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  1. Mayo Clinic Care Network: A Collaborative Health Care Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wald, John T; Lowery-Schrandt, Sherri; Hayes, David L; Kotsenas, Amy L

    2018-01-01

    By leveraging its experience and expertise as a consultative clinical partner, the Mayo Clinic developed an innovative, scalable care model to accomplish several strategic goals: (1) create and sustain high-value relationships that benefit patients and providers, (2) foster relationships with like-minded partners to act as a strategy against the development of narrow health care networks, and (3) increase national and international brand awareness of Mayo Clinic. The result was the Mayo Clinic Care Network. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. International market research at the Mayo Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathaway, M; Seltman, K

    2001-01-01

    Mayo Clinic has a long international history and has been providing care to international patients since its inception. Despite its history and reputation, however, the marketing staff continues to monitor the international market to gauge the level of awareness, reputation, and attractiveness of Mayo Clinic around the world. Here's a look at how one institution has used word-of-mouth marketing to maintain its global reputation.

  3. The Mayo Clinic Value Creation System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swensen, Stephen J; Dilling, James A; Harper, C Michel; Noseworthy, John H

    2012-01-01

    The authors present Mayo Clinic's Value Creation System, a coherent systems engineering approach to delivering a single high-value practice. There are 4 tightly linked, interdependent phases of the system: alignment, discovery, managed diffusion, and measurement. The methodology is described and examples of the results to date are presented. The Value Creation System has been demonstrated to improve the quality of patient care while reducing costs and increasing productivity.

  4. Empowering Mayo Clinic Individualized Medicine with Genomic Data Warehousing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iain Horton

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Individualized medicine enables better diagnoses and treatment decisions for patients and promotes research in understanding the molecular underpinnings of disease. Linking individual patient’s genomic and molecular information with their clinical phenotypes is crucial to these efforts. To address this need, the Center for Individualized Medicine at Mayo Clinic has implemented a genomic data warehouse and a workflow management system to bring data from institutional electronic health records and genomic sequencing data from both clinical and research bioinformatics sources into the warehouse. The system is the foundation for Mayo Clinic to build a suite of tools and interfaces to support various clinical and research use cases. The genomic data warehouse is positioned to play a key role in enhancing the research capabilities and advancing individualized patient care at Mayo Clinic.

  5. Empowering Mayo Clinic Individualized Medicine with Genomic Data Warehousing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Iain; Lin, Yaxiong; Reed, Gay; Wiepert, Mathieu; Hart, Steven

    2017-08-22

    Individualized medicine enables better diagnoses and treatment decisions for patients and promotes research in understanding the molecular underpinnings of disease. Linking individual patient's genomic and molecular information with their clinical phenotypes is crucial to these efforts. To address this need, the Center for Individualized Medicine at Mayo Clinic has implemented a genomic data warehouse and a workflow management system to bring data from institutional electronic health records and genomic sequencing data from both clinical and research bioinformatics sources into the warehouse. The system is the foundation for Mayo Clinic to build a suite of tools and interfaces to support various clinical and research use cases. The genomic data warehouse is positioned to play a key role in enhancing the research capabilities and advancing individualized patient care at Mayo Clinic.

  6. Optimizing the patient transport function at Mayo Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchera, Dustin; Rohleder, Thomas R

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we report on the implementation of a computerized scheduling tool to optimize staffing for patient transport at the Mayo Clinic. The tool was developed and implemented in Microsoft Excel and Visual Basic for Applications and includes an easy-to-use interface. The tool allows transport management to consider the trade-offs between patient waiting time and staffing levels. While improved staffing efficiency was a desire of the project, it was important that patient service quality was also maintained. The results show that staffing could be reduced while maintaining historical patient service levels.

  7. Patient quality of life in the Mayo Clinic Care Transitions program: a survey study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faucher J

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Joshua Faucher,1 Jordan Rosedahl,2 Dawn Finnie,3 Amy Glasgow,3 Paul Takahashi4 1Mayo Medical School, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, 2Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Department of Health Science Research, Mayo Clinic, 3Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery, 4Division of Primary Care Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA Background: Transitional care programs are common interventions aimed at reducing medical complications and associated readmissions for patients recently discharged from the hospital. While organizations strive to reduce readmissions, another important related metric is patient quality of life (QoL. Aims: To compare the relationship between QoL in patients enrolled in the Mayo Clinic Care Transitions (MCCT program versus usual care, and to determine if QoL changed in MCCT participants between baseline and 1-year follow-up. Methods: A baseline survey was mailed to MCCT enrollees in March 2013. Those who completed a baseline survey were sent a follow-up survey 1 year later. A cross-sectional survey of usual care participants was mailed in November 2013. We included in our analysis 199 participants (83 in the MCCT and 116 in usual care aged over 60 years with multiple comorbidities and receiving primary care. Primary outcomes were self-rated QoL; secondary outcomes included self-reported general, physical, and mental health. Intra- and intergroup comparisons of patients were evaluated using Pearson’s chi-squared analysis. Results: MCCT participants had more comorbidities and higher elder risk assessment scores than those receiving usual care. At baseline, 74% of MCCT participants reported responses of good-to-excellent QoL compared to 64% after 1 year (P=0.16. Between MCCT and usual care, there was no significant difference in self-reported QoL (P=0.21. Between baseline and follow-up in MCCT patients, and compared to usual care, there were no significant

  8. Clinical aspects of the Mayo/IBM PACS project

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    Forbes, Glenn S.; Morin, Richard L.; Pavlicek, William

    1991-07-01

    A joint project between Mayo Clinic and IBM to develop a picture archival and communications system has been under development for three years. This project began as a potential solution to a pressing archival problem in magnetic resonance imaging. The project has grown to encompass a much larger sphere of activity including workstations, image retrieval, and report archival. This report focuses on the clinical aspects involved in the design, development, and implementation of such a system. In particular, emphasis is placed on the clinical impact of the system both inside and outside of the radiology department. The primary concerns have centered on fidelity of archival data, ease of use, and diagnostic efficacy. The project to date has been limited to neuroradiology practice. This group consists of nine staff radiologists and fellows. Administrative policy decisions regarding the accessibility and available of digital data in the clinical environment have been much more difficult and complex than originally conceived. Based on the observations thus far, the authors believe the system will become a useful and valuable adjunct to clinical practice of radiology.

  9. Current Perspectives on Desmoid Tumors: The Mayo Clinic Approach

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    Scott Okuno

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Desmoid tumors are a rare group of locally aggressive, non malignant tumors of fibroblastic origin that can lead to significant morbidity due to local invasion. Despite advances in the understanding of these tumors, their natural history is incompletely understood and the optimal treatment is still a matter of debate. Local control is the main goal of treatment and there has been a change in philosophy regarding the management of these tumors from aggressive surgical resection to function preservation. A multidisciplinary approach is essential to plan local control with acceptable morbidity. The current Mayo Clinic algorithm for the treatment of these tumors is based on institutional experience and the available evidence in the literature: asymptomatic/non progressive lesions away from vital structures are managed with observation and regular imaging; primary or recurrent desmoid tumors which are symptomatic or progressive or near vital structures are managed with wide surgical resection when wide surgical margins are possible with minimal functional and cosmetic loss. When positive or close surgical margins are likely, surgical resection with adjuvant radiotherapy or definitive radiotherapy is preferred. If likely functional or cosmetic deficit is unacceptable, radiotherapy is the treatment of choice. Unresectable lesions are considered for radiotherapy, chemotherapy or newer modalities however an unresectable lesion associated with a painful, functionless, infected extremity is managed with an amputation.

  10. Current Perspectives on Desmoid Tumors: The Mayo Clinic Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joglekar, Siddharth B.; Rose, Peter S.; Sim, Franklin; Okuno, Scott; Petersen, Ivy

    2011-01-01

    Desmoid tumors are a rare group of locally aggressive, non malignant tumors of fibroblastic origin that can lead to significant morbidity due to local invasion. Despite advances in the understanding of these tumors, their natural history is incompletely understood and the optimal treatment is still a matter of debate. Local control is the main goal of treatment and there has been a change in philosophy regarding the management of these tumors from aggressive surgical resection to function preservation. A multidisciplinary approach is essential to plan local control with acceptable morbidity. The current Mayo Clinic algorithm for the treatment of these tumors is based on institutional experience and the available evidence in the literature: asymptomatic/non progressive lesions away from vital structures are managed with observation and regular imaging; primary or recurrent desmoid tumors which are symptomatic or progressive or near vital structures are managed with wide surgical resection when wide surgical margins are possible with minimal functional and cosmetic loss. When positive or close surgical margins are likely, surgical resection with adjuvant radiotherapy or definitive radiotherapy is preferred. If likely functional or cosmetic deficit is unacceptable, radiotherapy is the treatment of choice. Unresectable lesions are considered for radiotherapy, chemotherapy or newer modalities however an unresectable lesion associated with a painful, functionless, infected extremity is managed with an amputation

  11. Postradiation sarcoma of bone: review of 78 Mayo Clinic cases

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    Weatherby, R.P.; Dahlin, D.C.; Ivins, J.C.

    1981-05-01

    Postradiation sarcoma of bone is an uncommon but serious sequela of radiation therapy. Seventy-eight Mayo Clinic patients have been treated for sarcomas arising in irradiated bones. They received their initial radiotherapy for a wide variety of nonneoplastic and neoplastic conditions, both benign and malignant. Thirty-five sarcomas arose in bone that was normal at the time of radiotherapy, and 43 arose in irradiated preexisting osseous lesions. The latent period between radiotherapy and diagnosis of sarcoma averaged 14.3 years. Ninety percent of the postradiation sarcomas were either osteosarcomas or fibrosarcomas; chondrosarcoma, malignant (fibrous) histiocytoma, malignant lymphoma, Ewing's tumor, and metastasizing chondroblastoma also occurred. Prompt radical surgery, when feasible, is usually the treatment of choice for the sarcoma. About 30% of patients with sarcomas of the extremities or craniofacial bones survived 5 years without recurrence; there were no disease-free survivors among patients with tumors of the vertebral column, pelvis, or shoulder girdle. The low risk of sarcoma following radiotherapy for the treatment of cancer should not be a contraindication to its use in these patients; however, radiation therapy for benign bone tumors should be reserved for lesions that are not amenable to surgical treatment. An unusual case is also reported herein in which a fibrosarcoma was discovered in the humerus of a patient who had received radiotherapy 55 years previously for a verified osteosarcoma in the same site.

  12. Postradiation sarcoma of bone: review of 78 Mayo Clinic cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weatherby, R.P.; Dahlin, D.C.; Ivins, J.C.

    1981-01-01

    Postradiation sarcoma of bone is an uncommon but serious sequela of radiation therapy. Seventy-eight Mayo Clinic patients have been treated for sarcomas arising in irradiated bones. They received their initial radiotherapy for a wide variety of nonneoplastic and neoplastic conditions, both benign and malignant. Thirty-five sarcomas arose in bone that was normal at the time of radiotherapy, and 43 arose in irradiated preexisting osseous lesions. The latent period between radiotherapy and diagnosis of sarcoma averaged 14.3 years. Ninety percent of the postradiation sarcomas were either osteosarcomas or fibrosarcomas; chondrosarcoma, malignant (fibrous) histiocytoma, malignant lymphoma, Ewing's tumor, and metastasizing chondroblastoma also occurred. Prompt radical surgery, when feasible, is usually the treatment of choice for the sarcoma. About 30% of patients with sarcomas of the extremities or craniofacial bones survived 5 years without recurrence; there were no disease-free survivors among patients with tumors of the vertebral column, pelvis, or shoulder girdle. The low risk of sarcoma following radiotherapy for the treatment of cancer should not be a contraindication to its use in these patients; however, radiation therapy for benign bone tumors should be reserved for lesions that are not amenable to surgical treatment. An unusual case is also reported herein in which a fibrosarcoma was discovered in the humerus of a patient who had received radiotherapy 55 years previously for a verified osteosarcoma in the same site

  13. The Prince Edward Island-Mayo Clinic connection: Malcolm B. Dockerty and Lewis B. Woolner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, James R

    2014-03-01

    Malcolm B. Dockerty and Lewis B. Woolner, 2 preeminent mid-20th-century surgical pathologists, spent their entire careers at the Mayo Clinic. Both were raised in poverty on potato farms only 49 miles apart in Canada's smallest province (Prince Edward Island); both were educated in 1-room schools and graduated as gold medalists from Prince Edward Island's only college and then from Maritime Canada's only medical school; both then trained at the Mayo Clinic. To explore the lives and accomplishments of these 2 important surgical pathologists. Standard historiographic methods were used to explore primary and secondary historical sources. Both became world-renowned general surgical pathologists, one developing subspecialty expertise in gynecologic pathology and the other in cytopathology, pulmonary pathology, and thyroid/parathyroid pathology. Both were prolific authors with h-indices higher than 40, and between them, they published more than 750 peer-reviewed papers and book chapters. As educators, they trained hundreds of pathology and surgery residents/fellows who disseminated their knowledge around the world. Both were fascinated by poetry from childhood and could quote the classics from memory. One wrote poetry throughout his entire life and even used it to teach pathology and serve as his memoir; the other strongly preferred the classics and in jest called his colleague "a (minor) poet." Both received postretirement honorary doctorates from their alma maters. Dockerty died in 1987; Woolner celebrates his 100th birthday on November 17, 2013. Every pathologist should know of these 2 pioneering surgical pathologists.

  14. The Social Media DNA of Mayo Clinic-and Health Care.

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    Kotsenas, Amy L; Aase, Lee; Arce, Makala; Timimi, Farris K; Dacy, Matthew; Young, Colleen; Wald, John T

    2018-01-01

    Hippocrates' admonition and the medical community's aversion to risk have caused many physicians and institutions to resist participation in modern social media sites such as Facebook (Facebook, Inc, Menlo Park, California, USA), Twitter (Twitter Inc, San Francisco, California, USA), and YouTube (San Mateo, California, USA). However, because Mayo Clinic's founders were champions of analog social networking, it was among the earliest hospitals worldwide to create official accounts on these digital platforms. A proper understanding of the traditional mechanisms of knowledge diffusion in medicine and of the nature of social media sites should help professionals see and embrace the opportunities for positive engagement in social media. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The Enterprise Data Trust at Mayo Clinic: a semantically integrated warehouse of biomedical data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chute, Christopher G; Beck, Scott A; Fisk, Thomas B; Mohr, David N

    2010-01-01

    Mayo Clinic's Enterprise Data Trust is a collection of data from patient care, education, research, and administrative transactional systems, organized to support information retrieval, business intelligence, and high-level decision making. Structurally it is a top-down, subject-oriented, integrated, time-variant, and non-volatile collection of data in support of Mayo Clinic's analytic and decision-making processes. It is an interconnected piece of Mayo Clinic's Enterprise Information Management initiative, which also includes Data Governance, Enterprise Data Modeling, the Enterprise Vocabulary System, and Metadata Management. These resources enable unprecedented organization of enterprise information about patient, genomic, and research data. While facile access for cohort definition or aggregate retrieval is supported, a high level of security, retrieval audit, and user authentication ensures privacy, confidentiality, and respect for the trust imparted by our patients for the respectful use of information about their conditions.

  16. Validation of the Mayo Clinic Staging System in Determining Prognoses of Patients With Perihilar Cholangiocarcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coelen, Robert J. S.; Gaspersz, Marcia P.; Labeur, Tim A.; van Vugt, Jeroen L. A.; van Dieren, Susan; Willemssen, François E. J. A.; Nio, Chung Y.; Ijzermans, Jan N. M.; Klümpen, Heinz-Josef; Groot Koerkamp, Bas; van Gulik, Thomas M.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Most systems for staging perihilar cholangiocarcinoma (PHC) have been developed for the minority of patients with resectable disease. The recently developed Mayo Clinic system for staging PHC requires only clinical and radiologic variables, but has not yet been validated. We

  17. Brief Report: Cancer Immunotherapy in Patients With Preexisting Rheumatic Disease: The Mayo Clinic Experience.

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    Richter, Michael D; Pinkston, Olga; Kottschade, Lisa A; Finnes, Heidi D; Markovic, Svetomir N; Thanarajasingam, Uma

    2018-03-01

    To determine the risk of rheumatic disease flare and adverse effects in patients with preexisting rheumatic disease who were receiving immune checkpoint inhibitor (ICI) therapy. A retrospective medical record review was performed to identify all patients who received ICI therapy at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota between 2011 and 2016 (~700 patients). Those with a preexisting rheumatic disease were identified using specific diagnostic codes. Sixteen patients were identified (81% female, median age 68.5 years). The most common rheumatic diseases were rheumatoid arthritis (n = 5), polymyalgia rheumatica (n = 5), Sjögren's syndrome (n = 2), and systemic lupus erythematosus (n = 2). Seven patients were receiving immunosuppressive therapy or glucocorticoids for their rheumatic disease at the time of initiation of the ICI. The primary malignancies were melanoma (n = 10), pulmonary (n = 4), or hematologic (n = 2). In most cases, ICIs were offered only after failure of several other therapies. Immune-related adverse effects (IRAEs) occurred in 6 patients, and all were treated successfully with glucocorticoids and discontinuation of the ICI therapy. There were no significant differences in time from cancer diagnosis to immunotherapy, duration of immunotherapy, age, or sex between the patients with and those without IRAEs. To our knowledge, this represents the largest single-center cohort of patients with rheumatic diseases who were exposed to modern cancer immunotherapy. Only a minority of these patients experienced a flare of their preexisting rheumatic disease or any other IRAE. © 2017, American College of Rheumatology.

  18. Dr Albert L. Rhoton Jr's Time at the Mayo Clinic: The Beginnings of a Remarkable Career.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayan, Tarek; Carlson, Matthew L; Piepgras, David G; Link, Michael J; Van Gompel, Jamie J

    2017-08-09

    Dr Albert L. Rhoton Jr became the focal point of neurosurgery's evolution in understanding the intricate and complex microanatomy of the human brain over the last 4 decades. His pioneering work on cadaveric specimens proved to be a pivotal endeavor in the pursuit to better understand the complex microsurgical anatomy of cranial surgery. This paper details his early career at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. A comprehensive review and synthesis of data acquired from the institutional historical archives including the Annual Reports to the Executive Committee, the Reports to the Board of Directors, the MAYOVOX Newsletter, the illustration archives of the Mayo Clinic Division of Creative Media, staff biographies, curriculum vitae, personal interviews, as well as full-text journal articles, and book publications was performed. Dr Rhoton was engaged in a busy clinical practice as a young staff at the Mayo Clinic. Records show he focused on tackling complex intracranial pathologies along with numerous basic research and neuroanatomy projects that became a major part of his life's work and passion. He was a great teacher and friend to countless individuals and his work will continue to impact and improve the care provided to neurosurgery patients for generations to come. Copyright © 2017 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons.

  19. Building a protocol expressway: the case of Mayo Clinic Cancer Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McJoynt, Terre A; Hirzallah, Muhanad A; Satele, Daniel V; Pitzen, Jason H; Alberts, Steven R; Rajkumar, S Vincent

    2009-08-10

    Inconsistencies and errors resulting from nonstandard processes, together with redundancies, rework, and excess workload, lead to extended time frames for clinical trial protocol development. This results in dissatisfaction among sponsors, investigators, and staff and restricts the availability of novel treatment options for patients. A team of experts from Mayo Clinic formed, including Protocol Development Unit staff and management from the three Mayo Clinic campuses (Florida, Minnesota, and Arizona), a systems and procedures analyst, a quality office analyst, and two physician members to address the identified deficiencies. The current-state process was intensively reviewed, and improvement steps were taken to accelerate the development and approval of cancer-related clinical trials. The primary goal was to decrease the time from receipt of a new protocol through submission to an approving authority, such as the National Cancer Institute or institutional review board. Using the Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, Control (DMAIC) framework infused with Lean waste-reduction methodologies, areas were identified for improvement, including enhancing first-time quality and processing new studies on a first-in/first-out basis. The project was successful in improving the mean turnaround time for internally authored protocols (P Lean methodologies is an effective tool to structure the definition, planning, analysis, and implementation of significant process changes.

  20. Bringing human resources to the table: utilization of an HR balanced scorecard at Mayo Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fottler, Myron D; Erickson, Eric; Rivers, Patrick A

    2006-01-01

    Rather than viewing HR as a critical driver of organizational strategy and outcomes, most health care organizations see HR as a drain on the organization's bottom line. Only by aligning HR with the organizational strategy will HR leaders truly get a seat at the leadership table. HR professionals can overcome impediments and gain a seat at the table by learning the language of business and the ways in which organizational leaders use data to drive their decisions. This article shows how Mayo Clinic uses the popular Balanced Scorecard approach to align its measures of HR performance to the organization's strategic plan.

  1. Strategic performance management: development of a performance measurement system at the Mayo Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtright, J W; Stolp-Smith, S C; Edell, E S

    2000-01-01

    Managing and measuring performance become exceedingly complex as healthcare institutions evolve into integrated health systems comprised of hospitals, outpatient clinics and surgery centers, nursing homes, and home health services. Leaders of integrated health systems need to develop a methodology and system that align organizational strategies with performance measurement and management. To meet this end, multiple healthcare organizations embrace the performance-indicators reporting system known as a "balanced scorecard" or a "dashboard report." This discrete set of macrolevel indicators gives senior management a fast but comprehensive glimpse of the organization's performance in meeting its quality, operational, and financial goals. The leadership of outpatient operations for Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota built on this concept by creating a performance management and measurement system that monitors and reports how well the organization achieves its performance goals. Internal stakeholders identified metrics to measure performance in each key category. Through these metrics, the organization links Mayo Clinic's vision, primary value, core principles, and day-to-day operations by monitoring key performance indicators on a weekly, monthly, or quarterly basis.

  2. Mayo Alliance Prognostic Model for Myelodysplastic Syndromes: Integration of Genetic and Clinical Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tefferi, Ayalew; Gangat, Naseema; Mudireddy, Mythri; Lasho, Terra L; Finke, Christy; Begna, Kebede H; Elliott, Michelle A; Al-Kali, Aref; Litzow, Mark R; Hook, C Christopher; Wolanskyj, Alexandra P; Hogan, William J; Patnaik, Mrinal M; Pardanani, Animesh; Zblewski, Darci L; He, Rong; Viswanatha, David; Hanson, Curtis A; Ketterling, Rhett P; Tang, Jih-Luh; Chou, Wen-Chien; Lin, Chien-Chin; Tsai, Cheng-Hong; Tien, Hwei-Fang; Hou, Hsin-An

    2018-06-01

    To develop a new risk model for primary myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) that integrates information on mutations, karyotype, and clinical variables. Patients with World Health Organization-defined primary MDS seen at Mayo Clinic (MC) from December 28, 1994, through December 19, 2017, constituted the core study group. The National Taiwan University Hospital (NTUH) provided the validation cohort. Model performance, compared with the revised International Prognostic Scoring System, was assessed by Akaike information criterion and area under the curve estimates. The study group consisted of 685 molecularly annotated patients from MC (357) and NTUH (328). Multivariate analysis of the MC cohort identified monosomal karyotype (hazard ratio [HR], 5.2; 95% CI, 3.1-8.6), "non-MK abnormalities other than single/double del(5q)" (HR, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.3-2.6), RUNX1 (HR, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.2-3.1) and ASXL1 (HR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.2-2.3) mutations, absence of SF3B1 mutations (HR, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.1-2.4), age greater than 70 years (HR, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.6-3.1), hemoglobin level less than 8 g/dL in women or less than 9 g/dL in men (HR, 2.3; 95% CI, 1.7-3.1), platelet count less than 75 × 10 9 /L (HR, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.1-2.1), and 10% or more bone marrow blasts (HR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.1-2.8) as predictors of inferior overall survival. Based on HR-weighted risk scores, a 4-tiered Mayo alliance prognostic model for MDS was devised: low (89 patients), intermediate-1 (104), intermediate-2 (95), and high (69); respective median survivals (5-year overall survival rates) were 85 (73%), 42 (34%), 22 (7%), and 9 months (0%). The Mayo alliance model was subsequently validated by using the external NTUH cohort and, compared with the revised International Prognostic Scoring System, displayed favorable Akaike information criterion (1865 vs 1943) and area under the curve (0.87 vs 0.76) values. We propose a simple and contemporary risk model for MDS that is based on a limited set of genetic and clinical variables

  3. The conversion to electronic hospital notes at Mayo Clinic. Overcoming barriers and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreen, Debra L; Dobie, Linda J; Jasperson, Jan C; Lucas, Thomas A; Wubbenhorst, Cathryn L

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the conversion to electronic hospital notes at a large, multi-specialty group practice: Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. Because of the size of the institution and the barriers to the adoption of electronic notes, the process was a gradual one that took several years. Making a convincing case for change to institutional leaders and maintaining their support was crucial to success. Equally vital was the careful investigation of user requirements and the development of software features that allowed providers to complete their notes quickly in the fast-paced hospital environment. Care providers discovered the value of having immediate access to legible hospital notes throughout the campus and from remote locations.

  4. The Mayo Clinic Arizona Spasmodic Dysphonia Experience: A Demographic Analysis of 718 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Alpen B; Bansberg, Stephen F; Adler, Charles H; Lott, David G; Crujido, Lisa

    2015-11-01

    Analyze demographic data collected over a 25-year experience of 718 patients with spasmodic dysphonia (SD) who have been treated with botulinum toxin-A (BoNT-A) and compare our data with previously published studies. Seven hundred eighteen patients with SD were treated with 6621 BoNT-A injections at Mayo Clinic Arizona between 1989 and 2014. All patients were treated by the same physician team. Background demographic data for each patient were recorded. Of 718 patients, 557 patients were female (77.6%). Six hundred sixty of 718 (91.8%) patients had adductor SD (AdSD), and 58 of 718 (8.1%) patients had abductor SD (AbSD). Average age of onset was 51 years. Of 718 patients, 378 (52.6%) had vocal tremor (VT); VT was present in 54.4% of AdSD patients and 32.1% of AbSD patients. Thirty-seven of 718 (5.2%) patients had other dystonias, including cervical dystonia (2.3%), blepharospasm (1.4%), limb dystonia (1.1%), and oromandibular dystonia (0.3%). A positive family history of SD was present in only 6 of 718 patients (0.8%) and of other dystonias in 11 of 718 patients (1.5%). Spasmodic dysphonia is a chronic and potentially disabling focal laryngeal dystonia. The Mayo Clinic Arizona SD experience compares to prior reports and reveals a female preponderance, onset in middle age, infrequent hereditary pattern, high co-occurrence of VT, and low co-occurrence of other dystonias. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. The Minimal Clinically Important Difference for the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malec, James F; Kean, Jacob; Monahan, Patrick O

    To determine the Minimal Clinically Important Difference (MCID) and Robust Clinically Important Difference (RCID) of the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory-4 (MPAI-4) as measures of response to intervention. Retrospective analysis of existing data. Both distribution- and anchor-based methods were used to triangulate on the MCID and to identify a moderate, that is, more robust, level of change (RCID) for the MPAI-4. These were further evaluated with respect to clinical provider ratings. Data for individuals with acquired brain injury in rehabilitation programs throughout the United States in the OutcomeInfo Database (n = 3087) with 2 MPAI-4 ratings. MPAI-4, Supervision Rating Scale, Clinician Rating of Global Clinical Improvement. Initial analyses suggested 5 T-score points (5T) as the MCID and 9T as the RCID. Eighty-one percent to 87% of clinical raters considered a 5T change and 99% considered a 9T change to indicate meaningful improvement. 5T represents the MCID for the MPAI-4 and 9T, the RCID. Both values are notably less than the Reliable Change Index (RCI). While the RCI indicates change with a high level of statistical confidence, it may be insensitive to change that is considered meaningful by providers and participants as indicated by the MCID.

  6. Mohs micrographic surgery for the treatment of hidradenocarcinoma: the Mayo Clinic experience from 1993 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolkachjov, Stanislav N; Hocker, Thomas L; Hochwalt, Phillip C; Camilleri, Michael J; Arpey, Christopher J; Brewer, Jerry D; Otley, Clark C; Roenigk, Randall K; Baum, Christian L

    2015-02-01

    Hidradenocarcinoma (HAC) is a rare malignant adnexal neoplasm with reported metastatic potential and undefined optimal treatment. To review clinical characteristics and outcomes of patients with HAC treated with Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS). The authors performed a retrospective chart review of patients with HAC treated by MMS at Mayo Clinic from 1993 to 2013, recording patient demographics, tumor characteristics, MMS stages to clearance, follow-up, recurrence, metastasis, and mortality. Ten patients underwent MMS for HAC more than 20 years. The average age was 62.8 years, with 6 females and 4 males. Occipital scalp was the most common location (40%), followed by extremities (30%) and face (20%). In 5 of 7 cases (71%), "cyst" was the working clinical diagnosis. The average preoperative lesion area was 3.18 cm, with an average of 1.5 MMS stages required for clearance. Mean postoperative follow-up was 7 years (range, 5-205 months). No tumors treated with MMS recurred, metastasized, or led to disease-related mortality. Mohs micrographic surgery seems to be a useful treatment modality for HAC. This is the largest reported series of HAC treated with MMS with long-term follow-up.

  7. Laryngeal Schwannoma: A Case Presentation and Review of the Mayo Clinic Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romak, Jonathan J; Neel, H Bryan; Ekbom, Dale C

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the nature of laryngeal schwannomas through review of the experience of a single institution during a 104-year period. This is a retrospective case series. The Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota clinical and surgical pathology database was reviewed for the years 1985-2011. Four cases of laryngeal schwannoma were identified. These cases were pooled with a previously published series of laryngeal schwannomas treated at our institution between 1907 and 1986. The characteristics of all 11 cases were studied, and relevant literature was reviewed. A total of 11 cases of schwannoma of the larynx were identified. The mean age at presentation was 48 years (range 12-73 years). The most common presenting symptoms were dysphonia and dysphagia. The most frequently involved primary site was the false vocal fold (six patients), followed by the aryepiglottic fold (three), epiglottis (two), subglottis (two), ventricle (one), true vocal fold (one) and postcricoid region (one). The mean maximal tumor diameter was 2.5 cm. In all but one case, surgical excision was curative with no recurrence during recorded follow up ranging from 1 to 17 years. Laryngeal schwannomas, although rare, should be considered in the differential diagnosis of laryngeal tumors. They occur most frequently in the false vocal fold and present most commonly with dysphonia and/or dysphagia. Surgical excision is the treatment of choice. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Lichen planus affecting the female genitalia: A retrospective review of patients at Mayo Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahy, Caoimhe M R; Torgerson, Rochelle R; Davis, Mark D P

    2017-12-01

    Genital or vulval lichen planus (VLP) may have a disabling effect on a patient's quality of life. Evidence-based management guidelines are lacking for VLP. We sought to review clinical presentation and treatment of patients who received a diagnosis of VLP. The 100 consecutive patients who received a diagnosis of VLP at Mayo Clinic between January 1, 1997, and December 31, 2015, were reviewed retrospectively. Descriptive statistics were used for data analysis. Fisher's exact test and the Wilcoxon rank sum test were used for analysis of categorical and continuous variables, respectively. All statistical tests were 2 sided, with the α level set at .05 for statistical significance. The time to diagnosis for 49% of patients was more than 1 year. Three patients (3%) had vulval dysplasia, including invasive squamous cell carcinoma. Sixty-eight patients (68%) had multisite lichen planus disease. Eleven patients (11%) had disease remission. Dermatology was the lead specialty for 9 of these cases of remission. This was a retrospective, small-cohort study. A low frequency of disease remission was seen in patients with VLP. Patients with lichen planus benefit considerably from dermatology consultation. Further research is warranted to establish high-quality, evidence-based guidelines for multidisciplinary management of this challenging disease. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Evaluation of adjuvant chemoradiation therapy for ampullary adenocarcinoma: the Johns Hopkins Hospital - Mayo Clinic collaborative study

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    Narang, Amol K; Haddock, Michael G; Donohue, John H; Schulick, Richard D; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Cameron, John L; Herman, Joseph M; Miller, Robert C; Hsu, Charles C; Bhatia, Sumita; Pawlik, Timothy M; Laheru, Dan; Hruban, Ralph H; Zhou, Jessica; Winter, Jordan M

    2011-01-01

    The role of adjuvant chemoradiation therapy for ampullary carcinoma is unknown. Previous literature suggests that certain populations with high risk factors for recurrence may benefit from adjuvant chemoradiation. We combined the experience of two institutions to better delineate which patients may benefit from adjuvant chemoradiation. Patients who underwent curative surgery for ampullary carcinoma at the Johns Hopkins Hospital (n = 290; 1992-2007) and at the Mayo Clinic (n = 130; 1977-2005) were reviewed. Patients with <60 days of follow-up, metastatic disease at surgery, or insufficient pathologic data were excluded. The final combined study consisted of 186 patients (n = 104 Johns Hopkins, n = 82 Mayo). Most patients received 5-FU based chemoradiation with conformal radiation. Cox proportional hazards models were used for survival analysis. Median overall-survival was 39.9 months with 2- and 5-year survival rates of 62.4% and 39.1%. On univariate analysis, adverse prognostic factors for overall survival included T3/T4 stage disease (RR = 1.86, p = 0.002), node positive status (RR = 3.18, p < 0.001), and poor histological grade (RR = 1.69, p = 0.011). Patients who received adjuvant chemoradiation (n = 66) vs. surgery alone (n = 120) showed a higher rate of T3/T4 stage disease (57.6% vs. 30.8%, P < 0.001), lymph node involvement (72.7% vs. 30.0%, P < 0.001), and close or positive margins (4.6% vs. 0.0%, P = 0.019). Five year survival rates among node negative and node positive patients were 58.7% and 18.4% respectively. When compared with surgery alone, use of adjuvant chemoradiation improved survival among node positive patients (mOS 32.1 vs. 15.7 mos, 5 yr OS: 27.5% vs. 5.9%; RR = 0.47, P = 0.004). After adjusting for adverse prognostic factors on multivariate analysis, patients treated with adjuvant chemoradiation demonstrated a significant survival benefit (RR = 0.40, P < 0.001). Disease relapse occurred in 37.1% of all patients, most commonly metastatic

  10. Nurse practitioners and physician assistants: preparing new providers for hospital medicine at the mayo clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spychalla, Megan T; Heathman, Joanne H; Pearson, Katherine A; Herber, Andrew J; Newman, James S

    2014-01-01

    Hospital medicine is a growing field with an increasing demand for additional healthcare providers, especially in the face of an aging population. Reductions in resident duty hours, coupled with a continued deficit of medical school graduates to appropriately meet the demand, require an additional workforce to counter the shortage. A major dilemma of incorporating nonphysician providers such as nurse practitioners and physician assistants (NPPAs) into a hospital medicine practice is their varying academic backgrounds and inpatient care experiences. Medical institutions seeking to add NPPAs to their hospital medicine practice need a structured orientation program and ongoing NPPA educational support. This article outlines an NPPA orientation and training program within the Division of Hospital Internal Medicine (HIM) at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN. In addition to a practical orientation program that other institutions can model and implement, the division of HIM also developed supplemental learning modalities to maintain ongoing NPPA competencies and fill learning gaps, including a formal NPPA hospital medicine continuing medical education (CME) course, an NPPA simulation-based boot camp, and the first hospital-based NPPA grand rounds offering CME credit. Since the NPPA orientation and training program was implemented, NPPAs within the division of HIM have gained a reputation for possessing a strong clinical skill set coupled with a depth of knowledge in hospital medicine. The NPPA-physician model serves as an alternative care practice, and we believe that with the institution of modalities, including a structured orientation program, didactic support, hands-on learning, and professional growth opportunities, NPPAs are capable of fulfilling the gap created by provider shortages and resident duty hour restrictions. Additionally, the use of NPPAs in hospital medicine allows for patient care continuity that is otherwise missing with resident practice models.

  11. Delusional infestation is typically comorbid with other psychiatric diagnoses: review of 54 patients receiving psychiatric evaluation at Mayo Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hylwa, Sara A; Foster, Ashley A; Bury, Jessica E; Davis, Mark D P; Pittelkow, Mark R; Bostwick, J Michael

    2012-01-01

    Delusional infestation, which encompasses both delusions of parasitosis and delusions of infestation with inanimate objects (sometimes called Morgellons disease), has been said to represent a distinct and encapsulated delusion, that is, a stand-alone diagnosis. Anecdotally, we have observed that patients with delusional infestation often have one or more psychiatric comorbid conditions and that delusional infestation should not be regarded as a stand-alone diagnosis. The purpose of this study was to identify whether patients with delusional infestation have psychiatric comorbid conditions. We therefore identified patients who had been formally evaluated in the Department of Psychiatry during their visit to Mayo Clinic. We retrospectively searched for and reviewed the cases of all patients with delusional infestation seen from 2001 through 2007 at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, and who underwent psychiatric evaluation. The diagnoses resulting from psychiatric evaluation were analyzed. During the 7-year study period, 109 patients seen for delusional infestation at Mayo Clinic were referred to the Department of Psychiatry, 54 (50%) of whom actually followed through with psychiatric consultation. Of these 54 patients, 40 (74%) received additional active psychiatric diagnoses; 14 patients (26%) had delusional infestation alone. Abnormal personality traits were rarely documented. Most patients with delusional infestation have multiple coexisting or underlying psychiatric disorders. Therefore, evaluation by a psychiatrist, when possible, is advised for all patients with delusional infestation. Copyright © 2012 The Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Think big, start small, move fast a blueprint for transformation from the Mayo Clinic Center for Innovation

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    LaRusso, Nicholas; Farrugia, Gianrico

    2015-01-01

    The Only Innovation Guide You Will Ever Need--from the Award-Winning Minds at Mayo Clinic. A lot of businesspeople talk about innovation, but few companies have achieved the level of truly transformative innovation as brilliantly--or as famously--as the legendary Mayo Clinic. Introducing Think Big, Start Small, Move Fast, the first innovation guide based on the proven, decade-long program that’s made Mayo Clinic one of the most respected and successful organizations in the world. This essential must-have guide shows you how to: Inspire and ignite trailblazing innovation in your workplace Design a new business model that’s creative, collaborative, and sustainable Apply the traditional scientific method to the latest innovations in "design thinking" Build a customized toolkit of the best practices, project portfolios, and strategies Increase your innovation capacity--and watch how quickly you succeed These field-tested techniques grew out of the health care industry but are designed ...

  13. Outcomes and patterns of failure of sarcomatoid carcinoma of the larynx: The Mayo Clinic experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamez, Mauricio E; Jeans, Elizabeth; Hinni, Michael L; Moore, Eric; Young, Geoffrey; Ma, Daniel; McGee, Lisa; Buras, Matthew R; Patel, Samir H

    2018-02-01

    Sarcomatoid carcinoma is a rare variant of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. No consensus exists on its management. Our aim was to present our outcomes. Retrospective study. Median follow-up 45 months. There were 38 patients with pathologically confirmed sarcomatoid carcinoma of the larynx treated at the Mayo Clinic from 1990 to 2014. Statistical analysis of overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), and local control (LC) were conducted using the Kaplan-Meier method. The majority of patients were elderly males (92%) with a smoking history (74%) presenting with early-stage disease (71%). Surgery alone was the primary treatment in 27 patients (71%). Nine patients (25%) were treated with adjuvant radiation due to initial stage or high-risk pathologic features. Median radiation dose to the primary/surgical bed was 65 Gy (range, 60.3-75.0 Gy). A total of 15 patients (39%) had tumor recurrence, majority being local (n = 12). Sixty percent (n = 9) had multiple local recurrences. Five-year OS, PFS, and LC were 63%, 46%, and 72%, respectively. Subgroup analysis by stage I versus higher stages (II-IV) showed an OS of 80% versus 43% (P = .030), PFS of 65% versus 18% (P = .003), and LC of 84% versus 57% (P = .039). Sarcomatoid carcinoma of the larynx is rare, and frequently presents at an early stage in older men with history of smoking. Based on our outcomes and patterns of failure, it appears early-stage tumors are treated appropriately with single-modality therapy, whereas more advanced tumors require multimodality therapy. Validation in a larger cohort is warranted. 4. Laryngoscope, 128:373-377, 2018. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  14. Syndrome of rapid onset end stage renal disease in incident Mayo Clinic chronic hemodialysis patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. C. Onuigbo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite decades of research, a full understanding of chronic kidney disease (CKD-end stage renal disease (ESRD progression remains elusive. The common consensus is a predictable, linear, progressive and time-dependent decline of CKD to ESRD. Acute kidney injury (AKI on CKD is usually assumed to be transient, with recovery as the expected outcome. AKI-ESRD association in current nephrology literature is blamed on the so-called "residual confounding." We had previously described a relationship between AKI events and rapid onset yet irreversible ESRD happening in a continuum in a high-risk CKD cohort. However, the contribution of the syndrome of rapid onset-ESRD (SORO-ESRD to incident United States ESRD population remained conjectural. In this retrospective analysis, we analyzed serum creatinine trajectories of the last 100 consecutive ESRD patients in 4 Mayo Clinic chronic hemodialysis units to determine the incidence of SORO-ESRD. Excluding 9 patients, 31 (34% patients, including two renal transplant recipients, had SORO-ESRD: 18 males and 13 females age 72 (range 50-92 years. Precipitating AKI followed pneumonia (8, acutely decompensated heart failure (7, pyelonephritis (4, post-operative (5, sepsis (3, contrast-induced nephropathy (2, and others (2. Time to dialysis was shortest following surgical procedures. Concurrent renin angiotensin aldosterone system blockade was higher with SORO-ESRD - 23% versus 5%, P = 0.0113. In conclusion, SORO-ESRD is not uncommon among the incident general US ESRD population. The implications for ESRD care planning, AV-fistula-first programs, general CKD care and any associations with renal ageing/senescence warrant further study.

  15. Complex Fibroadenoma and Breast Cancer Risk: A Mayo Clinic Benign Breast Disease Cohort Studya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassar, Aziza; Visscher, Daniel W.; Degnim, Amy C.; Frank, Ryan D.; Vierkant, Robert A.; Frost, Marlene; Radisky, Derek C.; Vachon, Celine M.; Kraft, Ruth A.; Hartmann, Lynn C.; Ghosh, Karthik

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To examine the breast cancer risk overall among women with simple fibroadenoma or complex fibroadenoma and to examine the association of complex fibroadenoma with breast cancer through stratification of other breast cancer risks. Methods The study included women aged 18 to 85 years from the Mayo Clinic Benign Breast Disease Cohort who underwent excisional breast biopsy from 1967 through 1991. Within this cohort, women who had fibroadenoma were compared to women who did not have fibroadenoma. Breast cancer risk (observed vs expected) across fibroadenoma levels was assessed through standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) by using age- and calendar-stratified incidence rates from the Iowa Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry. Analyses were performed overall, within subgroups of involution status, with other demographic characteristics (age, year of biopsy, indication for biopsy, and family history), and with histologic characteristics, including overall impression (nonproliferative disease, proliferative disease without atypia [PDWA], or atypical hyperplasia). Results Fibroadenoma was identified in 2,136 women (noncomplex, 1,835 [85.9%]; complex, 301 [14.1%]). SIR for noncomplex fibroadenoma was 1.49 (95% CI, 1.26–1.74); for complex fibroadenoma, it was 2.27 (95% CI, 1.63–3.10) (test for heterogeneity in SIR, P=.02). However, women with complex fibroadenoma were more likely to have other, concomitant high-risk histologic characteristics (eg, incomplete involution and PDWA). In analyses stratified by involution status and PDWA, complex fibroadenoma was not an independent risk marker for breast cancer. Conclusions Complex fibroadenoma does not confer increased breast cancer risk beyond other established histologic characteristics. PMID:26264469

  16. Complex fibroadenoma and breast cancer risk: a Mayo Clinic Benign Breast Disease Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassar, Aziza; Visscher, Daniel W; Degnim, Amy C; Frank, Ryan D; Vierkant, Robert A; Frost, Marlene; Radisky, Derek C; Vachon, Celine M; Kraft, Ruth A; Hartmann, Lynn C; Ghosh, Karthik

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the breast cancer risk overall among women with simple fibroadenoma or complex fibroadenoma and to examine the association of complex fibroadenoma with breast cancer through stratification of other breast cancer risks. The study included women aged 18-85 years from the Mayo Clinic Benign Breast Disease Cohort who underwent excisional breast biopsy from 1967 through 1991. Within this cohort, women who had fibroadenoma were compared to women who did not have fibroadenoma. Breast cancer risk (observed versus expected) across fibroadenoma levels was assessed through standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) by using age- and calendar-stratified incidence rates from the Iowa Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry. Analyses were performed overall, within subgroups of involution status, with other demographic characteristics (age, year of biopsy, indication for biopsy, and family history), and with histologic characteristics, including overall impression [nonproliferative disease, proliferative disease without atypia (PDWA), or atypical hyperplasia]. Fibroadenoma was identified in 2136 women [noncomplex, 1835 (85.9%); complex, 301 (14.1%)]. SIR for noncomplex fibroadenoma was 1.49 (95% CI 1.26-1.74); for complex fibroadenoma, it was 2.27 (95% CI 1.63-3.10) (test for heterogeneity in SIR, P = .02). However, women with complex fibroadenoma were more likely to have other, concomitant high-risk histologic characteristics (e.g., incomplete involution and PDWA). In analyses stratified by involution status and PDWA, complex fibroadenoma was not an independent risk marker for breast cancer. Complex fibroadenoma does not confer increased breast cancer risk beyond other established histologic characteristics.

  17. Primary hyperparathyroidism surgical management since the introduction of minimally invasive parathyroidectomy: Mayo Clinic experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Clive S; Thompson, Geoffrey; Farley, David; van Heerden, Jon

    2005-05-01

    Minimally invasive parathyroidectomy (MIP) for primary hyperparathyroidism (HPT) has equal cure and recurrence rates as standard cervical exploration. Changes in the management of primary HPT have occurred since introducing MIP including localization, anesthesia, intraoperative parathyroid hormone monitoring, and indications for parathyroidectomy. Cohort analysis of 1361 consecutive patients with primary HPT operated on at the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn, from June 1998 through March 2004. Mean follow-up, 25 months. Tertiary referral center. One thousand three hundred sixty-one patients operated on for primary HPT, excluding 160 patients who were reoperated on. Standard cervical exploration MIP. Cure, recurrence, localization, anesthesia, hospitalization, intraoperative parathyroid hormone level monitoring, contraindications to MIP, surgical indications, assessment of osteoporosis and osteopenia, postoperative patient assessment of general patient health, and operative satisfaction. Cure of primary HPT for both conventional exploration and MIP was 97%; only 1 patient who underwent MIP had a potential recurrence. Imaging sensitivity and positive predictive values were as follows: sestamibi scintigraphy, 86% and 93%; ultrasonography, 61% and 87%, respectively. Usage of general vs local anesthesia with intravenous sedation was 46% and 49%, respectively, in patients w ho underwent MIP; 46% were dismissed as outpatients, 49% had single-night stays. The accuracy of intraoperative parathyroid hormone level monitoring was as follows: 98% (8% had true-negative results); the frequency of multiple gland disease was 13%. Accounting for causes precluding MIP, an estimated 60% to 70% of all patients would be eligible for MIP. By preoperative assessment, 79% had osteoporosis-osteopenia; 58% with postoperative bone mineral density measurements were improved. More than 85% were satisfied with the results of their operation. With high-quality localization and intraoperative

  18. Quality improvement education incorporated as an integral part of critical care fellows training at the Mayo Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashani, Kianoush B; Ramar, Kannan; Farmer, J Christopher; Lim, Kaiser G; Moreno-Franco, Pablo; Morgenthaler, Timothy I; Dankbar, Gene C; Hale, Curt W

    2014-10-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education emphasizes quality improvement (QI) education in residency/fellowship training programs. The Mayo Clinic Combined Critical Care Fellowship (CCF) program conducted a pilot QI education program to incorporate QI training as a required curriculum for the 2010-2011 academic year. CCF collaborated with the Mayo Quality Academy to customize and teach the existing Mayo Quality Fellows curriculum to the CCF fellows with the help of two quality coaches over five months starting July 2010. All fellows were to achieve Bronze and Silver certification prior to graduation. Silver required passing four written exams and submitting a health care QI project. Five projects were selected on the basis of the Impact-Effort Prioritization matrix, and DMAIC (Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, and Control) methodology was used to complete the projects. The primary outcome was to assess learners' satisfaction, knowledge, and skill transfer. All 20 fellows were Bronze certified, and 14 (70%) were Silver certified by the time of graduation. All five QI projects were completed and showed positive impacts on patient safety and care. Surveys showed improved learner satisfaction. Graduates felt the QI training improved their QI skills and employment and career advancement. The QI curriculum had appropriate content and teaching pace and did not significantly displace other important clinical core curriculum topics. The pilot was successfully implemented in the CCF program and now is in the fourth academic year as an established and integral part of the fellowship core curriculum.

  19. Decline in Weight and Incident Mild Cognitive Impairment: Mayo Clinic Study of Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhurani, Rabe E.; Vassilaki, Maria; Aakre, Jeremiah; Mielke, Michelle M.; Kremers, Walter K.; Machulda, Mary M.; Geda, Yonas E.; Knopman, David S.; Peterson, Ronald C.; Roberts, Rosebud O.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Unintentional weight loss has been associated with risk of dementia. Since mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is a prodromal stage for dementia, we sought to evaluate whether changes in weight and body mass index (BMI) may predict incident MCI. OBJECTIVE To investigate the association of change in weight and BMI with risk of MCI. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A population-based, prospective study of participants aged 70 years and older from the Mayo Clinic Study of Aging. Maximum weight and height in midlife (aged 40 to 65 years old) were retrospectively ascertained from the medical records of participants using a medical records linkage system. MAIN OUTCOMES MEASURES Participants were evaluated for cognitive outcomes of normal cognition, MCI, or dementia at baseline and prospectively assessed for incident events at each 15-month evaluation. The association of rate of change in weight and body mass index with risk of MCI was investigated using proportional hazards models. RESULTS Over a mean follow-up of 4.4 years, 524 of 1895 cognitively normal participants developed incident MCI. The mean (standard deviation) rate of weight change per decade from midlife to study entry was greater for individuals who developed incident MCI vs. those who remained cognitively normal (−2.0 (5.1) vs. −1.2 (4.9) kg; p = 0.006). A greater decline in weight per decade was associated with an increased risk of incident MCI (hazard ratio [HR] 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.04 [1.02, 1.06], p weight loss of 5 kg/decade corresponds to a 24% increase in risk of MCI (HR=1.24). Higher decline in BMI per decade was also associated with incident MCI (HR, 1.08, 95% CI = [1.03, 1.13], p = 0.003). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE These findings suggest that declining weight from midlife to late-life is a marker for MCI and may help identify persons at increased risk for MCI. PMID:26831542

  20. Review of Adjuvant Radiochemotherapy for Resected Pancreatic Cancer and Results From Mayo Clinic for the 5th JUCTS Symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Robert C.; Iott, Matthew J.; Corsini, Michele M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To present an overview of Phase III trials in adjuvant therapy for pancreatic cancer and review outcomes at the Mayo Clinic after adjuvant radiochemotherapy (RT/CT) for resected pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: A literature review and a retrospective review of 472 patients who underwent an R0 resection for T1-3N0-1M0 invasive carcinoma of the pancreas from 1975 to 2005 at the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN. Patients with metastatic or unresectable disease at the time of surgery, positive surgical margins, or indolent tumors and those treated with intraoperative radiotherapy were excluded from the analysis. Median radiotherapy dose was 50.4Gy in 28 fractions, with 98% of patients receiving concurrent 5-fluorouracil- based chemotherapy. Results: Median follow-up was 2.7 years. Median overall survival (OS) was 1.8 years. Median OS after adjuvant RT/CT was 2.1 vs. 1.6 years for surgery alone (p = 0.001). The 2-y OS was 50% vs. 39%, and 5-y was 28% vs. 17% for patients receiving RT/CT vs. surgery alone. Univariate and multivariate analysis revealed that adverse prognostic factors were positive lymph nodes (risk ratio [RR] 1.3, p < 0.001) and high histologic grade (RR 1.2, p < 0.001). T3 tumor status was found significant on univariate analysis only (RR 1.1, p = 0.07). Conclusions: Results from recent clinical trials support the use of adjuvant chemotherapy in resected pancreatic cancer. The role of radiochemotherapy in adjuvant treatment of pancreatic cancer remains a topic of debate. Results from the Mayo Clinic suggest improved outcomes after the administration of adjuvant radiochemotherapy after a complete resection of invasive pancreatic malignancies.

  1. Clinical use of the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory in rehabilitation after paediatric acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oddson, Bruce; Rumney, Peter; Johnson, Patricia; Thomas-Stonell, Nancy

    2006-11-01

    The Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory (MPAI; designed to be administered by clinicians) is a popular measure of disability following head injury in adults. Its acceptability, validity, and reliability were assessed for use with children. There were 335 children and adolescents (215 males, 120 females) aged between 1 and 19 years at injury (median age 9y 8mo [SD 5y]) in our sample. The test was acceptable to respondents, rapidly and easily administered, and required only small modifications. It demonstrated validity against client and parent reports of major symptoms. It demonstrated test-retest reliability within the limitations of our data and excellent interrater accord. Consequently, the MPAI is recommended for paediatric use for evaluating rehabilitation needs and therapy outcome.

  2. Assessment of anosognosia in persons with frontal lobe damage: clinical utility of the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory (MPAI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murrey, G J; Hale, F M; Williams, J D

    2005-08-10

    To determine if the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory (MPAI) demonstrates clinical utility in differentiating between persons with severe TBI and frontal lobe damage/anosognosia and persons with mild TBI and no frontal lobe damage. Forty-three persons with TBI and documented frontal lobe damage (mean age = 34; mean time since injury = 5.2 years) and 69 persons with mild TBI and no frontal lobe damage (mean age = 34.3; mean time since injury = 4.8 4.8 years). MPAI. Total inventory and select sub-category difference scores were significantly greater in the frontal lobe group than in the non-frontal lobe group. However, as expected, there was no significant difference between the two groups on the mobility sub-category difference scores. The MPAI appears to be potentially clinically useful in assessing for frontal lobe damage and associated anosognosia in patients with TBI.

  3. Patterns in deer-related traffic injuries over a decade: the Mayo clinic experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smoot Dustin L

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our American College of Surgeons Level 1 Trauma Center serves a rural population. As a result, there is a unique set of accidents that are not present in an urban environment such as deer related motor vehicle crashes (dMVC. We characterized injury patterns between motorcycle/all-terrain vehicles (MCC and automobile (MVC crashes related to dMVC (deer motor vehicle crash with the hypotheses that MCC will present with higher Injury Severity Score (ISS and that it would be related to whether the driver struck the deer or swerved. Methods The records of 157 consecutive patients evaluated at our institution for injury related to dMVC from January 1st, 1997 to December 31st, 2006 were reviewed from our prospectively collected trauma database. Demographic, clinical, and crash specific parameters were abstracted. Injury severity was analyzed by the Abbreviated Injury Scale score for each body region as well as the overall Injury Severity Score (ISS. Results Motorcycle crashes presented with a higher median ISS than MVCs (14 vs 5, p Within the MVC group, there was no difference between swerving and hitting the deer in any AIS group. Forty-seven percent of drivers were not wearing seat belts which resulted in similar median ISS (6 vs 5 and AIS of all body regions. Conclusions Motorcycle operators suffered higher ISS. There were no significant differences in median ISS if a driver involved in a deer-related motor vehicle crash swerved rather than collided, was helmeted, or restrained.

  4. Harmonizing and consolidating the measurement of patient-reported information at health care institutions: a position statement of the Mayo Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eton DT

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available David T Eton,1,2 Timothy J Beebe,1,2 Philip T Hagen,3 Michele Y Halyard,4 Victor M Montori,1,5 James M Naessens,1,2 Jeff A Sloan,6 Carrie A Thompson,7 Douglas L Wood1,81Division of Heath Care Policy and Research, Department of Health Sciences Research, 2Mayo Clinic Robert D. and Patricia E. Kern Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery, 3Department of Preventive, Occupational, and Aerospace Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, 4Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ, 5Knowledge and Evaluation Research Unit, 6Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Department of Health Sciences Research, 7Division of Hematology, Department of Medicine, 8Center for Innovation, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USAAbstract: Patient-reported outcomes (PROs capture how patients perceive their health and their health care; their use in clinical research is longstanding. Today, however, PROs increasingly are being used to inform the care of individual patients, and document the performance of health care entities. We recently wrote and internally distributed an institutional position statement titled "Harmonizing and Consolidating the Measurement of Patient-Reported Outcomes at Mayo Clinic: A Position Statement for the Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery". The statement is meant to educate clinicians, clinical teams, and institutional administrators about the merits of using PROs in a systematic manner for clinical care and quality measurement throughout the institution. The present article summarizes the most important messages from the statement, describing PROs and their use, identifying practical considerations for implementing them in routine practice, elucidating potential barriers to their use, and formulating strategies to overcome these barriers. The lessons learned from our experience – including pitfalls, challenges, and successes – may inform other health care institutions that are interested in

  5. Early experience of a fall and fracture prevention clinic at Mayo General Hospital.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hanley, A

    2010-06-01

    Falls in the elderly are a significant public health problem. Previous studies have shown that most falls are multifactorial and an efficacious way of reducing the risk of falling is provided by a falls clinic.

  6. Quantifying the importance of disease burden on perceived general health and depressive symptoms in patients within the Mayo Clinic Biobank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Euijung; Takahashi, Paul Y; Olson, Janet E; Hathcock, Matthew A; Novotny, Paul J; Pathak, Jyotishman; Bielinski, Suzette J; Cerhan, James R; Sloan, Jeff A

    2015-07-03

    Deficits in health-related quality of life (HRQOL) may be associated with worse patient experiences, outcomes and even survival. While there exists evidence to identify risk factors associated with deficits in HRQOL among patients with individual medical conditions such as cancer, it is less well established in more general populations without attention to specific illnesses. This study used patients with a wide range of medical conditions to identify contributors with the greatest influence on HRQOL deficits. Self-perceived general health and depressive symptoms were assessed using data from 21,736 Mayo Clinic Biobank (MCB) participants. Each domain was dichotomized into categories related to poor health: deficit (poor/fair for general health and ≥3 for PHQ-2 depressive symptoms) or non-deficit. Logistic regression models were used to test the association of commonly collected demographic characteristics and disease burden with each HRQOL domain, adjusting for age and gender. Gradient boosting machine (GBM) models were applied to quantify the relative influence of contributors on each HRQOL domain. The prevalence of participants with a deficit was 9.5 % for perception of general health and 4.6 % for depressive symptoms. For both groups, disease burden had the strongest influence for deficit in HRQOL (63 % for general health and 42 % for depressive symptoms). For depressive symptoms, age was equally influential. The prevalence of a deficit in general health increased slightly with age for males, but remained stable across age for females. Deficit in depressive symptoms was inversely associated with age. For both HRQOL domains, risk of a deficit was associated with higher disease burden, lower levels of education, no alcohol consumption, smoking, and obesity. Subjects with deficits were less likely to report that they were currently working for pay than those without a deficit; this association was stronger among males than females. Comorbid health burden has the

  7. The Off-Campus Clinical Program of the College of Optometry, Ferris State College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramore, James E.

    1982-01-01

    The clinical education program at Ferris State College, College of Optometry, and the various clinics affiliated with the college are described. To ensure quality, all individuals with the responsibility of teaching the students are faculty of Ferris State. (MLW)

  8. The association between peripheral total IGF-1, IGFBP-3, and IGF-1/IGFBP-3 and functional and cognitive outcomes in the Mayo Clinic Study of Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wennberg, Alexandra M V; Hagen, Clinton E; Machulda, Mary M; Hollman, John H; Roberts, Rosebud O; Knopman, David S; Petersen, Ronald C; Mielke, Michelle M

    2018-06-01

    Levels of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1, IGF-binding protein (IGFBP)-3, and their ratio in the blood may be useful for monitoring those at risk of cognitive and functional decline. However, the association between IGF measures and functional and cognitive outcomes has been mixed, and the associations may vary by sex. The present study investigated the cross-sectional, sex-specific associations between serum measures total IGF-1, IGFBP-3, and the IGF-1/IGFBP-3 ratio, gait speed, and cognition in 1320 cognitively unimpaired participants aged 50-95 years enrolled in the Mayo Clinic Study of Aging. We used multivariable linear regression models to determine the association between IGF measures and gait speed or cognitive test performance by sex. IGF measures were not associated with cognitive or functional performance among men. Among women, higher levels of log total IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 were associated with better performance in attention, visuospatial, and global cognitive domains, independent of the gait speed. These findings suggest that among women, IGF measures are associated with cognition, and these associations are independent of function. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. College clinic service quality and patient satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshwal, Pankaj; Ranjan, Vini; Mittal, Geetika

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to identify the service quality dimensions that play an important role in patient satisfaction in campus clinics in Delhi; assess student satisfaction with service; and suggests ways to improve areas of dissatisfaction. A questionnaire was distributed to students who had completed at least two consultations at the college clinic. Convenience sampling was used to approach respondents. The questionnaire uses modified SERVQUAL and other instruments, including original dimensions and those constructed through detailed discussions. Factor analyses, reliability tests and the Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin measure of sampling adequacy were conducted. The final sample had a total of 445 respondents. After factor analysis, the authors found that the dimensions affecting patient satisfaction are: staff professionalism; clinic staff reliability; clinic accessibility and basic facilities; tangibles; cleanliness; awareness of the clinic/diseases and how clinic staff deals with emergencies. Most students were satisfied with the professionalism of the clinic staff. More than 70 percent of the respondents reported that the clinic staff paid good attention to them. The campus clinic was deemed reliable by more than 50 percent of respondents. The students found the clinic's location convenient, with more than 50 percent supporting its location. However, there was dissatisfaction among the students regarding the tangibles of the clinic, with more than 50 percent favoring upgrading. There was satisfaction among the respondents regarding the availability of the doctor after clinic hours, but contact details for the clinic staff were not easily accessible on campus. More than 60 percent of respondents were satisfied with the cleanliness of the campus clinic. More than 50 percent felt that the campus clinic was not equipped to deal with emergencies efficiently. At the same time, 90 percent of respondents reported the availability of referral facilities in case of

  10. The Prevalence of Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors and the Framingham Risk Score in Patients Undergoing Percutaneous Intervention Over the Last 17 Years by Gender: Time-trend Analysis From the Mayo Clinic PCI Registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moo-Sik Lee

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aims to investigate trends of cardiovascular disease (CVD risk factor profiles over 17 years in percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI patients at the Mayo Clinic. Methods: We performed a time-trend analysis within the Mayo Clinic PCI Registry from 1994 to 2010. Results were the incidence and prevalence of CVD risk factors as estimate by the Framingham risk score. Results: Between 1994 and 2010, 25 519 patients underwent a PCI. During the time assessed, the mean age at PCI became older, but the gender distribution did not change. A significant trend towards higher body mass index and more prevalent hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, and diabetes was found over time. The prevalence of current smokers remained unchanged. The prevalence of ever-smokers decreased among males, but increased among females. However, overall CVD risk according to the Framingham risk score (FRS and 10-year CVD risk significantly decreased. The use of most of medications elevated from 1994 to 2010, except for β-blockers and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors decreased after 2007 and 2006 in both baseline and discharge, respectively. Conclusions: Most of the major risk factors improved and the FRS and 10-year CVD risk declined in this population of PCI patients. However, obesity, history of hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, diabetes, and medication use increased substantially. Improvements to blood pressure and lipid profile management because of medication use may have influenced the positive trends.

  11. Spontaneous Pneumomediastinum: Case Presentation to a College Student Health Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spotts, P. Hunter

    2017-01-01

    The author describes a case of spontaneous pneumomediastinum (SPM) in a 19-year-old man presenting to a college student health clinic. The author also provides a review on SPM, including clinical manifestations, diagnostic evaluation, and management.

  12. Performance characteristics of the Mayo/IBM PACS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persons, Kenneth R.; Gehring, Dale G.; Pavicic, Mark J.; Ding, Yingjai

    1991-07-01

    The Mayo Clinic and IBM (at Rochester, Minnesota) have jointly developed a picture archiving system for use with Mayo's MRI and Neuro CT imaging modalities. The communications backbone of the PACS is a portion of the Mayo institutional network: a series of 4-Mbps token rings interconnected by bridges and fiber optic extensions. The performance characteristics of this system are important to understand because they affect the response time a PACS user can expect, and the response time for non-PACS users competing for resources on the institutional network. The performance characteristics of each component and the average load levels of the network were measured for various load distributions. These data were used to quantify the response characteristics of the existing system and to tune a model developed by North Dakota State University Department of Computer Science for predicting response times of more complex topologies.

  13. The 2 + 1 paradigm: an efficient algorithm for central reading of Mayo endoscopic subscores in global multicenter phase 3 ulcerative colitis clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Harris A; Gottlieb, Klaus; Hussain, Fez

    2016-02-01

    Despite its importance and potential impact in clinical trials, central reading continues to be an under-represented topic in the literature about inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) clinical trials. Although several IBD studies have incorporated central reading to date, none have fully detailed the specific methodology with which the reads were conducted. Here we outline key principles for designing an efficient central reading paradigm for an ulcerative colitis (UC) study that addresses regulatory, operational and clinical expectations. As a step towards standardization of read methodology for the growing number of multicenter phase 3 clinical trials in IBD, we have applied these principles to the design of an optimal read methodology that we call the '2 + 1 paradigm.' The 2 + 1 paradigm involves the use of both site and central readers, validated scoring criteria and multiple measures for blinding readers, all of which contribute to reducing bias and generating a reliable endoscopic subscore that reflects endoscopic disease severity. The paradigm can be utilized while maintaining a practical workflow compatible with an operationally feasible clinical trial. The 2 + 1 paradigm represents a logical approach to endoscopic assessment in IBD clinical trials, one that should be considered attractive to prospective sponsors, contract research organizations, key opinion leaders and regulatory authorities and be ready for implementation and further evaluation. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press and the Digestive Science Publishing Co. Limited.

  14. Burning mouth syndrome: results of screening tests for vitamin and mineral deficiencies, thyroid hormone, and glucose levels-experience at Mayo Clinic over a decade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morr Verenzuela, Claudia S; Davis, Mark D P; Bruce, Alison J; Torgerson, Rochelle R

    2017-09-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a disorder characterized by chronic mouth pain in the absence of objective clinical abnormalities. Vitamin or mineral deficiencies may have a role in BMS, but data regarding the prevalence and relevance of hematinic deficiencies are conflicting. We aimed to determine the frequency of specific laboratory abnormalities in patients with BMS. We retrospectively reviewed the results of screening blood tests in patients with BMS at our institution between January 2003 and December 2013. Among 659 patients with BMS, the most common decreased values or deficiencies were vitamin D 3 (15%), vitamin B 2 (15%), vitamin B 6 (5.7%), zinc (5.7%), vitamin B 1 (5.3%), thyrotropin (TSH) (3.2%), vitamin B 12 (0.8%), and folic acid (0.7%). Laboratory values for fasting blood glucose and TSH were increased in 23.7% and 5.2%, respectively. In patients with symptoms of BMS, our results suggest it is reasonable to screen for fasting blood glucose, vitamin D (D 2 and D 3 ), vitamin B 6 , zinc, vitamin B 1 , and TSH. Deficiencies of vitamin B 12 and folic acid were rare (<1% abnormal). © 2017 The International Society of Dermatology.

  15. Transforming Research Management Systems at Mayo Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Steven C.; Gronseth, Darren L.

    2011-01-01

    In order for research programs at academic medical centers and universities to survive and thrive in the increasingly challenging economic, political and regulatory environment, successful transformation is extremely important. Transformation and quality management techniques are increasingly well established in medical practice organizations. In…

  16. Elton Mayo and Carl Rogers: A Tale of Two Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Kevin T.; Baker, David B.

    2002-01-01

    Compares the simultaneous emergence of Mayo's nonauthoritarian interviewing approach and Rogers' nondirective counseling approach. Examines the influence of Piaget on Mayo and reviews the Hawthorne studies. Concludes that differences in the approaches outweigh similarities. (Contains 21 references.) (SK)

  17. Optical projects in the Clinic program at Harvey Mudd College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Q.

    2017-08-01

    Clinic program is the senior capstone program at Harvey Mudd College (HMC). Multidisciplinary and industry-sponsored projects allow a team of students to solve a real-world problem over one academic year. Over its 50 plus years, Clinic program has completed numerous optics related projects. This report gives an overview of the Clinic program, reviews recent optical projects and discusses how this program supports the learning of the HMC engineering students. A few sample optical projects with more details are presented to provide an insight of what challenges that undergraduates can overcome. Students achieve learning within the optics discipline and the related engineering disciplines. The experiences in these optical projects indicate the great potential to bringing optical hands-on projects into the undergraduate level. Because of the general engineering curriculum at HMC, these projects often work the best with a multidisciplinary nature even if the core of the project is optically focused. Students gain leadership training, oral and written communication skills and experiences in team work. Close relationship with the sponsor liaisons allows for the students to gain skills in professional conduct, management of tight schedule and a specified budget, and it well prepares the students to their engineering practice. Optical projects have their own sets of specific challenges, so it needs to be chosen properly to match the undergraduate skill sets such as those of HMC engineering students.

  18. The Arabic Version of the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory 4: A Validation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, Razan; Tariah, Hashem Abu; Malkawi, Somaya; Holm, Margo B.

    2012-01-01

    The Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory 4 (MPAI-4) is a valid and reliable assessment tool to detect clinical impairments in patients with acquired brain injury. The tool is widely used by rehabilitation therapists worldwide, given its good psychometric properties and its availability in several languages. The purpose of this study was to…

  19. Exploring the uncertainties of early detection results: Model-based interpretation of mayo lung project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Shi (Lu); H. Tian (Haijun); W.J. McCarthy (William); B. Berman (Barbara); S. Wu (Shinyi); R. Boer (Rob)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The Mayo Lung Project (MLP), a randomized controlled clinical trial of lung cancer screening conducted between 1971 and 1986 among male smokers aged 45 or above, demonstrated an increase in lung cancer survival since the time of diagnosis, but no reduction in lung cancer

  20. AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS, AMERICAN COLLEGE OF ENDOCRINOLOGY, AND ASSOCIAZIONE MEDICI ENDOCRINOLOGI MEDICAL GUIDELINES FOR CLINICAL PRACTICE FOR THE DIAGNOSIS AND MANAGEMENT OF THYROID NODULES - 2016 UPDATE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gharib, Hossein; Papini, Enrico; Garber, Jeffrey R

    2016-01-01

    by the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE), American College of Endocrinology (ACE) and Associazione Medici Endocrinologi (AME). ABBREVIATIONS: AACE = American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists ACE = American College of Endocrinology AME = Associazione Medici Endocrinologi BEL = best...

  1. The Pine Ridge-Mayo National Aeronautics and Space Administration Telemedicine Project: Program Activities and Participant Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottke, T. E.; Little Finger, L.; Trapp, M. A.; Panser, L. A.; Novotny, P. J.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the response of participants to the Pine Ridge-Mayo National Aeronautics and Space Administration telemedicine project. DESIGN: We describe a 3-month demonstration project of medical education and clinical consultations conducted by means of satellite transmission. Postparticipation questionnaires and a postproject survey were used to assess the success of the activity. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patients and employees at the Pine Ridge Indian Health Service Hospital in southwestern South Dakota and employees at Mayo Clinic Rochester participated in a telemedicine project, after which they completed exit surveys and a postproject questionnaire to ascertain the acceptability of this mode of health care. RESULTS: Almost all Pine Ridge and Mayo Clinic participants viewed the project as beneficial. The educational sessions received favorable evaluations, and almost two-thirds of the patients who completed evaluations thought the consultation had contributed to their medical care. More than 90% of the respondents from Pine Ridge and more than 85% of the respondents from Mayo Clinic Rochester said that they would recommend participation in this project to others. More than 90% of respondents from Pine Ridge and 80% of Mayo respondents agreed with the statement that the project should continue. CONCLUSION: These data suggest that a program of clinical consultation services, professional education, and patient education available by telemedicine might be viewed as beneficial.

  2. Against the Corporate Culture Ideology: An Interview with Peter Mayo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suoranta, Juha

    2010-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Peter Mayo, author and expert in the field of sociology of adult education, on his major influences in this area, his books, and his views on the role of radical adult education and radical scholarship in the future. In the interview, Peter Mayo states that his initial view of adult education was quite a…

  3. Le nonne di Plaza de Mayo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedetta Calandra

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The article is focused on a specific case study of ‘motherist movement’ in Argentina during the last military rule (1976-1983: the Grandmothers of Plaza de Mayo. Blurring the boundaries between public and private realm, these old women, without a previous, soundly-based political conscience, were able to set up a transnational human rights movement, well known all over the world, while looking for their abducted grandchildren. A crucial issue, still, is: how far did this group go in terms of advocating womens’ rights? Could we really find a correspondence, as Jelin puts it, between ‘women for human rights’ and ‘women for women’s rights’? The answer, as the Argentinean case shows, seems to be not so straightforward.

  4. The Use of Clinical Hypnosis in a College Counseling Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Herbert A.

    This report describes the use of hypnosis at the Hiram College Counseling Center, a counseling technique that has been especially helpful in academic, athletic, and personal improvement areas. The induction techniques of hypnosis are described as well as the use of hyperempiria. The use of hypnosis in improving study habits and alleviating test…

  5. Clinical Assessment of Dissociative Identity Disorder among College Counseling Clients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Benjamin; Swanson, Janine E.

    2008-01-01

    College counseling professionals address a wide range of complex student mental health concerns. Among these, accurately identifying client presentations of dissociative identity disorder (DID) can be especially challenging because students with DID sometimes present as if they are experiencing another problem, such as a mood, anxiety, or…

  6. El paro estudiantil de mayo de 1938

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando Moreno Martínez

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available El presente artículo tiene como propósito analizar los sucesos ocurridos en la ciudad de Bogotá durante el paro estudiantil de mayo de 1938, programado para oponerse a algunas medidas de modernización y secularización educativa impuestas por el gobierno liberal del presidente Alfonso López Pumarejo. Específicamente, los estudiantes se levantaron contra el examen de revisión que se aplicaba al terminar la secundaria y el curso preparatorio que era un requisito para poder ingresar a la universidad. El escrito aborda la problemática suscitada por la reforma educativa, el desencadenamiento de la protesta estudiantil, las acciones desarrolladas por los estudiantes en la capital de la República, el impacto del movimiento en otras partes del país y las tendencias ideológicas que apoyaron el paro de estudiantes. A propósito de este último punto, si bien fue evidente el respaldo de la oposición conservadora, muchos estudiantes universitarios y de secundaria lucharon con convicción por lo que consideraron en su momento una arbitrariedad por parte del gobierno liberal.

  7. Establishment of the European College of Veterinary Clinical Pathology (ECVCP) and the current status of veterinary clinical pathology in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Brien, P.J.; Fournel-Fleury, C.; Bolliger, Adrian Marc

    2007-01-01

    congresses and a joint journal (with the American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology) for communication of scientific research and information; the College also maintains a website, a joint listserv, and a newsletter; 6) collaboration in training and continuing education with relevant colleges......After 5 years of development, the European College of Veterinary Clinical Pathology (ECVCP)was formally recognized and approved on July 4, 2007 by the European Board of Veterinary Specialisation (EBVS), the European regulatory body that oversees specialization in veterinary medicine and which has......; currently there are 18 resident trainingprograms inEurope; 3) administration of 3 annual board-certifying examinations thus far,with an overall pass rate of 70%; 4) European consensus criteria for assessing the continuing education of specialists every 5 ears; 5) organization of 8 annual scientific...

  8. Commentary on: "Ipilimumab versus placebo after radiotherapy in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer that had progressed after docetaxel chemotherapy (CA184-043): A multicentre, randomised, double-blind, phase 3 trial." Kwon ED, Drake CG, Scher HI, Fizazi K, Bossi A, van den Eertwegh AJ, Krainer M, Houede N, Santos R, Mahammedi H, Ng S, Maio M, Franke FA, Sundar S, Agarwal N, Bergman AM, Ciuleanu TE, Korbenfeld E, Sengeløv L, Hansen S, Logothetis C, Beer TM, McHenry MB, Gagnier P, Liu D, Gerritsen WR, CA184-043 Investigators. Departments of Urology and Immunology and Mayo Clinic Comprehensive Cancer Center, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA, Electronic address: kwon.eugene@mayo.edu; Johns Hopkins Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center and Brady Urological Institute, Baltimore, MD, USA; Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, USA; Institut Gustave Roussy, University of Paris-Sud, Villejuif, France; Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France; VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, Netherlands; Vienna General Hospital, Medical University Vienna, Vienna, Austria; Institut Bergonié, Bordeaux, France; CHU Caremeau, Nimes, France; Centro Médico Austral, Buenos Aires, Argentina; Centre Jean Perrin, Clermont-Ferrand, France; St John of God Hospital, Subiaco, WA, Australia; University Hospital of Siena, Istituto Toscano Tumori, Siena, Italy; Hospital de Caridade de Ijuí, Ijuí, Brazil; Nottingham University Hospital, Nottingham, UK; Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA; Netherlands Cancer Institute and Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam, Netherlands; Institute of Oncology Ion Chiricuta and University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iuliu Hatieganu, Cluj-Napoca, Romania; Hospital Británico de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina; Herlev Hospital, Herlev, Denmark; Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark; University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston,

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trump, Donald

    2016-05-01

    Ipilimumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody that binds cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 to enhance antitumour immunity. Our aim was to assess the use of ipilimumab after radiotherapy in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer that progressed after docetaxel chemotherapy. We did a multicentre, randomised, double-blind, phase 3 trial in which men with at least one bone metastasis from castration-resistant prostate cancer that had progressed after docetaxel treatment were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive bone-directed radiotherapy (8Gy in one fraction) followed by either ipilimumab 10mg/kg or placebo every 3 weeks for up to four doses. Non-progressing patients could continue to receive ipilimumab at 10mg/kg or placebo as maintenance therapy every 3 months until disease progression, unacceptable toxic effect, or death. Patients were randomly assigned to either treatment group via a minimisation algorithm, and stratified by Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status, alkaline phosphatase concentration, haemoglobin concentration, and investigator site. Patients and investigators were masked to treatment allocation. The primary endpoint was overall survival, assessed in the intention-to-treat population. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00861614. From May 26, 2009, to Feb 15, 2012, 799 patients were randomly assigned (399 to ipilimumab and 400 to placebo), all of whom were included in the intention-to-treat analysis. Median overall survival was 11.2 months (95% CI: 9.5-12.7) with ipilimumab and 10.0 months (8.3-11.0) with placebo (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.85, 0.72-1.00; P = 0.053). However, the assessment of the proportional hazards assumption showed that it was violated (P = 0.0031). A piecewise hazard model showed that the HR changed over time: the HR for 0-5 months was 1.46 (95% CI: 1.10-1.95), for 5-12 months was 0.65 (0.50-0.85), and beyond 12 months was 0.60 (0.43-0.86). The most common grade 3

  9. Specialized consultant in radiological safety to the Reforma peripheral clinic, PEMEX. - I. - May-June of 2003; Asesoria especializada en seguridad radiologica a la clinica periferica Reforma, PEMEX.- I.- Mayo-Junio de 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres P, A.; Garcia A, J.; Rodriguez A, F

    2003-07-15

    The Reforma peripheral clinic, dependent of PEMEX, It request consultant of the ININ to be able to maintain their sanitary license for the use of X-ray equipment for the radiologic diagnostic.The proposal of the ININ was to be a program of technical attendance, schedule monthly to be able to solve the observations that are presented in the use of those equipment, and that the clinic can conserve its respective sanitary license.(Author)

  10. Hospital de La Misericordia, 6 de mayo de 1906 - 6 de mayo de 1981

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liborio Sánchez Avella

    1981-07-01

    Full Text Available El 6 de mayo de 1981 cumplió el Hospital de La Misericordia 75 años de haber iniciado sus labores. La idea de crear el Hospital se venía gestando desde comienzos de 1890. Obtuvo la Personería Jurídica el 23 de julio de 1897y el 25 de julio del mismo año colocó la primera piedra el Presidente de la República Miguel Antonio Caro. José Ignacio Barberi, su fundador, dejó un escrito en el cual relataba la historia de este Hospital. El mejor homenaje que se le puede hacer al Hospital y a José Ignacio Barberi, es transcribir las palabras que él dejó inéditas en 1940.

  11. Spectrum of acute clinical characteristics of diagnosed concussions in college athletes wearing instrumented helmets: clinical article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duhaime, Ann-Christine; Beckwith, Jonathan G; Maerlender, Arthur C; McAllister, Thomas W; Crisco, Joseph J; Duma, Stefan M; Brolinson, P Gunnar; Rowson, Steven; Flashman, Laura A; Chu, Jeffrey J; Greenwald, Richard M

    2012-12-01

    Concussive head injuries have received much attention in the medical and public arenas, as concerns have been raised about the potential short- and long-term consequences of injuries sustained in sports and other activities. While many student athletes have required evaluation after concussion, the exact definition of concussion has varied among disciplines and over time. The authors used data gathered as part of a multiinstitutional longitudinal study of the biomechanics of head impacts in helmeted collegiate athletes to characterize what signs, symptoms, and clinical histories were used to designate players as having sustained concussions. Players on 3 college football teams and 4 ice hockey teams (male and female) wore helmets instrumented with Head Impact Telemetry (HIT) technology during practices and games over 2-4 seasons of play. Preseason clinical screening batteries assessed baseline cognition and reported symptoms. If a concussion was diagnosed by the team medical staff, basic descriptive information was collected at presentation, and concussed players were reevaluated serially. The specific symptoms or findings associated with the diagnosis of acute concussion, relation to specific impact events, timing of symptom onset and diagnosis, and recorded biomechanical parameters were analyzed. Data were collected from 450 athletes with 486,594 recorded head impacts. Forty-eight separate concussions were diagnosed in 44 individual players. Mental clouding, headache, and dizziness were the most common presenting symptoms. Thirty-one diagnosed cases were associated with an identified impact event; in 17 cases no specific impact event was identified. Onset of symptoms was immediate in 24 players, delayed in 11, and unspecified in 13. In 8 cases the diagnosis was made immediately after a head impact, but in most cases the diagnosis was delayed (median 17 hours). One diagnosed concussion involved a 30-second loss of consciousness; all other players retained

  12. Promoting fundamental clinical skills: a competency-based college approach at the University of Washington.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Erika A; Maclaren, Carol F; Smith, Sherilyn; Mengert, Terry J; Maestas, Ramoncita R; Foy, Hugh M; Wenrich, Marjorie D; Ramsey, Paul G

    2005-05-01

    The focus on fundamental clinical skills in undergraduate medical education has declined over the last several decades. Dramatic growth in the number of faculty involved in teaching and increasing clinical and research commitments have contributed to depersonalization and declining individual attention to students. In contrast to the close teaching and mentoring relationship between faculty and students 50 years ago, today's medical students may interact with hundreds of faculty members without the benefit of a focused program of teaching and evaluating clinical skills to form the core of their four-year curriculum. Bedside teaching has also declined, which may negatively affect clinical skills development. In response to these and other concerns, the University of Washington School of Medicine has created an integrated developmental curriculum that emphasizes bedside teaching and role modeling, focuses on enhancing fundamental clinical skills and professionalism, and implements these goals via a new administrative structure, the College system, which consists of a core of clinical teachers who spend substantial time teaching and mentoring medical students. Each medical student is assigned a faculty mentor within a College for the duration of his or her medical school career. Mentors continuously teach and reflect with students on clinical skills development and professionalism and, during the second year, work intensively with them at the bedside. They also provide an ongoing personal faculty contact. Competency domains and benchmarks define skill areas in which deepening, progressive attention is focused throughout medical school. This educational model places primary focus on the student.

  13. An Academic Healthcare Twitter Account: The Mayo Clinic Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widmer, R Jay; Engler, Nicole B; Geske, Jeffrey B; Klarich, Kyle W; Timimi, Farris K

    2016-06-01

    With more than 300 million monthly active users, Twitter is a powerful social media tool in healthcare, yet the characterization of an academic healthcare Twitter account remains poor to date. We assessed basic gender and geographic data on the account's "followers," as well as categorization of each tweet based on content type. We analyzed the impressions, engagements, retweets, favorites, replies, hashtag clicks, and detail expansions using both Sprinklr and Twitter Analytics. Over a period of 12 months, the account amassed 1,235 followers, with 54 percent being male and 68 percent residing in the United States. Of the 1,635 tweets sent out over the life of the account, we report more than 382,464 impressions, 6,023 engagements, 1,255 retweets, 776 favorites, and 1,654 embedded media clicks in this period. When broken down by tweet category, publication tweets garnered the highest engagement with an estimated mean number of clicks per tweet of 8.2 ± 81.9. Original content had higher total engagement per tweet than retweeted material (2.8 ± 9.2 vs. 0.2 ± 0.9 engagements per tweet; p < 0.0001). Tweets regarding internal, national, and continuing medical education events had similar engagement. Herein is the first publication within the medical literature describing a "case series" of cardiovascular tweets over 12 months. We highlight a rapidly emerging group of interactive followers, a successful means by which to disseminate and engage in breaking topics throughout the cardiovascular field, and the importance of combining physician-led knowledge with intermittent marketing messages.

  14. Adjuvant therapy for ampullary carcinomas: The Mayo Clinic experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatia, Sumita; Miller, Robert C.; Haddock, Michael G.; Donohue, John H.; Krishnan, Sunil

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the effects of adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy for carcinoma of the ampulla of Vater. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the records of 125 patients who underwent definitive surgery for carcinomas involving the ampulla of Vater between April 1977 and February 2005 and who survived more than 50 days after surgery. Twenty-nine of the patients also received adjuvant radiotherapy (median dose, 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions) with concurrent 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy. Adverse prognostic factors were investigated, and overall survival (OS) and local and distant failure were estimated. Results: Adverse prognostic factors for decreased OS by univariate analysis included lymph node (LN) involvement, locally advanced tumors (T3/T4), and poor histologic grade. By multivariate analysis, positive LN status (p = 0.02) alone was associated with decreased OS. The addition of adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy improved OS for patients with positive LN (p = 0.01). Median survival for positive LN patients receiving adjuvant therapy was 3.4 years, vs. 1.6 years for those with surgery alone. Conclusions: The addition of adjuvant radiotherapy and 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy may improve OS in patients with LN involvement. The effect of adjuvant therapy on outcomes for patients with poor histologic grade or T3/T4 tumors without LN involvement could not be assessed

  15. Adjuvant Therapy for Gallbladder Carcinoma: The Mayo Clinic Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, Douglas G.; Miller, Robert C.; Haddock, Michael G.; Gunderson, Leonard L.; Quevedo, Fernando; Donohue, John H.; Bhatia, Sumita; Nagorney, David M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the effect of adjuvant chemoradiotherapy on gallbladder carcinoma. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the records from consecutive patients who underwent R0 resection of gallbladder carcinoma between January 1, 1985, and December 31, 2004. Patients had either Stage I (T1-T2N0M0) or Stage II (T3N0M0 or T1-T3N1M0) disease. Patients undergoing adjuvant therapy received 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy concurrently with radiotherapy (median dosage, 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions). Adverse prognostic factors and the effect of adjuvant treatment on overall survival (OS) were evaluated. Results: A total of 73 patients were included in the analysis; of these, 25 received adjuvant chemoradiotherapy. On univariate analysis, no adverse prognostic factors for OS reached statistical significance, but trends were noted for Stage N1 vs. N0 (p = .06), Nx vs. N0 (p = .09), Stage T3 vs. T1-T2 (p = .06), and histologic findings other than adenocarcinoma (p = .13). The median OS for patients receiving adjuvant chemoradiotherapy vs. surgery alone was 4.8 years and 4.2 years, respectively (log-rank test, p = .56). However, a significantly greater percentage of patients receiving adjuvant chemoradiotherapy had Stage II disease (p <.001). In the multivariate Cox model, increasing T and N category and histologic findings other than adenocarcinoma were significant predictors of decreased OS. Additionally, adjuvant chemoradiotherapy was a significant predictor of improved OS after adjusting for these prognostic factors (hazard ratio for death, 0.3; 95% confidence interval, 0.13-0.69; p = .004). Conclusion: After adjusting for the stage parameters and histologic findings, our data suggest that adjuvant chemoradiotherapy might improve OS for patients with gallbladder cancer.

  16. Conservative management of pineal tumors - Mayo clinic experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laws, E.R.; Abay, E.O.; Forbes, G.S.; Grado, G.L.; Bruckman, J.E.; Scott, M.

    1984-01-01

    The typical pineal tumor occurs in an adolescent boy with subacute increased intracranial pressure and Parinaud's syndrome. Diagnosis is confirmed by CT scanning, and long-term survival usually following shunting and radiation therapy. Direct surgical methods for successful treatment of suitable pineal tumors have evolved and may be utilized with relatively low risk in appropriate cases

  17. Prevalence of clinically elevated depressive symptoms in college athletes and differences by gender and sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolanin, Andrew; Hong, Eugene; Marks, Donald; Panchoo, Kelly; Gross, Michael

    2016-02-01

    There are approximately 400,000 National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) student athletes and 5-7 million high school student athletes competing each year. According to the US Department of Health and Human Services, the depression prevalence rate for young adults, which ranges from 10% to 85% across studies, is higher than that of other age groups. Given the relatively high prevalence of depression in individuals of collegiate age in the general population, the prevalence of depression among athletes in this age group warrants further study. This multiyear study examined the prevalence of depressive symptoms in college athletes, as well as demographic factors related to increased or decreased rates of depressive symptoms by gender and sport. To describe the prevalence of depression symptoms among NCAA division I student athletes at a single institution over 3 consecutive years. Participants (n=465) completed a battery of measures during their yearly spring sports medicine physical across 3 consecutive years. The battery included the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) and a demographic questionnaire, administered during the course of routine sports medicine physical examinations. Differences in depressive symptoms prevalence and relative risk ratios were calculated by gender and sport. The prevalence rate for a clinically relevant level of depressive symptoms, as measured on the CES-D (CES-D ≥16), was 23.7%. A moderate to severe level of depressive symptoms was reported by 6.3%. There was a significant gender difference in prevalence of depressive symptoms, χ(2) (1)=7.459, p=0.006, with female athletes exhibiting 1.844 times the risk of male athletes for endorsing clinically relevant symptoms. The CES-D identified clinically relevant levels of depressive symptoms in nearly one-quarter of college student athletes in this large cross-sectional sample. Female college athletes reported significantly more depressive symptoms than males

  18. Claremount Nursing Home, Claremount, Claremorris, Mayo.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Reeves, Emer P

    2012-01-01

    The pathogenesis of lung disease in cystic fibrosis is characterised by decreased airway surface liquid volume and subsequent failure of normal mucociliary clearance. Mucus within the cystic fibrosis airways is enriched in negatively charged matrices composed of DNA released from colonizing bacteria or inflammatory cells, as well as F-actin and elevated concentrations of anionic glycosaminoglycans. Therapies acting against airway mucus in cystic fibrosis include aerosolized hypertonic saline. It has been shown that hypertonic saline possesses mucolytic properties and aids mucociliary clearance by restoring the liquid layer lining the airways. However, recent clinical and bench-top studies are beginning to broaden our view on the beneficial effects of hypertonic saline, which now extend to include anti-infective as well as anti-inflammatory properties. This review aims to discuss the described therapeutic benefits of hypertonic saline and specifically to identify novel models of hypertonic saline action independent of airway hydration.

  19. Study on Mobile Augmented Reality Adoption for Mayo Language Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Miranda Bojórquez, Erasmo; Vergara Villegas, Osslan Osiris; Cruz Sánchez, Vianey Guadalupe; García-Alcaraz, Jorge Luis; Favela Vara, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study applied to undergraduates in order to know how the cultural dimensions affect their perceptions of the acceptance and use of new technologies in a student-centered learning environment. A total of 85 undergraduate students from the Autonomous Indigenous University of Mexico (UAIM) participated in the study. Each student was asked to use a mobile augmented reality (MAR) application designed to learn Mayo language (language spoken in Northwestern Mexic...

  20. Remembering Joseph Mayo and His Contributions to Animal Science | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Carolynne Keenan, Guest Writer In the 1990s, when Joseph Mayo, D.V.M, ran out of gas leading coworkers home from a meeting in Bethesda, he pulled over to the side of the road on I-270 and waited for help. He didn’t have to wait long; within a few minutes a passing motorist took pity on the group of scientists and offered them a lift back to Fort Detrick.

  1. Rheumatoid arthritis disease activity measures: American College of Rheumatology recommendations for use in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jaclyn; Caplan, Liron; Yazdany, Jinoos; Robbins, Mark L; Neogi, Tuhina; Michaud, Kaleb; Saag, Kenneth G; O'Dell, James R; Kazi, Salahuddin

    2012-05-01

    Although the systematic measurement of disease activity facilitates clinical decision making in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), no recommendations currently exist on which measures should be applied in clinical practice in the US. The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) convened a Working Group (WG) to comprehensively evaluate the validity, feasibility, and acceptability of available RA disease activity measures and derive recommendations for their use in clinical practice. The Rheumatoid Arthritis Clinical Disease Activity Measures Working Group conducted a systematic review of the literature to identify RA disease activity measures. Using exclusion criteria, input from an Expert Advisory Panel (EAP), and psychometric analysis, a list of potential measures was created. A survey was administered to rheumatologists soliciting input. The WG used these survey results in conjunction with the psychometric analyses to derive final recommendations. Systematic review of the literature resulted in identification of 63 RA disease activity measures. Application of exclusion criteria and ratings by the EAP narrowed the list to 14 measures for further evaluation. Practicing rheumatologists rated 9 of these 14 measures as most useful and feasible. From these 9 measures, the WG selected 6 with the best psychometric properties for inclusion in the final set of ACR-recommended RA disease activity measures. We recommend the Clinical Disease Activity Index, Disease Activity Score with 28-joint counts (erythrocyte sedimentation rate or C-reactive protein), Patient Activity Scale (PAS), PAS-II, Routine Assessment of Patient Index Data with 3 measures, and Simplified Disease Activity Index because they are accurate reflections of disease activity; are sensitive to change; discriminate well between low, moderate, and high disease activity states; have remission criteria; and are feasible to perform in clinical settings. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  2. English language proficiency and the accommodations for language non-concordance amongst patients utilizing chiropractic college teaching clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saporito, Richard P

    2013-02-01

    The number of households in the United States that are not proficient in the English language is growing and presenting a challenge to the health care system. Over nineteen percent of the US population speak a language other than English in the home. This increase in language discordance generates a greater need to find and implement accommodations in the clinical setting to insure accurate and efficient diagnosis and treatment as well as provide for patient safety. The purpose of this study is to determine the percentage of patients accessing the chiropractic college teaching clinics who are not proficient in the English language and to what extent the colleges provide accommodations for that language disparity. The clinic directors and deans of the Association of Chiropractic Colleges were surveyed via an on-line survey engine. The survey queried the percentage of the patient population that is not English language proficient, the accommodations the college currently has in place, if the college has a language specific consent to treat document and if the college has a written policy concerning patients without English proficiency. Fifty percent of the contacted chiropractic colleges responded to the survey. In the respondent college clinics 16.5% of the patient population is not proficient in English, with over 75% speaking Spanish. All but one of the respondents provide some level of accommodation for the language non-concordance. Forty five percent of the responding colleges employ a language specific consent to treat form. The implementation of accommodations and the use of a language specific consent to treat form is more prevalent at colleges with a higher percentage of non-English speaking patients. The percentage of patients with limited English proficiency accessing services at the teaching clinics of the chiropractic colleges mirrors the numbers in the general population. There is a wide disparity in the accommodations that the individual colleges make

  3. Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) applied to college students: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pistorello, Jacqueline; Fruzzetti, Alan E; Maclane, Chelsea; Gallop, Robert; Iverson, Katherine M

    2012-12-01

    College counseling centers (CCCs) are increasingly being called upon to treat highly distressed students with complex clinical presentations. This study compared the effectiveness of Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) for suicidal college students with an optimized control condition and analyzed baseline global functioning as a moderator. The intent-to-treat (ITT) sample included 63 college students between the ages of 18 and 25 years who were suicidal at baseline, reported at least 1 lifetime nonsuicidal self-injurious (NSSI) act or suicide attempt, and met 3 or more borderline personality disorder (BPD) diagnostic criteria. Participants were randomly assigned to DBT (n = 31) or an optimized treatment-as-usual (O-TAU) control condition (n = 32). Treatment was provided by trainees, supervised by experts in both treatments. Both treatments lasted 7-12 months and included both individual and group components. Assessments were conducted at pretreatment, 3 months, 6 months, 9 months, 12 months, and 18 months (follow-up). Mixed effects analyses (ITT sample) revealed that DBT, compared with the control condition, showed significantly greater decreases in suicidality, depression, number of NSSI events (if participant had self-injured), BPD criteria, and psychotropic medication use and significantly greater improvements in social adjustment. Most of these treatment effects were observed at follow-up. No treatment differences were found for treatment dropout. Moderation analyses showed that DBT was particularly effective for suicidal students who were lower functioning at pretreatment. DBT is an effective treatment for suicidal, multiproblem college students. Future research should examine the implementation of DBT in CCCs in a stepped care approach.

  4. Analyzing Clinical Presentation, Service Utilization, and Clinical Outcome of Female Sexual Minority College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Heather C.

    2013-01-01

    Researchers examining clinically-relevant trends for sexual minority women have found evidence of psychological distress and greater utilization of mental health services compared to heterosexually-identified women. However, the results of many research studies with this population have methodological limitations surrounding recruitment of…

  5. Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists clinical practice guidelines for mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhi, Gin S; Bassett, Darryl; Boyce, Philip; Bryant, Richard; Fitzgerald, Paul B; Fritz, Kristina; Hopwood, Malcolm; Lyndon, Bill; Mulder, Roger; Murray, Greg; Porter, Richard; Singh, Ajeet B

    2015-12-01

    To provide guidance for the management of mood disorders, based on scientific evidence supplemented by expert clinical consensus and formulate recommendations to maximise clinical salience and utility. Articles and information sourced from search engines including PubMed and EMBASE, MEDLINE, PsycINFO and Google Scholar were supplemented by literature known to the mood disorders committee (MDC) (e.g., books, book chapters and government reports) and from published depression and bipolar disorder guidelines. Information was reviewed and discussed by members of the MDC and findings were then formulated into consensus-based recommendations and clinical guidance. The guidelines were subjected to rigorous successive consultation and external review involving: expert and clinical advisors, the public, key stakeholders, professional bodies and specialist groups with interest in mood disorders. The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists clinical practice guidelines for mood disorders (Mood Disorders CPG) provide up-to-date guidance and advice regarding the management of mood disorders that is informed by evidence and clinical experience. The Mood Disorders CPG is intended for clinical use by psychiatrists, psychologists, physicians and others with an interest in mental health care. The Mood Disorder CPG is the first Clinical Practice Guideline to address both depressive and bipolar disorders. It provides up-to-date recommendations and guidance within an evidence-based framework, supplemented by expert clinical consensus. Professor Gin Malhi (Chair), Professor Darryl Bassett, Professor Philip Boyce, Professor Richard Bryant, Professor Paul Fitzgerald, Dr Kristina Fritz, Professor Malcolm Hopwood, Dr Bill Lyndon, Professor Roger Mulder, Professor Greg Murray, Professor Richard Porter and Associate Professor Ajeet Singh. Professor Carlo Altamura, Dr Francesco Colom, Professor Mark George, Professor Guy Goodwin, Professor Roger McIntyre, Dr Roger Ng

  6. A demographic and epidemiological study of a Mexican chiropractic college public clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ndetan Harrison T

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Descriptive studies of chiropractic patients are not new, several have been performed in the U.S., Australia, Canada, and Europe. None have been performed in a Latin American country. The purpose of this study is to describe the patients who visited a Mexican chiropractic college public clinic with respect to demographics and clinical characteristics. Methods This study was reviewed and approved by the IRB of Parker College of Chiropractic and the Universidad Estatal del Valle de Ecatepec (UNEVE. Five hundred patient files from the UNEVE public clinic from May 2005 to May 2007 were selected from an approximate total number of 3,700. Information was collected for demographics, chief complaints, associated complaints, and previous care sought. Results The sample comprised 306 (61.2% female. Most files (44.2% were in the age range of 40–59 years (mean of 43.4 years. The most frequent complaints were lumbar pain (29.2% and extremity pain (28.0%, most commonly the knee. Most (62.0% described their complaints as greater than one year. Trauma (46.6% was indicated as the initial cause. Mean VAS score was 6.26/10 with 20% rated at 8/10. Conclusion Demographic results compared closer to studies conducted with private clinicians (females within the ages of 40–59. The primary complaint and duration was similar to previous studies (low back pain and chronic, except in this population the cause was usually initiated by trauma. The most striking features were the higher number of extremity complaints and the marked increased level of VAS score (20% rated as 8/10.

  7. The portfolio approach to competency-based assessment at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannefer, Elaine F; Henson, Lindsey C

    2007-05-01

    Despite the rapid expansion of interest in competency-based assessment, few descriptions of assessment systems specifically designed for a competency-based curriculum have been reported. The purpose of this article is to describe the design of a portfolio approach to a comprehensive, competency-based assessment system that is fully integrated with the curriculum to foster an educational environment focused on learning. The educational design goal of the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University was to create an integrated educational program-curriculum and instructional methods, student assessment processes, and learning environment-to prepare medical students for success in careers as physician investigators. The first class in the five-year program matriculated in 2004. To graduate, a student must demonstrate mastery of nine competencies: research, medical knowledge, communication, professionalism, clinical skills, clinical reasoning, health care systems, personal development, and reflective practice. The portfolio provides a tool for collecting and managing multiple types of assessment evidence from multiple contexts and sources within the curriculum to document competence and promote reflective practice skills. This article describes how the portfolio was developed to provide both formative and summative assessment of student achievement in relation to the program's nine competencies.

  8. Brief multiple behavior interventions in a college student health care clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werch, Chudley E Chad; Bian, Hui; Moore, Michele J; Ames, Steve; DiClemente, Carlo C; Weiler, Robert M

    2007-12-01

    This study examined the effects of brief image-based interventions, including a multiple behavior health contract, a one-on-one tailored consultation, and a combined consultation plus contract intervention, for impacting multiple health behaviors of students in a university health clinic. A total of 155 college students attending a major southern university were recruited to participate in a study evaluating a health promotion program titled Project Fitness during the fall 2005 and spring 2006. Participants were randomly assigned to one of three treatments as they presented at the clinic: 1) a multiple behavior health contract, 2) a one-on-one tailored consultation, or 3) a combined consultation plus contract intervention. Baseline and 1-month post-intervention data were collected using computer-assisted questionnaires in a quiet office within the student health clinic. Omnibus repeated-measures analyses of variance were significant for drinking driving behaviors, F(2,136) = 4.43, p = .01, exercise behaviors, F(5,140) = 6.12, p = .00, nutrition habits, F(3,143) = 5.37, p = .00, sleep habits, F(2,144) = 5.03, p = .01, and health quality of life, F(5,140) = 3.09, p = .01, with improvements on each behavior across time. Analysis of group-by-time interaction effects showed an increase in the use of techniques to manage stress, F(2,144) = 5.48, p = .01, and the number of health behavior goals set in the last 30 days, F(2,143) = 5.35, p = .01, but only among adolescents receiving the consultation, or consultation plus contract. Effect sizes were consistently larger across health behaviors, and medium in size, when both consult and contract were used together. Brief interventions using a positive goal image of fitness, and addressing a number of health habits using a contract and consultation strategy alone, or in combination, have the potential to influence positive changes in multiple health behaviors of college students attending a university primary health care clinic.

  9. Pilot Design and Implementation of an Innovative Mental Health and Wellness Clinic at a Historically Black College/University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jessica R; Pollio, David E; Hong, Barry A; Valencia, Celeste; Sorrell, Michael; North, Carol S

    2018-05-01

    A pilot mental health and wellness clinic was developed and implemented on the campus of Paul Quinn College, a small Historically Black College and University (HBCU) in Dallas, TX, to address mental health disparities in an African-American student population. Additionally, a series of student engagement activities was developed and implemented to address stigma and enhance linkage to the clinic. The student engagement activities were well attended. In all, 14 students requested a total of 97 appointments during the spring 2016 semester, but attended only 41 appointments. Students sought treatment of a variety of psychiatric disorders, most commonly major depressive disorder and adjustment disorder. A model based on this program could conceivably be extended to serve students more broadly in other HBCUs as well as in community colleges.

  10. Clinical Symptoms as a Function of Client Personality in College Students: Incorporating the Five-Factor Model of Personality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Marie S.; Lockman, Jennifer D.; Temple, Rebecca A.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the relationship between personality characteristics and presenting clinical symptoms of individuals at a college counseling center was examined. Analysis of assessments of personality (Costa & McCrae, 1992) and mental health symptoms (Farrell & McCullough, 1989) suggests that the personality characteristics of individuals…

  11. Official Executive Summary of an American Thoracic Society/American College of Chest Physicians Clinical Practice Guideline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Gregory A; Girard, Timothy D; Kress, John P

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This clinical practice guideline addresses six questions related to liberation from mechanical ventilation in critically ill adults. It is the result of a collaborative effort between the American Thoracic Society (ATS) and American College of Chest Physicians (CHEST). METHODS: A mult...

  12. Radon in dwellings the national radon survey Galway and Mayo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGarry, A.T.; Fennell, S.G.; Mackin, G.M.; Madden, J.S.; O'Colmain, M.

    1999-07-01

    This report presents the results of the final phase of the National Radon Survey carried out by the Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland. The counties included in this phase are Galway and Mayo. The average radon concentrations for the houses measured in these counties were 112 Bq/m 3 and 100 Bq/m 3 , respectively. The measurement data were grouped on the basis of the 10 km grid squares of the Irish National Grid System and used to predict the percentage of dwellings in each grid square which exceeds the Reference Level of 200 Bq/m 3 . Grid squares where this percentage is predicted to be 10% or higher are designated High Radon Areas. The health effects of exposure to high radon levels are discussed and recommendations are made regarding both new and existing dwellings. (author)

  13. Teachers at Heart: A Case Study Exploration of the Role Transition from Clinical Nurse to Community College Adjunct Clinical Nursing Instructor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Deborah S.

    2017-01-01

    The shortage of nursing faculty is limiting the number of students community colleges are able to enroll (National League for Nursing, 2014). The use of adjunct clinical nursing instructors may help lessen the impact of this shortage, while allowing nurses to gain valuable academic experience. An understanding of the process these nurses go…

  14. From college to clinic: reasoning over memorization is key for understanding anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Sue Ann; Perrotti, William; Silverthorn, Dee U; Dalley, Arthur F; Rarey, Kyle E

    2002-04-15

    Anatomy and physiology are taught in community colleges, liberal arts colleges, universities, and medical schools. The goals of the students vary, but educators in these diverse settings agree that success hinges on learning concepts rather than memorizing facts. In this article, educators from across the postsecondary educational spectrum expand on several points: (1) There is a problem with student perception that anatomy is endless memorization, whereas the ability to manage information and use reasoning to solve problems are ways that professionals work. This misperception causes students to approach the subject with the wrong attitude. (2) The process of learning to use information is as important as the concepts themselves. Using understanding to explain and make connections is a more useful long-term lesson than is memorization. Anatomy should be presented and learned as a dynamic basis for problem solving and for application in the practice and delivery of quality health care. (3) Integration of form and function must be explicit and universal across all systems. (4) Using only models, images, audiovisuals, or computers cannot lead students to the requisite reasoning that comes from investigative dissection of real tissue. (5) Some undergraduate courses require students to memorize excessive musculoskeletal detail. (6) Learning tissue biology is a particular struggle for medical students who have no background from an undergraduate course. (7) Medical professors and students see benefits when students have taken undergraduate courses in anatomy, histology, and physiology. If medical schools suggest these electives to applicants, medical students might arrive better prepared and, thus, be able to learn clinical correlations more efficiently in the limited allocated time of medical school curricula. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS AND AMERICAN COLLEGE OF ENDOCRINOLOGY POSITION STATEMENT ON MENOPAUSE-2017 UPDATE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobin, Rhoda H; Goodman, Neil F

    2017-07-01

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY This American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE)/American College of Endocrinology (ACE) Position Statement is designed to update the previous menopause clinical practice guidelines published in 2011 but does not replace them. The current document reviews new clinical trials published since then as well as new information regarding possible risks and benefits of therapies available for the treatment of menopausal symptoms. AACE reinforces the recommendations made in its previous guidelines and provides additional recommendations on the basis of new data. A summary regarding this position statement is listed below: New information available from randomized clinical trials and epidemiologic studies reported after 2011 was critically reviewed. No previous recommendations from the 2011 menopause clinical practice guidelines have been reversed or changed. Newer information enhances AACE's guidance for the use of hormone therapy in different subsets of women. Newer information helps to support the use of various types of estrogens, selective estrogen-receptor modulators (SERMs), and progesterone, as well as the route of delivery. Newer information supports the previous recommendation against the use of bioidentical hormones. The use of nonhormonal therapies for the symptomatic relief of menopausal symptoms is supported. Newer information enhances AACE's guidance for the use of hormone therapy in different subsets of women. Newer information helps to support the use of various types of estrogens, SERMs, and progesterone, as well as the route of delivery. Newer information supports the previous recommendation against the use of bioidentical hormones. The use of nonhormonal therapies for the symptomatic relief of menopausal symptoms is supported. New recommendations in this position statement include: 1. the use of menopausal hormone therapy in symptomatic postmenopausal women should be based on consideration of all risk factors for

  16. AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS AND AMERICAN COLLEGE OF ENDOCRINOLOGY PROTOCOL FOR STANDARDIZED PRODUCTION OF CLINICAL PRACTICE GUIDELINES, ALGORITHMS, AND CHECKLISTS - 2017 UPDATE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechanick, Jeffrey I; Pessah-Pollack, Rachel; Camacho, Pauline; Correa, Ricardo; Figaro, M Kathleen; Garber, Jeffrey R; Jasim, Sina; Pantalone, Kevin M; Trence, Dace; Upala, Sikarin

    2017-08-01

    Clinical practice guideline (CPG), clinical practice algorithm (CPA), and clinical checklist (CC, collectively CPGAC) development is a high priority of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) and American College of Endocrinology (ACE). This 2017 update in CPG development consists of (1) a paradigm change wherein first, environmental scans identify important clinical issues and needs, second, CPA construction focuses on these clinical issues and needs, and third, CPG provide CPA node/edge-specific scientific substantiation and appended CC; (2) inclusion of new technical semantic and numerical descriptors for evidence types, subjective factors, and qualifiers; and (3) incorporation of patient-centered care components such as economics and transcultural adaptations, as well as implementation, validation, and evaluation strategies. This third point highlights the dominating factors of personal finances, governmental influences, and third-party payer dictates on CPGAC implementation, which ultimately impact CPGAC development. The AACE/ACE guidelines for the CPGAC program is a successful and ongoing iterative exercise to optimize endocrine care in a changing and challenging healthcare environment. AACE = American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists ACC = American College of Cardiology ACE = American College of Endocrinology ASeRT = ACE Scientific Referencing Team BEL = best evidence level CC = clinical checklist CPA = clinical practice algorithm CPG = clinical practice guideline CPGAC = clinical practice guideline, algorithm, and checklist EBM = evidence-based medicine EHR = electronic health record EL = evidence level G4GAC = Guidelines for Guidelines, Algorithms, and Checklists GAC = guidelines, algorithms, and checklists HCP = healthcare professional(s) POEMS = patient-oriented evidence that matters PRCT = prospective randomized controlled trial.

  17. Conducting Integrated Objective Structured Clinical Examination: Experiences at KIST Medical College, Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rano Mal Piryani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Objective structured clinical examination (OSCE, an important tool for assessment of clinical skills, introduced more than 4 decades ago. KIST Medical College, a new medical school of Nepal, affiliated to Tribhuvan University Institute of Medicine, has made learning of physical examination skills structured and integrated with greater involvement of different clinical science departments. Students learn physical examination skills in second year MBBS as a part of early clinical exposure. Objective: To share the experiences regarding implementation of integrated OSCE. Materials and Methods: At the end of clinical posting of learning of physical examination skills, assessment was done with OSCE. Fifteen OSCE stations including each of 5 minutes were developed and arranged. Standardized patients and validated checklist were used. OSCE was conducted in novel way. Prior to the OSCE session: Suitable venue was selected, assessors were identified, standardized patients were selected, running order of the stations in circuit was developed, list of equipments/instruments required was prepared, and tasks, checklists, feedback questionnaires were printed. The day before the OSCE session: OSCE stations were inspected and clearly labeled, condition of required equipments/instruments was checked, a pack of the documents for each OSCE station were made available, and signs were displayed at proper places. On the day of the OSCE session: Reliable stop watch and loud manual bell were used, support staffs were placed to direct the candidates, examiners, and standardized patients (SPs, assessors explained SPs, students were briefed, supervisors observed the session, and feedback were taken from students, assessors, and SPs. At the end of the OSCE session: Checklists and feedback questionnaires were collected, token money was paid to SPs, and a contribution of everyone was appreciated. After the OSCE session: Score was compiled and result declared, and

  18. CLINICAL PROFILE OF DENGUE FEVER IN KANYAKUMARI GOVERNMENT MEDICAL COLLEGE- A STUDY FROM KANYAKUMARI, INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brinda J

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Dengue infection is viral infection with different clinical presentation. This study was conducted in Kanyakumari Government Medical College Hospital, Asaripallam, Tamil Nadu, to study the various clinical profile and polyserositis involvement in dengue. MATERIALS AND METHODS The clinical profile and polyserositis involvement in dengue infection were determined by the retrospective study of all dengue infection in Kanyakumari Government Medical College Hospital, Asaripallam, Nagercoil, Tamilnadu. It was a retrospective study. All probable cases that had high-grade fever, lymphadenopathy, hepatomegaly, features of hock or haemorrhage and so forth and were admitted with provisional diagnosis of dengue fever were taken into account. All patients with positive dengue tests, either NS1 antigen, IgM, IgG antibody rapid serological test kit or ELISA were taken into the study group. As the duration of history of fever might be fallacious, the patients were subjected to all three serological tests. Patients who were positive for malaria, meningitis and enteric fever were excluded from the study. The whole number of patients included in our study was 40 (=40. RESULTS In this study, it was found that the bleeding manifestation had no correlation with thrombocytopenia, hepatomegaly and raised SGOT. All 40 patients had fever and they were treated with antipyretics (paracetamol in appropriate doses. Patients who presented with warning signs and stable vital signs were initially encouraged to take oral fluids; if they were not tolerated, intravenous fluids were started according to the WHO guidelines. CONCLUSION Dengue is an important arboviral infection in tropical countries. 1 Global incidence of dengue fever has increased dramatically in the recent decades. There are very few studies based on the revised new dengue classification. In our study, the total number of cases analysed was 40, out of which 28 (70% were categorised as cases of non

  19. Supporting Transgender College Students: Implications for Clinical Intervention and Campus Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanbrow Becker, Martin A.; Nemeth Roberts, Stacey F.; Ritts, Sam M.; Branagan, William Tyler; Warner, Alia R.; Clark, Sheri L.

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the experiences of transgender college students in coping with stress in comparison to their cisgender peers. Undergraduate and graduate students from 73 colleges, totaling 26,292 participants, of which 47 identified as transgender completed an online survey. Transgender students reported greater exposure to trauma and higher…

  20. AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS AND AMERICAN COLLEGE OF ENDOCRINOLOGY POSITION STATEMENT ON TESTING FOR AUTONOMIC AND SOMATIC NERVE DYSFUNCTION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinik, Aaron I; Camacho, Pauline M; Davidson, Jaime A; Handelsman, Yehuda; Lando, Howard M; Leddy, Anne L; Reddy, Sethu K; Cook, Richard; Spallone, Vicenza; Tesfaye, Solomon; Ziegler, Dan

    2017-12-01

    This document represents the official position of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists and the American College of Endocrinology. Where there were no randomized controlled trials or specific U.S. FDA labeling for issues in clinical practice, the participating clinical experts utilized their judgment and experience. Every effort was made to achieve consensus among the committee members. Position statements are meant to provide guidance, but they are not to be considered prescriptive for any individual patient and cannot replace the judgment of a clinician.

  1. AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS AND AMERICAN COLLEGE OF ENDOCRINOLOGY POSITION STATEMENT ON THE ASSOCIATION OF TESTOSTERONE AND CARDIOVASCULAR RISK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Neil; Guay, Andre; Dandona, Paresh; Dhindsa, Sandeep; Faiman, Charles; Cunningham, Glenn R

    2015-09-01

    This document represents the official position of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists and the American College of Endocrinology. Where there were no randomized controlled trials or specific U.S. FDA labeling for issues in clinical practice, the participating clinical experts utilized their judgment and experience. Every effort was made to achieve consensus among the committee members. Position statements are meant to provide guidance, but they are not to be considered prescriptive for any individual patient and cannot replace the judgment of a clinician.

  2. Study on Mobile Augmented Reality Adoption for Mayo Language Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erasmo Miranda Bojórquez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of a study applied to undergraduates in order to know how the cultural dimensions affect their perceptions of the acceptance and use of new technologies in a student-centered learning environment. A total of 85 undergraduate students from the Autonomous Indigenous University of Mexico (UAIM participated in the study. Each student was asked to use a mobile augmented reality (MAR application designed to learn Mayo language (language spoken in Northwestern Mexico. Afterwards, the students responded to a survey with items concerning the use and technology acceptance and about cultural dimensions of individualism and uncertainty avoidance. Structural equation modeling (SEM was used to analyze the data collected from students. Results provide evidence that the individualism contributes positively to perceived ease of use of the MAR app, and uncertainty avoidance has no impact. The findings showed that the MAR system could be easily used if it includes a natural way to promote collaborative work. In addition, to gain the trust of students, the uncertainty avoidance needs to be reduced by enriching the help information offered for app use.

  3. Mindfulness Moderates the Relationship Between Disordered Eating Cognitions and Disordered Eating Behaviors in a Non-Clinical College Sample

    OpenAIRE

    Masuda, Akihiko; Price, Matthew; Latzman, Robert D.

    2012-01-01

    Psychological flexibility and mindfulness are two related, but distinct, regulation processes that have been shown to be at the core of psychological wellbeing. The current study investigated whether these two processes independently moderated the association between disordered eating cognitions and psychological distress as well as the relation between disordered eating cognitions and disordered eating behaviors. Non-clinical, ethnically diverse college undergraduates completed a web-based s...

  4. Clinical Profile and Outcome of Asphyxiated Newborn in a Medical College Teaching Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran Panthee

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Perinatal asphyxia, a major topic in neonatology, is a severe condition which has a high impact on neonatal mortality and morbidity and neurological and intellectual development of the infant. It is defined by WHO as "failure to initiate and sustain breathing at birth". It is estimated that around four million babies are born asphyxiated and among those one million die and an equal number of babies develop serious neurological consequences ranging from cerebral palsy and mental retardation to epilepsy. This study was done to identify the occurrence, clinical profile and, immediate outcome of perinatal asphyxia in Lumbini Medical College Teaching Hospital. Methods: It was a retrospective study where 82 cases who fulfilled the inclusion criteria were included between December 2014 to November 2015. Inclusion criteria included newborns with: a Apgar score equal to or less than six at five minutes, b requirement of  more than one minute of positive pressure ventilation, c signs of fetal distress (heart rate of less than 100 beats per minute, late decelerations. Results: Out of total 425 neonatal intensive care unit (NICU admissions, 82 (19.3% cases were of asphyxia among which 56 were inborn and 26 were referred from outside. Of those 82 cases, 47 (57.3% cases developed hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE; HIE stage I had good outcome with survival rate of 95% and HIE stage III had poor outcome with survival rate of only 25%. Conclusion: Despite advances in management of neonates, perinatal asphyxia is still the leading cause of neonatal intensive care unit admission and mortality and morbidity in neonates.

  5. An Official American Thoracic Society/American College of Chest Physicians Clinical Practice Guideline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Girard, Timothy D; Alhazzani, Waleed; Kress, John P

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Interventions that lead to earlier liberation from mechanical ventilation can improve patient outcomes. This guideline, a collaborative effort between the American Thoracic Society (ATS) and the American College of Chest Physicians (CHEST), provides evidence-based recommendations to o...

  6. Mida mõtleb professor Andrew Mayo? / Anne-Mari Ernesaks

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ernesaks, Anne-Mari

    2005-01-01

    PARE koordinaator tutvustab tuntud inimkapitali ideoloogi Andrew Mayo raamatut "Ettevõtte inimväärtus". Raamatu autori hinnangul on tänapäeva organisatsioonides juhtimise olulisim ülesanne inimese juhtimine varana. Lisa: Konverents

  7. Further psychometric evaluation and revision of the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory in a national sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malec, James F; Kragness, Miriam; Evans, Randall W; Finlay, Karen L; Kent, Ann; Lezak, Muriel D

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate the internal consistency of the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory (MPAI), further refine the instrument, and provide reference data based on a large, geographically diverse sample of persons with acquired brain injury (ABI). 386 persons, most with moderate to severe ABI. Outpatient, community-based, and residential rehabilitation facilities for persons with ABI located in the United States: West, Midwest, and Southeast. Rasch, item cluster, principal components, and traditional psychometric analyses for internal consistency of MPAI data and subscales. With rescoring of rating scales for 4 items, a 29-item version of the MPAI showed satisfactory internal consistency by Rasch (Person Reliability=.88; Item Reliability=.99) and traditional psychometric indicators (Cronbach's alpha=.89). Three rationally derived subscales for Ability, Activity, and Participation demonstrated psychometric properties that were equivalent to subscales derived empirically through item cluster and factor analyses. For the 3 subscales, Person Reliability ranged from.78 to.79; Item Reliability, from.98 to.99; and Cronbach's alpha, from.76 to.83. Subscales correlated moderately (Pearson r =.49-.65) with each other and strongly with the overall scale (Pearson r=.82-.86). Outcome after ABI is represented by the unitary dimension described by the MPAI. MPAI subscales further define regions of this dimension that may be useful for evaluation of clinical cases and program evaluation.

  8. Factor analysis of the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory: structure and validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohac, D L; Malec, J F; Moessner, A M

    1997-07-01

    Principal-components (PC) factor analysis of the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory (MPAI) was conducted using a sample of outpatients (n = 189) with acquired brain injury (ABI) to evaluate whether outcome after ABI is multifactorial or unifactorial in nature. An eight-factor model was derived which explained 64-4% of the total variance. The eight factors were interpreted as representing Activities of Daily Living, Social Initiation, Cognition, Impaired-Self-awareness/Distress, Social Skills/ Support, Independence, Visuoperceptual, and Psychiatric, respectively. Validation of the Cognition factor was supported when factor scores were correlated with various neuropsychological measures. In addition, 117 patient self-rating total scores were used to evaluate the Impaired Self-awareness/Distress factor. An inverse relationship was observed, supporting this factor's ability to capture the two-dimensional phenomena of diminished self-awareness or enhanced emotional distress. A new subscale structure is suggested, that may allow greater clinical utility in understanding how ABI manifests in patients, and may provide clinicians with a better structure for implementing treatment strategies to address specific areas of impairment and disability for specific patients. Additionally, more precise measurement of treatment outcomes may be afforded by this reorganization.

  9. Exploring the uncertainties of early detection results: model-based interpretation of mayo lung project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berman Barbara

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Mayo Lung Project (MLP, a randomized controlled clinical trial of lung cancer screening conducted between 1971 and 1986 among male smokers aged 45 or above, demonstrated an increase in lung cancer survival since the time of diagnosis, but no reduction in lung cancer mortality. Whether this result necessarily indicates a lack of mortality benefit for screening remains controversial. A number of hypotheses have been proposed to explain the observed outcome, including over-diagnosis, screening sensitivity, and population heterogeneity (initial difference in lung cancer risks between the two trial arms. This study is intended to provide model-based testing for some of these important arguments. Method Using a micro-simulation model, the MISCAN-lung model, we explore the possible influence of screening sensitivity, systematic error, over-diagnosis and population heterogeneity. Results Calibrating screening sensitivity, systematic error, or over-diagnosis does not noticeably improve the fit of the model, whereas calibrating population heterogeneity helps the model predict lung cancer incidence better. Conclusions Our conclusion is that the hypothesized imperfection in screening sensitivity, systematic error, and over-diagnosis do not in themselves explain the observed trial results. Model fit improvement achieved by accounting for population heterogeneity suggests a higher risk of cancer incidence in the intervention group as compared with the control group.

  10. Examination of weight control practices in a non-clinical sample of college women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, S; Napolitano, M A

    2012-09-01

    The current study examined healthy weight control practices among a sample of college women enrolled at an urban university (N=715; age=19.87±1.16; 77.2% Caucasian; 13.4% African American, 7.2% Asian, 2.2% other races). Participants completed measures as part of an on-line study about health habits, behaviors, and attitudes. Items from the Three Factor Eating Questionnaire were selected and evaluated with exploratory factor analysis to create a healthy weight control practices scale. Results revealed that college women, regardless of weight status, used a comparable number (four of eight) of practices. Examination of racial differences between Caucasian and African American women revealed that normal weight African American women used significantly fewer strategies than Caucasian women. Of note, greater use of healthy weight control practices was associated with higher cognitive restraint, drive for thinness, minutes of physical activity, and more frequent use of compensatory strategies. Higher scores on measures of binge and disinhibited eating, body dissatisfaction, negative affect, and depressive symptoms were associated with greater use of healthy weight control practices by underweight/normal weight but not by overweight/obese college women. Results suggest that among a sample of college females, a combination of healthy and potentially unhealthy weight control practices occurs. Implications of the findings suggest the need for effective weight management and eating disorder prevention programs for this critical developmental life stage. Such programs should be designed to help students learn how to appropriately use healthy weight control practices, as motivations for use may vary by weight status.

  11. St. Augustine's Community Nursing Unit, Cathedral Road, Ballina, Mayo.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nicholl, Honor

    2014-04-01

    In 2010\\/12 an innovative children\\'s palliative care interprofessional educational project funded by the Irish Hospice Foundation was undertaken in a University faculty (Trinity College Dublin). This initiative responded to international educational recommendations to meet the palliative care needs of children. The project involved the development and delivery of 3 standalone modules at Master\\'s level and a substantive research evaluation of the project to examine stakeholders and students perspectives to provide an insight into their experiences and to gather data for future developments. The research evaluation was conducted in two parts, part one sought students\\' evaluation and part two sought stakeholders\\

  12. Mayo-Portland adaptability inventory: comparing psychometrics in cerebrovascular accident to traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malec, James F; Kean, Jacob; Altman, Irwin M; Swick, Shannon

    2012-12-01

    (1) To evaluate the measurement reliability and construct validity of the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory, 4th revision (MPAI-4) in a sample consisting exclusively of patients with cerebrovascular accident (CVA) using single parameter (Rasch) item-response methods; (2) to examine the differential item functioning (DIF) by sex within the CVA population; and (3) to examine DIF and differential test functioning (DTF) across traumatic brain injury (TBI) and CVA samples. Retrospective psychometric analysis of rating scale data. Home- and community-based brain injury rehabilitation program. Individuals post-CVA (n=861) and individuals with TBI (n=603). Not applicable. MPAI-4. Item data on admission to community-based rehabilitation were submitted to Rasch, DIF, and DTF analyses. The final calibration in the CVA sample revealed satisfactory reliability/separation for persons (.91/3.16) and items (1.00/23.64). DIF showed that items for pain, anger, audition, and memory were associated with higher levels of disability for CVA than TBI patients; whereas, self-care, mobility, and use of hands indicated greater overall disability for TBI patients. DTF analyses showed a high degree of association between the 2 sets of items (R=.92; R(2)=.85) and, at most, a 3.7 point difference in raw scores. The MPAI-4 demonstrates satisfactory psychometric properties for use with individuals with CVA applying for interdisciplinary posthospital rehabilitation. DIF reveals clinically meaningful differences between CVA and TBI groups that should be considered in results at the item and subscale level. Copyright © 2012 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Clinical profile and outcome of acute encephalitis syndrome (AES patients treated in College of Medical Sciences-Teaching Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lekhjung J Thapa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Acute encephalitis syndrome is a cause of significant morbidity and mortality in Nepal. Although Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV was thought to be a major cause for acute encephalitis syndrome, more non-Japanese encephalitis virus cases are reported. The outcome of patients with acute encephalitis syndrome is variable. Our study was designed to study the clinical profile and outcome of patients with acute encephalitis syndrome managed in tertiary care center in central Nepal. Methods: The record of patients admitted with diagnosis of acute encephalitis syndrome,from January 2010 to December 2010 in College of Medical Sciences-Teaching Hospital (CMS-TH was reviewed. They were classified clinically as meningitis, encephalitis and meningoencephalitis. The clinical details and reports of the patients were recorded and analyzed. Results: Total of 85 cases of meningitis and encephalitis were identified. Mean age was 19.18 years. Fifty-six (65.9% patients were males and 29 (34.1% were females. Sixty (70.58% patients had meningitis, 8 (9.41% had encephalitis, and 17 (20.0% had meningoencephalitis. JE serology was positive in 4 patients (4.7%. Seventy-two (84.7% patients made full recovery and were discharged from hospital. Thirteen (15.3% patients left against medical advice (LAMA. Conclusion: Acute encephalitis syndrome is still a major public health problem in Nepal. Few of these patients have Japanese Encephalitis. There is a trend towards improved outcome because of availability of improved health services. However, financial constraint remains a challenge in management of acute encephalitis syndrome. Journal of College of Medical Sciences-Nepal, 2013, Vol-9, No-2, 31-37 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jcmsn.v9i2.9685

  14. Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine: an innovative approach to medical education and the training of physician investigators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishleder, Andrew J; Henson, Lindsey C; Hull, Alan L

    2007-04-01

    Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine (CCLCM) is an innovative, five-year medical education track within Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine (Case) with a focused mission to attract and educate a limited number of highly qualified persons who seek to become physician investigators. CCLCM curriculum governance, faculty appointments and promotions, and admissions committees are integrated with respective Case committees. The CCLCM curriculum is based on faculty-defined professional attributes that graduates are expected to develop. These attributes were used to create curricular and assessment principles that guided the development of an integrated basic science, clinical science, and research curriculum, conducted in an active learning environment. An organ-system approach is used to solidify an understanding of basic science discipline threads in the context of relevant clinical problems presented in PBL and case-based discussion formats. Clinical skills are introduced in the first year as part of the two-year longitudinal experience with a family practice or internal medicine physician. The research program provides all students with opportunities to learn and experience basic and translational research and clinical research before selecting a research topic for their 12- to 15-month master-level thesis project. All Case students participate in required and elective clinical curriculum after the second year, but CCLCM students return to the Cleveland Clinic on selected Friday afternoons for program-specific research and professionalism-learning activities. A unique portfolio-based assessment system is used to assess student achievements in nine competency areas, seven of which reflect the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education competencies.

  15. 78 FR 14528 - Mayo Hydropower, LLC, Avalon Hydropower, LLC; Notice of Application for Transfer of License, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Project No. 11169-029] Mayo Hydropower, LLC, Avalon Hydropower, LLC; Notice of Application for Transfer of License, and Soliciting Comments and Motions To Intervene On November 20, 2012, Mayo Hydropower, LLC (transferor) and Avalon Hydropower...

  16. Degree of vertical integration between the undergraduate program and clinical internship with respect to lumbopelvic diagnostic and therapeutic procedures taught at the canadian memorial chiropractic college.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermet, Shannon; McGinnis, Karen; Boodham, Melissa; Gleberzon, Brian J

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine to what extent the diagnostic and therapeutic procedures taught in the undergraduate program used for patients with lumbopelvic conditions are expected to be utilized by students during their clinical internship program at Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College or are being used by the clinical faculty. A confidential survey was distributed to clinical faculty at the college. It consisted of a list of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures used for lumbopelvic conditions taught at that college. Clinicians were asked to indicate the frequency with which they performed or they required students to perform each item. Seventeen of 23 clinicians responded. The following procedures were most likely required to be performed by clinicians: posture; ranges of motion; lower limb sensory, motor, and reflex testing; and core orthopedic tests. The following were less likely to be required to be performed: Waddell testing, Schober's test, Gillet tests, and abdominal palpation. Students were expected to perform (or clinicians performed) most of the mobilization (in particular, iliocostal, iliotransverse, and iliofemoral) and spinal manipulative therapies (in particular, the procedures referred to as the lumbar roll, lumbar pull/hook, and upper sacroiliac) taught at the college. This study suggests that there was considerable, but not complete, vertical integration between the undergraduate and clinical education program at this college.

  17. The clinical nurse leader: a comparative study of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing vision to role implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Marietta P; Barnett Lammon, Carol Ann; Williams, Eric S

    2011-01-01

    The clinical nurse leader (CNL) is a new nursing role developed from a series of discussions held by the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) about revisions in nursing education that would prepare nurses with the competencies needed to work in the current and future health care system. The CNL is supposed to have a direct impact on clinical, functional, satisfaction, and cost outcomes. A number of health care organizations have adapted the role and integrated it into their unique clinical environment, but it remains unclear if the implementation is in line with the AACN's vision. This study investigated this question using the first cohort of graduates at a major university in the Southern United States. Of the 11 graduates, 8 responded to a questionnaire. Results support the idea that these new CNLs function largely in accord with the nine components of the CNL role outlined by the AACN. However, these results also show that different CNL role components are emphasized in different clinical settings. The results suggest that the CNL role as an advanced generalist role is a genuine innovation, rebutting some critiques. Implications and directions for future research are discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists clinical practice guidelines for the management of schizophrenia and related disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galletly, Cherrie; Castle, David; Dark, Frances; Humberstone, Verity; Jablensky, Assen; Killackey, Eóin; Kulkarni, Jayashri; McGorry, Patrick; Nielssen, Olav; Tran, Nga

    2016-05-01

    This guideline provides recommendations for the clinical management of schizophrenia and related disorders for health professionals working in Australia and New Zealand. It aims to encourage all clinicians to adopt best practice principles. The recommendations represent the consensus of a group of Australian and New Zealand experts in the management of schizophrenia and related disorders. This guideline includes the management of ultra-high risk syndromes, first-episode psychoses and prolonged psychoses, including psychoses associated with substance use. It takes a holistic approach, addressing all aspects of the care of people with schizophrenia and related disorders, not only correct diagnosis and symptom relief but also optimal recovery of social function. The writing group planned the scope and individual members drafted sections according to their area of interest and expertise, with reference to existing systematic reviews and informal literature reviews undertaken for this guideline. In addition, experts in specific areas contributed to the relevant sections. All members of the writing group reviewed the entire document. The writing group also considered relevant international clinical practice guidelines. Evidence-based recommendations were formulated when the writing group judged that there was sufficient evidence on a topic. Where evidence was weak or lacking, consensus-based recommendations were formulated. Consensus-based recommendations are based on the consensus of a group of experts in the field and are informed by their agreement as a group, according to their collective clinical and research knowledge and experience. Key considerations were selected and reviewed by the writing group. To encourage wide community participation, the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists invited review by its committees and members, an expert advisory committee and key stakeholders including professional bodies and special interest groups. The

  19. Clinical analysis of asthenopia caused by wearing inappropriate glasses in college students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To proposed control measures by exploring visual fatigue caused by college students wearing inappropriate glasses.METHODS: A total of 124 cases of asthenopia patients underwent optometry students audition, checked the original spectacles; TOPCON-CL100 computer center was used to checked the original mirror glasses(glasses, the distance between the optical center; with near vision as the standard examination table nearly with vergence and regulation near point, and checked the visual function. RESULTS: All 124 cases(248 eyeshad refractive errors, 77% were spherical mirror and 69% column mirror with error ≥±0.50D, and the pupil center distance from the lens had significant difference(U=5.27, PCONCLUSION: Students wearing inappropriate spectacle asthenopia is caused by one of the main scientific wearing glasses can effectively control asthenopia.

  20. Comparing comprehensive care and departmental clinical education models: students' perceptions at the University of Tennessee College of Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghan, Mojdeh; Harrison, Janet; Langham, Sue; Scarbecz, Mark; Amini, Mehdi

    2015-02-01

    In summer 2012, the University of Tennessee Health Science Center College of Dentistry transitioned from a departmental clinical education model to a comprehensive care/group leader model. The aim of this study was to investigate the perspectives of the fourth-year class of dental students who, because the transition took place during their training, had experienced treating patients under both educational models. To achieve this objective, a questionnaire was designed to assess the students' opinions on the efficiency of their effort, availability of specialty faculty, stress, collaboration with classmates, and availability of exposure to different practice styles and techniques under the two systems. The students were also given an opportunity to provide open-ended feedback on the shortcomings and advantages of the systems. The Class of 2013 had 81 students, 55 of whom participated in the survey for a response rate of 67.9%. The majority (86%) of the respondents preferred the comprehensive care model and reported feeling that, in it, they were able to accomplish more comprehensive dentistry with greater consistency of supervision from faculty in a more patient-centered environment than in the departmental model. However, 56 percent considered having the same group leader for two years a disadvantage and recommended rotation of at least one group leader every six months. The results of this survey can help this college and other dental schools that are seeking to optimize their educational model to best serve students' educational experience and the dental needs of their patient population.

  1. Clinical Education Partnership: A Model for School District and College of Nursing Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreulen, Grace J.; Bednarz, Patricia K.; Wehrwein, Teresa; Davis, James

    2008-01-01

    Collaboration between school districts and universities has potential to increase the level of health services available in schools while providing quality public health clinical nursing placements for universities. This article describes the development, implementation, and evaluation of the Clinical Education Partnership Model (CEPM), a dynamic…

  2. Alcohol Use and Problems in Mandated College Students: A Randomized Clinical Trial Using Stepped Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsari, Brian; Hustad, John T.P.; Mastroleo, Nadine R.; Tevyaw, Tracy O’Leary; Barnett, Nancy P.; Kahler, Christopher W.; Short, Erica Eaton; Monti, Peter M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Over the past two decades, colleges and universities have seen a large increase in the number of students referred to the administration for alcohol policies violations. However, a substantial portion of mandated students may not require extensive treatment. Stepped care may maximize treatment efficiency and greatly reduce the demands on campus alcohol programs. Method Participants in the study (N = 598) were college students mandated to attend an alcohol program following a campus-based alcohol citation. All participants received Step 1: a 15-minute Brief Advice session that included the provision of a booklet containing advice to reduce drinking. Participants were assessed six weeks after receiving the Brief Advice, and those who continued to exhibit risky alcohol use (n = 405) were randomized to Step 2, a 60–90 minute brief motivational intervention (BMI) (n = 211) or an assessment-only control (n = 194). Follow-up assessments were conducted 3, 6, and 9 months after Step 2. Results Results indicated that the participants who received a BMI significantly reduced the number of alcohol-related problems compared to those who received assessment-only, despite no significant group differences in alcohol use. In addition, low risk drinkers (n = 102; who reported low alcohol use and related harms at 6-week follow-up and were not randomized to stepped care) showed a stable alcohol use pattern throughout the follow-up period, indicating they required no additional intervention. Conclusion Stepped care is an efficient and cost-effective method to reduce harms associated with alcohol use by mandated students. PMID:22924334

  3. Prácticas de crianza y educación inicial en la etnia Mayo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ángel Vera Noriega

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available En el artículo se describen las características de las prácticas de crianza en una comunidad mayo y se realiza un análisis documental del Modelo de Educación Inicial no Escolarizada del CONAFE. Ello con la finalidad de contrastar los resultados de la práctica de crianza con las competencias esperadas de los padres y niños que asisten al programa y con base en ello, identificar la eficacia de la implementación del programa para la reproducción social en la etnia mayo. Participaron cincuenta madres y niños de la comunidad indígena mayo "El Júpare" ubicada en el municipio de Huatabampo, al sur de Sonora. Los instrumentos utilizados fueron Índice de Estrés Parental (Abidin, 1990, Interacción Padre-Hijo-Madre (Peña, 2004, Estimulación del Niño en el Hogar (Caldwell y Bradley, 1967 y Escala del Desarrollo Integral del niño (Atkin, 1987. En la evaluación del desarrollo, 54% de los niños presentan un desarrollo normal, 26% rrollo en riesgo y en 20% se detectan problemas. El programa de Educación Inicial no Escolarizado requiere de modificaciones sustantivas para responder a las prácticas de crianza que se desarrollan en la etnia mayo.

  4. NASA/DARPA advanced communications technology satellite project for evaluation of telemedicine outreach using next-generation communications satellite technology: Mayo Foundation participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, B K; Mitchell, M P; Bengali, A R; Khandheria, B K

    1999-08-01

    To describe the development of telemedicine capabilities-application of remote consultation and diagnostic techniques-and to evaluate the feasibility and practicality of such clinical outreach to rural and underserved communities with limited telecommunications infrastructures. In 1992, Mayo Foundation (Rochester, Minn, Jacksonville, Fla, and Scottsdale, Ariz), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency collaborated to create a complex network of fiberoptic landlines, video recording systems, satellite terminals, and specially developed data translators linking Mayo sites with other locations in the continental United States on an on-demand basis. The purpose was to transmit data via the asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) digital communications protocol over the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite. The links were intended to provide a conduit for transmission of data for patient-specific consultations between physicians, evaluation of medical imagery, and medical education for clinical staffs at remote sites. Low-data-rate (LDR) experiments went live late in 1993. Mayo Clinic Rochester successfully provided medical consultation and services to 2 small regional medical facilities. High-data-rate (HDR) experiments included studies of remote digital echocardiography, store-and-forward telemedicine, cardiac catheterization, and teleconsultation for congenital heart disease. These studies combined landline data transmission with use of the satellite. The complexity of the routing paths and network components, immaturity of available software, and inexperience with existing telecommunications caused significant study delays. These experiments demonstrated that next-generation satellite technology can provide batch and real-time imagery for telemedicine. The first-generation of the ATM and satellite network technology used in these experiments created several technical problems and inconveniences that should

  5. Mindfulness Moderates the Relationship Between Disordered Eating Cognitions and Disordered Eating Behaviors in a Non-Clinical College Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Akihiko; Price, Matthew; Latzman, Robert D

    2012-03-01

    Psychological flexibility and mindfulness are two related, but distinct, regulation processes that have been shown to be at the core of psychological wellbeing. The current study investigated whether these two processes independently moderated the association between disordered eating cognitions and psychological distress as well as the relation between disordered eating cognitions and disordered eating behaviors. Non-clinical, ethnically diverse college undergraduates completed a web-based survey. Of 278 participants (nfemale=208; nmale=70) aged 18-24 years old, disordered eating cognitions, mindfulness, and psychological flexibility were related to psychological distress after controlling for gender, ethnicity, and body mass index. Disordered eating cognitions and mindfulness accounted for unique variance in disordered eating behaviors. Finally, mindfulness was found to moderate the association between disordered eating cognitions and disordered eating behaviors.

  6. CONTINUOUS GLUCOSE MONITORING: A CONSENSUS CONFERENCE OF THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS AND AMERICAN COLLEGE OF ENDOCRINOLOGY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Vivian A; Grunberger, George; Anhalt, Henry; Bailey, Timothy S; Blevins, Thomas; Garg, Satish K; Handelsman, Yehuda; Hirsch, Irl B; Orzeck, Eric A; Roberts, Victor Lawrence; Tamborlane, William

    2016-08-01

    Barriers to continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) use continue to hamper adoption of this valuable technology for the management of diabetes. The American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists and the American College of Endocrinology convened a public consensus conference February 20, 2016, to review available CGM data and propose strategies for expanding CGM access. Conference participants agreed that evidence supports the benefits of CGM in type 1 diabetes and that these benefits are likely to apply whenever intensive insulin therapy is used, regardless of diabetes type. CGM is likely to reduce healthcare resource utilization for acute and chronic complications, although real-world analyses are needed to confirm potential cost savings and quality of life improvements. Ongoing technological advances have improved CGM accuracy and usability, but more innovations in human factors, data delivery, reporting, and interpretation are needed to foster expanded use. The development of a standardized data report using similar metrics across all devices would facilitate clinician and patient understanding and utilization of CGM. Expanded CGM coverage by government and private payers is an urgent need. CGM improves glycemic control, reduces hypoglycemia, and may reduce overall costs of diabetes management. Expanding CGM coverage and utilization is likely to improve the health outcomes of people with diabetes. A1C = glycated hemoglobin AACE = American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists ACE = American College of Endocrinology ASPIRE = Automation to Simulate Pancreatic Insulin Response CGM = continuous glucose monitoring HRQOL = health-related quality of life ICER = incremental cost-effectiveness ratio JDRF = Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation MARD = mean absolute relative difference MDI = multiple daily injections QALY = quality-adjusted life years RCT = randomized, controlled trial SAP = sensor-augmented pump SMBG = self-monitoring of blood glucose STAR = Sensor

  7. Moral maps and medical imaginaries: clinical tourism at Malawi's College of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendland, Claire L

    2012-01-01

    At an understaffed and underresourced urban African training hospital, Malawian medical students learn to be doctors while foreign medical students, visiting Malawi as clinical tourists on short-term electives, learn about “global health.” Scientific ideas circulate fast there; clinical tourists circulate readily from outside to Malawi but not the reverse; medical technologies circulate slowly, erratically, and sometimes not at all. Medicine's uneven globalization is on full display. I extend scholarship on moral imaginations and medical imaginaries to propose that students map these wards variously as places in which—or from which—they seek a better medicine. Clinical tourists, enacting their own moral maps, also become representatives of medicine “out there”: points on the maps of others. Ethnographic data show that for Malawians, clinical tourists are colleagues, foils against whom they construct ideas about a superior and distinctly Malawian medicine and visions of possible alternative futures for themselves.

  8. [Neonatal herpes: Epidemiology, clinical manifestations and management. Guidelines for clinical practice from the French College of Gynecologists and Obstetricians (CNGOF)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renesme, L

    2017-12-01

    To describe the epidemiology of neonatal herpes and its risk factors, clinical and paraclinic manifestations, propose guidelines for a newborn at risk of neonatal herpes, describe treatment modalities, describe post-natal transmission and its prevention. Bibliographic search from Medline, Cochrane Library databases and research of international clinical practice guidelines. Neonatal herpes is rare (about 20 cases per year in France) and mainly due to HSV 1 (level of evidence LE3). The main risk factors for mother-to-child transmission are maternal primary episode of genital herpes close to delivery and serotype HSV 1 (LE3). There are three clinical forms of neonatal herpes : SEM infection for skin, eyes and mucosa, central nervous system (CNS) associated infection, and the disseminated infection. Neurological mortality and morbidity depend on the clinical form and the HSV serotype (LE3). In most of the case of neonatal herpes, the mothers have no history of genital herpes (LE3). Fever and vesicular rash may be absent at the time of diagnosis (LE3). In case of suspicion of neonatal herpes, different samples (blood and cerebrospinal fluid) for HSV PCR must be carried out to confirm the diagnosis (Professional consensus). Any newborn suspected of neonatal herpes should be treated with intravenous aciclovir (Grade A) prior to the results of HSV PCR (Professional consensus). In case of maternal genital herpes at delivery, the management of an asymptomatic newborn depends on the evaluation of the risk of transmission. In case of maternal reactivation (low risk of transmission), HSV PCR samples are taken at 24hours of life and the newborn must be follow closely until results. In the case of maternal primary episode or non-primary infection first episode (high risk of transmission), the samples are taken at 24hours of life and intravenous treatment with aciclovir is started (Professional consensus). The treatment of neonatal herpes is based on intravenous aciclovir (60mg

  9. The South African Military Nursing College Pupil Enrolled Nurses’ experiences of the clinical learning environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernestina M. Caka

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The study focused on the clinical learning experiences of Pupil Enrolled Nurses (PENs within the military health service. The purpose of the research was to explore and describe the learning experiences of PENs within the Military health clinical learning environment. An explorative, descriptive, contextual design which is qualitative in nature was used to guide the study. The military as a training institution prides itself on preparing nurses both as soldiers and nurses, this could be both challenging and exasperating for students, as the scopes are diverse. Being notably very hierarchical, the military’s rules constantly take precedence over nursing rules. For the duration of nursing training, students are allocated in the clinical learning area to acquire competencies such as problem solving, cognitive and psychomotor skills (Kuiper & Pesut 2003:383. Students learn how to merge theory and practice and apply theories in the practical sense. This is however, not done in isolation from the military codes, as they are intertwined. Attendance of military parades and drills are incorporated during this phase. This could create missed opportunities from the clinical learning as students are expected to leave the clinical setting for this purpose. Three focus group sessions were conducted and the experiences of the students, as narrated by themselves, yielded valuable insights. The researcher wrote field notes and assisted with the management of the audio tapes for easy retrieval of information. Data was analysed by the researcher, independent of the cocoder. Two themes relating to the PENs’ learning experiences emerged from the data analysed: (1 facilitators of clinical learning, (2 and barriers to clinical learning. The findings obtained depicted those factors which facilitated and obstructed student learning. These findings made it possible for the researcher to make recommendations concerning positive interventions which could be taken to

  10. Utility of the Mayo-Portland adaptability inventory-4 for self-reported outcomes in a military sample with traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kean, Jacob; Malec, James F; Cooper, Douglas B; Bowles, Amy O

    2013-12-01

    To investigate the psychometric properties of the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory-4 (MPAI-4) obtained by self-report in a large sample of active duty military personnel with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Consecutive cohort who completed the MPAI-4 as a part of a larger battery of clinical outcome measures at the time of intake to an outpatient brain injury clinic. Medical center. Consecutively referred sample of active duty military personnel (N=404) who suffered predominantly mild (n=355), but also moderate (n=37) and severe (n=12), TBI. Not applicable. MPAI-4 RESULTS: Initial factor analysis suggested 2 salient dimensions. In subsequent analysis, the ratio of the first and second eigenvalues (6.84:1) and parallel analysis indicated sufficient unidimensionality in 26 retained items. Iterative Rasch analysis resulted in the rescaling of the measure and the removal of 5 additional items for poor fit. The items of the final 21-item Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory-military were locally independent, demonstrated monotonically increasing responses, adequately fit the item response model, and permitted the identification of nearly 5 statistically distinct levels of disability in the study population. Slight mistargeting of the population resulted in the global outcome, as measured by the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory-military, tending to be less reflective of very mild levels of disability. These data collected in a relatively large sample of active duty service members with TBI provide insight into the ability of patients to self-report functional impairment and the distinct effects of military deployment on outcome, providing important guidance for the meaningful measurement of outcome in this population. Copyright © 2013 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. "Klebsiella Pneumonia" Liver Abscess Syndrome: Case Presentation to a College Student Health Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woll, Christopher; Spotts, P. Hunter

    2016-01-01

    The authors describe a case of "Klebsiella pneumoniae" liver abscess (KPLA) in a student presenting to a university student health center. The authors also provide a review of KPLA and invasive "Klebsiella pneumoniae" liver abscess syndrome (IKPLAS), including epidemiology, common clinical manifestations, standard diagnostic…

  12. AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS AND AMERICAN COLLEGE OF ENDOCRINOLOGY POSITION STATEMENT ON THE ASSOCIATION OF SGLT-2 INHIBITORS AND DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handelsman, Yehuda; Henry, Robert R; Bloomgarden, Zachary T; Dagogo-Jack, Sam; DeFronzo, Ralph A; Einhorn, Daniel; Ferrannini, Ele; Fonseca, Vivian A; Garber, Alan J; Grunberger, George; LeRoith, Derek; Umpierrez, Guillermo E; Weir, Matthew R

    2016-06-01

    AACE = American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists ACE = American College of Endocrinology DKA = diabetic ketoacidosis EMA = European Medicines Agency FDA = U.S. Food and Drug Administration SGLT-2 = sodium glucosecotransporter 2 T1D = type 1 diabetes T2D = type 2 diabetes.

  13. American Society of Clinical Oncology/College of American Pathologists guideline recommendations for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 testing in breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolff, Antonio C.; Hammond, M. Elizabeth H.; Schwartz, Jared N.; Hagerty, Karen L.; Allred, D. Craig; Cote, Richard J.; Dowsett, Mitchell; Fitzgibbons, Patrick L.; Hanna, Wedad M.; Langer, Amy; McShane, Lisa M.; Paik, Soonmyung; Pegram, Mark D.; Perez, Edith A.; Press, Michael F.; Rhodes, Anthony; Sturgeon, Catharine; Taube, Sheila E.; Tubbs, Raymond; Vance, Gail H.; van de Vijver, Marc; Wheeler, Thomas M.; Hayes, Daniel F.

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: To develop a guideline to improve the accuracy of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) testing in invasive breast cancer and its utility as a predictive marker. METHODS: The American Society of Clinical Oncology and the College of American Pathologists convened an expert panel,

  14. American Society of Clinical Oncology/College Of American Pathologists guideline recommendations for immunohistochemical testing of estrogen and progesterone receptors in breast cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hammond, M.E.; Hayes, D.F.; Dowsett, M.; Allred, D.C.; Hagerty, K.L.; Badve, S.; Fitzgibbons, P.L.; Francis, G.; Goldstein, N.S.; Hayes, M.; Hicks, D.G.; Lester, S.; Love, R.; Mangu, P.B.; McShane, L.; Miller, K.; Osborne, C.K.; Paik, S.; Perlmutter, J.; Rhodes, A.; Sasano, H.; Schwartz, J.N.; Sweep, F.C.; Taube, S.; Torlakovic, E.E.; Valenstein, P.; Viale, G.; Visscher, D.; Wheeler, T.; Williams, R.B.; Wittliff, J.L.; Wolff, A.C.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: To develop a guideline to improve the accuracy of immunohistochemical (IHC) estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PgR) testing in breast cancer and the utility of these receptors as predictive markers. METHODS: The American Society of Clinical Oncology and the College of

  15. American Society of Clinical Oncology/College of American Pathologists guideline recommendations for immunohistochemical testing of estrogen and progesterone receptors in breast cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hammond, M.E.; Hayes, D.F.; Dowsett, M.; Allred, D.C.; Hagerty, K.L.; Badve, S.; Fitzgibbons, P.L.; Francis, G.; Goldstein, N.S.; Hayes, M.; Hicks, D.G.; Lester, S.; Love, R.; Mangu, P.B.; McShane, L.; Miller, K.; Osborne, C.K.; Paik, S.; Perlmutter, J.; Rhodes, A.; Sasano, H.; Schwartz, J.N.; Sweep, F.C.; Taube, S.; Torlakovic, E.E.; Valenstein, P.; Viale, G.; Visscher, D.; Wheeler, T.; Williams, R.B.; Wittliff, J.L.; Wolff, A.C.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: To develop a guideline to improve the accuracy of immunohistochemical (IHC) estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PgR) testing in breast cancer and the utility of these receptors as predictive markers. METHODS: The American Society of Clinical Oncology and the College of

  16. American Society of Clinical Oncology/College of American Pathologists guideline recommendations for immunohistochemical testing of estrogen and progesterone receptors in breast cancer (unabridged version).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hammond, M.E.; Hayes, D.F.; Dowsett, M.; Allred, D.C.; Hagerty, K.L.; Badve, S.; Fitzgibbons, P.L.; Francis, G.; Goldstein, N.S.; Hayes, M.; Hicks, D.G.; Lester, S.; Love, R.; Mangu, P.B.; McShane, L.; Miller, K.; Osborne, C.K.; Paik, S.; Perlmutter, J.; Rhodes, A.; Sasano, H.; Schwartz, J.N.; Sweep, F.C.; Taube, S.; Torlakovic, E.E.; Valenstein, P.; Viale, G.; Visscher, D.; Wheeler, T.; Williams, R.B.; Wittliff, J.L.; Wolff, A.C.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: To develop a guideline to improve the accuracy of immunohistochemical (IHC) estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PgR) testing in breast cancer and the utility of these receptors as predictive markers. METHODS: The American Society of Clinical Oncology and the College of

  17. AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS AND AMERICAN COLLEGE OF ENDOCRINOLOGY DISEASE STATE CLINICAL REVIEW: DIAGNOSIS OF RECURRENCE IN CUSHING DISEASE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleseriu, Maria; Hamrahian, Amir H; Hoffman, Andrew R; Kelly, Daniel F; Katznelson, Laurence

    2016-12-01

    Recurrence of hypercortisolemia after initial treatment of Cushing disease (CD) is more common than previously thought, with a third of patients suffering a recurrence over their lifetime. Awareness of this high rate and delayed timeline (sometimes decades) of potential recurrence is critical and patients with CD should be monitored at regular intervals throughout their lives. In this manuscript, we review the complex evaluation needed for defining CD remission versus persistent disease after surgery, and focus on challenges in diagnosing early recurrent hypercortisolemia. Late night salivary cortisol appears to be an earlier predictor of recurrence when compared with urinary free cortisol (UFC) excretion. We also review the criteria suggested to define recurrence of hypercortisolemia in patients treated with medical therapy. Further research is needed to determine the optimal way to evaluate a patient with CD recurrence as well as the riskbenefit ratio of treatment in early, mild recurrent disease. ACTH = adrenocorticotropic hormone AI = adrenal insufficiency CD = Cushing disease CDDT = coupled dexamethasone desmopressin test CR = circadian rhythm CRH = corticotropin-releasing hormone GC = glucocorticoid GCR = global clinical response HPA = hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal LDDST = low-dose dexamethasone suppression test LNSC = late-night salivary cortisol ODST = overnight dexamethasone suppression test TSS = trans-sphenoidal surgery.

  18. Comparison of the EZ-Cap recapper with the Mayo recapper for the prevention of needlesticks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewhirst, Chad A; Hung, Joseph C

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this project was the development of a device that improves the design of our current capping block, the Mayo recapper. The major challenges for design and improvement included creating a device that is simple to use and can be applied throughout our department. We wanted a recapper device that increased safety and minimized the potential for needlesticks. Simplicity was another important factor, along with versatility and low cost. A new recapper, called EZ-Cap, was developed, and a comparison study was conducted to evaluate the pros and cons of the EZ-Cap recapper and the Mayo recapper. Nuclear medicine technologists (n = 10) in our department used each device when administering patient injections. At the conclusion of their patient injection rotation, they recorded on a survey sheet the pros and cons of each device. The results of this survey were used to evaluate the effectiveness, comfort level during use, and safety of each recapping device. We used a 2-level scoring system to help determine which device was more favorable. The first level focused on comfort and convenience and was given a score of +1 or -1. The second level focused on safety and was given a score of +2 or -2. Because we believed that safety was a high priority for our capping blocks, this level received a higher score than the first level. The Mayo recapper was the device preferred by 9 of 10 technologists surveyed. The EZ-Cap recapper had several technical issues that made it difficult to use and that could potentially lead to safety concerns. According to our scoring system, the Mayo recapper received a score of +9 for its pros and -4 for its cons. By comparison, the EZ-Cap recapper received a score of +7 for its pros and -16 for its cons. Our results show that the Mayo recapper was the device of choice because its pros outweighed its cons. However, we will continually improve the effectiveness of the Mayo recapper to prevent needlesticks.

  19. American College of Rheumatology provisional criteria for defining clinical inactive disease in select categories of juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Carol A; Giannini, Edward H; Huang, Bin; Itert, Lukasz; Ruperto, Nicolino

    2011-07-01

    To prospectively validate the preliminary criteria for clinical inactive disease (CID) in patients with select categories of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). We used the process for development of classification and response criteria recommended by the American College of Rheumatology Quality of Care Committee. Patient-visit profiles were extracted from the phase III randomized controlled trial of infliximab in polyarticular-course JIA (i.e., patients considered to resemble those with select categories of JIA) and sent to an international group of expert physician raters. Using the physician ratings as the gold standard, the sensitivity and specificity were calculated using the preliminary criteria. Modifications to the criteria were made, and these were sent to a larger group of pediatric rheumatologists to determine quantitative, face, and content validity. Variables weighted heaviest by physicians when making their judgment were the number of joints with active arthritis, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), physician's global assessment, and duration of morning stiffness. Three modifications were made: the definition of uveitis, the definition of abnormal ESR, and the addition of morning stiffness. These changes did not alter the accuracy of the preliminary set. The modified criteria, termed the "criteria for CID in select categories of JIA," have excellent feasibility and face, content, criterion, and discriminant validity to detect CID in select categories of JIA. The small changes made to the preliminary criteria set did not alter the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (0.954) or accuracy (91%), but have increased face and content validity. Copyright © 2011 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  20. [Evolution of clinical teaching at the medical college of Lisboa (I)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, J C

    1990-01-01

    Clinical teaching at Lisbon's Faculty of Medicine is analyzed in its two phases: 1. A period of stability and continuity of the institution (from 1911 to 1947) characterized by good rules in the selection of teachers: an impressive group of personalities (F. Gentil, Pulido Valente, Reynaldo dos Santos, Egas Moniz, A. Flores, Sobral Cid, Lopo de Carvalho, Gama Pinto, etc). At the some period a true University Hospital (of Santa Marta) provided clinical investigation (cerebral angiography and leucotomy, aortography and arteriography of the limbs, angiopneumography, endarterectomy) and the creation of new specialties (neurosurgery, vascular surgery, pneumology). 2. A period of instability due to a deleterious political intervention (from 1947 to the present day) responsible for the destruction of the structure and concept of a new teaching hospital (Hospital de Santa Maria). As a result of the socio-political situation conflicting law and vicious rules lead to an excess of non-selected teachers and an alarming increase of students, patients and medical doctors. A change from the present situation and a new concept of clinical teaching must be imagined.

  1. D'Alton Community Nursing Unit, Claremorris, Mayo.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hurley, Deirdre A

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic low back pain (CLBP) is a persistent disabling condition with rising significant healthcare, social and economic costs. Current research supports the use of exercise-based treatment approaches that encourage people with CLBP to assume a physically active role in their recovery. While international clinical guidelines and systematic reviews for CLBP support supervised group exercise as an attractive first-line option for treating large numbers of CLBP patients at low cost, barriers to their delivery include space and time restrictions in healthcare settings and poor patient attendance. The European Clinical Guidelines have identified the need for research in the use of brief\\/minimal contact self-activation interventions that encourage participation in physical activity for CLBP. Walking may be an ideally suited form of individualized exercise prescription as it is easy to do, requires no special skills or facilities, and is achievable by virtually all ages with little risk of injury, but its effectiveness for LBP is unproven. METHODS AND DESIGN: This study will be an assessor-blinded randomized controlled trial that will investigate the difference in clinical effectiveness and costs of an individualized walking programme and a supervised general exercise programme compared to usual physiotherapy, which will act as the control group, in people with chronic low back pain. A sample of 246 patients will be recruited in Dublin, Ireland through acute general hospital outpatient physiotherapy departments that provide treatment for people with CLBP. Patients will be randomly allocated to one of the three groups in a concealed manner. The main outcomes will be functional disability, pain, quality of life, fear avoidance, back beliefs, physical activity, satisfaction and costs, which will be evaluated at baseline, and 3, 6 and 12 months [follow-up by pre-paid postage]. Qualitative telephone interviews and focus groups will be embedded in the research

  2. Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists clinical practice guidelines for the treatment of eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Phillipa; Chinn, David; Forbes, David; Madden, Sloane; Newton, Richard; Sugenor, Lois; Touyz, Stephen; Ward, Warren

    2014-11-01

    This clinical practice guideline for treatment of DSM-5 feeding and eating disorders was conducted as part of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists (RANZCP) Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPG) Project 2013-2014. The CPG was developed in accordance with best practice according to the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia. Literature of evidence for treatments of anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), binge eating disorder (BED), other specified and unspecified eating disorders and avoidant restrictive food intake disorder (ARFID) was sourced from the previous RANZCP CPG reviews (dated to 2009) and updated with a systematic review (dated 2008-2013). A multidisciplinary working group wrote the draft CPG, which then underwent expert, community and stakeholder consultation, during which process additional evidence was identified. In AN the CPG recommends treatment as an outpatient or day patient in most instances (i.e. in the least restrictive environment), with hospital admission for those at risk of medical and/or psychological compromise. A multi-axial and collaborative approach is recommended, including consideration of nutritional, medical and psychological aspects, the use of family based therapies in younger people and specialist therapist-led manualised based psychological therapies in all age groups and that include longer-term follow-up. A harm minimisation approach is recommended in chronic AN. In BN and BED the CPG recommends an individual psychological therapy for which the best evidence is for therapist-led cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT). There is also a role for CBT adapted for internet delivery, or CBT in a non-specialist guided self-help form. Medications that may be helpful either as an adjunctive or alternative treatment option include an antidepressant, topiramate, or orlistat (the last for people with comorbid obesity). No specific treatment is recommended for ARFID as there are no trials to

  3. Friars Lodge Nursing Home, Convent Road, Ballinrobe, Mayo.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, JFA

    2011-01-01

    Lack of sleep has well established effects on physiological, cognitive and behavioural functionality. Sleep deprivation can adversely affect clinical performance as severely as alcohol according to some sources. Sleep deficiency may be due to loss of one night’s sleep or repeated interruptions of sleep. Chronic sleep degrades the ability to recognise one’s ability to recognise the impairments induced by sleep loss. The problem of sleep deprivation has vexed acute medical practice for decades. Improvement has been painfully slow. The problem is that all 168 hours throughout every week of every year have to be covered and there are a finite number of doctors to shoulder the burden. There are many strongly held views about how best to provide night-time and week-end care. Constructive innovations are thin on the ground. The biggest gap is between administration and doctors with financial considerations being the limiting factor. It is, however, generally accepted on all sides that sleep loss and fatigue can have adverse effects on both patients and doctors.

  4. The South African Military Nursing College Pupil Enrolled Nurses’ experiences of the clinical learning environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernestina M. Caka

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The study focused on the clinical learning experiences of Pupil Enrolled Nurses (PENs within the military health service. The purpose of the research was to explore and describe the learning experiences of PENs within the Military health clinical learning environment. An explorative, descriptive, contextual design which is qualitative in nature was used to guide the study. The military as a training institution prides itself on preparing nurses both as soldiers and nurses, this could be both challenging and exasperating for students, as the scopes are diverse. Being notably very hierarchical, the military’s rules constantly take precedence over nursing rules. For the duration of nursing training, students are allocated in the clinical learning area to acquire competencies such as problem solving, cognitive and psychomotor skills (Kuiper & Pesut 2003:383. Students learn how to merge theory and practice and apply theories in the practical sense. This is however, not done in isolation from the military codes, as they are intertwined. Attendance of military parades and drills are incorporated during this phase. This could create missed opportunities from the clinical learning as students are expected to leave the clinical setting for this purpose. Three focus group sessions were conducted and the experiences of the students, as narrated by themselves, yielded valuable insights. The researcher wrote field notes and assisted with the management of the audio tapes for easy retrieval of information. Data was analysed by the researcher, independent of the cocoder. Two themes relating to the PENs’ learning experiences emerged from the data analysed: (1 facilitators of clinical learning, (2 and barriers to clinical learning. The findings obtained depicted those factors which facilitated and obstructed student learning. These findings made it possible for the researcher to make recommendations concerning positive interventions which could be taken to

  5. AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS AND AMERICAN COLLEGE OF ENDOCRINOLOGY GUIDELINES FOR MANAGEMENT OF DYSLIPIDEMIA AND PREVENTION OF CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jellinger, Paul S; Handelsman, Yehuda; Rosenblit, Paul D; Bloomgarden, Zachary T; Fonseca, Vivian A; Garber, Alan J; Grunberger, George; Guerin, Chris K; Bell, David S H; Mechanick, Jeffrey I; Pessah-Pollack, Rachel; Wyne, Kathleen; Smith, Donald; Brinton, Eliot A; Fazio, Sergio; Davidson, Michael

    2017-04-01

    The development of these guidelines is mandated by the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) Board of Directors and American College of Endocrinology (ACE) Board of Trustees and adheres with published AACE protocols for the standardized production of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs). Recommendations are based on diligent reviews of the clinical evidence with transparent incorporation of subjective factors, according to established AACE/ACE guidelines for guidelines protocols. The Executive Summary of this document contains 87 recommendations of which 45 are Grade A (51.7%), 18 are Grade B (20.7%), 15 are Grade C (17.2%), and 9 (10.3%) are Grade D. These detailed, evidence-based recommendations allow for nuance-based clinical decision-making that addresses multiple aspects of real-world medical care. The evidence base presented in the subsequent Appendix provides relevant supporting information for Executive Summary Recommendations. This update contains 695 citations of which 203 (29.2 %) are EL 1 (strong), 137 (19.7%) are EL 2 (intermediate), 119 (17.1%) are EL 3 (weak), and 236 (34.0%) are EL 4 (no clinical evidence). This CPG is a practical tool that endocrinologists, other health care professionals, health-related organizations, and regulatory bodies can use to reduce the risks and consequences of dyslipidemia. It provides guidance on screening, risk assessment, and treatment recommendations for a range of individuals with various lipid disorders. The recommendations emphasize the importance of treating low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) in some individuals to lower goals than previously endorsed and support the measurement of coronary artery calcium scores and inflammatory markers to help stratify risk. Special consideration is given to individuals with diabetes, familial hypercholesterolemia, women, and youth with dyslipidemia. Both clinical and cost-effectiveness data are provided to support treatment decisions. 4S

  6. Rasch measurement analysis of the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory (MPAI-4) in a community-based rehabilitation sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kean, Jacob; Malec, James F; Altman, Irwin M; Swick, Shannon

    2011-05-01

    The precise measurement of patient outcomes depends upon clearly articulated constructs and refined clinical assessment instruments that work equally well for all subgroups within a population. This is a challenging task in those with acquired brain injury (ABI) because of the marked heterogeneity of the disorder and subsequent outcomes. Although essential, the iterative process of instrument refinement is often neglected. This present study was undertaken to examine validity, reliability, dimensionality and item estimate invariance of the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory - 4 (MPAI-4), an outcome measure for persons with ABI. The sampled population included 603 persons with traumatic ABI participating in a home- and community-based rehabilitation program. Results indicated that the MPAI-4 is a valid, reliable measure of outcome following traumatic ABI, which measures a broad but unitary core construct of outcome after ABI. Further, the MPAI-4 is composed of items that are unbiased toward selected subgroups except where differences could be expected [e.g., more chronic traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients are better able to negotiate demands of transportation than more acute TBI patients]. We address the trade-offs between strict unidimensionality and clinical applicability in measuring outcome, and illustrate the advantages and disadvantages of applying single-parameter measurement models to broad constructs.

  7. Relatively High Complication and Revision Rates of the Mayo® Metaphysical Conservative Femoral Stem in Young Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutenberg, Tal Frenkel; Warshevski, Yaniv; Gold, Aviram; Shasha, Nadav; Snir, Nimrod; Chechik, Ofir; Dolkart, Oleg; Eilig, Dynai; Herman, Amir; Rath, Ehud; Kramer, Moti; Drexler, Michael

    2018-05-08

    The Mayo metaphysical conservative femoral stem (Zimmer, Warsaw, Indiana) is a wedge-shaped implant designed to transfer loads proximally, reduce femoral destruction, and enable the preservation of bone stock in the proximal femur. Thus, it is a potentially preferred prosthesis for active, non-elderly patients who may require additional future surgeries. This retrospective case study analyzed the outcomes of consecutive patients who underwent total hip replacements with this stem between May 2001 and February 2013. All patients underwent clinical assessment, radiological evaluation for the presence and development of radiolucent lines, and functional assessment (numerical analog scale, Harris hip score, and Short Form-12 questionnaire). Ninety-five hips (79 patients) were available for analysis. The patients' mean age was 43 years (range, 18-64 years), and the mean follow-up was 97 months (range, 26.9-166 months). The postoperative clinical assessments and functional assessments revealed significant improvements. Sixteen patients (20.3%) had 18 orthopedic complications, the most common of which were an intraoperative femoral fracture and implant dislocation requiring revision surgeries in 10 hips (10.5%). Radiological analysis revealed evidence of femoral remodeling in 64 (67.4%) implants, spot welds (neocortex) in 35 (36.8%), and osteolysis in 3 (3.2%). These results suggest that the conservative hip femoral implant has an unacceptable complication rate for non-elderly patients. [Orthopedics. 201x; xx(x):xx-xx.]. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS AND AMERICAN COLLEGE OF ENDOCRINOLOGY COMPREHENSIVE CLINICAL PRACTICE GUIDELINES FOR MEDICAL CARE OF PATIENTS WITH OBESITY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, W Timothy; Mechanick, Jeffrey I; Brett, Elise M; Garber, Alan J; Hurley, Daniel L; Jastreboff, Ania M; Nadolsky, Karl; Pessah-Pollack, Rachel; Plodkowski, Raymond

    2016-07-01

    Development of these guidelines is mandated by the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) Board of Directors and the American College of Endocrinology (ACE) Board of Trustees and adheres to published AACE protocols for the standardized production of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs). Recommendations are based on diligent review of clinical evidence with transparent incorporation of subjective factors. There are 9 broad clinical questions with 123 recommendation numbers that include 160 specific statements (85 [53.1%] strong [Grade A]; 48 [30.0%] intermediate [Grade B], and 11 [6.9%] weak [Grade C], with 16 [10.0%] based on expert opinion [Grade D]) that build a comprehensive medical care plan for obesity. There were 133 (83.1%) statements based on strong (best evidence level [BEL] 1 = 79 [49.4%]) or intermediate (BEL 2 = 54 [33.7%]) levels of scientific substantiation. There were 34 (23.6%) evidence-based recommendation grades (Grades A-C = 144) that were adjusted based on subjective factors. Among the 1,790 reference citations used in this CPG, 524 (29.3%) were based on strong (evidence level [EL] 1), 605 (33.8%) were based on intermediate (EL 2), and 308 (17.2%) were based on weak (EL 3) scientific studies, with 353 (19.7%) based on reviews and opinions (EL 4). The final recommendations recognize that obesity is a complex, adiposity-based chronic disease, where management targets both weight-related complications and adiposity to improve overall health and quality of life. The detailed evidence-based recommendations allow for nuanced clinical decision-making that addresses real-world medical care of patients with obesity, including screening, diagnosis, evaluation, selection of therapy, treatment goals, and individualization of care. The goal is to facilitate high-quality care of patients with obesity and provide a rational, scientific approach to management that optimizes health outcomes and safety. A1C = hemoglobin A1c AACE = American

  9. A Retrospective Study of Epidemiological and Clinical Patterns of ACDRs in Goa Medical College over a 6 Year Period

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    Rakhi Ghodge

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adverse Cutaneous Drug Reactions (ACDRs account for 3% of all hospitalizations. The spectrum of drug reactions can be varied from mild to life threatening forms. Since the diagnosis of ACDR is purely clinical, early and prompt identification and withdrawal of drug (s is life saving for the patient. Aim and Objectives: To study the epidemiological and common clinical patterns and drugs causing ACDRs in tertiary care hospital of Goa Medical College, Goa over a 6 year period. Material and Methods:This was a retrospective study conducted over a period of 6 years. The medical records were analyzed for demographic profiles, morphology of drug eruptions, common groups of drugs involved, presence of co-morbid factors, systemic and mucosal involvement, common haematological abnormalities encountered, time interval between drug intake and onset of rash and mortality. Results: Our study population had 256 patients and the age group of 21-40 years was commonly affected. Maculopapular rash followed by angioedema were the commonest morphology of drug rash patterns encountered in our study. The time interval between consumption of drugs and onset of ACDR varied with interval of 1-7 days being the commonest group in having 158 (61.7% patients. Antibiotics followed by anticonvulsants and antiretrovirals were the commonest groups of drugs causing ACDR. We found that significant proportion of our patients had haematological, renal and hepatic system involvement. Conclusion: Early identification and withdrawal of the culprit drug remains the cornerstone in prevention of mortalities in ACDRs. A prior knowledge about the reaction patterns and common offending drugs in the population by the treating physician cannot be overemphasized.

  10. Knowledge and perception regarding clinical trials among doctors of government medical colleges: A questionnaire-based study

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    Supriyo Choudhury

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: By virtue of being a specialized field by itself, the science of clinical trials (CTs may not be well understood by doctors who are not specifically trained in it. A lack of knowledge may translate to a negative perception toward CT. With the idea of getting a situational snapshot, we estimated the knowledge and perception of CTs among doctors from government medical colleges of West Bengal who are not trained on CT in their postgraduate curriculum. Several determinants of knowledge and perception regarding CT were also evaluated. Methods: We have quantified the knowledge and perception of CTs by a structured validated questionnaire. Development and validation of the questionnaire was performed prior to the study. Results: Among 133 participants, 7.5% received focused training on CT and 16.5% participated in CTs as investigators. Majority of the doctors were unfamiliar with the basic terminologies such as, “adverse event” and “good clinical practice.” Encouragingly, 93.3% doctors advised that a detailed discussion of CT methodology should be incorporated in the under graduate medical science curriculum. They had an overall positive attitude toward CTs conducted in India, with a mean score that is 72.6% of the maximum positive score. However, a large number of the doctors were skeptical about the primary motivation and operations of pharmaceutical industry sponsored CTs, with 45% of them believing that patients are exploited in these sponsored CTs. Conclusion: Participant doctors had a basic knowledge of CT methodology. The study has revealed specific areas of deficient knowledge, which might be emphasized while designing focused training on CT methodology.

  11. Specialist perioperative allergy clinic services in the UK 2016: Results from the Royal College of Anaesthetists Sixth National Audit Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egner, W; Cook, T; Harper, N; Garcez, T; Marinho, S; Kong, K L; Nasser, S; Thomas, M; Warner, A; Hitchman, J; Floss, K

    2017-10-01

    Guidelines for investigation of perioperative drug allergy exist, but the quality of services is unknown. Specialist perioperative anaphylaxis services were surveyed through the Royal College of Anaesthetists 6 th National Audit Project. We compare self-declared UK practice in specialist perioperative allergy services with national recommendations. A SurveyMonkey™ questionnaire was distributed to providers of allergy services in the UK. Responses were assessed for adherence to the best practice recommendations of the British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology (BSACI), the Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland and the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) Guidance on Drug Allergy-CG183. Over 1200 patients were evaluated in 44 centres annually. Variation in workload, waiting times, access, staffing and diagnostic approach was noted. Paediatric centres had the longest routine waiting times (most wait >13 weeks) in contrast to adult centres (most wait specialist nurses and 18/44 (41%) an anaesthetist] and provision of information [18/44 (41%) gave immediate information in clinic and 5/44 (11%) sign-posted support groups]. Most centres were able to provide diagnostic challenges to antibiotics [40/44 (91%]) and local anaesthetics [41/44 (93%)]. Diagnostic testing is not harmonized, with marked variability in the NMBA panels used to identify safe alternatives. Chlorhexidine and latex are not part of routine testing in many centres. Poor access to services and patient information provision require attention. Harmonization of diagnostic approach is desirable, particularly with regard to a minimum NMBA panel for identification of safe alternatives. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. CONSENSUS STATEMENT BY THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS AND AMERICAN COLLEGE OF ENDOCRINOLOGY ON THE COMPREHENSIVE TYPE 2 DIABETES MANAGEMENT ALGORITHM--2015 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garber, Alan J; Abrahamson, Martin Julian; Barzilay, Joshua I; Blonde, Lawrence; Bloomgarden, Zachary T; Bush, Michael A; Dagogo-Jack, Samuel; Davidson, Michael B; Einhorn, Daniel; Garber, Jeffrey R; Garvey, W Timothy; Grunberger, George; Handelsman, Yehuda; Hirsch, Irl B; Jellinger, Paul S; McGill, Janet B; Mechanick, Jeffrey I; Rosenblit, Paul David; Umpierrez, Guillermo E

    2015-12-01

    This document represents the official position of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists and the American College of Endocrinology. Where there were no randomized controlled trials or specific U.S. FDA labeling for issues in clinical practice, the participating clinical experts utilized their judgment and experience. Every effort was made to achieve consensus among the committee members. Position statements are meant to provide guidance, but they are not to be considered prescriptive for any individual patient and cannot replace the judgment of a clinician.

  13. Surgical outcome and clinical profile of emergency versus elective cases of colorectal cancer in College of Medical Sciences, Nepal

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    Sujit Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients who undergo emergency colorectal cancer surgery has poor outcome compared to elective surgery, both in terms of morbidity and mortality. Approximately 15 to 30% of colorectal cancers present as an emergency, most often as obstruction or perforation. Objective: To compare surgical outcome and clinical profiles of emergency and elective cases for colorectal cancer. Methods: Retrospective analysis of 34 cases who underwent surgery for colorectal cancer between December 2011 to January 2013was carried out and their surgical outcomes, clinical presentation, demographic profile were analyzed. Results: The total numbers of patients included in this study were 34. Out of which 52.94 %( n=18 were emergency cases and 47.05 %( n=16 were elective. Male female ratio was 3:1 in emergency cases and 2.6:1 in elective cases. Per rectal bleeding (56% and altered bowel habit (31.25% was predominant clinical presentation in elective cases whereas intestinal obstruction (55.55% and peritonitis (22.22% were predominant clinical presentation in emergency cases. In emergency cases most of the tumors were located in left side (77.77% and in elective cases rectum was common site (37.5%. Left hemicolectomy was the commonest surgery performed (72.22% in emergency set up. In elective cases, right hemicolectomy, left hemicolectomy, APR and LAR was done in 31.25%, 31.25%, 25% and 25% cases respectively. In the emergency group 11.11% (n=2 developed enterocutaneous fistula and early mortality within 30 days was observed in 5% (n=1 of emergency cases only. Conclusion: In emergency conditions, colorectal cancer presented with intestinal obstruction where as elective cases presented with per rectal bleeding and altered bowel habits. Compared with the elective patients, the emergency patients had higher rate of morbidity and mortality. Because of higher incidence of colorectal cancer in our institution, in all emergency cases who presents with features of

  14. AMERICAN COLLEGE OF GASTROENTEROLOGY CLINICAL GUIDELINE: DIAGNOSIS AND MANAGEMENT OF CELIAC DISEASE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Tapia, Alberto; Hill, Ivor D; Kelly, Ciarán P; Calderwood, Audrey H; Murray, Joseph A

    2013-01-01

    This guideline presents recommendations for the diagnosis and management of patients with celiac disease. Celiac disease is an immune-based reaction to dietary gluten (storage protein for wheat, barley and rye) that primarily affects the small intestine in those with a genetic predisposition and resolves with exclusion of gluten from the diet. There has been a substantial increase in the prevalence of celiac disease over the last 50 years and an increase in the rate of diagnosis in the last 10 years. Celiac disease can present with many symptoms, including typical gastrointestinal symptoms (e.g. diarrhea, steatorrhea, weight loss, bloating, flatulence, abdominal pain) and also non-gastrointestinal abnormalities (e.g. abnormal liver function tests, iron deficiency anemia, bone disease, skin disorders, and many other protean manifestations). Indeed, many individuals with celiac disease may have no symptoms at all. Celiac disease is usually detected by serologic testing of celiac-specific antibodies. The diagnosis is confirmed by duodenal mucosal biopsies. Both serology and biopsy should be performed on a gluten-containing diet. The treatment for celiac disease is primarily a gluten-free diet (GFD), which requires significant patient education, motivation, and follow-up. Non-responsive celiac disease occurs frequently, particularly in those diagnosed in adulthood. Persistent or recurring symptoms should lead to a review of the patient’s original diagnosis to exclude alternative diagnoses, a review of the GFD to ensure there is no obvious gluten contamination, and serologic testing to confirm adherence with the GFD. In addition, evaluation for disorders associated with celiac disease that could cause persistent symptoms, such as microscopic colitis, pancreatic exocrine dysfunction, and complications of celiac disease, such as enteropathy-associated lymphoma or refractory celiac disease, should be entertained. Newer therapeutic modalities are being studied in clinical

  15. Clinical and socio-demographic characteristics of college students exposed to traumatic experiences: a census of seven college institutions in Northeastern Brazil.

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    Liana R Netto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Epidemiological studies show that most of the adult population will be exposed to at least one potentially traumatic event in the course of his/her life; adolescence and early adulthood are the most vulnerable periods of life for exposure to traumatic experiences (70% of their deaths are due to external causes. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder is characterized by the development of dysfunctional symptoms that cause distress or social, academic, or occupational impairment, as result of exposure to a traumatic event. The aim of this multicentric study is to establish the proportion of college students, within seven institutions in Northeastern Brazil, who were exposed to traumatic experience and met PTSD criteria. METHODS/DESIGN: A one-phase census protocol of seven college institutions in three metropolitan regions in Northeastern Brazil was performed (April to July 2011. All students aged 18 years or older, matriculated and attending their first or final semester were eligible. The self-applied protocol consisted of a socio-demographic questionnaire and the following scales adjusted to Brazilian Portuguese standards Trauma History Questionnaire (THQ, PTSD Checklist-Civilian (PCL-C, Impulsivity Scale (BIS-11. Data were entered into SPSS 17.0. RESULTS: 2213 (85.5% students consented to participate, and completely filled in the protocols. Of these, 66.1% were woman, mean age 23.9 (SD 6.3, 82.7% were single, and 57.3% attended university outside their native cities. The total PTSD prevalence was 14%, and the median for frequency of trauma exposure was 5 events. CONCLUSION: A high frequency of exposure to violence, as well as a high rate of PTSD, suicide attempts, and high-risk sexual behavior was found in Brazilian college students. This highlights the importance of effective public health actions in relation to the prevention and treatment of PTSD and other dysfunctional behaviors resulting from traumatic exposure in young individuals

  16. Shoulder dystocia: guidelines for clinical practice from the French College of Gynecologists and Obstetricians (CNGOF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentilhes, Loïc; Sénat, Marie-Victoire; Boulogne, Anne-Isabelle; Deneux-Tharaux, Catherine; Fuchs, Florent; Legendre, Guillaume; Le Ray, Camille; Lopez, Emmanuel; Schmitz, Thomas; Lejeune-Saada, Véronique

    2016-08-01

    avoid the following actions: excessive traction on the fetal head (Grade C), fundal pressure (Grade C), and inverse rotation of the fetal head (professional consensus). The McRoberts maneuver, with or without suprapubic pressure, is recommended first (Grade C). If it fails and the posterior shoulder is engaged, Wood's maneuver should be performed preferentially; if the posterior shoulder is not engaged, it is preferable to attempt to deliver the posterior arm next (professional consensus). It appears necessary to know at least two maneuvers to perform should the McRoberts maneuver fail (professional consensus). A pediatrician should be immediately informed of SD. The initial clinical examination should check for complications, such as brachial plexus injury or clavicle fracture (professional consensus). If no complications are observed, neonatal monitoring need not be modified (professional consensus). The implementation of practical training with simulation for all care providers in the delivery room is associated with a significant reduction in neonatal (LE3) but not maternal (LE3) injury. SD remains an unpredictable obstetric emergency. All physicians and midwives should know and perform obstetric maneuvers if needed, quickly but calmly. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Instrumental delivery: clinical practice guidelines from the French College of Gynaecologists and Obstetricians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vayssière, Christophe; Beucher, Gael; Dupuis, Olivier; Feraud, Olivia; Simon-Toulza, Caroline; Sentilhes, Loïc; Meunier, Emmanuelle; Parant, Olivier; Schmitz, Thomas; Riethmuller, Didier; Baud, Olivier; Galley-Raulin, Fabienne; Diemunsch, Pierre; Pierre, Fabrice; Schaal, Jean-Patrick; Fournié, Alain; Oury, Jean François

    2011-11-01

    Routine use of a partograph is associated with a reduction in the use of forceps, but is not associated with a reduction in the use of vacuum extraction (Level A). Early artificial rupture of the membranes, associated with oxytocin perfusion, does not reduce the number of operative vaginal deliveries (Level A), but does increase the rate of fetal heart rate abnormalities (Level B). Early correction of lack of progress in dilatation by oxytocin perfusion can reduce the number of operative vaginal deliveries (Level B). The use of low-concentration epidural infusions of bupivacaine potentiated by morphinomimetics reduces the number of operative interventions compared with larger doses (Level A). Placement of an epidural before 3-cm dilatation does not increase the number of operative vaginal deliveries (Level A). Posterior positions of the fetus result in more operative vaginal deliveries (Level B). Manual rotation of the fetus from a posterior position to an anterior position may reduce the number of operative deliveries (Level C). Walking during labour is not associated with a reduction in the number of operative vaginal deliveries (Level A). Continuous support of the parturient by a midwife or partner/family member during labour reduces the number of operative vaginal deliveries (Level A). Under epidural analgesia, delayed pushing (2h after full dilatation) reduces the number of difficult operative vaginal deliveries (Level A). Ultrasound is recommended if there is any clinical doubt about the presentation of the fetus (Level B). The available scientific data are insufficient to contra-indicate attempted midoperative delivery (professional consensus). The duration of the operative intervention is slightly shorter with forceps than with a vacuum extractor (Level C). Nonetheless, the urgency of operative delivery is not a reason to choose one instrument over another (professional consensus). The cup-shaped vacuum extractor seems to be the instrument of choice for

  18. Clinical utility of varenicline for smokers with medical and psychiatric comorbidity

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    Jon O Ebbert

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Jon O Ebbert, Kirk D Wyatt, Ali Zirakzadeh, Michael V Burke, JT HaysMayo Clinic College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USAAbstract: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a costly and deadly disease afflicting an estimated 210 million people and accounting for 5% of all global deaths. Exposure to cigarette smoke is the greatest risk factor for COPD in the developed world. Smoking cessation improves respiratory symptoms and lung function and reduces mortality among patients with COPD. Cigarette smokers with COPD and other co-morbid conditions such as cardiovascular disease and psychiatric illnesses should receive comprehensive tobacco treatment interventions incorporating efficacious pharmacotherapies. Varenicline, an α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor partial agonist, is the newest and most effective drug currently available to promote smoking cessation. In conjunction with behavioral interventions and clinical monitoring for potential side effects, varenicline offers great hope for reducing smoking-attributable death and disability.Keywords: smoking cessation, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, varenicline

  19. American College of Rheumatology/European League against Rheumatism Preliminary Definition of Remission in Rheumatoid Arthritis for Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felson, David T.; Smolen, Josef S.; Wells, George; Zhang, Bin; van Tuyl, Lilian H. D.; Funovits, Julia; Aletaha, Daniel; Allaart, Renée; Bathon, Joan; Bombardieri, Stefano; Brooks, Peter; Brown, Andrew; Matucci-Cerinic, Marco; Choi, Hyon; Combe, Bernard; de Wit, Maarten; Dougados, Maxime; Emery, Paul; Furst, Dan; Gomez-Reino, Juan; Hawker , Gillian; Keystone, Edward; Khanna, Dinesh; Kirwan, John; Kvien, Tore; Landewé, Robert; Listing, Joachim; Michaud, Kaleb; Mola, Emilio Martin; Montie, Pam; Pincus, Ted; Richards, Pam; Siegel, Jeff; Simon, Lee; Sokka, Tuulikki; Strand, Vibeke; Tugwell, Peter; Tyndall, Alan; van der Heijde, Desirée; Verstappen, Suzan; White, Barbara; Wolfe, Fred; Zink, Angela; Boers, Maarten

    2010-01-01

    Background With remission in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) an increasingly attainable goal, there is no widely used definition of remission that is stringent but achievable and could be applied uniformly as an outcome in clinical trials. Methods A committee consisting of members of the American College of Rheumatology, the European League Against Rheumatism and the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology Initiative (OMERACT) met to guide the process and review prespecified analyses from clinical trials of patients with RA. The committee requested a stringent definition (little, if any, active disease) and decided to use core set measures to define remission including at least joint counts and an acute phase reactant. Members were surveyed to select the level of each core set measure consistent with remission. Candidate definitions of remission were tested including those that constituted a number of individual measures in remission (Boolean approach) as well as definitions using disease activity indexes. To select a definition of remission, trial data were analyzed to examine the added contribution of patient reported outcomes and the ability of candidate measures to predict later good x-ray and functional outcomes. Results Survey results for the definition of remission pointed to indexes at published thresholds and to a count of core set measures with each measure scored as 1 or less (e.g. tender and swollen joint counts, CRP and global assessments on 0-10 scale). Analyses suggested the need to include a patient reported measure. Examination of 2 year follow-up data suggested that many candidate definitions performed comparably in terms of predicting later good x-ray and functional outcomes, although DAS28 based measures of remission did not predict good radiographic outcomes as well as did the other candidate definitions. Given these and other considerations, we propose that a patient be defined as in remission based on one of two definitions : 1: When their scores on the

  20. AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS, AMERICAN COLLEGE OF ENDOCRINOLOGY, AND ASSOCIAZIONE MEDICI ENDOCRINOLOGI MEDICAL GUIDELINES FOR CLINICAL PRACTICE FOR THE DIAGNOSIS AND MANAGEMENT OF THYROID NODULES--2016 UPDATE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharib, Hossein; Papini, Enrico; Garber, Jeffrey R; Duick, Daniel S; Harrell, R Mack; Hegedüs, Laszlo; Paschke, Ralf; Valcavi, Roberto; Vitti, Paolo

    2016-05-01

    malignant or suspicious nodules. The present document updates previous guidelines released in 2006 and 2010 by the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE), American College of Endocrinology (ACE) and Associazione Medici Endocrinologi (AME).

  1. Comparability of Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory ratings by staff, significant others and people with acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malec, James F

    2004-06-01

    To determine the internal consistency, reliability and comparability of the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory (MPAI-4) and sub-scales completed by people with acquired brain injury (ABI), family and significant others (SO) and rehabilitation staff. 134 people with ABI consecutively seen for outpatient rehabilitation evaluation. MPAI-4 protocols based on independent ratings by the people with ABI undergoing evaluation, SO and rehabilitation staff were submitted to Rasch Facets analysis to determine the internal consistency of the overall measure and sub-scales (Ability, Adjustment and Participation indices) for each rater group and for a composite measure based on all rater groups. Rater agreement for individual items was also examined. Rasch indicators of internal consistency were entirely within acceptable limits for 3-rater composite full scale and sub-scale measures; these indicators were generally within acceptable limits for measures based on a single rater group. Item agreement was generally acceptable; disagreements suggested various sources of bias for specific rater groups. The MPAI-4 possesses satisfactory internal consistency regardless of rating source. A composite measure based on ratings made independently by people with ABI, SO and staff may serve as a 'gold standard' for research purposes. In the clinical setting, assessment of varying perspectives and biases may not only best represent outcome as evaluated by all parties involved but be essential to developing effective rehabilitation plans.

  2. Anesthesia Practice in Pediatric Radiation Oncology: Mayo Clinic Arizona's Experience 2014-2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurmi, Narjeet; Patel, Perene; Koushik, Sarang; Daniels, Thomas; Kraus, Molly

    2018-02-01

    Understanding the goals of targeted radiation therapy in pediatrics is critical to developing high quality and safe anesthetic plans in this patient population. An ideal anesthetic plan includes allaying anxiety and achieving optimal immobilization, while ensuring rapid and efficient recovery. We conducted a retrospective chart review of children receiving anesthesia for radiation oncology procedures from 1/1/2014 to 7/31/2016. No anesthetics were excluded from the analysis. The electronic anesthesia records were analyzed for perianesthetic complications along with efficiency data. To compare our results to past and current data, we identified relevant medical literature covering a period from 1984-2017. A total of 997 anesthetic procedures were delivered in 58 unique patients. The vast majority of anesthetics were single-agent anesthesia with propofol. The average duration of radiation treatment was 13.24 min. The average duration of anesthesia was 37.81 min, and the average duration to meet discharge criteria in the recovery room was 29.50 min. There were seven instances of perianesthetic complications (0.7%) and no complications noted for the 80 CT simulations. Two of the seven complications occurred in patients receiving total body irradiation. The 5-year survival rate for pediatric cancers has improved greatly in part due to more effective and targeted radiation therapy. Providing an anesthetic with minimal complications is critical for successful daily radiation treatment. The results of our data analysis corroborate other contemporary studies showing minimal risk to patients undergoing radiation therapy under general anesthesia with propofol. Our data reveal that single-agent anesthesia with propofol administered by a dedicated anesthesia team is safe and efficient and should be considered for patients requiring multiple radiation treatments under anesthesia.

  3. Comparative analysis of fracture characteristics of the developing mandible: the Mayo Clinic experience.

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    Siwani, Rizwan; Tombers, Nicole M; Rieck, Kevin L; Cofer, Shelagh A

    2014-07-01

    To review and compare the epidemiology and treatment of mandibular fractures in subgroups of a pediatric population. We conducted a retrospective review of pediatric patients (age, ≤18 years) with mandibular fractures treated at our institution from January 1996 through November 2011. We identified 122 patients (93 [76%] male) with 216 mandibular fractures. The prevalent mechanisms of injury were motor vehicle accidents (n=52 [43%]), sports injuries (n=24 [20%]), and assault (n=13 [11%]). The most common fracture sites were subcondylar, parasymphyseal, angle, and body. Two patients (2%) were treated conservatively by observation only, 67 (55%) underwent maxillomandibular fixation alone, 41 (34%) underwent maxillomandibular fixation with plate fixation, and 7 (5.7%) underwent plate fixation only. The average duration of maxillomandibular fixation was 26 days (range, 7-49 days). Complications occurred in 11 patients (9.0%) over a mean follow-up of 92 days (range, 21-702 days). Fifty patients (41.0%) had comorbid conditions or a history of mental illness at the time of injury, including attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (n=11 [9%]), mental disorders other than attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (n=23 [19%]), and asthma (n=17 [14%]). Twenty-six patients (21%) had a history of substance use, the most common being tobacco (n=18 [15%]), alcohol (n=13 [11%]), and marijuana (n=11 [9%]). Treatment approach and outcomes were affected by age and fracture characteristics. In addition, a marked proportion of this cohort had preexisting mental disorders and history of substance use, which may have implications on treatment approach. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Catheter-based intervention for pulmonary vein stenosis due to fibrosing mediastinitis: The Mayo Clinic experience

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    Shiva P. Ponamgi

    2015-09-01

    Conclusions: We describe the largest reported case series of catheter-based intervention for PV stenosis in FM. Although catheter-based therapy improved hemodynamics, short-term vascular patency, and patient symptoms, the rate of life-threatening complications, restenosis, and mortality associated with these interventions was found to be high. Despite these associated risks, catheter-based intervention is the only palliative option available to improve quality of life in severely symptomatic patients with PV stenosis and FM. Patients with PV stenosis and FM (especially those with bilateral disease have an overall poor prognosis in spite of undergoing these interventions due to the progressive and recalcitrant nature of the disease. This underscores the need for further innovative approaches to manage this disease.

  5. Radiotherapy for malignancy in patients with scleroderma: The Mayo Clinic experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, Douglas G.; Miller, Robert C.; Petersen, Ivy A.; Osborn, Thomas G.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the frequency of acute and chronic adverse effects in patients with scleroderma who receive radiotherapy for treatment of cancer. Methods and Materials: Records were reviewed of 20 patients with scleroderma who received radiotherapy. Acute and chronic toxic effects attributable to radiotherapy were analyzed, and freedom from radiation-related toxicity was calculated. Results: Of the 20 patients, 15 had acute toxic effects, with Grade 3 or higher toxicity for 3 patients. Seven patients had self-limited Grade 1 or 2 radiation dermatitis, and no patient had Grade 3 or higher radiation dermatitis. Thirteen patients had chronic toxic effects, with Grade 3 or higher chronic toxicity for 3 patients. The median estimated time to any grade chronic toxicity was 0.4 years, and the median estimated time to Grade 3 or higher chronic toxicity has not been reached. Conclusions: The results suggest that although some patients with scleroderma treated with radiation experience considerable toxic effects, the occurrence of Grade 3 or higher toxicity may be less than previously anticipated

  6. Multiple sclerosis, brain radiotherapy, and risk of neurotoxicity: The Mayo Clinic experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Robert C.; Lachance, Daniel H.; Lucchinetti, Claudia F.; Keegan, B. Mark; Gavrilova, Ralitza H.; Brown, Paul D.; Weinshenker, Brian G.; Rodriguez, Moses

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was a retrospective assessment of neurotoxicity in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) receiving external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) to the brain. Methods and Materials: We studied 15 consecutively treated patients with MS who received brain EBRT. Neurologic toxicity was assessed with the Common Toxicity Criteria v.3.0. Results: Median follow-up for the 5 living patients was 6.0 years (range, 3.3-27.4 years). No exacerbation of MS occurred in any patient during EBRT. Five patients had Grade 4 neurologic toxicity and 1 had possible Grade 5 toxicity. Kaplan-Meier estimated risk of neurotoxicity greater than Grade 4 at 5 years was 57% (95% confidence interval, 27%-82%). Toxicity occurred at 37.5 to 54.0 Gy at a median of 1.0 year (range, 0.2-4.3 years) after EBRT. Univariate analysis showed an association between opposed-field irradiation of the temporal lobes, central white matter, and brainstem and increased risk of neurotoxicity (p < 0.04). Three of 6 cases of toxicity occurred in patients treated before 1986. Conclusions: External beam radiotherapy of the brain in patients with MS may be associated with an increased risk of neurotoxicity compared with patients without demyelinating illnesses. However, this risk is associated with treatment techniques that may not be comparable to modern, conformal radiotherapy

  7. The U.S. Role in Global Security: The Mayo Clinic, Not the Emergency Room

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hillen, John

    1998-01-01

    While many different proposals have been put forward outlining a post-Cold War security identity for the United States, most do not characterize an American role in terms of either excessive activism...

  8. Stress Induced Cardiomyopathy Triggered by Acute Myocardial Infarction: A Case Series Challenging the Mayo Clinic Definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christodoulidis, Georgios; Kundoor, Vishwa; Kaluski, Edo

    2017-08-28

    BACKGROUND Various physical and emotional factors have been previously described as triggers for stress induced cardiomyopathy. However, acute myocardial infarction as a trigger has never been reported. CASE REPORT We describe four patients who presented with an acute myocardial infarction, in whom the initial echocardiography revealed wall motion abnormalities extending beyond the coronary distribution of the infarct artery. Of the four patients identified, the mean age was 59 years; three patients were women and two patients had underlying psychiatric history. Electrocardiogram revealed ST elevation in the anterior leads in three patients; QTc was prolonged in all cases. All patients had ≤ moderately elevated troponin. Single culprit lesion was found uniformly in the proximal or mid left anterior descending artery. Initial echocardiography revealed severely reduced ejection fraction with relative sparing of the basal segments, whereas early repeat echocardiography revealed significant improvement in the left ventricular function in all patients. CONCLUSIONS This is the first case series demonstrating that acute myocardial infarction can trigger stress induced cardiomyopathy. Extensive reversible wall motion abnormalities, beyond the ones expected from angiography, accompanied by modest elevation in troponin and marked QTc prolongation, suggest superimposed stress induced cardiomyopathy.

  9. The state of the science of whole blood: lessons learned at Mayo Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbs, James R; Zielinski, Martin D; Jenkins, Donald

    2016-04-01

    AABB Standards specify that ABO group-specific whole blood is the only acceptable choice for whole blood transfusions. Although universal donor group O stored whole blood (SWB) was used extensively by the military during the wars of the mid-twentieth century, its use has fallen out of favor and has never been used to great extent in the civilian trauma population. Interest in the use of whole blood has been renewed, particularly in light of its potential value in far-forward military and other austere environments. Evidence of preserved platelet function in SWB has heightened enthusiasm for a "one stop shop" resuscitation product providing volume, oxygen carrying capacity, and hemostatic effects. Experience with universal donor group O SWB is required to ascertain whether its use will be an advance in trauma care. Described here is the process of establishing a universal donor group O SWB at a civilian trauma center in the United States. © 2016 AABB.

  10. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, Radiotherapy, and the Risk of Acute and Chronic Toxicity: The Mayo Clinic Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinn, Melva E.; Gold, Douglas G. M.; Petersen, Ivy A.; Osborn, Thomas G.; Brown, Paul D.; Miller, Robert C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the acute and chronic toxic effects of radiotherapy in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Methods and Materials: Medical records of 21 consecutive patients with SLE, who had received 34 courses of external beam radiotherapy and one low-dose-rate prostate implant, were retrospectively reviewed. Patients with discoid lupus erythematosus were excluded. Results: Median survival was 2.3 years and median follow-up 5.6 years. Eight (42%) of 19 patients evaluable for acute toxicity during radiotherapy experienced acute toxicity of Grade 1 or greater, and 4 (21%) had acute toxicity of Grade 3 or greater. The 5- and 10-year incidence of chronic toxicity of Grade 1 or greater was 45% (95% confidence interval [CI], 22-72%) and 56% (95% CI, 28-81%), respectively. The 5- and 10-year incidence of chronic toxicity of Grade 3 or greater was 28% (95% CI, 18-60%) and 40% (95% CI, 16-72%), respectively. Univariate analysis showed that chronic toxicity of Grade 1 or greater correlated with SLE renal involvement (p < 0.006) and possibly with the presence of five or more American Rheumatism Association criteria (p < 0.053). Chronic toxicity of Grade 3 or greater correlated with an absence of photosensitivity (p < 0.02), absence of arthritis (p < 0.03), and presence of a malar rash (p < 0.04). Conclusions: The risk of acute and chronic toxicity in patients with SLE who received radiotherapy was moderate but was not prohibitive of the use of radiotherapy. Patients with more advanced SLE may be at increased risk for chronic toxicity

  11. Animal-assisted therapy at Mayo Clinic: The time is now.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creagan, Edward T; Bauer, Brent A; Thomley, Barbara S; Borg, Jessica M

    2015-05-01

    The animal-human bond refers to an emotional, almost existential, relationship between animals and people. From the time of antiquity, domestic animals were an important source of economic vitality, but with the changing cultural landscape, the companion animal has become a faithful friend. Overwhelming anecdotal evidence supports the healing power of this relationship. We summarize the emerging literature on the neurobiochemical and cardiovascular benefits of companion pet ownership. We address the peer-reviewed data from myriad journal articles assessing the impact of the companion animal on the quality and often the length of life of select patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Mandated college students' response to sequentially administered alcohol interventions in a randomized clinical trial using stepped care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsari, Brian; Magill, Molly; Mastroleo, Nadine R; Hustad, John T P; Tevyaw, Tracy O'Leary; Barnett, Nancy P; Kahler, Christopher W; Eaton, Erica; Monti, Peter M

    2016-02-01

    Students referred to school administration for alcohol policies violations currently receive a wide variety of interventions. This study examined predictors of response to 2 interventions delivered to mandated college students (N = 598) using a stepped care approach incorporating a peer-delivered 15-min brief advice (BA) session (Step 1) and a 60- to 90-min brief motivational intervention (BMI) delivered by trained interventionists (Step 2). Analyses were completed in 2 stages. First, 3 types of variables (screening variables, alcohol-related cognitions, mandated student profile) were examined in a logistic regression model as putative predictors of lower risk drinking (defined as 3 or fewer heavy episodic drinking [HED] episodes and/or 4 or fewer alcohol-related consequences in the past month) 6 weeks following the BA session. Second, we used generalized estimating equations to examine putative moderators of BMI effects on HED and peak blood alcohol content compared with assessment only (AO) control over the 3-, 6-, and 9-month follow-ups. Participants reporting lower scores on the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test, more benefits to changing alcohol use, and those who fit the "Bad Incident" profile at baseline were more likely to report lower risk drinking 6 weeks after the BA session. Moderation analyses revealed that Bad Incident students who received the BMI reported more HED at 9-month follow-up than those who received AO. Current alcohol use as well as personal reaction to the referral event may have clinical utility in identifying which mandated students benefit from treatments of varying content and intensity. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. A CLINICAL STUDY OF 100 CASES OF ACUTE OLEANDER SEED POISONING IN KANYAKUMARI GOVERNMENT MEDICAL COLLEGE HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sankar Selvaraj

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Yellow oleander (Cascabela thevetia is a poisonous plant that is widely found in India. All parts of the C. thevetia plant are toxic to humans as they contain cardiac glycosides. MATERIALS AND METHODS 100 patients with alleged history of yellow oleander seed poisoning who came to Kanyakumari Government Medical College Hospital during the period of 2013-16 were enrolled in this study. Patients presenting with multiple poison consumption and those with previous history of heart disease were excluded from the study. A detailed history of the number of seeds consumed, the time of consumption, detailed clinical assessment, routine blood investigations and a 12-lead ECG were recorded. ECG was recorded at the time of admission and every 12th hourly to detect any cardiac arrhythmias. RESULTS Most symptomatic patients had conduction defects affecting the SA node, the AV node or both. Patients showing cardiac arrhythmias had significantly higher mean serum potassium concentrations ranging from 4.5-5.2 mEq/L. Yellow oleander seed poisoning is common among young females (56%. There is a poor correlation between the number of seeds ingested and the severity of cardiotoxicity. Arrhythmias has occurred after ingestion of one or two seeds; some patients are asymptomatic even after consuming five or more seeds without requiring specialised treatments. This could be explained on the basis that crushed seeds are more dangerous than whole seeds. CONCLUSION Most of these young previously healthy patients had conduction defects affecting the SA or AV nodes. Relatively, few had the atrial tachyarrhythmias or ventricular ectopic beats that are typical of digoxin poisoning. Yellow oleander induced arrhythmias were associated with high serum potassium levels when compared to patient without arrhythmias.

  14. Noninvasive Treatments for Acute, Subacute, and Chronic Low Back Pain: A Clinical Practice Guideline From the American College of Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qaseem, Amir; Wilt, Timothy J; McLean, Robert M; Forciea, Mary Ann

    2017-04-04

    The American College of Physicians (ACP) developed this guideline to present the evidence and provide clinical recommendations on noninvasive treatment of low back pain. Using the ACP grading system, the committee based these recommendations on a systematic review of randomized, controlled trials and systematic reviews published through April 2015 on noninvasive pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatments for low back pain. Updated searches were performed through November 2016. Clinical outcomes evaluated included reduction or elimination of low back pain, improvement in back-specific and overall function, improvement in health-related quality of life, reduction in work disability and return to work, global improvement, number of back pain episodes or time between episodes, patient satisfaction, and adverse effects. The target audience for this guideline includes all clinicians, and the target patient population includes adults with acute, subacute, or chronic low back pain. Given that most patients with acute or subacute low back pain improve over time regardless of treatment, clinicians and patients should select nonpharmacologic treatment with superficial heat (moderate-quality evidence), massage, acupuncture, or spinal manipulation (low-quality evidence). If pharmacologic treatment is desired, clinicians and patients should select nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or skeletal muscle relaxants (moderate-quality evidence). (Grade: strong recommendation). For patients with chronic low back pain, clinicians and patients should initially select nonpharmacologic treatment with exercise, multidisciplinary rehabilitation, acupuncture, mindfulness-based stress reduction (moderate-quality evidence), tai chi, yoga, motor control exercise, progressive relaxation, electromyography biofeedback, low-level laser therapy, operant therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, or spinal manipulation (low-quality evidence). (Grade: strong recommendation). In patients with chronic

  15. Salida de campo a Etang de Fournelet (Francia) el 1 de mayo de 1954

    OpenAIRE

    Valverde Gómez, José Antonio, 1926-2003

    2008-01-01

    Salida de campo a Etang de Fournelet, seguramente cerca a la reserva natural de La Camarga, en el delta del río Ródano (Provenza), el 1 de mayo de 1954, de la que se anotaron observaciones sobre las siguientes aves: Actitis hypoleucos (Andarríos chico, llamado Actynioides hypoleucus por el autor), Circus aeruginosus (Aguilucho lagunero occidental), Himantopus himantopus (Cigüeñuela común), Motacilla flava (Lavandera boyera), Saxicola rubetra (Tarabilla norteña), Sylvia conspicillata (Curruca ...

  16. Antimycobacterial activity of medicinal plants used by the Mayo people of Sonora, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronado-Aceves, Enrique Wenceslao; Sánchez-Escalante, José Jesús; López-Cervantes, Jaime; Robles-Zepeda, Ramón Enrique; Velázquez, Carlos; Sánchez-Machado, Dalia Isabel; Garibay-Escobar, Adriana

    2016-08-22

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious disease mainly caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), which generates 9 million new cases worldwide each year. The Mayo ethnicity of southern Sonora, Mexico is more than 2000 years old, and the Mayos possess extensive knowledge of traditional medicine. To evaluate the antimycobacterial activity levels of extracts of medicinal plants used by the Mayos against Mtb and Mycobacterium smegmatis (Msm) in the treatment of TB, respiratory diseases and related symptoms. A total of 34 plant species were collected, and 191 extracts were created with n-hexane, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate (EtOAc), methanol and water. Their minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) were determined against Mtb H37Rv using the microplate alamar blue assay (MABA) and against Msm using the resazurin microplate assay (REMA) at 6 and 2 days of exposure, respectively, and at concentrations of 250-1.9µg/mL (n-hexane extracts) and 1000-7.81µg/mL (extracts obtained with dichloromethane, EtOAc, methanol and water). Rhynchosia precatoria (Willd.) DC. (n-hexane root extract), Euphorbia albomarginata Torr. and A. Gray. (EtOAc shoot extract) and Helianthus annuus L. (n-hexane stem extract) were the most active plants against Mtb H37Rv, with MICs of 15.6, 250, 250µg/mL and MBCs of 31.25, 250, 250µg/mL, respectively. R. precatoria (root) was the only active plant against Msm, with MIC and MBC values of ≥250µg/mL. None of the aqueous extracts were active. This study validates the medicinal use of certain plants used by the Mayo people in the treatment of TB and related symptoms. R. precatoria, E. albomarginata and H. annuus are promising plant sources of active compounds that act against Mtb H37Rv. To our knowledge, this is the first time that their antimycobacterial activity has been reported. Crude extracts obtained with n-hexane, EtOAc and dichloromethane were the most active against Mtb H37Rv. Copyright © 2016

  17. 8 de Mayo ... día internacional de la mujer

    OpenAIRE

    Gutiérrez González, Acela Elena

    1987-01-01

    Al movimiento feminista lo podemos dividir en dos etapas. La primera corresponde a su lucha por la igualdad de derechos civiles que concluye en los países europeos y Norteamérica con la finalización de la segunda guerra mundial. La segunda etapa es política. En Latinoamérica surge con el nacimiento de la revolución cubana. En los países europeos, como consecuencia de la Primavera de Praga, el Mayo Francés y la oposición de los jóvenes norteamericanos a intervenir militarmente en la autodeterm...

  18. [Genital herpes and pregnancy: Epidemiology, clinical manifestations, prevention and screening. Guidelines for clinical practice from the French College of Gynecologists and Obstetrician (CNGOF)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picone, O

    2017-12-01

    To analyze the consequences of genital herpes infections in pregnant women. The PubMed database and the recommendations from the French and foreign obstetrical societies or colleges have been consulted. The symptomatology of herpes genital rash is often atypical (NP2) and not different during pregnancy (Professional consensus). It is most often due to HSV2 (NP2). Seventy percent of pregnant patients have a history of infection with Herpes simplex virus, without reference to genital or labial localization, and this is in most cases type 1 (NP2). The prevalence of clinical herpes lesions at birth in the event of recurrence is about 16% compared with 36% in the case of initial infection (NP4). In HSV+ patients, asymptomatic herpetic excretion is 4 to 10%. The rate of excretion increases in HIV+ patients (20 to 30%) (NP2). The risk of HSV seroconversion during pregnancy is 1 to 5% (NP2), but can reach 20% in case of sero-discordant couple (NP2). Questioning is not always sufficient to determine the history of herpes infection of a patient and her partner (NP2) and the clinical examination is not always reliable (NP2). Herpetic hepatitis and encephalitis are rare and potentially severe (NP4). These diagnoses should be discussed during pregnancy and antiviral therapy should be started as soon as possible (Professional consensus). There is no established link between herpes infection and miscarriages (NP3). There appears to be an association between untreated herpes infection and premature delivery (NP3) but not in the case of treated infections (NP4). Herpetic fetopathies are exceptional (NP4). There is no argument for recommending specific prenatal diagnosis for herpes infection during pregnancy (Professional consensus). Condom use reduces the risk of initial infection in women who are not pregnant (NP3). There is no evidence to justify routine screening during pregnancy (Professional consensus). There is a strong discrepancy between the prevalence of herpetic excretion

  19. Campus-Based, Community-Based, and Philanthropic Contributions to Predoctoral Pediatric Dental Clinical Education: Two Years of Experiences at One Dental College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiritoso, Stephen; Gross, Erin; Bean, Canise Y; Casamassimo, Paul S; Levings, Kevin; Lloyd, Patrick

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the contribution of a tiered predoctoral pediatric dentistry clinical education model to competency achievement by dental students over a two-year clinical education. Retrospective data were obtained for academic years 2012-13 and 2013-14 from three sources: a campus-based, dental school-housed clinic; division-directed clinics in community-based pediatric and special needs clinics (DDC); and clinics affiliated with the dental college's community-based dental education (CBDE) program, the OHIO Project (OP). A fourth dataset was obtained for the same two-year period from a biannual clinic event held at the college in conjunction with Give Kids a Smile Day (GKAS). Procedures considered essential to the care of children were sorted by 12 dental codes from all services for patients 18 years of age and younger. The dental school clinic provided 11,060 procedures; the DDC, 28,462; the OP, 17,863; and GKAS, 2,028. The two-year total was 59,433 procedures. Numbers of diagnostic and preventive procedures were 19,441, restorative procedures were 13,958, and pulp and surgical procedures were 7,392. Site contribution ranged from 52.2 to 144.9 procedures per attending student, with the DDC yielding the highest per student average for each year (126.4 and 144.9) and the dental school clinic the lowest (52.2 and 53.1). This study found that a combination of school-based, community-based, and philanthropic pediatric dental experiences offered a large number of essential pediatric dentistry experiences for predoctoral dental students, with CBDE opportunities offering the largest contribution.

  20. Smoking trends amongst young doctors of a tertiary care hospital - Mayo Hospital, Lahore - Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chudhary, M.K.; Younis, M.; Bukhari, M.H.

    2011-01-01

    The World Health Organization cites tobacco use as one of the biggest public health threats the world has ever faced. Tobacco is the number one preventable cause of disability and death. Tobacco has many negative health effects which many of the smokers know them well. In Pakistan tobacco use is common in general public and the health professionals don't lack behind this habit. To study the smoking trends amongst young doctors of Mayo Hospital. Questionnaire based descriptive study. This study was conducted at the Institute of Chest Medicine, Mayo Hospital - A tertiary care hospital affiliated with King Edward Medical University, Lahore. Out of 250 doctors, 180 (72%) were males and 70 (28%) were female. Amongst 180 male doctors 97 (53.88%) were smokers and 83 (46.21%) were non smokers. Amongst 70 female doctors 8 (11.43%) were smokers and 62 (88.57%) were non smokers. Smoking is common among male young doctors but it is less common in female doctors. (author)

  1. AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS AND AMERICAN COLLEGE OF ENDOCRINOLOGY 2018 POSITION STATEMENT ON INTEGRATION OF INSULIN PUMPS AND CONTINUOUS GLUCOSE MONITORING IN PATIENTS WITH DIABETES MELLITUS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunberger, George; Handelsman, Yehuda; Bloomgarden, Zachary T; Fonseca, Vivian A; Garber, Alan J; Haas, Richard A; Roberts, Victor L; Umpierrez, Guillermo E

    2018-03-01

    This document represents the official position of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists and American College of Endocrinology. Where there are no randomized controlled trials or specific U.S. FDA labeling for issues in clinical practice, the participating clinical experts utilized their judgment and experience. Every effort was made to achieve consensus among the committee members. Position statements are meant to provide guidance, but they are not to be considered prescriptive for any individual patient and cannot replace the judgment of a clinician. AACE/ACE Task Force on Integration of Insulin Pumps and Continuous Glucose Monitoring in the Management of Patients With Diabetes Mellitus Chair George Grunberger, MD, FACP, FACE Task Force Members Yehuda Handelsman, MD, FACP, FNLA, MACE Zachary T. Bloomgarden, MD, MACE Vivian A. Fonseca, MD, FACE Alan J. Garber, MD, PhD, FACE Richard A. Haas, MD, FACE Victor L. Roberts, MD, MBA, FACP, FACE Guillermo E. Umpierrez, MD, CDE, FACP, FACE Abbreviations: AACE = American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists ACE = American College of Endocrinology A1C = glycated hemoglobin BGM = blood glucose monitoring CGM = continuous glucose monitoring CSII = continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion DM = diabetes mellitus FDA = Food & Drug Administration MDI = multiple daily injections T1DM = type 1 diabetes mellitus T2DM = type 2 diabetes mellitus SAP = sensor-augmented pump SMBG = self-monitoring of blood glucose STAR 3 = Sensor-Augmented Pump Therapy for A1C Reduction phase 3 trial.

  2. Brief Screening and Intervention for Alcohol and Drug Use in a College Student Health Clinic: Feasibility, Implementation, and Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaro, Hortensia; Reed, Elizabeth; Rowe, Erin; Picci, Jennifer; Mantella, Philomena; Prado, Guillermo

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Evaluation of the Brief Alcohol Screen and Intervention in College Students (BASICS) in a university primary care setting. Participants/Methods: Undergraduates (N = 449) participated in BASICS and electronic surveys assessing frequency/quantity of alcohol and drug use, psychosocial and mental health outcomes, and demographic…

  3. A model (CMBP) for collaboration between university college and nursing practice to promote research utilization in students' clinical placements: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsborg Foss, Jette; Kvigne, Kari; Wilde Larsson, Bodil; Athlin, Elsy

    2014-08-01

    A collaborative project was initiated in Norway between a university college and a hospital in order to improve RNs' and nursing students' research utilization in clinical placements. This paper describes the model (CMBP) that was developed, its first application, and evaluation. The evaluation aimed at describing nurses' and students' experiences of the CMBP related to collaboration, facilitation, learning, and impact on nursing care. Thirty-eight students from the second and third year of nursing education, and four nurses answered questionnaires with closed and open ended questions. In addition two of the nurses wrote diaries. Data were subjected to qualitative and quantitative analysis. Almost all participants reported that collaboration between nursing college and nursing practice had been beneficial. Most students and all nurses reported about valuable learning, increased understanding of research utilization, and improved quality of nursing care. Both students and RNs recommended the CMBP to be used in all clinical placements to support academic learning and increase research utilization in clinical practice. Despite study limitations the findings indicate that the CMBP has a potential to be a useful model for teaching RNs' and students EBP. However, further refinement of the model is needed, followed by a more comprehensive implementation and evaluation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Supplemental Colleges

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The Supplemental Colleges layer attempts to capture additional Post Secondary Education campuses of colleges and universities associated with a single campus listed...

  5. Mary as Mother in the Flores de Mayo in Poblacion, Oslob

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Marion Y. Lopez

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper reflects on the meanings of the Flores de Mayo ritual as performed in a town on the southeastern coast of Cebu through the examination of Mary as a “semantically open” symbol. The essay illustrates how ideas about Mary are constructed through the discourse of the Church and are in turn, reinforced through a Church-instituted and regulated ritual. An analysis of selected elements of the ritual however, reveals that the symbol of Mary has the potential to hold “other” kinds of meanings that slip in between “official” and “unofficial” discourses, highlighting how Mary continues to be a negotiated field between church authorities and the popular faithful.

  6. ADIPOSITY-BASED CHRONIC DISEASE AS A NEW DIAGNOSTIC TERM: THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS AND AMERICAN COLLEGE OF ENDOCRINOLOGY POSITION STATEMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechanick, Jeffrey I; Hurley, Daniel L; Garvey, W Timothy

    2017-03-01

    The American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) and American College of Endocrinology (ACE) have created a chronic care model, advanced diagnostic framework, clinical practice guidelines, and clinical practice algorithm for the comprehensive management of obesity. This coordinated effort is not solely based on body mass index as in previous models, but emphasizes a complications-centric approach that primarily determines therapeutic decisions and desired outcomes. Adiposity-Based Chronic Disease (ABCD) is a new diagnostic term for obesity that explicitly identifies a chronic disease, alludes to a precise pathophysiologic basis, and avoids the stigmata and confusion related to the differential use and multiple meanings of the term "obesity." Key elements to further the care of patients using this new ABCD term are: (1) positioning lifestyle medicine in the promotion of overall health, not only as the first algorithmic step, but as the central, pervasive action; (2) standardizing protocols that comprehensively and durably address weight loss and management of adiposity-based complications; (3) approaching patient care through contextualization (e.g., primordial prevention to decrease obesogenic environmental risk factors and transculturalization to adapt evidence-based recommendations for different ethnicities, cultures, and socio-economics); and lastly, (4) developing evidence-based strategies for successful implementation, monitoring, and optimization of patient care over time. This AACE/ACE blueprint extends current work and aspires to meaningfully improve both individual and population health by presenting a new ABCD term for medical diagnostic purposes, use in a complications-centric management and staging strategy, and precise reference to the obesity chronic disease state, divested from counterproductive stigmata and ambiguities found in the general public sphere. AACE = American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists ABCD = Adiposity

  7. Major clinical events, signs and severity assessment scores related to actual survival in patients who died from primary biliary cirrhosis. A long-term historical cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dam, GM; Gips, CH; Reisman, Y; Maas, KW; Purmer, IM; Huizenga, [No Value; Verbaan, BW

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: One of the prognostic methods for survival in primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is the Mayo model, with a time-scale limited to 7 years. The aim of our study was to assess how major clinical events, signs, several severity assessment methods and Mayo survival probabilities fit in with

  8. Laboratory compliance with the American Society of Clinical Oncology/college of American Pathologists guidelines for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 testing: a College of American Pathologists survey of 757 laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakhleh, Raouf E; Grimm, Erin E; Idowu, Michael O; Souers, Rhona J; Fitzgibbons, Patrick L

    2010-05-01

    To ensure quality human epidermal growth receptor 2 (HER2) testing in breast cancer, the American Society of Clinical Oncology/College of American Pathologists guidelines were introduced with expected compliance by 2008. To assess the effect these guidelines have had on pathology laboratories and their ability to address key components. In late 2008, a survey was distributed with the HER2 immunohistochemistry (IHC) proficiency testing program. It included questions regarding pathology practice characteristics and assay validation using fluorescence in situ hybridization or another IHC laboratory assay and assessed pathologist HER2 scoring competency. Of the 907 surveys sent, 757 (83.5%) were returned. The median laboratory accessioned 15 000 cases and performed 190 HER2 tests annually. Quantitative computer image analysis was used by 33% of laboratories. In-house fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed in 23% of laboratories, and 60% of laboratories addressed the 6- to 48-hour tissue fixation requirement by embedding tissue on the weekend. HER2 testing was performed on the initial biopsy in 40%, on the resection specimen in 6%, and on either in 56% of laboratories. Testing was validated with only fluorescence in situ hybridization in 47% of laboratories, whereas 10% of laboratories used another IHC assay only; 13% used both assays, and 12% and 15% of laboratories had not validated their assays or chose "not applicable" on the survey question, respectively. The 90% concordance rate with fluorescence in situ hybridization results was achieved by 88% of laboratories for IHC-negative findings and by 81% of laboratories for IHC-positive cases. The 90% concordance rate for laboratories using another IHC assay was achieved by 80% for negative findings and 75% for positive cases. About 91% of laboratories had a pathologist competency assessment program. This survey demonstrates the extent and characteristics of HER2 testing. Although some American Society of

  9. The US Supreme Court in Mayo v. Prometheus - Taking the fire from or to biotechnology and personalized medicine?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minssen, Timo; Nilsson, David

    2012-01-01

    On 20 March 2012, the US Supreme Court handed down its much awaited patent eligibility- ruling in the dispute between Prometheus Laboratories Inc (“Prometheus”), acting as plaintiffs, and Mayo Medical Laboratories (“Mayo”), as alleged infringers of Prometheus’ licensed patents. This case review w...

  10. Factors affecting acquisition of psychomotor clinical skills by student nurses and midwives in CHAM Nursing Colleges in Malawi: A qualitative exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwale, Omero Gonekani; Kalawa, Roselyn

    2016-01-01

    Acquisition of psychomotor clinical skills has been shown to improve the quality of care provided to patients when care providers are competent. The aim of this study was to explore students, nurses and tutors experience on factors affecting acquisition of psychomotor clinical skills. The study employed an exploratory qualitative research design. The population was students, clinical nurses and tutors from a nursing College and mission hospital in the southern region of Malawi. In depth interviews using a semi structured guide was used to collect data. Thematic analysis method was employed to analyze the collected data. Ethical principles of respect of human dignity, beneficence and justice were observed. The findings have shown that acquisition of psychomotor skills is affected by: student motivation, lack of resources, learning environment, knowledge gap between the qualified nurses and tutors, and role modeling. In principle when student nurses have acquired necessary skills the quality of care provided to patients improve. Basing on the findings of this study it is recommended that Student should be well prepared before clinical placement Nurses and tutors should also update their knowledge and clinical teaching skills for them to adequately guide students. The clinical arena should have adequate resources.

  11. Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists clinical practice guidelines for the treatment of schizophrenia and related disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists is co-ordinating the development of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) in psychiatry, funded under the National Mental Health Strategy (Australia) and the New Zealand Health Funding Authority. This paper presents CPGs for schizophrenia and related disorders. Over the past decade schizophrenia has become more treatable than ever before. A new generation of drug therapies, a renaissance of psychological and psychosocial interventions and a first generation of reform within the specialist mental health system have combined to create an evidence-based climate of realistic optimism. Progressive neuroscientific advances hold out the strong possibility of more definitive biological treatments in the near future. However, this improved potential for better outcomes and quality of life for people with schizophrenia has not been translated into reality in Australia. The efficacy-effectiveness gap is wider for schizophrenia than any other serious medical disorder. Therapeutic nihilism, under-resourcing of services and a stalling of the service reform process, poor morale within specialist mental health services, a lack of broad-based recovery and life support programs, and a climate of tenacious stigma and consequent lack of concern for people with schizophrenia are the contributory causes for this failure to effectively treat. These guidelines therefore tackle only one element in the endeavour to reduce the impact of schizophrenia. They distil the current evidence-base and make recommendations based on the best available knowledge. A comprehensive literature review (1990-2003) was conducted, including all Cochrane schizophrenia reviews and all relevant meta-analyses, and a number of recent international clinical practice guidelines were consulted. A series of drafts were refined by the expert committee and enhanced through a bi-national consultation process. This guideline provides evidence-based recommendations

  12. The clinical application of genome-wide sequencing for monogenic diseases in Canada: Position Statement of the Canadian College of Medical Geneticists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boycott, Kym; Hartley, Taila; Adam, Shelin; Bernier, Francois; Chong, Karen; Fernandez, Bridget A; Friedman, Jan M; Geraghty, Michael T; Hume, Stacey; Knoppers, Bartha M; Laberge, Anne-Marie; Majewski, Jacek; Mendoza-Londono, Roberto; Meyn, M Stephen; Michaud, Jacques L; Nelson, Tanya N; Richer, Julie; Sadikovic, Bekim; Skidmore, David L; Stockley, Tracy; Taylor, Sherry; van Karnebeek, Clara; Zawati, Ma'n H; Lauzon, Julie; Armour, Christine M

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this Position Statement is to provide recommendations for Canadian medical geneticists, clinical laboratory geneticists, genetic counsellors and other physicians regarding the use of genome-wide sequencing of germline DNA in the context of clinical genetic diagnosis. This statement has been developed to facilitate the clinical translation and development of best practices for clinical genome-wide sequencing for genetic diagnosis of monogenic diseases in Canada; it does not address the clinical application of this technology in other fields such as molecular investigation of cancer or for population screening of healthy individuals. Two multidisciplinary groups consisting of medical geneticists, clinical laboratory geneticists, genetic counsellors, ethicists, lawyers and genetic researchers were assembled to review existing literature and guidelines on genome-wide sequencing for clinical genetic diagnosis in the context of monogenic diseases, and to make recommendations relevant to the Canadian context. The statement was circulated for comment to the Canadian College of Medical Geneticists (CCMG) membership-at-large and, following incorporation of feedback, approved by the CCMG Board of Directors. The CCMG is a Canadian organisation responsible for certifying medical geneticists and clinical laboratory geneticists, and for establishing professional and ethical standards for clinical genetics services in Canada. Recommendations include (1) clinical genome-wide sequencing is an appropriate approach in the diagnostic assessment of a patient for whom there is suspicion of a significant monogenic disease that is associated with a high degree of genetic heterogeneity, or where specific genetic tests have failed to provide a diagnosis; (2) until the benefits of reporting incidental findings are established, we do not endorse the intentional clinical analysis of disease-associated genes other than those linked to the primary indication; and (3) clinicians should

  13. The clinical application of genome-wide sequencing for monogenic diseases in Canada: Position Statement of the Canadian College of Medical Geneticists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boycott, Kym; Hartley, Taila; Adam, Shelin; Bernier, Francois; Chong, Karen; Fernandez, Bridget A; Friedman, Jan M; Geraghty, Michael T; Hume, Stacey; Knoppers, Bartha M; Laberge, Anne-Marie; Majewski, Jacek; Mendoza-Londono, Roberto; Meyn, M Stephen; Michaud, Jacques L; Nelson, Tanya N; Richer, Julie; Sadikovic, Bekim; Skidmore, David L; Stockley, Tracy; Taylor, Sherry; van Karnebeek, Clara; Zawati, Ma'n H; Lauzon, Julie; Armour, Christine M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose and scope The aim of this Position Statement is to provide recommendations for Canadian medical geneticists, clinical laboratory geneticists, genetic counsellors and other physicians regarding the use of genome-wide sequencing of germline DNA in the context of clinical genetic diagnosis. This statement has been developed to facilitate the clinical translation and development of best practices for clinical genome-wide sequencing for genetic diagnosis of monogenic diseases in Canada; it does not address the clinical application of this technology in other fields such as molecular investigation of cancer or for population screening of healthy individuals. Methods of statement development Two multidisciplinary groups consisting of medical geneticists, clinical laboratory geneticists, genetic counsellors, ethicists, lawyers and genetic researchers were assembled to review existing literature and guidelines on genome-wide sequencing for clinical genetic diagnosis in the context of monogenic diseases, and to make recommendations relevant to the Canadian context. The statement was circulated for comment to the Canadian College of Medical Geneticists (CCMG) membership-at-large and, following incorporation of feedback, approved by the CCMG Board of Directors. The CCMG is a Canadian organisation responsible for certifying medical geneticists and clinical laboratory geneticists, and for establishing professional and ethical standards for clinical genetics services in Canada. Results and conclusions Recommendations include (1) clinical genome-wide sequencing is an appropriate approach in the diagnostic assessment of a patient for whom there is suspicion of a significant monogenic disease that is associated with a high degree of genetic heterogeneity, or where specific genetic tests have failed to provide a diagnosis; (2) until the benefits of reporting incidental findings are established, we do not endorse the intentional clinical analysis of disease-associated genes

  14. Clinical reliability and validity of elbow functional assessment in rheumatoid arthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, Y.A. de; Ende, C.H.M. van den; Eygendaal, D.; Jolie, I.M.M.; Hazes, J.M.W.; Rozing, P.M.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: (1) To investigate the measurement characteristics of the Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) and Mayo Clinic elbow assessment instruments, utilizing methodological criteria including feasibility, reliability, validity, and discriminative ability; and (2) to develop an efficient and

  15. Defining natural history: assessment of the ability of college students to aid in characterizing clinical progression of Niemann-Pick disease, type C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Shin

    Full Text Available Niemann-Pick Disease, type C (NPC is a fatal, neurodegenerative, lysosomal storage disorder. It is a rare disease with broad phenotypic spectrum and variable age of onset. These issues make it difficult to develop a universally accepted clinical outcome measure to assess urgently needed therapies. To this end, clinical investigators have defined emerging, disease severity scales. The average time from initial symptom to diagnosis is approximately 4 years. Further, some patients may not travel to specialized clinical centers even after diagnosis. We were therefore interested in investigating whether appropriately trained, community-based assessment of patient records could assist in defining disease progression using clinical severity scores. In this study we evolved a secure, step wise process to show that pre-existing medical records may be correctly assessed by non-clinical practitioners trained to quantify disease progression. Sixty-four undergraduate students at the University of Notre Dame were expertly trained in clinical disease assessment and recognition of major and minor symptoms of NPC. Seven clinical records, randomly selected from a total of thirty seven used to establish a leading clinical severity scale, were correctly assessed to show expected characteristics of linear disease progression. Student assessment of two new records donated by NPC families to our study also revealed linear progression of disease, but both showed accelerated disease progression, relative to the current severity scale, especially at the later stages. Together, these data suggest that college students may be trained in assessment of patient records, and thus provide insight into the natural history of a disease.

  16. Tumors and tumor - like lesions of the oro - facial region at Mayo hospital, Lahore - a five year study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riaz, N.; Warriach, R.A.

    2011-01-01

    The oro-facial region including the oral cavity, the maxilla and mandible and related tissues can be the site of a multitude of neoplastic conditions. These tumours have a predilection for the entire facial region; however, odontogenic tumours tend to affect the mandible more than the maxilla. We report results from a retrospective study spanning five years on the frequency, clinical presentation, sites and character of orofacial tumors seen in the main referral hospital of Pakistan. Patients and Methods: Records of consecutive patients of all age and sex seen by the author's team at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Mayo Hospital with tumours affecting the oro-facial region from January 2005 to December 2009 were retrieved, coded and entered into a database. The data were then analyzed by age, sex, presenting signs and symptoms, site of lesion, and their histology. Results: A total of 237 patients with oro-facial swellings were retrieved from the registry. The complete data set was obtained for 189 patients, comprising 108 (57.9%) males and 81 (42%) females. The most common clinical presenting features were mandibular facial swelling (63%), intra-oral swelling (55%), and ulceration (29%). The tumors were found in the mandible 67 (35%), buccal mucosa 33 (17%), floor of the mouth 22 (11%) and tongue 29 (15%). The remainder making up almost 20% was found in the palate, submandibular region, pre auricular region and lips. Ninety three (49.2%) of the patients presented with lesions that were classified as malignant of which 64 (69%) were diagnosed as squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). seventy (37.0%) had benign odontogenic tumors and twenty six (13.7%) had non-odontogenic tumor - like lesions. Sixty - four (69%) of malignant tumors were squamous cell carcinoma; sixty four (86.4%) of the benign odontogenic tumors were classified as ameloblastoma. The mean age at presentation of all lesions was 40.4 years with over 50% of benign lesions in patients aged

  17. Morbidity and mortality pattern of hospitalized children with measles at mayo hospital, lahore (epidemic 2013)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Javed, T.; Bibi, A.

    2014-01-01

    Major outbreak of measles took place in Punjab recently (2013), leading on to increase in hospitalized cases of measles in children wards, with unacceptably high morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to find out morbidity and mortality pattern of hospitalized cases of measles and associated factors. Design: Prospective case series conducted at Pediatric Department Mayo Hospital, Lahore for 7 months, i.e. from 1st Jan to 31st Jul 2013 Methods:A total of 628 cases of measles were admitted in the children ward, Unit II, Mayo Hospital, Lahore from Jan-Jul 2013. The diagnosis was assigned using WHO criteria. Cases were admitted through emergency on 24 hour basis and managed in HDU and Measles isolation section. Chest X-Ray and blood complete examination was done in all cases. Complications were noted and managed along with eye consultations where necessary. Data was recorded in a predesigned proforma and entered in computer. Results: 628 admitted cases were enrolled, with comparable sex distribution, having mean age 30.8+-26.25 months and mean weight 9.69+-4.14 Kg. Eighty three percent cases were below 6 years of age (33% <1 year), 71% cases were under weight and 68% were wasted (WHO classification). Sixty six percent cases had not received measles vaccination, 144 (23%) cases had received a single dose and 71 cases (12.2%) had received two doses before admission. Majority of cases belonged to Lahore city and its peri-urban areas (83%). Pneumonia (80%), diarrhea (37%), and encephalitis (7.7%) were common complications. Eye complications (corneal ulcers, keratitis, perforation and blindness) were seen in 7.3% cases. Being under weight, H/O improper measles immunization, presence of anemia, pneumonia and encephalitis were statistically significant risk factors for mortality. The case fatality rate was 8.76%. Conclusion:Recent Measles outbreak further highlights the importance of strengthening the need for routine and mass vaccination for all children. In a

  18. Relationship Between Academic Performance and Student Self-Assessment of Clinical Performance in the College of Podiatric Medicine and Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoho, Robert M; Vardaxis, Vassilios; Millonig, Kelsey

    2016-05-01

    Student self-assessment is viewed as an important tool in medical education. We sought to identify the relationship between student academic performance and third-year clinical performance self-assessment. No such study exists in podiatric medical education. Third-year podiatric medical students from the classes of 2012 through 2014 completed a self-assessment of their performance for each of five broad clinical podiatric medical domains (Professionalism, Medicine, Radiology, Surgery, and Biomechanics/Orthopedics). The assessment was completed after students finished the first 12 weeks of their third-year clinical rotations (PRE) and a second time at the conclusion of the third year (POST). The mean self-assessment score for PRE and POST surveys for all combined domains was determined for each student. This mean was compared with the student's 3-year cumulative grade point average (GPA). Students' clinical experiences for the year were essentially identical. No statistically significant correlation was identified between cumulative GPA and the PRE and POST clinical self-assessments or with the change between PRE and POST assessments based on the Pearson correlation test for each class separately or on the pooled data. Published studies in allopathic medical education have shown that students with lower GPAs tend to rate their clinical performance higher in initial clinical performance self-assessment. Our results show that student academic performance was not correlated with clinical performance self-assessment. These findings may be due to the explicit description of successful clinical competency completion, the orientation students receive before the start of clinical training, and the continuous feedback received from clinical preceptors.

  19. Environmental iodine intake and pattern of thyroid diseases: experience at nuclear medicine centre, Mayo Hospital (abstract)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elahi, S.; Khan, M.; Rasool, S.; Khalid, A.; Tasneem, A.

    2011-01-01

    To know level of iodine intake in women residing in Lahore and correlate it with pattern of thyroid diseases found in women referred to Centre for Nuclear Medicine (CENUM), Mayo Hospital. Iodine intake status was determined by urinary iodine (UI) excretion by Sandell-Kolthoff reaction. Thyroid related hormones (FT4, FT3 and TSH) were measured by radioimmunoassay. In 110 non-pregnant euthyroid women (age 20-36 year) average iodine intake was 66.3 +- 14.4 mu g/L (range: 30-98 mu g/dL). All women were iodine deficient (UI 22.0 pmol/L and TSH greater or equal to 0.1mIU/L) was detected in 580(10.8%) women and hypothyroidism (FT4 0.4mIU/L) was found in 271(5.1%) women. Thus incidence of hyperthyroidism was almost double than that of hypothyroidism. Low iodine intake is manifested as increased incidence of hyperthyroidism. (author)

  20. Mapping the Mayo-Portland adaptability inventory to the international classification of functioning, disability and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lexell, Jan; Malec, James F; Jacobsson, Lars J

    2012-01-01

    To examine the contents of the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory (MPAI-4) by mapping it to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). Each of the 30 scoreable items in the MPAI-4 was mapped to the most precise ICF categories. All 30 items could be mapped to components and categories in the ICF. A total of 88 meaningful concepts were identified. There were, on average, 2.9 meaningful concepts per item, and 65% of all concepts could be mapped. Items in the Ability and Adjustment subscales mapped to categories in both the Body Functions and Activity/Participation components of the ICF, whereas all except 1 in the Participation subscale were to categories in the Activity/Participation component. The items could also be mapped to 34 (13%) of the 258 Environmental Factors in the ICF. This mapping provides better definition through more concrete examples (as listed in the ICF) of the types of body functions, activities, and participation indicators that are represented by the 30 scoreable MPAI-4 items. This may assist users throughout the world in understanding the intent of each item, and support further development and the possibility to report results in the form of an ICF categorical profile, making it universally interpretable.

  1. The Mayo-Portland Participation Index: A brief and psychometrically sound measure of brain injury outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malec, James F

    2004-12-01

    To evaluate the internal consistency, interrater agreement, concurrent validity, and floor and ceiling effects of the 8-item Participation Index (M2PI) of the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory (MPAI). M2PI data derived from MPAIs completed independently by the people with acquired brain injury undergoing evaluation, their significant others, and rehabilitation staff were submitted to Rasch Facets analysis to determine the internal consistency of each independent rater group and of composite measures that combined rater groups. Correlations with the full-scale MPAI were examined to assess concurrent validity, as was interrater agreement. Outpatient rehabilitation in academic physical medicine and rehabilitation department. People with acquired brain injury (N=134) consecutively seen for evaluation, significant others, and evaluating staff. Not applicable. The MPAI and M2PI. The M2PI showed satisfactory internal consistency, concurrent validity, interrater agreement, and minimal floor and ceiling effects, although evidence of rater bias was also apparent. Composite indices showed more desirable psychometric properties than ratings by individual rater groups. The M2PI, particularly in composite indices and with attention to rater biases, provides an outcome measure with satisfactory psychometric qualities and the potential to represent the varying perspectives of people with acquired brain injury, significant others, and rehabilitation staff.

  2. Elemental composition of Usnea sp lichen from Potter Peninsula, 25 de Mayo (King George) Island, Antarctica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bubach, Débora; Catán, Soledad Perez; Di Fonzo, Carla; Dopchiz, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Several pollutants, which include metals, are present in the Antarctic atmosphere, snow, marine and terrestrial organisms. This work reports the elements incorporated by Usnea sp thalli in Potter Peninsula, 25 de Mayo (King George) Island, South Shetlands, Antarctica. Geological origin was analyzed as possible sources of elements. For this purpose, correlations were done using a geochemical tracer, principal component analysis and enrichment factors were computed. Lithophile elements from particulate matter were present in most of the sampling sites. Bromine, Se and Hg showed the highest enrichment factors suggesting other sources than the particulate matter. Mercury values found in Usnea sp were in the same range as those reported for Deception Island (South Shetlands) and remote areas from the Patagonia Andes. - Highlights: • Hg enrichment factor was higher in ASPA than in human settlements area. • The elemental composition in Usnea sp from Antarctica reflected the human influence. • Bromine, Ca, Sr, Se, Fe, Hg and K contents indicated origins natural and anthropic. • The data will be considered as baselines for Potter Peninsula, King George Island. - This study provides recent element contents in Usnea sp from Potter Peninsula, South Shetland Islands, Antarctica. Some of them are the first concentration reported by Argentina.

  3. El valor de los servicios ambientales en la cuenca baja del río Mayo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alma Angelina Haro Martínez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available en este trabajo se presentan los resultados de la valora-ción económica de los servicios ambientales, para la cuencabaja del río Mayo, en Sonora, en el noroeste de México,donde las actividades económicas han impactado severa-mente y sustituido los ecosistemas naturales en la mayorparte del territorio. La metodología utilizada consistió en ladelimitación de los servicios en función de su distribuciónespacial y, en algunos casos, se usaron componentes de losecosistemas como proxy. Se compararon nueve servicios,que abarcan los cuatro grupos de funciones ecosistémicas(regulación, soporte, provisión y cultural. Los cálculos sebasaron en valores estimados de mercado por servicio y porunidad de área. Esto generó nueve mapas individuales y unodonde se integra el valor total por unidad de área.

  4. Polyphenolic substrates and dyes degradation by yeasts from 25 de Mayo/King George Island (Antarctica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovati, José I; Pajot, Hipólito F; Ruberto, Lucas; Mac Cormack, Walter; Figueroa, Lucía I C

    2013-11-01

    Antarctica offers a range of extreme climatic conditions, such as low temperatures, high solar radiation and low nutrient availability, and constitutes one of the harshest environments on Earth. Despite that, it has been successfully colonized by ’cold-loving’ fungi, which play a key role in decomposition cycles in cold ecosystems. However, knowledge about the ecological role of yeasts in nutrient or organic matter recycling/mineralization remains highly fragmentary. The aim of this work was to study the yeast microbiota in samples collected on 25 de Mayo/King George Island regarding the scope of their ability to degrade polyphenolic substrates such as lignin and azo dyes. Sixty-one yeast isolates were obtained from 37 samples, including soil, rocks, wood and bones. Molecular analyses based on rDNA sequences revealed that 35 yeasts could be identified at the species level and could be classified in the genera Leucosporidiella, Rhodotorula, Cryptococcus, Bullera and Candida. Cryptococcus victoriae was by far the most ubiquitous species. In total, 33% of the yeast isolates examined showed significant activity for dye decolorization, 25% for laccase activity and 38% for ligninolytic activity. Eleven yeasts did not show positive activity in any of the assays performed and no isolates showed positive activity across all tested substrates. A high diversity of yeasts were isolated in this work, possibly including undescribed species and conspicuous Antarctic yeasts, most of them belonging to oligotrophic, slow-growing and metabolically diverse basidiomycetous genera.

  5. Determining the association between retinopathy and metabolic syndrome in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus visiting Mayo Hospital, Lahore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghani, U; Niaz, Z; Cheema, T M; Abaidullah, S; Salman, S; Latif, F [King Edward Medical University, Mayo Hospital, Lahore (Pakistan). Dept. of Diabetic Mellitus

    2010-04-15

    Introduction: The metabolic syndrome is a cluster of metabolic abnormalities including abdominal obesity, glucose intolerance, hypertension and dyslipidemia. Diabetic retinopathy is common sequel of diabetes. Objective: To determine the frequency of retinopathy in patients of type 2 diabetes metabolic syndrome. Study Design; Descriptive study. This study was conducted in diabetic clinic of Mayo Hospital, Lahore, from January 17, 2007 to July 16,2007. Methods; Three hundred and sixty patients fulfilling the inclusion criteria were selected for this study and divided into two groups. (Diabetes and with metabolic syndrome) Demographic data of each patient including age, sex, height and weight were collected. Each patient was interviewed about the duration, treatment and complications of diabetes. Data were analyzed by SPSS. P value was calculated by Chi Square test. Results; In group I, the mean height was 1.60 +- 0.08 meters, mean weight was 68.82 +- 7.36 kilograms and mean BMI was 26.38 +- 1.10 kg/m2 and In group II, the mean height was 1.56 +- 0.12 meters, mean weight was 81.58 +- 9.85 kilograms and mean BMI was 33.80 +- 3.61 kg/m/sup 2/. In group I micro aneurysms, dot hemorrhages, blot hemorrhages and hard exudates were found in 12.22% patients. In group II, micro aneurysms, dot hemorrhages, blot hemorrhages and hard exudates were found in 25% patients (p 0.0028). In group I, there were 10.56% patients in which cotton wool spots were found and in group II there were 11.67% patients in which cotton wool spots were found (p 0.0358). In group I, there were 2.78% patients in which new blood vessel formation were found and in group II there were 4.44% patients in which new blood vessel formation was found (p 0.625). Conclusion; It is concluded from this study that frequency of retinopathy is high in patients with metabolic syndrome as compared to patients without metabolic syndrome. (author)

  6. Determining the association between retinopathy and metabolic syndrome in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus visiting Mayo Hospital, Lahore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghani, U.; Niaz, Z.; Cheema, T.M.; Abaidullah, S.; Salman, S.; Latif, F.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The metabolic syndrome is a cluster of metabolic abnormalities including abdominal obesity, glucose intolerance, hypertension and dyslipidemia. Diabetic retinopathy is common sequel of diabetes. Objective: To determine the frequency of retinopathy in patients of type 2 diabetes metabolic syndrome. Study Design; Descriptive study. This study was conducted in diabetic clinic of Mayo Hospital, Lahore, from January 17, 2007 to July 16,2007. Methods; Three hundred and sixty patients fulfilling the inclusion criteria were selected for this study and divided into two groups. (Diabetes and with metabolic syndrome) Demographic data of each patient including age, sex, height and weight were collected. Each patient was interviewed about the duration, treatment and complications of diabetes. Data were analyzed by SPSS. P value was calculated by Chi Square test. Results; In group I, the mean height was 1.60 +- 0.08 meters, mean weight was 68.82 +- 7.36 kilograms and mean BMI was 26.38 +- 1.10 kg/m2 and In group II, the mean height was 1.56 +- 0.12 meters, mean weight was 81.58 +- 9.85 kilograms and mean BMI was 33.80 +- 3.61 kg/m/sup 2/. In group I micro aneurysms, dot hemorrhages, blot hemorrhages and hard exudates were found in 12.22% patients. In group II, micro aneurysms, dot hemorrhages, blot hemorrhages and hard exudates were found in 25% patients (p 0.0028). In group I, there were 10.56% patients in which cotton wool spots were found and in group II there were 11.67% patients in which cotton wool spots were found (p 0.0358). In group I, there were 2.78% patients in which new blood vessel formation were found and in group II there were 4.44% patients in which new blood vessel formation was found (p 0.625). Conclusion; It is concluded from this study that frequency of retinopathy is high in patients with metabolic syndrome as compared to patients without metabolic syndrome. (author)

  7. Cardiac performance measure compliance in outpatients: the American College of Cardiology and National Cardiovascular Data Registry's PINNACLE (Practice Innovation And Clinical Excellence) program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Paul S; Oetgen, William J; Buchanan, Donna; Mitchell, Kristi; Fiocchi, Fran F; Tang, Fengming; Jones, Philip G; Breeding, Tracie; Thrutchley, Duane; Rumsfeld, John S; Spertus, John A

    2010-06-29

    We examined compliance with performance measures for 14,464 patients enrolled from July 2008 through June 2009 into the American College of Cardiology's PINNACLE (Practice Innovation And Clinical Excellence) program to provide initial insights into the quality of outpatient cardiac care. Little is known about the quality of care of outpatients with coronary artery disease (CAD), heart failure, and atrial fibrillation, and whether sex and racial disparities exist in the treatment of outpatients. The PINNACLE program is the first, national, prospective office-based quality improvement program of cardiac patients designed, in part, to capture, report, and improve outpatient performance measure compliance. We examined the proportion of patients whose care was compliant with established American College of Cardiology, American Heart Association, and American Medical Association-Physician Consortium for Performance Improvement (ACC/AHA/PCPI) performance measures for CAD, heart failure, and atrial fibrillation. There were 14,464 unique patients enrolled from 27 U.S. practices, accounting for 18,021 clinical visits. Of these, 8,132 (56.4%) had CAD, 5,012 (34.7%) had heart failure, and 2,786 (19.3%) had nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. Data from the PINNACLE program were feasibly collected for 24 of 25 ACC/AHA/PCPI performance measures. Compliance with performance measures ranged from being very low (e.g., 13.3% of CAD patients screened for diabetes mellitus) to very high (e.g., 96.7% of heart failure patients with blood pressure assessments), with moderate (70% to 90%) compliance observed for most performance measures. For 3 performance measures, there were small differences in compliance rates by race or sex. For more than 14,000 patients enrolled from 27 practices in the outpatient PINNACLE program, we found that compliance with performance measures was variable, even after accounting for exclusion criteria, suggesting an important opportunity to improve the quality of

  8. College Explorer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahl, David H.

    1985-01-01

    The "College Explorer" is a software package (for the 64K Apple II, IBM PC, TRS-80 model III and 4 microcomputers) which aids in choosing a college. The major features of this package (manufactured by The College Board) are described and evaluated. Sample input/output is included. (JN)

  9. CONSENSUS STATEMENT BY THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS AND AMERICAN COLLEGE OF ENDOCRINOLOGY ON THE QUALITY OF DXA SCANS AND REPORTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licata, Angelo A; Binkley, Neil; Petak, Steven M; Camacho, Pauline M

    2018-02-01

    High-quality dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scans are necessary for accurate diagnosis of osteoporosis and monitoring of therapy; however, DXA scan reports may contain errors that cause confusion about diagnosis and treatment. This American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists/American College of Endocrinology consensus statement was generated to draw attention to many common technical problems affecting DXA report conclusions and provide guidance on how to address them to ensure that patients receive appropriate osteoporosis care. The DXA Writing Committee developed a consensus based on discussion and evaluation of available literature related to osteoporosis and osteodensitometry. Technical errors may include errors in scan acquisition and/or analysis, leading to incorrect diagnosis and reporting of change over time. Although the International Society for Clinical Densitometry advocates training for technologists and medical interpreters to help eliminate these problems, many lack skill in this technology. Suspicion that reports are wrong arises when clinical history is not compatible with scan interpretation (e.g., dramatic increase/decrease in a short period of time; declines in previously stable bone density after years of treatment), when different scanners are used, or when inconsistent anatomic sites are used for monitoring the response to therapy. Understanding the concept of least significant change will minimize erroneous conclusions about changes in bone density. Clinicians must develop the skills to differentiate technical problems, which confound reports, from real biological changes. We recommend that clinicians review actual scan images and data, instead of relying solely on the impression of the report, to pinpoint errors and accurately interpret DXA scan images. AACE = American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists; BMC = bone mineral content; BMD = bone mineral density; DXA = dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry; ISCD = International

  10. Clinical pharmacy services in heart failure: an opinion paper from the Heart Failure Society of America and American College of Clinical Pharmacy Cardiology Practice and Research Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milfred-Laforest, Sherry K; Chow, Sheryl L; Didomenico, Robert J; Dracup, Kathleen; Ensor, Christopher R; Gattis-Stough, Wendy; Heywood, J Thomas; Lindenfeld, Joann; Page, Robert L; Patterson, J Herbert; Vardeny, Orly; Massie, Barry M

    2013-05-01

    Heart failure (HF) care takes place in multiple settings, with a variety of providers, and generally involves patients who have multiple comorbidities. This situation is a "perfect storm" of factors that predispose patients to medication errors. The goals of this paper are to outline potential roles for clinical pharmacists in a multidisciplinary HF team, to document outcomes associated with interventions by clinical pharmacists, to recommend minimum training for clinical pharmacists engaged in HF care, and to suggest financial strategies to support clinical pharmacy services within a multidisciplinary team. As patients transition from inpatient to outpatient settings and between multiple caregivers, pharmacists can positively affect medication reconciliation and education, assure consistency in management that results in improvements in patient satisfaction and medication adherence, and reduce medication errors. For mechanical circulatory support and heart transplant teams, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services considers the participation of a transplant pharmacology expert (e.g., clinical pharmacist) to be a requirement for accreditation, given the highly specialized and complex drug regimens used. Although reports of outcomes from pharmacist interventions have been mixed owing to differences in study design, benefits such as increased use of evidence-based therapies, decreases in HF hospitalizations and emergency department visits, and decreases in all-cause readmissions have been demonstrated. Clinical pharmacists participating in HF or heart transplant teams should have completed specialized postdoctoral training in the form of residencies and/or fellowships in cardiovascular and/or transplant pharmacotherapy, and board certification is recommended. Financial mechanisms to support pharmacist participation in the HF teams are variable. Positive outcomes associated with clinical pharmacist activities support the value of making this resource available

  11. AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS AND AMERICAN COLLEGE OF ENDOCRINOLOGY COMPREHENSIVE CLINICAL PRACTICE GUIDELINES FOR MEDICAL CARE OF PATIENTS WITH OBESITYEXECUTIVE SUMMARYComplete Guidelines available at https://www.aace.com/publications/guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, W Timothy; Mechanick, Jeffrey I; Brett, Elise M; Garber, Alan J; Hurley, Daniel L; Jastreboff, Ania M; Nadolsky, Karl; Pessah-Pollack, Rachel; Plodkowski, Raymond

    2016-07-01

    Development of these guidelines is mandated by the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) Board of Directors and the American College of Endocrinology (ACE) Board of Trustees and adheres to published AACE protocols for the standardized production of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs). Recommendations are based on diligent review of clinical evidence with transparent incorporation of subjective factors. There are 9 broad clinical questions with 123 recommendation numbers that include 160 specific statements (85 [53.1%] strong [Grade A], 48 [30.0%] intermediate [Grade B], and 11 [6.9%] weak [Grade C], with 16 [10.0%] based on expert opinion [Grade D]) that build a comprehensive medical care plan for obesity. There were 133 (83.1%) statements based on strong (best evidence level [BEL] 1 = 79 [49.4%]) or intermediate (BEL 2 = 54 [33.7%]) levels of scientific substantiation. There were 34 (23.6%) evidence-based recommendation grades (Grades A-C = 144) that were adjusted based on subjective factors. Among the 1,788 reference citations used in this CPG, 524 (29.3%) were based on strong (evidence level [EL] 1), 605 (33.8%) were based on intermediate (EL 2), and 308 (17.2%) were based on weak (EL 3) scientific studies, with 351 (19.6%) based on reviews and opinions (EL 4). The final recommendations recognize that obesity is a complex, adiposity-based chronic disease, where management targets both weight-related complications and adiposity to improve overall health and quality of life. The detailed evidence-based recommendations allow for nuanced clinical decision-making that addresses real-world medical care of patients with obesity, including screening, diagnosis, evaluation, selection of therapy, treatment goals, and individualization of care. The goal is to facilitate high-quality care of patients with obesity and provide a rational, scientific approach to management that optimizes health outcomes and safety. A1C = hemoglobin A1c AACE = American

  12. The Mayo Dysphagia Questionnaire-30: documentation of reliability and validity of a tool for interventional trials in adults with esophageal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElhiney, Judith; Lohse, Matthew R; Arora, Amindra S; Peloquin, Joanna M; Geno, Debra M; Kuntz, Melissa M; Enders, Felicity B; Fredericksen, Mary; Abdalla, Adil A; Khan, Yulia; Talley, Nicholas J; Diehl, Nancy N; Beebe, Timothy J; Harris, Ann M; Farrugia, Gianrico; Graner, Darlene E; Murray, Joseph A; Locke, G Richard; Grothe, Rayna M; Crowell, Michael D; Francis, Dawn L; Grudell, April M B; Dabade, Tushar; Ramirez, Angelica; Alkhatib, MhdMaan; Alexander, Jeffrey A; Kimber, Jessica; Prasad, Ganapathy; Zinsmeister, Alan R; Romero, Yvonne

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this study was to develop the Mayo Dysphagia Questionnaire-30 Day (MDQ-30), a tool to measure esophageal dysphagia, by adapting items from validated instruments for use in clinical trials, and assess its feasibility, reproducibility, and concurrent validity. Outpatients referred to endoscopy for dysphagia or seen in a specialty clinic were recruited. Feasibility testing was done to identify problematic items. Reproducibility was measured by test-retest format. Concurrent validity reflects agreement between information gathered in a structured interview versus the patients' written responses. The MDQ-30, a 28-item instrument, took 10 min (range = 5-30 min) to complete. Four hundred thirty-one outpatients [210 (49%) men; mean age = 61 years] participated. Overall, most concurrent validity kappa values for dysphagia were very good to excellent with a median of 0.78 (min 0.28, max 0.95). The majority of reproducibility kappa values for dysphagia were moderate to excellent with a median kappa value of 0.66 (min 0.07, max 1.0). Overall, concurrent validity and reproducibility kappa values for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms were 0.81 (95% CI = 0.72, 0.91) and 0.66 (95% CI = 0.55, 0.77), respectively. Individual item percent agreement was generally very good to excellent. Internal consistency was excellent. We conclude that the MDQ-30 is an easy-to-complete tool to evaluate reliably dysphagia symptoms over the last 30 days.

  13. Clinical Commentary by Barbara Segal, a Consultant Child and Adolescent Psychotherapist Working in University College London Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    This moving clinical account describes the psychotherapeutic work of a child psychotherapist undertaken in a hospital room with 13-year-old Maya, after the sudden onset of a terrifying and serious illness, Guillain-Barre syndrome, leaving her with paralysis and extreme weakness. The first session takes place almost three weeks after Maya's…

  14. Los acontecimientos de mayo del 68 y la lucha antipsiquiátrica

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    Valentín Galván García

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Los movimientos de detracción a la psiquiatría clásica no nacieron hasta la década de los años 60. Las reflexiones comunes de sociólogos, filósofos, políticos, psiquiatras y enfermos mentales coincidieron en un severo replanteamiento del saber psiquiátrico y de las prácticas propugnadas. El término propuesto en 1967 por David Cooper fue el estandarte de estos nuevos planteamientos. Con anterioridad al movimiento psiquiátrico, en 1961, se publicaron dos textos fundamentales: Internados de Erving Goffman y la Historia de la locura de Michel Foucault. Ambas obras, hasta entonces, conocidas exclusivamente en el ámbito académico, por lo que sus enfoques y problemáticas tuvieron escasa repercusión hasta los acontecimientos de Mayo del 68, los cuales propiciaron unas condiciones más favorables para su discurso.________________________ABSTRACT:The movements back to the classical psychiatry weren’t born until the 60 ths decade. The common thoughts of sociologists, philosophers, politicians, psychiatrists and mentally sick people joined together a strict reconsideration of the phychiatric knowledge and the proposed training. The word “antipsychiatry” proposed in 1967 by David Cooper was the flagship of these new thoughts. Before the psychiatric movement, in 1961, two main books were published: Asylums by Erving Goffman and History of mandess by Michel Foucault. Both books, until then, were known exclusively in the academic field, for its focus and problems had little repercussion until the May 68 events, which encouraged more favourable conditions for its speech.  

  15. Cigarette smoking and health care professionals at Mayo Hospital, Lahore, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malik, A.K.; Chaudhry, A.; Karamat, A.; Arif, N.; Cheema, M.A.; Rauf, A.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To observe the frequency of cigarette smoking in doctors and paramedics and study various variables associated with it. Methods: An anonymous questionnaire was given to randomly selected 250 Doctors and 250 Paramedics at Mayo Hospital in 2009. Information about demographic characteristics, smoking status in family, number of cigarettes smoked per day, influence for starting smoking, reason for continuation of smoking and use of nicotine replacement therapy was obtained. Results: A total of 234 questionnaires from doctors and 207 from paramedics were received back (88.2% response rate). There were 280 males (163 Doctors; 117 Paramedics) and 161 females (71 Doctors; 90 Paramedics). Eighty seven (37.18%) Doctors and 74 (35.74%) Paramedics were smokers with 82 (50.31%) male doctors and 5 (7.04%) females. Similar results were obtained in Paramedics 72 (61.53%) males and 2 (2.22%) females. Of the smokers, majority started smoking between 11-20 years age with 39 (44.83%) Doctors and 48 (64.86%) Paramedics. Twenty three (26.44%) Doctors and 31 (41.89%) Paramedics smoked 11-20 cigarettes per day. Smoking was initiated due to the influence of friends by 48 (55.17%) Doctors and 56 (75.68%) Paramedics. Most smokers, 29 (33.33%) Doctors and 33 (44.59%) Paramedics found use of cigarette smoking as 'Relaxing'. Addiction was the main reason for difficulty in quitting cigarette smoking as reported by 33 (37.93%) Doctors and 31 (41.89%) Paramedics. Of the smokers, 61(70.11%) doctors and 50 (32.43%) paramedics had no intention to quit smoking in the next 6 months. Conclusion: A significant number of doctors and paramedics, especially males, in Pakistan smoke cigarettes, which requires proper attention. (author)

  16. Recursos florísticos de la cuenca baja del río mayo, Sonora

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    Julio César Duarte Ruiz

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available En México se presentan prácticamente todos los grandes tipos de vegetación que existen en el mundo y su distribución a menudo es compleja. El objetivo del trabajo consistió en realizar un listado de la flora silvestre ribereña del Río Mayo, localizado en el sur del estado de Sonora, para conocer su composición. La recolección de especímenes se realizó mediante la técnica de intercepción o línea de Canfield (1941, en 15 sitios con dos repeticiones sumando 30 transectos. Se encontraron un total de 40 familias, 79 géneros y 99 especies. Las familias mejor representadas fueron: Leguminoseae, Cactaceae, Gramineae, Compositae, Chenopodiaceae, Salicaceae, Solanaceae, Euphorbiaceae, Amaranthaceae y Asteraceae. La dominante fue Leguminoseae con vegetación de bosque espinoso compuesta por Acacia cymbispina, Acacia farnesiana, Parkinsonia aculeata y Prosopis juliflora. Resulta perceptible la pérdida de flora debido al cambio de uso de suelo. Especies representativas de la zona riparia como Populus fremontii y Salix bonplandiana están desapareciendo por alteración del ecosistema. Poblaciones de mangle como Rhizophora mangle y Conocarpus erectus están disminuidas. El área estudiada es rica en especies a pesar de la perturbación. La diversidad varía de acuerdo al gradiente altitudinal y el número de especies guarda relación con los géneros y familias recolectadas. La agricultura, acuicultura, ganadería, la industria pesquera y la urbanización, son los giros que causan mayor afectación en los ecosistemas

  17. Degree of vertical integration between the undergraduate program and clinical internship with respect to cervical and cranial diagnostic and therapeutic procedures taught at the canadian memorial chiropractic college.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppington, Charmody; Gleberzon, Brian; Fortunato, Lisa; Doucet, Nicolea; Vandervalk, Kyle

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if diagnostic and therapeutic procedures for the cervical and cranial spine taught to students during the undergraduate program at Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College are required to be used during their internship by their supervising clinicians and, if so, to what extent these procedures are used. Course manuals and course syllabi from the Applied Chiropractic and Clinical Diagnosis faculty of the undergraduate chiropractic program for the academic year 2009-2010 were consulted and a list of all diagnostic and therapeutic procedures for the cranial and cervical spine was compiled. This survey asked clinicians to indicate if they themselves used or if they required the students they were supervising to use each procedure listed and, if so, to what extent each procedure was used. Demographic information of each clinician was also obtained. In general, most diagnostic procedures of the head and neck were seldom used, with the exception of postural observation and palpation. By contrast, most cervical orthopaedic tests were often used, with the exception of tests for vertigo. Most therapeutic procedures were used frequently with the exception of prone cervical and "muscle" adjustments. There was a low degree of vertical integration for cranial procedures as compared to a much higher degree of vertical integration for cervical procedures between the undergraduate and clinical internship programs taught. Vertical integration is an important element of curricular planning and these results may be helpful to aid educators to more appropriately allocate classroom instruction.

  18. Physician Satisfaction With Clinical Laboratory Services: A College of American Pathologists Q-Probes Study of 81 Institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Shannon J; Souers, Rhona J; Blond, Barbara; Massie, Larry

    2016-10-01

    -Assessment of customer satisfaction is a vital component of the laboratory quality improvement program. -To survey the level of physician satisfaction with hospital clinical laboratory services. -Participating institutions provided demographic information and survey results of physician satisfaction, with specific features of clinical laboratory services individually rated on a scale of 5 (excellent) to 1 (poor). -Eighty-one institutions submitted 2425 surveys. The median overall satisfaction score was 4.2 (10th percentile, 3.6; 90th percentile, 4.6). Of the 16 surveyed areas receiving the highest percentage of excellent/good ratings (combined scores of 4 and 5), quality of results was highest along with test menu adequacy, staff courtesy, and overall satisfaction. Of the 4 categories receiving the lowest percentage values of excellent/good ratings, 3 were related to turnaround time for inpatient "STAT" (tests performed immediately), outpatient STAT, and esoteric tests. The fourth was a new category presented in this survey: ease of electronic order entry. Here, 11.4% (241 of 2121) of physicians assigned below-average (2) or poor (1) scores. The 5 categories deemed most important to physicians included quality of results, turnaround times for inpatient STAT, routine, and outpatient STAT tests, and clinical report format. Overall satisfaction as measured by physician willingness to recommend their laboratory to another physician remains high at 94.5% (2160 of 2286 respondents). -There is a continued trend of high physician satisfaction and loyalty with clinical laboratory services. Physician dissatisfaction with ease of electronic order entry represents a new challenge. Test turnaround times are persistent areas of dissatisfaction, representing areas for improvement.

  19. Physician satisfaction with clinical laboratory services: a College of American Pathologists Q-probes study of 138 institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Bruce A; Bekeris, Leonas G; Nakhleh, Raouf E; Walsh, Molly K; Valenstein, Paul N

    2009-01-01

    Monitoring customer satisfaction is a valuable component of a laboratory quality improvement program. To survey the level of physician satisfaction with hospital clinical laboratory services. Participating institutions provided demographic and practice information and survey results of physician satisfaction with defined aspects of clinical laboratory services, rated on a scale of 1 (poor) to 5 (excellent). One hundred thirty-eight institutions participated in this study and submitted a total of 4329 physician surveys. The overall satisfaction score for all institutions ranged from 2.9 to 5.0. The median overall score for all participants was 4.1 (10th percentile, 3.6; 90th percentile, 4.5). Physicians were most satisfied with the quality/reliability of results and staff courtesy, with median values of excellent or good ratings of 89.9%. Of the 5 service categories that received the lowest percentage values of excellent/good ratings (combined scores of 4 and 5), 4 were related to turnaround time for inpatient stat, outpatient stat, routine, and esoteric tests. Surveys from half of the participating laboratories reported that 96% to 100% of physicians would recommend the laboratory to other physicians. The category most frequently selected as the most important category of laboratory services was quality/reliability of results (31.7%). There continues to be a high level of physician satisfaction and loyalty with clinical laboratory services. Test turnaround times are persistent categories of dissatisfaction and present opportunities for improvement.

  20. AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS AND AMERICAN COLLEGE OF ENDOCRINOLOGY POSITION STATEMENT ON THYROID DYSFUNCTION CASE FINDING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessey, James V; Garber, Jeffrey R; Woeber, Kenneth A; Cobin, Rhoda; Klein, Irwin

    2016-02-01

    Hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism can be readily diagnosed and can be treated in a safe, cost-effective manner. Professional organizations have given guidance on how and when to employ thyroid-stimulating hormone testing for the detection of thyroid dysfunction. Most recently, the United States Preventive Services Task Force did not endorse screening for thyroid dysfunction based on a lack of proven benefit and potential harm of treating those with thyroid dysfunction, which is mostly subclinical disease. The American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) is concerned that this may discourage physicians from testing for thyroid dysfunction when clinically appropriate. Given the lack of specificity of thyroid-associated symptoms, the appropriate diagnosis of thyroid disease requires biochemical confirmation. The Thyroid Scientific Committee of the AACE has produced this White Paper to highlight the important difference between screening and case-based testing in the practice of clinical medicine. We recommend that thyroid dysfunction should be frequently considered as a potential etiology for many of the nonspecific complaints that physicians face daily. The application and success of safe and effective interventions are dependent on an accurate diagnosis. We, therefore, advocate for an aggressive case-finding approach, based on identifying those persons most likely to have thyroid disease that will benefit from its treatment.

  1. Process and outcome measures of quality of care at the diabetes outpatient clinic, University College Hospital, Ibadan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeleye, J O; Kuti, M A

    2017-02-01

    The study aims to assess the quality of care provided at a diabetes outpatient clinic of a tertiary hospital in Nigeria using quality indicators approved by the National Diabetes Quality Improvement Alliance (NDQIA). The medical records of patients who had visited the clinic at least two times within a 12 months period preceding the index visit were reviewed during a 5 month period. Process measure indicators, approved by the NDQIA (evaluating the functioning of the clinic) and outcome measures, published by the American Diabetes Association, (evaluating the health status of the attending patients) were retrieved from the medical records. The 332 records reviewed showed that the most consistently performed process measures were blood pressure and weight measurement (>90%). Foot examination was done infrequently (10.5%). Less than 50% had at least an annual low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and hemoglobin A1c testing done. The mean (standard deviation) HbA1C (%), LDL-C (mg/dL) systolic blood pressure (SBP) (mmHg), and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) (mmHg) were 7.6 (2.0), 107.3 (31.5), 134.3 (20.8), 79.5 (11.0), respectively. HbA1C >8.0%, LDL-C >130 mg/dL, SBP >130 mmHg, and DBP >90 mmHg) were observed in 34.8%, 21.1%, 40.4%, and 23.8%, respectively. Although the organization of the outpatient services allowed for good performance with regards to "free" services such as blood pressure and weight measurement, it performed suboptimally for foot examinations. Performance indicators that required payment were consistently underperformed. Regular assessment of the quality of care may help in the identification of opportunities for improvement in the organization and delivery of care.

  2. The stress of clinical dental training: A cross-sectional survey among dental students and dentists of a dental college in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meena Jain

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Psychological disturbances in clinical dental students and teachers remain largely unknown. Aim: To describe the psychological health of clinical dental students and their trainers in an institution in India. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional, questionnaire-based study was conducted among clinical dental students and faculty of an Indian dental college in November 2014. The questionnaire consisted of depression anxiety stress scales-21 (DASS 21, a short version of the original 42-item DASS. Data were compiled on SPSS version 21. Group comparisons were done and P values were obtained. All tests were two-tailed with significance set at P< 0.05. Results: Stress scores were found to be higher in students as compared to trainers (P = 0.040, with the highest scores for undergraduate students. Statistically, significant difference was seen in stress scores between graduate and postgraduate trainers (P = 0.015, undergraduates and postgraduate trainers (P = 0.005, and postgraduate trainers and students (P = 0.029. A significant difference was also observed between depression scores in graduate and postgraduate trainers (P = 0.006 as well as postgraduate trainers and students (P = 0.041. Females had significantly higher level of stress (P = 0.007 and anxiety (P = 0.003 scores as compared to males. Conclusion: Stress, anxiety, and depression scores in dental students are higher than trainers. Undergraduate students among all showed the highest scores for all three parameters. Different approaches to reduce them should be further investigated and utilized at the earliest.

  3. Clinical practice parameters for hemodynamic support of pediatric and neonatal septic shock: 2007 update from the American College of Critical Care Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brierley, Joe; Carcillo, Joseph A.; Choong, Karen; Cornell, Tim; DeCaen, Allan; Deymann, Andreas; Doctor, Allan; Davis, Alan; Duff, John; Dugas, Marc-Andre; Duncan, Alan; Evans, Barry; Feldman, Jonathan; Felmet, Kathryn; Fisher, Gene; Frankel, Lorry; Jeffries, Howard; Greenwald, Bruce; Gutierrez, Juan; Hall, Mark; Han, Yong Y.; Hanson, James; Hazelzet, Jan; Hernan, Lynn; Kiff, Jane; Kissoon, Niranjan; Kon, Alexander; Irazusta, Jose; Lin, John; Lorts, Angie; Mariscalco, Michelle; Mehta, Renuka; Nadel, Simon; Nguyen, Trung; Nicholson, Carol; Peters, Mark; Okhuysen-Cawley, Regina; Poulton, Tom; Relves, Monica; Rodriguez, Agustin; Rozenfeld, Ranna; Schnitzler, Eduardo; Shanley, Tom; Skache, Sara; Skippen, Peter; Torres, Adalberto; von Dessauer, Bettina; Weingarten, Jacki; Yeh, Timothy; Zaritsky, Arno; Stojadinovic, Bonnie; Zimmerman, Jerry; Zuckerberg, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    Background The Institute of Medicine calls for the use of clinical guidelines and practice parameters to promote “best practices” and to improve patient outcomes. Objective 2007 update of the 2002 American College of Critical Care Medicine Clinical Guidelines for Hemodynamic Support of Neonates and Children with Septic Shock. Participants Society of Critical Care Medicine members with special interest in neonatal and pediatric septic shock were identified from general solicitation at the Society of Critical Care Medicine Educational and Scientific Symposia (2001–2006). Methods The Pubmed/MEDLINE literature database (1966–2006) was searched using the keywords and phrases: sepsis, septicemia, septic shock, endotoxemia, persistent pulmonary hypertension, nitric oxide, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), and American College of Critical Care Medicine guidelines. Best practice centers that reported best outcomes were identified and their practices examined as models of care. Using a modified Delphi method, 30 experts graded new literature. Over 30 additional experts then reviewed the updated recommendations. The document was subsequently modified until there was greater than 90% expert consensus. Results The 2002 guidelines were widely disseminated, translated into Spanish and Portuguese, and incorporated into Society of Critical Care Medicine and AHA sanctioned recommendations. Centers that implemented the 2002 guidelines reported best practice outcomes (hospital mortality 1%–3% in previously healthy, and 7%– 10% in chronically ill children). Early use of 2002 guidelines was associated with improved outcome in the community hospital emergency department (number needed to treat = 3.3) and tertiary pediatric intensive care setting (number needed to treat = 3.6); every hour that went by without guideline adherence was associated with a 1.4-fold increased mortality risk. The updated 2007 guidelines continue to recognize an increased likelihood that

  4. The Utility of the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory Participation Index (M2PI) in US Military Veterans With a History of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    OʼRourke, Justin; Critchfield, Edan; Soble, Jason; Bain, Kathleen; Fullen, Chrystal; Eapen, Blessen

    2018-05-31

    To examine the utility of the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory-4th Edition Participation Index (M2PI) as a self-report measure of functional outcome following mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) in US Military veterans. Department of Veterans Affairs Polytrauma Rehabilitation Center specialty hospital. On hundred thirty-nine veterans with a history of self-reported mTBI. Retrospective cross-sectional examination of data collected from regular clinical visits. M2PI, Neurobehavioral Symptoms Inventory with embedded validity measures, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist-Military Version. Forty-one percent of the sample provided symptom reports that exceeded established cut scores on embedded symptom validity tests. Invalid responders had higher levels of unemployment and endorsed significantly greater functional impairment, posttraumatic stress symptoms, and postconcussive complaints. For valid responders, regression analyses revealed that self-reported functioning was primarily related to posttraumatic stress complaints, followed by postconcussive cognitive complaints. For invalid responders, posttraumatic stress complaints also predicted self-reported functioning. Caution is recommended when utilizing the M2PI to measure functional outcome following mTBI in military veterans, particularly in the absence of symptom validity tests.

  5. Analysis of minnesota multiphasic personality inventory among college students in psychological counseling clinic%112名大学生人格测验结果分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高群; 江景华; 吴希庆; 张李娜; 王伏兰; 田海明

    2012-01-01

    Objective To understand the psychological status of college students in psychological counseling clinic, and to find out the deviation degree from the general population. Methods A total of 112 college students who came to the clinic for psychological consultation were surveyed using MMPI and the test data were analyzed statistically. Results The analysis revealed that the raw scores of Hs. D, Hy, Pd. Pt among male college students and scores of Hs, D, Hy, Pd, Mf, Pa, Pt, Sc, Ma among female students were all significantly higher than the norm raw scores in China. The top four high ratio of individuals whose T score was over 60 < Norm) in each clinical scale were Pd, Pt, D and Hy. The two types of coding were found mainly to be in the following types as 27/72 (9.0%), 23/32 (8. 1%), 49/94 (7.2%), 12/2 (6.3%) and 47/74 (5.4%) type. There were significant correlations between Hs, D, Hy, Pd, Pa, Pt, Sc, Ma subscales and prediction of individual dangerous behaviors such as the Dutch act, self-mutilation, aggressive action, alcohol and drug abuse. The highest correlation coefficient was between Pt and self-harm or suicide, Pd and aggressive act or Pd and alcohol and drug abuse. Conclusions It is obvious that some college students have a lot of psychological deviances and disorders, thus a reasonable intervention needs to be applied to improve the mental health condition of college students.%目的 探讨医院心理咨询门诊中大学生群体的心理特征,并了解其偏离一般群体的程度.方法 采用明尼苏达多项人格测验量表(MMPI)对心理咨询门诊中112名大学生进行测查,然后对测查数据进行统计学分析.结果 医院心理咨询门诊中男大学生的Hs(疑病)、D(抑郁)、Hy((瘴)症)、Pd(精神病态)、Pt(精神衰弱)原始分显著高于中国常模原始分(P<0.05);医院心理咨询门诊中女大学生的Hs、D、Hy、Pd、Mf(男-女子气)、Pa(偏执)、Pt、Sc(精神分裂)、Ma(轻躁狂)、Si(社会内向)

  6. RELACIONES HÍDRICAS Y TEMPERATURAS ALTAS EN FRIJOL DEL TIPO "FLOR DE MAYO"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin Javier Barrios-Gómez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Se estudió el efecto del déficit hídrico del suelo y temperatura alta del aire en las relaciones hídricas y temperatura del dosel del cultivo (Tc, rendimiento de semilla (RS y sus componentes en 8 variedades de frijol del tipo "Flor de Mayo" (FM y una variedad criolla. Se realizaron 3 experimentos de campo; Montecillo en riego (MR con la aplicación de agua de la siembra a la madurez, Montecillo en secano (MS con la lluvia como fuente única de humedad y Celaya en secano (CS con lluvia y 2 riegos suplementarios en floración. Se utilizó una dosis de fertilización de 80 kg.ha-1 de nitrógeno y 40 kg.ha-1 de fósforo. En MR el potencial hídrico foliar ( =-0,33 Mpa, osmótico ( =-1,26 Mpa y de turgencia y (P=0,93 Mpa fue más alto que en CS ( =-0,77, =-1,36 y P=0,59 Mpa y MS ( =-1,22, =-1,57 y P=0,35 Mpa; MS, con mayor deficiencia hídrica del suelo, tuvo mayor reducción en y , y mayor grado de ajuste osmótico (AO=0,70 Mpa. El AO estuvo positiva y significativamente asociado con RS y biomasa aérea final (BMAF en los 2 ambientes de secano. La Tc en MR (26,7°C fue más baja que en CS (30,8°C y MS (36,6°C; el estrés por calor se agudizó con el descenso en el contenido hídrico de las plantas en el ambiente más seco (MS; Tc se relacionó negativa y significativamente con y en MS. La alta Tc también tuvo efecto significativo en la producción de BMAF y RS y sus componentes; la alta Tc redujo el RS, BMAF, número de vainas normales.m-2 (VN.m-2 y peso de 100 semillas (P100S en 12,5, 10,7, 10,2 y 3,4% por cada ºC (-1 ºC de aumento en la Tc, respectivamente.

  7. Environmental pollution in Mayo area and its impact on people health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omer, N. H.

    2003-04-01

    The study undertook the pollution problem in Mayo area, south of the Green Belt. This is considered to have come about as a result of legal and illegal planning and the re-planning of the squatter settlements, plus the area that lies in the vicinity of the sanitary drainage pool. The study identified the factors and causes of the pollutants.The study also studied the effects of these pollutants on health. The objectives of the study were to identify the factors of environmental pollution in the area, the role of the people in the environmental pollution, the negative consequences of this pollution on people in the area, the attempts of the local authorities in fighting the area's pollution and improving the habitat. The study depended on some scientific approaches such as the historic method and the descriptive statistics method. Information was collected from primary and secondary sources. The researcher depended on field work such as direct observation, personal interviews and filling questionnaire which were prepared for data allocation. The study concluded that the environmental pollution is an out come of many factors that inter link with each other. One of the most important factors is the low economic level of the people, and its effects on the poor and deteriorating living environment and the planning of the area placing it near the sources of environmental pollution at the green belt. In addition to the negative role played by the areas inhabitants in relation to getting rid of environmental pollutants of the area, which has in turn led to the outbreak of environmental diseases that reside in the area, specially malaria and diarrhea. The researcher views that one of the most important recommendations that this study has come out of with is the general planning that takes into consideration the health, economic natural and environmental aspects. These are necessities that will participate in the decline and end of the spreading of these pollutants and what

  8. La jornada de reconciliación nacional del 5 de mayo de 1958

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Félix Hernández

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available En la segunda mitad de la década de los cincuenta la dictadura franquista atravesaba un período de crisis, ante la gravedad de la situación socio-económica que atravesaba el país, es en este contexto en el que el Partido Comunista de España decidió convocar una jornada de movilización contra la dictadura, a la que denominó Jornada de Reconciliación Nacional, para el 5 de mayo de 1958, pese a estar precedida de un período de fuertes protestas sociales los resultados de la misma fueron muy modestos, en este hecho influyeron el propio aislamiento en que se encontraban los comunistas dentro de la oposición antifranquista, como el miedo a la represión, mientras el franquismo continuaría recibiendo el apoyo de las instituciones políticas y grupos sociales sobre las que se asentaba asi como sus apoyos exteriores, lo que le permitiría imponer sus propias soluciones y sobrevivir hasta la muerte del dictador.In the second half of the fifties, the Franco dictatorship was going through a period of crisis given the gravity of the socioeconomic situation that the country was facing. It is in this context that the Spanish Communist Party decided to call mobilization day against dictatorship, which he called National Reconciliation Day, for the 5th of May 1958. Although it was preceded by a period of strong social protest, the results of it were very modest.In this event influenced the isolation itself in which the Communists were inside the anti-Franco opposition, as the fear of repression. While the Franco´s regime would continue receiving the support of political institutions and social groups on which was laid down as well as their external supports, which would enable it to impose its own solutions and survive until the dictator’s death.

  9. Specialist perioperative allergy clinic services in the UK 2018: Results from the Royal College of Anaesthetists Sixth National Audit Project (NAP6) Investigation of Perioperative Anaphylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egner, W; Cook, T M; Garcez, T; Marinho, S; Kemp, H; Lucas, D N; Floss, K; Farooque, S; Torevell, H; Thomas, M; Ferguson, K; Nasser, S; Karanam, S; Kong, K-L; McGuire, N; Bellamy, M; Warner, A; Hitchman, J; Farmer, L; Harper, N J N

    2018-05-19

    The Royal College of Anaesthetists 6th National Audit Project examined Grade 3-5 perioperative anaphylaxis for one year in the UK. To describe the causes and investigation of anaphylaxis in the NAP6 cohort, in relation to published guidance and previous baseline survey results. We used a secure registry to gather details of Grade 3-5 perioperative anaphylaxis. Anonymous reports were aggregated for analysis and reviewed in detail. Panel consensus diagnosis, reaction grade, review of investigations and clinic assessment are reported and compared to the prior NAP6 baseline clinic survey. 266 cases met inclusion criteria between November 2015 and 2016, detailing reactions and investigations. 192/266 (72%) had anaphylaxis with a trigger identified, of which 140/192(75%) met NAP6 criteria for IgE-mediated allergic anaphylaxis, 13% lacking evidence of positive IgE tests were labelled "non-allergic anaphylaxis". 3% were non-IgE mediated anaphylaxis. Adherence to guidance was similar to the baseline survey for waiting time for clinic assessment. However, lack of testing for chlorhexidine and latex, non-harmonised testing practices and poor coverage of all possible culprits was confirmed. Challenge testing may be under-used and many have unacceptably delayed assessments, even in urgent cases. Communication or information provision for patients was insufficient, especially for avoidance advice and communication of test results. Insufficient detail regarding skin test methods was available to draw conclusions regarding techniques. Current clinical assessment in the UK is effective but harmonisation of approach to testing, access to services and MHRA reporting is needed. Expert anaesthetist involvement should increase to optimise diagnostic yield and advice for future anaesthesia. Dynamic tryptase evaluation improves detection of tryptase release where peak tryptase is <14mcg/L and should be adopted. Standardised clinic reports containing appropriate details of tests

  10. Deluges of Grandeur: Water, Territory, and Power on Northwest Mexico’s Río Mayo, 1880-1910

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey M. Banister

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Northwest Mexico’s irrigation landscape, known today as El Distrito de Riego 038, or El Valle del Mayo, issues from historical struggles to build an official order out of a diverse world of signs, symbols, processes, places, and peoples. It is the ancestral home of the Yoreme (Mayo, an indigenous group for whom colonisation and agricultural development have meant the loss of autonomy and of the seasonal mobility required to subsist in an arid land. It is also the birthplace of President Álvaro Obregón, a one-time chickpea farmer who transformed late-19th century irrigation praxis into the laws and institutions of 20th century water management. Reshaping territory for the ends of centralising ('federalising' water resources has always proved exceedingly difficult in the Mayo. But this was particularly so in the beginning of the federalisation process, a time of aggressive modernisation under the direction of President Porfirio Díaz (1876-1910. Research on Mexican hydraulic politics and policy, with some important exceptions, has tended to focus on the scale and scope of centralisation. Scholars have paid less attention to the moments and places where water escapes officials’ otherwise ironclad grasp. This paper explores water governance (and state formation more broadly in the late 19th century, on the eve of Mexico’s 1910 Revolution, as an ongoing, ever-inchoate series of territorial claims and projects. Understanding the weaknesses and incompleteness of such projects offers critical insight into post-revolutionary and/or contemporary hydraulic politics.

  11. The dynamics of clinical students speciality preference: A study of the College of Medicine, University of Lagos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O J Akinsola

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Undergraduate medical education is only an initial step in training the highly differentiated doctor. The medical specialties chosen by doctors for their career play an important part in workforce planning of healthcare services and as a predictive index in the composition of medical graduates and potential physicians. However, there is little theoretical understanding of how different medical specialties are perceived or how choices are made. Objective: The aim of this study is to shed more light on how medical students view specialisation as well as to discover the factors that strongly influence their choice of medical specialty. Methodology: This study was a descriptive cross-sectional study carried out using anonymous self-administered questionnaire. Simple random sampling technique was used. Data management and analysis was done using SPSS software version 15.0. Results: The response rate was 93.7%. The respondents had a good overall knowledge about specialisation in Medicine as 175 (98.3% of the respondents knew about specialisation in Medicine as well as the different specialties in Medicine. Majority 126 (70.8% of the respondents would want to specialise and about two-thirds, 112 (62.9% indicated preferred specialties as Obstetrics & Gynecology 31 (17.5%, Pediatrics 30 (16.7%, Surgery 25 (14.3%, Internal medicine 17 (9.5% and Public Health 14 (7.9%. Conclusion: The study revealed the patterns of preference of medical students to medical specialty and factors that strongly influence their choice during clinical postings.

  12. Reconstrucción de la memoria Colectiva: Madres y Abuelas de Plaza de Mayo : Relatos del Futuro

    OpenAIRE

    Coria, Carla

    2013-01-01

    El Proyecto de Extensión Universitaria "Madres y Abuelas de Plaza de Mayo" fue realizado por el Taller de Producción Audiovisual I de la Facultad de Periodismo y Comunicación Social de la Universidad Nacional de La Plata. Su objetivo fue relevar y compilar relatos audiovisuales de las madres y abuelas víctimas del terrorismo de Estado en la Argentina para socializar sus experiencias de vida, fomentar la participación política y el compromiso de la comunidad universitaria. El present...

  13. Las madres de Plaza de Mayo: à memória do sangue, o legado ao revés

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Fernanda Garbero de Aragão Ponzio

    2009-01-01

    O contexto da Argentina da década de setenta é o cenário de personagens e narrativas que emergem do medo e permanecem, até os dias atuais, em posições de resistência e enfrentamento. Nessa paisagem marcada pela opressão do Estado militar, nascem as Madres de Plaza de Mayo, originadas pela tragédia do desaparecimento forçado de seus filhos. Investidas pela maternidade, elas rompem com a esfera privada para desestabilizar a esfera pública e questionar a memória de um país maculad...

  14. Streptococo del grupo B en mujeres embarazadas atendidas en el Centro de Salud Primero de Mayo. Abril-Agosto 2007

    OpenAIRE

    Dubón Méndez, Nancy; Altamirano González, Marjorie del Socorro; Alemán Rivera, Teresa de Jesús

    2008-01-01

    Streptococos del grupo B (SGB) es una de las principales causas de muertes neonatales en todo el mundo y esta directamente relacionada con la colonización materna al momento del parto. Se realizó un estudio descriptivo de corte transversal que incluyó un total de 120 mujeres embarazadas atendidas en el Centro de Salud 1ro. de mayo-León, con el objetivo de identificar la frecuencia de streptococo del grupo B, debido a que la identificación de esta bacteria influye positivamente en la prevenció...

  15. Hidden Curricula, Ethics, and Professionalism: Optimizing Clinical Learning Environments in Becoming and Being a Physician: A Position Paper of the American College of Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Lisa Soleymani; Sulmasy, Lois Snyder; Desai, Sanjay

    2018-04-03

    Much of what is formally taught in medicine is about the knowledge, skills, and behaviors required of a physician, including how to express compassion and respect for patients at the bedside. What is learned, however, includes not only admirable qualities but also behaviors and qualities that are inconsistent with ethics and professionalism. Positive role models may reinforce the character and values the profession seeks to cultivate; negative ones directly contradict classroom lessons and expectations of patients, society, and medical educators. These positive and negative lessons, which are embedded in organizational structure and culture, are the hidden curricula conveyed in medical schools, residency programs, hospitals, and clinics. This position paper from the American College of Physicians focuses on ethics, professionalism, and the hidden curriculum. It provides strategies for revealing what is hidden to foster the development of reflective and resilient lifelong learners who embody professionalism and clinicians who are, and are perceived as, positive role models. Making the hidden visible and the implicit explicit helps to create a culture reflecting medicine's core values.

  16. A Retrospective Radiographic Survey of Pathology Associated with Impacted Third Molars among Patients Seen in Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery Clinic of College of Dentistry, Riyadh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khawaja, Naveed Ahmad; Khalil, Hesham; Parveen, Kauser; Al-Mutiri, Abdulmajeed; Al-Mutiri, Saif; Al-Saawi, Abdullah

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the type and frequency of pathological conditions around third molar teeth among randomly selected patient's records in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, College of Dentistry, King Saud University, Riyadh. Totally, 281 patient panoramic radiographs were selected with detectable pathology among 570 files of patients seen in oral and maxillofacial surgery clinics 2 years retrospectively. Almost 17-55 years age (mean age 25.43) was selected. The following radiographs were analyzed for all pathology associated impacted teeth; dental caries, bone resorption, periodontitis, and apical pathology. The study found caries, external bone resorption and periodontitis are highly frequent to mesioangular and horizontal in mandibular impacted third molar compared to maxillary impacted third molar. Overall result evaluated that tooth #28 related periodontitis is significant (P = 0.021), and tooth #38 related bone resorption, tooth #48 related root caries, bone resorption and apical pathology are highly significant (P = 0.000) comparing to others. This study also concluded the high frequency of root caries, bone resorption and apical pathology reported in relation to mandibular impacted third teeth. Significant results were also achieved with periodontitis in relation to mesiangular and vertical angulation of left impacted maxillary third molars. Prophylactic removal of impacted third molars is recommended in many studies to avoid future risk of associated pathology. Retained asymptomatic impacted third molars imply pathology that could be difficult in later ages as less morbidity in younger ages.

  17. Over-the-counter access to emergency contraception without age restriction: an opinion of the Women's Health Practice and Research Network of the American College of Clinical Pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafie, Sally; McIntosh, Jennifer; Gardner, Debra K; Gawronski, Kristen M; Karaoui, Lamis R; Koepf, Erin R; Lehman, Katherine Joy; McBane, Sarah; Patel-Shori, Nima M

    2013-05-01

    Family planning remains a high priority area for the United States, with goals to increase the proportion of pregnancies that are intended, reduce pregnancy rates among adolescents, and increase contraceptive use prioritized in the Healthy People 2020 objectives. Contraception intended for use after unprotected intercourse, known as emergency contraception, remains underutilized. Levonorgestrel is one method of oral emergency contraception, which prevents fertilization and does not disrupt an already established pregnancy; thus, timing of administration is critical. Despite data demonstrating safety and efficacy, evidence-based decision making has been overshadowed by politically charged actions involving levonorgestrel emergency contraception for over a decade. The Women's Health Practice and Research Network of the American College of Clinical Pharmacy supports expanded access to levonorgestrel emergency contraception and removal of barriers such as age restrictions on the nonprescription drug product. Pharmacists remain a key provider of emergency contraceptive services and can help ensure timely access. In states where direct pharmacy access to emergency contraception is available, pharmacists are encouraged to participate. Education, research, and advocacy are other important responsibilities for pharmacists in this arena. © 2013 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  18. Laparoscopic versus open inguinal hernia repair in patients with obesity: an American College of Surgeons NSQIP clinical outcomes analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froylich, Dvir; Haskins, Ivy N; Aminian, Ali; O'Rourke, Colin P; Khorgami, Zhamak; Boules, Mena; Sharma, Gautam; Brethauer, Stacy A; Schauer, Phillip R; Rosen, Michael J

    2017-03-01

    The laparoscopic approach to inguinal hernia repair (IHR) has proven beneficial in reducing postoperative pain and facilitating earlier return to normal activity. Except for indications such as recurrent or bilateral inguinal hernias, there remains a paucity of data that specifically identities patient populations that would benefit most from the laparoscopic approach to IHR. Nevertheless, previous experience has shown that obese patients have increased wound morbidity following open surgical procedures. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a laparoscopic versus open surgical approach to IHR on early postoperative morbidity and mortality in the obese population using the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) database. All IHRs were identified within the NSQIP database from 2005 to 2013. Obesity was defined as a body mass index ≥30 kg/m 2 . A propensity score matching technique between the laparoscopic and open approaches was used. Association of obesity with postoperative outcomes was investigated using an adjusted and unadjusted model based on clinically important preoperative variables identified by the propensity scoring system. A total of 7346 patients met inclusion criteria; 5573 patients underwent laparoscopic IHR, while 1773 patients underwent open IHR. On univariate analysis, obese patients who underwent laparoscopic IHR were less likely to experience a deep surgical site infection, wound dehiscence, or return to the operating room compared with those who underwent an open IHR. In both the adjusted and unadjusted propensity score models, there was no difference in outcomes between those who underwent laparoscopic versus open IHR. The laparoscopic approach to IHR in obese patients has similar outcomes as an open approach with regard to 30-day wound events. Preoperative risk stratification of obese patients is important to determining the appropriate surgical approach to IHR. Further studies are needed to investigate the

  19. Prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolated from clinical samples at Yekatit 12 Hospital Medical College, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilnessa, Tebelay; Bitew, Adane

    2016-08-09

    Staphylococcus aureus particularly MRSA strains are one of the major causes of community and hospital acquired bacterial infections. They are also becoming increasingly multi-drug resistant and have recently developed resistance to vancomycin, which has been used successfully to treat MRSA for many years. In-vitro determination of drug resistance patterns of S. aureus is critical for the selection of effective drugs for the treatment of staphylococci infections. The main aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of methicillin resistant S. aureus strains from different clinical specimens from patients referred for routine culture and sensitivity testing. A cross sectional study was conducted among 1360 participants at Yekatit 12 Hospital Medical College in Ethiopia from September 2013 to April 2014. Clinical samples from various anatomical sites of study participants were cultured on blood agar and mannitol salt agar and identified to be S. aureus by using catalase, coagulase and DNAse tests. S. aureus isolates then were screened for MRSA using 30 μg cefoxitin disc and other 11 antimicrobial drugs by disc diffusion procedure, and agar dilution and E tests for vancomycin. All S. aureus isolates examined for beta-lactamase production by employing nitrocefin. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 20 software and logistic regressions were applied to assess any association between dependent and independent variables. Of 1360 clinical specimens analyzed S. aureus was recovered from (194, 14.3 %). Rate of isolation of S. aureus with regard to clinical specimens was the highest in pus (118, 55.4 %).No S. aureus was isolated from CSF and urethral discharge. Out of 194 S. aureus isolates, (34, 17.5 %) were found out to be MRSA and the remaining (160, 82.5 %) were MSSA. Ninety eight (50.5 %) S. aureus were multi drug resistant and the highest isolates were resistant to penicillin (187, 96.4 %) and least resistant for clindamycin (23, 11.9 %) and vancomycin

  20. TRANSCULTURALIZATION RECOMMENDATIONS FOR DEVELOPING LATIN AMERICAN CLINICAL PRACTICE ALGORITHMS IN ENDOCRINOLOGY--PROCEEDINGS OF THE 2015 PAN-AMERICAN WORKSHOP BY THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS AND AMERICAN COLLEGE OF ENDOCRINOLOGY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechanick, Jeffrey I; Harrell, R Mack; Allende-Vigo, Myriam Z; Alvayero, Carlos; Arita-Melzer, Onix; Aschner, Pablo; Camacho, Pauline M; Castillo, Rogelio Zacarias; Cerdas, Sonia; Coutinho, Walmir F; Davidson, Jaime A; Garber, Jeffrey R; Garvey, W Timothy; González, Fernando Javier Lavalle; Granados, Denis O; Hamdy, Osama; Handelsman, Yehuda; Jiménez-Navarrete, Manuel Francisco; Lupo, Mark A; Mendoza, Enrique J; Jiménez-Montero, José G; Zangeneh, Farhad

    2016-04-01

    The American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) and American College of Endocrinology (ACE) convened their first Workshop for recommendations to optimize Clinical Practice Algorithm (CPA) development for Latin America (LA) in diabetes (focusing on glycemic control), obesity (focusing on weight loss), thyroid (focusing on thyroid nodule diagnostics), and bone (focusing on postmenopausal osteoporosis) on February 28, 2015, in San Jose, Costa Rica. A standardized methodology is presented incorporating various transculturalization factors: resource availability (including imaging equipment and approved pharmaceuticals), health care professional and patient preferences, lifestyle variables, socio-economic parameters, web-based global accessibility, electronic implementation, and need for validation protocols. A standardized CPA template with node-specific recommendations to assist the local transculturalization process is provided. Participants unanimously agreed on the following five overarching principles for LA: (1) there is only one level of optimal endocrine care, (2) hemoglobin A1C should be utilized at every level of diabetes care, (3) nutrition education and increased pharmaceutical options are necessary to optimize the obesity care model, (4) quality neck ultrasound must be part of an optimal thyroid nodule care model, and (5) more scientific evidence is needed on osteoporosis prevalence and cost to justify intervention by governmental health care authorities. This 2015 AACE/ACE Workshop marks the beginning of a structured activity that assists local experts in creating culturally sensitive, evidence-based, and easy-to-implement tools for optimizing endocrine care on a global scale.

  1. Allergy. Conventional and alternative concepts. A report of the Royal College of Physicians Committee on Clinical Immunology and Allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, A B; Lessof, M H

    1992-10-01

    Allergy is an exaggerated response of the immune system to external substances. It plays a role in a wide range of diseases. In some, such as summer hayfever, the symptoms are due entirely to allergy. In other conditions, particularly asthma, eczema and urticaria, allergy plays a part in some patients but not all. In these situations, allergy may have either a major role or provide just one of many triggers. In an individual patient's illness, the importance of allergy may change with time. The most common allergens (substances causing allergy) are grass and tree pollens, the house dust mite, products from pets and other animals, agents encountered in industry, wasp and bee venom, drugs, and certain foods. Food allergy presents a particularly difficult problem. Some individuals who react to food suffer from food allergy in its strict sense but in others there is no evidence of an alteration in the immune system. Here the term 'food intolerance' is preferable. Conventional doctors treat allergy by allergen avoidance--where this is possible--and drugs that relieve symptoms. In a few selected cases, in which other methods have failed, immunotherapy (desensitisation or hyposensitisation) is recommended. Although patients who consult practitioners of alternative allergy may do so by preference, it is often also because they are dissatisfied with the conventional approach to diagnosis and treatment, or because they have conditions which conventional doctors do not accept as having an allergic basis. There is a very wide range of alternative approaches to allergy, including the methods used by clinical ecologists and other treatments such as acupuncture and homoeopathy. Hypnosis may have a small role to play in helping the asthmatic and similar effects have been suggested for acupuncture. Furthermore, it is likely that there are still many active ingredients in medicinal plants used by herbalists but these need to be clearly identified and purified before their usefulness

  2. AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS AND AMERICAN COLLEGE OF ENDOCRINOLOGY DISEASE STATE CLINICAL REVIEW: MANAGEMENT OF ACROMEGALY PATIENTS: WHAT IS THE ROLE OF PRE-OPERATIVE MEDICAL THERAPY?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleseriu, Maria; Hoffman, Andrew R; Katznelson, Laurence

    2015-06-01

    SRL may be considered in patients with macroadenomas without local mass effects on the optic chiasm, as SRLs have been shown to reduce tumor size and control GH hypersecretion. However, the data are insufficient to support general use of a SRL prior to surgery in order to improve post-surgery biochemical outcomes. Theoretically, patients with severe cardiac and respiratory complications due to acromegaly could potentially benefit from pre-operative SRLs in order to reduce peri-operative morbidity. Further investigation and investment in large randomized long-term clinical trials are needed to define the precise role and duration of pre-surgical medical treatment in acromegaly patients.

  3. Using Mobile Sensing to Test Clinical Models of Depression, Social Anxiety, State Affect, and Social Isolation Among College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Philip I; Fua, Karl; Huang, Yu; Bonelli, Wesley; Xiong, Haoyi; Barnes, Laura E; Teachman, Bethany A

    2017-03-03

    likelihood of spending time at home, and more negative or less positive affect was linked to longer homestay. Interactions indicated that, among individuals higher in social anxiety, higher negative affect and lower positive affect within a day was associated with greater likelihood of spending time at home the following day. Results demonstrate the feasibility and utility of modeling the relationship between affect and homestay using fine-grained GPS data. Although these findings must be replicated in a larger study and with clinical samples, they suggest that integrating repeated state affect assessments in situ with continuous GPS data can increase understanding of how actual homestay is related to affect in everyday life and to symptoms of anxiety and depression. ©Philip I Chow, Karl Fua, Yu Huang, Wesley Bonelli, Haoyi Xiong, Laura E Barnes, Bethany A Teachman. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http://www.jmir.org), 03.03.2017.

  4. Actitud del gobierno ante el 1º de mayo, desde 1890 hasta la Segunda República

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucía Rivas Lara

    1988-01-01

    Full Text Available El 1° de Mayo, cuyo origen estuvo en la aspiración obrera a la jornada de ocho horas, se celebró por primera vez en Estados Unidos en 1886, después de muchos años de lucha de los trabajadores en los diversos países por el acortamiento de las jornadas, dado que hasta entonces habían sido de 12 a 16 horas según los lugares. Pero este 1° de mayo de 1886 tuvo un nacimiento espontáneo entre los trabajadores anarquistas norteamericanos, merced a la decisión de un congreso de la Federación Americana del Trabajo (AFL, sin perspectiva de continuidad ni trascendencia más allá de sus fronteras. No obstante, en el marco de su país tuvo un notable éxito consiguiendo con él muchos trabajadores la jornada de ocho horas, y sirviendo de precedente.

  5. Interdisciplinary Development of an Improved Emergency Department Procedural Work Surface Through Iterative Design and Use Testing in Simulated and Clinical Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao C; Bermudez, Ana M; Reddy, Pranav M; Sarpatwari, Ravi R; Chheng, Darin B; Mezoian, Taylor J; Schwartz, Victoria R; Simmons, Quinneil J; Jay, Gregory D; Kobayashi, Leo

    2017-03-01

    surface and just-in-time training on its use when performing bedside procedures. Subjects completed the validated 10-point System Usability Scale postshift for the surface that they had used. The study protocol was approved by the institutional review board. Multiple prototypes and recursive design revisions resulted in a fully functional, portable, and durable bedside procedural surface that featured a stainless steel tray and intuitive hook-and-lock mechanisms for attachment to ED stretcher bed rails. Forty-two control and 40 experimental group subjects participated and completed questionnaires. The median System Usability Scale score (out of 100; higher scores associated with better usability) was 72.5 (interquartile range [IQR] 51.3 to 86.3) for the Mayo stand; the experimental surface was scored at 93.8 (IQR 84.4 to 97.5 for a difference in medians of 17.5 (95% confidence interval 10 to 27.5). Subjects reported several usability challenges with the Mayo stand; the experimental surface was reviewed as easy to use, simple, and functional. In accordance with experimental live environment deployment, questionnaire responses, and end-user suggestions, the project team finalized the design specification for the experimental procedural surface for open dissemination. An iterative, interdisciplinary approach was used to generate, evaluate, revise, and finalize the design specification for a new procedural surface that met all core end-user requirements. The final surface design was evaluated favorably on a validated usability tool against Mayo stands when use tested in simulated and live clinical settings. Copyright © 2016 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Healthy lifestyle interventions to combat noncommunicable disease-a novel nonhierarchical connectivity model for key stakeholders: a policy statement from the American Heart Association, European Society of Cardiology, European Association for Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation, and American College of Preventive Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arena, Ross; Guazzi, Marco; Lianov, Liana; Whitsel, Laurie; Berra, Kathy; Lavie, Carl J; Kaminsky, Leonard; Williams, Mark; Hivert, Marie-France; Cherie Franklin, Nina; Myers, Jonathan; Dengel, Donald; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M; Pinto, Fausto J; Cosentino, Francesco; Halle, Martin; Gielen, Stephan; Dendale, Paul; Niebauer, Josef; Pelliccia, Antonio; Giannuzzi, Pantaleo; Corra, Ugo; Piepoli, Massimo F; Guthrie, George; Shurney, Dexter; Arena, Ross; Berra, Kathy; Dengel, Donald; Franklin, Nina Cherie; Hivert, Marie-France; Kaminsky, Leonard; Lavie, Carl J; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M; Myers, Jonathan; Whitsel, Laurie; Williams, Mark; Corra, Ugo; Cosentino, Francesco; Dendale, Paul; Giannuzzi, Pantaleo; Gielen, Stephan; Guazzi, Marco; Halle, Martin; Niebauer, Josef; Pelliccia, Antonio; Piepoli, Massimo F; Pinto, Fausto J; Guthrie, George; Lianov, Liana; Shurney, Dexter

    2015-08-14

    Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) have become the primary health concern for most countries around the world. Currently, more than 36 million people worldwide die from NCDs each year, accounting for 63% of annual global deaths; most are preventable. The global financial burden of NCDs is staggering, with an estimated 2010 global cost of $6.3 trillion (US dollars) that is projected to increase to $13 trillion by 2030. A number of NCDs share one or more common predisposing risk factors, all related to lifestyle to some degree: (1) cigarette smoking, (2) hypertension, (3) hyperglycemia, (4) dyslipidemia, (5) obesity, (6) physical inactivity, and (7) poor nutrition. In large part, prevention, control, or even reversal of the aforementioned modifiable risk factors are realized through leading a healthy lifestyle (HL). The challenge is how to initiate the global change, not toward increasing documentation of the scope of the problem but toward true action-creating, implementing, and sustaining HL initiatives that will result in positive, measurable changes in the previously defined poor health metrics. To achieve this task, a paradigm shift in how we approach NCD prevention and treatment is required. The goal of this American Heart Association/European Society of Cardiology/European Association for Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation/American College of Preventive Medicine policy statement is to define key stakeholders and highlight their connectivity with respect to HL initiatives. This policy encourages integrated action by all stakeholders to create the needed paradigm shift and achieve broad adoption of HL behaviors on a global scale. © 2015 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research, and the European Society of Cardiology. This article is being published concurrently in Mayo Clinic Proceedings [1]. The articles are identical except for minor stylistic and spelling differences in keeping with each journal's style. Either citation can be used when

  7. Making Canada a destination for medical tourists: why Canadian provinces should not try to become "Mayo Clinics of the North".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Leigh

    2012-05-01

    When Canadian researchers examine the subject of medical tourism, they typically focus on ethical, social, public health and health policy issues related to Canadians seeking health services in other countries. They emphasize study of Canada as a departure point for medical tourists rather than as a potential destination for international patients. Several influential voices have recently argued that provincial healthcare systems in Canada should market health services to international patients. Proponents of marketing Canada as a destination for medical tourists argue that attracting international patients will generate revenue for provincial healthcare systems. Responding to such proposals, I argue that there are at least seven reasons why provincial health systems in Canada should not dedicate institutional, financial and health human resources to promoting themselves as destinations for medical tourists.

  8. The Mayo Clinic experience with Morel-Lavallée lesions: establishment of a practice management guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickerson, Terry P; Zielinski, Martin D; Jenkins, Donald H; Schiller, Henry J

    2014-02-01

    Although uncommon, Morel-Lavallée lesions (also called closed degloving injuries) are associated with considerable morbidity in trauma patients. There is lack of consensus regarding proper management of these lesions. Management options include nonoperative therapies, along with percutaneous and operative techniques. We sought to define the factors associated with failure of percutaneous aspiration to better identify patients requiring immediate operative management. We retrospectively searched our prospectively collected database for patient records containing the terms Morel-Lavallée, closed degloving injury, or posttraumatic seroma from February 2, 2004, through December 23, 2011. Treatment methods included compression wraps or observation (nonoperative management), percutaneous aspiration, or operative management with incision/drainage or formal debridement of skin and soft tissues that resulted in wound vacuum-assisted closure placement and/or split-thickness skin graft (operative management). The treatment groups were compared using univariate analysis and χ testing. We identified 79 patients with 87 Morel-Lavallée lesions in the setting of trauma. Most were caused by motor vehicle collisions (25%). No difference was observed between the treatment groups in sex, body mass index, anticoagulation treatment, diabetes mellitus, smoking history, or alcohol use. The percutaneous aspiration group had higher rates of recurrence (56% vs. 19% and 15% in nonoperative and operative groups, respectively). The percentage of patients who had aspiration of more than 50 mL of fluid was higher for lesions that recurred than for lesions that resolved (83% vs. 33%, p = 0.02). Aspiration of more than 50 mL of fluid from Morel-Lavallée lesions was much more common among lesions that recurred (83%) than among those that resolved (33%). We therefore recommend that aspiration of more than 50 mL of fluid from a Morel-Lavallée lesion prompts operative intervention. We have now adopted this as a practice management guideline. Therapeutic/care management study, level III.

  9. Quality initiatives: improving patient flow for a bone densitometry practice: results from a Mayo Clinic radiology quality initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aakre, Kenneth T; Valley, Timothy B; O'Connor, Michael K

    2010-03-01

    Lean Six Sigma process improvement methodologies have been used in manufacturing for some time. However, Lean Six Sigma process improvement methodologies also are applicable to radiology as a way to identify opportunities for improvement in patient care delivery settings. A multidisciplinary team of physicians and staff conducted a 100-day quality improvement project with the guidance of a quality advisor. By using the framework of DMAIC (define, measure, analyze, improve, and control), time studies were performed for all aspects of patient and technologist involvement. From these studies, value stream maps for the current state and for the future were developed, and tests of change were implemented. Comprehensive value stream maps showed that before implementation of process changes, an average time of 20.95 minutes was required for completion of a bone densitometry study. Two process changes (ie, tests of change) were undertaken. First, the location for completion of a patient assessment form was moved from inside the imaging room to the waiting area, enabling patients to complete the form while waiting for the technologist. Second, the patient was instructed to sit in a waiting area immediately outside the imaging rooms, rather than in the main reception area, which is far removed from the imaging area. Realignment of these process steps, with reduced technologist travel distances, resulted in a 3-minute average decrease in the patient cycle time. This represented a 15% reduction in the initial patient cycle time with no change in staff or costs. Radiology process improvement projects can yield positive results despite small incremental changes.

  10. CLINICAL SPECTRUM OF COMORBID COELIAC DISEASE IN TYPE 1 DIABETES MELLITUS- A TERTIARY CARE CENTRE BASED STUDY IN ASSAM MEDICAL COLLEGE AND HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apurba Dutta

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The relationship between T1DM and CD has been known due to their identical genetic and autoimmune background. The prevalence of CD in T1DM in Assam has not been determined. We examined the prevalence and clinical profile of CD in patient with T1DM in Assam. MATERIALS AND METHODS A cross-sectional study with 96 patients with T1DM from the Outpatient or Inpatient Department of Medicine of Assam Medical College and Hospital, Dibrugarh, was undertaken in the study period from July 1, 2015, to June 30, 2016. Anti-Tissue Transglutaminase Antibody (anti-TTG measurement was done by ELISA in all patients. Duodenal biopsy were performed for T1DM patients with positive and negative serology for anti-TTG antibodies. RESULTS Total 96 T1DM patients (51 males and 45 females with the age ranging from 12-50 years (mean ± SD 24.24 ± 6.89 were studied. Elevated anti-TTG levels were found in the sera of 4 (4.17% out of 96. The male-to-female ratio of the anti-TTG positive is 1:1. Serology positive patients had typical symptoms along with statistically significant association of neuropathy, anaemia, hypoalbuminaemia and hypocalcaemia. Duodenal mucosal biopsy of one IgA tTG positive patient was Marsh3a type. Out of 12 T1DM who were serology negative for CD, 1 had Marsh type 3a, 2 had type 2, 5 had type 1 and 4 had type 0 (normal. CONCLUSION Celiac disease in T1DM is not uncommon in this part and prevalence is 4.17%. Suspected cases needs evaluation by serological test along with histopathological examination of duodenal mucosa. Serum IgA measurement and genetic study can be considered in serology-negative patients with typical symptoms of celiac disease.

  11. Laboratory and clinical predictors of 30-day survival for patients on Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO): 8-Year experience at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francischetti, Ivo M B; Szymanski, James; Rodriguez, Daniel; Heo, Moonseong; Wolgast, Lucia R

    2017-08-01

    Survival of patients on ECMO has remained stable in every population. Laboratory values predictors of survival are required to improve patient care. Clinical Looking Glass software was used to assess Electronic Medical Records (EMRs) of patients at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center (2007-2014). Our population comprises of 166 adults and was divided in survivors and non-survivors, within 30days. Indications for ECMO were cardiac (65%), respiratory (25%) and infectious diseases (<10%). Eighty six patients (51.8%) survived the procedure. Gender, body weight, ejection fraction, diastolic blood pressure, and socio-economic status did not differ among survivors and non-survivors. In contrast, younger patients (45yo vs 55yo, p=0.0001) and higher systolic blood pressure (115mmHg vs 103mmHg, p=0.025) have favorable outcome. Univariate analysis shows that pre-cannulation values for creatinine (p=0.0003), chloride (p=0.009), bicarbonate (p=0.015) and pH (p=0.03) have prognostic value. Post-cannulation aPTT, pH, platelet and lymphocyte counts also have discriminative power. Notably, multiple logistic regressions for Multivariate Analysis identified chloride (OR 1.07; 95% CI 1.02-1.13; p=0.004), pH (OR 3.35; 95% CI 1.89-5.9; p<0.0001) and aPTT (OR 0.98; 95% CI 0.976-0.998; p=0.024) as independent risk factors for 30-day mortality. These results imply that pre-existing renal conditions and hemostatic dysregulation contribute to poor outcome. Finally, patients on VV-ECMO have increase odds of survival (OR 1.88; 95% CI 1.06-3.34; p=0.029). Laboratory markers identified herein may guide the management of patients on ECMO. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Prevalence of the American College of Rheumatology hematological classification criteria and associations with serological and clinical variables in 460 systemic lupus erythematosus patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thelma Skare

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study systemic lupus erythematosus in a Brazilian population using the American College of Rheumatology hematological classification criteria and report associations of the disease with serological and clinical profiles. Methods: This is a retrospective study of 460 systemic lupus erythematosus patients followed in a single rheumatologic center during the last 10 years. Hematological manifestations considered for this study were hemolysis, leukopenia, lymphocytopenia and thrombocytopenia. Results: The cumulative prevalences of leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, lymphocytopenia and hemolytic anemia were 29.8%, 21.08%, 17.7% and 8.4%, respectively. A higher percentage of patients with hemolysis had anticardiolipin IgM (p-value = 0.002. Those with leukopenia had more lymphopenia (p-value = 0.02, psychosis (p-value = 0.01, thrombocy- topenia (p-value <0.0001 and anti-double stranded DNA antibodies (p-value = 0.03. Patients with lymphopenia had more leukopenia (OR = 1.8; 95% CI = 1.01-3.29 and lupus anticoagulant antibodies (OR = 2.2; 95% CI = 1.16-4.39 and those with thrombocytopenia had more leukopenia (OR = 3.1; 95% CI = 1.82-5.44 and antiphospholipid syndrome (OR = 3.1; 95% CI = 1.28-7.87. Conclusion: The most common hematological finding was leukopenia and the least common was hemolysis. Associations of low platelet count and hemolysis were found with antiphospholipid syndrome and anticardiolipin IgM positivity, respectively. Leukopenia and lymphocytopenia are correlated and leukopenia is more common in systemic lupus erythe- matosus patients with psychosis, thrombocytopenia and anti-double stranded DNA.

  13. A statistical survey of x-ray CT cases at the Clinic of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Chiba Hospital, Tokyo Dental College

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitagawa, Hiromi; Wakoh, Mamoru; Shibuya, Hitoshi; Yamada, Masayuki; Harada, Takuya; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Makihara, Masahiro; Kuroyanagi, Kinya

    1997-01-01

    Statistical study was performed of x-ray CT cases at the Clinic of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Chiba Hospital, Tokyo Dental College since a Toshiba CT Scanner TCT-700S was settled in 1988, until December 1994. Total number of cases photographed was 2645 cases, Male; 1447 (54.7%), Female; 1198 cases (45.3%). Total number of cases yearly photographed have increased every year. 95.43% of the cases were the diseases of oral surgery regions. X-ray CT has been used to malignant tumors (730 cases; 29.7%), cyst (435 cases; 17.7%), inflammation (362 cases; 14.7%), benign tumors (261 cases; 10.6%), injury (171 cases; 7.0%), salivary gland diseases (126 cases; 5.1%) and others. The number of tumors and cyst have been increasing every year. Average number of slices in every diseases were counted. Malignant tumor, injury, temporomandibular joint diseases, and congenital anomalies and malformations were counted many slices. Percentages of number of enhanced CT cases have been increased every year. Recently, number of enhanced CT cases have more number than non-enhanced CT cases. This attitude is correlated with the number of malignant tumors which have been increasing every year. Total number of cases of three dimensional imaging CT (3D-CT) was 316 cases. 3D-CT has been used to injury (146 cases; 46.2%), temporomandibular joint diseases (52 cases; 16.4%), congenital anomalies and malformations (49 cases; 15.5%), tumors (21 cases; 6.7%), cyst (13 cases; 4.1%) and others. The need of x-ray CT in our field and the tendency of dental treatment at Chiba Hospital might be changed in the future. In order to this situation, this type of statistical study will be performed again. (author)

  14. Mentorship through advisory colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murr, Andrew H; Miller, Carol; Papadakis, Maxine

    2002-11-01

    Medical students face pressures ranging from the need to create a social network to learning vast amounts of scientific material. Students often feel isolated in this system and lack mentorship. In order to counteract feelings of bureaucratic anonymity and isolation, the University of California San Francisco has created an advisory college to foster the professional and personal growth and well being of students. UCSF has developed a formal structure to advise medical students. A selection committee, chaired by the associate dean of student affairs, appointed five faculty mentors to head advisory colleges. These five colleges serve as the advising and well-being infrastructure for the students. Mentors were chosen from a balanced range of clinical disciplines, both primary and specialty. The disciplines are obstetrics-gynecology, otolaryngology/head and neck surgery, medicine, pediatrics, and psychiatry. The mentors have demonstrated excellence in advising and counseling of students. Mentors meet individually at the beginning of the academic year with incoming first-year and second-year students. They then have bimonthly meetings with eight to ten students within each college throughout the academic year. Curricula for these group sessions include well-being discussions and coping techniques, sessions on the hidden and informal curriculum of professionalism, and discussions on career choices and strategies. For third-year students, advisory college meetings are scheduled during intersessions, which are weeklong courses that occur between the eight-week clerkship blocks. Mentors are available throughout the year to meet with students on an as-needed basis, and advisory colleges may hold group social activities. The dean's office supports each mentor with 20% salary and provides administrative support for the group college activities. Historically, UCSF students feel they receive an excellent education and appropriate job opportunities, but they do not feel they

  15. Gastrointestinal helminths of Gentoo penguins (Pygoscelis papua) from Stranger Point, 25 de Mayo/King George Island, Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Julia Inés; Fusaro, Bruno; Longarzo, Lucrecia; Coria, Néstor Rubén; Vidal, Virginia; Jerez, Silvia; Ortiz, Juana; Barbosa, Andrés

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this work is to contribute to the knowledge of gastrointestinal parasites of the Gentoo penguin (Pygoscelis papua) from 25 de Mayo/King George Island (South Shetlands, Antarctica). Gastrointestinal tracts of 37 fresh dead individuals (21 chicks, 10 juveniles, and 6 adults) were collected from December 2006 to February 2012 and examined for macroparasites. Four adult parasite species were found: one Cestoda species (Parorchites zederi), two Nematoda species (Stegophorus macronectes and Tetrameres wetzeli), and one Acanthocephalan (Corynosoma shackletoni). Two species of immature acanthocephalans, Corynosoma hamanni and Corynosoma bullosum, were found in a single host. This is the first record of Tetrameres wetzeli in Gentoo penguins. The low parasite richness observed could be related to the stenophagic and pelagic diet of this host species which feeds almost exclusively on krill.

  16. Implementation of a model of quality control program in the radiodiagnostic service at the general hospital Dos de Mayo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acosta Reginfo, N.; Ramirez Quijada, R.

    1998-01-01

    In order to implement a model of quality control program, the General Hospital Dos de Mayo was selected, since it manages a specialized radiology service - defined according to the OMS criteria - This radiology service attends nearly 60 % of total patients of the Hospital. This program intends to be a model for application to another hospitals havings similar characteritics, since any formal quality control program has been implemented in neither private nor public hospitals in the country. The model, while allowing to make measurements of main parameters, also allows to verify that radiation doses to patients, radiation workers and public trend to a level as low as reasonably achievable, and also to yield images with enough diagnostic quality, and to induce work environment with shared responsibility and commitment

  17. Salinity monitoring using remote sensing in the 038 Rio Mayo Irrigation District. Sonora, Mexico, by remote sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulido Madrigal, L.; Gonzalez Meraz, J.

    2009-01-01

    a soil salinity survey was carried out in the Rio Mayo irrigation district (ID) in 1996, using satellite imagery along with and EM-38 electromagnetic (EM) device. Data from Landsat TM imagery were calibrated with field data, according to the Plant Indicator methodology. This methodology yielded a partial salinity map of the ID, but including only those areas where indicator crops were cultivated. The remaining non-mapped areas were surveyed with an EM-38 electromagnetic device, generating a second partial salinity map. Both partial maps were integrated to get a complete soil salinity map of the ID. In 2001, another soil salinity survey was carried out using solely the EM device. The results of both methodologies were analyzed, resulting in less affected areas in 2001 compared too those obtained in 1996. (Author) 4 refs.

  18. College education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criswell, David R.

    1990-01-01

    Space Grant Colleges and Universities must build the space curriculum of the future on the firm basis of deep knowledge of an involvement with the present operating programs of the nation and an on-going and extensive program of leading edge research in the aerospace sciences and engineering, management, law, finance, and the other arts that are integral to our planetary society. The Space Grant College and Fellowship Program must create new academic fields of enquiry, which is a long and difficult process that will require deeper and broader interaction between NASA and academia than has previously existed.

  19. College algebra

    CERN Document Server

    Kolman, Bernard

    1985-01-01

    College Algebra, Second Edition is a comprehensive presentation of the fundamental concepts and techniques of algebra. The book incorporates some improvements from the previous edition to provide a better learning experience. It provides sufficient materials for use in the study of college algebra. It contains chapters that are devoted to various mathematical concepts, such as the real number system, the theory of polynomial equations, exponential and logarithmic functions, and the geometric definition of each conic section. Progress checks, warnings, and features are inserted. Every chapter c

  20. Lower and Middle Ordovician conodonts of Laurentian affinity from blocks of limestone in the Rosroe Formation, South Mayo Trough, western Ireland and their palaeogeographic implication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stouge, Svend; Harper, David A. T.; Sevastopulo, George D.

    2016-01-01

    The Middle Ordovician Rosroe Formation consists of some 1350m of coarse, mainly siliciclastic to volcaniclastic sedimentary rocks, deposited in a submarine fan environment, and is restricted to the southern limb of the South Mayo Trough, western Ireland. Discrete allochthonous blocks, reaching 5m...

  1. CLINICAL AND DEMOGRAPHIC STUDY OF JAPANESE ENCEPHALITIS PATIENTS ADMITTED IN GAUHATI MEDICAL COLLEGE AND HOSPITAL, GUWAHATI, ASSAM, INDIA DURING 2014 EPIDEMIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhaskar

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Japanese Encephalitis is one of the most common causes of Acute Encephalitic Syndrome in Asia. During the period of June to August in 2014 an epidemic occurred in Assam, a northestern state of India. METHODS Patients admitted in the Medicine Department in Gauhati Medical College and Hospital (GMCH, Guwahati, Assam, India, with clinical features of Acute Encephalitic Syndrome (AES i.e. acute onset fever and a change in mental status (including symptoms such as confusion, disorientation, coma, or inability to talk and/or new onset seizures (excluding simple febrile seizures from June to August 2014 underwent ELISA for Japanese Encephalitis Immunoglobulin M in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF at the time of admission. Clinical features, demographic profile and laboratory investigations were recorded in positive patients. RESULTS 226 AES patients were admitted in 6 different units of Medicine ward in GMCH, out of which 76 patients were diagnosed to be JE positive with CSF IgM ESLIA, coming from 17 districts of Assam. Out of 76 patients, 69 patients were from rural area, only 7 patients were from urban area. 59 (77.63% patients were farmers or daily labourers by occupation and 23 (30.26% patients were illiterate. Mean age of patients was 47.7 years and male to female ratio was 1.7:1. Mean duration of fever was 6.5 days, convulsion was found in 13.15% patients, out of which most common was generalised seizure (9.2%. 55.2% patients had meningeal signs, 23.68% patients had focal neurological deficits in the form of hemiparesis and monoparesis and mean GCS score was 9.28. Extra pyramidal features present in patients were rigidity (23.68%, abnormal posturing (15.78% and abnormal movements (23.68%. 23.68% patients had Leukocytosis and Thrombocytopenia was found in 21 (27.6% patients. Mean CSF cell count was 34.34 cells/mm3 with mean 29.67% polymorphs, mean CSF protein and sugar was 56.15 mg/dl and 66.92 mg/dl respectively. Serum bilirubin level was

  2. A designated centre for people with disabilities operated by Western Care Association - Mayo

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Harrison, Peter

    2017-06-01

    The experimental gingivitis study of Löe et al.1 demonstrated a cause and effect relationship between plaque accumulation and gingival inflammation, and helped to establish plaque\\/biofilm as the primary risk factor for gingivitis. When healthy individuals withdrew oral hygiene efforts, gingival inflammation ensued within 21 days in all subjects. Once effective plaque removal was recommenced, clinical gingival health was quickly re-established – indicating that plaque-associated inflammation is modifiable by plaque control. As current consensus confirms that gingivitis and periodontitis may be viewed as a continuum of disease,2 the rationale for achieving effective plaque control is clear.

  3. The clinical significance of quality of life assessments in oncology: a summary for clinicians

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sloan, Jeff A.; Frost, Marlene H.; Berzon, Rick; Dueck, Amylou; Guyatt, Gordon; Moinpour, Carol; Sprangers, Mirjam; Ferrans, Carol; Cella, David

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A series of six manuscripts with an introduction appeared in the Mayo Clinic Proceedings, based upon the collective effort of 30 individuals with an interest and expertise in assessing the clinical significance of quality of life (QOL) assessments. The series of manuscripts described the

  4. Present status and future directions of the Mayo/IBM PACS project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Richard L.; Forbes, Glenn S.; Gehring, Dale G.; Salutz, James R.; Pavlicek, William

    1991-07-01

    This joint project began in 1988 and was motivated by the need to develop an alternative to the archival process in place at that time (magnetic tape) for magnetic resonance imaging and neurological computed tomography. In addition, this project was felt to be an important step in gaining the necessary clinical experience for the future implementation of various aspects of electronic imaging. The initial phase of the project was conceived and developed to prove the concept, test the fundamental components, and produce performance measurements for future work. The key functions of this phase centered on attachment of imaging equipment (GE Signa) and archival processes using a non-dedicated (institutionally supplied) local area network (LAN). Attachment of imaging equipment to the LAN was performed using commercially available devices (Ethernet, PS/2, Token Ring). Image data were converted to ACR/NEMA format with retention of the vendor specific header information. Performance measurements were encouraging and led to the design of following projects. The second phase has recently been concluded. The major features of this phase have been to greatly expand the network, put the network into clinical use, establish an efficient and useful viewing station, include diagnostic reports in the archive data, provide wide area network (WAN) capability via ISDN, and establish two-way real-time video between remote sites. This phase has heightened both departmental and institutional thought regarding various issues raised by electronic imaging. Much discussion regarding both present as well as future archival processes has occurred. The use of institutional LAN resources has proven to be adequate for the archival function examined thus far. Experiments to date have shown that use of dedicated resources will be necessary for retrieval activities at even a basic level. This report presents an overview of the background present status and future directions of the project.

  5. Outcome prediction in home- and community-based brain injury rehabilitation using the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malec, James F; Parrot, Devan; Altman, Irwin M; Swick, Shannon

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study was to develop statistical formulas to predict levels of community participation on discharge from post-hospital brain injury rehabilitation using retrospective data analysis. Data were collected from seven geographically distinct programmes in a home- and community-based brain injury rehabilitation provider network. Participants were 642 individuals with post-traumatic brain injury. Interventions consisted of home- and community-based brain injury rehabilitation. The main outcome measure was the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory (MPAI-4) Participation Index. Linear discriminant models using admission MPAI-4 Participation Index score and log chronicity correctly predicted excellent (no to minimal participation limitations), very good (very mild participation limitations), good (mild participation limitations), and limited (significant participation limitations) outcome levels at discharge. Predicting broad outcome categories for post-hospital rehabilitation programmes based on admission assessment data appears feasible and valid. Equations to provide patients and families with probability statements on admission about expected levels of outcome are provided. It is unknown to what degree these prediction equations can be reliably applied and valid in other settings.

  6. The Mayo Portland Adaptability Inventory-4 outcome measure is superior to UK FIM+FAM in a British military population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGilloway, Emer; Mitchell, James; Dharm-Datta, Shreshth; Roberts, Andrew; Tilley, Haydn; Etherington, John

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the most appropriate rehabilitation outcome measure for use in a young adult population with acquired brain injury. A 2-year prospective study of patients admitted to a UK military neuro-rehabilitation unit with acquired brain injury to compare the appropriateness of the Functional Independence Measure/Functional Assessment Measure (FIM+FAM) vs the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory Version 4 (MPAI-4) in assessing outcomes. Patients were assessed at admission, discharge and at 4-month follow-up using FIM+FAM and MPAI-4. The FIM+FAM total motor score showed a marked ceiling affect, 42% of patients scored the maximum on admission rising to 80% at discharge. The MPAI-4 did not show significant ceiling effects. The other sub-scales of FIM+FAM and MPAI-4 were generally comparable, no more than 17% achieved ceiling at follow-up. This is the first comparative study of FIM+FAM and MPAI-4 in a young adult military population following acquired brain injury. All patients showed improvements in both outcome measures following intensive inpatient rehabilitation. However, the MPAI-4 did not show ceiling effects in motor scores. This measure was, therefore, found to be more appropriate in the cohort.

  7. Klebsiella pneumoniae nueva Delhi metalo-betalactamasa en el Hospital Nacional Dos de Mayo: Lima, Perú

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristhian Resurrección-Delgado

    Full Text Available La emergencia de enterobacterias productoras de carbapenemasas de tipo Nueva Delhi Metalo beta-lactamasas (NDM, representan, hoy en día, un verdadero problema de salud pública mundial. La presencia de este mecanismo de resistencia limita o anula las opciones terapéuticas para combatir a estas bacterias. En Latinoamérica, las cifras son cada vez más elevadas, pues se reportan en Guatemala, Colombia, Chile, Argentina, entre otros. Perú no ha descrito, hasta la fecha, la presencia de este patrón de resistencia; sin embargo, desde hace varios años se presume de su existencia. Se describen nueve casos de Klebsiella pneumoniae NDM, como agentes infecciosos o colonizantes, en pacientes críticamente enfermos, en su mayoría con patología neuroquirúrgica, del Hospital Nacional Dos de Mayo, en Lima - Perú. Los pacientes de la serie descrita a continuación, representan los primeros reportes de Klebsiella pneumoniae NDM en el Perú.

  8. El primero de mayo en la ciudad de México en los tiempos de la revolución.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Ribera Carb\\u00F3

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available De entre las tradiciones inventadas por los trabajadores del mundo, la más exitosa es, sin duda, la del Primero de Mayo que sirvió para cohesionar a grupos obreros de distinta denominación ideológica y a crear entre ellos conciencia de clase como ninguna otra. En México la conmemoración empezó a realizarse de manera tardía. Fue en 1913 cuando se organizó en la ciudad de México la primera manifestación masiva a partir de la iniciativa de la Casa del Obrero Mundial fundada un año antes y vinculada al pensamiento anarcosindicalista. Fue justamente con esta manifestación que la clase obrera empezó a construir su propio espacio en la capital del país y convirtió a la Casa del Obrero Mundial en un elemento fundamental del entramado político de la Revolución Mexicana.

  9. The Community College Option

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, James E.; Ahearn, Caitlin; Rosenbaum, Janet

    2016-01-01

    Efforts to promote college for all for all has opened college doors to a broad range of students. But college--and career success after college--doesn't have to mean a bachelor's degree. Community college credentials, such as associate's degrees and one-year certificates, can lead to further degrees or jobs that offer more benefits than students…

  10. The clinical application of genome-wide sequencing for monogenic diseases in Canada: Position Statement of the Canadian College of Medical Geneticists

    OpenAIRE

    Boycott, Kym; Hartley, Taila; Adam, Shelin; Bernier, Francois; Chong, Karen; Fernandez, Bridget A; Friedman, Jan M; Geraghty, Michael T; Hume, Stacey; Knoppers, Bartha M; Laberge, Anne-Marie; Majewski, Jacek; Mendoza-Londono, Roberto; Meyn, M Stephen; Michaud, Jacques L

    2015-01-01

    Purpose and scope The aim of this Position Statement is to provide recommendations for Canadian medical geneticists, clinical laboratory geneticists, genetic counsellors and other physicians regarding the use of genome-wide sequencing of germline DNA in the context of clinical genetic diagnosis. This statement has been developed to facilitate the clinical translation and development of best practices for clinical genome-wide sequencing for genetic diagnosis of monogenic diseases in Canada; it...

  11. Los movimientos sociales en la transición democrática. El caso de las Madres de Plaza de Mayo: sentimiento y discurso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martín D'ALESSANDRO

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available RESUMEN: El presente artículo hace un repaso por el surgimiento y consolidación de Madres de Plaza de Mayo como movimiento social que inició sus actividades cuestionando la lucha antisubversiva emprendida por la dictadura militar argentina. Plantea además como este movimiento ha sufrido una radicalización de su discurso en la época de la transición a la democracia, cuando se desarrolla el enjuiciamiento de las Juntas Militares, y a partir de ese momento deciden enfrentarse al "sistema burgués". El discurso de Madres de Plaza de Mayo es inicialmente ético y moral para posteriormente adquirir matices de izquierda.ABSTRACT: This article analyzes the emergence and consolidation of the "Madres de Plaza de Mayo" as a social movement which initiated its action questioning the repressive policies led by the Argentine military dictatorship. It shows how the "Madres" undertook a radicalization of its discourse during the democratic transition, as the military "Juntas" were tried by Argentine courts. At this moment, the "Madres" dcided to struggle against the "bourgeois system." The discourse of the Madres was initially ethical and moral, and it became later left wing oriented.

  12. A designated centre for people with disabilities operated by Western Care Association, Mayo

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Szucs, Szilard

    2012-06-27

    AbstractBackgroundPeripheral nerve blocks are effective in treating acute pain, thereby minimizing the requirement for opiate analgesics. Fractured neck of femur (FNF) is a common, painful injury. The provision of effective analgesia to this cohort is challenging but an important determinant of their functional outcome. We investigated the analgesic efficacy of continuous femoral nerve block (CFNB) in patients with FNF.MethodsFollowing institutional ethical approval and with informed consent, patients awaiting FNF surgery were randomly allocated to receive either standard opiate-based analgesia (Group 1) or a femoral perineural catheter (Group 2). Patients in Group 1 received parenteral morphine as required. Those in Group 2 received a CFNB comprising a bolus of local anaesthetic followed by a continuous infusion of 0.25% bupivacaine. For both Groups, rescue analgesia consisted of intramuscular morphine as required and all patients received paracetamol regularly. Pain was assessed using a visual analogue scale at rest and during passive movement (dynamic pain score) at 30 min following first analgesic intervention and six hourly thereafter for 72 hours. Patient satisfaction with the analgesic regimen received was recorded using verbal rating scores (0-10). The primary outcome measured was dynamic pain score from initial analgesic intervention to 72 hours later.ResultsOf 27 recruited, 24 patients successfully completed the study protocol and underwent per protocol analysis. The intervals from recruitment to the study until surgery were similar in both groups [31.4(17.7) vs 27.5(14.2) h, P = 0.57]. The groups were similar in terms of baseline clinical characteristics. For patients in Group 2, pain scores at rest were less than those reported by patients in Group 1 [9.5(9.4) vs 31(28), P = 0.031]. Dynamic pain scores reported by patients in Group 2 were less at each time point from 30 min up to 54 hours [e.g at 6 h 30.7(23.4) vs 67.0(32.0), P = 0

  13. A Study of the anthropometric and demographical profile of patients presenting with coronary artery disease at Mayo Hospital, Lahore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qureshi, N.S.; Hanif, A.; Akhtar, B.; Bhatti, T.A.; Lutfullah; Iqbal, M.; Khaled, Z.N.; Bakhshi, I.M.; Khan, B.Z.

    2010-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is very common in the South Asian sub-continent, yet there is relatively little published research available from these countries. Although we have a very active Cardiology Department in Mayo Hospital, Lahore, there is a parallel need for documentation of the data generated and its analysis for research and publication. This study was carried out to gain an insight into the nature of the risk factors and presentation of CAD in patients coming to our setup. Objectives: The objective was to study the relation of CAD with anthropometric (BMI, waist circumference, waist . to . height ratio) and demographical (age and gender) factors. Methodology: This study was carried out in the Department of Cardiology, Mayo Hospital, Lahore, for a duration of 17 months. We collected the required information (such as name, gender, and family history, demographical data and anthropometric measurements) on a prescribed proforma, managed and then analyzed accordingly. Results: In this study there were 302 (80.5%) males and 73 (19.5%) females. The number of males was significantly higher (p-value 0.000), but the frequency of different diagnoses was statistically the same in both males and females, i.e. p-value = 0.062. According to the WHO recommended criteria for the BMI of South Asian populations, there were 9(2.4%) people who were under weight, among these 7 (77.8%) were males and 2 (22.2%) were females patients. Out of 302 males, 7(2.3%) were under weight, 36 (11.9%) were of normal weight, 115 (38.1%) were overweight and the rest of 144 (47.7%) were obese. Among 73 females, 2 (2.7%) were under weight, 8 (11%) had normal weight, 15 (20.5%) were overweight and 48 (65.8%) were obese. The proportion of obesity was more in females in this study, p-value (0.000). The mean waist circumference of all patients was 95.57 +- 17.14 cm with a range of 53 - 190 cm. The waist circumference was statistically higher in males than females, p-value = 0.000. In 7 under

  14. College mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Şengül, Caner

    2016-01-01

    College Mechanics QueBank has been designed to be different, enthusiastic, interesting and helpful to you. Therefore, it is not just a test bank about mechanics but also it is like a compass in order to find your way in mechanics Each chapter in this book is put in an order to follow a hierarchy of the mechanics topics; from vectors to simple harmonic motion. Throughout the book there are many multiple choice and long answer questions for you to solve. They have been created for YGS, LYS, SAT, IB or other standardized exams in the world because mechanics has no boundaries and so Physics has no country. Learn the main principle of each chapter and explore the daily life applications. Then you can start to solve the questions by planning a problem solving method carefully. Finally, enjoy solving the questions and discover the meachanics of the universe once more.

  15. A CLINICAL STUDY OF SELECTED PARAMETERS OF SMOKING HABIT AMONG PATIENTS ATTENDING PULMONOLOGY OPD IN KATURI MEDICAL COLLEGE HOSPITAL, GUNTUR DURING 2012 - 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramakrishna

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available 200 patients attending Katuri Medical college Pulmonology OPD with a history of Tobacco smoking coming for various symptoms for various symptoms were analy sed regarding their smoking habits. Majority of them were the major bread earners of thei r families. Majority of them presented to the hospital in 4 th to 6 th decade of life. Male smokers were predominant but alternate modes of tobacco consumption and passi ve smoking are present in a majority of females. Majority of them are farmers, unemployed or semiskilled or unskilled with poor education and with low family incomes. A majority of them have high frequency of smoking tobacco per day Initiation of smoking o ccurred at less than 20 years of age. Majority presented with less than 40 pack years of smoking history.

  16. The Feasibility of Administering a Practical Clinical Examination in Podiatry at a College of Podiatric Medicine: Results of a Field Trial Under Simulated Part III Test Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    And Others; Valletta, Michael

    1978-01-01

    The results of a practical clinical examination in podiatric medicine administered to fourth-year students are presented. The examination could become the prototype of a Part III practical clinical examination under the auspices of the National Board of Podiatry Examiners. Its feasibility is established and problems and issues are discussed.…

  17. Referencias: mayo de 1964

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boletín Cultural y Bibliográfico Banco de la República

    1964-05-01

    Full Text Available Don Isidoro Laverde Amaya desempeñó en el campo de la inteligencia todos los oficios imaginables, desde el relato histórico hasta la crítica literaria, pasando por la poesía, la biografía, el teatro, el cuento y el periodismo.

  18. College Student Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenske, Robert H.; And Others

    This study examines the background characteristics of two large national samples of first-time enrolled freshmen who (a) attended college within their state of residence but away from their home community, (b) migrated to a college in an adjacent state, (c) migrated to a college in a distant state, and (d) attended college in their home community.…

  19. College Student Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taub, Deborah J.; Thompson, Jalonda

    2013-01-01

    Suicide is the second-leading cause of death among college students, and it is estimated that 1,088 college students die by suicide each year (National Mental Health Association and the Jed Foundation, 2002). This chapter presents the context of college student mental health within which the problem of college student suicide is situated. Because…

  20. Surviving Math, Surviving College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffhauser, Dian

    2009-01-01

    According to a 2000 community college study by Miami Dade College (FL) President Emeritus Robert McCabe, 41 percent of students entering community colleges are underprepared in at least one basic skill area. A three-year study of community college students, published in 2009 by the National Center for Education Statistics, reported that 41 percent…

  1. Sodium glucose co-transporter inhibitors for the management of diabetes mellitus: an opinion paper from the Endocrine and Metabolism Practice and Research Network of the American College of Clinical Pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, Jennifer N; Whitley, Heather P; D'Souza, Jennifer J; Gross, Benjamin; Hess, Rick; Reece, Sara; Gentry, Chad; Shealy, Kayce

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) carries a high prevalence in the United States and worldwide. Therefore, the number of medication classes being developed and studied has grown. The individualized management of diabetes is accomplished by evaluating a medication's efficacy, safety, and cost, along with the patient's preference and tolerance to the medication. Sodium glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitors are a new therapeutic class indicated for the treatment of diabetes and have a unique mechanism of action, independent of beta-cell function. The first agent approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) was canagliflozin in March 2013. Two agents - dapagliflozin and empagliflozin - were FDA-approved in January and July 2014, respectively. A clear understanding of the new class is needed to identify its appropriate use in clinical practice. Members of the American College of Clinical Pharmacy Endocrine and Metabolism Practice and Research Network reviewed available literature regarding this therapeutic class. The article addresses the advantages, disadvantages, emerging role, and patient education for sodium glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitors. Key limitations for this article include limited access to clinical trial data not published by the pharmaceutical company and limited data on products produced outside the United States.

  2. The Italian version of the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory-4. A new measure of brain injury outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattelani, R; Corsini, D; Posteraro, L; Agosti, M; Saccavini, M

    2009-12-01

    The assessment of major obstacles to community integration which may result from an acquired brain injury (ABI) is needed for rational planning and effective management of ABI patients' social adjustment. Currently, such a generally acceptable measure is not available for the Italian population. This paper reports the translation process, the internal consistency, and the inter-rater reliability data for the Italian version of the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory-4 (MPAI-4), a useful measure with highly developed and well documented psychometric properties. The MPAI-4 is specifically designed to assess socially relevant aspects of physical status and cognitive-behavioural competence following ABI. It is a 29-item inventory which is divided into three subdomains (Abilities, Adjustment, and Participation indices) covering a reasonably representative range Twenty ABI patients with at least one-year discharge from the rehabilitation facilities were submitted to the Italian MPAI-4. They were independently rated by two different rehabilitation professionals and a family member/significant other serving as informant (SO). Internal consistency was assessed by calculating the Cronbach's alpha values. Inter-rater agreement for individual items was statistically examined by determining the interclass correlation coefficient (ICC). In addition to the 8% of perfectly correspondent sentences, a clear prevalence (75.5%) of minor semantic variations and formal variations with no semantic value at the sentence-to-sentence matching was found. Full-scale Cronbach's alpha was 0.951 and 0.947 for the two professionals (rater #1 and rater #2, respectively), and was 0.957 for the family member serving as informant (rater #3). Full-Scale ICC (2.1) between professionals and SOs was 0.804 (CI=95%; lower-upper bound=0.688-0.901). The Italian MPAI-4 shares many psychometric features with the original English version, demonstrates both good internal consistency and good inter

  3. Evolución y letalidad por endocarditis infecciosa en pacientes atendidos en el Hospital Nacional Dos de Mayo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyn Sánchez

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Evaluar la evolución y letalidad de los pacientes portadores de endocarditis infecciosa, así como la presencia de complicaciones y la influencia de estas sobre la mortalidad. Diseño: Estudio longitudinal no concurrente. Lugar: Servicio de cardiología del Hospital 2 de Mayo, hospital universitario. Pacientes: Pacientes con diagnóstico de endocarditis infecciosa. Intervenciones: Se revisó las historias clínicas de los pacientes con diagnóstico de endocarditis infecciosa atendidos entre junio de 1999 y junio de 2005. Se evaluó los criterios clínicos, de laboratorio y ecocardiográficos (criterios de Duke empleados en el diagnóstico. Para el análisis estadístico, se realizó el análisis descriptivo y comparativo con el empleo de las pruebas de Fisher y t de Student y la comparación de las curvas de Kaplan Meier, para evaluar la supervivencia a través de la prueba de rango logarítmico. Principales medidas de resultados: Evaluación de supervivencia: Complicaciones y mortalidad en pacientes en endocarditis infecciosa. Resultados: Se estudió 75 pacientes, la edad promedio fue 42,1±20,4 años, 66,7% del sexo masculino. El 93,3% tenía cardiopatía de base. La presentación clínica incluyó insuficiencia cardiaca congestiva (73,3%, encefalopatía (17,3% y fenómenos embólicos (50,6%. Se evaluó la evolución de los parámetros de laboratorio, evidenciándose deterioro de la función renal. El ecocardiograma evidenció presencia de vegetaciones en 97,3% y complicaciones, como rotura valvar (8%, abscesos valvares (4%. Durante la evolución, se sometió a cirugía a 14,7%. La letalidad general fue 14,7%, la cual estuvo influenciada por el número de complicaciones, en particular las complicaciones sépticas y renales, que impactaron de igual manera en la probabilidad de supervivencia de estos pacientes. Conclusiones: Se registró una letalidad general de 14,7%. La probabilidad de supervivencia se vio afectada

  4. A guide to radiological research. The Research Sub-Committee of the Board of the Faculty of Clinical Radiology, the Royal College of Radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-11-01

    There are broad categories of radiological research. Basic science research undertaken in universities or in manufacturing companies may lead to new techniques or even new products like MRI, CT or contrast media. MRI is a product of university based research, while CT developed within a manufacturing company. Basic science type research is vital for the continuing development of our speciality, but requires considerable resources, teamwork, and research/management expertise. The best place for an interested radiologist to learn such skills is within university departments, typically in the context of an MD, Ph.D. or similar degree course. Clinical radiological research is of equal importance and, in the UK, underpins our international reputation for radiological excellence. Clinical research may be defined as research requiring patients. It can therefore only be carried out in hospitals and clinics. New technologies, drugs, indications, procedures etc., all require clinical research to validate them. The role of the clinical radiologist is pivotal to the proper conduct of clinical imaging research and technology assessment. This is not confined to university and teaching centres, but is of equal importance in district general hospitals. Results from clinical research carried out 'in the field' are the true test of our specialty. This research guide is sponsored by the RCR. Its target is radiologists and others carrying out clinical research within departments of radiology. If it stimulates Fellows and Members of the RCR to conduct more and better research then it will have succeeded in its basic objective. Research is always planned. It is based on observation, measurement and the testing of ideas or hypotheses. It is presented to peers for criticism and then published to be available to all for review. Research is always hard work and requires discipline. Like many things the ability to conduct research improves with practice. Many radiologists have not had much

  5. Incidencia de anemia ferropénica y factores asociados en las gestantes del distrito de Rapayan, Ancash, Perú: Periodo mayo 2010 - marzo 2011

    OpenAIRE

    Vite Gutiérrez, Flor Yessenia

    2011-01-01

    Objetivo: Conocer la incidencia de anemia ferropénica y factores asociados en la gestación en el distrito de Rapayan, Ancash, Perú. Material y método: estudio prospectivo, analítico y longitudinal en 39 gestantes del distrito de Rapayán, provincia de Huari, departamento de Ancash, Perú durante el periodo comprendido entre mayo 2010 y marzo del 2011. Se procedió a tomar muestras de sangre del total de la muestra n= 39 gestantes, durante los tres trimestres con el fin de controlar los niveles d...

  6. Personal Qualities and College Admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willingham, Warren W.; Breland, Hunter M.

    The extent to which personal and academic factors are important in college admission decisions was studied in 1978, based on data on 25,000 applicants to 9 colleges (Colgate University, Williams College, Ohio Wesleyan University, Kenyon College, Kalamazoo College, Occidental College, Hartwick College, University of Richmond, and Bucknell…

  7. Students' Perception of Important Teaching Behaviors in Classroom and Clinical Environments of a Community College Nursing and Dental Hygiene Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimbrough-Walls, Vickie J.

    2012-01-01

    Student success is dependent on effective instruction. Yet, effective teaching is difficult to define and described differently by students, faculty, and administrators. Nursing and dental hygiene education programs require faculty to teach in both classroom and clinical environments. However, accreditation agencies for these programs mandate…

  8. Why do general dental practitioners become involved in clinical teaching? A pilot study exploring the views of part-time practitioner teachers, King's College London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, B R; Leung, A N; Dunne, S M

    2013-05-01

    Dental schools in the United Kingdom are becoming increasingly reliant on the services of part-time teachers to deliver the clinical educational component of the dental course. Their background is predominantly from general dental practice but the opportunities to progress in the system are limited. The aim of this study was to ascertain the views and perceptions of such teachers at a dental school. An anonymous, non-incentivised online survey was used to obtain both qualitative and quantitative views of the part timers. The department has n = 40 part-time teachers and there was a response rate of 78%. Overall 73% were satisfied with their current teaching position, whereas the remaining 27% of teachers were seeking higher rewards both in terms of recognition and status. This study demonstrated the need for formal teaching skills and training to be made available to part-time clinical teachers. Allied to this is the requirement for a clearly defined and achievable career pathway.

  9. CLEP college mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Friedman, Mel

    2012-01-01

    Earn College Credit with REA's Test Prep for CLEP* College Mathematics Everything you need to pass the exam and get the college credit you deserve.CLEP* is the most popular credit-by-examination program in the country, accepted by more than 2,900 colleges and universities. For over 15 years, REA has helped students pass the CLEP* exam and earn college credit while reducing their tuition costs. Our test prep for CLEP* College Mathematics and the free online tools that come with it, allow you to create a personalized CLEP* study plan that can be customized to fit you: your schedule, your lea

  10. Clinical practice guidelines for the management of pregnancy in women with autoimmune rheumatic diseases of the Mexican College of Rheumatology. Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saavedra Salinas, Miguel Ángel; Barrera Cruz, Antonio; Cabral Castañeda, Antonio Rafael; Jara Quezada, Luis Javier; Arce-Salinas, C Alejandro; Álvarez Nemegyei, José; Fraga Mouret, Antonio; Orozco Alcalá, Javier; Salazar Páramo, Mario; Cruz Reyes, Claudia Verónica; Andrade Ortega, Lilia; Vera Lastra, Olga Lidia; Mendoza Pinto, Claudia; Sánchez González, Antonio; Cruz Cruz, Polita Del Rocío; Morales Hernández, Sara; Portela Hernández, Margarita; Pérez Cristóbal, Mario; Medina García, Gabriela; Hernández Romero, Noé; Velarde Ochoa, María Del Carmen; Navarro Zarza, José Eduardo; Portillo Díaz, Verónica; Vargas Guerrero, Angélica; Goycochea Robles, María Victoria; García Figueroa, José Luis; Barreira Mercado, Eduardo; Amigo Castañeda, Mary Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy in women with autoimmune rheumatic diseases is associated with several maternal and fetal complications. The development of clinical practice guidelines with the best available scientific evidence may help standardize the care of these patients. To provide recommendations regarding prenatal care, treatment, and a more effective monitoring of pregnancy in women with lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS). Nominal panels were formed for consensus, systematic search of information, development of clinical questions, processing and grading of recommendations, internal validation by peers, and external validation of the final document. The quality criteria of the AGREE II instrument were followed. The various panels answered the 37 questions related to maternal and fetal care in SLE, RA, and APS, as well as to the use of antirheumatic drugs during pregnancy and lactation. The recommendations were discussed and integrated into a final manuscript. Finally, the corresponding algorithms were developed. We present the recommendations for pregnant women with SLE in this first part. We believe that the Mexican clinical practice guidelines for the management of pregnancy in women with SLE integrate the best available evidence for the treatment and follow-up of patients with these conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Clinical practice guidelines for the management of pregnancy in women with autoimmune rheumatic diseases of the Mexican College of Rheumatology. Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saavedra Salinas, Miguel Ángel; Barrera Cruz, Antonio; Cabral Castañeda, Antonio Rafael; Jara Quezada, Luis Javier; Arce-Salinas, C Alejandro; Álvarez Nemegyei, José; Fraga Mouret, Antonio; Orozco Alcalá, Javier; Salazar Páramo, Mario; Cruz Reyes, Claudia Verónica; Andrade Ortega, Lilia; Vera Lastra, Olga Lidia; Mendoza Pinto, Claudia; Sánchez González, Antonio; Cruz Cruz, Polita Del Rocío; Morales Hernández, Sara; Portela Hernández, Margarita; Pérez Cristóbal, Mario; Medina García, Gabriela; Hernández Romero, Noé; Velarde Ochoa, María Del Carmen; Navarro Zarza, José Eduardo; Portillo Díaz, Verónica; Vargas Guerrero, Angélica; Goycochea Robles, María Victoria; García Figueroa, José Luis; Barreira Mercado, Eduardo; Amigo Castañeda, Mary Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy in women with autoimmune rheumatic diseases is associated with several maternal and fetal complications. The development of clinical practice guidelines with the best available scientific evidence may help standardize the care of these patients. To provide recommendations regarding prenatal care, treatment, and a more effective monitoring of pregnancy in women with lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). Nominal panels were formed for consensus, systematic search of information, development of clinical questions, processing and staging of recommendations, internal validation by peers and external validation of the final document. The quality criteria of the AGREE II instrument were followed. The panels answered 37 questions related to maternal and fetal care in lupus erythematosus, RA and APS, as well as for use of antirheumatic drugs during pregnancy and lactation. The recommendations were discussed and integrated into a final manuscript. Finally, the corresponding algorithms were developed. In this second part, the recommendations for pregnant women with RA, APS and the use of antirheumatic drugs during pregnancy and lactation are presented. We believe that the Mexican clinical practice guidelines for the management of pregnancy in women with RA and APS integrate the best available evidence for the treatment and follow-up of patients with these conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Molecular biology of lung cancer: Diagnosis and management of lung cancer, 3rd ed: American College of Chest Physicians evidence-based clinical practice guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nana-Sinkam, Serge Patrick; Powell, Charles A

    2013-05-01

    Based on recent bench and clinical research, the treatment of lung cancer has been refined, with treatments allocated according to histology and specific molecular features. For example, targeting mutations such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) with tyrosine kinase inhibitors has been particularly successful as a treatment modality, demonstrating response rates in selected patients with adenocarcinoma tumors harboring EGFR mutations that are significantly higher than those for conventional chemotherapy. However, the development of new targeted therapies is, in part, highly dependent on an improved understanding of the molecular underpinnings of tumor initiation and progression, knowledge of the role of molecular aberrations in disease progression, and the development of highly reproducible platforms for high-throughput biomarker discovery and testing. In this article, we review clinically relevant research directed toward understanding the biology of lung cancer. The clinical purposes of this research are (1) to identify susceptibility variants and field molecular alterations that will promote the early detection of tumors and (2) to identify tumor molecular alterations that serve as therapeutic targets, prognostic biomarkers, or predictors of tumor response. We focus on research developments in the understanding of lung cancer somatic DNA mutations, chromosomal aberrations, epigenetics, and the tumor microenvironment, and how they can advance diagnostics and therapeutics.

  13. AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS AND AMERICAN COLLEGE OF ENDOCRINOLOGY GUIDELINES FOR MANAGEMENT OF DYSLIPIDEMIA AND PREVENTION OF CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE - EXECUTIVE SUMMARYComplete Appendix to Guidelines available at http://journals.aace.com.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jellinger, Paul S; Handelsman, Yehuda; Rosenblit, Paul D; Bloomgarden, Zachary T; Fonseca, Vivian A; Garber, Alan J; Grunberger, George; Guerin, Chris K; Bell, David S H; Mechanick, Jeffrey I; Pessah-Pollack, Rachel; Wyne, Kathleen; Smith, Donald; Brinton, Eliot A; Fazio, Sergio; Davidson, Michael; Zangeneh, Farhad; Bush, Michael A

    2017-04-02

    The development of these guidelines is mandated by the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) Board of Directors and American College of Endocrinology (ACE) Board of Trustees and adheres with published AACE protocols for the standardized production of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs). Each Recommendation is based on a diligent review of the clinical evidence with transparent incorporation of subjective factors. The Executive Summary of this document contains 87 Recommendations of which 45 are Grade A (51.7%), 18 are Grade B (20.7%), 15 are Grade C (17.2%), and 9 (10.3%) are Grade D. These detailed, evidence-based recommendations allow for nuance-based clinical decision making that addresses multiple aspects of real-world medical care. The evidence base presented in the subsequent Appendix provides relevant supporting information for Executive Summary Recommendations. This update contains 695 citations of which 202 (29.1 %) are evidence level (EL) 1 (strong), 137 (19.7%) are EL 2 (intermediate), 119 (17.1%) are EL 3 (weak), and 237 (34.1%) are EL 4 (no clinical evidence). This CPG is a practical tool that endocrinologists, other healthcare professionals, regulatory bodies and health-related organizations can use to reduce the risks and consequences of dyslipidemia. It provides guidance on screening, risk assessment, and treatment recommendations for a range of patients with various lipid disorders. These recommendations emphasize the importance of treating low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) in some individuals to lower goals than previously recommended and support the measurement of coronary artery calcium scores and inflammatory markers to help stratify risk. Special consideration is given to patients with diabetes, familial hypercholesterolemia, women, and pediatric patients with dyslipidemia. Both clinical and cost-effectiveness data are provided to support treatment decisions. A1C = hemoglobin A1C ACE = American College of

  14. [Genital herpes and pregnancy: Serological and molecular diagnostic tools. Guidelines for clinical practice from the French College of Gynecologists and Obstetricians (CNGOF)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vauloup-Fellous, C

    2017-12-01

    To describe serological and molecular tools available for genital and neonatal herpes, and their use in different clinical situations. Bibliographic investigations from MedLine database and consultation of international clinical practice guidelines. Virological confirmation of genital herpes during pregnancy or neonatal herpes must rely on PCR (Professional consensus). HSV type-specific serology (IgG) will allow determining the immune status of a patient (in the absence of clinical lesions). However, there is currently no evidence to justify universal HSV serological testing during pregnancy (Professional consensus). In case of genital lesions in a pregnant woman that do not report any genital herpes before, it is recommended to perform a virological confirmation by PCR and HSV type-specific IgG in order to distinguish a true primary infection, a non-primary infection associated with first genital manifestation, from a recurrence (Grade C). HSV IgM is useless for diagnosis of genital herpes (Grade C). If a pregnant woman has personal history of genital herpes but no lesions, whatever the gestational age, it is not recommended to perform genital sampling nor serology (Professional consensus). In case of recurrence, if the lesion is characteristic of herpes, virological confirmation is not necessary (Professional Agreement). However, if the lesion is not characteristic, virological confirmation by PCR should be performed (Professional consensus). At birth, HSV PCR samples should be collected as soon as neonatal herpes is suspected (symptomatic neonate) (best before beginning antiviral treatment but must not delay the treatment), or after 24hours of life in case of asymptomatic neonate born to a mother with herpes lesions at delivery (Professional consensus). Clinical samples for virological confirmation should include at least blood and a peripheral location. In case of clinical manifestations of herpes in the neonate, first samples PCR positive, preterm birth, or

  15. 2016 American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism Criteria for Minimal, Moderate, and Major Clinical Response in Juvenile Dermatomyositis An International Myositis Assessment and Clinical Studies Group/Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation Collaborative Initiative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rider, Lisa G.; Aggarwal, Rohit; Pistorio, Angela; Bayat, Nastaran; Erman, Brian; Feldman, Brian M.; Huber, Adam M.; Cimaz, Rolando; Cuttica, Rubén J.; de Oliveira, Sheila Knupp; Lindsley, Carol B.; Pilkington, Clarissa A.; Punaro, Marilynn; Ravelli, Angelo; Reed, Ann M.; Rouster-Stevens, Kelly; van Royen-Kerkhof, Annet; Dressler, Frank; Magalhaes, Claudia Saad; Constantin, Tamás; Davidson, Joyce E.; Magnusson, Bo; Russo, Ricardo; Villa, Luca; Rinaldi, Mariangela; Rockette, Howard; Lachenbruch, Peter A.; Miller, Frederick W.; Vencovsky, Jiri; Ruperto, Nicolino; Hansen, Paul; Apaz, Maria; Bowyer, Suzanne; Curran, Megan; Davidson, Joyce; Griffin, Thomas; Huber, Adam H.; Jones, Olcay; Kim, Susan; Lang, Bianca; Lindsley, Carol; Lovell, Daniel; Saad Magalhaes, Claudia; Pachman, Lauren M.; Pilkington, Clarissa; Ponyi, Andrea; Quartier, Pierre; Ramanan, Athimalaipet V.; Reed, Ann; Rennebohm, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Objective. To develop response criteria for juvenile dermatomyositis (DM). Methods. We analyzed the performance of 312 definitions that used core set measures from either the International Myositis Assessment and Clinical Studies Group (IMACS) or the Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials

  16. 2016 American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism Criteria for Minimal, Moderate, and Major Clinical Response in Juvenile Dermatomyositis : An International Myositis Assessment and Clinical Studies Group/Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation Collaborative Initiative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rider, Lisa G.; Aggarwal, Rohit; Pistorio, Angela; Bayat, Nastaran; Erman, Brian; Feldman, Brian M.; Huber, Adam M.; Cimaz, Rolando; Cuttica, Rubén J.; De Oliveira, Sheila Knupp; Lindsley, Carol B.; Pilkington, Clarissa A.; Punaro, Marilynn; Ravelli, Angelo; Reed, Ann M.; Rouster-Stevens, Kelly; van Royen-Kerkhof, Annet; Dressler, Frank; Magalhaes, Claudia Saad; Constantin, Tamás; Davidson, Joyce E.; Magnusson, Bo; Russo, Ricardo; Villa, Luca; Rinaldi, Mariangela; Rockette, Howard; Lachenbruch, Peter A.; Miller, Frederick W.; Vencovsky, Jiri; Ruperto, Nicolino; Rider, Lisa G.; Ruperto, Nicolino; Miller, Frederick W.; Aggarwal, Rohit; Erman, Brian; Bayat, Nastaran; Pistorio, Angela; Huber, Adam M.; Feldman, Brian M.; Hansen, Paul; Rockette, Howard; Lachenbruch, Peter A.; Ruperto, Nicolino; Rider, Lisa G.; Apaz, Maria T; Bowyer, Suzanne; Cimaz, Rolando; Constantin, Tamás; Curran, Megan; Davidson, Joyce E.; Feldman, Brian M.; Griffin, Thomas; Huber, Adam H.; Jones, Olcay; Kim, Susan; Lang, Bianca; Lindsley, Carol; Lovell, Daniel J.; Saad Magalhaes, Claudia; Pachman, Lauren M.; Pilkington, Clarissa; Ponyi, Andrea; Punaro, Marilynn; Quartier, Pierre; Ramanan, Athimalaipet V; Ravelli, Angelo; Reed, Ann M.; Rennebohm, Robert; Sherry, David D.; Silva, Clovis A.; Stringer, Elizabeth; van Royen-Kerkhof, Annet; Wallace, Carol; Miller, Frederick W.; Oddis, Chester V.; Reed, Ann M.; Rider, Lisa G.; Ruperto, Nicolino; Apaz, Maria T; Avcin, Tadej; Becker, Mara; Beresford, Michael W.; Cimaz, Rolando; Constantin, Tamás; Curran, Megan; Cuttica, Ruben; Davidson, Joyce E.; Dressler, Frank; Dvergsten, Jeffrey; Feitosa de Oliveira, Sheila Knupp; Feldman, Brian M.; Leme Ferriani, Virginia Paes; Flato, Berit; Gerloni, Valeria; Griffin, Thomas; Henrickson, Michael; Hinze, Claas; Hoeltzel, Mark; Huber, Adam M.; Ibarra, Maria; Ilowite, Norman T; Imundo, Lisa; Jones, Olcay; Kim, Susan; Kingsbury, Daniel; Lang, Bianca; Lindsley, Carol; Lovell, Daniel J.; Martini, Alberto; Saad Magalhaes, Claudia; Magnusson, Bo; Maguiness, Sheilagh; Maillard, Susan; Mathiesen, Pernille; McCann, Liza J.; Nielsen, Susan; Pachman, Lauren M.; Passo, Murray; Pilkington, Clarissa; Punaro, Marilynn; Quartier, Pierre; Rabinovich, Egla; Ramanan, Athimalaipet V; Ravelli, Angelo; Reed, Ann M.; Rennebohm, Robert; Rider, Lisa G.; Rivas-Chacon, Rafael; Byun Robinson, Angela; Rouster-Stevens, Kelly; Russo, Ricardo; Rutkowska-Sak, Lidia; Sallum, Adriana; Sanner, Helga; Schmeling, Heinrike; Selcen, Duygu; Shaham, Bracha; Sherry, David D.; Silva, Clovis A.; Spencer, Charles H.; Sundel, Robert; Tardieu, Marc; Thatayatikom, Akaluck; van der Net, Janjaap; van Royen-Kerkhof, Annet; Wahezi, Dawn; Wallace, Carol; Zulian, Francesco; analysis, Conjoint; Cimaz, Rolando; Constantin, Tamás; Cuttica, Ruben; Davidson, Joyce E.; Dressler, Frank; Knupp Feitosa de Oliveira, Sheila; Feldman, Brian M.; Griffin, Thomas; Henrickson, Michael; Huber, Adam M.; Imundo, Lisa; Lang, Bianca; Lindsley, Carol; Saad Magalhaes, Claudia; Magnusson, Bo; Maillard, Susan; Pachman, Lauren M.; Passo, Murray; Pilkington, Clarissa; Punaro, Marilynn; Ravelli, Angelo; Reed, Ann M.; Rider, Lisa G.; Rouster-Stevens, Kelly; Russo, Ricardo; Shaham, Bracha; Sundel, Robert; van der Net, Janjaap; van Royen-Kerkhof, Annet; Cimaz, Rolando; Cuttica, Rubén J.; Knupp Feitosa de Oliveira, Sheila; Feldman, Brian M.; Huber, Adam M.; Lindsley, Carol B.; Pilkington, Clarissa; Punaro, Marilynn; Ravelli, Angelo; Reed, Ann M.; Rouster-Stevens, Kelly; van Royen-Kerkhof, Annet; Amato, Anthony A; Chinoy, Hector; Cooper, Robert G.; Dastmalchi, Maryam; de Visser, Marianne; Fiorentino, David; Isenberg, David; Katz, James; Mammen, Andrew; Oddis, Chester V.; Ytterberg, Steven R.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To develop response criteria for juvenile dermatomyositis (DM). Methods: We analyzed the performance of 312 definitions that used core set measures from either the International Myositis Assessment and Clinical Studies Group (IMACS) or the Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials

  17. Predicting effective contraceptive behavior in college females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, C B; Torre, C

    1987-09-01

    This article reports the results of a preliminary research project that explored the relationship between assertiveness, cognitive development and contraceptive behavior among single young women in their freshman and senior years at college. A total of 60 college women at a university health center volunteered to participate in this pilot study. They filled out three instruments: the Galassi College Self-Expression Scale (SES), the Measure of Intellectual Development (MID) tool and an author-developed sexuality questionnaire. Although there was a significant relationship between cognitive development and assertiveness, no significant relationships were found between cognitive development, assertiveness and use of effective contraception. Interesting descriptive characteristics were identified. Clinical implications are discussed.

  18. American College Health Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a robust series of courses leading to a brand new certification – the College Health and Wellness Professional ( ... future college health and wellness professionals, and strengthen awareness of the profession and association. Each month we' ...

  19. Depression and College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... depression and other mental health issues? Reference Share Depression and College Students Download PDF Download ePub Order ... Answers to college students’ frequently asked questions about depression Feeling moody, sad, or grouchy? Who doesn’t ...

  20. College Information Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibik, Margaret A.

    1982-01-01

    A survey of a sampling of college-bound high school seniors in Arizona was undertaken to determine students' information needs for college choice. Items, including institutional, student, and program characteristics, are ranked in order of perceived importance. (MSE)

  1. College Women's Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health - Learn the facts about HPV, HIV, and birth control. College Women's Social Media Toolkit - Share health tips with your campus community. College Women's Campaign - Find out how your school can join. Sign up for email alerts. Order ...

  2. Models and impact of patient and public involvement in studies carried out by the Medical Research Council Clinical Trials Unit at University College London: findings from ten case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    South, Annabelle; Hanley, Bec; Gafos, Mitzy; Cromarty, Ben; Stephens, Richard; Sturgeon, Kate; Scott, Karen; Cragg, William J; Tweed, Conor D; Teera, Jacqueline; Vale, Claire L

    2016-07-29

    Patient and public involvement (PPI) in studies carried out by the UK Medical Research Council Clinical Trials Unit (MRC CTU) at University College London varies by research type and setting. We developed a series of case studies of PPI to document and share good practice. We used purposive sampling to identify studies representing the scope of research at the MRC CTU and different approaches to PPI. We carried out semi-structured interviews with staff and patient representatives. Interview notes were analysed descriptively to categorise the main aims and motivations for involvement; activities undertaken; their impact on the studies and lessons learned. We conducted 19 interviews about ten case studies, comprising one systematic review, one observational study and 8 randomised controlled trials in HIV and cancer. Studies were either open or completed, with start dates between 2003 and 2011. Interviews took place between March and November 2014 and were updated in summer 2015 where there had been significant developments in the study (i.e. if the study had presented results subsequent to the interview taking place). A wide range of PPI models, including representation on trial committees or management groups, community engagement, one-off task-focused activities, patient research partners and participant involvement had been used. Overall, interviewees felt that PPI had a positive impact, leading to improvements, for example in the research question; study design; communication with potential participants; study recruitment; confidence to carry out or complete a study; interpretation and communication of results; and influence on future research. A range of models of PPI can benefit clinical studies. Researchers should consider different approaches to PPI, based on the desired impact and the people they want to involve. Use of multiple models may increase the potential impacts of PPI in clinical research.

  3. CLINICAL AND DEMOGRAPHIC PROFI LE OF HIV/AIDS PATIENTS IN BLDEU ’S SHRI B. M. PATIL MEDICAL COLLEGE, HOSPITAL AND RESEARCH CENTRE, VIJAYA PUR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash G.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Our aim was to study the clinical and demographic profile of patients infected with HIV infection. MATERIAL AND METHODS : The prospective study was conducted at a tertiary care referral teaching hospital in Vijayapur, India. The study was conducted on a group of 290 patients confirmed as HIV positive. They were studied for their clinical spectrum and different demographic parameters. RESULTS : The mean age of present ation was 36.32+/ - 12.42 years and majority of the patients belonged to the age group 31 - 40 years. Predominant route of transmission seen in these patients was heterosexual contact. The most common symptoms observed in the study group were fever, cough, bre athlessness, diarrhea, ab dominal pain. Tuberculosis and O ropharyngeal candidiasis were the most common opportunistic infections. CONCLUSION : The initial presentation of HIV - infected patients to health care assistance is occurring at a late stage of the dis ease, when signs and symptoms of immunodeficiency are already established. Efforts are necessary to construct strategies to make an early diagnosis of these patients, improve the quality of care, and guarantee the benefits of antiretroviral therapy, when i t is indicated

  4. ATTITUDES OF MEDICAL STUDENTS TOWARDS TAKING PART-TIME JOBS: A STUDY AMONGST FIRST YEAR CLINICAL STUDENTS OF THE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE, UNIVERSITY OF IBADAN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanmodi, K K; Akinloye, A G; Aladelusi, T O

    2017-06-01

    Student part-time jobs are employments taken up by students while in school. Students in tertiary institutions do engage in part-time jobs because of the associated benefits. Some of these benefits include work experience, independence, financial support, and job satisfaction. Different studies have reported different attitudes towards taking part-time jobs among university students. To determine the attitudes of medical students in their first clinical year of study at the University of Ibadan medical school towards taking up parttime medical jobs within the university hospital. This study was a descriptive cross-sectional study conducted among medical students in their first clinical year of study. Eighty one first clinical - year medical students were recruited to participate in this study. All participants were interviewed using a self-administered questionnaire to obtain information on bio-data, scholarship benefit status, level of satisfaction with monthly income, choices of part-time jobs, and the factors that might informed choice of a part-time job. No questionnaire was discarded because all were correctly filled. Data collected was coded, entered, and analysed using the SPSS version 16 software. Analyses of all variables were done using descriptive statistics. The mean age of the 81 respondents was 20.8 (±1.6) years and 51.9% were males. A higher proportion of the male respondents were studying on scholarship (57.1%), compared to that of the females (31.6%). Respondents studying on scholarship had a higher level of financial satisfaction. Over 90% of the participants supported the idea of part-time medical job creation for medical students. The majority of the respondents (64.2%) prefer to take up the job position of research assistantships. The amount of wages to be earned was the most predominant factor considered among the male respondents in their decision for taking up a part-time medical job, while opportunity to learn new skills was the most

  5. College Access Marketing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Christopher W.

    2011-01-01

    College Access Marketing (CAM) is a relatively new phenomenon that seeks to positively influence the college-going rate. This report defines CAM, describes CAM examples, and discusses how CAM seeks to counter barriers to college. It explores four main elements of CAM: information, marketing, advocacy, and social mobilization. Further, it…

  6. American Indian Community Colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    One Feather, Gerald

    With the emergence of reservation based community colleges (th Navajo Community College and the Dakota Community Colleges), the American Indian people, as decision makers in these institutions, are providing Indians with the technical skills and cultural knowledge necessary for self-determination. Confronted with limited numbers of accredited…

  7. Cash for College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators, Washington, DC.

    This booklet contains answers to questions that students may ask about financial aid for college. The booklet describes the usual costs of college, and suggests ways students can pay for a college education. The types of financial aid available are described, and the application process is outlined. The booklet offers tips for comparing different…

  8. Early College High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessoff, Alan

    2011-01-01

    For at-risk students who stand little chance of going to college, or even finishing high school, a growing number of districts have found a solution: Give them an early start in college while they still are in high school. The early college high school (ECHS) movement that began with funding from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation 10 years ago…

  9. Planning for College Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    PEPNet, 2009

    2009-01-01

    "Planning for College Success" (PCS) is a curriculum model designed by Sharon Downs, M.S., for a course intended to assist deaf and hard of hearing students during their initial introduction to college life. This program allows students to work one-on-one with a counselor to plan for their college success. The program includes short-term goals and…

  10. Cyberbullying in College

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos P. Zalaquett; SeriaShia J. Chatters

    2014-01-01

    Cyberbullying is commonly presented as affecting K-12 populations. Current research suggests cyberbullying continues in college. A diverse sample of 613 university students was surveyed to study their cyberbullying experiences in high school and college. Nineteen percent of the sample reported being a victim of cyberbullying in college and 35% of this subsample reported being cyberbullied in high school. Additional fin...

  11. Laboratory and clinical genomic data sharing is crucial to improving genetic health care: a position statement of the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acmg Board Of Directors

    2017-07-01

    Disclaimer: These recommendations are designed primarily as an educational resource for medical geneticists and other health-care providers, to help them provide quality medical genetic services. Adherence to these recommendations does not necessarily assure a successful medical outcome. These recommendations should not be considered inclusive of all proper procedures and tests or exclusive of other procedures and tests that are reasonably directed to obtaining the same results. In determining the propriety of any specific procedure or test, the geneticist should apply his or her own professional judgment to the specific clinical circumstances presented by the individual patient or specimen. It may be prudent, however, to document in the patient's record the rationale for any significant deviation from these recommendations.Genet Med advance online publication 05 January 2017.

  12. Assessing Clinical Laboratory Quality: A College of American Pathologists Q-Probes Study of Prothrombin Time INR Structures, Processes, and Outcomes in 98 Laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howanitz, Peter J; Darcy, Theresa P; Meier, Frederick A; Bashleben, Christine P

    2015-09-01

    The anticoagulant warfarin has been identified as the second most frequent drug responsible for serious, disabling, and fatal adverse drug events in the United States, and its effect on blood coagulation is monitored by the laboratory test called international normalized ratio (INR). To determine the presence of INR policies and procedures, INR practices, and completeness and timeliness of reporting critical INR results in participants' clinical laboratories. Participants reviewed their INR policies and procedure requirements, identified their practices by using a questionnaire, and studied completeness of documentation and timeliness of reporting critical value INR results for outpatients and emergency department patients. In 98 participating institutions, the 5 required policies and procedures were in place in 93% to 99% of clinical laboratories. Fifteen options for the allowable variations among duplicate results from different analyzers, 12 different timeliness goals for reporting critical values, and 18 unique critical value limits were used by participants. All required documentation elements were present in 94.8% of 192 reviewed INR validation reports. Critical value INR results were reported within the time frame established by the laboratory for 93.4% of 2604 results, but 1.0% of results were not reported. Although the median laboratories successfully communicated all critical results within their established time frames and had all the required validation elements based in their 2 most recent INR calculations, those participants at the lowest 10th percentile were successful in 80.0% and 85.7% of these requirements, respectively. Significant opportunities exist for adherence to INR procedural requirements and for practice patterns and timeliness goals for INR critical results' reporting.

  13. Informe Ana Libertad Baratti de la Cuadra : Informe de Radio Universidad Nacional de La Plata sobre la recuperación de la nieta número 115, por Abuelas de Plaza de Mayo

    OpenAIRE

    Pigeau, Nora; Barnes de Carlotto, Estela; Lovazzano, Eduardo; Velazco, Luis; Cuadra, Estela de la; Cardoso, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    Informe de Radio Universidad Nacional de La Plata sobre el hallazgo de la nieta número 115, recuperada por Abuelas de Plaza de Mayo: Ana Libertad Baratti de la Cuadra. El 22 de agosto de 2014 la ciudad de La Plata y el país entero celebró el encuentro de la nieta de la co-fundadora y primera presidenta de la Asociación Abuelas de Plaza de Mayo, Alicia “Licha” Zubasnabar de De la Cuadra: apareció Ana Libertad Baratti de la Cuadra. Héctor Carlos Baratti y de Elena de la Cuadra fueron se...

  14. Community-based clinic volunteering: an evaluation of the direct and indirect effects on the experience of health science college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Yelena; Islam, Adiba; Moraros, John

    2016-01-18

    The present study was conducted in a multi service-learning, student managed and operated, community-based clinic. Its aim was to measure the direct and indirect effects of how proximal factors (i.e., 'management', 'support received', 'duration of involvement', and 'average time spent per month') and mediators (i.e., 'training received', 'motivation', and 'commitment') influence distal outcomes (i.e., 'performance', 'satisfaction', and 'overall experience') within a volunteer organization. Participants were recruited through the use of an email list server. An online survey was used containing multi-item measures from validated scales. Data were collected from 170 volunteers from July to August 2013. Data analysis used a structural equation modeling (SEM) framework for the estimation of direct and indirect effects on constructs and variables of interest. Only statistically significant relationships were reported at p direct effects worthy of note. First, the proximal factor of 'management' plays an important role in influencing the mediators of 'motivation' (standardized beta = 0.55) and 'training received' (0.65) by the student volunteers but has a relatively small impact on their 'commitment' (0.39) to the organization. Second, the mediator of 'motivation' proved to have the strongest impact on the distal outcome of volunteer 'performance' and 'satisfaction' levels (0.41 and 0.58 respectively), whereas 'commitment' (0.44) was the key in determining their 'overall experience' with the organization. These results in turn, help contextualize the indirect effects observed in our study. Namely, the proximal factor of 'management' played a distinctive role in influencing the distal outcomes of volunteer 'performance' (0.32) and 'overall experience' (0.66), whereas the organizational 'support received' by the volunteers was key to their 'satisfaction' (0.21). The findings of the present study shed light into the direct and indirect effects of how proximal factors

  15. Prevalence of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Clinical Samples of Teerthankar Mahaveer Medical College Hospital and Research Centre (TMMCH & RC, Moradabad (UP, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bina Pani Gupta

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is the emerging and prevalent pathogen causing serious infections in community and hospital associated diseases. S. aureus resistant to methicillin is nowadays a big and expanding problem of concern in India. Amongst the different pathogens, S. aureus is being studied for prevalence of infections and drug resistance behavior. The present study describes the dominance of Staphylococcus aureus prevalence in the clinical samples of TMU, Moradabad, India. The study showed the isolation of 450 cultures of S. aureus from different samples. Amongst which, 234 isolates of S. aureus were from pus, 164 isolates were from blood, 15 isolates were from respiratory fluid samples, 33 isolates were from urine samples and 04 isolates were from ear swabs and nasal swabs. These strains of S. aureus were screened for characteristic coagulase assay. The strains were found to be coagulase positive and coagulases negative both. It was observed that, amongst, 450 isolates of Staphylococci, 185 (41.11% strains were coagulase positive and 265 (58.88% were coagulase negative. A total of 142 (76.75% of the coagulase positive staphylococci strains shows resistance to methicillin and 202 (76.22% coagulase negative strains showed methicillin resistance. Methicillin resistance was consistent when tested with other antibiotics in coagulase positive strains but when studied about coagulase negative strains, about 12.5% strains showed sensitivity with other antibiotics although they were found resistant when checked with methicillin. It was determined that, on an average, 85 (18.88% Staphylococci strains were resistant.

  16. CONSENSUS STATEMENT BY THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS AND AMERICAN COLLEGE OF ENDOCRINOLOGY ON THE COMPREHENSIVE TYPE 2 DIABETES MANAGEMENT ALGORITHM - 2018 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garber, Alan J; Abrahamson, Martin J; Barzilay, Joshua I; Blonde, Lawrence; Bloomgarden, Zachary T; Bush, Michael A; Dagogo-Jack, Samuel; DeFronzo, Ralph A; Einhorn, Daniel; Fonseca, Vivian A; Garber, Jeffrey R; Garvey, W Timothy; Grunberger, George; Handelsman, Yehuda; Hirsch, Irl B; Jellinger, Paul S; McGill, Janet B; Mechanick, Jeffrey I; Rosenblit, Paul D; Umpierrez, Guillermo E

    2018-01-01

    A1C = hemoglobin A1C; AACE = American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists; ACCORD = Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes; ACCORD BP = Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes Blood Pressure; ACEI = angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor; ADVANCE = Action in Diabetes and Vascular Disease: Preterax and Diamicron MR Controlled Evaluation; AGI = alpha-glucosidase inhibitor; apo B = apolipoprotein B; ASCVD = atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease; BAS = bile acid sequestrant; BCR-QR = bromocriptine quick release; BMI = body mass index; BP = blood pressure; CCB = calcium channel blocker; CHD = coronary heart disease; CKD = chronic kidney disease; CVD = cardiovascular disease; DASH = Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension; DPP4 = dipeptidyl peptidase 4; eGFR = estimated glomerular filtration rate; ER = extended release; FDA = Food and Drug Administration; GLP1 = glucagon-like peptide 1; HDL-C = high-density lipoprotein cholesterol; IMPROVE-IT = Improved Reduction of Outcomes: Vytorin Efficacy International Trial; LDL-C = low-density lipoprotein cholesterol; LDL-P = low-density lipoprotein particle; Look AHEAD = Look Action for Health in Diabetes; NPH = neutral protamine Hagedorn; OSA = obstructive sleep apnea; RCT = randomized controlled trial; SU = sulfonylurea; SGLT2 = sodium glucose cotransporter-2; SMBG = self-monitoring of blood glucose; T2D = type 2 diabetes; TZD = thiazolidinedione; VADT = Veterans Affairs Diabetes Trial.

  17. Cardiovascular Effects of Exposure to Cigarette Smoke and Electronic Cigarettes: Clinical Perspectives From the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease Section Leadership Council and Early Career Councils of the American College of Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Pamela B; Ference, Brian A; Jahangir, Eiman; Feldman, Dmitriy N; Ryan, John J; Bahrami, Hossein; El-Chami, Mikhael F; Bhakta, Shyam; Winchester, David E; Al-Mallah, Mouaz H; Sanchez Shields, Monica; Deedwania, Prakash; Mehta, Laxmi S; Phan, Binh An P; Benowitz, Neal L

    2015-09-22

    Cardiovascular morbidity and mortality as a result of inhaled tobacco products continues to be a global healthcare crisis, particularly in low- and middle-income nations lacking the infrastructure to develop and implement effective public health policies limiting tobacco use. Following initiation of public awareness campaigns 50 years ago in the United States, considerable success has been achieved in reducing the prevalence of cigarette smoking and exposure to secondhand smoke. However, there has been a slowing of cessation rates in the United States during recent years, possibly caused by high residual addiction or fatigue from cessation messaging. Furthermore, tobacco products have continued to evolve faster than the scientific understanding of their biological effects. This review considers selected updates on the genetics and epigenetics of smoking behavior and associated cardiovascular risk, mechanisms of atherogenesis and thrombosis, clinical effects of smoking and benefits of cessation, and potential impact of electronic cigarettes on cardiovascular health. Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Diluvios de grandeza: agua, territorio y poder en el río Mayo en el noroeste de México, 1880-1910

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey M. Banister

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available El actual distrito de riego 038 o valle del Mayo, que forma parte del espacio de riego del noroeste de México, surge de luchas históricas por construir un orden oficial en un mundo diverso de signos, símbolos, procesos, lugares y personas. Es el hogar ancestral de los yoremes (mayos, un grupo indígena para el que la colonización y el desarrollo agrícola han significado la pérdida de autonomía y de la movilidad estacional que requieren para subsistir en un terreno árido. Es el lugar donde nació el presidente Álvaro Obregón, otrora productor de garbanzo, que transformó las prácticas de riego de fines del siglo xix en las leyes e instituciones para la administración del agua del siglo xx. Reconfigurar el territorio con el fin de centralizar ("federalizar" los recursos hídricos ha probado ser excesivamente difícil en la zona del Mayo, pero esto fue así en particular al inicio del proceso de federalización, una época de modernización dinámica bajo la dirección del presidente Porfirio Díaz (1876-1910. La investigación sobre la política hidráulica de México, con algunas importantes excepciones, ha tendido a enfocarse en la centraliza- ción. Los estudiosos le han prestado menor atención a los momentos y lugares en los que el agua escapa al control de las autoridades. Este trabajo explora la importancia de la administración del agua (y más ampliamente la formación del Estado a finales del siglo xix, en vísperas de la Revolución Mexicana de 1910, como una serie continua, siempre incipiente de derechos y proyectos relativos a las tierras. Entender las debilidades e incompetencias de dichos proyectos ofrece un discernimiento crucial acerca de la política hidráulica posrevolucionaria o contemporánea.

  19. Postpartum hemorrhage: guidelines for clinical practice from the French College of Gynaecologists and Obstetricians (CNGOF): in collaboration with the French Society of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care (SFAR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentilhes, Loïc; Vayssière, Christophe; Deneux-Tharaux, Catherine; Aya, Antoine Guy; Bayoumeu, Françoise; Bonnet, Marie-Pierre; Djoudi, Rachid; Dolley, Patricia; Dreyfus, Michel; Ducroux-Schouwey, Chantal; Dupont, Corinne; François, Anne; Gallot, Denis; Haumonté, Jean-Baptiste; Huissoud, Cyril; Kayem, Gilles; Keita, Hawa; Langer, Bruno; Mignon, Alexandre; Morel, Olivier; Parant, Olivier; Pelage, Jean-Pierre; Phan, Emmanuelle; Rossignol, Mathias; Tessier, Véronique; Mercier, Frédéric J; Goffinet, François

    2016-03-01

    Postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) is defined as blood loss ≥500mL after delivery and severe PPH as blood loss ≥1000mL, regardless of the route of delivery (professional consensus). The preventive administration of uterotonic agents just after delivery is effective in reducing the incidence of PPH and its systematic use is recommended, regardless of the route of delivery (Grade A). Oxytocin is the first-line prophylactic drug, regardless of the route of delivery (Grade A); a slowly dose of 5 or 10 IU can be administered (Grade A) either IV or IM (professional consensus). After vaginal delivery, routine cord drainage (Grade B), controlled cord traction (Grade A), uterine massage (Grade A), and routine bladder voiding (professional consensus) are not systematically recommended for PPH prevention. After caesarean delivery, placental delivery by controlled cord traction is recommended (grade B). The routine use of a collector bag to assess postpartum blood loss at vaginal delivery is not systematically recommended (Grade B), since the incidence of severe PPH is not affected by this intervention. In cases of overt PPH after vaginal delivery, placement of a blood collection bag is recommended (professional consensus). The initial treatment of PPH consists in a manual uterine examination, together with antibiotic prophylaxis, careful visual assessment of the lower genital tract, a uterine massage, and the administration of 5-10 IU oxytocin injected slowly IV or IM, followed by a maintenance infusion not to exceed a cumulative dose of 40IU (professional consensus). If oxytocin fails to control the bleeding, the administration of sulprostone is recommended within 30minutes of the PPH diagnosis (Grade C). Intrauterine balloon tamponade can be performed if sulprostone fails and before recourse to either surgery or interventional radiology (professional consensus). Fluid resuscitation is recommended for PPH persistent after first line uterotonics, or if clinical signs of

  20. Acute Care Management of the HIV-Infected Patient: A Report from the HIV Practice and Research Network of the American College of Clinical Pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, Spencer H; Badowski, Melissa E; Liedtke, Michelle D; Rathbun, R Chris; Pecora Fulco, Patricia

    2017-05-01

    Patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) admitted to the hospital have complex antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens with an increased medication error rate upon admission. This report provides a resource for clinicians managing HIV-infected patients and ART in the inpatient setting. A survey of the authors was conducted to evaluate common issues that arise during an acute hospitalization for HIV-infected patients. After a group consensus, a review of the medical literature was performed to determine the supporting evidence for the following HIV-associated hospital queries: admission/discharge orders, antiretroviral hospital formularies, laboratory monitoring, altered hepatic/renal function, drug-drug interactions (DDIs), enteral administration, and therapeutic drug monitoring. With any hospital admission for an HIV-infected patient, a specific set of procedures should be followed including a thorough admission medication history and communication with the ambulatory HIV provider to avoid omissions or substitutions in the ART regimen. DDIs are common and should be reviewed at all transitions of care during the hospital admission. ART may be continued if enteral nutrition with a feeding tube is deemed necessary, but the entire regimen should be discontinued if no oral access is available for a prolonged period. Therapeutic drug monitoring is not generally recommended but, if available, should be considered in unique clinical scenarios where antiretroviral pharmacokinetics are difficult to predict. ART may need adjustment if hepatic or renal insufficiency ensues. Treatment of hospitalized patients with HIV is highly complex. HIV-infected patients are at high risk for medication errors during various transitions of care. Baseline knowledge of the principles of antiretroviral pharmacotherapy is necessary for clinicians managing acutely ill HIV-infected patients to avoid medication errors, identify DDIs, and correctly dose medications if organ

  1. Allergy: conventional and alternative concepts. Summary of a report of the Royal College of Physicians Committee on Clinical Immunology and Allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-07-01

    Allergy is an exaggerated response of the immune system to external substances. It plays a role in a wide range of diseases. In some, such as summer hayfever, the symptoms are entirely due to allergy. In other conditions, particularly asthma, eczema and urticaria, allergy plays a part in some patients but not all. In these situations, allergy may either have a major role or provide just one of many triggers. In an individual patient's illness, the importance of allergy may change with time. The most common allergens (substances causing allergy) are grass and tree pollens, the house dust mite, products from pets and other animals, agents encountered in industry, wasp and bee venom, drugs, and certain foods. Food allergy presents a particularly difficult problem. Some individuals who react to food suffer from true food allergy but in others there is no evidence of an alteration in the immune system. Here the term 'food intolerance' is preferable. Conventional doctors treat allergy by allergen avoidance--where this is possible--and drugs that relieve symptoms. In a few selected cases, in which other methods have failed, immunotherapy (desensitisation or hyposensitisation) is recommended. Patients who consult practitioners of alternative allergy often do so because they are dissatisfied with the conventional approach to diagnosis and treatment, and sometimes because they have conditions which conventional doctors do not accept as having an allergic basis. There is a very wide range of alternative approaches to allergy, including the methods used by clinical ecologists, acupuncturists and homoeopathists. Hypnosis may have a small role to play in asthma, and similar claims for acupuncture need to be evaluated.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Los motines de mayo de 1909. Inmigrantes y nativos en el mercado laboral de Lima a comienzos del siglo XX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2000-01-01

    manifestaciones, cómo los sectores populares nativos podían influir sobre la marcha de la economía y de la política, muchas veces para su propio beneficio. En este intento, las muchedumbres nativas de Lima de principios del siglo XX desarrollaron una cotidiana lucha que tenía como escenario el mercado de trabajo que, a veces, llegaba a niveles altos de violencia como en las asonadas de mayo de 1909 en el que, como se apreciará en el artículo que sigue, los trabajadores chinos fueron blanco de las agresiones de una multitud que consideraba que los orientales desplazaban a nacionales y además contribuían a la depreciación del salario. THE MAY 1909 RIOTS. IMMIGRANTS AND NATIONALS IN THE LABOUR MARKET OF LIMA AT THE BEGINNING OF THE 20TH CENTURY. This article is part of a larger study that seeks to contribute to our understanding of a crucial period of peruvian history, 1890-1920. The study of urban riots allows us to analyze how a society that was going through the first stages of a modernization process, produced a form of lower-class protest characterized by the destruction of property, the lack of a permanent form of organization, certain manifestations of racial outrage, and above all, notions of legitimacy sanctioned by tradition. In addition, the study of urban riots allows us to understand how lower classes could influence economic and political developments, often for their own benefit. In this attempt, the native masses of early 20th century Lima carried on a daily struggle whose scenario was the labor market witch, on occasion, was characterized by high levels of violence, such as the May 1909 riots. As the article details, Chinese people were the target of the crowd’s fury, due to the belief that Chinese workers were displacing locals from their jobs and were a factor in the overall decline in salary rates.

  3. Performance of the 2012 Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics classification criteria versus the 1997 American College of Rheumatology classification criteria in adult and juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus. A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Esther A R; van Royen-Kerkhof, Annet; Jacobs, Johannes W G; Welsing, Paco M J; Fritsch-Stork, Ruth D E

    2018-03-01

    To evaluate the performance in classifying systemic lupus erythematosus by the 2012 Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics criteria (SLICC'12), versus the revised American College of Rheumatology criteria from 1997 (ACR'97) in adult and juvenile SLE patients. A systematic literature search was conducted in PubMed and Embase for studies comparing SLICC'12 and ACR'97 with clinical diagnosis. A meta-analysis was performed to estimate the sensitivity and specificity of SLICC'12 and ACR'97. To assess classification earlier in the disease by either set, sensitivity and specificity were compared for patients with disease duration <5years. Sensitivity and specificity of individual criteria items were also assessed. In adult SLE (nine studies: 5236 patients, 1313 controls), SLICC'12 has higher sensitivity (94.6% vs. 89.6%) and similar specificity (95.5% vs. 98.1%) compared to ACR'97. For juvenile SLE (four studies: 568 patients, 339 controls), SLICC'12 demonstrates higher sensitivity (99.9% vs. 84.3%) than ACR'97, but much lower specificity (82.0% vs. 94.1%). SLICC'12 classifies juvenile SLE patients earlier in disease course. Individual items contributing to diagnostic accuracy are low complement, anti-ds DNA and acute cutaneous lupus in SLICC'12, and the immunologic and hematologic disorder in ACR'97. Based on sensitivity and specificity SLICC'12 is best for adult SLE. Following the view that higher specificity, i.e. avoidance of false positives, is preferable, ACR'97 is best for juvenile SLE even if associated with lower sensitivity. Our results on the contribution of the individual items of SLICC'12 and ACR´97 may be of value in future efforts to update classification criteria. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Treatment of stage IV non-small cell lung cancer: Diagnosis and management of lung cancer, 3rd ed: American College of Chest Physicians evidence-based clinical practice guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socinski, Mark A; Evans, Tracey; Gettinger, Scott; Hensing, Thomas A; VanDam Sequist, Lecia; Ireland, Belinda; Stinchcombe, Thomas E

    2013-05-01

    Stage IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a treatable, but not curable, clinical entity in patients given the diagnosis at a time when their performance status (PS) remains good. A systematic literature review was performed to update the previous edition of the American College of Chest Physicians Lung Cancer Guidelines. The use of pemetrexed should be restricted to patients with nonsquamous histology. Similarly, bevacizumab in combination with chemotherapy (and as continuation maintenance) should be restricted to patients with nonsquamous histology and an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) PS of 0 to 1; however, the data now suggest it is safe to use in those patients with treated and controlled brain metastases. Data at this time are insufficient regarding the safety of bevacizumab in patients receiving therapeutic anticoagulation who have an ECOG PS of 2. The role of cetuximab added to chemotherapy remains uncertain and its routine use cannot be recommended. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors as first-line therapy are the recommended treatment of those patients identified as having an EGFR mutation. The use of maintenance therapy with either pemetrexed or erlotinib should be considered after four cycles of first-line therapy in those patients without evidence of disease progression. The use of second- and third-line therapy in stage IV NSCLC is recommended in those patients retaining a good PS; however, the benefit of therapy beyond the third-line setting has not been demonstrated. In the elderly and in patients with a poor PS, the use of two-drug, platinum-based regimens is preferred. Palliative care should be initiated early in the course of therapy for stage IV NSCLC. Significant advances continue to be made, and the treatment of stage IV NSCLC has become nuanced and specific for particular histologic subtypes and clinical patient characteristics and according to the presence of specific genetic mutations.

  5. Refining a measure of brain injury sequelae to predict postacute rehabilitation outcome: rating scale analysis of the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malec, J F; Moessner, A M; Kragness, M; Lezak, M D

    2000-02-01

    Evaluate the psychometric properties of the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory (MPAI). Rating scale (Rasch) analysis of MPAI and principal component analysis of residuals; the predictive validity of the MPAI measures and raw scores was assessed in a sample from a day rehabilitation program. Outpatient brain injury rehabilitation. 305 persons with brain injury. A 22-item scale reflecting severity of sequelae of brain injury that contained a mix of indicators of impairment, activity, and participation was identified. Scores and measures for MPAI scales were strongly correlated and their predictive validities were comparable. Impairment, activity, and participation define a single dimension of brain injury sequelae. The MPAI shows promise as a measure of this construct.

  6. Public versus Private Colleges: Political Participation of College Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lott, Joe L., II.; Hernandez, Jose; King, Joe P.; Brown, Tiffany; Fajardo, Ismael

    2013-01-01

    Using data from the Baccalaureate and Beyond Longitudinal Study (B&B:93/03) of College Graduates, we use structural equation modeling to model the relationships between college major, values held in college, collegiate community service participation, and the post-college political participation of college graduates by public versus private…

  7. Cyberbullying in College

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos P. Zalaquett

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Cyberbullying is commonly presented as affecting K-12 populations. Current research suggests cyberbullying continues in college. A diverse sample of 613 university students was surveyed to study their cyberbullying experiences in high school and college. Nineteen percent of the sample reported being a victim of cyberbullying in college and 35% of this subsample reported being cyberbullied in high school. Additional findings and practical implications are presented.

  8. 2016 American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism Criteria for Minimal, Moderate, and Major Clinical Response in Juvenile Dermatomyositis: An International Myositis Assessment and Clinical Studies Group/Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation Collaborative Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rider, Lisa G; Aggarwal, Rohit; Pistorio, Angela; Bayat, Nastaran; Erman, Brian; Feldman, Brian M; Huber, Adam M; Cimaz, Rolando; Cuttica, Rubén J; de Oliveira, Sheila Knupp; Lindsley, Carol B; Pilkington, Clarissa A; Punaro, Marilynn; Ravelli, Angelo; Reed, Ann M; Rouster-Stevens, Kelly; van Royen-Kerkhof, Annet; Dressler, Frank; Saad Magalhaes, Claudia; Constantin, Tamás; Davidson, Joyce E; Magnusson, Bo; Russo, Ricardo; Villa, Luca; Rinaldi, Mariangela; Rockette, Howard; Lachenbruch, Peter A; Miller, Frederick W; Vencovsky, Jiri; Ruperto, Nicolino

    2017-05-01

    To develop response criteria for juvenile dermatomyositis (DM). We analysed the performance of 312 definitions that used core set measures from either the International Myositis Assessment and Clinical Studies Group (IMACS) or the Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation (PRINTO) and were derived from natural history data and a conjoint analysis survey. They were further validated using data from the PRINTO trial of prednisone alone compared to prednisone with methotrexate or cyclosporine and the Rituximab in Myositis (RIM) trial. At a consensus conference, experts considered 14 top candidate criteria based on their performance characteristics and clinical face validity, using nominal group technique. Consensus was reached for a conjoint analysis-based continuous model with a total improvement score of 0-100, using absolute per cent change in core set measures of minimal (≥30), moderate (≥45), and major (≥70) improvement. The same criteria were chosen for adult DM/polymyositis, with differing thresholds for improvement. The sensitivity and specificity were 89% and 91-98% for minimal improvement, 92-94% and 94-99% for moderate improvement, and 91-98% and 85-86% for major improvement, respectively, in juvenile DM patient cohorts using the IMACS and PRINTO core set measures. These criteria were validated in the PRINTO trial for differentiating between treatment arms for minimal and moderate improvement (p=0.009-0.057) and in the RIM trial for significantly differentiating the physician's rating for improvement (p<0.006). The response criteria for juvenile DM consisted of a conjoint analysis-based model using a continuous improvement score based on absolute per cent change in core set measures, with thresholds for minimal, moderate, and major improvement. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  9. 2016 American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism criteria for minimal, moderate, and major clinical response in adult dermatomyositis and polymyositis: An International Myositis Assessment and Clinical Studies Group/Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation Collaborative Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Rohit; Rider, Lisa G; Ruperto, Nicolino; Bayat, Nastaran; Erman, Brian; Feldman, Brian M; Oddis, Chester V; Amato, Anthony A; Chinoy, Hector; Cooper, Robert G; Dastmalchi, Maryam; Fiorentino, David; Isenberg, David; Katz, James D; Mammen, Andrew; de Visser, Marianne; Ytterberg, Steven R; Lundberg, Ingrid E; Chung, Lorinda; Danko, Katalin; García-De la Torre, Ignacio; Song, Yeong Wook; Villa, Luca; Rinaldi, Mariangela; Rockette, Howard; Lachenbruch, Peter A; Miller, Frederick W; Vencovsky, Jiri

    2017-05-01

    To develop response criteria for adult dermatomyositis (DM) and polymyositis (PM). Expert surveys, logistic regression, and conjoint analysis were used to develop 287 definitions using core set measures. Myositis experts rated greater improvement among multiple pairwise scenarios in conjoint analysis surveys, where different levels of improvement in 2 core set measures were presented. The PAPRIKA (Potentially All Pairwise Rankings of All Possible Alternatives) method determined the relative weights of core set measures and conjoint analysis definitions. The performance characteristics of the definitions were evaluated on patient profiles using expert consensus (gold standard) and were validated using data from a clinical trial. The nominal group technique was used to reach consensus. Consensus was reached for a conjoint analysis-based continuous model using absolute per cent change in core set measures (physician, patient, and extramuscular global activity, muscle strength, Health Assessment Questionnaire, and muscle enzyme levels). A total improvement score (range 0-100), determined by summing scores for each core set measure, was based on improvement in and relative weight of each core set measure. Thresholds for minimal, moderate, and major improvement were ≥20, ≥40, and ≥60 points in the total improvement score. The same criteria were chosen for juvenile DM, with different improvement thresholds. Sensitivity and specificity in DM/PM patient cohorts were 85% and 92%, 90% and 96%, and 92% and 98% for minimal, moderate, and major improvement, respectively. Definitions were validated in the clinical trial analysis for differentiating the physician rating of improvement (p<0.001). The response criteria for adult DM/PM consisted of the conjoint analysis model based on absolute per cent change in 6 core set measures, with thresholds for minimal, moderate, and major improvement. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not

  10. Making Canada a Destination for Medical Tourists: Why Canadian Provinces Should Not Try to Become “Mayo Clinics of the North”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Leigh

    2012-01-01

    When Canadian researchers examine the subject of medical tourism, they typically focus on ethical, social, public health and health policy issues related to Canadians seeking health services in other countries. They emphasize study of Canada as a departure point for medical tourists rather than as a potential destination for international patients. Several influential voices have recently argued that provincial healthcare systems in Canada should market health services to international patients. Proponents of marketing Canada as a destination for medical tourists argue that attracting international patients will generate revenue for provincial healthcare systems. Responding to such proposals, I argue that there are at least seven reasons why provincial health systems in Canada should not dedicate institutional, financial and health human resources to promoting themselves as destinations for medical tourists. PMID:23634159

  11. Outcomes of patients with loco-regionally recurrent or new primary squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck treated with curative intent reirradiation at Mayo Clinic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, Kelly K.; Ross, Helen J.; Garrett, Ashley L.; Jizba, Theresa A.; Patel, Ajay B.; Patel, Samir H.; Wong, William W.; Halyard, Michele Y.; Ko, Stephen J.; Kosiorek, Heidi E.; Foote, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    We reviewed outcomes of patients with loco-regionally recurrent (LRR) or new primary (NP) squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) treated at our institution with reirradiation (RRT). Patients received definitive RRT (DRRT) or post-operative RRT following salvage surgery (PRRT) from 2003 to 2011. Measured survival outcomes included loco-regional relapse free survival (LRFS) and overall survival (OS). Among 81 patients (PRRT, 42; DRRT, 39), median PRRT and DRRT doses were 60 Gy (12–70 Gy) and 69.6 Gy (48–76.8 Gy). The majority of patients received IMRT-based RRT (n = 77, 95 %). With median follow-up of 78.1 months (95 % CI, 56–96.8 months), 2-year OS was 53 % with PRRT and 48 % with DRRT (p = 0.12); 23 % of patients were alive at last follow-up. LRFS at 2 years was 60 %, and did not differ significantly between PRRT and DRRT groups. A trend toward inferior LRFS was noted among patients receiving chemotherapy with RRT versus RRT alone (p = 0.06). Late serious toxicities were uncommon, including osteoradionecrosis (2 patients) and carotid artery bleeding (1 patient, non-fatal). OS of PRRT- and DRRT-treated patients in this series appears superior to the published literature. We used IMRT for the majority of patients, in contrast to several series and trials previously reported, which may account in part for this difference. Future studies should seek to improve outcomes among patients with LRR/NP SCCHN via alternative therapeutic modalities such as proton radiotherapy and by incorporating novel systemic agents

  12. AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS, AMERICAN COLLEGE OF ENDOCRINOLOGY, AND ANDROGEN EXCESS AND PCOS SOCIETY DISEASE STATE CLINICAL REVIEW: GUIDE TO THE BEST PRACTICES IN THE EVALUATION AND TREATMENT OF POLYCYSTIC OVARY SYNDROME - PART 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Neil F; Cobin, Rhoda H; Futterweit, Walter; Glueck, Jennifer S; Legro, Richard S; Carmina, Enrico

    2015-12-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is recognized as the most common endocrine disorder of reproductive-aged women around the world. This document, produced by the collaboration of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists and the Androgen Excess Society aims to highlight the most important clinical issues confronting physicians and their patients with PCOS. It is a summary of current best practices in 2014. Insulin resistance is believed to play an intrinsic role in the pathogenesis of PCOS. The mechanism by which insulin resistance or insulin give rise to oligomenorrhea and hyperandrogenemia, however, is unclear. Hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp studies have shown that both obese and lean women with PCOS have some degree of insulin resistance. Insulin resistance is implicated in the ovulatory dysfunction of PCOS by disrupting the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis. Given the association with insulin resistance, all women with PCOS require evaluation for the risk of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its components, including type 2 diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and the possible risk of clinical events, including acute myocardial infarction and stroke. Obese women with PCOS are at increased risk for MetS with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT; 31 to 35%) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM; 7.5 to 10%). Rates of progression from normal glucose tolerance to IGT, and in turn to T2DM, may be as high as 5 to 15% within 3 years. Data suggest the need for baseline oral glucose tolerance test every 1 to 2 years based on family history of T2DM as well as body mass index (BMI) and yearly in women with IGT. Compared with BMI- and age-matched controls, young, lean PCOS women have lower high-density lipoprotein (HDL) size, higher very-low-density lipoprotein particle number, higher low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particle number, and borderline lower LDL size. Statins have been shown to lower testosterone levels either alone or in combination with oral

  13. Inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase-4: The mechanisms of action and clinical use of vildagliptin for the management of type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galina Smushkin

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Galina Smushkin, Adrian VellaDivision of Endocrinology, Diabetes, Metabolism, and Nutrition, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN, USAAbstract: Postprandial hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes is characterized by impaired insulin secretion and action, decreased glucose effectiveness and defective suppression of glucagon secretion. Newly available therapies for type 2 diabetes target the pathway of the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1. Oral inhibitors of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4 raise the level of endogenous GLP-1 by inhibiting its clearance thereby lowering fasting and postprandial glucose concentrations. Unlike compounds which act as agonists of the GLP-1 receptor, DPP-4 inhibitors are not associated with significant effects on gastrointestinal motility, which led to a controversy around the mechanisms responsible for their glucose-lowering effects. Here we review the evidence in regards to the mechanisms whereby DPP-4 inhibitors lower glucose concentrations. Their effects are most likely mediated by an increase in endogenous GLP-1, although additional mechanisms may be involved. The pharmacology, efficacy and safety of vildagliptin, a novel DPP-4 inhibitor, are also discussed.Keywords: insulin secretion, insulin action, incretin, DPP-4 inhibitor, glucagon-like peptide 1

  14. AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS, AMERICAN COLLEGE OF ENDOCRINOLOGY, AND ANDROGEN EXCESS AND PCOS SOCIETY DISEASE STATE CLINICAL REVIEW: GUIDE TO THE BEST PRACTICES IN THE EVALUATION AND TREATMENT OF POLYCYSTIC OVARY SYNDROME--PART 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Neil F; Cobin, Rhoda H; Futterweit, Walter; Glueck, Jennifer S; Legro, Richard S; Carmina, Enrico

    2015-11-01

    Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) is recognized as the most common endocrine disorder of reproductive-aged women around the world. This document, produced by the collaboration of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) and the Androgen Excess and PCOS Society (AES) aims to highlight the most important clinical issues confronting physicians and their patients with PCOS. It is a summary of current best practices in 2015. PCOS has been defined using various criteria, including menstrual irregularity, hyperandrogenism, and polycystic ovary morphology (PCOM). General agreement exists among specialty society guidelines that the diagnosis of PCOS must be based on the presence of at least two of the following three criteria: chronic anovulation, hyperandrogenism (clinical or biological) and polycystic ovaries. There is need for careful clinical assessment of women's history, physical examination, and laboratory evaluation, emphasizing the accuracy and validity of the methodology used for both biochemical measurements and ovarian imaging. Free testosterone (T) levels are more sensitive than the measurement of total T for establishing the existence of androgen excess and should be ideally determined through equilibrium dialysis techniques. Value of measuring levels of androgens other than T in patients with PCOS is relatively low. New ultrasound machines allow diagnosis of PCOM in patients having at least 25 small follicles (2 to 9 mm) in the whole ovary. Ovarian size at 10 mL remains the threshold between normal and increased ovary size. Serum 17-hydroxyprogesterone and anti-Müllerian hormone are useful for determining a diagnosis of PCOS. Correct diagnosis of PCOS impacts on the likelihood of associated metabolic and cardiovascular risks and leads to appropriate intervention, depending upon the woman's age, reproductive status, and her own concerns. The management of women with PCOS should include reproductive function, as well as the care of hirsutism

  15. Beyond College Eligibility: A New Framework for Promoting College Readiness. College Readiness Indicator Systems Resource Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annenberg Institute for School Reform at Brown University, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The College Readiness Indicator Systems (CRIS) initiative was developed in response to a troubling pattern: More students than ever are enrolling in college after high school, but many of them are not college ready, as evidenced by persistently low rates of college completion. The sense of urgency to close the gap between college eligibility and…

  16. HER2 Gene Amplification Testing by Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization (FISH): Comparison of the ASCO-College of American Pathologists Guidelines With FISH Scores Used for Enrollment in Breast Cancer International Research Group Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Press, Michael F; Sauter, Guido; Buyse, Marc; Fourmanoir, Hélène; Quinaux, Emmanuel; Tsao-Wei, Denice D; Eiermann, Wolfgang; Robert, Nicholas; Pienkowski, Tadeusz; Crown, John; Martin, Miguel; Valero, Vicente; Mackey, John R; Bee, Valerie; Ma, Yanling; Villalobos, Ivonne; Campeau, Anaamika; Mirlacher, Martina; Lindsay, Mary-Ann; Slamon, Dennis J

    2016-10-10

    Purpose ASCO and the College of American Pathologists (ASCO-CAP) recently recommended further changes to the evaluation of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 gene (HER2) amplification by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). We retrospectively assessed the impact of these new guidelines by using annotated Breast Cancer International Research Group (BCIRG) -005, BCIRG-006, and BCIRG-007 clinical trials data for which we have detailed outcomes. Patients and Methods The HER2 FISH status of BCIRG-005/006/007 patients with breast cancers was re-evaluated according to current ASCO-CAP guidelines, which designates five different groups according to HER2 FISH ratio and average HER2 gene copy number per tumor cell: group 1 (in situ hybridization [ISH]-positive): HER2-to-chromosome 17 centromere ratio ≥ 2.0, average HER2 copies ≥ 4.0; group 2 (ISH-positive): ratio ≥ 2.0, copies < 4.0; group 3 (ISH-positive): ratio < 2.0, copies ≥ 6.0; group 4 (ISH-equivocal): ratio < 2.0, copies ≥ 4.0 and < 6.0; and group 5 (ISH-negative): ratio < 2.0, copies < 4.0. We assessed correlations with HER2 protein, clinical outcomes by disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) and benefit from trastuzumab therapy (hazard ratio [HR]). Results Among 10,468 patients with breast cancers who were successfully screened for trial entry, 40.8% were in ASCO-CAP ISH group 1, 0.7% in group 2; 0.5% in group 3, 4.1% in group 4, and 53.9% in group 5. Distributions were similar in screened compared with accrued subpopulations. Among accrued patients, FISH group 1 breast cancers were strongly correlated with immunohistochemistry 3+ status (P < .0001), whereas groups 2, 3, 4, and 5 were not; however, groups 2, 4 and, 5 were strongly correlated with immunohistochemistry 0/1+ status (all P < .0001), whereas group 3 was not. Among patients accrued to BCIRG-005, group 4 was not associated with significantly worse DFS or OS compared with group 5. Among patients accrued to BCIRG-006, only

  17. College Drinking - Changing the Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... about college alcohol policies College Drinking - Changing the Culture This is your one-stop resource for comprehensive ... More about special features College Drinking - Changing the Culture This is your one-stop resource for comprehensive ...

  18. What Is College for?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Phyllis M.; Martin, Carolyn A.; Kinbrough, Walter M.; Hitt, John C.; Urgo, Joseph R.; Lief, Charles G.; Drake, Michael V.; Hellyer, Brenda; Pepicello, William

    2013-01-01

    Lately there has been a great deal of discussion about the importance of measuring a college's "return on investment." Is the point of a college education quantifiable results or personal and intellectual growth? In pursuit of answers, "The Chronicle" asked a selection of higher-education leaders. Phyllis M. Wise, Chancellor of…

  19. Latino College Completion: Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  20. Faculty Handbook. Regis College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regis Coll., Weston, MA.

    Regis College policies and procedures are described in this 1976 faculty handbook. Chapter 1 covers college organization and governance, including roles of academic officers and committees. Specific faculty data are presented in Chapter 2, such as definition of academic ranks and titles, recruitment and appointment, promotion, tenure, review,…

  1. Who Takes College Algebra?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herriott, Scott R.; Dunbar, Steven R.

    2009-01-01

    The common understanding within the mathematics community is that the role of the college algebra course is to prepare students for calculus. Though exceptions are emerging, the curriculum of most college algebra courses and the content of most textbooks on the market both reflect that assumption. This article calls that assumption into question…

  2. Community Colleges Today

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Corinne; Jervis, Angela

    2011-01-01

    Dr. Jill Biden, Vice President Joe Biden's wife, has been teaching in community colleges for the past 18 years. Dr. Biden believes that community colleges are "…uniquely American institutions where anyone who walks through the door is one step closer to realizing the American dream." This is an inspiring sentiment. However, of all the…

  3. Latino College Completion: Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  4. Examining Latina College Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Amanda R.

    2012-01-01

    The purposes of this qualitative narrative study were to explore the potential areas of conflict Latina college students experience between their educational goals and traditional cultural gender roles and expectations. Participants were selected utilizing purposeful sampling methods. All participants were first-generation college students.…

  5. College Rankings. ERIC Digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holub, Tamara

    The popularity of college ranking surveys published by "U.S. News and World Report" and other magazines is indisputable, but the methodologies used to measure the quality of higher education institutions have come under fire by scholars and college officials. Criticisms have focused on methodological flaws, such as failure to consider…

  6. Rasch Measurement Analysis of the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory (MPAI-4) in a Community-Based Rehabilitation Sample

    OpenAIRE

    Kean, Jacob; Malec, James F.; Altman, Irwin M.; Swick, Shannon

    2011-01-01

    The precise measurement of patient outcomes depends upon clearly articulated constructs and refined clinical assessment instruments that work equally well for all subgroups within a population. This is a challenging task in those with acquired brain injury (ABI) because of the marked heterogeneity of the disorder and subsequent outcomes. Alhough essential, the iterative process of instrument refinement is often neglected. This present study was undertaken to examine validity, reliability, dim...

  7. Descriptive Analysis of Medication Administration During Inpatient Cardiopulmonary Arrest Resuscitation (from the Mayo Registry for Telemetry Efficacy in Arrest Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snipelisky, David; Ray, Jordan; Matcha, Gautam; Roy, Archana; Dumitrascu, Adrian; Harris, Dana; Bosworth, Veronica; Clark, Brooke; Thomas, Colleen S; Heckman, Michael G; Vadeboncoeur, Tyler; Kusumoto, Fred; Burton, M Caroline

    2016-05-15

    Advanced cardiovascular life support guidelines exist, yet there are variations in clinical practice. Our study aims to describe the utilization of medications during resuscitation from in-hospital cardiopulmonary arrest. A retrospective review of patients who suffered a cardiopulmonary arrest from May 2008 to June 2014 was performed. Clinical and resuscitation data, including timing and dose of medications used, were extracted from the electronic medical record and comparisons made. A total of 94 patients were included in the study. Patients were divided into different groups based on the medication combination used during resuscitation: (1) epinephrine; (2) epinephrine and bicarbonate; (3) epinephrine, bicarbonate, and calcium; (4) epinephrine, bicarbonate, and epinephrine drip; and (5) epinephrine, bicarbonate, calcium, and epinephrine drip. No difference in baseline demographics or clinical data was present, apart from history of dementia and the use of calcium channel blockers. The number of medications given was correlated with resuscitation duration (Spearman's rank correlation = 0.50, p resuscitation durations compared to that of the other groups (p resuscitation efforts for in-hospital cardiopulmonary arrests. Increased duration and mortality rates were found in those resuscitations compared with epinephrine alone, likely due to the longer resuscitation duration in the former groups. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Dating Violence among College Students: Key Issues for College Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Christine E.; Kardatzke, Kerrie N.

    2007-01-01

    The authors present a review of literature examining dating violence among college students. They describe 6 key issues related to dating violence among college students that affect college counselors' work. These key issues relate to the incidence and prevalence of physical, sexual, and psychological violence in college students' dating…

  9. A Qualitative Study Comparing the Assay Performance Characteristics Between the 2007 and the 2013 American Society for Clinical Oncology and College of American Pathologists HER2 Scoring Methods in Mucinous Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chi-Kuan; Lee, Ming-Yung; Lin, Wea-Lung; Wang, Yu-Ting; Han, Chih-Ping; Yu, Cheng-Ping; Chao, Wan-Ru

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The remarkable success of trastuzumab and other newly developed anti-HER2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2) therapies in breast, gastric, or gastroesophageal junction cancer patients has supported us to investigate the HER2 status and its possible therapeutic implication in mucinous epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). However, there is currently no standardization of HER2 scoring criteria in mucinous EOC. In this study, we aimed to compare both the assay performance characteristics of the 2007 and the 2013 American Society for Clinical Oncology and College of American Pathologists scoring methods. Forty-nine tissue microarray samples of mucinous EOC from Asian women were analyzed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) tests using the 2007 and the 2013 criteria, respectively. The overall concordance between IHC and FISH by the 2007 criteria was 97.92 % (kappa = 0.921), and that by the 2013 criteria was 100% (kappa = 1.000). The percentage of Her2 FISH-amplified cases showed an increasing trend significantly through their corresponding HER2 IHC ordinals by the 2007 and the 2013 criteria, respectively (P < 0.001, P < 0.001). After excluding equivocal cases, the specificity (100%) and positive predictive value (100%) were unchanged under either the 2007 or the 2013 criteria. The sensitivity (100%), negative predictive value (NPV) (100%), and accuracy (100%) of HER2 IHC were higher under the 2013 criteria than those (sensitivity 87.5%, NPV 97.6%, and accuracy 97.9%) under the 2007 criteria. Of the total 49 cases, the number (n = 4) of HER2 IHC equivocal results under the 2013 criteria was 4-fold higher than that (n = 1) under the 2007 criteria (8.16% vs 2.04%). Conclusively, if first tested by IHC, the 2013 criteria caused more equivocal HER2 IHC cases to be referred to Her2 FISH testing than the 2007 criteria. That decreased the false-negative rate of HER2 status and increased the detection

  10. Laboratory compliance with the American Society of Clinical Oncology/College of American Pathologists human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 testing guidelines: a 3-year comparison of validation procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyhdalo, Kathryn S; Fitzgibbons, Patrick L; Goldsmith, Jeffery D; Souers, Rhona J; Nakhleh, Raouf E

    2014-07-01

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology/College of American Pathologists (ASCO/CAP) published guidelines in 2007 regarding testing accuracy, interpretation, and reporting of results for HER2 studies. A 2008 survey identified areas needing improved compliance. To reassess laboratory response to those guidelines following a full accreditation cycle for an updated snapshot of laboratory practices regarding ASCO/CAP guidelines. In 2011, a survey was distributed with the HER2 immunohistochemistry (IHC) proficiency testing program identical to the 2008 survey. Of the 1150 surveys sent, 977 (85.0%) were returned, comparable to the original survey response in 2008 (757 of 907; 83.5%). New participants submitted 124 of 977 (12.7%) surveys. The median laboratory accession rate was 14,788 cases with 211 HER2 tests performed annually. Testing was validated with fluorescence in situ hybridization in 49.1% (443 of 902) of the laboratories; 26.3% (224 of 853) of the laboratories used another IHC assay. The median number of cases to validate fluorescence in situ hybridization (n = 40) and IHC (n = 27) was similar to those in 2008. Ninety-five percent concordance with fluorescence in situ hybridization was achieved by 76.5% (254 of 332) of laboratories for IHC(-) findings and 70.4% (233 of 331) for IHC(+) cases. Ninety-five percent concordance with another IHC assay was achieved by 71.1% (118 of 168) of the laboratories for negative findings and 69.6% (112 of 161) of the laboratories for positive cases. The proportion of laboratories interpreting HER2 IHC using ASCO/CAP guidelines (86.6% [798 of 921] in 2011; 83.8% [605 of 722] in 2008) remains similar. Although fixation time improvements have been made, assay validation deficiencies still exist. The results of this survey were shared within the CAP, including the Laboratory Accreditation Program and the ASCO/CAP panel revising the HER2 guidelines published in October 2013. The Laboratory Accreditation Program checklist was

  11. Acción colectiva y políticas públicas. El caso de la masacre del 16 de mayo de 1998

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuelita Barrios Rodríguez

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available En 1998 sucedió la masacre del 16 de mayo en Barrancabermeja, que significó el ingreso de los grupos paramilitares al territorio y el incremento de la violencia. Como respuesta, las organizaciones sociales presentes en la ciudad realizaron diversas acciones colectivas, que trascendieron este hecho a un tema de interés nacional e internacional. El presente artículo es el resultado de una investigación triangular que utilizó técnicas cuantitativas y cualitativas de recolección de información. El análisis se realizó desde el enfoque del mesoanálisis, a través del cual se estudió la definición de la masacre como un problema público, y su inserción dentro del ciclo de política pública, que fue visibilizado por la acción colectiva y los medios de comunicación, generando un efecto búmeran.

  12. Reconciliación de Malí; mayo en Kidal, inflexión en la segunda fase del proceso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Castilla

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available La reconciliación es uno de los retos de la consolidación de la paz. El ejercicio de la soberanía por parte de las instituciones locales, puede originar diferencias con las organizaciones internacionales durante la transformación del conflicto. El desafío es coordinar estrategias y medidas en el tiempo. El proceso de reconciliación comenzó en Malí con un gobierno de transición. Durante el año 2014, el gobierno ha tratado de impulsar el proceso, en un contexto en el que se han reproducido los enfrentamientos tribales, se han dado nuevos choques entre el MNLA y las Fuerzas Armadas malíes, y dónde sigue influyendo la actividad terrorista yihadista. IBK se refirió a aspectos fundamentales para el futuro inmediato del proceso tras los acontecimientos de mayo en Kidal. Tras estos acontecimientos, las negociaciones de paz se desarrollan con la mediación argelina. La complementariedad entre la justicia nacional y la internacional será una de las claves, lo que a su vez puede interrelacionar con la potencial re-integración futura de excombatientes.

  13. Hoy hace: la erupción del Rincón de la Vieja el 8 de mayo de 1991

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soto Bonilla, Gerardo

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Uno de los eventos volcánicos importantes del siglo XX en Costa Rica fue el ocurrido el 8 de mayo del año 1991 en el Volcán Rincón de la Vieja. A continuación, se muestra la información recopilada en la serie Hoy hace. concerniente a la emergencia suscitada en esa ocasión. Se incluye una relación de las principales observaciones reportadas con respecto al Volcán desde el año 1765 hasta el año 1998. El documento explica el mecanismo de la erupción principal y enlista las actividades posteriores que se dieron One of the important volcanic events of the 20th Century in Costa Rica was the one of May 8, 1991 at the Rincón de la Vieja Volcano. Following, it shows the information collected in the series Today in History (Hoy hace related to the emergency generated at that moment. It includes a relation to the main observations reported in regards to the Volcano from the year 1765 to the year 1998. The document explains the mechanism of the main eruption and lists the posterior activities

  14. Benthic diatoms from Potter Cove, 25 de Mayo (King George) Island, Antarctica: Mucilage and glucan storage as a C-source for limpets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daglio, Yasmin; Sacristán, Hernán; Ansaldo, Martín; Rodríguez, María C.

    2018-03-01

    Biofilms were allowed to develop on ceramic tiles placed in closed containers on the shore of Potter Cove, 25 de Mayo (King George) Island. Water pumping from the cove inside the containers extended for 25 days. Diatoms were the dominant microalgae in these biofilms, which were removed from a set of tiles to a) characterize the extracellular mucilage, b) carry out floristic determination and c) perform grazing experiments with the limpet Nacella concinna. Biofilms mucilaginous matrix consisted of proteins and carbohydrates. Room temperature aqueous extraction of the freeze-dried material rendered a fraction enriched in the storage glucan chrysolaminarin, its identity confirmed by methylation structural analyses. Hot water extracted products showed greater heterogeneity in monosaccharide composition, including glucose, mannose, galactose, fucose, xylose and rhamnose. Diatom identification revealed that Pseudogomphonema kamtschaticum was the dominant species followed by several Navicula species, Nitzschia pellucida and Synedra kerguelensis. Photographical survey of colonized tiles placed in glass flasks together with a specimen of Nacella concinna exhibited between 5 and 30% removal of the biofilms coverage after 24 h of exposure to the limpet, suggesting that EPS and chrysolaminarin constitute a C-source for the gastropod.

  15. La identidad en la encrucijada: la comunidad galesa del Chubut y las conmemoraciones del Centenario y Bicentenario de la Revolución de Mayo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldine Lublin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available El presente artículo se propone rastrear a grandes rasgos la relación ―especial‖ entre el estado nacional argentino y, a partir de 1958, la provincia de Chubut por una parte y los colonos galeses que se establecieron en Chubut desde 1865 y sus descendientes por otra, a través del análisis de la posición de la colectividad galesa del Chubut en dos momentos históricos destacados: el Centenario y el Bicentenario de la Revolución de Mayo (1810. Al corresponderse el perfil de los galeses con la idea de poblaciones "civilizadas" que las autoridades pretendían impulsar en desmedro de los legítimos pobladores originales, estas políticas dieron lugar a una fuerte identificación histórica de la Provincia de Chubut con la llamada "gesta galesa". Se generó asimismo una peculiar dinámica triangular de las relaciones estatales, cuya evolución a través del tiempo ha desembocado en la actual promoción de la identidad chubutense como el resultado de la fusión de las culturas de los tehuelches originarios y los colonos galeses.

  16. Problem Gambling on College Campuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    McComb, Jennifer L.; Hanson, William E.

    2009-01-01

    The vast majority of college students gamble, with some doing so problematically. This article discusses gambling and problem gambling among college students, framing it as an emerging health issue on college campuses nationwide. Given that 4 out of 5 college students admit to gambling, and that approximately 8% gamble problematically, it is…

  17. Going to College

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chocolate cake. Many college campuses have lots of fast-food restaurants within easy reach of dorms or classes. ... re stressed, means you are overriding your body's natural signals. This tends to lead to more chaotic ...

  18. American College of Gastroenterology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... journal published to provide an opportunity to share interesting case reports. Edited by GI fellows, it is ... AmCollegeGastro Events November 9 Advances in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases – AIBD 2017 November 9 - 11, 2017 Walt Disney ...

  19. Getting Exercise in College

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in college? What Does My Body Need? The importance of exercise is nothing new. Thomas Jefferson once ... commitment to regular activity. According to the 2008 Physical activity guidelines, kids and teens should do 60 minutes ...

  20. Patient satisfaction and acceptability: a journey through an ambulatory gynaecology clinic in the West of Ireland

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Uzochukwu, I

    2016-06-01

    Ambulatory Gynaecology allows a “see-and-treat” approach to managing gynaecological conditions, providing a more streamlined, integrated care pathway than the traditional gynaecology clinic and inpatient care model. This study was designed to assess patient satisfaction and acceptability of Ambulatory Gynaecology services in Mayo University Hospital, Castlebar, Ireland. It also provided for feedback from patients as to how the service might be improved. \\r\

  1. Postgraduate Clinical Training at the New England School of Optometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Douglas J.

    1989-01-01

    The New England College of Optometry's two separate but integrated clinical postgraduate programs, one providing Veterans' Administration residencies and the other, college-based fellowships, are described. The shared curriculum components, exchange process, and evaluation system are highlighted. (MSE)

  2. Eating Patterns and Disorders in a College Population: Are College Women's Eating Problems a New Phenomenon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse-Biber, Sharlene

    1989-01-01

    Analysis of questionnaires returned by 395 sophomores reveals that the eating difficulties of college women may be a problem that only partially resembles clinical eating disorders. They displayed the behavioral symptoms but not the psychological traits associated with anorexia and bulimia. Diagnosis and treatment issues, and sociocultural…

  3. Unmarried parents in college.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldrick-Rab, Sara; Sorensen, Kia

    2010-01-01

    Noting that access to higher education has expanded dramatically in the past several decades, Sara Goldrick-Rab and Kia Sorensen focus on how unmarried parents fare once they enter college. Contrary to the expectation that access to college consistently promotes family stability and economic security, the authors argue that deficiencies in current policy lead college attendance to have adverse consequences for some families headed by unmarried parents. Although rates of college attendance have increased substantially among unmarried parents, their college completion rates are low. One explanation is inadequate academic preparation. Another is financial constraints, which can force unmarried students to interrupt their studies or increase their work hours, both of which compromise the quality of their educational experiences and the outcomes for their children. The authors point out that although many public programs offer support to unmarried parents attending college, the support is neither well coordinated nor easily accessed. Over the past three decades, loans have increasingly replaced grants as the most common form of federal and state financial aid. Confusion about what is available leads many low-income students to the two most "straightforward" sources of income--loans and work, both of which involve significant costs and can operate at cross-purposes with public forms of support. Too much work can lead to reductions in public benefits, and earnings do not always replace the lost income. A growing body of experimental evidence shows that providing social, financial, and academic supports to vulnerable community college students can improve achievement and attainment. Contextualized learning programs, for example, have enabled participants not only to move on from basic skills to credit-bearing coursework, but also to complete credits, earn certificates, and make gains on basic skills tests. Another successful initiative provided low-performing students with

  4. Progress assessed with the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory in 604 participants in 4 types of post-inpatient rehabilitation brain injury programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eicher, Vicki; Murphy, Mary Pat; Murphy, Thomas F; Malec, James F

    2012-01-01

    To compare progress in 4 types of post-inpatient rehabilitation brain injury programs. Quasiexperimental observational cohort study. Community and residential. Individuals (N=604) with acquired brain injury. Four program types within the Pennsylvania Association of Rehabilitation Facilities were compared: intensive outpatient and community-based rehabilitation (IRC; n=235), intensive residential rehabilitation (IRR; n=78), long-term residential supported living (SLR; n=246), and long-term community-based supported living (SLC; n=45). With the use of a commercial web-based data management system developed with federal grant support, progress was examined on 2 consecutive assessments. Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory (MPAI-4). Program types differed in participant age (F=10.69, PMPAI-4 score (F=6.89, PMPAI-4 score and chronicity were significantly associated with the second MPAI-4 rating. On average, SLR participants were 9.1 years postinjury compared with 5.1 years for IRR, 6.0 years for IRC, and 6.8 years for SLC programs. IRR participants were more severely disabled per MPAI-4 total score on admission than the other groups. Controlling for these variables, program types varied significantly on second MPAI-4 total score (F=5.14, P=.002). Both the IRR and IRC programs resulted in significant functional improvement across assessments. In contrast, both the SLR and SLC programs demonstrated relatively stable MPAI-4 scores. Results are consistent with stated goals of the programs; that is, intensive programs resulted in functional improvements, whereas supported living programs produced stable functioning. Further studies using data from this large, multiprovider measurement collaboration will potentially provide the foundation for developing outcome expectations for various types of postacute brain injury programs. Copyright © 2012 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Development of an Educational Game to Set Up Surgical Instruments on the Mayo Stand or Back Table: Applied Research in Production Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paim, Crislaine Pires Padilha; Goldmeier, Silvia

    2017-01-10

    Existing research suggests that digital games can be used effectively for educational purposes at any level of training. Perioperative nursing educators can use games to complement curricula, in guidance and staff development programs, to foster team collaboration, and to give support to critical thinking in nursing practice because it is a complex environment. To describe the process of developing an educational game to set up surgical instruments on the Mayo stand or back table as a resource to assist the instructor in surgical instrumentation training for students and nursing health professionals in continued education. The study was characterized by applied research in production technology. It included the phases of analysis and design, development, and evaluation. The objectives of the educational game were developed through Bloom's taxonomy. Parallel to the physical development of the educational game, a proposed model for the use of digital elements in educational game activities was applied to develop the game content. The development of the game called "Playing with Tweezers" was carried out in 3 phases and was evaluated by 15 participants, comprising students and professional experts in various areas of knowledge such as nursing, information technology, and education. An environment was created with an initial screen, menu buttons containing the rules of the game, and virtual tour modes for learning and assessment. The "digital" nursing student needs engagement, stimulation, reality, and entertainment, not just readings. "Playing with Tweezers" is an example of educational gaming as an innovative teaching strategy in nursing that encourages the strategy of involving the use of educational games to support theoretical or practical classroom teaching. Thus, the teacher does not work with only 1 type of teaching methodology, but with a combination of different methodologies. In addition, we cannot forget that skill training in an educational game does not

  6. Pre-college education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Sylvia

    1990-01-01

    Pre-college education efforts are many and varied, involving the teachers, students, parents, museums, and youth groups. However, it is necessary to reach out to school administration at all levels if teachers are to be innovative in their approaches. This introductory meeting clearly indicated that more interaction between the participants would be profitable. It is clear that the science pipeline leading from kindergarten to college entry needs to be filled with students. What is not clear is how we can do it. The plethora of projects being pursued by the NASA Space Grant College Fellowship (NSGC) programs to accomplish that goal are heartening and exciting. However, this large gamut of programs may also indicate how new we are in this game and how little anyone knows about creating a pre-college interest in science and engineering. In a way, it resembles the situation of the common cold--there is no known cure yet, so there are many so-called remedies. Unfortunately, the time we had together was entirely too short to address the evaluation situation, so that we can in the future zero in on the most effective approaches. This report is a summary of the many ways the different NSGC' s are approaching pre-college education and a list of suggestions.

  7. Assuring Quality Control of Clinical Education in Multiple Clinical Affiliates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Judith A.

    A plan was developed to assure equivalency of clinical education among the medical laboratory technician (MLT) programs affiliated with Sandhills Community College. The plan was designed by faculty to monitor the quality of clinical courses offered by the clinical affiliates. The major strategies were to develop competencies, slide/tape modules, a…

  8. Protecting Colleges and Students: Community College Strategies to Prevent Default

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKibben, Bryce; La Rocque, Matthew; Cochrane, Debbie

    2014-01-01

    Student loan default, defined as federal loan borrowers' failure to make any payments for at least 270 days, is an issue of increasing importance to community colleges and their students. This report takes a unique look at student loan default at nine community colleges across the nation, and how those colleges are working to help students avoid…

  9. College and Community in Partnership: The Furniture College at Letterfrack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, Stuart A.

    2001-01-01

    A community economic development organization in rural Ireland partnered with a technical college to build a college to teach furniture design and manufacturing, with an emphasis on entrepreneurship and new production technologies. The college has been successful in attracting good students and helping them find employment. A research and…

  10. Prevalence and characteristics of compulsive buying in college students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harvanko, Arit; Lust, Katherine; Odlaug, Brian Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    students. Overall survey response rate was 35.1% (n=2108). Our data indicated that 3.6% (n=67) of college students surveyed met criteria for CB with significantly more women affected (4.4%, n=48) than men (2.5%, n=19). Relative to students not meeting criteria for CB, college students who met criteria...... of college students who meet criteria for CB. During the spring of 2011, an online survey examining CB (using a clinically validated screening instrument, the Minnesota Impulse Disorders Interview), stress and mood states, psychiatric comorbidity, and psychosocial functioning was emailed to 2108 University...

  11. Eventos de Mayo (May Events).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro, Leonor; Pla, Myrna

    Designed as a resource for teachers, this booklet, written in Spanish, contains brief information on seven May events: La Semana de la Educacion (first Friday in May), Harry S. Truman (May 8), Dia de las Madres (second Sunday in May), Luis Llorens Torres (May 14), La Cruz Roja (May 21), John F. Kennedy (May 29), and El Dia De Conmemoracion (May…

  12. Community colleges and economic mobility

    OpenAIRE

    Natalia A. Kolesnikova

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the role of community colleges in the U.S. higher education system and their advantages and shortcomings. In particular, it discusses the population of community college students and economic returns to community college education for various demographic groups. It offers new evidence on the returns to an associate's degree. Furthermore, the paper uses data from the National Survey of College Graduates to compare educational objectives, progress, and labor market outcomes ...

  13. Largest College Endowments, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronicle of Higher Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Of all endowments valued at more than $250-million, the UCLA Foundation had the highest rate of growth over the previous year, at 49 percent. This article presents a table of the largest college endowments in 2011. The table covers the "rank," "institution," "market value as of June 30, 2011," and "1-year change" of institutions participating in…

  14. NASFAA's Cash for College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators, Washington, DC.

    This guide advises students about college costs and how to pay them. The booklet explains financial aid and how it can help a student reach his or her educational goals. Merit-based and need-based aid programs are described, and the family's expected financial contribution is explained. The process of obtaining and completing the Free Application…

  15. College Algebra I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Carl; And Others

    Presented are student performance objectives, a student progress chart, and assignment sheets with objective and diagnostic measures for the stated performance objectives in College Algebra I. Topics covered include: sets; vocabulary; linear equations; inequalities; real numbers; operations; factoring; fractions; formulas; ratio, proportion, and…

  16. Book Industry Trends: College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Stephanie; Sanislo, Glenn

    2009-01-01

    With the cost of college said to be escalating at double the rate of inflation, parents and students have voiced frustration, some think unreasonably, about textbook prices. In 2007, higher-education publishers continued to grapple with price resistance to textbooks and competition from the used-book market. This article reports that…

  17. Colleges and Cable Franchising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Neal D.

    After noting issues of audience appeal and financial and philosophical support for educational broadcasting, this paper urges community colleges to play an active role in the process of cable franchising. The paper first describes a cable franchise as a contract between a government unit and the cable television (CATV) company which specifies what…

  18. Inside the College Presidency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Educational Record, 1996

    1996-01-01

    In interview, president of the American Council on Education, Robert H. Atwell, offers his perspectives on the current state of the college presidency; its pressures, rewards, and frustrations; and what he'd like to see administrators do differently. Qualities of an effective president include high energy, tolerance for ambiguity, good listening…

  19. Perspectives on Multiunit Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossmeier, Joseph G.

    1976-01-01

    Research shows that neither centralization nor decentralization of decision-making authority in multiunit community colleges is a primary determinant of organizational effectiveness; rather it is the degree of participation in decision-making by staff members at all hierarchical levels. (BB)

  20. Gamers Go to College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westman, Craig; Bouman, Penny

    2006-01-01

    This book was written both to examine and reveal the Gamer generation as a popular culture trend that has been two plus decades in the making and shaping. And, it is a generation that is now entering college--Gen G. This book explores how the Gamer generation is less a subset of the Millennial generation, but rather a unique generation unto…

  1. California Community Colleges Parking Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, Chuck

    In 1990, a representative sample of 25 California community colleges was contacted by telephone to determine their parking policies and practices. The colleges were sampled on the basis of location and size. Study findings included the following: (1) 17 of the colleges reported that they had insufficient numbers of on-campus parking spaces; (2)…

  2. Symposium: What Is College English?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Lynn Z.; White, Edward M.; Enoch, Jessica; Hawk, Byron

    2013-01-01

    This symposium explores the role(s) College English has (or has not) had in the scholarly work of four scholars. Lynn Bloom explores the many ways College English influenced her work and the work of others throughout their scholarly lives. Edward M. White examines four articles he has published in College English and draws connections between…

  3. Community College Employee Wellness Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, L. Jay; Johnson, Sharon

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the prevalence and characteristics of employee wellness programs in public community colleges accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS). A random sample of 250 public community colleges accredited by SACS was mailed a 46-item employee-wellness program survey. The survey solicited program information…

  4. Social Media Go to College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Alemán, Ana M.

    2014-01-01

    Technology's march into the college classroom continues. Generations of college and university faculty have both embraced and resisted instructional technologies such as the book, the mimeograph, the overhead projector, and hand-held calculators. Now college and university faculty are greeting the 21st century's signature…

  5. What Is a College For?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slutsky, Bette

    1978-01-01

    Argues that open enrollment policies have debased the community college and led to an abandonment of merit, standards, and competency. Suggests their new mission be to serve only those adults who qualify and can benefit from college-level work, abandoning those vocational, remedial, and recreational responsibilities which community colleges have…

  6. Tenure and America's Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMaria, Frank

    2012-01-01

    America's colleges and universities have been moving slowly but steadily away from tenure over the past decade. The American Federation of Teachers reports that community colleges have seen a 22% increase in the number of instructional staff between 1997 and 2007. During that time, the percentage of community college faculty that were full-time…

  7. The Fiscal Impacts of College Attainment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trostel, Philip A.

    2010-01-01

    This study quantifies one part of the return to U.S. public investment in college education, namely, the fiscal benefits associated with greater college attainment. College graduates pay much more taxes than those not going to college. Government expenditures are also much less for college graduates than for those without a college education.…

  8. Pygoscelis antarcticus feathers as bioindicator of trace element risk in marine environments from Barton Peninsula, 25 de Mayo (King George) Island, Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catán, Soledad Perez; Bubach, Debora; Di Fonzo, Carla; Dopchiz, Laura; Arribére, Maria; Ansaldo, Martin

    2017-04-01

    We report the contents of elements in feathers of Chinstrap penguin (Pygoscelis antarcticus), which had not been informed up to now, such as silver and bromine and others listed as hazardous by the United States Environmental Protection Agency as arsenic, cobalt, chromium, and mercury. Analyses of the element concentrations in feathers, adult and chicken, from Barton Peninsulas at 25 de Mayo (King George) Island, South Shetlands, were made by Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis. Samarium, lanthanum a, thorium, and uranium concentrations in Chinstrap penguin feathers were below 0.1 mg/kg. This suggests that the elements in feather do not come from atmospheric particles surface deposition. Arsenic (0.120 ± 0.050 mg/kg) and cobalt (0.030 ± 0.020 mg/kg) concentrations were lower than the reports for other colony of Chinstrap penguins, and essential elements as iron (26 ± 12 mg/kg), zinc (78.0 ± 5.3 mg/kg), and chromium (0.51 ± 0.27 mg/kg) were in the same range while Se (2.90 ± 0.65 mg/kg) content were the lowest reported. Mercury (0.43 ± 0.21 mg/kg), chromium (0.210 ± 0.060 mg/kg), and silver (0.083 ± 0.003 mg/kg) in chicks tended to be lower than in adults. Iron, cobalt, and arsenic concentrations in feathers found in this study were the lowest compared to measurements were in several penguin species in Antarctica. These results confirm to feathers like effective indicators for the trace elements incorporated in the penguins and it provide a data set which can adds to the baseline for bioindication studies using feathers.

  9. Virus influenza y el diagnóstico diferencial de sintomáticos febriles en la costa norte del Perú (Mayo, 2001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Torres de Yon

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Identificar el virus influenza y otros agentes etiológicos relacionados con la presentación de síndrome febril en los departamentos de Piura, Tumbes, Lambayeque y La Libertad, en mayo de 2001. Material y Métodos: Estudio descriptivo, transversal. Incluye pacientes febriles que acudieron a los puestos de salud centinelas y que presentaban fiebre mayor de 38°C y gota gruesa negativa. Se obtuvieron dos muestras de sangre con un intervalo de 15-45 días. Se registró la sintomatología asociada a fiebre, y se determinó la presencia de anticuerpos mediante pruebas serológicas para dengue, influenza, sarampión y rubéola, además de pruebas para aislamiento y tipificación viral. Resultados: Se registraron 174 pacientes, 58,6% de ellos mujeres, siendo el grupo etáreo más frecuente de menores de 16 años (32,2%. Además de la fiebre se informaron como síntomas más frecuentes el dolor de cabeza (90,1% y dolor de huesos (81,9%. En 89 pacientes (51,1% se pudo obtener muestras de sueros pareados, los cuales fueron incluidos en el estudio serológico; 62 pacientes (69,6% presentaron serología positiva para dengue, 53 (59,5% para influenza y sólo uno (1,1% para rubéola. Conclusiones: El diagnóstico diferencial de pacientes sintomáticos febriles en los departamentos de la costa norte del Perú, luego de descartarse malaria, debe incluir además entre otras etiologías al virus influenza. Un diagnóstico diferencial adecuado permitirá un tratamiento precoz y efectivo. Se hace necesario implementar la vigilancia epidemiológica para mejorar el diagnóstico diferencial en sintomáticos febriles, que incluya a influenza.

  10. How risky is college investment?

    OpenAIRE

    Hendricks, Lutz; Leukhina, Oksana

    2015-01-01

    This paper is motivated by the fact that nearly half of U.S. college students drop out without earning a bachelor’s degree. Its objective is to quantify how much uncertainty college entrants face about their graduation outcomes. To do so, we develop a quantitative model of college choice. The innovation is to model in detail how students progress towards a college degree. The model is calibrated using transcript and financial data. We find that more than half of college entrants can predict...

  11. American College of Physicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Plus In this Section Clinical Guidelines & Recommendations Performance Measures Journals & Publications Clinical Resources & Products High Value Care Ethics & Professionalism Practice Resources Physician and Practice Timeline Upcoming important dates ...

  12. Inventario y evaluación semidetallada de los recursos de suelos, forestales y uso actual de la tierra de la cuenca alta del río Mayo: sector río Tumbaro - río Avisado

    OpenAIRE

    Oficina Nacional de Evaluación de Recursos Naturales

    1983-01-01

    Determina a nivel de semidetalle, el potencial y grado de utilización de los recursos suelos y forestales, así como el uso actual de la tierra de la cuenca alta del río Mayo, sector río Túmbaro - río Avisado, situada en el Norte del departamento de San Martín. El estudio, fue ejecutado en un sector con potencial agropecuario y comprendió una profundización del conocimiento de los recursos relacionados con estas actividades, con el fin de establecer y reordenar asentamientos humanos, formular ...

  13. Prevalencia de enteroparasitosis y factores asociados en niños escolares de la unidad educativa “Eudófilo Álvarez” cantón Sucúa, comunidad de Cumbatza, mayo- octubre 2014.

    OpenAIRE

    Espinoza Díaz, Cristóbal Ignacio; Astudillo González, Odalis; Cabrera Medina, Henry

    2014-01-01

    La parasitosis intestinal es responsable de una morbilidad considerable en el mundo entero, se presenta frecuentemente con síntomas no específicos y altas tasas de prevalencia. Objetivo: Establecer la prevalencia y factores asociados de enteroparásitos en los niños en edad escolar de la Unidad Educativa “Eudófilo Álvarez” comunidad de Cumbatza, cantón Sucúa en el período de Mayo- Octubre de 2014, previo a un Análisis Situacional de Salud realizado. Materiales y métodos: Se realizó un e...

  14. Factores que interviene en la aplicación de medidas de bioseguridad del profesional de enfermería del Servicio de Centro Quirúrgico del Hospital Nacional Dos de Mayo

    OpenAIRE

    Camacuari Cárdenas, Feliman Salome

    2017-01-01

    Determina los factores que intervienen en la aplicación de medidas de bioseguridad del profesional de enfermería del Servicio de Centro Quirúrgico (SCQ) del Hospital Nacional Dos de Mayo (HNDM). Estudio de tipo cuantitativo, método descriptivo de corte transversal. La población en estudio está constituida por 30 profesionales de enfermería que laboran en el SCQ. La técnica utilizada es la encuesta y el instrumento un cuestionario estructurado. Se llega a la conclusión que los factores desfavo...

  15. Interracial Friendships in College

    OpenAIRE

    Braz Camargo; Ralph Stinebrickner; Todd Stinebrickner

    2010-01-01

    Motivated by the reality that the benefits of diversity on a college campus will be mitigated if interracial interactions are scarce or superficial, previous work has strived to document the amount of interracial friendship interaction and to examine whether policy can influence this amount. In this paper we take advantage of unique longitudinal data from the Berea Panel Study to build on this previous literature by providing direct evidence about the amount of interracial friendships at diff...

  16. The Healthy College Student

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Adams O’Connell PhD

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Studies on the impact of health behaviors on morbidity often focus on the limited impact of a single behavior or a limited group of behaviors. In this study, we examine college student behaviors and investigate the link of these behaviors with a 2-week illness profile. Through self-reported surveys, we measure acute illness and a general illness burden, a cumulative measure of major and minor ailments. We explore how daily routines correlate with these illness measures. Eighty-four students from a random sample of 90 students attending a small liberal arts school completed the survey for a response rate of 93%. Living arrangements, exercise, sleep patterns, eating preferences and habits, and “social” behaviors were all significantly associated with illness burden. Students living in “singles” and those who got regular exercise and an average of 7 hr of sleep per night reported less illness. Most interesting is the effect of social behaviors. Students who greet others with a handshake reported higher illness rates, as did students who share food and/or drinks. While we can conceptualize why these behaviors would lead to a greater illness burden, students who engaged more frequently in these behaviors also reported being “happier.” In trying to reduce illness among college students, we might suggest less handshaking and food and beverage sharing, but these actions are ways in which college students express and maintain friendships. College administrators are challenged to discover ways to reduce illness while maintaining the positive aspects of local student culture. This study begins to explore some ways to balance health and camaraderie.

  17. The Strategic Imperative for the Use of Social Media in Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsenas, Amy L; Arce, Makala; Aase, Lee; Timimi, Farris K; Young, Colleen; Wald, John T

    2018-01-01

    Although health care lags behind many other industries in adopting social media as part of a business strategy, the Mayo Clinic recognized the importance of these applications more than a decade ago. In addition to typical media relations and marketing tactics, the Mayo Clinic has successfully used social media as part of an overall program to support the strategic imperatives of the institution. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. "Measuring up" to ethical standards in service delivery to college students on the Autism Spectrum: A practical application of Powell's model for ethical practices in clinical phonetics and linguistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Amy L; Rohland, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    This paper examined an interdisciplinary college-based support programme, the Communication Coaching Program (CCP), designed for students diagnosed on the autism spectrum in light of six ethical constructs described by Powell. Collecting data to monitor the successes and ongoing needs of individual participants in the programme is of vital importance, of course, but only addresses a portion of the efficacy question. In addition, the authors, who co-direct the programme and represent different professional expertise and perspectives, recognize the importance of determining whether their evolving intervention model has also been successful in meeting the ethical standards of their respective professions. Careful review of the 4 years of the CCP's operation in terms of ethical constructs has yielded evidence that the CCP, although based on sound principles of theory and scholarship, should be further individualized to meet the particular needs of participants diagnosed with deficits in social communication and executive functioning skills.

  19. The Implementation and Development of an Objective Structured Clinical Examination in the Community Pharmacy Course of a Select Gulf-Region Academic Institution (Ras Al Khaimah College of Pharmaceutical Sciences): A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Azzawi, Amad Mohammed Jamil; Nagavi, B.G.; Hachim, Mahmood Y.; Mossa, Omar H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs) were used to assess translational pharmacotherapeutic skills of a Gulf-region representative academic institution. Aim: The aim of the current study was to assess the clinical skills of students enrolled within the third year Bachelor of Pharmacy (BPharm) programme within Ras Al…

  20. For-profit colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deming, David; Goldin, Claudia; Katz, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    For-profit, or proprietary, colleges are the fastest-growing postsecondary schools in the nation, enrolling a disproportionately high share of disadvantaged and minority students and those ill-prepared for college. Because these schools, many of them big national chains, derive most of their revenue from taxpayer-funded student financial aid, they are of interest to policy makers not only for the role they play in the higher education spectrum but also for the value they provide their students. In this article, David Deming, Claudia Goldin, and Lawrence Katz look at the students who attend for-profits, the reasons they choose these schools, and student outcomes on a number of broad measures and draw several conclusions. First, the authors write, the evidence shows that public community colleges may provide an equal or better education at lower cost than for-profits. But budget pressures mean that community colleges and other nonselective public institutions may not be able to meet the demand for higher education. Some students unable to get into desired courses and programs at public institutions may face only two alternatives: attendance at a for-profit or no postsecondary education at all. Second, for-profits appear to be at their best with well-defined programs of short duration that prepare students for a specific occupation. But for-profit completion rates, default rates, and labor market outcomes for students seeking associate's or higher degrees compare unfavorably with those of public postsecondary institutions. In principle, taxpayer investment in student aid should be accompanied by scrutiny concerning whether students complete their course of study and subsequently earn enough to justify the investment and pay back their student loans. Designing appropriate regulations to help students navigate the market for higher education has proven to be a challenge because of the great variation in student goals and types of programs. Ensuring that potential

  1. Conceptions of a Good College Student, Parent-Student Communication About College, First-Year Grades, and College Retention Among First- and Non-First-Generation College Students

    OpenAIRE

    Palbusa, Julienne Marie Alipio

    2016-01-01

    This study examined conceptions of a good college student, parent-student communication about college, academic achievement, college student retention, and college generation status among first-year college students. 344 undergraduates described the characteristics and skills of a good college student. In addition, they reported the frequency, perceived helpfulness, and quality (instrumental and emotional support) of parent-student communication about college. Student GPA and second year rete...

  2. The fiscal impacts of college attainment

    OpenAIRE

    Philip A. Trostel

    2007-01-01

    This study quantifies one important part of the economic return to public investment in college education, namely, the fiscal benefits associated with greater college attainment. College graduates generally pay much more in taxes than those not going to college. Government expenditures are also generally much less for college graduates than for those without a college education. Indeed, over an average lifetime, total government spending per college degree is negative. That is, direct savings...

  3. Relationship of cytokine levels and clinical effect on platelet-rich plasma-treated lateral epicondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Wonbong; Park, Sang H; Kim, Bora; Kang, Sin W; Lee, Jung W; Moon, Young L

    2018-03-01

    Lateral epicondylitis (LE) is difficult to manage and can result in significant patient morbidity. Currently, the clinical use of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) for painful tendons has received attention, but its efficacy remains controversial. This study aimed to investigate the clinical effects of PRP and its biological components. A total of 156 patients with LE were randomly divided into group 1, treated with a single injection of 2-ml autologous PRP, and group 2, treated with a control received only physical therapy without injection. Both groups used a tennis elbow strap and performed stretching and strengthening exercises during 24 weeks' follow-up. Pain and functional improvements were assessed using the visual analog scale (VAS), Modified Mayo Clinic Performance Index for the elbow, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). White blood cell count, platelet count, and levels of platelet-derived growth factor-AB (PDGF-AB), PDGF-BB, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), vascular endothelial growth factor, epithelial growth factor, and interleukin-1 β in PRP were measured and investigated for statistical correlation with the clinical score. At 24 weeks, all pain and functional variables, including VAS score, Mayo Clinic performance scores, and MRI grade, improved significantly in group 1 (p < 0.05). PDGF-AB, PDGF-BB, and TGF-β levels were more significantly increased in PRP than in whole blood. TGF-β level significantly correlated with Mayo Clinic performance score and MRI grade improvement. Thus, TGF-β level in PRP is considered to play a pivotal role in tendon healing. These results may contribute to identifying the best protocol for PRP application in tendinopathies. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 36:913-920, 2018. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. The College Advantage: Weathering the Economic Storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnevale, Anthony P.; Jayasundera, Tamara; Cheah, Ban

    2012-01-01

    The rising cost of college education and high unemployment levels among recent college graduates are raising the question "Is college worth its cost?" in the minds of many Americans. A recent study published by the Associated Press found that one out of every two recent college graduates is jobless or underemployed, suggesting maybe college isn't…

  5. Comprehensive College Plan for 2000-2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Antonio Coll., TX.

    The document describes San Antonio College's (Texas) strategic goals and objectives for 2000-2001. San Antonio College's comprehensive planning and evaluation process monitors the achievement of college-wide goals and initiatives supporting the college's Vision and Mission Statement and the Alamo Community College District's Strategic Plan. The…

  6. TRIESTE: College on Microprocessors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    The International Centre for Theoretical Physics, set up at Trieste in 1964, has as its major task the provision of a stimulating intellectual environment for physicists from developing countries. This goal is furthered by a varied programme of courses for visiting scientists. Not all the courses remain in the rarefied atmosphere of theory and in September a very successful 'College on Microprocessors: Technology and Applications in Physics' was held. It was a prime example of the efforts being made to spread important modern technology into the developing countries

  7. A Web-Based Review of Sexual and Reproductive Health Services Available at Colleges and Universities in Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushing, Katherine F; Carson, Anna E; Short, Tyiesha D; Kot, Stefanie N; Tschokert, Merete; Sales, Jessica M

    2018-04-13

    Although two-thirds of graduating high school seniors attend college or university in the U.S., there is a paucity of national or state specific research regarding SRH services available on or near college and university campuses. A review of websites for all colleges and universities in Georgia was conducted to evaluate sexual health services available on campuses and evidence of referral to community providers. Of 96 colleges in Georgia, 44░had campus-located health centers, with only 3 at two-year colleges. Overall SRH service provision was low, with great variation between colleges. Distances between colleges and Title X clinics ranged from 0.33 to 35.45 miles. Many students lack access to campus health centers, and information on college websites regarding SRH service availability and referrals differs dramatically between campuses. In the absence of robust campus-located services, schools should highlight where students can obtain comprehensive SRH care in the community.

  8. Sexting Behavior among College Students: Implications for College Clinicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertlein, Katherine M.; Twist, Markie L. C.

    2017-01-01

    The practice of sexting is becoming increasingly common among college students but has the potential to both initiate productive interactions with others and interfere with relationship development. The purpose of this paper is to report on the findings of a study on sexting among college students and to provide a framework through which…

  9. College Choice Factors of Latino Community College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zayas-DeCouto, Georgina

    2016-01-01

    In the United States, a postsecondary education is significant for economic success. The future job markets require advanced certifications in order to compete in the global market. The federal government emphasizes this importance with the completion goal to increase the number of college graduates by the year 2020. Community colleges have been…

  10. College Math Assessment: SAT Scores vs. College Math Placement Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley-Peres, Kathleen; Poirier, Dawn

    2008-01-01

    Many colleges and university's use SAT math scores or math placement tests to place students in the appropriate math course. This study compares the use of math placement scores and SAT scores for 188 freshman students. The student's grades and faculty observations were analyzed to determine if the SAT scores and/or college math assessment scores…

  11. Literacy in Community Colleges. Junior College Resource Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarrington, Roger; And Others

    This series of Junior College Resource Reviews focuses on the community college's role in literacy development. After Roger Yarrington's overview of the topic, Robert McCabe and Susan Skidmore consider "The Literacy Crisis and American Education." In light of the changing nature of work and the severe decline in the communication skills of youth,…

  12. Propofol Frenzy: Clinical Spectrum in 3 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Diego Z; Townley, Ryan A; Burkle, Christopher M; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; Wijdicks, Eelco F M

    2017-11-01

    Postsedation neuroexcitation is sometimes attributed to intravenous injection of the sedative-hypnotic drug propofol. The movements associated with these events have strongly suggested convulsive activity, but they rarely have been comprehensively evaluated. We present video recordings of 3 healthy young patients who underwent elective surgery under conscious sedation and emerged from sedation with transient but repetitive violent motor activity and impaired consciousness. These manifestations required considerable mobilization of multiple health care workers to protect the patient from inflicting harm. All patients received propofol, and all fully recovered without adverse sequelae. We postulate that these movements are propofol related. Importantly, we found no evidence of seizures clinically or electrographically. Copyright © 2017 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Team physicians in college athletics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Mark E; Quigley, D Bradford; Wang, Frank; Balint, Christopher R; Boland, Arthur L

    2005-10-01

    There has been little documentation of what constitutes the clinical work of intercollegiate team physicians. Team physicians could be recruited based on the needs of athletes. A multidisciplinary team of physicians is necessary to treat college athletes. Most physician evaluations are for musculoskeletal injuries treated nonoperatively. Descriptive epidemiology study. For a 2-year period, a database was created that recorded information on team physician encounters with intercollegiate athletes at a major university. Data on imaging studies, hospitalizations, and surgeries were also recorded. The diagnoses for physician encounters with all undergraduates through the university's health service were also recorded. More initial athlete evaluations were for musculoskeletal diagnoses (73%) than for general medical diagnoses (27%) (P respiratory infections and dermatologic disorders, or multiple visits for concussions. Football accounted for 22% of all physician encounters, more than any other sport (P athletes did not require a greater number of physician encounters than did the general undergraduate pool of students on a per capita basis. Intercollegiate team physicians primarily treat musculoskeletal injuries that do not require surgery. General medical care is often single evaluations of common conditions and repeat evaluations for concussions.

  14. Learning clinical reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinnock, Ralph; Welch, Paul

    2014-04-01

    Errors in clinical reasoning continue to account for significant morbidity and mortality, despite evidence-based guidelines and improved technology. Experts in clinical reasoning often use unconscious cognitive processes that they are not aware of unless they explain how they are thinking. Understanding the intuitive and analytical thinking processes provides a guide for instruction. How knowledge is stored is critical to expertise in clinical reasoning. Curricula should be designed so that trainees store knowledge in a way that is clinically relevant. Competence in clinical reasoning is acquired by supervised practice with effective feedback. Clinicians must recognise the common errors in clinical reasoning and how to avoid them. Trainees can learn clinical reasoning effectively in everyday practice if teachers provide guidance on the cognitive processes involved in making diagnostic decisions. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2013 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  15. Innovative Partnerships Assist Community College Computing Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Banion, Terry

    1987-01-01

    Relates efforts of major corporations in providing assistance to community college computing programs. Explains the goals of the League for Innovation in the Community College, a consortium of 19 community colleges, and cites examples of collaborative projects. (ML)

  16. Marketing Model for Community College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahin, Jaime

    In order to survive projected enrollment decreases and to better serve nontraditional students, community colleges must develop marketing plans that make effective use of five community resources: local school system personnel, business and industry, civic and social service agencies, college personnel, and the local media. In approaching these…

  17. Latino College Completion: New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  18. ACCA College English Teaching Mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Renlun

    2008-01-01

    This paper elucidates a new college English teaching mode--"ACCA" (Autonomous Cooperative Class-teaching All-round College English Teaching Mode). Integrated theories such as autonomous learning and cooperative learning into one teaching mode, "ACCA", which is being developed and advanced in practice as well, is the achievement…

  19. Latino College Completion: United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  20. Latino College Completion: South Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  1. Latino College Completion: North Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  2. College and Career Development Organizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    National High School Center, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The National High School Center has created a college and career development organizer to synthesize and organize an increasingly complicated and crowded field of college and career readiness initiatives. The organizer, composed of three strands, can be used to map the efforts of state education agencies (SEAs) and local education agencies (LEAs)…

  3. Dyslexia and the College Student.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balajthy, Ernest; Waring, Eileen Whitcraft

    Recent research in the field of learning disabilities and other sources of information which may prove useful to college-level reading instructors in teaching the college-level dyslexic are summarized in this paper. The paper identifies research on techniques of formal and informal assessment, psychological and social factors, and remediation…

  4. Online Education in Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cejda, Brent

    2010-01-01

    This chapter explores the tremendous growth in the use of the Internet to deliver distance education at community colleges. The author examines various definitions of online education, including the types of courses, programs, and degrees available and the types of community colleges that offer greater amounts of online programming. Considerations…

  5. Latino College Completion: New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  6. Dating Violence among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iconis, Rosemary

    2013-01-01

    Dating violence is a significant problem on college campuses. More than one-fifth of the undergraduate dating population are physically abused by their dating partners and an even greater percentage are psychologically abused. Researchers have identified risk factors for college student dating violence. Preventive interventions are strongly…

  7. Iowa Community Colleges Accounting Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iowa State Dept. of Education, Des Moines. Div. of Community Colleges and Workforce Preparation.

    This document describes account classifications and definitions for the accounting system of the Iowa community colleges. In view of the objectives of the accounting system, it is necessary to segregate the assets of the community college according to its source and intended use. Additionally, the accounting system should provide for accounting by…

  8. College Students with Psychiatric Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Delar K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on college students with psychiatric disabilities. It defines and discusses various psychiatric conditions such as mood disorders, anxiety disorders, eating disorders, and personality disorders. It concludes with accommodations that a college professor can make to help these students succeed in higher education. (Contains 1…

  9. Developing a clinical trial unit to advance research in an academic institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croghan, Ivana T; Viker, Steven D; Limper, Andrew H; Evans, Tamara K; Cornell, Alissa R; Ebbert, Jon O; Gertz, Morie A

    2015-11-01

    Research, clinical care, and education are the three cornerstones of academic health centers in the United States. The research climate has always been riddled with ebbs and flows, depending on funding availability. During a time of reduced funding, the number and scope of research studies have been reduced, and in some instances, a field of study has been eliminated. Recent reductions in the research funding landscape have led institutions to explore new ways to continue supporting research. Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN has developed a clinical trial unit within the Department of Medicine, which provides shared resources for many researchers and serves as a solution for training and mentoring new investigators and study teams. By building on existing infrastructure and providing supplemental resources to existing research, the Department of Medicine clinical trial unit has evolved into an effective mechanism for conducting research. This article discusses the creation of a central unit to provide research support in clinical trials and presents the advantages, disadvantages, and required building blocks for such a unit. Copyright © 2015 Mayo Clinic. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Evidence for Nb-Ta Occurrences in the Syn-Tectonic Pan-African Mayo Salah Leucogranite (Northern Cameroon: Constraints from Nb-Ta Oxide Mineralogy, Geochemistry and U-Pb LA-ICP-MS Geochronology on Columbite and Monazite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Periclex Martial Fosso Tchunte

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The Mayo Salah pluton, which is located in the North-Cameroon domain of Central African Bold Belt (CAFB, is emplaced as a laccolith in volcano-sedimentary schists of Poli series, and displays features of Rare-metal Granite (RMG. It is made of two main rock groups: (1 the metaluminous barren muscovite granite (MsG and (2 the Nb-Ta bearing peraluminous leucogranite (MsL which expresses four subtypes. The evolved Rare-element MsL is subalkaline, slightly peraluminous (ASI = 1.01–1.21, and it displays flat REE chondrite-normalized patterns with a strong negative Eu anomaly (Eu/Eu* = 0.02–0.20. It belongs to the peraluminous low phosphorus Rare-element Granites and L-type igneous rocks, as shown by the relatively low Zr/Hf (4.8–14 and Nb/Ta (1.4–9.0 ratios and the positive slope of the Zr-Hf-Nb-Ta profile in spider diagrams. The rare-element-bearing mineral is represented by columbite-group minerals (CGM and other Nb-Ta-oxides (Nb-rutile and pyrochlore supergroup minerals. The CGM is classified as Mn-columbite, with Ta# and Mn# ratios increasing from core to rim. Two stages of mineralization are identified; the earliest stage (CGM-I consists in scattered tabular or prismatic euhedral grains that were related to magmatic fractionation. The latest stage (CGM-II is expressed as a Ta-rich Mn hydrothermal CGM episode represented as rims and/overgrowths around and/or as veinlet crosscutting CGM-I or in cleavage planes of muscovite. The U-Pb dating of columbite and monazite of the Mayo Salah leucogranite indicates a late-Neoproterozoic magmatic-hydrothermal mineralization event from 603.2 ± 5.3 to 581.6 ± 7.2 Ma, as consistent with both late D2 to D3 events that were recorded in the CAFB in Cameroon, and the associated continental collision environment. The Nb-Ta mineralization of the Mayo Salah pluton provides evidence for the presence of RMG in Northern Cameroon of CAFB, and its temporal association with the youngest period of metallogenic epoch

  11. GENDER, DEBT, AND DROPPING OUT OF COLLEGE

    OpenAIRE

    DWYER, RACHEL E.; HODSON, RANDY; MCLOUD, LAURA

    2012-01-01

    For many young Americans, access to credit has become critical to completing a college education and embarking on a successful career path. Young people increasingly face the trade-off of taking on debt to complete college or foregoing college and taking their chances in the labor market without a college degree. These trade-offs are gendered by differences in college preparation and support and by the different labor market opportunities women and men face that affect the value of a college ...

  12. Conceptual Complexity and Obsessionality in Bulimic College Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Nancy S.; Holloway, Elizabeth L.

    1988-01-01

    Examined relationship between bulimia, conceptual complexity, obsessional symptoms, and obsessional traits in 54 college women classified as bulimic-anorexic vomiters, normal-weight bulimic vomiters, clinical controls, and normal controls. Found both bulimic groups exhibited significantly lower levels of conceptual functioning, significantly…

  13. Retrospective evaluation of necrotizing fasciitis in university college ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Context: Cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis (CNF), although a potentially fatal fulminant infection has been largely under‑reported in the dental literature. Aims: To report our experience with cases seen and treated at the University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria. Settings and Design: A descriptive retrospective clinical ...

  14. Construct Validity of the MMPI-2 College Maladjustment (Mt) Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthlow, Deanna L.; Graham, John R.; Ben-Porath, Yossef S.; McNulty, John L

    2004-01-01

    The construct validity of the MMPI-2 (Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2) College Maladjustment (Mt) Scale was examined using 376 student clients at a university psychological clinic. A principal components analysis and correlations of Mt scale scores with clients' and therapists' ratings of symptoms and functioning showed that the Mt…

  15. Utility of the American-European Consensus Group and American College of Rheumatology Classification Criteria for Sjögren's syndrome in patients with systemic autoimmune diseases in the clinical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Molina, Gabriela; Avila-Casado, Carmen; Nuñez-Alvarez, Carlos; Cárdenas-Velázquez, Francisco; Hernández-Hernández, Carlos; Luisa Calderillo, María; Marroquín, Verónica; Recillas-Gispert, Claudia; Romero-Díaz, Juanita; Sánchez-Guerrero, Jorge

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and performance of the American-European Consensus Group (AECG) and ACR Classification Criteria for SS in patients with systemic autoimmune diseases. Three hundred and fifty patients with primary SS, SLE, RA or scleroderma were randomly selected from our patient registry. Each patient was clinically diagnosed as probable/definitive SS or non-SS following a standardized evaluation including clinical symptoms and manifestations, confirmatory tests, fluorescein staining test, autoantibodies, lip biopsy and medical chart review. Using the clinical diagnosis as the gold standard, the degree of agreement with each criteria set and between the criteria sets was estimated. One hundred fifty-four (44%) patients were diagnosed with SS. The AECG criteria were incomplete in 36 patients (10.3%) and the ACR criteria in 96 (27.4%; P vs 62.3 and a specificity of 94.3 vs 91.3, respectively. Either set of criteria was met by 123 patients (80%); 95 (61.7%) met the AECG criteria and 96 (62.3%) met the ACR criteria, but only 68 (44.2%) patients met both sets. The concordance rate between clinical diagnosis and AECG or ACR criteria was moderate (k statistic 0.58 and 0.55, respectively). Among 99 patients with definitive SS sensitivity was 83.3 vs 77.7 and specificity was 90.8 vs 85.6, respectively. A discrepancy between clinical diagnosis and criteria was seen in 59 patients (17%). The feasibility of the SS AECG criteria is superior to that of the ACR criteria, however, their performance was similar among patients with systemic autoimmune diseases. A subset of SS patients is still missed by both criteria sets. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Factors influencing Chinese college students' preferences for mental health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, Vitti; Chan, Fong; Chan, Jacob Yui-Chung; Lee, June Ka Yan; Sung, Connie; H Wilson, Emma

    2016-01-01

    Transition from high school to college can be particularly difficult and stressful for Chinese college students because of parent expectations. The purpose of this study was to examine therapist variables influencing Chinese college students' preferences for mental health professionals using conjoint analysis. Two hundred fifty-eight community college students in Hong Kong were asked to rate the profile of 55 mental health professionals representing a combination of therapist characteristics (i.e., gender, age, race/ethnicity, professional background, and training institutions) from the most to least preferred therapist from whom to seek psychological counselling. Results indicated that students' preference formation was based largely on professional background and training institution of the mental health professionals. Clinical psychologists and clinical social workers were preferred over educational psychologists (school psychologists), counsellors, and psychiatrists. Mental health professionals who received training from more prestigious schools were preferred over those trained at less prestigious schools. Understanding clients' preference formation for choosing mental health professionals could be the first step to gain insights for developing effective educational and outreach strategies to promote help seeking behavior and mental health service utilization among Chinese college students.

  17. The Learning Disabilities Unit at the State College of Optometry/SUNY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solan, Harold A.; Springer, Florence E.

    1986-01-01

    The Learning Disabilities Unit of New York's State College of Optometry, providing testing and research for learning disabled adults and children and professional instruction and clinical experience for students of optometry and related fields, is described. (MSE)

  18. Clinical Pharmacy and Pharmocology: Friends or Foes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csaky, T. Z.

    1973-01-01

    Two recent trends in the field of health education-the declining emphasis on basic sciences in medical instruction and the heavy emphasis on pharmacology, therapeutics, and clinical pharmacy in colleges of pharmacy-are compared. (Editor)

  19. Memorias sociales y familiares de la dictadura cívico-militar: narrativas biográficas de integrantes de la asociación Abuelas de Plaza de Mayo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Elizabeth Kriger

    2017-06-01

    Puede volverse una memoria fuerte o débil según la coyuntura y el papel que le otorguen el Estado y la sociedad. Se presentan aquí narrativas biográficas de tres miembros de la asociación Abuelas de Plaza de Mayo, surgidas de entrevistas presenciales semiestructuradas y en profundidad realizadas ad hoc, en las cuales se ponen en juego estas memorias en diferentes registros. Se muestran fragmentos selectos para establecer las modalidades de reconocimiento de sus hijos desaparecidos y las tensiones entre su identidad juvenil y su condición militante.

  20. Necesidades y demandas laborales de los empleadores de psicólogos/as clínicos, los meses de mayo a octubre de 2015

    OpenAIRE

    Torres Linares, Mayly Pastora

    2016-01-01

    Psychology in Ecuador is undergoing a process of change and transformation, both socially and educationally, based on the analysis carried out by the Government and its decision to modify the academic structure at the country’s universities. These changes are based on an analysis of the pedagogical model which is used for the teaching of Psychology in this country. With regard to clinical psychology, the need to broaden the knowledge of psychologists and clinical psyc...

  1. Study guide for college algebra

    CERN Document Server

    Snow, James W; Shapiro, Arnold

    1981-01-01

    Study Guide for College Algebra is a supplemental material for the basic text, College Algebra. Its purpose is to make the learning of college algebra and trigonometry easier and enjoyable.The book provides detailed solutions to exercises found in the text. Students are encouraged to use the study guide as a learning tool during the duration of the course, a reviewer prior to an exam, a reference book, and as a quick overview before studying a section of the text. The Study Guide and Solutions Manual consists of four major components: basic concepts that should be learned from each unit, what

  2. Test bank for college algebra

    CERN Document Server

    Kolman, Bernard; Levitan, Michael L

    1985-01-01

    Test Bank for College Algebra, Second Edition is a supplementary material for the text, College Algebra, Second Edition. The book is intended for use by mathematics teachers.The book contains standard tests for each chapter in the textbook. Each set of test aims to evaluate the level of understanding the student has achieved during the course. The answers for each chapter test and the final exam are found at the end of the book.Mathematics teachers teaching college algebra will find the book very useful.

  3. American College of Radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Items ACR Journal Advisor Discover expert commentary on essential clinical research in radiation oncology. Learn more ACR ... Advocacy Legislative Issues Regulatory Issues State & Local Relations Economics & Health Policy Informatics Membership Membership Services Membership Directory ...

  4. Alcohol drinking among college students: college responsibility for personal troubles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorant, Vincent; Nicaise, Pablo; Soto, Victoria Eugenia; d'Hoore, William

    2013-06-28

    One young adult in two has entered university education in Western countries. Many of these young students will be exposed, during this transitional period, to substantial changes in living arrangements, socialisation groups, and social activities. This kind of transition is often associated with risky behaviour such as excessive alcohol consumption. So far, however, there is little evidence about the social determinants of alcohol consumption among college students. We set out to explore how college environmental factors shape college students' drinking behaviour. In May 2010 a web questionnaire was sent to all bachelor and master students registered with an important Belgian university; 7,015 students participated (participation = 39%). The survey looked at drinking behaviour, social involvement, college environmental factors, drinking norms, and positive drinking consequences. On average each student had 1.7 drinks a day and 2.8 episodes of abusive drinking a month. We found that the more a student was exposed to college environmental factors, the greater the risk of heavy, frequent, and abusive drinking. Alcohol consumption increased for students living on campus, living in a dormitory with a higher number of room-mates, and having been in the University for a long spell. Most such environmental factors were explained by social involvement, such as participation to the student folklore, pre-partying, and normative expectations. Educational and college authorities need to acknowledge universities' responsibility in relation to their students' drinking behaviour and to commit themselves to support an environment of responsible drinking.

  5. Sources of Financing for Community Colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Steve; Anderson, Duane

    1985-01-01

    Reports on a nationwide survey of community college funding sources to determine the level of overall college budgets, the percentages of funds received from various sources for operating and capital expenses, the funding role of college foundations, administrator responsibilities, and fund-raising methods used by two-year colleges. (DMM)

  6. Philanthropic Motivations of Community College Donors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Linnie S.; Duggan, Molly H.

    2011-01-01

    This descriptive study surveyed current, lapsed, and major gift donors to explore the impact of college communications on donors' decisions to contribute to the college, the likelihood of donor financial support for various college projects, and the philanthropic motivation profiles of the donors of a midsized, multicampus community college in…

  7. Price and Value: Considerations for College Shoppers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broh, C. Anthony; Ansel, Dana

    2010-01-01

    Parents and students recognize the value of a college degree. Increasingly, they are borrowing large sums of money to invest in the future. Their choices about how to save for college, where to attend college, how much and from where to borrow for college, and how to repay their loans, have grown more complex. Yet families work with incomplete…

  8. Historic Rust College: Fulfilling a Mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Carl

    1989-01-01

    Describes Rust College, a Mississippi college dedicated to educating Blacks from economically and educationally impoverished backgrounds. Discusses the college's financial management, recent fund-raising efforts, building program, and academic programs. Examines the role of the predominantly Black college and Rust's mission to help students…

  9. The History of College Health Nursing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crihfield, Connie; Grace, Ted W.

    2011-01-01

    Almost from the beginning of formal college health programs in the second half of the 19th century, college health nurses were there to care for students in college and university settings. By the end of the 20th century, the role of college health nurses had evolved with the nursing field in general, but with enough unique features for the…

  10. Suicidal Behavior among Latina College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesin, Megan S.; Jeglic, Elizabeth L.

    2012-01-01

    Latina college students are one of the fastest-growing segments of the college student population. Although there is evidence suggesting Latina high school students are at increased risk of engaging in suicidal behavior, it is unclear Bwhether this risk continues in college. Over the course of 3 years, 554 Latina college students, the majority of…

  11. Nutritional Lifestyles of College Women

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Harmon, Michelle

    2001-01-01

    ...., second only to smoking. The purpose of this study is to explore the nutritional lifestyle of college women, and to determine if there are differences in nutritional lifestyle, as well as, perception of health status...

  12. Women's Colleges: A New Agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Charles E. P.

    1978-01-01

    The role of a women's college is addressed in terms of institutional environment, student motivation, career aspiration, noncurricular activities, counseling and other student services, and breaking sex stereotyping of men as well as women. (LBH)

  13. The Psychology of College Pricing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supiano, Beckie

    2009-01-01

    Tuition just about always moves in the same direction: up. So wouldn't it be great if students could lock in tuition at their college and know they will pay the same amount for four years? Some colleges have tried the strategy only to find it hard to convince families that it's a good idea. Just last week, the Georgia Board of Regents voted to…

  14. Multiple attachments and group psychotherapy: implications for college counseling centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmarosh, Cheri L

    2009-10-01

    A large body of literature has supported the application of attachment theory to the understanding of college student development and the process of individual psychotherapy. Despite group treatment being one of the major methods of intervention in college counseling centers, there has been very little research guided by attachment theory that has been applied to the area of group psychotherapy. Many current assessment instruments used in college counseling centers can be supported with attachment theory, and many group therapy interventions are aimed at facilitating secure working models of self, other, and groups. This paper explores the importance of personal and group attachments in group psychotherapy and specifically addresses implications for clinical training and research in university counseling centers.

  15. Depressive Symptomatology and College Persistence among African American College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyraz, Güler; Horne, Sharon G; Owens, Archandria C; Armstrong, Aisha P

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between depressive symptomatology and college outcomes among African American students, as well as to determine whether these relationships were moderated by gender and type of university. Participants included 569 African American first-year students attending two public universities in the Southeast United States: a historically Black college/university (HBCU) and a predominantly White institution (PWI). Using a longitudinal study design, data were collected at three time points. Results indicated that, after adjusting for the effects of the control variables (gender, type of institution, high school GPA, participation in on-campus activities, institutional and goal commitments), depressive symptomatology present in the first semester of college was associated with increased likelihood of dropping out of college before the end of the second year of college. The relationship between these two variables was mediated by first-year cumulative GPA. Results also indicated that the hypothesized relationships did not vary as a function of gender and the university type.

  16. Selected Collective Bargaining Agreements of Michigan Two-Year Colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Education Association, Washington, DC.

    Collective bargaining agreements of 19 selected Michigan two-year colleges are presented, representing contracts in effect in 1987. Contracts for the following colleges are included: Alpena Community College, Bay de Noc Community College, Gogebic Community College, Grand Rapids Junior College, Kalamazoo Valley Community College, Kellogg Community…

  17. Atypical antipsychotics: recent research findings and applications to clinical practice: Proceedings of a symposium presented at the 29th Annual European College of Neuropsychopharmacology Congress, 19 September 2016, Vienna, Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Robin; Correll, Christoph U; Reynolds, Gavin P; Taylor, David

    2017-03-01

    Available evidence suggests that second-generation atypical antipsychotics are broadly similar to first-generation agents in terms of their efficacy, but may have a more favourable tolerability profile, primarily by being less likely to cause extrapyramidal symptoms. However, atypical antipsychotics are variably associated with disturbances in the cardiometabolic arena, including increased body weight and the development of metabolic syndrome, which may reflect differences in their receptor binding profiles. Effective management of schizophrenia must ensure that the physical health of patients is addressed together with their mental health. This should therefore involve consideration of the specific tolerability profiles of available agents and individualization of treatment to minimize the likelihood of adverse metabolic sequelae, thereby improving long-term adherence and optimizing overall treatment outcomes. Alongside this, modifiable risk factors (such as exercise, diet, obesity/body weight and smoking status) must be addressed, in order to optimize patients' overall health and quality of life (QoL). In addition to antipsychotic-induced side effects, the clinical management of early nonresponders and psychopharmacological approaches for patients with treatment-resistant schizophrenia remain important unmet needs. Evidence suggests that antipsychotic response starts early in the course of treatment and that early nonresponse accurately predicts nonresponse over the longer term. Early nonresponse therefore represents an important modifiable risk factor for poor efficacy and effectiveness outcomes, since switching or augmenting antipsychotic treatment in patients showing early nonresponse has been shown to improve the likelihood of subsequent treatment outcomes. Recent evidence has also demonstrated that patients showing early nonresponse to treatment with lurasidone at 2 weeks may benefit from an increase in dose at this timepoint without compromising

  18. Are Interpersonal Violence Rates Higher Among Young Women in College Compared With Those Never Attending College?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coker, Ann L; Follingstad, Diane R; Bush, Heather M; Fisher, Bonnie S

    2016-05-01

    Estimates of sexual violence and partner violence rates among young women are generated primarily from college samples. Few studies have data to compare rates among similar-aged women attending college with those who never attended college. This study aims to estimate rates of partner violence by type (sexual, physical, and psychological) and severity (mild, moderate, severe), sexual harassment, and knowing or suspecting that someone put a drug in a drink (drugged drink) among a national sample of 959 young women aged 18 to 24 in an intimate relationship in the past 12 months who were either currently in college (college;n= 272) or never attended college (non-college;n= 687). After adjusting for demographic differences between these two groups, no significant differences were found in rates of sexual partner violence (28.4% non-college, 23.5% college), physical partner violence (27.9% non-college, 26.3% college), psychological partner violence (Mscore: 6.10 non-college, 5.59 college), sexual harassment (15.5% non-college, 14.1% college), or drugged drink (8.5% non-college, 7.8% college). Finding high rates of interpersonal violence among young women who are and are not currently attending college indicates the need to target all young adults with violence prevention interventions in educational, workplace, and other community-based settings. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. Care of the college student.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unwin, Brian K; Goodie, Jeffrey; Reamy, Brian V; Quinlan, Jeffrey

    2013-11-01

    There are approximately 20 million students in U.S. colleges and universities. Although this population is characterized as having good health, 600,000 students report some form of disability or some type of medical problem, including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, learning disabilities, psychiatric disorders, and chronic illnesses, among others. Physicians can enhance youth transition to an adult model of health care; the use of self-care skills checklists is one recommended method to assist with the transition. Stimulant medications are effective for treating adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, but physicians should use caution when prescribing stimulants to college students because of the high rates of medication diversion in this population. Depression, anxiety, posttraumatic stress disorder, sleep problems, and eating disorders are common in college students and can significantly impact performance. Emphasis on immunization of students for influenza, meningococcus, and pertussis is necessary because of the low rates of compliance. Screening and interventions for obesity, tobacco use, and substance abuse are important because of the high prevalence of these problems in college students. Screening for alcohol abuse facilitates identification of students with problem drinking behaviors. Students who are war veterans should be monitored for suicidal ideation and posttraumatic stress disorder. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning students are at risk of harassment and discrimination. Caution should be exercised when prescribing medications to college athletes to avoid violation of National Collegiate Athletic Association eligibility rules.

  20. Invisible Colleges: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rassoul Zavaraqi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Generation and consumption of information are among the functions unique to higher education. Scholarly communication plays an essential role in this process to such a degree that some consider it as being the cornerstone of science. Thus it could be said that no education could be realized without communication. Scientometrists analyze and assess formal scientific communications by studying the level of citation of such scientific outputs as books, journals and etc. Nevertheless, there is a special type of communication that lacks any external manifestation such as citations. Informal learning and education are indebted to such communication. This kind of informal communication for generating knowledge leads to an informal association among the scholars, which is called as "The invisible college". There are various definitions and interpretations concerning an invisible college. According to Price’s opinion, an invisible college is comprised of over a hundred colleagues that are engaged in communication with one another. He believed that members in such an association are reasonably in touch with and could consult and influence one another. The present paper, by reacquainting with the concept of invisible college, would review the role of informal links in the production of knowledge and higher education system, various assessment methods and critical notes, as well as the impact of modern ICT tools on the concept of invisible college.

  1. Preoperative fasting: a clinical audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Stuart

    2013-01-01

    This clinical audit examines the adherence to guidelines suggested by the Royal College of Nursing (2005); the results uphold previous studies of a preoperative starving period for patients undergoing elective surgical procedures. Patients excessively starved of food or fluids report problems relating to their health. These include hunger, distress and complaints of nausea.

  2. Clinical judgement and the emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, G

    2014-07-01

    The basic emotions are more important in decision making than we think. So we need to be aware of them and look not just for rationality in our clinical judgements but rational judgements that 'feel' right. © 2014 The Authors; Internal Medicine Journal © 2014 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  3. Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder-Specific Stimulant Misuse, Mood, Anxiety, and Stress in College-Age Women at High Risk for or with Eating Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Elise L.; Kass, Andrea E.; Eichen, Dawn M.; Fitzsimmons-Craft, Ellen E.; Trockel, Mickey; Wilfley, Denise E.; Taylor, C. Barr

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To examine the misuse of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)-specific stimulants in a college population at high risk for or with clinical or subclinical eating disorders. Participants: Four hundred forty-eight college-age women aged 18-25 at high risk for or with a clinical or subclinical eating disorder. Methods:…

  4. Diagnosis and Management of Waldenström Macroglobulinemia: Mayo Stratification of Macroglobulinemia and Risk-Adapted Therapy (mSMART) Guidelines 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Prashant; Ansell, Stephen M; Fonseca, Rafael; Chanan-Khan, Asher; Kyle, Robert A; Kumar, Shaji K; Mikhael, Joseph R; Witzig, Thomas E; Mauermann, Michelle; Dispenzieri, Angela; Ailawadhi, Sikander; Stewart, A Keith; Lacy, Martha Q; Thompson, Carrie A; Buadi, Francis K; Dingli, David; Morice, William G; Go, Ronald S; Jevremovic, Dragan; Sher, Taimur; King, Rebecca L; Braggio, Esteban; Novak, Ann; Roy, Vivek; Ketterling, Rhett P; Greipp, Patricia T; Grogan, Martha; Micallef, Ivana N; Bergsagel, P Leif; Colgan, Joseph P; Leung, Nelson; Gonsalves, Wilson I; Lin, Yi; Inwards, David J; Hayman, Suzanne R; Nowakowski, Grzegorz S; Johnston, Patrick B; Russell, Steven J; Markovic, Svetomir N; Zeldenrust, Steven R; Hwa, Yi L; Lust, John A; Porrata, Luis F; Habermann, Thomas M; Rajkumar, S Vincent; Gertz, Morie A; Reeder, Craig B

    2017-09-01

    Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM), an IgM-associated lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma, has witnessed several practice-altering advances in recent years. With availability of a wider array of therapies, the management strategies have become increasingly complex. Our multidisciplinary team appraised studies published or presented up to December 2015 to provide consensus recommendations for a risk-adapted approach to WM, using a grading system. Waldenström macroglobulinemia remains a rare, incurable cancer, with a heterogeneous disease course. The major classes of effective agents in WM include monoclonal antibodies, alkylating agents, purine analogs, proteasome inhibitors, immunomodulatory drugs, and mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors. However, the highest-quality evidence from rigorously conducted randomized clinical trials remains scant. Recognizing the paucity of data, we advocate participation in clinical trials, if available, at every stage of WM. Specific indications exist for initiation of therapy. Outside clinical trials, based on the synthesis of available evidence, we recommend bendamustine-rituximab as primary therapy for bulky disease, profound hematologic compromise, or constitutional symptoms attributable to WM. Dexamethasone-rituximab-cyclophosphamide is an alternative, particularly for nonbulky WM. Routine rituximab maintenance should be avoided. Plasma exchange should be promptly initiated before cytoreduction for hyperviscosity-related symptoms. Stem cell harvest for future use may be considered in first remission for patients 70 years or younger who are potential candidates for autologous stem cell transplantation. At relapse, retreatment with the original therapy is reasonable in patients with prior durable responses (time to next therapy ≥3 years) and good tolerability to previous regimen. Ibrutinib is efficacious in patients with relapsed or refractory disease harboring MYD88 L265P mutation. In the absence of neuropathy, a bortezomib

  5. Branding a college of pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, Michael T

    2012-11-12

    In a possible future of supply-demand imbalance in pharmacy education, a brand that positively differentiates a college or school of pharmacy from its competitors may be the key to its survival. The nominal group technique, a structured group problem-solving and decision-making process, was used during a faculty retreat to identify and agree on the core qualities that define the brand image of Midwestern University's College of Pharmacy in Glendale, AZ. Results from the retreat were provided to the faculty and students, who then proposed 168 mottos that embodied these qualities. Mottos were voted on by faculty members and pharmacy students. The highest ranked 24 choices were submitted to the faculty, who then selected the top 10 finalists. A final vote by students was used to select the winning motto. The methods described here may be useful to other colleges and schools of pharmacy that want to better define their own brand image and strengthen their organizational culture.

  6. Effect of Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP versus Autologous Whole Blood on Pain and Function Improvement in Tennis Elbow: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Ahmad Raeissadat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Autologous whole blood and platelet-rich plasma (PRP have been both suggested to treat chronic tennis elbow. The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of PRP versus autologous whole blood local injection in chronic tennis elbow. Methods. Forty patients with tennis elbow were randomly divided into 2 groups. Group 1 was treated with a single injection of 2 mL of autologous PRP and group 2 with 2 mL of autologous blood. Tennis elbow strap, stretching, and strengthening exercises were administered for both groups during a 2-month followup. Pain and functional improvements were assessed using visual analog scale (VAS, modified Mayo Clinic performance index for the elbow, and pressure pain threshold (PPT at 0, 4, and 8 weeks. Results. All pain and functional variables including VAS, PPT, and Mayo scores improved significantly in both groups 4 weeks after injection. No statistically significant difference was noted between groups regarding pain scores in 4-week follow-up examination (P>0.05. At 8-week reevaluations, VAS and Mayo scores improved only in PRP group (P<0.05. Conclusion. PRP and autologous whole blood injections are both effective to treat chronic lateral epicondylitis. PRP might be slightly superior in 8-week followup. However, further studies are suggested to get definite conclusion.

  7. Clearing House for Junior Colleges: Adjunct Faculty in Community Colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foote, Elizabeth

    1995-01-01

    Examines the literature on improving job satisfaction for community college adjunct faculty, providing an annotated bibliography of seven ERIC documents. Suggests that orientation programs to campus policies, professional development workshops, increased salaries and benefits, and job security all serve to increase the level of adjunct job…

  8. Building Bridges: College to Career for Underrepresented College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Means, Darris R.; Bryant, Immanuel; Crutchfield, Stacey; Jones, Michelle; Wade, Ross

    2016-01-01

    Colleges and universities have increased institutional outreach to diversify their campuses, however, campus leaders, faculty, and staff, particularly at predominantly White institutions (PWIs), must provide more and different support services as their institutional demographics shift to include more underrepresented students. The shift in…

  9. Community College Enrollment, College Major, and the Gender Wage Gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Andrew M.; Leigh, Duane E.

    2000-01-01

    Independent cross-sections developed using National Longitudinal Survey data reveal a decrease in the gender wage gap from 1989-1994 due to fewer differences in tenure and full-time employment. Disaggregating education by two- and four-year providers and college major accounts for 8.5-11% of the narrower wage gap for the period. (SK)

  10. Indigenous Women College Students' Perspectives on College, Work, and Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, Jennie L.; Adolpho, Quintina Bearchief; Jackson, Aaron P.; Alexitch, Louise R.

    2014-01-01

    Native American and First Nations (herein collectively referred to as Indigenous) women college students are faced with the challenge of balancing their cultural imperatives and the demands of the dominant Western culture in family, school, and work/employment roles. In order to explore these women's experiences and perspectives, this study…

  11. Reviving a Community, Modernizing an Industry: Ireland's Furniture College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regional Technology Strategies, Inc., Carrboro, NC.

    Connemara, a rural region in Ireland, is characterized by high unemployment, high emigration, poor infrastructure, inadequate public services, and a low rate of transfer to third-level education. To address the situation, the Galway-Mayo Institute of Technology (GMIT), joined forces with Connemara West (a community-owned development organization…

  12. Suicide Ideation, Alcohol Consumption, Motives, and Related Problems: Exploring the Association in College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Jami M; Witte, Tracy K; Correia, Christopher J

    2017-04-01

    Previous findings on the relationship between suicide ideation (SI) and alcohol misuse among college students are inconsistent, leading to conflicting clinical implications. We aimed to clarify this relationship in order to determine the utility of regarding alcohol misuse as a risk factor for SI in this population. Unselected college students (N = 545) completed an online survey including measures of alcohol consumption, problems, drinking motives, SI, and related variables. Our results suggest alcohol misuse is not a correlate of SI among college students; therefore, one should not assume that students who misuse alcohol are necessarily at increased risk for SI. © 2016 The American Association of Suicidology.

  13. Ecological validity of the screening module and the Daily Living tests of the Neuropsychological Assessment Battery using the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory-4 in postacute brain injury rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zgaljardic, Dennis J; Yancy, Sybil; Temple, Richard O; Watford, Monica F; Miller, Rebekah

    2011-11-01

    The assessment of ecological validity of neuropsychological measures is an area of growing interest, particularly in the postacute brain injury rehabilitation (PABIR) setting, as there is an increasing demand for clinicians to address functional and real-world outcomes. In the current study, we assessed the predictive value of the Screening module and the Daily Living tests of the Neuropsychological Assessment Battery (NAB) using clinician ratings from the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory-4 (MPAI-4) in patients with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury. Forty-seven individuals were each administered the NAB Screening module (NAB-SM) and the NAB Daily Living (NAB-DL) tests following admission to a residential PABIR program. MPAI-4 ratings were also obtained at admission. Linear regression analysis was used to examine the association between these functional and neuropsychological assessment measures. We replicated prior work (Temple at al., 2009) and expanded evidence for the ecological validity of the NAB-SM. Furthermore, our findings support the ecological validity of the NAB-DL Bill Payment, Judgment, and Map Reading tests with regards to functional skills and real-world activities. The current study supports prior work from our lab assessing the predictive value of the NAB-SM, as well as provides evidence for the ecological validity for select NAB-DL tests in patients with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury admitted to a residential PABIR program.

  14. Staged residential post-acute rehabilitation for adults following acquired brain injury: A comparison of functional gains rated on the UK Functional Assessment Measure (UK FIM+FAM) and the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory (MPAI-4).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Diana; Seaman, Karla; Sharp, Kristylee; Singer, Rachel; Wagland, Janet; Turner-Stokes, Lynne

    2017-01-01

    To compare the UK Functional Assessment Measure (UK FIM+FAM) and Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory (MPAI-4) as measures of functional change in patients with brain injury receiving a staged residential post-acute community-based rehabilitation programme. Longitudinal cohort study of consecutive admissions (N = 42) over 3 years. Patients were assessed at admission and discharge/annual review. We examined groups according to stage of independence on admission: Maximum support (stages 1 and 2: N = 17); moderate/maximum self-care/household support (stage 3: N = 15); minimal self-care and moderate household/community support (stages 4-6: N = 10). Median (IQR) age: 50 (37-56) years. Male:female ratio: (71%:29%). Aetiology: stroke (50%), traumatic (36%) and other brain injuries (14%). Both tools demonstrated significant gains in overall scores and all subscales (p MPAI-4 was more sensitive to changes in adjustment and participation for clients admitted in the later stages (4-6). The UK FIM+FAM and MPAI-4 provide complementary evaluation across functional tasks ranging from self-care to participation. This study supports their use for longitudinal outcome evaluation in community residential rehabilitation services that take patients at different stages of recovery.

  15. Immediate postoperative tracheal extubation in a liver transplant recipient with encephalopathy and the Mayo end-stage liver disease score of 41: A CARE-compliant case report revealed meaningful challenge in recovery after surgery (ERAS) for liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianbo; Wang, Chengdi; Chen, Nan; Song, Jiulin; Sun, Yan; Yao, Qin; Yan, Lunan; Yang, Jiayin

    2017-11-01

    Immediate postoperative tracheal extubation (IPTE) is one of the most important subject in recovery after surgery (ERAS) for liver transplantation. However, the criteria for IPTE is not uniform at present. We reported a successful IPTE in a liver transplant recipient with encephalopathy and a high Mayo end-stage liver disease (MELD) score of 41, which beyond the so-called criteria reported in the literature. The patient was 48-year-old man, admitted in September 2016 for end-stage liver cirrhosis secondary to hepatitis B. End-stage liver cirrhosis secondary to hepatitis B with encephalopathy and a high MELD score of 41. He was involved in our ERAS project and was extubated at the end of the liver transplantation in the operating room. As a result, the patient was not reintubated and had an excellent postoperative recovery, staying in intensive care unit (ICU) for just 2 days and discharged home on day 10. We believed IPTE in liver transplant recipients with severe liver dysfunction is a meaningful challenge in ERAS for liver transplantation. Our case and literature review suggest 3 things: IPTE in liver transplantation is generally feasible and safe; the encephalopathy or high MELD score should not be the only limiting factor; and a more systematic predicting system for IPTE in liver transplantation should be addressed in future studies. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. College Student Credit Card Usage and Debt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybka, Kathryn M.

    2001-01-01

    Provides an overview of the concerns related to credit card usage by college students. Offers information student affairs professionals can use to help college students make responsible choices. (Contains 26 references.) (GCP)

  17. Engaging college physics students with photonics research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Rhys; Chen, Lawrence R.

    2017-08-01

    As educators and researchers in the field of photonics, we find what we do to be very exciting, and sharing this passion and excitement to our university students is natural to us. Via outreach programs and college research funding, a new college and university collaboration has broadened our student audience: photonics is brought into the college classroom and research opportunities are provided to college students. Photonics-themed active learning activities are conducted in the college Waves and Modern Physics class, helping students forge relationships between course content and modern communications technologies. Presentations on photonics research are prepared and presented by the professor and past college student-researchers. The students are then given a full tour of the photonics university laboratories. Furthermore, funds are set aside to give college students a unique opportunity to assist the college professor with experiments during a paid summer research internship.

  18. Research | College of Engineering & Applied Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engineering & Applied Science. Please explore this webpage to learn about research activities and Associate Dean for Research College of Engineering and Applied Sciences Director, Center for Sustainable magazine. College ofEngineering & Applied Science Academics About People Students Research Business

  19. Immediate field of intervention: undergraduate college Preparation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... field of intervention: undergraduate college Preparation: at research institutes and universities The challenge: to transform the disciplines themselves Make them relevant and responsive. First step: create innovative interactions across the higher education spectrum, between Research Institute-University-College.

  20. A short history of the Australian College of Optometry 1940-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Barry L

    2015-09-01

    This paper gives an account of the history of the Australian College of Optometry from its foundation in 1940 and its achievements in optometric education, research and clinical service over the ensuing 75 years. © 2015 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Optometry © 2015 Optometry Australia.

  1. Rural model dedicated education unit: partnership between college and hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Lisa M

    2013-02-01

    This article describes the pilot project development of a rural model Dedicated Education Unit (DEU) by a rural college nursing program and a rural hospital to increase student nurses' confidence and proficiency and improve recruitment of prepared rural staff nurses. Traditionally, for economies of scale, most student clinical rotations occurred in urban settings with the number of students per clinical instructor allowed by the state board of nursing. College budget constraints negated the placement of fewer than this mandated maximum number of students in a rural hospital with a clinical instructor; moreover, rural hospitals could not accommodate 10 students at one time. Rural nursing students were anxious in the urban settings, and this anxiety precluded learning in many instances. Rural hospitals face higher registered nurse vacancies than urban centers. Of the nurses applying for open positions, many were not prepared for the demands of rural nursing, resulting in increased turnover and high orientation costs. The rural model DEU addressed issues of both the nursing program and the hospital. The design and development of the rural model DEU and the advantages of the partnership for the college nursing program and the hospital are discussed. Initial outcomes and serendipitous findings from the pilot project are also discussed. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  2. Information heterogeneity and intended college enrollment

    OpenAIRE

    Bleemer, Zachary; Zafar, Basit

    2014-01-01

    Despite a robust college premium, college attendance rates in the United States have remained stagnant and exhibit a substantial socioeconomic gradient. We focus on information gaps - specifically, incomplete information about college benefits and costs - as a potential explanation for these patterns. In a nationally representative survey of U.S. household heads, we show that perceptions of college costs and benefits are severely and systematically biased: 74 percent of our respondents undere...

  3. Colleges without Walls But with Foundations: Integrated College and Communications Development in Saskatchewan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faris, Ronald L.

    The evolvement of the community college in Saskatchewan is discussed. The college concept, which is embodied in seven principles, is essentially one of a communtiy college in which the community is the campus--the "college" exists wherever its programs are offered. Existing school and community facilities are utilized. In the first year…

  4. The Impact of Different Parenting Styles on First-Year College Students' Adaptation to College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Gregory J.

    2006-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine the impact of different parenting styles on college students' adaptation to college. During the second week of college, 80 first-year students from two-parent families completed the Tests of Reactions and Adaptations to College, English version and the Parental Authority Questionnaire. Authoritative…

  5. Increasing College Access: A Look at College Readiness from the Experiences of Foster Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, Demetrees Lee

    2017-01-01

    Fewer than 50% of all foster youth in the United States graduate from high school by the age of 18 and only 20% of those high school graduates attend college. There are many barriers that impact the college-going rates of foster youth. Past studies on college attendance among foster youth rarely look at college readiness experiences from the…

  6. Supply and Demand in the Higher Education Market: College Admission and College Choice. Research Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Michael; Kumar, Amal

    2015-01-01

    The nation's most selective colleges are often the centerpiece of the discussion surrounding college choice, and trends in college selectivity are relayed through stories of plunging admission rates at a few high-profile postsecondary institutions and anecdotes of model high school students unable to secure seats at these colleges. Such stories…

  7. Launching Early College Districtwide: Pharr-San Juan-Alamo's "College for All" Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Cecilia

    2012-01-01

    Across the nation, early college schools are creating a path to college success for young people underrepresented in higher education. For a decade, these innovative public schools blending high school and college have proven that, with the right support, all high school students can tackle college work. Now, a Texas school district near the…

  8. College-"Conocimiento": Toward an Interdisciplinary College Choice Framework for Latinx Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo-Gil, Nancy

    2017-01-01

    This paper builds upon Perna's college choice model by integrating Anzaldúa's theory of "conocimiento" to propose an interdisciplinary college choice framework for Latinx students. Using previous literature, this paper proposes college-"conocimiento" as a framework that contextualizes Latinx student college choices within the…

  9. Tuberculosis Prevention in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerman, Stephen J.; Bernardo, John; Daly, Jennifer S.; Husson, Robert

    2004-01-01

    To help college health services in all parts of the country improve their approach to latent tuberculosis, two Listservs were provided for them to post their questions on dealing with TB infection. In this article, the authors present some of the questions posted in the Listservs and their corresponding answers. In their answers, the authors have…

  10. Customer Service in Ontario's Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, John

    2005-01-01

    No doubt there are detractors who cringe at the prospect of connecting the term customer service with an institution of higher education. Some may consider the term demeaning. However, given the college funding crisis and current economic climate, a quality customer service strategy is a prudent adjunct to any marketing activity undertaken. It is…

  11. Adventures in Flipping College Algebra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Sickle, Jenna

    2015-01-01

    This paper outlines the experience of a university professor who implemented flipped learning in two sections of college algebra courses for two semesters. It details how the courses were flipped, what technology was used, advantages, challenges, and results. It explains what students do outside of class, what they do inside class, and discusses…

  12. Career Exploration among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouad, Nadya A.; Ghosh, Arpita; Chang, Wen-hsin; Figueiredo, Catia; Bachhuber, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    College is a significant time for undergraduates to declare majors and choose career paths. For many undergraduates, choosing both a major and a career path is challenging. Research shows that many universities deliver career interventions through dedicated career decision-making courses (Mead & Korschgen, 1994). However, there has been…

  13. Community Colleges and Cybersecurity Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teles, Elizabeth J.; Hovis, R. Corby

    2002-01-01

    Describes recent federal legislation (H.R. 3394) that charges the National Science Foundation with offering more grants to colleges and universities for degree programs in computer and network security, and to establish trainee programs for graduate students who pursue doctoral degrees in computer and network security. Discusses aspects of…

  14. Handbook for community college librarians

    CERN Document Server

    Crumpton, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    ""This work will serve as a very useful introduction for either new or aspiring community college librarians or as a text for an LIS course. The concise chapters, filled with both scholarship and practical advice, will help librarians better understand their environment."" - Library Journal Online

  15. [Community Service Program, Westmont College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistler, Christina

    This report describes a 2-year project at Westmont College, California, which established a Community Service Program with the purposes of decreasing student debt and increasing student participation in community organizations. Eligible students worked 8-10 hours per week for a qualified community agency and received credit towards tuition for the…

  16. College Mergers: An Emerging Alternative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuder, Robert L.

    1989-01-01

    Examines the merger of Williamsport Area Community College (WACC) and the University of Pennsylvania, necessitated by the city of Williamsport's decision to discontinue its sponsorship of WACC. Considers the principles underlying the merger, legal questions, reactions from within WACC and the surrounding community, and the benefits of the merger.…

  17. Working Alliances in College Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Steven A.

    2008-01-01

    I explain how professors can establish working alliances with students to cultivate a climate conducive to learning. This process involves (a) attending to the emotional bonds that exist in the college classroom, (b) developing shared educational goals and tasks to promote a common sense of purpose, and (c) addressing classroom conflict to repair…

  18. Screening College Students for Hypercholesterolemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faigel, Harris C.

    1992-01-01

    Describes one college's mandatory mass cholesterol screening for new students. Each year, over 30 beginning students with unknown hypercholesterolemia were detected. The program suggests that mass screening efficiently and economically identifies students who would benefit from cholesterol reduction, a modifiable risk in coronary artery disease.…

  19. Palo Verde College Facts, 2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palo Verde Coll., Blythe, CA.

    This is a 2001 report on Palo Verde College (PVC) (California) student demographics, enrollment status, citizenship, educational goals, and academic persistence. Student data were collected and analyzed to meet accrediting standards, improve institutional effectiveness, and fulfill the local district's mission. The report discusses enrollment…

  20. College Students and Their Cats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Lawrence; Alexander, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    Twenty-two Siamese and 32 mixed breed cats' personalities were rated by their respective college student owners and compared. Further, the owners' self rated personality traits were correlated with the pets'; significant Siamese and Mixed differences and correlations were obtained. These are the first data to examine breed of cat on a personality…