to assess health professionals\\' ability to identify the body weight status of adults and children. Discussion This project will assess and report the attitudes, current practices\\/behaviours and knowledge of key health professional groups within Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland on body weight status, and their ability to identify body weight status in both adults and children. The results of this project will generate recommendations for clinical practice in managing obesity, which may

  8. Muscular fatigue in response to different modalities of CrossFit sessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maté-Muñoz, José Luis; Lougedo, Juan H; Barba, Manuel; García-Fernández, Pablo; Garnacho-Castaño, Manuel V; Domínguez, Raúl

    2017-01-01

    CrossFit is a new strength and conditioning regimen involving short intense daily workouts called workouts of the day (WOD). This study assesses muscular fatigue levels induced by the three modalities of CrossFit WOD; gymnastics (G), metabolic conditioning (M) and weightlifting (W). 34 healthy subjects undertook three WOD (one per week): a G WOD consisting of completing the highest number of sets of 5 pull-ups, 10 push-ups and 15 air squats in 20 min; an M WOD, in which the maximum number of double skipping rope jumps was executed in 8 sets (20 s), resting (10 s) between sets; and finally, a W WOD in which the maximum number of power cleans was executed in 5 min, lifting a load equivalent to 40% of the individual's 1RM. Before and after each WOD, blood lactate concentrations were measured. Also, before, during, and after each WOD, muscular fatigue was assessed in a countermovement jump test (CMJ). Significant reductions were produced in the mechanical variables jump height, average power and maximum velocity in response to G; and in jump height, mean and peak power, maximum velocity and maximum force in response to W (P<0.01). However, in M, significant reductions in mechanical variables were observed between pre- and mid session (after sets 2, 4, 6 and 8), but not between pre- and post session. Muscular fatigue, reflected by reduced CMJ variables, was produced following the G and W sessions, while recovery of this fatigue was observed at the end of M, likely attributable to rest intervals allowing for the recovery of phosphocreatine stores. Our findings also suggest that the high intensity and volume of exercise in G and W WODs could lead to reduced muscular-tendon stiffness causing a loss of jump ability, related here to a longer isometric phase during the CMJ.

  9. The potential and problems of bulk irradiation in the Philippines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singson, C.C.

    1976-01-01

    Radiation as a processing tool has been adopted in the U.S. and other developed countries. Radiation processing of products on a commercial scale is feasible in the Philippines. A multi-purpose irradiation facility can provide the following services: 1) sterilization of medical and other products; 2) readily available supply of adequately sterilized disposables; 3) pasteurization of food and disinfestation of grains, tobacco, and lumber; 4) improvement in the quality of plywood, veneer and electric cable products; 5) treatment of effluents of leather, mining and textile industries; and 6) development of packaging materials and new chemicals. The Philippines has approximately 750 government and private hospitals with a total bed capacity of 45,000. Those hospitals require numerous sterile medical supplies for daily use and most of these medical products and devices are made of heat-sensitive thermoplastics which cannot be steam sterilized, thus radiation sterilization could be used instead. Some medical products that can be subjected to radiation sterilization are: 1) plastic administration sets; 2) disposable syringes and needles; 3) plastic containers and packaging materials; 4) talcum powder; 5) absorbent cotton; 6) sutures; and 7) other products such as catheters, gloves, petri dishes, etc. Food irradiation as a technique of food preservation utilizes ionizing radiation from large radiation sources. Irradiation can extend the market life of fresh fruits such as bananas, papayas and mangoes by controlling the rate of ripening. Vegetable crops like onion, ginger and garlic can also be irradiated to extend their shelf life. A dose of 15-50 Kr can control weevil and beetles infestation of grains and other seeds during the post harvest storage. Still there are problems existing, the public acceptance of irradiated food and the non existence of international trade of irradiated food

  10. Phosphatase Rtr1 Regulates Global Levels of Serine 5 RNA Polymerase II C-Terminal Domain Phosphorylation and Cotranscriptional Histone Methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Gerald O; Fox, Melanie J; Smith-Kinnaman, Whitney R; Gogol, Madelaine; Fleharty, Brian; Mosley, Amber L

    2016-09-01

    In eukaryotes, the C-terminal domain (CTD) of Rpb1 contains a heptapeptide repeat sequence of (Y1S2P3T4S5P6S7)n that undergoes reversible phosphorylation through the opposing action of kinases and phosphatases. Rtr1 is a conserved protein that colocalizes with RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) and has been shown to be important for the transition from elongation to termination during transcription by removing RNAPII CTD serine 5 phosphorylation (Ser5-P) at a selection of target genes. In this study, we show that Rtr1 is a global regulator of the CTD code with deletion of RTR1 causing genome-wide changes in Ser5-P CTD phosphorylation and cotranscriptional histone H3 lysine 36 trimethylation (H3K36me3). Using chromatin immunoprecipitation and high-resolution microarrays, we show that RTR1 deletion results in global changes in RNAPII Ser5-P levels on genes with different lengths and transcription rates consistent with its role as a CTD phosphatase. Although Ser5-P levels increase, the overall occupancy of RNAPII either decreases or stays the same in the absence of RTR1 Additionally, the loss of Rtr1 in vivo leads to increases in H3K36me3 levels genome-wide, while total histone H3 levels remain relatively constant within coding regions. Overall, these findings suggest that Rtr1 regulates H3K36me3 levels through changes in the number of binding sites for the histone methyltransferase Set2, thereby influencing both the CTD and histone codes. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Capacity of English NHS hospitals to monitor quality in infection prevention and control using a new European framework: a multilevel qualitative analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwami, Michiyo; Ahmad, Raheelah; Castro-Sánchez, Enrique; Birgand, Gabriel; Johnson, Alan P; Holmes, Alison

    2017-01-01

    Objective (1) To assess the extent to which current English national regulations/policies/guidelines and local hospital practices align with indicators suggested by a European review of effective strategies for infection prevention and control (IPC); (2) to examine the capacity of local hospitals to report on the indicators and current use of data to inform IPC management and practice. Design A national and local-level analysis of the 27 indicators was conducted. At the national level, documentary review of regulations/policies/guidelines was conducted. At the local level data collection comprised: (a) review of documentary sources from 14 hospitals, to determine the capacity to report performance against these indicators; (b) qualitative interviews with 3 senior managers from 5 hospitals and direct observation of hospital wards to find out if these indicators are used to improve IPC management and practice. Setting 2 acute English National Health Service (NHS) trusts and 1 NHS foundation trust (14 hospitals). Participants 3 senior managers from 5 hospitals for qualitative interviews. Primary and secondary outcome measures As primary outcome measures, a ‘Red-Amber-Green’ (RAG) rating was developed reflecting how well the indicators were included in national documents or their availability at the local organisational level. The current use of the indicators to inform IPC management and practice was also assessed. The main secondary outcome measure is any inconsistency between national and local RAG rating results. Results National regulations/policies/guidelines largely cover the suggested European indicators. The ability of individual hospitals to report some of the indicators at ward level varies across staff groups, which may mask required improvements. A reactive use of staffing-related indicators was observed rather than the suggested prospective strategic approach for IPC management. Conclusions For effective patient safety and infection prevention in

  12. A comparison of the cost-effectiveness of in vitro fertilization strategies and stimulated intrauterine insemination in a Canadian health economic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Taimur; Baibergenova, Akerke

    2008-05-01

    In vitro fertilization (IVF) with single embryo transfer (SET) has been proposed as a means of reducing multiple pregnancies associated with infertility treatment. All existing cost-effectiveness studies of IVF-SET have compared it with IVF with multiple embryo transfer but not with intrauterine insemination with gonadotropin stimulation (sIUI). We conducted a systematic review of studies of cost-effectiveness of IVF-SET versus IVF with double embryo transfer (DET). Further, we developed a health economy model that compared three strategies: (1) IVF-SET, (2) IVF-DET, and (3) sIUI. The decision analysis considered three cycles for each treatment option. IVF treatment was assumed to be a combination of cycles with transfer of fresh and frozen-thawed embryos. Probabilities used to populate the model were taken from published randomized clinical trials and observational studies. Cost estimates were based on average costs of associated procedures in Canada. The results of published studies on the cost-effectiveness of IVF-SET versus IVF-DET were not consistent. In our analysis, IVF-DET proved to be the most cost-effective strategy at $35,144/live birth, followed by sIUI at $66,960/live birth, and IVF-SET at $109,358/live birth. The results were sensitive both to the cost of IVF cycles and to the probability of live birth. This economic analysis showed that IVF-DET was the most cost-effective strategy of the options, and IVF-SET was the least cost-effective. The results in this model were insensitive to various probability inputs and to the costs associated with sIUI and IVF procedures.

  13. Study of a hydraulic DCPA/CaO-based cement for dental applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Briak, Hasna; Durand, Denis; Boudeville, Philippe

    2008-02-01

    A CPC was obtained by mixing calcium hydrogenphosphate (DCPA: CaHPO(4)) and calcium oxide with either water or sodium phosphate (NaP) buffers. Physical and mechanical properties such as compressive strength (CS), initial (I) and final (F) setting times, cohesion time (T(C)), dough time (T(D)), swelling time (T(S)), dimensional and thermal behavior, injectability (t(100%)), antimicrobial properties, setting reaction kinetics, and powder stability over time were investigated by varying different parameters such as liquid-to-powder (L/P) ratio (0.35 to 0.7 mL g(-1)), molar calcium-to-phosphate (Ca/P) ratio (1.67 to 3), the pH (4, 7 or 9) and the concentration (0 to 1 M) of the NaP buffer. The best results were obtained with the pH 7 NaP buffer at a concentration of 0.75 M. With this liquid phase, physical and mechanical properties depended on the Ca/P and L/P ratios, varying from 3 to 11 MPa (CS), 6 to 10 min (I), 11 to 15 min (F), 15 to 45 min (T(S)), 3 to 12 min (t(100%)), 16 min (T(D)). This cement expanded during its setting (2.5-7%), and is thus appropriate for tight filling. Finally the cement has antimicrobial activity from Ca/P = 2 and the whole properties were conserved after 8 months storage. Given the mechanical, rheological and antimicrobial properties of this new DCPA/CaO-based cement, its use as root canal sealing or pulp capping material may be considered as similar to calcium hydroxide or ZnO/eugenol-based pastes, without or with a gutta-percha point.

  14. Acute care patient portals: a qualitative study of stakeholder perspectives on current practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Sarah A; Rozenblum, Ronen; Leung, Wai Yin; Morrison, Constance Rc; Stade, Diana L; McNally, Kelly; Bourie, Patricia Q; Massaro, Anthony; Bokser, Seth; Dwyer, Cindy; Greysen, Ryan S; Agarwal, Priyanka; Thornton, Kevin; Dalal, Anuj K

    2017-04-01

    To describe current practices and stakeholder perspectives of patient portals in the acute care setting. We aimed to: (1) identify key features, (2) recognize challenges, (3) understand current practices for design, configuration, and use, and (4) propose new directions for investigation and innovation. Mixed methods including surveys, interviews, focus groups, and site visits with stakeholders at leading academic medical centers. Thematic analyses to inform development of an explanatory model and recommendations. Site surveys were administered to 5 institutions. Thirty interviews/focus groups were conducted at 4 site visits that included a total of 84 participants. Ten themes regarding content and functionality, engagement and culture, and access and security were identified, from which an explanatory model of current practices was developed. Key features included clinical data, messaging, glossary, patient education, patient personalization and family engagement tools, and tiered displays. Four actionable recommendations were identified by group consensus. Design, development, and implementation of acute care patient portals should consider: (1) providing a single integrated experience across care settings, (2) humanizing the patient-clinician relationship via personalization tools, (3) providing equitable access, and (4) creating a clear organizational mission and strategy to achieve outcomes of interest. Portals should provide a single integrated experience across the inpatient and ambulatory settings. Core functionality includes tools that facilitate communication, personalize the patient, and deliver education to advance safe, coordinated, and dignified patient-centered care. Our findings can be used to inform a "road map" for future work related to acute care patient portals. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  15. Reference ranges for blood concentrations of nucleated red blood cells in neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Robert D; Henry, Erick; Andres, Robert L; Bennett, Sterling T

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies reported a relationship between high nucleated red blood cells (NRBC) in neonates and the development of intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) and/or retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). We sought to (1) establish reference ranges for NRBC in neonates based on a large data set, (2) compare NRBC from automated versus manual counts, (3) determine the effect of an elevated NRBC, on the day of birth, on the odds of developing grade ≥3 IVH or ROP. We analyzed all NRBC obtained during 8.5 years in a multihospital system, displaying the 5th and 95th percentile limits according to gestational age and postnatal age. NRBC counts were retrieved from 61,932 neonates, 26,536 of which were excluded from the data set. Comparing 9,000 samples run simultaneously on manual versus automated methods, the manual counts yielded slightly higher counts, but the difference is likely insignificant clinically. Altitude of the birth hospital did not correlate with NRBC, and no correlations were observed with cord pH or 1- or 5-min Apgar. An NRBC count >95th percentile limit was associated with higher odds of developing a grade ≥3 IVH (OR 4.28; 95% CI 3.17-5.77) and grade ≥3 ROP (OR 4.18; 95% CI 2.74-6.38). The figures of this report display reference ranges for NRBC according to gestational age and postnatal age. An NRBC count above the 95% limit at birth is associated with a higher risk of subsequently developing severe IVH and severe ROP. We speculate that this association is because an elevated NRBC count is a marker for prenatal hypoxia. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Three Days of Intermittent Fasting: Repeated-Sprint Performance Decreased by Vertical-Stiffness Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherif, Anissa; Meeusen, Romain; Farooq, Abdulaziz; Ryu, Joong; Fenneni, Mohamed Amine; Nikolovski, Zoran; Elshafie, Sittana; Chamari, Karim; Roelands, Bart

    2017-03-01

    To examine the effects of 3 d of intermittent fasting (3d-IF: abstaining from eating/drinking from dawn to sunset) on physical performance and metabolic responses to repeated sprints (RSs). Twenty-one active males performed an RS test (2 sets: 5 × 5-s maximal sprints with 25 s of recovery between and 3 min of recovery between sets on an instrumented treadmill) in 2 conditions: counterbalanced fed/control session (CS) and fasting session (FS). Biomechanical and biochemical markers were assessed preexercise and postexercise. Significant main effects of IF were observed for sprints: maximal speed (P = .016), mean speed (P = .015), maximal power (P = .035), mean power (P = .049), vertical stiffness (P = .032), and vertical center-of-mass displacement (P = .047). Sprint speed and vertical stiffness decreased during the 1st (P = .003 and P = .005) and 2nd sprints (P = .046 and P = .048) of set 2, respectively. Postexercise insulin decreased in CS (P = .023) but not in FS (P = .230). Free-fatty-acid levels were higher in FS than in CS at preexercise (P < .001) and at postexercise (P = .009). High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) was higher at postexercise in FS (1.32 ± 0.22 mmol/L) than in CS (1.26 ± 0.21 mmol/L, P = .039). The triglyceride (TG) concentration was decreased in FS (P < .05) compared with CS. 3d-IF impaired speed and power through a decrease in vertical stiffness during the initial runs of the 2nd set of RS. The findings of the current study confirmed the benefits of 3d-IF: improved HDL-C and TG profiles while maintaining total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Moreover, improving muscle power might be a key factor to retain a higher vertical stiffness and to partly counteract the negative effects of intermittent fasting.

  17. Muscular fatigue in response to different modalities of CrossFit sessions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Maté-Muñoz

    Full Text Available CrossFit is a new strength and conditioning regimen involving short intense daily workouts called workouts of the day (WOD. This study assesses muscular fatigue levels induced by the three modalities of CrossFit WOD; gymnastics (G, metabolic conditioning (M and weightlifting (W.34 healthy subjects undertook three WOD (one per week: a G WOD consisting of completing the highest number of sets of 5 pull-ups, 10 push-ups and 15 air squats in 20 min; an M WOD, in which the maximum number of double skipping rope jumps was executed in 8 sets (20 s, resting (10 s between sets; and finally, a W WOD in which the maximum number of power cleans was executed in 5 min, lifting a load equivalent to 40% of the individual's 1RM. Before and after each WOD, blood lactate concentrations were measured. Also, before, during, and after each WOD, muscular fatigue was assessed in a countermovement jump test (CMJ.Significant reductions were produced in the mechanical variables jump height, average power and maximum velocity in response to G; and in jump height, mean and peak power, maximum velocity and maximum force in response to W (P<0.01. However, in M, significant reductions in mechanical variables were observed between pre- and mid session (after sets 2, 4, 6 and 8, but not between pre- and post session.Muscular fatigue, reflected by reduced CMJ variables, was produced following the G and W sessions, while recovery of this fatigue was observed at the end of M, likely attributable to rest intervals allowing for the recovery of phosphocreatine stores. Our findings also suggest that the high intensity and volume of exercise in G and W WODs could lead to reduced muscular-tendon stiffness causing a loss of jump ability, related here to a longer isometric phase during the CMJ.

  18. Comparison of lung protective ventilation strategies in a rabbit model of acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotta, A T; Gunnarsson, B; Fuhrman, B P; Hernan, L J; Steinhorn, D M

    2001-11-01

    To determine the impact of different protective and nonprotective mechanical ventilation strategies on the degree of pulmonary inflammation, oxidative damage, and hemodynamic stability in a saline lavage model of acute lung injury. A prospective, randomized, controlled, in vivo animal laboratory study. Animal research facility of a health sciences university. Forty-six New Zealand White rabbits. Mature rabbits were instrumented with a tracheostomy and vascular catheters. Lavage-injured rabbits were randomized to receive conventional ventilation with either a) low peak end-expiratory pressure (PEEP; tidal volume of 10 mL/kg, PEEP of 2 cm H2O); b) high PEEP (tidal volume of 10 mL/kg, PEEP of 10 cm H2O); c) low tidal volume with PEEP above Pflex (open lung strategy, tidal volume of 6 mL/kg, PEEP set 2 cm H2O > Pflex); or d) high-frequency oscillatory ventilation. Animals were ventilated for 4 hrs. Lung lavage fluid and tissue samples were obtained immediately after animals were killed. Lung lavage fluid was assayed for measurements of total protein, elastase activity, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and malondialdehyde. Lung tissue homogenates were assayed for measurements of myeloperoxidase activity and malondialdehyde. The need for inotropic support was recorded. Animals that received a lung protective strategy (open lung or high-frequency oscillatory ventilation) exhibited more favorable oxygenation and lung mechanics compared with the low PEEP and high PEEP groups. Animals ventilated by a lung protective strategy also showed attenuation of inflammation (reduced tracheal fluid protein, tracheal fluid elastase, tracheal fluid tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and pulmonary leukostasis). Animals treated with high-frequency oscillatory ventilation had attenuated oxidative injury to the lung and greater hemodynamic stability compared with the other experimental groups. Both lung protective strategies were associated with improved oxygenation, attenuated inflammation, and

  19. Inferring the lithology of borehole rocks by applying neural network classifiers to downhole logs: an example from the Ocean Drilling Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benaouda, D.; Wadge, G.; Whitmarsh, R. B.; Rothwell, R. G.; MacLeod, C.

    1999-02-01

    In boreholes with partial or no core recovery, interpretations of lithology in the remainder of the hole are routinely attempted using data from downhole geophysical sensors. We present a practical neural net-based technique that greatly enhances lithological interpretation in holes with partial core recovery by using downhole data to train classifiers to give a global classification scheme for those parts of the borehole for which no core was retrieved. We describe the system and its underlying methods of data exploration, selection and classification, and present a typical example of the system in use. Although the technique is equally applicable to oil industry boreholes, we apply it here to an Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) borehole (Hole 792E, Izu-Bonin forearc, a mixture of volcaniclastic sandstones, conglomerates and claystones). The quantitative benefits of quality-control measures and different subsampling strategies are shown. Direct comparisons between a number of discriminant analysis methods and the use of neural networks with back-propagation of error are presented. The neural networks perform better than the discriminant analysis techniques both in terms of performance rates with test data sets (2-3 per cent better) and in qualitative correlation with non-depth-matched core. We illustrate with the Hole 792E data how vital it is to have a system that permits the number and membership of training classes to be changed as analysis proceeds. The initial classification for Hole 792E evolved from a five-class to a three-class and then to a four-class scheme with resultant classification performance rates for the back-propagation neural network method of 83, 84 and 93 per cent respectively.

  20. Virtual chromoendoscopy can be a useful software tool in capsule endoscopy La Cromoendoscopia virtual puede ser una herramienta de software útil en la cápsula endoscópica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Duque

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: capsule endoscopy (CE has revolutionized the study of small bowel. One major drawback of this technique is that we cannot interfere with image acquisition process. Therefore, the development of new software tools that could modify the images and increase both detection and diagnosis of small-bowel lesions would be very useful. The Flexible Spectral Imaging Color Enhancement (FICE that allows for virtual chromoendoscopy is one of these software tools. Aims: to evaluate the reproducibility and diagnostic accuracy of the FICE system in CE. Methods: this prospective study involved 20 patients. First, four physicians interpreted 150 static FICE images and the overall agree-ment between them was determined using the Fleiss Kappa Test. Second, two experienced gastroenterologists, blinded to each other results, analyzed the complete 20 video streams. One interpreted conventional capsule videos and the other, the CE-FICE videos at setting 2. All findings were reported, regardless of their clinical value. Non-concordant findings between both interpretations were analyzed by a consensus panel of four gastroenterologists who reached a final result (positive or negative finding. Results: in the first arm of the study the overall concordance between the four gastroenterologists was substantial (0.650. In the second arm, the conventional mode identified 75 findings and the CE-FICE mode 95. The CE-FICE mode did not miss any lesions identified by the conventional mode and allowed the identification of a higher number of angiodysplasias (35 vs 32, and erosions (41 vs. 24. Conclusions: there is reproducibility for the interpretation of CE-FICE images between different observers experienced in conventional CE. The use of virtual chromoendoscopy in CE seems to increase its diagnostic accuracy by highlighting small bowel erosions and angiodysplasias that weren't identified by the conventional mode.

  1. University Prosperity Game. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyack, K.W.; Berman, M.

    1996-03-01

    Prosperity Games are an outgrowth and adaptation of move/countermove and seminar War Games. Prosperity Games are simulations that explore complex issues in a variety of areas including economics, politics, sociology, environment, education and research. These issues can be examined from a variety of perspectives ranging from a global, macroeconomic and geopolitical viewpoint down to the details of customer/supplier/market interactions in specific industries. All Prosperity Games are unique in that both the game format and the player contributions vary from game to game. This report documents the University Prosperity Game conducted under the sponsorship of the Anderson Schools of Management at the University of New Mexico. This Prosperity Game was initially designed for the roadmap making effort of the National Electronics Manufacturing Initiative (NEMI) of the Electronics Subcommittee of the Civilian Industrial Technology Committee under the aegis of the National Science and Technology Council. The game was modified to support course material in MGT 508, Ethical, Political, and Social Environment of Business. Thirty-five students participated as role players. In this educational context the game`s main objectives were to: (1) introduce and teach global competitiveness and business cultures in an experiential classroom setting; (2) explore ethical, political, and social issues and address them in the context of global markets and competition; and (3) obtain non-government views regarding the technical and non-technical (i.e., policy) issues developed in the NEMI roadmap-making endeavor. The negotiations and agreements made during the game, along with the student journals detailing the players feelings and reactions to the gaming experience, provide valuable insight into the benefits of simulation as an advanced learning tool in higher education.

  2. [Radiologic follow-up after breast-conserving surgery: value of MRI examination of the breast].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polgár, C; Forrai, G; Szabó, E; Riedl, E; Fodor, J; Fornet, B; Németh, G

    1999-11-21

    The aim of the study was to establish an objective method for evaluation the extent, topography and quantity of skin and soft tissue side effects after tele- and/or brachyradiotherapy of the conserved breast and to compare the sequales of different radiation methods. 26 patients operated on for T1-2 N0-1 breast cancer underwent the following kinds of postoperative radiotherapy: 1. 46-50 Gy whole breast teletherapy + 10-16 Gy electron boost (5 patients), 2. 46-50 Gy teletherapy + 10-15 Gy HDR brachytherapy boost (12 patients), 3. 46-50 Gy teletherapy (6 patients), 4. 36,4 Gy sole HDR brachytherapy of the tumour bed (5 patients). The postirradiation side effects were examined by MRI, mammogram, US and physical examination, as well. MRI was performed on a 0.5 T, double breast coil, with SE-T1, SE-T2 and 3D-GE sequences. The findings of MRI and mammography were compared to physically detectable side effects using the RTOG/EORTC late radiation morbidity scoring scheme. US is useful in the measurement of skin thickening and in the diagnosis of fat necrosis. Mammography and physical examination are very subjective and low specificity methods to evaluate postirradiation side effects. MRI is a suitable and more objective method to detect the real extent and quantity of skin thickening and fibrosis. The incidence of > or = G2 side effects of skin and breast parenchyma were 64.5 and 32.2%, respectively. The differences between the side effects of whole breast irradiation and sole brachytherapy of the tumour bed are also clearly demonstrated. Brachytherapy alone is feasible without compromising cosmetic results. The authors established the MRI criteria for categorization the extent and grade of skin thickening and fibrosis (focal vs diffuse, grade 1-4). Breast MRI is an objective tool for assisting to the evaluation of the side effects of postoperative radiotherapy.

  3. Thinking in nursing education. Part II. A teacher's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ironside, P M

    1999-01-01

    Across academia, educators are investigating teaching strategies that facilitate students' abilities to think critically. Because may these strategies require low teacher-student ratios or sustained involvement over time, efforts to implement them are often constrained by diminishing resources for education, faculty reductions, and increasing number of part-time teachers and students. In nursing, the challenges of teaching and learning critical thinking are compounded by the demands of providing care to patients with increasingly acute and complex problems in a wide variety of settings. To meet these challenges, nurse teachers have commonly used a variety of strategies to teach critical thinking (1). For instance, they often provide students with case studies or simulated clinical situations in classroom and laboratory settings (2). At other times, students are taught a process of critical thinking and given structured clinical assignments, such as care plans or care maps, where they apply this process in anticipating the care a particular patient will require. Accompanying students onto clinical units, teachers typically evaluate critical thinking ability by reviewing a student's preparation prior to the experience and discussing it with the student during the course of the experience. The rationales students provide for particular nursing interventions are taken as evidence of their critical thinking ability. While this approach is commonly thought to be effective, the evolving health care system has placed increased emphasis on community nursing (3,4), where it is often difficult to prespecify learning experiences or to anticipate patient care needs. In addition, teachers are often not able to accompany each student to the clinical site. Thus, the traditional strategies for teaching and learning critical thinking common to hospital-based clinical courses are being challenged, transformed, and extended (5). Part II of this article describes findings that suggest

  4. Use of containers with sterilizing filter in autologous serum eyedrops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-García, José S; García-Lozano, Isabel

    2012-11-01

    To assess the effect of the use of containers with an adapted sterilizing filter on the contamination of autologous serum eyedrops. Prospective, consecutive, comparative, and randomized study. Thirty patients with Sjögren syndrome. One hundred seventy-six autologous serum containers used in home therapy were studied; 48 of them included an adapted filter (Hyabak; Thea, Clermont-Ferrand, France), and the other 128 were conventional containers. Containers equipped with a filter were tested at 7, 14, 21, and 28 days of use, whereas conventional containers were studied after 7 days of use. In addition, testing for contamination was carried out in 14 conventional containers used during in-patient therapy every week for 4 weeks. In all cases, the preparation of the autologous serum was similar. Blood agar and chocolate agar were used as regular culture media for the microbiologic studies, whereas Sabouraud agar with chloramphenicol was the medium for fungal studies. Microbiologic contamination of containers with autologous serum eyedrops. Only one of the containers with an adapted sterilizing filter (2.1%) became contaminated with Staphylococcus epidermidis after 1 month of treatment, whereas the contamination rate among conventional containers reached 28.9% after 7 days of treatment. The most frequent germs found in the samples were coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (48.6%). With regard the containers used in the in-patient setting, 2 (14.3%) became contaminated after 2 weeks, 5 (35.7%) became contaminated after 3 weeks, and 5 (50%) became contaminated after 4 weeks, leaving 7 (50%) that did not become contaminated after 1 month of treatment. Using containers with an adapted filter significantly reduces the contamination rates in autologous serum eyedrops, thus extending the use of such container by the patients for up to 4 weeks with virtually no contamination risks. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A post-hoc subgroup analysis of outcomes in the first phase III clinical study of edaravone (MCI-186) in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Our first phase III study failed to demonstrate efficacy of edaravone for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) compared to placebo. Here, we performed post-hoc subgroup analysis to identify a subgroup in which edaravone might be expected to show efficacy. We focussed on two newly defined subgroups, EESP and dpEESP2y. The EESP was defined as the efficacy-expected subpopulation with % forced vital capacity of ≥80%, and ≥2 points for all item scores in the revised ALS functional rating scale (ALSFRS-R) score before treatment. The dpEESP2y was defined as the greater-efficacy-expected subpopulation within EESP having a diagnosis of 'definite' or 'probable' ALS according to the El Escorial revised Airlie House diagnostic criteria and onset of disease within two years. The primary endpoint of the post-hoc analysis was the change in the ALSFRS-R score during the 24-week treatment period. The intergroup differences of the least-squares mean change in the ALSFRS-R score ± standard error during treatment were 0.65 ± 0.78 (p = 0.4108) in the full analysis set, 2.20 ± 1.03 (p = 0.0360) in the EESP, and 3.01 ± 1.33 (p = 0.0270) in the dpEESP2y. Edaravone exhibited efficacy in the dpEESP2y subgroup. A further clinical study in patients meeting dpEESP2y criteria is warranted.

  6. Primary Prevention from the Epidemiology Perspective: Three Examples from the Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jahn Ingeborg

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary prevention programmes are of increasing importance to reduce the impact of chronic diseases on the individual, institutional and societal level. However, most initiatives that develop and implement primary prevention programmes are not evaluated with scientific rigor. On the basis of three different projects we discuss necessary steps on the road to evidence-based primary prevention. Discussion We first discuss how to identify suitable target groups exploiting sophisticated statistical methods. This is illustrated using data from a health survey conducted in a federal state of Germany. A literature review is the more typical approach to identify target groups that is demonstrated using a European project on the prevention of childhood obesity. In the next step, modifiable risk factors and realistic targets of the intervention have to be specified. These determine the outcome measures that in turn are used for effect evaluation. Both, the target groups and the outcome measures, lay the ground for the study design and the definition of comparison groups as can be seen in our European project. This project also illustrates the development and implementation of a prevention programme. These may require active involvement of participants which can be achieved by participatory approaches taking into account the socio-cultural and living environment. Evaluation is of utmost importance for any intervention to assess structure, process and outcome according to rigid scientific criteria. Different approaches used for this are discussed and illustrated by a methodological project developed within a health promotion programme in a deprived area. Eventually the challenge of transferring an evidence-based intervention into practice and to achieve its sustainability is addressed. Summary This article describes a general roadmap to primary prevention comprising (1 the identification of target groups and settings, (2 the

  7. How obstetric settings can help address gaps in psychiatric care for pregnant and postpartum women with bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byatt, Nancy; Cox, Lucille; Moore Simas, Tiffany A; Kini, Nisha; Biebel, Kathleen; Sankaran, Padma; Swartz, Holly A; Weinreb, Linda

    2018-03-13

    To elucidate (1) the challenges associated with under-recognition of bipolar disorder in obstetric settings, (2) barriers pregnant and postpartum women with bipolar disorder face when trying to access psychiatric care, and (3) how obstetric settings can identify such women and connect them with mental health services. Structured, in-depth interviews were conducted with 25 pregnant and postpartum women recruited from obstetric practices who scored ≥ 10 on the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale and met DSM-IV criteria for bipolar disorder I, II, or not otherwise specified using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview. Quantitative analyses included descriptive statistics. Interviews were transcribed, and resulting data were analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Most participants (n = 19, 79.17%) did not have a clinical diagnosis of bipolar disorder documented in their medical records nor had received referral for treatment during pregnancy (n = 15, 60%). Of participants receiving pharmacotherapy (n = 14, 58.33%), most were treated with an antidepressant alone (n = 10, 71.42%). Most medication was prescribed by an obstetric (n = 4, 28.57%) or primary care provider (n = 7, 50%). Qualitative interviews indicated that participants want their obstetric practices to proactively screen for, discuss and help them obtain mental health treatment. Women face challenges in securing mental health treatment appropriate to their bipolar illness. Obstetric providers provide the bulk of medical care for these women and need supports in place to (1) better recognize bipolar disorder, (2) avoid inappropriate prescribing practices for women with undiagnosed bipolar disorder, and (3) ensure women are referred to specialized treatment when needed.

  8. Extension of the RPV irradiation surveillance program of NPP GKN II by T0 approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barthelmes, J.; Keim, E.; Hein, H.; Koenig, G.

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear power plant (NPP) Neckarwestheim II (GKN II) started operation in 1989 and was designed for 40 years of operation. During the plant life time the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) integrity is a main aspect for nuclear safety since the RPV is exposed to neutron irradiation affecting the mechanical material properties, in particular toughness. In this context the ductile to brittle transition reference temperature of the RPV materials can be determined either indirectly according to the RT(NDT) concept by means of comparative examinations of irradiated and unirradiated notched-bar impact specimens or directly according to the Master Curve concept by means of examination of irradiated fracture mechanic specimens and determination of an alternative reference temperature RT(T0). With the implementation and evaluation of the first irradiation surveillance program consisting of three sets, one unirradiated reference set (set 1) and two irradiated sets (set 2 and 3), the RPV safety could be proven for the assessment fluence (AF) of 8*10 18 cm -2 (E > 1 MeV) using the RT(NDT) concept. Against the background of a possible long term operation and the state-of-the-art of science and technology in 1998 the NPP GKN II initiated a supplemental irradiation surveillance program with two irradiation sets (set 4 and 5) containing fracture mechanic specimens for complementary proof of safety according to the Master Curve concept. The results of the first irradiated set 4 are presented and assessed by means of the reference temperatures according to the Master Curve concept and compared to the results of the irradiation sets 1 to 3 of the conventional irradiation surveillance program. As an important outcome the existing RPV integrity assessment could be ensured by the Master Curve results. The applied approach adapts to the state-of-the-art of science and technology and is best practice to ensure the safe operation of RPV supplementary. (authors)

  9. Economic, ecological, and social performance of conventional and organic broiler production in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokkers, E A M; de Boer, I J M

    2009-09-01

    1. In this study, we compared a conventional broiler production system keeping fast growing broilers with an organic broiler production system keeping slow growing broilers in the Netherlands, both managed by one person working a full time year (Full Time Equivalent, FTE). This comparison was based on a quantification of economic, ecological and social indicators. Indicators were quantified using scientific literature and national data sets. 2. The organic system performed better for the economic indicator net farm income per FTE than the conventional system. 3. Regarding ecological indicators, calculations showed a higher on-farm emission of ammonia per kg live weight for the organic system. Moreover, an organic system includes a higher risk for eutrophication per ha due to outdoor access. Emission of green house gasses, use of fossil fuels and use of land required for the production of one kg of live weight is higher for an organic than for a conventional system. This is mainly due to a lower feed conversion in organic production and use of organic feed. 4. The organic system performed better than the conventional system for the social indicators related to animal welfare time spent on walking, footpad lesions, mortality, and sound legs. Regarding the social indicator food safety was found that meat from an organic system contained less antibiotic residues and Salmonella contaminations but more Campylobacter contaminations than meat from a conventional system. 5. Changing from a conventional to an organic broiler production system, therefore, not only affects animal welfare, but also affects economic, ecological and other social issues. In this study, we ran into the situation that some information needed was lacking in literature and quantifications had to be based upon several sources. Therefore, an integrated on-farm assessment is needed, which can be used to develop a broiler production system that is economically profitable, ecologically sound, and

  10. Unaccustomed eccentric contractions impair plasma K+ regulation in the absence of changes in muscle Na+,K+-ATPase content.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig A Goodman

    Full Text Available The Na+,K+-ATPase (NKA plays a fundamental role in the regulation of skeletal muscle membrane Na+ and K+ gradients, excitability and fatigue during repeated intense contractions. Many studies have investigated the effects of acute concentric exercise on K+ regulation and skeletal muscle NKA, but almost nothing is known about the effects of repeated eccentric contractions. We therefore investigated the effects of unaccustomed maximal eccentric knee extensor contractions on K+ regulation during exercise, peak knee extensor muscle torque, and vastus lateralis muscle NKA content and 3-O-MFPase activity. Torque measurements, muscle biopsies, and venous blood samples were taken before, during and up to 7 days following the contractions in six healthy adults. Eccentric contractions reduced peak isometric muscle torque immediately post-exercise by 26±11% and serum creatine kinase concentration peaked 24 h post-exercise at 339±90 IU/L. During eccentric contractions, plasma [K+] rose during Set 1 and remained elevated at ∼4.9 mM during sets 4-10; this was despite a decline in work output by Set 4, which fell by 18.9% at set 10. The rise in plasma [K+] x work(-1 ratio was elevated over Set 2 from Set 4- Set 10. Eccentric contractions had no effect on muscle NKA content or maximal in-vitro 3-O-MFPase activity immediately post- or up to 7 d post-exercise. The sustained elevation in plasma [K+] despite a decrease in work performed by the knee extensor muscles suggests an impairment in K+ regulation during maximal eccentric contractions, possibly due to increased plasma membrane permeability or to excitation-contraction uncoupling.

  11. What Is Real-World Data? A Review of Definitions Based on Literature and Stakeholder Interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makady, Amr; de Boer, Anthonius; Hillege, Hans; Klungel, Olaf; Goettsch, Wim

    Despite increasing recognition of the value of real-world data (RWD), consensus on the definition of RWD is lacking. To review definitions publicly available for RWD to shed light on similarities and differences between them. A literature review and stakeholder interviews were used to compile data from eight groups of stakeholders. Data from documents and interviews were subjected to coding analysis. Definitions identified were classified into four categories: 1) data collected in a non-randomized controlled trial setting, 2) data collected in a non-interventional/non-controlled setting, 3) data collected in a non-experimental setting, and 4) others (i.e., data that do not fit into the other three categories). The frequency of definitions identified per category was recorded. Fifty-three documents and 20 interviews were assessed. Thirty-eight definitions were identified: 20 out of 38 definitions (53%) were category 1 definitions, 9 (24%) were category 2 definitions, 5 (13%) were category 3 definitions, and 4 (11%) were category 4 definitions. Differences were identified between, and within, definition categories. For example, opinions differed on the aspects of intervention with which non-interventional/non-controlled settings should abide. No definitions were provided in two interviews or identified in 33 documents. Most of the definitions defined RWD as data collected in a non-randomized controlled trial setting. A considerable number of definitions, however, diverged from this concept. Moreover, a significant number of authors and stakeholders did not have an official, institutional definition for RWD. Persisting variability in stakeholder definitions of RWD may lead to disparities among different stakeholders when discussing RWD use in decision making. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The quality and impact of computer supported collaborative learning (CSCL) in radiology case-based learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourdioukova, Elena V; Verstraete, Koenraad L; Valcke, Martin

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this research was to explore (1) clinical years students' perceptions about radiology case-based learning within a computer supported collaborative learning (CSCL) setting, (2) an analysis of the collaborative learning process, and (3) the learning impact of collaborative work on the radiology cases. The first part of this study focuses on a more detailed analysis of a survey study about CSCL based case-based learning, set up in the context of a broader radiology curriculum innovation. The second part centers on a qualitative and quantitative analysis of 52 online collaborative learning discussions from 5th year and nearly graduating medical students. The collaborative work was based on 26 radiology cases regarding musculoskeletal radiology. The analysis of perceptions about collaborative learning on radiology cases reflects a rather neutral attitude that also does not differ significantly in students of different grade levels. Less advanced students are more positive about CSCL as compared to last year students. Outcome evaluation shows a significantly higher level of accuracy in identification of radiology key structures and in radiology diagnosis as well as in linking the radiological signs with available clinical information in nearly graduated students. No significant differences between different grade levels were found in accuracy of using medical terminology. Students appreciate computer supported collaborative learning settings when tackling radiology case-based learning. Scripted computer supported collaborative learning groups proved to be useful for both 5th and 7th year students in view of developing components of their radiology diagnostic approaches. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Contribution of hamstring fatigue to quadriceps inhibition following lumbar extension exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Joseph M; Kerrigan, D Casey; Fritz, Julie M; Saliba, Ethan N; Gansneder, Bruce; Ingersoll, Christopher D

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the contribution of hamstrings and quadriceps fatigue to quadriceps inhibition following lumbar extension exercise. Regression models were calculated consisting of the outcome variable: quadriceps inhibition and predictor variables: change in EMG median frequency in the quadriceps and hamstrings during lumbar fatiguing exercise. Twenty-five subjects with a history of low back pain were matched by gender, height and mass to 25 healthy controls. Subjects performed two sets of fatiguing isometric lumbar extension exercise until mild (set 1) and moderate (set 2) fatigue of the lumbar paraspinals. Quadriceps and hamstring EMG median frequency were measured while subjects performed fatiguing exercise. A burst of electrical stimuli was superimposed while subjects performed an isometric maximal quadriceps contraction to estimate quadriceps inhibition after each exercise set. Results indicate the change in hamstring median frequency explained variance in quadriceps inhibition following the exercise sets in the history of low back pain group only. Change in quadriceps median frequency explained variance in quadriceps inhibition following the first exercise set in the control group only. In conclusion, persons with a history of low back pain whose quadriceps become inhibited following lumbar paraspinal exercise may be adapting to the fatigue by using their hamstring muscles more than controls. Key PointsA neuromuscular relationship between the lumbar paraspinals and quadriceps while performing lumbar extension exercise may be influenced by hamstring muscle fatigue.QI following lumbar extension exercise in persons with a history of LBP group may involve significant contribution from the hamstring muscle group.More hamstring muscle contribution may be a necessary adaptation in the history of LBP group due to weaker and more fatigable lumbar extensors.

  14. A male-specific QTL for social interaction behavior in mice mapped with automated pattern detection by a hidden Markov model incorporated into newly developed freeware.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, Toshiya; Tanave, Akira; Ikeuchi, Shiho; Takahashi, Aki; Kakihara, Satoshi; Kimura, Shingo; Sugimoto, Hiroki; Asada, Nobuhiko; Shiroishi, Toshihiko; Tomihara, Kazuya; Tsuchiya, Takashi; Koide, Tsuyoshi

    2014-08-30

    Owing to their complex nature, social interaction tests normally require the observation of video data by a human researcher, and thus are difficult to use in large-scale studies. We previously established a statistical method, a hidden Markov model (HMM), which enables the differentiation of two social states ("interaction" and "indifference"), and three social states ("sniffing", "following", and "indifference"), automatically in silico. Here, we developed freeware called DuoMouse for the rapid evaluation of social interaction behavior. This software incorporates five steps: (1) settings, (2) video recording, (3) tracking from the video data, (4) HMM analysis, and (5) visualization of the results. Using DuoMouse, we mapped a genetic locus related to social interaction. We previously reported that a consomic strain, B6-Chr6C(MSM), with its chromosome 6 substituted for one from MSM/Ms, showed more social interaction than C57BL/6 (B6). We made four subconsomic strains, C3, C5, C6, and C7, each of which has a shorter segment of chromosome 6 derived from B6-Chr6C, and conducted social interaction tests on these strains. DuoMouse indicated that C6, but not C3, C5, and C7, showed higher interaction, sniffing, and following than B6, specifically in males. The data obtained by human observation showed high concordance to those from DuoMouse. The results indicated that the MSM-derived chromosomal region present in C6-but not in C3, C5, and C7-associated with increased social behavior. This method to analyze social interaction will aid primary screening for difference in social behavior in mice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Situationally-sensitive knowledge translation and relational decision making in hyperacute stroke: a qualitative study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madeleine J Murtagh

    Full Text Available Stroke is a leading cause of disability. Early treatment of acute ischaemic stroke with rtPA reduces the risk of longer term dependency but carries an increased risk of causing immediate bleeding complications. To understand the challenges of knowledge translation and decision making about treatment with rtPA in hyperacute stroke and hence to inform development of appropriate decision support we interviewed patients, their family and health professionals. The emergency setting and the symptomatic effects of hyper-acute stroke shaped the form, content and manner of knowledge translation to support decision making. Decision making about rtPA in hyperacute stroke presented three conundrums for patients, family and clinicians. 1 How to allow time for reflection in a severely time-limited setting. 2 How to facilitate knowledge translation regarding important treatment risks and benefits when patient and family capacity is blunted by the effects and shock of stroke. 3 How to ensure patient and family views are taken into account when the situation produces reliance on the expertise of clinicians. Strategies adopted to meet these conundrums were fourfold: face to face communication; shaping decisions; incremental provision of information; and communication tailored to the individual patient. Relational forms of interaction were understood to engender trust and allay anxiety. Shaping decisions with patients was understood as an expression of confidence by clinicians that helped alleviate anxiety and offered hope and reassurance to patients and their family experiencing the shock of the stroke event. Neutral presentations of information and treatment options promoted uncertainty and contributed to anxiety. 'Drip feeding' information created moments for reflection: clinicians literally made time. Tailoring information to the particular patient and family situation allowed clinicians to account for social and emotional contexts. The principal responses to

  16. OPTICAL POLARIZATION AND SPECTRAL VARIABILITY IN THE M87 JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perlman, Eric S.; Cara, Mihai; Bourque, Matthew; Simons, Raymond C.; Adams, Steven C.; Harris, D. E.; Madrid, Juan P.; Clausen-Brown, Eric; Cheung, C. C.; Stawarz, Lukasz; Georganopoulos, Markos; Sparks, William B.; Biretta, John A.

    2011-01-01

    During the last decade, M87's jet has been the site of an extraordinary variability event, with one knot (HST-1) increasing by over a factor 100 in brightness. Variability has also been seen on timescales of months in the nuclear flux. Here we discuss the optical-UV polarization and spectral variability of these components, which show vastly different behavior. HST-1 shows a highly significant correlation between flux and polarization, with P increasing from ∼20% at minimum to >40% at maximum, while the orientation of its electric vector stayed constant. HST-1's optical-UV spectrum is very hard (α UV-O ∼ 0.5, F ν ∝ν –α ), and displays 'hard lags' during epochs 2004.9-2005.5, including the peak of the flare, with soft lags at later epochs. We interpret the behavior of HST-1 as enhanced particle acceleration in a shock, with cooling from both particle aging and the relaxation of the compression. We set 2σ upper limits of 0.5δ pc and 1.02c on the size and advance speed of the flaring region. The slight deviation of the electric vector orientation from the jet position angle (P.A.) makes it likely that on smaller scales the flaring region has either a double or twisted structure. By contrast, the nucleus displays much more rapid variability, with a highly variable electric vector orientation and 'looping' in the (I, P) plane. The nucleus has a much steeper spectrum (α UV-O ∼ 1.5) but does not show UV-optical spectral variability. Its behavior can be interpreted as either a helical distortion to a steady jet or a shock propagating through a helical jet.

  17. Intergroup Cooperation in Common Pool Resource Dilemmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadowski, Jathan; Spierre, Susan G; Selinger, Evan; Seager, Thomas P; Adams, Elizabeth A; Berardy, Andrew

    2015-10-01

    Fundamental problems of environmental sustainability, including climate change and fisheries management, require collective action on a scale that transcends the political and cultural boundaries of the nation-state. Rational, self-interested neoclassical economic theories of human behavior predict tragedy in the absence of third party enforcement of agreements and practical difficulties that prevent privatization. Evolutionary biology offers a theory of cooperation, but more often than not in a context of discrimination against other groups. That is, in-group boundaries are necessarily defined by those excluded as members of out-groups. However, in some settings human's exhibit behavior that is inconsistent with both rational economic and group driven cooperation of evolutionary biological theory. This paper reports the results of a non-cooperative game-theoretic exercise that models a tragedy of the commons problem in which groups of players may advance their own positions only at the expense of other groups. Students enrolled from multiple universities and assigned to different multi-university identity groups participated in experiments that repeatedly resulted in cooperative outcomes despite intergroup conflicts and expressions of group identity. We offer three possible explanations: (1) students were cooperative because they were in an academic setting; (2) students may have viewed their instructors as the out-group; or (3) the emergence of a small number of influential, ethical leaders is sufficient to ensure cooperation amongst the larger groups. From our data and analysis, we draw out lessons that may help to inform approaches for institutional design and policy negotiations, particularly in climate change management.

  18. Multidetector helical CT plus superparamagnetic iron oxide-enhanced MR imaging for focal hepatic lesions in cirrhotic liver: A comparison with multi-phase CT during hepatic arteriography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yukisawa, Seigo; Okugawa, Hidehiro; Masuya, Yoshio; Okabe, Shinichirou; Fukuda, Hiroyuki; Yoshikawa, Masaharu; Ebara, Masaaki; Saisho, Hiromitsu

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate multidetector helical computed tomography (MDCT), superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO)-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and CT arterial portography (CTAP) and CT during hepatic arteriography (CTHA) for the detection and diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC). This included visual correlations of MDCT and SPIO-MR imaging in the detection of HCC using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Twenty-five patients with 57 nodular HCCs were retrospectively analyzed. A total of 200 segments, including 49 segments with 57 HCCs, were reviewed independently by three observers. Each observer read four sets of images (set 1, MDCT; set 2, unenhanced and SPIO-enhanced MR images; set 3, combined MDCT and SPIO-enhanced MR images; set 4, combined CTAP and CTHA). The mean Az values representing the diagnostic accuracy for HCCs of sets 1, 2, 3, and 4 were 0.777, 0.814, 0.849, and 0.911, respectively, and there was no significant difference between sets 3 and 4. The sensitivity of set 4 was significantly higher than those of set 3 for all the lesions and for lesions 10 mm or smaller (p < 0.05); however, for lesions larger than 10 mm, the sensitivities of the two sets were similar. No significant difference in positive predictive value and specificity was observed between set 3 and set 4. Combined MDCT and SPIO-enhanced MR imaging may obviate the need for more invasive CTAP and CTHA for the pre-therapeutic evaluation of patients with HCC more than 10 mm

  19. Coastal Carbon Dynamics as a New Chapter in SOCCR2: Tidal Wetlands and Estuaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windham-Myers, L.; Megonigal, P.; Cai, W. J.; Hopkinson, C.; Wang, A. Z.; Andersson, A. J.; Hinson, A.; Lagomasino, D.; Peteet, D. M.; Giri, C. P.; Howard, J.; Tang, J.; Crosswell, J.; Martin Hernandez-Ayon, J. M.; Dunton, K. H.; Kroeger, K. D.; Paulsen, M. L.; Allison, M. A.; Siedlecki, S. A.; Alin, S. R.; Hu, X.; Tzortziou, M.; Najjar, R.; Schafer, K. V.; Watson, E.; Pidgeon, E.

    2016-12-01

    Estuaries and tidal wetlands have been identified as distinct landscape elements for carbon cycling, worthy of a chapter in the pending State of the Carbon Cycle Report - version 2. Despite relatively small aerial coverage compared to other subsystems, tidal wetlands and estuaries have the greatest influence on carbon dynamics of any coastal ocean subsystem. As conduits that filter all material passing between land and the sea, they also exhibit the highest transfer rates of CO2 with the atmosphere of any of the coastal ocean subsystems. Carbon dynamics in estuaries and wetlands are constantly changing, reflecting geomorphic and ecological responses to long and short-term perturbations in external drivers such as sea-level rise, climate change, nutrient loading and land-use change. The influence of these drivers are profound in coastal systems, often more so than in inland wetlands or open ocean environments, and thus require distinct attention to patterns and processes associated with coastal ecosystem functioning, including carbon sequestration services in tidal wetland soils. This new chapter focusses on data sources available in North America to: (1) assess the current state of carbon stocks and fluxes in coastal settings, (2) document understanding of drivers associated with significant fluxes and stocks, and (3) synthesize carbon dynamics from a global context to regional perspectives (East, West, Gulf and high-latitude coastlines). Insights from remote sensing, in situ field data, and numerical models have advanced our ability to monitor and project carbon cycling in this dynamic and narrow fringe at the land-ocean interface. This synthetic chapter will address how these advances can help in decision making, as well as address remaining gaps in our knowledge and monitoring capabilities for these diverse and productive habitats.

  20. Towards a contemporary, comprehensive scoring system for determining technical outcomes of hybrid percutaneous chronic total occlusion treatment: The RECHARGE score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeremans, Joren; Spratt, James C; Knaapen, Paul; Walsh, Simon; Agostoni, Pierfrancesco; Wilson, William; Avran, Alexandre; Faurie, Benjamin; Bressollette, Erwan; Kayaert, Peter; Bagnall, Alan J; Smith, Dave; McEntegart, Margaret B; Smith, William H T; Kelly, Paul; Irving, John; Smith, Elliot J; Strange, Julian W; Dens, Jo

    2018-02-01

    This study sought to create a contemporary scoring tool to predict technical outcomes of chronic total occlusion (CTO) percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) from patients treated by hybrid operators with differing experience levels. Current scoring systems need regular updating to cope with the positive evolutions regarding materials, techniques, and outcomes, while at the same time being applicable for a broad range of operators. Clinical and angiographic characteristics from 880 CTO-PCIs included in the REgistry of CrossBoss and Hybrid procedures in FrAnce, the NetheRlands, BelGium and UnitEd Kingdom (RECHARGE) were analyzed by using a derivation and validation set (2:1 ratio). Variables significantly associated with technical failure in the multivariable analysis were incorporated in the score. Subsequently, the discriminatory capacity was assessed and the validation set was used to compare with the J-CTO score and PROGRESS scores. Technical success in the derivation and validation sets was 83% and 85%, respectively. Multivariate analysis identified six parameters associated with technical failure: blunt stump (beta coefficient (b) = 1.014); calcification (b = 0.908); tortuosity ≥45° (b = 0.964); lesion length 20 mm (b = 0.556); diseased distal landing zone (b = 0.794), and previous bypass graft on CTO vessel (b = 0.833). Score variables remained significant after bootstrapping. The RECHARGE score showed better discriminatory capacity in both sets (area-under-the-curve (AUC) = 0.783 and 0.711), compared to the J-CTO (AUC = 0.676) and PROGRESS (AUC = 0.608) scores. The RECHARGE score is a novel, easy-to-use tool for assessing the risk for technical failure in hybrid CTO-PCI and has the potential to perform well for a broad community of operators. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Community Hospital of the Assumption, Thurles, Tipperary.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moorhead, Anne

    2011-03-31

    Abstract Background Health professionals working in primary care and public health have opportunities to address body weight status issues with their patients through face-to-face contact. The objectives of this all-Ireland project are: 1. to assess the attitudes, current practices\\/behaviours and knowledge of key health professional groups on body weight status; 2. to assess the health professional groups\\' ability to identify body weight status in both adults and children. The health professional groups are: (a) community related public health nurses; (b) school public health nurses; (c) GPs and practice nurses (primary care); and (d) occupational health nurses (workplace) from both Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland. Methods\\/Design This all-Ireland multi-disciplinary project follows a mixed methods approach using both quantitative and qualitative methodologies, and consists of four components: 1. Literature review - to explore the role of health professionals in managing obesity through spontaneous intervention in a variety of health promotion settings. 2. Telephone interviews and focus groups - to gain an in-depth insight into the views of health professionals in assessing body weight status. 3. Survey (primarily online but also paper-based) - to determine the attitudes, current practices\\/behaviours and knowledge of health professionals in assessing body weight status. 4. Online evaluation study - an online interactive programme will be developed to assess health professionals\\' ability to identify the body weight status of adults and children. Discussion This project will assess and report the attitudes, current practices\\/behaviours and knowledge of key health professional groups within Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland on body weight status, and their ability to identify body weight status in both adults and children. The results of this project will generate recommendations for clinical practice in managing obesity, which may

  2. Evaluating methods for estimating home ranges using GPS collars: A comparison using proboscis monkeys (Nasalis larvatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Danica J; Vaughan, Ian P; Ramirez Saldivar, Diana A; Nathan, Senthilvel K S S; Goossens, Benoit

    2017-01-01

    The development of GPS tags for tracking wildlife has revolutionised the study of home ranges, habitat use and behaviour. Concomitantly, there have been rapid developments in methods for estimating habitat use from GPS data. In combination, these changes can cause challenges in choosing the best methods for estimating home ranges. In primatology, this issue has received little attention, as there have been few GPS collar-based studies to date. However, as advancing technology is making collaring studies more feasible, there is a need for the analysis to advance alongside the technology. Here, using a high quality GPS collaring data set from 10 proboscis monkeys (Nasalis larvatus), we aimed to: 1) compare home range estimates from the most commonly used method in primatology, the grid-cell method, with three recent methods designed for large and/or temporally correlated GPS data sets; 2) evaluate how well these methods identify known physical barriers (e.g. rivers); and 3) test the robustness of the different methods to data containing either less frequent or random losses of GPS fixes. Biased random bridges had the best overall performance, combining a high level of agreement between the raw data and estimated utilisation distribution with a relatively low sensitivity to reduced fixed frequency or loss of data. It estimated the home range of proboscis monkeys to be 24-165 ha (mean 80.89 ha). The grid-cell method and approaches based on local convex hulls had some advantages including simplicity and excellent barrier identification, respectively, but lower overall performance. With the most suitable model, or combination of models, it is possible to understand more fully the patterns, causes, and potential consequences that disturbances could have on an animal, and accordingly be used to assist in the management and restoration of degraded landscapes.

  3. Evaluating methods for estimating home ranges using GPS collars: A comparison using proboscis monkeys (Nasalis larvatus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danica J Stark

    Full Text Available The development of GPS tags for tracking wildlife has revolutionised the study of home ranges, habitat use and behaviour. Concomitantly, there have been rapid developments in methods for estimating habitat use from GPS data. In combination, these changes can cause challenges in choosing the best methods for estimating home ranges. In primatology, this issue has received little attention, as there have been few GPS collar-based studies to date. However, as advancing technology is making collaring studies more feasible, there is a need for the analysis to advance alongside the technology. Here, using a high quality GPS collaring data set from 10 proboscis monkeys (Nasalis larvatus, we aimed to: 1 compare home range estimates from the most commonly used method in primatology, the grid-cell method, with three recent methods designed for large and/or temporally correlated GPS data sets; 2 evaluate how well these methods identify known physical barriers (e.g. rivers; and 3 test the robustness of the different methods to data containing either less frequent or random losses of GPS fixes. Biased random bridges had the best overall performance, combining a high level of agreement between the raw data and estimated utilisation distribution with a relatively low sensitivity to reduced fixed frequency or loss of data. It estimated the home range of proboscis monkeys to be 24-165 ha (mean 80.89 ha. The grid-cell method and approaches based on local convex hulls had some advantages including simplicity and excellent barrier identification, respectively, but lower overall performance. With the most suitable model, or combination of models, it is possible to understand more fully the patterns, causes, and potential consequences that disturbances could have on an animal, and accordingly be used to assist in the management and restoration of degraded landscapes.

  4. School food environments associated with adiposity in Canadian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, C; Datta, G D; Henderson, M; Gray-Donald, K; Kestens, Y; Barnett, T A

    2017-07-01

    Targeting obesogenic features of children's environment that are amenable to change represents a promising strategy for health promotion. The school food environment, defined as the services and policies regarding nutrition and the availability of food in the school and surrounding neighborhood, is particularly important given that students travel through the school neighborhood almost daily and that they consume a substantial proportion of their calories at school. As part of the Quebec Adipose and Lifestyle Investigation in Youth (QUALITY) cohort study, we assessed features of school indoor dietary environment and the surrounding school neighborhoods, when children were aged 8-10 years (2005-2008). School principals reported on food practices and policies within the schools. The density of convenience stores and fast-food outlets surrounding the school was computed using a Geographical Information System. Indicators of school neighborhood deprivation were derived from census data. Adiposity outcomes were measured in a clinical setting 2 years later, when participants were aged 10-12 years (2008-2011). We conducted cluster analyses to identify school food environment types. Associations between school types and adiposity were estimated in linear regression models. Cluster analysis identified three school types with distinct food environments. Schools were characterized as: overall healthful (45%); a healthful food environment in the surrounding neighborhood, but an unhealthful indoor food environment (22%); or overall unhealthful (33%). Less healthful schools were located in more deprived neighborhoods and were associated with greater child adiposity. Despite regulatory efforts to improve school food environments, there is substantial inequity in dietary environments across schools. Ensuring healthful indoor and outdoor food environments across schools should be included in comprehensive efforts to reduce obesity-related health disparities.

  5. Reduced saphenous vein prostacyclin production in the absence of endothelial detachment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Caterina, R.; Cruz-Bracho, M.R.; Alonso, D.R.; Subramanian, V.A.; Weksler, B.B.

    1988-01-01

    High-potassium cardioplegic solutions have been suspected of inducing vascular damage at coronary bypass surgery. In this study the authors compared prostacyclin production and endothelial morphology in saphenous vein segments perfused either with cardioplegic solutions with a potassium concentration of 20, 40 and 80 mEq/1, or with a control buffer (1) at 4 grade centigrades for 30 min; (2) at 37 grade centigrades for 15 min; (3) at 37 grade centigrades for 15 min after the addition of arachidonic acid. Prostacyclin production (6-keto-PGF 1α , pg/ml cm 2 endothelial surface area) in control treated segments was a function of temperature and of substrute availability, being (mean±SEM) 62.4±8.2 in setting (1); 309±34.7 in setting (2); and 1515.4±205.2 in setting (3). Cardioplegic solution containing 20 mEq/1 potassium did not alter prostacyclin production in any of these settings, whereas exposure of tissue to the 40 mEq/1 potassium solution decreased prostacyclin production in setting (21) and (2), and the solution containing 80 mEq/1 potassium decreased prostacyclin production in all three experimental conditions. Absence of endothelial detachment in all experimental settings was documented by immunoperoxidase staining of vascular cross-sections for the specific endothelial marker Factor VIII - related antigen and staining of ''en face'' preparations of endothelial surface with silver nitrate and silver nitrate-hematoxylin. These data indicate that cardioplegic solutions with a potassium concentration equal or greater than 40 mEq/1 can induce morphologically silent endothelial damage manifested by decreased prostacyclin production. The use of these solutions may predispose to possible thrombogenicity after coronary bypass surgery

  6. Continuous Glucose Monitoring: A Review of Successes, Challenges, and Opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodbard, David

    2016-02-01

    Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) provides information unattainable by intermittent capillary blood glucose, including instantaneous real-time display of glucose level and rate of change of glucose, alerts and alarms for actual or impending hypo- and hyperglycemia, "24/7" coverage, and the ability to characterize glycemic variability. Progressively more accurate and precise, reasonably unobtrusive, small, comfortable, user-friendly devices connect to the Internet to share information and are sine qua non for a closed-loop artificial pancreas. CGM can inform, educate, motivate, and alert people with diabetes. CGM is medically indicated for patients with frequent, severe, or nocturnal hypoglycemia, especially in the presence of hypoglycemia unawareness. Surprisingly, despite tremendous advances, utilization of CGM has remained fairly limited to date. Barriers to use have included the following: (1) lack of Food and Drug Administration approval, to date, for insulin dosing ("nonadjuvant use") in the United States and for use in hospital and intensive care unit settings; (2) cost and variable reimbursement; (3) need for recalibrations; (4) periodic replacement of sensors; (5) day-to-day variability in glycemic patterns, which can limit the predictability of findings based on retrospective, masked "professional" use; (6) time, implicit costs, and inconvenience for uploading of data for retrospective analysis; (7) lack of fair and reasonable reimbursement for physician time; (8) inexperience and lack of training of physicians and other healthcare professionals regarding interpretation of CGM results; (9) lack of standardization of software methods for analysis of CGM data; and (10) need for professional medical organizations to develop and disseminate additional clinical practice guidelines regarding the role of CGM. Ongoing advances in technology and clinical research have addressed several of these barriers. Use of CGM in conjunction with an insulin pump with

  7. Fitness of Mass-Reared Males of Anastrepha obliqua (Diptera: Tephritidae) Resulting From Mating Competition Tests in Field Cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Emilio; Liedo, Pablo; Toledo, Jorge; Montoya, Pablo; Perales, Hugo; Ruiz-Montoya, Lorena

    2017-12-05

    The sterile insect technique uses males that have been mass-reared in a controlled environment. The insects, once released in the field, must compete to mate. However, the mass-rearing condition supposes a loss of fitness that will be noticeable by wild females. To compare the fitness of wild males and mass-reared males, three competition settings were established. In setting 1, wild males, mass-reared males and wild females were released in field cages. In setting 2, wild females and wild males were released without competition, and in setting 3, mass-reared males and mass-reared females were also released without competition. Male fitness was based on their mating success, fecundity, weight and longevity. The fitness of the females was measured based on weight and several demographic parameters. The highest percentage of mating was between wild males and wild females between 0800 and 0900 h in the competition condition, while the mass-reared males started one hour later. The successful wild males weighed more and showed longer mating times, greater longevity and a higher number of matings than the mass-reared males. Although the mass-reared males showed the lowest percentage of matings, their fecundity when mating with wild females indicated a high fitness. Since the survival and fecundity of wild females that mated with mass-reared males decreased to become similar to those of mass-reared females that mated with mass-reared males, females seem to be influenced by the type of male (wild or mass-reared). © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Adoption Of Small Family Norms In A Rural Community Of West Bengal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biswas A.K

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Research Questions: 1. To what extent do rural eligible couples accept the small family norm? 2. What are the factors which influence the adoption of small family norm by these couples? Objectives: 1. To determine the extent of adoption of small norm among family planning service acceptors (2 To identify factors influencing adoption of small family norm. Study Design: Cross sectional Study Setting: 2 villages- a PHC village and one 5 kms away of Block Sonarpur. Participants: 312 eligible couples of these villages. Study Variables: Socio â€" economics status, literacy of the wives, type of family, religion, number of children, type of family planning method. Outcome Variables: Prevalence of contraceptive method use, reasons for not using family planning methods. Statistical Analysis: Proportions Results : The prevalence of contraceptive use was 44.9% but the Effective Couple Protection Rate was only 20.5% and the Crude Birth Rate was still high (35/1000. This was because 40% of the couples had more then 2 children and of them 38% were still exposed to the risk of conception. Muslim couples had a lower contraceptive acceptance rate than Hindu couples. The more literate the wife, the greater the acceptance of the small family norm. Male preference pressure from elders and fear about contraception were the main reasons for non acceptance of family planning methods: The health teams were the main source of information to these couples. Recommendations: There is an urgent need to increase the emphasis on the 2 child family norm. The IEC activities of the health team should be strengthened.

  9. A Framework for the Development and Interpretation of Different Sepsis Definitions and Clinical Criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angus, Derek C; Seymour, Christopher W; Coopersmith, Craig M; Deutschman, Clifford S; Klompas, Michael; Levy, Mitchell M; Martin, Gregory S; Osborn, Tiffany M; Rhee, Chanu; Watson, R Scott

    2016-03-01

    Although sepsis was described more than 2,000 years ago, and clinicians still struggle to define it, there is no "gold standard," and multiple competing approaches and terms exist. Challenges include the ever-changing knowledge base that informs our understanding of sepsis, competing views on which aspects of any potential definition are most important, and the tendency of most potential criteria to be distributed in at-risk populations in such a way as to hinder separation into discrete sets of patients. We propose that the development and evaluation of any definition or diagnostic criteria should follow four steps: 1) define the epistemologic underpinning, 2) agree on all relevant terms used to frame the exercise, 3) state the intended purpose for any proposed set of criteria, and 4) adopt a scientific approach to inform on their usefulness with regard to the intended purpose. Usefulness can be measured across six domains: 1) reliability (stability of criteria during retesting, between raters, over time, and across settings), 2) content validity (similar to face validity), 3) construct validity (whether criteria measure what they purport to measure), 4) criterion validity (how new criteria fare compared to standards), 5) measurement burden (cost, safety, and complexity), and 6) timeliness (whether criteria are available concurrent with care decisions). The relative importance of these domains of usefulness depends on the intended purpose, of which there are four broad categories: 1) clinical care, 2) research, 3) surveillance, and 4) quality improvement and audit. This proposed methodologic framework is intended to aid understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of different approaches, provide a mechanism for explaining differences in epidemiologic estimates generated by different approaches, and guide the development of future definitions and diagnostic criteria.

  10. Diagnostic imaging of limbs in children with acute leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Yingru; Li Chenhui; Li Guo; Ye Wei; Huang Zhongkui; Long Liling; Luo Jianming

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate X-ray and MRI features of limbs in childhood acute leukemia. Methods: Thirteen children with acute leukemia in our pediatric hematology ward were recruited. All patients were pathologically diagnosed by bone marrow aspiration and complained of bone or joint pain in the first visit. Conventional X-ray and MRI examinations of algesic sites were performed before clinical treatment and after complete remission. MR images were obtained with SE-T 1 WI, SE-T 2 WI and T 2 WI-fat suppressed sequences and symmetrical bilateralism was requested while scanning. X-ray and MRI manifestations were evaluated and compared. Results: All 13 patients had received X-ray examinations. Among them, 6 had normal X-ray findings, whereas the other 7 (14 sites) showed various abnormalities including radiolucent metaphyseal bands (5 sites), periosteal reaction (3 sites), osteapenia (2 sites), mixed lesions (lysis- sclerosis, 1 site), and permeative pattern (3 sites). The number of patients for MRI examinations was 8 (11 sites). Among them, 6 (9 sites) showed bone marrow infiltration and bone marrow necrosis accompanied by normal X-ray findings, another 2 (2 sites) showed bone marrow infiltration associated with radiographic abnormalities of periosteal reaction and radiolucent metaphyseal bands. Four cases were followed up within 1 week when reached complete remission by chemotherapy. MR images features included reduced sizes of bone marrow infiltration lesions associated with increased signal intensity on T 1 WI, and disappearance of double-line sign on bone marrow necrosis accompanied by signal homogenization. However, the radiograph before and after treatment in the same cases did not differ significantly. Conclusions: MRI was earlier and more comprehensive in showing limbs bone marrow abnormality than radiogram in acute leukemia children with chief complaint of osteoarticular pains. MRI might be one of indicators in following up therapeutic effect for AL children with osteoarticular disorder. (authors)

  11. Thermohydromechanical stability analysis upon joint characteristics and depth variations in the region of an underground repository for the study of a disposal concept of high level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jhin Wung; Bae, Dae Suk; Kang, Chul Hyung; Choi, Jong Won

    2003-02-01

    The objective of the present study is to understand a long term(500 years) thermohydromechanical interaction behavior in the vicinity of a repository cavern upon joint location and repository depth variations, and then, to contribute to the development of a disposal concept. The model includes a saturated rock mass, PWR spent fuels in a disposal canister surrounded by compacted bentonite inside a deposition hole, and mixed bentonite backfilled in the rest of the space within a cavern. It is assumed that two joint sets exist within a model. A joint set 1 includes 56 .deg. dip joints, 20m spaced, and a joint set 2 is in the direction perpendicular to a joint set 1 and includes 34 .deg. dip joints, 20m spaced. In order to understand the behavior change upon joint location variations, 5 different models of 500m depth are analyzed, and additional 3 different models of 1km depth are analyzed to understand the effect of a depth variation. The two dimensional distinct element code, UDEC is used for the analysis. To understand the joint behavior adjacent to a repository cavern, Barton-Bandis joint model is used. Effect of the decay heat for PWR spent fuels on a repository model is analyzed, and a steady state algorithm is used for a hydraulic analysis. According to the thermohydromechanical interaction behavior of a repository model upon variations of joint locations and a repository depth, during the period of 500 years from waste emplacement, the effect of a depth variation on the stress and displacement behavior of a model is comparatively smaller than the effect of decay heat from radioactive materials. From the study of the joint location variation effect, it is advisable not to locate an underground opening in the region very close to the joint crossings

  12. Does alcohol affect memory for emotional and non-emotional experiences in different ways?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, S K Z; Duka, T

    2004-03-01

    Alcohol has been shown to have both impairing and facilitating effects on memory, depending on the sequencing of learning and ingestion of the drug. Its effects on memory for emotional material, however, have not been shown reliably. The current experiment sought to investigate the effects of alcohol on later recall of emotional and neutral events experienced before and after alcohol drinking. Using an incidental-learning paradigm, alcohol (0.65 g/kg) or placebo was administered in a double-blind randomized design to 34 participants, between two learning phases in which they viewed and rated positive, negative and neutral images. The drug's effects on memory were assessed in a surprise test of free recall. In addition, impact of alcohol on ratings of mood states, and of valence and arousal that the pictures evoked, was examined. Alcohol facilitated memory for material seen before, and impaired memory for material seen after, its administration. Furthermore, under alcohol, emotional images in the first set were more recalled over neutral than in the second set, indicating a higher retrograde facilitation for emotional than for neutral material. Alcohol improved positive mood states but had no effect on negative mood states. Evaluation of pictures with regard to valence showed an increase of the ratings for the positive and neutral images after alcohol and a decrease after placebo. No drug effects were found for arousal ratings. Whether a picture was likely to be remembered or not (tested only for set 2) was dependent on the intensity of the arousal but not of the valence that the picture evoked in the participants. Pictures that were rated high in arousal were also remembered better, and this effect was irrespective of alcohol or placebo ingestion. These data have shown that alcohol elicits retrograde facilitation and anterograde impairment for emotional materials. Furthermore, these data demonstrate that alcohol selectively facilitates memories for emotional events

  13. Numerical simulation of the manual operation of the charging/discharging machine (MID) control desk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doca, C; Dobre, A

    2004-01-01

    Since the year 2000 at 7th Division TAR of Institute for Nuclear Research - Pitesti continuous efforts were made to implement a software product package devoted to numerical simulation of operations at the test bench of charging/discharging machine (MID). Till now there were specified, designed, worked out and implemented on a computer the PUPITRU code, the present version fulfilling the following requirements: - graphical output specific for the computer/human operator interface: - design at a 1 : 4 scale for each of the 25 drawers of the control desk; - graphical and functional simulation of all the physical objects mounted in these drawers, namely: 12 measuring analog instruments with linear and non-linear dials (ampermeters), 21 measuring digital instruments (voltmeters), 24 two up/down settings switches, 13 switches with three up/down settings, 23 switches with two left/right hand settings, one switch with three left/right hand settings, one switch with four left/right hand settings, 2 switches with five left/right hand settings, 68, 16, 23, 53, 81 signaling lamps of white, yellow, orange, red and green light, respectively; implementation in the frame of PUPITRU code of the main notations used in the automation schemes in the execution design of the control desk, in view of a quick identification of the physical objects: switches, lamps, instruments, etc. ; - implementation in the frame of PUPITRU code of the full database (mnemonics and numerical values) used in the frame of MID tests; - implementation of over 1000 equations of numerical simulation appropriate to the situations characteristic for test bench and MID operation. At the moment, the final functional simulation for all the control desk components is finalized. In this paper a description and a demonstration run of the PUPITRU code is presented. (authors)

  14. An evaluation of the psychometric properties of the Purdue Pharmacist Directive Guidance Scale using SPSS and R software packages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marr-Lyon, Lisa R; Gupchup, Gireesh V; Anderson, Joe R

    2012-01-01

    The Purdue Pharmacist Directive Guidance (PPDG) Scale was developed to assess patients' perceptions of the level of pharmacist-provided (1) instruction and (2) feedback and goal-setting-2 aspects of pharmaceutical care. Calculations of its psychometric properties stemming from SPSS and R were similar, but distinct differences were apparent. Using SPSS and R software packages, researchers aimed to examine the construct validity of the PPDG using a higher order factoring procedure; in tandem, McDonald's omega and Cronbach's alpha were calculated as means of reliability analyses. Ninety-nine patients with either type I or type II diabetes, aged 18 years or older, able to read and write English, and who could provide written-informed consent participated in the study. Data were collected in 8 community pharmacies in New Mexico. Using R, (1) a principal axis factor analysis with promax (oblique) rotation was conducted, (2) a Schmid-Leiman transformation was attained, and (3) McDonald's omega and Cronbach's alpha were computed. Using SPSS, subscale findings were validated by conducting a principal axis factor analysis with promax rotation; strict parallels and Cronbach's alpha reliabilities were calculated. McDonald's omega and Cronbach's alpha were robust, with coefficients greater than 0.90; principal axis factor analysis with promax rotation revealed construct similarities with an overall general factor emerging from R. Further subjecting the PPDG to rigorous psychometric testing revealed stronger quantitative support of the overall general factor of directive guidance and subscales of instruction and feedback and goal-setting. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Person-Centered Care in the Home Setting for Parkinson’s Disease: Operation House Call Quality of Care Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nawaz Hack

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. (1 To evaluate the feasibility of implementing and evaluating a home visit program for persons with Parkinson’s disease (PD in a rural setting. (2 To have movement disorders fellows coordinate and manage health care delivery. Background. The University of Florida, Center for Movement Disorders and Neurorestoration established Operation House Call to serve patients with PD who could not otherwise afford to travel to an expert center or to pay for medical care. PD is known to lead to significant disability, frequent hospitalization, early nursing home placement, and morbidity. Methods. This was designed as a quality improvement project. Movement disorders fellows travelled to the home(s of underserved PD patients and coordinated their clinical care. The diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease was confirmed using standardized criteria, and the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale was performed and best treatment practices were delivered. Results. All seven patients have been followed up longitudinally every 3 to 6 months in the home setting, and they remain functional and independent. None of the patients have been hospitalized for PD related complications. Each patient has a new updatable electronic medical record. All Operation House Call cases are presented during video rounds for the interdisciplinary PD team to make recommendations for care (neurology, neurosurgery, neuropsychology, psychiatry, physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy, and social work. One Operation House Call patient has successfully received deep brain stimulation (DBS. Conclusion. This program is a pilot program that has demonstrated that it is possible to provide person-centered care in the home setting for PD patients. This program could provide a proof of concept for the construction of a larger visiting physician or nurse program.

  16. A Disciplined Architectural Approach to Scaling Data Analysis for Massive, Scientific Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crichton, D. J.; Braverman, A. J.; Cinquini, L.; Turmon, M.; Lee, H.; Law, E.

    2014-12-01

    Data collections across remote sensing and ground-based instruments in astronomy, Earth science, and planetary science are outpacing scientists' ability to analyze them. Furthermore, the distribution, structure, and heterogeneity of the measurements themselves pose challenges that limit the scalability of data analysis using traditional approaches. Methods for developing science data processing pipelines, distribution of scientific datasets, and performing analysis will require innovative approaches that integrate cyber-infrastructure, algorithms, and data into more systematic approaches that can more efficiently compute and reduce data, particularly distributed data. This requires the integration of computer science, machine learning, statistics and domain expertise to identify scalable architectures for data analysis. The size of data returned from Earth Science observing satellites and the magnitude of data from climate model output, is predicted to grow into the tens of petabytes challenging current data analysis paradigms. This same kind of growth is present in astronomy and planetary science data. One of the major challenges in data science and related disciplines defining new approaches to scaling systems and analysis in order to increase scientific productivity and yield. Specific needs include: 1) identification of optimized system architectures for analyzing massive, distributed data sets; 2) algorithms for systematic analysis of massive data sets in distributed environments; and 3) the development of software infrastructures that are capable of performing massive, distributed data analysis across a comprehensive data science framework. NASA/JPL has begun an initiative in data science to address these challenges. Our goal is to evaluate how scientific productivity can be improved through optimized architectural topologies that identify how to deploy and manage the access, distribution, computation, and reduction of massive, distributed data, while

  17. Challenge problem and milestones for : Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Wang, Yifeng; Howard, Robert; McNeish, Jerry A.; Schultz, Peter Andrew; Arguello, Jose Guadalupe, Jr.

    2010-09-01

    This report describes the specification of a challenge problem and associated challenge milestones for the Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC) supporting the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Campaign. The NEAMS challenge problems are designed to demonstrate proof of concept and progress towards IPSC goals. The goal of the Waste IPSC is to develop an integrated suite of modeling and simulation capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive waste storage or disposal system. The Waste IPSC will provide this simulation capability (1) for a range of disposal concepts, waste form types, engineered repository designs, and geologic settings, (2) for a range of time scales and distances, (3) with appropriate consideration of the inherent uncertainties, and (4) in accordance with robust verification, validation, and software quality requirements. To demonstrate proof of concept and progress towards these goals and requirements, a Waste IPSC challenge problem is specified that includes coupled thermal-hydrologic-chemical-mechanical (THCM) processes that describe (1) the degradation of a borosilicate glass waste form and the corresponding mobilization of radionuclides (i.e., the processes that produce the radionuclide source term), (2) the associated near-field physical and chemical environment for waste emplacement within a salt formation, and (3) radionuclide transport in the near field (i.e., through the engineered components - waste form, waste package, and backfill - and the immediately adjacent salt). The initial details of a set of challenge milestones that collectively comprise the full challenge problem are also specified.

  18. Volatility of organic aerosol and its components in the Megacity of Paris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paciga, A.; Karnezi, E.; Kostenidou, E.; Hildebrandt, L.; Psichoudaki, M.; Engelhart, G. J.; Lee, B.-H.; Crippa, M.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Baltensperger, U.; Pandis, S. N.

    2015-08-01

    Using a mass transfer model and the volatility basis set, we estimate the volatility distribution for the organic aerosol (OA) components during summer and winter in Paris, France as part of the collaborative project MEGAPOLI. The concentrations of the OA components as a function of temperature were measured combining data from a thermodenuder and an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) with Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) analysis. The hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) had similar volatility distributions for the summer and winter campaigns with half of the material in the saturation concentration bin of 10 μg m-3 and another 35-40 % consisting of low and extremely low volatility organic compounds (LVOCs and ELVOCs, respectively). The winter cooking OA (COA) was more than an order of magnitude less volatile than the summer COA. The low volatility oxygenated OA (LV-OOA) factor detected in the summer had the lowest volatility of all the derived factors and consisted almost exclusively of ELVOCs. The volatility for the semi-volatile oxygenated OA (SV-OOA) was significantly higher than that of the LV-OOA, containing both semi-volatile organic components (SVOCs) and LVOCs. The oxygenated OA (OOA) factor in winter consisted of SVOCs (45 %), LVOCs (25 %) and ELVOCs (30 %). The volatility of marine OA (MOA) was higher than that of the other factors containing around 60 % SVOCs. The biomass burning OA (BBOA) factor contained components with a wide range of volatilities with significant contributions from both SVOCs (50 %) and LVOCs (30 %). Finally, combining the O : C ratio and volatility distributions of the various factors, we incorporated our results into the two-dimensional volatility basis set (2D-VBS). Our results show that the factors cover a broad spectrum of volatilities with no direct link between the average volatility and average O : C of the OA components. Agreement between our findings and previous publications is encouraging for our understanding of the

  19. Is There Variation in Procedural Utilization for Lumbar Spine Disorders Between a Fee-for-Service and Salaried Healthcare System?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Andrew J; Makanji, Heeren; Jiang, Wei; Koehlmoos, Tracey; Bono, Christopher M; Haider, Adil H

    2017-12-01

    Whether compensation for professional services drives the use of those services is an important question that has not been answered in a robust manner. Specifically, there is a growing concern that spine care practitioners may preferentially choose more costly or invasive procedures in a fee-for-service system, irrespective of the underlying lumbar disorder being treated. (1) Were proportions of interbody fusions higher in the fee-for-service setting as opposed to the salaried Department of Defense setting? (2) Were the odds of interbody fusion increased in a fee-for-service setting after controlling for indications for surgery? Patients surgically treated for lumbar disc herniation, spinal stenosis, and spondylolisthesis (2006-2014) were identified. Patients were divided into two groups based on whether the surgery was performed in the fee-for-service setting (beneficiaries receive care at a civilian facility with expenses covered by TRICARE insurance) or at a Department of Defense facility (direct care). There were 28,344 patients in the entire study, 21,290 treated in fee-for-service and 7054 treated in Department of Defense facilities. Differences in the rates of fusion-based procedures, discectomy, and decompression between both healthcare settings were assessed using multinomial logistic regression to adjust for differences in case-mix and surgical indication. TRICARE beneficiaries treated for lumbar spinal disorders in the fee-for-service setting had higher odds of receiving interbody fusions (fee-for-service: 7267 of 21,290 [34%], direct care: 1539 of 7054 [22%], odds ratio [OR]: 1.25 [95% confidence interval 1.20-1.30], p fee-for-service setting irrespective of the underlying diagnosis. These results speak to the existence of provider inducement within the field of spine surgery. This reality portends poor performance for surgical practices and hospitals in Accountable Care Organizations and bundled payment programs in which provider inducement is allowed

  20. Context matters: the experience of 14 research teams in systematically reporting contextual factors important for practice change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomoaia-Cotisel, Andrada; Scammon, Debra L; Waitzman, Norman J; Cronholm, Peter F; Halladay, Jacqueline R; Driscoll, David L; Solberg, Leif I; Hsu, Clarissa; Tai-Seale, Ming; Hiratsuka, Vanessa; Shih, Sarah C; Fetters, Michael D; Wise, Christopher G; Alexander, Jeffrey A; Hauser, Diane; McMullen, Carmit K; Scholle, Sarah Hudson; Tirodkar, Manasi A; Schmidt, Laura; Donahue, Katrina E; Parchman, Michael L; Stange, Kurt C

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to advance the internal and external validity of research by sharing our empirical experience and recommendations for systematically reporting contextual factors. Fourteen teams conducting research on primary care practice transformation retrospectively considered contextual factors important to interpreting their findings (internal validity) and transporting or reinventing their findings in other settings/situations (external validity). Each team provided a table or list of important contextual factors and interpretive text included as appendices to the articles in this supplement. Team members identified the most important contextual factors for their studies. We grouped the findings thematically and developed recommendations for reporting context. The most important contextual factors sorted into 5 domains: (1) the practice setting, (2) the larger organization, (3) the external environment, (4) implementation pathway, and (5) the motivation for implementation. To understand context, investigators recommend (1) engaging diverse perspectives and data sources, (2) considering multiple levels, (3) evaluating history and evolution over time, (4) looking at formal and informal systems and culture, and (5) assessing the (often nonlinear) interactions between contextual factors and both the process and outcome of studies. We include a template with tabular and interpretive elements to help study teams engage research participants in reporting relevant context. These findings demonstrate the feasibility and potential utility of identifying and reporting contextual factors. Involving diverse stakeholders in assessing context at multiple stages of the research process, examining their association with outcomes, and consistently reporting critical contextual factors are important challenges for a field interested in improving the internal and external validity and impact of health care research.

  1. Quality indicators to compare accredited independent pharmacies and accredited chain pharmacies in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkaravichien, Wiwat; Wongpratat, Apichaya; Lertsinudom, Sunee

    2016-08-01

    Background Quality indicators determine the quality of actual practice in reference to standard criteria. The Community Pharmacy Association (Thailand), with technical support from the International Pharmaceutical Federation, developed a tool for quality assessment and quality improvement at community pharmacies. This tool has passed validity and reliability tests, but has not yet had feasibility testing. Objective (1) To test whether this quality tool could be used in routine settings. (2) To compare quality scores between accredited independent and accredited chain pharmacies. Setting Accredited independent pharmacies and accredited chain pharmacies in the north eastern region of Thailand. Methods A cross sectional study was conducted in 34 accredited independent pharmacies and accredited chain pharmacies. Quality scores were assessed by observation and by interviewing the responsible pharmacists. Data were collected and analyzed by independent t-test and Mann-Whitney U test as appropriate. Results were plotted by histogram and spider chart. Main outcome measure Domain's assessable scores, possible maximum scores, mean and median of measured scores. Results Domain's assessable scores were close to domain's possible maximum scores. This meant that most indicators could be assessed in most pharmacies. The spider chart revealed that measured scores in the personnel, drug inventory and stocking, and patient satisfaction and health promotion domains of chain pharmacies were significantly higher than those of independent pharmacies (p pharmacies and chain pharmacies in the premise and facility or dispensing and patient care domains. Conclusion Quality indicators developed by the Community Pharmacy Association (Thailand) could be used to assess quality of practice in pharmacies in routine settings. It is revealed that the quality scores of chain pharmacies were higher than those of independent pharmacies.

  2. Where Is Obesity Prevention on the Map? Distribution and Predictors of Local Health Department Prevention Activities in Relation to County-Level Obesity Prevalence in the US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamatakis, Katherine A.; Leatherdale, Scott T.; Marx, Christine; Yan, Yan; Colditz, Graham A.; Brownson, Ross C.

    2013-01-01

    Context The system of local health departments (LHD) in the US has potential to advance a locally-oriented public health response in obesity control and reduce geographic disparities. However, the extent to which obesity prevention programs correspond to local obesity levels is unknown. Objective This study examines the extent to which LHDs across the US have responded to local levels of obesity by examining the association between jurisdiction level obesity prevalence and the existence of obesity prevention programs. Design Data on LHD organizational characteristics from the Profile Study of Local Health Departments and county-level estimates of obesity from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System were analyzed (n=2,300). Since local public health systems are nested within state infrastructure, multilevel models were used to examine the relationship between county-level obesity prevalence and LHD obesity prevention programming and to assess the impact of state-level clustering. Setting 2,300 local health department jurisdictions defined with respect to county boundaries Participants Practitioners in local health departments who responded to the 2005 Profile Study of Local Health Departments. Main Outcome Measures Likelihood of having obesity prevention activities and association with area-level obesity prevalence Results The existence of obesity prevention activities was not associated with prevalence of obesity in the jurisdiction. A substantial portion of the variance in LHD activities was explained by state-level clustering. Conclusions This paper identified a gap in the local public health response to the obesity epidemic and underscores the importance of multilevel modeling in examining predictors of LHD performance. PMID:22836530

  3. Attention and Recall of Point-of-sale Tobacco Marketing: A Mobile Eye-Tracking Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal-Travers, Maansi; Adkison, Sarah E; O'Connor, Richard J; Thrasher, James F

    2016-01-01

    As tobacco advertising restrictions have increased, the retail 'power wall' behind the counter is increasingly invaluable for marketing tobacco products. The primary objectives of this pilot study were 3-fold: (1) evaluate the attention paid/fixations on the area behind the cash register where tobacco advertising is concentrated and tobacco products are displayed in a real-world setting, (2) evaluate the duration (dwell-time) of these fixations, and (3) evaluate the recall of advertising displayed on the tobacco power wall. Data from 13 Smokers (S) and 12 Susceptible or non-daily Smokers (SS) aged 180-30 from a mobile eye-tracking study. Mobile-eye tracking technology records the orientation (fixation) and duration (dwell-time) of visual attention. Participants were randomized to one of three purchase tasks at a convenience store: Candy bar Only (CO; N = 10), Candy bar + Specified cigarette Brand (CSB; N = 6), and Candy bar + cigarette Brand of their Choice (CBC; N = 9). A post-session survey evaluated recall of tobacco marketing. Key outcomes were fixations and dwell-time on the cigarette displays at the point-of-sale. Participants spent a median time of 44 seconds during the standardized time evaluated and nearly three-quarters (72%) fixated on the power wall during their purchase, regardless of smoking status (S: 77%, SS: 67%) or purchase task (CO: 44%, CSB: 71%, CBC: 100%). In the post session survey, nearly all participants (96%) indicated they noticed a cigarette brand and 64% were able to describe a specific part of the tobacco wall or recall a promotional offer. Consumers are exposed to point-of-sale tobacco marketing, regardless of smoking status. FDA should consider regulations that limit exposure to point-of-sale tobacco marketing among consumers.

  4. Facilitators and barriers to implementing a local policy to reduce sodium consumption in the County of Los Angeles government, California, 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gase, Lauren N; Kuo, Tony; Dunet, Diane O; Simon, Paul A

    2011-03-01

    This qualitative study explores facilitators and barriers to a proposed food procurement policy that would require food purchasers, distributors, and vendors of food service in the County of Los Angeles government to meet specified nutrition standards, including limits on sodium content. We conducted 30 key informant interviews. Interviewees represented 18 organizations from the County of Los Angeles government departments that purchased, distributed, or sold food; public and private non-County entities that had previously implemented food procurement policies in their organizations; and large organizations that catered food to the County. Study participants reported 3 key facilitators: their organization's authority to impose nutrition standards, their organization's desire to provide nutritious food, and the opportunity to build on existing nutrition policies. Eight key barriers were identified: 1) unique features among food service settings, 2) costs and unavailability of low-sodium foods, 3) complexity of food service arrangements, 4) lack of consumer demand for low-sodium foods, 5) undesirable taste of low-sodium foods, 6) preference for prepackaged products, 7) lack of knowledge and experience in operationalizing sodium standards, and 8) existing multiyear contracts that are difficult to change. Despite perceived barriers, several participants indicated that their organizations have successfully implemented nutritional standards that include limits on sodium. Developing or changing policies for procuring food represents a potentially feasible strategy for reducing sodium consumption in food service venues controlled by the County of Los Angeles. The facilitators and barriers identified here can inform the formulation, adoption, implementation, and evaluation of sodium reduction policies in other jurisdictions.

  5. Everyday ethics issues in the outpatient clinical practice of pediatric residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Margaret; Taylor, Holly A; McDonald, Erin L; Hughes, Mark T; Carrese, Joseph A

    2009-09-01

    To describe the ethics issues that pediatric residents encounter during routine care in an outpatient teaching clinic. Qualitative study including in-depth interviews with pediatric residents and direct observation of interactions between preceptors and residents in a pediatric teaching clinic. The Johns Hopkins Harriet Lane Pediatric Primary Care Clinic, March 20 through April 11, 2006. A convenience sample including all pediatric faculty preceptors supervising at the clinic during the 19 half-day sessions that occurred during the observation period (N = 15) and the pediatric residents seeing patients during these clinic sessions (N = 50). Main Outcome Measure Field notes of preceptor-resident discussions about patient care were made and transcribed for qualitative analysis. Qualitative analysis of the ethics content of cases presented by residents in this pediatric teaching clinic identified 5 themes for categorizing ethics challenges: (1) promoting the child's best interests in complex and resource-poor home and social settings; (2) managing the therapeutic alliance with parents and caregivers; (3) protecting patient privacy and confidentiality; (4) balancing the dual roles of learner and health care provider; and (5) using professional authority appropriately. Qualitative analysis of the ethics content of directly observed preceptor-resident case discussions yielded a set of themes describing the ethics challenges facing pediatric residents. The themes are somewhat different from the lists of residents' ethics experiences developed using recall or survey methods and may be very different from the ideas usually included in hospital-based ethics discussions. This may have implications for improving ethics education during residency training.

  6. Antiseptic barrier cap effective in reducing central line-associated bloodstream infections: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voor In 't Holt, Anne F; Helder, Onno K; Vos, Margreet C; Schafthuizen, Laura; Sülz, Sandra; van den Hoogen, Agnes; Ista, Erwin

    2017-04-01

    Microorganisms can intraluminally access a central venous catheter via the catheter hub. The catheter hub should be appropriately disinfected to prevent central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs). However, compliance with the time-consuming manual disinfection process is low. An alternative is the use of an antiseptic barrier cap, which cleans the catheter hub by continuous passive disinfection. To compare the effects of antiseptic barrier cap use and manual disinfection on the incidence of CLABSIs. Systematic review and meta-analysis. We systematically searched Embase, Medline Ovid, Web-of-science, CINAHL EBSCO, Cochrane Library, PubMed Publisher and Google Scholar until May 10, 2016. The primary outcome, reduction in CLABSIs per 1000 catheter-days, expressed as an incidence rate ratio (IRR), was analyzed with a random effects meta-analysis. Studies were included if 1) conducted in a hospital setting, 2) used antiseptic barrier caps on hubs of central lines with access to the bloodstream and 3) reported the number of CLABSIs per 1000 catheter-days when using the barrier cap and when using manual disinfection. A total of 1537 articles were identified as potentially relevant and after exclusion of duplicates, 953 articles were screened based on title and abstract; 18 articles were read full text. Eventually, nine studies were included in the systematic review, and seven of these nine in the random effects meta-analysis. The pooled IRR showed that use of the antiseptic barrier cap was effective in reducing CLABSIs (IRR=0.59, 95% CI=0.45-0.77, Pantiseptic barrier cap is associated with a lower incidence CLABSIs and is an intervention worth adding to central-line maintenance bundles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Automatic prediction of rheumatoid arthritis disease activity from the electronic medical records.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Lin

    Full Text Available We aimed to mine the data in the Electronic Medical Record to automatically discover patients' Rheumatoid Arthritis disease activity at discrete rheumatology clinic visits. We cast the problem as a document classification task where the feature space includes concepts from the clinical narrative and lab values as stored in the Electronic Medical Record.The Training Set consisted of 2792 clinical notes and associated lab values. Test Set 1 included 1749 clinical notes and associated lab values. Test Set 2 included 344 clinical notes for which there were no associated lab values. The Apache clinical Text Analysis and Knowledge Extraction System was used to analyze the text and transform it into informative features to be combined with relevant lab values.Experiments over a range of machine learning algorithms and features were conducted. The best performing combination was linear kernel Support Vector Machines with Unified Medical Language System Concept Unique Identifier features with feature selection and lab values. The Area Under the Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve (AUC is 0.831 (σ = 0.0317, statistically significant as compared to two baselines (AUC = 0.758, σ = 0.0291. Algorithms demonstrated superior performance on cases clinically defined as extreme categories of disease activity (Remission and High compared to those defined as intermediate categories (Moderate and Low and included laboratory data on inflammatory markers.Automatic Rheumatoid Arthritis disease activity discovery from Electronic Medical Record data is a learnable task approximating human performance. As a result, this approach might have several research applications, such as the identification of patients for genome-wide pharmacogenetic studies that require large sample sizes with precise definitions of disease activity and response to therapies.

  8. Prehospital Trauma Triage Decision-making: A Model of What Happens between the 9-1-1 Call and the Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Courtney Marie Cora; Cushman, Jeremy T; Lerner, E Brooke; Fisher, Susan G; Seplaki, Christopher L; Veazie, Peter J; Wasserman, Erin B; Dozier, Ann; Shah, Manish N

    2016-01-01

    We describe the decision-making process used by emergency medical services (EMS) providers in order to understand how 1) injured patients are evaluated in the prehospital setting; 2) field triage criteria are applied in-practice; and 3) selection of a destination hospital is determined. We conducted separate focus groups with advanced and basic life support providers from rural and urban/suburban regions. Four exploratory focus groups were conducted to identify overarching themes and five additional confirmatory focus groups were conducted to verify initial focus group findings and provide additional detail regarding trauma triage decision-making and application of field triage criteria. All focus groups were conducted by a public health researcher with formal training in qualitative research. A standardized question guide was used to facilitate discussion at all focus groups. All focus groups were audio-recorded and transcribed. Responses were coded and categorized into larger domains to describe how EMS providers approach trauma triage and apply the Field Triage Decision Scheme. We conducted 9 focus groups with 50 EMS providers. Participants highlighted that trauma triage is complex and there is often limited time to make destination decisions. Four overarching domains were identified within the context of trauma triage decision-making: 1) initial assessment; 2) importance of speed versus accuracy; 3) usability of current field triage criteria; and 4) consideration of patient and emergency care system-level factors. Field triage is a complex decision-making process which involves consideration of many patient and system-level factors. The decision model presented in this study suggests that EMS providers place significant emphasis on speed of decisions, relying on initial impressions and immediately observable information, rather than precise measurement of vital signs or systematic application of field triage criteria.

  9. Characterizing Microstructural Tissue Properties in Multiple Sclerosis with Diffusion MRI at 7 T and 3 T: The Impact of the Experimental Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Santis, Silvia; Bastiani, Matteo; Droby, Amgad; Kolber, Pierre; Zipp, Frauke; Pracht, Eberhard; Stoecker, Tony; Groppa, Sergiu; Roebroeck, Alard

    2018-04-07

    The recent introduction of advanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging techniques to characterize focal and global degeneration in multiple sclerosis (MS), like the Composite Hindered and Restricted Model of Diffusion, or CHARMED, diffusional kurtosis imaging (DKI) and Neurite Orientation Dispersion and Density Imaging (NODDI) made available new tools to image axonal pathology non-invasively in vivo. These methods already showed greater sensitivity and specificity compared to conventional diffusion tensor-based metrics (e.g., fractional anisotropy), overcoming some of its limitations. While previous studies uncovered global and focal axonal degeneration in MS patients compared to healthy controls, here our aim is to investigate and compare different diffusion MRI acquisition protocols in their ability to highlight microstructural differences between MS and control tissue over several much used models. For comparison, we contrasted the ability of fractional anisotropy measurements to uncover differences between lesion, normal-appearing white matter (WM), gray matter and healthy tissue under the same imaging protocols. We show that: (1) focal and diffuse differences in several microstructural parameters are observed under clinical settings; (2) advanced models (CHARMED, DKI and NODDI) have increased specificity and sensitivity to neurodegeneration when compared to fractional anisotropy measurements; and (3) both high (3 T) and ultra-high fields (7 T) are viable options for imaging tissue change in MS lesions and normal appearing WM, while higher b-values are less beneficial under the tested short-time (10 min acquisition) conditions. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. An Automated Inpatient Split-dose Bowel Preparation System Improves Colonoscopy Quality and Reduces Repeat Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadlapati, Rena; Johnston, Elyse R; Gluskin, Adam B; Gregory, Dyanna L; Cyrus, Rachel; Werth, Lindsay; Ciolino, Jody D; Grande, David P; Keswani, Rajesh N

    2017-07-19

    Inpatient colonoscopy preparations are often inadequate, compromising patient safety and procedure quality, while resulting in greater hospital costs. The aims of this study were to: (1) design and implement an electronic inpatient split-dose bowel preparation order set; (2) assess the intervention's impact upon preparation adequacy, repeated colonoscopies, hospital days, and costs. We conducted a single center prospective pragmatic quasiexperimental study of hospitalized adults undergoing colonoscopy. The experimental intervention was designed using DMAIC (define, measure, analyze, improve, and control) methodology. Prospective data collected over 12 months were compared with data from a historical preintervention cohort. The primary outcome was bowel preparation quality and secondary outcomes included number of repeated procedures, hospital days, and costs. On the basis of a Delphi method and DMAIC process, we created an electronic inpatient bowel preparation order set inclusive of a split-dose bowel preparation algorithm, automated orders for rescue medications, and nursing bowel preparation checks. The analysis data set included 969 patients, 445 (46%) in the postintervention group. The adequacy of bowel preparation significantly increased following intervention (86% vs. 43%; P<0.01) and proportion of repeated procedures decreased (2.0% vs. 4.6%; P=0.03). Mean hospital days from bowel preparation initiation to discharge decreased from 8.0 to 6.9 days (P=0.02). The intervention resulted in an estimated 1-year cost-savings of $46,076 based on a reduction in excess hospital days associated with repeated and delayed procedures. Our interdisciplinary initiative targeting inpatient colonoscopy preparations significantly improved quality and reduced repeat procedures, and hospital days. Other institutions should consider utilizing this framework to improve inpatient colonoscopy value.

  11. An alternative method for rapid preparation of 99Tcm-sestamibi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, M.E.; Hung, J.C.; Gibbons, R.J.

    1993-01-01

    The availability of 99 Tc m -sestamibi is limited, especially in emergency cases due to the time-consuming preparation procedure that requires a 10-min boiling water bath and a 30-min radiochemical purity (RCP) analysis. These two restrictions have been surmounted by the combined use of a microwave oven heating method and a minipaper chromatography system. However, use of the microwave oven heating method presents some potential problems: (1) technical error in setting the microwave oven heating time and power setting; (2) ejection of the rubber septum if the vial is not evacuated; (3) breakage of the vial during the microwave heating process; (4) inconsistent and inhomogeneous microwave heating; (5) re-evaluation process required for use of a different type of microwave oven. Although a 1-min boiling water bath time is sufficient to provide an acceptable RCP for 99 Tc m -sestamibi, additional time is required to heat the water to a boiling state. An instant hot water machine was evaluated for possible replacement of the microwave heating method. Three millilitres of 5500 MBq (150 mCi) 99 Tc m was added to a Cardiolite R kit and then placed in a 150-ml insulated beaker filled with hot water from an instant hot water machine. A minipaper chromatography system was used to determine the RCP of samples after 1, 1.5, 2, 3, 4 and 5 min incubation periods. Our results show that 2 min was the shortest incubation time that yielded an acceptable RCP of 94.7 ± 0.4% over the 24 h evaluation time. (author)

  12. Challenge problem and milestones for: Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Wang, Yifeng; Howard, Robert; McNeish, Jerry A.; Schultz, Peter Andrew; Arguello, Jose Guadalupe Jr.

    2010-01-01

    This report describes the specification of a challenge problem and associated challenge milestones for the Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC) supporting the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Campaign. The NEAMS challenge problems are designed to demonstrate proof of concept and progress towards IPSC goals. The goal of the Waste IPSC is to develop an integrated suite of modeling and simulation capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive waste storage or disposal system. The Waste IPSC will provide this simulation capability (1) for a range of disposal concepts, waste form types, engineered repository designs, and geologic settings, (2) for a range of time scales and distances, (3) with appropriate consideration of the inherent uncertainties, and (4) in accordance with robust verification, validation, and software quality requirements. To demonstrate proof of concept and progress towards these goals and requirements, a Waste IPSC challenge problem is specified that includes coupled thermal-hydrologic-chemical-mechanical (THCM) processes that describe (1) the degradation of a borosilicate glass waste form and the corresponding mobilization of radionuclides (i.e., the processes that produce the radionuclide source term), (2) the associated near-field physical and chemical environment for waste emplacement within a salt formation, and (3) radionuclide transport in the near field (i.e., through the engineered components - waste form, waste package, and backfill - and the immediately adjacent salt). The initial details of a set of challenge milestones that collectively comprise the full challenge problem are also specified.

  13. Health promoting behaviors in adolescence: validation of the Portuguese version of the Adolescent Lifestyle Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Pedro; Gaspar, Pedro; Fonseca, Helena; Hendricks, Constance; Murdaugh, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    Reliable and valid instruments are essential for understanding health-promoting behaviors in adolescents. This study analyzed the psychometric properties of the Portuguese version of the Adolescent Lifestyle Profile (ALP). A linguistic and cultural translation of the ALP was conducted with 236 adolescents from two different settings: a community (n=141) and a clinical setting (n=95). Internal consistency reliability and confirmatory factor analysis were performed. Results showed an adequate fit to data, yielding a 36-item, seven-factor structure (CMIN/DF=1.667, CFI=0.807, GFI=0.822, RMR=0.051, RMSEA=0.053, PNFI=0.575, PCFI=0.731). The ALP presented a high internal consistency (α=0.866), with the subscales presenting moderate reliability values (from 0.492 to 0.747). The highest values were in Interpersonal Relations (3.059±0.523) and Positive Life Perspective (2.985±0.588). Some gender differences were found. Findings showed that adolescents from the clinic reported an overall healthier lifestyle than those from the community setting (2.598±0.379 vs. 2.504±0.346; t=1.976, p=0.049). The ALP Portuguese version is a psychometrically reliable, valid, and useful measurement instrument for assessing health-promoting lifestyles in adolescence. The ALP is cross-culturally validated and can decisively contribute to a better understanding of adolescent health promotion needs. Additional research is needed to evaluate the instrument's predictive validity, as well as its clinical relevance for practice and research. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  14. Training for staff who support students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Eleanor; Woodward-Kron, Robyn; Hu, Wendy

    2016-02-01

    Front-line administrative, academic and clinical teaching staff often find themselves providing pastoral and learning support to students, but they are often not trained for this role, and this aspect of their work is under-acknowledged. Staff participating in an action research study at two medical schools identified common concerns about the personal impact of providing student support, and of the need for professional development to carry out this responsibility. This need is magnified in clinical placement settings that are remote from on-campus services. Informed by participatory action research, brief interactive workshops with multimedia training resources were developed, conducted and evaluated at eight health professional student training sites. These workshops were designed to: (1) be delivered in busy clinical placement and university settings; (2) provide a safe and inclusive environment for administrative, academic and clinical teaching staff to share experiences and learn from each other; (3) be publicly accessible; and (4) promote continued development and roll-out of staff training, adapted to each workplace (see http://www.uws.edu.au/meusupport). The workshops were positively evaluated by 97 participants, with both teaching and administrative staff welcoming the opportunity to discuss and share experiences. Staff supporting health professional students have shared, often unmet, needs for support themselves Staff supporting health professional students have shared, often unmet, needs for support themselves. Participatory action research can be a means for producing and maintaining effective training resources as well as the conditions for change in practice. In our workshops, staff particularly valued opportunities for guided discussion using videos of authentic cases to trigger reflection, and to collaboratively formulate student support guidelines, customised to each site. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. PREVIEW behavior modification intervention toolbox (PREMIT: a study protocol for a psychological element of a multicenter project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Kahlert

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Losing excess body weight and preventing weight regain by changing lifestyle is a challenging but promising task to prevent the incidence of type-2 diabetes. To be successful, it is necessary to use evidence-based and theory-driven interventions, which also contribute to the science of behavior modification by providing a deeper understanding of successful intervention components. Objective: To develop a physical activity and dietary behavior modification intervention toolbox (PREMIT that fulfills current requirements of being theory-driven and evidence-based, comprehensively described and feasible to evaluate. PREMIT is part of an intervention trial, which aims to prevent the onset of type-2 diabetes in pre-diabetics in eight clinical centers across the world by guiding them in changing their physical activity and dietary behavior through a group counselling approach. Methods: The program development took five progressive steps, in line with the Public Health Action Cycle: (1 Summing-up the intervention goal(s, target group and the setting, (2 uncovering the generative psychological mechanisms, (3 identifying behavior change techniques and tools, (4 preparing for evaluation and (5 implementing the intervention and assuring quality. Results: PREMIT is based on a trans-theoretical approach referring to valid behavior modification theories, models and approaches. A major ‘product’ of PREMIT is a matrix, constructed for use by onsite-instructors. The matrix includes objectives, tasks and activities ordered by periods. PREMIT is constructed to help instructors guide participant’s behavior change. To ensure high fidelity and adherence of program-implementation across the eight intervention centers standardized operational procedures were defined and train-the-trainer workshops were held. In summary PREMIT is a theory-driven, evidence-based program carefully developed to change physical activity and dietary behaviors in pre

  16. GlobalSoilMap France: High-resolution spatial modelling the soils of France up to two meter depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, V L; Lacoste, M; Richer-de-Forges, A C; Arrouays, D

    2016-12-15

    This work presents the first GlobalSoilMap (GSM) products for France. We developed an automatic procedure for mapping the primary soil properties (clay, silt, sand, coarse elements, pH, soil organic carbon (SOC), cation exchange capacity (CEC) and soil depth). The procedure employed a data-mining technique and a straightforward method for estimating the 90% confidence intervals (CIs). The most accurate models were obtained for pH, sand and silt. Next, CEC, clay and SOC were found reasonably accurate predicted. Coarse elements and soil depth were the least accurate of all models. Overall, all models were considered robust; important indicators for this were 1) the small difference in model diagnostics between the calibration and cross-validation set, 2) the unbiased mean predictions, 3) the smaller spatial structure of the prediction residuals in comparison to the observations and 4) the similar performance compared to other developed GlobalSoilMap products. Nevertheless, the confidence intervals (CIs) were rather wide for all soil properties. The median predictions became less reliable with increasing depth, as indicated by the increase of CIs with depth. In addition, model accuracy and the corresponding CIs varied depending on the soil variable of interest, soil depth and geographic location. These findings indicated that the CIs are as informative as the model diagnostics. In conclusion, the presented method resulted in reasonably accurate predictions for the majority of the soil properties. End users can employ the products for different purposes, as was demonstrated with some practical examples. The mapping routine is flexible for cloud-computing and provides ample opportunity to be further developed when desired by its users. This allows regional and international GSM partners with fewer resources to develop their own products or, otherwise, to improve the current routine and work together towards a robust high-resolution digital soil map of the world

  17. X-ray survival characteristics and genetic analysis for nineSaccharomyces deletion mutants that affect radiation sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Game, John C.; Williamson, Marsha S.; Baccari, Clelia

    2006-07-21

    We examine ionizing radiation (IR) sensitivity and epistasisrelationships of several Saccharomyces mutants affectingpost-translational modifications of histones H2B and H3. Mutantsbre1delta, lge1delta, and rtf1delta, defective in histone H2B lysine 123ubiquitination, show IR sensitivity equivalent to that of the dot1deltamutant that we reported on earlier, consistent with published findingsthat Dot1p requires H2B K123 ubiquitination to fully methylate histone H3K79. This implicates progressive K79 methylation rather thanmono-methylation in IR resistance. The set2delta mutant, defective in H3K36 methylation, shows mild IR sensitivity whereas mutants that abolishH3 K4 methylation resemble wild type. The dot1delta, bre1delta, andlge1delta mutants show epistasis for IR sensitivity. The paf1deltamutant, also reportedly defective in H2B K123 ubiquitination, confers nosensitivity. The rad6delta, rad51null, rad50delta, and rad9deltamutations are epistatic to bre1? and dot1delta, but rad18delta andrad5delta show additivity with bre1delta, dot1delta, and each other. Thebre1delta rad18delta double mutant resembles rad6delta in sensitivity;thus the role of Rad6p in ubiquitinating H2B accounts for its extrasensitivity compared to rad18delta. We conclude that IR resistanceconferred by BRE1 and DOT1 is mediated through homologous recombinationalrepair, not postreplication repair, and confirm findings of a G1checkpoint role for the RAD6/BRE1/DOT1 pathway.

  18. Home blood pressure-guided antihypertensive therapy in chronic kidney disease: more data are needed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgianos, Panagiotis I; Champidou, Eleni; Liakopoulos, Vassilios; Balaskas, Elias V; Zebekakis, Pantelis E

    2018-04-01

    In the era of newly introduced hypertension guidelines recommending lower blood pressure (BP) targets for drug-treated hypertensives, the necessity for optimized management of hypertension becomes even more urgent. The concept of home BP-guided antihypertensive therapy is for long suggested as a simple and feasible approach to improve BP control rates and optimize the management of hypertension. Home BP-guided antihypertensive therapy is particularly applicable to hypertensives with chronic kidney disease (CKD) for several reasons including the following: (1) difficult-to-control BP and high BP variability in the CKD setting; (2) poor accuracy of office BP in determining hypertension control status and detecting "white-coat" and "masked" hypertension; (3) poor value of routine office BP recordings in predicting the longitudinal progression of target-organ damage; and (4) superiority of home BP over office BP recordings in prognosticating the risk of incident end-stage renal disease or death. The concept of home BP-guided antihypertensive therapy is even more relevant for those on hemodialysis, given the high intradialytic and interdialytic BP variability and poor value of conventional peridialytic BP recordings in estimating the actual BP load recorded outside of dialysis with the use of home or ambulatory BP monitoring. Randomized trials comparing home BP-guided antihypertensive therapy versus usual care are warranted to prove the feasibility and effectiveness of this therapeutic approach and convince clinicians for using home BP monitoring as the standard of care when managing hypertension, particularly in people with CKD or end-stage renal disease. Copyright © 2018 American Heart Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Advance Directives among Nursing Home Residents with Mild, Moderate, and Advanced Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjia, Jennifer; Dharmawardene, Marisa; Givens, Jane L

    2018-01-01

    To describe prevalence and content of AD documentation among NH residents by dementia stage. The prevalence of advance directives (ADs) among nursing home (NH) residents with mild, moderate, and advanced dementia remains unclear. Population-based, cross-sectional study of all licensed NHs in five U.S. states. Subjects included all long-stay (>90 day) NH residents with dementia, aged ≥65 years, and a Cognitive Performance Scale (CPS) score ≥1 from the 2007 to 2008 Minimum Data Set 2.0 (n = 180,621). Dementia severity was classified as follows: mild (CPS 1-2), moderate (CPS 3-4), and advanced (CPS 5-6). ADs were defined as the presence of a living will, do-not-resuscitate order, do-not-hospitalize order, medication restriction, or feeding restriction). Overall, 59% of residents had any AD and 17% had a living will. Prevalence of any AD increased by dementia severity: mild (51.2%), moderate (58.2%), and advanced (61.5%) (p will was associated with higher education (≥high school graduate vs. some high school or less) and being married. While dementia severity was associated with greater likelihood of having documented any AD, almost 4 in 10 residents with dementia lacked any AD. Effective outreach may focus efforts on subgroups with lower odds of any AD or living wills, including non-white, less educated, and unmarried NH residents. A greater understanding of how such factors impact care planning will help to address barriers to patient-centered care for this population.

  20. Validation of the German version of the Ford Insomnia Response to Stress Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieck, Arne; Helbig, Susanne; Drake, Christopher L; Backhaus, Jutta

    2018-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the psychometric properties of a German version of the Ford Insomnia Response to Stress Test with groups with and without sleep problems. Three studies were analysed. Data set 1 was based on an initial screening for a sleep training program (n = 393), data set 2 was based on a study to test the test-retest reliability of the Ford Insomnia Response to Stress Test (n = 284) and data set 3 was based on a study to examine the influence of competitive sport on sleep (n = 37). Data sets 1 and 2 were used to test internal consistency, factor structure, convergent validity, discriminant validity and test-retest reliability of the Ford Insomnia Response to Stress Test. Content validity was tested using data set 3. Cronbach's alpha of the Ford Insomnia Response to Stress Test was good (α = 0.80) and test-retest reliability was satisfactory (r = 0.72). Overall, the one-factor model showed the best fit. Furthermore, significant positive correlations between the Ford Insomnia Response to Stress Test and impaired sleep quality, depression and stress reactivity were in line with the expectations regarding the convergent validity. Subjects with sleep problems had significantly higher scores in the Ford Insomnia Response to Stress Test than subjects without sleep problems (P Stress Test had significantly lower sleep quality (P = 0.01), demonstrating that vulnerability for stress-induced sleep disturbances accompanies poorer sleep quality in stressful episodes. The findings show that the German version of the Ford Insomnia Response to Stress Test is a reliable and valid questionnaire to assess the vulnerability to stress-induced sleep disturbances. © 2017 European Sleep Research Society.

  1. Late Neoproterozoic to Carboniferous genesis of A-type magmas in Avalonia of northern Nova Scotia: repeated partial melting of anhydrous lower crust in contrasting tectonic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, J. Brendan; Shellnutt, J. Gregory; Collins, William J.

    2018-03-01

    Avalonian rocks in northern mainland Nova Scotia are characterized by voluminous 640-600 Ma calc-alkalic to tholeiitic mafic to felsic magmas produced in a volcanic arc. However, after the cessation of arc activity, repeated episodes of felsic magmatism between ca. 580 Ma and 350 Ma are dominated by A-type geochemical characteristics. Sm-Nd isotopic data, combined with zircon saturation temperature estimates, indicate that these magmas were formed by high temperature (800-1050 °C) melting of the same anhydrous crustal source. Regional tectonic considerations indicate that A-type felsic magmatism was produced (1) at 580 Ma in a San Andreas-type strike slip setting, (2) at 495 Ma as Avalonia rifted off Gondwana, (3) at 465 and 455 in an ensialic island arc environment and (4) at 360-350 Ma during post-collisional, intra-continental strike-slip activity as Avalonia was translated dextrally along the Laurentian margin. These results attest to the importance of crustal source, rather than tectonic setting, in the generation of these A-type magmas and are an example of how additional insights are provided by comparing the geochemical and isotopic characteristics of igneous suites of different ages within the same terrane. They also suggest that the shallow crustal rocks in northern mainland Nova Scotia were not significantly detached from their lower crustal source between ca. 620 Ma and 350 Ma, a time interval that includes the separation of Avalonia from Gondwana, its drift and accretion to Laurentia as well as post-accretionary strike-slip displacement.

  2. Effects of draught load exercise and training on calcium homeostasis in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vervuert, I; Coenen, M; Zamhöfer, J

    2005-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of draught load exercise on calcium (Ca) homeostasis in young horses. Five 2-year-old untrained Standardbred horses were studied in a 4-month training programme. All exercise workouts were performed on a treadmill at a 6% incline and with a constant draught load of 40 kg (0.44 kN). The training programme started with a standardized exercise test (SET 1; six incremental steps of 5 min duration each, first step 1.38 m/s, stepwise increase by 0.56 m/s). A training programme was then initiated which consisted of low-speed exercise sessions (LSE; constant velocity at 1.67 m/s for 60 min, 48 training sessions in total). After the 16th and 48th LSE sessions, SETs (SET 2: middle of training period, SET 3: finishing training period) were performed again under the identical test protocol of SET 1. Blood samples for blood lactate, plasma total Ca, blood ionized calcium (Ca(2+)), blood pH, plasma inorganic phosphorus (P(i)) and plasma intact parathyroid hormone (PTH) were collected before, during and after SETs, and before and after the first, 16th, 32nd and 48th LSE sessions. During SETs there was a decrease in ionized Ca(2+) and a rise in lactate, P(i) and intact PTH. The LSEs resulted in an increase in pH and P(i), whereas lactate, ionized Ca(2+), total Ca and intact PTH were not affected. No changes in Ca metabolism were detected in the course of training. Results of this study suggest that the type of exercise influences Ca homeostasis and intact PTH response, but that these effects are not influenced in the course of the training period.

  3. PREVIEW Behavior Modification Intervention Toolbox (PREMIT): A Study Protocol for a Psychological Element of a Multicenter Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlert, Daniela; Unyi-Reicherz, Annelie; Stratton, Gareth; Meinert Larsen, Thomas; Fogelholm, Mikael; Raben, Anne; Schlicht, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Losing excess body weight and preventing weight regain by changing lifestyle is a challenging but promising task to prevent the incidence of type-2 diabetes. To be successful, it is necessary to use evidence-based and theory-driven interventions, which also contribute to the science of behavior modification by providing a deeper understanding of successful intervention components. To develop a physical activity and dietary behavior modification intervention toolbox (PREMIT) that fulfills current requirements of being theory-driven and evidence-based, comprehensively described and feasible to evaluate. PREMIT is part of an intervention trial, which aims to prevent the onset of type-2 diabetes in pre-diabetics in eight clinical centers across the world by guiding them in changing their physical activity and dietary behavior through a group counseling approach. The program development took five progressive steps, in line with the Public Health Action Cycle: (1) Summing-up the intervention goal(s), target group and the setting, (2) uncovering the generative psychological mechanisms, (3) identifying behavior change techniques and tools, (4) preparing for evaluation and (5) implementing the intervention and assuring quality. PREMIT is based on a trans-theoretical approach referring to valid behavior modification theories, models and approaches. A major "product" of PREMIT is a matrix, constructed for use by onsite-instructors. The matrix includes objectives, tasks and activities ordered by periods. PREMIT is constructed to help instructors guide participants' behavior change. To ensure high fidelity and adherence of program-implementation across the eight intervention centers standardized operational procedures were defined and "train-the-trainer" workshops were held. In summary PREMIT is a theory-driven, evidence-based program carefully developed to change physical activity and dietary behaviors in pre-diabetic people.

  4. Situationally-sensitive knowledge translation and relational decision making in hyperacute stroke: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murtagh, Madeleine J; Burges Watson, Duika L; Jenkings, K Neil; Lie, Mabel L S; Mackintosh, Joan E; Ford, Gary A; Thomson, Richard G

    2012-01-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of disability. Early treatment of acute ischaemic stroke with rtPA reduces the risk of longer term dependency but carries an increased risk of causing immediate bleeding complications. To understand the challenges of knowledge translation and decision making about treatment with rtPA in hyperacute stroke and hence to inform development of appropriate decision support we interviewed patients, their family and health professionals. The emergency setting and the symptomatic effects of hyper-acute stroke shaped the form, content and manner of knowledge translation to support decision making. Decision making about rtPA in hyperacute stroke presented three conundrums for patients, family and clinicians. 1) How to allow time for reflection in a severely time-limited setting. 2) How to facilitate knowledge translation regarding important treatment risks and benefits when patient and family capacity is blunted by the effects and shock of stroke. 3) How to ensure patient and family views are taken into account when the situation produces reliance on the expertise of clinicians. Strategies adopted to meet these conundrums were fourfold: face to face communication; shaping decisions; incremental provision of information; and communication tailored to the individual patient. Relational forms of interaction were understood to engender trust and allay anxiety. Shaping decisions with patients was understood as an expression of confidence by clinicians that helped alleviate anxiety and offered hope and reassurance to patients and their family experiencing the shock of the stroke event. Neutral presentations of information and treatment options promoted uncertainty and contributed to anxiety. 'Drip feeding' information created moments for reflection: clinicians literally made time. Tailoring information to the particular patient and family situation allowed clinicians to account for social and emotional contexts. The principal responses to the challenges of

  5. A regression approach for zircaloy-2 in-reactor creep constitutive equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yung Liu, Y.; Bement, A.L.

    1977-01-01

    In this paper the methodology of multiple regressions as applied to zircaloy-2 in-reactor creep data analysis and construction of constitutive equation are illustrated. While the resulting constitutive equation can be used in creep analysis of in-reactor zircaloy structural components, the methodology itself is entirely general and can be applied to any creep data analysis. From data analysis and model development point of views, both the assumption of independence and prior committment to specific model forms are unacceptable. One would desire means which can not only estimate the required parameters directly from data but also provide basis for model selections, viz., one model against others. Basic understanding of the physics of deformation is important in choosing the forms of starting physical model equations, but the justifications must rely on their abilities in correlating the overall data. The promising aspects of multiple regression creep data analysis are briefly outlined as follows: (1) when there are more than one variable involved, there is no need to make the assumption that each variable affects the response independently. No separate normalizations are required either and the estimation of parameters is obtained by solving many simultaneous equations. The number of simultaneous equations is equal to the number of data sets, (2) regression statistics such as R 2 - and F-statistics provide measures of the significance of regression creep equation in correlating the overall data. The relative weights of each variable on the response can also be obtained. (3) Special regression techniques such as step-wise, ridge, and robust regressions and residual plots, etc., provide diagnostic tools for model selections

  6. The influence of different locations of sputter guns on the morphological and structural properties of Cu–In–Ga precursors and Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J.; Zhu, J., E-mail: jiezhu@ustb.edu.cn; He, Y.X.

    2014-01-01

    The influence of two different locations of sputter guns on the morphological and structural properties of Cu–In–Ga precursors and Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) thin films was investigated. All the precursors contained cauliflower-like nodules, whereas smaller subnodules were observed on the background. All the precursors revealed apparent three-layered structures, and voids were observed at the CIGS/SLG interface of Sets 1 and 2 films rather than Set 3 film. EDS results indicated that all CIGS thin films were Cu-deficient. Based on the grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) patterns, as-selenized films showed peaks corresponding to the chalcopyrite-type CIGS structure. Depth-resolved Raman spectra showed the formation of a dominant CIGS phase inside the films for all the as-selenized samples investigated, and of an ordered vacancy compound (OVC) phase like Cu(In,Ga){sub 3}Se{sub 5} or Cu(In,Ga){sub 2}Se{sub 3.5} at the surface and/or CIGS/SLG interface region of Sets 2 and 3 films. No evidence was obtained on the presence of an OVC phase in Set 1 CIGS film, which may be speculated that long-time annealing is contributed to suppress the growth of OVC phases. The results of the present work suggest that the metallic precursors deposited with the upright-location sputter gun might be more appropriate to prepare CIGS thin films than those sputtered with the titled-location gun.

  7. Electroencephalographic activity in response to procedural pain in preterm infants born at 28 and 33 weeks gestational age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maimon, Neta; Grunau, Ruth E; Cepeda, Ivan L; Friger, Michael; Selnovik, Leonel; Gilat, Shlomo; Shany, Eilon

    2013-12-01

    Preterm infants undergo frequent painful procedures in the neonatal intensive care unit. Electroencephalography (EEG) changes in reaction to invasive procedures have been reported in preterm and full-term neonates. Frontal EEG asymmetry as an index of emotion during tactile stimulation shows inconsistent findings in full-term infants, and has not been examined in the context of pain in preterm infants. Our aim was to examine whether heel lance for blood collection induces changes in right-left frontal asymmetry, suggesting negative emotional response, in preterm neonates at different gestational age (GA) at birth and different duration of stay in the neonatal intensive care unit. Three groups of preterm infants were compared: set 1: group 1 (n=24), born and tested at 28 weeks GA; group 2 (n=22), born at 28 weeks GA and tested at 33 weeks; set 2: group 3 (n=25), born and tested at 33 weeks GA. EEG power was calculated for 30-second artifact-free periods, in standard frequency bandwidths, in 3 phases (baseline, up to 5 min after heel lance, 10 min after heel lance). No significant differences were found in right-left frontal asymmetry, or in ipsilateral or contralateral somatosensory response, across phases. In contrast, the Behavioral Indicators of Infant Pain scores changed across phase (P<0.0001). Infants in group 1 showed lower Behavioral Indicators of Infant Pain scores (P=0.039). There are technical challenges in recording EEG during procedures, as pain induces motor movements. More research is needed to determine the most sensitive approach to measure EEG signals within the context of pain in infancy.

  8. Implementation of a Computerized Screening Inventory: Improved Usability Through Iterative Testing and Modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudreaux, Edwin D; Fischer, Andrew Christopher; Haskins, Brianna Lyn; Saeed Zafar, Zubair; Chen, Guanling; Chinai, Sneha A

    2016-03-09

    The administration of health screeners in a hospital setting has traditionally required (1) clinicians to ask questions and log answers, which can be time consuming and susceptible to error, or (2) patients to complete paper-and-pencil surveys, which require third-party entry of information into the electronic health record and can be vulnerable to error and misinterpretation. A highly promising method that avoids these limitations and bypasses third-party interpretation is direct entry via a computerized inventory. To (1) computerize medical and behavioral health screening for use in general medical settings, (2) optimize patient acceptability and feasibility through iterative usability testing and modification cycles, and (3) examine how age relates to usability. A computerized version of 15 screeners, including behavioral health screeners recommended by a National Institutes of Health Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research collaborative workgroup, was subjected to systematic usability testing and iterative modification. Consecutive adult, English-speaking patients seeking treatment in an urban emergency department were enrolled. Acceptability was defined as (1) the percentage of eligible patients who agreed to take the assessment (initiation rate) and (2) average satisfaction with the assessment (satisfaction rate). Feasibility was defined as the percentage of the screening items completed by those who initiated the assessment (completion rate). Chi-square tests, analyses of variance, and Pearson correlations were used to detect whether improvements in initiation, satisfaction, and completion rates were seen over time and to examine the relation between age and outcomes. Of 2157 eligible patients approached, 1280 agreed to complete the screening (initiation rate=59.34%). Statistically significant increases were observed over time in satisfaction (F3,1061=3.35, P=.019) and completion rates (F3,1276=25.44, PUsability testing revealed several critical

  9. Promoting resilience among parents and caregivers of children with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Abby R; Baker, K Scott; Syrjala, Karen L; Back, Anthony L; Wolfe, Joanne

    2013-06-01

    Promoting resilience is an aspect of psychosocial care that affects patient and whole-family well-being. There is little consensus about how to define or promote resilience during and after pediatric cancer. The aims of this study were (1) to review the resilience literature in pediatric cancer settings; (2) to qualitatively ascertain caregiver-reported perceptions of resilience; and (3) to develop an integrative model of fixed and mutable factors of resilience among family members of children with cancer, with the goal of enabling better study and promotion of resilience among pediatric cancer families. The study entailed qualitative analysis of small group interviews with eighteen bereaved parents and family members of children with cancer treated at Seattle Children's Hospital. Small-group interviews were conducted with members of each bereaved family. Participant statements were coded for thematic analysis. An integrative, comprehensive framework was then developed. Caregivers' personal appraisals of the cancer experience and their child's legacy shape their definitions of resilience. Described factors of resilience include baseline characteristics (i.e., inherent traits, prior expectations of cancer), processes that evolve over time (i.e., coping strategies, social support, provider interactions), and psychosocial outcomes (i.e., post-traumatic growth and lack of psychological distress). These elements were used to develop a testable model of resilience among family members of children with cancer. Resilience is a complex construct that may be modifiable. Once validated, the proposed framework will not only serve as a model for clinicians, but may also facilitate the development of interventions aimed at promoting resilience in family members of children with cancer.

  10. Effects of sodium phosphate and caffeine ingestion on repeated-sprint ability in male athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopec, Benjamin J; Dawson, Brian T; Buck, Christopher; Wallman, Karen E

    2016-03-01

    To assess the effects of sodium phosphate (SP) and caffeine supplementation on repeated-sprint performance. Randomized, double-blind, Latin-square design. Eleven team-sport males participated in four trials: (1) SP (50mgkg(-1) of free fat-mass daily for six days) and caffeine (6mgkg(-1) ingested 1h before exercise); SP+C, (2) SP and placebo (for caffeine), (3) caffeine and placebo (for SP) and (4) placebo (for SP and caffeine). After loading, participants performed a simulated team-game circuit (STGC) consisting of 2×30min halves, with 6×20-m repeated-sprint sets performed at the start, half-time and end of the STGC. There were no interaction effects between trials for first-sprint (FS), best-sprint (BS) or total-sprint (TS) times (p>0.05). However, SP resulted in the fastest times for all sprints, as supported by moderate to large effect sizes (ES; d=0.51-0.83) and 'likely' to 'very likely' chances of benefit, compared with placebo. Compared with caffeine, SP resulted in 'possible' to 'likely' chances of benefit for FS, BS and TS for numerous sets and a 'possible' chance of benefit compared with SP+C for BS (set 2). Compared with placebo, SP+C resulted in moderate ES (d=0.50-0.62) and 'possible' to 'likely' benefit for numerous sprints, while caffeine resulted in a moderate ES (d=0.63; FS: set 3) and 'likely' chances of benefit for a number of sets. While not significant, ES and qualitative analysis results suggest that SP supplementation may improve repeated-sprint performance when compared with placebo. Copyright © 2015 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Relevance or Excellence? Setting Research Priorities for Mental Health and Psychosocial Support in Humanitarian Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tol, Wietse A; Patel, Vikram; Tomlinson, Mark; Baingana, Florence; Galappatti, Ananda; Silove, Derrick; Sondorp, Egbert; van Ommeren, Mark; Wessells, Michael G; Catherine, Panter-Brick

    2012-01-01

    Background: Humanitarian crises are associated with an increase in mental disorders and psychological distress. Despite the emerging consensus on intervention strategies in humanitarian settings, the field of mental health and psychosocial support (MHPSS) in humanitarian settings lacks a consensus-based research agenda. Methods: From August 2009 to February 2010, we contacted policymakers, academic researchers, and humanitarian aid workers, and conducted nine semistructured focus group discussions with 114 participants in three locations (Peru, Uganda, and Nepal), in both the capitals and remote humanitarian settings. Local stakeholders representing a range of academic expertise (psychiatry, psychology, social work, child protection, and medical anthropology) and organizations (governments, universities, nongovernmental organizations, and UN agencies) were asked to identify priority questions for MHPSS research in humanitarian settings, and to discuss factors that hamper and facilitate research. Results: Thematic analyses of transcripts show that participants broadly agreed on prioritized research themes in the following order: (1) the prevalence and burden of mental health and psychosocial difficulties in humanitarian settings, (2) how MHPSS implementation can be improved, (3) evaluation of specific MHPSS interventions, (4) the determinants of mental health and psychological distress, and (5) improved research methods and processes. Rather than differences in research themes across countries, what emerged was a disconnect between different groups of stakeholders regarding research processes: the perceived lack of translation of research findings into actual policy and programs; misunderstanding of research methods by aid workers; different appreciation of the time needed to conduct research; and disputed universality of research constructs. Conclusions: To advance a collaborative research agenda, actors in this field need to bridge the perceived disconnect between

  12. Influence of Genotype on Warfarin Maintenance Dose Predictions Produced Using a Bayesian Dose Individualization Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffian, Shamin M; Duffull, Stephen B; Roberts, Rebecca L; Tait, Robert C; Black, Leanne; Lund, Kirstin A; Thomson, Alison H; Wright, Daniel F B

    2016-12-01

    A previously established Bayesian dosing tool for warfarin was found to produce biased maintenance dose predictions. In this study, we aimed (1) to determine whether the biased warfarin dose predictions previously observed could be replicated in a new cohort of patients from 2 different clinical settings, (2) to explore the influence of CYP2C9 and VKORC1 genotype on predictive performance of the Bayesian dosing tool, and (3) to determine whether the previous population used to develop the kinetic-pharmacodynamic model underpinning the Bayesian dosing tool was sufficiently different from the test (posterior) population to account for the biased dose predictions. The warfarin maintenance doses for 140 patients were predicted using the dosing tool and compared with the observed maintenance dose. The impact of genotype was assessed by predicting maintenance doses with prior parameter values known to be altered by genetic variability (eg, EC50 for VKORC1 genotype). The prior population was evaluated by fitting the published kinetic-pharmacodynamic model, which underpins the Bayesian tool, to the observed data using NONMEM and comparing the model parameter estimates with published values. The Bayesian tool produced positively biased dose predictions in the new cohort of patients (mean prediction error [95% confidence interval]; 0.32 mg/d [0.14-0.5]). The bias was only observed in patients requiring ≥7 mg/d. The direction and magnitude of the observed bias was not influenced by genotype. The prior model provided a good fit to our data, which suggests that the bias was not caused by different prior and posterior populations. Maintenance doses for patients requiring ≥7 mg/d were overpredicted. The bias was not due to the influence of genotype nor was it related to differences between the prior and posterior populations. There is a need for a more mechanistic model that captures warfarin dose-response relationship at higher warfarin doses.

  13. Weight Care Project: Health professionals' attitudes and ability to assess body weight status - Study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murphy Kathy

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health professionals working in primary care and public health have opportunities to address body weight status issues with their patients through face-to-face contact. The objectives of this all-Ireland project are: 1. to assess the attitudes, current practices/behaviours and knowledge of key health professional groups on body weight status; 2. to assess the health professional groups' ability to identify body weight status in both adults and children. The health professional groups are: (a community related public health nurses; (b school public health nurses; (c GPs and practice nurses (primary care; and (d occupational health nurses (workplace from both Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland. Methods/Design This all-Ireland multi-disciplinary project follows a mixed methods approach using both quantitative and qualitative methodologies, and consists of four components: 1. Literature review - to explore the role of health professionals in managing obesity through spontaneous intervention in a variety of health promotion settings. 2. Telephone interviews and focus groups - to gain an in-depth insight into the views of health professionals in assessing body weight status. 3. Survey (primarily online but also paper-based - to determine the attitudes, current practices/behaviours and knowledge of health professionals in assessing body weight status. 4. Online evaluation study - an online interactive programme will be developed to assess health professionals' ability to identify the body weight status of adults and children. Discussion This project will assess and report the attitudes, current practices/behaviours and knowledge of key health professional groups within Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland on body weight status, and their ability to identify body weight status in both adults and children. The results of this project will generate recommendations for clinical practice in managing obesity, which may

  14. The Goat (Capra hircus) Mammary Gland Mitochondrial Proteome: A Study on the Effect of Weight Loss Using Blue-Native PAGE and Two-Dimensional Gel Electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cugno, Graziano; Parreira, José R; Ferlizza, Enea; Hernández-Castellano, Lorenzo E; Carneiro, Mariana; Renaut, Jenny; Castro, Noemí; Arguello, Anastasio; Capote, Juan; Campos, Alexandre M O; Almeida, André M

    2016-01-01

    Seasonal weight loss (SWL) is the most important limitation to animal production in the Tropical and Mediterranean regions, conditioning producer's incomes and the nutritional status of rural communities. It is of importance to produce strategies to oppose adverse effects of SWL. Breeds that have evolved in harsh climates have acquired tolerance to SWL through selection. Most of the factors determining such ability are related to changes in biochemical pathways as affected by SWL. In this study, a gel based proteomics strategy (BN: Blue-Native Page and 2DE: Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis) was used to characterize the mitochondrial proteome of the secretory tissue of the goat mammary gland. In addition, we have conducted an investigation of the effects of weight loss in two goat breeds with different levels of adaptation to nutritional stress: Majorera (tolerant) and Palmera (susceptible). The study used Majorera and Palmera dairy goats, divided in 4 sets, 2 for each breed: underfed group fed on wheat straw (restricted diet, so their body weight would be 15-20% reduced by the end of experiment), and a control group fed with an energy-balanced diet. At the end of the experimental period (22 days), mammary gland biopsies were obtained for all experimental groups. The proteomic analysis of the mitochondria enabled the resolution of a total of 277 proteins, and 148 (53%) were identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. Some of the proteins were identified as subunits of the glutamate dehydrogenase complex and the respiratory complexes I, II, IV, V from mitochondria, as well as numerous other proteins with functions in: metabolism, development, localization, cellular organization and biogenesis, biological regulation, response to stimulus, among others, that were mapped in both BN and 2DE gels. The comparative proteomics analysis enabled the identification of several proteins: NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase 75 kDa subunit and lamin B1 mitochondrial (up

  15. Differential Modulation of Rhythmic Brain Activity in Healthy Adults by a T-Type Calcium Channel Blocker: An MEG Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Kerry D; Maillet, Emeline L; Garcia, John; Cardozo, Timothy; Galatzer-Levy, Isaac; Llinás, Rodolfo R

    2017-01-01

    1-octanol is a therapeutic candidate for disorders involving the abnormal activation of the T-type calcium current since it blocks this current specifically. Such disorders include essential tremor and a group of neurological and psychiatric disorders resulting from thalamocortical dysrhythmia (TCD). For example, clinically, the observable phenotype in essential tremor is the tremor itself. The differential diagnostic of TCD is not based only on clinical signs and symptoms. Rather, TCD incorporates an electromagnetic biomarker, the presence of abnormal thalamocortical low frequency brain oscillations. The effect of 1-octanol on brain activity has not been tested. As a preliminary step to such a TCD study, we examined the short-term effects of a single dose of 1-octanol on resting brain activity in 32 healthy adults using magnetoencephalograpy. Visual inspection of baseline power spectra revealed that the subjects fell into those with strong low frequency activity (set 2, n = 11) and those without such activity, but dominated by an alpha peak (set 1, n = 22). Cross-validated linear discriminant analysis, using mean spectral density (MSD) in nine frequency bands as predictors, found overall that 82.5% of the subjects were classified as determined by visual inspection. The effect of 1-octanol on the MSD in narrow frequency bands differed between the two subject groups. In set 1 subjects the MSD increased in the 4.5-6.5Hz and 6.5-8.5 Hz bands. This was consistent with a widening of the alpha peak toward lower frequencies. In the set two subjects the MSD decrease in the 2.5-4.5 Hz and 4.5-6.5 Hz bands. This decreased power is consistent with the blocking effect of 1-octanol on T-type calcium channels. The subjects reported no adverse effects of the 1-octanol. Since stronger low frequency activity is characteristic of patients with TCD, 1-octanol and other T-type calcium channel blockers are good candidates for treatment of this group of disorders following a placebo

  16. Predicting Esophagitis After Chemoradiation Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: An Individual Patient Data Meta-Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palma, David A., E-mail: david.palma@uwo.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada); Senan, Suresh [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Oberije, Cary [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO Clinic), GROW – School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Belderbos, Jose [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute – Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Dios, Núria Rodríguez de [Department of Radiation Oncology, Parc de Salut Mar, Barcelona, Universidad Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); Bradley, Jeffrey D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Barriger, R. Bryan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Moreno-Jiménez, Marta [Department of Oncology, Radiation Oncology Division, Clínica Universidad de Navarra, University of Navarra, Pamplona (Spain); Kim, Tae Hyun [Center for Proton Therapy, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of); Ramella, Sara [Division of Radiation Oncology, Campus Bio-Medico University, Rome (Italy); Everitt, Sarah [Radiation Therapy Services, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Australia and Department of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University (Australia); Rengan, Ramesh [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Marks, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); De Ruyck, Kim [Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); and others

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) improves survival compared with sequential treatment for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer, but it increases toxicity, particularly radiation esophagitis (RE). Validated predictors of RE for clinical use are lacking. We performed an individual-patient-data meta-analysis to determine factors predictive of clinically significant RE. Methods and Materials: After a systematic review of the literature, data were obtained on 1082 patients who underwent CCRT, including patients from Europe, North America, Asia, and Australia. Patients were randomly divided into training and validation sets (2/3 vs 1/3 of patients). Factors predictive of RE (grade ≥2 and grade ≥3) were assessed using logistic modeling, with the concordance statistic (c statistic) used to evaluate the performance of each model. Results: The median radiation therapy dose delivered was 65 Gy, and the median follow-up time was 2.1 years. Most patients (91%) received platinum-containing CCRT regimens. The development of RE was common, scored as grade 2 in 348 patients (32.2%), grade 3 in 185 (17.1%), and grade 4 in 10 (0.9%). There were no RE-related deaths. On univariable analysis using the training set, several baseline factors were statistically predictive of RE (P<.05), but only dosimetric factors had good discrimination scores (c > .60). On multivariable analysis, the esophageal volume receiving ≥60 Gy (V60) alone emerged as the best predictor of grade ≥2 and grade ≥3 RE, with good calibration and discrimination. Recursive partitioning identified 3 risk groups: low (V60 <0.07%), intermediate (V60 0.07% to 16.99%), and high (V60 ≥17%). With use of the validation set, the predictive model performed inferiorly for the grade ≥2 endpoint (c = .58) but performed well for the grade ≥3 endpoint (c = .66). Conclusions: Clinically significant RE is common, but life-threatening complications occur in <1% of patients. Although several factors

  17. THE PANCHROMATIC HUBBLE ANDROMEDA TREASURY. IV. A PROBABILISTIC APPROACH TO INFERRING THE HIGH-MASS STELLAR INITIAL MASS FUNCTION AND OTHER POWER-LAW FUNCTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weisz, Daniel R.; Fouesneau, Morgan; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Clifton Johnson, L.; Beerman, Lori C.; Williams, Benjamin F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Hogg, David W.; Foreman-Mackey, Daniel T. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Rix, Hans-Walter; Gouliermis, Dimitrios [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Dolphin, Andrew E. [Raytheon Company, 1151 East Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85756 (United States); Lang, Dustin [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Bell, Eric F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Gordon, Karl D.; Kalirai, Jason S. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Skillman, Evan D., E-mail: dweisz@astro.washington.edu [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

    2013-01-10

    We present a probabilistic approach for inferring the parameters of the present-day power-law stellar mass function (MF) of a resolved young star cluster. This technique (1) fully exploits the information content of a given data set; (2) can account for observational uncertainties in a straightforward way; (3) assigns meaningful uncertainties to the inferred parameters; (4) avoids the pitfalls associated with binning data; and (5) can be applied to virtually any resolved young cluster, laying the groundwork for a systematic study of the high-mass stellar MF (M {approx}> 1 M {sub Sun }). Using simulated clusters and Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling of the probability distribution functions, we show that estimates of the MF slope, {alpha}, are unbiased and that the uncertainty, {Delta}{alpha}, depends primarily on the number of observed stars and on the range of stellar masses they span, assuming that the uncertainties on individual masses and the completeness are both well characterized. Using idealized mock data, we compute the theoretical precision, i.e., lower limits, on {alpha}, and provide an analytic approximation for {Delta}{alpha} as a function of the observed number of stars and mass range. Comparison with literature studies shows that {approx}3/4 of quoted uncertainties are smaller than the theoretical lower limit. By correcting these uncertainties to the theoretical lower limits, we find that the literature studies yield ({alpha}) = 2.46, with a 1{sigma} dispersion of 0.35 dex. We verify that it is impossible for a power-law MF to obtain meaningful constraints on the upper mass limit of the initial mass function, beyond the lower bound of the most massive star actually observed. We show that avoiding substantial biases in the MF slope requires (1) including the MF as a prior when deriving individual stellar mass estimates, (2) modeling the uncertainties in the individual stellar masses, and (3) fully characterizing and then explicitly modeling the

  18. Characterisation of nanoparticle emissions and exposure at traffic intersections through fast-response mobile and sequential measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Anju; Kumar, Prashant

    2015-04-01

    Quantification of disproportionate contribution made by signalised traffic intersections (TIs) to overall daily commuting exposure is important but barely known. We carried out mobile measurements in a car for size-resolved particle number concentrations (PNCs) in the 5-560 nm range under five different ventilation settings on a 6 km long busy round route with 10 TIs. These ventilation settings were windows fully open and both outdoor air intake from fan and heating off (Set1), windows closed, fan 25% on and heating 50% on (Set2), windows closed, fan 100% on and heating off (Set3), windows closed, fan off and heating 100% on (Set4), and windows closed, fan and heating off (Set5). Measurements were taken sequentially inside and outside the car cabin at 10 Hz sampling rate using a solenoid switching system in conjunction with a fast response differential mobility spectrometer (DMS50). The objectives were to: (i) identify traffic conditions under which TIs becomes hot-spots of PNCs, (ii) assess the effect of ventilation settings in free-flow and delay conditions (waiting time at a TI when traffic signal is red) on in-cabin PNCs with respect to on-road PNCs at TIs, (iii) deriving the relationship between the PNCs and change in driving speed during delay time at the TIs, and (iv) quantify the contribution of exposure at TIs with respect to overall commuting exposure. Congested TIs were found to become hot-spots when vehicle accelerate from idling conditions. In-cabin peak PNCs followed similar temporal trend as for on-road peak PNCs. Reduction in in-cabin PNC with respect to outside PNC was highest (70%) during free-flow traffic conditions when both fan drawing outdoor air into the cabin and heating was switched off. Such a reduction in in-cabin PNCs at TIs was highest (88%) with respect to outside PNC during delay conditions when fan was drawing outside air at 25% on and heating was 50% on settings. PNCs and change in driving speed showed an exponential

  19. Comparative Evaluation of Cash Benefit Scheme of Janani Suraksha Yojana for Beneficiary Mothers from Different Health Care Settings of Rewa District, Madhya Pradesh, India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trivedi R

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: For better outcomes in mother and child health, Government of India launched the National Rural Health Mission (NRHM in 2005 with a major objective of providing accessible, affordable and quality health care to the rural population; especially the vulnerable. Reduction in MMR to 100/100,000 is one of its goals and the Janani Suraksha Yojana (JSY is the key strategy of NRHM to achieve this reduction. The JSY, as a safe motherhood intervention and modified alternative of the National Maternity Benefit Scheme (NMBS, has been implemented in all states and Union territories with special focus on low performing states. The main objective and vision of JSY is to reduce maternal, neo-natal mortality and promote institutional delivery among the poor pregnant women of rural and urban areas. This scheme is 100% centrally sponsored and has an integrated delivery and post delivery care with the help of a key person i.e. ASHA (Accredited Social Health Activist, followed by cash monetary help to the women. Objectives: 1To evaluate cash benefit service provided under JSY at different health care settings. 2 To know the perception and elicit suggestions of beneficiaries on quality of cash benefit scheme of JSY. Methodology: This is a health care institute based observational cross sectional study including randomly selected 200 JSY beneficiary mothers from the different health care settings i.e., Primary Health Centres, Community Health Centres, District Hospital and Medical College Hospital of Rewa District of Madhya Pradesh state. Data was collected with the help of set pro forma and then analysed with Epi Info 2000. Chi square test was applied appropriately. Results: 60% and 80% beneficiaries from PHC and CHC received cash within 1 week after discharge whereas 100% beneficiaries of District Hospital and Medical College Hospital received cash at the time of discharge; the overall distribution of time of cash disbursement among beneficiaries of

  20. The investigation of active Martian dune fields using very high resolution photogrammetric measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jungrack; Kim, Younghwi; Park, Minseong

    2016-10-01

    At the present time, arguments continue regarding the migration speeds of Martian dune fields and their correlation with atmospheric circulation. However, precisely measuring the spatial translation of Martian dunes has succeeded only a very few times—for example, in the Nili Patera study (Bridges et al. 2012) using change-detection algorithms and orbital imagery. Therefore, in this study, we developed a generic procedure to precisely measure the migration of dune fields with recently introduced 25-cm resolution orbital imagery specifically using a high-accuracy photogrammetric processor. The processor was designed to trace estimated dune migration, albeit slight, over the Martian surface by 1) the introduction of very high resolution ortho images and stereo analysis based on hierarchical geodetic control for better initial point settings; 2) positioning error removal throughout the sensor model refinement with a non-rigorous bundle block adjustment, which makes possible the co-alignment of all images in a time series; and 3) improved sub-pixel co-registration algorithms using optical flow with a refinement stage conducted on a pyramidal grid processor and a blunder classifier. Moreover, volumetric changes of Martian dunes were additionally traced by means of stereo analysis and photoclinometry. The established algorithms have been tested using high-resolution HIRISE time-series images over several Martian dune fields. Dune migrations were iteratively processed both spatially and volumetrically, and the results were integrated to be compared to the Martian climate model. Migrations over well-known crater dune fields appeared to be almost static for the considerable temporal periods and were weakly correlated with wind directions estimated by the Mars Climate Database (Millour et al. 2015). As a result, a number of measurements over dune fields in the Mars Global Dune Database (Hayward et al. 2014) covering polar areas and mid-latitude will be demonstrated

  1. The investigation of Martian dune fields using very high resolution photogrammetric measurements and time series analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J.; Park, M.; Baik, H. S.; Choi, Y.

    2016-12-01

    At the present time, arguments continue regarding the migration speeds of Martian dune fields and their correlation with atmospheric circulation. However, precisely measuring the spatial translation of Martian dunes has rarely conducted only a very few times Therefore, we developed a generic procedure to precisely measure the migration of dune fields with recently introduced 25-cm resolution High Resolution Imaging Science Experimen (HIRISE) employing a high-accuracy photogrammetric processor and sub-pixel image correlator. The processor was designed to trace estimated dune migration, albeit slight, over the Martian surface by 1) the introduction of very high resolution ortho images and stereo analysis based on hierarchical geodetic control for better initial point settings; 2) positioning error removal throughout the sensor model refinement with a non-rigorous bundle block adjustment, which makes possible the co-alignment of all images in a time series; and 3) improved sub-pixel co-registration algorithms using optical flow with a refinement stage conducted on a pyramidal grid processor and a blunder classifier. Moreover, volumetric changes of Martian dunes were additionally traced by means of stereo analysis and photoclinometry. The established algorithms have been tested using high-resolution HIRISE images over a large number of Martian dune fields covering whole Mars Global Dune Database. Migrations over well-known crater dune fields appeared to be almost static for the considerable temporal periods and were weakly correlated with wind directions estimated by the Mars Climate Database (Millour et al. 2015). Only over a few Martian dune fields, such as Kaiser crater, meaningful migration speeds (>1m/year) compared to phtotogrammetric error residual have been measured. Currently a technical improved processor to compensate error residual using time series observation is under developing and expected to produce the long term migration speed over Martian dune

  2. Climate Variability In The Euro-atlantic Sector As Simulated By Echam4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, I.; Corte-Real, J.; Ramos, A.; Conde, F.

    The atmosphere is a fundamental component of the climate system and its influence in local and global climates results from its composition, structure and motion. The best available tools to simulate future climates are coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs), ECHAM4 (T42 L19)[1] being a very relevant exam- ple of such a model due to its elaborated parametrizations of physical processes. The purpose of this work is twofold : (1) to assess the ability of ECHAM4 in reproducing the reference climate of 1961-1990, over the Euro-Atlantic sector (29N-71N; 67W- 59E) in terms of mean sea level pressure, surface temperature and total precipitation; (2) to evaluate the expected changes of the same climate elements in a warmer world. To attain the first goal the ECHAMSs control run output is compared with observed data obtained from the Climatic Research Unit (CRU data set)[2-5]; to achieve the second objective, the modelSs control run is compared with its transient run forced by greenhouse gases. In both cases, comparisons are made in terms of mean values, variability in space and time and extremes. References [1] E. Roeckner, K. Arpe, L. Bengtsson, M. Christoph, M. Claussen, L. Dümenil, M. Esch, M. Giorgetta, U. Schlese, and U. Schulzweida, 1996: The atmospheric gen- eral circulation model ECHAM4: Model description and simulation of present-day climate. Max Planck Institut für Meteorologie, Report No. 218, Hamburg, Germany, 90 pp. [2] M. Hulme, D. Conway, P.D. Jones, T. Jiang, E.M. Barrow, and C. Turney (1995), Construction of a 1961-90 European climatology for climate change impacts and mod- elling applications, Int. J. Climatol., 15, 1333-1363. [3] M. Hulme (1994), The cost of climate data U a European experience, Weather, 49, 168-175. [4] M. Hulme, and M.G. New (1997), Dependence of large-scale precipitation clima- tologies on temporal and spatial sampling, J. Climate, 10, 1099-1113. 1 [5] C.J. Willmot, S.M. Robeson and M.J. Janis (1996

  3. Chironomus alchichica sp. n. (Diptera: Chironomidae) from Lake Alchichica, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Raúl; Prat, Narcís; Ribera, Carles; Michailova, Paraskeva; Hernández-Fonseca, María Del Carmen; Alcocer, Javier

    2017-12-15

    Morphological analysis of all developmental stages (except female), mitochondrial DNA sequences from cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (cox1) and cytological analysis of the polytene chromosomes were used to describe a new species of Chironomus found in the littoral and profundal zones of an endorheic, warm-monomictic lake in Mexico. Male imago is distinguished by the shape of superior volsella and by an antennal and bristle ratio lower than two. The pupa is characterized by the spur morphology of abdominal segment VIII. There is also a continuous row of hooklets on abdominal segment II. The larva is distinguished by a combination of antenna, mentum, mandible, and pecten epipharyngis characteristics, and abdominal ventral tubules. Molecular and cytological analysis supported the morphological differences found. The maximum likelihood tree obtained shows that Chironomus alchichica sp. n. clusters together with Chironomus decorus-group sp. 2 Butler et al. (1995) (bootstrap support = 92%), but genetic p-distances within C. alchichica sp. n. (0.004) were lower than the p-distances between other species of the decorus-group (C. decorus-group sp. 2, Chironomus bifurcatus Wülker et al., 2009 and Chironomus maturus Johannsen, 1908) confirming that it is a different species. The new species belongs to thummi cytocomplex, (decorus-group), with chromosome set- 2n = 8 and chromosome arm combinations: AB CD EF G. Karyologically, the species is closest to Chironomus riihimaekiensis Wülker (1973). This species has very compact salivary gland chromosomes with well heterochromatinized centromere regions in chromosomes AB CD G. Several fixed homozygous inversions distinguish arm A of the species from that of C. riihimaekiensis. Arm E differs from that of C. riihimaekiensis by simple fixed homozygous inversion. Some similarities in band sequences of this arm were found with species from the decorus-group as Chironomus blaylocki Wülker et al., 2009 and C. bifurcatus (decorus

  4. Low-dose CT pulmonary angiography on a 15-year-old CT scanner: a feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moritz Kaup

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Computed tomography (CT low-dose (LD imaging is used to lower radiation exposure, especially in vascular imaging; in current literature, this is mostly on latest generation high-end CT systems. Purpose To evaluate the effects of reduced tube current on objective and subjective image quality of a 15-year-old 16-slice CT system for pulmonary angiography (CTPA. Material and Methods CTPA scans from 60 prospectively randomized patients (28 men, 32 women were examined in this study on a 15-year-old 16-slice CT scanner system. Standard CT (SD settings were 100 kV and 150 mAs, LD settings were 100 kV and 50 mAs. Attenuation of the pulmonary trunk, various anatomic landmarks, and image noise were quantitatively measured; contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR and signal-to-noise ratios (SNR were calculated. Three independent blinded radiologists subjectively rated each image series using a 5-point grading scale. Results CT dose index (CTDI in the LD series was 66.46% lower compared to the SD settings (2.49 ± 0.55 mGy versus 7.42 ± 1.17 mGy. Attenuation of the pulmonary trunk showed similar results for both series (SD 409.55 ± 91.04 HU; LD 380.43 HU ± 93.11 HU; P = 0.768. Subjective image analysis showed no significant differences between SD and LD settings regarding the suitability for detection of central and peripheral PE (central SD/LD, 4.88; intra-class correlation coefficients [ICC], 0.894/4.83; ICC, 0.745; peripheral SD/LD, 4.70; ICC, 0.943/4.57; ICC, 0.919; all P > 0.4. Conclusion The LD protocol, on a 15-year-old CT scanner system without current high-end hardware or post-processing tools, led to a dose reduction of approximately 67% with similar subjective image quality and delineation of central and peripheral pulmonary arteries.

  5. Pharmacist-Physician Collaboration at a Family Medicine Residency Program: A Focus Group Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keri Hager

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: In response to transforming healthcare and pursuit of the Triple Aim, many health systems have added team members to expand the capabilities and effectiveness of the team to facilitate these aims. The objective of this study was to explore knowledge and perceptions of pharmacist-physician collaboration among family medicine residents (FMR, family medicine faculty (FMF, and pharmacist faculty and residents in a practice where clinical pharmacy services were relatively new. Understanding the nuances of pharmacist-physician interactions will provide insight into how to improve FMR education to prepare learners for patient-centered, team-based practice. Methods: An exploratory descriptive qualitative study design was used to articulate perceptions of professional roles and team-based care in an interprofessional family medicine community-based clinical practice. Five, 60-minute focus groups were conducted in a clinical training setting that focuses on preparing family medicine physicians for collaborative rural primary care practice. Results: Twenty-one FMRs, eight FMF, and six clinical pharmacists participated. Three themes emerged from the focus groups and were consistent across the groups: 1 roles of pharmacists recognized by physicians in different settings, 2 benefits to collaboration, and 3 keys to successful pharmacist-physician collaboration which include a developing the relationship, b optimizing communication, c creating beneficial clinical workflow, d clarifying roles and responsibilities, and e increasing opportunities for meaningful interactions. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that by co-locating physicians and pharmacists in the same environment, and providing a basic structure for collaboration, a collaborative working relationship can be initiated. Practices looking to have more effective collaborative working relationships should strive to increase the frequency of interactions of the professions, help the

  6. Mutation analysis of the ERCC4/FANCQ gene in hereditary breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Kohlhase

    Full Text Available The ERCC4 protein forms a structure-specific endonuclease involved in the DNA damage response. Different cancer syndromes such as a subtype of Xeroderma pigmentosum, XPF, and recently a subtype of Fanconi Anemia, FA-Q, have been attributed to biallelic ERCC4 gene mutations. To investigate whether monoallelic ERCC4 gene defects play some role in the inherited component of breast cancer susceptibility, we sequenced the whole ERCC4 coding region and flanking untranslated portions in a series of 101 Byelorussian and German breast cancer patients selected for familial disease (set 1, n = 63 or for the presence of the rs1800067 risk haplotype (set 2, n = 38. This study confirmed six known and one novel exonic variants, including four missense substitutions but no truncating mutation. Missense substitution p.R415Q (rs1800067, a previously postulated breast cancer susceptibility allele, was subsequently screened for in a total of 3,698 breast cancer cases and 2,868 controls from Germany, Belarus or Russia. The Gln415 allele appeared protective against breast cancer in the German series, with the strongest effect for ductal histology (OR 0.67; 95%CI 0.49; 0.92; p = 0.003, but this association was not confirmed in the other two series, with the combined analysis yielding an overall Mantel-Haenszel OR of 0.94 (95% CI 0.81; 1.08. There was no significant effect of p.R415Q on breast cancer survival in the German patient series. The other three detected ERCC4 missense mutations included two known rare variants as well as a novel substitution, p.E17V, that we identified on a p.R415Q haplotype background. The p.E17V mutation is predicted to be probably damaging but was present in just one heterozygous patient. We conclude that the contribution of ERCC4/FANCQ coding mutations to hereditary breast cancer in Central and Eastern Europe is likely to be small.

  7. Building a More Diverse Workforce in HIV/AIDS Research: The Time has Come.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoff, David M; Cargill, Victoria A

    2016-09-01

    greater discussions of these challenges in academic institutions and settings; (2) suggest meaningful strategies to address these challenges; and (3) foster a national discussion about the long-term investment necessary for permanent change, as there are no easy 'fixes' for these challenges.

  8. Preoperative detection of hepatocellular carcinoma: comparison of combined constrast-enhanced MR imaging and combined CT during arterial portography and CT hepatic arteriography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwak, H.S.; Kim, C.S.; Lee, J.M.; Seoul National University Medical Research Center

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare Gd-DTPA-enhanced dynamic MR images, superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO)-enhanced MR images, combined Gd-DTPA-enhanced dynamic and SPIO-enhanced MR images, vs combined CT arterial portography (CTAP) and CT hepatic arteriography (CTHA), in the detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Twenty-four patients with 38 nodular HCCs (5-60 mm, mean 23.0 mm) were retrospectively analyzed. Image reviews were conducted on a liver segment-by-segment basis. A total of 192 segments, including 36 segments with 38 HCC, were reviewed independently by three radiologists. Each radiologist read four sets of images (set 1, unenhanced and Gd-DTPA-enhanced dynamic MR images; set 2, unenhanced and SPIO-enhanced MR images; set 3, combined Gd-DTPA-enhanced dynamic and SPIO-enhanced MR images; set 4, combined CTAP and CTHA). To minimize any possible learning bias, the reviewing order was randomized and the reviewing procedure was performed in four sessions at 2-week intervals. The diagnostic accuracy (Az values) for HCCs of combined CTAP and CTHA, combined Gd-DTPA-enhanced dynamic and SPIO-enhanced MR images, Gd-DTPA-enhanced dynamic MR images, and SPIO-enhanced MR images for all observers were 0.934, 0.963, 0.878, and 0.869, respectively. The diagnostic accuracy of combined CTAP and CTHA and combined Gd-DTPA-enhanced dynamic and SPIO-enhanced MR images was significantly higher than Gd-DTPA-enhanced dynamic MR images or SPIO-enhanced MR images (p<0.005). The mean specificity of combined CTAP and CTHA (93%) and combined Gd-DTPA-enhanced dynamic and SPIO-enhanced MR images (95%) was significantly higher than Gd-DTPA-enhanced dynamic MR images (87%) or SPIO-enhanced MR images (88%; p<0.05). Combined Gd-DTPA-enhanced dynamic and SPIO-enhanced MR images may obviate the need for more invasive combined CTAP and CTHA for the preoperative evaluation of patients with HCC

  9. Influence of geometry of pipe on flow accelerated corrosion - a study under neutral pH condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madasamy, P.; Mukunthan, M.; Chandramohan, P.; Krishna Mohan, T.V.; Velmurugan, S.; Sylvanus, Andrews; Natarajan, E.

    2015-01-01

    The carbon steel piping material's degradation due to flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) is one of the problems in nuclear power plant. FAC impacts plant operation and maintenance significantly. Wall thinning of structural materials should be predictable based on combined hydrodynamics analyses and experimental corrosion data. Such predictive tools help to take preventive measures before loss of material becomes a serious issue for plant operation. In order to develop predictive tools, data on the effect of various parameters that control FAC are required. As per existing literature, one of the important parameters that affect FAC is piping configuration (Geometry of flow path). Hence, experiments were carried out to assess the role played by the geometry of the piping in the FAC of carbon steel. In this study, experiments were conducted in simulation loop under neutral pH condition while varying the geometry parameter of bend such as bend angle and bend radius. Therefore, pipe specimen holder 15 NB bend with 58 °, 73 ° as bend angle and 4D, 2D bend radius was designed and fabricated. The experiments were carried out in order to quantify the wear rate (wall thickness measurement was by ultrasonic method) with a single phase flow velocity (7 m/s) under neutral pH conditions With the pipe specimen four experiments were conducted under neutral pH condition and at 120 DC. Wall thickness mapping was carried out by ultrasonic thickness gauge using a template before and after the experiment. High wall thickness reduction under neutral water chemistry enables easy measurement by ultrasonic thickness gauge. It was observed from the first two sets (2D 58°, 4D 58°) that the corrosion rate with 4D, 58 ° was 50% less than the corrosion with 2D 58°. Subsequently, another two sets of experiments (2D 73° and 4D 73°) was carried out in SIM loop at 7 m/s under neutral pH conditions for two months. Thus, this method of experiments enables us to understand the geometrical

  10. Identification of Biomarkers of Impaired Sensory Profiles among Autistic Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Ansary, Afaf; Hassan, Wail M.; Qasem, Hanan; Das, Undurti N.

    2016-01-01

    Background Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder that displays significant heterogeneity. Comparison of subgroups within autism, and analyses of selected biomarkers as measure of the variation of the severity of autistic features such as cognitive dysfunction, social interaction impairment, and sensory abnormalities might help in understanding the pathophysiology of autism. Methods and Participants In this study, two sets of biomarkers were selected. The first included 7, while the second included 6 biomarkers. For set 1, data were collected from 35 autistic and 38 healthy control participants, while for set 2, data were collected from 29 out of the same 35 autistic and 16 additional healthy subjects. These markers were subjected to a principal components analysis using either covariance or correlation matrices. Moreover, libraries composed of participants categorized into units were constructed. The biomarkers used include, PE (phosphatidyl ethanolamine), PS (phosphatidyl serine), PC (phosphatidyl choline), MAP2K1 (Dual specificity mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1), IL-10 (interleukin-10), IL-12, NFκB (nuclear factor-κappa B); PGE2 (prostaglandin E2), PGE2-EP2, mPGES-1 (microsomal prostaglandin synthase E-1), cPLA2 (cytosolic phospholipase A2), 8-isoprostane, and COX-2 (cyclo-oxygenase-2). Results While none of the studied markers correlated with CARS and SRS as measure of cognitive and social impairments, six markers significantly correlated with sensory profiles of autistic patients. Multiple regression analysis identifies a combination of PGES, mPGES-1, and PE as best predictors of the degree of sensory profile impairment. Library identification resulted in 100% correct assignments of both autistic and control participants based on either set 1 or 2 biomarkers together with a satisfactory rate of assignments in case of sensory profile impairment using different sets of biomarkers. Conclusion The two selected sets of biomarkers were effective to

  11. Records for radioactive waste management up to repository closure: Managing the primary level information (PLI) set

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-07-01

    , are generated, identified, reviewed and actively managed during pre-closure phases so that they are available and usable at the appropriate time. This publication addresses the establishment and management of the PLI set up to the point of closure of a repository. Specifically, it (1) describes the importance of establishing a coordinated, integrated and well-managed PLI set, (2) provides a basic overview of the components of a PLI set, and (3) provides general guidance on the management of and responsibility for the PLI set

  12. Community-Based Management of Acute Malnutrition to Reduce Wasting in Urban Informal Settlements of Mumbai, India: A Mixed-Methods Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah More, Neena; Waingankar, Anagha; Ramani, Sudha; Chanani, Sheila; D'Souza, Vanessa; Pantvaidya, Shanti; Fernandez, Armida; Jayaraman, Anuja

    2018-03-21

    We evaluated an adaptation of a large-scale community-based management of acute malnutrition program run by an NGO with government partnerships, in informal settlements of Mumbai, India. The program aimed to reduce the prevalence of wasting among children under age 3 and covered a population of approximately 300,000. This study used a mixed-methods approach including a quasi-experimental design to compare prevalence estimates of wasting in intervention areas with neighboring informal settlements. Cross-sectional data were collected from March through November 2014 for the baseline and October through December 2015 for the endline. Endline data were analyzed using mixed-effects logistic regression models, adjusting for child, maternal, and household characteristics. In addition, we conducted in-depth interviews with 37 stakeholders (13 staff and 24 mothers) who reported on salient features that contributed to successful implementation of the program. We interviewed 2,578 caregivers at baseline and 3,455 at endline in intervention areas. In comparison areas, we interviewed 2,082 caregivers at baseline and 2,122 at endline. At endline, the prevalence of wasting decreased by 28% (18% to 13%) in intervention areas and by 5% (16.9% to 16%) in comparison areas. Analysis of the endline data indicated that children in intervention areas were significantly less likely to be malnourished (adjusted odds ratio, 0.81; confidence interval, 0.67 to 0.99). Stakeholders identified 4 main features as contributing to the success of the program: (1) tailoring and reinforcement of information provided to caregivers in informal settings, (2) constant field presence of staff, (3) holistic case management of issues beyond immediate malnourishment, and (4) persistence of field staff in persuading reluctant families. Staff capabilities were enhanced through training, stringent monitoring mechanisms, and support from senior staff in tackling difficult cases. NGO-government partnerships can

  13. Application of research findings and summary of research needs: Bud Britton Memorial Symposium on Metabolic Disorders of Feedlot Cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galyean, M L; Eng, K S

    1998-01-01

    Updated research findings with acidosis, feedlot bloat, liver abscesses, and sudden death syndromes were presented at the Bud Britton Memorial Symposium on Metabolic Disorders of Feedlot Cattle. Possible industry applications include the need to establish guidelines for use of clostridial vaccines in feedlot cattle, further assessment of the relationship between acidosis and polioencephalomalacia, examination of the effects of various ionophores on the incidence of metabolic disorders, and evaluation of the effects of feed bunk management and limit- and restricted-feeding programs on the incidence of metabolic disorders. A multidisciplinary approach among researchers, consulting nutritionists and veterinarians, and feedlot managers will be required for effective progress in research and in the application of research findings. Areas suggested for further research include 1) assessment of feed consumption patterns and social behavior of cattle in large-pen, feedlot settings; 2) evaluation of the relationship between feed intake management systems (feed bunk management programs, limit- and programmed-feeding) and the incidence of metabolic disorders, including delineation of the role of variability in feed intake in the etiology of such disorders; 3) efforts to improve antemortem and postmortem diagnosis, and to establish standardized regional or national epidemiological databases for various metabolic disorders; 4) ascertaining the accuracy of diagnosis of metabolic disorders and determining the relationship of previous health history of animals to the incidence of metabolic disorders; 5) further defining ruminal and intestinal microbiology as it relates to metabolic disorders and deeper evaluation of metabolic changes that occur with such disorders; 6) continued appraisal of the effects of grain processing and specific feed ingredients and nutrients on metabolic disorders, and development of new feed additives to control or prevent these disorders; and 7

  14. Mechanical Alterations Associated with Repeated Treadmill Sprinting under Heat Stress.

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    Olivier Girard

    Full Text Available Examine the mechanical alterations associated with repeated treadmill sprinting performed in HOT (38°C and CON (25°C conditions.Eleven recreationally active males performed a 30-min warm-up followed by three sets of five 5-s sprints with 25-s recovery and 3-min between sets in each environment. Constant-velocity running for 1-min at 10 and 20 km.h-1 was also performed prior to and following sprinting.Mean skin (37.2±0.7 vs. 32.7±0.8°C; P<0.001 and core (38.9±0.2 vs. 38.8±0.3°C; P<0.05 temperatures, together with thermal comfort (P<0.001 were higher following repeated sprinting in HOT vs. CON. Step frequency and vertical stiffness were lower (-2.6±1.6% and -5.5±5.5%; both P<0.001 and contact time (+3.2±2.4%; P<0.01 higher in HOT for the mean of sets 1-3 compared to CON. Running distance per sprint decreased from set 1 to 3 (-7.0±6.4%; P<0.001, with a tendency for shorter distance covered in HOT vs. CON (-2.7±3.4%; P = 0.06. Mean vertical (-2.6±5.5%; P<0.01, horizontal (-9.1±4.4%; P<0.001 and resultant ground reaction forces (-3.0±2.8%; P<0.01 along with vertical stiffness (-12.9±2.3%; P<0.001 and leg stiffness (-8.4±2.7%; P<0.01 decreased from set 1 to 3, independently of conditions. Propulsive power decreased from set 1 to 3 (-16.9±2.4%; P<0.001, with lower propulsive power values in set 2 (-6.6%; P<0.05 in HOT vs. CON. No changes in constant-velocity running patterns occurred between conditions, or from pre-to-post repeated-sprint exercise.Thermal strain alters step frequency and vertical stiffness during repeated sprinting; however without exacerbating mechanical alterations. The absence of changes in constant-velocity running patterns suggests a strong link between fatigue-induced velocity decrements during sprinting and mechanical alterations.

  15. Mechanical Alterations Associated with Repeated Treadmill Sprinting under Heat Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocherie, Franck; Morin, Jean-Benoit; Racinais, Sébastien; Millet, Grégoire P.; Périard, Julien D.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Examine the mechanical alterations associated with repeated treadmill sprinting performed in HOT (38°C) and CON (25°C) conditions. Methods Eleven recreationally active males performed a 30-min warm-up followed by three sets of five 5-s sprints with 25-s recovery and 3-min between sets in each environment. Constant-velocity running for 1-min at 10 and 20 km.h-1 was also performed prior to and following sprinting. Results Mean skin (37.2±0.7 vs. 32.7±0.8°C; P<0.001) and core (38.9±0.2 vs. 38.8±0.3°C; P<0.05) temperatures, together with thermal comfort (P<0.001) were higher following repeated sprinting in HOT vs. CON. Step frequency and vertical stiffness were lower (-2.6±1.6% and -5.5±5.5%; both P<0.001) and contact time (+3.2±2.4%; P<0.01) higher in HOT for the mean of sets 1–3 compared to CON. Running distance per sprint decreased from set 1 to 3 (-7.0±6.4%; P<0.001), with a tendency for shorter distance covered in HOT vs. CON (-2.7±3.4%; P = 0.06). Mean vertical (-2.6±5.5%; P<0.01), horizontal (-9.1±4.4%; P<0.001) and resultant ground reaction forces (-3.0±2.8%; P<0.01) along with vertical stiffness (-12.9±2.3%; P<0.001) and leg stiffness (-8.4±2.7%; P<0.01) decreased from set 1 to 3, independently of conditions. Propulsive power decreased from set 1 to 3 (-16.9±2.4%; P<0.001), with lower propulsive power values in set 2 (-6.6%; P<0.05) in HOT vs. CON. No changes in constant-velocity running patterns occurred between conditions, or from pre-to-post repeated-sprint exercise. Conclusions Thermal strain alters step frequency and vertical stiffness during repeated sprinting; however without exacerbating mechanical alterations. The absence of changes in constant-velocity running patterns suggests a strong link between fatigue-induced velocity decrements during sprinting and mechanical alterations. PMID:28146582

  16. Prevalence of diagnosis and direct treatment costs of back disorders in 644,773 children and youths in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ochsmann Elke B

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many authors have reported about the high prevalence rates of self-reported back pain in children. Nevertheless, little is known about the diagnosis of back disorders - regardless of whether the diagnosis is associated with back pain or not. Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyse the prevalence rates and costs of diagnosis of back disorders in childhood and youth. Methods We conducted a secondary data analysis of a large, population based German data set (2,300,980 insurants of statutory health insurance funds which allowed for identification of prevalence rates of diagnoses of back disorders in children (age group 0-14 years and youths (age group 15-24 years using three digit ICD-10 codes for dorsopathies (M40 - M54: kyphosis and lordosis; scoliosis; spinal osteochondrosis; other deforming dorsopathies; ankylosing spondylitis; other inflammatory spondylopathies; spondylosis; other spondylopathies; spondylopathies in diseases classified elsewhere; cervical disc disorders; other intervertebral disc disorders; other dorsopathies, not elsewhere classified; dorsalgia. Direct treatment costs were calculated based on the real incurred costs for cases with a singular diagnosis of a back disorder. Wherever possible, the results of the random sample were extrapolated to all insurants of statutory health insurance funds (i. e., about 90% of the German population. Results We found prevalence rates for the diagnosis of back disorders to range between 0.01 - 12.5%. "Scoliosis" (M41 and "dorsalgia" (M54 were the most frequent diagnoses in both age groups. Based on these results, it was calculated that in 2002 alone, approximately 1.4 million children/youths in Germany were diagnosed with "dorsalgia" (M54, and that the direct costs for back disorders in childhood and youth accounted for at least 100 million Euros. Conclusions Instead of focusing on the individual, and self-reported disorder or disability, this analysis allowed for

  17. Improving fMRI reliability in presurgical mapping for brain tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, M Tynan R; Clarke, David B; Stroink, Gerhard; Beyea, Steven D; D'Arcy, Ryan Cn

    2016-03-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) is becoming increasingly integrated into clinical practice for presurgical mapping. Current efforts are focused on validating data quality, with reliability being a major factor. In this paper, we demonstrate the utility of a recently developed approach that uses receiver operating characteristic-reliability (ROC-r) to: (1) identify reliable versus unreliable data sets; (2) automatically select processing options to enhance data quality; and (3) automatically select individualised thresholds for activation maps. Presurgical fMRI was conducted in 16 patients undergoing surgical treatment for brain tumours. Within-session test-retest fMRI was conducted, and ROC-reliability of the patient group was compared to a previous healthy control cohort. Individually optimised preprocessing pipelines were determined to improve reliability. Spatial correspondence was assessed by comparing the fMRI results to intraoperative cortical stimulation mapping, in terms of the distance to the nearest active fMRI voxel. The average ROC-r reliability for the patients was 0.58±0.03, as compared to 0.72±0.02 in healthy controls. For the patient group, this increased significantly to 0.65±0.02 by adopting optimised preprocessing pipelines. Co-localisation of the fMRI maps with cortical stimulation was significantly better for more reliable versus less reliable data sets (8.3±0.9 vs 29±3 mm, respectively). We demonstrated ROC-r analysis for identifying reliable fMRI data sets, choosing optimal postprocessing pipelines, and selecting patient-specific thresholds. Data sets with higher reliability also showed closer spatial correspondence to cortical stimulation. ROC-r can thus identify poor fMRI data at time of scanning, allowing for repeat scans when necessary. ROC-r analysis provides optimised and automated fMRI processing for improved presurgical mapping. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence

  18. Dealing with foreign cultural paradigms: A systematic review on intercultural challenges of international medical graduates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Michalski

    Full Text Available An increasing number of International Medical Graduates (IMG, who are defined to be physicians working in a country other than their country of origin and training, immigrate to Western countries. In order to ensure safe and high-quality patient care, they have to take medical and language tests. This systematic review aims to (1 collect all empiric research on intercultural communication of IMGs in medical settings, (2 identify and categorize all text passages mentioning intercultural issues in the included studies, and (3 describe the most commonly reported intercultural areas of communication of IMGs.This review was based on the PRISMA-Guidelines for systematic reviews. We conducted a broad and systematic electronic literature search for empiric research in the following databases: MEDLINE, BIOSIS Citation Index, BIOSIS Previews, KCI-Korean Journal Database and SciELO Citation Index. The search results were synthesized and analyzed with the aid of coding systems. These coding systems were based on textual analysis and derived from the themes and topics of the results and discussion sections from the included studies. A quality assessment was performed, comparing the studies with their corresponding checklist (COREQ or STROBE. Textual results of the studies were extracted and categorized.Among 10,630 search results, 47 studies were identified for analysis. 31 studies were qualitative, 12 quantitative and 4 studies used mixed methods. The quality assessment revealed a low level of quality of the studies in general. The following intercultural problems were identified: IMGs were not familiar with shared decision-making and lower hierarchies in the health care system in general. They had difficulties with patient-centered care, the subtleties of the foreign language and with the organizational structures of the new health care system. In addition, they described the medical education in their home countries as science-oriented, without focusing

  19. Dealing with foreign cultural paradigms: A systematic review on intercultural challenges of international medical graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalski, Kerstin; Farhan, Nabeel; Motschall, Edith; Vach, Werner; Boeker, Martin

    2017-01-01

    An increasing number of International Medical Graduates (IMG), who are defined to be physicians working in a country other than their country of origin and training, immigrate to Western countries. In order to ensure safe and high-quality patient care, they have to take medical and language tests. This systematic review aims to (1) collect all empiric research on intercultural communication of IMGs in medical settings, (2) identify and categorize all text passages mentioning intercultural issues in the included studies, and (3) describe the most commonly reported intercultural areas of communication of IMGs. This review was based on the PRISMA-Guidelines for systematic reviews. We conducted a broad and systematic electronic literature search for empiric research in the following databases: MEDLINE, BIOSIS Citation Index, BIOSIS Previews, KCI-Korean Journal Database and SciELO Citation Index. The search results were synthesized and analyzed with the aid of coding systems. These coding systems were based on textual analysis and derived from the themes and topics of the results and discussion sections from the included studies. A quality assessment was performed, comparing the studies with their corresponding checklist (COREQ or STROBE). Textual results of the studies were extracted and categorized. Among 10,630 search results, 47 studies were identified for analysis. 31 studies were qualitative, 12 quantitative and 4 studies used mixed methods. The quality assessment revealed a low level of quality of the studies in general. The following intercultural problems were identified: IMGs were not familiar with shared decision-making and lower hierarchies in the health care system in general. They had difficulties with patient-centered care, the subtleties of the foreign language and with the organizational structures of the new health care system. In addition, they described the medical education in their home countries as science-oriented, without focusing on

  20. Elastic robust intramedullary nailing for forearm fracture in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wasem, Jürgen

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Forearm fractures are the most common fractures in children (23% of all fractures. Basically there are two treatment options available for diaphyseal forearm fractures in children: closed reduction with cast immobilisation (conservative therapy and the elastic stable intramedullary nailing (ESIN. Treatment decision is influenced by the doctor's estimation of fracture instability. Stable fractures can be treated conservatively whereas instable forearm shaft fractures can be treated according the following three treatment strategies: 1. conservative therapy in an outpatient setting 2. conservative therapy in the operating room in attendance to change to ESIN in case that no stabilisation can be achieved with cast immobilisation 3. immediate treatment with ESIN in the operating room. Objectives: Aim of this Health Technology Assessment (HTA report is to assess and report the published evidence concerning effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of ESIN as a treatment option for diaphyseal forearm fractures in children and to identify future research need. Important parameters for the assessment of effectiveness are objective parameters (axis deviation, losses of motion, and numbers of reductions in case of redislocations and subjective parameters (pain or impairment in quality of life. Furthermore, a health economic evaluation shall be done which refers to the costs of the different therapy strategies. Methods: An extensive, systematic literature search in medical, economic, and HTA literature databases was performed. Relevant data were extracted and synthesised. Results: Three cohort studies and seven case series have been identified. Controlled clinical studies, systematic reviews and/or HTA reports that gave evidence to answer the own study question have not been found. The identified studies partly differed in respect of defined indication for ESIN, study population and treatment strategies. For that reason comparability of results was

  1. ImSET 3.1: Impact of Sector Energy Technologies Model Description and User's Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, Michael J.; Livingston, Olga V.; Balducci, Patrick J.; Roop, Joseph M.; Schultz, Robert W.

    2009-05-22

    This 3.1 version of the Impact of Sector Energy Technologies (ImSET) model represents the next generation of the previously-built ImSET model (ImSET 2.0) that was developed in 2005 to estimate the macroeconomic impacts of energy-efficient technology in buildings. In particular, a special-purpose version of the Benchmark National Input-Output (I-O) model was designed specifically to estimate the national employment and income effects of the deployment of Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)–developed energy-saving technologies. In comparison with the previous versions of the model, this version features the use of the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis 2002 national input-output table and the central processing code has been moved from the FORTRAN legacy operating environment to a modern C++ code. ImSET is also easier to use than extant macroeconomic simulation models and incorporates information developed by each of the EERE offices as part of the requirements of the Government Performance and Results Act. While it does not include the ability to model certain dynamic features of markets for labor and other factors of production featured in the more complex models, for most purposes these excluded features are not critical. The analysis is credible as long as the assumption is made that relative prices in the economy would not be substantially affected by energy efficiency investments. In most cases, the expected scale of these investments is small enough that neither labor markets nor production cost relationships should seriously affect national prices as the investments are made. The exact timing of impacts on gross product, employment, and national wage income from energy efficiency investments is not well-enough understood that much special insight can be gained from the additional dynamic sophistication of a macroeconomic simulation model. Thus, we believe that this version of ImSET is a cost-effective solution to estimating the economic

  2. Outcome of the geological mapping of the ONKALO underground research facility access tunnel, chainage 1980-3116

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordbaeck, N.

    2010-06-01

    This report describes the lithology and geological structures of the ONKALO underground rock characterization facility access tunnel in chainage 1980-3116. This part of the tunnel was excavated and mapped from spring 2007 to autumn 2008. The bedrock is very heterogeneous and mainly composed of veined gneiss and diatexitic gneiss, but many felsic dykes and sections of pegmatitic granite also occur. In addition, small sections of mica gneiss and K-feldspar porphyry are present. There are also numerous inclusions of mica gneiss, quartz gneiss and skarn. The foliation dips moderately towards SE. 14 fold axes and axial planes were measured from the ONKALO tunnel in chainage 1980-3116 and all have been interpreted to belong to deformation phase D 3 . The measured fold axes have various orientations, but most have moderate plunges and ENE- or WSW-trending ones dominate. The axial planes typically dip moderately towards SE. An almost vertical lineation was also measured from mica gneiss on two locations. A total of 7668 fractures were measured. Three main fracture sets were distinguished from the measured orientations: set 1 fractures are vertical and strike approximately NS, set 2 fractures are more or less horizontal and set 3 fractures are vertical and ENEWSW- striking. The most common filling minerals are calcite, pyrite, chlorite, kaolinite, epidote, muscovite, quartz, biotite, and illite. Of the measured fractures, 579 were slickensided. The slickensided fractures are mainly either sub-vertical N-S-trending (set 1) or sub-vertical NE-SW-trending, with dip to SE. Slickenside surfaces show N-S- and NE-SW-trending lineations, with shallow dip. The slickensided fractures are mostly strike-slip faults with both sinistral and dextral sense of movement. The chainage 1980- 3116 contains 170 tunnel-crosscutting fractures. The orientation is mostly vertical N-Sstriking, sub-horizontal or vertical E-W- trending. 27 deformation zone intersections were also observed, 23 brittle

  3. The Goat (Capra hircus Mammary Gland Mitochondrial Proteome: A Study on the Effect of Weight Loss Using Blue-Native PAGE and Two-Dimensional Gel Electrophoresis.

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    Graziano Cugno

    Full Text Available Seasonal weight loss (SWL is the most important limitation to animal production in the Tropical and Mediterranean regions, conditioning producer's incomes and the nutritional status of rural communities. It is of importance to produce strategies to oppose adverse effects of SWL. Breeds that have evolved in harsh climates have acquired tolerance to SWL through selection. Most of the factors determining such ability are related to changes in biochemical pathways as affected by SWL. In this study, a gel based proteomics strategy (BN: Blue-Native Page and 2DE: Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was used to characterize the mitochondrial proteome of the secretory tissue of the goat mammary gland. In addition, we have conducted an investigation of the effects of weight loss in two goat breeds with different levels of adaptation to nutritional stress: Majorera (tolerant and Palmera (susceptible. The study used Majorera and Palmera dairy goats, divided in 4 sets, 2 for each breed: underfed group fed on wheat straw (restricted diet, so their body weight would be 15-20% reduced by the end of experiment, and a control group fed with an energy-balanced diet. At the end of the experimental period (22 days, mammary gland biopsies were obtained for all experimental groups. The proteomic analysis of the mitochondria enabled the resolution of a total of 277 proteins, and 148 (53% were identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. Some of the proteins were identified as subunits of the glutamate dehydrogenase complex and the respiratory complexes I, II, IV, V from mitochondria, as well as numerous other proteins with functions in: metabolism, development, localization, cellular organization and biogenesis, biological regulation, response to stimulus, among others, that were mapped in both BN and 2DE gels. The comparative proteomics analysis enabled the identification of several proteins: NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase 75 kDa subunit and lamin B1 mitochondrial

  4. Differential Modulation of Rhythmic Brain Activity in Healthy Adults by a T-Type Calcium Channel Blocker: An MEG Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Kerry D.; Maillet, Emeline L.; Garcia, John; Cardozo, Timothy; Galatzer-Levy, Isaac; Llinás, Rodolfo R.

    2017-01-01

    1-octanol is a therapeutic candidate for disorders involving the abnormal activation of the T-type calcium current since it blocks this current specifically. Such disorders include essential tremor and a group of neurological and psychiatric disorders resulting from thalamocortical dysrhythmia (TCD). For example, clinically, the observable phenotype in essential tremor is the tremor itself. The differential diagnostic of TCD is not based only on clinical signs and symptoms. Rather, TCD incorporates an electromagnetic biomarker, the presence of abnormal thalamocortical low frequency brain oscillations. The effect of 1-octanol on brain activity has not been tested. As a preliminary step to such a TCD study, we examined the short-term effects of a single dose of 1-octanol on resting brain activity in 32 healthy adults using magnetoencephalograpy. Visual inspection of baseline power spectra revealed that the subjects fell into those with strong low frequency activity (set 2, n = 11) and those without such activity, but dominated by an alpha peak (set 1, n = 22). Cross-validated linear discriminant analysis, using mean spectral density (MSD) in nine frequency bands as predictors, found overall that 82.5% of the subjects were classified as determined by visual inspection. The effect of 1-octanol on the MSD in narrow frequency bands differed between the two subject groups. In set 1 subjects the MSD increased in the 4.5-6.5Hz and 6.5–8.5 Hz bands. This was consistent with a widening of the alpha peak toward lower frequencies. In the set two subjects the MSD decrease in the 2.5–4.5 Hz and 4.5–6.5 Hz bands. This decreased power is consistent with the blocking effect of 1-octanol on T-type calcium channels. The subjects reported no adverse effects of the 1-octanol. Since stronger low frequency activity is characteristic of patients with TCD, 1-octanol and other T-type calcium channel blockers are good candidates for treatment of this group of disorders following a

  5. Endogenous and radiation-induced expression of γH2AX in biopsies from patients treated for carcinoma of the uterine cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olive, Peggy L.; Banuelos, C. Adriana; Durand, Ralph E.; Kim, Joo-Young; Aquino-Parsons, Christina

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: The possibility of using γH2AX foci as a marker of DNA damage and as a potential predictor of tumour response to treatment was examined using biopsies from 3 sets of patients with advanced carcinoma of the cervix. The relation between endogenous γH2AX expression and hypoxia was also examined. Materials and methods: Set 1 consisted of 26 biopsies that included pre-treatment and 24 h post-radiation treatment samples. Pre-treatment biopsies from 12 patients in Set 2 were used to develop image analysis software while pre-treatment biopsies from 33 patients in Set 3 were examined for the relation between staining for the hypoxia marker pimonidazole and endogenous γH2AX expression. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections were analyzed after antigen retrieval and fluorescence antibody labeling for the hypoxia markers CAIX or pimonidazole in combination with γH2AX staining. Results: Before treatment, 24 ± 19% of cells contained γH2AX foci, with most positive cells containing fewer than 5 foci per nucleus. Twenty-four hours after exposure to the first fraction of 1.8-2.5 Gy, 38 ± 19% contained foci. CAIX positive cells were 1.4 times more likely to exhibit endogenous γH2AX foci, and pimonidazole-positive cells were 2.8 times more likely to contain γH2AX foci. For 18 patients for whom both pre-treatment and 24 h post-irradiation biopsies were available, local control was unrelated to the fraction of cells that retained γH2AX foci. However, 24 h after irradiation, tumours that had received 2.5 Gy showed a significantly higher fraction of cells with residual γH2AX foci than tumours given 1.8 Gy. Conclusions: Endogenous γH2AX foci are enriched in hypoxic tumour regions. Small differences in delivered dose can produce quantifiable differences in residual DNA damage that can overshadow inter-tumour differences in response.

  6. Geology, lithogeochemistry and paleotectonic setting of the host sequence to the Kangasjärvi Zn-Cu deposit, central Finland: implications for volcanogenic massive sulphide exploration in the Vihanti-Pyhäsalmi district

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D. Roberts

    2004-01-01

    hydrothermal circulation and subsequent alteration and massive sulphide mineralization at Kangasjärvi, and possibly elsewhere in the district, share many characteristics with other well-described, ancient VMS deposits (e.g. massive sulphide deposits in the Flin Flon Belt, Manitoba, Canada. These characteristics include: 1 an association with bimodal volcanism developed in extensional settings; 2 a close spatial association with regionally extensive felsic subvolcanic intrusions; and 3 petrogenesis of ore-associated volcanic rocks (e.g. high-silica rhyolites, felsic subvolcanic intrusions indicative of substantial heat transfer from the mantle tothe upper crust and the development of anomalous thermal corridors. These features translate into geochemically distinctive rock types that, when combined with aspects of stratigraphy and pre-metamorphic alteration, may be used to develop regional exploration strategies in the Vihanti-Pyhäsalmi district.

  7. Gene transcript analysis blood values correlate with {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-somatostatin analog (SSA) PET/CT imaging in neuroendocrine tumors and can define disease status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodei, L. [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Milan (Italy); Kidd, M.; Modlin, I.M.; Drozdov, I. [Wren Laboratories, Branford, CT (United States); Prasad, V. [Charite University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Berlin (Germany); Severi, S.; Paganelli, G. [Istituto Scientifico Romagnolo per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori (IRST) IRCCS, Nuclear Medicine and Radiometabolic Units, Meldola (Italy); Ambrosini, V. [S. Orsola-Malpighi University Hospital, Nuclear Medicine, Bologna (Italy); Kwekkeboom, D.J.; Krenning, E.P. [Erasmus Medical Center Rotterdam, Nuclear Medicine Department, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Baum, R.P. [Zentralklinik Bad Berka, THERANOSTICS Center for Molecular Radiotherapy and Imaging, Bad Berka (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    Precise determination of neuroendocrine tumor (NET) disease status and response to therapy remains a rate-limiting concern for disease management. This reflects limitations in biomarker specificity and resolution capacity of imaging. In order to evaluate biomarker precision and identify if combinatorial blood molecular markers and imaging could provide added diagnostic value, we assessed the concordance between {sup 68}Ga-somatostatin analog (SSA) positron emission tomography (PET), circulating NET gene transcripts (NETest), chromogranin A (CgA), and Ki-67 in NETs. We utilized two independent patient groups with positive {sup 68}Ga-SSA PET: data set 1 ({sup 68}Ga-SSA PETs undertaken for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT), as primary or salvage treatment, n = 27) and data set 2 ({sup 68}Ga-SSA PETs performed in patients referred for initial disease staging or restaging after various therapies, n = 22). We examined the maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}), circulating gene transcripts, CgA levels, and baseline Ki-67. Regression analyses, generalized linear modeling, and receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analyses were undertaken to determine the strength of the relationships. SUV{sub max} measured in two centers were mathematically evaluated (regression modeling) and determined to be comparable. Of 49 patients, 47 (96 %) exhibited a positive NETest. Twenty-six (54 %) had elevated CgA (χ{sup 2} = 20.1, p < 2.5 x 10{sup -6}). The majority (78 %) had Ki-67 < 20 %. Gene transcript scores were predictive of imaging with >95 % concordance and significantly correlated with SUV{sub max} (R {sup 2} = 0.31, root-mean-square error = 9.4). The genes MORF4L2 and somatostatin receptors SSTR1, 3, and 5 exhibited the highest correlation with SUV{sub max}. Progressive disease was identified by elevated levels of a quotient of MORF4L2 expression and SUV{sub max} [ROC-derived AUC (R {sup 2} = 0.7, p < 0.05)]. No statistical relationship was identified

  8. Gene transcript analysis blood values correlate with 68Ga-DOTA-somatostatin analog (SSA) PET/CT imaging in neuroendocrine tumors and can define disease status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodei, L.; Kidd, M.; Modlin, I.M.; Drozdov, I.; Prasad, V.; Severi, S.; Paganelli, G.; Ambrosini, V.; Kwekkeboom, D.J.; Krenning, E.P.; Baum, R.P.

    2015-01-01

    Precise determination of neuroendocrine tumor (NET) disease status and response to therapy remains a rate-limiting concern for disease management. This reflects limitations in biomarker specificity and resolution capacity of imaging. In order to evaluate biomarker precision and identify if combinatorial blood molecular markers and imaging could provide added diagnostic value, we assessed the concordance between 68 Ga-somatostatin analog (SSA) positron emission tomography (PET), circulating NET gene transcripts (NETest), chromogranin A (CgA), and Ki-67 in NETs. We utilized two independent patient groups with positive 68 Ga-SSA PET: data set 1 ( 68 Ga-SSA PETs undertaken for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT), as primary or salvage treatment, n = 27) and data set 2 ( 68 Ga-SSA PETs performed in patients referred for initial disease staging or restaging after various therapies, n = 22). We examined the maximum standardized uptake value (SUV max ), circulating gene transcripts, CgA levels, and baseline Ki-67. Regression analyses, generalized linear modeling, and receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analyses were undertaken to determine the strength of the relationships. SUV max measured in two centers were mathematically evaluated (regression modeling) and determined to be comparable. Of 49 patients, 47 (96 %) exhibited a positive NETest. Twenty-six (54 %) had elevated CgA (χ 2 = 20.1, p < 2.5 x 10 -6 ). The majority (78 %) had Ki-67 < 20 %. Gene transcript scores were predictive of imaging with >95 % concordance and significantly correlated with SUV max (R 2 = 0.31, root-mean-square error = 9.4). The genes MORF4L2 and somatostatin receptors SSTR1, 3, and 5 exhibited the highest correlation with SUV max . Progressive disease was identified by elevated levels of a quotient of MORF4L2 expression and SUV max [ROC-derived AUC (R 2 = 0.7, p < 0.05)]. No statistical relationship was identified between CgA and Ki-67 and no relationship with imaging parameters

  9. Tectonics control over instability of volcanic edifices in transtensional tectonic regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norini, G.; Capra, L.; Lagmay, A. M. F.; Manea, M.; Groppelli, G.

    2009-04-01

    We present the results of analogue modeling designed to investigate the interactions between volcanic edifices and transtensional basement faulting. Three sets of experiments were run to account for three examples of stratovolcanoes in active transtensive tectonics regimes, the Nevado de Toluca and Jocotitlan volcanoes in Mexico, and the Mayon volcano in the Philippines. All these volcanoes show different behavior and relationship among volcanism, instability of the volcanic edifice, and basement tectonics. Field geological and structural data gave the necessary constrains to the models. The modeling apparatus consisted of a sand cone on a sheared basal layer. Injections of vegetable oil were used to model the rising of magma inside the deformed analogue cones. Set 1: In the case of a volcano directly on top of a basal transtensive shear producing a narrow graben, as observed on the Nevado de Toluca volcano, the analogue models reveal a strong control of the basement faulting on the magma migration path and the volcano instability. Small lateral collapses are directed parallel to the basal shear and affect a limited sector of the cone. Set 2: If the graben generated by transtensive tectonics is bigger in respect to the volcanic edifice and the volcano sits on one boundary fault, as in the case of Mayon volcano, the combined normal and transcurrent movements of the analogue basement fault generate a sigmoidal structure in the sand cone, inducing major sector collapses directed at approx 45° relative to the basement shear toward the downthrown block. Set 3: For volcanoes located near major transtensive faults, as the Jocotitlan volcano, analogue modelling shows an important control of the regional tectonics on the geometry of the fractures and migration paths of magma inside the cone. These structures render unstable the flanks of the volcano and promote sector collapses perpendicular to the basement shear and directed toward the graben formed by the transtensive

  10. Intradialytic Laughter Yoga therapy for haemodialysis patients: a pre-post intervention feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Paul N; Parsons, Trisha; Ben-Moshe, Ros; Neal, Merv; Weinberg, Melissa K; Gilbert, Karen; Ockerby, Cherene; Rawson, Helen; Herbu, Corinne; Hutchinson, Alison M

    2015-06-09

    Laughter Yoga consists of physical exercise, relaxation techniques and simulated vigorous laughter. It has been associated with physical and psychological benefits for people in diverse clinical and non-clinical settings, but has not yet been tested in a haemodialysis setting. The study had three aims: 1) to examine the feasibility of conducting Laughter Yoga for patients with end stage kidney disease in a dialysis setting; 2) to explore the psychological and physiological impact of Laughter Yoga for these patients; and 3) to estimate the sample size required for future research. Pre/post intervention feasibility study. Eighteen participants were recruited into the study and Laughter Yoga therapists provided a four week intradialytic program (30-min intervention three times per week). Primary outcomes were psychological items measured at the first and last Laughter Yoga session, including: quality of life; subjective wellbeing; mood; optimism; control; self-esteem; depression, anxiety and stress. Secondary outcomes were: blood pressure, intradialytic hypotensive episodes and lung function (forced expiratory volume). Dialysis nurses exposed to the intervention completed a Laughter Yoga attitudes and perceptions survey (n = 11). Data were analysed using IBM SPSS Statistics v22, including descriptive and inferential statistics, and sample size estimates were calculated using G*Power. One participant withdrew from the study for medical reasons that were unrelated to the study during the first week (94 % retention rate). There were non-significant increases in happiness, mood, and optimism and a decrease in stress. Episodes of intradialytic hypotension decreased from 19 pre and 19 during Laughter Yoga to 4 post Laughter Yoga. There was no change in lung function or blood pressure. All nurses agreed or strongly agreed that Laughter Yoga had a positive impact on patients' mood, it was a feasible intervention and they would recommend Laughter Yoga to their patients. Sample

  11. Uroepithelial thickening improves detection of vesicoureteral reflux in infants with prenatal hydronephrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Zachary N; McLeod, Daryl J; Ching, Christina B; Herz, Daniel B; Bates, D Gregory; Becknell, Brian; Alpert, Seth A

    2016-08-01

    Postnatal evaluation of prenatal hydronephrosis (PNH) often includes a voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) for VUR assessment. Despite limited supporting data, VCUG is currently recommended if postnatal renal and bladder ultrasound (RBUS) reveals moderate/severe hydronephrosis (HN) or hydroureter (HU). Recent studies have shown VUR is more accurately diagnosed by using certain sonographic findings as criteria for obtaining VCUG. Uroepithelial thickening (UET) of the renal pelvis is a finding associated with high-grade vesicoureteral reflux (HGVUR); however, the clinical significance of UET with PNH has not been studied. We sought to determine if the presence of UET implies increased risk for VUR, and to investigate whether UET can improve the test characteristics of RBUS for VUR. We retrospectively analyzed postnatal RBUS and VCUG findings in infants ≤30 days undergoing evaluation for "prenatal hydronephrosis" over an 11-year period. We used logistic regression to identify factors associated with VUR. Test characteristics of RBUS for HGVUR were compared based on the presence of UET and two criteria sets to define abnormal RBUS. Criteria set 1 consisted of HN SFU grade 3-4 and/or HU; criteria set 2 was defined by the presence of two of following: UET, HU, duplication, and/or renal dysmorphia. Of 135 patients, 39 (29%) had VUR, of whom 16 (41%) had HGVUR. UET was significantly associated with VUR (p < 0.001), and the sensitivity for HGVUR based on UET alone was 94%. On multivariable analysis, UET, HU, duplication, and renal dysmorphia remained significant independent predictors of HGVUR. Compared to criteria 1, using criteria 2 resulted in 43 fewer VCUGs, and significant improvement in sensitivity and specificity for HGVUR (Table). Consistent with previous studies, HN alone on postnatal RBUS has little value in predicting the presence or severity of VUR. This study is the largest known series to evaluate UET in the setting of PNH, and our results demonstrate that UET

  12. Effects of simulated acid rain on soil and soil solution chemistry in a monsoon evergreen broad-leaved forest in southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Qingyan; Wu, Jianping; Liang, Guohua; Liu, Juxiu; Chu, Guowei; Zhou, Guoyi; Zhang, Deqiang

    2015-05-01

    Acid rain is an environmental problem of increasing concern in China. In this study, a laboratory leaching column experiment with acid forest soil was set up to investigate the responses of soil and soil solution chemistry to simulated acid rain (SAR). Five pH levels of SAR were set: 2.5, 3.0, 3.5, 4.0, and 4.5 (as a control, CK). The results showed that soil acidification would occur when the pH of SAR was ≤3.5. The concentrations of NO₃(-)and Ca(2+) in the soil increased significantly when the pH of SAR fell 3.5. The concentration of SO₄(2-) in the soil increased significantly when the pH of SAR was soil solution chemistry became increasingly apparent as the experiment proceeded (except for Na(+) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC)). The net exports of NO₃(-), SO₄(2-), Mg(2+), and Ca(2+) increased about 42-86% under pH 2.5 treatment as compared to CK. The Ca(2+) was sensitive to SAR, and the soil could release Ca(2+) through mineral weathering to mitigate soil acidification. The concentration of exchangeable Al(3+) in the soil increased with increasing the acidity of SAR. The releases of soluble Al and Fe were SAR pH dependent, and their net exports under pH 2.5 treatment were 19.6 and 5.5 times, respectively, higher than that under CK. The net export of DOC was reduced by 12-29% under SAR treatments as compared to CK. Our results indicate the chemical constituents in the soil are more sensitive to SAR than those in the soil solution, and the effects of SAR on soil solution chemistry depend not only on the intensity of SAR but also on the duration of SAR addition. The soil and soil solution chemistry in this region may not be affected by current precipitation (pH≈4.5) in short term, but the soil and soil leachate chemistry may change dramatically if the pH of precipitation were below 3.5 and 3.0, respectively.

  13. The Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury. IV. A Probabilistic Approach to Inferring the High-mass Stellar Initial Mass Function and Other Power-law Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisz, Daniel R.; Fouesneau, Morgan; Hogg, David W.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Foreman-Mackey, Daniel T.; Lang, Dustin; Johnson, L. Clifton; Beerman, Lori C.; Bell, Eric F.; Gordon, Karl D.; Gouliermis, Dimitrios; Kalirai, Jason S.; Skillman, Evan D.; Williams, Benjamin F.

    2013-01-01

    We present a probabilistic approach for inferring the parameters of the present-day power-law stellar mass function (MF) of a resolved young star cluster. This technique (1) fully exploits the information content of a given data set; (2) can account for observational uncertainties in a straightforward way; (3) assigns meaningful uncertainties to the inferred parameters; (4) avoids the pitfalls associated with binning data; and (5) can be applied to virtually any resolved young cluster, laying the groundwork for a systematic study of the high-mass stellar MF (M >~ 1 M ⊙). Using simulated clusters and Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling of the probability distribution functions, we show that estimates of the MF slope, α, are unbiased and that the uncertainty, Δα, depends primarily on the number of observed stars and on the range of stellar masses they span, assuming that the uncertainties on individual masses and the completeness are both well characterized. Using idealized mock data, we compute the theoretical precision, i.e., lower limits, on α, and provide an analytic approximation for Δα as a function of the observed number of stars and mass range. Comparison with literature studies shows that ~3/4 of quoted uncertainties are smaller than the theoretical lower limit. By correcting these uncertainties to the theoretical lower limits, we find that the literature studies yield langαrang = 2.46, with a 1σ dispersion of 0.35 dex. We verify that it is impossible for a power-law MF to obtain meaningful constraints on the upper mass limit of the initial mass function, beyond the lower bound of the most massive star actually observed. We show that avoiding substantial biases in the MF slope requires (1) including the MF as a prior when deriving individual stellar mass estimates, (2) modeling the uncertainties in the individual stellar masses, and (3) fully characterizing and then explicitly modeling the completeness for stars of a given mass. The precision on MF

  14. Renal carcinoma: determination of the features and extension by magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, E.; Soler, R.; Requejo, I.; Gonzalez, J.; Pombo, S.

    2000-01-01

    We retrospectively reviewed the MR findings in 31 patients with malignant renal neoplasms-either renal cell carcinoma (n=30) or renal leiomyosarcoma (n=1) out of a total of 160 renal neoplasms diagnosed in our hospital over the past 4 years. MR was performed in patients allergic to iodinated contrast media or when the results with ultrasound or computed tomography (CT) were not definitive as to the origin of the mass, extension of the venous thrombosis or infiltration of adjacent tissues or organs. The studies were carried out with a 0.5-T superconducting magnet. Axial images were obtained on T1-weighted (SE-T1) and T - weighted (SET-T2), and coronal and/or sagittal SE-T2 images were obtained when more precise information on the extent of the inferior vena cava (IVC)thrombus was needed. The MR images were correlated with the intraoperative and/or histopathological findings. The size of the renal masses ranges between 3 and 17 cm in 29 cases and was less than 3 cm in 2 cases. The signal intensity of the masses was intermediate in SE-T1 sequences (n=31; homogeneous in 4 and heterogeneous in 27). The signal was heterogeneously hyperintense (n=30) in T2-weighted images (with hypointense central areas in 7 cases and/or very hyperintense central areas in 23. The signal was hypointense in only one case. The intravenous administration of Gd-DTPA (n=8) heterogeneously increased the signal intensity in all the lesions. Renal vein thrombus and/or IVC thrombus was detected in 15 and 10 patients, respectively. The size and upward extension of the thrombus agreed with the surgical findings in every case. the suspicion of the infiltration of adjacent tissues or organs raised by CT was ruled out in 3 cases and confirmed in another 3. The renal origin of the mass was established by sagittal and coronal images in 2 cases. MR is a useful for assessing the local extension of renal neoplasms and the size and upward extension of IVC tumor thrombi. It should be employed in those cases in which the CT findings are not definitive or the administration of iodinated contrast media is contraindicated. (Author) 18 refs

  15. The ASH1 HOMOLOG 2 (ASHH2 histone H3 methyltransferase is required for ovule and anther development in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul E Grini

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: SET-domain proteins are histone lysine (K methyltransferases (HMTase implicated in defining transcriptionally permissive or repressive chromatin. The Arabidopsis ASH1 HOMOLOG 2 (ASHH2 protein (also called SDG8, EFS and CCR1 has been suggested to methylate H3K4 and/or H3K36 and is similar to Drosophila ASH1, a positive maintainer of gene expression, and yeast Set2, a H3K36 HMTase. Mutation of the ASHH2 gene has pleiotropic developmental effects. Here we focus on the role of ASHH2 in plant reproduction. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A slightly reduced transmission of the ashh2 allele in reciprocal crosses implied involvement in gametogenesis or gamete function. However, the main requirement of ASHH2 is sporophytic. On the female side, close to 80% of mature ovules lack embryo sac. On the male side, anthers frequently develop without pollen sacs or with specific defects in the tapetum layer, resulting in reduction in the number of functional pollen per anther by up to approximately 90%. In consistence with the phenotypic findings, an ASHH2 promoter-reporter gene was expressed at the site of megaspore mother cell formation as well as tapetum layers and pollen. ashh2 mutations also result in homeotic changes in floral organ identity. Transcriptional profiling identified more than 300 up-regulated and 600 down-regulated genes in ashh2 mutant inflorescences, whereof the latter included genes involved in determination of floral organ identity, embryo sac and anther/pollen development. This was confirmed by real-time PCR. In the chromatin of such genes (AP1, AtDMC1 and MYB99 we observed a reduction of H3K36 trimethylation (me3, but not H3K4me3 or H3K36me2. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The severe distortion of reproductive organ development in ashh2 mutants, argues that ASHH2 is required for the correct expression of genes essential to reproductive development. The reduction in the ashh2 mutant of H3K36me3 on down-regulated genes relevant to

  16. Preparing Future Geoscientists at the Critical High School-to-College Junction: Project METALS and the Value of Engaging Diverse Institutions to Serve Underrepresented Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, L. D.; Maygarden, D.; Serpa, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    Since 2010, the Minority Education Through Traveling and Learning in the Sciences (METALS) program, a collaboration among San Francisco State Univ., the Univ. of Texas at El Paso, the Univ. of New Orleans, and Purdue Univ., has created meaningful, field-based geoscience experiences for underrepresented minority high school students. METALS activities promote excitement about geoscience in field settings and foster mutual respect and trust among participants of different backgrounds and ethnicities. These gains are strengthened by the collective knowledge of the university partners and by faculty, graduate and undergraduate students, scientists, and science teachers who guide the field trips and who are committed to encouraging diversity in the geosciences. Through the student experiences it provides, METALS has helped shape and shift student attitudes and orientation toward geoscience, during and beyond their field experience, just as these students are poised at the critical juncture from high school to college. A review of the METALS findings and summative evaluation shows a distinct pattern of high to moderately high impact on most students in the various cohorts of the program. METALS, overall, was perceived by participants as a program that: (1) opens up opportunities for individuals who might not typically be able to experience science in outdoor settings; (2) offers high-interest geology content in field contexts, along with social and environmental connections; (3) promotes excitement about geology while encouraging the development of mutual respect, interdependence, and trust among individuals of different ethnicities; (4) influences the academic choices of students, in particular their choice of major and course selection in college. Summative data show that multiple aspects of this program were highly effective. Cross-university collaborations create a dynamic forum and a high-impact opportunity for students from different backgrounds to meet and develop

  17. Utility of diffusion-weighted MR imaging in the diagnosis of placenta accreta spectrum abnormality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sannananja, Bhagya; Ellermeier, Anna; Hippe, Daniel S; Winter, Thomas C; Kang, Stella K; Lee, Susanna I; Kilgore, Mark R; Dighe, Manjiri K

    2018-04-17

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the utility of added DWI sequences as an adjunct to traditional MR imaging in the evaluation of abnormal placentation in patients with suspicion for placenta accreta spectrum abnormality or morbidly adherent placenta (MAP). The study was approved by local ethics committee. The subjects included pregnant women with prenatal MRI performed between July 2013 to July 2015. All imaging was performed on a Philips 1.5T MR scanner using pelvic phased-array coil. Only T2-weighted and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) series were compiled for review. Two randomized imaging sets were created: set 1 included T2-weighted series only (T2W); set 2 included T2W with DWI series together (T2W + DWI). Three radiologists, blinded to history and pathology, reviewed the imaging, with 2 weeks of time between the two image sets. Sensitivity, specificity, and overall accuracy for MAP were calculated and compared between T2W only and T2W + DWI reads. Associations between imaging findings and invasion on pathology were tested using the Chi-squared test. Confidence scores, inter-reader agreement, and systematic differences were documented. A total of 17 pregnant women were included in the study. 8 cases were pathologically diagnosed with MAP. There were no significant differences in the diagnostic accuracy between T2W and T2W + DWI in the diagnosis of MAP in terms of overall accuracy (62.7% for T2W vs. 68.6% for T2W + DWI, p = 0.68), sensitivity (70.8% for T2W vs. 95.8% for T2W + DWI, p = 0.12), and specificity (55.6% for T2W vs. 44.4% for T2W + DWI, p = 0.49). There was no significant difference in the diagnostic confidence between the review of T2W images alone and the T2W + DWI review (mean 7.3 ± 1.8 for T2W vs. 7.5 ± 1.8 for T2W + DWI, p = 0.37). With the current imaging technique, addition of DWI sequence to the traditional T2W images cannot be shown to significantly increase the accuracy or

  18. Computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) of subsolid nodules: Evaluation of a commercial CAD system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benzakoun, Joseph; Bommart, Sébastien; Coste, Joël; Chassagnon, Guillaume; Lederlin, Mathieu; Boussouar, Samia

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • CAD sensitivity is still limited for automated detection of subsolid nodules. • CAD detection rate is higher for part-solid than for pure ground-glass nodules. • Part-solid nodule detection is not better for nodules with larger solid component. - Abstract: Objectives: To evaluate the performance of a commercially available CAD system for automated detection and measurement of subsolid nodules. Materials and methods: The CAD system was tested on 50 pure ground-glass and 50 part-solid nodules (median diameter: 17 mm) previously found on standard-dose CT scans in 100 different patients. True nodule detection and the total number of CAD marks were evaluated at different sensitivity settings. The influence of nodule and CT acquisition characteristics was analyzed with logistic regression. Software and manually measured diameters were compared with Spearman and Bland-Altman methods. Results: With sensitivity adjusted for 3-mm nodule detection, 50/100 (50%) subsolid nodules were detected, at the average cost of 17 CAD marks per CT. These figures were respectively 26/100 (26%) and 2 at the 5-mm setting. At the highest sensitivity setting (2-mm nodule detection), the average number of CAD marks per CT was 41 but the nodule detection rate only increased to 54%. Part–solid nodules were better detected than pure ground glass nodules: 36/50 (72%) versus 14/50 (28%) at the 3-mm setting (p < 0.0001), with no influence of the solid component size. Except for the type (i.e. part solid or pure ground glass), no other nodule characteristic influenced the detection rate. High-quality segmentation was obtained for 79 nodules, which for automated measurements correlated well with manual measurements (rho = 0.90[0.84–0.93]). All part-solid nodules had software-measured attenuation values above −671 Hounsfield units (HU). Conclusion: The detection rate of subsolid nodules by this CAD system was insufficient, but high-quality segmentation was obtained in 79% of

  19. Computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) of subsolid nodules: Evaluation of a commercial CAD system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benzakoun, Joseph, E-mail: benzakoun.joseph@gmail.com [Hôpital Hôtel-Dieu, 1 parvis Notre-Dame, 75004 Paris (France); Université Paris Descartes, 12 rue de l’Ecole de Médecine, 75006 Paris (France); Bommart, Sébastien, E-mail: s-bommart@chu-montpellier.fr [CHU de Montpellier, 191 avenue du Doyen Gaston Giraud, 34000 Montpellier (France); INSERM U 1046, 371 avenue du Doyen G. Giraud, 34000 Montpellier (France); Coste, Joël, E-mail: joel.coste@htd.aphp.fr [Hôpital Hôtel-Dieu, 1 parvis Notre-Dame, 75004 Paris (France); Université Paris Descartes, 12 rue de l’Ecole de Médecine, 75006 Paris (France); Chassagnon, Guillaume, E-mail: gchassagnon@gmail.com [Université Paris Descartes, 12 rue de l’Ecole de Médecine, 75006 Paris (France); Hôpital Cochin, Radiologie, 27 rue du Faubourg Saint Jacques, 75014 Paris (France); Lederlin, Mathieu, E-mail: mathieu.lederlin@chu-rennes.fr [CHU de Rennes, Radiologie, 2 Rue Henri le Guilloux, 35000 Rennes (France); Université de Rennes 1, 9 Rue Jean Macé, 35000 Rennes (France); Boussouar, Samia, E-mail: samiaboussouar@gmail.com [Université Paris Descartes, 12 rue de l’Ecole de Médecine, 75006 Paris (France); Hôpital Européen Georges Pompidou, 20 Rue Leblanc, 75015 Paris (France); and others

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • CAD sensitivity is still limited for automated detection of subsolid nodules. • CAD detection rate is higher for part-solid than for pure ground-glass nodules. • Part-solid nodule detection is not better for nodules with larger solid component. - Abstract: Objectives: To evaluate the performance of a commercially available CAD system for automated detection and measurement of subsolid nodules. Materials and methods: The CAD system was tested on 50 pure ground-glass and 50 part-solid nodules (median diameter: 17 mm) previously found on standard-dose CT scans in 100 different patients. True nodule detection and the total number of CAD marks were evaluated at different sensitivity settings. The influence of nodule and CT acquisition characteristics was analyzed with logistic regression. Software and manually measured diameters were compared with Spearman and Bland-Altman methods. Results: With sensitivity adjusted for 3-mm nodule detection, 50/100 (50%) subsolid nodules were detected, at the average cost of 17 CAD marks per CT. These figures were respectively 26/100 (26%) and 2 at the 5-mm setting. At the highest sensitivity setting (2-mm nodule detection), the average number of CAD marks per CT was 41 but the nodule detection rate only increased to 54%. Part–solid nodules were better detected than pure ground glass nodules: 36/50 (72%) versus 14/50 (28%) at the 3-mm setting (p < 0.0001), with no influence of the solid component size. Except for the type (i.e. part solid or pure ground glass), no other nodule characteristic influenced the detection rate. High-quality segmentation was obtained for 79 nodules, which for automated measurements correlated well with manual measurements (rho = 0.90[0.84–0.93]). All part-solid nodules had software-measured attenuation values above −671 Hounsfield units (HU). Conclusion: The detection rate of subsolid nodules by this CAD system was insufficient, but high-quality segmentation was obtained in 79% of

  20. THE PANCHROMATIC HUBBLE ANDROMEDA TREASURY. IV. A PROBABILISTIC APPROACH TO INFERRING THE HIGH-MASS STELLAR INITIAL MASS FUNCTION AND OTHER POWER-LAW FUNCTIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weisz, Daniel R.; Fouesneau, Morgan; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Clifton Johnson, L.; Beerman, Lori C.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Hogg, David W.; Foreman-Mackey, Daniel T.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Gouliermis, Dimitrios; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Lang, Dustin; Bell, Eric F.; Gordon, Karl D.; Kalirai, Jason S.; Skillman, Evan D.

    2013-01-01

    We present a probabilistic approach for inferring the parameters of the present-day power-law stellar mass function (MF) of a resolved young star cluster. This technique (1) fully exploits the information content of a given data set; (2) can account for observational uncertainties in a straightforward way; (3) assigns meaningful uncertainties to the inferred parameters; (4) avoids the pitfalls associated with binning data; and (5) can be applied to virtually any resolved young cluster, laying the groundwork for a systematic study of the high-mass stellar MF (M ∼> 1 M ☉ ). Using simulated clusters and Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling of the probability distribution functions, we show that estimates of the MF slope, α, are unbiased and that the uncertainty, Δα, depends primarily on the number of observed stars and on the range of stellar masses they span, assuming that the uncertainties on individual masses and the completeness are both well characterized. Using idealized mock data, we compute the theoretical precision, i.e., lower limits, on α, and provide an analytic approximation for Δα as a function of the observed number of stars and mass range. Comparison with literature studies shows that ∼3/4 of quoted uncertainties are smaller than the theoretical lower limit. By correcting these uncertainties to the theoretical lower limits, we find that the literature studies yield (α) = 2.46, with a 1σ dispersion of 0.35 dex. We verify that it is impossible for a power-law MF to obtain meaningful constraints on the upper mass limit of the initial mass function, beyond the lower bound of the most massive star actually observed. We show that avoiding substantial biases in the MF slope requires (1) including the MF as a prior when deriving individual stellar mass estimates, (2) modeling the uncertainties in the individual stellar masses, and (3) fully characterizing and then explicitly modeling the completeness for stars of a given mass. The precision on MF

  1. Increasing physical activity with mobile devices: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanning, Jason; Mullen, Sean P; McAuley, Edward

    2012-11-21

    Regular physical activity has established physical and mental health benefits; however, merely one quarter of the U.S. adult population meets national physical activity recommendations. In an effort to engage individuals who do not meet these guidelines, researchers have utilized popular emerging technologies, including mobile devices (ie, personal digital assistants [PDAs], mobile phones). This study is the first to synthesize current research focused on the use of mobile devices for increasing physical activity. To conduct a meta-analysis of research utilizing mobile devices to influence physical activity behavior. The aims of this review were to: (1) examine the efficacy of mobile devices in the physical activity setting, (2) explore and discuss implementation of device features across studies, and (3) make recommendations for future intervention development. We searched electronic databases (PubMed, PsychINFO, SCOPUS) and identified publications through reference lists and requests to experts in the field of mobile health. Studies were included that provided original data and aimed to influence physical activity through dissemination or collection of intervention materials with a mobile device. Data were extracted to calculate effect sizes for individual studies, as were study descriptives. A random effects meta-analysis was conducted using the Comprehensive Meta-Analysis software suite. Study quality was assessed using the quality of execution portion of the Guide to Community Preventative Services data extraction form. Four studies were of "good" quality and seven of "fair" quality. In total, 1351 individuals participated in 11 unique studies from which 18 effects were extracted and synthesized, yielding an overall weight mean effect size of g = 0.54 (95% CI = 0.17 to 0.91, P = .01). Research utilizing mobile devices is gaining in popularity, and this study suggests that this platform is an effective means for influencing physical activity behavior. Our focus

  2. Reliability and deviations of dates of the gamma-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matolin, M.

    1997-01-01

    In this article the method of the measurement of the terrestrial radioactivity by the transferable gamma-spectrometers with Na(TI) 76 x 76 mm with the scintillation detectors and the air gamma-spectrometry on the area of the Czech Republic is described. The radiometric map of the Czech Republic 1:50000, brought out in 1995, expressed in dose rate input of gamma-radiation, is based on regional (1957-1959) and detail (1960-1971) air measurement of the summary gamma-activity, of the air gamma-spectrometry (from 1976) and it was amplified with the results of the terrestrial and laboratory radiometric measurements. The method of feed back calibration was realized in 1994 with the means expression of the data in dose rate and equalization of data of the map. The map of the iso-lines with the step 10 nGy.h -1 was weaved by computer processing with the crining method. The regional terrestrial radiation in the Czech Republic, which is formed igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic minerals is in the range 15-200 (6-245) nGy.h -1 with the average value (65.6+-19.0) nGy.h -1 . The radiometric map of the Czech Republic 1:500000 was verified in 1995-1996 by comparison with the terrestrial gamma-spectrometric measurement. The middle difference of the comparing sets 2.1 nGy.h -1 indicate good regional equalization of the data while middle difference +-13.8 nGy.h -1 illustrate expected difference for the individual locality. The correlation coefficient of data of the comparing sets (N=81) is 0.942. The radiometric maps of the Saxon and of the Czech Republic in the border zone with the length about 250 km were compared. The middle difference (1.3+-13.6) nGy.h -1 nGy.h -1 indicate good unity of the data. The radiometric maps of the Poland and of the Czech Republic in the border zone with the length about 300 km were compared in 1977. The middle difference (12.1+-17.9) nGy.h -1 with higher values in the Czech Republic indicate the disunity of presentation of the radiometric data. The

  3. Fatigue Characterization of Fire Resistant Syntactic Foam Core Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Mohammad Mynul

    Eco-Core is a fire resistant material for sandwich structural application; it was developed at NC A&T State University. The Eco-Core is made of very small amount of phenolic resin and large volume of flyash by a syntactic process. The process development, static mechanical and fracture, fire and toxicity safety and water absorption properties and the design of sandwich structural panels with Eco-Core material was established and published in the literature. One of the important properties that is needed for application in transportation vehicles is the fatigue performance under different stress states. Fatigue data are not available even for general syntactic foams. The objective of this research is to investigate the fatigue performance of Eco-Core under three types of stress states, namely, cyclic compression, shear and flexure, then document failure modes, and develop empherical equations for predicting fatigue life of Eco-Core under three stress states. Compression-Compression fatigue was performed directly on Eco-Core cylindrical specimen, whereas shear and flexure fatigue tests were performed using sandwich beam made of E glass-Vinyl Ester face sheet and Eco-Core material. Compression-compression fatigue test study was conducted at two values of stress ratios (R=10 and 5), for the maximum compression stress (sigmamin) range of 60% to 90% of compression strength (sigmac = 19.6 +/- 0.25 MPa) for R=10 and 95% to 80% of compression strength for R=5. The failure modes were characterized by the material compliance change: On-set (2% compliance change), propagation (5%) and ultimate failure (7%). The number of load cycles correspond to each of these three damages were characterized as on-set, propagation and total lives. A similar approach was used in shear and flexure fatigue tests with stress ratio of R=0.1. The fatigue stress-number of load cycles data followed the standard power law equation for all three stress states. The constant of the equation were

  4. Comparative population structure of Plasmodium malariae and Plasmodium falciparum under different transmission settings in Malawi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molyneux Malcolm E

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Described here is the first population genetic study of Plasmodium malariae, the causative agent of quartan malaria. Although not as deadly as Plasmodium falciparum, P. malariae is more common than previously thought, and is frequently in sympatry and co-infection with P. falciparum, making its study increasingly important. This study compares the population parameters of the two species in two districts of Malawi with different malaria transmission patterns - one seasonal, one perennial - to explore the effects of transmission on population structures. Methods Six species-specific microsatellite markers were used to analyse 257 P. malariae samples and 257 P. falciparum samples matched for age, gender and village of residence. Allele sizes were scored to within 2 bp for each locus and haplotypes were constructed from dominant alleles in multiple infections. Analysis of multiplicity of infection (MOI, population differentiation, clustering of haplotypes and linkage disequilibrium was performed for both species. Regression analyses were used to determine association of MOI measurements with clinical malaria parameters. Results Multiple-genotype infections within each species were common in both districts, accounting for 86.0% of P. falciparum and 73.2% of P. malariae infections and did not differ significantly with transmission setting. Mean MOI of P. falciparum was increased under perennial transmission compared with seasonal (3.14 vs 2.59, p = 0.008 and was greater in children compared with adults. In contrast, P. malariae mean MOI was similar between transmission settings (2.12 vs 2.11 and there was no difference between children and adults. Population differentiation showed no significant differences between villages or districts for either species. There was no evidence of geographical clustering of haplotypes. Linkage disequilibrium amongst loci was found only for P. falciparum samples from the seasonal transmission

  5. Examining the pathways for young people with drug and alcohol dependence: a mixed-method design to examine the role of a treatment programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Sally; Rawstorne, Patrick; Hayen, Andrew; Bryant, Joanne; Baldry, Eileen; Ferry, Mark; Williams, Megan; Shanahan, Marian; Jayasinha, Ranmalie

    2016-05-25

    Young people with drug and alcohol problems are likely to have poorer health and other psychosocial outcomes than other young people. Residential treatment programmes have been shown to lead to improved health and related outcomes for young people in the short term. There is very little robust research showing longer term outcomes or benefits of such programmes. This paper describes an innovative protocol to examine the longer term outcomes and experiences of young people referred to a residential life management and treatment programme in Australia designed to address alcohol and drug issues in a holistic manner. This is a mixed-methods study that will retrospectively and prospectively examine young people's pathways into and out of a residential life management programme. The study involves 3 components: (1) retrospective data linkage of programme data to health and criminal justice administrative data sets, (2) prospective cohort (using existing programme baseline data and a follow-up survey) and (3) qualitative in-depth interviews with a subsample of the prospective cohort. The study will compare findings among young people who are referred and (a) stay 30 days or more in the programme (including those who go on to continuing care and those who do not); (b) start, but stay fewer than 30 days in the programme; (c) are assessed, but do not start the programme. Ethics approval has been sought from several ethics committees including a university ethics committee, state health departments and an Aboriginal-specific ethics committee. The results of the study will be published in peer-reviewed journals, presented at research conferences, disseminated via a report for the general public and through Facebook communications. The study will inform the field more broadly about the value of different methods in evaluating programmes and examining the pathways and trajectories of vulnerable young people. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to

  6. Consumers’ experiences of back pain in rural Western Australia: access to information and services, and self-management behaviours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Briggs Andrew M

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coordinated, interdisciplinary services, supported by self-management underpin effective management for chronic low back pain (CLBP. However, a combination of system, provider and consumer-based barriers exist which limit the implementation of such models into practice, particularly in rural areas where unique access issues exist. In order to improve health service delivery for consumers with CLBP, policymakers and service providers require a more in depth understanding of these issues. The objective of this qualitative study was to explore barriers experienced by consumers in rural settings in Western Australia (WA to accessing information and services and implementing effective self-management behaviours for CLBP. Methods Fourteen consumers with a history of CLBP from three rural sites in WA participated. Maximum variation sampling was employed to ensure a range of experiences were captured. An interviewer, blinded to quantitative pain history data, conducted semi-structured telephone interviews using a standardised schedule to explore individuals’ access to information and services for CLBP, and self-management behaviours. Interviews were digitally recorded and transcribed verbatim. Inductive analysis techniques were used to derive and refine key themes. Results Five key themes were identified that affected individuals’ experiences of managing CLBP in a rural setting, including: 1 poor access to information and services in rural settings; 2 inadequate knowledge and skills among local practitioners; 3 feelings of isolation and frustration; 4 psychological burden associated with CLBP; and 5 competing lifestyle demands hindering effective self-management for CLBP. Conclusions Consumers in rural WA experienced difficulties in knowing where to access relevant information for CLBP and expressed frustration with the lack of service delivery options to access interdisciplinary and specialist services for CLBP. Competing

  7. A study of longitudinal data examining concomitance of pain and cognition in an elderly long-term care population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burfield AH

    2012-03-01

    .Conclusion: Understanding the concomitance of pain and cognition aids in defining additional frameworks to extend models to include secondary needs, contextual factors, and resident outcomes. Cognitive decline, as with organic brain diseases, is progressive. Pain is a symptom that can be treated and reduced to improve resident quality of life. However, cognition can be used to determine the most appropriate method to assess pain in the elderly, thereby improving accuracy of pain detection in this population.Keywords: cognitive impairment, Cognitive Performance Scale (CPS, Minimum Data Set 2.0

  8. A new method of discriminating different types of post-Archean ophiolitic basalts and their tectonic significance using Th-Nb and Ce-Dy-Yb systematics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio Saccani

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new discrimination diagram using absolute measures of Th and Nb is applied to post-Archean ophiolites to best discriminate a large number of different ophiolitic basalts. This diagram was obtained using >2000 known ophiolitic basalts and was tested using ∼560 modern rocks from known tectonic settings. Ten different basaltic varieties from worldwide ophiolitic complexes have been examined. They include two basaltic types that have never been considered before, which are: (1 medium-Ti basalts (MTB generated at nascent forearc settings; (2 a type of mid-ocean ridge basalts showing garnet signature (G-MORB that characterizes Alpine-type (i.e., non volcanic rifted margins and ocean-continent transition zones (OCTZ. In the Th-Nb diagram, basalts generated in oceanic subduction-unrelated settings, rifted margins, and OCTZ can be distinguished from subduction-related basalts with a misclassification rate <1%. This diagram highlights the chemical variation of oceanic, rifted margin, and OCTZ basalts from depleted compositions to progressively more enriched compositions reflecting, in turn, the variance of source composition and degree of melting within the MORB-OIB array. It also highlights the chemical contributions of enriched (OIB-type components to mantle sources. Enrichment of Th relative to Nb is particularly effective for highlighting crustal input via subduction or crustal contamination. Basalts formed at continental margin arcs and island arc with a complex polygenetic crust can be distinguished from those generated in intra-oceanic arcs in supra-subduction zones (SSZ with a misclassification rate <1%. Within the SSZ group, two sub-settings can be recognized with a misclassification rate <0.5%. They are: (1 SSZ influenced by chemical contribution from subduction-derived components (forearc and intra-arc sub-settings characterized by island arc tholeiitic (IAT and boninitic basalts; (2 SSZ with no contribution from subduction

  9. Evaluating implementation of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) prevention guidelines in spinal cord injury centers using the PARIHS framework: a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbale, Salva N; Hill, Jennifer N; Guihan, Marylou; Hogan, Timothy P; Cameron, Kenzie A; Goldstein, Barry; Evans, Charlesnika T

    2015-09-09

    implementation of MRSA infection prevention guidelines in SCI/D settings requires (1) guideline dissemination that reaches the full range of SCI/D providers working in inpatient, outpatient, and other care settings, (2) provider education that is frequent and systematic, (3) strong leadership support, and (4) that barriers unique to the recommendations are addressed. These findings may be used to inform selection of implementation strategies and optimize infection prevention beyond MRSA as well as in other specialty care populations.

  10. Design of the HPTN 065 (TLC-Plus) study: A study to evaluate the feasibility of an enhanced test, link-to-care, plus treat approach for HIV prevention in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, Theresa; Branson, Bernard; Donnell, Deborah; Hall, H Irene; King, Georgette; Cutler, Blayne; Hader, Shannon; Burns, David; Leider, Jason; Wood, Angela Fulwood; G Volpp, Kevin; Buchacz, Kate; El-Sadr, Wafaa M

    2017-08-01

    Background/Aims HIV continues to be a major public health threat in the United States, and mathematical modeling has demonstrated that the universal effective use of antiretroviral therapy among all HIV-positive individuals (i.e. the "test and treat" approach) has the potential to control HIV. However, to accomplish this, all the steps that define the HIV care continuum must be achieved at high levels, including HIV testing and diagnosis, linkage to and retention in clinical care, antiretroviral medication initiation, and adherence to achieve and maintain viral suppression. The HPTN 065 (Test, Link-to-Care Plus Treat [TLC-Plus]) study was designed to determine the feasibility of the "test and treat" approach in the United States. Methods HPTN 065 was conducted in two intervention communities, Bronx, NY, and Washington, DC, along with four non-intervention communities, Chicago, IL; Houston, TX; Miami, FL; and Philadelphia, PA. The study consisted of five components: (1) exploring the feasibility of expanded HIV testing via social mobilization and the universal offer of testing in hospital settings, (2) evaluating the effectiveness of financial incentives to increase linkage to care, (3) evaluating the effectiveness of financial incentives to increase viral suppression, (4) evaluating the effectiveness of a computer-delivered intervention to decrease risk behavior in HIV-positive patients in healthcare settings, and (5) administering provider and patient surveys to assess knowledge and attitudes regarding the use of antiretroviral therapy for prevention and the use of financial incentives to improve health outcomes. The study used observational cohorts, cluster and individual randomization, and made novel use of the existing national HIV surveillance data infrastructure. All components were developed with input from a community advisory board, and pragmatic methods were used to implement and assess the outcomes for each study component. Results A total of 76 sites in

  11. Condicionantes macroeconômicos e regulatórios da determinação da capacidade produtiva: estudo de caso do setor aéreo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humberto Filipe de Andrade Januário Bettini

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho objetiva identificar fatores macroeconômicos, regulatórios e concorrenciais que afetam a decisão de empresas quanto ao dimensionamento de sua capacidade produtiva. Foi desenvolvido um estudo de caso do transporte aéreo - aproveitando de uma especificidade do setor - que requer a tomada de decisão quanto à capacidade em cada submercado (par de aeroportos operado. Buscou-se identificar o processo decisório das firmas utilizando-se um painel de dados tridimensional desagregado ao nível da empresa-mercado-tempo. Resultados finais mostraram que: 1. agregados macroeconômicos, como o PIB e a taxa de câmbio, têm impacto estatisticamente significante na formação da capacidade; 2. as medidas advindas do período da quase-desregulamentação do setor, a partir de 2001, tiveram pouco impacto sobre a capacidade, medida pela oferta de assentos; e, por fim, 3. a associação estabelecida entre as duas maiores empresas do setor, em 2003, teve impactos relevantes, ilustrando o fato de que maior dominância afeta a tomada de decisão quanto à oferta, e requer, assim, maior acompanhamento antitruste.This article aims at identifying elements that affect the decision firms make in what concerns productive capacity setting in markets. Among these elements, macroeconomic, regulatory and competition factors are highlighted. In this paper, a case study for the domestic scheduled airline industry is developed, taking advantage of the particularity of this sector, in which an airline ought to decide capacities in each sub-market (pair of airports where it is present. By using a three-dimensional panel of data (airline-market-time, we propose an identification of this decision-making process. Among the final results, it can be highlighted that: 1. macroeconomic aggregates such as GDP and exchange rate have significant impact over the decision process of capacity setting; 2. liberalizing measures adopted in 2001 and lasting for the two following

  12. Generating a city's first report on bicyclist safety: lessons from the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Dahianna S; Hemenway, David

    2017-08-03

    For cities aiming to create a useful surveillance system for bicycle injuries, a common challenge is that city crash reporting is scattered, faulty or non-existent. We document some of the lessons we learnt in helping the city of Boston, Massachusetts, USA, do the following: (1) Create a prototype for a comprehensive police crash data set (2) Produce the city's first cyclist safety report, (3) Make crash data available to the public and (4) Generate policy recommendations for both specific roadside improvements and for sustainable changes to the police department's crash reporting database. We provided research and technical assistance to government partners to generate the report and used participant-observation field notes to generate the list of learnt lessons. After the release of the report, the city implemented immediate activities aimed at making an effort to prevent injuries, including: (1) Furnishing over 1800 taxis with stickers to prevent 'dooring,' (2) Adding pavement markings at trolley tracks to decrease the likelihood that cyclists would fall from getting their wheels lodged in the tracks, (3) Conducting targeted enforcement of traffic laws and (4) Working directly with state and federal agencies to fund a more comprehensive surveillance system. As of January of 2017, nearly 4 years after its public release, 19 170 users have viewed the crash data set 23 247 times. Some of the lessons include finding and using committed champions, prioritising the use of existing data, creating opportunities to bridge divisions between stakeholders, partnering with local universities for assistance with advanced analytics and using deliverables, such as a cyclist safety report, to advocate for sustainability. Providing an initial report on bicycle crashes in Boston served to identify specific problems, showed the value of a data system, and provided a blueprint for an improved data system. Building a useful surveillance system depends in no small part on the

  13. Determination of performance criteria of safety systems in a nuclear power plant via simulated annealing optimization method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Woo Sik

    1993-02-01

    intolerable intermediate-level PSC determined by Set 1 should not be violated. On the other hand, Set 2 is obtained by maximizing safety function/system unavailabilities and at the same time minimizing risks. Thus, Set 2 reflects the flexibility in designing and operating safety functions/systems with the lowest possible risk to the public. The global optimization results from strong nonlinearity of the probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) model and nonconvexity of the problem. The Boolean algebra for the safety function/system unavailabilities and the risks are strongly nonlinear equations. Furthermore, the reliability allocation MOP has an infinite number of two-tier noninferior solutions. The transformation of the MOP to a single objective optimization problem is performed to find the two-tier noninferior solutions. After the scalarization of the reliability allocation MOP to a single objective optimization problem by the weighted Chebyshev norm (WCN) approach, the global optimization is performed by the improved Metropolis algorithm. The global minimum corresponds to one of the infinite two-tier noninferior solutions of the reliability allocation MOP. The methodology is applied to a realistic streamlined PSA model that is developed based on the PSA results of Surry Unit 1 nuclear power plant. The WCN approach with the improved Metropolis algorithm results in drastically reduced calculational efforts. The results of this study show that risks to the public are drastically changed according to the combination of safety system unavailabilities. When design and modification of a nuclear power plant or regulatory actions are performed, it is necessary that particular attention be paid to auxiliary feedwater system (AFW system) and onsite electric power system (OEP system) than to the other safety functions/systems. If we improve the unavailabilities of AFW and OEP systems, the induced risks are drastically reduced. On the other hand, the other safety function

  14. Geology of the Source Physics Experiment Site, Climax Stock, Nevada National Security Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Townsend, M., Prothro, L. B., Obi, C.

    2012-03-15

    from borehole image logs). The fractures were grouped into sets based on their orientation. The most ubiquitous fracture set (50 percent of all higher-ranked fractures) is a group of low-angle fractures (dips 0 to 30 degrees). Fractures with dips of 60 to 90 degrees account for 38 percent of high-ranked fractures, and the remaining 12 percent are fractures with moderate dips (30 to 60 degrees). The higher-angle fractures are further subdivided into three sets based on their dip direction: fractures of Set 1 dip to the north-northeast, fractures of Set 2 dip to the south-southwest, and Set 3 consists of high-angle fractures that dip to the southeast and strike northeast. The low-angle fractures (Set 4) dip eastward. Fracture frequency does not appear to change substantially with depth. True fracture spacing averages 0.9 to 1.2 m for high-angle Sets 1, 2, and 3, and 0.6 m for Set 4. Two significant faults were observed in the core, centered at the depths of 25.3 and 32.3 m. The upper of these two faults dips 80 degrees to the north-northeast and, thus, is related to the Set-1 fractures. The lower fault dips 79 degrees to the south-southwest and is related to SPE Set-2 fractures. Neither fault has an identifiable surface trace. Groundwater was encountered in all holes drilled on the SPE test bed, and the fluid level averaged about 15.2 to 18.3 m below ground surface. An informal study of variations in the fluid level in the holes conducted during various phases of construction of the test bed concluded that groundwater flow through the fractured granitic rocks is not uniform, and appears to be controlled by variations in the orientation and degree of interconnectedness of the fractures. It may also be possible that an aplite dike or quartz vein may be present in the test bed, which could act as a barrier to groundwater flow and, thus, could account for anisotropy seen in the groundwater recovery measurements.

  15. Assessment of four calculation methods proposed by the EC for waste hazardous property HP 14 'Ecotoxic'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennebert, Pierre; Humez, Nicolas; Conche, Isabelle; Bishop, Ian; Rebischung, Flore

    2016-02-01

    Legislation published in December 2014 revised both the List of Waste (LoW) and amended Appendix III of the revised Waste Framework Directive 2008/98/EC; the latter redefined hazardous properties HP 1 to HP 13 and HP 15 but left the assessment of HP 14 unchanged to allow time for the Directorate General of the Environment of the European Commission to complete a study that is examining the impacts of four different calculation methods for the assessment of HP 14. This paper is a contribution to the assessment of the four calculation methods. It also includes the results of a fifth calculation method; referred to as "Method 2 with extended M-factors". Two sets of data were utilised in the assessment; the first (Data Set #1) comprised analytical data for 32 different waste streams (16 hazardous (H), 9 non-hazardous (NH) and 7 mirror entries, as classified by the LoW) while the second data set (Data Set #2), supplied by the eco industries, comprised analytical data for 88 waste streams, all classified as hazardous (H) by the LoW. Two approaches were used to assess the five calculation methods. The first approach assessed the relative ranking of the five calculation methods by the frequency of their classification of waste streams as H. The relative ranking of the five methods (from most severe to less severe) is: Method 3>Method 1>Method 2 with extended M-factors>Method 2>Method 4. This reflects the arithmetic ranking of the concentration limits of each method when assuming M=10, and is independent of the waste streams, or the H/NH/Mirror status of the waste streams. A second approach is the absolute matching or concordance with the LoW. The LoW is taken as a reference method and the H wastes are all supposed to be HP 14. This point is discussed in the paper. The concordance for one calculation method is established by the number of wastes with identical classification by the considered calculation method and the LoW (i.e. H to H, NH to NH). The discordance is

  16. Influence of tidal volume on ventilation inhomogeneity assessed by electrical impedance tomography during controlled mechanical ventilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becher, T; Kott, M; Schädler, D; Vogt, B; Meinel, T; Weiler, N; Frerichs, I

    2015-01-01

    The global inhomogeneity (GI) index is a parameter of ventilation inhomogeneity that can be calculated from images of tidal ventilation distribution obtained by electrical impedance tomography (EIT). It has been suggested that the GI index may be useful for individual adjustment of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) and for guidance of ventilator therapy. The aim of the present work was to assess the influence of tidal volume (V_T) on the GI index values. EIT data from 9 patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome ventilated with a low and a high V_T of 5   ±   1 (mean  ±  SD) and 9   ±   1 ml kg"−"1 predicted body weight at a high and a low level of PEEP (PEEP_h_i_g_h, PEEP_l_o_w) were analyzed. PEEP_h_i_g_h and PEEP_l_o_w were set 2 cmH_2O above and 5 cmH_2O below the lower inflection point of a quasi-static pressure volume loop, respectively. The lower inflection point was identified at 8.1   ±   1.4 (mean  ±  SD) cmH_2O, resulting in a PEEP_h_i_g_h of 10.1   ±   1.4 and a PEEP_l_o_w of 3.1   ±   1.4 cmH_2O. At PEEP_h_i_g_h, we found no significant trend in GI index with low V_T when compared to high V_T (0.49   ±   0.15 versus 0.44   ±   0.09, p = 0.13). At PEEP_l_o_w, we found a significantly higher GI index with low V_T compared to high V_T (0.66   ±   0.19 versus 0.59   ±   0.17, p = 0.01). When comparing the PEEP levels, we found a significantly lower GI index at PEEP_h_i_g_h both for high and low V_T. We conclude that high V_T may lead to a lower GI index, especially at low PEEP settings. This should be taken into account when using the GI index for individual adjustment of ventilator settings. (paper)

  17. Coated particle fuel for high temperature gas cooled reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verfondern, Karl; Nabielek, Heinz [Research Center Julich (FZJ), Julich (Germany); Kendall, James M. [Global Virtual L1c, Prescott (United States)

    2007-10-15

    applications at 850-900 .deg. C and for process heat/hydrogen generation applications with 950 .deg. C outlet temperatures. There is a clear set of standards for modern high quality fuel in terms of low levels of heavy metal contamination, manufacture-induced particle defects during fuel body and fuel element making, irradiation/accident induced particle failures and limits on fission product release from intact particles. While gas-cooled reactor design is still open-ended with blocks for the prismatic and spherical fuel elements for the pebble-bed design, there is near worldwide agreement on high quality fuel: a 500 {mu}m diameter UO{sub 2} kernel of 10% enrichment is surrounded by a 100 {mu}m thick sacrificial buffer layer to be followed by a dense inner pyrocarbon layer, a high quality silicon carbide layer of 35 {mu}m thickness and theoretical density and another outer pyrocarbon layer. Good performance has been demonstrated both under operational and under accident conditions, i.e. to 10% FIMA and maximum 1600 .deg. C afterwards. And it is the wide-ranging demonstration experience that makes this particle superior. Recommendations are made for further work: 1. Generation of data for presently manufactured materials, e.g. SiC strength and strength distribution, PyC creep and shrinkage and many more material data sets. 2. Renewed start of irradiation and accident testing of modern coated particle fuel. 3. Analysis of existing and newly created data with a view to demonstrate satisfactory performance at burnups beyond 10% FIMA and complete fission product retention even in accidents that go beyond 1600 .deg. C for a short period of time. This work should proceed at both national and international level.

  18. Transporting dynamics of radioactive cesium in a forest ecosystem and its discharge processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iseda, Kohei; Ohte, Nobuhito; Tanoi, Keitaro; Endo, Izuki; Oda, Tomoki; Kato, Hiroyu [Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, University of Tokyo (Japan)

    2014-07-01

    A lot of radioactive substance including {sup 137}Cs, {sup 134}Cs fell out to Tohoku and Kanto region in particular Fukushima prefecture after the accident of Fukushima-daiichi nuclear power plant. Generally, cesium tends to attach to clay particle and organic matter. These clay particle and organic matter can potentially flow out from the forest through the river to the downstream not only as particulate matter but also dissolved matter. It is likely that behavior of cesium is similar to sediment locomotion. The objective of this study is to understand transporting dynamics of radioactive cesium inside and outside of the forest. We started investigations on transporting dynamics of cesium in the forest upper stream of Kami-Oguni river in Date city Fukushima prefecture located in about 50 km from the nuclear power plant since July 2012. We conducted river water sampling at 9 points along the river from the uppermost stream to the middle reaches during low flow condition once a month. We also sampled river water during storm event for 5 times in order to capture the change of {sup 137}Cs concentration in a flood stage. Samples were filtered and separated into particulate and dissolved matters using glass micro-fiber filters (GF/F). Samples were analyzed their {sup 137}Cs concentration by Germanium semiconductor detector at University of Tokyo. During low flow condition, {sup 137}Cs was detected only a very small amount both in particulate and dissolved matters. In contrast, during high flow condition, {sup 137}Cs was detected about 10-100 times higher than that of during low flow condition in particulate matter. We estimated discharge flux of {sup 137}Cs from the forest using the relations between water discharge and {sup 137}Cs concentration. It was 0.977 Bq/(m2 day ) (2012/8/31-2013/4/19). In the forest, we set 2 deciduous tree plots (Quercus serrata, Zelkova serrata and so on) and 1 evergreen confer plot (Cyptomeria japonica). Atmospheric depositions of {sup 137

  19. geological mapping of the Onkalo open cut

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talikka, M. [Geological Survey of Finland, Espoo (Finland)

    2005-11-15

    . Field observations included dip, dip direction, length, joint roughness (Jr) number, joint roughness (Jr) profile, joint alteration (Ja) number, fillings, aperture, end type, undulation, rock type, and other remarks. Coordinates for fractures were determined from 3D models based on stereographic photographs. Three fracture sets were identified. (1) Fractures along the S{sub 2} foliation, ea. 44% of the fractures; (2) Subvertical fractures in northsouth direction, ea. 5 % of the fractures; (3) Fractures dipping gently to north, ea. 4 % of the fractures. The set 2 fractures are mainly in the grey gneiss, set 3 fractures in the vein migmatite and set 1 fractures in both rock types. About 40 % of the fractures are less than a meter, 40 % 1-3 m, and 20 % over 3 m in length. Two thirds of all fractures have infillings, of which the most common are chlorite, kaolinite, biotite, calcite, pyrite, and clay. (orig.)

  20. Learning the Rules of the Game: The Nature of Game and Classroom Supports When Using a Concept-Integrated Digital Physics Game in the Middle School Science Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Phillip Michael, Jr.

    Games in science education is emerging as a popular topic of scholarly inquiry. The National Research Council recently published a report detailing a research agenda for games and science education entitled Learning Science Through Computer Games and Simulations (2011). The report recommends moving beyond typical proof-of-concept studies into more exploratory and theoretically-based work to determine how best to integrate games into K-12 classrooms for learning , as well as how scaffolds from within the game and from outside the game (from peers and teachers) support the learning of applicable science. This study uses a mixed-methods, quasi-experimental design with an 8th grade class at an independent school in southern Connecticut to answer the following questions: 1. What is the nature of the supports for science content learning provided by the game, the peer, and the teacher, when the game is used in a classroom setting? 2. How do the learning gains in the peer support condition compare to the solo play condition, both qualitatively and quantitatively? The concept-integrated physics game SURGE (Scaffolding Understanding through Redesigning Games for Education) was selected for this study, as it was developed with an ear towards specific learning theories and prior work on student understandings of impulse, force, and vectors. Stimulated recall interviews and video observations served as the primary sources and major patterns emerged through the triangulation of data sources and qualitative analysis in the software QSR NVivo 9. The first pattern which emerged indicated that scaffolding from within the game and outside the game requires a pause in game action to be effective, unless that scaffolding is directly useful to the player in the moment of action. The second major pattern indicated that both amount and type of prior gaming experience has somewhat complex effects on both the uses of supports and learning outcomes. In general, a high correlation was found

  1. Simulating the oxygen content of ambient organic aerosol with the 2D volatility basis set

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. N. Murphy

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A module predicting the oxidation state of organic aerosol (OA has been developed using the two-dimensional volatility basis set (2D-VBS framework. This model is an extension of the 1D-VBS framework and tracks saturation concentration and oxygen content of organic species during their atmospheric lifetime. The host model, a one-dimensional Lagrangian transport model, is used to simulate air parcels arriving at Finokalia, Greece during the Finokalia Aerosol Measurement Experiment in May 2008 (FAME-08. Extensive observations were collected during this campaign using an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS and a thermodenuder to determine the chemical composition and volatility, respectively, of the ambient OA. Although there are several uncertain model parameters, the consistently high oxygen content of OA measured during FAME-08 (O:C = 0.8 can help constrain these parameters and elucidate OA formation and aging processes that are necessary for achieving the high degree of oxygenation observed. The base-case model reproduces observed OA mass concentrations (measured mean = 3.1 μg m−3, predicted mean = 3.3 μg m−3 and O:C (predicted O:C = 0.78 accurately. A suite of sensitivity studies explore uncertainties due to (1 the anthropogenic secondary OA (SOA aging rate constant, (2 assumed enthalpies of vaporization, (3 the volatility change and number of oxygen atoms added for each generation of aging, (4 heterogeneous chemistry, (5 the oxidation state of the first generation of compounds formed from SOA precursor oxidation, and (6 biogenic SOA aging. Perturbations in most of these parameters do impact the ability of the model to predict O:C well throughout the simulation period. By comparing measurements of the O:C from FAME-08, several sensitivity cases including a high oxygenation case, a low oxygenation case, and biogenic SOA aging case are found to unreasonably depict OA aging, keeping in mind that this study does not consider

  2. IgA anti-Actin antibodies in children with celiac disease: comparison of immunofluorescence with Elisa assay in predicting severe intestinal damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mora Stefano

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have demonstrated that the presence of serum IgA antibodies against actin filaments (AAA in patients with celiac disease (CD is strongly associated with mucosal damage and severe degrees of villous atrophy. The aims of the present study were (1 to verify the effectiveness of IgA-AAA in newly diagnosed CD patients in a clinical setting (2 to compare the immunofluorescence assay with ELISA assay; (3 to compare the correlation of our IgA anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies (tTG-Ab class with mucosal intestinal lesions. Methods 90 patients underwent endoscopy and multiple biopsies for suspected CD on the basis of symptoms, in presence of positive tTG-Ab tests. Twenty biopsied and 25 not-biopsied subjects with negative tTG-Ab were tested as control groups. IgA-AAA assays were performed by indirect immunofluorescence using rat epithelial intestinal cells, and by ELISA with a commercial kit. tTG-Ab assay was a radio-binding assay. Intestinal specimens were collected by upper endoscopy and the histological study was done according to the Marsh's classification modified by Oberhuber (M/O. Auto-antibodies assays and histological evaluation have been performed blindly by skilled operators. Results CD diagnosis was confirmed in 82 patients (type I M/O in 2 patients, IIIA in 18 patients, IIIB in 29 patients and IIIC in 33 patients. Two patients with type 1 lesion in presence of positive tTG-Ab and abdominal complaints, started a gluten free diet. The rate of IgA-AAA positivity (sensitivity by IFI and ELISA in histologically proven celiac disease patients, were 5.5% and 25% patients in IIIA, 27.5% and 34.4% patients in IIIB, 78.8% and 75% in IIIC patients, respectively. Patients with normal or nearly normal mucosa, regardless of tTG-Ab status, presented negative IgA-AAA IFI assay. On the other hand, 1 patient with normal mucosa but positive tTG-Ab, also presented positive IgA-AAA ELISA. All healthy non biopsied

  3. EL EFECTO DE LA DIMENSIONALIDAD DE LA ESCENA EN EL COMPORTAMIENTO VISUAL Y MOTOR DURANTE EL RESTO AL SERVICIO EN TENIS Y TENIS EN SILLA DE RUEDAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Reina

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available

     

    RESUMEN

    El presente trabajo aborda la problemática del estudio del comportamiento visual y motor en una situación simulada de resto ante el servicio en tenis y tenis en silla de ruedas, en la que los sujetos deben responder ante los servicios efectuados por su oponente, tanto en situación de pista (3D como ante una proyección de video en una pantalla (2D. En el estudio participaron tres grupos: uno de tenistas en sillas de ruedas novel, uno experimentado, y un grupo de tenistas sin discapacidad alguna. Los tres grupos observaron dos secuencias (2D y 3D de 24 servicios liftados, efectuados por dos tenistas en silla y dos en bipedestación. Los sujetos mostraron un mayor número de fijaciones visuales en la situación de videoproyección, así como un mayor número y tiempo de fijación visual sobre localizaciones del miembro superior. En cambio, en la situación ante oponente real, mostraron un mayor número y tiempo de fijación visual sobre la bola. A tenor de los resultados obtenidos, parece ser que una menor habituación a situaciones simuladas de juego podría conllevar a una alteración de la estrategia de búsqueda visual desarrollada, con implicaciones en la estrategia de seguimiento de la trayectoria de la bola.
    PALABRAS CLAVE: Dimensionalidad, Comportamiento visual, Respuesta de reacción, Tenis en Silla de ruedas, Tenis, Resto al servicio.

     

    ABSTRACT

    The study of the visual and motor behaviour in a simulated situation of return to service in tennis and wheelchair tennis was carried out, where participants responded to the serves in both real-life (3D and video-based settings (2D. Automated systems to acquire data were

  4. Sentence comprehension in aphasia: A noisy channel approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Walsh Dickey

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Probabilistic accounts of language understanding assume that comprehension involves determining the probability of an intended message (m given an input utterance (u (P(m|u; e.g. Gibson et al, 2013a; Levy et al, 2009. One challenge is that communication occurs within a noisy channel; i.e. the comprehender’s representation of u may have been distorted, e.g., by a typo or by impairment associated with aphasia. Bayes’ rule provides a model of how comprehenders can combine the prior probability of m (P(m with the probability that m would have been distorted to u (P(mu to calculate the probability of m given u (P(m|u  P(mP(mu. This formalism can capture the observation that people with aphasia (PWA rely more on semantics than syntax during comprehension (e.g., Caramazza & Zurif, 1976: given the high probability that their representation of the input is unreliable, they weigh message likelihood more heavily. Gibson et al. (2013a showed that unimpaired adults are sensitive to P(m and P(mu: they more often chose interpretations that increased message plausibility or involved distortions requiring fewer changes, and/or deletions instead of insertions (see Figure 1a for examples. Gibson et al. (2013b found PWA were also sensitive to both P(m and P(mu in an act-out task, but relied more heavily than unimpaired controls on P(m. This shows group-level optimization towards the less noisy (semantic channel in PWA. The current experiment (8 PWA; 7 age-matched controls investigated noisy channel optimization at the level of individual PWA. It also included active/passive items with a weaker plausibility manipulation to test whether P(m is higher for implausible than impossible strings. The task was forced-choice sentence-picture matching (Figure 1b. Experimental sentences crossed active versus passive (A-P structures with plausibility (Set 1 or impossibility (Set 2, and prepositional-object versus double-object structures (PO-DO: Set 3 with

  5. Contestation internationale contre élites mondiales : l’action directe et la politique délibérative sont-elles conciliables ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Dupuis-Déri

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Dans cet article, j’analyse à la lumière des normes libérales de la politique délibérative le bien-fondé de l’action directe contre les institutions internationales associées au néolibéralisme et à la mondialisation du capitalisme (Banque mondiale, Organisation mondiale du commerce, etc.. Le processus délibératif de ces organismes étant illégitime du point de vue de la théorie de la politique délibérative, les activistes du mouvement altermondialiste sont en droit de contester ces organismes. De plus, une attitude de contestation peut avoir en elle-même une valeur délibérative pour au moins sept raisons : (1 lancer une délibération ; (2 élargir la participation à la délibération ; (3 renforcer la représentativité ; (4 faire circuler l’information et faire connaître les arguments (publicité ; (5 stimuler l’imagination ; (6 pousser à l’action ; (7 relancer la délibération. Finalement, les mouvements sociaux tels que le mouvement altermondialiste peuvent être vus comme des forums délibératifs. Ainsi, qui veut évaluer la légitimité de l’action directe doit prendre en considération la nature délibérative du processus par lequel les activistes choisissent les moyens les plus efficaces à utiliser pour corriger les défauts du processus délibératif officiel et pour faire avancer l’égalité, la liberté et la justice.In this article I examine the legitimacy of direct action in relation to liberal deliberative norms and global institutions (World Bank, World Trade Organization, etc.. Since the deliberative processes of these institutions are illegitimate according to the theory of deliberative politics, the activists of the movement for global justice should be legitimate to confront these institutions. Moreover, confrontational action in itself may have a deliberative value for at least seven reasons: (1 initiating deliberation (agenda-setting ; (2 enlarging participation ; (3 enlarging

  6. CARMEN-SYSTEM, Programs System for Thermal Neutron Diffusion and Burnup with Feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahnert, Carol; Aragones, Jose M.

    1983-01-01

    values included in the basic library, the cross sections by zone are corrected by these feedback effects and a new diffusion calculation is made with them, and the process continues until power convergence is reached between two successive diffusion calculations. Then the next burnup step starts. In one execution of CARMEN the whole burnup cycle may be calculated step by step. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The present version of CARMEN has the following restrictions: Number of rows, columns and planes: 210; Number of groups: 2; Number of zones: 99; Number of nuclides in a cross section set: 2; Number of coarse meshes in each direction: 150; Number of cross section sets: 99; Number of burnup steps to calculate: 15; Number of burnup steps in the basic library: 20; When CARMEN is executed without burnup option, the following restrictions apply: Number of rows: 210; Number of groups: 1000; Number of zones: 200; Number of nuclides in a cross section set: 200; Number of coarse meshes in each direction: 150; Number of cross section sets: 99; Largest nuclide number: 200. These limitations may be changed in the source program. This code system has been included in the Coordinated Research Programme (CRP) on 'Codes Adaptable to Small and Medium-Size Computers Available in Developing Countries for In-Core Fuel Management' of the International Atomic Energy Agency

  7. Practice parameters for the use of portable monitoring devices in the investigation of suspected obstructive sleep apnea in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesson, Andrew L; Berry, Richard B; Pack, Allan

    2003-11-01

    A variety of devices are used to evaluate patients with a potential diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). A committee comprised of members of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, American Thoracic Society, and American College of Chest Physicians systematically evaluated data on the use of these devices and developed practice parameters. Three categories of portable monitoring (PM) devices were reviewed with regard to assessing the probability of identifying an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) of greater or less than 15 in attended and unattended settings. Type 2 (minimum of seven channels, including EEG, EOG, chin EMG, ECG or heart rate, airflow, respiratory effort, oxygen saturation), Type 3 (minimum of four channels, including ventilation or airflow (at least two channels of respiratory movement, or respiratory movement and airflow), heart rate or ECG and oxygen saturation) and Type 4 (most monitors of this type measure a single parameter or two parameters) devices were evaluated, and in-laboratory, attended polysomnography was used as a reference. (1) Insufficient evidence is available to recommend the use of Type 2 PM devices in attended or unattended settings. (2) Type 3 PM devices appear to be capable of being used in an attended setting to increase or to decrease the probability that a patient has an apnea-hypopnea index greater than 15. (3) The use of Type 3 PM devices in an unattended setting is not recommended to rule in, rule out, or both rule in and rule out a diagnosis of OSA. (4) There is some evidence that the use of Type 3 PM devices in an attended in-laboratory setting may be acceptable to both rule in and rule out a diagnosis of OSA if certain limitations are in place. These limitations include manually scoring the records, using the devices only in patients without significant comorbid conditions, having an awareness that symptomatic patients with a negative study should have a Type 1 study, and not using these devices for titrating positive

  8. Paramedic knowledge, attitudes, and training in end-of-life care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Susan C; Abbott, Jean; McClung, Christian D; Colwell, Chris B; Eckstein, Marc; Lowenstein, Steven R

    2009-01-01

    Paramedics often are asked to care for patients at the end of life. To do this, they must communicate effectively with family and caregivers, understand their legal obligations, and know when to withhold unwanted interventions. The objectives of this study were to ascertain paramedics' attitudes toward end-of-life (EOL) situations and the frequency with which they encounter them; and to compare paramedics' preparation during training for a variety of EOL care skills. A written survey was administered to a convenience sample of paramedics in two cities: Denver, Colorado and Los Angeles, California. Questions addressed: (1) attitudes toward EOL decision-making in prehospital settings; (2) experience (number of EOL situations experienced in the past two years); (3) importance of various EOL tasks in clinical practice (pronouncing and communicating death, ending resuscitation, honoring advance directives (ADs)); and (4) self-assessed preparation for these EOL tasks. For each task, importance and preparation were measured using a four-point Likert scale. Proportions were compared using McNemar chi-square statistics to identify areas of under- or over-preparation. Two hundred thirty-six paramedics completed the survey. The mean age was 39 years (range 22-59 years), and 222 (94%) were male. Twenty percent had >20 years of experience. Almost all participants (95%; 95% CI = 91-97%) agreed that prehospital providers should honor field ADs, and more than half (59%; 95% CI = 52-65%) felt that providers should honor verbal wishes to limit resuscitation at the scene. Ninety-eight percent of the participants (95% CI = 96-100%) had questioned whether specific life support interventions were appropriate for patients who appeared to have a terminal disease. Twenty-six percent (95% CI = 20-32%) reported to have used their own judgment during the past two years to withhold or end resuscitation in a patient who appeared to have a terminal disease. Significant discrepancies between the

  9. DOE SciDAC’s Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies Final Report for University of Southern California Information Sciences Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chervenak, Ann Louise [Univ. of Southern California Information Sciences Inst., Marina del Rey, CA (United States)

    2013-12-19

    The mission of the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) is to provide the worldwide climate-research community with access to the data, information, model codes, analysis tools, and intercomparison capabilities required to make sense of enormous climate data sets. Its specific goals are to (1) provide an easy-to-use and secure web-based data access environment for data sets; (2) add value to individual data sets by presenting them in the context of other data sets and tools for comparative analysis; (3) address the specific requirements of participating organizations with respect to bandwidth, access restrictions, and replication; (4) ensure that the data are readily accessible through the analysis and visualization tools used by the climate research community; and (5) transfer infrastructure advances to other domain areas. For the ESGF, the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies (ESG-CET) team has led international development and delivered a production environment for managing and accessing ultra-scale climate data. This production environment includes multiple national and international climate projects (such as the Community Earth System Model and the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project), ocean model data (such as the Parallel Ocean Program), observation data (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Best Estimate, Carbon Dioxide Information and Analysis Center, Atmospheric Infrared Sounder, etc.), and analysis and visualization tools, all serving a diverse user community. These data holdings and services are distributed across multiple ESG-CET sites (such as ANL, LANL, LBNL/NERSC, LLNL/PCMDI, NCAR, and ORNL) and at unfunded partner sites, such as the Australian National University National Computational Infrastructure, the British Atmospheric Data Centre, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, the German Climate Computing

  10. 2014 Update of the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative: A review of papers published since its inception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Michael W.; Veitch, Dallas P.; Aisen, Paul S.; Beckett, Laurel A.; Cairns, Nigel J.; Cedarbaum, Jesse; Green, Robert C.; Harvey, Danielle; Jack, Clifford R.; Jagust, William; Luthman, Johan; Morris, John C.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Shaw, Leslie; Shen, Li; Schwarz, Adam; Toga, Arthur W.; Trojanowski, John Q.

    2016-01-01

    The Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) is an ongoing, longitudinal, multicenter study designed to develop clinical, imaging, genetic, and biochemical biomarkers for the early detection and tracking of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The initial study, ADNI-1, enrolled 400 subjects with early mild cognitive impairment (MCI), 200 with early AD, and 200 cognitively normal elderly controls. ADNI-1 was extended by a 2-year Grand Opportunities grant in 2009 and by a competitive renewal, ADNI-2, which enrolled an additional 550 participants and will run until 2015. This article reviews all papers published since the inception of the initiative and summarizes the results to the end of 2013. The major accomplishments of ADNI have been as follows: (1) the development of standardized methods for clinical tests, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers in a multicenter setting; (2) elucidation of the patterns and rates of change of imaging and CSF biomarker measurements in control subjects, MCI patients, and AD patients. CSF biomarkers are largely consistent with disease trajectories predicted by β-amyloid cascade (Hardy, J Alzheimer’s Dis 2006;9(Suppl 3):151–3) and tau-mediated neurodegeneration hypotheses for AD, whereas brain atrophy and hypometabolism levels show predicted patterns but exhibit differing rates of change depending on region and disease severity; (3) the assessment of alternative methods of diagnostic categorization. Currently, the best classifiers select and combine optimum features from multiple modalities, including MRI, [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose-PET, amyloid PET, CSF biomarkers, and clinical tests; (4) the development of blood biomarkers for AD as potentially noninvasive and low-cost alternatives to CSF biomarkers for AD diagnosis and the assessment of α-syn as an additional biomarker; (5) the development of methods for the early detection of AD. CSF biomarkers,

  11. Self-Organization of Temporal Structures — A Possible Solution for the Intervention Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Lucadou, Walter

    2006-10-01

    -local correlations. The structure of the data, however, allows the conclusion, that all observed correlations can be considered as entanglement-correlations. The number of entanglement-correlations was significantly higher for the highly motivated group (data set 2) than for the unselected group of the exhibition participants (data set 3). The latter, however, where not completely unsuccessful: A subgroup who showed "innovative" behavior also showed significant entanglement-correlations. It could further be shown, that the structure of the matrix of entanglement-correlations is not stable in time and changes if the experiment is repeated. In comparison with previous correlation-experiments, no decline of the effect size was observed. These results are in agreement with the predictions of the "Weak Quantum Theory (WQT)" and the "Model of Pragmatic Information (MPI)". These models interpret the measured correlations as entanglement-correlations within a self-organizing, organizationally closed, psycho-physical system that exist during a certain time-interval (as long as the system is active). The entanglement-correlations cannot be considered as a causal influence (in the sense of a PK-Influence) and thus are called "micro-synchronicity". After a short introduction (1.), the question is discussed how non-local correlations can be created in psycho-physical systems (2.). In chapter (3.) the description of the experimental setting is given and the apparatus (4.) and randomness test of the random event generator (5.) are described. Additionally, an overview of the structure of the data is given (6.) and the analysis methods are described (7.). In chapter (8.) the experimental hypotheses are formulated and the results are reported (9.). After the discussion of the results (10.) the conclusions (11).) of the study are presented.

  12. Comment on "An Analysis of VLF Electric Field Spectra Measured in Titan's Atmosphere by The Huygens Probe" By J. A. Morente et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grard, Rejean; Berthelin, Stephanie; Beghin, Christian; Hamelin, Michel; Berthelier, Jean-Jacques; Lopez-Moreno, Jose J.; Simoes, Fernando

    2011-01-01

    Morente et al. have recently revisited the VLF electric field measurements made with the Permittivity, Wave and Altimetry (PWA) instrument during the descent of the Huygens Probe through the atmosphere of Titan. They assert that they have identified several harmonics of the transverse resonance mode of the surface?]ionosphere cavity, which would prove the existence of an electrical activity in the atmosphere of the largest satellite of Saturn. We refute this finding on the basis that it results from an artifact due to an improper analysis of the data set. [2] The investigators of the Permittivity, Wave and Altimetry (PWA) experiment on the Huygens Probe have reported the extremely low frequency (ELF) and very low frequency (VLF) electric signals recorded during the descent through the atmosphere of Titan. The PWA data are archived in the Planetary Science Archive (PSA) of ESA, and an extensive description of the instrument is at the disposal of the scientific community. Morente and his coworkers have revisited this data set and reported the results of their investigations in two papers. In a first paper, they claim that they have detected in the ELF range (0.100 Hz) several harmonics of a global resonance allegedly generated by lightning activity in the spherical cavity guide formed by the surface of Titan and the inner boundary of the ionosphere, a phenomenon similar to the Schumann resonance observed at EartH In the second paper dedicated to the VLF electric signal recorded by PWA, in the range 0.10 kHz, they argue that they can also bring out the transverse resonance and its harmonics, a more local phenomenon that develops around the excitation source and whose frequency is controlled by the separation between Titan?fs surface and the inner ionospheric boundary. [3] The PWA investigators have analyzed the narrowband ELF signal at about 36 Hz effectively observed during the entire descent. They have not endorsed, however, the alternative approach of Morente et al

  13. Coated particle fuel for high temperature gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verfondern, Karl; Nabielek, Heinz; Kendall, James M.

    2007-01-01

    and for process heat/hydrogen generation applications with 950 .deg. C outlet temperatures. There is a clear set of standards for modern high quality fuel in terms of low levels of heavy metal contamination, manufacture-induced particle defects during fuel body and fuel element making, irradiation/accident induced particle failures and limits on fission product release from intact particles. While gas-cooled reactor design is still open-ended with blocks for the prismatic and spherical fuel elements for the pebble-bed design, there is near worldwide agreement on high quality fuel: a 500 μm diameter UO 2 kernel of 10% enrichment is surrounded by a 100 μm thick sacrificial buffer layer to be followed by a dense inner pyrocarbon layer, a high quality silicon carbide layer of 35 μm thickness and theoretical density and another outer pyrocarbon layer. Good performance has been demonstrated both under operational and under accident conditions, i.e. to 10% FIMA and maximum 1600 .deg. C afterwards. And it is the wide-ranging demonstration experience that makes this particle superior. Recommendations are made for further work: 1. Generation of data for presently manufactured materials, e.g. SiC strength and strength distribution, PyC creep and shrinkage and many more material data sets. 2. Renewed start of irradiation and accident testing of modern coated particle fuel. 3. Analysis of existing and newly created data with a view to demonstrate satisfactory performance at burnups beyond 10% FIMA and complete fission product retention even in accidents that go beyond 1600 .deg. C for a short period of time. This work should proceed at both national and international level

  14. The potential of mid- and near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy for determining major- and trace-element concentrations in soils from a geochemical survey of North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, J. B.; Smith, D.B.

    2009-01-01

    In 2004, soils were collected at 220 sites along two transects across the USA and Canada as a pilot study for a planned soil geochemical survey of North America (North American Soil Geochemical Landscapes Project). The objective of the current study was to examine the potential of diffuse reflectance (DR) Fourier Transform (FT) mid-infrared (mid-IR) and near-infrared (NIRS) spectroscopy to reduce the need for conventional analysis for the determination of major and trace elements in such continental-scale surveys. Soil samples (n = 720) were collected from two transects (east-west across the USA, and north-south from Manitoba, Canada to El Paso, Texas (USA), n = 453 and 267, respectively). The samples came from 19 USA states and the province of Manitoba in Canada. They represented 31 types of land use (e.g., national forest, rangeland, etc.), and 123 different land covers (e.g., soybeans, oak forest, etc.). The samples represented a combination of depth-based sampling (0-5 cm) and horizon-based sampling (O, A and C horizons) with 123 different depths identified. The set was very diverse with few samples similar in land use, land cover, etc. All samples were analyzed by conventional means for the near-total concentration of 49 analytes (Ctotal, Ccarbonate and Corganic, and 46 major and trace elements). Spectra were obtained using dried, ground samples using a Digilab FTS-7000 FT spectrometer in the mid- (4000-400 cm-1) and near-infrared (10,000-4000 cm-1) at 4 cm-1 resolution (64 co-added scans per spectrum) using a Pike AutoDIFF DR autosampler. Partial least squares calibrations were develop using: (1) all samples as a calibration set; (2) samples evenly divided into calibration and validation sets based on spectral diversity; and (3) samples divided to have matching analyte concentrations in calibration and validation sets. In general, results supported the conclusion that neither mid-IR nor NIRS would be particularly useful in reducing the need for conventional

  15. Organic and Non-Organic Language Disorders after Awake Brain Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elke De Witte

    2014-04-01

    non-organic origin: fluent and nonfluent language disorders unrelated to the documented lesions, strong variablilty in the error profile, marked fluctuations of symptoms over time and condition, atypical personal comments. All three patients had a prior history of psychiatric disease and one patient witnessed language problems in an aphasic relative. In the study of De Letter et al. (2012 similar findings were mentioned, but no comprehension problems were found. In all 3 cases the "psychogenic language problems" resolved after three to six weeks. DISCUSSION: As a possible explanation for the psychogenic linguistic manifestations the following hypotheses will be discussed: 1 psychogenic language problems as part of an acute stress disorder (the awake setting; 2 psychological decompensation as the result of the fact that the patient was clearly informed that the tumour was situated near language regions; 3 getting a lot of attention in the hospital and a feeling of anxiety to return home; 4 unintended imitation of a witnessed aphasic disorder. CONCLUSION: Careful evaluation and selection of the patients and good preoperative preparation seem to be fundamental for good tolerance during awake surgery. Moreover, in the postoperative phase, extensive assessments are necessary to differentially diagnose patients with organic and non-organic language disorders in order to develop appropriate treatment strategies.

  16. Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC): gap analysis for high fidelity and performance assessment code development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Joon H.; Siegel, Malcolm Dean; Arguello, Jose Guadalupe Jr.; Webb, Stephen Walter; Dewers, Thomas A.; Mariner, Paul E.; Edwards, Harold Carter; Fuller, Timothy J.; Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Jove-Colon, Carlos F.; Wang, Yifeng

    2011-01-01

    This report describes a gap analysis performed in the process of developing the Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC) in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Campaign. The goal of the Waste IPSC is to develop an integrated suite of computational modeling and simulation capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive waste storage or disposal system. The Waste IPSC will provide this simulation capability (1) for a range of disposal concepts, waste form types, engineered repository designs, and geologic settings, (2) for a range of time scales and distances, (3) with appropriate consideration of the inherent uncertainties, and (4) in accordance with rigorous verification, validation, and software quality requirements. The gap analyses documented in this report were are performed during an initial gap analysis to identify candidate codes and tools to support the development and integration of the Waste IPSC, and during follow-on activities that delved into more detailed assessments of the various codes that were acquired, studied, and tested. The current Waste IPSC strategy is to acquire and integrate the necessary Waste IPSC capabilities wherever feasible, and develop only those capabilities that cannot be acquired or suitably integrated, verified, or validated. The gap analysis indicates that significant capabilities may already exist in the existing THC codes although there is no single code able to fully account for all physical and chemical processes involved in a waste disposal system. Large gaps exist in modeling chemical processes and their couplings with other processes. The coupling of chemical processes with flow transport and mechanical deformation remains challenging. The data for extreme environments (e.g., for elevated temperature and high ionic strength media) that are

  17. Improving the representation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA in the MOZART-4 global chemical transport model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mahmud

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The secondary organic aerosol (SOA module in the Model for Ozone and Related Chemical Tracers, version 4 (MOZART-4 was updated by replacing existing two-product (2p parameters with those obtained from two-product volatility basis set (2p-VBS fits (MZ4-C1, and by treating SOA formation from the following additional volatile organic compounds (VOCs: isoprene, propene and lumped alkenes (MZ4-C2. Strong seasonal and spatial variations in global SOA distributions were demonstrated, with significant differences in the predicted concentrations between the base case and updated model simulations. Updates to the model resulted in significant increases in annual average SOA mass concentrations, particularly for the MZ4-C2 simulation in which the additional SOA precursor VOCs were treated. Annual average SOA concentrations predicted by the MZ4-C2 simulation were 1.00 ± 1.04 μg m−3 in South America, 1.57 ± 1.88 μg m−3 in Indonesia, 0.37 ± 0.27 μg m−3 in the USA, and 0.47 ± 0.29 μg m−3 in Europe with corresponding increases of 178, 406, 311 and 292% over the base-case simulation, respectively, primarily due to inclusion of isoprene. The increases in predicted SOA mass concentrations resulted in corresponding increases in SOA contributions to annual average total aerosol optical depth (AOD by ~ 1–6%. Estimated global SOA production was 5.8, 6.6 and 19.1 Tg yr−1 with corresponding burdens of 0.22, 0.24 and 0.59 Tg for the base-case, MZ4-C1 and MZ4-C2 simulations, respectively. The predicted SOA budgets fell well within reported ranges for comparable modeling studies, 6.7 to 96 Tg yr−1, but were lower than recently reported observationally constrained values, 50 to 380 Tg yr−1. For MZ4-C2, simulated SOA concentrations at the surface also were in reasonable agreement with comparable modeling studies and observations. Total organic aerosol (OA mass concentrations at the surface, however, were slightly over-predicted in Europe, Amazonian

  18. geological mapping of the Onkalo open cut

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talikka, M.

    2005-11-01

    observations included dip, dip direction, length, joint roughness (Jr) number, joint roughness (Jr) profile, joint alteration (Ja) number, fillings, aperture, end type, undulation, rock type, and other remarks. Coordinates for fractures were determined from 3D models based on stereographic photographs. Three fracture sets were identified. (1) Fractures along the S 2 foliation, ea. 44% of the fractures; (2) Subvertical fractures in northsouth direction, ea. 5 % of the fractures; (3) Fractures dipping gently to north, ea. 4 % of the fractures. The set 2 fractures are mainly in the grey gneiss, set 3 fractures in the vein migmatite and set 1 fractures in both rock types. About 40 % of the fractures are less than a meter, 40 % 1-3 m, and 20 % over 3 m in length. Two thirds of all fractures have infillings, of which the most common are chlorite, kaolinite, biotite, calcite, pyrite, and clay. (orig.)

  19. Fault zone architecture of a major oblique-slip fault in the Rawil depression, Western Helvetic nappes, Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasser, D.; Mancktelow, N. S.

    2009-04-01

    The Helvetic nappes in the Swiss Alps form a classic fold-and-thrust belt related to overall NNW-directed transport. In western Switzerland, the plunge of nappe fold axes and the regional distribution of units define a broad depression, the Rawil depression, between the culminations of Aiguilles Rouge massif to the SW and Aar massif to the NE. A compilation of data from the literature establishes that, in addition to thrusts related to nappe stacking, the Rawil depression is cross-cut by four sets of brittle faults: (1) SW-NE striking normal faults that strike parallel to the regional fold axis trend, (2) NW-SE striking normal faults and joints that strike perpendicular to the regional fold axis trend, and (3) WNW-ESE striking normal plus dextral oblique-slip faults as well as (4) WSW-ENE striking normal plus dextral oblique-slip faults that both strike oblique to the regional fold axis trend. We studied in detail a beautifully exposed fault from set 3, the Rezli fault zone (RFZ) in the central Wildhorn nappe. The RFZ is a shallow to moderately-dipping (ca. 30-60˚) fault zone with an oblique-slip displacement vector, combining both dextral and normal components. It must have formed in approximately this orientation, because the local orientation of fold axes corresponds to the regional one, as does the generally vertical orientation of extensional joints and veins associated with the regional fault set 2. The fault zone crosscuts four different lithologies: limestone, intercalated marl and limestone, marl and sandstone, and it has a maximum horizontal dextral offset component of ~300 m and a maximum vertical normal offset component of ~200 m. Its internal architecture strongly depends on the lithology in which it developed. In the limestone, it consists of veins, stylolites, cataclasites and cemented gouge, in the intercalated marls and limestones of anastomosing shear zones, brittle fractures, veins and folds, in the marls of anastomosing shear zones, pressure

  20. The Land Use Model Intercomparison Project (LUMIP) contribution to CMIP6: rationale and experimental design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, David M.; Hurtt, George C.; Arneth, Almut; Brovkin, Victor; Calvin, Kate V.; Jones, Andrew D.; Jones, Chris D.; Lawrence, Peter J.; de Noblet-Ducoudré, Nathalie; Pongratz, Julia; Seneviratne, Sonia I.; Shevliakova, Elena

    2016-09-01

    Human land-use activities have resulted in large changes to the Earth's surface, with resulting implications for climate. In the future, land-use activities are likely to expand and intensify further to meet growing demands for food, fiber, and energy. The Land Use Model Intercomparison Project (LUMIP) aims to further advance understanding of the impacts of land-use and land-cover change (LULCC) on climate, specifically addressing the following questions. (1) What are the effects of LULCC on climate and biogeochemical cycling (past-future)? (2) What are the impacts of land management on surface fluxes of carbon, water, and energy, and are there regional land-management strategies with the promise to help mitigate climate change? In addressing these questions, LUMIP will also address a range of more detailed science questions to get at process-level attribution, uncertainty, data requirements, and other related issues in more depth and sophistication than possible in a multi-model context to date. There will be particular focus on the separation and quantification of the effects on climate from LULCC relative to all forcings, separation of biogeochemical from biogeophysical effects of land use, the unique impacts of land-cover change vs. land-management change, modulation of land-use impact on climate by land-atmosphere coupling strength, and the extent to which impacts of enhanced CO2 concentrations on plant photosynthesis are modulated by past and future land use.LUMIP involves three major sets of science activities: (1) development of an updated and expanded historical and future land-use data set, (2) an experimental protocol for specific LUMIP experiments for CMIP6, and (3) definition of metrics and diagnostic protocols that quantify model performance, and related sensitivities, with respect to LULCC. In this paper, we describe LUMIP activity (2), i.e., the LUMIP simulations that will formally be part of CMIP6. These experiments are explicitly designed to be

  1. Agile Acceptance Test-Driven Development of Clinical Decision Support Advisories: Feasibility of Using Open Source Software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basit, Mujeeb A; Baldwin, Krystal L; Kannan, Vaishnavi; Flahaven, Emily L; Parks, Cassandra J; Ott, Jason M; Willett, Duwayne L

    2018-04-13

    suite. We used test-driven development to construct a new CDS tool advising Emergency Department nurses to perform a swallowing assessment prior to administering oral medication to a patient with suspected stroke. Test tables specified desired behavior for (1) applicable clinical settings, (2) triggering action, (3) rule logic, (4) user interface, and (5) system actions in response to user input. Automated test suite results for the "executable requirements" are shown prior to building the CDS alert, during build, and after successful build. Automated acceptance test-driven development and continuous regression testing of CDS configuration in a commercial EHR proves feasible with open source software. Automated test-driven development offers one potential contribution to achieving high-reliability EHR configuration. Vetting acceptance tests with clinicians elicits their input on crucial configuration details early during initial CDS design and iteratively during rapid-cycle optimization. ©Mujeeb A Basit, Krystal L Baldwin, Vaishnavi Kannan, Emily L Flahaven, Cassandra J Parks, Jason M Ott, Duwayne L Willett. Originally published in JMIR Medical Informatics (http://medinform.jmir.org), 13.04.2018.

  2. The Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative: A review of papers published since its inception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Michael W.; Veitch, Dallas P.; Aisen, Paul S.; Beckett, Laurel A.; Cairns, Nigel J.; Green, Robert C.; Harvey, Danielle; Jack, Clifford R.; Jagust, William; Liu, Enchi; Morris, John C.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Schmidt, Mark E.; Shaw, Leslie; Shen, Li; Siuciak, Judith A.; Soares, Holly; Toga, Arthur W.; Trojanowski, John Q.

    2014-01-01

    The Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) is an ongoing, longitudinal, multicenter study designed to develop clinical, imaging, genetic, and biochemical biomarkers for the early detection and tracking of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The study aimed to enroll 400 subjects with early mild cognitive impairment (MCI), 200 subjects with early AD, and 200 normal control subjects; $67 million funding was provided by both the public and private sectors, including the National Institute on Aging, 13 pharmaceutical companies, and 2 foundations that provided support through the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health. This article reviews all papers published since the inception of the initiative and summarizes the results as of February 2011. The major accomplishments of ADNI have been as follows: (1) the development of standardized methods for clinical tests, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers in a multicenter setting; (2) elucidation of the patterns and rates of change of imaging and CSF biomarker measurements in control subjects, MCI patients, and AD patients. CSF biomarkers are consistent with disease trajectories predicted by β-amyloid cascade (Hardy, J Alzheimers Dis 2006;9(Suppl 3):151–3) and tau-mediated neurodegeneration hypotheses for AD, whereas brain atrophy and hypometabolism levels show predicted patterns but exhibit differing rates of change depending on region and disease severity; (3) the assessment of alternative methods of diagnostic categorization. Currently, the best classifiers combine optimum features from multiple modalities, including MRI, [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose-PET, CSF biomarkers, and clinical tests; (4) the development of methods for the early detection of AD. CSF biomarkers, β-amyloid 42 and tau, as well as amyloid PET may reflect the earliest steps in AD pathology in mildly symptomatic or even nonsymptomatic subjects, and are leading candidates

  3. 3-D portal image analysis in clinical practice: an evaluation of 2-D and 3-D analysis techniques as applied to 30 prostate cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remeijer, Peter; Geerlof, Erik; Ploeger, Lennert; Gilhuijs, Kenneth; Herk, Marcel van; Lebesque, Joos V.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical importance and feasibility of a 3-D portal image analysis method in comparison with a standard 2-D portal image analysis method for pelvic irradiation techniques. Methods and Materials: In this study, images of 30 patients who were treated for prostate cancer were used. A total of 837 imaged fields were analyzed by a single technologist, using automatic 2-D and 3-D techniques independently. Standard deviations (SDs) of the random, systematic, and overall variations, and the overall mean were calculated for the resulting data sets (2-D and 3-D), in the three principal directions (left-right [L-R], cranial-caudal [C-C], anterior-posterior [A-P]). The 3-D analysis included rotations as well. For the translational differences between the three data sets, the overall SD and overall mean were computed. The influence of out-of-plane rotations on the 2-D registration accuracy was determined by analyzing the difference between the 2-D and 3-D translation data as function of rotations. To assess the reliability of the 2-D and 3-D methods, the number of times the automatic match was manually adjusted was counted. Finally, an estimate of the workload was made. Results: The SDs of the random and systematic components of the rotations around the three orthogonal axes were 1.1 (L-R), 0.6 (C-C), 0.5 (A-P) and 0.9 (L-R), 0.6 (C-C), 0.8 (A-P) degrees, respectively. The overall mean rotation around the L-R axis was 0.7 deg., which deviated significantly from zero. Translational setup errors were comparable for 2-D and 3-D analysis (ranging from 1.4 to 2.2 mm SD and from 1.5 to 2.5 mm SD, respectively). The variation of the difference between the 2-D and 3-D translation data increased from 1.1 mm (SD) for zero rotations to 2.7 mm (SD) for out-of-plane rotations of 3 deg., due to a reduced 2-D registration accuracy for large rotations. The number of times the analysis was not considered acceptable and was manually adjusted was 44% for the 2-D

  4. The NRL 2011 Airborne Sea-Ice Thickness Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brozena, J. M.; Gardner, J. M.; Liang, R.; Ball, D.; Richter-Menge, J.

    2011-12-01

    pulse-limited radar altimeter that has a footprint that varies from a few meters to a few tens of meters depending on altitude and roughness of the reflective surface. Intercalibration of the two instruments was accomplished at leads in the ice and by multiple over-flights of four radar corner-cubes set ~ 2 m above the snow along the ground-truth line. Direct comparison of successive flights of the ground-truth line to flights done in a grid pattern over and adjacent to the line was complicated by the ~ 20-30 m drift of the ice-floe between successive flight-lines. This rapid ice movement required the laser and radar data be translated into an ice-fixed, rather than a geographic reference frame. This was facilitated by geodetic GPS receiver measurements at the ice-camp and Pt. Barrow. The NRL data set, in combination with the ground-truth line and submarine upward-looking sonar data, will aid in understanding the error budgets of our systems, the ICEBRIDGE airborne measurements (also flown over the ground-truth line), and the CRYOSAT-2 data over a wide range of ice types.

  5. Characteristics, extent and origin of hydrothermal alteration at Mount Rainier Volcano, Cascades Arc, USA: Implications for debris-flow hazards and mineral deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, D.A.; Sisson, T.W.; Breit, G.N.; Rye, R.O.; Vallance, J.W.

    2008-01-01

    the west and east flanks of the edifice, spatially associated with dikes that are localized in those sectors; other edifice flanks lack dikes and associated alteration. The Osceola collapse removed most of the altered core and upper east flank of the volcano, but intensely altered rocks remain on the uppermost west flank. Major conclusions of this study are that: (1) Hydrothermal-mineral assemblages and distributions at Mount Rainier can be understood in the framework of hydrothermal processes and environments developed from studies of ore deposits formed in analogous settings. (2) Frequent eruptions supplied sufficient hot magmatic fluid to alter the upper interior of the volcano hydrothermally, despite the consistently deep (??? 8??km) magma reservoir which may have precluded formation of economic mineral deposits within or at shallow depths beneath Mount Rainier. The absence of indicator equilibrium alteration-mineral assemblages in the debris flows that effectively expose the volcano to a depth of 1-1.5??km also suggests a low potential for significant high-sulfidation epithermal or porphyry-type mineral deposits at depth. (3) Despite the long and complex history of the volcano, intensely altered collapse-prone rocks were spatially restricted to near the volcano's conduit system and summit, and short distances onto the upper east and west flanks, due to the necessary supply of reactive components carried by ascending magmatic fluids. (4) Intensely altered rocks were removed from the summit, east flank, and edifice interior by the Osceola collapse, but remain on the upper west flank in the Sunset Amphitheater area and present a continuing collapse hazard. (5) Visually conspicuous rocks on the lower east and mid-to-lower

  6. Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC) : gap analysis for high fidelity and performance assessment code development.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Joon H.; Siegel, Malcolm Dean; Arguello, Jose Guadalupe, Jr.; Webb, Stephen Walter; Dewers, Thomas A.; Mariner, Paul E.; Edwards, Harold Carter; Fuller, Timothy J.; Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Jove-Colon, Carlos F.; Wang, Yifeng

    2011-03-01

    This report describes a gap analysis performed in the process of developing the Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC) in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Campaign. The goal of the Waste IPSC is to develop an integrated suite of computational modeling and simulation capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive waste storage or disposal system. The Waste IPSC will provide this simulation capability (1) for a range of disposal concepts, waste form types, engineered repository designs, and geologic settings, (2) for a range of time scales and distances, (3) with appropriate consideration of the inherent uncertainties, and (4) in accordance with rigorous verification, validation, and software quality requirements. The gap analyses documented in this report were are performed during an initial gap analysis to identify candidate codes and tools to support the development and integration of the Waste IPSC, and during follow-on activities that delved into more detailed assessments of the various codes that were acquired, studied, and tested. The current Waste IPSC strategy is to acquire and integrate the necessary Waste IPSC capabilities wherever feasible, and develop only those capabilities that cannot be acquired or suitably integrated, verified, or validated. The gap analysis indicates that significant capabilities may already exist in the existing THC codes although there is no single code able to fully account for all physical and chemical processes involved in a waste disposal system. Large gaps exist in modeling chemical processes and their couplings with other processes. The coupling of chemical processes with flow transport and mechanical deformation remains challenging. The data for extreme environments (e.g., for elevated temperature and high ionic strength media) that are

  7. Problems and Guidelines of Strategy Implementation in Basic Educational Institutions under the Supervision of KhonKaen Primary Educational Service Area Office 4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasiwan Tonkanya

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The research aimed to 1 study problems of strategy implementation in basic educational institutions under Khonkaen Primary Educational Service Area Office 4 ; and 2 propose the guidelines for strategy implementation in basic educational institutions under Khonkaen Primary Educational Service Area Office 4. The study was carried out in 2 phases. In phase 1, it focused on the study and analysis of the strategic implementation problems and phase 2 studied the best practice schools. The informants for the interview in phase 1 comprised 6 school administrators and teachers who were involved in strategy implementation from small-sized, medium-sized, and large-sized schools. They were selected by the use of purposive sampling technique. The population in the study of the strategic implementation problems in basic educational institutions in phase 1 consisted of 543 school administrators and teachers who were involved in strategy implementation from 181 schools under Khonkaen Primary Educational Service Area Office 4 in academic year 2014. The study samples were 217 school administrators and teachers who were involved in strategy implementation from small-sized, medium-sized, and large-sized schools under Khonkaen Primary Educational Service Area Office 4. The samples were selected by the use of stratified sampling technique. The informants of the phase 2 study were 6 school administrators and teachers who were involved in strategy implementation from small-sized, medium-sized, and large-sized best practice schools obtained from purposive sampling technique. The research instruments used for data collection consisted of 2 sets of questionnaires. The Set 1 questionnaire was the 5-point Likert scale on the levels of the problems in implementation with item discrimination at 0.60 – 1.00 and reliability of the whole questionnaire at .9359. The questionnaire contained 3 parts with 65 items. The Set 2 questionnaire comprised 2 parts with 10 items regarding

  8. Repositioning for pressure ulcer prevention in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Brigid M; Chaboyer, Wendy P; McInnes, Elizabeth; Kent, Bridie; Whitty, Jennifer A; Thalib, Lukman

    2014-04-03

    A pressure ulcer (PU), also referred to as a 'pressure injury', 'pressure sore', or 'bedsore' is defined as an area of localised tissue damage that is caused by unrelieved pressure, friction or shearing forces on any part of the body. PUs commonly occur in patients who are elderly and less mobile, and carry significant human and economic impacts. Immobility and physical inactivity are considered to be major risk factors for PU development and the manual repositioning of patients in hospital or long-term care is a common pressure ulcer prevention strategy. The objectives of this review were to:1) assess the effects of repositioning on the prevention of PUs in adults, regardless of risk or in-patient setting;2) ascertain the most effective repositioning schedules for preventing PUs in adults; and3) ascertain the incremental resource consequences and costs associated with implementing different repositioning regimens compared with alternate schedules or standard practice. We searched the following electronic databases to identify reports of the relevant randomised controlled trials: the Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register (searched 06 September 2013), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2013, Issue 8); Ovid MEDLINE (1948 to August, Week 4, 2013); Ovid EMBASE (1974 to 2013, Week 35); EBESCO CINAHL (1982 to 30 August 2013); and the reference sections of studies that were included in the review. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs), published or unpublished, that assessed the effects of any repositioning schedule or different patient positions and measured PU incidence in adults in any setting. Two review authors independently performed study selection, risk of bias assessment and data extraction. We included three RCTs and one economic study representing a total of 502 randomised participants from acute and long-term care settings. Two trials compared the 30º and 90º tilt positions using similar repositioning frequencies (there was a

  9. Professionalism for future humanistic doctors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SEDIGHEH EBRAHIMI

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Dear editor Clinical environments encounter is an important part of studying medicine (1. Patient contact as an integral part of medical education occurs in various formats in the clinical settings (2, 3. During clinical training, medical students may experience high levels of stress, and some may not deal with it well. The abruptness of students’ transition to the clinical setting generated positive and negative emotions. Due to being a novice, they did not receive adequate training on how to get emotionally prepared for meeting seriously ill people. In such circumstances, the shortage of training will have predictably crucial consequences. Early clinical contact has been suggested to reduce these stresses and help the students adapt effectively to changes in the hospital climate (2. Patient contact creates an environment where each student appreciates cultural diversity and reinforces the development of clinical professional interpersonal skills through social, emotional and cognitive experiences (4, 5. It encourages validating of the relationship between patients and doctors and allows students to experience a more personal relationship with patients and nurture the ability to empathize with them, providing considerable benefits for trainees and patients. In this way, the social emotions that students experience when empathizing with a patient represent a uniquely human achievement. By internalizing their subjective interpretations of patient’s beliefs and feelings, the student’s body, brain and mind come together to produce cognition and emotion . They construct culturally relevant knowledge and make decisions about how to act and think about the patient’s problems as if they were their own. On the other hand, patient interaction in undergraduate education offers students a valuable early insight into the day-to-day role of a doctor and the patients’ perspective on specific conditions. Early experience provides a greater knowledge

  10. DOE SciDAC's Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Dean N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2011-09-27

    The mission of the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) is to provide the worldwide climate-research community with access to the data, information, model codes, analysis tools, and intercomparison capabilities required to make sense of enormous climate data sets. Its specific goals are to (1) provide an easy-to-use and secure web-based data access environment for data sets; (2) add value to individual data sets by presenting them in the context of other data sets and tools for comparative analysis; (3) address the specific requirements of participating organizations with respect to bandwidth, access restrictions, and replication; (4) ensure that the data are readily accessible through the analysis and visualization tools used by the climate research community; and (5) transfer infrastructure advances to other domain areas. For the ESGF, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies (ESG-CET) team has led international development and delivered a production environment for managing and accessing ultra-scale climate data. This production environment includes multiple national and international climate projects (such as the Community Earth System Model and the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project), ocean model data (such as the Parallel Ocean Program), observation data (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Best Estimate, Carbon Dioxide Information and Analysis Center, Atmospheric Infrared Sounder, etc.), and analysis and visualization tools, all serving a diverse user community. These data holdings and services are distributed across multiple ESG-CET sites (such as ANL, LANL, LBNL/NERSC, LLNL/PCMDI, NCAR, and ORNL) and at unfunded partner sites, such as the Australian National University National Computational Infrastructure, the British Atmospheric Data Centre, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, the German Climate

  11. Factors related to survival in hepatocellular carcinoma in the geographic area of Sabadell (Catalonia, Spain Factores relacionados con la supervivencia en el carcinoma hepatocelular en el área geográfica de Sabadell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mireia Miquel

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is a very frequent tumor. Screening for the disease is effective, but the prognostic factors are difficult to evaluate. Objectives: 1. To determine epidemiological data and the clinical course of HCC in our setting. 2. To compare patient survival according to whether screening is performed or not. 3. To evaluate survival prognostic factors. Patients and methods: data on the epidemiology and clinical course of patients diagnosed with HCC were collected on a prospective basis (January 2004-December 2006. Two groups were considered according to whether screening had been performed (group A or not (group B. Results: a total of 110 patients were diagnosed with HCC (70% males. The most common etiology of cirrhosis was hepatitis C (56.1%, and 69% presented mild liver failure (Child-Pugh grade A. The median follow-up was 1.8 years. Fifty-one percent had been subjected to screening. The diagnosis of HCC was established by imaging techniques in 48.2% of the cases, and by histological criteria in 51.8%. The median tumor size was 23 mm in group A and 28 mm in group B (p = 0.005. Treatment with curative intent was provided in 72% of the cases in group A and in 48% in group B (p = 0.011. The median overall survival was 1.99 years-2.67 years in group A and 1.75 years in group B (p = 0.05. The multivariate analysis of overall survival showed the type of treatment (OR = 2.82 95%CI: 1.3-6.12, p = 0.009 and liver function (OR = 1.71 95%CI: 1.1-2.68, p = 0.020 to be independent predictors of survival. Conclusions: screening allows the diagnosis of smaller lesions and a higher percentage of curative treatments. The degree of liver function and the provision of curative treatment are independent predictors of survival.Introducción: el carcinoma hepatocelular (CHC es un tumor muy prevalente. Su cribado es eficaz, pero los factores pronósticos son difíciles de evaluar. Objetivos: 1. Conocer datos epidemiológicos y evoluci

  12. REVIEW REPORT: BUILDING C-400 THERMAL TREATMENT 90 PERCENT REMEDIAL DESIGN REPORT AND SITE INVESTIGATION, PGDP, PADUCAH, KENTUCKY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Looney, B; Jed Costanza, J; Eva Davis, E; Joe Rossabi, J; Lloyd Stewart, L; Hans Stroo, H

    2007-01-01

    On 9 April 2007, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters, Office of Soil and Groundwater Remediation (EM-22) initiated an Independent Technical Review (ITR) of the 90% Remedial Design Report (RDR) and Site Investigation (RDSI) for thermal treatment of trichloroethylene (TCE) in the soil and groundwater in the vicinity of Building C-400 at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). The general ITR goals were to assess the technical adequacy of the 90% RDSI and provide recommendations sufficient for DOE to determine if modifications are warranted pertaining to the design, schedule, or cost of implementing the proposed design. The ultimate goal of the effort was to assist the DOE Paducah/Portsmouth Project Office (PPPO) and their contractor team in ''removing'' the TCE source zone located near the C-400 Building. This report provides the ITR findings and recommendations and supporting evaluations as needed to facilitate use of the recommendations. The ITR team supports the remedial action objective (RAO) at C-400 to reduce the TCE source area via subsurface Electrical Resistance Heating (ERH). Further, the ITR team commends PPPO, their contractor team, regulators, and stakeholders for the significant efforts taken in preparing the 90% RDR. To maximize TCE removal at the target source area, several themes emerge from the review which the ITR team believes should be considered and addressed before implementing the thermal treatment. These themes include the need for: (1) Accurate and site-specific models as the basis to verify the ERH design for full-scale implementation for this challenging hydrogeologic setting; (2) Flexible project implementation and operation to allow the project team to respond to observations and data collected during construction and operation; (3) Defensible performance metrics and monitoring, appropriate for ERH, to ensure sufficient and efficient clean-up; and (4) Comprehensive (creative and diverse) contingencies to address the

  13. Annual Report: EPAct Complementary Program's Ultra-Deepwater R&D Portfolio and Unconventional Resources R&D Portfolio (30 September 2012)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,; Rose, Kelly [NETL; Hakala, Alexandra [NETL; Guthrie, George [NETL

    2012-09-30

    objective of this body of work is to build the scientific understanding and assessment tools necessary to develop the confidence that key domestic oil and gas resources can be produced safely and in an environmentally sustainable way. For the Deepwater and Ultra-Deepwater Portfolio, the general objective is to develop a scientific base for predicting and quantifying potential risks associated with exploration and production in extreme offshore environments. This includes: (1) using experimental studies to improve understanding of key parameters (e.g., properties and behavior of materials) tied to loss-of-control events in deepwater settings, (2) compiling data on spatial variability for key properties used to characterize and simulate the natural and engineered components involved in extreme offshore settings, and (3) utilizing findings from (1) and (2) in conjunction with integrated assessment models to model worst-case scenarios, as well as assessments of most likely scenarios relative to potential risks associated with flow assurance and loss of control. This portfolio and approach is responsive to key Federal-scale initiatives including the Ocean Energy Safety Advisory Committee (OESC). In particular, the findings and recommendations of the OESC's Spill Prevention Subcommittee are addressed by aspects of the Complementary Program research. The Deepwater and Ultra-Deepwater Portfolio is also aligned with some of the goals of the United States- Department of the Interior (US-DOI) led Alaska Interagency Working Group (AIWG) which brings together state, federal, and tribal government personnel in relation to energy-related issues and needs in the Alaskan Arctic. For the Unconventional Fossil Resources Portfolio, the general objective is to develop a sufficient scientific base for predicting and quantifying potential risks associated with the oil/gas resources in shale reservoirs that require hydraulic fracturing and/or other engineering measures to produce. The major

  14. Characteristics, extent and origin of hydrothermal alteration at Mount Rainier Volcano, Cascades Arc, USA: Implications for debris-flow hazards and mineral deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, David A.; Sisson, Thomas W.; Breit, George N.; Rye, Robert O.; Vallance, James W.

    2008-08-01

    . The edifice was capped by a steam-heated alteration zone, most of which resulted from condensation of fumarolic vapor and oxidation of H 2S in the unsaturated zone above the water table. Weakly developed smectite-pyrite alteration extended into the west and east flanks of the edifice, spatially associated with dikes that are localized in those sectors; other edifice flanks lack dikes and associated alteration. The Osceola collapse removed most of the altered core and upper east flank of the volcano, but intensely altered rocks remain on the uppermost west flank. Major conclusions of this study are that: (1) Hydrothermal-mineral assemblages and distributions at Mount Rainier can be understood in the framework of hydrothermal processes and environments developed from studies of ore deposits formed in analogous settings. (2) Frequent eruptions supplied sufficient hot magmatic fluid to alter the upper interior of the volcano hydrothermally, despite the consistently deep (≥ 8 km) magma reservoir which may have precluded formation of economic mineral deposits within or at shallow depths beneath Mount Rainier. The absence of indicator equilibrium alteration-mineral assemblages in the debris flows that effectively expose the volcano to a depth of 1-1.5 km also suggests a low potential for significant high-sulfidation epithermal or porphyry-type mineral deposits at depth. (3) Despite the long and complex history of the volcano, intensely altered collapse-prone rocks were spatially restricted to near the volcano's conduit system and summit, and short distances onto the upper east and west flanks, due to the necessary supply of reactive components carried by ascending magmatic fluids. (4) Intensely altered rocks were removed from the summit, east flank, and edifice interior by the Osceola collapse, but remain on the upper west flank in the Sunset Amphitheater area and present a continuing collapse hazard. (5) Visually conspicuous rocks on the lower east and mid-to-lower west

  15. Modeling a calixarene-crown-6 and its alkali complexes by means of a hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamare, V.; Golebiowski, J.; Ruiz-Lopez, M.F.; Martins-Costa, M.; Millot, C.

    2000-01-01

    Calixarene-crown-6s in 1,3-alternate conformation are compounds currently investigated for their ability to selectively extract traces of cesium from acidic or strong salinity aqueous solutions. Studies based on molecular modeling were undertaken on these systems to understand their behavior regarding cesium and other alkali cations, in particular sodium. In this work, a recently developed molecular modeling approach was used to investigate calixarene BC6 and its alkali complexes. The whole calixarene ligand is treated by the semiempirical AM1 quantum method (QM) whereas the cation and solvent are treated by a conventional force field (MM). The total energy of the system is the sum of the QM and MM sub-system contributions plus the QM/MM interaction energy. The latter includes the electrostatic interaction between QM charges (nuclei + electrons) and MM sites, and the non-electrostatic QM/MM van der Weals term, usually expressed by a Lennard-Jones potential. In the QM/MM method, van der Waals interactions between the QM and MM sub-systems are described by empirical Lennard-Jones parameters which must be adapted to the hybrid potential considered. Parameters on oxygen atoms were optimized. For the cations, two sets of Parameters were tested: Aqvist empirical parameters, derived to represent cation/water interactions in classical dynamics (set 2), and a new set of parameters which we calculated from dispersion coefficients available in the literature (set 1). The latter gave better results for the interactions with the crown. In the sodium complex, the cation interacts with only four oxygen atoms of the crown, whereas in the complex with cesium, the interaction involves six oxygen atoms. Distortion of the BC6 is therefore less with sodium and favors the corresponding complex by 4 kcal/mol. The cation/BC6 van der Waals energy is very weak for the two complexes. Hence the interaction between the cation and BC6 is primarily electrostatic. The BC6 polarization energy due

  16. Portable bladder ultrasound: an evidence-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    the 3 studies concerning portable bladder ultrasound found the device acceptable to use. However, one study did not find the device as accurate for small PVR volume as for catheterization and another found that the device overestimated catheterized bladder volume. In the remaining study, the authors reported that when the device's hand-held ultrasound transducers (scanheads) were aimed impr