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Sample records for maximum graphite temperature

  1. Melting temperature of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korobenko, V.N.; Savvatimskiy, A.I.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text: Pulse of electrical current is used for fast heating (∼ 1 μs) of metal and graphite specimens placed in dielectric solid media. Specimen consists of two strips (90 μm in thick) placed together with small gap so they form a black body model. Quasy-monocrystal graphite specimens were used for uniform heating of graphite. Temperature measurements were fulfilled with fast pyrometer and with composite 2-strip black body model up to melting temperature. There were fulfilled experiments with zirconium and tungsten of the same black body construction. Additional temperature measurements of liquid zirconium and liquid tungsten are made. Specific heat capacity (c P ) of liquid zirconium and of liquid tungsten has a common feature in c P diminishing just after melting. It reveals c P diminishing after melting in both cases over the narrow temperature range up to usual values known from steady state measurements. Over the next wide temperature range heat capacity for W (up to 5000 K) and Zr (up to 4100 K) show different dependencies of heat capacity on temperature in liquid state. The experiments confirmed a high quality of 2-strip black body model used for graphite temperature measurements. Melting temperature plateau of tungsten (3690 K) was used for pyrometer calibration area for graphite temperature measurement. As a result, a preliminary value of graphite melting temperature of 4800 K was obtained. (author)

  2. Temperature distribution in graphite during annealing in air cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira Avila, C.R. de.

    1989-01-01

    A model for the evaluation temperature distributions in graphite during annealing operation in graphite. Moderated an-cooled reactors, is presented. One single channel and one dimension for air and graphite were considered. A numerical method based on finite control volumes was used for partioning the mathematical equations. The problem solution involves the use of unsteady equations of mass, momentum and energy conservation for air, and energy conservation for graphite. The source term was considered as stored energy release during annealing for describing energy conservation in the graphite. The coupling of energy conservation equations in air and graphite is performed by the heat transfer term betwen air and graphite. The results agree with experimental data. A sensitivity analysis shown that the termal conductivity of graphite and the maximum inlet channel temperature have great effect on the maximum temperature reached in graphite during the annealing. (author)

  3. High temperature soldering of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anikin, L.T.; Kravetskij, G.A.; Dergunova, V.S.

    1977-01-01

    The effect is studied of the brazing temperature on the strength of the brazed joint of graphite materials. In one case, iron and nickel are used as solder, and in another, molybdenum. The contact heating of the iron and nickel with the graphite has been studied in the temperature range of 1400-2400 ged C, and molybdenum, 2200-2600 deg C. The quality of the joints has been judged by the tensile strength at temperatures of 2500-2800 deg C and by the microstructure. An investigation into the kinetics of carbon dissolution in molten iron has shown that the failure of the graphite in contact with the iron melt is due to the incorporation of iron atoms in the interbase planes. The strength of a joint formed with the participation of the vapour-gas phase is 2.5 times higher than that of a joint obtained by graphite recrystallization through the carbon-containing metal melt. The critical temperatures are determined of graphite brazing with nickel, iron, and molybdenum interlayers, which sharply increase the strength of the brazed joint as a result of the formation of a vapour-gas phase and deposition of fine-crystal carbon

  4. Graphite for high-temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammer, W.; Leushacke, D.F.; Nickel, H.; Theymann, W.

    1976-01-01

    The different graphites necessary for HTRs are being developed, produced and tested within the Federal German ''Development Programme Nuclear Graphite''. Up to now, batches of the following graphite grades have been manufactured and fully characterized by the SIGRI Company to demonstrate reproducibility: pitch coke graphite AS2-500 for the hexagonal fuel elements and exchangeable reflector blocks; special pitch coke graphite ASI2-500 for reflector blocks of the pebble-bed reactor and as back-up material for the hexagonal fuel elements; graphite for core support columns. The material data obtained fulfill most of the requirements under present specifications. Production of large-size blocks for the permanent side reflector and the core support blocks is under way. The test programme covers all areas important for characterizing and judging HTR-graphites. In-pile testing comprises evaluation of the material for irradiation-induced changes of dimensions, mechanical and thermal properties - including behaviour under temperature cycling and creep behaviour - as well as irradiating fuel element segments and blocks. Testing out-of-pile includes: evaluation of corrosion rates and influence of corrosion on strength; strength measurements; including failure criteria. The test programme has been carried out extensively on the AS2-graphite, and the results obtained show that this graphite is suitable as HTGR fuel element graphite. (author)

  5. High temperature tests for graphite materials

    OpenAIRE

    Zhmurikov, Evgenij

    2015-01-01

    This study was performed within the framework of the EURISOL for facilities SPIRAL-II (GANIL, France) and SPES (LNL, Italy), and aims to investigate the anticipated strength properties of fine-grained graphite at elevated temperatures. It appears that the major parameters that affect to the lifetime of a graphite target of this IP are the temperature and heating time. High temperature tests were conducted to simulate the heating under the influence of a beam of heavy particles by passing thro...

  6. Nuclear graphite for high temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsden, B.J.

    2001-01-01

    The cores and reflectors in modern High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors (HTRs) are constructed from graphite components. There are two main designs; the Pebble Bed design and the Prism design. In both of these designs the graphite not only acts as a moderator, but is also a major structural component that may provide channels for the fuel and coolant gas, channels for control and safety shut off devices and provide thermal and neutron shielding. In addition, graphite components may act as a heat sink or conduction path during reactor trips and transients. During reactor operation, many of the graphite component physical properties are significantly changed by irradiation. These changes lead to the generation of significant internal shrinkage stresses and thermal shut down stresses that could lead to component failure. In addition, if the graphite is irradiated to a very high irradiation dose, irradiation swelling can lead to a rapid reduction in modulus and strength, making the component friable.The irradiation behaviour of graphite is strongly dependent on its virgin microstructure, which is determined by the manufacturing route. Nevertheless, there are available, irradiation data on many obsolete graphites of known microstructures. There is also a well-developed physical understanding of the process of irradiation damage in graphite. This paper proposes a specification for graphite suitable for modern HTRs. (author)

  7. Extreme Maximum Land Surface Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garratt, J. R.

    1992-09-01

    There are numerous reports in the literature of observations of land surface temperatures. Some of these, almost all made in situ, reveal maximum values in the 50°-70°C range, with a few, made in desert regions, near 80°C. Consideration of a simplified form of the surface energy balance equation, utilizing likely upper values of absorbed shortwave flux (1000 W m2) and screen air temperature (55°C), that surface temperatures in the vicinity of 90°-100°C may occur for dry, darkish soils of low thermal conductivity (0.1-0.2 W m1 K1). Numerical simulations confirm this and suggest that temperature gradients in the first few centimeters of soil may reach 0.5°-1°C mm1 under these extreme conditions. The study bears upon the intrinsic interest of identifying extreme maximum temperatures and yields interesting information regarding the comfort zone of animals (including man).

  8. Temperature dependence of phonons in pyrolitic graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brockhouse, B.N.; Shirane, G.

    1977-01-01

    Dispersion curves for longitudinal and transverse phonons propagating along and near the c-axis in pyrolitic graphite at temperatures between 4 0 K and 1500 0 C have been measured by neutron spectroscopy. The observed frequencies decrease markedly with increasing temperature (except for the transverse optical ''rippling'' modes in the hexagonal planes). The neutron groups show interesting asymmetrical broadening ascribed to interference between one phonon and many phonon processes

  9. Voronoi-Tessellated Graphite Produced by Low-Temperature Catalytic Graphitization from Renewable Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Leyi; Zhao, Xiuyun; Burke, Luke T; Bennett, J Craig; Dunlap, Richard A; Obrovac, Mark N

    2017-09-11

    A highly crystalline graphite powder was prepared from the low temperature (800-1000 °C) graphitization of renewable hard carbon precursors using a magnesium catalyst. The resulting graphite particles are composed of Voronoi-tessellated regions comprising irregular sheets; each Voronoi-tessellated region having a small "seed" particle located near their centroid on the surface. This suggests nucleated outward growth of graphitic carbon, which has not been previously observed. Each seed particle consists of a spheroidal graphite shell on the inside of which hexagonal graphite platelets are perpendicularly affixed. This results in a unique high surface area graphite with a high degree of graphitization that is made with renewable feedstocks at temperatures far below that conventionally used for artificial graphites. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Gilpin R.; Hammarstrom, Jane M.; Olson, Donald W.; Schulz, Klaus J.; DeYoung,, John H.; Seal, Robert R.; Bradley, Dwight C.

    2017-12-19

    Graphite is a form of pure carbon that normally occurs as black crystal flakes and masses. It has important properties, such as chemical inertness, thermal stability, high electrical conductivity, and lubricity (slipperiness) that make it suitable for many industrial applications, including electronics, lubricants, metallurgy, and steelmaking. For some of these uses, no suitable substitutes are available. Steelmaking and refractory applications in metallurgy use the largest amount of produced graphite; however, emerging technology uses in large-scale fuel cell, battery, and lightweight high-strength composite applications could substantially increase world demand for graphite.Graphite ores are classified as “amorphous” (microcrystalline), and “crystalline” (“flake” or “lump or chip”) based on the ore’s crystallinity, grain-size, and morphology. All graphite deposits mined today formed from metamorphism of carbonaceous sedimentary rocks, and the ore type is determined by the geologic setting. Thermally metamorphosed coal is the usual source of amorphous graphite. Disseminated crystalline flake graphite is mined from carbonaceous metamorphic rocks, and lump or chip graphite is mined from veins in high-grade metamorphic regions. Because graphite is chemically inert and nontoxic, the main environmental concerns associated with graphite mining are inhalation of fine-grained dusts, including silicate and sulfide mineral particles, and hydrocarbon vapors produced during the mining and processing of ore. Synthetic graphite is manufactured from hydrocarbon sources using high-temperature heat treatment, and it is more expensive to produce than natural graphite.Production of natural graphite is dominated by China, India, and Brazil, which export graphite worldwide. China provides approximately 67 percent of worldwide output of natural graphite, and, as the dominant exporter, has the ability to set world prices. China has significant graphite reserves, and

  11. High-Temperature Graphite/Phenolic Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seal, Ellis C.; Bodepudi, Venu P.; Biggs, Robert W., Jr.; Cranston, John A.

    1995-01-01

    Graphite-fiber/phenolic-resin composite material retains relatively high strength and modulus of elasticity at temperatures as high as 1,000 degrees F. Costs only 5 to 20 percent as much as refractory materials. Fabrication composite includes curing process in which application of full autoclave pressure delayed until after phenolic resin gels. Curing process allows moisture to escape, so when composite subsequently heated in service, much less expansion of absorbed moisture and much less tendency toward delamination. Developed for nose cone of external fuel tank of Space Shuttle. Other potential aerospace applications for material include leading edges, parts of nozzles, parts of aircraft engines, and heat shields. Terrestrial and aerospace applications include structural firewalls and secondary structures in aircraft, spacecraft, and ships. Modified curing process adapted to composites of phenolic with other fiber reinforcements like glass or quartz. Useful as high-temperature circuit boards and electrical insulators.

  12. Low temperature vapor phase digestion of graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, Robert A.

    2017-04-18

    A method for digestion and gasification of graphite for removal from an underlying surface is described. The method can be utilized to remove graphite remnants of a formation process from the formed metal piece in a cleaning process. The method can be particularly beneficial in cleaning castings formed with graphite molding materials. The method can utilize vaporous nitric acid (HNO.sub.3) or vaporous HNO.sub.3 with air/oxygen to digest the graphite at conditions that can avoid damage to the underlying surface.

  13. Modelling property changes in graphite irradiated at changing irradiation temperature

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kok, S

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method is proposed to predict the irradiation induced property changes in nuclear; graphite, including the effect of a change in irradiation temperature. The currently used method; to account for changes in irradiation temperature, the scaled...

  14. High-temperature annealing of graphite: A molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Andrew; Gillette, Victor

    2018-05-01

    A modified AIREBO potential was developed to simulate the effects of thermal annealing on the structure and physical properties of damaged graphite. AIREBO parameter modifications were made to reproduce Density Functional Theory interstitial results. These changes to the potential resulted in high-temperature annealing of the model, as measured by stored-energy reduction. These results show some resemblance to experimental high-temperature annealing results, and show promise that annealing effects in graphite are accessible with molecular dynamics and reactive potentials.

  15. Maximum Temperature Detection System for Integrated Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankiewicz, Maciej; Kos, Andrzej

    2015-03-01

    The paper describes structure and measurement results of the system detecting present maximum temperature on the surface of an integrated circuit. The system consists of the set of proportional to absolute temperature sensors, temperature processing path and a digital part designed in VHDL. Analogue parts of the circuit where designed with full-custom technique. The system is a part of temperature-controlled oscillator circuit - a power management system based on dynamic frequency scaling method. The oscillator cooperates with microprocessor dedicated for thermal experiments. The whole system is implemented in UMC CMOS 0.18 μm (1.8 V) technology.

  16. Temperature annealing of tracks induced by ion irradiation of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, J.; Yao, H.J.; Sun, Y.M.; Duan, J.L.; Hou, M.D.; Mo, D.; Wang, Z.G.; Jin, Y.F.; Abe, H.; Li, Z.C.; Sekimura, N.

    2006-01-01

    Highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) samples were irradiated by Xe ions of initial kinetic energy of 3 MeV/u. The irradiations were performed at temperatures of 500 and 800 K. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images show that the tracks occasionally have elongated structures under high-temperature irradiation. The track creation yield at 800 K is by three orders of magnitude smaller compared to that obtained during room-temperature irradiation. STM and Raman spectra show that amorphization occurs in graphite samples irradiated at 500 K to higher fluences, but not at 800 K. The obtained experimental results clearly reveal that the irradiation under high temperature causes track annealing

  17. The effective neutron temperature in heated graphite sleeves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, J A; Small, V G [General Reactor Physics Division, Atomic Energy Establishment, Winfrith, Dorchester, Dorset (United Kingdom)

    1963-08-15

    In a series of oscillator measurements carried out in the reactor NERO the variation of the relative reaction rates of cadmium and boron absorbers has been used to determine the effective neutron temperature inside heated graphite sleeves. This work extends the scope of similar oscillator measurements previously carried out in DIMPLE, in that the bulk moderator is now graphite as opposed to D{sub 2}O in the former case. (author)

  18. High temperature graphite irradiation creep experiment in the Dragon Reactor. Dragon Project report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manzel, R.; Everett, M. R.; Graham, L. W.

    1971-05-15

    The irradiation induced creep of pressed Gilsocarbon graphite under constant tensile stress has been investigated in an experiment carried out in FE 317 of the OECD High Temperature Gass Cooled Reactor ''Dragon'' at Winfrith (England). The experiment covered a temperature range of 850 dec C to 1240 deg C and reached a maximum fast neutron dose of 1.19 x 1021 n cm-2 NDE (Nickel Dose DIDO Equivalent). Irradiation induced dimensional changes of a string of unrestrained graphite specimens are compared with the dimensional changes of three strings of restrained graphite specimens stressed to 40%, 58%, and 70% of the initial ultimate tensile strength of pressed Gilsocarbon graphite. Total creep strains ranging from 0.18% to 1.25% have been measured and a linear dependence of creep strain on applied stress was observed. Mechanical property measurements carried out before and after irradiation demonstrate that Gilsocarbon graphite can accommodate significant creep strains without failure or structural deterioration. Total creep strains are in excellent agreement with other data, however the results indicate a relatively large temperature dependent primary creep component which at 1200 deg C approaches a value which is three times larger than the normally assumed initial elastic strain. Secondary creep constants derived from the experiment show a temperature dependence and are in fair agreement with data reported elsewhere. A possible determination of the results is given.

  19. Development and testing of nuclear graphite for the German pebble-bed high temperature reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haag, G.; Delle, W.; Nickel, H.; Theymann, W.; Wilhelmi, G.

    1987-01-01

    Several types of high temperature reactors have been developed in the Federal Republic of Germany. They are all based on spherical fuel elements being surrounded by graphite as reflector material. As an example, HTR-500 developed by the Hochtemperatur Reaktorbau GmbH is shown. The core consists of the top reflector, the side reflector with inner and outer parts, the bottom reflector and the core support columns. The most serious problem with respect to fast neutron radiation damage had to be solved for the materials of those parts near the pebble bed. Regarding the temperature profile in the core, the top reflector is at 300 deg C, and as cooling gas flows from the top downward, the temperature of the inner side reflector rises to about 700 deg C at the bottom. Fortunately, the highest fast neutron load accumulated during the life time of a reactor corresponds to the lowest temperature. This makes graphite components easier to survive neutron exposure without being mechanically damaged, although the maximum fast neutron fluence is as high as 4 x 10 22 /cm 2 at about 400 deg C. HTR graphite components are divided into four classes according to loading. The raw materials for nuclear graphite, the development of pitch coke nuclear graphite, the irradiation behavior of ATR-2E and ASR-IRS and others are reported. (Kako, I.)

  20. Low temperature chemical processing of graphite-clad nuclear fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Robert A.

    2017-10-17

    A reduced-temperature method for treatment of a fuel element is described. The method includes molten salt treatment of a fuel element with a nitrate salt. The nitrate salt can oxidize the outer graphite matrix of a fuel element. The method can also include reduced temperature degradation of the carbide layer of a fuel element and low temperature solubilization of the fuel in a kernel of a fuel element.

  1. High-temperature properties of commercial pyrolytic graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goetzel, C.G.

    1979-01-01

    Pyrolytic graphite is produced commercially as free-standing massive structures of continuously-nucleated and surface-nucleated varieties. Both are used for rocket nozzle components. The major design-significant thermal and mechanical properties of both material types are presented as a function of temperature up to 3000 K. They are compared with each other and with previous data. (author)

  2. Interactions of hydrogen with graphite at low pressure and elevated temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoinkis, E.

    1991-03-01

    The plasma facing components of the vacuum chamber for thermonuclear fusion experiments are clad with graphite. Recycling of gases affects the plasma properties, and the tritium quantity accumulated in the graphite during the operation of Tokamaks with DT must be known. An adsorption isotherm for deuterium on the nuclear grade graphitic Matrix A3-3 was measured by using a volumetric method at 1173 K at pressures c = 2.5 eV/D 2 using Fowler's equation and isotherms were calculated for this E c value. These isotherms predict saturation of the adsorption sites in graphite at T D2 > 0.1 Pa. At T > 1173 K and P D2 -2 Pa the adsorbed quantity is less than 1% of the saturation level. The release kinetics of deuterium was measured at temperatures uo to 2000 K. D 2 desorption commenced at 1170 K. The maximum of the release rate is observed at T p = 1770 K. A Lennard-Jones potential energy diagram was calculated, which suggests a C-H bond energy E b ≅ 3.4 eV/D and an activation energy of desorption E d ≅ 4 eV/D 2 . The partial pressures of hydrocarbons C n ≤3 H m in equilibrium with graphite were calculated. At total pressures -2 Pa the partial pressures of these hydrocarbons are less than 10 -7 Pa in the temperature range 600-1500 K. (orig./MM)

  3. Temperature dependence of the thermal expansion of neutron-irradiated pyrolytic carbon and graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Hideto

    1988-01-01

    The effects of neutron irradiation and annealing on the temperature dependence of the linear thermal expansion of pyrolytic carbon and graphite were investigated after irradiation at 930-1280 0 C to a maximum neutron fluence of 2.84 x 10 25 m -2 (E > 29 fJ). After irradiation, little change in the thermal expansion of pyrolytic graphite was observed. However, as-deposited pyrolytic carbon showed an increase in thermal expansion in the perpendicular direction, a decrease in the direction parallel to the deposition plane, and also an increase in the anisotropy of the thermal expansion. Annealing at 2000 0 C did not cause any effective changes for irradiated specimens of either as-deposited pyrolytic carbon or pyrolytic graphite. (author)

  4. The mechanical behavior and reliability prediction of the HTR graphite component at various temperature and neutron dose ranges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Xiang; Yu, Suyuan; Wang, Haitao; Li, Chenfeng

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The mechanical behavior of graphite component in HTRs under high temperature and neutron irradiation conditions is simulated. • The computational process of mechanical analysis is introduced. • Deformation, stresses and failure probability of the graphite component are obtained and discussed. • Various temperature and neutron dose ranges are selected in order to investigate the effect of in-core conditions on the results. - Abstract: In a pebble-bed high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTR), nuclear graphite serves as the main structural material of the side reflectors. The reactor core is made up of a large number of graphite bricks. In the normal operation case of the reactor, the maximum temperature of the helium coolant commonly reaches about 750 °C. After around 30 years’ full power operation, the peak value of in-core fast neutron cumulative dose reaches to 1 × 10 22 n cm −2 (EDN). Such high temperature and neutron irradiation strongly impact the behavior of graphite component, causing obvious deformation. The temperature and neutron dose are unevenly distributed inside a graphite brick, resulting in stress concentrations. The deformation and stress concentration can both greatly affect safety and reliability of the graphite component. In addition, most of the graphite properties (such as Young's modulus and coefficient of thermal expansion) change remarkably under high temperature and neutron irradiations. The irradiation-induced creep also plays a very important role during the whole process, and provides a significant impact on the stress accumulation. In order to simulate the behavior of graphite component under various in-core conditions, all of the above factors must be considered carefully. In this paper, the deformation, stress distribution and failure probability of a side graphite component are studied at various temperature points and neutron dose levels. 400 °C, 500 °C, 600 °C and 750 °C are selected as the

  5. A study of the high temperature behavior of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gale, H.; Zee, R. H.; Gale, W. F.; Yeh, W.

    1997-01-01

    Poco AXF 5Q graphite coupons were heated at temperatures ranging from 1900 K to 2400 K. A loss in weight was observed in all cases, but there appeared to be no simple relationship between the holding temperature and the weight loss observed. Scanning electron microscopy revealed no change in the surface morphology of the samples before and after heating, indicating that the loss of material occurred in a uniform, rather than a localized, fashion. The weight loss per hour, for pre-dried graphite coupons, was in most cases higher with short holding times than for prolonged exposure. Thus, it would appear that the observed weight changes were dominated in most cases by the removal of volatiles rather than by the evaporation of carbon

  6. Property changes in graphite irradiated at changing irradiation temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, R.J.; Haag, G.

    1979-07-01

    Design data for irradiated graphite are usually presented as families of isothermal curves showing the change in physical property as a function of fast neutron fluence. In this report, procedures for combining isothermal curves to predict behavior under changing irradiation temperatures are compared with experimental data on irradiation-induced changes in dimensions, Young's modulus, thermal conductivity, and thermal expansivity. The suggested procedure fits the data quite well and is physically realistic

  7. Thermal deoxygenation of graphite oxide at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kampars, V; Legzdina, M

    2015-01-01

    Synthesis of graphene via the deoxygenation of the graphite oxide (GO) is a method for the large-scale production of this nanomaterial possessing exceptional mechanical, electrical and translucent properties. Graphite oxide sheet contains at least four different oxygen atoms connected to the Csp 3 and Csp 2 atoms of the sheet in the form of hydroxyl, epoxy, carboxyl or carbonyl groups. Some of these functional groups are located at the surface but others situated at the edges of the platelets. To obtain the graphene nanoplatelets or the few-layer graphene the oxygen functionalities must be removed. Exfoliation and deoxygenation can be accomplished by the use of chemical reductants or heat. Thermal deoxygenation as greener and simpler approach is more preferable over chemical reduction approach. Usually a considerable mass loss of GO observed upon heating at temperatures starting at 200 °C and is attributed to the deoxygenation process. In order to avoid the defects of the obtained graphene sheets it is very important to find the methods for lowering the deoxygenation temperature of GO. Herein, we have investigated the way treatment of the Hummer's synthesis product with acetone and methyl tert-butyl ether under ultrasonication in order to lower the thermal stability of the graphite oxide and its deoxygenation temperature. The obtained results indicate that treatment of the graphite oxide with solvents mentioned above substantially reduces the reduction and exfoliation temperature (130 °C) under ambient atmosphere. The investigation of the composition of evolved gases by hyphenated Pyr/GC/MS method at different experimental conditions under helium atmosphere shows that without the expected H 2 O, CO and CO 2 also sulphur dioxide and acetone has been released

  8. High-temperature solid electrolyte interphases (SEI) in graphite electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Marco-Tulio F.; Sayed, Farheen N.; Gullapalli, Hemtej; Ajayan, Pulickel M.

    2018-03-01

    Thermal fragility of the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) is a major source of performance decay in graphite anodes, and efforts to overcome the issues offered by extreme environments to Li-ion batteries have had limited success. Here, we demonstrate that the SEI can be extensively reinforced by carrying the formation cycles at elevated temperatures. Under these conditions, decomposition of the ionic liquid present in the electrolyte favored the formation of a thicker and more protective layer. Cells in which the solid electrolyte interphase was cast at 90 °C were significantly less prone to self-discharge when exposed to high temperature, with no obvious damages to the formed SEI. This additional resilience was accomplished at the expense of rate capability, as charge transfer became growingly inefficient in these systems. At slower rates, however, cells that underwent SEI formation at 90 °C presented superior performances, as a result of improved Li+ transport through the SEI, and optimal wetting of graphite by the electrolyte. This work analyzes different graphite hosts and ionic liquids, showing that this effect is more pervasive than anticipated, and offering the unique perspective that, for certain systems, temperature can actually be an asset for passivation.

  9. RBS investigations of high-temperature reactions on graphite substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eloi, C.C. [Kentucky Univ., Lexington, KY (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Center for Applied Energy Research, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Robertson, J.D. [Kentucky Univ., Lexington, KY (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Center for Applied Energy Research, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Majidi, V. [Kentucky Univ., Lexington, KY (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1995-05-01

    While graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) is one of the most powerful techniques for ultratrace analysis of Pb, it is often plagued by matrix interferences. These interferences are minimized by the addition of matrix modifiers which stabilize the analyte signal through unknown mechanisms. Using RBS, the high temperature reactions of nitrate salts of Pb were studied on pyrolytically coated graphite with and without matrix modifiers. The addition of an ammonium phosphate modifier was found to stabilize Pb through the formation of a metal oxy-phosphorus compound. Moreover, the depth profiles demonstrated that the pyrolytically coated graphite was not impervious as previously thought. Pre-treatment of the surface with O{sub 2} is also known to cause a delay in the vaporization of Pb. While a surface effect had previously been postulated, the 3.04 MeV resonance {sup 16}O({alpha}, {alpha}){sup 16}O elastic scattering measurements show that it proceeds through the formation of surface bound lead-oxygen species as the number of oxygen atoms chemisorbed and the number of lead atoms, present on the surface prior to vaporization, are nearly equal. (orig.).

  10. Graphite beds for coolant filtration at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heathcock, R.E.; Lacy, C.S.

    1978-01-01

    High temperature filtration will be provided for new Ontario Hydro CANDU heat transport systems. Filtration has been shown to effectively reduce the concentration of circulating corrosion products in our heat transport systems, hence, minimizing the processes of activity transport. This paper will present one option we have for this application; Deep Bed Granular Graphite Filters. The filter system is described by discussing pertinent aspects of its development programme. The compatibility of the filter and the heat transport coolant are demonstrated by results from loop tests, both out- and in-reactor, and by subsequent results from a large filter installation in the NPD NGS heat transport system. (author)

  11. Strength and deformability of graphite under cyclic stresses and temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umanskij, Eh.S.; Uskov, E.I.; Bogomolov, A.V.; Aleksyuk, M.M.

    1978-01-01

    Presented are the results of investigations into a durability of two types of reactor graphites with the average density of 1.8 and 1.65 g/cm 2 under static and cyclic stresses (0.65-0.75 kg/mm 2 ) and temperatures (800 deg C, 250 reversible 800 deg C 250 reversible 1500 deg C). The considerable anisotropy is stated: the durability of the samples under study cut out parallel to the billet axis, is more than twice higher in comparison with that of samples cut out normal to it

  12. Evaluation of parameters effect on the maximum fuel temperature in the core thermal and hydraulic design of HTTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, Nozomu; Maruyama, Soh; Sudo, Yukio; Fujii, Sadao; Niguma, Yoshinori.

    1988-10-01

    This report presents the results of quantitative evaluation on the effects of the dominant parameters on the maximum fuel temperature in the core thermal hydraulic design of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor(HTTR) of 30 MW in thermal power, 950 deg C in reactor outlet coolant temperature and 40 kg/cm 2 G in coolant pressure. The dominant parameters investigated are 1) Gap conductance. 2) Effect of eccertricity of fuel compacts in graphite sleeve. 3) Effect of spacer ribs on heat transfer coefficients. 4) Contact probability of fuel compact and graphite sleeve. 5) Validity of uniform radial power density in the fuel compacts. 6) Effect of impurity gas on gap conductance. 7) Effect of FP gas on gap conductance. The effects of these items on the maximum fuel temperature were quantitalively identified as hot spot factors. A probability of the appearance of the maximum fuel temperature was also evaluated in this report. (author)

  13. Moessbauer study of small amounts of iron in graphite, around the diamond-graphite pressure-temperature stability region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, C.L.S. de; Silva, M.T.X.; Vasquez, A.; Jornada, J.A.H. da

    1991-01-01

    An exploratory Moessbauer spectroscopy study of the Fe-C system in the C rich region, prepared by high pressure-high temperature treatment near the graphite-diamond stability line, was made. The results obtained for the different processing conditions give no evidence of Fe intercalation in graphite. The presence of some water in the cell produced hydrated Fe complexes, which can explain the deleterious effect of water or hydrogen in the high pressure diamond synthesis. (orig.)

  14. Maximum vehicle cabin temperatures under different meteorological conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundstein, Andrew; Meentemeyer, Vernon; Dowd, John

    2009-05-01

    A variety of studies have documented the dangerously high temperatures that may occur within the passenger compartment (cabin) of cars under clear sky conditions, even at relatively low ambient air temperatures. Our study, however, is the first to examine cabin temperatures under variable weather conditions. It uses a unique maximum vehicle cabin temperature dataset in conjunction with directly comparable ambient air temperature, solar radiation, and cloud cover data collected from April through August 2007 in Athens, GA. Maximum cabin temperatures, ranging from 41-76°C, varied considerably depending on the weather conditions and the time of year. Clear days had the highest cabin temperatures, with average values of 68°C in the summer and 61°C in the spring. Cloudy days in both the spring and summer were on average approximately 10°C cooler. Our findings indicate that even on cloudy days with lower ambient air temperatures, vehicle cabin temperatures may reach deadly levels. Additionally, two predictive models of maximum daily vehicle cabin temperatures were developed using commonly available meteorological data. One model uses maximum ambient air temperature and average daily solar radiation while the other uses cloud cover percentage as a surrogate for solar radiation. From these models, two maximum vehicle cabin temperature indices were developed to assess the level of danger. The models and indices may be useful for forecasting hazardous conditions, promoting public awareness, and to estimate past cabin temperatures for use in forensic analyses.

  15. High-Temperature Graphitization Failure of Primary Superheater Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, D.; Ray, S.; Roy, H.; Mandal, N.; Shukla, A. K.

    2015-12-01

    Failure of boiler tubes is the main cause of unit outages of the plant, which further affects the reliability, availability and safety of the unit. So failure analysis of boiler tubes is absolutely essential to predict the root cause of the failure and the steps are taken for future remedial action to prevent the failure in near future. This paper investigates the probable cause/causes of failure of the primary superheater tube in a thermal power plant boiler. Visual inspection, dimensional measurement, chemical analysis, metallographic examination and hardness measurement are conducted as the part of the investigative studies. Apart from these tests, mechanical testing and fractographic analysis are also conducted as supplements. Finally, it is concluded that the superheater tube is failed due to graphitization for prolonged exposure of the tube at higher temperature.

  16. Modeling maximum daily temperature using a varying coefficient regression model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han Li; Xinwei Deng; Dong-Yum Kim; Eric P. Smith

    2014-01-01

    Relationships between stream water and air temperatures are often modeled using linear or nonlinear regression methods. Despite a strong relationship between water and air temperatures and a variety of models that are effective for data summarized on a weekly basis, such models did not yield consistently good predictions for summaries such as daily maximum temperature...

  17. Preparation, quantitative surface analysis, intercalation characteristics and industrial implications of low temperature expandable graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Tiefeng; Liu, Bin; Gao, Xuechao; Luo, Liqun; Sun, Hongjuan

    2018-06-01

    Expandable graphite is widely used as a new functional carbon material, especially as fire-retardant; however, its practical application is limited due to the high expansion temperature. In this work, preparation process of low temperature and highly expandable graphite was studied, using natural flake graphite as raw material and KMnO4/HClO4/NH4NO3 as oxidative intercalations. The structure, morphology, functional groups and thermal properties were characterized during expanding process by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectra, thermo-gravimetry differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The analysis showed that by oxidation intercalation, some oxygen-containing groups were grafted on the edge and within the graphite layer. The intercalation reagent entered the graphite layer to increase the interlayer spacing. After expansion, the original flaky expandable graphite was completely transformed into worm-like expanded graphite. The order of graphite intercalation compounds (GICs) was proposed and determined to be 3 for the prepared expandable graphite, based on quantitative XRD peak analysis. Meanwhile, the detailed intercalation mechanisms were also proposed. The comprehensive investigation paved a benchmark for the industrial application of such sulfur-free expanded graphite.

  18. Synergistically improved thermal conductivity of polyamide-6 with low melting temperature metal and graphite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. C. Jia

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Low melting temperature metal (LMTM-tin (Sn was introduced into polyamide-6 (PA6 and PA6/graphite composites respectively to improve the thermal conductivity of PA6 by melt processing (extruding and injection molding. After introducing Sn, the thermal conductivity of PA6/Sn was nearly constant because of the serious agglomeration of Sn. However, when 20 wt% (5.4 vol% of Sn was added into PA6 containing 50 wt% (33.3 vol% of graphite, the thermal conductivity of the composite was dramatically increased to 5.364 versus 1.852 W·(m·K–1 for the PA6/graphite composite, which suggests that the incorporation of graphite and Sn have a significant synergistic effect on the thermal conductivity improvement of PA6. What is more, the electrical conductivity of the composite increased nearly 8 orders of magnitudes after introducing both graphite and Sn. Characterization of microstructure and energy dispersive spectrum analysis (EDS indicates that the dispersion of Sn in PA6/graphite/Sn was much more uniform than that of PA6/Sn composite. According to Differential Scanning Calorimetry measurement and EDS, the uniform dispersion of Sn in PA6/graphite/Sn and the high thermal conductivity of PA6/graphite/Sn are speculated to be related with the electron transfer between graphite and Sn, which makes Sn distribute evenly around the graphite layers.

  19. High temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) graphite pebble fuel: Review of technologies for reprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcwilliams, A. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-09-08

    This report reviews literature on reprocessing high temperature gas-cooled reactor graphite fuel components. A basic review of the various fuel components used in the pebble bed type reactors is provided along with a survey of synthesis methods for the fabrication of the fuel components. Several disposal options are considered for the graphite pebble fuel elements including the storage of intact pebbles, volume reduction by separating the graphite from fuel kernels, and complete processing of the pebbles for waste storage. Existing methods for graphite removal are presented and generally consist of mechanical separation techniques such as crushing and grinding chemical techniques through the use of acid digestion and oxidation. Potential methods for reprocessing the graphite pebbles include improvements to existing methods and novel technologies that have not previously been investigated for nuclear graphite waste applications. The best overall method will be dependent on the desired final waste form and needs to factor in the technical efficiency, political concerns, cost, and implementation.

  20. Management of graphite material: a key issue for High Temperature Gas Reactor system (HTGR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourdeloie, C.; Marimbeau, P.; Robin, J.C.; Cellier, F.

    2005-01-01

    Graphite material is used in nuclear High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGR, Fig.1) as moderator, thermal absorber and also as structural components of the core (Fig.2). This type of reactor was selected by the Generation IV forum as a potential high temperature provider for supplying hydrogen production plants and is under development in France in the frame of the AREVA ANTARES program. In order to select graphite grades to be used in these future reactors, the requirements for mechanical, thermal, physical-chemical properties must match the internal environment of the nuclear core, especially with regard to irradiation effect. Another important aspect that must be addressed early in design is the waste issue. Indeed, it is necessary to reduce the amount of nuclear waste produced by operation of the reactor during its lifetime. Preliminary assessment of the nuclear waste output for an ANTARES type 280 MWe HTGR over 60 year-lifetime gives an estimated 6000 m 3 of activated graphite waste. Thus, reducing the graphite waste production is an important issue for any HTGR system. First, this paper presents a preliminary inventory of graphite waste fluxes coming from a HTGR, in mass and volume, with magnitudes of radiological activities based on activation calculations of graphite during its stay in the core of the reactor. Normalized data corresponding to an output of 1 GWe.year electricity allows comparison of the waste production with other nuclear reactor systems. Second, possible routes to manage irradiated graphite waste are addressed in both the context of French nuclear waste management rules and by comparison to other national regulations. Routes for graphite waste disposal studied in different countries (concerning existing irradiated graphite waste) will be discussed with regard to new issues of large graphite waste from HTGR. Alternative or complementary solutions aiming at lowering volume of graphite waste to be managed will be presented. For example

  1. Oxidation of graphites for core support post in air at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imai, Hisashi; Fujii, Kimio; Kurosawa, Takeshi

    1982-07-01

    Oxidation reactions of candidate graphites for core support post with atmospheric air were studied in a temperature range between 550 0 C and 1000 0 C. The reaction rates, temperature dependence of the rates and distribution of bulk density in the oxidized graphites were measured and the characters obtained were compared between the brand of graphites. On the basis of the experimental results, dimension and strength of the post after corrosion with air, which might be introduced in rupture accident of primary coolant tube, were discussed. In the case of IG-11 graphite, it was proved that the strength of post is still sufficient even 100 hours after the beginning of the accident and that, however, it is necessary to insert more deeply the post against graphite blocks. (author)

  2. Temperature control of the graphite stack of the reactor RBMK-1500

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesnoj, S.

    1998-01-01

    The paper includes general information about RBMK-1500 reactor, construction features and main technical data; graphite moderator stack, temperature channel, thermocouple TXA-1379, its basic technical and metrologic parameters as well as its advantages and disadvantages

  3. Process for the production of prismatic graphite molded articles for high temperature fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huschka, H.; Rachor, L.; Hrovat, M.; Wolff, W.

    1976-01-01

    Prismatic graphite molded objects for high temperature fuel elements are prepared by producing the outer geometry and the holes for cooling channels and for receiving fuel and fertile materials in the formation of the carbon object

  4. Synthesis, characterization and magnetic properties of room-temperature nanofluid ferromagnetic graphite

    OpenAIRE

    Souza, N. S.; Sergeenkov, S.; Speglich, C.; Rivera, V. A. G.; Cardoso, C. A.; Pardo, H.; Mombru, A. W.; Rodrigues, A. D.; de Lima, O. F.; Araujo-Moreira, F. M.

    2009-01-01

    We report the chemical synthesis route, structural characterization, and physical properties of nanofluid magnetic graphite (NFMG) obtained from the previously synthesized bulk organic magnetic graphite (MG) by stabilizing the aqueous ferrofluid suspension with an addition of active cationic surfactant. The measured magnetization-field hysteresis curves along with the temperature dependence of magnetization confirmed room-temperature ferromagnetism in both MG and NFMG samples. (C) 2009 Americ...

  5. Draft of standard for graphite core components in high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Taiju; Sawa, Kazuhiro; Eto, Motokuni; Kunimoto, Eiji; Shiozawa, Shusaku; Oku, Tatsuo; Maruyama, Tadashi

    2010-01-01

    For the design of the graphite components in the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR), the graphite structural design code for the HTTR etc. were applied. However, general standard systems for the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) have not been established yet. The authors had studied on the technical issues which is necessary for the establishment of a general standard system for the graphite components in the HTGR. The results of the study were documented and discussed at a 'Special committee on research on preparation for codes for graphite components in HTGR' at Atomic Energy Society of Japan (AESJ). As a result, 'Draft of Standard for Graphite Core Components in High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor.' was established. In the draft standard, the graphite components are classified three categories (A, B and C) in the standpoints of safety functions and possibility of replacement. For the components in the each class, design standard, material and product standards, and in-service inspection and maintenance standard are determined. As an appendix of the design standard, the graphical expressions of material property data of 1G-110 graphite as a function of fast neutron fluence are expressed. The graphical expressions were determined through the interpolation and extrapolation of the irradiated data. (author)

  6. Mid-depth temperature maximum in an estuarine lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanenko, V. M.; Repina, I. A.; Artamonov, A. Yu; Gorin, S. L.; Lykossov, V. N.; Kulyamin, D. V.

    2018-03-01

    The mid-depth temperature maximum (TeM) was measured in an estuarine Bol’shoi Vilyui Lake (Kamchatka peninsula, Russia) in summer 2015. We applied 1D k-ɛ model LAKE to the case, and found it successfully simulating the phenomenon. We argue that the main prerequisite for mid-depth TeM development is a salinity increase below the freshwater mixed layer, sharp enough in order to increase the temperature with depth not to cause convective mixing and double diffusion there. Given that this condition is satisfied, the TeM magnitude is controlled by physical factors which we identified as: radiation absorption below the mixed layer, mixed-layer temperature dynamics, vertical heat conduction and water-sediments heat exchange. In addition to these, we formulate the mechanism of temperature maximum ‘pumping’, resulting from the phase shift between diurnal cycles of mixed-layer depth and temperature maximum magnitude. Based on the LAKE model results we quantify the contribution of the above listed mechanisms and find their individual significance highly sensitive to water turbidity. Relying on physical mechanisms identified we define environmental conditions favouring the summertime TeM development in salinity-stratified lakes as: small-mixed layer depth (roughly, ~wind and cloudless weather. We exemplify the effect of mixed-layer depth on TeM by a set of selected lakes.

  7. Production of nanodiamonds by high-energy ion irradiation of graphite at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daulton, T.L.; Kirk, M.A.; Lewis, R.S.; Rehn, L.E.

    2001-01-01

    It has previously been shown that graphite can be transformed into diamond by MeV electron and ion irradiation at temperatures above approximately 600 deg. C. However, there exists geological evidence suggesting that carbonaceous materials can be transformed to diamond by irradiation at substantially lower temperatures. For example, submicron-size diamond aggregates have been found in uranium-rich, Precambrian carbonaceous deposits that never experienced high temperature or pressure. To test if diamonds can be formed at lower irradiation temperatures, sheets of fine-grain polycrystalline graphite were bombarded at 20 deg. C with 350±50 MeV Kr ions to fluences of 6x10 12 cm -2 using the Argonne tandem linear accelerator system (ATLAS). Ion-irradiated (and unirradiated control) graphite specimens were then subjected to acid dissolution treatments to remove untransformed graphite and isolate diamonds that were produced; these acid residues were subsequently characterized by high-resolution and analytical electron microscopy. The acid residue of the ion-irradiated graphite was found to contain nanodiamonds, demonstrating that ion irradiation of graphite at ambient temperature can produce diamond. The diamond yield under our irradiation conditions is low, ∼0.01 diamonds/ion. An important observation that emerges from comparing the present result with previous observations of diamond formation during irradiation is that nanodiamonds form under a surprisingly wide range of irradiation conditions. This propensity may be related to the very small difference in the graphite and diamond free-energies coupled with surface-energy considerations that may alter the relative stability of diamond and graphite at nanometer sizes

  8. High-temperature brazing of graphite using aluminium as brazing alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anikin, L.T.; Kravetskij, G.A.; Dergunova, V.S.

    1977-01-01

    The possibility of enhancing the strength of brazed joints, as well as the effect of the parameters of resistance heating of graphite VPP with PA-4 aluminium on the structure, composition and strength of the joint have been studied. It has been established that brazing of graphite materials, using an aluminium solder will produce a heat-resistant joint of a graphitic composition if the brazing temperature exceeds 2200 deg C. Thermocycling in the course of brazing results in a substantial (1.5-fold) increase in the strength of brazed joints

  9. Wear Behavior of Selected Nuclear Grade Graphites at Room Temperature in Ambient Air Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eung-Seon; Park, Kwang-Seok; Kim, Yong-Wan

    2008-01-01

    In a very high temperature reactor (VHTR), graphite will be used not only for as a moderator and reflector but also as a major structural component due to its excellent neutronic, thermal and mechanical properties. In the VHTR, wear of graphite components is inevitable due to a neutron irradiation-induced dimensional change, thermal gradient, relative motions of graphite components and a shock load such as an earthquake. Large wear particles accumulated at the bottom of a reactor can influence the cooling of the lower part and small wear particles accumulated on the primary circuit and heat exchanger tube can make it difficult to inspect the equipment, and also decrease the heat exchange rate. In the present work, preliminary wear tests were performed at room temperature in ambient air environment to understand the basic wear characteristics of selected nuclear grade graphites for the VHTR

  10. Measurements of impurity migration in graphite at high temperatures using a proton microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shroy, R.E.; Soo, P.; Sastre, C.A.; Schweiter, D.G.; Kraner, H.W.; Jones, K.W.

    1978-01-01

    The migration of fission products and other impurities through the graphite core of a High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor is of prime importance in studies of reactor safety. Work in this area is being carried out in which graphite specimens are heated to temperatures up to 3800 0 C to induce migration of trace elements whose local concentrations are then measured with a proton microprobe. This instrument is a powerful device for such work because of its ability to determine concentrations at a part per million (ppm) level in a circular area as small as 10 μm while operating in an air environment. Studies show that Si, Ca, Cl, and Fe impurities in graphite migrate from hotter to cooler regions. Also Si, S, Cl, Ca, Fe, Mn, and Cr are observed to escape from the graphite and be deposited on cooler surfaces

  11. Effects of high temperature neutron irradiation on the physical, chemical and mechanical properties of fine-grained isotropic graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, H.; Nomura, S.; Imai, H.; Oku, T.; Eto, M.

    1987-01-01

    Effects of neutron irradiation on the dimensional change, coefficient of thermal expansion(CTE), thermal conductivity, corrosion rate, Young's modulus and strengths were studied for the candidate graphite material IG-110 of the experimental very high temperature gas-cooled reactor(VHTR) after irradiation at 585 - 1273 deg C to neutron fluences of up to about 3 x 10 25 n/m 2 (E > 29 fJ) in the JMTR and JRR-2, and to about 7 x 10 25 n/m 2 (E > 29 fJ) in the HFR. The results were compared with the irradiation behaviors of other graphites. Dimensional shrinkage was observed in the whole irradiation temperature range, showing lower value than 2 %. The shrinkage rate showed the minimum in the irradiation temperature of around 850 deg C, followed by the increase for the samples irradiated at higher temperatures. The dimensional stability of the material was clarified to be almost the same with that of H451 graphite. The CTE, thermal resistivity and Young's modulus increased in the early stage of irradiation and then only the CTE decreased while the thermal resistivity and Young's modulus levelled off with further irradiation. The neutron fluence showing the maximum CTE shifted to the lower fluence with increasing irradiation temperature. The increases of both thermal resistivity and Young's modulus were remarkable for the samples irradiated at lower temperatures. Compressive and bending strengths measured at room temperature increased after irradiation as well. The corrosion rate with water-vapor of 0.65 % in helium at high temperatures decreased owing to irradiation and the reduction was independent of irradiation temperature and neutron fluence. The activation energy for the reaction was estimated to be the same before and after irradiation. (author)

  12. On residual gas analysis during high temperature baking of graphite tiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prakash, A A; Chaudhuri, P; Khirwadkar, S; Reddy, D Chenna; Saxena, Y C; Chauhan, N; Raole, P M

    2008-01-01

    Steady-state Super-conducting Tokamak-1 (SST-1) is a medium size tokamak with major radius of 1.1 m and minor radius of 0.20 m. It is designed for plasma discharge duration of 1000 seconds to obtain fully steady-state plasma operation. Plasma Facing Components (PFC), consisting of divertors, passive stabilizers, baffles and poloidal limiters are also designed to be UHV compatible for steady state operation. All PFC are made up of graphite tiles mechanically attached to the copper alloy substrate. Graphite is one of the preferred first wall armour material in present day tokamaks. High thermal shock resistance and low atomic number of carbon are the most important properties of graphite for this application. High temperature vacuum baking of graphite tiles is the standard process to remove the impurities. Residual Gas Analyzer (RGA) has been used for qualitative and quantitative measurements of released gases from graphite tiles during baking. Surface Analysis of graphite tiles has also been done before and after baking. This paper describes the residual gas analysis during baking and surface analysis of graphite tiles

  13. On residual gas analysis during high temperature baking of graphite tiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prakash, A A; Chaudhuri, P; Khirwadkar, S; Reddy, D Chenna; Saxena, Y C [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar - 382 428 (India); Chauhan, N; Raole, P M [Facilitation Center for Industrial Plasma Technologies, IPR, Gandhinagar (India)], E-mail: arun@ipr.res.in

    2008-05-01

    Steady-state Super-conducting Tokamak-1 (SST-1) is a medium size tokamak with major radius of 1.1 m and minor radius of 0.20 m. It is designed for plasma discharge duration of 1000 seconds to obtain fully steady-state plasma operation. Plasma Facing Components (PFC), consisting of divertors, passive stabilizers, baffles and poloidal limiters are also designed to be UHV compatible for steady state operation. All PFC are made up of graphite tiles mechanically attached to the copper alloy substrate. Graphite is one of the preferred first wall armour material in present day tokamaks. High thermal shock resistance and low atomic number of carbon are the most important properties of graphite for this application. High temperature vacuum baking of graphite tiles is the standard process to remove the impurities. Residual Gas Analyzer (RGA) has been used for qualitative and quantitative measurements of released gases from graphite tiles during baking. Surface Analysis of graphite tiles has also been done before and after baking. This paper describes the residual gas analysis during baking and surface analysis of graphite tiles.

  14. Evaluation of high temperature brazes for graphite first wall protection elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smid, I.; Koizlik, K.; Linke, J.; Nickel, H.; Wallura, E.; Kny, E.

    1989-01-01

    Four different high temperature brazed with melting points from 800 to 1865degC have been used to braze a commercial reactor grade graphite to TZM substrates. Those brazes were Zr, 90Ni 10Ti, 99Cu 10Ti and 70Ag 27Cu 3Ti (wt %). The resulting composite tiles of 80 x 80 mm 2 with a graphite thickness of 10 mm brazed on a 8 mm TZM substrate have been tested in electron beam experiments for their thermal fatigue properties. The parameters of the electron beam testing were chosen to match NET design specificatios for normal operation and 'slow' peak energy deposition. The resulting damages and microstructural changes on the graphite and the brazes are discussed. Additional information is supplied on tensile test and thermal conductivity data of brazed composites. These measurements confirm that thermal contact between TZM-substrate and graphite is improved by brazing. (author). 6 refs.; 5 figs.; 2 tabs

  15. Evaluation of high temperature brazes for graphite first wall protection elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smid, I.; Koizlik, K.; Linke, J.; Nickel, H.; Wallura, E.; Kny, E.

    1995-01-01

    Four different high temperature brazes with melting points from 800 to 1865 degree C have been used to braze a commercial reactor grade graphite to TZM substrates. Those brazes were Zr, 90Ni 10Ti, 90Cu 10Ti and 70Ag 27Cu 3Ti (wt %). The resulting composite tiles of 80 x 80 mm 2 with a graphite thickness of 10 mm brazed on a 3 mm TZM substrate have been tested in electron beam experiments for their thermal fatigue properties. The parameters of the electron beam testing were chosen to match NET design specifications for normal operation and 'slow' peak energy deposition. The resulting damages and microstructural changes on the graphite and the brazes are discussed. Additional information is supplied on tensile test and thermal conductivity data of brazed composites. These measurements confirm that thermal contact between TZM-substrate and graphite is improved by brazing. (author)

  16. Device for determining the maximum temperature of an environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cartier, Louis.

    1976-01-01

    This invention concerns a device for determining the maximum temperature of an environment. Its main characteristic is a central cylindrical rod on which can slide two identical tubes, the facing ends of which are placed end to end and the far ends are shaped to provide a sliding friction along the rod. The rod and tubes are fabricated in materials of which the linear expansion factors are different in value. The far ends are composed of tongs of which the fingers, fitted with claws, bear on the central rod. Because of this arrangement of the device the two tubes, placed end to end on being fitted, can expand under the effect of a rise in the temperature of the environment into which the device is introduced, with the result that there occurs an increase in the distance between the two far ends. This distance is maximal when the device is raised to its highest temperature. The far ends are shaped to allow the tubes to slide under the effect of expansion but to prevent sliding in the opposite direction when the device is taken back into the open air and the temperature drops to within ambient temperature. It follows that the tubes tend to return to their initial length and the ends that were placed end to end when fitted now have a gap between them. The measurement of this gap makes it possible to know the maximal temperature sought [fr

  17. On the Effect of Pouring Temperature on Spheroidal Graphite Cast Iron Solidification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Escobar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This work is focused on the effect of pouring temperature on the thermal-microstructural response of an eutectic spheroidal graphite cast iron (SGCI. To this end, experiments as well as numerical simulations were carried out. Solidification tests in a wedge-like part were cast at two different pouring temperatures. Five specific locations exhibiting distinct cooling rates along the sample were chosen for temperature measurements and metallographic analysis to obtain the number and size of graphite nodules at the end of the process. The numerical simulations were performed using a multinodular-based model. Reasonably good numerical-experimental agreements were obtained for both the cooling curves and the graphite nodule counts.

  18. An explication of the Graphite Structural Design Code of core components for the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyoku, Tatsuo; Ishihara, Masahiro; Toyota, Junji; Shiozawa, Shusaku

    1991-05-01

    The integrity evaluation of the core graphite components for the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) will be carried out based upon the Graphite Structural Design Code for core components. In the application of this design code, it is necessary to make clear the basic concept to evaluate the integrity of core components of HTTR. Therefore, considering the detailed design of core graphite structures such as fuel graphite blocks, etc. of HTTR, this report explicates the design code in detail about the concepts of stress and fatigue limits, integrity evaluation method of oxidized graphite components and thermal irradiation stress analysis method etc. (author)

  19. Studies on design principles and criteria of fuels and graphites for experimental multi-purpose very high temperature reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Taketoshi; Sato, Sadao; Tani, Yutaro

    1977-12-01

    Design principles and criteria of fuels and graphites have been studied to determine the main design parameters of a reference core MARK-III of the Experimental Multi-purpose Very High Temperature Reactor. The present status of research and development for HTGR fuels and graphites is reviewed from a standpoint of their integrity and safety aspects, and is compared to the specific design requirements for the VHTR fuels and graphites. Consequently, reasonable materials specifications, safety criteria and design analysis methods are presented for coated fuel particle, fuel compact, graphite sleeve, core support graphite and neutron absorber material. These design principles and criteria will be refined by further experimental investigations. (auth.)

  20. On the thermodynamic path enabling a room-temperature, laser-assisted graphite to nanodiamond transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorrini, F.; Cazzanelli, M.; Bazzanella, N.; Edla, R.; Gemmi, M.; Cappello, V.; David, J.; Dorigoni, C.; Bifone, A.; Miotello, A.

    2016-10-01

    Nanodiamonds are the subject of active research for their potential applications in nano-magnetometry, quantum optics, bioimaging and water cleaning processes. Here, we present a novel thermodynamic model that describes a graphite-liquid-diamond route for the synthesis of nanodiamonds. Its robustness is proved via the production of nanodiamonds powders at room-temperature and standard atmospheric pressure by pulsed laser ablation of pyrolytic graphite in water. The aqueous environment provides a confinement mechanism that promotes diamond nucleation and growth, and a biologically compatible medium for suspension of nanodiamonds. Moreover, we introduce a facile physico-chemical method that does not require harsh chemical or temperature conditions to remove the graphitic byproducts of the laser ablation process. A full characterization of the nanodiamonds by electron and Raman spectroscopies is reported. Our model is also corroborated by comparison with experimental data from the literature.

  1. Low-temperature synthesis of nanocrystalline ZrC coatings on flake graphite by molten salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Jun, E-mail: dingjun@wust.edu.cn; Guo, Ding; Deng, Chengji; Zhu, Hongxi; Yu, Chao

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Uniform ZrC coatings are prepared on flake graphite at 900 °C. • ZrC coatings are composed of nanosized (30–50 nm) particles. • The template growth mechanism is believed to be dominant in the molten salt synthesis process. - Abstract: A novel molten salt synthetic route has been developed to prepare nanocrystalline zirconium carbide (ZrC) coatings on flake graphite at 900 °C, using Zr powder and flake graphite as the source materials in a static argon atmosphere, along with molten salts as the media. The effects of different molten salt media, the sintered temperature, and the heat preservation time on the phase and microstructure of the synthetic materials were investigated. The ZrC coatings formed on the flake graphite were uniform and composed of nanosized particles (30–50 nm). With an increase in the reaction temperature, the ZrC nanosized particles were more denser, and the heat preservation time and thickness of the ZrC coating also increased accordingly. Electron microscopy was used to observe the ZrC coatings on the flake graphite, indicating that a “template mechanism” played an important role during the molten salt synthesis.

  2. Future changes over the Himalayas: Maximum and minimum temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimri, A. P.; Kumar, D.; Choudhary, A.; Maharana, P.

    2018-03-01

    An assessment of the projection of minimum and maximum air temperature over the Indian Himalayan region (IHR) from the COordinated Regional Climate Downscaling EXperiment- South Asia (hereafter, CORDEX-SA) regional climate model (RCM) experiments have been carried out under two different Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios. The major aim of this study is to assess the probable future changes in the minimum and maximum climatology and its long-term trend under different RCPs along with the elevation dependent warming over the IHR. A number of statistical analysis such as changes in mean climatology, long-term spatial trend and probability distribution function are carried out to detect the signals of changes in climate. The study also tries to quantify the uncertainties associated with different model experiments and their ensemble in space, time and for different seasons. The model experiments and their ensemble show prominent cold bias over Himalayas for present climate. However, statistically significant higher warming rate (0.23-0.52 °C/decade) for both minimum and maximum air temperature (Tmin and Tmax) is observed for all the seasons under both RCPs. The rate of warming intensifies with the increase in the radiative forcing under a range of greenhouse gas scenarios starting from RCP4.5 to RCP8.5. In addition to this, a wide range of spatial variability and disagreements in the magnitude of trend between different models describes the uncertainty associated with the model projections and scenarios. The projected rate of increase of Tmin may destabilize the snow formation at the higher altitudes in the northern and western parts of Himalayan region, while rising trend of Tmax over southern flank may effectively melt more snow cover. Such combined effect of rising trend of Tmin and Tmax may pose a potential threat to the glacial deposits. The overall trend of Diurnal temperature range (DTR) portrays increasing trend across entire area with

  3. Maximum surface level and temperature histories for Hanford waste tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flanagan, B.D.; Ha, N.D.; Huisingh, J.S.

    1994-01-01

    Radioactive defense waste resulting from the chemical processing of spent nuclear fuel has been accumulating at the Hanford Site since 1944. This waste is stored in underground waste-storage tanks. The Hanford Site Tank Farm Facilities Interim Safety Basis (ISB) provides a ready reference to the safety envelope for applicable tank farm facilities and installations. During preparation of the ISB, tank structural integrity concerns were identified as a key element in defining the safety envelope. These concerns, along with several deficiencies in the technical bases associated with the structural integrity issues and the corresponding operational limits/controls specified for conduct of normal tank farm operations are documented in the ISB. Consequently, a plan was initiated to upgrade the safety envelope technical bases by conducting Accelerated Safety Analyses-Phase 1 (ASA-Phase 1) sensitivity studies and additional structural evaluations. The purpose of this report is to facilitate the ASA-Phase 1 studies and future analyses of the single-shell tanks (SSTs) and double-shell tanks (DSTs) by compiling a quantitative summary of some of the past operating conditions the tanks have experienced during their existence. This report documents the available summaries of recorded maximum surface levels and maximum waste temperatures and references other sources for more specific data

  4. Pressure-Driven Commensurate-Incommensurate Transition Low-Temperature Submonolayer Krypton on Graphite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mourits; Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage; Bohr, Jakob

    1981-01-01

    By using D2 gas as a source of two-dimensional spreading pressure, we have studied the commensurate-incommensurate (C-I) transition in submonolayer Kr on ZYX graphite at temperatures near 40 K. High-resolution synchrotron x-ray diffraction results show both hysteresis and C-I phase coexistence...

  5. Influence of graphite discs, chamfers, and plenums on temperature distributions in high burnup fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranger, A.; Tayal, M.; Singh, P.

    1990-04-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the desirability to increase the fuel burnups in CANDU reactors from 7-9 GW.d/t to 21 GW.d/t. At high burnups, one consideration in fuel integrity is fission gas pressure, which is predicted to reach about 13 MPa. The gas pressure can be kept below the coolant pressure (about 10 MPa) via a variety of options such as bigger chamfers, deeper dishes, central hole, and plenums. However, it is important to address the temperature perturbations produced by the bigger chamfers and plenums which in turn, affect the gas pressure. Another consideration in fuel integrity is to reduce the likelihood of fuel failures via environmentally assisted cracking. Insertion of graphite discs between neighbouring pellets will lower the pellet temperatures, hence, lower fission gas release and lower expansion of the pellet. Therefore, it is desired to quantify the effect of graphite discs on pellet temperatures. Thermal analyses of different fuel element geometries: with and without chamfers, graphite discs, and plenums were performed. The results indicate that the two-dimensional distributions of temperatures due to the presence of chamfers, graphite discs, or plenums can have a significant impact on the integrity of high burnup fuel as we have been able to quantify in this paper

  6. High-temperature irradiation effects on mechnical properties of HTGR graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oku, Tatsuo; Eto, Motokuni; Fujisaki, Katsuo

    1978-04-01

    The irradiation effects on stress-strain relation, Young's modulus, tensile strength, bending strength and compressive strength of HTGR graphites were studied in irradiation temperature ranges of 200 - 300 0 C and 800 - 1400 0 C and in neutron fluences up to 7.4 x 10 20 n/cm 2 and 3 x 10 21 n/cm 2 (> 0.18 MeV). Fracture criteria and strain energy to fracture of the unirradiated and the irradiated graphites were also examined. (1) Neutron fluence dependences are similar in Young's modulus, tensile strength and bending strength. (2) The change of compressive strength and of tensile and bending strengths with neutron fluence differ; the former varies with graphite kind. (3) At lower irradiation temperatures the bending fracture strain energy decreases with increasing neutron fluence and at higher irradiation temperatures it increases. (4) The fracture criteria of graphites deviates from the constant strain energy theory (α = 0.5) and the constant strain theory (α = 1), shifting from α asymptotically equals 0.5 to α asymptotically equals 1 with increasing irradiation temperature. (auth.)

  7. Investigation on structural integrity of graphite component during high temperature 950degC continuous operation of HTTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumita, Junya; Shimazaki, Yosuke; Shibata, Taiju

    2014-01-01

    Graphite material is used for internal structures in high temperature gas-cooled reactor. The core components and graphite core support structures are so designed as to maintain the structural integrity to keep core cooling capability. To confirm that the core components and graphite core support structures satisfy the design requirements, the temperatures of the reactor internals are measured during the reactor operation. Surveillance test of graphite specimens and in-service inspection using TV camera are planned in conjunction with the refueling. This paper describes the evaluation results of the integrity of the core components and graphite core support structures during the high temperature 950degC continuous operation, a high temperature continuous operation with reactor outlet temperature of 950degC for 50 days, in high temperature engineering test reactor. The design requirements of the core components and graphite core support structures were satisfied during the high temperature 950degC continuous operation. The dimensional change of graphite which directly influences the temperature of coolant was estimated considering the temperature profiles of fuel block. The magnitude of irradiation-induced dimensional change considering temperature profiles was about 1.2 times larger than that under constant irradiation temperature of 1000degC. In addition, the programs of surveillance test and ISI using TV camera were introduced. (author)

  8. Impact of soil moisture on extreme maximum temperatures in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirien Whan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Land-atmosphere interactions play an important role for hot temperature extremes in Europe. Dry soils may amplify such extremes through feedbacks with evapotranspiration. While previous observational studies generally focused on the relationship between precipitation deficits and the number of hot days, we investigate here the influence of soil moisture (SM on summer monthly maximum temperatures (TXx using water balance model-based SM estimates (driven with observations and temperature observations. Generalized extreme value distributions are fitted to TXx using SM as a covariate. We identify a negative relationship between SM and TXx, whereby a 100 mm decrease in model-based SM is associated with a 1.6 °C increase in TXx in Southern-Central and Southeastern Europe. Dry SM conditions result in a 2–4 °C increase in the 20-year return value of TXx compared to wet conditions in these two regions. In contrast with SM impacts on the number of hot days (NHD, where low and high surface-moisture conditions lead to different variability, we find a mostly linear dependency of the 20-year return value on surface-moisture conditions. We attribute this difference to the non-linear relationship between TXx and NHD that stems from the threshold-based calculation of NHD. Furthermore the employed SM data and the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI are only weakly correlated in the investigated regions, highlighting the importance of evapotranspiration and runoff for resulting SM. Finally, in a case study for the hot 2003 summer we illustrate that if 2003 spring conditions in Southern-Central Europe had been as dry as in the more recent 2011 event, temperature extremes in summer would have been higher by about 1 °C, further enhancing the already extreme conditions which prevailed in that year.

  9. Fuel elements for high temperature reactors having special suitability for reuse of the structural graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huschka, H.; Herrmann, F.J.

    1976-01-01

    There are prepared fuel elements for high temperature reactors from which the fuel zone can be removed from the structural graphite after the burnup of the fissile material has taken place so that the fuel element can be filled with new fuel and again placed in the reactor by having the strength of the matrix in the fuel zone sufficient for binding the embedded coated fuel particles but substantially less than the strength of the structural graphite whereby by the action of force it can be easily split up without destroying the particles

  10. Effect of Temperature and Graphite Immersion Method on Carbothermic Reduction of Fayalite Slag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrašinović, Aleksandar

    2017-09-01

    In this work, graphite flakes were used to reduce fayalite slag originated from the pyrometallurgical copper extraction process. Experiments were conducted with a significantly different contact area between graphite and slag at two temperatures, 1300°C and 1400°C. The process was continuously monitored via the concentration change of CO and CO2 in off-gas. Reduction rate values in experiments where 150-micron-diameter graphite flakes were submerged into the slag and left to float slowly to the top are about four times higher compared with when graphite flakes were dispersed at the top surface of liquid slag. The activation energy for instigating reduction was 302.61 kJ mol-1 and 306.67 kJ mol-1 in the case where graphite flakes were submerged into the slag and dispersed at the surface, respectively. The reduction process is characterized by two distinctive periods: an initial steep increase in the concentration of CO and CO2 controlled by the Boudouard reaction and a subsequent slow decrease of CO and CO2 concentrations in the off-gas controlled by mass transfer of reducible oxides from bulk to the gas-slag interface.

  11. Investigation of Pristine Graphite Oxide as Room-Temperature Chemiresistive Ammonia Gas Sensing Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander G. Bannov

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Graphite oxide has been investigated as a possible room-temperature chemiresistive sensor of ammonia in a gas phase. Graphite oxide was synthesized from high purity graphite using the modified Hummers method. The graphite oxide sample was investigated using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry. Sensing properties were tested in a wide range of ammonia concentrations in air (10–1000 ppm and under different relative humidity levels (3%–65%. It was concluded that the graphite oxide–based sensor possessed a good response to NH3 in dry synthetic air (ΔR/R0 ranged from 2.5% to 7.4% for concentrations of 100–500 ppm and 3% relative humidity with negligible cross-sensitivity towards H2 and CH4. It was determined that the sensor recovery rate was improved with ammonia concentration growth. Increasing the ambient relative humidity led to an increase of the sensor response. The highest response of 22.2% for 100 ppm of ammonia was achieved at a 65% relative humidity level.

  12. Effects of porosity and temperature on oxidation behavior in air of selected nuclear graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Dongyue; Li Zhengcao; Miao Wei; Zhang Zhengjun

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear graphite endures gas oxidation in High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR), which may threaten the safety of reactor. To study the oxidation behavior of nuclear graphite, weight loss curve is usually measured through Thermo Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) method. In this work, three brands of nuclear graphite for HTGR (i.e., HSM-SC, IG-11, and NBG-18) are oxidized under 873 and 1073 K in open air, and their weight loss curves are obtained. The acceleration of oxidizing rate is observed for both HSM-SC and IG-11, and is attributed to the large porosity increase during oxidation process. For HSM-SC, the porosity increase comes from preferential binder oxidation, and thus its binder quality shall be improved to obtain better oxidation resistance. Temperature effects on oxidation for HSM-SC are also studied, which shows that oxidizing gas tends to be exhausted at graphite surface at high temperature instead of penetrate into the interior of bulk. (author)

  13. Experimental investigation of thermophysical properties of eutectic Mo–C, graphite and tantalum at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senchenko, V N; Belikov, R S; Popov, V S

    2016-01-01

    An experimental technique based on fast electrical heating for investigation of thermophysical properties of refractory materials under high pressures and at high temperatures is considered. A set of thermophysical properties of refractory materials such as specific enthalpy, specific heat capacity, specific resistivity, melting heat of eutectic Mo-C and thermal expansion of graphite and tantalum were determined. The obtained temperature of eutectic melting of MoC 0.82 shows close agreement with equilibrium Mo-C phase diagram. (paper)

  14. New results on the mid-latitude midnight temperature maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, Rafael L. A.; Meriwether, John W.; Makela, Jonathan J.; Fisher, Daniel J.; Harding, Brian J.; Sanders, Samuel C.; Tesema, Fasil; Ridley, Aaron J.

    2018-04-01

    Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) measurements of thermospheric temperatures and winds show the detection and successful determination of the latitudinal distribution of the midnight temperature maximum (MTM) in the continental mid-eastern United States. These results were obtained through the operation of the five FPI observatories in the North American Thermosphere Ionosphere Observing Network (NATION) located at the Pisgah Astronomic Research Institute (PAR) (35.2° N, 82.8° W), Virginia Tech (VTI) (37.2° N, 80.4° W), Eastern Kentucky University (EKU) (37.8° N, 84.3° W), Urbana-Champaign (UAO) (40.2° N, 88.2° W), and Ann Arbor (ANN) (42.3° N, 83.8° W). A new approach for analyzing the MTM phenomenon is developed, which features the combination of a method of harmonic thermal background removal followed by a 2-D inversion algorithm to generate sequential 2-D temperature residual maps at 30 min intervals. The simultaneous study of the temperature data from these FPI stations represents a novel analysis of the MTM and its large-scale latitudinal and longitudinal structure. The major finding in examining these maps is the frequent detection of a secondary MTM peak occurring during the early evening hours, nearly 4.5 h prior to the timing of the primary MTM peak that generally appears after midnight. The analysis of these observations shows a strong night-to-night variability for this double-peaked MTM structure. A statistical study of the behavior of the MTM events was carried out to determine the extent of this variability with regard to the seasonal and latitudinal dependence. The results show the presence of the MTM peak(s) in 106 out of the 472 determinable nights (when the MTM presence, or lack thereof, can be determined with certainty in the data set) selected for analysis (22 %) out of the total of 846 nights available. The MTM feature is seen to appear slightly more often during the summer (27 %), followed by fall (22 %), winter (20 %), and spring

  15. Effects of the temperature and the irradiation on the behaviour of chlorine 37 in nuclear graphite: consequences on the mobility of chlorine 36 in irradiated graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blondel, Antoine

    2013-01-01

    This thesis deals with the studies of the management of irradiated graphite wastes issued from the dismantling of the UNGG French reactors. This work focuses on the behavior of 36 Cl. This radionuclide is mainly issued through the neutron activation of 35 Cl by the reaction 35 Cl(n, γ) 36 Cl, pristine chlorine being an impurity of nuclear graphite, present at the level of some at.ppm. 36 Cl is a long lived radionuclide (about 300,000 years) and is highly soluble in water and mobile in concrete and clay. The solubilization of 36 Cl is controlled by the water accessibility into irradiated graphite pores as well as by factors related to 36 Cl itself such as its chemical speciation and its location within the irradiated graphite. Both speciation and chlorine location should strongly influence its behaviour and need to be taken into account for the choice of liable management options. However, data on radioactive chlorine features are difficult to assess in irradiated graphite and are mainly related to detection sensitivity problems. In this context, we simulated and evaluated the impact of the temperature, the irradiation and the radiolytic oxidation on the chlorine 36 behaviour. In order to simulate the presence of 36 Cl, we implanted 37 Cl into virgin nuclear graphite. Ion implantation has been widely used to study the lattice location, the diffusion and the release of fission and activation products in nuclear materials. Our results on the comparative effects of the temperature and the irradiation show that chlorine occurs in irradiated graphite on temperature and electronic and nuclear irradiation improve this effect. (author)

  16. Experimental investigation of linear thermal expansion of pyrolytic graphite at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senchenko, V. N.; Belikov, R. S.

    2017-11-01

    Using the previously described [1] experimental setup for investigation of the thermophysical properties of refractory materials under high pressure and temperature a few experiments with pyrolytic graphite were carried out. The density of the material was equal to 2.18 g/cm3. Experimental data on the linear thermal expansion in the perpendicular and parallel to the basal plane direction were obtained. Thermal expansion in the perpendicular to the basal plane direction during the heating from room temperature up to the melting point was 16.4 ± 1.6%. The results obtained allow calculating the density of pyrolytic graphite in the wide range of high temperatures up to the melting point.

  17. Possible room temperature superconductivity in conductors obtained by bringing alkanes into contact with a graphite surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasushi Kawashima

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Electrical resistances of conductors obtained by bringing alkanes into contact with a graphite surface have been investigated at room temperatures. Ring current in a ring-shaped container into which n-octane-soaked thin graphite flakes were compressed did not decay for 50 days at room temperature. After two HOPG plates were immersed into n-heptane and n-octane at room temperature, changes in resistances of the two samples were measured by four terminal technique. The measurement showed that the resistances of these samples decrease to less than the smallest resistance that can be measured with a high resolution digital voltmeter (0.1μV. The observation of persistent currents in the ring-shaped container suggests that the HOPG plates immersed in n-heptane and n-octane really entered zero-resistance state at room temperature. These results suggest that room temperature superconductor may be obtained by bringing alkanes into contact with a graphite surface.

  18. Improvement in transdermal drug delivery performance by graphite oxide/temperature-responsive hydrogel composites with micro heater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Jumi; Lee, Dae Hoon; Im, Ji Sun; Kim, Hyung-Il

    2012-01-01

    Transdermal drug delivery system (TDDS) was prepared with temperature-responsive hydrogel. The graphite was oxidized and incorporated into hydrogel matrix to improve the thermal response of hydrogel. The micro heater was fabricated to control the temperature precisely by adopting a joule heating method. The drug in hydrogel was delivered through a hairless mouse skin by controlling temperature. The efficiency of drug delivery was improved obviously by incorporation of graphite oxide due to the excellent thermal conductivity and the increased interfacial affinity between graphite oxide and hydrogel matrix. The fabricated micro heater was effective in controlling the temperature over lower critical solution temperature of hydrogel precisely with a small voltage less than 1 V. The cell viability test on graphite oxide composite hydrogel showed enough safety for using as a transdermal drug delivery patch. The performance of TDDS could be improved noticeably based on temperature-responsive hydrogel, thermally conductive graphite oxide, and efficient micro heater. - Graphical abstract: The high-performance transdermal drug delivery system could be prepared by combining temperature-responsive hydrogel, thermally conductive graphite oxide with improved interfacial affinity, and efficient micro heater fabricated by a joule heating method. Highlights: ► High performance of transdermal drug delivery system with an easy control of voltage. ► Improved thermal response of hydrogel by graphite oxide incorporation. ► Efficient micro heater fabricated by a joule heating method.

  19. Improvement in transdermal drug delivery performance by graphite oxide/temperature-responsive hydrogel composites with micro heater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Jumi [Department of Fine Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, BK21-E2M, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dae Hoon [Environment Research Division, Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, 171 Jang-dong, Yusong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Im, Ji Sun [Department of Fine Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, BK21-E2M, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyung-Il, E-mail: hikim@cnu.ac.kr [Department of Fine Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, BK21-E2M, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-08-01

    Transdermal drug delivery system (TDDS) was prepared with temperature-responsive hydrogel. The graphite was oxidized and incorporated into hydrogel matrix to improve the thermal response of hydrogel. The micro heater was fabricated to control the temperature precisely by adopting a joule heating method. The drug in hydrogel was delivered through a hairless mouse skin by controlling temperature. The efficiency of drug delivery was improved obviously by incorporation of graphite oxide due to the excellent thermal conductivity and the increased interfacial affinity between graphite oxide and hydrogel matrix. The fabricated micro heater was effective in controlling the temperature over lower critical solution temperature of hydrogel precisely with a small voltage less than 1 V. The cell viability test on graphite oxide composite hydrogel showed enough safety for using as a transdermal drug delivery patch. The performance of TDDS could be improved noticeably based on temperature-responsive hydrogel, thermally conductive graphite oxide, and efficient micro heater. - Graphical abstract: The high-performance transdermal drug delivery system could be prepared by combining temperature-responsive hydrogel, thermally conductive graphite oxide with improved interfacial affinity, and efficient micro heater fabricated by a joule heating method. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High performance of transdermal drug delivery system with an easy control of voltage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Improved thermal response of hydrogel by graphite oxide incorporation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Efficient micro heater fabricated by a joule heating method.

  20. Analytical and numerical study of graphite IG110 parts in advanced reactor under high temperature and irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Jinling, E-mail: Jinling_Gao@yeah.net; Yao, Wenjuan, E-mail: wj_yao@yeah.net; Ma, Yudong

    2016-08-15

    Graphical abstract: An analytical model and a numerical procedure are developed to study the mechanical response of IG-110 graphite bricks in HTGR subjected to high temperature and irradiation. The calculation results show great accordance with each other. Rational suggestions on the calculation and design of the IG-110 graphite structure are proposed based on the sensitivity analyses including temperature, irradiation dimensional change, creep and Poisson’s ratio. - Highlights: • Analytical solution of stress and displacement of IG-110 graphite components in HTGR. • Finite element procedure developed for stress analysis of HTGR graphite component. • Parameters analysis of mechanical response of graphite components during the whole life of the reflector. - Abstract: Structural design of nuclear power plant project is an important sub-discipline of civil engineering. Especially after appearance of the fourth generation advanced high temperature gas cooled reactor, structural mechanics in reactor technology becomes a popular subject in structural engineering. As basic ingredients of reflector in reactor, graphite bricks are subjected to high temperature and irradiation and the stress field of graphite structures determines integrity of reflector and makes a great difference to safety of whole structure. In this paper, based on assumptions of elasticity, side reflector is regarded approximately as a straight cylinder structure and primary creep strain is ignored. An analytical study on stress of IG110 graphite parts is present. Meanwhile, a finite element procedure for calculating stresses in the IG110 graphite structure exposed in the high temperature and irradiation is developed. Subsequently, numerical solution of stress in IG110 graphite structure is obtained. Analytical solution agrees well with numerical solution, which indicates that analytical derivation is accurate. Finally, influence of temperature, irradiation dimensional change, creep and Poisson

  1. Controlled synthesis of graphitic carbon-encapsulated α-Fe2O3 nanocomposite via low-temperature catalytic graphitization of biomass and its lithium storage property

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Feng; Huang, Rong; Mu, Daobin; Wu, Borong; Chen, Yongjian

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Facile synthesis of graphitic carbon/α-Fe 2 O 3 nano-sized anode composite. • In situ low temperature catalytic graphitization of biomass material. • Onion-like graphitic carbon layers conformally encapsulating around α-Fe 2 O 3 core. • High lithium storage properties, especially, outstanding cycle performance. - Abstract: A delicate structure of graphitic carbon-encapsulated α-Fe 2 O 3 nanocomposite is in situ constructed via “Absorption–Catalytic graphitization–Oxidation” strategy, taking use of biomass matter of degreasing cotton as carbon precursor and solution reservoir. With the assistance of the catalytic graphitization effect of iron core, onion-like graphitic carbon (GC) shell is made directly from the biomass at low temperature (650 °C). The nanosized α-Fe 2 O 3 particles would effectively mitigate volumetric strain and shorten Li + transport path during charge/discharge process. The graphitic carbon shells may promote charge transfer and protect active particles from directly exposing to electrolyte to maintain interfacial stability. As a result, the as-prepared α-Fe 2 O 3 @GC composite displays an outstanding cycle performance with a reversible capacity of 1070 mA h g −1 after 430 cycles at 0.2C, as well as a good rate capability of ∼ 950 mA h g −1 after 100 cycles at 1C and ∼ 850 mA h g −1 even up to 200 cycles at a 2C rate.

  2. High-temperature reaction of ''anisotropic'' pyrolitic graphite with oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavrenko, V.A.; Pomytkin, A.P.; Neshpor, V.S.; Vinokur, F.L.

    1980-01-01

    Investigated is the kinetics of initial interaction stages of highly dense crystalloorientated pyrographite with oxygen. Oxidation was carried out in pure oxygen within 0.1-740 mm Hg pressure range and 500-1100 deg C temperature range. It is stated, that at the temperatures below 700 deg C pyrographite oxidation is subjected to a linear law. Above 700-800 deg C the linear law is preserved only at the initial oxidation stage, then the process is described by a parabolic law. Extension of the linear site is decreased in time with the reduction of oxygen pressure. The reaction has apparent fractional order. Activation energy of pyrogrpahite oxidation by the linear low constitutes approximately 58 kcal/mol within 600-800 deg C range and 14 kcal/mol within 800-1100 deg C range. The apparent activation energy constitutes approximately 13 kcal/mol in the region of correspondence to the parabolic law

  3. Structure, temperature and frequency dependent electrical conductivity of oxidized and reduced electrochemically exfoliated graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radoń, Adrian; Włodarczyk, Patryk; Łukowiec, Dariusz

    2018-05-01

    The article presents the influence of reduction by hydrogen in statu nascendi and modification by hydrogen peroxide on the structure and electrical conductivity of electrochemically exfoliated graphite. It was confirmed that the electrochemical exfoliation can be used to produce oxidized nanographite with an average number of 25 graphene layers. The modified electrochemical exfoliated graphite and reduced electrochemical exfoliated graphite were characterized by high thermal stability, what was associated with removing of labile oxygen-containing groups. The presence of oxygen-containing groups was confirmed using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. Influence of chemical modification by hydrogen and hydrogen peroxide on the electrical conductivity was determined in wide frequency (0.1 Hz-10 kHz) and temperature range (-50 °C-100 °C). Material modified by hydrogen peroxide (0.29 mS/cm at 0 °C) had the lowest electrical conductivity. This can be associated with oxidation of unstable functional groups and was also confirmed by analysis of Raman spectra. The removal of oxygen-containing functional groups by hydrogen in statu nascendi resulted in a 1000-fold increase in the electrical conductivity compared to the electrochemical exfoliated graphite.

  4. Optimization of temperature coefficient and breeding ratio for a graphite-moderated molten salt reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, C.Y.; Cai, X.Z.; Jiang, D.Z.; Yu, C.G.; Li, X.X.; Ma, Y.W.; Han, J.L. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); CAS Center for Excellence in TMSR Energy System, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Key Laboratory of Nuclear Radiation and Nuclear Energy Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Chen, J.G., E-mail: chenjg@sinap.ac.cn [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); CAS Center for Excellence in TMSR Energy System, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Key Laboratory of Nuclear Radiation and Nuclear Energy Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • The temperature feedback coefficient with different moderation ratios for TMSR in thermal neutron region is optimized. • The breeding ratio and doubling time of a thermal TMSR with three different reprocessing schemes are analyzed. • The smaller hexagon size and larger salt fraction with more negative feedback coefficient can better satisfy the safety demands. • A shorter reprocessing time can achieve a better breeding ratio in a thermal TMSR. • The graphite moderator lifespan is compared with other MSRs and discussed. - Abstract: Molten salt reactor (MSR) has fascinating features: inherent safety, no fuel fabrication, online fuel reprocessing, etc. However, the graphite moderated MSR may present positive feedback coefficient which has severe implications for the transient behavior during operation. In this paper, the feedback coefficient and the breeding ratio are optimized based on the fuel-to-graphite ratio variation for a thorium based MSR (TMSR). A certain thermal core with negative feedback coefficient and relative high initial breeding ratio is chosen for the reprocessing scheme analysis. The breeding performances for the TMSR under different online fuel reprocessing efficiencies and frequencies are evaluated and compared with other MSR concepts. The results indicate that the thermal TMSR can get a breeding ratio greater than 1.0 with appropriate reprocessing scheme. The low fissile inventory in thermal TMSR leads to a short doubling time and low transuranic (TRU) inventory. The lifetime of graphite used for the TMSR is also discussed.

  5. Operational forecasting of daily temperatures in the Valencia Region. Part I: maximum temperatures in summer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, I.; Estrela, M.

    2009-09-01

    Extreme temperature events have a great impact on human society. Knowledge of summer maximum temperatures is very useful for both the general public and organisations whose workers have to operate in the open, e.g. railways, roadways, tourism, etc. Moreover, summer maximum daily temperatures are considered a parameter of interest and concern since persistent heat-waves can affect areas as diverse as public health, energy consumption, etc. Thus, an accurate forecasting of these temperatures could help to predict heat-wave conditions and permit the implementation of strategies aimed at minimizing the negative effects that high temperatures have on human health. The aim of this work is to evaluate the skill of the RAMS model in determining daily maximum temperatures during summer over the Valencia Region. For this, we have used the real-time configuration of this model currently running at the CEAM Foundation. To carry out the model verification process, we have analysed not only the global behaviour of the model for the whole Valencia Region, but also its behaviour for the individual stations distributed within this area. The study has been performed for the summer forecast period of 1 June - 30 September, 2007. The results obtained are encouraging and indicate a good agreement between the observed and simulated maximum temperatures. Moreover, the model captures quite well the temperatures in the extreme heat episodes. Acknowledgement. This work was supported by "GRACCIE" (CSD2007-00067, Programa Consolider-Ingenio 2010), by the Spanish Ministerio de Educación y Ciencia, contract number CGL2005-03386/CLI, and by the Regional Government of Valencia Conselleria de Sanitat, contract "Simulación de las olas de calor e invasiones de frío y su regionalización en la Comunidad Valenciana" ("Heat wave and cold invasion simulation and their regionalization at Valencia Region"). The CEAM Foundation is supported by the Generalitat Valenciana and BANCAIXA (Valencia, Spain).

  6. Thermal conductivity degradation of graphites due to neutron irradiation at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snead, L.L.; Burchell, T.D.

    1995-01-01

    Several graphites and carbon/carbon composites (C/C's) have been irradiated with fission neutrons near 150 C and at fluences up to a displacement level of 0.24 dpa. The unirradiated room temperature thermal conductivity of these materials varied from 114 W/m K for H-451 isotropic graphite, to 670 W/m K for a unidirectional FMI-1D C/C composite. At the irradiation temperature a saturation reduction in thermal conductivity was seen to occur at displacement levels of approximately 0.1 dpa. All materials were seen to degrade to approximately 10 to 14% of their original thermal conductivity after irradiation. The significant recovery of thermal conductivity due to post-irradiation isochronal anneals is also presented. (orig.)

  7. Disintegration of graphite matrix from the simulative high temperature gas-cooled reactor fuel element by electrochemical method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Lifang; Wen Mingfen; Li Linyan; Chen Jing

    2009-01-01

    Electrochemical method with salt as electrolyte has been studied to disintegrate the graphite matrix from the simulative high temperature gas-cooled reactor fuel elements. Ammonium nitrate was experimentally chosen as the appropriate electrolyte. The volume average diameter of disintegrated graphite fragments is about 100 μm and the maximal value is less than 900 μm. After disintegration, the weight of graphite is found to increase by about 20% without the release of a large amount of CO 2 probably owing to the partial oxidation to graphite in electrochemical process. The present work indicates that the improved electrochemical method has the potential to reduce the secondary nuclear waste and is a promising option to disintegrate graphite matrix from high temperature gas-cooled reactor spent fuel elements in the head-end of reprocessing.

  8. Effect of formation temperature on properties of graphite/stannum composite for bipolar plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selamat, Mohd Zulkefli; Yusuf, Muhammad Yusri Md; Wer, Tio Kok; Sahadan, Siti Norbaya; Malingam, Sivakumar Dhar; Mohamad, Noraiham

    2016-01-01

    Bipolar plates are key components in Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells. They carry current away from the cell and withstand the clamping force of the stack assembly. Therefore, PEM fuel cell bipolar plates must have high electrical conductivity and adequate mechanical strength, in addition to being light weight and low cost in terms of both applicable materials and production methods. In this research, the raw materials used to fabricate the high performance bipolar plate are Graphite (Gr), Stannum (Sn) and Polypropylene (PP). All materials used was in powder form and Gr and Sn act as fillers and the PP acts as binder. The ratio of fillers (Gr/Sn) and binder (PP) was fixed at 80:20. For the multi-conductive filler, small amount of Sn, which is 10 up to 20wt% (from the total weight of fillers 80%) have been added into Gr/Sn/PP composite. The fillers were mixed by using the ball mill machine. The second stage of mixing process between the mixer of fillers and binder is also carried out by using ball mill machine before the compaction process by the hot press machine. The effect of formation temperatures (160°C-170°C) on the properties of Gr/Sn/PP composite had been studied in detail, especially the electrical conductivity, bulk density, hardness and microstructure analysis of Gr/Sn/PP composite. The result shows that there are significant improvement in the electrical conductivity and bulk density, which are exceeding the US-DoE target with the maximum value of 265.35 S/cm and 1.682g/cm"3 respectively.

  9. Effect of formation temperature on properties of graphite/stannum composite for bipolar plate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selamat, Mohd Zulkefli, E-mail: azulkeflis@utem.edu.my; Yusuf, Muhammad Yusri Md, E-mail: yusri.cheras@gmail.com; Wer, Tio Kok, E-mail: to91@hotmail.my; Sahadan, Siti Norbaya, E-mail: norbaya@utem.edu.my; Malingam, Sivakumar Dhar, E-mail: sivakumard@utem.edu.my; Mohamad, Noraiham, E-mail: noraiham@utem.edu.my [Centre of Advanced Research on Energy (CARe), Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, UniversitiTeknikal Malaysia Melaka, Hang Tuah Jaya, 76100 Durian Tunggal, Melaka (Malaysia)

    2016-03-29

    Bipolar plates are key components in Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells. They carry current away from the cell and withstand the clamping force of the stack assembly. Therefore, PEM fuel cell bipolar plates must have high electrical conductivity and adequate mechanical strength, in addition to being light weight and low cost in terms of both applicable materials and production methods. In this research, the raw materials used to fabricate the high performance bipolar plate are Graphite (Gr), Stannum (Sn) and Polypropylene (PP). All materials used was in powder form and Gr and Sn act as fillers and the PP acts as binder. The ratio of fillers (Gr/Sn) and binder (PP) was fixed at 80:20. For the multi-conductive filler, small amount of Sn, which is 10 up to 20wt% (from the total weight of fillers 80%) have been added into Gr/Sn/PP composite. The fillers were mixed by using the ball mill machine. The second stage of mixing process between the mixer of fillers and binder is also carried out by using ball mill machine before the compaction process by the hot press machine. The effect of formation temperatures (160°C-170°C) on the properties of Gr/Sn/PP composite had been studied in detail, especially the electrical conductivity, bulk density, hardness and microstructure analysis of Gr/Sn/PP composite. The result shows that there are significant improvement in the electrical conductivity and bulk density, which are exceeding the US-DoE target with the maximum value of 265.35 S/cm and 1.682g/cm{sup 3} respectively.

  10. Temperature dependence of broadline NMR spectra of water-soaked, epoxy-graphite composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawing, David; Fornes, R. E.; Gilbert, R. D.; Memory, J. D.

    1981-10-01

    Water-soaked, epoxy resin-graphite fiber composites show a waterline in their broadline proton NMR spectrum which indicates a state of intermediate mobility between the solid and free water liquid states. The line is still present at -42 °C, but shows a reversible decrease in amplitude with decreasing temperature. The line is isotropic upon rotation of the fiber axis with respect to the external magnetic field.

  11. A study of the relationship between microstructure and oxidation effects in nuclear graphite at very high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, I.-Hsuan; Tzelepi, Athanasia; Patterson, Eann A.; Yeh, Tsung-Kuang

    2018-04-01

    Graphite is used in the cores of gas-cooled reactors as both the neutron moderator and a structural material, and traditional and novel graphite materials are being studied worldwide for applications in Generation IV reactors. In this study, the oxidation characteristics of petroleum-based IG-110 and pitch-based IG-430 graphite pellets in helium and air environments at temperatures ranging from 700 to 1600 °C were investigated. The oxidation rates and activation energies were determined based on mass loss measurements in a series of oxidation tests. The surface morphology was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. Although the thermal oxidation mechanism was previously considered to be the same for all temperatures higher than 1000 °C, the significant increases in oxidation rate observed at very high temperatures suggest that the oxidation behavior of the selected graphite materials at temperatures higher than 1200 °C is different. This work demonstrates that changes in surface morphology and in oxidation rate of the filler particles in the graphite materials are more prominent at temperatures above 1200 °C. Furthermore, possible intrinsic factors contributing to the oxidation of the two graphite materials at different temperature ranges are discussed taking account of the dominant role played by temperature.

  12. A graphite foam reinforced by graphite particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, J.J.; Wang, X.Y.; Guo, L.F.; Wang, Y.M.; Wang, Y.P.; Yu, M.F.; Lau, K.T.T. [DongHua University, Shanghai (China). College of Material Science and Engineering

    2007-11-15

    Graphite foam was obtained after carbonization and graphitization of a pitch foam formed by the pyrolysis of coal tar based mesophase pitch mixed with graphite particles in a high pressure and temperature chamber. The graphite foam possessed high mechanical strength and exceptional thermal conductivity after adding the graphite particles. Experimental results showed that the thermal conductivity of modified graphite foam reached 110W/m K, and its compressive strength increased from 3.7 MPa to 12.5 MPa with the addition of 5 wt% graphite particles. Through the microscopic observation, it was also found that fewer micro-cracks were formed in the cell wall of the modified foam as compared with pure graphite foam. The graphitization degree of modified foam reached 84.9% and the ligament of graphite foam exhibited high alignment after carbonization at 1200{sup o}C for 3 h and graphitization at 3000{sup o}C for 10 min.

  13. Electron spin resonance in neutron-irradiated graphite. Dependence on temperature and effect of annealing; Resonance paramagnetique du graphite irradie aux neutrons. Variation en fonction de la temperature et experiences de recuit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kester, T [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires, Laboratoire de resonance magnetique

    1967-09-01

    The temperature dependence of the electron spin resonance signal from neutron irradiated graphite has been studied. The results lead to an interpretation of the nature of the paramagnetic centers created by irradiation. In annealing experiments on graphite samples, which had been irradiated at low temperature, two annealing peaks and one anti-annealing peak were found. Interpretations are proposed for these peaks. (author) [French] Le graphite irradie aux neutrons a ete etudie par resonance paramagnetique electronique en fonction de la temperature. La nature des centres paramagnetiques crees par irradiation est interpretee a l'aide des resultats. Des experiences de recuit sur des echantillons de graphite irradie a 77 deg. K ont permis de mettre en evidence deux pics de recuit et un pic d'anti-recuit, pour lesquels des interpretations sont proposees. (auteur)

  14. Frictional characteristics of silicon graphite lubricated with water at high pressure and high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae Seon; Kim, Eun Hyun; Park, Jin Seok; Kim, Jong In

    2001-01-01

    Experimental frictional and wear characteristics of silicon graphite materials is studied in this paper. Those specimens are lubricated with high temperature and highly pressurized water to simulate the same operating condition for the journal bearing and the thrust bearing on the main coolant pump bearing in the newly developing nuclear reactor named SMART(System-integrated Modular Advanced ReacTor). Operating condition of the bearings is realized by the tribometer and the autoclave. Friction coefficient and wear loss are analyzed to choose the best silicon graphite material. Pin on plate test specimens are used and coned disk springs are used to control the applied force on the specimens. Wear loss and wear width are measured by a precision balance and a micrometer. The friction force is measured by the strain gauge which can be used under high temperature and high pressure. Three kinds of silicon graphite materials are examined and compared with each other, and each material shows similar but different results on frictional and wear characteristics

  15. The effect of temperature deposited on the performance of ZnO-CNT-graphite for supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darari, Alfin; Hakim, Istajib S.; Priyono; Subagio, Agus; Pardoyo; Subhan, Achmad

    2017-07-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs), graphite are now widely studied as the electrodes of supercapacitor, owing to their high conductivity, large surface area, chemical stability, etc. A lot of research has been focused on Carbon/metal oxide nanocomposite electrode for Electrode supercapacitor because it will increase the total capacitance. In this research, ZnO nanoparticles were deposited onto substrate CNT:Graphite in different temperatures such as 300°, 350°, and 400°C. The characterization of the crystal size using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) patterns showed ZnO material peak was detected a ZnO crystallite. The size of ZnO crystallite in 300°, 350°, and 400°C consecutively is 101.1; 103.4; and 116.7 nm. The test results are Electrochemical impedance spectrometry (EIS) high electrical conductivity values obtained on the composition of ZnO-CNT-graphite with a temperature of 350°C 4.6 (S/m); and (2) the highest value of capacitance in 300°C is 1.23 F/g.

  16. Outgassing tests on graphites in temperature range 100-1600 degrees C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alessandrini, C.; Apicella, M.L.; Verdini, L.

    1993-01-01

    Graphite is a an interesting material for plasma-facing components in fusion experiments, mainly because of its low atomic number and excellent thermal properties. Nevertheless, it contains a large amount of gaseous impurities, which can be released by plasma-surface interactions and affect the purity of the deuterium-tritium plasma. To investigate the outgassing behaviour of graphites, CFC's and doped C composites, a facility was set up to perform outgassing tests on samples, as a function of temperature in the range between 100 and 1600 degrees C. The experimental apparatus, designed to work in UHV conditions, allows outgassing measurements by a quadrupole mass spectrometer (1-200 AMU) using two different methods. The test facility, the quadrupole calibration and preliminary quantitative outgassing measurements on SEP CARB N112 samples are described

  17. Study on structural recovery of graphite irradiated with swift heavy ions at high temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pellemoine, F., E-mail: pellemoi@frib.msu.edu [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Avilov, M. [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Bender, M. [Dept. of Materials Research, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany); Ewing, R.C. [Dept. of Geological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-2115 (United States); Fernandes, S. [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Lang, M. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-2300 (United States); Li, W.X. [Dept. of Geological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-2115 (United States); Mittig, W. [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States); Schein, M. [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Severin, D. [Dept. of Materials Research, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany); Tomut, M. [Dept. of Materials Research, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany); Laboratory of Magnetism and Superconductivity, National Institute for Materials Physics NIMP, Bucharest (Romania); Trautmann, C. [Dept. of Materials Research, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany); Dept. of Materials Science, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Darmstadt (Germany); and others

    2015-12-15

    Thin graphite foils bombarded with an intense high-energy (8.6 MeV/u) gold beam reaching fluences up to 1 × 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2} lead to swelling and electrical resistivity changes. As shown earlier, these effects are diminished with increasing irradiation temperature. The work reported here extends the investigation of beam induced changes of these samples by structural analysis using synchrotron X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscope. A nearly complete recovery from swelling at irradiation temperatures above about 1500 °C is identified.

  18. Nano-Sn embedded in expanded graphite as anode for lithium ion batteries with improved low temperature electrochemical performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Yong; Ben, Liubin; Zhan, Yuanjie; Huang, Xuejie

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Nano-Sn embedded in interlayers of expanded graphite is fabricated. • The graphene/nano-Sn/graphene stacked structure promotes cycling stability of Sn. • The Sn/EG shows improved low temperature electrochemical performance. • Chemical diffusion coefficients of the Sn/EG are obtained by GITT. • The Sn/EG exhibits faster Li-ion intercalation kinetics than graphite. - Abstract: Metallic tin (Sn) used as anode material for lithium ion batteries has long been proposed, but its low temperature electrochemical performance has been rarely concerned. Here, a Sn/C composite with nano-Sn embedded in expanded graphite (Sn/EG) is synthesized. The nano-Sn particles (∼30 nm) are uniformly distributed in the interlayers of expanded graphite forming a tightly stacked layered structure. The electrochemical performance of the Sn/EG, particularly at low temperature, is carefully investigated compared with graphite. At -20 °C, the Sn/EG shows capacities of 200 mAh g −1 at 0.1C and 130 mAh g −1 at 0.2C, which is much superior to graphite (<10 mAh g −1 ). EIS measurements suggest that the charge transfer impedance of the Sn/EG increases less rapidly than graphite with decreasing temperatures, which is responsible for the improved low temperature electrochemical performance. The Li-ion chemical diffusion coefficients of the Sn/EG obtained by GITT are an order of magnitude higher at room temperature than that at -20 °C. Furthermore, the Sn/EG exhibits faster Li-ion intercalation kinetics than graphite in the asymmetric charge/discharge measurements, which shows great promise for the application in electric vehicles charged at low temperature.

  19. Constitutive modeling and finite element procedure development for stress analysis of prismatic high temperature gas cooled reactor graphite core components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohanty, Subhasish; Majumdar, Saurindranath; Srinivasan, Makuteswara

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Finite element procedure developed for stress analysis of HTGR graphite component. • Realistic fluence profile and reflector brick shape considered for the simulation. • Also realistic H-451 grade material properties considered for simulation. • Typical outer reflector of a GT-MHR type reactor considered for numerical study. • Based on the simulation results replacement of graphite bricks can be scheduled. -- Abstract: High temperature gas cooled reactors, such as prismatic and pebble bed reactors, are increasingly becoming popular because of their inherent safety, high temperature process heat output, and high efficiency in nuclear power generation. In prismatic reactors, hexagonal graphite bricks are used as reflectors and fuel bricks. In the reactor environment, graphite bricks experience high temperature and neutron dose. This leads to dimensional changes (swelling and or shrinkage) of these bricks. Irradiation dimensional changes may affect the structural integrity of the individual bricks as well as of the overall core. The present paper presents a generic procedure for stress analysis of prismatic core graphite components using graphite reflector as an example. The procedure is demonstrated through commercially available ABAQUS finite element software using the option of user material subroutine (UMAT). This paper considers General Atomics Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR) as a bench mark design to perform the time integrated stress analysis of a typical reflector brick considering realistic geometry, flux distribution and realistic irradiation material properties of transversely isotropic H-451 grade graphite

  20. Constitutive modeling and finite element procedure development for stress analysis of prismatic high temperature gas cooled reactor graphite core components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohanty, Subhasish, E-mail: smohanty@anl.gov [Argonne National Laboratory, South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Majumdar, Saurindranath [Argonne National Laboratory, South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Srinivasan, Makuteswara [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC 20555 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Highlights: • Finite element procedure developed for stress analysis of HTGR graphite component. • Realistic fluence profile and reflector brick shape considered for the simulation. • Also realistic H-451 grade material properties considered for simulation. • Typical outer reflector of a GT-MHR type reactor considered for numerical study. • Based on the simulation results replacement of graphite bricks can be scheduled. -- Abstract: High temperature gas cooled reactors, such as prismatic and pebble bed reactors, are increasingly becoming popular because of their inherent safety, high temperature process heat output, and high efficiency in nuclear power generation. In prismatic reactors, hexagonal graphite bricks are used as reflectors and fuel bricks. In the reactor environment, graphite bricks experience high temperature and neutron dose. This leads to dimensional changes (swelling and or shrinkage) of these bricks. Irradiation dimensional changes may affect the structural integrity of the individual bricks as well as of the overall core. The present paper presents a generic procedure for stress analysis of prismatic core graphite components using graphite reflector as an example. The procedure is demonstrated through commercially available ABAQUS finite element software using the option of user material subroutine (UMAT). This paper considers General Atomics Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR) as a bench mark design to perform the time integrated stress analysis of a typical reflector brick considering realistic geometry, flux distribution and realistic irradiation material properties of transversely isotropic H-451 grade graphite.

  1. New graphite/salt materials for high temperature energy storage. Phase change properties study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, J.

    2007-07-01

    This work is a contribution to the study of new graphite/salt composites dedicated to high temperature energy storage (≥200 C). The aim is to analyse and to understand the influence of both graphite and composite microstructure on the phase change properties of salts. This PhD is carried out within the framework of two projects: DISTOR (European) and HTPSTOCK (French). The major contributions of this work are threefold: 1) An important database (solid-liquid phase change properties) is provided from the DSC analysis of six salts and the corresponding composites. 2) Rigorous modeling of salts melting in confined media in several geometries are proposed to understand why, during the first melting of the compression elaborated composites, problems of salt leakage are observed. These models show that the materials morphology is responsible for these phenomena: the graphite matrix restrains the volume expansion due to salt melting: salt melts under pressure, which leads to a melting on a large temperature range and to a loss of energy density. Sensitivity analysis of parameters (geometric and physic) shows that matrix rigidity modulus is the parameter on which it is necessary to act during the composites elaboration to blur this phenomenon. 3) Finally, this work proposes a thermodynamic formulation of both surface/interface phenomena and the presence of dissolved impurities being able to explain a melting point lowering. It seems that the melting point lowering observed (∼ 5 C) are mainly due to the presence of dissolved impurities (brought by graphite) in the liquid, along with an additional Gibbs-Thomson effect (∼ 1 C, related to the size of the clusters crystals). (author)

  2. Investigation on maximum transition temperature of phonon mediated superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fusui, L; Yi, S; Yinlong, S [Physics Department, Beijing University (CN)

    1989-05-01

    Three model effective phonon spectra are proposed to get plots of {ital T}{sub {ital c}}-{omega} adn {lambda}-{omega}. It can be concluded that there is no maximum limit of {ital T}{sub {ital c}} in phonon mediated superconductivity for reasonable values of {lambda}. The importance of high frequency LO phonon is also emphasized. Some discussions on high {ital T}{sub {ital c}} are given.

  3. Oxidation of iridium coating on rhenium coated graphite at elevated temperature in stagnated air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Yongle; Bai, Shuxin; Zhang, Hong; Ye, Yicong

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Continuous and dense Ir coatings were prepared on graphite by electrodepostion. • The purification of the as-prepared Ir coating was higher than about 99.98%. • The Ir/Re/C specimen kept integrity without significant failures after oxidation. • The average oxidation rate of the Ir coating was about 0.219 mg/(cm 2 min). • Penetrating holes at gains boundaries resulted in the failure of the Ir coating. - Abstract: Continuous and dense iridium coatings were prepared on the rhenium coated graphite specimens by electrodeposition. The iridium/rhenium coated graphite (Ir/Re/C) specimens were oxidized at elevated temperatures in stagnated air for 3600 s. The purification of the as-prepared Ir coating was higher than about 99.98% with the main impurity elements Si, Al, Fe and Ru. After oxidation, the Ir/Re/C specimens kept integrity without significant failures and the average oxidation rate was about 0.219 mg/(cm 2 min). Pores were found at the grain boundaries and concentrated to penetrating holes with the growth of Ir grains, which resulted in disastrous failures of the Ir coating

  4. Oxidation of iridium coating on rhenium coated graphite at elevated temperature in stagnated air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Yongle; Bai, Shuxin, E-mail: NUDT_MSE_501@163.com; Zhang, Hong; Ye, Yicong

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Continuous and dense Ir coatings were prepared on graphite by electrodepostion. • The purification of the as-prepared Ir coating was higher than about 99.98%. • The Ir/Re/C specimen kept integrity without significant failures after oxidation. • The average oxidation rate of the Ir coating was about 0.219 mg/(cm{sup 2} min). • Penetrating holes at gains boundaries resulted in the failure of the Ir coating. - Abstract: Continuous and dense iridium coatings were prepared on the rhenium coated graphite specimens by electrodeposition. The iridium/rhenium coated graphite (Ir/Re/C) specimens were oxidized at elevated temperatures in stagnated air for 3600 s. The purification of the as-prepared Ir coating was higher than about 99.98% with the main impurity elements Si, Al, Fe and Ru. After oxidation, the Ir/Re/C specimens kept integrity without significant failures and the average oxidation rate was about 0.219 mg/(cm{sup 2} min). Pores were found at the grain boundaries and concentrated to penetrating holes with the growth of Ir grains, which resulted in disastrous failures of the Ir coating.

  5. Maximum weight of greenhouse effect to global temperature variation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Xian; Jiang, Chuangye

    2007-01-01

    Full text: The global average temperature has risen by 0.74 0 C since the late 19th century. Many studies have concluded that the observed warming in the last 50 years may be attributed to increasing concentrations of anthropogenic greenhouse gases. But some scientists have a different point of view. Global climate change is affected not only by anthropogenic activities, but also constraints in climate system natural factors. How much is the influencing weight of C02's greenhouse effects to the global temperature variation? Does global climate continue warming or decreasing in the next 20 years? They are two hot spots in global climate change. The multi-timescales analysis method - Empirical mode decomposition (EMD) is used to diagnose global annual mean air temperature dataset for land surface provided by IPCC and atmospheric content of C02 provided by the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) during 1881-2002. The results show that: Global temperature variation contains quasi-periodic oscillations on four timescales (3 yr, 6 yr, 20 yr and 60 yr, respectively) and a century-scale warming trend. The variance contribution of IMF1-IMF4 and trend is 17.55%, 11.34%, 6.77%, 24.15% and 40.19%, respectively. The trend and quasi-60 yr oscillation of temperature variation are the most prominent; C02's greenhouse effect on global temperature variation is mainly century-scale trend. The contribution of C02 concentration to global temperature variability is not more than 40.19%, whereas 59.81% contribution to global temperature variation is non-greenhouse effect. Therefore, it is necessary to re-study the dominant factors that induce the global climate change; It has been noticed that on the periods of 20 yr and 60 yr oscillation, the global temperature is beginning to decreased in the next 20 years. If the present C02 concentration is maintained, the greenhouse effect will be too small to countercheck the natural variation in global climate cooling in the next 20

  6. Sputtering graphite coating to improve the elevated-temperature cycling ability of the LiMn2O4 electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiexi; Zhang, Qiaobao; Li, Xinhai; Wang, Zhixing; Guo, Huajun; Xu, Daguo; Zhang, Kaili

    2014-08-14

    To improve the cycle performance of LiMn2O4 at elevated temperature, a graphite layer is introduced to directly cover the surface of a commercial LiMn2O4-based electrode via room-temperature DC magnetron sputtering. The as-modified cathodes display improved capacity retention as compared to the bare LiMn2O4 cathode (BLMO) at 55 °C. When sputtering graphite for 30 min, the sample shows the best cycling performance at 55 °C, maintaining 96.2% capacity retention after 200 cycles. Reasons with respect to the graphite layer for improving the elevated-temperature performance of LiMn2O4 are systematically investigated via the methods of cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectrometry, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry. The results demonstrate that the graphite coated LiMn2O4 cathode has much less increased electrode polarization and electrochemical impedance than BLMO during the elevated-temperature cycling process. Furthermore, the graphite layer is able to alleviate the severe dissolution of manganese ions into the electrolyte and mitigate the morphological and structural degradation of LiMn2O4 during cycling. A model for the electrochemical kinetics process is also suggested for explaining the roles of the graphite layer in suppressing the Mn dissolution.

  7. INVESTIGATIONS INTO THE INFLUENCE OF GRAPHITIZATION-TIME AND -TEMPERATURE ON THE ASH CONTENT OF ELECTROGRAPHITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wege, E

    1963-06-15

    The de-ashing of carbon bodies at higher temperatures was found to be relatively speedy procedure. Under equal conditions, after equal time perrods, the ratio between momentary ash content and original ash content is constant, low final ash content means low original ash content. Since the ash content of the packing dust affects the graphitization system, it seemed possible to increase the de-ashing rate by the use of purex packrng dust, or to decrease the de-ashing rate by the use of impure packing dust. Since the de-ashing speed is dependent on the temperature, small differences in the effective temperature will affect the ash content considerably. Thus, in order to prevent large differences in the final product as far as the ash content is concerned, it is suggested that the most uniform furnace temperatures be ensured. (P.C.H.)

  8. Oxidation damage evaluation by non-destructive method for graphite components in high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Taiju; Tada, Tatsuya; Sumita, Junya; Sawa, Kazuhiro

    2008-01-01

    To develop non-destructive evaluation methods for oxidation damage on graphite components in High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs), the applicability of ultrasonic wave and micro-indentation methods were investigated. Candidate graphites, IG-110 and IG-430, for core components of Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) were used in this study. These graphites were oxidized uniformly by air at 500degC. The following results were obtained from this study. (1) Ultrasonic wave velocities with 1 MHz can be expressed empirically by exponential formulas to burn-off, oxidation weight loss. (2) The porous condition of the oxidized graphite could be evaluated with wave propagation analysis with a wave-pore interaction model. It is important to consider the non-uniformity of oxidized porous condition. (3) Micro-indentation method is expected to determine the local oxidation damage. It is necessary to assess the variation of the test data. (author)

  9. Theoretical analysis of the graphitization of a nanodiamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, S Joon; Park, Jae-Gwan [Nano Science and Technology Division, Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), PO Box 131, Cheongryang, Seoul, 130-650 (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-09-26

    We report on a theoretical analysis of the graphitization of a nanosize diamond (nanodiamond) in the metastable state. A nanodiamond annealed at a relatively lower temperature suffers morphological transition into a nanodiamond-graphite core-shell structure. Thermodynamic stability analysis of the nanodiamond showed that the phase diagram (relationship between the annealing temperature and radius) of the nanodiamond-graphite has three regimes: smaller nanodiamond, nanodiamond-graphite, and larger nanodiamond. These regimes of nanodiamond-graphite are due to an additional phase boundary from finding the maximum size of the nanodiamond which can be graphitized. In the theoretical analysis, the most probable and the maximum volume fractions of graphite in the nanodiamond were 0.76 and 0.84 respectively, which were independent of the annealing temperature and the initial radius of the nanodiamond. Therefore, the nanodiamond is not completely transformed into graphite by simple annealing at relatively lower process temperature and pressure. The highest graphitization probability decreased with increasing annealing temperature. Raman spectra for the F{sub 2g} vibration mode of nanodiamond were also calculated, and we found that the variation in properties of the spectral line was strongly dependent on the graphitization temperature and the initial size of the nanodiamond.

  10. Theoretical analysis of the graphitization of a nanodiamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, S Joon; Park, Jae-Gwan

    2007-01-01

    We report on a theoretical analysis of the graphitization of a nanosize diamond (nanodiamond) in the metastable state. A nanodiamond annealed at a relatively lower temperature suffers morphological transition into a nanodiamond-graphite core-shell structure. Thermodynamic stability analysis of the nanodiamond showed that the phase diagram (relationship between the annealing temperature and radius) of the nanodiamond-graphite has three regimes: smaller nanodiamond, nanodiamond-graphite, and larger nanodiamond. These regimes of nanodiamond-graphite are due to an additional phase boundary from finding the maximum size of the nanodiamond which can be graphitized. In the theoretical analysis, the most probable and the maximum volume fractions of graphite in the nanodiamond were 0.76 and 0.84 respectively, which were independent of the annealing temperature and the initial radius of the nanodiamond. Therefore, the nanodiamond is not completely transformed into graphite by simple annealing at relatively lower process temperature and pressure. The highest graphitization probability decreased with increasing annealing temperature. Raman spectra for the F 2g vibration mode of nanodiamond were also calculated, and we found that the variation in properties of the spectral line was strongly dependent on the graphitization temperature and the initial size of the nanodiamond

  11. Decadal trends in Red Sea maximum surface temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaidez, V; Dreano, D; Agusti, S; Duarte, C M; Hoteit, I

    2017-08-15

    Ocean warming is a major consequence of climate change, with the surface of the ocean having warmed by 0.11 °C decade -1 over the last 50 years and is estimated to continue to warm by an additional 0.6 - 2.0 °C before the end of the century 1 . However, there is considerable variability in the rates experienced by different ocean regions, so understanding regional trends is important to inform on possible stresses for marine organisms, particularly in warm seas where organisms may be already operating in the high end of their thermal tolerance. Although the Red Sea is one of the warmest ecosystems on earth, its historical warming trends and thermal evolution remain largely understudied. We characterized the Red Sea's thermal regimes at the basin scale, with a focus on the spatial distribution and changes over time of sea surface temperature maxima, using remotely sensed sea surface temperature data from 1982 - 2015. The overall rate of warming for the Red Sea is 0.17 ± 0.07 °C decade -1 , while the northern Red Sea is warming between 0.40 and 0.45 °C decade -1 , all exceeding the global rate. Our findings show that the Red Sea is fast warming, which may in the future challenge its organisms and communities.

  12. Decadal trends in Red Sea maximum surface temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Chaidez, Veronica

    2017-08-09

    Ocean warming is a major consequence of climate change, with the surface of the ocean having warmed by 0.11 °C decade-1 over the last 50 years and is estimated to continue to warm by an additional 0.6 - 2.0 °C before the end of the century1. However, there is considerable variability in the rates experienced by different ocean regions, so understanding regional trends is important to inform on possible stresses for marine organisms, particularly in warm seas where organisms may be already operating in the high end of their thermal tolerance. Although the Red Sea is one of the warmest ecosystems on earth, its historical warming trends and thermal evolution remain largely understudied. We characterized the Red Sea\\'s thermal regimes at the basin scale, with a focus on the spatial distribution and changes over time of sea surface temperature maxima, using remotely sensed sea surface temperature data from 1982 - 2015. The overall rate of warming for the Red Sea is 0.17 ± 0.07 °C decade-1, while the northern Red Sea is warming between 0.40 and 0.45 °C decade-1, all exceeding the global rate. Our findings show that the Red Sea is fast warming, which may in the future challenge its organisms and communities.

  13. Decadal trends in Red Sea maximum surface temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Chaidez, Veronica; Dreano, Denis; Agusti, Susana; Duarte, Carlos M.; Hoteit, Ibrahim

    2017-01-01

    Ocean warming is a major consequence of climate change, with the surface of the ocean having warmed by 0.11 °C decade-1 over the last 50 years and is estimated to continue to warm by an additional 0.6 - 2.0 °C before the end of the century1. However, there is considerable variability in the rates experienced by different ocean regions, so understanding regional trends is important to inform on possible stresses for marine organisms, particularly in warm seas where organisms may be already operating in the high end of their thermal tolerance. Although the Red Sea is one of the warmest ecosystems on earth, its historical warming trends and thermal evolution remain largely understudied. We characterized the Red Sea's thermal regimes at the basin scale, with a focus on the spatial distribution and changes over time of sea surface temperature maxima, using remotely sensed sea surface temperature data from 1982 - 2015. The overall rate of warming for the Red Sea is 0.17 ± 0.07 °C decade-1, while the northern Red Sea is warming between 0.40 and 0.45 °C decade-1, all exceeding the global rate. Our findings show that the Red Sea is fast warming, which may in the future challenge its organisms and communities.

  14. Effect of expansion temperature of expandable graphite on microstructure evolution of expanded graphite during high-energy ball-milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue Xueqing; Li Liang; Zhang Ruijun; Zhang Fucheng

    2009-01-01

    Two expanded graphites (EG), marked as EG-1 and EG-2, were prepared by rapid heating of expandable graphite to 600 and 1000 deg. C, respectively, and ball milled in a high-energy mill (planetary-type) under air atmosphere. The microstructure evolution of the ball-milled samples was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). XRD analysis shows that the evolution degree of the average crystallite thickness along the c-axis (L c ) of EG-2 is lower than that of EG-1 during the milling process. From the HRTEM images of the samples after 100 h ball-milling, slightly curved graphene planes can be frequently observed both in the two EGs, however, EG-1 and EG-2 exhibit sharply curved graphene planes and smoothly curved graphene planes with high bending angles, respectively.

  15. High temperature vacuum furnace for the preparation of graphite targets for 14C dating by tandem accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowe, D.C.; Bristow, P.; Judd, W.J.

    1985-02-01

    A simple and reliable furnace design capable of producing temperatures of up to 2800 deg. C is presented. The furnace has been specifically designed for the rapid and reliable production of graphite targets for 14 C dating purposes but may be used in a variety of applications requiring high temperatures under vacuum conditions

  16. Thermal conductivity of an organic phase change material/expanded graphite composite across the phase change temperature range and a novel thermal conductivity model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling, Ziye; Chen, Jiajie; Xu, Tao; Fang, Xiaoming; Gao, Xuenong; Zhang, Zhengguo

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Expanded graphite can improve thermal conductivity of RT44HC by 20–60 times. • Thermal conductivity of PCM/EG composites keeps constant before/after melting. • Thermal conductivity of PCMs nearly doubled during phase changing. • Thermal conductivity of composite PCM increases with density and percentage of EG. • The simple model predicts thermal conductivity of EG-based composites accurately. - Abstract: This work studies factors that affect the thermal conductivity of an organic phase change material (PCM), RT44HC/expanded graphite (EG) composite, which include: EG mass fraction, composite PCM density and temperature. The increase of EG mass fraction and bulk density will both enhance thermal conductivity of composite PCMs, by up to 60 times. Thermal conductivity of RT44HC/EG composites remains independent on temperature outside the phase change range (40–45 °C), but nearly doubles during the phase change. The narrow temperature change during the phase change allows the maximum heat flux or minimum temperature for heat source if attaching PCMs to a first (constant temperature) or second (constant heat flux) thermal boundary. At last, a simple thermal conductivity model for EG-based composites is put forward, based on only two parameters: mass fraction of EG and bulk density of the composite. This model is validated with experiment data presented in this paper and in literature, showing this model has general applicability to any composite of EG and poor thermal conductive materials

  17. Investigation of high temperature reactions on solid substrates with Rutherford backscattering spectrometry: interaction of palladium with selenium on heated graphite surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majidi, V.; Robertson, J.D.

    1991-01-01

    Selenium and palladium interactions on heated pyrolytically coated graphite substrates were investigated using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. The studies were performed using selenium alone, palladium alone, and a combination of selenium and palladium deposited on the graphite substrates. The results indicate that palladium instantaneously stabilizes selenium at ambient temperatures and prevents the diffusion of selenium into the graphite. As the substrate is heated, temperature dependent diffusion of all analytes into the graphite is observed. Furthermore, it appears that the stabilization of selenium is due to the formation of a stoichiometric compound with palladium and oxygen. This compound decomposes at a temperature between 1070 and 1770 K. (author)

  18. Investigation of high temperature reactions on solid substrates with Rutherford backscattering spectrometry: interaction of palladium with selenium on heated graphite surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majidi, V.; Robertson, J.D. (Kentucky Univ., Lexington, KY (United States). Dept. of Chemistry)

    1991-01-01

    Selenium and palladium interactions on heated pyrolytically coated graphite substrates were investigated using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. The studies were performed using selenium alone, palladium alone, and a combination of selenium and palladium deposited on the graphite substrates. The results indicate that palladium instantaneously stabilizes selenium at ambient temperatures and prevents the diffusion of selenium into the graphite. As the substrate is heated, temperature dependent diffusion of all analytes into the graphite is observed. Furthermore, it appears that the stabilization of selenium is due to the formation of a stoichiometric compound with palladium and oxygen. This compound decomposes at a temperature between 1070 and 1770 K. (author).

  19. Brazing graphite to graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, G.R.

    1976-01-01

    Graphite is joined to graphite by employing both fine molybdenum powder as the brazing material and an annealing step that together produce a virtually metal-free joint exhibiting properties similar to those found in the parent graphite. Molybdenum powder is placed between the faying surfaces of two graphite parts and melted to form molybdenum carbide. The joint area is thereafter subjected to an annealing operation which diffuses the carbide away from the joint and into the graphite parts. Graphite dissolved by the dispersed molybdenum carbide precipitates into the joint area, replacing the molybdenum carbide to provide a joint of graphite

  20. Process for the fabrication of aluminum metallized pyrolytic graphite sputtering targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowiecki, Daniel M.; Ramsey, Philip B.; Juntz, Robert S.

    1995-01-01

    An improved method for fabricating pyrolytic graphite sputtering targets with superior heat transfer ability, longer life, and maximum energy transmission. Anisotropic pyrolytic graphite is contoured and/or segmented to match the erosion profile of the sputter target and then oriented such that the graphite's high thermal conductivity planes are in maximum contact with a thermally conductive metal backing. The graphite contact surface is metallized, using high rate physical vapor deposition (HRPVD), with an aluminum coating and the thermally conductive metal backing is joined to the metallized graphite target by one of four low-temperature bonding methods; liquid-metal casting, powder metallurgy compaction, eutectic brazing, and laser welding.

  1. Surface modification of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite by reaction with atomic nitrogen at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Luning; Pejakovic, Dusan A.; Geng Baisong; Marschall, Jochen

    2011-01-01

    Dry etching of {0 0 0 1} basal planes of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) using active nitridation by nitrogen atoms was investigated at low pressures and high temperatures. The etching process produces channels at grain boundaries and pits whose shapes depend on the reaction temperature. For temperatures below 600 deg. C, the majority of pits are nearly circular, with a small fraction of hexagonal pits with rounded edges. For temperatures above 600 deg. C, the pits are almost exclusively hexagonal with straight edges. The Raman spectra of samples etched at 1000 deg. C show the D mode near 1360 cm -1 , which is absent in pristine HOPG. For deep hexagonal pits that penetrate many graphene layers, neither the surface number density of pits nor the width of pit size distribution changes substantially with the nitridation time, suggesting that these pits are initiated at a fixed number of extended defects intersecting {0 0 0 1} planes. Shallow pits that penetrate 1-2 graphene layers have a wide size distribution, which suggests that these pits are initiated on pristine graphene surfaces from lattice vacancies continually formed by N atoms. A similar wide size distribution of shallow hexagonal pits is observed in an n-layer graphene sample after N-atom etching.

  2. Task 08/41, Low temperature loop at the RA reactor, Review IV - Maximum temperature values in the samples without forced cooling; Zadatak 08/41, Niskotemperaturna petlja u reaktoru 'RA', Pregled IV - Maksimalne temperature u uzorcima bez prinudnog hladjenja

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaric, Z [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1961-12-15

    The quantity of heat generated in the sample was calculated in the Review III. In stationary regime the heat is transferred through the air layer between the sample and the wall of the channel to the heavy water of graphite. Certain value of maximum temperature t{sub 0} is achieved in the sample. The objective of this review is determination of this temperature. [Serbo-Croat] Kolicina toplote generisana u uzorku, izracunata u pregledu III, u ravnoteznom stanju odvodi se kroz vazdusni sloj izmedju uzorka i zida kanala na tesku vodu odnosno grafit, pri cemu se u uzorku dostize izvesna maksimalna temperatura t{sub 0}. Odredjivanje ove temperature je predmet ovog pregleda.

  3. Treatment and Disposal of the Radioactive Graphite Waste of High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Spent Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Junfeng

    2016-01-01

    High-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) represent one of the Gen IV reactors in the future market, with efficient generation of energy and the supply of process heat at high temperature utilised in many industrial processes. HTGR development has been carried out within China’s National High Technology Research and Development Program. The first industrial demonstration HTGR of 200 MWe is under construction in Shandong Province China. HTGRs use ceramic-coated fuel particles that are strong and highly resistant to irradiation. Graphite is used as moderator and helium is used as coolant. The fuel particles and the graphite block in which they are imbedded can withstand very high temperature (up to ~1600℃). Graphite waste presents as the fuel element components of HTGR with up to 95% of the whole element beside the graphite blocks in the core. For example, a 200 MWe reactor could discharge about 90,000 fuel elements with 17 tonnes irradiated graphite included each year. The core of the HTGR in China consists of a pebble bed with spherical fuel elements. The UO 2 fuel kernel particles (0.5mm diameter) (triple-coated isotropic fuel particles) are coated by several layers including inner buffer layer with less dense pyrocarbon, dense pyro-carbon, SiC layer and outer layer of dense pyro-carbon, which can prevent the leaking of fission products (Fig. 1). Spherical fuel elements (60mm diameter) consist of a 50mm diameter inner zone and 5mm thick shell of fuel free zone [3]. The inner zone contains about 8300 triple-coated isotropic fuel particles of 0.92mm in diameter dispersed in the graphite matrix

  4. Stochastic modelling of the monthly average maximum and minimum temperature patterns in India 1981-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narasimha Murthy, K. V.; Saravana, R.; Vijaya Kumar, K.

    2018-04-01

    The paper investigates the stochastic modelling and forecasting of monthly average maximum and minimum temperature patterns through suitable seasonal auto regressive integrated moving average (SARIMA) model for the period 1981-2015 in India. The variations and distributions of monthly maximum and minimum temperatures are analyzed through Box plots and cumulative distribution functions. The time series plot indicates that the maximum temperature series contain sharp peaks in almost all the years, while it is not true for the minimum temperature series, so both the series are modelled separately. The possible SARIMA model has been chosen based on observing autocorrelation function (ACF), partial autocorrelation function (PACF), and inverse autocorrelation function (IACF) of the logarithmic transformed temperature series. The SARIMA (1, 0, 0) × (0, 1, 1)12 model is selected for monthly average maximum and minimum temperature series based on minimum Bayesian information criteria. The model parameters are obtained using maximum-likelihood method with the help of standard error of residuals. The adequacy of the selected model is determined using correlation diagnostic checking through ACF, PACF, IACF, and p values of Ljung-Box test statistic of residuals and using normal diagnostic checking through the kernel and normal density curves of histogram and Q-Q plot. Finally, the forecasting of monthly maximum and minimum temperature patterns of India for the next 3 years has been noticed with the help of selected model.

  5. Special graphites; Graphites speciaux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leveque, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    A large fraction of the work undertaken jointly by the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) and the Pechiney Company has been the improvement of the properties of nuclear pile graphite and the opening up of new fields of graphite application. New processes for the manufacture of carbons and special graphites have been developed: forged graphite, pyro-carbons, high density graphite agglomeration of graphite powders by cracking of natural gas, impervious graphites. The physical properties of these products and their reaction with various oxidising gases are described. The first irradiation results are also given. (authors) [French] Ameliorer les proprietes du graphite nucleaire pour empilements et ouvrir de nouveaux domaines d'application au graphite constituent une part importante de l'effort entrepris en commun par le Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) et la compagnie PECHINEY. Des procedes nouveaux de fabrication de carbones et graphites speciaux ont ete mis au point: graphite forge, pyrocarbone, graphite de haute densite, agglomeration de poudres de graphite par craquage de gaz naturel, graphites impermeables. Les proprietes physiques de ces produits ainsi que leur reaction avec differents gaz oxydants sont decrites. Les premiers resultats d'irradiation sont aussi donnes. (auteurs)

  6. New England observed and predicted Julian day of maximum growing season stream/river temperature points

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The shapefile contains points with associated observed and predicted Julian day of maximum growing season stream/river temperatures in New England based on a spatial...

  7. New England observed and predicted growing season maximum stream/river temperature points

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The shapefile contains points with associated observed and predicted growing season maximum stream/river temperatures in New England based on a spatial statistical...

  8. New England observed and predicted August stream/river temperature maximum daily rate of change points

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The shapefile contains points with associated observed and predicted August stream/river temperature maximum negative rate of change in New England based on a...

  9. Nondestructive testing on graphite structures for high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Masahiro; Kambe, Mamoru; Tsuji, Nobumasa.

    1994-01-01

    The application of ultrasonic (for internal defects) and eddy current testing (for surface defects) were investigated on the structures of nuclear-grade IG-110 and PGX graphite for the HTTR. The equipment were developed in order to detect the specific configuration of graphite blocks and the testing conditions were defined as the practical testing methods. The established testing methods are being used for the acceptance tests of graphite structures in the HTTR. (author)

  10. Measurement of the temperature of density maximum of water solutions using a convective flow technique

    OpenAIRE

    Cawley, M.F.; McGlynn, D.; Mooney, P.A.

    2006-01-01

    A technique is described which yields an accurate measurement of the temperature of density maximum of fluids which exhibit such anomalous behaviour. The method relies on the detection of changes in convective flow in a rectangular cavity containing the test fluid.The normal single-cell convection which occurs in the presence of a horizontal temperature gradient changes to a double cell configuration in the vicinity of the density maximum, and this transition manifests itself in changes in th...

  11. Transmission electron-microscopic studies of structural changes in polycrystalline graphite after high temperature irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platonov, P.A.; Gurovich, B.A.; Shtrombakh, Ya.I.; Karpukhin, V.I.

    1985-01-01

    Transmission electron-microscopic investigation of polycrystalline graphite before and after irradiation is carried out. The direct use of graphite samples after ion thinning, as an inquiry subject is the basic peculiarity of the work. Main structural components of MPG-6 graphite before and after irradiation are revealed, the structural mechanism of the reactor graphite destruction under irradiation is demonstrated. The mean values of L αm and L cm crystallite dimensions are determined. Radiation defects, occuring in some crystallites after irradiation are revealed by the dark-field electron microscopy method

  12. Development of in-service inspection system for core support graphite structures in the high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumita, Junya; Hanawa, Satoshi; Kikuchi, Takayuki; Ishihara, Masahiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    Visual inspection of core support graphite structures using TV camera as in-service inspection and measurement of material characteristics using surveillance test specimens are planned in the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) to confirm structural integrity of the core support graphite structures. For the visual inspection, in-service inspection system developed from September 1996 to June 1998, and pre-service inspection using the system was carried out. As the result of the pre-service inspection, it was validated that high quality of visual inspection with TV camera can be carried out, and also structural integrity of the core support graphite structures at the initial stage of the HTTR operation was confirmed. (author)

  13. Graphene synthesis on SiC: Reduced graphitization temperature by C-cluster and Ar-ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, R.; Li, H.; Zhang, Z.D.; Wang, Z.S.; Zhou, S.Y.; Wang, Z.; Li, T.C.; Liu, J.R.; Fu, D.J.

    2015-01-01

    Thermal decomposition of SiC is a promising method for high quality production of wafer-scale graphene layers, when the high decomposition temperature of SiC is substantially reduced. The high decomposition temperature of SiC around 1400 °C is a technical obstacle. In this work, we report on graphene synthesis on 6H–SiC with reduced graphitization temperature via ion implantation. When energetic Ar, C 1 and C 6 -cluster ions implanted into 6H–SiC substrates, some of the Si–C bonds have been broken due to the electronic and nuclear collisions. Owing to the radiation damage induced bond breaking and the implanted C atoms as an additional C source the graphitization temperature was reduced by up to 200 °C

  14. A Hybrid Maximum Power Point Search Method Using Temperature Measurements in Partial Shading Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mroczka Janusz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Photovoltaic panels have a non-linear current-voltage characteristics to produce the maximum power at only one point called the maximum power point. In the case of the uniform illumination a single solar panel shows only one maximum power, which is also the global maximum power point. In the case an irregularly illuminated photovoltaic panel many local maxima on the power-voltage curve can be observed and only one of them is the global maximum. The proposed algorithm detects whether a solar panel is in the uniform insolation conditions. Then an appropriate strategy of tracking the maximum power point is taken using a decision algorithm. The proposed method is simulated in the environment created by the authors, which allows to stimulate photovoltaic panels in real conditions of lighting, temperature and shading.

  15. Maximum Smoke Temperature in Non-Smoke Model Evacuation Region for Semi-Transverse Tunnel Fire

    OpenAIRE

    B. Lou; Y. Qiu; X. Long

    2017-01-01

    Smoke temperature distribution in non-smoke evacuation under different mechanical smoke exhaust rates of semi-transverse tunnel fire were studied by FDS numerical simulation in this paper. The effect of fire heat release rate (10MW 20MW and 30MW) and exhaust rate (from 0 to 160m3/s) on the maximum smoke temperature in non-smoke evacuation region was discussed. Results show that the maximum smoke temperature in non-smoke evacuation region decreased with smoke exhaust rate. Plug-holing was obse...

  16. Temperature and radiolytic corrosion effects on the chlorine behaviour in nuclear graphite: consequences for the disposable of irradiated graphite from UNGG reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaudey, C.E.

    2010-10-01

    This work concerns the dismantling of the UNGG reactor which have produced around 23 000 t of graphite wastes that ave to be disposed of according to the French law of June 206. These wastes contain two long-lived radionuclides ( 14 C and 36 Cl) which are the main long term dose contributors. In order to get information about their inventory and their long term behaviour in case of water ingress into the repository, it is necessary to determine their location and speciation in the irradiated graphite after the reactor shutdown. This work concerns the study of 36 Cl. The main objective is to reproduce its behaviour during reactor operation. For that purpose, we have studied the effects of temperature and radiolytic corrosion independently. Our results show a rapid release of around 20% 36 Cl during the first hours of reactor operation whereas a much slower release occurs afterwards. We have put in evidence two types of chlorine corresponding to two different chemical forms (of different thermal stabilities) or to two locations (of different accessibilities). We have also shown that the radiolytic corrosion seems to enhance chlorine release, whatever the irradiation dose. Moreover, the major chemical form of chlorine is inorganic. (author)

  17. Performance analysis and comparison of an Atkinson cycle coupled to variable temperature heat reservoirs under maximum power and maximum power density conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, P.-Y.; Hou, S.-S.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, performance analysis and comparison based on the maximum power and maximum power density conditions have been conducted for an Atkinson cycle coupled to variable temperature heat reservoirs. The Atkinson cycle is internally reversible but externally irreversible, since there is external irreversibility of heat transfer during the processes of constant volume heat addition and constant pressure heat rejection. This study is based purely on classical thermodynamic analysis methodology. It should be especially emphasized that all the results and conclusions are based on classical thermodynamics. The power density, defined as the ratio of power output to maximum specific volume in the cycle, is taken as the optimization objective because it considers the effects of engine size as related to investment cost. The results show that an engine design based on maximum power density with constant effectiveness of the hot and cold side heat exchangers or constant inlet temperature ratio of the heat reservoirs will have smaller size but higher efficiency, compression ratio, expansion ratio and maximum temperature than one based on maximum power. From the view points of engine size and thermal efficiency, an engine design based on maximum power density is better than one based on maximum power conditions. However, due to the higher compression ratio and maximum temperature in the cycle, an engine design based on maximum power density conditions requires tougher materials for engine construction than one based on maximum power conditions

  18. Phonon scattering in graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, P.

    1976-04-01

    Effects on graphite thermal conductivities due to controlled alterations of the graphite structure by impurity addition, porosity, and neutron irradiation are shown to be consistent with the phonon-scattering formulation 1/l = Σ/sub i equals 1/sup/n/ 1/l/sub i/. Observed temperature effects on these doped and irradiated graphites are also explained by this mechanism

  19. Altered electrode degradation with temperature in LiFePO4/mesocarbon microbead graphite cells diagnosed with impedance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klett, Matilda; Zavalis, Tommy Georgios; Kjell, Maria H.; Lindström, Rakel Wreland; Behm, Mårten; Lindbergh, Göran

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Aging of LiFePO 4 /mesocarbon microbead graphite cells from hybrid electric vehicle cycling. • Electrode degradation evaluated post-mortem by impedance spectroscopy and physics-based modeling. • Increased temperature promotes different degradation processes on the electrode level. • Conductive carbon degradation at 55 °C in the LiFePO 4 electrode. • Mesocarbon microbead graphite electrode degraded by cycling rather than temperature. - Abstract: Electrode degradation in LiFePO 4 /mesocarbon microbead graphite (MCMB) pouch cells aged at 55 °C by a synthetic hybrid drive cycle or storage is diagnosed and put into context with previous results of aging at 22 °C. The electrode degradation is evaluated by means of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), measured separately on electrodes harvested from the cells, and by using a physics-based impedance model for aging evaluation. Additional capacity measurements, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) are used in the evaluation. At 55 °C the LiFePO 4 electrode shows increased particle/electronic conductor resistance, for both stored and cycled electrodes. This differs from results obtained at 22 °C, where the electrode suffered lowered porosity, particle fracture, and loss of active material. For graphite, only cycling gave a sustained effect on electrode performance at 55 °C due to lowered porosity and changes of surface properties, and to greater extent than at low temperature. Furthermore, increased current collector resistance also contributes to a large part of the pouch cell impedance when aged at increased temperatures. The result shows that increased temperature promotes different degradation on the electrode level, and is an important implication for high temperature accelerated aging. In light of the electrode observations, the correlation between full-cell and electrode impedances is discussed

  20. Maximum temperature accounts for annual soil CO2 efflux in temperate forests of Northern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhiyong; Xu, Meili; Kang, Fengfeng; Jianxin Sun, Osbert

    2015-01-01

    It will help understand the representation legality of soil temperature to explore the correlations of soil respiration with variant properties of soil temperature. Soil temperature at 10 cm depth was hourly logged through twelve months. Basing on the measured soil temperature, soil respiration at different temporal scales were calculated using empirical functions for temperate forests. On monthly scale, soil respiration significantly correlated with maximum, minimum, mean and accumulated effective soil temperatures. Annual soil respiration varied from 409 g C m−2 in coniferous forest to 570 g C m−2 in mixed forest and to 692 g C m−2 in broadleaved forest, and was markedly explained by mean soil temperatures of the warmest day, July and summer, separately. These three soil temperatures reflected the maximum values on diurnal, monthly and annual scales. In accordance with their higher temperatures, summer soil respiration accounted for 51% of annual soil respiration across forest types, and broadleaved forest also had higher soil organic carbon content (SOC) and soil microbial biomass carbon content (SMBC), but a lower contribution of SMBC to SOC. This added proof to the findings that maximum soil temperature may accelerate the transformation of SOC to CO2-C via stimulating activities of soil microorganisms. PMID:26179467

  1. Technical specifications (replaces note T.62). Irradiation of graphite at ambient temperature, Note T. 76; Specification technique, (Annule et remplace la note T. 62), Irradiation de graphite a temperature ambiante, Note T. 76

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reseau, R A [Services des grandes piles experimentales, Section ' Physique et Experimentation, Saclay (France)

    1962-12-15

    The objective is to study the effects of fast neutron irradiation of different graphite samples. The irradiation conditions should be as follows: integral fast neutron flux should be higher than 10{sup 20} neutrons/cm{sup 2}, the reactor should operate at steady state for 15 days, the temperature od samples should not be higher than 100 deg C, preferably 80 deg C. Note T. 62 which is replaced by this Note is attached.

  2. Metal/graphite - composites in fusion engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staffler, R.; Kneringer, G.; Kny, E.; Reheis, N.

    1989-01-01

    Metal/graphite composites have been well known in medical industry for many years. X-ray tubes used in modern radiography, particularly in computerized tomography are equipped with rotating targets able to absorb a maximum of heat in a given time. Modern rotating targets consist of a refractory metal/graphite composite. Today the use of graphite as a plasma facing material is one predominant concept in fusion engineering. Depending on the thermal load, the graphite components have to be directly cooled (i.e. divertor plates) or inertially cooled (i.e. firstwall tiles). In case of direct cooling a metallurgical joining such as high temperature brazing between graphite and a metallic cooling structure shows the most promising results /1/. Inertially cooled graphite tiles have to be joined to a metallic backing plate in order to get a stable attachment to the supporting structure. The main requirements on the metallic partner of a metal/graphite composite used in the first wall area are: high melting point, high thermal strength, high thermal conductivity, low vapor pressure and a thermal expansion matching that of graphite. These properties are typical for the refractory metals such as molybdenum, tungsten and their alloys. 4 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab

  3. Metal/graphite - composites in fusion engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staffler, R.; Kneringer, G.; Kny, E.; Reheis, N.

    1995-01-01

    Metal/graphite composites have been well known in medical industry for many years. X-ray tubes used in modern radiography, particulary in computerized tomography are equipped with rotating targets able to absorb a maximum of heat in a given time. Modern rotating targets consist of a refractory metal/graphite composite. Today the use of graphite as a plasma facing material is one predominant concept in fusion engineering. Depending on the thermal load, the graphite components have to be directly cooled (i.e. divertor plates) or inertially cooled (i.e. firstwall tiles). In case of direct cooling a metallurgical joining such as high temperature brazing between graphite and a metalic cooling structure shows the most promising results /1/. Inertially cooled graphite tiles have to be joined to a metallic backing plate in order to get a stable attachment to the supporting structure. The main requirements on the metallic partner of a metal/graphite composite and in the first wall area are: high melting point, high thermal strength, high thermal conductivity, low vapour pressure and a thermal expansion matching that of graphite. These properties are typical for the refractory metals such as molybdenum, tungsten and their alloys. (author)

  4. Basic data for surveillance test on core support graphite structures for the high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumita, Junya; Shibata, Taiju; Kikuchi, Takayuki; Iyoku, Tatsuo; Fujimoto, Nozomu; Ishihara, Masahiro; Sawa, Kazuhiro

    2007-02-01

    Both of the visual inspection by a TV camera and the measurement of material properties by surveillance test on core support graphite structures are planned for the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) to confirm their structural integrity and characteristics. The surveillance test is aimed to investigate the change of material properties by aging effects such as fast neutron irradiation and oxidation. The obtained data will be used not only for evaluating the structural integrity of the core support graphite structures of the HTTR but also for design of advanced Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) discussed at generation IV international forum. This report describes the initial material properties of surveillance specimens before installation and installed position of surveillance specimens in the HTTR. (author)

  5. Study by internal friction of curing low temperature irradiation defects in graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouby, Dominique.

    1974-01-01

    Micromechanical properties and anelastic effects of neutrons irradiated graphites at 300 and 77 0 K are investigated by internal friction analysis and elasticity modulus variations. Defects created by irradiation are studied and evolution versus dose and annealing is followed [fr

  6. Influence of aliphatic amides on the temperature of maximum density of water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, Andrés Felipe; Romero, Carmen M.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The addition of amides decreases the temperature of maximum density of water suggesting a disruptive effect on water structure. • The amides in aqueous solution do not follow the Despretz equation in the concentration range considered. • The temperature shift Δθ as a function of molality is represented by a second order equation. • The Despretz constants were determined considering the dilute concentration region for each amide solution. • Solute disrupting effect of amides becomes smaller as its hydrophobic character increases. - Abstract: The influence of dissolved substances on the temperature of the maximum density of water has been studied in relation to their effect on water structure as they can change the equilibrium between structured and unstructured species of water. However, most work has been performed using salts and the studies with small organic solutes such as amides are scarce. In this work, the effect of acetamide, propionamide and butyramide on the temperature of maximum density of water was determined from density measurements using a magnetic float densimeter. Densities of aqueous solutions were measured within the temperature range from T = (275.65–278.65) K at intervals of 0.50 K in the concentration range between (0.10000 and 0.80000) mol·kg −1 . The temperature of maximum density was determined from the experimental results. The effect of the three amides is to decrease the temperature of maximum density of water and the change does not follow the Despretz equation. The results are discussed in terms of solute-water interactions and the disrupting effect of amides on water structure.

  7. Trends in mean maximum temperature, mean minimum temperature and mean relative humidity for Lautoka, Fiji during 2003 – 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed S. Ghani

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The current work observes the trends in Lautoka’s temperature and relative humidity during the period 2003 – 2013, which were analyzed using the recently updated data obtained from Fiji Meteorological Services (FMS. Four elements, mean maximum temperature, mean minimum temperature along with diurnal temperature range (DTR and mean relative humidity are investigated. From 2003–2013, the annual mean temperature has been enhanced between 0.02 and 0.080C. The heating is more in minimum temperature than in maximum temperature, resulting in a decrease of diurnal temperature range. The statistically significant increase was mostly seen during the summer months of December and January. Mean Relative Humidity has also increased from 3% to 8%. The bases of abnormal climate conditions are also studied. These bases were defined with temperature or humidity anomalies in their appropriate time sequences. These established the observed findings and exhibited that climate has been becoming gradually damper and heater throughout Lautoka during this period. While we are only at an initial phase in the probable inclinations of temperature changes, ecological reactions to recent climate change are already evidently noticeable. So it is proposed that it would be easier to identify climate alteration in a small island nation like Fiji.

  8. Analysis of graphite gasification by water vapor at different conversions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiaowei, Luo; Xiaoyu, Yu; Suyuan, Yu; Jean-Charles, Robin

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Graphite was gasified at different conversions. • The reaction temperature influences on the dimensionless the reaction rate. • The thickness or radius influence on the dimensionless reaction rate. - Abstract: The gasification rate of porous solids varies with the conversions with the rate increasing to a maximum and then decreasing. Many graphite gasification experiments have illustrated that the maximum gasification rates occur at different conversions for different temperatures and sample geometries. Thus, the gasification rate is related to the conversion, temperature and geometry of the graphite. The influences of those factors were studied for the graphite gasification by water vapor. A theoretical analysis was done on the basis of several logical assumptions. The influence of temperatures on the reaction rate was investigated for plate-like and cylindrical graphite. The effects of thickness for a plate-like graphite sample and of radius for a cylindrical sample on the reaction rate were also studied theoretically. The results reveal that the maximum dimensionless reaction rate decreases with reaction temperature. The plate thickness or the cylinder radius also affects the maximum dimensionless reaction rate

  9. New graphite/salt materials for high temperature energy storage. Phase change properties study; Nouveaux materiaux graphite/sel pour le stockage d'energie a haute temperature. Etude des proprietes de changement de phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, J

    2007-07-15

    This work is a contribution to the study of new graphite/salt composites dedicated to high temperature energy storage ({>=}200 C). The aim is to analyse and to understand the influence of both graphite and composite microstructure on the phase change properties of salts. This PhD is carried out within the framework of two projects: DISTOR (European) and HTPSTOCK (French). The major contributions of this work are threefold: 1) An important database (solid-liquid phase change properties) is provided from the DSC analysis of six salts and the corresponding composites. 2) Rigorous modeling of salts melting in confined media in several geometries are proposed to understand why, during the first melting of the compression elaborated composites, problems of salt leakage are observed. These models show that the materials morphology is responsible for these phenomena: the graphite matrix restrains the volume expansion due to salt melting: salt melts under pressure, which leads to a melting on a large temperature range and to a loss of energy density. Sensitivity analysis of parameters (geometric and physic) shows that matrix rigidity modulus is the parameter on which it is necessary to act during the composites elaboration to blur this phenomenon. 3) Finally, this work proposes a thermodynamic formulation of both surface/interface phenomena and the presence of dissolved impurities being able to explain a melting point lowering. It seems that the melting point lowering observed ({approx} 5 C) are mainly due to the presence of dissolved impurities (brought by graphite) in the liquid, along with an additional Gibbs-Thomson effect ({approx} 1 C, related to the size of the clusters crystals). (author)

  10. Large temperature variability in the southern African tropics since the Last Glacial Maximum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Powers, L.A.; Johnson, T.C.; Werne, J.P.; Castañeda, I.S.; Hopmans, E.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Schouten, S.

    2005-01-01

    The role of the tropics in global climate change is actively debated, particularly in regard to the timing and magnitude of thermal and hydrological response. Continuous, high-resolution temperature records through the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) from tropical oceans have provided much insight

  11. Effects of moisture, elevated temperature, and fatigue loading on the behavior of graphite/epoxy buffer strip panels with center cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigelow, C. A.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of fatigue loading combined with moisture and heat on the behavior of graphite epoxy panels with either Kevlar-49 or S-glass buffer strips were studied. Buffer strip panels, that had a slit in the center to represent damage, were moisture conditioned or heated, fatigue loaded, and then tested in tension to measure their residual strength. The buffer strips were parallel to the loading direction and were made by replacing narrow strips of the 0 deg graphite plies with Kevlar-49 epoxy or S-glass epoxy on a 1-for-1 basis. The panels were subjected to a fatigue loading spectrum. One group of panels was preconditioned by soaking in 60 C water to produce a 1 percent weight gain then tested at room temperature. One group was heated to 82 C during the fatigue loading. Another group was moisture conditioned and then tested at 82 C. The residual strengths of the buffer panels were not highly affected by the fatigue loading, the number of repetitions of the loading spectrum, or the maximum strain level. The moisture conditioning reduced the residual strengths of the S-glass buffer strip panel by 10 to 15 percent below the ambient results. The moisture conditioning did not have a large effect on the Kevlar-49 panels.

  12. Statistical assessment of changes in extreme maximum temperatures over Saudi Arabia, 1985-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raggad, Bechir

    2018-05-01

    In this study, two statistical approaches were adopted in the analysis of observed maximum temperature data collected from fifteen stations over Saudi Arabia during the period 1985-2014. In the first step, the behavior of extreme temperatures was analyzed and their changes were quantified with respect to the Expert Team on Climate Change Detection Monitoring indices. The results showed a general warming trend over most stations, in maximum temperature-related indices, during the period of analysis. In the second step, stationary and non-stationary extreme-value analyses were conducted for the temperature data. The results revealed that the non-stationary model with increasing linear trend in its location parameter outperforms the other models for two-thirds of the stations. Additionally, the 10-, 50-, and 100-year return levels were found to change with time considerably and that the maximum temperature could start to reappear in the different T-year return period for most stations. This analysis shows the importance of taking account the change over time in the estimation of return levels and therefore justifies the use of the non-stationary generalized extreme value distribution model to describe most of the data. Furthermore, these last findings are in line with the result of significant warming trends found in climate indices analyses.

  13. EXTREME MAXIMUM AND MINIMUM AIR TEMPERATURE IN MEDİTERRANEAN COASTS IN TURKEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbaros Gönençgil

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we determined extreme maximum and minimum temperatures in both summer and winter seasons at the stations in the Mediterranean coastal areas of Turkey.In the study, the data of 24 meteorological stations for the daily maximum and minimumtemperatures of the period from 1970–2010 were used. From this database, a set of four extreme temperature indices applied warm (TX90 and cold (TN10 days and warm spells (WSDI and cold spell duration (CSDI. The threshold values were calculated for each station to determine the temperatures that were above and below the seasonal norms in winter and summer. The TX90 index displays a positive statistically significant trend, while TN10 display negative nonsignificant trend. The occurrence of warm spells shows statistically significant increasing trend while the cold spells shows significantly decreasing trend over the Mediterranean coastline in Turkey.

  14. Maximum And Minimum Temperature Trends In Mexico For The Last 31 Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Centeno, R.; Zavala-Hidalgo, J.; Allende Arandia, M. E.; Carrasco-Mijarez, N.; Calderon-Bustamante, O.

    2013-05-01

    Based on high-resolution (1') daily maps of the maximum and minimum temperatures in Mexico, an analysis of the last 31-year trends is performed. The maps were generated using all the available information from more than 5,000 stations of the Mexican Weather Service (Servicio Meteorológico Nacional, SMN) for the period 1979-2009, along with data from the North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR). The data processing procedure includes a quality control step, in order to eliminate erroneous daily data, and make use of a high-resolution digital elevation model (from GEBCO), the relationship between air temperature and elevation by means of the average environmental lapse rate, and interpolation algorithms (linear and inverse-distance weighting). Based on the monthly gridded maps for the mentioned period, the maximum and minimum temperature trends calculated by least-squares linear regression and their statistical significance are obtained and discussed.

  15. Trends in Mean Annual Minimum and Maximum Near Surface Temperature in Nairobi City, Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Lukoye Makokha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the long-term urban modification of mean annual conditions of near surface temperature in Nairobi City. Data from four weather stations situated in Nairobi were collected from the Kenya Meteorological Department for the period from 1966 to 1999 inclusive. The data included mean annual maximum and minimum temperatures, and was first subjected to homogeneity test before analysis. Both linear regression and Mann-Kendall rank test were used to discern the mean annual trends. Results show that the change of temperature over the thirty-four years study period is higher for minimum temperature than maximum temperature. The warming trends began earlier and are more significant at the urban stations than is the case at the sub-urban stations, an indication of the spread of urbanisation from the built-up Central Business District (CBD to the suburbs. The established significant warming trends in minimum temperature, which are likely to reach higher proportions in future, pose serious challenges on climate and urban planning of the city. In particular the effect of increased minimum temperature on human physiological comfort, building and urban design, wind circulation and air pollution needs to be incorporated in future urban planning programmes of the city.

  16. Dynamic Performance of Maximum Power Point Trackers in TEG Systems Under Rapidly Changing Temperature Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, E. A.; Sera, D.; Mathe, L.; Schaltz, E.; Rosendahl, L.

    2016-03-01

    Characterization of thermoelectric generators (TEG) is widely discussed and equipment has been built that can perform such analysis. One method is often used to perform such characterization: constant temperature with variable thermal power input. Maximum power point tracking (MPPT) methods for TEG systems are mostly tested under steady-state conditions for different constant input temperatures. However, for most TEG applications, the input temperature gradient changes, exposing the MPPT to variable tracking conditions. An example is the exhaust pipe on hybrid vehicles, for which, because of the intermittent operation of the internal combustion engine, the TEG and its MPPT controller are exposed to a cyclic temperature profile. Furthermore, there are no guidelines on how fast the MPPT must be under such dynamic conditions. In the work discussed in this paper, temperature gradients for TEG integrated in several applications were evaluated; the results showed temperature variation up to 5°C/s for TEG systems. Electrical characterization of a calcium-manganese oxide TEG was performed at steady-state for different input temperatures and a maximum temperature of 401°C. By using electrical data from characterization of the oxide module, a solar array simulator was emulated to perform as a TEG. A trapezoidal temperature profile with different gradients was used on the TEG simulator to evaluate the dynamic MPPT efficiency. It is known that the perturb and observe (P&O) algorithm may have difficulty accurately tracking under rapidly changing conditions. To solve this problem, a compromise must be found between the magnitude of the increment and the sampling frequency of the control algorithm. The standard P&O performance was evaluated experimentally by using different temperature gradients for different MPPT sampling frequencies, and efficiency values are provided for all cases. The results showed that a tracking speed of 2.5 Hz can be successfully implemented on a TEG

  17. Uninterrupted thermoelectric energy harvesting using temperature-sensor-based maximum power point tracking system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jae-Do; Lee, Hohyun; Bond, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Feedforward MPPT scheme for uninterrupted TEG energy harvesting is suggested. • Temperature sensors are used to avoid current measurement or source disconnection. • MPP voltage reference is generated based on OCV vs. temperature differential model. • Optimal operating condition is maintained using hysteresis controller. • Any type of power converter can be used in the proposed scheme. - Abstract: In this paper, a thermoelectric generator (TEG) energy harvesting system with a temperature-sensor-based maximum power point tracking (MPPT) method is presented. Conventional MPPT algorithms for photovoltaic cells may not be suitable for thermoelectric power generation because a significant amount of time is required for TEG systems to reach a steady state. Moreover, complexity and additional power consumption in conventional circuits and periodic disconnection of power source are not desirable for low-power energy harvesting applications. The proposed system can track the varying maximum power point (MPP) with a simple and inexpensive temperature-sensor-based circuit without instantaneous power measurement or TEG disconnection. This system uses TEG’s open circuit voltage (OCV) characteristic with respect to temperature gradient to generate a proper reference voltage signal, i.e., half of the TEG’s OCV. The power converter controller maintains the TEG output voltage at the reference level so that the maximum power can be extracted for the given temperature condition. This feedforward MPPT scheme is inherently stable and can be implemented without any complex microcontroller circuit. The proposed system has been validated analytically and experimentally, and shows a maximum power tracking error of 1.15%

  18. KNO3/NaNO3 - Graphite materials for thermal energy storage at high temperature: Part I. - Elaboration methods and thermal properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acem, Zoubir; Lopez, Jerome; Palomo Del Barrio, Elena

    2010-01-01

    Composites graphite/salt for thermal energy storage at high temperature (∼200 deg. C) have been developed and tested. As at low temperature in the past, graphite has been used to enhance the thermal conductivity of the eutectic system KNO 3 /NaNO 3 . A new elaboration method has been proposed as an alternative to graphite foams infiltration. It consists of cold-compression of a physical mixing of expanded natural graphite particles and salt powder. Two different compression routes have been investigated: uni-axial compression and isostatic compression. The first part of the paper has been devoted to the analysis of the thermal properties of these new graphite/salt composites. It is proven that cold-compression is a simple and efficient technique for improving the salt thermal conductivity. For instance, graphite amounts between 15 and 20%wt lead to apparent thermal conductivities close to 20 W/m/K (20 times greater than the thermal conductivity of the salt). Furthermore, some advantages in terms of cost and safety are expected because materials elaboration is carried out at room temperature. The second part of the paper is focused on the analyses of the phase transition properties of these graphite/salt composites materials.

  19. Enhancing the oxidation resistance of graphite by applying an SiC coat with crack healing at an elevated temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jae-Won, E-mail: pjw@kaeri.re.kr [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedeok-Daero, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon-City (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eung-Seon; Kim, Jae-Un [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedeok-Daero, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon-City (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yootaek [Dept. of Materials Engineering, Kyonggi Universtiy, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Windes, William E. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Ion beam mixed SiC coating was performed on the graphite for the enhanced adhesion. • The SiC coated was cracked at the elevated temperature, confirming the strong bonding, and then was vigorously oxidized leaving only the SiC layer. • For crack healing, CVD crack healing increased by ∼4 times in 20% weight reduction in air at 900 °C as compared to PVD crack healing. - Abstract: The potential of reducing the oxidation of the supporting graphite components during normal and/or accident conditions in the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design has been studied. In this work efforts have been made to slow the oxidation process of the graphite with a thin SiC coating (∼ 10 μm). Upon heating at ≥ 1173 K in air, the spallations and cracks were formed in the dense columnar structured SiC coating layer grown on the graphite with a functionally gradient electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD. In accordance with the formations of these defects, the sample was vigorously oxidized, leaving only the SiC coating layer. Then, efforts were made to heal the surface defects using additional EB-PVD with ion beam bombardment and chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The EB-PVD did not effectively heal the cracks. But, the CVD was more appropriate for crack healing, likely due to its excellent crack line filling capability with a high density and high aspect ratio. It took ∼ 34 min for the 20% weight loss of the CVD crack healed sample in the oxidation test with annealing at 1173 K, while it took ∼ 8 min for the EB-PVD coated sample, which means it took ∼4 times longer at 1173 K for the same weight reduction in this experimental set-up.

  20. Enhancing the oxidation resistance of graphite by applying an SiC coat with crack healing at an elevated temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jae-Won; Kim, Eung-Seon; Kim, Jae-Un; Kim, Yootaek; Windes, William E.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Ion beam mixed SiC coating was performed on the graphite for the enhanced adhesion. • The SiC coated was cracked at the elevated temperature, confirming the strong bonding, and then was vigorously oxidized leaving only the SiC layer. • For crack healing, CVD crack healing increased by ∼4 times in 20% weight reduction in air at 900 °C as compared to PVD crack healing. - Abstract: The potential of reducing the oxidation of the supporting graphite components during normal and/or accident conditions in the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design has been studied. In this work efforts have been made to slow the oxidation process of the graphite with a thin SiC coating (∼ 10 μm). Upon heating at ≥ 1173 K in air, the spallations and cracks were formed in the dense columnar structured SiC coating layer grown on the graphite with a functionally gradient electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD. In accordance with the formations of these defects, the sample was vigorously oxidized, leaving only the SiC coating layer. Then, efforts were made to heal the surface defects using additional EB-PVD with ion beam bombardment and chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The EB-PVD did not effectively heal the cracks. But, the CVD was more appropriate for crack healing, likely due to its excellent crack line filling capability with a high density and high aspect ratio. It took ∼ 34 min for the 20% weight loss of the CVD crack healed sample in the oxidation test with annealing at 1173 K, while it took ∼ 8 min for the EB-PVD coated sample, which means it took ∼4 times longer at 1173 K for the same weight reduction in this experimental set-up.

  1. Effects of reaction temperature and inlet oxidizing gas flow rate on IG-110 graphite oxidation used in HTR-PM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Ximing; Dong Yujie; Zhou Yangping; Shi Lei; Sun Yuliang; Zhang Zuoyi; Li Zhengcao

    2017-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of a selected nuclear graphite (IG-110) used in Pebble-bed Module High Temperature gas-cooled Reactor was investigated under the condition of air ingress accident. The oblate rectangular specimen was oxidized by oxidant gas with oxygen mole fraction of 20% and flow rates of 125–500 ml/min at temperature of 400–1200°C. Experiment results indicate that the oxidation behavior can also be classified into three regimes according to temperature. The regime I at 400–550°C has lower apparent activation energies of 75.57–138.59 kJ/mol when the gas flow rate is 125–500 ml/min. In the regime II at 600–900°C, the oxidation rate restricted by the oxygen supply to graphite is almost stable with the increase of temperature. In the regime III above 900°C, the oxidation rate increases obviously with the increase of temperature.With the increase of inlet gas flow from 125 to 500 ml/min, the apparent activation energy in regime I is increased and the stableness of oxidation rate in regime II is reduced. (author)

  2. Room temperature hydrogen sensing with the graphite/ZnO nanorod junctions decorated with Pt nanoparticles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yatskiv, Roman; Grym, Jan; Gladkov, Petar; Černohorský, Ondřej; Vaniš, Jan; Maixner, J.; Dickerson, J.H.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 116, February (2016), s. 124-129 ISSN 0038-1101 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD14111; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-17044S Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Graphite based junction * Hydrogen sensor * Electrophoretic deposition Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.580, year: 2016

  3. Preparation by low-temperature nonthermal plasma of graphite fiber and its characteristics for solid-phase microextraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Fan; Wu Zucheng; Tao Ping; Cong Yanqing

    2009-01-01

    Low-temperature nonthermal plasma has been used to prepare solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fibers with high adsorbability, long-term serviceability, and high reproducibility. Graphite rods serving as fiber precursors were treated by an air plasma discharged at 15.2-15.5 kV for a duration of 8 min. Sampling results revealed that the adsorptive capacity of the homemade fiber was 2.5-34.6 times that of a polyacrylate (PA) fiber for alcohols (methanol, ethanol, isopropyl alcohol, n-butyl alcohol), and about 1.4-1.6 times and 2.5-5.1 times that of an activated carbon fiber (ACF) for alcohols and BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes), respectively. It is confirmed from FTIR (Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer) and SEM (scanning electron microscope) analyses that the improvement in the adsorptive performance attributed to increased surface energy and roughness of the graphite fiber. Using gas chromatography (GC)-flame-ionization detector (FID), the limits of detection (LODs) of the alcohols and BTEX ranged between 0.19 and 3.75 μg L -1 , the linear ranges were between 0.6 and 35619 μg L -1 with good linearity (R 2 = 0.9964-0.9997). It was demonstrated that nonthermal plasma offers a fast and simple method for preparing an efficient graphite SPME fiber, and that SPME using the homemade fiber represents a sensitive and selective extraction method for the analysis of a wide range of organic compounds

  4. Preparation by low-temperature nonthermal plasma of graphite fiber and its characteristics for solid-phase microextraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Fan; Wu, Zucheng; Tao, Ping; Cong, Yanqing

    2009-01-05

    Low-temperature nonthermal plasma has been used to prepare solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fibers with high adsorbability, long-term serviceability, and high reproducibility. Graphite rods serving as fiber precursors were treated by an air plasma discharged at 15.2-15.5 kV for a duration of 8 min. Sampling results revealed that the adsorptive capacity of the homemade fiber was 2.5-34.6 times that of a polyacrylate (PA) fiber for alcohols (methanol, ethanol, isopropyl alcohol, n-butyl alcohol), and about 1.4-1.6 times and 2.5-5.1 times that of an activated carbon fiber (ACF) for alcohols and BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes), respectively. It is confirmed from FTIR (Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer) and SEM (scanning electron microscope) analyses that the improvement in the adsorptive performance attributed to increased surface energy and roughness of the graphite fiber. Using gas chromatography (GC)-flame-ionization detector (FID), the limits of detection (LODs) of the alcohols and BTEX ranged between 0.19 and 3.75 microg L(-1), the linear ranges were between 0.6 and 35,619 microg L(-1) with good linearity (R(2)=0.9964-0.9997). It was demonstrated that nonthermal plasma offers a fast and simple method for preparing an efficient graphite SPME fiber, and that SPME using the homemade fiber represents a sensitive and selective extraction method for the analysis of a wide range of organic compounds.

  5. Enhancing the oxidation resistance of graphite by applying an SiC coat with crack healing at an elevated temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae-Won; Kim, Eung-Seon; Kim, Jae-Un; Kim, Yootaek; Windes, William E.

    2016-08-01

    The potential of reducing the oxidation of the supporting graphite components during normal and/or accident conditions in the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design has been studied. In this work efforts have been made to slow the oxidation process of the graphite with a thin SiC coating (∼ 10 μm). Upon heating at ≥ 1173 K in air, the spallations and cracks were formed in the dense columnar structured SiC coating layer grown on the graphite with a functionally gradient electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD. In accordance with the formations of these defects, the sample was vigorously oxidized, leaving only the SiC coating layer. Then, efforts were made to heal the surface defects using additional EB-PVD with ion beam bombardment and chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The EB-PVD did not effectively heal the cracks. But, the CVD was more appropriate for crack healing, likely due to its excellent crack line filling capability with a high density and high aspect ratio. It took ∼ 34 min for the 20% weight loss of the CVD crack healed sample in the oxidation test with annealing at 1173 K, while it took ∼ 8 min for the EB-PVD coated sample, which means it took ∼4 times longer at 1173 K for the same weight reduction in this experimental set-up.

  6. Graphite targets at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.D.; Grisham, D.L.

    1983-01-01

    Rotating polycrystalline and stationary pyrolytic graphite target designs for the LAMPF experimental area are described. Examples of finite element calculations of temperatures and stresses are presented. Some results of a metallographic investigation of irradiated pyrolytic graphite target plates are included, together with a brief description of high temperature bearings for the rotating targets

  7. Effects of fasting on maximum thermogenesis in temperature-acclimated rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L. C. H.

    1981-09-01

    To further investigate the limiting effect of substrates on maximum thermogenesis in acute cold exposure, the present study examined the prevalence of this effect at different thermogenic capabilities consequent to cold- or warm-acclimation. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=11) were acclimated to 6, 16 and 26‡C, in succession, their thermogenic capabilities after each acclimation temperature were measured under helium-oxygen (21% oxygen, balance helium) at -10‡C after overnight fasting or feeding. Regardless of feeding conditions, both maximum and total heat production were significantly greater in 6>16>26‡C-acclimated conditions. In the fed state, the total heat production was significantly greater than that in the fasted state at all acclimating temperatures but the maximum thermogenesis was significant greater only in the 6 and 16‡C-acclimated states. The results indicate that the limiting effect of substrates on maximum and total thermogenesis is independent of the magnitude of thermogenic capability, suggesting a substrate-dependent component in restricting the effective expression of existing aerobic metabolic capability even under severe stress.

  8. Temperature dependence of attitude sensor coalignments on the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitone, D. S.; Eudell, A. H.; Patt, F. S.

    1990-01-01

    The temperature correlation of the relative coalignment between the fine-pointing sun sensor and fixed-head star trackers measured on the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) is analyzed. An overview of the SMM, including mission history and configuration, is given. Possible causes of the misalignment variation are discussed, with focus placed on spacecraft bending due to solar-radiation pressure, electronic or mechanical changes in the sensors, uncertainty in the attitude solutions, and mounting-plate expansion and contraction due to thermal effects. Yaw misalignment variation from the temperature profile is assessed, and suggestions for spacecraft operations are presented, involving methods to incorporate flight measurements of the temperature-versus-alignment function and its variance in operational procedures and the spacecraft structure temperatures in the attitude telemetry record.

  9. Application of Markov chain model to daily maximum temperature for thermal comfort in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordin, Muhamad Asyraf bin Che; Hassan, Husna

    2015-01-01

    The Markov chain’s first order principle has been widely used to model various meteorological fields, for prediction purposes. In this study, a 14-year (2000-2013) data of daily maximum temperatures in Bayan Lepas were used. Earlier studies showed that the outdoor thermal comfort range based on physiologically equivalent temperature (PET) index in Malaysia is less than 34°C, thus the data obtained were classified into two state: normal state (within thermal comfort range) and hot state (above thermal comfort range). The long-run results show the probability of daily temperature exceed TCR will be only 2.2%. On the other hand, the probability daily temperature within TCR will be 97.8%

  10. THE MAXIMUM EFFECT OF DEEP LAKES ON TEMPERATURE PROFILES – DETERMINATION OF THE GEOTHERMAL GRADIENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eppelbaum L. V.

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the climate change processes on the basis of geothermal observations in boreholes is an important and at the same time high-intricate problem. Many non-climatic effects could cause changes in ground surface temperatures. In this study we investigate the effects of deep lakes on the borehole temperature profilesobserved within or in the vicinity of the lakes. We propose a method based on utilization of Laplace equation with nonuniform boundary conditions. The proposed method makes possible to estimate the maximum effect of deep lakes (here the term "deep lake" means that long term mean annual temperature of bottom sediments can beconsidered as a constant value on the borehole temperature profiles. This method also allows one to estimate an accuracy of the determination of the geothermal gradient.

  11. Evaluation of empirical relationships between extreme rainfall and daily maximum temperature in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herath, Sujeewa Malwila; Sarukkalige, Ranjan; Nguyen, Van Thanh Van

    2018-01-01

    Understanding the relationships between extreme daily and sub-daily rainfall events and their governing factors is important in order to analyse the properties of extreme rainfall events in a changing climate. Atmospheric temperature is one of the dominant climate variables which has a strong relationship with extreme rainfall events. In this study, a temperature-rainfall binning technique is used to evaluate the dependency of extreme rainfall on daily maximum temperature. The Clausius-Clapeyron (C-C) relation was found to describe the relationship between daily maximum temperature and a range of rainfall durations from 6 min up to 24 h for seven Australian weather stations, the stations being located in Adelaide, Brisbane, Canberra, Darwin, Melbourne, Perth and Sydney. The analysis shows that the rainfall - temperature scaling varies with location, temperature and rainfall duration. The Darwin Airport station shows a negative scaling relationship, while the other six stations show a positive relationship. To identify the trend in scaling relationship over time the same analysis is conducted using data covering 10 year periods. Results indicate that the dependency of extreme rainfall on temperature also varies with the analysis period. Further, this dependency shows an increasing trend for more extreme short duration rainfall and a decreasing trend for average long duration rainfall events at most stations. Seasonal variations of the scale changing trends were analysed by categorizing the summer and autumn seasons in one group and the winter and spring seasons in another group. Most of 99th percentile of 6 min, 1 h and 24 h rain durations at Perth, Melbourne and Sydney stations show increasing trend for both groups while Adelaide and Darwin show decreasing trend. Furthermore, majority of scaling trend of 50th percentile are decreasing for both groups.

  12. Subtropical Arctic Ocean temperatures during the Palaeocene/Eocene thermal maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sluijs, A.; Schouten, S.; Pagani, M.; Woltering, M.; Brinkhuis, H.; Damste, J.S.S.; Dickens, G.R.; Huber, M.; Reichart, G.-J.; Stein, R.; Matthiessen, J.; Lourens, L.J.; Pedentchouk, N.; Backman, J.; Moran, K.; Clemens, S.; Cronin, T.; Eynaud, F.; Gattacceca, J.; Jakobsson, M.; Jordan, R.; Kaminski, M.; King, J.; Koc, N.; Martinez, N.C.; McInroy, D.; Moore, T.C.; O'Regan, M.; Onodera, J.; Palike, H.; Rea, B.; Rio, D.; Sakamoto, T.; Smith, D.C.; St John, K.E.K.; Suto, I.; Suzuki, N.; Takahashi, K.; Watanabe, M. E.; Yamamoto, M.

    2006-01-01

    The Palaeocene/Eocene thermal maximum, ???55 million years ago, was a brief period of widespread, extreme climatic warming, that was associated with massive atmospheric greenhouse gas input. Although aspects of the resulting environmental changes are well documented at low latitudes, no data were available to quantify simultaneous changes in the Arctic region. Here we identify the Palaeocene/Eocene thermal maximum in a marine sedimentary sequence obtained during the Arctic Coring Expedition. We show that sea surface temperatures near the North Pole increased from ???18??C to over 23??C during this event. Such warm values imply the absence of ice and thus exclude the influence of ice-albedo feedbacks on this Arctic warming. At the same time, sea level rose while anoxic and euxinic conditions developed in the ocean's bottom waters and photic zone, respectively. Increasing temperature and sea level match expectations based on palaeoclimate model simulations, but the absolute polar temperatures that we derive before, during and after the event are more than 10??C warmer than those model-predicted. This suggests that higher-than-modern greenhouse gas concentrations must have operated in conjunction with other feedback mechanisms-perhaps polar stratospheric clouds or hurricane-induced ocean mixing-to amplify early Palaeogene polar temperatures. ?? 2006 Nature Publishing Group.

  13. Assessment of extreme value distributions for maximum temperature in the Mediterranean area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Alexander; Hertig, Elke; Jacobeit, Jucundus

    2015-04-01

    Extreme maximum temperatures highly affect the natural as well as the societal environment Heat stress has great effects on flora, fauna and humans and culminates in heat related morbidity and mortality. Agriculture and different industries are severely affected by extreme air temperatures. Even more under climate change conditions, it is necessary to detect potential hazards which arise from changes in the distributional parameters of extreme values, and this is especially relevant for the Mediterranean region which is characterized as a climate change hot spot. Therefore statistical approaches are developed to estimate these parameters with a focus on non-stationarities emerging in the relationship between regional climate variables and their large-scale predictors like sea level pressure, geopotential heights, atmospheric temperatures and relative humidity. Gridded maximum temperature data from the daily E-OBS dataset (Haylock et al., 2008) with a spatial resolution of 0.25° x 0.25° from January 1950 until December 2012 are the predictands for the present analyses. A s-mode principal component analysis (PCA) has been performed in order to reduce data dimension and to retain different regions of similar maximum temperature variability. The grid box with the highest PC-loading represents the corresponding principal component. A central part of the analyses is the model development for temperature extremes under the use of extreme value statistics. A combined model is derived consisting of a Generalized Pareto Distribution (GPD) model and a quantile regression (QR) model which determines the GPD location parameters. The QR model as well as the scale parameters of the GPD model are conditioned by various large-scale predictor variables. In order to account for potential non-stationarities in the predictors-temperature relationships, a special calibration and validation scheme is applied, respectively. Haylock, M. R., N. Hofstra, A. M. G. Klein Tank, E. J. Klok, P

  14. Room-temperature ferromagnetism in graphite driven by 2D networks of point defects

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Červenka, Jiří; Katsnelson, M.I.; Flipse, C.F.J.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 11 (2009), s. 840-844 ISSN 1745-2473 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : ferromagnetism * graphite * defects * magnetic force microscopy * superconductive quantum interference device Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 15.491, year: 2009 http://www.nature.com/nphys/journal/v5/n11/full/nphys1399.html

  15. Sorption of graphites at high temperatures. Progress report, February 1, 1976--January 31, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyecha, T.D.; Zumwalt, L.R.

    1977-01-01

    Preliminary to mixed isotherm studies, one additional cesium isotherm was obtained with a finned-rod H-451 graphite sample at 1100 0 C. The results indicated that not only are long times required to reach saturation, but also there is a hysteresis effect at low vapor pressures and concentrations and that under these conditions sorption of cesium in graphite is not readily reversible. Several cesium isotherms (at 1000 0 C) were obtained of H-451 graphite which had been pre-impregnated with selected concentrations of Sr-85-tagged strontium. The runs were of long duration to attain equilibrium. The data obtained showed a substantial effect of the presence (concentration) of strontium on cesium sorption. End-of-run cesium and strontium concentration profiles were obtained. As yet the data on the mixed-sorption behavior, relative to possible models, has not been analyzed in depth. As a preliminary to the mixed-sorption studies, strontium impregnation in the absence of cesium was studied and a few experiments on the effect of concentration on strontium diffusion were carried out with interesting results. Finally a few experiments on sample characterization and on the microdistribution of cesium and strontium were conducted. It was found difficult to obtain distributions at the concentration levels characteristic of our experiments

  16. The Hengill geothermal area, Iceland: Variation of temperature gradients deduced from the maximum depth of seismogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulger, G. R.

    1995-04-01

    Given a uniform lithology and strain rate and a full seismic data set, the maximum depth of earthquakes may be viewed to a first order as an isotherm. These conditions are approached at the Hengill geothermal area S. Iceland, a dominantly basaltic area. The likely strain rate calculated from thermal and tectonic considerations is 10 -15 s -1, and temperature measurements from four drill sites within the area indicate average, near-surface geothermal gradients of up to 150 °C km -1 throughout the upper 2 km. The temperature at which seismic failure ceases for the strain rates likely at the Hengill geothermal area is determined by analogy with oceanic crust, and is about 650 ± 50 °C. The topographies of the top and bottom of the seismogenic layer were mapped using 617 earthquakes located highly accurately by performing a simultaneous inversion for three-dimensional structure and hypocentral parameters. The thickness of the seismogenic layer is roughly constant and about 3 km. A shallow, aseismic, low-velocity volume within the spreading plate boundary that crosses the area occurs above the top of the seismogenic layer and is interpreted as an isolated body of partial melt. The base of the seismogenic layer has a maximum depth of about 6.5 km beneath the spreading axis and deepens to about 7 km beneath a transform zone in the south of the area. Beneath the high-temperature part of the geothermal area, the maximum depth of earthquakes may be as shallow as 4 km. The geothermal gradient below drilling depths in various parts of the area ranges from 84 ± 9 °Ckm -1 within the low-temperature geothermal area of the transform zone to 138 ± 15 °Ckm -1 below the centre of the high-temperature geothermal area. Shallow maximum depths of earthquakes and therefore high average geothermal gradients tend to correlate with the intensity of the geothermal area and not with the location of the currently active spreading axis.

  17. Probing Ionic Liquid Aqueous Solutions Using Temperature of Maximum Density Isotope Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Tariq

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This work is a new development of an extensive research program that is investigating for the first time shifts in the temperature of maximum density (TMD of aqueous solutions caused by ionic liquid solutes. In the present case we have compared the shifts caused by three ionic liquid solutes with a common cation—1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium coupled with acetate, ethylsulfate and tetracyanoborate anions—in normal and deuterated water solutions. The observed differences are discussed in terms of the nature of the corresponding anion-water interactions.

  18. Verification of surface minimum, mean, and maximum temperature forecasts in Calabria for summer 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Federico

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Since 2005, one-hour temperature forecasts for the Calabria region (southern Italy, modelled by the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS, have been issued by CRATI/ISAC-CNR (Consortium for Research and Application of Innovative Technologies/Institute for Atmospheric and Climate Sciences of the National Research Council and are available online at http://meteo.crati.it/previsioni.html (every six hours. Beginning in June 2008, the horizontal resolution was enhanced to 2.5 km. In the present paper, forecast skill and accuracy are evaluated out to four days for the 2008 summer season (from 6 June to 30 September, 112 runs. For this purpose, gridded high horizontal resolution forecasts of minimum, mean, and maximum temperatures are evaluated against gridded analyses at the same horizontal resolution (2.5 km.

    Gridded analysis is based on Optimal Interpolation (OI and uses the RAMS first-day temperature forecast as the background field. Observations from 87 thermometers are used in the analysis system. The analysis error is introduced to quantify the effect of using the RAMS first-day forecast as the background field in the OI analyses and to define the forecast error unambiguously, while spatial interpolation (SI analysis is considered to quantify the statistics' sensitivity to the verifying analysis and to show the quality of the OI analyses for different background fields.

    Two case studies, the first one with a low (less than the 10th percentile root mean square error (RMSE in the OI analysis, the second with the largest RMSE of the whole period in the OI analysis, are discussed to show the forecast performance under two different conditions. Cumulative statistics are used to quantify forecast errors out to four days. Results show that maximum temperature has the largest RMSE, while minimum and mean temperature errors are similar. For the period considered

  19. Mechanisms for neutron damage in graphite from low to high temperatures from first principles - 15308

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heggie, M.I.; Latham, C.D.; McKenna, A.J.; Trevethan, T.P.; Vuong, A.B.; Young, P.J.L.

    2015-01-01

    Mechanism is key to understanding the reliability and applicability of materials test reactor data to in-service behaviour. Here we review the historic understanding of dimensional change, drawing out the prima facie inadequacies of the standard model, and describing additional mechanisms (buckle, ruck and tuck) based on basal shear during radiation. Finally, we summarise new findings that vacancy aggregation into lines which heal and contract the basal layers is more credible now than appeared to be the case 10 years ago and that it can also give rise to ramps connecting graphite layers. (authors)

  20. Oxidation Resistant Graphite Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. Windes; R. Smith

    2014-07-01

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Graphite Research and Development Program is investigating doped nuclear graphite grades exhibiting oxidation resistance. During a oxygen ingress accident the oxidation rates of the high temperature graphite core region would be extremely high resulting in significant structural damage to the core. Reducing the oxidation rate of the graphite core material would reduce the structural effects and keep the core integrity intact during any air-ingress accident. Oxidation testing of graphite doped with oxidation resistant material is being conducted to determine the extent of oxidation rate reduction. Nuclear grade graphite doped with varying levels of Boron-Carbide (B4C) was oxidized in air at nominal 740°C at 10/90% (air/He) and 100% air. The oxidation rates of the boronated and unboronated graphite grade were compared. With increasing boron-carbide content (up to 6 vol%) the oxidation rate was observed to have a 20 fold reduction from unboronated graphite. Visual inspection and uniformity of oxidation across the surface of the specimens were conducted. Future work to determine the remaining mechanical strength as well as graphite grades with SiC doped material are discussed.

  1. Global view of F-region electron density and temperature at solar maximum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brace, L.H.; Theis, R.F.; Hoegy, W.R.

    1982-01-01

    Dynamics Explorer-2 is permitting the first measurements of the global structure of the F-regions at very high levels of solar activity (S>200). Selected full orbits of Langmuir probe measurements of electron temperature, T/sub e/, and density, N/sub e/, are shown to illustrate this global structure and some of the ionospheric features that are the topic of other papers in this issue. The ionospheric thermal structure is of particular interest because T/sub e/ is a sensitive indicator of the coupling of magnetospheric energy into the upper atmosphere. A comparison of these heating effects with those observed at solar minimum shows that the magnetospheric sources are more important at solar maximum, as might have been expected. Heating at the cusp, the auroral oval and the plasma-pause is generally both greater and more variable. Electron cooling rate calculations employing low latitude measurements indicate that solar extreme ultraviolet heating of the F region at solar maximum is enhanced by a factor that is greater than the increase in solar flux. Some of this enhanced electron heating arises from the increase in electron heating efficiency at the higher N/sub e/ of solar maximum, but this appears insufficient to completely resolve the discrepancy

  2. Preparation by low-temperature nonthermal plasma of graphite fiber and its characteristics for solid-phase microextraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo Fan [Department of Environmental Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Clean Energy Utilization, Key Laboratory of Polluted Environment Remediation and Ecological Health, MOE, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Wu Zucheng [Department of Environmental Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Clean Energy Utilization, Key Laboratory of Polluted Environment Remediation and Ecological Health, MOE, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)], E-mail: wuzc@zju.edu.cn; Tao Ping [Institute of Structural Mechanics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Cong Yanqing [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Zhejiang Gongshang University, Hangzhou 310012 (China)

    2009-01-05

    Low-temperature nonthermal plasma has been used to prepare solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fibers with high adsorbability, long-term serviceability, and high reproducibility. Graphite rods serving as fiber precursors were treated by an air plasma discharged at 15.2-15.5 kV for a duration of 8 min. Sampling results revealed that the adsorptive capacity of the homemade fiber was 2.5-34.6 times that of a polyacrylate (PA) fiber for alcohols (methanol, ethanol, isopropyl alcohol, n-butyl alcohol), and about 1.4-1.6 times and 2.5-5.1 times that of an activated carbon fiber (ACF) for alcohols and BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes), respectively. It is confirmed from FTIR (Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer) and SEM (scanning electron microscope) analyses that the improvement in the adsorptive performance attributed to increased surface energy and roughness of the graphite fiber. Using gas chromatography (GC)-flame-ionization detector (FID), the limits of detection (LODs) of the alcohols and BTEX ranged between 0.19 and 3.75 {mu}g L{sup -1}, the linear ranges were between 0.6 and 35619 {mu}g L{sup -1} with good linearity (R{sup 2} = 0.9964-0.9997). It was demonstrated that nonthermal plasma offers a fast and simple method for preparing an efficient graphite SPME fiber, and that SPME using the homemade fiber represents a sensitive and selective extraction method for the analysis of a wide range of organic compounds.

  3. Failure Predictions for Graphite Reflector Bricks in the Very High Temperature Reactor with the Prismatic Core Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Gyanender, E-mail: sing0550@umn.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota, 111, Church St. SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Fok, Alex [Minnesota Dental Research in Biomaterials and Biomechanics, School of Dentistry, University of Minnesota, 515, Delaware St. SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota, 111, Church St. SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Mantell, Susan [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota, 111, Church St. SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Failure probability of VHTR reflector bricks predicted though crack modeling. • Criterion chosen for defining failure strongly affects the predictions. • Breaching of the CRC could be significantly delayed through crack arrest. • Capability to predict crack initiation and propagation demonstrated. - Abstract: Graphite is used in nuclear reactor cores as a neutron moderator, reflector and structural material. The dimensions and physical properties of graphite change when it is exposed to neutron irradiation. The non-uniform changes in the dimensions and physical properties lead to the build-up of stresses over the course of time in the core components. When the stresses reach the critical limit, i.e. the strength of the material, cracking occurs and ultimately the components fail. In this paper, an explicit crack modeling approach to predict the probability of failure of a VHTR prismatic reactor core reflector brick is presented. Firstly, a constitutive model for graphite is constructed and used to predict the stress distribution in the reflector brick under in-reactor conditions of high temperature and irradiation. Fracture simulations are performed as part of a Monte Carlo analysis to predict the probability of failure. Failure probability is determined based on two different criteria for defining failure time: A) crack initiation and B) crack extension to near control rod channel. A significant difference is found between the failure probabilities based on the two criteria. It is predicted that the reflector bricks will start cracking during the time range of 5–9 years, while breaching of the control rod channels will occur during the period of 11–16 years. The results show that, due to crack arrest, there is a significantly delay between crack initiation and breaching of the control rod channel.

  4. Temperature of maximum density and excess thermodynamics of aqueous mixtures of methanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    González-Salgado, D.; Zemánková, K. [Departamento de Física Aplicada, Universidad de Vigo, Campus del Agua, Edificio Manuel Martínez-Risco, E-32004 Ourense (Spain); Noya, E. G.; Lomba, E. [Instituto de Química Física Rocasolano, CSIC, Calle Serrano 119, E-28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2016-05-14

    In this work, we present a study of representative excess thermodynamic properties of aqueous mixtures of methanol over the complete concentration range, based on extensive computer simulation calculations. In addition to test various existing united atom model potentials, we have developed a new force-field which accurately reproduces the excess thermodynamics of this system. Moreover, we have paid particular attention to the behavior of the temperature of maximum density (TMD) in dilute methanol mixtures. The presence of a temperature of maximum density is one of the essential anomalies exhibited by water. This anomalous behavior is modified in a non-monotonous fashion by the presence of fully miscible solutes that partly disrupt the hydrogen bond network of water, such as methanol (and other short chain alcohols). In order to obtain a better insight into the phenomenology of the changes in the TMD of water induced by small amounts of methanol, we have performed a new series of experimental measurements and computer simulations using various force fields. We observe that none of the force-fields tested capture the non-monotonous concentration dependence of the TMD for highly diluted methanol solutions.

  5. Special graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leveque, P.

    1964-01-01

    A large fraction of the work undertaken jointly by the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) and the Pechiney Company has been the improvement of the properties of nuclear pile graphite and the opening up of new fields of graphite application. New processes for the manufacture of carbons and special graphites have been developed: forged graphite, pyro-carbons, high density graphite agglomeration of graphite powders by cracking of natural gas, impervious graphites. The physical properties of these products and their reaction with various oxidising gases are described. The first irradiation results are also given. (authors) [fr

  6. Relationship between plants in Europe and surface temperatures of the Atlantic Ocean during the glacial maximum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Campo, M

    1984-01-01

    In Europe and North America, the deciduous forest, whether or not mixed with conifers, prevails within boundaries which coincide with the 12 and 18/sup 0/C isotherms of Ocean surface temperatures in August; within Europe this forest points to the limit of the Atlantic influence and bevels out as it is squeezed between coniferous forest to the NE (thermic boundary) and steppe to the SE (hydric boundary). During the glacial age this forest disappeared from its main European area and remained only in mountain refuges. Thus, the temperature of the eastern Atlantic surface waters, off Europe, control the nature of its vegetation. Variations in the pollen curve of pines, birches, Artemisia, Chenopodiaceae and Ephedra are accounted for by the climatic variations in southern Europe before 13,000 yr BP. It is seen that a very arid climate culminated at about 15,000 yr BP. It corresponds to the most active iceberg calving which considerably lowered the Ocean surface temperature far to the south. In spite of the increasing summer temperatures, this temperature remained as cold as it was during the glacial maximum. The result is the lowest evaporation from the Ocean hence a minimum of clouds and a minimum of rain. The end of the first phase of the deglaciation at +/- 13,000 yr BP corresponds to a warming up of the Ocean surface bringing about increased evaporation, hence rains over the continent. The evolution of the vegetation in Europe at the end of the glacial times from south of the ice sheet down to the Mediterranean, depends as much, if not more, on rains than on temperatures.

  7. Excimer laser assisted very fast exfoliation and reduction of graphite oxide at room temperature under air ambient for Supercapacitors electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malek Hosseini, S. M. B.; Baizaee, S. M.; Naderi, Hamid Reza; Dare Kordi, Ali

    2018-01-01

    Excimer laser was used for reduction and exfoliation of graphite oxide (GO) at room temperature under air ambient. The prepared excimer laser reduced graphite oxide (XLRGO) is characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), nitrogen adsorption/desorption (BET method), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and UV-vis absorption techniques for surface, structural functional groups and band gap analysis. Electrochemical properties are investigated using cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge-discharge, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and continues cyclic voltammetry (CCV) in 0.5 M Na2SO4 as electrolyte. Electrochemical investigations revealed that XLRGO electrode has enhanced supercapacitive performance including specific capacitance of 299 F/g at a scan rate of 2 mV/s. Furthermore, CCV measurement showed that XLRGO electrode kept 97.8% of its initial capacitance/capacity after 4000 cycles. The obtained results from electrochemical investigations confirm that the reduction of GO by using an excimer laser produces high-quality graphene for supercapacitor applications without the need for additional operations.

  8. Interfacial effects in ZnO nanotubes/needle-structured graphitic diamond nanohybrid for detecting dissolved acetone at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathiravan, Deepa; Huang, Bohr-Ran; Saravanan, Adhimoorthy; Yeh, Chien-Jui; Leou, Keh-Chyang; Lin, I.-Nan

    2017-12-01

    A high-performance ZnO nanotubes (ZNTs)/needle-structured graphitic diamond (NGD) nanohybrid material was prepared and observed the electrochemical sensing properties of liquid acetone in water. Initially, we synthesized NGD film using bias-enhanced growth (BEG) process. Afterwards, a well-etched ZNTs were spatially grown on the NGD film using simple hydrothermal method, and utilized as sensing material for assemble an electrochemical sensor (via EGFET configuration) operating at room temperature. The systematic investigations depict the ultra-high sensing properties attained from ZNTs grown on NGD film. The NGD film mostly have needle or wire shaped diamond grains, which contributes extremely high electrical conductivity. Furthermore, needle shaped diamond grains cover with multi-layer graphitic material generates conduction channels for ZNTs and leads to enhance the oxygen residuals and species. The material stability and conductivity of NGD as well the defects exist with oxygen vacancies in ZNTs offers superior sensing properties. Thus, the interesting combination of these wide band gap semiconductor materials exhibit high sensor response (89 mV/mL), high stability and long-term reliability (tested after 60 days).

  9. New composites graphite/salt for high temperature thermal energy storage: From elaboration to development of thermal characterization methods for orthotropic conductive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acem, Zoubir

    2007-01-01

    This PhD is carried out within the framework of DISTOR (European) and HTPSTOCK (French) projects, which have for objective to conceive and study new graphite/salt composites dedicated to high temperature energy storage (>200 deg. C). She is split into two distinct part. The first one focused mainly on works linked with elaboration and thermal characterisation of these new composites. The different composites ways of elaboration (Dispersion, uniaxial compression, isostatic) associated to the different kind of graphite (Natural expanded graphite (ENG), synthetic graphite) investigated during the PhD are presented. The results of the thermal characterization campaign of these composites are also presented and permit to highlight the impact of graphite in the thermal behaviour of studied materials. Based on these results, modelling studies of the evolution of the thermal conductivity have been undertaken to deepen the understanding of the effect of graphite (quantity, size of particles) on the effective conductivity composites. The second one describes the thermal characterization devices and associated thermo-kinetics models which had to be developed and adapted to the specificities of newly developed materials. This concerns mainly the materials prepared by compression, which present orthotropic properties and are difficult to reproduce. So, the characterization of this kind of material is very difficult and tedious. That is why we are committed to develop and adapt existing methods of characterization to allow the complete thermal characterisation of an orthotropic conductive material from a single experimentation on a single sample. (author) [fr

  10. Nuclear graphite ageing and turnaround

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsden, B.J.; Hall, G.N.; Smart, J.

    2001-01-01

    Graphite moderated reactors are being operated in many countries including, the UK, Russia, Lithuania, Ukraine and Japan. Many of these reactors will operate well into the next century. New designs of High Temperature Graphite Moderated Reactors (HTRS) are being built in China and Japan. The design life of these graphite-moderated reactors is governed by the ageing of the graphite core due to fast neutron damage, and also, in the case of carbon dioxide cooled reactors by the rate of oxidation of the graphite. Nuclear graphites are polycrystalline in nature and it is the irradiation-induced damage to the individual graphite crystals that determines the material property changes with age. The life of a graphite component in a nuclear reactor can be related to the graphite irradiation induced dimensional changes. Graphites typically shrink with age, until a point is reached where the shrinkage stops and the graphite starts to swell. This change from shrinkage to swelling is known as ''turnaround''. It is well known that pre-oxidising graphite specimens caused ''turnaround'' to be delayed, thus extending the life of the graphite, and hence the life of the reactor. However, there was no satisfactory explanation of this behaviour. This paper presents a numerical crystal based model of dimensional change in graphite, which explains the delay in ''turnaround'' in the pre-oxidised specimens irradiated in a fast neutron flux, in terms of crystal accommodation and orientation and change in compliance due to radiolytic oxidation. (author)

  11. A new global reconstruction of temperature changes at the Last Glacial Maximum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Annan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Some recent compilations of proxy data both on land and ocean (MARGO Project Members, 2009; Bartlein et al., 2011; Shakun et al., 2012, have provided a new opportunity for an improved assessment of the overall climatic state of the Last Glacial Maximum. In this paper, we combine these proxy data with the ensemble of structurally diverse state of the art climate models which participated in the PMIP2 project (Braconnot et al., 2007 to generate a spatially complete reconstruction of surface air (and sea surface temperatures. We test a variety of approaches, and show that multiple linear regression performs well for this application. Our reconstruction is significantly different to and more accurate than previous approaches and we obtain an estimated global mean cooling of 4.0 ± 0.8 °C (95% CI.

  12. The Hengill geothermal area, Iceland: variation of temperature gradients deduced from the maximum depth of seismogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulger, G.R.

    1995-01-01

    Given a uniform lithology and strain rate and a full seismic data set, the maximum depth of earthquakes may be viewed to a first order as an isotherm. These conditions are approached at the Hengill geothermal area, S. Iceland, a dominantly basaltic area. The temperature at which seismic failure ceases for the strain rates likely at the Hengill geothermal area is determined by analogy with oceanic crust, and is about 650 ?? 50??C. The topographies of the top and bottom of the seismogenic layer were mapped using 617 earthquakes. The thickness of the seismogenic layer is roughly constant and about 3 km. A shallow, aseismic, low-velocity volume within the spreading plate boundary that crosses the area occurs above the top of the seismogenic layer and is interpreted as an isolated body of partial melt. The base of the seismogenic layer has a maximum depth of about 6.5 km beneath the spreading axis and deepens to about 7 km beneath a transform zone in the south of the area. -from Author

  13. Effect of glycine, DL-alanine and DL-2-aminobutyric acid on the temperature of maximum density of water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, Carmen M.; Torres, Andres Felipe

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Effect of α-amino acids on the temperature of maximum density of water is presented. • The addition of α-amino acids decreases the temperature of maximum density of water. • Despretz constants suggest that the amino acids behave as water structure breakers. • Despretz constants decrease as the number of CH 2 groups of the amino acid increase. • Solute disrupting effect becomes smaller as its hydrophobic character increases. - Abstract: The effect of glycine, DL-alanine and DL-2-aminobutyric acid on the temperature of maximum density of water was determined from density measurements using a magnetic float densimeter. Densities of aqueous solutions were measured within the temperature range from T = (275.65 to 278.65) K at intervals of T = 0.50 K over the concentration range between (0.0300 and 0.1000) mol · kg −1 . A linear relationship between density and concentration was obtained for all the systems in the temperature range considered. The temperature of maximum density was determined from the experimental results. The effect of the three amino acids is to decrease the temperature of maximum density of water and the decrease is proportional to molality according to Despretz equation. The effect of the amino acids on the temperature of maximum density decreases as the number of methylene groups of the alkyl chain becomes larger. The results are discussed in terms of (solute + water) interactions and the effect of amino acids on water structure

  14. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy studies of graphite materials prepared by high-temperature treatment of unburned carbon concentrates from combustion fly ashes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miguel Cabielles; Jean-Nol Rouzaud; Ana B. Garcia [Instituto Nacional del Carbn (INCAR), Oviedo (Spain)

    2009-01-15

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) has been used in this work to study the microstructural (structure and microtexture) changes occurring during the high-temperature treatment of the unburned carbon concentrates from coal combustion fly ashes. Emphasis was placed on two aspects: (i) the development of graphitic carbon structures and (ii) the disordered carbon forms remaining in the graphitized samples. In addition, by coupling HRTEM with energy-dispersive spectroscopy, the transformations with the temperature of the inorganic matter (mainly iron- and silicon-based phases) of the unburned carbon concentrates were evidenced. The HRTEM results were compared to the averaged structural order of the materials as evaluated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy. As indicated by XRD and Raman parameters, more-ordered materials were obtained from the unburned carbon concentrates with higher mineral/inorganic matter, thus inferring the catalytic effect of some of their components. However, the average character of the information provided by these instrumental techniques seems to be inconclusive in discriminating between carbon structures with different degrees of order (stricto sensu graphite, graphitic, turbostratic, etc.) in a given graphitized unburned carbon. Unlike XRD and Raman, HRTEM is a useful tool for imaging directly the profile of the polyaromatic layers (graphene planes), thus allowing the sample heterogeneity to be looked at, specifically the presence of disordered carbon phases. 49 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Advanced High-Temperature Reactor for Production of Electricity and Hydrogen: Molten-Salt-Coolant, Graphite-Coated-Particle-Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of the Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR) is to provide the very high temperatures necessary to enable low-cost (1) efficient thermochemical production of hydrogen and (2) efficient production of electricity. The proposed AHTR uses coated-particle graphite fuel similar to the fuel used in modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (MHTGRs), such as the General Atomics gas turbine-modular helium reactor (GT-MHR). However, unlike the MHTGRs, the AHTR uses a molten salt coolant with a pool configuration, similar to that of the PRISM liquid metal reactor. A multi-reheat helium Brayton (gas-turbine) cycle, with efficiencies >50%, is used to produce electricity. This approach (1) minimizes requirements for new technology development and (2) results in an advanced reactor concept that operates at essentially ambient pressures and at very high temperatures. The low-pressure molten-salt coolant, with its high heat capacity and natural circulation heat transfer capability, creates the potential for (1) exceptionally robust safety (including passive decay-heat removal) and (2) allows scaling to large reactor sizes [∼1000 Mw(e)] with passive safety systems to provide the potential for improved economics

  16. New England observed and predicted August stream/river temperature maximum positive daily rate of change points

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The shapefile contains points with associated observed and predicted August stream/river temperature maximum positive daily rate of change in New England based on a...

  17. New England observed and predicted July stream/river temperature maximum positive daily rate of change points

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The shapefile contains points with associated observed and predicted July stream/river temperature maximum positive daily rate of change in New England based on a...

  18. New England observed and predicted July maximum negative stream/river temperature daily rate of change points

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The shapefile contains points with associated observed and predicted July stream/river temperature maximum negative daily rate of change in New England based on a...

  19. Impacts of Land Cover and Seasonal Variation on Maximum Air Temperature Estimation Using MODIS Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulin Cai

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Daily maximum surface air temperature (Tamax is a crucial factor for understanding complex land surface processes under rapid climate change. Remote detection of Tamax has widely relied on the empirical relationship between air temperature and land surface temperature (LST, a product derived from remote sensing. However, little is known about how such a relationship is affected by the high heterogeneity in landscapes and dynamics in seasonality. This study aims to advance our understanding of the roles of land cover and seasonal variation in the estimation of Tamax using the MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer LST product. We developed statistical models to link Tamax and LST in the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River in China for five major land-cover types (i.e., forest, shrub, water, impervious surface, cropland, and grassland and two seasons (i.e., growing season and non-growing season. Results show that the performance of modeling the Tamax-LST relationship was highly dependent on land cover and seasonal variation. Estimating Tamax over grasslands and water bodies achieved superior performance; while uncertainties were high over forested lands that contained extensive heterogeneity in species types, plant structure, and topography. We further found that all the land-cover specific models developed for the plant non-growing season outperformed the corresponding models developed for the growing season. Discrepancies in model performance mainly occurred in the vegetated areas (forest, cropland, and shrub, suggesting an important role of plant phenology in defining the statistical relationship between Tamax and LST. For impervious surfaces, the challenge of capturing the high spatial heterogeneity in urban settings using the low-resolution MODIS data made Tamax estimation a difficult task, which was especially true in the growing season.

  20. Investigation of high temperature reactions on graphite with Rutherford backscattering spectrometry: interaction of cadmium, lead and silver with a phosphate modifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eloi, C.; Robertson, J.D.; Majidi, V. (Kentucky Univ., Lexington, KY (United States))

    1993-03-01

    The depth-dependent concentration profiles of nitrate salts of Pb, Cd and Ag were observed with and without the addition of (NH[sub 4])H[sub 2]PO[sub 4] chemical modifier using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS). The RBS results demonstrate that the analytes, in all the systems investigated, readily migrate ([>=]3 [mu]m) into the pyrolytic graphite coated graphite substrate at room temperature. The stabilization of Cd and Pb with the phosphate modifier is proposed to be due to the formation of a phosphate glass. Silver did not extensively interact with the phosphate modifier and was, as a result, not stabilized. (author).

  1. Investigation of high temperature reactions on graphite with Rutherford backscattering spectrometry: interaction of cadmium, lead and silver with a phosphate modifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eloi, C.; Robertson, J.D.; Majidi, V.

    1993-01-01

    The depth-dependent concentration profiles of nitrate salts of Pb, Cd and Ag were observed with and without the addition of (NH 4 )H 2 PO 4 chemical modifier using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS). The RBS results demonstrate that the analytes, in all the systems investigated, readily migrate (≥3 μm) into the pyrolytic graphite coated graphite substrate at room temperature. The stabilization of Cd and Pb with the phosphate modifier is proposed to be due to the formation of a phosphate glass. Silver did not extensively interact with the phosphate modifier and was, as a result, not stabilized. (author)

  2. New results on equatorial thermospheric winds and the midnight temperature maximum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Meriwether

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Optical observations of thermospheric winds and temperatures determined with high resolution measurements of Doppler shifts and Doppler widths of the OI 630-nm equatorial nightglow emission have been made with improved accuracy at Arequipa, Peru (16.4° S, 71.4° W with an imaging Fabry-Perot interferometer. An observing procedure previously used at Arecibo Observatory was applied to achieve increased spatial and temporal sampling of the thermospheric wind and temperature with the selection of eight azimuthal directions, equally spaced from 0 to 360°, at a zenith angle of 60°. By assuming the equivalence of longitude and local time, the data obtained using this technique is analyzed to determine the mean neutral wind speeds and mean horizontal gradients of the wind field in the zonal and meridional directions. The new temperature measurements obtained with the improved instrumental accuracy clearly show the midnight temperature maximum (MTM peak with amplitudes of 25 to 200 K in all directions observed for most nights. The horizontal wind field maps calculated from the mean winds and gradients show the MTM peak is always preceded by an equatorward wind surge lasting 1–2 h. The results also show for winter events a meridional wind abatement seen after the MTM peak. On one occasion, near the September equinox, a reversal was observed during the poleward transit of the MTM over Arequipa. Analysis inferring vertical winds from the observed convergence yielded inconsistent results, calling into question the validity of this calculation for the MTM structure at equatorial latitudes during solar minimum. Comparison of the observations with the predictions of the NCAR general circulation model indicates that the model fails to reproduce the observed amplitude by a factor of 5 or more. This is attributed in part to the lack of adequate spatial resolution in the model as the MTM phenomenon takes place within a scale of 300–500 km and ~45 min in

  3. Merging daily sea surface temperature data from multiple satellites using a Bayesian maximum entropy method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shaolei; Yang, Xiaofeng; Dong, Di; Li, Ziwei

    2015-12-01

    Sea surface temperature (SST) is an important variable for understanding interactions between the ocean and the atmosphere. SST fusion is crucial for acquiring SST products of high spatial resolution and coverage. This study introduces a Bayesian maximum entropy (BME) method for blending daily SSTs from multiple satellite sensors. A new spatiotemporal covariance model of an SST field is built to integrate not only single-day SSTs but also time-adjacent SSTs. In addition, AVHRR 30-year SST climatology data are introduced as soft data at the estimation points to improve the accuracy of blended results within the BME framework. The merged SSTs, with a spatial resolution of 4 km and a temporal resolution of 24 hours, are produced in the Western Pacific Ocean region to demonstrate and evaluate the proposed methodology. Comparisons with in situ drifting buoy observations show that the merged SSTs are accurate and the bias and root-mean-square errors for the comparison are 0.15°C and 0.72°C, respectively.

  4. The maximum allowable temperature of zircaloy-2 fuel cladding under dry storage conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayuzumi, M.; Yoshiki, S.; Yasuda, T.; Nakatsuka, M.

    1990-09-01

    Japan plans to reprocess and reutilise the spent nuclear fuel from nuclear power generation. However, the temporary storage of spent fuel is assuming increasing importance as a means of ensuring flexibility in the nuclear fuel cycle. Our investigations of various methods of storage have shown that casks are the most suitable means of storing small quantities of spent fuel of around 500 t, and research and development are in progress to establish dry storage technology for such casks. The soundness of fuel cladding is being investigated. The most important factor in evaluating soundness in storage under inert gas as currently envisaged is creep deformation and rupture, and a number of investigations have been made of the creep behaviour of cladding. The present study was conducted on the basis of existing in-house results in collaboration with Nippon Kakunenryo Kaihatsu KK (Nippon Nuclear Fuel Department Co.), which has hot lab facilities. Tests were run on the creep deformation behaviour of irradiated cladding, and the maximum allowable temperature during dry storage was investigated. (author)

  5. Papers about coated particles, graphitic and metallic materials for progressive high-temperature reactors at the Reactor Meeting 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rottmann, J.

    1978-09-01

    In the contributions, questions on the development, the radiation and the high-temperature behaviour and the characterization of fuel element particles are treated. Furthermore the resistance and radiation behaviour of graphitic materials are discussed. Finally, questions on the choice of high-temperature alloys for nuclear process heat facilities are discussed and the testing-equipment of the Nuclear Research Centre as well as first results of the long-time experiments are presented. The work was performed within the frame of the projects 'HTR-Fuel Element Cycle' and 'Prototype Nuclear Process Heat', which are sponsored by the Federal Ministry of Research and Technology of the Federal Republic of Germany and of the state of North-Rhine-Westfalia. Partner firms, who participate in the two projects are Gelsenberg AG, Gesellschaft fuer Hochtemperaturreaktor-Technik mbH, Hochtemperaturreaktor-Brennelement GmbH, Hochtemperatur-Reaktorbau GmbH, Kernforschungsanlage Juelich GmbH, NUKEM GmbH, SIGRI Elektrographit GmbH/Ringsdorff-Werke GmbH, Bergbauforschung GmbH und Rheinische Braunkohlenwerke AG. (orig./UA) [de

  6. A Mechanistic Design Approach for Graphite Nanoplatelet (GNP) Reinforced Asphalt Mixtures for Low-Temperature Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    This report explores the application of a discrete computational model for predicting the fracture behavior of asphalt mixtures at low temperatures based on the results of simple laboratory experiments. In this discrete element model, coarse aggregat...

  7. Chapter 10: Calculation of the temperature coefficient of reactivity of a graphite-moderated reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, G.; Richmond, R.; Stace, R.H.W.

    1963-01-01

    The temperature coefficients of reactivity of the BEPO, Windscale and Calder reactors are calculated, using the revised methods given by Lockey et al. (1956) and by Campbell and Symonds (1962). The results are compared with experimental values. (author)

  8. Temperature and irradiation effects on the behaviour of 14C and its precursor 14N in nuclear graphite. Study of a decontamination process using steam reforming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silbermann, Gwennaelle

    2013-01-01

    The dismantling of UNGG reactors in France will generate about 23 000 tons of radioactive graphite wastes. To manage these wastes, the radiological inventory and data on radionuclides (RN) location and speciation should be determined. 14 C was identified as an important RN for disposal due to its high initial activity and the risk of release of a mobile organic fraction in environment, after water ingress into the disposal. Hence, the objective of this thesis, carried out in partnership with EDF is to implement experimental studies to simulate and evaluate the impact of temperature, irradiation and graphite radiolytic corrosion on the in reactor behavior of 14 C and its precursor, 14 N. The obtained data are then used to study the thermal decontamination of graphite in presence of water vapor. The experimental approach aims at simulating the presence of 14 C and 14 N by the respective ion implantation of 13 C and 14 N or 15 N in virgin graphite. This study shows that, in the temperature range reached during reactor operation, (100-500 C) and without radiolytic corrosion, 13 C is thermally stable whatever the initial graphite structure. Moreover, irradiation experiments were performed on heated graphite (500 C) put in contact with a gas representative of the radiolized coolant gas. They show the synergistic role played by the oxidative species and the graphite structure disorder on the enhancement of 13 C mobility resulting in the gasification of the graphite surface and/or the selective oxidation of 13 C more weakly bound than 12 C. Concerning the pristine nitrogen, we showed first that the surface concentration reaches several hundred ppm (≤500 ppm at) and decreases at deeper depths to about 160 ppm at.. Unlike implanted 13 C, implanted nitrogen migrates at 500 C when the graphite is highly disordered (about 8 dpa) while remaining stable for a lower disorder rate (0.14 dpa). Experiments also show the synergistic role by electronic excitations and temperature

  9. Method 200.12 - Determination of Trace Elements in Marine Waters by StabilizedTemperature Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    This method provides procedures for the determination of total recoverable elements by graphite furnace atomic absorption (GFAA) in marine waters, including estuarine, ocean and brines with salinities of up to 35 ppt.

  10. Graphite selection for the PBMR reflector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsden, B.J.; Preston, S.D.

    2000-01-01

    A high temperature, direct cycle gas turbine, graphite moderated, helium cooled, pebble-bed reactor (PBMR) is being designed and constructed in South Africa. One of the major components in the PBMR is the graphite reflector, which must be designed to last thirty-five full power years. Fast neutron irradiation changes the dimensions and material properties of reactor graphite, thus for design purposes a suitable graphite database is required. Data on the effect of irradiation on nuclear graphites has been gathered for many years, at considerable financial cost, but unfortunately these graphites are no longer available due to rationalization of the graphite industry and loss of key graphite coke supplies. However, it is possible, using un-irradiated graphite materials properties and knowledge of the particular graphite microstructure, to determine the probable irradiation behaviour. Three types of nuclear graphites are currently being considered for the PBMR reflector: an isostatically moulded, fine grained, high strength graphite and two extruded medium grained graphites of moderately high strength. Although there is some irradiation data available for these graphites, the data does not cover the temperature and dose range required for the PBMR. The available graphites have been examined to determine their microstructure and some of the key material properties are presented. (authors)

  11. Effect of temperature dependent properties on MHD convection of water near its density maximum in a square cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivasankaran, S.; Hoa, C.J.

    2008-01-01

    Natural convection of water near its density maximum in the presence of magnetic field in a cavity with temperature dependent properties is studied numerically. The viscosity and thermal conductivity of the water is varied with reference temperature and calculated by cubic polynomial. The finite volume method is used to solve the governing equations. The results are presented graphically in the form of streamlines, isotherms and velocity vectors and are discussed for various combinations of reference temperature parameter, Rayleigh number, density inversion parameter and Hartmann number. It is observed that flow and temperature field are affected significantly by changing the reference temperature parameter for temperature dependent thermal conductivity and both temperature dependent viscosity and thermal conductivity cases. There is no significant effect on fluid flow and temperature distributions for temperature dependent viscosity case when changing the values of reference temperature parameter. The average heat transfer rate considering temperature-dependent viscosity are higher than considering temperature-dependent thermal conductivity and both temperature-dependent viscosity and thermal conductivity. The average Nusselt number decreases with an increase of Hartmann number. It is observed that the density inversion of water leaves strong effects on fluid flow and heat transfer due to the formation of bi-cellular structure. The heat transfer rate behaves non-linearly with density inversion parameter. The direction of external magnetic field also affect the fluid flow and heat transfer. (authors)

  12. Probabilistic measures of climate change vulnerability, adaptation action benefits, and related uncertainty from maximum temperature metric selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWeber, Jefferson T.; Wagner, Tyler

    2018-01-01

    Predictions of the projected changes in species distributions and potential adaptation action benefits can help guide conservation actions. There is substantial uncertainty in projecting species distributions into an unknown future, however, which can undermine confidence in predictions or misdirect conservation actions if not properly considered. Recent studies have shown that the selection of alternative climate metrics describing very different climatic aspects (e.g., mean air temperature vs. mean precipitation) can be a substantial source of projection uncertainty. It is unclear, however, how much projection uncertainty might stem from selecting among highly correlated, ecologically similar climate metrics (e.g., maximum temperature in July, maximum 30‐day temperature) describing the same climatic aspect (e.g., maximum temperatures) known to limit a species’ distribution. It is also unclear how projection uncertainty might propagate into predictions of the potential benefits of adaptation actions that might lessen climate change effects. We provide probabilistic measures of climate change vulnerability, adaptation action benefits, and related uncertainty stemming from the selection of four maximum temperature metrics for brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis), a cold‐water salmonid of conservation concern in the eastern United States. Projected losses in suitable stream length varied by as much as 20% among alternative maximum temperature metrics for mid‐century climate projections, which was similar to variation among three climate models. Similarly, the regional average predicted increase in brook trout occurrence probability under an adaptation action scenario of full riparian forest restoration varied by as much as .2 among metrics. Our use of Bayesian inference provides probabilistic measures of vulnerability and adaptation action benefits for individual stream reaches that properly address statistical uncertainty and can help guide conservation

  13. Probabilistic measures of climate change vulnerability, adaptation action benefits, and related uncertainty from maximum temperature metric selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWeber, Jefferson T; Wagner, Tyler

    2018-06-01

    Predictions of the projected changes in species distributions and potential adaptation action benefits can help guide conservation actions. There is substantial uncertainty in projecting species distributions into an unknown future, however, which can undermine confidence in predictions or misdirect conservation actions if not properly considered. Recent studies have shown that the selection of alternative climate metrics describing very different climatic aspects (e.g., mean air temperature vs. mean precipitation) can be a substantial source of projection uncertainty. It is unclear, however, how much projection uncertainty might stem from selecting among highly correlated, ecologically similar climate metrics (e.g., maximum temperature in July, maximum 30-day temperature) describing the same climatic aspect (e.g., maximum temperatures) known to limit a species' distribution. It is also unclear how projection uncertainty might propagate into predictions of the potential benefits of adaptation actions that might lessen climate change effects. We provide probabilistic measures of climate change vulnerability, adaptation action benefits, and related uncertainty stemming from the selection of four maximum temperature metrics for brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis), a cold-water salmonid of conservation concern in the eastern United States. Projected losses in suitable stream length varied by as much as 20% among alternative maximum temperature metrics for mid-century climate projections, which was similar to variation among three climate models. Similarly, the regional average predicted increase in brook trout occurrence probability under an adaptation action scenario of full riparian forest restoration varied by as much as .2 among metrics. Our use of Bayesian inference provides probabilistic measures of vulnerability and adaptation action benefits for individual stream reaches that properly address statistical uncertainty and can help guide conservation actions. Our

  14. Nanodiamond infiltration into porous silicon through etching of solid carbon produced at different graphitization temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miranda, C. R. B., E-mail: claudia_rbm@yahoo.com.br [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais-INPE, Centro de Ciencias do Sistema Terrestre-CCST, Centro de Ciencias do Sistema Terrestre-CCST (Brazil); Baldan, M. R.; Beloto, A. F.; Ferreira, N. G. [CTE/INPE, Centro de Tecnologias Espaciais (Brazil)

    2011-09-15

    Nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) was grown on the porous silicon (PS) substrate using Reticulated Vitreous Carbon (RVC) as an additional solid carbon source. RVC was produced at different heat treatment temperatures of 1300, 1500, and 2000 Degree-Sign C, resulting in samples with different turbostratic carbon organizations. The PS substrate was produced by an electrochemical method. NCD film was obtained by the chemical vapor infiltration/deposition process where a RVC piece was positioned just below the PS substrate. The PS and NCD samples were characterized by Field Emission Gun-Scanning Electron Microscopy (FEG-SEM). NCD films presented faceted nanograins with uniform surface texture covering all the pores resulting in an apparent micro honeycomb structure. Raman's spectra showed the D and G bands, as well as, the typical two shoulders at 1,150 and 1,490 cm{sup -1} attributed to NCD. X-ray diffraction analyses showed the predominant (111) diamond orientation as well as the (220) and (311) peaks. The structural organization and the heteroatom presence on the RVC surface, analyzed from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, showed their significant influence on the NCD growth process. The hydrogen etching released, from RVC surface, associated to carbon and/or oxygen/nitrogen amounts led to different contributions for NCD growth.

  15. Dynamic Performance of Maximum Power Point Trackers in TEG Systems Under Rapidly Changing Temperature Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Man, E. A.; Sera, D.; Mathe, L.

    2016-01-01

    of the intermittent operation of the internal combustion engine, the TEG and its MPPT controller are exposed to a cyclic temperature profile. Furthermore, there are no guidelines on how fast the MPPT must be under such dynamic conditions. In the work discussed in this paper, temperature gradients for TEG integrated...

  16. Influence of maximum water temperature on occurrence of Lahontan cutthroat trout within streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. Dunham; R. Schroeter; B. Rieman

    2003-01-01

    We measured water temperature at 87 sites in six streams in two different years (1998 and 1999) to test for association with the occurrence of Lahontan cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarki henshawi. Because laboratory studies suggest that Lahontan cutthroat trout begin to show signs of acute stress at warm (>22°C) temperatures, we focused on the...

  17. Temperature-dependent thermal properties of a paraffin phase change material embedded with herringbone style graphite nanofibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warzoha, Ronald J.; Weigand, Rebecca M.; Fleischer, Amy S.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The thermal properties of a PCM with nanofibers are determined. • The solid-phase thermal conductivity scales exponentially with volume fraction. • The liquid-phase thermal conductivity is only enhanced beyond a critical percolation threshold. • The nanoscale interface resistance depends on the nanoparticle’s dimensionality. • The thermal diffusivity and volumetric heat capacity of the nanoenhanced PCMs are found. - Abstract: In many studies, carbon nanoparticles with high values of thermal conductivity (10–3000 W/m K) have been embedded into phase change thermal energy storage materials (PCMs) in order to enhance their bulk thermal properties. While a great deal of work to date has focused on determining the effect of these nanoparticles on a PCM’s solid phase thermal properties, little is known about their effect on its liquid phase thermal properties. Thus, in this study, the effect of implanting randomly oriented herringbone style graphite nanofibers (HGNF, average diameter = 100 nm, average length = 20 μm) on the bulk thermal properties of an organic paraffin PCM (IGI 1230A, T melt = 329.15 K) in both the solid and liquid phase is quantified. The bulk thermal conductivity, volumetric heat capacity and thermal diffusivity of HGNF/PCM nanocomposites are obtained as a function of temperature and HGNF volume loading level. It is found that the property enhancement varies significantly depending on the material phase. In order to explain the difference between solid and liquid phase thermal properties, heat flow at the nanoparticle–PCM and nanoparticle–nanoparticle interfaces is examined as a function of HGNF loading level and temperature. To do this, the solid and liquid phase thermal boundary resistances (TBRs) between the nanoparticles and the surrounding PCM and/or between contacting nanoparticles are found. Results suggest that the TBR at the HGNF–PCM interface is nearly double the TBR across the HGNF–HGNF interface in

  18. Screen-Printed Graphite Electrodes as Low-Cost Devices for Oxygen Gas Detection in Room-Temperature Ionic Liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Junqiao; Hussain, Ghulam; Banks, Craig E; Silvester, Debbie S

    2017-11-26

    Screen-printed graphite electrodes (SPGEs) have been used for the first time as platforms to detect oxygen gas in room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs). Up until now, carbon-based SPEs have shown inferior behaviour compared to platinum and gold SPEs for gas sensing with RTIL solvents. The electrochemical reduction of oxygen (O₂) in a range of RTILs has therefore been explored on home-made SPGEs, and is compared to the behaviour on commercially-available carbon SPEs (C-SPEs). Six common RTILs are initially employed for O₂ detection using cyclic voltammetry (CV), and two RTILs ([C₂mim][NTf₂] and [C₄mim][PF₆]) chosen for further detailed analytical studies. Long-term chronoamperometry (LTCA) was also performed to test the ability of the sensor surface for real-time gas monitoring. Both CV and LTCA gave linear calibration graphs-for CV in the 10-100% vol. range, and for LTCA in the 0.1-20% vol. range-on the SPGE. The responses on the SPGE were far superior to the commercial C-SPEs; more instability in the electrochemical responses were observed on the C-SPEs, together with some breaking-up or dissolution of the electrode surface materials. This study highlights that not all screen-printed ink formulations are compatible with RTIL solvents for longer-term electrochemical experiments, and that the choice of RTIL is also important. Overall, the low-cost SPGEs appear to be promising platforms for the detection of O₂, particularly in [C₄mim][PF₆].

  19. Screen-Printed Graphite Electrodes as Low-Cost Devices for Oxygen Gas Detection in Room-Temperature Ionic Liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junqiao Lee

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Screen-printed graphite electrodes (SPGEs have been used for the first time as platforms to detect oxygen gas in room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs. Up until now, carbon-based SPEs have shown inferior behaviour compared to platinum and gold SPEs for gas sensing with RTIL solvents. The electrochemical reduction of oxygen (O2 in a range of RTILs has therefore been explored on home-made SPGEs, and is compared to the behaviour on commercially-available carbon SPEs (C-SPEs. Six common RTILs are initially employed for O2 detection using cyclic voltammetry (CV, and two RTILs ([C2mim][NTf2] and [C4mim][PF6] chosen for further detailed analytical studies. Long-term chronoamperometry (LTCA was also performed to test the ability of the sensor surface for real-time gas monitoring. Both CV and LTCA gave linear calibration graphs—for CV in the 10–100% vol. range, and for LTCA in the 0.1–20% vol. range—on the SPGE. The responses on the SPGE were far superior to the commercial C-SPEs; more instability in the electrochemical responses were observed on the C-SPEs, together with some breaking-up or dissolution of the electrode surface materials. This study highlights that not all screen-printed ink formulations are compatible with RTIL solvents for longer-term electrochemical experiments, and that the choice of RTIL is also important. Overall, the low-cost SPGEs appear to be promising platforms for the detection of O2, particularly in [C4mim][PF6].

  20. Deposition of pyrolytic carbon from methane in the pores of artificial graphites. Influence of the temperature (1961); Depot de carbone pyrolytique dans les pores de graphites artificiels a partir de methane. Influence de la temperature (1961)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchard, R; Bochirol, L; Moreau, C; Philippot, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-07-01

    it is shown that below 1000 deg. C the carbon formed by the decomposition of methane is deposited at a depth of up to several centimetres in the porosity of graphitic supports; the probable mechanism of these reactions is given. (authors) [French] On montre qu'en dessous de 1000 deg. C le depot de carbone par decomposition de methane se produit jusqu'a une profondeur de plusieurs dizaines de millimetres dans la porosite de supports graphites, et l'on indique le mecanisme probable de ces reactions. (auteurs)

  1. Structural disorder of graphite and implications for graphite thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirilova, Martina; Toy, Virginia; Rooney, Jeremy S.; Giorgetti, Carolina; Gordon, Keith C.; Collettini, Cristiano; Takeshita, Toru

    2018-02-01

    Graphitization, or the progressive maturation of carbonaceous material, is considered an irreversible process. Thus, the degree of graphite crystallinity, or its structural order, has been calibrated as an indicator of the peak metamorphic temperatures experienced by the host rocks. However, discrepancies between temperatures indicated by graphite crystallinity versus other thermometers have been documented in deformed rocks. To examine the possibility of mechanical modifications of graphite structure and the potential impacts on graphite thermometry, we performed laboratory deformation experiments. We sheared highly crystalline graphite powder at normal stresses of 5 and 25 megapascal (MPa) and aseismic velocities of 1, 10 and 100 µm s-1. The degree of structural order both in the starting and resulting materials was analyzed by Raman microspectroscopy. Our results demonstrate structural disorder of graphite, manifested as changes in the Raman spectra. Microstructural observations show that brittle processes caused the documented mechanical modifications of the aggregate graphite crystallinity. We conclude that the calibrated graphite thermometer is ambiguous in active tectonic settings.

  2. Structural disorder of graphite and implications for graphite thermometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kirilova

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Graphitization, or the progressive maturation of carbonaceous material, is considered an irreversible process. Thus, the degree of graphite crystallinity, or its structural order, has been calibrated as an indicator of the peak metamorphic temperatures experienced by the host rocks. However, discrepancies between temperatures indicated by graphite crystallinity versus other thermometers have been documented in deformed rocks. To examine the possibility of mechanical modifications of graphite structure and the potential impacts on graphite thermometry, we performed laboratory deformation experiments. We sheared highly crystalline graphite powder at normal stresses of 5 and 25  megapascal (MPa and aseismic velocities of 1, 10 and 100 µm s−1. The degree of structural order both in the starting and resulting materials was analyzed by Raman microspectroscopy. Our results demonstrate structural disorder of graphite, manifested as changes in the Raman spectra. Microstructural observations show that brittle processes caused the documented mechanical modifications of the aggregate graphite crystallinity. We conclude that the calibrated graphite thermometer is ambiguous in active tectonic settings.

  3. A High Performance Lithium-Ion Capacitor with Both Electrodes Prepared from Sri Lanka Graphite Ore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiaoyu; Zhan, Changzhen; Yu, Xiaoliang; Liang, Qinghua; Lv, Ruitao; Gai, Guosheng; Shen, Wanci; Kang, Feiyu; Huang, Zheng-Hong

    2017-04-14

    The natural Sri Lanka graphite (vein graphite) is widely-used as anode material for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs), due to its high crystallinity and low cost. In this work, graphitic porous carbon (GPC) and high-purity vein graphite (PVG) were prepared from Sri Lanka graphite ore by KOH activation, and high temperature purification, respectively. Furthermore, a lithium-ion capacitor (LIC) is fabricated with GPC as cathode, and PVG as anode. The assembled GPC//PVG LIC shows a notable electrochemical performance with a maximum energy density of 86 W·h·kg -1 at 150 W·kg -1 , and 48 W·h·kg -1 at a high-power density of 7.4 kW·kg -1 . This high-performance LIC based on PVG and GPC is believed to be promising for practical applications, due to its low-cost raw materials and industrially feasible production.

  4. Climate Prediction Center (CPC) U.S. Daily Maximum Air Temperature Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Observational reports of daily air temperature (1200 UTC to 1200 UTC) are made by members of the NWS Automated Surface Observing Systems (ASOS) network; NWS...

  5. Buckling and reaction rate experiments in plutonium/uranium metal fuelled, graphite moderated lattices at temperatures up to 400 deg. C. Part I: Experimental techniques and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, D H; Clarke, W G; Gibson, M; Hobday, R; Hunt, C; Marshall, J; Puckett, B J; Symons, C R; Wass, T [General Reactor Physics Division, Atomic Energy Establishment, Winfrith, Dorchester, Dorset (United Kingdom)

    1964-07-15

    This report presents experimental measurements of bucklings, flux fine structure and fission rate distributions in graphite moderated lattices fuelled with plutonium/uranium metal at temperatures up to 400 deg. C in the sub-critical assemblies SCORPIO I and SCORPIO II. The experimental techniques employed are described in some detail. The accuracy of the experimental measurements appears to be adequate for testing methods of calculation being developed for the calculation of reactivity and temperature coefficient of reactivity for power reactors containing plutonium and uranium. (author) 26 refs, 17 tabs, 17 figs

  6. Maximum Efficiency of Thermoelectric Heat Conversion in High-Temperature Power Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Khvesyuk

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern trends in development of aircraft engineering go with development of vehicles of the fifth generation. The features of aircrafts of the fifth generation are motivation to use new high-performance systems of onboard power supply. The operating temperature of the outer walls of engines is of 800–1000 K. This corresponds to radiation heat flux of 10 kW/m2 . The thermal energy including radiation of the engine wall may potentially be converted into electricity. The main objective of this paper is to analyze if it is possible to use a high efficiency thermoelectric conversion of heat into electricity. The paper considers issues such as working processes, choice of materials, and optimization of thermoelectric conversion. It presents the analysis results of operating conditions of thermoelectric generator (TEG used in advanced hightemperature power devices. A high-temperature heat source is a favorable factor for the thermoelectric conversion of heat. It is shown that for existing thermoelectric materials a theoretical conversion efficiency can reach the level of 15–20% at temperatures up to 1500 K and available values of Ioffe parameter being ZT = 2–3 (Z is figure of merit, T is temperature. To ensure temperature regime and high efficiency thermoelectric conversion simultaneously it is necessary to have a certain match between TEG power, temperature of hot and cold surfaces, and heat transfer coefficient of the cooling system. The paper discusses a concept of radiation absorber on the TEG hot surface. The analysis has demonstrated a number of potentialities for highly efficient conversion through using the TEG in high-temperature power devices. This work has been implemented under support of the Ministry of Education and Science of the Russian Federation; project No. 1145 (the programme “Organization of Research Engineering Activities”.

  7. Artificial graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maire, J.

    1984-01-01

    Artificial graphites are obtained by agglomeration of carbon powders with an organic binder, then by carbonisation at 1000 0 C and graphitization at 2800 0 C. After description of the processes and products, we show how the properties of the various materials lead to the various uses. Using graphite enables us to solve some problems, but it is not sufficient to satisfy all the need of the application. New carbonaceous material open application range. Finally, if some products are becoming obsolete, other ones are being developed in new applications [fr

  8. Experimental program to determine maximum temperatures for dry storage of spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knox, C.A.; Gilbert, E.R.; White, G.D.

    1985-02-01

    Although air is used as a cover gas in some dry storage facilities, other facilities use inert cover gases which must be monitored to assure inertness of the atmosphere. Thus qualifying air as a cover gas is attractive for the dry storage of spent fuels. At sufficiently high temperatures, air can react with spent fuel (UO 2 ) at the site of cladding breaches that formed during reactor irradiation or during dry storage. The reaction rate is temperature dependent; hence the rates can be maintained at acceptable levels if temperatures are low. Tests with spent fuel are being conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to determine the allowable temperatures for storage of spent fuel in air. Tests performed with nonirradiated UO 2 pellets indicated that moisture, surface condition, gamma radiation, gadolinia content of the fuel pellet, and temperature are important variables. Tests were then initiated on spent fuel to develop design data under simulated dry storage conditions. Tests have been conducted at 200 and 230 0 C on spent fuel in air and 275 0 C in moist nitrogen. The results for nonirradiated UO 2 and published data for irradiated fuel indicate that above 230 0 C, oxidation rates are unacceptably high for extended storage in air. The tests with spent fuel will be continued for approximately three years to enable reliable extrapolations to be made for extended storage in air and inert gases with oxidizing constituents. 6 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  9. THE MAXIMUM EFFECT OF DEEP LAKES ON TEMPERATURE PROFILES – DETERMINATION OF THE GEOTHERMAL GRADIENT

    OpenAIRE

    Eppelbaum L. V.; Kutasov I. M.; Balobaev V. T.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the climate change processes on the basis of geothermal observations in boreholes is an important and at the same time high-intricate problem. Many non-climatic effects could cause changes in ground surface temperatures. In this study we investigate the effects of deep lakes on the borehole temperature profilesobserved within or in the vicinity of the lakes. We propose a method based on utilization of Laplace equation with nonuniform boundary conditions. The proposed method make...

  10. Temperature of the Icelandic crust: Inferred from electrical conductivity, temperature surface gradient, and maximum depth of earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björnsson, Axel

    2008-02-01

    Two different models of the structure of the Icelandic crust have been presented. One is the thin-crust model with a 10-15 km thick crust beneath the axial rift zones, with an intermediate layer of partially molten basalt at the base of the crust and on the top of an up-domed asthenosphere. The thick-crust model assumes a 40 km thick and relatively cold crust beneath central Iceland. The most important and crucial parameter to distinguish between these different models is the temperature distribution with depth. Three methods are used to estimate the temperature distribution with depth. First, the surface temperature gradient measured in shallow wells drilled outside geothermal areas. Second, the thickness of the seismogenic zone which is associated with a 750 °C isothermal surface. Third, the depth to a layer with high electrical conductivity which is associated with partially molten basalt with temperature around 1100 °C at the base of the crust. Combination of these data shows that the temperature gradient can be assumed to be nearly linear from the surface down to the base of the crust. These results are strongly in favour of the thin-crust model. The scattered deep seismic reflectors interpreted as Moho in the thick-crust model could be caused by phase transitions or reflections from melt pockets in the mantle.

  11. County-Level Climate Uncertainty for Risk Assessments: Volume 4 Appendix C - Historical Maximum Near-Surface Air Temperature.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backus, George A.; Lowry, Thomas Stephen; Jones, Shannon M; Walker, La Tonya Nicole; Roberts, Barry L; Malczynski, Leonard A.

    2017-06-01

    This report uses the CMIP5 series of climate model simulations to produce country- level uncertainty distributions for use in socioeconomic risk assessments of climate change impacts. It provides appropriate probability distributions, by month, for 169 countries and autonomous-areas on temperature, precipitation, maximum temperature, maximum wind speed, humidity, runoff, soil moisture and evaporation for the historical period (1976-2005), and for decadal time periods to 2100. It also provides historical and future distributions for the Arctic region on ice concentration, ice thickness, age of ice, and ice ridging in 15-degree longitude arc segments from the Arctic Circle to 80 degrees latitude, plus two polar semicircular regions from 80 to 90 degrees latitude. The uncertainty is meant to describe the lack of knowledge rather than imprecision in the physical simulation because the emphasis is on unfalsified risk and its use to determine potential socioeconomic impacts. The full report is contained in 27 volumes.

  12. Experimental determination of a critical temperature for maximum anaerobic digester biogas production

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sichilalu, S

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available fission of methanogenic bacteria. The temperature was varied over time over several days and the biogas production is recorded every after 24 hours(1 day) . Based on the experiment setup, the results show a higher biogas production proportional to the rise...

  13. Ion permeability of the cytoplasmic membrane limits the maximum growth temperature of bacteria and archaea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Vossenberg, J.L C M; Ubbink-Kok, T.; Elferink, M.G.L.; Driessen, A.J.M.; Konings, W.N

    1995-01-01

    Protons and sodium ions are the most commonly used coupling ions in energy transduction in bacteria and archaea. At their growth temperature, the permeability of the cytoplasmic membrane of thermophilic bacteria to protons is high compared with that of sodium ions. In some thermophiles, sodium is

  14. NMR studies on graphite-methanol system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Akkad, T.M.

    1977-01-01

    The nuclear magnetic relaxation times for protons of methanol on graphite have been studied. The perpendicular and the transversal magnetization as a function of temperature were measured. The results show that the presence of graphite slowed down the methanol movement compared with that in the pure alcohol, and that the methanol molecules are attached to the graphite surface via methyl groups. (author)

  15. Harwell Graphite Calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linacre, J.K.

    1970-01-01

    The calorimeter is of the steady state temperature difference type. It contains a graphite sample supported axially in a graphite outer jacket, the assembly being contained in a thin stainless steel outer can. The temperature of the jacket and the temperature difference between sample and jacket are measured by chromel-alumel thermocouples. The instrument is calibrated by means of an electric heater of low mass positioned on the axis of the sample. The resistance of the heater is known and both current through the heater and the potential across it may be measured. The instrument is filled with nitrogen at a pressure of one half atmosphere at room temperature. The calorimeter has been designed for prolonged operation at temperatures up to 600°C, and dose rates up to 1 Wg -1 , and instruments have been in use for periods in excess of one year

  16. Purification and preparation of graphite oxide from natural graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panatarani, C., E-mail: c.panatarani@phys.unpad.ac.id; Muthahhari, N.; Joni, I. Made [Instrumentation Systems and Functional Material Processing Laboratory, Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Universitas Padjadjaran, Padjadjaran University, Jl. Raya Bandung-Sumedang KM 21, Jatinangor, 45363, Jawa Barat (Indonesia); Rianto, Anton [Grafindo Nusantara Ltd., Belagio Mall Lantai 2, Unit 0 L3-19, Kawasan Mega Kuningan, Kav. B4 No.3, Jakarta Selatan (Indonesia)

    2016-03-11

    Graphite oxide has attracted much interest as a possible route for preparation of natural graphite in the large-scale production and manipulation of graphene as a material with extraordinary electronic properties. Graphite oxide was prepared by modified Hummers method from purified natural graphite sample from West Kalimantan. We demonstrated that natural graphite is well-purified by acid leaching method. The purified graphite was proceed for intercalating process by modifying Hummers method. The modification is on the reaction time and temperature of the intercalation process. The materials used in the intercalating process are H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and KMNO{sub 4}. The purified natural graphite is analyzed by carbon content based on Loss on Ignition test. The thermo gravimetricanalysis and the Fouriertransform infrared spectroscopy are performed to investigate the oxidation results of the obtained GO which is indicated by the existence of functional groups. In addition, the X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy are also applied to characterize respectively for the crystal structure and elemental analysis. The results confirmed that natural graphite samples with 68% carbon content was purified into 97.68 % carbon content. While the intercalation process formed a formation of functional groups in the obtained GO. The results show that the temperature and reaction times have improved the efficiency of the oxidation process. It is concluded that these method could be considered as an important route for large-scale production of graphene.

  17. Seasonal maximum temperature prediction skill over Southern Africa: 1- vs 2-tiered forecasting systems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Lazenby, MJ

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available TEMPERATURE PREDICTION SKILL OVER SOUTHERN AFRICA: 1- VS. 2-TIERED FORECASTING SYSTEMS Melissa J. Lazenby University of Pretoria, Private Bag X20, Pretoria, 0028, South Africa Willem A. Landman Council for Scientific and Industrial....J., Tyson, P.D. and Tennant, W.J., 2001. Retro-active skill of multi- tiered forecasts of summer rainfall over southern Africa. International Journal of Climatology, 21, 1- 19. Mason, S.J. and Graham, N.E., 2002. Areas beneath the relative operating...

  18. Characterisation of Chlorine Behavior in French Graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blondel, A.; Moncoffre, N.; Toulhoat, N.; Bererd, N.; Petit, L.; Laurent, G.; Lamouroux, C.

    2016-01-01

    Chlorine 36 is one of the main radionuclides of concern for French graphite waste disposal. In order to help the understanding of its leaching behaviour under disposal conditions, the respective impact of temperature, irradiation and gas radiolysis on chlorine release in reactor has been studied. Chlorine 36 has been simulated through chlorine 37 ion implantation in virgin nuclear graphite samples. Results show that part of chlorine is highly mobile in graphite in the range of French reactors operating temperatures in relation with graphite structural recovering. Ballistic damage generated by irradiation also promotes chlorine release whereas no clear impact of the coolant gas radiolysis was observed in the absence of graphite radiolytic corrosion. (author)

  19. Extended Kalman Filtering to estimate temperature and irradiation for maximum power point tracking of a photovoltaic module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Docimo, D.J.; Ghanaatpishe, M.; Mamun, A.

    2017-01-01

    This paper develops an algorithm for estimating photovoltaic (PV) module temperature and effective irradiation level. The power output of a PV system depends directly on both of these states. Estimating the temperature and irradiation allows for improved state-based control methods while eliminating the need of additional sensors. Thermal models and irradiation estimators have been developed in the literature, but none incorporate feedback for estimation. This paper outlines an Extended Kalman Filter for temperature and irradiation estimation. These estimates are, in turn, used within a novel state-based controller that tracks the maximum power point of the PV system. Simulation results indicate this state-based controller provides up to an 8.5% increase in energy produced per day as compared to an impedance matching controller. A sensitivity analysis is provided to examine the impact state estimate errors have on the ability to find the optimal operating point of the PV system. - Highlights: • Developed a temperature and irradiation estimator for photovoltaic systems. • Designed an Extended Kalman Filter to handle model and measurement uncertainty. • Developed a state-based controller for maximum power point tracking (MPPT). • Validated combined estimator/controller algorithm for different weather conditions. • Algorithm increases energy captured up to 8.5% over traditional MPPT algorithms.

  20. Determination of maximum water temperature within the spent fuel pool of Angra Nuclear Power Plant - Unit 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, F.L., E-mail: fernanda.werner@poli.ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear; Alves, A.S.M., E-mail: asergi@eletronuclear.gov.br [Eletrobras Termonuclear (Eletronuclear), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Frutuoso e Melo, P.F., E-mail: frutuoso@nuclear.ufrj.br [Coordenacao de Pos-Graduacao e Pesquisa de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, a mathematical model for the determination of the maximum water temperature within the spent fuel pool of Angra Nuclear Power Plant – Unit 3 was developed. The model was obtained from the boundary layer analysis and the application of Navier-Stokes equation to a vertical flat plate immersed in a water flow under free convection regime. Both types of pressure loss coefficients through the flow channel were considers in the modeling, the form coefficient for fuel assemblies (FAs) and the loss due to rod friction. The resulting equations enabled the determination of a mixed water temperature below the storage racks (High Density Storage Racks) as well as the estimation of a temperature gradient through the racks. The model was applied to the authorized operation of the plant (power operation, plant outage and upset condition) and faulted conditions (loss of coolant accidents and external events). The results obtained are in agreement with Brazilian and international standards. (author)

  1. Determination of maximum water temperature within the spent fuel pool of Angra Nuclear Power Plant - Unit 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, F.L.; Frutuoso e Melo, P.F.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a mathematical model for the determination of the maximum water temperature within the spent fuel pool of Angra Nuclear Power Plant – Unit 3 was developed. The model was obtained from the boundary layer analysis and the application of Navier-Stokes equation to a vertical flat plate immersed in a water flow under free convection regime. Both types of pressure loss coefficients through the flow channel were considers in the modeling, the form coefficient for fuel assemblies (FAs) and the loss due to rod friction. The resulting equations enabled the determination of a mixed water temperature below the storage racks (High Density Storage Racks) as well as the estimation of a temperature gradient through the racks. The model was applied to the authorized operation of the plant (power operation, plant outage and upset condition) and faulted conditions (loss of coolant accidents and external events). The results obtained are in agreement with Brazilian and international standards. (author)

  2. Estimating daily minimum, maximum, and mean near surface air temperature using hybrid satellite models across Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, Adar; Dorman, Michael; Schwartz, Joel; Novack, Victor; Just, Allan C; Kloog, Itai

    2017-11-01

    Meteorological stations measure air temperature (Ta) accurately with high temporal resolution, but usually suffer from limited spatial resolution due to their sparse distribution across rural, undeveloped or less populated areas. Remote sensing satellite-based measurements provide daily surface temperature (Ts) data in high spatial and temporal resolution and can improve the estimation of daily Ta. In this study we developed spatiotemporally resolved models which allow us to predict three daily parameters: Ta Max (day time), 24h mean, and Ta Min (night time) on a fine 1km grid across the state of Israel. We used and compared both the Aqua and Terra MODIS satellites. We used linear mixed effect models, IDW (inverse distance weighted) interpolations and thin plate splines (using a smooth nonparametric function of longitude and latitude) to first calibrate between Ts and Ta in those locations where we have available data for both and used that calibration to fill in neighboring cells without surface monitors or missing Ts. Out-of-sample ten-fold cross validation (CV) was used to quantify the accuracy of our predictions. Our model performance was excellent for both days with and without available Ts observations for both Aqua and Terra (CV Aqua R 2 results for min 0.966, mean 0.986, and max 0.967; CV Terra R 2 results for min 0.965, mean 0.987, and max 0.968). Our research shows that daily min, mean and max Ta can be reliably predicted using daily MODIS Ts data even across Israel, with high accuracy even for days without Ta or Ts data. These predictions can be used as three separate Ta exposures in epidemiology studies for better diurnal exposure assessment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The effect of light intensity and temperature on performance of photoelectrochemical solar cells of structure ITO/TiO2/PVC-LiClO4/graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Yusri Abd Rahman; Muhammad Mat Salleh; Ibrahim Abu Talib; Muhammad Yahaya

    2006-01-01

    The photovoltaic characteristics of a photoelectrochemical solar cells of ITO/TiO 2 /PVC-LiCIO 4 /Graphite are reported. This paper is concerned with the effect of light intensity and temperature on performance of the device. The photoelectrochemical solar cell material was a screen-printed layer of titanium dioxide onto an ITO-covered glass substrate which was used as a working electrode of the device. The electrolyte used was PVC-LiCIO 4 that was prepared by solution casting technique. The ionic conductivity of the electrolyte as a function of temperature was obtained from impedance spectroscopy technique. The graphite film which serve as a counter electrode were prepared onto glass substrate by electron beam evaporation technique. The current-voltage, I-V characteristics of the device under illumination of 20, 40, 60, 80 and 100 mWcm -2 light from tungsten halogen lamp at 40 degree C were obtained using Keithley Voltmeter 175A and Keithley Amperemeter 197A. The current-voltage under illumination of 100 mWcm -2 at 30 degree C, 35 degree C, 40 degree C, 45 degree C and 50 degree C respectively were also obtained. It was found that efficiency of the device increases with both light intensity and temperature

  4. Comparative Study of Regional Estimation Methods for Daily Maximum Temperature (A Case Study of the Isfahan Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghamar Fadavi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: As the statistical time series are in short period and the meteorological station are not distributed well in mountainous area determining of climatic criteria are complex. Therefore, in recent years interpolation methods for establishment of continuous climatic data have been considered. Continuous daily maximum temperature data are a key factor for climate-crop modeling which is fundamental for water resources management, drought, and optimal use from climatic potentials of different regions. The main objective of this study is to evaluate different interpolation methods for estimation of regional maximum temperature in the Isfahan province. Materials and Methods: Isfahan province has about 937,105 square kilometers, between 30 degree and 43 minutes to 34 degree and 27 minutes North latitude equator line and 49 degree and 36 minutes to 55 degree and 31 minutes east longitude Greenwich. It is located in the center of Iran and it's western part extend to eastern footage of the Zagros mountain range. It should be mentioned that elevation range of meteorological stations are between 845 to 2490 in the study area. This study was done using daily maximum temperature data of 1992 and 2007 years of synoptic and climatology stations of I.R. of Iran meteorological organization (IRIMO. In order to interpolate temperature data, two years including 1992 and 2007 with different number of meteorological stations have been selected the temperature data of thirty meteorological stations (17 synoptic and 13 climatologically stations for 1992 year and fifty four meteorological stations (31 synoptic and 23 climatologically stations for 2007 year were used from Isfahan province and neighboring provinces. In order to regionalize the point data of daily maximum temperature, the interpolation methods, including inverse distance weighted (IDW, Kriging, Co-Kriging, Kriging-Regression, multiple regression and Spline were used. Therefore, for this allocated

  5. Computed estimates of maximum temperature elevations in fetal tissues during transabdominal pulsed Doppler examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bly, S H; Vlahovich, S; Mabee, P R; Hussey, R G

    1992-01-01

    Measured characteristics of ultrasonic fields were obtained in submissions from manufacturers of diagnostic ultrasound equipment for devices operating in pulsed Doppler mode. Simple formulae were used with these data to generate upper limits to fetal temperature elevations, delta Tlim, during a transabdominal pulsed Doppler examination. A total of 236 items were analyzed, each item being a console/transducer/operating-mode/intended-use combination, for which the spatial-peak temporal-average intensity, ISPTA, was greater than 500 mW cm-2. The largest calculated delta Tlim values were approximately 1.5, 7.1 and 8.7 degrees C for first-, second- and third-trimester examinations, respectively. The vast majority of items yielded delta Tlim values which were less than 1 degree C in the first trimester. For second- and third-trimester examinations, where heating of fetal bone determines delta Tlim, most delta Tlim values were less than 4 degrees C. The clinical significance of the results is discussed.

  6. Enhanced oxidation resistance of SiC coating on Graphite by crack healing at the elevated temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jae-Won; Kim, Eung-Seon; Kim, Jae-Un; Kim, Yoo-Taek [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Windes, William E. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho (United States)

    2015-10-15

    An oxidation protective SiC coating on the graphite components could assist in slowing the oxidation down. However, the irradiation induced dimensional changes in the graphite (shrinkage followed by swelling) can occur, while the SiC CVD coating has been reported to swell even at a low dose neutron irradiation. In this work, functionally gradient electron beam evaporative coating with an ion beam processing was firstly conducted and then SiC coating on the FG coating to the desired thickness is followed. For the crack healing, both the repeated EB-PVD and CVD were performed. Oxidation and thermal cycling tests of the coated specimens were performed and reflected in the process development. In this work, efforts have been paid to heal the cracks in the SiC coated layer on graphite with both EB-PVD and CVD. CVD seems to be more appropriate coating method for crack healing probably due to its excellent crack-line filling capability for high density and high aspect ratio.

  7. Estimation of daily maximum and minimum air temperatures in urban landscapes using MODIS time series satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Cheolhee; Im, Jungho; Park, Seonyoung; Quackenbush, Lindi J.

    2018-03-01

    Urban air temperature is considered a significant variable for a variety of urban issues, and analyzing the spatial patterns of air temperature is important for urban planning and management. However, insufficient weather stations limit accurate spatial representation of temperature within a heterogeneous city. This study used a random forest machine learning approach to estimate daily maximum and minimum air temperatures (Tmax and Tmin) for two megacities with different climate characteristics: Los Angeles, USA, and Seoul, South Korea. This study used eight time-series land surface temperature (LST) data from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), with seven auxiliary variables: elevation, solar radiation, normalized difference vegetation index, latitude, longitude, aspect, and the percentage of impervious area. We found different relationships between the eight time-series LSTs with Tmax/Tmin for the two cities, and designed eight schemes with different input LST variables. The schemes were evaluated using the coefficient of determination (R2) and Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) from 10-fold cross-validation. The best schemes produced R2 of 0.850 and 0.777 and RMSE of 1.7 °C and 1.2 °C for Tmax and Tmin in Los Angeles, and R2 of 0.728 and 0.767 and RMSE of 1.1 °C and 1.2 °C for Tmax and Tmin in Seoul, respectively. LSTs obtained the day before were crucial for estimating daily urban air temperature. Estimated air temperature patterns showed that Tmax was highly dependent on the geographic factors (e.g., sea breeze, mountains) of the two cities, while Tmin showed marginally distinct temperature differences between built-up and vegetated areas in the two cities.

  8. Criteria for the selection of graphites for HTR integral block fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knowles, A.N.

    1980-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the special requirements for integral block fuel elements of the type first used in the Fort St. Vrain reactor. The main idea of these elements is that the carrier block and separate graphite clad fuel pins are combined into a single monolith. This combination leads to lower fabrication costs and some improvement in the thermal performance (lower temperature difference between fuel and the surface of heat transfer into the coolant). The advent of block fuel for HTRs of the Fort St. Vrain type has placed a fresh emphasis on the selection of graphite for block manufacture in respect of physical properties. This is because the temperature distributions typical of such fuelled blocks lead to shutdown stresses close to the maximum the graphite can sustain without damage. Figures presented in this paper suggest that the physical properties of the graphite can play a relatively large part in reducing such stress levels and that guidance on the key requirements for suitable specifications is therefore particularly needed by the manufacturers of fuel block graphites. While graphites for fuel blocks have this special need for combinations of physical properties which lead to low thermal and shrinkage stresses, the other characteristics must also receive attention. A low graphite cost combined with good homogeneity in the brick, so that waste minimized, are still necessary, while isotropy is also very important

  9. AGC-2 Graphite Preirradiation Data Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Swank; Joseph Lord; David Rohrbaugh; William Windes

    2012-10-01

    The NGNP Graphite R&D program is currently establishing the safe operating envelope of graphite core components for a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design. The program is generating quantitative data necessary for predicting the behavior and operating performance of the new nuclear graphite grades. To determine the in-service behavior of the graphite for pebble bed and prismatic designs, the Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) experiment is underway. This experiment is examining the properties and behavior of nuclear grade graphite over a large spectrum of temperatures, neutron fluences and compressive loads. Each experiment consists of over 400 graphite specimens that are characterized prior to irradiation and following irradiation. Six experiments are planned with the first, AGC-1, currently being irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and pre-irradiation characterization of the second, AGC-2, completed. This data package establishes the readiness of 512 specimens for assembly into the AGC-2 capsule.

  10. The Impacts of Maximum Temperature and Climate Change to Current and Future Pollen Distribution in Skopje, Republic of Macedonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Kendrovski

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND. The goal of the present paper was to assess the impact of current and future burden of the ambient temperature to pollen distributions in Skopje. METHODS. In the study we have evaluated a correlation between the concentration of pollen grains in the atmosphere of Skopje and maximum temperature, during the vegetation period of 1996, 2003, 2007 and 2009 as a current burden in context of climate change. For our analysis we have selected 9 representative of each phytoallergen group (trees, grasses, weeds. The concentration of pollen grains has been monitored by a Lanzoni volumetric pollen trap. The correlation between the concentration of pollen grains in the atmosphere and selected meteorological variable from weekly monitoring has been studied with the help of linear regression and correlation coefficients. RESULTS. The prevalence of the sensibilization of standard pollen allergens in Skopje during the some period shows increasing from 16,9% in 1996 to 19,8% in 2009. We detect differences in onset of flowering, maximum and end of the length of seasons for pollen. The pollen distributions and risk increases in 3 main periods: early spring, spring and summer which are the main cause of allergies during these seasons. The largest increase of air temperature due to climate change in Skopje is expected in the summer season. CONCLUSION. The impacts of climate change by increasing of the temperature in the next decades very likely will include impacts on pollen production and differences in current pollen season. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2012; 11(1.000: 35-40

  11. Management of UKAEA graphite liabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wise, M.

    2001-01-01

    The UK Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA) is responsible for managing its liabilities for redundant research reactors and other active facilities concerned with the development of the UK nuclear technology programme since 1947. These liabilities include irradiated graphite from a variety of different sources including low irradiation temperature reactor graphite (the Windscale Piles 1 and 2, British Energy Pile O and Graphite Low Energy Experimental Pile at Harwell and the Material Testing Reactors at Harwell and Dounreay), advanced gas-cooled reactor graphite (from the Windscale Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor) and graphite from fast reactor systems (neutron shield graphite from the Dounreay Prototype Fast Reactor and Dounreay Fast Reactor). The decommissioning and dismantling of these facilities will give rise to over 6,000 tonnes of graphite requiring disposal. The first graphite will be retrieved from the dismantling of Windscale Pile 1 and the Windscale Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor during the next five years. UKAEA has undertaken extensive studies to consider the best practicable options for disposing of these graphite liabilities in a manner that is safe whilst minimising the associated costs and technical risks. These options include (but are not limited to), disposal as Low Level Waste, incineration, or encapsulation and disposal as Intermediate Level Waste. There are a number of technical issues associated with each of these proposed disposal options; these include Wigner energy, radionuclide inventory determination, encapsulation of graphite dust, galvanic coupling interactions enhancing the corrosion of mild steel and public acceptability. UKAEA is currently developing packaging concepts and designing packaging plants for processing these graphite wastes in consultation with other holders of graphite wastes throughout Europe. 'Letters of Comfort' have been sought from both the Low Level Waste and the Intermediate Level Waste disposal organisations to support the

  12. Reconstructing temperatures in the Maritime Alps, Italy, since the Last Glacial Maximum using cosmogenic noble gas paleothermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Marissa; Spagnolo, Matteo; Ribolini, Adriano; Shuster, David

    2016-04-01

    The Gesso Valley, located in the southwestern-most, Maritime portion of the European Alps, contains an exceptionally well-preserved record of glacial advances during the late Pleistocene and Holocene. Detailed geomorphic mapping, geochronology of glacial deposits, and glacier reconstructions indicate that glaciers in this Mediterranean region responded to millennial scale climate variability differently than glaciers in the interior of the European Alps. This suggests that the Mediterranean Sea somehow modulated the climate of this region. However, since glaciers respond to changes in temperature and precipitation, both variables were potentially influenced by proximity to the Sea. To disentangle the competing effects of temperature and precipitation changes on glacier size, we are constraining past temperature variations in the Gesso Valley since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) using cosmogenic noble gas paleothermometry. The cosmogenic noble gases 3He and 21Ne experience diffusive loss from common minerals like quartz and feldspars at Earth surface temperatures. Cosmogenic noble gas paleothermometry utilizes this open-system behavior to quantitatively constrain thermal histories of rocks during exposure to cosmic ray particles at the Earth's surface. We will present measurements of cosmogenic 3He in quartz sampled from moraines in the Gesso Valley with LGM, Bühl stadial, and Younger Dryas ages. With these 3He measurements and experimental data quantifying the diffusion kinetics of 3He in quartz, we will provide a preliminary temperature reconstruction for the Gesso Valley since the LGM. Future work on samples from younger moraines in the valley system will be used to fill in details of the more recent temperature history.

  13. Acoustic emission from polycrystalline graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioka, I.; Yoda, S.; Oku, T.; Miyamoto, Y.

    1987-01-01

    Acoustic emission was monitored from polycrystalline graphites with different microstructure (pore size and pore volume) subjected to compressive loading. The graphites used in this study comprised five brands, that is, PGX, ISEM-1, IG-11, IG-15, and ISO-88. A root mean square (RMS) voltage and event counts of acoustic emission for graphites were measured during compressive loading. The acoustic emission was measured using a computed-based data acquisition and analysis system. The graphites were first deformed up to 80 % of the average fracture stress, then unloaded and reloaded again until the fracture occured. During the first loading, the change in RMS voltage for acoustic emission was detected from the initial stage. During the unloading, the RMS voltage became zero level as soon as the applied stress was released and then gradually rose to a peak and declined. The behavior indicated that the reversed plastic deformation occured in graphites. During the second loading, the RMS voltage gently increased until the applied stress exceeded the maximum stress of the first loading; there is no Kaiser effect in the graphites. A bicrystal model could give a reasonable explanation of this results. The empirical equation between the ratio of σ AE to σ f and σ f was obtained. It is considered that the detection of microfracture by the acoustic emission technique is effective in macrofracture prediction of polycrystalline graphites. (author)

  14. Nanostructured carbon films with oriented graphitic planes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teo, E. H. T.; Kalish, R.; Kulik, J.; Kauffmann, Y.; Lifshitz, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Nanostructured carbon films with oriented graphitic planes can be deposited by applying energetic carbon bombardment. The present work shows the possibility of structuring graphitic planes perpendicular to the substrate in following two distinct ways: (i) applying sufficiently large carbon energies for deposition at room temperature (E>10 keV), (ii) utilizing much lower energies for deposition at elevated substrate temperatures (T>200 deg. C). High resolution transmission electron microscopy is used to probe the graphitic planes. The alignment achieved at elevated temperatures does not depend on the deposition angle. The data provides insight into the mechanisms leading to the growth of oriented graphitic planes under different conditions.

  15. Improving Estimations of Spatial Distribution of Soil Respiration Using the Bayesian Maximum Entropy Algorithm and Soil Temperature as Auxiliary Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junguo Hu

    Full Text Available Soil respiration inherently shows strong spatial variability. It is difficult to obtain an accurate characterization of soil respiration with an insufficient number of monitoring points. However, it is expensive and cumbersome to deploy many sensors. To solve this problem, we proposed employing the Bayesian Maximum Entropy (BME algorithm, using soil temperature as auxiliary information, to study the spatial distribution of soil respiration. The BME algorithm used the soft data (auxiliary information effectively to improve the estimation accuracy of the spatiotemporal distribution of soil respiration. Based on the functional relationship between soil temperature and soil respiration, the BME algorithm satisfactorily integrated soil temperature data into said spatial distribution. As a means of comparison, we also applied the Ordinary Kriging (OK and Co-Kriging (Co-OK methods. The results indicated that the root mean squared errors (RMSEs and absolute values of bias for both Day 1 and Day 2 were the lowest for the BME method, thus demonstrating its higher estimation accuracy. Further, we compared the performance of the BME algorithm coupled with auxiliary information, namely soil temperature data, and the OK method without auxiliary information in the same study area for 9, 21, and 37 sampled points. The results showed that the RMSEs for the BME algorithm (0.972 and 1.193 were less than those for the OK method (1.146 and 1.539 when the number of sampled points was 9 and 37, respectively. This indicates that the former method using auxiliary information could reduce the required number of sampling points for studying spatial distribution of soil respiration. Thus, the BME algorithm, coupled with soil temperature data, can not only improve the accuracy of soil respiration spatial interpolation but can also reduce the number of sampling points.

  16. Improving Estimations of Spatial Distribution of Soil Respiration Using the Bayesian Maximum Entropy Algorithm and Soil Temperature as Auxiliary Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Junguo; Zhou, Jian; Zhou, Guomo; Luo, Yiqi; Xu, Xiaojun; Li, Pingheng; Liang, Junyi

    2016-01-01

    Soil respiration inherently shows strong spatial variability. It is difficult to obtain an accurate characterization of soil respiration with an insufficient number of monitoring points. However, it is expensive and cumbersome to deploy many sensors. To solve this problem, we proposed employing the Bayesian Maximum Entropy (BME) algorithm, using soil temperature as auxiliary information, to study the spatial distribution of soil respiration. The BME algorithm used the soft data (auxiliary information) effectively to improve the estimation accuracy of the spatiotemporal distribution of soil respiration. Based on the functional relationship between soil temperature and soil respiration, the BME algorithm satisfactorily integrated soil temperature data into said spatial distribution. As a means of comparison, we also applied the Ordinary Kriging (OK) and Co-Kriging (Co-OK) methods. The results indicated that the root mean squared errors (RMSEs) and absolute values of bias for both Day 1 and Day 2 were the lowest for the BME method, thus demonstrating its higher estimation accuracy. Further, we compared the performance of the BME algorithm coupled with auxiliary information, namely soil temperature data, and the OK method without auxiliary information in the same study area for 9, 21, and 37 sampled points. The results showed that the RMSEs for the BME algorithm (0.972 and 1.193) were less than those for the OK method (1.146 and 1.539) when the number of sampled points was 9 and 37, respectively. This indicates that the former method using auxiliary information could reduce the required number of sampling points for studying spatial distribution of soil respiration. Thus, the BME algorithm, coupled with soil temperature data, can not only improve the accuracy of soil respiration spatial interpolation but can also reduce the number of sampling points.

  17. Electronic properties of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, J.

    2010-10-01

    In this thesis, low-temperature magneto-transport (T ∼ 10 mK) and the de Haas-van Alphen effect of both natural graphite and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) are examined. In the first part, low field magneto-transport up to B = 11 T is discussed. A Fourier analysis of the background removed signal shows that the electric transport in graphite is governed by two types of charge carriers, electrons and holes. Their phase and frequency values are in agreement with the predictions of the SWM-model. The SWM-model is confirmed by detailed band structure calculations using the magnetic field Hamiltonian of graphite. The movement of the Fermi at B > 2 T is calculated self-consistently assuming that the sum of the electron and hole concentrations is constant. The second part of the thesis deals with high field magneto-transport of natural graphite in the magnetic field range 0 ≤ B ≤ 28 T. Both spin splitting of magneto-transport features in tilted field configuration and the onset of the charge density wave (CDW) phase for different temperatures with the magnetic field applied normal to the sample plane are discussed. Concerning the Zeeman effect, the SWM calculations including the Fermi energy movement require a g-factor of g* equal to 2.5 ± 0.1 to reproduce the spin spilt features. The measurements of the charge density wave state confirm that its onset magnetic field can be described by a Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS)-type formula. The measurements of the de Haas-van Alphen effect are in agreement with the results of the magneto-transport measurements at low field. (author)

  18. Graphite materials for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oku, Tatsuo

    1991-01-01

    Graphite materials have been used in the nuclear fission reactors from the beginning of the reactor development for the speed reduction and reflection of neutron. Graphite materials are used both as a moderator and as a reflector in the core of high temperature gas-cooled reactors, and both as a radiation shielding material and as a reflector in the surrounding of the core for the fast breeder reactor. On the other hand, graphite materials are being positively used as a first wall of plasma as it is known that low Z materials are useful for holding high temperature plasma in the nuclear fusion devices. In this paper the present status of the application of graphite materials to the nuclear fission reactors and fusion devices (reactors) is presented. In addition, a part of results on the related properties to the structural design and safety evaluation and results examined on the subjects that should be done in the future are also described. (author)

  19. Experiments on graphite block gaps connected with leak flow in bottom-core structure of experimental very high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Kenji; Futakawa, Masatoshi; Takizuka, Takakazu; Kaburaki, Hideo; Sanokawa, Konomo

    1984-01-01

    In order to minimize the leak flow rate of an experimental VHTR (a multi-purpose very high-temperature gas-cooled reactor), the graphite blocks are tightened to reduce the gap distance between blocks by core restrainers surrounded outside of the fixed reflectors of the bottom-core structure and seal elements are placed in the gaps. By using a 1/2.75-scale model of the bottom-core structure, the experiments on the following items have been carried out: a relationship between core restraint force and block gap, a relationship between core restraint force and inclined angle of the model, leak flow characteristics of seal elements etc. The conclusions derived from the experiments are as follows: (1) Core restraint force is significantly effective for decreasing the gap distance between hot plenum blocks, but ineffective for the gap between hot plenum block and fixed reflector. (2) Graphite seal element reduces the leak flow rate from the top surface of hot plenum block into plenum region to one-third. (author)

  20. Pyrolytic graphite gauge for measuring heat flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunker, Robert C. (Inventor); Ewing, Mark E. (Inventor); Shipley, John L. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A gauge for measuring heat flux, especially heat flux encountered in a high temperature environment, is provided. The gauge includes at least one thermocouple and an anisotropic pyrolytic graphite body that covers at least part of, and optionally encases the thermocouple. Heat flux is incident on the anisotropic pyrolytic graphite body by arranging the gauge so that the gauge surface on which convective and radiative fluxes are incident is perpendicular to the basal planes of the pyrolytic graphite. The conductivity of the pyrolytic graphite permits energy, transferred into the pyrolytic graphite body in the form of heat flux on the incident (or facing) surface, to be quickly distributed through the entire pyrolytic graphite body, resulting in small substantially instantaneous temperature gradients. Temperature changes to the body can thereby be measured by the thermocouple, and reduced to quantify the heat flux incident to the body.

  1. Effect of active zinc oxide dispersion on reduced graphite oxide for hydrogen sulfide adsorption at mid-temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Hoon Sub [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L3G1 (Canada); Greenhouse Gas Department, Korea Institute of Energy Research, 152 Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Moon Gyu [Department of Chemical Engineering Education, Chungnam National University, 99 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Croiset, Eric, E-mail: ecroiset@uwaterloo.ca [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L3G1 (Canada); Chen, Zhongwei [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L3G1 (Canada); Nam, Sung Chan; Ryu, Ho-Jung [Greenhouse Gas Department, Korea Institute of Energy Research, 152 Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Kwang Bok, E-mail: cosy32@cnu.ac.kr [Department of Chemical Engineering Education, Chungnam National University, 99 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-01

    Composites of Zinc oxide (ZnO) with reduced graphite oxide (rGO) were synthesized and used as adsorbents for hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) at 300 °C. Various characterization methods (TGA, XRD, FT-IR, TEM and XPS) were performed in order to link their H{sub 2}S adsorption performance to the properties of the adsorbent's surface. Microwave-assisted reduction process of graphite oxide (GO) provided mild reduction environment, allowing oxygen-containing functional groups to remain on the rGO surface. It was confirmed that for the ZnO/rGO synthesize using the microwave-assisted reduction method, the ZnO particle size and the degree of ZnO dispersion remained stable over time at 300 °C, which was not the case for only the ZnO particles themselves. This stable highly dispersed feature allows for sustained high surface area over time. This was confirmed through breakthrough experiments for H{sub 2}S adsorption where it was found that the ZnO/rGO composite showed almost four times higher ZnO utilization efficiency than ZnO itself. The effect of the H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} on H{sub 2}S adsorption was also investigated. The presence of hydrogen in the H{sub 2}S stream had a positive effect on the removal of H{sub 2}S since it allows a reducing environment for Zn-O and Zn-S bonds, leading to more active sites (Zn{sup 2+}) to sulfur molecules. On the other hand, the presence of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) showed the opposite trend, likely due to the oxidation environment and also due to possible competitive adsorption between H{sub 2}S and CO{sub 2}.

  2. Effect of active zinc oxide dispersion on reduced graphite oxide for hydrogen sulfide adsorption at mid-temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hoon Sub; Park, Moon Gyu; Croiset, Eric; Chen, Zhongwei; Nam, Sung Chan; Ryu, Ho-Jung; Yi, Kwang Bok

    2013-09-01

    Composites of Zinc oxide (ZnO) with reduced graphite oxide (rGO) were synthesized and used as adsorbents for hydrogen sulfide (H2S) at 300 °C. Various characterization methods (TGA, XRD, FT-IR, TEM and XPS) were performed in order to link their H2S adsorption performance to the properties of the adsorbent's surface. Microwave-assisted reduction process of graphite oxide (GO) provided mild reduction environment, allowing oxygen-containing functional groups to remain on the rGO surface. It was confirmed that for the ZnO/rGO synthesize using the microwave-assisted reduction method, the ZnO particle size and the degree of ZnO dispersion remained stable over time at 300 °C, which was not the case for only the ZnO particles themselves. This stable highly dispersed feature allows for sustained high surface area over time. This was confirmed through breakthrough experiments for H2S adsorption where it was found that the ZnO/rGO composite showed almost four times higher ZnO utilization efficiency than ZnO itself. The effect of the H2 and CO2 on H2S adsorption was also investigated. The presence of hydrogen in the H2S stream had a positive effect on the removal of H2S since it allows a reducing environment for Znsbnd O and Znsbnd S bonds, leading to more active sites (Zn2+) to sulfur molecules. On the other hand, the presence of carbon dioxide (CO2) showed the opposite trend, likely due to the oxidation environment and also due to possible competitive adsorption between H2S and CO2.

  3. Effect of active zinc oxide dispersion on reduced graphite oxide for hydrogen sulfide adsorption at mid-temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Hoon Sub; Park, Moon Gyu; Croiset, Eric; Chen, Zhongwei; Nam, Sung Chan; Ryu, Ho-Jung; Yi, Kwang Bok

    2013-01-01

    Composites of Zinc oxide (ZnO) with reduced graphite oxide (rGO) were synthesized and used as adsorbents for hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) at 300 °C. Various characterization methods (TGA, XRD, FT-IR, TEM and XPS) were performed in order to link their H 2 S adsorption performance to the properties of the adsorbent's surface. Microwave-assisted reduction process of graphite oxide (GO) provided mild reduction environment, allowing oxygen-containing functional groups to remain on the rGO surface. It was confirmed that for the ZnO/rGO synthesize using the microwave-assisted reduction method, the ZnO particle size and the degree of ZnO dispersion remained stable over time at 300 °C, which was not the case for only the ZnO particles themselves. This stable highly dispersed feature allows for sustained high surface area over time. This was confirmed through breakthrough experiments for H 2 S adsorption where it was found that the ZnO/rGO composite showed almost four times higher ZnO utilization efficiency than ZnO itself. The effect of the H 2 and CO 2 on H 2 S adsorption was also investigated. The presence of hydrogen in the H 2 S stream had a positive effect on the removal of H 2 S since it allows a reducing environment for Zn-O and Zn-S bonds, leading to more active sites (Zn 2+ ) to sulfur molecules. On the other hand, the presence of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) showed the opposite trend, likely due to the oxidation environment and also due to possible competitive adsorption between H 2 S and CO 2 .

  4. A safety assessment of the use of graphite in nuclear reactors licensed by the US NRC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schweitzer, D.G.; Gurinsky, D.H.; Kaplan, E.; Sastre, C.

    1987-09-01

    This report reviews existing literature and knowledge on graphite burning and on stored energy accumulation and releases in order to assess what role, if any, a stored energy release can have in initiating or contributing to hypothetical graphite burning scenarios in research reactors. It also addresses the question of graphite ignition and self-sustained combustion in the event of a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The conditions necessary to initiate and maintain graphite burning are summarized and discussed. From analyses of existing information it is concluded that only stored energy accumulations and releases below the burning temperature (650 0 C) are pertinent. After reviewing the existing knowledge on stored energy it is possible to show that stored energy releases do not occur spontaneously, and that the maximum stored energy that can be released from any reactor containing graphite is a very small fraction of the energy produced during the first few minutes of a burning incident. The conclusions from these analyses are that the potential to initiate or maintain a graphite burning incident is essentially independent of the stored energy in the graphite, and depends on other factors that are unique for these reactors, research reactors, and for Fort St. Vrain. In order to have self-sustained rapid graphite oxidation in any of these reactors, certain necessary conditions of geometry, temperature, oxygen supply, reaction product removal, and a favorable heat balance must be maintained. There is no new evidence associated with either the Windscale Accident or the Chernobyl Accident that indicates a credible potential for a graphite burning accident in any of the reactors considered in this review

  5. Proton irradiated graphite grades for a long baseline neutrino facility experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simos, N.; Nocera, P.; Zwaska, R.; Mokhov, N.

    2017-01-01

    In search of a low-Z pion production target for the Long Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) of the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) four graphite grades were irradiated with protons in the energy range of 140–180 MeV, to peak fluence of ~6.1×10"2"0 p/cm"2 and irradiation temperatures between 120–200 °C. The test array included POCO ZXF-5Q, Toyo-Tanso IG 430, Carbone-Lorraine 2020 and SGL R7650 grades of graphite. Irradiation was performed at the Brookhaven Linear Isotope Producer. Postirradiation analyses were performed with the objective of (a) comparing their response under the postulated irradiation conditions to guide a graphite grade selection for use as a pion target and (b) understanding changes in physical and mechanical properties as well as microstructure that occurred as a result of the achieved fluence and in particular at this low-temperature regime where pion graphite targets are expected to operate. A further goal of the postirradiation evaluation was to establish a proton-neutron correlation damage on graphite that will allow for the use of a wealth of available neutron-based damage data in proton-based studies and applications. Macroscopic postirradiation analyses as well as energy dispersive x-ray diffraction of 200 KeV x rays at the NSLS synchrotron of Brookhaven National Laboratory were employed. The macroscopic analyses revealed differences in the physical and strength properties of the four grades with behavior however under proton irradiation that qualitatively agrees with that reported for graphite under neutrons for the same low temperature regime and in particular the increase of thermal expansion, strength and Young’s modulus. The proton fluence level of ~10"2"0 cm"-"2 where strength reaches a maximum before it begins to decrease at higher fluences has been identified and it agrees with neutron-induced changes. X-ray diffraction analyses of the proton irradiated graphite revealed for the first time the similarity in

  6. Proton irradiated graphite grades for a long baseline neutrino facility experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simos, N.; Nocera, P.; Zhong, Z.; Zwaska, R.; Mokhov, N.; Misek, J.; Ammigan, K.; Hurh, P.; Kotsina, Z.

    2017-07-01

    In search of a low-Z pion production target for the Long Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) of the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) four graphite grades were irradiated with protons in the energy range of 140-180 MeV, to peak fluence of ˜6.1 ×1020 p /cm2 and irradiation temperatures between 120 - 200 °C . The test array included POCO ZXF-5Q, Toyo-Tanso IG 430, Carbone-Lorraine 2020 and SGL R7650 grades of graphite. Irradiation was performed at the Brookhaven Linear Isotope Producer. Postirradiation analyses were performed with the objective of (a) comparing their response under the postulated irradiation conditions to guide a graphite grade selection for use as a pion target and (b) understanding changes in physical and mechanical properties as well as microstructure that occurred as a result of the achieved fluence and in particular at this low-temperature regime where pion graphite targets are expected to operate. A further goal of the postirradiation evaluation was to establish a proton-neutron correlation damage on graphite that will allow for the use of a wealth of available neutron-based damage data in proton-based studies and applications. Macroscopic postirradiation analyses as well as energy dispersive x-ray diffraction of 200 KeV x rays at the NSLS synchrotron of Brookhaven National Laboratory were employed. The macroscopic analyses revealed differences in the physical and strength properties of the four grades with behavior however under proton irradiation that qualitatively agrees with that reported for graphite under neutrons for the same low temperature regime and in particular the increase of thermal expansion, strength and Young's modulus. The proton fluence level of ˜1020 cm-2 where strength reaches a maximum before it begins to decrease at higher fluences has been identified and it agrees with neutron-induced changes. X-ray diffraction analyses of the proton irradiated graphite revealed for the first time the similarity in

  7. Thermally exfoliated graphite oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prud'Homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Abdala, Ahmed (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A modified graphite oxide material contains a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 sq m/g to 2600 sq m/g, wherein the thermally exfoliated graphite oxide displays no signature of the original graphite and/or graphite oxide, as determined by X-ray diffraction.

  8. Buckling and reaction rate measurements in graphite moderated lattices fuelled with plutonium-uranium oxide clusters at temperatures up to 400 deg. C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, D.H.; Gibson, M.; King, D.C.; Marshall, J.; Puckett, B.J.; Richards, A.E.; Wass, T.; Wilson, D.J.

    1965-07-01

    The Report describes a series of experiments carried out in SCORPIO I and II on sub-critical graphite moderated lattices fuelled with 21-rod clusters of PuO 2 /UO 2 fuel. Three fuel batches with nominal plutonium: uranium ratios of 0.25%, 0.8% and 1.2% were investigated at temperatures between 20 deg. C and 400 deg. C. Because of the limited amounts of the three fuels, exponential measurements were made in 2-zone stacks, the outer regions of which were loaded with suitably matched 'reference fuel'. Fine structure distributions in the lattice cell were obtained with manganese and indium foils. Pu239/U235 fission ratios were determined both by fission chambers and by fission-product counting techniques. (author)

  9. Buckling and reaction rate measurements in graphite moderated lattices fuelled with plutonium-uranium oxide clusters at temperatures up to 400 deg. C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, D H; Gibson, M; King, D C; Marshall, J; Puckett, B J; Richards, A E; Wass, T; Wilson, D J [General Reactor Physics Division, Atomic Energy Establishment, Winfrith, Dorchester, Dorset (United Kingdom)

    1965-07-15

    The Report describes a series of experiments carried out in SCORPIO I and II on sub-critical graphite moderated lattices fuelled with 21-rod clusters of PuO{sub 2}/UO{sub 2} fuel. Three fuel batches with nominal plutonium: uranium ratios of 0.25%, 0.8% and 1.2% were investigated at temperatures between 20 deg. C and 400 deg. C. Because of the limited amounts of the three fuels, exponential measurements were made in 2-zone stacks, the outer regions of which were loaded with suitably matched 'reference fuel'. Fine structure distributions in the lattice cell were obtained with manganese and indium foils. Pu239/U235 fission ratios were determined both by fission chambers and by fission-product counting techniques. (author) 14 refs, 30 figs, 18 tabs

  10. Optimisation of sea surface current retrieval using a maximum cross correlation technique on modelled sea surface temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuzé, Céline; Eriksson, Leif; Carvajal, Gisela

    2017-04-01

    Using sea surface temperature from satellite images to retrieve sea surface currents is not a new idea, but so far its operational near-real time implementation has not been possible. Validation studies are too region-specific or uncertain, due to the errors induced by the images themselves. Moreover, the sensitivity of the most common retrieval method, the maximum cross correlation, to the three parameters that have to be set is unknown. Using model outputs instead of satellite images, biases induced by this method are assessed here, for four different seas of Western Europe, and the best of nine settings and eight temporal resolutions are determined. For all regions, tracking a small 5 km pattern from the first image over a large 30 km region around its original location on a second image, separated from the first image by 6 to 9 hours returned the most accurate results. Moreover, for all regions, the problem is not inaccurate results but missing results, where the velocity is too low to be picked by the retrieval. The results are consistent both with limitations caused by ocean surface current dynamics and with the available satellite technology, indicating that automated sea surface current retrieval from sea surface temperature images is feasible now, for search and rescue operations, pollution confinement or even for more energy efficient and comfortable ship navigation.

  11. Apparent molal volumes of HMT and TATD in aqueous solutions around the temperature of maximum density of water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clavijo Penagos, J.A.; Blanco, L.H.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ►V φ for HMT and TATD in aqueous solutions around the temperature of maximum density of water are reported. ► V φ is linear in m form m = 0.025 for all the aqueous solutions investigated. ► Variation of V ¯ 2 ∞ with T obeys a second grade polynomial trend. ► The solutes are classified as structure breakers according to Hepler’s criterion. - Abstract: Apparent molal volumes V φ have been determined from density measurements for several aqueous solutions of 1,3,5,7-tetraazatricyclo[3.3.1.1(3,7)]decane (HMT) and 1,3,6,8-tetraazatricyclo[4.4.1.1(3,8)]dodecane (TATD) at T = (275.15, 275.65, 276.15, 276.65, 277.15, 277.65 and 278.15) K as function of composition. The infinite dilution partial molar volumes of solutes in aqueous solution are evaluated through extrapolation. Interactions of the solutes with water are discussed in terms of the effect of the temperature on the volumetric properties and the structure of the solutes. The results are interpreted in terms of water structure-breaking or structure forming character of the solutes.

  12. Neutron multipilication factors as a function of temperature: a comparison of calculated and measured values for lattices using 233UO2-ThO2 fuel in graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, D.F.; Gore, B.F.

    1978-01-01

    Neutron multiplication factors calculated as a function of temperature for three graphite-moderated 233 UO 2 -ThO 2 -fueled lattices are correlated with the values measured for these lattices in the high-temperature lattice test reactor (HTLTR). The correlation analysis is accomplished by fitting calculated values of k/sub infinity/(T) to the measured values using two least-squares-fitted correlation coefficients: (a) a normalization factor and (b) a temperature coefficient bias factor. These correlations indicate the existence of a negative (nonconservative) bias in temperature coefficients of reactivity calculated using ENDF/B-IV cross-section data. Use of an alternate cross-section data set for thorium, which has a smaller resonance integral than ENDF/B-IV data, improved the agreement between calculated and measured temperature coefficients of reactivity for the three experimental lattices. The results of the correlations are used to estimate the bias in the temperature coefficient of reactivity calculated for a lattice typical of fresh 233 U recycle fuel for a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR). This extrapolation to a lattice having a heavier fissile loading than the experimental lattices is accomplished using a sensitivity analysis of the estimated bias to alternate thorium cross-section data used in calculations of k/sub infinity/(T). The envelope of uncertainty expected to contain the actual values for the temperature coefficient of the reactivity for the 233 U-fueled HTGR lattice studied remains negative at 1600 K (1327 0 C). Although a broader base of experimental data with improved accuracy is always desirable, the existing data base provided by the HTLTR experiments is judged to be adequate for the verification of neutronic calculations for the HTGR containing 233 U fuel at its current state of development

  13. Estimation of Land Surface Temperature through Blending MODIS and AMSR-E Data with the Bayesian Maximum Entropy Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaokang Kou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Land surface temperature (LST plays a major role in the study of surface energy balances. Remote sensing techniques provide ways to monitor LST at large scales. However, due to atmospheric influences, significant missing data exist in LST products retrieved from satellite thermal infrared (TIR remotely sensed data. Although passive microwaves (PMWs are able to overcome these atmospheric influences while estimating LST, the data are constrained by low spatial resolution. In this study, to obtain complete and high-quality LST data, the Bayesian Maximum Entropy (BME method was introduced to merge 0.01° and 0.25° LSTs inversed from MODIS and AMSR-E data, respectively. The result showed that the missing LSTs in cloudy pixels were filled completely, and the availability of merged LSTs reaches 100%. Because the depths of LST and soil temperature measurements are different, before validating the merged LST, the station measurements were calibrated with an empirical equation between MODIS LST and 0~5 cm soil temperatures. The results showed that the accuracy of merged LSTs increased with the increasing quantity of utilized data, and as the availability of utilized data increased from 25.2% to 91.4%, the RMSEs of the merged data decreased from 4.53 °C to 2.31 °C. In addition, compared with the filling gap method in which MODIS LST gaps were filled with AMSR-E LST directly, the merged LSTs from the BME method showed better spatial continuity. The different penetration depths of TIR and PMWs may influence fusion performance and still require further studies.

  14. Spatial-temporal changes of maximum and minimum temperatures in the Wei River Basin, China: Changing patterns, causes and implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Saiyan; Huang, Shengzhi; Xie, Yangyang; Huang, Qiang; Leng, Guoyong; Hou, Beibei; Zhang, Ying; Wei, Xiu

    2018-05-01

    Due to the important role of temperature in the global climate system and energy cycles, it is important to investigate the spatial-temporal change patterns, causes and implications of annual maximum (Tmax) and minimum (Tmin) temperatures. In this study, the Cloud model were adopted to fully and accurately analyze the changing patterns of annual Tmax and Tmin from 1958 to 2008 by quantifying their mean, uniformity, and stability in the Wei River Basin (WRB), a typical arid and semi-arid region in China. Additionally, the cross wavelet analysis was applied to explore the correlations among annual Tmax and Tmin and the yearly sunspots number, Arctic Oscillation, Pacific Decadal Oscillation, and soil moisture with an aim to determine possible causes of annual Tmax and Tmin variations. Furthermore, temperature-related impacts on vegetation cover and precipitation extremes were also examined. Results indicated that: (1) the WRB is characterized by increasing trends in annual Tmax and Tmin, with a more evident increasing trend in annual Tmin, which has a higher dispersion degree and is less uniform and stable than annual Tmax; (2) the asymmetric variations of Tmax and Tmin can be generally explained by the stronger effects of solar activity (primarily), large-scale atmospheric circulation patterns, and soil moisture on annual Tmin than on annual Tmax; and (3) increasing annual Tmax and Tmin have exerted strong influences on local precipitation extremes, in terms of their duration, intensity, and frequency in the WRB. This study presents new analyses of Tmax and Tmin in the WRB, and the findings may help guide regional agricultural production and water resources management.

  15. Attenuation of thermal neutron through graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adib, M.; Ismaail, H.; Fathaallah, M.; Abbas, Y.; Habib, N.; Wahba, M.

    2004-01-01

    Calculation of the nuclear capture, thermal diffuse and Bragg scattering cross-sections as a function of graphite temperature and crystalline from for neutron energies from 1 me V< E<10 eV were carried out. Computer programs have been developed which allow calculation for the graphite hexagonal closed-pack structure in its polycrystalline form and pyrolytic one. I The calculated total cross-section for polycrystalline graphite were compared with the experimental values. An overall agreement is indicated between the calculated values and experimental ones. Agreement was also obtained for neutron cross-section measured for oriented pyrolytic graphite at room and liquid nitrogen temperatures. A feasibility study for use of graphite in powdered form as a cold neutron filter is details. The calculated attenuation of thermal neutrons through large mosaic pyrolytic graphite show that such crystals can be used effectively as second order filter of thermal neutron beams and that cooling improve their effectiveness

  16. Bridged graphite oxide materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Alonso, Margarita (Inventor); McAllister, Michael J. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Prud'homme, Robert K. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Bridged graphite oxide material comprising graphite sheets bridged by at least one diamine bridging group. The bridged graphite oxide material may be incorporated in polymer composites or used in adsorption media.

  17. Graphite|LiFePO4 lithium-ion battery working at the heat engine coolant temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, Andrzej; Kurc, Beata; Swiderska-Mocek, Agnieszka; Kusa, Natalia

    2014-11-01

    Electrochemical properties of the graphite anode and the LiFePO4 cathode, working together with the 1 M LiPF6 in TMS (sulpholane) at 90 °C have been studied. The general aim of the investigation was to demonstrate a potential application for a Li-ion cell working in the cooling system of a car heat engine (90 °C). Electrodes were characterized with the use of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) as well as galvanostatic charging/discharging tests. SEM images of both electrodes after charging/discharging processes were covered with a film (electrochemical SEI formation). The charge transfer resistance at 90 °C, Rct, of the C6Li|Li+ anode and the LiFePO4 cathode was 24 Ω and 110 Ω, respectively. Reversible capacity of the LiC6 anode after 10-20 cycles, at a low current rate was close to the theoretical value of 370 mAh g-1 however an increasing current rate decreased to ca. 200 mAh g-1 (for 1C). The reversibility of the process was close to 95%. The capacity of the LiFePO4 cathode was ca. 150 mAh g-1, almost independent of the current rate and close to the theoretical value of 170 mAh g-1.

  18. Numerical and experimental study on temperature control of solar panels with form-stable paraffin/expanded graphite composite PCM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Zigeng; Huang, Zhaowen; Xie, Ning; Gao, Xuenong; Xu, Tao; Fang, Yutang; Zhang, Zhengguo

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A passive cooling PV-PCM system was developed. • Form-stable paraffin/EG composite PCM with high thermal conductivity was utilized. • Numerical simulation on the temperature of PV-PCM panel was carried out. • Effects of density were studied under the given weather conditions. - Abstract: Performance of photovoltaic (PV) panels is greatly affected by its operating temperature. And traditional active and passive cooling methods usually suffer from the disadvantages of external energy consumption, uneven temperature distribution and low thermal conductivity of phase change materials (PCMs). In this work, a PV-PCM system was developed to control the temperature of a PV panel by applying high thermal conductive form-stable paraffin (ZDJN-28)/EG composite PCM. The temperature, output voltage and power of a conventional PV panel and the PV-PCM panel were measured and compared. A numerical simulation model established by CFD software FLUENT was used to simulate the temperature change process of the PV-PCM panel with different material densities under the same conditions as experiment. The experiment results showed that compared with the temperature of the conventional PV panel, the temperature of the PV-PCM panel is kept below 50 °C for 200 min extended by 146 min with output power averagely increased by 7.28% in heating process. Simulated temperatures were in good agreement with experimental temperatures and indicated that the higher the density of the PCM is, the better the temperature management performance the PV panel could achieve. Besides, the PCM with density of 900 kg/m 3 was found sufficient to achieve a good temperature management performance when the average ambient temperature below 25 °C with the highest solar irradiation of 901 w/m 2 . In summary, this work is of great importance in the design of a PV-PCM system for temperature management of PV panels.

  19. Process for purifying graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clausius, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    A process for purifying graphite comprising: comminuting graphite containing mineral matter to liberate at least a portion of the graphite particles from the mineral matter; mixing the comminuted graphite particles containing mineral matter with water and hydrocarbon oil to form a fluid slurry; separating a water phase containing mineral matter and a hydrocarbon oil phase containing grahite particles; and separating the graphite particles from the hydrocarbon oil to obtain graphite particles reduced in mineral matter. Depending upon the purity of the graphite desired, steps of the process can be repeated one or more times to provide a progressively purer graphite

  20. Elastic properties of graphite and interstitial defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayasse, J.-B.

    1977-01-01

    The graphite elastic constants C 33 and C 44 , reflecting the interaction of the graphitic planes, were experimentally measured as a function of irradiation and temperature. A model of non-central strength atomic interaction was established to explain the experimental results obtained. This model is valid at zero temperature. The temperature dependence of the elastic properties was analyzed. The influence of the elastic property variations on the specific heat of the lattice at very low temperature was investigated [fr

  1. A binary genetic programing model for teleconnection identification between global sea surface temperature and local maximum monthly rainfall events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danandeh Mehr, Ali; Nourani, Vahid; Hrnjica, Bahrudin; Molajou, Amir

    2017-12-01

    The effectiveness of genetic programming (GP) for solving regression problems in hydrology has been recognized in recent studies. However, its capability to solve classification problems has not been sufficiently explored so far. This study develops and applies a novel classification-forecasting model, namely Binary GP (BGP), for teleconnection studies between sea surface temperature (SST) variations and maximum monthly rainfall (MMR) events. The BGP integrates certain types of data pre-processing and post-processing methods with conventional GP engine to enhance its ability to solve both regression and classification problems simultaneously. The model was trained and tested using SST series of Black Sea, Mediterranean Sea, and Red Sea as potential predictors as well as classified MMR events at two locations in Iran as predictand. Skill of the model was measured in regard to different rainfall thresholds and SST lags and compared to that of the hybrid decision tree-association rule (DTAR) model available in the literature. The results indicated that the proposed model can identify potential teleconnection signals of surrounding seas beneficial to long-term forecasting of the occurrence of the classified MMR events.

  2. Corrosion of graphitic high temperature reactor materials in steam/helium mixtures at total pessures of 3-55 bar and temperatures of 900-1150 C (1173-1423K)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinssen, H.K.; Loenissen, K.J.; Katscher, W.; Moormann, R.

    1993-03-01

    In course of accident examination for (HTR), experiments on the corrosion behavior of graphitic reactor materials in steam have been performed a total pressures of 3-55bar and temperatures of 900-1150 C (1173-1423K); these experiments and their evaluation are documented here. Reactor materials examined are the structure graphite V483T2 and the fuel element matrices A3-27 and A3-3. In all experiments, the steam partial pressure was 474mbar (inert gas helium). The dependence of reaction rates and density profiles on burn-off, total pressure and temperature has been examined. Experimental reaction rates depending on burn-off are fitted by theoretical curves, a procedure, which allows rate comparison for a well defined burn-off. Comparing rates as a function of total pressure, V483T2 shows a linear dependence on 1√p total , whereas for matrix materials a pressure independent rate was found for p total 4mm for A3-3. (orig.) [de

  3. Molecular hydrogen formation on surfaces of astrophysical interest: first results on water ice at very low temperature and on graphite at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baouche, Saoud

    2004-01-01

    As the generally admitted mechanism of formation of the H_2 molecule in the interstellar medium (ISM) is a catalytic reaction between two atoms of H on the surface of cosmic powder grains, where grains are supposed to be carbons or silicates and could have ice coats, this research thesis aims at providing some elements about the efficiency of this reaction, what happens to the bound energy released after formation of the H_2 molecule. The author first describes the FORMOLISM experiment (Formation of molecule in the ISM), and then reports the study of the source of H or D atoms which is a very important component of the experiment. He reports and comments results obtained on the formation of H_2 and D_2 molecules on amorphous water ice. He reports the study of the dynamics of formation of the D_2 molecule on a graphite surface by using the laser-aided associative adsorption technique

  4. The maximum temperature of a thermodynamic cycle effect on weight-dimensional characteristics of the NPP energy blocks with air cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezborodov, Yu.A.; Bubnov, V.P.; Nesterenko, V.B.

    1982-01-01

    The cycle maximum temperature effect on the properties of individual apparatuses and total NPP energy blocks characteristics has been investigated. Air, nitrogen, helium and chemically reacting system N 2 O 4 +2NO+O 2 have been considered as coolants. The conducted investigations have shown that maximum temperature of thermodynamical cycle affects considerably both the weight-dimensional characteristics of individual elements of NPP and total characteristics of NPP energy block. Energy blocks of NPP with air cooling wherein dissociating nitrogen tetroxide is used as working body, have better indexes on the majority of characteristics in comparison with blocks with air, nitrogen and helium cooling. If technical restrictions are to be taken into account (thermal resistance of metals, coolant decomposition under high temperatures, etc.) then dissociating nitrogen tetroxide should be recommended as working body and maximum cycle temperature in the range from 500 up to 600 deg C

  5. Principle design and data of graphite components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Masahiro; Sumita, Junya; Shibata, Taiju; Iyoku, Tatsuo; Oku, Tatsuo

    2004-01-01

    The High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) constructed by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) is a graphite-moderated and helium-gas-cooled reactor with prismatic fuel elements of hexagonal blocks. The reactor internal structures of the HTTR are mainly made up of graphite components. As well known, the graphite is a brittle material and there were no available design criteria for brittle materials. Therefore, JAERI had to develop the design criteria taking account of the brittle fracture behavior. In this paper, concept and key specification of the developed graphite design criteria is described, and also an outline of the quality control specified in the design criteria is mentioned

  6. Effect of thermal annealing on property changes of neutron-irradiated non-graphitized carbon materials and nuclear graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Hideto

    1991-06-01

    Changes in dimension of non-graphitized carbon materials and nuclear graphite, and the bulk density, electrical resistivity, Young's modulus and thermal expansivity of nuclear graphite were studied after neutron irradiation at 1128-1483 K and the successive thermal annealing up to 2573 K. Carbon materials showed larger and anisotropic dimensional shrinkage than that of nuclear graphite after the irradiation. The irradiation-induced dimensional shrinkage of carbon materials decreased during annealing at temperatures from 1773 to 2023 K, followed by a slight increase at higher temperatures. On the other hand, the irradiated nuclear graphite hardly showed the changes in length, density and thermal expansivity under the thermal annealing, but the electrical resistivity and Young's modulus showed a gradual decrease with annealing temperature. It has been clarified that there exists significant difference in the effect of thermal annealing on irradiation-induced dimensional shrinkage between graphitized nuclear graphite and non-graphitized carbon materials. (author)

  7. Estimating Daily Maximum and Minimum Land Air Surface Temperature Using MODIS Land Surface Temperature Data and Ground Truth Data in Northern Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phan Thanh Noi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to evaluate quantitatively the land surface temperature (LST derived from MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer MOD11A1 and MYD11A1 Collection 5 products for daily land air surface temperature (Ta estimation over a mountainous region in northern Vietnam. The main objective is to estimate maximum and minimum Ta (Ta-max and Ta-min using both TERRA and AQUA MODIS LST products (daytime and nighttime and auxiliary data, solving the discontinuity problem of ground measurements. There exist no studies about Vietnam that have integrated both TERRA and AQUA LST of daytime and nighttime for Ta estimation (using four MODIS LST datasets. In addition, to find out which variables are the most effective to describe the differences between LST and Ta, we have tested several popular methods, such as: the Pearson correlation coefficient, stepwise, Bayesian information criterion (BIC, adjusted R-squared and the principal component analysis (PCA of 14 variables (including: LST products (four variables, NDVI, elevation, latitude, longitude, day length in hours, Julian day and four variables of the view zenith angle, and then, we applied nine models for Ta-max estimation and nine models for Ta-min estimation. The results showed that the differences between MODIS LST and ground truth temperature derived from 15 climate stations are time and regional topography dependent. The best results for Ta-max and Ta-min estimation were achieved when we combined both LST daytime and nighttime of TERRA and AQUA and data from the topography analysis.

  8. Room-temperature synthesis of nanoporous 1D microrods of graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) with highly enhanced photocatalytic activity and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, Rajendra C; Kang, Suhee; Park, Jung Hyun; Kim, Jong-Ho; Ahn, Sunghoon; Lee, Caroline S

    2016-08-08

    A one-dimensional (1D) nanostructure having a porous network is an exceptional photocatalytic material to generate hydrogen (H2) and decontaminate wastewater using solar energy. In this report, we synthesized nanoporous 1D microrods of graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) via a facile and template-free chemical approach at room temperature. The use of concentrated acids induced etching and lift-off because of strong oxidation and protonation. Compared with the bulk g-C3N4, the porous 1D microrod structure showed five times higher photocatalytic degradation performance toward methylene blue dye (MB) under visible light irradiation. The photocatalytic H2 evolution of the 1D nanostructure (34 μmol g(-1)) was almost 26 times higher than that of the bulk g-C3N4 structure (1.26 μmol g(-1)). Additionally, the photocurrent stability of this nanoporous 1D morphology over 24 h indicated remarkable photocorrosion resistance. The improved photocatalytic activities were attributed to prolonged carrier lifetime because of its quantum confinement effect, effective separation and transport of charge carriers, and increased number of active sites from interconnected nanopores throughout the microrods. The present 1D nanostructure would be highly suited for photocatalytic water purification as well as water splitting devices. Finally, this facile and room temperature strategy to fabricate the nanostructures is very cost-effective.

  9. Inhibition of oxidation in nuclear graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winston, Philip L.; Sterbentz, James W.; Windes, William E.

    2015-01-01

    Graphite is a fundamental material of high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors, providing both structure and neutron moderation. Its high thermal conductivity, chemical inertness, thermal heat capacity, and high thermal structural stability under normal and off-normal conditions contribute to the inherent safety of these reactor designs. One of the primary safety issues for a high-temperature graphite reactor core is the possibility of rapid oxidation of the carbon structure during an off-normal design basis event where an oxidising atmosphere (air ingress) can be introduced to the hot core. Although the current Generation IV high-temperature reactor designs attempt to mitigate any damage caused by a postulated air ingress event, the use of graphite components that inhibit oxidation is a logical step to increase the safety of these reactors. Recent experimental studies of graphite containing between 5.5 and 7 wt% boron carbide (B 4 C) indicate that oxidation is dramatically reduced even at prolonged exposures at temperatures up to 900 deg. C. The proposed addition of B 4 C to graphite components in the nuclear core would necessarily be enriched in B-11 isotope in order to minimise B-10 neutron absorption and graphite swelling. The enriched boron can be added to the graphite during billet fabrication. Experimental oxidation rate results and potential applications for borated graphite in nuclear reactor components will be discussed. (authors)

  10. Effects of the midnight temperature maximum observed in the thermosphere-ionosphere over the northeast of Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Cosme Alexandre O. B.; Buriti, Ricardo A.; Paulino, Igo; Meriwether, John W.; Makela, Jonathan J.; Batista, Inez S.; Barros, Diego; Medeiros, Amauri F.

    2017-08-01

    The midnight temperature maximum (MTM) has been observed in the lower thermosphere by two Fabry-Pérot interferometers (FPIs) at São João do Cariri (7.4° S, 36.5° W) and Cajazeiras (6.9° S, 38.6° W) during 2011, when the solar activity was moderate and the solar flux was between 90 and 155 SFU (1 SFU = 10-22 W m-2 Hz-1). The MTM is studied in detail using measurements of neutral temperature, wind and airglow relative intensity of OI630.0 nm (referred to as OI6300), and ionospheric parameters, such as virtual height (h'F), the peak height of the F2 region (hmF2), and critical frequency of the F region (foF2), which were measured by a Digisonde instrument (DPS) at Eusébio (3.9° S, 38.4° W; geomagnetic coordinates 7.31° S, 32.40° E for 2011). The MTM peak was observed mostly along the year, except in May, June, and August. The amplitudes of the MTM varied from 64 ± 46 K in April up to 144 ± 48 K in October. The monthly temperature average showed a phase shift in the MTM peak around 0.25 h in September to 2.5 h in December before midnight. On the other hand, in February, March, and April the MTM peak occurred around midnight. International Reference Ionosphere 2012 (IRI-2012) model was compared to the neutral temperature observations and the IRI-2012 model failed in reproducing the MTM peaks. The zonal component of neutral wind flowed eastward the whole night; regardless of the month and the magnitude of the zonal wind, it was typically within the range of 50 to 150 m s-1 during the early evening. The meridional component of the neutral wind changed its direction over the months: from November to February, the meridional wind in the early evening flowed equatorward with a magnitude between 25 and 100 m s-1; in contrast, during the winter months, the meridional wind flowed to the pole within the range of 0 to -50 m s-1. Our results indicate that the reversal (changes in equator to poleward flow) or abatement of the meridional winds is an important factor in

  11. AGC-3 Graphite Preirradiation Data Analysis Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William Windes; David Swank; David Rohrbaugh; Joseph Lord

    2013-09-01

    This report describes the specimen loading order and documents all pre-irradiation examination material property measurement data for the graphite specimens contained within the third Advanced Graphite Capsule (AGC-3) irradiation capsule. The AGC-3 capsule is third in six planned irradiation capsules comprising the Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) test series. The AGC test series is used to irradiate graphite specimens allowing quantitative data necessary for predicting the irradiation behavior and operating performance of new nuclear graphite grades to be generated which will ascertain the in-service behavior of the graphite for pebble bed and prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) designs. The general design of AGC-3 test capsule is similar to the AGC-2 test capsule, material property tests were conducted on graphite specimens prior to loading into the AGC-3 irradiation assembly. However the 6 major nuclear graphite grades in AGC-2 were modified; two previous graphite grades (IG-430 and H-451) were eliminated and one was added (Mersen’s 2114 was added). Specimen testing from three graphite grades (PCEA, 2114, and NBG-17) was conducted at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and specimen testing for two grades (IG-110 and NBG-18) were conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from May 2011 to July 2013. This report also details the specimen loading methodology for the graphite specimens inside the AGC-3 irradiation capsule. The AGC-3 capsule design requires "matched pair" creep specimens that have similar dose levels above and below the neutron flux profile mid-plane to provide similar specimens with and without an applied load. This document utilized the neutron flux profile calculated for the AGC-3 capsule design, the capsule dimensions, and the size (length) of the selected graphite and silicon carbide samples to create a stacking order that can produce "matched pairs" of graphite samples above and below the AGC-3 capsule elevation mid-point to

  12. Recurrence quantification analysis of extremes of maximum and minimum temperature patterns for different climate scenarios in the Mesochora catchment in Central-Western Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagoulia, Dionysia; Vlahogianni, Eleni I.

    2018-06-01

    A methodological framework based on nonlinear recurrence analysis is proposed to examine the historical data evolution of extremes of maximum and minimum daily mean areal temperature patterns over time under different climate scenarios. The methodology is based on both historical data and atmospheric General Circulation Model (GCM) produced climate scenarios for the periods 1961-2000 and 2061-2100 which correspond to 1 × CO2 and 2 × CO2 scenarios. Historical data were derived from the actual daily observations coupled with atmospheric circulation patterns (CPs). The dynamics of the temperature was reconstructed in the phase-space from the time series of temperatures. The statistically comparing different temperature patterns were based on some discriminating statistics obtained by the Recurrence Quantification Analysis (RQA). Moreover, the bootstrap method of Schinkel et al. (2009) was adopted to calculate the confidence bounds of RQA parameters based on a structural preserving resampling. The overall methodology was implemented to the mountainous Mesochora catchment in Central-Western Greece. The results reveal substantial similarities between the historical maximum and minimum daily mean areal temperature statistical patterns and their confidence bounds, as well as the maximum and minimum temperature patterns in evolution under the 2 × CO2 scenario. A significant variability and non-stationary behaviour characterizes all climate series analyzed. Fundamental differences are produced from the historical and maximum 1 × CO2 scenarios, the maximum 1 × CO2 and minimum 1 × CO2 scenarios, as well as the confidence bounds for the two CO2 scenarios. The 2 × CO2 scenario reflects the strongest shifts in intensity, duration and frequency in temperature patterns. Such transitions can help the scientists and policy makers to understand the effects of extreme temperature changes on water resources, economic development, and health of ecosystems and hence to proceed to

  13. Irradiation behavior of graphite shielding materials for FBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Tadashi; Kaito, Takeji; Onose, Shoji; Shibahara, Itaru

    1994-01-01

    Thirteen kinds of isotropic graphites with different density and maximum grain size were irradiated in the experimental fast reactor 'JOYO' to fluences from 2.11 to 2.86x10 26 n/m 2 (E>0.1 MeV) at temperatures from 549 to 597degC. Postirradiation examination was carried out on dimensional change, elastic modulus, and the thermal conductivity. The result of measurement of dimensional change indicated that the graphites irradiated at lower fluences showed shrinkage upon neutron irradiation followed by increase with increasing neutron fluences, irrespective of differences in material parameters. The Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio increased to two to three times of unirradiated values. A large scatter found in Poisson's ratio of unirradiated materials became very small and a linear dependency on density was obtained after irradiation. The thermal conductivity decreased to one-fifth to one-tenth of unirradiated values, but the change in specific heat was negligibly small. The results of postirradiation examination indicated that the changes in physical properties of high density, isotropic graphites were mainly dominated by the irradiation condition rather than their material parameters. Namely, the effects of irradiation induced defects on physical properties of heavily neutron-irradiated graphites are much larger than that of defects associated with as-fabricated specimens. (author)

  14. Differences in interfacial bond strengths of graphite fiber-epoxy resin composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needles, H. L.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of epoxy-size and degree of cure on the interfacial bonding of an epoxy-amine-graphite fiber composite system is examined. The role of the fiber-resin interface in determining the overall mechanical properties of composites is poorly understood. A good interfacial adhesive bond is required to achieve maximum stress transfer to the fibers in composites, but at the same time some form of energy absorbing interfacial interaction is needed to achieve high fracture toughening. The incompatibility of these two processes makes it important to understand the nature and basic factors involved at the fiber-resin interface as stress is applied. The mechanical properties including interlaminar shear values for graphite fiber-resin composites are low compared to glass and boron-resin composites. These differences have been attributed to poor fiber-matrix adhesion. Graphite fibers are commonly subjected to post-treatments including application of organic sizing in order to improve their compatibility with the resin matrix and to protect the fiber tow from damage during processing and lay-up. In such processes, sized graphite fiber tow is impregnated with epoxy resin and then layed-up i nto the appropriate configuration. Following an extended ambient temperature cure, the graphite-resin composite structure is cured at elevated temperature using a programmed temperature sequence to cure and then cool the product.

  15. A rapid method for measuring maximum density temperatures in water and aqueous solutions for the study of quantum zero point energy effects in these liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deeney, F A; O'Leary, J P

    2008-01-01

    The connection between quantum zero point fluctuations and a density maximum in water and in liquid He 4 has recently been established. Here we present a description of a simple and rapid method of determining the temperatures at which maximum densities in water and aqueous solutions occur. The technique is such as to allow experiments to be carried out in one session of an undergraduate laboratory thereby introducing students to the concept of quantum zero point energy

  16. Influence of irradiation on high-strength graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virgil'ev, Yu.S.; Grebennik, V.N.; Kalyagina, I.P.

    1989-01-01

    To ensure efficiency of the graphite elements of the construction of the masonry of reactors, the graphite must possess high radiation stability, strength, and heat resistance. In this connection, the physical properties of graphites based on uncalcined petroleum coke with a binder - high-temperature hard coal pitch - the amount of which reaches 40% are considered in this paper

  17. Mechanical and thermophysical properties of graphite/polyimide composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rummler, D. R.; Clark, R. K.

    1979-01-01

    An on-going program to characterize advanced composites for up to 50,000 hours of exposure to simulated supersonic cruise environments is summarized. Results are presented for up to 25,000 hours of thermal exposure and 10,000 hours of flight simulation at temperatures up to 560K (550 F) with emphasis on HTS/710 graphite/polyimide composite material. Results to date indicate that the maximum use temperature for HTS/710 may be reduced to 505K (450 F) for long-time (1000 hours) application such as the supersonic transport. Preliminary thermophysical properties data for HTS/PMR15 graphite/polyimide were generated. These data include thermal conductivity, thermal expansion, and specific heat from 115K (-252 F) to 590K (600 F) and emittance at room temperature and 590K (600 F). The purpose in generating these data was to validate use of state-of-the-art property measurement methods for advanced graphite fiber reinforced resin matrix composites. Based on results to this point, thermal expansion measurements for composites are most difficult to perform. A high degree of caution in conducting thermal expansion tests and analyzing results is required to produce reliable data.

  18. Chemical sputtering of graphite by H+ ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busharov, N.P.; Gorbatov, E.A.; Gusev, V.M.; Guseva, M.I.; Martynenko, Y.V.

    1976-01-01

    In a study of the sputtering coefficient S for the sputtering of graphite by 10-keV H + ions as a function of the graphite temperature during the bombardment, it is found that at T> or =750degreeC the coefficient S is independent of the target temperature and has an anomalously high value, S=0.085 atom/ion. The high rate of sputtering of graphite by atomic hydrogen ions is shown to be due to chemical sputtering of the graphite, resulting primarily in the formation of CH 4 molecules. At T=1100degreeC, S falls off by a factor of about 3. A model for the chemical sputtering of graphite is proposed

  19. Graphite selection for the FMIT test cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, W.C.

    1982-06-01

    This document provides the basis for procuring a grade of graphite, at minimum cost, having minimum dimensional changes at low irradiation temperatures (nominal range 90 to 140 0 C). In light of those constraints, the author concludes that the most feasible approach is to attempt to reproduce a grade of graphite (TSGBF) which has exhibited a high degree of dimensional stability during low-temperature irradiations and on which irradiation-induced changes in other physical properties have been measured. The effects of differences in raw materials, especially coke morphology, and processing conditions, primarily graphitization temperture are briefly reviewed in terms of the practicality of producing a new grade of graphite with physical properties and irradiation-induced changes which would be very similar to those of TSGBF graphite. The production history and physical properties of TSGBF are also reviewed; no attempt is made, to project changes in dimensions or physical properties under the projected irradiation conditions

  20. STS Observations of Landau Levels at Graphite Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Matsui, T.; Kambara, H.; Niimi, Y.; Tagami, K.; Tsukada, M.; Fukuyama, Hiroshi

    2004-01-01

    Scanning tunneling spectroscopy measurements were made on surfaces of two different kinds of graphite samples, Kish graphite and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), at very low temperatures and in high magnetic fields. We observed a series of peaks in the tunnel spectra, which grow with increasing field, both at positive and negative bias voltages. These are associated with Landau quantization of the quasi two-dimensional electrons and holes in graphite in magnetic fields perpendicular...

  1. Comparison of the Spatiotemporal Variability of Temperature, Precipitation, and Maximum Daily Spring Flows in Two Watersheds in Quebec Characterized by Different Land Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali A. Assani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We compared the spatiotemporal variability of temperatures and precipitation with that of the magnitude and timing of maximum daily spring flows in the geographically adjacent L’Assomption River (agricultural and Matawin River (forested watersheds during the period from 1932 to 2013. With regard to spatial variability, fall, winter, and spring temperatures as well as total precipitation are higher in the agricultural watershed than in the forested one. The magnitude of maximum daily spring flows is also higher in the first watershed as compared with the second, owing to substantial runoff, given that the amount of snow that gives rise to these flows is not significantly different in the two watersheds. These flows occur early in the season in the agricultural watershed because of the relatively high temperatures. With regard to temporal variability, minimum temperatures increased over time in both watersheds. Maximum temperatures in the fall only increased in the agricultural watershed. The amount of spring rain increased over time in both watersheds, whereas total precipitation increased significantly in the agricultural watershed only. However, the amount of snow decreased in the forested watershed. The magnitude of maximum daily spring flows increased over time in the forested watershed.

  2. The Effects of Data Gaps on the Calculated Monthly Mean Maximum and Minimum Temperatures in the Continental United States: A Spatial and Temporal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stooksbury, David E.; Idso, Craig D.; Hubbard, Kenneth G.

    1999-05-01

    Gaps in otherwise regularly scheduled observations are often referred to as missing data. This paper explores the spatial and temporal impacts that data gaps in the recorded daily maximum and minimum temperatures have on the calculated monthly mean maximum and minimum temperatures. For this analysis 138 climate stations from the United States Historical Climatology Network Daily Temperature and Precipitation Data set were selected. The selected stations had no missing maximum or minimum temperature values during the period 1951-80. The monthly mean maximum and minimum temperatures were calculated for each station for each month. For each month 1-10 consecutive days of data from each station were randomly removed. This was performed 30 times for each simulated gap period. The spatial and temporal impact of the 1-10-day data gaps were compared. The influence of data gaps is most pronounced in the continental regions during the winter and least pronounced in the southeast during the summer. In the north central plains, 10-day data gaps during January produce a standard deviation value greater than 2°C about the `true' mean. In the southeast, 10-day data gaps in July produce a standard deviation value less than 0.5°C about the mean. The results of this study will be of value in climate variability and climate trend research as well as climate assessment and impact studies.

  3. A Study Of Physical Properties Of Matrix Graphite Particle's Distribution As Ras Materials On 900oC Baking Stage Temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajekti, Kasilani Noor; Dahroni, Imam; Nawangsih, Endang

    2000-01-01

    To aim's the physical characteristic of matrix graphite materials the physical basic characteristics were necessary prepared. Investigation of calsine cokes particle size distribution effect on 900 o C temperature baking stage had been done. The calsine coke and tar pitch were crushed and sieved, to get a particle size 63; 90; 106 and 125 μm, making pellet by mixed with 33% weight of tar pitch, than grilled at 900 o C during 30 minutes. Grilled products: physical (bulk density, electrical resistivity), mechanics (hardness, compressive strength) and micro's (surface area, total and pore radius) were analyzed. From the 9 samples, 3 samples in fulfilled condition with mixed particle size of calsine cokes 63 and 106 μm and the best weight ratio between calsine coke and tar pitch were 2/3:4/3 to 1. The physical properties yield were 1.19 g/mL bulk density, the electrical resistivity 2.63 Ωcm, the hardness 5.90 kg/mm 2 , the compressive strength 1600 Newton, the density (N 2 adsorbate) 2.89 g/mL, the specific surface area 8.08 mm 2 /g,the total pore /volume 1.48% and the average pore radius 12.60 Angstrom

  4. Effects of the midnight temperature maximum observed in the thermosphere–ionosphere over the northeast of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. O. B. Figueiredo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The midnight temperature maximum (MTM has been observed in the lower thermosphere by two Fabry–Pérot interferometers (FPIs at São João do Cariri (7.4° S, 36.5° W and Cajazeiras (6.9° S, 38.6° W during 2011, when the solar activity was moderate and the solar flux was between 90 and 155 SFU (1 SFU  =  10−22 W m−2 Hz−1. The MTM is studied in detail using measurements of neutral temperature, wind and airglow relative intensity of OI630.0 nm (referred to as OI6300, and ionospheric parameters, such as virtual height (h′F, the peak height of the F2 region (hmF2, and critical frequency of the F region (foF2, which were measured by a Digisonde instrument (DPS at Eusébio (3.9° S, 38.4° W; geomagnetic coordinates 7.31° S, 32.40° E for 2011. The MTM peak was observed mostly along the year, except in May, June, and August. The amplitudes of the MTM varied from 64 ± 46 K in April up to 144 ± 48 K in October. The monthly temperature average showed a phase shift in the MTM peak around 0.25 h in September to 2.5 h in December before midnight. On the other hand, in February, March, and April the MTM peak occurred around midnight. International Reference Ionosphere 2012 (IRI-2012 model was compared to the neutral temperature observations and the IRI-2012 model failed in reproducing the MTM peaks. The zonal component of neutral wind flowed eastward the whole night; regardless of the month and the magnitude of the zonal wind, it was typically within the range of 50 to 150 m s−1 during the early evening. The meridional component of the neutral wind changed its direction over the months: from November to February, the meridional wind in the early evening flowed equatorward with a magnitude between 25 and 100 m s−1; in contrast, during the winter months, the meridional wind flowed to the pole within the range of 0 to −50 m s−1. Our results indicate that the reversal (changes

  5. Flux and energy dependence of methane production from graphite due to H+ impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, J.W.; Haasz, A.A.; Stangeby, P.C.

    1986-06-01

    Carbon is in widespread use for limiter surfaces, as well as first wall coatings in current tokamaks. Chemical erosion via methane formation, due to energetic H + impact, is expected to contribute to the total erosion rate of carbon from these surfaces. Experimental results are presented for the methane yield from pyrolytic graphite due to H + exposure, using a mass analyzed ion beam. H + energies of 0.1-3 keV and flux densities of ∼ 5x10 13 to l0 16 H + /cm 2 s were used. The measured methane yield (CH 4 /H + ) initially increases with flux density, then reaches a maximum, which is followed by a gradual decrease. The magnitude of the maximum yield and the flux density at which it occurs depends on the graphite temperature. The yields obtained at temperatures corresponding to yield maxima at specific flux densities also show an initial increase, followed by a shallow maximum and a gradual decrease as a function of flux density; the maximum occurs at ∼10 15 H + /cm 2 s. Also presented are results on the methane production dependence on ion energy over the range 0.1 to 3 keV, and graphite temperature dependence measurements

  6. Fuel element for high-temperature nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schloesser, J.

    1974-01-01

    The fuel element of the HTGR consists of a spherical graphite body with a spherical cavity. A deposit of fissile material, e.g. coated particles of uranium carbide, is fixed to the inner wall using binders. In addition to the fissile material, there are concentric deposits of fertile material, e.g. coated thorium carbide particles. The remaining cavity is filled with a graphite mass, preferably graphite powder, and the filling opening with a graphite stopper. At the beginning of the reactor operation, the fissile material layer provides the whole power. With progressing burn-up, the energy production is taken over by the fertile layer, which provides the heat production until the end of burn-up. Due to the relatively small temperature difference between the outer wall of the outer graphite body and the maximum fuel temperature, the power of the fuel element can be increased. (DG) [de

  7. In-situ observation of the chemical erosion of graphite in the scrape-off-layer of TEXTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philipps, V.; Vietzke, E.; Erdweg, M.

    1989-01-01

    A sniffer probe system has been used to investigate the chemical erosion during interaction of the TEXTOR scrape-off plasma with a pyrolytic graphite plate at temperatures up to 1400 0 C. Floating potential conditions as well as 200 V bias has been applied at plasma ion fluxes of about 10 18 ions/cm 2 sec. Methane formation was found to be 8x10 -3 CH 4 /H and 1.5x10 -2 CD 4 /D + for room temperature graphite and floating potential increasing by a factor of two at temperature around 500 0 C. Biasing the graphite decreases the methane yield at room temperature and increase it in the maximum temperature range. CO formation due to chemical interaction of oxygen ions with the graphite reaches ratios between 3 and 6x10 -2 CO/D(H) near the limiter edge under normal TEXTOR scrape-off conditions and exceeds the chemical hydro-(deutero-)carbon formation significantly. The results are discussed in view of the present status of hydro-(deutero-)carbon formation on graphite and carbon impurity observations made in fusion experiments. (orig.)

  8. Ti-doped isotropic graphite: A promising armour material for plasma-facing components

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Rosales, C.; López-Galilea, I.; Ordás, N.; Adelhelm, C.; Balden, M.; Pintsuk, G.; Grattarola, M.; Gualco, C.

    2009-04-01

    Finely dispersed Ti-doped isotropic graphites with 4 at.% Ti have been manufactured using synthetic mesophase pitch 'AR' as raw material. These new materials show a thermal conductivity at room temperature of ˜200 W/mK and flexural strength close to 100 MPa. Measurement of the total erosion yield by deuterium bombardment at ion energies and sample temperatures for which pure carbon shows maximum values, resulted in a reduction of at least a factor of 4, mainly due to dopant enrichment at the surface caused by preferential erosion of carbon. In addition, ITER relevant thermal shock loads were applied with an energetic electron beam at the JUDITH facility. The results demonstrated a significantly improved performance of Ti-doped graphite compared to pure graphite. Finally, Ti-doped graphite was successfully brazed to a CuCrZr block using a Mo interlayer. These results let assume that Ti-doped graphite can be a promising armour material for divertor plasma-facing components.

  9. Ti-doped isotropic graphite: A promising armour material for plasma-facing components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Rosales, C. [CEIT and Tecnun (University of Navarra), Paseo de Manuel Lardizabal, 15, E-20018 San Sebastian (Spain)], E-mail: cgrosales@ceit.es; Lopez-Galilea, I.; Ordas, N. [CEIT and Tecnun (University of Navarra), Paseo de Manuel Lardizabal, 15, E-20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Adelhelm, C.; Balden, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Pintsuk, G. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, EURATOM Association, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Grattarola, M.; Gualco, C. [Ansaldo Ricerche S.p.A., I-16152 Genoa (Italy)

    2009-04-30

    Finely dispersed Ti-doped isotropic graphites with 4 at.% Ti have been manufactured using synthetic mesophase pitch 'AR' as raw material. These new materials show a thermal conductivity at room temperature of {approx}200 W/mK and flexural strength close to 100 MPa. Measurement of the total erosion yield by deuterium bombardment at ion energies and sample temperatures for which pure carbon shows maximum values, resulted in a reduction of at least a factor of 4, mainly due to dopant enrichment at the surface caused by preferential erosion of carbon. In addition, ITER relevant thermal shock loads were applied with an energetic electron beam at the JUDITH facility. The results demonstrated a significantly improved performance of Ti-doped graphite compared to pure graphite. Finally, Ti-doped graphite was successfully brazed to a CuCrZr block using a Mo interlayer. These results let assume that Ti-doped graphite can be a promising armour material for divertor plasma-facing components.

  10. Ti-doped isotropic graphite: A promising armour material for plasma-facing components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Rosales, C.; Lopez-Galilea, I.; Ordas, N.; Adelhelm, C.; Balden, M.; Pintsuk, G.; Grattarola, M.; Gualco, C.

    2009-01-01

    Finely dispersed Ti-doped isotropic graphites with 4 at.% Ti have been manufactured using synthetic mesophase pitch 'AR' as raw material. These new materials show a thermal conductivity at room temperature of ∼200 W/mK and flexural strength close to 100 MPa. Measurement of the total erosion yield by deuterium bombardment at ion energies and sample temperatures for which pure carbon shows maximum values, resulted in a reduction of at least a factor of 4, mainly due to dopant enrichment at the surface caused by preferential erosion of carbon. In addition, ITER relevant thermal shock loads were applied with an energetic electron beam at the JUDITH facility. The results demonstrated a significantly improved performance of Ti-doped graphite compared to pure graphite. Finally, Ti-doped graphite was successfully brazed to a CuCrZr block using a Mo interlayer. These results let assume that Ti-doped graphite can be a promising armour material for divertor plasma-facing components.

  11. Vapour pressure of caesium over nuclear graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faircloth, R.L.; Pummery, F.C.W.

    1976-01-01

    The vapour pressure of caesium over a fine-grained isotropic moulded gilsocarbon nuclear graphite intended for use in the manufacture of fuel tubes for the high temperature reactor has been determined as a function of temperature and concentration by means of the Knudsen effusion technique. The concentration range 0 to 10 μg caesium/g graphite was investigated and it was concluded that a Langmuir adsorption situation exists under these conditions. (author)

  12. Determination of hot spot factors for calculation of the maximum fuel temperatures in the core thermal and hydraulic design of HTTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Soh; Yamashita, Kiyonobu; Fujimoto, Nozomu; Murata, Isao; Shindo, Ryuichi; Sudo, Yukio

    1988-12-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has been designing the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR), which is 30 MW in thermal power, 950deg C in reactor outlet coolant temperature and 40 kg/cm 2 G in primary coolant pressure. This report summarizes the hot spot factors and their estimated values used in the evaluation of the maximum fuel temperature which is one of the major items in the core thermal and hydraulic design of the HTTR. The hot spot factors consist of systematic factors and random factors. They were identified and their values adopted in the thermal and hydraulic design were determined considering the features of the HTTR. (author)

  13. Some equipment for graphite research in swimming pool reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seguin, M.; Arragon, Ph.; Dupont, G.; Gentil, J.; Tanis, G.

    1964-01-01

    The irradiation devices described are used for research concerning reactors of the natural uranium type, moderated by graphite and cooled by carbon dioxide. The devices are generally designed for use in swimming pool reactors. The following points have been particularly studied: - maximum use of the irradiation volume, - use of the simplest technological solutions, - standardization of certain constituent parts. This standardization calls for precision machining and careful assembling; these requirements are also true when a relatively low irradiation temperature is required and the nuclear heating is pronounced. Finally, the design of these devices is suitable for the irradiation of other fissile or non-fissile materials. (authors) [fr

  14. Forming gas treatment of lithium ion battery anode graphite powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contescu, Cristian Ion; Gallego, Nidia C; Howe, Jane Y; Meyer, III, Harry M; Payzant, Edward Andrew; Wood, III, David L; Yoon, Sang Young

    2014-09-16

    The invention provides a method of making a battery anode in which a quantity of graphite powder is provided. The temperature of the graphite powder is raised from a starting temperature to a first temperature between 1000 and 2000.degree. C. during a first heating period. The graphite powder is then cooled to a final temperature during a cool down period. The graphite powder is contacted with a forming gas during at least one of the first heating period and the cool down period. The forming gas includes H.sub.2 and an inert gas.

  15. Evaluation of brazing joint of graphites and molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiyama, Shintarou; Kodaira, Tsuneo; Oku, Tatsuo

    1991-01-01

    Bonding test of six kinds of graphites to molybdenum was performed in the following conditions: Brazing elements was obtained by mixing of titanium nickel and copper in the range of 90∼51w%, 40∼10w%, 31∼0w%, respectively. Nonpressed brazing was performed at maximum temperature 1,000degC in a vacuum. Strength tests of these brazed joints were done in the conditions of at high temperature up to, 1,100degC in a vacuum, after 200 heat cycles from room temperature to about 900degC. Optical observation were performed before and after electron beam tests at 3.0 kW/cm 2 ·0.1 s·5 shots. The following results were derived: (1) The good mixing condition was found for titanium, nickel and copper brazing material at 64, 23 and 13w%, respectively. (2) Bending strengths of the brazed joints at room temperature were found to be proportional to the bending strengths of the graphite. (3) Bending strengths of the brazed joints shows no change until tested temperature reached 900degC in a vacuum. (4) Bending strength of the brazed joints showed no change after 200 heat cycles in the temperature range of room ∼ about 900degC and the electron beam tests. (author)

  16. Measurement of reactivity worths of burnable poison rods in enriched uranium graphite-moderated core simulated to high temperature gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akino, Fujiyoshi; Takeuchi, Motoyoshi; Kitadate, Kenji; Yoshifuji, Hisashi; Kaneko, Yoshihiko

    1980-11-01

    As the core design for the Experimental Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor progresses, evaluation of design precision has become increasingly important. For a high precision design, it is required to have adequate group constants based on accurate nuclear data, as well as calculation methods properly describing the physical behavior of neutrons. We, therefore, assembled a simulation core for VHTR, SHE-14, using a graphite-moderated 20%-enriched uranium Semi-Homogeneous Experimental Critical Facility (SHE), and obtained useful experimental data in evaluating the design precision. The VHTR is designed to accommodate burnable poison and control rods for reactivity compensation. Accordingly, the experimental burnable poison rods which are similar to those to be used in the experimental reactor were prepared, and their reactivity values were measured in the SHE-14 core. One to three rods of the above experimental burnable poison rods were inserted into the central column of the SHE-14 core, and the reactivity values were measured by the period and fuel rod substitution method. The results of the measurements have clearly shown that due to the self-shielding effect of B 4 C particles the reactivity value decreases with increasing particle diameter. For the particle diameter, the reactivity value is found to increase linearly with the logarithm of boron content. The measured values and those calculated are found to agree with each other within 5%. These results indicate that the reactivity of the burnable poison rod can be estimated fairly accurately by taking into account the self-shielding effect of B 4 C particles and the heterogeneity of the lattice cell. (author)

  17. In-situ electric resistance measurements and annealing effects of graphite exposed to swift heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, Sandrina; Pellemoine, Frederique; Tomut, Marilena; Avilov, Mikhail; Bender, Markus; Boulesteix, Marine; Krause, Markus; Mittig, Wolfgang; Schein, Mike; Severin, Daniel; Trautmann, Christina

    2013-01-01

    To study the suitability of using graphite as material for high-power targets for rare isotope production at the future Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) in the USA and at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Germany, thin foils of polycrystalline graphite were exposed to 8.6-MeV/u Au ions reaching a maximum fluence of 1 × 10 15 ions/cm 2 . Foil irradiation temperatures of up to 1800 °C were obtained by ohmic heating. In-situ monitoring of the electrical resistance of the graphite foils during and after irradiation provided information on beam-induced radiation damage. The rate of electrical resistance increase as a function of fluence was found to decrease with increasing irradiation temperature, indicating a more efficient annealing of the irradiation-produced defects. This is corroborated by the observation that graphite foils irradiated at temperatures below about 800 °C showed cracks and pronounced deformations, which did not appear on the samples irradiated at higher temperatures

  18. In-situ electric resistance measurements and annealing effects of graphite exposed to swift heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Sandrina [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Pellemoine, Frederique, E-mail: pellemoi@frib.msu.edu [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Tomut, Marilena [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); National Institute for Materials Physics (NIMP), Bucharest (Romania); Avilov, Mikhail [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Bender, Markus [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Boulesteix, Marine [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Krause, Markus [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Technische Universität, Darmstadt (Germany); Mittig, Wolfgang [National Superconducting Cyclotron Lab (NSCL), Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Schein, Mike [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Severin, Daniel [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Trautmann, Christina [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Technische Universität, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    To study the suitability of using graphite as material for high-power targets for rare isotope production at the future Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) in the USA and at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Germany, thin foils of polycrystalline graphite were exposed to 8.6-MeV/u Au ions reaching a maximum fluence of 1 × 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}. Foil irradiation temperatures of up to 1800 °C were obtained by ohmic heating. In-situ monitoring of the electrical resistance of the graphite foils during and after irradiation provided information on beam-induced radiation damage. The rate of electrical resistance increase as a function of fluence was found to decrease with increasing irradiation temperature, indicating a more efficient annealing of the irradiation-produced defects. This is corroborated by the observation that graphite foils irradiated at temperatures below about 800 °C showed cracks and pronounced deformations, which did not appear on the samples irradiated at higher temperatures.

  19. Metal/graphite-composite materials for fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kneringer, G.; Kny, E.; Fischer, W.; Reheis, N.; Staffler, R.; Samm, U.; Winter, J.

    1995-01-01

    The utilization of graphite as a structural material depends to an important extent on the availability of a joining technique suitable for the production of reliable large scale metal/graphite-composites. This study has been conducted to evaluate vacuum brazes and procedures for graphite and metals which can be used in fusion applications up to about 1500 degree C. The braze materials included: AgCuTi, CuTi, NiTi, Ti, ZrTi, Zr. Brazing temperatures ranged from 850 degree C to 1900 degree C. The influence of graphite quality on wettability and pore-penetration of the braze has been investigated. Screening tests of metal/graphite-assemblies with joint areas exceeding some square-centimeters have shown that they can only successfully be produced when graphite is brazed to a metal, such as tungsten or molybdenum with a coefficient of thermal expansion closely matching that of graphite. Therefore all experimental work on evaluation of joints has been concentrated on molybdenum/graphite brazings. The tensile strength of molybdenum/graphite-composites compares favorably with the tensile strength of bulk graphite from room temperature close to the melting temperature of the braze. In electron beam testing the threshold damage line for molybdenum/graphite-composites has been evaluated. Results show that even composites with the low melting AgCuTi-braze are expected to withstand 10 MW/m 2 power density for at least 10 3 cycles. Limiter testing in TEXTOR shows that molybdenum/graphite-segments with 3 mm graphite brazed on molybdenum-substrate withstand severe repeated TEXTOR plasma discharge conditions without serious damage. Results prove that actively cooled components on the basis of a molybdenum/graphite-composite can sustain a higher heat flux than bulk graphite alone. (author)

  20. Modeling Fission Product Sorption in Graphite Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szlufarska, Izabela; Morgan, Dane; Allen, Todd

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this project is to determine changes in adsorption and desorption of fission products to/from nuclear-grade graphite in response to a changing chemical environment. First, the project team will employ principle calculations and thermodynamic analysis to predict stability of fission products on graphite in the presence of structural defects commonly observed in very high-temperature reactor (VHTR) graphites. Desorption rates will be determined as a function of partial pressure of oxygen and iodine, relative humidity, and temperature. They will then carry out experimental characterization to determine the statistical distribution of structural features. This structural information will yield distributions of binding sites to be used as an input for a sorption model. Sorption isotherms calculated under this project will contribute to understanding of the physical bases of the source terms that are used in higher-level codes that model fission product transport and retention in graphite. The project will include the following tasks: Perform structural characterization of the VHTR graphite to determine crystallographic phases, defect structures and their distribution, volume fraction of coke, and amount of sp2 versus sp3 bonding. This information will be used as guidance for ab initio modeling and as input for sorptivity models; Perform ab initio calculations of binding energies to determine stability of fission products on the different sorption sites present in nuclear graphite microstructures. The project will use density functional theory (DFT) methods to calculate binding energies in vacuum and in oxidizing environments. The team will also calculate stability of iodine complexes with fission products on graphite sorption sites; Model graphite sorption isotherms to quantify concentration of fission products in graphite. The binding energies will be combined with a Langmuir isotherm statistical model to predict the sorbed concentration of fission products

  1. Temperature reconstruction and volcanic eruption signal from tree-ring width and maximum latewood density over the past 304 years in the southeastern Tibetan Plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mingqi; Huang, Lei; Yin, Zhi-Yong; Shao, Xuemei

    2017-11-01

    This study presents a 304-year mean July-October maximum temperature reconstruction for the southeastern Tibetan Plateau based on both tree-ring width and maximum latewood density data. The reconstruction explained 58% of the variance in July-October maximum temperature during the calibration period (1958-2005). On the decadal scale, we identified two prominent cold periods during AD 1801-1833 and 1961-2003 and two prominent warm periods during AD 1730-1800 and 1928-1960, which are consistent with other reconstructions from the nearby region. Based on the reconstructed temperature series and volcanic eruption chronology, we found that most extreme cold years were in good agreement with major volcanic eruptions, such as 1816 after the Tambora eruption in 1815. Also, clusters of volcanic eruptions probably made the 1810s the coldest decade in the past 300 years. Our results indicated that fingerprints of major volcanic eruptions can be found in the reconstructed temperature records, while the responses of regional climate to these eruption events varied in space and time in the southeastern Tibetan Plateau.

  2. Fission Product Sorptivity in Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tompson, Jr., Robert V. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Loyalka, Sudarshan [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Ghosh, Tushar [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Viswanath, Dabir [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Walton, Kyle [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Haffner, Robert [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Both adsorption and absorption (sorption) of fission product (FP) gases on/into graphite are issues of interest in very high temperature reactors (VHTRs). In the original proposal, we proposed to use packed beds of graphite particles to measure sorption at a variety of temperatures and to use an electrodynamic balance (EDB) to measure sorption onto single graphite particles (a few μm in diameter) at room temperature. The use of packed beds at elevated temperature is not an issue. However, the TPOC requested revision of this initial proposal to included single particle measurements at elevated temperatures up to 1100 °C. To accommodate the desire of NEUP to extend the single particle EDB measurements to elevated temperatures it was necessary to significantly revise the plan and the budget. These revisions were approved. In the EDB method, we levitate a single graphite particle (the size, surface characteristics, morphology, purity, and composition of the particle can be varied) or agglomerate in the balance and measure the sorption of species by observing the changes in mass. This process involves the use of an electron stepping technique to measure the total charge on a particle which, in conjunction with the measured suspension voltages for the particle, allows for determinations of mass and, hence, of mass changes which then correspond to measurements of sorption. Accommodating elevated temperatures with this type of system required a significant system redesign and required additional time that ultimately was not available. These constraints also meant that the grant had to focus on fewer species as a result. Overall, the extension of the original proposed single particle work to elevated temperatures added greatly to the complexity of the proposed project and added greatly to the time that would eventually be required as well. This means that the bulk of the experimental progress was made using the packed bed sorption systems. Only being able to recruit one

  3. Effect of Temperature on Wettability and Optimum Wetting Conditions for Maximum Oil Recovery in Carbonate Reservoir System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sohal, Muhammad Adeel Nassar; Thyne, Geoffrey; Søgaard, Erik Gydesen

    2017-01-01

    The additional oil recovery from fractured & oil-wet carbonates by ionically modified water is principally based on changing wettability and often attributed to an improvement in water wetness. The influence of different parameters like dilution of salinity, potential anions, temperature, pressure......, lithology, pH, oil acid and base numbers to improve water wetting has been tested in recovery experiments. In these studies temperature is mainly investigated to observe the reactivity of potential anions (SO42-, PO33-, and BO33-) at different concentrations. But the influence of systematically increasing...... and 100 times. It was observed that as temperature increased the water-wetness decreased for seawater and seawater dilutions, however, the presence of elevated sulfate can somewhat counter this trend as sulfate increased oil wetting....

  4. Development of the loss coefficient correlation for cross flow between graphite fuel blocks in the core of prismatic very high temperature reactor-PMR200

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong-Hun; Cho, Hyoung-Kyu; Park, Goon-Cherl

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Cross flow experimental data are produced with wedge-shaped and parallel gaps. • The results of a CFD analysis and experimental data are in good agreement. • Pressure loss coefficient for the cross gap between fuel blocks in PMR200 is found. • A new correlation of the cross flow loss coefficient for PMR200 is proposed. - Abstract: The core of the very high temperature reactor (VHTR) PMR200 (a prismatic modular reactor rated at 200 MW of thermal power) consists of hexagonal prismatic fuel blocks and reflector blocks made of graphite. If the core bypass flow ratio increases, the coolant channel flow is decreased and can then lower the heat removal efficiency, resulting in a locally increased fuel block temperature. The coolant channels in the fuel blocks are connected to bypass gaps by the cross gap, complicating flow distribution in the VHTR core. Therefore, reliable estimation of the bypass flow is highly important for the design and safety analysis of the VHTR core. Because of the complexity of the core geometry and gap configuration, it is challenging to predict the flow distribution in the VHTR core. To analyze this flow distribution accurately, it is necessary to determine the cross flow phenomena, and the loss coefficient across the cross gap has to be evaluated to determine the flow distribution in the VHTR core when a lumped parameter code or a flow network analysis code that uses the correlation of the loss coefficient is employed. The purpose of this paper is to develop a loss coefficient correlation applicable to the cross gap in the PMR200 core. The cross flow was evaluated experimentally using the difference between the measured inlet and outlet mass flow rates. Next, the applicability of a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, CFX 15, was confirmed by comparing the experimental data and CFD analysis results. To understand the cross flow phenomena, the loss coefficient was evaluated; in the high Reynolds number region

  5. Development of the loss coefficient correlation for cross flow between graphite fuel blocks in the core of prismatic very high temperature reactor-PMR200

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong-Hun, E-mail: huny12@snu.ac.kr; Cho, Hyoung-Kyu, E-mail: chohk@snu.ac.kr; Park, Goon-Cherl, E-mail: parkgc@snu.ac.kr

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • Cross flow experimental data are produced with wedge-shaped and parallel gaps. • The results of a CFD analysis and experimental data are in good agreement. • Pressure loss coefficient for the cross gap between fuel blocks in PMR200 is found. • A new correlation of the cross flow loss coefficient for PMR200 is proposed. - Abstract: The core of the very high temperature reactor (VHTR) PMR200 (a prismatic modular reactor rated at 200 MW of thermal power) consists of hexagonal prismatic fuel blocks and reflector blocks made of graphite. If the core bypass flow ratio increases, the coolant channel flow is decreased and can then lower the heat removal efficiency, resulting in a locally increased fuel block temperature. The coolant channels in the fuel blocks are connected to bypass gaps by the cross gap, complicating flow distribution in the VHTR core. Therefore, reliable estimation of the bypass flow is highly important for the design and safety analysis of the VHTR core. Because of the complexity of the core geometry and gap configuration, it is challenging to predict the flow distribution in the VHTR core. To analyze this flow distribution accurately, it is necessary to determine the cross flow phenomena, and the loss coefficient across the cross gap has to be evaluated to determine the flow distribution in the VHTR core when a lumped parameter code or a flow network analysis code that uses the correlation of the loss coefficient is employed. The purpose of this paper is to develop a loss coefficient correlation applicable to the cross gap in the PMR200 core. The cross flow was evaluated experimentally using the difference between the measured inlet and outlet mass flow rates. Next, the applicability of a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, CFX 15, was confirmed by comparing the experimental data and CFD analysis results. To understand the cross flow phenomena, the loss coefficient was evaluated; in the high Reynolds number region

  6. Test Plan to Determine the Maximum Surface Temperatures for a Plutonium Storage Cubicle with Horizontal 3013 Canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HEARD, F.J.

    2000-01-01

    A simulated full-scale plutonium storage cubicle with 22 horizontally positioned and heated 3013 canisters is proposed to confirm the effectiveness of natural circulation. Temperature and airflow measurements will be made for different heat generation and cubicle door configurations. Comparisons will be made to computer based thermal Hydraulic models

  7. Impacts of projected maximum temperature extremes for C21 by an ensemble of regional climate models on cereal cropping systems in the Iberian Peninsula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ruiz-Ramos

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Crops growing in the Iberian Peninsula may be subjected to damagingly high temperatures during the sensitive development periods of flowering and grain filling. Such episodes are considered important hazards and farmers may take insurance to offset their impact. Increases in value and frequency of maximum temperature have been observed in the Iberian Peninsula during the 20th century, and studies on climate change indicate the possibility of further increase by the end of the 21st century. Here, impacts of current and future high temperatures on cereal cropping systems of the Iberian Peninsula are evaluated, focusing on vulnerable development periods of winter and summer crops. Climate change scenarios obtained from an ensemble of ten Regional Climate Models (multimodel ensemble combined with crop simulation models were used for this purpose and related uncertainty was estimated. Results reveal that higher extremes of maximum temperature represent a threat to summer-grown but not to winter-grown crops in the Iberian Peninsula. The study highlights the different vulnerability of crops in the two growing seasons and the need to account for changes in extreme temperatures in developing adaptations in cereal cropping systems. Finally, this work contributes to clarifying the causes of high-uncertainty impact projections from previous studies.

  8. Mechanical design philosophy for the graphite components of the core structure of an HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodmann, E.

    1987-01-01

    Parallel to the layout and design of the graphite components for THTRs and the succeeding high temperature reactor projects, the design methods for graphite components have been improved over the years. The aim of this works is to develop the design methods which take into account both the particular properties of graphite and the particular functions of the components. Because of the close relation ship between materials and design codes, this development work has progressed with the development, testing and qualification of German reactor graphite. In this paper, the experience in this field of Hochtemperatur Reaktorbau GmbH and the results of the work and approach to the design problems are reported. The example of a HTR 500 design for a 550 MWe power station is taken up, and the core structure is explained. The graphite components are divided into three classes according to the stress limits. The loading of these components is reviewed. The aim of the design is not the complete avoidance of failure, but to avoid the failure of a single component from leading to a disadvantageous consequence which is not allowable. The classification of loading events, Weibull statistics and maximum allowable stress, the formation of the permissible stress, the assessment of stress due to multiaxial loading and so on are described. (Kako, I.)

  9. Status of Chronic Oxidation Studies of Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contescu, Cristian I. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mee, Robert W. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Graphite will undergo extremely slow, but continuous oxidation by traces of moisture that will be present, albeit at very low levels, in the helium coolant of HTGR. This chronic oxidation may cause degradation of mechanical strength and thermal properties of graphite components if a porous oxidation layer penetrates deep enough in the bulk of graphite components during the lifetime of the reactor. The current research on graphite chronic oxidation is motivated by the acute need to understand the behavior of each graphite grade during prolonged exposure to high temperature chemical attack by moisture. The goal is to provide the elements needed to develop predictive models for long-time oxidation behavior of graphite components in the cooling helium of HTGR. The tasks derived from this goal are: (1) Oxidation rate measurements in order to determine and validate a comprehensive kinetic model suitable for prediction of intrinsic oxidation rates as a function of temperature and oxidant gas composition; (2) Characterization of effective diffusivity of water vapor in the graphite pore system in order to account for the in-pore transport of moisture; and (3) Development and validation of a predictive model for the penetration depth of the oxidized layer, in order to assess the risk of oxidation caused damage of particular graphite grades after prolonged exposure to the environment of helium coolant in HTGR. The most important and most time consuming of these tasks is the measurement of oxidation rates in accelerated oxidation tests (but still under kinetic control) and the development of a reliable kinetic model. This report summarizes the status of chronic oxidation studies on graphite, and then focuses on model development activities, progress of kinetic measurements, validation of results, and improvement of the kinetic models. Analysis of current and past results obtained with three grades of showed that the classical Langmuir-Hinshelwood model cannot reproduce all

  10. AGC-2 Graphite Preirradiation Data Analysis Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William Windes; W. David Swank; David Rohrbaugh; Joseph Lord

    2013-08-01

    This report described the specimen loading order and documents all pre-irradiation examination material property measurement data for the graphite specimens contained within the second Advanced Graphite Capsule (AGC-2) irradiation capsule. The AGC-2 capsule is the second in six planned irradiation capsules comprising the Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) test series. The AGC test series is used to irradiate graphite specimens allowing quantitative data necessary for predicting the irradiation behavior and operating performance of new nuclear graphite grades to be generated which will ascertain the in-service behavior of the graphite for pebble bed and prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) designs. Similar to the AGC-1 specimen pre-irradiation examination report, material property tests were conducted on specimens from 18 nuclear graphite types but on an increased number of specimens (512) prior to loading into the AGC-2 irradiation assembly. All AGC-2 specimen testing was conducted at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) from October 2009 to August 2010. This report also details the specimen loading methodology for the graphite specimens inside the AGC-2 irradiation capsule. The AGC-2 capsule design requires “matched pair” creep specimens that have similar dose levels above and below the neutron flux profile mid-plane to provide similar specimens with and without an applied load. This document utilized the neutron flux profile calculated for the AGC-2 capsule design, the capsule dimensions, and the size (length) of the selected graphite and silicon carbide samples to create a stacking order that can produce “matched pairs” of graphite samples above and below the AGC-2 capsule elevation mid-point to provide specimens with similar neutron dose levels.

  11. Advanced Surface and Microstructural Characterization of Natural Graphite Anodes for Lithium Ion Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallego, Nidia C [ORNL; Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL; Meyer III, Harry M [ORNL; Howe, Jane Y [ORNL; Meisner, Roberta Ann [ORNL; Payzant, E Andrew [ORNL; Lance, Michael J [ORNL; Yoon, Steve [A123 Systems, Inc.; Denlinger, Matthew [A123 Systems, Inc.; Wood III, David L [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Natural graphite powders were subjected to a series of thermal treatments in order to improve the anode irreversible capacity loss (ICL) and capacity retention during long-term cycling of lithium ion batteries. A baseline thermal treatment in inert Ar or N2 atmosphere was compared to cases with a proprietary additive to the furnace gas environment. This additive substantially altered the surface chemistry of the natural graphite powders and resulted in significantly improved long-term cycling performance of the lithium ion batteries over the commercial natural graphite baseline. Different heat-treatment temperatures were investigated ranging from 950-2900 C with the intent of achieving the desired long-term cycling performance with as low of a maximum temperature and thermal budget as possible. A detailed summary of the characterization data is also presented, which includes X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, and temperature-programed desorption mass spectroscopy (TPD-MS). This characterization data was correlated to the observed capacity fade improvements over the course of long-term cycling at high charge-discharge rates in full lithium-ion coin cells. It is believed that the long-term performance improvements are a result of forming a more stable solid electrolyte interface (SEI) layer on the anode graphite surfaces, which is directly related to the surface chemistry modifications imparted by the proprietary gas environment during thermal treatment.

  12. Superconductivity in graphite intercalation compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Robert P. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Weller, Thomas E.; Howard, Christopher A. [Department of Physics & Astronomy, University College of London, Gower Street, London WCIE 6BT (United Kingdom); Dean, Mark P.M. [Department of Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Rahnejat, Kaveh C. [Department of Physics & Astronomy, University College of London, Gower Street, London WCIE 6BT (United Kingdom); Saxena, Siddharth S. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Ellerby, Mark, E-mail: mark.ellerby@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Physics & Astronomy, University College of London, Gower Street, London WCIE 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Historical background of graphite intercalates. • Superconductivity in graphite intercalates and its place in the field of superconductivity. • Recent developments. • Relevant modeling of superconductivity in graphite intercalates. • Interpretations that pertain and questions that remain. - Abstract: The field of superconductivity in the class of materials known as graphite intercalation compounds has a history dating back to the 1960s (Dresselhaus and Dresselhaus, 1981; Enoki et al., 2003). This paper recontextualizes the field in light of the discovery of superconductivity in CaC{sub 6} and YbC{sub 6} in 2005. In what follows, we outline the crystal structure and electronic structure of these and related compounds. We go on to experiments addressing the superconducting energy gap, lattice dynamics, pressure dependence, and how these relate to theoretical studies. The bulk of the evidence strongly supports a BCS superconducting state. However, important questions remain regarding which electronic states and phonon modes are most important for superconductivity, and whether current theoretical techniques can fully describe the dependence of the superconducting transition temperature on pressure and chemical composition.

  13. Superconductivity in graphite intercalation compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Robert P.; Weller, Thomas E.; Howard, Christopher A.; Dean, Mark P.M.; Rahnejat, Kaveh C.; Saxena, Siddharth S.; Ellerby, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Historical background of graphite intercalates. • Superconductivity in graphite intercalates and its place in the field of superconductivity. • Recent developments. • Relevant modeling of superconductivity in graphite intercalates. • Interpretations that pertain and questions that remain. - Abstract: The field of superconductivity in the class of materials known as graphite intercalation compounds has a history dating back to the 1960s (Dresselhaus and Dresselhaus, 1981; Enoki et al., 2003). This paper recontextualizes the field in light of the discovery of superconductivity in CaC 6 and YbC 6 in 2005. In what follows, we outline the crystal structure and electronic structure of these and related compounds. We go on to experiments addressing the superconducting energy gap, lattice dynamics, pressure dependence, and how these relate to theoretical studies. The bulk of the evidence strongly supports a BCS superconducting state. However, important questions remain regarding which electronic states and phonon modes are most important for superconductivity, and whether current theoretical techniques can fully describe the dependence of the superconducting transition temperature on pressure and chemical composition

  14. THE EFFECT OF APPLIED STRESS ON THE GRAPHITIZATION OF PYROLYTIC GRAPHITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bragg, R H; Crooks, D D; Fenn, Jr, R W; Hammond, M L

    1963-06-15

    Metallographic and x-ray diffraction studies were made of the effect of applied stress at high temperature on the structure of pyrolytic graphite (PG). The dominant factor was whether the PG was above or below its graphitization temperature, which, in turn, was not strongly dependent on applied stress. Below the graphitization temperature, the PG showed a high proportion of disordered layers (0.9), a fairly large mean tilt angle (20 deg ) and a small crystailite size (La --150 A). Fracture occurred at low stress and strain and the materiai exhibited a high apparent Young's modulus ( approximates 4 x 10/sup 6/ psi). Above the graphitization temperature, graphitization was considerably enhanced by strain up to about 8%. The disorder parameter was decreased from a zero strain value of 0.3 to 0.l5 with strain, the mean tilt angle was decreased to 4 deg , and a fivefold increase in crystallite size occurred. When the strainenhanced graphitization was complete, the material exhibited a low apparent modulus ( approximates 0.5 x 10/sup 6/ psi) and large plastic strains (>100%) for a constant stress ( approximates 55 ksi). Graphitization was shown to be a spontaneous process that is promoted by breaking cross-links thermally, and the process is furthered by chemical attack and plastic strain. (auth)

  15. Temperature effect on the inter-micellar collision and maximum packaging volume fraction in water/AOT/isooctane micro-emulsions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guettari, Moez; Ben Naceur, Imen; Kassab, Ghazi; Tajouri, Tahar

    2016-01-01

    We have studied the viscosity behaviour of water/AOT/isooctane micro-emulsions as a function of the volume fraction of the dispersed phase over a temperature range from the (298.15 to 328.15) K. For all the studied temperature range, a sharp increase of the viscosities is observed when the droplets concentration was varied. Several equations based on hard sphere model were examined to explain the behaviours of micro-emulsions under temperature and concentration effects. According to these equations, the shape factor and the inter-particle interaction parameters were found to be dependent on temperature which is in contradiction with experimental results reported in the literature. A modified Vand equation, taking into account the inter-particle collision time, is used to interpret the results obtained. This deviation is attributed to the aggregation of the droplets which becomes important by increasing temperature. The maximum packaging volume fraction of particles Φ_d_m and the intrinsic viscosity [η] were determined according to the Krieger and Dougherty equation through the temperature range studied. These two parameters were shown to be dependent on temperature but their product was found to be constant and close to 2 as reported in theory.

  16. Energy evaluations, graphite corrosion in Bugey I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brisbois, J.; Fiche, C.

    1967-01-01

    Bugey I presents a problem of radiolytic corrosion of the graphite by the CO 2 under pressure at high temperature. This report aims to evaluate the energy transferred to the gas by a Bugey I core cell, in normal operating conditions. The water, the carbon oxides and the hydrogen formed quantities are deduced as the consumed graphite and methane. Experimental studies are realized in parallel to validate the presented results. (A.L.B.)

  17. Effect of in-pile degradation of the meat thermal conductivity on the maximum temperature of the plate-type U-Mo dispersion fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medvedev, Pavel G.

    2009-01-01

    Effect of in-pile degradation of thermal conductivity on the maximum temperature of the plate-type research reactor fuels has been assessed using the steady-state heat conduction equation and assuming convection cooling. It was found that due to very low meat thickness, characteristic for this type of fuel, the effect of thermal conductivity degradation on the maximum fuel temperature is minor. For example, the fuel plate featuring 0.635 mm thick meat operating at heat flux of 600 W/cm2 would experience only a 20 C temperature rise if the meat thermal conductivity degrades from 0.8 W/cm-s to 0.3 W/cm-s. While degradation of meat thermal conductivity in dispersion-type U-Mo fuel can be very substantial due to formation of interaction layer between the particles and the matrix, and development of fission gas filled porosity, this simple analysis demonstrates that this phenomenon is unlikely to significantly affect the temperature-based safety margin of the fuel during normal operation.

  18. New climatic targets against global warming: will the maximum 2 °C temperature rise affect estuarine benthic communities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, Daniel; Grilo, Tiago Fernandes; Baptista, Joana; Coelho, João Pedro; Lillebø, Ana Isabel; Cássio, Fernanda; Fernandes, Isabel; Pascoal, Cláudia; Pardal, Miguel Ângelo; Dolbeth, Marina

    2017-06-20

    The Paris Agreement signed by 195 countries in 2015 sets out a global action plan to avoid dangerous climate change by limiting global warming to remain below 2 °C. Under that premise, in situ experiments were run to test the effects of 2 °C temperature increase on the benthic communities in a seagrass bed and adjacent bare sediment, from a temperate European estuary. Temperature was artificially increased in situ and diversity and ecosystem functioning components measured after 10 and 30 days. Despite some warmness effects on the analysed components, significant impacts were not verified on macro and microfauna structure, bioturbation or in the fluxes of nutrients. The effect of site/habitat seemed more important than the effects of the warmness, with the seagrass habitat providing more homogenous results and being less impacted by warmness than the adjacent bare sediment. The results reinforce that most ecological responses to global changes are context dependent and that ecosystem stability depends not only on biological diversity but also on the availability of different habitats and niches, highlighting the role of coastal wetlands. In the context of the Paris Agreement it seems that estuarine benthic ecosystems will be able to cope if global warming remains below 2 °C.

  19. Crystallization degree change of expanded graphite by milling and annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Qunwei; Wu Jihuai; Sun Hui; Fang Shijun

    2009-01-01

    Expanded graphite was ball milled with a planetary mill in air atmosphere, and subsequently thermal annealed. The samples were characterized by using X-ray diffraction spectroscopy (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). It was found that in the milling initial stage (less than 12 h), the crystallization degree of the expanded graphite declined gradually, but after milling more than 16 h, a recrystallization of the expanded graphite toke place, and ordered nanoscale expanded graphite was formed gradually. In the annealing initial stage, the non-crystallization of the graphite occurred, but, beyond an annealing time, recrystallizations of the graphite arise. Higher annealing temperature supported the recrystallization. The milled and annealed expanded graphite still preserved the crystalline structure as raw material and hold high thermal stability.

  20. Evaluation of daily maximum and minimum 2-m temperatures as simulated with the Regional Climate Model COSMO-CLM over Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Krähenmann

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The representation of the diurnal 2-m temperature cycle is challenging because of the many processes involved, particularly land-atmosphere interactions. This study examines the ability of the regional climate model COSMO-CLM (version 4.8 to capture the statistics of daily maximum and minimum 2-m temperatures (Tmin/Tmax over Africa. The simulations are carried out at two different horizontal grid-spacings (0.22° and 0.44°, and are driven by ECMWF ERA-Interim reanalyses as near-perfect lateral boundary conditions. As evaluation reference, a high-resolution gridded dataset of daily maximum and minimum temperatures (Tmin/Tmax for Africa (covering the period 2008–2010 is created using the regression-kriging-regression-kriging (RKRK algorithm. RKRK applies, among other predictors, the remotely sensed predictors land surface temperature and cloud cover to compensate for the missing information about the temperature pattern due to the low station density over Africa. This dataset allows the evaluation of temperature characteristics like the frequencies of Tmin/Tmax, the diurnal temperature range, and the 90th percentile of Tmax. Although the large-scale patterns of temperature are reproduced well, COSMO-CLM shows significant under- and overestimation of temperature at regional scales. The hemispheric summers are generally too warm and the day-to-day temperature variability is overestimated over northern and southern extra-tropical Africa. The average diurnal temperature range is underestimated by about 2°C across arid areas, yet overestimated by around 2°C over the African tropics. An evaluation based on frequency distributions shows good model performance for simulated Tmin (the simulated frequency distributions capture more than 80% of the observed ones, but less well performance for Tmax (capture below 70%. Further, over wide parts of Africa a too large fraction of daily Tmax values exceeds the observed 90th percentile of Tmax, particularly

  1. Evaluation of daily maximum and minimum 2-m temperatures as simulated with the regional climate model COSMO-CLM over Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraehenmann, Stefan; Kothe, Steffen; Ahrens, Bodo [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Inst. for Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences; Panitz, Hans-Juergen [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    The representation of the diurnal 2-m temperature cycle is challenging because of the many processes involved, particularly land-atmosphere interactions. This study examines the ability of the regional climate model COSMO-CLM (version 4.8) to capture the statistics of daily maximum and minimum 2-m temperatures (Tmin/Tmax) over Africa. The simulations are carried out at two different horizontal grid-spacings (0.22 and 0.44 ), and are driven by ECMWF ERA-Interim reanalyses as near-perfect lateral boundary conditions. As evaluation reference, a high-resolution gridded dataset of daily maximum and minimum temperatures (Tmin/Tmax) for Africa (covering the period 2008-2010) is created using the regression-kriging-regression-kriging (RKRK) algorithm. RKRK applies, among other predictors, the remotely sensed predictors land surface temperature and cloud cover to compensate for the missing information about the temperature pattern due to the low station density over Africa. This dataset allows the evaluation of temperature characteristics like the frequencies of Tmin/Tmax, the diurnal temperature range, and the 90{sup th} percentile of Tmax. Although the large-scale patterns of temperature are reproduced well, COSMO-CLM shows significant under- and overestimation of temperature at regional scales. The hemispheric summers are generally too warm and the day-to-day temperature variability is overestimated over northern and southern extra-tropical Africa. The average diurnal temperature range is underestimated by about 2 C across arid areas, yet overestimated by around 2 C over the African tropics. An evaluation based on frequency distributions shows good model performance for simulated Tmin (the simulated frequency distributions capture more than 80% of the observed ones), but less well performance for Tmax (capture below 70%). Further, over wide parts of Africa a too large fraction of daily Tmax values exceeds the observed 90{sup th} percentile of Tmax, particularly across

  2. Evaluation of ac conductivity behaviour of graphite filled

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Composites of epoxy resin having different amounts of graphite particles have been prepared by solution casting method. Temperature dependence of dielectric constant, tan and a.c. conductivity was measured in the frequency range, 1–20 kHz, temperature range, 40–180°C for 0.99, 1.96 and 2.91 wt% graphite filled ...

  3. Modelling the occurrence of heat waves in maximum and minimum temperatures over Spain and projections for the period 2031-60

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abaurrea, J.; Asín, J.; Cebrián, A. C.

    2018-02-01

    The occurrence of extreme heat events in maximum and minimum daily temperatures is modelled using a non-homogeneous common Poisson shock process. It is applied to five Spanish locations, representative of the most common climates over the Iberian Peninsula. The model is based on an excess over threshold approach and distinguishes three types of extreme events: only in maximum temperature, only in minimum temperature and in both of them (simultaneous events). It takes into account the dependence between the occurrence of extreme events in both temperatures and its parameters are expressed as functions of time and temperature related covariates. The fitted models allow us to characterize the occurrence of extreme heat events and to compare their evolution in the different climates during the observed period. This model is also a useful tool for obtaining local projections of the occurrence rate of extreme heat events under climate change conditions, using the future downscaled temperature trajectories generated by Earth System Models. The projections for 2031-60 under scenarios RCP4.5, RCP6.0 and RCP8.5 are obtained and analysed using the trajectories from four earth system models which have successfully passed a preliminary control analysis. Different graphical tools and summary measures of the projected daily intensities are used to quantify the climate change on a local scale. A high increase in the occurrence of extreme heat events, mainly in July and August, is projected in all the locations, all types of event and in the three scenarios, although in 2051-60 the increase is higher under RCP8.5. However, relevant differences are found between the evolution in the different climates and the types of event, with a specially high increase in the simultaneous ones.

  4. Acceptance test for graphite components and construction status of HTTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyoku, T.; Ishihara, M.; Maruyama, S.; Shiozawa, S.; Tsuji, N.; Miki, T.

    1996-01-01

    In March, 1991, the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) started to constructed the High Temperature engineering Test Reactor(HTTR) which is a 30-MW(thermal) helium gas-cooled reactor with a core composed of prismatic graphite blocks piled on the core support graphite structures. Two types of graphite materials are used in the HTTR. One is the garde IG-110, isotropic fine grain graphite, another is the grade PGX, medium-to-fine grained molded graphite. These materials were selected on the basis of the appropriate properties required by the HTTR reactor design. Industry-wide standards for an acceptance test of graphite materials used as main components of a nuclear reactor had not been established. The acceptance standard for graphite components of the HTTR, therefore, was drafted by JAERI and reviewed by specialists outside JAERI. The acceptance standard consists of the material testing, non-destructive examination such as the ultrasonic and eddy current testings, dimensional and visual inspections and assembly test. Ultrasonic and eddy current testings are applied to graphite logs to detect an internal flaw and to graphite components to detect a surface flaw, respectively. The assembly test is performed at the works, prior to their installation in the reactor pressure vessel, to examine fabricating precision of each component and alignment of piled-up structures. The graphite components of the HTTR had been tested on the basis of the acceptance standard. It was confirmed that the graphite manufacturing process was well controlled and high quality graphite components were provided to the HTTR. All graphite components except for the fuel graphite blocks are to be installed in the reactor pressure vessel of the HTTR in September 1995. The paper describes the construction status of the HTTR focusing on the graphite components. The acceptance test results are also presented in this paper. (author). Figs

  5. Low cost sic coated erosion resistant graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zafar, M.F.; Nicholls, J.R.

    2007-01-01

    The development of materials with unique and improved properties using low cost processes is essential to increase performance and reduce cost of the solid rocket motors. Specifically advancements are needed for boost phase nozzle. As these motors operate at very high pressure and temperatures, the nozzle must survive high thermal stresses with minimal erosion to maintain performance. Currently three material choices are being exploited; which are refractory metals, graphite and carbon-carbon composites. Of these three materials graphite is the most attractive choice because of its low cost, light weight, and easy forming. However graphite is prone to erosion, both chemical and mechanical, which may affect the ballistic conditions and mechanical properties of the nozzle. To minimize this erosion high density graphite is usually preferred; which is again very expensive. Another technique used to minimize the erosion is Pyrolytic Graphite (PG) coating inside the nozzle. However PG coating is prone to cracking and spallation along with very cumbersome deposition process. Another possible methodology to avoid this erosion is to convert the inside surface of the rocket nozzle to Silicon Carbide (SiC), which is very erosion resistant and have much better thermal stability compared to graphite and even PG. Due to its functionally gradient nature such a layer will be very adherent and resistant to spallation. The current research is focused on synthesizing, characterizing and oxidation testing of such a converted SiC layer on commercial grade graphite. (author)

  6. Some equipment for graphite research in swimming pool reactors; Quelques dispositifs d'etude du graphite dans les piles piscines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seguin, M; Arragon, Ph; Dupont, G; Gentil, J; Tanis, G [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    The irradiation devices described are used for research concerning reactors of the natural uranium type, moderated by graphite and cooled by carbon dioxide. The devices are generally designed for use in swimming pool reactors. The following points have been particularly studied: - maximum use of the irradiation volume, - use of the simplest technological solutions, - standardization of certain constituent parts. This standardization calls for precision machining and careful assembling; these requirements are also true when a relatively low irradiation temperature is required and the nuclear heating is pronounced. Finally, the design of these devices is suitable for the irradiation of other fissile or non-fissile materials. (authors) [French] Les dispositifs d'irradiation decrits servent aux etudes relatives a la filiere des reacteurs a uranium naturel, moderes au graphite et refroidis par le gaz carbonique. Ils sont generalement concus pour etre utilises dans des piles piscines. L'accent a ete mis sur: - l'utilisation au maximum du volume d'irradiation, - le recours aux solutions technologiques les plus simples, - la standardisation de certaines parties constitutives. Cette standardisation impose un usinage precis et un montage soigne, lesquels sont egalement necessaires lorsqu'on doit obtenir une temperature d'irradiation relativement basse alors que l'echauffement nucleaire est important. Enfin, la conception de ces dispositifs est valable pour irradier d'autres materiaux non fissiles ou fissiles. (auteurs)

  7. A graphite nanoeraser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Ze; Bøggild, Peter; Yang, Jia-rui

    2011-01-01

    We present here a method for cleaning intermediate-size (up to 50 nm) contamination from highly oriented pyrolytic graphite and graphene. Electron-beam-induced deposition of carbonaceous material on graphene and graphite surfaces inside a scanning electron microscope, which is difficult to remove...... by conventional techniques, can be removed by direct mechanical wiping using a graphite nanoeraser, thus drastically reducing the amount of contamination. We discuss potential applications of this cleaning procedure....

  8. Surface temperature evolution and the location of maximum and average surface temperature of a lithium-ion pouch cell under variable load profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goutam, Shovon; Timmermans, Jean-Marc; Omar, Noshin

    2014-01-01

    This experimental work attempts to determine the surface temperature evolution of large (20 Ah-rated capacity) commercial Lithium-Ion pouch cells for the application of rechargeable energy storage of plug in hybrid electric vehicles and electric vehicles. The cathode of the cells is nickel...

  9. Irradiation-induced amorphization process in graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Hiroaki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    1996-04-01

    Effects of the element process of irradiation damage on irradiation-induced amorphization processes of graphite was studied. High orientation thermal decomposed graphite was cut about 100 nm width and used as samples. The irradiation experiments are carried out under the conditions of electronic energy of 100-400 KeV, ion energy of 200-600 KeV, ionic species Xe, Ar, Ne, C and He and the irradiation temperature at from room temperature to 900 K. The critical dose ({phi}a) increases exponentially with increasing irradiation temperature. The displacement threshold energy of graphite on c-axis direction was 27 eV and {phi}a{sup e} = 0.5 dpa. dpa is the average number of displacement to atom. The critical dose of ion irradiation ({phi}a{sup i}) was 0.2 dpa at room temperature, and amorphous graphite was produced by less than half of dose of electronic irradiation. Amorphization of graphite depending upon temperature is discussed. (S.Y.)

  10. Heat Transfer During Evaporation of Cesium From Graphite Surface in an Argon Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bespala Evgeny

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on discussion of problem of graphite radioactive waste formation and accumulation. It is shown that irradiated nuclear graphite being inalienable part of uranium-graphite reactor may contain fission and activation products. Much attention is given to the process of formation of radioactive cesium on the graphite element surface. It is described a process of plasma decontamination of irradiated graphite in inert argon atmosphere. Quasi-one mathematical model is offered, it describes heat transfer process in graphite-cesium-argon system. Article shows results of calculation of temperature field inside the unit cell. Authors determined the factors which influence on temperature change.

  11. Thermal Properties of G-348 Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McEligot, Donald M. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Swank, W. David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cottle, David L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Valentin, Francisco I. [City Univ. (CUNY), NY (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Fundamental measurements have been obtained in the INL Graphite Characterization Laboratory to deduce the temperature dependence of thermal conductivity for G-348 isotropic graphite, which has been used by City College of New York in thermal experiments related to gas-cooled nuclear reactors. Measurements of thermal diffusivity, mass, volume and thermal expansion were converted to thermal conductivity in accordance with ASTM Standard Practice C781-08 (R-2014). Data are tabulated and a preliminary correlation for the thermal conductivity is presented as a function of temperature from laboratory temperature to 1000C.

  12. Chemical atomization of graphite by H+ ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busharov, I.P.; Gorbatov, E.A.; Gusev, V.M.; Guseva, M.I.; Martynenko, Yu.V.

    A simple model of the mechanism of chemical atomization is given, on whose basis a decrease in chemical atomization is qualitatively predicted for high temperatures. Mass spectrometric investigations of the atomization products cited, which found CH 4 and CH 3 molecules during the irradiation of graphite and H + ions thereby confirmed the presence of chemical atomization. A relationship of S and temperature of graphite T during irradiation was obtained which showed a decrease in the coefficient of atomization of a high temperature. (U.S.)

  13. Electrical properties of Egyptian natural graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Shazly, O.; El-Wahidy, E.F.; Elanany, N.; Saad, N.A.

    1992-06-01

    The electrical properties of Egyptian natural graphite flakes, obtained from the graphite schists of Wadi Bent, Eastern Desert, were measured. The flakes were ground and compressed into pellets. The standard four probe dc method was used to measure the temperature dependence of the electric resistivity from room temperature down to 12 K. The transverse and longitudinal magnetoresistance were measured in the low magnetic field range at temperatures 300 K, 77 K and 12 K. The transverse magnetoresistance data was used to estimate the average mobility, assuming a simple two-band model. (author). 20 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  14. The radioactivity estimation of 14C and 3H in graphite waste samples of the KRR-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyoung Kim, Hee

    2013-09-01

    The radioactivity of (14)C and (3)H in graphite samples from the dismantled Korea Research Reactor-2 (the KRR-2) site was analyzed by high-temperature oxidation and liquid scintillation counting, and the graphite waste was suggested to be disposed of as a low-level radioactive waste. The graphite samples were oxidized at a high temperature of 800 °C, and their counting rates were measured by using a liquid scintillation counter (LSC). The combustion ratio of the graphite was about 99% on the sample with a maximum weight of 1g. The recoveries from the combustion furnace were around 100% and 90% in (14)C and (3)H, respectively. The minimum detectable activity was 0.04-0.05 Bq/g for the (14)C and 0.13-0.15 Bq/g for the (3)H at the same background counting time. The activity of (14)C was higher than that of (3)H over all samples with the activity ratios of the (14)C to (3)H, (14)C/(3)H, being between 2.8 and 25. The dose calculation was carried out from its radioactivity analysis results. The dose estimation gave a higher annual dose than the domestic legal limit for a clearance. It was thought that the sampled graphite waste from the dismantled research reactor was not available for reuse or recycling and should be monitored as low-level radioactive waste. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Further studies of the stability of LiF:Mg,Cu,P (GR-200) at maximum readout temperatures between 240oC and 280oC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oster, L.; Horowitz, Y.S.; Horowitz, A.

    1996-01-01

    It has recently been shown that LiF:Mg,Cu,P (GR-200) can be read out to temperatures as high as 270 o C for 12 s with negligible loss in sensitivity. In the present work the long-term sensitivity of GR-200 was studied at readout temperatures between 240 o C and 280 o C. The idea was that the readout temperatures above 240 o C might initiate reaction processes which influence the sensitivity only after long-term storage. No difference was found in the behaviour of GR-200 chips with 80 accumulated readouts to 240 o C or 270 o C and after storage of up to four months. Slight losses in sensitivity of 4% for 240 o C and 10% for 270 o C are observed after 80 readouts during four months storage. However, at a maximum readout temperature of 280 o C, a 33% loss in sensitivity after 80 cycles is observed. In conclusion it is found that GR-200 can be read out at temperatures as high as 270 o C with negligible loss in sensitivity (less than 0.1% per readout following an initialisation procedure of 1 readout) and acceptable residual signal (0.6%). (author)

  16. Simulation of the maximum yield of sugar cane at different altitudes: effect of temperature on the conversion of radiation into biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martine, J.F.; Siband, P.; Bonhomme, R.

    1999-01-01

    To minimize the production costs of sugar cane, for the diverse sites of production found in La Réunion, an improved understanding of the influence of temperature on the dry matter radiation quotient is required. Existing models simulate poorly the temperature-radiation interaction. A model of sugar cane growth has been fitted to the results from two contrasting sites (mean temperatures: 14-30 °C; total radiation: 10-25 MJ·m -2 ·d -1 ), on a ratoon crop of cv R570, under conditions of non-limiting resources. Radiation interception, aerial biomass, the fraction of millable stems, and their moisture content, were measured. The time-courses of the efficiency of radiation interception differed between sites. As a function of the sum of day-degrees, they were similar. The dry matter radiation quotient was related to temperature. The moisture content of millable stems depended on the day-degree sum. On the other hand, the leaf/stem ratio was independent of temperature. The relationships established enabled the construction of a simple model of yield potential. Applied to a set of sites representing the sugar cane growing area of La Réunion, it gave a good prediction of maximum yields. (author) [fr

  17. Seismic research on graphite reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai Shigang; Sun Libin; Zhang Zhengming

    2013-01-01

    Background: Reactors with graphite core structure include production reactor, water-cooled graphite reactor, gas-cooled reactor, high-temperature gas-cooled reactor and so on. Multi-body graphite core structure has nonlinear response under seismic excitation, which is different from the response of general civil structure, metal connection structure or bolted structure. Purpose: In order to provide references for the designing and construction of HTR-PM. This paper reviews the history of reactor seismic research evaluation from certain countries, and summarizes the research methods and research results. Methods: By comparing the methods adopted in different gas-cooled reactor cores, inspiration for our own HTR seismic research was achieved. Results and Conclusions: In this paper, the research ideas of graphite core seismic during the process of designing, constructing and operating HTR-10 are expounded. Also the project progress of HTR-PM and the research on side reflection with the theory of similarity is introduced. (authors)

  18. Study on graphite samples for nuclear usage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez, J.C.M.; Silva Roseira, M. da

    1994-01-01

    Available as short communication only. The graphite, due to its properties (mechanical strength, thermal conductivity, high-temperature stability, machinability etc.) have many industrial applications, and consequently, an important strategic value. In the nuclear area, it has been used as moderator and reflector of neutrons in the fission process of uranium. The graphite can be produced from many types of carbonaceous materials by a variety of process dominated by the manufactures. This is the reason why there are in the world market a lot of graphite types with different physical and mechanical properties. The present investigation studies some physical characteristics of the graphite samples destined to use in a nuclear reactor. (author). 8 refs, 1 fig, 1 tab

  19. Collective modes in superconducting rhombohedral graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauppila, Ville [O.V. Lounasmaa Laboratory, Aalto University (Finland); Hyart, Timo; Heikkilae, Tero [University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    2015-07-01

    Recently it was realized that coupling particles with a Dirac dispersion (such as electrons in graphene) can lead to a topologically protected state with flat band dispersion. Such a state could support superconductivity with unusually high critical temperatures. Perhaps the most promising way to realize such coupling in real materials is in the surface of rhombohedrally stacked graphite. We consider collective excitations (i.e. the Higgs modes) in surface superconducting rhombohedral graphite. We find two amplitude and two phase modes corresponding to the two surfaces of the graphite where the superconductivity lives. We calculate the dispersion of these modes. We also derive the Ginzburg-Landau theory for this material. We show that in superconducting rhombohedral graphite, the collective modes, unlike in conventional BCS superconductors, give a large contribution to thermodynamic properties of the material.

  20. Controls on seasonal patterns of maximum ecosystem carbon uptake and canopy-scale photosynthetic light response: contributions from both temperature and photoperiod.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoy, Paul C; Trowbridge, Amy M; Bauerle, William L

    2014-02-01

    Most models of photosynthetic activity assume that temperature is the dominant control over physiological processes. Recent studies have found, however, that photoperiod is a better descriptor than temperature of the seasonal variability of photosynthetic physiology at the leaf scale. Incorporating photoperiodic control into global models consequently improves their representation of the seasonality and magnitude of atmospheric CO2 concentration. The role of photoperiod versus that of temperature in controlling the seasonal variability of photosynthetic function at the canopy scale remains unexplored. We quantified the seasonal variability of ecosystem-level light response curves using nearly 400 site years of eddy covariance data from over eighty Free Fair-Use sites in the FLUXNET database. Model parameters describing maximum canopy CO2 uptake and the initial slope of the light response curve peaked after peak temperature in about 2/3 of site years examined, emphasizing the important role of temperature in controlling seasonal photosynthetic function. Akaike's Information Criterion analyses indicated that photoperiod should be included in models of seasonal parameter variability in over 90% of the site years investigated here, demonstrating that photoperiod also plays an important role in controlling seasonal photosynthetic function. We also performed a Granger causality analysis on both gross ecosystem productivity (GEP) and GEP normalized by photosynthetic photon flux density (GEP n ). While photoperiod Granger-caused GEP and GEP n in 99 and 92% of all site years, respectively, air temperature Granger-caused GEP in a mere 32% of site years but Granger-caused GEP n in 81% of all site years. Results demonstrate that incorporating photoperiod may be a logical step toward improving models of ecosystem carbon uptake, but not at the expense of including enzyme kinetic-based temperature constraints on canopy-scale photosynthesis.

  1. Method for producing dustless graphite spheres from waste graphite fines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappano, Peter J [Oak Ridge, TN; Rogers, Michael R [Clinton, TN

    2012-05-08

    A method for producing graphite spheres from graphite fines by charging a quantity of spherical media into a rotatable cylindrical overcoater, charging a quantity of graphite fines into the overcoater thereby forming a first mixture of spherical media and graphite fines, rotating the overcoater at a speed such that the first mixture climbs the wall of the overcoater before rolling back down to the bottom thereby forming a second mixture of spherical media, graphite fines, and graphite spheres, removing the second mixture from the overcoater, sieving the second mixture to separate graphite spheres, charging the first mixture back into the overcoater, charging an additional quantity of graphite fines into the overcoater, adjusting processing parameters like overcoater dimensions, graphite fines charge, overcoater rotation speed, overcoater angle of rotation, and overcoater time of rotation, before repeating the steps until graphite fines are converted to graphite spheres.

  2. Proton irradiated graphite grades for a long baseline neutrino facility experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Simos

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In search of a low-Z pion production target for the Long Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF of the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE four graphite grades were irradiated with protons in the energy range of 140–180 MeV, to peak fluence of ∼6.1×10^{20}  p/cm^{2} and irradiation temperatures between 120–200 °C. The test array included POCO ZXF-5Q, Toyo-Tanso IG 430, Carbone-Lorraine 2020 and SGL R7650 grades of graphite. Irradiation was performed at the Brookhaven Linear Isotope Producer. Postirradiation analyses were performed with the objective of (a comparing their response under the postulated irradiation conditions to guide a graphite grade selection for use as a pion target and (b understanding changes in physical and mechanical properties as well as microstructure that occurred as a result of the achieved fluence and in particular at this low-temperature regime where pion graphite targets are expected to operate. A further goal of the postirradiation evaluation was to establish a proton-neutron correlation damage on graphite that will allow for the use of a wealth of available neutron-based damage data in proton-based studies and applications. Macroscopic postirradiation analyses as well as energy dispersive x-ray diffraction of 200 KeV x rays at the NSLS synchrotron of Brookhaven National Laboratory were employed. The macroscopic analyses revealed differences in the physical and strength properties of the four grades with behavior however under proton irradiation that qualitatively agrees with that reported for graphite under neutrons for the same low temperature regime and in particular the increase of thermal expansion, strength and Young’s modulus. The proton fluence level of ∼10^{20}  cm^{−2} where strength reaches a maximum before it begins to decrease at higher fluences has been identified and it agrees with neutron-induced changes. X-ray diffraction analyses of the proton irradiated graphite

  3. Electrochemical treatment of graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podlovilin, V.I.; Egorov, I.M.; Zhernovoj, A.I.

    1983-01-01

    In the course of investigating various modes of electrochemical treatment (ECT) it has been found that graphite anode treatment begins under the ''glow mode''. A behaviour of some marks of graphite with the purpose of ECT technique development in different electrolytes has been tested. Electrolytes have been chosen of three types: highly alkaline (pH 13-14), neutral (pH-Z) and highly acidic (pH 1-2). For the first time parallel to mechanical electroerosion treatment, ECT of graphite and carbon graphite materials previously considered chemically neutral is proposed. ECT of carbon graphite materials has a number of advantages as compared with electroerrosion and mechanical ones with respect to the treatment rate and purity (ronghness) of the surface. A small quantity of sludge (6-8%) under ECT is in highly alkali electrolytes.

  4. Electrochemical treatment of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podlovilin, V.I.; Egorov, I.M.; Zhernovoj, A.I.

    1983-01-01

    In the course of investigating various modes of electroche-- mical treatment (ECT) it has been found that graphite anode treatment begins under the ''glow mode''. A behaviour of some marks of graphite with the purpose of ECT technique development in different electrolytes has been tested. Electrolytes have been chosen of three types: highly alkaline (pH 13-14), neutral (pH-Z) and highly acidic (pH 1-2). For the first time parallel to mechanical electroerosion treatment ECT graphite and carbon graphite materials previously considered chemically neutral is proposed. ECT of carbon graphite materials has a number of advantages as compared with electroerrosion and mechanical ones this is treatment rate and purity (ronghness) of the surface. A sMall quantity of sludge (6-8%) under ECT is in highly alkali electrolytes

  5. Computational prediction of dust production in graphite moderated pebble bed reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostamian, Maziar

    The scope of the work reported here, which is the computational study of graphite wear behavior, supports the Nuclear Engineering University Programs project "Experimental Study and Computational Simulations of Key Pebble Bed Thermomechanics Issues for Design and Safety" funded by the US Department of Energy. In this work, modeling and simulating the contact mechanics, as anticipated in a PBR configuration, is carried out for the purpose of assessing the amount of dust generated during a full power operation year of a PBR. A methodology that encompasses finite element analysis (FEA) and micromechanics of wear is developed to address the issue of dust production and its quantification. Particularly, the phenomenon of wear and change of its rate with sliding length is the main focus of this dissertation. This work studies the wear properties of graphite by simulating pebble motion and interactions of a specific type of nuclear grade graphite, IG-11. This study consists of two perspectives: macroscale stress analysis and microscale analysis of wear mechanisms. The first is a set of FEA simulations considering pebble-pebble frictional contact. In these simulations, the mass of generated graphite particulates due to frictional contact is calculated by incorporating FEA results into Archard's equation, which is a linear correlation between wear mass and wear length. However, the experimental data by Johnson, University of Idaho, revealed that the wear rate of graphite decreases with sliding length. This is because the surfaces of the graphite pebbles become smoother over time, which results in a gradual decrease in wear rate. In order to address the change in wear rate, a more detailed analysis of wear mechanisms at room temperature is presented. In this microscale study, the wear behavior of graphite at the asperity level is studied by simulating the contact between asperities of facing surfaces. By introducing the effect of asperity removal on wear rate, a nonlinear

  6. Fracture criteria of reactor graphite under multiaxial stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, S.; Kawamata, K.; Kurumada, A.; Oku, T.

    1987-01-01

    New fracture criteria for graphite under multiaxial stresses are presented for designing core and support materials of a high temperature gas cooled reactor. Different kinds of fracture strength tests are carried out for a near isotropic graphite IG-11. Results show that, under the stress state in which tensile stresses are predominant, the maximum principal stress theory is seen as applicable for brittle fracture. Under the stress state in which compressive stresses are predominant there may be two fracture modes for brittle fracture, namely, slipping fracture and mode II fracture. For the former fracture mode the maximum shear stress criterion is suitable, but for the latter fracture mode a new mode II fracture criterion including a restraint effect for cracks is verified to be applicable. Also a statistical correction for brittle fracture criteria under multiaxial stresses is discussed. By considering the allowable stress values for safe design, the specified minimum ultimate strengths corresponding to a survival probability of 99% at the 95% confidence level are presented. (orig./HP)

  7. Calculation of thermal stresses in graphite fuel blocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lejeail, Y.; Cabrillat, M.T.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a parametric study of temperature and thermal stress calculations inside a HTGR core graphite block, taking into account the effect of fluence on the thermal and mechanical properties, up to 4. 10 21 n/cm 2 . The Finite Element model, realized with Cast3M CEA code, includes the effects of irradiation creep, which tends to produce secondary stress relaxation. Then, the Weibull weakest link theory is recalled, evaluating the possible effects of volume, stress field distribution (loading factor), and multiaxiality for graphite-type materials, and giving the methodology to compare the stress to rupture for the structure to the one obtained from characterization, in the general case. The maximum of the Weibull stress in Finite Element calculations is compared to the value for tensile specimens. It is found that the maximum of the stress corresponds to the end of the irradiation cycle, after reactor shutdown, since both thermal conductivity and Young's modulus increase with time. However, this behaviour is partly counterbalanced by the increase of material strength with irradiation. (authors)

  8. Carburization in fluidized bed of carbon-graphite materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murav' ev, V I

    1977-01-01

    A study has been made of the diffusion saturation with carbon of the surface of titanium alloy VT1-1, molybdenum and 08KP steel with respect to the type of carbographitic materials, methods of pseudoliquefaction and heating in the temperature interval 800 to 1100/sup 0/ deg C. Used as the carburizing materials have been charcoal, acetylene black, charcoal carburizer, graphitized particles, pyrobenzene. The maximum carburizing effect is shown to be possessed by charcoal, the minimum effect - by acetylene black. Carburization in the pseudoliquid layer is 5 to 7 times as intensive as in the case of gas cementation and in a solid carburizer. No oxidation of the materials and hydrogenation of titanium has been observed in the temperature interval under study.

  9. Monte Carlo calculation of standard graphite block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ljubenov, V.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents results of calculation of neutron flux space and energy distribution in the standard graphite block (SGB) obtained by the MCNP TM code. VMCCS nuclear data library, based on the ENDF / B-VI release 4 evaluation file, is used. MCNP model of the SGB considers detailed material, geometric and spectral properties of the neutron source, source carrier, graphite moderator medium, aluminium foil holders and proximate surrounding of SGB Geometric model is organised to provide the simplest homogeneous volume cells in order to obtain the maximum acceleration of neutron history tracking (author)

  10. Graphite matrix materials for nuclear waste isolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, W.C.

    1981-06-01

    At low temperatures, graphites are chemically inert to all but the strongest oxidizing agents. The raw materials from which artificial graphites are produced are plentiful and inexpensive. Morover, the physical properties of artificial graphites can be varied over a very wide range by the choice of raw materials and manufacturing processes. Manufacturing processes are reviewed herein, with primary emphasis on those processes which might be used to produce a graphite matrix for the waste forms. The approach, recommended herein, involves the low-temperature compaction of a finely ground powder produced from graphitized petroleum coke. The resultant compacts should have fairly good strength, low permeability to both liquids and gases, and anisotropic physical properties. In particular, the anisotropy of the thermal expansion coefficients and the thermal conductivity should be advantageous for this application. With two possible exceptions, the graphite matrix appears to be superior to the metal alloy matrices which have been recommended in prior studies. The two possible exceptions are the requirements on strength and permeability; both requirements will be strongly influenced by the containment design, including the choice of materials and the waste form, of the multibarrier package. Various methods for increasing the strength, and for decreasing the permeability of the matrix, are reviewed and discussed in the sections in Incorporation of Other Materials and Elimination of Porosity. However, it would be premature to recommend a particular process until the overall multi-barrier design is better defined. It is recommended that increased emphasis be placed on further development of the low-temperature compacted graphite matrix concept

  11. Asymptomatic Intracorneal Graphite Deposits following Graphite Pencil Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Philip, Swetha Sara; John, Deepa; John, Sheeja Susan

    2012-01-01

    Reports of graphite pencil lead injuries to the eye are rare. Although graphite is considered to remain inert in the eye, it has been known to cause severe inflammation and damage to ocular structures. We report a case of a 12-year-old girl with intracorneal graphite foreign bodies following a graphite pencil injury.

  12. Ion irradiation to simulate neutron irradiation in model graphites: Consequences for nuclear graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galy, N.; Toulhoat, N.; Moncoffre, N.; Pipon, Y.; Bérerd, N.; Ammar, M. R.; Simon, P.; Deldicque, D.; Sainsot, P.

    2017-10-01

    Due to its excellent moderator and reflector qualities, graphite was used in CO2-cooled nuclear reactors such as UNGG (Uranium Naturel-Graphite-Gaz). Neutron irradiation of graphite resulted in the production of 14C which is a key issue radionuclide for the management of the irradiated graphite waste. In order to elucidate the impact of neutron irradiation on 14C behavior, we carried out a systematic investigation of irradiation and its synergistic effects with temperature in Highly Oriented Pyrolitic Graphite (HOPG) model graphite used to simulate the coke grains of nuclear graphite. We used 13C implantation in order to simulate 14C displaced from its original structural site through recoil. The collision of the impinging neutrons with the graphite matrix carbon atoms induces mainly ballistic damage. However, a part of the recoil carbon atom energy is also transferred to the graphite lattice through electronic excitation. The effects of the different irradiation regimes in synergy with temperature were simulated using ion irradiation by varying Sn(nuclear)/Se(electronic) stopping power. Thus, the samples were irradiated with different ions of different energies. The structure modifications were followed by High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) and Raman microspectrometry. The results show that temperature generally counteracts the disordering effects of irradiation but the achieved reordering level strongly depends on the initial structural state of the graphite matrix. Thus, extrapolating to reactor conditions, for an initially highly disordered structure, irradiation at reactor temperatures (200 - 500 °C) should induce almost no change of the initial structure. On the contrary, when the structure is initially less disordered, there should be a "zoning" of the reordering: In "cold" high flux irradiated zones where the ballistic damage is important, the structure should be poorly reordered; In "hot" low flux irradiated zones where the ballistic

  13. Nuclear graphite wear properties and estimation of graphite dust production in HTR-10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Xiaowei, E-mail: xwluo@tsinghua.edu.cn; Wang, Xiaoxin; Shi, Li; Yu, Xiaoyu; Yu, Suyuan

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Graphite dust. • The wear properties of graphite. • Pebble bed. • High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor. • Fuel element. - Abstract: The issue of the graphite dust has been a research focus for the safety of High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs), especially for the pebble bed reactors. Most of the graphite dust is produced from the wear of fuel elements during cycling of fuel elements. However, due to the complexity of the motion of the fuel elements in the pebble bed, there is no systematic method developed to predict the amount the graphite dust in a pebble bed reactor. In this paper, the study of the flow of the fuel elements in the pebble bed was carried out. Both theoretical calculation and numerical analysis by Discrete Element Method (DEM) software PFC3D were conducted to obtain the normal forces and sliding distances of the fuel elements in pebble bed. The wearing theory was then integrated with PFC3D to estimate the amount of the graphite dust in a pebble bed reactor, 10 MW High Temperature gas-cooled test Reactor (HTR-10).

  14. Magnetic order in graphite: Experimental evidence, intrinsic and extrinsic difficulties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esquinazi, P.; Barzola-Quiquia, J.; Spemann, D.; Rothermel, M.; Ohldag, H.; Garcia, N.; Setzer, A.; Butz, T.

    2010-01-01

    We discuss recently obtained data using different experimental methods including magnetoresistance measurements that indicate the existence of metal-free high-temperature magnetic order in graphite. Intrinsic as well as extrinsic difficulties to trigger magnetic order by irradiation of graphite are discussed in view of recently published theoretical work.

  15. The role of graphite morphology and matrix structure on low ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Thermal cycling resistance; graphite morphology; grey cast iron; austempered ductile iron; compacted/vermicular graphite iron; matrix decompo- sition. 1. Introduction. When a material is subjected to a temperature gradient, it tends to expand differentially. During this process, thermal stresses are induced. The source of ...

  16. Linear expansion of products out of thermal splitting graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tishina, E.A.; Kurnevich, G.I.

    1994-01-01

    Linear expansion of thermally split graphite in the form of foil and pressed items of different density was studied. It is ascertained that the extreme character of temperature dependence of linear expansion factor of pressed samples of thermally split graphite is determined by the formation of closed pores containing air in the course of their production. 3 refs., 2 figs

  17. Thermophysical properties estimation of paraffin/graphite composite phase change material using an inverse method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lachheb, Mohamed; Karkri, Mustapha; Albouchi, Fethi; Mzali, Foued; Nasrallah, Sassi Ben

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Preparation of paraffin/graphite composites by uni-axial compression technique. • Measurement of thermophysical properties of paraffin/graphite using the periodic method. • Measurement of the experimental densities of paraffin/graphite composites. • Prediction of the effective thermal conductivity using analytical models. - Abstract: In this paper, two types of graphite were combined with paraffin in an attempt to improve thermal conductivity of paraffin phase change material (PCM): Synthetic graphite (Timrex SFG75) and graphite waste obtained from damaged Tubular graphite Heat Exchangers. These paraffin/graphite phase change material (PCM) composites are prepared by the cold uniaxial compression technique and the thermophysical properties were estimated using a periodic temperature method and an inverse technique. Results showed that the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity are greatly influenced by the graphite addition

  18. Study on practical of eddy current testing of core and core support graphite components in HTTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Masahiro; Iyoku, Tatsuo; Ooka, Norikazu; Shindo, Yoshihisa; Kawae, Hidetoshi; Hayashi, Motomitsu; Kambe, Mamoru; Takahashi, Masaaki; Ide, Akira.

    1994-01-01

    Core and core support graphite components in the HTTR (High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor) are mainly made of nuclear-grade IG-110 and PGX graphites. Nondestructive inspection with Eddy Current Testing (ECT) is planned to be applied to these components. The method of ECT has been already established for metallic components, however, cannot be applied directly to the graphite ones, because the characteristics of graphite are quite different in micro-structure from those of metals. Therefore, ECT method and condition were studied for the application of the ECT to the graphite components. This paper describes the study on practical method and conditions of ECT for above mentioned graphite structures. (author)

  19. Characterization of graphite dust produced by pneumatic lift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Ke [Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Thermal Management Engineering and Materials, Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen 518055, Guangdong (China); Peng, Wei; Liu, Bing [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University, Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology Cooperation Innovation Center, The Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Kang, Feiyu [Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Thermal Management Engineering and Materials, Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen 518055, Guangdong (China); Yang, Xiaoyong; Li, Weihua [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University, Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology Cooperation Innovation Center, The Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Yu, Suyuan, E-mail: suyuan@tsinghua.edu.cn [Center for Combustion Energy, The Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering, Ministry of Educations, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Generation of graphite dust by pneumatic lift. • Determination of morphology and particle size distribution of graphite dust. • The size of graphite dust in this study is compared to AVR and THTR-300 results. • Graphite dust originates from both filler and binder of the matrix graphite. - Abstract: Graphite dust is an important safety concern of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTR). The graphite dust could adsorb fission products, and the radioactive dust is transported by the coolant gas and deposited on the surface of the primary loop. The simulation of coagulation, aggregation, deposition, and resuspension behavior of graphite dust requires parameters such as particle size distribution and particle shape, but currently very limited data on graphite dust is available. The only data we have are from AVR and THTR-300, however, the AVR result is likely to be prejudiced by the oil ingress. In pebble-bed HTR, graphite dust is generally produced by mechanical abrasion, in particular, by the abrasion of graphite pebbles in the lifting pipe of the fuel handling system. Here we demonstrate the generation and characterization of graphite dust that were produced by pneumatic lift. This graphite dust could substitute the real dust in HTR for characterization. The dust, exhibiting a lamellar morphology, showed a number-weighted average particle size of 2.38 μm and a volume-weighted average size of 14.62 μm. These two sizes were larger than the AVR and THTR results. The discrepancy is possibly due to the irradiation effect and prejudice caused by the oil ingress accident. It is also confirmed by the Raman spectrum that both the filler particle and binder contribute to the dust generation.

  20. Recent developments in graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    Overall, the HTGR graphite situation is in excellent shape. In both of the critical requirements, fuel blocks and support structures, adequate graphites are at hand and improved grades are sufficiently far along in truncation. In the aerospace field, GraphNOL N3M permits vehicle performance with confidence in trajectories unobtainable with any other existing material. For fusion energy applications, no other graphite can simultaneously withstand both extreme thermal shock and neutron damage. Hence, the material promises to create new markets as well as to offer a better candidate material for existing applications

  1. Graphite for fusion energy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eatherly, W.P.; Clausing, R.E.; Strehlow, R.A.; Kennedy, C.R.; Mioduszewski, P.K.

    1987-03-01

    Graphite is in widespread and beneficial use in present fusion energy devices. This report reflects the view of graphite materials scientists on using graphite in fusion devices. Graphite properties are discussed with emphasis on application to fusion reactors. This report is intended to be introductory and descriptive and is not intended to serve as a definitive information source

  2. Change in physical properties of high density isotropic graphites irradiated in the ?JOYO? fast reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, T.; Kaito, T.; Onose, S.; Shibahara, I.

    1995-08-01

    Thirteen kinds of isotropic graphites with different density and maximum grain size were irradiated in the experimental fast reactor "JOYO" to fluences from 2.11 to 2.86 × 10 26 n/m 2 ( E > 0.1 MeV) at temperatures from 549 to 597°C. Postirradiation examination was carried out on the dimensional changes, elastic modulus, and thermal conductivity of these materials. Dimensional change results indicate that the graphites irradiated at lower fluences showed shrinkage upon neutron irradiation followed by increase with increasing neutron fluences, irrespective of differences in material parameters. The Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio increased by two to three times the unirradiated values. The large scatter found in Poisson's ratio of unirradiated materials became very small and a linear dependence on density was obtained after irradiation. The thermal conductivity decreased to one-fifth to one-tenth of unirradiated values, with a negligible change in specific heat. The results of postirradiation examination indicated that the changes in physical properties of high density, isotropic graphites were mainly dominated by the irradiation condition rather than their material parameters. Namely, the effects of irradiation induced defects on physical properties of heavily neutron-irradiated graphites are much larger than that of defects associated with as-fabricated specimens.

  3. Change in physical properties of high density isotropic graphites irradiated in the ''JOYO'' fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, T.; Kaito, T.; Onose, S.; Shibahara, I.

    1995-01-01

    Thirteen kinds of isotropic graphites with different density and maximum grain size were irradiated in the experimental fast reactor ''JOYO'' to fluences from 2.11 to 2.86x10 26 n/m 2 (E>0.1 MeV) at temperatures from 549 to 597 C. Postirradiation examination was carried out on the dimensional changes, elastic modulus, and thermal conductivity of these materials. Dimensional change results indicate that the graphites irradiated at lower fluences showed shrinkage upon neutron irradiation followed by increase with increasing neutron fluences, irrespective of differences in material parameters. The Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio increased by two to three times the unirradiated values. The large scatter found in Poisson's ratio of unirradiated materials became very small and a linear dependence on density was obtained after irradiation. The thermal conductivity decreased to one-fifth to one-tenth of unirradiated values, with a negligible change in specific heat. The results of postirradiation examination indicated that the changes in physical properties of high density, isotropic graphites were mainly dominated by the irradiation condition rather than their material parameters. Namely, the effects of irradiation induced defects on physical properties of heavily neutron-irradiated graphites are much larger than that of defects associated with as-fabricated specimens. (orig.)

  4. Deuterium migration in nuclear graphite: Consequences for the behavior of tritium in CO{sub 2}-cooled reactors and for the decontamination of irradiated graphite waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Guillou, M. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, CNRS/IN2P3 UMR 5822, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon – 4, rue Enrico Fermi, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Agence nationale pour la gestion des déchets radioactifs, DRD/CM – 1-7, rue Jean Monnet, Parc de la Croix-Blanche, F-92298 Châtenay-Malabry cedex (France); Toulhoat, N., E-mail: nelly.toulhoat@univ-lyon1.fr [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, CNRS/IN2P3 UMR 5822, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon – 4, rue Enrico Fermi, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); CEA/DEN – Centre de Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France); Pipon, Y. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, CNRS/IN2P3 UMR 5822, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon – 4, rue Enrico Fermi, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Institut Universitaire Technologique, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon – 43, boulevard du 11 novembre 1918, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Moncoffre, N. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, CNRS/IN2P3 UMR 5822, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon – 4, rue Enrico Fermi, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Khodja, H. [Laboratoire d’Etude des Eléments Légers, CEA/DSM/IRAMIS/NIMBE, UMR 3299 SIS2M – Centre de Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France)

    2015-06-15

    In this paper, we aim at understanding tritium behavior in the graphite moderator of French CO{sub 2}-cooled nuclear fission reactors (called UNGG for “Uranium Naturel-Graphite-Gaz”) to get information on its distribution and inventory in the irradiated graphite waste after their dismantling. These findings should be useful both to improve waste treatment processes and to foresee tritium behavior during reactor decommissioning and waste disposal operations. The purpose of the present work is to elucidate the effects of temperature on the behavior of tritium during reactor operation. Furthermore, it aims at exploring options of thermal decontamination. For both purposes, annealing experiments were carried out in inert atmosphere as well as in thermal conditions as close as possible to those encountered in UNGG reactors and in view of a potential decontamination in humid gas. D{sup +} ions were implanted into virgin nuclear graphite in order to simulate tritium displaced from its original structural site through recoil during reactor operation. The effect of thermal treatments on the mobility of the implanted deuterium was then investigated at temperatures ranging from 200 to 1200 °C, in inert atmosphere (vacuum or argon), in a gas simulating the UNGG coolant gas (mainly CO{sub 2}) or in humid nitrogen. Deuterium was analyzed by Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) both at millimetric and micrometric scales. We have identified three main stages for the deuterium release. The first one corresponds to deuterium permeation through graphite open pores. The second and third ones are controlled by the progressive detrapping of deuterium located at different trapping sites and its successive migration through the crystallites and along crystallites and coke grains edges. Extrapolating the thermal behavior of deuterium to tritium, the results show that the release becomes significant above the maximum UNGG reactor temperature of 500 °C and should be lower than 30% of the

  5. Hydrogen adsorption on and solubility in graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanashenko, S.L.; Wampler, W.R.

    1996-01-01

    The experimental data on adsorption and solubility of hydrogen isotopes in graphite over a wide range of temperatures and pressures are reviewed. Langmuir adsorption isotherms are proposed for the hydrogen-graphite interaction. The entropy and enthalpy of adsorption are estimated, allowing for effects of relaxation of dangling sp 2 bonds. Three kinds of traps are proposed: edge carbon atoms of interstitial loops with an adsorption enthalpy relative to H 2 gas of -4.4 eV/H 2 (unrelaxed, Trap 1), edge carbon atoms at grain surfaces with an adsorption enthalpy of -2.3 eV/H 2 (relaxed, Trap 2), and basal plane adsorption sites with an enthalpy of +2.43 eV/H 2 (Trap 3). The adsorption capacity of different types of graphite depends on the concentration of traps which depends on the crystalline microstructure of the material. The number of potential sites for the 'true solubility' (Trap 3) is assumed to be about one site per carbon atom in all types of graphite, but the endothermic character of this solubility leads to a negligible H inventory compared to the concentration of hydrogen in type 1 and type 2 traps for temperatures and gas pressures used in the experiments. Irradiation with neutrons or carbon atoms increases the concentration of type 1 and type 2 traps from about 20 and 200 appm respectively for unirradiated (POCO AXF-5Q) graphite to about 1500 and 5000 appm, respectively, at damage levels above 1 dpa. (orig.)

  6. Design of the Graphite Reflectors in Research Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jin Haeng; Cho, Yeong Garp; Kim, Tae Kyu; Kim, Jong In [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    Graphite is often used as one of reflector materials for research reactors because of its low neutron absorption cross-section, good moderating properties, and relatively low and stable price. In addition, graphite has excellent properties at high temperatures, so it is widely used as a core material in high temperature reactors. However, its material characteristics such as strength, elastic modulus, thermal expansion coefficient, dimensional change, and thermal conductivity sensitively depend on neutron fluence, temperature, and its manufacturing process. In addition, the Wigner energy and the treatment of the graphite waste such as C-14 should also be considered. For the design of the graphite reflectors, it is therefore essential to understand the material characteristics of chosen graphite materials at given conditions. Especially, the dimensional changes and the thermal conductivity are very important factors to design the nuclear components using graphite as a nonstructural material. Hence, in this study, the material characteristics of graphite are investigated via some experiments in literature. Improving design methods for graphite reflectors in research reactors are then suggested to minimize the problems, and the advantages and disadvantages of each method are also discussed

  7. Carbon-14 Graphitization Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, James; Collon, Philippe; Laverne, Jay

    2014-09-01

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is a process that allows for the analysis of mass of certain materials. It is a powerful process because it results in the ability to separate rare isotopes with very low abundances from a large background, which was previously impossible. Another advantage of AMS is that it only requires very small amounts of material for measurements. An important application of this process is radiocarbon dating because the rare 14C isotopes can be separated from the stable 14N background that is 10 to 13 orders of magnitude larger, and only small amounts of the old and fragile organic samples are necessary for measurement. Our group focuses on this radiocarbon dating through AMS. When performing AMS, the sample needs to be loaded into a cathode at the back of an ion source in order to produce a beam from the material to be analyzed. For carbon samples, the material must first be converted into graphite in order to be loaded into the cathode. My role in the group is to convert the organic substances into graphite. In order to graphitize the samples, a sample is first combusted to form carbon dioxide gas and then purified and reduced into the graphite form. After a couple weeks of research and with the help of various Physics professors, I developed a plan and began to construct the setup necessary to perform the graphitization. Once the apparatus is fully completed, the carbon samples will be graphitized and loaded into the AMS machine for analysis.

  8. Thermogravimetric analysis and kinetic modeling of low-transition-temperature mixtures pretreated oil palm empty fruit bunch for possible maximum yield of pyrolysis oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiin, Chung Loong; Yusup, Suzana; Quitain, Armando T; Uemura, Yoshimitsu; Sasaki, Mitsuru; Kida, Tetsuya

    2018-05-01

    The impacts of low-transition-temperature mixtures (LTTMs) pretreatment on thermal decomposition and kinetics of empty fruit bunch (EFB) were investigated by thermogravimetric analysis. EFB was pretreated with the LTTMs under different duration of pretreatment which enabled various degrees of alteration to their structure. The TG-DTG curves showed that LTTMs pretreatment on EFB shifted the temperature and rate of decomposition to higher values. The EFB pretreated with sucrose and choline chloride-based LTTMs had attained the highest mass loss of volatile matter (78.69% and 75.71%) after 18 h of pretreatment. For monosodium glutamate-based LTTMs, the 24 h pretreated EFB had achieved the maximum mass loss (76.1%). Based on the Coats-Redfern integral method, the LTTMs pretreatment led to an increase in activation energy of the thermal decomposition of EFB from 80.00 to 82.82-94.80 kJ/mol. The activation energy was mainly affected by the demineralization and alteration in cellulose crystallinity after LTTMs pretreatment. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Graphite oxidation and structural strength of graphite support column in VHTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Byung Ha; No, Hee Cheno; Kim, Eung Soo; Oh, Chang H.

    2009-01-01

    The air-ingress event by a large pipe break is an important accident considered in design of very high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (VHTR). Core-collapse prediction is a main safety issue. Structural failure model are technically required. The objective of this study is to develop structural failure model for the supporting graphite material in the lower plenum of the GT-MHR (gas-turbine-modular high temperature reactor). Graphite support column is important for VHTR structural integrity. Graphite support columns are under the axial load. Critical strength of graphite column is related to slenderness ratio and bulk density. Through compression tests for fresh and oxidized graphite columns we show that compressive strength of IG-110 was 79.46 MPa. And, the buckling strength of IG-110 column was expressed by the empirical formula: σ 0 =σ straight-line - C L/r, σ straight-line =91.31 MPa, C=1.01. The results of uniform and non-uniform oxidation tests show that the strength degradation of oxidized graphite column is expressed in the following non-dimensional form: σ/σ 0 =exp(-kd), k=0.111. Also, from the results of the uniform oxidation test with a complicated-shape column, we found out that the above non-dimensional equation obtained from the uniform oxidation test is applicable to a uniform oxidation case with a complicated-shape column. (author)

  10. Technical basis for the reduction of the maximum temperature TGA-MS analysis of oxide samples from the 3013 destructive examination program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scogin, J. H.

    2016-01-01

    Thermogravimetric analysis with mass spectroscopy of the evolved gas (TGA-MS) is used to quantify the moisture content of materials in the 3013 destructive examination (3013 DE) surveillance program. Salts frequently present in the 3013 DE materials volatilize in the TGA and condense in the gas lines just outside the TGA furnace. The buildup of condensate can restrict the flow of purge gas and affect both the TGA operations and the mass spectrometer calibration. Removal of the condensed salts requires frequent maintenance and subsequent calibration runs to keep the moisture measurements by mass spectroscopy within acceptable limits, creating delays in processing samples. In this report, the feasibility of determining the total moisture from TGA-MS measurements at a lower temperature is investigated. A temperature of the TGA-MS analysis which reduces the complications caused by the condensation of volatile materials is determined. Analysis shows that an excellent prediction of the presently measured total moisture value can be made using only the data generated up to 700 °C and there is a sound physical basis for this estimate. It is recommended that the maximum temperature of the TGA-MS determination of total moisture for the 3013 DE program be reduced from 1000 °C to 700 °C. It is also suggested that cumulative moisture measurements at 550 °C and 700°C be substituted for the measured value of total moisture in the 3013 DE database. Using these raw values, any of predictions of the total moisture discussed in this report can be made.

  11. Treponema pallidum 3-Phosphoglycerate Mutase Is a Heat-Labile Enzyme That May Limit the Maximum Growth Temperature for the Spirochete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Stéphane; Posey, James E.; Chenoweth, Matthew R.; Gherardini, Frank C.

    2001-01-01

    In the causative agent of syphilis, Treponema pallidum, the gene encoding 3-phosphoglycerate mutase, gpm, is part of a six-gene operon (tro operon) that is regulated by the Mn-dependent repressor TroR. Since substrate-level phosphorylation via the Embden-Meyerhof pathway is the principal way to generate ATP in T. pallidum and Gpm is a key enzyme in this pathway, Mn could exert a regulatory effect on central metabolism in this bacterium. To study this, T. pallidum gpm was cloned, Gpm was purified from Escherichia coli, and antiserum against the recombinant protein was raised. Immunoblots indicated that Gpm was expressed in freshly extracted infective T. pallidum. Enzyme assays indicated that Gpm did not require Mn2+ while 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (DPG) was required for maximum activity. Consistent with these observations, Mn did not copurify with Gpm. The purified Gpm was stable for more than 4 h at 25°C, retained only 50% activity after incubation for 20 min at 34°C or 10 min at 37°C, and was completely inactive after 10 min at 42°C. The temperature effect was attenuated when 1 mM DPG was added to the assay mixture. The recombinant Gpm from pSLB2 complemented E. coli strain PL225 (gpm) and restored growth on minimal glucose medium in a temperature-dependent manner. Increasing the temperature of cultures of E. coli PL225 harboring pSLB2 from 34 to 42°C resulted in a 7- to 11-h period in which no growth occurred (compared to wild-type E. coli). These data suggest that biochemical properties of Gpm could be one contributing factor to the heat sensitivity of T. pallidum. PMID:11466272

  12. Technical basis for the reduction of the maximum temperature TGA-MS analysis of oxide samples from the 3013 destructive examination program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scogin, J. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-03-24

    Thermogravimetric analysis with mass spectroscopy of the evolved gas (TGA-MS) is used to quantify the moisture content of materials in the 3013 destructive examination (3013 DE) surveillance program. Salts frequently present in the 3013 DE materials volatilize in the TGA and condense in the gas lines just outside the TGA furnace. The buildup of condensate can restrict the flow of purge gas and affect both the TGA operations and the mass spectrometer calibration. Removal of the condensed salts requires frequent maintenance and subsequent calibration runs to keep the moisture measurements by mass spectroscopy within acceptable limits, creating delays in processing samples. In this report, the feasibility of determining the total moisture from TGA-MS measurements at a lower temperature is investigated. A temperature of the TGA-MS analysis which reduces the complications caused by the condensation of volatile materials is determined. Analysis shows that an excellent prediction of the presently measured total moisture value can be made using only the data generated up to 700 °C and there is a sound physical basis for this estimate. It is recommended that the maximum temperature of the TGA-MS determination of total moisture for the 3013 DE program be reduced from 1000 °C to 700 °C. It is also suggested that cumulative moisture measurements at 550 °C and 700°C be substituted for the measured value of total moisture in the 3013 DE database. Using these raw values, any of predictions of the total moisture discussed in this report can be made.

  13. Characteristics of first loaded IG-110 graphite in HTTR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumita, Junya; Shibata, Taiju; Iyoku, Tatsuo; Sawa, Kazuhiro; Hanawa, Satoshi; Ishihara, Masahiro

    2006-10-01

    IG-110 graphite is a fine-grained isotropic and nuclear-grade graphite with excellent resistivity on both irradiation and corrosion and with high strength. The IG-110 graphite is used for the graphite components of High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) such as fuel and control rod guide blocks and support posts. In order to design and fabricate the graphite components in the HTTR, the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (the Japan Atomic Energy Agency at present) had established the graphite structural design code and design data on the basis of former research results. After the design code establishment, the IG-110 graphite components were fabricated and loaded in the HTTR core. This report summarized the characteristics of the first loaded IG-110 graphite as basic data for surveillance test, measuring material characteristics changed by neutron irradiation and oxidation. By comparing the design data, it was shown that the first loaded IG-110 graphite had excellent strength properties and enough safety margins to the stress limits in the design code. (author)

  14. A systematic study of acoustic emission from nuclear graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neighbour, G.B.; McEnaney, B.

    1996-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) monitoring has been identified as a possible method to determine internal stresses in nuclear graphites using the Kaiser effect, i.e., on stressing a graphite that has been subject to a prior stress, the onset of AE occurs at the previous peak stress. For three nuclear graphites (PGA, IM1-24 and VNEC), AE was monitored during both monotonic and cyclic loading to failure in tensile, compressive and flexural test modes. For unirradiated graphites, the Kaiser effect was not found in cyclic loading, but a Felicity effect was observed, i.e., the onset of AE occurred below the previously applied peak stress. The Felicity effect was attributed to time-dependent relaxation and recovery processes and was characterized using a new parameter, the Recovery ratio. It was shown that AE can be used to monitor creep strain and creep recovery in graphites at zero load. The AE-time responses from these experiments were fitted to equations similar to those used for creep strain-time at elevated temperatures. The number of AE counts from irradiated graphites were greater than those from unirradiated graphites, subject to similar stresses, due to increases in porosity caused by radiolytic oxidation. A Felicity effect was also observed on cyclic loading of irradiated graphites, but no evidence for a Kaiser effect was found for irradiated graphites loaded monotonically to failure. Thus internal stresses in irradiated graphites could not be measured using AE. This was attributed to relaxation and recovery processes that occur between removing the irradiated graphite from the reactor and AE testing. This work indicated that AE monitoring is not a suitable technique for measuring internal stresses in irradiated graphite. (author). 19 refs, 6 figs, 6 tabs

  15. Radiation creep of graphite. An introduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackstone, R [Commission of the European Communities, Petten (Netherlands). Joint Nuclear Research Center

    1977-03-01

    Graphite, a class of materials with many unique and unusual properties, shows a remarkably high creep ductility under irradiation. As this behaviour compensates to some extent some of the more worrying radiation effects, such as dimensional changes and their strong temperature dependence, it is a property of large technological interest. There are various ways of observing and measuring in-pile creep of graphite, varying in degree of sophistication and in cost, in accuracy and in the type of data that is generated. This paper attempts to review briefly the various experimental methods, and the knowledge generated so far. An indication is given of the areas in which further knowledge is wanted.

  16. Radiation creep of graphite. An introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackstone, R.

    1977-01-01

    Graphite, a class of materials with many unique and unusual properties, shows a remarkably high creep ductility under irradiation. As this behavior compensates to some extent some of the more worrying radiation effects, such as dimensional changes and their strong temperature dependence, it is a property of large technological interest. There are various ways of observing and measuring in-pile creep of graphite, varying in degree of sophistication and in cost, in accuracy and in the type of data that is generated. This paper attempts to review briefly the various experimental methods, and the knowledge generated so far. An indication is given of the areas in which further knowledge is wanted

  17. Radiation creep of graphite. An introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackstone, R.

    1977-01-01

    Graphite, a class of materials with many unique and unusual properties, shows a remarkably high creep ductility under irradiation. As this behaviour compensates to some extent some of the more worrying radiation effects, such as dimensional changes and their strong temperature dependence, it is a property of large technological interest. There are various ways of observing and measuring in-pile creep of graphite, varying in degree of sophistication and in cost, in accuracy and in the type of data that is generated. This paper attempts to review briefly the various experimental methods, and the knowledge generated so far. An indication is given of the areas in which further knowledge is wanted. (Auth.)

  18. Dislocation density and graphitization of diamond crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pantea, C.; Voronin, G.A.; Zerda, T.W.; Gubicza, J.; Ungar, T.

    2002-01-01

    Two sets of diamond specimens compressed at 2 GPa at temperatures varying between 1060 K and 1760 K were prepared; one in which graphitization was promoted by the presence of water and another in which graphitization of diamond was practically absent. X-ray diffraction peak profiles of both sets were analyzed for the microstructure by using the modified Williamson-Hall method and by fitting the Fourier coefficients of the measured profiles by theoretical functions for crystallite size and lattice strain. The procedures determined mean size and size distribution of crystallites as well as the density and the character of the dislocations. The same experimental conditions resulted in different microstructures for the two sets of samples. They were explained in terms of hydrostatic conditions present in the graphitized samples

  19. Graphite based Schottky diodes formed semiconducting substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Todd; Tongay, Sefaattin; Hebard, Arthur

    2010-03-01

    We demonstrate the formation of semimetal graphite/semiconductor Schottky barriers where the semiconductor is either silicon (Si), gallium arsenide (GaAs) or 4H-silicon carbide (4H-SiC). The fabrication can be as easy as allowing a dab of graphite paint to air dry on any one of the investigated semiconductors. Near room temperature, the forward-bias diode characteristics are well described by thermionic emission, and the extracted barrier heights, which are confirmed by capacitance voltage measurements, roughly follow the Schottky-Mott relation. Since the outermost layer of the graphite electrode is a single graphene sheet, we expect that graphene/semiconductor barriers will manifest similar behavior.

  20. Graphite moderated reactor for thermoelectric generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akazawa, Issei; Yamada, Akira; Mizogami, Yorikata

    1998-01-01

    Fuel rods filled with cladded fuel particles distributed and filled are buried each at a predetermined distance in graphite blocks situated in a reactor core. Perforation channels for helium gas as coolants are formed to the periphery thereof passing through vertically. An alkali metal thermoelectric power generation module is disposed to the upper lid of a reactor container while being supported by a securing receptacle. Helium gas in the coolant channels in the graphite blocks in the reactor core absorbs nuclear reaction heat, to be heated to a high temperature, rises upwardly by the reduction of the specific gravity, and then flows into an upper space above the laminated graphite block layer. Then the gas collides against a ceiling and turns, and flows down in a circular gap around the circumference of the alkali metal thermoelectric generation module. In this case, it transfers heat to the alkali metal thermoelectric generation module. (I.N.)

  1. Nondestructive evaluation of nuclear-grade graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunerth, D. C.; McJunkin, T. R.

    2012-05-01

    The material of choice for the core of the high-temperature gas-cooled reactors being developed by the U.S. Department of Energy's Next Generation Nuclear Plant Program is graphite. Graphite is a composite material whose properties are highly dependent on the base material and manufacturing methods. In addition to the material variations intrinsic to the manufacturing process, graphite will also undergo changes in material properties resulting from radiation damage and possible oxidation within the reactor. Idaho National Laboratory is presently evaluating the viability of conventional nondestructive evaluation techniques to characterize the material variations inherent to manufacturing and in-service degradation. Approaches of interest include x-ray radiography, eddy currents, and ultrasonics.

  2. Recompressed exfoliated graphite articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhamu, Aruna; Shi, Jinjun; Guo, Jiusheng; Jang, Bor Z

    2013-08-06

    This invention provides an electrically conductive, less anisotropic, recompressed exfoliated graphite article comprising a mixture of (a) expanded or exfoliated graphite flakes; and (b) particles of non-expandable graphite or carbon, wherein the non-expandable graphite or carbon particles are in the amount of between about 3% and about 70% by weight based on the total weight of the particles and the expanded graphite flakes combined; wherein the mixture is compressed to form the article having an apparent bulk density of from about 0.1 g/cm.sup.3 to about 2.0 g/cm.sup.3. The article exhibits a thickness-direction conductivity typically greater than 50 S/cm, more typically greater than 100 S/cm, and most typically greater than 200 S/cm. The article, when used in a thin foil or sheet form, can be a useful component in a sheet molding compound plate used as a fuel cell separator or flow field plate. The article may also be used as a current collector for a battery, supercapacitor, or any other electrochemical cell.

  3. MOnthly TEmperature DAtabase of Spain 1951-2010: MOTEDAS (2): The Correlation Decay Distance (CDD) and the spatial variability of maximum and minimum monthly temperature in Spain during (1981-2010).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortesi, Nicola; Peña-Angulo, Dhais; Simolo, Claudia; Stepanek, Peter; Brunetti, Michele; Gonzalez-Hidalgo, José Carlos

    2014-05-01

    One of the key point in the develop of the MOTEDAS dataset (see Poster 1 MOTEDAS) in the framework of the HIDROCAES Project (Impactos Hidrológicos del Calentamiento Global en España, Spanish Ministery of Research CGL2011-27574-C02-01) is the reference series for which no generalized metadata exist. In this poster we present an analysis of spatial variability of monthly minimum and maximum temperatures in the conterminous land of Spain (Iberian Peninsula, IP), by using the Correlation Decay Distance function (CDD), with the aim of evaluating, at sub-regional level, the optimal threshold distance between neighbouring stations for producing the set of reference series used in the quality control (see MOTEDAS Poster 1) and the reconstruction (see MOREDAS Poster 3). The CDD analysis for Tmax and Tmin was performed calculating a correlation matrix at monthly scale between 1981-2010 among monthly mean values of maximum (Tmax) and minimum (Tmin) temperature series (with at least 90% of data), free of anomalous data and homogenized (see MOTEDAS Poster 1), obtained from AEMEt archives (National Spanish Meteorological Agency). Monthly anomalies (difference between data and mean 1981-2010) were used to prevent the dominant effect of annual cycle in the CDD annual estimation. For each station, and time scale, the common variance r2 (using the square of Pearson's correlation coefficient) was calculated between all neighbouring temperature series and the relation between r2 and distance was modelled according to the following equation (1): Log (r2ij) = b*°dij (1) being Log(rij2) the common variance between target (i) and neighbouring series (j), dij the distance between them and b the slope of the ordinary least-squares linear regression model applied taking into account only the surrounding stations within a starting radius of 50 km and with a minimum of 5 stations required. Finally, monthly, seasonal and annual CDD values were interpolated using the Ordinary Kriging with a

  4. Bromine intercalated graphite for lightweight composite conductors

    KAUST Repository

    Amassian, Aram; Patole, Archana

    2017-01-01

    A method of fabricating a bromine-graphite/metal composite includes intercalating bromine within layers of graphite via liquid-phase bromination to create brominated-graphite and consolidating the brominated-graphite with a metal nanopowder via a

  5. Cesium diffusion in graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, R.B. III; Davis, W. Jr.; Sutton, A.L. Jr.

    1980-05-01

    Experiments on diffusion of 137 Cs in five types of graphite were performed. The document provides a completion of the report that was started and includes a presentation of all of the diffusion data, previously unpublished. Except for data on mass transfer of 137 Cs in the Hawker-Siddeley graphite, analyses of experimental results were initiated but not completed. The mass transfer process of cesium in HS-1-1 graphite at 600 to 1000 0 C in a helium atmosphere is essentially pure diffusion wherein values of (E/epsilon) and ΔE of the equation D/epsilon = (D/epsilon) 0 exp [-ΔE/RT] are about 4 x 10 -2 cm 2 /s and 30 kcal/mole, respectively

  6. Irradiation Creep in Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ubic, Rick; Butt, Darryl; Windes, William

    2014-03-13

    An understanding of the underlying mechanisms of irradiation creep in graphite material is required to correctly interpret experimental data, explain micromechanical modeling results, and predict whole-core behavior. This project will focus on experimental microscopic data to demonstrate the mechanism of irradiation creep. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy should be able to image both the dislocations in graphite and the irradiation-induced interstitial clusters that pin those dislocations. The team will first prepare and characterize nanoscale samples of virgin nuclear graphite in a transmission electron microscope. Additional samples will be irradiated to varying degrees at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) facility and similarly characterized. Researchers will record microstructures and crystal defects and suggest a mechanism for irradiation creep based on the results. In addition, the purchase of a tensile holder for a transmission electron microscope will allow, for the first time, in situ observation of creep behavior on the microstructure and crystallographic defects.

  7. Structural and thermodynamic study of the system Th-C-N in the presence of excess graphite; the existence of a new hexagonal phase β 'ThCN' stable at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pialoux, A.

    1980-01-01

    The progressive reaction of nitrogen on the 'dicarbide' of thorium in the presence of excess graphite has been studied using X-ray diffractometry at high temperature (T 0 C) under controlled pressure (10 -3 0 C using measurements of crystalline parameters, equilibrium pressures and free enthalpies of standard formation of the various carbonitrides and nitrides observed. It is notably shown that the 'dicarbide' in stable at psub(N2)'s considerably weaker than those stated by Benz and Froxel, the nitrogen content of the γ Th C 2 ' cubic phase increasing furthermore with temperature. The new β 'ThCN' phase which does not quench crystallizes in the hexagonal system and in reattatched to the group space with P31 m, the various contractions of tis crystalline parameter Csub(β) is interpreted as a closing of the double bond of the C 2 pairs in this structure. The temperature of 1125 0 C is attributed to the new polymorphic transformation: β 'ThCN' hexagonal reversible α 'ThCN' monoclinic which appear to be of the martensitic type, the crystalline parameters of α'ThCN' being furthermore measured from 20 to 1125 0 C. (orig.)

  8. Glassy carbon coated graphite for nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delpeux S; Cacciaguerra T; Duclaux L

    2005-01-01

    Taking into account the problems caused by the treatment of nuclear wastes, the molten salts breeder reactors are expected to a great development. They use a molten fluorinated salt (mixture of LiF, BeF 2 , ThF 4 , and UF 4 ) as fuel and coolant. The reactor core, made of graphite, is used as a neutrons moderator. Despite of its compatibility with nuclear environment, it appears crucial to improve the stability and inertness of graphite against the diffusion of chemicals species leading to its corrosion. One way is to cover the graphite surface by a protective impermeable deposit made of glassy carbon obtained by the pyrolysis of phenolic resin or polyvinyl chloride precursors. The main difficulty in the synthesis of glassy carbon is to create exclusively, in the primary pyrolysis product, a micro-porosity of about twenty Angstroms which closes later at higher temperature. Therefore, the evacuation of the volatile products occurring mainly between 330 and 600 C, must progress slowly to avoid the material to crack. In this study, the optimal parameters for the synthesis of glassy carbon as well as glassy carbon deposits on nuclear-type graphite pieces are discussed. Both thermal treatment of phenolic and PVC resins have been performed. The structure and micro-texture of glassy carbon have been investigated by X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopies and helium pycno-metry. Glassy carbon samples (obtained at 1200 C) show densities ranging from 1.3 to 1.55 g/cm 3 and closed pores with nano-metric size (∼ 5 to 10 nm) appear clearly on the TEM micrographs. Then, a thermal treatment to 2700 C leads to the shrinkage of the entangled graphene ribbons, in good agreement with the proposed texture model for glassy carbon. Glassy carbon deposits on nuclear graphite have been developed by an impregnation method. The uniformity of the deposit depends clearly on the surface texture and the chemistry of the graphite substrate. The deposit regions where

  9. Glassy carbon coated graphite for nuclear applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delpeux, S.; Cacciaguerra, T.; Duclaux, L. [Orleans Univ., CRMD, CNRS, 45 (France)

    2005-07-01

    Taking into account the problems caused by the treatment of nuclear wastes, the molten salts breeder reactors are expected to a great development. They use a molten fluorinated salt (mixture of LiF, BeF{sub 2}, ThF{sub 4}, and UF{sub 4}) as fuel and coolant. The reactor core, made of graphite, is used as a neutrons moderator. Despite of its compatibility with nuclear environment, it appears crucial to improve the stability and inertness of graphite against the diffusion of chemicals species leading to its corrosion. One way is to cover the graphite surface by a protective impermeable deposit made of glassy carbon obtained by the pyrolysis of phenolic resin [1,2] or polyvinyl chloride [3] precursors. The main difficulty in the synthesis of glassy carbon is to create exclusively, in the primary pyrolysis product, a micro-porosity of about twenty Angstroms which closes later at higher temperature. Therefore, the evacuation of the volatile products occurring mainly between 330 and 600 C, must progress slowly to avoid the material to crack. In this study, the optimal parameters for the synthesis of glassy carbon as well as glassy carbon deposits on nuclear-type graphite pieces are discussed. Both thermal treatment of phenolic and PVC resins have been performed. The structure and micro-texture of glassy carbon have been investigated by X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopies and helium pycno-metry. Glassy carbon samples (obtained at 1200 C) show densities ranging from 1.3 to 1.55 g/cm{sup 3} and closed pores with nano-metric size ({approx} 5 to 10 nm) appear clearly on the TEM micrographs. Then, a thermal treatment to 2700 C leads to the shrinkage of the entangled graphene ribbons (Fig 1), in good agreement with the proposed texture model for glassy carbon (Fig 2) [4]. Glassy carbon deposits on nuclear graphite have been developed by an impregnation method. The uniformity of the deposit depends clearly on the surface texture and the chemistry

  10. Thermal oxidation of nuclear graphite: A large scale waste treatment option

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Abbie N.; Marsden, Barry J.

    2017-01-01

    This study has investigated the laboratory scale thermal oxidation of nuclear graphite, as a proof-of-concept for the treatment and decommissioning of reactor cores on a larger industrial scale. If showed to be effective, this technology could have promising international significance with a considerable impact on the nuclear waste management problem currently facing many countries worldwide. The use of thermal treatment of such graphite waste is seen as advantageous since it will decouple the need for an operational Geological Disposal Facility (GDF). Particulate samples of Magnox Reactor Pile Grade-A (PGA) graphite, were oxidised in both air and 60% O2, over the temperature range 400–1200°C. Oxidation rates were found to increase with temperature, with a particular rise between 700–800°C, suggesting a change in oxidation mechanism. A second increase in oxidation rate was observed between 1000–1200°C and was found to correspond to a large increase in the CO/CO2 ratio, as confirmed through gas analysis. Increasing the oxidant flow rate gave a linear increase in oxidation rate, up to a certain point, and maximum rates of 23.3 and 69.6 mg / min for air and 60% O2 respectively were achieved at a flow of 250 ml / min and temperature of 1000°C. These promising results show that large-scale thermal treatment could be a potential option for the decommissioning of graphite cores, although the design of the plant would need careful consideration in order to achieve optimum efficiency and throughput. PMID:28793326

  11. Thermal oxidation of nuclear graphite: A large scale waste treatment option.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Theodosiou

    Full Text Available This study has investigated the laboratory scale thermal oxidation of nuclear graphite, as a proof-of-concept for the treatment and decommissioning of reactor cores on a larger industrial scale. If showed to be effective, this technology could have promising international significance with a considerable impact on the nuclear waste management problem currently facing many countries worldwide. The use of thermal treatment of such graphite waste is seen as advantageous since it will decouple the need for an operational Geological Disposal Facility (GDF. Particulate samples of Magnox Reactor Pile Grade-A (PGA graphite, were oxidised in both air and 60% O2, over the temperature range 400-1200°C. Oxidation rates were found to increase with temperature, with a particular rise between 700-800°C, suggesting a change in oxidation mechanism. A second increase in oxidation rate was observed between 1000-1200°C and was found to correspond to a large increase in the CO/CO2 ratio, as confirmed through gas analysis. Increasing the oxidant flow rate gave a linear increase in oxidation rate, up to a certain point, and maximum rates of 23.3 and 69.6 mg / min for air and 60% O2 respectively were achieved at a flow of 250 ml / min and temperature of 1000°C. These promising results show that large-scale thermal treatment could be a potential option for the decommissioning of graphite cores, although the design of the plant would need careful consideration in order to achieve optimum efficiency and throughput.

  12. Intercomparison of graphite irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hering, H; Perio, P; Seguin, M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1959-07-01

    While fast neutrons only are effective in damaging graphite, results of irradiations are more or less universally expressed in terms of thermal neutron fluxes. This paper attempts to correlate irradiations made in different reactors, i.e., in fluxes of different spectral compositions. Those attempts are based on comparison of 1) bulk length change and volume expansion, and 2) crystalline properties (e.g., lattice parameter C, magnetic susceptibility, stored energy, etc.). The methods used by various authors for determining the lattice constants of irradiated graphite are discussed. (author)

  13. Evaluation of the significance of inverse oxidation for HTGR graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, B.S.; Heiser, J. III; Sastre, C.

    1983-01-01

    The inverse oxidation refers to a higher mass loss inside the graphite than the outside. In 1980, Wichner et al reported this phenomenon (referred to as inside/out corrosion) observed in some H451 graphites, and offered an explanation that a catalyst (almost certainly Fe) is activated by the progressively increasing reducing conditions found in the graphite interior. Recently, Morgan and Thomas (1982) investigated this phenomenon is PGX graphites, and agreed on the existing mechanism to explain this pheomenon. They also called for attention to the possibility that this phenomenon may occur under HTGR (High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor) operating conditions. The purpose of this paper is to confirm the above mentioned explanation for this phenomenon and to evaluate the significance of this effect for HTGR graphites under realistic reactor conditions

  14. Variation of the properties of siliconized graphite during neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virgil'ev, Y.S.; Chugunova, T.K.; Pikulik, R.G.

    1986-01-01

    The authors evaluate the radiation-induced property changes in siliconized graphite of the industrial grades SG-P and SG-M. The authors simultaneously tested the reference (control) specimens of graphite that are used as the base for obtaining the SG-M siliconized graphite by impregnating with silicon. The suggested scheme (model) atributes the dimensional changes of the siliconized graphite specimens to the effect of the quantitative ratio of the carbide phase and carbon under different conditions of irradiation. If silicon is insufficient for the formation of a dense skeleton, graphite plays a devisive role, and it may be assumed that at an irradiation temperature greater than 600 K, the material shrinks. The presence of isolated carbide inclusions also affects the physicomechanical properties (including the anitfriction properties)

  15. Abrasion behavior of graphite pebble in lifting pipe of pebble-bed HTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Ke; Su, Jiageng [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology Cooperation Innovation Center, The Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 10084 (China); Zhou, Hongbo [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology Cooperation Innovation Center, The Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 10084 (China); Chinergy Co., LTD., Beijing 100193 (China); Peng, Wei; Liu, Bing [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology Cooperation Innovation Center, The Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 10084 (China); Yu, Suyun, E-mail: suyuan@tsinghua.edu.cn [Center for Combustion Energy, The Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering, Ministry of Educations, Tsinghua University, Beijing 10084 (China)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Quantitative determination of abrasion rate of graphite pebbles in different lifting velocities. • Abrasion behavior of graphite pebble in helium, air and nitrogen. • In helium, intensive collisions caused by oscillatory motion result in more graphite dust production. - Abstract: A pebble-bed high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (pebble-bed HTR) uses a helium coolant, graphite core structure, and spherical fuel elements. The pebble-bed design enables on-line refueling, avoiding refueling shutdowns. During circulation process, the pebbles are lifted pneumatically via a stainless steel lifting pipe and reinserted into the reactor. Inevitably, the movement of the fuel elements as they recirculate in the reactor produces graphite dust. Mechanical wear is the primary source of graphite dust production. Specifically, the sources are mechanisms of pebble–pebble contact, pebble–wall (structural graphite) contact, and fuel handling (pebble–metal abrasion). The key contribution to graphite dust production is from the fuel handling system, particularly from the lifting pipe. During pneumatic lift, graphite pebbles undergo multiple collisions with the stainless steel lifting pipe, thereby causing abrasion of the graphite pebbles and producing graphite dust. The present work explored the abrasion behavior of graphite pebble in the lifting pipe by measuring the abrasion rate at different lifting velocities. The abrasion rate of the graphite pebble in helium was found much higher than those in air and nitrogen. This gas environment effect could be explained by either tribology behavior or dynamic behavior. Friction testing excluded the possibility of tribology reason. The dynamic behavior of the graphite pebble was captured by analysis of the audio waveforms during pneumatic lift. The analysis results revealed unique dynamic behavior of the graphite pebble in helium. Oscillation and consequently intensive collisions occur during pneumatic lift, causing

  16. Analysis of electrochemical disintegration process of graphite matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Lifang; Wen Mingfen; Chen Jing

    2010-01-01

    The electrochemical method with ammonium nitrate as electrolyte was studied to disintegrate the graphite matrix from the simulative fuel elements for high temperature gas-cooled reactor. The influences of process parameters, including salt concentration, system temperature and current density, on the disintegration rate of graphite fragments were investigated in the present work. The experimental results showed that the disintegration rate depended slightly on the temperature and salt concentration. The current density strongly affected the disintegration rate of graphite fragments. Furthermore, the content of introduced oxygen in final graphite fragments was independent of the current density and the concentration of electrolyte. Moreover, the structural evolution of graphite was analyzed based on the microstructural parameters determined by X-ray diffraction profile fitting analysis using MAUD (material analysis using diffraction) before and after the disintegration process. It may safely be concluded that the graphite disintegration can be ascribed to the influences of the intercalation of foreign molecules in between crystal planes and the partial oxidation involved. The disintegration process was described deeply composed of intercalate part and further oxidation part of carbon which effected together to lead to the collapse of graphite crystals.

  17. Graphite-based photovoltaic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagally, Max; Liu, Feng

    2010-12-28

    The present invention uses lithographically patterned graphite stacks as the basic building elements of an efficient and economical photovoltaic cell. The basic design of the graphite-based photovoltaic cells includes a plurality of spatially separated graphite stacks, each comprising a plurality of vertically stacked, semiconducting graphene sheets (carbon nanoribbons) bridging electrically conductive contacts.

  18. Rate-dependent mode I interlaminar crack growth mechanisms in graphite/epoxy and graphite/PEEK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, J. W., Jr.; Carlsson, L. A.; Smiley, A. J.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper the mode I fracture behavior of graphite/epoxy and graphite/PEEK composites is examined over four decades of crosshead rates (0.25-250 mm/min). Straight-sided double-cantilever-beam specimens consisting of unidirectional laminates were tested at room temperature. For graphite/epoxy the load-deflection response was linear to fracture, and stable slow crack growth initiating at the highest load level was observed for all rates tested. In contrast, mode I crack growth in the graphite/PEEK material was often unstable and showed stick-slip behavior. Subcritical crack growth occurring prior to the onset of fracture was observed at intermediate displacement rates. A mechanism for the fracture behavior of the graphite/PEEK material (based on viscoelastic, plastic, and microcrack coalescence in the process zone) is proposed and related to the observed rate-dependent phenomena.

  19. Graphite content and isotopic fractionation between calcite-graphite pairs in metasediments from the Mgama Hills, Southern Kenya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arneth, J.D.; Schidlowski, M.; Sarbas, B.; Goerg, U.; Amstutz, G.C.

    1985-01-01

    Amphibolite-grade metasediments from the Mgama Hills region, Kenya, contain conspicuous quantities of graphite, most probably derived from organic progenitor materials,. The highest graphite contents are found in schists whereas calcite marbles intercalated in the sequence contain relatively low amounts. The graphitic constituents are consistently enriched in 13 C relative to common sedimentary organic material, with the highest isotopic ratios in graphite from the marbles. Carbon isotope fractionations between calcite and graphite mostly vary between 3.3 and 7.1 per mille, which comes close to both empirically recorded and thermodynamically calculated fractionations in the temperature range of the upper amphibolite facies. However, larger values occasionally encountered in the marbles suggest that complete isotopic equilibrium is not always attained in amphibolite-facies metamorphism. (author)

  20. Effects of graphite on rheological and conventional properties of bituminous binders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunus Erkuş

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effects of graphite used for developing the rheological and conventional properties of bitumen were investigated using various bituminous binder tests. Penetration, softening point, rotational viscosity (RV, dynamic shear rheometer (DSR and bending beam rheometer (BBR tests were applied to bituminous binders modified with four different proportions of graphite by bitumen weight. The penetration values declined while softening point values increased with rising graphite content. While graphite induced 8 °C increases in mixing-compacting temperature by increasing the viscosity values, it also increased the rutting parameter. According to the BBR test, the deformation and stiffness values changed significantly with increasing graphite content, but the m-values did not change significantly. These results showed that graphite generally used for improving the thermal properties can improve to high temperature performance of mixtures. Keywords: Graphite, Bitumen, Conventional properties, Rheological properties

  1. A comparison of PMIP2 model simulations and the MARGO proxy reconstruction for tropical sea surface temperatures at last glacial maximum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otto-Bliesner, Bette L.; Brady, E.C. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Climate and Global Dynamics Division, Boulder, CO (United States); Schneider, Ralph; Weinelt, M. [Christian-Albrechts Universitaet, Institut fuer Geowissenschaften, Kiel (Germany); Kucera, M. [Eberhard-Karls Universitaet Tuebingen, Institut fuer Geowissenschaften, Tuebingen (Germany); Abe-Ouchi, A. [The University of Tokyo, Center for Climate System Research, Kashiwa (Japan); Bard, E. [CEREGE, College de France, CNRS, Universite Aix-Marseille, Aix-en-Provence (France); Braconnot, P.; Kageyama, M.; Marti, O.; Waelbroeck, C. [Unite mixte CEA-CNRS-UVSQ, Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l' Environnement, Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Crucifix, M. [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Institut d' Astronomie et de Geophysique Georges Lemaitre, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Hewitt, C.D. [Met Office Hadley Centre, Exeter (United Kingdom); Paul, A. [Bremen University, Department of Geosciences, Bremen (Germany); Rosell-Mele, A. [Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, ICREA and Institut de Ciencia i Tecnologia Ambientals, Barcelona (Spain); Weber, S.L. [Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI), De Bilt (Netherlands); Yu, Y. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, LASG, Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Beijing (China)

    2009-05-15

    Results from multiple model simulations are used to understand the tropical sea surface temperature (SST) response to the reduced greenhouse gas concentrations and large continental ice sheets of the last glacial maximum (LGM). We present LGM simulations from the Paleoclimate Modelling Intercomparison Project, Phase 2 (PMIP2) and compare these simulations to proxy data collated and harmonized within the Multiproxy Approach for the Reconstruction of the Glacial Ocean Surface Project (MARGO). Five atmosphere-ocean coupled climate models (AOGCMs) and one coupled model of intermediate complexity have PMIP2 ocean results available for LGM. The models give a range of tropical (defined for this paper as 15 S-15 N) SST cooling of 1.0-2.4 C, comparable to the MARGO estimate of annual cooling of 1.7{+-}1 C. The models simulate greater SST cooling in the tropical Atlantic than tropical Pacific, but interbasin and intrabasin variations of cooling are much smaller than those found in the MARGO reconstruction. The simulated tropical coolings are relatively insensitive to season, a feature also present in the MARGO transferred-based estimates calculated from planktonic foraminiferal assemblages for the Indian and Pacific Oceans. These assemblages indicate seasonality in cooling in the Atlantic basin, with greater cooling in northern summer than northern winter, not captured by the model simulations. Biases in the simulations of the tropical upwelling and thermocline found in the preindustrial control simulations remain for the LGM simulations and are partly responsible for the more homogeneous spatial and temporal LGM tropical cooling simulated by the models. The PMIP2 LGM simulations give estimates for the climate sensitivity parameter of 0.67 -0.83 C per Wm{sup -2}, which translates to equilibrium climate sensitivity for doubling of atmospheric CO{sub 2} of 2.6-3.1 C. (orig.)

  2. Fragile-to-fragile liquid transition at Tg and stable-glass phase nucleation rate maximum at the Kauzmann temperature TK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tournier, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    An undercooled liquid is unstable. The driving force of the glass transition at T g is a change of the undercooled-liquid Gibbs free energy. The classical Gibbs free energy change for a crystal formation is completed including an enthalpy saving. The crystal growth critical nucleus is used as a probe to observe the Laplace pressure change Δp accompanying the enthalpy change −V m ×Δp at T g where V m is the molar volume. A stable glass–liquid transition model predicts the specific heat jump of fragile liquids at T≤T g , the Kauzmann temperature T K where the liquid entropy excess with regard to crystal goes to zero, the equilibrium enthalpy between T K and T g , the maximum nucleation rate at T K of superclusters containing magic atom numbers, and the equilibrium latent heats at T g and T K . Strong-to-fragile and strong-to-strong liquid transitions at T g are also described and all their thermodynamic parameters are determined from their specific heat jumps. The existence of fragile liquids quenched in the amorphous state, which do not undergo liquid–liquid transition during heating preceding their crystallization, is predicted. Long ageing times leading to the formation at T K of a stable glass composed of superclusters containing up to 147 atom, touching and interpenetrating, are evaluated from nucleation rates. A fragile-to-fragile liquid transition occurs at T g without stable-glass formation while a strong glass is stable after transition

  3. Hydrogen storage in graphite nanofibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, C.; Tan, C.D.; Hidalgo, R.; Baker, R.T.K.; Rodriguez, N.M. [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States). Chemistry Dept.

    1998-08-01

    Graphite nanofibers (GNF) are a type of material that is produced by the decomposition of carbon containing gases over metal catalyst particles at temperatures around 600 C. These molecularly engineered structures consist of graphene sheets perfectly arranged in a parallel, perpendicular or at angle orientation with respect to the fiber axis. The most important feature of the material is that only edges are exposed. Such an arrangement imparts the material with unique properties for gas adsorption because the evenly separated layers constitute the most ordered set of nanopores that can accommodate an adsorbate in the most efficient manner. In addition, the non-rigid pore walls can also expand so as to accommodate hydrogen in a multilayer conformation. Of the many varieties of structures that can be produced the authors have discovered that when gram quantities of a selected number of GNF are exposed to hydrogen at pressures of {approximately} 2,000 psi, they are capable of adsorbing and storing up to 40 wt% of hydrogen. It is believed that a strong interaction is established between hydrogen and the delocalized p-electrons present in the graphite layers and therefore a new type of chemistry is occurring within these confined structures.

  4. Graphite Oxidation Simulation in HTR Accident Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Genk, Mohamed

    2012-10-19

    Massive air and water ingress, following a pipe break or leak in steam-generator tubes, is a design-basis accident for high-temperature reactors (HTRs). Analysis of these accidents in both prismatic and pebble bed HTRs requires state-of-the-art capability for predictions of: 1) oxidation kinetics, 2) air helium gas mixture stratification and diffusion into the core following the depressurization, 3) transport of multi-species gas mixture, and 4) graphite corrosion. This project will develop a multi-dimensional, comprehensive oxidation kinetics model of graphite in HTRs, with diverse capabilities for handling different flow regimes. The chemical kinetics/multi-species transport model for graphite burning and oxidation will account for temperature-related changes in the properties of graphite, oxidants (O2, H2O, CO), reaction products (CO, CO2, H2, CH4) and other gases in the mixture (He and N2). The model will treat the oxidation and corrosion of graphite in geometries representative of HTR core component at temperatures of 900°C or higher. The developed chemical reaction kinetics model will be user-friendly for coupling to full core analysis codes such as MELCOR and RELAP, as well as computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes such as CD-adapco. The research team will solve governing equations for the multi-dimensional flow and the chemical reactions and kinetics using Simulink, an extension of the MATLAB solver, and will validate and benchmark the model's predictions using reported experimental data. Researchers will develop an interface to couple the validated model to a commercially available CFD fluid flow and thermal-hydraulic model of the reactor , and will perform a simulation of a pipe break in a prismatic core HTR, with the potential for future application to a pebble-bed type HTR.

  5. Brazed graphite/refractory metal composites for first-wall protection elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šmid, I.; Croessmann, C. D.; Salmonson, J. C.; Whitley, J. B.; Kny, E.; Reheis, N.; Kneringer, G.; Nickel, H.

    1991-03-01

    The peak surface heat flux deposition on divertor elements of near term fusion devices is expected to exceed 10 MW/m 2. The needed reliability of brazed plasma interactive components, particularly under abnormal operating conditions with peak surface temperatures well beyond 1000°C, makes refractory metallic substrates and brazes with a high melting point very attractive. TZM, a high temperature alloy of molybdenum, and isotropic graphite, materials very closely matched in their thermal expansion, were brazed with four high-temperature brazes. The brazes used were Zr, 90Ni/10Ti, 90Cu/10Ti and 70Ag/27Cu/3Ti (nominal composition prior to brazing, wt%). The resulting composite tiles of 50 × 50 mm2 with a TZM thickness of 5 mm and a graphite thickness of 10 mm have been tested in high heat flux simulation for their thermal fatigue properties. Up to 600 loading cycles were carried out with an average heat flux of 10 MW/m 2 for 0.5 s pulses. The maximum surface temperature was 1100°C. In support of the experiment, the thermal response and temperature gradients of the samples were investigated using a finite element model.

  6. Brazed graphite/refractory metal composites for first-wall protection elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smid, I.; Croessmann, C.D.; Salmonson, J.C.; Whitley, J.B.; Nickel, H.

    1991-01-01

    The peak surface heat flux deposition on divertor elements of near term fusion devices is expected to exceed 10 MW/m 2 . The needed reliability of brazed plasma interactive components, particularly under abnormal operating conditions with peak surface temperatures well beyond 1000deg C, makes refractory metallic substrates and brazes with a high melting point very attractive. TZM, a high temperature alloy of molybdenum, and isotropic graphite, materials very closely matched in their thermal expansion, were brazed with four high-temperature brazes. The brazes used were Zr, 90Ni/10Ti, 90Cu/10Ti and 70Ag/27Cu/3Ti (nominal composition prior to brazing, wt%). The resulting composite tiles of 50x50 mm 2 with a TZM thickness of 5 mm and a graphite thickness of 10 mm have been tested in high heat flux simulation for their thermal fatigue properties. Up to 600 loading cycles were carried out with an average heat flux of 10 MW/m 2 for 0.5 s pulses. The maximum surface temperature was 1100deg C. In support of the experiment, the thermal response and temperature gradients of the samples were investigated using a finite element model. (orig.)

  7. Brazed graphite/refractory metal composites for first-wall protection elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smid, I.; Croessmann, C. D.; Salmonson, J. C.; Whitley, J. B.; Kny, E.; Reheis, N.; Kneringer, G.; Nickel, H.

    1995-01-01

    The peak surface heat flux deposition on divertor elements of near term fusion devices is expected to exceed 10 MW/m 2 . The needed reliability of brazed plasma interactive components, particularly under abnormal operating conditions with peak surface temperatures well beyond 1000 degree C, makes refractory metallic substrates and brazes with a high melting point very attractive. TZM, a high temperature alloy of molybdenum, and isotropic graphite, materials very closely matched in their thermal expansion, were brazed with four high-temperature brazes. The brazes used were Zr, 90Ni/10Ti, 90Cu/10Ti and 70Ag/27Cu/3Ti (nominal composition prior to brazing, wt%). The resulting composite tiles of 5O X 50 mm 2 with a TZM thickness of 5 mm and a graphite thickness of 10 mm have been tested in high heat flux simulation for their thermal fatigue properties. Up to 600 loading cycles were carried out with an average heat flux of 10 MW/m 2 for 0.5 s pulses. The maximum surface temperature was 1100 degree C. In support of the experiment, the thermal response and temperature gradients of the samples were investigated using a finite element model. (author)

  8. Design Procedure of Graphite Components by ASME HTR Codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Ji-Ho; Jo, Chang Keun

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the ASME B and PV Code, Subsection HH, Subpart A, design procedure for graphite components of HTRs was reviewed and the differences from metal materials were remarked. The Korean VHTR has a prismatic core which is made of multiple graphite blocks, reflectors, and core supports. One of the design issues is the assessment of the structural integrity of the graphite components because the graphite is brittle and shows quite different behaviors from metals in high temperature environment. The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) issued the latest edition of the code for the high temperature reactors (HTR) in 2015. In this study, the ASME B and PV Code, Subsection HH, Subpart A, Graphite Materials was reviewed and the special features were remarked. Due the brittleness of graphites, the damage-tolerant design procedures different from the conventional metals were adopted based on semi-probabilistic approaches. The unique additional classification, SRC, is allotted to the graphite components and the full 3-D FEM or equivalent stress analysis method is required. In specific conditions, the oxidation and viscoelasticity analysis of material are required. The fatigue damage rule has not been established yet

  9. Design Procedure of Graphite Components by ASME HTR Codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Ji-Ho; Jo, Chang Keun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In this study, the ASME B and PV Code, Subsection HH, Subpart A, design procedure for graphite components of HTRs was reviewed and the differences from metal materials were remarked. The Korean VHTR has a prismatic core which is made of multiple graphite blocks, reflectors, and core supports. One of the design issues is the assessment of the structural integrity of the graphite components because the graphite is brittle and shows quite different behaviors from metals in high temperature environment. The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) issued the latest edition of the code for the high temperature reactors (HTR) in 2015. In this study, the ASME B and PV Code, Subsection HH, Subpart A, Graphite Materials was reviewed and the special features were remarked. Due the brittleness of graphites, the damage-tolerant design procedures different from the conventional metals were adopted based on semi-probabilistic approaches. The unique additional classification, SRC, is allotted to the graphite components and the full 3-D FEM or equivalent stress analysis method is required. In specific conditions, the oxidation and viscoelasticity analysis of material are required. The fatigue damage rule has not been established yet.

  10. Effect of various dopant elements on primary graphite growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valle, N; Theuwissen, K; Lacaze, J; Sertucha, J

    2012-01-01

    Five spheroidal graphite cast irons were investigated, a usual ferritic grade and four pearlitic alloys containing Cu and doped with Sb, Sn and Ti. These alloys were remelted in a graphite crucible, leading to volatilization of the magnesium added for spheroidization and to carbon saturation of the liquid. The alloys were then cooled down and maintained at a temperature above the eutectic temperature. During this step, primary graphite could develop showing various features depending on the doping elements added. The largest effects were that of Ti which greatly reduces graphite nucleation and growth, and that of Sb which leads to rounded agglomerates instead of lamellar graphite. The samples have been investigated with secondary ion mass spectrometry to enlighten distribution of elements in primary graphite. SIMS analysis showed almost even distribution of elements, including Mg and Al (from the inoculant) in the ferritic grade, while uneven distribution was evident in all doped alloys. Investigations are going on to clarify if the uneven distribution is associated with structural defects in the graphite precipitates.

  11. Protection of nuclear graphite toward fluoride molten salt by glassy carbon deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernardet, V.; Gomes, S.; Delpeux, S.; Dubois, M.; Guerin, K.; Avignant, D.; Renaudin, G.; Duclaux, L.

    2009-01-01

    Molten salt reactor represents one of the promising future Generation IV nuclear reactors families where the fuel, a liquid molten fluoride salt, is circulating through the graphite reactor core. The interactions between nuclear graphite and fluoride molten salt and also the graphite surface protection were investigated in this paper by powder X-ray diffraction, micro-Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy coupled with X-ray microanalysis. Nuclear graphite discs were covered by two kinds of protection deposit: a glassy carbon coating and a double coating of pyrolitic carbon/glassy carbon. Different behaviours have been highlighted according to the presence and the nature of the coated protection film. Intercalation of molten salt between the graphite layers did not occur. Nevertheless the molten salt adhered more or less to the surface of the graphite disc, filled more or less the graphite surface porosity and perturbed more or less the graphite stacking order at the disc surface. The behaviour of unprotected graphite was far to be satisfactory after two days of immersion of graphite in molten salt at 500 deg. C. The best protection of the graphite disc surface, with the maximum of inertness towards molten salt, has been obtained with the double coating of pyrolitic carbon/glassy carbon

  12. Decontamination of nuclear graphite by thermal processing; Dekontamination von Nukleargraphit durch thermische Behandlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Florjan, Monika W.

    2010-04-15

    The main problem in view of the direct disposal of the nuclear graphite is its large volume. This waste contains long-lived and short-lived radionuclides which determine the waste strategy. The irradiated graphite possess high amount of the {sup 14}C isotope. The main object of the present work was the selective separation of {sup 14}C isotope from the isotope {sup 12}C by thermal treatment (pyrolysis, partial oxidation). A successful separation could reduce the radiotoxicity and offer a different disposal strategy. Three different graphite types were investigated. The samples originate from the reflector and from the flaking of spherical fuel elements of the high-temperature reactor (AVR) Juelich. The samples from the thermal column of the research reactor (Merlin, Juelich) were also investigated. The maximum tritium releases were obtained both in inert gas atmosphere (N{sub 2}) and under water vapour-oxidizing conditions at 1280 C and 900 C. Furthermore it could be shown that 28% of {sup 14}C could be released under inert gas conditions at a 1280 C. By additive of oxidizing agent such as water vapour and oxygen the {sup 14}C release could be increased. Under water vapour-oxidizing conditions at a temperature of 1280 C up to 93% of the {sup 14}C was separated from the graphite. The matrix corrosion of 5.4% was obtained. The selective separation of the {sup 14}C is possible, because a substantial part of the radiocarbon is bound near the grain boundary surfaces. (orig.)

  13. Graphite development for gas-cooled reactors in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burchell, T.D.

    1991-01-01

    This document discusses Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) graphite activities in the USA which currently include the following research and development tasks: coke examination; effects of irradiation; variability of physical properties (mechanical, thermal-physical, and fracture); fatigue behavior, oxidation behavior; NDE techniques; structural design criteria; and carbon-carbon composite control rod clad materials. These tasks support nuclear grade graphite manufacturing technology including nondestructive examination of billets and components. Moreover, data shall be furnished to support design and licensing of graphite components for the MHTGR

  14. Corrosion-induced microstructural changes in a US core graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eatherly, W.P.; Lee, D.A.

    1981-01-01

    The results reported here apply to Great Lakes grade H-451 graphite, the core graphite specified for the US HTGR. This graphite is structurally similar to the German reflector grades we have investigated at ORNL, and hence should be applicable to them if similar impurity levels are obtained. Moreover, these results extend and confirm the behavior pattern exhibited by the fuel matrix material A3-3 reported in the previous paper, although the effects are more pronounced in A3-3 presumably due to its resin-type binder and low heat-treatment temperatures

  15. Electrical and thermal properties of graphite/polyaniline composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourdo, Shawn E., E-mail: sxbourdo@ualr.edu [Center for Integrative Nanotechnology Sciences, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, 2801 South University Avenue, Little Rock, AR 72204 (United States); Warford, Brock A.; Viswanathan, Tito [Department of Chemistry, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, 2801 South University Avenue, Little Rock, AR 72204 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    A composite of a carbon allotrope (graphite) and an inherently conducting polymer, polyaniline (PANI), has been prepared that exhibits an electrical conductivity greater than either of the two components. An almost 2-fold increase in the bulk conductivity occurs when only a small mass fraction of polyaniline exists in the composite (91% graphite/ 9% polyaniline, by mass). This increase in dc electrical conductivity is curious since in most cases a composite material will exhibit a conductivity somewhere between the two individual components, unless a modification to the electronic nature of the material occurs. In order to elucidate the fundamental electrical properties of the composite we have performed variable temperature conductivity measurements to better understand the nature of conduction in these materials. The results from these studies suggest a change in the mechanism of conduction as the amount of polyaniline is increased in the composite. Along with superior electrical properties, the composites exhibit an increase in thermal stability as compared to the graphite. - Graphical abstract: (Left) Room temperature electrical conductivity of G-PANI composites at different mass ratios. (Right) Electrical conductivity of G-PANI composites at temperatures from 5 K to 300 K. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Composites of graphite and polyaniline have been synthesized with unique electrical and thermal properties. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Certain G-PANI composites are more conductive and more thermally stable than graphite alone. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer G-PANI composites exhibit a larger conductivity ratio with respect to temperature than graphite alone.

  16. Graphite Oxidation Thermodynamics/Reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Propp, W.A.

    1998-01-01

    The vulnerability of graphite-matrix spent nuclear fuel to oxidation by the ambient atmosphere if the fuel canister is breached was evaluated. Thermochemical and kinetic data over the anticipated range of storage temperatures (200 to 400 C) were used to calculate the times required for a total carbon mass loss of 1 mgcm-2 from a fuel specimen. At 200 C, the time required to produce even this small loss is large, 900,000 yr. However, at 400 C the time required is only 1.9 yr. The rate of oxidation at 200 C is negligible, and the rate even at 400 C is so small as to be of no practical consequence. Therefore, oxidation of the spent nuclear fuel upon a loss of canister integrity is not anticipated to be a concern based upon the results of this study

  17. On estimating the fracture probability of nuclear graphite components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, Makuteswara

    2008-01-01

    The properties of nuclear grade graphites exhibit anisotropy and could vary considerably within a manufactured block. Graphite strength is affected by the direction of alignment of the constituent coke particles, which is dictated by the forming method, coke particle size, and the size, shape, and orientation distribution of pores in the structure. In this paper, a Weibull failure probability analysis for components is presented using the American Society of Testing Materials strength specification for nuclear grade graphites for core components in advanced high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. The risk of rupture (probability of fracture) and survival probability (reliability) of large graphite blocks are calculated for varying and discrete values of service tensile stresses. The limitations in these calculations are discussed from considerations of actual reactor environmental conditions that could potentially degrade the specification properties because of damage due to complex interactions between irradiation, temperature, stress, and variability in reactor operation

  18. On the Thermal Conductivity Change of Matrix Graphite Materials after Neutron Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young-Woo; Yeo, Seunghwan; Kim, Eung-Seon; Sah, Injin; Park, Daegyu; Kim, Youngjun; Cho, Moon Sung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In this work, the variations of the thermal conductivity of the A3-3 matrix graphite after neutron irradiation is discussed as well as of the IG-110 graphite for comparison. Neutron irradiation of the graphite specimens was carried out as a part of the first irradiation test of KAERI's coated particle fuel specimens by use of Hanaro research reactor. This work can be summarized as follows: 1) In the evaluation of the specific heat of the graphite materials, various literature data were used and the variations of the specific heat data of all the graphite specimens are observed well agreed, irrespectively of the difference in specimens (graphite and matrix graphite and irradiated and un-irradiated). 2) This implies that it should be reasonable that for both structural graphite and fuel matrix graphite, and even for the neuron-irradiated graphite, any of these specific heat data set be used in the calculation of the thermal conductivity. 3) For the irradiated A3-3 matrix graphite specimens, the thermal conductivity decreased on both directions. On the radial direction, the tendency of variation upon temperature is similar to that of unirradiated specimen, i.e., decreasing as the temperature increases. 4) In the German irradiation experiments with A3-27 matrix graphite specimens, the thermal conductivity of the un-irradiated specimen shows a decrease and that of irradiated specimen is nearly constant as the temperature increases. 5) The thermal conductivity of the irradiated IG-110 was considerably decreased compared with that of un-irradiated specimens The difference of the thermal conductivity of un-irradiated and irradiated IG-110 graphite specimens is much larger than that of un-irradiated and irradiated A3-3 matrix graphite specimens.

  19. Development of fracture toughness test method for nuclear grade graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, C. H.; Lee, J. S.; Cho, H. C.; Kim, D. J.; Lee, D. J. [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-02-15

    Because of its high strength and stability at very high temperature, as well as very low thermal neutron absorption cross-section, graphite has been widely used as a structural material in Gas Cooled Reactors (GCR). Recently, many countries are developing the Very High Temperature gas cooled Reactor (VHTR) because of the potentials of hydrogen production, as well as its safety and viable economics. In VHTR, helium gas serves as the primary coolant. Graphite will be used as a reflector, moderator and core structural materials. The life time of graphite is determined from dimensional changes due to neutron irradiation, which closely relates to the changes of crystal structure. The changes of both lattice parameter and crystallite size can be easily measured by X-ray diffraction method. However, due to high cost and long time of neutron irradiation test, ion irradiation test is being performed instead in KAERI. Therefore, it is essential to develop the technique for measurement of ion irradiation damage of nuclear graphite. Fracture toughness of nuclear grade graphite is one of the key properties in the design and development of VHTR. It is important not only to evaluate the various properties of candidate graphite but also to assess the integrity of nuclear grade graphite during operation. Although fracture toughness tests on graphite have been performed in many laboratories, there have been wide variations in values of the calculated fracture toughness, due to the differences in the geometry of specimens and test conditions. Hence, standard test method for nuclear graphite is required to obtain the reliable fracture toughness values. Crack growth behavior of nuclear grade graphite shows rising R-curve which means the increase in crack growth resistance as the crack length increases. Crack bridging and microcracking have been proposed to be the dominant mechanisms of rising R-curve behavior. In this paper, the technique to measure the changes of crystallite size and

  20. Raw materials for reflector graphite (for reactors)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhelmi, G.; Mindermann, D.

    1992-01-01

    The manufacturing concept for the core components of German high temperature reactor (HTR) types of graphite was previously entirely directed to the use of German tar coke (St coke). As the plants for producing this material no longer complied technically with the current environmental protection requirements, one had to assume that they would soon be shut down. To prevent bottlenecks in the erection of future HTR plants, alternative cokes produced by modern processes by Japanese manufacturers were checked for their suitability for the manufacture of reactor graphite. This report describes the investigations carried out on these materials from the safe delayed coking process. The project work, apart from analysis of the main data of the candidate coke considered, included the processing of the raw materials into directly and secondarily extruded graphite rods on the laboratory scale, including characterisation. As the results show, the material data achieved with the previous raw material can be reproduced with Japanese St coke. The tar coke LPC-A from the Nippon Steel Chemical Co., Ltd was decided on as the new standard coke for manufacturing reflector graphite. (orig.) With 15 tabs., 2 figs [de

  1. Effect of total pressure on graphite oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnette, R.D.; Hoot, C.G.

    1983-04-01

    Graphite corrosion in the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) is calculated using two key assumptions: (1) the kinetic, catalysis, and transport characteristics of graphite determined by bench-scale tests apply to large components at reactor conditions and (2) the effects of high pressure and turbulent flow are predictable. To better understand the differences between laboratory tests and reactor conditions, a high-pressure test loop (HPTL) has been constructed and used to perform tests at reactor temperature, pressure, and flow conditions. The HPTL is intended to determine the functional dependence of oxidation rate and characteristics on total pressure and gas velocity and to compare the oxidation results with calculations using models and codes developed for the reactor

  2. Assessment of the radiological inventory of EDF's graphite waste through an assimilation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poncet, B.

    2014-01-01

    The definitive disposal of graphite from the decommissioned UNGG reactors (Chinon A3, Saint-Laurent A1, Saint-Laurent A2 and Bugey 1) has required a radiological inventory of the irradiated graphite. This study focuses on Cl 36 that is produced by neutron absorption on Cl 35 that was present initially in graphite as an impurity (about 80 mg/t of Cl initially in Bugey 1 graphite)). It appears that the changes of Cl 36 concentration along the height of a stack of graphite do neither fit the changes in the neutron flux nor the changes in the graphite temperature. This fact is explained by the high level of purity of the graphite and the nugget effect. Challenged by the absence of spatial correlation of the Cl 36 concentration, an EDF's team has developed an assimilation method based on comparisons between calculations and measurements in order to get a conservative inventory. (A.C.)

  3. Radiation damage and life-time evaluation of RBMK graphite stack

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platonov, P A; Chugunov, O K; Manevsky, V N; Karpukhin, V I [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation). Reactor Material Div.

    1996-08-01

    At the present time there are 11 NPP units with RBMK reactors in operation in Russia, with the oldest now in operation 22 years. Design life-time of the RBMK-1000 reactor is 30 years. This paper addresses the evaluation of RBMK graphite stack life-time. It is the practice in Russia to evaluate the reliability of the channel reactor graphite stack using at least three criteria: degradation of physical-mechanical properties of graphite, preservation of the graphite brick integrity, and degradation of the graphite stack as a structure. Stack life-time evaluation by different criteria indicates that the most realistic approach may be realized on the basis of the criteria of brick cracking and degradation of the graphite stack as a structure. The RBMK reactor graphite stack life-time depends on its temperature and for different units it may be different. (author). 2 refs, 10 figs.

  4. A standard graphite block

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivkovic, M; Zdravkovic, Z; Sotic, O [Department of Reactor Physics and Dynamics, Boris Kidric Institute of nuclear sciences Vinca, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    1966-04-15

    A graphite block was calibrated for the thermal neutron flux of the Ra-Be source using indium foils as detectors. Experimental values of the thermal neutron flux along the central vertical axis of the system were corrected for the self-shielding effect and depression of flux in the detector. The experimental values obtained were compared with the values calculated on the basis of solving the conservation neutron equation by the continuous slowing-down theory. In this theoretical calculation of the flux the Ra-Be source was divided into three resonance energy regions. The measurement of the thermal neutron diffusion length in the standard graphite block is described. The measurements were performed in the thermal neutron region of the system. The experimental results were interpreted by the diffusion theory for point thermal neutron source in the finite system. The thermal neutron diffusion length was calculated to be L= 50.9 {+-}3.1 cm for the following graphite characteristics: density = 1.7 g/cm{sup 3}; boron content = 0.1 ppm; absorption cross section = 3.7 mb.

  5. A standard graphite block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivkovic, M.; Zdravkovic, Z.; Sotic, O.

    1966-04-01

    A graphite block was calibrated for the thermal neutron flux of the Ra-Be source using indium foils as detectors. Experimental values of the thermal neutron flux along the central vertical axis of the system were corrected for the self-shielding effect and depression of flux in the detector. The experimental values obtained were compared with the values calculated on the basis of solving the conservation neutron equation by the continuous slowing-down theory. In this theoretical calculation of the flux the Ra-Be source was divided into three resonance energy regions. The measurement of the thermal neutron diffusion length in the standard graphite block is described. The measurements were performed in the thermal neutron region of the system. The experimental results were interpreted by the diffusion theory for point thermal neutron source in the finite system. The thermal neutron diffusion length was calculated to be L= 50.9 ±3.1 cm for the following graphite characteristics: density = 1.7 g/cm 3 ; boron content = 0.1 ppm; absorption cross section = 3.7 mb

  6. Calculation of the Thermal State of the Graphite Moderator of the RBMK Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vorobiev Alexander V.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work is devoted to study the temperature field of the graphite stack of the RBMK reactor. In work was analyzed the influence of contact pressure between the components of the masonry on the temperature of the graphite moderator.

  7. Chemical vapor deposition of tantalum on graphite cloth for making hot pressed fiber reinforced carbide-graphite composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollabaugh, C.M.; Davidson, K.V.; Radosevich, C.L.; Riley, R.E.; Wallace, T.C.

    1977-01-01

    Conditions for the CVD of a uniform coating of Ta on fibers of a woven graphite cloth were established. The effect of gas composition, pressure, and temperature were investigated, and the conditions that gave the desired results are presented. Several layers of the coated cloth were hot pressed to produce a TaC--C composite having uniformly dispersed, fine-grained TaC in graphite. Three compositions were hot pressed: 15, 25, and 40 volume percent carbide. 8 figures, 2 tables

  8. Application of quantitative image analysis to the investigation of macroporosity of graphitic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delle, W.; Koizlik, K.; Hoven, H.; Wallura, E.

    1978-01-01

    The essence of quantitative image analysis is that the classification of graphitic materials to be inspected is possible on the basis of the grey value contrast between pores (dark) and carbon (bright). Macroporosity is defined as total of all pores with diameters larger than 0.2 μm. The pore size distributions and pore shapes of graphites based on petroleum, pitch, gilsonite and fluid coke as well as graphitic fuel matrices and pyrolytic carbons were investigated. The relationships between maximum grain size, macroporosity and total porosity as well as the anisotropies of macroporosity and electrical resistivity of graphite were established. (orig./GSC) [de

  9. Characterization of nuclear graphite elastic properties using laser ultrasonic methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Fan W.; Han, Karen; Olasov, Lauren R.; Gallego, Nidia C.; Contescu, Cristian I.; Spicer, James B.

    2015-05-01

    Laser ultrasonic methods have been used to characterize the elastic behaviors of commercially-available and legacy nuclear graphites. Since ultrasonic techniques are sensitive to various aspects of graphite microstructure including preferred grain orientation, microcrack orientation and porosity, laser ultrasonics is a candidate technique for monitoring graphite degradation and structural integrity in environments expected in high-temperature, gas-cooled nuclear reactors. Aspects of materials texture can be assessed by studying ultrasonic wavespeeds as a function of propagation direction and polarization. Shear wave birefringence measurements, in particular, can be used to evaluate elastic anisotropy. In this work, laser ultrasonic measurements of graphite moduli have been made to provide insight into the relationship between the microstructures and the macroscopic stiffnesses of these materials. In particular, laser ultrasonic measurements have been made using laser line sources to produce shear waves with specific polarizations. By varying the line orientation relative to the sample, shear wave birefringence measurements have been recorded. Results from shear wave birefringence measurements show that an isostatically molded graphite, such as PCIB, behaves isotropically, while an extruded graphite, such as H-451, displays significant ultrasonic texture. Graphites have complicated microstructures that depend on the manufacturing processes used, and ultrasonic texture in these materials could originate from grain orientation and preferred microcrack alignment. Effects on material isotropy due to service related microstructural changes are possible and the ultimate aim of this work is to determine the degree to which these changes can be assessed nondestructively using laser ultrasonics measurements.

  10. Bromine intercalated graphite for lightweight composite conductors

    KAUST Repository

    Amassian, Aram

    2017-07-20

    A method of fabricating a bromine-graphite/metal composite includes intercalating bromine within layers of graphite via liquid-phase bromination to create brominated-graphite and consolidating the brominated-graphite with a metal nanopowder via a mechanical pressing operation to generate a bromine-graphite/metal composite material.

  11. Chemical stabilization of graphite surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bistrika, Alexander A.; Lerner, Michael M.

    2018-04-03

    Embodiments of a device, or a component of a device, including a stabilized graphite surface, methods of stabilizing graphite surfaces, and uses for the devices or components are disclosed. The device or component includes a surface comprising graphite, and a plurality of haloaryl ions and/or haloalkyl ions bound to at least a portion of the graphite. The ions may be perhaloaryl ions and/or perhaloalkyl ions. In certain embodiments, the ions are perfluorobenzenesulfonate anions. Embodiments of the device or component including stabilized graphite surfaces may maintain a steady-state oxidation or reduction surface current density after being exposed to continuous oxidation conditions for a period of at least 1-100 hours. The device or component is prepared by exposing a graphite-containing surface to an acidic aqueous solution of the ions under oxidizing conditions. The device or component can be exposed in situ to the solution.

  12. The Influence of Using Fe2O3 Additive Materials of the Calcine Coke's Pellet to Physical Characteristic Product Graphitization at the Temperature 1500 oC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasilani NS; Tunjung I; Triyono

    2002-01-01

    The pellet's consisted of two size particles calcine coke's are 2 O 3 (0.5%; 0.75% and 1% from total weight) and tar pith, heated, to shaped and pressed into 27 KN. Pellet's baked at 1500 o C temperature with variated time, were tried to characteristic of the resistivity, the density and the hardness. The heated to changed the demention, phases and deformation. At the 1% additive material's of 2-1 code's and 60 minutes roasted, are reached the resistivity 0.597 Ω-cm, the densities 1.182 g/ml, the hardness 17.6 kg/mm 2 . (author)

  13. Graphitization in Carbon MEMS and Carbon NEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Swati

    Carbon MEMS (CMEMS) and Carbon NEMS (CNEMS) are an emerging class of miniaturized devices. Due to the numerous advantages such as scalable manufacturing processes, inexpensive and readily available precursor polymer materials, tunable surface properties and biocompatibility, carbon has become a preferred material for a wide variety of future sensing applications. Single suspended carbon nanowires (CNWs) integrated on CMEMS structures fabricated by electrospinning of SU8 photoresist on photolithographially patterned SU8 followed by pyrolysis are utilized for understanding the graphitization process in micro and nano carbon materials. These monolithic CNW-CMEMS structures enable the fabrication of very high aspect ratio CNWs of predefined length. The CNWs thus fabricated display core---shell structures having a graphitic shell with a glassy carbon core. The electrical conductivity of these CNWs is increased by about 100% compared to glassy carbon as a result of enhanced graphitization. We explore various tunable fabrication and pyrolysis parameters to improve graphitization in the resulting CNWs. We also suggest gas-sensing application of the thus fabricated single suspended CNW-CMEMS devices by using the CNW as a nano-hotplate for local chemical vapor deposition. In this thesis we also report on results from an optimization study of SU8 photoresist derived carbon electrodes. These electrodes were applied to the simultaneous detection of traces of Cd(II) and Pb(II) through anodic stripping voltammetry and detection limits as low as 0.7 and 0.8 microgL-1 were achieved. To further improve upon the electrochemical behavior of the carbon electrodes we elucidate a modified pyrolysis technique featuring an ultra-fast temperature ramp for obtaining bubbled porous carbon from lithographically patterned SU8. We conclude this dissertation by suggesting the possible future works on enhancing graphitization as well as on electrochemical applications

  14. Study on wear resistance of vanadium alloying compacted/vermicular graphite cast iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Yoon Woo

    1987-01-01

    Wear resistance of the Compacted/Vermicular graphite cast irons was studied by changing the vanadium content in the cast irons. The results obtained in this work are summarized as follows. 1. When the same amount of vanadium was added to the flake graphite cast iron, spheroidal graphitecast iron and Compacted/Vermicular graphite cast iron, spheroidal graphite cast iron and Compacted/Vermicular graphite cast iron wear resistance decreased in following sequence, that is, flake graphite cast iron> spheroidal graphite cast iron>Compacted/Vermicular graphite cast iron. 2. Addition of vanadium to the Compacted/Vermicular cast iron leaded to a remarkable increase in hardness because it made the amount of pearlite in matrix increase. 3. Addition of vanadium to the compacted/Vermicular graphite cast iron significantly enhanced wear resistance and the maximum resistance was achieved at about 0.36% vanadium. 4. The maximum amount of wear apppeared at sliding speed of about 1.4m/sec and wear mode was considered to be oxidation abrasion from the observation of wear tracks. (Author)

  15. Deuterium pumping and erosion behavior of selected graphite materials under high flux plasma bombardment in PISCES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirooka, Y.; Conn, R.W.; Goebel, D.M.; LaBombard, B.; Lehmer, R.; Leung, W.K.; Nygren, R.E.; Ra, Y.

    1988-06-01

    Deuterium plasma recycling and chemical erosion behavior of selected graphite materials have been investigated using the PISCES-A facility. These materials include: Pyro-graphite; 2D-graphite weave; 4D-graphite weave; and POCO-graphite. Deuterium plasma bombardment conditions are: fluxes around 7 /times/ 10 17 ions s/sup /minus/1/cm/sup /minus/2/; exposure time in the range from 10 to 100 s; bombarding energy of 300 eV; and graphite temperatures between 20 and 120/degree/C. To reduce deuterium plasma recycling, several approaches have been investigated. Erosion due to high-fluence helium plasma conditioning significantly increases the surface porosity of POCO-graphite and 4D-graphite weave whereas little change for 2D-graphite weave and Pyro-graphite. The increased pore openings and refreshed in-pore surface sites are found to reduce the deuterium plasma recycling and chemical erosion rates at transient stages. The steady state recycling rates for these graphite materials can be also correlated to the surface porosity. Surface topographical modification by machined-grooves noticeably reduces the steady state deuterium recycling rate and the impurity emission from the surface. These surface topography effects are attributed to co-deposition of remitted deuterium, chemically sputtered hydrocarbon and physically sputtered carbon under deuterium plasma bombardment. The co-deposited film is found to have a characteristic surface morphology with dendritic microstructures. 18 ref., 4 figs., 1 tab

  16. Heat exchanger using graphite foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campagna, Michael Joseph; Callas, James John

    2012-09-25

    A heat exchanger is disclosed. The heat exchanger may have an inlet configured to receive a first fluid and an outlet configured to discharge the first fluid. The heat exchanger may further have at least one passageway configured to conduct the first fluid from the inlet to the outlet. The at least one passageway may be composed of a graphite foam and a layer of graphite material on the exterior of the graphite foam. The layer of graphite material may form at least a partial barrier between the first fluid and a second fluid external to the at least one passageway.

  17. Effective Thermal Conductivity of Graphite Materials with Cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestchaanyi, S. E.; Landman, I. S.

    The dependence of effective thermal diffusivity on temperature caused by volumetric cracks is modelled for macroscopic graphite samples using the three-dimensional thermomechanics code Pegasus-3D. At high off-normal heat loads typical of the divertor armour, thermostress due to the anisotropy of graphite grains is much larger than that due to the temperature gradient. Numerical simulation demonstrated that the volumetric crack density both in fine grain graphites and in the CFC matrix depends mainly on the local sample temperature, not on the temperature gradient. This allows to define an effective thermal diffusivity for graphite with cracks. The results obtained are used to explain intense cracking and particle release from carbon based materials under electron beam heat load. Decrease of graphite thermal diffusivity with increase of the crack density explains particle release mechanism in the experiments with CFC where a clear energy threshold for the onset of particle release has been observed in J. Linke et al. Fusion Eng. Design, in press, Bazyler et al., these proceedings. Surface temperature measurement is necessary to calibrate the Pegasus-3D code for simulation of ITER divertor armour brittle destruction.

  18. Long-term trends of daily maximum and minimum temperatures for the major cities of South Korea and their implications on human health

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Choi, B. C.; Kim, J.; Lee, D. G.; Kyselý, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 2 (2007), s. 171-183 ISSN N R&D Projects: GA ČR GC205/07/J044 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : Temperature trends * Biometeorology * Climate change * Global warming * Human health * Temperature extremes * Urbanization Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology

  19. Role of nuclear grade graphite in controlling oxidation in modular HTGRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Windes, Willaim [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Strydom, G. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kane, J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Smith, R. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-11-01

    The passively safe High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) design is one of the primary concepts considered for Generation IV and Small Modular Reactor (SMR) programs. The helium cooled, nuclear grade graphite moderated core achieves extremely high operating temperatures allowing either industrial process heat or electricity generation at high efficiencies. In addition to their neutron moderating properties, nuclear grade graphite core components provide excellent high temperature stability, thermal conductivity, and chemical compatibility with the high temperature nuclear fuel form. Graphite has been continuously used in nuclear reactors since the 1940’s and has performed remarkably well over a wide range of core environments and operating conditions. Graphite moderated, gas-cooled reactor designs have been safely used for research and power production purposes in multiple countries since the inception of nuclear energy development. However, graphite is a carbonaceous material, and this has generated a persistent concern that the graphite components could actually burn during either normal or accident conditions [ , ]. The common assumption is that graphite, since it is ostensibly similar to charcoal and coal, will burn in a similar manner. While charcoal and coal may have the appearance of graphite, the internal microstructure and impurities within these carbonaceous materials are very different. Volatile species and trapped moisture provide a source of oxygen within coal and charcoal allowing them to burn. The fabrication process used to produce nuclear grade graphite eliminates these oxidation enhancing impurities, creating a dense, highly ordered form of carbon possessing high thermal diffusivity and strongly (covalently) bonded atoms.

  20. Effects of Oxidation on Oxidation-Resistant Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Windes, William [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Smith, Rebecca [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Carroll, Mark [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-05-01

    The Advanced Reactor Technology (ART) Graphite Research and Development Program is investigating doped nuclear graphite grades that exhibit oxidation resistance through the formation of protective oxides on the surface of the graphite material. In the unlikely event of an oxygen ingress accident, graphite components within the VHTR core region are anticipated to oxidize so long as the oxygen continues to enter the hot core region and the core temperatures remain above 400°C. For the most serious air-ingress accident which persists over several hours or days the continued oxidation can result in significant structural damage to the core. Reducing the oxidation rate of the graphite core material during any air-ingress accident would mitigate the structural effects and keep the core intact. Previous air oxidation testing of nuclear-grade graphite doped with varying levels of boron-carbide (B4C) at a nominal 739°C was conducted for a limited number of doped specimens demonstrating a dramatic reduction in oxidation rate for the boronated graphite grade. This report summarizes the conclusions from this small scoping study by determining the effects of oxidation on the mechanical strength resulting from oxidation of boronated and unboronated graphite to a 10% mass loss level. While the B4C additive did reduce mechanical strength loss during oxidation, adding B4C dopants to a level of 3.5% or more reduced the as-fabricated compressive strength nearly 50%. This effectively minimized any benefits realized from the protective film formed on the boronated grades. Future work to infuse different graphite grades with silicon- and boron-doped material as a post-machining conditioning step for nuclear components is discussed as a potential solution for these challenges in this report.

  1. Thermal desorption of formamide and methylamine from graphite and amorphous water ice surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaabouni, H.; Diana, S.; Nguyen, T.; Dulieu, F.

    2018-04-01

    Context. Formamide (NH2CHO) and methylamine (CH3NH2) are known to be the most abundant amine-containing molecules in many astrophysical environments. The presence of these molecules in the gas phase may result from thermal desorption of interstellar ices. Aims: The aim of this work is to determine the values of the desorption energies of formamide and methylamine from analogues of interstellar dust grain surfaces and to understand their interaction with water ice. Methods: Temperature programmed desorption (TPD) experiments of formamide and methylamine ices were performed in the sub-monolayer and monolayer regimes on graphite (HOPG) and non-porous amorphous solid water (np-ASW) ice surfaces at temperatures 40-240 K. The desorption energy distributions of these two molecules were calculated from TPD measurements using a set of independent Polanyi-Wigner equations. Results: The maximum of the desorption of formamide from both graphite and ASW ice surfaces occurs at 176 K after the desorption of H2O molecules, whereas the desorption profile of methylamine depends strongly on the substrate. Solid methylamine starts to desorb below 100 K from the graphite surface. Its desorption from the water ice surface occurs after 120 K and stops during the water ice sublimation around 150 K. It continues to desorb from the graphite surface at temperatures higher than160 K. Conclusions: More than 95% of solid NH2CHO diffuses through the np-ASW ice surface towards the graphitic substrate and is released into the gas phase with a desorption energy distribution Edes = 7460-9380 K, which is measured with the best-fit pre-exponential factor A = 1018 s-1. However, the desorption energy distribution of methylamine from the np-ASW ice surface (Edes = 3850-8420 K) is measured with the best-fit pre-exponential factor A = 1012 s-1. A fraction of solid methylamine monolayer of roughly 0.15 diffuses through the water ice surface towards the HOPG substrate. This small amount of methylamine

  2. Irradiated graphite studies prior to decommissioning of G1, G2 and G3 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonal, J.P.; Vistoli, J.Ph.; Combes, C.

    2005-01-01

    G1 (46 MW th ), G2 (250 MW th ) and G3 (250 MW th ) are the first French plutonium production reactors owned by CEA (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique). They started to be operated in 1956 (G1), 1959 (G2) and 1960 (G3); their final shutdown occurred in 1968, 1980 and 1984 respectively. Each reactor used about 1200 tons of graphite as moderator, moreover in G2 and G3, a 95 tons graphite wall is used to shield the rear side concrete from neutron irradiation. G1 is an air cooled reactor operated at a graphite temperature ranging from 30 C to 230 C; G2 and G3 are CO 2 cooled reactors and during operation the graphite temperature is higher (140 C to 400 C). These reactors are now partly decommissioned, but the graphite stacks are still inside the reactors. The graphite core radioactivity has decreased enough so that a full decommissioning stage may be considered. Conceming this decommissioning, the studies reported here are: (i) stored energy in graphite, (ii) graphite radioactivity measurements, (iii) leaching of radionuclide ( 14 C, 36 Cl, 63 Ni, 60 Co, 3 H) from graphite, (iv) chlorine diffusion through graphite. (authors)

  3. Graphene-graphite oxide field-effect transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standley, Brian; Mendez, Anthony; Schmidgall, Emma; Bockrath, Marc

    2012-03-14

    Graphene's high mobility and two-dimensional nature make it an attractive material for field-effect transistors. Previous efforts in this area have used bulk gate dielectric materials such as SiO(2) or HfO(2). In contrast, we have studied the use of an ultrathin layered material, graphene's insulating analogue, graphite oxide. We have fabricated transistors comprising single or bilayer graphene channels, graphite oxide gate insulators, and metal top-gates. The graphite oxide layers show relatively minimal leakage at room temperature. The breakdown electric field of graphite oxide was found to be comparable to SiO(2), typically ~1-3 × 10(8) V/m, while its dielectric constant is slightly higher, κ ≈ 4.3. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  4. Direct brazing of ceramics, graphite, and refractory metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canonico, D.A.; Cole, N.C.; Slaughter, G.M.

    1976-03-01

    ORNL has been instrumental in the development of brazing filler metals for joining ceramics, graphite, and refractory metals for application at temperatures above 1000 0 C. The philosophy and techniques employed in the development of these alloys are presented. A number of compositions are discussed that have been satisfactorily used to braze ceramics, graphite, and refractory metals without a prior surface treatment. One alloy, Ti--25 percent Cr--21 percent V, has wet and flowed on aluminum oxide and graphite. Further, it has been utilized in making brazes between different combinations of the three subject materials. The excellent flowability of this alloy and alloys from the Ti--Zr--Ge system is evidenced by the presence of filler metal in the minute pores of the graphite and ceramics

  5. Impact-Contact Analysis of Prismatic Graphite Blocks Using Abaqus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Ji Ho; Kim, Gyeong Ho; Choi, Woo Seok

    2010-12-01

    Graphite blocks are the important core components of the high temperature gas-cooled reactor. As these blocks are simply stacked in array, collisions among neighboring components may occur during earthquakes or accidents. The final objective of the research project is to develop a reliable seismic model of the stacked graphite blocks from which their behavior can be predicted and, thus, they are designed to have sufficient strength to maintain their structural integrity during the anticipated occurrences. The work summarized in this report is a first step toward the big picture and is dedicated to build a realistic impact-contact dynamics model of the graphite block using a commercial FEM package, Abaqus. The developed model will be further used to assist building a reliable lumped dynamics model of these stacked graphite components

  6. Structural performance of a graphite blanket in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfer, W.G.; Watson, R.D.

    1978-01-01

    Irradiation of graphite in a fusion reactor causes dimensional changes, enhanced creep, and changes in elastic properties and fracture strength. Temperature and flux gradients through the graphite blanket structure produce differential distortions and stress gradients. An inelastic stress analysis procedure is described which treats these variations of the graphite properties in a consistent manner as dictated by physical models for the radiation effects. Furthermore, the procedure follows the evolution of the stress and fracture strength distributions during the reactor operation as well as for possible shutdowns at any time. The lifetime of the graphite structure can be determined based on the failure criterion that the stress at any location exceeds one-half of the fracture strength. This procedure is applied to the most critical component of the blanket module in the SOLASE design

  7. Spin-density wave state in simple hexagonal graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosoyan, K. S.; Rozhkov, A. V.; Sboychakov, A. O.; Rakhmanov, A. L.

    2018-02-01

    Simple hexagonal graphite, also known as AA graphite, is a metastable configuration of graphite. Using tight-binding approximation, it is easy to show that AA graphite is a metal with well-defined Fermi surface. The Fermi surface consists of two sheets, each shaped like a rugby ball. One sheet corresponds to electron states, another corresponds to hole states. The Fermi surface demonstrates good nesting: a suitable translation in the reciprocal space superposes one sheet onto another. In the presence of the electron-electron repulsion, a nested Fermi surface is unstable with respect to spin-density-wave ordering. This instability is studied using the mean-field theory at zero temperature, and the spin-density-wave order parameter is evaluated.

  8. Dry Sliding Wear Behavior of Spark Plasma Sintered Fe-Based Bulk Metallic Glass/Graphite Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiulin Ji

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Bulk metallic glass (BMG and BMG-graphite composites were fabricated using spark plasma sintering at the sintering temperature of 575 °C and holding time of 15 min. The sintered composites exhibited partial crystallization and the presence of distributed porosity and graphite particles. The effect of graphite reinforcement on the tribological properties of the BMG/graphite composites was investigated using dry ball-on-disc sliding wear tests. The reinforcement of graphite resulted in a reduction in both the wear rate and the coefficient of friction as compared to monolithic BMG samples. The wear surfaces of BMG/graphite composites showed regions of localized wear loss due to microcracking and fracture, as was also the case with the regions covered with graphite-rich protective film due to smearing of pulled off graphite particles.

  9. 3-D Analysis of Graphite Nodules in Ductile Cast Iron Using FIB-SEM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Angelo, Luca; Jespersen, Freja N.; MacDonald, A. Nicole

    Ductile cast iron samples were analysed in a Focused Ion Beam Scanning Electron Microscope, FIB-SEM. The focussed ion beam was used to carefully remove layers of the graphite nodules to reveal internal structures in the nodules. The sample preparation and milling procedure for sectioning graphite...... inside the nodules, their orientation in relation to the graphite and the chemistry of the inclusions is analysed and described. Formation of the structures during solidification and subsequent cooling to room temperature is discussed....

  10. Maximum power point tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enslin, J.H.R.

    1990-01-01

    A well engineered renewable remote energy system, utilizing the principal of Maximum Power Point Tracking can be m ore cost effective, has a higher reliability and can improve the quality of life in remote areas. This paper reports that a high-efficient power electronic converter, for converting the output voltage of a solar panel, or wind generator, to the required DC battery bus voltage has been realized. The converter is controlled to track the maximum power point of the input source under varying input and output parameters. Maximum power point tracking for relative small systems is achieved by maximization of the output current in a battery charging regulator, using an optimized hill-climbing, inexpensive microprocessor based algorithm. Through practical field measurements it is shown that a minimum input source saving of 15% on 3-5 kWh/day systems can easily be achieved. A total cost saving of at least 10-15% on the capital cost of these systems are achievable for relative small rating Remote Area Power Supply systems. The advantages at larger temperature variations and larger power rated systems are much higher. Other advantages include optimal sizing and system monitor and control

  11. Graphite in Science and Nuclear Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Zhmurikov, E. I.; Bubnenkov, I. A.; Dremov, V. V.; Samarin, S. I.; Pokrovsky, A. S.; Harkov, D. V.

    2013-01-01

    The monograph is devoted to the application of graphite and graphite composites in science and technology. The structure and electrical properties, the technological aspects of production of high-strength synthetic graphites, the dynamics of the graphite destruction, traditionally used in the nuclear industry are discussed. It is focuses on the characteristics of graphitization and properties of graphite composites based on carbon isotope 13C. The book is based, generally, on the original res...

  12. Little Cross-Feeding of the Mycorrhizal Networks Shared Between C3-Panicum bisulcatum and C4-Panicum maximum Under Different Temperature Regimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Řezáčová

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Common mycorrhizal networks (CMNs formed by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF interconnect plants of the same and/or different species, redistributing nutrients and draining carbon (C from the different plant partners at different rates. Here, we conducted a plant co-existence (intercropping experiment testing the role of AMF in resource sharing and exploitation by simplified plant communities composed of two congeneric grass species (Panicum spp. with different photosynthetic metabolism types (C3 or C4. The grasses had spatially separated rooting zones, conjoined through a root-free (but AMF-accessible zone added with 15N-labeled plant (clover residues. The plants were grown under two different temperature regimes: high temperature (36/32°C day/night or ambient temperature (25/21°C day/night applied over 49 days after an initial period of 26 days at ambient temperature. We made use of the distinct C-isotopic composition of the two plant species sharing the same CMN (composed of a synthetic AMF community of five fungal genera to estimate if the CMN was or was not fed preferentially under the specific environmental conditions by one or the other plant species. Using the C-isotopic composition of AMF-specific fatty acid (C16:1ω5 in roots and in the potting substrate harboring the extraradical AMF hyphae, we found that the C3-Panicum continued feeding the CMN at both temperatures with a significant and invariable share of C resources. This was surprising because the growth of the C3 plants was more susceptible to high temperature than that of the C4 plants and the C3-Panicum alone suppressed abundance of the AMF (particularly Funneliformis sp. in its roots due to the elevated temperature. Moreover, elevated temperature induced a shift in competition for nitrogen between the two plant species in favor of the C4-Panicum, as demonstrated by significantly lower 15N yields of the C3-Panicum but higher 15N yields of the C4-Panicum at elevated as

  13. Magnetic response of certain curved graphitic geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L.; Davids, P.S.; Saxena, A.; Bishop, A.R.

    1992-01-01

    The quasi-particle energy spectra associated with some members of buckyfamily (curved graphitic geometries), in particular C 50 , C 60 , C 70 and related fullerenes as well as coaxial helical microtubules of graphite, are obtained analytically within the mean-field approximation. These energy spectra are then used to calculate various response functions. Specifically, we calculate the specific heat, magnetization and magnetic susceptibility in the presence of an external magnetic field at low temperatures. For a single microtubule an extra peak superimposed on the first de Haas van Alphen (dHvA) oscillation in magnetic susceptibility is found in the 50--170 Tesla range depending on the radius which is possibly accessible in special (explosive flux compression) experiments. Finally, we point to important potential applications of these novel mesoscopic structures in nanotechnology

  14. Preparation of nanoporous carbons from graphite nanofibres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Byung-Joo [Department of Green Chemistry and Environmental Biotechnology, University of Science and Technology, PO Box 107, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Soo-Jin [Department of Chemistry, Inha University, 253, Nam-gu, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-09-14

    In this study we manufactured highly porous graphite nanofibres (GNFs) by physical activation in order to develop promising energy storage materials. The activation was performed at activation temperatures in the range of 800-1050 deg. C. The pore structures of the porous GNFs were analysed using N{sub 2}/77 K adsorption isotherms. After the activation, the porous GNFs showed a decrease in diameter and scratches on their surfaces, resulting from surface oxidation and the opening of the graphitic layers, respectively. It was found that the specific surface area of the porous GNFs prepared at 1050 deg. C was more than 2000 m{sup 2} g{sup -1} without loss of their fibre shape or serious increase in electrical resistivity. This result indicates that porous GNFs prepared under optimal conditions can have a much higher specific surface area and are promising materials for energy storage technologies.

  15. Low-energy electron observation of graphite and molybdenite crystals. Application to the study of graphite oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, G.

    1969-01-01

    The LEED study of cleaved (0001) faces of crystals having a layered structure allowed to investigate flakes free of steps on graphite and molybdenite, to show twinning on natural graphite. By intensity measurements and computation in the case of a kinematical approximation it has been possible to determine an inner potential of 19 eV for graphite and to identify the direction of the Mo-S bond of the surface layer of molybdenite. The oxidation of graphite has been studied by observing changes, in symmetry of the diffraction patterns and by mass spectrometry of the gases evolved during the oxidation. No surface compounds have been detected and the carbon layers appeared to be peeled off one after the other. The oxidation took place at temperatures higher than 520 C under an oxygen pressure of 10 -5 torr. (author) [fr

  16. Modification of structural graphite machining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavrenev, M.M.

    1979-01-01

    Studied are machining procedures for structural graphites (GMZ, MG, MG-1, PPG) most widely used in industry, of the article mass being about 50 kg. Presented are dependences necessary for the calculation of cross sections of chip suction tappers and duster pipelines in machine shops for structural graphite machining

  17. Glass-Graphite Composite Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayzan, M.Z.H.; Lloyd, J.W.; Heath, P.G.; Stennett, M.C.; Hyatt, N.C.; Hand, R.J.

    2016-01-01

    A summary is presented of investigations into the potential of producing glass-composite materials for the immobilisation of graphite or other carbonaceous materials arising from nuclear power generation. The methods are primarily based on the production of base glasses which are subsequently sintered with powdered graphite or simulant TRISO particles. Consideration is also given to the direct preparation of glass-graphite composite materials using microwave technology. Production of dense composite wasteforms with TRISO particles was more successful than with powdered graphite, as wasteforms containing larger amounts of graphite were resistant to densification and the glasses tried did not penetrate the pores under the pressureless conditions used. Based on the results obtained it is concluded that the production of dense glassgraphite composite wasteforms will require the application of pressure. (author)

  18. Effect of reacting surface density on the overall graphite oxidation rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Chang; Kim, Eung; Lim, Jong; Schultz, Richard; Petti, David

    2009-01-01

    Graphite oxidation in an air-ingress accident is presently a very important issue for the reactor safety of the very high temperature gas cooled-reactor (VHTR), the concept of the next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) because of its potential problems such as mechanical degradation of the supporting graphite in the lower plenum of the VHTR might lead to core collapse if the countermeasure is taken carefully. The oxidation process of graphite has known to be affected by various factors, including temperature, pressure, oxygen concentration, types of graphite, graphite shape and size, flow distribution, etc. However, our recent study reveals that the internal pore characteristics play very important roles in the overall graphite oxidation rate. One of the main issues regarding graphite oxidation is the potential core collapse problem that may occur following the degradation of graphite mechanical strength. In analyzing this phenomenon, it is very important to understand the relationship between the degree of oxidization and strength degradation. In addition, the change of oxidation rate by graphite oxidation degree characterization by burn-off (ratio of the oxidized graphite density to the original density) should be quantified because graphite strength degradation is followed by graphite density decrease, which highly affects oxidation rates and patterns. Because the density change is proportional to the internal pore surface area, they should be quantified in advance. In order to understand the above issues, the following experiments were performed: (1) Experiment on the fracture of the oxidized graphite and validation of the previous correlations, (2) Experiment on the change of oxidation rate using graphite density and data collection, (3) Measure the BET surface area of the graphite. The experiments were performed using H451 (Great Lakes Carbon Corporation) and IG-110 (Toyo Tanso Co., Ltd) graphite. The reason for the use of those graphite materials is because

  19. Synthesis of Carbon Dots with Multiple Color Emission by Controlled Graphitization and Surface Functionalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Xiang; Qu, Dan; Yang, Dongxue; Nie, Bing; Zhao, Yikang; Fan, Hongyou; Sun, Zaicheng

    2018-01-01

    Multiple-color-emissive carbon dots (CDots) have potential applications in various fields such as bioimaging, light-emitting devices, and photocatalysis. The majority of the current CDots to date exhibit excitation-wavelength-dependent emissions with their maximum emission limited at the blue-light region. Here, a synthesis of multiple-color-emission CDots by controlled graphitization and surface function is reported. The CDots are synthesized through controlled thermal pyrolysis of citric acid and urea. By regulating the thermal-pyrolysis temperature and ratio of reactants, the maximum emission of the resulting CDots gradually shifts from blue to red light, covering the entire light spectrum. Specifically, the emission position of the CDots can be tuned from 430 to 630 nm through controlling the extent of graphitization and the amount of surface functional groups, COOH. The relative photoluminescence quantum yields of the CDots with blue, green, and red emission reach up to 52.6%, 35.1%, and 12.9%, respectively. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the CDots can be uniformly dispersed into epoxy resins and be fabricated as transparent CDots/epoxy composites for multiple-color- and white-light-emitting devices. This research opens a door for developing low-cost CDots as alternative phosphors for light-emitting devices. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Thermal dimensioning of the deep repository. Influence of canister spacing, canister power, rock thermal properties and nearfield design on the maximum canister surface temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoekmark, Harald; Faelth, Billy

    2003-12-01

    The report addresses the problem of the minimum spacing required between neighbouring canisters in the deep repository. That spacing is calculated for a number of assumptions regarding the conditions that govern the temperature in the nearfield and at the surfaces of the canisters. The spacing criterion is that the temperature at the canister surfaces must not exceed 100 deg C .The results are given in the form of nomographic charts, such that it is in principle possible to determine the spacing as soon as site data, i.e. the initial undisturbed rock temperature and the host rock heat transport properties, are available. Results of canister spacing calculations are given for the KBS-3V concept as well as for the KBS-3H concept. A combination of numerical and analytical methods is used for the KBS-3H calculations, while the KBS-3V calculations are purely analytical. Both methods are described in detail. Open gaps are assigned equivalent heat conductivities, calculated such that the conduction across the gaps will include also the heat transferred by radiation. The equivalent heat conductivities are based on the emissivities of the different gap surfaces. For the canister copper surface, the emissivity is determined by back-calculation of temperatures measured in the Prototype experiment at Aespoe HRL. The size of the different gaps and the emissivity values are of great importance for the results and will be investigated further in the future

  1. Thermogravimetric and Differential Scanning Calorimetric Behavior of Ball-Milled Nuclear Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eung Seon; Kim, Min Hwan; Kim, Yong Wan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yi Hyun; Cho, Seung Yon [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    An examination was made to characterize the oxidation behavior of ball-milled nuclear graphite powder through a TG-DSC analysis. With the ball milling time, the BET surface area increased with the reduction of particle size, but decreased with the chemisorptions of O{sub 2} on the activated surface. The enhancement of the oxidation after the ball milling is attributed to both increases in the specific surface area and atomic scale defects in the graphite structure. In a high temperature gas-cooled reactor, nuclear graphite has been widely used as fuel elements, moderator or reflector blocks, and core support structures owing to its excellent moderating power, mechanical properties and machinability. For the same reason, it will be used in a helium cooled ceramic reflector test blanket module for the ITER. Each submodule has a seven-layer breeding zone, including three neutron multiplier layers packed with beryllium pebbles, three lithium ceramic pebbles packed tritium breeder layers, and a reflector layer packed with 1 mm diameter graphite pebbles to reduce the volume of beryllium. The abrasion of graphite structures owing to relative motion or thermal cycle during operation may produce graphite dust. It is expected that graphite dust will be more oxidative than bulk graphite, and thus the oxidation behavior of graphite dust must be examined to analyze the safety of the reactors during an air ingress accident. In this study, the thermal stability of ball-milled graphite powder was investigated using a simultaneous thermogravimeter-differential scanning calorimeter.

  2. Surface area-burnoff correlation for the steam--graphite reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stark, W.A. Jr.; Malinauskas, A.P.

    1977-01-01

    The oxidation of core graphite by steam of air represents a problem area of significant concern in safety analyses for the high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR). Core and core-support graphite integrity and strength deteriorate with oxidation of the graphite, and oxidation furthermore could affect the rate of fission product release under upset conditions. Consequently, modeling of core response during steam or air ingress conditions requires an expression for the rate of graphite interaction with those impurities. The steam--graphite reaction in particular is a complex interaction of mass transport within the graphite with chemi-sorption and reaction on accessible surfaces; experimental results from graphite to graphite are highly variable, and the description of the reaction is not yet completely consistent. A simple etch pit model relating surface area to burnoff has been proposed and shown to provide reasonable correlation with experimental data obtained from steam oxidation studies of nuclear grade H-327 graphite. Unaccounted differences between theory and experiment arise at burnoffs exceeding 3 to 5 percent. The model, while not complete nor comprehensive, is consistent with experimental observations of graphite oxidation by O 2 (air), CO 2 , or H 2 O, and could have some utility in safety analysis

  3. Redistribution and Effect of Various Elements on the Morphology of Primary Graphite in Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lacaze

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown repeatedly that many elements present as traces or at low level can affect graphite shape in cast irons. As part of a long term project aimed at clarifying the growth and the alteration of spheroidal graphite, a study on the effect of a few elements (Cu, Sn, Sb, and Ti on primary graphite growth was undertaken and analysed with reference to an alloy without any such additions. This work was performed by remelting alloys in graphite crucibles thus saturating the melt in carbon and enabling primary graphite to grow by controlled cooling of the melt above the eutectic temperature. Primary graphite growth in the reference alloy was observed to be lamellar, while the added elements were found to affect bulk graphite and to modify its outer shape, with Sb leading eventually to rounded agglomerates together with wavy lamellae. Secondary ion mass spectrometry was used to analyze the distribution of elements, and no build-up of trace elements at the graphite surface could be observed. Instead, it is established that the perturbation of bulk graphite is associated with inhomogeneous distribution of metallic elements inside graphite precipitates.

  4. Graphite reactor physics; Physique des piles a graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacher, P; Cogne, F [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Noc, B [Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (France)

    1964-07-01

    The study of graphite-natural uranium power reactor physics, undertaken ten years ago when the Marcoule piles were built, has continued to keep in step with the development of this type of pile. From 1960 onwards the critical facility Marius has been available for a systematic study of the properties of lattices as a function of their pitch, of fuel geometry and of the diameter of cooling channels. This study has covered a very wide field: lattice pitch varying from 19 to 38 cm. uranium rods and tubes of cross-sections from 6 to 35 cm{sup 2}, channels with diameters between 70 and 140 mm. The lattice calculation methods could thus be checked and where necessary adapted. The running of the Marcoule piles and the experiments carried out on them during the last few years have supplied valuable information on the overall evolution of the neutronic properties of the fuel as a function of irradiation. More detailed experiments have also been performed in Marius with plutonium-containing fuels (irradiated or synthetic fuels), and will be undertaken at the beginning of 1965 at high temperature in the critical facility Cesar, which is just being completed at Cadarache. Spent fuel analyses complement these results and help in their interpretation. The thermalization and spectra theories developed in France can thus be verified over the whole valid temperature range. The efficiency of control rods as a function of their dimensions, the materials of which they are made and the lattices surrounding them has been measured in Marius, and the results compared with calculation on the one hand and with the measurements carried out in EDF 1 on the other. Studies on the control proper of graphite piles were concerned essentially with the risks of spatial instability and the means of detecting and controlling them, and with flux distortions caused by the control rods. (authors) [French] Entreprise il y a dix ans a l'occasion de la construction des piles de Marcoule, l'etude de la

  5. Final report on graphite irradiation test OG-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, R.J.; Beavan, L.A.

    1977-01-01

    The results of dimensional, thermal expansivity, thermal conductivity, Young's modulus, and tensile strength measurements on graphite specimens irradiated in capsule OG-3 are presented. The graphite grades investigated included near-isotropic H-451 (three different preproduction lots), TS-1240, and SO818; needle coke H-327; and European coal tar pitch coke grades P 3 JHA 2 N, P 3 JHAN, and ASI2-500. Data were obtained in the temperature range 823 0 K to 1673 0 K. The peak fast neutron fluence in the experiment was 3 x 10 25 n/m 3 (E greater than 29 fJ)/sub HTGR/; the total accumulated fluence exceeded 9 x 10 25 n/m 2 on some H-451 specimens and 6 x 10 25 n/m 2 on some TS-1240 specimens. Irradiation-induced dimensional changes on H-451 graphite differed slightly from earlier predictions. For an irradiation temperature of about 1225 0 K, axial shrinkage rates at high fluences were somewhat higher than predicted, and the fluence at which radial expansion started (about 9 x 10 25 n/m 2 at 1275 0 K) was lower. TS-1240 graphite underwent smaller dimensional changes than H-451 graphite, while limited data on SO818 and ASI2-500 graphites showed similar behavior to H-451. P 3 JHAN and P 3 JHA 2 N graphites displayed anisotropic behavior with rapid axial shrinkage. Comparison of dimensional changes between specimens from three logs of H-451 and of TS-1240 graphites showed no significant log-to-log variations for H-451, and small but significant log-to-log variations for TS-1240. The thermal expansivity of the near-isotropic graphites irradiated at 865-1045 0 K first increased by 5 percent to 10 percent and then decreased. At higher irradiation temperatures the thermal expansivity decreased by up to 50 percent. Changes in thermal conductivity were consistent with previously established curves. Specimens which were successively irradiated at two different temperatures took on the saturation conductivity for the new temperature

  6. Strength degradation of oxidized graphite support column in VHTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Byung Ha; No, Hee Cheon

    2010-01-01

    Air-ingress events caused by large pipe breaks are important accidents considered in the design of Very High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (VHTRs). A main safety concern for this type of event is the possibility of core collapse following the failure of the graphite support column, which can be oxidized by ingressed air. In this study, the main target is to predict the strength of the oxidized graphite support column. Through compression tests for fresh and oxidized graphite columns, the compressive strength of IG-110 was obtained. The buckling strength of the IG-110 column is expressed using the following empirical straight-line formula: σ cr,buckling =91.34-1.01(L/r). Graphite oxidation in Zone 1 is volume reaction and that in Zone 3 is surface reaction. We notice that the ultimate strength of the graphite column oxidized in Zones 1 and 3 only depends on the slenderness ratio and bulk density. Its strength degradation oxidized in Zone 1 is expressed in the following nondimensional form: σ/σ 0 =exp(-kd), k=0.114. We found that the strength degradation of a graphite column, oxidized in Zone 3, follows the above buckling empirical formula as the slenderness of the column changes. (author)

  7. Statistical considerations of graphite strength for assessing design allowable stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, M.; Mogi, H.; Ioka, I.; Arai, T.; Oku, T.

    1987-01-01

    Several aspects of statistics need to be considered to determine design allowable stresses for graphite structures. These include: 1) Statistical variation of graphite material strength. 2) Uncertainty of calculated stress. 3) Reliability (survival probability) required from operational and safety performance of graphite structures. This paper deals with some statistical considerations of structural graphite for assessing design allowable stress. Firstly, probability distribution functions of tensile and compressive strengths are investigated on experimental Very High Temperature candidated graphites. Normal, logarithmic normal and Weibull distribution functions are compared in terms of coefficient of correlation to measured strength data. This leads to the adaptation of normal distribution function. Then, the relation between factor of safety and fracture probability is discussed on the following items: 1) As the graphite strength is more variable than metalic material's strength, the effect of strength variation to the fracture probability is evaluated. 2) Fracture probability depending on survival probability of 99 ∼ 99.9 (%) with confidence level of 90 ∼ 95 (%) is discussed. 3) As the material properties used in the design analysis are usually the mean values of their variation, the additional effect of these variations on the fracture probability is discussed. Finally, the way to assure the minimum ultimate strength with required survival probability with confidence level is discussed in view of statistical treatment of the strength data from varying sample numbers in a material acceptance test. (author)

  8. Porosity effects in the neutron total cross section of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santisteban, J. R; Dawidowski, J; Petriw, S. N

    2009-01-01

    Graphite has been used in nuclear reactors since the birth of the nuclear industry due to its good performance as a neutron moderator material. Graphite is still an option as moderator for generation IV reactors due to its good mechanical and thermal properties at high operation temperatures. So, there has been renewed interest in a revision of the computer libraries used to describe the neutron cross section of graphite. For sub-thermal neutron energies, polycrystalline graphite shows a larger total cross section (between 4 and 8 barns) than predicted by existing theoretical models (0.2 barns). In order to investigate the origin of this discrepancy we measured the total cross section of graphite samples of three different origins, in the energy range from 0.001 eV to 10 eV. Different experimental arrangements and sample treatments were explored, to identify the effect of various experimental parameters on the total cross section measurement. The experiments showed that the increase in total cross section is due to neutrons scattered around the forward direction. We associate these smal