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Sample records for maximum postoperative pain

  1. Postoperative pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehlet, H; Dahl, J B

    1993-01-01

    also modify various aspects of the surgical stress response, and nociceptive blockade by regional anesthetic techniques has been demonstrated to improve various parameters of postoperative outcome. It is therefore stressed that effective control of postoperative pain, combined with a high degree......Treatment of postoperative pain has not received sufficient attention by the surgical profession. Recent developments concerned with acute pain physiology and improved techniques for postoperative pain relief should result in more satisfactory treatment of postoperative pain. Such pain relief may...

  2. Predicting postoperative pain by preoperative pressure pain assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yung-Wei; Somma, Jacques; Hung, Yu-Chun; Tsai, Pei-Shan; Yang, Chen-Hsien; Chen, Chien-Chuan

    2005-09-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate whether preoperative pressure pain sensitivity testing is predictive of postoperative surgical pain. Female subjects undergoing lower abdominal gynecologic surgery were studied. A pressure algometer was used preoperatively to determine the pressure pain threshold and tolerance. A visual analog scale (VAS) was used to assess postoperative pain. A State-Trait Anxiety Inventory was used to assess patients' anxiety. Subjects received intravenous patient-controlled analgesia for postoperative pain control. The preoperative pain threshold and tolerance were compared with the postoperative VAS pain score and morphine consumption. Forty women were enrolled. Their preoperative pressure pain threshold and tolerance were 141 +/- 65 kPa and 223 +/- 62 kPa, respectively. The VAS pain score in the postanesthesia care unit and at 24 h postoperatively were 81 +/- 24 and 31 +/- 10, respectively. Highly anxious patients had higher VAS pain scores in the postanesthesia care unit (P pain tolerance was significantly correlated with the VAS at 24 h postoperatively (P pain tolerance after fentanyl administration (mean, 272 +/- 68 kPa) correlated significantly with morphine consumption in the first 24 h postoperatively (P pain tolerance is significantly correlated with the level of postoperative pain. Pain tolerance assessment after fentanyl was administered and fentanyl sensitivity predicted the dose of analgesics used in the first 24 h after surgery. The algometer is thus a simple, useful tool for predicting postoperative pain and analgesic consumption.

  3. Prediction of postoperative pain after percutaneous nephrolithotomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Katja Venborg; Olesen, Anne Estrup; Osther, Palle Jørn Sloth

    2013-01-01

    Postoperative pain remains a significant problem and the individual variance in postoperative pain is not fully understood. In recent years, there has been focus on identifying risk factors predicting patients with high postoperative pain intensity or consumption of analgesics, which may facilitate...... thresholds were measured using electrical (single and 5 repeated) and pressure pain stimulation over the flank bilaterally (stone-side = operation side and control-side = non-operation side). Postoperative pain scores were recorded on a numerical rating scale and analgesic consumption was registered....... The responses to repeated electrical stimuli (temporal summation) were preoperatively increased on the stone-side compared to the control-side (P = 0.016). Preoperative electrical pain thresholds from the control-side correlated inversely with postoperative opioid consumption (single stimuli: ρ = -0.43, P

  4. Nursing approaches in the postoperative pain management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevilay Yüceer

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Patients frequently experience moderate to severe pain inthe postoperative period. Although the pain managementis an integral and important part of the nursing care, studiessuggest that, nursing management of postoperativepain remains inadequate.Postoperative care nurses are responsible to assess thepatient’s pain, teach the patient strategies to deal with thepain, apply the analgesic treatment plan, monitor the resultsof treatment, educate the patient and the family onpain management and document the pain managementoutcomes. The nurses’ holistic approach to pain managementminimizes the patients’ discomfort caused by pain inthe postoperative period after the surgery. In this article,nurses’ approaches to postoperative pain managementare discussed. J Clin Exp Invest 2011; 2 (4: 474-478

  5. Neutrophil Lymphocyte Ratio Predicts Postoperative Pain after ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background and Aim: Postoperative pain is well known and usually disturbing complication of surgery. Inflammation plays an important role in the development and progression of postoperative pain. We aimed to investigate possible relationship between preoperatively measured neutrophil‑lymphocyte ratio (NLR) – as an ...

  6. Nursing approaches in the postoperative pain management

    OpenAIRE

    Sevilay Yüceer

    2011-01-01

    Patients frequently experience moderate to severe pain inthe postoperative period. Although the pain managementis an integral and important part of the nursing care, studiessuggest that, nursing management of postoperativepain remains inadequate.Postoperative care nurses are responsible to assess thepatient’s pain, teach the patient strategies to deal with thepain, apply the analgesic treatment plan, monitor the resultsof treatment, educate the patient and the family onpain management and doc...

  7. Neutrophil Lymphocyte Ratio Predicts Postoperative Pain after ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-12-05

    Dec 5, 2017 ... systemic diseases (hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus),. Original Article. INTRODUCTION. Postoperative ... vertigo, etc.) have been shown.[3-15]. In this study, we aimed to investigate possible relationship between preoperative NLR and postoperative pain (which was evaluated by analgesic demand at.

  8. Pain locations in the postoperative period after cardiac surgery: Chronology of pain and response to treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca, J; Valero, R; Gomar, C

    Postoperative pain after cardiac surgery (CS) can be generated at several foci besides the sternotomy. Prospective descriptive longitudinal study on the chronological evolution of pain in 11 sites after CS including consecutive patients submitted to elective CS through sternotomy. The primary endpoints were to establish the main origins of pain, and to describe its chronological evolution during the first postoperative week. Secondary endpoints were to describe pain characteristics in the sternotomy area and to correlate pain intensity with other variables. Numerical Pain Rating Scale from 0 to 10 at rest and at movement on postoperative days 1, 2, 4 and 6. Numerical Pain Rating Scale>3 was considered moderate pain. Statistical analysis consisted in Mann-Whitney U-test, a Chi-squared, a Fisher exact text and Pearson's correlations. Forty-seven patients were enrolled. In 4 of 11 locations pain was reported as Numerical Pain Rating Scale>3 (sternotomy, oropharynx, saphenectomy and musculoskeletal pain in the back and shoulders). Maximum intensity of pain on postoperative days 1 and 2 was reported in the sternotomy area, while on postoperative days 4 and 6 it was reported at the saphenectomy. Pain at rest and at movement differed considerably in the sternotomy, saphenectomy and oropharynx. Pain at back and shoulders and at central venous catheter entry were not influenced by movement. Pain in the sternotomy was mainly described as oppressive. Patients with arthrosis and younger patients presented higher intensity of pain (P=.004; P=.049, respectively). Four locations were identified as the main sources of pain after CS: sternotomy, oropharynx, saphenectomy, and back and shoulders. Pain in different focuses presented differences in chronologic evolution and was differently influenced by movement. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Adult tonsillectomy: postoperative pain depends on indications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaf Zagólski

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Intense pain is one of the most important postoperative complaints after tonsillectomy. It is often described by patients as comparable to the pain that accompanies an acute tonsillitis. Although recurrent tonsillitis is the most frequent indication for surgery, many tonsillectomies are performed due to other indications and these patients may be unfamiliar with such pain. OBJECTIVE: To verify whether individuals with recurrent tonsillitis experience different post-tonsillectomy pain intensity than those with other indications for surgery, with no history of episodes of acute tonsillitis. METHODS: A total of 61 tonsillectomies were performed under general anesthesia, using a potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP laser (to eliminate the potential influence on the study results of forceful dissection of fibrotic tonsils in patients with history of recurrent tonsillitis and multiple ligations of blood vessels within the tonsillar beds. The patients received 37.5 mg Tramadoli hydrochloridum + 325 mg Paracetamol tablets for 10 days. Postoperative variables included the duration of hospital stay, postoperative hemorrhage and readmission rate. The patients reported pain intensity on consecutive days, pain duration, weight loss on postoperative day 10, character, intensity and duration of swallowing difficulties, and the need for additional doses of painkillers. Healing was also assessed. Capsular nerve fibers were histologically examined in the resected tonsils by immunostainings for general and sensory markers. RESULTS: Indications for the surgery were: recurrent acute tonsillitis (34 patients, no history of recurrent tonsillitis: focus tonsil (20 and intense malodour (7. Pain intensity on postoperative days 3-4 and incidence of readmissions due to dehydration were significantly higher in the group with no history of recurrent tonsillitis. No significant differences in relative densities of protein gene product (PGP 9.5- and

  10. Postoperative pain outcomes after transvaginal mesh revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danford, Jill M; Osborn, David J; Reynolds, W Stuart; Biller, Daniel H; Dmochowski, Roger R

    2015-01-01

    Although the current literature discusses mesh complications including pain, as well as suggesting different techniques for removing mesh, there is little literature regarding pain outcomes after surgical removal or revision. The purpose of this study is to determine if surgical removal or revision of vaginal mesh improves patient's subjective complaints of pelvic pain associated with original placement of mesh. After obtaining approval from the Vanderbilt University Medical Center Institutional Review Board, a retrospective review of female patients with pain secondary to previous mesh placement who underwent excision or revision of vaginal mesh from January 2000 to August 2012 was performed. Patient age, relevant medical history including menopause status, previous hysterectomy, smoking status, and presence of diabetes, fibromyalgia, interstitial cystitis, and chronic pelvic pain, was obtained. Patients' postoperative pain complaints were assessed. Of the 481 patients who underwent surgery for mesh revision, removal or urethrolysis, 233 patients met our inclusion criteria. One hundred and sixty-nine patients (73 %) reported that their pain improved, 19 (8 %) reported that their pain worsened, and 45 (19 %) reported that their pain remained unchanged after surgery. Prior history of chronic pelvic pain was associated with increased risk of failure of the procedure to relieve pain (OR 0.28, 95 % CI 0.12-0.64, p = 0.003). Excision or revision of vaginal mesh appears to be effective in improving patients' pain symptoms most of the time. Patients with a history of chronic pelvic pain are at an increased risk of no improvement or of worsening pain.

  11. Nursing Music Protocol and Postoperative Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, Michael J; Coto, Jeffrey

    2018-04-01

    Pain has always been a major concern for patients and nurses during the postoperative period. Therapies, medicines, and protocols have been developed to improve pain and anxiety but have undesirable risks to the patient. Complementary and alternative medicine therapies have been studied but have not been applied as regular protocols in the hospital setting. Music is one type of complementary and alternative medicine therapy that has been reported to have favorable results on reducing postoperative pain, anxiety, and opioid usage. However, music lacks a protocol that nurses can implement during the perioperative process. This paper is an in-depth literature review assessing a best practice recommendation and protocol that establishes a consensus in the use of music therapy. The results suggest that music therapy may consist of calming, soft tones of 60-80 beats per minute for at least 15-30 minutes at least twice daily during the pre- and postoperative periods. It is suggested that music only be used in conjunction with standards of care and not as the primary intervention of pain or anxiety. This evidence suggests that proper use of music therapy can significantly reduce surgical pain. Implementing these protocols and allowing the freedom of nursing staff to use them may lead to greater reductions in surgical pain and anxiety and a reduction in opioid use. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Postoperative Pain Management: Clinicians' Knowledge and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Postoperative Pain Management: Clinicians' Knowledge and Practices on Assessment and Measurement at Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital. ... A standardized questionnaire was administered to 236 hospital – based clinicians including medical doctors, nurses and clinical officers. The questionnaire consisted of ...

  13. Peripherally applied opioids for postoperative pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, B N; Henneberg, S W; Schmiegelow, K

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Opioids applied peripherally at the site of surgery may produce postoperative analgesia with few side effects. We performed this systematic review to evaluate the analgesic effect of peripherally applied opioids for acute postoperative pain. METHODS: We searched PubMed (1966 to June...... 2013), Embase (1980 to June 2013), and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library 2013, Issue 6). Randomized controlled trials investigating the postoperative analgesic effect of peripherally applied opioids vs. systemic opioids or placebo, measured by pain intensity...... difference -5 mm, 95% CI: -7 to -3) for peripherally applied opioids vs. placebo and statistically significant increased time to first analgesic (mean difference 153 min, 95% CI: 41-265). When preoperative inflammation was reported (five studies), peripherally applied opioids significantly improved...

  14. [QUIPS: quality improvement in postoperative pain management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, Winfried

    2011-01-01

    Despite the availability of high-quality guidelines and advanced pain management techniques acute postoperative pain management is still far from being satisfactory. The QUIPS (Quality Improvement in Postoperative Pain Management) project aims to improve treatment quality by means of standardised data acquisition, analysis of quality and process indicators, and feedback and benchmarking. During a pilot phase funded by the German Ministry of Health (BMG), a total of 12,389 data sets were collected from six participating hospitals. Outcome improved in four of the six hospitals. Process indicators, such as routine pain documentation, were only poorly correlated with outcomes. To date, more than 130 German hospitals use QUIPS as a routine quality management tool. An EC-funded parallel project disseminates the concept internationally. QUIPS demonstrates that patient-reported outcomes in postoperative pain management can be benchmarked in routine clinical practice. Quality improvement initiatives should use outcome instead of structural and process parameters. The concept is transferable to other fields of medicine. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  15. [Management of postoperative pain in surgical units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delbos, A

    1998-01-01

    In order to improve the management of postoperative pain many publications insist on progressive changes in care organization. The following list outlines steps to be taken for implementation of these changes: 1) an initial analysis of management of post-operative pain allows awareness of reforms to be proposed; 2) participation of health teams in special training in order to use evaluation tools and collect data (use of analgesics, adverse effects); 3) establishing policies and procedures: recovery room, guidelines for analgesic use and adverse effects; 4) notifying patient about the various procedures to be used in postoperative period--discussion with the patient during the preoperative interview; 5) current use of standard patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) and locoregional analgesia; 6) use of combined techniques in order to achieve a balanced analgesia; 7) implementing a quality assurance programme which should include analgesic effectiveness, patient satisfaction and prevention of complications; and 8) planning of an Acute Pain Service based on a clinical nurse co-ordinator which offers highly effective forms of postsurgical analgesia.

  16. Pain Unheard? Postoperative Pain Assessment in Neonates and Infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Dijk (Monique)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractStudy aim: The study aimed at answering two questions: • How reliable. valid, and feasible is the multidimensional COMFORT scale to assess postoperative pain in infants and toddlers 0-3 years of age? • What is the difference between intermittent morphine administration and

  17. Tramadol for postoperative pain treatment in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnabel, Alexander; Reichl, Sylvia U; Meyer-Frießem, Christine; Zahn, Peter K; Pogatzki-Zahn, Esther

    2015-03-18

    According to current recommendations a multimodal approach is believed to be the gold standard for postoperative pain treatment in children. However, several surveys in the last few years demonstrated that postoperative pain in children is still a serious problem, mainly because opioids are avoided. One of the reasons for this is the fear of severe adverse events following opioid administration. Tramadol is a weak mu-opioid agonist and inhibits reuptake of noradrenaline and serotonin (5HT). Because of a relatively wide therapeutic window and a ceiling effect with a lower risk for severe adverse events (for example respiratory depression) tramadol is a widely used opioid in children. However, the exact efficacy and occurrence of adverse events following tramadol (in comparison with placebo or other opioids) for postoperative pain treatment in children and adolescents are currently not clear. To assess the effectiveness and side effect profile of tramadol for postoperative pain relief in children and adolescents undergoing different surgical procedures. We searched the following electronic databases: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2014, Issue 6), MEDLINE via PubMed (January 1966 to July 2014) and EMBASE via Ovid (January 1947 to July 2014). There were no restrictions regarding language or date of publication. The reference lists of all included trials were checked for additional studies. All randomised controlled clinical trials investigating the perioperative administration of tramadol compared to placebo or other opioids for postoperative pain treatment in children and adolescents were included. Three review authors independently assessed the study eligibility, performed the data extraction and assessed the risk of bias of included trials. Twenty randomised controlled trials involving 1170 patients were included in this systematic review. The overall risk of bias in included trials was assessed as unclear, because

  18. Pain management discussion forum: prevention of chronic postoperative pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breivik, Harald

    2014-09-01

    ABSTRACT A case of a 35-year-old woman scheduled for removal of a painful breast tumor is discussed. Ways to reduce risk of chronic pain developing postoperatively are described. Preoperative medications, nerve blocks, local anesthetics, and postoperative epidural pharmacotherapy are described. This report is adapted from paineurope 2014; Issue 1, Haymarket Medical Publications Ltd., and is presented with permission. paineurope is provided as a service to pain management by Mundipharma International, Ltd., and is distributed free of charge to health care professionals in Europe. Archival issues can be accessed via the Web site: http://www.paineurope.com, at which European health professionals can register online to receive copies of the quarterly publication.

  19. Post-operative pain prevalence, predictors, management practices ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MWASHAMBWA

    developing countries however, the prevalence of post-operative pain is relatively very high and pain control strategies ... Keywords: post-operative pain, prevalence, predictors, pain management, satisfaction, Tanzania. Introduction ..... perception and patterns of cerebral activation during noxious heat stimulation in humans.

  20. Acute Postoperative Pain Therapy: Current State . Patient Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Lončarić-Katušin, Mirjana; Persoli-Gudelj, Marijana; Šimić-Korać, Nataša; Blažanin, Božidar; Žunić, Josip; Korać, Želimir

    2006-01-01

    In effective control of acute postoperative pain, it is essential to respect the principles of multimodal balanced analgesia, and to apply them within organized units for the management of acute postoperative pain (acute pain service). The aim of the study was to find out patient expectations and experience in the intensity of acute postoperative pain, and the efficiency of therapy they received. Between October 11, 2002 and December 14, 2002, 103 patients having undergone elective operative ...

  1. Postoperative pain treatment after total hip arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højer Karlsen, Anders Peder; Geisler, Anja; Petersen, Pernille Lykke

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of postoperative pain should rely on results from randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses of high scientific quality. The efficacy of a particular intervention may depend on the type of surgical procedure, which supports the reporting of "procedure-specific" interventions. The aim...... of this systematic review was to document the procedure-specific evidence for analgesic interventions after total hip arthroplasty (THA). This PRISMA-compliant and PROSPERO-registered review includes randomized placebo-controlled trials (RCTs) of medication-based analgesic interventions after THA. Endpoints were......, and lumbar plexus block reduced nausea and pruritus. The GRADE-rated quality of evidence ranged from low to very low throughout the analyses. This review demonstrated, that some analgesic interventions may have the capacity to reduce mean opioid requirements and/or mean pain intensity compared with controls...

  2. Postoperative patients' perspectives on rating pain : A qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, J.F.M.; Vervoort, Sigrid; van Wijck, Albert J.M.; Kalkman, CJ; Schuurmans, Marieke

    Background: In postoperative pain treatment patients are asked to rate their pain experience on a single uni-dimensional pain scale. Such pain scores are also used as indicator to assess the quality of pain treatment. However, patients may differ in how they interpret the Numeric Rating Scale (NRS)

  3. The use of Glifanan in postoperative pain | Van Staden | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The use of Glifanan in postoperative pain. ... South African Medical Journal ... analgesic effect of Glifanan 200 mg, dextropropoxyphene 65 mg and placebo is reported. The degree of pain relief was significantly greater following Glifanan than ...

  4. [Postoperative pain management. Aims and organization of a strategy for postoperative acute pain therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolli, M; Nicosia, F

    2000-09-01

    The Health Services, not only the Italian one, is under pressure because of request for improving treatment quality and the financial need for reorganization and cost-saving. It's required a rationalization of intervention, together with a careful choice of the best and cheapest techniques and the demonstration of their efficacy. The anaesthesia service activity, in a period of cost rationalization and funds restriction should be aimed to appropriate outcome measures corrected by both patient's risk factors and surgical-anaesthesiological case-mix. The development of a complete strategy for surgical pain management might run into two phases. The first phase, internal and mono-specialistic, should develop like the creation of an Acute Pain Team. The main processes are: focusing the problem (charge of the care), training, information, teaching methodology (timing, methods, drugs, techniques, etc.) and the audit (before and after changes). The main aims are the evaluation of the level of analgesia and pain relief or patient's satisfaction which are partial endpoints useful to demonstrate the improvement and the efficacy of the new pain management strategies. The second phase, multidisciplinary, is directed toward the creation of a Postoperative Evaluation Team. The main objective is to set up a collaborative clinical group able to identify the criteria for quality, efficacy and safety. The major purpose is the evaluation of major outcome measures: surgical outcome, morbidity, mortality and length of hospitalization. The improvement in the quality of postoperative pain treatment goes through a better organization and a progressive increase of the already available therapy. The achievement of the result and the quality projects depend on the interaction among staff members with different behaviours and settings. Internal teaching and training, continuous education for doctors and nurses, and external information, marketing and improvement of attractive capability of

  5. Quality of Postoperative Pain Management After Maxillofacial Fracture Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peisker, Andre; Meissner, Winfried; Raschke, Gregor F; Fahmy, Mina D; Guentsch, Arndt; Schiller, Juliane; Schultze-Mosgau, Stefan

    2018-05-01

    Effective pain management is an essential component in the perioperative care of surgical patients. However, postoperative pain after maxillofacial fracture repair and its optimal therapy has not been described in detail. In a prospective cohort study, 95 adults rated their pain on the first postoperative day after maxillofacial fracture repair using the questionnaire of the Quality Improvement in Postoperative Pain Management (QUIPS) project. Quality Improvement in Postoperative Pain Management allowed for a standardized assessment of patients' characteristics and pain-related parameters. Overall, the mean maximal pain and pain on activity (numeric rating scales) were significantly higher in patients with mandibular fractures than in patients with midface fractures (P = 0.002 and P = 0.045, respectively). In patients with mandibular fractures, a longer duration of surgery was significantly associated with higher satisfaction with pain intensity (P = 0.015), but was more frequently associated with postoperative vomiting (P = 0.023). A shorter duration of surgery and an absence of preoperative pain counseling in these patients were significantly correlated to desire for more pain medication (P = 0.049 and P = 0.004, respectively). Patients with mandibular fractures that received opioids in the recovery room had significantly higher strain-related pain (P = 0.017). In patients with midface fractures, a longer duration of surgery showed significantly higher levels of decreased mobility (P = 0.003). Patients receiving midazolam for premedication had significantly less minimal pain (P = 0.021). Patients with mandibular fractures seem to have more postoperative pain than patients with midface fractures. Monitoring of postsurgical pain and a procedure-specific pain-treatment protocol should be performed in clinical routine.

  6. Does Foot Massage Relieve Acute Postoperative Pain? A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanif Chanif

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study aimed to examine the current state of knowledge regarding foot massageto determine if foot massage has an effect on relieving acute postoperative pain.Method: The following questions were used to guide this review: How does pain occur?What is the pain management modalities used in relieving acute postoperative pain? Does footmassage relieve acute postoperative pain? A comprehensive systematic search of publishedliterature and journal articles from Science Direct, CINAHL, PubMed, ProQuest and fromrelevant textbooks was conducted. The universal case entry website, Google-scholar was usedas well. The following keywords were used: foot massage, pain management, andpostoperative pain. Eight studies on foot massage and more than thirty related articles werereviewed.Result: Postoperative pain is caused by tissue damage that induces release of chemicalmediators from the surgical wound. The four processes of pain are transduction, transmission,perception and modulation. Pain medication is the goal standard for acute postoperative painrelief. In addition, foot massage is a modality that can be used in relieving acute postoperativepain. Massage stimulates large nerve fibers and dermatome layers which contain tactile andpressure receptors. The receptors subsequently transmit the nerve impulse to the centralnervous system. The gate control system in the dorsal horn is activated through the inhibitoryinterneuron, thus closing the gate. Subsequently, the brain does not receive the pain message.Eight reviewed studies demonstrated that foot massage relieves acute postoperative pain.However, there were some methodological limitations of these studies.Conclusion: It is recommended to examine the effect of foot massage on acute postoperativepain with high homogenous samples using various duration of massage and range of time forpain measurement at different settings.Key words: foot massage, pain management and postoperative pain.

  7. Acute pain control and accelerated postoperative surgical recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehlet, H

    1999-01-01

    Postoperative pain relief continues to demand our awareness, and surgeons should be fully aware of the potential physiologic benefits of effective dynamic pain relief regimens and the great potential to improve postoperative outcome if such analgesia is used for rehabilitation. To achieve advanta...... to recent knowledge within surgical pathophysiology. Such efforts must be expected to lead to improved quality of care for patients, with less pain and reduced morbidity leading to cost efficiency....

  8. Postoperative Pain in Children After Dentistry Under General Anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Michelle; Copp, Peter E; Haas, Daniel A

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence, severity, and duration of postoperative pain in children undergoing general anesthesia for dentistry. This prospective cross-sectional study included 33 American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) Class I and II children 4-6 years old requiring multiple dental procedures, including at least 1 extraction, and/or pulpectomy, and/or pulpotomy of the primary dentition. Exclusion criteria were children who were developmentally delayed, cognitively impaired, born prematurely, taking psychotropic medications, or recorded baseline pain or analgesic use. The primary outcome of pain was measured by parents using the validated Faces Pain Scale-Revised (FPS-R) and Parents' Postoperative Pain Measure (PPPM) during the first 72 hours at home. The results showed that moderate-to-severe postoperative pain, defined as FPS-R ≥ 6, was reported in 48.5% of children. The prevalence of moderate-to-severe pain was 29.0% by FPS-R and 40.0% by PPPM at 2 hours after discharge. Pain subsided over 3 days. Postoperative pain scores increased significantly from baseline (P children do experience moderate-to-severe pain postoperatively. Although parents successfully used pain scales, they infrequently administered analgesics.

  9. Nurses' strategies for managing pain in the postoperative setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manias, Elizabeth; Bucknall, Tracey; Botti, Mari

    2005-03-01

    Acute pain is a significant problem in the postoperative setting. Patients report a lack of information about pain-control measures and ineffective pain control. Nurses continue to rely on pharmacologic measures and tend to under-administer analgesics. The purpose of this study was to determine the strategies nurses used to manage patients' pain in the postoperative setting. It also sought to examine the effect of context, including organization of care, nurses' prioritization of work activities, and pressures during a working shift, on their pain-management strategies. An observational design was used in two surgical units of a metropolitan teaching hospital in Melbourne, Australia. Six fixed observation times were identified as key periods for pain activities, each comprising a 2-hour duration. An observation period was examined at least 12 times, resulting in the completion of 74 observations and the identification of 316 pain cases. Fifty-two nurses were observed during their normal day's work with postoperative patients. Six themes were identified: managing pain effectively; prioritizing pain experiences for pain management; missing pain cues for pain management; regulators and enforcers of pain management; preventing pain; and reactive management of pain. The findings highlighted the critical nature of communication between clinicians and patients and among clinicians. It also demonstrated the influence of time on management strategies and the relative importance that nurses place on nonpharmacologic measures in actual practice. This research, which portrays what happens in actual clinical practice, has facilitated the identification of new data that were not evident from other research studies.

  10. Postoperative pain : Knowledge and beliefs of patients and nurses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Jacqueline Fm; Schuurmans, Marieke J.; Alblas, Eva E.; Kalkman, Cor J.; van Wijck, Albert Jm

    2017-01-01

    Aims and objectives: To describe patients' and nurses' knowledge and beliefs regarding pain management. Moreover, to explore the effect of information and education on patients' and nurses' knowledge and beliefs regarding pain management. Background: In the treatment of postoperative pain, patients'

  11. Postoperative pain after hip fracture is procedure specific

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Nicolai; Kristensen, Morten Tange; Palm, H

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hip fracture patients experience high pain levels during postoperative rehabilitation. The role of surgical technique on postoperative pain has not been evaluated previously. METHODS: One hundred and seventeen hip fracture patients were included in a descriptive prospective study. All.......001) and walking (r=-0.36, P=0.004). CONCLUSIONS: Postoperative pain levels after surgery for hip fracture are dependent on the surgical procedure, which should be taken into account in future studies of analgesia and rehabilitation....... patients received continuous epidural analgesia and were treated according to a standardized perioperative rehabilitation programme. Resting pain, pain on hip flexion, and walking were measured during daily physiotherapy sessions on a verbal five-point rating scale during the first four postoperative days...

  12. Post-operative pain control after tonsillectomy: dexametasone vs tramadol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topal, Kubra; Aktan, Bulent; Sakat, Muhammed Sedat; Kilic, Korhan; Gozeler, Mustafa Sitki

    2017-06-01

    Tramadol was found to be more effective than dexamethasone in post-operative pain control, with long-lasting relief of pain. This study aimed to compare the effects of pre-operative local injections of tramadol and dexamethasone on post-operative pain, nausea and vomiting in patients who underwent tonsillectomy. Sixty patients between 3-13 years of age who were planned for tonsillectomy were included in the study. Patients were divided into three groups. Group 1 was the control group. Patients in Group 2 received 0.3 mg/kg Dexamethasone and Group 3 received 0.1 mg/kg Tramadol injection to the peritonsillary space just before the operation. Patients were evaluated for nausea, vomiting, and pain. When the control and the dexamethasone groups were compared; there were statistically significant differences in pain scores at post-operative 15 and 30 min, whereas there was no statistically significant difference in pain scores at other hours. When the control and tramadol groups were compared, there was a statistically significant difference in pain scores at all intervals. When tramadol and dexamethasone groups were compared, there was no statistically significant difference in pain scores at post-operative 15 and 30 min, 1 and 2 h, whereas there was a statistically significant difference in pain scores at post-operative 6 and 24 h.

  13. Pain: Postoperative Analgesia in Infants and Neonates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Ceelie (Ilse)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractPain affects almost everyone at some point in his or her life. A definition drawn up by the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) has it that pain is always subjective This would seem to imply that the way in which pain is perceived varies from person to person and may

  14. Procedure-specific postoperative pain treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerbershagen, H.J.

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this thesis are: To give an overview of one of the serious consequences of acute pain – the transition to chronic pain; To measure and rank pain intensity in a large number of surgical groups in order to define the surgical groups where pain treatment is insufficient and those where

  15. Music and the reduction of post-operative pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Kelly

    The prevention and treatment of post-operative pain, and the promotion of comfort are the challenges facing practitioners working in the recovery room setting. Surgical pain produces autonomic, psychological, immunological and behavioural responses that can delay or inhibit normal healing. Nurses spend more time with patients experiencing pain than any other healthcare professional. Therefore, they are in an ideal position to consider other pain-relieving strategies to complement the analgesics currently used. The studies reviewed cannot prove that music is effective in reducing post-operative pain, because the research methodology in the majority is poor. Patients, experience of listening to music post-operatively was positive, aiding distraction and increasing comfort. This shows the difference between inconsistent results for the objective measures of pain and what the patient is reporting.

  16. Prediction of postoperative pain after mandibular third molar surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudin, Asa; Eriksson, Lars; Liedholm, Rolf

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the predictive potential of preoperative psychological and psychophysiological variables in estimating severity of postoperative pain following mandibular third molar surgery (MTMS). Methods: Following ethical committee approval and informed consent, 40 consecutive patients scheduled...

  17. Effect of postoperative experiences on willingness to pay to avoid postoperative pain, nausea, and vomiting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bosch, Jolanda E.; Bonsel, Gouke J.; Moons, Karel G.; Kalkman, Cor J.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The authors assessed the willingness to pay (WTP) for "perfect" prophylactic antiemetics and analgesics in patients who were scheduled to undergo surgery during general anesthesia. Furthermore, they determined whether postoperative experiences of pain and nausea and vomiting (PONV)

  18. Factors associated with acute postoperative pain following breast reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita R. Kulkarni

    2017-03-01

    Conclusions: This study identifies patients at risk for severe acute postoperative pain following breast reconstruction. These findings will allow plastic surgeons to better tailor postoperative care to improve patient comfort, reduce clinical morbidity, and enhance patient satisfaction with their surgical outcome.

  19. Pre-emptive analgesia with paracetamol (acetaminophen) in postoperative pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afhami, M.R.; Hassanzadeh, J.P.; Panahea, J.R.

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate efficacy and safety of preoperative paracetamol for postoperative pain relief. The study population consisted of 40 adult female patients scheduled for tubectomy as an elective surgery who were in ASA class I. Patients were allocated randomly to receive 325mg of acetaminophen orally half an hour before surgery. Pain was assessed by verbal rating scale in three situations (resting, moving and coughing). Data was collection done using the questionnaire and data analysis done using descriptive statistical methods. The patients who received oral paracetamol experienced moderate and mild pain in 50% of the cases when they were in resting position. Feeling mild and moderate pain with movement was in 40% and 60% respectively. While coughing, 100% of the cases felt only moderate pain and none experienced severe pain. Administration of a single dose of acetaminophen in preoperative period is effective for acute postoperative pain relief. (author)

  20. Assessment of postoperative pain intensity by using photoplethysmography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Peng; Siyuan, Yu; Wei, Wei; Quan, Gong; Bo, Gao

    2014-12-01

    Timely assessment of acute postoperative pain is very important for pain management. No objective and reliable method to assess postoperative pain intensity exists till now. The aim of the study was to investigate the feasibility of photoplethysmography (PPG) signals in postoperative pain assessment. Thirty patients scheduled for elective abdominal surgery under general anesthesia were examined. Finger PPG signals and visual analogue scale (VAS) score were acquired before and 5, 10, 20, and 30 min after sufentanil administration when the patients were awake and transferred to the post-anesthesia care unit (PACU). During each pain rating, the patient's blood pressure, heart rate, and pulse oxygen saturation were recorded. The amplitude of alternating current (AC) and direct current (DC) extracted from finger PPG signals were analyzed, and the ratio of AC and DC (AC/DC) was calculated. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were built to assess the performance of AC and AC/DC to detect patients with VAS >4 in the PACU. After administration of sufentanil, VAS scores decreased significantly (p pain levels, but no obvious differences in blood pressures and heart rate. The area under the ROC curves were 0.754 for AC and 0.795 for AC/DC, respectively. The finger PPG signal can be used in acute postoperative pain assessment. Both AC/DC and AC had significant correlations with the pain rating levels, while blood pressure and heart rate were unreliable in pain assessment.

  1. Prevalence of postoperative pain in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis and the association with preoperative pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastrom, Tracey P; Marks, Michelle C; Yaszay, Burt; Newton, Peter O

    2013-10-01

    Review of a prospective database registry of surgical patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence of postoperative pain and its impact on patient-reported postoperative outcomes using the Scoliosis Research Society (SRS)-22 outcomes questionnaire. Although reportedly rare, postoperative pain can be a devastating situation for the patient with AIS. Most recent studies examining outcomes in AIS surgical treatment use the SRS Pain domain score to assess pain in this population. A prospectively enrolled multicenter database was queried. Patients with minimum 2-year follow-up and 2-year SRS scores were included. Postoperative pain after the acute phase of recovery when reported by the patient to the treating surgeon/clinical team in follow-up is recorded as a complication in the database. Patients included in this series were grouped as either reporting pain or not to the surgeon/clinical team postoperatively. Pre- and postoperative SRS scores were then compared between these 2 groups using analysis of variance (P imaging). These 41 patients had significantly decreased 2-year SRS scores in the domains of Pain, Self-image, Mental health, and Total score (P 0.05). Unexplained pain after the 6-month postoperative period occurred in 7% of the cohort. The results indicate that patients reporting pain to their surgeons/clinical team postoperatively have lower pain scores on a subjective outcome instrument thus further validating the SRS-22 outcome tool. This reported pain seems to be associated with decreases in other SRS-22 domains. Interestingly, these patients also have lower preoperative pain scores than those without postoperative pain. Study into causes of pain in AIS and whether preoperative education and expectations targeted at this population would positively impact outcomes is warranted, especially because on average patients after AIS surgery have less pain. 3.

  2. Epidural morphine for postoperative pain relief in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henneberg, S W; Hole, P; Haas, Inge Madsen De

    1993-01-01

    Epidural morphine for postoperative pain relief is in general use, and has proved to be very efficient in adults. The epidural technique and the use of epidural morphine are much less frequent in children. For 2 years we have prospectively followed 76 children who had epidural morphine...... for postoperative pain relief after major abdominal surgery. The age distribution was from newborn to 13 years, with a median age of 12 months. It was estimated that 94% of the patients had good analgesia for the first 24 postoperative hours and no other opioids were given. The side effects were few, but one case...... the investigation. We observed a change in the sleeping pattern with an increased number of sleep-induced myoclonia during the administration of epidural morphine. In conclusion, the use of epidural morphine in children for postoperative pain relief is very efficient. The minimal effective dose has not been...

  3. Postoperative Visual Analog Pain Scores and Overall Anesthesia Patient Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, Tony; Seipel, Scott J; Coyle, Nina; Ortega, Keri H; DeJesus, Ozzie

    2017-12-01

    Patient satisfaction is evolving into an important measure of high-quality health care and anesthesia care is no exception. Pain management is an integral part of anesthesia care and must be assessed to determine patient satisfaction; therefore, it is a measure for quality of care. One issue is how patients reflect individual experiences into their overall anesthesia experience. There is a need to identify how postoperative pain scores correlate with anesthesia patient satisfaction survey results. Postoperative pain is not a dominant measure in determining anesthesia patient satisfaction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Prediction of postoperative pain by preoperative pain response to heat stimulation in total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunn, Troels H; Gaarn-Larsen, Lissi; Kehlet, Henrik

    2013-09-01

    It has been estimated that up to 54% of the variance in postoperative pain experience may be predicted with preoperative pain responses to experimental stimuli, with suprathreshold heat pain as the most consistent test modality. This study aimed to explore whether 2 heat test paradigms could predict postoperative pain after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Patients scheduled for elective, unilateral, primary TKA under spinal anesthesia were consecutively included in this prospective, observational study. Perioperative analgesia was standardized for all patients. Outcomes were postoperative pain during walk: from 6 to 24 hours (primary), from postoperative day (POD) 1 to 7 (secondary), and from POD 14 to 30 (tertiary). Two preoperative tonic heat stimuli with 47°C were used; short (5 seconds) and long (7 minutes) stimulation upon which patients rated their pain response on an electronic visual analog scale. Multivariate stepwise linear and logistic regressions analyses were carried out, including 8 potential preoperative explanatory variables (among these anxiety, depression, preoperative pain, and pain catastrophizing) to assess pain response to preoperative heat pain stimulation as an independent predictor for postoperative pain. A total of 100 patients were included, and 3 were later excluded. A weak correlation [rho (95% confidence interval); P value] was observed between pain from POD 1 to 7 and pain response to short [rho=0.25(0.04 to 0.44); P=.02] and to long [rho=0.27 (0.07 to 0.46); P=.01] heat pain stimulation. However, these positive correlations were not supported by the linear and logistic regression analyses, in which only anxiety, preoperative pain, and pain catastrophizing were significant explanatory variables (but with low R-squares; 0.05 to 0.08). Pain responses to 2 types of preoperative heat stimuli were not independent clinically relevant predictors for postoperative pain after TKA. Copyright © 2013 International Association for the Study of

  5. [Evaluation of the "initiative pain-free clinic" for quality improvement in postoperative pain management. A prospective controlled study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmkuhl, D; Meissner, W; Neugebauer, E A M

    2011-09-01

    Demonstration of improved postoperative pain management by implementation of the S3 guidelines on treatment of acute perioperative and posttraumatic pain, by the integrated quality management concept "quality management acute pain" of the TÜV Rheinland or by participation in the benchmark project "Quality improvement in postoperative pain management" (QUIPS). A prospective controlled study (pre-post design) was carried out in hospitals with various levels of care comparing three hospital groups (n = 17/7/3, respectively). Group 1: participation in the QUIPS project (intraclinic and interclinic comparison of outcome data of postoperative pain treatment), group 2: participation in the quality management acute pain program (certified by TÜV Rheinland), group 3: control group with no involvement in either of the two concepts. In all three groups, an anonymous data collection was performed consisting of patient-reported pain intensity, side effects, pain disability and patient satisfaction. Pain therapy intervention was carried out only in group 2 by an integrated quality management concept (certification project: Quality management acute pain) with a package of measures to improve structure, process and outcome quality. The TÜV Rheinland certified clinics (group 2) showed a significant improvement in the pre-post comparison (before versus after certification) in the areas maximum pain (from visual analogue scale VAS 4.6 to 3.7), stress pain (5.3 to 3.9), pain-related impairment (proportion of patients with pain-linked decreased mobility and movement 26% to 16.1%, coughing and breathing 23.1% to 14.3%) and patient satisfaction (from 13.2 to 13.7; scale 0 completely unsatisfied, 15 very satisfied). The clinics with participation in QUIPS for 2 years also showed a significant improvement in stress pain (numeric rating scale NRS for pain 4.5 to 4.2), pain-linked-limitation of coughing and breathing (28% to 23.6%), and patient satisfaction (from 11.9 to 12.4). There were

  6. Prediction of postoperative pain: a systematic review of predictive experimental pain studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werner, Mads Utke; Mjöbo, Helena N; Nielsen, Per R

    2010-01-01

    Quantitative testing of a patient's basal pain perception before surgery has the potential to be of clinical value if it can accurately predict the magnitude of pain and requirement of analgesics after surgery. This review includes 14 studies that have investigated the correlation between...... preoperative responses to experimental pain stimuli and clinical postoperative pain and demonstrates that the preoperative pain tests may predict 4-54% of the variance in postoperative pain experience depending on the stimulation methods and the test paradigm used. The predictive strength is much higher than...

  7. Prevention of postoperative pain by balanced analgesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, J B; Rosenberg, J; Dirkes, W E

    1990-01-01

    Fourteen patients undergoing colorectal surgery received an intraoperative afferent neural block with combined intrathecal and extradural local anaesthetics plus a balanced postoperative low-dose regimen of extradural bupivacaine 10 mg h-1-morphine 0.2 mg h-1 and systemic piroxicam 20 mg/24 h...

  8. Prediction of postoperative pain by preoperative pain response to heat stimulation in total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunn, Troels H; Gaarn-Larsen, Lissi; Kehlet, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    It has been estimated that up to 54% of the variance in postoperative pain experience may be predicted with preoperative pain responses to experimental stimuli, with suprathreshold heat pain as the most consistent test modality. We aimed to explore if 2 heat test paradigms could predict postopera......It has been estimated that up to 54% of the variance in postoperative pain experience may be predicted with preoperative pain responses to experimental stimuli, with suprathreshold heat pain as the most consistent test modality. We aimed to explore if 2 heat test paradigms could predict...... and logistic regressions analyses were carried out including 8 potential preoperative explanatory variables (among these anxiety, depression, preoperative pain and pain catastrophizing) to assess pain response to preoperative heat pain stimulation as independent predictor for postoperative pain. 100 patients...... by the linear and logistic regression analyses, where only anxiety, preoperative pain and pain catastrophizing were significant explanatory variables (but with low R-Squares;0.05-0.08). Pain responses to 2 types of preoperative heat stimuli were not independent clinical relevant predictors for postoperative...

  9. PCA and Postoperative Pain Management After Orthopedic Surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M. Hashemi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients often suffer from inadequate treatment of postoperative pain. The aim of this study was to investigate effect of PCA on postoperative pain management and patients’ satisfaction from use of PCA. Materials and Methods: In this prospective study, between 2010 to 2011, patients presented by orthopedic specialists to acute and chronic pain service of Akhtar Hospital. A satisfaction questionnaire was given on discharge to this patients, were asked to fill out it . Then collected by ward nurse. Results: patients’ satisfaction from pain relief with use of PCA was high ( 94.9% . In this patient pain relief at third day after surgery and require analgesic was low, significantly (p=0.0001. Significant patients’ satisfaction from effect of PCA in pain control and products support was high (p=0.0001.     Conclusion: Patient controlled analgesia is a safe, effective and noninvasive method for post operative pain management and in this study patients’ satisfaction for pain management was high for use of PCA and pain service. 

  10. Monitoring of skin conductance to assess postoperative pain intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledowski, T; Bromilow, J; Paech, M J; Storm, H; Hacking, R; Schug, S A

    2006-12-01

    Pain is known to alter the electrogalvanic properties of the skin. The aim of this pilot study was to investigate the influence of postoperative pain on skin conductance (SC) readings. After obtaining ethical approval and written informed consent, 25 postoperative patients were asked to quantify their level of pain on a numeric rating scale (NRS, 0-10) at different time points in the recovery room. As a parameter of SC, the number of fluctuations within the mean SC per second (NFSC) was recorded. Simultaneously, the NRS was obtained from patients by a different observer who was blinded to the NFSC values. Data from 110 readings of 25 patients (14 female, 11 male; 21-67 yr) were included. NFSC showed a significant correlation with the NRS (r=0.625; P3 on the NRS was predicted with sensitivity of 89% and specificity of 74%. The severity of postoperative pain significantly influences SC. Using cut-off values, NFSC may prove a useful tool for pain assessment in the postoperative period.

  11. Topical lidocaine patch 5% for acute postoperative pain control.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gilhooly, D

    2011-02-01

    A 39-year-old para 3 woman presented for elective caesarean section (lower segment caesarean section (LSCS)) for breech presentation. The patient had a strong history of atopy and anaphylaxis to paracetamol, codeine, penicillin and latex. The patient was asthmatic, triggered by aspirin. Epidural anaesthesia was unsuccessful and LSCS was carried out under spinal anaesthesia. Postoperatively the patient was unwilling to take analgesic medication due to fear of an allergic reaction. Three 5% lidocaine patches were applied to the wound for postoperative analgesia. This reduced the patient\\'s visual analogue scale pain score from 10\\/10 to 5\\/10 at rest and 10\\/10 to 7\\/10 with movement. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation was added and this improved associated back pain, reducing the pain further to 2\\/10. This is the first description of lignocaine patch 5% for postoperative LSCS pain. It is suggested that this method of delivery of local anaesthetic, which is easy to apply and has minimal side effects, should be considered not as a sole agent but as part of a multimodal technique to address postoperative LSCS pain.

  12. Characterization of persistent postoperative pain by quantitative sensory testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werner, Mads U.; Kehlet, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    Postoperative pain remains inadequately treated, and it has been estimated that 5-10% undergoing surgery will develop moderate to severe persistent pain leading to chronic physical disability and psychosocial distress. Quantitative sensory testing (QST) is a graded, standardized activation...... research tool in studies investigating the correlation between responses to preoperatively applied experimental pain stimuli and clinical postoperative pain. Second, the use of QST as a valuable prognostic, sequential assessment tool in surgical procedure specific research is presented. Third......, the implications of these findings for use of QST in future research are discussed. More rational design of predictive studies in PPP, based on surgical procedure specific approaches, is needed in order to improve our understanding of prevention and management of this debilitating postsurgical condition....

  13. Characterization of persistent postoperative pain by quantitative sensory testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werner, Mads U.; Kehlet, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    , the implications of these findings for use of QST in future research are discussed. More rational design of predictive studies in PPP, based on surgical procedure specific approaches, is needed in order to improve our understanding of prevention and management of this debilitating postsurgical condition.......Postoperative pain remains inadequately treated, and it has been estimated that 5-10% undergoing surgery will develop moderate to severe persistent pain leading to chronic physical disability and psychosocial distress. Quantitative sensory testing (QST) is a graded, standardized activation...... research tool in studies investigating the correlation between responses to preoperatively applied experimental pain stimuli and clinical postoperative pain. Second, the use of QST as a valuable prognostic, sequential assessment tool in surgical procedure specific research is presented. Third...

  14. Prediction of postoperative pain after mandibular third molar surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudin, Asa; Eriksson, Lars; Liedholm, Rolf

    2010-01-01

    . Standardized surgery was performed during local anesthesia. Postoperative pain management was with rescue paracetamol and ibuprofen. The patients were instructed to record each day their pain at rest and during dynamic conditions, and their requirement of analgesics for 14 days following surgery.......To evaluate the predictive potential of preoperative psychological and psychophysiological variables in estimating severity of postoperative pain following mandibular third molar surgery (MTMS). Methods: Following ethical committee approval and informed consent, 40 consecutive patients scheduled...... for MTMS were included. Preoperative psychometric indicators of anxiety, depression, and vulnerability were evaluated by patient questionnaires. Thermal thresholds and heat pain perception (1 second phasic stimuli: 44 degrees C to 48 degrees C) were evaluated with quantitative sensory testing techniques...

  15. Preventive effect of dexketoprofen on postoperative pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelir, İsmail Kerem; Güleç, Sacit; Ceyhan, Dilek

    2016-04-01

    Preventive analgesia has been defined as reduction in noxious stimuli during preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative periods. The aim of the present study was to prevent central sensitization by administering ketamine infusion throughout the surgical procedure. In addition, possible preventive effects of dexketoprofen when administered before and after incision were evaluated. Fifty patients were included. Group I was administered 50 mg intravenous dexketoprofen prior to surgical incision, and Group II received the same amount 10 minutes after the incision had been made. Following induction of general anesthesia, all patients received a bolus of 0.50 mg/kg ketamine in 0.07 mg/kg/h intravenous infusion. When postoperative visual analog scale values were compared, values for Group I after 1 and 4 hours were significantly lower than those of Group II. In addition, morphine consumption at 4, 8, 12, and 24 hours was significantly lower in Group I. Combined with the prevention of central sensitization with ketamine, administration of dexketoprofen prior to incision led to a lower rate of morphine consumption and more effective analgesia than post-incision administration.

  16. Single dose oral flurbiprofen for acute postoperative pain in adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultan, Asquad; McQuay, Henry J; Moore, R Andrew; Derry, Sheena

    2014-01-01

    Background Flurbiprofen is a non-selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), related to ibuprofen and naproxen, used to treat acute and chronic painful conditions. There is no systematic review of its use in acute postoperative pain. Objectives To assess efficacy, duration of action, and associated adverse events of single dose oral flurbiprofen in acute postoperative pain in adults. Search methods We searched Cochrane CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Oxford Pain Relief Database for studies to January 2009. Selection criteria Randomised, double blind, placebo-controlled trials of single dose orally administered flurbiprofen in adults with moderate to severe acute postoperative pain. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. Pain relief or pain intensity data were extracted and converted into the dichotomous outcome of number of participants with at least 50% pain relief over 4 to 6 hours, from which relative risk (RR) and number needed to treat to benefit (NNT) were calculated. Numbers of participants using rescue medication over specified time periods, and time to use of rescue medication, were sought as additional measures of efficacy. Information on adverse events and withdrawals were collected. Main results Eleven studies compared flurbiprofen (699 participants) with placebo (362 participants) in studies lasting 6 to 12 hours. Studies were of adequate reporting quality, and most participants had pain following dental extractions. The dose of flurbiprofen used was 25 mg to 100 mg, with most information for 50 mg and 100 mg. The NNT for at least 50% pain relief over 4 to 6 hours for flurbiprofen 50 mg compared with placebo (692 participants) was 2.7 (2.3 to 3.3) and for 100 mg (416 participants) it was 2.5 (2.0 to 3.1). With flurbiprofen 50 mg and 100 mg 65% to 70% of participants experienced at least 50% pain relief, compared with 25% to 30% with placebo. Rescue medication was used by 25

  17. Postoperative pain: knowledge and beliefs of patients and nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Jacqueline Fm; Schuurmans, Marieke J; Alblas, Eva E; Kalkman, Cor J; van Wijck, Albert Jm

    2017-11-01

    To describe patients' and nurses' knowledge and beliefs regarding pain management. Moreover, to explore the effect of information and education on patients' and nurses' knowledge and beliefs regarding pain management. In the treatment of postoperative pain, patients' and nurses' inadequate knowledge and erroneous beliefs may hamper the appropriate use of analgesics. A randomised controlled trial and a cross-sectional study. In 2013, half of 760 preoperative patients were allocated to the intervention group and received written information about the complications of postoperative pain. The knowledge and beliefs of 1184 nurses were studied in 2014 in a cross-sectional study. All data were collected with the same questionnaires. In the intervention group, patients' knowledge level was significant higher than in the control group, while no differences were found in beliefs. Nurses had higher knowledge and more positive beliefs towards pain management compared with both patient groups. Nurses with additional pain education scored better than nurses without additional pain education. Nurses were also asked what percentage of pain scores matched their impression of the patient's pain, and the mean was found to be 63%. Written information was effective for increasing patients' knowledge. However, it was not effective for changing beliefs about analgesics and patients and nurses had erroneous beliefs about analgesics. It is necessary to continue to inform patients and nurses about the need for analgesics after surgery. Such education could also emphasise that a discrepancy between a patient's reported pain score and the nurse's own assessment of the patient's pain should prompt a discussion with the patient about his/her pain. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Effect of postoperative dexamethasone on pain, emesis and haemorrhage in tonsillectomy by dissection method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, K.A.; Faiz, S.B.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the effect of postoperative intravenous dose of dexamethasone on morbidity in patients undergoing tonsillectomy. Design: Randomized control trial. Place and Duration of Study: This study was conducted in ENT Department Shaikh Khalifa Bin Zayed Al Nahyan Hospital (CMH) Muzaffarabad from 10th Jan 2010 to 15th Feb 2011. Patients and Methods: After getting informed consent, a total of 60 patients who fulfilled the inclusion criteria were selected and tonsillectomy by dissection method was carried out. They were divided into two groups of 30 each using a random numbers table. Group A received 0.25 mg/kg body weight (maximum 20 mg) of Dexamethasone postoperatively intravenously for 03 days while group B (control group) did not receive any steroid. Results: In group A, 80% patients had mild pain, 16.7% had moderate pain and 3.3% had a severe pain while in group B, 30% patients had mild pain, 6.7% had moderate pain and 63.3% had severe pain (p< 0.05). In group A, 76.7% patients had mild emesis while in group B, 86.7% had moderate emesis (p< 0.05). There was an insignificant difference in secondary hemorrhage. Conclusion: Dexamethasone given postoperatively significantly reduces the morbidity that is pain, episodes of emesis thus early recovery to a normal lifestyle with no effect on secondary hemorrhage in patients undergoing Tonsillectomy by dissection method. (author)

  19. Pressure Pain Threshold as a Predictor of Acute Postoperative Pain Following Total Joint Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghverdian, Brandon A; Wright, David J; Schwarzkopf, Ran

    2016-10-26

    Acute pain in the postoperative period after total joint arthroplasty (TJA) has a significant effect on early rehabilitation, hospital length of stay, and the development of chronic pain. Consequently, efforts have been made to predict the occurrence of postoperative pain using preoperative and intraoperative factors. In this study, we tested the usefulness of preoperative pressure pain threshold (PPT) values in the prediction of three outcomes for patients who underwent TJA: visual analog scale pain scores, hospital length of stay, and opioid consumption. Using a digital pressure algometer, we measured the preoperative PPT in 41 patients expected to undergo TJA at three different body sites: the first web space of the hand, the operative joint, and the contralateral joint. We correlated each PPT separately with postoperative visual analog scale pain scores, hospital length of stay, and opioid consumption. No significant correlation was found between preoperative PPT and the three postoperative outcomes. This finding held true when patients were subdivided by surgery type (total knee arthroplasty vs. total hip arthroplasty). There was no significant difference in PPT between the three body testing sites. This study failed to prove the usefulness of PPT in the prediction of acute postoperative pain, pain medication consumption, and length of stay. The pressure algometer has previously found a place in the assessment of pain in a variety of clinical settings, but its utility has not yet been demonstrated in patients undergoing TJA.

  20. Epidural morphine for postoperative pain relief in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henneberg, S W; Hole, P; Haas, Inge Madsen De

    1993-01-01

    the investigation. We observed a change in the sleeping pattern with an increased number of sleep-induced myoclonia during the administration of epidural morphine. In conclusion, the use of epidural morphine in children for postoperative pain relief is very efficient. The minimal effective dose has not been...

  1. Intravenous analgesics for pain management in postoperative patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To compare the effectiveness of post-operative pain management and associated adverse effects of ketamine and nefopam. Methods: In total, 78 American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) grade 1 and 2 patients who had undergone abdominal surgery were given 3 mg of intravenous (IV) morphine as ...

  2. Single dose oral piroxicam for acute postoperative pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R Andrew; Edwards, Jayne; Loke, Yoon; Derry, Sheena; McQuay, Henry J

    2014-01-01

    Background This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in Issue 2, 2000. Piroxicam is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) with analgesic properties, and is used mainly for treating rheumatic disorders. Some drugs have been directly compared against each other within a trial setting to determine their relative efficacies, whereas other have not. It is possible, however, to compare analgesics indirectly by examining the effectiveness of each drug against placebo when used in similar clinical situations. Objectives To determine the analgesic efficacy and adverse effects of single-dose piroxicam compared with placebo in moderate to severe postoperative pain. To compare the effects of piroxicam with other analgesics. Search methods Published studies were identified from systematic searching of MEDLINE, Biological Abstracts, EMBASE, CENTRAL and the Oxford Pain Relief Database in December 2007. Additional studies were identified from the reference lists of retrieved reports. Selection criteria The following inclusion criteria were used: full journal publication, randomised placebo controlled trial, double-blind design, adult participants, postoperative pain of moderate to severe intensity at the baseline assessment, postoperative administration of oral or intramuscular piroxicam. Data collection and analysis Summed pain intensity and pain relief data were extracted and converted into dichotomous information to yield the number of participants obtaining at least 50% pain relief. This was used to calculate estimates of relative benefit and number-needed-to-treat-to-benefit (NNT) for one participant to obtain at least 50% pain relief. Information was collected on adverse effects and estimates of relative risk and number-needed-to-treat-to-harm (NNH) were calculated. Main results In this update no further studies were found. The original search identified three studies (141 participants) which compared oral piroxicam 20 mg with placebo and

  3. [Validation of the Spanish version of Parent's Postoperative Pain Management pain scale].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullan, A M; Perelló, M; Jerez, C; Gómez, E; Planas, M J; Serrallonga, N

    2016-02-01

    Assessment of postoperative pain is a fundamental aspect of post-surgical care. When surgery is performed as an outpatient, the parents are mainly responsible for the assessment of pain, but they may not always correctly evaluate their children's pain. This makes it necessary to have tools that help them to assess postoperative pain reliably. The Parent's Postoperative Pain Measurement (PPPM) is a behavioral measurement tool of post-operative pain developed to help parents to assess their children's post-operative pain. The purpose of this work was to translate this scale into Spanish, and validate the psychometric properties of the Spanish version of the scale. Participants were 111 children aged 2 to 12 years, who had undergone surgery, and one of their parents. After the operation, the children's level of pain was assessed, and the parents completed the PPPM scale in Spanish. The PPPM items in Spanish showed good internal consistency (Cronbach alpha between 0.784 and 0.900) and the scale scores were closely related to the global pain assessment (Spearman's rho correlation between 0.626 and 0.431). The score on the scale decreased between the day of the operation and the next day, and discriminated well between children undergoing surgery qualified as low/moderate pain and high pain. We conclude that the Spanish version of the PPPM scale evaluated in this study, has good psychometric properties to assess postoperative pain by parents at home. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Low degree of satisfactory individual pain relief in post-operative pain trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisler, A; Dahl, J B; Karlsen, A P H; Persson, E; Mathiesen, O

    2017-01-01

    The majority of clinical trials regarding post-operative pain treatment focuses on the average analgesic efficacy, rather than on efficacy in individual patients. It has been argued, that in acute pain trials, the underlying distributions are often skewed, which makes the average unfit as the only way to measure efficacy. Consequently, dichotomised, individual responder analyses using a predefined 'favourable' response, e.g. Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) pain scores ≤ 30, have recently been suggested as a more clinical relevant outcome. We re-analysed data from 16 randomised controlled trials of post-operative pain treatment and from meta-analyses of a systematic review regarding hip arthroplasty. The predefined success criterion was that at least 80% of patients in active treatment groups should obtain VAS < 30 at 6 and 24 h post-operatively. In the analysis of data from the randomised controlled trials, we found that at 6 h post-operatively, 50% (95% CI: 31-69) of patients allocated to active treatment reached the success criterion for pain at rest and 14% (95% CI: 5-34) for pain during mobilisation. At 24 h post-operatively, 60% (95% CI: 38-78) of patients allocated to active treatment reached the success criterion for pain at rest, and 15% (95% CI: 5-36) for pain during mobilisation. Similar results were found for trials from the meta-analyses. Our results indicate that for conventional, explanatory trials of post-operative pain, individual patient's achievement of a favourable response to analgesic treatment is rather low. Future pragmatic clinical trials should focus on both average pain levels and individual responder analyses in order to promote effective pain treatment at the individually patient level. © 2016 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Assessment of quality of care in acute postoperative pain management

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    Milutinović Dragana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Managing of acute postoperative pain should be of great interest for all hospital institutions, as one of the key components of patients satisfaction, which indicates quality, as well as the outcome of treatment. The aim of this study was to assess the quality of nursing care in managing acute postoperative pain and to establish factors which influence patients assessment of the same. Method. The investigation was conducted on the sample of 135 patients hospitalized in surgical clinics of the Clinical Centre of Vojvodina in Novi Sad in the form of cross-sectional study, by interviewing patients during the second postoperative day and collecting sociodemographic variables, type of surgical procedure and applied analgesic therapy which were taken from their medical documentation. The modified questionnaire of the Strategic and Clinical Quality Indicators in Postoperative Pain Management (SCQIPP was used as the instrument of the investigation. The data were processed with suitable mathematical statistics methods such as multivariate analyses of variance (MANOVA, discriminative and other parametric procedures and methods. Roy's test, Pearson's coefficient contingency (χ, multiple correlation coefficient (R were conducted amongst other invariant procedures. Results. The mean score for the individual items of SCQIPP questionnaire was between 2.0 and 4.7 (scale range 1-5 and the percentage of patients answers 'strongly agree' ranged from 4.4 to 77%. The smallest number of positive answers were given by the patients for the item 'In order to assess pain intensity, some of the staff asked me at least once in the morning, in the afternoon and in the evening to show the number from 0-10'. Most of the patients (57% evaluated severe pain during the previous 24 hours, as moderate pain, which represents significantly greater number of patients which complain of severe pain and mild pain (p < 0.001. The analysis of patients evaluation (MANOVA p

  6. The effects of Western music on postoperative pain in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, M; Chin, C C

    1998-02-01

    Music is a method nurses can use to help relieve pain, however little is known about its effectiveness across cultures. In this study, Western music was tested for its effectiveness in reducing postoperative pain in 38 Taiwanese patients, and its acceptability was explored. A pretest and post-test experimental design was used with visual analogue scales to measure sensation and distress of pain. Before surgery, subjects were randomly assigned to receive tape recorded music or the usual care. Those who were assigned to the music group chose among 5 types of sedative music. On postoperative Day 1 and Day 2, the effectiveness of the tape-recorded music was investigated during 15 minutes of rest in bed. Patients were interviewed on Day 3 to determine their liking for the music, its calming effects, and the helpfulness of the music. Repeated measures analysis of variance showed a significant interaction between time and group in the distress of pain on Day 1, but not on Day 2, and in pain sensation on Day 2, but not Day 1. Subjects from Taiwan were similar to subjects in a previous study in the United States in their liking for the music, and in reports of the helpfulness of the music for pain sensation and distress, but fewer Taiwanese found the music calming, and they had different choices: more chose harp music and fewer chose jazz than subjects in the U.S. study, and some would prefer Buddhist hymns or popular songs heard in Taiwan. Findings support the use of culturally acceptable music in addition to analgesic medication for the sensation and distress of postoperative pain.

  7. The effect of diclofenac mouthwash on periodontal postoperative pain

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    Jaber Yaghini

    2011-01-01

    After the operation in addition to ibuprofen 400 mg, one quadrant randomly received Diclofenac mouthwash (0/01% for 30 seconds, 4 times a day (for a week and for the contrary quadrant, ibuprofen and placebo mouthwash was given to be used in the same manner. The patients scored the number of ibuprofen consumption and their pain intensity based on VAS index in a questionnaire in days 1, 2, 3 and the first week after operation. The findings were analysed using two-way ANOVA, t-test and Wilcoxon. P-value less than 0.05 considered to be significant. Results: There was a significant difference between the mean values of pain intensity of two quadrants in four periods (P = 0.031. But, there was no significant difference between the average ibuprofen consumption in two groups (P = 0.51. Postoperative satisfaction was not significantly different in two quadrants (P = 0.059. 60% of patients preferred Diclofenac mouthwash. Conclusion: Diclofenac mouthwash was effective in reducing postoperative periodontal pain but it seems that it isn′t enough to control postoperative pain on its own.

  8. Low degree of satisfactory individual pain relief in post-operative pain trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geisler, A; Dahl, J B; Karlsen, A P H

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The majority of clinical trials regarding post-operative pain treatment focuses on the average analgesic efficacy, rather than on efficacy in individual patients. It has been argued, that in acute pain trials, the underlying distributions are often skewed, which makes the average unfi...

  9. Pain point system scale (PPSS: a method for postoperative pain estimation in retrospective studies

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    Gkotsi A

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Anastasia Gkotsi,1 Dimosthenis Petsas,2 Vasilios Sakalis,3 Asterios Fotas,3 Argyrios Triantafyllidis,3 Ioannis Vouros,3 Evangelos Saridakis,2 Georgios Salpiggidis,3 Athanasios Papathanasiou31Department of Experimental Physiology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece; 2Department of Anesthesiology, 3Department of Urology, Hippokration General Hospital, Thessaloniki, GreecePurpose: Pain rating scales are widely used for pain assessment. Nevertheless, a new tool is required for pain assessment needs in retrospective studies.Methods: The postoperative pain episodes, during the first postoperative day, of three patient groups were analyzed. Each pain episode was assessed by a visual analog scale, numerical rating scale, verbal rating scale, and a new tool – pain point system scale (PPSS – based on the analgesics administered. The type of analgesic was defined based on the authors’ clinic protocol, patient comorbidities, pain assessment tool scores, and preadministered medications by an artificial neural network system. At each pain episode, each patient was asked to fill the three pain scales. Bartlett’s test and Kaiser–Meyer–Olkin criterion were used to evaluate sample sufficiency. The proper scoring system was defined by varimax rotation. Spearman’s and Pearson’s coefficients assessed PPSS correlation to the known pain scales.Results: A total of 262 pain episodes were evaluated in 124 patients. The PPSS scored one point for each dose of paracetamol, three points for each nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug or codeine, and seven points for each dose of opioids. The correlation between the visual analog scale and PPSS was found to be strong and linear (rho: 0.715; P <0.001 and Pearson: 0.631; P < 0.001.Conclusion: PPSS correlated well with the known pain scale and could be used safely in the evaluation of postoperative pain in retrospective studies.Keywords: pain scale, retrospective studies, pain point system

  10. The importance of communication in the management of postoperative pain.

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    Sugai, Daniel Y; Deptula, Peter L; Parsa, Alan A; Don Parsa, Fereydoun

    2013-06-01

    This study investigates the importance of communication in surgery and how delivering preoperative patient education can lead to better health outcomes postoperatively, via promoting tolerable pain scores and minimizing the use of narcotics after surgery. Patients who underwent outpatient surgery were randomly divided into groups to compare the pain scores of those who received preoperative patient education, the experimental group, and those who did not receive any form of patient education, the control group. Two weeks before surgery, the experimental group subjects received oral and written forms of patient education consisting of how the body responds to pain, and how endorphins cause natural analgesia. Moreover, patients were educated on the negative effects narcotics have on endorphin production and activity, as well as mechanisms of non-opioid analgesics. Of the 69 patients in the experimental group, 90% declined a prescription for hydrocodone after receiving preoperative education two weeks prior to surgery. The control group consisted of 66 patients who did not receive preoperative patient education and 100% filled their hydrocodone prescriptions. Patients in both groups were offered and received gabapentin and celecoxib preoperatively for prophylaxis of postoperative pain unless they declined. The control groups were found to have average pain scores significantly greater (P groups and also a significantly longer (P communication, which can serve as an effective means to minimize narcotic analgesia after surgery.

  11. [Transfer managment of postoperative acute pain therapy to outpatient aftercare].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tank, C; Lefering, R; Althaus, A; Simanski, C; Neugebauer, E

    2014-10-01

    The significance of postoperative pain management for patients in the hospital is well known and has been a focus of research for several years. The ambulatory care after hospital discharge, however, is not well investigated. A prospective observational study was therefore conducted to study the transfer management from in-hospital patients to ambulatory care. A patient questionnaire was developed and patients were asked to fill it out at different time points after the operation: during the time in the hospital, then at 2 weeks and 6 months after hospital discharge. In addition, the responsible family doctor was approached and interviewed. The main focus of the questionnaire was the measurement of post-surgical pain (numeric rating scale NRS), patient satisfaction (Cologne patient questionnaire), and quality of life (SF 12). Of a total of 128 patients 72.9% described moderate to severe pain after the orthopaedic operations in the hospital. 90.8% of the patients had pain directly after discharge from the hospital; in 67.4% of the cases pain was ≥3 and in 23.4% of the cases pain was ≥6. Six months after discharge pain was significant in 29.4% of the patients, 60.8% of the patients were satisfied with the transfer to the home setting. 16% were not satisfied at all and 23.2% were neutral. Important factors for dissatisfaction with the transfer management were, according to stepwise logistic regeression analysis, sex (female patients), young age, a poor bodily constitution at the hospital and thereafter, and the pain management in the hospital and after discharge. The study shows the significance of the acute pain therapy not only during the hospital stay but also after discharge. There are very few data on pain therapy after discharge from the hospital. Based on the significance of the chronification of acute pain it is of the utmost importance to close this gap. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Post-operative orofacial pain, temporomandibular dysfunction and trigeminal sensitivity after recent pterional craniotomy: preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazoloto, Thiago Medina; de Siqueira, Silvia Regina Dowgan Tesseroli; Rocha-Filho, Pedro Augusto Sampaio; Figueiredo, Eberval Gadelha; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; de Siqueira, José Tadeu Tesseroli

    2017-05-01

    Surgical trauma at the temporalis muscle is a potential cause of post-craniotomy headache and temporomandibular disorders (TMD). The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of pain, masticatory dysfunction and trigeminal somatosensory abnormalities in patients who acquired aneurysms following pterional craniotomy. Fifteen patients were evaluated before and after the surgical procedure by a trained dentist. The evaluation consisted of the (1) research diagnostic criteria for TMD, (2) a standardized orofacial pain questionnaire and (3) a systematic protocol for quantitative sensory testing (QST) for the trigeminal nerve. After pterional craniotomy, 80% of the subjects, 12 patients, developed orofacial pain triggered by mandibular function. The pain intensity was measured by using the visual analog scale (VAS), and the mean pain intensity was 3.7. The prevalence of masticatory dysfunction was 86.7%, and there was a significant reduction of the maximum mouth opening. The sensory evaluation showed tactile and thermal hypoesthesia in the area of pterional access in all patients. There was a high frequency of temporomandibular dysfunction, postoperative orofacial pain and trigeminal sensory abnormalities. These findings can help to understand several abnormalities that can contribute to postoperative headache or orofacial pain complaints after pterional surgeries.

  13. EFFICACY OF HYOSCINE BUTYL BROMIDE SUPPOSITORY FOR POSTOPERATIVE PAIN RELIEF

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    Soniya C. Alphonse

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Caesarean Section is on the rise all over the world. Women undergoing Caesarean section often wish to be awake post operatively and to avoid excessive medications affecting interactions with the new born infant. Multimodal pain therapy has been advocated for postoperative pain management after caesarean section. MATERIALS AND METHODS The study is a prospective randomized controlled study conducted at a tertiary care hospital to study the effect of Hyoscine Butyl Bromide Suppositories for postoperative analgesia following elective repeat caesarean section. The study included sixty patients divided into two groups- Group1 (study group were given Hyoscine Butyl Bromide Suppository (10 mg along with Injection. Tramadol 50 mg IM and Group II (control group were given Injection Tramadol IM only at the end of surgery. Pain score of the patient assessed at 1 hr, 2 hrs, 6hrs and 24 hrs post operatively. The total no of doses of injection tramadol needed in 24 hrs and the interval between 1st and 2nd dose of tramadol was also noted. The adverse effects of the drug and additional advantages of the drug if any were also assessed. RESULTS There was no statistically significant difference in pain score during the assessment intervals between the two groups. There was no difference in the number of doses of tramadol needed in the first 24 hrs. The mean interval between the 1st and 2nd dose of tramadol was found to be 7.6538 hours for group 1 patients and 6.9130 for group patients which was found to be statistically significant. There was no statistically significant side effects/ additional advantages for the drugs. CONCLUSION Concurrent administration of Hyoscine Butyl Bromide Suppository (10 mg and injection Tramadol 50 mg IM offers a longer postoperative analgesia without any increased adverse effects.

  14. Patients' perception of postoperative pain management: validation of the International Pain Outcomes (IPO) questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothaug, Judith; Zaslansky, Ruth; Schwenkglenks, Matthias; Komann, Marcus; Allvin, Renée; Backström, Ragnar; Brill, Silviu; Buchholz, Ingo; Engel, Christoph; Fletcher, Dominique; Fodor, Lucian; Funk, Peter; Gerbershagen, Hans J; Gordon, Debra B; Konrad, Christoph; Kopf, Andreas; Leykin, Yigal; Pogatzki-Zahn, Esther; Puig, Margarita; Rawal, Narinder; Taylor, Rod S; Ullrich, Kristin; Volk, Thomas; Yahiaoui-Doktor, Maryam; Meissner, Winfried

    2013-11-01

    PAIN OUT is a European Commission-funded project aiming at improving postoperative pain management. It combines a registry that can be useful for quality improvement and research using treatment and patient-reported outcome measures. The core of the project is a patient questionnaire-the International Pain Outcomes questionnaire-that comprises key patient-level outcomes of postoperative pain management, including pain intensity, physical and emotional functional interference, side effects, and perceptions of care. Its psychometric quality after translation and adaptation to European patients is the subject of this validation study. The questionnaire was administered to 9,727 patients in 10 languages in 8 European countries and Israel. Construct validity was assessed using factor analysis. Discriminant validity assessment used Mann-Whitney U tests to detect mean group differences between 2 surgical disciplines. Internal consistency reliability was calculated as Cronbach's alpha. Factor analysis resulted in a 3-factor structure explaining 53.6% of variance. Cronbach's alpha at overall scale level was high (.86), and for the 3 subscales was low, moderate, or high (range, .53-.89). Significant mean group differences between general and orthopedic surgery patients confirmed discriminant validity. The psychometric quality of the International Pain Outcomes questionnaire can be regarded as satisfactory. The International Pain Outcomes questionnaire provides an instrument for postoperative pain assessment and improvement of quality of care, which demonstrated good psychometric quality when translated into a variety of languages in a large European and Israeli patient population. This measure provides the basis for the first comprehensive postoperative pain registry in Europe and other countries. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Patient-controlled oral analgesia for postoperative pain management following total knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastanias, Patti; Gowans, Sue; Tumber, Paul S; Snaith, Kianda; Robinson, Sandra

    2010-01-01

    To investigate whether patient-controlled oral analgesia (PCOA) used by individuals receiving a total knee replacement could reduce pain, increase patient satisfaction, reduce opioid use and/or reduce opioid side effects when compared with traditional nurse (RN)-administered oral analgesia. Patients who underwent an elective total knee replacement at a quaternary care centre (Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario) were randomly assigned to either PCOA or RN-administered short-acting oral opioids on postoperative day 2. Subjects in the RN group called the RN to receive their prescribed short-acting opioid. Subjects in the PCOA group kept a single dose of their prescribed oral opioid at their bedside and took this dose when they felt they needed it, to a maximum of one dose every 2 h. Study outcomes, collected on postoperative day 2, included pain (measured by the Brief Pain Inventory - Short Form), patient satisfaction (measured by the Pain Outcome Questionnaire Satisfaction subscale - component II), opioid use (oral morphine equivalents), opioid side effects (nausea, pruritus and/or constipation) and knee measures (maximum passive knee flexion and pain at maximum passive knee flexion, performed on the operative knee). Study outcomes were analyzed twice. First, for a subset of 73 subjects who remained in their randomly assigned group (PCOA group, n=36; RN group, n=37), randomized analyses were performed. Second, for the larger sample of 88 subjects who were categorized by their actual method of receiving oral opioids (PCOA group, n=41; RN group, n=47), as-treated analyses were performed. There were no differences in study outcomes between the PCOA and RN groups in either analysis. PCOA was not superior to RN administration on study outcomes. However, PCOA did not increase opioid use or pain. PCOA remains an important element in the patient-centred care facility.

  16. An expert opinion on postoperative pain management, with special reference to new developments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jørgen B; Mathiesen, Ole; Kehlet, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    Recently, much attention has been directed towards the effect of opioid-sparing strategies on postoperative morbidity and hospitalization, and on different nociceptive mechanisms involved in various postoperative pain states and surgical procedures. This has resulted in an increased interest...

  17. Role of Ketamine in Acute Postoperative Pain Management: A Narrative Review

    OpenAIRE

    Brian M. Radvansky; Khushbu Shah; Anant Parikh; Anthony N. Sifonios; Vanny Le; Jean D. Eloy

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. The objective of this narrative review was to examine the usage of ketamine as a postoperative analgesic agent across a wide variety of surgeries. Design. A literature search was performed using the phrases “ketamine” and “postoperative pain.” The authors analyzed the studies that involved testing ketamine’s effectiveness at controlling postoperative pain. Effectiveness was assessed through various outcomes such as the amount of opiate consumption, visual analog scale (VAS) pain ...

  18. Postoperative pain management experiences among school-aged children: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sng, Qian Wen; Taylor, Beverley; Liam, Joanne Lw; Klainin-Yobas, Piyanee; Wang, Wenru; He, Hong-Gu

    2013-04-01

    To explore postoperative pain management experiences among school-aged children. Ineffective postoperative pain management among children has been commonly reported. School-aged children are able to evaluate how their pain is managed and what their preferred strategies are. Most studies in pain management have adopted quantitative methods and have overlooked children's pain management experiences. This is a qualitative study using face-to-face interviews. Data were collected from 15 school-aged children admitted to a tertiary hospital in Singapore by in-depth interviews conducted between November 2010 and January 2011. Data were analysed by thematic analysis. Five themes were identified: children's self-directed actions to relieve their postoperative pain (e.g. using cognitive-behavioural methods of distraction and imagery, physical method of positioning, sleeping and drinking, seeking other people's help by informing parents and crying and using pain medications); children's perceptions of actions parents take for their postoperative pain relief (assessing pain, administering pain medications, using various cognitive-behavioural, physical methods and emotional support strategies, assisting in activities and alerting health professionals); children's perception of actions nurses take for their postoperative pain relief (administering medication, using cognitive-behavioural methods, emotional support strategies and helping with activities of daily living) and suggestions for parents (using distraction and presence) and nurses (administering medications, distraction and positioning) for their postoperative pain relief improvement. This study contributed to the existing knowledge about children's postoperative pain management based on their own experiences. Children, their parents and nurses used various strategies, including pain medication and non-pharmacological methods, especially distraction, for children's postoperative pain relief. This study provides evidence

  19. Optimizing post-operative pain management in Latin America

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    João Batista Santos Garcia

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Post-operative pain management is a significant problem in clinical practice in Latin America. Insufficient or inappropriate pain management is in large part due to insufficient knowledge, attitudes and education, and poor communications at various levels. In addition, the lack of awareness of the availability and importance of clear policies and guidelines for recording pain intensity, the use of specific analgesics and the proper approach to patient education have led to the consistent under-treatment of pain management in the region. However, these problems are not insurmountable and can be addressed at both the provider and patient level. Robust policies and guidelines can help insure continuity of care and reduce unnecessary variations in practice. The objective of this paper is to call attention to the problems associated with Acute Post-Operative Pain (APOP and to suggest recommendations for their solutions in Latin America. A group of experts on anesthesiology, surgery and pain developed recommendations that will lead to more efficient and effective pain management. It will be necessary to change the knowledge and behavior of health professionals and patients, and to obtain a commitment of policy makers. Success will depend on a positive attitude and the commitment of each party through the development of policies, programs and the promotion of a more efficient and effective system for the delivery of APOP services as recommended by the authors of this paper. The writing group believes that implementation of these recommendations should significantly enhance efficient and effective post-operative pain management in Latin America. Resumo: O controle da dor no período pós-operatório é um problema significativo na prática clínica na América Latina. O controle insuficiente ou inadequado da dor é devido, em grande parte, à insuficiência de conhecimento, atitudes e formação e à comunicação precária em vários níveis. Al

  20. Role of microglia in neuropathic pain, postoperative pain, and morphine tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yeong-Ray; Tan, Ping-Heng; Cheng, Jen-Kun; Liu, Yen-Chin; Ji, Ru-Rong

    2011-01-01

    Management of chronic pain such as nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain associated with diabetic neuropathy, viral infection, and cancer is a real clinical challenge. Major surgeries such as breast and thoracic surgery, leg amputation, and coronary artery bypass surgery also lead to chronic pain in 10–50% of individuals after acute postoperative pain, in part due to surgery-induced nerve injury. Current treatments mainly focus on blocking neurotransmission in the pain pathway and have only resulted in limited success. Ironically, chronic opioid exposure may lead to paradoxical pain. Development of effective therapeutic strategies requires a better understanding of cellular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain. An important progress in pain research points to important role of microglial cells in the development of chronic pain. Spinal cord microglia are strongly activated after nerve injury, surgical incision, and chronic opioid exposure. Increasing evidence suggests that under all these conditions the activated microglia not only exhibit increased expression of microglial markers CD11b and Iba1 but also display elevated phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase. Inhibition of spinal cord p38 has been shown to attenuate neuropathic pain and postoperative pain, as well as morphine-induced antinociceptive tolerance. Activation of p38 in spinal microglia results in increased synthesis and release of the neurotrophin BDNF and the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α. These microglia-released mediators can powerfully modulate spinal cord synaptic transmission, leading to increased excitability of dorsal horn neurons, i.e. central sensitization, in part via suppressing inhibitory synaptic transmission. We review the studies that support the pronociceptive role of microglia in conditions of neuropathic pain, post-surgical pain, and opioid tolerance. Some of these studies have been accomplished by four Taiwanese anesthesiologists who are also

  1. Comparison of the Effects of Preemptive Gabapentin and Dextromethorphan on the Postoperative Pain after Open Prostatectomy

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    M.R. Mohaghegh

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground and Objectives: Preemptive administration of gabapentin and dextromethorphan has been shown to be effective for reduction of postoperative pain; but the effect of these two drugs has not yet been compared. The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of administration of gabapentin and dextromethorphan on the postoperative pain after open prostatectomy. Methods: In a randomized clinical trial, 80 adult males with ASA class of I, II and III who were candidate for open prostatectomy under spinal anesthesia in Shahid Hasheminejad Educational Center (in Tehran were enrolled and randomly allocated to two groups of gabapentin (n=40 and dextromethorphan (n=40. In dextromethorphan group, 60 mg of dextromethorphan syrup and in gabapentin group, 300 mg of gabapentin syrup were administered 2 hours preoperatively. During operation, the maximum height of block was determined at 5, 10 and 15 minutes after spinal anesthesia establishment. In postoperative period, at 1, 2, 12, and 24 hours, the pain intensity was measured through Visual Analogue Pain Scale (VAS; and, overall opioid consumption and the time to first analgesic request were recorded as well.Results: While the pain intensity in all the measurements was comparable between groups, at the 2nd hour, the pain was significantly lesser in gabapentin group (2.70±1.51 vs. 3.74±1.77, P=0.006. Also, the time for the first analgesic request was comparable between study groups; however, the total dose of postoperative opioid consumption was lesser in gabapentin group (45.0±39.32 vs. 64.45±32.12 mg, P=0.018. Moreover, the height of block showed no significant difference. Conclusion: Preemptive oral administration of 300 mg of gabapentin syrup in patients undergoing open prostatectomy under spinal anesthesia significantly lessens the pain intensity and the total dose of opioid consumption compared with 60 mg of dextromethorphan syrup. Meanwhile, the level of spinal anesthesia

  2. Comparison of the Effects of Preemptive Gabapentin and Dextromethorphan on the Postoperative Pain after Open Prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R Mohaghegh

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available

    Background and Objectives: Preemptive administration of gabapentin and dextromethorphan has been shown to be effective for reduction of postoperative pain; but the effect of these two drugs has not yet been compared. The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of administration of gabapentin and dextromethorphan on the postoperative pain after open prostatectomy.

    Methods: In a randomized clinical trial, 80 adult males with ASA class of I, II and III who were candidate for open prostatectomy under spinal anesthesia in Shahid Hasheminejad Educational Center (in Tehran were enrolled and randomly allocated to two groups of gabapentin (n=40 and dextromethorphan (n=40. In dextromethorphan group, 60 mg of dextromethorphan syrup and in gabapentin group, 300 mg of gabapentin syrup were administered 2 hours preoperatively. During operation, the maximum height of block was determined at 5, 10 and 15 minutes after spinal anesthesia establishment. In postoperative period, at 1, 2, 12, and 24 hours, the pain intensity was measured through Visual Analogue Pain Scale (VAS; and, overall opioid consumption and the time to first analgesic request were recorded as well.

    Results: While the pain intensity in all the measurements was comparable between groups, at the 2nd hour, the pain was significantly lesser in gabapentin group (2.70±1.51 vs. 3.74±1.77, P=0.006. Also, the time for the first analgesic request was comparable between study groups; however, the total dose of postoperative opioid consumption was lesser in gabapentin group (45.0±39.32 vs. 64.45±32.12 mg, P=0.018. Moreover, the height of block showed no significant difference.

    Conclusion: Preemptive oral administration of 300 mg of gabapentin syrup in patients undergoing open prostatectomy under spinal

  3. Cumulative incidence of postoperative severe pain at Hospital Universitario San Jose, Popayan. Preliminar report

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    Ingrid Muñoz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Postoperative pain remains as a problem. National studies report incidences of 31% for moderate and 22% for severe pain. Inadequate analgesia is related to dissatisfaction and adverse outcomes. The aim of this study was to describe the incidence and characteristics of the postoperative pain in the post-anesthesia care unit (PACU at Hospital Universitario San José of Popayán (HUSJ in patients undergoing general anesthesia during the first postoperative hour. Methods: Cohort study. We recruited patients attending PACU and undergoing procedures using general anesthesia, between 18 and 70 years. Using a standardized collection form medical history, demographic data, medical history, anesthetic management, intraoperative analgesia and postoperative pain assessment by verbal and numerical pain scale (1-10 were recorded. Postoperative outcome data were also collected in the PACU. Results: The incidence of severe postoperative pain at 10 minutes was 12.3% 95%CI [7.1-18.2] (19 patients. Within 30 minutes of assessment 4.5% 95%CI [1.3-8.4] (7 patients and 1.9% 60 minutes 95%CI [0-4.5] (3 patients. 48.7% required rescue analgesic at PACU. Incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV was significantly different in patients requiring rescue analgesic. Conclusion: The incidence of severe postoperative pain in the first postoperative hour at HUSJ is close to 12% and it decreases as time goes by. Patients requiring rescue analgesic have a higher incidence of postoperative complications such as PONV.

  4. Validity, Sensitivity, and Responsiveness of the 11-Face Faces Pain Scale to Postoperative Pain in Adult Orthopedic Surgery Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Giang, Nguyen; Chiu, Hsiao-Yean; Thai, Duong Hong; Kuo, Shu-Yu; Tsai, Pei-Shan

    2015-10-01

    Pain is common in patients after orthopedic surgery. The 11-face Faces Pain Scale has not been validated for use in adult patients with postoperative pain. To assess the validity of the 11-face Faces Pain Scale and its ability to detect responses to pain medications, and to determine whether the sensitivity of the 11-face Faces Pain Scale for detecting changes in pain intensity over time is associated with gender differences in adult postorthopedic surgery patients. The 11-face Faces Pain Scale was translated into Vietnamese using forward and back translation. Postoperative pain was assessed using an 11-point numerical rating scale and the 11-face Faces Pain Scale on the day of surgery, and before (Time 1) and every 30 minutes after (Times 2-5) the patients had taken pain medications on the first postoperative day. The 11-face Faces Pain Scale highly correlated with the numerical rating scale (r = 0.78, p Scale is appropriate for measuring acute postoperative pain in adults. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. CLINICAL ASPECTS OF ACUTE POST-OPERATIVE PAIN MANAGEMENT & ITS ASSESSMENT

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    R.S.R Murthy

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Management of postoperative pain relieve suffering and leads to earlier mobilization, shortened hospital stay, reduced hospital costs, and increased patient satisfaction. An effective postoperative management is not a standardized regime rather is tailored to the needs of the individual patient, taking into account medical, psychological, and physical condition; age; level of fear or anxiety; surgical procedure; personal preference; and response to therapeutic agents given. The major goal in the management of postoperative pain is to minimize the dose of medications to lessen side effects & provide adequate analgesia. Postoperative pain is still under managed due to obstacles in implementation of Acute Pain Services due to insufficient education, fear of complications associated with available analgesic drugs, poor pain assessment and inadequate staff. This review reflects the clinical aspects of postoperative pain & its assessment & management with an emphasis on research for new analgesic molecules & delivery system.

  6. Clinical aspects of acute post-operative pain management & its assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuj Gupta

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Management of postoperative pain relieve suffering and leads to earlier mobilization, shortened hospital stay, reduced hospital costs, and increased patient satisfaction. An effective postoperative management is not a standardized regime rather is tailored to the needs of the individual patient, taking into account medical, psychological, and physical condition; age; level of fear or anxiety; surgical procedure; personal preference; and response to therapeutic agents given. The major goal in the management of postoperative pain is to minimize the dose of medications to lessen side effects & provide adequate analgesia. Postoperative pain is still under managed due to obstacles in implementation of Acute Pain Services due to insufficient education, fear of complications associated with available analgesic drugs, poor pain assessment and inadequate staff. This review reflects the clinical aspects of postoperative pain & its assessment & management with an emphasis on research for new analgesic molecules & delivery system.

  7. Effect of Music Therapy on Postoperative Pain Management in Gynecological Patients: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin, Wai Man; Chow, Ka Ming

    2015-12-01

    Unrelieved postoperative pain may have a negative impact on the physiological and psychological well-being of patients. Pharmacological methods are currently used to relieve such pain in gynecological patients; however, inadequate pain control is still reported, and the use of nonpharmacological pain-relieving methods is increasingly being advocated, one of which is music therapy. The purpose of this literature review was to identify, summarize, and critically appraise current evidence on music therapy and postoperative pain management among gynecological patients. A systematic search of MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, British Nursing Index, and Allied and Complementary Medicine was conducted using the search terms music, gynecological, pain, surgery, operative, and post-operative to identify relevant articles in English from 1995 to the present. All identified articles were assessed independently for inclusion into review. A total of 7 articles were included after removal of duplicates and exclusion of irrelevant studies. All the included studies assessed the effects of music therapy on postoperative pain intensity, and three of them measured pain-related physiological symptoms. The findings indicated that music therapy, in general, was effective in reducing pain intensity, fatigue, anxiety, and analgesic consumption in gynecological patients during the postoperative period. It is recommended as an adjunct to pharmacological pain-relieving methods in reducing postoperative pain. Future researches on music therapy to identify the most effective application and evaluate its effect by qualitative study are recommended. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Postoperative Pain Management after Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Surgical Treatment: Comparing Practice with Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utrobičić, Ivan; Utrobičić, Frane; Prološčić, Ivona; Utrobičić, Toni; Jerić, Milka; Jeličić Kadić, Antonia; Puljak, Livia

    2017-09-01

    The management of postoperative pain after carpal tunnel syndrome surgical treatment at a tertiary hospital was analyzed and compared with the guidelines for perioperative pain management. This retrospective study included 579 patients operated on for carpal tunnel syndrome at the Split University Hospital Center in Split, Croatia. The following key data were collected from patient medical records: age, gender, type and dosage of premedication, type and dosage of anesthesia, type and dosage of postoperative analgesia per each postoperative day. The procedures related to perioperative pain were analyzed and compared with the current guidelines for perioperative acute pain management. Study results showed that 99.6% of patients with carpal tunnel syndrome were operated under local anesthesia, of which 2.9% also received sedation. Analgesics were prescribed to 45% of patients after surgery, and according to patient charts, 39% of patients actually received postoperative analgesic(s). Generally, postoperative pain was treated on the fi rst postoperative day, mostly with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Only two patients received weak opioids for postoperative pain. Many recommendations from the guidelines for perioperative acute pain management were not followed. In conclusion, the guidelines should be followed and appropriate interventions used to improve postoperative pain management.

  9. Can consistent benchmarking within a standardized pain management concept decrease postoperative pain after total hip arthroplasty? A prospective cohort study including 367 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benditz A

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Achim Benditz,1 Felix Greimel,1 Patrick Auer,2 Florian Zeman,3 Antje Göttermann,4 Joachim Grifka,1 Winfried Meissner,4 Frederik von Kunow1 1Department of Orthopedics, University Medical Center Regensburg, 2Clinic for anesthesia, Asklepios Klinikum Bad Abbach, Bad Abbach, 3Centre for Clinical Studies, University Medical Center Regensburg, Regensburg, 4Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Jena University Hospital, Jena, Germany Background: The number of total hip replacement surgeries has steadily increased over recent years. Reduction in postoperative pain increases patient satisfaction and enables better mobilization. Thus, pain management needs to be continuously improved. Problems are often caused not only by medical issues but also by organization and hospital structure. The present study shows how the quality of pain management can be increased by implementing a standardized pain concept and simple, consistent, benchmarking.Methods: All patients included in the study had undergone total hip arthroplasty (THA. Outcome parameters were analyzed 24 hours after surgery by means of the questionnaires from the German-wide project “Quality Improvement in Postoperative Pain Management” (QUIPS. A pain nurse interviewed patients and continuously assessed outcome quality parameters. A multidisciplinary team of anesthetists, orthopedic surgeons, and nurses implemented a regular procedure of data analysis and internal benchmarking. The health care team was informed of any results, and suggested improvements. Every staff member involved in pain management participated in educational lessons, and a special pain nurse was trained in each ward.Results: From 2014 to 2015, 367 patients were included. The mean maximal pain score 24 hours after surgery was 4.0 (±3.0 on an 11-point numeric rating scale, and patient satisfaction was 9.0 (±1.2. Over time, the maximum pain score decreased (mean 3.0, ±2.0, whereas patient satisfaction

  10. Prediction of post-operative pain after a laparoscopic tubal ligation procedure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudin, A.; Wolner-Hanssen, P.; Hellbom, M.

    2008-01-01

    ligation procedure. METHODS: Assessments of anxiety, mood, psychological vulnerability and pre-operative pain were made before surgery using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), the Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale (HADS), a psychological vulnerability test and the Short-Form McGill Pain......BACKGROUND: Pre-operative identification of reliable predictors of post-operative pain may lead to improved pain management strategies. We investigated the correlation between pre-operative pain, psychometric variables, response to heat stimuli and post-operative pain following a laparoscopic tubal...... Questionnaire (SF-MPQ), respectively. Pre-operative assessments of thermal thresholds and pain response to randomized series of heat stimuli (1 s, 44-48 degrees C) were made with quantitative sensory testing technique. Post-operative pain intensity was evaluated daily by a visual analogue scale during rest...

  11. Postoperative pain management in children: A survey of practices of pediatric surgeons in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulrasheed A Nasir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Postoperative pain has a negative effect on the process of recovery. There is paucity of literature on the postoperative pain management practice in children in developing countries. We sought to determine the current practice of postoperative pain management in children among pediatric surgeons in Nigeria. Methods: A cohort of 43 pediatric surgeons/trainees attending two annual meetings of Association of Paediatric Surgeons of Nigeria (2011 and 2013 were surveyed with a questionnaire enquiring about the practice of postoperative pain management in children and their perceptions. Results: Thirty-seven respondents had completed the survey (86% response rate. Of these respondents, 27 (73.0% were consultants and 10 (27.0% were trainees. Only 2 (5.4% respondents used any guidelines, and 8 (21.6% respondents had an established institutional protocol for the pediatric postoperative pain management. Almost half of the respondents (18, 48.6% used clinical judgments for assessing postoperative pain, followed by crying, requires oxygen to maintain saturation > 95%, increased vital signs, expressions, and sleeplessness scale (13, 35.1%; alertness, calmness, respiratory response/crying, physical movement, muscle tone, and facial tension behavioral scale (11, 29.7%; and verbal rating (10, 27.0%. In neonates, 89% of the respondents used paracetamol and 32% used pentazocine for routine postoperative analgesia. None of the respondents used morphine for neonatal postoperative analgesia. In older children, commonly used analgesics include paracetamol (35, 94.6%, pentazocine (30, 81.1%, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (28, 75.7%. More than half of the respondents (20, 54.1% were not satisfied with their current practice of postoperative pain management. Conclusion: Pain was infrequently assessed, and analgesic therapy though multimodal was largely not protocol based and therefore subject to inadequate pain relief. Postoperative pain should be

  12. Enhanced presurgical pain temporal summation response predicts post-thoracotomy pain intensity during the acute postoperative phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissman-Fogel, Irit; Granovsky, Yelena; Crispel, Yonathan; Ben-Nun, Alon; Best, Lael Anson; Yarnitsky, David; Granot, Michal

    2009-06-01

    Recent evidence points to an association between experimental pain measures obtained preoperatively and acute postoperative pain (POP). We hypothesized that pain temporal summation (TS) might be an additional predictor for POP insofar as it represents the neuroplastic changes that occur in the central nervous system following surgery. Therefore, a wide range of psychophysical tests (TS to heat and mechanical repetitive stimuli, pain threshold, and suprathreshold pain estimation) and personality tests (pain catastrophizing and anxiety levels) were administered prior to thoracotomy in 84 patients. POP ratings were evaluated on the 2nd and 5th days after surgery at rest (spontaneous pain) and in response to activity (provoked pain). Linear regression models revealed that among all assessed variables, enhanced TS and higher pain scores for mechanical stimulation were significantly associated with greater provoked POP intensity (overall r2 = 0.225, P = .008). Patients who did not demonstrate TS to both modalities reported lower scores of provoked POP as compared with patients who demonstrated TS in response to at least 1 modality (F = 4.59 P = .013). Despite the moderate association between pain catastrophizing and rest POP, none of the variables predicted the spontaneous POP intensity. These findings suggest that individual susceptibility toward a greater summation response may characterize patients who are potentially vulnerable to augmented POP. This study proposed the role of pain temporal summation assessed preoperatively as a significant psychophysical predictor for acute postoperative pain intensity. The individual profile of enhanced pain summation is associated with the greater likelihood of higher postoperative pain scores.

  13. Preoperative pain mechanisms assessed by cuff algometry are associated with chronic postoperative pain relief after total knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Kristian Kjær; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas; Simonsen, Ole; Laursen, Mogens Berg; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2016-07-01

    Chronic postoperative pain after total knee replacement (TKR) in knee osteoarthritis (KOA) implies clinical challenges. Widespread hyperalgesia, facilitated temporal summation of pain (TSP), and impaired conditioned pain modulation (CPM) have been found in painful KOA. This exploratory study investigated postoperative pain relief 12 months after TKR in 4 subgroups of patients preoperatively profiled by mechanistic quantitative sensory testing. In 103 patients with KOA, pressure pain detection threshold (PDT) and tolerance thresholds (PTT) were assessed at the lower leg using cuff algometry. Temporal summation of pain was measured as an increase in pain intensity scores during 10 repeated (2 seconds intervals) painful cuff stimuli. Conditioned pain modulation was calculated as the relative increase in PDT during painful conditioning stimulation. The grand averages of TSP and CPM were calculated and values below or above were used for subgrouping: facilitated TSP/impaired CPM (group A, N = 16), facilitated TSP/normal CPM (group B, N = 15), normal TSP/impaired CPM (group C, N = 44), and normal TSP/normal CPM (group D, N = 28). Clinical VAS pain intensity scores were collected before and 12 months after TKR surgery and the pain relief calculated. Less pain relief was found in group A (52.0% ± 14.0% pain relief) than in group B (81.1% ± 3.5%, P = 0.023) and group C (79.6% ± 4.4%, P = 0.007), but not group D (69.4% ± 7.9%, P = 0.087). Low preoperative PDT was associated with a less postoperative pain relief (R = -0.222, P = 0.034), whereas TSP or CPM alone showed no associations with postoperative pain relief. This explorative study indicated that patients with osteoarthritis with facilitated TSP together with impaired CPM are more vulnerable to experience less pain relief after TKR.

  14. Immediate Postoperative Pain Scores Predict Neck Pain Profile up to 1 Year Following Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adogwa, Owoicho; Elsamadicy, Aladine A; Vuong, Victoria D; Mehta, Ankit I; Vasquez, Raul A; Cheng, Joseph; Bagley, Carlos A; Karikari, Isaac O

    2018-05-01

    Retrospective cohort review. To assess whether immediate postoperative neck pain scores accurately predict 12-month visual analog scale-neck pain (VAS-NP) outcomes following Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion surgery (ACDF). This was a retrospective study of 82 patients undergoing elective ACDF surgery at a major academic medical center. Patient reported outcomes measures VAS-NP scores were recorded on the first postoperative day, then at 6-weeks, 3, 6, and 12-months after surgery. Multivariate correlation and logistic regression methods were utilized to determine whether immediate postoperative VAS-NP score accurately predicted 1-year patient reported VAS-NP Scores. Overall, 46.3% male, 25.6% were smokers, and the mean age and body mass index (BMI) were 53.7 years and 28.28 kg/m 2 , respectively. There were significant correlations between immediate postoperative pain scores and neck pain scores at 6 weeks VAS-NP ( P = .0015), 6 months VAS-NP ( P = .0333), and 12 months VAS-NP ( P = .0247) after surgery. Furthermore, immediate postoperative pain score is an independent predictor of 6 weeks, 6 months, and 1 year VAS-NP scores. Our study suggests that immediate postoperative patient reported neck pain scores accurately predicts and correlates with 12-month VAS-NP scores after an ACDF procedure. Patients with high neck pain scores after surgery are more likely to report persistent neck pain 12 months after index surgery.

  15. Predictive variables for postoperative pain after 520 consecutive dental extraction surgeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortoluzzi, Marcelo Carlos; Manfro, Aline Rosler Grings; Nodari, Rudy Jose; Presta, Andreia Antoniuk

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate postoperative pain in patients who had a single tooth or multiple erupted teeth extracted. This research evaluated 520 consecutive dental extraction surgeries in which 680 teeth were removed. Data collection was obtained through a questionnaire of patients and of the undergraduate students who performed all procedures. Pain was evaluated through qualitative self-reported scores at seven days postsurgery. An increased pain level was statistically associated with ostectomy, postoperative complications, and tobacco consumption. Pain that persisted for more than two days was statistically associated with the amount of anesthetic solution used, with a notable increase in surgical time and development of postoperative complications. Periods of pain lasting more than two days could be expected for traumatic surgeries lasting more than 30 minutes. Both severe and prolonged pain were signs of development of postoperative complications, such as alveolar osteitis and alveolar infection.

  16. Can consistent benchmarking within a standardized pain management concept decrease postoperative pain after total hip arthroplasty? A prospective cohort study including 367 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benditz, Achim; Greimel, Felix; Auer, Patrick; Zeman, Florian; Göttermann, Antje; Grifka, Joachim; Meissner, Winfried; von Kunow, Frederik

    2016-01-01

    The number of total hip replacement surgeries has steadily increased over recent years. Reduction in postoperative pain increases patient satisfaction and enables better mobilization. Thus, pain management needs to be continuously improved. Problems are often caused not only by medical issues but also by organization and hospital structure. The present study shows how the quality of pain management can be increased by implementing a standardized pain concept and simple, consistent, benchmarking. All patients included in the study had undergone total hip arthroplasty (THA). Outcome parameters were analyzed 24 hours after surgery by means of the questionnaires from the German-wide project "Quality Improvement in Postoperative Pain Management" (QUIPS). A pain nurse interviewed patients and continuously assessed outcome quality parameters. A multidisciplinary team of anesthetists, orthopedic surgeons, and nurses implemented a regular procedure of data analysis and internal benchmarking. The health care team was informed of any results, and suggested improvements. Every staff member involved in pain management participated in educational lessons, and a special pain nurse was trained in each ward. From 2014 to 2015, 367 patients were included. The mean maximal pain score 24 hours after surgery was 4.0 (±3.0) on an 11-point numeric rating scale, and patient satisfaction was 9.0 (±1.2). Over time, the maximum pain score decreased (mean 3.0, ±2.0), whereas patient satisfaction significantly increased (mean 9.8, ±0.4; p benchmarking a standardized pain management concept. But regular benchmarking, implementation of feedback mechanisms, and staff education made the pain management concept even more successful. Multidisciplinary teamwork and flexibility in adapting processes seem to be highly important for successful pain management.

  17. The association between incentive spirometry performance and pain in postoperative thoracic epidural analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, David J; Hilliard, Paul E; Jewell, Elizabeth S; Brummett, Chad M

    2015-01-01

    Effective use of postoperative incentive spirometry improves patient outcomes but is limited by pain after thoracic and upper abdominal surgery. Thoracic epidurals are frequently used to provide analgesia and attenuate postoperative pulmonary dysfunction. We hypothesized that, in patients with thoracic epidurals for thoracic and abdominal surgery, high pain scores would be associated with poorer incentive spirometry performance, even when accounting for other variables. Retrospective study of 468 patients who underwent upper abdominal or thoracic surgery using postoperative thoracic epidural analgesia between June 1, 2009, and August 31, 2013, at a single tertiary academic center. The association between incentive spirometry performance and pain was assessed as the primary outcome. Other independent predictors of incentive spirometry performance were also identified. Postoperative incentive spirometry performance was found to be inversely proportional to pain score, which correlated significantly stronger with deep breathing pain compared with pain at rest (-0.33 vs -0.14 on postoperative day 1; -0.23 vs -0.12 on postoperative day 2). Pain with deep breathing was independently associated with poorer incentive spirometry performance in the multivariable linear regression model (P spirometry performance could be used as another indicator of thoracic epidural efficacy. This may be particularly useful in patients reporting high pain scores postoperatively.

  18. Efficacy and Tolerability of Intramuscular Dexketoprofen in Postoperative Pain Management following Hernia Repair Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Jamdade, P. T.; Porwal, A.; Shinde, J. V.; Erram, S. S.; Kamat, V. V.; Karmarkar, P. S.; Bhagtani, K.; Dhorepatil, S.; Irpatgire, R.; Bhagat, H.; Kolte, S. S.; Shirure, P. A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of intramuscular dexketoprofen for postoperative pain in patients undergoing hernia surgery. Methodology. Total 202 patients received single intramuscular injection of dexketoprofen 50 mg or diclofenac 50 mg postoperatively. The pain intensity (PI) was self-evaluated by patients on VAS at baseline 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 hours. The efficacy parameters were number of responders, difference in PI (PID) at 8 hours, sum of analogue of pain intensity differ...

  19. Predictors, prevention, and management of postoperative pain associated with nonsurgical root canal treatment: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mothanna K. AlRahabi, PhD

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative pain after root canal treatment can be reduced by applying recent advances in endodontic techniques and equipment. This systematic review includes current knowledge about pain after nonsurgical root canal treatment, including predictors, related factors, effects of recent advances, and management. A literature search was performed using the PubMed, ScienceDirect, and Cochrane Library databases for articles published between 1990 and 2016. Search keywords included postoperative pain, nonsurgical treatment, single visit, recent advances in endodontics, and management of postoperative pain with endodontic treatment. Only original research studies were included; editorials, reviews, brief notes, conference proceedings, and letters to the editor were excluded. The initial search yielded 4941 articles, which were assessed and filtered using the selection criteria. Sixty-five studies met the inclusion criteria and were included in the review. The findings showed that pain after nonsurgical root canal treatment occurred in 3–69.3% of patients. Microorganisms were identified as the primary contributors to postoperative pain, and there was no significant difference in postoperative pain between single- and multiple-visit treatments. Postoperative pain after root canal treatment ranges from mild to moderate and occurs even after optimally performed procedures. Furthermore, adequate management of postoperative pain is often considered an indicator of clinical excellence. Application of recently developed endodontic techniques and devices will reduce postoperative pain. Furthermore, a flexible, severity-based drug administration plan can be used to control and manage pain after root canal treatment. Application of the current research findings will reduce pain following root canal treatment and improve patient outcomes.

  20. Short-term pre- and post-operative stress prolongs incision-induced pain hypersensitivity without changing basal pain perception

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Jing; Wang, Po-Kai; Tiwari, Vinod; Liang, Lingli; Lutz, Brianna Marie; Shieh, Kun-Ruey; Zang, Wei-Dong; Kaufman, Andrew G.; Bekker, Alex; Gao, Xiao-Qun; Tao, Yuan-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic stress has been reported to increase basal pain sensitivity and/or exacerbate existing persistent pain. However, most surgical patients have normal physiological and psychological health status such as normal pain perception before surgery although they do experience short-term stress during pre- and post-operative periods. Whether or not this short-term stress affects persistent postsurgical pain is unclear. Results In this study, we showed that pre- or post-surgical expos...

  1. Stress symptoms among adolescents before and after scoliosis surgery: correlations with postoperative pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rullander, Anna-Clara; Lundström, Mats; Lindkvist, Marie; Hägglöf, Bruno; Lindh, Viveca

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to describe stress symptoms among adolescents before and after scoliosis surgery and to explore correlations with postoperative pain. Scoliosis surgery is a major surgical procedure. Adolescent patients suffer from preoperative stress and severe postoperative pain. Previous studies indicate that there is a risk of traumatisation and psychological complications during the recovery period. A prospective quantitative cohort study with consecutive inclusion of participants. A cohort of 37 adolescent patients aged 13-18. To assess the adolescents' experiences before surgery and at six to eight months after surgery, the Trauma Symptom Checklist for Children - Alternative version, Youth Self-Report and Kiddie Schedule for Affective Disorder and Schizophrenia for children 12-18 were used. The Visual Analogue Scale was used for self-report of postoperative pain on day three. Rates of anxiety/depression and internalising behaviour were significantly higher before surgery than six months after. Preoperative anger, social problems and attention problems correlated significantly with postoperative pain on day three. At follow-up, postoperative pain correlated significantly with anxiety, social problems and attention problems. The results of this study indicate a need for interventions to reduce perioperative stress and postoperative pain to improve the quality of nursing care. Attention to preoperative stress and implementation of interventions to decrease stress symptoms could ameliorate the perioperative process by reducing levels of postoperative pain, anxiety, social and attention problems in the recovery period. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. The Relationship Between Intraoperative Tear Dimensions and Postoperative Pain in 1624 Consecutive Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Daniel Y T; Walton, Judie R; Lam, Patrick; Murrell, George A C

    2017-03-01

    Rotator cuff repair often results in significant pain postoperatively, the cause of which is undetermined. Purpose/Hypothesis: The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between rotator cuff tear area and postoperative pain in patients who had undergone arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. We hypothesized that larger tears would be more painful because of elevated repair tension at 1 week postoperatively but that smaller tears would be more painful because of a greater healing response, especially from 6 weeks postoperatively. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. A total of 1624 patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair were included in this study. Exclusion criteria were moderate to severe osteoarthritis, isolated subscapularis repair, calcific tendinitis, synthetic patch repair, revision surgery, and retears on ultrasound at 6 months after surgery. Rotator cuff tears were subdivided into groups based on the tear size and retear rate found for each group. A modified L'Insalata questionnaire was given before surgery and at 1 week, 6 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months after surgery. Pearson and Spearman correlation coefficient tests were performed between rotator cuff tear areas and pain scores. Intraoperative rotator cuff tear areas did not correlate with pain scores preoperatively or at 1 week after surgery. A smaller tear area was associated with more frequent and severe pain with overhead activities, at rest, and during sleep as well as a poorer perceived overall shoulder condition at 6 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months after repair ( r = 0.11-0.23, P 8 cm 2 . There were fewer retears with smaller tears, but they were more painful than large tears postoperatively from 6 weeks to 6 months after surgery. Smaller tears may heal more vigorously, causing more pain. Patients with smaller tears experienced more pain after rotator cuff repair compared with patients with larger tears. These findings are contrary to previous ideas about tear size and

  3. Does wound infi ltration of tramadol reduce postoperative pain in laparoscopic or open herniorrhaphy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remziye Sıvacı

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The laparoscopic approach may be associated with more postoperative pain initially. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of administered tramadol at wound closure on postoperative painand analgesic requirements under spinal anesthesia in laparoscopic inguinal herniorrhaphy (LH or tension free open inguinal herniorrhaphy (TFOH.Methods: Twenty patients were randomly divided into two groups (n= 10 in each as LH or TFOH. Patients received infiltration of 200 mg tramadol with 40 mL of 0.9% saline solution at wound closure procedure. Postoperative pain was assessed with a Visual Analog Scale (VAS at 3, 6, 12, and 24 hours postoperatively. Additional requirements of tramadol for postoperative pain releif were registered.Results: VAS scores at postoperative 12 and 24 hours were signifi cantly higher according to 3rd hour VAS scores in both groups. The VAS scores at 12 hours after operation signifi cantly lower in LH group than inTFOH group (1.5 ± 0.97 vs 5.1 ± 0.99. Additional requirements of tramadol for postoperative pain releif were significantly lower in LH group.Conclusion: We conclude that wound infi ltration of 200 mg tramadol reduce postoperative pain in LH group.

  4. Role of Ketamine in Acute Postoperative Pain Management: A Narrative Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radvansky, Brian M.; Shah, Khushbu; Parikh, Anant; Sifonios, Anthony N.; Eloy, Jean D.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. The objective of this narrative review was to examine the usage of ketamine as a postoperative analgesic agent across a wide variety of surgeries. Design. A literature search was performed using the phrases “ketamine” and “postoperative pain.” The authors analyzed the studies that involved testing ketamine's effectiveness at controlling postoperative pain. Effectiveness was assessed through various outcomes such as the amount of opiate consumption, visual analog scale (VAS) pain scores, and persistent postoperative pain at long-term follow-up. Results. While many different administration protocols were evaluated, delivering ketamine both as a pre- or perioperative bolus and postoperative infusion for up to 48 hours appeared to be the most effective. These effects are dose-dependent. However, a number of studies analyzed showed no benefit in using ketamine versus placebo for controlling postoperative pain. While ketamine is a safe and well-tolerated drug, it does have adverse effects, and there are concerns for possible neurotoxicity and effects on memory. Conclusions. In a number of limited situations, ketamine has shown some efficacy in controlling postoperative pain and decreasing opioid consumption. More randomized controlled trials are necessary to determine the surgical procedures and administrations (i.e., intravenous, epidural) that ketamine is best suited for. PMID:26495312

  5. Role of ketamine in acute postoperative pain management: a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radvansky, Brian M; Shah, Khushbu; Parikh, Anant; Sifonios, Anthony N; Le, Vanny; Eloy, Jean D

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this narrative review was to examine the usage of ketamine as a postoperative analgesic agent across a wide variety of surgeries. A literature search was performed using the phrases "ketamine" and "postoperative pain." The authors analyzed the studies that involved testing ketamine's effectiveness at controlling postoperative pain. Effectiveness was assessed through various outcomes such as the amount of opiate consumption, visual analog scale (VAS) pain scores, and persistent postoperative pain at long-term follow-up. While many different administration protocols were evaluated, delivering ketamine both as a pre- or perioperative bolus and postoperative infusion for up to 48 hours appeared to be the most effective. These effects are dose-dependent. However, a number of studies analyzed showed no benefit in using ketamine versus placebo for controlling postoperative pain. While ketamine is a safe and well-tolerated drug, it does have adverse effects, and there are concerns for possible neurotoxicity and effects on memory. In a number of limited situations, ketamine has shown some efficacy in controlling postoperative pain and decreasing opioid consumption. More randomized controlled trials are necessary to determine the surgical procedures and administrations (i.e., intravenous, epidural) that ketamine is best suited for.

  6. Role of Ketamine in Acute Postoperative Pain Management: A Narrative Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian M. Radvansky

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The objective of this narrative review was to examine the usage of ketamine as a postoperative analgesic agent across a wide variety of surgeries. Design. A literature search was performed using the phrases “ketamine” and “postoperative pain.” The authors analyzed the studies that involved testing ketamine’s effectiveness at controlling postoperative pain. Effectiveness was assessed through various outcomes such as the amount of opiate consumption, visual analog scale (VAS pain scores, and persistent postoperative pain at long-term follow-up. Results. While many different administration protocols were evaluated, delivering ketamine both as a pre- or perioperative bolus and postoperative infusion for up to 48 hours appeared to be the most effective. These effects are dose-dependent. However, a number of studies analyzed showed no benefit in using ketamine versus placebo for controlling postoperative pain. While ketamine is a safe and well-tolerated drug, it does have adverse effects, and there are concerns for possible neurotoxicity and effects on memory. Conclusions. In a number of limited situations, ketamine has shown some efficacy in controlling postoperative pain and decreasing opioid consumption. More randomized controlled trials are necessary to determine the surgical procedures and administrations (i.e., intravenous, epidural that ketamine is best suited for.

  7. Catecholamine-o-methyltransferase polymorphisms are associated with postoperative pain intensity.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lee, Peter J

    2011-02-01

    single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the genes for catecholamine-O-methyltransferase (COMT), μ-opioid receptor and GTP cyclohydrolase (GCH1) have been linked to acute and chronic pain states. COMT polymorphisms are associated with experimental pain sensitivity and a chronic pain state. No such association has been identified perioperatively. We carried out a prospective observational clinical trial to examine associations between these parameters and the development of postoperative pain in patients undergoing third molar (M3) extraction.

  8. A Model-Based Approach for Joint Analysis of Pain Intensity and Opioid Consumption in Postoperative Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Rasmus V; Knøsgaard, Katrine R; Olesen, Anne E

    2016-01-01

    Joint analysis of pain intensity and opioid consumption is encouraged in trials of postoperative pain. However, previous approaches have not appropriately addressed the complexity of their interrelation in time. In this study, we applied a non-linear mixed effects model to simultaneously study pain...... intensity and opioid consumption in a 4-h postoperative period for 44 patients undergoing percutaneous kidney stone surgery. Analysis was based on 748 Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) scores of pain intensity and 51 observed morphine and oxycodone dosing events. A joint model was developed to describe...... the recurrent pattern of four key phases determining the development of pain intensity and opioid consumption in time; (A) Distribution of pain intensity scores which followed a truncated Poisson distribution with time-dependent mean score ranging from 0.93 to 2.45; (B) Probability of transition to threshold...

  9. Wound infiltration with local anesthetics for post-operative pain relief in lumbar spine surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, M; Møiniche, S; Olsen, K S

    2012-01-01

    In this systematic review, we evaluated double-blind, randomized and controlled trials on the effect of wound infiltration with local anesthetics compared with the effect of placebo on post-operative pain after lumbar spine surgery.......In this systematic review, we evaluated double-blind, randomized and controlled trials on the effect of wound infiltration with local anesthetics compared with the effect of placebo on post-operative pain after lumbar spine surgery....

  10. Post-operative pain treatment in Denmark from 2000 to 2009

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, P R; Christensen, P A; Meyhoff, C S

    2012-01-01

    In Denmark, the first acute pain service (APS) was introduced in 1993. An important objective became to facilitate implementation of accelerated post-operative rehabilitation programmes (ACC) in selected procedures in abdominal, gynaecological and orthopaedic surgery. Therefore......, it is of considerable interest to study the association between the developments of post-operative pain management and the ACC by sequential analyses from 2000 to 2009....

  11. The effects of religion and spirituality on postoperative pain, hemodynamic functioning and anxiety after cesarean section.

    OpenAIRE

    Siavash Beiranvand; Morteza Noparast; Nasrin Eslamizade; Saeed Saeedikia

    2014-01-01

    Spiritual elements play an important role in the recovery process from acute postoperative pain. This study was conducted to assess the effect of pray meditation on postoperative pain reduction and physiologic responds among muslim patients who underwent cesarean surgery under spinal anesthesia. This double-blinded randomized clinical trial study was conducted among muslim patients who underwent cesarean surgery under spinal anesthesia during 2011-2013 at tertiary regional and teaching hospit...

  12. Effect of postoperative epidural analgesia on rehabilitation and pain after hip fracture surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Nicolai Bang; Kristensen, Morten Tange; Kristensen, Billy Bjarne

    2005-01-01

    Hip fracture surgery usually carries a high demand for rehabilitation and a significant risk of perioperative morbidity and mortality. Postoperative epidural analgesia may reduce morbidity and has been shown to facilitate rehabilitation in elective orthopedic procedures. No studies exist...... on the effect of postoperative epidural analgesia on pain and rehabilitation after hip fracture surgery....

  13. Postoperative pain in complex ophthalmic surgical procedures: comparing practice with guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesin, Mladen; Sundov, Zeljka Duplancic; Jukic, Marko; Puljak, Livia

    2014-06-01

    To analyze the management of postoperative pain after complex ophthalmic surgery and to compare it to the guidelines. A retrospective study. University Hospital Split, Croatia. Patients (N = 447) who underwent complex ophthalmic surgical procedures from 2008 to 2012. The following data were extracted from patient medical records: age, gender, type and dosage of premedication, preoperative patient's physical status, type of procedure, duration of procedure-surgical and anesthesia time, type and dosage of anesthesia, the type and dosage of postoperative analgesia for each postoperative day. None of the patients had information about pain intensity in their records. There were 90% patients who did not receive any medication the night before surgery, 54% did not receive any premedication immediately before surgery, 19% did not receive any pain medication after the surgery in the operating room and 46% of patients did not receive any analgesics after being released to the ophthalmology department. Among those who received analgesia after surgery, 98% received only one dose of an analgesic, and 93% of patients received analgesia only on the day of the surgery. Furthermore, patients were returned to the department immediately after surgery, without intensive monitoring. During the analyzed five years there were no educational session organized by anesthesiologist to the ophthalmic surgeons. Postoperative pain management and perioperative care of patients undergoing major ophthalmic surgery indicates lack of attention towards pain intensity and postoperative analgesia. Appropriate interventions should be employed to improve postoperative pain management, to facilitate patient recovery. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Prediction of postoperative pain by preoperative nociceptive responses to heat stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werner, Mads U; Duun, Preben; Kehlet, Henrik

    2004-01-01

    , secondary hyperalgesia area, thermal and mechanical pain perception, and pain thresholds. Postoperative analgesia consisted of ibuprofen and acetaminophen. Pain ratings (visual analog scale) at rest and during limb movement were followed for 10 days after surgery. RESULTS: The burn injury was associated......BACKGROUND: Despite major advances in the understanding of the neurobiologic mechanisms of pain, the wide variation in acute pain experience has not been well explained. Therefore, the authors investigated the potential of a preoperatively induced heat injury to predict subsequent postoperative...... pain ratings in patients undergoing knee surgery. METHODS: Twenty patients were studied. The burn injury was induced 6 days before surgery with a contact thermode (12.5 cm2, 47 degrees C for 7 min). The sensory testing, before and 1 h after the injury, included pain score during induction of the burn...

  15. Barriers to postoperative pain management in hip fracture patients with dementia as evaluated by nursing staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantala, Maija; Kankkunen, Päivi; Kvist, Tarja; Hartikainen, Sirpa

    2014-03-01

    This paper reports a study of the perceptions of nursing staff regarding barriers to postoperative pain management in hip fracture patients with dementia, their expectations, and facilitators offered by their employers to overcome these barriers. Patients with dementia are at high risk for insufficient postoperative pain treatment, mainly owing to inability to articulate or convey their pain experience. Nursing staff have an essential role in the treatment and care of patients who are vulnerable, and therefore unable to advocate for their own pain treatment. Questionnaires with both structured and open-ended questions were used to collect data from nursing staff members in seven university hospitals and ten city-center hospitals from March to May 2011. The response rate was 52% (n = 331). According to nursing staff, the biggest barrier in pain management was the difficulty in assessing pain owing to a patient's cognitive impairment (86%). Resisting care and restlessness among patients with dementia can lead to use of restraints, although these kinds of behavioral changes can point to the occurrence of pain. There were statistically significant differences between the sufficiency of pain management and barriers. Those who expected pain management to be insufficient identified more barriers than those who expected pain management to be sufficient (p nursing staff in pain detection and management is needed so that nursing staff are also able to recognize behavioral symptoms as potential signs of pain and provide appropriate pain management. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Controlling Acute Post-operative Pain in Iranian Children with using of Music Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Miladinia

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite the development of pediatric post-operative pain management and use of analgesic/narcotic drugs, post-operative pain remains as a common problem. Some studies suggested, the most effective approach to controlling immediate post-operative pain may include a combination of drug agents and non-drug methods. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of music therapy on the acute post-operative pain in Iranian children.  Materials and Methods: A quasi-experimental, repeated measure design was used. In this study, 63 children were placed in the music and control groups. In the music group, pain intensity was measured before start intervention (baseline. Then, this group listened to two non-speech music for 20 minutes. Then, pain intensity was measured with numeric rating scale, immediately after intervention, 1 hour, 3 hours and 6 hours after intervention, respectively. Also, in the control group, pain intensity was measured in times similar to music group. Results: The mean of pain intensity did not significantly different between the 2 groups at baseline (P>0.05. The results of repeated measure ANOVA showed that, trend of pain intensity between 2 groups was significant (P

  17. Co-administration of morphine and gabapentin leads to dose dependent synergistic effects in a rat model of postoperative pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papathanasiou, Theodoros; Juul, Rasmus Vestergaard; Heegaard, Anne-Marie

    2016-01-01

    dose combinations and investigate whether co-administration leads to synergistic effects in a preclinical model of postoperative pain. The pharmacodynamic effects of morphine (1, 3 and 7 mg/kg), gabapentin (10, 30 and 100 mg/kg) or their combination (9 combinations in total) were evaluated in the rat...... plantar incision model using an electronic von Frey device. The percentage of maximum possible effect (%MPE) and the area under the response curve (AUC) were used for evaluation of the antihyperalgesic effects of the drugs. Identification of synergistic interactions was based on Loewe additivity response...... surface analyses. The combination of morphine and gabapentin resulted in synergistic antihyperalgesic effects in a preclinical model of postoperative pain. The synergistic interactions were found to be dose dependent and the increase in observed response compared to the theoretical additive response...

  18. Consensus statement on the anticipation and prevention of acute postoperative pain: multidisciplinary RADAR approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, A; Bali, S; Baxter, A; Bruce, G; England, J; Heafield, R; Langford, R; Makin, R; Power, I; Trim, J

    2009-10-01

    There has been considerable investment in efforts to improve postoperative pain management, including the introduction of acute pain teams. There have also been a number of guidelines published on postoperative pain management and there is widespread agreement on how pain should be practically managed. Despite these advances, there is no apparent improvement in the number of patients experiencing moderately severe or extreme pain after surgery. This highlights significant scope for improvement in acute postoperative pain management. In January 2009, a multidisciplinary UK expert panel met to define and agree a practical framework to encourage implementation of the numerous guidelines and fundamentals of pain management at a local level. The panel recognised that to do this, there was a need to organise the information and guidelines into a simplified, accessible and easy-to-implement system based on their practical clinical experience. Given the volume of literature in this area, the Chair recommended that key international guidelines from professional bodies should be distributed and then reviewed during the meeting to form the basis of the framework. Consensus was reached by unanimous agreement of all ten participants. This report provides a framework for the key themes, including consensus recommendations based upon practical experience agreed during the meeting, with the aim of consolidating the key guidelines to provide a fundamental framework which is simple to teach and implement in all areas. Key priorities that emerged were: Responsibility, Anticipation, Discussion, Assessment and Response. This formed the basis of RADAR, a novel framework to help pain specialists educate the wider care team on understanding and prioritising the management of acute pain. Acute postoperative pain can be more effectively managed if it is prioritised and anticipated by a well-informed care team who are educated with regard to appropriate analgesic options and understand what

  19. Short-term pre- and post-operative stress prolongs incision-induced pain hypersensitivity without changing basal pain perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jing; Wang, Po-Kai; Tiwari, Vinod; Liang, Lingli; Lutz, Brianna Marie; Shieh, Kun-Ruey; Zang, Wei-Dong; Kaufman, Andrew G; Bekker, Alex; Gao, Xiao-Qun; Tao, Yuan-Xiang

    2015-12-02

    Chronic stress has been reported to increase basal pain sensitivity and/or exacerbate existing persistent pain. However, most surgical patients have normal physiological and psychological health status such as normal pain perception before surgery although they do experience short-term stress during pre- and post-operative periods. Whether or not this short-term stress affects persistent postsurgical pain is unclear. In this study, we showed that pre- or post-surgical exposure to immobilization 6 h daily for three consecutive days did not change basal responses to mechanical, thermal, or cold stimuli or peak levels of incision-induced hypersensitivity to these stimuli; however, immobilization did prolong the duration of incision-induced hypersensitivity in both male and female rats. These phenomena were also observed in post-surgical exposure to forced swimming 25 min daily for 3 consecutive days. Short-term stress induced by immobilization was demonstrated by an elevation in the level of serum corticosterone, an increase in swim immobility, and a decrease in sucrose consumption. Blocking this short-term stress via intrathecal administration of a selective glucocorticoid receptor antagonist, RU38486, or bilateral adrenalectomy significantly attenuated the prolongation of incision-induced hypersensitivity to mechanical, thermal, and cold stimuli. Our results indicate that short-term stress during the pre- or post-operative period delays postoperative pain recovery although it does not affect basal pain perception. Prevention of short-term stress may facilitate patients' recovery from postoperative pain.

  20. Inguinal pain syndrome. The influence of intraoperative local administration of 0.5% bupivacaine on postoperative pain control following Lichtenstein hernioplasty. A prospective case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cybułka, Bartosz

    2017-04-30

    or recurrent hernia, a similar intervention was applied in 41.67% (n=10) of patients. During the hospital stay, pain was assessed four times a day using the NRS numeric scale. All patients received preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis, and, during observation, analgesics and low-molecular-weight heparin were used. In the studied group, risk factor were identified, which affect the pain level associated with surgical treatment of an inguinal hernia. Mean pain level score according to the NRS scale (0-10) for an inguinal hernia was 4.17 on day 0 (standard deviation 2.22; minimum 0; maximum 10). On day 1 - 2.86 (standard deviation 1.86; minimum 0; maximum 8). On day 2 - 0.84 (standard deviation 1.21; minimum 0; maximum 5). The values of those parameters for a scrotal and recurrent hernia were as follows: on day 0 - 3.67 (standard deviation 1.76; minimum 0; maximum 7). On day 1 - 3.79 (standard deviation 1.67; minimum 0; maximum 7). On day 2 - 2.25 (standard deviation 1.54; minimum 0; maximum 4). Intraoperative application of 20 mL 0.5% bupivacaine did not reduce the postoperative pain on the postoperative day 0, 1, 2. Among independent risk factors exacerbating pain, the following variables were identified: local complications of the operated site including edema, ecchymosis and hematoma of the inguinal region. More frequent dressing changes were directly correlated with an increased pain sensation. Postoperative urethral catheterization due to urinary retention was associated with an increased pain immediately after surgery. In the case of intraoperative diagnosis of concurrent direct and indirect hernia (so-called pantaloon hernia), less intense pain was observed on postoperative day 0. Other parameters such as age, sex, duration of operation, duration of hospitalization and wound drainage did not influence the pain sensation. Local injection of an analgesic into the operated site was not associated with the reduction of pain assessed on postoperative day 0, 1 and 2

  1. Challenge of improving postoperative pain management: case studies of three acute pain services in the UK National Health Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, A E; Davies, H T O; Bannister, J; Macrae, W A

    2009-06-01

    Previous national survey research has shown significant deficits in routine postoperative pain management in the UK. This study used an organizational change perspective to explore in detail the organizational challenges faced by three acute pain services in improving postoperative pain management. Case studies were conducted comprising documentary review and semi-structured interviews (71) with anaesthetists, surgeons, nurses, other health professionals, and managers working in and around three broadly typical acute pain services. Although the precise details differed to some degree, the three acute pain services all faced the same broad range of inter-related challenges identified in the organizational change literature (i.e. structural, political, cultural, educational, emotional, and physical/technological challenges). The services were largely isolated from wider organizational objectives and activities and struggled to engage other health professionals in improving postoperative pain management against a background of limited resources, turbulent organizational change, and inter- and intra-professional politics. Despite considerable efforts they struggled to address these challenges effectively. The literature on organizational change and quality improvement in health care suggests that it is only by addressing the multiple challenges in a comprehensive way across all levels of the organization and health-care system that sustained improvements in patient care can be secured. This helps to explain why the hard work and commitment of acute pain services over the years have not always resulted in significant improvements in routine postoperative pain management for all surgical patients. Using this literature and adopting a whole-organization quality improvement approach tailored to local circumstances may produce a step-change in the quality of routine postoperative pain management.

  2. Single fixed-dose oral dexketoprofen plus tramadol for acute postoperative pain in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derry, Sheena; Cooper, Tess E; Phillips, Tudor

    2016-09-22

    Combining two different analgesics in fixed doses in a single tablet can provide better pain relief than either drug alone in acute pain. This appears to be broadly true across a range of different drug combinations, in postoperative pain and migraine headache. A new combination of dexketoprofen (a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug) plus tramadol (an opioid) has been tested in acute postoperative pain conditions. It is not yet licensed for use. This review is one of a series on oral analgesics for acute postoperative pain. Individual reviews have been brought together in two overviews to provide information about the relative efficacy and harm of the different interventions. To assess the analgesic efficacy and adverse effects of a single fixed-dose of oral dexketoprofen plus tramadol, compared with placebo, for moderate to severe postoperative pain in adults, using methods that permit comparison with other analgesics evaluated in standardised trials using almost identical methods and outcomes. A secondary objective was to compare the combination with the individual analgesics alone. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) via CRSO, MEDLINE via Ovid, and Embase via Ovid from inception to 31 May 2016. We also searched the reference lists of retrieved studies and reviews, and two online clinical trial registries. Randomised, double-blind trials of oral dexketoprofen plus tramadol administered as a single oral dose, for the relief of acute postoperative pain in adults, and compared to placebo. Two review authors independently considered trials for inclusion in the review, examined issues of study quality and potential bias, and extracted data. For dichotomous outcomes, we calculated risk ratio (RR) and number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome (NNT) for dexketoprofen plus tramadol, compared with placebo with 95% confidence intervals (CI). We collected information on the number of participants with at least 50% of

  3. Improving the management of post-operative acute pain: Priorities for change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meissner, W. (Winfried); F. Coluzzi (Flaminia); Fletcher, D. (Dominique); F.J.P.M. Huygen (Frank); B. Morlion (Bart); Neugebauer, E. (Edmund); Pérez, A.M. (Antonio Montes); J. Pergolizzi (Joseph)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractPoor management of post-operative acute pain can contribute to medical complications including pneumonia, deep vein thrombosis, infection and delayed healing, as well as the development of chronic pain. It is therefore important that all patients undergoing surgery should receive

  4. Opioid exit plan: A pharmacist's role in managing acute postoperative pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genord, Cheryl; Frost, Timothy; Eid, Deeb

    The benefits of a pharmacist's involvement in medication reconciliation and discharge counseling are well documented in the literature as improving patient outcomes. In contrast, no studies have focused on the initiation of a pharmacist-led opioid exit plan (OEP) for acute postoperative pain management. This paper summarizes a pharmacist-led OEP practice model and the potential role that pharmacists and student pharmacists can have at the point of admission, during postoperative recovery, and on discharge in acute pain management patients. The pain management team at St. Joseph Mercy Hospital in Ann Arbor, MI, has developed and implemented a pharmacist-led OEP to better manage acute postoperative pain in neurosurgery and orthopedic and colorectal surgery in an effort to ensure appropriate patient and provider education and understanding of pain management. OEP is a tool with the potential to expand the role of pharmacists in managing acute pain in postoperative patients at the point of admission, during the postoperative inpatient stay, and on discharge. Its benefits include medication reconciliation review and prescription drug-monitoring program search before admission, interdisciplinary rounds with the medical team to provide optimal inpatient postoperative pain management, clinical assessment of outpatient prescriptions with opioid discharge counseling, and medication evaluation of prescribed pain regimen and opioid discontinuation status at the post-discharge follow-up appointment. A hospital pain management team operating a pharmacist-led OEP can be key to guiding the appropriate prescribing practice of opioids and assisting with transitions of care on discharge. Further outcomes-based evaluations of the practice model are planned and encouraged to validate and improve the pharmacist-led OEP practice. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of Interscalene Nerve Block for Postoperative Pain Management in Patients after Shoulder Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsiu-Pin; Shen, Shih-Jyun; Tsai, Hsin-I; Kao, Sheng-Chin; Yu, Huang-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Shoulder surgery can produce severe postoperative pain and movement limitations. Evidence has shown that regional nerve block is an effective management for postoperative shoulder pain. The purpose of this study was to investigate the postoperative analgesic effect of intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) combined with interscalene nerve block in comparison to PCA alone after shoulder surgery. In this study, 103 patients receiving PCA combined with interscalene nerve block (PCAIB) and 48 patients receiving PCA alone after shoulder surgery were included. Patients' characteristics, preoperative shoulder score and range of motion, surgical and anesthetic condition in addition to visual analog scale (VAS) pain score, postoperative PCA consumption, and adverse outcomes were evaluated. The results showed that PCA combined with interscalene nerve block (PCAIB) group required less volume of analgesics than PCA alone group in 24 hours (57.76 ± 23.29 mL versus 87.29 ± 33.73 mL, p shoulder surgery.

  6. Effect of postoperative pain therapy on surgical outcome

    OpenAIRE

    MAJERIĆ KOGLER, VIŠNJA; BANDIĆ, DANIJELA; KOGLER, JANA; BEKAVAC MIŠAK, VILKA; SAKAN, SANJA

    2009-01-01

    Although efficient treatment of post-surgical pain is considered to be a pre-condition for a normal course of the post-surgical period, epidemiological and clinical research show that a significant number of patients still suffer intense pain after major surgery. Intense nociceptive somatic and visceral post-surgical pain has in the last ten years been considered the most important development of endocrine and neurohumoral disorders in the immediate post-surgical period, (the vital organ f...

  7. Diclofenac Potassium in Acute Postoperative Pain and Dysmenorrhoea: Results from Comprehensive Clinical Trial Reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Andrew Moore

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We compared the efficacy of diclofenac potassium in unpublished clinical study reports (CSRs and published reports to examine publication bias, industry bias, and comprehensiveness. Novartis provided CSRs of randomised double-blind trials of diclofenac potassium involving postoperative patients following third molar extraction (3 trials, n=519, gynaecological surgery (3 trials, n=679, and dysmenorrhoea (2 trials, n=711 conducted in 1988–1990. Searches identified published reports of 6 trials. Information from 599/1909 patients was not published; trials with 846/1909 patients were published in a defunct journal. Greater methodological information in CSRs contributed to lesser risk of bias than published trials. Numbers needed to treat (NNT from CSRs for all six postoperative trials for at least 50% of maximum pain relief over 6 h were 2.2 (95% confidence interval, 1.9–2.6 and 2.1 (1.8–2.4 for 50 and 100 mg diclofenac potassium, respectively. A Cochrane review of published trial data reported NNTs of 2.1 and 1.9, and one comprehensive analysis reported NNTs of 2.2 and 2.1, respectively. All analyses had similar results for patients remedicating within 8 h. No data from dysmenorrhoea CSRs appeared in a Cochrane review. CSRs provide useful information and increase confidence. Stable efficacy estimates with standard study designs reduce the need for updating reviews.

  8. Early Postoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Detecting Radicular Pain After Lumbar Decompression Surgery: Retrospective Study of the Relationship Between Dural Sac Cross-sectional Area and Postoperative Radicular Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futatsugi, Toshimasa; Takahashi, Jun; Oba, Hiroki; Ikegami, Shota; Mogami, Yuji; Shibata, Syunichi; Ohji, Yoshihito; Tanikawa, Hirotaka; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2017-07-01

    A retrospective analysis. To evaluate the association between early postoperative dural sac cross-sectional area (DCSA) and radicular pain. The correlation between postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and postoperative neurological symptoms after lumbar decompression surgery is controversial. This study included 115 patients who underwent lumbar decompression surgery followed by MRI within 7 days postoperatively. There were 46 patients with early postoperative radicular pain, regardless of whether the pain was mild or similar to that before surgery. The intervertebral level with the smallest DCSA was identified on MRI and compared preoperatively and postoperatively. Risk factors for postoperative radicular pain were determined using univariate and multivariate analyses. Subanalysis according to absence/presence of a residual suction drain also was performed. Multivariate regression analysis showed that smaller postoperative DCSA was significantly associated with early postoperative radicular pain (per -10 mm; odds ratio, 1.26). The best cutoff value for radicular pain was early postoperative DCSA of 67.7 mm. Even with a cutoff value of surgery. The best cutoff value for postoperative radicular pain was 67.7 mm. Absence of a suction drain at the time of early postoperative MRI was related to smaller DCSA.

  9. Factors related to postoperative pain among patients who underwent radiofrequency ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh, Y.-C.; Yap, Y.-S.; Hung, C.-H.; Chen, C.-H.; Lu, S.-N.; Wang, J.-H.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the incidence and associated factors of postoperative intense pain and haemodynamic changes during radiofrequency ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma. Materials and methods: A total of 123 consecutive hepatocellular carcinoma patients who underwent radiofrequency ablation were prospectively recruited. Patient factors, tumour characteristics, procedural factors, intraoperative haemodynamic changes, complications, postoperative events, laboratory values before and after ablation, and postoperative pain were evaluated. Postoperative pain was scored using a visual analogue scale after the procedure. Results: The mean age of the patients was 65.6 ± 9.6 years. In multiple logistic regression analysis, patients who underwent general anaesthesia [odds ratio (95% CI): 2.68 (1.23–5.81); p = 0.013] and had more postoperative nausea and vomiting episodes [3.10 (1.11–8.63); p = 0.036] were associated with intense pain. These findings remain robust after propensity score matching. For mean difference values between before and after RFA, higher in change in aspartate transaminase (p = 0.026), alanine transaminase (p = 0.016) and white blood cell count (p = 0.015), and lower in change in haemoglobin (p = 0.009) were also correlated with intense pain. There was no significant difference in haemodynamic changes between the general anaesthesia and local anaesthesia group during ablation. Conclusion: General anaesthesia, postoperative nausea and vomiting, and laboratory factors were associated with postoperative intense pain in patients who underwent radiofrequency ablation. Counselling and modification of analgesics should be considered in patients with related factors for intense pain

  10. [Nursing intervention and evaluation of postoperative pain in preschool children with cleft lip and palate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Caixia; Yan, Miao; Jiang, Fei; Chen, Zehua; Long, Yuan; Chen, Lixian; Zheng, Qian; Shi, Bing

    2014-06-01

    This study aimed to observe the postoperative pain rate and degree of pain in preschool children with cleft lip and palate, and investigate the effect of nursing intervention on pain relief. A total of 120 hospitalized cases of three- to seven-year-old preschool children with cleft lip and palate were selected from May to October 2011. The subjects were randomly divided into the control group and experimental groups 1, 2, and 3. The control group used conventional nursing methods, experimental group 1 used analgesic drug treatment, experimental group 2 used psychological nursing interventions, and experimental group 3 used both psychological nursing intervention and analgesic drug treatment. After 6, 12, 24, and 48 h, pain self-assessment, pain parent-assessment, and pain nurse-assessment were calculated for the four groups using the pain assessment forms, and their ratings were compared. The postoperative pain rates of the four groups ranged from 50.0% to 73.3%. The difference among the four groups was statistically significant (P palate is common. Psychological nursing intervention with analgesic treatment is effective in relieving postoperative pain.

  11. Elective division of ilioinguinal nerve in inguinal hernioplasty: remedy for the morbid postoperative inguinal pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muneeb, M.D.; Baig, M.A.N.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To compare the postoperative pain in inguinal hernioplasty, by preserving versus wide elective division of ilioinguinal nerve. Study Design: Randomized controlled trial. Place and Duration of Study: Surgical Department, Civil Hospital, Karachi, from January till August 2015. Methodology: All patients of either gender above 15 years of age, undergoing mesh repair for unilateral, reducible inguinal hernia, were included. Patients with recurrent inguinal hernia, bilateral inguinal hernia, and those who will require emergency hernia surgeries like irreducible, obstructed, and strangulated hernia, were excluded. They were randomly assigned 42 into inguinal nerve preservation group (group A) and 42 in division (group B). Postoperative pain was assessed at first day, at discharge and after one month using visual analogue scale. Results: There were a total of 84 patients. Group A patients had median (IQR) pain scores of 5 (1) and 3 (2) as compared to group B pain scores of 4 (2) and 2 (1) at 24 hours of surgery and at discharge, respectively (p <0.05). Median (IQR) postoperative pain score one month after inguinal hernioplasty was 2.5 (1) in group A, while 0.5 (1) in group B (p <0.05). A significant decline in the pain scores were observed in group B from the first day of surgery till one month afterwards (p <0.05). Conclusion: Wide resection of ilioinguinal nerve has a lower frequency of postoperative pain in comparison to the ilioinguinal nerve preservation, in inguinal hernioplasty. (author)

  12. Intra-operative remifentanil might influence pain levels in the immediate postoperative period after major abdominal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, EG; Duedahl, Tina H; Rømsing, Janne

    2005-01-01

    Remifentanil, a widely used analgesic agent in anaesthesia, has a rapid onset and short duration of action. In clinical settings, this requires an appropriate pain strategy to prevent unacceptable pain in the post-operative period. The aim of this study was to investigate whether remifentanil had...... any impact on post-operative pain and opioid consumption after major abdominal surgery....

  13. Postoperative pain assessment based on numeric ratings is not the same for patients and professionals: A cross-sectional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, J.F.; van Wijck, A.J.M.; Kappen, T.H.; Peelen, L.M.; Kalkman, C.J.; Schuurmans, M.J.

    Background: Numeric pain scores have become important in clinical practice to assess postoperative pain and to help develop guidelines for treating pain. Professionals need the patients’ pain scores to administer analgesic medication. However, do professionals interpret the pain scores in line with

  14. The effects of secondhand smoke on postoperative pain and fentanyl consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydogan, Mustafa Said; Ozturk, Erdogan; Erdogan, Mehmet Ali; Yucel, Aytac; Durmus, Mahmut; Ersoy, Mehmet Ozcan; Colak, Cemil

    2013-08-01

    Although the need for increased postoperative analgesia in smokers has been described, the effect of secondhand smoke on postoperative analgesia requirements has not been studied. We examined the effects of secondhand smoke on fentanyl consumption and postoperative pain. In this study, 101 patients (American Society of Anesthesiology physical status I and II) who underwent abdominal hysterectomy were divided into 3 groups according to history of exposure to cigarette smoke as per medical records which was retrospectively confirmed by measurement of serum cotinine: smokers (n = 28), nonsmokers (n = 31), and secondhand smokers (n = 32). All patients received propofol-remifentanil total intravenous anesthesia and used fentanyl patient controlled analgesia for postoperative pain. The fentanyl consumption visual analogue scale-pain intensity (VAS-PI) score and side effects were recorded in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU) and at 2, 4, 6, and 24 h after surgery. Fentanyl consumption at all the evaluation time points was significantly higher in secondhand smokers than in nonsmokers (P secondhand smokers was lower than that in smokers in the PACU and at 24 h (P secondhand smokers than in nonsmokers (P effects such as nausea, vomiting, and dizziness (P > 0.05). Secondhand smoking was associated with increased postoperative fentanyl consumption, and increased VAS-PI scores. These findings may be beneficial for managing postoperative pain in secondhand smokers.

  15. Prediction of chronic post-operative pain: pre-operative DNIC testing identifies patients at risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarnitsky, David; Crispel, Yonathan; Eisenberg, Elon; Granovsky, Yelena; Ben-Nun, Alon; Sprecher, Elliot; Best, Lael-Anson; Granot, Michal

    2008-08-15

    Surgical and medical procedures, mainly those associated with nerve injuries, may lead to chronic persistent pain. Currently, one cannot predict which patients undergoing such procedures are 'at risk' to develop chronic pain. We hypothesized that the endogenous analgesia system is key to determining the pattern of handling noxious events, and therefore testing diffuse noxious inhibitory control (DNIC) will predict susceptibility to develop chronic post-thoracotomy pain (CPTP). Pre-operative psychophysical tests, including DNIC assessment (pain reduction during exposure to another noxious stimulus at remote body area), were conducted in 62 patients, who were followed 29.0+/-16.9 weeks after thoracotomy. Logistic regression revealed that pre-operatively assessed DNIC efficiency and acute post-operative pain intensity were two independent predictors for CPTP. Efficient DNIC predicted lower risk of CPTP, with OR 0.52 (0.33-0.77 95% CI, p=0.0024), i.e., a 10-point numerical pain scale (NPS) reduction halves the chance to develop chronic pain. Higher acute pain intensity indicated OR of 1.80 (1.28-2.77, p=0.0024) predicting nearly a double chance to develop chronic pain for each 10-point increase. The other psychophysical measures, pain thresholds and supra-threshold pain magnitudes, did not predict CPTP. For prediction of acute post-operative pain intensity, DNIC efficiency was not found significant. Effectiveness of the endogenous analgesia system obtained at a pain-free state, therefore, seems to reflect the individual's ability to tackle noxious events, identifying patients 'at risk' to develop post-intervention chronic pain. Applying this diagnostic approach before procedures that might generate pain may allow individually tailored pain prevention and management, which may substantially reduce suffering.

  16. Epidural versus In postoperatIve intramuscular pain relief pethidine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Epidural versus. •. •. In postoperatIve ... would be left entirely up to them and they would receive analge- sia whenever they .... Fusion right knee. Epidural. 15 ..... reaches the brain but that its action persists in the spinal cord. The onset of ...

  17. Single dose oral ketoprofen or dexketoprofen for acute postoperative pain in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskell, Helen; Derry, Sheena; Wiffen, Philip J; Moore, R Andrew

    2017-05-25

    This review is an update of "Single dose oral ketoprofen and dexketoprofen for acute postoperative pain in adults" last updated in Issue 4, 2009. Ketoprofen is a non-selective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) used to treat acute and chronic painful conditions. Dexketoprofen is the (S)-enantiomer, which is believed to confer analgesia. Theoretically dexketoprofen is expected to provide equivalent analgesia to ketoprofen at half the dose, with a consequent reduction in gastrointestinal adverse events. This review is one of a series on oral analgesics for acute postoperative pain. Individual reviews have been brought together in two overviews to provide information about the relative efficacy and harm of the different interventions. To assess the efficacy and safety of single dose oral ketoprofen and oral dexketoprofen compared with placebo for acute postoperative pain, using methods that permit comparison with other analgesics evaluated in the same way, and criteria of efficacy recommended by an in-depth study at the individual patient level. For this update, we searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, and Embase from 2009 to 28 March 2017. We also searched the reference lists of retrieved studies and reviews, and two online clinical trial registries. Randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of single dose orally administered ketoprofen or dexketoprofen in adults with moderate to severe acute postoperative pain. Two review authors independently considered studies for inclusion in the review, examined issues of study quality and potential bias, and extracted data. For dichotomous outcomes, we calculated risk ratio (RR) and number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome (NNT) or harmful outcome (NNH) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for ketoprofen and dexketoprofen, compared with placebo, where there were sufficient data. We collected information on the number of participants with at least 50

  18. Post-operative pain prevalence, predictors, management practices ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MWASHAMBWA

    School of Medicine & Dentistry, College of Health Sciences, The University of Dodoma, P.O ... and immunosuppressive, and it is associated with both local wound and ..... American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine, and the ...

  19. Management of postoperative pain: experience of the Niamey National Hospital, Niger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaibou MS

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Maman Sani Chaibou,1 Samuila Sanoussi,2 Rachid Sani,2 Nouhou A Toudou,1 Hadjara Daddy,1 Moussa Madougou,1 Idrissa Abdou,1 Habibou Abarchi,2 Martin Chobli31Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, 2Department of Surgery, The Niamey National Hospital, Niamey, Republic of Niger; 3Department of Anesthesiology, Hubert K Maga University Teaching Hospital, Cotonou, BeninObjective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the management of postoperative pain at the Niamey National Hospital.Methods: A prospective study was conducted in the Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care at the Niamey National Hospital from March to June, 2009. Data collected included age, sex, literacy, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA physical status classification, type of anesthesia, type of surgery, postoperative analgesics used, and the cost of analgesics. Three types of pain assessment scale were used depending on the patient's ability to describe his or her pain: the verbal rating scale (VRS, the numerical rating scale (NRS, or the visual analog scale (VAS. Patients were evaluated during the first 48 hours following surgery.Results: The sample included 553 patients. The VRS was used for the evaluation of 72% of patients, the NRS for 14.4%, and the VAS for 13.6%. Of the VRS group, 33.9%, 8.3%, and 2.1% rated their pain as 3 or 4 out of 4 at 12, 24, and 48 hours postoperatively, respectively. For the NRS group, 33.8%, 8.8%, and 2.5% rated their pain as greater than 7 out of 10 at 12, 24, and 48 hours postoperatively, respectively. For the VAS group, 29.3%, 5.4%, and 0% rated their pain as greater than 7 out of 10 at 12, 24, and 48 hours postoperatively, respectively. Conclusion: Postoperative pain assessment and management in developing countries has not been well described. Poverty, illiteracy, and inadequate training of physicians and other health personnel contribute to the underutilization of postoperative analgesia. Analysis of the results

  20. Postoperative pain management in children has been improved, but can be further optimized

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kart, T; van der Laan, K; Crombach, J

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of the analgesic treatment currently used in children, and to identify if problems can be related to any particular routine or group of children. Analgesics administered pre-, per- and postoperatively were recorded, and intensity of pain during rest...... improvements have been obtained, it is still a challenge to optimize the postoperative pain management of children, and when doing so attention should be paid not only to pain relief, but also to side effects of the administered analgesics....... pain, while unacceptable pruritus, nausea or vomiting were observed in 18 children. It was not possible to relate the incidence of pain and side effects to any particular analgesic treatment or type of surgery, but groups of children that might need additional attention were identified. Even though...

  1. Postoperative pain after endodontic retreatment: single- versus two-visit treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoldas, Oguz; Topuz, Aysin; Isçi, A Sehnaz; Oztunc, Haluk

    2004-10-01

    The purpose of this clinical study was to determine the effect of 1- or 2-visit root canal treatment on the postoperative pain in the retreatment cases. Two hundred eighteen cases that required retreatment were included in the study. Obturated and unfilled canal space and the status of periapical tissues were evaluated according to the PAI index. The patients were subcategorized in regard to the presence or the absence of preoperative pain. Approximately half of each category was treated in 1 appointment. After removing the previous root canal obturation materials and biomechanic preparation of root canals, the teeth in the 1-visit group were obturated at the first appointment by using AH 26 sealer and laterally compacted gutta-percha, and those in the 2-visit group were medicated with calcium hydroxide-chlorhexidine combination and then closed with a temporary filling material. One week after the initial appointment, patients were asked about the occurrence of postoperative pain. The level of discomfort was rated as no pain, mild pain, moderate pain, or severe pain (flare-up). Data were statistically analyzed using the chi-squared and Fischer exact tests. Eight patients from the 1-visit group and 2 patients from the 2-visit group had flare-ups. There was a statistical difference between the groups (P endodontic treatment with intracanal medication was found to be effective in reducing postoperative pain of previously symptomatic teeth and decreased the number of flare-ups in all retreatment cases.

  2. Postoperative pain management following ambulatory anesthesia: challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schug SA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Stephan A Schug,1,2 Chandani Chandrasena2 1School of Medicine and Pharmacology, The University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia; 2Department of Anesthesia and Pain Medicine, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, WA, Australia Abstract: Worldwide, there is an increasing trend toward performing more and more complex surgery in an ambulatory setting, partially driven by economic considerations. Provision of appropriate pain relief is still often inadequate in this setting; poor pain control and adverse effects of opioids provided for pain control are common reasons for readmission, with human and economic consequences. Therefore, improved analgesia after ambulatory surgery is an important goal; appropriate strategies include identification of at-risk patients, provision of multimodal analgesia, and early use of rescue strategies. Multimodal analgesia is based on the combined use of multiple medications or techniques for pain control, which have different mechanisms of action or act on different sites at the pain pathways. Thereby, such an approach improves analgesia, reduces opioid requirements, and reduces adverse effects of opioids. Important components of multimodal analgesia are nonopioids (acetaminophen and anti-inflammatory drugs, corticosteroids, and alpha-2-delta modulators (gabapentin, pregabalin, but most importantly the use of local and regional anesthesia techniques. Here, the use of adjuvants is one way to increase the duration of pain relief, but, increasingly, continuous peripheral nerve blocks via catheters are used in ambulatory patients, too. Finally, the planning of discharge medications needs a balancing act between the requirements for provision of good analgesia and the risk of opioids going out into the community. Keywords: ambulatory surgery, short-stay surgery, multimodal analgesia, nonopioids, local anesthetics, regional anesthesia

  3. Parents' knowledge, attitudes, use of pain relief methods and satisfaction related to their children's postoperative pain management: a descriptive correlational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chng, Hui Yi; He, Hong-Gu; Chan, Sally Wai-Chi; Liam, Joanne Li Wee; Zhu, Lixia; Cheng, Karis Kin Fong

    2015-06-01

    To examine parents' knowledge about and attitudes towards pain management, use of pain relief strategies and satisfaction with their children's postoperative pain management, as well as the relationships among these variables. Children's postoperative pain is inadequately managed worldwide. Despite increasing emphasis on parental involvement in children's postoperative pain management, few studies have examined parents' management of their child's postoperative pain in Singapore. A descriptive correlational study. A convenience sample of 60 parents having 6- to 14-year-old children undergoing inpatient elective surgery in a public hospital in Singapore was recruited. Data were collected one day after each child's surgery using the Pain Management Knowledge and Attitudes questionnaire and the Parents' Use of Pain Relief Strategies questionnaire. Descriptive statistics, Mann-Whitney U tests, Kruskal-Wallis tests and Spearman's rank correlation coefficient were used for data analyses. Parents displayed moderate levels of knowledge, attitudes and use of pain relief methods in relation to their children's postoperative pain and pain management. They were generally satisfied with the management of their child's postoperative pain. There was significant difference in Parents' Use of Pain Relief Strategies scores between parents with and without previous experience of caring for their hospitalised child. Statistically significant positive correlations were found between parents' knowledge and attitude, knowledge and satisfaction, attitude and satisfaction, knowledge and pain relief strategies, as well as attitude and pain relief strategies. This study indicates the need to provide parents with more information regarding their children's postoperative pain management. Future studies are needed to develop educational interventions for parents to improve their knowledge and attitudes, which will eventually improve their use of pain relief strategies for their children. Health

  4. Effect of preemptive ketamine administration on postoperative visceral pain after gynecological laparoscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hong-Qi; Jia, Dong-Lin

    2016-08-01

    The pain following gynecological laparoscopic surgery is less intense than that following open surgery; however, patients often experience visceral pain after the former surgery. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of preemptive ketamine on visceral pain in patients undergoing gynecological laparoscopic surgery. Ninety patients undergoing gynecological laparoscopic surgery were randomly assigned to one of three groups. Group 1 received placebo. Group 2 was intravenously injected with preincisional saline and local infiltration with 20 mL ropivacaine (4 mg/mL) at the end of surgery. Group 3 was intravenously injected with preincisional ketamine (0.3 mg/kg) and local infiltration with 20 mL ropivacaine (4 mg/mL) at the end of surgery. A standard anesthetic was used for all patients, and meperidine was used for postoperative analgesia. The visual analogue scale (VAS) scores for incisional and visceral pain at 2, 6, 12, and 24 h, cumulative analgesic consumption and time until first analgesic medication request, and adverse effects were recorded postoperatively. The VAS scores of visceral pain in group 3 were significantly lower than those in group 2 and group 1 at 2 h and 6 h postoperatively (Ppain did not differ significantly between groups 2 and 3, but they were significantly lower than those in group 1 (Ppain scores at 2 h and 6 h postoperatively. Moreover, the three groups showed no statistically significant differences in visceral and incisional pain scores at 12 h and 24 h postoperatively. The consumption of analgesics was significantly greater in group 1 than in groups 2 and 3, and the time to first request for analgesics was significantly longer in groups 2 and 3 than in group 1, with no statistically significant difference between groups 2 and 3. However, the three groups showed no significant difference in the incidence of shoulder pain or adverse effects. Preemptive ketamine may reduce visceral pain in patients undergoing gynecological

  5. The impact of music on postoperative pain and anxiety following cesarean section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reza, Nikandish; Ali, Sahmedini Mohammad; Saeed, Khademi; Abul-Qasim, Avand; Reza, Tabatabaee Hamid

    2007-10-01

    The relief of post-cesarean delivery pain is important. Good pain relief improves mobility and reduces the risk of thromboembolic disease, which may have been increased during pregnancy. Pain may impair the mother's ability to optimally care for her infant in the immediate postpartum period and may adversely affect early interactions between mother and infant. It is necessary, therefore that pain relief be safe and effective and results in no adverse neonatal effects during breast-feeding. Music may be considered as a potential method of post cesarean pain therapy due to its noninvasiveness and lack of side effects. In this study we evaluated the effect of intraoperative music under general anesthesia for reducing the postoperative morphine requirements after cesarean section. In a double blind placebo-controlled trial, 100 women (ASA I) scheduled for elective cesarean section under general anesthesia, were randomly allocated into two groups of fifty. After standardization of anesthesia, patients in the music group were exposed to a compact disk of Spanish guitar after induction of anesthesia up to the time of wound dressing. In the control group patients were exposed to white music. Post operative pain and anxiety were evaluated by visual analog scale (VAS) up to six hours after discharge from PACU. Morphine was given intravenously for reducing pain to VAS 0.05). In addition, morphine requirements were not different between two groups at different time intervals up to six hours postoperatively (P>0.05). There were not statistically significant difference between two groups regarding postoperative anxiety score and vomiting frequency (P>0.05). As per conditions of this study, intraoperative Spanish music was not effective in reducing postoperative pain after cesarean section. In addition postoperative morphine requirement, anxiety, and vomiting were not affected by the music during general anesthesia.

  6. Efficacy and Tolerability of Intramuscular Dexketoprofen in Postoperative Pain Management following Hernia Repair Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamdade, P T; Porwal, A; Shinde, J V; Erram, S S; Kamat, V V; Karmarkar, P S; Bhagtani, K; Dhorepatil, S; Irpatgire, R; Bhagat, H; Kolte, S S; Shirure, P A

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of intramuscular dexketoprofen for postoperative pain in patients undergoing hernia surgery. Methodology. Total 202 patients received single intramuscular injection of dexketoprofen 50 mg or diclofenac 50 mg postoperatively. The pain intensity (PI) was self-evaluated by patients on VAS at baseline 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 hours. The efficacy parameters were number of responders, difference in PI (PID) at 8 hours, sum of analogue of pain intensity differences (SAPID), and onset and duration of analgesia. Tolerability assessment was done by global evaluation and adverse events in each group. Results. Dexketoprofen showed superior efficacy in terms of number of responders (P = .007), PID at 8 hours (P = .02), and SAPID( 0-8 hours ) (P dexketoprofen trometamol 50 mg given intramuscularly provided faster, better, and longer duration of analgesia in postoperative patients of hernia repair surgery than diclofenac 50 mg, with comparable safety.

  7. [The effects of preemptive dexketoprofen use on postoperative pain relief and tramadol consumption].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Inci; Tuncer, Sema; Erol, Atilla; Reisli, Ruhiye

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the efficacy of preemptive dexketoprofen usage on postoperative pain relief and tramadol consumption was evaluated. Fifty American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA)-I or ASA-II patients undergoing plastic surgery were randomized into two groups. Group 1 received dexketoprofen 25 mg and Group 2 received placebo tablets 1 hour (h) before surgery. All patients received a standard anesthetic protocol. At the end of the surgery, all patients received intravenous tramadol with Patient Controlled Analgesia (PCA) device. Pain scores was evaluated with visual analog scale during the postoperative 1st, 8th and 24th h. Tramadol consumption, adverse effects and patient satisfaction were recorded. The pain scores and tramadol consumption were significantly lower in Group 1 (pdexketoprofen reduced postoperative tramadol consumption and incidence of adverse events.

  8. Effect of submucosal application of tramadol on postoperative pain after third molar surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gönül, Onur; Satılmış, Tülin; Bayram, Ferit; Göçmen, Gökhan; Sipahi, Aysegül; Göker, Kamil

    2015-10-14

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of submucosal application of tramadol, for acute postoperative facial pain, following the extraction of impacted third molar teeth. This prospective, double-blind, randomised placebo-controlled study included 60 ASA I-II patients undergoing impacted third molar surgery under local anaesthesia. Following the surgical procedure, patients were randomly divided into two groups; group T (1 mg/kg tramadol) and group S (2-mL saline). Treatments were applied submucosally after surgery. Pain after extraction was evaluated using a visual analogue scale (VAS) 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, 12, 24, and 48 h postoperatively. The time at which the first analgesic drug was taken, the total analgesic dose used, and adverse tissue reactions were also evaluated. In group T, postoperative VAS scores were significantly lower compared to that in group S (p pain after impacted third molar surgery.

  9. Postoperative shoulder pain after laparoscopic hysterectomy with deep neuromuscular blockade and low-pressure pneumoperitoneum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Matias Vested; Istre, Olav; Staehr-Rye, Anne K

    2016-01-01

    indicate that the use of deep neuromuscular blockade (NMB) improves surgical conditions during a low-pressure pneumoperitoneum (8 mmHg). OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate whether low-pressure pneumoperitoneum (8 mmHg) and deep NMB (posttetanic count 0 to 1) compared with standard......: Ninety-nine patients. INTERVENTIONS: Randomisation to either deep NMB and 8 mmHg pneumoperitoneum (Group 8-Deep) or moderate NMB and 12 mmHg pneumoperitoneum (Group 12-Mod). Pain was assessed on a visual analogue scale (VAS) for 14 postoperative days. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary endpoint...... was the incidence of shoulder pain during 14 postoperative days. Secondary endpoints included area under curve VAS scores for shoulder, abdominal, incisional and overall pain during 4 and 14 postoperative days; opioid consumption; incidence of nausea and vomiting; antiemetic consumption; time to recovery...

  10. Day-surgery patients anesthetized with propofol have less postoperative pain than those anesthetized with sevoflurane.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tan, Terry

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: There have been recent studies suggesting that patients anesthetized with propofol have less postoperative pain compared with patients anesthetized with volatile anesthetics. METHODS: In this randomized, double-blind study, 80 patients undergoing day-case diagnostic laparoscopic gynecological surgery were either anesthetized with IV propofol or sevoflurane. The primary outcome measured was pain on a visual analog scale. RESULTS: Patients anesthetized with propofol had less pain compared with patients anesthetized with sevoflurane (P = 0.01). There was no difference in any of the other measured clinical outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: The patients anesthetized with propofol appeared to have less pain than patients anesthetized with sevoflurane.

  11. Evaluating the Efficacy of Levonorgestrel Intrauterine System and Danazol for Relief of Postoperative Pain in Endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taneja, Ashima; Kaur, Satinder; Soni, R K; Bhanupriya; Kaur, Jaspreet; Singla, Laveen

    2017-07-01

    Endometriosis is an oestrogen-dependent disorder, manifests during reproductive years and is associated with pain and infertility. There is considerable debate about the effectiveness of various interventions for pain relief. To evaluate the efficacy of Levonorgestrel Intrauterine System (LNG-IUS) and Danazol in postoperative pain relief for patients with endometriosis. Hundred patients with diagnosis of endometriosis, who were treated laparoscopically, entered the study to receive either danazol (600 mg once daily) or LNG-IUS (inserted during immediate post operative period) postsurgery, for pain relief. Patients were analysed for pain relief according to VAS score and recurrence of disease using ultrasonography at third and sixth months of follow up. There were 50% patients in stage IV of endometriosis. Majority of them presented with complaint of infertility (49%) and pelvic pain (43%). It was observed that LNG-IUS was significantly more effective in relieving pain compared to danazol (65.2% vs 38.0%, ppain compared to danazol.

  12. A retrospective study on analgesic requirements for thoracoscopic surgery postoperative pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuroda H

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Hiroaki Kuroda,1 Hitomi Mizuno,2 Hitoshi Dejima,1 Kiyoe Watanabe,2 Tatsuya Yoshida,3 Yumiko Naito,2 Yukinori Sakao1 1Department of Thoracic Surgery, 2Department of Nursing, 3Department of Thoracic Oncology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya, Japan Background: Thoracoscopic surgery (TS has been performed as a minimally invasive procedure since the beginning of the 1990s. This has led to a dramatic change in the postoperative condition of these patients, facilitating early ambulation and easier management of postoperative pain. However, empirical evidence on postoperative pain management after TS is limited. The aims of this study were to determine the efficacy and adequacy of postoperative analgesic medications and to simplify the choice of additional drugs based on a numerical rating scale (NRS.Materials and methods: A retrospective study of patients who underwent TS was performed to evaluate postoperative pain, analgesia requirements, and the number of drugs needed during the perioperative period based on the NRS score.Results: Of the 524 patients, mild pain was noted in 87% patients on the day of the operation and in 75.6% patients on ambulation. The mean NRS score was 1.83±1.49 on the day of the operation and 2.73±1.75 on ambulation. An NRS score of 3 on both the day of operation and on ambulation was defined as the necessary condition for improved pain management. Multivariate analysis showed that high surgical stress significantly influenced pain scores. Reduction in pain with an NRS score of ≥1 was significant with the addition of pentazocine hydrochloride (p<0.01 and flurbiprofen (p<0.01. Interestingly, the addition of tramadol was borderline efficacious (p=0.05 in patients with an NRS score of >3 on ambulation.Conclusion: A small number of patients have moderate-to-severe pain after TS. Tramadol demonstrated borderline efficacy in controlling postoperative intense pain with an NRS score of ≥3. Keywords: tramadol, thoracoscopic

  13. Thoracoscopic esophagomyotomy for achalasia: maximum gain, minimal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, J W

    1997-10-01

    Achalasia can be effectively treated by either hydrostatic balloon dilatation or transthoracic modified Heller myotomy. The purpose of this study was to determine whether thoracoscopic methods could be used to achieve surgical results equal to the transthoracic approach with less pain. Twenty-one patients (10 men, 11 women; median age 42 years) had the diagnosis of achalasia confirmed by manometry, radiography, and endoscopy. All had dysphagia; five had weight loss. Median duration of symptoms was 12 months (range: 1 to 360 months). Eleven patients had undergone previous unsuccessful hydrostatic dilatation. Mean esophageal diameter was 5.5 +/- 2.2 cm. All patients underwent attempted modified Heller myotomy through a left thoracoscopic approach. Three patients required conversion to thoracotomy. The myotomy was extended Heller myotomy reproduces the superior results of open esophagomyotomy with a reduced hospitalization and reduced incisional pain and disability.

  14. Knowledge, compliance with good clinical practices and barriers to effective control of postoperative pain among nurses from hospitals with and without a "Hospital without Pain" certificate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaszek, Lucyna; Dębska, Grażyna

    2018-04-01

    (i) To compare knowledge and compliance with good clinical practices regarding control of postoperative pain among nurses employed at hospitals with and without a "Hospital without Pain" certificate, (ii) to identify the determinants of nurses' knowledge and (iii) to define barriers to effective control of postoperative pain. Only a slight improvement in postoperative pain control has been observed recently, if any. Implementation of good clinical practices in the control of postoperative pain requires involvement of nurses. A cross-sectional study. The study included 257 nurses from hospitals with a "Hospital without Pain" certificate and 243 nurses from noncertified hospitals, with mean job seniority of 17.6 ± 9.6 years. All respondents answered 26 questions regarding postoperative pain control-related issues. Based on the answers, overall scores were calculated for (i) nurses' knowledge, (ii) compliance with good clinical practices and (iii) barriers to effective control of postoperative pain. Nurses from the certified hospitals presented with significantly higher levels of knowledge and compliance with good clinical practices and identified significantly more barriers to effective control of postoperative pain. Apart from certification of a hospital, better knowledge of postoperative pain control was determined by higher education, participation in postgraduate training programmes and other relevant courses, self-education from medical journals, employment at paediatric ward or intensive care unit. The most commonly reported barriers to effective control of pain included too low doses of painkillers prescribed by physicians and inability to modify the protocol of pain treatment by the nurse. Control of postoperative pain can be improved by enrolling nurses in various forms of continuous training and by providing them with greater autonomy in administering painkillers to surgical patients. Better quality of care offered to patients with postoperative pain

  15. Postoperative Pain after Endodontic Retreatment Using Rotary or Reciprocating Instruments: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comparin, Daniel; Moreira, Edson Jorge Lima; Souza, Erick M; De-Deus, Gustavo; Arias, Ana; Silva, Emmanuel João Nogueira Leal

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this randomized clinical trial was to evaluate the influence of rotary or reciprocating retreatment techniques on the incidence, intensity, duration of postoperative pain, and medication intake. After power analysis calculations, 65 patients who needed endodontic retreatment were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups according to the instrumentation system used: Mtwo (VDW, Munich, Germany) or Reciproc (VDW). Retreatments were performed in a single visit by an endodontic specialist. Participants were asked to rate the incidence and intensity of the postoperative pain on a verbal rating scale 24, 48, and 72 hours after treatment. Patients were also asked to record the number of prescribed analgesic medication tablets (ibuprofen 400 mg) taken. A logistic regression analysis was used to assess both the incidence and duration of pain. Differences in the intensity of pain were analyzed using the ordinal (linear) chi-square test, and the Mann-Whitney U test was used to assess differences in the intake of analgesic medication between groups. No statistically significant difference was found among the 2 groups in relation to postoperative pain or analgesic medication intake at the 3 time points assessed (P > .05). Multivariate analysis showed a significantly higher incidence of pain after 24 hours when preoperative pain was present and a significantly longer duration of pain for men than women independently of the retreatment technique used. The reciprocating system and the continuous rotary system were found to be equivalent regarding the incidence, intensity, duration of postoperative pain, and intake of analgesic medication. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Postoperative pain after manual and mechanical glide path: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqualini, Damiano; Mollo, Livio; Scotti, Nicola; Cantatore, Giuseppe; Castellucci, Arnaldo; Migliaretti, Giuseppe; Berutti, Elio

    2012-01-01

    This prospective randomized clinical trial evaluated the incidence of postoperative pain after glide path performed with PathFile (PF) (Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland) versus stainless-steel K-file (KF). In 149 subjects, the mechanical glide path was performed with nickel-titanium (NiTi) rotary PF; in 146 subjects, the manual glide path was performed with stainless-steel KFs. Postoperative pain, analgesics consumption, and the number of days to complete pain resolution were evaluated in the following 7 days. An analysis of variance model for repeated measures was used to compare the variation of pain-scale values (P < .05). The Student's t test for continuous variables normally distributed, the nonparametric Mann-Whitney U test for the nonnormally distributed variables, and the chi-square test for dichotomous variables were used (P < .05). Despite homogeneous baseline conditions at diagnosis, tooth type, pain prevalence, and scores, the postoperative pain prevalence curves in PF group evidenced a more favorable trend in terms of time to pain resolution compared with the KF group (P = .004). The difference was also evident in the model adjusted for analgesics consumption in both groups (P = .012). The mean analgesics intake per subject was significantly higher in the KF group (3.7 ± 2.2) compared with the PF group (2 ± 1.7) (P < .001). Mean pain stop values were also significantly higher in the KF group (2.7) compared with the PF group (1.7) (P = .001). The glide path with NiTi Rotary PF leads to less postoperative pain and faster symptom resolution. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The Effect of Listening to Music on Postoperative Pain in Adult Orthopedic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Melissa A

    2018-03-01

    Pain is a common occurrence after orthopedic surgery. Patients need additional resources to manage their pain. The purpose of this study was to determine if listening to music has a positive effect on pain scores and satisfaction in the postoperative adult orthopedic patient. There are limited studies demonstrating statistically significant decreases in postoperative pain in this group. A secondary purpose was to expose nurses on a standard medical-surgical unit to an intervention, supported by the holistic nursing model that they could use in their care. This study was a descriptive, comparative, quasi-experimental design. Patients listened to prerecorded music on individual CD players and recorded pre-post pain scores with the intervention. A satisfactory survey was completed at discharge. Results demonstrated a statistically significant reduction in patients' pain scores after listening to music. Length of listening time had no effect. Patients expressed overall satisfaction, and 100% of participants would recommend this intervention to others. Listening to music is beneficial as an adjunct to pain medication and contributes to increased patient satisfaction. It is hoped that the information gained from this study will lead to an enhancement in the standard of care for postoperative patients.

  18. Reducing Postoperative Pain from Tonsillectomy Using Monopolar Electrocautery by Cooling the Oropharynx

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vieira, Lucas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective Evaluate intraoperative cooling of the oropharynx to reduce postoperative pain in tonsillectomy using monopolar electrocautery. Methods Sixty-six patients, age 1 to 12 years, were selected for the study, 33 in the control group and 33 in the experimental group. After randomization, patients underwent subcapsular dissection and hemostasis with monopolar electrocautery. Patients in the experimental group had the oropharynx cooled after tonsil dissection and hemostasis for 10 minutes. The procedure was done through the oral cavity by irrigation with 500 mL of 0.9% saline, in temperatures between 5°C and 10°C, for 5 minutes. The evaluation of postoperative pain was made with the pain visual analog scale (VAS for 10 days. As complementary data on the evaluation of pain, we recorded daily use of ketoprofen for pain relief. Results Pain after tonsillectomy assessed by VAS was significantly lower in the experimental group at days 0, 5, and 6 (p < 0.05. There were no differences in the use of ketoprofen between the groups. Conclusion Cooling of the oropharynx after tonsillectomy promotes clinically significant reduction in postoperative pain, without additional complications.

  19. Modified expansive open-door laminoplasty technique improved postoperative neck pain and cervical range of motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Kuang-Ting; Chen, Ing-Ho; Yu, Tzai-Chiu; Liu, Kuan-Lin; Peng, Cheng-Huan; Wang, Jen-Hung; Lee, Ru-Ping; Wu, Wen-Tien

    2015-12-01

    Expansive open-door laminoplasty (EOLP) is a useful technique for multiple-level cervical spondylotic myelopathy. The common postoperative complications of EOLP include moderate to severe neck pain, loss of cervical lordosis, decrease of cervical range of motion, and C5 palsy. We modified the surgical technique to lessen these complications. This study is aimed to elucidate the efficacy of modified techniques to lessen the complications of traditional procedures. We collected data from 126 consecutive patients treated at our institution between August 2008 and December 2012. Of these, 66 patients underwent conventional EOLP (CEOLP) and the other 60 patients underwent modified EOLP (MEOLP). The demographic and preoperative data, axial pain visual analog scale scores at 2 weeks and 3 months postoperatively, clinical outcomes evaluated using Nurick score and Japanese Orthopedic Association recovery rate at 12 months postoperatively, and radiographic results assessed using plain films at 3 months and 12 months postoperatively for both groups were compared and analyzed. There were no significant differences regarding the preoperative condition between the CEOLP and MEOLP groups (p > 0.05). The Japanese Orthopedic Association recovery rate of the MEOLP group was 70.3%, comparable to the result of the other group (70.2%). Postoperative axial neck pain, loss of range of motion, and loss of lordosis of cervical curvature decreased significantly in the MEOLP group (p cervical spondylotic myelopathy, which decreases postoperative complications effectively. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Single dose oral ibuprofen plus paracetamol (acetaminophen) for acute postoperative pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derry, Christopher J; Derry, Sheena; Moore, R Andrew

    2013-06-24

    Combining two different analgesics in fixed doses in a single tablet can provide better pain relief than either drug alone in acute pain. This appears to be broadly true across a range of different drug combinations, in postoperative pain and migraine headache. Some combinations of ibuprofen and paracetamol are available for use without prescription in some acute pain situations. To assess the efficacy and adverse effects of single dose oral ibuprofen plus paracetamol for acute postoperative pain using methods that permit comparison with other analgesics evaluated in standardised trials using almost identical methods and outcomes. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) on The Cochrane Library (Issue 4 of 12, 2013), MEDLINE (1950 to May 21st 2013), EMBASE (1974 to May 21st 2013), the Oxford Pain Database, ClinicalTrials.gov, and reference lists of articles. Randomised, double-blind clinical trials of single dose, oral ibuprofen plus paracetamol compared with placebo or the same dose of ibuprofen alone for acute postoperative pain in adults. Two review authors independently considered trials for inclusion in the review, assessed quality, and extracted data. We used validated equations to calculate the area under the pain relief versus time curve and derive the proportion of participants with at least 50% of maximum pain relief over six hours. We calculated relative risk (RR) and number needed to treat to benefit (NNT) for ibuprofen plus paracetamol, ibuprofen alone, or placebo. We used information on use of rescue medication to calculate the proportion of participants requiring rescue medication and the weighted mean of the median time to use. We also collected information on adverse events. Searches identified three studies involving 1647 participants. Each of them examined several dose combinations. Included studies provided data from 508 participants for the comparison of ibuprofen 200 mg + paracetamol 500 mg with placebo, 543

  1. Management of acute pain in the postoperative setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meissner, Winfried; Huygen, Frank Jpm; Neugebauer, Edmund A M

    2018-01-01

    /unsuccessful. In the hospital sector the development and implementation of QIs is complex. The nature of POPM requires a highly-trained, multidisciplinary team and it is at this level where major improvements can be made. Greater involvement of patients regarding pain management is also seen as a priority area for improving...

  2. Management of acute pain in the postoperative setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meissner, Winfried; Huygen, Frank Jpm; Neugebauer, Edmund A M

    2017-01-01

    /unsuccessful. In the hospital sector the development and implementation of QIs is complex. The nature of POPM requires a highly-trained, multidisciplinary team and it is at this level where major improvements can be made. Greater involvement of patients regarding pain management is also seen as a priority area for improving...

  3. Post-operative pain management in paediatric surgery at Sylvanus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate pain management in paediatric surgery at Sylvanus Olympio University Teaching Hospital, Lome. Patients and Methods: A prospective descriptive study was conducted in the Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care at Sylvanus Olympio teaching hospital from 1 ...

  4. COMBINATION OF MORPHINE AND GABAPENTIN LEADS TO SYNERGISTIC EFFECTS IN A RAT MODEL OF POSTOPERATIVE PAIN

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papathanasiou, Theodoros; Juul, Rasmus Vestergaard; Heegaard, Anne-Marie

    Postoperative pain is a complex clinical condition that is still inadequately managed. Opioids remain the first line agents for the management of postoperative pain despite their side effects. Combination treatment with non-opioid agents that act at different sites within the central and peripheral...... of hindpaw withdrawal thresholds, after subcutaneous administration of morphine (0, 1, 3 and 7 mg/kg), gabapentin (0, 10, 30 and 100 mg/kg) or their combination (9 combinations of the above doses) were obtained using an electronic von Frey device. Surface of synergistic interaction (SSI) analysis was used...

  5. Efficacy of Tramadol as a Sole Analgesic for Postoperative Pain in Male and Female Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, A Marissa; Kennedy, Lucy H; Na, Jane J; Nemzek-Hamlin, Jean A

    2015-07-01

    Tramadol is a centrally acting weak μ opioid agonist that has few of the adverse side effects common to other opioids. Little work has been done to establish an effective analgesic dose of tramadol specific for surgical laparotomy and visceral manipulation in mice. We used general appearance parameters to score positive indicators of pain including posture, coat condition, activity, breathing, and interactions with other mice, activity events (that is, the number of times each mouse stretched up in a 3-min period) used as an indicator of decreased pain, von Frey fibers, and plasma levels of corticosterone to determine whether tramadol at 20, 40, or 80 mg/kg prevented postoperative pain in male and female C57BL/6 mice. A ventral midline laparotomy with typhlectomy was used as a model of postoperative pain. In male mice, none of the markers differed between groups that received tramadol (regardless of dose) and the saline-treated controls. However, general appearance scores and plasma corticosterone levels were lower in female mice that received 80 mg/kg tramadol compared with saline. In summary, for severe postoperative pain after laparotomy and aseptic typhlectomy, tramadol was ineffective in male C57BL/6 mice at all doses tested. Although 80 mg/kg ameliorated postoperative pain in female C57BL/6 mice, this dose is very close to the threshold reported to cause toxic side effects, such as tremors and seizures. Therefore, we do not recommend the use of tramadol as a sole analgesic in this mouse model of postoperative pain.

  6. Relaxation Therapy with Guided Imagery for Postoperative Pain Management: An Integrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, Márcia Marques Dos Santos; Ferreira, Maria Beatriz Guimarães; da Cruz, Luciana Falcão; Barbosa, Maria Helena

    2017-12-14

    To identify the evidence in the literature about relaxation therapy with guided imagery for postoperative pain management. Integrative review. PubMed, Lilacs, Cochrane, Embase, Web of Science, Scopus and Cinahl, between August 2006 and December 2016. Descriptors: Postoperative Pain, Imagery (Psychotherapy) and Guided Imagery. original studies published in English, Spanish and Portuguese. 291 studies were identified and eight were selected. Descriptive data analysis, presented in detail, with a summary of the knowledge produced in each study. In the primary studies included, the use of guided imagery associated with other complementary therapies was highlighted: hand and foot "M" technique, education on postoperative pain management with analgesic drugs, relaxation exercises, respiration exercises, meditation, soothing biorhythmic music combined with positive and encouraging assertions and music with nature sounds. The knowledge synthesis resulting from this study indicates that evidence could be identified on the use of guided imagery associated with relaxation therapy as a complementary approach to drug analgesia in postoperative pain control strengthens its indication for nursing practice. This evidence, however, demonstrates that the quality of the use of this therapy is limited, and it is necessary to carry out new randomized clinical studies to fill the existing gaps in this topic. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Immediate Postoperative Pain and Recovery Time after Pulpotomy Performed under General Anaesthesia in Young Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultan Keles

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of this retrospective study was to compare immediate postoperative pain scores and need for rescue analgesia in children who underwent pulpotomies and restorative treatment and those who underwent restorative treatment only, all under general anaesthesia. Methods. Ninety patients aged between 3 and 7 years who underwent full mouth dental rehabilitation under general anaesthesia were enrolled in the study and reviewed. The experimental group included patients who were treated with at least one pulpotomy, and the control group was treated with dental fillings only. The Wong-Baker FACES scale was used to evaluate self-reported pain and need for rescue analgesia. The data were analysed using the Kruskal-Wallis test, two sample t-tests, chi-square tests, and Pearson’s correlation analysis. Results. Ninety percent of the children experienced postoperative pain in varying degrees of severity. Immediate postoperative pain scores in experimental group were found to be significantly higher than in control group (x2=24.82, p<0.01. In the experimental group, 48% of the children needed rescue analgesia, compared with only 13% of the children in the control group (x2=13.27, p<0.05. Conclusion. Children who underwent pulpotomy treatment had higher postoperative pain scores and greater need for rescue analgesia than control group who underwent only dental fillings.

  8. Comparison between two thoracotomy closure techniques: postoperative pain and pulmonary function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leandro, Juliana Duarte; Rodrigues, Olavo Ribeiro; Slaets, Annie France Frere; Schmidt, Aurelino F; Yaekashi, Milton L

    2014-01-01

    To compare two thoracotomy closure techniques (pericostal and transcostal suture) in terms of postoperative pain and pulmonary function. This was a prospective, randomized, double-blind study carried out in the Department of Thoracic Surgery of the Luzia de Pinho Melo Hospital das Clínicas and at the University of Mogi das Cruzes, both located in the city of Mogi das Cruzes, Brazil. We included 30 patients (18-75 years of age) undergoing posterolateral or anterolateral thoracotomy. The patients were randomized into two groups by the type of thoracotomy closure: pericostal suture (PS; n = 16) and transcostal suture (TS; n = 14). Pain intensity during the immediate and late postoperative periods was assessed by a visual analogic scale and the McGill Pain Questionnaire. Spirometry variables (FEV1, FVC, FEV1/FVC ratio, and PEF) were determined in the preoperative period and on postoperative days 21 and 60. Pain intensity was significantly greater in the PS group than in the TS group. Between the preoperative and postoperative periods, there were decreases in the spirometry variables studied. Those decreases were significant in the PS group but not in the TS group. The patients in the TS group experienced less immediate and late post-thoracotomy pain than did those in the PS group, as well as showing smaller reductions in the spirometry parameters. Therefore, transcostal suture is recommended over pericostal suture as the thoracotomy closure technique of choice.

  9. Comparison between two thoracotomy closure techniques: postoperative pain and pulmonary function*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leandro, Juliana Duarte; Rodrigues, Olavo Ribeiro; Slaets, Annie France Frere; Schmidt, Aurelino F.; Yaekashi, Milton L.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare two thoracotomy closure techniques (pericostal and transcostal suture) in terms of postoperative pain and pulmonary function. METHODS: This was a prospective, randomized, double-blind study carried out in the Department of Thoracic Surgery of the Luzia de Pinho Melo Hospital das Clínicas and at the University of Mogi das Cruzes, both located in the city of Mogi das Cruzes, Brazil. We included 30 patients (18-75 years of age) undergoing posterolateral or anterolateral thoracotomy. The patients were randomized into two groups by the type of thoracotomy closure: pericostal suture (PS; n = 16) and transcostal suture (TS; n = 14). Pain intensity during the immediate and late postoperative periods was assessed by a visual analogic scale and the McGill Pain Questionnaire. Spirometry variables (FEV1, FVC, FEV1/FVC ratio, and PEF) were determined in the preoperative period and on postoperative days 21 and 60. RESULTS: Pain intensity was significantly greater in the PS group than in the TS group. Between the preoperative and postoperative periods, there were decreases in the spirometry variables studied. Those decreases were significant in the PS group but not in the TS group. CONCLUSIONS: The patients in the TS group experienced less immediate and late post-thoracotomy pain than did those in the PS group, as well as showing smaller reductions in the spirometry parameters. Therefore, transcostal suture is recommended over pericostal suture as the thoracotomy closure technique of choice. PMID:25210961

  10. Comparison of pregabalin versus ketamine in postoperative pain management in breast cancer surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Essam Mahran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Breast surgery compromises one of the most common cancer surgeries in females and commonly followed by acute postoperative pain. Pregabalin and ketamine have been used in many previous studies and was found to have a good analgesic profile. We assumed that pregabalin and ketamine can be used in control of postoperative pain in female patients undergoing breast cancer surgery. Material and Methods: Ninety female patients scheduled for cancer breast surgery were allocated in three groups (30 patients each, control group (group c received preoperative placebo, pregabalin group (group p received oral 150 mg pregabalin 1 h before surgery, ketamine group (group k received intravenous (IV 0.5 mg/kg ketamine with induction of anesthesia followed by 0.25 mg/kg/h IV throughout the surgery. All patients received general anesthesia and after recovery, the three groups were assessed in the first postoperative 24 h for postoperative visual analog scale (VAS , total 24 h morphine consumption, incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV, sedation score >2 and any complications from the drugs used in the study. Results: The use of pregabalin or ketamine was found to reduce total postoperative morphine consumption with P 2. Conclusion: The use of preoperative oral 150 mg pregabalin 1 h before surgery or IV 0.5 mg ketamine with induction of anesthesia can reduce postoperative opioid consumption in breast cancer surgery without change in sedation or PONV and with a good safety profile.

  11. Pattern of postoperative pain management among adult surgical patients in a low-resource setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogboli-Nwasor E

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Elizabeth Ogboli-Nwasor,1 Sa’adatu T Sule,2 Lazarus MD Yusufu31Department of Anaesthesia, Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital, Zaria, Nigeria; 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital, Zaria, Nigeria; 3Department of Surgery, Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital, Zaria, NigeriaObjective: Postoperative pain is one of the most common complications of surgery. The pattern of management varies between centers. The current study aimed to study the prescription pattern and the common drugs used in the management of postoperative pain in adult surgical patients at Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital (ABUTH; Zaria, Nigeria.Methods: Following ethical approval, a prospective observational study of consecutive adult patients who had surgery at the ABUTH Zaria was performed from January to December 2005. The data were entered into a proforma and analyzed using the Minitab statistical package.Results: One hundred and thirty-eight patients were included in the study. The age range was 17 to 80 years, with a mean age of 41 years. One hundred and thirty-two (95.7% of the prescriptions were written solely by the surgeon or surgical resident; passive suggestions were given by the anesthetists for only six patients (4.3%. Intermittent intramuscular injections of opioids/opiates were prescribed for 126 patients (91.3%, while nine patients (6.5% received intermittent intramuscular injections with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Oral paracetamol was prescribed for six patients (4.3%, while three patients (2.1% received no postoperative analgesic. Moderate pain was recorded in 48 patients (34.8%, and 90 patients (65.2% had mild pain 8 hours after their operation before subsequent doses of analgesics were given. More females (81 patients [58.7%], than males (42 patients [29.7%] suffered moderate to severe pain. The reported side effects were nausea (reported by 32.6% of patients, dry mouth (21

  12. Comparison of the Effects of Topical Ketamine and Tramadol on Postoperative Pain After Mandibular Molar Extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gönül, Onur; Satilmiş, Tülin; Ciftci, Alanur; Sipahi, Aysegül; Garip, Hasan; Göker, Kamil

    2015-11-01

    This study compared the analgesic efficacy of postoperative tramadol versus ketamine for preventing pain after mandibular molar extraction. Ninety patients who had undergone molar extraction were randomly divided into 3 groups: group T (tramadol 1 mg/kg), group K (ketamine 0.5 mg/kg), and group P (saline 2 mL). The treatment was applied to the extraction sockets using resorbable gelatin sponges. Pain after extraction was evaluated using a visual analog scale (VAS) 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, 12, 24, and 48 hours postoperatively. The VAS scores after extraction were statistically higher in group P than in either treatment group. Group K had the lowest pain intensity. This study shows that topical tramadol and ketamine are effective alternatives for decreasing pain after molar extractions. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Evidence-based management of postoperative pain in adults undergoing open inguinal hernia surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joshi, G P; Rawal, N; Kehlet, H

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Open inguinal hernia repair is associated with moderate postoperative pain, but optimal analgesia remains controversial. The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the available literature on the management of pain after open hernia surgery. METHODS: Randomized studies......, in English, published between January 1966 and March 2009, assessing analgesic and anaesthetic interventions in adult open hernia surgery, and reporting pain scores, were retrieved from the Embase and MEDLINE databases. In addition to published evidence, clinical practice was taken into account to ensure...... and increased time to home-readiness compared with regional anaesthesia. CONCLUSION: Field block with, or without wound infiltration, either as a sole anaesthetic/analgesic technique or as an adjunct to general anaesthesia, is recommended to reduce postoperative pain. Continuous local anaesthetic infusion...

  14. Multilevel lumbar fusion and postoperative physiotherapy rehabilitation in a patient with persistent pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pons, Tracey; Shipton, Edward A

    2011-04-01

    There are no comparative randomised controlled trials of physiotherapy modalities for chronic low back and radicular pain associated with multilevel fusion. Physiotherapy-based rehabilitation to control pain and improve activation levels for persistent pain following multilevel fusion can be challenging. This is a case report of a 68-year-old man who was referred for physiotherapy intervention 10 months after a multilevel spinal fusion for spinal stenosis. He reported high levels of persistent postoperative pain with minimal activity as a consequence of his pain following the surgery. The physiotherapy interventions consisted of three phases of rehabilitation starting with pool exercise that progressed to land-based walking. These were all combined with transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) that was used consistently for up to 8 hours per day. As outcome measures, daily pain levels and walking distances were charted once the pool programme was completed (in the third phase). Phase progression was determined by shuttle test results. The pain level was correlated with the distance walked using linear regression over a 5-day average. Over a 5-day moving average, the pain level reduced and walking distance increased. The chart of recorded pain level and walking distance showed a trend toward decreased pain with the increased distance walked. In a patient undergoing multilevel lumbar fusion, the combined use of TENS and a progressive walking programme (from pool to land) reduced pain and increased walking distance. This improvement was despite poor medication compliance and a reported high level of postsurgical pain.

  15. The Effect of Inhalation of Aromatherapy Blend containing Lavender Essential Oil on Cesarean Postoperative Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Olapour, Alireza; Behaeen, Kaveh; Akhondzadeh, Reza; Soltani, Farhad; al Sadat Razavi, Forough; Bekhradi, Reza

    2013-01-01

    Background Pain is a major problem in patients after cesarean and medication such as aromatherapy which is a complementary therapy, in which the essences of the plants oils are used to reduce such undesirable conditions. Objectives In this study, the effect of aromatherapy using Lavender (Lavandula) essential oil on cesarean postoperative pain was assessed. Materials and Methods In a triple blind, randomized placebo-controlled trial study, 60 pregnant women who were admitted to a general hosp...

  16. Association of postoperative nausea/vomiting and pain with breastfeeding success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon Abola

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Successful breastfeeding is a goal set forth by the World Health Organization to improve neonatal care. Increasingly, patients express the desire to breastfeed, and clinicians should facilitate successful breastfeeding. The primary aim of this study is to determine if postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV or postoperative pain are associated with decreased breastfeeding success after cesarean delivery. Methods This is a historical cohort study using the Stony Brook Elective Cesarean Delivery Database. Self-reported breastfeeding success at 4 weeks postoperative was analyzed for associations with postoperative antiemetic use and postoperative pain scores. Breastfeeding success was also analyzed for associations with patient factors and anesthetic medications. Results Overall, 86% of patients (n = 81 who intended on breastfeeding reported breastfeeding success. Breastfeeding success was not associated with postoperative nausea or vomiting as measured by post anesthesia care unit antiemetic use (15% use in successful vs. 18% use in unsuccessful, p = 0.67 or 48-h antiemetic use (28% use in successful group vs 36% use in unsuccessful group, p = 0.732. Pain visual analog scale scores at 6, 12 and 24 h postoperatively were not significantly different between patients with or without breastfeeding success. Breastfeeding success was associated with having had at least 1 previous child (86% vs 36%, p < 0.001. Patients with asthma were less likely to have breastfeeding success (45% vs 4%, p = 0.002. Conclusions Efforts to improve PONV and pain after cesarean delivery may not be effective in improving breastfeeding success. To possibly improve breastfeeding rates, resources should be directed toward patients with no previous children and patients with asthma.

  17. Postoperative Pain after Root Canal Treatment: A Prospective Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gotler

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate the incidence and severity of postendodontic treatment pain (PEP subsequent to root canal treatment (RCT in vital and necrotic pulps and after retreatment. Methodology. A prospective study. Participants were all patients (=274 who underwent RCT in teeth with vital pulp, necrotic pulp, or vital pulp that had been treated for symptomatic irreversible pulpitis or who received root canal retreatment, by one clinician, during an eight-month period. Exclusion criteria were swelling, purulence, and antibiotic use during initial treatment. A structured questionnaire accessed age, gender, tooth location, and pulpal diagnosis. Within 24 h of treatment, patients were asked to grade their pain at 6 and 18 hours posttreatment, using a 1–5 point scale. Results. RCT of teeth with vital pulp induced a significantly higher incidence and severity of PEP (63.8%; 2.46 ± 1.4, resp. than RCT of teeth with necrotic pulp (38.5%; 1.78 ± 1.2, resp. or of retreated teeth (48.8%; 1.89 ± 1.1, resp.. No statistical relation was found between type of pain (spontaneous or stimulated and pulp condition. Conclusion. RCT of teeth with vital pulp induced a significantly higher incidence and intensity of PEP compared to teeth with necrotic pulp or retreated teeth.

  18. Demonstration of analgesic effect of intranasal ketamine and intranasal fentanyl for postoperative pain after pediatric tonsillectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yenigun, Alper; Yilmaz, Sinan; Dogan, Remzi; Goktas, Seda Sezen; Calim, Muhittin; Ozturan, Orhan

    2018-01-01

    Tonsillectomy is one of the oldest and most commonly performed surgical procedure in otolaryngology. Postoperative pain management is still an unsolved problem. In this study, our aim is to demonstrate the efficacy of intranasal ketamine and intranasal fentanyl for postoperative pain relief after tonsillectomy in children. This randomized-controlled study was conducted to evaluate the effects of intranasal ketamine and intranasal fentanyl in children undergoing tonsillectomy. Tonsillectomy performed in 63 children were randomized into three groups. Group I received: Intravenous paracetamol (10 mg/kg), Group II received intranasal ketamine (1.5 mg/kg ketamine), Group III received intranasal fentanyl (1.5 mcg/kg). The Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Pain Scale (CHEOPS) and Wilson sedation scale scores were recorded at 15, 30, 60 min, 2 h, 6hr, 12 h and 24 h postoperatively. Patients were interviewed on the day after surgery to assess the postoperative pain, nightmares, hallucinations, nausea, vomiting and bleeding. Intranasal ketamine and intranasal fentanyl provided significantly stronger analgesic affects compared to intravenous paracetamol administration at postoperative 15, 30, 60 min and at 2, 6, 12 and 24 h in CHEOPS (p ketamine administration group. No such sedative effect was seen in the groups that received intranasal fentanyl and intravenous paracetamol in Wilson Sedation Scale (p ketamine and intranasal fentanyl were more effective than paracetamol for postoperative analgesia after pediatric tonsillectomy. Sedative effects were observed in three patients with the group of intranasal ketamine. There was no significant difference in the efficacy of IN Ketamine and IN Fentanyl for post-tonsillectomy pain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Music benefits on postoperative distress and pain in pediatric day care surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Calcaterra

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative effect of music listening has not been established in pediatric age. Response on postoperative distress and pain in pediatric day care surgery has been evaluated. Forty-two children were enrolled. Patients were randomly assigned to the music-group (music intervention during awakening period or the non-music group (standard postoperative care. Slow and fast classical music and pauses were recorded and played via ambient speakers. Heart rate, blood pressure, oxygen saturation, glucose and cortisol levels, faces pain scale and Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, Consolability (FLACC Pain Scale were considered as indicators of response to stress and pain experience. Music during awakening induced lower increase of systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels. The non-music group showed progressive increasing values of glycemia; in music-group the curve of glycemia presented a plateau pattern (P<0.001. Positive impact on reactions to pain was noted using the FLACC scale. Music improves cardiovascular parameters, stress-induced hyperglycemia. Amelioration on pain perception is more evident in older children. Positive effects seems to be achieved by the alternation of fast, slow rhythms and pauses even in pediatric age.

  20. Prediction of immediate postoperative pain using the analgesia/nociception index: a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boselli, E; Bouvet, L; Bégou, G; Dabouz, R; Davidson, J; Deloste, J-Y; Rahali, N; Zadam, A; Allaouchiche, B

    2014-04-01

    The analgesia/nociception index (ANI) is derived from heart rate variability, ranging from 0 (maximal nociception) to 100 (maximal analgesia), to reflect the analgesia/nociception balance during general anaesthesia. This should be correlated with immediate postoperative pain in the post-anaesthesia care unit (PACU). The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of ANI measured at arousal from general anaesthesia to predict immediate postoperative pain on arrival in PACU. Two hundred patients undergoing ear, nose, and throat or lower limb orthopaedic surgery with general anaesthesia using an inhalational agent and remifentanil were included in this prospective observational study. The ANI was measured immediately before tracheal extubation and pain intensity was assessed within 10 min of arrival in PACU using a 0-10 numerical rating scale (NRS). The relationship between ANI and NRS was assessed using linear regression. A receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to evaluate the performance of ANI to predict NRS>3. A negative linear relationship was observed between ANI immediately before extubation and NRS on arrival in PACU. Using a threshold of 3 were both 86% with 92% negative predictive value, corresponding to an area under the ROC curve of 0.89. The measurement of ANI immediately before extubation after inhalation-remifentanil anaesthesia was significantly associated with pain intensity on arrival in PACU. The performance of ANI for the prediction of immediate postoperative pain is good and may assist physicians in optimizing acute pain management. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01796249.

  1. The effect of a preoperative educational film on patients' postoperative pain in relation to their request for opioids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Jacqueline F M; van Wijck, Albert J M; Kappen, TH; Peelen, Linda M.; Kalkman, CJ; Schuurmans, Marieke J.

    2015-01-01

    Guidelines for postoperative pain treatment are based on patients' pain scores. Patients with an intermediate Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) score of 5 or 6 may consider their pain as either bearable or unbearable, which makes it difficult to decide on pain treatment because guidelines advise

  2. Evaluating Persistent Postoperative Pain in One Tertiary Hospital: Incidence, Quality of Life, Associated Factors, and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimaraes-Pereira, Luis; Valdoleiros, Ines; Reis, Pedro; Abelha, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    Persistent postoperative pain (PPP) is defined as persistent pain after surgery of greater than three months' duration. Identify the incidence of PPP in our hospital and its associated factors; evaluate quality of life (QoL) and treatment of patients. We conducted an observational prospective study in adults proposed to various types of surgery using the brief pain inventory short form preoperatively (T0), one day after surgery, and three months later (T3). If the patient had pain at T3 and other causes of pain were excluded, they were considered to have PPP, and the McGill Pain Questionnaire Short Form was applied. QoL was measured with the EuroQol 5-dimension questionnaire (EQ-5D). One hundred seventy-five patients completed the study. The incidence of PPP was 28%, and the affected patients presented lower QoL. The majority referred to a moderate to severe level of interference in their general activity. Cholecystectomies were less associated with PPP, and total knee/hip replacements were more associated with it. Preoperative pain, preoperative benzodiazepines or antidepressants, and more severe acute postoperative pain were associated with the development of PPP. Half of the patients with PPP were under treatment, and they refer a mean symptomatic relief of 69%. This study, apart from attempting to better characterize the problem of PPP, emphasizes the lack of its treatment.

  3. Pregabalin for the treatment of postoperative pain: results from three controlled trials using different surgical models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singla NK

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Neil K Singla,1 Jacques E Chelly,2 David R Lionberger,3 Joseph Gimbel,4 Luis Sanin,5 Jonathan Sporn,5 Ruoyong Yang,5 Raymond Cheung,5 Lloyd Knapp,6 Bruce Parsons5 1Lotus Clinical Research, Pasadena, CA, USA; 2Division of Acute Interventional Perioperative Pain, Department of Anesthesiology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; 3Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA; 4Arizona Research Center, Phoenix, AZ, USA; 5Pfizer Inc., New York, NY, USA; 6Pfizer Inc., New London, CT, USA Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of pregabalin (150 or 300 mg/d as an adjunctive therapy for the treatment of postoperative pain. Patients and methods: This study reports findings from three separate, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of adjunctive pregabalin for the treatment of postoperative pain. Patients underwent one of three categories of surgical procedures (one procedure per study: elective inguinal hernia repair (post-IHR; elective total knee arthroplasty (post-TKA; or total abdominal hysterectomy (posthysterectomy. The primary endpoint in each trial, mean worst pain over the past 24 hours, was assessed 24 hours post-IHR and posthysterectomy, and 48 hours post-TKA. Patients rated their pain on a scale from 0 to 10, with higher scores indicating greater pain severity. Results: In total, 425 (post-IHR, 307 (post-TKA, and 501 (posthysterectomy patients were randomized to treatment. There were no statistically significant differences between the pregabalin and placebo groups with respect to the primary endpoint in any of the three trials. The least squares mean difference in worst pain, between 300 mg/d pregabalin and placebo, was -0.7 (95% confidence interval [CI] =-1.4, -0.1; Hochberg adjusted P=0.067 post-IHR; -0.34 (95% CI =-1.07, 0.39; P=0.362 post-TKA; and -0.2 (95% CI =-0.66, 0.31; P=0.471 posthysterectomy. Conclusion: There were no significant differences

  4. The effects of positive or negative words when assessing postoperative pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chooi, C S L; Nerlekar, R; Raju, A; Cyna, A M

    2011-01-01

    Negative or harsh words such as 'pain' and 'sting' used to describe sensations prior to potentially painful procedures have been shown to increase pain. We aimed to determine whether the reporting of pain and its severity is affected by the way it is assessed during anaesthesia follow-up after caesarean section. Following caesarean section, 232 women were randomised prior to post-anaesthesia review. Group N participants were asked questions containing the negative word 'pain, "Do you have any pain?" and then asked to rate it on a 0 to 10 point Verbal Numerical Rating Scale. Group P participants were asked questions using more positive words, "How are you feeling?" and "Are you comfortable?". Data are presented as median, interquartile range. In Group N, 63 participants (54.3%) reported pain compared with only 28 participants (24.1%) in Group P (P positive words, decreases its incidence but does not affect its severity when measured by pain scores. Words that focus the patient on pain during its assessment may lead some to interpret sensations as pain which they might not do otherwise. These findings may have important implications when assessing and researching postoperative pain.

  5. Postoperative Pain and Flare-Ups: Comparison of Incidence Between Single and Multiple Visit Pulpectomy in Primary Molars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowda, Subhadra Halemane Nagaraj

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Endodontic treatment performed in either single- or multiple visit can be followed by numerous short- and long term complications. One of the short term complications include postoperative pain and flare–ups. The ability to predict its prevalence and forewarn the patient may go some way towards enabling coping strategies and help dentist in pain management treatment decisions Aim To compare the incidence and intensity of postoperative pain and flare-ups between single- and multiple visit pulpectomy in primary molars. Also, to correlate the preoperative status of the pulp to postoperative pain and flare-ups. Materials and Methods Eighty primary molars indicated for pulpectomy were included in the study and divided into two groups. Tooth treated and preoperative status of the pulp vitality was recorded. All the conventional steps in pulpectomy were followed. Teeth in Group 1 (single visit pulpectomy) were obturated on the same visit. Teeth in Group 2 (multiple visit pulpectomy) were obturated in the subsequent appointment. The recording of postoperative pain, flare-ups, use of medication were done after 24 hours, seven days and one month. Results Four cases in both the groups reported postoperative pain (10%) at 24 hour recall, p=0.74. One flare-up (2.5%) was recorded in each group p=0.67. None of the patients reported pain at seventh day and one month recall. Postoperative pain was recorded in five non-vital teeth (13.5%) and three vital teeth (6.9%). However, it was statistically not significant p=0.53. Conclusion From the perspective of our study there was a low incidence of postoperative pain. The majority of patients in both groups reported no pain or only minimal pain within 24 hours of treatment. There were no differences between single- and multi visit treatment protocols with respect to the incidence of postoperative pain. No significant correlation could be found between pulp vitality and the incidence of postoperative pain. PMID:28511499

  6. Effectiveness of preemptive analgesia on postoperative pain following third molar surgery: Review of literatures

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    Akira Yamaguchi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the efficacy of preemptive analgesia for mandibular third molar surgery by, reviewing of randomized controlled trials. In many of the studies, the preemptive use of NSAIDs before, tooth extraction demonstrated that the postoperative pain was better controlled beyond the expected, effect time, compared without such preemptive use. On the other hand, some studies reported that, compared to the administration before removal of the tooth, postoperative administration was, associated with better suppression of postoperative pain. This suggests that in postoperative pain after, removal of mandibular third molars, peripheral sensitization caused by reactive inflammation, following the tooth extraction and secondary central sensitization are more important factors than, direct central sensitization caused by surgical tissue damage. Accordingly, when a mandibular third, molar is removed, central sensitization due to tissue damage should be suppressed by, preadministration of analgesics. In order then to suppress postoperative peripheral sensitization, the, readministration of analgesics is considered more effective. Furthermore, although acid NSAIDs are, effective analgesics, the associated adverse events are of concern. Accordingly, acetaminophen (1000 mg, which, is devoid of anti-inflammatory effects but is a weak cyclooxygenase inhibitor, can be used for, preemptive analgesia administration.

  7. Nurses' responsibilities in postoperative pain management following total hip arthroplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Dumolard, Pierre; Gök, Mustafa; Le, Ngoc

    2017-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty is the replacement of a hip joint that has been severely damaged. The operation is recommended if other treatments have not responded adequately. As the nurses are the professionals who spend the most time with patients after the surgery, they play an important role in the patient’s pain management. The aim of the thesis is to define the nurse’s responsibilities in the care of total hip arthroplasty. The purpose of the thesis is to analyze existing research, which may s...

  8. Postoperative pain assessment using four behavioral scales in Pakistani children undergoing elective surgery

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    Faisal Shamim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Several measurement tools have been used for assessment of postoperative pain in pediatric patients. Self-report methods have limitations in younger children and parent, nurse or physician assessment can be used as a surrogate measure. These tools should be tested in different cultures as pain can be influenced by sociocultural factors. The objective was to assess the inter-rater agreement on four different behavioral pain assessment scales in our local population. Materials and Methods: This prospective, descriptive, observational study was conducted in Pakistan. American Society of Anesthesiologists I and II children, 3-7 years of age, undergoing elective surgery were enrolled. Four pain assessment scales were used, Children′s Hospital of Eastern Ontario Pain Scale (CHEOPS, Toddler Preschool Postoperative Pain Scale (TPPPS, objective pain scale (OPS, and Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, Consolability (FLACC. After 15 and 60 min of arrival in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU, each child evaluated his/her postoperative pain by self-reporting and was also independently assessed by the PACU nurse, PACU anesthetist and the parent. The sensitivity and specificity of the responses of the four pain assessment scales were compared to the response of the child. Results: At 15 min, sensitivity and specificity were >60% for doctors and nurses on FLACC, OPS, and CHEOPS scales and for FLACC and CHEOPS scale for the parents. Parents showed poor agreement on OPS and TPPS. At 60 min, sensitivity was poor on the OPS scale by all three observers. Nurses showed a lower specificity on FLACC tool. Parents had poor specificity on CHEOPS and rate of false negatives was high with TPPS. Conclusions: We recommend the use of FLACC scale for assessment by parents, nurses, and doctors in Pakistani children aged between 3 and 7.

  9. Postoperative Pain Management After Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty: The Value of Liposomal Bupivacaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sporer, Scott M; Rogers, Thea

    2016-11-01

    Multimodal pain protocols have been proposed to achieve improved long-acting postoperative analgesia. Controlling postoperative pain after joint arthroplasty is especially important as it relates to patient satisfaction and outcomes. The purpose of this study was to compare the postoperative pain, time to ambulation, and overall narcotic usage between patients who received either a femoral nerve block with a periarticular bupivacaine injection or a periarticular bupivacaine and extended-release liposomal bupivacaine injection after primary total knee arthroplasty. A total of 597 consecutive primary total knee arthroplasties performed between September 1, 2012 and August 31, 2014 received preoperative celecoxib, oxycodone, and transdermal scopolamine. Intraoperatively, patients either received a single-dose bupivacaine femoral nerve block along with 30-mL 0.25% bupivacaine periarticular injection (group A) or a 60-mL periarticular injection alone (20-mL liposomal bupivacaine, 30-mL 0.25% bupivacaine, and 10-mL saline; group B). The postoperative pain scores, narcotic usage, and time to ambulation were retrospectively collected from the electronic medical record. These outcomes were compared between treatment groups. There were 325 patients in group A compared with 272 in group B during the time frame. There was no difference among age, gender, race, and body mass index between the groups. Group B demonstrated a decreased need for breakthrough pain medication (16.9% vs 36.3% P bupivacaine resulted in a decrease need for breakthrough pain medication, improved pain scores at 12 hours, and an earlier time to ambulation compared to a combined femoral nerve block and periarticular bupivacaine injection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparison of immediate postoperative pain after transvaginal versus traditional laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Stephanie G; Dabu-Bondoc, Susan; Dai, Feng; Mikhael, Hosni; Vadivelu, Nalini; Roberts, Kurt E

    2014-04-01

    Transvaginal cholecystectomy (TVC) is the most common natural orifice transluminal surgery (NOTES) performed in women, yet there is a paucity of data on intraoperative and immediate postoperative pain management. Previous studies have demonstrated that NOTES procedures are associated with less postoperative pain and faster recovery times. This study analyzes intraoperative and postoperative opioid use for TVC compared with traditional four-port laparoscopic cholecystectomies (LCs). This is a retrospective analysis of consecutive TVC and LC female patients between August 2009 and August 2012 in an academic institution. We compared demographics, intraoperative and postoperative opioid use and times in the operating room (OR) and in the post anesthesia care unit (PACU). A total of 68 TVC and 67 LC patients were included in this study. The TVC and LC groups were similar in terms of age (both 41 years) and body mass index (29 and 31 kg/m2, respectively). The intraoperative preparation, surgical, and emergence times were significantly longer for the TVC than for the LC (p ≤ 0.01). Compared with the LC group, the intraoperative opioid requirement was significantly greater (TVC 27 mg vs. LC 25 mg; p = 0.003), but after adjusting for anesthesia time, the difference in OR opioid consumption became non-significant (p = 0.08). The PACU opioid requirement (TVC 2.5 vs. LC 5 mg; p = 0.04) was significantly lower for the TVC group, and a greater proportion of patients did not need any pain medications (TVC 38 % vs. LC 21 %; p = 0.04), compared with the LC group. The average PACU pain scores were not significantly different between the groups (p = 0.45). TVC patients did not experience more pain than LC patients. Although the average pain scores of TVC patients did not differ from those of the LC patients, TVC patients did require less pain medication in the PACU.

  11. Postoperative Pain after Endodontic Treatment of Asymptomatic Teeth Using Rotary Instruments: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahi, Shahriar; Asghari, Vahideh; Rahimi, Saeed; Lotfi, Mehrdad; Samiei, Mohammad; Yavari, Hamidreza; Shakouie, Sahar; Nezafati, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of the present study was to compare the effect of two different rotary instruments on postoperative pain in teeth with asymptomatic irreversible pulpitis. Methods and Materials: A total of 78 mandibular first and second molars were divided into two groups (n=39) and their root canal preparation was carried out with either RaCe or ProTaper rotary instruments. All the subjects underwent one-visit root canal treatment and the severity of postoperative pain was evaluated using visual analog scale (VAS) at 4-, 12-, 24-, 48- and 72-h and 1-week intervals. In addition, the need for taking analgesics was recorded. Data were analyzed with the repeated-measures ANOVA and the Mann-Whitney U test was used for two-by-two comparison. Statistical significance was set at 0.05. Results: Comparison of mean pain severity between the two groups at various postoperative intervals did not reveal any significant differences (P=0.10). The difference in amount of analgesics taken by each groups was not statistically significant (P=0.25). Conclusion: There were no significant differences in the postoperative pain reported between the two groups; which indicates the clinical acceptability of both systems. PMID:26843876

  12. Tramadol suppositories are less suitable for post-operative pain relief than rectal acetaminophen/codeine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pluim, M. A.; Wegener, J. T.; Rupreht, J.; Vulto, A. G.

    1999-01-01

    The suitability of tramadol suppositories for inclusion in our hospital formulary for the treatment of mild to moderate post-operative pain was evaluated. In an open randomized trial, rectal tramadol was compared with our standard treatment acetaminophen/codeine suppositories. We expected tramadol

  13. The risk of severe postoperative pain: Modification and validation of a clinical prediction rule

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Kristel J. M.; Kalkman, Cor J.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Bonsel, Gouke J.; Moons, Karel G. M.; Vergouwe, Yvonne

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recently, a prediction rule was developed to preoperatively predict the risk of severe pain in the first postoperative hour in surgical inpatients. We aimed to modify the rule to enhance its use in both surgical inpatients and outpatients (ambulatory patients). Subsequently, we

  14. Preincisional and postoperative epidural morphine, ropivacaine, ketamine, and naloxone treatment for postoperative pain management in upper abdominal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Hou-Chuan; Hsieh, Chung-Bao; Wong, Chih-Shung; Yeh, Chun-Chang; Wu, Zhi-Fu

    2016-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that preincisional epidural morphine, bupivacaine, and ketamine combined with epidural anesthesia (EA) and general anesthesia (GA) provided pre-emptive analgesia for upper abdominal surgery. Recent studies reported that ultralow-dose naloxone enhanced the antinociceptive effect of morphine in rats. This study investigated the benefits of preincisional and postoperative epidural morphine + ropivacaine + ketamine + naloxone (M + R + K + N) treatment for achieving postoperative pain relief in upper abdominal surgery. Eighty American Society of Anesthesiology I-II patients scheduled for major upper abdominal surgery were allocated to four groups in a randomized, single-blinded study. All patients received combined GA and EA with a continuous epidural infusion of 2% lidocaine (6-8 mL/h) 30 minutes after pain regimen. After GA induction, in Group I, an epidural pain control regimen (total 10 mL) was administered using 1% lidocaine (8 mL) + morphine (2 mg) + ropivacaine (20 mg; M + R); in Group II, 1% lidocaine 8 (mL) + morphine (2 mg) + ropivacaine (20 mg) + ketamine (20 mg; M + R + K); in Group III, 1% lidocaine (8 mL) + morphine (2 mg) + ropivacaine (20 mg) + naloxone (2 μg; M + R + N); and in Group IV, 1% lidocaine (8 mL) + morphine (2 mg) + ropivacaine (20 mg) + ketamine (20 mg) + naloxone (2 μg; M + R + K + N), respectively. All patients received patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) with different pain regimens to control subsequent postoperative pain for 3 days following surgery. During the 3-day period following surgery, PCEA consumption (mL), numerical rating scale (NRS) score while cough/moving, and analgesic-related adverse effects were recorded. Total PCEA consumption for the 3-day observation period was 161.5±17.8 mL, 103.2±21.7 mL, 152.4±25.6 mL, and 74.1±16.9 mL for Groups I, II, III, and IV, respectively. (p pain management than preincisional

  15. Multicentre evaluation of postoperative pain control after 24hours in three hospitals of Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado-Alba, Jorge Enrique; Machado-Duque, Manuel Enrique; Ramírez-Sarmiento, Javier Orlando

    To determine the intensity of pain in operated patients using a visual analogue scale and identify variables associated with lack of pain control in three cities in Colombia. A cross-sectional study in patients over the age of 18 years, between January 1 st and September 30 th 2014, in 3 clinics in Colombia. The intensity of postoperative pain using a visual analogue scale at 24hours after surgery was recorded. Socio-demographic, clinical and pharmacological variables were taken into account. SPSS 22.0 was used for the analysis. 460 patients were evaluated, mean age 47.6±17.4 years, and 63.3% were female. The mean pain level was 23.8±17.4mm, with 91 (19.8% of patients) with moderate or greater pain (i.e., lack of pain control). Tramadol was the most used analgesic, followed by dipyrone and diclofenac. 53.0% were treated with monotherapy. Compliance with the dosing regimen of the first analgesic (OR: 0.53; 95% CI: 0.294 to .988; p=.046) was statistically significantly associated with a decreased risk of poorly controlled pain. Pain intensity and the proportion of patients with uncontrolled pain at 24hours after surgery show better results than other studies previously published in the country. There must be insistence on the administration of analgesia within a suitable interval in order to improve pain control. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Assessment of post-operative pain in children: who knows best?

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    Anjalee Brahmbhatt

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Pain assessment in children can be extremely challenging. Most professional bodies recommend that parents or carers should be involved with their child’s pain assessment; but the evidence that parents can accurately report pain on behalf of their children is mixed. Our objective was to examine whether there were differences in post-operative pain score ratings between the child, nurse and parent or carer after surgery. Cognitively intact children aged four upwards, undergoing all surgical procedures, whose parents were present in the post-anaesthetic recovery unit (PACU, were studied. Thirty-three children were included in the study. The numerical rating scale was used to rate the child’s pain by the child, nurse and parent on arrival to the PACU and prior to discharge. We found strong correlations between children’s, nurses’ and parent’s pain scores on admission and discharge from PACU. The intraclass correlation of pain scores reported by children, nurses and parents was 0.94 (95% confidence intervals 0.91-0.96, P<0.0001. In cognitively intact children, it is adequate to manage pain based upon the assessment of children’s and nurses’ pain scores alone. The numerical rating scale appeared to be suitable for younger children. Whilst there are benefits of parents being present in recovery, it is not essential for optimizing the assessment of pain.

  17. The Influence of a New Clinical Motion for Endodontic Instruments on the Incidence of Postoperative Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambarini, G; Di Nardo, D; Miccoli, G; Guerra, F; Di Giorgio, R; Di Giorgio, G; Glassman, G; Piasecki, L; Testarelli, L

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies showed that motor motions play an important role in determining apical extrusion of debris. Therefore a new clinical motion (MIMERACI) has been proposed. The basic idea is to progress slowly (1mm advancement), and after each 1mm, to remove the instrument from the canal, clean flutes and irrigate. The aim of the study was to prove whether the clinical use of MIMERACI technique would influence or not postoperative pain. 100 teeth requesting endodontic treatment were selected for the study and divided into two similar groups based on anatomy, pre-operative symptoms and vitality, presence or absence of periapical lesion. All teeth were shaped, cleaned and obturated by the same operator, using the same NiTi instruments. The only difference between the two groups was the instrumentation technique: tradional (group A) vs MIMERACI (group B). Assessment of postoperative pain was performed 3 days after treatment. Presence, absence and degree of pain were recorded with a visual analogue scale (VAS), validated in previous studies. Collected data statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA post hoc Tukey test. For VAS pain scores MIMERACI technique showed significantly better results than group A (p=0,031). Overall, both incidence and intensity of symptoms were significantly lower. Flare ups occurred in 3 patients, but none treated with the MIMERACI Technique. Since extruded debris can elicit more postoperative pain, results obtained by using MIMERACI technique are probably due to many factors: better mechanical removal and less production of debris and more efficient irrigation during instrumentation.

  18. Music benefits on postoperative distress and pain in pediatric day care surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcaterra, Valeria; Ostuni, Selene; Bonomelli, Irene; Mencherini, Simonetta; Brunero, Marco; Zambaiti, Elisa; Mannarino, Savina; Larizza, Daniela; Albertini, Riccardo; Tinelli, Carmine; Pelizzo, Gloria

    2014-08-12

    Postoperative effect of music listening has not been established in pediatric age. Response on postoperative distress and pain in pediatric day care surgery has been evaluated. Forty-two children were enrolled. Patients were randomly assigned to the music-group (music intervention during awakening period) or the non-music group (standard postoperative care). Slow and fast classical music and pauses were recorded and played via ambient speakers. Heart rate, blood pressure, oxygen saturation, glucose and cortisol levels, faces pain scale and Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, Consolability (FLACC) Pain Scale were considered as indicators of response to stress and pain experience. Music during awakening induced lower increase of systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels. The non-music group showed progressive increasing values of glycemia; in music-group the curve of glycemia presented a plateau pattern (PMusic improves cardiovascular parameters, stress-induced hyperglycemia. Amelioration on pain perception is more evident in older children. Positive effects seems to be achieved by the alternation of fast, slow rhythms and pauses even in pediatric age.

  19. The effect of a preoperative single-dose methylprednisolone on postoperative pain after abdominal hysterectomy:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabakke, Anna J M; Holst, Lars B; Jørgensen, Jørgen C

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Methylprednisolone has been shown to have analgesic effects after orthopedic surgery. The objective of this trial was to compare the effect of 125 mg methylprednisolone with placebo on postoperative pain after abdominal hysterectomy. STUDY DESIGN: In this randomized double......-blinded placebo-controlled trial women scheduled for elective abdominal hysterectomy (n=59) were randomized to preoperatively receive either 125 mg methylprednisolone or saline intravenously. Primary outcome was postoperative pain measured on a 0.0-10.0 visual analog scale and assessed at rest and during...... models. RESULTS: Forty-nine cases were analyzed (methylprednisolone n=25, placebo n=24). Pain scores were significantly higher in the methylprednisolone group compared to the placebo group during mobilization (0.79 [95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.07-1.50] P=0.03) but not at rest (0.55 [95% CI: -0...

  20. Quadratus lumborum block for post-operative pain relief in patient with Prune belly syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Chitra; Khanna, Sangeeta; Mehta, Yatin

    2017-10-01

    Abdominal field blocks are commonly used as part of multimodal analgesia for post-operative pain relief in patients undergoing abdominal surgery. Conventionally, transversus abdominis plane block is used, but has the disadvantage of limited spread only to T10-T12 segments, providing only partial pain relief. The new quadratus lumborum (QL) block has the advantage of providing wider sensory block from T6 to L1 and thus has an evolving role in opioid-free anaesthesia. Opioid-induced cough depression, urinary retention, and drowsiness can be problematic in patients with Prune belly syndrome, who have deficient abdominal muscles and myriad of genitourinary problems. We report a case of a young male with Prune belly syndrome, who had a pain-free post-operative period after high inguinal orchidectomy with unilateral QL block.

  1. Quadratus lumborum block for post-operative pain relief in patient with Prune belly syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chitra Garg

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abdominal field blocks are commonly used as part of multimodal analgesia for post-operative pain relief in patients undergoing abdominal surgery. Conventionally, transversus abdominis plane block is used, but has the disadvantage of limited spread only to T10–T12 segments, providing only partial pain relief. The new quadratus lumborum (QL block has the advantage of providing wider sensory block from T6 to L1 and thus has an evolving role in opioid-free anaesthesia. Opioid-induced cough depression, urinary retention, and drowsiness can be problematic in patients with Prune belly syndrome, who have deficient abdominal muscles and myriad of genitourinary problems. We report a case of a young male with Prune belly syndrome, who had a pain-free post-operative period after high inguinal orchidectomy with unilateral QL block.

  2. Comparative effect of paracetamol, NSAIDs or their combination in postoperative pain management: a qualitative review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyllested, M; Jones, S; Pedersen, J L

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Quantitative reviews of postoperative pain management have demonstrated that the number of patients needed to treat for one patient to achieve at least 50% pain relief (NNT) is 2.7 for ibuprofen (400 mg) and 4.6 for paracetamol (1000 mg), both compared with placebo. However, direct...... comparisons between paracetamol and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have not been extensively reviewed. The aims of this review are (i) to compare the analgesic and adverse effects of paracetamol with those of other NSAIDs in postoperative pain, (ii) to compare the effects of combined...... paracetamol and NSAID with those of either drug alone, and (iii) to discuss whether the adverse effects of NSAIDs in short-term use are justified by their analgesic effects, compared with paracetamol. METHODS: Medline (1966 to January 2001) and the Cochrane Library (January 2001) were used to perform...

  3. Training of medical staff positively influences postoperative pain management at home in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepponen, K; Kokki, H; Ahonen, R

    1999-08-01

    The aim of this study was to describe how parents manage their child's postoperative pain at home following day-case surgery. The incidence of pain, different analgesics used and problems related to administering medications were the main interests of the study. A postal questionnaire was sent to the parents of 275 children who were under 8 years of age and had undergone an ear, nose and throat (ENT) day-case operation. The questionnaire was sent to the parents a week after discharge from hospital. Altogether, the parents of 227 children answered the questionnaire (response rate 83%). The study was divided into two phases (preintervention and postintervention), and incorporated a training program for doctors and nurses between these two phases. The training program aimed to improve the treatment practices of postoperative pain in children. Seventy-eight per cent of the children in the preintervention study and 75% in the postintervention study experienced at least mild pain after discharge. The training program for doctors and nurses affected the home treatment practices of postoperative pain. The proportion of parents treating their children increased from 68% to 80% after the training program (p = 0.028). Many parents faced problems while treating their children; for example, 19% (n = 30) of the children refused to take their medicine, and suppositories were regarded to be an especially unpleasant dosage form. However, no serious adverse effects were reported. We conclude that due to the pain experienced at home by the great majority of children following day-case ENT operations, parents need information on how to manage their child's pain. A training program for doctors and nurses can improve the treatment of children's pain even at home. Since some children dislike suppositories, it would be worth considering the use of small tablets or mixtures instead.

  4. Pre- and post-operative gait analysis for evaluation of neck pain in chronic whiplash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ginsburg Glen M

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Chronic neck pain after whiplash is notoriously refractory to conservative treatment, and positive radiological findings to explain the symptoms are scarce. The apparent disproportionality between subjective complaints and objective findings is significant for the planning of treatment, impairment ratings, and judicial questions on causation. However, failure to identify a symptom's focal origin with routine imaging studies does not invalidate the symptom per se. It is therefore of a general interest both to develop effective therapeutic strategies in chronic whiplash, and to establish techniques for objectively evaluation of treatment outcomes. Methods Twelve patients with chronic neck pain after whiplash underwent pre- and postoperative computerized 3D gait analysis. Results Significant improvement was found in all gait parameters, cervical range-of-motion, and self reported pain (VAS. Conclusion Chronic neck pain is associated with abnormal cervical spine motion and gait patterns. 3D gait analysis is a useful instrument to assess the outcome of treatment for neck pain.

  5. The efficacy of preoperative versus postoperative rofecoxib for preventing acute postoperative dental pain: a prospective randomized crossover study using bilateral symmetrical oral surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ong, K. S.; Seymour, R. A.; Yeo, J. F.; Ho, K. H.; Lirk, P.

    2005-01-01

    Previous data have demonstrated that rofecoxib has good analgesic efficacy for acute postoperative dental pain. However, up to half of these patients require rescue analgesics within the first 24 hours. As the timing of analgesic interventions may be an important factor in pain control, the present

  6. Postoperative pain management with transdermal fentanyl after forefoot surgery: a randomized, placebo-controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merivirta R

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Riika Merivirta,1 Mikko Pitkänen,2 Jouko Alanen,3 Elina Haapoja,1 Mari Koivisto,4 Kristiina Kuusniemi11Department of Anaesthesiology, Intensive Care, Emergency Care and Pain Medicine of Turku University Hospital and University of Turku, Turku, 2Department of Anaesthesia, Hospital Orton, Invalid Foundation, Helsinki, 3Terveystalo Clinic Hospital, Helsinki, 4Department of Biostatistics, University of Turku, Turku, FinlandBackground: Quality of life is decreased in patients with hallux valgus deformity, mainly because of pain. Significant improvement is usually achieved by surgery. However, postoperative pain can be moderate to severe for 2–3 days. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the use of transdermal fentanyl for postoperative pain management after forefoot surgery.Methods: Sixty patients undergoing hallux valgus or hallux rigidus surgery were allocated to receive a patch delivering either fentanyl 12 µg/hour or placebo for postoperative pain. The consumption of rescue opioid oxycodone, the primary outcome measure, was evaluated daily until the fourth postoperative day. Total consumption of oxycodone during the study period was also assessed. Pain scores and possible adverse effects were evaluated every 6 hours during the first 24 hours and on the fourth postoperative day.Results: The use of rescue opioid was low in both groups, the median (range consumption of oxycodone being 10 (0–50 mg on the day of surgery (no difference between the groups, P=0.31 and 0 (0–35 mg thereafter. The total combined consumption was 10 (0–105 mg in the fentanyl group and 20 (0–70 mg in the placebo group (P=0.23. There were no statistically significant differences in pain scores or adverse effects between the groups.Conclusion: As a part of multimodal analgesia with ibuprofen and acetaminophen, a patch delivering fentanyl 12 µg/hour did not significantly decrease the consumption of rescue opioid or pain scores after forefoot surgery

  7. Persistent postoperative pain after cardiac surgery: a systematic review with meta-analysis regarding incidence and pain intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães-Pereira, Luís; Reis, Pedro; Abelha, Fernando; Azevedo, Luís Filipe; Castro-Lopes, José Manuel

    2017-10-01

    Persistent postoperative pain (PPP) has been described as a complication of cardiac surgery (CS). We aimed to study PPP after CS (PPPCS) by conducting a systematic review of the literature regarding its incidence, intensity, location, and the presence of neuropathic pain, according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses. The review comprised 3 phases: a methodological assessment of 6 different databases identifying potential articles and screening for inclusion criteria by 2 independent reviewers; data extraction; and study quality assessment. Meta-analysis was used to estimate the pooled incidence rates using a random effects model. We have identified 442 potentially relevant studies through database searching. A total of 23 studies (involving 11,057 patients) met our inclusion criteria. Persistent postoperative pain affects 37% patients in the first 6 months after CS, and it remains present more than 2 years after CS in 17%. The reported incidence of PPP during the first 6 months after CS increased in recent years. Globally, approximately half of the patients with PPPCS reported moderate to severe pain. Chest is the main location of PPPCS followed by the leg; neuropathic pain is present in the majority of the patients. This is the first systematic review and meta-analysis to provide estimates regarding incidence and intensity of PPPCS, which elucidates its relevance. There is an urgent need for adequate treatment and follow-up in patients with PPPCS.

  8. A PROSPECTIVE STUDY ON LOCAL ANAESTHETIC INFILTRATION FOR POSTOPERATIVE PAIN RELIEF AFTER LAPAROSCOPY

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    Peter Manoharan Chellapa

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Laparoscopic surgery is a modern surgical technique in which operations are performed through small incisions and with the aid of a camera. Pain is the most common complaint following any surgery, but as compared to open surgery, the severity of pain is much lower in patients undergoing surgery via laparoscopy. The pain following laparoscopic procedure can be divided into three components- parietal pain, visceral pain and shoulder pain. The use of local long-acting anaesthetics reduces postoperative parietal pain. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that local anaesthetics instilled at the end of laparoscopic procedure are able to prevent postoperative pain during the first 24 hours post-surgery. The outcome measures were pain scores, analgesic consumption and time to analgesic request. MATERIALS AND METHODS This was a prospective study conducted by the surgical department, Pondicherry Institute of Medical Sciences for a period of 13 months. The study comprised of 50 patients with an ASA I or II who underwent laparoscopic procedures between April 2016 to May 2017. Patients in this study were randomly categorised equally into two groups; in the study group (Group A patients received local anaesthetic infiltration with bupivacaine, while in the control group (Group B, patients did not receive local anaesthetic infiltration. Following history taking and physical examination, patients were subjected to routine laboratory investigations and ultrasonogram. Contrast-enhanced computerised tomography was done in patients when indicated and following which patients diagnosed with acute appendicitis or who had symptomatic cholelithiasis were taken up for laparoscopic surgery. In the study group, local anaesthetic was instilled at the end of surgery after port removal. The total volume of infiltrated solution in the study group was 10 mL divided proportionally according to the length of the skin incisions (3 mL for 10 mm incisions and 2 m

  9. Attitudes and perceptions of veterinary paraprofessionals in New Zealand to postoperative pain in dogs and cats.

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    Kongara, K; Squance, H E; Topham, I A; Bridges, J P

    2016-03-01

    To survey the attitudes and perceptions of veterinary paraprofessionals in New Zealand to postoperative pain in dogs and cats. In December 2011, veterinary paraprofessionals (VP) from throughout New Zealand were invited to participate in an online survey. Eleven questions, which were divided into five sections, were used to determine demographic information, the respondents' assessment of pain after commonly performed surgeries in dogs and cats, their opinions on provision of analgesia, who had responsibility for pain monitoring and the use of any formal pain scoring system in the practice. Data from 165 respondents were able to be used, and 162 (98%) respondents to the survey were female. According to the respondents' estimates, fracture repair in dogs and repair of diaphragmatic hernias in cats had the highest pain score following surgery. Neutering procedures involving dogs were scored higher than for cats (pdogs and cats. The results indicate that all respondents believe that surgery results in sufficient pain to warrant analgesic therapy. Routine neutering surgeries were considered to be more painful in dogs than in cats. The current survey also provides information to educators on potential areas of focus, given that 93% of respondents felt that their knowledge of pain and assessment of pain could be enhanced.

  10. Comparison of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation and Parasternal Block for Postoperative Pain Management after Cardiac Surgery

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    Nilgun Kavrut Ozturk

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Parasternal block and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS have been demonstrated to produce effective analgesia and reduce postoperative opioid requirements in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Objectives. To compare the effectiveness of TENS and parasternal block on early postoperative pain after cardiac surgery. Methods. One hundred twenty patients undergoing cardiac surgery were enrolled in the present randomized, controlled prospective study. Patients were assigned to three treatment groups: parasternal block, intermittent TENS application, or a control group. Results. Pain scores recorded 4 h, 5 h, 6 h, 7 h, and 8 h postoperatively were lower in the parasternal block group than in the TENS and control groups. Total morphine consumption was also lower in the parasternal block group than in the TENS and control groups. It was also significantly lower in the TENS group than in the control group. There were no statistical differences among the groups regarding the extubation time, rescue analgesic medication, length of intensive care unit stay, or length of hospital stay. Conclusions. Parasternal block was more effective than TENS in the management of early postoperative pain and the reduction of opioid requirements in patients who underwent cardiac surgery through median sternotomy. This trial is registered with Clinicaltrials.gov number NCT02725229.

  11. The Effect of Musical Therapy on Postoperative Pain after Caesarean Section

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    Ali Sizlan

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM: We reasoned that addition of musicotherapy -a simple and convenient method with no adverse effects- in the preoperative period would have favorable effects pertaining to postoperative pain. METHODS: One hundred patients, between the ages of 20-40 years, who were undergoing elective caesarean delivery under general anaesthesia, were enrolled. The patients were randomly allocated into two groups (with 50 patients in each and in group 1, patients listened to music through a headphone for one hour immediately before surgery whereas in group 2, patients did not listen to any music during the same period. The anaesthetic technique was standardized. All neonates were also assessed and Apgar scores were recorded. In the postanaesthesia care unit, patients were connected to i.v.-PCA device when they were able to respond to commands. The patient’s level of satisfaction with perioperative care was assessed by a 10-cm visual analogue scale and the severity of postoperative pain was assessed with VAS. RESULTS: Postoperative tramadol consumption, total amount of tramadol consumption, additional analgesic use and all VAS values were lower in group 1 (p<0.05. Apgar scores were significantly greater in group 1. CONCLUSION: We imply that music therapy given before surgery decreases postoperative pain and analgesic requirement. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2009; 8(2.000: 107-112

  12. The effects of religion and spirituality on postoperative pain, hemodynamic functioning and anxiety after cesarean section.

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    Siavash Beiranvand

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Spiritual elements play an important role in the recovery process from acute postoperative pain. This study was conducted to assess the effect of pray meditation on postoperative pain reduction and physiologic responds among muslim patients who underwent cesarean surgery under spinal anesthesia. This double-blinded randomized clinical trial study was conducted among muslim patients who underwent cesarean surgery under spinal anesthesia during 2011-2013 at tertiary regional and teaching hospital in Lorestan, Iran. The patients were randomly divided into interventional group (n=80 and control group (n=80. For about 20 minutes using a disposable phone mentioned and listened to pray meditation "Ya man esmoho davaa va zekroho shafa, Allahomma salle ala mohammad va ale mohammad" in interventional group and phone off in control group. Before and during pray meditation, 30, 60 minutes, 3 and 6 hours after pray meditation pain intensity, blood pressure, heart rate and respiratory rate were measured. No statistically significant improvement in pain score was found before and during pray meditation, 30, 60 minutes after pray meditation (P>0.05. Statistically significant improvement in pain score was found at 3 and 6 hours after pray meditation than control group (1.5 ± 0.3 vs. 3 ± 1.3, P=0.030 and (1.3 ± 0.8 vs. 3 ± 1.1, P=0.003. However, there was no significant difference in the physiological responses (systolic and diastolic blood pressure, respiration, and heart rate any time between the groups. Religion and spirituality intervention such as pray meditation could be used as one of non-pharmacological pain management techniques for reducing pain after cesarean surgery. Also, Pray meditation provides less postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV and more relaxation.

  13. The Effect of Inhalation of Aromatherapy Blend containing Lavender Essential Oil on Cesarean Postoperative Pain.

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    Olapour, Alireza; Behaeen, Kaveh; Akhondzadeh, Reza; Soltani, Farhad; Al Sadat Razavi, Forough; Bekhradi, Reza

    2013-01-01

    Pain is a major problem in patients after cesarean and medication such as aromatherapy which is a complementary therapy, in which the essences of the plants oils are used to reduce such undesirable conditions. In this study, the effect of aromatherapy using Lavender (Lavandula) essential oil on cesarean postoperative pain was assessed. In a triple blind, randomized placebo-controlled trial study, 60 pregnant women who were admitted to a general hospital for cesarean section, were divided randomly into two groups. After cesarean, the Lavender group inhaled about 3 drops of 10% Lavender oil essence and the placebo group inhaled 3 drops of placebo after the start of postoperative pain, four, eight and 12 hours later, for 5 minutes from the 10 cm distance. Patient's pain was measured by the VAS (Visual Analog Scale) score before and after each intervention, and vital sign, complications and level of satisfaction of every patient were recorded before and after aromatherapy. There was no statistically significant difference between groups in age, height, weight, and time to the first analgesic requirement. Patients in the Lavender group had less postoperative pain in four (P = 0.008), eight (P = 0.024) and 12 (P = 0.011) hours after first medication than the placebo group. The decreased heart rate and patients' level of satisfaction with analgesia were significantly higher in the Lavender group (P = 0.001). In the placebo group, the use of diclofenac suppositories for complete analgesia was also significantly higher than the Lavender group (P = 0.008). The inhaled Lavender essence may be used as a part of the multidisciplinary treatment of pain after cesarean section, but it is not recommended as the sole pain management.

  14. The effects of religion and spirituality on postoperative pain, hemodynamic functioning and anxiety after cesarean section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiranvand, Siavash; Noparast, Morteza; Eslamizade, Nasrin; Saeedikia, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    Spiritual elements play an important role in the recovery process from acute postoperative pain. This study was conducted to assess the effect of pray meditation on postoperative pain reduction and physiologic responds among muslim patients who underwent cesarean surgery under spinal anesthesia. This double-blinded randomized clinical trial study was conducted among muslim patients who underwent cesarean surgery under spinal anesthesia during 2011-2013 at tertiary regional and teaching hospital in Lorestan, Iran. The patients were randomly divided into interventional group (n=80) and control group (n=80). For about 20 minutes using a disposable phone mentioned and listened to pray meditation "Ya man esmoho davaa va zekroho shafa, Allahomma salle ala mohammad va ale mohammad" in interventional group and phone off in control group. Before and during pray meditation, 30, 60 minutes, 3 and 6 hours after pray meditation pain intensity, blood pressure, heart rate and respiratory rate were measured. No statistically significant improvement in pain score was found before and during pray meditation, 30, 60 minutes after pray meditation (P>0.05). Statistically significant improvement in pain score was found at 3 and 6 hours after pray meditation than control group (1.5 ± 0.3 vs. 3 ± 1.3, P=0.030) and (1.3 ± 0.8 vs. 3 ± 1.1, P=0.003). However, there was no significant difference in the physiological responses (systolic and diastolic blood pressure, respiration, and heart rate) any time between the groups. Religion and spirituality intervention such as pray meditation could be used as one of non-pharmacological pain management techniques for reducing pain after cesarean surgery. Also, Pray meditation provides less postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) and more relaxation.

  15. Sublingual piroxicam in the management of postoperative pain after surgical removal of impacted mandibular third molar.

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    Mohammad, Shadab; Singh, Vibha; Wadhwani, Puneet; Tayade, Himanshu P; Rathod, Onkar K

    2012-01-01

    Surgical removal of impacted mandibular third molar is one of the most commonly performed procedures in oral and maxillofacial surgical practice. The role of preoperative and postoperative medications for management of postoperative complications has been extensively evaluated. To assess the therapeutic effect of a single dose of 40 mg sublingual piroxicam (study group) vs 150 mg oral diclofenac (50 mg thrice a day) (control group) in patients undergoing surgical removal of impacted mandibular third molar. A total of 100 patients with asymptomatic impacted mandibular third molars were randomized into two groups. One group received two 20-mg tablets of piroxicam once daily on the first and second postoperative days, followed by one 20-mg tablet on the third post-operative day. The other group received one tablet of diclofenac 50 mg orally thrice daily on the first, second, and third post-operative days. Repeated extraoral examinations were done for continuous assessment of swelling, trismus, and reduction in pain. Overall impression of the treating physician and the patient regarding efficacy of study drugs were recorded at the end of the study. In the piroxicam group there was >50% reduction in pain on all three days postoperatively. The incidence of swelling and trismus was found to be higher in the control group as compared to the study group. Adverse events, such as gastrointestinal (GI) disturbances, were significantly higher in the diclofenac group (11%) as compared to the piroxicam group (0%). Two sublingual piroxicam 20 mg tablets once daily has better efficacy and tolerability profile than diclofenac 50 mg one tablet thrice daily in the management of pain after surgical removal of impacted mandibular third molar.

  16. Economic assessment of postoperative pain control strategies for treatment of adult patients with cancer

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    Rafael Freitas dos Santos

    Full Text Available Summary Objective: The authors performed an economic assessment of opioids currently being used for control of postoperative pain relating to the surgical treatment of cancer (fentanyl and sufentanil within the Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS, in the Portuguese acronym. Method: The assessment was based on the perspective of the government, in order to collaborate with the promotion of effectiveness in public policies of health, and to optimize the allocation of public resources into health. A cost-effectiveness analysis was performed using data collected from the Brazilian Unified Health System and information from literature review, in order to build a decision tree on the alternatives for control of postoperative pain related to cancer treatment among adult patients. The outcomes considered were: effectiveness of postoperative analgesia and occurrence of nausea and vomit in the 48 hour period after surgery, and additional 24-hour cycles in patient follow-up. A univariate sensitivity analysis was conducted in order to verify robustness of the model estimated. Results: Literature review showed a limited number of studies directly comparing fentanyl and sufentanil for control of postoperative pain. The adoption of sufentanil (cost = U$ 25.72 / outcome = 1.6 VAS points was dominant in relation to the use of fentanyl (cost = U$ 32.58 / outcome = 2.6 VAS points. The estimated model showed robustness in relation to changes in the parameters analyzed. Conclusion: Sufentanil presented higher cost-effectiveness ratio in relation to fentanyl for control of postoperative pain in surgeries related to cancer treatment among adult patients in the Brazilian Unified Health System.

  17. Intraoperative Sensorcaine significantly improves postoperative pain management in outpatient reduction mammaplasty.

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    Culliford, Alfred T; Spector, Jason A; Flores, Roberto L; Louie, Otway; Choi, Mihye; Karp, Nolan S

    2007-09-15

    Breast reduction is one of the most frequently performed plastic surgical procedures in the United States; more than 160,500 patients underwent the procedure in 2005. Many outpatient reduction mammaplasty patients report the greatest postoperative discomfort in the first 48 hours. The authors' investigated the effect of intraoperative topical application of the long-acting local anesthetic agent bupivacaine (Sensorcaine or Marcaine) on postoperative pain, time to postanesthesia care unit discharge, and postoperative use of narcotic medication. In a prospective, randomized, single-blind trial, intraoperative use of Sensorcaine versus placebo (normal saline) was compared. Postoperative pain was quantified using the visual analogue scale, and time to discharge from the postanesthesia care unit was recorded. Patients documented their outpatient pain medication usage. Of the 37 patients enrolled in the study, 20 were treated with intraoperative topical Sensorcaine and 17 received placebo. Patients treated with Sensorcaine were discharged home significantly faster (2.9 hours versus 3.8 hours, p = 0.002). The control arm consistently had higher pain scores in the postanesthesia care unit (although not statistically significant) than the Sensorcaine group using the visual analogue scale system. Furthermore, patients receiving Sensorcaine required significantly less narcotic medication while recovering at home (mean, 3.5 tablets of Vicodin) than the control group (mean, 6.4 tablets; p = 0.001). There were no complications resulting from Sensorcaine usage. This prospective, randomized, single-blind study demonstrates that a single dose of intraoperative Sensorcaine provides a safe, inexpensive, and efficacious way to significantly shorten the length of postanesthesia care unit stay and significantly decrease postoperative opioid analgesic use in patients undergoing ambulatory reduction mammaplasty.

  18. Comparison of Laparoscopic and Microscopic Subinguinal Varicocelectomy in terms of Postoperative Scrotal Pain

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    Penbegül, Necmettin; Atar, Murat; Bozkurt, Yaşar; Sancaktutar, Ahmet Ali; Altunoluk, Bülent

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives: In this study, 2 different varicocelectomy methods were compared with regard to postoperative scrotal pain, length of operation, and complications. Methods: Forty varicocele patients, who visited our clinic because of infertility or scrotal pain between 2008 and 2009, were enrolled in this clinical study. Microscopic subinguinal varicocelectomy was performed on 20 patients in Group I, and laparoscopic varicocelectomy was performed on 20 patients in Group II. Following surgery, the patients were assessed for postoperative requirements for analgesia; return to normal activity; varicocele recurrence; hydrocele formation; scrotal pain at postoperative days 1, 3, and 7; and other complications. Results: Mean age was 24.2±3.4 years in Group I and 25.1±2.1 years in Group II. Mean pain scores at postoperative 1, 3, and 7 days in Group I were (5.20±1.14, 4.60±0.97, and 3.50±0.97, respectively) significantly higher than those of Group II (0.70±0.82, 0.60±0.84, and 0.10±0.32, respectively). Time to return to normal activity was significantly shorter in Group II (3.7±2.1 days) compared with Group I (6.8±3.4 days) (p=0.028). However, the number of recurrences and hydroceles, as a complication of varicocelectomy, was 2 times higher in Group II (10%) than in Group I (5%). Conclusions: We believe that laparoscopic varicocelectomy is a safe, effective, and minimally invasive procedure. Furthermore, reduced postoperative discomfort and earlier return to normal activity are additional advantages of this method. PMID:23477168

  19. Ibuprofen versus Acetaminophen in Controlling Postoperative Impacted Third Molar Tooth Extraction Pain

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    Khan, I.; Bukhari, S. G. A.; Ahmad, W.; Rubbab,; Junaid, M.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the efficacy of ibuprofen and acetaminophen in reducing postoperative third molar extraction pain in patients reporting to Armed Forces Institute of Dentistry. Study design: Randomized controlled trial. Place and duration of study: The study was carried out on patients who presented for surgical removal of impacted teeth at Armed Forces Institute of Dentistry Rawalpindi (AFID) from February 2008 to March 2--9 at the Department of Oral Surgery, Armed Forces Institute of Dentistry Rawalpindi. Patients and methods: One hundred and forty patients requiring surgical removal of mandibular impacted teeth were equally divided into two groups. Surgical extraction of third molar tooth was performed under local anesthesia. Patients in group A were given ibuprofen and in group B were given acetaminophen at 6 hourly intervals. First dose was given 3 hours postoperatively. Each patient rated pain on a visual analog scale at baseline and then at 12, 24, 48 and 72 hours postoperatively. Results: There was statistically significant difference (p=0.025) during first 12 hours with ibuprofen group showing better efficacy but afterwards there was no significant difference in the efficacy of both drugs. Conclusions: Ibuprofen is more effective in controlling severe third molar extraction pain as compared to acetaminophen but has similar efficacy in controlling moderate pain. (author)

  20. Postoperative persistent chronic pain: what do we know about prevention, risk factors, and treatment

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    Durval Campos Kraychete

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objectives: Postoperative persistent chronic pain (POCP is a serious health problem, disabling, undermining the quality of life of affected patients. Although more studies and research have addressed the possible mechanisms of the evolution from acute pain to chronic postoperatively, there are still no consistent data about the risk factors and prevention. This article aims to bring what is in the panorama of the current literature available. Content: This review describes the definition, risk factors, and mechanisms of POCD, its prevention and treatment. The main drugs and techniques are exposed comprehensively. Conclusion: Postoperative persistent chronic pain is a complex and still unclear etiology entity, which interferes heavily in the life of the subject. Neuropathic pain resulting from surgical trauma is still the most common expression of this entity. Techniques to prevent nerve injury are recommended and should be used whenever possible. Despite efforts to understand and select risk patients, the management and prevention of this syndrome remain challenging and inappropriate.

  1. Overprescription of postoperative narcotics: a look at postoperative pain medication delivery, consumption and disposal in urological practice.

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    Bates, Cory; Laciak, Robert; Southwick, Andrew; Bishoff, Jay

    2011-02-01

    Prescription narcotic abuse is a significant social problem. Surplus medication following surgery is 1 source of prescription diversion. We assessed prescribing practices, consumption and disposal of prescribed narcotics after urological surgery. Surveys were administered to a 3-month consecutive sample of adult patients who underwent surgery performed by full and adjunct University of Utah Urology faculty. Surveys were performed 2 to 4 weeks postoperatively. With the exception of the investigators, prescribing physicians had no prior knowledge of the study. Data collected included perception of pain control, type and quantity of medication prescribed, quantity of leftover medication, refills needed, disposal instructions and surplus medication disposition. Overall 47% of 586 patients participated in the study. Hydrocodone was prescribed most commonly (63%), followed by oxycodone (35%), and 86% of the patients were satisfied with pain control. Of the dispensed narcotics 58% was consumed and 12% of patients requested refills. A total of 67% of patients had surplus medication from the initial prescription and 92% received no disposal instructions for surplus medication. Of those patients with leftover medication 91% kept the medication at home while 6% threw it in the trash, 2% flushed it down the toilet and less than 1% returned it to a pharmacy. Overprescription of narcotics is common and retained surplus medication presents a readily available source of opioid diversion. It appears that no entity on the prescribing or dispensing ends of prescription opioid delivery is fulfilling the responsibility to accurately educate patients on proper surplus medication disposal. Surgeons should analyze prescribing practices and consider decreasing the quantity of postoperative narcotics prescribed. Copyright © 2011 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparing efficacy of preemptively used dexketoprofen and tramadol for postoperative pain in patients underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy

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    Süreyya Özkan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In our study, we aimed to compare effects of preoperative dexketoprofen and tramadol administered by intravenous route on intraoperative and postoperative analgesic consumption, postoperative pain, durations of hospital stay and patient satisfaction in patients, undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Methods:After approval of ethic committee and written consent of patients were obtained, 60 patients between 18-70 years old with ASA I-II were included in the study. After routine monitorization and 20 minutes before induction of anesthesia, dexketoprofen 50 mg in 100 cc 0.9% NaCl was administered in Dexketoprofen Group and tramadol 100 mg in 100 cc 0.9% NaCl in Tramadol Group as intravenous infusion during 20 minutes. Intraoperative hemodynamic parameters, analgesic-anesthetic consumptions and complications of patients, on whom standard general anesthesia was applied, were recorded. Pain severity, degree of sedation, morphine consumptions and hemodynamic parameters were recorded at postoperative 30 th minute, and 4 th, 8th, 12th and 24 th hours. Additional analgesia requirement, times for requiring first analgesia, duration of hospital stay, postoperative complications and patient satisfactions were recorded. Results: Intraoperative analgesic-anesthetic consumptions, postoperative visual analogue scale (VAS scores, sedation degrees, intravenous patient controlled analgesia (PCA and morphine consumptions, times for requiring first analgesic, durations of hospital stay, intraoperative-postoperative complications developed and patient satisfactions were similar in both groups. Consequently, postoperative analgesic efficacy of pre-emptive dexketoprofen intravenous 50 mg and tramadol intravenous 100 mg administered was found to be similar in cases, who had laparoscopic cholecystectomy operation. Conclusion:Because VAS scores were low in our patients, morphine consumptions with intravenous PCA were similar in both groups, and there wasn

  3. An exploration of Singaporean parental experiences in managing school-aged children's postoperative pain: a descriptive qualitative approach.

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    Lim, Siew Hoon; Mackey, Sandra; Liam, Joanne Li Wee; He, Hong-Gu

    2012-03-01

    To enhance understanding of the experience of parents in managing their children's postoperative pain in Singapore. Parents play a significant role in their hospitalised child's postoperative pain care. Their active involvement may contribute to accurate pain assessment and effective pain management for their child. However, there is a lack of in-depth research exploring the experience of parents involved in their children's postoperative pain management. This study adopted a descriptive qualitative approach, which is situated in the interpretive paradigm. Semi-structured interviews were conducted to collect data from 14 parents whose children were hospitalised in one of the three paediatric surgical wards in a hospital in Singapore in December 2009. Thematic analysis was used to analyse the data. Three themes were identified: 'Actions used by parents to alleviate their child's postoperative pain', 'Factors influencing parents' management of their child's postoperative pain' and 'Parents' needs in the process of caring for their child's postoperative pain'. Parents used a range of non-pharmacological pain relief interventions for their child. Parental roles and expectations, bond between parent and child, support from nurses, family and own religious beliefs, as well as children's age and maturity level were factors which promoted parental participation, whereas parents' negative feelings, knowledge deficit and nurses' busy schedule were hindering factors. Parents expressed needs for more involvement in their child's care, adequate rest and information support from nurses. This study highlights the importance of involving parents in their child's postoperative pain management. It provides evidence for health care professionals to pay attention to factors that may influence parental participation and, therefore, guide their practice. Nurses need to provide parents with support and education to facilitate their roles and improve their child's postoperative pain

  4. Effect of carboxyhemoglobin on postoperative complications and pain in pediatric tonsillectomy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyuncu, Onur; Turhanoglu, Selim; Tuzcu, Kasım; Karcıoglu, Murat; Davarcı, Isil; Akbay, Ercan; Cevik, Cengiz; Ozer, Cahit; Sessler, Daniel I; Turan, Alparslan

    2015-03-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is a product of burning solid fuel in stoves and smoking. Exposure to CO may provoke postoperative complications. Furthermore, there appears to be an association between COHb concentrations and pain. We thus tested the primary hypothesis that children with high preoperative carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) concentrations have more postoperative complications and pain after tonsillectomies, and secondarily that high-COHb concentrations are associated with more pain and analgesic use. 100 children scheduled for elective tonsillectomy were divided into low and high carbon monoxide (CO) exposure groups: COHb ≤3 or ≥4 g·dl(-1) . We considered a composite of complications during the 7 days after surgery which included bronchospasm, laryngospasm, persistent coughing, desaturation, re-intubation, hypotension, postoperative bleeding, and reoperation. Pain was evaluated with Wong-Baker Faces pain scales, and supplemental tramadol use recorded for four postoperative hours. There were 36 patients in the low-exposure group COHb [1.8 ± 1.2 g·dl(-1) ], and 64 patients were in the high-exposure group [6.4 ± 2.1 g·dl(-1) ]. Indoor coal-burning stoves were reported more often by families of the high- than low-COHb children (89% vs 72%, P < 0.001). Second-hand cigarette smoke exposure was reported by 54% of the families with children with high COHb, but only by 24% of the families of children with low COHb. Composite complications were more common in patients with high COHb [47% vs 14%, P = 0.0001, OR:7.4 (95% Cl, lower = 2.5-upper = 21.7)], with most occurring in the postanesthesia care unit. Pain scores in postanesthesia care unit and one hour after surgery were statistically significantly lower in the low-exposure group [respectively, P = 0.020 (95%CI, lower = -1.21-upper = -0.80), P = 0.026 (95% CI, lower = -0.03-upper = 0.70)], and tramadol use increased at 4 h (3.5 (interquartile range: 0-8) vs 6 (5-9) mg, P = 0.012) and

  5. The efficacy of a lidocaine-infused pain pump for postoperative analgesia following elective augmentation mammaplasty or abdominoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez-Abraham, Victor; Barr, Jason S; Zwiebel, Paul C

    2011-08-01

    Postoperative pain management following aesthetic plastic surgery traditionally has been achieved by systemic administration of several narcotic pain medications. Because this method can lead to undesirable side effects such as sedation, nausea, vomiting, and respiratory depression, a more efficacious method of postoperative analgesia with fewer side effects needs to be implemented in outpatient cosmetic surgery. From March of 2003 until December of 2008, 690 patients underwent augmentation mammaplasty and 215 patients underwent abdominoplasty. All of these patients were equipped with an elastomeric continuous infusion pump postoperatively and were prescribed oral narcotics. Prior to 2003, patients were prescribed only oral narcotics postoperatively. A retrospective chart review of patients before and after implementation of the pain pump was undertaken to review the perceived pain patients experienced postoperatively with and without the pump. The self-administration of oral narcotics was also assessed. Patients equipped with the pain pump experienced a statistically significant decrease in perceived pain compared to those without the pump (augmentation mammaplasty: 2.27 vs. 3.68, p use of the oral narcotic Vicodin™ at 72 h postoperatively (5 mg hydrocodone/500 mg acetaminophen, Abbott Laboratories, Abbott Park, IL) (augmentation mammaplasty: 26.5 mg/2650 mg vs. 49 mg/4900 mg, p reduce both the amount of pain patients experience and the quantity of narcotics used postoperatively.

  6. Postoperative pain and gastro-intestinal recovery after colonic resection with epidural analgesia and multimodal rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werner, M U; Gaarn-Larsen, L; Basse, L

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate initial postoperative pain intensity and the association with recovery of gastrointestinal function and length of stay (LOS) in a multimodal programme with epidural analgesia, early oral nutrition and mobilisation with a 48 h planned hospital stay. One hundred...... of change in the surgical procedures (2), surgical morbidity (6), medical factors (4) and psychosocial or other factors (5) all independent of pain. Pain data were incomplete in two patients and therefore excluded. In the remaining 91 patients, median time to defaecation and LOS were 24 and 48 h......, respectively. Gastrointestinal recovery and LOS did not differ between patients with high (3-6) versus low (0-2) dynamic pain scores (P > 0.4 and P > 0.1, respectively). It is concluded that a multimodal rehabilitation program including continuous thoracic epidural analgesia leads to early recovery...

  7. A Delphi Study to Identify Indicators of Poorly Managed Pain for Pediatric Postoperative and Procedural Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison M Twycross

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Adverse health care events are injuries occurring as a result of patient care. Significant acute pain is often caused by medical and surgical procedures in children, and it has been argued that undermanaged pain should be considered to be an adverse event. Indicators are often used to identify other potential adverse events. There are currently no validated indicators for undertreated pediatric pain.

  8. Perioperative Dextromethorphan as an Adjunct for Postoperative Pain: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Michael R; Ladha, Karim S; Gelineau, Amanda M; Anderson, T Anthony

    2016-03-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists have been shown to reduce perioperative pain and opioid use. The authors performed a meta-analysis to determine whether the use of perioperative dextromethorphan lowers opioid consumption or pain scores. PubMed, Web of Science, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Pubget, and EMBASE were searched. Studies were included if they were randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trials written in English, and performed on patients 12 yr or older. For comparison of opioid use, included studies tracked total consumption of IV or intramuscular opioids over 24 to 48 h. Pain score comparisons were performed at 1, 4 to 6, and 24 h postoperatively. Difference in means (MD) was used for effect size. Forty studies were identified and 21 were eligible for one or more comparisons. In 848 patients from 14 trials, opioid consumption favored dextromethorphan (MD, -10.51 mg IV morphine equivalents; 95% CI, -16.48 to -4.53 mg; P = 0.0006). In 884 patients from 13 trials, pain at 1 h favored dextromethorphan (MD, -1.60; 95% CI, -1.89 to -1.31; P dextromethorphan (MD, -0.89; 95% CI, -1.11 to -0.66; P dextromethorphan (MD, -0.92; 95% CI, -1.24 to -0.60; P dextromethorphan use perioperatively reduces the postoperative opioid consumption at 24 to 48 h and pain scores at 1, 4 to 6, and 24 h.

  9. Postoperative pain and gastro-intestinal recovery after colonic resection with epidural analgesia and multimodal rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werner, M U; Gaarn-Larsen, L; Basse, L

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate initial postoperative pain intensity and the association with recovery of gastrointestinal function and length of stay (LOS) in a multimodal programme with epidural analgesia, early oral nutrition and mobilisation with a 48 h planned hospital stay. One hundred......, respectively. Gastrointestinal recovery and LOS did not differ between patients with high (3-6) versus low (0-2) dynamic pain scores (P > 0.4 and P > 0.1, respectively). It is concluded that a multimodal rehabilitation program including continuous thoracic epidural analgesia leads to early recovery...

  10. Role of Prophylactic Antibiotics in the Management of Postoperative Endodontic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsomadi, Leena; Al Habahbeh, Riyad

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the efficacy of using antibiotics in post endodontic treatment as a method to alleviate post-treatment pain. After completion of endodontic treatment 129 patients were randomly divided into two groups: Group A (65 patients) received Ibuprofen 400 mg one tablet before procedure and one tablet every 8 hours for the first day, then one tablet once indicated by pain. Group B (64 patients) received the same regimen as group A in addition to amoxicillin, clavulanic acid tablets (one tablet before the procedure, and then one tablet twice daily for a total of 3 days). Intensity of pain at 8 hours interval using visual analog scale (VAS) and total number of Ibuprofen tablets used was recorded by patients. Peak postoperative pain occurred at 16 hours post-treatment in both groups, there was a significant difference in the pain scale between the two groups in favor for group B over group A (3.8 vs 2.1 respectively). Pain scale was significantly lower in group B at 24, 32, 40, and 48 hours post-treatment with a p-value of Antibiotic prescription to manage post endodontic treatment pain results in less pain with less consumption of Ibuprofens. Pain management in endodontics is a real challenge, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) are used effectively in many patients to alleviate post endodontic pain. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs may have adverse reactions or may be contraindicated. Short-term use of antibiotics to alleviate pain can be of clinical benefits in these patients.

  11. Commercially Available Smartphone Apps to Support Postoperative Pain Self-Management: Scoping Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalloo, Chitra; Shah, Ushma; Birnie, Kathryn A; Davies-Chalmers, Cleo; Rivera, Jordan; Stinson, Jennifer; Campbell, Fiona

    2017-10-23

    Recently, the use of smartphones to deliver health-related content has experienced rapid growth, with more than 165,000 mobile health (mHealth) apps currently available in the digital marketplace. With 3 out of 4 Canadians currently owning a smartphone, mHealth apps offer opportunities to deliver accessible health-related knowledge and support. Many individuals experience pain after surgery, which can negatively impact their health-related quality of life, including sleep, emotional, and social functioning. Smartphone apps that provide remote real-time monitoring and symptom management have the potential to improve self-management skills in patients experiencing postoperative pain. Increased confidence and practice of self-management skills could contribute to decreased postoperative pain and reduce risk of developing persistent pain. Published reviews of general pain self-management apps demonstrate a lack of evidence-based content, theoretical grounding, and health care professional involvement. However, no review to date has focused on the app marketplace specific for individuals with postoperative pain. The aim of this study was to characterize and critically appraise the content and functionality of commercially available postoperative pain self-management apps. An electronic search and extraction was conducted between December 2016 and March 2017 of the official Canadian app stores for the three major smartphone operating systems (iPhone operating system [iOS], Android, and Windows). Stores were searched separately using predetermined search terms. Two authors screened apps based on information provided in the public app description. Metadata from all included apps were abstracted into a standard spreadsheet. Two authors verified the data with reference to the apps and downloaded apps themselves. The content and functionality of each app as it pertained to postoperative pain self-management was rated. A total of 10 apps met the inclusion criteria. All

  12. Inhibition by local bupivacaine-releasing microspheres of acute postoperative pain from hairy skin incision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohri, Rachit; Wang, Jeffrey Chi-Fei; Blaskovich, Phillip D; Pham, Lan N; Costa, Daniel S; Nichols, Gary A; Hildebrand, William P; Scarborough, Nelson L; Herman, Clifford J; Strichartz, Gary R

    2013-09-01

    Acute postoperative pain causes physiological deficits and slows recovery. Reduction of such pain by local anesthetics that are delivered for several days postoperatively is a desirable clinical objective, which is approached by a new formulation and applied in animal studies reported here. We subcutaneously injected a new formulation of poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid polymer microspheres, which provides steady drug release for 96+ hours into rats at the dorsal region 2 hours before surgery. A single 1.2-cm-long skin incision was followed by blunt dissection of skin away from the underlying fascia, and closed by 2 sutures, followed by 14 days of testing. Microspheres containing 5, 10, 20, and 40 mg bupivacaine were injected locally 2 hours before surgery; bupivacaine-free microspheres were the vehicle control, and bupivacaine HCl solution (0.5%), the positive control. Mechanical sensitivity was determined by the frequency of local muscle contractions to repeated pokes with nylon monofilaments (von Frey hairs) exerting 4 and 15 g forces, testing, respectively, allodynia and hyperalgesia, and by pinprick. Injection of bupivacaine microspheres (40 mg drug) into intact skin reduced responses to 15 g von Frey hairs for 6 hours and to pinprick for 36 hours. Respective reductions from bupivacaine HCl lasted for 3 and 2 hours. Skin incision and dissection alone caused mechanical allodynia and hyperalgesia for 14 days. Microspheres containing 20 or 40 mg bupivacaine suppressed postoperative hypersensitivity for up to 3 days, reduced integrated allodynia (area under curve of response versus time) over postoperative days 1 to 5 by 51% ± 20% (mean ± SE) and 78% ± 12%, and reduced integrated hyperalgesia by 55% ± 13% and 64% ± 11%, for the respective doses. Five and ten milligrams bupivacaine in microspheres and the 0.5% bupivacaine solution were ineffective in reducing postoperative hypersensitivity, as were 40 mg bupivacaine microspheres injected contralateral to the

  13. Lack of postoperative pain relief after hysterectomy using preperitoneally administered bupivacaine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Billy Bjarne; Christensen, D S; Østergaard, Mette

    1999-01-01

    the subcutaneous, layer. The present study investigated the effect of frequent bolus injections of bupivacaine (15 mL 2.5 mg/mL) preperitoneally through catheters placed intraoperatively in women who had undergone hysterectomy. METHODS: Postoperative pain and analgesic requirements were studied in a double...... bupivacaine (15 mL 2.5 mg/mL) every 4 hours for 48 hours via each catheter starting in the operating room. The placebo group (n = 19) received saline in a like manner. Postoperative pain was evaluated using a visual analog scale (VAS) and verbal rating scale (VRS) twice a day for 2 days at rest...... and on movement. Requirements of supplementary analgesics were monitored, as was wound infection after discharge. RESULTS: Bupivacaine administered preperitoneally did not improve analgesia at rest, during coughing, or during mobilization compared with saline. No difference between the groups was found regarding...

  14. Pregabalin and dexamethasone for postoperative pain control: a randomized controlled study in hip arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, O.; Jacobsen, L.S.; Holm, H.E.

    2008-01-01

    Background. Optimal pain treatment with minimal side-effects is essential for early mobility and recovery in patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty. We investigated the analgesic effect of pregabalin and dexamethasone in this surgical procedure. Methods. One hundred and twenty patients were...... randomly allocated to either Group A (placebo), Group B (pregabalin 300 mg), or Group C (pregabalin 300 mg+dexamethasone 8 mg). The medication and acetaminophen 1 g were given before operation. Spinal anaesthesia was performed. Postoperative pain treatment was with acetaminophen 1 g three times daily...... with the other groups. Conclusions. Pregabalin resulted in a 50% reduction in 24 h postoperative morphine requirements. This was not associated with a reduced incidence of nausea or vomiting. Pregabalin resulted in increased levels of sedation. Combining pregabalin and dexamethasone provided no additional...

  15. Preoperative flurbiprofen axetil administration for acute postoperative pain: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ke; Luo, Jun; Zheng, Limin; Luo, Tao

    2017-12-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have been shown to effectively decrease postoperative pain and reduce opioid requirements. Flurbiprofen axetil is an injectable non-selective cyclooxygenase inhibitor that has a high affinity for inflammatory tissues to achieve targeted drug therapy and prolonged duration of action. This meta-analysis examined the use of preoperative flurbiprofen axetil and its impact on postoperative analgesia. An electronic literature search of the Library of PubMed, Cochrane CENTRAL, and EMBASE databases was conducted in Feb 2016. Searches were limited to randomized controlled trials. The primary outcome was pain scores. The secondary outcomes included cumulative postoperative opioid consumption and opioid-related adverse effects. A total of nine RCT studies involving 457 patients were included in this study. Compared to patients without perioperative flurbiprofen axetil, patients treated with preoperative flurbiprofen axetil had lower pain scores at 2 h (SMD -1.00; 95% CI -1.57 to -0.43, P = 0.0006), 6 h (SMD -1.22; 95% CI -2.01 to -0.43; P = 0.002), 12 h (SMD -1.19; 95% CI -2.10 to -0.28; P = 0.01), and 24 h (SMD -0.79; 95% CI -1.31 to -0.27; P = 0.003) following surgery. Preoperative flurbiprofen axetil had no significant effect on postoperative opioid consumption (SMD -13.11; 95% CI -34.56 to 8.33; P = 0.23). There was no significant difference between the groups with regard to adverse effects. Compared to patients with postoperative flurbiprofen axetil, however, preoperative flurbiprofen axetil resulted in decreased pain score only at 2 h after operation. Preoperative use of flurbiprofen axetil will result in significantly lower postoperative pain scores, but no difference in nausea, vomiting, and opioid consumption compared to those who did not receive flurbiprofen axetil. However, more homogeneous and well-designed clinical studies are necessary to determine whether preoperative flurbiprofen axetil administration has

  16. Post-operative pain management in paediatric surgery at Sylvanus Olympio University Teaching Hospital, Togo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamza Doles Sama

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate pain management in paediatric surgery at Sylvanus Olympio University Teaching Hospital, Lome. Patients and Methods: A prospective descriptive study was conducted in the Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care at Sylvanus Olympio teaching hospital from 1 January to 30 June 2012. Data collected include: demography, type of surgery, American Society of Anaesthesiologists (ASA classification, anaesthetic protocol, analgesia technique, post-operative complications and cost of analgesia. Results: The study includes 106 post-operative children. Abdominal surgery was performed in 41.5% and orthopaedic surgery in 31.1%. A total of 75% of patients were classified ASA 1. General anaesthesia (GA was performed in 88%. Anaesthetists supervised post-operative care in 21.7% cases. Multimodal analgesia was used in every case and 12% of patients received a regional block. The most frequently unwanted effects of analgesics used were nausea and/or vomiting in 12.3%. At H24, child under 7 years have more pain assessment than those from 7 to 15 years (46% vs 24% and this difference was statistically significant (chi-square = 4.7598; P = 0.0291 < 0.05. The average cost of peri-operative analgesia under loco regional analgesia (LRA versus GA during the first 48 h post-operative was US $23 versus $46. Conclusion: Our study showed that post-operative pain management in paediatric surgery is often not well controlled and paediatric loco regional analgesia technique is under practiced in sub Saharan Africa.

  17. Efficacy and Tolerability of Intramuscular Dexketoprofen in Postoperative Pain Management following Hernia Repair Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. T. Jamdade

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of intramuscular dexketoprofen for postoperative pain in patients undergoing hernia surgery. Methodology. Total 202 patients received single intramuscular injection of dexketoprofen 50 mg or diclofenac 50 mg postoperatively. The pain intensity (PI was self-evaluated by patients on VAS at baseline 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 hours. The efficacy parameters were number of responders, difference in PI (PID at 8 hours, sum of analogue of pain intensity differences (SAPID, and onset and duration of analgesia. Tolerability assessment was done by global evaluation and adverse events in each group. Results. Dexketoprofen showed superior efficacy in terms of number of responders (P=.007, PID at 8 hours (P=.02, and SAPID 0–8 hours (P<.0001. It also showed faster onset of action (42 minutes and longer duration of action (6.5 hours. The adverse events were comparable in both groups. Conclusion. Single dose of dexketoprofen trometamol 50 mg given intramuscularly provided faster, better, and longer duration of analgesia in postoperative patients of hernia repair surgery than diclofenac 50 mg, with comparable safety.

  18. Effect of Intraperitoneal Bupivacaine on Postoperative Pain in the Gynecologic Oncology Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivard, Colleen; Vogel, Rachel Isaksson; Teoh, Deanna

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate if the administration of intraperitoneal bupivacaine decreased postoperative pain in patients undergoing minimally invasive gynecologic and gynecologic cancer surgery. Retrospective cohort study (Canadian Task Force classification II-3). University-based gynecologic oncology practice operating at a tertiary medical center. All patients on the gynecologic oncology service undergoing minimally invasive surgery between September 2011 and June 2013. Starting August 2012, intraperitoneal administration of .25% bupivacaine was added to all minimally invasive surgeries. These patients were compared with historical control subjects who had surgery between September 2011 and July 2012 but did not receive intraperitoneal bupivacaine. One-hundred thirty patients were included in the study. The patients who received intraperitoneal bupivacaine had lower median narcotic use on the day of surgery and the first postoperative day compared with those who did not receive intraperitoneal bupivacaine (day 0: 7.0 mg morphine equivalents vs 11.0 mg, p = .007; day 1: .3 mg vs 1.7 mg, p = .0002). The median patient-reported pain scores were lower on the day of surgery in the intraperitoneal bupivacaine group (2.7 vs 3.2, p = .05) CONCLUSIONS: The administration of intraperitoneal bupivacaine was associated with improved postoperative pain control in patients undergoing minimally invasive gynecologic and gynecologic cancer surgery and should be further evaluated in a prospective study. Copyright © 2015 AAGL. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The efficacy of different pre- and post-operative analgesics in the management of pain after orthodontic separator placement: A randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Sudhakar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pain-free treatment to the patients is considered as an important treatment objective for orthodontic health care providers. However, many orthodontists underestimate the degree of pain experienced by the patients. Hence, this study was conducted as a randomized, double-blinded clinical trial with the following objectives. Objective: To study the pain characteristics after separator placement; to compare the efficacy of various commonly used analgesics in pain management and to determine the efficacy of pre- and post-operative analgesics in pain management. Subjects and Methods: Data were collected from 154 patients (77 males and 77 females, age group of 14-21 years, with mean age of 18.8 years who reported to Department of Orthodontics. Patients were randomly divided in to four groups. Group 1: Paracetamol 650 mg, Group 2: Ibuprofen 400 mg, Group 3: Aspirin 300 mg, Group 4: Placebo and the study were conducted as a randomized, double-blinded clinical trial. The patients were instructed to take two tablets, one tablet 1 h before separator placement, and the other one after 6 h. The pain evaluations were made by the patients, when teeth not touching (TNT, biting back teeth together, chewing food (CF using a 100-mm visual analogue scale for 7 days after separator placement. Patients were advised to record the severity of pain. Results: Group 3 (Aspirin 300 mg showed lowest pain values, followed by Group 2 (ibuprofen 400 mg, and Group 1 (paracetamol 650 mg. All NSAID′s achieved good pain control compared to Group 4 (placebo, where the intensity pain was maximum. Conclusion: Pre- and post-operative analgesics were found to be more effective in controlling orthodontic pain, after separator placement at all-time intervals.

  20. Evaluation of interobserver agreement for postoperative pain and sedation assessment in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito, Javier; Monteiro, Beatriz P; Beauchamp, Guy; Lascelles, B Duncan X; Steagall, Paulo V

    2017-09-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate agreement between observers with different training and experience for assessment of postoperative pain and sedation in cats by use of a dynamic and interactive visual analog scale (DIVAS) and for assessment of postoperative pain in the same cats with a multidimensional composite pain scale (MCPS). DESIGN Randomized, controlled, blinded study. ANIMALS 45 adult cats undergoing ovariohysterectomy. PROCEDURES Cats received 1 of 3 preoperative treatments: bupivacaine, IP; meloxicam, SC with saline (0.9% NaCl) solution, IP, (positive control); or saline solution only, IP (negative control). All cats received premedication with buprenorphine prior to general anesthesia. An experienced observer (observer 1; male; native language, Spanish) used scales in English, and an inexperienced observer (observer 2; female; native language, French) used scales in French to assess signs of sedation and pain. Rescue analgesia was administered according to MCPS scoring by observer 1. Mean pain and sedation scores per treatment and time point, proportions of cats in each group with MCPS scores necessitating rescue analgesia, and mean MCPS scores assigned at the time of rescue analgesia were compared between observers. Agreement was assessed by intraclass correlation coefficient determination. Percentage disagreement between observers on the need for rescue analgesia was calculated. RESULTS Interobserver agreements for pain scores were good, and that for sedation scores was fair. On the basis of observer 1's MCPS scores, a greater proportion of cats in the negative control group received rescue analgesia than in the bupivacaine or positive control groups. Scores from observer 2 indicated a greater proportion of cats in the negative control group than in the positive control group required rescue analgesia but identified no significant difference between the negative control and bupivacaine groups for this variable. Overall, disagreement regarding need for rescue

  1. Comparison of Patient-Controlled Analgesia Using Morphine With and Without Paracetamol in Postoperative Pain Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehryar Taghavi Gilani

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Postoperative pain control plays a pivotal role in reducing postoperative complications, hospitality time, and increasing satisfaction. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of paracetamol on the pain and complications caused by gastrectomy. Materials and Methods: This randomized prospective study was conducted on 60 patients (two same group who were candidate for gastrectomy in Imam Reza Hospital of Mashhad, Iran during August-September 2015. The first group received Patient-Controlled Analgesia (PCA with morphine only, and in the second group, paracetamol (1 gram infused with morphine every six hours. Level of pain, morphine intake, and side effects were evaluated in both groups. Results:No significant difference was observed in the four-scale score of pain in the patients (morphine group: 0.64±0.1, morphine-paracetamol group: 0.6±0.1 (P=0.72. During the first 24 hours after the surgery, the morphine group had lower consciousness level (2.3±0.2 compared to the morphine-paracetamol group (1.7±0.3 (P=0.001. Moreover, infusion of paracetamol with morphine to control the pain after gastrectomy reduced the need for morphine analgesia. Morphine intake was 21.4±7.7 in morphine group, while it was 14.3±5.8 in the morphine-paracetamol group within the first 24 hours after the surgery (P=0.001. However, this level had no significant effect on postoperative complications such as itching, nausea, and arterial oxygen saturation. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, intravenous paracetamol (one gram administered every six hours with PCA using morphine could decrease morphine intake leading to better consciousness level during the first 24 hours after gastrectomy without further complications.

  2. Tramadol-Paracetamol Combination for Postoperative Pain Relief in Elective Single-level Microdisectomy Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogar, Samie A; Khan, Fauzia A

    2017-04-01

    The tramadol and paracetamol combination is used frequently for postoperative pain management. The literature on the use of this combination for vertebral surgery is limited. Our objective was to compare a combination of paracetamol 1 g and a lower dose of tramadol (1 mg/kg: group 1T) with a combination of paracetamol 1 g and a higher dose of tramadol (1.5 mg/kg: group 1.5T) for postoperative pain after microdisectomy surgery. Our main outcome measure was Visual Analogue Scale pain scores for 4 hours postoperatively. This prospective randomized triple-blind clinical trial was conducted at Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi. Ninety-four patients aged between 18 and 50 years scheduled for elective single-level microdisectomy were allocated randomly into 1 of 2 groups. Twenty minutes before the end of the surgery, patients received the study drugs. There was no significant demographic difference between groups. None of the patients experienced severe pain (VAS>6). There was no significant difference in the mean pain score between groups. The mean score at 4 hours was 2.17 (1.38) in group 1.5T and 1.74 (1.37) in group 1T. The difference was not statistically significant (P=0.14). In group 1.5T, 13 patients reported having nausea and vomiting compared with 2 patients in group 1T. This was a statistically significant difference (P=0.004). The sedation score was similar between groups. The combination of low-dose tramadol (1 mg/kg) and paracetamol has comparable analgesia and a decreased incidence of nausea and vomiting compared with the higher dose of tramadol (1.5 mg/kg) and paracetamol combination.

  3. Prolonged nerve block by microencapsulated bupivacaine prevents acute postoperative pain in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohri, Rachit; Blaskovich, Phillip; Wang, Jeffrey Chi-Fei; Pham, Lan; Nichols, Gary; Hildebrand, William; Costa, Daniel; Scarborough, Nelson; Herman, Clifford; Strichartz, Gary

    2012-01-01

    To minimize acute postoperative pain, a new formulation of slowly released bupivacaine was developed. Bupivacaine was microencapsulated at 60% (wt/wt) in poly-lactide-co-glycolide polymers and characterized for physicochemical properties and bupivacaine release kinetics. This formulation was injected around the rat sciatic nerve to produce an antinociceptive effect to toe pinch. Mechanical hyperalgesia following lateral plantar paw incision in rats was assessed for 7 to 14 days when the bupivacaine slow-release formulation was placed at the ipsilateral sciatic nerve and compared with the hyperalgesia that developed with various controls. Bupivacaine was released in vitro at a relatively constant rate over a period of ≈ 72 to 96 hours. Complete antinociception, shown as no response to toe pinch, lasted for 23 ± 7 hours, with a half-recovery time of 42 ± 8 hours after sciatic nerve injection of 0.4 mL of the microspheres delivering 34 mg of bupivacaine. Solutions of 0.5% (wt/vol) bupivacaine-HCl (0.1 mL) produced complete antinociception for less than 2 hours and recovery half-times of 2 hours. Postincisional mechanical hyperalgesia, shown by increased withdrawal responses to von Frey filaments, was absent for 24 hours and was lower than control for 96 hours, when the sciatic nerve was blocked by bupivacaine microspheres, whereas the 0.5% bupivacaine solution reduced postincisional pain for only 4 hours. Corresponding to its far greater functional blocking time, the microsphere-bupivacaine formulation was able to significantly reduce postoperative pain below control levels for up to 4 days. These findings of several days of postoperative pain relief, for an injectable formulation containing a single active agent, present an improved and potentially promising therapy to prevent acute pain after surgery.

  4. Turkish Nurses' Use of Nonpharmacological Methods for Relieving Children's Postoperative Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelebioğlu, Ayda; Küçükoğlu, Sibel; Odabaşoğlu, Emel

    2015-01-01

    The experience of pain is frequently observed among children undergoing surgery. Hospitalization and surgery are stressful experiences for those children. The research was conducted to investigate and analyze Turkish nurses' use of nonpharmacological methods to relieve postoperative pain in children. The study was cross-sectional and descriptive. The study took place at 2 hospitals in eastern Turkey. Participants were 143 nurses whose patients had undergone surgical procedures at the 2 hospitals. The researchers used a questionnaire, a checklist of nonpharmacological methods, and a visual analogue scale (VAS) to collect the data. To assess the data, descriptive statistics and the χ² test were used. Of the 143 nurses, 73.4% initially had applied medication when the children had pain. Most of the nurses (58.7%) stated the children generally experienced a middle level of postoperative pain. The most frequent practices that the nurses applied after the children's surgery were (1) "providing verbal encouragement" (90.2%), a cognitive-behavioral method; (2) "a change in the child's position" (85.3%), a physical method; (3) "touch" (82.5%), a method of emotional support; and (4) "ventilation of the room" (79.7%), a regulation of the surroundings. Compared with participants with other educational levels, the cognitive-behavioral methods were the ones most commonly used by the more educated nurses (P encouraging patients with rewards, (2) helping them think happy thoughts, (3) helping them use their imaginations, (4) providing music, and (5) reading books. Female nurses used the following methods more than the male nurses did (P encouragement with rewards, (2) helping patients with deep breathing, (3) keeping a desired item beside them, (4) changing their positions, and (5) ventilating the room. Undergoing surgery is generally a painful experience for children. Nurses most commonly use cognitive-behavioral methods in the postoperative care of their pediatric patients

  5. Assessment of post-operative pain management among acutely and electively admitted patients - a Swedish ward perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magidy, Mahnaz; Warrén-Stomberg, Margareta; Bjerså, Kristofer

    2016-04-01

    Swedish health care is regulated to involve the patient in every intervention process. In the area of post-operative pain, it is therefore important to evaluate patient experience of the quality of pain management. Previous research has focused on mapping this area but not on comparing experiences between acutely and electively admitted patients. Hence, the aim of this study was to investigate the experiences of post-operative pain management quality among acutely and electively admitted patients at a Swedish surgical department performing soft-tissue surgery. A survey study design was used as a method based on a multidimensional instrument to assess post-operative pain management: Strategic and Clinical Quality Indicators in Postoperative Pain Management (SCQIPP). Consecutive patients at all wards of a university hospital's surgical department were included. Data collection was performed at hospital discharge. In total, 160 patients participated, of whom 40 patients were acutely admitted. A significant difference between acutely and electively admitted patients was observed in the SCQIPP area of environment, whereas acute patients rated the post-operative pain management quality lower compared with those who were electively admitted. There may be a need for improvement in the areas of post-operative pain management in Sweden, both specifically and generally. There may also be a difference in the experience of post-operative pain quality between acutely and electively admitted patients in this study, specifically in the area of environment. In addition, low levels of the perceived quality of post-operative pain management among the patients were consistent, but satisfaction with analgesic treatment was rated as good. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Prolonged amelioration of experimental postoperative pain by bupivacaine released from microsphere-coated hernia mesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohri, Rachit; Wang, Jeffery Chi-Fei; Pham, Lan; Blaskovich, Phillip D; Costa, Daniel; Nichols, Gary; Hildebrand, William; Scarborough, Nelson; Herman, Clifford; Strichartz, Gary R

    2014-01-01

    Postoperative pain alters physiological functions and delays discharge. Perioperative local anesthetics are effective analgesics in the immediate 1- to 2-day postoperative period, but acute pain often lasts longer. The goal of this work was to develop a local anesthetic formulation adhering to an intraoperative implanted device that reduces pain for at least 3 days after surgery. Six groups, each with 8 rats, were studied. In a control group (group I), one 1.2-cm-long incision of the skin was followed by blunt dissection to separate the skin away from the underlying tissues and closing with 2 sutures. In 3 of the treatment groups, the same surgical procedure was used, with the subcutaneous space formed by the blunt dissection lined with a 1-cm square patch of hernia mesh coated with poly lactide co-glycolic acid microspheres containing approximately 17 mg of bupivacaine (group II), no drug (placebo; group III), or bupivacaine free-base powder (group IV). Uncoated mesh implants (group V) served as a secondary control. A standard bupivacaine solution (0.4 mL, 0.5%; 2-mg dose) was infiltrated subcutaneously 30 minutes before the surgery and served as a standard control (group VI). Mechanosensitivity of the skin was tested by the local subcutaneous muscle responses to cutaneous tactile stimulation by von Frey hairs with forces of 4 g (for allodynia) and 15 g (for hyperalgesia) preoperatively and for 7 postoperative days. Control rats (group I) showed mechanohypersensitivity, indicative of postoperative allodynia and hyperalgesia, for all 7 postoperative days. Mechanohyperalgesia in rats that received mesh coated with bupivacaine-releasing microspheres (group II) was reduced during this period to 13% of control postoperative values (P < 0.001); mesh coated with bupivacaine base (group IV) reduced it by 50% (P = 0.034). The placebo mesh (group III) and uncoated mesh (group V) caused no significant reduction of mechanohypersensitivity, and bupivacaine solution infiltrated

  7. Dextromethorphan Reduces Postoperative Pain of Post Partum Tubal Ligation under General Anesthesia

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    N. Manochehrian

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Postoperative pain has harmful effects in many systems. Dextromethorphan reduces postoperative pain in post partum tubal ligation under general anesthesia. Materials & Methods: In this research 40 patients with ASA class I and II in double blind randomized clinical trial were studied in two groups. 90 minutes before surgery the patients received 90 mg dextromethorphan or placebo (oral. The patients induced general anesthesia with thiopental (5mg/kg, fentanyl 1.5 g/kg and succinylcholin(1-1.5 mg/kg and maintenance with halothane and N2O 50%. Patients were observed studied for analgesic requirement, nausea, vomiting, urinary retention and respiratory depression in recovery and 2,4,8 and 24 hours after surgery. Results: There was no significant difference in age, education, . . . Pain in recovery, 2 and 4 hours after surgery in dextromethorphan was less than placebo group. The analgesic requirement (pethidine in dextromethophan was less than placebo group.Conclusion: Administration of 90 mg dextromethorphan 90 minutes before the surgery under GA reduces pain in recovery time , 2 and 4 hours after the surgery.

  8. Preferred Presentation of the Visual Analog Scale for Measurement of Postoperative Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Helle Birgitte; Klausen, Tobias Wirenfeldt; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to evaluate differences in pain scores with different visual analog scale (VAS) presentations and to compare those differences with a numeric rating scale. We also asked the patients for preference of the different methods. METHODS: Prior to the trial, we...... performed power calculations to estimate a preferred sample size, and 62 postoperative patients supplied a complete set of data to the study. Inclusion criteria were newly operated patients within the first 5 days after surgery. Every patient included was with 1-minute intervals and presented with one...... of the following 100-mm VAS lines: VAS horizontal with or without stop lines at the endings, or VAS vertical with or without stop lines. They also completed a numeric rating scale (NRS). RESULTS: We did not find differences in pain scores between the four VAS measures. The NRS had slightly higher pain scores than...

  9. Barriers perceived by nurses in the optimal treatment of postoperative pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medrzycka-Dabrowka Wioletta

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available It is currently estimated that the lack of adequate pain management affects 80% of the global population and the phenomenon poses a serious problem in more than 150 countries. On a national level, the greatest burden of inadequate treatment is borne, among others, by elderly patients. The purpose of the paper was to compare the prevalence of barriers to optimum post-operative pain management in elderly patients, observed by nurses in a clinical, provincial and municipal hospital in Poland. The research project was a multi-center one and took over a year. The study was questionnaire-based. It used the Polish version of the Nurses’ Perceived Obstacles to Pain Assessment and Management Practices questionnaire. The study included a total of 1602 nurses working at a clinical, provincial and municipal hospital.

  10. Postoperative pain control in the parturient: new challenges in the new millennium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuczkowski, Krzysztof M

    2011-02-01

    In the new millennium, the horizons of modern anesthesia practice continue to expand beyond the provision of surgical anesthesia to encompass areas outside of the operating room, including preoperative evaluation, labor analgesia, postanesthesia care, critical care and acute and chronic pain management. Adequate postoperative analgesia following caesarean delivery hastens ambulation, decreases maternal morbidity, improves patient outcome, and facilitates care of the newborn. There is currently no "gold standard" for post-cesarean pain management. The number of options is large and the choice of the method of pain control is determined by drug availability, institutional protocols, individual preferences, available resources, and financial considerations. This article provides an overview of the currently available methods of post-cesarean analgesia.

  11. Knowledge of and Attitudes Regarding Postoperative Pain among the Pediatric Cardiac Nursing Staff: An Indian Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dongara, Ashish R; Shah, Shail N; Nimbalkar, Somashekhar M; Phatak, Ajay G; Nimbalkar, Archana S

    2015-06-01

    Pain following cardiac intervention in children is a common, but complex phenomenon. Identifying and reporting pain is the responsibility of the nursing staff, who are the primary caregivers and spend the most time with the patients. Inadequately managed pain in children may lead to multiple short- and long-term adverse effects. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to assess the knowledge and attitudes regarding postoperative pain in children among the nursing staff at B.M. Patel Cardiac Center, Karamsad, Anand, Gujarat, India. The study included 42 of the 45 nurses employed in the cardiac center. The nurses participating in the study were responsible for the care of the pediatric patients. A modified Knowledge and Attitudes Survey Regarding Pain and a sociodemographic questionnaire were administered after obtaining written informed consent. The study was approved by the institutional Human Research Ethics Committee. Mean (SD) experience in years of the nursing staff was 2.32 (1.69) years (range 1 month to 5 years). Of the nurses, 67% were posted in the cardiac surgical intensive care unit (ICU). The mean (SD) score for true/false questions was 11.48 (2.95; range 7,19). The average correct response rate of the true/false questions was 45.9%. Knowledge about pain was only affected by the ward in which the nurse was posted. In first (asymptomatic) and second (symptomatic) case scenarios, 78.6% and 59.5% underestimated pain, respectively. Knowledge and attitudes regarding pain and its management is poor among nurses. Targeted training sessions and repeated reinforcement sessions are essential for holistic patient care. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Dezocine for Preventing Postoperative Pain: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

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    Xuelong Zhou

    Full Text Available Dezocine is considered to be an alternative medication for managing postoperative pain. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of this drug in this regard.Medline, EMBASE and the Cochrane Central Register of Control Trials (CENTRAL were searched to identify all randomized controlled trials (RCTs that compare dezocine with placebo or dezocine with morphine on postoperative pain. The data were extracted and pooled using Mantel-Haenszel random effects model. Heterogeneity was tested using the I2 statistic with values >50% and Chi2 test with P ≤ 0.05 indicating obvious heterogeneity between the studies.Seven trials evaluating 665 patients were included. The number of patients with at least 50% pain relief was increased (N = 234; RR 3.04, 95% CI 2.27 to 4.08 and physician (N = 465; RR 2.84, 95% CI 1.66 to 4.84 and patient satisfaction (N = 390; RR 2.81, 95% CI 1.85 to 4.26 were improved following the administration of dezocine compared with the placebo. The effects of dezocine were similar to those of morphine in terms of the number of patients reporting at least 50% pain relief within 2-6 h after surgery (N = 235; RR 1.29, 95% CI 1.15 to 1.46 and physician (N = 234; RR 1.18, 95% CI 0.93 to 1.49 and patient (N = 158; RR 1.33, 95% CI 0.93 to 1.92 satisfaction. While, the number of patients with at least 50% pain relief within 0-1 h after surgery increased following dezocine compared with morphine treatment (N = 79; RR 1.45, 95% CI 1.18 to 1.77. There was no difference in the incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV following dezocine treatment compared with the placebo (N = 391; RR 1.06, 95% CI 0.42 to 2.68 or morphine treatment (N = 235; RR 0.65, 95% CI 0.14 to 2.93.Dezocine is a promising analgesic for preventing postoperative pain, but further studies are required to evaluate its safety.

  13. The effect of peritoneal gas drain on postoperative pain in benign gynecologic laparoscopic surgery: a double-blinded randomized controlled trial controlled trial

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    Tharanon C

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Chantip Tharanon, Kovit Khampitak Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Srinagarind Hospital, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand Objectives: To compare the effect of peritoneal gas drain on postoperative pain in benign gynecologic laparoscopic surgery and the amount of postoperative analgesic dosage.Methods: The trial included 45 females who had undergone operations during the period December 2014 to October 2015. The patients were block randomized based on operating time (<2 and ≥2 hours. The intervention group (n=23 was treated with postoperative intraperitoneal gas drain and the control group (n=22 was not. The mean difference in scores for shoulder, epigastric, suprapubic, and overall pain at 6, 24, 48 hours postoperatively were statistically evaluated using mixed-effect restricted maximum likelihood regression. The differences in the analgesic drug usage between the groups were also analyzed using a Student’s t-test. The data were divided and analyzed to two subgroups based on operating time (<2 hours, n=20; and ≥2 hours, n=25.Results: The intervention had significantly lower overall pain than the control group, with a mean difference and 95% confidence interval at 6, 24, and 48 hours of 2.59 (1.49–3.69, 2.23 (1.13–3.34, and 1.48 (0.3–2.58, respectively. Correspondingly, analgesic drug dosage was significantly lower in the intervention group (3.52±1.47 mg vs 5.72±2.43 mg, P<0.001. The three largest mean differences in patients with operating times of ≥2 hours were in overall pain, suprapubic pain at 6 hours, and shoulder pain at 24 hours at 3.27 (1.14–5.39, 3.20 (1.11–5.26, and 3.13 (1.00–5.24, respectively. These were greater than the three largest mean differences in the group with operating times of <2 hours, which were 2.81 (1.31–4.29, 2.63 (0.51–4.73, and 2.02 (0.68–3.36. The greatest analgesic drug requirement was in the control group with a longer operative time.Conclusion: The use of

  14. Use of Liposomal Bupivacaine for Postoperative Analgesia in an Incisional Pain Model in Rats (Rattus norvegicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Stacey C; Jampachaisri, Katechan; Seymour, Travis L; Felt, Stephen A; Pacharinsak, Cholawat

    2017-01-01

    The local anesthetic bupivacaine is valuable for perioperative analgesia, but its use in the postoperative period is limited by its short duration of action. Here, we evaluated the application of a slow-release liposomal formulation of bupivacaine for postoperative analgesia. The aim was to assess whether liposomal bupivacaine effectively attenuates postoperative mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity in a rat model of incisional pain. Rats (n = 36) were randomly assigned to 1 of 5 treatment groups: saline, 1 mL/kg SC every 12 h for 2 d; buprenorphine HCl, 0.05 mg/kg SC every 12 h for 2 d (Bup HCl); 0.5% bupivacaine, 2 mg/kg SC local infiltration once (Bupi); liposomal bupivacaine, 1 mg/kg SC local infiltration once (Exp1); and liposomal bupivacaine, 6 mg/kg SC local infiltration once (Exp6). Mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity were evaluated daily on days -1, 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4. The saline group exhibited both hypersensitivities through all 4 evaluated postoperative days. Bup HCl attenuated mechanical hypersensitivity for 2 d and thermal hypersensitivity for 1 d. Bupi attenuated only thermal hypersensitivity for 4 d. Rats in the Exp1 group showed attenuation of both mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity for 4 d, and those in the Exp6 group had attenuation of mechanical hypersensitivity on day 0 and thermal hypersensitivity for 4 d. These data suggest that a single local infiltration of liposomal bupivacaine at a dose of 1 mg/kg SC effectively attenuates postoperative mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity for 4 d in a rat model of incisional pain.

  15. Comparison of Intravenous Morphine with Sublingual Buprenorphine in Management of Postoperative Pain after Closed Reduction Orthopedic Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Ghasem Soltani; Mahmood Khorsand; ALireza Sepehri Shamloo; Lida Jarahi; Nahid Zirak

    2015-01-01

    Background: Postoperative pain is a common side effect following surgery that can significantly reduce surgical quality and patient’s satisfaction. Treatment options are morphine and buprenorphine. We aimed to compare the efficacy of a single dose of intravenous morphine with sublingual buprenorphine in postoperative pain control following closed reduction surgery. Methods: This triple blind clinical trial was conducted on 90 patients referred for closed reduction orthopedic surgery. They wer...

  16. Effect of trochar site lidocaine on postoperative pain scoring and patient satisfaction after gynecologic laparoscopies – A randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal M. Zahran

    2011-06-01

    Conclusion: The combined use trochar sites and intraperitoneal lidocaine is superior to intraperitoneal lidocaine alone in managing postoperative pain after laparoscopic gynecological procedures. It leads to lower VAS at day 1 and day 7 postoperatively, less need for additional analgesics and higher patient satisfaction.

  17. Interventions for postoperative pain in children: An overview of systematic reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boric, Krste; Dosenovic, Svjetlana; Jelicic Kadic, Antonia; Batinic, Marijan; Cavar, Marija; Urlic, Marjan; Markovina, Nikolina; Puljak, Livia

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to conduct an overview of systematic reviews that summarizes the results about efficacy and safety from randomized controlled trials involving the various strategies used for postoperative pain management in children. We searched the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, CINAHL, Database of Reviews of Effect, Embase, MEDLINE, and PsycINFO from the earliest date to January 24, 2016. This overview included 45 systematic reviews that evaluated interventions for postoperative pain in children. Out of 45 systematic reviews that investigated various interventions for postoperative pain in children, 19 systematic reviews (42%) presented conclusive evidence of efficacy. Positive conclusive evidence was reported in 18 systematic reviews (40%) for the efficacy of diclofenac, ketamine, caudal analgesia, dexmedetomidine, music therapy, corticosteroid, epidural analgesia, paracetamol, and/or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and transversus abdominis plane block. Only one systematic review reported conclusive evidence of equal efficacy that involved a comparison of dexmedetomidine vs morphine and fentanyl. Safety of interventions was reported as conclusive in 14 systematic reviews (31%), with positive conclusive evidence for dexmedetomidine, corticosteroid, epidural analgesia, transversus abdominis plane block, and clonidine. Seven systematic reviews reported equal conclusive safety for epidural infusion, diclofenac intravenous vs ketamine added to opioid analgesia, bupivacaine, ketamine, paracetamol, and dexmedetomidine vs intravenous infusions of various opioid analgesics, oral suspension and suppository of diclofenac, only opioid, normal saline, no treatment, placebo, and midazolam. Negative conclusive statement for safety was reported in one systematic review for caudal analgesia vs noncaudal regional analgesia. More than half of systematic reviews included in this overview were rated as having medium methodological quality. Of 45 included

  18. The role of hydromorphone and OPRM1 in postoperative pain relief with hydrocodone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boswell, Mark V; Stauble, M Elaine; Loyd, Gary E; Langman, Loralie; Ramey-Hartung, Bronwyn; Baumgartner, Richard N; Tucker, William W; Jortani, Saeed A

    2013-01-01

    Postoperative pain management remains a challenge for clinicians due to unpredictable patient responses to opioid therapy. Some of this variability may result from single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the human opioid mu-1 receptor (OPRM1) that modify receptor binding or signal transduction. The OPRM1 variant with the highest frequency is the A118G SNP. However, previous studies have produced inconsistent results regarding the clinical effects of A118G on opioid response. We hypothesized that measurement of serum opioid concentrations, in addition to determining total opioid consumption, may provide a more precise method of assessing the effects of A118G on analgesic response. The current study evaluated the relationship of analgesia, side effects, total hydrocodone consumption, quantitative serum hydrocodone and hydromorphone concentrations, and A118G SNP in postoperative patients following Cesarean section. 158 women scheduled for Cesarean section were enrolled prospectively in the study. The patients had bupivacaine spinal anesthesia for surgery and received intrathcal morphine with the spinal anesthetic or parenteral morphine for the first 24 hours after surgery. Thereafter, patients received hydrocodone/acetaminophen for postoperative pain control. On postoperative day 3, venous blood samples were obtained for OPRM1 A118G genotyping and serum opioid concentrations. 131 (82.9%) of the subjects were homozygous for the 118A allele of OPRM1 (AA) and 27 (17.1%) carried the G allele (AG/GG). By regression analysis, pain relief was significantly associated with total hydrocodone dose in the AA group (P = 0.01), but not in the AG/GG group (P = 0.554). In contrast, there was no association between pain relief and serum hydrocodone concentration in either group. However, pain relief was significantly associated with serum hydromorphone concentration (a metabolite of hydrocodone) in the AA group (P = 0.004), but not in the AG/GG group (P = 0.724). Conversely, side

  19. Predictors of Post-Operative Pain Relief in Patients with Chronic Pancreatitis Undergoing the Frey or Whipple Procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Amitasha; Patel, Yuval A; Cruise, Michael; Matsukuma, Karen; Zaheer, Atif; Afghani, Elham; Yadav, Dhiraj; Makary, Martin A; Hirose, Kenzo; Andersen, Dana K; Singh, Vikesh K

    2016-04-01

    Post-operative pain relief in chronic pancreatitis (CP) is variable. Our objective was to determine clinical imaging or histopathologic predictor(s) of post-operative pain relief in CP patients undergoing the Whipple or Frey procedure. All patients who underwent a Whipple (n = 30) or Frey procedure (n = 30) for painful CP between January 2003 and September 2013 were evaluated. A toxic etiology was defined as a history of alcohol use and/or smoking. The pre-operative abdominal CT was evaluated for calcification(s) and main pancreatic duct (MPD) dilation (≥5 mm). The post-operative histopathology was evaluated for severe fibrosis. Clinical imaging and histopathologic features were evaluated as predictors of post-operative pain relief using univariable and multivariable regression analysis. A total of 60 patients (age 51.6 years, 53% males) were included in our study, of whom 42 (70%) reported post-operative pain relief over a mean follow-up of 1.1 years. There were 37 (62%) patients with toxic etiology, 36 (60%) each with calcification(s) and MPD dilation. A toxic etiology, calcifications, and severe fibrosis were associated with post-operative pain relief on univariable analysis (all p Whipple or Frey procedure.

  20. Extended Release Liposomal Bupivacaine Injection (Exparel) for Early Postoperative Pain Control Following Palatoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Kristopher M; Nair, Narayanan M; Sargent, Larry A

    2018-05-14

    Liposomal bupivacaine (LB) is a long-acting local anesthetic reported to decrease postoperative pain in adults. The authors demonstrate the safe use of LB in pediatric patients with improved pain control following palatoplasty. Retrospective patient series of all single-surgeon palatoplasty patients treated at a tertiary craniofacial center from August 2014 to December 2015 were included. All patients received 1.3% LB intraoperatively as greater palatal nerve and surgical field blocks in 2-flap V-Y pushback palatoplasty. Postoperative oral intake, opioids administered, duration of hospitalization, and FLACC (face, legs, activity, cry, consolability) pain scores were measured. Twenty-seven patients (16 males and 11 females, average age of 10.8 months, weight 8.8 kg) received 2.9 ± 0.9 mL (2.6 ± 1.9 mg/kg) 1.3% LB. Average FLACC scores were 2.4 ± 2.2/10 in the postanesthesia care unit and 3.8 ± 1.8/10 while inpatients. Oral intake was first tolerated 10.3 ± 11.5 hours postoperatively and tolerated 496.4 ± 354.2 mL orally in the first 24 hours postoperatively. Patients received 8.5 ± 8.4 mg hydrocodone equivalents (0.46 ± 0.45 mg/kg per d hydrocodone equivalents) and were discharged 2.1 ± 1.3 days postoperatively. Opioid-related adverse events included emesis in 7.4% and pruritis in 3.7% of patients. The LB may be used safely in pediatric patients. Intraoperative injection of LB during palatoplasty can yield low postoperative opioid use and an early and adequate volume of oral intake over an average hospital stay. Further cost-efficacy studies of LB are needed to assess its value in pediatric plastic surgery.

  1. Post-operative pain following coblation or monopolar electrocautery tonsillectomy in children: a prospective, single-blinded, randomised comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, N P; Walner, D L

    2011-10-01

    To compare post-operative pain following tonsillectomy by either coblation or monopolar electrocautery in children. A parallel-designed, prospective, single-blinded, randomised trial. Ambulatory surgical facility. Eighty otherwise healthy paediatric patients undergoing coblation or electrocautery tonsillectomy by a fellowship-trained paediatric otolaryngologist. (i) The number of post-operative days with severe pain based on subjective qualification by the caretaker, (ii) post-operative days with pain rated ≥ 5 on a scale of 1-10, (iii) post-operative days requiring oral paracetamol/acetaminophen with codeine solution and (iv) post-operative days until resumption of a regular diet were assessed and recorded daily using a post-operative pain survey as a form of daily diary that was returned at the 2-week follow-up visit. Patients were consecutively enrolled into two groups of 40 patients. Average ages were 5.2 years for coblation tonsillectomy and 6.0 years for electrocautery tonsillectomy. The average number of post-operative days with severe pain was 4.2 for coblation and 5.9 for electrocautery (P = 0.006), days rating pain ≥ 5 were 3.6 for coblation and 4.8 for electrocautery (P = 0.037), days of codeine use were 2.5 for coblation and 2.9 for electrocautery (P = 0.324), and days until resumption of a regular diet were 5.2 for coblation and 6.2 for electrocautery (0.329). Coblation tonsillectomy may reduce post-operative pain and the time until resumption of a regular diet compared to electrocautery tonsillectomy. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Single dose oral ketoprofen and dexketoprofen for acute postoperative pain in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barden, Jodie; Derry, Sheena; McQuay, Henry J; Moore, R Andrew

    2009-10-07

    Ketoprofen is a non-selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) used to treat acute and chronic painful conditions. Dexketoprofen is the (S)-enantiomer, which is believed to confer analgesia. Theoretically dexketoprofen is expected to provide equivalent analgesia to ketoprofen at half the dose, with a consequent reduction in gastrointestinal adverse events. To assess efficacy, duration of action, and associated adverse events of single dose oral ketoprofen and dexketoprofen in acute postoperative pain in adults. We searched Cochrane CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Oxford Pain Relief Database for studies to August 2009. Randomised, double blind, placebo-controlled trials of single dose orally administered ketoprofen and dexketoprofen in adults with moderate to severe acute postoperative pain. Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. Pain relief or pain intensity data were extracted and converted into the dichotomous outcome of number of participants with at least 50% pain relief over 4 to 6 hours, from which relative risk and number-needed-to-treat-to-benefit (NNT) were calculated. Numbers of participants using rescue medication over specified time periods, and time to use of rescue medication, were sought as additional measures of efficacy. Information on adverse events and withdrawals was collected. Fourteen studies compared ketoprofen (968 participants) at mainly 25 mg and 50 mg with placebo (520 participants). Seven studies compared dexketoprofen (681 participants) at mainly 10 mg to 25 mg with placebo (289 participants). Studies were of adequate reporting quality, and participants had pain following dental, orthopaedic, obstetric, gynaecological and general surgery. There was considerable clinical heterogeneity between studies in dental and other types of surgery, particularly bunionectomy, which limited analysis.Ketoprofen at doses between 12.5 mg and 100 mg produced NNTs for at least 50% pain relief over 4 to 6

  3. New approach for treatment of prolonged postoperative pain: APS Out-Patient Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiippana, Elina; Hamunen, Katri; Heiskanen, Tarja; Nieminen, Teija; Kalso, Eija; Kontinen, Vesa K

    2016-07-01

    Persistent postoperative pain (PPP) is a significant clinical problem. Several patient-related risk factors for PPP have been identified, including a previous chronic pain problem, young age, female gender and psychological vulnerability. Intra- and postoperative risk factors include surgical complications such as infections, haematoma, nerve damage and repeated surgery. As the length of hospital stay has been shortened, some patients may be discharged despite ongoing pain and insufficient analgesic medication. The challenge is to identify patients at high risk of developing PPP and to create a targeted care pathway to ensure effective and safe pain treatment especially in the subacute postoperative phase at home. This observational study describes the first two years of the Acute Pain Service Out-Patient Clinic (APS-OPC) at the Helsinki University Hospital. Patient characteristics, known risk factors, and details of treatment of PPP for the first 200 patients referred to our APS-OPC were retrospectively collected from the medical records. The APS-OPC clinic functions in close collaboration with the Multidisciplinary Pain Clinic (MPC), and the number of patients in need of physiotherapist, psychologist or psychiatrist counselling was recorded, as well as the number of patients referred to the MPC for further PPP management. Patients were referred to the APS-OPC from different surgical specialities, the two most common being thoracic and orthopaedic surgery. Seventy per cent of the patients (139/200) presented symptoms indicating neuropathic postsurgical pain. The patients had, on average, five risk factors for PPP. The median time from surgery to the first contact to the APS-OPC was two months, and the median duration of follow-up was 2.8 months (0-16 months). The median number of contacts with APS-OPC was 3 (range 1-14). Every fourth patient needed only one contact to the APS-OPC. Nineteen per cent of the patients had an appointment with the physiotherapist and 20

  4. Recurrent back pain after diskectomy: MRI findings MR of the postoperative lumbar spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aparicio, Rocio; Eguren, Leonor Z.; Schinder, Humberto; Stur, Mariela

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To show the morphological changes in postoperative lumbar spine. Material and methods: We reviewed 128 Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) studies of lumbar spine. All patients complained of low back pain and had a previous lumbar surgery (1 month to 8 years). All the examinations include axial and sagittal Gadopentate-dimeglumine enhanced T1 weighted imaging. Results: Only 7,8% have the normal appearance of the postoperative lumbar spine. Epidural scar was found in 69% of examinations; of this group, 72% showed radicular involvement, and 28% had no radicular involvement. Recurrent disc herniation was found in 14,8% of exams, using gadopentate-dimeglumine to assist the differentiation from epidural fibrosis; infections like spondylodiscitis and abscess in 12,5%. Other findings included arachnoiditis, pseudomeningoceles and seromas. Conclusions: MRI is a useful method to study the postoperative lumbar spine, specially when enhanced with gadopentate-dimeglumine. Enhanced images can differentiate two of the major complication like epidural fibrosis, and recurrent disc herniation. Spondylodiscitis are important and frequent too. Although the findings of complications in our series in the postoperative lumbar spine represent 92,18 %, these not always explain the symptomatology. Therefore, the interrelation is important with the surgeon to determine which abnormalities are clinically significant. (authors) [es

  5. Incidence of persistent postoperative pain after hepatectomies with 2 regimes of perioperative analgesia containing ketamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masgoret, Paula; Gomar, Carmen; Tena, Beatriz; Taurá, Pilar; Ríos, José; Coca, Miquel

    2017-04-01

    Studies designed to assess persistent postoperative pain (PPP) incidence after hepatectomies are lacking. Our aim was to assess PPP incidence 6 months after hepatectomies with intravenous (IV) or epidural (EPI) analgesia containing ketamine.Prospective observational comparative study between 2 cohorts of patients submitted to hepatectomy. Patients received 1 of 2 analgesic regimes containing ketamine: EPI group or IV group. Visual analog scale (VAS), Neuropathic Pain Symptom Inventory (NPSI), Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS), and quantitative sensorial testing (QST: to determine area of hyperalgesia/allodynia) were assessed preoperatively and postoperatively at 2 h, 24 h, 7 days, 1 month, and 6 months. VAS ≥ 1 at 1 and 6 months was considered indicative of PPP and VAS > 3 was considered as not controlled pain. Side effects and complications were registered.Forty-four patients were included: 23 in EPI group and 21 in IV group. Patients in IV group were older and had more comorbidities. No patient presented VAS > 3 at 1 or 6 months. VAS ≥ 1 at 1 and 6 months was 36.4% and 22.7%, respectively. No differences in VAS, NPSI, or PCS were found between groups. Allodynia/hyperalgesia area did not differ between groups and was infrequent and slight. Pain pressure threshold in the wound vertical component was significantly higher in EPI group after 7 days. IV group showed more cognitive side effects.Incidence of PPP at 6 months after open hepatectomies with EPI or IV analgesia containing ketamine was lower than previously reported for other abdominal surgeries.Ketamine influence on low PPP incidence and hyperalgesia cannot be discarded.

  6. A randomized controlled trial to compare pregabalin with gabapentin for postoperative pain in abdominal hysterectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anju Ghai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pregabalin is a potent ligand for alpha-2-delta subunit of voltage-gated calcium channels in the central nervous system, which exhibits potent anticonvulsant, analgesic and anxiolytic activity. The pharmacological activity of pregabalin is similar to that of gabapentin and shows possible advantages. Although it shows analgesic efficacy against neuropathic pain, very limited evidence supports its postoperative analgesic efficacy. We investigated its analgesic efficacy in patients experiencing acute pain after abdominal hysterectomy and compared it with gabapentin and placebo. Methods: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was conducted in 90 women undergoing abdominal hysterectomy who were anaesthetized in a standardized fashion. Patients received 300 mg pregabalin, 900 mg gabapentin or placebo, 1-2 hours prior to surgery. Postoperative analgesia was administered at visual analogue scale (VAS ≥3. The primary outcome was analgesic consumption over 24 hours and patients were followed for pain scores, time to rescue analgesia and side effects as secondary outcomes. Results: The diclofenac consumption was statistically significant between pregabalin and control groups, and gabapentin and control groups; however, pregabalin and gabapentin groups were comparable. Moreover, the consumption of tramadol was statistically significant among all the groups. Patients in pregabalin and gabapentin groups had lower pain scores in the initial hour of recovery. However, pain scores were subsequently similar in all the groups. Time to first request for analgesia was longer in pregabalin group followed by gabapentin and control groups. Conclusion: A single dose of 300 mg pregabalin given 1-2 hours prior to surgery is superior to 900 mg gabapentin and placebo after abdominal hysterectomy. Both the drugs are better than placebo.

  7. The effect of preoperative intravenous dexketoprofen trometamol on postoperative pain in minor outpatient urologic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolat, Özgür; Erhan, Elvan; Deniz, Mustafa Nuri

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this prospective double-blind randomized study was to compare the effectiveness of preoperative dexketoprofen trometamol for acute postoperative pain in patients undergoing minor outpatient urologic surgery. Sixty male patients (ASA I and II) undergoing varicocelectomy and testicular sperm extraction (TESE) with standard laryngeal mask airway (LMA) anesthesia were randomly divided into two groups. Patients in Group I (n=30) received 50 mg of dexketoprofen trometamol iv before induction, whereas patients in Group II (n=30) received saline. All patients received standard LMA anesthesia (propofol, sevoflurane and N2O/O2). Analgesic efficacy was evaluated by self-assessment of pain intensity (VAS) at regular intervals. Vital signs, side effects and time to reach a postanesthesia discharge score (PADS) of ≥9 were also recorded. Paracetamol 1 gr iv and tramadol 100 mg iv were used for rescue analgesia. Demographic data and duration of surgery were similar in both groups. There was no significant difference between groups with respect to postoperative pain scores and side effects. Although more patients in Group II (60%) required rescue analgesia compared to Group I (33.3%), the difference did not reach statistical significance. Preoperative IV use of dexketoprofen trometamol iv did not decrease the need for rescue analgesia in patients undergoing minor outpatient urological surgery.

  8. Effects of a transdermal lidocaine patch on indicators of postoperative pain in dogs undergoing midline ovariohysterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merema, Danielle K; Schoenrock, Emily K; Le Boedec, Kevin; McMichael, Maureen A

    2017-05-15

    OBJECTIVE To determine the effects of a transdermal lidocaine patch (TLP) on indicators of postoperative pain in healthy dogs following ovariohysterectomy. DESIGN Randomized, blinded controlled trial. ANIMALS 40 healthy shelter-owned female dogs admitted to a student surgery program for ovariohysterectomy. PROCEDURES Dogs were randomly assigned to receive after ovariohysterectomy a 5-cm-wide strip of TLP applied topically on both sides of the incision, for the full length of the incision and a wound dressing (n = 19) or a placebo patch (nonmedicated wound dressing; 21). All dogs underwent midline ovariohysterectomy. Immediately afterward, dogs received 2 IM morphine injections, carprofen (SC, q 12 h for 2 days), and the assigned patch (left in place for 18 hours). Postoperative comfort was evaluated by use of the short form of the Glasgow Composite Measures Pain Scale and serum cortisol concentrations measured prior to premedication and 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 18 hours after surgery. RESULTS No significant difference in pain scores or serum cortisol concentrations was identified between dogs that received the TLP and dogs that received a placebo patch after ovariohysterectomy. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE The TLP provided no additional analgesic benefit to dogs treated concurrently with recommended doses of morphine and carprofen following ovariohysterectomy. Additional studies are needed to investigate whether similar results might be achieved in dogs treated concurrently with other analgesics. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2017;250:1140-1147).

  9. Feasibility of international data collection and feedback on post-operative pain data: proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaslansky, R; Chapman, C R; Rothaug, J; Bäckström, R; Brill, S; Davidson, E; Elessi, K; Fletcher, D; Fodor, L; Karanja, E; Konrad, C; Kopf, A; Leykin, Y; Lipman, A; Puig, M; Rawal, N; Schug, S; Ullrich, K; Volk, T; Meissner, W

    2012-03-01

    Post-operative pain exacts a high toll from patients, families, healthcare professionals and healthcare systems worldwide. PAIN-OUT is a research project funded by the European Union's 7th Framework Program designed to develop effective, evidence-based approaches to improve pain management after surgery, including creating a registry for feedback, benchmarking and decision support. In preparation for PAIN-OUT, we conducted a pilot study to evaluate the feasibility of international data collection with feedback to participating sites. Adult orthopaedic or general surgery patients consented to participate between May and October 2008 at 14 collaborating hospitals in 13 countries. Project staff collected patient-reported outcomes and process data from 688 patients and entered the data into an online database. Project staff in 10 institutions met the enrolment criteria of collecting data from at least 50 patients. The completeness and quality of the data, as assessed by rate of missing data, were acceptable; only 2% of process data and 0.06% of patient-reported outcome data were missing. Participating institutions received access to select items as Web-based feedback comparing their outcomes to those of the other sites, presented anonymously. We achieved proof of concept because staff and patients in all 14 sites cooperated well despite marked differences in cultures, nationalities and languages, and a central database management team was able to provide valuable feedback to all. © 2011 European Federation of International Association for the Study of Pain Chapters.

  10. Agreement between veterinary students and anesthesiologists regarding postoperative pain assessment in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barletta, Michele; Young, Courtni N; Quandt, Jane E; Hofmeister, Erik H

    2016-01-01

    To determine the levels of agreement among first- and second-year veterinary students and experienced anesthesiologists in assessing postoperative pain in dogs from video-recordings. Cross-sectional study. Twenty-seven veterinary students, five anesthesiologists and 13 canine clinical patients. Prior to their enrolment in a core anesthesia course, veterinary students volunteered to watch 13 90 second videos of dogs. Dogs were hospitalized in an intensive care unit after a variety of surgical procedures. Students were asked to score the level of the dogs' pain using the Dynamic Interactive Visual Analog Scale and the Short Form of the Glasgow Composite-Measure Pain Scale. The same videotapes were scored by five board-certified anesthesiologists. The differences and agreement between the ratings of anesthesiologists and students, and first- and second-year students were determined with Mann-Whitney U-tests and Fleiss' or Cohen's kappa, respectively. Pain scores assigned by students and anesthesiologists differed significantly (p Veterinary students early in their training assigned pain scores to dogs that differed from scores assigned by experienced anesthesiologists. © 2015 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia.

  11. The Efficacy of Acupuncture in Post-Operative Pain Management: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Shun Wu

    Full Text Available Postoperative pain resulting from surgical trauma is a significant challenge for healthcare providers. Opioid analgesics are commonly used to treat postoperative pain; however, these drugs are associated with a number of undesirable side effects.This systematic review and meta-analysis evaluated the effectiveness of acupuncture and acupuncture-related techniques in treating postoperative pain.MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, and EMBASE databases were searched until Sep 30, 2014.Randomized controlled trials of adult subjects (≥ 18 years who had undergone surgery and who had received acupuncture, electroacupuncture, or acupoint electrical stimulation for managing acute post-operative pain were included.We found that patients treated with acupuncture or related techniques had less pain and used less opioid analgesics on Day 1 after surgery compared with those treated with control (P < 0.001. Sensitivity analysis using the leave-one-out approach indicated the findings are reliable and are not dependent on any one study. In addition, no publication bias was detected. Subgroup analysis indicated that conventional acupuncture and transcutaneous electric acupoint stimulation (TEAS were associated with less postoperative pain one day following surgery than control treatment, while electroacupuncture was similar to control (P = 0.116. TEAS was associated with significantly greater reduction in opioid analgesic use on Day 1 post surgery than control (P < 0.001; however conventional acupuncture and electroacupuncture showed no benefit in reducing opioid analgesic use compared with control (P ≥ 0.142.Our findings indicate that certain modes of acupuncture improved postoperative pain on the first day after surgery and reduced opioid use. Our findings support the use of acupuncture as adjuvant therapy in treating postoperative pain.

  12. The analgesic effect of Magnesium Sulfate in postoperative pain of inguinal hernia repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehraein A

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Magnesium Sulfate (MgSO4 has been used as a pharmacologic agent in different situations for many years in the treatment of tachyarrhythmias, myocardial ischemia, preeclampsia, and tocolysis among others. The analgesic effect of MgSO4 for postoperative pain has been used since the 1990s. Postoperative pain is one of the most common complications in the perioperative period and can result in serious consequences in different organs if left untreated. Inguinal herniorrhaphy is among the most common surgeries and is almost always accompanied by severe pain. The object of this study is to determine the effect of a pre-induction infusion of MgSO4 on the reduction of postsurgical pain after herniorrhaphy. Methods: This double-blind, randomized clinical trial included 105 ASA class I and class II herniorrhaphy patients at Shariati Hospital in years 2004 and 2005. For statistical analysis, the 2 and T tests were used. The patients were divided into three groups based on block randomization. Patients in the following groups received: Group A, 200 ml of normal saline infusion (placebo; Group B, 25 mg/kg MgSO4 in 200 ml of normal saline; Group C, 50 mg/kg MgSO4 in 200 ml of normal saline. All groups were infused twenty minutes before induction of anesthesia using identical methods and dosage in all three groups. Heart rate and mean arterial pressure (MAP at pre- and postintubation and so at skin incision time were charted. Visual analog scale (VAS pain score, nausea, vomiting and the amount of morphine used before recovery room discharge and in six, twelve and twenty-four hours after recovery discharge was recorded. Results: The average age for the different groups was as follows: Group A: 33.6, Group B: 37.37, Group C: 32.74. Nausea and vomiting between the case and control groups were not statistically different (60% vs. 71.4%, p=0.0499, nor was the amount of Morphine used. On recovery room discharge, the VAS scores were 8.1, 7.2, and 5

  13. The Efficacy of Ilioinguinal and Iliohypogastric Nerve Block for Postoperative Pain After Caesarean Section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melike Sakallı

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background:: The effect of ilioinguinal and iliohypogastric (II-IH nerve block on postoperative pain is well documented when applied before Caesarean section but the efficacy remains unclear when applied after the surgical procedure. Therefore we investigated the effect of II-IH nerve block on postoperative pain and analgesic consumption in patients when applied after Caesarean Section. Methods: Sixty ASA I-II patients, scheduled for elective C/S were included in the study. After general anaesthesia was performed, the patients were allocated into 2 groups randomly. In Group I (n=30, bilateral II-IH block had been applied after the skin closure, with 10 ml of 0.5% ropivacaine on each side. In Group II (n=30 sham block had been applied. For postoperative analgesia all patients received tramadol via i.v patient controlled analgesia. VAS scores, tramadol consumption and side effects at 0th, 2nd, 4th, 6th, 8th, 12th, 16th, 20th, 24th hours were noted. Results: There was no difference between groups regarding demographical data. The mean VAS scores in Group I were significantly lower than in Group II at 6th (p=0.003, 8th (p=0.019, 12th (p=0.024, 24th hours (p=0.004 at rest and at 6th (p=0.022, 8th hours (p=0.047 with movement. Tramadol usage in Group I was significantly less than in Group II at all estimated time intervals (P=0.001. Total tramadol consumption was 331 ± 82 mg in Group I and 622±107 mg in group II (P=0.001. Conclusions: We observed that II-IH nerve block when applied after the surgery may reduce analgesic consumption after C/S. Key Words: Caesarean section, postoperative analgesia, Ilioinguinal and Iliohypogastric (II-IH nerve block.

  14. Perceptions about traditional and novel methods to learn about postoperative pain management: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingadottir, Brynja; Blondal, Katrin; Jaarsma, Tiny; Thylen, Ingela

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the perceptions of surgical patients about traditional and novel methods to learn about postoperative pain management. Patient education is an important part of postoperative care. Contemporary technology offers new ways for patients to learn about self-care, although face-to-face discussions and brochures are the most common methods of delivering education in nursing practice. A qualitative design with a vignette and semi-structured interviews used for data collection. A purposeful sample of 13 postsurgical patients, who had been discharged from hospital, was recruited during 2013-2014. The patients were given a vignette about anticipated hospital discharge after surgery with four different options for communication (face-to-face, brochure, website, serious game) to learn about postoperative pain management. They were asked to rank their preferred method of learning and thereafter to reflect on their choices. Data were analysed using an inductive content analysis approach. Patients preferred face-to-face education with a nurse, followed by brochures and websites, while games were least preferred. Two categories, each with two sub-categories, emerged from the data. These conceptualized the factors affecting patients' perceptions: (1) 'Trusting the source', sub-categorized into 'Being familiar with the method' and 'Having own prejudgments'; and (2) 'Being motivated to learn' sub-categorized into 'Managing an impaired cognition' and 'Aspiring for increased knowledge'. To implement successfully novel educational methods into postoperative care, healthcare professionals need to be aware of the factors influencing patients' perceptions about how to learn, such as trust and motivation. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Effects of Addition of Preoperative Intravenous Ibuprofen to Pregabalin on Postoperative Pain in Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüseyin Ulaş Pınar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Ibuprofen and pregabalin both have independent positive effects on postoperative pain. The aim of the study is researching effect of 800 mg i.v. ibuprofen in addition to preoperative single dose pregabalin on postoperative analgesia and morphine consumption in posterior lumbar interbody fusion surgery. Materials and Methods. 42 adult ASA I-II physical status patients received 150 mg oral pregabalin 1 hour before surgery. Patients received either 250 ml saline with 800 mg i.v. ibuprofen or saline without ibuprofen 30 minutes prior to the surgery. Postoperative analgesia was obtained by morphine patient controlled analgesia (PCA and 1 g i.v. paracetamol every six hours. PCA morphine consumption was recorded and postoperative pain was evaluated by Visual Analog Scale (VAS in postoperative recovery room, at the 1st, 2nd, 4th, 8th, 12th, 24th, 36th, and 48th hours. Results. Postoperative pain was significantly lower in ibuprofen group in recovery room, at the 1st, 2nd, 36th, and 48th hours. Total morphine consumption was lower in ibuprofen group at the 2nd, 4th, 8th, 12th, and 48th hours. Conclusions. Multimodal analgesia with preoperative ibuprofen added to preoperative pregabalin safely decreases postoperative pain and total morphine consumption in patients having posterior lumbar interbody fusion surgery, without increasing incidences of bleeding or other side effects.

  16. Clinical study on lorazepam for treating postoperative pain of wound after spinal meningioma surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-peng WANG

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective To estimate the effect of lorazepam in relieving postoperative wound pain and anxiety after spinal meningioma surgery. Methods A total of 106 patients underwent spinal meningioma resection with endotracheal general anesthesia. They were randomly divided into lorazepam group (N = 53 and control group (N = 53. Patients in lorazepam group were given lorazepam 0.50 mg one night before surgery and 6 h after surgery, while control group were given compound vitamin B at the same time. Operation time, intraoperative bleeding and wound healing after surgery were recorded. McCormick grade and Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS were used to evaluate the spinal function and anxiety. At 48 h after surgery, Visual Analogue Scale (VAS was used to evaluate the degree of postoperative pain. Results All patients underwent tumor total resection, and spent the perioperative period safely. No complications such as infection happened. Neurological function were relieved to varying degrees and there was no worsening case. Compared with control group, SAS score in lorazepam group was significantly decreased at 48 h after surgery (P = 0.000. Compared with before surgery, SAS score in lorazepam group was significantly decreased at 48 h after surgery (P = 0.000. The VAS score at 48 h after surgery in lorazepam group was significantly lower than control group [(5.40 ± 1.24 score vs. (7.15 ± 1.12 score; t = 7.593, P = 0.000]. Conclusions Lorazepam as an antianxiety agent can effectively relieve postoperative pain after spinal meningioma resection. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2017.12.011

  17. Independent risk factors for postoperative pain in need of intervention early after awakening from general anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Wei; Seeling, Matthes; Franck, Martin; Radtke, Finn; Brantner, Benedikt; Wernecke, Klaus-Dieter; Spies, Claudia

    2010-02-01

    Despite advances in postoperative pain management, the proportion of patients with moderate to severe postoperative pain is still ranging 20-80%. In this retrospective study, we investigated 1736 patients to determine the incidence of postoperative pain in need of intervention (PPINI)defined as numeric rating scale >4 at rest in the post anaesthesia care unit early after awakening from general anaesthesia, and to identify possible risk factors. The proportion of patients with PPINI was 28.5%. On multivariate analysis, younger age (OR=1.300 [1.007-1.678], p=0.044), female gender (OR=1.494 [1.138-1.962], p=0.004), obesity (OR=1.683 [1.226-2.310], p=0.001), use of nitrous oxide (OR=1.621 [1.110-2.366], p=0.012), longer duration of surgery (OR=1.165 [1.050-1.292], p=0.004), location of surgery (musculoskeletal OR=2.026 [1.326-3.095], p=0.001; intraabdominal OR=1.869 [1.148-3.043], p=0.012), and ASA-PS I-II (OR=1.519 [1.131-2.039], P=0.005) were identified as independent risk factors for PPINI. Patients with PPINI experienced significantly more PONV (10.3% vs. 6.2%, p=0.003), more psychomotor agitation (5.5% vs. 2.7%, p=0.004), needed more application of opioid in PACU (62.8% vs. 24.2%, p<0.001), stayed significantly longer in PACU (89.6min [70-120] vs. 80min [60-100], p<0.001), had a longer median length of hospital stay (6.6 days [4.0-8.8] vs. 6.0 days [3.2-7.8

  18. Neuronal plasticity and pre-emptive analgesia: implications for the management of postoperative pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, J B

    1994-01-01

    and furthermore, clinicians may ask if preoperative administration of morphine or other opioids is really a "novel approach" (Katz 1993) to the management of postoperative pain. Thus, administration of opioids for premedication, and during induction and maintenance of general anaesthesia has been common clinical......Prevention of injury-induced functional alterations in the central nervous system by pre-emptive analgesia or other techniques is a fascinating working hypothesis based on substantial scientific evidence. Although experimental data may provide a rationale for this concept, translation into clinical...

  19. A comparison of the postoperative pain experience in children with and without attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosander, Sondra; Nause-Osthoff, Rebecca; Voepel-Lewis, Terri; Tait, Alan R

    2015-10-01

    Children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may experience pain differently compared to other children, yet the evidence is equivocal regarding whether pain is heightened or dampened. This prospective observational study, therefore, was designed to compare the postoperative pain experiences in children with and without ADHD. Children aged 7-17 years with a diagnosis of ADHD (n = 119) who were scheduled for a surgical procedure requiring postoperative pain management and a matched cohort of children without ADHD were recruited (n = 122). Postoperative pain scores and analgesic use were recorded for 1 week, as was parents' estimate of their child's return to normal activity. There were no differences in highest pain scores between children with ADHD (3.3 ± 2.5, 0-10 numerical rating scale) and those without (2.8 ± 1.9). Postoperative opioid use was also similar on day 1 following surgery (0.12 ± 0.3 mg·kg(-1) vs 0.08 mg·kg(-1 ) ± 0.1 morphine equivalents, respectively). Children with ADHD, however, had a significantly longer return to normal activity (4.9 ± 3.8 vs 3.8 ± 3.0 days; P children with and without ADHD. However, the observation that children with ADHD took longer to return to baseline activity will be important in educating parents regarding their child's postoperative experience. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Ketamine as an Adjunct to Postoperative Pain Management in Opioid Tolerant Patients After Spinal Fusions: A Prospective Randomized Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Urban, Michael K.; Ya Deau, Jacques T.; Wukovits, Barbara; Lipnitsky, Jane Y.

    2007-01-01

    Management of acute postoperative pain is challenging, particularly in patients with preexisting narcotic dependency. Ketamine has been used at subanesthetic doses as a N-methyl d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist to block the processing of nociceptive input in chronic pain syndromes. This prospective randomized study was designed to assess the use of ketamine as an adjunct to acute pain management in narcotic tolerant patients after spinal fusions. Twenty-six patients for 1–2 level poster...

  1. Comparison of epidural butorphanol versus epidural morphine in postoperative pain relief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Geeta P; Veena, Shah R; Vora, Kalpana; Parikh, Beena; Joshi, Anish

    2014-02-01

    Epidural route is preferable for postoperative pain relief in thoraco-abdominal and lower limb surgeries. We aimed to compare epidural butorphanol versus morphine for postoperative analgesia up to 24 hours in open nephrectomy surgery. 80 ASA physical status I and II adult patients were selected for this randomized double blind prospective study. A standard balanced general anesthesia technique was applied for all patients. Epidural catheter was placed in lower thoracic inter-vertebral space before the start of surgery. Injection butorphanol 0.04 mg/kg in group B (n = 40) or morphine 0.06 mg/kg in group M (n = 40) was given in a double blind manner after completion of surgery and before extubation through the epidural catheter. Patients were observed for pain relief by Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for the next 24 hours. Dose was repeated when VAS was > 4. The onset and peak effect of pain relief, duration of analgesia of 1st dose, frequency of drug administration and side effects if any were observed. The average onset of analgesia was 26.5 +/- 7.61 minutes with butorphanol and 62.5 +/- 13.4 minutes with morphine group which was statistically significant (p < 0.05). The mean peak effect of pain relief following 1st dose was 173 +/- 51.25 minutes with butorphanol and 251 +/- 52.32 minutes with morphine group. The duration of pain relief after 1st dose was statistically significant and was 339.13 +/- 79.57 minutes in group B and 709.75 +/- 72.12 minutes in group M which was gradually increased on repeated dosing in group B while it was almost same in Group M. Number of doses required in 24 hours was significantly higher (p < 0.05) in butorphanol group than morphine group. Somnolence was the main side effect in group B while pruritus was the main side effect with group M. Epidural butorphanol appears to provide safer and faster postoperative analgesia without much untoward effects but its analgesic action is short so more repeated doses are required than morphine via

  2. Liposomal bupivacaine peripheral nerve block for the management of postoperative pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Thomas W; Athanassoglou, Vassilis; Trivella, Marialena; Strickland, Louise H; Mellon, Stephen; Murray, David; Pandit, Hemant G

    2016-08-25

    Postoperative pain remains a significant issue with poor perioperative pain management associated with an increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Liposomal bupivacaine is an analgesic consisting of bupivacaine hydrochloride encapsulated within multiple, non-concentric lipid bi-layers offering a novel method of sustained release. To assess the analgesic efficacy and adverse effects of liposomal bupivacaine infiltration peripheral nerve block for the management of postoperative pain. We identified randomised trials of liposomal bupivacaine peripheral nerve block for the management of postoperative pain. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2016, Issue 1), Ovid MEDLINE (1946 to January Week 1 2016), Ovid MEDLINE In-Process (14 January 2016), EMBASE (1974 to 13 January 2016), ISI Web of Science (1945 to 14 January 2016), and reference lists of retrieved articles. We sought unpublished studies from Internet sources, and searched clinical trials databases for ongoing trials. The date of the most recent search was 15 January 2016. Randomised, double-blind, placebo- or active-controlled clinical trials of a single dose of liposomal bupivacaine administered as a peripheral nerve block in adults aged 18 years or over undergoing elective surgery at any surgical site. We included trials if they had at least two comparison groups for liposomal bupivacaine peripheral nerve block compared with placebo or other types of analgesia. Two review authors independently considered trials for inclusion in the review, assessed risk of bias, and extracted data. We performed analyses using standard statistical techniques as described in the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions, using Review Manager 5. We planned to perform a meta-analysis, however there were insufficient data to ensure a clinically meaningful answer; as such we have produced a 'Summary of findings' table in a narrative format, and where possible we assessed the

  3. The Edible Brown Seaweed Ecklonia cava Reduces Hypersensitivity in Postoperative and Neuropathic Pain Models in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Goo Kim

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The current study was designed to investigate whether edible brown seaweed Ecklonia cava extracts exhibits analgesic effects in plantar incision and spared nerve injury (SNI rats. To evaluate pain-related behavior, we performed the mechanical withdrawal threshold (MWT and thermal hypersensitivity tests measured by von Frey filaments and a hot/cold plate analgesia meter. Pain-related behavior was also determined through analysis of ultrasonic vocalization. The results of experiments showed MWT values of the group that was treated with E. cava extracts by 300 mg/kg significantly increased; on the contrary, number of ultrasonic distress vocalization of the treated group was reduced at 6 h and 24 h after plantar incision operation (62.8%, p < 0.05. Moreover, E. cava 300 mg/kg treated group increased the paw withdrawal latency in hot-and cold-plate tests in the plantar incision rats. After 15 days of continuous treatment with E. cava extracts at 300 mg/kg, the treated group showed significantly alleviated SNI-induced hypersensitivity response by MWT compared with the control group. In conclusion, these results suggest that E. cava extracts have potential analgesic effects in the case of postoperative pain and neuropathic pain in rats.

  4. Effect of local infiltration analgesia on post-operative pain following TVT-O: a double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tommaselli, Giovanni A; Di Carlo, Costantino; Formisano, Carmen; Fabozzi, Annamaria; Nappi, Carmine

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of a protocol of local anesthesia and epinephrine associated with sedo-analgesia on post-TVT-O pain in comparison with infiltration of saline and epinephrine. Forty-two patients undergoing TVT-O were randomized into two groups to receive periurethral infiltration with epinephrine only (group A, n = 21) or with epinephrine plus 1 % lidocaine hydrochloride (group B, n = 21). Post-operative pain was assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS) from 0 (absence of pain) to 10 (maximum pain possible), 1, 6, 12 and 24 h after the procedure. The total amount of analgesia was recorded and the proportion of women reporting a pain VAS score ≥4, 1 h after the procedure was calculated. ANOVA for repeated measures and Bonferroni correction, the Student's t test for independent samples, the Mann-Whitney U test, the Fisher exact test, or the χ (2) test for parametric was used. Pain level was significantly lower in group B 1 (p = 0.01) and 6 h (p = 0.05) after surgery, but not 12 and 24 h after the procedure. No significant difference was observed in the proportion of women requesting analgesia and in the total dosage of analgesics between the two groups. A significant higher proportion of women in group A reported a pain VAS score higher than four 1 h after surgery in comparison with patients in group B. This randomized study seems to indicate that systematic infiltration before TVT-O positioning with local anesthetic may reduce immediate post-operative pain.

  5. The associations between severity of early postoperative pain, chronic postsurgical pain and plasma concentration of stable nitric oxide products after breast surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Iohom, Gabriella

    2012-02-03

    In this study, we compared the effects of two analgesic regimens on perioperative nitric oxide index (NOx) and the likelihood of subsequent development of chronic postsurgical pain (CPSP) after breast surgery and sought to determine the association among early postoperative pain, NOx, and the likelihood of subsequent development of CPSP. Twenty-nine consecutive ASA I or II patients undergoing breast surgery with axillary clearance were randomly allocated to one of two groups. Patients in group S (n = 15) received a standard intraoperative and postoperative analgesic regimen (morphine sulfate, diclofenac, dextropropoxyphene hydrochloride + acetaminophen prn). Patients in group N (n = 14) received a continuous paravertebral block (for 48 h) and acetaminophen and parecoxib (followed by celecoxib up to 5 days). Visual analog scale pain scores at rest and on arm movement were recorded regularly until the fifth postoperative day. A telephone interview was conducted 10 wk postoperatively. The McGill Pain Questionnaire was used to characterize pain. NOx was estimated preoperatively, at the end of surgery, 30 min and 2, 4, 12, 24, 48 h postoperatively. Twelve (80%) patients in group S and no patient in group N developed CPSP (P = 0.009). Compared with patients with a pain rating index > or =1 (n = 18) 10 wk postoperatively, patients with a pain rating index = 0 (n = 11) had lesser visual analog scale pain scores on movement at each postoperative time point from 30 min until 96 h postoperatively (P < 0.005) and at rest 30 min (0.6 +\\/- 1.5 versus 30.2 +\\/- 26.8; P = 0.004), 4 h (2.3 +\\/- 7.5 versus 19.0 +\\/- 25.8; P = 0.013), 8 h (4.4 +\\/- 10.2 versus 21.4 +\\/- 27.0; P = 0.03) and 12 h (0.7 +\\/- 1.2 versus 15.4 +\\/- 27.0; P = 0.035) postoperatively. NOx values were greater in group N compared with group S 48 h postoperatively (40.6 +\\/- 20.1 versus 26.4 +\\/- 13.5; P = 0.04).

  6. Treatment of post-operative pain in old oncology patients with intravenous application of 50% glucose solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Nikola Č.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative pain is the most important factor od so called "tumor promotive effect of surgery" ie. of endocrine-metabolic changes having the consequence drop in immune, antiinfective and antitumor defense. Due to presence of organic involutive changes, old people (≥ 65 years, often have serious side effects during application of usual analgetics. Since hypertonic glucose (33% given i.v. or per os, works analgesically in small children there is assumption that it can be used in treatment of postoperative pain in old oncology patients. We tested the hypothesis that postoperative pain in old oncology patients can be treated with i.v. application of 50% of glucose solution. 37 oncology patients over 65 years, 26 females and 11 males, operated for breast cancer and soft tissue cancer, werw investigated. Average age of the patients was 72±4 years. 50% Glucose solution was given in two boluses of 20 ml each: the first bolus was given to all patients at the end of anesthesia and the other bolus was given individually after appearance of post-operative pain. Pain intensity (in coefficients of the visual analogue scale VAK = 1-100 and its characteristics were tested by oral testing of operated patients: after weaking from anesthesia, after the first appearance of the pain and 15 minutes after giving of the second glucose bolus. None patient had pain weaking from anesthesia. All tested patients experienced pain during the first 70 minutes and it could be categorized as very strong pain (=82 VAK. The pain was decreased with another glucose bolus by approximately (=56% VAK so it was classifies in category of bearable pains (=36 VAK. In 9 patients (24,3% the pain had neuropatic component (filing of "burning" which could not be eliminated by hypertonic glucose but only with application of tramadol. Activation of the central cholinergic transmission is the most significant mechanism of analgesic glucose effect, but, probably there is another one

  7. Assessment of postoperative pain after reciprocating or rotary NiTi instrumentation of root canals: a randomized, controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relvas, João Bosko Formigas; Bastos, Mariana Mena Barreto; Marques, André Augusto Franco; Garrido, Angela Delfina Bitencourt; Sponchiado, Emílio Carlos

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess postoperative pain in a prospective randomized clinical trial comparing two groups, using the Reciproc® system in one group and the ProTaper® rotary system in the other. The study included 78 male patients, aged 18-64 years (mean age of 26 years), with asymptomatic pulp necrosis in mandibular molar teeth (n = 78). The single-session endodontic treatment was performed by a single operator specialized in Endodontics. Mechanical preparation of the root canals was performed using the ProTaper® and Reciproc® instrumentation techniques. Postoperative pain was recorded using a verbal rating scale (VRS) and verbal description with well-defined categories at the three following time intervals: 24 h, 72 h, and 7 days after the endodontic procedure. The assessment of postoperative pain was recorded as no pain, mild pain, moderate pain, and severe pain or flare-up. Data were analyzed using the nonparametric Mann-Whitney test with the aid of the STATA® software. The incidence of postoperative pain in the ProTaper group (PT) 24 h after the endodontic procedure was 17.9 and 5.1 % after 72 h. In the Reciproc group (RP), the incidence after 24 h was 15.3 and 2.5 % after 72 h. No patients presented severe pain at the time intervals assessed. No significant difference (p > 0.05) in postoperative pain was found between the ProTaper® and Reciproc® instrumentation technique during endodontic treatment in this study. According to our findings and the results of the clinical trial, the occurrence of postoperative pain was low and similar between the reciprocating and rotary techniques during the time intervals assessed. These results are different from basic laboratory studies that affirm that the reciprocating techniques tend to promote more postoperative pain since extrusion of debris is greater.

  8. Liposomal bupivacaine infiltration at the surgical site for the management of postoperative pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Thomas W; Athanassoglou, Vassilis; Mellon, Stephen; Strickland, Louise H; Trivella, Marialena; Murray, David; Pandit, Hemant G

    2017-02-01

    Despite multi-modal analgesic techniques, acute postoperative pain remains an unmet health need, with up to three quarters of people undergoing surgery reporting significant pain. Liposomal bupivacaine is an analgesic consisting of bupivacaine hydrochloride encapsulated within multiple, non-concentric lipid bi-layers offering a novel method of sustained-release analgesia. To assess the analgesic efficacy and adverse effects of liposomal bupivacaine infiltration at the surgical site for the management of postoperative pain. On 13 January 2016 we searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-Process, Embase, ISI Web of Science and reference lists of retrieved articles. We obtained clinical trial reports and synopses of published and unpublished studies from Internet sources, and searched clinical trials databases for ongoing trials. Randomised, double-blind, placebo- or active-controlled clinical trials in people aged 18 years or over undergoing elective surgery, at any surgical site, were included if they compared liposomal bupivacaine infiltration at the surgical site with placebo or other type of analgesia. Two review authors independently considered trials for inclusion, assessed risk of bias, and extracted data. We performed data analysis using standard statistical techniques as described in the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions, using Review Manager 5.3. We planned to perform a meta-analysis and produce a 'Summary of findings' table for each comparison however there were insufficient data to ensure a clinically meaningful answer. As such we have produced two 'Summary of findings' tables in a narrative format. Where possible we assessed the quality of evidence using GRADE. We identified nine studies (10 reports, 1377 participants) that met inclusion criteria. Four Phase II dose-escalating/de-escalating trials, designed to evaluate and demonstrate efficacy and safety, presented pooled data that we could not use. Of the remaining five parallel

  9. A comparison of the effect of intramuscular diclofenac, ketorolac or piroxicam on postoperative pain following laparoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hanlon, J. J.; Beers, H.; Huss, B. K.; Milligan, K. R.

    1996-01-01

    Sixty patients presenting for in-patient gynaecological laparoscopic surgery were randomly allocated to receive either diclofenac 75 mg (n = 20), ketorolac 30 mg (n = 20) or piroxicam 20 mg (n = 20) as an intra-muscular injection immediately after induction of anaesthesia. Postoperative visual analogue scores over the first 24 hours, using a 10 cm scale, ranged from 3.2-0.5 in the diclofenac group, 2.7-0.85 in the ketorolac group and 2.8-0.5 in the piroxicam group. The scores did not differ significantly between the three groups (p > 0.05). Mean time (SD) to first analgesia was 27(94) minutes in the piroxicam group, 16 (30) minutes in the diclofenac group and 62 (120) minutes in the piroxicam group. Six out of twenty patients in the diclofenac group required further analgesia compared to nine out of twenty in the other two drug groups. This difference was not significant. There were no reports of increased bleeding, bronchoconstriction, bleeding from the upper gastrointestinal tract, renal impairment or pain from the intra-muscular injection site in any of the groups. The administration of a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug to patients presenting for laparoscopic surgery reduces postoperative pain. There were no obvious differences between the agents used. PMID:8686101

  10. Comparison of Postoperative Pain Relief by Intercostal Block Between Pre-rib Harvest and Post-rib Harvest Groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bashir, M. M.; Shahzad, M. A.; Yousaf, M. N.; Khan, B. A.; Khan, F. A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To compare intercostal nerve block before and after rib harvest in terms of mean postoperative pain score and mean postoperative tramadol usage. Study Design: Randomized controlled trial. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Plastic Surgery, Mayo Hospital, KEMU, Lahore, from January 2011 to July 2012. Methodology: Patients (n = 120) of either gender with ASA class-I and II requiring autogenous costal cartilage graft were inducted. Patients having history of local anaesthetic hypersensitivity and age 60 years were excluded. Subjects were randomly assigned to pre-rib harvest (group-1) and post-rib harvest (group-2). Local anaesthetic mixture was prepared by adding 10 milliliters 2% lidocaine to 10 milliliters 0.5% bupivacaine to obtain a total 20 ml solution. Group-1 received local anaesthetic infiltration along the proposed incision lines and intercostals block before the rib harvest. Group-2 received the infiltration and block after rib harvest. Postoperative consumption of tramadol and pain scores were measured at 6 and 12 hours postoperatively using VAS. Results: Mean age was 31.43 A +- 10.78 years. The mean pain scores at 6 hours postoperatively were 1.033 A +- 0.609 and 2.4667 A +- 0.812 in pre-rib harvest and post-rib harvest groups respectively (p < 0.0001). The mean pain scores at 12 hours postoperatively were 1.45 A +- 0.565 and 3.65 A +- 0.633 in pre-rib harvest and post-rib harvest groups respectively (p < 0.0001). The mean tramadol used postoperatively in first 24 hours was 169 A +- 29.24 mg and 255 A +- 17.70 mg in prerib harvest and post-rib harvest groups respectively (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: Intercostal block administered before rib harvest as preemptive strategy result in decreased postoperative pain scores and narcotic use. (author)

  11. Liposomal Bupivacaine Use in Transversus Abdominis Plane Blocks Reduces Pain and Postoperative Intravenous Opioid Requirement After Colorectal Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, Audrey L; Adhikary, Sanjib D; Quintili, Ashley; Puleo, Frances J; Choi, Christine S; Hollenbeak, Christopher S; Messaris, Evangelos

    2017-02-01

    Enhanced recovery protocols frequently use multimodal postoperative analgesia to improve postoperative outcomes in patients undergoing colorectal surgery. The purpose of this study was to evaluate liposomal bupivacaine use in transversus abdominis plane blocks on postoperative pain scores and opioid use after colorectal surgery. This was a retrospective cohort study comparing outcomes between patients receiving nonliposomal anesthetic (n = 104) and liposomal bupivacaine (n = 303) blocks. The study was conducted at a single tertiary care center. Patients included those identified within an institutional database as inpatients undergoing colorectal procedures between 2013 and 2015 who underwent transversus abdominis plane block for perioperative analgesia. The study measured postoperative pain scores and opioid requirements. Patients receiving liposomal bupivacaine had significantly lower pain scores for the first 24 to 36 postoperative hours. Pain scores were similar after 36 hours. The use of intravenous opioids among the liposomal bupivacaine group decreased by more than one third during the hospitalization (99.1 vs 64.5 mg; p = 0.040). The use of ketorolac was also decreased (49.0 vs 18.3 mg; p bupivacaine group but did not achieve statistical significance. The study was limited by its retrospective, single-center design and heterogeneity of block administration. Attenuated pain scores observed with liposomal bupivacaine use were associated with significantly lower intravenous opioid and ketorolac use, suggesting that liposomal bupivacaine-containing transversus abdominis plane blocks are well aligned with the opioid-reducing goals of many enhanced recovery protocols.

  12. A Multimodal Approach to Post-Operative Pain Relief in Children Undergoing Ambulatory Eye Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V V Jaichandran

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried to assess the efficacy of multimodal analgesia using ketorolac and fentanyl, for post-operative pain relief in children undergoing ambulatory eye surgery. Total of 161 children, aged 1 to 5 years, were randomly stratified to three different analgesic regimens: Group A Ketorolac 0.75 mg.kg -1 I.M. , Group B Fentanyl 0.75 µg.kg -1 I.V. and Group C Ketorolac 0.50mg.kg -1 I.M. and Fentanyl 0.50µg.kg -1 I.V. Ketorolac I.M. was given 45 minutes before extubation and fentanyl I.V. was given soon after extubation in the respective groups. Post-operative pain was assessed in a double blinded manner using Children′s Hospital of Eastern Onatario Pain Scale (CHEOPS scoring system and by recording the heart rate at 10, 30 and 60 minutes. If the score was above 8, the child was left with the parents. In case the score did not improve and persisted to be greater than 8, fentanyl 0.50µg.kg -1 I.V. was given as the rescue analgesia. The incidence of nausea, vomiting, sleep disturbances or any other complaints were recorded by a staff nurse 24 hours post operatively. Mean CHEOPS score at 10, 30 and 60 minutes and mean heart rate at 10 and 30 minutes were significantly higher for Group A compared with Group C. Mean pain score emerged significantly higher for Group B compared with Group C at 30 and 60 minutes, (P< 0.01. Rescue analgesia required was significantly higher in Group A compared to Groups B and C, (P< 0.0001. Post-operatively, significant incidence of drowsiness was reported in children in Group B compared to Groups A and C, (P< 0.01. A multimodal approach using both ketorolac and fentanyl at low doses produce effective and safe analgesia in children undergoing ambula-tory eye surgery.

  13. Possible effects of mobilisation on acute post-operative pain and nociceptive function after total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunn, T H; Kristensen, B B; Gaarn-Larsen, L

    2012-01-01

    anaesthesia and analgesia underwent an exercise (mobilisation) strategy on the first post-operative morning consisting of 25-m walking twice, with a 20-min interval. Pain was assessed at rest and during passive hip and knee flexion before, and 5 and 20 min after walk, as well as during walk. Nociceptive......BACKGROUND: Experimental studies in animals, healthy volunteers, and patients with chronic pain suggest exercise to provide analgesia in several types of pain conditions and after various nociceptive stimuli. To our knowledge, there is no data on the effects of exercise on pain and nociceptive...... function in surgical patients despite early mobilisation being an important factor to enhance recovery. We therefore investigated possible effects of mobilisation on post-operative pain and nociceptive function after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). METHODS: Thirty patients undergoing TKA under standardised...

  14. Auricular Acupressure for Managing Postoperative Pain and Knee Motion in Patients with Total Knee Replacement: A Randomized Sham Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling-hua Chang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Postoperative pain management remains a significant challenge for all healthcare providers. A randomized controlled trial was conducted to examine the adjuvant effects of auricular acupressure on relieving postoperative pain and improving the passive range of motion in patients with total knee replacement (TKR. Method. Sixty-two patients who had undergone a TKR were randomly assigned to the acupressure group and the sham control group. The intervention was delivered three times a day for 3 days. A visual analog scale (VAS and the Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire were used to assess pain intensity. Pain medication consumption was recorded, and the knee motion was measured using a goniometer. Results. The patients experienced a moderately severe level of pain postoperatively (VAS 58.66 ± 20.35 while being on the routine PCA. No differences were found in pain scores between the groups at all points. However, analgesic drug usage in the acupressure group patients was significantly lower than in the sham control group (<0.05, controlling for BMI, age, and pain score. On the 3rd day after surgery, the passive knee motion in the acupressure group patients was significantly better than in the sham control group patients (<0.05, controlling for BMI. Conclusion. The application of auricular acupressure at specific therapeutic points significantly reduces the opioid analgesia requirement and improves the knee motion in patients with TKR.

  15. Comparison of 2% chlorhexidine and 5.25% sodium hypochlorite irrigating solutions on postoperative pain: A randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bashetty Kusum

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To compare the levels of postoperative pain after cleaning and shaping of root canals using two different root canal irrigants for debridement. Materials and Methods: Forty patients with irreversible pulpitis, pulp necrosis and non-vital teeth exhibiting acute apical periodontitis requiring root canal treatment were included. At random, canals were cleaned and shaped with the following protocols. 2% chlorhexidine solution in group I and 5.25% sodium hypochlorite solution in group II were used as an irrigants. Access cavities were closed with a sterile cotton pellet and cavit. The patients recorded degree of pain at various time intervals after cleaning and shaping on a visual analogue scale for 1 week. Results: The mean pain score for group I was between 0.65 and 3.35 and for group II was between 0.95 and 4.50. There was significant difference in the pain level between the two groups only at 6 th hour postoperatively (P<0.05 and the pain was more in sodium hypochlorite group. Conclusions: More pain was present in teeth irrigated using 5.25% sodium hypochlorite when compared to that in teeth irrigated using 2% chlorhexidine solution. Significant difference in pain level was present only at 6th hour postoperatively, and at all other periods (24 th hour, 4 th and 7 th days there was no significant difference in pain level between the two groups.

  16. Activity-based costing analysis of the analgesic treatments used in postoperative pain management in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanelli, Andrea; Ruggeri, Matteo; Basile, Michele; Cicchetti, Americo; Coluzzi, Flaminia; Della Rocca, Giorgio; Di Marco, Pierangelo; Esposito, Clelia; Fanelli, Guido; Grossi, Paolo; Leykin, Yigal; Lorini, Ferdinando Luca; Paolicchi, Adriana; Scardino, Marco; Corcione, Antonio

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this analysis is to evaluate the costs of 72-hour postoperative pain treatment in patients undergoing major abdominal, orthopedic and thoracic procedures in nine different Italian hospitals, defined as the cumulative cost of drugs, consumable materials and time required for anesthesiologists, surgeons and nurses to administer each analgesic technique. Nine Italian hospitals have been involved in this study through the administration of a questionnaire aimed to acquire information about the Italian clinical practice in terms of analgesia. This study uses activity-based costing (ABC) analysis to identify, measure and give value to the resources required to provide the therapeutic treatment used in Italy to manage the postoperative pain patients face after surgery. A deterministic sensitivity analysis (DSA) has been performed to identify the cost determinants mainly affecting the final cost of each treatment analyzed. Costs have been reclassified according to three surgical macro-areas (abdominal, orthopedic and thoracic) with the aim to recognize the cost associated not only to the analgesic technique adopted but also to the type of surgery the patient faced before undergoing the analgesic pathway. Fifteen different analgesic techniques have been identified for the treatment of moderate to severe pain in patients who underwent a major abdominal, orthopedic or thoracic surgery. The cheapest treatment actually employed is the oral administration "around the clock" (€ 8.23), whilst the most expensive is continuous peripheral nerve block (€ 223.46). The intravenous patient-controlled analgesia costs € 277.63. In terms of resources absorbed, the non-continuous administration via bolus is the gold standard in terms of cost-related to the drugs used (€ 1.28), and when administered pro re nata it also absorbs the lowest amount of consumables (€0.58€) compared to all other therapies requiring a delivery device. The oral analgesic administration pro re

  17. Extended release local anesthetic agents in a postoperative arthritic pain model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ickowicz, Diana E; Golovanevski, Ludmila; Haze, Amir; Domb, Abraham J; Weiniger, Carolyn F

    2014-01-01

    Local anesthetics play an important role in postoperative pain management in orthopedic joint procedures. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of an intraoperative extra-articular injection of poly(DL-lactic acid co castor oil 3:7), p(DLLA:CO) 3:7 loaded with 15% bupivacaine, for postoperative analgesia following knee arthroplasty. Prolonged release local anesthetic formulation was synthesized by mixing p(DLLA:CO) 3:7 with bupivacaine base. Under anesthesia, the knee joint of Sprague-Dawley rats was exposed, a hole drilled in the femoral trochlea. 0.2 mL of either 15% polymer-bupivacaine formulation or plain bupivacaine (control) was injected locally and compared with a nonsurgery control group. Mechanical hyperalgesia was determined by counting the vocalizations and leg withdrawal after joint squeezing. Behavioral assessments over a day postoperative period revealed a reduction in rearing and ambulation in an open-field apparatus in animals of both experimental groups compared with the nonsurgery control. The vocalizations during the hyperalgesia test increased compared with the control at 24 h. At 48 h, 3.667 ± 0.5138, p = 0.0076 vocalizations were recorded for the plain bupivacaine group versus 1.417 ± 0.5138, p < 0.0001 in the 15% polymer-bupivacaine formulation. Bupivacaine encapsulated in p(DLLA:CO) 3:7 extended the duration of the analgesia compared with plain drug in rats and could represent effective postoperative analgesic in orthopedic joint procedures. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  18. A prospective comparison of postoperative pain and quality of life in robotic assisted vs conventional laparoscopic gynecologic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zechmeister, Jenna R; Pua, Tarah L; Boyd, Leslie R; Blank, Stephanie V; Curtin, John P; Pothuri, Bhavana

    2015-02-01

    We sought to compare robotic vs laparoscopic surgery in regards to patient reported postoperative pain and quality of life. This was a prospective study of patients who presented for treatment of a new gynecologic disease requiring minimally invasive surgical intervention. All subjects were asked to take the validated Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form at 3 time points to assess pain and its effect on quality of life. Statistical analyses were performed using Pearson x(2) and Student's t test. One hundred eleven were included in the analysis of which 56 patients underwent robotic assisted surgery and 55 patients underwent laparoscopic surgery. There was no difference in postoperative pain between conventional laparoscopy and robotic assisted surgery for gynecologic procedures. There was a statistically significant difference found at the delayed postoperative period when evaluating interference of sleep, favoring laparoscopy (ROB 2.0 vs LSC 1.0; P = .03). There were no differences found between the robotic and laparoscopic groups of patients receiving narcotics (56 vs 53, P = .24, respectively), route of administration of narcotics (47 vs 45, P > .99, respectively), or administration of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory medications (27 vs 21, P = .33, respectively). Our results demonstrate no difference in postoperative pain between conventional laparoscopy and robotic assisted surgery for gynecologic procedures. Furthermore, pain did not appear to interfere consistently with any daily activity of living. Interference of sleep needs to be further evaluated after controlling for bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. PROSPECT: a practical method for formulating evidence-based expert recommendations for the management of postoperative pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugebauer, E A M; Wilkinson, R C; Kehlet, H; Schug, S A

    2007-07-01

    Many patients still suffer severe acute pain in the postoperative period. Although guidelines for treating acute pain are widely published and promoted, most do not consider procedure-specific differences in pain experienced or in techniques that may be most effective and appropriate for different surgical settings. The procedure-specific postoperative pain management (PROSPECT) Working Group provides procedure-specific recommendations for postoperative pain management together with supporting evidence from systematic literature reviews and related procedures at http://www.postoppain.org The methodology for PROSPECT reviews was developed and refined by discussion of the Working Group, and it adapts existing methods for formulation of consensus recommendations to the specific requirements of PROSPECT. To formulate PROSPECT recommendations, we use a methodology that takes into account study quality and source and level of evidence, and we use recognized methods for achieving group consensus, thus reducing potential bias. The new methodology is first applied in full for the 2006 update of the PROSPECT review of postoperative pain management for laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Transparency in PROSPECT processes allows the users to be fully aware of any limitations of the evidence and recommendations, thereby allowing for appropriate decisions in their own practice setting.

  20. Postoperative pain after foraminal enlargement in anterior teeth with necrosis and apical periodontitis: a prospective and randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Emmanuel João Nogueira Leal; Menaged, Karyne; Ajuz, Natasha; Monteiro, Maria Rachel Figueiredo Penalva; Coutinho-Filho, Tauby de Souza

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this randomized, controlled, prospective clinical study was to determine if foraminal enlargement instrumentation during endodontic treatment is associated with more postoperative pain compared with standard nonenlargement instrumentation. Forty volunteers with a single root canal were diagnosed with asymptomatic necrosis with apical periodontitis and randomized into 2 experimental groups (ie, the control group and the foraminal enlargement group). Endodontic treatment was performed in a single visit, and volunteers were instructed to record pain intensity (ie, none, slight, moderate, and severe). Scores from 1 to 4 were attributed to each kind of pain after 12, 24, and 48 hours. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov and Student's t tests were used to determine significant differences at P .05, Student's t test). Postoperative pain showed no statistically significant difference between the groups at any observation period (P > .05). Also, no significant difference was observed in the mean number of analgesic tablets used between the groups (P > .05). The foraminal enlargement and nonenlargement techniques resulted in the same postoperative pain and necessity for analgesic medication. This may suggest that the use of foraminal enlargement should be performed for endodontic treatment previsibility without increasing postoperative pain. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Validation of a Behavioral Ethogram for Assessing Postoperative Pain in Guinea Pigs (Cavia porcellus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, Misha L; David, Emily M; Aline, Marian R; Lofgren, Jennifer L

    2016-01-01

    Although guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus) have been used in research for more than a century and remain the most prevalent USDA-covered species, little has been elucidated regarding the recognition of clinical pain or analgesic efficacy in this species. We sought to assess pain in guinea pigs by using newer, clinically relevant methods that have been validated in other rodent species: the behavioral ethogram and cageside proxy indicator. In this study, 10 male guinea pigs underwent electronic von Frey testing of nociception, remote videorecording of behavior, and cageside assessment by using time-to-consumption (TTC) of a preferred treat test. These assessments were performed across 2 conditions (anesthesia only and castration surgery under anesthesia) at 3 time points (2, 8, and 24 h after the event). The anesthesia only condition served to control for the nonpainful but potentially distressing components of the surgical experience. Compared with those after anesthesia only conditions, subtle body movements were increased and nociceptive thresholds were decreased at 2 and 8 h after surgery. At 24 h, neither subtle body movement behaviors nor nociceptive thresholds differed between the 2 conditions. In contrast, TTC scores did not differ between the anesthesia only and surgery conditions at any time point, underscoring the challenge of identifying pain in this species through cageside evaluation. By comparing ethogram scores with measures of nociception, we validated select behaviors as pain-specific. Therefore, our novel ethogram allowed us to assess postoperative pain and may further serve as a platform for future analgesia efficacy studies in guinea pigs.

  2. Effect of adding celecoxib to a single dose of gabapentin on postoperative pain relief

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansour Choubsaz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In recent years, several studies with conflicting results have been done on the role of gabapentin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in pre-emptive analgesia to control postoperative pain. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of adding low doses of celecoxib to gabapentin on increasing the analgesic effect and patients’ satisfaction. Methods: In this double-blind randomized clinical trial, 130 patients with ASA I, II class were divided in two groups as they were the candidates for elective inguinal hernia surgery with spinal anesthesia. Before the surgery, the control group (G received 300 mg oral dose of gabapentin and the study group (GC received 100 mg celecoxib in addition to the above dose. Severity of patients’ pain was measured using the visual analogue scale (VAS. By the same token, the amount of painkillers usedwas measured and statistically analyzed. Results: The results suggested a statistically significant difference between the two groups in terms of pain level 4, 6 and 24 hours after surgery (P<0.05. Adding low-dose of celeoxib to gabapentin before the surgery and the combination of these two drugs caused further reduction of pain 4, 6 and 24 h after the surgery in comparison to the administration of gabapentin alone. Conclusion: Adding 100 mg celecoxib to 300 mg gabapentin resulted in a reduction of pain level 24 h after elective surgery of inguinal hernia in patients of control group (P<0.05. However, in terms of using painkillers (analgesics, there was no statistically significant difference between the two groups.

  3. Effects of jazz on postoperative pain and stress in patients undergoing elective hysterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafer, Lorenzo; Austin, Flower; Frey, Jessica; Mulvey, Christie; Vaida, Sonia; Prozesky, Jansie

    2015-01-01

    Anesthesiologists use various medications to provide surgical patients with pain relief in the postoperative period. Other modalities, such as music, could be used in conjunction with opioids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to decrease pain and lower heart rate and blood pressure. Our hypothesis was that patients listening to jazz in a postanesthesia care unit (PACU) would have lower heart rates and blood pressures and reduced pain and anxiety. The study objective was to determine if listening to jazz music in the PACU, when compared to wearing noise-canceling headphones with no music playing, would decrease heart rate, blood pressure, pain, or anxiety in patients undergoing a hysterectomy. The research design was a prospective, randomized study. The study was conducted in the PACU at the Penn State Hershey Medical Center in Hershey, PA, USA. A total of 56 patients, aged 18-75 y, who were categorized as status 1 or 2 according to the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) Physical Status Classification System, and who were undergoing elective laparoscopic or abdominal hysterectomies, were enrolled in the study. Patients were randomly assigned either to listen to jazz music where the beats per min (BPM) was jazz group, heart rates were significantly lower at 15, 20, 25, and 30 min when compared with baseline. The pain scores were significantly lower (P jazz group at 10 min into the recovery period. Overall, the results showed that patients responded not only to music but also to silence in the PACU. Using music and/or noise reduction could decrease opioid administration, promote relaxation, and improve patient satisfaction.

  4. Persistent Postoperative Pain after Cardiac Surgery: Incidence, Characterization, Associated Factors and its impact in Quality of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães-Pereira, Luís; Farinha, Filomena; Azevedo, Luís; Abelha, Fernando; Castro-Lopes, José

    2016-10-01

    Cardiac surgery (CS) ranks among the most frequently performed interventions worldwide and persistent postoperative pain (PPP) has been recognized as a relevant clinical outcome in this context. We aimed to evaluate its incidence, characteristics, associated factors and patient's quality of life (QoL). Observational prospective study conducted in patients undergoing CS in a tertiary university hospital. PPP was defined as persistent pain after surgery with higher than 3 months' duration, after excluding other causes of pain. We used a set of questionnaires for data collection: Pain Catastrophizing Scale, Duke Health Profile, Brief Pain Inventory Short Form, McGill Pain Questionnaire Short Form, Douleur Neuropathique en 4 Questions and standardized questions regarding pain periodicity. A total of 288 patients have completed the study and 43% presented PPP assessed at 3 months (PPP3M); out of which 84% were not under any treatment. PPP patients reported significantly lower QoL, and a neuropathic pain (NP) component was present in 50% of them. Younger age, female gender, higher body mass index, catastrophizing, coronary artery bypass graft, osteoarthritis, history of previous surgery (excluding sternotomy) and moderate to severe acute postoperative pain were independent predictors of PPP3M. This is the first study comprehensively describing PPP after CS and identifying NP in half of them. Our results support the important role that PPP plays after CS in considering its interference in patients' daily life and their lower QoL, which deserves the attention of health care professionals in order to improve prevention, assessment and treatment of these patients. WHAT DOES THIS STUDY ADD?: This study comprehensively describes persistent postoperative pain (PPP) after cardiac surgery (CS) and identifies neuropathic pain (NP) in half of them. Our results support the important role that PPP plays after CS in considering its interference in patients' daily life and their

  5. Reiki therapy for postoperative oral pain in pediatric patients: pilot data from a double-blind, randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Anjana; Lin, Yuting; Oron, Assaf P; Doorenbos, Ardith Z

    2014-02-01

    To examine the effects of Reiki as an adjuvant therapy to opioid therapy for postoperative pain control in pediatric patients. This was a double-blind, randomized controlled study of children undergoing dental procedures. Participants were randomly assigned to receive either Reiki therapy or the control therapy (sham Reiki) preoperatively. Postoperative pain scores, opioid requirements, and side effects were assessed. Family members were also asked about perioperative care satisfaction. Multiple linear regressions were used for analysis. Thirty-eight children participated. The blinding procedure was successful. No statistically significant difference was observed between groups on all outcome measures. Our study provides a successful example of a blinding procedure for Reiki therapy among children in the perioperative period. This study does not support the effectiveness of Reiki as an adjuvant therapy to opioid therapy for postoperative pain control in pediatric patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Quadratus Lumborum Block Versus Transversus Abdominis Plane Block for Postoperative Pain After Cesarean Delivery: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Rafael; Ansari, Tarek; Riad, Waleed; Shetty, Nanda

    Effective postoperative analgesia after cesarean delivery enhances early recovery, ambulation, and breastfeeding. In a previous study, we established the effectiveness of the quadratus lumborum block in providing pain relief after cesarean delivery compared with patient-controlled analgesia (morphine). In the current study, we hypothesized that this method would be equal to or better than the transversus abdominis plane block with regard to pain relief and its duration of action after cesarean delivery. Between April 2015 and August 2015, we randomized 76 patients scheduled for elective cesarean delivery under spinal anesthesia to receive the quadratus lumborum block or the transversus abdominis plane block for postoperative pain relief. This trial was registered prospectively (NCT 02489851) [corrected]. Patients in the quadratus lumborum block group used significantly less morphine than the transversus abdominis plane block group (P consumption and demands than transversus abdominis plane blocks after cesarean section. This effect was observed up to 48 hours postoperatively.

  7. Analgesic Effect of Indian Gooseberry (Emblica officinalis Fruit Extracts on Postoperative and Neuropathic Pain in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Wook Lim

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Indian gooseberry (Emblica officinalis fruit, also known as “Amla” is one of the oldest edible fruits known in India. It has also traditionally been used to treat inflammation, and as an analgesic to treat wounds. However, experimental evidence for the analgesic effects of E. officinalis has been lacking. The present study investigated whether E. officinalis extracts exhibit analgesic effects in the plantar incision (PI and spared nerve injury (SNI pain-model rats. We evaluated the mechanical withdrawal threshold (MWT using von Frey filaments, and pain-related behavior was determined after surgery based on ultrasonic vocalization (USV. The group treated with E. officinalis extracts at 300 mg/kg had significantly increased MWT values at 6 h and 24 h after the PI, and had a significantly reduced number of 22–27-kHz USVs at 6 h and 24 h after PI. Moreover, after 15 days of continuous treatment with E. officinalis extracts, the treated group showed significantly alleviated SNI-induced hypersensitivity and reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine levels. Thus, E. officinalis extracts have potential analgesic effects in both postoperative and neuropathic pain models in vivo.

  8. Influence of esmolol on requirement of inhalational agent using entropy and assessment of its effect on immediate postoperative pain score

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    Bhawna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Context: Beta - blockers have been used for attenuation of stress response, decreasing anaesthetic requirement and augmentation of the effect of opioids during general anaesthesia. Aims and Objectives: The present study aims to evaluate the influence of esmolol on the requirement of an inhalational agent while monitoring the depth of anaesthesia by entropy and also its effect on immediate postoperative pain score. Methods: Fifty American Society of Anaesthesiologists (ASA I and II patients, between 25 and 65 years of age who underwent lower abdominal surgeries were randomly allocated to two groups: Group E and Group S of 25 patients each. Group E received esmolol infusion while Group S received the same volume of saline infusion. Demographic data, haemodynamics, amount of isoflurane used, end-tidal isoflurane concentration, postoperative pain score and total dose of morphine consumed in immediate postoperative period of 30 min were analyzed by using appropriate statistical tests. Value of P<0.05 was considered significant and P<0.001 as highly significant. Results: The two groups were comparable with respect to age, weight, ASA physical status, duration of surgery and amount of isoflurane used during anaesthesia. Assessment of postoperative pain was assessed by Visual Analogue Scale (VAS which showed significant difference at 30 min. The total dose of morphine consumption was significantly less (P<0.05 in Group E for relief of postoperative pain. Conclusions: We conclude that in light of depth of anaesthesia monitor esmolol has no effect on requirement of isoflurane, but it decreases the postoperative pain as well as postoperative requirement of morphine without increasing the risk of awareness.

  9. Ear Acupuncture for Post-Operative Pain Associated with Ambulatory Arthroscopic Knee Surgery: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-14

    E7(/(3+21(180%(5 ,QFOXGHDUHDFRGH 14 Jan 2014 Final Report Ear acupuncture for post-operative pain associated with ambulatory arthroscopic...DISTRIBUTION A. Approved for public release: distribution unlimited. The purpose of this study is to compare ear acupuncture plus standard therapy versus...3298 Ear Acupuncture for Post-operative Pa111 Assoc1ated With Ambulatory Arthroscopic Knee Surgery A Randomized Controlled Trial ’• V ’’ ’-’ I

  10. Utility of 18F sodium fluoride PET/CT imaging in the evaluation of postoperative pain following surgical spine fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouldar, D; Bakshian, S; Matthews, R; Rao, V; Manzano, M; Dardashti, S

    2017-08-01

    A retrospective case review of patients who underwent 18F sodium fluoride PET/CT imaging of the spine with postoperative pain following vertebral fusion. To determine the benefit of 18F sodium fluoride PET/CT imaging in the diagnosis of persistent pain in the postoperative spine. The diagnosis of pain generators in the postoperative spine has proven to be a diagnostic challenge. The conventional radiologic evaluation of persistent pain after spine surgery with the use of plain radiographs, MRI, and CT can often fall short of diagnosis in the complex patient. 18F sodium fluoride PET/CT imaging is an alternative tool to accurately identify a patient's source of pain in the difficult patient. This retrospective study looked at 25 adult patients who had undergone 18F sodium fluoride PET/CT imaging. All patients had persistent or recurrent back pain over the course of a 15-month period after having undergone spinal fusion surgery. All patients had inconclusive dedicated MRI. The clinical accuracy of PET/CT in identifying the pain generator and contribution to altering the decision making process was compared to the use of CT scan alone. Of the 25 patients studied, 17 patients had increased uptake on the 18F sodium fluoride PET/CT fusion images. There was a high-level correlation of radiotracer uptake to the patients' pain generator. Overall 88% of the studies were considered beneficial with either PET/CT altering the clinical diagnosis and treatment plan of the patient or confirming unnecessary surgery. 18F sodium fluoride PET/CT proves to be a useful tool in the diagnosis of complex spine pathology of the postoperative patients. In varied cases, a high correlation of metabolic activity to the source of the patient's pain was observed.

  11. Ketamine as an adjunct to postoperative pain management in opioid tolerant patients after spinal fusions: a prospective randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Michael K; Ya Deau, Jacques T; Wukovits, Barbara; Lipnitsky, Jane Y

    2008-02-01

    Management of acute postoperative pain is challenging, particularly in patients with preexisting narcotic dependency. Ketamine has been used at subanesthetic doses as a N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist to block the processing of nociceptive input in chronic pain syndromes. This prospective randomized study was designed to assess the use of ketamine as an adjunct to acute pain management in narcotic tolerant patients after spinal fusions. Twenty-six patients for 1-2 level posterior lumbar fusions with segmental instrumentation were randomly assigned to receive ketamine or act as a control. Patients in the ketamine group received 0.2 mg/kg on induction of general anesthesia and then 2 mcg kg(-1) hour(-1) for the next 24 hours. Patients were extubated in the operating room and within 15 minutes of arriving in the Post Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU) were started on intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) hydromorphone without a basal infusion. Patients were assessed for pain (numerical rating scale [NRS]), narcotic use, level of sedation, delirium, and physical therapy milestones until discharge. The ketamine group had significantly less pain during their first postoperative hour in the PACU (NRS 4.8 vs 8.7) and continued to have less pain during the first postoperative day at rest (3.6 vs 5.5) and with physical therapy (5.6 vs 8.0). Three patients in the control group failed PCA pain management and were converted to intravenous ketamine infusions when their pain scores improved. Patients in the ketamine group required less hydromorphone than the control group, but the differences were not significant. Subanesthetic doses of ketamine reduced postoperative pain in narcotic tolerant patients undergoing posterior spine fusions.

  12. The comparison of preincisional peritonsillar infiltration of ketamine and tramadol for postoperative pain relief on children following adenotonsillectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugur, Kadriye Serife; Karabayirli, Safinaz; Demircioğlu, Rüveyda İrem; Ark, Nebil; Kurtaran, Hanifi; Muslu, Bunyamin; Sert, Hüseyin

    2013-11-01

    To investigate and compare the effectiveness of preincisional peritonsillar infiltration of ketamine and tramadol for post-operative pain on children following adenotonsillectomy. Prospective randomized double blind controlled study. Seventy-five children aged 3-10 years undergoing adenotonsillectomy were included in study. Patients received injections in peritonsillar fossa of tramadol (2 mg/kg-2 ml), ketamine (0.5 mg/kg-2 ml) or 2 ml serum physiologic. During operation heart rate, oxygen saturation, average mean blood pressures were recorded in every 5 min. Operation, anesthesia and the time that Alderete scores 9-10, patient satisfaction, analgesic requirements were recorded. Postoperatively nausea, vomiting, sedation, dysphagia, bleeding scores were recorded at 0, 10, 30, 60 min and 2, 4, 8, 12, 18, 24h postoperatively. Pain was evaluated using modified Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Pain Scale (mCHEOPS) at fixed intervals after the procedure (15 min and 1, 4, 12, 16, and 24h postoperatively). The recordings of heart rate, mean arterial pressure, nausea, vomiting, sedation and bleeding scores were similar in all groups (p>0.05). The mCHEOPS scores at 10 min, 30 min, 1h, 8h were significantly lower in both tramadol and ketamine group when compared with control (p0.05). Preincisional injection of ketamine and tramadol prior to tonsillectomy is safe, effective method and equivalent for post-tonsillectomy pain, patient satisfaction, postoperative nausea, vomiting, dysphagia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Postoperative groin pain and success rates following transobturator midurethral sling placement: TVT ABBREVO® system versus TVT™ obturator system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canel, Virginie; Thubert, Thibault; Wigniolle, Ingrid; Fernandez, Hervé; Deffieux, Xavier

    2015-10-01

    Placement of a transobturator midurethral sling (MUS) is the standard surgical treatment for stress urinary incontinence. Most recent MUS procedures have been poorly evaluated. We compared the results using a "new" device expected to reduce postoperative pain, the TVT ABBREVO® system (TVT-Abb), with those using the TVT™ obturator system (TVT-O). This was a retrospective study comparing the use of the TVT-Abb (in 50 patients) and the TVT-O (in 50 patients). The main outcomes were the amount of postoperative pain, the success rate (no reported urinary leakage and negative cough test) with both MUS procedures, and the prevalence of complications. The mean follow-up time was 12 months. The preoperative characteristics of the two groups were comparable. There was less postoperative pain (VAS, 0 to 100) in the TVT-Abb group than in the TVT-O group (12.2 vs. 24.4, p TVT-Abb group and the TVT-O group (8 % vs. 12 %, p = 0.74). The prevalences of perioperative and postoperative complications (bladder/urethral injury, haemorrhage) in the two groups were equal. The success rates were similar at 12 months after surgery (88 % vs. 78 %, p = 0.29). The success rates with TVT-Abb and TVT-O were equal at 12 months after surgery, but there was less immediate postoperative pain with TVT-Abb.

  14. Utility of numerical and visual analog scales for evaluating the post-operative pain in rural patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudgalkar, Nikhil; Bele, Samir D; Valsangkar, Sameer; Bodhare, Trupti N; Gorre, Mahipal

    2012-11-01

    Visual analog scales (VAS) and numeric analog scales (NAS) are used to assess post-operative pain, but few studies indicate their usefulness in rural illiterate population in India. This study was designed to 1) Compare the impact of literacy on the ability to indicate pain rating on VAS and NAS in post-operative rural patients. 2) Assess the level of agreement between the pain scales. Cross sectional, hospital based study. Informed consent was obtained from patients prior to undergoing surgical procedures in a teaching hospital. Post surgery, patients who were conscious and coherent, were asked to rate pain on both VAS and NAS. The pain ratings were obtained within 24 hours of surgery and within 5 minutes of each other. Percentages, chi square test, regression analysis. A total of 105 patients participated in the study. 43 (41%) of the sample was illiterate. 82 (78.1%) were able to rate pain on VAS while 81 (77.1%) were able to rate pain on NAS. There was no significant association between pain ratings and type of surgery, duration of surgery and nature of anaesthesia. In multivariate analysis, age, sex and literacy had no significant association with the ability to rate pain on VAS (P value 0.652, 0.967, 0.328 respectively). Similarly, no significant association was obtained between age, sex and literacy and ability to rate pain on NAS (P value 0.713, 0.405, 0.875 respectively). Correlation coefficient between the scales was 0.693. VAS and NAS can be used interchangeably in Indian rural population as post-operative pain assessment tools irrespective of literacy status.

  15. Utility of numerical and visual analog scales for evaluating the post-operative pain in rural patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikhil Mudgalkar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Visual analog scales (VAS and numeric analog scales (NAS are used to assess post-operative pain, but few studies indicate their usefulness in rural illiterate population in India. Aims: This study was designed to 1 Compare the impact of literacy on the ability to indicate pain rating on VAS and NAS in post-operative rural patients. 2 Assess the level of agreement between the pain scales. Setting and Design: Cross sectional, hospital based study. Methods: Informed consent was obtained from patients prior to undergoing surgical procedures in a teaching hospital. Post surgery, patients who were conscious and coherent, were asked to rate pain on both VAS and NAS. The pain ratings were obtained within 24 hours of surgery and within 5 minutes of each other. Statistical Methods: Percentages, chi square test, regression analysis. Results: A total of 105 patients participated in the study. 43 (41% of the sample was illiterate. 82 (78.1% were able to rate pain on VAS while 81 (77.1% were able to rate pain on NAS. There was no significant association between pain ratings and type of surgery, duration of surgery and nature of anaesthesia. In multivariate analysis, age, sex and literacy had no significant association with the ability to rate pain on VAS (P value 0.652, 0.967, 0.328 respectively. Similarly, no significant association was obtained between age, sex and literacy and ability to rate pain on NAS (P value 0.713, 0.405, 0.875 respectively. Correlation coefficient between the scales was 0.693. Conclusion: VAS and NAS can be used interchangeably in Indian rural population as post-operative pain assessment tools irrespective of literacy status.

  16. PREEMPTIVE SINGLE-DOSE PREGABALIN IN MODULATION OF POSTOPERATIVE PAIN AND OPIOID REQUIREMENT AFTER LAPAROSCOPIC CHOLECYSTECTOMY- A RANDOMIZED CLINICAL STUDY

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    Rajib Hazarika

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND With the enormous advancement in the field of laparoscopic cholecystectomy, postoperative pain has substantially reduced as compared to open procedures. However, postoperative pain is still the most frequent complaint, which can hamper recovery, mandate inpatient admission and thereby increase the cost of such care. Preemptive analgesia attenuates sensitisation of pain before surgery so as to reduce postoperative hyperalgesia and allodynia. Pregabalin is a structural analog of γ-aminobutyric acid, which shows analgesic, anticonvulsant, and anxiolytic effects. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of preemptive oral pregabalin on postoperative pain and opioid consumption in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. MATERIALS AND METHODS Eighty adult patients of ASA I and II undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy were randomly divided into two groups to receive either pregabalin 150 mg capsule or a matching placebo (vitamin B complex capsule 1 hour before surgery. Anaesthesia technique was standardised in both the groups. Postoperative pain was assessed at 0, 1, 2, 3, 6, 9, 12, 18 and 24 hours period postoperatively by a 10 cm visual analogue scale, where 0, no pain; 10, worst imaginable pain. Subjects received Inj. Tramadol hydrochloride (1 mg/kg IV as a rescue analgesic whenever VAS score was ≥4. Occurrence of any side effects like nausea, vomiting, sedation, headache and dizziness was also noted. Statistical Analysis Used- Data analysis was done using PASW 18.0 software. Results were analysed by Mann-Whitney U-test, large sample difference in proportion test and Fisher’s Exact test. RESULTS Patients in the pregabalin group had significantly lower pain scores at all the time intervals in comparison to placebo group (p<0.05. Total postoperative tramadol consumption in the pregabalin group was statistically significantly lower than in the control group (p<0.05 and also time to first request for

  17. Association of blood lipid levels with the risk of cholecystectomy and postoperative pain

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    WANG Qiang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate whether blood lipid control can delay the progression of asymptomatic gallstones and reduce the risk of cholecystectomy in patients with gallstones and hyperlipidemia, as well as the influence of hyperlipidemia on postoperative pain after cholecystectomy. MethodsA total of 153 patients with asymptomatic gallstones and hyperlipidemia who underwent physical examination from February 2013 to February 2015 were enrolled and randomly divided into experimental group with 72 patients and control group with 81 patients. The patients in the experimental group were given blood lipid control via diet, exercise, and drugs, and according to fasting triglyceride (TG and total cholesterol (TC after 3 months, these patients were further divided into normal blood lipid group with 47 patients and abnormal blood lipid group with 25 patients. All the patients were followed up for 2 years with an interval of 3 months. The surgical indications for laparoscopic cholecystectomy were persistent pain in the gallbladder or more than 3 times of gallbladder discomfort within the past one month. A subgroup analysis was performed based on the number and size of gallstones to evaluate the risk of cholecystectomy. A numerical pain scale was used to assess the improvement in pain during hospitalization and at 3 and 6 months after surgery. The t-test was used for comparison of continuous data between two groups; a one-way analysis of variance was used for comparison between three groups, and the Bonferroni test was used for further comparison between any two groups. The chi-square test was used for comparison of categorical data between groups. ResultsThe normal blood lipid group had a significantly lower rate of cholecystectomy than the abnormal blood lipid group and the control group (23.4% vs 68.8%/70.4%, χ2=2772, P<0.01. The patients in the normal blood lipid group had moderate pain during hospitalization, while those in the abnormal blood lipid

  18. Intraoperative ketamine reduces immediate postoperative opioid consumption after spinal fusion surgery in chronic pain patients with opioid dependency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rikke Vibeke; Fomsgaard, Jonna Storm; Siegel, Hanna

    2017-01-01

    Perioperative handling of surgical patients with opioid dependency represents an important clinical problem. Animal studies suggest that ketamine attenuates central sensitization and hyperalgesia and thereby reduces postoperative opioid tolerance. We hypothesized that intraoperative ketamine would...... to 24 hours postoperatively (visual analogue scale), adverse events, and persistent pain 6 months postoperatively. One hundred fifty patients were randomly assigned to intraoperative S-ketamine bolus 0.5 mg/kg and infusion 0.25 mg·kg·h or placebo. Postoperatively, patients received their usual opioids......, paracetamol and IV patient-controlled analgesia with morphine. In the final analyses, 147 patients were included. Patient-controlled analgesia IV morphine consumption 0 to 24 hours postoperatively was significantly reduced in the ketamine group compared with the placebo group: 79 (47) vs 121 (53) mg IV, mean...

  19. Antihyperalgesic effects of dexketoprofen and tramadol in a model of postoperative pain in mice - effects on glial cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Alejo, Elizabeth; Puig, Margarita M; Romero, Asunción

    2016-08-01

    To define likely targets (i.e. glia) and protocols (analgesic combinations) to improve postoperative pain outcomes and reduce chronic pain after surgery. Specifically, to assess the antihyperalgesic effects of the dexketoprofen : tramadol (DEX : TRM) combination, exploring the implication of glial activation. In a mouse model of postincisional pain, we evaluated mechanical nociceptive thresholds (Von Frey) for 21 days postoperatively. We assessed DEX and TRM alone and combined (1 : 1 ratio) on postoperative hyperalgesia (POH, day 1) and delayed latent pain sensitisation (substantiated by a naloxone challenge; PS, day 21). The interactions were analysed using isobolograms, and concomitant changes in spinal glial cell activation were measured. On day 1, DEX completely blocked POH, whereas TRM induced 32% inhibition. TRM, but not DEX, partially (47%) protected against PS, at 21 days. Co-administration of DEX : TRM (1 : 1 ratio) showed additivity for antihyperalgesia. Both drugs and their combination totally inhibited surgery-induced microglia activation on day 1, but had no effect on surgery-induced astrocyte activation (1 day) or re-activation after naloxone (21 days). The DEX : TRM combination could have clinical advantages: a complete prevention of POH after surgery, together with a substantial (48%) inhibition of the development of PS by TRM. Microglia, but not astrocyte activation, could play a relevant role in the development of postoperative pain hypersensitivity. © 2016 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  20. Lumiracoxib for acute postoperative dental pain: a systematic review of randomized clinical trials

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    Ricardo Carvalho Lopes Silva

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Lumiracoxib is an anti-inflammatory drug that has been used to treat acute dental pain, mainly in postsurgical settings, in which the greatest levels of pain and discomfort are experienced during the first 24 hours. This study aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of lumiracoxib for treating acute postsurgical dental pain. DESIGN AND SETTING: Systematic review developed at the Brazilian Cochrane Centre, Universidade Federal de São Paulo. METHODS: An electronic search was conducted in the PubMed, Cochrane Library, Lilacs (Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde, SciELO (Scientific Electronic Library Online and Embase databases. A manual search was also performed. Only randomized controlled trials were included, and these were selected and assessed by two researchers with regard to the risk of bias. RESULTS: Three clinical trials with 921 participants were included. Lumiracoxib 400 mg produced onset of analgesia in a shorter time than shown by lumiracoxib 100 mg, celecoxib 200 mg and ibuprofen 400 mg. There was no difference between lumiracoxib 400 mg and rofecoxib 50 mg. In two studies, the mean time taken to attain onset of analgesia for the placebo was not estimated because the number of participants who reached onset was too small. CONCLUSION: There is evidence with a moderate risk of bias that recommends the use of lumiracoxib for acute postoperative dental pain. However, the adverse effects are not completely known. Given that lumiracoxib is currently available in only three countries, further studies are likely to be rare and discouraged.

  1. [Effects of electroacupuncture preemptive intervention on postoperative pain of mixed hemorrhoids].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing; Zhao, Yu; Yang, Chun-Mei; Xue, Qi-Ming; Li, Ning

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate clinical efficacy of electroacupuncture at Changqiang (GV 1) and Chengshan (BL 57) 30 min before surgery on postoperative pain and discomforts in patients with mixed hemorrhoids. One hundred and twenty cases of mixed hemorrhoids who received Milligan-Morgan operation were randomly divided into an electroacupuncture group, a sham electroacupuncture group and a blank group, 40 cases in each one. At the same time of basic treatment, the electroacupuncture was applied at Changqiang (GV 1) and Chengshan (BL 57) 30 min before surgery in the electroacupuncture group, while shallow needling without electrical stimulation at sham acupoint (1 cm next to acupoint) was applied 30 min before surgery in the sham electroacupuncture group, while no treatment was given before the surgery in the blank group. The total dose of painkillers in the first 24 h after operation, the number of cases who received additional anesthetic in the operation, the self-score of most severity pain in the first 24 h after operation and sleeping time in the night of surgery were observed. The differences of the numbers of cases who received additional anesthetic in the operation had no statistical significance among the three groups (all P > 0.05), but compared with the sham electroacupuncture group and blank group, the total dose of painkillers in the first 24 h after operation was reduced in the electroacupuncture group [(2.43 +/- 1.08) tablets vs (3.23 +/- 1.33) tablets, (3.10 +/- 1.22) tablets], and the score of most severity pain was also decreased (6.65 +/- 1.00 vs 7.48 +/- 0.96, 7.25 +/- 1.19), besides, the sleeping time in the night of surgery was increased [(220.63 +/- 85.50) min vs (162.00 +/- 92.69) min, (151.50 +/- 80.01) min, all P electroacupuncture at Changqiang (GV 1) and Chengshan (BL 57) 30 min before surgery has effects of preemptive analgesia on postoperative pain for patients with mixed hemorrhoids.

  2. No evidence for generalized increased postoperative responsiveness to pain: a combined behavioral and serial functional magnetic resonance imaging study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kupers, Ron; Schneider, Fabien C G; Christensen, Rune

    2009-01-01

    area and to the lower forearm, a site remote from the surgical area. A group of eight age- and sex-matched control subjects underwent the same two-test procedure except that they were not submitted to an orthopedic surgical intervention. RESULTS: Subjective pain and brain responses to innocuous...... and noxious stimulation were not increased postoperatively. Actually, responses in primary and secondary somatosensory cortex for stimulation of the operated leg were significantly smaller after surgery. Brain responses in the control group did not differ significantly across the two sessions. CONCLUSION......BACKGROUND: Although it is generally accepted that increased pain responsiveness and central sensitization develop after major tissue injury, this claim has not been tested using brain imaging methods in a clinical pain setting. We tested this hypothesis using a postoperative pain model...

  3. Pharmacokinetics and analgesic effect of ropivacaine during continuous epidural infusion for postoperative pain relief

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erichsen, C J; Sjövall, J; Kehlet, H

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The pharmacokinetics and clinical efficacy of ropivacaine (2.5 mg/ml) during a 24-h continuous epidural infusion for postoperative pain relief in 20 patients scheduled for abdominal hysterectomy were characterized using an open-label, increasing-dose design. METHODS: Through an epidural...... catheter inserted at T10-T12, a test dose of 7.5 mg ropivacaine was given 3 min before a bolus dose of 42.5 mg and immediately followed by a 24-h continuous epidural infusion with either 10 or 20 mg/h. Peripheral venous plasma samples were collected up to 48 h after infusion, and urinary excretion...... plasma concentrations of ropivacaine increased markedly and consistently during the 24-h epidural infusion, in contrast to stable unbound concentrations. Both total and unbound plasma concentrations at the end of infusion were proportional to the total dose, although only the latter was proportional...

  4. A comparative study of efficacy and safety of flupirtine versus piroxicam in postoperative pain in patients undergoing lower limb surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinnaiyan S

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Sowmya Chinnaiyan,1 Narayana Sarala,1 Heddur Shanthappa Arun2 1Department of Pharmacology, 2Department of Orthopaedics, Sri Devaraj Urs Medical College, Sri Devaraj Urs Academy of Higher Education and Research, Kolar, Karnataka, India Background: Effective control of pain postoperatively is essential in providing enhanced patient care and a cost-effective hospital stay. Though many treatment modalities exist for postoperative pain management in orthopedic surgeries they are often accompanied by adverse effects. This study was carried out to assess the efficacy of flupirtine and piroxicam in postoperative pain reduction using visual analog scale (VAS score. Materials and methods: An open-label, parallel group, comparative study was conducted on patients undergoing lower limb orthopedic surgery, randomized into two groups of 38 patients each. They received either flupirtine 100 mg or piroxicam 20 mg 6 hours after surgery and then twice daily orally for 5 days. Pain was measured using VAS score, total pain relief score (TOTPAR24, and patient satisfaction score (PSS; the other scales used were behavioral pain assessment scale (BPAS and functional activity score (FAS. Rescue medication used was tramadol 100 mg intravenously. WHO causality scale was used for assessing adverse effects. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used for assessment of various parameters. Results: A total of 76 patients with mean ± standard deviation age of 35.08±10.3 years were recruited; 34 in the flupirtine and 37 in the piroxicam groups completed the study. Patients in both groups were comparable in baseline characteristics. Flupirtine and piroxicam reduced VAS score 48 hours postoperatively compared to baseline (p=0.006 and 0.001 and piroxicam produced significant reduction in pain at 8, 12, and 120 hours compared to flupirtine (p=0.028, 0.032, 0.021. TOTPAR24 and PSS at 24 hours were comparable between the treatments. BPAS scores at 24 hours were reduced

  5. Effect of adductor-canal-blockade on established, severe post-operative pain after total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaeger, P; Grevstad, Ulrik; Henningsen, Maja

    2012-01-01

    In this proof-of-concept study, we investigated the effect of the predominantly sensory adductor-canal-blockade on established pain in the early post-operative period after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). We hypothesised that the adductor-canal-blockade would reduce pain during flexion of the knee...... (primary end point) and at rest, as well as reducing morphine consumption and morphine-related side effects (secondary outcomes) compared with placebo....

  6. Comparison of postoperative pain and inflammation reaction in dogs undergoing preventive laparoscopic-assisted and incisional gastropexy

    OpenAIRE

    HARAGUCHI, Tomoya; KIMURA, Shiho; ITOH, Harumichi; NISHIKAWA, Shimpei; HIYAMA, Masato; TANI, Kenji; ISERI, Toshie; ITOH, Yoshiki; NAKAICHI, Munekazu; TAURA, Yasuho; ITAMOTO, Kazuhito

    2017-01-01

    This study compared the effects of postoperative pain and inflammation reaction after preventive laparoscopic-assisted gastropexy (LAG) and incisional gastropexy (IG) in 10 clinically normal Beagles. Surgical time, incision length, visual analog scale (VAS) score, University of Melbourne Pain Scale (UMPS) score, and plasma C-reactive protein (CRP), plasma cortisol (COR), and serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels were evaluated. The VAS and UMPS scores and COR and IL-6 levels were recorded at 0.5,...

  7. [Analgesic quality in a postoperative pain service: continuous assessment with the cumulative sum (cusum) method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista Macaroff, W M; Castroman Espasandín, P

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the cumulative sum (cusum) method for evaluating the performance of our hospital's acute postoperative pain service. The period of analysis was 7 months. Analgesic failure was defined as a score of 3 points or more on a simple numerical scale. Acceptable failure (p0) was set at 20% of patients upon admission to the postanesthetic recovery unit and at 7% 24 hours after surgery. Unacceptable failure was set at double the p0 rate at each time (40% and 14%, respectively). The unit's patient records were used to generate a cusum graph for each evaluation. Nine hundred four records were included. The rate of failure was 31.6% upon admission to the unit and 12.1% at the 24-hour postoperative assessment. The curve rose rapidly to the value set for p0 at both evaluation times (n = 14 and n = 17, respectively), later leveled off, and began to fall after 721 and 521 cases, respectively. Our study shows the efficacy of the cusum method for monitoring a proposed quality standard. The graph also showed periods of suboptimal performance that would not have been evident from analyzing the data en block. Thus the cusum method would facilitate rapid detection of periods in which quality declines.

  8. New formulations of bupivacaine for the treatment of postoperative pain: liposomal bupivacaine and SABER-Bupivacaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skolnik, Aaron; Gan, Tong J

    2014-08-01

    Although generally considered both safe and effective, local anesthetics are often used in conjunction with opioids postoperatively in part because of the limited duration of drug action of local anesthetics. Much interest exists in extending the duration of local anesthetics' effects, which may reduce the requirement for opioid pain medications that are frequently associated with side effects, including nausea and vomiting, pruritus and respiratory depression. This article introduces liposomal bupivacaine and SABER®-Bupivacaine, two new formulations of bupivacaine that increase the duration of analgesia postoperatively through two novel slow-release technologies. The pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, efficacy and safety of both preparations of bupivacaine are reviewed. An electronic database search conducted using the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and MEDLINE/PubMed with the following search terms: 'bupivacaine,' 'liposomal bupivacaine', 'liposome bupivacaine', 'Exparel', 'SABER-Bupivacaine', 'SABER Bupivacaine', and 'SABER' yielded 90 articles (no language or date of publication restrictions were imposed). Clinical trials involving liposomal bupivacaine and SABER-Bupivacaine indicate that both safely prolong analgesia, while decreasing opioid requirements when compared with placebo. However, additional clinical studies are necessary to better determine the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of these long-acting local anesthetic formulations.

  9. Physiological Indices of Stress Prior to and Following Total Knee Arthroplasty Predict the Occurrence of Severe Post-Operative Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremeans-Smith, Julie K; Greene, Kenneth; Delahanty, Douglas L

    2016-05-01

    The severe pain and disability associated with osteoarthritis often motivate individuals to undergo arthroplastic surgery. However, a significant number of surgical patients continue to experience pain following surgery. Prior research has implicated both the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and sympathetic nervous system (SNS) in the sensitization of pain receptors and chronic pain conditions. This study uses a prospective, observational, cohort design to examine whether physiological stress responses before and after surgery could predict post-operative pain severity. Participants included 110 patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty. Physiological indices of stress included the measurement of catecholamine and cortisol levels in 15-hour urine samples collected prior to and 1 month following surgery, as well as in-hospital heart rate and blood pressure (before and after surgery), which were abstracted from medical records. Patients completed the pain subscale of the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) [Bellamy et al., J Orthop Rheumatol 1: , 95 (1988)] 2.5 weeks prior to surgery and at a 3-month follow-up. Contrary to expectations, lower stress hormone levels at baseline were related to more severe post-operative pain. Data at later time points, however, supported our hypothesis: cardiovascular tone shortly before surgery and urinary levels of epinephrine 1 month following surgery were positively related to pain severity 3 months later. Results suggest that the occurrence of post-operative pain can be predicted on the basis of stress physiology prior to and following arthroplastic surgery. © 2015 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Effect of Transversus Abdominis Plane Block on Postoperative Pain after Colorectal Surgery: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lin; Xie, Yan-Hu; Zhang, Wei; Chai, Xiao-Qing

    2018-01-01

    To assess the analgesic efficacy of transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block in patients undergoing colorectal surgery (CRS). The databases of PubMed, ISI Web of Science, and Embase were searched, and randomized controlled studies (RCTs) that compared TAP block to control for relief of postoperative pain in patients who underwent CRS were included. Outcomes, including postoperative pain at rest and with movement, morphine use, postoperative nausea and vomiting, and the length of hospital stay, were analyzed using STATA software. The weighted mean differences (WMDs) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) or relative risk with 95% CI were used to present the strength of associations. A total of 7 RCTs with 511 patients were included. The results of this study suggested that TAP block significantly relieved postoperative pain during postanesthetic recovery after CRS at rest and during movement (WMDs were -0.98 [95% CI -1.57 to -0.38] and -0.68 [-1.07 to -0.30], respectively), and also decreased pain intensity during movement 24 h after CRS (WMD: -0.57 [95% CI -1.06 to -0.08]). TAP block significantly reduced opioid consumption within 24 h when compared to controls, with a WMD of 15.66 (95% CI -23.93 to -7.39). However, TAP block did not shorten the length of hospital stay. TAP block was an effective approach for relief of postoperative pain and reduced postoperative consumption of morphine. More RCTs with large sample sizes are required to confirm these findings. © 2018 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Effects of a modified technique for TVT-O positioning on postoperative pain: single-blind randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tommaselli, Giovanni A; Formisano, Carmen; Di Carlo, Costantino; Fabozzi, Annamaria; Nappi, Carmine

    2012-09-01

    One of the most frequent and distressing complications of the tension-free vaginal tape obturator (TVT-O) procedure for stress urinary incontinence (SUI) is groin pain, which may be related to the surgical technique or to the tape. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of a more limited dissection and a more medial trocar trajectory in TVT-O positioning on postoperative pain. Seventy-two SUI patients were randomized to undergo TVT-O either with the traditional technique (group A) or a modified procedure (reduced paraurethral dissection and a more medial trocar trajectory) (group B). Visual analog scale pain scores 12 h, 24 h, and 1 month after the procedure, number of analgesic vials, objective cure rate, and patient functional and quality of life scores 6 months after the procedure were evaluated. Data were analyzed by the Student's t test for parametric variables, the Mann-Whitney U and Wilcoxon tests for nonparametric variables, and Fisher's exact test for categorical variables. Pain scores were significantly lower in group B compared with group A 24 h after surgery (P = 0.01). Pain scores significantly decreased from 12-24 h postoperatively to 1 month follow-up in both groups (P TVT-O seem to reduce postoperative groin pain at 24 h after the procedure, but not the analgesic requirement.

  12. Management of somatic pain induced by treatment of head and neck cancer: Postoperative pain. Guidelines of the French Oto-Rhino-Laryngology--Head and Neck Surgery Society (SFORL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espitalier, F; Testelin, S; Blanchard, D; Binczak, M; Bollet, M; Calmels, P; Couturaud, C; Dreyer, C; Navez, M; Perrichon, C; Morinière, S; Albert, S

    2014-09-01

    To present the guidelines of the French Oto-Rhino-Laryngology--Head and Neck Surgery Society (SFORL) concerning the management of somatic pain induced by the treatment of head and neck cancer, and in particular the management of early and late post-surgical pain. A multidisciplinary work group conducted a review of the scientific literature on the study topic. An editorial group subsequently read the resulting guidelines before validation. It is recommended to prevent onset of pain caused by malpositioning on the operating table, as well as pain related to postoperative care. During surgery, it is recommended to spare nerve and muscle structures as far as possible to limit painful sequelae. Management of early postoperative pain upon tumor resection and flap harvesting sites requires patient-controlled analgesia by morphine pump. Physical therapy is recommended after flap harvesting to minimize painful sequelae. Preventive and curative measures should be undertaken for appropriate management of post-surgical pain in the treatment of head and neck cancers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Clinical efficacy of hydrocodone-acetaminophen and tramadol for control of postoperative pain in dogs following tibial plateau leveling osteotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benitez, Marian E; Roush, James K; McMurphy, Rose; KuKanich, Butch; Legallet, Claire

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate clinical efficacy of hydrocodone-acetaminophen and tramadol for treatment of postoperative pain in dogs undergoing tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO). ANIMALS 50 client-owned dogs. Standardized anesthetic and surgical protocols were followed. Each patient was randomly assigned to receive either tramadol hydrochloride (5 to 7 mg/kg, PO, q 8 h; tramadol group) or hydrocodone bitartrate-acetaminophen (0.5 to 0.6 mg of hydrocodone/kg, PO, q 8 h; hydrocodone group) for analgesia after surgery. The modified Glasgow composite measure pain scale was used to assess signs of postoperative pain at predetermined intervals by an investigator who was blinded to treatment group. Scoring commenced with the second dose of the assigned study analgesic. Pain scores and rates of treatment failure (ie, dogs requiring rescue analgesia according to a predetermined protocol) were compared statistically between groups. 12 of 42 (29%; 5/19 in the hydrocodone-acetaminophen group and 7/23 in the tramadol group) dogs required rescue analgesic treatment on the basis of pain scores. Median pain score for the hydrocodone group was significantly lower than that of the tramadol group 2 hours after the second dose of study analgesic. The 2 groups had similar pain scores at all other time points. Overall, differences in pain scores between dogs that received hydrocodone-acetaminophen or tramadol were minor. The percentage of dogs with treatment failure in both groups was considered unacceptable.

  14. Comparison of Preemptive Effects of Celecoxib and Ibuprofen on Postoperative Pain in Addicted Patients Undergoing Lower Abdominal Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Farhanchi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Pain is a common postoperative complaint, and the use of analgesics before surgical trauma can effectively prevent peripheral and central sensitization. We aimed to compare the preemptive effects of ibuprofen and celecoxib on post-operative pain after lower abdominal surgery in addicted patients. Materials and Methods: In this clinical trial, after obtaining informed consent, 114 addicted patients undergoing lower abdominal surgery were randomly divided into three groups of 38. The first group was given a 200 mg dose of oral celecoxib, 400 mg of ibuprofen was orally administered to patients in the second group, and the third group was given redsop hcrats as placebo by a nurse who prepared these drugs in the form of capsules. Postoperative pain was assessed by using a 10-cm ruler as the visual analogue scale at intervals of 1 and 6 hours after surgery. Postoperative opioid consumption was recorded in those periods. The obtained data were analyzed using the appropriate statistical tests in SPSS software. Results: Mean pain scores at 1 hour after surgery were not significantly different across the three groups, whereas at 6 hours after surgery, pain scores were significantly lower in the ibuprofen and celecoxib groups in comparison to the placebo group (P=0.001 and P=0.005, respectively. Postoperative nausea and vomiting was not significantly different among the three groups. Conclusion: Despite the significant difference in mean pain scores among the study groups, the opioid consumption doses were not significantly different among the groups. Thus, the preemptive prescription of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in addicted patient does not have any noticeable effects.

  15. Self-Managing Postoperative Pain with the Use of a Novel, Interactive Device: A Proof of Concept Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke Mordecai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Pain is commonly experienced following surgical procedures. Suboptimal management is multifactorial. Objectives. The primary objective was to assess whether patients used a device (Navimed to self-report pain over and above a normal baseline of observations. Secondary outcome measures included comparison of pain scores and patient use of and feedback on the device. Methods. In a prospective randomized controlled trial, elective gynaecological surgery patients received standard postoperative pain care or standard care plus the Navimed, which allowed them to self-report pain and offered interactive self-help options. Results. 52 female patients, 26 in each of device and standard groups, did not differ in the frequency of nurse-documented pain scores or mean pain scores provided to nurses. The device group additionally reported pain on the device (means 18.50 versus 11.90 pain ratings per day, t(32=2.75, p<0.001 that was significantly worse than reported to nurses but retrospectively rated significantly less anxiety. 80% of patients found the device useful. Discussion and Conclusion. This study demonstrates that patients used the Navimed to report pain and to help manage it. Further work is required to investigate the difference in pain scores reported and to develop more sophisticated software.

  16. Patient considerations in the use of transdermal iontophoretic fentanyl for acute postoperative pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartrick CT

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Craig T Hartrick,1 Cecile R Pestano,1 Li Ding,2 Hassan Danesi,2 James B Jones,2 1Beaumont Health System, Troy, MI, 2The Medicines Company, Parsippany, NJ, USA Abstract: Opioids are commonly used in the management of moderate-to-severe postoperative pain. Patient-controlled analgesic techniques are recognized as preferred administration methods. Previously, research has focused on intravenously administered opioids via a programmable pump. More recently, an iontophoretic transdermal system (ITS, which is patient controlled, has been developed. The focus of this review is on pain management using the fentanyl ITS during the 24–72-hour time period immediately following surgery. Fentanyl ITS offers a needle-free alternative to traditional intravenous (IV patient-controlled analgesia (PCA system that is as effective and safe as IV PCA. This system is easy to use for both patients and nurses. The use of fentanyl ITS is generally associated with a better ease-of-care profile, including a greater ease of mobility, from a patients' perspective when compared with morphine IV PCA. Keywords: patient-controlled analgesia, fentanyl iontophoretic transdermal system, ease of care, mobility, patient perspective, review

  17. A PLGA-PEG-PLGA Thermosensitive Gel Enabling Sustained Delivery of Ropivacaine Hydrochloride for Postoperative Pain Relief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xudong; Zeng, Huilin; Guo, Jiaping; Liu, Hong; Shi, Zhen; Chen, Huhai; Li, Dezong; Xie, Xiangyang; Kuang, Changchun

    2017-01-01

    Postoperative pain is a complex physiological response to disease and tissue injury. Moderate-to-severe pain typically occurs within 48 h after surgery. Amino amide local anesthetics are widely applied to manage postoperative pain, and they have high efficacy, a low risk for addiction and limited side effects. However, these anesthetics also have short half-lives, often necessitating continuous injection to obtain satisfactory pain relief. In the current work, we used a poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA)-polyethylene glycol (PEG)-PLGA (PLGA-PEG-PLGA) temperature-sensitive gel to deliver a local anesthetic, ropivacaine hydrochloride (RP), to prolong its analgesic effect. We investigated the influence of polymer and drug concentration on gelation temperature and the in vitro drug release rate from the temperature-sensitive gel. RP-loaded PLGA-PEG-PLGA solution is a liquid at room temperature and forms a gel at temperatures slightly lower than body temperature. With regard to the gel's drug release rate, 37.5, 51.3 and 72.6% of RP was released at 12, 24 and 48 h, respectively. This in vitro drug release profile conformed to the Higuchi equation. To assess pain control efficacy when using the gel, we evaluated the mechanical paw withdrawal reflex threshold, thermal pain threshold and incision cumulative pain scores in a rat incisional model. The results showed that the anti-pain effect of a single injection of RP-loaded gel at the incision site lasted for 48 h, which is significantly longer than the effect produced by injection of RP solution alone. The use of RP-loaded thermosensitive gels could provide a promising method for managing postoperative pain.

  18. The Effect of N-acetylcysteine on postoperative pain after laparoscopic cholecystectomy: a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahram Seyfi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Postoperative pain is one of the most common complications following laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Because the majority of the analgesic drugs including opioids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have many side effects, using drugs with lesser side effects is beneficial. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of N-acetylcysteine on the pain after laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Methods: In a randomized clinical trial, in two university-affiliated teaching hospitals in Babol City (Shahid Beheshti and Shahid Yahyanezhad Hospitals, Iran, from August 2015 to March 2015, a total number of 38 patients with age of 20-50 years, who were candidates for laparoscopic cholecystectomy with American Society of Anesthesiologists Class-I were chosen and randomly assigned into two groups. The night before operation, 1200 mg oral N-acetylcysteine is given to intervention group. Also, they received 600 mg IV N-acetylcysteine in the morning before operation. In the control group, two vitamin C effervescent tablets as placebo were given at night before operation and 3 ml sterile water as placebo was injected in the morning of operation. Amount of pethidine consumption and the changes in hemodynamic in two groups was recorded and analyzed at 24 hours after operation. Results: The average of patients age was not significant different between two groups (P=0.23. Average of pain score in placebo group was 3.5 and in N-acetylcysteine group was 2.7 that it was not significant difference between two groups (P=0.06. Average of pethidine consumption in placebo group was 52 mg and in N-acetylcysteine group was 29 mg in 24 hours, that the difference was statistically significant between two groups (P=0.01 Conclusion: As the results of the study, it can be concluded that the anti-inflammatory effects N- acetylcysteine can inhibit the function of lipoproteins and prostaglandins, reduced glutathione peroxidase and dismutase has been restored and can be

  19. The prevalence of postoperative pain and flare-up in single- and multiple-visit endodontic treatment: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathorn, C; Parashos, P; Messer, H

    2008-02-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to assess the evidence regarding postoperative pain and flare-up of single- or multiple-visit root canal treatment. CENTRAL, MEDLINE and EMBASE databases were searched. Reference lists from identified articles were scanned. A forward search was undertaken on the authors of the identified articles. Papers that had cited these articles were also identified through Science Citation Index to identify potentially relevant subsequent primary research. The included clinical studies compared the prevalence/severity of postoperative pain or flare-up in single- and multiple-visit root canal treatment. Data in those studies were extracted independently. Sixteen studies fitted the inclusion criteria in the review, with sample size varying from 60 to 1012 cases. The prevalence of postoperative pain ranged from 3% to 58%. The heterogeneity amongst included studies was far too great to conduct meta-analysis and yield meaningful results. Compelling evidence indicating a significantly different prevalence of postoperative pain/flare-up of either single- or multiple-visit root canal treatment is lacking.

  20. Perspectives, Perceptions and Experiences in Postoperative Pain Management in Developing Countries: A Focus Group Study Conducted in Rwanda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana P Johnson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Access to postoperative acute pain treatment is an important component of perioperative care and is frequently managed by a multidisciplinary team of anesthesiologists, surgeons, pharmacists, technicians and nurses. In some developing countries, treatment modalities are often not performed due to scarce health care resources, knowledge deficiencies and cultural attitudes.

  1. An international consensus algorithm for management of chronic postoperative inguinal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, J F M; Kaufmann, R; Wijsmuller, A R; Pierie, J P E N; Ploeg, R J; Chen, D C; Amid, P K

    2015-02-01

    Tension-free mesh repair of inguinal hernia has led to uniformly low recurrence rates. Morbidity associated with this operation is mainly related to chronic pain. No consensus guidelines exist for the management of this condition. The goal of this study is to design an expert-based algorithm for diagnostic and therapeutic management of chronic inguinal postoperative pain (CPIP). A group of surgeons considered experts on inguinal hernia surgery was solicited to develop the algorithm. Consensus regarding each step of an algorithm proposed by the authors was sought by means of the Delphi method leading to a revised expert-based algorithm. With the input of 28 international experts, an algorithm for a stepwise approach for management of CPIP was created. 26 participants accepted the final algorithm as a consensus model. One participant could not agree with the final concept. One expert did not respond during the final phase. There is a need for guidelines with regard to management of CPIP. This algorithm can serve as a guide with regard to the diagnosis, management, and treatment of these patients and improve clinical outcomes. If an expectative phase of a few months has passed without any amelioration of CPIP, a multidisciplinary approach is indicated and a pain management team should be consulted. Pharmacologic, behavioral, and interventional modalities including nerve blocks are essential. If conservative measures fail and surgery is considered, triple neurectomy, correction for recurrence with or without neurectomy, and meshoma removal if indicated should be performed. Surgeons less experienced with remedial operations for CPIP should not hesitate to refer their patients to dedicated hernia surgeons.

  2. Adding ketamine to morphine for intravenous patient-controlled analgesia for acute postoperative pain: a qualitative review of randomized trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, M; Møller, A M

    2010-01-01

    In experimental trials, ketamine has been shown to reduce hyperalgesia, prevent opioid tolerance, and lower morphine consumption. Clinical trials have found contradictory results. We performed a review of randomized, double-blinded clinical trials of ketamine added to opioid in i.v. patient......-controlled analgesia (PCA) for postoperative pain in order to clarify this controversy. Our primary aim was to compare the effectiveness and safety of postoperative administered ketamine in addition to opioid for i.v. PCA compared with i.v. PCA with opioid alone. Studies were identified from the Cochrane Library 2003...... of 4.5. Pain was assessed using visual analogue scales or verbal rating scales. Six studies showed significant improved postoperative analgesia with the addition of ketamine to opioids. Five studies showed no significant clinical improvement. For thoracic surgery, the addition of ketamine to opioid...

  3. Managing Postoperative Analgesic Failure: Tramadol Versus Morphine for Refractory Pain in the Post-Operative Recovery Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Kelly; Nolan, Aoife; Barnard, John; Tozer, Megan; Harris, David; Sleigh, Jamie

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed to discover whether co-analgesia with tramadol or additional morphine was more effective for patients who still had severe pain despite being given 10 mg intravenous morphine in the post-anesthesia care unit (PACU). All eligible patients were consented and recruited to the trial pre-operatively, but only a small subgroup – whose pain was not successfully controlled (pain score 6/10 or more) after receiving 10 mg of morphine in the PACU—were then randomized to enter the trial and receive, in a double blinded fashion, the analgesic study drug; which consisted of either a further 10 mg of morphine, or 100 mg of tramadol, titrated intravenously to control their pain. The groups were compared as to: the time to readiness for discharge, the patient’s pain scores over time, and the presence of side effects. There was no statistically significant difference in any of the outcomes measured. The time to readiness for discharge from PACU was 119 minutes in the morphine group and 120 minutes in the tramadol group. However in approximately half the cases who entered the trial (i.e., where pain had not been controlled with the pre-enrollment baseline 10 mg of morphine in PACU) neither a further 10 mg of morphine nor 100 mg of tramadol effectively relieved the patient’s pain. We found no difference between additional morphine and co-analgesia with tramadol in this study. Patients who don’t respond to reasonable doses of opioids in PACU are very likely to be unresponsive to further opioids, and other non-opioid analgesic techniques (such as regional anesthesia) should be considered early in this group of patients.

  4. Implementing a benchmarking and feedback concept decreases postoperative pain after total knee arthroplasty: A prospective study including 256 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benditz, A; Drescher, J; Greimel, F; Zeman, F; Grifka, J; Meißner, W; Völlner, F

    2016-12-05

    Perioperative pain reduction, particularly during the first two days, is highly important for patients after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Problems are not only caused by medical issues but by organization and hospital structure. The present study shows how the quality of pain management can be increased by implementing a standardized pain concept and simple, consistent benchmarking. All patients included into the study had undergone total knee arthroplasty. Outcome parameters were analyzed by means of a questionnaire on the first postoperative day. A multidisciplinary team implemented a regular procedure of data analyzes and external benchmarking by participating in a nationwide quality improvement project. At the beginning of the study, our hospital ranked 16 th in terms of activity-related pain and 9 th in patient satisfaction among 47 anonymized hospitals participating in the benchmarking project. At the end of the study, we had improved to 1 st activity-related pain and to 2 nd in patient satisfaction. Although benchmarking started and finished with the same standardized pain management concept, results were initially pure. Beside pharmacological treatment, interdisciplinary teamwork and benchmarking with direct feedback mechanisms are also very important for decreasing postoperative pain and for increasing patient satisfaction after TKA.

  5. The effect of verapamil as an adjuvant agent with local anesthetic on sensory block level, hemodynamic and postoperative pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabaeizavareh, M.H.; Omranifard, M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Coadministration of verapamil with local anesthetics could potentiate the sensory block of peripheral nerve, increase the duration of sensory nerve block and reduce postoperative pain and analgesic consumption. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of verapamil as an adjuvant with bupivacaine on level of sensory block, post-operative pain and analgesic consumption among patients undergone elective surgery in Isfahan. Methodology: In this prospective randomized interventional clinical double-blind study ASA physical status I or II male patients referred for elective lower abdominal surgery were enrolled. They randomized in group A (20 cc of 0.5% bupivacaine plus 5 mg verapamil) and B(20 cc of 0.5% bupivacaine plus 2 cc normal saline). The sensory level block, postoperative pain, opioid consumption and vomiting and nausa and hemodynamic state was recorded and compared in two groups. Results: Sixty two patients were studied. Mean of the sensory level block 20 minutes after stating epidural anesthesia and immediately after surgery, postoperative pain score, opioid consumption and nausea and vomiting and fluid intake was not significantly different in two groups (P>0.05). Mean of systolic and diastolic blood pressure and pulse rate changes was not significantly different in two groups (P>0.05). Conclusion: Verapamil as an adjuvant with bupivacaine could not significantly increase the level of sensory block and attenuate post-operative pain and analgesic consumption and hemodynamic condition of the patients. For more accurate results it is recommended to determine the effect of different dose of verapamil in larger sample size of the patients. Studying the effect of other Ca channel blockers would be favorable in this regard. (author)

  6. Comparison of Intravenous Morphine with Sublingual Buprenorphine in Management of Postoperative Pain after Closed Reduction Orthopedic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, Ghasem; Khorsand, Mahmood; Shamloo, Alireza Sepehri; Jarahi, Lida; Zirak, Nahid

    2015-10-01

    Postoperative pain is a common side effect following surgery that can significantly reduce surgical quality and patient's satisfaction. Treatment options are morphine and buprenorphine. We aimed to compare the efficacy of a single dose of intravenous morphine with sublingual buprenorphine in postoperative pain control following closed reduction surgery. This triple blind clinical trial was conducted on 90 patients referred for closed reduction orthopedic surgery. They were older than 18 years and in classes I and II of the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) with an operation time of 30-90 minutes. Patients were divided into two groups of buprenorphine (4.5µg/kg sublingually) and morphine (0.2mg/kg intravenously). Baseline characteristics, vital signs, pain score, level of sedation and pharmacological side effects were recorded in the recovery room (at 0 and 30 minutes), and in the ward (at 3, 6 and 12 hours). SPSS version 19 software was used for data analysis and the significance level was set at P<0.05. Ninety patients were studied, 60 males and 30 females with a mean age of 37.7±16.2 years. There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of baseline characteristics. Pain score in the morphine group was significantly higher than the buprenorphine group with an average score of 2.5 (P<0.001). Postoperative mean heart rate in the buprenorphine group was four beats lower than the morphine group (P<0.001). Also, in the buprenorphine 48.6% and in the morphine group 86.7% of cases were conscious in recovery (P=0.001) with a higher rate of pruritus in the latter group (P=0.001). Sublingual buprenorphine administration before anesthesia induction in closed reduction surgery can lead to better postoperative pain control in comparison to intravenous morphine. Due to simple usage and longer postoperative sedation, sublingual buprenorphine is recommended as a suitable drug in closed reduction surgery.

  7. Comparison of Manual and Rotary Instrumentation on Postoperative Pain in Teeth with Asymptomatic Irreversible Pulpitis: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talebzadeh, Bita; Nezafati, Saeed; Rahimi, Saeed; Shahi, Shahriar; Lotfi, Mehrdad; Ghasemi, Negin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: One of the most common complications of root canal treatment is postoperative pain. The aim of the present clinical trial was to compare the severity of postoperative pain after root canal preparation with RaCe rotary system and hand K-Flexofile. Methods and Materials: A total of 96 mandibular first and second molars were divided into two groups (n=48) based on root canal preparation technique. The teeth in both groups underwent one-session root canal treatment and the severity of postoperative pain was evaluated using visual analog scale (VAS) at 4-, 8-, 12-, 24- and 48-h and 1-week intervals. In addition, the type and dosage of analgesics were recorded. Data were analyzed with repeated-measures ANOVA. Statistical significance was set at 0.05. Results: The difference between the two groups during this period and at subsequent intervals were not significant (P>0.05). There were no significant differences between the two groups in type and the number of analgesics in pain-free subjects (P=0.12 and P=0.61, respectively). Conclusion: There were no statistically significant differences in pain severity between the two groups at any intervals. PMID:27790255

  8. Comparison of single-dose nalbuphine versus tramadol for postoperative pain management in children: a randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaqat, Naeem; Dar, Sajid Hameed

    2017-04-01

    Acute postoperative pain control in children is an essential component of postoperative care, particularly in daycare procedures. Giving patients continuous narcotic analgesics can be risky; however, a single dose may be sufficient. This study used a prospective, randomized controlled design and was conducted at the Pediatric Surgery Unit, Services Hospital, Lahore. In total, 150 patients who underwent inguinal herniotomy (age range: 1-12 years) were randomly assigned to two groups: group A (nalbuphine) and group B (tramadol). Patients were given a single dose of either nalbuphine (0.2 mg/kg) or tramadol (2 mg/kg) immediately after surgery and pain was measured at 0, 1, 2, 4, and 8 h. The demographic characteristics were similar between the two groups. The mean pain score was lower in group A than in group B at 0 and 1 h (P pain scores in group A were still lower, but not significantly. In all, 9 patients (12.0%) required rescue analgesics in group A compared to 16 patients (21.3%) in group B (P = 0.051). The mean time for requirement of rescue analgesics was 6.5 ± 0.5 h in group A and 5.3 ± 1.7 h in group B (P = 0.06). A single dose of nalbuphine is sufficient, and superior to tramadol, for postoperative pain management in children who have undergone daycare procedures.

  9. Effect of Intravenous High Dose Vitamin C on Postoperative Pain and Morphine Use after Laparoscopic Colectomy: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Younghoon Jeon

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective. Vitamin C has antioxidant, neuroprotective, and neuromodulating effects. Recently, it showed antinociceptive effect as a result of the antioxidant properties. Therefore, we designed this study to assess the effect of intravenous vitamin C on opiate consumption and pain in patients undergoing laparoscopic colectomy. Methods. A total of 100 patients were enrolled and allocated to receive 50 mg/kg vitamin C or placebo by intravenous infusion immediately after induction of anesthesia. Morphine consumption and scores of pain were assessed at 2, 6, and 24 h after completion of surgery. Results. There were 97 patients included in the analysis. Patients who received vitamin C had higher plasma concentrations of vitamin C at the end of surgery, significantly lower morphine consumption at the 2 h after end of surgery, and significantly lower pain scores at rest during first 24 h postoperatively. There was no significant difference between groups in side effects, fatigue score, or pain score during cough. Conclusion. This study shows high dose vitamin C infusion decreased postoperative pain during the first 24 h and reduced morphine consumption in the early postoperative period. Additional research needed to examine whether higher doses of vitamin C and longer infusion times can amplify these effects.

  10. Pregabalin and dexamethasone in combination with paracetamol for postoperative pain control after abdominal hysterectomy. A randomized clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, M L; Dierking, G; Lech, K

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Multimodal analgesia may be important for optimal postoperative pain treatment and facilitation of early mobilization and recovery. We investigated the analgesic effect of pregabalin and dexamethasone in combination with paracetamol after abdominal hysterectomy. METHODS: One hundred...... and sixteen patients were randomly assigned to either group A (paracetamol+placebo x 2), group B (paracetamol+pregabalin+placebo) or group C (paracetamol+pregabalin+dexamethasone). According to randomization and preoperatively, patients received paracetamol 1000 mg, pregabalin 300 mg, dexamethasone 8 mg...... or placebo. General anaesthesia was performed. Postoperative pain treatment was paracetamol 1000 mg x 4 and patient-controlled intravenous morphine, 2.5 mg bolus. Nausea was treated with ondansetron. Morphine consumption, pain score (visual analogue scale) at rest and during mobilization, nausea, sedation...

  11. The Evaluation of Undergraduate Nursing Students' Knowledge of Post-op Pain Management after Participation in Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Cecile B; Mixon, Diana K

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this paper was to assess undergraduate nursing students' pain knowledge after participation in a simulation scenario. The Knowledge and Attitudes of Survey Regarding Pain (KASRP) was used to assess pain knowledge. In addition, reflective questions related to the simulation were examined. Student preferences for education method and reactions to the simulation (SIM) were described. Undergraduate nursing students' knowledge of pain management is reported as inadequate. An emerging pedagogy used to educate undergraduate nurses in a safe, controlled environment is simulation. Literature reports of simulation to educate students' about pain management are limited. As part of the undergraduate nursing student clinical coursework, a post-operative pain management simulation, the SIM was developed. Students were required to assess pain levels and then manage the pain for a late adolescent male whose mother's fear of addiction was a barrier to pain management. The students completed an anonymous written survey that included selected questions from the KASRP and an evaluation of the SIM experience. The students' mean KASRP percent correct was 70.4% ± 8.6%. Students scored the best on items specific to pain assessment and worst on items specific to opiate equivalents and decisions on PRN orders. The students' overall KASRP score post simulation was slightly better than previous studies of nursing students. These results suggest that educators should consider simulations to educate about pain assessment and patient/family education. Future pain simulations should include more opportunities for students to choose appropriate pain medications when provided PRN orders. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Intraperitoneal pre-insufflation of 0.125% bupivaciane with tramadol for postoperative pain relief following laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aslam Jamal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is associated with a fairly high incidence of postoperative discomfort which is more of visceral origin than somatic. Studies have concluded that the instillation of local anesthetic with opioid around gall bladder bed provides more effective analgesia than either local anesthetic or opioid alone. Material and Methods: The study included 90 American Society of Anesthesiologists I-II patients of age 16-65 years scheduled for laparoscopic cholecystectomy under general anesthesia. The patients received the study drugs at the initiation of insufflation of CO 2 in the intraperitoneal space by the operating surgeon under laparoscopic camera guidance over the gallbladder bed. Patients in Group T received tramadol 2 mg/kg in 30 ml normal saline, in Group B received bupivacaine 30 ml of 0.125% and in Group BT received tramadol 2 mg/kg in 30 ml of 0.125% bupivacaine intraperitoneally. Postoperative pain assessment was done at different time intervals in the first 24 h using Visual Analog Scale of 0-10 (0 = No pain, 10 = Worst pain imagined. Time to first dose of rescue analgesic and total analgesics required in the first 24 h postoperatively were also recorded. The incidence of side effects during the postoperative period was recorded. Results: Reduction in postoperative pain was elicited, at 4 and 8 h postoperatively when Group BT (bupivacaine-tramadol group was compared with Group T (tramadol group or Group B (bupivacaine group (P < 0.01. There was a significantly lower requirement of analgesics during first 24 h postoperatively in Group BT compared to Group B or T but no significant difference in the intake of analgesics was noted between Groups B Group T. Time to first dose of rescue analgesic was also significantly prolonged in Group BT compared to Group B or T. The incidence of nausea and vomiting was comparable in all the study groups. Conclusions: Intraperitoneal application of bupivacaine with

  13. Transversus abdominal plane (TAP block for postoperative pain management: a review [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Jakobsson

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Transversus abdominal plane (TAP block has a long history and there is currently extensive clinical experience around TAP blocks. The aim of this review is to provide a summary of the present evidence on the effects of TAP block and to provide suggestions for further studies. There are several approaches to performing abdominal wall blocks, with the rapid implementation of ultrasound-guided technique facilitating a major difference in TAP block performance. During surgery, an abdominal wall block may also be applied by the surgeon from inside the abdominal cavity. Today, there are more than 11 meta-analyses providing a compiled evidence base around the effects of TAP block. These analyses include different procedures, different techniques of TAP block administration and, importantly, they compare the TAP block with a variety of alternative analgesic regimes. The effects of TAP block during laparoscopic cholecystectomy seem to be equivalent to local infiltration analgesia and also seem to be beneficial during laparoscopic colon resection. The effects of TAP are more pronounced when it is provided prior to surgery and these effects are local anaesthesia dose-dependent. TAP block seems an interesting alternative in patients with, for example, severe obesity where epidural or spinal anaesthesia/analgesia is technically difficult and/or poses a risk. There is an obvious need for further high-quality studies comparing TAP block prior to surgery with local infiltration analgesia, single-shot spinal analgesia, and epidural analgesia. These studies should be procedure-specific and the effects should be evaluated, both regarding short-term pain and analgesic requirement and also including the effects on postoperative nausea and vomiting, recovery of bowel function, ambulation, discharge, and protracted recovery outcomes (assessed by e.g., postoperative quality of recovery scale.

  14. Transversus abdominal plane (TAP) block for postoperative pain management: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsson, Jan; Wickerts, Liselott; Forsberg, Sune; Ledin, Gustaf

    2015-01-01

    Transversus abdominal plane (TAP) block has a long history and there is currently extensive clinical experience around TAP blocks. The aim of this review is to provide a summary of the present evidence on the effects of TAP block and to provide suggestions for further studies. There are several approaches to performing abdominal wall blocks, with the rapid implementation of ultrasound-guided technique facilitating a major difference in TAP block performance. During surgery, an abdominal wall block may also be applied by the surgeon from inside the abdominal cavity. Today, there are more than 11 meta-analyses providing a compiled evidence base around the effects of TAP block. These analyses include different procedures, different techniques of TAP block administration and, importantly, they compare the TAP block with a variety of alternative analgesic regimes. The effects of TAP block during laparoscopic cholecystectomy seem to be equivalent to local infiltration analgesia and also seem to be beneficial during laparoscopic colon resection. The effects of TAP are more pronounced when it is provided prior to surgery and these effects are local anaesthesia dose-dependent. TAP block seems an interesting alternative in patients with, for example, severe obesity where epidural or spinal anaesthesia/analgesia is technically difficult and/or poses a risk. There is an obvious need for further high-quality studies comparing TAP block prior to surgery with local infiltration analgesia, single-shot spinal analgesia, and epidural analgesia. These studies should be procedure-specific and the effects should be evaluated, both regarding short-term pain and analgesic requirement and also including the effects on postoperative nausea and vomiting, recovery of bowel function, ambulation, discharge, and protracted recovery outcomes (assessed by e.g., postoperative quality of recovery scale).

  15. Oral morphine versus ibuprofen administered at home for postoperative orthopedic pain in children: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poonai, Naveen; Datoo, Natasha; Ali, Samina; Cashin, Megan; Drendel, Amy L; Zhu, Rongbo; Lepore, Natasha; Greff, Michael; Rieder, Michael; Bartley, Debra

    2017-10-10

    Oral morphine for postoperative pain after minor pediatric surgery, while increasingly popular, is not supported by evidence. We evaluated whether oral morphine was superior to ibuprofen for at-home management of children's postoperative pain. We conducted a randomized superiority trial comparing oral morphine (0.5 mg/kg) with ibuprofen (10 mg/kg) in children 5 to 17 years of age who had undergone minor outpatient orthopedic surgery (June 2013 to September 2016). Participants took up to 8 doses of the intervention drug every 6 hours as needed for pain at home. The primary outcome was pain, according to the Faces Pain Scale - Revised, for the first dose. Secondary outcomes included additional analgesic requirements, adverse effects, unplanned health care visits and pain scores for doses 2 to 8. We analyzed data for 77 participants in each of the morphine and ibuprofen groups. Both interventions decreased pain scores with no difference in efficacy. The median difference in pain score before and after the first dose of medication was 1 (interquartile range 0-1) for both morphine and ibuprofen ( p = 0.2). For doses 2 to 8, the median differences in pain score before and after the dose were not significantly different between groups. Significantly more participants taking morphine reported adverse effects (45/65 [69%] v. 26/67 [39%], p ibuprofen groups, respectively; p = 0.003). Morphine was not superior to ibuprofen, and both drugs decreased pain with no apparent difference in efficacy. Morphine was associated with significantly more adverse effects, which suggests that ibuprofen is a better first-line option after minor surgery. ClinicalTrials.gov, no. NCT01686802. © 2017 Canadian Medical Association or its licensors.

  16. The Effect of Subcutaneous Ketamine Infiltration on Postoperative Pain in Elective Cesarean Section under Spinal Anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Manouchehrian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Appropriate analgesia after cesarean section helps women feel more comfortable and increase the mobility of the mother's and also their ability to take better care of their newborns. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of subcutaneous infiltration of ketamine on postoperative pain reduction and hemodynamic status of patients after elective cesarean section. Materials & Methods: This study was designed as a double blinded prospective, randomized clinical trial and 60 cases of women undergoing elective cesarean section under spinal anes-thesia were randomly assigned into two groups. For 30 cases in the ketamine group, infiltra-tion of subcutaneous ketamine 0.5 mg / kg was administered after closure of surgical inci-sion. 30 patients in the placebo group received subcutaneous infiltration of saline. During the patient's recovery time and after transferring to the ward, the VAS of pain and vital signs were continuously assessed. if VAS ? 3, 100 mg diclofenac suppository was administered and if there were no response, 30 mg intravenous pethidine was also administered. Prescribed number of suppositories and pethidine dosage were compared. The complications, such as hallucination, nystagmus, nausea, vomiting and drowsiness in patients were also recorded and compared. Statistical analysis was performed by SPSS16 software and ?2 and t-test. P< 0.05 was considered statistically significant in all of the cases. Results: In the course of systolic blood pressure, heart rate and arterial blood oxygen satura-tion during the first 24 hours, no significant differences were mentioned between the two groups. At the time of arrival to the recovery room and 30 minutes later, the mean VAS was not significantly different in the groups. However, the mean VAS at 1, 2 , 4 , 6 , 8 and 12 hours after surgery were significantly lower in the ketamine group (0.61±059 than in the sa-line group (3.37±096 (P<0.001. The mean

  17. [The Analgesic Sparing Effect of Ketamine for Postoperative Pain Management after Pediatric Surgery on the Body Surface].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urabe, Tomoaki; Nakanuno, Ryuichi; Hayase, Kazuma; Sasada, Shogo; Iwamitsu, Reimi; Senami, Masaki

    2016-04-01

    It is reported that ketamine, a N-methyl-D-aspertate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, can provide analgesic effect improving postoperative pain management and decrease the supplementary analgesic requirement. We investigated the analgesic sparing effect of ketamine for postoperative pain in children undergoing surgery of body surface. Fifty eight patients (0-9 yrs) who had surgery of body surface were divided into two groups (ketamine : n = 27, Group K or control : n = 31, Group N). Postoperative analgesia extracted from charts was retrospectively evaluated by the times patients used analgesics until discharge after the operations. Chi-square and Mann-Whitney U tests were used for statistical analysis. Results : The ketamine group received an intrave- nous bolus of ketamine (1 mg - kg-1) before surgical skin incision. However, there were no significant differ- ences of usage (Group K vs Group N : 4/27 vs 7/31, P=0.45) and frequency of supplementary analgesic us- ages (P=0.85) among groups. In addition, there were also no significant demographic differences between the two groups. Conclusions : Our investigation suggests that the intravenous bolus of ketamine (1 mg - kg-1) before surgical skin incision does not decrease the supple- mentary analgesic requirements on postoperative pain management in pediatric surgery of the body surface.

  18. A double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized comparison of pre and postoperative administration of ketorolac and tramadol for dental extraction pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitesh Mishra

    2012-01-01

    Results: Ketorolac and tramadol were significantly better than placebo in relieving molar tooth extraction pain. Postoperative administration of tramadol was found to be more efficacious than preoperative administration in relieving the pain, whereas the preoperative administration of ketorolac was better than its postoperative administration. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that tramadol is equally effective to ketorolac in relieving pain in the first 6 h after molar extraction and therefore can be tried in patients who are intolerant to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

  19. Continuous wound infiltration system for postoperative pain management in gynecologic oncology patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Banghyun; Kim, Kidong; Ahn, Soyeon; Shin, Hyun-Jung; Suh, Dong Hoon; No, Jae Hong; Kim, Yong Beom

    2017-05-01

    Major open surgery for gynecologic cancer usually involves a long midline skin incision and induces severe postoperative surgical site pain (POSP) that may not be effectively controlled with the conventional management. We investigated whether combining a continuous wound infiltration system (CWIS, ON-Q PainBuster ® ) and intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV PCA) effectively decreases POSP, compared with IV PCA alone, in gynecologic oncology patients. This retrospective study included 62 Korean patients who received a long midline skin incision during gynecologic cancer surgery. The combined therapy group (n = 31), which received CWIS (0.5% ropivacaine infused over 72 h) and IV PCA (fentanyl citrate), and the IV PCA only group (n = 31) were determined using 1:1 matching. POSP was assessed using resting numeric rating scale (NRS) scores measured for 96 h after surgery, which were analyzed using a linear mixed model. The slopes of the predicted NRS values from the linear mixed model were significantly different between the groups. Compared with the control group, the combined therapy group had lower predicted NRS scores for the first 72 h, but higher predicted scores between 72 and 96 h. Moreover, the mean NRS scores over the first 48 h postoperation were significantly lower in the combined therapy group than in the control group; the scores were similar in both groups during the remaining period. With the exception of a higher body mass index in the CWIS group, the other variables, such as the dosage and usage time of fentanyl citrate, use of additional painkillers, and side effects, including wound complications, did not differ between groups. Combined therapy using CWIS and IV PCA may be a useful strategy for POSP management in gynecologic oncology patients.

  20. Improving postoperative tonsillectomy pain management in children--a double blinded randomised control trial of a patient analgesia information sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Lucas; Sun, Jing; Courtney, Mark; Murphy, Paul

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate paediatric post-tonsillectomy pain management using oxycodone when a specific analgesia information sheet is included with standard postoperative information. Oxycodone information sheets were randomly allocated to half the study children's post-tonsillectomy information pack. The trial was double-blinded to the surgeon, anaesthetist, nursing and administrative staff. Parents and children completed the pain assessment on day 3, 5 and 7. On day 10 the parents completed a questionnaire. A postoperative analgesia information sheet provides for higher satisfaction and knowledge for parents using oxycodone (psheet, most significantly at day 3 and 7 post operatively (psheets are useful in education and use of postoperative analgesia. The primary objective to explore the efficacy of the information sheet has proved to be successful in this setting. Given risks of opioid analgesia, it is recommended that postoperative information sheets be given to all parents, to provide for improved analgesia control and safe management of children in the postoperative period. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Role of oral gabapentin as preemptive adjuvant with spinal anesthesia for postoperative pain in patients undergoing surgeries under spinal anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roshan Lal Gogna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: The study was undertaken to evaluate postoperative benefit in patients administered tablet gabapentin as premedication with the primary outcome determining the effect on duration of analgesia with total analgesic requirement and measurement of postoperative sedation scores as our secondary outcomes. Methods: The study was a prospective randomized observational study in sixty patients undergoing surgeries in spinal anesthesia (SA. Patients were randomly assigned into two groups. Group A (n = 30 patients received tablet gabapentin (600 mg while Group B (n = 30 received a placebo (Vitamin B complex orally 2 h before surgery. Postoperative pain was managed with intravenous tramadol 2 mg/kg. Postoperative monitoring and assessment included pain assessment every 2 h with Numeric Rating Scale (0–10 for 12 h and then at 24 h. Results: On comparison of intergroup data, the duration of analgesia was prolonged in Group A (288.79 ± 38.81 min as compared to Group B (218.67 ± 37.62 min with P (0.0001. Total opioid requirement was higher in placebo group as compared to the Group A (P = 0.025. Statistical difference in mean (standard deviation pain score at 24 h was statistically significant (P = 0.0002. Sedation scores were significantly higher in Group A at 2 and 4 h post-SA. Conclusion: Single dose of gabapentin administered 2 h before surgery provides better pain control as compared to placebo. It prolongs the duration of analgesia, reduces the total analgesic requirement during the postoperative period.

  2. Use of Fentanyl Iontophoretic Transdermal System (ITS) (IONSYS®) in the Management of Patients with Acute Postoperative Pain: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poplawski, Steven; Johnson, Matthew; Philips, Philip; Eberhart, Leopold H J; Koch, Tilo; Itri, Loretta M

    2016-12-01

    Fentanyl iontophoretic transdermal system (ITS) [IONSYS ® , The Medicines Company, Parsippany, NJ, USA] is a needle-free, patient-controlled, postoperative opioid pain management treatment. It is indicated for the short-term management of acute postoperative pain in adults requiring opioid analgesia in the hospital. The safety and effectiveness of fentanyl ITS for acute postoperative pain management has been demonstrated in a range of surgery and patient types studied in seven phase 3 trials (three placebo-controlled trials and four active-comparator trials). The majority of the patients in the phase 3 trials had undergone either abdominal/pelvic, orthopedic, or thoracic surgery. Consistent with the prescribing information, physicians in clinical practice may treat patients with this system following any type of surgery including those that may not have been included in the phase 3 trials. The purpose of this case series is to illustrate how fentanyl ITS is being utilized for postoperative pain management in real-world clinical practice following a variety of surgeries and in current pain management protocols that may have evolved since the completion of the phase 3 program. There are seven cases from three clinical centers described within this case series, each using fentanyl ITS according to the prescribing information. The surgery types included are bariatric (N = 3), prostate (N = 2), colorectal (N = 1), and perirectal abscess drainage (N = 1). A systematic review of each patient chart was conducted via a standardized retrospective assessment by the clinicians who managed each patient. Additionally, each healthcare professional was interviewed regarding their overall experience and key learnings using fentanyl ITS. Overall, fentanyl ITS was effective and well tolerated in these case reports in current-day clinical practice settings. These case studies are informative about fentanyl ITS use shortly after product approval and set the stage for

  3. Comparison of efficacy of dexketoprofen versus paracetamol on postoperative pain and morphine consumption in laminectomy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesimci, Elvin; Gümüş, Tülin; Izdeş, Seval; Sen, Pelin; Kanbak, Orhan

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this prospective randomized, double-blind study was to evaluate the analgesic efficacy and opioid-sparing effects of preemptive single dose of dexketoprofen trometamol in comparison with that of paracetamol or placebo for elective lumbar disc surgery, over a 24-hour (h) investigation period. After institutional approval and informed consent had been obtained, 75 patients scheduled for single level lumbar disc surgery were randomly allocated into three equal groups. Patients received oral dexketoprofen 25 mg (Group D), 500 mg paracetamol (Group P) or placebo tablets (Group C) 30 minutes (min) before induction of standard anesthesia. Patient-controlled analgesia was supplied postoperatively using morphine. Hemodynamics, visual analogue scale (VAS), sedation score, morphine consumption, and side effects were recorded every 15 min in the first hour and at 2, 6 and 24 h after surgery. The mean pain scores were similar among groups (p>0.05). The cumulative (SD) 24-h morphine consumption was 28.1 mg, 40.6 mg, and 43.6 mg for Groups D, P and C, respectively. The amount of morphine use at 2, 6 and 24 h was significantly lower in Group D (p0.05). The study demonstrated that preemptive dexketoprofen trometamol 25 mg is associated with a decrease of up to 35% in morphine consumption compared with placebo over the first 24 h following lumbar disc surgery; however, paracetamol 500 mg did not show the expected opioid-sparing effect comparatively.

  4. A comparative study of postoperative pain for open thyroidectomy versus bilateral axillo-breast approach robotic thyroidectomy using a self-reporting application for iPad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Young Jun; Song, Junho; Kang, Jiyoung; Woo, Jung-Woo; Song, Ra-Yeong; Kwon, Hyungju; Kim, Su-Jin; Choi, June Young; Lee, Kyu Eun

    2016-05-01

    Postoperative pain for robotic thyroid surgeries including bilateral axillo-breast approach (BABA) has not been well studied. In this study, we have developed a self-reporting application (SRA) for iPad and prospectively collected pain scores from open thyroidectomy (OT) and BABA robotic thyroidectomy (RT) patients. Female patients who underwent total thyroidectomy for papillary thyroid carcinoma were included. Patients recorded pain scores for throat, anterior neck, posterior neck, chest, and back on postoperative days 1, 2, and 3. Once discharged, on postoperative day 14, a survey was also conducted on satisfaction of SRA and cosmesis. A total of 54 patients were enrolled (27 BABA RT and 27 OT). There were no significant differences between the 2 groups in clinicopathological characteristics and postoperative complication rates. Postoperative pain scores at days 1, 2, 3, and 14 were not significantly different between the groups for throat, anterior neck, posterior neck, or back. Postoperative analgesic requirements were similar between the 2 groups. Wound satisfaction scores were significantly higher in the BABA RT group (BABA RT 7.4 vs. OT 5.7; P = 0.016). Satisfaction scores for the usefulness of SRA were above 7.2 for all four questionnaire items on the 10-point scale. Postoperative pain for BABA RT is equivalent to OT but offers greater cosmetic satisfaction for patients. A mobile device application such as SRA may facilitate proper assessment and management of pain in postoperative patients.

  5. Preoperative physical therapy treatment did not influence postoperative pain and disability outcomes in patients undergoing shoulder arthroscopy: a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valencia C

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Carolina Valencia,1 Rogelio A Coronado,2 Corey B Simon,3,4 Thomas W Wright,5 Michael W Moser,5 Kevin W Farmer,5 Steven Z George3,6,7 1Department of Applied Medicine and Rehabilitation, Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN, 2Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, 3Department of Physical Therapy, College of Public Health and Health Professions, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 4Department of Community Dentistry and Behavioral Science, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville,FL, 5Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 6Center for Pain Research and Behavioral Health, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 7Brooks–PHHP Research Collaboration, Jacksonville, FL, USA Background: There is limited literature investigating preoperative physical therapy (pre-op PT treatment on pain intensity and disability after musculoskeletal surgery. The purposes of the present cohort study were to describe patient characteristics for those who had and did not have pre-op PT treatment and determine whether pre-op PT influenced the length of postoperative physical therapy (post-op PT treatment (number of sessions and 3-month and 6-month postsurgical outcomes, such as pain intensity and disability. Patients and methods: A total of 124 patients (mean age =43 years, 81 males with shoulder pain were observed before and after shoulder arthroscopic surgery. Demographic data, medical history, and validated self-report questionnaires were collected preoperatively and at 3 months and 6 months after surgery. Analysis of variance models were performed to identify differences across measures for patients who had pre-op PT treatment and those who did not and to examine outcome differences at 3 months and 6 months. Alpha was set at the 0.05 level for statistical significance. Results: Males had less participation in pre-op PT than females (P=0.01. In

  6. Validation of the scale on Satisfaction of Adolescents with Postoperative pain management-idiopathic Scoliosis (SAP-S

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khadra C

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Christelle Khadra,1–3 Sylvie Le May,1,2 Ariane Ballard,1,2 Jean Théroux,1,4 Sylvie Charette,5 Edith Villeneuve,6,7 Stefan Parent,2,8,9 Argerie Tsimicalis,10,11 Jill MacLaren Chorney12,13 1Faculty of Nursing, Université de Montréal, 2CHU Sainte-Justine Research Centre, 3Montreal Chest Institute, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC, Canada; 4School of Health Professions, Murdoch University, Perth, WA, Australia; 5Direction of Nursing, 6Department of Anesthesia, CHU Sainte-Justine, 7Department of Anesthesia, 8Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Université de Montréal, 9Orthopaedic Service, Department of Surgery, CHU Sainte-Justine, 10Ingram School of Nursing, McGill University, 11Shriners Hospitals for Children, Montreal, QC, 12Pediatric Complex Pain Team, IWK Health Centre, 13Department of Anesthesia, Pain Management, and Perioperative Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada Background: Spinal fusion is a common orthopedic surgery in children and adolescents and is associated with high pain levels postoperatively. If the pain is not well managed, negative outcomes may ensue. To our knowledge, there is no measure in English that assesses patient’s satisfaction with postoperative pain management following idiopathic scoliosis surgery. The aim of the present study was to assess the psychometric properties of the satisfaction subscale of the English version of the Satisfaction of Adolescents with Postoperative pain management – idiopathic Scoliosis (SAP-S scale.Methods: Eighty-two participants aged 10–18 years, who had undergone spinal fusion surgery, fully completed the SAP-S scale at 10–14 days postdischarge. Construct validity was assessed through a principal component analysis using varimax rotation.Results: Principal component analysis indicated a three-factor structure of the 13-item satisfaction subscale of the SAP-S scale. Factors referred to satisfaction regarding current

  7. How Repeated Time To Event (RTTE) modelling of opioid requests after surgery may improve future post-operative pain management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Rasmus Vestergaard; Rasmussen, Sten; Kreilgaard, Mads

    at Orthopaedic Department, Aalborg University Hospital, Denmark during the period May-Dec 2012. Morphine administration times (estimated precision: ±5mins), formulations and doses were extracted from medical journals in the hospitalization period or until 96 hours after surgery. RTTE modelling was performed......Title: How Repeated Time To Event (RTTE) modelling of opioid requests after surgery may improve future post-operative pain management Author: Rasmus Vestergaard Juul (1) Sten Rasmussen (2) Mads Kreilgaard (1) Ulrika S. H. Simonsson (3) Lona Louring Christrup (1) Trine Meldgaard Lund (1) Institution...... of surgery specific, drug concentration related, population specific and/or time-varying covariates of opioid requests and pain events. Conclusions: A framework has been developed based on RTTE modelling that may help improve future pain management by 1) Identification of surgery specific patterns in pain...

  8. Transversus abdominis plane block reduces postoperative pain intensity and analgesic consumption in elective cesarean delivery under general anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslamian, Laleh; Jalili, Zorvan; Jamal, Ashraf; Marsoosi, Vajiheh; Movafegh, Ali

    2012-06-01

    It is reported that following abdominal surgery, transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block can reduce postoperative pain. The primary outcome of this study was the evaluation of the efficacy of TAP block on pain intensity following cesarean delivery with Pfannenstiel incision. Fifty pregnant women were randomized blindly to receive either a TAP block with 15 ml 0.25% bupivacaine in both sides (group T, n = 25) or no blockade (group C, n = 25) at the end of the surgery, which was performed with a Pfannenstiel incision under general anesthesia. The pain intensity in the patients was assessed by a blinded investigator at the time of discharge from recovery and at 6, 12, and 24 h postoperatively, with a visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain. The women in the TAP block group had significantly lower VAS pain scores at rest and during coughing and consumed significantly less tramadol than the women in group C [50 mg (0-150) vs. 250 mg (0-400), P = 0.001]. There was a significantly longer time to the first request for analgesic in the TAP block group [210 min (0-300) vs. 30 min (10-180) in group C, P = 0.0001]. Two-sided TAP block with 0.25% bupivacaine in parturients who undergo cesarean section with a Pfannenstiel incision under general anesthesia can decrease postoperative pain and analgesic consumption. The time to the first analgesic rescue was longer in the parturients who received the TAP block.

  9. Validation of orthopedic postoperative pain assessment methods for dogs: a prospective, blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled study.

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    Pascale Rialland

    Full Text Available In the context of translational research, there is growing interest in studying surgical orthopedic pain management approaches that are common to humans and dogs. The validity of postoperative pain assessment methods is uncertain with regards to responsiveness and the potential interference of analgesia. The hypothesis was that video analysis (as a reference, electrodermal activity, and two subjective pain scales (VAS and 4A-VET would detect different levels of pain intensity in dogs after a standardized trochleoplasty procedure. In this prospective, blinded, randomized study, postoperative pain was assessed in 25 healthy dogs during a 48-hour time frame (T. Pain was managed with placebo (Group 1, n = 10, preemptive and multimodal analgesia (Group 2, n = 5, or preemptive analgesia consisting in oral tramadol (Group 3, n = 10. Changes over time among groups were analyzed using generalized estimating equations. Multivariate regression tested the significance of relationships between pain scales and video analysis. Video analysis identified that one orthopedic behavior, namely 'Walking with full weight bearing' of the operated leg, decreased more in Group 1 at T24 (indicative of pain, whereas three behaviors indicative of sedation decreased in Group 2 at T24 (all p<0.004. Electrodermal activity was higher in Group 1 than in Groups 2 and 3 until T1 (p<0.0003. The VAS was not responsive. 4A-VET showed divergent results as its orthopedic component (4A-VETleg detected lower pain in Group 2 until T12 (p<0.0009, but its interactive component (4A-VETbeh was increased in Group 2 from T12 to T48 (p<0.001. Concurrent validity established that 4A-VETleg scores the painful orthopedic condition accurately and that pain assessment through 4A-VETbeh and VAS was severely biased by the sedative side-effect of the analgesics. Finally, the video analysis offered a concise template for assessment in dogs with acute orthopedic pain. However, subjective pain

  10. Intraperitoneal injection of Bupivacaine and Lidocaine in reducing postoperative pain in gynecologic laparoscopic surgeries: a comparative study

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    Alleyassin A

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: As less invasive surgical procedures, such as laparoscopy, become more common, patients can go home soon after the surgery. However, some pain is accompanied by such procedures due to peritoneal stretching, diaphragmatic irritation, or, to a lesser extent, abdominal puncture. It is important to reduce the level of pain to the point that narcotics are not necessary. The administration of opioids for pain after abdominal surgeries is common. The receptors involved seem to be susceptible to blockade with low-dose local anesthesia, although this is subject to some controversy. In this study, we assess and compare the effectiveness of intraperitoneal Bupivacaine and Lidocaine in pain reduction after diagnostic gynecologic laparoscopy in infertility patients. Methods: In this randomized clinical trial, 150 patients admitted to Dr. Shariati Hospital for diagnostic gynecologic laparoscopy were entered into three randomized groups. Group B received Bupivacaine after the diagnostic laparoscopic procedure, group L received Lidocaine and group C, the control group, received a placebo after the surgery, all administered intraperi- toneally. Postsurgerical pain was assessed using the numeric visual analogue scale at 6 and 24 hours after surgery. Results: In group B, the pain scores at 6 and 24 hours after surgery were significantly less than those of group L. Conclusions: Administration of Bupivacaine after diagnostic gynecologic laparoscopic procedures is more effective in pain control than Lidocaine. The effect of this drug is temporary, yet it significantly decreases early postoperative pain, reducing the need for additional postoperative analgesics. Furthermore, the time at which patients can be discharged from the hospital is significantly reduced.

  11. Comparison of Postoperative Pain between Infiltrative Local Anesthesia plus Paracetamol and Total Intravenous Anesthesia plus Paracetamol in Ambulatory Breast Surgery

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    Kasra Karvandian

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute postoperative pain is an important surgical side effect that may delay patient discharge in ambulatory operations; moreover, the strategies used to alleviate pain may cause side effects that require longer hospitalization to recover. In this clinical trial, we compared two current anesthetic methods with special concerns about postoperative pain intensity beside other important components of ambulatory anesthesia.Methods: This clinical trial was conducted on two age-matched groups of 75 members who underwent ambulatory breast surgery. Patients in the first group (GA underwent general anesthesia with propofol plus remifentanil by employing a laryngeal mask airway. In the second group (LA, the surgeon used infiltration of 2% lidocaine in the breast tissue and midazolam was applied as premedication. At the end of surgery, paracetamol was administered to all patients in both groups. The pain score was evaluated when the patients were fully awake using a numerical pain rating scale. Patients with severe pain received analgesia. The length of postanesthesia care unit (PACU stay was recorded for each patient.Results: None of the patients in the LA group were satisfied because of the experience of needle insertion into their breast tissue (P = 0.001. The patients in the LA group experienced more pain in PACU requiring adjuvant analgesia (P = 0.001. Patients in the LA group had longer PACU admission (P = 0.001.Conclusions: Patients in the LA group had higher pain scores and were dissatisfied with the plan of their anesthesia. This may confirm the role of preemptive analgesia or the effect of emotional stress of breast tissue needling in wakeful patient.

  12. Determination of moderate-to-severe postoperative pain on the numeric rating scale: a cut-off point analysis applying four different methods.

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    Gerbershagen, H J; Rothaug, J; Kalkman, C J; Meissner, W

    2011-10-01

    Cut-off points (CPs) of the numeric rating scale (NRS 0-10) are regularly used in postoperative pain treatment. However, there is insufficient evidence to identify the optimal CP between mild and moderate pain. A total of 435 patients undergoing general, trauma, or oral and maxillofacial surgery were studied. To determine the optimal CP for pain treatment, four approaches were used: first, patients estimated their tolerable postoperative pain intensity before operation; secondly, 24 h after surgery, they indicated if they would have preferred to receive more analgesics; thirdly, satisfaction with pain treatment was analysed, and fourthly, multivariate analysis was used to calculate the optimal CP for pain intensities in relation to pain-related interference with movement, breathing, sleep, and mood. The estimated tolerable postoperative pain before operation was median (range) NRS 4.0 (0-10). Patients who would have liked more analgesics reported significantly higher average pain since surgery [median NRS 5.0 (0-9)] compared with those without this request [NRS 3.0 (0-8)]. Patients satisfied with pain treatment reported an average pain intensity of median NRS 3.0 (0-8) compared with less satisfied patients with NRS 5.0 (2-9). Analysis of average postoperative pain in relation to pain-related interference with mood and activity indicated pain categories of NRS 0-2, mild; 3-4, moderate; and 5-10, severe pain. Three of the four methods identified a treatment threshold of average pain of NRS≥4. This was considered to identify patients with pain of moderate-to-severe intensity. This cut-off was indentified as the tolerable pain threshold.

  13. Efficacy of intravenous paracetamol and dexketoprofen on postoperative pain and morphine consumption after a lumbar disk surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunali, Yusuf; Akçil, Eren F; Dilmen, Ozlem Korkmaz; Tutuncu, Ayse C; Koksal, Guniz Meyanci; Akbas, Sedat; Vehid, Hayriye; Yentur, Ercument

    2013-04-01

    We compared the analgesic effects of intravenous (IV) paracetamol with that of dexketoprofen on postoperative pain and morphine consumption during the first 24 hour after a lumbar disk surgery. This prospective, placebo-controlled, double blind study investigated the analgesic effects of IV paracetamol and dexketoprofen on postoperative pain, morphine consumption, and morphine-related side effects after a lumbar disk surgery. Sixty American Society of Anesthesiologists 1 or 2 status patients scheduled for elective lumbar disk surgery under general anesthesia were included in the study. Patients were treated using patient-controlled analgesia with morphine for 24 hours after a lumbar disk surgery and randomized to receive IV paracetamol 1 g, dexketoprofen 50 mg, or isotonic saline (placebo). The primary endpoint was pain intensity measured by the visual analogue scale, and secondary endpoints were morphine consumption and related side effects. Pain intensity was lower in the dexketoprofen group (P=0.01) but not in the paracetamol group (P=0.21) when compared with the control group. Cumulative morphine consumption and morphine-related side effects did not reveal significant differences between the groups. The study showed that pain intensity during 24 hours after the lumbar disk surgery was significantly lowered by dexketoprofen, but not with paracetamol, as a supplemental analgesic to morphine patient-controlled analgesia when compared with controls.

  14. Evaluation of preemptive dexketoprofen trometamol effect on blood chemistry, vital signs and postoperative pain in dogs undergoing ovariohysterectomy.

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    Saritas, Z K; Saritas, T B; Pamuk, K; Korkmaz, M; Yaprakci, M V; Yilmaz, O; Demirkan, I

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the postoperative analgesic effects of preemptive dexketoprofen trometamol in dogs subjected to ovariohysterectomy (OHE). Seventeen adult bitches of various breeds were used in this study. The dogs were randomly allocated into of two groups. Subjects in the dexketoprofen trometamol (DEX) group (n=10), received intravenous (i.v.) dexketoprofen trometamol, 1 mg/kg, 15 minutes before premedication, while those assigned to the control (C) group (n=7) were given no analgesics prior to premedication. Pain level was assessed by two researchers before the administration of anaesthesia (15 minutes before start) and 0, 1, 2, 4 and 6 hours after surgery. A modified University of Melbourne Pain Scale (UMPS) was used to evaluate pain in both groups. Serum cortisol level changed from 0 to 1 h and from 0 to 1 to 4 h were compared between the groups; the increase in the C group was statistically significant. The modified UMPS was applied to both groups at baseline and postoperative 1, 2, 4 and 6 h. According to this test, the values for DEX were significantly lower than controls at 4 and 6 h (pdexketoprofen administration are a promising finding. The clinical advantage shown by the pain scale difference and the low serum cortisol levels should qualify dexketoprofen for preemptive pain management in dogs (Tab. 5, Fig. 2, Ref. 30).

  15. Prospective, randomized, and controlled trial on ketamine infusion during bilateral axillo-breast approach (BABA) robotic or endoscopic thyroidectomy: Effects on postoperative pain and recovery profiles

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    Kim, Dong-Ho; Choi, June Young; Kim, Byoung-Gook; Hwang, Jin-Young; Park, Seong-Joo; Oh, Ah-Young; Jeon, Young-Tae; Ryu, Jung-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Robotic or endoscopic thyroidectomy using bilateral axillo-breast approach (BABA) is frequently performed for excellent cosmesis. However, postoperative pain is remained as concerns due to the extent tissue dissection and tension during the operation. Ketamine is a noncompetitive N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist that reduces acute postoperative pain. We evaluated the effects of intraoperative ketamine infusion on postoperative pain control and recovery profiles following BABA robotic or endoscopic thyroidectomy. Methods: Fifty-eight adult patients scheduled for BABA robotic or endoscopic thyroidectomy were randomized into a control group (n = 29) and ketamine group (n = 29). Following induction of anesthesia, patients in each group were infused with the same volume of saline or ketamine solution (1 mg/kg bolus, 60 μg/kg/h continuous infusion). Total intravenous anesthesia with propofol and remifentanil was used to induce and maintain anesthesia. Pain scores (101-point numerical rating scale, 0 = no pain, 100 = the worst imaginable pain), the consumption of rescue analgesics, and other postoperative adverse effects were assessed at 1, 6, 24, and 48 hours postoperatively. Results: Patients in the ketamine group reported lower pain scores than those in the control group at 6 hours (30 [30] vs 50 [30]; P = 0.017), 24 hours (20 [10] vs 30 [20]; P ketamine infusion during anesthesia resulted in lower postoperative pain scores following BABA robotic or endoscopic thyroidectomy, with no increase in adverse events. PMID:27930531

  16. Nefopam hydrochloride loaded microspheres for post-operative pain management: synthesis, physicochemical characterization and in-vivo evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Neelam; Arora, Sandeep; Madan, Jitender

    2018-02-01

    Once-daily oral dosage of nefopam hydrochloride loaded sustained release microspheres (NPH-MS) was investigated as novel therapeutic strategy for post-operative pain management. Microspheres were synthesized using poly-3-hydroxybutyrate and poly-(ɛ-caprolactone) by double emulsion solvent evaporation technique. NPH-MS were characterized through FTIR, PXRD and SEM. In-vitro drug release study revealed sustained behavior till 24 h. Haemolysis was pain model, reversal of mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia by NPH-MS was statistically significant (p < .001) as compared with NPH till 24 h post-dose.

  17. A comparison of intraoperative morphine sulfate and methadone hydrochloride on postoperative visual analogue scale pain scores and narcotic requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laur, D F; Sinkovich, J; Betley, K

    1995-02-01

    Morphine sulfate and methadone hydrochloride exhibit very different half-lives but are described as having an analgesic potency of one. The use of a drug like methadone may provide prolonged and constant analgesia in the perioperative setting. This double-blinded investigation used methadone and morphine intraoperatively and measured pain scores and narcotic requirements in the first 24 hours postoperatively. Thirty American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) patients, physical status I through III, between the ages of 18 to 65 years were scheduled for orthopedic surgery and randomly assigned to receive morphine or methadone at 0.30 mg/kg. Fifteen patients received morphine and fifteen patients received methadone. There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of age, height, weight, and ASA status. No statistically significant difference was observed among the two groups between the amount of analgesic requirements postoperatively or in the visual analogue scale pain score.

  18. Post-operative pain relief using local infiltration analgesia during open abdominal hysterectomy: a randomized, double-blind study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, J M; Oras, J; Karlsson, O I; Olausson, K G; Thörn, S-E; Gupta, A

    2017-05-01

    Post-operative pain is common and often severe after open abdominal hysterectomy, and analgesic consumption high. This study assessed the efficacy of local infiltration analgesia (LIA) injected systematically into different tissues during surgery compared with saline on post-operative pain and analgesia. Fifty-nine patients were randomized to Group LIA (n = 29) consisting of 156 ml of a mixture of 0.2% ropivacaine + 30 mg ketorolac + 0.5 mg (5 ml) adrenaline, where the drugs were injected systematically in the operating site, around the proximal vagina, the ligaments, in the fascia and subcutaneously, or to saline and intravenous ketorolac, Group C (Control, n = 28), in a double-blind study. Post-operative pain, analgesic consumption, side-effects, and home discharge were analysed. Median dose of rescue morphine given 0-24 h after surgery was significantly lower in group LIA (18 mg, IQR 5-25 mg) compared with group C (27 mg, IQR 15-43 mg, P = 0.028). Median time to first analgesic injection was significantly longer in group LIA (40 min, IQR 20-60 min) compared with group C (20 min, IQR 12-30 min, P = 0.009). NRS score was lower in the group LIA compared with group C in the direct post-operative period (0-2 h). No differences were found in post-operative side-effects or home discharge between the groups. Systematically injected local infiltration analgesia for pain management was superior to saline in the primary endpoint, resulting in significantly lower rescue morphine requirements during 0-24 h, longer time to first analgesic request and lower early post-operative pain intensity. © 2017 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Association between COMT Polymorphism Val158Met and Opioid Consumption in Patients with Postoperative Pain: A Meta-Analysis

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    Bo Hu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Several factors influencing postoperative pain and the effect of opioid analgesics have been investigated on an individual level. The aim of this study was to clarify the impact of catecholamine-O-methyltransferase (COMT gene Val158Met on opioid consumption in postoperative patients. Methods: A systematic review and meta-analysis of the literature up to September 30, 2017, were performed by using PubMed, Cochrane Library, ISI Web of Science, and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI database. The meta-analysis examined all studies involving the association between genetic polymorphisms of COMT Val158Met and opioid consumption during the acute postoperative period. Results: Of the 153 identified studies, 23 studies were retrieved for systematic review and 10 studies were retrieved for meta-analysis. However, it was impossible to conduct meta-analysis on the association between COMT Val158Met polymorphism and postoperative pain because of heterogeneity of the data. Overall, meta-analysis showed that COMT Val/Met carriers consumed less opioid for analgesia within the first 24 hours after surgery (SMD = 0.14, 95% CI = [0.03, 0.25], P = 0.01 but not within 48 hours (SMD = 0.14, 95% CI = [0.08, 0.36], P = 0.21. There was no significant difference in opioid consumption between Val/ Val and Met/Met patients. Conclusion: Patients with Val/Met but not Met/Met allele variant consumed less opioid, though larger and better-designed studies are required to obtain an exclusive conclusion about the correlation between postoperative pain and COMT Val158Met polymorphism.

  20. [Interest of evaluation of professional practice for the improvement of the management of postoperative pain with patient controlled analgesia (PCA)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, A; Cuignet-Royer, E; Cornet, C; Trueck, S; Heck, M; Taron, F; Peignier, C; Chastel, A; Gervais, P; Bouaziz, H; Audibert, G; Mertes, P-M

    2010-10-01

    To evaluate the daily practice of postoperative PCA in Nancy University Hospital, in continuity with a quality program of postoperative pain (POP) care conducted in 2003. A retrospective audit of patient medical records. A review of all the medical records of consecutive surgical patients managed by PCA over a 5-week period in six surgical services. Criteria studied: Evaluation of hospital means (eight criteria) and of medical and nursing staff practice (16 criteria). A second audit was conducted 6 months after the implementation of quality improvement measures. Assessment of the hospital means: temperature chart including pain scores and PCA drug consumption, patient information leaflet, PCA protocol, postoperative pre-filled prescription form (PFPF) for post-anaesthesia care including PCA, and optional training of nurses in postoperative pain management. EVALUATION OF PRACTICES: One hundred and fifty-nine files of a total of 176 patients were analyzed (88%). Improvements noted after 6 months: trace of POP evaluation progressed from 73 to 87%, advance prescription of PCA adjustment increased from 56 to 68% and of the treatment of adverse effects from 54 to 68%, trace of PCA adaptation by attending nurse from 15 to 43%, trace of the administration of the treatment of adverse effects by attending nurse from 24% to 64%, as did the use of PFPF from 59 to 70%. The usefulness of a pre-filled prescription form for post-anaesthesia care including PCA prescription is demonstrated. Quality improvement measures include: poster information and pocket guides on PCA for nurses, training of 3 nurses per service to act as "PCA advisers" who will in turn train their ward colleagues in PCA management and the use of equipment until an acute pain team is established. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. The Effect of Pre-Emptive Administration of Dextromethorphan on Postoperative Pain in Patients Undergoing Interval Laparoscopic Tubal Sterilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-10-01

    requirements following surgery. Dextromethorphan , a readily available nonopioid antitussive in clinical use for more than 40 years, is one such NMDA...receptor Anticosti. This prospective, randomized, double blind pilot study compared the effects over time when patients received dextromethorphan versus...groups. Group I received 60 mg of dextromethorphan orally, and Group II received an oral placebo. Postoperative pain was assessed using an 11 point

  2. Electroacupuncture to alleviate postoperative pain after a laparoscopic appendectomy: study protocol for a three-arm, randomised, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seunghoon; Nam, Dongwoo; Kwon, Minsoo; Park, Won Seo; Park, Sun Jin

    2017-08-04

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of electroacupuncture (EA) for postoperative pain after laparoscopic appendectomy compared with sham electroacupuncture (SEA) and no acupuncture treatment. This study is a protocol for a three-arm, randomised, patient-assessor-blinded (to the type of acupuncture treatment), controlled, parallel trial. 138 participants diagnosed with appendicitis and scheduled for laparoscopic appendectomy will be randomly assigned to the EA group (n=46), SEA group (n=46) or control group (n=46). The EA group will receive acupuncture treatment at both regional and distal acupuncture points with electrostimulation. The SEA group will receive sham acupuncture treatment with mock electrostimulation. Both EA and SEA groups will receive a total of four treatments 1 hour preoperative, 1 hour postoperative and during the morning and afternoon the day after surgery with the same routine postoperative pain control. The control group will receive only routine postoperative pain control. The primary outcome is the 11-point Pain Intensity Numerical Rating Scale (PI-NRS) at 24 hours after surgery. The secondary outcomes are the PI-NRS, analgesic consumption, opioid-related side effects, time to first passing flatus, quality of life and adverse events evaluated 6, 12, 24 and 36 hours and 7 days after surgery. The study was planned in accordance with the Helsinki Declaration and the Korean Good Clinical Practice Guidelines to protect the participants and was approved by the institutional review board (IRB) of Kyung Hee University Medical Center (KMC IRB-1427-02). The results will be disseminated in peer-reviewed journals and presented at international conferences. Clinical Research Information Service (KCT0001328). © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  3. Evaluation of Oral Robenacoxib for the Treatment of Postoperative Pain and Inflammation in Cats: Results of a Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Stephen; Roberts, Elizabeth S.; Roycroft, Linda M.; King, Jonathan N.

    2012-01-01

    The efficacy and safety of robenacoxib were assessed for the control of postoperative pain and inflammation in cats. The study was a multicenter, prospective, randomized, blinded, and parallel group clinical trial. A total of 249 client-owned cats scheduled for forelimb onychectomy plus either ovariohysterectomy or castration surgeries were included. All cats received butorphanol prior to anesthesia and forelimb four-point regional nerve blocks with bupivacaine after induction of general anesthesia. Cats were randomized to receive daily oral tablet robenacoxib, at a mean (range) dosage of 1.84 (1.03–2.40) mg/kg (n = 167), or placebo (n = 82), once prior to surgery and for two days postoperatively. Significantly (P < 0.05) fewer robenacoxib cats received additional analgesia rescue therapy (16.5%) than placebo cats (46.3%). Pain elicited on palpation of the soft tissue incision site, behavior following social interaction, and posture assessed during the first 8 hours after extubation were significantly (P < 0.05) improved in cats receiving robenacoxib. Frequency of reported adverse clinical signs, hematology, serum chemistry and urinalysis variables, and body weight changes weresimilar between groups. In conclusion, robenacoxib was effective and well tolerated in the control of postoperative pain and inflammation in cats undergoing onychectomy with ovariohysterectomy or castration. PMID:23738129

  4. Efficacy and Safety of Transdermal Buprenorphine versus Oral Tramadol/Acetaminophen in Patients with Persistent Postoperative Pain after Spinal Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Hyup; Kim, Jin-Hyok; Kim, Jin-Hwan; Kim, Hak-Sun; Min, Woo-Kie; Park, Ye-Soo; Lee, Kyu-Yeol; Lee, Jung-Hee

    2017-01-01

    Control of persistent pain following spinal surgery is an unmet clinical need. This study compared the efficacy and safety of buprenorphine transdermal system (BTDS) to oral tramadol/acetaminophen (TA) in Korean patients with persistent, moderate pain following spinal surgery. Open-label, interventional, randomized multicenter study. Adults with persistent postoperative pain (Numeric Rating Scale [NRS] ≥ 4 at 14-90 days postsurgery) were enrolled. Patients received once-weekly BTDS ( n = 47; 5  μ g/h titrated to 20  μ g/h) or twice-daily TA ( n = 40; tramadol 37.5 mg/acetaminophen 325 mg, one tablet titrated to 4 tablets) for 6 weeks. The study compared pain reduction with BTDS versus TA at week 6. Quality of life (QoL), treatment satisfaction, medication compliance, and adverse events (AEs) were assessed. At week 6, both groups reported significant pain reduction (mean NRS change: BTDS -2.02; TA -2.76, both P pain following spinal surgery, BTDS is an alternative to TA for reducing pain and supports medication compliance. This trial is registered with Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01983111.

  5. Intraoperative ketamine reduces immediate postoperative opioid consumption after spinal fusion surgery in chronic pain patients with opioid dependency: a randomized, blinded trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Rikke Vibeke; Fomsgaard, Jonna Storm; Siegel, Hanna; Martusevicius, Robertas; Nikolajsen, Lone; Dahl, Jørgen Berg; Mathiesen, Ole

    2017-03-01

    Perioperative handling of surgical patients with opioid dependency represents an important clinical problem. Animal studies suggest that ketamine attenuates central sensitization and hyperalgesia and thereby reduces postoperative opioid tolerance. We hypothesized that intraoperative ketamine would reduce immediate postoperative opioid consumption compared with placebo in chronic pain patients with opioid dependency undergoing lumbar spinal fusion surgery. Primary outcome was morphine consumption 0 to 24 hours postoperatively. Secondary outcomes were acute pain at rest and during mobilization 2 to 24 hours postoperatively (visual analogue scale), adverse events, and persistent pain 6 months postoperatively. One hundred fifty patients were randomly assigned to intraoperative S-ketamine bolus 0.5 mg/kg and infusion 0.25 mg·kg·h or placebo. Postoperatively, patients received their usual opioids, paracetamol and IV patient-controlled analgesia with morphine. In the final analyses, 147 patients were included. Patient-controlled analgesia IV morphine consumption 0 to 24 hours postoperatively was significantly reduced in the ketamine group compared with the placebo group: 79 (47) vs 121 (53) mg IV, mean difference 42 mg (95% confidence interval -59 to -25), P ketamine group 6 and 24 hours postoperatively. There were no significant differences regarding acute pain, nausea, vomiting, hallucinations, or nightmares. Back pain at 6 months postoperatively compared with preoperative pain was significantly more improved in the ketamine group compared with the placebo group, P = 0.005. In conclusion, intraoperative ketamine significantly reduced morphine consumption 0 to 24 hours after lumbar fusion surgery in opioid-dependent patients. The trend regarding less persistent pain 6 months postoperatively needs further investigation.

  6. Long-term effect of ropivacaine nanoparticles for sciatic nerve block on postoperative pain in rats

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    Wang Z

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Zi Wang,1,* Haizhen Huang,2,* Shaozhong Yang,1 Shanshan Huang,1 Jingxuan Guo,1 Qi Tang,1 Feng Qi1 1Department of Anesthesiology, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, 2Department of Anesthesiology, Stomatology Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: The analgesic effect of ropivacaine (Rop for nerve block lasts only ~3–6 hours for single use. The aim of this study was to develop long-acting regional anesthetic Rop nanoparticles and investigate the effects of sciatic nerve block on postoperative pain in rats.Materials and methods: Rop nanoparticles were developed using polyethylene glycol-co-polylactic acid (PELA. One hundred and twenty adult male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups (n=30, each: Con (control group; 0.9% saline, 200 µL, PELA (PELA group; 10 mg, Rop (Rop group; 0.5%, 200 µL, and Rop-PELA (Rop-PELA group; 10%, 10 mg. Another 12 rats were used for the detection of Rop concentration in plasma. The mechanical withdrawal threshold and thermal withdrawal latency were measured at 2 hours, 4 hours, 8 hours, 1 day, 2 days, 3 days, 5 days, and 7 days after incision. The expression of c-FOS was determined by immunohistochemistry at 2 hours, 8 hours, 48 hours, and 7 days. Nerve and organ toxicities were also evaluated at 7 days.Results: The duration of Rop absorption in the plasma of the Rop-PELA group was longer (>8 hours than that of the Rop group (4 hours. Mechanical withdrawal threshold and thermal withdrawal latency in the Rop-PELA group were higher than that in other groups (4 hours–3 days. c-FOS expression in the Rop-PELA group was lower than that in the control group at 2 hours, 8 hours, and 48 hours and lower than that in the Rop group at 8 hours and 48 hours after paw incision. Slight foreign body reactions were observed surrounding the sciatic nerve at 7 days. No obvious pathophysiological

  7. Translation and Validation of the Thai Version of a Modified Brief Pain Inventory: A Concise Instrument for Pain Assessment in Postoperative Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keawnantawat, Pakamas; Thanasilp, Sureeporn; Preechawong, Sunida

    2017-07-01

    Acute pain after cardiac surgery can be assessed using validated instruments such as the modified interference subscale of the Brief Pain Inventory (mod-BPI). Despite the available knowledge, the Thai version of a mod-BPI has not yet been presented. To translate a mod-BPI into the Thai language (BPI-T) and to validate it in acute pain after cardiac surgery. This multisetting, cross-sectional study was done from 4 cardiac centers. With a convenience sampling technique, 132 cardiac surgery patients were enrolled during the first 72 postoperative hours. A BPI-T composed of 4 items on the intensity subscale and 6 items on the interference subscale was translated following Brislin's model. Convergent validity against the numeric rating scale (NRS), confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), and internal consistency reliability were examined. Of the total sample, 70% experienced moderate to severe pain (cutoff points of worst pain ≥ 4/10), and 65% had moderate to severe interference with deep breathing and coughing, 53% with general activity, and 49% with walking. The CFA confirmed the 2-factor structure of intensity and interference subscales consistent with the original version (root-mean-square error of approximation = 0.08, comparative fit index = 0.95, χ 2 = 39.00, df = 27, χ 2 /df = 1.44, P = 0.06). The physical and mental subdimensions under the interference subscale were determined (standardized factor loading = 0.70 and 0.42, respectively). The BPI-T also has good internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha coefficients 0.76 and 0.85). Pearson's correlation coefficients at 0.35 to 0.70 supported the convergent validity to the NRS. The BPI-T is a concise instrument for pain assessment in postoperative cardiac surgery. © 2016 World Institute of Pain.

  8. A unilateral open door laminoplasty technique: prospective analysis of the relationship between midline extensor muscle preservation and postoperative neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin Hoon; Jeong, Eui-Kyun; Lee, Moon Kyu; Chul Rhim, Seung; Roh, Sung Woo; Kim, Jeoung Hee; Jeon, Sang Ryong

    2015-02-01

    Since laminoplasty was first introduced, several techniques have been developed to reduce postoperative neck pain and progressive kyphosis following this procedure. We describe the importance of deep muscle preservation to prevent postoperative neck pain following cervical posterior surgery, using the inter-muscular plane. We performed cervical laminoplasty on 10 patients from March to July 2012. The mean follow-up duration was 14.6 (range 12-18) months, and the mean age was 58.8 (48-68) years. There were eight men and two women in the study cohort, which consisted of eight cases of cervical spondylotic myelopathy and two cases of ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament. The Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score and neck disability index (NDI) score were assessed before and at 6 and 12 months after surgery. The numeric rating scale (NRS) for neck pain was evaluated at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after surgery. CT scan was performed immediately after the operation, and a radiograph was performed preoperatively and during the follow-up evaluation at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after surgery. The preoperative JOA and NDI scores improved in all patients. Although there were two patients who complained of moderate postoperative neck pain (NRS 4 and 5), their condition gradually improved. Seven patients had mild or no neck pain (below NRS 3) at the 12 month follow-up. In addition, the cervical alignment was well maintained in all but one patient. Although larger prospective cohorts, longer follow-up periods, and comparative analyses are still needed, the clinical and radiological outcomes observed in the short 12 month period in this small cohort are promising. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Electroacupuncture for postoperative pain and gastrointestinal motility after laparoscopic appendectomy (AcuLap): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gangmi

    2015-10-14

    Acupuncture is a widely serviced complementary medicine. Although acupuncture is suggested for managing postoperative ileus and pain, supporting evidence is weak. The AcuLap trial is designed to provide high-level evidence regarding whether or not electroacupuncture is effective in promoting gastrointestinal motility and controlling pain after laparoscopic surgery. This study is a prospective randomized controlled trial with a three-arm, parallel-group structure evaluating the efficacy of electroacupuncture for gastrointestinal motility and postoperative pain after laparoscopic appendectomy. Patients with appendicitis undergoing laparoscopic surgery are included and randomized into three groups: 1) electroacupuncture group, 2) sham acupuncture group, and 3) control group. Patients receive 1) acupuncture with electrostimulation or 2) fake electroacupuncture with sham device twice a day or 3) no acupuncture after laparoscopic appendectomy. The primary outcome is time to first passing flatus after operation. Secondary outcomes include postoperative pain, analgesics, nausea/vomiting, bowel motility, time to tolerable diet, complications, hospital stay, readmission rates, time to recovery, quality of life, medical costs, and protocol failure rate. Patients and hospital staff (physicians and nurses) are blinded to which group the patient is assigned, electroacupuncture or sham acupuncture. Data analysis personnel are blinded to group assignment among all three groups. Estimated sample size to detect a minimum difference of time to first flatus with 80 % power, 5 % significance, and 10 % drop rate is 29 × 3 groups = 87 patients. Analysis will be performed according to the intention-to-treat principle. The AcuLap trial will provide evidence on the merits and/or demerits of electroacupuncture for bowel motility recovery and pain relief after laparoscopic appendectomy. The trial was registered in Clinical Research Information Service (CRiS), Republic of Korea ( KCT0001486

  10. Comparison of Intravenous Morphine with Sublingual Buprenorphine in Management of Postoperative Pain after Closed Reduction Orthopedic Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghasem Soltani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Postoperative pain is a common side effect following surgery that can significantly reduce surgical quality and patient’s satisfaction. Treatment options are morphine and buprenorphine. We aimed to compare the efficacy of a single dose of intravenous morphine with sublingual buprenorphine in postoperative pain control following closed reduction surgery. Methods: This triple blind clinical trial was conducted on 90 patients referred for closed reduction orthopedic surgery. They were older than 18 years and in classes I and II of the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA with an operation time of 30-90 minutes. Patients were divided into two groups of buprenorphine (4.5μg/kg sublingually and morphine (0.2mg/kg intravenously. Baseline characteristics, vital signs, pain score, level of sedation and pharmacological side effects were recorded in the recovery room (at 0 and 30 minutes, and in the ward (at 3, 6 and 12 hours. SPSS version 19 software was used for data analysis and the significance level was set at P Results: Ninety patients were studied, 60 males and 30 females with a mean age of 37.7±16.2 years. There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of baseline characteristics.Pain score in the morphine group was significantly higher than the buprenorphine group with an average score of 2.5 (P

  11. Comparison of Intravenous Morphine with Sublingual Buprenorphine in Management of Postoperative Pain after Closed Reduction Orthopedic Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghasem Soltani

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Postoperative pain is a common side effect following surgery that can significantly reduce surgical quality and patient’s satisfaction. Treatment options are morphine and buprenorphine. We aimed to compare the efficacy of a single dose of intravenous morphine with sublingual buprenorphine in postoperative pain control following closed reduction surgery. Methods: This triple blind clinical trial was conducted on 90 patients referred for closed reduction orthopedic surgery. They were older than 18 years and in classes I and II of the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA with an operation time of 30-90 minutes. Patients were divided into two groups of buprenorphine (4.5μg/kg sublingually and morphine (0.2mg/kg intravenously. Baseline characteristics, vital signs, pain score, level of sedation and pharmacological side effects were recorded in the recovery room (at 0 and 30 minutes, and in the ward (at 3, 6 and 12 hours. SPSS version 19 software was used for data analysis and the significance level was set at P Results: Ninety patients were studied, 60 males and 30 females with a mean age of 37.7±16.2 years. There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of baseline characteristics.Pain score in the morphine group was significantly higher than the buprenorphine group with an average score of 2.5 (P

  12. Transversus abdominis plane block using a short-acting local anesthetic for postoperative pain after laparoscopic colorectal surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Tak Kyu; Lee, Se-Jun; Do, Sang-Hwan; Song, In-Ae

    2018-02-01

    Transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block using a short-acting local anesthetic as part of multimodal analgesia is efficient in various abdominal surgeries, including laparoscopic surgery. However, information regarding its use in laparoscopic colorectal surgery is still limited and sometimes controversial. Therefore, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to determine whether TAP block using a short-acting anesthetic has a positive postoperative analgesic outcome in patients who have undergone laparoscopic colorectal surgery. We searched for studies comparing the postoperative pain outcome after laparoscopic colorectal surgery between patients who received TAP block and a control group (placebo or no treatment). Outcome measures were early pain at rest (numeric rating scale [NRS] score at 0-2 h postoperatively), late pain at movement (NRS score at 24 h postoperatively), late pain at rest (NRS score at 24 h postoperatively), and postoperative opioid consumption (up to 24 h postoperatively). We used a random-effects model for the meta-analysis and Egger's regression test to detect publication bias. We included six studies involving 452 patients (224 in the TAP block group, 228 in the control group). Early and late pain scores at movement were significantly different between the TAP block and control groups (standardized mean difference: - 0.695, P consumption (P = 0.257). The TAP block using a short-acting anesthetic had a significant effect on the postoperative pain outcome in the early (0-2 h) and late (24 h) period at movement. However, it did not have a significant effect on the postoperative pain outcome in the early (0-2 h) and late (24 h) periods at rest after laparoscopic surgery.

  13. Anti-allodynic effects of N-demethylsinomenine, an active metabolite of sinomenine, in a mouse model of postoperative pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Yuntao; Su, Man; Ling, Yong; Wei, Qianqian; Pan, Fei; Li, Jiejia; Li, Jun-Xu; Zhu, Qing

    2018-03-15

    Sinomenine, a major bioactive ingredient isolated from traditional Chinese medicine Sinomenium acutum, has been reported to have analgesic effects in various pain animal models. N-demethylsinomenine, the N-demethylated product of sinomenine, has been identified to be the major metabolite of sinomenine and is also a natural component extracted from Sinomenium acutum. This study examined the anti-allodynic effects of N-demethylsinomenine in a mouse model of postoperative pain. A significant and sustained mechanical allodynia that lasted for 4 days was induced by making a surgical incision on the right hind paw in mice. Acute treatment with N-demethylsinomenine (10-40 mg/kg, s.c.) relieved the mechanical allodynia in a dose-dependent manner. Although there was no difference in maximal analgesic effect between N-demethylsinomenine (40 mg/kg, s.c.) and sinomenine (40 mg/kg, s.c.), the onset of action of N-demethylsinomenine was quicker than sinomenine. Repeated treatment with N-demethylsinomenine (10-40 mg/kg/day, s.c.) also dose-dependently exerted sustained antinociception against postoperative allodynia and did not produce analgesic tolerance and carry-over effect. The anti-allodynia induced by N-demethylsinomenine (40 mg/kg, s.c.) was attenuated by bicuculline, a selective γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA A ) receptor antagonist. In addition, the doses of N-demethylsinomenine used here did not alter the locomotor activity in mice. Our findings demonstrated that N-demethylsinomenine exerts behaviorally-specific anti-allodynia against postoperative allodynia mediated through the GABA A receptors, suggesting it may be a useful novel pharmacotherapy for the control of postoperative pain. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparison of Efficacy of Epidural Ropivacaine versus Bupivacaine for Postoperative Pain Relief in Total Knee Replacement Surgeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhasin, Sidharth; Dhar, Mridul; Sreevastava, Deepak Kumar; Nair, Rajiv; Chandrakar, Saurabh

    2018-01-01

    Epidural analgesia has become the standard of care for knee replacement surgeries worldwide. Bupivacaine has been used successfully for many years. Epidural ropivacaine is now being used increasingly and seems to have benefits other than just pain relief, in terms of a better safety profile. To compare the efficacy of bupivacaine 0.125% (Group B) versus two concentrations of ropivacaine 0.1% (Group R1) and 0.2% (Group R2), in terms of pain scores, requirement of rescue analgesia, related adverse effects, and duration of postoperative (PO) hospital stay. A retrospective study was conducted from the acute pain service data of patients who underwent joint replacement surgeries in one or both limbs, over a span of 6 months. Patients were allocated to and analyzed under one of the three groups based on the drug concentration used postoperatively by epidural infusion. Data retrieved were demographic data, daily average visual analog scale (VAS) pain scores, rescue analgesia given, adverse effects, and PO hospital stay days for all three groups. Demographic data were comparable between the three groups. Daily average VAS pain scores on days 1 and 2 were significantly higher in Group R1. Groups B and R2 were comparable. There was significantly more requirement of rescue analgesia in Group R1 on day 1. Day 2 showed no significant difference in rescue analgesic requirement in all three groups. Days of PO hospital stay were significantly higher in Group R1. Adverse effects such as hypotension and delayed motor block were higher in Group B. Ropivacaine 0.2% and bupivacaine 0.125% were equally efficacious in terms of VAS pain scores, rescue analgesic requirement, and duration of PO hospital stay, but ropivacaine had a better safety profile in terms of less hypotension and lesser motor block.

  15. Reduced postoperative pain scores and narcotic use favor per-oral endoscopic myotomy over laparoscopic Heller myotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docimo, Salvatore; Mathew, Abraham; Shope, Alexander J; Winder, Joshua S; Haluck, Randy S; Pauli, Eric M

    2017-02-01

    Per-oral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) is a less invasive therapy for achalasia with a shorter hospitalization but with similar short- and long-term outcomes as a laparoscopic Heller myotomy (LHM). Previous literature comparing POEM to LHM has focused primarily on postoperative outcome parameters such as complications, dysphagia scores and gastro-esophageal reflux severity. This study specifically compares postoperative pain following POEM to pain following LHM, the current gold-standard operation. A retrospective review of all patients undergoing POEM or LHM for achalasia was performed from 2006 to 2015. Data collection included demographics, comorbidities, length of stay (LOS) and pain scores (arrival to the recovery room, 1 h postoperative, average first 24 h and upon discharge). Statistical analysis was performed using Student's t test and Chi-square test. Forty-four POEM patients and 122 LHM patients were identified. The average age (52.2 ± 20.75 vs 50.9 ± 17.89 years, p = 0.306) and BMI (28.1 ± 7.62 vs 27.6 ± 7.07 kg/m 2 , p = 0.824) did not differ between the POEM and LHM groups, respectively; however, the American Society of Anesthesiology scores were higher in the POEM patients (2.43 ± 0.62 vs 2.11 ± 0.71, p = 0.011). There were no differences in rates of smoking, diabetes, cardiac disease or pulmonary disease. The average pain scores upon arrival to the recovery room and 1 h postoperatively were lower in the POEM group (2.3 ± 3.014 vs 3.61 ± 3 0.418, p = 0.025 and 2.2 ± 2.579 vs 3.46 ± 3.063, p = 0.034, respectively). There was no difference in the average pain score over the first 24 h (2.7 ± 2.067 vs 3.29 ± 1.980, p = 0.472) or at the time of discharge (1.6 ± 2.420 vs 2.09 ± 2.157, p = 0.0657) between the POEM and LHM groups. After standardizing opioid administration against 10 mg of oral morphine, the POEM group used significantly less narcotics that the LHM group (35.8 vs 101.8 mg, p < 0

  16. International guidelines for prevention and management of post-operative chronic pain following inguinal hernia surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alfieri, S; Amid, P K; Campanelli, G

    2011-01-01

    To provide uniform terminology and definition of post-herniorrhaphy groin chronic pain. To give guidelines to the scientific community concerning the prevention and the treatment of chronic groin and testicular pain....

  17. Comparison of different administration of ketamine and intravenous tramadol hydrochloride for postoperative pain relief and sedation after pediatric tonsillectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yenigun, Alper; Et, Tayfun; Aytac, Sirin; Olcay, Betul

    2015-01-01

    Tonsillectomy is the oldest and most frequently performed surgical procedure practiced by ear, nose, and throat physicians. In this study, our aim was to compare the analgesic effects of peritonsillar, rectal, as well as intravenous infiltration of ketamine and intravenous tramadol hydrochloride infiltration for postoperative pain relief and sedation after tonsillectomy in children. This randomized controlled study evaluated the effects of peritonsillar, intravenous, and rectal infiltration of ketamine in children undergoing adenotonsillectomy. One hundred twenty children who were categorized under American Society of Anesthesiologists classes I to II were randomized to 4 groups of 30 members each. Group 1 received intravenous (IV) ketamine (0.5 mg/kg), group 2 received rectal ketamine (0.5 mg/kg), group 3 received local peritonsillar ketamine (2 mg/kg), and the control group received IV tramadol hydrochloride infiltration (2 mg/kg). Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Pain Scale scores and Wilson sedation scale were recorded at minutes 1, 15, 30, 60 as well as hours 2, 12, and 24 postoperatively. The patients were interviewed on the day after the surgery to assess the postoperative pain and sedation. All the routes of infiltration of ketamine were as effective as those of tramadol hydrochloride (P > 0.05). A statistically significant difference was observed between IV infiltrations and all groups during the assessments at hours 6 and 24. The analgesic efficacy of IV ketamine was found especially higher at hours 6 and 24 (P(6) = 0.045, P(24) = 0.011). Perioperative, low-dose IV, rectal, or peritonsillar ketamine infiltration provides efficient pain relief without any adverse effects in children who would undergo adenotonsillectomy.

  18. Local analgesic effect of tramadol is mediated by opioid receptors in late postoperative pain after plantar incision in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira Junior, José Oswaldo; de Freitas, Milena Fernandes; Bullara de Andrade, Carolina; Chacur, Marucia; Ashmawi, Hazem Adel

    2016-01-01

    Tramadol is a drug used to treat moderate to severe pain. It is known to present a peripheral effect, but the local mechanisms underlying its actions remain unclear. The role of peripheral opioid receptors in postoperative pain is not well understood. In the present study, we examined the peripheral opioid receptors to determine the local effect of tramadol in a plantar incision pain model. Rats were subjected to plantar incision and divided into four groups on postoperative day (POD) 1: SF_SF, 0.9% NaCl injected into the right hindpaw; SF_TraI, 0.9% NaCl and tramadol injected into the right hindpaw; SF_TraC, 0.9% NaCl and tramadol injected into the contralateral hindpaw; and Nal_Tra, naloxone and tramadol injected into the ipsilateral hindpaw. To determine the animals' nociceptive threshold, mechanical hyperalgesia was measured before incision, on POD1 before treatment and at 15, 30, 45, and 60 minutes after the incision. The same procedure was repeated on the POD2. The expression levels of μ-opioid receptor (MOR) and δ-opioid receptor (DOR) were obtained through immunoblotting assays in the lumbar dorsal root ganglia (L3-L6) in naïve rats and 1, 2, 3, and 7 days after the incision. Our results showed that the plantar incision was able to cause an increase in mechanical hyperalgesia and that tramadol reversed this hyperalgesia on POD1 and POD2. Tramadol injections in the contralateral paw did not affect the animals' nociceptive threshold. Naloxone was able to antagonize the tramadol effect partially on POD1 and completely on POD2. The DOR expression increased on POD2, POD3, and POD7, whereas the MOR expression did not change. Together, our results show that tramadol promoted a local analgesic effect in the postoperative pain model that was antagonized by naloxone in POD2, alongside the increase of DOR expression.

  19. International guidelines for prevention and management of post-operative chronic pain following inguinal hernia surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alfieri, S; Amid, P K; Campanelli, G

    2011-01-01

    To provide uniform terminology and definition of post-herniorrhaphy groin chronic pain. To give guidelines to the scientific community concerning the prevention and the treatment of chronic groin and testicular pain.......To provide uniform terminology and definition of post-herniorrhaphy groin chronic pain. To give guidelines to the scientific community concerning the prevention and the treatment of chronic groin and testicular pain....

  20. Comparative Study of the Effect of Intravenous Paracetamol and Tramadol in Relieving of Postoperative Pain after General Anesthesia in Nephrectomy Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manne, Venkata Sesha Sai Krishna; Gondi, Srinivasa Rao

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effect of intravenous paracetamol and tramadol in relieving of postoperative pain after general anesthesia for nephrectomy in prospective donor patients for kidney transplantation. A randomized study was conducted on 100 adult patients scheduled for nephrectomy aged from 35 to 55 years of both sexes and divided into two groups and were administered intravenous paracetamol and tramadol for postoperative pain relief and assessed with visual analog scale score and variations in vital parameters to assess extent of pain relief. After statistical interpretation of collected data, the observations were extrapolated. There was a statistically significant difference in the pain intensity scores obtained between the paracetamol and tramadol groups. On the basis of the present study, it is concluded that tramadol due to its lesser onset of action time was superior to paracetamol in providing acute postoperative pain relief.

  1. Evaluation of a single-dose of intravenous magnesium sulphate for prevention of postoperative pain after inguinal surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashi Kiran

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to study efficacy of single dose of intravenous magnesium sulphate to reduce post-operative pain in patients undergoing inguinal surgery. One hundred patients undergoing inguinal surgery were divided randomly in two groups of 50 each. The patients of magnesium sulphate group (Group-I received magnesium sulphate 50 mg/kg in 250 ml of isotonic sodium chloride solution IV whereas patients in control group (Group-II received same volume of isotonic sodium chloride over 30 minutes preoperatively. Anaesthesia was induced with propofol (2 mg/kg and pethidine (1 mg/kg. Atracurium besylate (0.5 mg/kg was given to facilitate insertion of LMA. Pain at emergence from anaesthesia and 2, 4, 6, 12 and 24 hours after surgery was evaluated. The timing and dosage of rescue analgesic during first 24 hrs after operation was noted. Pain in postop period was significantly lower in magnesium sulphate group in comparison to control group at emergence from anaesthesia and 2, 4, 6, 12 and 24 hrs postop [1.86 vs. 1.96 (P=0.138, 1.22 vs. 1.82 (P=0.001, 1.32 vs. 1.88 (P=0.000, 2.74 vs. 3.84 (P=0.000, 1.36 vs. 2.00 (P=0.000 and 0.78 vs 1.30 (P=0.000, respectively]. Patients in group-I were more sedated as compared to group-II [sedation score 1.86 vs. 1.40 (P=0.000]. Rescue analgesia requirement postoperatively in first 4, 8 and 16 hrs was significantly lower in patients of group-1 than in group- II [1.9 vs. 3.8 (P<0.05, 25.50 vs. 52.50 (P<0.05 and 0.000 vs. 7.5 (P<0.05]. Preoperative magnesium sulphate infusion decreases postop pain and requirement of rescue analgesia.

  2. Does Liposomal Bupivacaine (Exparel) Significantly Reduce Postoperative Pain/Numbness in Symptomatic Teeth with a Diagnosis of Necrosis? A Prospective, Randomized, Double-blind Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Brandon; Drum, Melissa; Reader, Al; Fowler, Sara; Nusstein, John; Beck, Mike

    2016-09-01

    Medical studies have shown some potential for infiltrations of liposomal bupivacaine (Exparel; Pacira Pharmaceuticals, San Diego, CA), a slow-release bupivacaine solution, to extend postoperative benefits of numbness/pain relief for up to several days. Because the Food and Drug Administration has approved Exparel only for infiltrations, we wanted to evaluate if it would be effective as an infiltration to control postoperative pain. The purpose of this study was to compare an infiltration of bupivacaine with liposomal bupivacaine for postoperative numbness and pain in symptomatic patients diagnosed with pulpal necrosis experiencing moderate to severe preoperative pain. One hundred patients randomly received a 4.0-mL buccal infiltration of either bupivacaine or liposomal bupivacaine after endodontic debridement. For postoperative pain, patients were given ibuprofen/acetaminophen, and they could receive narcotic pain medication as an escape. Patients recorded their level of numbness, pain, and medication use the night of the appointment and over the next 5 days. Success was defined as no or mild postoperative pain and no narcotic use. The success rate was 29% for the liposomal group and 22% for the bupivacaine group, with no significant difference (P = .4684) between the groups. Liposomal bupivacaine had some effect on soft tissue numbness, pain, and use of non-narcotic medications, but it was not clinically significant. There was no significant difference in the need for escape medication. For symptomatic patients diagnosed with pulpal necrosis experiencing moderate to severe preoperative pain, a 4.0-mL infiltration of liposomal bupivacaine did not result in a statistically significant increase in postoperative success compared with an infiltration of 4.0 mL bupivacaine. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparison of pain and postoperative stress in dogs undergoing natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery, laparoscopic, and open oophorectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Lynetta J; Rahmani, Emad Y; Al-Haddad, Mohammad; Sherman, Stuart; Chiorean, Michael V; Selzer, Don J; Snyder, Paul W; Constable, Peter D

    2010-08-01

    Few studies are available to compare the potential benefits of natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) approaches to traditional surgery. To compare complications, surgical stress, and postoperative pain. Prospective study in dogs. Research laboratory. Thirty dogs. Oophorectomy procedures were performed via NOTES and laparoscopic and traditional open surgery. Operative time, pain scores, systemic stress parameters (cortisol, glucose), surgical stress markers (interleukin 6, C-reactive protein), 3-day observation. Median operative times were 76, 44, and 35 minutes for the NOTES, laparoscopic, and open procedures, respectively, with the NOTES procedure being significantly longer than the other 2 procedures. All ovaries were completely excised, and all the animals survived without complications. The NOTES animals had greater increases in serum cortisol concentrations at 2 hours but no statistically significant differences in glucose concentrations compared with the other groups. Serum interleukin 6 and C-reactive protein concentrations were significantly increased at specific times compared with baseline in the NOTES group, but not in the open or laparoscopic surgery groups. Based on the cumulative pain score and nociceptive thresholds, the animals in the NOTES group demonstrated less evidence of pain. Small sample size, limited follow-up. Although the NOTES oophorectomy procedures took approximately twice as long and there may be more evidence of tissue damage as judged by increases in serum cortisol and interleukin 6 concentrations, the dogs in the NOTES group had lower pain scores, especially when compared with animals undergoing open surgery. Copyright 2010 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. EFFECT OF PREOPERATIVE PAIN AND DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF POSTOPERATIVE DELIRIUM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosar, Cyrus M; Tabloski, Patricia A; Travison, Thomas G; Jones, Richard N; Schmitt, Eva M; Puelle, Margaret R; Inloes, Jennifer B; Saczynski, Jane S; Marcantonio, Edward R; Meagher, David; Reid, M Carrington; Inouye, Sharon K

    2014-11-01

    Preoperative pain and depression predispose patients to delirium. Our goal was to determine whether pain and depressive symptoms interact to increase delirium risk. We enrolled 459 persons without dementia aged ≥70 years scheduled for elective orthopedic surgery. At baseline, participants reported their worst and average pain within seven days and current pain on a 0-10 scale. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale and chart. Delirium was assessed with the Confusion Assessment Method and chart. We examined the relationship between preoperative pain, depressive symptoms and delirium using multivariable analysis of pain and delirium stratified by presence of depressive symptoms. Delirium, occurring in 23% of the sample, was significantly higher in those with depressive symptoms at baseline than those without (relative risk, RR, 1·6, 95% confidence interval, CI, 1·2-2·3). Preoperative pain was associated with an increased adjusted risk for delirium across all pain measures (RR from 1·07-1·08 per point of pain). In stratified analyses, patients with depressive symptoms had a 21% increased risk for delirium for each one-point increase in worst pain score, demonstrating a significant interaction ( P =0·049). Similarly, a significant 13% increased risk for delirium was demonstrated for a one-point increase in average pain score, but the interaction did not achieve statistical significance. Preoperative pain and depressive symptoms demonstrated increased risk for delirium independently and with substantial interaction, suggesting a cumulative impact. Thus, pain and depression are vulnerability factors for delirium that should be assessed before surgery. U.S. National Institute on Aging.

  5. Intravenous Ibuprofen for Treatment of Post-Operative Pain: A Multicenter, Double Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Gago Martínez

    Full Text Available Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are often used as components of multimodal therapy for postoperative pain management, but their use is currently limited by its side effects. The specific objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a new formulation of intravenous (IV ibuprofen for the management of postoperative pain in a European population.A total of 206 patients from both abdominal and orthopedic surgery, were randomly assigned in 1:1 ratio to receive 800 mg IV-ibuprofen or placebo every 6 hours; all patients had morphine access through a patient controlled analgesia pump. The primary outcome measure was median morphine consumption within the first 24 hours following surgery. The mean±SEM of morphine requirements was reduced from 29,8±5,25 mg to 14,22±3,23 mg (p = 0,015 and resulted in a decrease in pain at rest (p = 0,02 measured by Visual Analog Scale (VAS from mean±SEM 3.34±0,35 to 0.86±0.24, and also in pain during movement (p = 0,02 from 4.32±0,36 to 1.90±0,30 in the ibuprofen treatment arm; while in the placebo group VAS score at rest ranged from 4.68±0,40 to 2.12±0,42 and during movement from 5.66±0,42 to 3.38±0,44. Similar treatment-emergent adverse events occurred across both study groups and there was no difference in the overall incidence of these events.Perioperative administration of IV-Ibuprofen 800 mg every 6 hours in abdominal surgery patient's decreases morphine requirements and pain score. Furthermore IV-Ibuprofen was safe and well tolerate. Consequently we consider appropriate that protocols for management of postoperative pain include IV-Ibuprofen 800 mg every 6 hours as an option to offer patients an analgesic benefit while reducing the potentially risks associated with morphine consumption.EU Clinical Trials Register 2011-005007-33.

  6. Intravenous Ibuprofen for Treatment of Post-Operative Pain: A Multicenter, Double Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escontrela Rodriguez, Blanca; Planas Roca, Antonio; Martínez Ruiz, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Background Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are often used as components of multimodal therapy for postoperative pain management, but their use is currently limited by its side effects. The specific objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a new formulation of intravenous (IV) ibuprofen for the management of postoperative pain in a European population. Methods and Findings A total of 206 patients from both abdominal and orthopedic surgery, were randomly assigned in 1:1 ratio to receive 800 mg IV-ibuprofen or placebo every 6 hours; all patients had morphine access through a patient controlled analgesia pump. The primary outcome measure was median morphine consumption within the first 24 hours following surgery. The mean±SEM of morphine requirements was reduced from 29,8±5,25 mg to 14,22±3,23 mg (p = 0,015) and resulted in a decrease in pain at rest (p = 0,02) measured by Visual Analog Scale (VAS) from mean±SEM 3.34±0,35 to 0.86±0.24, and also in pain during movement (p = 0,02) from 4.32±0,36 to 1.90±0,30 in the ibuprofen treatment arm; while in the placebo group VAS score at rest ranged from 4.68±0,40 to 2.12±0,42 and during movement from 5.66±0,42 to 3.38±0,44. Similar treatment-emergent adverse events occurred across both study groups and there was no difference in the overall incidence of these events. Conclusions Perioperative administration of IV-Ibuprofen 800 mg every 6 hours in abdominal surgery patient’s decreases morphine requirements and pain score. Furthermore IV-Ibuprofen was safe and well tolerate. Consequently we consider appropriate that protocols for management of postoperative pain include IV-Ibuprofen 800 mg every 6 hours as an option to offer patients an analgesic benefit while reducing the potentially risks associated with morphine consumption. Trial Registration EU Clinical Trials Register 2011-005007-33 PMID:27152748

  7. The Effect of Intravenous Acetaminophen on Postoperative Pain and Narcotic Consumption After Vaginal Reconstructive Surgery: A Double-Blind Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisp, Catrina C; Khan, Madiha; Lambers, Donna L; Westermann, Lauren B; Mazloomdoost, Donna M; Yeung, Jennifer J; Kleeman, Steven D; Pauls, Rachel N

    This study aimed to determine the effect of intravenous acetaminophen versus placebo on postoperative pain, satisfaction with pain control, and narcotic use after vaginal reconstructive surgery. This was an institutional review board-approved, double-blind placebo-controlled randomized trial. Women scheduled for reconstructive surgery including vaginal hysterectomy and vaginal vault suspension were enrolled. Subjects received 1000 mg of intravenous acetaminophen or 100 mL placebo every 6 hours for 24 hours. Pain and satisfaction with pain control were assessed using visual analog scales and a numeric rating scale. Visual analog scales were collected at 18 and 24 hours postoperatively and at discharge. A sample size calculation determined 90 subjects would be required to detect a 30% reduction in postoperative narcotic use with 80% power and significance level of 0.05. One hundred subjects were enrolled. There were no differences in demographics or surgical data and no difference in narcotic consumption at multiple evaluation points. At 18 hours postoperative, median pain scores at rest were 27.0 (interquartile range, 35.0) for acetaminophen and 35.0 (interquartile range, 44.5) for placebo, finding no difference (P = 0.465). Furthermore, pain with activity and numeric rating scale-assessed pain scales were similar (P = 0.328; P = 0.597). Although satisfaction with pain control was high overall (91.5), no difference was noted. Patients undergoing vaginal reconstructive surgery receiving perioperative intravenous acetaminophen did not experience a decrease in narcotic requirements or postoperative pain when compared with placebo. Reassuringly, pain scores were low and satisfaction with pain control was high for all subjects. The general use of this medication is not supported in these surgical patients.

  8. Effects of Various Cryotherapy Applications on Postoperative Pain in Molar Teeth with Symptomatic Apical Periodontitis: A Preliminary Randomized Prospective Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundogdu, Eyup Candas; Arslan, Hakan

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effects of intracanal, intraoral, and extraoral cryotherapy on postoperative pain in molar teeth with symptomatic apical periodontitis. A total of 100 patients were randomly distributed into 4 groups: control (without cryotherapy application), intracanal cryotherapy application, intraoral cryotherapy application, and extraoral cryotherapy application. The postoperative pain of the patients was recorded at the first, third, fifth, and seventh days. The data were statistically analyzed by using linear regression, χ 2 , one-way analysis of variance, Tukey post hoc, and Kruskal-Wallis H tests (P = .05). There were no statistically significant differences among the groups in terms of demographic data (P > .05). The preoperative pain levels and preoperative visual analogue scale (VAS) scores of pain on percussion were similar among the groups (P > .05). The linear regression analysis demonstrated that group variable had the most significant effect on postoperative pain at day 1 (P < .001) among the other variables (group, age, gender, tooth number, preoperative pain levels, and VAS scores of pain on percussion). When compared with the control group, all the cryotherapy groups exhibited less percussion pain and less postoperative pain at the first, third, fifth, and seventh days (P < .05). Within the study limitations, all the cryotherapy applications (intracanal, intraoral, and extraoral) resulted in lower postoperative pain levels and lower VAS scores of pain on percussion versus those of the control group. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Is there a reasonable excuse for not providing post-operative analgesia when using animal models of peripheral neuropathic pain for research purposes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hestehave, Sara; Munro, Gordon; Christensen, Rie

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The induction of neuropathic pain-like behaviors in rodents often requires surgical intervention. This engages acute nociceptive signaling events that contribute to pain and stress post-operatively that from a welfare perspective demands peri-operative analgesic treatment. However...

  10. Patients speak out: development of an evidence-based model for managing orthopaedic postoperative pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulido, Pamela; Hardwick, Mary E; Munro, Michelle; May, Laura; Dupies-Rosa, Denise

    2010-01-01

    Perioperative pain management after total joint replacement continues to be a concern for orthopaedic nurses. In our institution, the results of routine post-hospital stay surveys had shown below average scores in the area of pain management. This began as a quality management issue, became a pain subcommittee issue, and drew in the research nurses to ask what we can learn from this process. Changing the method of handling pain management is not easy, but it makes a difference in patients' hospital experiences. We learned that cooperation and expertise from multiple departments within the institution and some organizations outside the institution is needed to bring about change. We learned that education of not just staff members but also patients on pain management affected the outcome. This article describes our journey to enhance pain management in our institution.

  11. General anesthesia and postoperative pain management in analgesic intolerant patients with/without asthma: is it safe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celiker, V; Basgül, E; Karakaya, G; Oguzalp, H; Bozkurt, B; Kalyoncu, A F

    2004-01-01

    Analgesic intolerance (AI) appears in approximately 1 % of the general population. The triad of bronchial asthma, nasal polyposis, and analgesic intolerance is called analgesic-induced asthma (AIA). These patients are frequently referred to adult allergy clinics for preoperative evaluation for possible analgesic cross reactivity and intolerance to anesthetic agents. To determine allergic problems related to anesthesia and postoperative pain management in AI patients with and without asthma. The medical records of 45 patients who had been diagnosed with AI between January 1991 and December 2002 in the adult allergy unit and who underwent surgery in the same hospital in the last 4 years were retrospectively analyzed. The mean age of the patients was 44.4 13.4 years and 30 (66.6 %) were female. Thirty-six (80 %) had AIA, 34 (75.6 %) had persistent allergic rhinitis and 21 (46.7 %) had nasal polyps. Fifty-one surgical procedures were performed in 45 patients, in whom ear, nose and throat surgery was the main procedure (64.7 %). Anesthesia was induced with propofol, fentanyl, and vecuronium and was maintained by sevoflurane or isoflurane. Fentanyl was used for early postoperative pain relief. No complications appeared in relation to anesthesia or early pain management except in a 44-year-old AIA woman who had a reaction in the postoperative period after receiving an inappropriate analgesic. None of the patients had anesthesia-related allergic problems. Atropine and diazepam in the premedication, propofol and fentanyl during induction, muscle relaxation facilitation by vecuronium, and sevoflurane or isoflurane for maintenance seem to be a safe general anesthetic choice for analgesic intolerant patients with and without asthma.

  12. Comparative study of intravenous Tramadol versus Ketorolac for preventing postoperative pain after third molar surgery--a prospective randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalraju, Prathibha; Lalitha, Ramanujapuram Manikarnike; Prasad, Kavitha; Ranganath, Krishnappa

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this comparative, prospective, randomized, controlled study was to evaluate two different regimens of analgesics: a preoperative intravenous dose of either Tramadol or Ketorolac given 10 min prior to surgery to assess their impact on clinical recovery after third molar surgery. Forty patients requiring surgical extraction of unilateral impacted mandibular third molars similar in position were enrolled in the study. Patients were randomly divided into two groups based on permuting the numbers. Patients in Group 1 and Group 2 were administered either Tramadol 50 mg or Ketorolac 30 mg, intravenously, 10 min prior to surgery. The difference in postoperative pain was assessed by four primary points: pain intensity as measured by a 10 mm visual analogue scale hourly for 12 h, median time to rescue analgesics, number of analgesics consumed and patient's overall 5-point global assessment scale. Throughout the 12 h investigation period, patients treated with Ketorolac reported significantly lower pain intensity scores, significantly longer time to rescue analgesics (Acetaminophen 500 mg) and less intake of postoperative analgesics. In Group 2, 40% of the patient had good overall assessment as compared to Group 1 where only 25% of patients had good overall assessment. The current study shows that pre-emptive use of Inj. Ketorolac 30 mg intravenously can reduce the severity of the postoperative sequelae of asymptomatic impacted mandibular third molar surgery. Copyright © 2013 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Efficacy and Safety of Transdermal Buprenorphine versus Oral Tramadol/Acetaminophen in Patients with Persistent Postoperative Pain after Spinal Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Hyup Lee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Control of persistent pain following spinal surgery is an unmet clinical need. This study compared the efficacy and safety of buprenorphine transdermal system (BTDS to oral tramadol/acetaminophen (TA in Korean patients with persistent, moderate pain following spinal surgery. Methods. Open-label, interventional, randomized multicenter study. Adults with persistent postoperative pain (Numeric Rating Scale [NRS] ≥ 4 at 14–90 days postsurgery were enrolled. Patients received once-weekly BTDS (n=47; 5 μg/h titrated to 20 μg/h or twice-daily TA (n=40; tramadol 37.5 mg/acetaminophen 325 mg, one tablet titrated to 4 tablets for 6 weeks. The study compared pain reduction with BTDS versus TA at week 6. Quality of life (QoL, treatment satisfaction, medication compliance, and adverse events (AEs were assessed. Findings. At week 6, both groups reported significant pain reduction (mean NRS change: BTDS −2.02; TA −2.76, both P<0.0001 and improved QoL (mean EQ-5D index change: BTDS 0.10; TA 0.19, both P<0.05. The BTDS group achieved better medication compliance (97.8% versus 91.0%. Incidence of AEs (26.1% versus 20.0% and adverse drug reactions (20.3% versus 16.9% were comparable between groups. Implications. For patients with persistent pain following spinal surgery, BTDS is an alternative to TA for reducing pain and supports medication compliance. This trial is registered with Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01983111.

  14. Effects of tramadol or morphine in dogs undergoing castration on intra-operative electroencephalogram responses and post-operative pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongara, K; Chambers, J P; Johnson, C B; Dukkipati, V S R

    2013-11-01

    To compare the effects of pre-operatively administered tramadol with those of morphine on electroencephalographic responses to surgery and post-operative pain in dogs undergoing castration. Dogs undergoing castration were treated with either pre-operative morphine (0.5 mg/kg S/C, n = 8) or tramadol (3 mg/kg S/C, n = 8). All dogs also received 0.05 mg/kg acepromazine and 0.04 mg/kg atropine S/C in addition to the test analgesic. Anaesthesia was induced with thiopentone administered I/V to effect and maintained with halothane in oxygen. Respiratory rate, heart rate, end-tidal halothane tension (EtHal) and end-tidal CO2 tension (EtCO2) were monitored throughout surgery. Electroencephalograms (EEG) were recorded continuously using a three electrode montage. Median frequency (F50), total power (Ptot) and 95% spectral edge frequency (F95) derived from EEG power spectra recorded before skin incision (baseline) were compared with those recorded during ligation of the spermatic cords of both testicles. Post-operatively, pain was assessed after 1, 3, 6 and 9 h using the short form of the Glasgow composite measure pain scale (CMPS-SF). Dogs premedicated with tramadol had higher mean F50 (12.2 (SD 0.2) Hz) and lower Ptot (130.39 (SD 12.1) µv(2)) compared with those premedicated with morphine (11.5 (SD 0.2) Hz and 161.8 (SD 15.1) µv(2), respectively; p0.05). The F95 of the EEG did not differ between the two groups during the ligation of either testicle (p > 0.05). Post-operatively, no significant differences in the CMPS-SF score were found between animals premedicated with tramadol and morphine at any time during the post-operative period. No dog required rescue analgesia. Tramadol and morphine administered pre-operatively provided a similar degree of post-operative analgesia in male dogs at the doses tested.

  15. Response surface analysis of synergistic interactions of morphine and gabapentin in a rat model of postoperative pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papathanasiou, Theodoros; Juul, Rasmus Vestergaard; Heegaard, Anne-Marie

    of combination doses and investigate whether co-administration can lead to synergistic effects in a preclinical model of postoperative pain. Methods The pharmacodynamic effects of morphine (1, 3 and 7 mg/kg), gabapentin (10, 30 and 100 mg/kg) or their combination (9 combinations of the above doses) were...... [Internet]. 1995 [cited 2014 Nov 27]; Available from: http://intl.pharmrev.org/content/47/2/331.full.pdf+html 3. R Development Core Team R. R: A Language and Environment for Statistical Computing [Internet]. R Foundation for Statistical Computing. 2011. p. 409. Available from: http://www.r-project.org...

  16. Comparison of postoperative pain and inflammation reaction in dogs undergoing preventive laparoscopic-assisted and incisional gastropexy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraguchi, Tomoya; Kimura, Shiho; Itoh, Harumichi; Nishikawa, Shimpei; Hiyama, Masato; Tani, Kenji; Iseri, Toshie; Itoh, Yoshiki; Nakaichi, Munekazu; Taura, Yasuho; Itamoto, Kazuhito

    2017-09-12

    This study compared the effects of postoperative pain and inflammation reaction after preventive laparoscopic-assisted gastropexy (LAG) and incisional gastropexy (IG) in 10 clinically normal Beagles. Surgical time, incision length, visual analog scale (VAS) score, University of Melbourne Pain Scale (UMPS) score, and plasma C-reactive protein (CRP), plasma cortisol (COR), and serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels were evaluated. The VAS and UMPS scores and COR and IL-6 levels were recorded at 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, 18 and 24 hr after surgery. CRP level was recorded at 12, 24 and 48 hr after surgery. The VAS and UMPS scores showed no significant intergroup differences. Compared to IG, LAG had significantly lower surgical time (45 ± 9.91 min vs 64 ± 5.30 min; Pgastric dilatation-volvulus. Nevertheless, since this study used experimental models, its usefulness should be evaluated in future cases.

  17. A randomized study of the effects of single-dose gabapentin versus placebo on postoperative pain and morphine consumption after mastectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dirks, Jesper; Fredensborg, Birgitte B; Christensen, Dennis

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The anticonvulsant gabapentin has proven effective for neuropathic pain in three large placebo-controlled clinical trials. Experimental and clinical studies have demonstrated antihyperalgesic effects in models involving central neuronal sensitization. It has been suggested that central...... neuronal sensitization may play an important role in postoperative pain. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of gabapentin on morphine consumption and postoperative pain in patients undergoing radical mastectomy. METHODS: In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, 70 patients...... received a single dose of oral gabapentin (1,200 mg) or placebo 1 h before surgery. Patients received patient-controlled analgesia with morphine at doses of 2.5 mg with a lock-out time of 10 min for 4 h postoperatively. Pain was assessed on a visual analog scale at rest and during movement, and side...

  18. Comparison of the effect of pre- and post-operative physical therapy versus post-operative physical therapy alone on pain and recovery of function after total knee arthroplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Alghadir, Ahmad; Iqbal, Zaheen Ahmed; Anwer, Shahnawaz

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to compare the effect of pre-operative and post-operative physical therapy versus post-operative physical therapy alone on pain and recovery of function after total knee arthroplasty. [Subjects and Methods] Fifty patients (18 males and 32 females) ranging in age from 48 to 80?years (mean 63.28, SD 9.44) participated in a 6-week two-arm randomized rater-blinded trial. One group received pre- and post-operative physical therapy whereas the other group ...

  19. Pregabalin and dexamethasone improves post-operative pain treatment after tonsillectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, O; Jørgensen, D G; Hilsted, K L

    2011-01-01

    Post-tonsillectomy pain can be severe. We investigated the analgesic effect from combinations of paracetamol, pregabalin and dexamethasone in adults undergoing tonsillectomy.......Post-tonsillectomy pain can be severe. We investigated the analgesic effect from combinations of paracetamol, pregabalin and dexamethasone in adults undergoing tonsillectomy....

  20. The Efficacy of Postoperative Wound Infusion with Bupivacaine for Pain Control after Cesarean Delivery: Randomized Double Blind Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azin Alavi

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study investigated the efficacy of bupivacaine wound infusion for pain control and opioid sparing effect after cesarean delivery.Materials and methods: We conducted a randomized double blind, placebo controlled clinical trial on 60 parturients undergoing cesarean section at a university hospital in Tehran. Patients were randomized to receive a pump infusion system that was filled with either 0.25% bupivacaine or equal volume of distilled water. A catheter was placed above the fascia and connected to electronic pump for 24 hours. Postoperative analog pain scores and morphine consumption were assessed at 6, 12 and 24 hours. Also time interval to first ambulation, length of hospitalization, complications and patient satisfaction were recorded. Data were analyzed using the SPSS software and P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Mann-Whitney u-test, student t-test and chi-square were used. Results: There were no differences in patient demographics and length of hospitalization and patient-generated resting pain scores between the two groups. Pain scores after coughing and leg raise during the first 6 postoperative hours were significantly less in the Bupivacaine group (P<0.001. The total dose of morphine consumption during the 24 hours study period was 2.5 ± 2.5 mg vs. 7.3 ± 2.7 mg for the bupivacaine and control groups, respectively (P<0.001. Compared with the control group, time to first ambulation was shorter in the bupivacaine group (11± 5h vs. 16 ± 4h (P< 0.01. Conclusion: Bupivacaine wound infusion was a simple and safe technique that provides effective analgesia and reduces morphine requirements after cesarean delivery.

  1. The Cerebrospinal Fluid Distribution of Postoperatively Administred Dexketoprofen and Etoricoxib and Their Effect on Pain and Inflammatory Markers in Patients Undergoing Hip Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piirainen, Annika; Kokki, Merja; Hautajärvi, Heidi; Lehtonen, Marko; Miettinen, Hannu; Pulkki, Kari; Ranta, Veli-Pekka; Kokki, Hannu

    2016-07-01

    Based on earlier literature, etoricoxib may have a delayed analgesic effect in postoperative setting when analgesic efficacy of nonselective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug dexketoprofen is rapid. This may be caused by slow penetration of etoricoxib into the central nervous system (CNS). Therefore we decided to determine the plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of dexketoprofen and etoricoxib in patients with hip arthroplasty. A total of 24 patients, scheduled for an elective primary hip arthroplasty were enrolled. After surgery, 12 subjects were randomized to received a single intravenous dose of dexketoprofen, and 12 subjects were given oral etoricoxib. Paired blood and CSF samples were taken up to 24 h for measurement of drug concentrations, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1ra and blood for interleukin 10. In CSF the highest measured concentration (C max) of dexketoprofen was 4.0 (median) ng/mL (minimum-maximum 1.9-13.9) and time to the highest concentration (t max) 3 h (2-5), and for etoricoxib C max 73 ng/mL (36-127) and t max 5 h (1-24), respectively. Opioid consumption during the first 24 postoperative hours was similar in the two groups. Dexketoprofen and etoricoxib had a similar effect on the postoperative inflammatory response. No significant differences considering pain relief or adverse events were found between the two groups. Dexketoprofen and etoricoxib entered the CNS readily, already at 30 min after administration dexketoprofen was detected in the CSF in most subjects and etoricoxib after 60 min. A single dose of dexketoprofen and etoricoxib provided a similar anti-inflammatory and analgesic response after major orthopaedic surgery.

  2. Efficacy and safety profile of combination of tramadol-diclofenac versus tramadol-paracetamol in patients with acute musculoskeletal conditions, postoperative pain, and acute flare of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis: a Phase III, 5-day open-label study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandanwale, Ajay S; Sundar, Subramanian; Latchoumibady, Kaliaperumal; Biswas, Swati; Gabhane, Mukesh; Naik, Manoj; Patel, Kamlesh

    2014-01-01

    Objective We aimed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of a fixed-dose combination (FDC) of tramadol and diclofenac versus a standard approved FDC of tramadol and paracetamol, in patients with acute moderate to severe pain. Methods A total of 204 patients with moderate to severe pain due to acute musculoskeletal conditions (n=52), acute flare of osteoarthritis (n=52), acute flare of rheumatoid arthritis (n=50), or postoperative pain (n=50) were enrolled in the study at baseline. Each disease category was then randomized to receive either of two treatments for 5 days: group A received an FDC of immediate-release tramadol hydrochloride (50 mg) and sustained-release diclofenac sodium (75 mg) (one tablet, twice daily), and group B received an FDC of tramadol hydrochloride (37.5 mg) and paracetamol (325 mg) (two tablets every 4–6 hours, up to a maximum of eight tablets daily). The primary efficacy end points were reductions in pain intensity from baseline at day 3 and day 5 as assessed by a Visual Analog Scale (VAS) score. Results Group A showed a significant reduction in the VAS score for overall pain from baseline on day 3 (P=0.001) and day 5 (Ppain, and gastritis), which required minimal management, without any treatment discontinuation. The number of adverse events in group A was nine (8.82%) compared with 22 (21.78%) in group B, after 5 days of treatment. Conclusion An FDC of tramadol-diclofenac showed a significantly greater reduction in pain intensity and was well tolerated compared with tramadol-paracetamol, resulting in better analgesia in patients suffering from moderate to severe pain due to acute musculoskeletal conditions, postoperative pain following orthopedic surgery, or acute flare of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:25152629

  3. Evaluation of a novel biodegradable thermosensitive keto-hydrogel for improving postoperative pain in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Meng-Huang; Shih, Ming-Hung; Hsu, Wei-Bin; Dubey, Navneet Kumar; Lee, Wen-Fu; Lin, Tsai-Yu; Hsieh, Meng-Yow; Chen, Chin-Fu; Peng, Kuo-Ti; Huang, Tsung-Jen; Shi, Chung-Sheng; Guo, Ren-Shyang; Cai, Chang-Jhih; Chung, Chiu-Yen; Wong, Chung-Hang

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluates the sustained analgesic effect of ketorolac-eluting thermosensitive biodegradable hydrogel in the plantar incisional pain model of the rat hind-paw. A ketorolac-embedded 2, 2'-Bis (2-oxazolin) (BOX) linking methoxy-poly(ethylene glycol) and poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (mPEG-PLGA) diblock copolymer (BOX copolymer) was synthesized as keto-hydrogel based on optimal sol-gel phase transition and in vitro drug release profile. The effect of keto-hydrogel on postoperative pain (POP) was assessed using the established plantar incisional pain model in hind-paw of rats and compared to that of ketorolac solution. Pain and sensory threshold, as well as pain scoring, were evaluated with behavioral tests by means of anesthesiometer and incapacitance apparatus, respectively. Pro-inflammatory cytokine levels (TNF-α, IL-6, VEGF, and IL-1β) around incisional wounds were measured by ELISA. Tissue histology was assessed using hematoxylin and eosin and Masson's trichrome staining. Ten mg/mL (25 wt%) keto-hydrogel showed a sol-gel transition at 26.4°C with a 10-day sustained drug release profile in vitro. Compared to ketorolac solution group, the concentration of ketorolac in tissue fluid was higher in the keto-hydrogel group during the first 18 h of application. Keto-hydrogel elevated pain and sensory threshold, increased weight-bearing capacity, and significantly reduced the levels of TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β while enhanced VEGF in tissue fluid. Histologic analysis reveals greater epithelialization and collagen deposition around wound treated with keto-hydrogel. In conclusion, our study suggests that keto-hydrogel is an ideal compound to treat POP with a secondary gain of improved incisional wound healing.

  4. Evaluation of a novel biodegradable thermosensitive keto-hydrogel for improving postoperative pain in a rat model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Huang Wu

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the sustained analgesic effect of ketorolac-eluting thermosensitive biodegradable hydrogel in the plantar incisional pain model of the rat hind-paw. A ketorolac-embedded 2, 2'-Bis (2-oxazolin (BOX linking methoxy-poly(ethylene glycol and poly(lactide-co-glycolide (mPEG-PLGA diblock copolymer (BOX copolymer was synthesized as keto-hydrogel based on optimal sol-gel phase transition and in vitro drug release profile. The effect of keto-hydrogel on postoperative pain (POP was assessed using the established plantar incisional pain model in hind-paw of rats and compared to that of ketorolac solution. Pain and sensory threshold, as well as pain scoring, were evaluated with behavioral tests by means of anesthesiometer and incapacitance apparatus, respectively. Pro-inflammatory cytokine levels (TNF-α, IL-6, VEGF, and IL-1β around incisional wounds were measured by ELISA. Tissue histology was assessed using hematoxylin and eosin and Masson's trichrome staining. Ten mg/mL (25 wt% keto-hydrogel showed a sol-gel transition at 26.4°C with a 10-day sustained drug release profile in vitro. Compared to ketorolac solution group, the concentration of ketorolac in tissue fluid was higher in the keto-hydrogel group during the first 18 h of application. Keto-hydrogel elevated pain and sensory threshold, increased weight-bearing capacity, and significantly reduced the levels of TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β while enhanced VEGF in tissue fluid. Histologic analysis reveals greater epithelialization and collagen deposition around wound treated with keto-hydrogel. In conclusion, our study suggests that keto-hydrogel is an ideal compound to treat POP with a secondary gain of improved incisional wound healing.

  5. Efficiency of bupivacaine and association with dexmedetomidine in transversus abdominis plane block ultrasound guided in postoperative pain of abdominal surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Recep Aksu

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objectives We aimed to evaluate the effect of bupivacaine and dexmedetomidine added to bupivacaine used in tranversus abdominis plane (TAP block on postoperative pain and patient satisfaction in patients undergoing lower abdominal surgery. Methods Patients submitted to lower abdominal surgery were enrolled in the study. After anesthesia induction, ultrasound guided TAP block was performed. TAP block was obtained with 21 mL 0.9% saline in Group C (n = 31, 20 mL 0.5% bupivacaine + 1 mL saline in Group B (n = 31, and 20 mL 0.5% bupivacaine + 1 mL dexmedetomidine (100 µg in Group BD (n = 31. Results Visual analog scale scores were lower in Group BD compared to Group C, at all time points (p 0.05. Conclusions The addition of dexmedetomidine to bupivacaine on TAP block decreased postoperative pain scores and morphine consumption; it also increased patient satisfaction in patients undergoing lower abdominal surgery. Dexmedetomidine did not have any effect on nausea and vomiting score and antiemetic requirement.

  6. [Efficiency of bupivacaine and association with dexmedetomidine in transversus abdominis plane block ultrasound guided in postoperative pain of abdominal surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksu, Recep; Patmano, Gülçin; Biçer, Cihangir; Emek, Ertan; Çoruh, Aliye Esmaoğlu

    We aimed to evaluate the effect of bupivacaine and dexmedetomidine added to bupivacaine used in tranversus abdominis plane (TAP) block on postoperative pain and patient satisfaction in patients undergoing lower abdominal surgery. Patients submitted to lower abdominal surgery were enrolled in the study. After anesthesia induction, ultrasound guided TAP block was performed. TAP block was obtained with 21mL 0.9% saline in Group C (n=31), 20mL 0.5% bupivacaine+1mL saline in Group B (n=31), and 20mL 0.5% bupivacaine+1mL dexmedetomidine (100μg) in Group BD (n=31). Visual analog scale scores were lower in Group BD compared to Group C, at all time points (pconsumption was lower in Group BD compared to other groups and lower in group B than in the controls (p0.05). The addition of dexmedetomidine to bupivacaine on TAP block decreased postoperative pain scores and morphine consumption; it also increased patient satisfaction in patients undergoing lower abdominal surgery. Dexmedetomidine did not have any effect on nausea and vomiting score and antiemetic requirement. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  7. Acupuncture-Point Stimulation for Postoperative Pain Control: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian-Liang Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Acupuncture-point stimulation (APS in postoperative pain control compared with sham/placebo acupuncture or standard treatments (usual care or no treatment. Only randomized controlled trials (RCTs were included. Meta-analysis results indicated that APS interventions improved VAS scores significantly and also reduced total morphine consumption. No serious APS-related adverse effects (AEs were reported. There is Level I evidence for the effectiveness of body points plaster therapy and Level II evidence for body points electroacupuncture (EA, body points acupressure, body points APS for abdominal surgery patients, auricular points seed embedding, manual auricular acupuncture, and auricular EA. We obtained Level III evidence for body points APS in patients who underwent cardiac surgery and cesarean section and for auricular-point stimulation in patients who underwent abdominal surgery. There is insufficient evidence to conclude that APS is an effective postoperative pain therapy in surgical patients, although the evidence does support the conclusion that APS can reduce analgesic requirements without AEs. The best level of evidence was not adequate in most subgroups. Some limitations of this study may have affected the results, possibly leading to an overestimation of APS effects.

  8. PRK vs LASEK vs Epi-LASIK: a comparison of corneal haze, postoperative pain and visual recovery in moderate to high myopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, C D; Panday, V; Lazos, V; Mittelstaedt, B R

    2010-01-01

    The field of refractive surgery continues to evolve amid continued concerns as to which surgical technique minimizes the risk of inducing ectasia. To compare clinical outcomes between PRK, LASEK and Epi-LASIK in moderately to highly myopic eyes (-4.00 D to -8.00 D). A retrospective chart review of 100 PRK eyes, 100 LASEK eyes (with alcohol) and 97 Epi-LASIK eyes was performed. Post-operative pain, uncorrected visual acuity, and corneal haze data was recorded and analyzed at post-op days 1, 4 and 7 and at post-op months 1, 3, 6 and 12. In all groups surgical corrections ranged from -4.00 D to -8.00 D. There was less pain associated with the epi-LASIK procedure especially early (post-op days 1 and 4). Visual recovery was superior within the PRK group during the first post-operative week but by post-op week 4 all three were equal. Haze scores were similar but a trend for less haze was demonstrated with epi-LASIK at 6 and 12 months. Epi-LASIK has a slight advantage over PRK and LASEK early on in the post-op course with regards to pain. Visual recovery is similar by 4 weeks and is better with PRK early. In addition, epi-LASIK trends toward less significant haze. © Nepal Ophthalmic Society.

  9. REMIFENTANIL VS FENTANYL DURING DAY CASE DENTAL SURGERY IN PEOPLE WITH SPECIAL NEEDS: A COMPARATIVE, PILOT STUDY OF THEIR EFFECT ON STRESS RESPONSE AND POSTOPERATIVE PAIN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sklika, Eirini; Kalimeris, Konstantinos; Perrea, Despina; Stavropoulos, Nikolaos; Kostopanagiotou, Georgia; Matsota, Paraskevi

    2016-06-01

    People with special needs undergoing dental surgery frequently require general anesthesia. We investigated the effect of remifentanil vs fentanyl on stress response and postoperative pain in people with special needs undergoing day-case dental surgery. Forty-six adult patients with cognitive impairment undergoing day-case dental surgery under general anesthesia were allocated to receive intraoperatively either fentanyl 50 μg iv bolus (group F, n = 23) or continuous infusion of remifentanil 0.5-1 μg/kg/min (group R, n = 23). Iintraoperative hemodynamic parameters were recorded and serum inflammatory mediators [tumor necrosis factor-α, substance-P], stress hormons (melatonin, cortisol) and β-endorphin were measured. Postoperative pain was assessed during the first postoperative 12 hours with the Wong-Baker faces pain-rating scale. Demographics were similar in two groups. The two groups did not differ regarding their effects on inflammatory mediators, stress hormons and postoperative pain scores. However, the use of remifentanil prevented intraoperative increases of arterial blood pressure and heart rate. Remifentanil and fentanyl did not affect differently stress and inflammatory hormones during day-case dental surgery, although remifentanil may render intraoperative management of hemodynamic responses easier. Both opioids are equally efficient for postoperative pain management following dental surgery in people with special needs.

  10. Effect of systematic local infiltration analgesia on postoperative pain in vaginal hysterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hristovska, Ana-Marija; Kristensen, Billy B; Rasmussen, Marianne A

    2014-01-01

    : Thirty-seven patients undergoing vaginal hysterectomy. METHODS: Patients received high-volume (50 mL) ropivacaine 0.50% (n = 20) or saline (n = 17) infiltration using a systematic technique ensuring uniform delivery to all tissues incised, handled or instrumented during the procedure. MAIN OUTCOME...... MEASURES: Pain, nausea, vomiting and opioid requirements were assessed for 32 h as well as time spent in the post-anesthesia care unit and time to first mobilization. RESULTS: Pain at rest was significantly reduced after one, four and eight hours in the ropivacaine group (p ≤ 0.001-0.01). Pain during...... coughing was significantly reduced after one and four hours (p ≤ 0.001 and p ≤ 0.003), and pain during movement was significantly reduced after four hours (p ≤ 0.02). Opioid requirements and time spent in the post-anesthesia care unit were significantly reduced in the ropivacaine group (p