WorldWideScience

Sample records for maximum uranium temperature

  1. Maximum permissible concentrations of uranium in air

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, N

    1973-01-01

    The retention of uranium by bone and kidney has been re-evaluated taking account of recently published data for a man who had been occupationally exposed to natural uranium aerosols and for adults who had ingested uranium at the normal dietary levels. For life-time occupational exposure to uranium aerosols the new retention functions yield a greater retention in bone and a smaller retention in kidney than the earlier ones, which were based on acute intakes of uranium by terminal patients. Hence bone replaces kidney as the critical organ. The (MPC) sub a for uranium 238 on radiological considerations using the current (1959) ICRP lung model for the new retention functions is slightly smaller than for earlier functions but the (MPC) sub a determined by chemical toxicity remains the most restrictive.

  2. Extreme Maximum Land Surface Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garratt, J. R.

    1992-09-01

    There are numerous reports in the literature of observations of land surface temperatures. Some of these, almost all made in situ, reveal maximum values in the 50°-70°C range, with a few, made in desert regions, near 80°C. Consideration of a simplified form of the surface energy balance equation, utilizing likely upper values of absorbed shortwave flux (1000 W m2) and screen air temperature (55°C), that surface temperatures in the vicinity of 90°-100°C may occur for dry, darkish soils of low thermal conductivity (0.1-0.2 W m1 K1). Numerical simulations confirm this and suggest that temperature gradients in the first few centimeters of soil may reach 0.5°-1°C mm1 under these extreme conditions. The study bears upon the intrinsic interest of identifying extreme maximum temperatures and yields interesting information regarding the comfort zone of animals (including man).

  3. A discussion about maximum uranium concentration in digestion solution of U3O8 type uranium ore concentrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Dechang; Liu Chao

    2012-01-01

    On the basis of discussing the influence of single factor on maximum uranium concentration in digestion solution,the influence degree of some factors such as U content, H 2 O content, mass ratio of P and U was compared and analyzed. The results indicate that the relationship between U content and maximum uranium concentration in digestion solution was direct ratio, while the U content increases by 1%, the maximum uranium concentration in digestion solution increases by 4.8%-5.7%. The relationship between H 2 O content and maximum uranium concentration in digestion solution was inverse ratio, the maximum uranium concentration in digestion solution decreases by 46.1-55.2 g/L while H 2 O content increases by 1%. The relationship between mass ratio of P and U and maximum uranium concentration in digestion solution was inverse ratio, the maximum uranium concentration in digestion solution decreases by 116.0-181.0 g/L while the mass ratio of P and U increase 0.1%. When U content equals 62.5% and the influence of mass ratio of P and U is no considered, the maximum uranium concentration in digestion solution equals 1 578 g/L; while mass ratio of P and U equals 0.35%, the maximum uranium concentration decreases to 716 g/L, the decreased rate is 54.6%, so the mass ratio of P and U in U 3 O 8 type uranium ore concentrate is the main controlling factor. (authors)

  4. Maximum Temperature Detection System for Integrated Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankiewicz, Maciej; Kos, Andrzej

    2015-03-01

    The paper describes structure and measurement results of the system detecting present maximum temperature on the surface of an integrated circuit. The system consists of the set of proportional to absolute temperature sensors, temperature processing path and a digital part designed in VHDL. Analogue parts of the circuit where designed with full-custom technique. The system is a part of temperature-controlled oscillator circuit - a power management system based on dynamic frequency scaling method. The oscillator cooperates with microprocessor dedicated for thermal experiments. The whole system is implemented in UMC CMOS 0.18 μm (1.8 V) technology.

  5. Uranium peroxide precipitate drying temperature relationships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodgers, C.; Dyck, B., E-mail: chick_rodgers@cameco.com [Cameco Corp., Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Cameco Corporation is in the process of revitalizing the mill at its Key Lake operation in northern Saskatchewan. The current Key Lake process employs ammonia stripping and ammonia precipitation. As part of the revitalization, the company is considering installing strong acid stripping in solvent extraction as used at its Rabbit Lake operation. This change would lead to using hydrogen peroxide for uranium precipitation. As part of the process evaluation, tests were carried out to study how changes in the temperature of an indirect fired dryer affected the properties of uranium peroxide [yellowcake] precipitate. This paper discusses the results of the test work, including the relationships between drying temperature and the following: (author)

  6. Uranium casting furnace automatic temperature control development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lind, R.F.

    1992-01-01

    Development of an automatic molten uranium temperature control system for use on batch-type induction casting furnaces is described. Implementation of a two-color optical pyrometer, development of an optical scanner for the pyrometer, determination of furnace thermal dynamics, and design of control systems are addressed. The optical scanning system is shown to greatly improve pyrometer measurement repeatability, particularly where heavy floating slag accumulations cause surface temperature gradients. Thermal dynamics of the furnaces were determined by applying least-squares system identification techniques to actual production data. A unity feedback control system utilizing a proportional-integral-derivative compensator is designed by using frequency-domain techniques. 14 refs

  7. Maximum vehicle cabin temperatures under different meteorological conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundstein, Andrew; Meentemeyer, Vernon; Dowd, John

    2009-05-01

    A variety of studies have documented the dangerously high temperatures that may occur within the passenger compartment (cabin) of cars under clear sky conditions, even at relatively low ambient air temperatures. Our study, however, is the first to examine cabin temperatures under variable weather conditions. It uses a unique maximum vehicle cabin temperature dataset in conjunction with directly comparable ambient air temperature, solar radiation, and cloud cover data collected from April through August 2007 in Athens, GA. Maximum cabin temperatures, ranging from 41-76°C, varied considerably depending on the weather conditions and the time of year. Clear days had the highest cabin temperatures, with average values of 68°C in the summer and 61°C in the spring. Cloudy days in both the spring and summer were on average approximately 10°C cooler. Our findings indicate that even on cloudy days with lower ambient air temperatures, vehicle cabin temperatures may reach deadly levels. Additionally, two predictive models of maximum daily vehicle cabin temperatures were developed using commonly available meteorological data. One model uses maximum ambient air temperature and average daily solar radiation while the other uses cloud cover percentage as a surrogate for solar radiation. From these models, two maximum vehicle cabin temperature indices were developed to assess the level of danger. The models and indices may be useful for forecasting hazardous conditions, promoting public awareness, and to estimate past cabin temperatures for use in forensic analyses.

  8. Modeling maximum daily temperature using a varying coefficient regression model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han Li; Xinwei Deng; Dong-Yum Kim; Eric P. Smith

    2014-01-01

    Relationships between stream water and air temperatures are often modeled using linear or nonlinear regression methods. Despite a strong relationship between water and air temperatures and a variety of models that are effective for data summarized on a weekly basis, such models did not yield consistently good predictions for summaries such as daily maximum temperature...

  9. High-temperature thermal conductivity of uranium chromite and uranium niobate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedoseev, D.V.; Varshavskaya, I.G.; Lavrent'ev, A.V.; Oziraner, S.N.; Kuznetsova, D.G.

    1979-01-01

    The technique of determining thermal conductivity coefficient of uranium niobate and uranium chromite on heating with laser radiation is described. Determined is the coefficient of free-convective heat transfer (with provision for a conduction component) by means of a standard specimen. The thermal conductivity coefficients of uranium chromite and niobate were measured in the 1300-1700 K temperature range. The results are presented in a diagram form. It has been calculated, that the thermal conductivity coefficient for uranium niobate specimens is greater in comparison with uranium chromite specimens. The thermal conductivity coefficients of the materials mentioned depend on temperature very slightly. Thermal conductivity of the materials considerably depends on their porosity. The specimens under investigation were fabricated by the pressing method and had the following porosity: uranium chromite - 30 %, uranium niobate - 10 %. Calculation results show, that thermal conductivity of dense uranium chromite is higher than thermal conductivity of dense uranium niobate. The experimental error equals approximately 20 %, that is mainly due to the error of measuring the temperature equal to +-25 deg, with a micropyrometer

  10. Debye temperatures of uranium chalcogenides from their lattice ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Phonon dispersion relations in uranium chalcogenides have been investigated using a modified three-body force shell model. From the phonon frequencies, their Debye temperatures are evaluated. Further, on the basis of the spin fluctuation in the heavy fermion uranium compounds, UPt3 and UBe13, the possible ...

  11. Measurement of surface temperature profiles on liquid uranium metal during electron beam evaporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohba, Hironori; Shibata, Takemasa [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-11-01

    Surface temperature distributions of liquid uranium in a water-cooled copper crucible during electron beam evaporation were measured. Evaporation surface was imaged by a lens through a band-path filter (650{+-}5 nm) and a double mirror system on a charge coupled device (CCD) camera. The video signals of the recorded image were connected to an image processor and converted to two-dimensional spectral radiance profiles. The surface temperatures were obtained from the spectral radiation intensity ratio of the evaporation surface and a freezing point of uranium and/or a reference light source using Planck`s law of radiation. The maximum temperature exceeded 3000 K and had saturation tendency with increasing electron beam input. The measured surface temperatures agreed with those estimated from deposition rates and data of saturated vapor pressure of uranium. (author)

  12. Distribution of temperature and deformations during resistance butt welding of uranium rods with titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatarinov, V.R.; Krasnorutskij, V.S.

    1977-01-01

    Results are described on studying time-temperature and deformation parameters for resistance welding of uranium rods with titanium. It is shown that in the first period of welding (approximately 2/3 tsub(wel.)) the maxima of weld temperature and weld deformation deviate to titanium, and in the final period uranium deformation reaches the level of maximum lateral deformation of titanium. For faying surfaces with minimum weld deformation the joint cleaning of contaminants and oxides is insufficient, which results in lower weld quality

  13. Debye temperatures of uranium chalcogenides from their lattice ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    From the phonon frequencies, their Debye temperatures are evaluated. Further, ... Keywords. Uranium chalcogenides; p-wave electronic superconductor; phonon frequency; Debye tempera- ture; spin ... to the ionic crystals of similar structure.

  14. Mid-depth temperature maximum in an estuarine lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanenko, V. M.; Repina, I. A.; Artamonov, A. Yu; Gorin, S. L.; Lykossov, V. N.; Kulyamin, D. V.

    2018-03-01

    The mid-depth temperature maximum (TeM) was measured in an estuarine Bol’shoi Vilyui Lake (Kamchatka peninsula, Russia) in summer 2015. We applied 1D k-ɛ model LAKE to the case, and found it successfully simulating the phenomenon. We argue that the main prerequisite for mid-depth TeM development is a salinity increase below the freshwater mixed layer, sharp enough in order to increase the temperature with depth not to cause convective mixing and double diffusion there. Given that this condition is satisfied, the TeM magnitude is controlled by physical factors which we identified as: radiation absorption below the mixed layer, mixed-layer temperature dynamics, vertical heat conduction and water-sediments heat exchange. In addition to these, we formulate the mechanism of temperature maximum ‘pumping’, resulting from the phase shift between diurnal cycles of mixed-layer depth and temperature maximum magnitude. Based on the LAKE model results we quantify the contribution of the above listed mechanisms and find their individual significance highly sensitive to water turbidity. Relying on physical mechanisms identified we define environmental conditions favouring the summertime TeM development in salinity-stratified lakes as: small-mixed layer depth (roughly, ~wind and cloudless weather. We exemplify the effect of mixed-layer depth on TeM by a set of selected lakes.

  15. High temperature behavior of metallic inclusions in uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, R.L.

    1980-08-01

    The object of this thesis was to construct a temperature gradient furnace to simulate the thermal conditions in the reactor fuel and to study the migration of metallic inclusions in uranium oxide under the influence of temperature gradient. No thermal migration of molybdenum and tungsten inclusions was observed under the experimental conditions. Ruthenium inclusions, however, dissolved and diffused atomically through grain boundaries in slightly reduced uranium oxide. An intermetallic compound (probably URu 3 ) was formed by reaction of Ru and UO/sub 2-x/. The diffusivity and solubility of ruthenium in uranium oxide were measured

  16. Low temperature sintering of hyperstoichiometric uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevrel, H.

    1991-12-01

    In the lattice of uranium dioxide with hyperstoichiometric oxygen content (UO 2+x ), each additional oxygen atoms is introduced by shifting two anions from normal sites to interstitial ones, thereby creating two oxygen vacancies. The point defects then combine to form complex defects comprising several interstitials and vacancies. The group of anions (3x) in the interstitial position participate in equilibria promoting the creation of uranium vacancies thereby considerably increasing uranium self-diffusion. However, uranium grain boundaries diffusion governs densification during the first two stages of sintering of uranium dioxide with hyperstoichiometric oxygen content, i.e., up to 93% of the theoretical density. Surface diffusion and evaporation-condensation, which are considerably accentuated by the hyperstoichiometric deviation, play an active role during sintering by promoting crystalline growth during the second and third stages of sintering. U 8 O 8 can be added to adjust the stoichiometry and to form a finely porous structure and thus increase the pore area subjected to surface phenomena. The composition with an O/U ratio equal to 2.25 is found to densify the best, despite a linear growth in sintering activation energy with hyperstoichiometric oxygen content, increasing from 300 kj.mol -1 for UO 2.10 to 440 kJ.mol -1 for UO 2.25 . Seeds can be introduced to obtain original microstructures, for example the presence of large grains in small-grain matrix

  17. Device for determining the maximum temperature of an environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cartier, Louis.

    1976-01-01

    This invention concerns a device for determining the maximum temperature of an environment. Its main characteristic is a central cylindrical rod on which can slide two identical tubes, the facing ends of which are placed end to end and the far ends are shaped to provide a sliding friction along the rod. The rod and tubes are fabricated in materials of which the linear expansion factors are different in value. The far ends are composed of tongs of which the fingers, fitted with claws, bear on the central rod. Because of this arrangement of the device the two tubes, placed end to end on being fitted, can expand under the effect of a rise in the temperature of the environment into which the device is introduced, with the result that there occurs an increase in the distance between the two far ends. This distance is maximal when the device is raised to its highest temperature. The far ends are shaped to allow the tubes to slide under the effect of expansion but to prevent sliding in the opposite direction when the device is taken back into the open air and the temperature drops to within ambient temperature. It follows that the tubes tend to return to their initial length and the ends that were placed end to end when fitted now have a gap between them. The measurement of this gap makes it possible to know the maximal temperature sought [fr

  18. Release of gases from uranium metal at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayi, Y.S.; Ramanjaneyulu, P.S.; Yadav, C.S.; Shankaran, P.S.; Chhapru, G.C.; Ramakumar, K.L.; Venugopal, V.

    2008-01-01

    Depending on the ambient environmental conditions, different gaseous species could get entrapped in uranium metal ingots or pellets. On heating, melting or vapourising uranium metal, these get released and depending on the composition, may cause detrimental effects either within the metal matrix itself or on the surrounding materials/environment. For instance, these gases may affect the performance of the uranium metal, which is used as fuel in the heavy water moderated research reactors, CIRUS and DHRUVA. Hence, detailed investigations have been carried out on the release of gases over a temperature range 875-1500 K employing hot vacuum extraction technique, in specimen uranium pellets made from uranium rods/ingots. Employing an on-line quadrupole mass spectrometer, the analysis of released gases was carried out. The isobaric interference between carbon monoxide and nitrogen at m/e = 28 in the mass spectrometric analysis has been resolved by considering their fragmentation patterns. Since no standards are available to evaluate the results, only the reproducibility is tested. The precision (relative standard deviation at 3σ level) of the method is ±5%. The minimum detectable gas content employing the method is 5.00 x 10 -09 m 3 . About 4 x 10 -04 m 3 /kg of gas is released from uranium pellets, with hydrogen as the main constituent. The gas content increases with storage in air

  19. Future changes over the Himalayas: Maximum and minimum temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimri, A. P.; Kumar, D.; Choudhary, A.; Maharana, P.

    2018-03-01

    An assessment of the projection of minimum and maximum air temperature over the Indian Himalayan region (IHR) from the COordinated Regional Climate Downscaling EXperiment- South Asia (hereafter, CORDEX-SA) regional climate model (RCM) experiments have been carried out under two different Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios. The major aim of this study is to assess the probable future changes in the minimum and maximum climatology and its long-term trend under different RCPs along with the elevation dependent warming over the IHR. A number of statistical analysis such as changes in mean climatology, long-term spatial trend and probability distribution function are carried out to detect the signals of changes in climate. The study also tries to quantify the uncertainties associated with different model experiments and their ensemble in space, time and for different seasons. The model experiments and their ensemble show prominent cold bias over Himalayas for present climate. However, statistically significant higher warming rate (0.23-0.52 °C/decade) for both minimum and maximum air temperature (Tmin and Tmax) is observed for all the seasons under both RCPs. The rate of warming intensifies with the increase in the radiative forcing under a range of greenhouse gas scenarios starting from RCP4.5 to RCP8.5. In addition to this, a wide range of spatial variability and disagreements in the magnitude of trend between different models describes the uncertainty associated with the model projections and scenarios. The projected rate of increase of Tmin may destabilize the snow formation at the higher altitudes in the northern and western parts of Himalayan region, while rising trend of Tmax over southern flank may effectively melt more snow cover. Such combined effect of rising trend of Tmin and Tmax may pose a potential threat to the glacial deposits. The overall trend of Diurnal temperature range (DTR) portrays increasing trend across entire area with

  20. Maximum surface level and temperature histories for Hanford waste tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flanagan, B.D.; Ha, N.D.; Huisingh, J.S.

    1994-01-01

    Radioactive defense waste resulting from the chemical processing of spent nuclear fuel has been accumulating at the Hanford Site since 1944. This waste is stored in underground waste-storage tanks. The Hanford Site Tank Farm Facilities Interim Safety Basis (ISB) provides a ready reference to the safety envelope for applicable tank farm facilities and installations. During preparation of the ISB, tank structural integrity concerns were identified as a key element in defining the safety envelope. These concerns, along with several deficiencies in the technical bases associated with the structural integrity issues and the corresponding operational limits/controls specified for conduct of normal tank farm operations are documented in the ISB. Consequently, a plan was initiated to upgrade the safety envelope technical bases by conducting Accelerated Safety Analyses-Phase 1 (ASA-Phase 1) sensitivity studies and additional structural evaluations. The purpose of this report is to facilitate the ASA-Phase 1 studies and future analyses of the single-shell tanks (SSTs) and double-shell tanks (DSTs) by compiling a quantitative summary of some of the past operating conditions the tanks have experienced during their existence. This report documents the available summaries of recorded maximum surface levels and maximum waste temperatures and references other sources for more specific data

  1. Impact of soil moisture on extreme maximum temperatures in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirien Whan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Land-atmosphere interactions play an important role for hot temperature extremes in Europe. Dry soils may amplify such extremes through feedbacks with evapotranspiration. While previous observational studies generally focused on the relationship between precipitation deficits and the number of hot days, we investigate here the influence of soil moisture (SM on summer monthly maximum temperatures (TXx using water balance model-based SM estimates (driven with observations and temperature observations. Generalized extreme value distributions are fitted to TXx using SM as a covariate. We identify a negative relationship between SM and TXx, whereby a 100 mm decrease in model-based SM is associated with a 1.6 °C increase in TXx in Southern-Central and Southeastern Europe. Dry SM conditions result in a 2–4 °C increase in the 20-year return value of TXx compared to wet conditions in these two regions. In contrast with SM impacts on the number of hot days (NHD, where low and high surface-moisture conditions lead to different variability, we find a mostly linear dependency of the 20-year return value on surface-moisture conditions. We attribute this difference to the non-linear relationship between TXx and NHD that stems from the threshold-based calculation of NHD. Furthermore the employed SM data and the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI are only weakly correlated in the investigated regions, highlighting the importance of evapotranspiration and runoff for resulting SM. Finally, in a case study for the hot 2003 summer we illustrate that if 2003 spring conditions in Southern-Central Europe had been as dry as in the more recent 2011 event, temperature extremes in summer would have been higher by about 1 °C, further enhancing the already extreme conditions which prevailed in that year.

  2. New results on the mid-latitude midnight temperature maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, Rafael L. A.; Meriwether, John W.; Makela, Jonathan J.; Fisher, Daniel J.; Harding, Brian J.; Sanders, Samuel C.; Tesema, Fasil; Ridley, Aaron J.

    2018-04-01

    Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) measurements of thermospheric temperatures and winds show the detection and successful determination of the latitudinal distribution of the midnight temperature maximum (MTM) in the continental mid-eastern United States. These results were obtained through the operation of the five FPI observatories in the North American Thermosphere Ionosphere Observing Network (NATION) located at the Pisgah Astronomic Research Institute (PAR) (35.2° N, 82.8° W), Virginia Tech (VTI) (37.2° N, 80.4° W), Eastern Kentucky University (EKU) (37.8° N, 84.3° W), Urbana-Champaign (UAO) (40.2° N, 88.2° W), and Ann Arbor (ANN) (42.3° N, 83.8° W). A new approach for analyzing the MTM phenomenon is developed, which features the combination of a method of harmonic thermal background removal followed by a 2-D inversion algorithm to generate sequential 2-D temperature residual maps at 30 min intervals. The simultaneous study of the temperature data from these FPI stations represents a novel analysis of the MTM and its large-scale latitudinal and longitudinal structure. The major finding in examining these maps is the frequent detection of a secondary MTM peak occurring during the early evening hours, nearly 4.5 h prior to the timing of the primary MTM peak that generally appears after midnight. The analysis of these observations shows a strong night-to-night variability for this double-peaked MTM structure. A statistical study of the behavior of the MTM events was carried out to determine the extent of this variability with regard to the seasonal and latitudinal dependence. The results show the presence of the MTM peak(s) in 106 out of the 472 determinable nights (when the MTM presence, or lack thereof, can be determined with certainty in the data set) selected for analysis (22 %) out of the total of 846 nights available. The MTM feature is seen to appear slightly more often during the summer (27 %), followed by fall (22 %), winter (20 %), and spring

  3. Emission characteristics of uranium hexafluoride at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krascella, N.L.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to ascertain the spectral characteristics of uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) and possible UF 6 thermal decomposition products as a function of temperature and pressure. Relative emission measurements were made for UF 6 /Argon mixtures heated in a plasma torch over a range of temperatures from 800 to about 3600 0 K over a wavelength range from 80 to 600 nm. Total pressures were varied from 1 to approximately 1.7 atm. Similarly absorption measurements were carried out in the visible region from 420 to 580 nm over a temperature range from about 1000 to 1800 0 K. Total pressure for these measurements was 1.0 atm

  4. Operational forecasting of daily temperatures in the Valencia Region. Part I: maximum temperatures in summer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, I.; Estrela, M.

    2009-09-01

    Extreme temperature events have a great impact on human society. Knowledge of summer maximum temperatures is very useful for both the general public and organisations whose workers have to operate in the open, e.g. railways, roadways, tourism, etc. Moreover, summer maximum daily temperatures are considered a parameter of interest and concern since persistent heat-waves can affect areas as diverse as public health, energy consumption, etc. Thus, an accurate forecasting of these temperatures could help to predict heat-wave conditions and permit the implementation of strategies aimed at minimizing the negative effects that high temperatures have on human health. The aim of this work is to evaluate the skill of the RAMS model in determining daily maximum temperatures during summer over the Valencia Region. For this, we have used the real-time configuration of this model currently running at the CEAM Foundation. To carry out the model verification process, we have analysed not only the global behaviour of the model for the whole Valencia Region, but also its behaviour for the individual stations distributed within this area. The study has been performed for the summer forecast period of 1 June - 30 September, 2007. The results obtained are encouraging and indicate a good agreement between the observed and simulated maximum temperatures. Moreover, the model captures quite well the temperatures in the extreme heat episodes. Acknowledgement. This work was supported by "GRACCIE" (CSD2007-00067, Programa Consolider-Ingenio 2010), by the Spanish Ministerio de Educación y Ciencia, contract number CGL2005-03386/CLI, and by the Regional Government of Valencia Conselleria de Sanitat, contract "Simulación de las olas de calor e invasiones de frío y su regionalización en la Comunidad Valenciana" ("Heat wave and cold invasion simulation and their regionalization at Valencia Region"). The CEAM Foundation is supported by the Generalitat Valenciana and BANCAIXA (Valencia, Spain).

  5. Comparative study of the oxidation of various qualities of uranium in carbon dioxide at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desrues, R.; Paidassi, J.

    1965-01-01

    Uranium samples of six different qualities were subjected, in the temperature range 400 - 1000 C, to the action of carbon dioxide carefully purified to eliminate oxygen and water vapour; the resulting oxidation was followed micro-graphically and also (but only in the range 400 - 700 C) gravimetrically using an Ugine-Eyraud microbalance. A comparison of the results leads to the following 3 observations. First, the oxidation of the six uraniums studied obeys a linear law, (followed at 700 C by an accelerating law). The rates of reaction differ by a maximum of 100 per cent, the higher purity grades being oxidized more slowly except at 700 C when the reverse is true. Secondly, simultaneously with the growth, of an approximately uniform film of uranium dioxide on the metal, there occurs a localized attack in the form of blisters in the immediate neighbourhood of the monocarbide inclusions in the uranium. The relative importance of this attack is greater for lower oxidation temperatures and for a larger size, number and inequality of distribution of the inclusions, that is to say for higher carbon concentrations in the uranium (which have values from 7 to 1000 ppm in our tests). Thirdly, for oxidation temperatures above 600 C blistering is much less pronounced, but at 700 C the beginning of a general deformation of the sample occurs, which, above 750 C, becomes much greater; this leads to an acceleration of the reaction rate with respect to the linear law. In view of the over-heating, the sample must already be in the γ-phase which is particularly easily deformed; furthermore this expansion phenomenon is more pronounced when the sample is more plastic and therefore purer. (authors) [fr

  6. Stability with temperature of mixed uranium plutonium monocarbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riglet-Martial, Ch.; Dumas, J.C.; Piron, J.P.; Gueneau, Ch.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Among the different advanced fuel materials of concern for Generation IV systems, the mixed carbide of uranium and plutonium fuel is considered as one of the key materials for Gas Fast Reactors (GFR) systems. For purposes of optimising its fabrication process as well as its performances in various operating conditions, the losses of gaseous plutonium specially at elevated temperatures have to be controlled and minimized. The paper is therefore concerned with a parametric analysis of the stability with temperature of mixed carbides of uranium and plutonium. Previous published experimental studies have shown that mixed (U ,Pu) carbides undergo a highly incongruent sublimation at high temperatures: the vapour phase in equilibrium with the solid is mainly composed of gaseous plutonium (P Pu /P total > 99 % ) while the contribution of gaseous U and C remains very low. The composition of the system U 1-z Pu z C 1+x ' (z =Pu/(U+Pu) and x C/(U+Pu)), the temperature (T) and the expansion volume (V) of the gas are the main parameters in the loss of gaseous Pu. The calculations are carried out using the SAGE (Solgasmix Advanced Gibbs Energy) software, by assuming ideal solid solutions between UC and PuC, as well as between U 2 C 3 and Pu 2 C 3 . The validity of the model is previously tested using published equilibrium vapour pressure data. This work gives rise to a large description of the variations of Pu losses from mixed uranium plutonium carbides and leads to some basic recommendations in connection with the use of this advanced fuel materials

  7. Investigation on maximum transition temperature of phonon mediated superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fusui, L; Yi, S; Yinlong, S [Physics Department, Beijing University (CN)

    1989-05-01

    Three model effective phonon spectra are proposed to get plots of {ital T}{sub {ital c}}-{omega} adn {lambda}-{omega}. It can be concluded that there is no maximum limit of {ital T}{sub {ital c}} in phonon mediated superconductivity for reasonable values of {lambda}. The importance of high frequency LO phonon is also emphasized. Some discussions on high {ital T}{sub {ital c}} are given.

  8. AC measurements on uranium doped high temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisterer, M.

    1999-11-01

    The subject of this thesis is the influence of fission tracks on the superconducting properties of melt textured Y-123. The critical current densities, the irreversibility lines and the transition temperature were determined by means of ac measurements. The corresponding ac techniques are explored in detail. Deviations of the ac signal from the expectations according to the Bean model were explained by the dependence of the shielding currents on the electric field. This explanation is supported by the influence of the ac amplitude and frequency on the critical current density but also by a comparison of the obtained data with other experimental techniques. Y-123 has to be doped with uranium in order to induce fission tracks. Uranium forms normal conducting clusters, which are nearly spherical, with a diameter of about 300 nm. Fission of uranium-235 by thermal neutrons creates two high energy ions with a total energy of about 160 MeV. Each of these fission products induces a linear defect with a diameter of about 10 nm. The length of one fission track is 2-4 μm. At 77 K the critical current density is enhanced by the pinning action of the uranium clusters, compared to undoped samples. With decreasing temperature this influence becomes negligible. The critical current densities are strongly enhanced due to the irradiation. At low magnetic fields we find extremely high values for melt textured materials, e.g. 2.5x10 9 Am -2 at 77 K and 0.25 T or 6x10 10 Am -2 at 5 K. Since the critical current was found to be inverse proportional to the square root of the applied magnetic field it decreases rapidly as the field increases. This behavior is predicted by simple theoretical considerations, but is only valid at low temperatures as well as in low magnetic fields at high temperatures. At high fields the critical current drops more rapidly. The irreversibility lines are only slightly changed by this irradiation technique. Only a small shift to higher fields and temperatures

  9. Coarsening-densification transition temperature in sintering of uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balakrishna, Palanki; Narasimha Murty, B.; Chakraborthy, K.P.; Jayaraj, R.N.; Ganguly, C.

    2001-01-01

    The concept of coarsening-densification transition temperature (CDTT) has been proposed to explain the experimental observations of the study of sintering undoped uranium dioxide and niobia-doped uranium dioxide powder compacts in argon atmosphere in a laboratory tubular furnace. The general method for deducing CDTT for a given material under the prevailing conditions of sintering and the likely variables that influence the CDTT are described. Though the present work is specific in nature for uranium dioxide sintering in argon atmosphere, the concept of CDTT is fairly general and must be applicable to sintering of any material and has immense potential to offer advantages in designing and/or optimizing the profile of a sintering furnace, in the diagnosis of the fault in the process conditions of sintering, and so on. The problems of viewing the effect of heating rate only in terms of densification are brought out in the light of observing the undesirable phenomena of coring and bloating and causes were identified and remedial measures suggested

  10. Maximum weight of greenhouse effect to global temperature variation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Xian; Jiang, Chuangye

    2007-01-01

    Full text: The global average temperature has risen by 0.74 0 C since the late 19th century. Many studies have concluded that the observed warming in the last 50 years may be attributed to increasing concentrations of anthropogenic greenhouse gases. But some scientists have a different point of view. Global climate change is affected not only by anthropogenic activities, but also constraints in climate system natural factors. How much is the influencing weight of C02's greenhouse effects to the global temperature variation? Does global climate continue warming or decreasing in the next 20 years? They are two hot spots in global climate change. The multi-timescales analysis method - Empirical mode decomposition (EMD) is used to diagnose global annual mean air temperature dataset for land surface provided by IPCC and atmospheric content of C02 provided by the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) during 1881-2002. The results show that: Global temperature variation contains quasi-periodic oscillations on four timescales (3 yr, 6 yr, 20 yr and 60 yr, respectively) and a century-scale warming trend. The variance contribution of IMF1-IMF4 and trend is 17.55%, 11.34%, 6.77%, 24.15% and 40.19%, respectively. The trend and quasi-60 yr oscillation of temperature variation are the most prominent; C02's greenhouse effect on global temperature variation is mainly century-scale trend. The contribution of C02 concentration to global temperature variability is not more than 40.19%, whereas 59.81% contribution to global temperature variation is non-greenhouse effect. Therefore, it is necessary to re-study the dominant factors that induce the global climate change; It has been noticed that on the periods of 20 yr and 60 yr oscillation, the global temperature is beginning to decreased in the next 20 years. If the present C02 concentration is maintained, the greenhouse effect will be too small to countercheck the natural variation in global climate cooling in the next 20

  11. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamdoun, N.A.

    2007-01-01

    The article includes a historical preface about uranium, discovery of portability of sequential fission of uranium, uranium existence, basic raw materials, secondary raw materials, uranium's physical and chemical properties, uranium extraction, nuclear fuel cycle, logistics and estimation of the amount of uranium reserves, producing countries of concentrated uranium oxides and percentage of the world's total production, civilian and military uses of uranium. The use of depleted uranium in the Gulf War, the Balkans and Iraq has caused political and environmental effects which are complex, raising problems and questions about the effects that nuclear compounds left on human health and environment.

  12. Melting temperature of uranium - plutonium mixed oxide fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishii, Tetsuya; Hirosawa, Takashi [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    1997-08-01

    Fuel melting temperature is one of the major thermodynamical properties that is used for determining the design criteria on fuel temperature during irradiation in FBR. In general, it is necessary to evaluate the correlation of fuel melting temperature to confirm that the fuel temperature must be kept below the fuel melting temperature during irradiation at any conditions. The correlations of the melting temperature of uranium-plutonium mixed oxide (MOX) fuel, typical FBR fuel, used to be estimated and formulized based on the measured values reported in 1960`s and has been applied to the design. At present, some experiments have been accumulated with improved experimental techniques. And it reveals that the recent measured melting temperatures does not agree well to the data reported in 1960`s and that some of the 1960`s data should be modified by taking into account of the recent measurements. In this study, the experience of melting temperature up to now are summarized and evaluated in order to make the fuel pin design more reliable. The effect of plutonium content, oxygen to metal ratio and burnup on MOX fuel melting was examined based on the recent data under the UO{sub 2} - PuO{sub 2} - PuO{sub 1.61} ideal solution model, and then formulized. (J.P.N.)

  13. Melting temperature of uranium - plutonium mixed oxide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Tetsuya; Hirosawa, Takashi

    1997-08-01

    Fuel melting temperature is one of the major thermodynamical properties that is used for determining the design criteria on fuel temperature during irradiation in FBR. In general, it is necessary to evaluate the correlation of fuel melting temperature to confirm that the fuel temperature must be kept below the fuel melting temperature during irradiation at any conditions. The correlations of the melting temperature of uranium-plutonium mixed oxide (MOX) fuel, typical FBR fuel, used to be estimated and formulized based on the measured values reported in 1960's and has been applied to the design. At present, some experiments have been accumulated with improved experimental techniques. And it reveals that the recent measured melting temperatures does not agree well to the data reported in 1960's and that some of the 1960's data should be modified by taking into account of the recent measurements. In this study, the experience of melting temperature up to now are summarized and evaluated in order to make the fuel pin design more reliable. The effect of plutonium content, oxygen to metal ratio and burnup on MOX fuel melting was examined based on the recent data under the UO 2 - PuO 2 - PuO 1.61 ideal solution model, and then formulized. (J.P.N.)

  14. Anomalous thermal property behaviour of uranium at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandenaw, T.A.

    1975-01-01

    Low temperature heat capacity curves are presented for polycrystalline 235 U and 238 U metals in different microstructural states and of different purities. Thermal conductivity versus temperature curves are shown for low-purity, polycrystalline 238 U in the temperature range between approximately 80 and 373 0 K for metal having undergone varied fabrication procedures. Published information suggests that there will be no structural modification in very pure uranium below room temperature. The influence of impurities on low temperature transitions may be through their effects on dislocation formation. Thermal conductivity and heat capacity runs started at approximately 80 0 K, after holding specimens at the temperature of boiling liquid nitrogen, do not give results which match up with runs started below 36 to 43 0 K. Result of measurements started at approximately 80 0 K indicate that an ordering mechanism is predominating, with microstructure rather than purity being the important factor. This can be explained if ordering at approximately 80 0 K is through lattice imperfections remaining from prior specimen processing. The drop off in heat capacity appearing above 36 0 K in the C/sub p/ versus T curves of 235 U and 238 U suggest the possibility of: (1) heat evolution from a developing antiphase structure or (2) heat evolution similar to that noted with a quenched martensite. Physical property changes in 238 U at 250 to 270 0 K and at 325 to 350 0 K seem to be related to the heat evolution which starts at 36 0 K during adiabatic heat capacity measurements. The data from heat capacity and thermal conductivity measurements are analyzed to help explain the significance of the sometimes very slight physical property changes observed at 36 to 43, approximately 80, 250 to 270 and 325 to 350 0 K in uranium metal. (U.S.)

  15. Decadal trends in Red Sea maximum surface temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaidez, V; Dreano, D; Agusti, S; Duarte, C M; Hoteit, I

    2017-08-15

    Ocean warming is a major consequence of climate change, with the surface of the ocean having warmed by 0.11 °C decade -1 over the last 50 years and is estimated to continue to warm by an additional 0.6 - 2.0 °C before the end of the century 1 . However, there is considerable variability in the rates experienced by different ocean regions, so understanding regional trends is important to inform on possible stresses for marine organisms, particularly in warm seas where organisms may be already operating in the high end of their thermal tolerance. Although the Red Sea is one of the warmest ecosystems on earth, its historical warming trends and thermal evolution remain largely understudied. We characterized the Red Sea's thermal regimes at the basin scale, with a focus on the spatial distribution and changes over time of sea surface temperature maxima, using remotely sensed sea surface temperature data from 1982 - 2015. The overall rate of warming for the Red Sea is 0.17 ± 0.07 °C decade -1 , while the northern Red Sea is warming between 0.40 and 0.45 °C decade -1 , all exceeding the global rate. Our findings show that the Red Sea is fast warming, which may in the future challenge its organisms and communities.

  16. Decadal trends in Red Sea maximum surface temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Chaidez, Veronica

    2017-08-09

    Ocean warming is a major consequence of climate change, with the surface of the ocean having warmed by 0.11 °C decade-1 over the last 50 years and is estimated to continue to warm by an additional 0.6 - 2.0 °C before the end of the century1. However, there is considerable variability in the rates experienced by different ocean regions, so understanding regional trends is important to inform on possible stresses for marine organisms, particularly in warm seas where organisms may be already operating in the high end of their thermal tolerance. Although the Red Sea is one of the warmest ecosystems on earth, its historical warming trends and thermal evolution remain largely understudied. We characterized the Red Sea\\'s thermal regimes at the basin scale, with a focus on the spatial distribution and changes over time of sea surface temperature maxima, using remotely sensed sea surface temperature data from 1982 - 2015. The overall rate of warming for the Red Sea is 0.17 ± 0.07 °C decade-1, while the northern Red Sea is warming between 0.40 and 0.45 °C decade-1, all exceeding the global rate. Our findings show that the Red Sea is fast warming, which may in the future challenge its organisms and communities.

  17. Decadal trends in Red Sea maximum surface temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Chaidez, Veronica; Dreano, Denis; Agusti, Susana; Duarte, Carlos M.; Hoteit, Ibrahim

    2017-01-01

    Ocean warming is a major consequence of climate change, with the surface of the ocean having warmed by 0.11 °C decade-1 over the last 50 years and is estimated to continue to warm by an additional 0.6 - 2.0 °C before the end of the century1. However, there is considerable variability in the rates experienced by different ocean regions, so understanding regional trends is important to inform on possible stresses for marine organisms, particularly in warm seas where organisms may be already operating in the high end of their thermal tolerance. Although the Red Sea is one of the warmest ecosystems on earth, its historical warming trends and thermal evolution remain largely understudied. We characterized the Red Sea's thermal regimes at the basin scale, with a focus on the spatial distribution and changes over time of sea surface temperature maxima, using remotely sensed sea surface temperature data from 1982 - 2015. The overall rate of warming for the Red Sea is 0.17 ± 0.07 °C decade-1, while the northern Red Sea is warming between 0.40 and 0.45 °C decade-1, all exceeding the global rate. Our findings show that the Red Sea is fast warming, which may in the future challenge its organisms and communities.

  18. A comparison between thorium-uranium and low enrichment uranium cycles in the high temperature reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerles, J M

    1973-03-15

    In a previous report, it was shown that the Uranium cycle could be used as well with multi-hole block (GGA type) as with tubular elements. Now, in a F.S.V. geometry, a comparison is made between Thorium cycle and Uranium cycle. This comparison will be concerned with the physical properties of the materials, the needs of natural Uranium, the fissile material inventory and, at last, an attempt of economical considerations. In this report the cycle will be characterizd by the fertile material. So, we write ''Thorium cycle'' for Highly Enriched Uranium - Thorium cycle and ''Uranium cycle'' for low Enrichment Uranium cycle.

  19. Detection of uranium extraction zone by axial temperature profiles in a pulsed column for Purex process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukada, T.; Takahashi, K.

    1991-01-01

    A new method was presented for detecting uranium extraction zone in a pulsed column by means of measuring axial temperature profile originated from reaction heat during uranium extraction. Key parameters of the temperature profiles were estimated with a code developed for calculating temperature profiles in a direct-contact heat exchanger such as a pulsed column, and were verified using data from a small pulsed column simulating reaction heat with injecting hot water. Finally, the results were compared with those from an actual uranium extraction tests, indicating that the method presented was promising for detecting uranium extraction zone in a pulsed column. (author)

  20. Temperature Dependence of Uranium and Vanadium Adsorption on Amidoxime-Based Adsorbents in Natural Seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuo, Li-Jung [Marine Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Sequim WA 98382 USA; Gill, Gary A. [Marine Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Sequim WA 98382 USA; Tsouris, Costas [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831 USA; Rao, Linfeng [Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley CA 94720 USA; Pan, Horng-Bin [Department of Chemistry, University of Idaho, Moscow ID 83844 USA; Wai, Chien M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Idaho, Moscow ID 83844 USA; Janke, Christopher J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831 USA; Strivens, Jonathan E. [Marine Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Sequim WA 98382 USA; Wood, Jordana R. [Marine Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Sequim WA 98382 USA; Schlafer, Nicholas [Marine Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Sequim WA 98382 USA; D' Alessandro, Evan K. [Rosensteil School of Marine and Atmospheric Chemistry, University of Miami, Miami FL 33149 USA

    2018-01-16

    The apparent enthalpy and entropy of the complexation of uranium (VI) and vanadium (V) with amidoxime ligands grafted onto polyethylene fiber was determined using time series measurements of adsorption capacities in natural seawater at three different temperatures. The complexation of uranium was highly endothermic, while the complexation of vanadium showed minimal temperature sensitivity. Amidoxime-based polymeric adsorbents exhibit significantly increased uranium adsorption capacities and selectivity in warmer waters.

  1. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuney, M.; Pagel, M.; Leroy, J.

    1992-01-01

    First, this book presents the physico-chemical properties of Uranium and the consequences which can be deduced from the study of numerous geological process. The authors describe natural distribution of Uranium at different scales and on different supports, and main Uranium minerals. A great place in the book is assigned to description and classification of uranium deposits. The book gives also notions on prospection and exploitation of uranium deposits. Historical aspects of Uranium economical development (Uranium resources, production, supply and demand, operating costs) are given in the last chapter. 7 refs., 17 figs

  2. Simultaneous determination of nitric acid and uranium concentrations in aqueous solution from measurements of electrical conductivity, density, and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, B.B.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear fuel reprocessing plants handle aqueous solutions of nitric acid and uranium in large quantities. Automatic control of process operations requires reliable measurements of these solutes concentration, but this is difficult to directly measure. Physical properties such as solution density and electrical conductivity vary with solute concentration and temperature. Conductivity, density and temperature can be measured accurately with relatively simple and inexpensive devices. These properties can be used to determine solute concentrations will good correlations. This paper provides the appropriate correlations for solutions containing 2 to 6 Molar (M) nitric acid and 0 to 300 g/L uranium metal at temperatures from 25--90 degrees C. The equations are most accurate below 5 M nitric acid, due to a broad maximum in the conductivity curve at 6 M. 12 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs

  3. In situ spectroscopy and spectroelectrochemistry of uranium in high-temperature alkali chloride molten salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polovov, Ilya B; Volkovich, Vladimir A; Charnock, John M; Kralj, Brett; Lewin, Robert G; Kinoshita, Hajime; May, Iain; Sharrad, Clint A

    2008-09-01

    Soluble uranium chloride species, in the oxidation states of III+, IV+, V+, and VI+, have been chemically generated in high-temperature alkali chloride melts. These reactions were monitored by in situ electronic absorption spectroscopy. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy of uranium(VI) in a molten LiCl-KCl eutectic was used to determine the immediate coordination environment about the uranium. The dominant species in the melt was [UO 2Cl 4] (2-). Further analysis of the extended X-ray absorption fine structure data and Raman spectroscopy of the melts quenched back to room temperature indicated the possibility of ordering beyond the first coordination sphere of [UO 2Cl 4] (2-). The electrolytic generation of uranium(III) in a molten LiCl-KCl eutectic was also investigated. Anodic dissolution of uranium metal was found to be more efficient at producing uranium(III) in high-temperature melts than the cathodic reduction of uranium(IV). These high-temperature electrolytic processes were studied by in situ electronic absorption spectroelectrochemistry, and we have also developed in situ X-ray absorption spectroelectrochemistry techniques to probe both the uranium oxidation state and the uranium coordination environment in these melts.

  4. BfR recommends the establishment of a European maximum level for uranium in drinking and mineral water

    OpenAIRE

    German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment

    2007-01-01

    Uranium is a widespread, radioactive heavy metal on earth. It is to be found in varying concentrations and states in various rocks and minerals as well as in water, soil and air. Uranium may also reach the environment anthropogenically for instance in mineral phosphate fertilisers. Because of its widespread presence traces of uranium can also be detected in foods like drinking and mineral water. Uranium is not essential for humans. The ongoing intake of higher uranium concentration...

  5. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    The article briefly discusses the Australian government policy and the attitude of political party factions towards the mining and exporting of the uranium resources in Australia. Australia has a third of the Western World's low-cost uranium resources

  6. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poty, B.; Cuney, M.; Bruneton, P.; Virlogeux, D.; Capus, G.

    2010-01-01

    With the worldwide revival of nuclear energy comes the question of uranium reserves. For more than 20 years, nuclear energy has been neglected and uranium prospecting has been practically abandoned. Therefore, present day production covers only 70% of needs and stocks are decreasing. Production is to double by 2030 which represents a huge industrial challenge. The FBR-type reactors technology, which allows to consume the whole uranium content of the fuel, is developing in several countries and will ensure the long-term development of nuclear fission. However, the implementation of these reactors (the generation 4) will be progressive during the second half of the 21. century. For this reason an active search for uranium ores will be necessary during the whole 21. century to ensure the fueling of light water reactors which are huge uranium consumers. This dossier covers all the aspects of natural uranium production: mineralogy, geochemistry, types of deposits, world distribution of deposits with a particular attention given to French deposits, the exploitation of which is abandoned today. Finally, exploitation, ore processing and the economical aspects are presented. Contents: 1 - the uranium element and its minerals: from uranium discovery to its industrial utilization, the main uranium minerals (minerals with tetravalent uranium, minerals with hexavalent uranium); 2 - uranium in the Earth's crust and its geochemical properties: distribution (in sedimentary rocks, in magmatic rocks, in metamorphic rocks, in soils and vegetation), geochemistry (uranium solubility and valence in magmas, uranium speciation in aqueous solution, solubility of the main uranium minerals in aqueous solution, uranium mobilization and precipitation); 3 - geology of the main types of uranium deposits: economical criteria for a deposit, structural diversity of deposits, classification, world distribution of deposits, distribution of deposits with time, superficial deposits, uranium

  7. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackay, G.A.

    1978-01-01

    The author discusses the contribution made by various energy sources in the production of electricity. Estimates are made of the future nuclear contribution, the future demand for uranium and future sales of Australian uranium. Nuclear power growth in the United States, Japan and Western Europe is discussed. The present status of the six major Australian uranium deposits (Ranger, Jabiluka, Nabarlek, Koongarra, Yeelerrie and Beverley) is given. Australian legislation relevant to the uranium mining industry is also outlined

  8. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The development, prospecting, research, processing and marketing of South Africa's uranium industry and the national policies surrounding this industry form the headlines of this work. The geology of South Africa's uranium occurences and their positions, the processes used in the extraction of South Africa's uranium and the utilisation of uranium for power production as represented by the Koeberg nuclear power station near Cape Town are included in this publication

  9. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, E.D.J.

    1974-01-01

    A discussion is given of uranium as an energy source in The Australian economy. Figures and predictions are presented on the world supply-demand position and also figures are given on the added value that can be achieved by the processing of uranium. Conclusions are drawn about Australia's future policy with regard to uranium (R.L.)

  10. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toens, P.D.

    1981-03-01

    The geological setting of uranium resources in the world can be divided in two basic categories of resources and are defined as reasonably assured resources, estimated additional resources and speculative resources. Tables are given to illustrate these definitions. The increasing world production of uranium despite the cutback in the nuclear industry and the uranium requirements of the future concluded these lecture notes

  11. Stochastic modelling of the monthly average maximum and minimum temperature patterns in India 1981-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narasimha Murthy, K. V.; Saravana, R.; Vijaya Kumar, K.

    2018-04-01

    The paper investigates the stochastic modelling and forecasting of monthly average maximum and minimum temperature patterns through suitable seasonal auto regressive integrated moving average (SARIMA) model for the period 1981-2015 in India. The variations and distributions of monthly maximum and minimum temperatures are analyzed through Box plots and cumulative distribution functions. The time series plot indicates that the maximum temperature series contain sharp peaks in almost all the years, while it is not true for the minimum temperature series, so both the series are modelled separately. The possible SARIMA model has been chosen based on observing autocorrelation function (ACF), partial autocorrelation function (PACF), and inverse autocorrelation function (IACF) of the logarithmic transformed temperature series. The SARIMA (1, 0, 0) × (0, 1, 1)12 model is selected for monthly average maximum and minimum temperature series based on minimum Bayesian information criteria. The model parameters are obtained using maximum-likelihood method with the help of standard error of residuals. The adequacy of the selected model is determined using correlation diagnostic checking through ACF, PACF, IACF, and p values of Ljung-Box test statistic of residuals and using normal diagnostic checking through the kernel and normal density curves of histogram and Q-Q plot. Finally, the forecasting of monthly maximum and minimum temperature patterns of India for the next 3 years has been noticed with the help of selected model.

  12. Performance and metallography of a uranium tritide bed operated at elevated temperatures and tritium pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mote, M.W. Jr.; Mintz, J.M.

    1986-12-01

    A uranium gettering bed was cycled between room temperature/zero pressure and 600C/275 psi (D 2 ) for 210 cycles over a period of 8 months. Metallographic examination of the hardware revealed an acceptable amount of reaction between the uranium and the stainless steel container. This exposure is estimated to represent about ten years of normal use

  13. New England observed and predicted Julian day of maximum growing season stream/river temperature points

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The shapefile contains points with associated observed and predicted Julian day of maximum growing season stream/river temperatures in New England based on a spatial...

  14. New England observed and predicted growing season maximum stream/river temperature points

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The shapefile contains points with associated observed and predicted growing season maximum stream/river temperatures in New England based on a spatial statistical...

  15. New England observed and predicted August stream/river temperature maximum daily rate of change points

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The shapefile contains points with associated observed and predicted August stream/river temperature maximum negative rate of change in New England based on a...

  16. Measurement of the temperature of density maximum of water solutions using a convective flow technique

    OpenAIRE

    Cawley, M.F.; McGlynn, D.; Mooney, P.A.

    2006-01-01

    A technique is described which yields an accurate measurement of the temperature of density maximum of fluids which exhibit such anomalous behaviour. The method relies on the detection of changes in convective flow in a rectangular cavity containing the test fluid.The normal single-cell convection which occurs in the presence of a horizontal temperature gradient changes to a double cell configuration in the vicinity of the density maximum, and this transition manifests itself in changes in th...

  17. Spectroscopic measurements of plasma temperatures and electron number density in a uranium hollow cathode discharge lamp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, M.L.; Suri, B.M.; Gupta, G.P.

    2015-01-01

    The HCD (Hollow Cathode Discharge) lamps have been used as a source of free atoms of any metal, controllable by direct current in the lamp. The plasma parameters including neutral species temperature, atomic excitation temperature and electron number density in a see-through type, homemade uranium hollow cathode discharge lamp with neon as a buffer gas have been investigated using optical emission spectroscopic techniques. The neutral species temperature has been measured using the Doppler broadening of a neon atomic spectral line. The atomic excitation temperature has been measured using the Boltzmann plot method utilizing uranium atomic spectral lines. The electron number density has been determined from the Saha-Boltzmann equation utilizing uranium atomic and ionic spectral lines. To the best of our knowledge, all these three plasma parameters are simultaneously measured for the first time in a uranium hollow cathode discharge lamp

  18. A Hybrid Maximum Power Point Search Method Using Temperature Measurements in Partial Shading Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mroczka Janusz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Photovoltaic panels have a non-linear current-voltage characteristics to produce the maximum power at only one point called the maximum power point. In the case of the uniform illumination a single solar panel shows only one maximum power, which is also the global maximum power point. In the case an irregularly illuminated photovoltaic panel many local maxima on the power-voltage curve can be observed and only one of them is the global maximum. The proposed algorithm detects whether a solar panel is in the uniform insolation conditions. Then an appropriate strategy of tracking the maximum power point is taken using a decision algorithm. The proposed method is simulated in the environment created by the authors, which allows to stimulate photovoltaic panels in real conditions of lighting, temperature and shading.

  19. Maximum Smoke Temperature in Non-Smoke Model Evacuation Region for Semi-Transverse Tunnel Fire

    OpenAIRE

    B. Lou; Y. Qiu; X. Long

    2017-01-01

    Smoke temperature distribution in non-smoke evacuation under different mechanical smoke exhaust rates of semi-transverse tunnel fire were studied by FDS numerical simulation in this paper. The effect of fire heat release rate (10MW 20MW and 30MW) and exhaust rate (from 0 to 160m3/s) on the maximum smoke temperature in non-smoke evacuation region was discussed. Results show that the maximum smoke temperature in non-smoke evacuation region decreased with smoke exhaust rate. Plug-holing was obse...

  20. Performance analysis and comparison of an Atkinson cycle coupled to variable temperature heat reservoirs under maximum power and maximum power density conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, P.-Y.; Hou, S.-S.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, performance analysis and comparison based on the maximum power and maximum power density conditions have been conducted for an Atkinson cycle coupled to variable temperature heat reservoirs. The Atkinson cycle is internally reversible but externally irreversible, since there is external irreversibility of heat transfer during the processes of constant volume heat addition and constant pressure heat rejection. This study is based purely on classical thermodynamic analysis methodology. It should be especially emphasized that all the results and conclusions are based on classical thermodynamics. The power density, defined as the ratio of power output to maximum specific volume in the cycle, is taken as the optimization objective because it considers the effects of engine size as related to investment cost. The results show that an engine design based on maximum power density with constant effectiveness of the hot and cold side heat exchangers or constant inlet temperature ratio of the heat reservoirs will have smaller size but higher efficiency, compression ratio, expansion ratio and maximum temperature than one based on maximum power. From the view points of engine size and thermal efficiency, an engine design based on maximum power density is better than one based on maximum power conditions. However, due to the higher compression ratio and maximum temperature in the cycle, an engine design based on maximum power density conditions requires tougher materials for engine construction than one based on maximum power conditions

  1. An unusual temperature dependence in the oxidation of oxycarbide layers on uranium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Walton P.

    1981-09-01

    An anomalous temperature dependence has been observed for the oxidation kinetics of outermost oxycarbide layers on polycrystalline uranium metal. Normally, oxidation or corrosion reactions are expected to proceed more rapidly as the temperature is elevated. Thus, it came as a surprise when we observed that the removal of the outermost atomic layers of carbon from uranium oxycarbide by O 2 reproducibly proceeds at a much faster rate at 25°C than at 280°C.

  2. Maximum temperature accounts for annual soil CO2 efflux in temperate forests of Northern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhiyong; Xu, Meili; Kang, Fengfeng; Jianxin Sun, Osbert

    2015-01-01

    It will help understand the representation legality of soil temperature to explore the correlations of soil respiration with variant properties of soil temperature. Soil temperature at 10 cm depth was hourly logged through twelve months. Basing on the measured soil temperature, soil respiration at different temporal scales were calculated using empirical functions for temperate forests. On monthly scale, soil respiration significantly correlated with maximum, minimum, mean and accumulated effective soil temperatures. Annual soil respiration varied from 409 g C m−2 in coniferous forest to 570 g C m−2 in mixed forest and to 692 g C m−2 in broadleaved forest, and was markedly explained by mean soil temperatures of the warmest day, July and summer, separately. These three soil temperatures reflected the maximum values on diurnal, monthly and annual scales. In accordance with their higher temperatures, summer soil respiration accounted for 51% of annual soil respiration across forest types, and broadleaved forest also had higher soil organic carbon content (SOC) and soil microbial biomass carbon content (SMBC), but a lower contribution of SMBC to SOC. This added proof to the findings that maximum soil temperature may accelerate the transformation of SOC to CO2-C via stimulating activities of soil microorganisms. PMID:26179467

  3. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whillans, R.T.

    1981-01-01

    Events in the Canadian uranium industry during 1980 are reviewed. Mine and mill expansions and exploration activity are described, as well as changes in governmental policy. Although demand for uranium is weak at the moment, the industry feels optimistic about the future. (LL)

  4. Comparative study of the oxidation of various qualities of uranium in carbon dioxide at high temperatures; Etude comparative de l'oxydation de diverses qualites d'uranium dans l'anhydride carbonique aux temperatures elevees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desrues, R; Paidassi, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-07-01

    Uranium samples of six different qualities were subjected, in the temperature range 400 - 1000 C, to the action of carbon dioxide carefully purified to eliminate oxygen and water vapour; the resulting oxidation was followed micro-graphically and also (but only in the range 400 - 700 C) gravimetrically using an Ugine-Eyraud microbalance. A comparison of the results leads to the following 3 observations. First, the oxidation of the six uraniums studied obeys a linear law, (followed at 700 C by an accelerating law). The rates of reaction differ by a maximum of 100 per cent, the higher purity grades being oxidized more slowly except at 700 C when the reverse is true. Secondly, simultaneously with the growth, of an approximately uniform film of uranium dioxide on the metal, there occurs a localized attack in the form of blisters in the immediate neighbourhood of the monocarbide inclusions in the uranium. The relative importance of this attack is greater for lower oxidation temperatures and for a larger size, number and inequality of distribution of the inclusions, that is to say for higher carbon concentrations in the uranium (which have values from 7 to 1000 ppm in our tests). Thirdly, for oxidation temperatures above 600 C blistering is much less pronounced, but at 700 C the beginning of a general deformation of the sample occurs, which, above 750 C, becomes much greater; this leads to an acceleration of the reaction rate with respect to the linear law. In view of the over-heating, the sample must already be in the {gamma}-phase which is particularly easily deformed; furthermore this expansion phenomenon is more pronounced when the sample is more plastic and therefore purer. (authors) [French] Des echantillons de six qualites d'uranium ont ete soumis, dans l'intervalle 400-1000 C, a l'action de l'anhydride carbonique tres soigneusement purifie en oxygene et en vapeur d'eau, et leur oxydation a ete suivie par voie micrographique et egalement (mais seulement entre 400

  5. Influence of aliphatic amides on the temperature of maximum density of water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, Andrés Felipe; Romero, Carmen M.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The addition of amides decreases the temperature of maximum density of water suggesting a disruptive effect on water structure. • The amides in aqueous solution do not follow the Despretz equation in the concentration range considered. • The temperature shift Δθ as a function of molality is represented by a second order equation. • The Despretz constants were determined considering the dilute concentration region for each amide solution. • Solute disrupting effect of amides becomes smaller as its hydrophobic character increases. - Abstract: The influence of dissolved substances on the temperature of the maximum density of water has been studied in relation to their effect on water structure as they can change the equilibrium between structured and unstructured species of water. However, most work has been performed using salts and the studies with small organic solutes such as amides are scarce. In this work, the effect of acetamide, propionamide and butyramide on the temperature of maximum density of water was determined from density measurements using a magnetic float densimeter. Densities of aqueous solutions were measured within the temperature range from T = (275.65–278.65) K at intervals of 0.50 K in the concentration range between (0.10000 and 0.80000) mol·kg −1 . The temperature of maximum density was determined from the experimental results. The effect of the three amides is to decrease the temperature of maximum density of water and the change does not follow the Despretz equation. The results are discussed in terms of solute-water interactions and the disrupting effect of amides on water structure.

  6. Trends in mean maximum temperature, mean minimum temperature and mean relative humidity for Lautoka, Fiji during 2003 – 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed S. Ghani

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The current work observes the trends in Lautoka’s temperature and relative humidity during the period 2003 – 2013, which were analyzed using the recently updated data obtained from Fiji Meteorological Services (FMS. Four elements, mean maximum temperature, mean minimum temperature along with diurnal temperature range (DTR and mean relative humidity are investigated. From 2003–2013, the annual mean temperature has been enhanced between 0.02 and 0.080C. The heating is more in minimum temperature than in maximum temperature, resulting in a decrease of diurnal temperature range. The statistically significant increase was mostly seen during the summer months of December and January. Mean Relative Humidity has also increased from 3% to 8%. The bases of abnormal climate conditions are also studied. These bases were defined with temperature or humidity anomalies in their appropriate time sequences. These established the observed findings and exhibited that climate has been becoming gradually damper and heater throughout Lautoka during this period. While we are only at an initial phase in the probable inclinations of temperature changes, ecological reactions to recent climate change are already evidently noticeable. So it is proposed that it would be easier to identify climate alteration in a small island nation like Fiji.

  7. Study of the quenching and subsequent return to room temperature of uranium-chromium, uranium-iron, and uranium-molybdenum alloys containing only small amounts of the alloying element; Etude de la trempe et du revenu a la temperature ordinaire d'alliages uranium-chrome, uranium-fer et uranium-molybdene, a faible teneur en element d'alliage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delaplace, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1960-09-15

    By means of an apparatus which makes possible thermal pre-treatments in vacuo, quenching carried out in a high purity argon atmosphere, and simultaneous recording of time temperature cooling and thermal contraction curves, the author has examined the transformations which occur in uranium-chromium, uranium-iron and uranium-molybdenum alloys during their quenching and subsequent return to room temperature. For uranium-chromium and uranium-iron alloys, the temperature at which the {gamma} {yields} {beta} transformation starts varies very little with the rate of cooling. For uranium-molybdenum alloys containing 2,8 atom per cent of Mo, this temperature is lowered by 120 deg. C for a cooling rate of 500 deg. C/mn. The temperature at which the {beta} {yields} {alpha} transformation starts is lowered by 170 deg. C for a cooling rate of 500 deg. C/mn in the case of uranium-chromium alloy containing 0,37 atom per cent of Cr. The temperature is little affected in the case of uranium-iron alloys. The addition of chromium or iron makes it possible to conserve the form {beta} at ordinary temperatures after quenching from the {beta} and {gamma} regions. The {beta} phase is particularly unstable and changes into needles of the {alpha} form even at room temperatures according to an autocatalytic transformation law similar to the austenitic-martensitic transformation law in the case of iron. The {beta} phase obtained by quenching from the {beta} phase region is more stable than that obtained by quenching from the {gamma} region. Chromium is a more effective stabiliser of the {beta} phase than is iron. Unfortunately it causes serious surface cracking. The {beta} {yields} {alpha} transformation in uranium-chromium alloys has been followed at room temperature by means of micro-cinematography. The author has not observed the direct {gamma} {yields} {alpha} transformation in uranium-molybdenum alloys containing 2,8 per cent of molybdenum even for cooling rates of up to 2000 deg. C

  8. Study of the quenching and subsequent return to room temperature of uranium-chromium, uranium-iron, and uranium-molybdenum alloys containing only small amounts of the alloying element; Etude de la trempe et du revenu a la temperature ordinaire d'alliages uranium-chrome, uranium-fer et uranium-molybdene, a faible teneur en element d'alliage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delaplace, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1960-09-15

    By means of an apparatus which makes possible thermal pre-treatments in vacuo, quenching carried out in a high purity argon atmosphere, and simultaneous recording of time temperature cooling and thermal contraction curves, the author has examined the transformations which occur in uranium-chromium, uranium-iron and uranium-molybdenum alloys during their quenching and subsequent return to room temperature. For uranium-chromium and uranium-iron alloys, the temperature at which the {gamma} {yields} {beta} transformation starts varies very little with the rate of cooling. For uranium-molybdenum alloys containing 2,8 atom per cent of Mo, this temperature is lowered by 120 deg. C for a cooling rate of 500 deg. C/mn. The temperature at which the {beta} {yields} {alpha} transformation starts is lowered by 170 deg. C for a cooling rate of 500 deg. C/mn in the case of uranium-chromium alloy containing 0,37 atom per cent of Cr. The temperature is little affected in the case of uranium-iron alloys. The addition of chromium or iron makes it possible to conserve the form {beta} at ordinary temperatures after quenching from the {beta} and {gamma} regions. The {beta} phase is particularly unstable and changes into needles of the {alpha} form even at room temperatures according to an autocatalytic transformation law similar to the austenitic-martensitic transformation law in the case of iron. The {beta} phase obtained by quenching from the {beta} phase region is more stable than that obtained by quenching from the {gamma} region. Chromium is a more effective stabiliser of the {beta} phase than is iron. Unfortunately it causes serious surface cracking. The {beta} {yields} {alpha} transformation in uranium-chromium alloys has been followed at room temperature by means of micro-cinematography. The author has not observed the direct {gamma} {yields} {alpha} transformation in uranium-molybdenum alloys containing 2,8 per cent of molybdenum even for cooling rates of up to 2000 deg. C

  9. Uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, R M

    1976-01-01

    Evidence of expanding markets, improved prices and the short supply of uranium became abundantly clear in 1975, providing the much needed impetus for widespread activity in all phases of uranium operations. Exploration activity that had been at low levels in recent years in Canada was evident in most provinces as well as the Northwest Territories. All producers were in the process of expanding their uranium-producing facilities. Canada's Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) by year-end had authorized the export of over 73,000 tons of U/sub 3/0/sub 8/ all since September 1974, when the federal government announced its new uranium export guidelines. World production, which had been in the order of 25,000 tons of U/sub 3/0/sub 8/ annually, was expected to reach about 28,000 tons in 1975, principally from increased output in the United States.

  10. The uranium dioxide-uranium system at high temperature; Le systeme uranium-dioxyde d'uranium a haute temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guinet, Ph.; Vaugoyeau, H.; Blum, P. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1966-07-01

    The liquidus curve has been determined by a saturation method in which the thermal gradient was cancelled upon cooling, and the solidus curve by analyzing the deposits in equilibrium with the liquid at each temperature. The diagram, of a displaced eutectic type, presents a liquid immiscibility domain between 47 and 59 mol per cent of dioxide and a substoichiometry range UO{sub 2x}, the minimum O/U ratio being 1,6 at 3470 {+-} 30 C. The monotectic composition was found by chemical analysis to be 59 mol per cent of dioxide and the reaction temperature 2470 {+-} 30 C. (author) [French] La courbe liquidus a ete determinee par une methode de saturation en annulant le gradient thermique au cours du refroidissement, la courbe solidus par analyse des depots en equilibre avec le liquide a chaque temperature. Le diagramme du type a eutectique deporte comporte un domaine d'immiscibilite liquide entre 47 et 59 moles pour cent de dioxyde, ainsi qu'un domaine d'existence du compose sous stoechiometrique UO{sub 2x}, le rapport O/U minimum etant egal a 1,6 a 2470 {+-} 30 C. La composition du monotectique, obtenue par analyse chimique, est de 59 moles pour cent de dioxyde et la temperature de la reaction a ete trouvee egale a 2470 {+-} 30 C. (auteur)

  11. Influence of the temperature in the uranium (Vi) sorption in zirconium diphosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia G, N.; Solis, D.; Ordonez R, E.

    2012-10-01

    In the present work was evaluated the uranium (Vi) sorption at 10, 20, 30, 40 and 60 C on the zirconium diphosphate (ZrP 2 O 7 ). They were carried out kinetic and isotherms using the method by lots, these will allow to fix the sorption time (kinetic) and to explain the behavior of this sorption in different ph conditions and temperature (isotherm). The quantity of retained uranium in the surface was quantified by means of the fluorescence technique. (Author)

  12. Large temperature variability in the southern African tropics since the Last Glacial Maximum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Powers, L.A.; Johnson, T.C.; Werne, J.P.; Castañeda, I.S.; Hopmans, E.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Schouten, S.

    2005-01-01

    The role of the tropics in global climate change is actively debated, particularly in regard to the timing and magnitude of thermal and hydrological response. Continuous, high-resolution temperature records through the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) from tropical oceans have provided much insight

  13. Statistical assessment of changes in extreme maximum temperatures over Saudi Arabia, 1985-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raggad, Bechir

    2018-05-01

    In this study, two statistical approaches were adopted in the analysis of observed maximum temperature data collected from fifteen stations over Saudi Arabia during the period 1985-2014. In the first step, the behavior of extreme temperatures was analyzed and their changes were quantified with respect to the Expert Team on Climate Change Detection Monitoring indices. The results showed a general warming trend over most stations, in maximum temperature-related indices, during the period of analysis. In the second step, stationary and non-stationary extreme-value analyses were conducted for the temperature data. The results revealed that the non-stationary model with increasing linear trend in its location parameter outperforms the other models for two-thirds of the stations. Additionally, the 10-, 50-, and 100-year return levels were found to change with time considerably and that the maximum temperature could start to reappear in the different T-year return period for most stations. This analysis shows the importance of taking account the change over time in the estimation of return levels and therefore justifies the use of the non-stationary generalized extreme value distribution model to describe most of the data. Furthermore, these last findings are in line with the result of significant warming trends found in climate indices analyses.

  14. EXTREME MAXIMUM AND MINIMUM AIR TEMPERATURE IN MEDİTERRANEAN COASTS IN TURKEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbaros Gönençgil

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we determined extreme maximum and minimum temperatures in both summer and winter seasons at the stations in the Mediterranean coastal areas of Turkey.In the study, the data of 24 meteorological stations for the daily maximum and minimumtemperatures of the period from 1970–2010 were used. From this database, a set of four extreme temperature indices applied warm (TX90 and cold (TN10 days and warm spells (WSDI and cold spell duration (CSDI. The threshold values were calculated for each station to determine the temperatures that were above and below the seasonal norms in winter and summer. The TX90 index displays a positive statistically significant trend, while TN10 display negative nonsignificant trend. The occurrence of warm spells shows statistically significant increasing trend while the cold spells shows significantly decreasing trend over the Mediterranean coastline in Turkey.

  15. Maximum And Minimum Temperature Trends In Mexico For The Last 31 Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Centeno, R.; Zavala-Hidalgo, J.; Allende Arandia, M. E.; Carrasco-Mijarez, N.; Calderon-Bustamante, O.

    2013-05-01

    Based on high-resolution (1') daily maps of the maximum and minimum temperatures in Mexico, an analysis of the last 31-year trends is performed. The maps were generated using all the available information from more than 5,000 stations of the Mexican Weather Service (Servicio Meteorológico Nacional, SMN) for the period 1979-2009, along with data from the North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR). The data processing procedure includes a quality control step, in order to eliminate erroneous daily data, and make use of a high-resolution digital elevation model (from GEBCO), the relationship between air temperature and elevation by means of the average environmental lapse rate, and interpolation algorithms (linear and inverse-distance weighting). Based on the monthly gridded maps for the mentioned period, the maximum and minimum temperature trends calculated by least-squares linear regression and their statistical significance are obtained and discussed.

  16. Trends in Mean Annual Minimum and Maximum Near Surface Temperature in Nairobi City, Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Lukoye Makokha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the long-term urban modification of mean annual conditions of near surface temperature in Nairobi City. Data from four weather stations situated in Nairobi were collected from the Kenya Meteorological Department for the period from 1966 to 1999 inclusive. The data included mean annual maximum and minimum temperatures, and was first subjected to homogeneity test before analysis. Both linear regression and Mann-Kendall rank test were used to discern the mean annual trends. Results show that the change of temperature over the thirty-four years study period is higher for minimum temperature than maximum temperature. The warming trends began earlier and are more significant at the urban stations than is the case at the sub-urban stations, an indication of the spread of urbanisation from the built-up Central Business District (CBD to the suburbs. The established significant warming trends in minimum temperature, which are likely to reach higher proportions in future, pose serious challenges on climate and urban planning of the city. In particular the effect of increased minimum temperature on human physiological comfort, building and urban design, wind circulation and air pollution needs to be incorporated in future urban planning programmes of the city.

  17. Dynamic Performance of Maximum Power Point Trackers in TEG Systems Under Rapidly Changing Temperature Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, E. A.; Sera, D.; Mathe, L.; Schaltz, E.; Rosendahl, L.

    2016-03-01

    Characterization of thermoelectric generators (TEG) is widely discussed and equipment has been built that can perform such analysis. One method is often used to perform such characterization: constant temperature with variable thermal power input. Maximum power point tracking (MPPT) methods for TEG systems are mostly tested under steady-state conditions for different constant input temperatures. However, for most TEG applications, the input temperature gradient changes, exposing the MPPT to variable tracking conditions. An example is the exhaust pipe on hybrid vehicles, for which, because of the intermittent operation of the internal combustion engine, the TEG and its MPPT controller are exposed to a cyclic temperature profile. Furthermore, there are no guidelines on how fast the MPPT must be under such dynamic conditions. In the work discussed in this paper, temperature gradients for TEG integrated in several applications were evaluated; the results showed temperature variation up to 5°C/s for TEG systems. Electrical characterization of a calcium-manganese oxide TEG was performed at steady-state for different input temperatures and a maximum temperature of 401°C. By using electrical data from characterization of the oxide module, a solar array simulator was emulated to perform as a TEG. A trapezoidal temperature profile with different gradients was used on the TEG simulator to evaluate the dynamic MPPT efficiency. It is known that the perturb and observe (P&O) algorithm may have difficulty accurately tracking under rapidly changing conditions. To solve this problem, a compromise must be found between the magnitude of the increment and the sampling frequency of the control algorithm. The standard P&O performance was evaluated experimentally by using different temperature gradients for different MPPT sampling frequencies, and efficiency values are provided for all cases. The results showed that a tracking speed of 2.5 Hz can be successfully implemented on a TEG

  18. Uninterrupted thermoelectric energy harvesting using temperature-sensor-based maximum power point tracking system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jae-Do; Lee, Hohyun; Bond, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Feedforward MPPT scheme for uninterrupted TEG energy harvesting is suggested. • Temperature sensors are used to avoid current measurement or source disconnection. • MPP voltage reference is generated based on OCV vs. temperature differential model. • Optimal operating condition is maintained using hysteresis controller. • Any type of power converter can be used in the proposed scheme. - Abstract: In this paper, a thermoelectric generator (TEG) energy harvesting system with a temperature-sensor-based maximum power point tracking (MPPT) method is presented. Conventional MPPT algorithms for photovoltaic cells may not be suitable for thermoelectric power generation because a significant amount of time is required for TEG systems to reach a steady state. Moreover, complexity and additional power consumption in conventional circuits and periodic disconnection of power source are not desirable for low-power energy harvesting applications. The proposed system can track the varying maximum power point (MPP) with a simple and inexpensive temperature-sensor-based circuit without instantaneous power measurement or TEG disconnection. This system uses TEG’s open circuit voltage (OCV) characteristic with respect to temperature gradient to generate a proper reference voltage signal, i.e., half of the TEG’s OCV. The power converter controller maintains the TEG output voltage at the reference level so that the maximum power can be extracted for the given temperature condition. This feedforward MPPT scheme is inherently stable and can be implemented without any complex microcontroller circuit. The proposed system has been validated analytically and experimentally, and shows a maximum power tracking error of 1.15%

  19. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkin, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    Developments in the Australian uranium industry during 1980 are reviewed. Mine production increased markedly to 1841 t U 3 O 8 because of output from the new concentrator at Nabarlek and 1131 t of U 3 O 8 were exported at a nominal value of $37.19/lb. Several new contracts were signed for the sale of yellowcake from Ranger and Nabarlek Mines. Other developments include the decision by the joint venturers in the Olympic Dam Project to sink an exploration shaft and the release of an environmental impact statement for the Honeymoon deposit. Uranium exploration expenditure increased in 1980 and additions were made to Australia's demonstrated economic uranium resources. A world review is included

  20. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabelman, J.W.; Chenoweth, W.L.; Ingerson, E.

    1981-01-01

    The uranium production industry is well into its third recession during the nuclear era (since 1945). Exploration is drastically curtailed, and many staffs are being reduced. Historical market price production trends are discussed. A total of 3.07 million acres of land was acquired for exploration; drastic decrease. Surface drilling footage was reduced sharply; an estimated 250 drill rigs were used by the uranium industry during 1980. Land acquisition costs increased 8%. The domestic reserve changes are detailed by cause: exploration, re-evaluation, or production. Two significant discoveries of deposits were made in Mohave County, Arizona. Uranium production during 1980 was 21,850 short tons U 3 O 8 ; an increase of 17% from 1979. Domestic and foreign exploration highlights were given. Major producing areas for the US are San Juan basin, Wyoming basins, Texas coastal plain, Paradox basin, northeastern Washington, Henry Mountains, Utah, central Colorado, and the McDermitt caldera in Nevada and Oregon. 3 figures, 8 tables

  1. Effects of fasting on maximum thermogenesis in temperature-acclimated rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L. C. H.

    1981-09-01

    To further investigate the limiting effect of substrates on maximum thermogenesis in acute cold exposure, the present study examined the prevalence of this effect at different thermogenic capabilities consequent to cold- or warm-acclimation. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=11) were acclimated to 6, 16 and 26‡C, in succession, their thermogenic capabilities after each acclimation temperature were measured under helium-oxygen (21% oxygen, balance helium) at -10‡C after overnight fasting or feeding. Regardless of feeding conditions, both maximum and total heat production were significantly greater in 6>16>26‡C-acclimated conditions. In the fed state, the total heat production was significantly greater than that in the fasted state at all acclimating temperatures but the maximum thermogenesis was significant greater only in the 6 and 16‡C-acclimated states. The results indicate that the limiting effect of substrates on maximum and total thermogenesis is independent of the magnitude of thermogenic capability, suggesting a substrate-dependent component in restricting the effective expression of existing aerobic metabolic capability even under severe stress.

  2. Temperature dependence of attitude sensor coalignments on the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitone, D. S.; Eudell, A. H.; Patt, F. S.

    1990-01-01

    The temperature correlation of the relative coalignment between the fine-pointing sun sensor and fixed-head star trackers measured on the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) is analyzed. An overview of the SMM, including mission history and configuration, is given. Possible causes of the misalignment variation are discussed, with focus placed on spacecraft bending due to solar-radiation pressure, electronic or mechanical changes in the sensors, uncertainty in the attitude solutions, and mounting-plate expansion and contraction due to thermal effects. Yaw misalignment variation from the temperature profile is assessed, and suggestions for spacecraft operations are presented, involving methods to incorporate flight measurements of the temperature-versus-alignment function and its variance in operational procedures and the spacecraft structure temperatures in the attitude telemetry record.

  3. Application of Markov chain model to daily maximum temperature for thermal comfort in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordin, Muhamad Asyraf bin Che; Hassan, Husna

    2015-01-01

    The Markov chain’s first order principle has been widely used to model various meteorological fields, for prediction purposes. In this study, a 14-year (2000-2013) data of daily maximum temperatures in Bayan Lepas were used. Earlier studies showed that the outdoor thermal comfort range based on physiologically equivalent temperature (PET) index in Malaysia is less than 34°C, thus the data obtained were classified into two state: normal state (within thermal comfort range) and hot state (above thermal comfort range). The long-run results show the probability of daily temperature exceed TCR will be only 2.2%. On the other hand, the probability daily temperature within TCR will be 97.8%

  4. THE MAXIMUM EFFECT OF DEEP LAKES ON TEMPERATURE PROFILES – DETERMINATION OF THE GEOTHERMAL GRADIENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eppelbaum L. V.

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the climate change processes on the basis of geothermal observations in boreholes is an important and at the same time high-intricate problem. Many non-climatic effects could cause changes in ground surface temperatures. In this study we investigate the effects of deep lakes on the borehole temperature profilesobserved within or in the vicinity of the lakes. We propose a method based on utilization of Laplace equation with nonuniform boundary conditions. The proposed method makes possible to estimate the maximum effect of deep lakes (here the term "deep lake" means that long term mean annual temperature of bottom sediments can beconsidered as a constant value on the borehole temperature profiles. This method also allows one to estimate an accuracy of the determination of the geothermal gradient.

  5. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    Recent decisions by the Australian Government will ensure a significant expansion of the uranium industry. Development at Roxby Downs may proceed and Ranger may fulfil two new contracts but the decision specifies that apart from Roxby Downs, no new mines should be approved. The ACTU maintains an anti-uranium policy but reaction to the decision from the trade union movement has been muted. The Australian Science and Technology Council (ASTEC) has been asked by the Government to conduct an inquiry into a number of issues relating to Australia's role in the nuclear fuel cycle. The inquiry will examine in particular Australia's nuclear safeguards arrangements and the adequacy of existing waste management technology. In two additional decisions the Government has dissociated itself from a study into the feasibility of establishing an enrichment operation and has abolished the Uranium Advisory Council. Although Australian reserves account for 20% of the total in the Western World, Australia accounts for a relatively minor proportion of the world's uranium production

  6. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    The French Government has decided to freeze a substantial part of its nuclear power programme. Work has been halted on 18 reactors. This power programme is discussed, as well as the effect it has on the supply of uranium by South Africa

  7. Evaluation of empirical relationships between extreme rainfall and daily maximum temperature in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herath, Sujeewa Malwila; Sarukkalige, Ranjan; Nguyen, Van Thanh Van

    2018-01-01

    Understanding the relationships between extreme daily and sub-daily rainfall events and their governing factors is important in order to analyse the properties of extreme rainfall events in a changing climate. Atmospheric temperature is one of the dominant climate variables which has a strong relationship with extreme rainfall events. In this study, a temperature-rainfall binning technique is used to evaluate the dependency of extreme rainfall on daily maximum temperature. The Clausius-Clapeyron (C-C) relation was found to describe the relationship between daily maximum temperature and a range of rainfall durations from 6 min up to 24 h for seven Australian weather stations, the stations being located in Adelaide, Brisbane, Canberra, Darwin, Melbourne, Perth and Sydney. The analysis shows that the rainfall - temperature scaling varies with location, temperature and rainfall duration. The Darwin Airport station shows a negative scaling relationship, while the other six stations show a positive relationship. To identify the trend in scaling relationship over time the same analysis is conducted using data covering 10 year periods. Results indicate that the dependency of extreme rainfall on temperature also varies with the analysis period. Further, this dependency shows an increasing trend for more extreme short duration rainfall and a decreasing trend for average long duration rainfall events at most stations. Seasonal variations of the scale changing trends were analysed by categorizing the summer and autumn seasons in one group and the winter and spring seasons in another group. Most of 99th percentile of 6 min, 1 h and 24 h rain durations at Perth, Melbourne and Sydney stations show increasing trend for both groups while Adelaide and Darwin show decreasing trend. Furthermore, majority of scaling trend of 50th percentile are decreasing for both groups.

  8. Influence of pyrolytic temperature on uranium adsorption capability by biochar derived from macauba coconut residue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guilhen, Sabine Neusatz; Fungaro, Denise Alves; Coleti, Jorge; Tenório, Jorge Alberto Soares

    2017-01-01

    Biochar (BC) is a carbon-rich product obtained when biomass is thermally decomposed at relatively low temperatures (under 700°C) and limited supply of oxygen in a process called pyrolysis. The conversion of biomass into BC can not only result in renewable energy source of synthetic gas and bio-oil, but also decrease the content of CO 2 in the atmosphere, as well as improving soil fertility. Because of its porous structure, charged surface and surface functional groups, BC exhibits a great potential as an adsorbent. Brazilian agro energy chain involves tons of biomass waste, providing a wide range of biomass with different chemical and physical properties. BC characteristics strongly depend on the feedstock and the pyrolysis conditions, in which the temperature is the key parameter. The aim of this study was to evaluate the adsorption potential for the removal of uranium, U(VI), from aqueous solutions using BC obtained through the pyrolysis of the Macauba (Acrocomia aculeata) coconut endocarp as a function of the final pyrolytic temperature. BCs produced at higher temperatures are likely to present lower H/C and O/C ratios, indicating the loss of easily degradable carbon compounds such as volatile matter. In contrast, low-temperature pyrolysis produces not only a higher BC yield, but also richer in surface functional groups which will likely enable interactions with the U(VI) ions. The endocarp was subjected to six different pyrolytic temperatures, ranging from 250°C to 750 °C. The influence of parameters such as pH, sorbent dose and initial concentration on the adsorption of U(VI) was investigated. The maximum adsorption capacity (q) was achieved for the BC obtained at 250°C (BC250), which presented a removal percentage of approx. 86%, demonstrating the potential of the BC from macauba endocarp for treatment of wastewaters. Thus, submitting the endocarp to temperatures higher than 250°C becomes unnecessary, saving time and reducing operating costs. (author)

  9. Influence of pyrolytic temperature on uranium adsorption capability by biochar derived from macauba coconut residue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guilhen, Sabine Neusatz; Fungaro, Denise Alves [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Coleti, Jorge; Tenório, Jorge Alberto Soares, E-mail: snguilhen@ipen.br, E-mail: dfungaro@ipen.br, E-mail: jorgecoleti@usp.br, E-mail: jtenorio@usp.br [Universidade de São Paulo (USP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Metalúrgica e de Materiais

    2017-07-01

    Biochar (BC) is a carbon-rich product obtained when biomass is thermally decomposed at relatively low temperatures (under 700°C) and limited supply of oxygen in a process called pyrolysis. The conversion of biomass into BC can not only result in renewable energy source of synthetic gas and bio-oil, but also decrease the content of CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere, as well as improving soil fertility. Because of its porous structure, charged surface and surface functional groups, BC exhibits a great potential as an adsorbent. Brazilian agro energy chain involves tons of biomass waste, providing a wide range of biomass with different chemical and physical properties. BC characteristics strongly depend on the feedstock and the pyrolysis conditions, in which the temperature is the key parameter. The aim of this study was to evaluate the adsorption potential for the removal of uranium, U(VI), from aqueous solutions using BC obtained through the pyrolysis of the Macauba (Acrocomia aculeata) coconut endocarp as a function of the final pyrolytic temperature. BCs produced at higher temperatures are likely to present lower H/C and O/C ratios, indicating the loss of easily degradable carbon compounds such as volatile matter. In contrast, low-temperature pyrolysis produces not only a higher BC yield, but also richer in surface functional groups which will likely enable interactions with the U(VI) ions. The endocarp was subjected to six different pyrolytic temperatures, ranging from 250°C to 750 °C. The influence of parameters such as pH, sorbent dose and initial concentration on the adsorption of U(VI) was investigated. The maximum adsorption capacity (q) was achieved for the BC obtained at 250°C (BC250), which presented a removal percentage of approx. 86%, demonstrating the potential of the BC from macauba endocarp for treatment of wastewaters. Thus, submitting the endocarp to temperatures higher than 250°C becomes unnecessary, saving time and reducing operating costs

  10. Subtropical Arctic Ocean temperatures during the Palaeocene/Eocene thermal maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sluijs, A.; Schouten, S.; Pagani, M.; Woltering, M.; Brinkhuis, H.; Damste, J.S.S.; Dickens, G.R.; Huber, M.; Reichart, G.-J.; Stein, R.; Matthiessen, J.; Lourens, L.J.; Pedentchouk, N.; Backman, J.; Moran, K.; Clemens, S.; Cronin, T.; Eynaud, F.; Gattacceca, J.; Jakobsson, M.; Jordan, R.; Kaminski, M.; King, J.; Koc, N.; Martinez, N.C.; McInroy, D.; Moore, T.C.; O'Regan, M.; Onodera, J.; Palike, H.; Rea, B.; Rio, D.; Sakamoto, T.; Smith, D.C.; St John, K.E.K.; Suto, I.; Suzuki, N.; Takahashi, K.; Watanabe, M. E.; Yamamoto, M.

    2006-01-01

    The Palaeocene/Eocene thermal maximum, ???55 million years ago, was a brief period of widespread, extreme climatic warming, that was associated with massive atmospheric greenhouse gas input. Although aspects of the resulting environmental changes are well documented at low latitudes, no data were available to quantify simultaneous changes in the Arctic region. Here we identify the Palaeocene/Eocene thermal maximum in a marine sedimentary sequence obtained during the Arctic Coring Expedition. We show that sea surface temperatures near the North Pole increased from ???18??C to over 23??C during this event. Such warm values imply the absence of ice and thus exclude the influence of ice-albedo feedbacks on this Arctic warming. At the same time, sea level rose while anoxic and euxinic conditions developed in the ocean's bottom waters and photic zone, respectively. Increasing temperature and sea level match expectations based on palaeoclimate model simulations, but the absolute polar temperatures that we derive before, during and after the event are more than 10??C warmer than those model-predicted. This suggests that higher-than-modern greenhouse gas concentrations must have operated in conjunction with other feedback mechanisms-perhaps polar stratospheric clouds or hurricane-induced ocean mixing-to amplify early Palaeogene polar temperatures. ?? 2006 Nature Publishing Group.

  11. Assessment of extreme value distributions for maximum temperature in the Mediterranean area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Alexander; Hertig, Elke; Jacobeit, Jucundus

    2015-04-01

    Extreme maximum temperatures highly affect the natural as well as the societal environment Heat stress has great effects on flora, fauna and humans and culminates in heat related morbidity and mortality. Agriculture and different industries are severely affected by extreme air temperatures. Even more under climate change conditions, it is necessary to detect potential hazards which arise from changes in the distributional parameters of extreme values, and this is especially relevant for the Mediterranean region which is characterized as a climate change hot spot. Therefore statistical approaches are developed to estimate these parameters with a focus on non-stationarities emerging in the relationship between regional climate variables and their large-scale predictors like sea level pressure, geopotential heights, atmospheric temperatures and relative humidity. Gridded maximum temperature data from the daily E-OBS dataset (Haylock et al., 2008) with a spatial resolution of 0.25° x 0.25° from January 1950 until December 2012 are the predictands for the present analyses. A s-mode principal component analysis (PCA) has been performed in order to reduce data dimension and to retain different regions of similar maximum temperature variability. The grid box with the highest PC-loading represents the corresponding principal component. A central part of the analyses is the model development for temperature extremes under the use of extreme value statistics. A combined model is derived consisting of a Generalized Pareto Distribution (GPD) model and a quantile regression (QR) model which determines the GPD location parameters. The QR model as well as the scale parameters of the GPD model are conditioned by various large-scale predictor variables. In order to account for potential non-stationarities in the predictors-temperature relationships, a special calibration and validation scheme is applied, respectively. Haylock, M. R., N. Hofstra, A. M. G. Klein Tank, E. J. Klok, P

  12. The Hengill geothermal area, Iceland: Variation of temperature gradients deduced from the maximum depth of seismogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulger, G. R.

    1995-04-01

    Given a uniform lithology and strain rate and a full seismic data set, the maximum depth of earthquakes may be viewed to a first order as an isotherm. These conditions are approached at the Hengill geothermal area S. Iceland, a dominantly basaltic area. The likely strain rate calculated from thermal and tectonic considerations is 10 -15 s -1, and temperature measurements from four drill sites within the area indicate average, near-surface geothermal gradients of up to 150 °C km -1 throughout the upper 2 km. The temperature at which seismic failure ceases for the strain rates likely at the Hengill geothermal area is determined by analogy with oceanic crust, and is about 650 ± 50 °C. The topographies of the top and bottom of the seismogenic layer were mapped using 617 earthquakes located highly accurately by performing a simultaneous inversion for three-dimensional structure and hypocentral parameters. The thickness of the seismogenic layer is roughly constant and about 3 km. A shallow, aseismic, low-velocity volume within the spreading plate boundary that crosses the area occurs above the top of the seismogenic layer and is interpreted as an isolated body of partial melt. The base of the seismogenic layer has a maximum depth of about 6.5 km beneath the spreading axis and deepens to about 7 km beneath a transform zone in the south of the area. Beneath the high-temperature part of the geothermal area, the maximum depth of earthquakes may be as shallow as 4 km. The geothermal gradient below drilling depths in various parts of the area ranges from 84 ± 9 °Ckm -1 within the low-temperature geothermal area of the transform zone to 138 ± 15 °Ckm -1 below the centre of the high-temperature geothermal area. Shallow maximum depths of earthquakes and therefore high average geothermal gradients tend to correlate with the intensity of the geothermal area and not with the location of the currently active spreading axis.

  13. Study about uranium oxides at high temperature by X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, M.I.

    1978-01-01

    In this work a technique to study the lattice parameters in the crystalline substances at hight temperature by X-rays diffraction is developed. The results obtained agree very well with the experimental data found in the literature. The crystalline structure of uranium oxide at different temperature is studied in detail by this technique. At the range of the temperature investigated, i.e., 20 0 C to 640 0 C, the following forms for uranium oxide: U 3 O 8 in its hexagonal modification, cubic UO 2 , cubic U 4 O 9 and tetragonal U 3 O 7 is observed. The appearance of two hexagonal units observed in this work is identified by Milne. A good reproducibillity is observed for measurements at the same temperature [pt

  14. Probing Ionic Liquid Aqueous Solutions Using Temperature of Maximum Density Isotope Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Tariq

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This work is a new development of an extensive research program that is investigating for the first time shifts in the temperature of maximum density (TMD of aqueous solutions caused by ionic liquid solutes. In the present case we have compared the shifts caused by three ionic liquid solutes with a common cation—1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium coupled with acetate, ethylsulfate and tetracyanoborate anions—in normal and deuterated water solutions. The observed differences are discussed in terms of the nature of the corresponding anion-water interactions.

  15. Verification of surface minimum, mean, and maximum temperature forecasts in Calabria for summer 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Federico

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Since 2005, one-hour temperature forecasts for the Calabria region (southern Italy, modelled by the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS, have been issued by CRATI/ISAC-CNR (Consortium for Research and Application of Innovative Technologies/Institute for Atmospheric and Climate Sciences of the National Research Council and are available online at http://meteo.crati.it/previsioni.html (every six hours. Beginning in June 2008, the horizontal resolution was enhanced to 2.5 km. In the present paper, forecast skill and accuracy are evaluated out to four days for the 2008 summer season (from 6 June to 30 September, 112 runs. For this purpose, gridded high horizontal resolution forecasts of minimum, mean, and maximum temperatures are evaluated against gridded analyses at the same horizontal resolution (2.5 km.

    Gridded analysis is based on Optimal Interpolation (OI and uses the RAMS first-day temperature forecast as the background field. Observations from 87 thermometers are used in the analysis system. The analysis error is introduced to quantify the effect of using the RAMS first-day forecast as the background field in the OI analyses and to define the forecast error unambiguously, while spatial interpolation (SI analysis is considered to quantify the statistics' sensitivity to the verifying analysis and to show the quality of the OI analyses for different background fields.

    Two case studies, the first one with a low (less than the 10th percentile root mean square error (RMSE in the OI analysis, the second with the largest RMSE of the whole period in the OI analysis, are discussed to show the forecast performance under two different conditions. Cumulative statistics are used to quantify forecast errors out to four days. Results show that maximum temperature has the largest RMSE, while minimum and mean temperature errors are similar. For the period considered

  16. Global view of F-region electron density and temperature at solar maximum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brace, L.H.; Theis, R.F.; Hoegy, W.R.

    1982-01-01

    Dynamics Explorer-2 is permitting the first measurements of the global structure of the F-regions at very high levels of solar activity (S>200). Selected full orbits of Langmuir probe measurements of electron temperature, T/sub e/, and density, N/sub e/, are shown to illustrate this global structure and some of the ionospheric features that are the topic of other papers in this issue. The ionospheric thermal structure is of particular interest because T/sub e/ is a sensitive indicator of the coupling of magnetospheric energy into the upper atmosphere. A comparison of these heating effects with those observed at solar minimum shows that the magnetospheric sources are more important at solar maximum, as might have been expected. Heating at the cusp, the auroral oval and the plasma-pause is generally both greater and more variable. Electron cooling rate calculations employing low latitude measurements indicate that solar extreme ultraviolet heating of the F region at solar maximum is enhanced by a factor that is greater than the increase in solar flux. Some of this enhanced electron heating arises from the increase in electron heating efficiency at the higher N/sub e/ of solar maximum, but this appears insufficient to completely resolve the discrepancy

  17. Temperature of maximum density and excess thermodynamics of aqueous mixtures of methanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    González-Salgado, D.; Zemánková, K. [Departamento de Física Aplicada, Universidad de Vigo, Campus del Agua, Edificio Manuel Martínez-Risco, E-32004 Ourense (Spain); Noya, E. G.; Lomba, E. [Instituto de Química Física Rocasolano, CSIC, Calle Serrano 119, E-28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2016-05-14

    In this work, we present a study of representative excess thermodynamic properties of aqueous mixtures of methanol over the complete concentration range, based on extensive computer simulation calculations. In addition to test various existing united atom model potentials, we have developed a new force-field which accurately reproduces the excess thermodynamics of this system. Moreover, we have paid particular attention to the behavior of the temperature of maximum density (TMD) in dilute methanol mixtures. The presence of a temperature of maximum density is one of the essential anomalies exhibited by water. This anomalous behavior is modified in a non-monotonous fashion by the presence of fully miscible solutes that partly disrupt the hydrogen bond network of water, such as methanol (and other short chain alcohols). In order to obtain a better insight into the phenomenology of the changes in the TMD of water induced by small amounts of methanol, we have performed a new series of experimental measurements and computer simulations using various force fields. We observe that none of the force-fields tested capture the non-monotonous concentration dependence of the TMD for highly diluted methanol solutions.

  18. Relationship between plants in Europe and surface temperatures of the Atlantic Ocean during the glacial maximum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Campo, M

    1984-01-01

    In Europe and North America, the deciduous forest, whether or not mixed with conifers, prevails within boundaries which coincide with the 12 and 18/sup 0/C isotherms of Ocean surface temperatures in August; within Europe this forest points to the limit of the Atlantic influence and bevels out as it is squeezed between coniferous forest to the NE (thermic boundary) and steppe to the SE (hydric boundary). During the glacial age this forest disappeared from its main European area and remained only in mountain refuges. Thus, the temperature of the eastern Atlantic surface waters, off Europe, control the nature of its vegetation. Variations in the pollen curve of pines, birches, Artemisia, Chenopodiaceae and Ephedra are accounted for by the climatic variations in southern Europe before 13,000 yr BP. It is seen that a very arid climate culminated at about 15,000 yr BP. It corresponds to the most active iceberg calving which considerably lowered the Ocean surface temperature far to the south. In spite of the increasing summer temperatures, this temperature remained as cold as it was during the glacial maximum. The result is the lowest evaporation from the Ocean hence a minimum of clouds and a minimum of rain. The end of the first phase of the deglaciation at +/- 13,000 yr BP corresponds to a warming up of the Ocean surface bringing about increased evaporation, hence rains over the continent. The evolution of the vegetation in Europe at the end of the glacial times from south of the ice sheet down to the Mediterranean, depends as much, if not more, on rains than on temperatures.

  19. Finding of no significant impact: Interim storage of enriched uranium above the maximum historical level at the Y-12 Plant Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) for the Proposed Interim Storage of Enriched Uranium Above the Maximum Historical Storage Level at the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE/EA-0929, September, 1994). The EA evaluates the environmental effects of transportation, prestorage processing, and interim storage of bounding quantities of enriched uranium at the Y-12 Plant over a ten-year period. The State of Tennessee and the public participated in public meetings and workshops which were held after a predecisional draft EA was released in February 1994, and after the revised pre-approval EA was issued in September 1994. Comments provided by the State and public have been carefully considered by the Department. As a result of this public process, the Department has determined that the Y-12 Plant-would store no more than 500 metric tons of highly enriched uranium (HEU) and no more than 6 metric tons of low enriched uranium (LEU). The bounding storage quantities analyzed in the pre-approval EA are 500 metric tons of HEU and 7,105.9 metric tons of LEU. Based on-the analyses in the EA, as revised by the attachment to the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI), DOE has determined that interim storage of 500 metric tons of HEU and 6 metric tons of LEU at the Y-12 Plant does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required and the Department is issuing this FONSI

  20. Uranium luminescence in La2 Zr2 O7 : effect of concentration and annealing temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, M; Rajeswari, B; Hon, N S; Kadam, R M

    2016-12-01

    The speciation of a particular element in any given matrix is a prerequisite to understanding its solubility and leaching properties. In this context, speciation of uranium in lanthanum zirconate pyrochlore (La 2 Zr 2 O 7  = LZO), prepared by a low-temperature combustion route, was carried out using a simple photoluminescence lifetime technique. The LZO matrix is considered to be a potential ceramic host for fixing nuclear and actinide waste products generated during the nuclear fuel cycle. Special emphasis has been given to understanding the dynamics of the uranium species in the host as a function of annealing temperature and concentration. It was found that, in the LZO host, uranium is stabilized as the commonly encountered uranyl species (UO 2 2+ ) up to a heat treatment of 500 °C at the surface. Above 500 °C, the uranyl ion is diffused into the matrix as the more symmetric octahedral uranate species (UO 6 6- ). The uranate ions thus formed replace the six-coordinated 'Zr' atoms at regular lattice positions. Further, it was observed that concentration quenching takes place beyond 5 mol% of uranium doping. The mechanism of the quenching was found to be a multipolar interaction. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battey, G.C.; McKay, A.D.

    1988-01-01

    Production for 1986 was 4899 t U 3 O 8 (4154 t U), 30% greater than in 1985, mainly because of a 39% increase in production at Ranger. Exports for 1986 were 4166 t U 3 O 8 at an average f.o.b. unit value of $40.57/lb U 3 O 8 . Private exploration expenditure for uranium in Australia during the 1985-86 fiscal year was $50.2 million. Plans were announced to increase the nominal capacity of the processing plant at Ranger from 3000 t/year U 3 O 8 to 4500 t and later to 6000 t/year. Construction and initial mine development at Olympic Dam began in March. Production is planned for mid 1988 at an annual rate of 2000 t U 3 O 8 , 30 000 t Cu, and 90 000 oz (2800 kg) Au. The first long-term sales agreement was concluded in September 1986. At the Manyingee deposit, testing of the alkaline solution mining method was completed, and the treatment plant was dismantled. Spot market prices (in US$/lb U 3 O 8 ) quoted by Nuexco were generally stable. From January-October the exchange value fluctuated from US$17.00-US$17.25; for November and December it was US$16.75. Australia's Reasonably Assured Resources of uranium recoverable at less than US$80/kg U at December 1986 were estimated as 462 000 t U, 3000 t U less than in 1985. This represents 30% of the total low-cost RAR in the WOCA (World Outside the Centrally Planned Economy Areas) countries. Australia also has 257 000 t U in the low-cost Estimated Additional Resources Category I, 29% of the WOCA countries' total resources in this category

  2. A new global reconstruction of temperature changes at the Last Glacial Maximum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Annan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Some recent compilations of proxy data both on land and ocean (MARGO Project Members, 2009; Bartlein et al., 2011; Shakun et al., 2012, have provided a new opportunity for an improved assessment of the overall climatic state of the Last Glacial Maximum. In this paper, we combine these proxy data with the ensemble of structurally diverse state of the art climate models which participated in the PMIP2 project (Braconnot et al., 2007 to generate a spatially complete reconstruction of surface air (and sea surface temperatures. We test a variety of approaches, and show that multiple linear regression performs well for this application. Our reconstruction is significantly different to and more accurate than previous approaches and we obtain an estimated global mean cooling of 4.0 ± 0.8 °C (95% CI.

  3. The Hengill geothermal area, Iceland: variation of temperature gradients deduced from the maximum depth of seismogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulger, G.R.

    1995-01-01

    Given a uniform lithology and strain rate and a full seismic data set, the maximum depth of earthquakes may be viewed to a first order as an isotherm. These conditions are approached at the Hengill geothermal area, S. Iceland, a dominantly basaltic area. The temperature at which seismic failure ceases for the strain rates likely at the Hengill geothermal area is determined by analogy with oceanic crust, and is about 650 ?? 50??C. The topographies of the top and bottom of the seismogenic layer were mapped using 617 earthquakes. The thickness of the seismogenic layer is roughly constant and about 3 km. A shallow, aseismic, low-velocity volume within the spreading plate boundary that crosses the area occurs above the top of the seismogenic layer and is interpreted as an isolated body of partial melt. The base of the seismogenic layer has a maximum depth of about 6.5 km beneath the spreading axis and deepens to about 7 km beneath a transform zone in the south of the area. -from Author

  4. Effect of glycine, DL-alanine and DL-2-aminobutyric acid on the temperature of maximum density of water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, Carmen M.; Torres, Andres Felipe

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Effect of α-amino acids on the temperature of maximum density of water is presented. • The addition of α-amino acids decreases the temperature of maximum density of water. • Despretz constants suggest that the amino acids behave as water structure breakers. • Despretz constants decrease as the number of CH 2 groups of the amino acid increase. • Solute disrupting effect becomes smaller as its hydrophobic character increases. - Abstract: The effect of glycine, DL-alanine and DL-2-aminobutyric acid on the temperature of maximum density of water was determined from density measurements using a magnetic float densimeter. Densities of aqueous solutions were measured within the temperature range from T = (275.65 to 278.65) K at intervals of T = 0.50 K over the concentration range between (0.0300 and 0.1000) mol · kg −1 . A linear relationship between density and concentration was obtained for all the systems in the temperature range considered. The temperature of maximum density was determined from the experimental results. The effect of the three amino acids is to decrease the temperature of maximum density of water and the decrease is proportional to molality according to Despretz equation. The effect of the amino acids on the temperature of maximum density decreases as the number of methylene groups of the alkyl chain becomes larger. The results are discussed in terms of (solute + water) interactions and the effect of amino acids on water structure

  5. Viscoplastic behavior of uranium dioxide at high temperature; Comportement viscoplastique du dioxyde d'uranium a haute temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sauter, F

    2001-02-01

    This work is a part of a project led by EDF the purpose of which is the development of more predictive models to describe the thermomechanical behavior of fuel assembly. First, we recall the baselines of the Power Water Reactors then we deal with the viscoplastic behavior of uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}). This knowledge enables an accurate description of the stress relaxation during Pellet Cladding Interactions. The pellets we have used in the last part are similar to the industrial ones. They exhibit a yield point during strain hardening tests and a sigma creep curve. In order to describe these characteristics, we have adapted different kind of approaches: thermodynamical - the Distribution of Non Linear Relaxations, approaches based on dislocation glide inspired by Alexander and Haasen and introduced in the Pilvin polycrystalline model. We recall the purpose of internal variables in the thermodynamics of system far from equilibrium then in case of a viscoplastic flow controlled by dislocation glide, we establish a link between densities of dislocations and internal variables in the D.N.L.R. approach. As vacancy diffusion in the grain boundary has a contribution to the viscoplastic strain, a similar is presented in appendix. These models are able to reproduce the behavior of UO{sub 2} pellets in strain hardening, stress relaxation and creep tests. Much possible progress has been revealed by the analysis of the tests. Further more, we propose a model for yield point and sigma creep curve. We also have extended these results to the behavior of irradiated pellets and stressed the influence of damage. (author)

  6. Temperature and direction dependence of internal strain and texture evolution during deformation of uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, D.W., E-mail: dbrown@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Bourke, M.A.M.; Clausen, B.; Korzekwa, D.R.; Korzekwa, R.C.; McCabe, R.J.; Sisneros, T.A.; Teter, D.F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2009-06-25

    Depleted uranium is of current programmatic interest at Los Alamos National Lab due to its high density and nuclear applications. At room temperature, depleted uranium displays an orthorhombic crystal structure with highly anisotropic mechanical and thermal properties. For instance, the coefficient of thermal expansion is roughly 20 x 10{sup -6} deg. C{sup -1} in the a and c directions, but near zero or slightly negative in the b direction. The innate anisotropy combined with thermo-mechanical processing during manufacture results in spatially varying residual stresses and crystallographic texture, which can cause distortion, and failure in completed parts, effectively wasting resources. This paper focuses on the development of residual stresses and textures during deformation at room and elevated temperatures with an eye on the future development of computational polycrystalline plasticity models based on the known micro-mechanical deformation mechanisms of the material.

  7. Study of the quenching and subsequent return to room temperature of uranium-chromium, uranium-iron, and uranium-molybdenum alloys containing only small amounts of the alloying element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delaplace, J.

    1960-09-01

    By means of an apparatus which makes possible thermal pre-treatments in vacuo, quenching carried out in a high purity argon atmosphere, and simultaneous recording of time temperature cooling and thermal contraction curves, the author has examined the transformations which occur in uranium-chromium, uranium-iron and uranium-molybdenum alloys during their quenching and subsequent return to room temperature. For uranium-chromium and uranium-iron alloys, the temperature at which the γ → β transformation starts varies very little with the rate of cooling. For uranium-molybdenum alloys containing 2,8 atom per cent of Mo, this temperature is lowered by 120 deg. C for a cooling rate of 500 deg. C/mn. The temperature at which the β → α transformation starts is lowered by 170 deg. C for a cooling rate of 500 deg. C/mn in the case of uranium-chromium alloy containing 0,37 atom per cent of Cr. The temperature is little affected in the case of uranium-iron alloys. The addition of chromium or iron makes it possible to conserve the form β at ordinary temperatures after quenching from the β and γ regions. The β phase is particularly unstable and changes into needles of the α form even at room temperatures according to an autocatalytic transformation law similar to the austenitic-martensitic transformation law in the case of iron. The β phase obtained by quenching from the β phase region is more stable than that obtained by quenching from the γ region. Chromium is a more effective stabiliser of the β phase than is iron. Unfortunately it causes serious surface cracking. The β → α transformation in uranium-chromium alloys has been followed at room temperature by means of micro-cinematography. The author has not observed the direct γ → α transformation in uranium-molybdenum alloys containing 2,8 per cent of molybdenum even for cooling rates of up to 2000 deg. C/s. He has however observed the formation of several martensitic structures. (author) [fr

  8. High temperature chlorination of uranium and some radionuclides from rich sulphide ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahdy, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    This work is concerned with the application of the high temperature chlorination technique upon a sulphide-rich uranium ore from elliot lake, ontario, canada. The purpose is to find a substitute to conventional sulphuric acid leaching which involves both acid drainage and radionuclide dissolution problems. Test work has therefore been directed towards studying some relevant factors of chlorination beside the effect of a number of additives

  9. Uranium-thorium fuel cycle in a very high temperature hybrid system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, C.R.G.; Oliva, A.M.; Fajardo, L.G.; Garcia, J.A.R.; Curbelo, J.P.; Abadanes, A.

    2011-01-01

    Thorium is a potentially valuable energy source since it is about three to four times as abundant as Uranium. It is also a widely distributed natural resource readily accessible in many countries. Therefore, Thorium fuels can complement Uranium fuels and ensure long term sustainability of nuclear power. The main advantages of the use of a hybrid system formed by a Pebble Bed critical nuclear reactor and two Pebble Bed Accelerator Driven Systems (ADSs) using a Uranium-Thorium (U + Th) fuel cycle are shown in this paper. Once-through and two step U + Th fuel cycle was evaluated. With this goal, a preliminary conceptual design of a hybrid system formed by a Graphite Moderated Gas-Cooled Very High Temperature Reactor and two ADSs is proposed. The main parameters related to the neutronic behavior of the system in a deep burn scheme are optimized. The parameters that describe the nuclear fuel breeding and Minor Actinide stockpile are compared with those of a simple Uranium fuel cycle. (author)

  10. Temperature effect on uranium retention onto Zr2O(PO4)2 surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almazan Torres, M.G.

    2007-03-01

    Uranium sorption onto Zr 2 O(PO 4 ) 2 has been studied between 298 K and 363 K, in 0.1 M NaClO 4 medium. Potentiometric titrations were realized to determine temperature dependency of the acid-base properties (pH(pcn), acidity constants). Classical batch experiments were performed at different temperatures. The sorption experiments revealed that the uranium sorption onto Zr 2 O(PO 4 ) 2 is favoured with the temperature. Structural characterization of the surface complexes was performed by both Time-Resolved Laser-Induced Fluorescence (TRLIF) and EXAFS spectroscopy. The TRLIF measurements vs. temperature revealed two uranyl surface complexes. No influence of the temperature onto the nature surface complex was observed. The EXAFS analysis showed a splitting of the equatorial oxygen atoms in two shells, corresponding to uranyl bidentate, inner-sphere complexes. The obtained structural uranyl surface complex information was used to simulate (using a constant capacitance model) the sorption edges. The proposed complexes equilibrium model consists of the following surface complexes: (ZrOH) 2 UO 2 2+ and (PO) 2 UO 2 . Besides the stability constants for the surface complexes, the thermodynamic parameters ΔH 0 and ΔS 0 were determined using the van't Hoff equation. The enthalpy values associated to the U(VI) retention onto Zr 2 O(PO 4 ) 2 , determined by the temperature dependence of the stability constants, testify that the formation of the complex (PO) 2 UO 2 (55 kJ/mol) is endothermic, while no influence of the temperature was observed for the formation of the complex (ZrOH) 2 UO 2 2+ . The adsorption reaction of the last complex is then driven by entropy. In addition, calorimetric measurements of uranium sorption onto Zr 2 O(PO 4 ) 2 were carried out to directly quantify the enthalpy associated to the retention processes. (author)

  11. New England observed and predicted August stream/river temperature maximum positive daily rate of change points

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The shapefile contains points with associated observed and predicted August stream/river temperature maximum positive daily rate of change in New England based on a...

  12. New England observed and predicted July stream/river temperature maximum positive daily rate of change points

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The shapefile contains points with associated observed and predicted July stream/river temperature maximum positive daily rate of change in New England based on a...

  13. New England observed and predicted July maximum negative stream/river temperature daily rate of change points

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The shapefile contains points with associated observed and predicted July stream/river temperature maximum negative daily rate of change in New England based on a...

  14. Impacts of Land Cover and Seasonal Variation on Maximum Air Temperature Estimation Using MODIS Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulin Cai

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Daily maximum surface air temperature (Tamax is a crucial factor for understanding complex land surface processes under rapid climate change. Remote detection of Tamax has widely relied on the empirical relationship between air temperature and land surface temperature (LST, a product derived from remote sensing. However, little is known about how such a relationship is affected by the high heterogeneity in landscapes and dynamics in seasonality. This study aims to advance our understanding of the roles of land cover and seasonal variation in the estimation of Tamax using the MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer LST product. We developed statistical models to link Tamax and LST in the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River in China for five major land-cover types (i.e., forest, shrub, water, impervious surface, cropland, and grassland and two seasons (i.e., growing season and non-growing season. Results show that the performance of modeling the Tamax-LST relationship was highly dependent on land cover and seasonal variation. Estimating Tamax over grasslands and water bodies achieved superior performance; while uncertainties were high over forested lands that contained extensive heterogeneity in species types, plant structure, and topography. We further found that all the land-cover specific models developed for the plant non-growing season outperformed the corresponding models developed for the growing season. Discrepancies in model performance mainly occurred in the vegetated areas (forest, cropland, and shrub, suggesting an important role of plant phenology in defining the statistical relationship between Tamax and LST. For impervious surfaces, the challenge of capturing the high spatial heterogeneity in urban settings using the low-resolution MODIS data made Tamax estimation a difficult task, which was especially true in the growing season.

  15. Experimental studies of neutron irradiated uranium dioxide at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanke, R.H.J.

    1990-01-01

    In case of an accident situation, in which the heat of the nuclear fuel can no longer be transferred to coolin water, the temperature of the nuclear fuel ay rise very strongly, so that radioactive fission products may be released, which can ultimately lead to the release of radioactive substances to the environment. In this respect it is important to know more about the release rate of the various fission products and their fuel samples, used in the investigation, were UO-2 spheres of approximately 1 mm. The chemical forms of the particles which are being released from the sphees during evaporation have been determined using a mass spectrometer. At the same time, the activity of the fission products has been measured using a gamma spectrometer. A gamma tomographer has been developed for determining the three-dimensional distribution of the concentration of radioactive fission products in the sphere. With this tomographer the change of this distribution as a function of temperature could be measured. For interpretation of the results two models have been developed: a model of the evaporation of the non-stoichiometric UO-2, and a model of the diffusion of fission products in UO-2. The first model was used to determine the stoichiometry of the sphere while the second has been used to determine the activation energy for the diffusion of the fission products. The main conclusion is that the microstructure of the nuclear fuel has a great effect on both the amount of free oxygen atoms, the release rate and the chemical form of fission products. This microstructure has not been investigated in greater detail so that all other conclusions are of qualitative nature. (author). 111 refs.; 114 figs.; 13 tabs

  16. Uranium recovery by leaching with sodium carbonate at high temperature and pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soerensen, E.; Koefoed, S.; Lundgaard, T.

    1983-11-01

    The principal uranium bearing mineral in Greenland steenstrupine is a complex sodium REE phosphosilicate in which Fe, Mn, Th, U are minor constituents. The Na 2 CO 3 extractant is used for specially acidconsuming ores. However, steenstrupine is decomposed by Na 2 CO 3 only at temperatures above 220degC, so the leaching must be carried out under pressure. Laboratory tests have shown the optimal temperature to be 260degC and the leach liquor composition120 g/l of NaHCO 3 and 20 g/l of Na 2 CO 3 . Addition of oxygen is necessary as uranium will not dissolve in carbonate unless it is brought in its highest state of oxidation. According to the laboratory tests it may be estimated that 1 kg of ore suspended in 1 l of leach liquor and ground to 80% minus 200 mesh can be extracted in 20-40 minutes. On the basis of data obtained a process was suggested in which the ore is ground with carbonate leach liquor to a suitable suspension which is fed to an autoclave with a retentiontime of 20 minutes at 260degC. The residue is filtered off and the liquor reused for grinding and ex- traction. The demand for a reaction temperature near 300degC, a pressure up to 120 atm. and a continuos operation favours a tubular flow autoclave with so narrow a bore that the turbulence provides the mechanical agitation of the suspension. From the mined material it appears that more than 80% of the uranium can be extracted in the pipe autoclave. Some samples give off the obtainable uranium in 20 minutes. The precipitated yellow cake is contaminated with more Na and Si than admitted by international standards. (EG)

  17. The temperature coefficient of the resonance integral for uranium metal and oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomberg, P; Hellstrand, E; Homer, S

    1960-06-15

    The temperature coefficient of the resonance integral in uranium metal and oxide has been measured over a wide temperature range for rods with three different diameters. The results for metal agree with most earlier results from activation measurements but differ as much as a factor of two from results obtained with reactivity methods. For oxide only one measurement has been reported recently. Our value is considerably lower than the result of that measurement. The experiments will continue in order to find the reason for the large discrepancy mentioned above.

  18. The temperature coefficient of the resonance integral for uranium metal and oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomberg, P.; Hellstrand, E.; Homer, S.

    1960-06-01

    The temperature coefficient of the resonance integral in uranium metal and oxide has been measured over a wide temperature range for rods with three different diameters. The results for metal agree with most earlier results from activation measurements but differ as much as a factor of two from results obtained with reactivity methods. For oxide only one measurement has been reported recently. Our value is considerably lower than the result of that measurement. The experiments will continue in order to find the reason for the large discrepancy mentioned above

  19. Plastic Flow Characteristics of Uranium-Niobium as a Function of Strain Rate and Temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cady, C.M.; Gray, G.T. III; Hecker, S.S; Thoma, D.J.; Korzekwa, D.R.; Patterson, R.A.; Dunn, P.S.; Bingert, J.F.

    1999-01-01

    The stress-strain response of uranium-niobium alloys as a function of temperature, strain-rate and stress-state was investigated. The yield and flow stresses of the U-Nb alloys were found to exhibit a pronounced strain rate sensitivity, while the hardening rates were found to be insensitive to strain rate and temperature. The overall stress-strain response of the U-6Nb exhibits a sinusoidal hardening response, which is consistent with multiple deformation modes and is thought to be related to shape-memory behavior

  20. Evaluation of parameters effect on the maximum fuel temperature in the core thermal and hydraulic design of HTTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, Nozomu; Maruyama, Soh; Sudo, Yukio; Fujii, Sadao; Niguma, Yoshinori.

    1988-10-01

    This report presents the results of quantitative evaluation on the effects of the dominant parameters on the maximum fuel temperature in the core thermal hydraulic design of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor(HTTR) of 30 MW in thermal power, 950 deg C in reactor outlet coolant temperature and 40 kg/cm 2 G in coolant pressure. The dominant parameters investigated are 1) Gap conductance. 2) Effect of eccertricity of fuel compacts in graphite sleeve. 3) Effect of spacer ribs on heat transfer coefficients. 4) Contact probability of fuel compact and graphite sleeve. 5) Validity of uniform radial power density in the fuel compacts. 6) Effect of impurity gas on gap conductance. 7) Effect of FP gas on gap conductance. The effects of these items on the maximum fuel temperature were quantitalively identified as hot spot factors. A probability of the appearance of the maximum fuel temperature was also evaluated in this report. (author)

  1. New results on equatorial thermospheric winds and the midnight temperature maximum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Meriwether

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Optical observations of thermospheric winds and temperatures determined with high resolution measurements of Doppler shifts and Doppler widths of the OI 630-nm equatorial nightglow emission have been made with improved accuracy at Arequipa, Peru (16.4° S, 71.4° W with an imaging Fabry-Perot interferometer. An observing procedure previously used at Arecibo Observatory was applied to achieve increased spatial and temporal sampling of the thermospheric wind and temperature with the selection of eight azimuthal directions, equally spaced from 0 to 360°, at a zenith angle of 60°. By assuming the equivalence of longitude and local time, the data obtained using this technique is analyzed to determine the mean neutral wind speeds and mean horizontal gradients of the wind field in the zonal and meridional directions. The new temperature measurements obtained with the improved instrumental accuracy clearly show the midnight temperature maximum (MTM peak with amplitudes of 25 to 200 K in all directions observed for most nights. The horizontal wind field maps calculated from the mean winds and gradients show the MTM peak is always preceded by an equatorward wind surge lasting 1–2 h. The results also show for winter events a meridional wind abatement seen after the MTM peak. On one occasion, near the September equinox, a reversal was observed during the poleward transit of the MTM over Arequipa. Analysis inferring vertical winds from the observed convergence yielded inconsistent results, calling into question the validity of this calculation for the MTM structure at equatorial latitudes during solar minimum. Comparison of the observations with the predictions of the NCAR general circulation model indicates that the model fails to reproduce the observed amplitude by a factor of 5 or more. This is attributed in part to the lack of adequate spatial resolution in the model as the MTM phenomenon takes place within a scale of 300–500 km and ~45 min in

  2. Uranium recovery by leaching with sodium carbonate at high temperature and pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soerensen, E.; Koefoed, S.; Lundgaard, T.

    1990-09-01

    An alkaline rock from the Ilimaussaq instrusion, SW Greenland, was proposed as a source of uranium. Its principal uranium bearing mineral, Steenstrupine, is a complex sodium REE phosphosilicate in which Fe, Mn, Th and U are minor constituents. A special feature of this ore body is the content of water soluble minerals: NaF (Villiaumite), Na 2 Si 2 O 5 (Natrosilite) and an organic substance which displays the characteristics of humus. Sulfides are sparse, the most important one being ZnS (Sphalerite) of which the content is generally less than 0.5%. In the mineral under consideration (Lujavrite) the Steenstrupine is mainly finelay disseminated throughout the rock, yielding a uranium content of 300-400 ppm and thorium content of 800-1000 ppm. Laboratory tests indicated that high temperature carbonate leaching was necessary to decompose Steenstrupine. The optium temperature was shown to be 260 deg. C and the leach liquor composition 120 g/l of NaHCO 3 and 20 g/l of Na 2 C0 3 . Addition of oxygen is necessary. The process was developed to industrial scale in a continuous pipe autoclave with a retention time of 20 min. After filtering on a belt filter, the liquor was recycled several times to obtain a higher U-concentration. By reductive precipitation with iron powder a raw UO 2 was obtained. It was purified after dissolution in HNO 3 . An overall yield of 80% could be obtained. (author) 32 tabs., 13 ills., 24 refs

  3. Maruhn-Greiner Maximum of Uranium Fission for Confirmation of Low Energy Nuclear Reactions LENR via a Compound Nucleus with Double Magic Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hora, H.; Miley, G. H.

    2007-12-01

    One of the most convincing facts about LENR due to deuterons of very high concentration in host metals as palladium is the measurement of the large scale minimum of the reaction probability depending on the nucleon number A of generated elements at A = 153 where a local maximum was measured. This is similar to the fission of uranium at A = 119 where the local maximum follows from the Maruhn-Greiner theory if the splitting nuclei are excited to about MeV energy. The LENR generated elements can be documented any time after the reaction by SIMS or K-shell X-ray excitation to show the very unique distribution with the local maximum. An explanation is based on the strong Debye screening of the Maxwellian deuterons within the degenerate rigid electron background especially within the swimming electron layer at the metal surface or at interfaces. The deuterons behave like neutrals at distances of about 2 picometers. They may form clusters due to soft attraction in the range above thermal energy. Clusters of 10 pm diameter may react over long time probabilities (megaseconds) with Pd nuclei leading to a double magic number compound nucleus which splits like in fission to the A = 153 element distribution.

  4. The fracture mechanism of uranium-niobium alloys near hypoeutectoid composition aged at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaoying; Ren Dapeng; Yang Jianxiong; Jiang Guifen

    2006-01-01

    The microstructures and the crack propagation of uranium-niobium alloys near hypoeutectoid composition aged at temperature 200 degree C for 2 hours during a tension was investigated by means of in situ tension tests using TEM. The results show that the twinning planes inside and between the martensite laths move and merge, and then disintegrate in uranium-niobium alloys with monoclinic α structure during the tension. The crack propagation can be described as follows. Under the tension, the thinning zone which is locally plastically deformed emerges in the front of the crack tip. After the process of nucleation, growth and conjunction, the microvoids connect with the main crack, which results in the fracture. Neither of emission, propagation and movement of dislocation was observed during the tension. (authors)

  5. Merging daily sea surface temperature data from multiple satellites using a Bayesian maximum entropy method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shaolei; Yang, Xiaofeng; Dong, Di; Li, Ziwei

    2015-12-01

    Sea surface temperature (SST) is an important variable for understanding interactions between the ocean and the atmosphere. SST fusion is crucial for acquiring SST products of high spatial resolution and coverage. This study introduces a Bayesian maximum entropy (BME) method for blending daily SSTs from multiple satellite sensors. A new spatiotemporal covariance model of an SST field is built to integrate not only single-day SSTs but also time-adjacent SSTs. In addition, AVHRR 30-year SST climatology data are introduced as soft data at the estimation points to improve the accuracy of blended results within the BME framework. The merged SSTs, with a spatial resolution of 4 km and a temporal resolution of 24 hours, are produced in the Western Pacific Ocean region to demonstrate and evaluate the proposed methodology. Comparisons with in situ drifting buoy observations show that the merged SSTs are accurate and the bias and root-mean-square errors for the comparison are 0.15°C and 0.72°C, respectively.

  6. The maximum allowable temperature of zircaloy-2 fuel cladding under dry storage conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayuzumi, M.; Yoshiki, S.; Yasuda, T.; Nakatsuka, M.

    1990-09-01

    Japan plans to reprocess and reutilise the spent nuclear fuel from nuclear power generation. However, the temporary storage of spent fuel is assuming increasing importance as a means of ensuring flexibility in the nuclear fuel cycle. Our investigations of various methods of storage have shown that casks are the most suitable means of storing small quantities of spent fuel of around 500 t, and research and development are in progress to establish dry storage technology for such casks. The soundness of fuel cladding is being investigated. The most important factor in evaluating soundness in storage under inert gas as currently envisaged is creep deformation and rupture, and a number of investigations have been made of the creep behaviour of cladding. The present study was conducted on the basis of existing in-house results in collaboration with Nippon Kakunenryo Kaihatsu KK (Nippon Nuclear Fuel Department Co.), which has hot lab facilities. Tests were run on the creep deformation behaviour of irradiated cladding, and the maximum allowable temperature during dry storage was investigated. (author)

  7. Fuel Retention Improvement at High Temperatures in Tungsten-Uranium Dioxide Dispersion Fuel Elements by Plasma-Spray Cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisaffe, Salvatore J.; Caves, Robert M.

    1964-01-01

    An investigation was undertaken to determine the feasibility of depositing integrally bonded plasma-sprayed tungsten coatings onto 80-volume-percent tungsten - 20-volume-percent uranium dioxide composites. These composites were face clad with thin tungsten foil to inhibit uranium dioxide loss at elevated temperatures, but loss at the unclad edges was still significant. By preheating the composite substrates to approximately 3700 degrees F in a nitrogen environment, metallurgically bonded tungsten coatings could be obtained directly by plasma spraying. Furthermore, even though these coatings were thin and somewhat porous, they greatly inhibited the loss of uranium dioxide. For example, a specimen that was face clad but had no edge cladding lost 5.8 percent uranium dioxide after 2 hours at 4750 dgrees F in flowing hydrogen. A similar specimen with plasma-spray-coated edges, however, lost only 0.75 percent uranium dioxide under the same testing conditions.

  8. Thermodynamic functions and vapor pressures of uranium and plutonium oxides at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, D.W.; Reedy, G.T.; Leibowitz, L.

    1977-01-01

    The total energy release in a hypothetical reactor accident is sensitive to the total vapor pressure of the fuel. Thermodynamic functions which are accurate at high temperature can be calculated with the methods of statistical mechanics provided that needed spectroscopic data are available. This method of obtaining high-temperature vapor pressures should be greatly superior to the extrapolation of experimental vapor pressure measurements beyond the temperature range studied. Spectroscopic data needed for these calculations are obtained from infrared spectroscopy of matrix-isolated uranium and plutonium oxides. These data allow the assignments of the observed spectra to specific molecular species as well as the calculation of anharmonicities for monoxides, bond angles for dioxides, and molecular geometries for trioxides. These data are then employed, in combination with data on rotational and electronic molecular energy levels, to determine thermodynamic functions that are suitable for the calculation of high-temperature vapor pressures

  9. First-principles study on oxidation effects in uranium oxides and high-pressure high-temperature behavior of point defects in uranium dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Hua Y.; Song, Hong X.; Jin, K.; Xiang, S. K.; Wu, Q.

    2011-11-01

    Formation Gibbs free energy of point defects and oxygen clusters in uranium dioxide at high-pressure high-temperature conditions are calculated from first principles, using the LSDA+U approach for the electronic structure and the Debye model for the lattice vibrations. The phonon contribution on Frenkel pairs is found to be notable, whereas it is negligible for the Schottky defect. Hydrostatic compression changes the formation energies drastically, making defect concentrations depend more sensitively on pressure. Calculations show that, if no oxygen clusters are considered, uranium vacancy becomes predominant in overstoichiometric UO2 with the aid of the contribution from lattice vibrations, while compression favors oxygen defects and suppresses uranium vacancy greatly. At ambient pressure, however, the experimental observation of predominant oxygen defects in this regime can be reproduced only in a form of cuboctahedral clusters, underlining the importance of defect clustering in UO2+x. Making use of the point defect model, an equation of state for nonstoichiometric oxides is established, which is then applied to describe the shock Hugoniot of UO2+x. Furthermore, the oxidization and compression behavior of uranium monoxide, triuranium octoxide, uranium trioxide, and a series of defective UO2 at 0 K are investigated. The evolution of mechanical properties and electronic structures with an increase of the oxidation degree are analyzed, revealing the transition of the ground state of uranium oxides from metallic to Mott insulator and then to charge-transfer insulator due to the interplay of strongly correlated effects of 5f orbitals and the shift of electrons from uranium to oxygen atoms.

  10. In-situ neutron diffraction characterization of temperature dependence deformation in α-uranium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, C. A.; Garlea, E.; Sisneros, T. A.; Agnew, S. R.

    2018-04-01

    In-situ strain neutron diffraction measurements were conducted at temperature on specimens coming from a clock-rolled α-uranium plate, and Elasto-Plastic Self-Consistent (EPSC) modeling was employed to interpret the findings. The modeling revealed that the active slip systems exhibit a thermally activated response, while deformation twinning remains athermal over the temperature ranges explored (25-150 °C). The modeling also allowed assessment of the effects of thermal residual stresses on the mechanical response during compression. These results are consistent with those from a prior study of room-temperature deformation, indicating that the thermal residual stresses strongly influence the internal strain evolution of grain families, as monitored with neutron diffraction, even though accounting for these residual stresses has little effect on the macroscopic flow curve, except in the elasto-plastic transition.

  11. Design and installation of high-temperature ultrasonic measuring system and grinder for nuclear fuel containing trans-uranium elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serizawa, Hiroyuki; Kikuchi, Hironobu; Iwai, Takashi; Arai, Yasuo; Kurosawa, Makoto; Mimura, Hideaki; Abe, Jiro

    2005-07-01

    A high-temperature ultrasonic measuring system had been designed and installed in a glovebox (711-DGB) to study a mechanical property of nuclear fuel containing trans-uranium (TRU) elements. A figuration apparatus for the cylinder-type sample preparation had also been modified and installed in an established glovebox (142-D). The system consists of an ultrasonic probe, a heating furnace, cooling water-circulating system, a cooling air compressor, vacuum system, gas supplying system and control system. An A/D converter board and an pulsar/receiver board for the measurement of wave velocity were installed in a personal computer. The apparatus was modified to install into the glovebox. Some safety functions were supplied to the control system. The shape and size of the sample was revised to minimize the amount of TRU elements for the use of the measurement. The maximum sample temperature is 1500degC. The performance of the installed apparatuses and the glovebox were confirmed through a series of tests. (author)

  12. Effect of temperature dependent properties on MHD convection of water near its density maximum in a square cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivasankaran, S.; Hoa, C.J.

    2008-01-01

    Natural convection of water near its density maximum in the presence of magnetic field in a cavity with temperature dependent properties is studied numerically. The viscosity and thermal conductivity of the water is varied with reference temperature and calculated by cubic polynomial. The finite volume method is used to solve the governing equations. The results are presented graphically in the form of streamlines, isotherms and velocity vectors and are discussed for various combinations of reference temperature parameter, Rayleigh number, density inversion parameter and Hartmann number. It is observed that flow and temperature field are affected significantly by changing the reference temperature parameter for temperature dependent thermal conductivity and both temperature dependent viscosity and thermal conductivity cases. There is no significant effect on fluid flow and temperature distributions for temperature dependent viscosity case when changing the values of reference temperature parameter. The average heat transfer rate considering temperature-dependent viscosity are higher than considering temperature-dependent thermal conductivity and both temperature-dependent viscosity and thermal conductivity. The average Nusselt number decreases with an increase of Hartmann number. It is observed that the density inversion of water leaves strong effects on fluid flow and heat transfer due to the formation of bi-cellular structure. The heat transfer rate behaves non-linearly with density inversion parameter. The direction of external magnetic field also affect the fluid flow and heat transfer. (authors)

  13. Probabilistic measures of climate change vulnerability, adaptation action benefits, and related uncertainty from maximum temperature metric selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWeber, Jefferson T.; Wagner, Tyler

    2018-01-01

    Predictions of the projected changes in species distributions and potential adaptation action benefits can help guide conservation actions. There is substantial uncertainty in projecting species distributions into an unknown future, however, which can undermine confidence in predictions or misdirect conservation actions if not properly considered. Recent studies have shown that the selection of alternative climate metrics describing very different climatic aspects (e.g., mean air temperature vs. mean precipitation) can be a substantial source of projection uncertainty. It is unclear, however, how much projection uncertainty might stem from selecting among highly correlated, ecologically similar climate metrics (e.g., maximum temperature in July, maximum 30‐day temperature) describing the same climatic aspect (e.g., maximum temperatures) known to limit a species’ distribution. It is also unclear how projection uncertainty might propagate into predictions of the potential benefits of adaptation actions that might lessen climate change effects. We provide probabilistic measures of climate change vulnerability, adaptation action benefits, and related uncertainty stemming from the selection of four maximum temperature metrics for brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis), a cold‐water salmonid of conservation concern in the eastern United States. Projected losses in suitable stream length varied by as much as 20% among alternative maximum temperature metrics for mid‐century climate projections, which was similar to variation among three climate models. Similarly, the regional average predicted increase in brook trout occurrence probability under an adaptation action scenario of full riparian forest restoration varied by as much as .2 among metrics. Our use of Bayesian inference provides probabilistic measures of vulnerability and adaptation action benefits for individual stream reaches that properly address statistical uncertainty and can help guide conservation

  14. Probabilistic measures of climate change vulnerability, adaptation action benefits, and related uncertainty from maximum temperature metric selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWeber, Jefferson T; Wagner, Tyler

    2018-06-01

    Predictions of the projected changes in species distributions and potential adaptation action benefits can help guide conservation actions. There is substantial uncertainty in projecting species distributions into an unknown future, however, which can undermine confidence in predictions or misdirect conservation actions if not properly considered. Recent studies have shown that the selection of alternative climate metrics describing very different climatic aspects (e.g., mean air temperature vs. mean precipitation) can be a substantial source of projection uncertainty. It is unclear, however, how much projection uncertainty might stem from selecting among highly correlated, ecologically similar climate metrics (e.g., maximum temperature in July, maximum 30-day temperature) describing the same climatic aspect (e.g., maximum temperatures) known to limit a species' distribution. It is also unclear how projection uncertainty might propagate into predictions of the potential benefits of adaptation actions that might lessen climate change effects. We provide probabilistic measures of climate change vulnerability, adaptation action benefits, and related uncertainty stemming from the selection of four maximum temperature metrics for brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis), a cold-water salmonid of conservation concern in the eastern United States. Projected losses in suitable stream length varied by as much as 20% among alternative maximum temperature metrics for mid-century climate projections, which was similar to variation among three climate models. Similarly, the regional average predicted increase in brook trout occurrence probability under an adaptation action scenario of full riparian forest restoration varied by as much as .2 among metrics. Our use of Bayesian inference provides probabilistic measures of vulnerability and adaptation action benefits for individual stream reaches that properly address statistical uncertainty and can help guide conservation actions. Our

  15. Vapor pressures and vapor compositions in equilibrium with hypostoichiometric uranium-plutonium dioxide at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, D.W.; Fink, J.K.; Leibowitz, L.

    1982-01-01

    Vapor pressures and vapor compositions in equilibrium with a hypostoichiometric uranium-plutonium dioxide condensed phase (U/sub 1-y/Pu/sub y/)O/sub 2-x/, as functions of T, x, and y, have been calculated for 0.0 less than or equal to x less than or equal to 0.1, 0.0 less than or equal to y less than or equal to 0.3, and for the temperature range 2500 less than or equal to T less than or equal to 6000 K. The range of compositions and temperatures was limited to the region of interest to reactor safety analysis. Thermodynamic functions for the condensed phase and for each of the gaseous species were combined with an oxygen potential model to obtain partial pressures of O, O 2 , Pu, PuO, PuO 2 , U, UO, UO 2 , and UO 3 as functions of T, x, and y

  16. Dynamic Performance of Maximum Power Point Trackers in TEG Systems Under Rapidly Changing Temperature Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Man, E. A.; Sera, D.; Mathe, L.

    2016-01-01

    of the intermittent operation of the internal combustion engine, the TEG and its MPPT controller are exposed to a cyclic temperature profile. Furthermore, there are no guidelines on how fast the MPPT must be under such dynamic conditions. In the work discussed in this paper, temperature gradients for TEG integrated...

  17. Influence of maximum water temperature on occurrence of Lahontan cutthroat trout within streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. Dunham; R. Schroeter; B. Rieman

    2003-01-01

    We measured water temperature at 87 sites in six streams in two different years (1998 and 1999) to test for association with the occurrence of Lahontan cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarki henshawi. Because laboratory studies suggest that Lahontan cutthroat trout begin to show signs of acute stress at warm (>22°C) temperatures, we focused on the...

  18. Climate Prediction Center (CPC) U.S. Daily Maximum Air Temperature Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Observational reports of daily air temperature (1200 UTC to 1200 UTC) are made by members of the NWS Automated Surface Observing Systems (ASOS) network; NWS...

  19. U3O8 obtained from metallic uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, Marisol; Gonzalez, Alfredo; Pasqualini, Enrique E.

    2003-01-01

    Enriched uranium oxide, U 3 O 8 , used as nuclear powder in MTR's, can be obtained by direct oxidation of metallic uranium at 800 C degrees. Maximum density, 8.2 gr/cm 3 , is achieved after grinding and a high temperature treatment at 1400 C degrees. All the process is highly controllable and performed in dry environments. (author)

  20. Maximum Efficiency of Thermoelectric Heat Conversion in High-Temperature Power Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Khvesyuk

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern trends in development of aircraft engineering go with development of vehicles of the fifth generation. The features of aircrafts of the fifth generation are motivation to use new high-performance systems of onboard power supply. The operating temperature of the outer walls of engines is of 800–1000 K. This corresponds to radiation heat flux of 10 kW/m2 . The thermal energy including radiation of the engine wall may potentially be converted into electricity. The main objective of this paper is to analyze if it is possible to use a high efficiency thermoelectric conversion of heat into electricity. The paper considers issues such as working processes, choice of materials, and optimization of thermoelectric conversion. It presents the analysis results of operating conditions of thermoelectric generator (TEG used in advanced hightemperature power devices. A high-temperature heat source is a favorable factor for the thermoelectric conversion of heat. It is shown that for existing thermoelectric materials a theoretical conversion efficiency can reach the level of 15–20% at temperatures up to 1500 K and available values of Ioffe parameter being ZT = 2–3 (Z is figure of merit, T is temperature. To ensure temperature regime and high efficiency thermoelectric conversion simultaneously it is necessary to have a certain match between TEG power, temperature of hot and cold surfaces, and heat transfer coefficient of the cooling system. The paper discusses a concept of radiation absorber on the TEG hot surface. The analysis has demonstrated a number of potentialities for highly efficient conversion through using the TEG in high-temperature power devices. This work has been implemented under support of the Ministry of Education and Science of the Russian Federation; project No. 1145 (the programme “Organization of Research Engineering Activities”.

  1. Method for converting uranium oxides to uranium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duerksen, W.K.

    1988-01-01

    A method for converting uranium oxide to uranium metal is described comprising the steps of heating uranium oxide in the presence of a reducing agent to a temperature sufficient to reduce the uranium oxide to uranium metal and form a heterogeneous mixture of a uranium metal product and oxide by-products, heating the mixture in a hydrogen atmosphere at a temperature sufficient to convert uranium metal in the mixture to uranium hydride, cooling the resulting uranium hydride-containing mixture to a temperature sufficient to produce a ferromagnetic transition in the uranium hydride, magnetically separating the cooled uranium hydride from the mixture, and thereafter heating the separated uranium hydride in an inert atmosphere to a temperature sufficient to convert the uranium hydride to uranium metal

  2. Experimental program to determine maximum temperatures for dry storage of spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knox, C.A.; Gilbert, E.R.; White, G.D.

    1985-02-01

    Although air is used as a cover gas in some dry storage facilities, other facilities use inert cover gases which must be monitored to assure inertness of the atmosphere. Thus qualifying air as a cover gas is attractive for the dry storage of spent fuels. At sufficiently high temperatures, air can react with spent fuel (UO 2 ) at the site of cladding breaches that formed during reactor irradiation or during dry storage. The reaction rate is temperature dependent; hence the rates can be maintained at acceptable levels if temperatures are low. Tests with spent fuel are being conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to determine the allowable temperatures for storage of spent fuel in air. Tests performed with nonirradiated UO 2 pellets indicated that moisture, surface condition, gamma radiation, gadolinia content of the fuel pellet, and temperature are important variables. Tests were then initiated on spent fuel to develop design data under simulated dry storage conditions. Tests have been conducted at 200 and 230 0 C on spent fuel in air and 275 0 C in moist nitrogen. The results for nonirradiated UO 2 and published data for irradiated fuel indicate that above 230 0 C, oxidation rates are unacceptably high for extended storage in air. The tests with spent fuel will be continued for approximately three years to enable reliable extrapolations to be made for extended storage in air and inert gases with oxidizing constituents. 6 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  3. THE MAXIMUM EFFECT OF DEEP LAKES ON TEMPERATURE PROFILES – DETERMINATION OF THE GEOTHERMAL GRADIENT

    OpenAIRE

    Eppelbaum L. V.; Kutasov I. M.; Balobaev V. T.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the climate change processes on the basis of geothermal observations in boreholes is an important and at the same time high-intricate problem. Many non-climatic effects could cause changes in ground surface temperatures. In this study we investigate the effects of deep lakes on the borehole temperature profilesobserved within or in the vicinity of the lakes. We propose a method based on utilization of Laplace equation with nonuniform boundary conditions. The proposed method make...

  4. Waste arisings from a high-temperature reactor with a uranium-thorium fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-09-01

    This paper presents an equilibrium-recycle condition flow sheet for a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTR) fuel cycle which uses thorium and high-enriched uranium (93% U-235) as makeup fuel. INFCE Working Group 7 defined percentage losses to various waste streams are used to adjust the heavy-element mass flows per gigawatt-year of electricity generated. Thorium and bred U-233 are recycled following Thorex reprocessing. Fissile U-235 is recycled one time following Purex reprocessing and then is discarded to waste. Plutonium and other transuranics are discarded to waste. Included are estimates of volume, radioactivity, and heavy-element content of wastes arising from HTR fuel element fabrication; HTR operation, maintenance, and decommissioning; and reprocessing spent fuel where the waste is unique to the HTR fuel cycle

  5. High-temperature vaporization of thorium-uranium mixed monocarbide (Th1-y, Uy)C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyama, Tadafumi; Yamawaki, Michio

    1989-01-01

    Vaporization thermodynamics of thorium-uranium mixed monocarbide phase (Th 1-y , U y )C was studied by mass spectrometric Knudsen effusion method for the compositions of (Th 0.9 , U 0.1 )C 0.855 , (Th 0.8 , U 0.2 )C 0.973 and (Th 0.6 , U 0.4 )C 0.973 . The partial vapor pressures of Th(g) and U(g) and activities of Th and U of these mixed monocarbides were determined at temperatures ranging from about 2000 to 2200 K. Further, the partial pressures of Th(g) and U(g) and activities of Th and U of the stoichiometric mixed monocarbides (Th 1-y , U y )C 1.00 were evaluated by compensating for the effect of carbon content. The Gibbs energies of formation of stoichiometric (Th 1-y , U y )C 1.00 were also evaluated. (orig.)

  6. Temperature of the Icelandic crust: Inferred from electrical conductivity, temperature surface gradient, and maximum depth of earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björnsson, Axel

    2008-02-01

    Two different models of the structure of the Icelandic crust have been presented. One is the thin-crust model with a 10-15 km thick crust beneath the axial rift zones, with an intermediate layer of partially molten basalt at the base of the crust and on the top of an up-domed asthenosphere. The thick-crust model assumes a 40 km thick and relatively cold crust beneath central Iceland. The most important and crucial parameter to distinguish between these different models is the temperature distribution with depth. Three methods are used to estimate the temperature distribution with depth. First, the surface temperature gradient measured in shallow wells drilled outside geothermal areas. Second, the thickness of the seismogenic zone which is associated with a 750 °C isothermal surface. Third, the depth to a layer with high electrical conductivity which is associated with partially molten basalt with temperature around 1100 °C at the base of the crust. Combination of these data shows that the temperature gradient can be assumed to be nearly linear from the surface down to the base of the crust. These results are strongly in favour of the thin-crust model. The scattered deep seismic reflectors interpreted as Moho in the thick-crust model could be caused by phase transitions or reflections from melt pockets in the mantle.

  7. County-Level Climate Uncertainty for Risk Assessments: Volume 4 Appendix C - Historical Maximum Near-Surface Air Temperature.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backus, George A.; Lowry, Thomas Stephen; Jones, Shannon M; Walker, La Tonya Nicole; Roberts, Barry L; Malczynski, Leonard A.

    2017-06-01

    This report uses the CMIP5 series of climate model simulations to produce country- level uncertainty distributions for use in socioeconomic risk assessments of climate change impacts. It provides appropriate probability distributions, by month, for 169 countries and autonomous-areas on temperature, precipitation, maximum temperature, maximum wind speed, humidity, runoff, soil moisture and evaporation for the historical period (1976-2005), and for decadal time periods to 2100. It also provides historical and future distributions for the Arctic region on ice concentration, ice thickness, age of ice, and ice ridging in 15-degree longitude arc segments from the Arctic Circle to 80 degrees latitude, plus two polar semicircular regions from 80 to 90 degrees latitude. The uncertainty is meant to describe the lack of knowledge rather than imprecision in the physical simulation because the emphasis is on unfalsified risk and its use to determine potential socioeconomic impacts. The full report is contained in 27 volumes.

  8. Experimental determination of a critical temperature for maximum anaerobic digester biogas production

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sichilalu, S

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available fission of methanogenic bacteria. The temperature was varied over time over several days and the biogas production is recorded every after 24 hours(1 day) . Based on the experiment setup, the results show a higher biogas production proportional to the rise...

  9. Ion permeability of the cytoplasmic membrane limits the maximum growth temperature of bacteria and archaea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Vossenberg, J.L C M; Ubbink-Kok, T.; Elferink, M.G.L.; Driessen, A.J.M.; Konings, W.N

    1995-01-01

    Protons and sodium ions are the most commonly used coupling ions in energy transduction in bacteria and archaea. At their growth temperature, the permeability of the cytoplasmic membrane of thermophilic bacteria to protons is high compared with that of sodium ions. In some thermophiles, sodium is

  10. Phonon dispersion relation of uranium nitrate above and below the Neel temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolling, G.; Holden, T.M.; Evensson, E.C.; Buyers, W.J.L.; Lander, G.H.

    1977-01-01

    Neutron coherent inelastic scattering measurements have been made of the phonon dispersion relation of uranium nitride both above and below the Neel temperature T/sub N/ = 50 K. Within the precision of the measurements, about 1% in frequency and 10% in line width and in scattered neutron intensity, no significant changes in these phonon properties were observed as a function of temperature other than those arising from population factor changes and a small stiffening of the lattice as the temperature decreases. At 4.2 K, two acoustic and two optic branches have been determined for each of the [001], [110] and [111] directions. The optic mode measurements revealed (a) a 20% variation in frequency across the Brillouin zone and (b) an interesting disposition of the LO and TO modes, such that nu/sub LO/ > nu/sub TO/ along [001] and [110], while the reverse is true along the [111] directions. Within the experimental resolution, the LO and TO modes are degenerate near q = 0. We have been unable to obtain any satisfactory description of these results on the basis of conventional theoretical treatments (e.g. rigid-ion or shell models). Other possible interpretations of the results are discussed

  11. Phonon dispersion relation of uranium nitride above and below the Neel temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolling, G.; Holden, T.M.; Svensson, E.C.; Buyers, W.J.L.; Lander, G.H.

    1977-01-01

    Neutron coherent inelastic scattering measurements have been made of the phonon dispersion relation of uranium nitride both above and below the Neel temperature T N = 50 K. Within the precision of the measurements, about 1% in frequency and 10% in line width and in scattered neutron intensity, no significant changes in these phonon properties were observed as a function of temperature other than those arising from population factor changes and a small stiffening of the lattice as the temperature decreases. At 4.2 K, two acoustic and two optic branches have been determined for each of the [001], [110] and [111] directions. The optic mode measurements revealed (a) a 20% variation in frequency across the Brillouin zone and (b) and interesting disposition of the LO and TO modes, such that ν LO > ν TO along [001] and [11-], while the reverse is true along the [111] directions. Within the experimental resolution, the LO and TO modes are degenerate near q = 0. We have been unable to obtain any satisfactory description of these results on the basis of conventional theoretical treatments (e.g. rigid-ion or shell models). Other possible interpretations of the results are discussed. (author)

  12. Seasonal maximum temperature prediction skill over Southern Africa: 1- vs 2-tiered forecasting systems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Lazenby, MJ

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available TEMPERATURE PREDICTION SKILL OVER SOUTHERN AFRICA: 1- VS. 2-TIERED FORECASTING SYSTEMS Melissa J. Lazenby University of Pretoria, Private Bag X20, Pretoria, 0028, South Africa Willem A. Landman Council for Scientific and Industrial....J., Tyson, P.D. and Tennant, W.J., 2001. Retro-active skill of multi- tiered forecasts of summer rainfall over southern Africa. International Journal of Climatology, 21, 1- 19. Mason, S.J. and Graham, N.E., 2002. Areas beneath the relative operating...

  13. Extended Kalman Filtering to estimate temperature and irradiation for maximum power point tracking of a photovoltaic module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Docimo, D.J.; Ghanaatpishe, M.; Mamun, A.

    2017-01-01

    This paper develops an algorithm for estimating photovoltaic (PV) module temperature and effective irradiation level. The power output of a PV system depends directly on both of these states. Estimating the temperature and irradiation allows for improved state-based control methods while eliminating the need of additional sensors. Thermal models and irradiation estimators have been developed in the literature, but none incorporate feedback for estimation. This paper outlines an Extended Kalman Filter for temperature and irradiation estimation. These estimates are, in turn, used within a novel state-based controller that tracks the maximum power point of the PV system. Simulation results indicate this state-based controller provides up to an 8.5% increase in energy produced per day as compared to an impedance matching controller. A sensitivity analysis is provided to examine the impact state estimate errors have on the ability to find the optimal operating point of the PV system. - Highlights: • Developed a temperature and irradiation estimator for photovoltaic systems. • Designed an Extended Kalman Filter to handle model and measurement uncertainty. • Developed a state-based controller for maximum power point tracking (MPPT). • Validated combined estimator/controller algorithm for different weather conditions. • Algorithm increases energy captured up to 8.5% over traditional MPPT algorithms.

  14. Determination of maximum water temperature within the spent fuel pool of Angra Nuclear Power Plant - Unit 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, F.L., E-mail: fernanda.werner@poli.ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear; Alves, A.S.M., E-mail: asergi@eletronuclear.gov.br [Eletrobras Termonuclear (Eletronuclear), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Frutuoso e Melo, P.F., E-mail: frutuoso@nuclear.ufrj.br [Coordenacao de Pos-Graduacao e Pesquisa de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, a mathematical model for the determination of the maximum water temperature within the spent fuel pool of Angra Nuclear Power Plant – Unit 3 was developed. The model was obtained from the boundary layer analysis and the application of Navier-Stokes equation to a vertical flat plate immersed in a water flow under free convection regime. Both types of pressure loss coefficients through the flow channel were considers in the modeling, the form coefficient for fuel assemblies (FAs) and the loss due to rod friction. The resulting equations enabled the determination of a mixed water temperature below the storage racks (High Density Storage Racks) as well as the estimation of a temperature gradient through the racks. The model was applied to the authorized operation of the plant (power operation, plant outage and upset condition) and faulted conditions (loss of coolant accidents and external events). The results obtained are in agreement with Brazilian and international standards. (author)

  15. Determination of maximum water temperature within the spent fuel pool of Angra Nuclear Power Plant - Unit 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, F.L.; Frutuoso e Melo, P.F.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a mathematical model for the determination of the maximum water temperature within the spent fuel pool of Angra Nuclear Power Plant – Unit 3 was developed. The model was obtained from the boundary layer analysis and the application of Navier-Stokes equation to a vertical flat plate immersed in a water flow under free convection regime. Both types of pressure loss coefficients through the flow channel were considers in the modeling, the form coefficient for fuel assemblies (FAs) and the loss due to rod friction. The resulting equations enabled the determination of a mixed water temperature below the storage racks (High Density Storage Racks) as well as the estimation of a temperature gradient through the racks. The model was applied to the authorized operation of the plant (power operation, plant outage and upset condition) and faulted conditions (loss of coolant accidents and external events). The results obtained are in agreement with Brazilian and international standards. (author)

  16. Estimating daily minimum, maximum, and mean near surface air temperature using hybrid satellite models across Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, Adar; Dorman, Michael; Schwartz, Joel; Novack, Victor; Just, Allan C; Kloog, Itai

    2017-11-01

    Meteorological stations measure air temperature (Ta) accurately with high temporal resolution, but usually suffer from limited spatial resolution due to their sparse distribution across rural, undeveloped or less populated areas. Remote sensing satellite-based measurements provide daily surface temperature (Ts) data in high spatial and temporal resolution and can improve the estimation of daily Ta. In this study we developed spatiotemporally resolved models which allow us to predict three daily parameters: Ta Max (day time), 24h mean, and Ta Min (night time) on a fine 1km grid across the state of Israel. We used and compared both the Aqua and Terra MODIS satellites. We used linear mixed effect models, IDW (inverse distance weighted) interpolations and thin plate splines (using a smooth nonparametric function of longitude and latitude) to first calibrate between Ts and Ta in those locations where we have available data for both and used that calibration to fill in neighboring cells without surface monitors or missing Ts. Out-of-sample ten-fold cross validation (CV) was used to quantify the accuracy of our predictions. Our model performance was excellent for both days with and without available Ts observations for both Aqua and Terra (CV Aqua R 2 results for min 0.966, mean 0.986, and max 0.967; CV Terra R 2 results for min 0.965, mean 0.987, and max 0.968). Our research shows that daily min, mean and max Ta can be reliably predicted using daily MODIS Ts data even across Israel, with high accuracy even for days without Ta or Ts data. These predictions can be used as three separate Ta exposures in epidemiology studies for better diurnal exposure assessment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Comparative Study of Regional Estimation Methods for Daily Maximum Temperature (A Case Study of the Isfahan Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghamar Fadavi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: As the statistical time series are in short period and the meteorological station are not distributed well in mountainous area determining of climatic criteria are complex. Therefore, in recent years interpolation methods for establishment of continuous climatic data have been considered. Continuous daily maximum temperature data are a key factor for climate-crop modeling which is fundamental for water resources management, drought, and optimal use from climatic potentials of different regions. The main objective of this study is to evaluate different interpolation methods for estimation of regional maximum temperature in the Isfahan province. Materials and Methods: Isfahan province has about 937,105 square kilometers, between 30 degree and 43 minutes to 34 degree and 27 minutes North latitude equator line and 49 degree and 36 minutes to 55 degree and 31 minutes east longitude Greenwich. It is located in the center of Iran and it's western part extend to eastern footage of the Zagros mountain range. It should be mentioned that elevation range of meteorological stations are between 845 to 2490 in the study area. This study was done using daily maximum temperature data of 1992 and 2007 years of synoptic and climatology stations of I.R. of Iran meteorological organization (IRIMO. In order to interpolate temperature data, two years including 1992 and 2007 with different number of meteorological stations have been selected the temperature data of thirty meteorological stations (17 synoptic and 13 climatologically stations for 1992 year and fifty four meteorological stations (31 synoptic and 23 climatologically stations for 2007 year were used from Isfahan province and neighboring provinces. In order to regionalize the point data of daily maximum temperature, the interpolation methods, including inverse distance weighted (IDW, Kriging, Co-Kriging, Kriging-Regression, multiple regression and Spline were used. Therefore, for this allocated

  18. Computed estimates of maximum temperature elevations in fetal tissues during transabdominal pulsed Doppler examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bly, S H; Vlahovich, S; Mabee, P R; Hussey, R G

    1992-01-01

    Measured characteristics of ultrasonic fields were obtained in submissions from manufacturers of diagnostic ultrasound equipment for devices operating in pulsed Doppler mode. Simple formulae were used with these data to generate upper limits to fetal temperature elevations, delta Tlim, during a transabdominal pulsed Doppler examination. A total of 236 items were analyzed, each item being a console/transducer/operating-mode/intended-use combination, for which the spatial-peak temporal-average intensity, ISPTA, was greater than 500 mW cm-2. The largest calculated delta Tlim values were approximately 1.5, 7.1 and 8.7 degrees C for first-, second- and third-trimester examinations, respectively. The vast majority of items yielded delta Tlim values which were less than 1 degree C in the first trimester. For second- and third-trimester examinations, where heating of fetal bone determines delta Tlim, most delta Tlim values were less than 4 degrees C. The clinical significance of the results is discussed.

  19. Refining of high-temperature uranium melt by filtration through foam-ceramic filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antsiferov, V.N.; Porozova, S.E.; Filippov, V.B.; Shtutsa, M.G.; Il'enko, E.V.; Kolotygina, N.S.

    2004-01-01

    An opportunity of applying foam-ceramic filters of corundum-mullite composition has been studied in refining natural uranium melts. Uranium melting conditions were chosen depending on technical characteristics of the foam ceramic filters. When their using, a portion of nonmetallic inclusions decreases by 20-30% (as little as 2.0-3.5% ingot weight), their size is reduced and their distribution in the ingot volume is equalized, contamination of uranium by the filter material being failed to be noticed. The parameters of foam-ceramic filters are optimized for provision of stable characteristics of uranium melt filtration process [ru

  20. Estimation of daily maximum and minimum air temperatures in urban landscapes using MODIS time series satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Cheolhee; Im, Jungho; Park, Seonyoung; Quackenbush, Lindi J.

    2018-03-01

    Urban air temperature is considered a significant variable for a variety of urban issues, and analyzing the spatial patterns of air temperature is important for urban planning and management. However, insufficient weather stations limit accurate spatial representation of temperature within a heterogeneous city. This study used a random forest machine learning approach to estimate daily maximum and minimum air temperatures (Tmax and Tmin) for two megacities with different climate characteristics: Los Angeles, USA, and Seoul, South Korea. This study used eight time-series land surface temperature (LST) data from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), with seven auxiliary variables: elevation, solar radiation, normalized difference vegetation index, latitude, longitude, aspect, and the percentage of impervious area. We found different relationships between the eight time-series LSTs with Tmax/Tmin for the two cities, and designed eight schemes with different input LST variables. The schemes were evaluated using the coefficient of determination (R2) and Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) from 10-fold cross-validation. The best schemes produced R2 of 0.850 and 0.777 and RMSE of 1.7 °C and 1.2 °C for Tmax and Tmin in Los Angeles, and R2 of 0.728 and 0.767 and RMSE of 1.1 °C and 1.2 °C for Tmax and Tmin in Seoul, respectively. LSTs obtained the day before were crucial for estimating daily urban air temperature. Estimated air temperature patterns showed that Tmax was highly dependent on the geographic factors (e.g., sea breeze, mountains) of the two cities, while Tmin showed marginally distinct temperature differences between built-up and vegetated areas in the two cities.

  1. Uranium geochemistry, mineralogy, geology, exploration and resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Vivo, B.

    1984-01-01

    This book comprises papers on the following topics: history of radioactivity; uranium in mantle processes; transport and deposition of uranium in hydrothermal systems at temperatures up to 300 0 C: Geological implications; geochemical behaviour of uranium in the supergene environment; uranium exploration techniques; uranium mineralogy; time, crustal evolution and generation of uranium deposits; uranium exploration; geochemistry of uranium in the hydrographic network; uranium deposits of the world, excluding Europe; uranium deposits in Europe; uranium in the economics of energy; role of high heat production granites in uranium province formation; and uranium deposits

  2. The Impacts of Maximum Temperature and Climate Change to Current and Future Pollen Distribution in Skopje, Republic of Macedonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Kendrovski

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND. The goal of the present paper was to assess the impact of current and future burden of the ambient temperature to pollen distributions in Skopje. METHODS. In the study we have evaluated a correlation between the concentration of pollen grains in the atmosphere of Skopje and maximum temperature, during the vegetation period of 1996, 2003, 2007 and 2009 as a current burden in context of climate change. For our analysis we have selected 9 representative of each phytoallergen group (trees, grasses, weeds. The concentration of pollen grains has been monitored by a Lanzoni volumetric pollen trap. The correlation between the concentration of pollen grains in the atmosphere and selected meteorological variable from weekly monitoring has been studied with the help of linear regression and correlation coefficients. RESULTS. The prevalence of the sensibilization of standard pollen allergens in Skopje during the some period shows increasing from 16,9% in 1996 to 19,8% in 2009. We detect differences in onset of flowering, maximum and end of the length of seasons for pollen. The pollen distributions and risk increases in 3 main periods: early spring, spring and summer which are the main cause of allergies during these seasons. The largest increase of air temperature due to climate change in Skopje is expected in the summer season. CONCLUSION. The impacts of climate change by increasing of the temperature in the next decades very likely will include impacts on pollen production and differences in current pollen season. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2012; 11(1.000: 35-40

  3. Reconstructing temperatures in the Maritime Alps, Italy, since the Last Glacial Maximum using cosmogenic noble gas paleothermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Marissa; Spagnolo, Matteo; Ribolini, Adriano; Shuster, David

    2016-04-01

    The Gesso Valley, located in the southwestern-most, Maritime portion of the European Alps, contains an exceptionally well-preserved record of glacial advances during the late Pleistocene and Holocene. Detailed geomorphic mapping, geochronology of glacial deposits, and glacier reconstructions indicate that glaciers in this Mediterranean region responded to millennial scale climate variability differently than glaciers in the interior of the European Alps. This suggests that the Mediterranean Sea somehow modulated the climate of this region. However, since glaciers respond to changes in temperature and precipitation, both variables were potentially influenced by proximity to the Sea. To disentangle the competing effects of temperature and precipitation changes on glacier size, we are constraining past temperature variations in the Gesso Valley since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) using cosmogenic noble gas paleothermometry. The cosmogenic noble gases 3He and 21Ne experience diffusive loss from common minerals like quartz and feldspars at Earth surface temperatures. Cosmogenic noble gas paleothermometry utilizes this open-system behavior to quantitatively constrain thermal histories of rocks during exposure to cosmic ray particles at the Earth's surface. We will present measurements of cosmogenic 3He in quartz sampled from moraines in the Gesso Valley with LGM, Bühl stadial, and Younger Dryas ages. With these 3He measurements and experimental data quantifying the diffusion kinetics of 3He in quartz, we will provide a preliminary temperature reconstruction for the Gesso Valley since the LGM. Future work on samples from younger moraines in the valley system will be used to fill in details of the more recent temperature history.

  4. Metal electrodeposition and electron transfer studies of uranium compounds in room temperature ionic liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoll, M.E.; Oldham, W.J.; Costa, D.A.

    2004-01-01

    Room temperature ionic liquids (RTIL's) comprised of 1,3-dialkylimidazolium or quaternary ammonium cations and one of several anions such as PF 6 - , BF 4 - , or - N(SO 2 CF 3 ) 2 , represent a class of solvents that possess great potential for use in applications employing electrochemical procedures. Part of the intrigue with RTIL's stems from some of their inherent solvent properties including negligible vapor pressure, good conductivity, high chemical and thermal stability, and non-flammability. Additionally, a substantial number of RTIL's can be envisioned simply by combining different cation and anion pairs, thereby making them attractive for specific application needs. We are interested in learning more about the possible use of RTIL's within the nuclear industry. In this regard our research team has been exploring the electron transfer behavior of simple metal ions in addition to coordination and organometallic complexes in these novel solvents. Results from our research have also provided us with insight into the bonding interactions between our current anion of choice, bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide = NTf 2 , and open coordination sites on actinide and transition metal fragments. This presentation will focus on recent results in two areas: the electrodeposition of electropositive metal ions from RTIL solutions and the electron transfer behavior for several uranium complexes. Details concerning the cathodic electrodeposition and anodic stripping of alkali metals (Na, K) from various working electrode surfaces (Pt, Au, W, Glassy Carbon) will be discussed. Figure 1 displays typical behavior for the electrodeposition of potassium metal from an RTIL containing potassium ions produced through the reaction of KH with H[NTf 2 ]. Our efforts with other metal ions, including our results to date with uranium electrodeposition, will be covered during the presentation. The electron transfer behavior for a number of uranium complexes have been studied with various

  5. Improving Estimations of Spatial Distribution of Soil Respiration Using the Bayesian Maximum Entropy Algorithm and Soil Temperature as Auxiliary Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junguo Hu

    Full Text Available Soil respiration inherently shows strong spatial variability. It is difficult to obtain an accurate characterization of soil respiration with an insufficient number of monitoring points. However, it is expensive and cumbersome to deploy many sensors. To solve this problem, we proposed employing the Bayesian Maximum Entropy (BME algorithm, using soil temperature as auxiliary information, to study the spatial distribution of soil respiration. The BME algorithm used the soft data (auxiliary information effectively to improve the estimation accuracy of the spatiotemporal distribution of soil respiration. Based on the functional relationship between soil temperature and soil respiration, the BME algorithm satisfactorily integrated soil temperature data into said spatial distribution. As a means of comparison, we also applied the Ordinary Kriging (OK and Co-Kriging (Co-OK methods. The results indicated that the root mean squared errors (RMSEs and absolute values of bias for both Day 1 and Day 2 were the lowest for the BME method, thus demonstrating its higher estimation accuracy. Further, we compared the performance of the BME algorithm coupled with auxiliary information, namely soil temperature data, and the OK method without auxiliary information in the same study area for 9, 21, and 37 sampled points. The results showed that the RMSEs for the BME algorithm (0.972 and 1.193 were less than those for the OK method (1.146 and 1.539 when the number of sampled points was 9 and 37, respectively. This indicates that the former method using auxiliary information could reduce the required number of sampling points for studying spatial distribution of soil respiration. Thus, the BME algorithm, coupled with soil temperature data, can not only improve the accuracy of soil respiration spatial interpolation but can also reduce the number of sampling points.

  6. Improving Estimations of Spatial Distribution of Soil Respiration Using the Bayesian Maximum Entropy Algorithm and Soil Temperature as Auxiliary Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Junguo; Zhou, Jian; Zhou, Guomo; Luo, Yiqi; Xu, Xiaojun; Li, Pingheng; Liang, Junyi

    2016-01-01

    Soil respiration inherently shows strong spatial variability. It is difficult to obtain an accurate characterization of soil respiration with an insufficient number of monitoring points. However, it is expensive and cumbersome to deploy many sensors. To solve this problem, we proposed employing the Bayesian Maximum Entropy (BME) algorithm, using soil temperature as auxiliary information, to study the spatial distribution of soil respiration. The BME algorithm used the soft data (auxiliary information) effectively to improve the estimation accuracy of the spatiotemporal distribution of soil respiration. Based on the functional relationship between soil temperature and soil respiration, the BME algorithm satisfactorily integrated soil temperature data into said spatial distribution. As a means of comparison, we also applied the Ordinary Kriging (OK) and Co-Kriging (Co-OK) methods. The results indicated that the root mean squared errors (RMSEs) and absolute values of bias for both Day 1 and Day 2 were the lowest for the BME method, thus demonstrating its higher estimation accuracy. Further, we compared the performance of the BME algorithm coupled with auxiliary information, namely soil temperature data, and the OK method without auxiliary information in the same study area for 9, 21, and 37 sampled points. The results showed that the RMSEs for the BME algorithm (0.972 and 1.193) were less than those for the OK method (1.146 and 1.539) when the number of sampled points was 9 and 37, respectively. This indicates that the former method using auxiliary information could reduce the required number of sampling points for studying spatial distribution of soil respiration. Thus, the BME algorithm, coupled with soil temperature data, can not only improve the accuracy of soil respiration spatial interpolation but can also reduce the number of sampling points.

  7. Uranium energy dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erkes, P.

    1981-06-01

    Uranium supply and demand as projected by the Uranium Institute is discussed. It is concluded that for the industrialized countries, maximum energy independence is a necessity. Hence it is necessary to achieve assurance of supply for uranium used in thermal power reactors in current programs and eventually to move towards breeders

  8. Airborne uranium, its concentration and toxicity in uranium enrichment facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.; Mauro, J.; Ryniker, J.; Fellman, R.

    1979-02-01

    The release of uranium hexafluoride and its hydrolysis products into the work environment of a plant for enriching uranium by means of gas centrifuges is discussed. The maximum permissible mass and curie concentration of airborne uranium (U) is identified as a function of the enrichment level (i.e., U-235/total U), and chemical and physical form. A discussion of the chemical and radiological toxicity of uranium as a function of enrichment and chemical form is included. The toxicity of products of UF 6 hydrolysis in the atmosphere, namely, UO 2 F 2 and HF, the particle size of toxic particulate material produced from this hydrolysis, and the toxic effects of HF and other potential fluoride compounds are also discussed. Results of an investigation of known effects of humidity and temperature on particle size of UO 2 F 2 produced by the reaction of UF 6 with water vapor in the air are reported. The relationship of the solubility of uranium compounds to their toxic effects was studied. Identification and discussion of the standards potentially applicable to airborne uranium compounds in the working environment are presented. The effectiveness of High Efficiency Particulate (HEPA) filters subjected to the corrosive environment imposed by the presence of hydrogen fluoride is discussed

  9. Enriched-uranium feed costs for the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled reactor: trends and comparison with other reactor concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, W.E.

    1976-04-01

    This report discusses each of the components that affect the unit cost for enriched uranium; that is, ore costs, U 3 O 8 to UF 6 conversion cost, costs for enriching services, and changes in transaction tails assay. Historical trends and announced changes are included. Unit costs for highly enriched uranium (93.15 percent 235 U) and for low-enrichment uranium (3.0, 3.2, and 3.5 percent 235 U) are displayed as a function of changes in the above components and compared. It is demonstrated that the trends in these cost components will probably result in significantly less cost increase for highly enriched uranium than for low-enrichment uranium--hence favoring the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

  10. Optimisation of sea surface current retrieval using a maximum cross correlation technique on modelled sea surface temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuzé, Céline; Eriksson, Leif; Carvajal, Gisela

    2017-04-01

    Using sea surface temperature from satellite images to retrieve sea surface currents is not a new idea, but so far its operational near-real time implementation has not been possible. Validation studies are too region-specific or uncertain, due to the errors induced by the images themselves. Moreover, the sensitivity of the most common retrieval method, the maximum cross correlation, to the three parameters that have to be set is unknown. Using model outputs instead of satellite images, biases induced by this method are assessed here, for four different seas of Western Europe, and the best of nine settings and eight temporal resolutions are determined. For all regions, tracking a small 5 km pattern from the first image over a large 30 km region around its original location on a second image, separated from the first image by 6 to 9 hours returned the most accurate results. Moreover, for all regions, the problem is not inaccurate results but missing results, where the velocity is too low to be picked by the retrieval. The results are consistent both with limitations caused by ocean surface current dynamics and with the available satellite technology, indicating that automated sea surface current retrieval from sea surface temperature images is feasible now, for search and rescue operations, pollution confinement or even for more energy efficient and comfortable ship navigation.

  11. Apparent molal volumes of HMT and TATD in aqueous solutions around the temperature of maximum density of water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clavijo Penagos, J.A.; Blanco, L.H.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ►V φ for HMT and TATD in aqueous solutions around the temperature of maximum density of water are reported. ► V φ is linear in m form m = 0.025 for all the aqueous solutions investigated. ► Variation of V ¯ 2 ∞ with T obeys a second grade polynomial trend. ► The solutes are classified as structure breakers according to Hepler’s criterion. - Abstract: Apparent molal volumes V φ have been determined from density measurements for several aqueous solutions of 1,3,5,7-tetraazatricyclo[3.3.1.1(3,7)]decane (HMT) and 1,3,6,8-tetraazatricyclo[4.4.1.1(3,8)]dodecane (TATD) at T = (275.15, 275.65, 276.15, 276.65, 277.15, 277.65 and 278.15) K as function of composition. The infinite dilution partial molar volumes of solutes in aqueous solution are evaluated through extrapolation. Interactions of the solutes with water are discussed in terms of the effect of the temperature on the volumetric properties and the structure of the solutes. The results are interpreted in terms of water structure-breaking or structure forming character of the solutes.

  12. The interdiffusion behaviour of uranium and aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Claire, A D; Bear, I J

    1952-03-05

    Results are given for measurements made on the rate, as a function of temperature and pressure, of the increase in width of the diffusion zone formed by the interdiffusion of uranium and aluminium and of the relative penetration of uranium into aluminium and of aluminium into uranium. The experiments are unusual among diffusion meaurements in showing a marked effect of pressure on the rates of diffusion. Between 570 deg and 640 deg C (the eutectic temperature) the rate of growth of the diffusion zone increases regularly with increase of temperature or of pressure, at least up to the maximum pressure of 10 tons/sq.in. employed in the experiments. Below 570 deg C the rate of diffusion, rising with the rise in pressure at constant temperature increases discontinuously when the pressure reaches a value a little above 1 1/4 tons/sq.in. by a factor which increases, as the temperature is lowered, to a maximum value at 540 deg C. It then remains constant at this maximum value for temperatures below 540 deg C. The accelerating effect of pressure on the rate of interdiffusion is then most apparent when the temperature is below 540 deg C and the pressure raised from below to above about 1 1/4 tons/sq.in. The penetration of the uranium into the aluminium is about 2 1/4 times faster than that of the aluminium into the uranium. The results of a microscopical and X-ray examination of the diffusion zone are presented, and a discussion is given of the possible origins of the pressure effect and of the importance of the work in an understanding of the ''pimpling'' of aluminium clad uranium bars. (auth)

  13. Estimation of Land Surface Temperature through Blending MODIS and AMSR-E Data with the Bayesian Maximum Entropy Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaokang Kou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Land surface temperature (LST plays a major role in the study of surface energy balances. Remote sensing techniques provide ways to monitor LST at large scales. However, due to atmospheric influences, significant missing data exist in LST products retrieved from satellite thermal infrared (TIR remotely sensed data. Although passive microwaves (PMWs are able to overcome these atmospheric influences while estimating LST, the data are constrained by low spatial resolution. In this study, to obtain complete and high-quality LST data, the Bayesian Maximum Entropy (BME method was introduced to merge 0.01° and 0.25° LSTs inversed from MODIS and AMSR-E data, respectively. The result showed that the missing LSTs in cloudy pixels were filled completely, and the availability of merged LSTs reaches 100%. Because the depths of LST and soil temperature measurements are different, before validating the merged LST, the station measurements were calibrated with an empirical equation between MODIS LST and 0~5 cm soil temperatures. The results showed that the accuracy of merged LSTs increased with the increasing quantity of utilized data, and as the availability of utilized data increased from 25.2% to 91.4%, the RMSEs of the merged data decreased from 4.53 °C to 2.31 °C. In addition, compared with the filling gap method in which MODIS LST gaps were filled with AMSR-E LST directly, the merged LSTs from the BME method showed better spatial continuity. The different penetration depths of TIR and PMWs may influence fusion performance and still require further studies.

  14. Spatial-temporal changes of maximum and minimum temperatures in the Wei River Basin, China: Changing patterns, causes and implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Saiyan; Huang, Shengzhi; Xie, Yangyang; Huang, Qiang; Leng, Guoyong; Hou, Beibei; Zhang, Ying; Wei, Xiu

    2018-05-01

    Due to the important role of temperature in the global climate system and energy cycles, it is important to investigate the spatial-temporal change patterns, causes and implications of annual maximum (Tmax) and minimum (Tmin) temperatures. In this study, the Cloud model were adopted to fully and accurately analyze the changing patterns of annual Tmax and Tmin from 1958 to 2008 by quantifying their mean, uniformity, and stability in the Wei River Basin (WRB), a typical arid and semi-arid region in China. Additionally, the cross wavelet analysis was applied to explore the correlations among annual Tmax and Tmin and the yearly sunspots number, Arctic Oscillation, Pacific Decadal Oscillation, and soil moisture with an aim to determine possible causes of annual Tmax and Tmin variations. Furthermore, temperature-related impacts on vegetation cover and precipitation extremes were also examined. Results indicated that: (1) the WRB is characterized by increasing trends in annual Tmax and Tmin, with a more evident increasing trend in annual Tmin, which has a higher dispersion degree and is less uniform and stable than annual Tmax; (2) the asymmetric variations of Tmax and Tmin can be generally explained by the stronger effects of solar activity (primarily), large-scale atmospheric circulation patterns, and soil moisture on annual Tmin than on annual Tmax; and (3) increasing annual Tmax and Tmin have exerted strong influences on local precipitation extremes, in terms of their duration, intensity, and frequency in the WRB. This study presents new analyses of Tmax and Tmin in the WRB, and the findings may help guide regional agricultural production and water resources management.

  15. Method for converting uranium oxides to uranium metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duerksen, Walter K.

    1988-01-01

    A process is described for converting scrap and waste uranium oxide to uranium metal. The uranium oxide is sequentially reduced with a suitable reducing agent to a mixture of uranium metal and oxide products. The uranium metal is then converted to uranium hydride and the uranium hydride-containing mixture is then cooled to a temperature less than -100.degree. C. in an inert liquid which renders the uranium hydride ferromagnetic. The uranium hydride is then magnetically separated from the cooled mixture. The separated uranium hydride is readily converted to uranium metal by heating in an inert atmosphere. This process is environmentally acceptable and eliminates the use of hydrogen fluoride as well as the explosive conditions encountered in the previously employed bomb-reduction processes utilized for converting uranium oxides to uranium metal.

  16. Uranium recovery from slags of metallic uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fornarolo, F.; Frajndlich, E.U.C.; Durazzo, M.

    2006-01-01

    The Center of the Nuclear Fuel of the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research - IPEN finished the program of attainment of fuel development for research reactors the base of Uranium Scilicet (U 3 Si 2 ) from Hexafluoride of Uranium (UF 6 ) with enrichment 20% in weight of 235 U. In the process of attainment of the league of U 3 Si 2 we have as Uranium intermediate product the metallic one whose attainment generates a slag contend Uranium. The present work shows the results gotten in the process of recovery of Uranium in slags of calcined slags of Uranium metallic. Uranium the metallic one is unstable, pyrophoricity and extremely reactive, whereas the U 3 O 8 is a steady oxide of low chemical reactivity, what it justifies the process of calcination of slags of Uranium metallic. The calcination of the Uranium slag of the metallic one in oxygen presence reduces Uranium metallic the U 3 O 8 . Experiments had been developed varying it of acid for Uranium control and excess, nitric molar concentration gram with regard to the stoichiometric leaching reaction of temperature of the leaching process. The 96,0% income proves the viability of the recovery process of slags of Uranium metallic, adopting it previous calcination of these slags in nitric way with low acid concentration and low temperature of leaching. (author)

  17. The Influences of Uranium Concentration and Polyvinyl Alcohol on the Quality UO2 Microsphere for Fuel of High Temperature Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damunir; Sukarsono; Bangun-Wasito; Endang Nawangsih

    2000-01-01

    The influences of uranium concentration and PVA on the quality of UO 2 microspheres for fuel of high temperature reactor have been investigated. The UO 2 particles were prepared by gel precipitation using internal gelation process. Uranyl nitrate solution containing uranium of 100 g/l was neutralized using NH 4 OH 1 M. The solution was changed into sol by adding 60 g PVA/l solution while stirred and heated up to 80 o C for 20 minutes. In order to find gels in spherical shape, the sol solution was dropped into 5 M NH 4 OH medium. The formed gels were small spheres, was washed, screened and heated up to 120 o C. After that, the gels were calcined at 800 o C for 4 hours, resulting in U 3 O 8 spheres. The U 3 O 8 particles were reduced using H 2 gas in a N 2 media at 800 o C for 4 hours, yielded in UO 2 spheres. Using a similar procedure, the influence of uranium concentration of 150-250 g/l and PVA 40-80 g/l were studied. The qualities of UO 2 particles were obtained by their physical properties, i.e. density, specific surface area, total volume of pores and pore radius using surface area meter and N 2 gas used as absorbent, and the particle size was observed using optical microscope. The result showed that the changing of uranium and PVA concentrations on the internal gelation affected the density, specific surface area, total volume of pores and pore radius of UO 2 particles. (author)

  18. Effect of small additions of silicon, iron, and aluminum on the room-temperature tensile properties of high-purity uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludwig, R.L.

    1983-01-01

    Eleven binary and ternary alloys of uranium and very low concentrations of iron, silicon, and aluminum were prepared and tested for room-temperature tensile properties after various heat treatments. A yield strength approximately double that of high-purity derby uranium was obtained from a U-400 ppM Si-200 ppM Fe alloy after beta solution treatment and alpha aging. Higher silicon plus iron alloy contents resulted in increased yield strength, but showed an unacceptable loss of ductility

  19. Bacteriological lixiviation of low-grade uranium ores at low temperatures, by phiobacillus ferrooxidaus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobato Filho, A.N.S.

    1976-12-01

    Laboratory experiments are described that, using selective and mutagenic agents, allowed the isolation of a strain of thiobacillus ferrooxidams capable of developing at 8 0 C, and keeping its oxidesing characteristics tests showed that the isoled sample is capable of solubilizing 95% of the uranium content in samples with U 3 O 8 content below 1000ppm [pt

  20. A binary genetic programing model for teleconnection identification between global sea surface temperature and local maximum monthly rainfall events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danandeh Mehr, Ali; Nourani, Vahid; Hrnjica, Bahrudin; Molajou, Amir

    2017-12-01

    The effectiveness of genetic programming (GP) for solving regression problems in hydrology has been recognized in recent studies. However, its capability to solve classification problems has not been sufficiently explored so far. This study develops and applies a novel classification-forecasting model, namely Binary GP (BGP), for teleconnection studies between sea surface temperature (SST) variations and maximum monthly rainfall (MMR) events. The BGP integrates certain types of data pre-processing and post-processing methods with conventional GP engine to enhance its ability to solve both regression and classification problems simultaneously. The model was trained and tested using SST series of Black Sea, Mediterranean Sea, and Red Sea as potential predictors as well as classified MMR events at two locations in Iran as predictand. Skill of the model was measured in regard to different rainfall thresholds and SST lags and compared to that of the hybrid decision tree-association rule (DTAR) model available in the literature. The results indicated that the proposed model can identify potential teleconnection signals of surrounding seas beneficial to long-term forecasting of the occurrence of the classified MMR events.

  1. The effect of temperature on the sorption of technetium, uranium, neptunium and curium on bentonite, tuff and granodiorite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baston, G.M.N.; Berry, J.A.; Brownsword, M.; Heath, T.G.; Ilett, D.J.; Tweed, C.J.; Yui, M.

    1997-01-01

    A study of the sorption of the radioelements technetium; uranium; neptunium; and curium onto geological materials has been carried out as part of the PNC program to increase confidence in the performance assessment for a high-level radioactive waste repository in Japan. Batch sorption experiments have been performed in order to study the sorption of the radioelements onto bentonite, tuff and granodiorite from equilibrated de-ionized water under strongly-reducing conditions at both room temperature and at 60 C. Mathematical modelling using the geochemical speciation program HARPHRQ in conjunction with the HATCHES database has been undertaken in order to interpret the experimental results

  2. The maximum temperature of a thermodynamic cycle effect on weight-dimensional characteristics of the NPP energy blocks with air cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezborodov, Yu.A.; Bubnov, V.P.; Nesterenko, V.B.

    1982-01-01

    The cycle maximum temperature effect on the properties of individual apparatuses and total NPP energy blocks characteristics has been investigated. Air, nitrogen, helium and chemically reacting system N 2 O 4 +2NO+O 2 have been considered as coolants. The conducted investigations have shown that maximum temperature of thermodynamical cycle affects considerably both the weight-dimensional characteristics of individual elements of NPP and total characteristics of NPP energy block. Energy blocks of NPP with air cooling wherein dissociating nitrogen tetroxide is used as working body, have better indexes on the majority of characteristics in comparison with blocks with air, nitrogen and helium cooling. If technical restrictions are to be taken into account (thermal resistance of metals, coolant decomposition under high temperatures, etc.) then dissociating nitrogen tetroxide should be recommended as working body and maximum cycle temperature in the range from 500 up to 600 deg C

  3. Corrosion of metallic materials by uranium hexafluoride at high temperatures (1963); Corrosion de materiaux metalliques par l'hexafluorure d'uranium a haute temperature (1963)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langlois, G [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-07-01

    The corrosion of the following metals or alloys by UF{sub 6}: nickel, monel, Inconel, gold, platinum, stainless steel, is studied in the temperature range from 300 to 1000 deg. C. The test method, designed to avoid heating the apparatus containing the corrosive fluid to a high temperature, consists in using threadlike samples heated by the Joule effect, the rest of the apparatus being maintained close to room temperature. This technique makes it possible also to determine continuously the penetration of the corrosion by measuring the electrical resistance of the sample with a double Thomson bridge. A series of rapid comparison tests shows that stainless steel, precious metals and Inconel are attacked far too rapidly to be used above 500 deg. C; only monel and especially nickel appear capable of resisting at high temperatures. The detailed examination of the behaviour of nickel shows that the metallic fluoride is volatilized and that this influences the corrosion rate. It shows also the existence of a temperature zone situated between 550 and 700 deg. C in which occurs A strong intergranular corrosion the cause of which appears to be the presence of impurities in the metal. (author) [French] La corrosion par l'UF{sub 6} des metaux ou alliages suivants: lickel, monel, inconel, or, platine, acier inoxydable, est etudiee dans le un domaine de temperature compris entre 300 et 1000 deg. C. La methode d'essai, destinee a eviter le chauffage de l'enceinte contenant le fluide corrosif a temperature elevee, consiste a utiliser des eprouvettes filiformes, echauffees par effet Joule, le reste de l'appareillage etant maintenu a une temperature proche de l'ambiance. Cette technique permet en outre de determiner en continu la penetration de la corrosion, par mesure de la resistance electrique de l'eprouvette, au moyen d'un pont double de Thomson. Une serie d'essais comparatifs, assez sommaires, montre que l'acier inoxydable, les metaux precieux et l'inconel sont attaques beaucoup

  4. Corrosion of metallic materials by uranium hexafluoride at high temperatures (1963); Corrosion de materiaux metalliques par l'hexafluorure d'uranium a haute temperature (1963)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langlois, G. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-07-01

    The corrosion of the following metals or alloys by UF{sub 6}: nickel, monel, Inconel, gold, platinum, stainless steel, is studied in the temperature range from 300 to 1000 deg. C. The test method, designed to avoid heating the apparatus containing the corrosive fluid to a high temperature, consists in using threadlike samples heated by the Joule effect, the rest of the apparatus being maintained close to room temperature. This technique makes it possible also to determine continuously the penetration of the corrosion by measuring the electrical resistance of the sample with a double Thomson bridge. A series of rapid comparison tests shows that stainless steel, precious metals and Inconel are attacked far too rapidly to be used above 500 deg. C; only monel and especially nickel appear capable of resisting at high temperatures. The detailed examination of the behaviour of nickel shows that the metallic fluoride is volatilized and that this influences the corrosion rate. It shows also the existence of a temperature zone situated between 550 and 700 deg. C in which occurs A strong intergranular corrosion the cause of which appears to be the presence of impurities in the metal. (author) [French] La corrosion par l'UF{sub 6} des metaux ou alliages suivants: lickel, monel, inconel, or, platine, acier inoxydable, est etudiee dans le un domaine de temperature compris entre 300 et 1000 deg. C. La methode d'essai, destinee a eviter le chauffage de l'enceinte contenant le fluide corrosif a temperature elevee, consiste a utiliser des eprouvettes filiformes, echauffees par effet Joule, le reste de l'appareillage etant maintenu a une temperature proche de l'ambiance. Cette technique permet en outre de determiner en continu la penetration de la corrosion, par mesure de la resistance electrique de l'eprouvette, au moyen d'un pont double de Thomson. Une serie d'essais comparatifs, assez sommaires, montre que l'acier inoxydable, les metaux

  5. Estimating Daily Maximum and Minimum Land Air Surface Temperature Using MODIS Land Surface Temperature Data and Ground Truth Data in Northern Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phan Thanh Noi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to evaluate quantitatively the land surface temperature (LST derived from MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer MOD11A1 and MYD11A1 Collection 5 products for daily land air surface temperature (Ta estimation over a mountainous region in northern Vietnam. The main objective is to estimate maximum and minimum Ta (Ta-max and Ta-min using both TERRA and AQUA MODIS LST products (daytime and nighttime and auxiliary data, solving the discontinuity problem of ground measurements. There exist no studies about Vietnam that have integrated both TERRA and AQUA LST of daytime and nighttime for Ta estimation (using four MODIS LST datasets. In addition, to find out which variables are the most effective to describe the differences between LST and Ta, we have tested several popular methods, such as: the Pearson correlation coefficient, stepwise, Bayesian information criterion (BIC, adjusted R-squared and the principal component analysis (PCA of 14 variables (including: LST products (four variables, NDVI, elevation, latitude, longitude, day length in hours, Julian day and four variables of the view zenith angle, and then, we applied nine models for Ta-max estimation and nine models for Ta-min estimation. The results showed that the differences between MODIS LST and ground truth temperature derived from 15 climate stations are time and regional topography dependent. The best results for Ta-max and Ta-min estimation were achieved when we combined both LST daytime and nighttime of TERRA and AQUA and data from the topography analysis.

  6. Effects of the midnight temperature maximum observed in the thermosphere-ionosphere over the northeast of Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Cosme Alexandre O. B.; Buriti, Ricardo A.; Paulino, Igo; Meriwether, John W.; Makela, Jonathan J.; Batista, Inez S.; Barros, Diego; Medeiros, Amauri F.

    2017-08-01

    The midnight temperature maximum (MTM) has been observed in the lower thermosphere by two Fabry-Pérot interferometers (FPIs) at São João do Cariri (7.4° S, 36.5° W) and Cajazeiras (6.9° S, 38.6° W) during 2011, when the solar activity was moderate and the solar flux was between 90 and 155 SFU (1 SFU = 10-22 W m-2 Hz-1). The MTM is studied in detail using measurements of neutral temperature, wind and airglow relative intensity of OI630.0 nm (referred to as OI6300), and ionospheric parameters, such as virtual height (h'F), the peak height of the F2 region (hmF2), and critical frequency of the F region (foF2), which were measured by a Digisonde instrument (DPS) at Eusébio (3.9° S, 38.4° W; geomagnetic coordinates 7.31° S, 32.40° E for 2011). The MTM peak was observed mostly along the year, except in May, June, and August. The amplitudes of the MTM varied from 64 ± 46 K in April up to 144 ± 48 K in October. The monthly temperature average showed a phase shift in the MTM peak around 0.25 h in September to 2.5 h in December before midnight. On the other hand, in February, March, and April the MTM peak occurred around midnight. International Reference Ionosphere 2012 (IRI-2012) model was compared to the neutral temperature observations and the IRI-2012 model failed in reproducing the MTM peaks. The zonal component of neutral wind flowed eastward the whole night; regardless of the month and the magnitude of the zonal wind, it was typically within the range of 50 to 150 m s-1 during the early evening. The meridional component of the neutral wind changed its direction over the months: from November to February, the meridional wind in the early evening flowed equatorward with a magnitude between 25 and 100 m s-1; in contrast, during the winter months, the meridional wind flowed to the pole within the range of 0 to -50 m s-1. Our results indicate that the reversal (changes in equator to poleward flow) or abatement of the meridional winds is an important factor in

  7. Plasma spheroidization and high temperature stability of lanthanum phosphate and its compatibility with molten uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ananthapadmanabhan, P.V. [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)], E-mail: pvananth@barc.gov.in; Sreekumar, K.P.; Thiyagarajan, T.K.; Satpute, R.U. [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Krishnan, K.; Kulkarni, N.K. [Fuel Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Kutty, T.R.G. [Radiometallurgy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2009-01-15

    Lanthanum phosphate has excellent thermal stability and corrosion resistance against many molten metals and other chemically corrosive environments. Lanthanum phosphate (LaPO{sub 4}) was synthesized from lanthanum oxalate by thermal dissociation of the oxalate to the oxide, followed by conversion to hydrated lanthanum phosphate (LaPO{sub 4}.0.5H{sub 2}O). Thermal treatment of LaPO{sub 4}.0.5H{sub 2}O above 773 K resulted in the irreversible transformation of the hydrated phase to the stable monazite phase. Thermal and chemical stability of monazite was studied by plasma spheroidization experiments using a DC thermal plasma reactor set up. Compatibility of monazite with molten uranium was studied by thermal analysis. Results showed that monazite is thermally stable up to its melting point and also is resistant towards attack by molten uranium. Adherent coatings of LaPO{sub 4} could be deposited onto various substrates by atmospheric plasma spray technique.

  8. Plasma spheroidization and high temperature stability of lanthanum phosphate and its compatibility with molten uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ananthapadmanabhan, P.V.; Sreekumar, K.P.; Thiyagarajan, T.K.; Satpute, R.U.; Krishnan, K.; Kulkarni, N.K.; Kutty, T.R.G.

    2009-01-01

    Lanthanum phosphate has excellent thermal stability and corrosion resistance against many molten metals and other chemically corrosive environments. Lanthanum phosphate (LaPO 4 ) was synthesized from lanthanum oxalate by thermal dissociation of the oxalate to the oxide, followed by conversion to hydrated lanthanum phosphate (LaPO 4 .0.5H 2 O). Thermal treatment of LaPO 4 .0.5H 2 O above 773 K resulted in the irreversible transformation of the hydrated phase to the stable monazite phase. Thermal and chemical stability of monazite was studied by plasma spheroidization experiments using a DC thermal plasma reactor set up. Compatibility of monazite with molten uranium was studied by thermal analysis. Results showed that monazite is thermally stable up to its melting point and also is resistant towards attack by molten uranium. Adherent coatings of LaPO 4 could be deposited onto various substrates by atmospheric plasma spray technique

  9. Recurrence quantification analysis of extremes of maximum and minimum temperature patterns for different climate scenarios in the Mesochora catchment in Central-Western Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagoulia, Dionysia; Vlahogianni, Eleni I.

    2018-06-01

    A methodological framework based on nonlinear recurrence analysis is proposed to examine the historical data evolution of extremes of maximum and minimum daily mean areal temperature patterns over time under different climate scenarios. The methodology is based on both historical data and atmospheric General Circulation Model (GCM) produced climate scenarios for the periods 1961-2000 and 2061-2100 which correspond to 1 × CO2 and 2 × CO2 scenarios. Historical data were derived from the actual daily observations coupled with atmospheric circulation patterns (CPs). The dynamics of the temperature was reconstructed in the phase-space from the time series of temperatures. The statistically comparing different temperature patterns were based on some discriminating statistics obtained by the Recurrence Quantification Analysis (RQA). Moreover, the bootstrap method of Schinkel et al. (2009) was adopted to calculate the confidence bounds of RQA parameters based on a structural preserving resampling. The overall methodology was implemented to the mountainous Mesochora catchment in Central-Western Greece. The results reveal substantial similarities between the historical maximum and minimum daily mean areal temperature statistical patterns and their confidence bounds, as well as the maximum and minimum temperature patterns in evolution under the 2 × CO2 scenario. A significant variability and non-stationary behaviour characterizes all climate series analyzed. Fundamental differences are produced from the historical and maximum 1 × CO2 scenarios, the maximum 1 × CO2 and minimum 1 × CO2 scenarios, as well as the confidence bounds for the two CO2 scenarios. The 2 × CO2 scenario reflects the strongest shifts in intensity, duration and frequency in temperature patterns. Such transitions can help the scientists and policy makers to understand the effects of extreme temperature changes on water resources, economic development, and health of ecosystems and hence to proceed to

  10. Recovery and recycling of uranium from rejected coated particles for compact high temperature reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pai, Rajesh V., E-mail: pairajesh007@gmail.com [Fuel Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Mollick, P.K. [Powder Metallurgy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Kumar, Ashok [Fuel Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Banerjee, J. [Radiometullurgy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Radhakrishna, J. [Fuel Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Chakravartty, J.K. [Powder Metallurgy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    2016-05-15

    UO{sub 2} microspheres prepared by internal gelation technique were coated with pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide using CVD technique. The particles which were not meeting the specifications were rejected. The rejected/failed UO{sub 2} based coated particles prepared by CVD technique was used for oxidation and recovery and recycling. The oxidation behaviour of sintered UO{sub 2} microspheres coated with different layers of carbon and SiC was studied by thermal techniques to develop a method for recycling and recovery of uranium from the failed/rejected coated particles. It was observed that the complete removal of outer carbon from the spheres is difficult. The crushing of microspheres enabled easier accessibility of oxygen and oxidation of carbon and uranium at 800–1000 °C. With the optimized process of multiple crushing using die & plunger and sieving the broken coated layers, we could recycle around fifty percent of the UO{sub 2} microspheres which could be directly recoated. The rest of the particles were recycled using a wet recycling method. - Highlights: • The oxidation behaviour of coated particles was studied in air, O{sub 2} and moist O{sub 2}. • It was observed that coated layers cannot be completely removed by mere oxidation. • Complete recovery of uranium from the rejected coated particles has been carried out using a combination of dry and wet recovery scheme. • A crushing step prior to oxidation is needed for full recovery of uranium from the coated particles.

  11. A rapid method for measuring maximum density temperatures in water and aqueous solutions for the study of quantum zero point energy effects in these liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deeney, F A; O'Leary, J P

    2008-01-01

    The connection between quantum zero point fluctuations and a density maximum in water and in liquid He 4 has recently been established. Here we present a description of a simple and rapid method of determining the temperatures at which maximum densities in water and aqueous solutions occur. The technique is such as to allow experiments to be carried out in one session of an undergraduate laboratory thereby introducing students to the concept of quantum zero point energy

  12. Uranium leaching by fungal metabolite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yongdong; Li Guangyue; Ding Dexin; Hu Nan

    2012-01-01

    To explore new means of bioleaching, one strain of high-yielding fungi-Aspergillus niger which could produce organic acids was separated and purified from soil samples of uranium mine. The influence of cultural temperature, initial pH value, inoculum sizes on its growth characteristics were carried out. And the tests of uranium leaching of metabolin of Aspergillus niger were operated. On these tests, the effects of metabolin of Aspergillus niger with different pH value produced in the diverse culture temperature on uranium leaching were investigated. The results show that this strain of Aspergillus niger can grow best under the following conditions: the temperature is 37℃, the initial pH value is 7.0, the inoculum sizes is 2% (the OD value of the spores solution is 0.06). The uranium extraction effects relative to the final pH value of the cultures. and the maximum leaching rates is 83.05% when the pH value is 2.3. (authors)

  13. Influence of temperature, strain rate and thermal aging on the structure/property behavior of uranium 6 wt% Nb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cady, C.M.; Gray, G.T.; Chen, S.R.; Lopez, M.F. [Los Alamos National Lab., MST-8, MS G-755, NM (United States); Field, R.D.; Korzekwa, D.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., MST-6, MS G-770, NM (United States); Hixson, R.S. [Los Alamos National Lab, DX-9, MS P-952, NM (United States)

    2006-08-15

    A rigorous experimentation and validation program is being undertaken to create constitutive models that elucidate the fundamental mechanisms controlling plasticity in uranium-6 wt% niobium alloys (U-6Nb). These models should accurately predict high-strain-rate large-strain plasticity, damage evolution and failure. The goal is a physically-based constitutive model that captures 1) an understanding of how strain rate, temperature, and aging affects the mechanical response of a material, and 2) an understanding of the operative deformation mechanisms. The stress-strain response of U-6Nb has been studied as a function of temperature, strain-rate, and thermal aging. U-6Nb specimens in a solution-treated and quenched condition and after subsequent aging at 473 K for 2 hours were studied. The constitutive behavior was evaluated over the range of strain rates from quasi-static (0.001 s{sup -1}) to dynamic ({approx} 2000 s{sup -1}) and temperatures ranging from 77 to 773 K. The yield stress of U-6Nb was exhibited pronounced temperature sensitivity. The strain hardening rate is seen to be less sensitive to strain rate and temperature beyond plastic strains of 0.10. The yield strength of the aged material is less significantly affected by temperature and the work hardening rate shows adiabatic heating at lower strains rates (1/s). (authors)

  14. Development of a high density fuel based on uranium-molybdenum alloys with high compatibility in high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Fabio Branco Vaz de

    2008-01-01

    This work has as its objective the development of a high density and low enriched nuclear fuel based on the gamma-UMo alloys, for utilization where it is necessary satisfactory behavior in high temperatures, considering its utilization as dispersion. For its accomplishment, it was started from the analysis of the RERTR ('Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors') results and some theoretical works involving the fabrication of gamma-uranium metastable alloys. A ternary addition is proposed, supported by the properties of binary and ternary uranium alloys studied, having the objectives of the gamma stability enhancement and an ease to its powder fabrication. Alloys of uranium-molybdenum were prepared with 5 to 10% Mo addition, and 1 and 3% of ternary, over a gamma U7Mo binary base alloy. In all the steps of its preparation, the alloys were characterized with the traditional techniques, to the determination of its mechanical and structural properties. To provide a process for the alloys powder obtention, its behavior under hydrogen atmosphere were studied, in thermo analyser-thermo gravimeter equipment. Temperatures varied from the ambient up to 1000 deg C, and times from 15 minutes to 16 hours. The results validation were made in a semi-pilot scale, where 10 to 50 g of powders of some of the alloys studied were prepared, under static hydrogen atmosphere. Compatibility studies were conducted by the exposure of the alloys under oxygen and aluminum, to the verification of possible reactions by means of differential thermal analysis. The alloys were exposed to a constant heat up to 1000 deg C, and their performances were evaluated in terms of their reaction resistance. On the basis of the results, it was observed that ternary additions increases the temperatures of the reaction with aluminum and oxidation, in comparison with the gamma UMo binaries. A set of conditions to the hydration of the alloys were defined, more restrictive in terms of temperature, time and

  15. Buckling and reaction rate experiments in plutonium/uranium metal fuelled, graphite moderated lattices at temperatures up to 400 deg. C. Part I: Experimental techniques and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, D H; Clarke, W G; Gibson, M; Hobday, R; Hunt, C; Marshall, J; Puckett, B J; Symons, C R; Wass, T [General Reactor Physics Division, Atomic Energy Establishment, Winfrith, Dorchester, Dorset (United Kingdom)

    1964-07-15

    This report presents experimental measurements of bucklings, flux fine structure and fission rate distributions in graphite moderated lattices fuelled with plutonium/uranium metal at temperatures up to 400 deg. C in the sub-critical assemblies SCORPIO I and SCORPIO II. The experimental techniques employed are described in some detail. The accuracy of the experimental measurements appears to be adequate for testing methods of calculation being developed for the calculation of reactivity and temperature coefficient of reactivity for power reactors containing plutonium and uranium. (author) 26 refs, 17 tabs, 17 figs

  16. Comparison of the Spatiotemporal Variability of Temperature, Precipitation, and Maximum Daily Spring Flows in Two Watersheds in Quebec Characterized by Different Land Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali A. Assani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We compared the spatiotemporal variability of temperatures and precipitation with that of the magnitude and timing of maximum daily spring flows in the geographically adjacent L’Assomption River (agricultural and Matawin River (forested watersheds during the period from 1932 to 2013. With regard to spatial variability, fall, winter, and spring temperatures as well as total precipitation are higher in the agricultural watershed than in the forested one. The magnitude of maximum daily spring flows is also higher in the first watershed as compared with the second, owing to substantial runoff, given that the amount of snow that gives rise to these flows is not significantly different in the two watersheds. These flows occur early in the season in the agricultural watershed because of the relatively high temperatures. With regard to temporal variability, minimum temperatures increased over time in both watersheds. Maximum temperatures in the fall only increased in the agricultural watershed. The amount of spring rain increased over time in both watersheds, whereas total precipitation increased significantly in the agricultural watershed only. However, the amount of snow decreased in the forested watershed. The magnitude of maximum daily spring flows increased over time in the forested watershed.

  17. The Effects of Data Gaps on the Calculated Monthly Mean Maximum and Minimum Temperatures in the Continental United States: A Spatial and Temporal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stooksbury, David E.; Idso, Craig D.; Hubbard, Kenneth G.

    1999-05-01

    Gaps in otherwise regularly scheduled observations are often referred to as missing data. This paper explores the spatial and temporal impacts that data gaps in the recorded daily maximum and minimum temperatures have on the calculated monthly mean maximum and minimum temperatures. For this analysis 138 climate stations from the United States Historical Climatology Network Daily Temperature and Precipitation Data set were selected. The selected stations had no missing maximum or minimum temperature values during the period 1951-80. The monthly mean maximum and minimum temperatures were calculated for each station for each month. For each month 1-10 consecutive days of data from each station were randomly removed. This was performed 30 times for each simulated gap period. The spatial and temporal impact of the 1-10-day data gaps were compared. The influence of data gaps is most pronounced in the continental regions during the winter and least pronounced in the southeast during the summer. In the north central plains, 10-day data gaps during January produce a standard deviation value greater than 2°C about the `true' mean. In the southeast, 10-day data gaps in July produce a standard deviation value less than 0.5°C about the mean. The results of this study will be of value in climate variability and climate trend research as well as climate assessment and impact studies.

  18. Effects of the midnight temperature maximum observed in the thermosphere–ionosphere over the northeast of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. O. B. Figueiredo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The midnight temperature maximum (MTM has been observed in the lower thermosphere by two Fabry–Pérot interferometers (FPIs at São João do Cariri (7.4° S, 36.5° W and Cajazeiras (6.9° S, 38.6° W during 2011, when the solar activity was moderate and the solar flux was between 90 and 155 SFU (1 SFU  =  10−22 W m−2 Hz−1. The MTM is studied in detail using measurements of neutral temperature, wind and airglow relative intensity of OI630.0 nm (referred to as OI6300, and ionospheric parameters, such as virtual height (h′F, the peak height of the F2 region (hmF2, and critical frequency of the F region (foF2, which were measured by a Digisonde instrument (DPS at Eusébio (3.9° S, 38.4° W; geomagnetic coordinates 7.31° S, 32.40° E for 2011. The MTM peak was observed mostly along the year, except in May, June, and August. The amplitudes of the MTM varied from 64 ± 46 K in April up to 144 ± 48 K in October. The monthly temperature average showed a phase shift in the MTM peak around 0.25 h in September to 2.5 h in December before midnight. On the other hand, in February, March, and April the MTM peak occurred around midnight. International Reference Ionosphere 2012 (IRI-2012 model was compared to the neutral temperature observations and the IRI-2012 model failed in reproducing the MTM peaks. The zonal component of neutral wind flowed eastward the whole night; regardless of the month and the magnitude of the zonal wind, it was typically within the range of 50 to 150 m s−1 during the early evening. The meridional component of the neutral wind changed its direction over the months: from November to February, the meridional wind in the early evening flowed equatorward with a magnitude between 25 and 100 m s−1; in contrast, during the winter months, the meridional wind flowed to the pole within the range of 0 to −50 m s−1. Our results indicate that the reversal (changes

  19. Analysis of the reactivity coefficients of the advanced high-temperature reactor for plutonium and uranium fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakova, Jitka; Talamo, Alberto

    2008-01-01

    The conceptual design of the advanced high-temperature reactor (AHTR) has recently been proposed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, with the intention to provide and alternative energy source for very high temperature applications. In the present study, we focused on the analyses of the reactivity coefficients of the AHTR core fueled with two types of fuel: enriched uranium and plutonium from the reprocessing of light water reactors irradiated fuel. More precisely, we investigated the influence of the outer graphite reflectors on the multiplication factor of the core, the fuel and moderator temperature reactivity coefficients and the void reactivity coefficient for five different molten salts: NaF, BeF 2 , LiF, ZrF 4 and Li 2 BeF 4 eutectic. In order to better illustrate the behavior of the previous parameters for different core configurations, we evaluated the moderating ratio of the molten salts and the absorption rate of the key fuel nuclides, which, of course, are driven by the neutron spectrum. The results show that the fuel and moderator temperature reactivity coefficients are always negative, whereas the void reactivity coefficient can be set negative provided that the fuel to moderator ratio is optimized (the core is undermoderated) and the moderating ratio of the coolant is large

  20. Simulation of uranium transport with variable temperature and oxidation potential: The computer program THCC [Thermo-Hydro-Chemical Coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carnahan, C.L.

    1986-12-01

    A simulator of reactive chemical transport has been constructed with the capabilities of treating variable temperatures and variable oxidation potentials within a single simulation. Homogeneous and heterogeneous chemical reactions are simulated at temperature-dependent equilibrium, and changes of oxidation states of multivalent elements can be simulated during transport. Chemical mass action relations for formation of complexes in the fluid phase are included explicitly within the partial differential equations of transport, and a special algorithm greatly simplifies treatment of reversible precipitation of solid phases. This approach allows direct solution of the complete set of governing equations for concentrations of all aqueous species and solids affected simultaneously by chemical and physical processes. Results of example simulations of transport, along a temperature gradient, of uranium solution species under conditions of varying pH and oxidation potential and with reversible precipitation of uraninite and coffinite are presented. The examples illustrate how inclusion of variable temperature and oxidation potential in numerical simulators can enhance understanding of the chemical mechanisms affecting migration of multivalent waste elements

  1. Analysis of the reactivity coefficients of the advanced high-temperature reactor for plutonium and uranium fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakova, Jitka [Department of Nuclear and Reactor Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, KTH, Roslagstullsbacken 21, S-10691, Stockholm (Sweden)], E-mail: jitka.zakova@neutron.kth.se; Talamo, Alberto [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, ANL, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)], E-mail: alby@anl.gov

    2008-05-15

    The conceptual design of the advanced high-temperature reactor (AHTR) has recently been proposed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, with the intention to provide and alternative energy source for very high temperature applications. In the present study, we focused on the analyses of the reactivity coefficients of the AHTR core fueled with two types of fuel: enriched uranium and plutonium from the reprocessing of light water reactors irradiated fuel. More precisely, we investigated the influence of the outer graphite reflectors on the multiplication factor of the core, the fuel and moderator temperature reactivity coefficients and the void reactivity coefficient for five different molten salts: NaF, BeF{sub 2}, LiF, ZrF{sub 4} and Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4} eutectic. In order to better illustrate the behavior of the previous parameters for different core configurations, we evaluated the moderating ratio of the molten salts and the absorption rate of the key fuel nuclides, which, of course, are driven by the neutron spectrum. The results show that the fuel and moderator temperature reactivity coefficients are always negative, whereas the void reactivity coefficient can be set negative provided that the fuel to moderator ratio is optimized (the core is undermoderated) and the moderating ratio of the coolant is large.

  2. Compositional changes at the interface between thorium-doped uranium dioxide and zirconium due to high-temperature annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youn, Young-Sang; Lee, Jeongmook; Kim, Jandee; Kim, Jong-Yun

    2018-06-01

    Compositional changes at the interface between thorium-doped uranium dioxide (U0.97Th0.03O2) and Zr before and after annealing at 1700 °C for 18 h were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Raman spectroscopy. At room temperature, the U0.97Th0.03O2 pellet consisted of hyperstoichiometric UO2+x with UO2 and ThO2, and the Zr sample contained Zr with ZrO2. After annealing, the former contained stoichiometric UO2 with ThO2 and the latter consisted of ZrO2 along with ZrO2·2H2O.

  3. Deformation of depleted uranium - 0.78 Ti under shock compression to 11.0 GPa at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dandekar, D.P.; Martin, A.G.; Kelley, J.V.

    1980-01-01

    The present work on depleted uranium alloyed with 0.78% titanium by weight (i.e., U-0.8 Ti) describes the nature of deformation it undergoes when subjected to shock compression at room temperature. The principal results emerging out of the present work are: (1) The stress limits of elastic deformation are dependent on the thickness of U-0.8Ti. The stress limit decreases from over 3.0 GPa at the impact surface to 1.2 GPa at a depth of 9 mm in U-0.8 Ti; (2) The lower limit of the stress agrees with the static yield stress in U-0.8 Ti; (3) Above the elastic stress limit, the deformation of U-0.8 Ti proceeds in a manner of the ideal plastic solid; and (4) The pressure derivative of Lame's parameter of U-0.8 Ti is estimated to be 3.8

  4. Study of the transformation of uranium-niobium alloys with low niobium concentrations, tempered from the gamma and beta + gamma 1 regions and then annealed at different temperatures. Comparison with uranium-molybdenum alloys (1963); Etude des transformations des alliages uranium-niobium a faible teneur en niobium trempes depuis les domaines gamma et beta + gamma 1 puis revenus a differentes temperatures. Comparaison avec les alliages uranium-molybdene (1963)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collot, C [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1962-09-15

    The author shows that uranium-niobium alloys, like uranium-molybdenum alloys, tempered from the gamma region, give a martensitic phase with a structure deriving from that of alpha uranium by a slight contraction parallel to the axis [001], The critical cooling rate allowing the formation of this martensite is 80 deg. C/s at 750 deg. C. Retention of the beta phase of uranium-niobium alloys is particularly difficult, the critical retention rate being 700 deg. C/s at 668 deg. C for an alloy containing 2.5 at. per cent of Nb. This beta phase is completely converted to the alpha phase at room temperature in about 6 hours. The TTT curves of this beta alloy are effectively reduced to the lower branch of the lower 'C'. The beta phase conversion law is expressed as: 1-x = exp. (kt){sup n} x being the degree of progression of the conversion, t the time, n an exponent no-varying with temperature and having approximately the value 2 for the alloy considered, k an increasing function of temperature. The activation energy of conversion is of the order of 14,600 cal/mole. Niobium is much less active than molybdenum as a stabiliser of beta uranium. (author) [French] Dans ce travail l'auteur montre que les alliages uranium-niobium, comme d'ailleurs les alliages uranium-molybdene, trempes depuis le domaine gamma, donnent une phase martensitique dont la structure derive de celle de l'uranium alpha par une legere contraction parallele de l'axe [001]. La vitesse critique de refroidissement permettant la formation de cette martensite est de 80 deg. C/s a 750 deg. C. La retention de la phase beta des alliages uranium-niobium est particulierement delicate car la vitesse critique de retention est de 700 deg. C/s a 668 deg. C pour l'alliage a 2,5 at. pour cent de Nb. Cette phase beta se transforme completement en phase alpha a la temperature ordinaire en 6 heures environ. Les courbes TTT de cet alliage de structure beta se reduisent pratiquement a la branche inferieure du 'C' inferieur. La

  5. Analytical calculation of the fuel temperature reactivity coefficient for pebble bed and prismatic high temperature reactors for plutonium and uranium-thorium fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talamo, Alberto

    2007-01-01

    We analytically evaluated the fuel coefficient of temperature both for pebble bed and prismatic high temperature reactors when they utilize as fuel plutonium and minor actinides from light water reactors spent fuel or a mixture of 50% uranium, enriched 20% in 235 U, and 50% thorium. In both cores the calculation involves the evaluation of the resonances integrals of the high absorbers fuel nuclides 240 Pu, 238 U and 232 Th and it requires the esteem of the Dancoff-Ginsburg factor for a pebble bed or prismatic core. The Dancoff-Ginsburg factor represents the only discriminating parameter in the results for the two different reactors types; in fact, both the pebble bed and the prismatic reactors share the same the pseudo-cross-section describing an infinite medium made of graphite filled by TRISO particles. We considered only the resolved resonances with a statistical spin factor equal to one and we took into account 267, 72, 212 resonances in the range 1.057-5692, 6.674-14485, 21.78-3472 eV for 240 Pu, 238 U and 232 Th, respectively, for investigating the influence on the fuel temperature reactivity coefficient of the variation of the TRISO kernel radius and TRISO particles packing fraction from 100, 200 to 300 μm and from 10% to 50%, respectively. Finally, in the pebble bed core, we varied the radius of the pebble for setting a fuel temperature reactivity coefficient similar to the one of a prismatic core

  6. Determination of hot spot factors for calculation of the maximum fuel temperatures in the core thermal and hydraulic design of HTTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Soh; Yamashita, Kiyonobu; Fujimoto, Nozomu; Murata, Isao; Shindo, Ryuichi; Sudo, Yukio

    1988-12-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has been designing the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR), which is 30 MW in thermal power, 950deg C in reactor outlet coolant temperature and 40 kg/cm 2 G in primary coolant pressure. This report summarizes the hot spot factors and their estimated values used in the evaluation of the maximum fuel temperature which is one of the major items in the core thermal and hydraulic design of the HTTR. The hot spot factors consist of systematic factors and random factors. They were identified and their values adopted in the thermal and hydraulic design were determined considering the features of the HTTR. (author)

  7. Task 08/41, Low temperature loop at the RA reactor, Review IV - Maximum temperature values in the samples without forced cooling; Zadatak 08/41, Niskotemperaturna petlja u reaktoru 'RA', Pregled IV - Maksimalne temperature u uzorcima bez prinudnog hladjenja

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaric, Z [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1961-12-15

    The quantity of heat generated in the sample was calculated in the Review III. In stationary regime the heat is transferred through the air layer between the sample and the wall of the channel to the heavy water of graphite. Certain value of maximum temperature t{sub 0} is achieved in the sample. The objective of this review is determination of this temperature. [Serbo-Croat] Kolicina toplote generisana u uzorku, izracunata u pregledu III, u ravnoteznom stanju odvodi se kroz vazdusni sloj izmedju uzorka i zida kanala na tesku vodu odnosno grafit, pri cemu se u uzorku dostize izvesna maksimalna temperatura t{sub 0}. Odredjivanje ove temperature je predmet ovog pregleda.

  8. Study of the low temperature oxidation of uranium powders and its application to the sintering of uranium oxide powders; Etude de l'oxydation des poudres dtranium a basse temperature et son application au frittage de poudres d'uranium oxyde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conte-Albert, M. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-06-01

    The uranium oxygen reaction has been studied with a view to obtaining U-UO{sub 2} samples containing about 20 per cent by weight of UO{sub 2} starting from spherical grain uranium powder (36 {mu} < {phi} < 50 {mu}). The techniques used are micrography, thermogravimetry, sintering under pressure, radio-crystallography. At 170 deg. C in air or argon + oxygen mixtures, the uranium oxide formed is always UO{sub 2} and it is uniformly distributed around the initial uranium spheres. These mixed powders can easily be sintered under pressure in the {gamma}-phase. The density of the samples obtained is 85 to 90 per cent of the theoretical density. The influence of UO{sub 2} on the properties of uranium has been shown by the use of dilatometry and thermal cycling in the {alpha} phase. The temperatures at which the phase changes {alpha} {r_reversible} {beta} and {beta} {r_reversible} {gamma} occur are lowered, the remnant expansion is decreased. High density samples resist well to thermal cycling; the characteristic defects of uranium: high distortion, wrinkled surface, have almost disappeared. Heat treatments in a secondary vacuum at 1050 deg. C cause crystallization of UO{sub 2} in a geometrical form and the appearance of a phase of the F.C.C. crystalline type having the composition U{sub W}C{sub X}O{sub Y}N{sub Z}. This phase causes a new decrease in the {alpha} {r_reversible} {beta}, {beta} {r_reversible} {gamma} transformation temperatures for the uranium. After ten dilatometric cycles the remanent expansion of the sample is about 0.5 per cent. The resistance to thermal cycling of a low density sample which has been heat-treated is similar to that of a high density sample which has not undergone a heat treatment. (author) [French] La reaction uranium-oxygene a ete etudiee pour permettre l'obtention d'echantillons U-UO{sub 2} a 20 pour cent en poids environ d'UO{sub 2}, a partir de billes d'uranium pulverulent (36 {mu} < {phi} < 50 {mu}). Les

  9. The effect of strain rate and temperature on the tensile behaviour of uranium - 2sup(w)/o molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harding, J.; Boyd, G.A.C.

    1983-01-01

    This report describes the uniaxial tensile behaviour of uranium 2 w/o molybdenum alloy over a wide range of temperature and strain rate. Specimen blanks taken from co-reduced and extruded U2 w/o Mo rods were given one of two heat treatments. Longitudinal tensile test pieces, taken from these blanks at near surface locations were tested in the temperature range -150 deg C to +100 deg C at strain rates from quasistatic (10 -4 s -1 ) to 10 3 s -1 . To achieve this range of testing rates three machines were required: an Instron screw driven machine for rates up to 0.1 s -1 , a second specially constructed hydraulic machine for the range 0.1 s -1 to 50 s -1 and a drop weight machine for the highest strain rates. The ways in which the mechanical properties - elongation to fracture, flow stresses and ultimate tensile stress - vary with both temperature and strain rate are presented and discussed for material in both heat treatment conditions. (author)

  10. The effect of strain rate and temperature on the tensile behaviour of uranium 2 w/o molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harding, J.; Boyd, G.A.C.

    1983-01-01

    This report describes the uniaxial tensile behaviour of uranium 2 w/o molybdenum alloy over a wide range of temperature and strain rate. Specimen blanks taken from co-reduced and extruded U 2 w/o Mo rods were given one of two heat treatments. Longitudinal tensile test pieces, taken from these blanks at near surface locations were tested in the temperature range -150 deg C to +100 deg C at strain rates from quasistatic (10 -4 s -1 ) to 10 3 s -1 . To achieve this range of testing rates three machines were required: an Instron screw driven machine for rates up to 0.1 s -1 , a second specially constructed hydraulic machine for the range 0.1 s -1 to 50 s -1 and a drop weight machine for the highest strain rates. The ways in which the mechanical properties - elongation to fracture, flow stresses and ultimate tensile stress - vary with both temperature and strain rate are presented and discussed for material in both heat treatment conditions. (author)

  11. Effects of temperature, concentration, and uranium chloride mixture on zirconium electrochemical studies in LiCl−KCl eutectic salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoover, Robert O. [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering and Nuclear Engineering Program, University of Idaho, Center for Advanced Energy Studies, 995 University Blvd, Idaho Falls, ID 8340 (United States); Yoon, Dalsung [Department of Mechanical & Nuclear Engineering, Virginia Commonwealth University, 401 West Main St., Richmond, VA 23284 (United States); Phongikaroon, Supathorn, E-mail: sphongikaroon@vcu.edu [Department of Mechanical & Nuclear Engineering, Virginia Commonwealth University, 401 West Main St., Richmond, VA 23284 (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Experimental studies were performed to provide measurement and analysis of zirconium (Zr) electrochemistry in LiCl−KCl eutectic salt at different temperatures and concentrations using cyclic voltammetry (CV). An additional experimental set with uranium chloride added into the system forming UCl{sub 3}−ZrCl{sub 4}−LiCl−KCl was performed to explore the general behavior of these two species together. Results of CV experiments with ZrCl{sub 4} show complicated cathodic and anodic peaks, which were identified along with the Zr reactions. The CV results reveal that diffusion coefficients (D) of ZrCl{sub 4} and ZrCl{sub 2} as the function of temperature can be expressed as D{sub Zr(IV)} = 0.00046exp(−3716/T) and D{sub Zr(II)} = 0.027exp(−5617/T), respectively. The standard rate constants and apparent standard potentials of ZrCl{sub 4} at different temperatures were calculated. Furthermore, the results from the mixture of UCl{sub 3} and ZrCl{sub 4} indicate that high concentrations of UCl{sub 3} hide the features of the smaller concentration of ZrCl{sub 4} while Zr peaks become prominent as the concentration of ZrCl{sub 4} increases.

  12. Influence of the temperature in the uranium (Vi) sorption in zirconium diphosphate; Influencia de la temperatura en la sorcion de uranio (VI) en difosfato de circonio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia G, N.; Solis, D. [Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Facultad de Quimica, Paseo Colon y Paseo Tollocan, 50120 Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Ordonez R, E., E-mail: nidgg@yahoo.com.mx [ININ, Departamento de Quimica, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    In the present work was evaluated the uranium (Vi) sorption at 10, 20, 30, 40 and 60 C on the zirconium diphosphate (ZrP{sub 2}O{sub 7}). They were carried out kinetic and isotherms using the method by lots, these will allow to fix the sorption time (kinetic) and to explain the behavior of this sorption in different ph conditions and temperature (isotherm). The quantity of retained uranium in the surface was quantified by means of the fluorescence technique. (Author)

  13. An X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic study of a nitric acid/argon ion cleaned uranium metal surface at elevated temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, A.J.; Sherwood, P.M.A.

    1987-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy has been used to study the surface of uranium metal cleaned by nitric acid treatment and argon ion etching, followed by heating in a high vacuum. The surface is shown to contain UOsub(2-x) species over the entire temperature range studied. Heating to temperatures in the range 400-600 0 C generates a mixture of this oxide, the metal and a carbide and/or oxycarbide species. (author)

  14. Temperature reconstruction and volcanic eruption signal from tree-ring width and maximum latewood density over the past 304 years in the southeastern Tibetan Plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mingqi; Huang, Lei; Yin, Zhi-Yong; Shao, Xuemei

    2017-11-01

    This study presents a 304-year mean July-October maximum temperature reconstruction for the southeastern Tibetan Plateau based on both tree-ring width and maximum latewood density data. The reconstruction explained 58% of the variance in July-October maximum temperature during the calibration period (1958-2005). On the decadal scale, we identified two prominent cold periods during AD 1801-1833 and 1961-2003 and two prominent warm periods during AD 1730-1800 and 1928-1960, which are consistent with other reconstructions from the nearby region. Based on the reconstructed temperature series and volcanic eruption chronology, we found that most extreme cold years were in good agreement with major volcanic eruptions, such as 1816 after the Tambora eruption in 1815. Also, clusters of volcanic eruptions probably made the 1810s the coldest decade in the past 300 years. Our results indicated that fingerprints of major volcanic eruptions can be found in the reconstructed temperature records, while the responses of regional climate to these eruption events varied in space and time in the southeastern Tibetan Plateau.

  15. METHOD OF ROLLING URANIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, C.S.

    1959-08-01

    A method is described for rolling uranium metal at relatively low temperatures and under non-oxidizing conditions. The method involves the steps of heating the uranium to 200 deg C in an oil bath, withdrawing the uranium and permitting the oil to drain so that only a thin protective coating remains and rolling the oil coated uranium at a temperature of 200 deg C to give about a 15% reduction in thickness at each pass. The operation may be repeated to accomplish about a 90% reduction without edge cracking, checking or any appreciable increase in brittleness.

  16. PRODUCTION OF URANIUM METAL BY CARBON REDUCTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, R.B.; Powers, R.M.; Blaber, O.J.

    1959-09-22

    The preparation of uranium metal by the carbon reduction of an oxide of uranium is described. In a preferred embodiment of the invention a charge composed of carbon and uranium oxide is heated to a solid mass after which it is further heated under vacuum to a temperature of about 2000 deg C to produce a fused uranium metal. Slowly ccoling the fused mass produces a dendritic structure of uranium carbide in uranium metal. Reacting the solidified charge with deionized water hydrolyzes the uranium carbide to finely divide uranium dioxide which can be separated from the coarser uranium metal by ordinary filtration methods.

  17. Effect of Temperature on Wettability and Optimum Wetting Conditions for Maximum Oil Recovery in Carbonate Reservoir System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sohal, Muhammad Adeel Nassar; Thyne, Geoffrey; Søgaard, Erik Gydesen

    2017-01-01

    The additional oil recovery from fractured & oil-wet carbonates by ionically modified water is principally based on changing wettability and often attributed to an improvement in water wetness. The influence of different parameters like dilution of salinity, potential anions, temperature, pressure......, lithology, pH, oil acid and base numbers to improve water wetting has been tested in recovery experiments. In these studies temperature is mainly investigated to observe the reactivity of potential anions (SO42-, PO33-, and BO33-) at different concentrations. But the influence of systematically increasing...... and 100 times. It was observed that as temperature increased the water-wetness decreased for seawater and seawater dilutions, however, the presence of elevated sulfate can somewhat counter this trend as sulfate increased oil wetting....

  18. Extraction of uranium from seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanno, M.

    1977-01-01

    The nuclear power generation is thought to be very important in Japan. However, known domestic uranium resources in Japan are very rare. So, extraction of uranium from sea water have been carried out since 1962 at Japan Tobacco and Salt Public Corporation. There are a number of results obtained also by Kyoto University, Shikoku Govenment Industrial Research Institute, Tokyo University and others. In order to investigate the technical and economical feasibility of extraction of uranium and other resources from sea water, a research program was started in fiscal 1975, sponsored by the Ministry of International Trade and Industry with the budget of about $440,000. In this program, the conceptional design of two types of model plants, the ''column type'' and the ''tidal type'' was drawn on the design bases set up with available information. It was found that there has been several problems waiting solution, but there were no technically fatal problems. Adsorption tests were carried out with adsorbents of more than eleven types, including titanium hydroxide, and it was found that titanium hydroxide made by titanyl surphate and urea had the largest adsorption capacity of uranium among them. Elution experiments were performed only with ammonium carbonate and the efficiency at the temperature of 60 0 C showed three times higher than that of 20 0 C. A few long term column operation was conducted, mainly with the adsorbent of granulated titanium hydroxide for 15-60 days. The maximum yield of uranium throughout the adsorption and elution operation was over 20% and macimum concentration of uranium in eluate was 7 ppm

  19. Test Plan to Determine the Maximum Surface Temperatures for a Plutonium Storage Cubicle with Horizontal 3013 Canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HEARD, F.J.

    2000-01-01

    A simulated full-scale plutonium storage cubicle with 22 horizontally positioned and heated 3013 canisters is proposed to confirm the effectiveness of natural circulation. Temperature and airflow measurements will be made for different heat generation and cubicle door configurations. Comparisons will be made to computer based thermal Hydraulic models

  20. Equation of state, phase stability, and phase transformations of uranium-6 wt. % niobium under high pressure and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianzhong; Vogel, Sven; Brown, Donald; Clausen, Bjorn; Hackenberg, Robert

    2018-05-01

    In-situ time-of-flight neutron diffraction experiments were conducted on the uranium-niobium alloy with 6 wt. % Nb (U-6Nb) at pressures up to 4.7 GPa and temperatures up to 1073 K. Upon static compression at room temperature, the monoclinic structure of U-6Nb (α″ U-6Nb) remains stable up to the highest experimental pressure. Based on the pressure-volume measurements at room temperature, the least-squares fit using the finite-strain equation of state (EOS) yields an isothermal bulk modulus of B0 = 127 ± 2 GPa for the α″-phase of U-6Nb. The calculated zero-pressure bulk sound speed from this EOS is 2.706 ± 0.022 km/s, which is in good agreement with the linear extrapolation of the previous Hugoniot data above 12 GPa for α″ U-6Nb, indicating that the dynamic response under those shock-loading conditions is consistent with the stabilization of the initial monoclinic phase of U-6Nb. Upon heating at ambient and high pressures, the metastable α″ U-6Nb exhibits complex transformation paths leading to the diffusional phase decomposition, which are sensitive to applied pressure, stress state, and temperature-time path. These findings provide new insight into the behavior of atypical systems such as U-Nb and suggest that the different U-Nb phases are separated by rather small energies and hence highly sensitive to compositional, thermal, and mechanical perturbations.

  1. Impacts of projected maximum temperature extremes for C21 by an ensemble of regional climate models on cereal cropping systems in the Iberian Peninsula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ruiz-Ramos

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Crops growing in the Iberian Peninsula may be subjected to damagingly high temperatures during the sensitive development periods of flowering and grain filling. Such episodes are considered important hazards and farmers may take insurance to offset their impact. Increases in value and frequency of maximum temperature have been observed in the Iberian Peninsula during the 20th century, and studies on climate change indicate the possibility of further increase by the end of the 21st century. Here, impacts of current and future high temperatures on cereal cropping systems of the Iberian Peninsula are evaluated, focusing on vulnerable development periods of winter and summer crops. Climate change scenarios obtained from an ensemble of ten Regional Climate Models (multimodel ensemble combined with crop simulation models were used for this purpose and related uncertainty was estimated. Results reveal that higher extremes of maximum temperature represent a threat to summer-grown but not to winter-grown crops in the Iberian Peninsula. The study highlights the different vulnerability of crops in the two growing seasons and the need to account for changes in extreme temperatures in developing adaptations in cereal cropping systems. Finally, this work contributes to clarifying the causes of high-uncertainty impact projections from previous studies.

  2. Is uranium dioxide a glass at high temperature: the reason for its irradiation resistance?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desgranges, Lionel

    2008-01-01

    Electronic intrinsic carriers are shown to have some influence on UO 2 high temperature properties. The physical nature of these carriers, called polarons, is discussed and it is proposed that they could correspond to quasi-broken bonds, in a similar way to intrinsic electronic defects in SiO 2 . It is shown that this hypothesis provides an explanation, at least qualitative, for UO 2 specific behavior at high temperature and under irradiation. (author)

  3. Study of the temperature influence during the uranium (Vi) sorption on surface of ZrP2O7 in presence of oxalic and salicylic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia G, N.

    2013-01-01

    This work studies the effect of temperature on the uranium (Vi) sorption onto zirconium diphosphate in the presence of organic acids (oxalic and salicylic acids). Zirconium diphosphate was synthesized by a chemical condensation reaction and characterized using several analytical techniques, in order to check its purity. This point is very important because the presence of any impurities or secondary phases may interfere with the hydration and sorption process. Prior to the sorption experiments, three batches of zirconium diphosphate were pre-equilibrated with NaClO 4 , oxalic acid or salicylic acid solutions. The hydrated solids were washed and dried and then again characterized in order to study the interactions between organic acids and zirconium diphosphate surface. Uranium sorption onto zirconium diphosphate (pre-equilibrated with NaClO 4 , oxalic acid and salicylic acid solutions) was investigated as a function of ph, organic acid and temperature (20, 40 y 60 grades C). Thermodynamic parameters for the sorption reactions (enthalpy change, entropy change and Gibbs free energy change) were determined from temperature dependence of distribution coefficient by using the Vant Hoff equation. Solids characterization after hydration shows that exist an interaction between organic acids and ZrP 2 O 7 . This fact was confirmed with the microcalorimetry study, the reaction heat for hydration of zirconium diphosphate in NaClO 4 solution was exothermic (-269.59 mJ) and for hydration of zirconium diphosphate in oxalic acid solution was endothermic (53.64 mJ). The experimental results showed important differences in the sorption mechanisms for the reaction of Uranium with ZrP 2 O 7 in the presence and absence of organic acids. For the zirconium diphosphate hydrated with oxalic acid, the sorption percentage was 50% from lowest ph values. For the zirconium diphosphate hydrated with salicylic acid, the initial concentration of uranium was 6 x 10 -4 M and a percentage of 10% was

  4. Study of elementary mechanisms of creep in uranium as a function of temperature (150 deg. to 760 deg. C) by activation energy measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grenier, P.

    1966-06-01

    Creep tests were carried out on single crystals and polycrystalline specimens of uranium in both the α and β phases over the temperature range 150 - 760 deg. C. The determination of the activation energy for creep and the study of its variation with temperature made it possible to distinguish various temperature ranges in which one or more elementary mechanisms govern deformation. Micrographic observations after creep and the study of the variation of creep-rate with load support the conclusions. The creep behavior of single crystals is identical with that of polycrystalline material below 325 deg. C. From 325 deg. C to one upper limiting temperature whose value depends on the purity and previous history of the metal, the creep deformation of uranium is controlled by cross-slip. From this limiting temperature up to 520 deg. C, the creep of uranium involves two independent mechanisms operating simultaneously, the movement of screw dislocation by cross-slip and the climbing of edge dislocations out of their slip plane. Between 520 deg. C and the α - β transformation temperature creep in polycrystals is governed by the climb of edge dislocations out of their slip planes, by a pile up mechanism in the case of primary creep and by dipole annihilation in the case of secondary creep. In single crystals creep is dependent on the climb of edge dislocations into pre-existent sub-boundaries and their subsequent rearrangement within these boundaries. In the β phase the creep of polycrystals is governed by the diffusional climb of edge dislocations. Between 450 and 630 deg. C small alloy additions of molybdenum modify the creep characteristics of uranium although the deformation mechanisms involved are analogous to those in the pure metal. (author) [fr

  5. Analytical calculation of the fuel temperature reactivity coefficient for pebble bed and prismatic high temperature reactors for plutonium and uranium-thorium fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talamo, Alberto [Department of Nuclear and Reactor Physics, Royal Institute of Technology - KTH, Roslagstullsbacken 21, S-10691 Stockholm (Sweden)]. E-mail: alby@anl.gov

    2007-01-15

    We analytically evaluated the fuel coefficient of temperature both for pebble bed and prismatic high temperature reactors when they utilize as fuel plutonium and minor actinides from light water reactors spent fuel or a mixture of 50% uranium, enriched 20% in {sup 235}U, and 50% thorium. In both cores the calculation involves the evaluation of the resonances integrals of the high absorbers fuel nuclides {sup 240}Pu, {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th and it requires the esteem of the Dancoff-Ginsburg factor for a pebble bed or prismatic core. The Dancoff-Ginsburg factor represents the only discriminating parameter in the results for the two different reactors types; in fact, both the pebble bed and the prismatic reactors share the same the pseudo-cross-section describing an infinite medium made of graphite filled by TRISO particles. We considered only the resolved resonances with a statistical spin factor equal to one and we took into account 267, 72, 212 resonances in the range 1.057-5692, 6.674-14485, 21.78-3472 eV for {sup 240}Pu, {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th, respectively, for investigating the influence on the fuel temperature reactivity coefficient of the variation of the TRISO kernel radius and TRISO particles packing fraction from 100, 200 to 300 {mu}m and from 10% to 50%, respectively. Finally, in the pebble bed core, we varied the radius of the pebble for setting a fuel temperature reactivity coefficient similar to the one of a prismatic core.

  6. A review of the oxidation of uranium dioxide at temperatures below 400oC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEachern, R.J.; Taylor, P.

    1997-01-01

    A critical review of the extensive literature on the air oxidation Of U0 2 at temperatures below 400 o C is presented. The key parameters that affect the rate Of U0 2 oxidation are examined systematically, and their importance to the reaction rate is evaluated. The formation of U 30 7/U 4 0 9 on unirradiated U0 2 powders follows the discrete-layer mechanism and displays diffusion-controlled kinetics. In contrast, U 3 0 8 formation on unirradiated U0 2 displays sigmoidal 'nucleation-and-growth' kinetics. Low-temperature oxidation of used fuel tends to proceed by rapid grain-boundary oxidation followed by simultaneous intragranular oxidation throughout the sample. The activation energy for the formation Of U 3 0 7 /U 4 0 9 is 96 kJ mol -1 for U0 2 powders, 99 kJ mol -1 for sintered pellets and 106 kJ mol -1 for used fuel. The activation energy for the formation Of U 3 0 8 is temperature dependent. The best estimate of the activation energy below ∼325 o C is 154 kJ mol -1 , but all the kinetic data incorporate substantial approximations so that further study is required to properly predict the behaviour of used fuel under low-temperature ( o C) dry-air storage conditions, based on high-temperature (200 to 350 o C) laboratory data. (author). 204 refs., 5 tabs., 4 figs

  7. Corrosion of metallic materials by uranium hexafluoride at high temperatures (1963)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langlois, G.

    1963-01-01

    The corrosion of the following metals or alloys by UF 6 : nickel, monel, Inconel, gold, platinum, stainless steel, is studied in the temperature range from 300 to 1000 deg. C. The test method, designed to avoid heating the apparatus containing the corrosive fluid to a high temperature, consists in using threadlike samples heated by the Joule effect, the rest of the apparatus being maintained close to room temperature. This technique makes it possible also to determine continuously the penetration of the corrosion by measuring the electrical resistance of the sample with a double Thomson bridge. A series of rapid comparison tests shows that stainless steel, precious metals and Inconel are attacked far too rapidly to be used above 500 deg. C; only monel and especially nickel appear capable of resisting at high temperatures. The detailed examination of the behaviour of nickel shows that the metallic fluoride is volatilized and that this influences the corrosion rate. It shows also the existence of a temperature zone situated between 550 and 700 deg. C in which occurs A strong intergranular corrosion the cause of which appears to be the presence of impurities in the metal. (author) [fr

  8. Investigation of uranium (VI) adsorption by polypyrrole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdi, S. [Faculty of Chemical, Petroleum and Gas Engineering, Semnan University, Semnan 35195-363 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nasiri, M., E-mail: mnasiri@semnan.ac.ir [Faculty of Chemical, Petroleum and Gas Engineering, Semnan University, Semnan 35195-363 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mesbahi, A. [Faculty of Chemical, Petroleum and Gas Engineering, Semnan University, Semnan 35195-363 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khani, M.H. [Nuclear Fuel Cycle Research School, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Tehran, 14395-836 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • The adsorbent (polypyrrole) was synthesized by a chemical method using PEG, DBSNa and CTAB as the surfactant. • The solution pH was one of the most important parameters affecting the adsorption of uranium. • The CTAB provided higher removal percentage compared with the other surfactants. • The maximum adsorption capacity obtained from Langmuir isotherm was 87.72 mg/g. • The pseudo second-order model fitted well with the adsorption kinetic of polypyrrole to uranium. - Abstract: The purpose of this study was to investigate the adsorption of uranium (VI) ions on the polypyrrole adsorbent. Polypyrrole was synthesized by a chemical method using polyethylene glycol, sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate, and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide as the surfactant and iron (III) chloride as an oxidant in the aqueous solution. The effect of various surfactants on the synthesized polymers and their performance as the uranium adsorbent were investigated. Adsorbent properties were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) techniques. The effect of different parameters such as pH, contact time, initial metal ion concentrations, adsorbent dose, and the temperature was investigated in the batch system for uranium adsorption process. It has been illustrated that the adsorption equilibrium time is 7 min. The results showed that the Freundlich model had the best agreement and the maximum adsorption capacity of polypyrrole for uranium (VI) was determined 87.72 mg/g from Langmuir isotherm. In addition, the mentioned adsorption process was fast and the kinetic data were fitted to the Pseudo first and second order models. The adsorption kinetic data followed the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Moreover, the thermodynamic parameters ΔG{sup 0}, ΔH{sup 0} and ΔS{sup 0} showed that the uranium adsorption process by polypyrrole was endothermic and spontaneous.

  9. Temperature dependence of diffusion coefficients of trivalent uranium ions in chloride and chloride-fluoride melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komarov, V.E.; Borodina, N.P.

    1981-01-01

    Diffusion coefficients of U 3+ ions are measured by chronopotentiometric method in chloride 3LiCl-2KCl and in mixed chloride fluoride 3LiCl(LiF)-2KCl melts in the temperature range 633-1235 K. It is shown It is shown that experimental values of diffusion-coefficients are approximated in a direct line in lg D-1/T coordinate in chloride melt in the whole temperature range and in chloride-fluoride melt in the range of 644-1040 K. Experimental values of diffusion coefficients diviate from Arrhenius equation in the direction of large values in chloride-fluoride melt at further increase of temperature up to 1235 K. Possible causes of such a diviation are considered [ru

  10. Temperature effect on the inter-micellar collision and maximum packaging volume fraction in water/AOT/isooctane micro-emulsions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guettari, Moez; Ben Naceur, Imen; Kassab, Ghazi; Tajouri, Tahar

    2016-01-01

    We have studied the viscosity behaviour of water/AOT/isooctane micro-emulsions as a function of the volume fraction of the dispersed phase over a temperature range from the (298.15 to 328.15) K. For all the studied temperature range, a sharp increase of the viscosities is observed when the droplets concentration was varied. Several equations based on hard sphere model were examined to explain the behaviours of micro-emulsions under temperature and concentration effects. According to these equations, the shape factor and the inter-particle interaction parameters were found to be dependent on temperature which is in contradiction with experimental results reported in the literature. A modified Vand equation, taking into account the inter-particle collision time, is used to interpret the results obtained. This deviation is attributed to the aggregation of the droplets which becomes important by increasing temperature. The maximum packaging volume fraction of particles Φ_d_m and the intrinsic viscosity [η] were determined according to the Krieger and Dougherty equation through the temperature range studied. These two parameters were shown to be dependent on temperature but their product was found to be constant and close to 2 as reported in theory.

  11. Effect of in-pile degradation of the meat thermal conductivity on the maximum temperature of the plate-type U-Mo dispersion fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medvedev, Pavel G.

    2009-01-01

    Effect of in-pile degradation of thermal conductivity on the maximum temperature of the plate-type research reactor fuels has been assessed using the steady-state heat conduction equation and assuming convection cooling. It was found that due to very low meat thickness, characteristic for this type of fuel, the effect of thermal conductivity degradation on the maximum fuel temperature is minor. For example, the fuel plate featuring 0.635 mm thick meat operating at heat flux of 600 W/cm2 would experience only a 20 C temperature rise if the meat thermal conductivity degrades from 0.8 W/cm-s to 0.3 W/cm-s. While degradation of meat thermal conductivity in dispersion-type U-Mo fuel can be very substantial due to formation of interaction layer between the particles and the matrix, and development of fission gas filled porosity, this simple analysis demonstrates that this phenomenon is unlikely to significantly affect the temperature-based safety margin of the fuel during normal operation.

  12. New climatic targets against global warming: will the maximum 2 °C temperature rise affect estuarine benthic communities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, Daniel; Grilo, Tiago Fernandes; Baptista, Joana; Coelho, João Pedro; Lillebø, Ana Isabel; Cássio, Fernanda; Fernandes, Isabel; Pascoal, Cláudia; Pardal, Miguel Ângelo; Dolbeth, Marina

    2017-06-20

    The Paris Agreement signed by 195 countries in 2015 sets out a global action plan to avoid dangerous climate change by limiting global warming to remain below 2 °C. Under that premise, in situ experiments were run to test the effects of 2 °C temperature increase on the benthic communities in a seagrass bed and adjacent bare sediment, from a temperate European estuary. Temperature was artificially increased in situ and diversity and ecosystem functioning components measured after 10 and 30 days. Despite some warmness effects on the analysed components, significant impacts were not verified on macro and microfauna structure, bioturbation or in the fluxes of nutrients. The effect of site/habitat seemed more important than the effects of the warmness, with the seagrass habitat providing more homogenous results and being less impacted by warmness than the adjacent bare sediment. The results reinforce that most ecological responses to global changes are context dependent and that ecosystem stability depends not only on biological diversity but also on the availability of different habitats and niches, highlighting the role of coastal wetlands. In the context of the Paris Agreement it seems that estuarine benthic ecosystems will be able to cope if global warming remains below 2 °C.

  13. Evaluation of daily maximum and minimum 2-m temperatures as simulated with the Regional Climate Model COSMO-CLM over Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Krähenmann

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The representation of the diurnal 2-m temperature cycle is challenging because of the many processes involved, particularly land-atmosphere interactions. This study examines the ability of the regional climate model COSMO-CLM (version 4.8 to capture the statistics of daily maximum and minimum 2-m temperatures (Tmin/Tmax over Africa. The simulations are carried out at two different horizontal grid-spacings (0.22° and 0.44°, and are driven by ECMWF ERA-Interim reanalyses as near-perfect lateral boundary conditions. As evaluation reference, a high-resolution gridded dataset of daily maximum and minimum temperatures (Tmin/Tmax for Africa (covering the period 2008–2010 is created using the regression-kriging-regression-kriging (RKRK algorithm. RKRK applies, among other predictors, the remotely sensed predictors land surface temperature and cloud cover to compensate for the missing information about the temperature pattern due to the low station density over Africa. This dataset allows the evaluation of temperature characteristics like the frequencies of Tmin/Tmax, the diurnal temperature range, and the 90th percentile of Tmax. Although the large-scale patterns of temperature are reproduced well, COSMO-CLM shows significant under- and overestimation of temperature at regional scales. The hemispheric summers are generally too warm and the day-to-day temperature variability is overestimated over northern and southern extra-tropical Africa. The average diurnal temperature range is underestimated by about 2°C across arid areas, yet overestimated by around 2°C over the African tropics. An evaluation based on frequency distributions shows good model performance for simulated Tmin (the simulated frequency distributions capture more than 80% of the observed ones, but less well performance for Tmax (capture below 70%. Further, over wide parts of Africa a too large fraction of daily Tmax values exceeds the observed 90th percentile of Tmax, particularly

  14. Evaluation of daily maximum and minimum 2-m temperatures as simulated with the regional climate model COSMO-CLM over Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraehenmann, Stefan; Kothe, Steffen; Ahrens, Bodo [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Inst. for Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences; Panitz, Hans-Juergen [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    The representation of the diurnal 2-m temperature cycle is challenging because of the many processes involved, particularly land-atmosphere interactions. This study examines the ability of the regional climate model COSMO-CLM (version 4.8) to capture the statistics of daily maximum and minimum 2-m temperatures (Tmin/Tmax) over Africa. The simulations are carried out at two different horizontal grid-spacings (0.22 and 0.44 ), and are driven by ECMWF ERA-Interim reanalyses as near-perfect lateral boundary conditions. As evaluation reference, a high-resolution gridded dataset of daily maximum and minimum temperatures (Tmin/Tmax) for Africa (covering the period 2008-2010) is created using the regression-kriging-regression-kriging (RKRK) algorithm. RKRK applies, among other predictors, the remotely sensed predictors land surface temperature and cloud cover to compensate for the missing information about the temperature pattern due to the low station density over Africa. This dataset allows the evaluation of temperature characteristics like the frequencies of Tmin/Tmax, the diurnal temperature range, and the 90{sup th} percentile of Tmax. Although the large-scale patterns of temperature are reproduced well, COSMO-CLM shows significant under- and overestimation of temperature at regional scales. The hemispheric summers are generally too warm and the day-to-day temperature variability is overestimated over northern and southern extra-tropical Africa. The average diurnal temperature range is underestimated by about 2 C across arid areas, yet overestimated by around 2 C over the African tropics. An evaluation based on frequency distributions shows good model performance for simulated Tmin (the simulated frequency distributions capture more than 80% of the observed ones), but less well performance for Tmax (capture below 70%). Further, over wide parts of Africa a too large fraction of daily Tmax values exceeds the observed 90{sup th} percentile of Tmax, particularly across

  15. Modelling the occurrence of heat waves in maximum and minimum temperatures over Spain and projections for the period 2031-60

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abaurrea, J.; Asín, J.; Cebrián, A. C.

    2018-02-01

    The occurrence of extreme heat events in maximum and minimum daily temperatures is modelled using a non-homogeneous common Poisson shock process. It is applied to five Spanish locations, representative of the most common climates over the Iberian Peninsula. The model is based on an excess over threshold approach and distinguishes three types of extreme events: only in maximum temperature, only in minimum temperature and in both of them (simultaneous events). It takes into account the dependence between the occurrence of extreme events in both temperatures and its parameters are expressed as functions of time and temperature related covariates. The fitted models allow us to characterize the occurrence of extreme heat events and to compare their evolution in the different climates during the observed period. This model is also a useful tool for obtaining local projections of the occurrence rate of extreme heat events under climate change conditions, using the future downscaled temperature trajectories generated by Earth System Models. The projections for 2031-60 under scenarios RCP4.5, RCP6.0 and RCP8.5 are obtained and analysed using the trajectories from four earth system models which have successfully passed a preliminary control analysis. Different graphical tools and summary measures of the projected daily intensities are used to quantify the climate change on a local scale. A high increase in the occurrence of extreme heat events, mainly in July and August, is projected in all the locations, all types of event and in the three scenarios, although in 2051-60 the increase is higher under RCP8.5. However, relevant differences are found between the evolution in the different climates and the types of event, with a specially high increase in the simultaneous ones.

  16. Crystallographic and oxidation kinetic study of uranium dioxide by high temperature X-ray diffractometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teixeira, S.R.

    1981-01-01

    The structural behavior of UO 2 sintered plates was studied as a function of temperature by X-ray diffractometry. All the experiments were carried out under an inert atmosphere with low oxygen content (approximated 140 ppm). The thermal expansion coefficient of UO 2 05 was found to be 10,5 x 10 - 6 0 C - 1 for temperatures above 165 0 C. Structural transformations during oxidation were observed at 170,235 and 275 0 C. The isothermal oxidation of UO 2 to U 3 O 7 follows a parabolic form and the diffusion of oxygen through the product layer U 4 O 9 is the mechanism controlling the oxidation rate. The phases observed were UO 2 (cubic) - U 4 O 9 (cubic) - U 3 O 7 (tetragonal). Activation energies of oxidation were found for different crystallographic planes (hkl). From this one can conclude that there is a preferential occupation of interstitial oxygen within the UO 2 structure. (Author) [pt

  17. Mechanisms of the plastic deformation of uranium alloys at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Poac, P.; Nomine, A.M.; Miannay, D.

    1976-01-01

    The mechanical characteristics of the bcc binary alloys U-6Mo, U-8Mo, U-10Mo, U-12Mo and bcc ternary alloys U-8Mo-1Ti, U-10Mo-1Ti, U-10Mo-1Zr, stressed in compression, were determined between -196 deg C and + 450 deg C. The plastic flow shear stress in non-dependent on temperature above 300 deg C. At lower temperature shear stress is highly activated, except for the alloy U-6Mo and U-12Mo. Athermal shear stress above 300 deg C is due to the hardening of the solid solution described by Mott and Nabarro. In the thermal range, the recombination of the dissociated dislocations controls the plastic deformation [fr

  18. Mechanical properties of aluminium-uranium alloy and aluminium commercially pure at several temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quadros, N.F. de.

    1976-01-01

    The mechanical properties of Ai-U (18,4 wt %) alloy with and without heat treatment were determined, and they were compared with the mechanical properties of aluminum alloy of commercial purity, AI-1100, at tempiratures of 25, 500, 550 and 600 0 C, the changes of both the yield point stress and the ultimate tensile strength as a function of temperature may be described through two emperical relationships. A fractography study was also made [pt

  19. Assessment of the thorium and uranium fuel cycle in the fast breeder and the high temperature reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schikorr, W.M.

    1977-01-01

    This report assesses the fissile fuel economy of the uranium and thorium cycle in the advanced reactors currently under development, the fast breeder reactor (FBR) and the high temperature reactor (HTR). It is shown by means of detailed burnup calculations that replacing UO 2 with ThO 2 or Th-metal as the radial blanket breeding material will not have any significant imapct on the breeding and burnup properties of the FBR. A global, analytical investigation is performed to study the fissile fuel economy of the many fissile fuel cycles possible in the HTR. Here it is demonstrated that the optimum conversion ratio of CR 3 O 8 ) demands are evaluated for a country such as the FRG under the assumptions of different future reactor strategy scenarios. Here it is demonstrated that the employement of both HTRs and FBRs can lead to a practically resource independent energy supply system within the next 40 to 60 years. However only through the large scale employement of the fast breeder can the future nuclear resource requirements be assured. (orig.) [de

  20. Reactor physics and reactor strategy investigations into the fissionable material economy of the thorium and uranium cycle in fast breeder reactors and high temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schikorr, W.M.

    In this work the properties governing the fissionable material economy of the uranium and thorium cycles are investigated for the advanced reactor types currently under development - the fast breeder reactor (FBR) and the high temperature reactor (HTR) - from the point of view of the optimum utilization of the available nuclear fuel reserves and the continuance of supply of these reserves. For this purpose, the two reactor types are first of all considered individually and are subsequently discussed as a complementary overall system

  1. Universal high-temperature heat treatment furnace for FBR mixed uranium and plutonium carbide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Handa, Muneo; Takahashi, Ichiro; Watanabe, Hitoshi

    1978-10-01

    A universal high-temperature heat treatment furnace for LMFBR advanced fuels was installed in Plutonium Fuel Laboratory, Oarai Research Establishment. Design, construction and performance of the apparatus are described. With the apparatus, heat treatment of the fuel under a controlled gas atmosphere and quenching of the fuel with blowing helium gas are possible. Equipment to measure impurity gas release of the fuel is also provided. Various plutonium enclosure techniques, e.g., a gas line filter with new exchange mechanics, have been developed. In performance test, results of the enclosure techniques are described. (author)

  2. Spectroscopic evidence for 5f bands at room temperature in uranium-based heavy fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arko, A.J.; Koelling, D.D.; Dunlap, B.D.; Capasso, C.; del Giudice, M.

    1988-01-01

    We present data on the alloy system UPd/sub 3-x/Pt/sub x/ and show that in the double hexagonal phase (x 2.4) as well, except that the low-binding energy feature is locked in at E/sub F/ and shows evidence of energy dispersion at room temperature/endash/consistent with well-defined bands. Conversely, we show that even in well-behaved narrow band systems (USn 3 there is evidence for satellite formation. 44 refs., 8 figs

  3. Surface temperature evolution and the location of maximum and average surface temperature of a lithium-ion pouch cell under variable load profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goutam, Shovon; Timmermans, Jean-Marc; Omar, Noshin

    2014-01-01

    This experimental work attempts to determine the surface temperature evolution of large (20 Ah-rated capacity) commercial Lithium-Ion pouch cells for the application of rechargeable energy storage of plug in hybrid electric vehicles and electric vehicles. The cathode of the cells is nickel...

  4. Proposal of new 235U nuclear data to improve keff biases on 235U enrichment and temperature for low enriched uranium fueled lattices moderated by light water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Haicheng; Okumura, Keisuke; Shibata, Keiichi

    2005-06-01

    The under prediction of k eff depending on 235 U enrichment in low enriched uranium fueled systems, which had been a long-standing puzzle especially for slightly enriched ones, was studied in this report. Benchmark testing was carried out with several evaluated nuclear data files, including the new uranium evaluations from preliminary ENDF/B-VII and CENDL-3.1. Another problem reviewed here was k eff underestimation vs. temperature increase, which was observed in the sightly enriched system with recent JENDL and ENDF/B uranium evaluations. Through the substitute analysis of nuclear data of 235 U and 238 U, we propose a new evaluation of 235 U data to solve both of the problems. The new evaluation was tested for various uranium fueled systems including low or highly enriched metal and solution benchmarks in the ICSBEP handbook. As a result, it was found that the combination of the new evaluation of 235 U and the 238 U data from the preliminary ENDF/B-VII gives quite good results for most of benchmark problems. (author)

  5. Uranium extraction history using pressure leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraser, K.S.; Thomas, K.G.

    2010-01-01

    Over the past 60 years of uranium process development only a few commercial uranium plants have adopted a pressure leaching process in their flowsheet. The selection of acid versus alkaline pressure leaching is related to the uranium and gangue mineralogy. Tetravalent (U"+"4) uranium has to be oxidized to hexavalent (U"+"6) uranium to be soluble. Refractory tetravalent uranium requires higher temperature and pressure, as practised in pressure leaching, for conversation to soluble hexavalent uranium. This paper chronicles the history of these uranium pressure leaching facilities over the past 60 years, with specific details of each design and operation. (author)

  6. Effective Uranium (VI) Sorption from Alkaline Solutions Using Bi-Functionalized Silica-Coated Magnetic Nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, X.; He, L.; Liu, B.; Tang, Y.

    2015-01-01

    High temperature gas reactor is one of generation IV reactors that can adapt the future energy market, of which the preparation of fuel elements will produce a large amount of radioactive wastewater with uranium and high-level ammonia. Sorption treatment is one of the most important method to recover uranium from wastewater. However, there are few report on uranium sorbent that can directly be applied in wastewater with ammonia. Therefore, the development of a sorbent that can recover uranium in basic environment will greatly decrease the cost of fuel element production and the risk of radioactive pollution. In this work, ammonium-phosphonate-bifunctionalized silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles has been developed for effective sorption of uranium from alkaline media, which are not only advantaged in the uranium separation from liquid phase, but also with satisfactory adsorption rate, amount and reusability. The as-prepared sorbent is found to show a maximum uranium sorption capacity of 70.7 mg/g and a fast equilibrium time of 2 h at pH 9.5 under room temperature. Compared with the mono-functionalized (phosphonate alone and ammonium alone) particles, the combination of the bi-functionalized groups gives rise to an excellent ability to remove uranium from basic environment. The sorbent can be used as a promising solid phase candidate for highly-efficient removal of uranium from basic solution. (author)

  7. Radiation damage of metal uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihajlovic, A.

    1965-01-01

    This report is concerned with the role of dispersion second phase in uranium and burnup rate. The role of dispersion phases in radiation stability of metal uranium was studies by three methods: variation of electric conductivity dependent on the neutron flux and temperature of pure uranium for different states of dispersion second phase; influence of dispersion phase on the radiation creep; transmission electron microscopy of fresh and irradiated uranium

  8. Further studies of the stability of LiF:Mg,Cu,P (GR-200) at maximum readout temperatures between 240oC and 280oC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oster, L.; Horowitz, Y.S.; Horowitz, A.

    1996-01-01

    It has recently been shown that LiF:Mg,Cu,P (GR-200) can be read out to temperatures as high as 270 o C for 12 s with negligible loss in sensitivity. In the present work the long-term sensitivity of GR-200 was studied at readout temperatures between 240 o C and 280 o C. The idea was that the readout temperatures above 240 o C might initiate reaction processes which influence the sensitivity only after long-term storage. No difference was found in the behaviour of GR-200 chips with 80 accumulated readouts to 240 o C or 270 o C and after storage of up to four months. Slight losses in sensitivity of 4% for 240 o C and 10% for 270 o C are observed after 80 readouts during four months storage. However, at a maximum readout temperature of 280 o C, a 33% loss in sensitivity after 80 cycles is observed. In conclusion it is found that GR-200 can be read out at temperatures as high as 270 o C with negligible loss in sensitivity (less than 0.1% per readout following an initialisation procedure of 1 readout) and acceptable residual signal (0.6%). (author)

  9. Simulation of the maximum yield of sugar cane at different altitudes: effect of temperature on the conversion of radiation into biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martine, J.F.; Siband, P.; Bonhomme, R.

    1999-01-01

    To minimize the production costs of sugar cane, for the diverse sites of production found in La Réunion, an improved understanding of the influence of temperature on the dry matter radiation quotient is required. Existing models simulate poorly the temperature-radiation interaction. A model of sugar cane growth has been fitted to the results from two contrasting sites (mean temperatures: 14-30 °C; total radiation: 10-25 MJ·m -2 ·d -1 ), on a ratoon crop of cv R570, under conditions of non-limiting resources. Radiation interception, aerial biomass, the fraction of millable stems, and their moisture content, were measured. The time-courses of the efficiency of radiation interception differed between sites. As a function of the sum of day-degrees, they were similar. The dry matter radiation quotient was related to temperature. The moisture content of millable stems depended on the day-degree sum. On the other hand, the leaf/stem ratio was independent of temperature. The relationships established enabled the construction of a simple model of yield potential. Applied to a set of sites representing the sugar cane growing area of La Réunion, it gave a good prediction of maximum yields. (author) [fr

  10. Swelling of uranium dioxide and deformation behavior of the fuel element at high temperature irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gontar, A.S.; Gutnik, V.S.; Nelidov, M.V.; Nikolaev, Yu.V.

    1993-01-01

    As post-reactor investigations showed, significant difference of swelling rates is connected with the fact that swelling of UO 2 with the equiaxial structure is mainly the result of fission gas bubbles accumulation along grain boundaries, and, in the case of the column structure, with formation of fine bubbles inside grains. The data given testify to usefulness of such investigations to predict TFE lifetime. As proven in this study one can see rates of radial deformation of fuel element cladding of a multi-cell TFE as a result of UO 2 swelling. They were calculated using the code SDS. Typical sizes were taken for calculation: cladding diameter--20 mm, cladding temperature at the central section of the fuel element--1,900 K, energy generation rate--145 W/cm 3 . These parameters provide output electric power of the TFE 600 W at the active zone length--400 mm

  11. Sustainability of thorium-uranium in pebble-bed fluoride salt-cooled high temperature reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, G.; Zou, Y.; Xu, H.

    2016-01-01

    Sustainability of thorium fuel in a Pebble-Bed Fluoride salt-cooled High temperature Reactor (PBFHR) is investigated to find the feasible region of high discharge burnup and negative Flibe (2LiF-BeF_2) salt Temperature Reactivity Coefficient (TRC). Dispersion fuel or pellet fuel with SiC cladding and SiC matrix is used to replace the tri-structural-isotropic (TRISO) coated particle system for increasing fuel loading and decreasing excessive moderation. To analyze the neutronic characteristics, an equilibrium calculation method of thorium fuel self-sustainability is developed. We have compared two refueling schemes (mixing flow pattern and directional flow pattern) and two kinds of reflector materials (SiC and graphite). This method found that the feasible region of breeding and negative Flibe TRC is between 20 vol% and 62 vol% fuel loading in the fuel. A discharge burnup could be achieved up to about 200 MWd/kgHM. The case with directional flow pattern and SiC reflector showed superior burnup characteristics but the worst radial power peak factor, while the case with mixing flow pattern and SiC reflector, which was the best tradeoff between discharge burnup and radial power peak factor, could provide burnup of 140 MWd/kgHM and about 1.4 radial power peak factor with 50 vol% dispersion fuel. In addition, Flibe salt displays good neutron properties as a coolant of quasi-fast reactors due to the strong "9Be(n,2n) reaction and low neutron absorption of "6Li (even at 1000 ppm) in fast spectrum. Preliminary thermal hydraulic calculation shows a good safety margin. The greatest challenge of this reactor may be the decades irradiation time of the pebble fuel. (A.C)

  12. High-temperature, Knudsen cell-mass spectroscopic studies on lanthanum oxide/uranium dioxide solid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunder, S.; McEachern, R.; LeBlanc, J.C.

    2001-01-01

    Knudsen cell-mass spectroscopic experiments were carried out with lanthanum oxide/uranium oxide solid solutions (1%, 2% and 5% (metal at.% basis)) to assess the volatilization characteristics of rare earths present in irradiated nuclear fuel. The oxidation state of each sample used was conditioned to the 'uranium dioxide stage' by heating in the Knudsen cell under an atmosphere of 10% CO 2 in CO. The mass spectra were analyzed to obtain the vapour pressures of the lanthanum and uranium species. It was found that the vapour pressure of lanthanum oxide follows Henry's law, i.e., its value is directly proportional to its concentration in the solid phase. Also, the vapour pressure of lanthanum oxide over the solid solution, after correction for its concentration in the solid phase, is similar to that of uranium dioxide. (authors)

  13. Controls on seasonal patterns of maximum ecosystem carbon uptake and canopy-scale photosynthetic light response: contributions from both temperature and photoperiod.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoy, Paul C; Trowbridge, Amy M; Bauerle, William L

    2014-02-01

    Most models of photosynthetic activity assume that temperature is the dominant control over physiological processes. Recent studies have found, however, that photoperiod is a better descriptor than temperature of the seasonal variability of photosynthetic physiology at the leaf scale. Incorporating photoperiodic control into global models consequently improves their representation of the seasonality and magnitude of atmospheric CO2 concentration. The role of photoperiod versus that of temperature in controlling the seasonal variability of photosynthetic function at the canopy scale remains unexplored. We quantified the seasonal variability of ecosystem-level light response curves using nearly 400 site years of eddy covariance data from over eighty Free Fair-Use sites in the FLUXNET database. Model parameters describing maximum canopy CO2 uptake and the initial slope of the light response curve peaked after peak temperature in about 2/3 of site years examined, emphasizing the important role of temperature in controlling seasonal photosynthetic function. Akaike's Information Criterion analyses indicated that photoperiod should be included in models of seasonal parameter variability in over 90% of the site years investigated here, demonstrating that photoperiod also plays an important role in controlling seasonal photosynthetic function. We also performed a Granger causality analysis on both gross ecosystem productivity (GEP) and GEP normalized by photosynthetic photon flux density (GEP n ). While photoperiod Granger-caused GEP and GEP n in 99 and 92% of all site years, respectively, air temperature Granger-caused GEP in a mere 32% of site years but Granger-caused GEP n in 81% of all site years. Results demonstrate that incorporating photoperiod may be a logical step toward improving models of ecosystem carbon uptake, but not at the expense of including enzyme kinetic-based temperature constraints on canopy-scale photosynthesis.

  14. Depleted uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huffer, E.; Nifenecker, H.

    2001-02-01

    This document deals with the physical, chemical and radiological properties of the depleted uranium. What is the depleted uranium? Why do the military use depleted uranium and what are the risk for the health? (A.L.B.)

  15. Study of elementary mechanisms of creep in uranium as a function of temperature (150 deg. to 760 deg. C) by activation energy measurements; Etude des mecanismes elementaires de deformation par fluage de l'uranium en fonction de la temperature (de 150 deg. a 760 deg. C) par la mesure des energies d'activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grenier, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-07-01

    Creep tests were carried out on single crystals and polycrystalline specimens of uranium in both the {alpha} and {beta} phases over the temperature range 150 - 760 deg. C. The determination of the activation energy for creep and the study of its variation with temperature made it possible to distinguish various temperature ranges in which one or more elementary mechanisms govern deformation. Micrographic observations after creep and the study of the variation of creep-rate with load support the conclusions. The creep behavior of single crystals is identical with that of polycrystalline material below 325 deg. C. From 325 deg. C to one upper limiting temperature whose value depends on the purity and previous history of the metal, the creep deformation of uranium is controlled by cross-slip. From this limiting temperature up to 520 deg. C, the creep of uranium involves two independent mechanisms operating simultaneously, the movement of screw dislocation by cross-slip and the climbing of edge dislocations out of their slip plane. Between 520 deg. C and the {alpha} - {beta} transformation temperature creep in polycrystals is governed by the climb of edge dislocations out of their slip planes, by a pile up mechanism in the case of primary creep and by dipole annihilation in the case of secondary creep. In single crystals creep is dependent on the climb of edge dislocations into pre-existent sub-boundaries and their subsequent rearrangement within these boundaries. In the {beta} phase the creep of polycrystals is governed by the diffusional climb of edge dislocations. Between 450 and 630 deg. C small alloy additions of molybdenum modify the creep characteristics of uranium although the deformation mechanisms involved are analogous to those in the pure metal. (author) [French] Des essais de fluage a diverses temperatures comprises entre 150 et 760 deg. C ont ete effectues sur des polycristaux et des monocristaux d'uranium, en phase {alpha} et en phase {beta}. La

  16. Calculation and measurement of the uranium temperature during irradiation in the experimental channel in the reflector of the RA reactor - Annex 15; Prilog 15 - Proracun i merenje temperature urana pri ozracivanju u eksperimentalnom kanalu reflektora na reaktoru RA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolic, M; Strugar, P; Mitrovic, S [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Reaktor RA, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1964-12-15

    Upon demand of the Laboratory for fuel reprocessing, six domestic metal uranium pellets were exposed to neutron flux ( 4 - 5 10{sup 12} n cm{sup -2} sec {sup -1}) in the RA reactor. Irradiation of fuel demanded special analyses for safety reasons. Weight of the fuel pellets was 13 - 20 g, having diameter 20 mm. pellets were placed in leak tight aluminium capsules with helium. The irradiation was dome in the aluminium experimental channel in the graphite reflector. Theoretical study has shown that the expected fuel temperature in the core could be up to 300 deg C at nominal power. For that reason temperature of the capsule with the uranium sample was measured during irradiation by using thermocouples. Results showed the discrepancy between measure and calculated values to be about 30%.

  17. Uranium conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliver, Lena; Peterson, Jenny; Wilhelmsen, Katarina

    2006-03-01

    FOI, has performed a study on uranium conversion processes that are of importance in the production of different uranium compounds in the nuclear industry. The same conversion processes are of interest both when production of nuclear fuel and production of fissile material for nuclear weapons are considered. Countries that have nuclear weapons ambitions, with the intention to produce highly enriched uranium for weapons purposes, need some degree of uranium conversion capability depending on the uranium feed material available. This report describes the processes that are needed from uranium mining and milling to the different conversion processes for converting uranium ore concentrate to uranium hexafluoride. Uranium hexafluoride is the uranium compound used in most enrichment facilities. The processes needed to produce uranium dioxide for use in nuclear fuel and the processes needed to convert different uranium compounds to uranium metal - the form of uranium that is used in a nuclear weapon - are also presented. The production of uranium ore concentrate from uranium ore is included since uranium ore concentrate is the feed material required for a uranium conversion facility. Both the chemistry and principles or the different uranium conversion processes and the equipment needed in the processes are described. Since most of the equipment that is used in a uranium conversion facility is similar to that used in conventional chemical industry, it is difficult to determine if certain equipment is considered for uranium conversion or not. However, the chemical conversion processes where UF 6 and UF 4 are present require equipment that is made of corrosion resistant material

  18. Uranium exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Voto, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    This paper is a review of the methodology and technology that are currently being used in varying degrees in uranium exploration activities worldwide. Since uranium is ubiquitous and occurs in trace amounts (0.2 to 5 ppm) in virtually all rocks of the crust of the earth, exploration for uranium is essentially the search of geologic environments in which geologic processes have produced unusual concentrations of uranium. Since the level of concentration of uranium of economic interest is dependent on the present and future price of uranium, it is appropriate here to review briefly the economic realities of uranium-fueled power generation. (author)

  19. Reaction of water vapor with a clean liquid uranium surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siekhaus, W.

    1985-01-01

    To study the reaction of water vapor with uranium, we have exposed clean liquid uranium surfaces to H 2 O under UHV conditions. We have measured the surface concentration of oxygen as a function of exposure, and determined the maximum attainable surface oxygen concentration X 0 /sup s/ as a function of temperature. We have used these measurements to estimate, close to the melting point, the solubility of oxygen (X 0 /sup b/, -4 ) and its surface segregation coefficient β/sup s/(> 10 3 ). 8 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  20. Mechanical behaviour of uranium; Comportement mecanique de l'uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, J L; Coureau, G [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Dir. Industrielle, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1957-07-01

    The chief mechanical properties of uranium, taken at room and at different temperatures, are presented in this report. (author) [French] Dans ce rapport sont presentees les principales caracteristiques mecaniques de l'uranium, relevees a l'ambiante et a differentes temperatures. (auteur)

  1. Uranium oxide recovering method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ota, Kazuaki; Takazawa, Hiroshi; Teramae, Naoki; Onoue, Takeshi.

    1997-01-01

    Nitrates containing uranium nitrate are charged in a molten salt electrolytic vessel, and a heat treatment is applied to prepare molten salts. An anode and a cathode each made of a graphite rod are disposed in the molten salts. AC voltage is applied between the anode and the cathode to conduct electrolysis of the molten salts. Uranium oxides are deposited as a recovered product of uranium, on the surface of the anode. The nitrates containing uranium nitrate are preferably a mixture of one or more nitrates selected from sodium nitrate, potassium nitrate, calcium nitrate and magnesium nitrate with uranium nitrate. The nitrates may be liquid wastes of nitrates. The temperature for the electrolysis of the molten salts is preferably from 150 to 300degC. The voltage for the electrolysis of the molten salts is preferably an AC voltage of from 2 to 6V, more preferably from 4 to 6V. (I.N.)

  2. Influence of uranium hydride oxidation on uranium metal behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, N.; Hambley, D.; Clarke, S.A.; Simpson, K.

    2013-01-01

    This work addresses concerns that the rapid, exothermic oxidation of active uranium hydride in air could stimulate an exothermic reaction (burning) involving any adjacent uranium metal, so as to increase the potential hazard arising from a hydride reaction. The effect of the thermal reaction of active uranium hydride, especially in contact with uranium metal, does not increase in proportion with hydride mass, particularly when considering large quantities of hydride. Whether uranium metal continues to burn in the long term is a function of the uranium metal and its surroundings. The source of the initial heat input to the uranium, if sufficient to cause ignition, is not important. Sustained burning of uranium requires the rate of heat generation to be sufficient to offset the total rate of heat loss so as to maintain an elevated temperature. For dense uranium, this is very difficult to achieve in naturally occurring circumstances. Areas of the uranium surface can lose heat but not generate heat. Heat can be lost by conduction, through contact with other materials, and by convection and radiation, e.g. from areas where the uranium surface is covered with a layer of oxidised material, such as burned-out hydride or from fuel cladding. These rates of heat loss are highly significant in relation to the rate of heat generation by sustained oxidation of uranium in air. Finite volume modelling has been used to examine the behaviour of a magnesium-clad uranium metal fuel element within a bottle surrounded by other un-bottled fuel elements. In the event that the bottle is breached, suddenly, in air, it can be concluded that the bulk uranium metal oxidation reaction will not reach a self-sustaining level and the mass of uranium oxidised will likely to be small in relation to mass of uranium hydride oxidised. (authors)

  3. Influence of uranium hydride oxidation on uranium metal behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, N.; Hambley, D. [National Nuclear Laboratory (United Kingdom); Clarke, S.A. [Sellafield Ltd (United Kingdom); Simpson, K.

    2013-07-01

    This work addresses concerns that the rapid, exothermic oxidation of active uranium hydride in air could stimulate an exothermic reaction (burning) involving any adjacent uranium metal, so as to increase the potential hazard arising from a hydride reaction. The effect of the thermal reaction of active uranium hydride, especially in contact with uranium metal, does not increase in proportion with hydride mass, particularly when considering large quantities of hydride. Whether uranium metal continues to burn in the long term is a function of the uranium metal and its surroundings. The source of the initial heat input to the uranium, if sufficient to cause ignition, is not important. Sustained burning of uranium requires the rate of heat generation to be sufficient to offset the total rate of heat loss so as to maintain an elevated temperature. For dense uranium, this is very difficult to achieve in naturally occurring circumstances. Areas of the uranium surface can lose heat but not generate heat. Heat can be lost by conduction, through contact with other materials, and by convection and radiation, e.g. from areas where the uranium surface is covered with a layer of oxidised material, such as burned-out hydride or from fuel cladding. These rates of heat loss are highly significant in relation to the rate of heat generation by sustained oxidation of uranium in air. Finite volume modelling has been used to examine the behaviour of a magnesium-clad uranium metal fuel element within a bottle surrounded by other un-bottled fuel elements. In the event that the bottle is breached, suddenly, in air, it can be concluded that the bulk uranium metal oxidation reaction will not reach a self-sustaining level and the mass of uranium oxidised will likely to be small in relation to mass of uranium hydride oxidised. (authors)

  4. Thermogravimetric analysis and kinetic modeling of low-transition-temperature mixtures pretreated oil palm empty fruit bunch for possible maximum yield of pyrolysis oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiin, Chung Loong; Yusup, Suzana; Quitain, Armando T; Uemura, Yoshimitsu; Sasaki, Mitsuru; Kida, Tetsuya

    2018-05-01

    The impacts of low-transition-temperature mixtures (LTTMs) pretreatment on thermal decomposition and kinetics of empty fruit bunch (EFB) were investigated by thermogravimetric analysis. EFB was pretreated with the LTTMs under different duration of pretreatment which enabled various degrees of alteration to their structure. The TG-DTG curves showed that LTTMs pretreatment on EFB shifted the temperature and rate of decomposition to higher values. The EFB pretreated with sucrose and choline chloride-based LTTMs had attained the highest mass loss of volatile matter (78.69% and 75.71%) after 18 h of pretreatment. For monosodium glutamate-based LTTMs, the 24 h pretreated EFB had achieved the maximum mass loss (76.1%). Based on the Coats-Redfern integral method, the LTTMs pretreatment led to an increase in activation energy of the thermal decomposition of EFB from 80.00 to 82.82-94.80 kJ/mol. The activation energy was mainly affected by the demineralization and alteration in cellulose crystallinity after LTTMs pretreatment. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Purification of uranium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Kenji; Shikama, Tatsuo; Ochiai, Akira.

    1993-01-01

    We developed the system for purifying uranium metal and its metallic compounds and for growing highly pure uranium compounds to study their intrinsic physical properties. Uranium metal was zone refined under low contamination conditions as far as possible. The degree of the purity of uranium metal was examined by the conventional electrical resistivity measurement and by the chemical analysis using the inductive coupled plasma emission spectrometry (ICP). The results show that some metallic impurities evaporated by the r.f. heating and other usual metallic impurities moved to the end of a rod with a molten zone. Therefore, we conclude that the zone refining technique is much effective to the removal of metallic impurities and we obtained high purified uranium metal of 99.99% up with regarding to metallic impurities. The maximum residual resistivity ratio, the r.r.r., so far obtained was about 17-20. Using the purified uranium, we are attempting to grow a highly pure uranium-titanium single crystals. (author)

  6. RECOVERY OF URANIUM FROM ZIRCONIUM-URANIUM NUCLEAR FUELS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gens, T.A.

    1962-07-10

    An improvement was made in a process of recovering uranium from a uranium-zirconium composition which was hydrochlorinated with gsseous hydrogen chloride at a temperature of from 350 to 800 deg C resulting in volatilization of the zirconium, as zirconium tetrachloride, and the formation of a uranium containing nitric acid insoluble residue. The improvement consists of reacting the nitric acid insoluble hydrochlorination residue with gaseous carbon tetrachloride at a temperature in the range 550 to 600 deg C, and thereafter recovering the resulting uranium chloride vapors. (AEC)

  7. Technical basis for the reduction of the maximum temperature TGA-MS analysis of oxide samples from the 3013 destructive examination program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scogin, J. H.

    2016-01-01

    Thermogravimetric analysis with mass spectroscopy of the evolved gas (TGA-MS) is used to quantify the moisture content of materials in the 3013 destructive examination (3013 DE) surveillance program. Salts frequently present in the 3013 DE materials volatilize in the TGA and condense in the gas lines just outside the TGA furnace. The buildup of condensate can restrict the flow of purge gas and affect both the TGA operations and the mass spectrometer calibration. Removal of the condensed salts requires frequent maintenance and subsequent calibration runs to keep the moisture measurements by mass spectroscopy within acceptable limits, creating delays in processing samples. In this report, the feasibility of determining the total moisture from TGA-MS measurements at a lower temperature is investigated. A temperature of the TGA-MS analysis which reduces the complications caused by the condensation of volatile materials is determined. Analysis shows that an excellent prediction of the presently measured total moisture value can be made using only the data generated up to 700 °C and there is a sound physical basis for this estimate. It is recommended that the maximum temperature of the TGA-MS determination of total moisture for the 3013 DE program be reduced from 1000 °C to 700 °C. It is also suggested that cumulative moisture measurements at 550 °C and 700°C be substituted for the measured value of total moisture in the 3013 DE database. Using these raw values, any of predictions of the total moisture discussed in this report can be made.

  8. Treponema pallidum 3-Phosphoglycerate Mutase Is a Heat-Labile Enzyme That May Limit the Maximum Growth Temperature for the Spirochete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Stéphane; Posey, James E.; Chenoweth, Matthew R.; Gherardini, Frank C.

    2001-01-01

    In the causative agent of syphilis, Treponema pallidum, the gene encoding 3-phosphoglycerate mutase, gpm, is part of a six-gene operon (tro operon) that is regulated by the Mn-dependent repressor TroR. Since substrate-level phosphorylation via the Embden-Meyerhof pathway is the principal way to generate ATP in T. pallidum and Gpm is a key enzyme in this pathway, Mn could exert a regulatory effect on central metabolism in this bacterium. To study this, T. pallidum gpm was cloned, Gpm was purified from Escherichia coli, and antiserum against the recombinant protein was raised. Immunoblots indicated that Gpm was expressed in freshly extracted infective T. pallidum. Enzyme assays indicated that Gpm did not require Mn2+ while 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (DPG) was required for maximum activity. Consistent with these observations, Mn did not copurify with Gpm. The purified Gpm was stable for more than 4 h at 25°C, retained only 50% activity after incubation for 20 min at 34°C or 10 min at 37°C, and was completely inactive after 10 min at 42°C. The temperature effect was attenuated when 1 mM DPG was added to the assay mixture. The recombinant Gpm from pSLB2 complemented E. coli strain PL225 (gpm) and restored growth on minimal glucose medium in a temperature-dependent manner. Increasing the temperature of cultures of E. coli PL225 harboring pSLB2 from 34 to 42°C resulted in a 7- to 11-h period in which no growth occurred (compared to wild-type E. coli). These data suggest that biochemical properties of Gpm could be one contributing factor to the heat sensitivity of T. pallidum. PMID:11466272

  9. Technical basis for the reduction of the maximum temperature TGA-MS analysis of oxide samples from the 3013 destructive examination program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scogin, J. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-03-24

    Thermogravimetric analysis with mass spectroscopy of the evolved gas (TGA-MS) is used to quantify the moisture content of materials in the 3013 destructive examination (3013 DE) surveillance program. Salts frequently present in the 3013 DE materials volatilize in the TGA and condense in the gas lines just outside the TGA furnace. The buildup of condensate can restrict the flow of purge gas and affect both the TGA operations and the mass spectrometer calibration. Removal of the condensed salts requires frequent maintenance and subsequent calibration runs to keep the moisture measurements by mass spectroscopy within acceptable limits, creating delays in processing samples. In this report, the feasibility of determining the total moisture from TGA-MS measurements at a lower temperature is investigated. A temperature of the TGA-MS analysis which reduces the complications caused by the condensation of volatile materials is determined. Analysis shows that an excellent prediction of the presently measured total moisture value can be made using only the data generated up to 700 °C and there is a sound physical basis for this estimate. It is recommended that the maximum temperature of the TGA-MS determination of total moisture for the 3013 DE program be reduced from 1000 °C to 700 °C. It is also suggested that cumulative moisture measurements at 550 °C and 700°C be substituted for the measured value of total moisture in the 3013 DE database. Using these raw values, any of predictions of the total moisture discussed in this report can be made.

  10. Production of uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, J.E.; Shuck, D.L.; Lyon, W.L.

    1977-01-01

    A continuous, four stage fluidized bed process for converting uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) to ceramic-grade uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) powder suitable for use in the manufacture of fuel pellets for nuclear reactors is disclosed. The process comprises the steps of first reacting UF 6 with steam in a first fluidized bed, preferably at about 550 0 C, to form solid intermediate reaction products UO 2 F 2 , U 3 O 8 and an off-gas including hydrogen fluoride (HF). The solid intermediate reaction products are conveyed to a second fluidized bed reactor at which the mol fraction of HF is controlled at low levels in order to prevent the formation of uranium tetrafluoride (UF 4 ). The first intermediate reaction products are reacted in the second fluidized bed with steam and hydrogen at a temperature of about 630 0 C. The second intermediate reaction product including uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) is conveyed to a third fluidized bed reactor and reacted with additional steam and hydrogen at a temperature of about 650 0 C producing a reaction product consisting essentially of uranium dioxide having an oxygen-uranium ratio of about 2 and a low residual fluoride content. This product is then conveyed to a fourth fluidized bed wherein a mixture of air and preheated nitrogen is introduced in order to further reduce the fluoride content of the UO 2 and increase the oxygen-uranium ratio to about 2.25

  11. Uranium removal from the water supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranzadeh, Mohammad Bagher.

    1996-01-01

    Uranium can be naturally occurring radionuclides that contaminate some potable water supplies. Uranium is found both in surface water and ground water supplies. The United States Environmental Protection Agency recently proposed a maximum contaminant of 20 micro gram/liter for uranium because of concerns about its association with kidney disease and cancer. uranium can be removed from the supply by strong base anion-resin. Exhausted resin is regenerated by sodium chloride solution. (Author)

  12. Uranium dioxide pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zawidzki, T.W.

    1982-01-01

    A process for the preparation of a sintered, high density, large crystal grain size uranium dioxide pellet is described which involves: (i) reacting a uranyl nitrate of formula UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 .6H 2 O with a sulphur source, at a temperature of from about 300 deg. C to provide a sulphur-containing uranium trioxide; (ii) reacting the thus-obtained modified uranium trioxide with ammonium nitrate to form an insoluble sulphur-containing ammonium uranate; (iii) neutralizing the thus-formed slurry with ammonium hydroxide to precipitate out as an insoluble ammonium uranate the remaining dissolved uranium; (iv) recovering the thus-formed precipitates in a dry state; (v) reducing the dry precipitate to UO 2 , and forming it into 'green' pellets; and (vi) sintering the pellets in a hydrogen atmosphere at an elevated temperature

  13. URANIUM BISMUTHIDE DISPERSION IN MOLTEN METAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teitel, R.J.

    1959-10-27

    The formation of intermetallic bismuth compounds of thorium or uranium dispersed in a liquid media containing bismuth and lead is described. A bismuthide of uranium dispersed in a liquid metal medium is formed by dissolving uranium in composition of lead and bismuth containing less than 80% lead and lowering the temperature of the composition to a temperature below the point at which the solubility of uranium is exceeded and above the melting point of the composition.

  14. The use of room temperature phosphorescence for the determination of uranium in tin-tailings mineral samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meor Yusof bin Meor Sulaiman

    1988-01-01

    The possibility of using phosphorescence technique in determining uranium in mineral samples and its comparison with that of fluorescence using high carbonate flux is presented. Samples used are tin-tailings mineral such as monazite, xenotime, ilmenite and zircon. The calibration graph obtained shows a linear relationship between the concentration range of 0-55 ppm U. From here, analysis of the standard showed that the result obtained and that of the certified value are consistent. HN0 3 :H 2 SO 4 (1:3) and phosphoric acid leaching methods are tried and the results show that phosphoric acid is the better method for phosphate mineral. Comparison of the results obtained from this technique and that of the direct and extraction methods of fluorimetry are also made. Phosphorescence is found to be a better method in determining uranium in this type of samples. (author)

  15. Study on complexation behaviour of uranium and thorium with amino acids at different temperatures in aqueous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, J.D.; Patel, M.R.; Patel, A.D.

    1992-01-01

    The complexation behaviour of uranium and thorium with important amino acids have been studied using Irving-Rossotti titration technique at 25deg, 35deg and 45degC in inert atmosphere of nitrogen and 0.1M ionic strength using NaClO 4 . The thermodynamic parameters ΔG, ΔH and ΔS have been calculated. Results indicate that thorium (IV) is forming more stable complexes than UO 2 2+ . (author). 3 refs., 2 tab

  16. Optimization of operating parameters and rate of uranium bioleaching from a low-grade ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashidi, A.; Roosta-Azad, R.; Safdari, S.J.

    2014-01-01

    In this study the bioleaching of a low-grade uranium ore containing 480 ppm uranium has been reported. The studies involved extraction of uranium using Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans derived from the uranium mine samples. The maximum specific growth rate (μ max ) and doubling time (t d ) were obtained 0.08 h -1 and 8.66 h, respectively. Parameters such as Fe 2+ concentration, particle size, temperature and pH were optimized. The effect of pulp density (PD) was also studied. Maximum uranium bio-dissolution of 100 ± 5 % was achieved under the conditions of pH 2.0, 5 % PD and 35 deg C in 48 h with the particles of d 80 = 100 μm. The optimum concentration of supplementary Fe 2+ was dependent to the PD. This value was 0 and 10 g of FeSO 4 ·7H 2 O/l at the PD of 5 and 15 %, respectively. The effects of time, pH and PD on the bioleaching process were studied using central composite design. New rate equation was improved for the uranium leaching rate. The rate of leaching is controlled with the concentrations of ferric and ferrous ions in solution. This study shows that uranium bioleaching may be an important process for the Saghand U mine at Yazd (Iran). (author)

  17. Magnetic graphene based nanocomposite for uranium scavenging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Maghrabi, Heba H. [Egyptian Petroleum Research Institute, 11727, Cairo (Egypt); Abdelmaged, Shaimaa M. [Nuclear Materials Authority, 6530 P.O. Box Maadi, Cairo (Egypt); Nada, Amr A. [Egyptian Petroleum Research Institute, 11727, Cairo (Egypt); Zahran, Fouad, E-mail: f.zahran@quim.ucm.es [Faculty of Science, Helwan University, 11795, Cairo (Egypt); El-Wahab, Saad Abd; Yahea, Dena [Faculty of Science, Ain shams University, Cairo (Egypt); Hussein, G.M.; Atrees, M.S. [Nuclear Materials Authority, 6530 P.O. Box Maadi, Cairo (Egypt)

    2017-01-15

    Graphical abstract: Graphical representation of U{sup 6+} adsorption on Magnetic Ferberite-Graphene Nanocomposite. - Highlights: • Synthesis of new magnetic wolframite bimetallic nanostructure on graphene. • A promising adsorption capacity of 455 mg/g was recorded for FG-20 within 60 min at room temperature. • The uranium removal was followed pseudo-second order kinetics and Langmuir isotherm. - Abstract: Magnetic graphene based ferberite nanocomposite was tailored by simple, green, low cost and industrial effective method. The microstructure and morphology of the designed nanomaterials were examined via XRD, Raman, FTIR, TEM, EDX and VSM. The prepared nanocomposites were introduced as a novel adsorbent for uranium ions scavenging from aqueous solution. Different operating conditions of time, pH, initial uranium concentration, adsorbent amount and temperature were investigated. The experimental data shows a promising adsorption capacity. In particular, a maximum value of 455 mg/g was obtained within 60 min at room temperature with adsorption efficiency of 90.5%. The kinetics and isotherms adsorption data were fitted with the pseudo-second order model and Langmuir equation, respectively. Finally, the designed nanocomposites were found to have a great degree of sustainability (above 5 times of profiteering) with a complete maintenance of their parental morphology and adsorption capacity.

  18. Thermodynamic study contribution of U-Fe and U-Ga alloys by high temperature mass spectroscopy, and of the wetting of yttrium oxide by uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardie, P.

    1992-01-01

    High temperature thermodynamic properties study of U-Fe and U-Ga alloys, and wetting study of yttrium oxide by uranium are presented. High temperature mass spectrometry coupled to a Knudsen effusion multi-cell allows to measure iron activity in U-Fe alloys and of gallium in U-Ga alloys, the U activity is deduced from Gibbs-Duhem equation. Wetting of the system U/Y_2O_3_-_x is studied between 1413 K and 1973 K by the put drop method visualized by X-rays. This technique also furnishes density, surface tension of U and of U-Fe alloys put on Y_2O_3_-_x. A new model of the interfacial oxygen action on wetting is done for the system U/Y_2O_3_-_x. (A.B.)

  19. MOnthly TEmperature DAtabase of Spain 1951-2010: MOTEDAS (2): The Correlation Decay Distance (CDD) and the spatial variability of maximum and minimum monthly temperature in Spain during (1981-2010).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortesi, Nicola; Peña-Angulo, Dhais; Simolo, Claudia; Stepanek, Peter; Brunetti, Michele; Gonzalez-Hidalgo, José Carlos

    2014-05-01

    One of the key point in the develop of the MOTEDAS dataset (see Poster 1 MOTEDAS) in the framework of the HIDROCAES Project (Impactos Hidrológicos del Calentamiento Global en España, Spanish Ministery of Research CGL2011-27574-C02-01) is the reference series for which no generalized metadata exist. In this poster we present an analysis of spatial variability of monthly minimum and maximum temperatures in the conterminous land of Spain (Iberian Peninsula, IP), by using the Correlation Decay Distance function (CDD), with the aim of evaluating, at sub-regional level, the optimal threshold distance between neighbouring stations for producing the set of reference series used in the quality control (see MOTEDAS Poster 1) and the reconstruction (see MOREDAS Poster 3). The CDD analysis for Tmax and Tmin was performed calculating a correlation matrix at monthly scale between 1981-2010 among monthly mean values of maximum (Tmax) and minimum (Tmin) temperature series (with at least 90% of data), free of anomalous data and homogenized (see MOTEDAS Poster 1), obtained from AEMEt archives (National Spanish Meteorological Agency). Monthly anomalies (difference between data and mean 1981-2010) were used to prevent the dominant effect of annual cycle in the CDD annual estimation. For each station, and time scale, the common variance r2 (using the square of Pearson's correlation coefficient) was calculated between all neighbouring temperature series and the relation between r2 and distance was modelled according to the following equation (1): Log (r2ij) = b*°dij (1) being Log(rij2) the common variance between target (i) and neighbouring series (j), dij the distance between them and b the slope of the ordinary least-squares linear regression model applied taking into account only the surrounding stations within a starting radius of 50 km and with a minimum of 5 stations required. Finally, monthly, seasonal and annual CDD values were interpolated using the Ordinary Kriging with a

  20. Effect of reagent parameters on recovery of South Africa uranium ore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afolabi, A.S., E-mail: afolaas@unisa.ac.za [Univ. of South Africa, Dept. of Civil and Chemical Engineering, Johannesburg (South Africa); Muzenda, E. [Univ. of Johannesburg, Chemical Engineering Technology Dept., Johannesburg (South Africa); Sigwadi, R. [SGS Lakefield Research Africa (Pty) Ltd., Johannesburg (South Africa)

    2010-07-01

    The effects of leach parameters to determine the variability of reagents consumption on a uranium ore was investigated in this work. The effects of time, temperature sulphates, and acid consumption on the rate of dissolution of the comminuted uranium ore samples were also studied. It was found that 77% dissolution of uranium was achieved after 8 hours while maximum uranium leaching of 92% was achieved at temperature 30{sup o}C for 1 hour. The addition of ferric sulphate at 30{sup o}C showed a decrease in acid consumption from 79.32 kg/t to 32.32 kg/t as well as decrease in the MnO{sub 2} consumption from 21.03 kg/t to 15.06 kg/t. At elevated temperature of 6{sup o}C a higher acid consumption of 100 kg/t was obtained and this is attributed to the fact that other acid consuming minerals were leached at this temperature. Maximum uranium dissolution of 89.37% was achieved after 24 hours and the acid consumption was 31 kg/t with a MnO{sub 2} addition of 24.26 kg/t. (author)

  1. Precise coulometric titration of uranium in a high-purity uranium metal and in uranium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Tatsuhiko; Yoshimori, Takayoshi

    1975-01-01

    Uranium in uranyl nitrate, uranium trioxide and a high-purity uranium metal was assayed by the coulometric titration with biamperometric end-point detection. Uranium (VI) was reduced to uranium (IV) by solid bismuth amalgam in 5M sulfuric acid solution. The reduced uranium was reoxidized to uranium (VI) with a large excess of ferric ion at a room temperature, and the ferrous ion produced was titrated with the electrogenerated manganese(III) fluoride. In the analyses of uranium nitrate and uranium trioxide, the results were precise enough when the error from uncertainty in water content in the samples was considered. The standard sample of pure uranium metal (JAERI-U4) was assayed by the proposed method. The sample was cut into small chips of about 0.2g. Oxides on the metal surface were removed by the procedure shown by National Bureau of Standards just before weighing. The mean assay value of eleven determinations corrected for 3ppm of iron was (99.998+-0.012) % (the 95% confidence interval for the mean), with a standard deviation of 0.018%. The proposed coulometric method is simple and permits accurate and precise determination of uranium which is matrix constituent in a sample. (auth.)

  2. The Streltsovskoye uranium district

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ischukova, L.P.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the geology of the Streltsovskoye uranium district located in south-eastern Zabaikalie region, Chita Province, Siberia, Russia. This district hosts Russia's only currently active uranium production centre. The uranium ore was discovered from 1963 to 1967 by drilling below fluorite veins which had minor associated uranium mineralization and radioactive anomalies. The uranium occurs as large scale vein stockwork deposits of hydrothermal origin within a volcano-tectonic caldera formed by continental volcanism of Late Mesozoic age. Rocks occurring in the caldera include basalt and trachydacite, overlain by rhyolite, and with associated interbedded sediments. The ore bodies occur in steeply dipping faults, with the greatest concentrations located where faults along the margins of the caldera intersect steeply dipping, cross cutting, northeasterly and northwesterly striking faults. The Streltsovskoye caldera extends over an area of 150 km 2 and is underlain by a large batholith. The 19 identified uranium deposits occurred in structural features that cut through the caldera sequence and extend into the basement rocks. The caldera has a maximum thickness of 1400 metres. Details of several deposits are given, including descriptions of mineralization and associated alteration. (author). 10 figs

  3. Temperature effect on the physico-chemical properties of silica based bio-hybrid composite for uranium uptake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, Archana; Melo, Jose Savio

    2013-01-01

    In the present work, silica based bio-hybrid composite has been prepared using Streptococcus lactis cells and silica nanoparticles through one step single process of spray drying. Bio-hybrids have many desired characteristics, and are thus used in a wide range of applications for example environmental cleanup which is of increasing importance. Thermogravimetric and thermodynamic analysis have been employed to understand the binding of uranium to the synthesized bio-hybrid material. Analysis of the thermodynamic parameters (ΔG 0 , ΔS 0 and ΔH 0 ) provides information regarding the inherent energy and feasibility of the sorption process. (author)

  4. Examination of temperature-induced shape memory of uranium--5.3-to 6.9 weight percent niobium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemperly, V.C.

    1976-01-01

    The uranium-niobium alloy system was examined in the range of 5.3-to-6.9 weight percent niobium with respect to shape memory, mechanical properties, metallography, Coefficients of linear thermal expansion, and differential thermal analysis. Shape memory increased with increasing niobium levels in the study range. There were no useful correlations found between shape memory and the other tests. Coefficients of linear thermal expansion tests of as-quenched 5.8 and 6.2 weight percent niobium specimens, but not 5.3 and 6.9 weight percent niobium specimens, had a contraction component on heating, but the phenomenon was not a contributor to shape memory

  5. Internal friction in uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selle, J.E.

    1975-01-01

    Results are presented of studies conducted to relate internal friction measurements in U to allotropic transformations. It was found that several internal friction peaks occur in α-uranium whose magnitude changed drastically after annealing in the β phase. All of the allotropic transformations in uranium are diffusional in nature under slow heating and cooling conditions. Creep at regions of high stress concentration appears to be responsible for high temperature internal friction in α-uranium. The activation energy for grain boundary relaxation in α-uranium was found to be 65.1 +- 4 kcal/mole. Impurity atoms interfere with the basic mechanism for grain boundary relaxation resulting in a distribution in activation energies. A considerable distribution in ln tau 0 was also found which is a measure of the distribution in local order and in the Debye frequency around a grain boundary

  6. REMOVAL OF URANIUM FROM DRINKING WATER BY CONVENTIONAL TREATMENT METHODS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The USEPA currently does not regulate uranium in drinking water but will be revising the radionuclide regulations during 1989 and will propose a maximum contaminant level for uranium. The paper presents treatment technology information on the effectiveness of conventional method...

  7. METHOD OF APPLYING NICKEL COATINGS ON URANIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, A.G.

    1959-07-14

    A method is presented for protectively coating uranium which comprises etching the uranium in an aqueous etching solution containing chloride ions, electroplating a coating of nickel on the etched uranium and heating the nickel plated uranium by immersion thereof in a molten bath composed of a material selected from the group consisting of sodium chloride, potassium chloride, lithium chloride, and mixtures thereof, maintained at a temperature of between 700 and 800 deg C, for a time sufficient to alloy the nickel and uranium and form an integral protective coating of corrosion-resistant uranium-nickel alloy.

  8. A comparison of PMIP2 model simulations and the MARGO proxy reconstruction for tropical sea surface temperatures at last glacial maximum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otto-Bliesner, Bette L.; Brady, E.C. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Climate and Global Dynamics Division, Boulder, CO (United States); Schneider, Ralph; Weinelt, M. [Christian-Albrechts Universitaet, Institut fuer Geowissenschaften, Kiel (Germany); Kucera, M. [Eberhard-Karls Universitaet Tuebingen, Institut fuer Geowissenschaften, Tuebingen (Germany); Abe-Ouchi, A. [The University of Tokyo, Center for Climate System Research, Kashiwa (Japan); Bard, E. [CEREGE, College de France, CNRS, Universite Aix-Marseille, Aix-en-Provence (France); Braconnot, P.; Kageyama, M.; Marti, O.; Waelbroeck, C. [Unite mixte CEA-CNRS-UVSQ, Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l' Environnement, Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Crucifix, M. [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Institut d' Astronomie et de Geophysique Georges Lemaitre, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Hewitt, C.D. [Met Office Hadley Centre, Exeter (United Kingdom); Paul, A. [Bremen University, Department of Geosciences, Bremen (Germany); Rosell-Mele, A. [Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, ICREA and Institut de Ciencia i Tecnologia Ambientals, Barcelona (Spain); Weber, S.L. [Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI), De Bilt (Netherlands); Yu, Y. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, LASG, Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Beijing (China)

    2009-05-15

    Results from multiple model simulations are used to understand the tropical sea surface temperature (SST) response to the reduced greenhouse gas concentrations and large continental ice sheets of the last glacial maximum (LGM). We present LGM simulations from the Paleoclimate Modelling Intercomparison Project, Phase 2 (PMIP2) and compare these simulations to proxy data collated and harmonized within the Multiproxy Approach for the Reconstruction of the Glacial Ocean Surface Project (MARGO). Five atmosphere-ocean coupled climate models (AOGCMs) and one coupled model of intermediate complexity have PMIP2 ocean results available for LGM. The models give a range of tropical (defined for this paper as 15 S-15 N) SST cooling of 1.0-2.4 C, comparable to the MARGO estimate of annual cooling of 1.7{+-}1 C. The models simulate greater SST cooling in the tropical Atlantic than tropical Pacific, but interbasin and intrabasin variations of cooling are much smaller than those found in the MARGO reconstruction. The simulated tropical coolings are relatively insensitive to season, a feature also present in the MARGO transferred-based estimates calculated from planktonic foraminiferal assemblages for the Indian and Pacific Oceans. These assemblages indicate seasonality in cooling in the Atlantic basin, with greater cooling in northern summer than northern winter, not captured by the model simulations. Biases in the simulations of the tropical upwelling and thermocline found in the preindustrial control simulations remain for the LGM simulations and are partly responsible for the more homogeneous spatial and temporal LGM tropical cooling simulated by the models. The PMIP2 LGM simulations give estimates for the climate sensitivity parameter of 0.67 -0.83 C per Wm{sup -2}, which translates to equilibrium climate sensitivity for doubling of atmospheric CO{sub 2} of 2.6-3.1 C. (orig.)

  9. Fragile-to-fragile liquid transition at Tg and stable-glass phase nucleation rate maximum at the Kauzmann temperature TK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tournier, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    An undercooled liquid is unstable. The driving force of the glass transition at T g is a change of the undercooled-liquid Gibbs free energy. The classical Gibbs free energy change for a crystal formation is completed including an enthalpy saving. The crystal growth critical nucleus is used as a probe to observe the Laplace pressure change Δp accompanying the enthalpy change −V m ×Δp at T g where V m is the molar volume. A stable glass–liquid transition model predicts the specific heat jump of fragile liquids at T≤T g , the Kauzmann temperature T K where the liquid entropy excess with regard to crystal goes to zero, the equilibrium enthalpy between T K and T g , the maximum nucleation rate at T K of superclusters containing magic atom numbers, and the equilibrium latent heats at T g and T K . Strong-to-fragile and strong-to-strong liquid transitions at T g are also described and all their thermodynamic parameters are determined from their specific heat jumps. The existence of fragile liquids quenched in the amorphous state, which do not undergo liquid–liquid transition during heating preceding their crystallization, is predicted. Long ageing times leading to the formation at T K of a stable glass composed of superclusters containing up to 147 atom, touching and interpenetrating, are evaluated from nucleation rates. A fragile-to-fragile liquid transition occurs at T g without stable-glass formation while a strong glass is stable after transition

  10. Metallurgical structures in a high uranium-silicon alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyatt, B.S.; Berthiaume, L.C.; Conversi, J.L.

    1968-10-01

    The effects of fabrication and heat treatment variables on the structure of a uranium -- 3.96 wt% silicon alloy have been studied using optical microscopy, quantitative metallography and hardness determinations. It has been shown that an optimum temperature exists below the peritectoid temperature where the maximum amount of transformation to U 3 Si occurs in a given period of time. The time required to fully transform an as-cast alloy at this optimum temperature is affected by the size of the primary U 3 Si 2 dendrites. With a U 3 Si 2 particle size of <12 μm complete transformation can be achieved in four hours. (author)

  11. Anticorrosion protection of uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncharov, Ivan D.; Kazakovskaya, Tatiana; Tukmakov, Victor; Shapovalov, Vyacheslav [Russian Federal Nuclear Center-VNIIEF, 37, Mira Ave., RU-607190 Sarov (Nizhnii Gorod), 010450 (Russian Federation)

    2004-07-01

    Uranium in atmospheric conditions is non-stable. Sloughing products are being generated on its surface during storage or use. These corrosion products make many difficulties because of necessity to provide personnel safety. Besides, uranium corrosion may cause damage in parts. The first works devoted to uranium corrosion were performed in the framework of the USA Manhattan Project in the early forties of last century. Various methods of uranium protection were investigated, among them the galvanic one was the most studied. Later on the galvanic technology was patented. The works on this problem remains urgent up to the present time. In Russia, many methods of uranium corrosion protection, mainly against atmospheric corrosion, were tried on. In particular, such methods as diffusion zinc and paint coating were investigated. In the first case, a complex intermetallic U-Zn compound was formed but its protection was not reliable enough, this protection system was inconvenient and uncertain and that is why an additional paint coating was necessary. In the case of paint coatings another problem appeared. It was necessary to find such a coating where gas-permeability would prevail over water-permeability. Otherwise significant uranium corrosion occurs. This circumstance together with low mechanical resistance of paint coatings does not allow to use paint coating for long-term protection of uranium. Currently, there are following methods of uranium protection: ion-plasma, galvanic and thermo-vacuum annealing. These are described in this paper. In the end the issue of corrosion protection in reactor core zones is addressed. Here the greatest difficulties are caused when enriched uranium heated up to 500 deg. C needs anticorrosion protection. In this case various metal coatings are not reliable because of brittle inter-metallide formation. The reliable protection may be provided only up to the temperature plus 400 - 500 deg. C with the help of galvanic copper coating since

  12. Anticorrosion protection of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncharov, Ivan D.; Kazakovskaya, Tatiana; Tukmakov, Victor; Shapovalov, Vyacheslav

    2004-01-01

    Uranium in atmospheric conditions is non-stable. Sloughing products are being generated on its surface during storage or use. These corrosion products make many difficulties because of necessity to provide personnel safety. Besides, uranium corrosion may cause damage in parts. The first works devoted to uranium corrosion were performed in the framework of the USA Manhattan Project in the early forties of last century. Various methods of uranium protection were investigated, among them the galvanic one was the most studied. Later on the galvanic technology was patented. The works on this problem remains urgent up to the present time. In Russia, many methods of uranium corrosion protection, mainly against atmospheric corrosion, were tried on. In particular, such methods as diffusion zinc and paint coating were investigated. In the first case, a complex intermetallic U-Zn compound was formed but its protection was not reliable enough, this protection system was inconvenient and uncertain and that is why an additional paint coating was necessary. In the case of paint coatings another problem appeared. It was necessary to find such a coating where gas-permeability would prevail over water-permeability. Otherwise significant uranium corrosion occurs. This circumstance together with low mechanical resistance of paint coatings does not allow to use paint coating for long-term protection of uranium. Currently, there are following methods of uranium protection: ion-plasma, galvanic and thermo-vacuum annealing. These are described in this paper. In the end the issue of corrosion protection in reactor core zones is addressed. Here the greatest difficulties are caused when enriched uranium heated up to 500 deg. C needs anticorrosion protection. In this case various metal coatings are not reliable because of brittle inter-metallide formation. The reliable protection may be provided only up to the temperature plus 400 - 500 deg. C with the help of galvanic copper coating since

  13. ELECTRODEPOSITION OF NICKEL ON URANIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, A.G.

    1958-08-26

    A method is described for preparing uranium objects prior to nickel electroplating. The process consiats in treating the surface of the uranium with molten ferric chloride hexahydrate, at a slightiy elevated temperature. This treatment etches the metal surface providing a structure suitable for the application of adherent electrodeposits and at the same time plates the surface with a thin protective film of iron.

  14. Method for preparation of uranium hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorski, M.S.; Goncalves, Miriam; Mirage, A.; Lima, W. de.

    1985-01-01

    A method for preparation of Uranium Hydride starting from Hidrogen and Uranium is described. In the temperature range of 250 0 up to 350 0 C, and pressures above 10torr, Hydrogen reacts smoothly with Uranium turnings forming a fine black or dark gray powder (UH 3 ). Samples containing a significant amount of oxides show a delay before the reaction begging. (Author) [pt

  15. Yellowcake processing in uranium recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    This information relates to the recovery of uranium from uranium peroxide yellowcake produced by precipitation with hydrogen peroxide. The yellowcake is calcined at an elevated temperature to effect decomposition of the yellowcake to uranium oxide with the attendant evolution of free oxygen. The calcination step is carried out in the presence of a reducing agent which reacts with the free oxygen, thus retarding the evolution of chlorine gas from sodium chloride in the yellowcake. Suitable reducing agents include ammonia producing compounds such as ammonium carbonate and ammonium bicarbonate. Ammonium carbonate and/or ammonium bicarbonate may be provided in the eluant used to desorb the uranium from an ion exchange column

  16. Yellowcake processing in uranium recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, J.M.

    1981-10-06

    This information relates to the recovery of uranium from uranium peroxide yellowcake produced by precipitation with hydrogen peroxide. The yellowcake is calcined at an elevated temperature to effect decomposition of the yellowcake to uranium oxide with the attendant evolution of free oxygen. The calcination step is carried out in the presence of a reducing agent which reacts with the free oxygen, thus retarding the evolution of chlorine gas from sodium chloride in the yellowcake. Suitable reducing agents include ammonia producing compounds such as ammonium carbonate and ammonium bicarbonate. Ammonium carbonate and/or ammonium bicarbonate may be provided in the eluant used to desorb the uranium from an ion exchange column.

  17. Czechoslovak uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pluskal, O.

    1992-01-01

    Data and knowledge related to the prospecting, mining, processing and export of uranium ores in Czechoslovakia are presented. In the years between 1945 and January 1, 1991, 98,461.1 t of uranium were extracted. In the period 1965-1990 the uranium industry was subsidized from the state budget to a total of 38.5 billion CSK. The subsidies were put into extraction, investments and geologic prospecting; the latter was at first, ie. till 1960 financed by the former USSR, later on the two parties shared costs on a 1:1 basis. Since 1981 the prospecting has been entirely financed from the Czechoslovak state budget. On Czechoslovak territory uranium has been extracted from deposits which may be classified as vein-type deposits, deposits in uranium-bearing sandstones and deposits connected with weathering processes. The future of mining, however, is almost exclusively being connected with deposits in uranium-bearing sandstones. A brief description and characteristic is given of all uranium deposits on Czechoslovak territory, and the organization of uranium mining in Czechoslovakia is described as is the approach used in the world to evaluate uranium deposits; uranium prices and actual resources are also given. (Z.S.) 3 figs

  18. Buckling and reaction rate measurements in graphite moderated lattices fuelled with plutonium-uranium oxide clusters at temperatures up to 400 deg. C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, D.H.; Gibson, M.; King, D.C.; Marshall, J.; Puckett, B.J.; Richards, A.E.; Wass, T.; Wilson, D.J.

    1965-07-01

    The Report describes a series of experiments carried out in SCORPIO I and II on sub-critical graphite moderated lattices fuelled with 21-rod clusters of PuO 2 /UO 2 fuel. Three fuel batches with nominal plutonium: uranium ratios of 0.25%, 0.8% and 1.2% were investigated at temperatures between 20 deg. C and 400 deg. C. Because of the limited amounts of the three fuels, exponential measurements were made in 2-zone stacks, the outer regions of which were loaded with suitably matched 'reference fuel'. Fine structure distributions in the lattice cell were obtained with manganese and indium foils. Pu239/U235 fission ratios were determined both by fission chambers and by fission-product counting techniques. (author)

  19. Buckling and reaction rate measurements in graphite moderated lattices fuelled with plutonium-uranium oxide clusters at temperatures up to 400 deg. C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, D H; Gibson, M; King, D C; Marshall, J; Puckett, B J; Richards, A E; Wass, T; Wilson, D J [General Reactor Physics Division, Atomic Energy Establishment, Winfrith, Dorchester, Dorset (United Kingdom)

    1965-07-15

    The Report describes a series of experiments carried out in SCORPIO I and II on sub-critical graphite moderated lattices fuelled with 21-rod clusters of PuO{sub 2}/UO{sub 2} fuel. Three fuel batches with nominal plutonium: uranium ratios of 0.25%, 0.8% and 1.2% were investigated at temperatures between 20 deg. C and 400 deg. C. Because of the limited amounts of the three fuels, exponential measurements were made in 2-zone stacks, the outer regions of which were loaded with suitably matched 'reference fuel'. Fine structure distributions in the lattice cell were obtained with manganese and indium foils. Pu239/U235 fission ratios were determined both by fission chambers and by fission-product counting techniques. (author) 14 refs, 30 figs, 18 tabs

  20. Effect of temperature on the expansion and microstructure Of U3 Si2-AI mini plate fuel of 3.6 g/cm3 uranium loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginting, A. Br.; Samosir, N.; Suparjo; Nasution, H.

    2000-01-01

    Expansion analysis has been conducted to 50 x 20-mm U 3 Si 2 -AI mini plate of 3.6 g/cm 3 uranium loading using dilatometer. The analysis was carried out at various temperatures of 170 o C, 350 o C and 550 o C in Argon medium with delay time 4 days. The result showed that the fuel plate was relatively stable with increasing of heating time but underwent significant expansion. Heating at 170 o C, 350 o C and 550 o C resulted in the expansion of the U 3 Si 2 -AI fuel plate of to 83-212 mum, 333-475 mum, and 433-724 mum with coefficient expansion of 24.2x10 -6 / o C - 24.3x10 -6 / o C, 25.5x10 -6 / o C - 26.2x10 -6 /'oC and 26.6 x 10 -6 / o C - 28.2 x 10 -6 / o C respectively. Microanalysis of the U 3 Si 2 -AI mini plate fuel with SEM-EDS upon heating at those temperature variation showed that microstructure change didn't occur at 170 o C, mean while interaction between AIMg2 cladding and the fuel meat appeared to take place at 350 o C and 550 o C. Data on the expansion and microstructure change of U 3 Si 2 -AI fuel plate upon heating are of great important for the manufacture/fabrication of research fuel plate to produce silicide fuel element for higher uranium loading. (author)

  1. Rare-earth elements and uranium in high-temperature solutions from East Pacific Rise hydrothermal vent field (130N)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michard, A.; Albarede, F.; Michard, G.; Minster, J.F.; Charlou, J.L.

    1983-01-01

    The mobility of rare-earth elements (REE) and U during hydrothermal alteration of the basalts at spreading centres has long been a matter of concern because of its bearing on the evolution and recycling of the oceanic crust. Previous approaches to this problem have been indirect, through studies on altered dredged basalts or ophiolites. Sampling of hydrothermal vent waters from the East Pacific Rise (EPR) at 13 0 N is reported. It provides the first direct evidence of REE-enriched solutions which, however, leave the budget of these elements in the crust and the ocean rather unmodified. In constrast, uranium, like magnesium, is quantitatively taken up from the seawater during the hydrothermal process. (author)

  2. Process for recovering uranium

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacWood, G. E.; Wilder, C. D.; Altman, D.

    1959-03-24

    A process useful in recovering uranium from deposits on stainless steel liner surfaces of calutrons is presented. The deposit is removed from the stainless steel surface by washing with aqueous nitric acid. The solution obtained containing uranium, chromium, nickel, copper, and iron is treated with an excess of ammonium hydroxide to precipitnte the uranium, iron, and chromium and convert the nickel and copper to soluble ammonio complexions. The precipitated material is removed, dried and treated with carbon tetrachloride at an elevated temperature of about 500 to 600 deg C to form a vapor mixture of UCl/ sub 4/, UCl/sub 5/, FeCl/sub 3/, and CrCl/sub 4/. The UCl/sub 4/ is separated from this vapor mixture by selective fractional condensation at a temperature of about 500 to 400 deg C.

  3. Uranium dioxide calcining apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, E.A.; Peterson, R.S.

    1978-01-01

    This invention relates to an improved continuous calcining apparatus for consistently and controllably producing from calcinable reactive solid compounds of uranium, such as ammonium diuranate, uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) having an oxygen to uranium ratio of less than 2.2. The apparatus comprises means at the outlet end of a calciner kiln for receiving hot UO 2 , means for cooling the UO 2 to a temperature of below 100 deg C and conveying the cooled UO 2 to storage or to subsequent UO 2 processing apparatus where it finally comes into contact with air, the means for receiving cooling and conveying being sealed to the outlet end of the calciner and being maintained full of UO 2 and so operable as to exclude atmospheric oxygen from coming into contact with any UO 2 which is at elevated temperatures where it would readily oxidize, without the use of extra hydrogen gas in said means. (author)

  4. The effect of low-temperature aging on the microstructure and deformation of uranium- 6 wt% niobium: An in-situ neutron diffraction study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, D.W., E-mail: dbrown@lanl.gov [Material Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, 87545 (United States); Bourke, M.A.M. [Material Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, 87545 (United States); Clarke, A.J. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois Street, Golden, CO, 80401 (United States); Field, R.D.; Hackenberg, R.E.; Hults, W.L. [Material Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, 87545 (United States); Thoma, D.J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, WI, 3706 (United States)

    2016-12-01

    The mechanical properties of uranium-niobium alloys evolve with aging at relatively low temperatures due to subtle microstructural changes. In-situ neutron diffraction measurements during aging of a monoclinic U-6Nb alloy at temperatures to 573 K were performed to monitor these changes. Further, in-situ neutron diffraction studies during deformation of U-6Nb in the as-quenched state and after aging for two and eight hours at 473 K were completed to assess the influence of microstructural evolution on mechanical properties. With heating, large anisotropic changes in lattice parameter were observed followed by relaxation with time at the aging temperature. The lattice parameters return to nearly their initial values with cooling. The active plastic deformation mechanisms including, in order of occurrence, shape-memory de-twinning, mechanical twinning, and slip-mediated deformation do not change with prior aging. However, the resistance to motion of the as-quenched martensitic twin boundaries increases following aging, resulting in the observed increase in initial yield strength.

  5. Uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poty, B.; Roux, J.

    1998-01-01

    The processing of uranium ores for uranium extraction and concentration is not much different than the processing of other metallic ores. However, thanks to its radioactive property, the prospecting of uranium ores can be performed using geophysical methods. Surface and sub-surface detection methods are a combination of radioactive measurement methods (radium, radon etc..) and classical mining and petroleum prospecting methods. Worldwide uranium prospecting has been more or less active during the last 50 years, but the rise of raw material and energy prices between 1970 and 1980 has incited several countries to develop their nuclear industry in order to diversify their resources and improve their energy independence. The result is a considerable increase of nuclear fuels demand between 1980 and 1990. This paper describes successively: the uranium prospecting methods (direct, indirect and methodology), the uranium deposits (economical definition, uranium ores, and deposits), the exploitation of uranium ores (use of radioactivity, radioprotection, effluents), the worldwide uranium resources (definition of the different categories and present day state of worldwide resources). (J.S.)

  6. Uranium market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubini, L.A.; Asem, M.A.D.

    1990-01-01

    The historical development of the uranium market is present in two periods: The initial period 1947-1970 and from 1970 onwards, with the establishment of a commercial market. The world uranium requirements are derived from the corresponding forecast of nuclear generating capacity, with, particular emphasis to the brazilian requirements. The forecast of uranium production until the year 2000 is presented considering existing inventories and the already committed demand. The balance between production and requirements is analysed. Finally the types of contracts currently being used and the development of uranium prices in the world market are considered. (author)

  7. Uranium enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This report looks at the following issues: How much Soviet uranium ore and enriched uranium are imported into the United States and what is the extent to which utilities flag swap to disguise these purchases? What are the U.S.S.R.'s enriched uranium trading practices? To what extent are utilities required to return used fuel to the Soviet Union as part of the enriched uranium sales agreement? Why have U.S. utilities ended their contracts to buy enrichment services from DOE?

  8. Raman Investigation of The Uranium Compounds U3O8, UF4, UH3 and UO3 under Pressure at Room Temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipp, M.J.; Jenei, Z.; Park-Klepeis, J.; Evans, W.J.

    2011-01-01

    Our current state-of-the-art X-ray diffraction experiments are primarily sensitive to the position of the uranium atom. While the uranium - low-Z element bond (such as U-H or U-F) changes under pressure and temperature the X-ray diffraction investigations do not reveal information about the bonding or the stoichiometry. Questions that can be answered by Raman spectroscopy are (i) whether the bonding strength changes under pressure, as observed by either blue- or red-shifted peaks of the Raman active bands in the spectrum and (ii) whether the low-Z element will eventually be liberated and leave the host lattice, i.e. do the fluorine, oxygen, or hydrogen atoms form dimers after breaking the bond to the uranium atom. Therefore Raman spectra were also collected in the range where those decomposition products would appear. Raman is particularly well suited to these types of investigations due to its sensitivity to trace amounts of materials. One challenge for Raman investigations of the uranium compounds is that they are opaque to visible light. They absorb the incoming radiation and quickly heat up to the point of decomposition. This has been dealt with in the past by keeping the incoming laser power to very low levels on the tens of milliWatt range consequently affecting signal to noise. Recent modern investigations also used very small laser spot sizes (micrometer range) but ran again into the problem of heating and chemical sensitivity to the environment. In the studies presented here (in contrast to all other studies that were performed at ambient conditions only) we employ micro-Raman spectroscopy of samples situated in a diamond anvil cell. This increases the trustworthiness of the obtained data in several key-aspects: (a) We surrounded the samples in the DAC with neon as a pressure transmitting medium, a noble gas that is absolutely chemically inert. (b) Through the medium the sample is thermally heat sunk to the diamond anvils, diamond of course possessing the

  9. Study of elastic and thermodynamic properties of uranium dioxide under high temperature and pressure with density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Mu; Wang Feng; Zheng Zhou; Liu Xiankun; Jiang Tao

    2013-01-01

    The elastic and thermodynamic properties of UO 2 under extreme physical condition are studied by using the density functional theory and quasi-harmonic Debye model. Results show that UO 2 is still stable ionic crystal under high temperatures, and pressures. Tetragonal shear constant is steady under high pressures and temperatures, while elastic constant C 44 is stable under high temperatures, but rises with pressure sharply. Bulk modulus, shear modulus and Young's modulus increase with pressure rapidly, but temperature would not cause evident debasement of the moduli, all of which indicate that UO 2 has excellent mechanical properties. Heat capacity of different pressures increases with temperature and is close to the Dulong-Petit limit near 1000 K. Debye temperature decreases with temperature, and increases with pressure. Under low pressure, thermal expansion coefficient raises with temperature rapidly, and then gets slow at higher pressure and temperature. Besides, the thermal expansion coefficient of UO 2 is much lower than that of other nuclear materials. (authors)

  10. Separation of uranium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, J.T.

    1980-01-01

    Methods and apparatus are disclosed for separation of uranium isotopes by selective isotopic excitation of photochemically reactive uranyl salt source material at cryogenic temperatures, followed by chemical separation of selectively photochemically reduced U+4 thereby produced from remaining uranyl source material

  11. Uranium mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, G.

    1975-01-01

    The winning of uranium ore is the first stage of the fuel cycle. The whole complex of questions to be considered when evaluating the profitability of an ore mine is shortly outlined, and the possible mining techniques are described. Some data on uranium mining in the western world are also given. (RB) [de

  12. Uranium enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    GAO was asked to address several questions concerning a number of proposed uranium enrichment bills introduced during the 100th Congress. The bill would have restructured the Department of Energy's uranium enrichment program as a government corporation to allow it to compete more effectively in the domestic and international markets. Some of GAO's findings discussed are: uranium market experts believe and existing market models show that the proposed DOE purchase of a $750 million of uranium from domestic producers may not significantly increase production because of large producer-held inventories; excess uranium enrichment production capacity exists throughout the world; therefore, foreign producers are expected to compete heavily in the United States throughout the 1990s as utilities' contracts with DOE expire; and according to a 1988 agreement between DOE's Offices of Nuclear Energy and Defense Programs, enrichment decommissioning costs, estimated to total $3.6 billion for planning purposes, will be shared by the commercial enrichment program and the government

  13. Uranium resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    This is a press release issued by the OECD on 9th March 1976. It is stated that the steep increases in demand for uranium foreseen in and beyond the 1980's, with doubling times of the order of six to seven years, will inevitably create formidable problems for the industry. Further substantial efforts will be needed in prospecting for new uranium reserves. Information is given in tabular or graphical form on the following: reasonably assured resources, country by country; uranium production capacities, country by country; world nuclear power growth; world annual uranium requirements; world annual separative requirements; world annual light water reactor fuel reprocessing requirements; distribution of reactor types (LWR, SGHWR, AGR, HWR, HJR, GG, FBR); and world fuel cycle capital requirements. The information is based on the latest report on Uranium Resources Production and Demand, jointly issued by the OECD's Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) and the International Atomic Energy Agency. (U.K.)

  14. Removal of uranium ions from synthetic wastewater using ZnO/Na-clinoptilolite nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aghadavoud, Azadeh; Saraee, Khadijeh Rezaee Ebrahim; Shakur, Hamid Reza; Sayyari, Rasol

    2016-01-01

    Uranium is one of the heavy metals that is found in industrial wastewater and is very toxic for human and environment. In this work, natural clinoptilolite is used as a low-cost adsorbent for uranium removal from aqueous solutions. The sodium form of clinoptilolite and ZnO/Na-clinoptilolite nanocomposite were prepared. The sample sorption capacities for uranium removal from simulated drinking water in the presence of other anions and cations were investigated. Natural zeolite and its modified forms were characterized by XRD, XRF, FTIR, TEM and BET. Batch experiments were used to determine the best adsorption conditions. The effects of various parameters such as contact time, pH, initial uranium concentration, temperature and mass sorbent on the removal efficiency of uranium ions were studied. The equilibration was attained after 2 and 6 h for the Na-clinoptilolite and ZnO/Na-clinoptilolite nanocomposite, respectively. Both adsorbents showed relatively fast adsorption. Effective removal of uranium was demonstrated at pH values of 4-8 for both forms of zeolite. Temperature had no significant effect on adsorption. The maximum removal efficiency of uranium by the ZnO/Na-clinoptilolite nanocomposite in pH=7.2 and room temperature was 98.55%. Langmuir, Freundlich and Sips models were used for describing the equilibrium isotherms for uranium uptake. The Sips model corresponded well with the experimental data. The thermodynamic parameters, such as ΔG , ΔH and ΔS , have been calculated and interpreted. The pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order models were applied to describe the kinetic data. The pseudo-second order kinetic model had excellent kinetic data fitting (R2=1).

  15. Removal of uranium ions from synthetic wastewater using ZnO/Na-clinoptilolite nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aghadavoud, Azadeh; Saraee, Khadijeh Rezaee Ebrahim; Shakur, Hamid Reza [Isfahan Univ. (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Sayyari, Rasol

    2016-07-01

    Uranium is one of the heavy metals that is found in industrial wastewater and is very toxic for human and environment. In this work, natural clinoptilolite is used as a low-cost adsorbent for uranium removal from aqueous solutions. The sodium form of clinoptilolite and ZnO/Na-clinoptilolite nanocomposite were prepared. The sample sorption capacities for uranium removal from simulated drinking water in the presence of other anions and cations were investigated. Natural zeolite and its modified forms were characterized by XRD, XRF, FTIR, TEM and BET. Batch experiments were used to determine the best adsorption conditions. The effects of various parameters such as contact time, pH, initial uranium concentration, temperature and mass sorbent on the removal efficiency of uranium ions were studied. The equilibration was attained after 2 and 6 h for the Na-clinoptilolite and ZnO/Na-clinoptilolite nanocomposite, respectively. Both adsorbents showed relatively fast adsorption. Effective removal of uranium was demonstrated at pH values of 4-8 for both forms of zeolite. Temperature had no significant effect on adsorption. The maximum removal efficiency of uranium by the ZnO/Na-clinoptilolite nanocomposite in pH=7.2 and room temperature was 98.55%. Langmuir, Freundlich and Sips models were used for describing the equilibrium isotherms for uranium uptake. The Sips model corresponded well with the experimental data. The thermodynamic parameters, such as ΔG , ΔH and ΔS , have been calculated and interpreted. The pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order models were applied to describe the kinetic data. The pseudo-second order kinetic model had excellent kinetic data fitting (R2=1).

  16. PRODUCTION OF URANIUM TUBING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creutz, E.C.

    1958-04-15

    The manufacture of thin-walled uranium tubing by the hot-piercing techique is described. Uranium billets are preheated to a temperature above 780 d C. The heated billet is fed to a station where it is engaged on its external surface by three convex-surfaced rotating rollers which are set at an angle to the axis of the billet to produce a surface friction force in one direction to force the billet over a piercing mandrel. While being formed around the mandrel and before losing the desired shape, the tube thus formed is cooled by a water spray.

  17. Long-term trends of daily maximum and minimum temperatures for the major cities of South Korea and their implications on human health

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Choi, B. C.; Kim, J.; Lee, D. G.; Kyselý, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 2 (2007), s. 171-183 ISSN N R&D Projects: GA ČR GC205/07/J044 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : Temperature trends * Biometeorology * Climate change * Global warming * Human health * Temperature extremes * Urbanization Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology

  18. Uranium supply and demand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spriggs, M J

    1976-01-01

    Papers were presented on the pattern of uranium production in South Africa; Australian uranium--will it ever become available; North American uranium resources, policies, prospects, and pricing; economic and political environment of the uranium mining industry; alternative sources of uranium supply; whither North American demand for uranium; and uranium demand and security of supply--a consumer's point of view. (LK)

  19. Study of algae's adsorption to uranium ion in water solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Yang; Qiu Yongmei; Dan Guiping; Zhang Dong; Lei Jiarong

    2007-01-01

    The adsorption efficiencies of the algae to uranium ion were determined at various pH, uranium ion concentrations, adsorption temperatures and the species of coexisted metal ions, and the effect of coexisted metal ion on the adsorption efficiency was researched. The experimental results at pH= 5-8 are as follows. 1) the adsorption capacity is a constant to be about 1.40 μg/g for the Yantai red alga and the sea spinach, and is changeable in the range of 1.03-2.23 μg/g with pH for the sea edible fungus; 2) for the algae the adsorption efficiency and adsorption capacity are related to uranium ion concentration, and the maximum adsorption efficiency and capacity is 95.8% and 65.4 μg/g, respectively; 3) the adsorption process for 24 h is not dependent on the temperature; 4) the effect of the species of coexisted metal ions on the adsorption capacity of uranium ion is various with the time during adsorption process. (authors)

  20. Studies on some influential factors of the zinc-activated carbon composite adsorbent on adsorptivity for uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyai, Yoshitaka; Kitamura, Takao; Takagi, Norio; Katoh, Shunsaku; Miyazaki, Hidetoshi

    1978-01-01

    Factors, which influence the uranium adsorption of powdery composite adsorbent of basic zinc carbonate and activated carbon were studied. In the range studied, zinc content of the adsorbent was the most influential factor on the uranium adsorption, and the second influential factor was sea water volume and the third factor was adsorption period. Interactive effects were observed between zinc content and sea water volume, and between zinc content and adsorption period, and it was deduced that there existed the optimum value of sea water volume and adsorption period respectively for the zinc content of the adsorbent. Maximum uranium adsorption of adsorbent with 40% zinc content was observed at sea water volume of 15 liters and adsorption period of 25 hrs. As for temperature in the range of 15 - 35 0 C, the lower the temperature, the larger amount of adsorbed uranium was. The powdery adsorbent was made into granule, and its strength and its uranium adsorptivity were studied in relation to the granulating conditions. By use of PVA with degree of polymerization above 1,700 as binder, the granular adsorbent with the same strength as commercial granular activated carbon was obtained. PVA amount and its degree of polymerization gave only small effect on uranium adsorption of the adsorbent. Effect of granule size on the uranium adsorption rate in the range of 1 - 4 mm was that the uranium adsorption rate changed proportionally to surface area of assumed sphere. As a test for practical use, five times repetitions of adsorption and desorption were carried out on the same granular adsorbent. During the repetition the amount of adsorbed uranium rather increased, and desorption ratio of adsorbed uranium was constant at 91 - 93%. The weight loss of the adsorbent in a cycle of adsorption and desorption was about 3%. (author)

  1. METHOD OF SEPARATING URANIUM VALUES, PLUTONIUM VALUES AND FISSION PRODUCTS BY CHLORINATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, H.S.; Seaborg, G.T.

    1959-02-24

    The separation of plutonium and uranium from each other and from other substances is described. In general, the method comprises the steps of contacting the uranium with chlorine in the presence of a holdback material selected from the group consisting of lanthanum oxide and thorium oxide to form a uranium chloride higher than uranium tetrachloride, and thereafter heating the uranium chloride thus formed to a temperature at which the uranium chloride is volatilized off but below the volatilizalion temperature of plutonium chloride.

  2. Method for producing uranium atomic beam source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krikorian, O.H.

    1976-01-01

    A method is described for producing a beam of neutral uranium atoms by vaporizing uranium from a compound UM/sub x/ heated to produce U vapor from an M boat or from some other suitable refractory container such as a tungsten boat, where M is a metal whose vapor pressure is negligible compared with that of uranium at the vaporization temperature. The compound, for example, may be the uranium-rhenium compound, URe 2 . An evaporation rate in excess of about 10 times that of conventional uranium beam sources is produced

  3. Maximum power point tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enslin, J.H.R.

    1990-01-01

    A well engineered renewable remote energy system, utilizing the principal of Maximum Power Point Tracking can be m ore cost effective, has a higher reliability and can improve the quality of life in remote areas. This paper reports that a high-efficient power electronic converter, for converting the output voltage of a solar panel, or wind generator, to the required DC battery bus voltage has been realized. The converter is controlled to track the maximum power point of the input source under varying input and output parameters. Maximum power point tracking for relative small systems is achieved by maximization of the output current in a battery charging regulator, using an optimized hill-climbing, inexpensive microprocessor based algorithm. Through practical field measurements it is shown that a minimum input source saving of 15% on 3-5 kWh/day systems can easily be achieved. A total cost saving of at least 10-15% on the capital cost of these systems are achievable for relative small rating Remote Area Power Supply systems. The advantages at larger temperature variations and larger power rated systems are much higher. Other advantages include optimal sizing and system monitor and control

  4. Little Cross-Feeding of the Mycorrhizal Networks Shared Between C3-Panicum bisulcatum and C4-Panicum maximum Under Different Temperature Regimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Řezáčová

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Common mycorrhizal networks (CMNs formed by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF interconnect plants of the same and/or different species, redistributing nutrients and draining carbon (C from the different plant partners at different rates. Here, we conducted a plant co-existence (intercropping experiment testing the role of AMF in resource sharing and exploitation by simplified plant communities composed of two congeneric grass species (Panicum spp. with different photosynthetic metabolism types (C3 or C4. The grasses had spatially separated rooting zones, conjoined through a root-free (but AMF-accessible zone added with 15N-labeled plant (clover residues. The plants were grown under two different temperature regimes: high temperature (36/32°C day/night or ambient temperature (25/21°C day/night applied over 49 days after an initial period of 26 days at ambient temperature. We made use of the distinct C-isotopic composition of the two plant species sharing the same CMN (composed of a synthetic AMF community of five fungal genera to estimate if the CMN was or was not fed preferentially under the specific environmental conditions by one or the other plant species. Using the C-isotopic composition of AMF-specific fatty acid (C16:1ω5 in roots and in the potting substrate harboring the extraradical AMF hyphae, we found that the C3-Panicum continued feeding the CMN at both temperatures with a significant and invariable share of C resources. This was surprising because the growth of the C3 plants was more susceptible to high temperature than that of the C4 plants and the C3-Panicum alone suppressed abundance of the AMF (particularly Funneliformis sp. in its roots due to the elevated temperature. Moreover, elevated temperature induced a shift in competition for nitrogen between the two plant species in favor of the C4-Panicum, as demonstrated by significantly lower 15N yields of the C3-Panicum but higher 15N yields of the C4-Panicum at elevated as

  5. Uranium, depleted uranium, biological effects; Uranium, uranium appauvri, effets biologiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    Physicists, chemists and biologists at the CEA are developing scientific programs on the properties and uses of ionizing radiation. Since the CEA was created in 1945, a great deal of research has been carried out on the properties of natural, enriched and depleted uranium in cooperation with university laboratories and CNRS. There is a great deal of available data about uranium; thousands of analyses have been published in international reviews over more than 40 years. This presentation on uranium is a very brief summary of all these studies. (author)

  6. Uranium toxicology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreyra, Mariana D.; Suarez Mendez, Sebastian

    1997-01-01

    In this paper are presented the methods and procedures optimized by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) for the determination of: natural uranium mass, activity of enriched uranium in samples of: urine, mucus, filters, filter heads, rinsing waters and Pu in urine, adopted and in some cases adapted, by the Environmental Monitoring and Internal Dosimetry Laboratory. The analyzed material corresponded to biological and environmental samples belonging to the staff professionally exposed that work in plants of the nuclear fuel cycle. For a better comprehension of the activities of this laboratory, it is included a brief description of the uranium radiochemical toxicity and the limits internationally fixed to preserve the workers health

  7. Use of electrical imaging and distributed temperature sensing methods to characterize surface water–groundwater exchange regulating uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Lee D.; Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Mwakanyamale, Kisa; Versteeg, Roelof J.; Ward, Andy; Strickland, Christopher; Johnson, Carole D.; Lane, John W.

    2010-01-01

    We explored the use of continuous waterborne electrical imaging (CWEI), in conjunction with fiber‐optic distributed temperature sensor (FO‐DTS) monitoring, to improve the conceptual model for uranium transport within the Columbia River corridor at the Hanford 300 Area, Washington. We first inverted resistivity and induced polarization CWEI data sets for distributions of electrical resistivity and polarizability, from which the spatial complexity of the primary hydrogeologic units was reconstructed. Variations in the depth to the interface between the overlying coarse‐grained, high‐permeability Hanford Formation and the underlying finer‐grained, less permeable Ringold Formation, an important contact that limits vertical migration of contaminants, were resolved along ∼3 km of the river corridor centered on the 300 Area. Polarizability images were translated into lithologic images using established relationships between polarizability and surface area normalized to pore volume (Spor). The FO‐DTS data recorded along 1.5 km of cable with a 1 m spatial resolution and 5 min sampling interval revealed subreaches showing (1) temperature anomalies (relatively warm in winter and cool in summer) and (2) a strong correlation between temperature and river stage (negative in winter and positive in summer), both indicative of reaches of enhanced surface water–groundwater exchange. The FO‐DTS data sets confirm the hydrologic significance of the variability identified in the CWEI and reveal a pattern of highly focused exchange, concentrated at springs where the Hanford Formation is thickest. Our findings illustrate how the combination of CWEI and FO‐DTS technologies can characterize surface water–groundwater exchange in a complex, coupled river‐aquifer system.

  8. Thermodynamic Studies at Higher Temperatures of the Phase Relationships of Substoichiometric Plutonium and Uranium/Plutonium Oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ole Toft

    1976-01-01

    Partial molar thermodynamic quantities for oxygen in non-stoichiometric Pu and U/Pu oxides were determined by thermogravimetric measurements in CO/CO2 mixtures in the temperature range 900-1450°C. A detailed analysis of the thermodynamic data obtained, as well as data previously published...

  9. Achieving maximum baryon densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyulassy, M.

    1984-01-01

    In continuing work on nuclear stopping power in the energy range E/sub lab/ approx. 10 GeV/nucleon, calculations were made of the energy and baryon densities that could be achieved in uranium-uranium collisions. Results are shown. The energy density reached could exceed 2 GeV/fm 3 and baryon densities could reach as high as ten times normal nuclear densities

  10. Novel precipitation technique for uranium recovery from carbonate leach solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sujoy Biswas; Rupawate, V.H.; Hareendran, K.N.; Roy, S.B.; Chakravartty, J.K.

    2015-01-01

    The recovery of uranium from carbonate ore leach solution was studied using novel precipitation method. The uranium from leach liquor was recovered as magnesium diuranate with NaOH in presence of trace amount of Mg 2+ . Effects of various parameters such as addition of H 2 SO 4 , MgO, MgSO 4 as well as NaOH were investigated for maximum uranium recovery. Overall uranium recovery of the process was 97 % with improved particle size (∼57 µm). Based on the experimental findings, a process flow-sheet was developed for uranium recovery from carbonate ore leach solution with a uranium concentration of <1 g/L. (author)

  11. Rossing uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    In this article the geology of the deposits of the Rossing uranium mine in Namibia is discussed. The planning of the open-pit mining, the blasting, drilling, handling and the equipment used for these processes are described

  12. Literature review of thermal and radiation performance parameters for high-temperature, uranium dioxide fueled cermet materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haertling, C.; Hanrahan, R.J.

    2007-01-01

    High-temperature fissile-fueled cermet literature was reviewed. Data are presented primarily for the W-UO 2 as this was the system most frequently studied; other reviewed systems include cermets with Mo, Re, or alloys as a matrix. Failure mechanisms for the cermets are typically degradation of mechanical integrity and loss of fuel. Mechanical failure can occur through stresses produced from dissimilar expansion coefficients, voids created from diffusion of dissimilar materials or formation of metal hydride and subsequent volume expansion. Fuel loss failure can occur by high temperature surface vaporization or by vaporization after loss of mechanical integrity. Techniques found to aid in retaining fuel include the use of coatings around UO 2 fuel particles, use of oxide stabilizers in the UO 2 , minimizing grain sizes in the metal matrix, minimizing impurities, controlling the cermet sintering atmosphere, and cladding around the cermet

  13. Construction of an apparatus for measuring the low-temperature thermal conductivity before and after neutron irradiation. Application to uranium dioxide (1963); Realisation d'un appareil pour la mesure de la conductibilite thermique a basse temperature avant et apres irradiation neutronique. Application au dioxyde d'uranium (1963)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bethoux, O [Commisariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-09-15

    An apparatus has been studied and built which makes it possible to alternatively irradiate a sample at room temperature in the reactor 'Melusine' at the Grenoble Nuclear Research Centre, and to measure its thermal conductivity between 20 and 100 deg. K in perfect safety. The results obtained on UO{sub 2} have made it possible on the one hand to check experimentally that the spin-phonon diffusion leads to a thermal resistance independent of temperature above 30 deg. K, and on the other hand to propose a simple theory which takes into count the role played by the damage due to U-235 fission products in the decrease of thermal conductivity after irradiation. (author) [French] Un appareil permettant alternativement d'irradier un echantillon a temperature ambiante dans le reacteur ''Melusine'' du C.E.N.G., et de mesurer sa conductibilite thermique entre 20 et 100 deg. K en toute securite, a ete etudie et construit Les resultats obtenus sur UO{sub 2} ont permis, d'une part, de verifier experimentalement que la diffusion spin-phonon conduit a une resistance thermique independante de la temperature au-dessus de 30 deg. K, et, d'autre part, de proposer une theorie simple tenant compte du role joue par les degats dus aux produits de fission de l'uranium 235, dans la deterioration de la conductibilite thermique apres irradiation. (auteur)

  14. Uranium, depleted uranium, biological effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Physicists, chemists and biologists at the CEA are developing scientific programs on the properties and uses of ionizing radiation. Since the CEA was created in 1945, a great deal of research has been carried out on the properties of natural, enriched and depleted uranium in cooperation with university laboratories and CNRS. There is a great deal of available data about uranium; thousands of analyses have been published in international reviews over more than 40 years. This presentation on uranium is a very brief summary of all these studies. (author)

  15. Thermal dimensioning of the deep repository. Influence of canister spacing, canister power, rock thermal properties and nearfield design on the maximum canister surface temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoekmark, Harald; Faelth, Billy

    2003-12-01

    The report addresses the problem of the minimum spacing required between neighbouring canisters in the deep repository. That spacing is calculated for a number of assumptions regarding the conditions that govern the temperature in the nearfield and at the surfaces of the canisters. The spacing criterion is that the temperature at the canister surfaces must not exceed 100 deg C .The results are given in the form of nomographic charts, such that it is in principle possible to determine the spacing as soon as site data, i.e. the initial undisturbed rock temperature and the host rock heat transport properties, are available. Results of canister spacing calculations are given for the KBS-3V concept as well as for the KBS-3H concept. A combination of numerical and analytical methods is used for the KBS-3H calculations, while the KBS-3V calculations are purely analytical. Both methods are described in detail. Open gaps are assigned equivalent heat conductivities, calculated such that the conduction across the gaps will include also the heat transferred by radiation. The equivalent heat conductivities are based on the emissivities of the different gap surfaces. For the canister copper surface, the emissivity is determined by back-calculation of temperatures measured in the Prototype experiment at Aespoe HRL. The size of the different gaps and the emissivity values are of great importance for the results and will be investigated further in the future

  16. Uranium loans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    When NUEXCO was organized in 1968, its founders conceived of a business based on uranium loans. The concept was relatively straightforward; those who found themselves with excess supplies of uranium would deposit those excesses in NUEXCO's open-quotes bank,close quotes and those who found themselves temporarily short of uranium could borrow from the bank. The borrower would pay interest based on the quantity of uranium borrowed and the duration of the loan, and the bank would collect the interest, deduct its service fee for arranging the loan, and pay the balance to those whose deposits were borrowed. In fact, the original plan was to call the firm Nuclear Bank Corporation, until it was discovered that using the word open-quotes Bankclose quotes in the name would subject the firm to various US banking regulations. Thus, Nuclear Bank Corporation became Nuclear Exchange Corporation, which was later shortened to NUEXCO. Neither the nuclear fuel market nor NUEXCO's business developed quite as its founders had anticipated. From almost the very beginning, the brokerage of uranium purchases and sales became a more significant activity for NUEXCO than arranging uranium loans. Nevertheless, loan transactions have played an important role in the international nuclear fuel market, requiring the development of special knowledge and commercial techniques

  17. Equations of state for enriched uranium and uranium alloy to 3500 MPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai Chaomao; Hai Yuying; Liu Jenlong; Li Zhenrong

    1990-04-01

    The volume compressions of 6 kinds of cast materials including enriched uranium, poor uranium, U-0.57 wt% Ti, U-0.33 wt% Nb, U-2.85 wt% Nb and U-7.5 wt% Nb-3.3 wt% Zr have been determined by monitoring piston displacements in a piston cylinder apparatus with double strengthening rings to 3500 MPa at room temperature. The dilation of the cylinder vessel and the press deformation were corrected by some experiments. The calculational data free from using the standard sample closed with used standard sample. The volume compressions of enriched uranium and poor uranium are nearly coincident. Pure uranium is more compressible than uranium alloys. These values of enriched uranium are in close agreement with values of Bridgman's pure uranium. The fitting coefficients of Bridgman's polynomial and Anderson's equation of state and isothermal bulk modules for the above materials are given

  18. Uranium extraction from gold-uranium ores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laskorin, B.N.; Golynko, Z.Sh.

    1981-01-01

    The process of uranium extraction from gold-uranium ores in the South Africa is considered. Flowsheets of reprocessing gold-uranium conglomerates, pile processing and uranium extraction from the ores are presented. Continuous counter flow ion-exchange process of uranium extraction using strong-active or weak-active resins is noted to be the most perspective and economical one. The ion-exchange uranium separation with the succeeding extraction is also the perspective one.

  19. Uranium mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The economic and environmental sustainability of uranium mining has been analysed by Monash University researcher Dr Gavin Mudd in a paper that challenges the perception that uranium mining is an 'infinite quality source' that provides solutions to the world's demand for energy. Dr Mudd says information on the uranium industry touted by politicians and mining companies is not necessarily inaccurate, but it does not tell the whole story, being often just an average snapshot of the costs of uranium mining today without reflecting the escalating costs associated with the process in years to come. 'From a sustainability perspective, it is critical to evaluate accurately the true lifecycle costs of all forms of electricity production, especially with respect to greenhouse emissions, ' he says. 'For nuclear power, a significant proportion of greenhouse emissions are derived from the fuel supply, including uranium mining, milling, enrichment and fuel manufacture.' Dr Mudd found that financial and environmental costs escalate dramatically as the uranium ore is used. The deeper the mining process required to extract the ore, the higher the cost for mining companies, the greater the impact on the environment and the more resources needed to obtain the product. I t is clear that there is a strong sensitivity of energy and water consumption and greenhouse emissions to ore grade, and that ore grades are likely to continue to decline gradually in the medium to long term. These issues are critical to the current debate over nuclear power and greenhouse emissions, especially with respect to ascribing sustainability to such activities as uranium mining and milling. For example, mining at Roxby Downs is responsible for the emission of over one million tonnes of greenhouse gases per year and this could increase to four million tonnes if the mine is expanded.'

  20. Uranium and other heavy metal resistance and accumulation in bacteria isolated from uranium mine wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Sangeeta; Islam, Ekramul; Kazy, Sufia K; Sar, Pinaki

    2012-01-01

    Ten bacterial strains isolated from uranium mine wastes were characterized in terms of their uranium and other metal resistance and accumulation. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis identified the strains as members of genera Bacillus, Serratia, and Arthrobacter. Strains were able to utilize various carbon sources, particularly aromatic hydrocarbons, grow at broad pH and temperature ranges and produce non specific acid phosphatase relevant for metal phosphate precipitation in contaminated environment. The isolates exhibited high uranium and other heavy metals (Ni, Co, Cu and Cd) resistance and accumulation capacities. Particularly, Arthrobacter sp. J001 and Bacillus sp. J003 were superior in terms of U resistance at low pH (pH 4.0) along with metals and actinides (U and Th) removal with maximum cell loading of 1088 μmol U, 1293 μmol Th, 425 μmol Cu, 305 μmol Cd, 377 μmol Zn, 250 μmol Ni g(-1) cell dry wt. Genes encoding P(1B)-type ATPases (Cu-CPx and Zn-CPx) and ABC transporters (nik) as catalytic tools for maintaining cellular metal homeostasis were detected within several Bacillus spp., with possible incidence of horizontal gene transfer for the later gene showing phylogenetic lineage to α Proteobacteria members. The study provides evidence on intrinsic abilities of indigenous bacteria from U-mine suitable for survival and cleaning up of contaminated mine sites.

  1. The last glacial maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, P.U.; Dyke, A.S.; Shakun, J.D.; Carlson, A.E.; Clark, J.; Wohlfarth, B.; Mitrovica, J.X.; Hostetler, S.W.; McCabe, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    We used 5704 14C, 10Be, and 3He ages that span the interval from 10,000 to 50,000 years ago (10 to 50 ka) to constrain the timing of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) in terms of global ice-sheet and mountain-glacier extent. Growth of the ice sheets to their maximum positions occurred between 33.0 and 26.5 ka in response to climate forcing from decreases in northern summer insolation, tropical Pacific sea surface temperatures, and atmospheric CO2. Nearly all ice sheets were at their LGM positions from 26.5 ka to 19 to 20 ka, corresponding to minima in these forcings. The onset of Northern Hemisphere deglaciation 19 to 20 ka was induced by an increase in northern summer insolation, providing the source for an abrupt rise in sea level. The onset of deglaciation of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet occurred between 14 and 15 ka, consistent with evidence that this was the primary source for an abrupt rise in sea level ???14.5 ka.

  2. Sustainability of thorium-uranium in pebble-bed fluoride salt-cooled High Temperature Reactor - 15171

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, G.; Zou, Y.; Xu, Hongjie

    2015-01-01

    Sustainability of thorium fuel in a pebble-bed fluoride salt-cooled high temperature reactor (PB-FHR) is investigated to find the feasible region of high discharge burnup and negative FLiBe (2LiF-BeF 2 ) salt temperature reactivity coefficient (TRC). Dispersion fuel or pellet fuel with SiC cladding and SiC matrix is used to replace the tri-structural-isotropic (TRISO) coated particle system for increasing heavy metal loading and decreasing excessive moderation. In order to analyze the neutronic characteristics, an equilibrium calculation method of thorium fuel self-sustainability is developed. We have compared 2 refueling schemes (mixing flow pattern and directional flow pattern) and 2 kinds of reflector materials (SiC and graphite). This method has found that the feasible regions of breeding and negative FLiBe TRC is between 20 vol% and 62 vol% heavy metal loading in the fuel. A discharge burnup could be achieved up to about 200 MWd/kgHM. The case with directional flow pattern and SiC reflector showed superior burnup characteristics but the worst radial power peak factor, while the case with mixing flow pattern and SiC reflector, which was the best tradeoff between discharge burnup and radial power peak factor, could provide burnup of 140 MWd/kgHM and about 1.4 radial power peak factor with 50 vol% dispersion fuel. In addition, FLiBe salt displays good neutron properties as a coolant of quasi-fast reactors due to the strong 9 Be(n,2n) reaction and low neutron absorption of 6 Li (even at 1000 ppm) in fast spectrum. Preliminary thermal hydraulic calculation shows good safety margins. The greatest challenge of this reactor may be the very long irradiation time of the pebble fuel. (authors)

  3. Electrochemical preparation of new uranium oxide phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smolenskij, V.V.; Lyalyushkin, N.V.; Bove, A.L.; Komarov, V.K.; Kapshukov, I.I.

    1992-01-01

    Behaviour of uranium ions in oxidation states 3+ and 4+ in molten chlorides of alkali metals in the temperature range of 700-900 degC in the atmosphere of an inert gas was studied by the method of cyclic voltametry. It is shown that as a result of introduction of crystal uranium dioxide into the salt melt formation of uranium oxide ions of the composition UO + and UO 2+ occurs, the ions participating in electrode reactions and bringing about formation of the following uranium oxides on the cathode: UO and, presumably, U 3 O 4 . Oxides UO and U 3 O 4 are thermodynamically unstable at low temperatures and decompose into uranium oxide of the composition UO 2-x , where x varies from 0 to 0.05, and metal uranium

  4. Synthesis of Uranium nitride powders using metal uranium powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jae Ho; Kim, Dong Joo; Oh, Jang Soo; Rhee, Young Woo; Kim, Jong Hun; Kim, Keon Sik

    2012-01-01

    Uranium nitride (UN) is a potential fuel material for advanced nuclear reactors because of their high fuel density, high thermal conductivity, high melting temperature, and considerable breeding capability in LWRs. Uranium nitride powders can be fabricated by a carbothermic reduction of the oxide powders, or the nitriding of metal uranium. The carbothermic reduction has an advantage in the production of fine powders. However it has many drawbacks such as an inevitable engagement of impurities, process burden, and difficulties in reusing of expensive N 15 gas. Manufacturing concerns issued in the carbothermic reduction process can be solved by changing the starting materials from oxide powder to metals. However, in nitriding process of metal, it is difficult to obtain fine nitride powders because metal uranium is usually fabricated in the form of bulk ingots. In this study, a simple reaction method was tested to fabricate uranium nitride powders directly from uranium metal powders. We fabricated uranium metal spherical powder and flake using a centrifugal atomization method. The nitride powders were obtained by thermal treating those metal particles under nitrogen containing gas. We investigated the phase and morphology evolutions of powders during the nitriding process. A phase analysis of nitride powders was also a part of the present work

  5. Density and viscosity study of nicotinic acid and nicotinamide in dilute aqueous solutions at and around the temperature of the maximum density of water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhondge, Sudhakar S.; Dahasahasra, Prachi N.; Paliwal, Lalitmohan J.; Deshmukh, Dinesh W.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Volumetric and transport behaviour of aqueous solutions of important vitamins are reported. • Various interactions of nicotinic acid and nicotinamide with water have been reported. • The temperature dependence of interactions between solute and solvent is discussed. • The study indicates that nicotinamide is more hydrated as compared to nicotinic acid. - Abstract: In the present study, we report experimental densities (ρ) and viscosities (η) of aqueous solutions of nicotinic acid and nicotinamide within the concentration range (0 to 0.1) mol · kg −1 at T = (275.15, 277.15 and 279.15) K. These parameters are then used to obtain thermodynamic and transport functions such as apparent molar volume of solute (V ϕ ), limiting apparent molar volume of solute (V ϕ 0 ), limiting apparent molar expansivity of solute (E ϕ 0 ), coefficient of thermal expansion (α ∗ ), Jones–Dole equation viscosity A, B and D coefficients, temperature derivative of B coefficient i.e. (dB/dT) and hydration number (n H ), etc. The activation parameters of viscous flow for the binary mixtures have been determined and discussed in terms of Eyring’s transition state theory. These significant parameters are helpful to study the structure promoting or destroying tendency of solute and various interactions present in (nicotinic acid + water) and (nicotinamide + water) binary mixtures

  6. Uranium enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rae, H.K.; Melvin, J.G.

    1988-06-01

    Canada is the world's largest producer and exporter of uranium, most of which is enriched elsewhere for use as fuel in LWRs. The feasibility of a Canadian uranium-enrichment enterprise is therefore a perennial question. Recent developments in uranium-enrichment technology, and their likely impacts on separative work supply and demand, suggest an opportunity window for Canadian entry into this international market. The Canadian opportunity results from three particular impacts of the new technologies: 1) the bulk of the world's uranium-enrichment capacity is in gaseous diffusion plants which, because of their large requirements for electricity (more than 2000 kW·h per SWU), are vulnerable to competition from the new processes; 2) the decline in enrichment costs increases the economic incentive for the use of slightly-enriched uranium (SEU) fuel in CANDU reactors, thus creating a potential Canadian market; and 3) the new processes allow economic operation on a much smaller scale, which drastically reduces the investment required for market entry and is comparable with the potential Canadian SEU requirement. The opportunity is not open-ended. By the end of the century the enrichment supply industry will have adapted to the new processes and long-term customer/supplier relationships will have been established. In order to seize the opportunity, Canada must become a credible supplier during this century

  7. Study of electrolytic reduction of uranium VI to uranium IV in nitrate systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, B.F. de; Almeida, S.G. de; Forbicini, S; Matsuda, H T; Araujo, J.A. de [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, Sao Paulo (Brazil). Centro de Engenharia Quimica

    1980-01-01

    Experimental parameters are optimized in order to obtain uranium (IV) nitrate solutions at maximum yield, using hydrazine as stabilizer. Uranium (VI) electrolytic reduction was chosen because: there is no increase in the volume of radioactive effluents; there are no secondary reactions; there is no need for further separations; all reagents used are not inflammable. The method is, therefore, efficient and of low cost.

  8. Electrical impedance studies of uranium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hampton, R.N.

    1986-11-01

    The thesis presents data on the electrical properties of uranium oxide at temperatures from 1700K to 4.2K, and pressures between 25 K bar and 70 K bar. The impedance data were analysed using the technique of complex plane representation to establish the conductivity and dielectric constant of uranium dioxide. The thermophysical data were compared with previously reported experimental and theoretical work on uranium dioxide and other fluorite structured oxides. (U.K.)

  9. Synthesis of UN coatings on uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mar, R.W.; Hastings, J.C.

    1975-04-01

    A single-displacement reaction approach was used to form uranium mononitride as a protective coating for uranium; the source of the nitrogen was a solid nitride, and magnesium nitride was chosen as the most attractive candidate for the experiment. While the goal of synthesizing a single-phase uranium mononitride coating at temperatures lower than 1405 K was met, a number of problems inherent in the process were identified. 6 figures, 2 tables

  10. METHOD OF PRODUCING URANIUM METAL BY ELECTROLYSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, R.D.

    1962-09-01

    A process is given for making uranium metal from oxidic material by electrolytic deposition on the cathode. The oxidic material admixed with two moles of carbon per one mole of uranium dioxide forms the anode, and the electrolyte is a mixture of from 40 to 75% of calcium fluoride or barium fluoride, 15 to 45% of uranium tetrafluoride, and from 10 to 20% of lithium fluoride or magnesium fluoride; the temperature of the electrolyte is between 1150 and 1175 deg C. (AEC)

  11. On the separation of so-called non-volatile uranium fission products of uranium using the conversion of neutron-irradiated uranium dioxide and graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elhardt, W.

    1979-01-01

    The investigations are continued in the following work which arose from the concept of separating uranium fission products from uranium. This is achieved in that due to the lattice conversions occurring during the course of solid chemical reactions, fission products can easily pass from the uranium-contained solid to a second solid. The investigations carried out primarily concern the release behaviour of cerium and neodymium in the temperature region of 1200 to 1700 0 C. UO 2 + graphite, both in powder form, are selected as suitable reaction system having the preconditions needed for the lattice conversion for the release effect. The target aimed at from the practical aspect for the improved release of lanthanoids is achieved by an isobar test course - changing temperature from 1200 to 1500 0 C at constant pressure, with a cerium release of 75-80% and a neodynium release of 80-90% (maximum at 1400 0 C). The concepts on the mechanism of the fission product release are related to transport processes in crystal lattices, as well as chemical solid reactions and evaporation processes on the surface of UC 2 grains. (orig./RB) [de

  12. Measurement of reactivity worths of burnable poison rods in enriched uranium graphite-moderated core simulated to high temperature gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akino, Fujiyoshi; Takeuchi, Motoyoshi; Kitadate, Kenji; Yoshifuji, Hisashi; Kaneko, Yoshihiko

    1980-11-01

    As the core design for the Experimental Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor progresses, evaluation of design precision has become increasingly important. For a high precision design, it is required to have adequate group constants based on accurate nuclear data, as well as calculation methods properly describing the physical behavior of neutrons. We, therefore, assembled a simulation core for VHTR, SHE-14, using a graphite-moderated 20%-enriched uranium Semi-Homogeneous Experimental Critical Facility (SHE), and obtained useful experimental data in evaluating the design precision. The VHTR is designed to accommodate burnable poison and control rods for reactivity compensation. Accordingly, the experimental burnable poison rods which are similar to those to be used in the experimental reactor were prepared, and their reactivity values were measured in the SHE-14 core. One to three rods of the above experimental burnable poison rods were inserted into the central column of the SHE-14 core, and the reactivity values were measured by the period and fuel rod substitution method. The results of the measurements have clearly shown that due to the self-shielding effect of B 4 C particles the reactivity value decreases with increasing particle diameter. For the particle diameter, the reactivity value is found to increase linearly with the logarithm of boron content. The measured values and those calculated are found to agree with each other within 5%. These results indicate that the reactivity of the burnable poison rod can be estimated fairly accurately by taking into account the self-shielding effect of B 4 C particles and the heterogeneity of the lattice cell. (author)

  13. Uranium update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steane, R.

    1997-01-01

    This paper is about the current uranium mining situation, especially that in Saskatchewan. Canada has a unique advantage with the Saskatchewan uranium deposits. Making the most of this opportunity is important to Canada. The following is reviewed: project development and the time and capital it takes to bring a new project into production; the supply and demand situation to show where the future production fits into the world market; and our foreign competition and how we have to be careful not to lose our opportunity. (author)

  14. Experiments of progressive replacement in Cesar at operation temperature. Uranium-plutonium fuels. Study performed within the frame of the CEA-EURATOM - No. 002 64 9 TRUF contract - 'Plutonium recycling'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosser, Roland; Cuny, Gerard; Hoffmann, Alain; Langlet, Gerard; Laponche, Bernard; Morier, Francis; Penet, Francois; Charbonneau, Serge

    1969-08-01

    Experiments of progressive replacement (or substitution) of uranium-plutonium alloy fuels are part of a general program of experimental studies which are aimed at testing the methods used by the CEA to calculate the evolution of nuclear power reactors (calculation of spectrum in plutonium-containing fuels and validity of data used in these calculations, calculation of cross sections). Such progressive replacements have been performed in Aquilon (with heavy water as moderator) and measurements have been performed by oscillation in Marius and Cesar (graphite moderator). Herein reported experiments have been performed at 20, 100 and 200 C during a first campaign in 1966, and at 300, 400 and 450 C during a second campaign in 1968. Measurements are interpreted by means of the Coregraf 2 code. The report presents experimental conditions in Cesar, the measurement principle and the interpretation method (substitution experiments, enriched uranium calibration, interpretation steps, and temperature coefficient measurement), the obtained results and their discussion [fr

  15. Precipitation behavior of uranium in multicomponent solution by oxalic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Y.J.; Kim, I.S.; Lee, W.K.; Shin, H.S.; Ro, S.G.

    1996-01-01

    A study on the precipitation of uranium by oxalic acid was carried out in a multicomponent solution. The precipitation method is usually applied to the treatment of radioactive waste and the recovery of uranium from a uranium-scrap contaminated with impurities. In these cases, the problem is how to increase the precipitation yield of target element and to prevent impurities from coprecipitation. The multicomponent solution in the present experiment was prepared by dissolving U, Nd, Cs and Sr in nitric acid. The effects of concentrations of oxalic acid and ascorbic acid on the precipitation yield and purity of uranium were observed. As results of the study, the maximum precipitation yield of uranium is revealed to be about 96.5% and the relative precipitation ratio of Nd, Cs and Sr versus uranium are discussed at the condition of the maximum precipitation yield of uranium, respectively. (author). 11 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  16. Supercritical fluid extraction of uranium and thorium from nitric acid medium using organophosphorous compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitchaiah, K.C.; Sujatha, K.; Rao, C.V.S. Brahmmananda; Subramaniam, S.; Sivaraman, N.; Rao, P.R. Vasudeva [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India). Chemistry Group

    2015-06-01

    In recent years, Supercritical Fluid Extraction (SFE) technique has been widely used for the extraction of metal ions. In the present study, extraction of uranium from nitric acid medium was investigated using supercritical carbon dioxide (Sc-CO{sub 2}) containing various organophosphorous compounds such as trialkyl phosphates e.g. tri-iso-amyl phosphate (TiAP), tri-sec-butyl phosphate (TsBP) and tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP), dialkylalkyl phosphonates, e.g. diamylamyl phosphonate (DAAP) and dibutyl butyl phosphonate (DBBP), dialkyl hydrogen phosphonates, e.g. dioctyl hydrogen phosphonate (DOHP), dioctylphosphineoxide (DOPO), trioctyl phosphine oxide (TOPO), n-octylphenyl N,N-diisobutyl carbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) and di-2-ethyl-hexyl phosphoric acid (HDEHP). Some of these ligands have been investigated for the first time in the supercritical phase for the extraction of uranium. The extraction efficiency of uranium was studied with TiAP, DAAP and DBBP as a function of nitric acid concentration; the kinetics of the equilibration period (static extraction) and transportation of the metal complex (dynamic extraction) was investigated. The influence of pressure and temperature on the extraction behaviour of uranium with DAAP was studied from 4 N HNO{sub 3}. The extraction efficiency of uranium from 4 N nitric acid medium was found to increase in the order of phosphates < phosphonates < HDEHP < TOPO < CMPO. In the case of phosphates and phosphonates, the maximum extraction of uranium was found to be from 4 N HNO{sub 3} medium. The acidic extractants, HDEHP and DOHP showed relatively higher extraction at lower acidities. The relative extraction of uranium and thorium from their mixture was also examined using Sc-CO{sub 2} containing phosphates, phosphonates and TOPO. The ligand, TsBP provided better fractionation between uranium and thorium compared to trialkyl phosphates, dialkyl alkyl phosphonates and TOPO.

  17. Machining of uranium and uranium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, T.O.

    1981-01-01

    Uranium and uranium alloys can be readily machined by conventional methods in the standard machine shop when proper safety and operating techniques are used. Material properties that affect machining processes and recommended machining parameters are discussed. Safety procedures and precautions necessary in machining uranium and uranium alloys are also covered. 30 figures

  18. A portable storage maximum thermometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayart, Gerard.

    1976-01-01

    A clinical thermometer storing the voltage corresponding to the maximum temperature in an analog memory is described. End of the measurement is shown by a lamp switch out. The measurement time is shortened by means of a low thermal inertia platinum probe. This portable thermometer is fitted with cell test and calibration system [fr

  19. Development of casting techniques for uranium and uranium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, S.P.

    2003-01-01

    The casting process concerning furnace set-up, mould temperatures, pouring temperatures, out gassing, post heating, casting recovery and crucible and mould clean-up is discussed. Some applications of casting theory can be made in practice, but experience in handling the metal is most valuable in the successful solution of a new problem. The casting of uranium alloys using induction stirring of the melt to promote homogeneity in the casting is described. A few remarks are made concerning safety aspects associated with the casting of uranium

  20. Structural and magnetic properties of some pseudo-binary and ternary compounds at high curie temperature prepared in the systems: -) rare earth (Nd, Sm) iron hydrogen, -) gadolinium iron aluminium, and -) uranium iron or cobalt silicon or germanium; Proprietes structurales et magnetiques de quelques composes pseudobinaires et ternaires ferromagnetiques a temperature de curie elevee prepares dans les systemes: -) terres rares Nd Sm fer hydrogene, -) gadolinium fer aluminium, and -) uranium fer ou cobalt silicium ou germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berlureau, T

    1991-07-15

    This work highlights the importance of crystal and chemical studies for understanding the magnetic properties of systems as complex as inter-metallic compounds involving rare-earth elements, uranium, silicon or germanium. With a view of finding new compounds with high Curie temperature and strong magneto-crystal anisotropy, it appears that uranium compounds such as UFe{sub 10}Si{sub 2}, UCo{sub 10}Si{sub 2}, U(Fe{sub 10-x}Co{sub x})Si{sub 2} and U{sub 2}M{sub 17-y}X{sub y} where M is Fe or Co and Y is Si or Ge, are interesting because of the 5f orbital that can form bands through direct overlapping and can link itself very strongly with orbitals of nearby atoms.

  1. Approximate maximum parsimony and ancestral maximum likelihood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alon, Noga; Chor, Benny; Pardi, Fabio; Rapoport, Anat

    2010-01-01

    We explore the maximum parsimony (MP) and ancestral maximum likelihood (AML) criteria in phylogenetic tree reconstruction. Both problems are NP-hard, so we seek approximate solutions. We formulate the two problems as Steiner tree problems under appropriate distances. The gist of our approach is the succinct characterization of Steiner trees for a small number of leaves for the two distances. This enables the use of known Steiner tree approximation algorithms. The approach leads to a 16/9 approximation ratio for AML and asymptotically to a 1.55 approximation ratio for MP.

  2. Sharp Reduction in Maximum LEU Fuel Temperatures during Loss of Coolant Accidents in a PBMR DPP-400 core by means of Optimised Placement of Neutron Poisons: Implications for Pu fuel-cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serfontein, Dawid E.

    2013-01-01

    The optimisation of the power profiles by means of placing an optimised distribution of neutron poison concentrations in the central reflector resulted in a large reduction in the maximum DLOFC temperature, which may produce far reaching safety and licensing benefits. Unfortunately this came at the expense of losing the ability to execute effective load following. The neutron poisons also caused a large reduction of 22% in the average burn-up of the fuel. Further optimisation is required to counter this reduction in burn-up

  3. Uranium mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheeseman, E.W.

    1980-01-01

    The international uranium market appears to be currently over-supplied with a resultant softening in prices. Buyers on the international market are unhappy about some of the restrictions placed on sales by the government, and Canadian sales may suffer as a result. About 64 percent of Canada's shipments come from five operating Ontario mines, with the balance from Saskatchewan. Several other properties will be producing within the next few years. In spite of the adverse effects of the Three Mile Island incident and the default by the T.V.A. of their contract, some 3 600 tonnes of new uranium sales were completed during the year. The price for uranium had stabilized at US $42 - $44 by mid 1979, but by early 1980 had softened somewhat. The year 1979 saw the completion of major environmental hearings in Ontario and Newfoundland and the start of the B.C. inquiry. Two more hearings are scheduled for Saskatchewan in 1980. The Elliot Lake uranium mining expansion hearings are reviewed, as are other recent hearings. In the production of uranium for nuclear fuel cycle, environmental matters are of major concern to the industry, the public and to governments. Research is being conducted to determine the most effective method for removing radium from tailings area effluents. Very stringent criteria are being drawn up by the regulatory agencies that must be met by the industry in order to obtain an operating licence from the AECB. These criteria cover seepages from the tailings basin and through the tailings retention dam, seismic stability, and both short and long term management of the tailings waste management area. (auth)

  4. Maximum permissible dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    This chapter presents a historic overview of the establishment of radiation guidelines by various national and international agencies. The use of maximum permissible dose and maximum permissible body burden limits to derive working standards is discussed

  5. Study of natural thermoluminescence of quartzite in a gold and uranium mineralized zone (Canavieiras, Jacobina, Brazil)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, J.; Nordemann, D.

    1976-01-01

    The quartzite of the Canavieiras gold mine (Jacobina, Bahia, Brazil) exhibits a high temperature peak (280 +- 2) 0 C in its natural thermoluminescence glow curve. It was experimentally determined that the amount of light in this peak could be reproduced to within 5% for grain sizes between 80 and 100 mesh (0.149 and 0.177 mm). A positive correlation was found between the amount of this thermoluminescence and the uranium content with saturation beginning to be detected at the maximum (700 ppm) amount of uranium found. Assuming that the thermoluminescence peak used is at a temperature high enough to permit accumulation and stability at room temperatures, the thermoluminescence found could have accumulated in (12.1 +- 0.3) x 10 6 years. This may date a complete liberation of trapped electrons in conjunction with a well documented initiation of weathering. (author) [pt

  6. Uranium industry annual 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1996 (UIA 1996) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1996 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1987 through 1996 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2006, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. A feature article, The Role of Thorium in Nuclear Energy, is included. 24 figs., 56 tabs.

  7. Uranium industry annual 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-04-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1996 (UIA 1996) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry's activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1996 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1987 through 1996 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2006, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. A feature article, The Role of Thorium in Nuclear Energy, is included. 24 figs., 56 tabs

  8. Uranium Dioxide Powder Flow ability Improvement Using Sol-Gel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juanda, D.; Sambodo Daru, G.

    1998-01-01

    The improvement of flow ability characteristics of uranium dioxide powder has been done using sol-gel process. To anticipate a pellet mass production with uniform pellet dimension, the uranium dioxide powder must be have a spherical form. Uranium dioxide spherical powder has been diluted in acid transformed into sol colloidal solution. To obtain uranium dioxide spherical form, the uranium sol-colloidal solution has been dropped in a hot paraffin ( at the temperature of 90 0 C) to form gelatinous colloid and then dried at 800 0 C, and sintered at the temperature of 1700 0 C. The flow ability of spherical uranium dioxide powder has been examined by using Flowmeter Hall (ASTM. B. 213-46T). The measurement result reveals that the spherical uranium dioxide powder has a flow ability twice than that of unprocessed uranium dioxide powder

  9. Uranium industry annual, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    In the Uranium Industry Annual 1991, data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities including domestic uranium purchases, commitments by utilities, procurement arrangements, uranium imports under purchase contracts and exports, deliveries to enrichment suppliers, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and uranium for sale by domestic suppliers are presented in Chapter 2. A feature article entitled ''The Uranium Industry of the Commonwealth of Independent States'' is included in this report

  10. Uranium concentrations in groundwater, northeastern Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahle, Sue C.; Welch, Wendy B.; Tecca, Alison E.; Eliason, Devin M.

    2018-04-18

    A study of uranium in groundwater in northeastern Washington was conducted to make a preliminary assessment of naturally occurring uranium in groundwater relying on existing information and limited reconnaissance sampling. Naturally occurring uranium is associated with granitic and metasedimentary rocks, as well as younger sedimentary deposits, that occur in this region. The occurrence and distribution of uranium in groundwater is poorly understood. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulates uranium in Group A community water systems at a maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 30 μg/L in order to reduce uranium exposure, protect from toxic kidney effects of uranium, and reduce the risk of cancer. However, most existing private wells in the study area, generally for single family use, have not been sampled for uranium. This document presents available uranium concentration data from throughout a multi-county region, identifies data gaps, and suggests further study aimed at understanding the occurrence of uranium in groundwater.The study encompasses about 13,000 square miles (mi2) in the northeastern part of Washington with a 2010 population of about 563,000. Other than the City of Spokane, most of the study area is rural with small towns interspersed throughout the region. The study area also includes three Indian Reservations with small towns and scattered population. The area has a history of uranium exploration and mining, with two inactive uranium mines on the Spokane Indian Reservation and one smaller inactive mine on the outskirts of Spokane. Historical (1977–2016) uranium in groundwater concentration data were used to describe and illustrate the general occurrence and distribution of uranium in groundwater, as well as to identify data deficiencies. Uranium concentrations were detected at greater than 1 microgram per liter (μg/L) in 60 percent of the 2,382 historical samples (from wells and springs). Uranium concentrations ranged from less than 1 to

  11. Adsorption property of Br-PADAP-impregnated multiwall carbon nanotubes towards uranium and its performance in the selective separation and determination of uranium in different environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamirchi, Ramzanali; Hosseini-Bandegharaei, Ahmad; Alahabadi, Ahmad; Sivamani, Selvaraju; Rahmani-Sani, Abolfazl; Shahryari, Taher; Anastopoulos, Ioannis; Miri, Mohammad; Tran, Hai Nguyen

    2018-04-15

    A newer efficient U(VI) ion adsorbent was synthesized by impregnating Br-PADAP [2-(5-Bromo-2-pyridylazo)-5-(diethylamino)phenol] onto multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The effects of various operation conditions on uranium adsorption (i.e., pH contact time, temperature, and initial uranium concentration) were systematically evaluated using batch experiments. The results indicated that the uranium adsorption on modified MWNCTs (5.571 × 10 -3 g/mg × min) reached faster equilibrium than that on pristine MWNCTs (4.832 × 10 -3 g/mg × min), reflecting the involvement of appropriate functional groups of Br-PADAP on the chelating ion-exchange mechanism of U(VI) adsorption. Modified MWNCTs (83.4mg/g) exhibited significantly higher maximum Langmuir adsorption capacity than pristine MWNCTs (15.1mg/g). Approximately 99% of uranium adsorbed onto modified MWNCTs can be desorbed by 2.5mL of 1M HNO 3 solution. Therefore, Br-PADAP-modified MWNCTs can server as a promising adsorbent for efficient uranium adsorption applications in water treatment. Subsequently, the proposed solid-phase extraction (using a mini-column packed with Br-PADAP/MWCNT) was successfully utilized for analysing trace uranium levels by the ICP-AES method in different environmental samples with a pre-concentration factor of 300-fold. The coexistence of other ions demonstrated an insignificant interference on the separative pre-concentration of uranium. the detection limit was recognized as 0.14μg/L, and the relative standard deviation was approximately 3.3% (n = 7). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Drawing of uranium in γ phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stohr, J.A.

    1955-01-01

    It describes the study of working and drawing of uranium in γ phase. In a first part, the forgeable characteristics of uranium metal in the three different phases (α, β and γ) are compared by using BASTIEN-PORTEVIN method. The different experiments are testing the behaviour metal in each phase under different stresses and a temperature gradient as slow and shock traction, slow and shock compression, resilience, flexibility. Results show that optimum conditions for uranium drawing is uranium in phase γ. In a second part, it described the drawing method and process. The uranium rods obtained by this technique are of very good quality. In addition, the material wear is very low which permits a low production cost. Finally, the uranium rod physical properties are studied. (M.P.)

  13. The manufacturing of depleted uranium biological shield components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metelkin, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    The unique combination of the physical and mechanical properties of uranium made it possible to manufacture biological shield components of transport package container (TPC) for transportation nuclear power plant irradiated fuel and radionuclides of radiation diagnostic instruments. Protective properties are substantially dependent on the nature radionuclide composition of uranium, that why I recommended depleted uranium after radiation chemical processing. Depleted uranium biological shield (DUBS) has improved specific mass-size characteristics compared to a shield made of lead, steel or tungsten. Technological achievements in uranium casting and machining made it possible to manufacture DUBS components of TPC up to 3 tons of mass and up to 2 metres of the maximum size. (authors)

  14. An unusual feature of uranium ore from Domiasiat, Meghalaya: presence of water soluble uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, A.K.; Padmanabhan, N.P.H.; Sivaramakrishnan, K.; Krishna Rao, N.

    1993-01-01

    An unusual feature of the recently discovered sandstone-type uranium deposit in Domiasiat is the presence of appreciable amount of water soluble uranium. With normal tap water at its natural pH (7.5-7.8), upto 35% of the uranium in the ore was found to be soluble during agitation in the different samples. Presence of other ions in appreciable quantities particularly SO 4 -2 Cl - and Fe +3 appear to influence the dissolution. Percolation experiments give terminal solubilization of upto 58%, but the instantaneous uranium concentration in the percolating water attains its maximum within the first few minutes of contact. A detailed study on the chemistry of uranium dissolution may throw light on the physico-chemical controls of localization of uranium in the deposit. (author). 7 refs., 3 tabs., 4 tabs

  15. Development of on-line uranium enrichment monitor of gaseous UF6 for uranium enrichment plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Xuesheng; Liu Guorong; Jin Huimin; Zhao Yonggang; Li Jinghuai; Hao Xueyuan; Ying Bin; Yu Zhaofei

    2013-01-01

    An on-line enrichment monitor was developed to measure the enrichment of UF 6 , flowing through the processing pipes in uranium enrichment plant. A Nal (Tl) detector was used to measure the count rates of the 185.7 keV γ-ray emitted from 235 U, and the total quantity of uranium was determined from thermodynamic characteristics of gaseous uranium hexafluoride. The results show that the maximum relative standard deviation is less than 1% when the measurement time is 120 s or more and the pressure is more than 2 kPa in the measurement chamber. Uranium enrichment of gaseous uranium hexafluoride in the output end of cascade can be monitored continuously by using the device. It should be effective for nuclear materials accountability verifications and materials balance verification at uranium enrichment plant. (authors)

  16. Radiation damage of metal uranium; Radijaciono ostecenje metalnog urana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihajlovic, A [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1965-11-15

    This report is concerned with the role of dispersion second phase in uranium and burnup rate. The role of dispersion phases in radiation stability of metal uranium was studies by three methods: variation of electric conductivity dependent on the neutron flux and temperature of pure uranium for different states of dispersion second phase; influence of dispersion phase on the radiation creep; transmission electron microscopy of fresh and irradiated uranium.

  17. Uranium recovering from slags generated in the metallic uranium by magnesiothermic reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fornarolo, F.; Carvalho, E.F. Urano de; Durazzo, M.; Riella, H.G.

    2008-01-01

    The Nuclear Fuel Center of IPEN/CNEN-SP has recent/y concluded a program for developing the fabrication technology of the nuclear fuel based on the U 3 Si 2 -Al dispersion, which is being used in the IEA-R1 research reactor. The uranium silicide (U 3 Si 2 ) fuel production starts with the uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) processing and uranium tetrafluoride (UF 4 ) precipitation. Then, the UF 4 is converted to metallic uranium by magnesiothermic reduction. The UF 4 reduction by magnesium generates MgF 2 slag containing considerable concentrations of uranium, which could reach 20 wt%. The uranium contained in that slag should be recovered and this work presents the results obtained in recovering the uranium from that slag. The uranium recovery is accomplished by acidic leaching of the calcined slag. The calcination transforms the metallic uranium in U 3 O 8 , promoting the pulverization of the pieces of metallic uranium and facilitating the leaching operation. As process variables, have been considered the nitric molar concentration, the acid excess regarding the stoichiometry and the leaching temperature. As result, the uranium recovery reached a 96% yield. (author)

  18. Uranium - what role

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grey, T.; Gaul, J.; Crooks, P.; Robotham, R.

    1980-01-01

    Opposing viewpoints on the future role of uranium are presented. Topics covered include the Australian Government's uranium policy, the status of nuclear power around the world, Australia's role as a uranium exporter and problems facing the nuclear industry

  19. Brazilian uranium exploration program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, J.P.M.

    1981-01-01

    General information on Brazilian Uranium Exploration Program, are presented. The mineralization processes of uranium depoits are described and the economic power of Brazil uranium reserves is evaluated. (M.C.K.) [pt

  20. Uranium enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-11-01

    This paper analyzes under four different scenarios the adequacy of a $500 million annual deposit into a fund to pay for the cost of cleaning up the Department of Energy's (DOE) three aging uranium enrichment plants. These plants are located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Paducah, Kentucky; and Portsmouth, Ohio. In summary the following was found: A fixed annual $500 million deposit made into a cleanup fund would not be adequate to cover total expected cleanup costs, nor would it be adequate to cover expected decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) costs. A $500 million annual deposit indexed to an inflation rate would likely be adequate to pay for all expected cleanup costs, including D and D costs, remedial action, and depleted uranium costs

  1. Uranium production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spriggs, M.

    1980-01-01

    The balance between uranium supply and demand is examined. Should new resources become necessary, some unconventional sources which could be considered include low-grade extensions to conventional deposits, certain types of intrusive rock, tuffs, and lake and sea-bed sediments. In addition there are large but very low grade deposits in carbonaceous shales, granites, and seawater. The possibility of recovery is discussed. Programmes of research into the feasibility of extraction of uranium from seawater, as a by-product from phosphoric acid production, and from copper leach solutions, are briefly discussed. Other possible sources are coal, old mine dumps and tailings, the latter being successfully exploited commercially in South Africa. The greatest constraints on increased development of U from lower grade sources are economics and environmental impact. It is concluded that apart from U as a by-product from phosphate, other sources are unlikely to contribute much to world requirements in the foreseeable future. (U.K.)

  2. Purification process of uranium hexafluoride containing traces of plutonium fluoride and/or neptunium fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubert, J.; Bethuel, L.; Carles, M.

    1983-01-01

    In this process impure uranium hexafluoride is contacted with a metallic fluoride chosen in the group containing lead fluoride PbF 2 , uranium fluorides UFsub(4+x) (0 3 at a temperature such as plutonium and/or neptunium are reduced and pure uranium hexafluoride is recovered. Application is made to uranium hexafluoride purification in spent fuel reprocessing [fr

  3. Near-field high-temperature transport: Evidence from the genesis of the Osamu Utsumi uranium mine, Pocos de Caldas alkaline complex, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cathles, L.M.; Shea, M.E.

    1990-01-01

    The chemical, isotopic and mineralogical alteration which occurred during primary uranium ore deposition at the breccia pipe-hosted Osamu Utsumi mine, Pocos de Caldas, Brazil, was studied as a natural analogue for near-field radionuclide migration. Chemical and isotopic alteration models were combined with finite difference models of the convective cooling of caldera intrusives. Application of the chemical models successfully used to interpret mineralization and alteration at the Osamu Utsumi mine to the hypothetical waste repository shows that even in a worst case scenario (waste emplaced in a permeable host rock with no measures taken to inhibit flow through the repository), the amount of hydrothermal alteration in the hypothetical repository will be about 0.1% of that in the breccia pipe at the Osamu Utsumi mine. Assuming no barriers to uranium mobility, uranium precipitation above the hypothetical repository would be 0.05 ppm (rather than 50 ppm), hydrothermal alteration 0.03 wt.% (rather than 30 wt.%), etc. The analysis indicates that mineralogical alteration is extremely sensitive to thermodynamic data. Prediction of mineralogical alteration (which may be necessary to predict the migration of radionuclides other than uranium, for example) probably cannot be based directly on even very carefully collected laboratory thermodynamic data. Mineralogical complexities of the system, as well as database uncertainties, will require calibration of the thermodynamic framework against mineralogical alteration observed in the laboratory or field by procedures briefly described. (au)

  4. Corium Oxidation at Temperatures Above 2000 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagrman, Donald L.; Rempe, Joy L.

    2001-01-01

    A mechanistic model, based on a quasi-equilibrium analysis of oxidation reactions, is proposed for predicting high-temperature corium oxidation. The analysis suggests that oxide forming on the surface of corium containing uranium, zirconium, and iron is similar to the oxides formed on zirconium and uranium as long as there is a small percentage of unoxidized zirconium or uranium in the metallic phase. This is because of the higher affinity of zirconium and uranium for oxygen. Hence, oxidation rates and heat production rates are similar to (U,Zr) compounds until nearly all the uranium and zirconium in the corium oxidizes. Oxidation rates after this point are predicted to be similar to those implied by the oxide thickness present when the forming oxide ceases to be protective, and heat generation rates should be similar to those implied by iron oxidation, i.e., ∼4% of the zirconium oxidation heating rate.The maximum atomic ratio of unoxidized iron to unoxidized liquid zirconium plus uranium for the formation of a solid protective oxide below 2800 K is estimated for a temperature, T (in Kelvin), as follows:(unoxidized iron)/(unoxidized zirconium + turanium) = (1/28){5.7/exp[-(147 061 + 12.08T log(T) - 61.03T - 0.000555T 2 /1.986T)]} 1/2 .As long as this limit is not exceeded, either zirconium or uranium metal oxidation rates and heating describe the corium oxidation rate. If this limit is exceeded, diffusion of steam to the corium surface will limit the oxidation rate, and linear time-dependent growth of a nonprotective, mostly FeO, layer will occur below the protective (Zr,U) O 2 scale. When this happens, the oxidation should be at the constant rate given by the thickness of the protective layer. Heat generation should be similar to that of iron oxidation

  5. Corium Oxidation at Temperatures Above 2000 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagrman, Donald Lee; Rempe, Joy Lynn

    2001-02-01

    A mechanistic model, based on a quasi-equilibrium analysis of oxidation reactions, is proposed for predicting high-temperature corium oxidation. The analysis suggests that oxide forming on the surface of corium containing uranium, zirconium, and iron is similar to the oxides formed on zirconium and uranium as long as there is a small percentage of unoxidized zirconium or uranium in the metallic phase. This is because of the higher affinity of zirconium and uranium for oxygen. Hence, oxidation rates and heat production rates are similar to (U,Zr) compounds until nearly all the uranium and zirconium in the corium oxidizes. Oxidation rates after this point are predicted to be similar to those implied by the oxide thickness present when the forming oxide ceases to be protective, and heat generation rates should be similar to those implied by iron oxidation, i.e., ~4% of the zirconium oxidation heating rate. The maximum atomic ratio of unoxidized iron to unoxidized liquid zirconium plus uranium for the formation of a solid protective oxide below 2800 K is estimated for a temperature, T (in Kelvin), as follows: (unoxidized iron)/(unoxidized zirconium + turanium) = (1/28){5.7/exp[-(147 061 + 12.08T log(T) - 61.03T - 0.000555T2/1.986T)]}1/2. As long as this limit is not exceeded, either zirconium or uranium metal oxidation rates and heating describe the corium oxidation rate. If this limit is exceeded, diffusion of steam to the corium surface will limit the oxidation rate, and linear time-dependent growth of a nonprotective, mostly FeO, layer will occur below the protective (Zr,U) O2 scale. When this happens, the oxidation should be at the constant rate given by the thickness of the protective layer. Heat generation should be similar to that of iron oxidation.

  6. Dissolution experiments of unirradiated uranium dioxide pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ollila, K.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the dissolution rate of uranium from unirradiated uranium dioxide pellets in deionized water and natural groundwater. Moreover, the solubility limit of uranium in natural groundwater was measured. Two different temperatures, 25 and 60 deg C were used. The low oxygen content of deep groundwater was simulated. The dissolution rate of uranium varied from 10 -7 to 10 -8 g cm -2 d -1 . The rate in reionized water was one order of magnitude lower than in groundwater. No great difference was observed between the natural groundwaters with different composition. Temperature seems to have effect on the dissolution rate. The solubility limit of uranium in natural groundwater in reducing conditions, at 25 deg C, varied from 20 to 600 μg/l and in oxidizing conditions, at 60 deg C, from 4 to 17 mg/l

  7. Study of ammonia synthesis over uranium catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spitsyn, V.I.; Erofeev, B.V.; Mikhajlenko, I.E.; Gorelkin, I.I.; Ivanov, L.S.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of induced radiactivity and chemical composition of uranium catalysts on their catalytic activity in the ammonia synthesis reaction has been studied. The catalyst samples comprise pieces of metal uranium and chip irradiated in nuclear reactor by the 4.3x10 16 n/cm 2 integral flux of slow neutrons. Studies of catalytic activity was carried out at 1 atm and 340-510 deg C when stoichiometric nitrogen-hydrogen mixture passed through the following installation. At different temperatures uranium nitrides of different composition are shown to be formed. Uranium nitrides with the composition close to UN 2 are the samples with the highest catalYtic activity. The reduction of catalytic activity of uranium catalysts with the increased temperature of their formation above 400 deg C is explained by low catalytic activity of forming UNsub(1.7) in comparison with UN 2 . Catalytic properties of irradiated and nonirradiated samples do not differ from one another

  8. Uranium enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-08-01

    This paper reports that in 1990 the Department of Energy began a two-year project to illustrate the technical and economic feasibility of a new uranium enrichment technology-the atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) process. GAO believes that completing the AVLIS demonstration project will provide valuable information about the technical viability and cost of building an AVLIS plant and will keep future plant construction options open. However, Congress should be aware that DOE still needs to adequately demonstrate AVLIS with full-scale equipment and develop convincing cost projects. Program activities, such as the plant-licensing process, that must be completed before a plant is built, could take many years. Further, an updated and expanded uranium enrichment analysis will be needed before any decision is made about building an AVLIS plant. GAO, which has long supported legislation that would restructure DOE's uranium enrichment program as a government corporation, encourages DOE's goal of transferring AVLIS to the corporation. This could reduce the government's financial risk and help ensure that the decision to build an AVLIS plant is based on commercial concerns. DOE, however, has no alternative plans should the government corporation not be formed. Further, by curtailing a planned public access program, which would have given private firms an opportunity to learn about the technology during the demonstration project, DOE may limit its ability to transfer AVLIS to the private sector

  9. Derived enriched uranium market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutkowski, E.

    1996-01-01

    The potential impact on the uranium market of highly enriched uranium from nuclear weapons dismantling in the Russian Federation and the USA is analyzed. Uranium supply, conversion, and enrichment factors are outlined for each country; inventories are also listed. The enrichment component and conversion components are expected to cause little disruption to uranium markets. The uranium component of Russian derived enriched uranium hexafluoride is unresolved; US legislation places constraints on its introduction into the US market

  10. Solid phase extraction of uranium(VI) onto benzoylthiourea-anchored activated carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yongsheng; Liu Chunxia; Feng Miao; Chen Zhen; Li Shuqiong; Tian Gan; Wang Li; Huang Jingbo; Li Shoujian

    2010-01-01

    A new solid phase extractant selective for uranium(VI) based on benzoylthiourea anchored to activated carbon was developed via hydroxylation, amidation and reaction with benzoyl isothiocyanate in sequence. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and total element analysis proved that benzoylthiourea had been successfully grafted to the surface of the activated carbon, with a loading capacity of 1.2 mmol benzoylthiourea per gram of activated carbon. The parameters that affect the uranium(VI) sorption, such as contact time, solution pH, initial uranium(VI) concentration, adsorbent dose and temperature, have been investigated. Results have been analyzed by Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm; the former was more suitable to describe the sorption process. The maximum sorption capacity (82 mg/g) for uranium(VI) was obtained at experimental conditions. The rate constant for the uranium sorption by the as-synthesized extractant was 0.441 min -1 from the first order rate equation. Thermodynamic parameters (ΔH 0 = -46.2 kJ/mol; ΔS 0 = -98.0 J/mol K; ΔG 0 = -17.5 kJ/mol) showed the adsorption of an exothermic process and spontaneous nature, respectively. Additional studies indicated that the benzoylthiourea-anchored activated carbon (BT-AC) selectively sorbed uranyl ions in the presence of competing ions, Na + , Co 2+ , Sr 2+ , Cs + and La 3+ .

  11. Solid phase extraction of uranium(VI) onto benzoylthiourea-anchored activated carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Yongsheng; Liu Chunxia; Feng Miao; Chen Zhen; Li Shuqiong; Tian Gan; Wang Li; Huang Jingbo [College of Chemistry, Sichuan University, 29 Wangjiang Lu, Chengdu, 610064, Sichuan (China); Li Shoujian, E-mail: sjli000616@scu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Sichuan University, 29 Wangjiang Lu, Chengdu, 610064, Sichuan (China)

    2010-04-15

    A new solid phase extractant selective for uranium(VI) based on benzoylthiourea anchored to activated carbon was developed via hydroxylation, amidation and reaction with benzoyl isothiocyanate in sequence. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and total element analysis proved that benzoylthiourea had been successfully grafted to the surface of the activated carbon, with a loading capacity of 1.2 mmol benzoylthiourea per gram of activated carbon. The parameters that affect the uranium(VI) sorption, such as contact time, solution pH, initial uranium(VI) concentration, adsorbent dose and temperature, have been investigated. Results have been analyzed by Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm; the former was more suitable to describe the sorption process. The maximum sorption capacity (82 mg/g) for uranium(VI) was obtained at experimental conditions. The rate constant for the uranium sorption by the as-synthesized extractant was 0.441 min{sup -1} from the first order rate equation. Thermodynamic parameters ({Delta}H{sup 0} = -46.2 kJ/mol; {Delta}S{sup 0} = -98.0 J/mol K; {Delta}G{sup 0} = -17.5 kJ/mol) showed the adsorption of an exothermic process and spontaneous nature, respectively. Additional studies indicated that the benzoylthiourea-anchored activated carbon (BT-AC) selectively sorbed uranyl ions in the presence of competing ions, Na{sup +}, Co{sup 2+}, Sr{sup 2+}, Cs{sup +} and La{sup 3+}.

  12. Uranium industry annual, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    Uranium industry data collected in the EIA-858 survey provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of annual activities of the industry and include some information about industry plans over the next several years. This report consists of two major sections. The first addresses uranium raw materials activities and covers the following topics: exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment. The second major section is concerned with the following uranium marketing activities: uranium purchase commitments, uranium prices, procurement arrangements, uranium imports and exports, enrichment services, inventories, secondary market activities utility market requirements and related topics

  13. Uranium Industry. Annual 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence, M.S.S.

    1985-01-01

    This report provides a statistical description of activities of the US uranium industry during 1984 and includes a statistical profile of the status of the industry at the end of 1984. It is based on the results of an Energy Information Administration (EIA) survey entitled ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey'' (Form EIA-858). The principal findings of the survey are summarized under two headings - Uranium Raw Materials Activities and Uranium Marketing Activities. The first heading covers exploration and development, uranium resources, mine and mill production, and employment. The second heading covers uranium deliveries and delivery commitments, uranium prices, foreign trade in uranium, inventories, and other marketing activities. 32 figs., 48 tabs

  14. Thermal stress relieving of dilute uranium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckelmeyer, K.H.

    1981-01-01

    The kinetics of thermal stress relieving of uranium - 2.3 wt % niobium, uranium - 2.0 wt % molybdenum, and uranium - 0.75 wt % titanium are reported and discussed. Two temperature regimes of stress relieving are observed. In the low temperature regime (T 0 C) the process appears to be controlled by an athermal microplasticity mechanism which can be completely suppressed by prior age hardening. In the high temperature regime (300 0 C 0 C) the process appears to be controlled by a classical diffusional creep mechanism which is strongly dependent on temperature and time. Stress relieving is accelerated in cases where it occurs simultaneously with age hardening. The potential danger of residual stress induced stress corrosion cracking of uranium alloys is discussed

  15. Mise en solution et précipitation de l'uranium et du thorium dans les conditions de moyenne et haute température (résumé Solution and Precipitation of Uranium and Thorium under Average and High-Temperature (Summary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreau M.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Les études tant analytiques qu'expérimentales réalisées au cours des vingt dernières années ont bien montré le rôle joué par les complexes d'uranylcarbonates dans le transport de l'uranium en milieu hydrothermal oxydant ou faiblement réducteur. Les travaux expérimentaux actuels sur la mobilité de U et Th, à haute température et haute pression, montrent la très grande différence de solubilité entre UO2 et ThO2, comme l'influence des ions complexants et celles de fO2 et aH+. Ces résultats expérimentaux sont comparés aux données recueillies sur les leucogranites et les granites calcoalcalins (France et divers gisements ou anomalies en uranium (Québec, Rössing, Madagascar, etc.. Dans la catazone U et Th précipitent sous forme de solutions solides d'uranothorianite dans les milieux déficitaires en silice, et sous forme d'uranothorite dans les granites et les syénites La précipitation d'uraninite non thorifère dans les leucogranites français s'explique d'abord par la faible concentration en thorium des solutions aqueuses durant la phase deutérique. Au cours du métamorphisme progressif on peut observer un retard dans la mobilisation de l'uranium en conditions relativement oxydantes, quand U est associé à Ti et OH. Dans le domaine mésozonal la brannérite stabilise l'uranium en présence de titane jusqu'à l'anatexie. Au-delà elle se dissocie en donnant de l'uraninite non thorifère et du rutile. Both analytic and experimental research done over the Iast twenty years has revealed the role played by uranylcarbonate complexes in the transfer of uranium in an oxidant or slightly reducing hydrothermal medium. Recent experimental research on the mobility of U and Th, at high temperature and high pressure, shows the great difference in solubility between UO2 and ThO2, like the influence of complexing ions and of fO2 and aH+. These experimental findings are compared to data gathered on leucogranites and colcoalkaline granites

  16. Granite-related hypothermal uranium mineralization in South China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, X.; Wu, J.; Pan, J.; Zhu, M.

    2014-01-01

    As one of the important geological types, granite-related uranium deposits account for about 29% of the total discovered natural uranium resources in China. Most of the granite-related uranium deposits located in Taoshan - Zhuguang uranium metallogenic belt, South China. In addition to the typical pitchblende vein-type uranium mineralization of epithermal metallogenic system, a new type of granite-related uranium mineralization with characteristics of hypothermal matallogenic system was discovered in South China by current studies. However, hypothermal is contact thermal to epithermal mineralization, and not the conventional intrusive high temperature mineralization. Hypothermal uranium mineralization is presented by disseminated uraninite or pitchblende stockwork in fissures in granites normally with extensive alkaline alteration. The high temperature mineral assemblage of uraninite associate with scheelite and tourmaline was identified in hypothermal uranium mineralization. Fluid inclusion studies on this type mineralization indicated the middle to high temperature (>250℃) mineralization with the mixing evidence of ore forming solution derived from deep level, and the boiling and mixing of ore forming solution are regarded as the dominant mineralization mechanism for the precipitating of uranium. In contrast to the mineralization ages of 67 Ma to 87 Ma for typical pitchblende vein mineralization of epithermal metallogenic system, the mineralization age is older than 100 Ma for hypothermal uranium mineralization in granite. In the Shituling deposit, Xiazhuang uranium ore field, uraninite and pitchblende micro veins with extensive potassic alteration, chloritization and sericitization are hosted in fissures of Indo-Chinese epoch granites with the uranium mineralization age of 130 Ma to 138 Ma with a mineralization temperature of 290℃ to 330℃ indicated. Other examples sharing the similar characters of hypothermal uranium mineralization have been recognized in

  17. URANIUM MARKET TRENDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serghei MĂRGULESCU

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The recent UN Climate Talks in Paris have put forward the goal of limiting the global temperature rise to two degrees Celsius by the end of the century. This is providing a strong political base for expanding the nuclear power capacity because of the critical role that nuclear power plants play in the production of electricity without emissions of greenhouse gases. In all, more than a dozen countries get over 25% of their energy from nuclear power, with 437 nuclear reactors operating around the world. On top of that, there are another 71 reactors under construction, 165 planned, and 315 proposed. Global uranium demand is expected to rise 40% by 2025 and 81% by 2035. Mined supply of uranium will struggle to keep pace amid rising demand and falling secondary supplies. A cumulative supply deficit is expected to emerge by 2021 while 2016 marks a huge inflection point for the industry, beeing the first year that demand will actually exceed supplies, creating a 60,000-tonne shortfall by 2018. Over the next 10 years, we're going to see uranium prices more than double while the bull run will begin in earnest in 2016.

  18. Neoendemic ground beetles and private tree haplotypes: two independent proxies attest a moderate last glacial maximum summer temperature depression of 3-4 °C for the southern Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Joachim; Opgenoorth, Lars; Martens, Jochen; Miehe, Georg

    2011-07-01

    Previous findings regarding the Last Glacial Maximum LGM summer temperature depression (maxΔT in July) on the Tibetan Plateau varied over a large range (between 0 and 9 °C). Geologic proxies usually provided higher values than palynological data. Because of this wide temperature range, it was hitherto impossible to reconstruct the glacial environment of the Tibetan Plateau. Here, we present for the first time data indicating that local neoendemics of modern species groups are promising proxies for assessing the LGM temperature depression in Tibet. We used biogeographical and phylogenetic data from small, wingless edaphous ground beetles of the genus Trechus, and from private juniper tree haplotypes. The derived values of the maxΔT in July ranged between 3 and 4 °C. Our data support previous findings that were based on palynological data. At the same time, our data are spatially more specific as they are not bound to specific archives. Our study shows that the use of modern endemics enables a detailed mapping of local LGM conditions in High Asia. A prerequisite for this is an extensive biogeographical and phylogenetic exploration of the area and the inclusion of additional endemic taxa and evolutionary lines.

  19. Uranium price reporting systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-09-01

    This report describes the systems for uranium price reporting currently available to the uranium industry. The report restricts itself to prices for U 3 O 8 natural uranium concentrates. Most purchases of natural uranium by utilities, and sales by producers, are conducted in this form. The bulk of uranium in electricity generation is enriched before use, and is converted to uranium hexafluoride, UF 6 , prior to enrichment. Some uranium is traded as UF 6 or as enriched uranium, particularly in the 'secondary' market. Prices for UF 6 and enriched uranium are not considered directly in this report. However, where transactions in UF 6 influence the reported price of U 3 O 8 this influence is taken into account. Unless otherwise indicated, the terms uranium and natural uranium used here refer exclusively to U 3 O 8 . (author)

  20. Uranium Industry Annual, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry for the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and electric utility industries, and the public. The feature article, ''Decommissioning of US Conventional Uranium Production Centers,'' is included. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities including domestic uranium purchases, commitments by utilities, procurement arrangements, uranium imports under purchase contracts and exports, deliveries to enrichment suppliers, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and uranium for sale by domestic suppliers are presented in Chapter 2

  1. Uranium Industry Annual, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-28

    The Uranium Industry Annual provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry for the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and electric utility industries, and the public. The feature article, ``Decommissioning of US Conventional Uranium Production Centers,`` is included. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities including domestic uranium purchases, commitments by utilities, procurement arrangements, uranium imports under purchase contracts and exports, deliveries to enrichment suppliers, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and uranium for sale by domestic suppliers are presented in Chapter 2.

  2. Hot pressing of uranium nitride and mixed uranium plutonium nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, J.Y.

    1975-01-01

    The hot pressing characteristics of uranium nitride and mixed uranium plutonium nitride were studied. The utilization of computer programs together with the experimental technique developed in the present study may serve as a useful purpose of prediction and fabrication of advanced reactor fuel and other high temperature ceramic materials for the future. The densification of nitrides follow closely with a plastic flow theory expressed as: d rho/ dt = A/T(t) (1-rho) [1/1-(1-rho)/sup 2/3/ + B1n (1-rho)] The coefficients, A and B, were obtained from experiment and computer curve fitting. (8 figures) (U.S.)

  3. Provision by the uranium and uranium products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elagin, Yu.P.

    2005-01-01

    International uranium market is converted from the buyer market into the seller market. The prices of uranium are high and the market attempts to adapt to changing circumstances. The industry of uranium enrichment satisfies the increasing demands but should to increase ots capacities. On the whole the situation is not stable and every year may change the existing position [ru

  4. Magnetic-superexchange interactions of uranium(IV) chloride-addition complexes with amides, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyake, Chie; Hinatsu, Yukio; Imoto, Shosuke

    1983-01-01

    The magnetic susceptibilities of five cyclic amide (lactam)-addition complexes of uranium(IV) chloride were measured between room temperature and 2 K. Magnetic-exchange interaction was found only for N-methyl-substituted amide complexes, and a dimer structure was assumed for them on the basis of their chemical properties. Treating interdimer interaction with a molecular-field approximation, the magnetic susceptibilities were calculated to be in good agreement with the experimental results in the temperature region of the maxima in chi sub(A). The transmission of antiparallel spin coupling via the π orbitals of the bridging amide ligands is proposed to explain the strong intradimer superexchange interaction for the uranium(IV) chloride-amide complexes with the magnetic-susceptibility maximum. (author)

  5. Studies of the kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of uranium by dry and moist air. A model for determining the oxidation rate over a wide range of temperatures and water vapour pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGillivray, G.W. (Atomic Weapons Establishment, Aldermaston, Reading (United Kingdom)); Geeson, D.A. (Atomic Weapons Establishment, Aldermaston, Reading (United Kingdom)); Greenwood, R.C. (Atomic Weapons Establishment, Aldermaston, Reading (United Kingdom))

    1994-01-01

    The rate of oxidation of uranium metal by moist air has been measured at temperatures from 115 to 350 C and water vapour pressures from 0 to 47 kPa (350 Torr). From this and from previously reported data, a model has been developed which allows the rate of uranium oxidation to be calculated at any particular combination of temperature and water vapour pressure of interest, in the range 0-350 C and 0-101.3 kPa (760 Torr). The model is based on the assumption that the surface concentration of water determines the rate of reaction and that the adsorption of water onto the oxide follows a Langmuir type isotherm. Theoretical plots of rate as a function of water vapour pressure and Arrhenius plots derived from the model have been shown to be in good agreement with experimental data. The model assumes separate contributions to the overall observed rate from oxygen and water vapour. Surface studies have been carried out using SIMS (secondary ion mass spectrometry). Depth profiling of the oxide produced by isotopically labelled reagents ([sup 18]O[sub 2] and H[sup 18][sub 2]O), has shown that oxygen from both reactants is incorporated into the oxide layer in the ratio predicted by the kinetic model. This supports a mechanism in which oxygen and water vapour produce separate diffusing species (possibly O[sup 2-] and OH[sup -]). (orig.)

  6. Studies of the kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of uranium by dry and moist air A model for determining the oxidation rate over a wide range of temperatures and water vapour pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGillivray, G. W.; Geeson, D. A.; Greenwood, R. C.

    1994-01-01

    The rate of oxidation of uranium metal by moist air has been measured at temperatures from 115 to 350°C and water vapour pressures from 0 to 47 kPa (350 Torr). From this and from previously reported data, a model has been developed which allows the rate of uranium oxidation to be calculated at any particular combination of temperature and water vapour pressure of interest, in the range 0-350°C and 0-101.3 kPa (760 Torr). The model is based on the assumption that the surface concentration of water determines the rate of reaction and that the adsorption of water onto the oxide follows a Langmuir type isotherm. Theoretical plots of rate as a function of water vapour pressure and Arrhenius plots derived from the model have been shown to be in good agreement with experimental data. The model assumes separate contributions to the overall observed rate from oxygen and water vapour. Surface studies have been carried out using SIMS (secondary ion mass spectrometry). Depth profiling of the oxide produced by isotopically labelled reagents ( 18O 2 and H 218O), has shown that oxygen from both reactants is incorporated into the oxide layer in the ratio predicted by the kinetic model. This supports a mechanism in which oxygen and water vapour produce separate diffusing species (possibly O 2- and OH -).

  7. Uranium enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohrhauer, H.

    1982-01-01

    The separation of uranium isotopes in order to enrich the fuel for light water reactors with the light isotope U-235 is an important part of the nuclear fuel cycle. After the basic principals of isotope separation the gaseous diffusion and the centrifuge process are explained. Both these techniques are employed on an industrial scale. In addition a short review is given on other enrichment techniques which have been demonstrated at least on a laboratory scale. After some remarks on the present situation on the enrichment market the progress in the development and the industrial exploitation of the gas centrifuge process by the trinational Urenco-Centec organisation is presented. (orig.)

  8. Pyrophoricity of uranium in long-term storage environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solbrig, C.W.; Krsul, J.R.; Olsen, D.N.

    1994-01-01

    A corrosion cycle for uranium is postulated which can be used to assess whether a given storage situation might produce fire hazards and/or continual uranium corrosion. A significant reaction rate of uranium and moisture occurs at room temperature which produces uranium oxide and hydrogen. If the hydrogen cannot escape, it will react slowly with uranium to form uranium hydride. The hydride is pyrophoric at room temperature when exposed to air. Either the hydrogen or the hydride can produce a dangerous situation as demonstrated by two different incidents described here. Long-term corrosion will occur even if the normal precautions are taken as is demonstrated by the long-term storage of stainless steel clad uranium fuel plates. The major initiator of these problems is attributed to any moisture condensed on the metal or any brought in by the cover gas. The postulated corrosion cycle is used to suggest ways to circumvent these problems

  9. REMOVAL AND CONCENTRATION OF URANIUM FROM WASTE MINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizângela Augusta Santos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of leaching agents, such as sodium citrate and ammonium carbonate, were assessed for the extraction of uranium from one mining residue containing 0.25% U. Concentration techniques such as precipitation and ion exchange were employed to recover the uranium from the leaching liquor. Leaching results showed maximum uranium extraction of about 40% for both reagents. The use 10 mol L-1 NaOH to precipitate the uranium from the leach liquor leads to a recovery of 62%; what was considered not satisfactory. In view of this, resins were used to concentrate the uranium from the liquor and the metal loading obtained at pH 3.9 was higher for the resin DOWEX RPU, whose maximum loading maximum capacity was 148.3 mg g-1, compared to 126.9 mg g-1 presented by the resin IRA 910 U.

  10. Drawing of uranium in {gamma} phase; Filage de l'uranium en phase gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stohr, J A [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Chevigny, R [Conpagnie, Pechiney, 73 - Chambery (France)

    1955-07-01

    It describes the study of working and drawing of uranium in {gamma} phase. In a first part, the forgeable characteristics of uranium metal in the three different phases ({alpha}, {beta} and {gamma}) are compared by using BASTIEN-PORTEVIN method. The different experiments are testing the behaviour metal in each phase under different stresses and a temperature gradient as slow and shock traction, slow and shock compression, resilience, flexibility. Results show that optimum conditions for uranium drawing is uranium in phase {gamma}. In a second part, it described the drawing method and process. The uranium rods obtained by this technique are of very good quality. In addition, the material wear is very low which permits a low production cost. Finally, the uranium rod physical properties are studied. (M.P.)

  11. Drawing of uranium in {gamma} phase; Filage de l'uranium en phase gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stohr, J.A. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Chevigny, R. [Conpagnie, Pechiney, 73 - Chambery (France)

    1955-07-01

    It describes the study of working and drawing of uranium in {gamma} phase. In a first part, the forgeable characteristics of uranium metal in the three different phases ({alpha}, {beta} and {gamma}) are compared by using BASTIEN-PORTEVIN method. The different experiments are testing the behaviour metal in each phase under different stresses and a temperature gradient as slow and shock traction, slow and shock compression, resilience, flexibility. Results show that optimum conditions for uranium drawing is uranium in phase {gamma}. In a second part, it described the drawing method and process. The uranium rods obtained by this technique are of very good quality. In addition, the material wear is very low which permits a low production cost. Finally, the uranium rod physical properties are studied. (M.P.)

  12. Maximum Acceleration Recording Circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Coarsely digitized maximum levels recorded in blown fuses. Circuit feeds power to accelerometer and makes nonvolatile record of maximum level to which output of accelerometer rises during measurement interval. In comparison with inertia-type single-preset-trip-point mechanical maximum-acceleration-recording devices, circuit weighs less, occupies less space, and records accelerations within narrower bands of uncertainty. In comparison with prior electronic data-acquisition systems designed for same purpose, circuit simpler, less bulky, consumes less power, costs and analysis of data recorded in magnetic or electronic memory devices. Circuit used, for example, to record accelerations to which commodities subjected during transportation on trucks.

  13. Uranium, thorium and REE partitioning into sulfide liquids at high pressure and high temperature: Implications for reduced, S-rich planetary bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlers, A.; Wood, B. J.

    2017-12-01

    Based on models of the young solar nebula it is likely that the inner planets went through an early reduced phase of accretion with high metal/silicate ratio and low volatile element contents. Mercury is an existing example of a large planetary embryo with these characteristics but also with a very high S content. In order to investigate the geochemical evolution of Mercury-like bodies we experimentally determined the partitioning of lithophile elements (U, Th, Eu, Sm, Nd, Zr, La, Ce, Yb) between sulfide liquid, low-S metals and silicate melt at 1.5 GPa and 1400-2100˚C. Our results, when combined with those of Wohlers and Wood (2015) show that under highly reducing conditions (FeOsilicatemetal and FeO contents of the silicate may be understood in terms of exchange reactions: UO2 + 2FeS = 2FeO + US2silicate sulfide silicate sulfideHigh concentrations of FeSmetal and low FeO contents of the silicate melts drive the reaction to the right, yielding high US2 in the sulfide and high DU. A second effect which raises DU (and other lithophile D's) is the S content of the silicate melt. The latter increases rapidly at low FeO contents and reaches 11wt %. This greatly reduces the activity coefficient of FeO, displacing the reaction further to the right. At 1.5GPa and 1400˚C we obtain sulfide-silicate partitioning with DNd/DSm 1.4 and DTh 0.1DU. As temperature increases to 2100˚C, DNd/DSm declines to 1.0 and DTh/DU increases to 0.3. We estimated the effects of accreting a reduced sulfur-rich component (with FeS core) added to early Earth. The results at 1400˚C imply the possibility of a significant ( 11ppm) 142Nd anomaly in silicate Earth and the addition of >8 ppb U to the core, but require an unreasonably high Th/U of silicate Earth (4.54). Results at 2100˚C lead to a 142Nd anomaly of 0 but addition of such a reduced sulfur-rich body could add up to 10 ppb of U to the core, together with 21 ppb Th. This combination would generate 3 TW of the energy required for the

  14. Uranium conversion; Urankonvertering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliver, Lena; Peterson, Jenny; Wilhelmsen, Katarina [Swedish Defence Research Agency (FOI), Stockholm (Sweden)

    2006-03-15

    FOI, has performed a study on uranium conversion processes that are of importance in the production of different uranium compounds in the nuclear industry. The same conversion processes are of interest both when production of nuclear fuel and production of fissile material for nuclear weapons are considered. Countries that have nuclear weapons ambitions, with the intention to produce highly enriched uranium for weapons purposes, need some degree of uranium conversion capability depending on the uranium feed material available. This report describes the processes that are needed from uranium mining and milling to the different conversion processes for converting uranium ore concentrate to uranium hexafluoride. Uranium hexafluoride is the uranium compound used in most enrichment facilities. The processes needed to produce uranium dioxide for use in nuclear fuel and the processes needed to convert different uranium compounds to uranium metal - the form of uranium that is used in a nuclear weapon - are also presented. The production of uranium ore concentrate from uranium ore is included since uranium ore concentrate is the feed material required for a uranium conversion facility. Both the chemistry and principles or the different uranium conversion processes and the equipment needed in the processes are described. Since most of the equipment that is used in a uranium conversion facility is similar to that used in conventional chemical industry, it is difficult to determine if certain equipment is considered for uranium conversion or not. However, the chemical conversion processes where UF{sub 6} and UF{sub 4} are present require equipment that is made of corrosion resistant material.

  15. Process for preparing sintered uranium dioxide nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, R.E.

    1975-01-01

    Uranium dioxide is prepared for use as fuel in nuclear reactors by sintering it to the desired density at a temperature less than 1300 0 C in a chemically controlled gas atmosphere comprised of at least two gases which in equilibrium provide an oxygen partial pressure sufficient to maintain the uranium dioxide composition at an oxygen/uranium ratio of at least 2.005 at the sintering temperature. 7 Claims, No Drawings

  16. Issues in uranium availability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schanz, J.J. Jr.; Adams, S.S.; Gordon, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this publication is to show the process by which information about uranium reserves and resources is developed, evaluated and used. The following three papers in this volume have been abstracted and indexed for the Energy Data Base: (1) uranium reserve and resource assessment; (2) exploration for uranium in the United States; (3) nuclear power, the uranium industry, and resource development

  17. Australian uranium industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warner, R K

    1976-04-01

    Various aspects of the Australian uranium industry are discussed including the prospecting, exploration and mining of uranium ores, world supply and demand, the price of uranium and the nuclear fuel cycle. The market for uranium and the future development of the industry are described.

  18. Irradiated uranium reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gal, I.

    1961-12-01

    Task concerned with reprocessing of irradiated uranium covered the following activities: implementing the method and constructing the cell for uranium dissolving; implementing the procedure for extraction of uranium, plutonium and fission products from radioactive uranium solutions; studying the possibilities for using inorganic ion exchangers and adsorbers for separation of U, Pu and fission products

  19. Uranium processing and properties

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Covers a broad spectrum of topics and applications that deal with uranium processing and the properties of uranium Offers extensive coverage of both new and established practices for dealing with uranium supplies in nuclear engineering Promotes the documentation of the state-of-the-art processing techniques utilized for uranium and other specialty metals

  20. Recovering uranium from phosphates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergeret, M [Compagnie de Produits Chimiques et Electrometallurgiques Pechiney-Ugine Kuhlmann, 75 - Paris (France)

    1981-06-01

    Processes for the recovery of the uranium contained in phosphates have today become competitive with traditional methods of working uranium sources. These new possibilities will make it possible to meet more rapidly any increases in the demand for uranium: it takes ten years to start working a new uranium deposit, but only two years to build a recovery plant.

  1. Uranium enrichment plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagne, R.W.; Thomas, D.C.

    1977-01-01

    The status of existing uranium enrichment contracts in the US is reviewed and expected natural uranium requirements for existing domestic uranium enrichment contracts are evaluated. Uncertainty in natural uranium requirements associated with requirements-type and fixed-commitment type contracts is discussed along with implementation of variable tails assay

  2. Uranium enrichment plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, D.C.; Gagne, R.W.

    1978-01-01

    The following topics are covered: the status of the Government's existing uranium enrichment services contracts, natural uranium requirements based on the latest contract information, uncertainty in predicting natural uranium requirements based on uranium enrichment contracts, and domestic and foreign demand assumed in enrichment planning

  3. Some characteristics of uranium oxides in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Guoqing; Wang, Aizhen; Gu, Qifang; Zhang, Jingyi; Zhang, Zhaoming; Huang, Yuzhu

    1981-01-01

    According to the analytical data of seventy-seven samples from several tens of uranium ore deposits and occurrences in China, chemical properties, cell dimensions and reflectance of uranium oxides are studied. Chemical properties of uranium oxides from different types of uranium ore deposits and the influence of various mineralization ages and hosts on the compositions of uranium oxides are presented. The influence of these factor such as mineralization temperatures, the compositions of hosts and geochemical background on the compositions of uranium oxides are evident. Lead in proterozoic uranium oxides is relatively enriched by the decay of radio-active elements. Cell dimensions have positive correlation with mineralization ages, formation temperatures and concentration of rare earths and Pb, and negative correlation with the oxidation coefficient. The cell size is an exponential function of the content in CaO. It is suggested that among the factors of influence the most important is the mineralization temperature. The size of ionic radius of elements substituted U 4 + and autooxidation of U 4 + during the process of the decay of radioactive elements are of secondary importance. The reflectance is independent of the content of CaO and SiO 2 . The reflectance is positively correlative with the cell size and negatively correlative with oxidation coefficient. The relation between the reflectance and the content of PbO is logarithmic

  4. Uranium industry annual 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-11-01

    This report consists of two major sections. The first addresses uranium raw materials activities and covers the following topics: exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment. The second major section is concerned with the following uranium marketing activities: uranium purchase commitments, uranium prices, procurement arrangements, uranium imports and exports, enrichment services, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and related topics. A glossary and appendices are included to assist the reader in interpreting the substantial array of statistical data in this report and to provide background information about the survey

  5. Uranium industry framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riley, K.

    2008-01-01

    The global uranium market is undergoing a major expansion due to an increase in global demand for uranium, the highest uranium prices in the last 20 years and recognition of the potential greenhouse benefits of nuclear power. Australia holds approximately 27% of the world's uranium resources (recoverable at under US$80/kg U), so is well placed to benefit from the expansion in the global uranium market. Increasing exploration activity due to these factors is resulting in the discovery and delineation of further high grade uranium deposits and extending Australia's strategic position as a reliable and safe supplier of low cost uranium.

  6. Inhalation of uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuart, B.O.; Jackson, P.O.

    1975-01-01

    In previous studies the biological dispositions of individual long-lived alpha members of the uranium chain ( 238 U, 234 U and 230 Th) were determined during and following repeated inhalation exposures of rats to pitchblende (26 percent U 3 O 8 ) ore. Although finely dispersed ore in secular equilibrium was inhaled, 230 Th/ 234 U radioactivity ratios in the lungs rose from 1.0 to 2.5 during 8 weeks of exposures and increased to 9.2 by four months after cessation of exposures. Marked non-equilibrium levels were also found in the tracheobronchial lymph nodes, kidneys, liver, and femur. Daily exposures of beagle dogs to high levels of this ore for 8 days resulted in lung 230 Th/ 234 U ratios of >2.0. Daily exposures of dogs to lower levels (0.1 mg/1) for 6 months, with sacrifice 15 months later, resulted in lung and thoracic lymph node 230 Th/ 234 U ratios ranging from 3.6 to 9 and nearly 7, respectively. The lungs of hamsters exposed to carnotite (4 percent U 3 O 8 ) ore in current lifespan studies show 230 Th/ 234 U ratios as high as 2.0 during daily inhalation of this ore in secular equilibrium. Beagle dogs sacrificed after several years of daily inhalations of the same carnotite ore plus radon daughters also showed marked non-equilibrium ratios of 230 Th/ 234 U, ranging from 5.6 to 7.4 in lungs and 6.2 to 9.1 in thoracic lymph nodes. This pattern of higher retention of 230 Th than 234 U in lungs, thoracic lymph nodes, and other tissues is thus consistent for two types of uranium ore among several species and suggests a reevaluation of maximum permissible air concentrations of ore, currently based only on uranium content

  7. Maximum Quantum Entropy Method

    OpenAIRE

    Sim, Jae-Hoon; Han, Myung Joon

    2018-01-01

    Maximum entropy method for analytic continuation is extended by introducing quantum relative entropy. This new method is formulated in terms of matrix-valued functions and therefore invariant under arbitrary unitary transformation of input matrix. As a result, the continuation of off-diagonal elements becomes straightforward. Without introducing any further ambiguity, the Bayesian probabilistic interpretation is maintained just as in the conventional maximum entropy method. The applications o...

  8. Maximum power demand cost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biondi, L.

    1998-01-01

    The charging for a service is a supplier's remuneration for the expenses incurred in providing it. There are currently two charges for electricity: consumption and maximum demand. While no problem arises about the former, the issue is more complicated for the latter and the analysis in this article tends to show that the annual charge for maximum demand arbitrarily discriminates among consumer groups, to the disadvantage of some [it

  9. Adsorption of uranium on halloysite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilislioglu, A.; Bilgin, B.

    2002-01-01

    Adsorption of uranium (U(VI)) from aqueous solutions on halloysite type clay was studied as a function of amount of adsorbent, initial concentration and pH. The values of adsorption data were fitted to Freundlich, Langmuir and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) adsorption isotherms. The mean energy of adsorption was calculated as 5.91 kJ/mol from D-R adsorption isotherm. Lagergren and Bangham equation has been used for dynamic modelling of process and the rate constants of adsorption of uranium on halloysite type clay were calculated at 293, 313 and 333 K. In order to explain the mechanism of adsorption reaction, the rate constants were calculated at high and low uranium concentrations. Adsorption reaction was studied at 293, 303, 313, 323 and 333 K for halloysite type clay and also thermodynamic constants have been calculated. The results show that the adsorption reaction was endothermic and more spontaneous at high temperature. (orig.)

  10. Adsorption of uranium on halloysite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilislioglu, A.; Bilgin, B. [Istanbul Univ. (Turkey). Faculty of Engineering

    2002-07-01

    Adsorption of uranium (U(VI)) from aqueous solutions on halloysite type clay was studied as a function of amount of adsorbent, initial concentration and pH. The values of adsorption data were fitted to Freundlich, Langmuir and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) adsorption isotherms. The mean energy of adsorption was calculated as 5.91 kJ/mol from D-R adsorption isotherm. Lagergren and Bangham equation has been used for dynamic modelling of process and the rate constants of adsorption of uranium on halloysite type clay were calculated at 293, 313 and 333 K. In order to explain the mechanism of adsorption reaction, the rate constants were calculated at high and low uranium concentrations. Adsorption reaction was studied at 293, 303, 313, 323 and 333 K for halloysite type clay and also thermodynamic constants have been calculated. The results show that the adsorption reaction was endothermic and more spontaneous at high temperature. (orig.)

  11. Uranium exploration planning and strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.Y.; Tauchid, M.

    1991-01-01

    A country may decide to begin uranium exploration for any of the following three reasons: 1. To meet the needs of a domestic nuclear power programme; 2. To supply uranium as a commodity to the world market in order to earn foreign exchange; 3. To acquire national information on the country's mineral resource planning. In any of these cases, a country must make some basic decisions regarding the means and modes whereby the uranium exploration will be carried out - by national organizations exclusively; by state organizations in joint venture with outside interests by foreign interests under the control of national regulations. Most uranium exploration is carried out following an exploration strategy in which the programme is divided into a series of steps or stages. Each of the phases is designed to eliminate areas of low potential to contain uranium deposits, while focusing attention on areas of higher potential that will be explored in greater detail at higher cost in the subsequent phase. The methods used in each phase are selected to provide the maximum information at the minimum cost so that at the end of each phase a decision can be made whether to continue to the next phase of stop. Because uranium exploration is a high cost high risk activity, governments must make decisions at the outset whether they wish to carry our the work alone and whether they can support the costs involved, or whether they wish to attract foreign investors to help absorb the costs and therefore the risks. In either case, major policy decisions are required to be made to establish the legal and fiscal environment in which the programm will be carried out. (author). 4 refs, 4 figs

  12. Changes in Extreme Maximum Temperature Events and Population Exposure in China under Global Warming Scenarios of 1.5 and 2.0°C: Analysis Using the Regional Climate Model COSMO-CLM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Mingjin; Li, Xiucang; Sun, Hemin; Zhai, Jianqing; Jiang, Tong; Wang, Yanjun

    2018-02-01

    We used daily maximum temperature data (1986-2100) from the COSMO-CLM (COnsortium for Small-scale MOdeling in CLimate Mode) regional climate model and the population statistics for China in 2010 to determine the frequency, intensity, coverage, and population exposure of extreme maximum temperature events (EMTEs) with the intensity-area-duration method. Between 1986 and 2005 (reference period), the frequency, intensity, and coverage of EMTEs are 1330-1680 times yr-1, 31.4-33.3°C, and 1.76-3.88 million km2, respectively. The center of the most severe EMTEs is located in central China and 179.5-392.8 million people are exposed to EMTEs annually. Relative to 1986-2005, the frequency, intensity, and coverage of EMTEs increase by 1.13-6.84, 0.32-1.50, and 15.98%-30.68%, respectively, under 1.5°C warming; under 2.0°C warming, the increases are 1.73-12.48, 0.64-2.76, and 31.96%-50.00%, respectively. It is possible that both the intensity and coverage of future EMTEs could exceed the most severe EMTEs currently observed. Two new centers of EMTEs are projected to develop under 1.5°C warming, one in North China and the other in Southwest China. Under 2.0°C warming, a fourth EMTE center is projected to develop in Northwest China. Under 1.5 and 2.0°C warming, population exposure is projected to increase by 23.2%-39.2% and 26.6%-48%, respectively. From a regional perspective, population exposure is expected to increase most rapidly in Southwest China. A greater proportion of the population in North, Northeast, and Northwest China will be exposed to EMTEs under 2.0°C warming. The results show that a warming world will lead to increases in the intensity, frequency, and coverage of EMTEs. Warming of 2.0°C will lead to both more severe EMTEs and the exposure of more people to EMTEs. Given the probability of the increased occurrence of more severe EMTEs than in the past, it is vitally important to China that the global temperature increase is limited within 1.5°C.

  13. Reduction of uranium hexafluoride to uranium tetrafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, I.S.; Do, J.B.; Choi, Y.D.; Park, M.H.; Yun, H.H.; Kim, E.H.; Kim, Y.W.

    1982-01-01

    The single step continuous reduction of uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) to uranium tetrafluoride (UF 4 ) has been investigated. Heat required to initiate and maintain the reaction in the reactor is supplied by the highly exothermic reaction of hydrogen with a small amount of elemental fluorine which is added to the uranium hexafluoride stream. When gases uranium hexafluoride and hydrogen react in a vertical monel pipe reactor, the green product, UF 4 has 2.5g/cc in bulk density and is partly contaminated by incomplete reduction products (UF 5 ,U 2 F 9 ) and the corrosion product, presumably, of monel pipe of the reactor itself, but its assay (93% of UF 4 ) is acceptable for the preparation of uranium metal with magnesium metal. Remaining problems are the handling of uranium hexafluoride, which is easily clogging the flowmeter and gas feeding lines because of extreme sensitivity toward moisture, and a development of gas nozzel for free flow of uranium hexafluoride gas. (Author)

  14. Uranium - the world picture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, J.M.; Wright, W.J.

    1976-01-01

    The world resources of uranium and the future demand for uranium are discussed. The amount of uranium available depends on the price which users are prepared to pay for its recovery. As the price is increased, there is an incentive to recover uranium from lower grade or more difficult deposits. In view of this, attention is drawn to the development of the uranium industry in Australias

  15. Development of a high density fuel based on uranium-molybdenum alloys with high compatibility in high temperatures; Desenvolvimento de um combustivel de alta densidade a base das ligas uranio-molibdenio com alta compatibilidade em altas temperaturas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Fabio Branco Vaz de

    2008-07-01

    This work has as its objective the development of a high density and low enriched nuclear fuel based on the gamma-UMo alloys, for utilization where it is necessary satisfactory behavior in high temperatures, considering its utilization as dispersion. For its accomplishment, it was started from the analysis of the RERTR ('Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors') results and some theoretical works involving the fabrication of gamma-uranium metastable alloys. A ternary addition is proposed, supported by the properties of binary and ternary uranium alloys studied, having the objectives of the gamma stability enhancement and an ease to its powder fabrication. Alloys of uranium-molybdenum were prepared with 5 to 10% Mo addition, and 1 and 3% of ternary, over a gamma U7Mo binary base alloy. In all the steps of its preparation, the alloys were characterized with the traditional techniques, to the determination of its mechanical and structural properties. To provide a process for the alloys powder obtention, its behavior under hydrogen atmosphere were studied, in thermo analyser-thermo gravimeter equipment. Temperatures varied from the ambient up to 1000 deg C, and times from 15 minutes to 16 hours. The results validation were made in a semi-pilot scale, where 10 to 50 g of powders of some of the alloys studied were prepared, under static hydrogen atmosphere. Compatibility studies were conducted by the exposure of the alloys under oxygen and aluminum, to the verification of possible reactions by means of differential thermal analysis. The alloys were exposed to a constant heat up to 1000 deg C, and their performances were evaluated in terms of their reaction resistance. On the basis of the results, it was observed that ternary additions increases the temperatures of the reaction with aluminum and oxidation, in comparison with the gamma UMo binaries. A set of conditions to the hydration of the alloys were defined, more restrictive in terms of temperature

  16. Studies on tempering at different temperatures of the beta phase retained by water quenching in uranium-chromium alloys containing from 0,37 to 4 atoms of chromium percent (1963); Etude du revenu a differentes temperatures de la phase beta retenue par trempe a l'eau dans les alliages uranium-chrome contenant de 0,37 a 4 atomes pour cent de chrome (1963)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degois, M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1962-07-15

    The author made a systematic study of the annealing of the beta phase retained by water-quenching in uranium-chromium alloys of concentrations between 0.37 and 4 of chromium percent. It is shown that alloys containing less than 1 atom per cent are transformed at temperatures between room temperature and 250 deg. C according to a bainitic process involving activation energies of the order of 14,500 cal/mole. Alloys containing more than 1 at. per cent are transformed at temperature between 400 and 650 deg. C by way of a germination and growth process involving an activation energy of the order of 33,000 cal/mole. The limit of solubility of chromium in beta uranium plays a fundamental part in the transformations of the alloys. The TTT curves of beta {yields} alpha transformation were drawn by the use of a thermo-dilatometer of very low inertia. The transformation law may be expressed 1 x = exp. (kt){sup n}; x represents the degree of progression of the transformation, k a coefficient dependent on the temperature, and n an exponent depending only on the composition of the alloy. A micrographic and crystallographic study confirmed the results found by dilatometry; in particular it was possible to measure the progression rates of the transformation. (author) [French] L'auteur a fait une etude systematique du revenu de la phase beta retenue par trempe a l'eau dans les alliages uranium-chrome de teneurs comprises entre 0,37 et 4 atomes pour cent de chrome. Il a montre que les alliages qui contiennent moins de 1 atome pour cent de chrome se transforment aux temperatures comprises entre la temperature ordinaire et 250 deg. C selon un processus bainitique mettant en jeu des energies d'activatlon de l'ordre de 14500 cal/mole. Les alliages qui renferment plus de 1 atome pour cent de chrome se transforment aux temperatures comprises entre 400 et 650 deg. C suivant un processus de germination et croissance mettant en jeu une energie d'activation de l'ordre de -33000 cal/mole. La

  17. Crystal chemistry of iron in low-temperature chlorites, implications for geo-thermometry and the determination of redox paleo-conditions in uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rigault, Cecile

    2010-01-01

    In contexts of uranium deposits, redox conditions constitute the main factor controlling the uranium deposition. Often observed in these deposits, chlorites are the unique clay mineral which can be able to record in their structure the redox conditions through their Fe"3"+/SFe ratio. However, the common presence of several populations of chlorites makes difficult to understand the message carried out by these minerals. Thanks to μ-XANES spectroscopy, we are now able to measure on thin sections the Fe"3"+/SFe ratio in chlorites with an accuracy of 5 %. Measurements show that it can reach 60 % in di-tri-octahedral chlorites and 5 % to more than 40 % for tri-octahedral chlorites. In hydrothermal contexts where chlorites crystallize through a dissolution-recrystallization process, their Fe"3"+/SFe ratio decreases with the increase of the global Fe content. Diagenetic chlorites observed resulting from the polymorphic transformation of berthierine have a different behavior because there is no link between their total iron content and their Fe"3"+/SFe ratio: their chemistry is directly inherited from the one of the precursor mineral because this transformation does not allow a reorganization of cations in the structure. This transformation explains that thermodynamic models cannot work for these phases. For the use of chlorites as makers of redox paleo-conditions in contexts of uranium deposits where diagenetic and hydrothermal chlorites can be present, it is decisive to determine their origin, for example analyzing their polytype: Ib (b=90 degrees) for chlorites crystallized from solid-state transformation and IIb for chlorites crystallized through dissolution-recrystallization process. (author)

  18. Aspects on optimization of natural uranium fuel utilization in heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-08-01

    This paper is dealing with a possibility to decrease the natural uranium consumption of CANDU PHWR using the once-through cycle. This possibility is based on the utilization of slightly enriched uranium. The optimal two-zone structure of a reactor using natural uranium is found out. The optimal criterium is the maximization of the burnup (equivalent to minimization of uranium requirements) with a constraint on power density radial uniformity factor. As regards the enriched uranium, the optimal enrichment and the two-zone structure of a reactor which minimizes the natural uranium requirement with constraints on uniformity factor and maximum burnup are established. Corresponding to a maximum burnup of 16,000 MWd/t and 1% enrichment, the natural uranium requirement is found to be 10% less than that of the natural uranium reactor

  19. The mechanism of uranium adsorption on Resin 508 and isoelectric point of the resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Qingping; Lu Weichang; Su Huijuan; Hu Jinbo; Zhang Liqin; Chen Banglin

    1990-01-01

    The adsorption process of uranium by Resin 508 at the solid-liquid interface was investigated and the mechanism of uranium adsorption including adsorption dynamics, adsorption thermodynamics and isoelectric point of resin was studied. The results are as follows: The maximum of uranium adsorption is attained at pH5-7; Uranium adsorption isotherm by Resin 508 in experimental conditions agrees with Langmuir's adsorption isotherm, the maximum of uranium adsorbed (Vm) is 716 mg U/g-dried resin; The adsorption of uranium by Resin 508 is an endothermic reaction and ΔH = 16.87 kJ/mol; The exchange-adsorption rate is mainly controlled by liquid film diffusion; The isoelectric points of Resin 508 before and after uranium adsorption are found to be pH7.5 and pH5.7 respectively. It is a specific adsorption for uranium

  20. Acidic aqueous uranium electrodeposition for target fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saliba-Silva, A.M.; Oliveira, E.T.; Garcia, R.H.L.; Durazzo, M.

    2013-01-01

    Direct irradiation of targets inside nuclear research or multiple purpose reactors is a common route to produce 99 Mo- 99m Tc radioisotopes. The electroplating of low enriched uranium over nickel substrate might be a potential alternative to produce targets of 235 U. The electrochemistry of uranium at low temperature might be beneficial for an alternative route to produce 99 Mo irradiation LEU targets. Electrodeposition of uranium can be made using ionic and aqueous solutions producing uranium oxide deposits. The performance of uranium electrodeposition is relatively low because a big competition with H 2 evolution happens inside the window of electrochemical reduction potential. This work explores possibilities of electroplating uranium as UO 2 2+ (Uranium-VI) in order to achieve electroplating uranium in a sufficient amount to be commercially irradiated in the future Brazilian RMB reactor. Electroplated nickel substrate was followed by cathodic current electrodeposition from aqueous UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 solution. EIS tests and modeling showed that a film formed differently in the three tested cathodic potentials. At the lower level, (-1.8V) there was an indication of a double film formation, one overlaying the other with ionic mass diffusion impaired at the interface with nickel substrate as showed by the relatively lower admittance of Warburg component. (author)

  1. Microbial uptake of uranium, cesium, and radium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strandberg, G.W.; Shumate, S.E. II; Parrott, J.R. Jr.; McWhirter, D.A.

    1980-01-01

    The ability of diverse microbial species to concentrate uranium, cesium, and radium was examined. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and a mixed culture of denitrifying bacteria accumulated uranium to 10 to 15% of the dry cell weight. Only a fraction of the cells in a given population had visible uranium deposits in electron micrographs. While metabolism was not required for uranium uptake, mechanistic differences in the metal uptake process were indicated. Uranium accumulated slowly (hours) on the surface of S. cerevisiae and was subject to environmental factors (i.e., temperature, pH, interfering cations and anions). In contrast, P. aeruginosa and the mixed culture of denitrifying bacteria accumulated uranium rapidly (minutes) as dense, apparently random, intracellular deposits. This very rapid accumulation has prevented us from determining whether the uptake rate during the transient between the initial and equilibrium distribution of uranium is affected by environmental conditions. However, the final equilibrium distributions are not affected by those conditions which affect uptake by S. cerevisiae. Cesium and radium were concentrated to a considerably lesser extent than uranium by the several microbial species tested. The potential utility of microorganisms for the removal and concentration of these metals from nuclear processing wastes and several bioreactor designs for contacting microorganisms with contaminated waste streams will be discussed.

  2. Natural uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammerich, Marc; Frot, Patricia; Gambini, Denis-Jean; Gauron, Christine; Moureaux, Patrick; Herbelet, Gilbert; Lahaye, Thierry; Pihet, Pascal; Rannou, Alain

    2014-08-01

    This sheet belongs to a collection which relates to the use of radionuclides essentially in unsealed sources. Its goal is to gather on a single document the most relevant information as well as the best prevention practices to be implemented. These sheets are made for the persons in charge of radiation protection: users, radioprotection-skill persons, labor physicians. Each sheet treats of: 1 - the radio-physical and biological properties; 2 - the main uses; 3 - the dosimetric parameters; 4 - the measurement; 5 - the protection means; 6 - the areas delimitation and monitoring; 7 - the personnel classification, training and monitoring; 8 - the effluents and wastes; 9 - the authorization and declaration administrative procedures; 10 - the transport; and 11 - the right conduct to adopt in case of incident or accident. This sheet deals specifically with natural uranium

  3. Sorption of uranium by cellulose derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muroi, M.; Imai, S.; Hamaguchi, A.

    1985-01-01

    The sorption behaviour of uranium was investigated by batch and column methods using four cellulose derivatives, two having an amino group and two having an amino group plus a dithiocarboxylate group. All four derivatives showed maximum uranium sorption from pure water in the neutral region or from artificial sea water in the acidic region. In the batch method, quantitative removal of 100 μg of uranium from 50 ml of water at pH 5.0 was achieved by equilibration with 50 mg of any of the four sorbents. The percentage removal under these conditions decreased gradually with increasing concentration of uranium above 100 μg per 50 ml. A similar high percentage removal of uranium was achieved using artificial sea water. In the column method, quantitative removal of 5 μg of uranium from 1l of water at pH 6.7 was achieved with 200 mg of either of the two sorbents. Similar quantitative removal of uranium was achieved from 1l of artificial sea water at pH 5.4 with 500 mg of either of the two sorbents. (author)

  4. Behaviour of uranium under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adda, Y.; Mustelier, J.P.; Quere, Y.; Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses

    1964-01-01

    The main results obtained in a study of the formation of defects caused in uranium by fission at low temperature are reported. By irradiation at 20 K. it was possible to determine the number of Frenkel pairs produced by one fission. An analysis of the curves giving the variations in electrical resistivity shows the size of the displacement spikes and the mechanism of defect creation due to fission. Irradiations at 77 K gave additional information, showing behaviour differences in the case of recrystallised and of cold worked uranium. The diffusion of rare gases was studied using metal-rare gas alloys obtained by electrical discharge, and samples of irradiated uranium. Simple diffusion is only responsible for the release of the rare gases under vacuum in cases where the rare gas content is very low (very slightly irradiated U). On the other hand when the concentration is higher (samples prepared by electrical discharge) the gas is given off by the formation, growth and coalescence of bubbles; the apparent diffusion coefficient is then quite different from the true coefficient and cannot be used in calculations on swelling. The various factors governing the phenomenon of simple diffusion were examined. It was shown in particular that a small addition of molybdenum could reduce the diffusion coefficient by a factor of 100. The precipitation of gas in uranium (Kr), in silver (Kr) and in Al-Li alloy (He) have been followed by measurement of the crystal parameter and of the electrical resistivity, and by electron microscope examination of thin films. The important part played by dislocations in the generation and growth of bubbles has been demonstrated, and it has been shown also that precipitation of bubbles on the dislocation lattice could block the development of recrystallisation. The results of these studies were compared with observations made on the swelling of uranium and uranium alloys U Mo and U Nb strongly irradiated between 400 and 700 C. In the case of Cubic

  5. Uranium and radon surveys in western Himalaya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virk, H.S.

    1997-01-01

    The water samples from mountain springs, streams and river systems in the western Himalaya were collected and analysed in the laboratory for uranium and radon contents. It is observed that the Himalayan river system is conspicuous by its high dissolved uranium and radium concentration. The water samples contain from 0.89 ppb to 63.4 ppb of uranium and from 34 Bq/I to 364 Bq/I of radon. The radon emanation in soil is measured by the track-etch method, emanometry and alpha-logger technique. The daily and long-term variation of radon was monitored in some mineralized zones of Himachal Pradesh (HP) state with high uranium content in the soil. The maximum values of radon are recorded in Chhinjra, Rameda, Samurkala and Kasol areas of HP. (author)

  6. Uranium management activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, D.; Marshall, E.; Sideris, T.; Vasa-Sideris, S.

    2001-01-01

    One of the missions of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Oak Ridge Office (ORO) has been the management of the Department's uranium materials. This mission has been accomplished through successful integration of ORO's uranium activities with the rest of the DOE complex. Beginning in the 1980's, several of the facilities in that complex have been shut down and are in the decommissioning process. With the end of the Cold War, the shutdown of many other facilities is planned. As a result, inventories of uranium need to be removed from the Department facilities. These inventories include highly enriched uranium (HEU), low enriched uranium (LEU), normal uranium (NU), and depleted uranium (DU). The uranium materials exist in different chemical forms, including metals, oxides, solutions, and gases. Much of the uranium in these inventories is not needed to support national priorities and programs. (author)

  7. Uranium industry annual 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1998 (UIA 1998) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry's activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. It contains data for the period 1989 through 2008 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey.'' Data provides a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry's activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry's plans and commitments for the near-term future. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1989 through 1998, including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment, are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2008, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, and uranium inventories, are shown in Chapter 2. The methodology used in the 1998 survey, including data edit and analysis, is described in Appendix A. The methodologies for estimation of resources and reserves are described in Appendix B. A list of respondents to the ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey'' is provided in Appendix C. The Form EIA-858 ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey'' is shown in Appendix D. For the readers convenience, metric versions of selected tables from Chapters 1 and 2 are presented in Appendix E along with the standard conversion factors used. A glossary of technical terms is at the end of the report. 24 figs., 56 tabs

  8. Uranium industry annual 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1994 (UIA 1994) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry's activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing during that survey year. The UIA 1994 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. It contains data for the 10-year period 1985 through 1994 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey.'' Data collected on the ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey'' (UIAS) provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry's activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry's plans and commitments for the near-term future. Where aggregate data are presented in the UIA 1994, care has been taken to protect the confidentiality of company-specific information while still conveying accurate and complete statistical data. A feature article, ''Comparison of Uranium Mill Tailings Reclamation in the United States and Canada,'' is included in the UIA 1994. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, and uranium inventories, enrichment feed deliveries (actual and projected), and unfilled market requirements are shown in Chapter 2

  9. Activity concentration of uranium in groundwater from uranium mineralized areas and its neighborhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arabi, S.A.; Funtua, I.I.; Dewu, B.B.M.; Alagbe, S.A.; Garba, M.L.; Kwaya, M.Y.; Baloga, A.D.

    2013-01-01

    Uranium mineralization in parts of northeastern Nigeria necessitated its exploration during early eighties by the Nigeria Uranium Mining Company (NUMCO) which was later abandoned. During their course of decay, uranium isotopes pass through radioactive decay stage and eventually into stable isotope of lead. The course of concern for soluble uranium in groundwater especially from the mineralized areas include ionizing radiation, chemical toxicity and reproductive defects for which ingested uranium has been implicated to have caused. This study is aimed at assessing the levels of concentration of uranium in groundwater to ascertain its compliance with the World Health Organization's (WHO) and the United State Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) guideline for uranium in drinking water. Thirty five groundwater samples were collected using EPA's groundwater sampling protocol and analyzed at the Department of Geology, University of Cape Town using an Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometric (ICP-MS) technique. Significant finding of this work was that there is radiological contamination of groundwater in the area. There is also an indication that the extent of radiological contamination is not much within the mineralized zones, therefore, there is likelihood that groundwater has acted as a medium of transporting and enhancing uranium in groundwater in an environment away from that of origin. About 5.7 % of the samples studied had uranium concentration above WHO and EPA's maximum contaminant level of 30 μg/L which is a major concern for inhabitants of the area. It was also apparent that radiological contamination at the southwestern part of the study area extends into the adjacent sheet (sheet 152). Uranium concentration above set standards in those areas might have originated from rocks around established mineralized zones but was transported to those contaminated areas by groundwater that leaches across the host rock and subsequently mobilizing soluble uranium

  10. Thermodynamic and transport properties of uranium dioxide and related phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1965-01-01

    The high melting point of uranium dioxide and its stability under irradiation have led to its use as a fuel in a variety of types of nuclear reactors. A wide range of chemical and physical studies has been stimulated by this circumstances and by the complex nature of the uranium dioxide phase itself. The boundaries of this phase widen as the temperature is increased; at 2000 deg. K a single, homogeneous phase exists from U 2.27 to a hypostoichiometric (UO 2-x ) composition, depending on the oxygen potential of the surroundings. Since there is often an incentive to operate a reactor at the maximum practicable heat rating and, therefore, maximum thermal gradient in the fuel, the determination of the physical properties of the UO 2-x phase becomes a matter of great technological importance. In addition a complex sequence of U-O phases may be formed during the preparation of powder feed material or during the sintering process; these affect the microstructure and properties of the final product and have also received much attention. 184 refs, 33 figs, 15 tabs

  11. Irradiation of TZM: Uranium dioxide fuel pin at 1700 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdonald, G. E.

    1973-01-01

    A fuel pin clad with TZM and containing solid pellets of uranium dioxide was fission heated in a static helium-cooled capsule at a maximum surface temperature of 1700 K for approximately 1000 hr and to a total burnup of 2.0 percent of the uranium-235. The results of the postirradiation examination indicated: (1) A transverse, intergranular failure of the fuel pin occurred when the fuel pin reached 2.0-percent burnup. This corresponds to 1330 kW-hr/cu cm, where the volume is the sum of the fuel, clad, and void volumes in the fuel region. (2) The maximum swelling of the fuel pin was less than 1.5 percent on the fuel-pin diameter. (3) There was no visible interaction between the TZM clad and the UO2. (4) Irradiation at 1700 K produced a course-grained structure, with an average grain diameter of 0.02 centimeter and with some of the grains extending one-half of the thickness of the clad. (5) Below approximately 1500 K, the irradiation of the clad produced a moderately fine-grained structure, with an average grain diameter of 0.004 centimeter.

  12. Depleted uranium hexafluoride: Waste or resource?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwertz, N.; Zoller, J.; Rosen, R.; Patton, S.; Bradley, C.; Murray, A.

    1995-07-01

    The US Department of Energy is evaluating technologies for the storage, disposal, or re-use of depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ). This paper discusses the following options, and provides a technology assessment for each one: (1) conversion to UO 2 for use as mixed oxide duel, (2) conversion to UO 2 to make DUCRETE for a multi-purpose storage container, (3) conversion to depleted uranium metal for use as shielding, (4) conversion to uranium carbide for use as high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) fuel. In addition, conversion to U 3 O 8 as an option for long-term storage is discussed

  13. Liquid uranium contaimment in refractories metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duarte, J.L.; Padilha, A.F.

    1982-01-01

    Tests were performed on metalic materials for liquid uranium containment up to 2100 0 C. The materials Nb, Mo, Ta and W in the form of crucibles were tested at 2100 0 C for one hour in the presence of flowing argon. After testing, the crucibles were etched using HCl and analysed by optical metallography and electron proble microanalysis. The results are discussed in terms of Berthoud equation and indicated that the solubility limit of the crucible material in uranium at the temperature controlls the crucible dissolution by liquid uranium. The various phases formed, the mechanism of dissolution and the possible material for future use are presented and discussed. (Author) [pt

  14. Maximum likely scale estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loog, Marco; Pedersen, Kim Steenstrup; Markussen, Bo

    2005-01-01

    A maximum likelihood local scale estimation principle is presented. An actual implementation of the estimation principle uses second order moments of multiple measurements at a fixed location in the image. These measurements consist of Gaussian derivatives possibly taken at several scales and/or ...

  15. Robust Maximum Association Estimators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Alfons (Andreas); C. Croux (Christophe); P. Filzmoser (Peter)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractThe maximum association between two multivariate variables X and Y is defined as the maximal value that a bivariate association measure between one-dimensional projections αX and αY can attain. Taking the Pearson correlation as projection index results in the first canonical correlation

  16. Solvent extraction of uranium from high acid leach solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramadevi, G.; Sreenivas, T.; Navale, A.S.; Padmanabhan, N.P.H.

    2010-01-01

    A significant part of the total uranium reserves all over the world is contributed by refractory uranium minerals. The refractory oxides are highly stable and inert to attack by most of the commonly used acids under normal conditions of acid strength, pressure and temperature. Quantitative dissolution of uranium from such ores containing refractory uranium minerals requires drastic operating conditions during chemical leaching like high acid strength, elevated pressures and temperatures. The leach liquors produced under these conditions normally have high free acidity, which affects the downstream operations like ion exchange and solvent extraction

  17. Uranium in Kosovo's drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berisha, Fatlume; Goessler, Walter

    2013-11-01

    The results of this paper are an initiation to capture the drinking water and/or groundwater elemental situation in the youngest European country, Kosovo. We aim to present a clear picture of the natural uranium concentration in drinking water and/or groundwater as it is distributed to the population of Kosovo. Nine hundred and fifty-one (951) drinking water samples were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). The results are the first countrywide interpretation of the uranium concentration in drinking water and/or groundwater, directly following the Kosovo war of 1999. More than 98% of the samples had uranium concentrations above 0.01 μg L(-1), which was also our limit of quantification. Concentrations up to 166 μg L(-1) were found with a mean of 5 μg L(-1) and median 1.6 μg L(-1) were found. Two point six percent (2.6%) of the analyzed samples exceeded the World Health Organization maximum acceptable concentration of 30 μg L(-1), and 44.2% of the samples exceeded the 2 μg L(-1) German maximum acceptable concentrations recommended for infant food preparations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Uranium: a basic evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crull, A.W.

    1978-01-01

    All energy sources and technologies, including uranium and the nuclear industry, are needed to provide power. Public misunderstanding of the nature of uranium and how it works as a fuel may jeopardize nuclear energy as a major option. Basic chemical facts about uranium ore and uranium fuel technology are presented. Some of the major policy decisions that must be made include the enrichment, stockpiling, and pricing of uranium. Investigations and lawsuits pertaining to uranium markets are reviewed, and the point is made that oil companies will probably have to divest their non-oil energy activities. Recommendations for nuclear policies that have been made by the General Accounting Office are discussed briefly

  19. Uranium health physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This report contains the papers delivered at the Summer School on Uranium Health Physics held in Pretoria on the 14 and 15 April 1980. The following topics were discussed: uranium producton in South Africa; radiation physics; internal dosimetry and radiotoxicity of long-lived uranium isotopes; uranium monitoring; operational experience on uranium monitoring; dosimetry and radiotoxicity of inhaled radon daughters; occupational limits for inhalation of radon-222, radon-220 and their short-lived daughters; radon monitoring techniques; radon daughter dosimeters; operational experience on radon monitoring; and uranium mill tailings management

  20. Uranium: one utility's outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gass, C.B.

    1983-01-01

    The perspective of the Arizona Public Service Company (APS) on the uncertainty of uranium as a fuel supply is discussed. After summarizing the history of nuclear power and the uranium industries, a projection is made for the future uranium market. An uncrtain uranium market is attributed to various determining factors that include international politics, production costs, non-commercial government regulation, production-company stability, and questionable levels of uranium sales. APS offers its solutions regarding type of contract, choice of uranium producers, pricing mechanisms, and aids to the industry as a whole. 5 references, 10 figures, 1 table

  1. Liquid membranes and process for uranium recovery therewith

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frankenfeld, J.W.; Li, N.N.T.; Bruncati, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    A liquid membrane system consisting of water-in-oil type emulsions dispersed in water, which is capable of extracting uranium-containing ions from an aqueous feed solution containing uranium ions at a temperature in the range of 25 0 C to 80 0 C, is described. The emulsion comprises an aqueous interior phase surrounded by a surfactant-containing exterior phase. The exterior phase is immiscible with the interior phase and comprises a transfer agent capable of transporting selectively the desired uranium-containing ions and a solvent for the transfer agent. The interior phase comprises a reactant capable of removing uranium-containing ions from the transfer agent and capable of changing the valency of the uranium in uranium-containing ions to a second valency state and converting the uranium-containing ions into a nonpermeable form. (U.K.)

  2. The study on process of recycling uranium in mixture of residue and liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jie; Shen Weiwei; Hao Jidong; Wu Jiangming

    2014-01-01

    The treat method of mixture of residue and liquid produced from HWR nuclear fuel chemical process using some kind of U_3O_8 powder was studied in this experiment. For recycling the uranium in mixture of residue and liquid, chemical dissolving method, washing and centrifuging method and dilute nitric acid leaching uranium method was contrasted in this test. The merit of dilute nitric acid leaching uranium method is simpler, more effective and higher uranium recycling ratio. Next, dilute nitric acid leaching uranium method was studied systematically. As a result, the main influence factors of uranium recycling ratio is dip sour degree and dip sour temperature. The influence law of factors to uranium recycling ratio and filtering effect was found out also. Along with increasing of dip sour degree and dip sour temperature, uranium recycling ratio increases and speed of filtrate increases also. At last, the process of batch treating mixture of residue and liquid was build and abundant uranium was recycled. (authors)

  3. Corrosion of Al-7075 by uranium hexafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The results of the Al-7075 corrosion by uranium hexafluoride are presented in this work. The kinetic study shows that corrosion process occurs by two temperature dependent mechanism and that the alloy can be safely used up to 140 0 C. The corrosion film is formed by uranium oxifluoride with variable composition in depth. Two alternative corrosion models are proposed in order to explain the experimental results, as well as the tests taht will be carried out to confirm one of them [pt

  4. PROCESSES OF CHLORINATION OF URANIUM OXIDES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, S.

    1958-09-16

    An improvement is described in the process fur making UCl/sub 4/ from uranium oxide and carbon tetrachloride. In that process, oxides of uranium are contacted with carbon tetrachloride vapor at an elevated temperature. It has been fuund that the reaction product and yield are improved if the uranlum oxide charge is disposed in flat trays in the reaction zone, to a depth of not more than 1/2 centimeter.

  5. A Contribution to the Study of the Oxidation of Uranium Monocarbide in Carbonic Anhydride at High Temperatures; Contribution a l'etude de l'oxydation du monocarbure d'uranium dans l'anhydride carbonique aux temperatures elevees; Vklad v izuchenie voprosa okisleniya monokarbida urana v ugol'nom angidride pri povyshennykh temperaturakh; Contribucion al estudio de la oxidacion del monocarburo de uranio en anhidrido carbonico a temperaturas elevadas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desrues, R; Paidassi, J.; Darras, R. [Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires, Saclay (France)

    1963-11-15

    Samples of uranium monocarbide, manufactured by two different techniques, and of a cermet composed of 96.7% U and 3.3% C (by weight) were submitted to the action of very carefully purified carbonic anhydride in oxygen and in water vapour in the temperature range 350 deg. C to 600 deg. C; oxidation was observed gravimetrically (Eyraud thermobalance) and micrographically. The following points were noted: (1) The curves representing the increase of weight as a function of time start by being more or less linear, but climb rapidly, mainly because of the progressive fragmentation of the samples. Incidentally the observed increases of weight are markedly less than those hitherto reported, very probably because of the greater purity of the carbonic anhydride used and the extremely low porosity of the uranium monocarbide. (2) The presence of uranium or dicarbide inclusions in the monocarbide decreases its resistance to oxidation; this must be attributed chiefly to the fact that they undergo very severe oxidation, namely because of the mechanical constraints which are introduced. (3) In all cases oxidation may be characterized by an activation energy of 29 000 cal/M - very close to the value for the oxidation of metallic uranium in the same gas and to the diffusion of oxygen in the oxide of uranium (UO{sub 2}) formed. (author) [French] Des echantillons de monocarbure d'uranium, fabrique suivant deux techniques differentes, et d'un cermet compose de 96,7% U- 3,37% C (en poids) ont ete soumis a l'action de l'anhydride carbonique tres soigneusement purifie en oxygene et en vapeur d'eau, dans l'intervalle 350-600 deg. C; leur oxydation a ete suivie a la fois par voie gravimetrique a l'aide d'une thermobalance Eyraud et par voie micrographique. Les points suivants ont pu etre degages: 1. Les courbes representant les augmentations de poids en fonction du temps sont au depart sensiblement lineaires, puis prennent ensuite une allure acceleree, ce qui s'explique surtout par la

  6. Internal friction in uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulin Filho, Pedro Iris

    1979-01-01

    The uranium dioxide inelastic properties were studied measuring internal friction at low frequencies (of the order of 1 Hz). The work was developed in the 160 to 400 deg C temperature range. The effect of stoichiometry variation was studied oxidizing the sample with consequent change of the defect structure originally present in the non-stoichiometric uranium dioxide. The presence of a wide and irregular peak due to oxidation was observed at low temperatures. Activation energy calculations indicated the occurrence of various relaxation processes and assuming the existence of a peak between - 80 and - 70 deg C , the absolute value obtained for the activation energy (0,54 eV) is consistent with the observed values determined at medium and high frequencies for the stress induced reorientation of defects. The microstructure effect on the inelastic properties was studied for stoichiometric uranium dioxide, by varying grain size and porosity. These parameters have influence on the high temperature measurements of internal friction. The internal friction variation for temperatures higher than 340 deg C is thought to be due to grain boundary relaxation phenomena. (author)

  7. Recovery of uranium from crude uranium tetrafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, S.K.; Bellary, M.P.; Keni, V.S.

    1994-01-01

    An innovative process has been developed for recovery of uranium from crude uranium tetrafluoride cake. The process is based on direct dissolution of uranium tetrafluoride in nitric acid in presence of aluminium hydroxide and use of solvent extraction for removal of fluorides and other bulk impurities to make uranium amenable for refining. It is a simple process requiring minimum process step and has advantage of lesser plant corrosion. This process can be applied for processing of uranium tetrafluoride generated from various sources like uranium by-product during thorium recovery from thorium concentrate, first stage product of uranium recovery from phosphoric acid by OPPA process and off grade uranium tetrafluoride material. The paper describes the details of the process developed and demonstrated on bench and pilot scale and its subsequent modification arising out of bulky solid waste generation. The modified process uses a lower quantity of aluminium hydroxide by allowing a lower dissolution of uranium per cycle and recycles the undissolved material to the next cycle, maintaining the overall recovery at high level. This innovation has reduced the solid waste generated by a factor of four at the cost of a slightly larger dissolution vessel and its increased corrosion rate. (author)

  8. Recovery of uranium from crude uranium tetrafluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, S K; Bellary, M P; Keni, V S [Chemical Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    1994-06-01

    An innovative process has been developed for recovery of uranium from crude uranium tetrafluoride cake. The process is based on direct dissolution of uranium tetrafluoride in nitric acid in presence of aluminium hydroxide and use of solvent extraction for removal of fluorides and other bulk impurities to make uranium amenable for refining. It is a simple process requiring minimum process step and has advantage of lesser plant corrosion. This process can be applied for processing of uranium tetrafluoride generated from various sources like uranium by-product during thorium recovery from thorium concentrate, first stage product of uranium recovery from phosphoric acid by OPPA process and off grade uranium tetrafluoride material. The paper describes the details of the process developed and demonstrated on bench and pilot scale and its subsequent modification arising out of bulky solid waste generation. The modified process uses a lower quantity of aluminium hydroxide by allowing a lower dissolution of uranium per cycle and recycles the undissolved material to the next cycle, maintaining the overall recovery at high level. This innovation has reduced the solid waste generated by a factor of four at the cost of a slightly larger dissolution vessel and its increased corrosion rate. (author). 4 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  9. Adsorption of uranium(VI) from sulphate solutions using Amberlite IRA-402 resin: Equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solgy, Mostafa; Taghizadeh, Majid; Ghoddocynejad, Davood

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Adsorption of uranium from sulphate solutions by an anion exchange resin. • The effects of pH, contact time and adsorbent dosage were investigated. • The adsorption equilibrium is well described by the Freundlich isotherm model. • The adsorption kinetics can be predicted by the pseudo second-order model. • The adsorption is a physical, spontaneous and endothermic process. - Abstract: In the present study, adsorption of uranium from sulphate solutions was evaluated using Amberlite IRA-402 resin. The variation of adsorption process was investigated in batch sorption mode. The parameters studied were pH, contact time and adsorbent dosage. Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models were used in order to present a mathematical description of the equilibrium data at three different temperatures (25 °C, 35 °C and 45 °C). The final results confirmed that the equilibrium data tend to follow Freundlich isotherm model. The maximum adsorption capacity of Amberlite IRA-402 for uranium(VI) was evaluated to be 213 mg/g for the Langmuir model at 25 °C. The adsorption of uranium on the mentioned anion exchange resin was found to follow the pseudo-second order kinetic model, indicating that chemical adsorption was the rate limiting-step. The values of thermodynamic parameters proved that adsorption process of uranium onto Amberlite IRA-402 resin could be considered endothermic (ΔH > 0) and spontaneous (ΔG < 0)

  10. Uranium production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, J.Q.

    1981-01-01

    The domestic uranium industry is in a state of stagflation. Costs continue to rise while the market for the product remains stagnant. During the last 12 months, curtailments and closures of mines and mills have eliminated over 5000 jobs in the industry, plus many more in those industries that furnish supplies and services. By January 1982, operations at four mills and the mines that furnish them ore will have been terminated. Other closures may follow, depending on cost trends, duration of current contracts, the degree to which mills have been amortized, the feasibility of placing mines on standby, the grade of the ore, and many other factors. Open-pit mines can be placed on standby without much difficulty, other than the possible cost of restoration before all the ore has been removed. There are a few small, dry, underground mines that could be mothballed; however, the major underground producers are wet sandstone mines that in most cases could not be reopened after a prolonged shutdown; mills can be mothballed for several years. Figure 8 shows the location of all the production centers in operation, as well as those that have operated or are on standby. Table 1 lists the same production centers plus those that have been deferred, showing nominal capacity of conventional mills in tons of ore per calendar day, and the industry production rate for those mills as of October 1, 1981

  11. Radiological hazards to uranium miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-05-01

    The purpose of the present document is to review and assess the occupational hazards to uranium miners in Canada. Amendments to regulations set the maximum permissible dose to uranium miners at 50 mSv per year. Uranium miners are exposed to radon and thoron progeny, external gamma radiation and long-lived alpha-emitting radionuclides in dust. The best estimate for the lifetime risk of inhaled radon progeny is about 3 x 10 -4 lung cancers per WLM for the average miner, with a range of uncertainty from about 1 -6 x 10 -4 per WLM. This central value is nearly twice as high as that recommended by the ICRP in 1981. The probability of serious biological consequences following exposure to external gamma rays is currently under review but is expected to be in the range of 3 - 6 x 10 -2 Sv -1 . Dosimetric calculations indicate that the stochastic risks per WLM of thoron progeny are about one-third of those for radon progeny. The annual limits on intake of inhaled ore dusts recommended by the ICRP are probably too low by at least a factor of two for the type of ore and dust normally encountered in underground uranium mines in Ontario; this is due in part to the fact that the average diameter of these dusts is five times greater than the value used by the ICRP. Radiological exposures of uranium miners in Canada were reviewed. The biological impact of these exposures were compared with those of conventional accidents on the basis of the years of normal life expectancy that are lost or seriously impaired due to occupational hazards. The objectives in considering all occupational risks are to reduce the total risk from all causes and to use funds spent for health protection as effectively as possible

  12. Chlorination of uranium ore for extraction of uranium, thorium and radium and for pyrite removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skeaf, J.M.

    1979-01-01

    The high-temperature chlorination of uranium ore was investigated. The objective was to develop a process which is both economically viable and environmentally acceptable. Test work was directed toward obtaining high extractions of uranium, thorium and radium-226, as well as iron, sulphur and the rare earths, and consists of chlorinating samples of an Elliot Lake uranium ore at elevated temperatures and repulping the resulting calcine in dilute hydrochloric acid. The effect of temperature and chlorine throughput on the extraction of the various metals was investigated. The best conditions yielded extractions of uranium, iron and sulphur (all as chlorides) greater than 95 percent. Chlorine consumption varied between 6 and 16 percent by weight of the ore charge. (author)

  13. FORMING TUBES AND RODS OF URANIUM METAL BY EXTRUSION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creutz, E.C.

    1959-01-27

    A method and apparatus are presented for the extrusion of uranium metal. Since uranium is very brittle if worked in the beta phase, it is desirable to extrude it in the gamma phase. However, in the gamma temperature range thc uranium will alloy with the metal of the extrusion dic, and is readily oxidized to a great degree. According to this patent, uranium extrusion in thc ganmma phase may be safely carried out by preheating a billet of uranium in an inert atmosphere to a trmperature between 780 C and 1100 C. The heated billet is then placed in an extrusion apparatus having dies which have been maintained at an elevated temperature for a sufficient length of time to produce an oxide film, and placing a copper disc between the uranium billet and the die.

  14. METHOD OF HOT ROLLING URANIUM METAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, A.R.

    1959-03-10

    A method is given for quickly and efficiently hot rolling uranium metal in the upper part of the alpha phase temperature region to obtain sound bars and sheets possessing a good surface finish. The uranium metal billet is heated to a temperature in the range of 1000 deg F to 1220 deg F by immersion iii a molten lead bath. The heated billet is then passed through the rolls. The temperature is restored to the desired range between successive passes through the rolls, and the rolls are turned down approximately 0.050 inch between successive passes.

  15. Methods for the exploration and recovering of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kegel, K.E.

    1982-01-01

    The uranium reserves in the western world occur basically in two types of deposits a) vein type and vein like types b) sedimentary types, with the vein deposits providing only 5 percent of the actual uranium production. 85% of the known uranium reserves in the western world, amounting to about 5 million metric tons U occur in a relatively small number of countries (U.S.A., Canada, Australia, South Africa and Namibia, France, Niger and Gabun). Exploration on uranium deposits is carried out by using geophysical and geochemical methods. Radiometry, i.e. the determination of the radioactivity of the ground in a prospective area, is the main geophysical tool. In the mining of uranium ores, practically all mining methods, applied in other metal mining branches, are being used. The benefication of uranium ore is characterized by a large up-grading factor (i.e. the ratio between the uranium content in the concentrates and the uranium content in the ore) which is higher than in most other metal mining operations. In the field of health and safety in uranium mines, the radiation protection of the workers plays a paramount role. Strict rules exist for maximum values of certain elements in waste air and waste water of uranium mining operations, emitted into the environment. (orig.)

  16. Uptake of uranium from sea water by microalgae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakaguchi, Takashi; Horikoshi, Takao; Nakajima, Akira

    1978-01-01

    The uptake of uranium from aqueous systems especially from sea water by various microalgae was investigated. The freshwater microalgae, Chlorella regularis, Scenedesmus bijuga, Scenedesmus chloreloides, Scenedesmus obliquus, Chlamydomonas angulosa, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, accumulated relatively large amounts of uranium from the solution containing uranium only. The concentration factors of the above mentioned algae were: Chlorella regularis 3930, Chlamydomonas 2330 - 3400, Scenedesmus 803 - 1920. The uptake of uranium from sea water by Chlorella regularis was inhibited markedly by the co-existence of carbonate ions. Chlorella cells could take up a great quantity of uranium from decarbonated sea water. The uptake of uranium was affected by the pH of sea water, and the amount of uranium absorbed was maximum at pH 5. The experiment was carried out to screen marine microalgae which have the ability to accumulate a large amount of uranium from sea water. The uptake of uranium from sea water by marine microalgae of different species turned out to be in the following decreasing order: Synechococcus > Chlamydomonas >> Chlorella > Dunaliella > Platymonas > Calothrix > Porphyridium. The amount of uranium absorbed differed markedly with different species of marine microalgae. (author)

  17. Uranium mining in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    Known uranium deposits and the companies involved in uranium mining and exploration in Australia are listed. The status of the development of the deposits is outlined and reasons for delays to mining are given

  18. Uranium Processing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — An integral part of Y‑12's transformation efforts and a key component of the National Nuclear Security Administration's Uranium Center of Excellence, the Uranium...

  19. Uranium in Niger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabelmann, E.

    1978-03-01

    This document presents government policy in the enhancement of uranium resources, existing mining companies and their productions, exploitation projects and economical outcome related to the uranium mining and auxiliary activities [fr

  20. Price of military uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimenko, A.V.

    1998-01-01

    The theoretical results about optimum strategy of use of military uranium confirmed by systems approach accounts are received. The numerical value of the system approach price of the highly enriched military uranium also is given

  1. Uranium market and resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capus, G.; Arnold, Th.

    2004-01-01

    The controversy about the extend of the uranium resources worldwide is still important, this article sheds some light on this topic. Every 2 years IAEA and NEA (nuclear energy agency) edit an inventory of uranium resources as reported by contributing countries. It appears that about 4.6 millions tons of uranium are available at a recovery cost less than 130 dollars per kg of uranium and a total of 14 millions tons of uranium can be assessed when including all existing or supposed resources. In fact there is enough uranium to sustain a moderate growth of the park of nuclear reactors during next decades and it is highly likely that the volume of uranium resources can allow a more aggressive development of nuclear energy. It is recalled that a broad use of the validated breeder technology can stretch the durability of uranium resources by a factor 50. (A.C.)

  2. Uranium from phosphate ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurst, F.J.

    1983-01-01

    The following topics are described briefly: the way phosphate fertilizers are made; how uranium is recovered in the phosphate industry; and how to detect covert uranium recovery operations in a phsophate plant

  3. Industrial realities: Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiron, H.

    1990-01-01

    In this special issue are examined ores and metals in France and in the world for 1988. The chapter on uranium gives statistical data on the uranium market: Demand, production, prices and reserves [fr

  4. Brazilian uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, L.C.S. dos.

    1985-01-01

    Estimatives of uranium reserves carried out in Figueira, Itataia, Lagoa Real and Espinharas, in Brazil are presented. The samples testing allowed to know geological structures, and the characteristics of uranium mineralization. (M.C.F.) [pt

  5. Uranium mining in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    The mining of uranium in Australia is criticised in relation to it's environmental impact, economics and effects on mine workers and Aborigines. A brief report is given on each of the operating and proposed uranium mines in Australia

  6. Thermal-hydraulic calculations for KUHFR with reduced enrichment uranium fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishima, Kaichiro; Shibata, Toshikazu.

    1982-01-01

    This report provides the preliminary results of the thermal-hydraulic calculations to study the safety aspects in fueling the KUHFR with reduced enrichment uranium. The calculations were based on what was outlined in the Safety Analysis Report for the KUHFR and the guidebook for research reactor core conversion, IAEA-TECDOC-233, published by the International Atomic Energy Agency. No significant differences in the thermal-hydraulic operating conditions have been found between HEU and MEU fuels. However, in LEU cases, the combination of three factors - larger power peaking with LEU fuel, smaller thermal conductivity of U 3 O 8 -Al fuel with high uranium densities, and thicker fuel meat - resulted in higher maximum fuel and surface temperatures with the LEU oxide fuel. (author)

  7. Temperature effect on uranium retention onto Zr{sub 2}O(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} surface; Effet de la temperature sur les mecanismes d'interaction entre l'ion uranyle et l'oxophosphate de zirconium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almazan Torres, M.G

    2007-03-15

    Uranium sorption onto Zr{sub 2}O(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} has been studied between 298 K and 363 K, in 0.1 M NaClO{sub 4} medium. Potentiometric titrations were realized to determine temperature dependency of the acid-base properties (pH(pcn), acidity constants). Classical batch experiments were performed at different temperatures. The sorption experiments revealed that the uranium sorption onto Zr{sub 2}O(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} is favoured with the temperature. Structural characterization of the surface complexes was performed by both Time-Resolved Laser-Induced Fluorescence (TRLIF) and EXAFS spectroscopy. The TRLIF measurements vs. temperature revealed two uranyl surface complexes. No influence of the temperature onto the nature surface complex was observed. The EXAFS analysis showed a splitting of the equatorial oxygen atoms in two shells, corresponding to uranyl bidentate, inner-sphere complexes. The obtained structural uranyl surface complex information was used to simulate (using a constant capacitance model) the sorption edges. The proposed complexes equilibrium model consists of the following surface complexes: (ZrOH){sub 2}UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} and (PO){sub 2}UO{sub 2}. Besides the stability constants for the surface complexes, the thermodynamic parameters {delta}H{sup 0} and {delta}S{sup 0} were determined using the van't Hoff equation. The enthalpy values associated to the U(VI) retention onto Zr{sub 2}O(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}, determined by the temperature dependence of the stability constants, testify that the formation of the complex (PO){sub 2}UO{sub 2} (55 kJ/mol) is endothermic, while no influence of the temperature was observed for the formation of the complex (ZrOH){sub 2}UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}. The adsorption reaction of the last complex is then driven by entropy. In addition, calorimetric measurements of uranium sorption onto Zr{sub 2}O(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} were carried out to directly quantify the enthalpy associated to the retention processes. (author)

  8. Uranium mining in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackay, G.A.

    1978-01-01

    Western world requirements for uranium based on increasing energy consumption and a changing energy mix, will warrant the development of Australia's resources. By 1985 Australian mines could be producing 9500 tonnes of uranium oxide yearly and by 1995 the export value from uranium could reach that from wool. In terms of benefit to the community the economic rewards are considerable but, in terms of providing energy to the world, Australias uranium is vital

  9. Radiation damage of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazarevic, Dj.

    1966-11-01

    Study of radiation damage covered the following: Kinetics of electric resistance of uranium and uranium alloy with 1% of molybdenum dependent on the second phase and burnup rate; Study of gas precipitation and diffusion of bubbles by transmission electron microscopy; Numerical analysis of the influence of defects distribution and concentration on the rare gas precipitation in uranium; study of thermal sedimentation of uranium alloy with molybdenum; diffusion of rare gas in metal by gas chromatography method

  10. Bicarbonate leaching of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, C.

    1998-01-01

    The alkaline leach process for extracting uranium from uranium ores is reviewed. This process is dependent on the chemistry of uranium and so is independent on the type of mining system (conventional, heap or in-situ) used. Particular reference is made to the geochemical conditions at Crownpoint. Some supporting data from studies using alkaline leach for remediation of uranium-contaminated sites is presented

  11. Bicarbonate leaching of uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mason, C.

    1998-12-31

    The alkaline leach process for extracting uranium from uranium ores is reviewed. This process is dependent on the chemistry of uranium and so is independent on the type of mining system (conventional, heap or in-situ) used. Particular reference is made to the geochemical conditions at Crownpoint. Some supporting data from studies using alkaline leach for remediation of uranium-contaminated sites is presented.

  12. Uranium in fossil bones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koul, S.L.

    1978-01-01

    An attempt has been made to determine the uranium content and thus the age of certain fossil bones Haritalyangarh (Himachal Pradesh), India. The results indicate that bones rich in apatite are also rich in uranium, and that the radioactivity is due to radionuclides in the uranium series. The larger animals apparently have a higher concentration of uranium than the small. The dating of a fossil jaw (elephant) places it in the Pleistocene. (Auth.)

  13. Study of reactions between uranium-plutonium mixed oxide and uranium nitride and between uranium oxide and uranium nitride; Etude des reactions entre l`oxyde mixte d`uranium-plutonium et le nitrure d`uranium et entre l`oxyde d`uranium et le nitrure d`uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lecraz, C

    1993-06-11

    A new type of combustible elements which is a mixture of uranium nitride and uranium-plutonium oxide could be used for Quick Neutrons Reactors. Three different studies have been made on the one hand on the reactions between uranium nitride (UN) and uranium-plutonium mixed oxide (U,Pu)O{sub 2}, on the other hand on these between UN and uranium oxide UO{sub 2}. They show a sizeable reaction between nitride and oxide for the studied temperatures range (1573 K to 1973 K). This reaction forms a oxynitride compound, MO{sub x} N{sub y} with M=U or M=(U,Pu), whose crystalline structure is similar to oxide`s. Solubility of nitride in both oxides is studied, as the reaction kinetics. (TEC). 32 refs., 48 figs., 22 tabs.

  14. Irradiation Stability of Uranium Alloys at High Exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonell, W.R.

    2001-01-01

    Postirradiation examinations were begun of a series of unrestrained dilute uranium alloy specimens irradiated to exposures up to 13,000 MWD/T in NaK-containing stainless steel capsules. This test, part of a program of development of uranium metal fuels for desalination and power reactors sponsored by the Division of Reactor Development and Technology, has the objective of defining the temperature and exposure limits of swelling resistance of the alloyed uranium. This paper discusses those test results

  15. Uranium mobilization from low-grade ore by cyanobacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenz, M.G.; Krumbein, W.E.

    1985-01-01

    Three cyanobacterial isolates (two LPP-B forms and one Anabaena or Nostoc species) from different environments could mobilize uranium from low-grade ores. After 80 days, up to 18% uranium had been extracted from coal and 51% from a carbonate rock by the filamentous cyanobacterium OL3, a LPP-B form. Low growth requirements with regard to light and temperature optima make this strain a possible candidate for leaching neutral and alkaline low-grade uranium ores. (orig.)

  16. Uranium mobilization from low-grade ore by cyanobacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, M.G.; Krumbein, W.E.

    1985-04-01

    Three cyanobacterial isolates (two LPP-B forms and one Anabaena or Nostoc species) from different environments could mobilize uranium from low-grade ores. After 80 days, up to 18% uranium had been extracted from coal and 51% from a carbonate rock by the filamentous cyanobacterium OL3, a LPP-B form. Low growth requirements with regard to light and temperature optima make this strain a possible candidate for leaching neutral and alkaline low-grade uranium ores.

  17. Preparation and Purification of natural uranium metal by Iodine method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taies, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    In this work ,glass-metal apparatus was designed and manufactured which used for preparing a high purity uranium.The reaction is simply take place between iodine vapour and uranium metal at 500C in closed system to form uranium tetra iodide which is decomposed on hot wire at high temperature around 1100C.Also another apparatus was made from Glass and used for preparing a high purity of UI 4 more than 99.9%purity

  18. Laser separation of uranium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, J.T.

    1981-01-01

    Method and apparatus for separating uranium isotopes are claimed. The method comprises the steps of irradiating a uranyl source material at a wavelength selective to a desired isotope and at an effective temperature for isotope spectral line splitting below about 77 deg.K., further irradiating the source material within the fluorescent lifetime of the source material to selectively photochemically reduce the excited isotopic species, and chemically separating the reduced isotope species from the remaining uranyl salt compound

  19. Exploration and uranium mining in Niger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moussa, M.

    2014-01-01

    Niger is a Sahelian country bordered by Algeria and Libya to the north, Mali and Burkina Faso to the west, Benin and Nigeria to the south and Chad to the east. Niger has approximately 17 million habitants in the last census (2013) and covers an area of 1.27 million km"2. Niger’s climate is very hot and dry (45-50°C in the hot season, 30°C in the winter), daily ranges of temperature vary from 20 to 30°C. There is a rainy season with light rain fall (40 mm) extending from June to September. Niger’s economy is centered on subsistence agriculture, animal husbandry and uranium production. Uranium exports accounted for 70% of the national export economy during the 1970s, but falling prices have caused the contribution from uranium to shrink substantially in recent years. Uranium ore deposits in the Niger Republic are located in the western part of the country, west of the Aïr Mountains. The Arlit site is located 250 km north of Agadez, and 1200 km north-west of Niamey, the capital of Niger. After the discovery of the first uranium occurrences in 1956, systematic exploration programmes were conducted between 1960 and 1968 along the western sedimentary margin of Aïr Mountains, in North Central Niger by French company CEA. These programmes led to the discovery of several uranium deposits including the Arlit and Akouta deposits which are presently being mined respectively by SOMAIR and Cominak. Further works by CEA and its 100% subsidiary COGEMA and other companies consisted basically in follow up of the different targets outlined by the above programmes. The rocks hosting the uranium mineralisation are commonly arenites of the Carboniferous age Guezouman and Tarat Formations. Some beds within the Tchirozerine Formation of Jurassic age and the Irhazer Formation of Cretaceous age also contain uranium. The depositional environment of these formations was fluvial to deltaic. Apparently uranium was leached from the basement. Tectonic, lithological and geochemical

  20. Complex defects in the oxidation of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacCrone, R.K.; Sankaran, S.; Shatynski, S.R.; Colmenares, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    We are reporting EPR results obtained with uranium powder samples fully oxidized in dry air, water vapor, and air/water vapor mixtures. The results reported previously are confirmed and additional paramagnetic centers, associated with chemisorbed species, have been identified. The temperature dependence of the g-value for these centers from room temperature to 10K is also reported