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Sample records for maxwell fdtd approach

  1. FDTD for Hydrodynamic Electron Fluid Maxwell Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingxue Zhao

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we develop a numerical method for solving the three dimensional hydrodynamic electron fluid Maxwell equations that describe the electron gas dynamics driven by an external electromagnetic wave excitation. Our numerical approach is based on the Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD method for solving the Maxwell’s equations and an explicit central finite difference method for solving the hydrodynamic electron fluid equations containing both electron density and current equations. Numerical results show good agreement with the experiment of studying the second-harmonic generation (SHG from metallic split-ring resonator (SRR.

  2. Discrete exterior calculus approach for discretizing Maxwell's equations on face-centered cubic grids for FDTD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmasi, Mahbod; Potter, Michael

    2018-07-01

    Maxwell's equations are discretized on a Face-Centered Cubic (FCC) lattice instead of a simple cubic as an alternative to the standard Yee method for improvements in numerical dispersion characteristics and grid isotropy of the method. Explicit update equations and numerical dispersion expressions, and the stability criteria are derived. Also, several tools available to the standard Yee method such as PEC/PMC boundary conditions, absorbing boundary conditions, and scattered field formulation are extended to this method as well. A comparison between the FCC and the Yee formulations is made, showing that the FCC method exhibits better dispersion compared to its Yee counterpart. Simulations are provided to demonstrate both the accuracy and grid isotropy improvement of the method.

  3. High-order FDTD methods via derivative matching for Maxwell's equations with material interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Shan; Wei, G.W.

    2004-01-01

    This paper introduces a series of novel hierarchical implicit derivative matching methods to restore the accuracy of high-order finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) schemes of computational electromagnetics (CEM) with material interfaces in one (1D) and two spatial dimensions (2D). By making use of fictitious points, systematic approaches are proposed to locally enforce the physical jump conditions at material interfaces in a preprocessing stage, to arbitrarily high orders of accuracy in principle. While often limited by numerical instability, orders up to 16 and 12 are achieved, respectively, in 1D and 2D. Detailed stability analyses are presented for the present approach to examine the upper limit in constructing embedded FDTD methods. As natural generalizations of the high-order FDTD schemes, the proposed derivative matching methods automatically reduce to the standard FDTD schemes when the material interfaces are absent. An interesting feature of the present approach is that it encompasses a variety of schemes of different orders in a single code. Another feature of the present approach is that it can be robustly implemented with other high accuracy time-domain approaches, such as the multiresolution time-domain method and the local spectral time-domain method, to cope with material interfaces. Numerical experiments on both 1D and 2D problems are carried out to test the convergence, examine the stability, access the efficiency, and explore the limitation of the proposed methods. It is found that operating at their best capacity, the proposed high-order schemes could be over 2000 times more efficient than their fourth-order versions in 2D. In conclusion, the present work indicates that the proposed hierarchical derivative matching methods might lead to practical high-order schemes for numerical solution of time-domain Maxwell's equations with material interfaces

  4. Simulation of Plasmonics Nanodevices with Coupled Maxwell and Schrödinger Equations using the FDTD Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Ahmed

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Maxwell and Schrödinger equations are coupled to incorporate quantum effects for the simulation of plasmonics nanodevices. Maxwell equations with Lorentz-Drude (LD dispersive model are applied to large size plasmonics components, whereas coupled Maxwell and Schrödinger equations are applied to components where quantum effects are needed. The finite difference time domain method (FDTD is applied to simulate these coupled equations.

  5. 2-D Fused Image Reconstruction approach for Microwave Tomography: a theoretical assessment using FDTD Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindu, G; Semenov, S

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes an efficient two-dimensional fused image reconstruction approach for Microwave Tomography (MWT). Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) models were created for a viable MWT experimental system having the transceivers modelled using thin wire approximation with resistive voltage sources. Born Iterative and Distorted Born Iterative methods have been employed for image reconstruction with the extremity imaging being done using a differential imaging technique. The forward solver in the imaging algorithm employs the FDTD method of solving the time domain Maxwell's equations with the regularisation parameter computed using a stochastic approach. The algorithm is tested with 10% noise inclusion and successful image reconstruction has been shown implying its robustness.

  6. Global 3-D FDTD Maxwell's-Equations Modeling of Ionospheric Disturbances Associated with Earthquakes Using an Optimized Geodesic Grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, J. J.; Taflove, A.

    2005-12-01

    We report a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) computational solution of Maxwell's equations [1] that models the possibility of detecting and characterizing ionospheric disturbances above seismic regions. Specifically, we study anomalies in Schumann resonance spectra in the extremely low frequency (ELF) range below 30 Hz as observed in Japan caused by a hypothetical cylindrical ionospheric disturbance above Taiwan. We consider excitation of the global Earth-ionosphere waveguide by lightning in three major thunderstorm regions of the world: Southeast Asia, South America (Amazon region), and Africa. Furthermore, we investigate varying geometries and characteristics of the ionospheric disturbance above Taiwan. The FDTD technique used in this study enables a direct, full-vector, three-dimensional (3-D) time-domain Maxwell's equations calculation of round-the-world ELF propagation accounting for arbitrary horizontal as well as vertical geometrical and electrical inhomogeneities and anisotropies of the excitation, ionosphere, lithosphere, and oceans. Our entire-Earth model grids the annular lithosphere-atmosphere volume within 100 km of sea level, and contains over 6,500,000 grid-points (63 km laterally between adjacent grid points, 5 km radial resolution). We use our recently developed spherical geodesic gridding technique having a spatial discretization best described as resembling the surface of a soccer ball [2]. The grid is comprised entirely of hexagonal cells except for a small fixed number of pentagonal cells needed for completion. Grid-cell areas and locations are optimized to yield a smoothly varying area difference between adjacent cells, thereby maximizing numerical convergence. We compare our calculated results with measured data prior to the Chi-Chi earthquake in Taiwan as reported by Hayakawa et. al. [3]. Acknowledgement This work was suggested by Dr. Masashi Hayakawa, University of Electro-Communications, Chofugaoka, Chofu Tokyo. References [1] A

  7. Comparing Teaching Approaches About Maxwell's Displacement Current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karam, Ricardo; Coimbra, Debora; Pietrocola, Maurício

    2014-08-01

    Due to its fundamental role for the consolidation of Maxwell's equations, the displacement current is one of the most important topics of any introductory course on electromagnetism. Moreover, this episode is widely used by historians and philosophers of science as a case study to investigate several issues (e.g. the theory-experiment relationship). Despite the consensus among physics educators concerning the relevance of the topic, there are many possible ways to interpret and justify the need for the displacement current term. With the goal of understanding the didactical transposition of this topic more deeply, we investigate three of its domains: (1) The historical development of Maxwell's reasoning; (2) Different approaches to justify the term insertion in physics textbooks; and (3) Four lectures devoted to introduce the topic in undergraduate level given by four different professors. By reflecting on the differences between these three domains, significant evidence for the knowledge transformation caused by the didactization of this episode is provided. The main purpose of this comparative analysis is to assist physics educators in developing an epistemological surveillance regarding the teaching and learning of the displacement current.

  8. New approach to far field analysis for radiation pattern estimation using FDTD method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Bojana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper an approach to efficient computation of radiation pattern in FDTD simulation environment is presented. A necessary large distance from the radiating object is achieved by multigrid space discretization with unilaterally connected subdomains. A numerical dispersion is reduced using more general complex-envelope finite difference time domain (CE-FDTD formulation and high order accuracy FDTD schemes where possible. In order to examine how much the introduced algorithm complexity and increased demands concerning computational power and memory are justified by the gain in accuracy, several different scenarios were considered. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR-32051 i br. TR-33008

  9. Crosstalk in modern on-chip interconnects a FDTD approach

    CERN Document Server

    Kaushik, B K; Patnaik, Amalendu

    2016-01-01

    The book provides accurate FDTD models for on-chip interconnects, covering most recent advancements in materials and design. Furthermore, depending on the geometry and physical configurations, different electrical equivalent models for CNT and GNR based interconnects are presented. Based on the electrical equivalent models the performance comparison among the Cu, CNT and GNR-based interconnects are also discussed in the book. The proposed models are validated with the HSPICE simulations. The book introduces the current research scenario in the modeling of on-chip interconnects. It presents the structure, properties, and characteristics of graphene based on-chip interconnects and the FDTD modeling of Cu based on-chip interconnects. The model considers the non-linear effects of CMOS driver as well as the transmission line effects of interconnect line that includes coupling capacitance and mutual inductance effects. In a more realistic manner, the proposed model includes the effect of width-dependent MFP of the ...

  10. High-order FDTD methods for transverse electromagnetic systems in dispersive inhomogeneous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shan

    2011-08-15

    This Letter introduces a novel finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) formulation for solving transverse electromagnetic systems in dispersive media. Based on the auxiliary differential equation approach, the Debye dispersion model is coupled with Maxwell's equations to derive a supplementary ordinary differential equation for describing the regularity changes in electromagnetic fields at the dispersive interface. The resulting time-dependent jump conditions are rigorously enforced in the FDTD discretization by means of the matched interface and boundary scheme. High-order convergences are numerically achieved for the first time in the literature in the FDTD simulations of dispersive inhomogeneous media. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  11. Explicit formulation of second and third order optical nonlinearity in the FDTD framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varin, Charles; Emms, Rhys; Bart, Graeme; Fennel, Thomas; Brabec, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    The finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method is a flexible and powerful technique for rigorously solving Maxwell's equations. However, three-dimensional optical nonlinearity in current commercial and research FDTD softwares requires solving iteratively an implicit form of Maxwell's equations over the entire numerical space and at each time step. Reaching numerical convergence demands significant computational resources and practical implementation often requires major modifications to the core FDTD engine. In this paper, we present an explicit method to include second and third order optical nonlinearity in the FDTD framework based on a nonlinear generalization of the Lorentz dispersion model. A formal derivation of the nonlinear Lorentz dispersion equation is equally provided, starting from the quantum mechanical equations describing nonlinear optics in the two-level approximation. With the proposed approach, numerical integration of optical nonlinearity and dispersion in FDTD is intuitive, transparent, and fully explicit. A strong-field formulation is also proposed, which opens an interesting avenue for FDTD-based modelling of the extreme nonlinear optics phenomena involved in laser filamentation and femtosecond micromachining of dielectrics.

  12. Metamaterialen simulazioa FDTD metodoaren bidez

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández Elorrieta, Ainhoa

    2016-01-01

    Azken urteetan metamaterialek izugarrizko arreta eragin dute. Material artifizial horiek hainbat aplikazio ezberdin izateko diseinatzen dira eta horretarako, ikerkuntza haien propietate elektromagnetikoak ulertzean zentratu da. Lan honen helburua, hortaz, metamaterialen jokabide elektromagnetikoa ulertzea da. Horretarako, FDTD (Finite Difference Time Domain) metodoa erabiliko dugu Maxwell-en ekuazioak ebazteko. Oinarria ulertzeko, lehenik, uhin elektromagnetikoen hedapena aztertuko dugu ingur...

  13. Time-domain simulations for metallic nano-structures - a Krylov-subspace approach beyond the limitations of FDTD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenig, Michael [Institut fuer Theoretische Festkoerperphysik, Universitaet Karlsruhe (Germany); Karlsruhe School of Optics and Photonics (KSOP), Universitaet Karlsruhe (Germany); Niegemann, Jens; Tkeshelashvili, Lasha; Busch, Kurt [Institut fuer Theoretische Festkoerperphysik, Universitaet Karlsruhe (Germany); DFG Forschungszentrum Center for Functional Nanostructures (CFN), Universitaet Karlsruhe (Germany); Karlsruhe School of Optics and Photonics (KSOP), Universitaet Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Numerical simulations of metallic nano-structures are crucial for the efficient design of plasmonic devices. Conventional time-domain solvers such as FDTD introduce large numerical errors especially at metallic surfaces. Our approach combines a discontinuous Galerkin method on an adaptive mesh for the spatial discretisation with a Krylov-subspace technique for the time-stepping procedure. Thus, the higher-order accuracy in both time and space is supported by unconditional stability. As illustrative examples, we compare numerical results obtained with our method against analytical reference solutions and results from FDTD calculations.

  14. SAR calculation using FDTD simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Ferro, Francisco Nabais; Pinto, Guilherme Taveira; Pinho, Pedro

    2009-01-01

    The main intend of this work, is to determinate the Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) on human head tissues exposed to radiation caused by sources of 900 and 1800MHz, since those are the typical frequencies for mobile communications systems nowadays. In order to determinate the SAR, has been used the FDTD (Finite Difference Time Domain), which is a numeric method in time domain, obtained from the Maxwell equations in differential mode. In order to do this, a computational model from the human he...

  15. Research on Radiation Characteristic of Plasma Antenna through FDTD Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianming Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The radiation characteristic of plasma antenna is investigated by using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD approach in this paper. Through using FDTD method, we study the propagation of electromagnetic wave in free space in stretched coordinate. And the iterative equations of Maxwell equation are derived. In order to validate the correctness of this method, we simulate the process of electromagnetic wave propagating in free space. Results show that electromagnetic wave spreads out around the signal source and can be absorbed by the perfectly matched layer (PML. Otherwise, we study the propagation of electromagnetic wave in plasma by using the Boltzmann-Maxwell theory. In order to verify this theory, the whole process of electromagnetic wave propagating in plasma under one-dimension case is simulated. Results show that Boltzmann-Maxwell theory can be used to explain the phenomenon of electromagnetic wave propagating in plasma. Finally, the two-dimensional simulation model of plasma antenna is established under the cylindrical coordinate. And the near-field and far-field radiation pattern of plasma antenna are obtained. The experiments show that the variation of electron density can introduce the change of radiation characteristic.

  16. Research on radiation characteristic of plasma antenna through FDTD method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jianming; Fang, Jingjing; Lu, Qiuyuan; Liu, Fan

    2014-01-01

    The radiation characteristic of plasma antenna is investigated by using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) approach in this paper. Through using FDTD method, we study the propagation of electromagnetic wave in free space in stretched coordinate. And the iterative equations of Maxwell equation are derived. In order to validate the correctness of this method, we simulate the process of electromagnetic wave propagating in free space. Results show that electromagnetic wave spreads out around the signal source and can be absorbed by the perfectly matched layer (PML). Otherwise, we study the propagation of electromagnetic wave in plasma by using the Boltzmann-Maxwell theory. In order to verify this theory, the whole process of electromagnetic wave propagating in plasma under one-dimension case is simulated. Results show that Boltzmann-Maxwell theory can be used to explain the phenomenon of electromagnetic wave propagating in plasma. Finally, the two-dimensional simulation model of plasma antenna is established under the cylindrical coordinate. And the near-field and far-field radiation pattern of plasma antenna are obtained. The experiments show that the variation of electron density can introduce the change of radiation characteristic.

  17. Bistatic scattering from a three-dimensional object above a two-dimensional randomly rough surface modeled with the parallel FDTD approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, L-X; Li, J; Zeng, H

    2009-11-01

    We present an investigation of the electromagnetic scattering from a three-dimensional (3-D) object above a two-dimensional (2-D) randomly rough surface. A Message Passing Interface-based parallel finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) approach is used, and the uniaxial perfectly matched layer (UPML) medium is adopted for truncation of the FDTD lattices, in which the finite-difference equations can be used for the total computation domain by properly choosing the uniaxial parameters. This makes the parallel FDTD algorithm easier to implement. The parallel performance with different number of processors is illustrated for one rough surface realization and shows that the computation time of our parallel FDTD algorithm is dramatically reduced relative to a single-processor implementation. Finally, the composite scattering coefficients versus scattered and azimuthal angle are presented and analyzed for different conditions, including the surface roughness, the dielectric constants, the polarization, and the size of the 3-D object.

  18. FDTD method and models in optical education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiaogang; Wan, Nan; Weng, Lingdong; Zhu, Hao; Du, Jihe

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method has been proposed as a pedagogical way in optical education. Meanwhile, FDTD solutions, a simulation software based on the FDTD algorithm, has been presented as a new tool which helps abecedarians to build optical models and to analyze optical problems. The core of FDTD algorithm is that the time-dependent Maxwell's equations are discretized to the space and time partial derivatives, and then, to simulate the response of the interaction between the electronic pulse and the ideal conductor or semiconductor. Because the solving of electromagnetic field is in time domain, the memory usage is reduced and the simulation consequence on broadband can be obtained easily. Thus, promoting FDTD algorithm in optical education is available and efficient. FDTD enables us to design, analyze and test modern passive and nonlinear photonic components (such as bio-particles, nanoparticle and so on) for wave propagation, scattering, reflection, diffraction, polarization and nonlinear phenomena. The different FDTD models can help teachers and students solve almost all of the optical problems in optical education. Additionally, the GUI of FDTD solutions is so friendly to abecedarians that learners can master it quickly.

  19. Ion diode simulation with a finite-volume PIC approach for the numerical solution of the Maxwell-Lorentz system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munz, C D; Schneider, R; Stein, E; Voss, U [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany). Institut fuer Neutronenphysik und Reaktortechnik; Westermann, T [FH Karlsruhe (Germany). Fachbereich Naturwissenschaften; Krauss, M [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany). Hauptabteilung Informations- und Kommunikationstechik

    1997-12-31

    The numerical concept realized in the the Karlsruhe Diode Code KADI2D is briefly reviewed. Several new aspects concerning the Maxwell field solver based on high resolution finite-volume methods are presented. A new approach maintaining charge conservation numerically for the Maxwell-Lorentz equations is shortly summarized. (author). 2 figs., 12 refs.

  20. Ion diode simulation with a finite-volume PIC approach for the numerical solution of the Maxwell-Lorentz system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munz, C.D.; Schneider, R.; Stein, E.; Voss, U.; Westermann, T.; Krauss, M.

    1996-01-01

    The numerical concept realized in the the Karlsruhe Diode Code KADI2D is briefly reviewed. Several new aspects concerning the Maxwell field solver based on high resolution finite-volume methods are presented. A new approach maintaining charge conservation numerically for the Maxwell-Lorentz equations is shortly summarized. (author). 2 figs., 12 refs

  1. FDTD Stability: Critical Time Increment

    OpenAIRE

    Z. Skvor; L. Pauk

    2003-01-01

    A new approach suitable for determination of the maximal stable time increment for the Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) algorithm in common curvilinear coordinates, for general mesh shapes and certain types of boundaries is presented. The maximal time increment corresponds to a characteristic value of a Helmholz equation that is solved by a finite-difference (FD) method. If this method uses exactly the same discretization as the given FDTD method (same mesh, boundary conditions, order of ...

  2. Use of the perfect electric conductor boundary conditions to discretize a diffractor in FDTD/PML environment

    OpenAIRE

    Calderón-Ramón, C.; Gómez-Aguilar, J. F.; Rodríguez-Achach, M.; Morales- Mendoza, L. J.; Laguna-Camacho, J. R.; Benavides-Cruz, M.; Cruz-Orduna, M. I.; González-Lee, M.; Pérez-Meana, H.; Enciso-Aguilar, M.; Chávez-Pérez, R.; Martínez-García, H.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present a computational electromagnetic simulation of a multiform diffractor placed at the center of an antenna array. Our approach is to solve Maxwell's differential equations with a discrete space-time formulation, using the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method. The Perfectly Matched Layers (PML) method is used as an absorbing boundary condition, to prevent further spread of the electromagnetic wave to the outside of the calculation region. The Perfect Electric Condu...

  3. Mass transfer simulation of nanofiltration membranes for electrolyte solutions through generalized Maxwell-Stefan approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshyargar, Vahid; Fadaei, Farzad; Ashrafizadeh, Seyed Nezameddin

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive mathematical model is developed for simulation of ion transport through nanofiltration membranes. The model is based on the Maxwell-Stefan approach and takes into account steric, Donnan, and dielectric effects in the transport of mono and divalent ions. Theoretical ion rejection for multi-electrolyte mixtures was obtained by numerically solving the 'hindered transport' based on the generalized Maxwell-Stefan equation for the flux of ions. A computer simulation has been developed to predict the transport in the range of nanofiltration, a numerical procedure developed linearization and discretization form of the governing equations, and the finite volume method was employed for the numerical solution of equations. The developed numerical method is capable of solving equations for multicomponent systems of n species no matter to what extent the system shows stiffness. The model findings were compared and verified with the experimental data from literature for two systems of Na 2 SO 4 +NaCl and MgCl 2 +NaCl. Comparison showed great agreement for different concentrations. As such, the model is capable of predicting the rejection of different ions at various concentrations. The advantage of such a model is saving costs as a result of minimizing the number of required experiments, while it is closer to a realistic situation since the adsorption of ions has been taken into account. Using this model, the flux of permeates and rejections of multi-component liquid feeds can be calculated as a function of membrane properties. This simulation tool attempts to fill in the gap in methods used for predicting nanofiltration and optimization of the performance of charged nanofilters through generalized Maxwell-Stefan (GMS) approach. The application of the current model may weaken the latter gap, which has arisen due to the complexity of the fundamentals of ion transport processes via this approach, and may further facilitate the industrial development of

  4. FDTD approach to optical forces of tightly focused vector beams on metal particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jian-Qi; Wang, Xi-Lin; Jia, Ding; Chen, Jing; Fan, Ya-Xian; Ding, Jianping; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2009-05-11

    We propose an improved FDTD method to calculate the optical forces of tightly focused beams on microscopic metal particles. Comparison study on different kinds of tightly focused beams indicates that trapping efficiency can be altered by adjusting the polarization of the incident field. The results also show the size-dependence of trapping forces exerted on metal particles. Transverse tapping forces produced by different illumination wavelengths are also evaluated. The numeric simulation demonstrates the possibility of trapping moderate-sized metal particles whose radii are comparable to wavelength.

  5. On symmetries and exact solutions of the Einstein–Maxwell field equations via the symmetry approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaur, Lakhveer; Gupta, R K

    2013-01-01

    Using the Lie symmetry approach, we have examined herein the system of partial differential equations corresponding to the Einstein–Maxwell equations for a static axially symmetric spacetime. The method used reduces the system of partial differential equations to a system of ordinary differential equations according to the Lie symmetry admitted. In particular, we found the relevant system of ordinary differential equations is all optimal subgroups. The system of ordinary differential equations is further solved in general to obtain exact solutions. Several new physically important families of exact solutions are derived. (paper)

  6. Classical Electrodynamics Coupled to Quantum Mechanics for Calculation of Molecular Optical Properties: a RT-TDDFT/FDTD Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Hanning; McMahon, J. M.; Ratner, Mark A.; Schatz, George C.

    2010-09-02

    A new multiscale computational methodology was developed to effectively incorporate the scattered electric field of a plasmonic nanoparticle into a quantum mechanical (QM) optical property calculation for a nearby dye molecule. For a given location of the dye molecule with respect to the nanoparticle, a frequency-dependent scattering response function was first determined by the classical electrodynamics (ED) finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) approach. Subsequently, the time-dependent scattered electric field at the dye molecule was calculated using the FDTD scattering response function through a multidimensional Fourier transform to reflect the effect of polarization of the nanoparticle on the local field at the molecule. Finally, a real-time time-dependent density function theory (RT-TDDFT) approach was employed to obtain a desired optical property (such as absorption cross section) of the dye molecule in the presence of the nanoparticle’s scattered electric field. Our hybrid QM/ED methodology was demonstrated by investigating the absorption spectrum of the N3 dye molecule and the Raman spectrum of pyridine, both of which were shown to be significantly enhanced by a 20 nm diameter silver sphere. In contrast to traditional quantum mechanical optical calculations in which the field at the molecule is entirely determined by intensity and polarization direction of the incident light, in this work we show that the light propagation direction as well as polarization and intensity are important to nanoparticle-bound dye molecule response. At no additional computation cost compared to conventional ED and QM calculations, this method provides a reliable way to couple the response of the dye molecule’s individual electrons to the collective dielectric response of the nanoparticle.

  7. The many faces of Maxwell, Dirac and Einstein equations a Clifford bundle approach

    CERN Document Server

    Rodrigues, Jr, Waldyr A

    2016-01-01

    This book is an exposition of the algebra and calculus of differential forms, of the Clifford and Spin-Clifford bundle formalisms, and of vistas to a formulation of important concepts of differential geometry indispensable for an in-depth understanding of space-time physics. The formalism discloses the hidden geometrical nature of spinor fields. Maxwell, Dirac and Einstein fields are shown to have representatives by objects of the same mathematical nature, namely sections of an appropriate Clifford bundle. This approach reveals unity in diversity and suggests relationships that are hidden in the standard formalisms and opens new paths for research. This thoroughly revised second edition also adds three new chapters: on the Clifford bundle approach to the Riemannian or semi-Riemannian differential geometry of branes; on Komar currents in the context of the General Relativity theory; and an analysis of the similarities and main differences between Dirac, Majorana and ELKO spinor fields. The exercises with solut...

  8. FDTD based model of ISOCT imaging for validation of nanoscale sensitivity (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eid, Aya; Zhang, Di; Yi, Ji; Backman, Vadim

    2017-02-01

    Many of the earliest structural changes associated with neoplasia occur on the micro and nanometer scale, and thus appear histologically normal. Our group has established Inverse Spectroscopic OCT (ISOCT), a spectral based technique to extract nanoscale sensitive metrics derived from the OCT signal. Thus, there is a need to model light transport through relatively large volumes (< 50 um^3) of media with nanoscale level resolution. Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) is an iterative approach which directly solves Maxwell's equations to robustly estimate the electric and magnetic fields propagating through a sample. The sample's refractive index for every spatial voxel and wavelength are specified upon a grid with voxel sizes on the order of λ/20, making it an ideal modelling technique for nanoscale structure analysis. Here, we utilize the FDTD technique to validate the nanoscale sensing ability of ISOCT. The use of FDTD for OCT modelling requires three components: calculating the source beam as it propagates through the optical system, computing the sample's scattered field using FDTD, and finally propagating the scattered field back through the optical system. The principles of Fourier optics are employed to focus this interference field through a 4f optical system and onto the detector. Three-dimensional numerical samples are generated from a given refractive index correlation function with known parameters, and subsequent OCT images and mass density correlation function metrics are computed. We show that while the resolvability of the OCT image remains diffraction limited, spectral analysis allows nanoscale sensitive metrics to be extracted.

  9. Transitory and steady analysis of grounding structures using the LN-FDTD method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Rodrigo Melo e Silva de; Souza Sobrinho, Carlos Leonidas da S. [Federal University of Para (UFPA), Belem, PA (Brazil). Electrical and Computer Engineering Dept.], Emails: rodrigo@lane.ufpa.br, leonidas@ufpa.br

    2007-07-01

    This work presents an overview of the LN-FDTD method (FDTD in local and non orthogonal coordinate system) to solve Maxwell's Equations. This method has been used to simulate curved grounding structures. Results are obtained by employing the presented methodology and they are compared to reference equations available in literature. (author)

  10. FDTD Stability: Critical Time Increment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Skvor

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available A new approach suitable for determination of the maximal stable timeincrement for the Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD algorithm incommon curvilinear coordinates, for general mesh shapes and certaintypes of boundaries is presented. The maximal time incrementcorresponds to a characteristic value of a Helmholz equation that issolved by a finite-difference (FD method. If this method uses exactlythe same discretization as the given FDTD method (same mesh, boundaryconditions, order of precision etc., the maximal stable time incrementis obtained from the highest characteristic value. The FD system issolved by an iterative method, which uses only slightly alteredoriginal FDTD formulae. The Courant condition yields a stable timeincrement, but in certain cases the maximum increment is slightlygreater [2].

  11. Introduction to the Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) Method for Electromagnetics

    CERN Document Server

    Gedney, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Introduction to the Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) Method for Electromagnetics provides a comprehensive tutorial of the most widely used method for solving Maxwell's equations -- the Finite Difference Time-Domain Method. This book is an essential guide for students, researchers, and professional engineers who want to gain a fundamental knowledge of the FDTD method. It can accompany an undergraduate or entry-level graduate course or be used for self-study. The book provides all the background required to either research or apply the FDTD method for the solution of Maxwell's equations to p

  12. A Full-Maxwell Approach for Large-Angle Polar Wander of Viscoelastic Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, H.; van der Wal, W.; Vermeersen, L. L. A.

    2017-12-01

    For large-angle long-term true polar wander (TPW) there are currently two types of nonlinear methods which give approximated solutions: those assuming that the rotational axis coincides with the axis of maximum moment of inertia (MoI), which simplifies the Liouville equation, and those based on the quasi-fluid approximation, which approximates the Love number. Recent studies show that both can have a significant bias for certain models. Therefore, we still lack an (semi)analytical method which can give exact solutions for large-angle TPW for a model based on Maxwell rheology. This paper provides a method which analytically solves the MoI equation and adopts an extended iterative procedure introduced in Hu et al. (2017) to obtain a time-dependent solution. The new method can be used to simulate the effect of a remnant bulge or models in different hydrostatic states. We show the effect of the viscosity of the lithosphere on long-term, large-angle TPW. We also simulate models without hydrostatic equilibrium and show that the choice of the initial stress-free shape for the elastic (or highly viscous) lithosphere of a given model is as important as its thickness for obtaining a correct TPW behavior. The initial shape of the lithosphere can be an alternative explanation to mantle convection for the difference between the observed and model predicted flattening. Finally, it is concluded that based on the quasi-fluid approximation, TPW speed on Earth and Mars is underestimated, while the speed of the rotational axis approaching the end position on Venus is overestimated.

  13. Nuclear EMP simulation for large-scale urban environments. FDTD for electrically large problems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, William S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bull, Jeffrey S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wilcox, Trevor [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bos, Randall J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shao, Xuan-Min [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Goorley, John T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Costigan, Keeley R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-13

    In case of a terrorist nuclear attack in a metropolitan area, EMP measurement could provide: (1) a prompt confirmation of the nature of the explosion (chemical or nuclear) for emergency response; and (2) and characterization parameters of the device (reaction history, yield) for technical forensics. However, urban environment could affect the fidelity of the prompt EMP measurement (as well as all other types of prompt measurement): (1) Nuclear EMP wavefront would no longer be coherent, due to incoherent production, attenuation, and propagation of gamma and electrons; and (2) EMP propagation from source region outward would undergo complicated transmission, reflection, and diffraction processes. EMP simulation for electrically-large urban environment: (1) Coupled MCNP/FDTD (Finite-difference time domain Maxwell solver) approach; and (2) FDTD tends to be limited to problems that are not 'too' large compared to the wavelengths of interest because of numerical dispersion and anisotropy. We use a higher-order low-dispersion, isotropic FDTD algorithm for EMP propagation.

  14. Helicopter time-domain electromagnetic numerical simulation based on Leapfrog ADI-FDTD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, S.; Ji, Y.; Li, D.; Wu, Y.; Wang, A.

    2017-12-01

    We present a three-dimension (3D) Alternative Direction Implicit Finite-Difference Time-Domain (Leapfrog ADI-FDTD) method for the simulation of helicopter time-domain electromagnetic (HTEM) detection. This method is different from the traditional explicit FDTD, or ADI-FDTD. Comparing with the explicit FDTD, leapfrog ADI-FDTD algorithm is no longer limited by Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy(CFL) condition. Thus, the time step is longer. Comparing with the ADI-FDTD, we reduce the equations from 12 to 6 and .the Leapfrog ADI-FDTD method will be easier for the general simulation. First, we determine initial conditions which are adopted from the existing method presented by Wang and Tripp(1993). Second, we derive Maxwell equation using a new finite difference equation by Leapfrog ADI-FDTD method. The purpose is to eliminate sub-time step and retain unconditional stability characteristics. Third, we add the convolution perfectly matched layer (CPML) absorbing boundary condition into the leapfrog ADI-FDTD simulation and study the absorbing effect of different parameters. Different absorbing parameters will affect the absorbing ability. We find the suitable parameters after many numerical experiments. Fourth, We compare the response with the 1-Dnumerical result method for a homogeneous half-space to verify the correctness of our algorithm.When the model contains 107*107*53 grid points, the conductivity is 0.05S/m. The results show that Leapfrog ADI-FDTD need less simulation time and computer storage space, compared with ADI-FDTD. The calculation speed decreases nearly four times, memory occupation decreases about 32.53%. Thus, this algorithm is more efficient than the conventional ADI-FDTD method for HTEM detection, and is more precise than that of explicit FDTD in the late time.

  15. Conformal FDTD modeling wake fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jurgens, T.; Harfoush, F.

    1991-05-01

    Many computer codes have been written to model wake fields. Here we describe the use of the Conformal Finite Difference Time Domain (CFDTD) method to model the wake fields generated by a rigid beam traveling through various accelerating structures. The non- cylindrical symmetry of some of the problems considered here requires the use of a three dimensional code. In traditional FDTD codes, curved surfaces are approximated by rectangular steps. The errors introduced in wake field calculations by such an approximation can be reduced by increasing the mesh size, therefore increasing the cost of computing. Another approach, validated here, deforms Ampere and Faraday contours near a media interface so as to conform to the interface. These improvements of the FDTD method result in better accuracy of the fields at asymptotically no computational cost. This method is also capable of modeling thin wires as found in beam profile monitors, and slots and cracks as found in resistive wall motions. 4 refs., 5 figs.

  16. Maxwell's fishpond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinsler, Paul; Tan Jiajun; Thio, Timothy C Y; Trant, Claire; Kandapper, Navin

    2012-01-01

    Most of us will have at some time thrown a pebble into water, and watched the ripples spread outwards and fade away. But now there is also a way to reverse the process, and make those ripples turn around and reconverge again, …and again, and again. To do this we have designed the Maxwell's fishpond, a water wave or ‘transformation aquatics’ version of the Maxwell's fisheye lens (Tyc et al 2011 New J. Phys. 13 115004; Luneburg 1964 Mathematical Theory of Optics). These are transformation devices where wave propagation on the surface of a sphere is modelled using a flat device with spatially varying properties. And just as for rays from a point source on a sphere, a wave disturbance in a Maxwell's fisheye or fishpond spreads out at first, but then reforms itself at its opposite (or complementary) point. Here we show how such a device can be made for water waves, partly in friendly competition with comparable electromagnetic devices (Ma et al 2011 New J. Phys. 13 033016) and partly as an accessible and fun demonstration of the power of transformation mechanics. To the eye, our Maxwell's fishpond was capable of reforming a disturbance up to five times, although such a feat required taking considerable care, close observation, and a little luck. (paper)

  17. FDTD Modelling of Electromagnetic waves in Stratified Medium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The technique is an adaptation of the finite-difference time domain (FDTD) approach usually applied to model electromagnetic wave propagation. In this paper a simple 2D implementation of FDTD algorithm in mathematica environment is presented. Source implementation and the effect of conductivity on the incident field ...

  18. Massive parallel electromagnetic field simulation program JEMS-FDTD design and implementation on jasmin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Hanyu; Zhou Haijing; Dong Zhiwei; Liao Cheng; Chang Lei; Cao Xiaolin; Xiao Li

    2010-01-01

    A large-scale parallel electromagnetic field simulation program JEMS-FDTD(J Electromagnetic Solver-Finite Difference Time Domain) is designed and implemented on JASMIN (J parallel Adaptive Structured Mesh applications INfrastructure). This program can simulate propagation, radiation, couple of electromagnetic field by solving Maxwell equations on structured mesh explicitly with FDTD method. JEMS-FDTD is able to simulate billion-mesh-scale problems on thousands of processors. In this article, the program is verified by simulating the radiation of an electric dipole. A beam waveguide is simulated to demonstrate the capability of large scale parallel computation. A parallel performance test indicates that a high parallel efficiency is obtained. (authors)

  19. Advances in FDTD computational electrodynamics photonics and nanotechnology

    CERN Document Server

    Oskooi, Ardavan; Johnson, Steven G

    2013-01-01

    Advances in photonics and nanotechnology have the potential to revolutionize humanity s ability to communicate and compute. To pursue these advances, it is mandatory to understand and properly model interactions of light with materials such as silicon and gold at the nanoscale, i.e., the span of a few tens of atoms laid side by side. These interactions are governed by the fundamental Maxwell s equations of classical electrodynamics, supplemented by quantum electrodynamics. This book presents the current state-of-the-art in formulating and implementing computational models of these interactions. Maxwell s equations are solved using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) technique, pioneered by the senior editor, whose prior Artech books in this area are among the top ten most-cited in the history of engineering. You discover the most important advances in all areas of FDTD and PSTD computational modeling of electromagnetic wave interactions. This cutting-edge resource helps you understand the latest develo...

  20. FDTD-analyse of electromagnetic wave propagation through photonic band gap structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brendel', M.O.; Danilov, V.V.; Makarov, D.G.; Nechiporuk, O.Yu.

    2007-01-01

    FDTD-method for numerical solution of Maxwell's equation has used for investigation of electromagnetic wave transmission through the periodically inhomogeneous planar waveguide. The spectral dependence for transmission factor has obtained. This result compared with the previous one, obtained with approximate analytical calculations

  1. AN FDTD ALGORITHM WITH PERFECTLY MATCHED LAYERS FOR CONDUCTIVE MEDIA. (R825225)

    Science.gov (United States)

    We extend Berenger's perfectly matched layers (PML) to conductive media. A finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) algorithm with PML as an absorbing boundary condition is developed for solutions of Maxwell's equations in inhomogeneous, conductive media. For a perfectly matched laye...

  2. FDTD Modeling of Nano- and Bio-Photonic Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanev, Stoyan; Tuchin, Valery; Pond, James

    2010-01-01

    to address newly emerging problems and not so much on its mathematical formulation. We will first discuss the application of a traditional formulation of the FDTD approach to the modeling of sub-wavelength photonics structures. Next, a modified total/scattered field FDTD approach will be applied...... to the modeling of biophotonics applications including Optical Phase Contrast Microscope (OPCM) imaging of cells containing gold nanoparticles (NPs) as well as its potential application as a modality for in vivo flow cytometry configurations.......In this paper we focus on the discussion of two recent unique applications of the Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) simulation method to the design and modeling of advanced nano- and bio-photonic problems. The approach that is adopted here focuses on the potential of the FDTD methodology...

  3. A Revised Piecewise Linear Recursive Convolution FDTD Method for Magnetized Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Song; Zhong Shuangying; Liu Shaobin

    2005-01-01

    The piecewise linear recursive convolution (PLRC) finite-different time-domain (FDTD) method improves accuracy over the original recursive convolution (RC) FDTD approach and current density convolution (JEC) but retains their advantages in speed and efficiency. This paper describes a revised piecewise linear recursive convolution PLRC-FDTD formulation for magnetized plasma which incorporates both anisotropy and frequency dispersion at the same time, enabling the transient analysis of magnetized plasma media. The technique is illustrated by numerical simulations of the reflection and transmission coefficients through a magnetized plasma layer. The results show that the revised PLRC-FDTD method has improved the accuracy over the original RC FDTD method and JEC FDTD method

  4. Reduced Vlasov-Maxwell simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helluy, P.; Navoret, L.; Pham, N.; Crestetto, A.

    2014-01-01

    The Maxwell-Vlasov system is a fundamental model in physics. It can be applied to plasma simulations, charged particles beam, astrophysics, etc. The unknowns are the electromagnetic field, solution to the Maxwell equations and the distribution function, solution to the Vlasov equation. In this paper we review two different numerical methods for Vlasov-Maxwell simulations. The first method is based on a coupling between a Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) Maxwell solver and a Particle-In-Cell (PIC) Vlasov solver. The second method only uses a DG approach for the Vlasov and Maxwell equations. The Vlasov equation is first reduced to a space-only hyperbolic system thanks to the finite-element method. The two numerical methods are implemented using OpenCL in order to achieve high performance on recent Graphic Processing Units (GPU). We obtained interesting speedups, but we also observe that the PIC method is the most expensive part of the computation. Therefore we propose another fully Eulerian approach. Thanks to a decomposition of the distribution function on velocity basis functions, we obtain a reduced Vlasov model, which appears to be a hyperbolic system of conservation laws written only in the (x,t) space. We can thus adapt very easily our DG solver to the reduced model

  5. Advances in the FDTD design and modeling of nano- and bio-photonics applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanev, Stoyan; Tuchin, Valery; Cheben, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we focus on the discussion of two recent unique applications of the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation method to the design and modeling of advanced nano- and bio-photonic problems. The approach that is adopted here focuses on the potential of the FDTD methodology...

  6. Modified Splitting FDTD Methods for Two-Dimensional Maxwell’s Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liping Gao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we develop a new method to reduce the error in the splitting finite-difference method of Maxwell’s equations. By this method two modified splitting FDTD methods (MS-FDTDI, MS-FDTDII for the two-dimensional Maxwell equations are proposed. It is shown that the two methods are second-order accurate in time and space and unconditionally stable by Fourier methods. By energy method, it is proved that MS-FDTDI is second-order convergent. By deriving the numerical dispersion (ND relations, we prove rigorously that MS-FDTDI has less ND errors than the ADI-FDTD method and the ND errors of ADI-FDTD are less than those of MS-FDTDII. Numerical experiments for computing ND errors and simulating a wave guide problem and a scattering problem are carried out and the efficiency of the MS-FDTDI and MS-FDTDII methods is confirmed.

  7. Green`s function of Maxwell`s equations and corresponding implications for iterative methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singer, B.S. [Macquarie Univ., Sydney (Australia); Fainberg, E.B. [Inst. of Physics of the Earth, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1996-12-31

    Energy conservation law imposes constraints on the norm and direction of the Hilbert space vector representing a solution of Maxwell`s equations. In this paper, we derive these constrains and discuss the corresponding implications for the Green`s function of Maxwell`s equations in a dissipative medium. It is shown that Maxwell`s equations can be reduced to an integral equation with a contracting kernel. The equation can be solved using simple iterations. Software based on this algorithm have successfully been applied to a wide range of problems dealing with high contrast models. The matrix corresponding to the integral equation has a well defined spectrum. The equation can be symmetrized and solved using different approaches, for instance one of the conjugate gradient methods.

  8. Wavefront-ray grid FDTD algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    ÇİYDEM, MEHMET

    2016-01-01

    A finite difference time domain algorithm on a wavefront-ray grid (WRG-FDTD) is proposed in this study to reduce numerical dispersion of conventional FDTD methods. A FDTD algorithm conforming to a wavefront-ray grid can be useful to take into account anisotropy effects of numerical grids since it features directional energy flow along the rays. An explicit and second-order accurate WRG-FDTD algorithm is provided in generalized curvilinear coordinates for an inhomogeneous isotropic medium. Num...

  9. Dispersion Analysis of the ADI-FDTD and S-FDTD Methods

    OpenAIRE

    KUŞAF, Mehmet; ÖZTOPRAK, Abdullah Y.

    2014-01-01

    Numerical dispersion performances of ADI-FDTD and S-FDTD methods have been compared. It has been shown that for time steps below the stability limits of the S-FDTD method it has much better dispersion performance compared with the ADI-FDTD method and that the S-FDTD method can be usefully employed for space increments in the order of l/25 to l/50.

  10. Maxwell Air Force Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    most effective style of leadership. (Courtesy Photo, Air University Press) Air University Press Directory Maxwell Links Welcome Leadership Joint Land Use Study Heritage Pamphlet Maxwell Driving Tour (No releases 'A Discourse on Winning and Losing' "Developing Your Full Range of Leadership" focuses

  11. Maxwell's Multipole Vectors and the CMB

    OpenAIRE

    Weeks, Jeffrey R.

    2004-01-01

    The recently re-discovered multipole vector approach to understanding the harmonic decomposition of the cosmic microwave background traces its roots to Maxwell's Treatise on Electricity and Magnetism. Taking Maxwell's directional derivative approach as a starting point, the present article develops a fast algorithm for computing multipole vectors, with an exposition that is both simpler and better motivated than in the author's previous work. Tests show the resulting algorithm, coded up as a ...

  12. Comparison of errors and stability in FDTD and FVTD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Leuchtmann

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The methods of finite-difference time-domain (FDTD and finite-volume time-domain (FVTD are well known techniques for solving electromagnetic problems. While for FDTD a number of commercial codes is available there are only few based on FVTD. However, FVTD has advantages since it allows completely unstructured meshes. This paper 1. deals with the principle errors made in both approaches and 2. gives a theoretical comparison of the (local stability of an FVTD scheme as opposed to the conventional Yee-scheme commonly used in FDTD. Finally the principles of a new FVTD program is presented. Its capabilities are demonstrated by the field of an antenna array.

  13. FDTD simulations of forces on particles during holographic assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito, David C; Simpson, Stephen H; Hanna, Simon

    2008-03-03

    We present finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) calculations of the forces and torques on dielectric particles of various shapes, held in one or many Gaussian optical traps, as part of a study of the physical limitations involved in the construction of micro- and nanostructures using a dynamic holographic assembler (DHA). We employ a full 3-dimensional FDTD implementation, which includes a complete treatment of optical anisotropy. The Gaussian beams are sourced using a multipole expansion of a fifth order Davis beam. Force and torques are calculated for pairs of silica spheres in adjacent traps, for silica cylinders trapped by multiple beams and for oblate silica spheroids and calcite spheres in both linearly and circularly polarized beams. Comparisons are drawn between the magnitudes of the optical forces and the Van der Waals forces acting on the systems. The paper also considers the limitations of the FDTD approach when applied to optical trapping.

  14. Generation of an incident focused light pulse in FDTD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capoğlu, Ilker R; Taflove, Allen; Backman, Vadim

    2008-11-10

    A straightforward procedure is described for accurately creating an incident focused light pulse in the 3-D finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) electromagnetic simulation of the image space of an aplanatic converging lens. In this procedure, the focused light pulse is approximated by a finite sum of plane waves, and each plane wave is introduced into the FDTD simulation grid using the total-field/scattered-field (TF/SF) approach. The accuracy of our results is demonstrated by comparison with exact theoretical formulas.

  15. fdtd modelling of electromagnetic waves in stratified medium

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BRIAN

    The technique is an adaptation of the finite-difference time domain (FDTD) approach usually applied to ... as two coupled first order partial differential equations. The method is an initial value problem formulation, thus the solution at any future time depend explicitly on the ... borehole radar can be useful for mining as well.

  16. Global Modeling of Microwave Three Terminal Active Devices Using the FDTD Method

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mrabet, O. E; Essaaidi, M; Drissi, M'hamed

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a new approach for the global electromagnetic analysis of the three-Terminal active linear and nonlinear microwave circuits using the Finite-Difference Time Domain (FDTD) Method...

  17. Magnetic monopoles, Galilean invariance, and Maxwell's equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, F.S.

    1992-01-01

    Maxwell's equations have space reserved for magnetic monopoles. Whether or not they exist in our part of the universe, monopoles provide a useful didactic tool to help us recognize relations among Maxwell's equations less easily apparent in the approach followed by many introductory textbooks, wherein Coulomb's law, Biot and Savart's law, Ampere's law, Faraday's law, Maxwell's displacement current, etc., are introduced independently, ''as demanded by experiment.'' Instead a conceptual path that deduces all of Maxwell's equations from the near-minimal set of assumptions: (a) Inertial frames exist, in which Newton's laws hold, to a first approximation; (b) the laws of electrodynamics are Galilean invariant---i.e., they have the same form in every inertial frame, to a first approximation; (c) magnetic poles (as well as the usual electric charges) exist; (d) the complete Lorentz force on an electric charge is known; (e) the force on a monopole at rest is known; (f) the Coulomb-like field produced by a resting electric charge and by a resting monopole are known. Everything else is deduced. History is followed in the assumption that Newtonian mechanics have been discovered, but not special relativity. (Only particle velocities v much-lt c are considered.) This ends up with Maxwell's equations (Maxwell did not need special relativity, so why should we,) but facing Einstein's paradox, the solution of which is encapsulated in the Einstein velocity-addition formula

  18. Birefringent dispersive FDTD subgridding scheme

    OpenAIRE

    De Deckere, B; Van Londersele, Arne; De Zutter, Daniël; Vande Ginste, Dries

    2016-01-01

    A novel 2D finite difference time domain (FDTD) subgridding method is proposed, only subject to the Courant limit of the coarse grid. By making mu or epsilon inside the subgrid dispersive, unconditional stability is induced at the cost of a sparse, implicit set of update equations. By only adding dispersion along preferential directions, it is possible to dramatically reduce the rank of the matrix equation that needs to be solved.

  19. Comparative Study of FDTD-Adopted Numerical Algorithms for Kerr Nonlinearities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maksymov, Ivan S.; Sukhorukov, Andrey A.; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2011-01-01

    Accurate finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) modeling of optical pulse propagation in nonlinear media usually implies the use of auxiliary differential equation (ADE) techniques. The updating of electric field in full-vectorial 3-D ADE FDTD modeling of the optical Kerr effect and two-photon abso...... approaches. Such schemes can significantly reduce the CPU time for nonlinear computations, especially in 3-D models....

  20. Hybrid FDTD Analysis for Periodic On-Chip Terahertz (THZ) Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussein, Yasser A.; Spencer, James E.; /SLAC

    2005-06-07

    We present electromagnetic analysis and radiation efficiency calculations for on-chip terahertz (THz) structures based on a hybrid, finite-difference, time-domain (HFDTD) technique. The method employs the FDTD technique to calculate S-parameters for one cell of a periodic structure. The transmission ABCD matrix is then estimated and multiplied by itself n times to obtain the n-cell periodic structure ABCD parameters that are then converted back to S-parameters. Validation of the method is carried out by comparing the results of the hybrid technique with FDTD calculations of the entire periodic structure as well as with HFSS which all agree quite well. This procedure reduces the CPU-time and allows efficient design and optimization of periodic THz radiation sources. Future research will involve coupling of Maxwell's equations with a more detailed, physics-based transport model for higher-order effects.

  1. Self-consistent Maxwell-Bloch model of quantum-dot photonic-crystal-cavity lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartar, William; Mørk, Jesper; Hughes, Stephen

    2017-08-01

    We present a powerful computational approach to simulate the threshold behavior of photonic-crystal quantum-dot (QD) lasers. Using a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) technique, Maxwell-Bloch equations representing a system of thousands of statistically independent and randomly positioned two-level emitters are solved numerically. Phenomenological pure dephasing and incoherent pumping is added to the optical Bloch equations to allow for a dynamical lasing regime, but the cavity-mediated radiative dynamics and gain coupling of each QD dipole (artificial atom) is contained self-consistently within the model. These Maxwell-Bloch equations are implemented by using Lumerical's flexible material plug-in tool, which allows a user to define additional equations of motion for the nonlinear polarization. We implement the gain ensemble within triangular-lattice photonic-crystal cavities of various length N (where N refers to the number of missing holes), and investigate the cavity mode characteristics and the threshold regime as a function of cavity length. We develop effective two-dimensional model simulations which are derived after studying the full three-dimensional passive material structures by matching the cavity quality factors and resonance properties. We also demonstrate how to obtain the correct point-dipole radiative decay rate from Fermi's golden rule, which is captured naturally by the FDTD method. Our numerical simulations predict that the pump threshold plateaus around cavity lengths greater than N =9 , which we identify as a consequence of the complex spatial dynamics and gain coupling from the inhomogeneous QD ensemble. This behavior is not expected from simple rate-equation analysis commonly adopted in the literature, but is in qualitative agreement with recent experiments. Single-mode to multimode lasing is also observed, depending on the spectral peak frequency of the QD ensemble. Using a statistical modal analysis of the average decay rates, we also

  2. How to obtain the covariant form of Maxwell's equations from the continuity equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heras, Jose A

    2009-01-01

    The covariant Maxwell equations are derived from the continuity equation for the electric charge. This result provides an axiomatic approach to Maxwell's equations in which charge conservation is emphasized as the fundamental axiom underlying these equations

  3. How to obtain the covariant form of Maxwell's equations from the continuity equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heras, Jose A [Departamento de Ciencias Basicas, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Azcapotzalco, Av. San Pablo No. 180, Col. Reynosa, 02200, Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Departamento de Fisica y Matematicas, Universidad Iberoamericana, Prolongacion Paseo de la Reforma 880, Mexico D. F. 01210 (Mexico)

    2009-07-15

    The covariant Maxwell equations are derived from the continuity equation for the electric charge. This result provides an axiomatic approach to Maxwell's equations in which charge conservation is emphasized as the fundamental axiom underlying these equations.

  4. FDTD simulation of trapping nanowires with linearly polarized and radially polarized optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Wu, Xiaoping

    2011-10-10

    In this paper a model of the trapping force on nanowires is built by three dimensional finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) and Maxwell stress tensor methods, and the tightly focused laser beam is expressed by spherical vector wave functions (VSWFs). The trapping capacities on nanoscale-diameter nanowires are discussed in terms of a strongly focused linearly polarized beam and radially polarized beam. Simulation results demonstrate that the radially polarized beam has higher trapping efficiency on nanowires with higher refractive indices than linearly polarized beam.

  5. Calculation of the extinction cross section and lifetime of a gold nanoparticle using FDTD simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radhakrishnan, Archana; Murugesan, Dr V.

    2014-01-01

    The electromagnetic theory of light explains the behavior of light in most of the domains quite accurately. The problem arises when the exact solution of the Maxwell's equation is not present, in case of objects with arbitrary geometry. To find the extinction cross-section and lifetime of the gold nanoparticle, the software FDTD solutions 8.6 by Lumerical is employed. The extinction cross-sections and lifetimes of Gold nanospheres of different sizes and arrangements are studied using pulse lengths of the order of femtoseconds. The decay constant and other properties are compared. Further, the lifetimes are calculated using frequency and time domain calculations

  6. Calculation of the extinction cross section and lifetime of a gold nanoparticle using FDTD simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radhakrishnan, Archana, E-mail: anju.archana@gmail.com [B.Tech, Engineering Physics, National Institute Of Technology, Calicut (India); Murugesan, Dr V., E-mail: murugesh@serc.iisc.in [Assistant Professor, Supercomputer Education and Research Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore (India)

    2014-10-15

    The electromagnetic theory of light explains the behavior of light in most of the domains quite accurately. The problem arises when the exact solution of the Maxwell's equation is not present, in case of objects with arbitrary geometry. To find the extinction cross-section and lifetime of the gold nanoparticle, the software FDTD solutions 8.6 by Lumerical is employed. The extinction cross-sections and lifetimes of Gold nanospheres of different sizes and arrangements are studied using pulse lengths of the order of femtoseconds. The decay constant and other properties are compared. Further, the lifetimes are calculated using frequency and time domain calculations.

  7. El Dimoni de Maxwell

    OpenAIRE

    Monserrat, Bartomeu

    2010-01-01

    El dimoni de Maxwell és el resultat d'un experiment mental que va proposar el físic escocès James Clerk Maxwell (1831-1879), que si es complís amenaçaria la validesa de la segona llei de la termodinàmica. Segons aquest experiment, seria possible la transmissió de calor d'un cos a un altre de més calent sense cap altre canvi. S'hi ex- posen diverses solucions, que van des de la interacció entre la mesura i el sistema mesurat, fins a la teoria de la informació. Aquest article, origi...

  8. Mathematics and Maxwell's equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boozer, Allen H

    2010-01-01

    The universality of mathematics and Maxwell's equations is not shared by specific plasma models. Computations become more reliable, efficient and transparent if specific plasma models are used to obtain only the information that would otherwise be missing. Constraints of high universality, such as those from mathematics and Maxwell's equations, can be obscured or lost by integrated computations. Recognition of subtle constraints of high universality is important for (1) focusing the design of control systems for magnetic field errors in tokamaks from perturbations that have little effect on the plasma to those that do, (2) clarifying the limits of applicability to astrophysics of computations of magnetic reconnection in fields that have a double periodicity or have B-vector =0 on a surface, as in a Harris sheet. Both require a degree of symmetry not expected in natural systems. Mathematics and Maxwell's equations imply that neighboring magnetic field lines characteristically separate exponentially with distance along a line. This remarkably universal phenomenon has been largely ignored, though it defines a trigger for reconnection through a critical magnitude of exponentiation. These and other examples of the importance of making distinctions and understanding constraints of high universality are explained.

  9. FDTD subcell graphene model beyond the thin-film approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valuev, Ilya; Belousov, Sergei; Bogdanova, Maria; Kotov, Oleg; Lozovik, Yurii

    2017-01-01

    A subcell technique for calculation of optical properties of graphene with the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method is presented. The technique takes into account the surface conductivity of graphene which allows the correct calculation of its dispersive response for arbitrarily polarized incident waves interacting with the graphene. The developed technique is verified for a planar graphene sheet configuration against the exact analytical solution. Based on the same test case scenario, we also show that the subcell technique demonstrates a superior accuracy and numerical efficiency with respect to the widely used thin-film FDTD approach for modeling graphene. We further apply our technique to the simulations of a graphene metamaterial containing periodically spaced graphene strips (graphene strip-grating) and demonstrate good agreement with the available theoretical results.

  10. Electromagnetic simulation using the FDTD method

    CERN Document Server

    Sullivan, Dennis M

    2013-01-01

    A straightforward, easy-to-read introduction to the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) is one of the primary computational electrodynamics modeling techniques available. Since it is a time-domain method, FDTD solutions can cover a wide frequency range with a single simulation run and treat nonlinear material properties in a natural way. Written in a tutorial fashion, starting with the simplest programs and guiding the reader up from one-dimensional to the more complex, three-dimensional programs, this book provides a simple, yet comp

  11. FDTD Seismic Simulation of Moving Tracked Vehicle

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ketcham, Stephen

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the utility of a large finite-difference time domain (FDTD) simulation of seismic wave propagation from a spatially and time varying source that generically represents a moving tracked vehicle...

  12. FDTD-ANT User Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Martin L.

    1995-01-01

    This manual explains the theory and operation of the finite-difference time domain code FDTD-ANT developed by Analex Corporation at the NASA Lewis Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. This code can be used for solving electromagnetic problems that are electrically small or medium (on the order of 1 to 50 cubic wavelengths). Calculated parameters include transmission line impedance, relative effective permittivity, antenna input impedance, and far-field patterns in both the time and frequency domains. The maximum problem size may be adjusted according to the computer used. This code has been run on the DEC VAX and 486 PC's and on workstations such as the Sun Sparc and the IBM RS/6000.

  13. Complex-envelope alternating-direction-implicit FDTD method for simulating active photonic devices with semiconductor/solid-state media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gurpreet; Ravi, Koustuban; Wang, Qian; Ho, Seng-Tiong

    2012-06-15

    A complex-envelope (CE) alternating-direction-implicit (ADI) finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) approach to treat light-matter interaction self-consistently with electromagnetic field evolution for efficient simulations of active photonic devices is presented for the first time (to our best knowledge). The active medium (AM) is modeled using an efficient multilevel system of carrier rate equations to yield the correct carrier distributions, suitable for modeling semiconductor/solid-state media accurately. To include the AM in the CE-ADI-FDTD method, a first-order differential system involving CE fields in the AM is first set up. The system matrix that includes AM parameters is then split into two time-dependent submatrices that are then used in an efficient ADI splitting formula. The proposed CE-ADI-FDTD approach with AM takes 22% of the time as the approach of the corresponding explicit FDTD, as validated by semiconductor microdisk laser simulations.

  14. Three dimensional numerical modeling for ground penetrating radar using finite difference time domain (FDTD) method; Jikan ryoiki yugen sabunho ni yoru chika radar no sanjigen suchi modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanada, Y; Ashida, Y; Sassa, K [Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)

    1996-10-01

    3-D numerical modeling by FDTD method was studied for ground penetrating radar. Radar radiates electromagnetic wave, and determines the existence and distance of objects by reflection wave. Ground penetrating radar uses the above functions for underground surveys, however, its resolution and velocity analysis accuracy are problems. In particular, propagation characteristics of electromagnetic wave in media such as heterogeneous and anisotropic soil and rock are essential. The behavior of electromagnetic wave in the ground could be precisely reproduced by 3-D numerical modeling using FDTD method. FDTD method makes precise analysis in time domain and electric and magnetic fields possible by sequentially calculating the difference equation of Maxwell`s equation. Because of the high calculation efficiency of FDTD method, more precise complicated analysis can be expected by using the latest advanced computers. The numerical model and calculation example are illustrated for surface type electromagnetic pulse ground penetrating radar assuming the survey of steel pipes of 1m deep. 4 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Adjoint sensitivity analysis of plasmonic structures using the FDTD method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Ahmed, Osman S; Bakr, Mohamed H

    2014-05-15

    We present an adjoint variable method for estimating the sensitivities of arbitrary responses with respect to the parameters of dispersive discontinuities in nanoplasmonic devices. Our theory is formulated in terms of the electric field components at the vicinity of perturbed discontinuities. The adjoint sensitivities are computed using at most one extra finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation regardless of the number of parameters. Our approach is illustrated through the sensitivity analysis of an add-drop coupler consisting of a square ring resonator between two parallel waveguides. The computed adjoint sensitivities of the scattering parameters are compared with those obtained using the accurate but computationally expensive central finite difference approach.

  16. Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) Simulations Using Graphics Processors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adams, Samuel; Payne, Jason; Boppana, Rajendra

    2007-01-01

    .... This paper shows how GPUs can be used to greatly speedup FDTD simulations. The main objective is to leverage GPU processing power for FDTD update calculations and complete computationally expensive simulations in reasonable time...

  17. MAXWELL EQUATIONS FOR A GENERALISED LAGRANGIAN FUNCTIONAL ECUACIONES DE MAXWELL PARA UNA FUNCIONAL DE LAGRANGE GENERALIZADA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Torres-Silva

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with the problem of the construction of the Lagrange functional for an electromagnetic field. The generalised Maxwell equations for an electromagnetic field in free space are introduced. The main idea relies on the change of Lagrange function under the integral action. Usually, the Lagrange functional which describes the electromagnetic field is built with the quadrate of the electromagnetic field tensor . Such a quadrate term is the reason, from a mathematical point of view, for the linear form of the Maxwell equations in free space. The author does not make this assumption and nonlinear Maxwell equations are obtained. New material parameters of free space are established. The equations obtained are quite similar to the well-known Maxwell equations. The energy tensor of the electromagnetic field from a chiral approach to the Born Infeld Lagrangian is discussed in connection with the cosmological constant.Se aborda el problema de la construcción de la funcional de Lagrange de un campo electromagnético. Se introducen las ecuaciones generalizadas de Maxwell de un campo electromagnético en el espacio libre. La idea principal se basa en el cambio de función de Lagrange en virtud de la acción integral. Por lo general, la funcional de lagrange, que describe el campo electromagnético, se construye con el cuadrado del tensor de campo electromagnético. Ese término cuadrático es la razón, desde un punto de vista matemático, de la forma lineal de las ecuaciones de Maxwell en el espacio libre. Se obtienen las ecuaciones no lineales de Maxwell sin considerar esta suposición. Las ecuaciones de Maxwell obtenidas son bastante similares a las conocidas ecuaciones de Maxwell. Se analiza el tensor de energía del campo electromagnético en un enfoque quiral de la Lagrangiana de Born Infeld en relación con la constante cosmológica.

  18. A parallel graded-mesh FDTD algorithm for human-antenna interaction problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catarinucci, Luca; Tarricone, Luciano

    2009-01-01

    The finite difference time domain method (FDTD) is frequently used for the numerical solution of a wide variety of electromagnetic (EM) problems and, among them, those concerning human exposure to EM fields. In many practical cases related to the assessment of occupational EM exposure, large simulation domains are modeled and high space resolution adopted, so that strong memory and central processing unit power requirements have to be satisfied. To better afford the computational effort, the use of parallel computing is a winning approach; alternatively, subgridding techniques are often implemented. However, the simultaneous use of subgridding schemes and parallel algorithms is very new. In this paper, an easy-to-implement and highly-efficient parallel graded-mesh (GM) FDTD scheme is proposed and applied to human-antenna interaction problems, demonstrating its appropriateness in dealing with complex occupational tasks and showing its capability to guarantee the advantages of a traditional subgridding technique without affecting the parallel FDTD performance.

  19. Determination of the transmission coefficients for quantum structures using FDTD method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yangyang; Wang, Xiaoying; Sui, Wenquan

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop a simple method to incorporate quantum effect in traditional finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulators. Witch could make it possible to co-simulate systems include quantum structures and traditional components. In this paper, tunneling transmission coefficient is calculated by solving time-domain Schrödinger equation with a developed FDTD technique, called FDTD-S method. To validate the feasibility of the method, a simple resonant tunneling diode (RTD) structure model has been simulated using the proposed method. The good agreement between the numerical and analytical results proves its accuracy. The effectness and accuracy of this approach makes it a potential method for analysis and design of hybrid systems includes quantum structures and traditional components.

  20. Single realization stochastic FDTD for weak scattering waves in biological random media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Tengmeng; Taflove, Allen; Backman, Vadim

    2013-02-01

    This paper introduces an iterative scheme to overcome the unresolved issues presented in S-FDTD (stochastic finite-difference time-domain) for obtaining ensemble average field values recently reported by Smith and Furse in an attempt to replace the brute force multiple-realization also known as Monte-Carlo approach with a single-realization scheme. Our formulation is particularly useful for studying light interactions with biological cells and tissues having sub-wavelength scale features. Numerical results demonstrate that such a small scale variation can be effectively modeled with a random medium problem which when simulated with the proposed S-FDTD indeed produces a very accurate result.

  1. Lightning Return Stroke Current Analysis Using Electromagnetic Models and the 3D-FDTD Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaddour Arzag

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The three dimensions finite difference time domain method (3D-FDTD is employed to calculate lightning return stoke current distributions in a vertical lightning channel. The latter is excited at its bottom by a lumped current source above a flat perfectly conducting ground. In this study four lightning return stroke electromagnetic models are used. The calculating approach, which is based on Taflove formulation of the 3D-FDTD method combined to the UPML boundary conditions, is implemented on Matlab environment. For validation needs, the obtained lightning return stroke space and time distributions are compared with others taken from specialized literature.

  2. Maxwell's Enduring Legacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longair, Malcolm

    2016-07-01

    Preface; Acknowledgements; Figure credits; Part I. To 1874: 1. Physics in the nineteenth century; 2. Mathematics and physics in Cambridge in the nineteenth century; Part II. 1874 to 1879: 3. The Maxwell era; Part III. 1879 to 1884: 4. Rayleigh's Quinquennium; Part IV. 1884 to 1919: 5. The challenges facing J. J. Thomson; 6. The J. J. Thomson era, 1884-1900 - the electron; 7. The Thomson era, 1900-19 - atomic structure; Part V. 1919 to 1937: 8. Rutherford at McGill and Manchester Universities - new challenges in Cambridge; 9. The Rutherford era - the radioactivists; 10. Rutherford era - the seeds of the new physics; Part VI. 1938 to 1953: 11. Bragg and the war years; 12. Bragg and the post-war years; Part VII. 1953 to 1971: 13. The Mott era - an epoch of expansion; 14. The Mott era - radio astronomy and high energy physics; 15. The Mott era - the growth of condensed matter physics; Part VIII. 1971 to 1982: 16. The Pippard era - a new laboratory and a new vision; 17. The Pippard era - radio astronomy, high energy physics and laboratory astrophysics; 18. The Pippard era - condensed matter physics; Part IX. 1984 to 1995: 19. The Edwards era - a new epoch of expansion; 20. The Edwards era - new directions in condensed matter physics; 21. The Edwards era - high energy physics and radio astronomy; Part X. 1995 to present: 22. Towards the new millennium and beyond; 23. The evolution of the New Museums site; Notes; Bibliography; Author index; Index.

  3. FDTD simulation tools for UWB antenna analysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brocato, Robert Wesley

    2005-02-01

    This paper describes the development of a set of software tools useful for analyzing ultra-wideband (UWB) antennas and structures. These tools are used to perform finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulation of a conical antenna with continuous wave (CW) and UWB pulsed excitations. The antenna is analyzed using spherical coordinate-based FDTD equations that are derived from first principles. The simulation results for CW excitation are compared to simulation and measured results from published sources; the results for UWB excitation are new.

  4. FDTD simulation tools for UWB antenna analysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brocato, Robert Wesley

    2004-12-01

    This paper describes the development of a set of software tools useful for analyzing ultra-wideband (UWB) antennas and structures. These tools are used to perform finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulation of a conical antenna with continuous wave (CW) and UWB pulsed excitations. The antenna is analyzed using spherical coordinate-based FDTD equations that are derived from first principles. The simulation results for CW excitation are compared to simulation and measured results from published sources; the results for UWB excitation are new.

  5. Geology of Maxwell Montes, Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, J. W.; Campbell, D. B.; Peterfreund, A. R.; Zisk, S. A.

    1984-01-01

    Maxwell Montes represent the most distinctive topography on the surface of Venus, rising some 11 km above mean planetary radius. The multiple data sets of the Pioneer missing and Earth based radar observations to characterize Maxwell Montes are analyzed. Maxwell Montes is a porkchop shaped feature located at the eastern end of Lakshmi Planum. The main massif trends about North 20 deg West for approximately 1000 km and the narrow handle extends several hundred km West South-West WSW from the north end of the main massif, descending down toward Lakshmi Planum. The main massif is rectilinear and approximately 500 km wide. The southern and northern edges of Maxwell Montes coincide with major topographic boundaries defining the edge of Ishtar Terra.

  6. Modelling of bow-tie microstrip antennas using modified locally conformal FDTD method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    George, J.

    2000-01-01

    An analysis of bow-tie microstrip antennas is presented based on the use of the modified locally conformal finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. This approach enables the number of cells along the antenna length and width to be chosen independently of the antenna central width, which helps to

  7. FDTD modeling of thin impedance sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luebbers, Raymond J.; Kunz, Karl S.

    1991-01-01

    Thin sheets of resistive or dielectric material are commonly encountered in radar cross section calculations. Analysis of such sheets is simplified by using sheet impedances. In this paper it is shown that sheet impedances can be modeled easily and accurately using Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) methods.

  8. Coupling of the PISCES device modeler to a 3-D Maxwell FDTD solver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, V.A.; Jones, M.E.; Mason, R.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The authors show how PISCES-like semiconductor models can be joined non-invasively to finite difference time domain models for the calculation of coupled external electromagnetics. The method involves tricking the standard current boundary condition for the device model into accepting an effective parallel external capacitance. For nearly steady state device conditions the authors show the results for a transmission line-coupled PISCES diode to agree well with those for an ideal diode.

  9. Numerical comparison between Maxwell stress method and equivalent multipole approach for calculation of the dielectrophoretic force in single-cell traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales, Carlos; Lim, Kian Meng

    2005-06-01

    This paper presents detailed numerical calculations of the dielectrophoretic force in traps designed for single-cell trapping. A trap with eight planar electrodes is studied for spherical and ellipsoidal particles using the boundary element method (BEM). Multipolar approximations of orders one to three are compared with the full Maxwell stress tensor (MST) calculation of the electrical force on spherical particles. Ellipsoidal particles are also studied, but in their case only the dipolar approximation is available for comparison with the MST solution. The results show that a small number of multipolar terms need to be considered in order to obtain accurate results for spheres, even in the proximity of the electrodes, and that the full MST calculation is only required in the study of non-spherical particles.

  10. Conformal FDTD modeling of 3-D wake fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurgens, T.G.; Harfoush, F.A.

    1991-01-01

    Many computer codes have been written to model wake fields. Here the authors describe the use of the Conformal Finite Difference Time Domain (CFDTD) method to model the wake fields generated by a rigid beam traveling through various accelerating structures. The non-cylindrical symmetry of some of the problems considered here requires the use of a three dimensional code. In traditional FDTD codes, curved surfaces are approximated by rectangular steps. The errors introduced in wake field calculations by such an approximation can be reduced by increasing the mesh size, therefore increasing the cost of computing. Another approach, validated here, deforms Ampere and Faraday contours near a media interface so as to conform to the interface. These improvements so as to conform to the interface. These improvements to the FDTD method result in better accuracy of the fields at asymptotically no computational cost. This method is also capable of modeling thin wires as found in beam profile monitors, and slots and cracks as found in resistive wall monitors

  11. Study on the gain media with four energy level model using two dimensional FDTD method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Bo; Sun, Bingbing; Xue, Hui; Xiao, Feng [Key Laboratory of Intelligent Computing and Signal Processing, Anhui University, Hefei 230039 (China); Huang, Zhixiang, E-mail: zxhuang@ahu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Intelligent Computing and Signal Processing, Anhui University, Hefei 230039 (China); Wu, Xianliang, E-mail: xlwu@ahu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Intelligent Computing and Signal Processing, Anhui University, Hefei 230039 (China); Department of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Hefei Normal University, Hefei 230061 (China)

    2013-08-15

    A four energy level model is applied to the gain media, which shows possible application to the complex metamaterials system due to its amplification effect. The coupled equations named polarization equation, rate equations of electronic population and Maxwell's equations are used to describe the coupling between the atoms and electromagnetic wave. Population inversion and lasing threshold are investigated using numerical simulations based on a novel finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) treatment of the optical field. The validations of the method are also tested. The numerical results show the good agreement with the classic lasing theory. Our numerical model can be used as an efficient design tool for investigating novel physical phenomena for new laser devices.

  12. James Clerk Maxwell: Life and science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marston, Philip L.

    2016-01-01

    Maxwell's life and science are presented with an account of the progression of Maxwell's research on electromagnetic theory. This is appropriate for the International Year of Light and Light-based Technologies, 2015. Maxwell's own confidence in his 1865 electromagnetic theory of light is examined, along with some of the difficulties he faced and the difficulties faced by some of his followers. Maxwell's interest in radiation pressure and electromagnetic stress is addressed, as well as subsequent developments. Some of Maxwell's other contributions to physics are discussed with an emphasis on the kinetic and molecular theory of gases. Maxwell's theistic perspective on science is illustrated, accompanied by examples of perspectives on Maxwell and his science provided by his peers and accounts of his interactions with those peers. Appendices examine the peer review of Maxwell's 1865 electromagnetic theory paper and the naming of the Maxwell Garnett effective media approximation and provide various supplemental perspectives. From Maxwell's publications and correspondence there is evidence he had a high regard for Michael Faraday. Examples of Maxwell's contributions to electromagnetic terminology are noted. - Highlights: • Maxwell’s 1865 “Dynamical theory of the electromagnetic field” is examined. • Maxwell affirmed confidence in his electromagnetic wave theory in his 1873 Treatise. • Discussion includes views and unpublished correspondence of Maxwell's contemporaries. • His contemporaries noticed the depth and breadth of Maxwell’s thought. • Maxwell’s contemporaries noticed his theistic perspective concerning science.

  13. FDTD-based optical simulations methodology for CMOS image sensors pixels architecture and process optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirigoyen, Flavien; Crocherie, Axel; Vaillant, Jérôme M.; Cazaux, Yvon

    2008-02-01

    This paper presents a new FDTD-based optical simulation model dedicated to describe the optical performances of CMOS image sensors taking into account diffraction effects. Following market trend and industrialization constraints, CMOS image sensors must be easily embedded into even smaller packages, which are now equipped with auto-focus and short-term coming zoom system. Due to miniaturization, the ray-tracing models used to evaluate pixels optical performances are not accurate anymore to describe the light propagation inside the sensor, because of diffraction effects. Thus we adopt a more fundamental description to take into account these diffraction effects: we chose to use Maxwell-Boltzmann based modeling to compute the propagation of light, and to use a software with an FDTD-based (Finite Difference Time Domain) engine to solve this propagation. We present in this article the complete methodology of this modeling: on one hand incoherent plane waves are propagated to approximate a product-use diffuse-like source, on the other hand we use periodic conditions to limit the size of the simulated model and both memory and computation time. After having presented the correlation of the model with measurements we will illustrate its use in the case of the optimization of a 1.75μm pixel.

  14. Optical properties of ordered vertical arrays of multi-walled carbon nanotubes from FDTD simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Hua; Ruan, Xiulin; Fisher, Timothy S

    2010-03-15

    A finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method is used to model thermal radiative properties of vertical arrays of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT). Individual CNTs are treated as solid circular cylinders with an effective dielectric tensor. Consistent with experiments, the results confirm that CNT arrays are highly absorptive. Compared with the commonly used Maxwell-Garnett theory, the FDTD calculations generally predict larger reflectance and absorbance, and smaller transmittance, which are attributed to the diffraction and scattering within the cylinder array structure. The effects of volume fraction, tube length, tube distance, and incident angle on radiative properties are investigated systematically. Low volume fraction and long tubes are more favorable to achieve low reflectance and high absorbance. For a fixed volume fraction and finite tube length, larger periodicity results in larger reflectance and absorbance. The angular dependence studies reveal an optimum incident angle at which the reflectance can be minimized. The results also suggest that an even darker material could be achieved by using CNTs with good alignment on the top surface.

  15. Compound FDTD method for silicon photonics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Olyaee

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Attempt to manufacture photonics devices on silicon requires theoretical and numerical prediction. This essay presents Compound FDTD (C-FDTD method for comprehensive simulation of silicon photonics devices. Although this method is comprehensive, it maintains conventional Yee algorithm. The method involves variation of refractive index due to nonlinear effects. With the help of this simulator, refractive index change due to free-carriers created through two photon absorption and Kerr effect in silicon waveguide is considered. Results indicate how to choose pump pulse shape to optimum operation of active photonics devices. Also conductivity variation of Si waveguide due to change in free-carrier density is studied. By considering variations in conductivity profile, we are able to design better schemes for sweep free carriers away with reverse bias or nonlinear photovoltaic effect for fast devices and Raman amplifiers.

  16. Minimizing Dispersion in FDTD Methods with CFL Limit Extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chen

    The CFL extension in FDTD methods is receiving considerable attention in order to reduce the computational effort and save the simulation time. One of the major issues in the CFL extension methods is the increased dispersion. We formulate a decomposition of FDTD equations to study the behaviour of the dispersion. A compensation scheme to reduce the dispersion in CFL extension is constructed and proposed. We further study the CFL extension in a FDTD subgridding case, where we improve the accuracy by acting only on the FDTD equations of the fine grid. Numerical results confirm the efficiency of the proposed method for minimising dispersion.

  17. 21 CFR 886.1435 - Maxwell spot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Maxwell spot. 886.1435 Section 886.1435 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1435 Maxwell spot. (a) Identification. A Maxwell spot is an AC...

  18. FDTD simulation of exposure of biological material to electromagnetic nanopulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simicevic, Neven [Center for Applied Physics Studies, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States); Haynie, Donald T [Center for Applied Physics Studies and Biomedical Engineering, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States)

    2005-01-21

    Ultra-wideband (UWB) electromagnetic pulses of nanosecond duration, or nanopulses, are of considerable interest to the communications industry and are being explored for various applications in biotechnology and medicine. The propagation of a nanopulse through biological matter has been computed using the finite difference-time domain (FDTD) method. The approach required the reparametrization of existing Cole-Cole model-based descriptions of dielectric properties of biological matter in terms of the Debye model without loss of accuracy. Several tissue types have been considered. Results show that the electromagnetic field inside biological tissue depends on incident pulse rise time and width. Rise time dominates pulse behaviour inside tissue as conductivity increases. It has also been found that the amount of energy deposited by 20 kV m{sup -1} nanopulses is insufficient to change the temperature of the exposed material for pulse repetition rates of 1 MHz or less, consistent with recent experimental results.

  19. An Extended Newmark-FDTD Method for Complex Dispersive Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Qiang Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on polarizability in the form of a complex quadratic rational function, a novel finite-difference time-domain (FDTD approach combined with the Newmark algorithm is presented for dealing with a complex dispersive medium. In this paper, the time-stepping equation of the polarization vector is derived by applying simultaneously the Newmark algorithm to the two sides of a second-order time-domain differential equation obtained from the relation between the polarization vector and electric field intensity in the frequency domain by the inverse Fourier transform. Then, its accuracy and stability are discussed from the two aspects of theoretical analysis and numerical computation. It is observed that this method possesses the advantages of high accuracy, high stability, and a wide application scope and can thus be applied to the treatment of many complex dispersion models, including the complex conjugate pole residue model, critical point model, modified Lorentz model, and complex quadratic rational function.

  20. Calibration of ultra-high frequency (UHF) partial discharge sensors using FDTD method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishak, Asnor Mazuan; Ishak, Mohd Taufiq

    2018-02-01

    Ultra-high frequency (UHF) partial discharge sensors are widely used for conditioning monitoring and defect location in insulation system of high voltage equipment. Designing sensors for specific applications often requires an iterative process of manufacturing, testing and mechanical modifications. This paper demonstrates the use of finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) technique as a tool to predict the frequency response of UHF PD sensors. Using this approach, the design process can be simplified and parametric studies can be conducted in order to assess the influence of component dimensions and material properties on the sensor response. The modelling approach is validated using gigahertz transverse electromagnetic (GTEM) calibration system. The use of a transient excitation source is particularly suitable for modeling using FDTD, which is able to simulate the step response output voltage of the sensor from which the frequency response is obtained using the same post-processing applied to the physical measurement.

  1. An FDTD code for hyperthermia treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marrocco, G.; Bardati, F. [Rome Univ. Tor Vergata (Italy). Dipt. di Informatica, sistemi e produzione; Tognolatti, P. [L' Aquila Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Ingegneria Elettrica

    1999-08-01

    Radio-frequency hyperthermia is an anticancer modality based on the heating of tumours by radiating sources. A set of antennas is frequently used to enhance power depositions in tissues. Treatments planning needs electromagnetic field computation within realistic body models. Since several simulation may be required the optimize the antenna-body configuration, the electromagnetic solver should be designed in such a way that new configuration of the antenna set-up can be solved without heavy changes of the basic numerical code. In this paper a numerical investigation on the effects of a segmentation technique will be presented, with reference to an FDTD computation and the heating of a paediatric tumour.

  2. FD-TD modeling of 2-D dielectric waveguides for propagation and scattering of femtosecond optical solitons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Rose; Goorjian, Peter; Taflove, Allen

    1993-01-01

    Experimentalists have produced all-optical switches capable of 100-fs responses. To adequately model such switches, nonlinear effects in optical materials (both instantaneous and dispersive) must be included. In principle, the behavior of electromagnetic fields in nonlinear dielectrics can be determined by solving Maxwell's equations subject to the assumption that the electric polarization has a nonlinear relation to the electric field. However, until our previous work, the resulting nonlinear Maxwell's equations have not been solved directly. Rather, approximations have been made that result in a class of generalized nonlinear Schrodinger equations (GNLSE) that solve only for the envelope of the optical pulses. In this paper, we present first-time calculations from the vector nonlinear Maxwell's equations of femtosecond soliton propagation and scattering, including carrier waves, in two-dimensional systems of dielectric waveguides exhibiting the Kerr and Raman quantum effects. We use the finite-difference time-domain (FD-TD) method in an extension of our 1-D work. There, in a fundamental innovation, we treated the linear and nonlinear convolutions for the electric polarization as new dependent variables. By differentiating these convolutions in the time domain, we derived an equivalent system of coupled, nonlinear second-order ODE's. These equations together with Maxwell's equations form the system that is solved to determine the electromagnetic fields in inhomogeneous nonlinear dispersive media. Backstorage in time is limited to only that needed by the time-integration algorithm for the ODE's, rather than that needed to store the time-history of the kernel functions of the convolutions (1000-10,000 time steps). Thus, a 2-D nonlinear optics model from Maxwell's equations is now feasible.

  3. Flow cytometry with gold nanoparticlesand their clusters as scattering contrast agents: FDTD simulation of light-cell interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanev, Stoyan; Sun, Wenbo; Pond, James

    2009-01-01

    refractive index matching conditions and by cells labeled by gold nanoparticles. The optical schematics including phase contrast (OPCM) microscopy as a prospective modality for in vivo flow cytometry is also analyzed. The validation of the FDTD approach for the simulation of flow cytometry may open a new...

  4. A PML-FDTD ALGORITHM FOR SIMULATING PLASMA-COVERED CAVITY-BACKED SLOT ANTENNAS. (R825225)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A three-dimensional frequency-dependent finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) algorithm with perfectly matched layer (PML) absorbing boundary condition (ABC) and recursive convolution approaches is developed to model plasma-covered open-ended waveguide or cavity-backed slot antenn...

  5. Reading Maxwell in Conceptual Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonham, Scott W.

    2018-05-01

    An important aspect of science education involves helping students learn to read and communicate scientific information and arguments. In this note, I would like to share a resource that I have come across which I have found to be a useful tool for helping students improve those skills, learn content material, and acquaint them with a great scientist. Specifically, this is having non-science college students in my course Light, Color and Vision read and discuss a letter by James Clerk Maxwell entitled "On the Theory of Colours in Relation to Colour-Blindness" (see Fig. 1).

  6. Advanced FDTD methods parallelization, acceleration, and engineering applications

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Wenhua

    2011-01-01

    The finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method has revolutionized antenna design and electromagnetics engineering. Here's a cutting-edge book that focuses on the performance optimization and engineering applications of FDTD simulation systems. Covering the latest developments in this area, this unique resource offer you expert advice on the FDTD method, hardware platforms, and network systems. Moreover the book offers guidance in distinguishing between the many different electromagnetics software packages on the market today. You also find a complete chapter dedicated to large multi-scale pro

  7. Generalized Sheet Transition Condition FDTD Simulation of Metasurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahabzadeh, Yousef; Chamanara, Nima; Caloz, Christophe

    2018-01-01

    We propose an FDTD scheme based on Generalized Sheet Transition Conditions (GSTCs) for the simulation of polychromatic, nonlinear and space-time varying metasurfaces. This scheme consists in placing the metasurface at virtual nodal plane introduced between regular nodes of the staggered Yee grid and inserting fields determined by GSTCs in this plane in the standard FDTD algorithm. The resulting update equations are an elegant generalization of the standard FDTD equations. Indeed, in the limiting case of a null surface susceptibility ($\\chi_\\text{surf}=0$), they reduce to the latter, while in the next limiting case of a time-invariant metasurface $[\\chi_\\text{surf}\

  8. Hybrid transfer-matrix FDTD method for layered periodic structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deinega, Alexei; Belousov, Sergei; Valuev, Ilya

    2009-03-15

    A hybrid transfer-matrix finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method is proposed for modeling the optical properties of finite-width planar periodic structures. This method can also be applied for calculation of the photonic bands in infinite photonic crystals. We describe the procedure of evaluating the transfer-matrix elements by a special numerical FDTD simulation. The accuracy of the new method is tested by comparing computed transmission spectra of a 32-layered photonic crystal composed of spherical or ellipsoidal scatterers with the results of direct FDTD and layer-multiple-scattering calculations.

  9. A hybrid FDTD-Rayleigh integral computational method for the simulation of the ultrasound measurement of proximal femur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassereau, Didier; Nauleau, Pierre; Bendjoudi, Aniss; Minonzio, Jean-Gabriel; Laugier, Pascal; Bossy, Emmanuel; Grimal, Quentin

    2014-07-01

    The development of novel quantitative ultrasound (QUS) techniques to measure the hip is critically dependent on the possibility to simulate the ultrasound propagation. One specificity of hip QUS is that ultrasounds propagate through a large thickness of soft tissue, which can be modeled by a homogeneous fluid in a first approach. Finite difference time domain (FDTD) algorithms have been widely used to simulate QUS measurements but they are not adapted to simulate ultrasonic propagation over long distances in homogeneous media. In this paper, an hybrid numerical method is presented to simulate hip QUS measurements. A two-dimensional FDTD simulation in the vicinity of the bone is coupled to the semi-analytic calculation of the Rayleigh integral to compute the wave propagation between the probe and the bone. The method is used to simulate a setup dedicated to the measurement of circumferential guided waves in the cortical compartment of the femoral neck. The proposed approach is validated by comparison with a full FDTD simulation and with an experiment on a bone phantom. For a realistic QUS configuration, the computation time is estimated to be sixty times less with the hybrid method than with a full FDTD approach. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Fractional vector calculus and fractional Maxwell's equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarasov, Vasily E.

    2008-01-01

    The theory of derivatives and integrals of non-integer order goes back to Leibniz, Liouville, Grunwald, Letnikov and Riemann. The history of fractional vector calculus (FVC) has only 10 years. The main approaches to formulate a FVC, which are used in the physics during the past few years, will be briefly described in this paper. We solve some problems of consistent formulations of FVC by using a fractional generalization of the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. We define the differential and integral vector operations. The fractional Green's, Stokes' and Gauss's theorems are formulated. The proofs of these theorems are realized for simplest regions. A fractional generalization of exterior differential calculus of differential forms is discussed. Fractional nonlocal Maxwell's equations and the corresponding fractional wave equations are considered

  11. Geometric Implications of Maxwell's Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Felix T.

    2015-03-01

    Maxwell's synthesis of the varied results of the accumulated knowledge of electricity and magnetism, based largely on the searching insights of Faraday, still provide new issues to explore. A case in point is a well recognized anomaly in the Maxwell equations: The laws of electricity and magnetism require two 3-vector and two scalar equations, but only six dependent variables are available to be their solutions, the 3-vectors E and B. This leaves an apparent redundancy of two degrees of freedom (J. Rosen, AJP 48, 1071 (1980); Jiang, Wu, Povinelli, J. Comp. Phys. 125, 104 (1996)). The observed self-consistency of the eight equations suggests that they contain additional information. This can be sought as a previously unnoticed constraint connecting the space and time variables, r and t. This constraint can be identified. It distorts the otherwise Euclidean 3-space of r with the extremely slight, time dependent curvature k (t) =Rcurv-2 (t) of the 3-space of a hypersphere whose radius has the time dependence dRcurv / dt = +/- c nonrelativistically, or dRcurvLor / dt = +/- ic relativistically. The time dependence is exactly that of the Hubble expansion. Implications of this identification will be explored.

  12. SO-FDTD analysis of anisotropic magnetized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Hongwei; Nanjing Univ. of Science and Technology, Nanjing; Yuan Hong; Chen Rushan; Yang Yang

    2007-01-01

    A novel finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, called shift operator FDTD (SO-FDTD) method is developed for anisotropic magnetized dispersive media. The recursive relation between operators is used. In this paper, some expressions containing the dielectric constants of magnetized dispersive media are written as rational polynomial function. The SO-FDTD formulation for anisotropic magnetized plasma is derived. The high efficiency and effectiveness of the method are confirmed by computing the reflection and transmission through a magnetized plasma layer, with the direction of the propagation parallel to the direction of the biasing field. A comparison with frequency domain analytic results is included. The CPU time was several times shorter than that of the JEC method. (authors)

  13. FDTD simulation for plasma photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Shaobin; Zhu Chuanxi; Yuan Naichang

    2005-01-01

    Plasma photonic crystals are artificially periodic structures, which are composed of plasmas and dielectric structures (or vacuum). In this paper, the piecewise linear current density recursive convolution (PLCDRC) finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method is applied to study the plasma photonic crystals and those containing defects. In time-domain, the electromagnetic (EM) propagation process and reflection/transmission electric field of Gauss pulses passing through the plasma photonic crystals are investigated. In frequency-domain, the reflection and transmission coefficients of the pulses through the two kinds of crystals are computed. The results illustrate that the plasma photonic crystals mostly reflect for the EM wave of frequencies less than the plasma frequency, and mostly transmit for EM wave of frequencies higher than the plasma frequency. In high frequency domain, the plasma photonic crystals have photonic band gaps, which is analogous to the conventional photonic crystals. (authors)

  14. RCS modeling with the TSAR FDTD code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennock, S.T.; Ray, S.L.

    1992-03-01

    The TSAR electromagnetic modeling system consists of a family of related codes that have been designed to work together to provide users with a practical way to set up, run, and interpret the results from complex 3-D finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) electromagnetic simulations. The software has been in development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and at other sites since 1987. Active internal use of the codes began in 1988 with limited external distribution and use beginning in 1991. TSAR was originally developed to analyze high-power microwave and EMP coupling problems. However, the general-purpose nature of the tools has enabled us to use the codes to solve a broader class of electromagnetic applications and has motivated the addition of new features. In particular a family of near-to-far field transformation routines have been added to the codes, enabling TSAR to be used for radar-cross section and antenna analysis problems.

  15. Unconditionally stable integration of Maxwell's equations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.G. Verwer (Jan); M.A. Botchev

    2008-01-01

    htmlabstractNumerical integration of Maxwell''s equations is often based on explicit methods accepting a stability step size restriction. In literature evidence is given that there is also a need for unconditionally stable methods, as exemplified by the successful alternating direction

  16. New family of Maxwell like algebras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concha, P.K.; Durka, R.; Merino, N.; Rodríguez, E.K.

    2016-01-01

    We introduce an alternative way of closing Maxwell like algebras. We show, through a suitable change of basis, that resulting algebras are given by the direct sums of the AdS and the Maxwell algebras already known in the literature. Casting the result into the S-expansion method framework ensures the straightaway construction of the gravity theories based on a found enlargement.

  17. New family of Maxwell like algebras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Concha, P.K., E-mail: patillusion@gmail.com [Departamento de Ciencias, Facultad de Artes y Facultad de Ingeniería y Ciencias, Universidad Adolfo Ibáñez, Av. Padre Hurtado 750, Viña del Mar (Chile); Instituto de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad Austral de Chile, Casilla 567, Valdivia (Chile); Durka, R., E-mail: remigiuszdurka@gmail.com [Instituto de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Casilla 4059, Valparaíso (Chile); Merino, N., E-mail: nemerino@gmail.com [Instituto de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Casilla 4059, Valparaíso (Chile); Rodríguez, E.K., E-mail: everodriguezd@gmail.com [Departamento de Ciencias, Facultad de Artes y Facultad de Ingeniería y Ciencias, Universidad Adolfo Ibáñez, Av. Padre Hurtado 750, Viña del Mar (Chile); Instituto de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad Austral de Chile, Casilla 567, Valdivia (Chile)

    2016-08-10

    We introduce an alternative way of closing Maxwell like algebras. We show, through a suitable change of basis, that resulting algebras are given by the direct sums of the AdS and the Maxwell algebras already known in the literature. Casting the result into the S-expansion method framework ensures the straightaway construction of the gravity theories based on a found enlargement.

  18. Transition analysis of magnetic recording heads using FDTD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, Shinji

    2001-01-01

    Transition waveforms of a magnetic recording head have been analyzed using finite difference time domain (FDTD). The distributed inductance and capacitance of the head effect the rising time of the magnetic fields in the recording process. FDTD electromagnetic analysis is easy to combine with SPICE circuit analysis. Using this combined program, a transition analysis of the recording process including a write amplifier has become possible

  19. Transition analysis of magnetic recording heads using FDTD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanabe, Shinji E-mail: tanabe@ele.crl.melco.co.jp

    2001-10-01

    Transition waveforms of a magnetic recording head have been analyzed using finite difference time domain (FDTD). The distributed inductance and capacitance of the head effect the rising time of the magnetic fields in the recording process. FDTD electromagnetic analysis is easy to combine with SPICE circuit analysis. Using this combined program, a transition analysis of the recording process including a write amplifier has become possible.

  20. Maxwell superalgebras and Abelian semigroup expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.K. Concha

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The Abelian semigroup expansion is a powerful and simple method to derive new Lie algebras from a given one. Recently it was shown that the S-expansion of so(3,2 leads us to the Maxwell algebra M. In this paper we extend this result to superalgebras, by proving that different choices of abelian semigroups S lead to interesting D=4 Maxwell Superalgebras. In particular, the minimal Maxwell superalgebra sM and the N-extended Maxwell superalgebra sM(N recently found by the Maurer–Cartan expansion procedure, are derived alternatively as an S-expansion of osp(4|N. Moreover, we show that new minimal Maxwell superalgebras type sMm+2 and their N-extended generalization can be obtained using the S-expansion procedure.

  1. Maxwell superalgebras and Abelian semigroup expansion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Concha, P.K.; Rodríguez, E.K. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Concepción, Casilla 160-C, Concepción (Chile); Dipartimento di Scienza Applicata e Tecnologia (DISAT), Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Sezione di Torino, Via Pietro Giuria, 1, 10125 Torino (Italy)

    2014-09-15

    The Abelian semigroup expansion is a powerful and simple method to derive new Lie algebras from a given one. Recently it was shown that the S-expansion of so(3,2) leads us to the Maxwell algebra M. In this paper we extend this result to superalgebras, by proving that different choices of abelian semigroups S lead to interesting D=4 Maxwell Superalgebras. In particular, the minimal Maxwell superalgebra sM and the N-extended Maxwell superalgebra sM{sup (N)} recently found by the Maurer–Cartan expansion procedure, are derived alternatively as an S-expansion of osp(4|N). Moreover, we show that new minimal Maxwell superalgebras type sM{sub m+2} and their N-extended generalization can be obtained using the S-expansion procedure.

  2. Maxwell iteration for the lattice Boltzmann method with diffusive scaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Weifeng; Yong, Wen-An

    2017-03-01

    In this work, we present an alternative derivation of the Navier-Stokes equations from Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook models of the lattice Boltzmann method with diffusive scaling. This derivation is based on the Maxwell iteration and can expose certain important features of the lattice Boltzmann solutions. Moreover, it will be seen to be much more straightforward and logically clearer than the existing approaches including the Chapman-Enskog expansion.

  3. Mathematical and numerical methods for Vlasov-Maxwell equations: the contributions of data mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assous, F.; Chaskalovic, J.

    2014-01-01

    There exist a lot of formulations that can model plasma physics or particle accelerators problems as the Vlasov- Maxwell equations. This paper deals with the applications of data mining techniques in the evaluation of numerical solutions of Vlasov-Maxwell models. This is part of the topic of characterizing the model and approximation errors via learning techniques. We give two examples of application. The first one aims at comparing two Vlasov-Maxwell approximate models. In the second one, a scheme based on data mining techniques is proposed to characterize the errors between a P1 and a P2 finite element Particle-In-Cell approach. Beyond these examples, this original approach should operate in all cases where intricate numerical simulations like for the Vlasov-Maxwell equations take a central part. (authors)

  4. New high order FDTD method to solve EMC problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Deymier

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In electromagnetic compatibility (EMC context, we are interested in developing new ac- curate methods to solve efficiently and accurately Maxwell’s equations in the time domain. Indeed, usual methods such as FDTD or FVTD present im- portant dissipative and/or dispersive errors which prevent to obtain a good numerical approximation of the physical solution for a given industrial scene unless we use a mesh with a very small cell size. To avoid this problem, schemes like the Discontinuous Galerkin (DG method, based on higher order spa- tial approximations, have been introduced and stud- ied on unstructured meshes. However the cost of this kind of method can become prohibitive accord- ing to the mesh used. In this paper, we first present a higher order spatial approximation method on carte- sian meshes. It is based on a finite element ap- proach and recovers at the order 1 the well-known Yee’s schema. Next, to deal with EMC problem, a non-oriented thin wire formalism is proposed for this method. Finally, several examples are given to present the benefits of this new method by compar- ison with both Yee’s schema and DG approaches.

  5. J ames Clerk Maxwell and his Equations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    standing importance in the development of physical ideas. Maxwell has been ... mathematics teacher was William Hopkins, the famous 'Wran- ... union (like Faraday's) was child- ... bility or to use any influence when he unsuccessfully tried for.

  6. FDTD technique based crosstalk analysis of bundled SWCNT interconnects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duksh, Yograj Singh; Kaushik, Brajesh Kumar; Agarwal, Rajendra P.

    2015-01-01

    The equivalent electrical circuit model of a bundled single-walled carbon nanotube based distributed RLC interconnects is employed for the crosstalk analysis. The accurate time domain analysis and crosstalk effect in the VLSI interconnect has emerged as an essential design criteria. This paper presents a brief description of the numerical method based finite difference time domain (FDTD) technique that is intended for estimation of voltages and currents on coupled transmission lines. For the FDTD implementation, the stability of the proposed model is strictly restricted by the Courant condition. This method is used for the estimation of crosstalk induced propagation delay and peak voltage in lossy RLC interconnects. Both functional and dynamic crosstalk effects are analyzed in the coupled transmission line. The effect of line resistance on crosstalk induced delay, and peak voltage under dynamic and functional crosstalk is also evaluated. The FDTD analysis and the SPICE simulations are carried out at 32 nm technology node for the global interconnects. It is observed that the analytical results obtained using the FDTD technique are in good agreement with the SPICE simulation results. The crosstalk induced delay, propagation delay, and peak voltage obtained using the FDTD technique shows average errors of 4.9%, 3.4% and 0.46%, respectively, in comparison to SPICE. (paper)

  7. Effective Permittivity for FDTD Calculation of Plasmonic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James B. Cole

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a new effective permittivity (EP model to accurately calculate surface plasmons (SPs using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD method. The computational representation of physical structures with curved interfaces causes inherent errors in FDTD calculations, especially when the numerical grid is coarse. Conventional EP models improve the errors, but they are not effective for SPs because the SP resonance condition determined by the original permittivity is changed by the interpolated EP values. We perform FDTD simulations using the proposed model for an infinitely-long silver cylinder and gold sphere, and the results are compared with Mie theory. Our model gives better accuracy than the conventional staircase and EP models for SPs.

  8. GPU accelerated FDTD solver and its application in MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, J; Liu, F; Jin, J; Mason, D G; Crozier, S

    2010-01-01

    The finite difference time domain (FDTD) method is a popular technique for computational electromagnetics (CEM). The large computational power often required, however, has been a limiting factor for its applications. In this paper, we will present a graphics processing unit (GPU)-based parallel FDTD solver and its successful application to the investigation of a novel B1 shimming scheme for high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The optimized shimming scheme exhibits considerably improved transmit B(1) profiles. The GPU implementation dramatically shortened the runtime of FDTD simulation of electromagnetic field compared with its CPU counterpart. The acceleration in runtime has made such investigation possible, and will pave the way for other studies of large-scale computational electromagnetic problems in modern MRI which were previously impractical.

  9. FDTD modeling of EM field inside microwave cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Narayan, Shiv; Kanth, V Krushna

    2017-01-01

    This book deals with the EM analysis of closed microwave cavities based on a three-dimensional FDTD method. The EM analysis is carried out for (i) rectangular microwave ovens and (ii) hybrid-cylindrical microwave autoclaves at 2.45 GHz. The field distribution is first estimated inside domestic rectangular ovens in xy-, yz-, and zx-plane. Further, the RF leakage from the oven door is determined to study the effect of leakage radiation on wireless communication at 2.45 GHz. Furthermore, the EM analysis of the autoclave is carried out based on 3D FDTD using staircase approximation. In order to show the capability of autoclaves (excited with five source) for curing the aerospace components and materials, the field distribution inside autoclave cavity is studied in presence of aerospace samples. The FDTD based modelling of oven and autoclave are explained with the appropriate expressions and illustrations.

  10. Flow cytometry with gold nanoparticles and their clusters as scattering contrast agents: FDTD simulation of light-cell interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanev, Stoyan; Sun, Wenbo; Pond, James; Tuchin, Valery V; Zharov, Vladimir P

    2009-09-01

    The formulation of the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) approach is presented in the framework of its potential applications to in-vivo flow cytometry based on light scattering. The consideration is focused on comparison of light scattering by a single biological cell alone in controlled refractive-index matching conditions and by cells labeled by gold nanoparticles. The optical schematics including phase contrast (OPCM) microscopy as a prospective modality for in-vivo flow cytometry is also analyzed. The validation of the FDTD approach for the simulation of flow cytometry may open up a new avenue in the development of advanced cytometric techniques based on scattering effects from nanoscale targets. 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim

  11. Numerical Simulation of Plasma Antenna with FDTD Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, Liang; Yue-Min, Xu; Zhi-Jiang, Wang

    2008-01-01

    We adopt cylindrical-coordinate FDTD algorithm to simulate and analyse a 0.4-m-long column configuration plasma antenna. FDTD method is useful for solving electromagnetic problems, especially when wave characteristics and plasma properties are self-consistently related to each other. Focus on the frequency from 75 MHz to 400 MHz, the input impedance and radiation efficiency of plasma antennas are computed. Numerical results show that, different from copper antenna, the characteristics of plasma antenna vary simultaneously with plasma frequency and collision frequency. The property can be used to construct dynamically reconBgurable antenna. The investigation is meaningful and instructional for the optimization of plasma antenna design

  12. Numerical simulation of plasma antenna with FDTD method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Chao; Xu Yuemin; Wang Zhijiang

    2008-01-01

    We adopt cylindrical-coordinate FDTD algorithm to simulate and analyse a 0.4-m-long column configuration plasma antenna. FDTD method is useful for solving electromagnetic problems, especially when wave characteristics and plasma properties are self-consistently related to each other. Focus on the frequency from 75 MHz to 400 MHz, the input impedance and radiation efficiency of plasma antennas are computed. Numerical results show that, different from copper antenna, the characteristics of plasma antenna vary simultaneously with plasma frequency and collision frequency. The property can be used to construct dynamically reconfigurable antenna. The investigation is meaningful and instructional for the optimization of plasma antenna design. (authors)

  13. Effects of geometry discretization aspects on the numerical solution of the bioheat transfer equation with the FDTD technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samaras, T; Christ, A; Kuster, N [Department of Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Foundation for Research on Information Technologies in Society (IT' IS Foundation), Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH), CH-8004 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2006-06-07

    In this work, we highlight two issues that have to be taken into consideration for accurate thermal modelling with the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, namely the tissue interfaces and the staircasing effect. The former appears less critical in the overall accuracy of the results, whereas the latter may have an influence on the worst-case approach used in numerical dosimetry of non-ionizing radiation. (note)

  14. Effects of geometry discretization aspects on the numerical solution of the bioheat transfer equation with the FDTD technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samaras, T; Christ, A; Kuster, N

    2006-01-01

    In this work, we highlight two issues that have to be taken into consideration for accurate thermal modelling with the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, namely the tissue interfaces and the staircasing effect. The former appears less critical in the overall accuracy of the results, whereas the latter may have an influence on the worst-case approach used in numerical dosimetry of non-ionizing radiation. (note)

  15. Supersymmetrization schemes of D=4 Maxwell algebra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamimura, Kiyoshi; Lukierski, Jerzy

    2012-01-01

    The Maxwell algebra, an enlargement of Poincaré algebra by Abelian tensorial generators, can be obtained in arbitrary dimension D by the suitable contraction of O(D-1,1)⊕O(D-1,2) (Lorentz algebra ⊕ AdS algebra). We recall that in D=4 the Lorentz algebra O(3,1) is described by the realification Sp R (2|C) of complex algebra Sp(2|C)≃Sl(2|C) and O(3,2)≃Sp(4). We study various D=4N-extended Maxwell superalgebras obtained by the contractions of real superalgebras OSp R (2N-k;2|C)⊕OSp(k;4) (k=0,1,2,…,2N); (extended Lorentz superalgebra ⊕ extended AdS superalgebra). If N=1 (k=0,1,2) one arrives at three different versions of simple Maxwell superalgebra. For any fixed N we get 2N different superextensions of Maxwell algebra with n-extended Poincaré superalgebras (1⩽n⩽N) and the internal symmetry sectors obtained by suitable contractions of the real algebra O R (2N-k|C)⊕O(k). Finally the comments on possible applications of Maxwell superalgebras are presented.

  16. The free Maxwell field in curved spacetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kueskue, M.

    2001-09-01

    The aim of this thesis is to discuss quantizations of the free Maxwell field in flat and curved spacetimes. First we introduce briefly some notions from tensor analysis and the causal structure of spacetime. As an introduction to the main topic, we review some aspects of the two axiomatic quantum field theories, Wightman theory and algebraic quantum field theory. We also give an introduction into concepts of the quantization of fields on curved spacetime backgrounds. Then the wave equation and quantization of the Maxwell field in flat spacetimes is discussed. It follows a review of J. Dimock's quantization of the Maxwell field on curved spacetimes and then we come to our main result: We show explicitly that the Maxwell field, defined by dF=0 and δF=0, has a well posed initial value formulation on arbitrary globally hyperbolic spacetime manifolds. We prove the existence and uniqueness of fundamental solutions without employing a vector potential. Thus our solution is also applicable to spacetimes not satisfying the Poincare lemma and should lead to a quantization of the Maxwell field on non-trivial spacetime backgrounds. This in turn provides the opportunity to investigate physical states on non-trivial spacetime-topologies and could lead to the discovery of new quantum phenomena. (orig.)

  17. Static Einstein--Maxwell field equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, A.

    1979-01-01

    The static Einstein--Maxwell field equations are investigated in the presence of both electric and magnetic fields. The sources or bodies are assumed to be of finite size and to not affect the connectivity of the associated space. Furthermore, electromagnetic and metric fields are assumed to have reasonable differentiabilities. It is then proved that the electric and magnetic field vectors are constant multiples of one another. Moreover, the static Einstein--Maxwell equations reduce to the static magnetovac case. If, furthermore, the variational derivation of the Einstein--Maxwell equations is assumed, then both the total electric and magnetic charge of each body must vanish. As a physical consequence it is pointed out that if a suspended magnet be electrically charged then it must experience a purely general relativistic torque

  18. Efficient analysis of mode profiles in elliptical microcavity using dynamic-thermal electron-quantum medium FDTD method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoo, E H; Ahmed, I; Goh, R S M; Lee, K H; Hung, T G G; Li, E P

    2013-03-11

    The dynamic-thermal electron-quantum medium finite-difference time-domain (DTEQM-FDTD) method is used for efficient analysis of mode profile in elliptical microcavity. The resonance peak of the elliptical microcavity is studied by varying the length ratio. It is observed that at some length ratios, cavity mode is excited instead of whispering gallery mode. This depicts that mode profiles are length ratio dependent. Through the implementation of the DTEQM-FDTD on graphic processing unit (GPU), the simulation time is reduced by 300 times as compared to the CPU. This leads to an efficient optimization approach to design microcavity lasers for wide range of applications in photonic integrated circuits.

  19. VALU, AVX and GPU acceleration techniques for parallel FDTD methods

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Wenhua

    2013-01-01

    This book introduces a general hardware acceleration technique that can significantly speed up FDTD simulations and their applications to engineering problems without requiring any additional hardware devices. This acceleration of complex problems can be efficient in saving both time and money and once learned these new techniques can be used repeatedly.

  20. Simulador electromagnético basado en FDTD

    OpenAIRE

    Inclan Alonso, Jose Manuel

    2012-01-01

    El presenta trabajo fin de master tiene como objetivo el desarrollo de un simulador electromagnético basado en FDTD. El simulador incluye fronteras abiertas basadas en PML y transformada de campo cercano a lejano en el dominio del tiempo.

  1. FDTD Analysis of U-Slot Rectangular Patch Antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luk, K. M.; Tong, K. F.; Shum, S. M.; Lee, K. F.; Lee, R. Q.

    1997-01-01

    The U-slot rectangular patch antenna (Figure I) has been found experimentally to provide impedance and gain bandwidths of about 300 without the need of stacked or coplanar parasitic elements [1,2]. In this paper, simulation results of the U-slot patch using FDTD analysis are presented. Comparison with measured results are given.

  2. FDTD scattered field formulation for scatterers in stratified dispersive media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olkkonen, Juuso

    2010-03-01

    We introduce a simple scattered field (SF) technique that enables finite difference time domain (FDTD) modeling of light scattering from dispersive objects residing in stratified dispersive media. The introduced SF technique is verified against the total field scattered field (TFSF) technique. As an application example, we study surface plasmon polariton enhanced light transmission through a 100 nm wide slit in a silver film.

  3. FDTD analysis of open-ended dielectric sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, J.; Okoniewski, M.; Stuchly, S.S. [Univ. of Victoria (Canada)

    1994-12-31

    The reflection coefficient of an open-ended coaxial line immersed in water and methanol is simulated using a modified FDTD code. Calculated values are compared with previously obtained moment method and experimental values. The effects of variations in the end of line geometry on the reflection coefficient are investigated.

  4. Efficient Calculation of Near Fields in the FDTD Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franek, Ondrej

    2011-01-01

    When calculating frequency-domain near fields by the FDTD method, almost 50 % reduction in memory and CPU operations can be achieved if only E-fields are stored during the main time-stepping loop and H-fields computed later. An improved method of obtaining the H-fields from Faraday's Law is prese...

  5. MAXWELL3, 3-D FEM Electromagnetism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grant, J.B.

    2001-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: MAXWELL3 is a linear, time domain, finite element code designed for simulation of electromagnetic fields interacting with three-dimensional objects. The simulation region is discretized into 6-sided, 8-nodded elements which need not form a logically regular grid. Scatterers may be perfectly conducting or dielectric. Restart capability and a Muer-type radiating boundary are included. MAXWELL3 can be run in a two-dimensional mode or on infinitesimally thin geometries. The output of time histories on surfaces, or shells, in addition to volumes, is allowed. Two post-processors are included - HIST2XY, which splits the MAXWELL3 history file into simple xy data files, and FFT A BS, which performs fast Fourier transformations on the xy data. 2 - Method of solution: The numerical method requires that the model be discretized with a mesh generator. MAXWELL3 then uses the mesh and computes the time domain electric and magnetic fields by integrating Maxwell's divergence-free curl equations over time. The output from MAXWELL3 can then be used with a post-processor to get the desired information in a graphical form. The explicit time integration is done with a leap-frog technique that alternates evaluating the electric and magnetic fields at half time steps. This allows for centered time differencing accurate in second order. The algorithm is naturally robust and requires no parameters. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: MAXWELL3 has no mesh generation capabilities. Anisotropic, nonlinear, and magnetic materials cannot be modeled. Material interfaces only account for dielectric changes and neglect any surface charges that would be present at the surface of a partially conducting material. The radiation boundary algorithm is only accurate for normally incident fields and becomes less accurate as the angle of incidence increases. Thus, only models using scattered fields should use the radiation boundary. This limits MAXWELL3

  6. Maxwell-Higgs vortices with internal structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazeia, D.; Marques, M. A.; Menezes, R.

    2018-05-01

    Vortices are considered in relativistic Maxwell-Higgs systems in interaction with a neutral scalar field. The gauge field interacts with the neutral field via the presence of generalized permeability, and the charged and neutral scalar fields interact in a way dictated by the presence of first order differential equations that solve the equations of motion. The neutral field may be seen as the source field of the vortex, and we study some possibilities, which modify the standard Maxwell-Higgs solution and include internal structure to the vortex.

  7. Modified Maxwell equations in quantum electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Harmuth, Henning F; Meffert, Beate

    2001-01-01

    Divergencies in quantum field theory referred to as "infinite zero-point energy" have been a problem for 70 years. Renormalization has always been considered an unsatisfactory remedy. In 1985 it was found that Maxwell's equations generally do not have solutions that satisfy the causality law. An additional term for magnetic dipole currents corrected this shortcoming. Rotating magnetic dipoles produce magnetic dipole currents, just as rotating electric dipoles in a material like barium titanate produce electric dipole currents. Electric dipole currents were always part of Maxwell's equations. T

  8. Hybrid ray-FDTD model for the simulation of the ultrasonic inspection of CFRP parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jezzine, Karim; Ségur, Damien; Ecault, Romain; Dominguez, Nicolas; Calmon, Pierre

    2017-02-01

    Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymers (CFRP) are commonly used in structural parts in the aeronautic industry, to reduce the weight of aircraft while maintaining high mechanical performances. Simulation of the ultrasonic inspections of these parts has to face the highly heterogeneous and anisotropic characteristics of these materials. To model the propagation of ultrasound in these composite structures, we propose two complementary approaches. The first one is based on a ray model predicting the propagation of the ultrasound in an anisotropic effective medium obtained from a homogenization of the material. The ray model is designed to deal with possibly curved parts and subsequent continuously varying anisotropic orientations. The second approach is based on the coupling of the ray model, and a finite difference scheme in time domain (FDTD). The ray model handles the ultrasonic propagation between the transducer and the FDTD computation zone that surrounds the composite part. In this way, the computational efficiency is preserved and the ultrasound scattering by the composite structure can be predicted. Inspections of flat or curved composite panels, as well as stiffeners can be performed. The models have been implemented in the CIVA software platform and compared to experiments. We also present an application of the simulation to the performance demonstration of the adaptive inspection technique SAUL (Surface Adaptive Ultrasound).

  9. Stochastic Levy Divergence and Maxwell's Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. O. Volkov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the main reasons for interest in the Levy Laplacian and its analogues such as Levy d'Alembertian is a connection of these operators with gauge fields. The theorem proved by Accardi, Gibillisco and Volovich stated that a connection in a bundle over a Euclidean space or over a Minkowski space is a solution of the Yang-Mills equations if and only if the corresponding parallel transport to the connection is a solution of the Laplace equation for the Levy Laplacian or of the d'Alembert equation for the Levy d'Alembertian respectively (see [5, 6]. There are two approaches to define Levy type operators, both of which date back to the original works of Levy [7]. The first is that the Levy Laplacian (or Levy d'Alembertian is defined as an integral functional generated by a special form of the second derivative. This approach is used in the works [5, 6], as well as in the paper [8] of Leandre and Volovich, where stochastic Levy-Laplacian is discussed. Another approach to the Levy Laplacian is defining it as the Cesaro mean of second order derivatives along the family of vectors, which is an orthonormal basis in the Hilbert space. This definition of the Levy Laplacian is used for the description of solutions of the Yang-Mills equations in the paper [10].The present work shows that the definitions of the Levy Laplacian and the Levy d'Alembertian based on Cesaro averaging of the second order directional derivatives can be transferred to the stochastic case. In the article the values of these operators on a stochastic parallel transport associated with a connection (vector potential are found. In this case, unlike the deterministic case and the stochastic case of Levy Laplacian from [8], these values are not equal to zero if the vector potential corresponding to the stochastic parallel transport is a solution of the Maxwell's equations. As a result, two approaches to definition of the Levy Laplacian in the stochastic case give different operators. This

  10. On fictitious domain formulations for Maxwell's equations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahmen, W.; Jensen, Torben Klint; Urban, K.

    2003-01-01

    We consider fictitious domain-Lagrange multiplier formulations for variational problems in the space H(curl: Omega) derived from Maxwell's equations. Boundary conditions and the divergence constraint are imposed weakly by using Lagrange multipliers. Both the time dependent and time harmonic formu...

  11. Maxwell's electromagnetic theory and special relativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Graham

    2008-05-28

    This paper presents a brief history of electromagnetic theory from ancient times up to the work of Maxwell and the advent of Einstein's special theory of relativity. It is divided into five convenient periods and the intention is to describe these developments for the benefit of a lay scientific audience and with the minimum of technical detail.

  12. Unconditionally stable integration of Maxwell's equations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verwer, J.G.; Bochev, Mikhail A.

    Numerical integration of Maxwell's equations is often based on explicit methods accepting a stability step size restriction. In literature evidence is given that there is also a need for unconditionally stable methods, as exemplified by the successful alternating direction implicit finite difference

  13. Maxwell and the classical wave particle dualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonça, J T

    2008-05-28

    Maxwell's equations are one of the greatest theoretical achievements in physics of all times. They have survived three successive theoretical revolutions, associated with the advent of relativity, quantum mechanics and modern quantum field theory. In particular, they provide the theoretical framework for the understanding of the classical wave particle dualism.

  14. Null canonical formalism 1, Maxwell field. [Poisson brackets, boundary conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wodkiewicz, K [Warsaw Univ. (Poland). Inst. Fizyki Teoretycznej

    1975-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to formulate the canonical formalism on null hypersurfaces for the Maxwell electrodynamics. The set of the Poisson brackets relations for null variables of the Maxwell field is obtained. The asymptotic properties of the theory are investigated. The Poisson bracket relations for the news-functions of the Maxwell field are computed. The Hamiltonian form of the asymptotic Maxwell equations in terms of these news-functions is obtained.

  15. FDTD computation of human eye exposure to ultra-wideband electromagnetic pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simicevic, Neven [Center for Applied Physics Studies, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States)], E-mail: neven@phys.latech.edu

    2008-03-21

    With an increase in the application of ultra-wideband (UWB) electromagnetic pulses in the communications industry, radar, biotechnology and medicine, comes an interest in UWB exposure safety standards. Despite an increase of the scientific research on bioeffects of exposure to non-ionizing UWB pulses, characterization of those effects is far from complete. A numerical computational approach, such as a finite-difference time domain (FDTD) method, is required to visualize and understand the complexity of broadband electromagnetic interactions. The FDTD method has almost no limits in the description of the geometrical and dispersive properties of the simulated material, it is numerically robust and appropriate for current computer technology. In this paper, a complete calculation of exposure of the human eye to UWB electromagnetic pulses in the frequency range of 3.1-10.6, 22-29 and 57-64 GHz is performed. Computation in this frequency range required a geometrical resolution of the eye of 0.1 mm and an arbitrary precision in the description of its dielectric properties in terms of the Debye model. New results show that the interaction of UWB pulses with the eye tissues exhibits the same properties as the interaction of the continuous electromagnetic waves (CWs) with the frequencies from the pulse's frequency spectrum. It is also shown that under the same exposure conditions the exposure to UWB pulses is from one to many orders of magnitude safer than the exposure to CW.

  16. FDTD computation of human eye exposure to ultra-wideband electromagnetic pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simicevic, Neven

    2008-03-21

    With an increase in the application of ultra-wideband (UWB) electromagnetic pulses in the communications industry, radar, biotechnology and medicine, comes an interest in UWB exposure safety standards. Despite an increase of the scientific research on bioeffects of exposure to non-ionizing UWB pulses, characterization of those effects is far from complete. A numerical computational approach, such as a finite-difference time domain (FDTD) method, is required to visualize and understand the complexity of broadband electromagnetic interactions. The FDTD method has almost no limits in the description of the geometrical and dispersive properties of the simulated material, it is numerically robust and appropriate for current computer technology. In this paper, a complete calculation of exposure of the human eye to UWB electromagnetic pulses in the frequency range of 3.1-10.6, 22-29 and 57-64 GHz is performed. Computation in this frequency range required a geometrical resolution of the eye of 0.1 mm and an arbitrary precision in the description of its dielectric properties in terms of the Debye model. New results show that the interaction of UWB pulses with the eye tissues exhibits the same properties as the interaction of the continuous electromagnetic waves (CWs) with the frequencies from the pulse's frequency spectrum. It is also shown that under the same exposure conditions the exposure to UWB pulses is from one to many orders of magnitude safer than the exposure to CW.

  17. FDTD computation of human eye exposure to ultra-wideband electromagnetic pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simicevic, Neven

    2008-01-01

    With an increase in the application of ultra-wideband (UWB) electromagnetic pulses in the communications industry, radar, biotechnology and medicine, comes an interest in UWB exposure safety standards. Despite an increase of the scientific research on bioeffects of exposure to non-ionizing UWB pulses, characterization of those effects is far from complete. A numerical computational approach, such as a finite-difference time domain (FDTD) method, is required to visualize and understand the complexity of broadband electromagnetic interactions. The FDTD method has almost no limits in the description of the geometrical and dispersive properties of the simulated material, it is numerically robust and appropriate for current computer technology. In this paper, a complete calculation of exposure of the human eye to UWB electromagnetic pulses in the frequency range of 3.1-10.6, 22-29 and 57-64 GHz is performed. Computation in this frequency range required a geometrical resolution of the eye of 0.1 mm and an arbitrary precision in the description of its dielectric properties in terms of the Debye model. New results show that the interaction of UWB pulses with the eye tissues exhibits the same properties as the interaction of the continuous electromagnetic waves (CWs) with the frequencies from the pulse's frequency spectrum. It is also shown that under the same exposure conditions the exposure to UWB pulses is from one to many orders of magnitude safer than the exposure to CW

  18. Electromagnetic modeling of waveguide amplifier based on Nd3+ Si-rich SiO2 layers by means of the ADE-FDTD method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dufour Christian

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract By means of ADE-FDTD method, this paper investigates the electromagnetic modelling of a rib-loaded waveguide composed of a Nd3+ doped Silicon Rich Silicon Oxide active layer sandwiched between a SiO2 bottom cladding and a SiO2 rib. The Auxilliary Differential Equations are the rate equations which govern the levels populations. The Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD scheme is used to solve the space and time dependent Maxwell equations which describe the electromagnetic field in a copropagating scheme of both pumping (λ pump = 488 nm and signal (λ signal = 1064 nm waves. Such systems are characterized by extremely different specific times such as the period of electromagnetic field ~ 10-15 s and the lifetimes of the electronic levels between ~ 10-10s and ~ 10-4 s. The time scaling method is used in addition to specific initial conditions in order to decrease the computational time. We show maps of the Poynting vector along the propagation direction as a function of the silicon nanograin (Si-ng concentrations. A threshold value of 1024 Si-ng m-3 is extracted below which the pump wave can propagate so that a signal amplication is possible.

  19. Electromagnetic modeling of waveguide amplifier based on Nd3+ Si-rich SiO2 layers by means of the ADE-FDTD method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufour, Christian; Cardin, Julien; Debieu, Olivier; Fafin, Alexandre; Gourbilleau, Fabrice

    2011-04-04

    By means of ADE-FDTD method, this paper investigates the electromagnetic modelling of a rib-loaded waveguide composed of a Nd3+ doped Silicon Rich Silicon Oxide active layer sandwiched between a SiO2 bottom cladding and a SiO2 rib. The Auxilliary Differential Equations are the rate equations which govern the levels populations. The Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) scheme is used to solve the space and time dependent Maxwell equations which describe the electromagnetic field in a copropagating scheme of both pumping (λpump = 488 nm) and signal (λsignal = 1064 nm) waves. Such systems are characterized by extremely different specific times such as the period of electromagnetic field ~ 10-15 s and the lifetimes of the electronic levels between ~ 10-10s and ~ 10-4 s. The time scaling method is used in addition to specific initial conditions in order to decrease the computational time. We show maps of the Poynting vector along the propagation direction as a function of the silicon nanograin (Si-ng) concentrations. A threshold value of 1024 Si-ng m-3 is extracted below which the pump wave can propagate so that a signal amplication is possible.

  20. Controlling the numerical Cerenkov instability in PIC simulations using a customized finite difference Maxwell solver and a local FFT based current correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Fei; Yu, Peicheng; Xu, Xinlu; Fiuza, Frederico; Decyk, Viktor K.

    2017-01-01

    In this study we present a customized finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) Maxwell solver for the particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithm. The solver is customized to effectively eliminate the numerical Cerenkov instability (NCI) which arises when a plasma (neutral or non-neutral) relativistically drifts on a grid when using the PIC algorithm. We control the EM dispersion curve in the direction of the plasma drift of a FDTD Maxwell solver by using a customized higher order finite difference operator for the spatial derivative along the direction of the drift (1^ direction). We show that this eliminates the main NCI modes with moderate |k_1|, while keeps additional main NCI modes well outside the range of physical interest with higher |k_1|. These main NCI modes can be easily filtered out along with first spatial aliasing NCI modes which are also at the edge of the fundamental Brillouin zone. The customized solver has the possible advantage of improved parallel scalability because it can be easily partitioned along 1^ which typically has many more cells than other directions for the problems of interest. We show that FFTs can be performed locally to current on each partition to filter out the main and first spatial aliasing NCI modes, and to correct the current so that it satisfies the continuity equation for the customized spatial derivative. This ensures that Gauss’ Law is satisfied. Lastly, we present simulation examples of one relativistically drifting plasma, of two colliding relativistically drifting plasmas, and of nonlinear laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) in a Lorentz boosted frame that show no evidence of the NCI can be observed when using this customized Maxwell solver together with its NCI elimination scheme.

  1. Full-Wave Analysis of the Shielding Effectiveness of Thin Graphene Sheets with the 3D Unidirectionally Collocated HIE-FDTD Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arne Van Londersele

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Graphene-based electrical components are inherently multiscale, which poses a real challenge for finite-difference time-domain (FDTD solvers due to the stringent time step upper bound. Here, a unidirectionally collocated hybrid implicit-explicit (UCHIE FDTD method is put forward that exploits the planar structure of graphene to increase the time step by implicitizing the critical dimension. The method replaces the traditional Yee discretization by a partially collocated scheme that allows a more accurate numerical description of the material boundaries. Moreover, the UCHIE-FDTD method preserves second-order accuracy even for nonuniform discretization in the direction of collocation. The auxiliary differential equation (ADE approach is used to implement the graphene sheet as a dispersive Drude medium. The finite grid is terminated by a uniaxial perfectly matched layer (UPML to permit open-space simulations. Special care is taken to elaborate on the efficient implementation of the implicit update equations. The UCHIE-FDTD method is validated by computing the shielding effectiveness of a typical graphene sheet.

  2. Advanced Electric and Magnetic Material Models for FDTD Electromagnetic Codes

    CERN Document Server

    Poole, Brian R; Nelson, Scott D

    2005-01-01

    The modeling of dielectric and magnetic materials in the time domain is required for pulse power applications, pulsed induction accelerators, and advanced transmission lines. For example, most induction accelerator modules require the use of magnetic materials to provide adequate Volt-sec during the acceleration pulse. These models require hysteresis and saturation to simulate the saturation wavefront in a multipulse environment. In high voltage transmission line applications such as shock or soliton lines the dielectric is operating in a highly nonlinear regime, which requires nonlinear models. Simple 1-D models are developed for fast parameterization of transmission line structures. In the case of nonlinear dielectrics, a simple analytic model describing the permittivity in terms of electric field is used in a 3-D finite difference time domain code (FDTD). In the case of magnetic materials, both rate independent and rate dependent Hodgdon magnetic material models have been implemented into 3-D FDTD codes an...

  3. ADVANCED ELECTRIC AND MAGNETIC MATERIAL MODELS FOR FDTD ELECTROMAGNETIC CODES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poole, B R; Nelson, S D; Langdon, S

    2005-05-05

    The modeling of dielectric and magnetic materials in the time domain is required for pulse power applications, pulsed induction accelerators, and advanced transmission lines. For example, most induction accelerator modules require the use of magnetic materials to provide adequate Volt-sec during the acceleration pulse. These models require hysteresis and saturation to simulate the saturation wavefront in a multipulse environment. In high voltage transmission line applications such as shock or soliton lines the dielectric is operating in a highly nonlinear regime, which require nonlinear models. Simple 1-D models are developed for fast parameterization of transmission line structures. In the case of nonlinear dielectrics, a simple analytic model describing the permittivity in terms of electric field is used in a 3-D finite difference time domain code (FDTD). In the case of magnetic materials, both rate independent and rate dependent Hodgdon magnetic material models have been implemented into 3-D FDTD codes and 1-D codes.

  4. ADVANCED ELECTRIC AND MAGNETIC MATERIAL MODELS FOR FDTD ELECTROMAGNETIC CODES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poole, B R; Nelson, S D; Langdon, S

    2005-01-01

    The modeling of dielectric and magnetic materials in the time domain is required for pulse power applications, pulsed induction accelerators, and advanced transmission lines. For example, most induction accelerator modules require the use of magnetic materials to provide adequate Volt-sec during the acceleration pulse. These models require hysteresis and saturation to simulate the saturation wavefront in a multipulse environment. In high voltage transmission line applications such as shock or soliton lines the dielectric is operating in a highly nonlinear regime, which require nonlinear models. Simple 1-D models are developed for fast parameterization of transmission line structures. In the case of nonlinear dielectrics, a simple analytic model describing the permittivity in terms of electric field is used in a 3-D finite difference time domain code (FDTD). In the case of magnetic materials, both rate independent and rate dependent Hodgdon magnetic material models have been implemented into 3-D FDTD codes and 1-D codes

  5. Computation of nonuniform transmission lines using the FDTD method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miranda, G.C.; Paulino, J.O.S. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). School of Engineering

    1997-12-31

    Calculation of lightning overvoltages on transmission lines has been described. Lightning induced overvoltages are of great significance under certain conditions because of the main characteristics of the phenomena. The lightning channel model is one of the most important parameters essential to obtaining the generated electromagnetic fields. In this study, nonuniform transmission line equations were solved using the finite difference method and the leap-frog scheme, the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method. The subroutine was interfaced with the Electromagnetic Transients Program (EMTP). Two models were used to represent the characteristic impedance of the nonuniform lines used to model the transmission line towers and the lightning main channel. The advantages of the FDTD method was the much smaller code and faster processing time. 35 refs., 5 figs.

  6. Optimization of Excitation in FDTD Method and Corresponding Source Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Dimitrijevic

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Source and excitation modeling in FDTD formulation has a significant impact on the method performance and the required simulation time. Since the abrupt source introduction yields intensive numerical variations in whole computational domain, a generally accepted solution is to slowly introduce the source, using appropriate shaping functions in time. The main goal of the optimization presented in this paper is to find balance between two opposite demands: minimal required computation time and acceptable degradation of simulation performance. Reducing the time necessary for source activation and deactivation is an important issue, especially in design of microwave structures, when the simulation is intensively repeated in the process of device parameter optimization. Here proposed optimized source models are realized and tested within an own developed FDTD simulation environment.

  7. FDTD modeling of solar energy absorption in silicon branched nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundgren, Christin; Lopez, Rene; Redwing, Joan; Melde, Kathleen

    2013-05-06

    Thin film nanostructured photovoltaic cells are increasing in efficiency and decreasing the cost of solar energy. FDTD modeling of branched nanowire 'forests' are shown to have improved optical absorption in the visible and near-IR spectra over nanowire arrays alone, with a factor of 5 enhancement available at 1000 nm. Alternate BNW tree configurations are presented, achieving a maximum absorption of over 95% at 500 nm.

  8. An auxiliary differential equation FDTD method for anisotropic magnetized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Shaobin; Mo Jinjun; Yuan Naichang

    2004-01-01

    An auxiliary differential equation finite-difference time-domain (ADE-FDTD) methodology for anisotropic magnetized plasmas is derived. The method is based on a difference approximation of the auxiliary differential equation. A comparison with the JEC method is included. The CPU time saving by several times and accuracy of the method are confirmed by computing the reflection and transmission through a magnetized plasma layer with the direction of propagation parallel to the direction of the biasing field

  9. FDTD simulation of microwave sintering of ceramics in multimode cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iskander, M.F.; Smith, R.L.; Andrade, A.O.M.; Walsh, L.M. (Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Kimrey, H. Jr. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1994-05-01

    At present, various aspects of the sintering process such as preparation of sample sizes and shapes, types of insulations, and the desirability of including a process stimulus such as SiC rods are considered forms of art and highly dependent on human expertise. The simulation of realistic sintering experiments in a multimode cavity may provide an improved understanding of critical parameters involved and allow for the development of guidelines towards the optimization of the sintering process. In this paper, the authors utilize the FDTD technique to model various geometrical arrangements and material compatibility aspects in multimode microwave cavities and to simulate realistic sintering experiments. The FDTD procedure starts with the simulation of a field distribution in multimode microwave cavities that resembles a set of measured data using liquid crystal sheets. Also included in the simulation is the waveguide feed as well as a ceramic loading plate placed at the base of the cavity. The FDTD simulation thus provides realistic representation of a typical sintering experiment. Aspects that have been successfully simulated include the effects of various types of insulation, the role of SiC rods on the uniformity of the resulting microwave fields, and the possible shielding effects that may result from excessive use of SiC. These results as well as others showing the electromagnetic fields and power-deposition patterns in multiple ceramic samples are presented.

  10. FDTD-SPICE for Characterizing Metamaterials Integrated with Electronic Circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengwei Hao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A powerful time-domain FDTD-SPICE simulator is implemented and applied to the broadband analysis of metamaterials integrated with active and tunable circuit elements. First, the FDTD-SPICE modeling theory is studied and details of interprocess communication and hybridization of the two techniques are discussed. To verify the model, some simple cases are simulated with results in both time domain and frequency domain. Then, simulation of a metamaterial structure constructed from periodic resonant loops integrated with lumped capacitor elements is studied, which demonstrates tuning resonance frequency of medium by changing the capacitance of the integrated elements. To increase the bandwidth of the metamaterial, non-Foster transistor configurations are integrated with the loops and FDTD-SPICE is applied to successfully bridge the physics of electromagnetic and circuit topologies and to model the whole composite structure. Our model is also applied to the design and simulation of a metasurface integrated with nonlinear varactors featuring tunable reflection phase characteristic.

  11. Maxwell electrodynamics subjected to quantum vacuum fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gevorkyan, A. S.; Gevorkyan, A. A.

    2011-01-01

    The propagation of electromagnetic waves in the vacuum is considered taking into account quantum fluctuations in the limits of Maxwell-Langevin (ML) equations. For a model of “white noise” fluctuations, using ML equations, a second order partial differential equation is found which describes the quantum distribution of virtual particles in vacuum. It is proved that in order to satisfy observed facts, the Lamb Shift etc, the virtual particles should be quantized in unperturbed vacuum. It is shown that the quantized virtual particles in toto (approximately 86 percent) are condensed on the “ground state” energy level. It is proved that the extension of Maxwell electrodynamics with inclusion of the vacuum quantum field fluctuations may be constructed on a 6D space-time continuum with a 2D compactified subspace. Their influence on the refraction indexes of vacuum is studied.

  12. Classes of exact Einstein Maxwell solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komathiraj, K.; Maharaj, S. D.

    2007-12-01

    We find new classes of exact solutions to the Einstein Maxwell system of equations for a charged sphere with a particular choice of the electric field intensity and one of the gravitational potentials. The condition of pressure isotropy is reduced to a linear, second order differential equation which can be solved in general. Consequently we can find exact solutions to the Einstein Maxwell field equations corresponding to a static spherically symmetric gravitational potential in terms of hypergeometric functions. It is possible to find exact solutions which can be written explicitly in terms of elementary functions, namely polynomials and product of polynomials and algebraic functions. Uncharged solutions are regainable with our choice of electric field intensity; in particular we generate the Einstein universe for particular parameter values.

  13. Maxwell-Chern-Simons Casimir effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milton, K.A.; Ng, Y.J.

    1990-01-01

    The topology of (2+1)-dimensional space permits the construction of quantum electrodynamics with the usual Maxwell action augmented by a gauge-invariant, but P- and T-violating, Chern-Simons mass term. We discuss the Casimir effect between parallel lines in such a theory. The effect of finite temperature is also considered. In principle, our results provide a way to measure the topological mass of the photon

  14. Stationary axisymmetric Einstein--Maxwell field equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catenacci, R.; Diaz Alonso, J.

    1976-01-01

    We show the existence of a formal identity between Einstein's and Ernst's stationary axisymmetric gravitational field equations and the Einstein--Maxwell and the Ernst equations for the electrostatic and magnetostatic axisymmetric cases. Our equations are invariant under very simple internal symmetry groups, and one of them appears to be new. We also obtain a method for associating two stationary axisymmetric vacuum solutions with every electrostatic known

  15. Loading relativistic Maxwell distributions in particle simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zenitani, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    Numerical algorithms to load relativistic Maxwell distributions in particle-in-cell (PIC) and Monte-Carlo simulations are presented. For stationary relativistic Maxwellian, the inverse transform method and the Sobol algorithm are reviewed. To boost particles to obtain relativistic shifted-Maxwellian, two rejection methods are proposed in a physically transparent manner. Their acceptance efficiencies are ≈50% for generic cases and 100% for symmetric distributions. They can be combined with arbitrary base algorithms

  16. Loading relativistic Maxwell distributions in particle simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zenitani, Seiji, E-mail: seiji.zenitani@nao.ac.jp [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2015-04-15

    Numerical algorithms to load relativistic Maxwell distributions in particle-in-cell (PIC) and Monte-Carlo simulations are presented. For stationary relativistic Maxwellian, the inverse transform method and the Sobol algorithm are reviewed. To boost particles to obtain relativistic shifted-Maxwellian, two rejection methods are proposed in a physically transparent manner. Their acceptance efficiencies are ≈50% for generic cases and 100% for symmetric distributions. They can be combined with arbitrary base algorithms.

  17. Historic Landscape Survey, Maxwell AFB, Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    signifies Maxwell AFB’s historic landscapes. 2.1 The pre-military landscape Prehistory in the southeastern United States is generally designated as...the period of Native American occupation before Spanish explorers made contact in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. In Alabama, the prehistory ... prehistory or history is made clear.56 A historic property is determined to be either significant or not significant by applying standardized National

  18. Mathematics and Maxwell's equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boozer, Allen H, E-mail: ahb17@columbia.ed [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

    2010-12-15

    The universality of mathematics and Maxwell's equations is not shared by specific plasma models. Computations become more reliable, efficient and transparent if specific plasma models are used to obtain only the information that would otherwise be missing. Constraints of high universality, such as those from mathematics and Maxwell's equations, can be obscured or lost by integrated computations. Recognition of subtle constraints of high universality is important for (1) focusing the design of control systems for magnetic field errors in tokamaks from perturbations that have little effect on the plasma to those that do, (2) clarifying the limits of applicability to astrophysics of computations of magnetic reconnection in fields that have a double periodicity or have B-vector =0 on a surface, as in a Harris sheet. Both require a degree of symmetry not expected in natural systems. Mathematics and Maxwell's equations imply that neighboring magnetic field lines characteristically separate exponentially with distance along a line. This remarkably universal phenomenon has been largely ignored, though it defines a trigger for reconnection through a critical magnitude of exponentiation. These and other examples of the importance of making distinctions and understanding constraints of high universality are explained.

  19. Maxwell: A new vision of the world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maystre, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    The paper outlines the crucial contributions of James Clerk Maxwell to Physics and more generally to our vision of the world. He achieved 150 years ago a synthesis of the pioneering works in magnetostatics, electrostatics, induction and, by introducing the notion of displacement current, gave birth to Electromagnetics. Then, he deduced the existence of electromagnetic waves and identified light as one of them. Maxwell equations deeply changed a Newtonian conception of the world based on particle interactions by pointing out the vital role of waves in physics. This new conception had a strong influence on the development of quantum physics. Finally, the invariance of light velocity in Galilean frames led to Lorentz transformations, a key step toward the theory of relativity. Par ailleurs, les équations de Maxwell ont profondément changé une conception du monde newtonienne basée sur l'interaction entre particules en révélant le rôle essentiel des ondes en physique, ce qui eut une influence déterminante sur le développement de la physique quantique. Enfin, l'invariance de la vitesse de la lumière dans les repères galiléens a entraîné la découverte des transformations de Lorentz, une étape capitale vers la théorie de la relativité.

  20. Light scattering by multiple spheres: comparison between Maxwell theory and radiative-transfer-theory calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voit, Florian; Schäfer, Jan; Kienle, Alwin

    2009-09-01

    We present a methodology to compare results of classical radiative transfer theory against exact solutions of Maxwell theory for a high number of spheres. We calculated light propagation in a cubic scattering region (20 x 20 x 20 microm(3)) consisting of different concentrations of polystyrene spheres in water (diameter 2 microm) by an analytical solution of Maxwell theory and by a numerical solution of radiative transfer theory. The relative deviation of differential as well as total scattering cross sections obtained by both approaches was evaluated for each sphere concentration. For the considered case, we found that deviations due to radiative transfer theory remain small, even for concentrations up to ca. 20 vol. %.

  1. Numerical Simulations of Light Bullets, Using The Full Vector, Time Dependent, Nonlinear Maxwell Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goorjian, Peter M.; Silberberg, Yaron; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    This paper will present results in computational nonlinear optics. An algorithm will be described that solves the full vector nonlinear Maxwell's equations exactly without the approximations that we currently made. Present methods solve a reduced scalar wave equation, namely the nonlinear Schrodinger equation, and neglect the optical carrier. Also, results will be shown of calculations of 2-D electromagnetic nonlinear waves computed by directly integrating in time the nonlinear vector Maxwell's equations. The results will include simulations of 'light bullet' like pulses. Here diffraction and dispersion will be counteracted by nonlinear effects. The time integration efficiently implements linear and nonlinear convolutions for the electric polarization, and can take into account such quantum effects as Karr and Raman interactions. The present approach is robust and should permit modeling 2-D and 3-D optical soliton propagation, scattering, and switching directly from the full-vector Maxwell's equations.

  2. Comparison of different Maxwell solvers coupled to a PIC resolution method of Maxwell-Vlasov equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fochesato, Ch.; Bouche, D.

    2007-01-01

    The numerical solution of Maxwell equations is a challenging task. Moreover, the range of applications is very wide: microwave devices, diffraction, to cite a few. As a result, a number of methods have been proposed since the sixties. However, among all these methods, none has proved to be free of drawbacks. The finite difference scheme proposed by Yee in 1966, is well suited for Maxwell equations. However, it only works on cubical mesh. As a result, the boundaries of complex objects are not properly handled by the scheme. When classical nodal finite elements are used, spurious modes appear, which spoil the results of simulations. Edge elements overcome this problem, at the price of rather complex implementation, and computationally intensive simulations. Finite volume methods, either generalizing Yee scheme to a wider class of meshes, or applying to Maxwell equations methods initially used in the field of hyperbolic systems of conservation laws, are also used. Lastly, 'Discontinuous Galerkin' methods, generalizing to arbitrary order of accuracy finite volume methods, have recently been applied to Maxwell equations. In this report, we more specifically focus on the coupling of a Maxwell solver to a PIC (Particle-in-cell) method. We analyze advantages and drawbacks of the most widely used methods: accuracy, robustness, sensitivity to numerical artefacts, efficiency, user judgment. (authors)

  3. New and old symmetries of the Maxwell and Dirac equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fushchich, V.I.; Nikitin, A.G.

    1983-01-01

    The symmetry properties of Maxwell's equations for the electromagnetic field and also of the Dirac and Kemmer-Duffin-Petiau equations are analyzed. In the framework of a ''non-Lie'' approach it is shown that, besides the well-known invariance with respect to the conformal group and the Heaviside-Larmor-Rainich transformations, Maxwell's equations have an additional symmetry with respect to the group U(2)xU(2) and with respect to the 23-dimensional Lie algebra A 23 . The transformations of the additional symmetry are given by nonlocal (integro-differential) operators. The symmetry of the Dirac equation in the class of differential and integro-differential transformations is investigated. It is shown that this equation is invariant with respect to an 18-parameter group, which includes the Poincare group as a subgroup. A 28-parameter invariance group of the Kemmer-Duffin-Petiau equation is found. Finite transformations of the conformal group for a massless field with arbitrary spin are obtained. The explicit form of conformal transformations for the electromagnetic field and also for the Dirac and Weyl fields is given

  4. On new and old symmetries of Maxwell and Dirac equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fushchich, V.I.; Nikitin, A.G.

    1983-01-01

    Symmetry properties of the Maxwell equation for the electromagnetic field are analysed as well as of the Dirac and Kemmer-Duffin-Petiau one. In the frame of the non-geometrical approach it is demonstrated, that besides to the well-known invariance under the conformal group and Heaviside-Larmor-Rainich transformation, Maxwell equation possess the additional symmetry under the group U(2)xU(2) and under the 23-dimensional Lie algebra A 23 . The additional symmetry transformations are realized by the non-local (integro-differential) operators. The symmetry of the Dirac. equation under the differential and integro-differential transformations is investio.ated. It is shown that this equation is invariant under the 18-parametrical group, which includes the Poincare group as a subgroup. The 28-parametrical invariance group of the Kemmer-Duffin-Petiau equation is found. The finite conformal group transformations for a massless field of any spin are obtained. The explicit form of the conformal transformations for the electromagnetic field as well as for the Dirac and Weyl fields is given

  5. FDTD chiral brain tissue model for specific absorption rate determination under radiation from mobile phones at 900 and 1800 MHz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamorano, M; Torres-Silva, H [Departamento de Electronica, Universidad de Tarapaca, 18 de Septiembre 2222, Arica (Chile)

    2006-04-07

    A new electrodynamics model formed by chiral bioplasma, which represents the human head inner structure and makes it possible to analyse its behaviour when it is irradiated by a microwave electromagnetic field from cellular phones, is presented. The finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) numeric technique is used, which allows simulation of the electromagnetic fields, deduced with Maxwell's equations, and allows us to simulate the specific absorption rate (SAR). The results show the SAR behaviour as a function of the input power and the chirality factor. In considering the chiral brain tissue in the proposed human head model, the two more important conclusions of our work are the following: (a) the absorption of the electromagnetic fields from cellular phones is stronger, so the SAR coefficient is higher than that using the classical model, when values of the chiral factor are of order of 1; (b) 'inverse skin effect' shows up at 1800 MHz, with respect to a 900 MHz source.

  6. FDTD simulations of near-field mediated semiconductor molecular optical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Dai; Sakrow, Marcus; Mihaljevic, Josip; Meixner, Alfred J. [Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, University Tuebingen, Auf der Morgenstelle 8, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    The optical properties of molecules can be dramatically altered when they are in a close proximity of an excited metal antenna. In order to get insight into how the antenna generated near-field influences the optical properties of low quantum yield molecules, we carried out FDTD simulations of a sharp laser-illuminated Au tip approaching to a semiconductor thin film. The time-averaged field distribution between the semiconductor thin film and the tip antenna is calculated regarding to different distances. Our calculation demonstrates that the coupling between the localized plasmon at the tip apex and semiconductor polariton can be achieved building up a distance-dependent high field enhancement. Our experimental results show that such a high field strength enhances not only the excitation process by a factor of 104, but alters the radiative: non-radiative decay rate giving approx. 15 times stronger photoluminescence emission.

  7. Dispersive finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) analysis of the elliptic cylindrical cloak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y. Y.; Ahn, D. [University of Seoul, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    A dispersive full-wave finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) model is used to calculate the performance of elliptic cylindrical cloaking devices. The permittivity and the permeability tensors for the cloaking structure are derived by using an effective medium approach in general relativity. The elliptic cylindrical invisibility devices are found to show imperfect cloaking, and the cloaking performance is found to depend on the polarization of the incident waves, the direction of the propagation of those waves, the semi-focal distances and the loss tangents of the meta-material. When the semifocal distance of the elliptic cylinder decreases, the performance of the cloaking becomes very good, with neither noticeable scatterings nor field penetrations. For a larger semi-focal distance, only the TM wave with a specific propagation direction shows good cloaking performance. Realistic cloaking materials with loss still show a cloak that is working, but attenuated back-scattering waves exist.

  8. One-Step Leapfrog LOD-BOR-FDTD Algorithm with CPML Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Gang Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An unconditionally stable one-step leapfrog locally one-dimensional finite-difference time-domain (LOD-FDTD algorithm towards body of revolution (BOR is presented. The equations of the proposed algorithm are obtained by the algebraic manipulation of those used in the conventional LOD-BOR-FDTD algorithm. The equations for z-direction electric and magnetic fields in the proposed algorithm should be treated specially. The new algorithm obtains a higher computational efficiency while preserving the properties of the conventional LOD-BOR-FDTD algorithm. Moreover, the convolutional perfectly matched layer (CPML is introduced into the one-step leapfrog LOD-BOR-FDTD algorithm. The equation of the one-step leapfrog CPML is concise. Numerical results show that its reflection error is small. It can be concluded that the similar CPML scheme can also be easily applied to the one-step leapfrog LOD-FDTD algorithm in the Cartesian coordinate system.

  9. A GPU-based calculation using the three-dimensional FDTD method for electromagnetic field analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaoka, Tomoaki; Watanabe, Soichi

    2010-01-01

    Numerical simulations with the numerical human model using the finite-difference time domain (FDTD) method have recently been performed frequently in a number of fields in biomedical engineering. However, the FDTD calculation runs too slowly. We focus, therefore, on general purpose programming on the graphics processing unit (GPGPU). The three-dimensional FDTD method was implemented on the GPU using Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA). In this study, we used the NVIDIA Tesla C1060 as a GPGPU board. The performance of the GPU is evaluated in comparison with the performance of a conventional CPU and a vector supercomputer. The results indicate that three-dimensional FDTD calculations using a GPU can significantly reduce run time in comparison with that using a conventional CPU, even a native GPU implementation of the three-dimensional FDTD method, while the GPU/CPU speed ratio varies with the calculation domain and thread block size.

  10. James Clerk Maxwell 1831-1879

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    Earlier this year saw the centenary of the birth of Albert Einstein. It is highly apt that 1979, which has been marked by further consolidation of the unified theory of weak and electromagnetic interactions and its recognition in the award of the Nobel Prize to Glashow, Salam and Weinberg, is also the centenary of the death of the great Scottish physicist who first formulated a unified theory of electric and magnetic fields. We are grateful to Abdus Salam for drawing our attention to the Maxwell anniversary

  11. Maxwell's demon, Szilard's engine and quantum measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zorek, W.H.

    1986-01-01

    The author proposes and analyzes a quantum version of Szilard's one-molecule engine. In particular, the author recovers, in the quantum context, Szilard's conclusion concerning the free energy ''cost'' of measurements (delta /sub F/ is greater than or equal to k/sub b/T1n2) per bit of information. A cycle of Szilard's engine is illustrated for both the original and quantum versions. The measurement of the location of the molecule is essential in the process of extracting work in both classical and quantum design. Measurements are made by the classical Maxwell's demon

  12. James Clerk Maxwell 1831-1879

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1979-12-15

    Earlier this year saw the centenary of the birth of Albert Einstein. It is highly apt that 1979, which has been marked by further consolidation of the unified theory of weak and electromagnetic interactions and its recognition in the award of the Nobel Prize to Glashow, Salam and Weinberg, is also the centenary of the death of the great Scottish physicist who first formulated a unified theory of electric and magnetic fields. We are grateful to Abdus Salam for drawing our attention to the Maxwell anniversary.

  13. Simulation of ultrasonic and EMAT arrays using FEM and FDTD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yuedong; Yin, Wuliang; Liu, Zenghua; Peyton, Anthony

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a method which combines electromagnetic simulation and ultrasonic simulation to build EMAT array models. For a specific sensor configuration, Lorentz forces are calculated using the finite element method (FEM), which then can feed through to ultrasonic simulations. The propagation of ultrasound waves is numerically simulated using finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method to describe their propagation within homogenous medium and their scattering phenomenon by cracks. Radiation pattern obtained with Hilbert transform on time domain waveforms is proposed to characterise the sensor in terms of its beam directivity and field distribution along the steering angle. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. FDTD method using for electrodynamic simulation of resonator accelerating structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorogushin, M.F.; Svistunov, Yu.A.; Chetverikov, I.O.; Malyshev, V.N.; Malyukhov, M.V.

    2000-01-01

    The finite difference method in the time area (FDTD) makes it possible to model both stationary and nonstationary processes, originating by the beam and field interaction. Possibilities of the method by modeling the fields in the resonant accelerating structures are demonstrated. The possibility of considering the transition processes is important besides the solution of the problem on determination of frequencies and distribution in the space of the resonators oscillations proper types. The program presented makes it possible to obtain practical results for modeling accelerating structures on personal computers [ru

  15. Analysis of Various Frequency Selective Shielding Glass by FDTD method

    OpenAIRE

    笠嶋, 善憲; Kasashima, Yoshinori

    2012-01-01

    A frequency Selective shielding (FSS) glass is a print of many same size antennas on a sheet of glass, and it has high shielding properties for one specific frequency. This time, the author analyzed characteristics of various FSSs whose antenna types are different by FDTD method. The antenna types are cross dipole, circular loop, square loop, circular patch, and square patch. As the result, the FSSs can be composed of the various types of the antennas, and the FSSs have broad-band shielding c...

  16. Numerical analysis of Sakiadis flow problem considering Maxwell nanofluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Meraj

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates the flow of Maxwell nanofluid over a moving plate in a calm fluid. Novel aspects of Brownian motion and thermophoresis are taken into consideration. Revised model for passive control of nanoparticle volume fraction at the plate is used in this study. The formulated differential system is solved numerically by employing shooting approach together with fourth-fifth-order-Runge-Kutta integration procedure and Newton’s method. The solutions are greatly influenced with the variation of embedded parameters which include the local Deborah number, the Brownian motion parameter, the thermophoresis parameter, the Prandtl number, and the Schmidt number. We found that the variation in velocity distribution with an increase in local Deborah number is non-monotonic. Moreover, the reduced Nusselt number has a linear and direct relationship with the local Deborah number.

  17. CSR Fields: Direct Numerical Solution of the Maxwell's Equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novokhatski, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the properties of the coherent electromagnetic fields of a very short, ultra-relativistic bunch in a rectangular vacuum chamber inside a bending magnet. The analysis is based on the results of a direct numerical solution of Maxwell's equations together with Newton's equations. We use a new dispersion-free time-domain algorithm which employs a more efficient use of finite element mesh techniques and hence produces self-consistent and stable solutions for very short bunches. We investigate the fine structure of the CSR fields including coherent edge radiation. This approach should be useful in the study of existing and future concepts of particle accelerators and ultrafast coherent light sources. The coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) fields have a strong action on the beam dynamics of very short bunches, which are moving in the bends of all kinds of magnetic elements. They are responsible for additional energy loss and energy spread; micro bunching and beam emittance growth. These fields may bound the efficiency of damping rings, electron-positron colliders and ultrafast coherent light sources, where high peak currents and very short bunches are envisioned. This is relevant to most high-brightness beam applications. On the other hand these fields together with transition radiation fields can be used for beam diagnostics or even as a powerful resource of THz radiation. A history of the study of CSR and a good collection of references can be found in (1). Electromagnetic theory suggests several methods on how to calculate CSR fields. The most popular method is to use Lienard-Wiechert potentials. Other approach is to solve numerically the approximate equations, which are a Schrodinger type equation. These numerical methods are described in (2). We suggest that a direct solution of Maxwell's equations together with Newton's equations can describe the detailed structure of the CSR fields (3).

  18. FDTD Simulation on Terahertz Waves Propagation Through a Dusty Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Maoyan; Zhang, Meng; Li, Guiping; Jiang, Baojun; Zhang, Xiaochuan; Xu, Jun

    2016-08-01

    The frequency dependent permittivity for dusty plasmas is provided by introducing the charging response factor and charge relaxation rate of airborne particles. The field equations that describe the characteristics of Terahertz (THz) waves propagation in a dusty plasma sheath are derived and discretized on the basis of the auxiliary differential equation (ADE) in the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. Compared with numerical solutions in reference, the accuracy for the ADE FDTD method is validated. The reflection property of the metal Aluminum interlayer of the sheath at THz frequencies is discussed. The effects of the thickness, effective collision frequency, airborne particle density, and charge relaxation rate of airborne particles on the electromagnetic properties of Terahertz waves through a dusty plasma slab are investigated. Finally, some potential applications for Terahertz waves in information and communication are analyzed. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 41104097, 11504252, 61201007, 41304119), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (Nos. ZYGX2015J039, ZYGX2015J041), and the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (No. 20120185120012)

  19. FDTD modeling of anisotropic nonlinear optical phenomena in silicon waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissanayake, Chethiya M; Premaratne, Malin; Rukhlenko, Ivan D; Agrawal, Govind P

    2010-09-27

    A deep insight into the inherent anisotropic optical properties of silicon is required to improve the performance of silicon-waveguide-based photonic devices. It may also lead to novel device concepts and substantially extend the capabilities of silicon photonics in the future. In this paper, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, we present a three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method for modeling optical phenomena in silicon waveguides, which takes into account fully the anisotropy of the third-order electronic and Raman susceptibilities. We show that, under certain realistic conditions that prevent generation of the longitudinal optical field inside the waveguide, this model is considerably simplified and can be represented by a computationally efficient algorithm, suitable for numerical analysis of complex polarization effects. To demonstrate the versatility of our model, we study polarization dependence for several nonlinear effects, including self-phase modulation, cross-phase modulation, and stimulated Raman scattering. Our FDTD model provides a basis for a full-blown numerical simulator that is restricted neither by the single-mode assumption nor by the slowly varying envelope approximation.

  20. Precision of a FDTD method to simulate cold magnetized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlenko, I.V.; Melnyk, D.A.; Prokaieva, A.O.; Girka, I.O.

    2014-01-01

    The finite difference time domain (FDTD) method is applied to describe the propagation of the transverse electromagnetic waves through the magnetized plasmas. The numerical dispersion relation is obtained in a cold plasma approximation. The accuracy of the numerical dispersion is calculated as a function of the frequency of the launched wave and time step of the numerical grid. It is shown that the numerical method does not reproduce the analytical results near the plasma resonances for any chosen value of time step if there is not a dissipation mechanism in the system. It means that FDTD method cannot be applied straightforward to simulate the problems where the plasma resonances play a key role (for example, the mode conversion problems). But the accuracy of the numerical scheme can be improved by introducing some artificial damping of the plasma currents. Although part of the wave power is lost in the system in this case but the numerical scheme describes the wave processes in an agreement with analytical predictions.

  1. EM modeling for GPIR using 3D FDTD modeling codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, S.D.

    1994-10-01

    An analysis of the one-, two-, and three-dimensional electrical characteristics of structural cement and concrete is presented. This work connects experimental efforts in characterizing cement and concrete in the frequency and time domains with the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) modeling efforts of these substances. These efforts include Electromagnetic (EM) modeling of simple lossless homogeneous materials with aggregate and targets and the modeling dispersive and lossy materials with aggregate and complex target geometries for Ground Penetrating Imaging Radar (GPIR). Two- and three-dimensional FDTD codes (developed at LLNL) where used for the modeling efforts. Purpose of the experimental and modeling efforts is to gain knowledge about the electrical properties of concrete typically used in the construction industry for bridges and other load bearing structures. The goal is to optimize the performance of a high-sample-rate impulse radar and data acquisition system and to design an antenna system to match the characteristics of this material. Results show agreement to within 2 dB of the amplitudes of the experimental and modeled data while the frequency peaks correlate to within 10% the differences being due to the unknown exact nature of the aggregate placement.

  2. GPU-Accelerated Parallel FDTD on Distributed Heterogeneous Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronglin Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a (finite difference time domain FDTD code written in Fortran and CUDA for realistic electromagnetic calculations with parallelization methods of Message Passing Interface (MPI and Open Multiprocessing (OpenMP. Since both Central Processing Unit (CPU and Graphics Processing Unit (GPU resources are utilized, a faster execution speed can be reached compared to a traditional pure GPU code. In our experiments, 64 NVIDIA TESLA K20m GPUs and 64 INTEL XEON E5-2670 CPUs are used to carry out the pure CPU, pure GPU, and CPU + GPU tests. Relative to the pure CPU calculations for the same problems, the speedup ratio achieved by CPU + GPU calculations is around 14. Compared to the pure GPU calculations for the same problems, the CPU + GPU calculations have 7.6%–13.2% performance improvement. Because of the small memory size of GPUs, the FDTD problem size is usually very small. However, this code can enlarge the maximum problem size by 25% without reducing the performance of traditional pure GPU code. Finally, using this code, a microstrip antenna array with 16×18 elements is calculated and the radiation patterns are compared with the ones of MoM. Results show that there is a well agreement between them.

  3. The Riemannian geometry is not sufficient for the geometrization of the Maxwell's equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulyabov, Dmitry S.; Korolkova, Anna V.; Velieva, Tatyana R.

    2018-04-01

    The transformation optics uses geometrized Maxwell's constitutive equations to solve the inverse problem of optics, namely to solve the problem of finding the parameters of the medium along the paths of propagation of the electromagnetic field. For the geometrization of Maxwell's constitutive equations, the quadratic Riemannian geometry is usually used. This is due to the use of the approaches of the general relativity. However, there arises the question of the insufficiency of the Riemannian structure for describing the constitutive tensor of the Maxwell's equations. The authors analyze the structure of the constitutive tensor and correlate it with the structure of the metric tensor of Riemannian geometry. It is concluded that the use of the quadratic metric for the geometrization of Maxwell's equations is insufficient, since the number of components of the metric tensor is less than the number of components of the constitutive tensor. A possible solution to this problem may be a transition to Finslerian geometry, in particular, the use of the Berwald-Moor metric to establish the structural correspondence between the field tensors of the electromagnetic field.

  4. Chaotic dynamics in the Maxwell-Bloch equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holm, D.D.; Kovacic, G.

    1992-01-01

    In the slowly varying envelope approximation and the rotating wave approximation for the Maxwell-Bloch equations, we describe how the presence of a small-amplitude probe laser in an excited, two-level, resonant medium leads to homoclinic chaos in the laser-matter dynamics. We also describe a derivation of the Maxwell-Bloch equations from an action principle

  5. Maxwell Equations and the Redundant Gauge Degree of Freedom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Chun Wa

    2009-01-01

    On transformation to the Fourier space (k,[omega]), the partial differential Maxwell equations simplify to algebraic equations, and the Helmholtz theorem of vector calculus reduces to vector algebraic projections. Maxwell equations and their solutions can then be separated readily into longitudinal and transverse components relative to the…

  6. FDTD method for laser absorption in metals for large scale problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Chun; Ki, Hyungson

    2013-10-21

    The FDTD method has been successfully used for many electromagnetic problems, but its application to laser material processing has been limited because even a several-millimeter domain requires a prohibitively large number of grids. In this article, we present a novel FDTD method for simulating large-scale laser beam absorption problems, especially for metals, by enlarging laser wavelength while maintaining the material's reflection characteristics. For validation purposes, the proposed method has been tested with in-house FDTD codes to simulate p-, s-, and circularly polarized 1.06 μm irradiation on Fe and Sn targets, and the simulation results are in good agreement with theoretical predictions.

  7. A High-Performance Parallel FDTD Method Enhanced by Using SSE Instruction Set

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dau-Chyrh Chang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a hardware acceleration technique for the parallel finite difference time domain (FDTD method using the SSE (streaming (single instruction multiple data SIMD extensions instruction set. The implementation of SSE instruction set to parallel FDTD method has achieved the significant improvement on the simulation performance. The benchmarks of the SSE acceleration on both the multi-CPU workstation and computer cluster have demonstrated the advantages of (vector arithmetic logic unit VALU acceleration over GPU acceleration. Several engineering applications are employed to demonstrate the performance of parallel FDTD method enhanced by SSE instruction set.

  8. Loading relativistic Maxwell distributions in particle simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenitani, S.

    2015-12-01

    In order to study energetic plasma phenomena by using particle-in-cell (PIC) and Monte-Carlo simulations, we need to deal with relativistic velocity distributions in these simulations. However, numerical algorithms to deal with relativistic distributions are not well known. In this contribution, we overview basic algorithms to load relativistic Maxwell distributions in PIC and Monte-Carlo simulations. For stationary relativistic Maxwellian, the inverse transform method and the Sobol algorithm are reviewed. To boost particles to obtain relativistic shifted-Maxwellian, two rejection methods are newly proposed in a physically transparent manner. Their acceptance efficiencies are 􏰅50% for generic cases and 100% for symmetric distributions. They can be combined with arbitrary base algorithms.

  9. Maxwell equations in conformal invariant electrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fradkin, E.S.; AN SSSR, Novosibirsk. Inst. Avtomatiki i Ehlektrometrii); Kozhevnikov, A.A.; Palchik, M.Ya.; Pomeransky, A.A.

    1983-01-01

    We consider a conformal invariant formulation of quantum electrodynamics. Conformal invariance is achieved with a specific mathematical construction based on the indecomposable representations of the conformal group associated with the electromagnetic potential and current. As a corolary of this construction modified expressions for the 3-point Green functions are obtained which both contain transverse parts. They make it possible to formulate a conformal invariant skeleton perturbation theory. It is also shown that the Euclidean Maxwell equations in conformal electrodynamics are manifestations of its kinematical structure: in the case of the 3-point Green functions these equations follow (up to constants) from the conformal invariance while in the case of higher Green functions they are equivalent to the equality of the kernels of the partial wave expansions. This is the manifestation of the mathematical fast of a (partial) equivalence of the representations associated with the potential, current and the field tensor. (orig.)

  10. Incompressible Navier-Stokes equation from Einstein-Maxwell and Gauss-Bonnet-Maxwell theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niu Chao; Tian Yu; Wu Xiaoning; Ling Yi

    2012-01-01

    The dual fluid description for a general cutoff surface at radius r=r c outside the horizon in the charged AdS black brane bulk space-time is investigated, first in the Einstein-Maxwell theory. Under the non-relativistic long-wavelength expansion with parameter ε, the coupled Einstein-Maxwell equations are solved up to O(ε 2 ). The incompressible Navier-Stokes equation with external force density is obtained as the constraint equation at the cutoff surface. For non-extremal black brane, the viscosity of the dual fluid is determined by the regularity of the metric fluctuation at the horizon, whose ratio to entropy density η/s is independent of both the cutoff r c and the black brane charge. Then, we extend our discussion to the Gauss-Bonnet-Maxwell case, where the incompressible Navier-Stokes equation with external force density is also obtained at a general cutoff surface. In this case, it turns out that the ratio η/s is independent of the cutoff r c but dependent on the charge density of the black brane.

  11. Direct time integration of Maxwell's equations in linear dispersive media with absorption for scattering and propagation of femtosecond electromagnetic pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Rose M.; Hagness, Susan C.; Taflove, Allen

    1991-01-01

    The initial results for femtosecond pulse propagation and scattering interactions for a Lorentz medium obtained by a direct time integration of Maxwell's equations are reported. The computational approach provides reflection coefficients accurate to better than 6 parts in 10,000 over the frequency range of dc to 3 x 10 to the 16th Hz for a single 0.2-fs Gaussian pulse incident upon a Lorentz-medium half-space. New results for Sommerfeld and Brillouin precursors are shown and compared with previous analyses. The present approach is robust and permits 2D and 3D electromagnetic pulse propagation directly from the full-vector Maxwell's equations.

  12. Modeling hemoglobin at optical frequency using the unconditionally stable fundamental ADI-FDTD method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heh, Ding Yu; Tan, Eng Leong

    2011-04-12

    This paper presents the modeling of hemoglobin at optical frequency (250 nm - 1000 nm) using the unconditionally stable fundamental alternating-direction-implicit finite-difference time-domain (FADI-FDTD) method. An accurate model based on complex conjugate pole-residue pairs is proposed to model the complex permittivity of hemoglobin at optical frequency. Two hemoglobin concentrations at 15 g/dL and 33 g/dL are considered. The model is then incorporated into the FADI-FDTD method for solving electromagnetic problems involving interaction of light with hemoglobin. The computation of transmission and reflection coefficients of a half space hemoglobin medium using the FADI-FDTD validates the accuracy of our model and method. The specific absorption rate (SAR) distribution of human capillary at optical frequency is also shown. While maintaining accuracy, the unconditionally stable FADI-FDTD method exhibits high efficiency in modeling hemoglobin.

  13. Ultra-Wideband TEM Horns, Transient Arrays and Exponential Curves: A FDTD Look

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Utton, Troy

    1999-01-01

    .... The first part of this study demonstrates the Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) method's ability to duplicate experimental data, and establishes the baseline models used throughout the remainder of the research...

  14. A Modified AH-FDTD Unconditionally Stable Method Based on High-Order Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Pan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The unconditionally stable method, Associated-Hermite FDTD, has attracted more and more attentions in computational electromagnetic for its time-frequency compact property. Because of the fewer orders of AH basis needed in signal reconstruction, the computational efficiency can be improved further. In order to further improve the accuracy of the traditional AH-FDTD, a high-order algorithm is introduced. Using this method, the dispersion error induced by the space grid can be reduced, which makes it possible to set coarser grid. The simulation results show that, on the condition of coarse grid, the waveforms obtained from the proposed method are matched well with the analytic result, and the accuracy of the proposed method is higher than the traditional AH-FDTD. And the efficiency of the proposed method is higher than the traditional FDTD method in analysing 2D waveguide problems with fine-structure.

  15. FDTD simulations of localization and enhancements on fractal plasmonics nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buil, Stéphanie; Laverdant, Julien; Berini, Bruno; Maso, Pierre; Hermier, Jean-Pierre; Quélin, Xavier

    2012-05-21

    A parallelized 3D FDTD (Finite-Difference Time-Domain) solver has been used to study the near-field electromagnetic intensity upon plasmonics nanostructures. The studied structures are obtained from AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy) topography measured on real disordered gold layers deposited by thermal evaporation under ultra-high vacuum. The simulation results obtained with these 3D metallic nanostructures are in good agreement with previous experimental results: the localization of the electromagnetic intensity in subwavelength areas ("hot spots") is demonstrated; the spectral and polarization dependences of the position of these "hot spots" are also satisfactory; the enhancement factors obtained are realistic compared to the experimental ones. These results could be useful to further our understanding of the electromagnetic behavior of random metal layers.

  16. Analysis of equivalent antenna based on FDTD method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-xing Yang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available An equivalent microstrip antenna used in radio proximity fuse is presented. The design of this antenna is based on multilayer multi-permittivity dielectric substrate which is analyzed by finite difference time domain (FDTD method. Equivalent iterative formula is modified in the condition of cylindrical coordinate system. The mixed substrate which contains two kinds of media (one of them is airtakes the place of original single substrate. The results of equivalent antenna simulation show that the resonant frequency of equivalent antenna is similar to that of the original antenna. The validity of analysis can be validated by means of antenna resonant frequency formula. Two antennas have same radiation pattern and similar gain. This method can be used to reduce the weight of antenna, which is significant to the design of missile-borne antenna.

  17. Nonlinear FDTD Analysis of Lightning-Generated Sferics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdman, A.; Moore, R. C.

    2017-12-01

    Lightning strikes are extremely powerful natural events producing wideband electromagnetic waves. The EMP radiation and quasi-electrostatic field changes from powerful lightning discharges are capable of directly heating and ionizing the lower ionosphere. These changes to the electrical parameters of the lower ionosphere in turn modify the way different components of the wideband sferic propagate through and reflect from the lower ionosphere. Here we present the results of a new FDTD model that utilizes a 2D cylindrically symmetric grid with second-order accurate centered-difference differentials to evaluate a large number of chemical reactions pertinent to the D-region in order to update the electron density and conductivity every iteration. Using this model, we are able to evaluate the impact of lightning strikes of varying magnitude and analyze the role of ionospheric self-action in changing in the sferic waveform observed on the ground.

  18. Modal loss mechanism of micro-structured VCSELs studied using full vector FDTD method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Du-Ho; Vu, Ngoc Hai; Kim, Jin-Tae; Hwang, In-Kag

    2011-09-12

    Modal properties of vertical cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) with holey structures are studied using a finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. We investigate loss behavior with respect to the variation of structural parameters, and explain the loss mechanism of VCSELs. We also propose an effective method to estimate the modal loss based on mode profiles obtained using FDTD simulation. Our results could provide an important guideline for optimization of the microstructures of high-power single-mode VCSELs.

  19. Analytical BPS Maxwell-Higgs Vortices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hora, E. da; Ferreira, M. M. Jr.; Santos, C. dos; Casana, R.

    2014-01-01

    We have established a prescription for the calculation of analytical vortex solutions in the context of generalized Maxwell-Higgs models whose overall dynamics is controlled by two positive functions of the scalar field, namely, f(|ϕ|) and w(|ϕ|). We have also determined a natural constraint between these functions and the Higgs potential U(|ϕ|), allowing the existence of axially symmetric Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) solutions possessing finite energy. Furthermore, when the generalizing functions are chosen suitably, the nonstandard BPS equations can be solved exactly. We have studied some examples, comparing them with the usual Abrikosov-Nielsen-Olesen (ANO) solution. The overall conclusion is that the analytical self-dual vortices are well-behaved in all relevant sectors, strongly supporting the consistency of the respective generalized models. In particular, our results mimic well-known properties of the usual (numerical) configurations, as localized energy density, while contributing to the understanding of topological solitons and their description by means of analytical methods.

  20. The Proell Effect: A Macroscopic Maxwell's Demon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauen, Kenneth M.

    2011-12-01

    Maxwell's Demon is a legitimate challenge to the Second Law of Thermodynamics when the "demon" is executed via the Proell effect. Thermal energy transfer according to the Kinetic Theory of Heat and Statistical Mechanics that takes place over distances greater than the mean free path of a gas circumvents the microscopic randomness that leads to macroscopic irreversibility. No information is required to sort the particles as no sorting occurs; the entire volume of gas undergoes the same transition. The Proell effect achieves quasi-spontaneous thermal separation without sorting by the perturbation of a heterogeneous constant volume system with displacement and regeneration. The classical analysis of the constant volume process, such as found in the Stirling Cycle, is incomplete and therefore incorrect. There are extra energy flows that classical thermo does not recognize. When a working fluid is displaced across a regenerator with a temperature gradient in a constant volume system, complimentary compression and expansion work takes place that transfers energy between the regenerator and the bulk gas volumes of the hot and cold sides of the constant volume system. Heat capacity at constant pressure applies instead of heat capacity at constant volume. The resultant increase in calculated, recyclable energy allows the Carnot Limit to be exceeded in certain cycles. Super-Carnot heat engines and heat pumps have been designed and a US patent has been awarded.

  1. Parallel Implementation of the Discrete Green's Function Formulation of the FDTD Method on a Multicore Central Processing Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Stefański

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Parallel implementation of the discrete Green's function formulation of the finite-difference time-domain (DGF-FDTD method was developed on a multicore central processing unit. DGF-FDTD avoids computations of the electromagnetic field in free-space cells and does not require domain termination by absorbing boundary conditions. Computed DGF-FDTD solutions are compatible with the FDTD grid enabling the perfect hybridization of FDTD with the use of time-domain integral equation methods. The developed implementation can be applied to simulations of antenna characteristics. For the sake of example, arrays of Yagi-Uda antennas were simulated with the use of parallel DGF-FDTD. The efficiency of parallel computations was investigated as a function of the number of current elements in the FDTD grid. Although the developed method does not apply the fast Fourier transform for convolution computations, advantages stemming from the application of DGF-FDTD instead of FDTD can be demonstrated for one-dimensional wire antennas when simulation results are post-processed by the near-to-far-field transformation.

  2. Revisiting the phase transition of AdS-Maxwell-power-Yang-Mills black holes via AdS/CFT tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Moumni, H.

    2018-01-01

    In the present work we investigate the Van der Waals-like phase transition of AdS black hole solution in the Einstein-Maxwell-power-Yang-Mills gravity (EMPYM) via different approaches. After reconsidering this phase structure in the entropy-thermal plane, we recall the nonlocal observables such as holographic entanglement entropy and two point correlation function to show that the both observables exhibit a Van der Waals-like behavior as the case of the thermal entropy. By checking the Maxwell's equal area law and calculating the critical exponent for different values of charge C and nonlinearity parameter q we confirm that the first and the second order phases persist in the holographic framework. Also the validity of the Maxwell law is governed by the proximity to the critical point.

  3. Classes of general axisymmetric solutions of Einstein-Maxwell equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krori, K.D.; Choudhury, T.

    1981-01-01

    An exact solution of the Einstein equations for a stationary axially symmetric distribution of mass composed of all types of multipoles is obtained. Following Ernst (1968), from this vacuum solution the corresponding solution of the coupled Einstein-Maxwell equations is derived. A solution of Einstein-Maxwell fields for a static axially symmetric system composed of all types of multipoles is also obtained. (author)

  4. Doubly stratified mixed convection flow of Maxwell nanofluid with heat generation/absorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasi, F.M., E-mail: abbasisarkar@gmail.com [Department of Mathematics, Comsats Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Shehzad, S.A. [Department of Mathematics, Comsats Institute of Information Technology, Sahiwal 57000 (Pakistan); Hayat, T. [Department of Mathematics, Quaid-i-Azam University, 45320, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); NAAM Research Group, Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Ahmad, B. [NAAM Research Group, Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia)

    2016-04-15

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) doubly stratified flow of Maxwell nanofluid in presence of mixed convection is analyzed in this article. Effects of thermophoresis, Brownian motion and heat generation/absorption are present. The flow is induced due to linear stretching of sheet. Mathematical formulation is made under boundary layer approach. Expressions of velocity, temperature and nanoparticles concentration are developed. The obtained results are plotted and discussed to examine the variations in temperature and nanoparticles concentration due to different physical parameters. Numerical computations are made to obtain the values of local Nusselt and Sherwood numbers. Impact of sundry parameters on the flow quantities is analyzed graphically. - Highlights: • Double stratified flow of Maxwell nanofluid with mixed convection is modeled. • Thermophoresis and Brownian motion effects are encountered. • Computations are made to obtain the solution expressions. • Numerical values of local Nusselt and Sherwood numbers are computed and examined.

  5. Maxwell: A semi-analytic 4D code for earthquake cycle modeling of transform fault systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandwell, David; Smith-Konter, Bridget

    2018-05-01

    We have developed a semi-analytic approach (and computational code) for rapidly calculating 3D time-dependent deformation and stress caused by screw dislocations imbedded within an elastic layer overlying a Maxwell viscoelastic half-space. The maxwell model is developed in the Fourier domain to exploit the computational advantages of the convolution theorem, hence substantially reducing the computational burden associated with an arbitrarily complex distribution of force couples necessary for fault modeling. The new aspect of this development is the ability to model lateral variations in shear modulus. Ten benchmark examples are provided for testing and verification of the algorithms and code. One final example simulates interseismic deformation along the San Andreas Fault System where lateral variations in shear modulus are included to simulate lateral variations in lithospheric structure.

  6. Effect of deviations from the Maxwell distribution on neutron production in laser targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, D.B.; Petschek, A.G.

    1978-11-01

    Because of the brief duration of laser implosions and the small size of the pellets, one may be concerned that the ions never reach a Maxwell distribution or that the tail is lost by diffusion. This might have a large effect on , which depends heavily on the tail. We have calculated the ion distribution and the DT . Results are presented for the ratio of for a monoenergetic isotropic distribution to that for a Maxwell distribution, for the rate of approach of to the equilibrium value, and for the decay of due to fast ion losses. The main effect in the last case is due to energy losses, not to non-Maxwellian distribution. The effect is substantially different than previously reported

  7. GMES: A Python package for solving Maxwell’s equations using the FDTD method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Kyungwon; Kim, Huioon; Kim, Hyounggyu; Jung, Kil Su; Chung, Youngjoo

    2013-04-01

    This paper describes GMES, a free Python package for solving Maxwell’s equations using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The design of GMES follows the object-oriented programming (OOP) approach and adopts a unique design strategy where the voxels in the computational domain are grouped and then updated according to its material type. This piecewise updating scheme ensures that GMES can adopt OOP without losing its simple structure and time-stepping speed. The users can easily add various material types, sources, and boundary conditions into their code using the Python programming language. The key design features, along with the supported material types, excitation sources, boundary conditions and parallel calculations employed in GMES are also described in detail. Catalog identifier: AEOK_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEOK_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License v3.0 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 17700 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 89878 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++, Python. Computer: Any computer with a Unix-like system with a C++ compiler, and a Python interpreter; developed on 2.53 GHz Intel CoreTM i3. Operating system: Any Unix-like system; developed under Ubuntu 12.04 LTS 64 bit. Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: Yes. Parallelized with MPI directives (optional). RAM: Problem dependent (a simulation with real valued electromagnetic field uses roughly 0.18 KB per Yee cell.) Classification: 10. External routines: SWIG [1], Cython [2], NumPy [3], SciPy [4], matplotlib [5], MPI for Python [6] Nature of problem: Classical electrodynamics Solution method: Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method Additional comments: This article describes version 0.9.5. The most recent version can be downloaded at the GMES

  8. Complex and biofluids: From Maxwell to nowadays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misbah, Chaouqi

    2009-11-01

    Complex fluids are the rule in biology and in many industrial applications. Typical examples are blood, cartilage, and polymer solutions. Unlike water (as well as domestic oils, soft clear drinks, and so on), the law(s) describing the behavior of complex fluids are not yet fully established. The complexity arises from strong coupling between microscopic scales (like the motion of a red blood cell in the case of blood, or a polymer molecule for a polymer solution) and the global scale of the flow (say at the scale of a blood artery, or a channel in laboratory experiments). In this issue entitled Complex and Biofluids a large panel of experimental and theoretical problems of complex fluids is exposed. The topics range from dilute polymer solutions, food products, to biology (blood flow, cell and tissue mechanics). One of the earliest model put forward as an attempt to describe a complex fluid was suggested a long time ago by James Clerk Maxwell (in 1867). Other famous scientists, like Einstein (in 1906), and Taylor (in 1932) have made important contributions to the field, but the topic of complex fluids still continues to pose a formidable challenge to science. This field has known during the past decade an unbelievable upsurge of interest in many branches of science (physics, mechanics, chemistry, biology, medical science, mathematics, and so on). Understanding complex fluids is viewed as one of the biggest challenge of the present century. This synthesis will provide a simple introduction to the topic, summarize the main contribution of this issue, and list major open questions in this field. To cite this article: C. Misbah, C. R. Physique 10 (2009).

  9. Precast concrete unit assessment through GPR survey and FDTD modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo, Davide

    2017-04-01

    Precast concrete elements are widely used within United Kingdom house building offering ease in assembly and added values as structural integrity, sound and thermal insulation; most common concrete components include walls, beams, floors, panels, lintels, stairs, etc. The lack of respect of the manufacturer instruction during assembling, however, may induce cracking and short/long term loss of bearing capacity. GPR is a well-established not destructive technique employed in the assessment of structural elements because of real-time imaging, quickness of data collecting and ability to discriminate finest structural details. In this work, GPR has been used to investigate two different precast elements: precast reinforced concrete planks constituting the roof slab of a school and precast wood-cement blocks with insulation material pre-fitted used to build a perimeter wall of a private building. Visible cracks affected both constructions. For the assessment surveys, a GSSI 2.0 GHz GPR antenna has been used because of the high resolution required and the small size of the antenna case (155 by 90 by 105mm) enabling scanning up to 45mm from any obstruction. Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) numerical modelling was also performed to build a scenario of the expected GPR signal response for a preliminary real-time interpretation and to help solve uncertainties due to complex reflection patterns: simulated radargrams were built using Reflex Software v. 8.2, reproducing the same GPR pulse used for the surveys in terms of wavelet, nominal frequency, sample frequency and time window. Model geometries were derived from the design projects available both for the planks and the blocks; the electromagnetic properties of the materials (concrete, reinforcing bars, air-filled void, insulation and wooden concrete) were inferred from both values reported in literature and a preliminary interpretation of radargrams where internal layer interfaces were clearly recognizable and

  10. FDTD-based Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation model applied to specific neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanjul-Vélez, Félix; Salas-García, Irene; Ortega-Quijano, Noé; Arce-Diego, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    Non-invasive treatment of neurodegenerative diseases is particularly challenging in Western countries, where the population age is increasing. In this work, magnetic propagation in human head is modelled by Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) method, taking into account specific characteristics of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) in neurodegenerative diseases. It uses a realistic high-resolution three-dimensional human head mesh. The numerical method is applied to the analysis of magnetic radiation distribution in the brain using two realistic magnetic source models: a circular coil and a figure-8 coil commonly employed in TMS. The complete model was applied to the study of magnetic stimulation in Alzheimer and Parkinson Diseases (AD, PD). The results show the electrical field distribution when magnetic stimulation is supplied to those brain areas of specific interest for each particular disease. Thereby the current approach entails a high potential for the establishment of the current underdeveloped TMS dosimetry in its emerging application to AD and PD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Maxwell fields and shear-free null geodesic congruences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, Ezra T

    2004-01-01

    We study and report on the class of vacuum Maxwell fields in Minkowski space that possess a non-degenerate, diverging, principal null vector field (null eigenvector field of the Maxwell tensor) that is tangent to a shear-free null geodesics congruence. These congruences can be either surface forming (the tangent vectors being proportional to gradients) or not, i.e., the twisting congruences. In the non-twisting case, the associated Maxwell fields are precisely the Lienard-Wiechert fields, i.e., those Maxwell fields arising from an electric monopole moving on an arbitrary worldline. The null geodesic congruence is given by the generators of the light-cones with apex on the worldline. The twisting case is much richer, more interesting and far more complicated. In a twisting subcase, where our main interests lie, the following strange interpretation can be given. If we allow the real Minkowski space to be complexified so that the real Minkowski coordinates x a take complex values, i.e., x a → z a = x a + iy a with complex metric g η ab dz a dz b , the real vacuum Maxwell equations can be extended into the complex space and rewritten as curl W=i W radical, div W=0 with W=E+iB. This subcase of Maxwell fields can then be extended into the complex space so as to have as source, a complex analytic worldline, i.e., to now become complex Lienard-Wiechart fields. When viewed as real fields on the real Minkowski space (z a = x a ), they possess a real principal null vector that is shear-free but twisting and diverging. The twist is a measure of how far the complex worldline is from the real 'slice'. Most Maxwell fields in this subcase are asymptotically flat with a time-varying set of electric and magnetic moments, all depending on the complex displacements and the complex velocities

  12. FDTD simulation of induction heating of conducting ceramic ware

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, M.J.; Iskander, M.F.; Bringhurst, S. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Electrical Engineering Dept.

    1996-12-31

    Induction heating for the treatment of metals has been in commercial use since the mid 1960`s. Traditional advantages of induction heating over the convection or radiation processes include speed of heating, possible energy savings, and the ability to customize the coil design to optimize the heating process. In this paper the authors used the Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) technique to simulate and analyze the induction heating process for highly conducting ceramics. In order to analyze frequency effects, simulations were performed at 300 kHz, 2 MHz, and 25 MHz. It is found that at higher frequencies coils with a pitch of 2 in. or greater became capacitive and generate a large, axial, electric-field component. This new axial electric field, in addition to the normally encountered azimuthal field, causes an improvement in the uniformity of the power deposition in the ceramic sample. If the sample occupies a large portion of the coil, uniformity may also be improved by using a variable-pitch coil, or by extending the length of the coil a few turns beyond the length of the sample. In a production-line arrangement, where multiple samples are placed inside the coil, it is shown that maximum uniformity is achieved when the samples are placed coaxially.

  13. Frequency-Dependent FDTD Algorithm Using Newmark’s Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Wei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the characteristics of the polarizability in frequency domain of three common models of dispersive media, the relation between the polarization vector and electric field intensity is converted into a time domain differential equation of second order with the polarization vector by using the conversion from frequency to time domain. Newmark βγ difference method is employed to solve this equation. The electric field intensity to polarizability recursion is derived, and the electric flux to electric field intensity recursion is obtained by constitutive relation. Then FDTD iterative computation in time domain of electric and magnetic field components in dispersive medium is completed. By analyzing the solution stability of the above differential equation using central difference method, it is proved that this method has more advantages in the selection of time step. Theoretical analyses and numerical results demonstrate that this method is a general algorithm and it has advantages of higher accuracy and stability over the algorithms based on central difference method.

  14. Synthetic Microwave Imaging Reflectometry diagnostic using 3D FDTD Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, Scott; Jenkins, Thomas; Smithe, David; King, Jacob; Nimrod Team Team

    2017-10-01

    Microwave Imaging Reflectometry (MIR) has become a standard diagnostic for understanding tokamak edge perturbations, including the edge harmonic oscillations in QH mode operation. These long-wavelength perturbations are larger than the normal turbulent fluctuation levels and thus normal analysis of synthetic signals become more difficult. To investigate, we construct a synthetic MIR diagnostic for exploring density fluctuation amplitudes in the tokamak plasma edge by using the three-dimensional, full-wave FDTD code Vorpal. The source microwave beam for the diagnostic is generated and refelected at the cutoff surface that is distorted by 2D density fluctuations in the edge plasma. Synthetic imaging optics at the detector can be used to understand the fluctuation and background density profiles. We apply the diagnostic to understand the fluctuations in edge plasma density during QH-mode activity in the DIII-D tokamak, as modeled by the NIMROD code. This work was funded under DOE Grant Number DE-FC02-08ER54972.

  15. Acceleration of FDTD mode solver by high-performance computing techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Lin; Xi, Yanping; Huang, Wei-Ping

    2010-06-21

    A two-dimensional (2D) compact finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) mode solver is developed based on wave equation formalism in combination with the matrix pencil method (MPM). The method is validated for calculation of both real guided and complex leaky modes of typical optical waveguides against the bench-mark finite-difference (FD) eigen mode solver. By taking advantage of the inherent parallel nature of the FDTD algorithm, the mode solver is implemented on graphics processing units (GPUs) using the compute unified device architecture (CUDA). It is demonstrated that the high-performance computing technique leads to significant acceleration of the FDTD mode solver with more than 30 times improvement in computational efficiency in comparison with the conventional FDTD mode solver running on CPU of a standard desktop computer. The computational efficiency of the accelerated FDTD method is in the same order of magnitude of the standard finite-difference eigen mode solver and yet require much less memory (e.g., less than 10%). Therefore, the new method may serve as an efficient, accurate and robust tool for mode calculation of optical waveguides even when the conventional eigen value mode solvers are no longer applicable due to memory limitation.

  16. 3D modelling of the electromagnetic response of geophysical targets using the FDTD method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debroux, P.S. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Mining and Geological Engineering Dept.

    1996-05-01

    A publicly available and maintained electromagnetic finite-difference time domain (FDTD) code has been applied to the forward modelling of the response of 1D, 2D and 3D geophysical targets to a vertical magnetic dipole excitation. The FDTD method is used to analyze target responses in the 1 MHz to 100 MHz range, where either conduction or displacement currents may have the controlling role. The response of the geophysical target to the excitation is presented as changes in the magnetic field ellipticity. The results of the FDTD code compare favorably with previously published integral equation solutions of the response of 1D targets, and FDTD models calculated with different finite-difference cell sizes are compared to find the effect of model discretization on the solution. The discretization errors, calculated as absolute error in ellipticity, are presented for the different ground geometry models considered, and are, for the most part, below 10% of the integral equation solutions. Finally, the FDTD code is used to calculate the magnetic ellipticity response of a 2D survey and a 3D sounding of complicated geophysical targets. The response of these 2D and 3D targets are too complicated to be verified with integral equation solutions, but show the proper low- and high-frequency responses.

  17. Accelerating three-dimensional FDTD calculations on GPU clusters for electromagnetic field simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaoka, Tomoaki; Watanabe, Soichi

    2012-01-01

    Electromagnetic simulation with anatomically realistic computational human model using the finite-difference time domain (FDTD) method has recently been performed in a number of fields in biomedical engineering. To improve the method's calculation speed and realize large-scale computing with the computational human model, we adapt three-dimensional FDTD code to a multi-GPU cluster environment with Compute Unified Device Architecture and Message Passing Interface. Our multi-GPU cluster system consists of three nodes. The seven GPU boards (NVIDIA Tesla C2070) are mounted on each node. We examined the performance of the FDTD calculation on multi-GPU cluster environment. We confirmed that the FDTD calculation on the multi-GPU clusters is faster than that on a multi-GPU (a single workstation), and we also found that the GPU cluster system calculate faster than a vector supercomputer. In addition, our GPU cluster system allowed us to perform the large-scale FDTD calculation because were able to use GPU memory of over 100 GB.

  18. Numerical Simulations of Self-Focused Pulses Using the Nonlinear Maxwell Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goorjian, Peter M.; Silberberg, Yaron; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    This paper will present results in computational nonlinear optics. An algorithm will be described that solves the full vector nonlinear Maxwell's equations exactly without the approximations that are currently made. Present methods solve a reduced scalar wave equation, namely the nonlinear Schrodinger equation, and neglect the optical carrier. Also, results will be shown of calculations of 2-D electromagnetic nonlinear waves computed by directly integrating in time the nonlinear vector Maxwell's equations. The results will include simulations of 'light bullet' like pulses. Here diffraction and dispersion will be counteracted by nonlinear effects. The time integration efficiently implements linear and nonlinear convolutions for the electric polarization, and can take into account such quantum effects as Kerr and Raman interactions. The present approach is robust and should permit modeling 2-D and 3-D optical soliton propagation, scattering, and switching directly from the full-vector Maxwell's equations. Abstract of a proposed paper for presentation at the meeting NONLINEAR OPTICS: Materials, Fundamentals, and Applications, Hyatt Regency Waikaloa, Waikaloa, Hawaii, July 24-29, 1994, Cosponsored by IEEE/Lasers and Electro-Optics Society and Optical Society of America

  19. James Clerk Maxwell perspectives on his life and work

    CERN Document Server

    McCartney, Mark; Whitaker, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    James Clerk Maxwell (1831-1879) had a relatively brief, but remarkable life, lived in his beloved rural home of Glenlair, and variously in Edinburgh, Aberdeen, London and Cambridge. His scholarship also ranged wide - covering all the major aspects of Victorian natural philosophy. He was one of the most important mathematical physicists of all time, coming only after Newton and Einstein. In scientific terms his immortality is enshrined in electromagnetism and Maxwell's equations, but as this book shows, there was much more to Maxwell than electromagnetism, both in terms of his science and his wider life. Maxwell's life and contributions to science are so rich that they demand the expertise of a range of academics - physicists, mathematicians, and historians of science and literature - to do him justice. The various chapters will enable Maxwell to be seen from a range of perspectives. Chapters 1 to 4 deal with wider aspects of his life in time and place, at Aberdeen, King's College London and the Cavendish Labo...

  20. Comparison of different Maxwell solvers coupled to a PIC resolution method of Maxwell-Vlasov equations; Evaluation de differents solveurs Maxwell pour la resolution de Maxwell-Vlasov par une methode PIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fochesato, Ch. [CEA Bruyeres-le-Chatel, Dept. de Conception et Simulation des Armes, Service Simulation des Amorces, Lab. Logiciels de Simulation, 91 (France); Bouche, D. [CEA Bruyeres-le-Chatel, Dept. de Physique Theorique et Appliquee, Lab. de Recherche Conventionne, Centre de Mathematiques et Leurs Applications, 91 (France)

    2007-07-01

    The numerical solution of Maxwell equations is a challenging task. Moreover, the range of applications is very wide: microwave devices, diffraction, to cite a few. As a result, a number of methods have been proposed since the sixties. However, among all these methods, none has proved to be free of drawbacks. The finite difference scheme proposed by Yee in 1966, is well suited for Maxwell equations. However, it only works on cubical mesh. As a result, the boundaries of complex objects are not properly handled by the scheme. When classical nodal finite elements are used, spurious modes appear, which spoil the results of simulations. Edge elements overcome this problem, at the price of rather complex implementation, and computationally intensive simulations. Finite volume methods, either generalizing Yee scheme to a wider class of meshes, or applying to Maxwell equations methods initially used in the field of hyperbolic systems of conservation laws, are also used. Lastly, 'Discontinuous Galerkin' methods, generalizing to arbitrary order of accuracy finite volume methods, have recently been applied to Maxwell equations. In this report, we more specifically focus on the coupling of a Maxwell solver to a PIC (Particle-in-cell) method. We analyze advantages and drawbacks of the most widely used methods: accuracy, robustness, sensitivity to numerical artefacts, efficiency, user judgment. (authors)

  1. Singularity Processing Method of Microstrip Line Edge Based on LOD-FDTD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the performance of the accuracy and efficiency for analyzing the microstrip structure, a singularity processing method is proposed theoretically and experimentally based on the fundamental locally one-dimensional finite difference time domain (LOD-FDTD with second-order temporal accuracy (denoted as FLOD2-FDTD. The proposed method can highly improve the performance of the FLOD2-FDTD even when the conductor is embedded into more than half of the cell by the coordinate transformation. The experimental results showed that the proposed method can achieve higher accuracy when the time step size is less than or equal to 5 times of that the Courant-Friedrich-Levy (CFL condition allowed. In comparison with the previously reported methods, the proposed method for calculating electromagnetic field near microstrip line edge not only improves the efficiency, but also can provide a higher accuracy.

  2. Computation of tightly-focused laser beams in the FDTD method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capoğlu, Ilker R; Taflove, Allen; Backman, Vadim

    2013-01-14

    We demonstrate how a tightly-focused coherent TEMmn laser beam can be computed in the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The electromagnetic field around the focus is decomposed into a plane-wave spectrum, and approximated by a finite number of plane waves injected into the FDTD grid using the total-field/scattered-field (TF/SF) method. We provide an error analysis, and guidelines for the discrete approximation. We analyze the scattering of the beam from layered spaces and individual scatterers. The described method should be useful for the simulation of confocal microscopy and optical data storage. An implementation of the method can be found in our free and open source FDTD software ("Angora").

  3. Performance advantages of CPML over UPML absorbing boundary conditions in FDTD algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvozdic, Branko D.; Djurdjevic, Dusan Z.

    2017-01-01

    Implementation of absorbing boundary condition (ABC) has a very important role in simulation performance and accuracy in finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. The perfectly matched layer (PML) is the most efficient type of ABC. The aim of this paper is to give detailed insight in and discussion of boundary conditions and hence to simplify the choice of PML used for termination of computational domain in FDTD method. In particular, we demonstrate that using the convolutional PML (CPML) has significant advantages in terms of implementation in FDTD method and reducing computer resources than using uniaxial PML (UPML). An extensive number of numerical experiments has been performed and results have shown that CPML is more efficient in electromagnetic waves absorption. Numerical code is prepared, several problems are analyzed and relative error is calculated and presented.

  4. Multi-GPU accelerated three-dimensional FDTD method for electromagnetic simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaoka, Tomoaki; Watanabe, Soichi

    2011-01-01

    Numerical simulation with a numerical human model using the finite-difference time domain (FDTD) method has recently been performed in a number of fields in biomedical engineering. To improve the method's calculation speed and realize large-scale computing with the numerical human model, we adapt three-dimensional FDTD code to a multi-GPU environment using Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA). In this study, we used NVIDIA Tesla C2070 as GPGPU boards. The performance of multi-GPU is evaluated in comparison with that of a single GPU and vector supercomputer. The calculation speed with four GPUs was approximately 3.5 times faster than with a single GPU, and was slightly (approx. 1.3 times) slower than with the supercomputer. Calculation speed of the three-dimensional FDTD method using GPUs can significantly improve with an expanding number of GPUs.

  5. Implementation of Associated Hermite FDTD Method in Handling INBCs for Shielding Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihua Shi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available For modeling of electrically thin conductive shields, the unconditionally stable Associated Hermite (AH FDTD scheme is combined with the impedance network boundary conditions (INBCs in this paper. The two-port network equations of INBCs in frequency domain are transformed into AH domain to represent the relationship of tangential components of the electric and magnetic fields at faces of the shield. The established AH-INBCs shielding boundaries are incorporated into a set of implicit equations to calculate the expansion coefficients vectors of electromagnetic fields in the computational domain. The method is free of CFL condition and no convolution integral operation for solving the conventional INBCs-FDTD is involved. Numerical example shows that, compared with analytical solutions and conventional FDTD method, the proposed algorithm is efficient and accurate.

  6. An Optimized Parallel FDTD Topology for Challenging Electromagnetic Simulations on Supercomputers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shugang Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It may not be a challenge to run a Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD code for electromagnetic simulations on a supercomputer with more than 10 thousands of CPU cores; however, to make FDTD code work with the highest efficiency is a challenge. In this paper, the performance of parallel FDTD is optimized through MPI (message passing interface virtual topology, based on which a communication model is established. The general rules of optimal topology are presented according to the model. The performance of the method is tested and analyzed on three high performance computing platforms with different architectures in China. Simulations including an airplane with a 700-wavelength wingspan, and a complex microstrip antenna array with nearly 2000 elements are performed very efficiently using a maximum of 10240 CPU cores.

  7. FDTD modelling of induced polarization phenomena in transient electromagnetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commer, Michael; Petrov, Peter V.; Newman, Gregory A.

    2017-04-01

    The finite-difference time-domain scheme is augmented in order to treat the modelling of transient electromagnetic signals containing induced polarization effects from 3-D distributions of polarizable media. Compared to the non-dispersive problem, the discrete dispersive Maxwell system contains costly convolution operators. Key components to our solution for highly digitized model meshes are Debye decomposition and composite memory variables. We revert to the popular Cole-Cole model of dispersion to describe the frequency-dependent behaviour of electrical conductivity. Its inversely Laplace-transformed Debye decomposition results in a series of time convolutions between electric field and exponential decay functions, with the latter reflecting each Debye constituents' individual relaxation time. These function types in the discrete-time convolution allow for their substitution by memory variables, annihilating the otherwise prohibitive computing demands. Numerical examples demonstrate the efficiency and practicality of our algorithm.

  8. The scientific papers of James Clerk Maxwell, vol.I

    CERN Document Server

    Maxwell, James Clerk

    2014-01-01

    One of the greatest theoretical physicists of the 19th century, James Clerk Maxwell is best known for his studies of the electromagnetic field. The 101 scientific papers of this two-volume set, arranged chronologically, testify to Maxwell's profound scientific legacy and include the preliminary explorations that culminated in his most famous work, A Treatise on Electricity and Magnetism. One of the nineteenth century's most significant papers, "A Dynamical Theory of the Electromagnetic Field," appears here, along with similarly influential expositions of Maxwell's dynamical theory of gases. The author's extensive range of interests is well represented, from his discussions of color blindness and the composition of Saturn's rings to his essays on geometrical optics, ether, and protecting buildings from lightning. His less technical writings are featured as well, including items written for the Encyclopedia Britannica and Nature magazine, book reviews, and popular lectures. Striking in their originality, these ...

  9. FDTD simulation of EM wave propagation in 3-D media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, T.; Tripp, A.C. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics

    1996-01-01

    A finite-difference, time-domain solution to Maxwell`s equations has been developed for simulating electromagnetic wave propagation in 3-D media. The algorithm allows arbitrary electrical conductivity and permittivity variations within a model. The staggered grid technique of Yee is used to sample the fields. A new optimized second-order difference scheme is designed to approximate the spatial derivatives. Like the conventional fourth-order difference scheme, the optimized second-order scheme needs four discrete values to calculate a single derivative. However, the optimized scheme is accurate over a wider wavenumber range. Compared to the fourth-order scheme, the optimized scheme imposes stricter limitations on the time step sizes but allows coarser grids. The net effect is that the optimized scheme is more efficient in terms of computation time and memory requirement than the fourth-order scheme. The temporal derivatives are approximated by second-order central differences throughout. The Liao transmitting boundary conditions are used to truncate an open problem. A reflection coefficient analysis shows that this transmitting boundary condition works very well. However, it is subject to instability. A method that can be easily implemented is proposed to stabilize the boundary condition. The finite-difference solution is compared to closed-form solutions for conducting and nonconducting whole spaces and to an integral-equation solution for a 3-D body in a homogeneous half-space. In all cases, the finite-difference solutions are in good agreement with the other solutions. Finally, the use of the algorithm is demonstrated with a 3-D model. Numerical results show that both the magnetic field response and electric field response can be useful for shallow-depth and small-scale investigations.

  10. FDTD simulated observation of a gold nanorod by scanning near-field optical microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawada, Keiji; Maruoka, Teruto; Nakamura, Hiroaki; Tamura, Yuichi; Imura, Kohei; Saiki, Toshiharu; Okamoto, Hiromi

    2010-01-01

    The optical properties of a gold nanorod were investigated by Imura et. al. using an apertured-type scanning near-field optical microscope (SNOM). The observed transmission image showed an oscillating pattern along the long axis of the nanorod. We obtain the image using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. Our model includes a nanorod on a glass substrate, a SNOM, and current as a light source. We develop a simple method for including the Drude-Lorentz dispersion relation of Vial et. al. for gold in the FDTD. The oscillating pattern is explained by the total current in the nanorod, tip of the SNOM, and light source. (author)

  11. Split-field FDTD method for oblique incidence study of periodic dispersive metallic structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baida, F I; Belkhir, A

    2009-08-15

    The study of periodic structures illuminated by a normally incident plane wave is a simple task that can be numerically simulated by the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. On the contrary, for off-normal incidence, a widely modified algorithm must be developed in order to bypass the frequency dependence appearing in the periodic boundary conditions. After recently implementing this FDTD algorithm for pure dielectric materials, we here extend it to the study of metallic structures where dispersion can be described by analytical models. The accuracy of our code is demonstrated through comparisons with already-published results in the case of 1D and 3D structures.

  12. Application of Numerical Dispersion Compensation of the Yee-FDTD Algorithm on Elongated Domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franek, Ondrej; Zhang, Shuai; Olesen, Kim

    2017-01-01

    A postprocessing method to compensate for the numerical dispersion of the Yee-FDTD scheme is presented. The method makes use of frequency domain deconvolution of the erroneous phase shift from the obtained results and can be applied on certain specific conditions, such as for simulations on elong......A postprocessing method to compensate for the numerical dispersion of the Yee-FDTD scheme is presented. The method makes use of frequency domain deconvolution of the erroneous phase shift from the obtained results and can be applied on certain specific conditions, such as for simulations...

  13. Numerical Simulation of Partially-Coherent Broadband Optical Imaging Using the FDTD Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çapoğlu, İlker R.; White, Craig A.; Rogers, Jeremy D.; Subramanian, Hariharan; Taflove, Allen; Backman, Vadim

    2012-01-01

    Rigorous numerical modeling of optical systems has attracted interest in diverse research areas ranging from biophotonics to photolithography. We report the full-vector electromagnetic numerical simulation of a broadband optical imaging system with partially-coherent and unpolarized illumination. The scattering of light from the sample is calculated using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) numerical method. Geometrical optics principles are applied to the scattered light to obtain the intensity distribution at the image plane. Multilayered object spaces are also supported by our algorithm. For the first time, numerical FDTD calculations are directly compared to and shown to agree well with broadband experimental microscopy results. PMID:21540939

  14. FDTD analysis of 3-D conducting target coated by anisotropic magnetized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Lijun; Liu Shaobin; Mo Jinjun; Yuan Naichang

    2006-01-01

    The JEC finite-difference time-domain (JEC-FDTD) method is extended to three dimensional anisotropic dispersive media- the magnetized plasma. The problem which incorporates both anisotropy and frequency dispersion at the same time is solved for the electromagnetic wave propagation. The three dimensional JEC-FDTD formulations for anisotropic magnetized plasma are derived. The method is applied to the electromagnetic scattering of dihedral corner reflector and sphere-cone coated with anisotropic magnetized plasma. By simulating the interaction of electromagnetic wave with magnetized plasma, some numerical results are obtained, which indicate that an appropriate plasma coating may efficiently reduce the RCS of a metallic target. (authors)

  15. Analysis of photonic band-gap (PBG) structures using the FDTD method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tong, M.S.; Cheng, M.; Lu, Y.L.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, a number of photonic band-gap (PBG) structures, which are formed by periodic circuit elements printed oil transmission-line circuits, are studied by using a well-known numerical method, the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The results validate the band-stop filter...... behavior of these structures, and the computed results generally match well with ones published in the literature. It is also found that the FDTD method is a robust, versatile, and powerful numerical technique to perform such numerical studies. The proposed PBG filter structures may be applied in microwave...

  16. FDTD Simulation of Nonlinear Ultrasonic Pulse Propagation in ESWL Using Equations Including Lagrangian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuhara, Keisuke; Morita, Nagayoshi

    New FDTD algorithm is proposed for analyzing ultrasonic pulse propagation in the human body, the problem being connected with ESWL (Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy). In this method, we do not use plane wave approximation but employ directly the original equations taking account of Lagrangian to derive new FDTD algorithms. This method is applied to an experimental setup and its numerical model that resemble actual treatment situation to compare sound pressure distributions obtained numerically with those obtained experimentally. It is shown that the present method gives clearly better results than the earlier method, in the viewpoint of numerical reappearance of strongly nonlinear waveform.

  17. FDTD analysis of a noninvasive hyperthermia system for brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yacoob, Sulafa M; Hassan, Noha S

    2012-08-14

    Hyperthermia is considered one of the new therapeutic modalities for cancer treatment and is based on the difference in thermal sensitivity between healthy tissues and tumors. During hyperthermia treatment, the temperature of the tumor is raised to 40-45°C for a definite period resulting in the destruction of cancer cells. This paper investigates design, modeling and simulation of a new non-invasive hyperthermia applicator system capable of effectively heating deep seated as well as superficial brain tumors using inexpensive, simple, and easy to fabricate components without harming surrounding healthy brain tissues. The proposed hyperthermia applicator system is composed of an air filled partial half ellipsoidal chamber, a patch antenna, and a head model with an embedded tumor at an arbitrary location. The irradiating antenna is placed at one of the foci of the hyperthermia chamber while the center of the brain tumor is placed at the other focus. The finite difference time domain (FDTD) method is used to compute both the SAR patterns and the temperature distribution in three different head models due to two different patch antennas at a frequency of 915 MHz. The obtained results suggest that by using the proposed noninvasive hyperthermia system it is feasible to achieve sufficient and focused energy deposition and temperature rise to therapeutic values in deep seated as well as superficial brain tumors without harming surrounding healthy tissue. The proposed noninvasive hyperthermia system proved suitable for raising the temperature in tumors embedded in the brain to therapeutic values by carefully selecting the systems components. The operator of the system only needs to place the center of the brain tumor at a pre-specified location and excite the antenna at a single frequency of 915 MHz. Our study may provide a basis for a clinical applicator prototype capable of heating brain tumors.

  18. FDTD analysis of a noninvasive hyperthermia system for brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yacoob Sulafa M

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hyperthermia is considered one of the new therapeutic modalities for cancer treatment and is based on the difference in thermal sensitivity between healthy tissues and tumors. During hyperthermia treatment, the temperature of the tumor is raised to 40–45°C for a definite period resulting in the destruction of cancer cells. This paper investigates design, modeling and simulation of a new non-invasive hyperthermia applicator system capable of effectively heating deep seated as well as superficial brain tumors using inexpensive, simple, and easy to fabricate components without harming surrounding healthy brain tissues. Methods The proposed hyperthermia applicator system is composed of an air filled partial half ellipsoidal chamber, a patch antenna, and a head model with an embedded tumor at an arbitrary location. The irradiating antenna is placed at one of the foci of the hyperthermia chamber while the center of the brain tumor is placed at the other focus. The finite difference time domain (FDTD method is used to compute both the SAR patterns and the temperature distribution in three different head models due to two different patch antennas at a frequency of 915 MHz. Results The obtained results suggest that by using the proposed noninvasive hyperthermia system it is feasible to achieve sufficient and focused energy deposition and temperature rise to therapeutic values in deep seated as well as superficial brain tumors without harming surrounding healthy tissue. Conclusions The proposed noninvasive hyperthermia system proved suitable for raising the temperature in tumors embedded in the brain to therapeutic values by carefully selecting the systems components. The operator of the system only needs to place the center of the brain tumor at a pre-specified location and excite the antenna at a single frequency of 915 MHz. Our study may provide a basis for a clinical applicator prototype capable of heating brain tumors.

  19. Variational principle for nonlinear gyrokinetic Vlasov--Maxwell equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brizard, Alain J.

    2000-01-01

    A new variational principle for the nonlinear gyrokinetic Vlasov--Maxwell equations is presented. This Eulerian variational principle uses constrained variations for the gyrocenter Vlasov distribution in eight-dimensional extended phase space and turns out to be simpler than the Lagrangian variational principle recently presented by H. Sugama [Phys. Plasmas 7, 466 (2000)]. A local energy conservation law is then derived explicitly by the Noether method. In future work, this new variational principle will be used to derive self-consistent, nonlinear, low-frequency Vlasov--Maxwell bounce-gyrokinetic equations, in which the fast gyromotion and bounce-motion time scales have been eliminated

  20. The contributions of Faraday and Maxwell to electrical science

    CERN Document Server

    Tricker, R A R

    1966-01-01

    The Contributions of Faraday and Maxwell to Electrical Science deals with the development of electromagnetic theory following the establishment of the basis for the first law of circulation relating to the magnetic fields generated by steady currents. This book is organized into two parts encompassing nine chapters that specifically treat the provision of the basis for the second law of circulation, the law that deals with the induction of currents, which was predominantly the work of British physicists, Michael Faraday and James Clerk Maxwell. Part I highlights their life, career, and contri

  1. SF-FDTD analysis of a predictive physical model for parallel aligned liquid crystal devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez, Andrés.; Francés, Jorge; Martínez, Francisco J.; Gallego, Sergi; Alvarez, Mariela L.; Calzado, Eva M.; Pascual, Inmaculada; Beléndez, Augusto

    2017-08-01

    Recently we demonstrated a novel and simplified model enabling to calculate the voltage dependent retardance provided by parallel aligned liquid crystal devices (PA-LCoS) for a very wide range of incidence angles and any wavelength in the visible. To our knowledge it represents the most simplified approach still showing predictive capability. Deeper insight into the physics behind the simplified model is necessary to understand if the parameters in the model are physically meaningful. Since the PA-LCoS is a black-box where we do not have information about the physical parameters of the device, we cannot perform this kind of analysis using the experimental retardance measurements. In this work we develop realistic simulations for the non-linear tilt of the liquid crystal director across the thickness of the liquid crystal layer in the PA devices. We consider these profiles to have a sine-like shape, which is a good approximation for typical ranges of applied voltage in commercial PA-LCoS microdisplays. For these simulations we develop a rigorous method based on the split-field finite difference time domain (SF-FDTD) technique which provides realistic retardance values. These values are used as the experimental measurements to which the simplified model is fitted. From this analysis we learn that the simplified model is very robust, providing unambiguous solutions when fitting its parameters. We also learn that two of the parameters in the model are physically meaningful, proving a useful reverse-engineering approach, with predictive capability, to probe into internal characteristics of the PA-LCoS device.

  2. Self-dual Maxwell-Chern-Simons theory on a cylinder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Jongmin; Kim, Seongtag

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we study the relativistic Maxwell-Chern-Simons vortices on an asymptotically flat cylinder. A topological multivortex solution is constructed by variational methods, and the Maxwell and the Chern-Simons limits are verified.

  3. Incompressible Maxwell-Boussinesq approximation: Existence, uniqueness and shape sensitivity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Consiglieri, L.; Nečasová, Šárka; Sokolowski, J.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 38, č. 4 (2009), s. 1193-1215 ISSN 0324-8569 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/05/0005; GA ČR GA201/08/0012 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : Maxwell-Boussinesq approximation Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.378, year: 2009

  4. Conserved quantities for stationary Einstein-Maxwell space-times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esposito, F.P.; Witten, L.

    1978-01-01

    It is shown that every stationary Einstein-Maxwell space-time has eight divergence-free vector fields and these are isolated in general form. The vector fields and associated conserved quantities are calculated for several families of space-times. (Auth.)

  5. Incompressible Einstein–Maxwell fluids with specified electric fields

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Einstein–Maxwell equations describing static charged spheres with uniform density and variable electric field intensity are studied. The special case of constant electric field is also studied. The evolution of the model is governed by a hypergeometric differential equation which has a general solution in terms of special ...

  6. Ito terms and the Maxwell field on the lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Olivo, J.C.; Socolovsky, M.

    1988-01-01

    If lattice renormalization effects are ignored and the number of space-time dimensions is less than four, it is explicitly shown that the effective continuum action for the Maxwell field does not contain the so-called Ito terms. As is known, the qualitative reason for this result is the flat character of the integration measure

  7. Maxwell-Vlasov equations as a continuous Hamiltonian system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, P.J.

    1980-09-01

    The well-known Maxwell-Vlasov equations that describe a collisionless plasma are cast into Hamiltonian form. The dynamical variables are the physical although noncanonical variables E, B and f. We present a Poisson bracket which acts on these variables and the energy functional to produce the equations of motion

  8. Second order guiding-center Vlasov–Maxwell equations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jens

    2010-01-01

    Second order gyrogauge invariant guiding-center coordinates with strong E×B-flow are derived using the Lie transformation method. The corresponding Poisson bracket structure and equations of motion are obtained. From a variational principle the explicit Vlasov–Maxwell equations are derived...

  9. Finite difference time domain analysis of a chiro plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres-Silva, H.; Obligado, A.; Reggiani, N.; Sakanaka, P.H.

    1995-01-01

    The finite difference time-domain (FDTD) method is one of the most widely used computational methods in electromagnetics. Using FDTD, Maxwell's equations are solved directly in the time domain via finite differences and time stepping. The basic approach is relatively easy to understand and is an alternative to the more usual frequency-domain approaches. (author). 5 refs

  10. Scattered-field FDTD and PSTD algorithms with CPML absorbing boundary conditions for light scattering by aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Wenbo; Videen, Gorden; Fu, Qiang; Hu, Yongxiang

    2013-01-01

    As fundamental parameters for polarized-radiative-transfer calculations, the single-scattering phase matrix of irregularly shaped aerosol particles must be accurately modeled. In this study, a scattered-field finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) model and a scattered-field pseudo-spectral time-domain (PSTD) model are developed for light scattering by arbitrarily shaped dielectric aerosols. The convolutional perfectly matched layer (CPML) absorbing boundary condition (ABC) is used to truncate the computational domain. It is found that the PSTD method is generally more accurate than the FDTD in calculation of the single-scattering properties given similar spatial cell sizes. Since the PSTD can use a coarser grid for large particles, it can lower the memory requirement in the calculation. However, the Fourier transformations in the PSTD need significantly more CPU time than simple subtractions in the FDTD, and the fast Fourier transform requires a power of 2 elements in calculations, thus using the PSTD could not significantly reduce the CPU time required in the numerical modeling. Furthermore, because the scattered-field FDTD/PSTD equations include incident-wave source terms, the FDTD/PSTD model allows for the inclusion of an arbitrarily incident wave source, including a plane parallel wave or a Gaussian beam like those emitted by lasers usually used in laboratory particle characterizations, etc. The scattered-field FDTD and PSTD light-scattering models can be used to calculate single-scattering properties of arbitrarily shaped aerosol particles over broad size and wavelength ranges. -- Highlights: • Scattered-field FDTD and PSTD models are developed for light scattering by aerosols. • Convolutional perfectly matched layer absorbing boundary condition is used. • PSTD is generally more accurate than FDTD in calculating single-scattering properties. • Using same spatial resolution, PSTD requires much larger CPU time than FDTD

  11. OpenCL-Based FPGA Accelerator for 3D FDTD with Periodic and Absorbing Boundary Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasitha Muthumala Waidyasooriya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Finite difference time domain (FDTD method is a very poplar way of numerically solving partial differential equations. FDTD has a low operational intensity so that the performances in CPUs and GPUs are often restricted by the memory bandwidth. Recently, deeply pipelined FPGA accelerators have shown a lot of success by exploiting streaming data flows in FDTD computation. In spite of this success, many FPGA accelerators are not suitable for real-world applications that contain complex boundary conditions. Boundary conditions break the regularity of the data flow, so that the performances are significantly reduced. This paper proposes an FPGA accelerator that computes commonly used absorbing and periodic boundary conditions in many 3D FDTD applications. Accelerator is designed using a “C-like” programming language called OpenCL (open computing language. As a result, the proposed accelerator can be customized easily by changing the software code. According to the experimental results, we achieved over 3.3 times and 1.5 times higher processing speed compared to the CPUs and GPUs, respectively. Moreover, the proposed accelerator is more than 14 times faster compared to the recently proposed FPGA accelerators that are capable of handling complex boundary conditions.

  12. Resource-saving application of FDTD technique in 3D photonic crystal waveguide calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lavrinenko, Andrei; Tromborg, Bjarne

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents an algorithm based on the well-known FDTD numerical method which is adapted for 3D problems of transmission and reflection of photonic crystal waveguides, and which effectively saves memory and computing resources. Specific examples showing its validity and effectiveness...

  13. FDTD analysis of the light extraction efficiency of OLEDs with a random scattering layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jun-Whee; Jang, Ji-Hyang; Oh, Min-Cheol; Shin, Jin-Wook; Cho, Doo-Hee; Moon, Jae-Hyun; Lee, Jeong-Ik

    2014-01-13

    The light extraction efficiency of OLEDs with a nano-sized random scattering layer (RSL-OLEDs) was analyzed using the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method. In contrast to periodic diffraction patterns, the presence of an RSL suppresses the spectral shift with respect to the viewing angle. For FDTD simulation of RSL-OLEDs, a planar light source with a certain spatial and temporal coherence was incorporated, and the light extraction efficiency with respect to the fill factor of the RSL and the absorption coefficient of the material was investigated. The design results were compared to the experimental results of the RSL-OLEDs in order to confirm the usefulness of FDTD in predicting experimental results. According to our FDTD simulations, the light confined within the ITO-organic waveguide was quickly absorbed, and the absorption coefficients of ITO and RSL materials should be reduced in order to obtain significant improvement in the external quantum efficiency (EQE). When the extinction coefficient of ITO was 0.01, the EQE in the RSL-OLED was simulated to be enhanced by a factor of 1.8.

  14. Discrete Green’s function diakoptics for stable FDTD interaction between multiply-connected domains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hon, de B.P.; Arnold, J.M.; Graglia, R.D.

    2007-01-01

    We have developed FDTD boundary conditions based on discrete Green's function diakoptics for arbitrary multiply-connected 2D domains. The associated Z-domain boundary operator is symmetric, with an imaginary part that can be proved to be positive semi-definite on the upper half of the unit circle in

  15. The use of MR B+1 imaging for validation of FDTD electromagnetic simulations of human anatomies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, Cornelis A T van den; Bartels, Lambertus W; Bergen, Bob van den; Kroeze, Hugo; Leeuw, Astrid A C de; Kamer, Jeroen B van de; Lagendijk, Jan J W

    2006-01-01

    In this study, MR B + 1 imaging is employed to experimentally verify the validity of FDTD simulations of electromagnetic field patterns in human anatomies. Measurements and FDTD simulations of the B + 1 field induced by a 3 T MR body coil in a human corpse were performed. It was found that MR B + 1 imaging is a sensitive method to measure the radiofrequency (RF) magnetic field inside a human anatomy with a precision of approximately 3.5%. A good correlation was found between the B + 1 measurements and FDTD simulations. The measured B + 1 pattern for a human pelvis consisted of a global, diagonal modulation pattern plus local B + 1 heterogeneties. It is believed that these local B + 1 field variations are the result of peaks in the induced electric currents, which could not be resolved by the FDTD simulations on a 5 mm 3 simulation grid. The findings from this study demonstrate that B + 1 imaging is a valuable experimental technique to gain more knowledge about the dielectric interaction of RF fields with the human anatomy

  16. SO-FDTD method and its application to the calculation of electromagnetic wave reflection coefficients of plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Hongwei; Nanjing Agricultural Univ., Nanjing; Chen Rushan; Zhang Yun

    2006-01-01

    The dielectric property of dispersive media is written as rational polynomial function, the relation between D and E is derived in time domain. It is named shift operator FDTD (SO-FDTD) method. The high accuracy and efficiency of this method is confirmed by computing the reflection coefficients of electromagnetic waves by a collisional plasma slab. The reflection coefficients between plasma and the atmosphere or vacuum can be calculated by using the SO-FDTD method. The result is that the reflection coefficients are affected by plasma thickness, electron numerical density, the distributing orderliness of electron density, and incidence wave frequency. (authors)

  17. 77 FR 65403 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New Mexico...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-26

    ... Inventory Completion: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM AGENCY... affiliated with the human remains may contact the Maxwell Museum of Anthropology. Repatriation of the human..., Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, MSC01 1050, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001...

  18. 76 FR 56468 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New Mexico...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-13

    ...: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New Mexico has... contact the Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New Mexico. Repatriation of the human remains to...

  19. 77 FR 46116 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New Mexico...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-02

    ... Inventory Completion: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Maxwell Museum of Anthropology has completed... has a cultural affiliation with the human remains should contact the Maxwell Museum of Anthropology at...

  20. 77 FR 65404 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New Mexico...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-26

    ... Inventory Completion: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM; Correction... affiliated with the human remains may contact the Maxwell Museum of Anthropology. Repatriation of the human..., Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, MSC01 1050, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001...

  1. Representing the Electromagnetic Field: How Maxwell's Mathematics Empowered Faraday's Field Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tweney, Ryan D.

    2011-01-01

    James Clerk Maxwell "translated" Michael Faraday's experimentally-based field theory into the mathematical representation now known as "Maxwell's Equations." Working with a variety of mathematical representations and physical models Maxwell extended the reach of Faraday's theory and brought it into consistency with other…

  2. Optical rectenna operation: where Maxwell meets Einstein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, Saumil; Moddel, Garret

    2016-01-01

    Optical rectennas are antenna-coupled diode rectifiers that receive and convert optical-frequency electromagnetic radiation into DC output. The analysis of rectennas is carried out either classically using Maxwell’s wave-like approach, or quantum-mechanically using Einstein’s particle-like approach for electromagnetic radiation. One of the characteristics of classical operation is that multiple photons transfer their energy to individual electrons, whereas in quantum operation each photon transfers its energy to each electron. We analyze the correspondence between the two approaches by comparing rectenna response first to monochromatic illumination obtained using photon-assisted tunnelling theory and classical theory. Applied to broadband rectenna operation, this correspondence provides clues to designing a rectenna solar cell that has the potential to exceed the 44% quantum-limited conversion efficiency. The comparison of operating regimes shows how optical rectenna operation differs from microwave rectenna operation. (paper)

  3. Optical rectenna operation: where Maxwell meets Einstein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Saumil; Moddel, Garret

    2016-07-01

    Optical rectennas are antenna-coupled diode rectifiers that receive and convert optical-frequency electromagnetic radiation into DC output. The analysis of rectennas is carried out either classically using Maxwell’s wave-like approach, or quantum-mechanically using Einstein’s particle-like approach for electromagnetic radiation. One of the characteristics of classical operation is that multiple photons transfer their energy to individual electrons, whereas in quantum operation each photon transfers its energy to each electron. We analyze the correspondence between the two approaches by comparing rectenna response first to monochromatic illumination obtained using photon-assisted tunnelling theory and classical theory. Applied to broadband rectenna operation, this correspondence provides clues to designing a rectenna solar cell that has the potential to exceed the 44% quantum-limited conversion efficiency. The comparison of operating regimes shows how optical rectenna operation differs from microwave rectenna operation.

  4. Calculation of transient overvoltages in a 145-kV-cable termination by using the FDTD-method; Feldstaerkenberechnung bei transienten Spannungen an einem 145-kV-Endverschluss mit Hilfe des FDTD-Verfahrens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerhard, G.; Ioffe, A. [Gerhard-Mercator-Univ.-GH Duisburg (Germany). Fachgebiet Elektrische Energieuebertragung

    1997-10-20

    The transient electromagnetic field occured from the overvoltages in a slip-on cable termination was calculated by using the FDTD-method. The electric field strength in a gap between the cable shield and the stress cone was studied. (orig.) [Deutsch] Mit Hilfe des FDTD-Feldberechnungsverfahrens wird das transiente elektromagnetische Feld in einem Aufschiebeendverschluss untersucht, wobei ein Luftspalt zwischen den leitenden Teilen der Kabelader und dem Feldsteuerelement beruecksichtigt wird. (orig.)

  5. Implementation of the FDTD method in cylindrical coordinates for dispersive materials: Modal study of C-shaped nano-waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    kebci, Zahia; Belkhir, Abderrahmane; Mezeghrane, Abdelaziz; Lamrous, Omar; Baida, Fadi Issam

    2018-03-01

    The objective of this work is to develop a code based on the finite difference time domain method in cylindrical coordinates (CC-FDTD) that integrates the Drude Critical Points model (DCP) and to apply it in the study of a metallic C-shaped waveguide (CSWG). The integrated dispersion model allows an accurate description of noble metals in the optical range and working in cylindrical coordinates is necessary to bypass the staircase effect induced by a Cartesian mesh especially in the case of curved geometrical forms. The CC-FDTD code developed as a part of this work is more general than the Body-Of-Revolution-FDTD algorithm that can only handle structures exhibiting a complete cylindrical symmetry. A N-order CC-FDTD code is then derived and used to perform a parametric study of an infinitly-long CSWG for nano-optic applications. Propagation losses and dispersion diagrams are given for different geometrical parameters.

  6. A New Efficient Algorithm for the 2D WLP-FDTD Method Based on Domain Decomposition Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo-Ao Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This letter introduces a new efficient algorithm for the two-dimensional weighted Laguerre polynomials finite difference time-domain (WLP-FDTD method based on domain decomposition scheme. By using the domain decomposition finite difference technique, the whole computational domain is decomposed into several subdomains. The conventional WLP-FDTD and the efficient WLP-FDTD methods are, respectively, used to eliminate the splitting error and speed up the calculation in different subdomains. A joint calculation scheme is presented to reduce the amount of calculation. Through our work, the iteration is not essential to obtain the accurate results. Numerical example indicates that the efficiency and accuracy are improved compared with the efficient WLP-FDTD method.

  7. A new model of dispersion for metals leading to a more accurate modeling of plasmonic structures using the FDTD method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vial, A.; Dridi, M.; Cunff, L. le [Universite de Technologie de Troyes, Institut Charles Delaunay, CNRS UMR 6279, Laboratoire de Nanotechnologie et d' Instrumentation Optique, 12, rue Marie Curie, BP-2060, Troyes Cedex (France); Laroche, T. [Universite de Franche-Comte, Institut FEMTO-ST, CNRS UMR 6174, Departement de Physique et de Metrologie des Oscillateurs, Besancon Cedex (France)

    2011-06-15

    We present FDTD simulations results obtained using the Drude critical points model. This model enables spectroscopic studies of metallic structures over wider wavelength ranges than usually used, and it facilitates the study of structures made of several metals. (orig.)

  8. Transient Response of Thin Wire above a Layered Half-Space Using TDIE/FDTD Hybrid Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Wei

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The TDIE/FDTD hybrid method is applied to calculate the transient responses of thin wire above a lossy layered half-space. The time-domain reflection of the layered half space is computed by one-dimensional modified FDTD method. Then, transient response of thin wire induced by two excitation sources (the incident wave and reflected wave is calculated by TDIE method. Finally numerical results are given to illustrate the feasibility and high efficiency of the presented scheme.

  9. An FDTD algorithm for simulation of EM waves propagation in laser with static and dynamic gain models

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Jabr, Ahmad Ali; Alsunaidi, Mohammad A.; Ooi, Boon S.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents methods of simulating gain media in the finite difference time-domain (FDTD) algorithm utilizing a generalized polarization formulation. The gain can be static or dynamic. For static gain, Lorentzian and non-Lorentzian models are presented and tested. For the dynamic gain, rate equations for two-level and four-level models are incorporated in the FDTD scheme. The simulation results conform with the expected behavior of wave amplification and dynamic population inversion.

  10. Black hole dynamics in Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschmann, Eric W.; Lehner, Luis; Liebling, Steven L.; Palenzuela, Carlos

    2018-03-01

    We consider the properties and dynamics of black holes within a family of alternative theories of gravity, namely Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory. We analyze the dynamical evolution of individual black holes as well as the merger of binary black hole systems. We do this for a wide range of parameter values for the family of Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theories, investigating, in the process, the stability of these black holes. We examine radiative degrees of freedom, explore the impact of the scalar field on the dynamics of merger, and compare with other scalar-tensor theories. We argue that the dilaton can largely be discounted in understanding merging binary systems and that the end states essentially interpolate between charged and uncharged, rotating black holes. For the relatively small charge values considered here, we conclude that these black hole systems will be difficult to distinguish from their analogs within General Relativity.

  11. Quantum vacuum energy near a black hole: the Maxwell field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elster, T.

    1984-01-01

    A quantised Maxwell field is considered propagating in the gravitational field of a Schwarzschild black hole. The vector Hartle-Hawking propagator is defined on the Riemannian section of the analytically continued space-time and expanded in terms of four-dimensional vector spherical harmonics. The equations for the radial functions appearing in the expansion are derived for both odd and even parity. Using the expansion of the vector Hartle-Hawking propagator, the point-separated expectation value of the Maxwellian energy-momentum tensor in the Hartle-Hawking vacuum is derived. The renormalised values of radial pressure, tangential pressure and energy density are obtained near the horizon of the black hole. In contrast to the scalar field, the Maxwell field exhibits a positive energy density near the horizon in the Hartle-Hawking vacuum state. (author)

  12. Maxwell-Like Equations for Free Dirac Electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, S. A.

    2018-03-01

    In this article, we show that the wave equation for a free Dirac electron can be represented in a form that is analogous to Maxwell's electrodynamics. The electron bispinor wavefunction is explicitly expressed in terms of its real and imaginary components. This leads us to incorporate into it appropriate scalar and pseudo-scalar fields in advance, so that a full symmetry may be accomplished. The Dirac equation then takes on a form similar to that of a set of inhomogeneous Maxwell's equations involving a particular self-source. We relate plane wave solutions of these equations to waves corresponding to free Dirac electrons, identifying the longitudinal component of the electron motion, together with the corresponding Zitterbewegung ("trembling motion").

  13. Spontaneous compactification in six-dimensional Einstein-Maxwell theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randjbar-Daemi, S.; Salam, A.; Strathdee, J.

    1982-10-01

    A discrete set of solutions to the classical Einstein-Maxwell equations in six-dimensional spacetime is considered. These solutions have the form of a product of four-dimensional constant curvature spacetime with a 2-sphere. The Maxwell field has support on the 2-sphere where it represents a monopole of magnetic charge, n = +-1, +-2,... The spectrum of massless and massive states is obtained for the special case of the flat 4-space, and the solution is shown to be classically stable. The limiting case where the radius of the 2-sphere becomes small is considered and a dimensionally reduced effective Lagrangian for the long range modes is derived. This turns out to be an SU(2) x U(1) gauge theory with chiral couplings. (author)

  14. Nonlinear gyrokinetic Maxwell-Vlasov equations using magnetic coordinates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brizard, A.

    1988-09-01

    A gyrokinetic formalism using magnetic coordinates is used to derive self-consistent, nonlinear Maxwell-Vlasov equations that are suitable for particle simulation studies of finite-β tokamak microturbulence and its associated anomalous transport. The use of magnetic coordinates is an important feature of this work as it introduces the toroidal geometry naturally into our gyrokinetic formalism. The gyrokinetic formalism itself is based on the use of the Action-variational Lie perturbation method of Cary and Littlejohn, and preserves the Hamiltonian structure of the original Maxwell-Vlasov system. Previous nonlinear gyrokinetic sets of equations suitable for particle simulation analysis have considered either electrostatic and shear-Alfven perturbations in slab geometry, or electrostatic perturbations in toroidal geometry. In this present work, fully electromagnetic perturbations in toroidal geometry are considered. 26 refs

  15. Modeling Human Body Using Four-Pole Debye Model in Piecewise Linear Recursive Convolution FDTD Method for the SAR Calculation in the Case of Vehicular Antenna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ammar Guellab

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose an efficient finite difference time domain (FDTD method based on the piecewise linear recursive convolution (PLRC technique to evaluate the human body exposure to electromagnetic (EM radiation. The source of radiation considered in this study is a high-power antenna, mounted on a military vehicle, covering a broad band of frequency (100 MHz–3 GHz. The simulation is carried out using a nonhomogeneous human body model which takes into consideration most of the internal body tissues. The human tissues are modeled by a four-pole Debye model which is derived from experimental data by using particle swarm optimization (PSO. The human exposure to EM radiation is evaluated by computing the local and whole-body average specific absorption rate (SAR for each occupant. The higher in-tissue electric field intensity points are localized, and the SAR values are compared with the crew safety standard recommendations. The accuracy of the proposed PLRC-FDTD approach and the matching of the Debye model with the experimental data are verified in this study.

  16. The effective action in Einstein-Maxwell theory

    OpenAIRE

    Bastianelli, Fiorenzo; Davila, Jose Manuel; Schubert, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Considerable work has been done on the one-loop effective action in combined electromagnetic and gravitational fields, particularly as a tool for determining the properties of light propagation in curved space. After a short review of previous work, I present some recent results obtained using the worldline formalism. In particular, I will discuss various ways of generalizing the QED Euler-Heisenberg Lagrangian to the Einstein-Maxwell case.

  17. Symplectic discretization for spectral element solution of Maxwell's equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yanmin; Dai Guidong; Tang Yifa; Liu Qinghuo

    2009-01-01

    Applying the spectral element method (SEM) based on the Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre (GLL) polynomial to discretize Maxwell's equations, we obtain a Poisson system or a Poisson system with at most a perturbation. For the system, we prove that any symplectic partitioned Runge-Kutta (PRK) method preserves the Poisson structure and its implied symplectic structure. Numerical examples show the high accuracy of SEM and the benefit of conserving energy due to the use of symplectic methods.

  18. Algorithm development for Maxwell's equations for computational electromagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goorjian, Peter M.

    1990-01-01

    A new algorithm has been developed for solving Maxwell's equations for the electromagnetic field. It solves the equations in the time domain with central, finite differences. The time advancement is performed implicitly, using an alternating direction implicit procedure. The space discretization is performed with finite volumes, using curvilinear coordinates with electromagnetic components along those directions. Sample calculations are presented of scattering from a metal pin, a square and a circle to demonstrate the capabilities of the new algorithm.

  19. Derivation of special relativity from Maxwell and Newton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunstan, D J

    2008-05-28

    Special relativity derives directly from the principle of relativity and from Newton's laws of motion with a single undetermined parameter, which is found from Faraday's and Ampère's experimental work and from Maxwell's own introduction of the displacement current to be the -c(-2) term in the Lorentz transformations. The axiom of the constancy of the speed of light is quite unnecessary. The behaviour and the mechanism of the propagation of light are not at the foundations of special relativity.

  20. Applications of 3-D Maxwell solvers to accelerator design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, W.

    1990-01-01

    This paper gives a brief discussion on various applications of 3-D Maxwell solvers to accelerator design. The work is based on our experience gained during the design of the storage ring of the 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source (APS). It shows that 3-D codes are not replaceable in many cases, and that a lot of work remains to be done in order to establish a solid base for 3-D simulations

  1. Development of a multi-grid FDTD code for three-dimensional simulation of large microwave sintering experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, M.J.; Iskander, M.F. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Electrical Engineering Dept.; Kimrey, H.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) code available at the University of Utah has been used to simulate sintering of ceramics in single and multimode cavities, and many useful results have been reported in literature. More detailed and accurate results, specifically around and including the ceramic sample, are often desired to help evaluate the adequacy of the heating procedure. In electrically large multimode cavities, however, computer memory requirements limit the number of the mathematical cells, and the desired resolution is impractical to achieve due to limited computer resources. Therefore, an FDTD algorithm which incorporates multiple-grid regions with variable-grid sizes is required to adequately perform the desired simulations. In this paper the authors describe the development of a three-dimensional multi-grid FDTD code to help focus a large number of cells around the desired region. Test geometries were solved using a uniform-grid and the developed multi-grid code to help validate the results from the developed code. Results from these comparisons, as well as the results of comparisons between the developed FDTD code and other available variable-grid codes are presented. In addition, results from the simulation of realistic microwave sintering experiments showed improved resolution in critical sites inside the three-dimensional sintering cavity. With the validation of the FDTD code, simulations were performed for electrically large, multimode, microwave sintering cavities to fully demonstrate the advantages of the developed multi-grid FDTD code.

  2. On the hidden maxwell superalgebra underlying D = 4 supergravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penafiel, D.M. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Concepcion (Chile); DISAT, Politecnico di Torino (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Sezione di Torino (Italy); Ravera, L. [DISAT, Politecnico di Torino (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Sezione di Torino (Italy)

    2017-09-15

    In this work, we expand the hidden AdS-Lorentz superalgebra underlying D = 4 supergravity, reaching a (hidden) Maxwell superalgebra. The latter can be viewed as an extension involving cosmological constant of the superalgebra underlying D = 4 supergravity in flat spacetime. We write the Maurer-Cartan equations in this context and we find some interesting extensions of the antisymmetric 3-form A{sup (3)} appearing in the Free Differential Algebra in Minkowski space. The structure of Free Differential Algebras is obtained by considering the zero curvature equations. We write the parametrization of A{sup (3)} in terms of 1-forms and we rend the topological features of its extensions manifest. We interestingly find out that the structure of these extensions, and consequently the structure of the corresponding boundary contribution dA{sup (3)}, strongly depends on the form of the extra fermionic generator appearing in the hidden Maxwell superalgebra. The model we develop in this work is defined in an enlarged superspace with respect to the ordinary one, and the extra bosonic and fermionic 1-forms required for the closure of the hidden Maxwell superalgebra must be considered as physical fields in this enlarged superspace. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  3. Inductor-Free Wireless Energy Delivery via Maxwell's Displacement Current from an Electrodeless Triboelectric Nanogenerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xia; Zhang, Meng; Huang, Jinrong; Jiang, Tao; Zou, Jingdian; Wang, Ning; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2018-02-01

    Wireless power delivery has been a dream technology for applications in medical science, security, radio frequency identification (RFID), and the internet of things, and is usually based on induction coils and/or antenna. Here, a new approach is demonstrated for wireless power delivery by using the Maxwell's displacement current generated by an electrodeless triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) that directly harvests ambient mechanical energy. A rotary electrodeless TENG is fabricated using the contact and sliding mode with a segmented structure. Due to the leakage of electric field between the segments during relative rotation, the generated Maxwell's displacement current in free space is collected by metal collectors. At a gap distance of 3 cm, the output wireless current density and voltage can reach 7 µA cm -2 and 65 V, respectively. A larger rotary electrodeless TENG and flexible wearable electrodeless TENG are demonstrated to power light-emitting diodes (LEDs) through wireless energy delivery. This innovative discovery opens a new avenue for noncontact, wireless energy transmission for applications in portable and wearable electronics. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Corrections to the General (2,4) and (4,4) FDTD Schemes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meierbachtol, Collin S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Smith, William S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Shao, Xuan-Min [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2018-01-29

    The sampling weights associated with two general higher order FDTD schemes were derived by Smith, et al. and published in a IEEE Transactions on Antennas and Propagation article in 2012. Inconsistencies between governing equations and their resulting solutions were discovered within the article. In an effort to track down the root cause of these inconsistencies, the full three-dimensional, higher order FDTD dispersion relation was re-derived using MathematicaTM. During this process, two errors were identi ed in the article. Both errors are highlighted in this document. The corrected sampling weights are also provided. Finally, the original stability limits provided for both schemes are corrected, and presented in a more precise form. It is recommended any future implementations of the two general higher order schemes provided in the Smith, et al. 2012 article should instead use the sampling weights and stability conditions listed in this document.

  5. An FFT-accelerated fdtd scheme with exact absorbing conditions for characterizing axially symmetric resonant structures

    KAUST Repository

    Sirenko, Kostyantyn

    2011-01-01

    An accurate and efficient finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method for characterizing transient waves interactions on axially symmetric structures is presented. The method achieves its accuracy and efficiency by employing localized and/or fast Fourier transform (FFT) accelerated exact absorbing conditions (EACs). The paper details the derivation of the EACs, discusses their implementation and discretization in an FDTD method, and proposes utilization of a blocked-FFT based algorithm for accelerating the computation of temporal convolutions present in nonlocal EACs. The proposed method allows transient analyses to be carried for long time intervals without any loss of accuracy and provides reliable numerical data pertinent to physical processes under resonant conditions. This renders the method highly useful in characterization of high-Q microwave radiators and energy compressors. Numerical results that demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the method are presented.

  6. A Simple FDTD Algorithm for Simulating EM-Wave Propagation in General Dispersive Anisotropic Material

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Jabr, Ahmad Ali; Alsunaidi, Mohammad A.; Ng, Tien Khee; Ooi, Boon S.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, an finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) algorithm for simulating propagation of EM waves in anisotropic material is presented. The algorithm is based on the auxiliary differential equation and the general polarization formulation. In anisotropic materials, electric fields are coupled and elements in the permittivity tensor are, in general, multiterm dispersive. The presented algorithm resolves the field coupling using a formulation based on electric polarizations. It also offers a simple procedure for the treatment of multiterm dispersion in the FDTD scheme. The algorithm is tested by simulating wave propagation in 1-D magnetized plasma showing excellent agreement with analytical solutions. Extension of the algorithm to multidimensional structures is straightforward. The presented algorithm is efficient and simple compared to other algorithms found in the literature. © 2012 IEEE.

  7. FDTD Investigation on Electromagnetic Scattering from Two-Layered Rough Surfaces under UPML Absorbing Condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juan, Li; Li-Xin, Guo; Hao, Zeng

    2009-01-01

    Electromagnetic scattering from one-dimensional two-layered rough surfaces is investigated by using finite-difference time-domain algorithm (FDTD). The uniaxial perfectly matched layer (UPML) medium is adopted for truncation of FDTD lattices, in which the finite-difference equations can be used for the total computation domain by properly choosing the uniaxial parameters. The rough surfaces are characterized with Gaussian statistics for the height and the autocorrelation function. The angular distribution of bistatic scattering coefficient from single-layered perfect electric conducting and dielectric rough surface is calculated and it is in good agreement with the numerical result with the conventional method of moments. The influence of the relative permittivity, the incident angle, and the correlative length of two-layered rough surfaces on the bistatic scattering coefficient with different polarizations are presented and discussed in detail. (fundamental areas of phenomenology (including applications))

  8. Software enhancements and modifications to Program FDTD executable on the Cray X-MP computer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stringer, J.C.

    1987-09-04

    This report summarizes enhancements and modifications to PROGRAM FDTD executable on the Cray X-MP computer system. Specifically, the tasks defined and performed under this effort are revision of the material encoding/decoding scheme to allow material type specification on an individual cell basis; modification of the I/O buffering scheme to maximize the use of available central memory and minimize the number of physical I/O accesses; user interface enhancements. Provide enhanced input/output features for greater flexibility; increased modularity. Divide the code into additional modules for ease of maintenance and future enhancements; and assist in the conversion and testing of FDTD to Floating Point Systems scientific computers and associated peripheral devices.

  9. A Simple FDTD Algorithm for Simulating EM-Wave Propagation in General Dispersive Anisotropic Material

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Jabr, Ahmad Ali

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, an finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) algorithm for simulating propagation of EM waves in anisotropic material is presented. The algorithm is based on the auxiliary differential equation and the general polarization formulation. In anisotropic materials, electric fields are coupled and elements in the permittivity tensor are, in general, multiterm dispersive. The presented algorithm resolves the field coupling using a formulation based on electric polarizations. It also offers a simple procedure for the treatment of multiterm dispersion in the FDTD scheme. The algorithm is tested by simulating wave propagation in 1-D magnetized plasma showing excellent agreement with analytical solutions. Extension of the algorithm to multidimensional structures is straightforward. The presented algorithm is efficient and simple compared to other algorithms found in the literature. © 2012 IEEE.

  10. Partially Loaded Cavity Analysis by Using the 2-D FDTD Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Bin; Zheng Qin-Hong; Peng Jin-Hui; Zhong Ru-Neng; Xiang Tai; Xu Wan-Song

    2011-01-01

    A compact two-dimensional (2-D) finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method is proposed to calculate the resonant frequencies and quality factors of a partially loaded cavity that is uniform in the z-direction and has an arbitrary cross section in the x—y plane. With the description of z dependence by k z , the three-dimensional (3-D) problem can be transformed into a 2-D problem. Therefore, less memory and CPU time are required as compared to the conventional 3-D FDTD method. Three representative examples, a half-loaded rectangular cavity, an inhomogeneous cylindrical cavity and a cubic cavity loaded with dielectric post, are presented to validate the utility and efficiency of the proposed method. (cross-disciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  11. Finite difference time domain (FDTD) modeling of implanted deep brain stimulation electrodes and brain tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabran, S R I; Saad, J H; Salama, M M A; Mansour, R R

    2009-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the electromagnetic modeling and simulation of an implanted Medtronic deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrode using finite difference time domain (FDTD). The model is developed using Empire XCcel and represents the electrode surrounded with brain tissue assuming homogenous and isotropic medium. The model is created to study the parameters influencing the electric field distribution within the tissue in order to provide reference and benchmarking data for DBS and intra-cortical electrode development.

  12. An FDTD method with FFT-accelerated exact absorbing boundary conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Sirenko, Kostyantyn

    2011-07-01

    An accurate and efficient finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method for analyzing axially symmetric structures is presented. The method achieves its accuracy and efficiency using exact absorbing conditions (EACs) for terminating the computation domain and a blocked-FFT based scheme for accelerating the computation of the temporal convolutions present in non-local EACs. The method is shown to be especially useful in characterization of long-duration resonant wave interactions. © 2011 IEEE.

  13. Modeling of various kinds of applicators used for microwave hyperthermia based on the FDTD method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camart, J.C.; Despretz, D.; Chive, M.; Pribetich, J. [Domaine Scientifique et Univ. de Villeneuve D`Ascq (France). Dept. Hyperfrequencies et Semiconducteurs

    1996-10-01

    This paper presents the modeling using the finite-difference time domain (FDTD) method of interstitial and endocavitary applicators which have been designed and developed for microwave hyperthermia treatments controlled by microwave radiometry. For each kind of applicators, the numerical results are given concerning the reflection coefficient S{sub 11}, the power deposition, and the heating patterns. These results are compared with the measurements performed on phantom models of human tissues and show a good agreement. Possibilities of future developments are discussed.

  14. FDTD based transition time dependent crosstalk analysis for coupled RLC interconnects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Devendra Kumar; Kaushik, Brajesh Kumar; Sharma, R. K.

    2014-01-01

    The performance of high density chips operating in the GHz range is mostly affected by on-chip interconnects. The interconnect delay depends on many factors, a few of them are inputs toggling patterns, line and coupling parasitics, input rise/fall time and source/load characteristics. The transition time of the input is of prime importance in high speed circuits. This paper addresses the FDTD based analysis of transition time effects on functional and dynamic crosstalk. The analysis is carried out for equal and unequal transition times of coupled inputs. The analysis of the effects of unequal rise time is equally important because practically, it is quite common to have mismatching in the rise time of the signals transmitting through different length wires. To demonstrate the effects, two distributed RLC lines coupled inductively and capacitively are taken into consideration. The FDTD technique is used because it gives accurate results and carries time domain analysis of coupled lines. The number of lumps in SPICE simulations is considered the same as those of spatial segments. To validate the FDTD computed results, SPICE simulations are run and results are compared. A good agreement of the computed results has been observed with respect to SPICE simulated results. An average error of less than 3.2% is observed in the computation of the performance parameters using the proposed method. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  15. An in-depth stability analysis of nonuniform FDTD combined with novel local implicitization techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Londersele, Arne; De Zutter, Daniël; Vande Ginste, Dries

    2017-08-01

    This work focuses on efficient full-wave solutions of multiscale electromagnetic problems in the time domain. Three local implicitization techniques are proposed and carefully analyzed in order to relax the traditional time step limit of the Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) method on a nonuniform, staggered, tensor product grid: Newmark, Crank-Nicolson (CN) and Alternating-Direction-Implicit (ADI) implicitization. All of them are applied in preferable directions, alike Hybrid Implicit-Explicit (HIE) methods, as to limit the rank of the sparse linear systems. Both exponential and linear stability are rigorously investigated for arbitrary grid spacings and arbitrary inhomogeneous, possibly lossy, isotropic media. Numerical examples confirm the conservation of energy inside a cavity for a million iterations if the time step is chosen below the proposed, relaxed limit. Apart from the theoretical contributions, new accomplishments such as the development of the leapfrog Alternating-Direction-Hybrid-Implicit-Explicit (ADHIE) FDTD method and a less stringent Courant-like time step limit for the conventional, fully explicit FDTD method on a nonuniform grid, have immediate practical applications.

  16. Calculation of light delay for coupled microrings by FDTD technique and Padé approximation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yong-Zhen; Yang, Yue-De

    2009-11-01

    The Padé approximation with Baker's algorithm is compared with the least-squares Prony method and the generalized pencil-of-functions (GPOF) method for calculating mode frequencies and mode Q factors for coupled optical microdisks by FDTD technique. Comparisons of intensity spectra and the corresponding mode frequencies and Q factors show that the Padé approximation can yield more stable results than the Prony and the GPOF methods, especially the intensity spectrum. The results of the Prony method and the GPOF method are greatly influenced by the selected number of resonant modes, which need to be optimized during the data processing, in addition to the length of the time response signal. Furthermore, the Padé approximation is applied to calculate light delay for embedded microring resonators from complex transmission spectra obtained by the Padé approximation from a FDTD output. The Prony and the GPOF methods cannot be applied to calculate the transmission spectra, because the transmission signal obtained by the FDTD simulation cannot be expressed as a sum of damped complex exponentials.

  17. FDTD simulations and analysis of thin sample dielectric properties measurements using coaxial probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bringhurst, S.; Iskander, M.F.; White, M.J. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Electrical Engineering Dept.

    1996-12-31

    A metallized ceramic probe has been designed for high temperature broadband dielectric properties measurements. The probe was fabricated out of an alumina tube and rod as the outer and inner conductors respectively. The alumina was metallized with a 3 mil layer of moly-manganese and then covered with a 0.5 mil protective layer of nickel plating. The probe has been used to make complex dielectric properties measurements over the complete frequency band from 500 MHz to 3 GHz, and for temperatures as high as 1,000 C. A 3D Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) code was used to help investigate the feasibility of this probe to measure the complex permittivity of thin samples. It is shown that by backing the material under test with a standard material of known dielectric constant, the complex permittivity of thin samples can be measured accurately using the developed FDTD algorithm. This FDTD procedure for making thin sample dielectric properties measurements will be described.

  18. Label-free, single-object sensing with a microring resonator: FDTD simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Dan T; Norwood, Robert A

    2013-01-14

    Label-free, single-object sensing with a microring resonator is investigated numerically using the finite difference time-domain (FDTD) method. A pulse with ultra-wide bandwidth that spans over several resonant modes of the ring and of the sensing object is used for simulation, enabling a single-shot simulation of the microring sensing. The FDTD simulation not only can describe the circulation of the light in a whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) microring and multiple interactions between the light and the sensing object, but also other important factors of the sensing system, such as scattering and radiation losses. The FDTD results show that the simulation can yield a resonant shift of the WGM cavity modes. Furthermore, it can also extract eigenmodes of the sensing object, and therefore information from deep inside the object. The simulation method is not only suitable for a single object (single molecule, nano-, micro-scale particle) but can be extended to the problem of multiple objects as well.

  19. A new multistack radiation boundary condition for FDTD based on self-teleportation of fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz, Rodolfo E.; Scherbatko, Igor

    2005-01-01

    In [Electromagnetics 23 (2003) 187], a technique for injecting perfect plane waves into finite regions of space in FDTD was reported. The essence of the technique, called Field Teleportation, is to invoke the principle of equivalent sources using FDTDs discrete definition of the curl to copy any field propagating in one FDTD domain to a finite region of another domain. In this paper, we apply this technique of Field Teleportation to the original domain itself to create a transparent boundary across which any outward traveling FDTD field produces an exact negative copy of itself. When this copied field is teleported one cell ahead and one cell forward in time it causes significant self-cancelation of the original field. Illustrative experiments in two-dimensions show that a two-layer (10-cell thick) multi-stack Radiation Boundary Condition (RBC) with a simplest Huygens's termination readily yields reflection coefficients of the order of -80 dB up to grazing incidence for all the fields radiated by a harmonic point source (λ = 30 cells) in free space located 20 cells away from the boundary. Similarly low levels of artificial reflection are demonstrated for a case in which the RBC cuts through five different magnetodielectric materials

  20. Operational derivation of Boltzmann distribution with Maxwell's demon model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoya, Akio; Maruyama, Koji; Shikano, Yutaka

    2015-11-24

    The resolution of the Maxwell's demon paradox linked thermodynamics with information theory through information erasure principle. By considering a demon endowed with a Turing-machine consisting of a memory tape and a processor, we attempt to explore the link towards the foundations of statistical mechanics and to derive results therein in an operational manner. Here, we present a derivation of the Boltzmann distribution in equilibrium as an example, without hypothesizing the principle of maximum entropy. Further, since the model can be applied to non-equilibrium processes, in principle, we demonstrate the dissipation-fluctuation relation to show the possibility in this direction.

  1. Traffic restrictions on Routes Bloch, Maxwell and Bohr

    CERN Multimedia

    IT Department

    2008-01-01

    Excavation and pipework is being carried out in the framework of the transfer of the waste water treatment plant for the effluents from the surface treatment workshops from Building 254 to Building 676, currently under construction. This work may encroach onto Routes Bloch, Maxwell and Bohr and disrupt the flow of traffic. Users are requested to comply with the road signs that will be erected. The work is expected to last until the beginning of December 2008. Thank you for your understanding. TS/CE and TS/FM Groups Tel.7 4188 or 16 4314

  2. Maxwell-Chern-Simons Casimir effect. II. Circular boundary conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milton, K.A.; Ng, Y.J.

    1992-01-01

    In odd-dimensional spaces, gauge invariance permits a Chern-Simons mass term for the gauge fields in addition to the usual Maxwell-Yang-Mills kinetic energy term. We study the Casimir effect in such a (2+1)-dimensional Abelian theory. The case of parallel conducting lines was considered by us in a previous paper. Here we discuss the Casimir effect for a circle and examine the effect of finite temperature. The Casimir stress is found to be attractive at both low and high temperatures

  3. Quantized Dirac field interacting with a classical Maxwell field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolsrud, M.

    1987-10-01

    The S operator for the quantized and the s matrix for the unquantized Dirac field, both fields interacting with an unquantized Maxwell field, are shown to be related in the following way: S=exp(-ic†kc) and s=exp(-ik). Here c is the column matrix of the particle operators, and k is a Hermitian matrix. With splitting of c into an electron and a positron part, a corresponding factorization of S is performed. Exact expressions for the probability amplitude for various electron and/or positron processes are then obtained

  4. Nonlocal symmetries and nonlocal conservation laws of Maxwell's equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anco, S.C.; Bluman, G.

    1997-01-01

    Nonlocal symmetries are obtained for Maxwell's equations in three space-time dimensions through the use of two potential systems involving scalar and vector potentials for the electromagnetic field. Corresponding nonlocal conservation laws are derived from these symmetries. The conservation laws yield nine functionally independent constants of motion which cannot be expressed in terms of the constants of motion arising from local conservation laws for space-time symmetries. These nine constants of motion represent additional conserved quantities for the electromagnetic field in three space endash time dimensions. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  5. Quantum criticality in Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, Wen-Yu

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the quantum Lifshitz criticality in a general background of Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton gravity. In particular, we demonstrate the existence of critical point with dynamic critical exponent z by tuning a nonminimal coupling to its critical value. We also study the effect of nonminimal coupling and exponent z to the Efimov states and holographic RG flow in the overcritical region. We have found that the nonminimal coupling increases the instability for a probe scalar to condensate and its back reaction is discussed. At last, we give a quantum mechanics treatment to a solvable system with z=2, and comment for generic z>2.

  6. Local WKB dispersion relation for the Vlasov-Maxwell equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berk, H.L.; Dominguez, R.R.

    1982-10-01

    A formalism for analyzing systems of integral equations, based on the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) approximation, is applied to the Vlasov-Maxwell integral equations in an arbitrary-β, spatially inhomogenous plasma model. It is shown that when treating frequencies comparable with and larger than the cyclotron frequency, relevant new terms must be accounted for to treat waves that depend upon local spatial gradients. For a specific model, the response for very short wavelength and high frequency is shown to reduce to the straight-line orbit approximation when the WKB rules are correctly followed

  7. The free energy of Maxwell-Vlasov equilibria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, P.J.; Pfirsch, D.

    1989-10-01

    A previously derived expression for the energy of arbitrary perturbations about arbitrary Vlasov-Maxwell equilibria is transformed into a very compact form. The new form is also obtained by a canonical transformation method for solving Vlasov's equation, which is based on Lie group theory. This method is simpler than the one used before and provides better physical insight. Finally a procedure is presented for determining the existence of negative-energy modes. In this context the question of why there is an accessibility constraint for the particles, but not for the fields, is discussed. 16 refs

  8. Modeling arbitrarily directed slots that are narrow both in width and depth with regard to the FDTD spatial cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, D.J.; Turner, C.D.

    1991-12-31

    The Hybrid Thin-Slot Algorithm (HTSA) integrates a transient integral-equation solution for an aperture in an infinite plane into a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) code. The technique was introduced for linear apertures and was extended to include wall loss and lossy internal gaskets. A general implementation for arbitrary thin slots is briefly described here. The 3-D FDTD-code TSAR was selected for the implementation. The HTSA does not provide universal solutions to the narrow slot problem, but has merits appropriate for particular applications. The HTSA is restricted to planar slots, but can solve the important case that both the width and depth of the slot are narrow compared to the FDTD spatial cell. IN addition, the HTSA is not bound to the FDTD discrete spatial and time increments, and therefore, high-resolution solutions for the slot physics are possible. The implementation of the HTSA into TSAR is based upon a ``slot data file`` that includes the cell indices where the desired slots are exist within the FDTD mesh. For an HTSA-defined slot, the wall region local to the slot is shorted, and therefore, to change the slot`s topology simply requires altering the file to include the desired cells. 7 refs.

  9. GPU-accelerated FDTD modeling of radio-frequency field-tissue interactions in high-field MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Jieru; Liu, Feng; Weber, Ewald; Li, Yu; Crozier, Stuart

    2011-06-01

    The analysis of high-field RF field-tissue interactions requires high-performance finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) computing. Conventional CPU-based FDTD calculations offer limited computing performance in a PC environment. This study presents a graphics processing unit (GPU)-based parallel-computing framework, producing substantially boosted computing efficiency (with a two-order speedup factor) at a PC-level cost. Specific details of implementing the FDTD method on a GPU architecture have been presented and the new computational strategy has been successfully applied to the design of a novel 8-element transceive RF coil system at 9.4 T. Facilitated by the powerful GPU-FDTD computing, the new RF coil array offers optimized fields (averaging 25% improvement in sensitivity, and 20% reduction in loop coupling compared with conventional array structures of the same size) for small animal imaging with a robust RF configuration. The GPU-enabled acceleration paves the way for FDTD to be applied for both detailed forward modeling and inverse design of MRI coils, which were previously impractical.

  10. Incorporating excitation-induced dephasing into the Maxwell-Bloch numerical modeling of photon echoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burr, G.W.; Harris, Todd L.; Babbitt, Wm. Randall; Jefferson, C. Michael

    2004-01-01

    We describe the incorporation of excitation-induced dephasing (EID) into the Maxwell-Bloch numerical simulation of photon echoes. At each time step of the usual numerical integration, stochastic frequency jumps of ions--caused by excitation of neighboring ions--is modeled by convolving each Bloch vector with the Bloch vectors of nearby frequency detunings. The width of this convolution kernel follows the instantaneous change in overall population, integrated over the simulated bandwidth. This approach is validated by extensive comparison against published and original experimental results. The enhanced numerical model is then used to investigate the accuracy of experiments designed to extrapolate to the intrinsic dephasing time T 2 from data taken in the presence of EID. Such a modeling capability offers improved understanding of experimental results, and should allow quantitative analysis of engineering tradeoffs in realistic optical coherent transient applications

  11. A Maxwell elasto-brittle rheology for sea ice modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dansereau, Véronique; Weiss, Jérôme; Saramito, Pierre; Lattes, Philippe

    2016-07-01

    A new rheological model is developed that builds on an elasto-brittle (EB) framework used for sea ice and rock mechanics, with the intent of representing both the small elastic deformations associated with fracturing processes and the larger deformations occurring along the faults/leads once the material is highly damaged and fragmented. A viscous-like relaxation term is added to the linear-elastic constitutive law together with an effective viscosity that evolves according to the local level of damage of the material, like its elastic modulus. The coupling between the level of damage and both mechanical parameters is such that within an undamaged ice cover the viscosity is infinitely large and deformations are strictly elastic, while along highly damaged zones the elastic modulus vanishes and most of the stress is dissipated through permanent deformations. A healing mechanism is also introduced, counterbalancing the effects of damaging over large timescales. In this new model, named Maxwell-EB after the Maxwell rheology, the irreversible and reversible deformations are solved for simultaneously; hence drift velocities are defined naturally. First idealized simulations without advection show that the model reproduces the main characteristics of sea ice mechanics and deformation: strain localization, anisotropy, intermittency and associated scaling laws.

  12. Einstein-aether theory with a Maxwell field: General formalism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balakin, Alexander B., E-mail: Alexander.Balakin@kpfu.ru [Department of General Relativity and Gravitation, Institute of Physics, Kazan Federal University, Kremlevskaya str. 18, Kazan 420008 (Russian Federation); Lemos, José P.S., E-mail: joselemos@ist.utl.pt [Centro Multidisciplinar de Astrofísica-CENTRA, Departamento de Física, Instituto Superior Técnico-IST, Universidade de Lisboa-UL, Avenida Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2014-11-15

    We extend the Einstein-aether theory to include the Maxwell field in a nontrivial manner by taking into account its interaction with the time-like unit vector field characterizing the aether. We also include a generic matter term. We present a model with a Lagrangian that includes cross-terms linear and quadratic in the Maxwell tensor, linear and quadratic in the covariant derivative of the aether velocity four-vector, linear in its second covariant derivative and in the Riemann tensor. We decompose these terms with respect to the irreducible parts of the covariant derivative of the aether velocity, namely, the acceleration four-vector, the shear and vorticity tensors, and the expansion scalar. Furthermore, we discuss the influence of an aether non-uniform motion on the polarization and magnetization of the matter in such an aether environment, as well as on its dielectric and magnetic properties. The total self-consistent system of equations for the electromagnetic and the gravitational fields, and the dynamic equations for the unit vector aether field are obtained. Possible applications of this system are discussed. Based on the principles of effective field theories, we display in an appendix all the terms up to fourth order in derivative operators that can be considered in a Lagrangian that includes the metric, the electromagnetic and the aether fields.

  13. Electronic Maxwell demon in the coherent strong-coupling regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, Gernot; Cerrillo, Javier; Engelhardt, Georg; Strasberg, Philipp

    2018-05-01

    We consider an external feedback control loop implementing the action of a Maxwell demon. Applying control actions that are conditioned on measurement outcomes, the demon may transport electrons against a bias voltage and thereby effectively converts information into electric power. While the underlying model—a feedback-controlled quantum dot that is coupled to two electronic leads—is well explored in the limit of small tunnel couplings, we can address the strong-coupling regime with a fermionic reaction-coordinate mapping. This exact mapping transforms the setup into a serial triple quantum dot coupled to two leads. We find that a continuous projective measurement of the central dot occupation would lead to a complete suppression of electronic transport due to the quantum Zeno effect. In contrast, by using a microscopic detector model we can implement a weak measurement, which allows for closure of the control loop without transport blockade. Then, in the weak-coupling regime, the energy flows associated with the feedback loop are negligible, and dominantly the information gained in the measurement induces a bound for the generated electric power. In the strong coupling limit, the protocol may require more energy for operating the control loop than electric power produced, such that the whole device is no longer information dominated and can thus not be interpreted as a Maxwell demon.

  14. Maxwell's equations, quantum physics and the quantum graviton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gersten, Alexander; Moalem, Amnon

    2011-01-01

    Quantum wave equations for massless particles and arbitrary spin are derived by factorizing the d'Alembertian operator. The procedure is extensively applied to the spin one photon equation which is related to Maxwell's equations via the proportionality of the photon wavefunction Ψ to the sum E + iB of the electric and magnetic fields. Thus Maxwell's equations can be considered as the first quantized one-photon equation. The photon wave equation is written in two forms, one with additional explicit subsidiary conditions and second with the subsidiary conditions implicitly included in the main equation. The second equation was obtained by factorizing the d'Alembertian with 4×4 matrix representation of 'relativistic quaternions'. Furthermore, scalar Lagrangian formalism, consistent with quantization requirements is developed using derived conserved current of probability and normalization condition for the wavefunction. Lessons learned from the derivation of the photon equation are used in the derivation of the spin two quantum equation, which we call the quantum graviton. Quantum wave equation with implicit subsidiary conditions, which factorizes the d'Alembertian with 8×8 matrix representation of relativistic quaternions, is derived. Scalar Lagrangian is formulated and conserved probability current and wavefunction normalization are found, both consistent with the definitions of quantum operators and their expectation values. We are showing that the derived equations are the first quantized equations of the photon and the graviton.

  15. GPR data modeling by using the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) methods; Modelagem de dados de GPR atraves do metodo FDTD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, Gleide A.N.; Silva, Jadir C.; Rocha, Paula F.; Costa, Jorge L. [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Geologia]. E-mail: gleidalencar@hotmail.com.br; jadir@geologia.ufrj.br; ferrucio@acd.ufrj.br; jotalc@yahoo.com.br

    2003-07-01

    Presently the oil industry has shown the importance of defining the structural framework of reservoirs. This study intends to contribute for the solution of this problem, using synthetic models in order to evaluate the electromagnetic signal due to a certain target. Use was made of an algorithm, which is based in the Finite Difference Time Domain Methods (FDTD). The simulated results of this survey found the best parameters for the chosen frequencies. In the present study there were simulated polarization, geometry and constitutive parameters (dielectric permittivity and electric conductivity). The results, using frequencies of 50 and 100 MHz, show clearly the effects of the electromagnetic waves attenuation and their problems related with signal resolution of targets in depth. (author)

  16. Investigation of composite electromagnetic scattering from ship-like target on the randomly rough sea surface using FDTD method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juan, Li; Li-Xin, Guo; Hao, Zeng; Xu-Biao, Han

    2009-01-01

    Composite electromagnetic scattering from a two-dimensional (2D) ship-like target on a one-dimensional sea surface is investigated by using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. A uniaxial perfectly matched layer is adopted for truncation of FDTD lattices. The FDTD updated equations can be used for the total computation domain by choosing the uniaxial parameters properly. To validate the proposed numerical technique, a 2D infinitely long cylinder over the sea surface is taken into account first. The variation of angular distribution of the scattering changing with incident angle is calculated. The results show good agreement with the conventional moment method. Finally, the influence of the incident angle, the polarization, and the size of the ship-like target on the composite scattering coefficient is discussed in detail. (classical areas of phenomenology)

  17. Analysis of Electromagnetic Propagation from MHz to THz with a Memory-Optimised CPML-FDTD Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rodríguez-Sánchez

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available FDTD method opened a fertile research area on the numerical analysis of electromagnetic phenomena under a wide range of media and propagation conditions, providing an extensive analysis of electromagnetic behaviour like propagation, reflection, refraction, and multitrajectory phenomena. In this paper, we present an optimised FDTD-CPML algorithm, focused in saving memory while increasing the performance of the algorithm. We particularly implement FDTD-CPML method at high frequency bands, used in several telecommunications applications as well as in nanoelectromagnetism. We show an analysis of the performance of the algorithm in single and double precision, as well as a stability of the algorithm analysis, from where we conclude that the implemented CPML ABC constitutes a robust choice in terms of precision and accuracy for the high frequencies herein considered. It is important to recall that the CPML ABC parameters provided in this paper are fixed for the tested range of frequencies, that is, from MHz to THz.

  18. Study on High Performance of MPI-Based Parallel FDTD from WorkStation to Super Computer Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. L. He

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Parallel FDTD method is applied to analyze the electromagnetic problems of the electrically large targets on super computer. It is well known that the more the number of processors the less computing time consumed. Nevertheless, with the same number of processors, computing efficiency is affected by the scheme of the MPI virtual topology. Then, the influence of different virtual topology schemes on parallel performance of parallel FDTD is studied in detail. The general rules are presented on how to obtain the highest efficiency of parallel FDTD algorithm by optimizing MPI virtual topology. To show the validity of the presented method, several numerical results are given in the later part. Various comparisons are made and some useful conclusions are summarized.

  19. Large-visual-angle microstructure inspired from quantitative design of Morpho butterflies' lamellae deviation using the FDTD/PSO method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wanlin; Zhang, Wang; Chen, Weixin; Gu, Jiajun; Liu, Qinglei; Deng, Tao; Zhang, Di

    2013-01-15

    The wide angular range of the treelike structure in Morpho butterfly scales was investigated by finite-difference time-domain (FDTD)/particle-swarm-optimization (PSO) analysis. Using the FDTD method, different parameters in the Morpho butterflies' treelike structure were studied and their contributions to the angular dependence were analyzed. Then a wide angular range was realized by the PSO method from quantitatively designing the lamellae deviation (Δy), which was a crucial parameter with angular range. The field map of the wide-range reflection in a large area was given to confirm the wide angular range. The tristimulus values and corresponding color coordinates for various viewing directions were calculated to confirm the blue color in different observation angles. The wide angular range realized by the FDTD/PSO method will assist us in understanding the scientific principles involved and also in designing artificial optical materials.

  20. A postprocessing method based on high-resolution spectral estimation for FDTD calculation of phononic band structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su Xiaoxing, E-mail: xxsu@bjtu.edu.c [School of Electronic and Information Engineering, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Li Jianbao; Wang Yuesheng [Institute of Engineering Mechanics, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China)

    2010-05-15

    If the energy bands of a phononic crystal are calculated by the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method combined with the fast Fourier transform (FFT), good estimation of the eigenfrequencies can only be ensured by the postprocessing of sufficiently long time series generated by a large number of FDTD iterations. In this paper, a postprocessing method based on the high-resolution spectral estimation via the Yule-Walker method is proposed to overcome this difficulty. Numerical simulation results for three-dimensional acoustic and two-dimensional elastic systems show that, compared with the classic FFT-based postprocessing method, the proposed method can give much better estimation of the eigenfrequencies when the FDTD is run with relatively few iterations.

  1. FDTD parallel computational analysis of grid-type scattering filter characteristics for medical X-ray image diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Koichi; Miyazaki, Yasumitsu; Goto, Nobuo

    2007-01-01

    X-ray diagnosis depends on the intensity of transmitted and scattered waves in X-ray propagation in biomedical media. X-ray is scattered and absorbed by tissues, such as fat, bone and internal organs. However, image processing for medical diagnosis, based on the scattering and absorption characteristics of these tissues in X-ray spectrum is not so much studied. To obtain precise information of tissues in a living body, the accurate characteristics of scattering and absorption are required. In this paper, X-ray scattering and absorption in biomedical media are studied using 2-dimensional finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. In FDTD method, the size of analysis space is very limited by the performance of available computers. To overcome this limitation, parallel and successive FDTD method is introduced. As a result of computer simulation, the amplitude of transmitted and scattered waves are presented numerically. The fundamental filtering characteristics of grid-type filter are also shown numerically. (author)

  2. A postprocessing method based on high-resolution spectral estimation for FDTD calculation of phononic band structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Xiaoxing; Li Jianbao; Wang Yuesheng

    2010-01-01

    If the energy bands of a phononic crystal are calculated by the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method combined with the fast Fourier transform (FFT), good estimation of the eigenfrequencies can only be ensured by the postprocessing of sufficiently long time series generated by a large number of FDTD iterations. In this paper, a postprocessing method based on the high-resolution spectral estimation via the Yule-Walker method is proposed to overcome this difficulty. Numerical simulation results for three-dimensional acoustic and two-dimensional elastic systems show that, compared with the classic FFT-based postprocessing method, the proposed method can give much better estimation of the eigenfrequencies when the FDTD is run with relatively few iterations.

  3. Comments on Dirac-like monopole, Maxwell and Maxwell-Chern-Simons electrodynamics in D=(2+1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moura-Melo, Winder A. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). E-mail: winder@cbpf.br; Helayel Neto, J.A. [Universidade Catolica de Petropolis, RJ (Brazil). Grupo de Fisica Teorica. E-mail: helayel@cbpf.br

    2000-05-01

    Classical Maxwell and Maxwell-Chern-Simons Electrodynamics in (2+1) D are studied in some details. General expressions for the potential and fields are obtained for both models, and some particular cases are explicitly solved. Conceptual and technical difficulties arise, however, for accelerated charges. The propagation of electromagnetic signals is also studied and their reverberation is worked out and discussed. Furthermore, we show that a Dirac-like monopole yields a (static) tangential electric field. We also discuss some classical and quantum consequences of the field created by such a monopole when acting upon an usual electric charge. In particular, we show that at large distances, the dynamics of one single charged particle under the action of such a potential and a constant (external) magnetic field as well, reduces to that of one central harmonic oscillator, presenting, however, an interesting angular sector which admits energy-eigenvalues. For example, the quantisation of these eigenvalues yields a Dirac-like condition on the product of the charges. Moreover, such eigenvalues are shown to feel (and respond) to discrete shift of the angle variable. We also raise the question on the possibility of the formation pf bound states in this system. (author)

  4. Twisting null geodesic congruences and the Einstein-Maxwell equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, Ezra T; Silva-Ortigoza, Gilberto

    2006-01-01

    In a recent article, we returned to the study of asymptotically flat solutions of the vacuum Einstein equations with a rather unconventional point of view. The essential observation in that work was that from a given asymptotically flat vacuum spacetime with a given Bondi shear, one can find a class of asymptotically shear-free (but, in general, twisting) null geodesic congruences where the class was uniquely given up to the arbitrary choice of a complex analytic 'worldline' in a four-dimensional complex space. By imitating certain terms in the Weyl tensor that are found in the algebraically special type II metrics, this complex worldline could be made unique and given-or assigned-the physical meaning as the complex centre of mass. Equations of motion for this case were found. The purpose of the present work is to extend those results to asymptotically flat solutions of the Einstein-Maxwell equations. Once again, in this case, we get a class of asymptotically shear-free null geodesic congruences depending on a complex worldline in the same four-dimensional complex space. However in this case there will be, in general, two distinct but uniquely chosen worldlines, one of which can be assigned as the complex centre of charge while the other could be called the complex centre of mass. Rather than investigating the situation where there are two distinct complex worldlines, we study instead the special degenerate case where the two worldlines coincide, i.e., where there is a single unique worldline. This mimics the case of algebraically special Einstein-Maxwell fields where the degenerate principle null vector of the Weyl tensor coincides with a Maxwell principle null vector. Again we obtain equations of motion for this worldline-but explicitly found here only in an approximation. Though there are ambiguities in assigning physical meaning to different terms it appears as if reliance on the Kerr and charged Kerr metrics and classical electromagnetic radiation theory helps

  5. Development of a Finite-Difference Time Domain (FDTD) Model for Propagation of Transient Sounds in Very Shallow Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprague, Mark W; Luczkovich, Joseph J

    2016-01-01

    This finite-difference time domain (FDTD) model for sound propagation in very shallow water uses pressure and velocity grids with both 3-dimensional Cartesian and 2-dimensional cylindrical implementations. Parameters, including water and sediment properties, can vary in each dimension. Steady-state and transient signals from discrete and distributed sources, such as the surface of a vibrating pile, can be used. The cylindrical implementation uses less computation but requires axial symmetry. The Cartesian implementation allows asymmetry. FDTD calculations compare well with those of a split-step parabolic equation. Applications include modeling the propagation of individual fish sounds, fish aggregation sounds, and distributed sources.

  6. Interactive visualization system to analyze corrugated millimeter-waveguide component of ECH in nuclear fusion with FDTD simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashima, N; Nakamura, H; Kubo, S; Tamura, Y; Ito, A M

    2014-01-01

    We have simulated distribution of electromagnetic waves through the system composed of miter bends by Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) simulation. We develop the interactive visualization system using a new interactive GUI system which is composed of the virtual reality system and android tablet to analyze the FDTD simulation. The effect of the waveguide system with grooves have been investigated to quantitatively by visualization system. Comparing waveguide system with grooves and without grooves, grooves have been confirmed to suppress the surface current at the metal surface. The surface current at complex shape such as the miter bend have been investigated

  7. Three-dimensional FDTD Modeling of Earth-ionosphere Cavity Resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H.; Pasko, V. P.

    2003-12-01

    Resonance properties of the earth-ionosphere cavity were first predicted by W. O. Schumann in 1952 [Schumann, Z. Naturforsch. A, 7, 149, 1952]. Since then observations of extremely low frequency (ELF) signals in the frequency range 1-500 Hz have become a powerful tool for monitoring of global lightning activity and planetary scale variability of the lower ionosphere, as well as, in recent years, for location and remote sensing of sprites, jets and elves and associated lightning discharges [e.g., Sato et al., JASTP, 65, 607, 2003; Su et al., Nature, 423, 974, 2003; and references cited therein]. The simplicity and flexibility of finite difference time domain (FDTD) technique for finding first principles solutions of electromagnetic problems in a medium with arbitrary inhomogeneities and ever-increasing computer power make FDTD an excellent candidate to be the technique of the future in development of realistic numerical models of VLF/ELF propagation in Earth-ionosphere waveguide [Cummer, IEEE Trans. Antennas Propagat., 48, 1420, 2000], and several reports about successful application of the FDTD technique for solution of related problems have recently appeared in the literature [e.g., Thevenot et al., Ann. Telecommun., 54, 297, 1999; Cummer, 2000; Berenger, Ann. Telecommun., 57, 1059, 2002, Simpson and Taflove, IEEE Antennas Wireless Propagat. Lett., 1, 53, 2002]. In this talk we will present results from a new three-dimensional spherical FDTD model, which is designed for studies of ELF electromagnetic signals under 100 Hz in the earth-ionosphere cavity. The model accounts for a realistic latitudinal and longitudinal variation of ground conductivity (i.e., for the boundaries between oceans and continents) by employing a broadband surface impedance technique proposed in [Breggs et al., IEEE Trans. Antenna Propagat., 41, 118, 1993]. The realistic distributions of atmospheric/lower ionospheric conductivity are derived from the international reference ionosphere model

  8. FDTD solutions for the distribution of radiation from dipoles embedded in dielectric particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Changhui [Department of Physics, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX (United States)]. E-mail: cli@biomed.wustl.edu; Kattawar, George W. [Department of Physics, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX (United States); You, Yu [Department of Physics, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX (United States); Zhai Pengwang [Department of Physics, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX (United States); Yang Ping [Department of Atmospheric Sciences, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX (United States)

    2007-07-15

    The finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method is used to simulate the electromagnetic radiation emitted by an infinitesimal electric dipole embedded in a small particle with an arbitrary shape and internal composition. The far-field pattern of the radiation pertaining to dipoles embedded in a host particle is highly sensitive to the particle shape. Thus, it is possible to discriminate host particles according to their radiation patterns. The method reported here is also applicable to the study of induced Raman scattering and fluorescence phenomena and the detection of biological agents.

  9. RCWA and FDTD modeling of light emission from internally structured OLEDs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callens, Michiel Koen; Marsman, Herman; Penninck, Lieven; Peeters, Patrick; de Groot, Harry; ter Meulen, Jan Matthijs; Neyts, Kristiaan

    2014-05-05

    We report on the fabrication and simulation of a green OLED with an Internal Light Extraction (ILE) layer. The optical behavior of these devices is simulated using both Rigorous Coupled Wave Analysis (RCWA) and Finite Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) methods. Results obtained using these two different techniques show excellent agreement and predict the experimental results with good precision. By verifying the validity of both simulation methods on the internal light extraction structure we pave the way to optimization of ILE layers using either of these methods.

  10. Unconditionally stable WLP-FDTD method for the modeling of electromagnetic wave propagation in gyrotropic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zheng-Wei; Xi, Xiao-Li; Zhang, Jin-Sheng; Liu, Jiang-fan

    2015-12-14

    The unconditional stable finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method based on field expansion with weighted Laguerre polynomials (WLPs) is applied to model electromagnetic wave propagation in gyrotropic materials. The conventional Yee cell is modified to have the tightly coupled current density components located at the same spatial position. The perfectly matched layer (PML) is formulated in a stretched-coordinate (SC) system with the complex-frequency-shifted (CFS) factor to achieve good absorption performance. Numerical examples are shown to validate the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed method.

  11. An improved cylindrical FDTD method and its application to field-tissue interaction study in MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Jieru; Liu, Feng; Xia, Ling; Shao, Tingting; Mason, David G; Crozier, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a three dimensional finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) scheme in cylindrical coordinates with an improved algorithm for accommodating the numerical singularity associated with the polar axis. The regularization of this singularity problem is entirely based on Ampere's law. The proposed algorithm has been detailed and verified against a problem with a known solution obtained from a commercial electromagnetic simulation package. The numerical scheme is also illustrated by modeling high-frequency RF field-human body interactions in MRI. The results demonstrate the accuracy and capability of the proposed algorithm.

  12. Analysis of Broad-band Frequency Selective Shielding Glass by FDTD method

    OpenAIRE

    笠嶋, 善憲; Kasashima, Yoshinori

    2010-01-01

    A frequency Selective shielding (FSS) glass is a print of many same size antennas on a sheet of glass, and it has high shielding properties for one specific frequency. In the past, the author analyzed theoretically the characteristics of the FSS, as a large scale array antenna. The FSS has narrow-band shielding characteristics. This time, the author analyzed accurately the characteristics of a FSS glass being a print of many same size dipole antennas on a sheet of glass by FDTD method. As the...

  13. Maxwell-Stefan diffusion coefficient estimation for ternary systems: an ideal ternary alcohol system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allie-Ebrahim, Tariq; Zhu, Qingyu; Bräuer, Pierre; Moggridge, Geoff D; D'Agostino, Carmine

    2017-06-21

    The Maxwell-Stefan model is a popular diffusion model originally developed to model diffusion of gases, which can be considered thermodynamically ideal mixtures, although its application has been extended to model diffusion in non-ideal liquid mixtures as well. A drawback of the model is that it requires the Maxwell-Stefan diffusion coefficients, which are not based on measurable quantities but they have to be estimated. As a result, numerous estimation methods, such as the Darken model, have been proposed to estimate these diffusion coefficients. However, the Darken model was derived, and is only well defined, for binary systems. This model has been extended to ternary systems according to two proposed forms, one by R. Krishna and J. M. van Baten, Ind. Eng. Chem. Res., 2005, 44, 6939-6947 and the other by X. Liu, T. J. H. Vlugt and A. Bardow, Ind. Eng. Chem. Res., 2011, 50, 10350-10358. In this paper, the two forms have been analysed against the ideal ternary system of methanol/butan-1-ol/propan-1-ol and using experimental values of self-diffusion coefficients. In particular, using pulsed gradient stimulated echo nuclear magnetic resonance (PGSTE-NMR) we have measured the self-diffusion coefficients in various methanol/butan-1-ol/propan-1-ol mixtures. The experimental values of self-diffusion coefficients were then used as the input data required for the Darken model. The predictions of the two proposed multicomponent forms of this model were then compared to experimental values of mutual diffusion coefficients for the ideal alcohol ternary system. This experimental-based approach showed that the Liu's model gives better predictions compared to that of Krishna and van Baten, although it was only accurate to within 26%. Nonetheless, the multicomponent Darken model in conjunction with self-diffusion measurements from PGSTE-NMR represents an attractive method for a rapid estimation of mutual diffusion in multicomponent systems, especially when compared to exhaustive

  14. Geometric model of topological insulators from the Maxwell algebra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Giandomenico

    2017-11-01

    We propose a novel geometric model of time-reversal-invariant topological insulators in three dimensions in presence of an external electromagnetic field. Their gapped boundary supports relativistic quantum Hall states and is described by a Chern-Simons theory, where the gauge connection takes values in the Maxwell algebra. This represents a non-central extension of the Poincaré algebra and takes into account both the Lorentz and magnetic-translation symmetries of the surface states. In this way, we derive a relativistic version of the Wen-Zee term and we show that the non-minimal coupling between the background geometry and the electromagnetic field in the model is in agreement with the main properties of the relativistic quantum Hall states in the flat space.

  15. Maxwell's enduring legacy a scientific history of the Cavendish laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Longair, Malcolm

    2016-01-01

    The Cavendish Laboratory is arguably the most famous physics laboratory in the world. Founded in 1874, it rapidly gained a leading international reputation through the researches of the Cavendish professors beginning with Maxwell, Rayleigh, J. J. Thomson, Rutherford and Bragg. Its name will always be associated with the discoveries of the electron, the neutron, the structure of the DNA molecule and pulsars, but these are simply the tip of the iceberg of outstanding science. The physics carried out in the laboratory is the central theme of the book and this is explained in reasonably non-technical terms. The research activities are set in their international context. Generously illustrated, with many pictures of the apparatus used and diagrams from the original papers, the story is brought right up to date with descriptions of the science carried out under the leadership of the very different personalities of Mott, Pippard and Edwards.

  16. The road to Maxwell's demon conceptual foundations of statistical mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Hemmo, Meir

    2012-01-01

    Time asymmetric phenomena are successfully predicted by statistical mechanics. Yet the foundations of this theory are surprisingly shaky. Its explanation for the ease of mixing milk with coffee is incomplete, and even implies that un-mixing them should be just as easy. In this book the authors develop a new conceptual foundation for statistical mechanics that addresses this difficulty. Explaining the notions of macrostates, probability, measurement, memory, and the arrow of time in statistical mechanics, they reach the startling conclusion that Maxwell's Demon, the famous perpetuum mobile, is consistent with the fundamental physical laws. Mathematical treatments are avoided where possible, and instead the authors use novel diagrams to illustrate the text. This is a fascinating book for graduate students and researchers interested in the foundations and philosophy of physics.

  17. Geometric Model of Topological Insulators from the Maxwell Algebra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Giandomenico

    I propose a novel geometric model of time-reversal-invariant topological insulators in three dimensions in presence of an external electromagnetic field. Their gapped boundary supports relativistic quantum Hall states and is described by a Chern-Simons theory, where the gauge connection takes values in the Maxwell algebra. This represents a non-central extension of the Poincare' algebra and takes into account both the Lorentz and magnetic-translation symmetries of the surface states. In this way, I derive a relativistic version of the Wen-Zee term and I show that the non-minimal coupling between the background geometry and the electromagnetic field in the model is in agreement with the main properties of the relativistic quantum Hall states in the flat space. This work is part of the DITP consortium, a program of the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO) that is funded by the Dutch Ministry of Education, Culture and Science (OCW).

  18. On the stationary Einstein-Maxwell-Klein-Gordon equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gegenberg, J.D.

    1981-05-01

    The stationary Einstein-Maxwell-Klein-Gordon (EMKG) equations for interacting gravitational, electromagnetic and meson fields are examined. The theory is cast into the formalism of principal fiber bundles with a connection, wherein its relationship to current trends in theoretical physics is made manifest. The EMKG equations are shown to admit a Higgs-like mechanism for giving mass to the gauge field. A theorem specifying sufficient conditions for the stationarity of the spacetime metric to imply stationarity of the other fields is proved. By imposing additional constraints and symmetries, the EMKG equations are considerably simplified. An attempt is made to apply a solution-generation technique, and this meets with only partial success. Finally, a stationary but non-static solution is found, and the geometric and physical properties are discussed

  19. Limited-diffraction solutions to Maxwell and Schroedinger equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Jian-yu; Greenleaf, J.F.

    1996-10-01

    The authors have developed a new family of limited diffraction electromagnetic X-shaped waves based on the scalar X-shaped waves discovered previously. These waves are diffraction-free in theory and particle-like (wave packets), in that they maintain their shape as they propagate to an infinite distance. The 'X waves' possess (theoretically) infinitely extended 'arms' and - at least, the ones studied in this paper - have an infinite total energy: therefore, they are not physically realizable. However, they can be truncated in both space and time and 'approximated' by means of a finite aperture radiator so to get a large enough depth of interest (depth of field). In addition to the Maxwell equations, X wave solutions to the free Schroedinger equation are also obtained. Possible applications of these new waves are discussed. Finally, the authors discuss the appearance of the X-shaped solutions from the purely geometric point of view of the special relativity theory

  20. Chaotic Dynamics of Falling Disks: from Maxwell to Bar Tricks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Stuart

    1998-03-01

    Understanding the motion of flat objects falling in a viscous medium dates back to at least Newton and Maxwell, and is relevant to problems in meteorology, sedimentology, aerospace and chemical engineering, and nori/disks/pub.html>bar wagering strategies. Recent theoretical studies have emphasized the role played by deterministic chaos. Here we nori/falling.html>report(S. B. Field, M. Klaus, M. G. Moore, and F. Nori, Nature 388), 252 (1997) experimental observations and theoretical analysis of the dynamics of disks falling in water/glycerol mixtures. We find four distinct types of motion, and map out a ``phase diagram'' in the appropriate variables. The apparently complex behavior of the disks can be reduced to a series of one-dimensional maps which display a discontinuity at the crossover from periodic and chaotic motion. This discontinuity leads to an unusual intermittency transition between the two behaviors, which has not previously been observed experimentally in any system.

  1. Holographic renormalization of Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Bom Soo

    2016-01-01

    We generalize the boundary value problem with a mixed boundary condition that involves the gauge and scalar fields in the context of Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton theories. In particular, the expectation value of the dual scalar operator can be a function of the expectation value of the current operator. The properties are prevalent in a fixed charge ensemble because the conserved charge is shared by both fields through the dilaton coupling, which is also responsible for non-Fermi liquid properties. We study the on-shell action and the stress energy tensor to note practical importances of the boundary value problem. In the presence of the scalar fields, physical quantities are not fully fixed due to the finite boundary terms that manifest in the massless scalar or the scalar with mass saturating the Breitenlohner-Freedman bound.

  2. On some orthogonality properties of Maxwell's multipole vectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gramada, Apostol

    2007-01-01

    We determine the location of the expansion points with respect to which the two Maxwell's multipole vectors of the quadrupole moment and the dipole vector of a distribution of charge form an orthogonal trihedron. We find that with respect to these 'orthogonality centres' both the dipole and the quadrupole moments are each characterized by a single real parameter. We further show that the orthogonality centres coincide with the stationary points of the magnitude of the quadrupole moment and, therefore, they can be seen as an extension of the concept of centre of the dipole moment of a neutral system introduced previously in the literature. The nature of the stationary points then provides the means for the classification of a distribution of charge in two different categories

  3. Cubic interactions of Maxwell-like higher spins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francia, Dario [Scuola Normale Superiore and INFN,Piazza dei Cavalieri, 7 I-56126 Pisa (Italy); Monaco, Gabriele Lo [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pisa,Piazza Fibonacci, 3, I-56126, Pisa (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Milano-Bicocca,Piazza della Scienza 3, I-20126 Milano (Italy); Mkrtchyan, Karapet [Max Planck Institut für Gravitationsphysik,Am Mühlenberg 1, Potsdam 14476 (Germany)

    2017-04-12

    We study the cubic vertices for Maxwell-like higher-spins in flat and (A)dS background spaces of any dimension. Reducibility of their free spectra implies that a single cubic vertex involving any three fields subsumes a number of couplings among different particles of various spins. The resulting vertices do not involve traces of the fields and in this sense are simpler than their Fronsdal counterparts. We propose an extension of both the free theory and of its cubic deformation to a more general class of partially reducible systems, that one can obtain from the original theory upon imposing trace constraints of various orders. The key to our results is a version of the Noether procedure allowing to systematically account for the deformations of the transversality conditions to be imposed on the gauge parameters at the free level.

  4. Deciphering the embedded wave in Saturn's Maxwell ringlet

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Richard G.; Nicholson, Philip D.; Hedman, Mathew M.; Hahn, Joseph M.; McGhee-French, Colleen A.; Colwell, Joshua E.; Marouf, Essam A.; Rappaport, Nicole J.

    2016-11-01

    The eccentric Maxwell ringlet in Saturn's C ring is home to a prominent wavelike structure that varies strongly and systematically with true anomaly, as revealed by nearly a decade of high-SNR Cassini occultation observations. Using a simple linear "accordion" model to compensate for the compression and expansion of the ringlet and the wave, we derive a mean optical depth profile for the ringlet and a set of rescaled, background-subtracted radial wave profiles. We use wavelet analysis to identify the wave as a 2-armed trailing spiral, consistent with a density wave driven by an m = 2 outer Lindblad resonance (OLR), with a pattern speed Ωp = 1769.17° d-1 and a corresponding resonance radius ares = 87530.0 km. Estimates of the surface mass density of the Maxwell ringlet range from a mean value of 11g cm-2 derived from the self-gravity model to 5 - 12gcm-2 , as inferred from the wave's phase profile and a theoretical dispersion relation. The corresponding opacity is about 0.12 cm2 g-1, comparable to several plateaus in the outer C ring (Hedman, M.N., Nicholson, P.D. [2014]. Mont. Not. Roy. Astron. Soc. 444, 1369-1388). A linear density wave model using the derived wave phase profile nicely matches the wave's amplitude, wavelength, and phase in most of our observations, confirming the accuracy of the pattern speed and demonstrating the wave's coherence over a period of 8 years. However, the linear model fails to reproduce the narrow, spike-like structures that are prominent in the observed optical depth profiles. Using a symplectic N-body streamline-based dynamical code (Hahn, J.M., Spitale, J.N. [2013]. Astrophys. J. 772, 122), we simulate analogs of the Maxwell ringlet, modeled as an eccentric ringlet with an embedded wave driven by a fictitious satellite with an OLR located within the ring. The simulations reproduce many of the features of the actual observations, including strongly asymmetric peaks and troughs in the inward-propagating density wave. We argue that

  5. Holographic Fermions in Anisotropic Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton-Axion Theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuang, Xiao-Mei; Fang, Li-Qing

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the properties of the holographic Fermionic system dual to an anisotropic charged black brane bulk in Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton-Axion gravity theory. We consider the minimal coupling between the Dirac field and the gauge field in the bulk gravity theory and mainly explore the dispersion relation exponents of the Green functions of the dual Fermionic operators in the dual field theory. We find that along both the anisotropic and the isotropic directions the Fermi momentum will be effected by the anisotropy of the bulk theory. However, the anisotropy has influence on the dispersion relation which is almost linear for massless Fermions with charge q=2. The universal properties that the mass and the charge of the Fermi possibly correspond to nonlinear dispersion relation are also investigated

  6. Second order finite volume scheme for Maxwell's equations with discontinuous electromagnetic properties on unstructured meshes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ismagilov, Timur Z., E-mail: ismagilov@academ.org

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents a second order finite volume scheme for numerical solution of Maxwell's equations with discontinuous dielectric permittivity and magnetic permeability on unstructured meshes. The scheme is based on Godunov scheme and employs approaches of Van Leer and Lax–Wendroff to increase the order of approximation. To keep the second order of approximation near dielectric permittivity and magnetic permeability discontinuities a novel technique for gradient calculation and limitation is applied near discontinuities. Results of test computations for problems with linear and curvilinear discontinuities confirm second order of approximation. The scheme was applied to modelling propagation of electromagnetic waves inside photonic crystal waveguides with a bend.

  7. On the classical Maxwell-Lorentz electrodynamics, the electron inertia problem, and the Feynman proper time paradigm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prykarpatsky, A.K.; Bogolubov, J.R.

    2016-01-01

    The classical Maxwell electromagnetic field and the Lorentz-type force equations are rederived in the framework of the Feynman proper time paradigm and the related vacuum field theory approach. The classical Ampere law origin is rederived, and its relationship with the Feynman proper time paradigm is discussed. The electron inertia problem is analyzed in detail within the Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formalisms and the related pressure-energy compensation principle of stochastic electrodynamics. The modified Abraham-Lorentz damping radiation force is derived and the electromagnetic electron mass origin is argued

  8. 3. Similarities Across the Centuries: A Comparison Between Two Vocal Works by Barbara Strozzi and Peter Maxwell Davies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisi Rossella

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Musical creativity may be expressed by composers in diverse ways: sometimes they compose fully original works, which are characterized by specific features making them unique. Other times, musicians may feel a particular affinity with colleagues who lived centuries before, or identify peculiar resemblances between the time they live in, and a previous epoch, such as similar cultural climate and approach to life: in these cases, composers may author pieces which show surprising similarities with those of some predecessors. The present study compares a work of the seventeenth century, composed by Barbara Strozzi, and one composed in the 1960s by Peter Maxwell Davies, highlighting their similarities.

  9. Maxwell-Chern-Simons theory in covariant and Coulomb gauges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haller, K.; Lim-Lombridas, E.

    1996-01-01

    We quantize quantum electrodynamics in 2 + 1 dimensions coupled to a Chern-Simons (CS) term and a charged spinor field, in covariant gauges and in the Coulomb gauge. The resulting Maxwell-Chern-Simons (MCS) theory describes charged fermions interacting with each other and with topologically massive propagating photons. We impose Gauss's law and the gauge conditions and investigate their effect on the dynamics and on the statistics of n-particle states. We construct charged spinor states that obey Gauss's law and the gauge conditions and transform the theory to representations in which these states constitute a Fock space. We demonstrate that, in these representations, the nonlocal interactions between charges and between charges and transverse currents-along with the interactions between currents and massive propagating photons-are identical in the different gauges we analyze in this and in earlier work. We construct the generators of the Poincare group, show that they implement the Poincare algebra, and explicitly demonstrate the effect of rotations and Lorentz boosts on the particle states. We show that the imposition of Gauss's law does not produce any open-quotes exoticclose quotes fractional statistics. In the case of the covariant gauges, this demonstration makes use of unitary transformations that provide charged particles with the gauge fields required by Gauss's law, but that leave the anticommutator algebra of the spinor fields untransformed. In the Coulomb gauge, we show that the anticommutators of the spinor fields apply to the Dirac-Bergmann constraint surfaces, on which Gauss's law and the gauge conditions obtain. We examine MCS theory in the large CS coupling constant limit, and compare that limiting form with CS theory, in which the Maxwell kinetic energy term is not included in the Larangian. 34 refs

  10. 2D Efficient Unconditionally Stable Meshless FDTD Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Luo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an efficient weighted Laguerre polynomials based meshless finite-difference time domain (WLP-MFDTD. By decomposing the coefficients of the system matrix and adding a perturbation term, a factorization-splitting scheme is introduced. The huge sparse matrix is transformed into two N×N matrices with 9 unknown elements in each row regardless of the duplicated ones. Consequently, compared with the conventional implementation, the CPU time and memory requirement can be saved greatly. The perfectly matched layer absorbing boundary condition is also extended to this approach. A numerical example demonstrates the capability and efficiency of the proposed method.

  11. 77 FR 19697 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-02

    ... Cultural Items: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, in consultation... with the cultural items may contact the Maxwell Museum of Anthropology. DATES: Representatives of any...

  12. Simulation of an Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducer Array by Using Analytical Method and FDTD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuedong Xie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Previously, we developed a method based on FEM and FDTD for the study of an Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducer Array (EMAT. This paper presents a new analytical solution to the eddy current problem for the meander coil used in an EMAT, which is adapted from the classic Deeds and Dodd solution originally intended for circular coils. The analytical solution resulting from this novel adaptation exploits the large radius extrapolation and shows several advantages over the finite element method (FEM, especially in the higher frequency regime. The calculated Lorentz force density from the analytical EM solver is then coupled to the ultrasonic simulations, which exploit the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD method to describe the propagation of ultrasound waves, in particular for Rayleigh waves. Radiation pattern obtained with Hilbert transform on time-domain waveforms is proposed to characterise the sensor in terms of its beam directivity and field distribution along the steering angle, which can produce performance parameters for an EMAT array, facilitating the optimum design of such sensors.

  13. GPR Imaging for Deeply Buried Objects: A Comparative Study Based on FDTD Models and Field Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilley, roger; Dowla, Farid; Nekoogar, Faranak; Sadjadpour, Hamid

    2012-01-01

    Conventional use of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) is hampered by variations in background environmental conditions, such as water content in soil, resulting in poor repeatability of results over long periods of time when the radar pulse characteristics are kept the same. Target objects types might include voids, tunnels, unexploded ordinance, etc. The long-term objective of this work is to develop methods that would extend the use of GPR under various environmental and soil conditions provided an optimal set of radar parameters (such as frequency, bandwidth, and sensor configuration) are adaptively employed based on the ground conditions. Towards that objective, developing Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) GPR models, verified by experimental results, would allow us to develop analytical and experimental techniques to control radar parameters to obtain consistent GPR images with changing ground conditions. Reported here is an attempt at developing 20 and 3D FDTD models of buried targets verified by two different radar systems capable of operating over different soil conditions. Experimental radar data employed were from a custom designed high-frequency (200 MHz) multi-static sensor platform capable of producing 3-D images, and longer wavelength (25 MHz) COTS radar (Pulse EKKO 100) capable of producing 2-D images. Our results indicate different types of radar can produce consistent images.

  14. FDTD simulation of microwave sintering in large (500/4000 liter) multimode cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subirats, M.; Iskander, M.F.; White, M.J. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Electrical Engineering Dept.; Kiggans, J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-12-31

    To help develop large-scale microwave-sintering processes and to explore the feasibility of the commercial utilization of this technology, the authors used the recently developed multi-grid 3D Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) code and the 3D Finite-Difference Heat-Transfer (FDHT) code to determine the electromagnetic (EM) fields, the microwave power deposition, and temperature-distribution patterns in layers of samples processed in large-scale multimode microwave cavities. This paper presents results obtained from the simulation of realistic sintering experiments carried out in both 500 and 4,000 liter furnaces operating at 2.45 GHz. The ceramic ware being sintered is placed inside a cubical crucible box made of rectangular plates of various ceramic materials with various electrical and thermal properties. The crucible box can accommodate up to 5 layers of ceramic samples with 16 to 20 cup-like samples per layer. Simulation results provided guidelines regarding selection of crucible-box materials, crucible-box geometry, number of layers, shelf material between layers, and the fraction volume of the load vs. that of the furnace. Results from the FDTD and FDHT simulations will be presented and various tradeoffs involved in designing an effective microwave-processing system will be compared graphically.

  15. Computer analysis of microcrystalline silicon hetero-junction solar cell with lumerical FDTD/DEVICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz, Muhammad; Earles, S. K.; Kadhim, Ahmed; Azzahrani, Ahmad

    The computer analysis of tandem solar cell, c-Si/a-Si:H/μc-SiGe, is studied within Lumerical FDTD/Device 4.6. The optical characterization is performed in FDTD and then total generation rate is transported into DEVICE for electrical characterization. The electrical characterization of the solar cell is carried out in DEVICE. The design is implemented by staking three sub cells with band gap of 1.12eV, 1.50eV and 1.70eV, respectively. First, single junction solar cell with both a-Si and μc-SiGe absorbing layers are designed and compared. The thickness for both layers are kept the same. In a single junction, solar cell with a-Si absorbing layer, the fill factor and the efficiency are noticed as FF = 78.98%, and η = 6.03%. For μc-SiGe absorbing layer, the efficiency and fill factor are increased as η = 7.06% and FF = 84.27%, respectively. Second, for tandem thin film solar cell c-Si/a-Si:H/μc-SiGe, the fill factor FF = 81.91% and efficiency η = 9.84% have been noticed. The maximum efficiency for both single junction thin film solar cell c-Si/μc-SiGe and tandem solar cell c-Si/a-Si:H/μc-SiGe are improved with check board surface design for light trapping.

  16. FDTD-based quantitative analysis of terahertz wave detection for multilayered structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Wanli; Zhong, Shuncong; Shen, Yaochun; Zhou, Qing; Yao, Ligang

    2014-10-01

    Experimental investigations have shown that terahertz pulsed imaging (TPI) is able to quantitatively characterize a range of multilayered media (e.g., biological issues, pharmaceutical tablet coatings, layered polymer composites, etc.). Advanced modeling of the interaction of terahertz radiation with a multilayered medium is required to enable the wide application of terahertz technology in a number of emerging fields, including nondestructive testing. Indeed, there have already been many theoretical analyses performed on the propagation of terahertz radiation in various multilayered media. However, to date, most of these studies used 1D or 2D models, and the dispersive nature of the dielectric layers was not considered or was simplified. In the present work, the theoretical framework of using terahertz waves for the quantitative characterization of multilayered media was established. A 3D model based on the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method is proposed. A batch of pharmaceutical tablets with a single coating layer of different coating thicknesses and different refractive indices was modeled. The reflected terahertz wave from such a sample was computed using the FDTD method, assuming that the incident terahertz wave is broadband, covering a frequency range up to 3.5 THz. The simulated results for all of the pharmaceutical-coated tablets considered were found to be in good agreement with the experimental results obtained using a commercial TPI system. In addition, we studied a three-layered medium to mimic the occurrence of defects in the sample.

  17. Applying FDTD to the Coverage Prediction of WiMAX Femtocells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valcarce Alvaro

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Femtocells, or home base stations, are a potential future solution for operators to increase indoor coverage and reduce network cost. In a real WiMAX femtocell deployment in residential areas covered by WiMAX macrocells, interference is very likely to occur both in the streets and certain indoor regions. Propagation models that take into account both the outdoor and indoor channel characteristics are thus necessary for the purpose of WiMAX network planning in the presence of femtocells. In this paper, the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD method is adapted for the computation of radiowave propagation predictions at WiMAX frequencies. This model is particularly suitable for the study of hybrid indoor/outdoor scenarios and thus well adapted for the case of WiMAX femtocells in residential environments. Two optimization methods are proposed for the reduction of the FDTD simulation time: the reduction of the simulation frequency for problem simplification and a parallel graphics processing units (GPUs implementation. The calibration of the model is then thoroughly described. First, the calibration of the absorbing boundary condition, necessary for proper coverage predictions, is presented. Then a calibration of the material parameters that minimizes the error function between simulation and real measurements is proposed. Finally, some mobile WiMAX system-level simulations that make use of the presented propagation model are presented to illustrate the applicability of the model for the study of femto- to macrointerference.

  18. Emergent pseudospin-1 Maxwell fermions with a threefold degeneracy in optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yan-Qing; Zhang, Dan-Wei; Yan, Hui; Xing, Ding-Yu; Zhu, Shi-Liang

    2017-09-01

    The discovery of relativistic spin-1/2 fermions such as Dirac and Weyl fermions in condensed-matter or artificial systems opens a new era in modern physics. An interesting but rarely explored question is whether other relativistic spinal excitations could be realized with artificial systems. Here, we construct two- and three-dimensional tight-binding models realizable with cold fermionic atoms in optical lattices, where the low energy excitations are effectively described by the spin-1 Maxwell equations in the Hamiltonian form. These relativistic (linear dispersion) excitations with unconventional integer pseudospin, beyond the Dirac-Weyl-Majorana fermions, are an exotic kind of fermions named as Maxwell fermions. We demonstrate that the systems have rich topological features. For instance, the threefold degenerate points called Maxwell points may have quantized Berry phases and anomalous quantum Hall effects with spin-momentum locking may appear in topological Maxwell insulators in the two-dimensional lattices. In three dimensions, Maxwell points may have nontrivial monopole charges of ±2 with two Fermi arcs connecting them, and the merging of the Maxwell points leads to topological phase transitions. Finally, we propose realistic schemes for realizing the model Hamiltonians and detecting the topological properties of the emergent Maxwell quasiparticles in optical lattices.

  19. Investigation on wide-band scattering of a 2-D target above 1-D randomly rough surface by FDTD method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Juan; Guo, Li-Xin; Jiao, Yong-Chang; Li, Ke

    2011-01-17

    Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) algorithm with a pulse wave excitation is used to investigate the wide-band composite scattering from a two-dimensional(2-D) infinitely long target with arbitrary cross section located above a one-dimensional(1-D) randomly rough surface. The FDTD calculation is performed with a pulse wave incidence, and the 2-D representative time-domain scattered field in the far zone is obtained directly by extrapolating the currently calculated data on the output boundary. Then the 2-D wide-band scattering result is acquired by transforming the representative time-domain field to the frequency domain with a Fourier transform. Taking the composite scattering of an infinitely long cylinder above rough surface as an example, the wide-band response in the far zone by FDTD with the pulsed excitation is computed and it shows a good agreement with the numerical result by FDTD with the sinusoidal illumination. Finally, the normalized radar cross section (NRCS) from a 2-D target above 1-D rough surface versus the incident frequency, and the representative scattered fields in the far zone versus the time are analyzed in detail.

  20. One-step leapfrog ADI-FDTD method for simulating electromagnetic wave propagation in general dispersive media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiang-Hua; Yin, Wen-Yan; Chen, Zhi Zhang David

    2013-09-09

    The one-step leapfrog alternating-direction-implicit finite-difference time-domain (ADI-FDTD) method is reformulated for simulating general electrically dispersive media. It models material dispersive properties with equivalent polarization currents. These currents are then solved with the auxiliary differential equation (ADE) and then incorporated into the one-step leapfrog ADI-FDTD method. The final equations are presented in the form similar to that of the conventional FDTD method but with second-order perturbation. The adapted method is then applied to characterize (a) electromagnetic wave propagation in a rectangular waveguide loaded with a magnetized plasma slab, (b) transmission coefficient of a plane wave normally incident on a monolayer graphene sheet biased by a magnetostatic field, and (c) surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) propagation along a monolayer graphene sheet biased by an electrostatic field. The numerical results verify the stability, accuracy and computational efficiency of the proposed one-step leapfrog ADI-FDTD algorithm in comparison with analytical results and the results obtained with the other methods.

  1. The use of MR B{sup +}{sub 1} imaging for validation of FDTD electromagnetic simulations of human anatomies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, Cornelis A T van den [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, PO Box 85500, HP Q.00.118 3508 GA Utrecht (Netherlands); Bartels, Lambertus W [Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Utrecht, PO Box 85500, 3508 GA Utrecht (Netherlands); Bergen, Bob van den [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, PO Box 85500, HP Q.00.118 3508 GA Utrecht (Netherlands); Kroeze, Hugo [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, PO Box 85500, HP Q.00.118 3508 GA Utrecht (Netherlands); Leeuw, Astrid A C de [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, PO Box 85500, HP Q.00.118 3508 GA Utrecht (Netherlands); Kamer, Jeroen B van de [Department of Radiotherapy, Amsterdam Medical Center, Amsterdam, PO Box 22660, 1100 DD Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lagendijk, Jan J W [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, PO Box 85500, HP Q.00.118 3508 GA Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2006-10-07

    In this study, MR B{sup +}{sub 1} imaging is employed to experimentally verify the validity of FDTD simulations of electromagnetic field patterns in human anatomies. Measurements and FDTD simulations of the B{sup +}{sub 1} field induced by a 3 T MR body coil in a human corpse were performed. It was found that MR B{sup +}{sub 1} imaging is a sensitive method to measure the radiofrequency (RF) magnetic field inside a human anatomy with a precision of approximately 3.5%. A good correlation was found between the B{sup +}{sub 1} measurements and FDTD simulations. The measured B{sup +}{sub 1} pattern for a human pelvis consisted of a global, diagonal modulation pattern plus local B{sup +}{sub 1} heterogeneties. It is believed that these local B{sup +}{sub 1} field variations are the result of peaks in the induced electric currents, which could not be resolved by the FDTD simulations on a 5 mm{sup 3} simulation grid. The findings from this study demonstrate that B{sup +}{sub 1} imaging is a valuable experimental technique to gain more knowledge about the dielectric interaction of RF fields with the human anatomy.

  2. A reconstruction of Maxwell model for effective thermal conductivity of composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, J.Z.; Gao, B.Z.; Kang, F.Y.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Deficiencies were found in classical Maxwell model for effective thermal conductivity. • Maxwell model was reconstructed based on potential mean-field theory. • Reconstructed Maxwell model was extended with particle–particle contact resistance. • Predictions by reconstructed Maxwell model agree excellently with experimental data. - Abstract: Composite materials consisting of high thermal conductive fillers and polymer matrix are often used as thermal interface materials to dissipate heat generated from mechanical and electronic devices. The prediction of effective thermal conductivity of composites remains as a critical issue due to its dependence on considerably factors. Most models for prediction are based on the analog between electric potential and temperature that satisfy the Laplace equation under steady condition. Maxwell was the first to derive the effective electric resistivity of composites by examining the far-field spherical harmonic solution of Laplace equation perturbed by a sphere of different resistivity, and his model was considered as classical. However, a close review of Maxwell’s derivation reveals that there exist several controversial issues (deficiencies) inherent in his model. In this study, we reconstruct the Maxwell model based on a potential mean-field theory to resolve these issues. For composites made of continuum matrix and particle fillers, the contact resistance among particles was introduced in the reconstruction of Maxwell model. The newly reconstructed Maxwell model with contact resistivity as a fitting parameter is shown to fit excellently to experimental data over wide ranges of particle concentration and mean particle diameter. The scope of applicability of the reconstructed Maxwell model is also discussed using the contact resistivity as a parameter.

  3. Computational analysis of magnetohydrodynamic Casson and Maxwell flows over a stretching sheet with cross diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumaran, G.; Sandeep, N.; Ali, M. E.

    This paper reports the magnetohydrodynamic chemically reacting Casson and Maxwell fluids past a stretching sheet with cross diffusion, non-uniform heat source/sink, thermophoresis and Brownian motion effects. Numerical results are obtained by employing the R-K based shooting method. Effects of pertinent parameters on flow, thermal and concentration fields are discussed with graphical illustrations. We presented the tabular results to discuss the nature of the skin friction coefficient, reduced Nusselt and Sherwood numbers. Dual nature is observed in the solution of Casson and Maxwell fluids. It is also observed a significant increase in heat and mass transfer rate of Maxwell fluid when compared with the Casson fluid.

  4. Majumdar-Papapetrou class of nonstatic cylindrically symmetric Brans-Dicke-Maxwell fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiwari, R.N.; Rao, P.P.

    1979-01-01

    Relations have been obtained between certain components of the metric and the electromagnetic potentials for source-free Brans-Dicke-Maxwell fields described by a nonstatic cylindrically symmetric Einstein-Rosen metric. These are important, in the sense that they generate a class of solutions that in a way can be said to belong to the class generated by similar relations obtained by Majumdar (Phys. Rev.; 72: 390 (1947)) and Papapetrou (Proc. R. Ir. Acad. Sect. A.; 51: 191 (1947)) for generalized static Einstein-Maxwell fields. The relations have further been used to reduce the B-D Maxwell equations to B-D vacuum equations and vice versa. (author)

  5. A New Observing Tool for the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folger, Martin; Bridger, Alan; Dent, Bill; Kelly, Dennis; Adamson, Andy; Economou, Frossie; Hirst, Paul; Jenness, Tim

    A new Observing Tool (OT) has been developed at the UK Astronomy Technology Centre, Edinburgh, UK and the Joint Astronomy Centre, Hilo, Hawaii, USA. It is based on the Gemini Observing Tool and provides the first graphical observation preparation tool for the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) as well as being the first use of the OT for a non-optical/IR telescope. The OT allows the observer to assemble high level Science Programs using graphical representations of observation components such as instrument, target, and filter. This is later translated into low level control sequences for telescope and instruments. The new OT is designed to work on multiple telescopes: currently the UK Infrared Telescope (UKIRT) and JCMT. Object-oriented design makes the inclusion of telescope and instrument specific packages easy. The OT is written in Java using GUI packages such as Swing and JSky. A new component for the JCMT OT is the graphical Frequency Editor for Heterodyne instruments. It can be used to specify parameters such as frequencies, bandwidths, and sidebands of multiple subsystems, while graphically displaying the front-end frequency, emission lines and atmospheric transmission. In addition, Flexible Scheduling support has been added to the OT. The observer can define scheduling constraints by arranging observations graphically. Science Programs can be saved as XML or sent directly from the OT to a database (via SOAP).

  6. The Maxwell-Chern-Simons gravity, and its cosmological implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haghani, Zahra; Shahidi, Shahab [Damghan University, School of Physics, Damghan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Harko, Tiberiu [Babes-Bolyai University, Department of Physics, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); University College London, Department of Mathematics, London (United Kingdom)

    2017-08-15

    We consider the cosmological implications of a gravitational theory containing two vector fields coupled via a generalized Chern-Simons term. One of the vector fields is the usual Maxwell field, while the other is a constrained vector field with constant norm included in the action via a Lagrange multiplier. The theory admits a de Sitter type solution, with healthy cosmological perturbations. We also show that there are seven degrees of freedom that propagate on top of de Sitter space-time, consisting of two tensor polarizations, four degrees of freedom related to the two vector fields, and a scalar degree of freedom that makes one of the vector fields massive. We investigate the cosmological evolution of Bianchi type I space-time, by assuming that the matter content of the Universe can be described by the stiff and dust. The cosmological evolution of the Bianchi type I Universe strongly depends on the initial conditions of the physical quantities, as well as on the model parameters. The mean anisotropy parameter, and the deceleration parameter, are also studied, and we show that independently of the matter equation of state the cosmological evolution of the Bianchi type I Universe always ends in an isotropic de Sitter type phase. (orig.)

  7. Nanoscale roughness effect on Maxwell-like boundary conditions for the Boltzmann equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brull, S., E-mail: Stephane.Brull@math.u-bordeaux.fr; Charrier, P., E-mail: Pierre.Charrier@math.u-bordeaux.fr; Mieussens, L., E-mail: Luc.Mieussens@math.u-bordeaux.fr [University of Bordeaux, CNRS, Bordeaux INP, IMB, UMR 5251, F-33400 Talence (France)

    2016-08-15

    It is well known that the roughness of the wall has an effect on microscale gas flows. This effect can be shown for large Knudsen numbers by using a numerical solution of the Boltzmann equation. However, when the wall is rough at a nanometric scale, it is necessary to use a very small mesh size which is much too expansive. An alternative approach is to incorporate the roughness effect in the scattering kernel of the boundary condition, such as the Maxwell-like kernel introduced by the authors in a previous paper. Here, we explain how this boundary condition can be implemented in a discrete velocity approximation of the Boltzmann equation. Moreover, the influence of the roughness is shown by computing the structure scattering pattern of mono-energetic beams of the incident gas molecules. The effect of the angle of incidence of these molecules, of their mass, and of the morphology of the wall is investigated and discussed in a simplified two-dimensional configuration. The effect of the azimuthal angle of the incident beams is shown for a three-dimensional configuration. Finally, the case of non-elastic scattering is considered. All these results suggest that our approach is a promising way to incorporate enough physics of gas-surface interaction, at a reasonable computing cost, to improve kinetic simulations of micro- and nano-flows.

  8. Nontopological bare solutions in the relativistic self-dual Maxwell-Chern-Simons-Higgs model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Jongmin; Jang, Jaeduk

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we prove the existence of the radially symmetric nontopological bare solutions in the relativistic self-dual Maxwell-Chern-Simons-Higgs model. We also verify the Chern-Simons limit for those solutions

  9. Maxwell's color statistics: from reduction of visible errors to reduction to invisible molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cat, Jordi

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents a cross-disciplinary and multi-disciplinary account of Maxwell's introduction of statistical models of molecules for the composition of gases. The account focuses on Maxwell's deployment of statistical models of data in his contemporaneous color researches as established in Cambridge mathematical physics, especially by Maxwell's seniors and mentors. The paper also argues that the cross-disciplinary, or cross-domain, transfer of resources from the natural and social sciences took place in both directions and relied on the complex intra-disciplinary, or intra-domain, dynamics of Maxwell's researches in natural sciences, in color theory, physical astronomy, electromagnetism and dynamical theory of gases, as well as involving a variety of types of communicating and mediating media, from material objects to concepts, techniques and institutions.

  10. Message-passing-interface-based parallel FDTD investigation on the EM scattering from a 1-D rough sea surface using uniaxial perfectly matched layer absorbing boundary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J; Guo, L-X; Zeng, H; Han, X-B

    2009-06-01

    A message-passing-interface (MPI)-based parallel finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) algorithm for the electromagnetic scattering from a 1-D randomly rough sea surface is presented. The uniaxial perfectly matched layer (UPML) medium is adopted for truncation of FDTD lattices, in which the finite-difference equations can be used for the total computation domain by properly choosing the uniaxial parameters. This makes the parallel FDTD algorithm easier to implement. The parallel performance with different processors is illustrated for one sea surface realization, and the computation time of the parallel FDTD algorithm is dramatically reduced compared to a single-process implementation. Finally, some numerical results are shown, including the backscattering characteristics of sea surface for different polarization and the bistatic scattering from a sea surface with large incident angle and large wind speed.

  11. Prolongation structure and linear eigenvalue equations for Einstein-Maxwell fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, D.; Neugebauer, G.

    1981-01-01

    The Einstein-Maxwell equations for stationary axisymmetric exterior fields are shown to be the integrability conditions of a set of linear eigenvalue equations for pseudopotentials. Using the method of Wahlquist and Estabrook (J. Math Phys.; 16:1 (1975)) it is shown that the prolongation structure of the Einstein-Maxwell equations contains the SU(2,1) Lie algebra. A new mapping of known solutions to other solutions has been found. (author)

  12. The covariant formulation of Maxwell's equations expressed in a form independent of specific units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heras, Jose A; Baez, G

    2009-01-01

    The covariant formulation of Maxwell's equations can be expressed in a form independent of the usual systems of units by introducing the constants α, β and γ into these equations. Maxwell's equations involving these constants are then specialized to the most commonly used systems of units: Gaussian, SI and Heaviside-Lorentz by giving the constants α, β and γ the values appropriate to each system

  13. Construction of a new wastewater treatment plant, building 676, route Maxwell

    CERN Multimedia

    SC Unit

    2008-01-01

    A new wastewater treatment plant is being constructed on Route Maxwell to treat the effluents from the TS/MME/CCS surface treatment workshops. For this purpose, excavation work is being performed in two separate locations along Route Maxwell, causing a slight disruption to traffic in these areas. Site access through Gate C should, however, be maintained. The work is scheduled to continue through until February 2009.

  14. Construction of a new waste-water treatment plant, building 676, route Maxwell

    CERN Multimedia

    TS Department

    2008-01-01

    A new waste-water treatment plant is being constructed on Route Maxwell to treat the effluents from the TS/MME/CCS surface treatment workshops. For this purpose, excavation work is being performed in two separate locations along Route Maxwell, causing a slight disruption to traffic in these areas. Site access through Gate C should, however, be maintained. The work is scheduled to continue until February 2009.

  15. Electron-electron attractive interaction in Maxwell-Chern-Simons QED3 at zero temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belich, H.; Ferreira Junior, M.M.; Helayel-Neto, J.A.; Ferreira Junior, M.M.

    2001-04-01

    One discusses the issue of low-energy electron-electron bound states in the Maxwell-Chern-Simons model coupled to QED 3 with spontaneous breaking of a local U(1)-symmetry. The scattering potential, in the non-relativistic limit, steaming from the electron-electron Moeller scattering, mediated by the Maxwell-Chern-Simons-Proca gauge field and the Higgs scalar, might be attractive by fine-tuning properly the physical parameters of the model. (author)

  16. Linearized analysis of (2+1)-dimensional Einstein-Maxwell theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soda, Jiro.

    1989-08-01

    On the basis of previous result by Hosoya and Nakao that (2+1)-dimensional gravity reduces the geodesic motion in moduli space, we investigate the effects of matter fields on the geodesic motion using the linearized theory. It is shown that the transverse-traceless parts of energy-momentum tensor make the deviation from the geodesic motion. This result is important for the Einstein-Maxwell theory due to the existence of global modes of Maxwell fields on torus. (author)

  17. Generation of static solutions of the self-consistent system of Einstein-Maxwell equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anchikov, A.M.; Daishev, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    A theorem is proved, according to which to each solution of the Einstein equations with an arbitrary momentum-energy tensor in the right hand side there corresponds a static solution of the self-consistent system of Einstein-Maxwell equations. As a consequence of this theorem, a method is established of generating static solutions of the self-consistent system of Einstein-Maxwell equations with a charged grain as a source of vacuum solutions of the Einstein equations

  18. An FDTD algorithm for simulating light propagation in anisotropic dynamic gain media

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Jabr, A. A.

    2014-05-02

    Simulating light propagation in anisotropic dynamic gain media such as semiconductors and solid-state lasers using the finite difference time-domain FDTD technique is a tedious process, as many variables need to be evaluated in the same instant of time. The algorithm has to take care of the laser dynamic gain, rate equations, anisotropy and dispersion. In this paper, to the best of our knowledge, we present the first algorithm that solves this problem. The algorithm is based on separating calculations into independent layers and hence solving each problem in a layer of calculations. The anisotropic gain medium is presented and tested using a one-dimensional set-up. The algorithm is then used for the analysis of a two-dimensional problem.

  19. An FDTD algorithm for simulating light propagation in anisotropic dynamic gain media

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Jabr, A. A.; San Roman Alerigi, Damian; Ooi, Boon S.; Alsunaidi, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    Simulating light propagation in anisotropic dynamic gain media such as semiconductors and solid-state lasers using the finite difference time-domain FDTD technique is a tedious process, as many variables need to be evaluated in the same instant of time. The algorithm has to take care of the laser dynamic gain, rate equations, anisotropy and dispersion. In this paper, to the best of our knowledge, we present the first algorithm that solves this problem. The algorithm is based on separating calculations into independent layers and hence solving each problem in a layer of calculations. The anisotropic gain medium is presented and tested using a one-dimensional set-up. The algorithm is then used for the analysis of a two-dimensional problem.

  20. Full 3D FDTD analysis of Electromagnetic Field in Photonic Crystal VCSEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Fa; Xu Chen; Xie Yiyang; Zhao Zhenbo; Zhou Kang; Wang Baoqiang; Liu Yingming; Shen Guangdi

    2011-01-01

    The effect of etch damage to the mode characteristics of photonic crystal vertical cavity surface emitting lasers was simulated in this paper. The devices simulated in this paper are 850-nm GaAs-based VCSELs with photonic crystal. And the devices were simulated by using finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. Limited to the computer resource, the top DBR was simulated only, and the traverse size was smaller than the real size. In order to highlight the impact of the etch damage, several kinds of light sources and photonic crystal structures were simulated separately, and each situation is calculated in the condition of ideal photonic crystal and photonic crystal with etch damage respectively. All parameters of device and light feature are referred to the real condition.

  1. [Transmission efficiency analysis of near-field fiber probe using FDTD simulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Dai, Song-Tao; Wang, Huai-Yu; Zhou, Yun-Song

    2011-10-01

    A fiber probe is the key component of near-field optical technology which is widely used in high resolution imaging, spectroscopy detection and nano processing. How to improve the transmission efficiency of the fiber probe is a very important problem in the application of near-field optical technology. Based on the results of 3D-FDTD computation, the dependence of the transmission efficiency on the cone angle, the aperture diameter, the wavelength and the thickness of metal cladding is revealed. The authors have also made a comparison between naked probe and the probe with metal cladding in terms of transmission efficiency and spatial resolution. In addition, the authors have discovered the fluctuation phenomena of transmission efficiency as the wavelength of incident laser increases.

  2. The structure optimization design of the organic solar cells using the FDTD method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Jian [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China); Wang Chengwei, E-mail: cwwang@nwnu.edu.c [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China); Li Yan [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China); Zhou Feng; Liu Weimin [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2010-04-15

    The finite-different time-domain method (FDTD) was used to optimize structure of organic solar cells based on the heterojunction of the substituted polythiophene polymer (PEOPT) and the C{sub 60} molecule. The absorption of the device in visible light range was determined, and the maximized average absorption is about 88% at the wavelength of 469 nm. The effects of the glass substrate thickness on the absorption and the distribution of the optical energy inside the device were investigated. Based on the important roles of the optical energy at PEOPT/C{sub 60} interface in the photocurrent efficiency, the device structure was optimized for the maximized photocurrent efficiency. The optimal C{sub 60} thickness 29 nm was obtained for the wavelength of 469 nm. Meantime, when the PEOPT thickness is the range of 80-130 nm, there are few effects on optical energy at PEOPT/C{sub 60} interface.

  3. Full 3D FDTD analysis of Electromagnetic Field in Photonic Crystal VCSEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Fa; Xu Chen; Xie Yiyang; Zhao Zhenbo; Zhou Kang; Wang Baoqiang; Liu Yingming; Shen Guangdi, E-mail: liufa20719@126.com [Key Laboratory of Opto-electronics Technology (Beijing University of Technology), Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Technology, 100 Ping Le Yuan, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100124 (China)

    2011-02-01

    The effect of etch damage to the mode characteristics of photonic crystal vertical cavity surface emitting lasers was simulated in this paper. The devices simulated in this paper are 850-nm GaAs-based VCSELs with photonic crystal. And the devices were simulated by using finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. Limited to the computer resource, the top DBR was simulated only, and the traverse size was smaller than the real size. In order to highlight the impact of the etch damage, several kinds of light sources and photonic crystal structures were simulated separately, and each situation is calculated in the condition of ideal photonic crystal and photonic crystal with etch damage respectively. All parameters of device and light feature are referred to the real condition.

  4. 3-D FDTD simulation of shear waves for evaluation of complex modulus imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orescanin, Marko; Wang, Yue; Insana, Michael

    2011-02-01

    The Navier equation describing shear wave propagation in 3-D viscoelastic media is solved numerically with a finite differences time domain (FDTD) method. Solutions are formed in terms of transverse scatterer velocity waves and then verified via comparison to measured wave fields in heterogeneous hydrogel phantoms. The numerical algorithm is used as a tool to study the effects on complex shear modulus estimation from wave propagation in heterogeneous viscoelastic media. We used an algebraic Helmholtz inversion (AHI) technique to solve for the complex shear modulus from simulated and experimental velocity data acquired in 2-D and 3-D. Although 3-D velocity estimates are required in general, there are object geometries for which 2-D inversions provide accurate estimations of the material properties. Through simulations and experiments, we explored artifacts generated in elastic and dynamic-viscous shear modulus images related to the shear wavelength and average viscosity.

  5. Fractional Calculus Based FDTD Modeling of Layered Biological Media Exposure to Wideband Electromagnetic Pulses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Mescia

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic fields are involved in several therapeutic and diagnostic applications such as hyperthermia and electroporation. For these applications, pulsed electric fields (PEFs and transient phenomena are playing a key role for understanding the biological response due to the exposure to non-ionizing wideband pulses. To this end, the PEF propagation in the six-layered planar structure modeling the human head has been studied. The electromagnetic field and the specific absorption rate (SAR have been calculated through an accurate finite-difference time-domain (FDTD dispersive modeling based on the fractional derivative operator. The temperature rise inside the tissues due to the electromagnetic field exposure has been evaluated using both the non-thermoregulated and thermoregulated Gagge’s two-node models. Moreover, additional parametric studies have been carried out with the aim to investigate the thermal response by changing the amplitude and duration of the electric pulses.

  6. Collocated electrodynamic FDTD schemes using overlapping Yee grids and higher-order Hodge duals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deimert, C.; Potter, M. E.; Okoniewski, M.

    2016-12-01

    The collocated Lebedev grid has previously been proposed as an alternative to the Yee grid for electromagnetic finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations. While it performs better in anisotropic media, it performs poorly in isotropic media because it is equivalent to four overlapping, uncoupled Yee grids. We propose to couple the four Yee grids and fix the Lebedev method using discrete exterior calculus (DEC) with higher-order Hodge duals. We find that higher-order Hodge duals do improve the performance of the Lebedev grid, but they also improve the Yee grid by a similar amount. The effectiveness of coupling overlapping Yee grids with a higher-order Hodge dual is thus questionable. However, the theoretical foundations developed to derive these methods may be of interest in other problems.

  7. Representing the Electromagnetic Field: How Maxwell's Mathematics Empowered Faraday's Field Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tweney, Ryan D.

    2011-07-01

    James Clerk Maxwell `translated' Michael Faraday's experimentally-based field theory into the mathematical representation now known as `Maxwell's Equations.' Working with a variety of mathematical representations and physical models Maxwell extended the reach of Faraday's theory and brought it into consistency with other results in the physics of electricity and magnetism. Examination of Maxwell's procedures opens many issues about the role of mathematical representation in physics and the learning background required for its success. Specifically, Maxwell's training in `Cambridge University' mathematical physics emphasized the use of analogous equations across fields of physics and the repeated solving of extremely difficult problems in physics. Such training develops an array of overlearned mathematical representations supported by highly sophisticated cognitive mechanisms for the retrieval of relevant information from long term memory. For Maxwell, mathematics constituted a new form of representation in physics, enhancing the formal derivational and calculational role of mathematics and opening a cognitive means for the conduct of `experiments in the mind' and for sophisticated representations of theory.

  8. Quasistatic zooming of FDTD E-field computations: the impact of down-scaling techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van de Kamer, J.B.; Kroeze, H.; De Leeuw, A.A.C.; Lagendijk, J.J.W. [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2001-05-01

    Due to current computer limitations, regional hyperthermia treatment planning (HTP) is practically limited to a resolution of 1 cm, whereas a millimetre resolution is desired. Using the centimetre resolution E-vector-field distribution, computed with, for example, the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method and the millimetre resolution patient anatomy it is possible to obtain a millimetre resolution SAR distribution in a volume of interest (VOI) by means of quasistatic zooming. To compute the required low-resolution E-vector-field distribution, a low-resolution dielectric geometry is needed which is constructed by down-scaling the millimetre resolution dielectric geometry. In this study we have investigated which down-scaling technique results in a dielectric geometry that yields the best low-resolution E-vector-field distribution as input for quasistatic zooming. A segmented 2 mm resolution CT data set of a patient has been down-scaled to 1 cm resolution using three different techniques: 'winner-takes-all', 'volumetric averaging' and 'anisotropic volumetric averaging'. The E-vector-field distributions computed for those low-resolution dielectric geometries have been used as input for quasistatic zooming. The resulting zoomed-resolution SAR distributions were compared with a reference: the 2 mm resolution SAR distribution computed with the FDTD method. The E-vector-field distribution for both a simple phantom and the complex partial patient geometry down-scaled using 'anisotropic volumetric averaging' resulted in zoomed-resolution SAR distributions that best approximate the corresponding high-resolution SAR distribution (correlation 97, 96% and absolute averaged difference 6, 14% respectively). (author)

  9. On the convergence and accuracy of the FDTD method for nanoplasmonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesina, Antonino Calà; Vaccari, Alessandro; Berini, Pierre; Ramunno, Lora

    2015-04-20

    Use of the Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) method to model nanoplasmonic structures continues to rise - more than 2700 papers have been published in 2014 on FDTD simulations of surface plasmons. However, a comprehensive study on the convergence and accuracy of the method for nanoplasmonic structures has yet to be reported. Although the method may be well-established in other areas of electromagnetics, the peculiarities of nanoplasmonic problems are such that a targeted study on convergence and accuracy is required. The availability of a high-performance computing system (a massively parallel IBM Blue Gene/Q) allows us to do this for the first time. We consider gold and silver at optical wavelengths along with three "standard" nanoplasmonic structures: a metal sphere, a metal dipole antenna and a metal bowtie antenna - for the first structure comparisons with the analytical extinction, scattering, and absorption coefficients based on Mie theory are possible. We consider different ways to set-up the simulation domain, we vary the mesh size to very small dimensions, we compare the simple Drude model with the Drude model augmented with two critical points correction, we compare single-precision to double-precision arithmetic, and we compare two staircase meshing techniques, per-component and uniform. We find that the Drude model with two critical points correction (at least) must be used in general. Double-precision arithmetic is needed to avoid round-off errors if highly converged results are sought. Per-component meshing increases the accuracy when complex geometries are modeled, but the uniform mesh works better for structures completely fillable by the Yee cell (e.g., rectangular structures). Generally, a mesh size of 0.25 nm is required to achieve convergence of results to ∼ 1%. We determine how to optimally setup the simulation domain, and in so doing we find that performing scattering calculations within the near-field does not necessarily produces large

  10. Language Individuation and Marker Words: Shakespeare and His Maxwell's Demon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsden, John; Budden, David; Craig, Hugh; Moscato, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Within the structural and grammatical bounds of a common language, all authors develop their own distinctive writing styles. Whether the relative occurrence of common words can be measured to produce accurate models of authorship is of particular interest. This work introduces a new score that helps to highlight such variations in word occurrence, and is applied to produce models of authorship of a large group of plays from the Shakespearean era. A text corpus containing 55,055 unique words was generated from 168 plays from the Shakespearean era (16th and 17th centuries) of undisputed authorship. A new score, CM1, is introduced to measure variation patterns based on the frequency of occurrence of each word for the authors John Fletcher, Ben Jonson, Thomas Middleton and William Shakespeare, compared to the rest of the authors in the study (which provides a reference of relative word usage at that time). A total of 50 WEKA methods were applied for Fletcher, Jonson and Middleton, to identify those which were able to produce models yielding over 90% classification accuracy. This ensemble of WEKA methods was then applied to model Shakespearean authorship across all 168 plays, yielding a Matthews' correlation coefficient (MCC) performance of over 90%. Furthermore, the best model yielded an MCC of 99%. Our results suggest that different authors, while adhering to the structural and grammatical bounds of a common language, develop measurably distinct styles by the tendency to over-utilise or avoid particular common words and phrasings. Considering language and the potential of words as an abstract chaotic system with a high entropy, similarities can be drawn to the Maxwell's Demon thought experiment; authors subconsciously favour or filter certain words, modifying the probability profile in ways that could reflect their individuality and style.

  11. Language Individuation and Marker Words: Shakespeare and His Maxwell's Demon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Marsden

    Full Text Available Within the structural and grammatical bounds of a common language, all authors develop their own distinctive writing styles. Whether the relative occurrence of common words can be measured to produce accurate models of authorship is of particular interest. This work introduces a new score that helps to highlight such variations in word occurrence, and is applied to produce models of authorship of a large group of plays from the Shakespearean era.A text corpus containing 55,055 unique words was generated from 168 plays from the Shakespearean era (16th and 17th centuries of undisputed authorship. A new score, CM1, is introduced to measure variation patterns based on the frequency of occurrence of each word for the authors John Fletcher, Ben Jonson, Thomas Middleton and William Shakespeare, compared to the rest of the authors in the study (which provides a reference of relative word usage at that time. A total of 50 WEKA methods were applied for Fletcher, Jonson and Middleton, to identify those which were able to produce models yielding over 90% classification accuracy. This ensemble of WEKA methods was then applied to model Shakespearean authorship across all 168 plays, yielding a Matthews' correlation coefficient (MCC performance of over 90%. Furthermore, the best model yielded an MCC of 99%.Our results suggest that different authors, while adhering to the structural and grammatical bounds of a common language, develop measurably distinct styles by the tendency to over-utilise or avoid particular common words and phrasings. Considering language and the potential of words as an abstract chaotic system with a high entropy, similarities can be drawn to the Maxwell's Demon thought experiment; authors subconsciously favour or filter certain words, modifying the probability profile in ways that could reflect their individuality and style.

  12. Language Individuation and Marker Words: Shakespeare and His Maxwell's Demon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsden, John; Budden, David; Craig, Hugh; Moscato, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Background Within the structural and grammatical bounds of a common language, all authors develop their own distinctive writing styles. Whether the relative occurrence of common words can be measured to produce accurate models of authorship is of particular interest. This work introduces a new score that helps to highlight such variations in word occurrence, and is applied to produce models of authorship of a large group of plays from the Shakespearean era. Methodology A text corpus containing 55,055 unique words was generated from 168 plays from the Shakespearean era (16th and 17th centuries) of undisputed authorship. A new score, CM1, is introduced to measure variation patterns based on the frequency of occurrence of each word for the authors John Fletcher, Ben Jonson, Thomas Middleton and William Shakespeare, compared to the rest of the authors in the study (which provides a reference of relative word usage at that time). A total of 50 WEKA methods were applied for Fletcher, Jonson and Middleton, to identify those which were able to produce models yielding over 90% classification accuracy. This ensemble of WEKA methods was then applied to model Shakespearean authorship across all 168 plays, yielding a Matthews' correlation coefficient (MCC) performance of over 90%. Furthermore, the best model yielded an MCC of 99%. Conclusions Our results suggest that different authors, while adhering to the structural and grammatical bounds of a common language, develop measurably distinct styles by the tendency to over-utilise or avoid particular common words and phrasings. Considering language and the potential of words as an abstract chaotic system with a high entropy, similarities can be drawn to the Maxwell's Demon thought experiment; authors subconsciously favour or filter certain words, modifying the probability profile in ways that could reflect their individuality and style. PMID:23826143

  13. Characterizing the performance of the Conway-Maxwell Poisson generalized linear model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Royce A; Geedipally, Srinivas Reddy; Guikema, Seth D; Dhavala, Soma Sekhar; Lord, Dominique; LaRocca, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Count data are pervasive in many areas of risk analysis; deaths, adverse health outcomes, infrastructure system failures, and traffic accidents are all recorded as count events, for example. Risk analysts often wish to estimate the probability distribution for the number of discrete events as part of doing a risk assessment. Traditional count data regression models of the type often used in risk assessment for this problem suffer from limitations due to the assumed variance structure. A more flexible model based on the Conway-Maxwell Poisson (COM-Poisson) distribution was recently proposed, a model that has the potential to overcome the limitations of the traditional model. However, the statistical performance of this new model has not yet been fully characterized. This article assesses the performance of a maximum likelihood estimation method for fitting the COM-Poisson generalized linear model (GLM). The objectives of this article are to (1) characterize the parameter estimation accuracy of the MLE implementation of the COM-Poisson GLM, and (2) estimate the prediction accuracy of the COM-Poisson GLM using simulated data sets. The results of the study indicate that the COM-Poisson GLM is flexible enough to model under-, equi-, and overdispersed data sets with different sample mean values. The results also show that the COM-Poisson GLM yields accurate parameter estimates. The COM-Poisson GLM provides a promising and flexible approach for performing count data regression. © 2011 Society for Risk Analysis.

  14. Celebrating 30 years of science from the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Ian; Friberg, Per

    2017-01-01

    The James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) has been the world’s most successful single-dish telescope at submillimetre wavelengths since it began operations in 1987. From the pioneering days of single-element photometers and mixers, through to the state-of-the-art imaging and spectroscopic cameras, the JCMT has been associated with a number of major scientific discoveries. Famous for the discovery of ‘SCUBA’ galaxies, which are responsible for a large fraction of the far-infrared background, the JCMT has pushed the sensitivity limits arguably more than any other facility in this most difficult of wavebands in which to observe. Closer to home, the first images of huge discs of cool debris around nearby stars gave us clues to the evolution of planetary systems, further evidence of the importance of studying astrophysics in the submillimetre region. Now approaching the 30th anniversary of the first observations, the telescope continues to carry out unique and innovative science. In this review article, we look back on some of the major scientific highlights from the past 30 years. PMID:28989775

  15. Celebrating 30 years of science from the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Ian; Holland, Wayne S.; Friberg, Per

    2017-09-01

    The James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) has been the world's most successful single-dish telescope at submillimetre wavelengths since it began operations in 1987. From the pioneering days of single-element photometers and mixers, through to the state-of-the-art imaging and spectroscopic cameras, the JCMT has been associated with a number of major scientific discoveries. Famous for the discovery of `SCUBA' galaxies, which are responsible for a large fraction of the far-infrared background, the JCMT has pushed the sensitivity limits arguably more than any other facility in this most difficult of wavebands in which to observe. Closer to home, the first images of huge discs of cool debris around nearby stars gave us clues to the evolution of planetary systems, further evidence of the importance of studying astrophysics in the submillimetre region. Now approaching the 30th anniversary of the first observations, the telescope continues to carry out unique and innovative science. In this review article, we look back on some of the major scientific highlights from the past 30 years.

  16. About perfectly adapted layers for the temporal resolution of Maxwell's equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Potier, Ch.

    1995-01-01

    The major obstacle encountered in diffraction problems is the limitation in place memory. One solution is to approach the Sommerfeld condition by taking into account absorbing boundary conditions on a boundary surface surrounding the studied object. Many authors have studied these problems, but, unfortunately, the implementation of absorbing boundary conditions of order greater than two for 3-dimensional non-structural meshes in the temporal case is a still unresolved problem to our knowledge. Another way is to add a dummy absorbent layer around the computational domain. J.P. Berenger has revived this method and considerably improved the resolution of the problems of time diffraction. His idea is to split the Maxwell equations in their anisotropic version in a layer surrounding the computational domain. On the other hand, J.Y. Wu introduced a new system of anisotropic equations in the frequency case. The author shows that this new system possesses the same properties as that of Berenger and this idea has been generalized to the temporal case with discretization in space by finite volumes in 3 dimensions for a structured or not structured mesh. The report also presents the implementation of these new methods in the SUMER-T code and the accuracy of these is compared with conventional absorbing boundary conditions [fr

  17. Scattering of targets over layered half space using a semi-analytic method in conjunction with FDTD algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Le; Wei, Bing

    2014-08-25

    Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) algorithm with a new method of plane wave excitation is used to investigate the RCS (Radar Cross Section) characteristics of targets over layered half space. Compare with the traditional excitation plane wave method, the calculation memory and time requirement is greatly decreased. The FDTD calculation is performed with a plane wave incidence, and the RCS of far field is obtained by extrapolating the currently calculated data on the output boundary. However, methods available for extrapolating have to evaluate the half space Green function. In this paper, a new method which avoids using the complex and time-consuming half space Green function is proposed. Numerical results show that this method is in good agreement with classic algorithm and it can be used in the fast calculation of scattering and radiation of targets over layered half space.

  18. Simulation of long-wave phonon ({lambda}> b) scattering at geometric imperfections in nanowires by FDTD method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salamatov, E.I. [Physico-Technical Institute, UrB RAS, 132 Kirov Street, Izhevsk (Russian Federation)

    2012-01-15

    Elementary acts of acoustic phonon scattering in nanowires are studied numerically by the FDTD method. The points of bifurcation of the main waveguide are considered as defects. The particularities of the reflection/transmission coefficient of phonons of different polarizations are studied as a function of the frequency and geometrical parameters of the problem. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. A study of two kinds of electromagnetic pulse antennas with a continuous resistive loading using the FDTD method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Congguang; Zhou Hui

    2003-01-01

    The cylindrical and conical monopole antenna with a continuous resistive loading is considered as a radiator in the experiments of the electromagnetic pulse compatibility. The various principle of the resistive loading is discussed in details and the characters of the antennas are studied using the Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) method. The key techniques of the calculating are presented. The results are in good agreement with the documents and the theory

  20. Performance analysis of the FDTD method applied to holographic volume gratings: Multi-core CPU versus GPU computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francés, J.; Bleda, S.; Neipp, C.; Márquez, A.; Pascual, I.; Beléndez, A.

    2013-03-01

    The finite-difference time-domain method (FDTD) allows electromagnetic field distribution analysis as a function of time and space. The method is applied to analyze holographic volume gratings (HVGs) for the near-field distribution at optical wavelengths. Usually, this application requires the simulation of wide areas, which implies more memory and time processing. In this work, we propose a specific implementation of the FDTD method including several add-ons for a precise simulation of optical diffractive elements. Values in the near-field region are computed considering the illumination of the grating by means of a plane wave for different angles of incidence and including absorbing boundaries as well. We compare the results obtained by FDTD with those obtained using a matrix method (MM) applied to diffraction gratings. In addition, we have developed two optimized versions of the algorithm, for both CPU and GPU, in order to analyze the improvement of using the new NVIDIA Fermi GPU architecture versus highly tuned multi-core CPU as a function of the size simulation. In particular, the optimized CPU implementation takes advantage of the arithmetic and data transfer streaming SIMD (single instruction multiple data) extensions (SSE) included explicitly in the code and also of multi-threading by means of OpenMP directives. A good agreement between the results obtained using both FDTD and MM methods is obtained, thus validating our methodology. Moreover, the performance of the GPU is compared to the SSE+OpenMP CPU implementation, and it is quantitatively determined that a highly optimized CPU program can be competitive for a wider range of simulation sizes, whereas GPU computing becomes more powerful for large-scale simulations.

  1. Two-dimensional simulation of broad-band ferrite electromagnetic wave absorbers by using the FDTD method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hyun Jin; Kim, Dong Il [Korea Maritime University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-10-15

    The purpose of this simulation study is to design and fabricate an electromagnetic (EM) wave absorber in order to develop a wide-band absorber. We have proposed and modeled a bird-eye-type and cutting-cone-type EM wave absorber by using the equivalent material constants method (EMCM), and we simulated them by using a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. A two or a three-dimensional simulation would be desirable to analyze the EM wave absorber characteristics and to develop new structures. The two-dimensional FDTD simulation requires less computer resources than a three-dimensional simulation to consider the structural effects of the EM wave absorbers. The numerical simulation by using the FDTD method shows propagating EM waves in various types of periodic structure EM wave absorbers. Simultaneously, a Fourier analysis is used to characterize the input pulse and the reflected EM waves for ferrite absorbers with various structures. The results have a wide-band reflection-reducing characteristic. The validity of the proposed model was confirmed by comparing the two-dimensional simulation with the experimental results. The simulations were carried out in the frequency band from 30 MHz to 10 GHz.

  2. Two-dimensional simulation of broad-band ferrite electromagnetic wave absorbers by using the FDTD method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Hyun Jin; Kim, Dong Il

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this simulation study is to design and fabricate an electromagnetic (EM) wave absorber in order to develop a wide-band absorber. We have proposed and modeled a bird-eye-type and cutting-cone-type EM wave absorber by using the equivalent material constants method (EMCM), and we simulated them by using a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. A two or a three-dimensional simulation would be desirable to analyze the EM wave absorber characteristics and to develop new structures. The two-dimensional FDTD simulation requires less computer resources than a three-dimensional simulation to consider the structural effects of the EM wave absorbers. The numerical simulation by using the FDTD method shows propagating EM waves in various types of periodic structure EM wave absorbers. Simultaneously, a Fourier analysis is used to characterize the input pulse and the reflected EM waves for ferrite absorbers with various structures. The results have a wide-band reflection-reducing characteristic. The validity of the proposed model was confirmed by comparing the two-dimensional simulation with the experimental results. The simulations were carried out in the frequency band from 30 MHz to 10 GHz.

  3. A hybrid method combining the FDTD and a time domain boundary-integral equation marching-on-in-time algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Becker

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a hybrid method combining the FDTD/FIT with a Time Domain Boundary-Integral Marching-on-in-Time Algorithm (TD-BIM is presented. Inhomogeneous regions are modelled with the FIT-method, an alternative formulation of the FDTD. Homogeneous regions (which is in the presented numerical example the open space are modelled using a TD-BIM with equivalent electric and magnetic currents flowing on the boundary between the inhomogeneous and the homogeneous regions. The regions are coupled by the tangential magnetic fields just outside the inhomogeneous regions. These fields are calculated by making use of a Mixed Potential Integral Formulation for the magnetic field. The latter consists of equivalent electric and magnetic currents on the boundary plane between the homogeneous and the inhomogeneous region. The magnetic currents result directly from the electric fields of the Yee lattice. Electric currents in the same plane are calculated by making use of the TD-BIM and using the electric field of the Yee lattice as boundary condition. The presented hybrid method only needs the interpolations inherent in FIT and no additional interpolation. A numerical result is compared to a calculation that models both regions with FDTD.

  4. Obtaining source current density related to irregularly structured electromagnetic target field inside human body using hybrid inverse/FDTD method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jijun; Yang, Deqiang; Sun, Houjun; Xin, Sherman Xuegang

    2017-01-01

    Inverse method is inherently suitable for calculating the distribution of source current density related with an irregularly structured electromagnetic target field. However, the present form of inverse method cannot calculate complex field-tissue interactions. A novel hybrid inverse/finite-difference time domain (FDTD) method that can calculate the complex field-tissue interactions for the inverse design of source current density related with an irregularly structured electromagnetic target field is proposed. A Huygens' equivalent surface is established as a bridge to combine the inverse and FDTD method. Distribution of the radiofrequency (RF) magnetic field on the Huygens' equivalent surface is obtained using the FDTD method by considering the complex field-tissue interactions within the human body model. The obtained magnetic field distributed on the Huygens' equivalent surface is regarded as the next target. The current density on the designated source surface is derived using the inverse method. The homogeneity of target magnetic field and specific energy absorption rate are calculated to verify the proposed method.

  5. On Understanding: Maxwell on the Methods of Illustration and Scientific Metaphor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cat, Jordi

    In this paper I examine the notion and role of metaphors and illustrations in Maxwell's works in exact science as a pathway into a broader and richer philosophical conception of a scientist and scientific practice. While some of these notions and methods are still at work in current scientific research-from economics and biology to quantum computation and quantum field theory-, here I have chosen to attest to their entrenchment and complexity in actual science by attempting to make some conceptual sense of Maxwell's own usage; this endeavour includes situating Maxwell's conceptions and applications in his own culture of Victorian science and philosophy. I trace Maxwell's notions to the formulation of the problem of understanding, or interpreting, abstract representations such as potential functions and Lagrangian equations. I articulate the solution in terms of abstract-concrete relations, where the concrete, in tune with Victorian British psychology and engineering, includes the muscular as well as the pictorial. This sets the basis for a conception of understanding in terms of unification and concrete modelling, or representation. I examine the relation of illustration to analogies and metaphors on which this account rests. Lastly, I stress and explain the importance of context-dependence, its consequences for realism-instrumentalism debates, and Maxwell's own emphasis on method.

  6. Simulation studies of hydrodynamic aspects of magneto-inertial fusion and high order adaptive algorithms for Maxwell equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lingling

    composite deuterium - xenon liners reduce the energy gain due to lower target compression rates. The effect of heating of targets by alpha particles on the fusion energy gain has also been investigated. The study of the dependence of the ram pressure amplification on radial compressibility showed a good agreement with the theory. The study concludes that a liner with higher Mach number and lower adiabatic index gamma (the radio of specific heats) will generate higher ram pressure amplification and higher fusion energy gain. We implemented a second order embedded boundary method for the Maxwell equations in geometrically complex domains. The numerical scheme is second order in both space and time. Comparing to the first order stair-step approximation of complex geometries within the FDTD method, this method can avoid spurious solution introduced by the stair step approximation. Unlike the finite element method and the FE-FD hybrid method, no triangulation is needed for this scheme. This method preserves the simplicity of the embedded boundary method and it is easy to implement. We will also propose a conservative (symplectic) fourth order scheme for uniform geometry boundary.

  7. Massively-parallel FDTD simulations to address mask electromagnetic effects in hyper-NA immersion lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirapu Azpiroz, Jaione; Burr, Geoffrey W.; Rosenbluth, Alan E.; Hibbs, Michael

    2008-03-01

    In the Hyper-NA immersion lithography regime, the electromagnetic response of the reticle is known to deviate in a complicated manner from the idealized Thin-Mask-like behavior. Already, this is driving certain RET choices, such as the use of polarized illumination and the customization of reticle film stacks. Unfortunately, full 3-D electromagnetic mask simulations are computationally intensive. And while OPC-compatible mask electromagnetic field (EMF) models can offer a reasonable tradeoff between speed and accuracy for full-chip OPC applications, full understanding of these complex physical effects demands higher accuracy. Our paper describes recent advances in leveraging High Performance Computing as a critical step towards lithographic modeling of the full manufacturing process. In this paper, highly accurate full 3-D electromagnetic simulation of very large mask layouts are conducted in parallel with reasonable turnaround time, using a Blue- Gene/L supercomputer and a Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) code developed internally within IBM. A 3-D simulation of a large 2-D layout spanning 5μm×5μm at the wafer plane (and thus (20μm×20μm×0.5μm at the mask) results in a simulation with roughly 12.5GB of memory (grid size of 10nm at the mask, single-precision computation, about 30 bytes/grid point). FDTD is flexible and easily parallelizable to enable full simulations of such large layout in approximately an hour using one BlueGene/L "midplane" containing 512 dual-processor nodes with 256MB of memory per processor. Our scaling studies on BlueGene/L demonstrate that simulations up to 100μm × 100μm at the mask can be computed in a few hours. Finally, we will show that the use of a subcell technique permits accurate simulation of features smaller than the grid discretization, thus improving on the tradeoff between computational complexity and simulation accuracy. We demonstrate the correlation of the real and quadrature components that comprise the

  8. The energy-momentum tensor for the linearized Maxwell-Vlasov and kinetic guiding center theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfirsch, D.; Morrison, P.J.; Texas Univ., Austin

    1990-02-01

    A modified Hamilton-Jacobi formalism is introduced as a tool to obtain the energy-momentum and angular-momentum tensors for any kind of nonlinear or linearized Maxwell-collisionless kinetic theories. The emphasis is on linearized theories, for which these tensors are derived for the first time. The kinetic theories treated - which need not be the same for all particle species in a plasma - are the Vlasov and kinetic guiding center theories. The Hamiltonian for the guiding center motion is taken in the form resulting from Dirac's constraint theory for non-standard Lagrangian systems. As an example of the Maxwell-kinetic guiding center theory, the second-order energy for a perturbed homogeneous magnetized plasma is calculated with initially vanishing field perturbations. The expression obtained is compared with the corresponding one of Maxwell-Vlasov theory. (orig.)

  9. The energy-momentum tensor for the linearized Maxwell-Vlasov and kinetic guiding center theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfirsch, D.; Morrison, P.J.

    1990-02-01

    A modified Hamilton-Jacobi formalism is introduced as a tool to obtain the energy-momentum and angular-momentum tensors for any king of nonlinear or linearized Maxwell-collisionless kinetic theories. The emphasis is on linearized theories, for which these tensors are derived for the first time. The kinetic theories treated --- which need not be the same for all particle species in a plasma --- are the Vlasov and kinetic guiding center theories. The Hamiltonian for the guiding center motion is taken in the form resulting from Dirac's constraint theory for non-standard Lagrangian systems. As an example of the Maxwell-kinetic guiding center theory, the second-order energy for a perturbed homogeneous magnetized plasma is calculated with initially vanishing field perturbations. The expression obtained is compared with the corresponding one of Maxwell-Vlasov theory. 11 refs

  10. Axiomatic field theory and quantum electrodynamics: the massive case. [Gauge invariance, Maxwell equations, high momentum behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinmann, O [Bielefeld Univ. (F.R. Germany). Fakultaet fuer Physik

    1975-01-01

    Massive quantum electrodynamics of the electron is formulated as an LSZ theory of the electromagnetic field F(..mu nu..) and the electron-positron fields PSI. The interaction is introduced with the help of mathematically well defined subsidiary conditions. These are: 1) gauge invariance of the first kind, assumed to be generated by a conserved current j(..mu..); 2) the homogeneous Maxwell equations and a massive version of the inhomogeneous Maxwell equations; 3) a minimality condition concerning the high momentum behaviour of the theory. The inhomogeneous Maxwell equation is a linear differential equation connecting Fsub(..mu nu..) with the current Jsub(..mu..). No Lagrangian, no non-linear field equations, and no explicit expression of Jsub(..mu..) in terms of PSI, anti-PSI are needed. It is shown in perturbation theory that the proposed conditions fix the physically relevant (i.e. observable) quantities of the theory uniquely.

  11. Resolution of unsteady Maxwell equations with charges in non convex domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Emmanuelle

    2002-01-01

    This research thesis deals with the modelling and numerical resolution of problems related to plasma physics. The interaction of charged particles (electrons and ions) with electromagnetic fields is modelled with the system of unsteady Vlasov-Maxwell coupled equations (the Vlasov system describes the transport of charged particles and the Maxwell equations describe the wave propagation). The author presents definitions related to singular domains, establishes a Helmholtz decomposition in a space of electro-magnetostatic solutions. He reports a mathematical analysis of decompositions into a regular and a singular part of general functional spaces intervening in the investigation of the Maxwell system in complex geometries. The method is then implemented for bi-dimensional domains. A last part addressed the study and the numerical resolution of three-dimensional problems

  12. Effects of backreaction on power-Maxwell holographic superconductors in Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salahi, Hamid Reza; Montakhab, Afshin [Shiraz University, Physics Department and Biruni Observatory, College of Sciences, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sheykhi, Ahmad [Shiraz University, Physics Department and Biruni Observatory, College of Sciences, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics of Maragha (RIAAM), P.O. Box 55134-441, Maragha (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    We analytically and numerically investigate the properties of s-wave holographic superconductors by considering the effects of scalar and gauge fields on the background geometry in five-dimensional Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity. We assume the gauge field to be in the form of the power-Maxwell nonlinear electrodynamics. We employ the Sturm-Liouville eigenvalue problem for analytical calculation of the critical temperature and the shooting method for the numerical investigation. Our numerical and analytical results indicate that higher curvature corrections affect condensation of the holographic superconductors with backreaction. We observe that the backreaction can decrease the critical temperature of the holographic superconductors, while the power-Maxwell electrodynamics and Gauss-Bonnet coefficient term may increase the critical temperature of the holographic superconductors. We find that the critical exponent has the mean-field value β = 1/2, regardless of the values of Gauss-Bonnet coefficient, backreaction and power-Maxwell parameters. (orig.)

  13. Stress field models from Maxwell stress functions: southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Peter

    2017-08-01

    The lithospheric stress field is formally divided into three components: a standard pressure which is a function of elevation (only), a topographic stress anomaly (3-D tensor field) and a tectonic stress anomaly (3-D tensor field). The boundary between topographic and tectonic stress anomalies is somewhat arbitrary, and here is based on the modeling tools available. The topographic stress anomaly is computed by numerical convolution of density anomalies with three tensor Green's functions provided by Boussinesq, Cerruti and Mindlin. By assuming either a seismically estimated or isostatic Moho depth, and by using Poisson ratio of either 0.25 or 0.5, I obtain four alternative topographic stress models. The tectonic stress field, which satisfies the homogeneous quasi-static momentum equation, is obtained from particular second derivatives of Maxwell vector potential fields which are weighted sums of basis functions representing constant tectonic stress components, linearly varying tectonic stress components and tectonic stress components that vary harmonically in one, two and three dimensions. Boundary conditions include zero traction due to tectonic stress anomaly at sea level, and zero traction due to the total stress anomaly on model boundaries at depths within the asthenosphere. The total stress anomaly is fit by least squares to both World Stress Map data and to a previous faulted-lithosphere, realistic-rheology dynamic model of the region computed with finite-element program Shells. No conflict is seen between the two target data sets, and the best-fitting model (using an isostatic Moho and Poisson ratio 0.5) gives minimum directional misfits relative to both targets. Constraints of computer memory, execution time and ill-conditioning of the linear system (which requires damping) limit harmonically varying tectonic stress to no more than six cycles along each axis of the model. The primary limitation on close fitting is that the Shells model predicts very sharp

  14. Generation of static solutions of self-consistent system of Einstein-Maxwell equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anchikov, A.M.; Daishev, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    The theorem, according to which the static solution of the self-consistent system of the Einstein-Maxwell equations is assigned to energy static solution of the Einstein equations with the arbitrary energy-momentum tensor in the right part, is proved. As a consequence of this theorem, the way of the generation of the static solutions of the self-consistent system of the Einstein-Maxwell equations with charged dust as a source of the vacuum solutions of the Einstein equations is shown

  15. Stationary solutions of the Maxwell-Dirac and the Klein-Gordon-Dirac equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteban, M.J.; Georgiev, V.; Sere, E.

    1995-01-01

    The Maxwell-Dirac system describes the interaction of an electron with its own electromagnetic field. We prove the existence of soliton-like solutions of Maxwell-Dirac in (3+1)-Minkowski space-time. The solutions obtained are regular, stationary in time, and localized in space. They are found by a variational method, as critical points of an energy functional. This functional is strongly indefinite and presents a lack of compactness. We also find soliton-like solutions for the Klein-Gordon-Dirac system, arising in the Yukawa model. (author). 32 refs

  16. The signature of the magnetorotational instability in the Reynolds and Maxwell stress tensors in accretion discs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pessah, Martin Elias; Chan, Chi-kwan; Psaltis, Dimitrios

    2006-01-01

    stresses during the late times of the exponential growth of the instability is determined only by the local shear and does not depend on the initial spectrum of perturbations or the strength of the seed magnetic. Even though we derived these properties of the stress tensors for the exponential growth...... of the instability, the mean (averaged over the disc scale-height) Reynolds stress is always positive, the mean Maxwell stress is always negative, and hence the mean total stress is positive and leads to a net outward flux of angular momentum. More importantly, we show that the ratio of the Maxwell to the Reynolds...

  17. New variational formulation of Maxwell-Vlasov and guiding center theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfirsch, D.

    1983-07-01

    A new variational formulation of Maxwell-Vlasov and related theories is given in terms of a common Lagrangian density for both the 'Vlasov particles' and the Maxwell fields. This formulation is used to derive in a consistent way, on the one hand, correct charge and current densities and, on the other, corresponding energy and energy flux densities. All of these densities generally show in addition to particle like contributions electric polarization and magnetization terms. By some limiting procedure collisionless guiding center theories with polarization drifts included are also treated. In this way local energy conservation laws are formulated for such theories, which has not been possible up to now. (orig.)

  18. The Maxwell-Einstein system, Ward identities and the Vilkovisky construction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, N. K.

    2012-01-01

    The gauge fixing dependence of the one-loop effective action of quantum gravity in the proper-time representation is investigated for a space of arbitrary curvature, and the investigation is extended to Maxwell-Einstein theory. The construction of Vilkovisky and DeWitt for removal of this depende......The gauge fixing dependence of the one-loop effective action of quantum gravity in the proper-time representation is investigated for a space of arbitrary curvature, and the investigation is extended to Maxwell-Einstein theory. The construction of Vilkovisky and DeWitt for removal...

  19. An unified approach for the design of focal-plane arrays in satellite communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zamanifekri, A.; Smolders, A.B.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a hybrid approach for designing focal plane arrays using commercially available software, considering the fact that the main trade-off in the EM simulation is the accuracy versus computational power. The presented approach is hybrid method based on FDTD/PO. The

  20. Parallelized FDTD simulation for flat-plate bounded wave EMP simulator with lumped terminator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Xiangqin; Chen Weiqing; Chen Zaigao; Cai Libing; Wang Jianguo

    2013-01-01

    A parallelized finite-difference time-domain(FDTD) method for simulating the bounded wave electromagnetic pulse (EMP) simulator with lumped terminator and parallel plate is presented. The effects of several model-parameters on the simulator to the fields in the working volume are simulated and analyzed. The results show that if the width of the lower PEC plate is(or is bigger than)1.5 times that of the upper plate of working volume, the projection length of front transitional section does not have a significant effect on the rise-times of electric fields at the points near the front transitional section, and the rise-times of electric fields at the points near the working volume center decrease as the projection length increases, but the decrement of rise-time decreases. The rise-times of E z at all points also decrease as the lower PEC plate's width increases, but the decrements of rise-time decreases. If the projection length of the front transitional section is fixed, the good results can not be obtained by increasing or decreasing the height of the simulator only, however, which has an optimal value. (authors)

  1. Cell light scattering characteristic numerical simulation research based on FDTD algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiaogang; Wan, Nan; Zhu, Hao; Weng, Lingdong

    2017-01-01

    In this study, finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) algorithm has been used to work out the cell light scattering problem. Before beginning to do the simulation contrast, finding out the changes or the differences between normal cells and abnormal cells which may be cancerous or maldevelopment is necessary. The preparation of simulation are building up the simple cell model of cell which consists of organelles, nucleus and cytoplasm and setting up the suitable precision of mesh. Meanwhile, setting up the total field scattering field source as the excitation source and far field projection analysis group is also important. Every step need to be explained by the principles of mathematic such as the numerical dispersion, perfect matched layer boundary condition and near-far field extrapolation. The consequences of simulation indicated that the position of nucleus changed will increase the back scattering intensity and the significant difference on the peak value of scattering intensity may result from the changes of the size of cytoplasm. The study may help us find out the regulations based on the simulation consequences and the regulations can be meaningful for early diagnosis of cancers.

  2. [Size dependent SERS activity of gold nanoparticles studied by 3D-FDTD simulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li-mei; Fang, Ping-ping; Yang, Zhi-lin; Huang, Wen-da; Wu, De-yin; Ren, Bin; Tian, Zhong-qun

    2009-05-01

    By synthesizing Au nanoparticles with the controllable size from about 16 to 160 nm and measuring their SERS activity, the authors found that Au nanoparticles film with a size in the range of 120-135 nm showed the highest SERS activity with the 632.8 nm excitation, which is different from previous experimental results and theoretical predictions. The three dimensional finite difference time domain (3D-FDTD)method was employed to simulate the size dependent SERS activity. At the 632.8 nm excitation, the particles with a size of 110 nm shows the highest enhancement under coupling condition and presents an enhancement as high as 10(9) at the hot site. If the enhancement is averaged over the whole surface, the enhancement can still be as high as 10(7), in good agreement with our experimental data. For Au nanoparticles with a larger size such as 220 nm, the multipolar effect leads to the appearance of the second maximum enhancement with the increase in particles size. The averaged enhancement for the excitation line of 325 nm is only 10(2).

  3. Comparison of FDTD numerical computations and analytical multipole expansion method for plasmonics-active nanosphere dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhawan, Anuj; Norton, Stephen J; Gerhold, Michael D; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2009-06-08

    This paper describes a comparative study of finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) and analytical evaluations of electromagnetic fields in the vicinity of dimers of metallic nanospheres of plasmonics-active metals. The results of these two computational methods, to determine electromagnetic field enhancement in the region often referred to as "hot spots" between the two nanospheres forming the dimer, were compared and a strong correlation observed for gold dimers. The analytical evaluation involved the use of the spherical-harmonic addition theorem to relate the multipole expansion coefficients between the two nanospheres. In these evaluations, the spacing between two nanospheres forming the dimer was varied to obtain the effect of nanoparticle spacing on the electromagnetic fields in the regions between the nanostructures. Gold and silver were the metals investigated in our work as they exhibit substantial plasmon resonance properties in the ultraviolet, visible, and near-infrared spectral regimes. The results indicate excellent correlation between the two computational methods, especially for gold nanosphere dimers with only a 5-10% difference between the two methods. The effect of varying the diameters of the nanospheres forming the dimer, on the electromagnetic field enhancement, was also studied.

  4. Light distribution analysis of optical fibre probe-based near-field optical tweezers using FDTD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, B H; Yang, L J; Wang, Y [School of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Heilongjiang, Harbin, 150001 (China)], E-mail: richelaw@163.com

    2009-09-01

    Optical fibre probe-based near-field optical tweezers overcomes the diffraction limit of conventional optical tweezers, utilizing strong mechanical forces and torque associated with highly enhanced electric fields to trap and manipulate nano-scale particles. Near-field evanescent wave generated at optical fibre probe decays rapidly with the distance that results a significant reduced trapping volume, thus it is necessary to analyze the near-field distribution of optical fibre probe. The finite difference time domain (FDTD) method is applied to characterize the near-field distribution of optical fibre probe. In terms of the distribution patterns, depolarization and polarization, the near-field distributions in longitudinal sections and cross-sections of tapered metal-coated optical fibre probe are calculated. The calculation results reveal that the incident polarized wave becomes depolarized after exiting from the nano-scale aperture of probe. The near-field distribution of the probe is unsymmetrical, and the near-field distribution in the cross-section vertical to the incident polarized wave is different from that in the cross-section parallel to the incident polarized wave. Moreover, the polarization of incident wave has a great impact on the light intensity distribution.

  5. Newmark-Beta-FDTD method for super-resolution analysis of time reversal waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Sheng-Bing; Shao, Wei; Ma, Jing; Jin, Congjun; Wang, Xiao-Hua

    2017-09-01

    In this work, a new unconditionally stable finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method with the split-field perfectly matched layer (PML) is proposed for the analysis of time reversal (TR) waves. The proposed method is very suitable for multiscale problems involving microstructures. The spatial and temporal derivatives in this method are discretized by the central difference technique and Newmark-Beta algorithm, respectively, and the derivation results in the calculation of a banded-sparse matrix equation. Since the coefficient matrix keeps unchanged during the whole simulation process, the lower-upper (LU) decomposition of the matrix needs to be performed only once at the beginning of the calculation. Moreover, the reverse Cuthill-Mckee (RCM) technique, an effective preprocessing technique in bandwidth compression of sparse matrices, is used to improve computational efficiency. The super-resolution focusing of TR wave propagation in two- and three-dimensional spaces is included to validate the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed method.

  6. Three-dimensional FDTD simulation of biomaterial exposure to electromagnetic nanopulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simicevic, Neven [Center for Applied Physics Studies, Louisiana Tech University, PO Box 10348, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States)

    2005-11-07

    Ultra-wideband (UWB) electromagnetic pulses of nanosecond duration, or nanopulses, have recently been approved by the Federal Communications Commission for a number of different applications. They are also being explored for applications in biotechnology and medicine. The simulation of the propagation of a nanopulse through biological matter, previously performed using a two-dimensional finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, has been extended here into a full three-dimensional computation. To account for the UWB frequency range, the geometrical resolution of the exposed sample was 0.25 mm and the dielectric properties of biological matter were accurately described in terms of the Debye model. The results obtained from the three-dimensional computation support the previously obtained results: the electromagnetic field inside a biological tissue depends on the incident pulse rise time and width, with increased importance of the rise time as the conductivity increases; no thermal effects are possible for the low pulse repetition rates, supported by recent experiments. New results show that the dielectric sample exposed to nanopulses behaves as a dielectric resonator. For a sample in a cuvette, we obtained the dominant resonant frequency and the Q-factor of the resonator.

  7. Classification of PD sources in HV cables using neural networks and the LN-FDTD method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barros, W.H.; Oliveira, R.M.; Sobrinho, C.L.; Leite, R.C. [Univ. Federal do Para, Para (Brazil). Dept. of Computational and Electrical Engineering

    2008-07-01

    Partial discharges can be generated by the presence of several defects, and are often the cause of failures in electrical equipment insulators. In this study, a local non-orthogonal finite difference time-domain method (LN-FDTD) was used to simulate the sources of partial discharges in a high voltage coaxial cable model. The artificial neural network (ANN) technique used a Marquandt-Levenberg training algorithm to detect and classify cable PD sources. A set of harmonics obtained from the difference between the registered signals in the time domain was used as part of the training procedure. A failure was inserted on an electrical cable in each simulation in order to obtain the correlated data. Input signals were injected using a voltage pulse represented by a Gaussian function. A total of 90 simulations were conducted to generate 360 data groups in order to consider 6 different types of failures. Results of the study showed that the method can be used to detect and classify partial discharges in cables. 12 refs., 21 figs.

  8. Optimization of imprintable nanostructured a-Si solar cells: FDTD study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisker, Christian; Pedersen, Thomas Garm

    2013-03-11

    We present a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) study of an amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin film solar cell, with nano scale patterns on the substrate surface. The patterns, based on the geometry of anisotropically etched silicon gratings, are optimized with respect to the period and anti-reflection (AR) coating thickness for maximal absorption in the range of the solar spectrum. The structure is shown to increase the cell efficiency by 10.2% compared to a similar flat solar cell with an optimized AR coating thickness. An increased back reflection can be obtained with a 50 nm zinc oxide layer on the back reflector, which gives an additional efficiency increase, leading to a total of 14.9%. In addition, the patterned cells are shown to be up to 3.8% more efficient than an optimized textured reference cell based on the Asahi U-type glass surface. The effects of variations of the optimized solar cell structure due to the manufacturing process are investigated, and shown to be negligible for variations below ±10%.

  9. Three-dimensional FDTD simulation of biomaterial exposure to electromagnetic nanopulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simicevic, Neven

    2005-01-01

    Ultra-wideband (UWB) electromagnetic pulses of nanosecond duration, or nanopulses, have recently been approved by the Federal Communications Commission for a number of different applications. They are also being explored for applications in biotechnology and medicine. The simulation of the propagation of a nanopulse through biological matter, previously performed using a two-dimensional finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, has been extended here into a full three-dimensional computation. To account for the UWB frequency range, the geometrical resolution of the exposed sample was 0.25 mm and the dielectric properties of biological matter were accurately described in terms of the Debye model. The results obtained from the three-dimensional computation support the previously obtained results: the electromagnetic field inside a biological tissue depends on the incident pulse rise time and width, with increased importance of the rise time as the conductivity increases; no thermal effects are possible for the low pulse repetition rates, supported by recent experiments. New results show that the dielectric sample exposed to nanopulses behaves as a dielectric resonator. For a sample in a cuvette, we obtained the dominant resonant frequency and the Q-factor of the resonator

  10. Solution of two-dimensional electromagnetic scattering problem by FDTD with optimal step size, based on a semi-norm analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monsefi, Farid [Division of Applied Mathematics, The School of Education, Culture and Communication, Mälardalen University, MDH, Västerås, Sweden and School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, IDT, Mälardalen University, MDH Väs (Sweden); Carlsson, Linus; Silvestrov, Sergei [Division of Applied Mathematics, The School of Education, Culture and Communication, Mälardalen University, MDH, Västerås (Sweden); Rančić, Milica [Division of Applied Mathematics, The School of Education, Culture and Communication, Mälardalen University, MDH, Västerås, Sweden and Department of Theoretical Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Electronic Engineering, University (Serbia); Otterskog, Magnus [School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, IDT, Mälardalen University, MDH Västerås (Sweden)

    2014-12-10

    To solve the electromagnetic scattering problem in two dimensions, the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method is used. The order of convergence of the FDTD algorithm, solving the two-dimensional Maxwell’s curl equations, is estimated in two different computer implementations: with and without an obstacle in the numerical domain of the FDTD scheme. This constitutes an electromagnetic scattering problem where a lumped sinusoidal current source, as a source of electromagnetic radiation, is included inside the boundary. Confined within the boundary, a specific kind of Absorbing Boundary Condition (ABC) is chosen and the outside of the boundary is in form of a Perfect Electric Conducting (PEC) surface. Inserted in the computer implementation, a semi-norm has been applied to compare different step sizes in the FDTD scheme. First, the domain of the problem is chosen to be the free-space without any obstacles. In the second part of the computer implementations, a PEC surface is included as the obstacle. The numerical instability of the algorithms can be rather easily avoided with respect to the Courant stability condition, which is frequently used in applying the general FDTD algorithm.

  11. A hybrid method combining the Time-Domain Method of Moments, the Time-Domain Uniform Theory of Diffraction and the FDTD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Becker

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a hybrid method combining the Time-Domain Method of Moments (TD-MoM, the Time-Domain Uniform Theory of Diffraction (TD-UTD and the Finite-Difference Time-Domain Method (FDTD is presented. When applying this new hybrid method, thin-wire antennas are modeled with the TD-MoM, inhomogeneous bodies are modelled with the FDTD and large perfectly conducting plates are modelled with the TD-UTD. All inhomogeneous bodies are enclosed in a so-called FDTD-volume and the thin-wire antennas can be embedded into this volume or can lie outside. The latter avoids the simulation of white space between antennas and inhomogeneous bodies. If the antennas are positioned into the FDTD-volume, their discretization does not need to agree with the grid of the FDTD. By using the TD-UTD large perfectly conducting plates can be considered efficiently in the solution-procedure. Thus this hybrid method allows time-domain simulations of problems including very different classes of objects, applying the respective most appropriate numerical techniques to every object.

  12. Solution of two-dimensional electromagnetic scattering problem by FDTD with optimal step size, based on a semi-norm analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monsefi, Farid; Carlsson, Linus; Silvestrov, Sergei; Rančić, Milica; Otterskog, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    To solve the electromagnetic scattering problem in two dimensions, the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method is used. The order of convergence of the FDTD algorithm, solving the two-dimensional Maxwell’s curl equations, is estimated in two different computer implementations: with and without an obstacle in the numerical domain of the FDTD scheme. This constitutes an electromagnetic scattering problem where a lumped sinusoidal current source, as a source of electromagnetic radiation, is included inside the boundary. Confined within the boundary, a specific kind of Absorbing Boundary Condition (ABC) is chosen and the outside of the boundary is in form of a Perfect Electric Conducting (PEC) surface. Inserted in the computer implementation, a semi-norm has been applied to compare different step sizes in the FDTD scheme. First, the domain of the problem is chosen to be the free-space without any obstacles. In the second part of the computer implementations, a PEC surface is included as the obstacle. The numerical instability of the algorithms can be rather easily avoided with respect to the Courant stability condition, which is frequently used in applying the general FDTD algorithm

  13. Modeling arbitrarily directed slots that are narrow both in width and depth with regard to the FDTD spatial cell. [Finite Difference-Time Domain (TDTD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, D.J.; Turner, C.D.

    1991-01-01

    The Hybrid Thin-Slot Algorithm (HTSA) integrates a transient integral-equation solution for an aperture in an infinite plane into a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) code. The technique was introduced for linear apertures and was extended to include wall loss and lossy internal gaskets. A general implementation for arbitrary thin slots is briefly described here. The 3-D FDTD-code TSAR was selected for the implementation. The HTSA does not provide universal solutions to the narrow slot problem, but has merits appropriate for particular applications. The HTSA is restricted to planar slots, but can solve the important case that both the width and depth of the slot are narrow compared to the FDTD spatial cell. IN addition, the HTSA is not bound to the FDTD discrete spatial and time increments, and therefore, high-resolution solutions for the slot physics are possible. The implementation of the HTSA into TSAR is based upon a slot data file'' that includes the cell indices where the desired slots are exist within the FDTD mesh. For an HTSA-defined slot, the wall region local to the slot is shorted, and therefore, to change the slot's topology simply requires altering the file to include the desired cells. 7 refs.

  14. 77 FR 46114 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-02

    ... Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New Mexico... Anthropology, in consultation with the Pueblo of Santa Ana, New Mexico, has determined that a collection of... cultural affiliation with the cultural items should contact the Maxwell Museum of Anthropology at the...

  15. Enhanced Recovery in Tight Gas Reservoirs using Maxwell-Stefan Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, C. J. S.; Kantzas, A.

    2017-12-01

    Due to the steep production decline in unconventional gas reservoirs, enhanced recovery (ER) methods are receiving great attention from the industry. Wet gas or liquid rich reservoirs are the preferred ER candidates due to higher added value from natural gas liquids (NGL) production. ER in these reservoirs has the potential to add reserves by improving desorption and displacement of hydrocarbons through the medium. Nevertheless, analysis of gas transport at length scales of tight reservoirs is complicated because concomitant mechanisms are in place as pressure declines. In addition to viscous and Knudsen diffusion, multicomponent gas modeling includes competitive adsorption and molecular diffusion effects. Most models developed to address these mechanisms involve single component or binary mixtures. In this study, ER by gas injection is investigated in multicomponent (C1, C2, C3 and C4+, CO2 and N2) wet gas reservoirs. The competing effects of Knudsen and molecular diffusion are incorporated by using Maxwell-Stefan equations and the Dusty-Gas approach. This model was selected due to its superior properties on representing the physics of multicomponent gas flow, as demonstrated during the presented model validation. Sensitivity studies to evaluate adsorption, reservoir permeability and gas type effects are performed. The importance of competitive adsorption on production and displacement times is demonstrated. In the absence of adsorption, chromatographic separation is negligible. Production is merely dictated by competing effects between molecular and Knudsen diffusion. Displacement fronts travel rapidly across the medium. When adsorption effects are included, molecules with lower affinity to the adsorption sites will be produced faster. If the injected gas is inert (N2), an increase in heavier fraction composition occurs in the medium. During injection of adsorbing gases (CH4 and CO2), competitive adsorption effects will contribute to improved recovery of heavier

  16. Mathematical model for thermal solar collectors by using magnetohydrodynamic Maxwell nanofluid with slip conditions, thermal radiation and variable thermal conductivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asif Mahmood

    Full Text Available Solar energy is the cleanest, renewable and most abundant source of energy available on earth. The main use of solar energy is to heat and cool buildings, heat water and to generate electricity. There are two types of solar energy collection system, the photovoltaic systems and the solar thermal collectors. The efficiency of any solar thermal system depend on the thermophysical properties of the operating fluids and the geometry/length of the system in which fluid is flowing. In the present research a simplified mathematical model for the solar thermal collectors is considered in the form of non-uniform unsteady stretching surface. The flow is induced by a non-uniform stretching of the porous sheet and the uniform magnetic field is applied in the transverse direction to the flow. The non-Newtonian Maxwell fluid model is utilized for the working fluid along with slip boundary conditions. Moreover the high temperature effect of thermal radiation and temperature dependent thermal conductivity are also included in the present model. The mathematical formulation is carried out through a boundary layer approach and the numerical computations are carried out for cu-water and TiO2-water nanofluids. Results are presented for the velocity and temperature profiles as well as the skin friction coefficient and Nusselt number and the discussion is concluded on the effect of various governing parameters on the motion, temperature variation, velocity gradient and the rate of heat transfer at the boundary. Keywords: Solar energy, Thermal collectors, Maxwell-nanofluid, Thermal radiation, Partial slip, Variable thermal conductivity

  17. A postprocessing method based on chirp Z transform for FDTD calculation of point defect states in two-dimensional phononic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Xiaoxing; Wang Yuesheng

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a new postprocessing method for the finite difference time domain (FDTD) calculation of the point defect states in two-dimensional (2D) phononic crystals (PNCs) is developed based on the chirp Z transform (CZT), one of the frequency zooming techniques. The numerical results for the defect states in 2D solid/liquid PNCs with single or double point defects show that compared with the fast Fourier transform (FFT)-based postprocessing method, the method can improve the estimation accuracy of the eigenfrequencies of the point defect states significantly when the FDTD calculation is run with relatively few iterations; and furthermore it can yield the point defect bands without calculating all eigenfrequencies outside the band gaps. The efficiency and accuracy of the FDTD method can be improved significantly with this new postprocessing method.

  18. Validation of a non-uniform meshing algorithm for the 3D-FDTD method by means of a two-wire crosstalk experimental set-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Esteban Jiménez-Mejía

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an algorithm used to automatically mesh a 3D computational domain in order to solve electromagnetic interaction scenarios by means of the Finite-Difference Time-Domain -FDTD-  Method. The proposed algorithm has been formulated in a general mathematical form, where convenient spacing functions can be defined for the problem space discretization, allowing the inclusion of small sized objects in the FDTD method and the calculation of detailed variations of the electromagnetic field at specified regions of the computation domain. The results obtained by using the FDTD method with the proposed algorithm have been contrasted not only with a typical uniform mesh algorithm, but also with experimental measurements for a two-wire crosstalk set-up, leading to excellent agreement between theoretical and experimental waveforms. A discussion about the advantages of the non-uniform mesh over the uniform one is also presented.

  19. A postprocessing method based on chirp Z transform for FDTD calculation of point defect states in two-dimensional phononic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su Xiaoxing, E-mail: xxsu@bjtu.edu.c [School of Electronic and Information Engineering, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Wang Yuesheng [Institute of Engineering Mechanics, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China)

    2010-09-01

    In this paper, a new postprocessing method for the finite difference time domain (FDTD) calculation of the point defect states in two-dimensional (2D) phononic crystals (PNCs) is developed based on the chirp Z transform (CZT), one of the frequency zooming techniques. The numerical results for the defect states in 2D solid/liquid PNCs with single or double point defects show that compared with the fast Fourier transform (FFT)-based postprocessing method, the method can improve the estimation accuracy of the eigenfrequencies of the point defect states significantly when the FDTD calculation is run with relatively few iterations; and furthermore it can yield the point defect bands without calculating all eigenfrequencies outside the band gaps. The efficiency and accuracy of the FDTD method can be improved significantly with this new postprocessing method.

  20. Regularity of the Maxwell equations in heterogeneous media and Lipschitz domains

    KAUST Repository

    Bonito, Andrea

    2013-12-01

    This note establishes regularity estimates for the solution of the Maxwell equations in Lipschitz domains with non-smooth coefficients and minimal regularity assumptions. The argumentation relies on elliptic regularity estimates for the Poisson problem with non-smooth coefficients. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Adaptive finite element techniques for the Maxwell equations using implicit a posteriori error estimates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harutyunyan, D.; Izsak, F.; van der Vegt, Jacobus J.W.; Bochev, Mikhail A.

    For the adaptive solution of the Maxwell equations on three-dimensional domains with N´ed´elec edge finite element methods, we consider an implicit a posteriori error estimation technique. On each element of the tessellation an equation for the error is formulated and solved with a properly chosen

  2. The square root of the Dirac operator on superspace and the Maxwell equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bzdak, Adam; Hadasz, Leszek

    2004-01-01

    We re-consider the procedure of 'taking a square root of the Dirac equation' on superspace and show that it leads to the well-known superfield W α and to the proper equations of motion for the components, i.e., the Maxwell equations and the massless Dirac equation

  3. The square root of the Dirac operator on superspace and the Maxwell equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bzdak, Adam; Hadasz, Leszek

    2004-02-01

    We re-consider the procedure of "taking a square root of the Dirac equation" on superspace and show that it leads to the well-known superfield Wα and to the proper equations of motion for the components, i.e., the Maxwell equations and the massless Dirac equation.

  4. The square root of the Dirac operator on the superspace and the Maxwell equations

    OpenAIRE

    Bzdak, Adam; Hadasz, Leszek

    2003-01-01

    We re-consider the procedure of ``taking a square root of the Dirac equation'' on the superspace and show that it leads to the well known superfield W_\\alpha and to the proper equations of motion for the components, i.e. the Maxwell equations and the massless Dirac equation.

  5. The square root of the Dirac operator on superspace and the Maxwell equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bzdak, Adam; Hadasz, Leszek

    2004-02-26

    We re-consider the procedure of 'taking a square root of the Dirac equation' on superspace and show that it leads to the well-known superfield W{sub {alpha}} and to the proper equations of motion for the components, i.e., the Maxwell equations and the massless Dirac equation.

  6. Isomonodromic deformations and self-similar solutions of the Einstein-Maxwell equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitaev, A.V.

    1992-01-01

    It is shown that the self-similar solutions of the Einstein-Maxwell equations in the cylindrical case describe the isomonodromic deformations of ordinary linear differential equations with rational coefficients. New types of such solutions, expressed in terms of the fifth Painleve transcendent, are found. 24 refs

  7. The Maxwell-Stefan description of mixture diffusion in nanoporous crystalline materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krishna, R.

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of nanoporous crystalline materials in separation applications is often influenced to a significant extent by diffusion of guest molecules within the pores of the structural frameworks. The Maxwell-Stefan (M-S) equations provide a fundamental and convenient description of mixture

  8. On Bianchi-I cosmic strings coupled with Maxwell fields in bimetric ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Axially symmetric Bianchi-I model is studied with source cosmic cloud strings coupled with electromagnetic field in Rosen's bimetric theory of relativity and observed that there is no contribution from cosmic strings and Maxwell fields in this theory.

  9. Approximation of the eigenvalue problem for the time harmonic Maxwell system by continuous Lagrange finite elements

    KAUST Repository

    Bonito, Andrea; Guermond, Jean-Luc

    2011-01-01

    We propose and analyze an approximation technique for the Maxwell eigenvalue problem using H1-conforming finite elements. The key idea consists of considering a mixed method controlling the divergence of the electric field in a fractional Sobolev space H-α with α ∈ (1/2, 1). The method is shown to be convergent and spectrally correct. © 2011 American Mathematical Society.

  10. The Chevreton tensor and Einstein-Maxwell spacetimes conformal to Einstein spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergqvist, Goeran; Eriksson, Ingemar

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we characterize the source-free Einstein-Maxwell spacetimes which have a trace-free Chevreton tensor. We show that this is equivalent to the Chevreton tensor being of pure radiation type and that it restricts the spacetimes to Petrov type N or O. We prove that the trace of the Chevreton tensor is related to the Bach tensor and use this to find all Einstein-Maxwell spacetimes with a zero cosmological constant that have a vanishing Bach tensor. Among these spacetimes we then look for those which are conformal to Einstein spaces. We find that the electromagnetic field and the Weyl tensor must be aligned, and in the case that the electromagnetic field is null, the spacetime must be conformally Ricci-flat and all such solutions are known. In the non-null case, since the general solution is not known on a closed form, we settle by giving the integrability conditions in the general case, but we do give new explicit examples of Einstein-Maxwell spacetimes that are conformal to Einstein spaces, and we also find examples where the vanishing of the Bach tensor does not imply that the spacetime is conformal to a C-space. The non-aligned Einstein-Maxwell spacetimes with vanishing Bach tensor are conformally C-spaces, but none of them are conformal to Einstein spaces

  11. Generalization of the Biot--Savart law to Maxwell's equations using special relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuenschwander, D.E.; Turner, B.N.

    1992-01-01

    Maxwell's equations are obtained by generalizing the laws of magnetostatics, which follow from the Biot--Savart law and superposition, to be consistent with special relativity. The Lorentz force on a charged particle and its rate of energy change also follow by making Newton's second law for a particle in a magnetostatic field consistent with special relativity

  12. Non-minimal Maxwell-Chern-Simons theory and the composite Fermion model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paschoal, Ricardo C.; Helayel Neto, Jose A.

    2003-01-01

    The magnetic field redefinition in Jain's composite fermion model for the fractional quantum Hall effect is shown to be effective described by a mean-field approximation of a model containing a Maxwell-Chern-Simons gauge field nominally coupled to matter. Also an explicit non-relativistic limit of the non-minimal (2+1) D Dirac's equation is derived. (author)

  13. Exact cosmological solutions of Einstein-Maxwell equations as perturbations of the Bertotti-Robinson model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portugal, R.; Soares, I.D.

    1985-01-01

    Two new classes of spatially homogeneous cosmological solutions of Einstein-Maxwell equations are obtained by considering a class of exact perturbations of the static Bertotti-Robinson (BR) model. The BR solution is shown to be unstable under these perturbations, being perturbed into exact cosmological solutions with perfect fluid (equations of state p = lambda rho, O [pt

  14. On The Flow of Maxwell Fluid Between Two Walls Induced By A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The flow of a Maxwell fluid between two side walls induced by a constant accelerating plate is revisited. In the present investigation, we employed asymptotic technique by assuming small and large relaxation times λ. We proved the uniqueness of our solution based on some simplifying assumption; the result shows that λ ...

  15. Inapplicability of the Maxwell relation for the quantification of caloric effects in anisotropic ferroic materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Niemann, R.; Heczko, Oleg; Schultz, L.; Fähler, S.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 37, SI (2014), 281-288 ISSN 0140-7007 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP107/11/0391 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : magnetocaloric * shape memory alloy s * multiferroic * Ni-Mn-Ga * Maxwell relation Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.241, year: 2014

  16. q-deformed Weinberg-Salam model and q-deformed Maxwell equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alavi, S.A.; Sarbishaei, M.; Mokhtari, A.

    2000-01-01

    We study the q-deformation of the gauge part of the Weinberg-Salam model and show that the q-deformed theory involves new interactions. We then obtain q-deformed Maxwell equations from which magnetic monopoles appear naturally. (author)

  17. Time-integration methods for finite element discretisations of the second-order Maxwell equation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarmany, D.; Bochev, Mikhail A.; van der Vegt, Jacobus J.W.

    This article deals with time integration for the second-order Maxwell equations with possibly non-zero conductivity in the context of the discontinuous Galerkin finite element method DG-FEM) and the $H(\\mathrm{curl})$-conforming FEM. For the spatial discretisation, hierarchic

  18. Orbiting the moons of Pluto complex solutions to the Einstein, Maxwell, Schroedinger and Dirac equations

    CERN Document Server

    Rauscher, Elizabeth A

    2011-01-01

    The Maxwell, Einstein, Schrödinger and Dirac equations are considered the most important equations in all of physics. This volume aims to provide new eight- and twelve-dimensional complex solutions to these equations for the first time in order to reveal

  19. Solitary waves, steepening and initial collapse in the Maxwell-Lorentz system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mads Peter; Brio, Moysey; Webb, Garry

    2002-01-01

    We present a numerical study of Maxwell's equations in nonlinear dispersive optical media describing propagation of pulses in one Cartesian space dimension. Dispersion and nonlinearity are accounted for by a linear Lorentz model and an instantaneous Kerr nonlinearity, respectively. The dispersion......–Rosales weakly dispersive system. The weak dispersion in general cannot prevent the wave breaking with instantaneous or delayed nonlinearities....

  20. 3-D simulation study for a thermionic RF gun using an FDTD method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hama, H. E-mail: hama@lns.tohoku.ac.jp; Hinode, F.; Shinto, K.; Miyamoto, A.; Tanaka, T

    2004-08-01

    Beam dynamics in a thermionic RF gun for a new pre-injector in a future synchrotron radiation facility at Tohoku university has been studied by developing a 3-D Maxwell's equation solver. Backbombardment (BB) effect on a cathode, which is a crucial problem for performance of the thermionic RF gun, has been investigated. It is found that an external dipole magnetic field applying around the cathode is effective to reduce high-energy backstreaming electrons from the accelerating cell. However, the low-energy electrons coming back from the first cell inevitably hit the cathode, so that characteristics of the cathode material seems to be crucial for reduction of the BB effect.

  1. Fibonacci Sequences Quasiperiodic A5B6C7 Ferroelectric Based Photonic Crystal: FDTD analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Simsek

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we present an investigation of the optical properties and band structures for the conventional and Fibonacci photonic crystals (PCs based on some A5B6C7 ferroelectrics (SbSBr and BiTeCl. Here, we use one dimensional SbSBr and BiTeCl based layers in air background. We have theoretically calculated the photonic band structure and transmission spectra of SbSBr and BiTeCl based PC superlattices. The position of minima in the transmission spectrum correlates with the gaps obtained in the calculation. The intensity of the transmission depths is more intense in the case of higher refractive index contrast between the layers. In our simulation, we employed the finite-difference time domain  technique and the plane wave expansion method, which implies the solution of Maxwell equations with centered finite-difference expressions for the space and time derivatives.

  2. Determination of excited states of quantum systems by finite difference time domain method (FDTD) with supersymmetric quantum mechanics (SUSY-QM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudiarta, I. Wayan; Angraini, Lily Maysari, E-mail: lilyangraini@unram.ac.id [Physics Study Program, University of Mataram, Jln. Majapahit 62 Mataram, NTB (Indonesia)

    2016-04-19

    We have applied the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method with the supersymmetric quantum mechanics (SUSY-QM) procedure to determine excited energies of one dimensional quantum systems. The theoretical basis of FDTD, SUSY-QM, a numerical algorithm and an illustrative example for a particle in a one dimensional square-well potential were given in this paper. It was shown that the numerical results were in excellent agreement with theoretical results. Numerical errors produced by the SUSY-QM procedure was due to errors in estimations of superpotentials and supersymmetric partner potentials.

  3. The influence of boundary conditions on resonant frequencies of cavities in 3-D FDTD algorithm using non-orthogonal co-ordinates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, L.; Tong, L.S. [Southeast Univ., Nanjing (China). Research Inst. of Electronics; Carter, R.G. [Lancaster Univ. (United Kingdom). Engineering Dept.

    1994-09-01

    The 3-dimensional finite-difference time-domain method in non-orthogonal co-ordinates (non-standard FDTD) is used to calculate the frequencies of resonators. The numerical boundary conditions of the method are presented. The Influences of boundary conditions and discrete meshes on the numerical accuracy are investigated. The authors present the nonstandard FDTD method using the boundary-orthogonal mesh and equivalent dielectric constant so that the error is reduced from 8.66% to 3.0% for the cylindrical cavity loaded by a dielectric button.

  4. Stability and Instability of the Sub-extremal Reissner-Nordström Black Hole Interior for the Einstein-Maxwell-Klein-Gordon Equations in Spherical Symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Moortel, Maxime

    2018-05-01

    We show non-linear stability and instability results in spherical symmetry for the interior of a charged black hole—approaching a sub-extremal Reissner-Nordström background fast enough—in presence of a massive and charged scalar field, motivated by the strong cosmic censorship conjecture in that setting: 1. Stability We prove that spherically symmetric characteristic initial data to the Einstein-Maxwell-Klein-Gordon equations approaching a Reissner-Nordström background with a sufficiently decaying polynomial decay rate on the event horizon gives rise to a space-time possessing a Cauchy horizon in a neighbourhood of time-like infinity. Moreover, if the decay is even stronger, we prove that the space-time metric admits a continuous extension to the Cauchy horizon. This generalizes the celebrated stability result of Dafermos for Einstein-Maxwell-real-scalar-field in spherical symmetry. 2. Instability We prove that for the class of space-times considered in the stability part, whose scalar field in addition obeys a polynomial averaged- L 2 (consistent) lower bound on the event horizon, the scalar field obeys an integrated lower bound transversally to the Cauchy horizon. As a consequence we prove that the non-degenerate energy is infinite on any null surface crossing the Cauchy horizon and the curvature of a geodesic vector field blows up at the Cauchy horizon near time-like infinity. This generalizes an instability result due to Luk and Oh for Einstein-Maxwell-real-scalar-field in spherical symmetry. This instability of the black hole interior can also be viewed as a step towards the resolution of the C 2 strong cosmic censorship conjecture for one-ended asymptotically flat initial data.

  5. Optimizing image-based patterned defect inspection through FDTD simulations at multiple ultraviolet wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Bryan M.; Zhou, Hui; Henn, Mark-Alexander; Sohn, Martin Y.; Silver, Richard M.

    2017-06-01

    The sizes of non-negligible defects in the patterning of a semiconductor device continue to decrease as the dimensions for these devices are reduced. These "killer defects" disrupt the performance of the device and must be adequately controlled during manufacturing, and new solutions are required to improve optics-based defect inspection. To this end, our group has reported [Barnes et al., Proc. SPIE 1014516 (2017)] our initial five-wavelength simulation study, evaluating the extensibility of defect inspection by reducing the inspection wavelength from a deep-ultraviolet wavelength to wavelengths in the vacuum ultraviolet and the extreme ultraviolet. In that study, a 47 nm wavelength yielded enhancements in the signal to noise (SNR) by a factor of five compared to longer wavelengths and in the differential intensities by as much as three orders-of-magnitude compared to 13 nm. This paper briefly reviews these recent findings and investigates the possible sources for these disparities between results at 13 nm and 47 nm wavelengths. Our in-house finite-difference time-domain code (FDTD) is tested in both two and three dimensions to determine how computational conditions contributed to the results. A modified geometry and materials stack is presented that offers a second viewpoint of defect detectability as functions of wavelength, polarization, and defect type. Reapplication of the initial SNR-based defect metric again yields no detection of a defect at λ = 13 nm, but additional image preprocessing now enables the computation of the SNR for λ = 13 nm simulated images and has led to a revised defect metric that allows comparisons at all five wavelengths.

  6. An FDTD-based computer simulation platform for shock wave propagation in electrohydraulic lithotripsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Bülent; Çiftçi, Emre

    2013-06-01

    Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy (ESWL) is based on disintegration of the kidney stone by delivering high-energy shock waves that are created outside the body and transmitted through the skin and body tissues. Nowadays high-energy shock waves are also used in orthopedic operations and investigated to be used in the treatment of myocardial infarction and cancer. Because of these new application areas novel lithotriptor designs are needed for different kinds of treatment strategies. In this study our aim was to develop a versatile computer simulation environment which would give the device designers working on various medical applications that use shock wave principle a substantial amount of flexibility while testing the effects of new parameters such as reflector size, material properties of the medium, water temperature, and different clinical scenarios. For this purpose, we created a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD)-based computational model in which most of the physical system parameters were defined as an input and/or as a variable in the simulations. We constructed a realistic computational model of a commercial electrohydraulic lithotriptor and optimized our simulation program using the results that were obtained by the manufacturer in an experimental setup. We, then, compared the simulation results with the results from an experimental setup in which oxygen level in water was varied. Finally, we studied the effects of changing the input parameters like ellipsoid size and material, temperature change in the wave propagation media, and shock wave source point misalignment. The simulation results were consistent with the experimental results and expected effects of variation in physical parameters of the system. The results of this study encourage further investigation and provide adequate evidence that the numerical modeling of a shock wave therapy system is feasible and can provide a practical means to test novel ideas in new device design procedures

  7. The Maxwell-Lorentz Model for optical Pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mads Peter; Brio, Moysey

    2007-01-01

    Dynamics of optical pulses, especially of ultra short femtosecond pulses, are of great technological and theoretical interest. The dynamics of optical pulses is usually studied using the nonlinear Schrodinger (NLS) equation model. While such approach works surprisingly well for description of pulse...

  8. Manipulating the electron distribution through a combination of electron injection and MacKenzie’s Maxwell Demon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yip, Chi-Shung; Hershkowitz, Noah

    2015-01-01

    Experiments on electron heating are performed in a biased hot filament-produced argon plasma. Electrons are confined by multi-dipole magnetic fields on the radial wall of the cylindrical chamber but not the planar end walls. Electron heating is provided by a combination of cold electron injection (Hershowitz N and Leung K N 1975 Appl. Phys. Lett. 26 607) and a MacKenzie Maxwell Demon (Mackenzie K R et al 1971 Appl. Phys. Lett. 18 529). This approach allows the manipulation of the electrons by introducing a depleted tail into the electron energy distribution function or by removing a depleted tail. It is found that the injected electrons mimic and thermalize with the electron species with the closest average energy or temperature. The effect of the injected electrons is optimal when they mimic the secondary electrons emitted from the wall instead of the degraded primary electrons. Both approaches combine to achieve increases in electron temperature T e from 0.67 to 2.8 eV, which was not significantly higher than using each approach alone. (paper)

  9. Perbandingan Regresi Binomial Negatif dan Regresi Conway-Maxwell-Poisson dalam Mengatasi Overdispersi pada Regresi Poisson

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lusi Eka Afri

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Regresi Binomial Negatif dan regresi Conway-Maxwell-Poisson merupakan solusi untuk mengatasi overdispersi pada regresi Poisson. Kedua model tersebut merupakan perluasan dari model regresi Poisson. Menurut Hinde dan Demetrio (2007, terdapat beberapa kemungkinan terjadi overdispersi pada regresi Poisson yaitu keragaman hasil pengamatan keragaman individu sebagai komponen yang tidak dijelaskan oleh model, korelasi antar respon individu, terjadinya pengelompokan dalam populasi dan peubah teramati yang dihilangkan. Akibatnya dapat menyebabkan pendugaan galat baku yang terlalu rendah dan akan menghasilkan pendugaan parameter yang bias ke bawah (underestimate. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk membandingan model Regresi Binomial Negatif dan model regresi Conway-Maxwell-Poisson (COM-Poisson dalam mengatasi overdispersi pada data distribusi Poisson berdasarkan statistik uji devians. Data yang digunakan dalam penelitian ini terdiri dari dua sumber data yaitu data simulasi dan data kasus terapan. Data simulasi yang digunakan diperoleh dengan membangkitkan data berdistribusi Poisson yang mengandung overdispersi dengan menggunakan bahasa pemrograman R berdasarkan karakteristik data berupa , peluang munculnya nilai nol (p serta ukuran sampel (n. Data dibangkitkan berguna untuk mendapatkan estimasi koefisien parameter pada regresi binomial negatif dan COM-Poisson.   Kata Kunci: overdispersi, regresi binomial negatif, regresi Conway-Maxwell-Poisson Negative binomial regression and Conway-Maxwell-Poisson regression could be used to overcome over dispersion on Poisson regression. Both models are the extension of Poisson regression model. According to Hinde and Demetrio (2007, there will be some over dispersion on Poisson regression: observed variance in individual variance cannot be described by a model, correlation among individual response, and the population group and the observed variables are eliminated. Consequently, this can lead to low standard error

  10. Studying the TEM response of a 3-D conductor at a geological contact using the FDTD method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, T.; Tripp, A.C.; Hohmann, G.W. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics

    1995-07-01

    Many mineral targets are located near contact zones. Since the change of resistivity across the contact can distort or obscure the transient electromagnetic (TEM) response of the target, it is important to understand the possible effects. Previous investigators have examined similar problems using scale models. For example, Spies and Parker (1984) studied the TEM responses of fixed-loop and moving-loop configurations to geological contacts with lateral resistivity variations. More recently, Wilt (1991) systematically studied TEM soundings near a geological contact and observed that different survey systems respond to the contact in different ways. This paper will illustrate the use of the finite-difference, time-domain (FDTD) algorithm of Wang and Hohmann (1993) for calculating the TEM response of a 3-D conductive body at a geological contact. The algorithm is based on the Yee staggered grid FDTD method for solving the transient electrical nonmagnetic field responses of a 3-D model. On a suitable computer, a wide range of model responses can be readily calculated, a versatility that scale modeling does not share. This study uses a fixed transmitter loop, roving-receiver configuration. Many other configurations can be regarded as special cases of this survey. It is commonly employed, for instance, by the Newmont EMP (Body and Wiles, 1984), UTEM (West et al., 1984), and Geonics EM37 systems. The configuration also facilitates finite-difference, time-domain modeling because it does not require frequent movement of the source.

  11. FDTD Modeling of LEMP Propagation in the Earth-Ionosphere Waveguide With Emphasis on Realistic Representation of Lightning Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Thang H.; Baba, Yoshihiro; Somu, Vijaya B.; Rakov, Vladimir A.

    2017-12-01

    The finite difference time domain (FDTD) method in the 2-D cylindrical coordinate system was used to compute the nearly full-frequency-bandwidth vertical electric field and azimuthal magnetic field waveforms produced on the ground surface by lightning return strokes. The lightning source was represented by the modified transmission-line model with linear current decay with height, which was implemented in the FDTD computations as an appropriate vertical phased-current-source array. The conductivity of atmosphere was assumed to increase exponentially with height, with different conductivity profiles being used for daytime and nighttime conditions. The fields were computed at distances ranging from 50 to 500 km. Sky waves (reflections from the ionosphere) were identified in computed waveforms and used for estimation of apparent ionospheric reflection heights. It was found that our model reproduces reasonably well the daytime electric field waveforms measured at different distances and simulated (using a more sophisticated propagation model) by Qin et al. (2017). Sensitivity of model predictions to changes in the parameters of atmospheric conductivity profile, as well as influences of the lightning source characteristics (current waveshape parameters, return-stroke speed, and channel length) and ground conductivity were examined.

  12. Resolution of the Vlasov-Maxwell system by PIC discontinuous Galerkin method on GPU with OpenCL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crestetto Anaïs

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an implementation of a Vlasov-Maxwell solver for multicore processors. The Vlasov equation describes the evolution of charged particles in an electromagnetic field, solution of the Maxwell equations. The Vlasov equation is solved by a Particle-In-Cell method (PIC, while the Maxwell system is computed by a Discontinuous Galerkin method. We use the OpenCL framework, which allows our code to run on multicore processors or recent Graphic Processing Units (GPU. We present several numerical applications to two-dimensional test cases.

  13. A design tool for direct and non-stochastic calculations of near-field radiative transfer in complex structures: The NF-RT-FDTD algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didari, Azadeh; Pinar Mengüç, M.

    2017-08-01

    Advances in nanotechnology and nanophotonics are inextricably linked with the need for reliable computational algorithms to be adapted as design tools for the development of new concepts in energy harvesting, radiative cooling, nanolithography and nano-scale manufacturing, among others. In this paper, we provide an outline for such a computational tool, named NF-RT-FDTD, to determine the near-field radiative transfer between structured surfaces using Finite Difference Time Domain method. NF-RT-FDTD is a direct and non-stochastic algorithm, which accounts for the statistical nature of the thermal radiation and is easily applicable to any arbitrary geometry at thermal equilibrium. We present a review of the fundamental relations for far- and near-field radiative transfer between different geometries with nano-scale surface and volumetric features and gaps, and then we discuss the details of the NF-RT-FDTD formulation, its application to sample geometries and outline its future expansion to more complex geometries. In addition, we briefly discuss some of the recent numerical works for direct and indirect calculations of near-field thermal radiation transfer, including Scattering Matrix method, Finite Difference Time Domain method (FDTD), Wiener Chaos Expansion, Fluctuating Surface Current (FSC), Fluctuating Volume Current (FVC) and Thermal Discrete Dipole Approximations (TDDA).

  14. Magnetohydrodynamic flow of generalized Maxwell fluids in a rectangular micropump under an AC electric field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Guangpu [School of Mathematical Science, Inner Mongolia University, Hohhot, Inner Mongolia 010021 (China); Jian, Yongjun, E-mail: jianyj@imu.edu.cn [School of Mathematical Science, Inner Mongolia University, Hohhot, Inner Mongolia 010021 (China); Chang, Long [School of Mathematics and Statistics, Inner Mongolia University of Finance and Economics, Hohhot, Inner Mongolia 010051 (China); Buren, Mandula [School of Mathematical Science, Inner Mongolia University, Hohhot, Inner Mongolia 010021 (China)

    2015-08-01

    By using the method of separation of variables, an analytical solution for the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow of the generalized Maxwell fluids under AC electric field through a two-dimensional rectangular micropump is reduced. By the numerical computation, the variations of velocity profiles with the electrical oscillating Reynolds number Re, the Hartmann number Ha, the dimensionless relaxation time De are studied graphically. Further, the comparison with available experimental data and relevant researches is presented. - Highlights: • MHD flow of the generalized Maxwell fluids under AC electric field is analyzed. • The MHD flow is confined to a two-dimensional rectangular micropump. • Analytical solution is obtained by using the method of separation of variables. • The influences of related parameters on the MHD velocity are discussed.

  15. Dual solutions in boundary layer flow of Maxwell fluid over a porous shrinking sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya Krishnendu; Hayat Tasawar; Alsaedi Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    An analysis is carried out for dual solutions of the boundary layer flow of Maxwell fluid over a permeable shrinking sheet. In the investigation, a constant wall mass transfer is considered. With the help of similarity transformations, the governing partial differential equations (PDEs) are converted into a nonlinear self-similar ordinary differential equation (ODE). For the numerical solution of transformed self-similar ODE, the shooting method is applied. The study reveals that the steady flow of Maxwell fluid is possible with a smaller amount of imposed mass suction compared with the viscous fluid flow. Dual solutions for the velocity distribution are obtained. Also, the increase of Deborah number reduces the boundary layer thickness for both solutions. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  16. Maxwell fields in the vicinity of an atom: are they essentially classical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Power, E.A.; Thirunamachandran, T.

    1984-01-01

    Multipolar formalism is commonly used as the starting point in quantum optics, and the coupling between the radiation field and atoms is taken to be in the lowest order, namely the electric dipole interaction. In the present work, the authors use the Heisenberg picture to describe the Maxwell fields and the charge fields evolving together as a coupled system. The basic electromagnetic fields are calculated as power series in the transition moments of the atom. At t = 0, the time when the different pictures are chosen to agree, the Maxwell operators act in the photon occupation space only and the electron field operators act solely in the fermion space. However, for t > O, the Heisenberg operators act in the composite space so that the electromagnetic fields are complicated functions of the annihilation and creation operators for both electrons and photons. The explicit forms of the first few terms of the series for the displacement vector and magnetic fields are presented

  17. Superconvergence of mixed finite element approximations to 3-D Maxwell's equations in metamaterials

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Yunqing

    2011-09-01

    Numerical simulation of metamaterials has attracted more and more attention since 2000, after the first metamaterial with negative refraction index was successfully constructed. In this paper we construct a fully-discrete leap-frog type finite element scheme to solve the three-dimensional time-dependent Maxwell\\'s equations when metamaterials are involved. First, we obtain some superclose results between the interpolations of the analytical solutions and finite element solutions obtained using arbitrary orders of Raviart-Thomas-Nédélec mixed spaces on regular cubic meshes. Then we prove the superconvergence result in the discrete l2 norm achieved for the lowest-order Raviart-Thomas-Nédélec space. To our best knowledge, such superconvergence results have never been obtained elsewhere. Finally, we implement the leap-frog scheme and present numerical results justifying our theoretical analysis. © 2011 Elsevier Inc.

  18. Ampère–Maxwell law for a conducting wire: a topological perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, J M; Anacleto, Joaquim

    2013-01-01

    The integral form of Ampère–Maxwell's law for an arbitrarily-shaped wire is recast from a topological perspective, eliminating the need to use conduction current and displacement current terms to determine the magnetic field circulation around an arbitrarily-shaped loop. A generalized flux of the electric field is defined, enabling Ampère–Maxwell's law for magnetic field circulation to be written in a form which parallels that in the absence of conduction current. It is hoped that this work has educational interest since it provides an example of how topology can simplify the formulation of physical laws. The ideas presented herein are primarily intended for undergraduate students of electromagnetism, but may also be of interest to graduate students and teachers. (paper)

  19. On solution of Maxwell's equations in axisymmetric domains with edges. Part I: Theoretical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nkemzi, Boniface

    2003-10-01

    In this paper we present the basic mathematical tools for treating boundary value problems for the Maxwell's equations in three-dimensional axisymmetric domains with reentrant edges by means of partial Fourier analysis. We consider the decomposition of the classical and regularized time-harmonic three-dimensional Maxwell's equations into variational equations in the plane meridian domain of the axisymmetric domain and define suitable weighted Sobolev spaces for their treatment. The trace properties of these spaces on the rotational axis and some properties of the solutions are proved, which are important for further numerical treatment, e.g. by the finite-element method. Particularly, a priori estimates of the solutions of the reduced system are given and the asymptotic behavior of these solutions near reentrant corners of the meridian domain is explicitly described by suitable singular functions. (author)

  20. A new type of massive spin-one boson: And its relation with Maxwell equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahluwalia, D.V.

    1995-01-01

    First, the author showed that in the (1, 0) circle-plus (0, 1) representation space there exist not one but two theories for charged particles. In the Weinberg construct, the boson and its antiboson carry same relative intrinsic parity, whereas in the author's construct the relative intrinsic parities of the boson and its antiboson are opposite. These results originate from the commutativity of the operations of Charge conjugation and Parity in Weinberg's theory, and from the anti-commutativity of the operations of Charge conjugation and Parity in the author's theory. The author thus claims that he has constructed a first non-trivial quantum theory of fields for the Wigner-type particles. Second, the massless limit of both theories seems formally identical and suggests a fundamental modification of Maxwell equations. At its simplest level, the modification to Maxwell equations enters via additional boundary condition(s)