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Sample records for maximum erucic acid

  1. Can we “cultivate” erucic acid in southern Europe?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Zanetti

    Full Text Available Over the last fifteen years, considerable progress has been made in the field of “green chemistry”, as regards both research aspects and market development. In particular, extraction of erucic acid (C22:1 from plants and its industrial applications have received increasing attention. At present, known species producing oils yielding large quantities of erucic acid belong, with few exceptions, to the Brassicaceae family. Among these, the two major sources of erucic acid in the world are HEAR (High Erucic Acid Rapeseed, Brassica napus var. oleifera and crambe (Crambe abyssinica, both mainly cultivated in the USA. Their cultivation has also recently been considered and extended to southern Europe, supported by specific research projects. The quantity of erucic acid in Brassicaceae oils ranges greatly, from 55% in Crambe abyssinica to nearly zero in some varieties of Brassica napus var. oleifera. Even more differentiated and peculiar to each species and variety is adaptability to specific climatic and soil conditions. In this regard, the major limitation to the cultivation of some interesting Brassicaceae species, crambe in particular, is their poor tolerance to cold. Among Brassicaceae producing erucic acid, the less frequently cultivated species, such as Brassica juncea and B. carinata, if grown in areas with relatively mild winters, may give yields of seed and oil similar to those of the most productive rapeseed genotypes. Within this framework, in order to achieve high production of erucic acid, it is essential to identify the most productive genotypes, among available species, for each environment. In this report, seed and oil productions of some important Brassicaceae species for extraction of erucic acid, derived from 15 years of field trials in northern Italy, are discussed in relation to the possibility of autumn or spring sowing.

  2. Comparative in vitro metabolism of 1-14C-oleic acid and 1-14C-erucic acid in liver, heart and skeletal muscles of rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatia, I.S.; Sharma, A.K.; Ahuja, S.P.

    1978-01-01

    In vitro oxidation of 14 C-oleic and 1- 14 C-erucic acid and their incorporation into lipids by liver, heart and skeletal muscles from female albino rats were studied. These tissues were obtained from rats maintained for 120 days on low fat diet or diets containing 15% mustard oil or 15% groundnut oil. In all these tissues from rats on different types of diets, the oxidation of 1- 14 C-erucic acid was lower than that 1- 14 C-oleic acid. There was little accumulation of lipids in heart after 120 days of feeding mustard oil. Oxidation of 1- 14 C-erucic acid was enhanced in liver, heart and skeletal muscles of rats conditioned to the mustard oil diet supplying erucic acid. Oxidation of erucic acid was maximum in liver and least in heart, whereas there were no differences in the oxidation of 1- 14 C-oleic acid in these tissues. Incorporation of 1- 14 C-oleic acid into triglycerides and phospholipids was not affected by the type of diet or tissues Incorporation of 1- 14 C-erucic acid was mainly into triglycerides of heart and skeletal muscles of rats not accustomed to mustard oil diet whereas these tissues from rats accustomed to mustard oil diets incorporated 1- 14 C-erucic acid both into the triglycerides and phospholipids. (author)

  3. Biosynthesis of 14C-labelled erucic acid by means of rape plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meisgeier, G.; Eckert, H.; Mueller, H.

    1991-01-01

    For the biosynthetic preparation of 14 C-erucic adid (C 21 H 41 COOH) by means of rape plants cv. sollux the plants were supplied with 14 CO 2 and additionally fed with 14 C-Sodium acetate after anthesis. After saponification of the extracted lipids the erucic acid was isolated and purified. The substance was identified by gas chromatography. The incorporation of the applied radioactive (34 MBq 14 CO 2 ; 37 MBq 14 C-natrium acetate) into the fatty acids amounted to 1,2 per cent. The erucic acid could be isolated from the fatty acids mixture with a specific radioactivity of 1,001 MBq/mmol and a purity of 97,2 per cent. (orig.) [de

  4. Oxidative cleavage of erucic acid for the synthesis of brassylic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammed J. Nasrullah; Pooja Thapliyal; Erica N. Pfarr; Nicholas S. Dusek; Kristofer L. Schiele; James A. Bahr

    2010-10-29

    The main focus of this work is to synthesize Brassylic Acid (BA) using oxidative cleavage of Erucic Acid (EA). Crambe (Crambe abyssinica) is an industrial oilseed grown in North Dakota. Crambe has potential as an industrial fatty acid feedstock as a source of Erucic acid (EA). It has approximately 50-60 % of EA, a C{sub 22} monounsaturated fatty acid. Oxidative cleavage of unsaturated fatty acids derived from oilseeds produces long chain (9, 11, and 13 carbon atoms) dibasic and monobasic acids. These acids are known commercial feedstocks for the preparation of nylons, polyesters, waxes, surfactants, and perfumes. Other sources of EA are Rapeseed seed oil which 50-60 % of EA. Rapeseed is grown outside USA. The oxidative cleavage of EA was done using a high throughput parallel pressure reactor system. Kinetics of the reaction shows that BA yields reach a saturation at 12 hours. H{sub 2}WO{sub 4} was found to be the best catalyst for the oxidative cleavage of EA. High yields of BA were obtained at 80 C with bubbling of O{sub 2} or 10 bar of O{sub 2} for 12 hours.

  5. Scientific Opinion on erucic acid in feed and food

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Annette

    Erucic acid is the trivial name of the fatty acid cis-13-docosenoic acid and occurs at high concentrations mainly in the seeds of species of the Brassicaceae (e.g. rape seed or mustard seed). The European Commission requested EFSA to deliver a scientific opinion on the risks for animal and human...

  6. Scientific opinion: Erucic acid in feed and food

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogenboom, L.A.P.

    2016-01-01

    Erucic acid is the trivial name of the fatty acid cis-13-docosenoic acid and occurs at high concentrations mainly in the seeds of species of the Brassicaceae (e.g. rape seed or mustard seed). The European Commission requested EFSA to deliver a scientific opinion on the risks for animal and human

  7. QTL for phytosterol and sinapate ester content in Brassica napus L. collocate with the two erucic acid genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amar, Samija; Ecke, Wolfgang; Becker, Heiko C.

    2008-01-01

    Improving oil and protein quality for food and feed purposes is an important goal in rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) breeding programs. Rapeseed contains phytosterols, used to enrich food products, and sinapate esters, which are limiting the utilization of rapeseed proteins in the feed industry. Increasing the phytosterol content of oil and lowering sinapate ester content of meal could increase the value of the oilseed rape crop. The objective of the present study was to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) for phytosterol and sinapate ester content in a winter rapeseed population of 148 doubled haploid lines, previously found to have a large variation for these two traits. This population also segregated for the two erucic acid genes. A close negative correlation was found between erucic acid and phytosterol content (Spearman’s rank correlation, rs = −0.80**). For total phytosterol content, three QTL were detected, explaining 60% of the genetic variance. The two QTL with the strongest additive effects were mapped on linkage groups N8 and N13 within the confidence intervals of the two erucic acid genes. For sinapate ester content four QTL were detected, explaining 53% of the genetic variance. Again, a close negative correlation was found between erucic acid and sinapate ester content (rs = −0.66**) and the QTL with the strongest additive effects mapped on linkage groups N8 and N13 within the confidence intervals of the two erucic acid genes. The results suggests, that there is a pleiotropic effect of the two erucic acid genes on phytosterol and sinapate ester content; the effect of the alleles for low erucic acid content is to increase phytosterol and sinapate ester content. Possible reasons for this are discussed based on known biosynthetic pathways. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00122-008-0734-2) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:18335203

  8. Decreasing erucic acid level by RNAi-mediated silencing of fatty ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To develop low level of erucic acid in rapeseeds by intron-spliced hairpin RNA, an inverted repeat unit of a partial BnFAE1.1 gene interrupted by a spliceable intron ... In conclusion, the expression of endogenous BnFAE1.1 was efficiently silenced by the designed RNAi silencer, causing a significant down-regulation in the ...

  9. Changes in oil composition after chronic irradiation of winter and spring zero-erucic rape hybrids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabry, A.; Cerny, J.

    1980-01-01

    Hybrid plants of the F1 generation of erucic-free spring Canadian rape and some winter rape cultivars containing erucic acid were irradiated in a gamma field with doses ranging between 5973 and 329 R during vegetation. Chronic irradiation increased significantly the frequency of zero- or low-erucic genotypes in the segregating F2 generation. Chronic irradiation disturbed the correlations between the contents of the studied fatty acids in the hybrid F1, F2 and F3 progenies. Lines of zero- and low-erucic winter rapes with a reduced content of linolenic acid and increased content of linoleic acid were obtained by selection. (author)

  10. Effects of chronic ethanol intake on metabolic conversions of 14C erucic acid by the livers of rat fed with rapeseed or ground nut oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecerf, J.; Bezard, J.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of addition of ethanol to diets containing rapeseed or ground nut oil on the metabolic conversion of 14 14 C erudic and 9-10 3 H oleic acid were studied in the rat liver. Whatever the diet more 14 C than 3 H radioactivity was recovered in liver lipids 2 and 19 hours after injection of labelled fatty acids. Ethanol has little effect on this incorporation. Only small amounts of 3 H oleic acid were converted. In all cases, the metabolic conversion of erucic acid was identical: the main part of 14 C was not recovered as erucic acid but was present in other mono unsaturated fatty acids n-9:oleic acid (18:1), which was the most labelled acid, 16:1, 20:1 and nervonic acid (24:1). The amount of erucic acid converted to shorter chain fatty acids was unchanged by addition of ethanol but the alcohol increased the proportion of 14 C radioactivity recovered as nervonic acid. This latter effect was opposite to the effect of rapeseed oil diet, which consisted in a decrease in the conversion of erucic to nervonic acid. A high amount of 14 C radioactivity was recovered in the F.F.A. fraction of the liver as an unknown compound (13 and 80% of 14 C radioacitivty respectively after 2 and 19h). Its identification is presently under investigation [fr

  11. Influence of dietary fat on metabolism of (14-14C)erucic acid in the perfused rat liver. Distribution of metabolites in lipid classes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmer, G.; Ronneberg, R.

    1986-01-01

    Two groups of rats were fed diets containing 20% by weight of either partially hydrogenated marine oil supplemented with sunflower seed oil (PHMO) or palm oil (PO) for 8 wk. Using a liver perfusion system, the effect of dietary long chain monoenoic fatty acids on the uptake and metabolism of [14- 14 C]erucic acid was studied. The perfusion times were 15 and 60 min, respectively. The two groups showed equal ability for erucic acid uptake in the liver but differed in the channeling of the fatty acids into various metabolic pathways. A higher metabolic turnover of 22:1 in the PHMO livers relative to the PO livers was demonstrated by an increased recovery of total [ 14 C]labeling in the triglyceride (TG) and phospholipid (PL) fractions, already evident after 15 min of perfusion. The chain-shortening capacity was highest in the PHMO group, reflected by a higher [ 14 C]18:1 incorporation in both TG and PL, and increasing from 15 to 60 min of perfusion. The amount of [ 14 C]18:1 found in PL and TG after 60 min of perfusion of livers from rats fed PO corresponded to that shown for the PHMO group after 15 min. The PL demonstrated a discrimination against 22:1 compared to TG, and, when available, 18:1 was highly preferred for PL-synthesis. The total fatty acid distribution in the TG, as determined by gas liquid chromatography (GLC), reflected the composition of the dietary fats. In the total liver PL, 22:1 and 20:1 were present in negligible amounts, although the PHMO diet contained 12-13% of both 22:1 and 20:1. In the free fatty acid fraction (FFA), the major part of the radioactivity (approximately 80%) was [14- 14 C]erucic acid, and only small amounts of [ 14 C]18:1 (less than 2%) were present, even after 60 min of perfusion. The shortened-chain 18:1 was readily removed from the FFA pool and preferentially used for lipid esterification

  12. The utilization of the acyl-CoA and the involvement PDAT and DGAT in the biosynthesis of erucic acid-rich triacylglycerols in Crambe seed oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furmanek, Tomasz; Demski, Kamil; Banaś, Walentyna; Haslam, Richard; Napier, Jonathan; Stymne, Sten; Banaś, Antoni

    2014-04-01

    The triacylglycerol of Crambe abyssinica seeds consist of 95% very long chain (>18 carbon) fatty acids (86% erucic acid; 22:1∆13) in the sn-1 and sn-3 positions. This would suggest that C. abyssinica triacylglycerols are not formed by the action of the phospholipid:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (PDAT), but are rather the results of acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) activity. However, measurements of PDAT and DGAT activities in microsomal membranes showed that C. abyssinica has significant PDAT activity, corresponding to about 10% of the DGAT activity during periods of rapid seed oil accumulation. The specific activity of DGAT for erucoyl-CoA had doubled at 19 days after flowering compared to earlier developmental stages, and was, at that stage, the preferred acyl donor, whereas the activities for 16:0-CoA and 18:1-CoA remained constant. This indicates that an expression of an isoform of DGAT with high specificity for erucoyl-CoA is induced at the onset of rapid erucic acid and oil accumulation in the C. abyssinica seeds. Analysis of the composition of the acyl-CoA pool during different stages of seed development showed that the percentage of erucoyl groups in acyl-CoA was much higher than in complex lipids at all stages of seed development except in the desiccation phase. These results are in accordance with published results showing that the rate limiting step in erucic acid accumulation in C. abyssinica oil is the utilization of erucoyl-CoA by the acyltransferases in the glycerol-3-phosphate pathway.

  13. Lipase-catalyzed synthesis of fatty acid amide (erucamide) using fatty acid and urea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasthi, Neeraj Praphulla; Singh, R P

    2007-01-01

    Ammonolysis of fatty acids to the corresponding fatty acid amides is efficiently catalysed by Candida antartica lipase (Novozym 435). In the present paper lipase-catalysed synthesis of erucamide by ammonolysis of erucic acid and urea in organic solvent medium was studied and optimal conditions for fatty amides synthesis were established. In this process erucic acid gave 88.74 % pure erucamide after 48 hour and 250 rpm at 60 degrees C with 1:4 molar ratio of erucic acid and urea, the organic solvent media is 50 ml tert-butyl alcohol (2-methyl-2-propanol). This process for synthesis is economical as we used urea in place of ammonia or other amidation reactant at atmospheric pressure. The amount of catalyst used is 3 %.

  14. Kinetics study of heterogeneous reactions of ozone with erucic acid using an ATR-IR flow reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Chunbo; Hiltner, Joseph; Pham, Hai; Kelley, Judas; Mach, Mindy; Zhang, Yunhong; Liu, Yong

    2014-03-07

    The ozone initiated heterogeneous oxidation of erucic acid (EA) thin film was investigated using a flow system combined with attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR) over wide ranges of ozone concentrations (0.25-60 ppm), thin film thickness (0.1-1.0 μm), temperatures (263-298 K), and relative humidities (0-80% RH) for the first time. Pseudo-first-order rate constants, kapp, and overall reactive uptake coefficients, γ, were obtained through changes in the absorbance of C[double bond, length as m-dash]O stretching bands at 1695 cm(-1), which is assigned to the carbonyl group in carboxylic acid. Results showed that the reaction followed the Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism and kapp was largely dominated by surface reaction over bulk phase reaction. In addition, both the kapp and the γ values showed very strong temperature dependences (∼two orders of magnitude) over the temperature range; in contrast, they only slightly increased with increasing RH values from 0-80%. According to the kapp values as a function of temperature, the activation energy for the heterogeneous reaction was estimated to be 80.6 kJ mol(-1). Our results have suggested that heterogeneous reactions between ozone and unsaturated solid surfaces likely have a substantially greater temperature dependence than liquid ones. Moreover, the hygroscopic properties of EA thin films before and after exposure to ozone were also studied by measurement of water uptake. Based on the hygroscopicity data, the insignificant RH effect on reaction kinetics was probably due to the relatively weak water uptake by the unreacted and reacted EA thin films.

  15. Mechanism of long chain monoenoic fatty acids acting on the energy metabolism of heart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buddecke, E; Filipovic, I; Wortberg, B; Seher, A

    1975-01-01

    The oxidation of 1-/sup 14/C-erucic (Csub(22:1)) and 1-/sup 14/C-nervonic (Csub(24:1)) acid was studied compared to 1-/sup 14/C-palmitic and -oleic acid in isolated rat and pig heart mitochondria. After mitochondrial incubation with the albumin-bound fatty acids only small amounts of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ developed from the oxidation of the long chain monoenoic acids as compared to palmitic or oleic acid. The slow down of the oxidation rate was more pronounced in rat than in pig heart mitochondria. The oxidation of palmitic or oleic acid was not found to be inhibited by the C/sub 20/-C/sub 24/-monoeneic acids, whereas palmitic or oleic acid inhibited the oxidation of erucic acid competitively. From present findings an idea may be developed of the interference on fatty acid metabolism in heart muscle by erucic and other long chain monenoic acids.

  16. Combining Ability Analysis and Genetic-Effects Studies for Some Important Quality Characters in Brassica napus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aamar Shehzad

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Combining ability analysis has an important position in rapeseed breeding. To evaluate genetic and combining ability effects, three Brassica napus L. testers “Punjab Sarson, Legend and Durre-NIFA” and five lines “Duncled, K-258, ZN-R-1, ZN-R-8, ZN-M-6” were crossed using line × tester design in Randomized Complete Block Design (RCBD with three replications. Mean sum of squares of the analysis of variances (ANOVA for genotypes was highly significant for all of the traits. Most of the lines and testers exhibited significant results of mean sum of squares for combining ability. Line ‘Duncled’ was proved good general combiner for oil (8.8, protein (3.7, erucic acid (33.0, oleic acid (13.0 and glucosinolate (-19.3 over other lines and tester ‘Durree-NIFA’ for protein (6.6, erucic acid (-23.4, and linolenic acid (-5.3 over other testers. Significant specific combining ability effects were also observed. The best hybrid combinations were Legend × ZN-R-1 for oil (9.6, Punjab Sarson × Duncled for minimum erucic acid (-14.0 and linolenic acid contents (-6.0, and Legend × ZN-M-6 for maximum protein (8.2 and minimum glucosinolate contents (-11.1. The maximum oil contents were observed in ‘Legend × ZN-R-1’ (52.4%. The cross ‘Punjab Sarson × Duncled’ expressed maximum values of protein (26.5% and oleic acid (62.5% while minimum for erucic acid (2.3%, linolenic acid (5.4% and glucosinolate contents (19.3µmol/g. This research discloses the significance of non-additive genetic effects for most of the studied traits except oil contents. These studies will also help to improve nutritional values of rapeseed crop by selecting noble crosses.

  17. Molecular cloning and characterization of a KCS gene from Cardamine graeca and its heterologous expression in Brassica oilseeds to engineer high nervonic acid oils for potential medical and industrial use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, David C; Francis, Tammy; Guo, Yiming; Brost, Jennifer M; Katavic, Vesna; Mietkiewska, Elzbieta; Michael Giblin, E; Lozinsky, Sharla; Hoffman, Travis

    2009-12-01

    Nervonic acid 24:1 Delta15 (cis-tetracos-15-enoic acid) is a very long-chain monounsaturated fatty acid and exists in nature as an elongation product of oleic acid. There is an increasing interest in production of high nervonic acid oils for pharmaceutical, nutraceutical and industrial applications. Using a polymerase chain reaction approach, we have isolated a gene from Cardamine graeca L., which encodes a 3-ketoacyl-CoA synthase (KCS), the first component of the elongation complex involved in synthesis of nervonic acid. Expression of the Cardamine KCS in yeast resulted in biosynthesis of nervonic acid, which is not normally present in yeast cells. We transformed Arabidopsis and Brassica carinata with the Cardamine KCS under the control of the seed-specific promoter, napin. The T(3) generations of transgenic Arabidopsis and B. carinata plants expressing the Cardamine KCS showed that seed-specific expression resulted in relatively large comparative increases in nervonic acid proportions in Arabidopsis seed oil, and 15-fold increase in nervonic acid proportions in B. carinata seed oil. The highest nervonic acid level in transgenic B. carinata lines reached 44%, with only 6% of residual erucic acid. In contrast, similar transgenic expression of the Cardamine KCS in high erucic B. napus resulted in 30% nervonic acid but with 20% residual erucic acid. Experiments using the Lunaria KCS gene gave results similar to the latter. In both cases, the erucic acid content is too high for human or animal consumption. Thus, the Cardamine KCS: B. carinata high nervonic/highly reduced erucic transgenic seed oils will be the most suitable for testing in pharmaceutical/nutraceutical applications to improve human and animal health.

  18. Computational estimation of soybean oil adulteration in Nepalese mustard seed oil based on fatty acid composition

    OpenAIRE

    Shrestha, Kshitij; De Meulenaer, Bruno

    2011-01-01

    The experiment was carried out for the computational estimation of soybean oil adulteration in the mustard seed oil using chemometric technique based on fatty acid composition. Principal component analysis and K-mean clustering of fatty acid composition data showed 4 major mustard/rapeseed clusters, two of high erucic and two of low erucic mustard type. Soybean and other possible adulterants made a distinct cluster from them. The methodology for estimation of soybean oil adulteration was deve...

  19. Evaluation of canola seeds of different cultivars with special emphasis on the quantification of erucic acid and glucosinolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anwar, Farooq

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This study reports the characterization of the seeds and seed oils of five locally grown canola cultivars: Zafar-2002, Bulbul (Frontier, Dunkeld, Oscar and Con-11. The oil contents from canola seeds ranged from 34.3 to 39.3%. The levels of protein, fiber, ash and moisture were found to be 22.1-41.0, 12.0-14.0, 3.0-3.5 and 4.0-7.5%, respectively. The glucosinolate (GSL contents in the canola seeds examined ranged from 49.7 to 78.1 mmol g-1. The extracted canola seed oils revealed an iodine value of 118.2-124.6 g of I/100g of oil; refractive index (40 °C, 1.460-1.464; density (24 °C, 0.914-0.919 mg m-1; saponification value, 187-195; unsaponifiable matter, 0.51-1.10%; acidity (% as oleic acid, 0.40-1.40, and color (1-in. cell, 1.35-1.73 R + 21.0-38.0 Y. Peroxide value (meq/ kg of oil and specific extinctions at 232 and 270 nm were determined to be 2.00-7.08, 2.17-3.16 and 0.44-0.91, respectively. The seed oils of the five canola cultivars mainly consisted of oleic (C18:1, linoleic (C18:2 and linolenic (C18:3 acids at levels of 49.16-62.14, 14.61, 23.45 and 6.97-9.10%, respectively. The concentrations of palmitic (C16:0, stearic (C18:0, erucic (C22:1 and gadoleic (C20:1 acids ranged from 3.47 to 6.00, 1.51 to 2.10, traces to 13.03 and 1.30 to 10.63%, respectively. A small amount of arachidic acid (20:0 with a contribution below 1% was also detected. The contents of tocopherols (α, γ, and δ in the canola oils accounted for 77.1-270.3, 191-500, 3.5-15.6 mg kg-1, respectively.The presence of rather high levels of erucic acid and GSL in the present analysis of canola emphasized the need to further reduce the contents of these two antinutritional constituents in the investigated cultivars.Este estudio describe de la caracterización de semillas y de sus aceites de cinco cultivos locales de canola: Zafar2002, Bulbul (Frontier, Dunkeld, Oscar y Con 11. El contenido de aceite de las semillas de canola varió entre un 34.3 y un 39.3%. Los niveles

  20. A jojoba beta-Ketoacyl-CoA synthase cDNA complements the canola fatty acid elongation mutation in transgenic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassner, M W; Lardizabal, K; Metz, J G

    1996-02-01

    beta-Ketoacyl-coenzyme A (CoA) synthase (KCS) catalyzes the condensation of malonyl-CoA with long-chain acyl-CoA. This reaction is the initial step of the microsomal fatty acyl-CoA elongation pathway responsible for formation of very long chain fatty acids (VLCFAs, or fatty acids with chain lengths > 18 carbons). Manipulation of this pathway is significant for agriculture, because it is the basis of conversion of high erucic acid rapeseed into canola. High erucic acid rapeseed oil, used as an industrial feedstock, is rich in VLCFAs, whereas the edible oil extracted from canola is essentially devoid of VLCFAs. Here, we report the cloning of a cDNA from developing jojoba embryos involved in microsomal fatty acid elongation. The jojoba cDNA is homologous to the recently cloned Arabidopsis FATTY ACID ELONGATION1 (FAE1) gene that has been suggested to encode KCS. We characterize the jojoba enzyme and present biochemical data indicating that the jojoba cDNA does indeed encode KCS. Transformation of low erucic acid rapeseed with the jojoba cDNA restored KCS activity to developing embryos and altered the transgenic seed oil composition to contain high levels of VLCFAs. The data reveal the key role KCS plays in determining the chain lengths of fatty acids found in seed oils.

  1. Effect of chronic radiation on rape genotype formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabry, A.; Hannich, K.; Cerny, J.; Vyvadilova, M.

    1975-01-01

    The F 1 generation of hybrid plants of the Canadian erucic acid-free rape cross-bred with some European winter rape varieties with a high content of erucic acid were chronically irradiated in a gamma-field with doses ranging from 5978 to 329 R er vegetation. In segregating F 2 generations, the irradiation significantly increased the proportion of winter genotypes; a matroclinous influence on the developmental characteristics of plants occurred in irradiated segregating F 2 hybrid populations. As against spring rape, winter rape varieties used as the maternal form during hybridization caused a statistically significant increase in the frequency of winter genotypes. The segregation of half-winter forms in irradiated segregating hybrid populations of the F 2 generation proved the incomplete dominance of the spring habit of oil rape. Chronic irradiation significantly increased erucic-free (0 - 10% of erucic acid) and low-erucic (10 - 20% of erucic acid) genotype frequencies in segregating F 2 generations. Chronic irradiation of the hybrid plants of erucic-free spring rapes and erucic winter rapes with doses ranging from 5978 to 329 R per vegetation, together with the temperature screening of winter forms and with the determination of the fatty acid content, may be considered as an effective method of creating non-erucic and low-erucic winter forms of oil rape. (author)

  2. Exploring genotypic variations for improved oil content and healthy fatty acids composition in rapeseed (Brassica napus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishaq, Muhammad; Razi, Raziuddin; Khan, Sabaz Ali

    2017-04-01

    Development of new genotypes having high oil content and desirable levels of fatty acid compositions is a major objective of rapeseed breeding programmes. In the current study combining ability was determined for oil, protein, glucosinolates and various fatty acids content using 8 × 8 full diallel in rapeseed (Brassica napus). Highly significant genotypic differences were observed for oil, protein, glucosinolates, oleic acid, linolenic acid and erucic acid content. Mean squares due to general combining ability (GCA), specific combining ability (SCA) and reciprocal combining ability (RCA) were highly significant (P ≤ 0.01) for biochemical traits. Parental line AUP-17 for high oil content and low glucosinolates, genotype AUP-2 for high protein and oleic acids, and AUP-18 for low lenolenic and erucic acid were best general combiners. Based on desirable SCA effects, F 1 hybrids AUP-17 × AUP-20; AUP-2 × AUP-8; AUP-7 × AUP-14; AUP-2 × AUP-9; AUP-7 × AUP-14 and AUP-2 × AUP-9 were found superior involving at least one best general combiner. F 1 hybrids AUP-17 × AUP-20 (for oil content); AUP-2 × AUP-8 (for protein content); AUP-7 × AUP-14 (for glucosinolates); AUP-2 × AUP-9 (for oleic acid); AUP-7 × AUP-14 (for linolenic acid) and AUP-2 × AUP-9 (for erucic acid) were found superior involving at least one best general combiner. As reciprocal crosses of AUP-14 with AUP-7 and AUP-8 were superior had low × low and low × high GCA effects for glucosinolates and oleic acid, respectively therefore, these could be exploited in future rapeseed breeding programmes to develop new lines with good quality. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Use of chronic irradiation in formation of new rape genotypes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabry, A.; Zukalova, H.; Cerny, J.; Folk, A.

    1980-01-01

    Chronic irradiation of hybrid plants of F 1 generation obtained by crossing the Canadian rape without erucic acid with European winter varieties containg this acid, doubled the frequency of winter genotypes and increased significantly the frequency of required recombinations of winter character and absence of erucic acid in F 2 -M 2 . Genotypes with a more favourable ratio between linoleic and linolenic acids were obtained in the irradiated F 2 -M 2 population. The obtained radio-induced mutants are used for the production of new varieties of winter rape without erucic acid at the Slapy Breeding Station. (author)

  4. Ultrasound-assisted self-metathesis reactions of monounsaturated fatty acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elmkaddem Mohammed Kamal

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available An efficient protocol for the self-metathesis of oleic acid, using ruthenium catalysts is described. The self-metathesis reaction under ultrasonic activation allows the conversion of monoenic fatty acids such as oleic acid, elaidic acid and erucic acid into diacids and olefins with very short reaction times in the presence of Grubbs ruthenium catalysts. These yields and selectivity towards the desired products are influenced by the nature of solvents. This study demonstrated that metathesis reaction carried out in DCM or 1-butanol showed promising results, since it produced a variety of products, like n-alkenes and diacids with good yields (45–75% and high selectivities (75–95%.

  5. Estimation of brassylic acid by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammed J. Nasrullah, Erica N. Pfarr, Pooja Thapliyal, Nicholas S. Dusek, Kristofer L. Schiele, Christy Gallagher-Lein, and James A. Bahr

    2010-10-29

    The main focus of this work is to estimate Brassylic Acid (BA) using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). BA is a product obtained from the oxidative cleavage of Erucic Acid (EA). BA has various applications for making nylons and high performance polymers. BA is a 13 carbon compound with two carboxylic acid functional groups at the terminal end. BA has a long hydrocarbon chain that makes the molecule less sensitive to some of the characterization techniques. Although BA can be characterized by NMR, both the starting material (EA) and products BA and nonanoic acid (NA) have peaks at similar {delta}, ppm values. Hence it becomes difficult for the quick estimation of BA during its synthesis.

  6. Effect of glycine, DL-alanine and DL-2-aminobutyric acid on the temperature of maximum density of water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, Carmen M.; Torres, Andres Felipe

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Effect of α-amino acids on the temperature of maximum density of water is presented. • The addition of α-amino acids decreases the temperature of maximum density of water. • Despretz constants suggest that the amino acids behave as water structure breakers. • Despretz constants decrease as the number of CH 2 groups of the amino acid increase. • Solute disrupting effect becomes smaller as its hydrophobic character increases. - Abstract: The effect of glycine, DL-alanine and DL-2-aminobutyric acid on the temperature of maximum density of water was determined from density measurements using a magnetic float densimeter. Densities of aqueous solutions were measured within the temperature range from T = (275.65 to 278.65) K at intervals of T = 0.50 K over the concentration range between (0.0300 and 0.1000) mol · kg −1 . A linear relationship between density and concentration was obtained for all the systems in the temperature range considered. The temperature of maximum density was determined from the experimental results. The effect of the three amino acids is to decrease the temperature of maximum density of water and the decrease is proportional to molality according to Despretz equation. The effect of the amino acids on the temperature of maximum density decreases as the number of methylene groups of the alkyl chain becomes larger. The results are discussed in terms of (solute + water) interactions and the effect of amino acids on water structure

  7. Microalgal fatty acid methyl ester a new source of bioactive compounds with antimicrobial activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arumugham Suresh

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate fatty acid composition and the antimicrobial activity of the major fraction of fatty acid methyl ester (FAME extracts from three microalgae collected from freshwater lakes in Theni District, Tamil Nadu, India. Methods: Antimicrobial study was carried out by well diffusion method against bacterial as well as fungal pathogens such as Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterobacter sp., Klebsiella sp., Salmonella typhi, Fusarium sp., Cryptococcus sp., Candida sp., and Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus flavus. The FAME profiles were determined through gas chromatography with a flame ionization detector. Results: The FAME was found to be radial effective in inhibiting the radial growth of both bacterial and fungal pathogens. The FAME extracts exhibited the antibacterial activity against three clinical pathogens, namely, Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhi and Enterobacter sp. with the maximum zone of inhibition of 12.0 mm, 12.0 mm and 11.0 mm, respectively. The FAME showed moderate antifungal activity against Cryptococcus sp. (11.8 mm, Aspergillus niger (10.5 mm, Candida sp. (11.8 mm and Fusarium sp. (10.4 mm. Gas chromatography-flame ionization detector analysis revealed about 30 different FAMEs. Conclusions: We assume that the observed antimicrobial potency may be due to the abundance of erucic acid methyl ester (C22:0, arachidic acid methyl ester (C20:0, palmitic acid methyl ester (C16:0, cis-11-eicosenoicmethyl ester (C20:1, cis-11, 14-eicosadienoic acid methyl ester (C20:2 and linolenic acid methyl ester (C18:3 in FAMEs which appears to be promising to treat microbial diseases.

  8. Fatty Acid and Transcript Profiling in Developing Seeds of Three Brassica napus Cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petkova Mariana

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Fatty acid levels and gene expression profiles for selected genes associated with the synthesis of fatty acids (FA, triacylglycerol, and oil body proteins were examined in three oilseed rape (Brassica napus cultivars that have utility for cultivar development in our spring canola breeding program. The seed oil content of Bronowski, Q2, and Westar was 39.0, 40.1, and 40.6%, respectively at 40 days after flowering (DAF. During the 20 to 40 day period of seed development, cultivars had varying levels of palmitic, stearic, oleic, linoleic, α-linolenic, eicosenoic, and erucic acid. In general, the percentage of each FA was similar among the cultivars during seed development. However, the level of oleic acid was lower and the levels of eicosenoic acid and erucic acid were higher in Bronowski than in Q2 and Westar seeds; linoleic acid also tended to be lower in Bronowski. Gene expression among the cultivars was similar from 10 to 40 DAF. The few exceptions were that expression of KAS1 and SAD were higher in Westar and Q2 than in Bronowski at 25 DAF, SAD was highest in Q2, intermediate in Westar, and lowest in Bronowski at 35 DAF, FAD2 was higher in Q2 than in Bronowski at 35 DAF, FAD3 was higher in Q2 than in Bronowski at 15 DAF and Q2 and Westar at 25 and 30 DAF, and FAE1 was higher in Westar and Q2 than in Bronowski at 30 DAF. Correlation analysis for gene expression against DAF for each genotype supported a common trend in gene expression among the three cultivars with gene expression tending to decrease over time; except for LPAAT, which tended to increase. The correlation between the level of FAs and expression of genes by genotype indicated no general trend; rather correlations seem to depend on the genotype.

  9. Present state of breeding of oil crops. Stand der Zuechtung von Oelpflanzen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedt, W. (Giessen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Pflanzenbau und Pflanzenzuechtung)

    1992-04-01

    Different oil crops are characterized by specific fatty acid patterns. For example, rapeseed (Brassica napus) is naturally rich in erucic acid (C22:1), traditional genotypes of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) contain high levels of linoleic acid (C18:2) in their seed oil, and linseed (oilflax, Linum usitatissimum L.) oil is normally rich in linolenic acid (C18:3). Extreme modifications of these ''natural'' fatty acid patterns are possible by breeding. Impressive examples are, (1) the elimination of erucic acid from rapeseed oil, which made it possible to use this vegetable oil for human consumption, (2) the development of sunflower cultivars with high oleic acid, and (3) the selection of linseed mutants with extremely low linolenic acid contents. However, the yield potential of these ''alternative'' genotypes is usually lower than that of those which are predominantly used for oil production: i.e., ''normal'' (high-linolenic) linseed, ''normal'' (high-linoleic) sunflower, and ''0/00'' (low-erucic and low-glucosinolate) rapeseed cultivars. Even in these cases, the yield potential of modern varieties is not completely exhaused. Further improvements of plant production systems can help to improve both, the economical yield and the ecological acceptability of agricultural production of vegetable oils. (orig.)

  10. Breeding response of transcript profiling in developing seeds of Brassica napus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xiaodan

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The upgrading of rapeseed cultivars has resulted in a substantial improvement in yield and quality in China over the past 30 years. With the selective pressure against fatty acid composition and oil content, high erucic acid- and low oil-content cultivars have been replaced by low erucic acid- and high oil-content cultivars. The high erucic acid cultivar Zhongyou 821 and its descendent, low erucic acid cultivar Zhongshuang 9, are representatives of two generations of the most outstanding Chinese rapeseed cultivars (B. napus developed the past 2 decades. This paper compares the transcriptional profiles of Zhongshuang 9 and Zhongyou 821 for 32 genes that are principally involved in lipid biosynthesis during seed development in order to elucidate how the transcriptional profiles of these genes responded to quality improvement over the past 20 years. Results Comparison of the cultivar Zhongyou 821 with its descendent, Zhongshuang 9, shows that the transcriptional levels of seven of the 32 genes were upregulated by 30% to 109%, including FAD3, ACCase, FAE1, GKTP, Caleosin, GAPDH, and PEPC. Of the 32 genes, 10 (KAS3, β-CT, BcRK6, P450, FatA, Oleosin, FAD6, FatB, α-CT and SUC1 were downregulated by at least 20% and most by 50%. The Napin gene alone accounted for over 75% of total transcription from all 32 genes assessed in both cultivars. Most of the genes showed significant correlation with fatty acid accumulation, but the correlation in ZS9 was significantly different from that in ZY821. Higher KCR2 activity is associated with higher C16:0, C18:0, and C18:2 in both cultivars, lower C22:1 and total fatty acid content in ZY821, and lower 18:1 in ZS9. Conclusion This paper illustrates the response of the transcription levels of 32 genes to breeding in developing rapeseed seeds. Both cultivars showed similar transcription profiles, with the Napin gene predominantly transcribed. Selective pressure for zero erucic acid, low

  11. Selection of suitable mineral acid and its concentration for biphasic dilute acid hydrolysis of the sodium dithionite delignified Prosopis juliflora to hydrolyze maximum holocellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseeruddin, Shaik; Desai, Suseelendra; Venkateswar Rao, L

    2016-02-01

    Two grams of delignified substrate at 10% (w/v) level was subjected to biphasic dilute acid hydrolysis using phosphoric acid, hydrochloric acid and sulfuric acid separately at 110 °C for 10 min in phase-I and 121 °C for 15 min in phase-II. Combinations of acid concentrations in two phases were varied for maximum holocellulose hydrolysis with release of fewer inhibitors, to select the suitable acid and its concentration. Among three acids, sulfuric acid in combination of 1 & 2% (v/v) hydrolyzed maximum holocellulose of 25.44±0.44% releasing 0.51±0.02 g/L of phenolics and 0.12±0.002 g/L of furans, respectively. Further, hydrolysis of delignified substrate using selected acid by varying reaction time and temperature hydrolyzed 55.58±1.78% of holocellulose releasing 2.11±0.07 g/L and 1.37±0.03 g/L of phenolics and furans, respectively at conditions of 110 °C for 45 min in phase-I & 121 °C for 60 min in phase-II. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Short-time maximum entropy method analysis of molecular dynamics simulation: Unimolecular decomposition of formic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Osamu; Nomura, Tetsuo; Tabayashi, Kiyohiko; Yamasaki, Katsuyoshi

    2008-07-01

    We performed spectral analysis by using the maximum entropy method instead of the traditional Fourier transform technique to investigate the short-time behavior in molecular systems, such as the energy transfer between vibrational modes and chemical reactions. This procedure was applied to direct ab initio molecular dynamics calculations for the decomposition of formic acid. More reactive trajectories of dehydrolation than those of decarboxylation were obtained for Z-formic acid, which was consistent with the prediction of previous theoretical and experimental studies. Short-time maximum entropy method analyses were performed for typical reactive and non-reactive trajectories. Spectrograms of a reactive trajectory were obtained; these clearly showed the reactant, transient, and product regions, especially for the dehydrolation path.

  13. Maximum production rate optimization for sulphuric acid decomposition process in tubular plug-flow reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Chao; Chen, Lingen; Xia, Shaojun; Sun, Fengrui

    2016-01-01

    A sulphuric acid decomposition process in a tubular plug-flow reactor with fixed inlet flow rate and completely controllable exterior wall temperature profile and reactants pressure profile is studied in this paper by using finite-time thermodynamics. The maximum production rate of the aimed product SO 2 and the optimal exterior wall temperature profile and reactants pressure profile are obtained by using nonlinear programming method. Then the optimal reactor with the maximum production rate is compared with the reference reactor with linear exterior wall temperature profile and the optimal reactor with minimum entropy generation rate. The result shows that the production rate of SO 2 of optimal reactor with the maximum production rate has an increase of more than 7%. The optimization of temperature profile has little influence on the production rate while the optimization of reactants pressure profile can significantly increase the production rate. The results obtained may provide some guidelines for the design of real tubular reactors. - Highlights: • Sulphuric acid decomposition process in tubular plug-flow reactor is studied. • Fixed inlet flow rate and controllable temperature and pressure profiles are set. • Maximum production rate of aimed product SO 2 is obtained. • Corresponding optimal temperature and pressure profiles are derived. • Production rate of SO 2 of optimal reactor increases by 7%.

  14. Exogenous carbohydrases do not improve the physiological and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NWUUser

    2017-10-17

    Oct 17, 2017 ... industry. Secondary plant compounds such as glucosinolates, erucic acid, phytic acid, non-starch polysaccharides (NSP), and .... Scientific, Australia). .... distributed. For all statistical tests, significance was declared at P <0.05.

  15. Biochemical and histopathological profiling of Wistar rat treated with Brassica napus as a supplementary feed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazi Md. Mahmudul Hasan

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic changes together with cardiovascular and hepatic factors are related to the development of diseases like myocardial lipidosis, heart disease, and profound toxicity. The aim of this animal study is to determine the effects of high erucic acid containing rapeseed oil (Brassica napus L. varieties on liver, kidney and heart muscles in Wistar rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into three groups where each group containing four rats. Group A was considered as control diet group, while Group B rapeseed wild oil group and Group C rapeseed hybrid oil group were considered as experimental diet groups. The levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST, alanine aminotransferase (ALT,alkaline phosphatase(ALP, creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB and creatinine of two experimental groups were significantly elevated while compared to the control groups (p  0.05. Noticeable tissue injury observed in this study is a sign of the relative toxicity of erucic acid containing rapeseed oil to mammalian species. The use of Brassica napus as a supplementary feed ingredient should be, therefore, thoroughly considered Keywords: Rapeseed oil, Rattus norvegicus, Serum enzymes, Erucic acid, Tissue profiling

  16. GC-MS analysis of hexane extract of Jatropha curcas L. seed oil

    OpenAIRE

    Warra, Aliyu A.; Abubakar, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    The spectral interpretation here was based on compounds identification. The following fatty acids were identified considering the peaks and library fragments; Oleic acid, Stearic acid, Palmitic acid Margaric acid, 6-Octadecenoic acid, Elaidic acid Erucic acid, Methyl ricinoleate, 11-octadecenoic acid,10-undecenoic acid. The results indicated that the Jatropha curcas L seed oil has potential in the production of cosmetics, perfumery and pharmaceuticals.The spectral interpretation here was ba...

  17. Phytochemical analysis and antibacterial activity of eruca sativa seed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulfraz, M.; Sadiq, A.; Tariq, H.; Imran, M.; Qureshi, R.; Zeenat, A.

    2011-01-01

    Antibacterial activity of various solvent extracts of Eruca sativa seed as well as seed oil was investigated against Gram+ve and Gram-ve bacterial strains. Maximum zone of inhibition was observed from seed oil followed by methanolic seed extracts from all bacterial strains compared with broad spectrum antibiotics gentamicine. MIC values of seed oil were within the ranges of 52-72 mu g/ml as compared to 56-70 mu g/ml standard antibiotic Gentamicine). Proximate and Phytochemical analysis of seed of E. sativa showed presence of all essential phyto constituents required for promising traditional medicine. Analysis of seed oil by gas chromatography revealed that there was high concentration of Erucic acid (51.2%) followed by oleic acid (15.1%) and cis-11-eicosenoic acid (12.5%). In addition, minor quantities of other essential and non essential fatty acids were also present. Therefore the present study supports effectiveness of E. sativa seeds for it use in traditional medicine used in various human disorders. (author)

  18. Studies on nitrogen uptake and utilization by rape (Brassica napus L.) under different sowing dates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Qixin; Nie Guangming

    1992-01-01

    The nitrogen uptake and utilization by low erucic acid variety, Zhong You Di Gai No.2, of rape (Brassica napus L.) under different sowing dates were studied. Total N uptake, the percentage N derived from the fertilizer, the rate of utilization of nitrogenous fertilizer, the production efficiency of N-fertilizer (seed yield g/gN derived by rape plant from the fertilizer), total P uptake and the production efficiency of phosphorus (seed yield g/gP derived by rape plant from fertilizer and soil) were all significantly higher at early sowing than that at later sowing within the range of normal sowing dates. Therefore, the biomass yield, the seed yield and oil content all increased significantly at early sowing treatment, but erucic acid content showed no significant difference

  19. Photovoltaic High-Frequency Pulse Charger for Lead-Acid Battery under Maximum Power Point Tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung-I. Hsieh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A photovoltaic pulse charger (PV-PC using high-frequency pulse train for charging lead-acid battery (LAB is proposed not only to explore the charging behavior with maximum power point tracking (MPPT but also to delay sulfating crystallization on the electrode pores of the LAB to prolong the battery life, which is achieved due to a brief pulse break between adjacent pulses that refreshes the discharging of LAB. Maximum energy transfer between the PV module and a boost current converter (BCC is modeled to maximize the charging energy for LAB under different solar insolation. A duty control, guided by a power-increment-aided incremental-conductance MPPT (PI-INC MPPT, is implemented to the BCC that operates at maximum power point (MPP against the random insolation. A 250 W PV-PC system for charging a four-in-series LAB (48 Vdc is examined. The charging behavior of the PV-PC system in comparison with that of CC-CV charger is studied. Four scenarios of charging statuses of PV-BC system under different solar insolation changes are investigated and compared with that using INC MPPT.

  20. Genetic diversity of notary-national uniform rape seed yield trial and brassica napus varieties using raped markers and biochemical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakhat, J.; Fareed, A.; Swati, Z.A.; Shafi, M.

    2011-01-01

    In Pakistan, Brassica is the second most important source of oil after cotton. Seventeen NURYT (National Uniform Rape Seed Yield Trial) lines and 5 Brassica napus varieties were assessed through RAPD primers and biochemical assays. Seven different Randomly Amplified Polymorphic DNA markers (RAPD) were employed during the present study. A total of 30 RAPD bands were scored by these primers. Size of the scorable fragments ranged from approximately 250 to 2000 bp. Diversity index was estimated to be 42%. Mean genetic distance estimates ranged between 0.10 and 1.00. For the assessment of various biochemical parameters, Near Infrared Reflectance Spectroscopy (NIRS) was used. Oil content ranged from 38.30 to 49% and protein content from 19.80 to 29.10% among the 22 genotypes. Maximum protein content was assayed in genotype RBN 3046 while minimum in Hyola 405. Glucosinolates ranged between 2 and 84% for genotype CRH 60/08 and CRH05/08 showing the maximum and minimum values respectively. Oleic acid (52 to 72.5%), linolenic acid (7.07 and 9.90%) and erucic acid content (9.57 to 38.3%) was also recorded during the present study. (author)

  1. Bioaugmentation with Petroleum-Degrading Consortia Has a Selective Growth-Promoting Impact on Crop Plants Germinated in Diesel Oil-Contaminated Soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graj, Weronika; Lisiecki, Piotr; Szulc, Alicja

    2013-01-01

    or seeds with indigenous rhizospheric populations is a common approach in the rhizoremediation. However, we introduced hydrocarbon-degrading consortia (M10, R3, and K52) that were previously isolated from crude oil-contaminated soil instead of indigenous microbes. Bioaugmentation with these petroleum...... with the rhizospheric microbes. The microorganisms may be stimulated by the secreted root exudates, which results in an increased breakdown of contaminants in the rhizosphere. The main goal of this study was to establish a potential rhizoremediation combination for a diesel-polluted site. Inoculation of plant roots...... degraders was applied to screen four high biomass crop species (Indian mustard, alfalfa, high erucic acid rapeseed, HEAR, and low erucic acid rapeseed, LEAR) for their tolerance towards diesel oil. At no pollution, a promoting effect of M10 bacteria could be observed on germination and root elongation...

  2. Improvement of brassica oilseeds through modern biotechnological approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.R.; Rashid, H.

    2007-01-01

    Pakistan is chronically deficient in the production of edible oils. So much so that 3/4 (three fourth) of the country's requirements are met through imports, costing huge amounts in foreign exchange. The total edible-oil requirements of Pakistan for 1999-2000 stands at 2 million tons. The rest was imported on heavy foreign exchange cost of US dollars 800 million/year (Anonymous, 2000). One disturbing aspect of this critical issue is an annual increase in the gap between consumption and domestic production of edible oils. The different uses of rapeseed have given rise to specialized cultivars, and it is important to differentiate between the three principal types viz. seed quality, high erucic acid (HEAR), and canola. The term Canola refers to seed or seed-products with less than 2% erucic acid in the oil and less than 30 macro mol/g meal of aliphatic glucosinolates. (author)

  3. Kelussia odoratissima Mozaff. as a rich source of essential fatty acids and phthalides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghasemi Mehdi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The present study is the first assessment of the fatty acids of leaf and essential oil compositions of new three habitats of aerial parts of K. odoratissima. Methods: The aerial parts of K. odoratissima from the three habitats were dried. The essential oils were obtained by hydrodistillation for 3 h in a Clevenger-type apparatus, then the analysis of the components was carried out using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. To study the oil yield and fatty acids, the dried leaves subjected to extraction in hexane by using Soxhlet Apparatus. To analyze fatty acids from the oil fractions by gas chromatography technique, the oil was subjected to transesterification to obtain the fatty acid methyl esters, which, were dissolved in hexane and subjected to GC analysis. Results: According to the results, a total of 43 components, the major constitutes of essential oil compositions were (Z-Ligustilide (76.45%, Unknown-A (4.47%, (E-Ligustilide (2.57%, (Z-Butylidene phthalide (2.37%, 5-pentyl cyclohexa-1,3-diene (1.57% and Kessane (0.77% in K. odoratissima. The sixteen fatty acids were separated from the oil (5% yield per 100 g dry matter. Linoleic acid (25.46%, α-Linolenic acid (16.66%, Palmitic acid (11.92%, Oleic acid (9.33%, Stearic acid (4.72%, Petroselinic acid (2.53%, Arachidonic acid (2.51% and Erucic acid (1.76% were major fatty acids. Conclusion: Generally, K. odoratissima is a rich source of essential fatty acids and phthalide derivatives, specially (Z-ligustilide. This study was presented valuable information about the phytochemical properties, which can be useful for the future researches on the pharmacological effects of K. odoratissima.

  4. Random amplified polymorphic DNA markers of the Brassica alboglabra chromosome of a B. campestris-alboglabra addition line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger Jørgensen, Rikke; Chen, B.Y.; Cheng, B.F.

    1996-01-01

    The alien C-genome chromosome in a Brassica campestris-alboglabra monosomic addition line was characterized by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis. The alien chromosome carried three loci, E(c), W-c and Lap-1C, controlling synthesis of erucic acid, white flower colour and a fast...

  5. Heritability studies for seed quality traits in introgressed segregating populations of brassica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farhatullah, S.; Nasim, A.; Fayyaz, L.

    2014-01-01

    Estimation of genetic parameters in the context of trait characterization is an essential component of future targeted crop improvement programs. Collection of knowledge about genetic behavior such as genetic variability and heritability etc., of the germplasm is the basic step for initiation of any breeding program. Genetic variability and Broad sense heritability for various seed quality traits in 10 brassica genotypes and their 12 F2 progenies comprising of introgressed hybrids were studied. The genotypes had highly significant variation for oil content, protein, glucosinolates contents, oleic, linolenic and erucic acid contents. Glucosinolates content and erucic acid showed high heritability in all F2 populations, while rest of the traits showed variable trends. The cross combination 547 x 118 (B. napus x B. campestris) proved to be a good interspecific hybrid that had high proportion of introgression and has high heritability for beneficial traits. The individual plants having combination of desirable traits were also identified from the F2 populations. (author)

  6. A diet rich in monounsaturated rapeseed oil reduces the lipoprotein cholesterol concentration and increases the relative content of n-3 fatty acids in serum in hyperlipidemic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, I B; Vessby, B; Ohrvall, M; Nydahl, M

    1994-03-01

    The effects of 3 wk on a diet rich in monounsaturated rapeseed oil were compared with those of a diet containing sunflower oil within a lipid-lowering diet. Ninety-five subjects with moderate hyperlipoproteinemia were randomly assigned to one of the two well-controlled diets prepared at the hospital kitchen. Total serum, low-density- and high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations decreased by 15%, 16%, and 11% (P oil diet and by 16%, 14%, and 13% (P oil diet. Serum triglycerides decreased more markedly (by 29%, P oil than on the rapeseed oil diet (14%, P oil diet but decreased on the sunflower oil diet. There was an increase in the alpha-tocopherol concentrations after both diets. The findings indicate that low erucic acid rapeseed oil can replace oils and fats rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids in a lipid-lowering diet.

  7. De novo fatty acid biosynthesis and elongation in very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase-deficient mice supplemented with odd or even medium-chain fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucci, Sara; Behringer, Sidney; Spiekerkoetter, Ute

    2015-11-01

    An even medium-chain triglyceride (MCT)-based diet is the mainstay of treatment in very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) deficiency (VLCADD). Previous studies with magnetic resonance spectroscopy have shown an impact of MCT on the average fatty acid chain length in abdominal fat. We therefore assume that medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs) are elongated and accumulate in tissue as long-chain fatty acids. In this study, we explored the hepatic effects of long-term supplementation with MCT or triheptanoin, an odd-chain C7-based triglyceride, in wild-type and VLCAD-deficient (VLCAD(-/-) ) mice after 1 year of supplementation as compared with a control diet. The de novo biosynthesis and elongation of fatty acids, and peroxisomal β-oxidation, were quantified by RT-PCR. This was followed by a comprehensive analysis of hepatic and cardiac fatty acid profiles by GC-MS. Long-term application of even and odd MCFAs strongly induced de novo biosynthesis and elongation of fatty acids in both wild-type and VLCAD(-/-) mice, leading to an alteration of the hepatic fatty acid profiles. We detected de novo-synthesized and elongated fatty acids, such as heptadecenoic acid (C17:1n9), eicosanoic acid (C20:1n9), erucic acid (C22:1n9), and mead acid (C20:3n9), that were otherwise completely absent in mice under control conditions. In parallel, the content of monounsaturated fatty acids was massively increased. Furthermore, we observed strong upregulation of peroxisomal β-oxidation in VLCAD(-/-) mice, especially when they were fed an MCT diet. Our data raise the question of whether long-term MCFA supplementation represents the most efficient treatment in the long term. Studies on the hepatic toxicity of triheptanoin are still ongoing. © 2015 FEBS.

  8. Nutritive values of brassica campestris L. oil as affected by growth regulator treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bano, A.; Khan, N.

    2009-01-01

    The effects of plant growth regulators, viz. Indole acetic acid (IAA), Gibberellic acid (GA) and Abscisic acid (ABA) were studied on fatty acid compositions, glucosinolate content and protein content of Brassica campestris L subsp. Oleifera (common name yellow sarson). Growth regulators were applied in seed soaking solution as well as foliar spray during vegetative phase and at flowering stage. There were reductions in the amount of long chain fatty acids viz erucic acid, eicosenoic acid and increase in the amount of unsaturated fatty acid viz. linoleic acid by lAA applications. The stimulating effect of lAA which reduced amount of unsaturated fatty acid was more pronounced when applied as foliar spray at vegetative stage. But, foliar spray of ABA during flowering increased the concentration of linoleic acid and reduced the eicosenoic acid and erucic acid. The glucosinolate content was greater in seeds soaked in 10/sup -5/ M lAA than that of control but less in 10/sup -5/ M GA treated seeds than that of control. The ABA treatment (10/sup -5/M) increased the concentration of glucosinolates in the seeds IAA treatments (10/sup -5/M) increased the protein percentage in the seeds. Foliar application of GA (10/sup -5/M) during vegetative growth and ABA (10/sup -5/M) as seed soaking prior to sowing as well as foliar spry during flowering decreased the protein content of seeds. (author)

  9. Crambe meal : evaluation, improvement and comparison with rapeseed meal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Y.G.

    1994-01-01

    Crambe abyssinica has gradually been introduced in agriculture as a new oil-bearing crop. Its oil contains 55 to 60% erucic acid (C22:1, Δ13), desirable as lubricants, plastic additives or as a raw material for chemical synthesis. The defatted meal has high protein

  10. Adrenoleukodystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    1989-01-01

    The biochemical and clinical efficacy of dietary erucic acid (C22:1) therapy for X-l inked adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD) was investigated at the Departments of Pediatrics, Human Genetics, Neurology, Medical College of Virginia, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, and the Department of Neurology, University of California, Davis, Sacramento, CA.

  11. In vitro propagation of Ethiopian mustard ( Brassica carinata A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Brassica carinata (A. Braun) is an amphi-diploid species that originated from interspecific hybridization between Brassica nigra and Brassica oleracea in the highlands of Ethiopia. The crop has many desirable agronomic traits but with oil quality constraints like high erucic acid and glucosinolate contents. In this study, two ...

  12. Journal of Genetics | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Polymorphism of the examined molecular and cytogenetic markers as well as the heterozygosis level of FAE1.1 gene controlling erucic acid synthesis in rapeseed was higher in the winter varieties than in the spring ones. The obtained data were in a satisfactory agreement with increased tolerance to environmental stress ...

  13. Progress in a Crambe cross breeding programme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mastebroek, H.D.; Lange, W.

    1997-01-01

    Crambe (Crambe abyssinica Hochst. ex Fries) is an annual cruciferous oilseed crop with a high content of erucic acid (55-60%) in the seed oil. Since 1990, a breeding programme in crambe has been carried out at the DLO-Centre for Plant Breeding and Reproduction Research. Three accessions, two early

  14. Crambe tataria sebeók seeds and plants grown in vitro and in vivo fatty acid composition comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Oleksandrivna Pushkarova

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Methods of in vitro conservation offer a number of advantages for endangered species preservation. Crambe tataria Sebeók biochemistry study (fatty acid (FA composition, antioxidant activity (AOA, polyfructan and total soluble protein content is fairly importaint and could show the potential value of this species in agriculture, Food and Chemical Industry or pharmacology including its use as a source of valuble genetic material and could lead to new promising sources of biofuel discovery. Also, comparison of in vitro and in vivo cultured plants could point out to the effect of in vitro culture methods on plants biochemical composition Fatty acid (FA content was determined using Gas chromatography-mass spectrophotometry (GC/MS of fatty acid ethers. Antioxidant activity was determined using DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging method. Total soluble protein content was measured using Bradford method and polyfructan content determination was based upon ketosugars ability to color in the acidic environment with resorcinol. Plants that were grown under in vitro and in vivo conditions and seeds were used in this research. Obtained data showed that C. tataria plants had high AOA and total soluble protein content along with high total FA content along with high content of α-Linolenic acid and absence of erucic acid. Difference in biochemical composition between plants grown in aseptic and not aseptic conditions was shown. 

  15. Inhibition of steroid 5 alpha-reductase by specific aliphatic unsaturated fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, T; Liao, S

    1992-01-01

    Human or rat microsomal 5 alpha-reductase activity, as measured by enzymic conversion of testosterone into 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone or by binding of a competitive inhibitor, [3H]17 beta-NN-diethulcarbamoyl-4-methyl-4-aza-5 alpha-androstan-3-one ([3H]4-MA) to the reductase, is inhibited by low concentrations (less than 10 microM) of certain polyunsaturated fatty acids. The relative inhibitory potencies of unsaturated fatty acids are, in decreasing order: gamma-linolenic acid greater than cis-4,7,10,13,16,19-docosahexaenoic acid = cis-6,9,12,15-octatetraenoic acid = arachidonic acid = alpha-linolenic acid greater than linoleic acid greater than palmitoleic acid greater than oleic acid greater than myristoleic acid. Other unsaturated fatty acids such as undecylenic acid, erucic acid and nervonic acid, are inactive. The methyl esters and alcohol analogues of these compounds, glycerols, phospholipids, saturated fatty acids, retinoids and carotenes were inactive even at 0.2 mM. The results of the binding assay and the enzymic assay correlated well except for elaidic acid and linolelaidic acid, the trans isomers of oleic acid and linoleic acid respectively, which were much less active than their cis isomers in the binding assay but were as potent in the enzymic assay. gamma-Linolenic acid had no effect on the activities of two other rat liver microsomal enzymes: NADH:menadione reductase and glucuronosyl transferase. gamma-Linolenic acid, the most potent inhibitor tested, decreased the Vmax. and increased Km values of substrates, NADPH and testosterone, and promoted dissociation of [3H]4-MA from the microsomal reductase. gamma-Linolenic acid, but not the corresponding saturated fatty acid (stearic acid), inhibited the 5 alpha-reductase activity, but not the 17 beta-dehydrogenase activity, of human prostate cancer cells in culture. These results suggest that unsaturated fatty acids may play an important role in regulating androgen action in target cells. PMID:1637346

  16. Anti-nutritional factors in canola produced in the Western and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The development of low erucic acid, low glucosinolate cultivars of canola seed has led to the availability of a feed ingredient with considerable potential to replace soyabean meal in diets for all classes of farm animals. The sinapine and glucosinolate content of various canola cultivars cultivated in two areas of the Western ...

  17. Evaluation of drought tolerance indices among some winter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-09-14

    Sep 14, 2011 ... double low. 280-260. Cold and Mild-Cold. 7. Talaye. Germany. Open- pollination. 43-40 double low. 280-260. Cold and Mild-Cold. 1GSL: Growing season length, 2“double low”: low erucic acid and low glucosinolate. Table 2. Physical and chemical properties of experimental soil before planting. Available k.

  18. Maximum power output and load matching of a phosphoric acid fuel cell-thermoelectric generator hybrid system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaohang; Wang, Yuan; Cai, Ling; Zhou, Yinghui

    2015-10-01

    Based on the current models of phosphoric acid fuel cells (PAFCs) and thermoelectric generators (TGs), a new hybrid system is proposed, in which the effects of multi-irreversibilities resulting from the activation, concentration, and ohmic overpotentials in the PAFC, Joule heat and heat leak in the TG, finite-rate heat transfer between the TG and the heat reservoirs, and heat leak from the PAFC to the environment are taken into account. Expressions for the power output and efficiency of the PAFC, TG, and hybrid system are analytically derived and directly used to discuss the performance characteristics of the hybrid system. The optimal relationship between the electric currents in the PAFC and TG is obtained. The maximum power output is numerically calculated. It is found that the maximum power output density of the hybrid system will increase about 150 Wm-2, compared with that of a single PAFC. The problem how to optimally match the load resistances of two subsystems is discussed. Some significant results for practical hybrid systems are obtained.

  19. Isolation of low erucic acid-containing genotype of Indian mustard ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reciprocal crosses were done between two cultivars; cv. RJ15 and cv. RLM198 of Indian mustard (Brassica juncea). Anther derived lines designated as A1 plants, were raised through anther culture from these F1 hybrid plants. 45% germination was obtained from distinctly shriveled and small A1 seeds and grown along ...

  20. Simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers analysis of genetic diversity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hope&shola

    2012-04-24

    Apr 24, 2012 ... erucic acid in the oil and low glucosinolate content in the meal has made rapeseed a valuable source of high quality oil for people and nutritional protein for live-stock. (Qiu et al., 2006). Previous studies have demonstrated that yellow seeds have a thinner seed coat than black seeds in the same genetic ...

  1. Journal of Genetics | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    However, glucosinolate content was higher than that of the maternal plants. As for protein content, similar results were found in the F2 plants and their maternal parents. It was shown that the four quality traits, i.e. erucic acid, glucosinolate, oil content, and protein content, had heritability values of 0.614, 0.405, 0.153 and ...

  2. Chemical Composition and Fatty Acid Content of Some Spices and Herbs under Saudi Arabia Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahad Mohammed Al-Jasass

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Some Saudi herbs and spices were analyzed. The results indicated that mustard, black cumin, and cress seeds contain high amount of fat 38.45%, 31.95% and 23.19%, respectively, as compared to clove (16.63%, black pepper (5.34% and fenugreek (4.51% seeds. Cress, mustard, black cumin and black pepper contain higher protein contents ranging from 26.61 to 25.45%, as compared to fenugreek (12.91% and clove (6.9%. Crude fiber and ash content ranged from 6.36 to 23.6% and from 3.57 to 7.1%, respectively. All seeds contain high levels of potassium (ranging from 383 to 823 mg/100g, followed by calcium (ranging from 75 to 270 mg/100g, Magnesium (ranged from 42 to 102 mg/100g and iron (ranged from 20.5 to 65 mg/100g. However, zinc, manganese and copper were found at low levels. The major fatty acids in cress and mustard were linolenic acid (48.43% and erucic acid (29.81%, respectively. The lenoleic acid was the major fatty acid in black cumin, fenugreek, black pepper and clove oils being 68.07%, 34.85%, 33.03% and 44.73%, respectively. Total unsaturated fatty acids were 83.24, 95.62, 86.46, 92.99, 81.34 and 87.82% for cress, mustard, black cumin, fenugreek, black pepper and clove, respectively. The differences in the results obtained are due to environmental factors, production areas, cultivars used to produce seeds and also due to the different methods used to prepare these local spices.

  3. ReplacementMatrix: a web server for maximum-likelihood estimation of amino acid replacement rate matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Cuong Cao; Lefort, Vincent; Le, Vinh Sy; Le, Quang Si; Gascuel, Olivier

    2011-10-01

    Amino acid replacement rate matrices are an essential basis of protein studies (e.g. in phylogenetics and alignment). A number of general purpose matrices have been proposed (e.g. JTT, WAG, LG) since the seminal work of Margaret Dayhoff and co-workers. However, it has been shown that matrices specific to certain protein groups (e.g. mitochondrial) or life domains (e.g. viruses) differ significantly from general average matrices, and thus perform better when applied to the data to which they are dedicated. This Web server implements the maximum-likelihood estimation procedure that was used to estimate LG, and provides a number of tools and facilities. Users upload a set of multiple protein alignments from their domain of interest and receive the resulting matrix by email, along with statistics and comparisons with other matrices. A non-parametric bootstrap is performed optionally to assess the variability of replacement rate estimates. Maximum-likelihood trees, inferred using the estimated rate matrix, are also computed optionally for each input alignment. Finely tuned procedures and up-to-date ML software (PhyML 3.0, XRATE) are combined to perform all these heavy calculations on our clusters. http://www.atgc-montpellier.fr/ReplacementMatrix/ olivier.gascuel@lirmm.fr Supplementary data are available at http://www.atgc-montpellier.fr/ReplacementMatrix/

  4. Optimization of a Nucleic Acids united-RESidue 2-Point model (NARES-2P) with a maximum-likelihood approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Yi; Scheraga, Harold A.; Liwo, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Coarse-grained models are useful tools to investigate the structural and thermodynamic properties of biomolecules. They are obtained by merging several atoms into one interaction site. Such simplified models try to capture as much as possible information of the original biomolecular system in all-atom representation but the resulting parameters of these coarse-grained force fields still need further optimization. In this paper, a force field optimization method, which is based on maximum-likelihood fitting of the simulated to the experimental conformational ensembles and least-squares fitting of the simulated to the experimental heat-capacity curves, is applied to optimize the Nucleic Acid united-RESidue 2-point (NARES-2P) model for coarse-grained simulations of nucleic acids recently developed in our laboratory. The optimized NARES-2P force field reproduces the structural and thermodynamic data of small DNA molecules much better than the original force field

  5. Combining ability analysis in Brassica juncea L. for oil quality traits

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-06-28

    Jun 28, 2010 ... the SCA effects for glucosinolate, erucic acid and protein content. The parental genotypes NUM009,. NUM123, NUM105 and NUM117 and their hybrids NUM009x NUM123, NUM103x NUM105, NUM113x. NUM124 and NUM103x NUM120 had high GCA and SCA effects, respectively and therefore these ...

  6. Microbiological Quality of Panicum maximum Grass Silage with Addition of Lactobacillus sp. as Starter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumarsih, S.; Sulistiyanto, B.; Utama, C. S.

    2018-02-01

    The aim of the research was to evaluate microbiological quality of Panicum maximum grass silage with addition Lactobacillus sp as starter. The completely randomized design was been used on this research with 4 treaments and 3 replications. The treatments were P0 ( Panicum maximum grass silage without addition Lactobacillus sp ), P1 ( Panicum maximum grass silage with 2% addition Lactobacillus sp), P2 (Panicum maximum grass silage with 4% addition Lactobacillus sp) and P3 (Panicum maximum grass silage with 6% addition Lactobacillus sp).The parameters were microbial populations of Panicum maximum grass silage (total lactic acid bacteria, total bacteria, total fungi, and Coliform bacteria. The data obtained were analyzed variance (ANOVA) and further tests performed Duncan’s Multiple Areas. The population of lactic acid bacteria was higher (PMicrobiological quality of Panicum maximum grass silage with addition Lactobacillus sp was better than no addition Lactobacillus sp.

  7. Optimisation of ultrasound-assisted extraction of natural antioxidants from mustard seed cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szydłowska-Czerniak, Aleksandra; Tułodziecka, Agnieszka; Karlovits, György; Szłyk, Edward

    2015-05-01

    Modified mustard varieties can produce edible oil with reduced amounts of erucic acid and glucosinolates and enhanced antioxidant potential. Therefore, this work focused on the optimisation of the ultrasound-assisted extraction of compounds with high antioxidant capacity from three white mustard seed cultivars using response surface methodology. The predicted optimum solvent polarity (57.2, 56.5 and 57.6) and ultrasound power-to-sonication time ratio (4.5, 4.8 and 4.3 W min(-1)) resulted in antioxidant capacities determined by the ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assay [54.37, 65.75 and 68.55 mmol Trolox equivalent (TE) kg(-1)] and the 2,2'-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) method (141.65, 175.26 and 185.10 mmol TE kg(-1)) and total phenolics content (23.70, 27.16 and 11.29 mg sinapic acid g(-1)) for extracts obtained from one traditional and two modified mustard seed varieties. The highest FRAP and DPPH values (69.51 and 197.73 mmol TE kg(-1)) revealed 50% methanolic extract prepared from modified mustard seed cultivar without erucic acid and glucosinolates treated with ultrasound for 30 min (ultrasound power/ultrasound time = 4 W min(-1)). Ultrasound-assisted extraction was found to be a more rapid, convenient and appropriate extraction method with higher yield of antioxidants, shorter time and lower solvent consumption in comparison to conventional extraction. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. Analytical application of aminohydroxamic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fadl Elmoula, Abd ELfatah Abdella

    2000-11-01

    Anthranilic hydroxamic acid was prepared by coupling of methylanthranilate (prepared by esterification of anthranilic acid with methyl alcohol using the fisher-speir method) with freshly prepared hydroxylamine. The lignad was characterized by the usual reaction of hydroxamic acid with acidic V(V) and Fe(III) solutions that gives blood-red colour in amyl alcohol and deep-violet colour in aqueous solution, respectively. The absorbance of Fe(III)-hydroxamic acids complexes increases with increase of pH. In this study, the effect of pH on the absorbance of Fe(III)-anthranilic hydroxamic acid was in accordance with this trend. The maximum absorbance was obtained at pH 5.0 at maximum wavelength of 482 nm. For Cu(II)-anthranilic hydroxamic acid complex, the use of acidic basic pH lead to precipitation of Cu(II)-ligand complex. But when using buffer pH (acetic acid/sodium acetate) a clear green colour of Cu(II)-ligand complex was obtained. The maximum wavelength of 390 nm. V(V)-anthranilic hydroxamic acid complex was extracted in acidic medium in amyl alcohol at pH 2.0 because in aqueous solution V(V)-anthranilic hydroxamic acid complex has not clear colour. It was observed the the maximum extraction in acidic medium decrease sharply with the increasing of pH value. The maximum wavelength for maximum absorbance was recorded at 472 nm. V(V) interfered with determination of Fe(III)) above concentration of 2 ppm, whereas Cu(II) interferes slightly with the determination of Fe(III) ions even at a high concentration of the Cu(II) ions. Both Cu(II) and Ni(II) do not interfere with the determination of V(V) ions even at high concentrations, Fe(III) ion produced slight interference, while Mo(VI) ions have a pronounced interference. Both V(V) and Fe(III) ions interfered markedly with the determination of Cu(II) ions, and made impractical under conditions. However, the calibration curves for the three metal ions produced a practical linear dynamic range.(Author)

  9. The influence of SO4 and NO3 to the acidity (pH) of rainwater using minimum variance quadratic unbiased estimation (MIVQUE) and maximum likelihood methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilla, Shintia Ulfa; Andriyana, Yudhie; Sudartianto

    2017-03-01

    Acid rain causes many bad effects in life. It is formed by two strong acids, sulfuric acid (H2SO4) and nitric acid (HNO3), where sulfuric acid is derived from SO2 and nitric acid from NOx {x=1,2}. The purpose of the research is to find out the influence of So4 and NO3 levels contained in the rain to the acidity (pH) of rainwater. The data are incomplete panel data with two-way error component model. The panel data is a collection of some of the observations that observed from time to time. It is said incomplete if each individual has a different amount of observation. The model used in this research is in the form of random effects model (REM). Minimum variance quadratic unbiased estimation (MIVQUE) is used to estimate the variance error components, while maximum likelihood estimation is used to estimate the parameters. As a result, we obtain the following model: Ŷ* = 0.41276446 - 0.00107302X1 + 0.00215470X2.

  10. Variations in fatty acid composition, glucosinolate profile and some phyto chemical contents in selected oil seed rape (Brassica napus L.) cultivars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Din Saad El-Beltag, H.; Mohamed, A. A.

    2010-07-01

    Rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) is now the third most important source of edible oil in the world after soybean and palm oil. In this study seeds of five different rapeseed cultivars namely; pactol, silvo, topas, serw 4 and serw 6 were evaluated for their fatty acid composition, glucosinolate profile, amino acids, total tocopherols and phenolic content. Among all cultivars significant variability in fatty acids were observed. The oleic acid (C18:1) ranged from 56.31% to 58.67%, linoleic acid (C18:2) from 10.52% to 13.74%, {alpha}-linolenic acid (C18:3) from 8.83% to 10.32% and erucic acid (22:1) from 0.15% to 0.91%. The glucosinolate profile of rapeseed was also separated and identified using high-performance liquid chromatography. Small variations in the glucosinolate profile were observed among all tested cultivars; however, progoitrin and gluconapin were the major glucosinolate found. Additionally, silvo cultivar showed the highest total glucosinolate contents (5.97 {mu}mol/g dw). Generally, the contents of aspartic, glutamic, arginine and leucine were high, while the contents of tyrosine and isoleucine were low among all cultivars. For total tocopherols, the results indicated that both serw 6 and pactol cultivars had the highest total tocopherol contents (138.3 and 102.8 mg/100 g oil, respectively). Total phenolic contents varied from 28.0 to 35.4 mg/g dw. The highest total phenolic content was found in topas while the lowest value was detected in serw 6. These parameters; fatty acid contents, glucosinolate profile and amino acids together with total tocopherols and phenolic contents, could be taken into consideration by oilseed rape breeders as selection criteria for developing genotypes with modified seed quality traits in Brassica napus L. (Author)

  11. Structural and solubility parameter correlations of gelation abilities for dihydroxylated derivatives of long-chain, naturally occurring fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mohan; Selvakumar, Sermadurai; Zhang, Xinran; Sibi, Mukund P; Weiss, Richard G

    2015-06-01

    Creating structure-property correlations at different distance scales is one of the important challenges to the rational design of molecular gelators. Here, a series of dihydroxylated derivatives of long-chain fatty acids, derived from three naturally occurring molecules-oleic, erucic and ricinoleic acids-are investigated as gelators of a wide variety of liquids. Conclusions about what constitutes a more (or less!) efficient gelator are based upon analyses of a variety of thermal, structural, molecular modeling, and rheological results. Correlations between the manner of molecular packing in the neat solid or gel states of the gelators and Hansen solubility data from the liquids leads to the conclusion that diol stereochemistry, the number of carbon atoms separating the two hydroxyl groups, and the length of the alkanoic chains are the most important structural parameters controlling efficiency of gel formation for these gelators. Some of the diol gelators are as efficient or even more efficient than the well-known, excellent gelator, (R)-12-hydroxystearic acid; others are much worse. The ability to form extensive intermolecular H-bonding networks along the alkyl chains appears to play a key role in promoting fiber growth and, thus, gelation. In toto, the results demonstrate how the efficiency of gelation can be modulated by very small structural changes and also suggest how other structural modifications may be exploited to create efficient gelators. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Genetic variability among advanced lines of brassica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullah, N.; Farhatullah, A.; Rahman, H.U.; Fayyaz, L.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic variability for morphological and biochemical traits among six advanced lines (F10:11) of brassica was studied at The University of Agriculture Peshawar during crop season of 2012-13. These lines were developed through interspecific hybridization. Significant differences at (p=0.01) for plant height, main, pods main raceme-1, pod length, seed yield plant-1 and protein content at (p=0.05) for 100-seed weight, oil content were recorded. The advanced line, AUP-05 produced the maximum seed yield plant-1 (19.73 g), protein content (24.56%), 100-seed weight (0.64 g). Advanced line AUP-04 had the highest erucic acid (50.31%), linolenic acid (10.60%) and was late maturing (179.33). Advanced line AUP-06 produced the high oil content (48.82%). Advanced line AUP-03 produced comparatively longer main raceme (69.32 cm). Environmental variance was smaller than genotypic variance for majority of the traits. Genotypic and phenotypic coefficients of variation ranged from 2.45 to 25.67% and 2.50 to 27.68%, respectively. Heritability was high for majority of the traits. The maximum heritability was recorded for plant height (0.61), main raceme length (0.81), pods main raceme-1 (0.74), seed yield plant-1 (0.86) and protein content (0.77). Moderate heritability was observed for oil (0.58) contents. Heritability for 100-seed weight (0.30) was the lowest. These lines may be released as new improved varieties for specific parameters. (author)

  13. Analytical study of fatty acids in bioreactor of an anaerobic treatment of distillery effluent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, F.A.; Pathan, M.I.

    2005-01-01

    An anaerobic digestion in bioreactors, offers a two-fold benefit: pollution potential reduction and biogas production. In this study, fatty acids in an anaerobic reactor are studied. The reactor exhibits a notable variation at different corks (1-6). The concentrations for both acetic acid and propionic acid are at maximum range at cork 2 and 5. For isobutyric acid; it is maximum at 1 and 2 corks. Butyric acid is maximum at 5; isovaleric acid is maximum at cork-2. This shows that cork-2 location has its maximum activity for fatty acids. Being nearest to the agitator this location has maximum agitation and resulted more formation of the fatty acids. This acidic effect will ultimately affect the reactor output for Biogas generation. (author)

  14. Detection and identification of extra virgin olive oil adulteration by GC-MS combined with chemometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Ferro, Miguel Duarte; Cavaco, Isabel; Liang, Yizeng

    2013-04-17

    In this study, an analytical method for the detection and identification of extra virgin olive oil adulteration with four types of oils (corn, peanut, rapeseed, and sunflower oils) was proposed. The variables under evaluation included 22 fatty acids and 6 other significant parameters (the ratio of linoleic/linolenic acid, oleic/linoleic acid, total saturated fatty acids (SFAs), polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs), MUFAs/PUFAs). Univariate analyses followed by multivariate analyses were applied to the adulteration investigation. As a result, the univariate analyses demonstrated that higher contents of eicosanoic acid, docosanoic acid, tetracosanoic acid, and SFAs were the peculiarities of peanut adulteration and higher levels of linolenic acid, 11-eicosenoic acid, erucic acid, and nervonic acid the characteristics of rapeseed adulteration. Then, PLS-LDA made the detection of adulteration effective with a 1% detection limit and 90% prediction ability; a Monte Carlo tree identified the type of adulteration with 85% prediction ability.

  15. Branched-chain dicationic ionic liquids for fatty acid methyl ester assessment by gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talebi, Mohsen; Patil, Rahul A; Sidisky, Leonard M; Berthod, Alain; Armstrong, Daniel W

    2017-12-06

    Twelve bis- or dicationic ionic liquids (ILs) including eight based on imidazolium, a single one based on phosphonium, and three based on pyrrolidinium cationic units were prepared with the bis(trifluoromethyl sulfonyl) imide anion. The two identical cationic moieties were attached by different alkyl spacers having three or five carbons and differing alkyl substituents attached to the spacer. The SLB-IL111 column, as the most polar commercial stationary phase known, was included in the study for comparison. Isothermal separations of a rapeseed oil fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) sample were used to study and compare the 12 IL-based column performances and selectivities. The retention times of the most retained methyl esters of lignoceric (C24:0) and erucic (C22:1) acids were used to estimate the IL polarity. The phosphonium dicationic IL column was, by far, the least polar. Imidazolium-based dicationic IL columns were the most polar. Polarity and selectivity for the FAME separation were somewhat related. The separation of a 37-FAME standard mixture allowed the investigation of selectivity variations observed on the 12 IL-based columns under temperature gradients up to 230 °C. The remarkable selectivity of the IL-based columns is demonstrated by the detailed analysis of the cis/trans C18:1 isomers of a partially hydrogenated vegetable oil sample on 30-m columns, separations competing with that done following an "official method" performed on a 100-m column. Graphical abstract Separation of fatty acid methyl esters on a 30-m 3m 2 C 5 (mpy) 2 . 2NTf 2 branched-chain dicationic IL-based column. Branched chain dicationic ILs show great selectivity for separation of cis/trans, ω-3/ω-6, and detailed analysis of cis/trans fats.

  16. Role of sialic acid in synaptosomal transport of amino acid transmitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaleska, M.M.; Erecinska, M.

    1987-01-01

    Active, high-affinity, sodium-dependent uptake of [ 14 C]-aminobutyric acid and of the acidic amino acid D-[ 3 H]-aspartate was inhibited by pretreatment of synaptosomes with neuraminidase from Vibrio cholerae. Inhibition was of a noncompetitive type and was related to the amount of sialic acid released. The maximum accumulation ratios of both amino acids (intracellular [amino acid]/extracellular [amino acid]) remained largely unaltered. Treatment with neuraminidase affected neither the synaptosomal energy levels nor the concentration of internal potassium. It is suggested that the γ-aminobutyric acid and acidic amino acid transporters are glycosylated and that sialic acid is involved in the operation of the carrier proteins directly and not through modification of driving forces responsible for amino acid uptake

  17. Analysis of oilseed of Halophytic species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parto Roshandel

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Seeds of Atriplex griffithii, Haloxylon ammodendron, Salicornia europaea and Salsola yazdiana were analyzed to determine their potential as sources of edible oil. The quantity of total oil varied from 13.8% in Atriplex griffithii to 20.9% in H. ammodendron. The proportion of unsaturated fatty acids were higher (62-73.8%, with the highest values of α-linoleic acid (18.6%, linoleic acid (28.6% and oleic acid (19.7% in the seeds of A. griffithii, H. ammodendron and S. europaea, respectively. Results of physicochemical evaluation of the extracted oils ranged as follows: iodine values, 99.8-106.5 (g I2/100 g; saponification value, 188-283 (mg KOH/1g of oil; peroxide value, 9-13 (meq./kg and refractive index, 1.4750- 1.4761. Amongst these oilseeds, S. europaea (containing 73.8% unsaturated fatty acids but not erucic acid was the highest in quality for human consumption followed by H. ammodendron.

  18. Purification of a jojoba embryo fatty acyl-coenzyme A reductase and expression of its cDNA in high erucic acid rapeseed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz, J G; Pollard, M R; Anderson, L; Hayes, T R; Lassner, M W

    2000-03-01

    The jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis) plant produces esters of long-chain alcohols and fatty acids (waxes) as a seed lipid energy reserve. This is in contrast to the triglycerides found in seeds of other plants. We purified an alcohol-forming fatty acyl-coenzyme A reductase (FAR) from developing embryos and cloned the cDNA encoding the enzyme. Expression of a cDNA in Escherichia coli confers FAR activity upon those cells and results in the accumulation of fatty alcohols. The FAR sequence shows significant homology to an Arabidopsis protein of unknown function that is essential for pollen development. When the jojoba FAR cDNA is expressed in embryos of Brassica napus, long-chain alcohols can be detected in transmethylated seed oils. Resynthesis of the gene to reduce its A plus T content resulted in increased levels of alcohol production. In addition to free alcohols, novel wax esters were detected in the transgenic seed oils. In vitro assays revealed that B. napus embryos have an endogenous fatty acyl-coenzyme A: fatty alcohol acyl-transferase activity that could account for this wax synthesis. Thus, introduction of a single cDNA into B. napus results in a redirection of a portion of seed oil synthesis from triglycerides to waxes.

  19. Intake of fatty acids in Western Europe with emphasis on trans fatty acids: The TRANSFAIR study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulshof, K.F.A.M; Erp van - Baart, M.A.; Anttolainen, M.; Becker, W.; Church, S.M.; Couet, C.; Hermann-Kunz, E.; Kesteloot, H.; Leth, T.; Martins, I.; Moreiras, O.; Moschandreas, J.; Pizzoferrato, L.; Rimestad, A.H.; Thorgeirsdottir, H.; Amelsvoort, J.M.M. van; Aro, A.; Kafatos, A.G.; Lanzmann-Petithory, D.; Poppel, G. van

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To assess the intake of trans fatty acids (TFA) and other fatty acids in 14 Western European countries. Design and subjects: A maximum of 100 foods per country were sampled and centrally analysed. Each country calculated the intake of individual trans and other fatty acids, clusters of

  20. Intake of fatty acids in Western Europe with emphasis on trans fatty acids: The TRANSFAIR study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hulshof, K. F. A. M.; Erp-Baart, M. A. van; Anttolainen, M.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To assess the intake of trans fatty acids (TFA) and other fatty acids in 14 Western European countries. Design and subjects: A maximum of 100 foods per country were sampled and centrally analysed. Each country calculated the intake of individual trans and other fatty acids, clusters of...

  1. Optimal operating conditions for maximum biogas production in anaerobic bioreactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balmant, W.; Oliveira, B.H.; Mitchell, D.A.; Vargas, J.V.C.; Ordonez, J.C.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the existence of optimal residence time and substrate inlet mass flow rate for maximum methane production through numerical simulations performed with a general transient mathematical model of an anaerobic biodigester introduced in this study. It is herein suggested a simplified model with only the most important reaction steps which are carried out by a single type of microorganisms following Monod kinetics. The mathematical model was developed for a well mixed reactor (CSTR – Continuous Stirred-Tank Reactor), considering three main reaction steps: acidogenesis, with a μ max of 8.64 day −1 and a K S of 250 mg/L, acetogenesis, with a μ max of 2.64 day −1 and a K S of 32 mg/L, and methanogenesis, with a μ max of 1.392 day −1 and a K S of 100 mg/L. The yield coefficients were 0.1-g-dry-cells/g-pollymeric compound for acidogenesis, 0.1-g-dry-cells/g-propionic acid and 0.1-g-dry-cells/g-butyric acid for acetogenesis and 0.1 g-dry-cells/g-acetic acid for methanogenesis. The model describes both the transient and the steady-state regime for several different biodigester design and operating conditions. After model experimental validation, a parametric analysis was performed. It was found that biogas production is strongly dependent on the input polymeric substrate and fermentable monomer concentrations, but fairly independent of the input propionic, acetic and butyric acid concentrations. An optimisation study was then conducted and optimal residence time and substrate inlet mass flow rate were found for maximum methane production. The optima found were very sharp, showing a sudden drop of methane mass flow rate variation from the observed maximum to zero, within a 20% range around the optimal operating parameters, which stresses the importance of their identification, no matter how complex the actual bioreactor design may be. The model is therefore expected to be a useful tool for simulation, design, control and

  2. Approximate maximum parsimony and ancestral maximum likelihood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alon, Noga; Chor, Benny; Pardi, Fabio; Rapoport, Anat

    2010-01-01

    We explore the maximum parsimony (MP) and ancestral maximum likelihood (AML) criteria in phylogenetic tree reconstruction. Both problems are NP-hard, so we seek approximate solutions. We formulate the two problems as Steiner tree problems under appropriate distances. The gist of our approach is the succinct characterization of Steiner trees for a small number of leaves for the two distances. This enables the use of known Steiner tree approximation algorithms. The approach leads to a 16/9 approximation ratio for AML and asymptotically to a 1.55 approximation ratio for MP.

  3. Acid hydrolysis of Curcuma longa residue for ethanol and lactic acid fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Cuong Mai; Nguyen, Thanh Ngoc; Choi, Gyung Ja; Choi, Yong Ho; Jang, Kyoung Soo; Park, Youn-Je; Kim, Jin-Cheol

    2014-01-01

    This research examines the acid hydrolysis of Curcuma longa waste, to obtain the hydrolysate containing lactic acid and ethanol fermentative sugars. A central composite design for describing regression equations of variables was used. The selected optimum condition was 4.91% sulphuric acid, 122.68°C and 50 min using the desirability function under the following conditions: the maximum reducing sugar (RS) yield is within the limited range of the 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) and furfural concentrations. Under the condition, the obtained solution contained 144 g RS/L, 0.79 g furfural/L and 2.59 g HMF/L and was directly fermented without a detoxification step. The maximum product concentration, average productivity, RS conversion and product yield were 115.36 g/L, 2.88 g/L/h, 89.43% and 64% for L-lactic acid; 113.92 g/L, 2.59 g/L/h, 88.31% and 63.29% for D-lactic acid; and 55.03 g/L, 1.38 g/L/h, 42.66 and 30.57%, respectively, for ethanol using a 7-L jar fermenter. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Simultaneous Determination of Salicylic Acid, Jasmonic Acid, Methyl Salicylate, and Methyl Jasmonate from Ulmus pumila Leaves by GC-MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-hong Huang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, methyl salicylate, and methyl jasmonate are important phytohormones and defensive signaling compounds, so it is of great importance to determine their levels rapidly and accurately. The study uses Ulmus pumila leaves infected by Tetraneura akinire Sasaki at different stages as materials; after extraction with 80% methanol and ethyl acetate and purification with primary secondary amine (PSA and graphitized carbon blacks (GCB, the contents of signal compounds salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, methyl salicylate, and methyl jasmonate were determined by GC-MS. The results showed that the level of salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, methyl salicylate, and methyl jasmonate increased remarkably in U. pumila once infected by T. akinire Sasaki, but the maximums of these four compounds occurred at different times. Salicylic acid level reached the highest at the early stage, and jasmonic acid level went to the maximum in the middle stage; by contrast, change of content of methyl salicylate and methyl jasmonate was the quite opposite.

  5. Simultaneous Determination of Salicylic Acid, Jasmonic Acid, Methyl Salicylate, and Methyl Jasmonate from Ulmus pumila Leaves by GC-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhi-Hong; Wang, Zhi-Li; Shi, Bao-Lin; Wei, Dong; Chen, Jian-Xin; Wang, Su-Li; Gao, Bao-Jia

    2015-01-01

    Salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, methyl salicylate, and methyl jasmonate are important phytohormones and defensive signaling compounds, so it is of great importance to determine their levels rapidly and accurately. The study uses Ulmus pumila leaves infected by Tetraneura akinire Sasaki at different stages as materials; after extraction with 80% methanol and ethyl acetate and purification with primary secondary amine (PSA) and graphitized carbon blacks (GCB), the contents of signal compounds salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, methyl salicylate, and methyl jasmonate were determined by GC-MS. The results showed that the level of salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, methyl salicylate, and methyl jasmonate increased remarkably in U. pumila once infected by T. akinire Sasaki, but the maximums of these four compounds occurred at different times. Salicylic acid level reached the highest at the early stage, and jasmonic acid level went to the maximum in the middle stage; by contrast, change of content of methyl salicylate and methyl jasmonate was the quite opposite.

  6. Enzymatic production of α-ketoglutaric acid from l-glutamic acid via l-glutamate oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Panqing; Dong, Xiaoxiang; Wang, Yuancai; Liu, Liming

    2014-06-10

    In this study, a novel strategy for α-ketoglutaric acid (α-KG) production from l-glutamic acid using recombinant l-glutamate oxidase (LGOX) was developed. First, by analyzing the molecular structure characteristics of l-glutamic acid and α-KG, LGOX was found to be the best catalyst for oxidizing the amino group of l-glutamic acid to a ketonic group without the need for exogenous cofactor. Then the LGOX gene was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) in a soluble and active form, and the recombinant LGOX activity reached to a maximum value of 0.59U/mL at pH 6.5, 30°C. Finally, the maximum α-KG concentration reached 104.7g/L from 110g/L l-glutamic acid in 24h, under the following optimum conditions: 1.5U/mL LGOX, 250U/mL catalase, 3mM MnCl2, 30°C, and pH 6.5. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. The chemical composition, botanical characteristic and biological activities of Borago officinalis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi-Samani, Majid; Bahmani, Mahmoud; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud

    2014-09-01

    Borage (Borago officinalis) is an annual herb which is cultivated for medicinal and culinary uses, although it is commercially cultivated for borage seed oil. Borage seed oil is the plant rich in the gamma-linolenic acid (26%-38%) which is used as dietary or food supplement. Other than seed oil it contains a lot of fatty acids such as linoleic acid (35%-38%), oleic acid (16%-20%), palmitic acid (10%-11%), stearic acid (3.5%-4.5%), eicosenoic acid (3.5%-5.5%) and erucic acid (1.5%-3.5%). It is used for the treatment of various diseases such as multiple sclerosis, diabetes, heart diseases, arthritis and eczema. In this study different aspects of borage such as plant characteristics, production, applications in traditional medicine, clinical considerations, its effects on patients' blood and urine biochemistry, and also the effect of the its products on liver and kidney performance tests are presented using published articles in scientific sites. Copyright © 2014 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The generalized F constraint in the maximum-entropy method - a study on simulated data

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Palatinus, Lukáš; van Smaalen, S.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 58, - (2002), s. 559-567 ISSN 0108-7673 Grant - others:DFG(DE) XX Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : maximum-entropy method * electron density * oxalic acid Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.417, year: 2002

  9. Properties of a membrane-bound triglyceride lipase of rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) cotyledons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosnitschek, I; Theimer, R R

    1980-04-01

    The properties of the alkaline lipase activity (EC 3.1.1.3) that was recovered almost completely from a microsomal membrane fraction of 4-d-old rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) cotyledons were studied employing a titrimetric test procedure. The apparent KM was 6.5 mmol l(-1), with emulgated sunflower oil as the substrate. The products of triglyceride hydrolysis in vitro were glycerol, free fatty acids, and minor amounts of mono- and diglycerides. Maximum lipase activity depended on the preincubation of the lipolytic membrane fraction in 0.15 mol l(-1) NaCl and on the presence of at least 0.1 mol l(-1) NaCl in the test mixture. Desoxycholate and up to 0.1 mol l(-1) CaCl2 also activated the enzyme while EDTA and detergents such as trito x-100, digitonin, tween 85, and sodium dodecylsulfate were inhibitory. The rapeseed lipase displayed a conspicuous substrate selectivity among different plant triglycerides; the activity was inversely correlated with the oleic acid content of the oils. Water-soluble triacetin and the phospholipid lecithin were not hydrolyzed. Increasing amounts of free fatty acids reduced lipase activity; erucic acid, a major component of rapeseed oil, exhibited the strongest effect, suggesting a possible role in the regulation of lipase activity in vivo. The data demonstrate that the lipolytic membrane fraction houses a triglyceride lipase with properties similar to other plant and animal lipases. It can both qualitatively and quantitatively account for the fat degradation in rapeseed cotyledons. The evidence that provides further reason to acknowledge the membranous appendices of the spherosomes as the intracellular site of lipolysis is discussed.

  10. Using Maximum Entropy to Find Patterns in Genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sophia; Hockenberry, Adam; Lancichinetti, Andrea; Jewett, Michael; Amaral, Luis

    The existence of over- and under-represented sequence motifs in genomes provides evidence of selective evolutionary pressures on biological mechanisms such as transcription, translation, ligand-substrate binding, and host immunity. To accurately identify motifs and other genome-scale patterns of interest, it is essential to be able to generate accurate null models that are appropriate for the sequences under study. There are currently no tools available that allow users to create random coding sequences with specified amino acid composition and GC content. Using the principle of maximum entropy, we developed a method that generates unbiased random sequences with pre-specified amino acid and GC content. Our method is the simplest way to obtain maximally unbiased random sequences that are subject to GC usage and primary amino acid sequence constraints. This approach can also be easily be expanded to create unbiased random sequences that incorporate more complicated constraints such as individual nucleotide usage or even di-nucleotide frequencies. The ability to generate correctly specified null models will allow researchers to accurately identify sequence motifs which will lead to a better understanding of biological processes. National Institute of General Medical Science, Northwestern University Presidential Fellowship, National Science Foundation, David and Lucile Packard Foundation, Camille Dreyfus Teacher Scholar Award.

  11. Comparison of Buffer Effect of Different Acids During Sandstone Acidizing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafiq, Mian Umer; Mahmud, Hisham Khaled Ben; Hamid, Mohamed Ali

    2015-01-01

    The most important concern of sandstone matrix acidizing is to increase the formation permeability by removing the silica particles. To accomplish this, the mud acid (HF: HCl) has been utilized successfully for many years to stimulate the sandstone formations, but still it has many complexities. This paper presents the results of laboratory investigations of different acid combinations (HF: HCl, HF: H 3 PO 4 and HF: HCOOH). Hydrofluoric acid and fluoboric acid are used to dissolve clays and feldspar. Phosphoric and formic acids are added as a buffer to maintain the pH of the solution; also it allows the maximum penetration of acid into the core sample. Different tests have been performed on the core samples before and after the acidizing to do the comparative study on the buffer effect of these acids. The analysis consists of permeability, porosity, color change and pH value tests. There is more increase in permeability and porosity while less change in pH when phosphoric and formic acids were used compared to mud acid. From these results it has been found that the buffer effect of phosphoric acid and formic acid is better than hydrochloric acid. (paper)

  12. Maximum permissible dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    This chapter presents a historic overview of the establishment of radiation guidelines by various national and international agencies. The use of maximum permissible dose and maximum permissible body burden limits to derive working standards is discussed

  13. Porous structure and surface chemistry of phosphoric acid activated carbon from corncob

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sych, N.V.; Trofymenko, S.I.; Poddubnaya, O.I.; Tsyba, M.M.; Sapsay, V.I.; Klymchuk, D.O.; Puziy, A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Phosphoric acid activation results in formation of carbons with acidic surface groups. ► Maximum amount of surface groups is introduced at impregnation ratio 1.25. ► Phosphoric acid activated carbons show high capacity to copper. ► Phosphoric acid activated carbons are predominantly microporous. ► Maximum surface area and pore volume achieved at impregnation ratio 1.0. - Abstract: Active carbons have been prepared from corncob using chemical activation with phosphoric acid at 400 °C using varied ratio of impregnation (RI). Porous structure of carbons was characterized by nitrogen adsorption and scanning electron microscopy. Surface chemistry was studied by IR and potentiometric titration method. It has been shown that porosity development was peaked at RI = 1.0 (S BET = 2081 m 2 /g, V tot = 1.1 cm 3 /g), while maximum amount of acid surface groups was observed at RI = 1.25. Acid surface groups of phosphoric acid activated carbons from corncob includes phosphate and strongly acidic carboxylic (pK = 2.0–2.6), weakly acidic carboxylic (pK = 4.7–5.0), enol/lactone (pK = 6.7–7.4; 8.8–9.4) and phenol (pK = 10.1–10.7). Corncob derived carbons showed high adsorption capacity to copper, especially at low pH. Maximum adsorption of methylene blue and iodine was observed for carbon with most developed porosity (RI = 1.0).

  14. Porous structure and surface chemistry of phosphoric acid activated carbon from corncob

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sych, N.V.; Trofymenko, S.I.; Poddubnaya, O.I.; Tsyba, M.M. [Institute for Sorption and Endoecology Problems, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 13 General Naumov St., 03164 Kyiv (Ukraine); Sapsay, V.I.; Klymchuk, D.O. [M.G. Kholodny Institute of Botany, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 2 Tereshchenkivska St., 01601 Kyiv (Ukraine); Puziy, A.M., E-mail: alexander.puziy@ispe.kiev.ua [Institute for Sorption and Endoecology Problems, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 13 General Naumov St., 03164 Kyiv (Ukraine)

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phosphoric acid activation results in formation of carbons with acidic surface groups. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Maximum amount of surface groups is introduced at impregnation ratio 1.25. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phosphoric acid activated carbons show high capacity to copper. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phosphoric acid activated carbons are predominantly microporous. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Maximum surface area and pore volume achieved at impregnation ratio 1.0. - Abstract: Active carbons have been prepared from corncob using chemical activation with phosphoric acid at 400 Degree-Sign C using varied ratio of impregnation (RI). Porous structure of carbons was characterized by nitrogen adsorption and scanning electron microscopy. Surface chemistry was studied by IR and potentiometric titration method. It has been shown that porosity development was peaked at RI = 1.0 (S{sub BET} = 2081 m{sup 2}/g, V{sub tot} = 1.1 cm{sup 3}/g), while maximum amount of acid surface groups was observed at RI = 1.25. Acid surface groups of phosphoric acid activated carbons from corncob includes phosphate and strongly acidic carboxylic (pK = 2.0-2.6), weakly acidic carboxylic (pK = 4.7-5.0), enol/lactone (pK = 6.7-7.4; 8.8-9.4) and phenol (pK = 10.1-10.7). Corncob derived carbons showed high adsorption capacity to copper, especially at low pH. Maximum adsorption of methylene blue and iodine was observed for carbon with most developed porosity (RI = 1.0).

  15. Obtaining a new variety of rape by biotechnology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Z H; Cun, S X; Zhang, Z Z; Wang, W F; Zhang, T H; Li, W B; Zhang, L H [Institute of Genetics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); [Laboratory of Genetic Engineering, Yunnan Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Kunming (China)

    1990-01-01

    Full text: High-frequency induction of pollen embryoids and plantlets of rape was obtained by stepped float anther culture. In addition, somatic embryoids and plantlets were induced with a high frequency from several species by cell suspension culture. The erucic acid (EA) content of embryoids was analysed by a micro-analysis technique and a semi-micro-analysis of glucosinolates (GS) content in culture was used. A new variety 'H86-166' with low EA and low GS content was selected by these techniques. It gave a yield of 3169 kg/ha and has been released for commercial production on about 1000 ha in Yunnan Province. (author)

  16. Evaluation of Hanford high level waste vitrification chemistry for an NCAW simulant -- FY 1994: Potential exothermic reactions in the presence of formic acid, glycolic acid, and oxalic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sills, J.A.

    1995-07-01

    A potential for an uncontrollable exothermic reaction between nitrate and organic salts during preparation of a high level waste melter feed has been identified. In order to examine this potential more closely, the thermal behavior of simulated neutralized current acid waste (NCAW) treated with various organic reductants was studied. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements were collected on simulated waste samples and their supernates treated with organics. Organic reductants used were formic acid, glycolic acid, and oxalic acid. For comparison, samples of untreated simulant and untreated simulant with added noble metals were tested. When heated, untreated simulant samples both with and without noble metals showed no exothermic behavior. All of the treated waste simulant samples showed exothermic behavior. Onset temperatures of exothermic reactions were 120 C to 210 C. Many onset temperatures, particularly those for formic acid treated samples, are well below 181 C, the estimated maximum steam coil temperature (considered to be a worst case maximum temperature for chemical process tank contents). The enthalpies of the reactions were {minus}180 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} J/Kg supernate ({minus}181 J/g) for the oxalic acid treated simulant supernate to {minus}1,150 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} J/Kg supernate ({minus}1,153 J/g) for the formic acid treated simulant supernate.

  17. Evaluation of Hanford high level waste vitrification chemistry for an NCAW simulant -- FY 1994: Potential exothermic reactions in the presence of formic acid, glycolic acid, and oxalic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sills, J.A.

    1995-07-01

    A potential for an uncontrollable exothermic reaction between nitrate and organic salts during preparation of a high level waste melter feed has been identified. In order to examine this potential more closely, the thermal behavior of simulated neutralized current acid waste (NCAW) treated with various organic reductants was studied. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements were collected on simulated waste samples and their supernates treated with organics. Organic reductants used were formic acid, glycolic acid, and oxalic acid. For comparison, samples of untreated simulant and untreated simulant with added noble metals were tested. When heated, untreated simulant samples both with and without noble metals showed no exothermic behavior. All of the treated waste simulant samples showed exothermic behavior. Onset temperatures of exothermic reactions were 120 C to 210 C. Many onset temperatures, particularly those for formic acid treated samples, are well below 181 C, the estimated maximum steam coil temperature (considered to be a worst case maximum temperature for chemical process tank contents). The enthalpies of the reactions were -180 x 10 -3 J/Kg supernate (-181 J/g) for the oxalic acid treated simulant supernate to -1,150 x 10 -3 J/Kg supernate (-1,153 J/g) for the formic acid treated simulant supernate

  18. Acid phosphatase and lipid peroxidation in human cataractous lens epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasavada Abhay

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available The anterior lens epithelial cells undergo a variety of degenerative and proliferative changes during cataract formation. Acid phosphatase is primarily responsible for tissue regeneration and tissue repair. The lipid hydroperoxides that are obtained by lipid peroxidation of polysaturated or unsaturated fatty acids bring about deterioration of biological membranes at cellular and tissue levels. Acid phosphatase and lipid peroxidation activities were studied on the lens epithelial cells of nuclear cataract, posterior subcapsular cataract, mature cataract, and mixed cataract. Of these, mature cataractous lens epithelium showed maximum activity for acid phosphatase (516.83 moles of p-nitrophenol released/g lens epithelium and maximum levels of lipid peroxidation (86.29 O.D./min/g lens epithelium. In contrast, mixed cataractous lens epithelium showed minimum activity of acid phosphatase (222.61 moles of p-nitrophenol released/g lens epithelium and minimum levels of lipid peroxidation (54.23 O.D./min/g lens epithelium. From our study, we correlated the maximum activity of acid phosphatase in mature cataractous lens epithelium with the increased areas of superimposed cells associated with the formation of mature cataract. Likewise, the maximum levels of lipid peroxidation in mature cataractous lens epithelium was correlated with increased permeability of the plasma membrane. Conversely, the minimum levels of lipid peroxidation in mixed cataractous lens epithelium makes us presume that factors other than lipid peroxidation may also account for the formation of mixed type of cataract.

  19. Sugar yields from dilute oxalic acid pretreatment of maple wood compared to those with other dilute acids and hot water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Taiying; Kumar, Rajeev; Wyman, Charles E

    2013-01-30

    Dilute oxalic acid pretreatment was applied to maple wood to improve compatibility with downstream operations, and its performance in pretreatment and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis was compared to results for hydrothermal and dilute hydrochloric and sulfuric acid pretreatments. The highest total xylose yield of ∼84% of the theoretical maximum was for both 0.5% oxalic and sulfuric acid pretreatment at 160 °C, compared to ∼81% yield for hydrothermal pretreatment at 200 °C and for 0.5% hydrochloric acid pretreatment at 140 °C. The xylooligomer fraction from dilute oxalic acid pretreatment was only 6.3% of the total xylose in solution, similar to results with dilute hydrochloric and sulfuric acids but much lower than the ∼70% value for hydrothermal pretreatment. Combining any of the four pretreatments with enzymatic hydrolysis with 60 FPU cellulase/g of glucan plus xylan in the pretreated maple wood resulted in virtually the same total glucose plus xylose yields of ∼85% of the maximum possible. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Acid rain abatement in Belgium: lessons in cost-effectiveness studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuijpers, C.; Proost, S.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper a cost-effectiveness analysis is presented for combating emissions of acid precursors. The focus of concern is to reach the environmental quality goal at least cost. Two cost-effective approaches are elaborated. Firstly, the maximum allowable emission of each acid precursor seperately is allocated in a cost-effective way across the economic sectors. Secondly, the maximum allowable emissions of acid precursors are allocated in a cost-effective way across the three considered acid precursors as well as across the economic sectors. It is argued that not only the energy consumption but also the agricultural sector could play an important role in a cost-effective strategy by curtailing its ammonia emissions. 6 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  1. The effects of gamma irradiation on morphological, cytological and biochemical characters of double-low rape (Brassica napus L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Huajun; He Yuanhui; Chen Xuifang

    1992-01-01

    The dormant seeds of three varieties of double-low rape were treated with 0, 80, 100, 120, 140 and 160 krad of γ-ray. The dose-effect curves of survival rate, yield, length of pod, rate of bearing pods and oil content in rapeseed fit the equation: y = Exp (-Ax-Bx 2 ). The dose-effect curves of field germination rate, seed bearing rate, number of seeds per pod and chromosome aberration rate fit the equation: y = A + Bx. The dose-effect curve of morphological malformation rate fit the equation: y = Ae Bx . The contents of erucic acid, linolenic acid, glucosinolates and protein in rapeseed changed irregularly with the increase of doses of gamma irradiation. Close correlation were found among the effects of irradiation on morphological, cytological and biochemical characters. The radiosensitivities of rape varieties were apparently different

  2. Biosynthesis of triacylglycerols containing very long chain monounsaturated acyl moieties in developing seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fehling, E.; Murphy, D.J.; Mukherjee, K.D.

    1990-01-01

    Particulate (15,000g) fractions from developing seeds of honesty (Lunaria annua L.) and mustard (Sinapis alba L.) synthesize radioactive very long chain monounsaturated fatty acids (gadoleic, erucic, and nervonic) from [1- 14 C]oleoyl-CoA and malonyl-CoA or from oleoyl-CoA and [2- 14 C]malonyl-CoA. The very long chain monounsaturated fatty acids are rapidly channeled to triacylglycerols and other acyl lipids without intermediate accumulation of their CoA thioesters. When [1- 14 C]oleoyl-CoA is used as the radioactive substrate, phosphatidylcholines and other phospholipids are most extensively radiolabeled by oleoyl moieties rather than by very long chain monounsaturated acyl moieties. When [2- 14 C]malonyl-CoA is used as the radioactive substrate, no radioactive oleic acid is formed and the newly synthesized very long chain monounsaturated fatty acids are extensively incorporated into phosphatidylcholines and other phospholipids as well as triacylglycerols. The pattern of labeling of the key intermediates of the Kennedy pathway, e.g. lysophosphatidic acids, phosphatidic acids, and diacylglycerols by the newly synthesized very long chain monounsaturated fatty acids is consistent with the operation of this pathway in the biosynthesis of triacylglycerols

  3. Microtensile strength of spruce pine after exposure to acids and bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    F.G. Manwiller; P.R. Godfrey

    1973-01-01

    Earlywood and latewood microtensile specimens from 12 trees of Pinus glabra Walt. were subjected to 10-percent solution of 5 acids and 3 bases at good for up to 3 hours. Hydrochloric and sulfuric acids were the most damaging, lowering maximum tensile strength 27 and 17 percent in earlywood and 36 and 39 percent in latewood; they reduced work to maximum load 40 percent...

  4. Cosmic shear measurement with maximum likelihood and maximum a posteriori inference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Alex; Taylor, Andy

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the problem of noise bias in maximum likelihood and maximum a posteriori estimators for cosmic shear. We derive the leading and next-to-leading order biases and compute them in the context of galaxy ellipticity measurements, extending previous work on maximum likelihood inference for weak lensing. We show that a large part of the bias on these point estimators can be removed using information already contained in the likelihood when a galaxy model is specified, without the need for external calibration. We test these bias-corrected estimators on simulated galaxy images similar to those expected from planned space-based weak lensing surveys, with promising results. We find that the introduction of an intrinsic shape prior can help with mitigation of noise bias, such that the maximum a posteriori estimate can be made less biased than the maximum likelihood estimate. Second-order terms offer a check on the convergence of the estimators, but are largely subdominant. We show how biases propagate to shear estimates, demonstrating in our simple set-up that shear biases can be reduced by orders of magnitude and potentially to within the requirements of planned space-based surveys at mild signal-to-noise ratio. We find that second-order terms can exhibit significant cancellations at low signal-to-noise ratio when Gaussian noise is assumed, which has implications for inferring the performance of shear-measurement algorithms from simplified simulations. We discuss the viability of our point estimators as tools for lensing inference, arguing that they allow for the robust measurement of ellipticity and shear.

  5. Evaluation of the Dutch general exemption level for voluntary fortification with folic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janneke Verkaik-Kloosterman

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Fortification with folic acid was prohibited in the Netherlands. Since 2007, a general exemption is given to fortify with folic acid up until a maximum level of 100 µg/100 kcal. This maximum level was based on a calculation model and data of adults only. The model requires parameters on intake (diet, supplements, energy and on the proportion of energy that may be fortified. This study aimed to evaluate the model parameters considering the changing fortification market. In addition, the risk of young children exceeding the UL for folic acid was studied. Methods: Folic acid fortified foods present on the Dutch market were identified in product databases and by a supermarket inventory. Together with data of the Dutch National Consumption Survey-Young Children (2005/2006 these inventory results were used to re-estimate the model parameters. Habitual folic acid intake of young children was estimated and compared to the UL for several realistic fortification scenarios. Results: Folic acid fortified foods were identified in seven different food groups. In up to 10% of the population, the proportion of energy intake of folic acid fortified foods exceeded 10% – the original model parameter. The folic acid intake from food supplements was about 100 µg/day, which is lower than the intake assumed as the original model parameter (300 µg. In the scenarios representing the current market situation, a small proportion (<5% of the children exceeded the UL. Conclusion: The maximum fortification level of 100 µg/100 kcal is sufficiently protective for children in the current market situation. In the precautionary model to estimate the maximum fortification levels, subjects with high intakes of folic acid from food and supplements, and high energy intakes are protected from too high folic acid intakes. Combinations of high intakes are low in this population. The maximum levels should be monitored and revised with increasing fortification and

  6. Breeding cultivars of barley and mustard containing biochemical mutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oram, R N [Division of Plant industry, CSIRO, Canberra (Australia)

    1990-01-01

    Full text: The inactivation of dominant and co-dominant alleles is becoming increasingly important in changing the composition of seed carbohydrates, protein, oil, fibre and secondary products to suit modern food and feed technologies. In barley, breeding lines adapted to south-eastern Australian conditions have been developed containing a waxy endosperm from the Japanese variety 'Sumire Mochi', the high lysine gene lys from cv. 'Hiproly' of Ethiopia, and the induced high lysine mutant gene lys 3a from 'Risoe 1508'. The improved mutant lines yield 12-34% less than the highest yielding feed barley. The lys and lys 3a alleles suppress the formation of prolamins, the waxy allele inhibits the formation of amylose. It seems difficult to modify the background genotype to fully compensate for the reduction of major storage carbohydrate or protein compounds. However, waxy barleys have uses in some human foods and a premium can be paid to producers. The grain of the provisionally-patented waxy cultivar Wasiro is suitable for pearling. It contains 5% {beta}-glucan (soluble fibre) and therefore should be as effective as oat bran for reducing blood cholesterol. In Indian mustard (Brassica juncea), three cultivars differing in date of maturity, each containing the spontaneous mutant alleles for low erucic acid levels in the seed oil, have been developed to produce a high quality, mildly flavoured cooking/salad oil. The concentration of glucosinolates in the seed meal must be reduced to make it palatable and non-toxic to pigs and poultry. Three B. juncea lines were treated in up to four successive generations with gamma rays or EMS. 60,000 seed samples were analysed in subsequent generations. Two induced mutants with reduced glucosinolate concentrations are now available besides 4 naturally-occurring sources with only little reduced yields. Recombination may give a high-yielding low erucic acid and low glucosinolate variety of B. juncea. (author)

  7. Breeding cultivars of barley and mustard containing biochemical mutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oram, R.N.

    1990-01-01

    Full text: The inactivation of dominant and co-dominant alleles is becoming increasingly important in changing the composition of seed carbohydrates, protein, oil, fibre and secondary products to suit modern food and feed technologies. In barley, breeding lines adapted to south-eastern Australian conditions have been developed containing a waxy endosperm from the Japanese variety 'Sumire Mochi', the high lysine gene lys from cv. 'Hiproly' of Ethiopia, and the induced high lysine mutant gene lys 3a from 'Risoe 1508'. The improved mutant lines yield 12-34% less than the highest yielding feed barley. The lys and lys 3a alleles suppress the formation of prolamins, the waxy allele inhibits the formation of amylose. It seems difficult to modify the background genotype to fully compensate for the reduction of major storage carbohydrate or protein compounds. However, waxy barleys have uses in some human foods and a premium can be paid to producers. The grain of the provisionally-patented waxy cultivar Wasiro is suitable for pearling. It contains 5% β-glucan (soluble fibre) and therefore should be as effective as oat bran for reducing blood cholesterol. In Indian mustard (Brassica juncea), three cultivars differing in date of maturity, each containing the spontaneous mutant alleles for low erucic acid levels in the seed oil, have been developed to produce a high quality, mildly flavoured cooking/salad oil. The concentration of glucosinolates in the seed meal must be reduced to make it palatable and non-toxic to pigs and poultry. Three B. juncea lines were treated in up to four successive generations with gamma rays or EMS. 60,000 seed samples were analysed in subsequent generations. Two induced mutants with reduced glucosinolate concentrations are now available besides 4 naturally-occurring sources with only little reduced yields. Recombination may give a high-yielding low erucic acid and low glucosinolate variety of B. juncea. (author)

  8. 76 FR 45510 - Sulfanilic Acid From India and the People's Republic of China; Final Results of Third Expedited...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-29

    ..., refined (or purified) sulfanilic acid and sodium salt of sulfanilic acid. Sulfanilic acid is a synthetic... concrete additives. The principal differences between the grades are the undesirable quantities of residual... maximum aniline and 0.25 percent maximum alkali insoluble materials. Sodium salt (sodium sulfanilate...

  9. Potential Use of Gelidium amansii Acid Hydrolysate for Lactic Acid Production by Lactobacillus rhamnosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Soo Jang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Galactose and glucose are the main monosaccharides produced from the saccharification of Gelidium amansii. They were hydrolysed with 3 % (by volume H2SO4 at 140 °C for 5 min and obtained at concentrations of 19.60 and 10.21 g/L, respectively. G. amansii hydrolysate (5 %, by mass per volume was used as a substrate for L(+-lactic acid production by Lactobacillus rhamnosus. The maximum lactic acid yield (YP/S was 42.03 % with optical purity of 84.54 %. Lactic acid produced from G. amansii hydrolysate can be applicable, among others, for the production of lactic acid esters, like ethyl or methyl lactate, and disinfectant in seaweed cultivation.

  10. Maximum Acceleration Recording Circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Coarsely digitized maximum levels recorded in blown fuses. Circuit feeds power to accelerometer and makes nonvolatile record of maximum level to which output of accelerometer rises during measurement interval. In comparison with inertia-type single-preset-trip-point mechanical maximum-acceleration-recording devices, circuit weighs less, occupies less space, and records accelerations within narrower bands of uncertainty. In comparison with prior electronic data-acquisition systems designed for same purpose, circuit simpler, less bulky, consumes less power, costs and analysis of data recorded in magnetic or electronic memory devices. Circuit used, for example, to record accelerations to which commodities subjected during transportation on trucks.

  11. Neutron spectra unfolding with maximum entropy and maximum likelihood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Shikoh; Tsunoda, Toshiharu

    1989-01-01

    A new unfolding theory has been established on the basis of the maximum entropy principle and the maximum likelihood method. This theory correctly embodies the Poisson statistics of neutron detection, and always brings a positive solution over the whole energy range. Moreover, the theory unifies both problems of overdetermined and of underdetermined. For the latter, the ambiguity in assigning a prior probability, i.e. the initial guess in the Bayesian sense, has become extinct by virtue of the principle. An approximate expression of the covariance matrix for the resultant spectra is also presented. An efficient algorithm to solve the nonlinear system, which appears in the present study, has been established. Results of computer simulation showed the effectiveness of the present theory. (author)

  12. Maximum Power from a Solar Panel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Miller

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Solar energy has become a promising alternative to conventional fossil fuel sources. Solar panels are used to collect solar radiation and convert it into electricity. One of the techniques used to maximize the effectiveness of this energy alternative is to maximize the power output of the solar collector. In this project the maximum power is calculated by determining the voltage and the current of maximum power. These quantities are determined by finding the maximum value for the equation for power using differentiation. After the maximum values are found for each time of day, each individual quantity, voltage of maximum power, current of maximum power, and maximum power is plotted as a function of the time of day.

  13. The acidic properties of mixed tin and antimony oxide catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irving, E.A.; Taylor, D.

    1978-01-01

    The acidic properties of mixed tin + antimony oxide catalysts were studied in the isomerization of 3,3-dimethyl-1-butene, cyclopropane, 1-butene, and cis-2-butene and the dehydration of isopropanol over the mixed oxides outgassed at room temperature and 698/sup 0/K. Only the zero-order portions of the reaction were used for calculations. With catalysts outgassed at room temperature, weakly acidic sites were present, and all the reactions probably occurred by a carbonium ion mechanism with Broensted acid sites as a source of protons. The rates increased with increasing antimony content to a maximum at approx. 50 at. % and then decreased with further increase in the antimony content. Outgassing of the catalysts at 698/sup 0/K increased the isomerization rate of 3,3-dimethyl-1-butene, but decreased those for cyclopropane and isopropanol due to poisoning by the propylene produced. For 1-butene and cis-2-butene and catalysts outgassed at 698/sup 0/K, only catalysts with less than 50Vertical Bar3< antimony were active. The catalysts were poisoned by treatment with bases or with sodium acetate. A proposed correlation between rates and acidity led to the conclusion that the catalyst composition corresponding to maximum acidity differs from that for maximum selective oxidation activity. Graphs and 10 references.

  14. Bioconversion of sugar cane molasses into glutamic acid by gamma irradiated corynebacterium glutamicum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Batal, A.I.

    1996-01-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum (ATCC 13058) was used for glutamic acid production from sugar cane molasses which contain sufficient. The addition of 5 units ml 4 of penicillin G was superior in glutamic acid production (11.5 g L 4 ). Tweens and their saturated fatty acids were effective on the accumulation of glutamic acid in the culture medium and the maximum yield (16.6 g L 4 ) was the addition of 5 mg ml 4 Tween 40. Gamma irradiation prior to Tween-40 treatment of bacterial cells resulted in an obvious increase in glutamic acid production and it was maximum (23.72 g L 4 ) at 0.1 k Gy exposure dose of inocula. 5 tabs

  15. Abscisic Acid Stimulates Elongation of Excised Pea Root Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaither, Douglas H.; Lutz, Donald H.; Forrence, Leonard E.

    1975-01-01

    Excised Pisum sativum L. root tips were incubated in a pH 5.2 sucrose medium containing abscisic acid. Elongation growth was inhibited by 100 μm abscisic acid. However, decreasing the abscisic acid concentration caused stimulation of elongation, the maximum response (25% to 30%) occurring at 1 μm abscisic acid. Prior to two hours, stimulation of elongation by 1 μm abscisic acid was not detectable. Increased elongation did not occur in abscisic acid-treated root tips of Lens culinaris L., Phaseolus vulgaris L., or Zea mays L. PMID:16659198

  16. 21 CFR 184.1097 - Tannic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... characteristic odor, and has an astringent taste. Tannic acid is obtained by solvent extraction of nutgalls or... of food Maximum level of use in food (as served) (percent) Functional use Baked goods and baking...

  17. Chromium–tungsten–titanium mixed oxides solid catalyst for fatty acid methyl ester synthesis from palm fatty acid distillate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan, Zuraida; Hameed, B.H.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Chromium–tungsten–titanium mixed oxides as solid catalyst. • Catalyst used for esterification of palm fatty acid distillate to methyl esters. • The maximum methyl ester content is 83%. • Catalyst has shown good activity and can be recycled for 4 times. - Abstract: Chromium–tungsten–titanium mixed oxides solid catalysts were prepared and evaluated in the esterification of palm fatty acid distillate (PFAD) to produce fatty acid methyl ester (FAME). Esterification was conducted in a batch reactor at 110–200 °C temperature ranges. The catalysts were characterized by several techniques such as BET, TEM, FTIR, TGA, XRD, EDX and SEM. The treatment conditions during catalyst preparation, effect of reaction parameters, leaching of the active species and the recycled use of the catalyst were investigated. The catalyst with formula CrWTiO 2 was found to be the most active with maximum FAME content of 83% obtained at best reaction conditions of 170 °C for 3 h, 2:1 (methanol to oil molar ratio) and 2 wt.% catalyst dosage. The catalyst can be recycled for 4 times. The results revealed CrWTiO 2 good potentials for use in esterification of high acid value oil

  18. Acid Pretreatment of Sago Wastewater for Biohydrogen Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illi Mohamad Puad, Noor; Rahim, Nurainin Farhan Abd; Suhaida Azmi, Azlin

    2018-03-01

    Biohydrogen has been recognized to be one of the future renewable energy sources and has the potential in solving the greenhouse effects. In this study, Enterobacter aerogenes (E. aerogenes) was used as the biohydrogen producer via dark fermentation process using sago wastewater as the substrate. However, pretreatment of sago wastewater is required since it consists of complex sugars that cannot be utilized directly by the bacteria. This study aimed to use acid pretreatment method to produce high amount of glucose from sago wastewater. Three different types of acid: sulfuric acid (H2SO4); hydrochloric acid (HCl) and nitric acid (HNO3) were screened for the best acid in producing a maximum amount of glucose. H2SO4 gave the highest amount of glucose which was 9.406 g/L. Design of experiment was done using Face-centred Central Composite Design (FCCCD) tool under Response Surface Methodology (RSM) in Design Expert 9 software. The maximum glucose (9.138 g/L) was recorded using 1 M H2SO4 at 100 °C for 60 min. A batch dark fermentation using E. aerogenes was carried out and it was found that pretreated sago wastewater gave a higher hydrogen concentration (1700 ppm) compared to the raw wastewater (410 ppm).

  19. Maximum concentrations at work and maximum biologically tolerable concentration for working materials 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The meaning of the term 'maximum concentration at work' in regard of various pollutants is discussed. Specifically, a number of dusts and smokes are dealt with. The valuation criteria for maximum biologically tolerable concentrations for working materials are indicated. The working materials in question are corcinogeneous substances or substances liable to cause allergies or mutate the genome. (VT) [de

  20. 40 CFR 1042.140 - Maximum engine power, displacement, power density, and maximum in-use engine speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... cylinders having an internal diameter of 13.0 cm and a 15.5 cm stroke length, the rounded displacement would... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Maximum engine power, displacement... Maximum engine power, displacement, power density, and maximum in-use engine speed. This section describes...

  1. Application of Tryptophan Fluorescence Bandwidth-Maximum Plot in Analysis of Monoclonal Antibody Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Cheng-Yen; Hsieh, Ming-Ching; Zhou, Qinwei

    2017-04-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have become the fastest growing protein therapeutics in recent years. The stability and heterogeneity pertaining to its physical and chemical structures remain a big challenge. Tryptophan fluorescence has been proven to be a versatile tool to monitor protein tertiary structure. By modeling the tryptophan fluorescence emission envelope with log-normal distribution curves, the quantitative measure can be exercised for the routine characterization of monoclonal antibody overall tertiary structure. Furthermore, the log-normal deconvolution results can be presented as a two-dimensional plot with tryptophan emission bandwidth vs. emission maximum to enhance the resolution when comparing samples or as a function of applied perturbations. We demonstrate this by studying four different monoclonal antibodies, which show the distinction on emission bandwidth-maximum plot despite their similarity in overall amino acid sequences and tertiary structures. This strategy is also used to demonstrate the tertiary structure comparability between different lots manufactured for one of the monoclonal antibodies (mAb2). In addition, in the unfolding transition studies of mAb2 as a function of guanidine hydrochloride concentration, the evolution of the tertiary structure can be clearly traced in the emission bandwidth-maximum plot.

  2. Credal Networks under Maximum Entropy

    OpenAIRE

    Lukasiewicz, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We apply the principle of maximum entropy to select a unique joint probability distribution from the set of all joint probability distributions specified by a credal network. In detail, we start by showing that the unique joint distribution of a Bayesian tree coincides with the maximum entropy model of its conditional distributions. This result, however, does not hold anymore for general Bayesian networks. We thus present a new kind of maximum entropy models, which are computed sequentially. ...

  3. Maximum Entropy in Drug Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Yuan Tseng

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Drug discovery applies multidisciplinary approaches either experimentally, computationally or both ways to identify lead compounds to treat various diseases. While conventional approaches have yielded many US Food and Drug Administration (FDA-approved drugs, researchers continue investigating and designing better approaches to increase the success rate in the discovery process. In this article, we provide an overview of the current strategies and point out where and how the method of maximum entropy has been introduced in this area. The maximum entropy principle has its root in thermodynamics, yet since Jaynes’ pioneering work in the 1950s, the maximum entropy principle has not only been used as a physics law, but also as a reasoning tool that allows us to process information in hand with the least bias. Its applicability in various disciplines has been abundantly demonstrated. We give several examples of applications of maximum entropy in different stages of drug discovery. Finally, we discuss a promising new direction in drug discovery that is likely to hinge on the ways of utilizing maximum entropy.

  4. Maximum Quantum Entropy Method

    OpenAIRE

    Sim, Jae-Hoon; Han, Myung Joon

    2018-01-01

    Maximum entropy method for analytic continuation is extended by introducing quantum relative entropy. This new method is formulated in terms of matrix-valued functions and therefore invariant under arbitrary unitary transformation of input matrix. As a result, the continuation of off-diagonal elements becomes straightforward. Without introducing any further ambiguity, the Bayesian probabilistic interpretation is maintained just as in the conventional maximum entropy method. The applications o...

  5. Weighted Maximum-Clique Transversal Sets of Graphs

    OpenAIRE

    Chuan-Min Lee

    2011-01-01

    A maximum-clique transversal set of a graph G is a subset of vertices intersecting all maximum cliques of G. The maximum-clique transversal set problem is to find a maximum-clique transversal set of G of minimum cardinality. Motivated by the placement of transmitters for cellular telephones, Chang, Kloks, and Lee introduced the concept of maximum-clique transversal sets on graphs in 2001. In this paper, we study the weighted version of the maximum-clique transversal set problem for split grap...

  6. Precipitation behavior of uranium in multicomponent solution by oxalic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Y.J.; Kim, I.S.; Lee, W.K.; Shin, H.S.; Ro, S.G.

    1996-01-01

    A study on the precipitation of uranium by oxalic acid was carried out in a multicomponent solution. The precipitation method is usually applied to the treatment of radioactive waste and the recovery of uranium from a uranium-scrap contaminated with impurities. In these cases, the problem is how to increase the precipitation yield of target element and to prevent impurities from coprecipitation. The multicomponent solution in the present experiment was prepared by dissolving U, Nd, Cs and Sr in nitric acid. The effects of concentrations of oxalic acid and ascorbic acid on the precipitation yield and purity of uranium were observed. As results of the study, the maximum precipitation yield of uranium is revealed to be about 96.5% and the relative precipitation ratio of Nd, Cs and Sr versus uranium are discussed at the condition of the maximum precipitation yield of uranium, respectively. (author). 11 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  7. Arginine-vasopressin stimulates the formation of phosphatidic acid in rat Leydig cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J.R.; Hansen, Harald S.; Jensen, B.

    1987-01-01

    Arginine-vasopressin (AVP) stimulated the formation of labelled phosphatidic acid (PA) in [C]arachidonic acid-prelabelled rat Leydig cells. After addition of 10 M AVP [C]arachidonoylphosphatidic acid reached a maximum within 2 min. The increase was dose-dependent (10-10 M). No change in labelling...

  8. Maximum power demand cost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biondi, L.

    1998-01-01

    The charging for a service is a supplier's remuneration for the expenses incurred in providing it. There are currently two charges for electricity: consumption and maximum demand. While no problem arises about the former, the issue is more complicated for the latter and the analysis in this article tends to show that the annual charge for maximum demand arbitrarily discriminates among consumer groups, to the disadvantage of some [it

  9. Porous structure and surface chemistry of phosphoric acid activated carbon from corncob

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sych, N. V.; Trofymenko, S. I.; Poddubnaya, O. I.; Tsyba, M. M.; Sapsay, V. I.; Klymchuk, D. O.; Puziy, A. M.

    2012-11-01

    Active carbons have been prepared from corncob using chemical activation with phosphoric acid at 400 °C using varied ratio of impregnation (RI). Porous structure of carbons was characterized by nitrogen adsorption and scanning electron microscopy. Surface chemistry was studied by IR and potentiometric titration method. It has been shown that porosity development was peaked at RI = 1.0 (SBET = 2081 m2/g, Vtot = 1.1 cm3/g), while maximum amount of acid surface groups was observed at RI = 1.25. Acid surface groups of phosphoric acid activated carbons from corncob includes phosphate and strongly acidic carboxylic (pK = 2.0-2.6), weakly acidic carboxylic (pK = 4.7-5.0), enol/lactone (pK = 6.7-7.4; 8.8-9.4) and phenol (pK = 10.1-10.7). Corncob derived carbons showed high adsorption capacity to copper, especially at low pH. Maximum adsorption of methylene blue and iodine was observed for carbon with most developed porosity (RI = 1.0).

  10. Microspore culture of winter oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) in conjunction with other in vitro technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cegielska-Taras, T.; Szala, L.; Bartkowiak-Broda, I.

    2001-01-01

    Microspore culture in conjunction with other technologies such as selection, mutagenesis and transformation has been used for the production of novel genotypes of Brassica napus L. for crop improvement. The example of in vitro selection of microspore - derived embryos includes: a) ploidy level, b) seed oil composition (for example: high level of erucic acid), c) genotypes with restorer gene for CMS-ogura system (by means of isozyme marker PGI-2 ), d) herbicide resistant forms. Efficiency of microspore mutagenesis has been tested by the treatment of freshly isolated microspores with UV and MNU. Direct delivery of foreign gene to the microspores (microprojectile bombardment) combined with the use of Agrobacterium tumefaciens to microspore derived embryos seems to be a promising way of oilseed rape transformation. (author)

  11. Effects of ambient and elevated level of ozone on Brassica campestris L. with special reference to yield and oil quality parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Ruchika; Agrawal, S B

    2012-11-01

    Tropospheric ozone (O(3)) has become a serious threat to growth and yield of important agricultural crops over Asian regions including India. Effect of elevated O(3) (ambient+10ppb) was studied on Brassica campestris L. (cv. Sanjukta and Vardan) in open top chambers under natural field conditions. Eight hourly mean ambient O(3) concentration varied from 26.3ppb to 69.5ppb during the growth period. Plants under O(3) exposure showed reductions in photosynthetic rate, reproductive parameters, yield as well as seed and oil quality. Cultivar Sanjukta showed more reduction in photosynthetic characteristics, reproductive structures and seed and oil quality. However, total yield was more affected in Vardan. Exposure of O(3) increased the degree of unsaturation and level of PUFA, ω-6fatty acid, linolenic acid and erucic acid in oil indicating the deterioration of its quality. The study further confirmed that there is a correspondence between O(3) induced change in photosynthetic processes, reproductive development and yield and did not find any compensatory response in the final yield. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Influence of Poly-(L-Lactic Acid Nanofiber Functionalization on Maximum Load, Young's Modulus, and Strain of Nanofiber Scaffolds Before and After Cultivation of Osteoblasts: An In Vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Paletta

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to characterize the influence of functionalization of synthetic poly-(L-lactic acid (PLLA nanofibers on mechanical properties such as maximum load, elongation, and Young's modulus. Furthermore, the impact of osteoblast growth on the various nanofiber scaffolds stability was determined. Nanofiber matrices composed of PLLA, PLLA-collagen, or BMP-2–incorporated PLLA were produced from different solvents by electrospinning. Standardized test samples of each nanofiber scaffold were subjected to failure protocol before or after incubation in the presence of osteoblasts over a period of 22 days under osteoinductive conditions. PLLA nanofibers electrospun from hexafluoroisopropanol (HFIP showed a higher strain and tended to have increased maximum loads and Young's modulus compared to PLLA fibers spun from dichloromethane. In addition, they had a higher resistance during incubation in the presence of cells. Functionalization by incorporation of growth factors increased Young's modulus, independent of the solvent used. However, the incorporation of growth factors using the HFIP system resulted in a loss of strain. Similar results were observed when PLLA was blended with different ratios of collagen. Summarizing the results, this study indicates that different functionalization strategies influence the mechanical stability of PLLA nanofibers. Therefore, an optimization of nanofibers should not only account for the optimization of biological effects on cells, but also has to consider the stability of the scaffold.

  13. Spectrophotometric determination of tungsten with salicylic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncalves, Z.C.

    1976-10-01

    The method comprises the complexation of tungsten with salicylic acid in concentrated sulphuric acid yielding a reddish color. The maximum absorbance of the complex lies within 410-420 nm, 420 nm being the chosen wavelenght. The final concentration of salicylic acid is 0,080 g/ml. The sensitivity is 0,13 μg W(%T) -1 ml -1 . Titanium, vanadium, rhenium, niobium and molybdenum interferes and must be separated, titanium being the strongest interferent. The separation procedures, advantages of the process, stoichiometric relations and equilibrium constant are discussed. (Author) [pt

  14. Scientific Opinion on the safety of refined Buglossoides oil as a novel food ingredient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    2015-01-01

    . With the exceptions of SDA and GLA, these FAs are widely present in common foods. The NFI is intended to be used in a range of foods and food supplements to provide approximately 200 mg of SDA per day. Upon digestion, FAs are used primarily as an energy source. ALA and SDA can be elongated and desaturated to produce......Following a request from the European Commission, the EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) was asked to deliver a scientific opinion on refined Buglossoides oil as a novel food ingredient (NFI) in the context of Regulation (EC) No 258/97. The NFI is produced from the seeds...... eicosapentaenoic acid. In human studies using various sources of SDA, no increase or small increases in SDA were observed in blood cell membranes or in total plasma. The proposed specifications for pyrrolizidine alkaloids and erucic acid, which are undesirable substances,do not give rise to concern in view...

  15. 49 CFR 230.24 - Maximum allowable stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Maximum allowable stress. 230.24 Section 230.24... Allowable Stress § 230.24 Maximum allowable stress. (a) Maximum allowable stress value. The maximum allowable stress value on any component of a steam locomotive boiler shall not exceed 1/4 of the ultimate...

  16. Occurrence of Conjugated Linolenic Acids in Purified Soybean Oil

    OpenAIRE

    Kinami, Tomohisa; Horii, Naoto; Narayan, Bhaskar; Arato, Shingo; Hosokawa, Masashi; Miyashita, Kazuo; Negishi, Hironori; Ikuina, Junichi; Noda, Ryuji; Shirasawa, Seiichi

    2007-01-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method is described for the determination of conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) and conjugated linolenic acids (CLN). Methyl esters prepared from purified lipid fractions of soybean oil were analyzed using an HPLC system equipped with photodiode-array detector to detect peaks having maximum absorption around 233 and 275 nm. These peaks were concentrated by AgNO3-silicic acid column chromatography and reversed-phase HPLC. The structural analysis, o...

  17. Simultaneous estimation of mefenamic acid and ethamsylate in tablets

    OpenAIRE

    Garg G; Saraf Swarnlata; Saraf S

    2007-01-01

    The simple spectrophotometric methods for the determination of mefenamic acid and ethamsylate in pharmaceutical formulations have been developed. The methods are based on the additivity of absorbances and the determination of graphical absorbance ratio at two selected wavelengths, one being the isoabsorptive point for the two drugs (301 nm) and the other being the absorption maximum of mefenamic acid (336 nm) and ethamsylate (305 nm). The Beer Lambert′s law is obeyed for mefenamic acid...

  18. Production of vanillic acid from vanillin by resting cells of Serratia marcescens.

    OpenAIRE

    Perestelo, F; Dalcón, M A; de la Fuente, G

    1989-01-01

    Resting-cell suspensions of Serratia marcescens were able to convert, quantitatively, 0.3% vanillin to vanillic acid. The vanillic acid-producing activity reached a maximum after 28 h of incubation with 0.01% vanillin as an inducer.

  19. A maximum power point tracking for photovoltaic-SPE system using a maximum current controller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muhida, Riza [Osaka Univ., Dept. of Physical Science, Toyonaka, Osaka (Japan); Osaka Univ., Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Park, Minwon; Dakkak, Mohammed; Matsuura, Kenji [Osaka Univ., Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Tsuyoshi, Akira; Michira, Masakazu [Kobe City College of Technology, Nishi-ku, Kobe (Japan)

    2003-02-01

    Processes to produce hydrogen from solar photovoltaic (PV)-powered water electrolysis using solid polymer electrolysis (SPE) are reported. An alternative control of maximum power point tracking (MPPT) in the PV-SPE system based on the maximum current searching methods has been designed and implemented. Based on the characteristics of voltage-current and theoretical analysis of SPE, it can be shown that the tracking of the maximum current output of DC-DC converter in SPE side will track the MPPT of photovoltaic panel simultaneously. This method uses a proportional integrator controller to control the duty factor of DC-DC converter with pulse-width modulator (PWM). The MPPT performance and hydrogen production performance of this method have been evaluated and discussed based on the results of the experiment. (Author)

  20. Caffeoylquinic Acids Generated In Vitro in a High-Anthocyanin-Accumulating Sweet potato Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Konczak

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Accumulation of phenolic compounds has been monitored in a suspension culture of anthocyanin-accumulating sweet potato cell line grown under the conditions of modified Murashige and Skoog high-anthocyanin production medium (APM over a period of 24 days. Tissue samples extracted with 15% acetic acid were analysed using HPLC at a detection wavelength of 326 nm. Among others, the following derivatives of caffeoylquinic acids were detected: 4,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid, 3,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid, 3,4-dicaffeoylquinic acid, and 3,4,5-tricaffeoylquinic acid. Their total amount reached a maximum of 110 mg/gFW between the 4th and the 15th day of culture growth on APM. The major compound of the phenolic mixture was 3,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid with maximum accumulation level of 80 mg/100 gFW. The potential effects of targeted phenolic compounds on the nutraceutical qualities of in vitro produced anthocyanin-rich extracts are discussed.

  1. Studies on inorganic exchangers - polyantimonic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murthy, T.S.; Balasubramanian, K.R.; Ananthakrishnan, M.; Ramani, K.S.; Varma, R.N.

    1976-01-01

    From the detailed experimental investigations carried out, it may be mentioned that the inorganic exchanger polyantimonic acid could be used for effectively separating strontium from fission product waste solutions free from caesium and zirconium at acidities of the order of 2M or so. After thorough washing of the column with 2M HNO 3 acid to remove any residual activity unadsorbed, the strontium can be eluted with a mixture of 1M AgNO 3 +6M HNO 3 at room temperature. The column after regeneration and conditioning can be used for further adsorption and elution up to a maximum of 6 cycles without much deterioration in column characteristics. (author)

  2. Lake Basin Fetch and Maximum Length/Width

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Linear features representing the Fetch, Maximum Length and Maximum Width of a lake basin. Fetch, maximum length and average width are calcuated from the lake polygon...

  3. Production of vanillic acid from vanillin by resting cells of Serratia marcescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perestelo, F; Dalcón, M A; de la Fuente, G

    1989-01-01

    Resting-cell suspensions of Serratia marcescens were able to convert, quantitatively, 0.3% vanillin to vanillic acid. The vanillic acid-producing activity reached a maximum after 28 h of incubation with 0.01% vanillin as an inducer. PMID:2669632

  4. Maximum permissible voltage of YBCO coated conductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, J.; Lin, B.; Sheng, J.; Xu, J.; Jin, Z. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Hong, Z., E-mail: zhiyong.hong@sjtu.edu.cn [Department of Electrical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Wang, D.; Zhou, H.; Shen, X.; Shen, C. [Qingpu Power Supply Company, State Grid Shanghai Municipal Electric Power Company, Shanghai (China)

    2014-06-15

    Highlights: • We examine three kinds of tapes’ maximum permissible voltage. • We examine the relationship between quenching duration and maximum permissible voltage. • Continuous I{sub c} degradations under repetitive quenching where tapes reaching maximum permissible voltage. • The relationship between maximum permissible voltage and resistance, temperature. - Abstract: Superconducting fault current limiter (SFCL) could reduce short circuit currents in electrical power system. One of the most important thing in developing SFCL is to find out the maximum permissible voltage of each limiting element. The maximum permissible voltage is defined as the maximum voltage per unit length at which the YBCO coated conductors (CC) do not suffer from critical current (I{sub c}) degradation or burnout. In this research, the time of quenching process is changed and voltage is raised until the I{sub c} degradation or burnout happens. YBCO coated conductors test in the experiment are from American superconductor (AMSC) and Shanghai Jiao Tong University (SJTU). Along with the quenching duration increasing, the maximum permissible voltage of CC decreases. When quenching duration is 100 ms, the maximum permissible of SJTU CC, 12 mm AMSC CC and 4 mm AMSC CC are 0.72 V/cm, 0.52 V/cm and 1.2 V/cm respectively. Based on the results of samples, the whole length of CCs used in the design of a SFCL can be determined.

  5. Modification of Aliphatic Petroleum Resin by Peracetic Acid

    OpenAIRE

    Bondaletov, Vladimir Grigoryevich; Bondaletova, Lyudmila Ivanovna; Hamlenko, A.; Bondaletov, Oleg Vladimirovich; Starovoit, M.

    2014-01-01

    This work demonstrates the possibility of obtaining modified aliphatic resin (PRC5) by means of petroleum resin oxidation by peracetic acid. We have experimentally determined oxidation conditions that lead to producing resin with maximum epoxy and acid numbers. Ratio of "oxidative system: PRC5" is 0.5:1, process duration is 2 hours. The modified resin structure is determined by IR and NMR spectroscopy.

  6. MEGA5: Molecular Evolutionary Genetics Analysis Using Maximum Likelihood, Evolutionary Distance, and Maximum Parsimony Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Koichiro; Peterson, Daniel; Peterson, Nicholas; Stecher, Glen; Nei, Masatoshi; Kumar, Sudhir

    2011-01-01

    Comparative analysis of molecular sequence data is essential for reconstructing the evolutionary histories of species and inferring the nature and extent of selective forces shaping the evolution of genes and species. Here, we announce the release of Molecular Evolutionary Genetics Analysis version 5 (MEGA5), which is a user-friendly software for mining online databases, building sequence alignments and phylogenetic trees, and using methods of evolutionary bioinformatics in basic biology, biomedicine, and evolution. The newest addition in MEGA5 is a collection of maximum likelihood (ML) analyses for inferring evolutionary trees, selecting best-fit substitution models (nucleotide or amino acid), inferring ancestral states and sequences (along with probabilities), and estimating evolutionary rates site-by-site. In computer simulation analyses, ML tree inference algorithms in MEGA5 compared favorably with other software packages in terms of computational efficiency and the accuracy of the estimates of phylogenetic trees, substitution parameters, and rate variation among sites. The MEGA user interface has now been enhanced to be activity driven to make it easier for the use of both beginners and experienced scientists. This version of MEGA is intended for the Windows platform, and it has been configured for effective use on Mac OS X and Linux desktops. It is available free of charge from http://www.megasoftware.net. PMID:21546353

  7. Intramolecular synergistic effect of glutamic acid, cysteine and glycine against copper corrosion in hydrochloric acid solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Daquan; Xie Bin; Gao Lixin; Cai Qirui; Joo, Hyung Goun; Lee, Kang Yong

    2011-01-01

    The corrosion protection of copper by glutamic acid, cysteine, glycine and their derivative (glutathione) in 0.5 M hydrochloric acid solution has been studied by the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. The inhibition efficiency of the organic inhibitors on copper corrosion increases in the order: glutathione > cysteine > cysteine + glutamic acid + glycine > glutamic acid > glycine. Maximum inhibition efficiency for cysteine reaches about 92.9% at 15 mM concentration level. The glutathione can give 96.4% inhibition efficiency at a concentration of 10 mM. The molecular structure parameters were obtained by PM3 (Parametric Method 3) semi-empirical calculation. The intramolecular synergistic effect of glutamic acid, cysteine and glycine moieties in glutathione is attributed to the lower energy of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (E LUMO ) level and to the excess hetero-atom adsorption centers and the bigger coverage on the copper surface.

  8. Receiver function estimated by maximum entropy deconvolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴庆举; 田小波; 张乃铃; 李卫平; 曾融生

    2003-01-01

    Maximum entropy deconvolution is presented to estimate receiver function, with the maximum entropy as the rule to determine auto-correlation and cross-correlation functions. The Toeplitz equation and Levinson algorithm are used to calculate the iterative formula of error-predicting filter, and receiver function is then estimated. During extrapolation, reflective coefficient is always less than 1, which keeps maximum entropy deconvolution stable. The maximum entropy of the data outside window increases the resolution of receiver function. Both synthetic and real seismograms show that maximum entropy deconvolution is an effective method to measure receiver function in time-domain.

  9. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF OXALIC ACID PRODUCED FROM RICE HUSK AND PADDY

    OpenAIRE

    P.I. Oghome; K.O.Amanze; C.I.O.Kamalu; A.C Nkwocha; S.O.Opebiyi

    2012-01-01

    In this research work, comparative analysis of Oxalic acid produced from Rice husk and Paddy was carried out in order to ascertain which waste sample produced a better yield. Nitric acid oxidation of carbohydrates was the method adopted in the production. The variable ratios of HNO3:H2SO4 used were 80:20, 70:30, 60:40, and 50:50. The variable ratio of 60:40 gave the maximum yield and at a maximum temperature of 75oC. Rice husk sample gave a percentage yield of 53.2, 64.4, 81.0, and 53.3 at te...

  10. Lactic acid production from wheat straw hemicellulose hydrolysate by Lactobacillus pentosus and Lactobacillus brevis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garde, Arvid; Jonsson, Gunnar Eigil; Schmidt, A. S.

    2002-01-01

    Lactic acid production by Lactobacillus brevis and Lactobacillus pentosus on a hemicellulose hydrolysate (HH) of wet-oxidized wheat straw was evaluated. The potential of 11-12 g/l fermentable sugars was released from the HH through either enzymatic or acidic pretreatment. Fermentation of added......% of the theoretical maximum yield after enzymatic, or acid treatment of HH, respectively. Individually, neither of the two strains were able to fully utilize the relatively broad spectra of sugars released by the acid and enzyme treatments; however, lactic acid production increased to 95% of the theoretical maximum...... yield by co-inoculation of both strains. Xylulose was the main sugar released after enzymatic treatment of HH with Celluclast(R). Lb. brevis was able to degrade xylobiose, but was unable to assimilate xylulose, whereas Lb. pentosus was able to assimilate xylulose but unable to degrade xylobiose. (C...

  11. Bromosubstituted aryl hydroxamic acids and their analytical application towards some transition metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, Salah Elnaiem

    1997-01-01

    Four aryl substituted hydroxamic acids were prepared: N-phenyl-N-p-bromobenzohydroxamic acid, N-phenyl-N-o-bromobenzohydroxamic acid, p-methyl-N-phenyl-N-p-bromobenzohydroxamic acid and P-methyl-N-phenyl-N-o-bromobenzohydroxamic acid by the reaction of β-phenylhydroxylamine and p-methyl-β phenylhydroxylamine with the corresponding acid chloride. The acids were identified by their melting points, elemental analysis (nitrogen and bromine contents), infrared and ultraviolet absorption in chloroform, as well as reactions towards acidic solutions of vanadium (V) and iron (III) to give violet and blood-red coulured complexes in the chloroform layer respectively. The extractability of these acids towards chromium (VI), molybdenum (VI), iron (III), vanadium (V), copper (II) and cobalt (II) was investigated. N-phenyl-N-p-bromobenzohydroxamic acid has a maximum extraction for chromium (VI) 96.00% at 1M H 2 SO 4 , molybdenum (VI) 87.00% at pH 1, iron (III) 73.90% at pH 4, vanadium (V) 93.00% at pH 1, cobalt (II) 83.10 at pH 8 and copper (II) 93.80% at pH 6. N-phenyl-N-o-bromobenzohydroxamic acid has a maximum extraction for chromium (VI) 97.00% at 1M H 2 SO 4 , molybdenum (VI) 92.70% at pH 1, iron (III) 71.20% at pH 4, vanadium (V) 90.00% at pH 1, cobalt (II) 54.70% at pH 7 and copper (II) 86.50% at pH 5. P-methyl-N-phenyl-N-p-bromobenzohydroxamic acid has a maximum extraction for chromium (VI) 98.70% at 1M H 2 SO 4 , molybdenum (VI) 74.00% at pH 1, iron (III) 69.60% at pH 5, vandium (V) 76.00% at pH 1, cobalt (II) 51.20% at pH 8 and copper (II) 82.20% at pH 5. P-methyl-N-phenyl-N-o-bromobenzohydroxamic acid has a maximum extraction for chromium (VI) 51.00% at 1M H 2 SO 4 , molybdenum (VI) 84.70% at pH 1, iron (III) 66.00% at pH 4, vandium (V) 88.00% at pH 1, cobalt (II) 50.00% at pH 7 and copper (II) 78.6% at pH 6. Twenty four of hydroxamic acids complexes of Cr (VI), Mo (VI), V (V), Fe (III), Co (II) and Cu (II) were prepared by the reaction of these acids with the six

  12. Conversion of Aqueous Ammonia-Treated Corn Stover to Lactic Acid by Simultaneous Saccharification and Cofermentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yongming; Lee, Y. Y.; Elander, Richard T.

    Treatment of corn stover with aqueous ammonia removes most of the structural lignin, whereas retaining the majority of the carbohydrates in the solids. After treatment, both the cellulose and hemicellulose in corn stover become highly susceptible to enzymatic digestion. In this study, corn stover treated by aqueous ammonia was investigated as the substrate for lactic acid production by simultaneous saccharification and cofermentation (SSCF). A commercial cellulase (Spezyme-CP) and Lactobacillus pentosus American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) 8041 (Spanish Type Culture Collection [CECT]-4023) were used for hydrolysis and fermentation, respectively. In batch SSCF operation, the carbohydrates in the treated corn stover were converted to lactic acid with high yields, the maximum lactic acid yield reaching 92% of the stoichiometric maximum based on total fermentable carbohydrates (glucose, xylose, and arabinose). A small amount of acetic acid was also produced from pentoses through the phosphoketolase pathway. Among the major process variables for batch SSCF, enzyme loading and the amount of yeast extract were found to be the key factors affecting lactic acid production. Further tests on nutrients indicated that corn steep liquor could be substituted for yeast extract as a nitrogen source to achieve the same lactic acid yield. Fed-batch operation of the SSCF was beneficial in raising the concentration of lactic acid to a maximum value of 75.0 g/L.

  13. Maximum Gene-Support Tree

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunfeng Shan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Genomes and genes diversify during evolution; however, it is unclear to what extent genes still retain the relationship among species. Model species for molecular phylogenetic studies include yeasts and viruses whose genomes were sequenced as well as plants that have the fossil-supported true phylogenetic trees available. In this study, we generated single gene trees of seven yeast species as well as single gene trees of nine baculovirus species using all the orthologous genes among the species compared. Homologous genes among seven known plants were used for validation of the finding. Four algorithms—maximum parsimony (MP, minimum evolution (ME, maximum likelihood (ML, and neighbor-joining (NJ—were used. Trees were reconstructed before and after weighting the DNA and protein sequence lengths among genes. Rarely a gene can always generate the “true tree” by all the four algorithms. However, the most frequent gene tree, termed “maximum gene-support tree” (MGS tree, or WMGS tree for the weighted one, in yeasts, baculoviruses, or plants was consistently found to be the “true tree” among the species. The results provide insights into the overall degree of divergence of orthologous genes of the genomes analyzed and suggest the following: 1 The true tree relationship among the species studied is still maintained by the largest group of orthologous genes; 2 There are usually more orthologous genes with higher similarities between genetically closer species than between genetically more distant ones; and 3 The maximum gene-support tree reflects the phylogenetic relationship among species in comparison.

  14. LIME EFFECTIVENESS OF SOME FERTILIZERS IN A TROPICAL ACID ALFISOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercy Omogbohu Anetor

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Liming increases production costs and environmentally unfriendly. Effectiveness of crystalliser (CRYS, single super phosphate (SSP and organic fertilizer (OF for liming was evaluated by determining pH and phosphorus- (P- availability in an acid alfisol incubated with the amendments, Ca(OH2 being reference. Treatments were replicated thrice in completely randomised design. Un-amended soil remained acidic (pH 4.8 but liming raised pH (6.1-6.6, enhancing maximum (15.09-17.33 mg kg-1 P–release (un-amended having 4.24-7.09 mg P kg-1. Lime (L and L+P treatments resulted in maximum pH increases (7.0-7.2, decreasing with incubation. Fertilizer treatments also raised pH (5.0-5.5 for OF, CRYS or SSP; 5.6-5.8 for CRYS +SSP, CRYS+OF and OF+SSP relative to control (5.2. Acid soil infertility-ameliorating potential of CRYS and OF was revealed. They could be used multi-purposely as lime and P fertilizers by poor-resource farmers challenged by acid soil infertility factors.

  15. Batch fermentation of whey ultra filtrate by Lactobacillus helveticus for lactic acid production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, D; Goulet, J; Le Duy, Q

    1986-06-01

    Cheese whey ultrafiltrate (WU) was used as the carbon source for the production of lactic acid by batch fermentation with Lactobacillus helveticus strain milano. The fermentation was conducted in a 400 ml fermentor at an agitation rate of 200 revolutions per minute and under conditions of controlled temperature (42 degrees C) and pH. In the whey ultrafiltrate-corn steep liquor (WU-CSL) medium, the optimal pH for fermentation was 5.9. Inoculum propagated in skim milk (SM) medium or in lactose synthetic (LS) medium resulted in the best performance in fermentation (in terms of growth, lactic acid production, lactic acid yield and maximum productivity of lactic acid), as compared to that propagated in glucose synthetic (GS) medium. The yeast extract ultrafiltrate (YEU) used as the nitrogen/growth factor source in the WU medium at 1.5% (w/v) gave the highest maximum productivity of lactic acid of 2.70 g/l-h, as compared to the CSL and the tryptone ultrafiltrate (TU). 27 references.

  16. Maximum neutron flux in thermal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strugar, P.V.

    1968-12-01

    Direct approach to the problem is to calculate spatial distribution of fuel concentration if the reactor core directly using the condition of maximum neutron flux and comply with thermal limitations. This paper proved that the problem can be solved by applying the variational calculus, i.e. by using the maximum principle of Pontryagin. Mathematical model of reactor core is based on the two-group neutron diffusion theory with some simplifications which make it appropriate from maximum principle point of view. Here applied theory of maximum principle are suitable for application. The solution of optimum distribution of fuel concentration in the reactor core is obtained in explicit analytical form. The reactor critical dimensions are roots of a system of nonlinear equations and verification of optimum conditions can be done only for specific examples

  17. Using genetic transformation to produce enhanced levels of erucic acid and novel wax esters in Crambe abyssinica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qi, W.

    2014-01-01

    Crambe abyssinica (crambe) is een oliehoudend gewas dat grote potentie heeft als industrieel uitgangsmateriaal. In het onderzoek beschreven in dit proefschrift werd een solide transformatieprotocol ontwikkeld voor crambe. Om tegemoet te komen aan de eisen voor introductie in het milieu die de EU

  18. 75 FR 43840 - Inflation Adjustment of the Ordinary Maximum and Aggravated Maximum Civil Monetary Penalties for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-27

    ...-17530; Notice No. 2] RIN 2130-ZA03 Inflation Adjustment of the Ordinary Maximum and Aggravated Maximum... remains at $250. These adjustments are required by the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act [email protected] . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act of 1990...

  19. Half-width at half-maximum, full-width at half-maximum analysis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    addition to the well-defined parameter full-width at half-maximum (FWHM). The distribution of ... optical side-lobes in the diffraction pattern resulting in steep central maxima [6], reduc- tion of effects of ... and broad central peak. The idea of.

  20. Rhizoremediation of Diesel-Contaminated Soil with Two Rapeseed Varieties and Petroleum degraders Reveals Different Responses of the Plant Defense Mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wojtera-Kwiczor, Joanna; Żukowska, Weronika; Graj, Weronika

    2014-01-01

    . The oxidative stress was enhanced in LEAR being exposed to sole diesel oil, in comparison with HEAR. However, when LEAR plants were additionally inoculated with bacteria, suppression of total catalase (CAT) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activity were observed. Interestingly, glutathione transferase (GST......Plant-assisted bioremediation (rhizoremediation) stands out as a potential tool to inactivate or completely remove xenobiotics from the polluted environment. Therefore, it is of key importance to find an adequate combination of plant species and microorganisms that together enhance the clean......-up process. To understand the response of plants upon bioaugmentation, the antioxidative and detoxification system was analyzed in high and low erucic acid rapeseed varieties (HEAR and LEAR, respectively), after 8 weeks of their treatment with petroleum degraders and 6000 mg diesel oil/kg dry soil...

  1. Two-dimensional maximum entropy image restoration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brolley, J.E.; Lazarus, R.B.; Suydam, B.R.; Trussell, H.J.

    1977-07-01

    An optical check problem was constructed to test P LOG P maximum entropy restoration of an extremely distorted image. Useful recovery of the original image was obtained. Comparison with maximum a posteriori restoration is made. 7 figures

  2. The Role of Amino Acids in Gluconeogenesis in Lactating Ruminants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Black, A. L.; Egan, A. R.; Anand, R. S.; Chapman, T. E. [Department of Physiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    1968-07-01

    Gluconeogenesis has an important metabolic role in all animals, but it is especially important in ruminants because of the paucity of their alimentary glucose. Several amino acids give rise to glucogenic precursors during metabolism and thus dietary or body protein represents an important source of potential glucogenic material that the ruminant can utilize to manufacture the glucose required for its physiological functions. The role of various amino acids as glucose precursors has been evaluated in lactating ruminants by making a single intravenous injection of several different amino acids uniformly labelled with {sup 14}C and following, with time, the rate and extent of incorporation of {sup 14}C into the plasma glucose. The time interval after injecting each {sup 14}C-amino acid until the specific activity maximum occurred in plasma glucose was found to vary widely among the different amino acids. Thus, the maximum specific activity in plasma glucose occurred 6 min after injection of L-aspartate-{sup 14}C and 15 min after injection of L-glutamate- {sup 14}C, while for L-valine-{sup 14}C and L-arginine-{sup 14}C the maximum specific activity in plasma glucose did not occur until 45 and 90 min, respectively, had elapsed. After injection of L-serine and L-alanine there were several maxima in the glucose specific activity. These maxima occurred between 12 and 24 min after injection of serine and during the first 30 min after injection of alanine indicating that carbon from these amino acids becomes available for glucose synthesis along diverse pathways which have different delays. Although only a few amino acids have been studied, the experimental results obtained clearly suggest an important metabolic role for protein in ruminants which has previously not been recognized. It appears that amino acids, released from protein, are utilized by the animal in a fashion which results in a prolonged availability of glucogenic precursors so that the animal can form glucose

  3. Maximum power point tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enslin, J.H.R.

    1990-01-01

    A well engineered renewable remote energy system, utilizing the principal of Maximum Power Point Tracking can be m ore cost effective, has a higher reliability and can improve the quality of life in remote areas. This paper reports that a high-efficient power electronic converter, for converting the output voltage of a solar panel, or wind generator, to the required DC battery bus voltage has been realized. The converter is controlled to track the maximum power point of the input source under varying input and output parameters. Maximum power point tracking for relative small systems is achieved by maximization of the output current in a battery charging regulator, using an optimized hill-climbing, inexpensive microprocessor based algorithm. Through practical field measurements it is shown that a minimum input source saving of 15% on 3-5 kWh/day systems can easily be achieved. A total cost saving of at least 10-15% on the capital cost of these systems are achievable for relative small rating Remote Area Power Supply systems. The advantages at larger temperature variations and larger power rated systems are much higher. Other advantages include optimal sizing and system monitor and control

  4. 7 CFR 3565.210 - Maximum interest rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maximum interest rate. 3565.210 Section 3565.210... AGRICULTURE GUARANTEED RURAL RENTAL HOUSING PROGRAM Loan Requirements § 3565.210 Maximum interest rate. The interest rate for a guaranteed loan must not exceed the maximum allowable rate specified by the Agency in...

  5. Preparation of N-1 -naphthyl benzo- and N-phenyl benzo hydroxamic acids and study of their extractability towards Fe (III), Cr (VI) and U (VI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamed, Eltoum Elnour [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Khartoum, Khartoum (Sudan)

    1997-12-01

    Two aryl hydroxamic acids were prepared; The N-phenyl benzo hydroxamic acid and the N-1- naphthyl benzohydroxamic acid the first one was prepared by the partial reduction of nitrobenzene to the {beta}-phenyl hydroxylamine and coupling the latter with benzyl chloride. The reduction was carried out using ammonium chloride and zinc dust; this pair failed after so many attempts to give the N-1- naphthyl hydroxylamine. So the latter was prepared by using a somewhat milder reducing agent; hydrogen sulphide and ammonia gas in absolute alcohol. The two acids were obtained using the modified procedure of Tandon coupling the hydroxylamine with benzoyl chloride. The two acids were characterized by their melting points, elemental analysis, their I.R functional group frequencies and by their characteristic colour tests with vanadium (VI) and Iron (III). The acids were used for the extraction and spectrophotometric determination for iron (III), Chromium (VI), and Uranium (VI) from different molar solution, PH and from synthetic sea water. The maximum recovery of iron (III) occurred at PH 4 and PH 5 giving 92.25 and 91.25% when using N-1-naphthyl benzo hydroxamic acid and a maximum recovery of 100% at PH 5 with other acid. The maximum recovery of Chromium (VI) occurred at 3MH{sup 2}SO{sup 4} of 97.50% when using N-1-naphthyl benzohydroxamic acid and a maximum of 94.25% at the same molar concentration with N-phenyl benzo hydroxamic acid. The maximum recovery for Uranium (VI) was occurred at PH 7 giving 100% when using N-1-naphthyl benzo hydroxamic acid and a maximum recovery of 85% at PH 7 and PH* with the other acid. The two reagents give sharp colour with both iron (III) and chromium (VI), so trials were carried out to compare the curves obtained with that of the original reagent i.e. Thiocynate and diphenylcarbazide, which give a smaller slope.(Author) 121 refs. , 15 tabs. , 13 figs

  6. Preparation of N-1 -naphthyl benzo- and N-phenyl benzo hydroxamic acids and study of their extractability towards Fe (III), Cr (VI) and U (VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, Eltoum Elnour

    1997-12-01

    Two aryl hydroxamic acids were prepared; The N-phenyl benzo hydroxamic acid and the N-1- naphthyl benzohydroxamic acid the first one was prepared by the partial reduction of nitrobenzene to the β-phenyl hydroxylamine and coupling the latter with benzyl chloride. The reduction was carried out using ammonium chloride and zinc dust; this pair failed after so many attempts to give the N-1- naphthyl hydroxylamine. So the latter was prepared by using a somewhat milder reducing agent; hydrogen sulphide and ammonia gas in absolute alcohol. The two acids were obtained using the modified procedure of Tandon coupling the hydroxylamine with benzoyl chloride. The two acids were characterized by their melting points, elemental analysis, their I.R functional group frequencies and by their characteristic colour tests with vanadium (VI) and Iron (III). The acids were used for the extraction and spectrophotometric determination for iron (III), Chromium (VI), and Uranium (VI) from different molar solution, PH and from synthetic sea water. The maximum recovery of iron (III) occurred at PH 4 and PH 5 giving 92.25 and 91.25% when using N-1-naphthyl benzo hydroxamic acid and a maximum recovery of 100% at PH 5 with other acid. The maximum recovery of Chromium (VI) occurred at 3MH 2 SO 4 of 97.50% when using N-1-naphthyl benzohydroxamic acid and a maximum of 94.25% at the same molar concentration with N-phenyl benzo hydroxamic acid. The maximum recovery for Uranium (VI) was occurred at PH 7 giving 100% when using N-1-naphthyl benzo hydroxamic acid and a maximum recovery of 85% at PH 7 and PH* with the other acid. The two reagents give sharp colour with both iron (III) and chromium (VI), so trials were carried out to compare the curves obtained with that of the original reagent i.e. Thiocynate and diphenylcarbazide, which give a smaller slope.(Author)

  7. Effect of processing on nutrients and fatty acid composition of garden cress (Lepidium sativum) seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Tanu; Grover, Kiran; Kaur, Gurpreet

    2016-12-15

    Garden cress seeds were undergone for different processing methods and analyzed for its nutritional composition. Effect of processing on nutrient retention was evaluated to attain the best processed form of seeds with maximum amount of nutrients. Soaking improved protein and ash by 2.10 and 2.48 percent respectively. Boiling improved fat and fibre by 1.66 and 8.32 percent respectively. Maximum retention of iron and zinc was found with roasting. It also improved calcium by 3.18 percent. Percent ionizable iron and bioavailability was found maximum with boiling (13.59 and 6.88% respectively). In vitro starch and protein digestibility were found maximum on boiling (57.98 and 32.39% respectively) with a decrease of 9.65 and 14.13 percent in phytin phosphorus and oxalate respectively. Amino acids and fatty acids were decreased with heat treatment and maximum retention was found with soaking. Overall improvement in nutrient composition and maximum nutrient retention was found with boiling method. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Bromosubstituted aryl hydroxamic acids and their analytical application towards some transition metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamed, Salah Elnaiem [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Khartoum, Khartoum (Sudan)

    1997-07-01

    Four aryl substituted hydroxamic acids were prepared: N-phenyl-N-p-bromobenzohydroxamic acid, N-phenyl-N-o-bromobenzohydroxamic acid, p-methyl-N-phenyl-N-p-bromobenzohydroxamic acid and P-methyl-N-phenyl-N-o-bromobenzohydroxamic acid by the reaction of {beta}-phenylhydroxylamine and p-methyl-{beta} phenylhydroxylamine with the corresponding acid chloride. The acids were identified by their melting points, elemental analysis (nitrogen and bromine contents), infrared and ultraviolet absorption in chloroform, as well as reactions towards acidic solutions of vanadium (V) and iron (III) to give violet and blood-red coulured complexes in the chloroform layer respectively. The extractability of these acids towards chromium (VI), molybdenum (VI), iron (III), vanadium (V), copper (II) and cobalt (II) was investigated. N-phenyl-N-p-bromobenzohydroxamic acid has a maximum extraction for chromium (VI) 96.00% at 1M H{sup 2}SO{sup 4}, molybdenum (VI) 87.00% at pH 1, iron (III) 73.90% at pH 4, vanadium (V) 93.00% at pH 1, cobalt (II) 83.10 at pH 8 and copper (II) 93.80% at pH 6. N-phenyl-N-o-bromobenzohydroxamic acid has a maximum extraction for chromium (VI) 97.00% at 1M H{sup 2}SO{sup 4}, molybdenum (VI) 92.70% at pH 1, iron (III) 71.20% at pH 4, vanadium (V) 90.00% at pH 1, cobalt (II) 54.70% at pH 7 and copper (II) 86.50% at pH 5. P-methyl-N-phenyl-N-p-bromobenzohydroxamic acid has a maximum extraction for chromium (VI) 98.70% at 1M H{sup 2}SO{sup 4}, molybdenum (VI) 74.00% at pH 1, iron (III) 69.60% at pH 5, vandium (V) 76.00% at pH 1, cobalt (II) 51.20% at pH 8 and copper (II) 82.20% at pH 5. P-methyl-N-phenyl-N-o-bromobenzohydroxamic acid has a maximum extraction for chromium (VI) 51.00% at 1M H{sup 2}SO{sup 4}, molybdenum (VI) 84.70% at pH 1, iron (III) 66.00% at pH 4, vandium (V) 88.00% at pH 1, cobalt (II) 50.00% at pH 7 and copper (II) 78.6% at pH 6. Twenty four of hydroxamic acids complexes of Cr (VI), Mo (VI), V (V), Fe (III), Co (II) and Cu (II) were prepared by the

  9. Fermentation of aqueous plant seed extracts by lactic acid bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schafner, D.W.; Beuchat, R.L.

    1986-05-01

    The effects of lactic acid bacterial fermentation on chemical and physical changes in aqueous extracts of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), peanut (Arachis hypogea), soybean (Glycine max), and sorghum (Sorghum vulgare) were studied. The bacteria investigated were Lactobacillus helveticus, L. delbrueckii, L. casei, L. bulgaricus, L. acidophilus, and Streptococcus thermophilus. Organisms were inoculated individually into all of the seed extracts; L. bulgaricus and S. thermophilus were also evaluated together as inocula for fermenting the legume extracts. During fermentation, bacterial population and changes in titratable acidity, pH, viscosity, and color were measured over a 72 h period at 37 degrees C. Maximum bacterial populations, titratable acidity, pH, and viscosity varied depending upon the type of extract and bacterial strain. The maximum population of each organism was influenced by fermentable carbohydrates, which, in turn, influenced acid production and change in pH. Change in viscosity was correlated with the amount of protein and titratable acidity of products. Color was affected by pasteurization treatment and fermentation as well as the source of extract. In the extracts inoculated simultaneously with L. bulgaricus and S. thermophilus, a synergistic effect resulted in increased bacterial populations, titratable acidity, and viscosity, and decreased pH in all the legume extracts when compared to the extracts fermented with either of these organisms individually. Fermented extracts offer potential as substitutes for cultured dairy products. 24 references.

  10. 21 CFR 184.1011 - Alginic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... used in food only within the following specific limitations: Category of food Maximum level of use in... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Alginic acid. 184.1011 Section 184.1011 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN...

  11. MXLKID: a maximum likelihood parameter identifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavel, D.T.

    1980-07-01

    MXLKID (MaXimum LiKelihood IDentifier) is a computer program designed to identify unknown parameters in a nonlinear dynamic system. Using noisy measurement data from the system, the maximum likelihood identifier computes a likelihood function (LF). Identification of system parameters is accomplished by maximizing the LF with respect to the parameters. The main body of this report briefly summarizes the maximum likelihood technique and gives instructions and examples for running the MXLKID program. MXLKID is implemented LRLTRAN on the CDC7600 computer at LLNL. A detailed mathematical description of the algorithm is given in the appendices. 24 figures, 6 tables

  12. Liquid-Phase Heat-Release Rates of the Systems Hydrazine-Nitric Acid and Unsymmetrical Dimethylhydrazine-Nitric Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somogyi, Dezso; Feiler, Charles E.

    1960-01-01

    The initial rates of heat release produced by the reactions of hydrazine and unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine with nitric acid were determined in a bomb calorimeter under conditions of forced mixing. Fuel-oxidant weight ratio and injection velocity were varied. The rate of heat release apparently depended on the interfacial area between the propellants. Above a narrow range of injection velocities representing a critical amount of interfacial area, the rates reached a maximum and were almost constant with injection velocity. The maximum rate for hydrazine was about 70 percent greater than that for unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine. The total heat released did not vary with mixture ratio over the range studied.

  13. Aspergillus niger whole-cell catalyzed synthesis of caffeic acid phenethyl ester in ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajapriya, Govindaraju; Morya, Vivek Kumar; Mai, Ngoc Lan; Koo, Yoon-Mo

    2018-04-01

    Synthesis of caffeic acid ester essentially requires an efficient esterification process to produce various kinds of medicinally important ester derivatives. In the present study, a comprehensive and comparative analysis of whole-cell catalyzed caffeic acid esters production in ionic liquids (ILs) media was performed. Olive oil induced mycelial mass of halotolerant Aspergillus niger (A.niger) EXF 4321 was freeze dried and used as a catalyst. To ensure maximum solubilization of caffeic acid for highest substrate loading several ILs were screened and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([Emim][Tf 2 N]) was found to have the maximum solubility and favoured for enzymatic activity of freeze dried mycelia. The whole-cell catalyzed synthesis of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) conditions were optimized and bioconversion up to 84% was achieved at a substrate molar ratio of 1:20 (caffeic acid:2-phenyl ethanol), 30°C for 12h. Results obtained during this study were encouraging and helpful to design a bioreactor system to produce caffeic acid derived esters. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Amination of oxy acids in aqueous solution by gamma-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ema, Kimiko; Kato, Taizo; Shinagawa, Mutsuaki

    1978-01-01

    Alanin, β-alanine, glicine, and aspartic, α-amino-n-butyric, and γ-amino-n-butyric acids were obtained by γ-irradiation of aqueous ammonia solutions of lactic, β-oxypropionic, glycolic, malic, α-oxybutyric, and γ-oxybutyric acids, respectively. The yields of amino acids were examined for functions of radiation dose (0.75 - 3.55Mrad), concentrations of oxy acid (0.01 - 0.1M) and ammonia (0.1 - 15M), and substances added as radical (potassium iodide), and hydrated electron (nitrous oxide) scavengers. The maximum G-values were 0.6 for alanine in a solution of 0.1M lactic acid-4M ammonia and some nitrous oxide and 1.14 for β-alanine in a solution of 0.1M β-oxypropionic acid and 0.7M ammonia. The yield of alanine increased with increased concentrations of lactic acid and ammonia due to saturation of nitrous oxide but decreased when potassium iodide (0.03M) was added. The yield of β-alanine showed a maximum increase at ca. 0.7M ammonia and decreased when potassium iodide and nitrous oxide were added. Serine was obtained from G = 0.002 in a solution of β-oxypropionic acid and increased to G = 0.058 due to saturation of nitrous oxide. The manner of chemical amination due to radiation was studied from the above results. In general, oxy acids from which hydrogen has been abstracted by an H or OH radical react with ammonia to form amino acids. The effect of ammonia concentration on the yield of amino acids demonstrates that the NH 2 radical abstracts the α-hydrogen of lactic acid but does not react with the β-hydrogen of β-oxypropionic acid. The effect of nitrous oxide indicates that hydrated electrons interfere with alanine formation, contribute to β-alanine formation, react with the carboxyl group of lactic acids to form lactamide, and abstract the β-hydroxyl group of β-oxypropionic acids to form β-alanine. (Bell, E.)

  15. Attempts at improving citric acid fermentation by Aspergillus niger in beet-molasses medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adham, N.Z. [National Research Centre, Cairo (Egypt). Products Dept.

    2002-08-01

    Natural oils with high unsaturated fatty acids content when added at concentrations of 2% and 4% (v/v) to beet molasses (BM) medium caused a considerable increase in citric acid yield from Aspergillus niger. The fermentation capacities were also examined for production of citric acid using BM-oil media under different fermentation conditions. Maximum citric acid yield was achieved in surface culture in the presence of 4% olive oil after 12 days incubation. (author)

  16. Effect of Temperature and pH on Formulating the Kinetic Growth Parameters and Lactic Acid Production of Lactobacillus bulgaricus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzieh Aghababaie

    2014-09-01

    Results: Second order model for Xmax, μmax, P and K was significant but product formation parameters were almost constant. The optimum values of temperature and pH for attaining maximum biomass, maximum specific growth rate, and maximum acid production were obtained at 44 °C and 5.7, respectively. Conclusions: The attained empirical mathematical correlations of RSM alongside the kinetic equations could be used to determine growth conditions under predefined temperature and pH in the fermentation process. Keywords: Lactobacillus bulgaricus, Richards model, Response surface methodology, Lactic acid production, Luedeking-Piret model

  17. 75 FR 40736 - Acetic Acid; Exemption from the Requirement of a Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-14

    ... an exemption from the requirement of a tolerance for residues of acetic acid, also known as vinegar... a maximum permissible level for residues of acetic acid, also known as vinegar. DATES: This... humans. It is also naturally produced during the fermentation process in a wide range of foods. In plants...

  18. A Review of the Phytochemistry and Pharmacological Activities of Raphani Semen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tung-Ting Sham

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The dried ripe seed of Raphanus sativus L., commonly known as radish seed (or Raphani Semen, is used as traditional Chinese medicine (TCM to treat constipation, chronic tracheitis, and hypertension. The major active compounds in Raphani Semen are alkaloids, glucosinolates, brassinosteroids, and flavonoids. Fatty acids are its main nutritional contents. Raphani Semen has been demonstrated to have beneficial effects on hypertension, obesity, diabetes mellitus, constipation, and cough. So far, there is no report about the adverse/toxic effects of this herb on humans. However, Raphani Semen processed by roasting was reported to exhibit some adverse effects on mice. Additionally, erucic acid, the main fatty acid in Raphani Semen, was shown to enhance the toxicity of doxorubicin. Thus, Raphani Semen has a potential risk of causing toxicity and drug interaction. In summary, Raphani Semen is a valuable TCM herb with multiple pharmacological effects. More studies on Raphani Semen could help better understand its pharmacological mechanisms so as to provide clear scientific evidence to explain its traditional uses, to identify its therapeutic potential on other diseases, and to understand its possible harmful effects.

  19. Microtensile strength of spruce pine after exposure to acids and bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd G. Manwiller; Paul R. Godfrey

    1972-01-01

    Earlywood and latewood microtensile specimens from 12 trees of Pinus glabra Wal. were subjected to 10-percent solution of 5 acids and 3 bases at 90oC for up to 3 hours. Hydrochloric and sulfuric acids were the most damaging, lowering maximum tensile strength 27 and 17 percent in earlywood and 36 and 39 percent in latewood; they...

  20. A new approach to microbial production of gallic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajpai, Bhakti; Patil, Shridhar

    2008-10-01

    In a new approach to microbial gallic acid production by Aspergillus fischeri MTCC 150, 40gL(-1) of tannic acid was added in two installments during the bioconversion phase of the process (25gL(-1) and 15gL(-1) at 32 and 44h respectively). The optimum parameters for the bioconversion phase were found to be temperature: 35°C, pH: slightly acidic (3.3-3.5), aeration: nil and agitation: 250 rpm. A maximum of 71.4% conversion was obtained after 71h fermentation with 83.3% product recovery. The yield was 7.35 g of gallic acid per g of biomass accumulated and the fermenter productivity was 0.56 g of gallic acid produced per liter of medium per hour.

  1. 78 FR 9845 - Minimum and Ordinary Maximum and Aggravated Maximum Civil Monetary Penalties for a Violation of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-12

    ... maximum penalty amount of $75,000 for each violation, except that if the violation results in death... the maximum civil penalty for a violation is $175,000 if the violation results in death, serious... Penalties for a Violation of the Hazardous Materials Transportation Laws or Regulations, Orders, Special...

  2. Microbial transformation of tannin-rich substrate to gallic acid through co-culture method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Rintu; Mukherjee, Gargi; Patra, Krushna Chandra

    2005-05-01

    Modified solid-state fermentation (MSSF) of tannin-rich substrate yielding tannase and gallic acid was carried out using a co-culture of the filamentous fungi, Rhizopus oryzae (RO IIT RB-13, NRRL 21498) and Aspergillus foetidus (GMRB013 MTCC 3557). Powdered fruits of Terminalia chebula and powdered pod cover of Caesalpinia digyna was used in the process and the different process parameters for maximum production of tannase and gallic acid by co-culture method were optimized through media engineering. MSSF was carried out at the optimum conditions of 30 degrees C and 80% relative humidity. The optimal pH and incubation period was 5.0 and 48 h respectively. Through the co-culture technique the maximum yield of tannase and gallic acid was found to be 41.3 U/ml and 94.8% respectively.

  3. Radioactively labelled phytic acid from maturing seeds of sinapis alba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaicher, F.M.; Mukherjee, K.D.

    1981-01-01

    Maturing seeds of Sinapis alba were incubated with D-[U- 14 C]glucose, sodium [1- 14 C] acetate or myo-[U 14 C] inositol in order to prepare radioactively labelled phytic acid with high specific activity. Although each substrate was utilized for the biosynthesis of phytic acid, maximum incorporation of radioactivity into phytic acid was found with myo-inositol. Radiochemical purity of the [U- 14 C]phytic acid preparations was confirmed by chromatographic techniques. Such preparations should be useful for the study of interaction of phytic acid with metal ions and proteins and may serve as substrate in the assay should be useful for the study of interaction of phytic acid with metal ions and proteins and may serve as substrate in the assay of phytase. (orig.)

  4. Effect of abscisic acid on the linoleic acid metabolism in developing maize embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abian, J.; Gelpi, E.; Pages, M.

    1991-01-01

    Partially purified protein extracts from maize (Zea mays L.) embryos, whether treated or not with abscisic acid (ABA), were incubated with linoleic acid (LA) and 1-[ 14 C]LA. The resulting LA metabolites were monitored by high performance liquid chromatography with a radioactivity detector and identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. α- and γ-ketol metabolites arising from 9-lipoxygenase activity were the more abundant compounds detected in the incubates, although the corresponding metabolites produced by 13-lipoxygenase were also present in the samples. In addition, a group of stereoisomers originating form two isomeric trihydroxy acids (9,12,13-trihydroxy-10-octadecenoic and 9,10,13-trihydroxy-11-octadecenoic acids) are described. Important variations in the relative proportions of the LA metabolites were observed depending on the embryo developmental stage and on ABA treatment. Two new ABA-induced compounds have been detected. These compounds are present in embryos at all developmental stages, being more abundant in old (60 days) embryos. Furthermore, ABA induction of these compounds is maximum at very young development stages, decreasing as maturation progresses. A tentative structure for these compounds (10-oxo-9,13-dihydroxy-11-octadecenoic acid and 12-oxo-9,13-dihydroxy-10-octadecenoic acid) is also provided. This study revealed an early stage in maize embryogenesis characterized by a higher relative sensitivity to ABA. The physiological importance of ABA on LA metabolism is discussed

  5. Performance analysis and comparison of an Atkinson cycle coupled to variable temperature heat reservoirs under maximum power and maximum power density conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, P.-Y.; Hou, S.-S.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, performance analysis and comparison based on the maximum power and maximum power density conditions have been conducted for an Atkinson cycle coupled to variable temperature heat reservoirs. The Atkinson cycle is internally reversible but externally irreversible, since there is external irreversibility of heat transfer during the processes of constant volume heat addition and constant pressure heat rejection. This study is based purely on classical thermodynamic analysis methodology. It should be especially emphasized that all the results and conclusions are based on classical thermodynamics. The power density, defined as the ratio of power output to maximum specific volume in the cycle, is taken as the optimization objective because it considers the effects of engine size as related to investment cost. The results show that an engine design based on maximum power density with constant effectiveness of the hot and cold side heat exchangers or constant inlet temperature ratio of the heat reservoirs will have smaller size but higher efficiency, compression ratio, expansion ratio and maximum temperature than one based on maximum power. From the view points of engine size and thermal efficiency, an engine design based on maximum power density is better than one based on maximum power conditions. However, due to the higher compression ratio and maximum temperature in the cycle, an engine design based on maximum power density conditions requires tougher materials for engine construction than one based on maximum power conditions

  6. Radiation-induced grafting of acrylic acid onto polypropylene film and its biodegradability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Dev K.; Bhunia, Haripada; Bajpai, Pramod K.; Chaudhari, C. V.; Dubey, K. A.; Varshney, L.

    2016-06-01

    Polypropylene based commodity polyolefins are widely used in packaging, manufacturing, electrical, pharmaceutical and other applications. The aim of the present work is to study the effect of grafting of acrylic acid on the biodegradability of acrylic acid grafted polypropylene. The effect of different conditions showed that grafting percentage increased with increase in monomer concentration, radiation dose and inhibitor concentration but decreased with increase in radiation dose rate. The maximum grafting of 159.4% could be achieved at optimum conditions. The structure of grafted polypropylene films at different degree of grafting was characterized by EDS, FTIR, TGA, DSC, SEM and XRD. EDS studies showed that the increase in acrylic acid grafting percentage increased the hydrophilicity of the grafted films. FTIR studies indicated the presence of acrylic acid on the surface of polypropylene film. TGA studies revealed that thermal stability decreased with increase in grafting percentage. DSC studies showed that melting temperature and crystallinity of the grafted polypropylene films lower than polypropylene film. SEM studies indicated that increase in acrylic acid grafting percentage increased the wrinkles in the grafted films. The maximum biodegradability could be achieved to 6.85% for 90.5% grafting. This suggested that microorganisms present in the compost could biodegrade acrylic acid grafted polypropylene.

  7. Evolutionary analysis of apolipoprotein E by Maximum Likelihood and complex network methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro de Jesus Benevides

    Full Text Available Abstract Apolipoprotein E (apo E is a human glycoprotein with 299 amino acids, and it is a major component of very low density lipoproteins (VLDL and a group of high-density lipoproteins (HDL. Phylogenetic studies are important to clarify how various apo E proteins are related in groups of organisms and whether they evolved from a common ancestor. Here, we aimed at performing a phylogenetic study on apo E carrying organisms. We employed a classical and robust method, such as Maximum Likelihood (ML, and compared the results using a more recent approach based on complex networks. Thirty-two apo E amino acid sequences were downloaded from NCBI. A clear separation could be observed among three major groups: mammals, fish and amphibians. The results obtained from ML method, as well as from the constructed networks showed two different groups: one with mammals only (C1 and another with fish (C2, and a single node with the single sequence available for an amphibian. The accordance in results from the different methods shows that the complex networks approach is effective in phylogenetic studies. Furthermore, our results revealed the conservation of apo E among animal groups.

  8. Kinetics Studies on citric acid production by gamma ray induced mutant of Aspergillus niger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Begum, A.A.; Choudhury, N.; Islam, M.S.

    1991-01-01

    Effect of cultural pH and incubation temperature on citric acid yield and kinetic patterns of citric acid fermentation by a natural isolate of aspergillus niger as CA16 and one of its gamma ray induced mutants were studied using cane molasses as growth and fermentation substrate. Mutant strain, 277/30 gave maximum citric acid yield of 85 g/l at pH 3.5 and 28 degree centigrade in molasses medium adjusted to 16% sugar and 25% prescott salt in the medium. Parent strain, CA16 gave a maximum yield of 34 g/l at pH 4.0 and 26 degree centigrade in molasses medium adjusted to 16% sugar and 100% prescott salt in the medium. In kinetic studies, strains showed combination kinetics of citric acid fermentation where product formation is directly related to growth and cell mass and indirectly related to carbohydrate uptake

  9. Leaching of basic oxygen furnace sludge with sulphuric acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Miškufová

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study the hydrometallurgical processing of BOF sludge in the sulphuric acid solutions under atmospheric pressureand temperatures up to 100 °C is investigated on a laboratory scale. The influence of sulphuric acid concentration, temperature, timeand liquid to solid ratio (L:S on the leaching process was studied. The main aim of this study was to determine optimal conditions whenthe maximum amount of zinc passes into the solution.

  10. Mycosporine like amino acids in brown algae

    OpenAIRE

    Serban Radu; Stoian Gheorghe

    2013-01-01

    Biosynthesis of mycosporine and accumulation in cells serves as protection, by shielding the cells sensitive molecules Mycosporine-like aminoacids (MAAs) are derivated compounds of mycosporine that contains an amino-cyclohexenimine ring liked to an amino acid, amino alcohol or amino group. They preesent absorbtion maximum between 320 and 360 nm.

  11. Citric acid production using immobilized conidia of Aspergillus niger TMB 2022

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsay, S.S.; To, K.Y.

    1987-02-20

    Conidia of Aspergillus niger TMB 2022 were immobilized in calcium alginate for the production of citric acid. A 1-ml condidia suspension containing ca. 2.32 x 10/sup 8/ conidia were entrapped into sodium alginate solution in order to prepare 3% Ca-alginate (w/v) gel bead. Immobilized conidia were inoculated into productive medium containing 14% sucrose, 0.25% (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/CO/sub 3/, 0.25% KH/sub 2/PO/sub 4/, and 0.025% MgSO/sub 4/.7H/sub 2/O with addition of 0.06 mg/l CuSO/sub 4/.5H/sub 2/O, 0.25 mg/l ZnCl/sub 2/, 1.3 mg/l FeCl/sub 3/.6H/sub 2/O, pH 3.8, and incubated at 35 degrees C for 13 days by surface culture to produce 61.53 g/l anhydrous citric acid. Under the same conditions with a batchwise culture, it was found that immobilized conidia could maintain a longer period for citric acid production (31 days): over 70 g/l anhydrous citric acid from runs No. 2-4, with the maximum yield for anhydrous citric acid reaching 77.02 g/l for run No. 2. In contrast, free conidia maintained a shorter acid-producing phase, circa 17 days; the maximum yield for anhydrous citric acid was 71.07 g/l for run No. 2 but dropped quickly as the run number increased. 14 references.

  12. Use of Nonspecific, Glutamic Acid-Free, Media and High Glycerol or High Amylase as Inducing Parameters for Screening Bacillus Isolates Having High Yield of Polyglutamic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxi, Nandita N

    2014-01-01

    Out of fifty-five Bacillus isolates obtained from ten different regional locations and sources, seven showed the ability to consistently produce specific extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) on rich as well as synthetic but nonspecific media which did not contain glutamic acid. The isolates were identified as either Bacillus licheniformis or Bacillus subtilis. The EPS from all isolates was resistant to alpha protease, proteinase K, and was thus of high molecular weight. Further it was detected after SDS-PAGE by methylene blue but not by coomassie blue R staining as in case of proteins with high proportion of acidic amino acids. Cell-free EPS, after acid hydrolysis, showed absence of carbohydrates and presence of only glutamic acid. Thus the native the EPS from all seven isolates was confirmed to be gamma polyglutamic acid (PGA) and not exopolysaccharide. The Bacillus isolate T which produced maximum polymer on all media tested had higher amylase: protease activity as compared to other strains. If inoculum was developed in rich medium as compared to synthetic medium, the PGA produced increased by twofold in the subsequent synthetic production medium. Similarly, use of inoculum consisting of young and vegetative cells also increased the PGA production by twofold though amount of inoculum did not affect yield of PGA. Though PGA was produced in even in the absence of glutamic acid supplementation in the production medium by all isolates, the yield of PGA increased by fourfold in the presence glutamic acid and the maximum yield was 30 g/l for isolate K. The supplementation of glutamine instead of glutamic acid into the medium caused an increase in the viscosity of the non-Newtonian solution of PGA.

  13. Lactic acid fermentation of crude sorghum extract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samuel, W.A.; Lee, Y.Y.; Anthony, W.B.

    1980-04-01

    Crude extract from sweet sorghum supplemented with vetch juice was utilized as the carbohydrate source for fermentative production of lactic acid. Fermentation of media containing 7% (w/v) total sugar was completed in 60-80 hours by Lactobacillus plantarum, product yield averaging 85%. Maximum acid production rates were dependent on pH, initial substrate distribution, and concentration, the rates varying from 2 to 5 g/liter per hour. Under limited medium supplementation the lactic acid yield was lowered to 67%. The fermented ammoniated product contained over eight times as much equivalent crude protein (N x 6.25) as the original medium. Unstructured kinetic models were developed for cell growth, lactic acid formation, and substrate consumption in batch fermentation. With the provision of experimentally determined kinetic parameters, the proposed models accurately described the fermentation process. 15 references.

  14. Influence of phase separation on the anaerobic digestion of glucose: maximum COD turnover rate during continuous operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, A; Van Andel, J G; Breure, A M; Van Deursen, A

    1980-01-01

    A mineral medium containing 1% of glucose as the main carbon source was subjected to one-phase and two-phase anaerobic digestion processes under comparable conditions. The one-phase system combined acidogenic and methanogenic populations allowing a complete conversion of the carbon source into gaseous end products and biomass. The two-phase system consists of an acid reactor and a methane reactor connected in series allowing sequential acidogenesis and methanogenesis. Performance of the one-phase system is compared with that of the two-phase system. Maximum turnover of COD was determined for each system. Maximum specific sludge loading of the two-phase system was more than three times higher than that of the one-phase system. Effects of overloading each system were determined. The eco-physiological significance of phase separation is discussed briefly. (2 diagrams, 5 graphs, 41 references, 5 tables)

  15. Synthesis of acid-soluble spore proteins by Bacillus subtilis.

    OpenAIRE

    Leventhal, J M; Chambliss, G H

    1982-01-01

    The major acid-soluble spore proteins (ASSPs) of Bacillus subtilis were detected by immunoprecipitation of radioactively labeled in vitro- and in vivo-synthesized proteins. ASSP synthesis in vivo began 2 h after the initiation of sporulation (t2) and reached its maximum rate at t7. This corresponded to the time of synthesis of mRNA that stimulated the maximum rate of ASSP synthesis in vitro. Under the set of conditions used in these experiments, protease synthesis began near t0, alkaline phos...

  16. Production of L-lactic acid from Cassava peel wastes using single and mixed cultures of Rhizopus oligosporus and Lactobacillus plantarum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nwokoro Ogbonnaya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Production of L-lactic acid using cultures of Rhizopus oligosporus and Lactobacillus plantarum was investigated. Cassava peels were hydrolyzed by boiling for 1 h in either NaOH or HCl solutions followed by neutralization to a pH of 6.2. Reducing sugar produced from the hydrolysates increased with increasing concentrations of alkali or acid. Samples hydrolyzed with HCl produced a maximum reducing sugar concentration of 402 mg/g substrate while alkali hydrolyzed samples produced a maximum reducing sugar concentration of 213 mg/g substrate. Hydrolysates were amended with 0.5% ammonium sulphate solution and inoculated with either single or mixed cultures of Rhizopus oligosporus and Lactobacillus plantarum and incubated for 48 h for lactic acid production. The best lactic acid production of 50.2 g/100g substrate was observed in a mixed culture fermentation of acid hydrolyzed peels. Mixed culture fermentation of alkali hydrolyzed peels produced a maximum lactic acid concentration of 36.4 g/100g substrate. Un hydrolyzed cassava peels inoculated with a mixed culture of the microorganisms produced only 4.6 g/100g substrate. This work reports an efficient use of cassava peels for bio-product formation through microbial fermentation.

  17. Recovery of Organic and Amino Acids from Sludge and Fish Waste in Sub Critical Water Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Faisal

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of organic and amino acid production from the treatment of sludge and fish waste using water at sub critical conditions was investigated. The results indicated that at sub-critical conditions, where the ion product of water went through a maximum, the formation of organic acids was favorable. The presence of oxidant favored formation of acetic and formic acid. Other organic acids of significant amount were propionic, succinic and lactic acids. Depending on the type of wastes, formation of other organic acids was also possible. Knowing the organic acids obtained by hydrolysis and oxidation in sub-critical water of various wastes are useful in designing of applicable waste treatment process, complete degradation of organic wastes into volatile carbon and water, and also on the viewpoint of resource recovery. The production of lactic acid was discussed as well. The results indicated that temperature of 573 K, with the absence of oxidant, yield of lactic acid from fish waste was higher than sewage sludge. The maximum yield of total amino acids (137 mg/g-dry fish from waste fish entrails was obtained at subcritical condition (T = 523 K, P = 4 MPa at reaction time of 60 min by using the batch reactor. The amino acids obtained in this study were mainly alanine and glycine. Keywords:  organic acids, amino acids, sub-critical water, hydrothermal, resources recovery

  18. LCLS Maximum Credible Beam Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clendenin, J.

    2005-01-01

    The maximum credible beam power is defined as the highest credible average beam power that the accelerator can deliver to the point in question, given the laws of physics, the beam line design, and assuming all protection devices have failed. For a new accelerator project, the official maximum credible beam power is determined by project staff in consultation with the Radiation Physics Department, after examining the arguments and evidence presented by the appropriate accelerator physicist(s) and beam line engineers. The definitive parameter becomes part of the project's safety envelope. This technical note will first review the studies that were done for the Gun Test Facility (GTF) at SSRL, where a photoinjector similar to the one proposed for the LCLS is being tested. In Section 3 the maximum charge out of the gun for a single rf pulse is calculated. In Section 4, PARMELA simulations are used to track the beam from the gun to the end of the photoinjector. Finally in Section 5 the beam through the matching section and injected into Linac-1 is discussed

  19. Influence of glutamic acid enantiomers on C-mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formánek, Pavel; Vranová, Valerie; Lojková, Lea

    2015-02-01

    Seasonal dynamics in the mineralization of glutamic acid enantiomers in soils from selected ecosystems was determined and subjected to a range of treatments: ambient x elevated CO2 level and meadow x dense x thinned forest environment. Mineralization of glutamic acid was determined by incubation of the soil with 2 mg L- or D-glutamic acid g(-1) of dry soil to induce the maximum respiration rate. Mineralization of glutamic acid enantiomers in soils fluctuates over the course of a vegetation season, following a similar trend across a range of ecosystems. Mineralization is affected by environmental changes and management practices, including elevated CO2 level and thinning intensity. L-glutamic acid metabolism is more dependent on soil type as compared to metabolism of its D-enantiomer. The results support the hypothesis that the slower rate of D- compared to L- amino acid mineralization is due to different roles in anabolism and catabolism of the soil microbial community. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Two-stage magnetic orientation of uric acid crystals as gout initiators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Y.; Miyashita, Y.; Mizukawa, Y.; Iwasaka, M.

    2014-01-01

    The present study focuses on the magnetic behavior of uric acid crystals, which are responsible for gout. Under a sub-Tesla (T)-level magnetic field, rotational motion of the crystals, which were caused by diamagnetic torque, was observed. We used horizontal magnetic fields with a maximum magnitude of 500 mT generated by an electromagnet to observe the magnetic orientation of the uric acid microcrystals by a microscope. The uric acid crystals showed a perpendicular magnetic field orientation with a minimum threshold of 130 mT. We speculate that the distinct diamagnetic anisotropy in the uric acid crystals resulted in their rotational responses.

  1. Synthesis and evaluation of a "6"8Ga labeled folic acid derivative for targeting folate receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, Akanksha; Mathur, Anupam; Pandey, Usha; Bhatt, Jyotsna; Mukherjee, Archana; Ram, Ramu; Sarma, Haladhar Dev; Dash, Ashutosh

    2016-01-01

    Present work evaluates the potential of a newly synthesized "6"8Ga-NOTA-folic acid conjugate for PET imaging of tumors over-expressing folate receptors (FRs). NOTA-folic acid conjugate was synthesized and characterized. It was radiolabeled with "6"8Ga in ≥ 95% radiolabeling yields. In vitro cell binding studies showed a maximum cell uptake of 1.7±0.4% per million KB cells which was completely blocked on addition of cold folic acid showing specificity towards the FRs. However, further studies in tumor xenografts are warranted in order to assess the potential of "6"8Ga-folic acid complex for imaging tumors over-expressing FRs. - Highlights: • NOTA-Bn-(3-aminopropyl) folic acid conjugate was synthesized and characterized by "1H-NMR, ESI-MS and HPLC analysis. • NOTA-folic acid conjugate radiolabeled with "6"8Ga in >95% yields and high serum stability (≥95%) upto 1 h. • In vitro studies in KB cells showed specificity of NOTA-Bn-(3-aminopropyl) folic acid. • A maximum cell uptake of 1.7±0.4% per million KB cells was observed for "6"8Ga-NOTA-folic acid.

  2. Mycosporine like amino acids in brown algae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serban Radu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Biosynthesis of mycosporine and accumulation in cells serves as protection, by shielding the cells sensitive molecules Mycosporine-like aminoacids (MAAs are derivated compounds of mycosporine that contains an amino-cyclohexenimine ring liked to an amino acid, amino alcohol or amino group. They preesent absorbtion maximum between 320 and 360 nm.

  3. Radioactively labelled phytic acid from maturing seeds of Sinapis alba

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaicher, F.M.; Mukherjee, K.D.

    Maturing seeds of Sinapis alba were incubated with D-(U-/sup 14/C)glucose, sodium (1-/sup 14/C) acetate or myo-(U/sup 14/C) inositol in order to prepare radioactively labelled phytic acid with high specific activity. Although each substrate was utilized for the biosynthesis of phytic acid, maximum incorporation of radioactivity into phytic acid was found with myo-inositol. Radiochemical purity of the (U-/sup 14/C)phytic acid preparations was confirmed by chromatographic techniques. Such preparations should be useful for the study of interaction of phytic acid with metal ions and proteins and may serve as substrate in the assay should be useful for the study of interaction of phytic acid with metal ions and proteins and may serve as substrate in the assay of phytase.

  4. Prehydrolysis of aspen wood with water and with dilute aqueous sulfuric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edward L. Springer; John F. Harris

    1982-01-01

    Water prehydrolysis of aspen wood was compared with 0.40% sulfuric acid prehydrolysis at a reaction temperature of 170°C. Acid prehydrolysis gave much higher yields of total anhydroxylose units in the prehydrolyzate and removed significantly less anhydroglucose from the wood than did the water treatment. At maximum yields of total anhydroxylose units in the...

  5. Effect of fluoride on ion exchange, remineralization and acid resistance of surface enamel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aponte-Merced, L A; Feagin, F F [Alabama Univ., Birmingham (USA)

    1979-01-01

    In a system of constant ion activities the rates of F/sup -/ exchange in enamel, under conditions of exchange alone and remineralization, depended on the concentration of F/sup -/ in solutions. Acid resistance of surface minerals resulted from exchange of F/sup -/ for OH/sup -/ in the enamel at pH 7.0 and 4.5. The level of 0.5 mM NaF, compared to 0.05 and 5.0 mM, caused maximum rates of isotopic exchange of /sup 45/Ca and maximum acid resistance of enamel. Similarly low levels of F/sup -/ may be feasible for use in caries prevention in the absence and presence of remineralization.

  6. 13 CFR 107.840 - Maximum term of Financing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maximum term of Financing. 107.840... COMPANIES Financing of Small Businesses by Licensees Structuring Licensee's Financing of An Eligible Small Business: Terms and Conditions of Financing § 107.840 Maximum term of Financing. The maximum term of any...

  7. Copigmentation Of Anthocyanin Extract of Purple Sweet Potatoes (Ipomea Batatas L.) Using Ferulic Acid And Tannic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susanti, I.; Wijaya, H.; Hasanah, F.; Heryani, S.

    2018-02-01

    Copigmentation is one of the methods to improve the color stability and intensity of anthocyanin extract. This study aimed to do the copigmentation of the anthocyanin extract of purple sweet potato using ferulic acid and tannic acid. The anthocyanin extraction was conducted with distilled water at pH 7 and pH 2 while the copigmentation was conducted by varying the concentration of ferulic acid and tannic acid. The results showed that best anthocyanin extraction method of the purple sweet potato was using distilled water at pH 2. The yield of freeze dried anthocyanin on the extraction with distilled water at pH 2 was 1710 ppm, while the yield when using distilled water at pH 7 was 888 ppm. Ferulic acid and tannic acid can be used for the copigmentation of anthocyanin extract of purple sweet potato by observing the maximum wavelength shift (bathochromic effect, Δλmax) and increase of color intensity (hyperchromic effect, ΔAmax). The bathochromic effect of ferulic acid began to occur at a concentration of 0.01M, while the hypochromic effect on tannic acid occurred at a concentration of 0.005M and remained up to a concentration of 0.02M. The best copigmentation concentration of ferulic acid was 0.015M, while tannic acid was 0.02M. The use of tannic acid 0.02M is recommended compared to ferulic acid 0.015M because with the same bathocromic effect (Δλmaks = 3,9) results hyperchromic effect (ΔA = 0,258) higher by tannic acid.

  8. On hydrazine oxidation in nitric acid media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zil'berman, B.Ya.; Lelyuk, G.A.; Mashkin, A.N.; Yasnovitskaya, A.L.

    1988-01-01

    Yield of products of radiolytic ( 60 Co gamma radiation) and chemical hydrazine (HZ) oxidation in nitric acid media is studied. Under radiolyte HZ oxidation by nitric acid hydrazoic acid, ammonia and nitrogen appear to be the reaction products. HN 3 yield maximum under HZN oxidation makes up ∼ 0.35 mol per a mol of oxiduzed HZN. Under chemical oxidation HZN is oxidized by HNO 3 according to reaction catalysed by technetium HN 3 yield makes up ∼ 0.35 mol per a mol of oxidized HZN. Radiation-chemical oxidation of HN 3 proceeds up to its complete decomposition, decomposition rate is comparable with HZ oxidation rate. Under the chemical oxidation HN 3 is more stable, it is slowly decomposed after complete HZ decomposition

  9. Extractive properties of benzohydroxamic and N-benzoyl-benzohydroxamic acids as analytical reagents towards six transition metal ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, Mohamed Rafie Hamid

    1999-06-01

    Two hydroxamic acids were prepared: benzohydroxamic and N-benzoyl benzohydroxamic acids. The former was prepared by coupling the free hydrox amine with benzoyl chloride with the ratio 1:1 in alkaline medium, where as the latter by the same procedure with the ratio 1:2 respectively, they were identified by their melting points, elemental analysis of their nitrogen contents. infra-red spectrophotometry, as well as their nitrogen using elevation of boiling point and the titration method to determine their molecular weights. The two hydroxamic acids were used as analytical reagents for the extraction of the metals Cr(vi), Fe(III), Ti(iv), Co(II) and U(vi). Benzohydroxamic acid has a maximum extraction 99.55% for Cr.(vi) 3M H 2 SO 4 , of 90.16% for Ti(iv) at pH 2.0,of 80.56% for Co(II) at pH 8.0 and 98.01% for U(vi) at pH 6.0. N-benzoyl benzohydroxamic acid has a maximum extraction of 96.45% for Cr(vi) at 3M H 2 So 4 , of 90.82% for Fe(III) at pH 4.0, of 97.02% for V(v) at 3M H 2 So 4 , of 83.56% for Ti(iv) at pH 2.0, of 89.82% for Co(II) at pH 8.0 and of 97.16% for U(vi) at pH 6.0. at the same pH of maximum extraction using heavy matrix, synthetic sea-water, benzohydroxamic acid has maximum values of 91.08%, of 77.99%, of 91.39%, of 87.50 and of 93.17% for Cr(vi), Fe(III), V(v), Ti(iv), Co9II) and U(vi) respectively whereas n-benzoyl benzohydroxamic acid has maximum values of 86.17%, of 77.78%, of 89.61%, of 75.66%, of 79.63% and of 91.18% for Cr(vi), Fe(III), V(v), Ti(iv), Co(II) and U(vi) respectively. The ratio of metal to ligand was determined utilizing the continuous variation method. It was 1 :2, 1: 1, 1 : 1, 1 : 2, 1: 2 and 1 : 2 with respect to Cr(vi), fe(III), Ti(iv), Co(II) and U(vi) respectively.(Author)

  10. 20 CFR 226.52 - Total annuity subject to maximum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Total annuity subject to maximum. 226.52... COMPUTING EMPLOYEE, SPOUSE, AND DIVORCED SPOUSE ANNUITIES Railroad Retirement Family Maximum § 226.52 Total annuity subject to maximum. The total annuity amount which is compared to the maximum monthly amount to...

  11. application of ascorbic acid 2-phosphate as a new voltammetric

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    acid 2-phosphate (AAP) as a new voltammetric substrate has been described in this paper. In the alkaline buffer .... ALP labeled goat anti-rabbit ..... Classical Michaelis-Menten kinetic experiments were carried out to measure the maximum.

  12. Fatty acid composition of Spirulina sp., Chlorella sp. and Chaetoceros sp. microalgae and introduction as potential new sources to extinct omega 3 and omega 6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homan Gorjzdadeh

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study was carried out to determine the oil fatty acids from two special species of microalgae; Spirulina sp.,Chlorella sp. and also Chaetoceros sp. collected from Bahmanshir River. Materials and Methods: Sampling of microalgae Chaetoceros sp. from Bahmanshir River was under taken using bottle samplers during spring season of 2013. Microalgae Spirulina sp. and Chlorella sp. were supplied from Shrimp Research Institute of Iran in Bushehr Province. Samples then were cultured under controlled laboratory conditions and mass culture for 100 liters was undertaken. Isolation of microalgae species from water of cultured media was carried out using filtration and centrifugation methods. The fatty acid compositions were determined by Gas – FID chromatography. Results: Results showed that regarding Saturated Fatty Acids (SFA obtained from purified culture of Chaetoceros sp., Spirulina sp. and Chlorella sp. the maximum amount of total fatty acids were belonged to palmitic acids (C16:0 with 15.21%, 30.1% and 25.17% of total fatty acids  respectively. Analysis of Mono Unsaturated Fatty Acids (MUFA showed that in the Oleic acid was maximum amount of 34% in Spirulina sp. In addition the amount of MUFA in Chlorella sp. was 16.37% of total fatty acids. On the other hand the amount of palmeotic acid in purified culture of Chaetoceros sp. was 30.33% from total content of fatty acids. Analysis of Poly Unsaturated Fatty Acids (PUFA, Linoleic acid (C18:2 (Omega 6, revealed maximum percentage in Spirulina sp. with 18.8%. Results of Alpha linoleic acid (C18:3 (Omega3 analysis showed maximum amount of 9.66% in Chlorella sp. compared to other microalgae with lower omega 3 contents. Spirulina sp. contained maximum amount of Linoleic acid (C18:2 with 18.8% of total fatty acids. Therefore, Spirulina sp. can be considered as a rich source of omega 6 for the purpose of fatty acid extractions. The presence of PUFA in Chlorella sp. and Spirulina sp. was

  13. [The effect of N-stearoylethanolamine on liver phospholipid composition of rats with insulin resistance caused by alimentary obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onopchenko, O V; Kosiakova, H V; Horid'ko, T M; Klimashevskyĭ, V M; Hula, N M

    2014-01-01

    We used alimentary obesity-induced insulin resistance (IR) model in rats to investigate the influence of N-stearoylethanolamine on the content of phospholipids and their fatty acid composition. Our results show that prolonged high-fat diet triggers considerable aberrations in the composition of main phospholipids in the liver and can be one of the causes of IR in rats. In particular, the increase of phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine and significant decrease of other phospholipids: lysophosphatidylcholine, lysophosphatidylethanolamine, sphingomyelin, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylserine and diphosphaglicerol were observed. The levels of monounsaturated (erucic, nervonic, oleic) and polyunsaturated (eicosatrienoic, docosatrienoic, arachidonic) fatty acids were increased; meanwhile the content of diunsaturated acids was decreased. The NSE administration (50 mg/kg of body weight) caused restoration of the phospholipids content in the liver of rats with diet-induced IR that highly correlated with the decrease in plasma insulin level and the improvement of insulin sensitivity. Moreover, the effect of NSE was accompanied by the normalization of fatty acids composition of phospholipids that could be related to modulating influence of NSE on the activity of the main fatty acid desaturases. It is known that the imbalance in phospholipid composition of the rat liver causes substantial metabolic alterations that are associated with the development of IR. Accordingly, the compensations of the imbalance by NSE can help to restore insulin sensitivity, inhibit the development of obesity, IR and type 2 diabetes.

  14. Direct catalytic conversion of brown seaweed-derived alginic acid to furfural using 12-tungstophosphoric acid catalyst in tetrahydrofuran/water co-solvent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Geonu; Jeon, Wonjin; Ban, Chunghyeon; Woo, Hee Chul; Kim, Do Heui

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Furfural was produced by catalytic conversion of macroalgae-derived alginic acid. • 12-Tungstophosphoric acid (H_3PW_1_2O_4_0) showed remarkable catalytic performance. • Tetrahydrofuran (THF) as a reaction medium significantly enhanced production of furfural. - Abstract: Furfural, a biomass-derived platform chemical, was produced by acid-catalyzed reaction of alginic acid extracted from brown seaweed. Three acid catalysts, H_2SO_4, Amberlyst15 and 12-tungstophosphoric acid (H_3PW_1_2O_4_0), were compared to evaluate their catalytic performance for the alginic acid conversion. The H_3PW_1_2O_4_0 catalyst showed the highest catalytic activity, yielding the maximum furfural yield (33.8%) at 180 °C for 30 min in tetrahydrofuran/water co-solvent. Higher reaction temperature promoted the conversion of alginic acid to furfural, but the transformation of furfural to humin was also accelerated. To our knowledge, this is the highest furfural yield among studies about the direct catalytic conversion of alginic acid. Furthermore, products distribution with time-on-stream was investigated in detail, which led us to propose a reaction pathway.

  15. Maximum likely scale estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loog, Marco; Pedersen, Kim Steenstrup; Markussen, Bo

    2005-01-01

    A maximum likelihood local scale estimation principle is presented. An actual implementation of the estimation principle uses second order moments of multiple measurements at a fixed location in the image. These measurements consist of Gaussian derivatives possibly taken at several scales and/or ...

  16. Capsaicinoids, amino acid and fatty acid profiles in different fruit components of the world hottest Naga king chilli (Capsicum chinense Jacq).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananthan, R; Subhash, K; Longvah, T

    2018-01-01

    The world hottest Naga king chilli is cultivated and consumed in Northeast India. Capsaicinoids, amino acids and fatty acids were studied in fruit and fruit components of Naga king chilli. Capsaicinoid content was increased in each ripening stage and maximum level was observed at red color fruits. Total protein and fat content of placenta was 19.41 and 20.36% respectively. Capsaicinoids of placenta (7.35±2.241%) was higher followed by seed (3.83±1.358%) and pericarp (2.91±0.667%). Similarly, essential amino acid content was also higher in placenta compared to other components. Amino acid score ranged from 37 to 38 with cystine and methionine as limiting amino acid. Low level of palmitic, stearic and α-linolenic acid and very high level of linoleic acid were found in seeds. Total polyunsaturates of seeds were higher followed by whole fruit. Naga king chilli is unique due to its high capsaicinoid content and it offers potential crop for the future exploitation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Production of gluconic acid using Micrococcus sp.: optimisation of carbon and nitrogen sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, V D; Sreekantiah, K R; Manjrekar, S P

    1996-01-01

    A process for production of gluconic acid from glucose by a Micrococcus sp. is described. More than 400 bacterial cultures isolated from local soil were tested for gluconic acid production. Three isolates, were selected on basis of their ability to produce gluconic acid and high titrable acidity. These were identified as Micrococcus sp. and were named M 27, M 54 and M 81. Nutritional and other parameters for maximum production of gluconic acid by the selected isolates were optimised. It was found that Micrococcus sp. isolate M 27 gave highest yield of 8.19 g gluconic acid from 9 g glucose utilised giving 91% conversion effeciency.

  18. Conversion of rice straw to sugars by dilute-acid hydrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karimi, Keikhosro; Kheradmandinia, Shauker; Taherzadeh, Mohammad J.

    2006-01-01

    Hydrolysis of rice straw by dilute sulfuric acid at high temperature and pressure was investigated in one and two stages. The hydrolyses were carried out in a 10-l reactor, where the hydrolysis retention time (3-10 min), pressure (10-35 bar) and acid concentration (0-1%) were examined. Optimization of first stage hydrolysis is desirable to achieve the highest yield of the sugars from hemicellulose and also as a pretreatment for enzymatic hydrolysis. The results show the ability of first stage hydrolysis to depolymerize xylan to xylose with a maximum yield of 80.8% at hydrolysis pressure of 15 bar, 10 min retention time and 0.5% acid concentration. However, the yield of glucose from glucan was relatively low in first stage hydrolysis at a maximum of 25.8%. The solid residuals were subjected to further dilute-acid hydrolysis in this study. This second-stage hydrolysis without addition of the acid could not increase the yield of glucose from glucan beyond 26.6%. On the other hand, the best results of the hydrolysis were achieved, when 0.5% sulfuric acid was added prior to each stage in two-stage hydrolysis. The best results of the second stage of the hydrolysis were achieved at the hydrolysis pressure and the retention time of 30 bar and 3 min in the second stage hydrolysis, where a total of 78.9% of xylan and 46.6% of glucan were converted to xylose and glucose, respectively in the two stages. Formation of furfural and HMF were functions of the hydrolysis pressure, acid concentration, and retention time, whereas the concentration of acetic acid was almost constant at pressure of higher than 10 bar and a total retention time of 10 min

  19. Maximum gravitational redshift of white dwarfs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, S.L.; Teukolsky, S.A.

    1976-01-01

    The stability of uniformly rotating, cold white dwarfs is examined in the framework of the Parametrized Post-Newtonian (PPN) formalism of Will and Nordtvedt. The maximum central density and gravitational redshift of a white dwarf are determined as functions of five of the nine PPN parameters (γ, β, zeta 2 , zeta 3 , and zeta 4 ), the total angular momentum J, and the composition of the star. General relativity predicts that the maximum redshifts is 571 km s -1 for nonrotating carbon and helium dwarfs, but is lower for stars composed of heavier nuclei. Uniform rotation can increase the maximum redshift to 647 km s -1 for carbon stars (the neutronization limit) and to 893 km s -1 for helium stars (the uniform rotation limit). The redshift distribution of a larger sample of white dwarfs may help determine the composition of their cores

  20. Thermal runaway reaction hazards and mechanisms of hydroxylamine with acid/base contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Chunyang; Saraf, Sanjeev R.; Rogers, William J.; Sam Mannan, M.

    2004-01-01

    Hydroxylamine (HA) has been involved in two incidents since 1999 because of its thermal instability and incompatibility. In this study, thermal runaway reactions of hydroxylamine with various concentrations of KOH and HCl were studied using the reactive system screening tool (RSST) and automatic pressure tracking adiabatic calorimeter (APTAC). The thermokinetic data, such as onset temperature, heat of reaction, maximum self-heat rate, maximum pressure rate, and non-condensable gas pressure, were compared with those of hydroxylamine solution without added impurity. Our study shows that the thermal decomposition behavior of hydroxylamine is affected by the presence of acid/base, and mixing of hydroxylamine with acid/base may cause thermal decomposition at lower temperatures. Different decomposition pathways can be initiated by hydrogen ion and hydroxide ion. The decomposition mechanisms of hydroxylamine in alkaline and acidic solutions are proposed based on the products, information from the literature, and quantum mechanical calculations. The experimental results are discussed in terms of the proposed reaction mechanisms

  1. Revealing the Maximum Strength in Nanotwinned Copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, L.; Chen, X.; Huang, Xiaoxu

    2009-01-01

    boundary–related processes. We investigated the maximum strength of nanotwinned copper samples with different twin thicknesses. We found that the strength increases with decreasing twin thickness, reaching a maximum at 15 nanometers, followed by a softening at smaller values that is accompanied by enhanced...

  2. 49 CFR 195.406 - Maximum operating pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Maximum operating pressure. 195.406 Section 195.406 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS... HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Operation and Maintenance § 195.406 Maximum operating pressure. (a) Except for...

  3. Modification of wheat starch with succinic acid/acetic anhydride and azelaic acid/acetic anhydride mixtures I. Thermophysical and pasting properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subarić, Drago; Ačkar, Durđica; Babić, Jurislav; Sakač, Nikola; Jozinović, Antun

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate the influence of modification with succinic acid/acetic anhydride and azelaic acid/acetic anhydride mixtures on thermophysical and pasting properties of wheat starch. Starch was isolated from two wheat varieties and modified with mixtures of succinic acid and acetic anhydride, and azelaic acid and acetic anhydride in 4, 6 and 8 % (w/w). Thermophysical, pasting properties, swelling power, solubility and amylose content of modified starches were determined. The results showed that modifications with mixtures of afore mentioned dicarboxylic acids with acetic anhydride decreased gelatinisation and pasting temperatures. Gelatinisation enthalpy of Golubica starch increased, while of Srpanjka starch decreased by modifications. Retrogradation after 7 and 14 day-storage at 4 °C decreased after modifications of both starches. Maximum, hot and cold paste viscosity of both starches increased, while stability during shearing at high temperatures decreased. % setback of starches modified with azelaic acid/acetic anhydride mixture decreased. Swelling power and solubility of both starches increased by both modifications.

  4. EXTRACTION AND SORPTION BENZOIC ACID FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS OF POLYMERS BASED ON N-VINYLAMIDES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Savvina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The widespread use of aromatic acids (benzoic acid, salicylic as preservatives necessitates their qualitative and quantitative determination in food. Effective and common way to separation and concentration of aromatic acids liquid extraction. Biphasic system of water-soluble polymers based on (poly-N-vinyl pyrrolidone, and poly-N-vinylcaprolactam satisfy the requirements of the extraction system. When sorption concentration improved definition of the metrological characteristics, comply with the requirements for sensitivity and selectivity definition appears possible, use of inexpensive and readily available analytical equipment. When studying the adsorption of benzoic acid used as a sorbent crosslinked polymer based on N-vinyl pyrrolidone, obtained by radical polymerisation of a functional monomer and crosslinker. In the extraction of benzoic acid to maximize the allocation of water and the organic phase of the polymer used salt solutions with concentrations close to saturation. Regardless of the nature of the anion salt is used as salting-out agent, aromatic acids sorption increases with the size of the cations. In the experiment the maximum recovery rate (80% benzoic acid obtained in the PVP (0.2 weight%. Ammonium sulphate. The dependence stepepni benzoic acid extraction from time sorption sorbent mass and the pH of the aqueous phase. To establish equilibrium in the system, for 20 minutes. The dependence of the degree of extraction of the acid pH indicates that the acid is extracted into the molecular form. The maximum adsorption is reached at pH 3,5, with its efficiency decreases symbatically reduce the amount of undissociated acid molecules in solution.

  5. Maximum spectral demands in the near-fault region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yin-Nan; Whittaker, Andrew S.; Luco, Nicolas

    2008-01-01

    The Next Generation Attenuation (NGA) relationships for shallow crustal earthquakes in the western United States predict a rotated geometric mean of horizontal spectral demand, termed GMRotI50, and not maximum spectral demand. Differences between strike-normal, strike-parallel, geometric-mean, and maximum spectral demands in the near-fault region are investigated using 147 pairs of records selected from the NGA strong motion database. The selected records are for earthquakes with moment magnitude greater than 6.5 and for closest site-to-fault distance less than 15 km. Ratios of maximum spectral demand to NGA-predicted GMRotI50 for each pair of ground motions are presented. The ratio shows a clear dependence on period and the Somerville directivity parameters. Maximum demands can substantially exceed NGA-predicted GMRotI50 demands in the near-fault region, which has significant implications for seismic design, seismic performance assessment, and the next-generation seismic design maps. Strike-normal spectral demands are a significantly unconservative surrogate for maximum spectral demands for closest distance greater than 3 to 5 km. Scale factors that transform NGA-predicted GMRotI50 to a maximum spectral demand in the near-fault region are proposed.

  6. Crystal structure of (E-pent-2-enoic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Peppel

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The molecule of the title compound, C5H8O2, a low-melting α,β-unsaturated carboxylic acid, is essentially planar [maximum displacement = 0.0239 (13 Å]. In the crystal, molecules are linked into centrosymmetric dimers via pairs of O—H...O hydrogen bonds.

  7. Maximum allowable load on wheeled mobile manipulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habibnejad Korayem, M.; Ghariblu, H.

    2003-01-01

    This paper develops a computational technique for finding the maximum allowable load of mobile manipulator during a given trajectory. The maximum allowable loads which can be achieved by a mobile manipulator during a given trajectory are limited by the number of factors; probably the dynamic properties of mobile base and mounted manipulator, their actuator limitations and additional constraints applied to resolving the redundancy are the most important factors. To resolve extra D.O.F introduced by the base mobility, additional constraint functions are proposed directly in the task space of mobile manipulator. Finally, in two numerical examples involving a two-link planar manipulator mounted on a differentially driven mobile base, application of the method to determining maximum allowable load is verified. The simulation results demonstrates the maximum allowable load on a desired trajectory has not a unique value and directly depends on the additional constraint functions which applies to resolve the motion redundancy

  8. Robust Maximum Association Estimators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Alfons (Andreas); C. Croux (Christophe); P. Filzmoser (Peter)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractThe maximum association between two multivariate variables X and Y is defined as the maximal value that a bivariate association measure between one-dimensional projections αX and αY can attain. Taking the Pearson correlation as projection index results in the first canonical correlation

  9. Selection of the Maximum Spatial Cluster Size of the Spatial Scan Statistic by Using the Maximum Clustering Set-Proportion Statistic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yue; Yin, Fei; Zhang, Tao; Zhou, Xiaohua Andrew; Li, Xiaosong

    2016-01-01

    Spatial scan statistics are widely used in various fields. The performance of these statistics is influenced by parameters, such as maximum spatial cluster size, and can be improved by parameter selection using performance measures. Current performance measures are based on the presence of clusters and are thus inapplicable to data sets without known clusters. In this work, we propose a novel overall performance measure called maximum clustering set-proportion (MCS-P), which is based on the likelihood of the union of detected clusters and the applied dataset. MCS-P was compared with existing performance measures in a simulation study to select the maximum spatial cluster size. Results of other performance measures, such as sensitivity and misclassification, suggest that the spatial scan statistic achieves accurate results in most scenarios with the maximum spatial cluster sizes selected using MCS-P. Given that previously known clusters are not required in the proposed strategy, selection of the optimal maximum cluster size with MCS-P can improve the performance of the scan statistic in applications without identified clusters.

  10. Maximum-Likelihood Detection Of Noncoherent CPM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divsalar, Dariush; Simon, Marvin K.

    1993-01-01

    Simplified detectors proposed for use in maximum-likelihood-sequence detection of symbols in alphabet of size M transmitted by uncoded, full-response continuous phase modulation over radio channel with additive white Gaussian noise. Structures of receivers derived from particular interpretation of maximum-likelihood metrics. Receivers include front ends, structures of which depends only on M, analogous to those in receivers of coherent CPM. Parts of receivers following front ends have structures, complexity of which would depend on N.

  11. Sulfuric acid functional zirconium (or aluminum) incorporated mesoporous MCM-48 solid acid catalysts for alkylation of phenol with tert-butyl alcohol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Tingshun; Cheng, Jinlian; Liu, Wangping; Fu, Lie; Zhou, Xuping; Zhao, Qian; Yin, Hengbo

    2014-01-01

    Several zirconium (or aluminum) incorporated mesoporous MCM-48 solid acid catalysts (SO 4 2− /Zr-MCM-48 and SO 4 2− /Al-MCM-48) were prepared by the impregnation method and their physicochemical properties were characterized by means of XRD, FT-IR, TEM, NH 3 -TPD and N 2 physical adsorption. Also, the catalytic activities of these solid acid catalysts were evaluated by the alkylation of phenol with tert-butyl alcohol. The effect of weight hour space velocity (WHSV), reaction time and reaction temperature on catalytic properties was also studied. The results show that the SO 4 2− /Zr-MCM-48 and SO 4 2− /Al-MCM-48 still have good mesoporous structure and long range ordering. Compared with the Zr (or Al)–MCM-48 samples, SO 4 2− /Zr-MCM-48 and SO 4 2− /Al-MCM-48 solid acid catalysts have strong acidity and exhibit high activities in alkylation reaction of phenol with tert-butyl alcohol. The SO 4 2− /Zr-MCM-48-25 (molar ratio of Si/Zr=0.04) catalyst was found to be the most promising and gave the highest phenol conversion among all catalysts. A maximum phenol conversion of 91.6% with 4-tert-butyl phenol (4-TBP) selectivity of 81.8% was achieved when the molar ratio of tert-butyl alcohol:phenol is 2:1, reaction time is 2 h, the WHSV is 2 h −1 and the reaction temperature is 140 °C. - Highlights: • Sulfuric acid functional mesoporous solid acid catalysts were prepared via impregnation method. • The alkylation of phenol with tert-butyl alcohol was carried out over these solid acid catalysts. • The catalytic activity of SO 4 2− /Zr-MCM-48-25 catalyst is much higher than that of the others. • A maximum phenol conversion of 91.6% was achieved under optimum reaction conditions for SO 4 2− /Zr-MCM-48-25

  12. Maximum Entropy Fundamentals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Topsøe

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: In its modern formulation, the Maximum Entropy Principle was promoted by E.T. Jaynes, starting in the mid-fifties. The principle dictates that one should look for a distribution, consistent with available information, which maximizes the entropy. However, this principle focuses only on distributions and it appears advantageous to bring information theoretical thinking more prominently into play by also focusing on the "observer" and on coding. This view was brought forward by the second named author in the late seventies and is the view we will follow-up on here. It leads to the consideration of a certain game, the Code Length Game and, via standard game theoretical thinking, to a principle of Game Theoretical Equilibrium. This principle is more basic than the Maximum Entropy Principle in the sense that the search for one type of optimal strategies in the Code Length Game translates directly into the search for distributions with maximum entropy. In the present paper we offer a self-contained and comprehensive treatment of fundamentals of both principles mentioned, based on a study of the Code Length Game. Though new concepts and results are presented, the reading should be instructional and accessible to a rather wide audience, at least if certain mathematical details are left aside at a rst reading. The most frequently studied instance of entropy maximization pertains to the Mean Energy Model which involves a moment constraint related to a given function, here taken to represent "energy". This type of application is very well known from the literature with hundreds of applications pertaining to several different elds and will also here serve as important illustration of the theory. But our approach reaches further, especially regarding the study of continuity properties of the entropy function, and this leads to new results which allow a discussion of models with so-called entropy loss. These results have tempted us to speculate over

  13. Synthesis of biodiesel from waste vegetable oil with large amounts of free fatty acids using a carbon-based solid acid catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shu, Qing; Gao, Jixian; Nawaz, Zeeshan; Liao, Yuhui; Wang, Dezheng; Wang, Jinfu [Beijing Key Laboratory of Green Chemical Reaction Engineering and Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2010-08-15

    A carbon-based solid acid catalyst was prepared by the sulfonation of carbonized vegetable oil asphalt. This catalyst was employed to simultaneously catalyze esterification and transesterification to synthesis biodiesel when a waste vegetable oil with large amounts of free fatty acids (FFAs) was used as feedstock. The physical and chemical properties of this catalyst were characterized by a variety of techniques. The maximum conversion of triglyceride and FFA reached 80.5 wt.% and 94.8 wt.% after 4.5 h at 220 C, when using a 16.8 M ratio of methanol to oil and 0.2 wt.% of catalyst to oil. The high catalytic activity and stability of this catalyst was related to its high acid site density (-OH, Broensted acid sites), hydrophobicity that prevented the hydration of -OH species, hydrophilic functional groups (-SO{sub 3}H) that gave improved accessibility of methanol to the triglyceride and FFAs, and large pores that provided more acid sites for the reactants. (author)

  14. 22 CFR 201.67 - Maximum freight charges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., commodity rate classification, quantity, vessel flag category (U.S.-or foreign-flag), choice of ports, and... the United States. (2) Maximum charter rates. (i) USAID will not finance ocean freight under any... owner(s). (4) Maximum liner rates. USAID will not finance ocean freight for a cargo liner shipment at a...

  15. Quantitation of alpha-linolenic acid elongation to eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acid as affected by the ratio of n6/n3 fatty acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somoza Veronika

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conversion of linoleic acid (LA and alpha-linolenic acid (ALA to their higher chain homologues in humans depends on the ratio of ingested n6 and n3 fatty acids. Design and methods In order to determine the most effective ratio with regard to the conversion of ALA to eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, human hepatoma cells were incubated with varying ratios of [13C] labeled linoleic acid ([13C]LA- and alpha-linolenic acid ([13C]ALA-methylesters. Regulative cellular signal transduction pathways involved were studied by determinations of transcript levels of the genes encoding delta-5 desaturase (D5D and delta-6 desaturase (D6D, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα and sterol regulatory element binding protein 1c (SREBP-1c. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1 (MEK1 and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 1 (MEKK1 were also examined. Results Maximum conversion was observed in cells incubated with the mixture of [13C]LA/[13C]ALA at a ratio of 1:1, where 0.7% and 17% of the recovered [13C]ALA was converted to DHA and EPA, respectively. Furthermore, differential regulation of enzymes involved in the conversion at the transcript level, dependent on the ratio of administered n6 to n3 fatty acids in human hepatocytes was demonstrated. Conclusion Formation of EPA and DHA was highest at an administered LA/ALA ratio of 1:1, although gene expression of PPARα, SREBP-1c and D5D involved in ALA elongation were higher in the presence of ALA solely. Also, our findings suggest that a diet-induced enhancement of the cell membrane content of highly unsaturated fatty acids is only possible up to a certain level.

  16. Antimicrobial and Antifungal Effects of Acid and Water-Soluble Chitosan Extracted from Indian Shrimp (Fenneropenaeus indicus Shell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Taheri

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objective : Currently, efforts are underway to seek new and effective antimicrobial agents, and marine resources are potent candidates for this aim. The following study was conducted to investigate the efficacy of water-soluble and acid-soluble chitosan against some pathogenic organisms.   Materials & Method s: Inhibition zone of different concentrations (5, 7.5, and 10 mg/ml of acid- soluble and water-soluble chitosan were examined for in vitro antibacterial activity against 4 kinds of hospital bacteria and penicillium sp. Results were compared with 4 standard antibiotics: streptomycin, gentamicin, tetracycline, and erythromycin. Furthermore, minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum lethal concentration were determined.   Results: Inhibition activity of acid-soluble chitosan (10% showed the best result (p value < 0.05, whereas water-soluble chitosan exhibited the least antibacterial effects (p value < 0.05. Chitosan demonstrated maximum effect on V. cholera cerotype ogava , and the least effect was seen on E. coli (p value < 0.05. Acid-soluble chitosan had a more potent effect than the standard antibiotics. Also, acid-soluble chitosan (10% and water-soluble chitosan showed maximum inhibitory effects on penicillium sp.   Conclusion: Chitosan showed maximum antibacterial effect against S. aureus, V. cholerae cerotype ogava, and water-soluble chitosan demonstrated good antifungal effects, revealing a statistically significant difference with common antibacterial and antifungal medicines.

  17. Americium removal from nitric acid waste streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muscatello, A.C.; Navratil, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    Separations research at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) has found ways to significantly improve americium removal from nitric acid (7M) waste streams generated by plutonium purification operations. Partial neutralization of the acid waste followed by solid supported liquid membranes (SLM) are useful in transferring and concentrating americium from nitrate solutions. Specifically, DHDECMP (dihexyl-N,N-diethylcarbamoylmethylphosphonate) supported on Accurel polypropylene hollow fibers assembled in modular form transfers >95% of the americium from high nitrate (6.9M), low acid (0.1M) feeds into 0.25M oxalic acid stripping solution. Maximum permeabilities were observed to be 0.001 cm/sec, consistent with typical values for other systems. The feed:strip volume ratio shows an inverse relationship to the fraction of metal ion transferred. Cation exchangers may be used to concentrate americium from the strip solution. Furthermore, O0D (iB)CMPO (or CMPO) (octylphenyl-N-N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide) has been tested in an extraction chromatography mode. Preliminary results show CMPO to be effective in removing americium if the feed is neutralized to 1.0M acidity and iron(III) is complexed with 0.20M oxalic acid. 3 figs

  18. Determination of the maximum-depth to potential field sources by a maximum structural index method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedi, M.; Florio, G.

    2013-01-01

    A simple and fast determination of the limiting depth to the sources may represent a significant help to the data interpretation. To this end we explore the possibility of determining those source parameters shared by all the classes of models fitting the data. One approach is to determine the maximum depth-to-source compatible with the measured data, by using for example the well-known Bott-Smith rules. These rules involve only the knowledge of the field and its horizontal gradient maxima, and are independent from the density contrast. Thanks to the direct relationship between structural index and depth to sources we work out a simple and fast strategy to obtain the maximum depth by using the semi-automated methods, such as Euler deconvolution or depth-from-extreme-points method (DEXP). The proposed method consists in estimating the maximum depth as the one obtained for the highest allowable value of the structural index (Nmax). Nmax may be easily determined, since it depends only on the dimensionality of the problem (2D/3D) and on the nature of the analyzed field (e.g., gravity field or magnetic field). We tested our approach on synthetic models against the results obtained by the classical Bott-Smith formulas and the results are in fact very similar, confirming the validity of this method. However, while Bott-Smith formulas are restricted to the gravity field only, our method is applicable also to the magnetic field and to any derivative of the gravity and magnetic field. Our method yields a useful criterion to assess the source model based on the (∂f/∂x)max/fmax ratio. The usefulness of the method in real cases is demonstrated for a salt wall in the Mississippi basin, where the estimation of the maximum depth agrees with the seismic information.

  19. Acid Pre hydrolysis of the Lignocellulose biomass from thistle Onopordum nervosum Boiss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez Contreras, C.; Paz Saa, D.; Diaz Palma, A.

    1983-01-01

    The acid pre hydrolysis of the lignocellulose biomass from thistle O. nervosum has been conducted to determine the conditions for maximum yield of pentoses with minimum yield of hexoses. Variables studied were acid concentration (H 2 SO 4 , 1 , 3, 4 and 5%) , temperature (1000 and 120 degree centigree) time, solid to liquid ratio and degree of fineness of thistle (1 to 65 mesh). (Author) 15 refs

  20. 40 CFR 141.13 - Maximum contaminant levels for turbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... turbidity. 141.13 Section 141.13 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER... Maximum contaminant levels for turbidity. The maximum contaminant levels for turbidity are applicable to... part. The maximum contaminant levels for turbidity in drinking water, measured at a representative...

  1. Antioxidant activity and controlled drug delivery potential of tragacanth gum-cl- poly (lactic acid-co-itaconic acid) hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vinod Kumar; Sood, Swadeep; Agarwal, Shilpi; Saini, Adesh K; Pathania, Deepak

    2018-02-01

    Tragacanth gum-cl-poly (lactic acid-co-itaconic acid) (TG-cl-p(LA-co-IA)) hydrogel is synthesized through graft copolymerization reaction using microwave assisted technique. The synthesized hydrogel was characterised using various analytical and characterization techniques such as FTIR, FESEM, XRD, TGA, TEM and SEM. It was observed that, the maximum percentage swelling (P s ) of the hydrogel was 311.61% after 6h at room temperature and 298.06% after 3h at 60°C and TG-cl-p(LA-co-IA) exhibited highest Amoxicillin loading (73%) in double distilled waterafter 24h. From the controlled release studies, it was evident that maximum drug release of about 96% took place at pH 2.2=after 6h. The synthesized hydrogel also showed mild antioxidant properties and 43.85% of free radical scavenging was occurred at a concentration of 640μg/mL and hence it can be effectively used to reduce the oxidative stresses. In addition to this, the antibacterial studies also showed that it is more effective against S. aureus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Selection of lactic acid bacteria able to ferment inulin hydrolysates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octavian BASTON

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Eight homofermentative lactic acid bacteria isolates were tested for lactic acid production using chicory and Jerusalem artichoke hydrolysate as substrate. The pH, lactic acid yield and productivity were used to select the best homolactic bacteria for lactic acid production. The selected strains produced lactic acid at maximum yield after 24 hours of fermentation and the productivity was greater at 24 hours of fermentation. From all studied strains, Lb1 and Lb2 showed the best results regarding lactic acid yields andproductivity. After 48 hours of chicory and Jerusalem artichhoke hydrolysates fermentation, from all the studied strains, Lb2 produced the highest lactic acid yield (0.97%. Lb2 produced after 48 hours of fermentation the lowest pH value of 3.45±0.01. Lb2 showed greater lactic acid productivity compared to the other studied lactic acid bacteria, the highest values, 0.13 g·L-1·h-1fromJerusalem artichoke hydrolysate and 0.11g·L-1·h-1 from chicory hydrolysate, being produced after 24 hours of fermentation.

  3. Modelling maximum canopy conductance and transpiration in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is much current interest in predicting the maximum amount of water that can be transpired by Eucalyptus trees. It is possible that industrial waste water may be applied as irrigation water to eucalypts and it is important to predict the maximum transpiration rates of these plantations in an attempt to dispose of this ...

  4. 40 CFR 141.62 - Maximum contaminant levels for inorganic contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Maximum contaminant levels for inorganic contaminants. 141.62 Section 141.62 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Water Regulations: Maximum Contaminant Levels and Maximum Residual Disinfectant Levels § 141.62 Maximum...

  5. Weak scale from the maximum entropy principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Yuta; Kawai, Hikaru; Kawana, Kiyoharu

    2015-03-01

    The theory of the multiverse and wormholes suggests that the parameters of the Standard Model (SM) are fixed in such a way that the radiation of the S3 universe at the final stage S_rad becomes maximum, which we call the maximum entropy principle. Although it is difficult to confirm this principle generally, for a few parameters of the SM, we can check whether S_rad actually becomes maximum at the observed values. In this paper, we regard S_rad at the final stage as a function of the weak scale (the Higgs expectation value) vh, and show that it becomes maximum around vh = {{O}} (300 GeV) when the dimensionless couplings in the SM, i.e., the Higgs self-coupling, the gauge couplings, and the Yukawa couplings are fixed. Roughly speaking, we find that the weak scale is given by vh ˜ T_{BBN}2 / (M_{pl}ye5), where ye is the Yukawa coupling of electron, T_BBN is the temperature at which the Big Bang nucleosynthesis starts, and M_pl is the Planck mass.

  6. THIOGLYCOLIC ACID ESTERIFIED IN TO RICE STRAW FOR REMOVING LEAD FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Gong

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Thiol rice straw (TRS was prepared by esterifying thioglycolic acid onto rice straw in the medium of acetic anhydride and acetic acid with sulfuric acid as catalyst. The sorption of lead (Pb on TRS from aqueous solution was subsequently investigated. The batch experiments showed that Pb removal was dependent on initial pH, sorbent dose, Pb concentration, contact time, and temperature. The maximum value of Pb removal appeared at pH 5. For 100 mg/L of Pb solution, a removal ratio of greater than 98% could be achieved with 2.0 g/L or more of TRS. The isothermal data of Pb sorption conformed well to the Langmuir model, and the maximum sorption capacity (Qm of TRS for Pb was 104.17 mg/g. The equilibrium of Pb removal was reached within 120 min. The Pb removal process could be described by the pseudo-first-order kinetic model. The thermodynamic study indicated that the Pb removal process was spontaneous and endothermic.

  7. A study of organic acid production in contrasts between two phosphate solubilizing fungi: Penicillium oxalicum and Aspergillus niger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen; Bai, Tongshuo; Dai, Letian; Wang, Fuwei; Tao, Jinjin; Meng, Shiting; Hu, Yunxiao; Wang, Shimei; Hu, Shuijin

    2016-04-01

    Phosphate solubilizing fungi (PSF) have huge potentials in enhancing release of phosphorus from fertilizer. Two PSF (NJDL-03 and NJDL-12) were isolated and identified as Penicillium oxalicum and Aspergillus niger respectively in this study. The quantification and identification of organic acids were performed by HPLC. Total concentrations of organic acids secreted by NJDL-03 and NJDL-12 are ~4000 and ~10,000 mg/L with pH values of 3.6 and 2.4 respectively after five-days culture. Oxalic acid dominates acidity in the medium due to its high concentration and high acidity constant. The two fungi were also cultured for five days with the initial pH values of the medium varied from 6.5 to 1.5. The biomass reached the maximum when the initial pH values are 4.5 for NJDL-03 and 2.5 for NJDL-12. The organic acids for NJDL-12 reach the maximum at the initial pH = 5.5. However, the acids by NJDL-03 continue to decrease and proliferation of the fungus terminates at pH = 2.5. The citric acid production increases significantly for NJDL-12 at acidic environment, whereas formic and oxalic acids decrease sharply for both two fungi. This study shows that NJDL-12 has higher ability in acid production and has stronger adaptability to acidic environment than NJDL-03.

  8. Application of acoustic agglomeration for removing sulfuric acid mist from air stream

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asghar Sadighzadeh

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of acoustic fields at high sound pressure levels (SPLs for removing sulfuric acid mists from the air stream was studied. An acoustic agglomeration chamber was used to conduct the experiments. The studied SPLs ranged from 115 to 165 decibel (dB, with three inlet concentrations of acid mist at 5–10, 15–20, and 25–30 ppm. The air flow rates for conducting experiments were 20, 30, and 40 L min−1. The concentration of sulfuric acid mist was measured using US Environmental Protection Agency Method 8 at inlet and outlet of the chamber. The resonance frequencies for experiments were found to be 852, 1410, and 3530 Hz. The maximum acoustic agglomeration efficiency of 86% was obtained at optimum frequency of 852 Hz. The analysis of variance test revealed significant differences between agglomeration efficiency at three resonance frequencies (p-value < 0.001. The maximum acoustic agglomeration efficiency was obtained at SPL level of 165 dB. High initial concentrations of acid mists and lower air flow rates enhance the acoustic agglomeration of mists. High removal efficiency of acid mists from air stream could be achieved by the application of acoustic agglomeration method with appropriate range of frequencies and SPLs. Keywords: Sulfuric acid, Mist, Acoustic agglomeration, SPL

  9. Accurate modeling and maximum power point detection of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Accurate modeling and maximum power point detection of photovoltaic ... Determination of MPP enables the PV system to deliver maximum available power. ..... adaptive artificial neural network: Proposition for a new sizing procedure.

  10. 40 CFR 141.61 - Maximum contaminant levels for organic contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Maximum contaminant levels for organic contaminants. 141.61 Section 141.61 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER... Regulations: Maximum Contaminant Levels and Maximum Residual Disinfectant Levels § 141.61 Maximum contaminant...

  11. The power and robustness of maximum LOD score statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Y J; Mendell, N R

    2008-07-01

    The maximum LOD score statistic is extremely powerful for gene mapping when calculated using the correct genetic parameter value. When the mode of genetic transmission is unknown, the maximum of the LOD scores obtained using several genetic parameter values is reported. This latter statistic requires higher critical value than the maximum LOD score statistic calculated from a single genetic parameter value. In this paper, we compare the power of maximum LOD scores based on three fixed sets of genetic parameter values with the power of the LOD score obtained after maximizing over the entire range of genetic parameter values. We simulate family data under nine generating models. For generating models with non-zero phenocopy rates, LOD scores maximized over the entire range of genetic parameters yielded greater power than maximum LOD scores for fixed sets of parameter values with zero phenocopy rates. No maximum LOD score was consistently more powerful than the others for generating models with a zero phenocopy rate. The power loss of the LOD score maximized over the entire range of genetic parameters, relative to the maximum LOD score calculated using the correct genetic parameter value, appeared to be robust to the generating models.

  12. The effects of solvents and structure on the electronic absorption spectra of the isomeric pyridine carboxylic acid N-oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drmanić Saša Ž.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The ultraviolet absorption spectra of the carboxyl group of three isomeric pyridine carboxylic acids N-oxides (picolinic acid N-oxide, nicotinic acid N-oxide and isonicotinic acid N-oxide were determined in fourteen solvents in the wavelength range from 200 to 400 nm. The position of the absorption maxima (λmax of the examined acids showed that the ultraviolet absorption maximum wavelengths of picolinic acid N-oxide are the shortest, and those of isonicotinic acid N-oxide acid are the longest. In order to analyze the solvent effect on the obtained absorption spectra, the ultraviolet absorption frequencies of the electronic transitions in the carboxylic group of the examined acids were correlated using a total solvatochromic equation of the form max = v0 + sπ + aα+ bβ, where υmax is the absorption frequency (1/λmax, p is a measure of the solvent polarity, β represents the scale of solvent hydrogen bond acceptor basicities and α represent the scale of solvent hydrogen bond donor acidities. The correlation of the spectroscopic data was carried out by means of multiple linear regression analysis. The solvent effects on the ultraviolet absorption maximums of the examined acids were discussed.

  13. Maximum Power Training and Plyometrics for Cross-Country Running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebben, William P.

    2001-01-01

    Provides a rationale for maximum power training and plyometrics as conditioning strategies for cross-country runners, examining: an evaluation of training methods (strength training and maximum power training and plyometrics); biomechanic and velocity specificity (role in preventing injury); and practical application of maximum power training and…

  14. Extraction of Uranium in The Mixtures of Nitric and Sulfuric Acids With Neutral and Basic Ligands in Kerosene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nampira, Y; Rahayu Imam, S; Djoyosubroto, H

    1998-01-01

    The tendency of uranium ion in the mixture of nitric and sulfuric acid's medium is to from uranyl sulphate complex. The compound of uranyl sulphate is containing into the heteropoly compound that has acid property. Regarding to the mentioned property, the U extraction process was carried out using a basic or neutral complexing agent containing a ligand that formed the soluble uranium complex in the organic solvent (kerosene).The use of basic complexing agent such as n,tri-octyl amine is more suitable than that of tri butyl phosphate as a neutral agent. The maximum distribution coefficient of uranium will be reached if the maximum concentration of nitric acid and sulphuric acid can be maintained at 0.3 M and 1.5 M respectively in the organic solvent medium consisted n,tri-octyl amine of 30% volume fraction

  15. The last glacial maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, P.U.; Dyke, A.S.; Shakun, J.D.; Carlson, A.E.; Clark, J.; Wohlfarth, B.; Mitrovica, J.X.; Hostetler, S.W.; McCabe, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    We used 5704 14C, 10Be, and 3He ages that span the interval from 10,000 to 50,000 years ago (10 to 50 ka) to constrain the timing of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) in terms of global ice-sheet and mountain-glacier extent. Growth of the ice sheets to their maximum positions occurred between 33.0 and 26.5 ka in response to climate forcing from decreases in northern summer insolation, tropical Pacific sea surface temperatures, and atmospheric CO2. Nearly all ice sheets were at their LGM positions from 26.5 ka to 19 to 20 ka, corresponding to minima in these forcings. The onset of Northern Hemisphere deglaciation 19 to 20 ka was induced by an increase in northern summer insolation, providing the source for an abrupt rise in sea level. The onset of deglaciation of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet occurred between 14 and 15 ka, consistent with evidence that this was the primary source for an abrupt rise in sea level ???14.5 ka.

  16. Determination of molybdenum with gallic acid and hydroxylamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bermejo-Barrera, Ma.P.; Vazquez-Gonzalez, J.F.; Pazos-Naveira, Ma.C.; Bermejo-Martinez, F.

    1987-01-01

    A method for the spectrophotometric determination of molybdenum with gallic acid and hydroxylamine is proposed. The spectrum of the complex formed has a stable absorption maximum at 420 nm in acidic media and the molar absorptivity is 4.84 x 10 3 l mol -1 cm -1 in the range in which the complex obeys Beer's law (3.02-25.12 μg ml -1 of Mo). The effects of the concentration of reagent, pH, time and temperature were investigated, together with the stoicheiometry of the complex, the reproducibility and precision of the method and its susceptibility to interferences. (author)

  17. Maximum physical capacity testing in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knutsen, L.; Quist, M; Midtgaard, J

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Over the past few years there has been a growing interest in the field of physical exercise in rehabilitation of cancer patients, leading to requirements for objective maximum physical capacity measurement (maximum oxygen uptake (VO(2max)) and one-repetition maximum (1RM)) to determin...... early in the treatment process. However, the patients were self-referred and thus highly motivated and as such are not necessarily representative of the whole population of cancer patients treated with chemotherapy....... in performing maximum physical capacity tests as these motivated them through self-perceived competitiveness and set a standard that served to encourage peak performance. CONCLUSION: The positive attitudes in this sample towards maximum physical capacity open the possibility of introducing physical testing...

  18. MAXIMUM PRINCIPLE FOR SUBSONIC FLOW WITH VARIABLE ENTROPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Sizykh Grigory

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Maximum principle for subsonic flow is fair for stationary irrotational subsonic gas flows. According to this prin- ciple, if the value of the velocity is not constant everywhere, then its maximum is achieved on the boundary and only on the boundary of the considered domain. This property is used when designing form of an aircraft with a maximum critical val- ue of the Mach number: it is believed that if the local Mach number is less than unit in the incoming flow and on the body surface, then the Mach number is less then unit in all points of flow. The known proof of maximum principle for subsonic flow is based on the assumption that in the whole considered area of the flow the pressure is a function of density. For the ideal and perfect gas (the role of diffusion is negligible, and the Mendeleev-Clapeyron law is fulfilled, the pressure is a function of density if entropy is constant in the entire considered area of the flow. Shows an example of a stationary sub- sonic irrotational flow, in which the entropy has different values on different stream lines, and the pressure is not a function of density. The application of the maximum principle for subsonic flow with respect to such a flow would be unreasonable. This example shows the relevance of the question about the place of the points of maximum value of the velocity, if the entropy is not a constant. To clarify the regularities of the location of these points, was performed the analysis of the com- plete Euler equations (without any simplifying assumptions in 3-D case. The new proof of the maximum principle for sub- sonic flow was proposed. This proof does not rely on the assumption that the pressure is a function of density. Thus, it is shown that the maximum principle for subsonic flow is true for stationary subsonic irrotational flows of ideal perfect gas with variable entropy.

  19. Maximum power point tracker based on fuzzy logic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daoud, A.; Midoun, A.

    2006-01-01

    The solar energy is used as power source in photovoltaic power systems and the need for an intelligent power management system is important to obtain the maximum power from the limited solar panels. With the changing of the sun illumination due to variation of angle of incidence of sun radiation and of the temperature of the panels, Maximum Power Point Tracker (MPPT) enables optimization of solar power generation. The MPPT is a sub-system designed to extract the maximum power from a power source. In the case of solar panels power source. the maximum power point varies as a result of changes in its electrical characteristics which in turn are functions of radiation dose, temperature, ageing and other effects. The MPPT maximum the power output from panels for a given set of conditions by detecting the best working point of the power characteristic and then controls the current through the panels or the voltage across them. Many MPPT methods have been reported in literature. These techniques of MPPT can be classified into three main categories that include: lookup table methods, hill climbing methods and computational methods. The techniques vary according to the degree of sophistication, processing time and memory requirements. The perturbation and observation algorithm (hill climbing technique) is commonly used due to its ease of implementation, and relative tracking efficiency. However, it has been shown that when the insolation changes rapidly, the perturbation and observation method is slow to track the maximum power point. In recent years, the fuzzy controllers are used for maximum power point tracking. This method only requires the linguistic control rules for maximum power point, the mathematical model is not required and therefore the implementation of this control method is easy to real control system. In this paper, we we present a simple robust MPPT using fuzzy set theory where the hardware consists of the microchip's microcontroller unit control card and

  20. Radiochemical synthesis of copolymers of N-vinylpyrrolidone with undecylenic and oleic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ushakova, V.N.; Panarin, E.F.; Denisov, V.M.; Kol' tsov, A.I.; Persinen, A.A.

    1988-11-01

    Radiation copolymerization of N-vinylpyrrolidone with undecylenic and oleic acids was studied. It was shown that the yield of polymer and the rate of copolymerization are essentially a function of the composition of the starting mixture. The maximum molar concentration of carbonyl units in the copolymer is 30%. A random copolymer in which there is nothing next to the standing carboxylic acid units is formed. The relative reactivity of the acids is equal to zero; the reactivities of N-vinylpyrrolidone - 0.61 < r < 0.94 for undecylenic and 0.90 < r < 1.31 for oleic acids - were calculated in consideration of the effect of the next-to-last unit.

  1. Radiation chemical synthesis of N-vinylpyrrolidone copolymers with undecylenic and oleic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ushakova, V.N.; Panarin, E.F.; Denisov, V.M.; Kol'tsov, A.I.; Persinen, A.A.

    1988-01-01

    Radiation copolymerization of N-vinylpyrrolidone with undecylenic and oleic acids is investigated. Irradiation was carried out at 320 and 300 K using γ-radiation with 0.23 and 0.04 Gy/s dose rate respectively. Polymer yield and copolimerization rate sufficiently depend on composition of initial mixture. Maximum molar concentration of carboxyl links in copolymer is 30 %. Statistic copolymer, which has no adjacent links of carboxylic acid, is formed. The relative reactivity of acids is equal to zero; reactivities of N-vinylpyrrolidone: 0.61< r<0.94 for undecylenic and 0.90 < r < 1.31 for oleic acid are calculated taking account of preterminal link effect

  2. Radiochemical synthesis of copolymers of N-vinylpyrrolidone with undecylenic and oleic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ushakova, V.N.; Panarin, E.F.; Denisov, V.M.; Kol'tsov, A.I.; Persinen, A.A.

    1988-01-01

    Radiation copolymerization of N-vinylpyrrolidone with undecylenic and oleic acids was studied. It was shown that the yield of polymer and the rate of copolymerization are essentially a function of the composition of the starting mixture. The maximum molar concentration of carbonyl units in the copolymer is 30%. A random copolymer in which there is nothing next to the standing carboxylic acid units is formed. The relative reactivity of the acids is equal to zero; the reactivities of N-vinylpyrrolidone - 0.61 < r < 0.94 for undecylenic and 0.90 < r < 1.31 for oleic acids - were calculated in consideration of the effect of the next-to-last unit

  3. POLY(AMINOMETHYLENEPHOSPHONIC ACID FOR SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF METAL IONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M’hamed Kaid

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Diaminododecyltetramethylenetetraphosphonic acid (DADTMTPA has been investigated in liquid - liquid extraction of Zn (II and Cu (II in acetate media. The extraction of both cations was carried out in different media with the addition of CH3COONa, CH3COOH, HCl and H2SO4 at different pH values. The maximum extraction yield for copper is 70% after addition of 10 mg of sodium acetate and for zinc is 30% after addition of acetic acid at pHi = 5.5, in one step.

  4. Maximum entropy methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponman, T.J.

    1984-01-01

    For some years now two different expressions have been in use for maximum entropy image restoration and there has been some controversy over which one is appropriate for a given problem. Here two further entropies are presented and it is argued that there is no single correct algorithm. The properties of the four different methods are compared using simple 1D simulations with a view to showing how they can be used together to gain as much information as possible about the original object. (orig.)

  5. Hyper-thermal acid hydrolysis and adsorption treatment of red seaweed, Gelidium amansii for butyric acid production with pH control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ra, Chae Hun; Jeong, Gwi-Taek; Kim, Sung-Koo

    2017-03-01

    Optimal hyper-thermal (HT) acid hydrolysis conditions for Gelidium amansii were determined to be 12% (w/v) seaweed slurry content and 144 mM H 2 SO 4 at 150 °C for 10 min. HT acid hydrolysis-treated G. amansii hydrolysates produced low concentrations of inhibitory compounds and adsorption treatment using 3% activated carbon. An adsorption time of 5 min was subsequently used to remove the inhibitory 5-hydroxymethylfurfural from the medium. A final maximum monosaccharide concentration of 44.6 g/L and 79.1% conversion from 56.4 g/L total fermentable monosaccharides with 120 g dw/L G. amansii slurry was obtained from HT acid hydrolysis, enzymatic saccharification, and adsorption treatment. This study demonstrates the potential for butyric acid production from G. amansii hydrolysates under non-pH-controlled as well as pH-controlled fermentation using Clostridium acetobutylicum KCTC 1790. The activated carbon treatment and pH-controlled fermentation showed synergistic effects and produced butyric acid at a concentration of 11.2 g/L after 9 days of fermentation.

  6. Optimising Refined Bleached Deodorized Palm Stearin For Its Crude Stearic Acid Iodine Value To Provide The Stable Specification Of Blended Stearic Acid Distillate Iodine Value

    OpenAIRE

    Ritonga, Muhammad Yusuf

    2015-01-01

    On the commercial scale, the quality standard of Blended Stearic Acid Distilled (BSAD) couldn’t be achieved by normal distillation. BSAD iodine value is mostly higher than maximum quality standard (0.2 mg/100 g), with the same iodine value (0.80 g/100 g) of feed Hydrogenated Splitted RBDPS Fatty Acid or HSRBDPSFA, feed capacity 5.5 ton/hour with bottom flash distiller temperature reaching 213oC. The separation and reduction of chemical impurities (so sensitive to oxidation/temperature/heat ch...

  7. Maximum entropy deconvolution of low count nuclear medicine images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGrath, D.M.

    1998-12-01

    Maximum entropy is applied to the problem of deconvolving nuclear medicine images, with special consideration for very low count data. The physics of the formation of scintigraphic images is described, illustrating the phenomena which degrade planar estimates of the tracer distribution. Various techniques which are used to restore these images are reviewed, outlining the relative merits of each. The development and theoretical justification of maximum entropy as an image processing technique is discussed. Maximum entropy is then applied to the problem of planar deconvolution, highlighting the question of the choice of error parameters for low count data. A novel iterative version of the algorithm is suggested which allows the errors to be estimated from the predicted Poisson mean values. This method is shown to produce the exact results predicted by combining Poisson statistics and a Bayesian interpretation of the maximum entropy approach. A facility for total count preservation has also been incorporated, leading to improved quantification. In order to evaluate this iterative maximum entropy technique, two comparable methods, Wiener filtering and a novel Bayesian maximum likelihood expectation maximisation technique, were implemented. The comparison of results obtained indicated that this maximum entropy approach may produce equivalent or better measures of image quality than the compared methods, depending upon the accuracy of the system model used. The novel Bayesian maximum likelihood expectation maximisation technique was shown to be preferable over many existing maximum a posteriori methods due to its simplicity of implementation. A single parameter is required to define the Bayesian prior, which suppresses noise in the solution and may reduce the processing time substantially. Finally, maximum entropy deconvolution was applied as a pre-processing step in single photon emission computed tomography reconstruction of low count data. Higher contrast results were

  8. Measurement of the incorporation rates of four amino acids into proteins for estimating bacterial production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servais, P

    1995-03-01

    In aquatic ecosystems, [(3)H]thymidine incorporation into bacterial DNA and [(3)H]leucine incorporation into proteins are usually used to estimate bacterial production. The incorporation rates of four amino acids (leucine, tyrosine, lysine, alanine) into proteins of bacteria were measured in parallel on natural freshwater samples from the basin of the river Meuse (Belgium). Comparison of the incorporation into proteins and into the total macromolecular fraction showed that these different amino acids were incorporated at more than 90% into proteins. From incorporation measurements at four subsaturated concentrations (range, 2-77 nm), the maximum incorporation rates were determined. Strong correlations (r > 0.91 for all the calculated correlations) were found between the maximum incorporation rates of the different tested amino acids over a range of two orders of magnitude of bacterial activity. Bacterial production estimates were calculated using theoretical and experimental conversion factors. The productions calculated from the incorporation rates of the four amino acids were in good concordance, especially when the experimental conversion factors were used (slope range, 0.91-1.11, and r > 0.91). This study suggests that the incorporation of various amino acids into proteins can be used to estimate bacterial production.

  9. Concentration of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA of Asian catfish oil by urea complexation: optimization of reaction conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pornpisanu Thammapat

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Optimization of the concentrating conditions of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA extracted from Asian catfish oil was studied to obtain a maximum concentration. The crude fish oil was extracted from the belly flap and adipose tissue of Asian catfish, and the extracted oil was used as fresh crude oil. The EPA and DHA were concentrated by the urea complexation method. A hexagonal rotatable design was applied to examine the effects of crystallization temperature and urea-to-fatty acid ratio on the total content of EPA and DHA (Y1 and the liquid recovery yield (Y2 . The second order polynomial regression models for Y1 and Y2 were employed to generate the response surfaces. Under the optimum conditions of -20 °C and a urea-to-fatty acid ratio of 4 (w/w, the total concentration of EPA and DHA could be increased by up to 88%, while a liquid recovery yield of 26% was obtained.

  10. Enhancement of carboxylic acid degradation with sulfate radical generated by persulfate activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criquet, J; Nebout, P; Karpel Vel Leitner, N

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the generation of sulfate radical for the removal of two carboxylic acids in aqueous solution: acetic and citric acids. From photochemical and radiolytic processes, kinetics of the degradation of these two carboxylic acids was studied as a function of the pH of the solution. It was shown that the maximum of acetic acid degradation occurred at pH 5. Above this pH, competitive reactions with the carbon mineralized inhibit the reaction of with the solute. In the case of citric acid, pH has only a little effect on the kinetic of citric acid degradation. The determination of mineralization yields shows several differences depending on carboxylic acids and pH. The degradation of both carboxylic acids was also studied in the radiolysis process whether with or without persulfate addition. A comparison of the processes of sulfate radical production is presented.

  11. Biodegradation of clofibric acid and identification of its metabolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salgado, R.; Oehmen, A.; Carvalho, G.; Noronha, J.P.; Reis, M.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Metabolites produced during clofibric acid biodegradation. Highlights: ► Clofibric acid is biodegradable. ► Mainly heterotrophic bacteria degraded the clofibric acid. ► Metabolites of clofibric acid biodegradation were identified. ► The metabolic pathway of clofibric acid biodegradation is proposed. - Abstract: Clofibric acid (CLF) is the pharmaceutically active metabolite of lipid regulators clofibrate, etofibrate and etofyllinclofibrate, and it is considered both environmentally persistent and refractory. This work studied the biotransformation of CLF in aerobic sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) with mixed microbial cultures, monitoring the efficiency of biotransformation of CLF and the production of metabolites. The maximum removal achieved was 51% biodegradation (initial CLF concentration = 2 mg L −1 ), where adsorption and abiotic removal mechanisms were shown to be negligible, showing that CLF is indeed biodegradable. Tests showed that the observed CLF biodegradation was mainly carried out by heterotrophic bacteria. Three main metabolites were identified, including α-hydroxyisobutyric acid, lactic acid and 4-chlorophenol. The latter is known to exhibit higher toxicity than the parent compound, but it did not accumulate in the SBRs. α-Hydroxyisobutyric acid and lactic acid accumulated for a period, where nitrite accumulation may have been responsible for inhibiting their degradation. A metabolic pathway for the biodegradation of CLF is proposed in this study.

  12. Maximum Principles for Discrete and Semidiscrete Reaction-Diffusion Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Stehlík

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We study reaction-diffusion equations with a general reaction function f on one-dimensional lattices with continuous or discrete time ux′  (or  Δtux=k(ux-1-2ux+ux+1+f(ux, x∈Z. We prove weak and strong maximum and minimum principles for corresponding initial-boundary value problems. Whereas the maximum principles in the semidiscrete case (continuous time exhibit similar features to those of fully continuous reaction-diffusion model, in the discrete case the weak maximum principle holds for a smaller class of functions and the strong maximum principle is valid in a weaker sense. We describe in detail how the validity of maximum principles depends on the nonlinearity and the time step. We illustrate our results on the Nagumo equation with the bistable nonlinearity.

  13. Minimal length, Friedmann equations and maximum density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awad, Adel [Center for Theoretical Physics, British University of Egypt,Sherouk City 11837, P.O. Box 43 (Egypt); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Ain Shams University,Cairo, 11566 (Egypt); Ali, Ahmed Farag [Centre for Fundamental Physics, Zewail City of Science and Technology,Sheikh Zayed, 12588, Giza (Egypt); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Benha University,Benha, 13518 (Egypt)

    2014-06-16

    Inspired by Jacobson’s thermodynamic approach, Cai et al. have shown the emergence of Friedmann equations from the first law of thermodynamics. We extend Akbar-Cai derivation http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevD.75.084003 of Friedmann equations to accommodate a general entropy-area law. Studying the resulted Friedmann equations using a specific entropy-area law, which is motivated by the generalized uncertainty principle (GUP), reveals the existence of a maximum energy density closed to Planck density. Allowing for a general continuous pressure p(ρ,a) leads to bounded curvature invariants and a general nonsingular evolution. In this case, the maximum energy density is reached in a finite time and there is no cosmological evolution beyond this point which leaves the big bang singularity inaccessible from a spacetime prospective. The existence of maximum energy density and a general nonsingular evolution is independent of the equation of state and the spacial curvature k. As an example we study the evolution of the equation of state p=ωρ through its phase-space diagram to show the existence of a maximum energy which is reachable in a finite time.

  14. Maximum-Entropy Inference with a Programmable Annealer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chancellor, Nicholas; Szoke, Szilard; Vinci, Walter; Aeppli, Gabriel; Warburton, Paul A.

    2016-03-01

    Optimisation problems typically involve finding the ground state (i.e. the minimum energy configuration) of a cost function with respect to many variables. If the variables are corrupted by noise then this maximises the likelihood that the solution is correct. The maximum entropy solution on the other hand takes the form of a Boltzmann distribution over the ground and excited states of the cost function to correct for noise. Here we use a programmable annealer for the information decoding problem which we simulate as a random Ising model in a field. We show experimentally that finite temperature maximum entropy decoding can give slightly better bit-error-rates than the maximum likelihood approach, confirming that useful information can be extracted from the excited states of the annealer. Furthermore we introduce a bit-by-bit analytical method which is agnostic to the specific application and use it to show that the annealer samples from a highly Boltzmann-like distribution. Machines of this kind are therefore candidates for use in a variety of machine learning applications which exploit maximum entropy inference, including language processing and image recognition.

  15. Design of PDT protocols using delta-aminolevulinic acid (5ALA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques, Steven L.; He, Xiao-Yan; Gofstein, Gary

    1993-06-01

    The kinetics of protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) synthesis, bioconversion to other metabolic products, and photobleaching were measured in cell cultures after incubation in media containing the metabolic precursor for heme synthesis, (delta) -aminolevulinic acid (5 ALA). A compartmental model described the kinetics in terms of rate constants for the three processes. The maximum amount of PPIX that can be attained in the cells and the concentration of 5 ALA in the medium that obtains this maximum were determined. Using this information, two dosimetry protocols are outlined which both involve complete photobleaching of the PPIX: (1) the classical acute protocol using maximum 5 ALA to produce maximum PPIX and a light treatment of about 0.5 - 1 hr, and (2) a novel prolonged protocol using continuous low-level 5 ALA delivery to produce only slightly elevated PPIX and an extended light exposure time of over 24 hrs.

  16. Probabilistic maximum-value wind prediction for offshore environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staid, Andrea; Pinson, Pierre; Guikema, Seth D.

    2015-01-01

    statistical models to predict the full distribution of the maximum-value wind speeds in a 3 h interval. We take a detailed look at the performance of linear models, generalized additive models and multivariate adaptive regression splines models using meteorological covariates such as gust speed, wind speed......, convective available potential energy, Charnock, mean sea-level pressure and temperature, as given by the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts forecasts. The models are trained to predict the mean value of maximum wind speed, and the residuals from training the models are used to develop...... the full probabilistic distribution of maximum wind speed. Knowledge of the maximum wind speed for an offshore location within a given period can inform decision-making regarding turbine operations, planned maintenance operations and power grid scheduling in order to improve safety and reliability...

  17. Characterizing graphs of maximum matching width at most 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeong, Jisu; Ok, Seongmin; Suh, Geewon

    2017-01-01

    The maximum matching width is a width-parameter that is de ned on a branch-decomposition over the vertex set of a graph. The size of a maximum matching in the bipartite graph is used as a cut-function. In this paper, we characterize the graphs of maximum matching width at most 2 using the minor o...

  18. Laser-induced photochemical reaction of aqueous maleic acid solutions containing H2O2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Yuichi; Kawanishi, Shunichi; Suzuki, Nobutake

    1995-01-01

    Hydroxy acid such as glycolic, tartaric and malic acids was directly produced by XeF-laser irradiation of the N 2 -saturated maleic acid aqueous solution containing H 2 O 2 . The selectivities of these products at the maximum of tartaric acid were 71, 4, and 2% at H 2 O 2 feeding rate of 3.2 ml h -1 , respectively. On the other hand, the irradiation of maleates such as dipotassium, calcium, and disodium greatly enhanced the selectivities of tartaric acid formation to 19%, and of malic acid formation to 13%, respectively, for dipotassium maleate. It may be considered from these results that the stability of the hydroxylated intermediate radical plays an important role for the efficient formations of tartaric and malic acids. (author)

  19. Production of itaconic acid from acetate by engineering acid-tolerant Escherichia coli W.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Myung Hyun; Lim, Hyun Gyu; Woo, Sung Hwa; Song, Jinyi; Jung, Gyoo Yeol

    2018-03-01

    Utilization of abundant and cheap carbon sources can effectively reduce the production cost and enhance the economic feasibility. Acetate is a promising carbon source to achieve cost-effective microbial processes. In this study, we engineered an Escherichia coli strain to produce itaconic acid from acetate. As acetate is known to inhibit cell growth, we initially screened for a strain with a high tolerance to 10 g/L of acetate in the medium, and the W strain was selected as the host. Subsequently, the WC strain was obtained by overexpression of cad (encoding cis-aconitate decarboxylase) using a synthetic promoter and 5' UTR. However, the WC strain produced only 0.13 g/L itaconic acid because of low acetate uptake. To improve the production, the acetate assimilating pathway and glyoxylate shunt pathway were amplified by overexpression of pathway genes as well as its deregulation. The resulting strain, WCIAG4 produced 3.57 g/L itaconic acid (16.1% of theoretical maximum yield) after 88 hr of fermentation with rapid acetate assimilation. These efforts support that acetate can be a potential feedstock for biochemical production with engineered E. coli. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Lipids as renewable resources: current state of chemical and biotechnological conversion and diversification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, J O; Bornscheuer, U

    2006-06-01

    Oils and fats are the most important renewable raw materials of the chemical industry. They make available fatty acids in such purity that they may be used for chemical conversions and for the synthesis of chemically pure compounds. Oleic acid (1) from "new sunflower," linoleic acid (2) from soybean, linolenic acid (3) from linseed, erucic acid (4) from rape seed, and ricinoleic acid (5) from castor oil are most important for chemical transformations offering in addition to the carboxy group one or more C-C-double bonds. New plant oils containing fatty acids with new and interesting functionalities such as petroselinic acid (6) from Coriandrum sativum, calendic acid (7) from Calendula officinalis, alpha-eleostearic acid (8) from tung oil, santalbic acid (9) from Santalum album (Linn.), and vernolic acid (10) from Vernonia galamensis are becoming industrially available. The basic oleochemicals are free fatty acids, methyl esters, fatty alcohols, and fatty amines as well as glycerol as a by-product. Their interesting new industrial applications are the usage as environmentally friendly industrial fluids and lubricants, insulating fluid for electric utilities such as transformers and additive to asphalt. Modern methods of synthetic organic chemistry including enzymatic and microbial transformations were applied extensively to fatty compounds for the selective functionalization of the alkyl chain. Syntheses of long-chain diacids, omega-hydroxy fatty acids, and omega-unsaturated fatty acids as base chemicals derived from vegetable oils were developed. Interesting applications were opened by the epoxidation of C-C-double bonds giving the possibility of photochemically initiated cationic curing and access to polyetherpolyols. Enantiomerically pure fatty acids as part of the chiral pool of nature can be used for the synthesis of nonracemic building blocks.

  1. The Maximum Resource Bin Packing Problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyar, J.; Epstein, L.; Favrholdt, L.M.

    2006-01-01

    Usually, for bin packing problems, we try to minimize the number of bins used or in the case of the dual bin packing problem, maximize the number or total size of accepted items. This paper presents results for the opposite problems, where we would like to maximize the number of bins used...... algorithms, First-Fit-Increasing and First-Fit-Decreasing for the maximum resource variant of classical bin packing. For the on-line variant, we define maximum resource variants of classical and dual bin packing. For dual bin packing, no on-line algorithm is competitive. For classical bin packing, we find...

  2. Maximum entropy analysis of EGRET data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pohl, M.; Strong, A.W.

    1997-01-01

    EGRET data are usually analysed on the basis of the Maximum-Likelihood method \\cite{ma96} in a search for point sources in excess to a model for the background radiation (e.g. \\cite{hu97}). This method depends strongly on the quality of the background model, and thus may have high systematic unce...... uncertainties in region of strong and uncertain background like the Galactic Center region. Here we show images of such regions obtained by the quantified Maximum-Entropy method. We also discuss a possible further use of MEM in the analysis of problematic regions of the sky....

  3. Density estimation by maximum quantum entropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, R.N.; Wallstrom, T.; Martz, H.F.

    1993-01-01

    A new Bayesian method for non-parametric density estimation is proposed, based on a mathematical analogy to quantum statistical physics. The mathematical procedure is related to maximum entropy methods for inverse problems and image reconstruction. The information divergence enforces global smoothing toward default models, convexity, positivity, extensivity and normalization. The novel feature is the replacement of classical entropy by quantum entropy, so that local smoothing is enforced by constraints on differential operators. The linear response of the estimate is proportional to the covariance. The hyperparameters are estimated by type-II maximum likelihood (evidence). The method is demonstrated on textbook data sets

  4. Omega-3 Fatty Acid Content in Various Tissues of Different Persian Gulf Fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MJ Zibaee Nezhad

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The fatty acids of omega-3 family have high nutritional value and can prevent coronary heart disease.These fatty acids are found in various fish and sea foods. To investigate the level of omega-3 fatty acids indifferent kind of fish head, muscle and liver from 30 species of fish collected from Persian Gulf.Material and Methods: In this experimental study, the fish were collected by hunting from Boushehr and Hormozgansea ports. Their head, muscle and liver fatty acids were determined on their methylated fatty acids dissolvedin N-hexin. Quantitative analysis of fatty acids was performed by gas chromatography (GC with methylmyristateused as the reference material in this analysis and the qualitative analysis of fatty acids was done bygas chromatography and mass spectrometer (GC- mass and cod liver oil which contained all of omega-3 fattyacids used as standard.Results: Our study showed that some fish were good sources of omega-3 fatty acids and Trout (Ghezel-ALA,Bartail flathead (Zaminkan-e-domnavari, Malabar blood snapper (Sorkhoo malabari had maximum levels ofomega-3 in all body tissues. Other types of fish were rich in omega 3 fatty acids in separate organs, such as liverin Bartail flathead (Zaminkan-e-domnavari, head in Sillago Sihama (Shoort and muscle in Trout (Ghezel-ALA. In contrast, lesser amount of omega 3 fatty acids is found in tissues of other species of fish such as Silverpomfret (Halva sefid, Longfin trevally (Gish-e-derazbale and Xiphophorus Hellerii (Dom-shamshiri.Conclusion: This research showed that the liver of fish had the highest level of omega-3 fatty acids and fish musclecontained more omega-3 fatty acids than the head. Thus for having maximum levels of omega-3 fatty acids inthe diet, all fish tissues can be served. As liver and head of fish are not usually consumed, it is recommended thatsuch organs be used for preparation of omega 3-containing cardio supportive supplements.

  5. Ascorbic acid reduces noise-induced nitric oxide production in the guinea pig ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Ulf-Rüdiger; Fischer, Ilka; Brieger, Jürgen; Rümelin, Andreas; Schmidtmann, Irene; Li, Huige; Mann, Wolf J; Helling, Kai

    2008-05-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss can be caused, among other causes, by increased nitric oxide (NO) production in the inner ear leading to nitroactive stress and cell destruction. Some studies in the literature suggest that the degree of hearing loss (HL) could be reduced in an animal model through ascorbic acid supplementation. To identify the effect of ascorbic acid on tissue-dependent NO content in the inner ear of the guinea pig, we determined the local NO production in the organ of Corti and the lateral wall separately 6 hours after noise exposure. Prospective animal study in guinea pigs. Over a period of 7 days, male guinea pigs were supplied with minimum (25 mg/kg body weight/day) and maximum (525 mg/kg body weight/day) ascorbic acid doses, and afterwards exposed to noise (90 dB sound pressure level for 1 hour). The acoustic-evoked potentials were recorded before and after noise exposure. The organ of Corti and the lateral wall were incubated differently for 6 hours in culture medium, and the degree of NO production was determined by chemiluminescence. Ascorbic acid treatment reduced the hearing threshold shift after noise exposure depending on concentration. When the maximum ascorbic acid dose was substituted, NO production was significantly reduced in the lateral wall after noise exposure and slightly reduced in the organ of Corti. Oral supplementation of the natural radical scavenger ascorbic acid reduces the NO-production rate in the inner ear in noisy conditions. This finding supports the concept of inner ear protection by ascorbic acid supplementation.

  6. Urethral orifice hyaluronic acid injections: a novel animal model of bladder outlet obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongquan; Xiong, Zhiyong; Gong, Wei; Zhou, Zhansong; Lu, Gensheng

    2015-02-21

    We produced a novel model of bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) by periurethral injection of hyaluronic acid and compared the cystometric features, postoperative complications, and histopathological changes of that model with that of traditional open surgery. Forty female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups. Fifteen rats were subcutaneously injected with 0.2 ml hyaluronic acid at 5, 7, and 12 o'clock around the urethral orifice. Another fifteen rats underwent traditional open partial proximal urethral obstruction surgery, and 10 normal rats used as controls. After 4 weeks, filling cystometry, postoperative complications, and histopathological features were evaluated in each group. Three rats were also observed for 12 weeks after hyaluronic acid injection to evaluate the long-term effect. Hyaluronic acid periurethral injection caused increased maximum cystometric capacity, maximum bladder pressure, micturition interval, and post-void residual urine volume compared with control (p injection group had significantly shorter operative time, less incidence of incision infection and bladder stone formation compared with the surgery group (p injection and surgery bladders; these were not observed in the control group. Bladder weight and thickness of smooth muscle in the injection and surgery groups were significantly greater than those in the control group (p injection or control groups. Rats periurethrally injected hyaluronic acid were stable the compound was not fully absorbed in any rat after 12 weeks. Hyaluronic acid periurethral injection generates a simple, effective, and persistent animal model of BOO with lower complications, compared with traditional surgery.

  7. Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-lactic acid nanocarrier-based degradable hydrogels for restoring the vaginal microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Sujata Sundara; Turovskiy, Yevgeniy; Singh, Yashveer; Chikindas, Michael L.; Sinko, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    Women with bacterial vaginosis (BV) display reduced vaginal acidity, which make them susceptible to associated infections such as HIV. In the current study, poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) nanocarrier-based degradable hydrogels were developed for the controlled release of lactic acid in the vagina of BV-infected women. PEG-lactic acid (PEG-LA) nanocarriers were prepared by covalently attaching lactic acid to 8-arm PEG-SH via cleavable thioester bonds. PEG-LA nanocarriers with 4 copies of lactic acid per molecule provided controlled release of lactic acid with a maximum release of 23% and 47% bound lactic acid in phosphate buffered saline (PBS, pH 7.4) and acetate buffer (AB, pH 4.3), respectively. The PEG nanocarrier-based hydrogels were formed by cross-linking the PEG-LA nanocarriers with 4-arm PEG-NHS via degradable thioester bonds. The nanocarrier-based hydrogels formed within 20 min under ambient conditions and exhibited an elastic modulus that was 100-fold higher than the viscous modulus. The nanocarrier-based degradable hydrogels provided controlled release of lactic acid for several hours; however, a maximum release of only 10%–14% bound lactic acid was observed possibly due to steric hindrance of the polymer chains in the cross-linked hydrogel. In contrast, hydrogels with passively entrapped lactic acid showed burst release with complete release within 30 min. Lactic acid showed antimicrobial activity against the primary BV pathogen Gardnerella vaginalis with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 3.6 mg/ml. In addition, the hydrogels with passively entrapped lactic acid showed retained antimicrobial activity with complete inhibition G. vaginalis growth within 48 h. The results of the current study collectively demonstrate the potential of PEG nanocarrier-based hydrogels for vaginal administration of lactic acid for preventing and treating BV. PMID:25223229

  8. Plant refuses driven biochar: Application as metal adsorbent from acidic solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puja Khare

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Biochar prepared from aromatic spent was used as adsorbent for assessing its removal capacity of cadmium, chromium, copper and lead from aqueous acidic solutions. For the optimization of the processes, separate experiments were setup in fixed bed columns of biochar prepared from different biomasses in variable sizes at different temperatures, metal concentrations, flow rate and time. The effect of the above parameters on adsorption of metals was assessed in terms of maximum adsorption capacity, kinetics, theorem and thermodynamics. Results show that maximum removal of each metal was 60 mg/g. The adsorption equilibrium data obeyed the Freundlich model and the kinetic data were well described by the pseudo-second-order model. The adsorption process is believed to proceed by an initial surface adsorption followed by intra-particle diffusion. In this regard to the proposed mechanism, modeling results implied that exchange of the hydrogen occurs during the low loading of metal. Opposite is true for the calcium, magnesium and sodium ions. Thermodynamic studies revealed the feasibility and endothermic nature of the system. Treatment of acidic mine water with biochar suggests that it buffers the acid and is capable of efficient removal of these metals.

  9. Cinnamic acid derivatives in cosmetics - current use and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunia-Krzyżak, Agnieszka; Słoczyńska, Karolina; Popiół, Justyna; Koczurkiewicz, Paulina; Marona, Henryk; Pękala, Elżbieta

    2018-06-05

    Cinnamic acid derivatives are widely used in cosmetics and possess various functions. This group of compounds includes both naturally occurring as well as synthetic substances. On the basis of the Cosmetic Ingredient Database (CosIng) and available literature, this review summarizes their functions in cosmetics, including their physicochemical and biological properties as well as reported adverse effects. A perfuming function is typical of many derivatives of cinnamaldehyde, cinnamyl alcohol, dihydrocinnamyl alcohol, and cinnamic acid itself; these substances are commonly used in cosmetics all over the world. Some of them show allergic and photoallergic potential, resulting in restrictions in maximum concentrations and/or a requirement to indicate the presence of some substances in the list of ingredients when their concentrations exceed certain fixed values in a cosmetic product. Another important function of cinnamic acid derivatives in cosmetics is UV protection. Ester derivatives such as ethylhexyl methoxycinnamate (octinoxate), isoamyl p-methoxycinnamte (amiloxiate), octocrylene, and cinoxate are used in cosmetics all over the world as UV filters. However, their maximum concentrations in cosmetic products are restricted due to their adverse effects, which include contact and a photocontact allergies, phototoxic contact dermatitis, contact dermatitis, estrogenic modulation, and generation of reactive oxygen species. Other rarely utilized functions of cinnamic acid derivatives are as an antioxidant, in skin conditioning, hair conditioning, as a tonic, and in antimicrobial activities. Moreover, some currently investigated natural and synthetic derivatives of cinnamic acid have shown skin lightening and anti-aging properties. Some of them may become new cosmetic ingredients in the future. In particular, 4-hydroxycinnamic acid, which is currently indexed as a skin-conditioning cosmetics ingredient, has been widely tested in vitro and in vivo as a new drug candidate

  10. Proteomic and lipidomic signatures of lipid metabolism in NASH-associated hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, Kyle; Hazim, Antonious; He, Ying; Peyressatre, Marion; Kim, Do-Young; Song, Xiaoling; Beretta, Laura

    2013-08-01

    Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a common preneoplastic condition of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Mice with hepatocytic deletion of Pten develop NASH and HCC later in life. This model is highly valuable for studies aimed at identifying the molecular mechanism by which metabolic disorders contribute to tumor development. We applied proteomic and lipidomic profiling approaches to Pten-null NASH liver and tumors. Circulating fatty acid composition was also characterized in these mice. The relevance to human NASH and HCC was further validated. This integrative proteomic and lipidomic study from mouse to human and from liver to blood identified the following disease signatures: (i) an HCC signature: upregulated hepatic scd1/scd2, fads2, and acsl5:acsl1 ratio, elevated vaccenic and erucic acids, and reduced margaric and linoleic acids in both liver and plasma; (ii) a NASH signature that correlates with tumor burden: upregulated hepatic elovl6, elevated oleic, adrenic, and osbond acids, and reduced cervonic acid in liver and plasma; and (iii) a NASH signature: reduced hepatic and circulating lignoceric and eicosapentaenoic acids. Altogether, these results show the role of lipid-modifying enzymes converting saturated fatty acids (SFA) to monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) in HCC and the importance of an increased ratio of long chain n6-polyunsaturated fatty acids over n3-polyunsaturated fatty acids in NASH and HCC risk. They also highlight the relevance of the Pten-null model for studies related to NASH and HCC and show that circulating lipid metabolome provides a direct read of lipid changes in the liver. Most importantly, novel candidate targets for HCC diagnosis, therapy, risk assessment, and prevention were identified. ©2013 AACR.

  11. The effect of the distance between acidic site and basic site immobilized on mesoporous solid on the activity in catalyzing aldol condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaofang; Yu, Xiaobo; Wu, Shujie; Liu, Bo; Liu, Heng; Guan, Jingqi; Kan, Qiubin

    2011-02-01

    Acid-base bifunctional heterogeneous catalysts containing carboxylic and amine groups, which were immobilized at defined distance from one another on the mesoporous solid were synthesized by immobilizing lysine onto carboxyl-SBA-15. The obtained materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), N 2 adsorption, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron micrographs (SEM), transmission electron micrographs (TEM), elemental analysis, and back titration. Proximal-C-A-SBA-15 with a proximal acid-base distance was more active than maximum-C-A-SBA-15 with a maximum acid-base distance in aldol condensation reaction between acetone and various aldehydes. It appears that the distance between acidic site and basic site immobilized on mesoporous solid should be an essential factor for catalysis optimization.

  12. Composition of the enzymatic and acid hydrolyzates of gamma-irradiated rice straw

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abad, L.V.; Banzon, R.B.; Rosa, A. de la

    1989-01-01

    Gamma irradiation was utilized to induce structural changes in rice straw that would enhance the conversion of its cellulose and ligno-cellulosic components to glucose and other reducing sugars. With the appropriate fermentation conditions these sugars can eventually be converted into alcohol. Rice straw materials were irradiated at varying doses (0-500 kgy) and hydrolyzed by the use of a) cellulose enzyme and b) 1% sulfuric acid. The composition of the hydrolyzates of rice straw was studied by thin layer chromatography (TLC) coupled with the Nelson-Somogyi test for its quantification. Acid hydrolyzates of rice straw showed a maximum increase of 16.46% in its total reducing sugars at 300 Kgy. TLC of the acid hydrolyzates of rice straw revealed the presence of glucose, xylose, arabinose, and cellobiose. However, it was only with xylose that a significant increase in yield was observed with the non-irradiated straw 12.55% xylose yield was noted while with rice straw-irradiated at 400 Kgy a maximum yield of 15.90% xylose was obtained. Total reducing sugar of the enzymatic hydrolyzate of rice straw showed a maximum increase of 205% at 500 Kgy. TLC revealed that only glucose was present in the enzymatic hydrolyzate. Glucose yield increase from 2.49% (0 Kgy) to 7.31% (500 Kgy). The results showed that radiation pre-treatment of rice straw induces significant increases in reducing sugar for both enzymatic and hydrolyzate. (Auth.). 2 tabs.; 1 fig

  13. Preparation and properties of N-Phenylbutyrohydroxamic acid and N-p-Chlorophenylbutyrohydroxamic acid and their uses as extracting agents for Chromium (VI), Molybdenum (VI), Titanium (IV) and Uranium (VI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abu Elnour, Sawsan Hassan [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Khartoum, Khartoum (Sudan)

    1993-05-01

    Two lignads, N-phenylbutyrohydroxamic acid (1), N-p-chlorophenylbutyryl chloride with {beta} phenyl-hydroylamine and N-p-chlorophenylhydroxylamine, respectively. The acids prepared were identified and characterised through their reactions with Vanadiun (V) and iron (III), their melting points, infra-red spectra and nitrogen content. The extractive properties of these acids towards the metals Cr (VI), Mo (VI), Ti (IV) and U (VI) were examined at different PH values. The percentage of maximum extraction with the two acids was found to be as follows : for Cr (VI) at PH 1, (100%) for both acids, Mo (VI) at PH 2 (33.34%) with acid (I) and (16.67%) with acid (II) and U (VI) at PH 6 (72%) with acid (I) and (76%) with acid (II). The metal: Ligand complexes ratios were determined by using the continuous variation method, the ratio of the two ligands with four metals was found to be 1:2. Finally the suitability of the two acids for spectrophotometric determination of four metals was examined.(Author) 90 refs. , 24 tabs. , 24 figs

  14. Preparation and properties of N-Phenylbutyrohydroxamic acid and N-p-Chlorophenylbutyrohydroxamic acid and their uses as extracting agents for Chromium (VI), Molybdenum (VI), Titanium (IV) and Uranium (VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abu Elnour, Sawsan Hassan

    1993-05-01

    Two lignads, N-phenylbutyrohydroxamic acid (1), N-p-chlorophenylbutyryl chloride with β phenyl-hydroylamine and N-p-chlorophenylhydroxylamine, respectively. The acids prepared were identified and characterised through their reactions with Vanadiun (V) and iron (III), their melting points, infra-red spectra and nitrogen content. The extractive properties of these acids towards the metals Cr (VI), Mo (VI), Ti (IV) and U (VI) were examined at different PH values. The percentage of maximum extraction with the two acids was found to be as follows : for Cr (VI) at PH 1, (100%) for both acids, Mo (VI) at PH 2 (33.34%) with acid (I) and (16.67%) with acid (II) and U (VI) at PH 6 (72%) with acid (I) and (76%) with acid (II). The metal: Ligand complexes ratios were determined by using the continuous variation method, the ratio of the two ligands with four metals was found to be 1:2. Finally the suitability of the two acids for spectrophotometric determination of four metals was examined.(Author)

  15. Analogue of Pontryagin's maximum principle for multiple integrals minimization problems

    OpenAIRE

    Mikhail, Zelikin

    2016-01-01

    The theorem like Pontryagin's maximum principle for multiple integrals is proved. Unlike the usual maximum principle, the maximum should be taken not over all matrices, but only on matrices of rank one. Examples are given.

  16. Chemical polymerization of aniline in phenylphosphinic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NICOLETA PLESU

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The chemical polymerization of aniline was performed in phenylphosphinic acid (APP medium using ammonium peroxidisulfate as the oxidizing agent, at 0 ºC and 25 ºC. The yield of polyaniline (PANI was about 60–69 %. The polymerization process required an induction time 8–10 times greater than in other acids (hydrochloric, sulfuric. The average density of the obtained polymer was 1.395 g cm-3 for PANI-salt and 1.203 g cm-3 for PANI-base. The acid capacity of PANI depends on the synthesis parameters and the maximum value was 15.02 meq/g polymer. The inherent viscosity of PANI was 0.662 dl/g at aniline/oxidant molar ratios >2 and 0 ºC. The oxidation state was a function of the synthesis parameters and lay between 0.553–0.625, as determined from UV-VIS and titration with TiCl3 data. The PANI samples were characterized by measurements of their density, inherent viscosity, conductivity, acid capacity, FTIR and UV-VIS spectrum, and thermogravimetric data.

  17. Microprocessor Controlled Maximum Power Point Tracker for Photovoltaic Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiya, J. D.; Tahirou, G.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a microprocessor controlled maximum power point tracker for photovoltaic module. Input current and voltage are measured and multiplied within the microprocessor, which contains an algorithm to seek the maximum power point. The duly cycle of the DC-DC converter, at which the maximum power occurs is obtained, noted and adjusted. The microprocessor constantly seeks for improvement of obtained power by varying the duty cycle

  18. Sulfuric acid functional zirconium (or aluminum) incorporated mesoporous MCM-48 solid acid catalysts for alkylation of phenol with tert-butyl alcohol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Tingshun, E-mail: tshjiang@mail.ujs.edu.cn; Cheng, Jinlian; Liu, Wangping; Fu, Lie; Zhou, Xuping; Zhao, Qian; Yin, Hengbo

    2014-10-15

    Several zirconium (or aluminum) incorporated mesoporous MCM-48 solid acid catalysts (SO{sub 4}{sup 2−}/Zr-MCM-48 and SO{sub 4}{sup 2−}/Al-MCM-48) were prepared by the impregnation method and their physicochemical properties were characterized by means of XRD, FT-IR, TEM, NH{sub 3}-TPD and N{sub 2} physical adsorption. Also, the catalytic activities of these solid acid catalysts were evaluated by the alkylation of phenol with tert-butyl alcohol. The effect of weight hour space velocity (WHSV), reaction time and reaction temperature on catalytic properties was also studied. The results show that the SO{sub 4}{sup 2−}/Zr-MCM-48 and SO{sub 4}{sup 2−}/Al-MCM-48 still have good mesoporous structure and long range ordering. Compared with the Zr (or Al)–MCM-48 samples, SO{sub 4}{sup 2−}/Zr-MCM-48 and SO{sub 4}{sup 2−}/Al-MCM-48 solid acid catalysts have strong acidity and exhibit high activities in alkylation reaction of phenol with tert-butyl alcohol. The SO{sub 4}{sup 2−}/Zr-MCM-48-25 (molar ratio of Si/Zr=0.04) catalyst was found to be the most promising and gave the highest phenol conversion among all catalysts. A maximum phenol conversion of 91.6% with 4-tert-butyl phenol (4-TBP) selectivity of 81.8% was achieved when the molar ratio of tert-butyl alcohol:phenol is 2:1, reaction time is 2 h, the WHSV is 2 h{sup −1} and the reaction temperature is 140 °C. - Highlights: • Sulfuric acid functional mesoporous solid acid catalysts were prepared via impregnation method. • The alkylation of phenol with tert-butyl alcohol was carried out over these solid acid catalysts. • The catalytic activity of SO{sub 4}{sup 2−}/Zr-MCM-48-25 catalyst is much higher than that of the others. • A maximum phenol conversion of 91.6% was achieved under optimum reaction conditions for SO{sub 4}{sup 2−}/Zr-MCM-48-25.

  19. Cell-cycle variation in the induction of lethality and mitotic recombination after treatment with UV and nitrous acid in the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, P.J.; Tippins, R.S.; Parry, J.M.

    1978-01-01

    Exponentially growing yeast cultures separated into discrete periods of the cell cycle by zonal rotor centrifugation show cyclic variation in both UV and nitrous acid induced cell lethality, mitotic gene conversion and mitotic crossing-over. Maximum cell survival after UV treatment was observed in the S and G2 phases of the cell cycle at a time when UV induction of both types of mitotic recombination was at a minumum. In contrast, cell inactivation by the chemical mutagen nitrous acid showed a single discrete period of sensitivity which occurred in S phase cells which are undergoing DNA synthesis. Mitotic gene conversion ahd mitotic crossing-over were induced by nitrous acid in cells at all stages of the cell cycle with a peak of induction of both events occurring at the time of maximum cell lethality. The lack of correlation observed between maximum cell survival and the maximum induction of mitotic intragenic recombination suggest that other DNA-repair mechanisms besides DNA-recombination repair are involved in the recovery of inactivated yeast cells during the cell cycle. (Auth.)

  20. The effect of N-stearoylethanolamine on liver phospholipid composition of rats with insulin resistance caused by alimentary obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Onopchenko

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We used alimentary obesity-induced insulin resistance (IR model in rats to investigate the influence of N-stearoylethanolamine on the content of phospholipids and their fatty acid composition. Our results show that prolonged high-fat diet triggers considerable aberrations in the composition of main phospholipids in the liver and can be one of the causes of IR in rats. In particular, the increase of phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine and significant decrease of other phospholipids: lysophosphatidylcholine, lysophosphatidylethanolamine, sphingomyelin, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylserine and diphosphaglicerol were observed. The levels of monounsaturated (erucic, nervonic, oleic and polyunsaturated (eicosatrienoic, docosatrienoic, arachidonic fatty acids were increased; meanwhile the content of diunsaturated acids was decreased. The NSE administration (50 mg/kg of body weight caused restoration of the phospholipids content in the liver of rats with diet-induced IR that highly correlated with the decrease in plasma insulin level and the improvement of insulin sensitivity. Moreover, the effect of NSE was accompanied by the normalization of fatty acids composition of phospholipids that could be related to modulating influen­ce of NSE on the activity of the main fatty acid desaturases. It is known that the imbalance in phospholipid composition of the rat liver causes substantial metabolic alterations that are associated with the development of IR. Accordingly, the compensations of the imbalance by NSE can help to restore insulin sensitivity, inhibit the development of obesity, IR and type 2 diabetes.

  1. Low molecular weight organic acids in fogwater in an urban area (Strasbourg, France)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millet, M.; Wortham, H.; Sanusi, A.; Mirabel, P. [Centre de Geochime de la Surface, Equipe de Physico-Chimie de l`Atmosphere, Strasbourg (France)

    1997-10-27

    This work presents the chemical analysis of low weight carboxylic acids: formate and acetate in two droplet-size categories (2-6 and 5-8 {mu}m) of fogwater collected in Strasbourg (eastern France) between 1991 and 1994. For each sample, the ratio between acetate and formate was calculated, in many cases, this ratio was typically higher than one. This calculation indicates that the origin of acetate and formate can be attributed to automobile exhaust. Maximum contribution of these acids to the total free acidity of fogwater was also checked and the results show that the contribution is very low in regard to the strong mineral acids from anthropogenic origin

  2. Cyanobacteria as efficient producers of mycosporine-like amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Shikha; Prajapat, Ganshyam; Abrar, Mustari; Ledwani, Lalita; Singh, Anoop; Agrawal, Akhil

    2017-09-01

    Mycosporine-like amino acids are the most common group of transparent ultraviolet radiation absorbing intracellular secondary metabolites. These molecules absorb light in the range of ultraviolet-A and -B with a maximum absorbance between 310 and 362 nm. Cyanobacteria might have faced the most deleterious ultraviolet radiation, which leads to an evolution of ultraviolet protecting mycosporine-like amino acids for efficient selection in the environment. In the last 30 years, scientists have investigated various cyanobacteria for novel mycosporine-like amino acids, applying different induction techniques. This review organizes all the cyanobacterial groups that produce various mycosporine-like amino acids. We found out that cyanobacteria belonging to orders Synechococcales, Chroococcales, Oscillatoriales, and Nostocales are frequently studied for the presence of mycosporine-like amino acids, while orders Gloeobacterales, Spirulinales, Pleurocapsales, and Chroococcidiopsidales are still need to be investigated. Nostoc and Anabaena strains are major studied genus for the mycosporine-like amino acids production. Hence, this review will give further insight to the readers about potential mycosporine-like amino acid producing cyanobacterial groups in future investigations. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Maximum entropy reconstructions for crystallographic imaging; Cristallographie et reconstruction d`images par maximum d`entropie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papoular, R

    1997-07-01

    The Fourier Transform is of central importance to Crystallography since it allows the visualization in real space of tridimensional scattering densities pertaining to physical systems from diffraction data (powder or single-crystal diffraction, using x-rays, neutrons, electrons or else). In turn, this visualization makes it possible to model and parametrize these systems, the crystal structures of which are eventually refined by Least-Squares techniques (e.g., the Rietveld method in the case of Powder Diffraction). The Maximum Entropy Method (sometimes called MEM or MaxEnt) is a general imaging technique, related to solving ill-conditioned inverse problems. It is ideally suited for tackling undetermined systems of linear questions (for which the number of variables is much larger than the number of equations). It is already being applied successfully in Astronomy, Radioastronomy and Medical Imaging. The advantages of using MAXIMUM Entropy over conventional Fourier and `difference Fourier` syntheses stem from the following facts: MaxEnt takes the experimental error bars into account; MaxEnt incorporate Prior Knowledge (e.g., the positivity of the scattering density in some instances); MaxEnt allows density reconstructions from incompletely phased data, as well as from overlapping Bragg reflections; MaxEnt substantially reduces truncation errors to which conventional experimental Fourier reconstructions are usually prone. The principles of Maximum Entropy imaging as applied to Crystallography are first presented. The method is then illustrated by a detailed example specific to Neutron Diffraction: the search for proton in solids. (author). 17 refs.

  4. substantiation of the standards for tritium amino acids intake by human organism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhesko, T.V.; Balonov, M.I.

    1984-01-01

    Calculated values of β-irradiation tissue doses of bound tritium and tritium oxide absorbed by animals treated with different amino acids are given. The obtained dose values are compared with tritium water doses. The data obtained in animal studies are extrapolated to man in order to determine the dose equivalent to the incorporated 3 H-amino acids dose. It is assumed that the dose equivalent to 3 H-amino acids radiation is three times as high as the equivalent amount of tritium oxide. 9 mCi/yr is established as the maximum allowable blood intake of 3 H-amino acids. Due to their metabolic characteristics, air permissible concentrations of 3 H-amino acids and tritium oxide have approximately the same values. The value of 30 nCi/cm 2 is recommended as a standard for work clothing contamination with 3 H-amino acids

  5. Corrosion inhibition of mild steel in 1 M HCl solution by henna extract: A comparative study of the inhibition by henna and its constituents (Lawsone, Gallic acid, {alpha}-D-Glucose and Tannic acid)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostovari, A. [Technical Inspection Engineering Department, Petroleum University of Technology, Abadan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: A.Ostovari@gmail.com; Hoseinieh, S.M.; Peikari, M. [Technical Inspection Engineering Department, Petroleum University of Technology, Abadan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shadizadeh, S.R. [Petroleum Engineering Department, Petroleum University of Technology, Abadan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hashemi, S.J. [Technical Inspection Engineering Department, Petroleum University of Technology, Abadan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-09-15

    The inhibitive action of henna extract (Lawsonia inermis) and its main constituents (lawsone, gallic acid, {alpha}-D-Glucose and tannic acid) on corrosion of mild steel in 1 M HCl solution was investigated through electrochemical techniques and surface analysis (SEM/EDS). Polarization measurements indicate that all the examined compounds act as a mixed inhibitor and inhibition efficiency increases with inhibitor concentration. Maximum inhibition efficiency (92.06%) is obtained at 1.2 g/l henna extract. Inhibition efficiency increases in the order: lawsone > henna extract > gallic acid > {alpha}-D-Glucose > tannic acid. Also, inhibition mechanism and thermodynamic parameters are discussed.

  6. Corrosion inhibition of mild steel in 1 M HCl solution by henna extract: A comparative study of the inhibition by henna and its constituents (Lawsone, Gallic acid, α-D-Glucose and Tannic acid)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostovari, A.; Hoseinieh, S.M.; Peikari, M.; Shadizadeh, S.R.; Hashemi, S.J.

    2009-01-01

    The inhibitive action of henna extract (Lawsonia inermis) and its main constituents (lawsone, gallic acid, α-D-Glucose and tannic acid) on corrosion of mild steel in 1 M HCl solution was investigated through electrochemical techniques and surface analysis (SEM/EDS). Polarization measurements indicate that all the examined compounds act as a mixed inhibitor and inhibition efficiency increases with inhibitor concentration. Maximum inhibition efficiency (92.06%) is obtained at 1.2 g/l henna extract. Inhibition efficiency increases in the order: lawsone > henna extract > gallic acid > α-D-Glucose > tannic acid. Also, inhibition mechanism and thermodynamic parameters are discussed.

  7. Comprehensive performance analyses and optimization of the irreversible thermodynamic cycle engines (TCE) under maximum power (MP) and maximum power density (MPD) conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonca, Guven; Sahin, Bahri; Ust, Yasin; Parlak, Adnan

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents comprehensive performance analyses and comparisons for air-standard irreversible thermodynamic cycle engines (TCE) based on the power output, power density, thermal efficiency, maximum dimensionless power output (MP), maximum dimensionless power density (MPD) and maximum thermal efficiency (MEF) criteria. Internal irreversibility of the cycles occurred during the irreversible-adiabatic processes is considered by using isentropic efficiencies of compression and expansion processes. The performances of the cycles are obtained by using engine design parameters such as isentropic temperature ratio of the compression process, pressure ratio, stroke ratio, cut-off ratio, Miller cycle ratio, exhaust temperature ratio, cycle temperature ratio and cycle pressure ratio. The effects of engine design parameters on the maximum and optimal performances are investigated. - Highlights: • Performance analyses are conducted for irreversible thermodynamic cycle engines. • Comprehensive computations are performed. • Maximum and optimum performances of the engines are shown. • The effects of design parameters on performance and power density are examined. • The results obtained may be guidelines to the engine designers

  8. 76 FR 77709 - Butyl acrylate-methacrylic acid-styrene polymer; Tolerance Exemption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-14

    ...This regulation establishes an exemption from the requirement of a tolerance for residues of 2-Propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, polymer with butyl 2-propenoate and ethenylbenzene (CAS Reg. No. 25036-16-2); also known as butyl acrylate-methacrylic acid-styrene polymer when used as an inert ingredient in a pesticide chemical formulation. Momentive Performance Materials submitted a petition to EPA under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FFDCA), requesting an exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. This regulation eliminates the need to establish a maximum permissible level for residues of 2-Propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, polymer with butyl 2-propenoate and ethenylbenzene on food or feed commodities.

  9. Shower maximum detector for SDC calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ernwein, J.

    1994-01-01

    A prototype for the SDC end-cap (EM) calorimeter complete with a pre-shower and a shower maximum detector was tested in beams of electrons and Π's at CERN by an SDC subsystem group. The prototype was manufactured from scintillator tiles and strips read out with 1 mm diameter wave-length shifting fibers. The design and construction of the shower maximum detector is described, and results of laboratory tests on light yield and performance of the scintillator-fiber system are given. Preliminary results on energy and position measurements with the shower max detector in the test beam are shown. (authors). 4 refs., 5 figs

  10. Maximum Power Point Tracking in Variable Speed Wind Turbine Based on Permanent Magnet Synchronous Generator Using Maximum Torque Sliding Mode Control Strategy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Esmaeil Ghaderi; Hossein Tohidi; Behnam Khosrozadeh

    2017-01-01

    The present study was carried out in order to track the maximum power point in a variable speed turbine by minimizing electromechanical torque changes using a sliding mode control strategy.In this strategy,fhst,the rotor speed is set at an optimal point for different wind speeds.As a result of which,the tip speed ratio reaches an optimal point,mechanical power coefficient is maximized,and wind turbine produces its maximum power and mechanical torque.Then,the maximum mechanical torque is tracked using electromechanical torque.In this technique,tracking error integral of maximum mechanical torque,the error,and the derivative of error are used as state variables.During changes in wind speed,sliding mode control is designed to absorb the maximum energy from the wind and minimize the response time of maximum power point tracking (MPPT).In this method,the actual control input signal is formed from a second order integral operation of the original sliding mode control input signal.The result of the second order integral in this model includes control signal integrity,full chattering attenuation,and prevention from large fluctuations in the power generator output.The simulation results,calculated by using MATLAB/m-file software,have shown the effectiveness of the proposed control strategy for wind energy systems based on the permanent magnet synchronous generator (PMSG).

  11. 32 CFR 842.35 - Depreciation and maximum allowances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Depreciation and maximum allowances. 842.35... LITIGATION ADMINISTRATIVE CLAIMS Personnel Claims (31 U.S.C. 3701, 3721) § 842.35 Depreciation and maximum allowances. The military services have jointly established the “Allowance List-Depreciation Guide” to...

  12. Biodegradation of clofibric acid and identification of its metabolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salgado, R. [REQUIMTE/CQFB, Chemistry Department, FCT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); ESTS-IPS, Escola Superior de Tecnologia de Setubal do Instituto Politecnico de Setubal, Rua Vale de Chaves, Campus do IPS, Estefanilha, 2910-761 Setubal (Portugal); Oehmen, A. [REQUIMTE/CQFB, Chemistry Department, FCT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Carvalho, G. [REQUIMTE/CQFB, Chemistry Department, FCT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Instituto de Biologia Experimental e Tecnologica (IBET), Av. da Republica (EAN), 2784-505 Oeiras (Portugal); Noronha, J.P. [REQUIMTE/CQFB, Chemistry Department, FCT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Reis, M.A.M., E-mail: amr@fct.unl.pt [REQUIMTE/CQFB, Chemistry Department, FCT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal)

    2012-11-30

    Graphical abstract: Metabolites produced during clofibric acid biodegradation. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Clofibric acid is biodegradable. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mainly heterotrophic bacteria degraded the clofibric acid. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Metabolites of clofibric acid biodegradation were identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The metabolic pathway of clofibric acid biodegradation is proposed. - Abstract: Clofibric acid (CLF) is the pharmaceutically active metabolite of lipid regulators clofibrate, etofibrate and etofyllinclofibrate, and it is considered both environmentally persistent and refractory. This work studied the biotransformation of CLF in aerobic sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) with mixed microbial cultures, monitoring the efficiency of biotransformation of CLF and the production of metabolites. The maximum removal achieved was 51% biodegradation (initial CLF concentration = 2 mg L{sup -1}), where adsorption and abiotic removal mechanisms were shown to be negligible, showing that CLF is indeed biodegradable. Tests showed that the observed CLF biodegradation was mainly carried out by heterotrophic bacteria. Three main metabolites were identified, including {alpha}-hydroxyisobutyric acid, lactic acid and 4-chlorophenol. The latter is known to exhibit higher toxicity than the parent compound, but it did not accumulate in the SBRs. {alpha}-Hydroxyisobutyric acid and lactic acid accumulated for a period, where nitrite accumulation may have been responsible for inhibiting their degradation. A metabolic pathway for the biodegradation of CLF is proposed in this study.

  13. Investigation of complex formation processes of hydroxypropylmethylcellulose and polymethacrylic acid in aqueous solutions

    OpenAIRE

    M. Katayeva; R. Mangazbayeva; R. Abdykalykova

    2012-01-01

    The complex formation process of hydroxypropylcellulose (HPC) with polymethacrylic acid (PMA) have been studied using methods of turbidimetric and viscosimetric titration. Position of maximum depending on polymer concentration and molecular mass of polysaccharide have different values.

  14. 40 CFR 141.63 - Maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) for microbiological contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) for microbiological contaminants. 141.63 Section 141.63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Water Regulations: Maximum Contaminant Levels and Maximum Residual Disinfectant Levels § 141.63 Maximum...

  15. Remediation of acid mine drainage using magnesite and its bentonite clay composite

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Masindi, Vhahangwele

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available .............................. 46 Table 3.1: Synthetic acid mine drainage used in this study .................................................. 73 Table 3.2: Chemical compositions of acid mine drainage before and after contacting magnesite.... The reaction of AMD with magnesite at an optimum solid: liquid ratio of 1:100 and contact time of 60 min led to an increase in pH, reaching a maximum pH of 10, resulting in significant precipitation of most metal species. Increase of pH in solution...

  16. Running speed in mammals increases with muscle n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid content.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Ruf

    Full Text Available Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs are important dietary components that mammals cannot synthesize de novo. Beneficial effects of PUFAs, in particular of the n-3 class, for certain aspects of animal and human health (e.g., cardiovascular function are well known. Several observations suggest, however, that PUFAs may also affect the performance of skeletal muscles in vertebrates. For instance, it has been shown that experimentally n-6 PUFA-enriched diets increase the maximum swimming speed in salmon. Also, we recently found that the proportion of PUFAs in the muscle phospholipids of an extremely fast runner, the brown hare (Lepus europaeus, are very high compared to other mammals. Therefore, we predicted that locomotor performance, namely running speed, should be associated with differences in muscle fatty acid profiles. To test this hypothesis, we determined phospholipid fatty acid profiles in skeletal muscles of 36 mammalian species ranging from shrews to elephants. We found that there is indeed a general positive, surprisingly strong relation between the n-6 PUFAs content in muscle phospholipids and maximum running speed of mammals. This finding suggests that muscle fatty acid composition directly affects a highly fitness-relevant trait, which may be decisive for the ability of animals to escape from predators or catch prey.

  17. Particle Swarm Optimization Based of the Maximum Photovoltaic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Photovoltaic electricity is seen as an important source of renewable energy. The photovoltaic array is an unstable source of power since the peak power point depends on the temperature and the irradiation level. A maximum peak power point tracking is then necessary for maximum efficiency. In this work, a Particle Swarm ...

  18. 40 CFR 1045.140 - What is my engine's maximum engine power?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) Maximum engine power for an engine family is generally the weighted average value of maximum engine power... engine family's maximum engine power apply in the following circumstances: (1) For outboard or personal... value for maximum engine power from all the different configurations within the engine family to...

  19. Hepatic Metabolism of Perfluorinated Carboxylic Acids and Polycholorotrifluoroethylene: A Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Investigation in Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-14

    I14JAN93 Annual Technical Report 15DEC91-1ý+JAN9 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Hepatic Metabolism of Perfluorinated Carboxylic Acids and G-FS...13. ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 words) This report describes our studies of the effects of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorodecanolc acid (PFDA) on...metabolism. 31 p NMR was used to examine the effects of PFDA. PFOA. and clofibrate (C LOF) in both rats and guinea pigs. A unique effect is revealed in

  20. Optimization of date syrup for enhancement of the production of citric acid using immobilized cells of Aspergillus niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, Yasser S; Alamri, Saad A

    2012-04-01

    Date syrup as an economical source of carbohydrates and immobilized Aspergillus niger J4, which was entrapped in calcium alginate pellets, were employed for enhancing the production of citric acid. Maximum production was achieved by pre-treating date syrup with 1.5% tricalcium phosphate to remove heavy metals. The production of citric acid using a pretreated medium was 38.87% higher than an untreated one that consumed sugar. The appropriate presence of nitrogen, phosphate and magnesium appeared to be important in order for citric acid to accumulate. The production of citric acid and the consumed sugar was higher when using 0.1% ammonium nitrate as the best source of nitrogen. The production of citric acid increased significantly when 0.1 g/l of KH2PO4 was added to the medium of date syrup. The addition of magnesium sulfate at the rate of 0.20 g/l had a stimulating effect on the production of citric acid. Maximum production of citric acid was obtained when calcium chloride was absent. One of the most important benefits of immobilized cells is their ability and stability to produce citric acid under a repeated batch culture. Over four repeated batches, the production of citric acid production was maintained for 24 days when each cycle continued for 144 h. The results obtained in the repeated batch cultivation using date syrup confirmed that date syrup could be used as a medium for the industrial production of citric acid.

  1. Membrane potential and proton cotransport of alanine and phosphate as affected by permeant weak acids in Lemna gibba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basso, B.; Ullrich-Eberius, C.I.

    1987-01-01

    The treatment of Lemna gibba plants with the weak acids (trimethylacetic acid and butyric acid), used as tools to decrease intracellular pH, induced a hyperpolarization of membrane potential, dependent on the concentration of the undissociated permeant form of the weak acid and on the value of the resting potential. Measurements were carried out both with high potential and low potential plants and the maximum values of acid induced hyperpolarization were about 35 and 71 millivolts, respectively. Weak acids influenced also the transient light-dark membrane potential changes, typical for photosynthesizing material, suggesting a dependence of these changes on an acidification of cytoplasm. In the presence of the weak acids, the membrane depolarization induced by the cotransport of alanine and phosphate with protons was reduced; the maximum reduction (about 90%) was obtained with alanine during 2 millimolar trimethylacetic acid perfusion at pH 5. A strong inhibition of the uptake rates (up to 48% for [ 14 C]alanine and 68% for 32 P-phosphate) was obtained in the presence of the weak acids, both by decreasing the pH of the medium and by increasing the concentration of the acid. In these experimental conditions, the ATP level and O 2 uptake rates did not change significantly. These results constitute good evidence that H + /solute cotransport in Lemna, already known to be dependent on the electrochemical potential difference for protons, is also strongly regulated by the cytoplasmic pH value

  2. Durability and service life prediction of GFRP bars embedded in concrete under acid environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou Jikai, E-mail: jkzhou@hotmail.com [College of Civil and Transportation Engineering, Hohai University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210098 (China); Chen Xudong, E-mail: cxdong1985@hotmail.com [College of Civil and Transportation Engineering, Hohai University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210098 (China); Chen Shixue, E-mail: 710567525@qq.com [College of Civil and Transportation Engineering, Hohai University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210098 (China)

    2011-10-15

    Highlights: > Bond strength of GFRP bars decrease with an increase in pH of acid solutions. > Bond strength of steel bars decrease with an increase in pH of acid solutions. > Durability of GFRP bars could be predicted by modified Arrhenius relation. - Abstract: In recent years, glass fiber reinforcing polymers (GFRP) has emerged as an alternative to conventional steel reinforcing bars in concrete structures. The bond behavior of GFRP bars to concrete under acidic environment is important because of increasing acid rain in China nowadays. This paper presents an experimental investigation into comparison of the durability of the bond between GFRP and steel bars to concrete under acid environment. The specimens were subject to corrosion by immersion in acid solutions with different concentration. One hundred and twenty pullout specimens were used to study the effect of different environment on bond strength of GFRP and steel bars to concrete. Experimental results showed that, For GFRP bars, at the end of 75 days of conditioning duration, maximum bond strength loss of 11%, 22%, 17.2% and 14% were observed in tap water, pH = 2, pH = 3, and pH = 4 environment, respectively. For steel bars, at the end of 75 days of conditioning duration, maximum bond strength loss of 19.6% and 12.3% were observed in pH = 2 and pH = 3 environment, respectively. The influence of solution concentration on bond strength of GFRP bars was determined using Arrhenius equation and time shift method (TSF).

  3. 42 CFR 409.62 - Lifetime maximum on inpatient psychiatric care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lifetime maximum on inpatient psychiatric care. 409....62 Lifetime maximum on inpatient psychiatric care. There is a lifetime maximum of 190 days on inpatient psychiatric hospital services available to any beneficiary. Therefore, once an individual receives...

  4. Maximum-entropy description of animal movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Chris H; Subaşı, Yiğit; Calabrese, Justin M

    2015-03-01

    We introduce a class of maximum-entropy states that naturally includes within it all of the major continuous-time stochastic processes that have been applied to animal movement, including Brownian motion, Ornstein-Uhlenbeck motion, integrated Ornstein-Uhlenbeck motion, a recently discovered hybrid of the previous models, and a new model that describes central-place foraging. We are also able to predict a further hierarchy of new models that will emerge as data quality improves to better resolve the underlying continuity of animal movement. Finally, we also show that Langevin equations must obey a fluctuation-dissipation theorem to generate processes that fall from this class of maximum-entropy distributions when the constraints are purely kinematic.

  5. Extreme Maximum Land Surface Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garratt, J. R.

    1992-09-01

    There are numerous reports in the literature of observations of land surface temperatures. Some of these, almost all made in situ, reveal maximum values in the 50°-70°C range, with a few, made in desert regions, near 80°C. Consideration of a simplified form of the surface energy balance equation, utilizing likely upper values of absorbed shortwave flux (1000 W m2) and screen air temperature (55°C), that surface temperatures in the vicinity of 90°-100°C may occur for dry, darkish soils of low thermal conductivity (0.1-0.2 W m1 K1). Numerical simulations confirm this and suggest that temperature gradients in the first few centimeters of soil may reach 0.5°-1°C mm1 under these extreme conditions. The study bears upon the intrinsic interest of identifying extreme maximum temperatures and yields interesting information regarding the comfort zone of animals (including man).

  6. On Maximum Entropy and Inference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Gresele

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Maximum entropy is a powerful concept that entails a sharp separation between relevant and irrelevant variables. It is typically invoked in inference, once an assumption is made on what the relevant variables are, in order to estimate a model from data, that affords predictions on all other (dependent variables. Conversely, maximum entropy can be invoked to retrieve the relevant variables (sufficient statistics directly from the data, once a model is identified by Bayesian model selection. We explore this approach in the case of spin models with interactions of arbitrary order, and we discuss how relevant interactions can be inferred. In this perspective, the dimensionality of the inference problem is not set by the number of parameters in the model, but by the frequency distribution of the data. We illustrate the method showing its ability to recover the correct model in a few prototype cases and discuss its application on a real dataset.

  7. Measurement of binding of ascorbic acid to myrosinase by rate of dialysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtsuru, Masaru; Hata, Tadao

    1975-01-01

    The activation mechanism of myrosinase by L-ascorbic acid depends on the slight conformational change of enzyme protein induced by ascorbic acid. Ascorbic acid binds to enzyme like Michaelis-complex, and then the value of Km had been evaluated to be 1 x 10 -3 M. The authors determined the binding constant and the number of binding sites using dialysis rate technique. Rate dialysis was carried out with a dialysis cell, and the ordinary cellophane tubing membrane was used. ( 14 C) - ascorbic acid was added, and counted by liquid scintillation counting. By the time course of two dialysis rate measurement with and without enzyme. The concentrations of free and bound ascorbic acids were counted. From the results, the enzyme was activated to the maximum level at 10 -3 M of ascorbic acid, and four molecules of ascorbic acid bound to the enzyme on Kd=0.1x10 -4 M. However, when more than 4 molecules of L-ascorbic acid bound to the enzyme, Kd increased to 0.9x10 -4 M, and L-ascorbic acid acted as an inhibitor. (Kubatake, H.)

  8. Effect of organic acids on biofilm formation and quorum signaling of pathogens from fresh fruits and vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amrutha, Balagopal; Sundar, Kothandapani; Shetty, Prathapkumar Halady

    2017-10-01

    Organic acids are known to be used as food preservatives due to their antimicrobial potential. This study evaluated the ability of three organic acids, namely, acetic acid, citric acid and lactic acid to manage E. coli and Salmonella sp. from fresh fruits and vegetables. Effect of these organic acids on biofilm forming ability and anti-quorum potential was also investigated. The effect of organic acids on inactivation of E. coli and Salmonella sp. on the surface of a selected vegetable (cucumber) was determined. The minimum inhibitory concentration of the organic acids were found to be 1.5, 2 and 0.2% in E. coli while it was observed to be 1, 1.5 and 1% in Salmonella sp. for acetic, citric and lactic acids respectively. Maximum inhibition of biofilm formation was recorded at 39.13% with lactic acid in E. coli and a minimum of 22.53% with citric acid in Salmonella sp. EPS production was affected in E. coli with lactic acid showing reduction by 13.42% while citric acid and acetic acid exhibited only 6.25% and 10.89% respectively. Swimming and swarming patterns in E. coli was notably affected by both acetic and lactic acids. Lactic and acetic acids showed higher anti-quorum sensing (QS) potential when compared to citric acid. 2% lactic acid showed a maximum inhibition of violacein production by 37.7%. Organic acids can therefore be used as potential quorum quenching agents in food industry. 2% lactic acid treatment on cucumber demonstrated that it was effective in inactivating E. coli and Salmonella sp. There was 1 log reduction in microbial count over a period of 6 days after the lactic acid treatment. Thus, organic acids can act as effective potential sanitizers in reducing the microbial load associated with fresh fruits and vegetables. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Fractal Dimension and Maximum Sunspot Number in Solar Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.-S. Kim

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The fractal dimension is a quantitative parameter describing the characteristics of irregular time series. In this study, we use this parameter to analyze the irregular aspects of solar activity and to predict the maximum sunspot number in the following solar cycle by examining time series of the sunspot number. For this, we considered the daily sunspot number since 1850 from SIDC (Solar Influences Data analysis Center and then estimated cycle variation of the fractal dimension by using Higuchi's method. We examined the relationship between this fractal dimension and the maximum monthly sunspot number in each solar cycle. As a result, we found that there is a strong inverse relationship between the fractal dimension and the maximum monthly sunspot number. By using this relation we predicted the maximum sunspot number in the solar cycle from the fractal dimension of the sunspot numbers during the solar activity increasing phase. The successful prediction is proven by a good correlation (r=0.89 between the observed and predicted maximum sunspot numbers in the solar cycles.

  10. Automatic maximum entropy spectral reconstruction in NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mobli, Mehdi; Maciejewski, Mark W.; Gryk, Michael R.; Hoch, Jeffrey C.

    2007-01-01

    Developments in superconducting magnets, cryogenic probes, isotope labeling strategies, and sophisticated pulse sequences together have enabled the application, in principle, of high-resolution NMR spectroscopy to biomolecular systems approaching 1 megadalton. In practice, however, conventional approaches to NMR that utilize the fast Fourier transform, which require data collected at uniform time intervals, result in prohibitively lengthy data collection times in order to achieve the full resolution afforded by high field magnets. A variety of approaches that involve nonuniform sampling have been proposed, each utilizing a non-Fourier method of spectrum analysis. A very general non-Fourier method that is capable of utilizing data collected using any of the proposed nonuniform sampling strategies is maximum entropy reconstruction. A limiting factor in the adoption of maximum entropy reconstruction in NMR has been the need to specify non-intuitive parameters. Here we describe a fully automated system for maximum entropy reconstruction that requires no user-specified parameters. A web-accessible script generator provides the user interface to the system

  11. Stationary neutrino radiation transport by maximum entropy closure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bludman, S.A.

    1994-11-01

    The authors obtain the angular distributions that maximize the entropy functional for Maxwell-Boltzmann (classical), Bose-Einstein, and Fermi-Dirac radiation. In the low and high occupancy limits, the maximum entropy closure is bounded by previously known variable Eddington factors that depend only on the flux. For intermediate occupancy, the maximum entropy closure depends on both the occupation density and the flux. The Fermi-Dirac maximum entropy variable Eddington factor shows a scale invariance, which leads to a simple, exact analytic closure for fermions. This two-dimensional variable Eddington factor gives results that agree well with exact (Monte Carlo) neutrino transport calculations out of a collapse residue during early phases of hydrostatic neutron star formation

  12. Synthesis, characterization and corrosion inhibition properties of benzamide-2-chloro-4-nitrobenzoic acid and anthranilic acid-2-chloro-4-nitrobenzoic acid for mild steel corrosion in acidic medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Archana; Verma, Chandrabhan; Singh, B.; Ebenso, Eno E.

    2018-03-01

    The present study deals with the synthesis of two new compounds namely, benzamide - 2-chloro-4-nitrobenzoic acid (BENCNBA) and anthranilic acid-2-chloro-4-nitrobenzoic acid (AACNBA) using solid phase reactions. The phase diagram studies revealed that formation of the investigated compounds occurs in 1:1 molar ratio. The synthesized compounds were characterized using several spectral techniques such as FT-IR, 1H and 13C NMR, UV-Vis, powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD). Single crystal XRD (SCXRD) study showed that both BENCNBA and AACNBA compounds crystallize in triclinic crystal system with P-1 space group. Further, the presence of intermolecular hydrogen bonding between the constituent components was also supported by single crystal X-ray diffraction (SCXRD) method. Heat of mixing, entropy of fusion, roughness parameter, interfacial energy and excess thermodynamic functions have also been computed using the enthalpy of fusion values derived from differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) study. The inhibition effect of BENCNBA and AACNBA on the mild steel corrosion in hydrochloric acid solution was tested using electrochemical methods. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) study revealed that both BENCNBA and AACNBA behaved as interface corrosion inhibitors and showed maximum inhibition efficiencies of 95.71% and 96.42%, respectively at 400 ppm (1.23 × 10-3 M) concentration. Potentiodynamic polarization (PDP) measurements suggested that BENCNBA and AACNBA acted as mixed type corrosion inhibitors. EIS and PDP results showed that BENCNBA and AACNBA act as efficient corrosion inhibitors for mild steel and their inhibition efficiencies enhances on increasing their concentrations.

  13. Pharmacokinetics, Safety and Tolerability of Melissa officinalis Extract which Contained Rosmarinic Acid in Healthy Individuals: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moeko Noguchi-Shinohara

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of single dose of Melissa officinalis extract which contained rosmarinic acid, including food-effects in healthy individuals. A total of eleven healthy individuals were randomly assigned to treatment arms in the two studies [Study 1 (fasted state and Study 2 (fed state]. Rosmarinic acid in serum was measured by a coulometric detection method using High-Performance Liquid Chromatography electrochemical detector. The serum concentration of total rosmarinic acid peaked at 1 hour after administration of Melissa officinalis extract containing 500mg rosmarinic acid in fasted state, with a maximum serum concentration 162.20 nmol/ L. The area under the curve for intact rosmarinic acid was calculated from the serum concentration-time profile to be 832.13 nmol • hour/ L. Food intake increases area under the curve and delayed time at which the maximum serum concentration. Rosmarinic acid supplementation did not affect liver, kidney, or blood cell function parameters. No adverse event was reported by any of the participants due to the study treatment. Single dose of Melissa officinalis extract containing 500 mg rosmarinic acid appears to be safe and tolerable in healthy individuals. Food intake increased the exposure of rosmarinic acid and delayed absorption of rosmarinic acid in healthy individuals.

  14. Biodegradation of clofibric acid and identification of its metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado, R; Oehmen, A; Carvalho, G; Noronha, J P; Reis, M A M

    2012-11-30

    Clofibric acid (CLF) is the pharmaceutically active metabolite of lipid regulators clofibrate, etofibrate and etofyllinclofibrate, and it is considered both environmentally persistent and refractory. This work studied the biotransformation of CLF in aerobic sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) with mixed microbial cultures, monitoring the efficiency of biotransformation of CLF and the production of metabolites. The maximum removal achieved was 51% biodegradation (initial CLF concentration=2 mg L(-1)), where adsorption and abiotic removal mechanisms were shown to be negligible, showing that CLF is indeed biodegradable. Tests showed that the observed CLF biodegradation was mainly carried out by heterotrophic bacteria. Three main metabolites were identified, including α-hydroxyisobutyric acid, lactic acid and 4-chlorophenol. The latter is known to exhibit higher toxicity than the parent compound, but it did not accumulate in the SBRs. α-Hydroxyisobutyric acid and lactic acid accumulated for a period, where nitrite accumulation may have been responsible for inhibiting their degradation. A metabolic pathway for the biodegradation of CLF is proposed in this study. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Acidic Attack Resistance of Cement Mortar Treated with Alkaline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Nazhat Sabeeh

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The negative effect of acidic attack on the properties of concrete and cement mortar is a topic of increasing significance in the recent years. Many attempts has occurred to mitigate this negative impact by improving the properties of concrete and increase resistance to acids by using additives. The present study includes treatment of sand by alkaline material and examine the effect of treatment on cement mortar resistance towards hydrochloric and sulfuric acid. Results show that sand treatment by alkaline material significantly enhance mortar ability to resist acids. In terms of loss weight, the maximum weight rate gain was 25.54% for specimens immersed in Hydrochloric acid with water cement ratio 40%. For specimens immersed in HCl, the average gain in compressive strength is (20.15-19.433% for w/c (40-45% respectively. The average gain in modulus of rupture toward the influence of H2SO4 is (18.37–17.99% for w/c (40-45%, respectively.

  16. Maximum power per VA control of vector controlled interior ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Thakur Sumeet Singh

    2018-04-11

    Apr 11, 2018 ... Department of Electrical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New ... The MPVA operation allows maximum-utilization of the drive-system. ... Permanent magnet motor; unity power factor; maximum VA utilization; ...

  17. Application of maximum entropy to neutron tunneling spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhopadhyay, R.; Silver, R.N.

    1990-01-01

    We demonstrate the maximum entropy method for the deconvolution of high resolution tunneling data acquired with a quasielastic spectrometer. Given a precise characterization of the instrument resolution function, a maximum entropy analysis of lutidine data obtained with the IRIS spectrometer at ISIS results in an effective factor of three improvement in resolution. 7 refs., 4 figs

  18. The maximum economic depth of groundwater abstraction for irrigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierkens, M. F.; Van Beek, L. P.; de Graaf, I. E. M.; Gleeson, T. P.

    2017-12-01

    Over recent decades, groundwater has become increasingly important for agriculture. Irrigation accounts for 40% of the global food production and its importance is expected to grow further in the near future. Already, about 70% of the globally abstracted water is used for irrigation, and nearly half of that is pumped groundwater. In many irrigated areas where groundwater is the primary source of irrigation water, groundwater abstraction is larger than recharge and we see massive groundwater head decline in these areas. An important question then is: to what maximum depth can groundwater be pumped for it to be still economically recoverable? The objective of this study is therefore to create a global map of the maximum depth of economically recoverable groundwater when used for irrigation. The maximum economic depth is the maximum depth at which revenues are still larger than pumping costs or the maximum depth at which initial investments become too large compared to yearly revenues. To this end we set up a simple economic model where costs of well drilling and the energy costs of pumping, which are a function of well depth and static head depth respectively, are compared with the revenues obtained for the irrigated crops. Parameters for the cost sub-model are obtained from several US-based studies and applied to other countries based on GDP/capita as an index of labour costs. The revenue sub-model is based on gross irrigation water demand calculated with a global hydrological and water resources model, areal coverage of crop types from MIRCA2000 and FAO-based statistics on crop yield and market price. We applied our method to irrigated areas in the world overlying productive aquifers. Estimated maximum economic depths range between 50 and 500 m. Most important factors explaining the maximum economic depth are the dominant crop type in the area and whether or not initial investments in well infrastructure are limiting. In subsequent research, our estimates of

  19. What controls the maximum magnitude of injection-induced earthquakes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, D. W. S.

    2017-12-01

    Three different approaches for estimation of maximum magnitude are considered here, along with their implications for managing risk. The first approach is based on a deterministic limit for seismic moment proposed by McGarr (1976), which was originally designed for application to mining-induced seismicity. This approach has since been reformulated for earthquakes induced by fluid injection (McGarr, 2014). In essence, this method assumes that the upper limit for seismic moment release is constrained by the pressure-induced stress change. A deterministic limit is given by the product of shear modulus and the net injected fluid volume. This method is based on the assumptions that the medium is fully saturated and in a state of incipient failure. An alternative geometrical approach was proposed by Shapiro et al. (2011), who postulated that the rupture area for an induced earthquake falls entirely within the stimulated volume. This assumption reduces the maximum-magnitude problem to one of estimating the largest potential slip surface area within a given stimulated volume. Finally, van der Elst et al. (2016) proposed that the maximum observed magnitude, statistically speaking, is the expected maximum value for a finite sample drawn from an unbounded Gutenberg-Richter distribution. These three models imply different approaches for risk management. The deterministic method proposed by McGarr (2014) implies that a ceiling on the maximum magnitude can be imposed by limiting the net injected volume, whereas the approach developed by Shapiro et al. (2011) implies that the time-dependent maximum magnitude is governed by the spatial size of the microseismic event cloud. Finally, the sample-size hypothesis of Van der Elst et al. (2016) implies that the best available estimate of the maximum magnitude is based upon observed seismicity rate. The latter two approaches suggest that real-time monitoring is essential for effective management of risk. A reliable estimate of maximum

  20. Topics in Bayesian statistics and maximum entropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutihac, R.; Cicuttin, A.; Cerdeira, A.; Stanciulescu, C.

    1998-12-01

    Notions of Bayesian decision theory and maximum entropy methods are reviewed with particular emphasis on probabilistic inference and Bayesian modeling. The axiomatic approach is considered as the best justification of Bayesian analysis and maximum entropy principle applied in natural sciences. Particular emphasis is put on solving the inverse problem in digital image restoration and Bayesian modeling of neural networks. Further topics addressed briefly include language modeling, neutron scattering, multiuser detection and channel equalization in digital communications, genetic information, and Bayesian court decision-making. (author)

  1. Citric acid production by Koji fermentation using banana peel as a novel substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikeyan, Alagarsamy; Sivakumar, Nallusamy

    2010-07-01

    The growing demand for citric acid and the current need for alternative sources have encouraged biotechnologists to search for novel and economical substrates. Koji fermentation was conducted using the peels of banana (Musa acuminata) as an inexpensive substrate for the production of citric acid using Aspergillus niger. Various crucial parameters that affect citric acid production such as moisture content, temperature, pH, inoculum level and incubation time were quantified. Moisture (70%), 28 degrees C temperature, an initial pH 3, 10(8) spores/ml as inoculum and 72h incubation was found to be suitable for maximum citric acid production by A. niger using banana peel as a substrate. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Enzymatic Extraction of Hydroxycinnamic Acids from Coffee Pulp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Favela-Torres

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ferulic, caffeic, p-coumaric and chlorogenic acids are classified as hydroxycinnamic acids, presenting anticarcinogenic, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. In this work, enzymatic extraction has been studied in order to extract high value-added products like hydroxycinnamic acids from coffee pulp. A commercial pectinase and enzyme extract produced by Rhizomucor pusillus strain 23aIV in solid-state fermentation using olive oil or coffee pulp (CP as an inducer of the feruloyl esterase activity were evaluated separately and mixed. The total content (covalently linked and free of ferulic, caffeic, p-coumaric and chlorogenic acids was 5276 mg per kg of coffee pulp. Distribution was as follows (in %: chlorogenic acid 58.7, caffeic acid 37.6, ferulic acid 2.1 and p-coumaric acid 1.5. Most of the hydroxycinnamic acids were covalently bound to the cell wall (in %: p-coumaric acid 97.2, caffeic acid 94.4, chlorogenic acid 76.9 and ferulic acid 73.4. The content of covalently linked hydroxycinnamic acid was used to calculate the enzyme extraction yield. The maximum carbon dioxide rate for the solid-state fermentation using olive oil as an inducer was higher and it was reached in a short cultivation time. Nevertheless, the feruloyl esterase (FAE activity (units per mg of protein obtained in the fermentation using CP as an inducer was 31.8 % higher in comparison with that obtained in the fermentation using olive oil as the inducer. To our knowledge, this is the first report indicating the composition of both esterified and free ferulic, caffeic, p-coumaric and chlorogenic acids in coffee pulp. The highest yield of extraction of hydroxycinnamic acids was obtained by mixing the produced enzyme extract using coffee pulp as an inducer and a commercial pectinase. Extraction yields were as follows (in %: chlorogenic acid 54.4, ferulic acid 19.8, p-coumaric acid 7.2 and caffeic acid 2.3. An important increase in the added value of coffee pulp was mainly

  3. Uptake of Tyrosine Amino Acid on Nano-Graphene Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossam M. Nassef

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Graphene oxide (GO is emerging as a promising nanomaterial with potential application in the detection and analysis of amino acids, DNA, enzymes, and proteins in biological fluid samples. So, the reaction of GO with amino acids should be characterized and determined before using it in biosensing methods and devices. In this study, the reaction of tyrosine amino acid (Tyr with GO was characterized using FT-IR, UV-vis spectrophotometry, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM before its use. The optimum conditions for GO’s interaction with Tyr amino acid have been studied under variable conditions. The optimum conditions of pH, temperature, shaking time, and GO and tyrosine concentrations for the uptaking of tyrosine amino acid onto the GO’s surface from aqueous solution were determined. The SEM analysis showed that the GO supplied was in a particle size range between 5.4 and 8.1 nm. A pH of 8.4–9.4 at 25 °C and 5 min of shaking time were the optimum conditions for a maximum uptake of 1.4 μg/mL of tyrosine amino acid onto 0.2 mg/mL of GO.

  4. Pulse radiolytic study of the oxidation reaction of uric acid in presence of bovine serum albumin: evidence of possible complex formation in the transient state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adhikari, S.; Gopinathan, C.

    1996-01-01

    The pulse radiolytic and spectrophotometric study of uric acid in presence of bovine serum albumin (BSA) has been carried out. In the spectrophotometric study there is no evidence for ground state interaction between BSA and uric acid. The reaction of CCl 3 OO . radical with uric acid produces a transient having absorption maximum at 330 nm and that with BSA produces transient having absorption maximum at 410 nm. In a composition of equal concentration of uric acid and BSA the CCl 3 OO . radical produces a transient absorption spectrum which shows two peaks at 330 nm and 350 nm and a shoulder at 410 nm. The peak at 350 nm is ascribed due to weak complex formation between BSA and uric acid radicals. The rate constant of CCl 3 OO . radical with uric acid increases with the increase in BSA concentration which is explained as protection of BSA by uric acid from radical attack. (author). 4 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  5. Maximum vehicle cabin temperatures under different meteorological conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundstein, Andrew; Meentemeyer, Vernon; Dowd, John

    2009-05-01

    A variety of studies have documented the dangerously high temperatures that may occur within the passenger compartment (cabin) of cars under clear sky conditions, even at relatively low ambient air temperatures. Our study, however, is the first to examine cabin temperatures under variable weather conditions. It uses a unique maximum vehicle cabin temperature dataset in conjunction with directly comparable ambient air temperature, solar radiation, and cloud cover data collected from April through August 2007 in Athens, GA. Maximum cabin temperatures, ranging from 41-76°C, varied considerably depending on the weather conditions and the time of year. Clear days had the highest cabin temperatures, with average values of 68°C in the summer and 61°C in the spring. Cloudy days in both the spring and summer were on average approximately 10°C cooler. Our findings indicate that even on cloudy days with lower ambient air temperatures, vehicle cabin temperatures may reach deadly levels. Additionally, two predictive models of maximum daily vehicle cabin temperatures were developed using commonly available meteorological data. One model uses maximum ambient air temperature and average daily solar radiation while the other uses cloud cover percentage as a surrogate for solar radiation. From these models, two maximum vehicle cabin temperature indices were developed to assess the level of danger. The models and indices may be useful for forecasting hazardous conditions, promoting public awareness, and to estimate past cabin temperatures for use in forensic analyses.

  6. Aspartic acid incorporated monolithic columns for affinity glycoprotein purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armutcu, Canan; Bereli, Nilay; Bayram, Engin; Uzun, Lokman; Say, Rıdvan; Denizli, Adil

    2014-02-01

    Novel aspartic acid incorporated monolithic columns were prepared to efficiently affinity purify immunoglobulin G (IgG) from human plasma. The monolithic columns were synthesised in a stainless steel HPLC column (20 cm × 5 mm id) by in situ bulk polymerisation of N-methacryloyl-L-aspartic acid (MAAsp), a polymerisable derivative of L-aspartic acid, and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA). Monolithic columns [poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-N-methacryloyl-L-aspartic acid) (PHEMAsp)] were characterised by swelling studies, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The monolithic columns were used for IgG adsorption/desorption from aqueous solutions and human plasma. The IgG adsorption depended on the buffer type, and the maximum IgG adsorption from aqueous solution in phosphate buffer was 0.085 mg/g at pH 6.0. The monolithic columns allowed for one-step IgG purification with a negligible capacity decrease after ten adsorption-desorption cycles. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Combining Experiments and Simulations Using the Maximum Entropy Principle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boomsma, Wouter; Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten

    2014-01-01

    are not in quantitative agreement with experimental data. The principle of maximum entropy is a general procedure for constructing probability distributions in the light of new data, making it a natural tool in cases when an initial model provides results that are at odds with experiments. The number of maximum entropy...... in the context of a simple example, after which we proceed with a real-world application in the field of molecular simulations, where the maximum entropy procedure has recently provided new insight. Given the limited accuracy of force fields, macromolecular simulations sometimes produce results....... Three very recent papers have explored this problem using the maximum entropy approach, providing both new theoretical and practical insights to the problem. We highlight each of these contributions in turn and conclude with a discussion on remaining challenges....

  8. Transfer of oleic acid between albumin and phospholipid vesicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, J.A.; Cistola, D.P.

    1986-01-01

    The net transfer of oleic acid between egg phosphatidylcholine unilamellar vesicles and bovine serum albumin has been monitored by 13 C NMR spectroscopy and 90% isotopically substituted [1- 13 C]oleic acid. The carboxyl chemical shifts of oleic acid bound to albumin were different from those for oleic acid in phospholipid vesicles. Therefore, in mixtures of donor particles, the equilibrium distribution of oleic acid was determined from chemical shift and peak intensity data without separation of donor and acceptor particles. In a system containing equal masses of albumin and phospholipid and a stoichiometry of 4-5 mol of oleic acid per mol of albumin, the oleic acid distribution was pH dependent, with ≥80% of the oleic acid associated with albumin at pH 7.4; association was ≥90% at pH 8.0. Decreasing the pH below 7.4 markedly decreased the proportion of fatty acid bound to albumin. The distribution was reversible with pH and was independent of whether vesicles or albumin acted as a donor. These data suggest that pH may strongly influence the partitioning of fatty acid between cellular membranes and albumin. The 13 C NMR method is also advantageous because it provides information about the structural environments of oleic acid bound to albumin or phospholipid, the ionization state of oleic acid in each environment, and the structural integrity of the vesicles. In addition, minimum and maximum limits for the exchange rates of oleic acid among different environments were obtained from the NMR data

  9. Environmentally friendly properties of vegetable oil methyl esters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gateau Paul

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Measurements were carried out on Vegetable Oil Methyl Esters (VOME or FAME answering the most recent specifications. The products tested are RME (Rapeseed oil Methyl Ester, ERME (Erucic Rapeseed oil Methyl Esters, SME (Sunflower oil Methyl Esters, and HOSME (High Oleic Sunflower oil Methyl Esters. They contain more than 99.5% of fatty acid mono esters. The compositions are given. VOME are not volatile and they are not easily flammable. They are not soluble in water and they are biodegradable. According to the methods implemented for the determination of the German classification of substances hazardous to waters WGK, they are not toxic on mammals and unlike diesel fuel they are not toxic on fish, daphnia, algae and bacteria. The RME is not either toxic for shrimps. According to tests on rabbits, RME and SME are not irritating for the skin and the eyes. VOME display particularly attractive environmental properties.

  10. Mutation induction, evaluation and utilization for development of high yielding varieties in Indian mustard and sunflower: an overview of BARC work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jambhulkar, S.J.; Shitre, A.S.

    2009-01-01

    Mutation breeding programme in Indian mustard and sunflower at BARC has resulted into the development of wide spectrum of mutations for seed coat colour, chlorophyll, plant height, maturity, flower morphology, seed weight and oil content. In Indian mustard, TM1 and TM50 are high yielding yellow seed coat mutants, which were exploited in hybridisation to develop bold, yellow seed coat and high yielding genotypes. Light green leaf and variegated leaf are novel mutation in mustard. Putative mutants for drought tolerance have been isolated. Variability for zero erucic acid and zero glucosinolates genotypes have been developed in B. napus and B. juncea. In sunflower, high yielding black seed coat mutant were isolated. Extreme dwarf measuring only 11 cm is novel. Three high yielding varieties namely TM2, TM4, and TPM1 in mustard and one i.e.TAS82 in sunflower have been released for cultivation in collaboration with state agricultural universities. (author)

  11. Investigation of complex formation processes of hydroxypropylmethylcellulose and polymethacrylic acid in aqueous solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Katayeva

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The complex formation process of hydroxypropylcellulose (HPC with polymethacrylic acid (PMA have been studied using methods of turbidimetric and viscosimetric titration. Position of maximum depending on polymer concentration and molecular mass of polysaccharide have different values.

  12. Maximum entropy beam diagnostic tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mottershead, C.T.

    1985-01-01

    This paper reviews the formalism of maximum entropy beam diagnostic tomography as applied to the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) prototype accelerator. The same formalism has also been used with streak camera data to produce an ultrahigh speed movie of the beam profile of the Experimental Test Accelerator (ETA) at Livermore

  13. Agdc1p - a Gallic Acid Decarboxylase Involved in the Degradation of Tannic Acid in the Yeast Blastobotrys (Arxula) adeninivorans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Anna K; Worch, Sebastian; Böer, Erik; Hartmann, Anja; Mascher, Martin; Marzec, Marek; Scholz, Uwe; Riechen, Jan; Baronian, Kim; Schauer, Frieder; Bode, Rüdiger; Kunze, Gotthard

    2017-01-01

    Tannins and hydroxylated aromatic acids, such as gallic acid (3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid), are plant secondary metabolites which protect plants against herbivores and plant-associated microorganisms. Some microbes, such as the yeast Arxula adeninivorans are resistant to these antimicrobial substances and are able to use tannins and gallic acid as carbon sources. In this study, the Arxula gallic acid decarboxylase (Agdc1p) which degrades gallic acid to pyrogallol was characterized and its function in tannin catabolism analyzed. The enzyme has a higher affinity for gallic acid (K m -0.7 ± 0.2 mM, k cat -42.0 ± 8.2 s -1 ) than to protocatechuic acid (3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid) (K m -3.2 ± 0.2 mM, k cat -44.0 ± 3.2 s -1 ). Other hydroxylated aromatic acids, such as 3-hydroxybenzoic acid, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid and 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid are not gallic acid decarboxylase substrates. A. adeninivorans G1212/YRC102-AYNI1-AGDC1, which expresses the AGDC1 gene under the control of the strong nitrate inducible AYNI1 promoter achieved a maximum gallic acid decarboxylase activity of 1064.4 U/l and 97.5 U/g of dry cell weight in yeast grown in minimal medium with nitrate as nitrogen source and glucose as carbon source. In the same medium, gallic acid decarboxylase activity was not detected for the control strain G1212/YRC102 with AGDC1 expression under the control of the endogenous promoter. Gene expression analysis showed that AGDC1 is induced by gallic acid and protocatechuic acid. In contrast to G1212/YRC102-AYNI1-AGDC1 and G1212/YRC102, A. adeninivorans G1234 [Δ agdc1 ] is not able to grow on medium with gallic acid as carbon source but can grow in presence of protocatechuic acid. This confirms that Agdc1p plays an essential role in the tannic acid catabolism and could be useful in the production of catechol and cis,cis -muconic acid. However, the protocatechuic acid catabolism via Agdc1p to catechol seems to be

  14. Citric acid fermentation by gamma ray induced mutants of Aspergillus niger in different carbohydrate media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anjuman Ara Begum; Naiyyum Choudhury; Mohammad Serajul Islam (Institute of Food and Radiation Biology, Dacca (Bangladesh))

    1990-01-01

    A natural isolate of Aspergillus niger, CA16, and two of its second step mutants, 136/40 and 277/30, grown on different sugar substrates gave maximum citric acid yields of 34, 70, and 126 mg/ml respectively in sucrose medium. Combination of two sugars in the medium at 50% of each improved the yields of citric acid for the sucrose: glucose, glucose: sorbitol, glucose: xylose, and xylose: sorbitol combinations with the mutant strains. Inclusion of galactose in combinations decreased the citric acid yield. (author).

  15. Citric acid fermentation by gamma ray induced mutants of Aspergillus niger in different carbohydrate media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anjuman Ara Begum; Naiyyum Choudhury; Mohammad Serajul Islam

    1990-01-01

    A natural isolate of Aspergillus niger, CA16, and two of its second step mutants, 136/40 and 277/30, grown on different sugar substrates gave maximum citric acid yields of 34, 70, and 126 mg/ml respectively in sucrose medium. Combination of two sugars in the medium at 50% of each improved the yields of citric acid for the sucrose: glucose, glucose: sorbitol, glucose: xylose, and xylose: sorbitol combinations with the mutant strains. Inclusion of galactose in combinations decreased the citric acid yield. (author)

  16. A Maximum Radius for Habitable Planets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibert, Yann

    2015-09-01

    We compute the maximum radius a planet can have in order to fulfill two constraints that are likely necessary conditions for habitability: 1- surface temperature and pressure compatible with the existence of liquid water, and 2- no ice layer at the bottom of a putative global ocean, that would prevent the operation of the geologic carbon cycle to operate. We demonstrate that, above a given radius, these two constraints cannot be met: in the Super-Earth mass range (1-12 Mearth), the overall maximum that a planet can have varies between 1.8 and 2.3 Rearth. This radius is reduced when considering planets with higher Fe/Si ratios, and taking into account irradiation effects on the structure of the gas envelope.

  17. On semidefinite programming relaxations of maximum k-section

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Klerk, E.; Pasechnik, D.V.; Sotirov, R.; Dobre, C.

    2012-01-01

    We derive a new semidefinite programming bound for the maximum k -section problem. For k=2 (i.e. for maximum bisection), the new bound is at least as strong as a well-known bound by Poljak and Rendl (SIAM J Optim 5(3):467–487, 1995). For k ≥ 3the new bound dominates a bound of Karisch and Rendl

  18. Strategies for improving production performance of probiotic Pediococcus acidilactici viable cell by overcoming lactic acid inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Majdiah; Ariff, Arbakariya B; Wasoh, Helmi; Kapri, Mohd Rizal; Halim, Murni

    2017-11-27

    Lactic acid bacteria are industrially important microorganisms recognized for fermentative ability mostly in their probiotic benefits as well as lactic acid production for various applications. Fermentation conditions such as concentration of initial glucose in the culture, concentration of lactic acid accumulated in the culture, types of pH control strategy, types of aeration mode and different agitation speed had influenced the cultivation performance of batch fermentation of Pediococcus acidilactici. The maximum viable cell concentration obtained in constant fed-batch fermentation at a feeding rate of 0.015 L/h was 6.1 times higher with 1.6 times reduction in lactic acid accumulation compared to batch fermentation. Anion exchange resin, IRA 67 was found to have the highest selectivity towards lactic acid compared to other components studied. Fed-batch fermentation of P. acidilactici coupled with lactic acid removal system using IRA 67 resin showed 55.5 and 9.1 times of improvement in maximum viable cell concentration compared to fermentation without resin for batch and fed-batch mode respectively. The improvement of the P. acidilactici growth in the constant fed-batch fermentation indicated the use of minimal and simple process control equipment is an effective approach for reducing by-product inhibition. Further improvement in the cultivation performance of P. acidilactici in fed-bath fermentation with in situ addition of anion-exchange resin significantly helped to enhance the growth of P. acidilactici by reducing the inhibitory effect of lactic acid and thus increasing probiotic production.

  19. Modeling multisite streamflow dependence with maximum entropy copula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Z.; Singh, V. P.

    2013-10-01

    Synthetic streamflows at different sites in a river basin are needed for planning, operation, and management of water resources projects. Modeling the temporal and spatial dependence structure of monthly streamflow at different sites is generally required. In this study, the maximum entropy copula method is proposed for multisite monthly streamflow simulation, in which the temporal and spatial dependence structure is imposed as constraints to derive the maximum entropy copula. The monthly streamflows at different sites are then generated by sampling from the conditional distribution. A case study for the generation of monthly streamflow at three sites in the Colorado River basin illustrates the application of the proposed method. Simulated streamflow from the maximum entropy copula is in satisfactory agreement with observed streamflow.

  20. Determination of scandium with salicylaldehyde and 2-aminobenzenearsonic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farias, P.A.M.; Hainberger, L.; Andrade, H.A.S.

    1984-01-01

    A new method for the spectrophotometric determination of scandium by means of a coloured complex formed with salicylaldehyde and 2-aminobenzenearsonic acid is described. Lambert-Beer's law is followed in the range of 0.2 - 2.0 μg/ml of the final solution. The maximum amounts of 39 ions that may be present without interfering in the method are listed. (Author) [pt

  1. Thermal and Hydrolytic Stability of Dithiophophoric Acids Stabilité thermique et hydrolytique des acides dithiophosphoriques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanov S. K.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The thermal and hydrolytic stability of dibutyl-, diisobutyl- and diisooctyldithiophosphoric acids have been studied in the range of 40-80°C. The reaction progress was followed by the H2S evolution kinetics in volumetric equipment at constant pressure, equal to the barometric one. The kinetic parameters of the process have been determined at various acid water ratios - maximum rates of gas evolution, activation energy and the kinetic order. It has been shown that the hydrolysis proceeds mainly along the sulph-hydrate group of the acid (up to temperatures of 60°C, while at higher temperatures the ester groups and the thion sulphur are attacked too. The thermal stability of dithiophosphoric acids has been studied in the presence of stainless steel, lead and copper plates. It has been shown that stainless steel doesn't affect the process rate, while copper and especially lead increase the gas evolution and decrease the activation energy. A model describing the reaction progress at the interfacial surfaces - organic phase, water and metal surface - has been developed. Based on these data a conclusion is advanced, related to the manifacture technology of antioxidant, anticorrosion and antiwear additives of the zinc dialkyldithiophosphate type. It is pointed out that the neutralization process of dithiophosphoric acids should be carried out in a stainless steel reactor at tempeatures below 70°C. Le présent article s'efforce d'élucider l'influence de l'eau, de la température et des surfaces métalliques sur la stabilité thermique et hydrolytique des acides dibutyl-, diisobutyl- et diisooctyldithiophosphoriques, à la lumière du concept d'interaction.

  2. Coproduction of acetic acid and electricity by application of microbial fuel cell technology to vinegar fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanino, Takanori; Nara, Youhei; Tsujiguchi, Takuya; Ohshima, Takayuki

    2013-08-01

    The coproduction of a useful material and electricity via a novel application of microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology to oxidative fermentation was investigated. We focused on vinegar production, i.e., acetic acid fermentation, as an initial and model useful material that can be produced by oxidative fermentation in combination with MFC technology. The coproduction of acetic acid and electricity by applying MFC technology was successfully demonstrated by the simultaneous progress of acetic acid fermentation and electricity generation through a series of repeated batch fermentations. Although the production rate of acetic acid was very small, it increased with the number of repeated batch fermentations that were conducted. We obtained nearly identical (73.1%) or larger (89.9%) acetic acid yields than that typically achieved by aerated fermentation (75.8%). The open-cycle voltages measured before and after fermentation increased with the total fermentation time and reached a maximum value of 0.521 V prior to the third batch fermentation. The maximum current and power densities measured in this study (19.1 μA/cm² and 2.47 μW/cm², respectively) were obtained after the second batch fermentation. Copyright © 2013 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and X-ray crystallographic analysis of glucuronic acid dehydrogenase from Chromohalobacter salexigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Jae-Woo; Lee, Shin Youp; Kim, Sangwoo; Cho, Sun Ja; Lee, Sun Bok; Kim, Kyung-Jin

    2011-01-01

    Recombinant glucuronic acid dehydrogenase from the halophilic bacterium Chromohalobacter salexigens has been crystallized and X-ray diffraction data collected to a maximum resolution of 2.1 Å. Glucuronic acid dehydrogenase (GluUADH), the product of the Csal-2474 gene from the halophilic bacterium Chromohalobacter salexigens DSM 3043, is an enzyme with potential use in the conversion of glucuronic acid in seaweed biomass to fuels and chemicals. GluUADH is an enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of glucuronic acid (GluUA) and galacturonic acid (GalUA) and has a preference for NAD + rather than NADP + as a cofactor. Recombinant GluUADH was crystallized in the presence of 0.2 M calcium acetate, 0.1 M Tris–HCl pH 7.0 and 20% PEG 3000 at 295 K. X-ray diffraction data were collected to a maximum resolution of 2.1 Å. The GluUADH crystal belonged to space group P6 3 , with unit-cell parameters a = b = 122.58, c = 150.49 Å, γ = 120°. With one molecule per asymmetric unit, the crystal volume per unit protein weight (V M ) is 2.78 Å 3 Da −1 . The structure was solved by the single anomalous dispersion method and structure refinement is in progress

  4. Maximum stellar iron core mass

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    60, No. 3. — journal of. March 2003 physics pp. 415–422. Maximum stellar iron core mass. F W GIACOBBE. Chicago Research Center/American Air Liquide ... iron core compression due to the weight of non-ferrous matter overlying the iron cores within large .... thermal equilibrium velocities will tend to be non-relativistic.

  5. [Value of early application of different doses of amino acids in parenteral nutrition among preterm infants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhi-Juan; Liu, Guo-Sheng; Chen, Yong-Ge; Zhang, Hui-Li; Wu, Xue-Fen

    2015-01-01

    To study the short-term response and tolerance of different doses of amino acids in parenteral nutrition among preterm infants. This study included 86 preterm infants who had a birth weight between 1 000 to 2 000 g and were admitted to the hospital within 24 hours of birth between March 2013 and June 2014. According to the early application of different doses of amino acids, they were randomized into low-dose group (n=29, 1.0 g/kg per day with an increase of 1.0 g/kg daily and a maximum of 3.5 g/kg per day), medium-dose group (n=28, 2.0 g/kg per day with an increase of 1.0 g/kg daily and a maximum of 3.7 g/kg per day), and high-dose group (n=29, 3.0 g/kg per day with an increase of 0.5-1.0 g/kg daily and a maximum of 4.0 g/kg per day). Other routine parenteral nutrition and enteral nutrition support were also applied. The maximum weight loss was lower and the growth rate of head circumference was greater in the high-dose group than in the low-dose group (Pnutrition, shorter duration of hospital stay, and less hospital cost than those in the low-dose group (P0.05). Parenteral administration of high-dose amino acids in preterm infants within 24 hours after birth can improve the short-term nutritional status of preterm infants, but there is a transient increase in BUN level.

  6. Fatty acid biosynthesis in pea root plastids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stahl, R.J.; Sparace, S.A.

    1989-01-01

    Fatty acid biosynthesis from [1- 14 C]acetate was optimized in plastids isolated from primary root tips of 7-day-old germinating pea seeds. Fatty acid synthesis was maximum at approximately 80 nmoles/hr/mg protein in the presence of 200 μM acetate, 0.5 mM each of NADH, NADPH and CoA, 6 mM each of ATP and MgCl 2 , 1 mM each of the MnCl 2 and glycerol-3-phosphate, 15 mM KHCO 3 , and 0.1M Bis-tris-propane, pH 8.0 incubated at 35C. At the standard incubation temperature of 25C, fatty acid synthesis was linear from up to 6 hours with 80 to 100 μg/mL plastid protein. ATP and CoA were absolute requirements, whereas KHCO 3 , divalent cations and reduced nucleotides all improved activity by 80 to 85%. Mg 2+ and NADH were the preferred cation and nucleotide, respectively. Dithiothreitol and detergents were generally inhibitory. The radioactive products of fatty acid biosynthesis were approximately 33% 16:0, 10% 18:0 and 56% 18:1 and generally did not vary with increasing concentrations of each cofactor

  7. Properties of precipitates formed during ammonization of extractional phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakharova, B.S.; Komissarova, L.N.; Naumov, S.V.; Traskin, V.Yu.

    1992-01-01

    Dimensions of precipitated rare-earth phosphate particles -(0.1 μm)- are near the boundary of colloidal system sedimentation stability range at neutralization of extraction phosphoric acid. Thus, formation of multiple aggregates of colloidal particles results in immediate sedimentation of the precipitate. Processes occurring within the system may be described using second order reaction equation. Average efficient size of precipitates grows at reduction of reaction mixture pH. About 30% of rare-earth elements and yttrium in the extraction phosphoric acid is extracted from it; concentration of rare-earth elements, yttrium and scandium in precipitate is maximum 2 mass. %

  8. The regulation of starch accumulation in Panicum maximum Jacq ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... decrease the starch level. These observations are discussed in relation to the photosynthetic characteristics of P. maximum. Keywords: accumulation; botany; carbon assimilation; co2 fixation; growth conditions; mesophyll; metabolites; nitrogen; nitrogen levels; nitrogen supply; panicum maximum; plant physiology; starch; ...

  9. Accurately Diagnosing Uric Acid Stones from Conventional Computerized Tomography Imaging: Development and Preliminary Assessment of a Pixel Mapping Software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, Vishnu; De, Shubha; Shkumat, Nicholas; Marchini, Giovanni; Monga, Manoj

    2018-02-01

    Preoperative determination of uric acid stones from computerized tomography imaging would be of tremendous clinical use. We sought to design a software algorithm that could apply data from noncontrast computerized tomography to predict the presence of uric acid stones. Patients with pure uric acid and calcium oxalate stones were identified from our stone registry. Only stones greater than 4 mm which were clearly traceable from initial computerized tomography to final composition were included in analysis. A semiautomated computer algorithm was used to process image data. Average and maximum HU, eccentricity (deviation from a circle) and kurtosis (peakedness vs flatness) were automatically generated. These parameters were examined in several mathematical models to predict the presence of uric acid stones. A total of 100 patients, of whom 52 had calcium oxalate and 48 had uric acid stones, were included in the final analysis. Uric acid stones were significantly larger (12.2 vs 9.0 mm, p = 0.03) but calcium oxalate stones had higher mean attenuation (457 vs 315 HU, p = 0.001) and maximum attenuation (918 vs 553 HU, p uric acid stones. A combination of stone size, attenuation intensity and attenuation pattern from conventional computerized tomography can distinguish uric acid stones from calcium oxalate stones with high sensitivity and specificity. Copyright © 2018 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Maximum entropy beam diagnostic tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mottershead, C.T.

    1985-01-01

    This paper reviews the formalism of maximum entropy beam diagnostic tomography as applied to the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) prototype accelerator. The same formalism has also been used with streak camera data to produce an ultrahigh speed movie of the beam profile of the Experimental Test Accelerator (ETA) at Livermore. 11 refs., 4 figs

  11. A portable storage maximum thermometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayart, Gerard.

    1976-01-01

    A clinical thermometer storing the voltage corresponding to the maximum temperature in an analog memory is described. End of the measurement is shown by a lamp switch out. The measurement time is shortened by means of a low thermal inertia platinum probe. This portable thermometer is fitted with cell test and calibration system [fr

  12. A Maximum Resonant Set of Polyomino Graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Heping

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A polyomino graph P is a connected finite subgraph of the infinite plane grid such that each finite face is surrounded by a regular square of side length one and each edge belongs to at least one square. A dimer covering of P corresponds to a perfect matching. Different dimer coverings can interact via an alternating cycle (or square with respect to them. A set of disjoint squares of P is a resonant set if P has a perfect matching M so that each one of those squares is M-alternating. In this paper, we show that if K is a maximum resonant set of P, then P − K has a unique perfect matching. We further prove that the maximum forcing number of a polyomino graph is equal to the cardinality of a maximum resonant set. This confirms a conjecture of Xu et al. [26]. We also show that if K is a maximal alternating set of P, then P − K has a unique perfect matching.

  13. Spatio-temporal observations of the tertiary ozone maximum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. F. Sofieva

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available We present spatio-temporal distributions of the tertiary ozone maximum (TOM, based on GOMOS (Global Ozone Monitoring by Occultation of Stars ozone measurements in 2002–2006. The tertiary ozone maximum is typically observed in the high-latitude winter mesosphere at an altitude of ~72 km. Although the explanation for this phenomenon has been found recently – low concentrations of odd-hydrogen cause the subsequent decrease in odd-oxygen losses – models have had significant deviations from existing observations until recently. Good coverage of polar night regions by GOMOS data has allowed for the first time to obtain spatial and temporal observational distributions of night-time ozone mixing ratio in the mesosphere.

    The distributions obtained from GOMOS data have specific features, which are variable from year to year. In particular, due to a long lifetime of ozone in polar night conditions, the downward transport of polar air by the meridional circulation is clearly observed in the tertiary ozone maximum time series. Although the maximum tertiary ozone mixing ratio is achieved close to the polar night terminator (as predicted by the theory, TOM can be observed also at very high latitudes, not only in the beginning and at the end, but also in the middle of winter. We have compared the observational spatio-temporal distributions of the tertiary ozone maximum with that obtained using WACCM (Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model and found that the specific features are reproduced satisfactorily by the model.

    Since ozone in the mesosphere is very sensitive to HOx concentrations, energetic particle precipitation can significantly modify the shape of the ozone profiles. In particular, GOMOS observations have shown that the tertiary ozone maximum was temporarily destroyed during the January 2005 and December 2006 solar proton events as a result of the HOx enhancement from the increased ionization.

  14. Optimization of date syrup for enhancement of the production of citric acid using immobilized cells of Aspergillus niger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, Yasser S.; Alamri, Saad A.

    2012-01-01

    Date syrup as an economical source of carbohydrates and immobilized Aspergillus niger J4, which was entrapped in calcium alginate pellets, were employed for enhancing the production of citric acid. Maximum production was achieved by pre-treating date syrup with 1.5% tricalcium phosphate to remove heavy metals. The production of citric acid using a pretreated medium was 38.87% higher than an untreated one that consumed sugar. The appropriate presence of nitrogen, phosphate and magnesium appeared to be important in order for citric acid to accumulate. The production of citric acid and the consumed sugar was higher when using 0.1% ammonium nitrate as the best source of nitrogen. The production of citric acid increased significantly when 0.1 g/l of KH2PO4 was added to the medium of date syrup. The addition of magnesium sulfate at the rate of 0.20 g/l had a stimulating effect on the production of citric acid. Maximum production of citric acid was obtained when calcium chloride was absent. One of the most important benefits of immobilized cells is their ability and stability to produce citric acid under a repeated batch culture. Over four repeated batches, the production of citric acid production was maintained for 24 days when each cycle continued for 144 h. The results obtained in the repeated batch cultivation using date syrup confirmed that date syrup could be used as a medium for the industrial production of citric acid. PMID:23961184

  15. Poly(N-vinylimidazole/ethylene glycol dimethacrylate) for the purification and isolation of phenolic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schemeth, Dieter; Noël, Jean-Christophe [Institute of Analytical Chemistry and Radiochemistry, Leopold-Franzens University of Innsbruck, CCB—Center of Chemistry and Biomedicine, Innrain 80-82, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Jakschitz, Thomas [Austrian Drug Screening Institute, Innrain 66a, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Rainer, Matthias, E-mail: m.rainer@uibk.ac.at [Institute of Analytical Chemistry and Radiochemistry, Leopold-Franzens University of Innsbruck, CCB—Center of Chemistry and Biomedicine, Innrain 80-82, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Tessadri, Richard [Institute of Mineralogy and Petrography, Leopold-Franzens University of Innsbruck, Innrain 52, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Huck, Christian W. [Institute of Analytical Chemistry and Radiochemistry, Leopold-Franzens University of Innsbruck, CCB—Center of Chemistry and Biomedicine, Innrain 80-82, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Bonn, Günther K. [Institute of Analytical Chemistry and Radiochemistry, Leopold-Franzens University of Innsbruck, CCB—Center of Chemistry and Biomedicine, Innrain 80-82, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Austrian Drug Screening Institute, Innrain 66a, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2015-07-23

    Highlights: • Free-radical polymerization of protonable vinylimidazole with EGMDA. • Polymer-optimization by maximum loading capacity of phenolic acids. • Performs better than SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in normal phase mode using acetonitrile. • Performs equal or even better in anion-exchange mode compared to Oasis-MAX. • Efficient purification of phenolic compounds from crude extract. - Abstract: In this study we report the novel polymeric resin poly(N-vinyl imidazole/ethylene glycol dimethacrylate) for the purification and isolation of phenolic acids. The monomer to crosslinker ratio and the porogen composition were optimized for isolating phenolic acids diluted in acetonitrile at normal phase chromatography conditions, first. Acetonitrile serves as polar, aprotic solvent, dissolving phenolic acids but not interrupting interactions with the stationary phase due to the approved Hansen solubility parameters. The optimized resin demonstrated high loading capacities and adsorption abilities particularly for phenolic acids in both, acetonitrile and aqueous solutions. The adsorption behavior of aqueous standards can be attributed to ion exchange effects due to electrostatic interactions between protonated imidazole residues and deprotonated phenolic acids. Furthermore, adsorption experiments and subsequent curve fittings provide information of maximum loading capacities of single standards according to the Langmuir adsorption model. Recovery studies of the optimized polymer in the normal-phase and ion-exchange mode illustrate the powerful isolation properties for phenolic acids and are comparable or even better than typical, commercially available solid phase extraction materials. In order to prove the applicability, a highly complex extract of rosemary leaves was purified by poly(N-vinyl imidazole/ethylene glycol dimethacrylate) and the isolated compounds were identified using UHPLC–qTOF-MS.

  16. High production of D-tagatose by the addition of boric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Byung-Chul; Kim, Hye-Jung; Oh, Deok-Kun

    2007-01-01

    An L-arabinose isomerase mutant enzyme from Geobacillus thermodenitrificans was used to catalyze the isomerization of D-galactose to D-tagatose with boric acid. Maximum production of D-tagatose occurred at pH 8.5-9.0, 60 degrees C, and 0.4 molar ratio of boric acid to D-galactose, and the production increased with increasing enzyme concentration. Under the optimum conditions, the enzyme (10.8 units/mL) converted 300 g/L D-galactose to 230 g/L D-tagatose for 20 h with a yield of 77% (w/w); the production and conversion yield with boric acid were 1.5-fold and 24% higher than without boric acid, respectively. In 24 h, the enzyme produced 370 g/L D-tagatose from 500 g/L D-galactose with boric acid, corresponding to a conversion yield of 74% (w/w) and a production rate of 15.4 g/L.h. The production and yield of D-tagatose obtained in this study are unprecedented.

  17. Acid-functionalized nanoparticles for biomass hydrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena Duque, Leidy Eugenia

    Cellulosic ethanol is a renewable source of energy. Lignocellulosic biomass is a complex material composed mainly of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. Biomass pretreatment is a required step to make sugar polymers liable to hydrolysis. Mineral acids are commonly used for biomass pretreatment. Using acid catalysts that can be recovered and reused could make the process economically more attractive. The overall goal of this dissertation is the development of a recyclable nanocatalyst for the hydrolysis of biomass sugars. Cobalt iron oxide nanoparticles (CoFe2O4) were synthesized to provide a magnetic core that could be separated from reaction using a magnetic field and modified to carry acid functional groups. X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirmed the crystal structure was that of cobalt spinel ferrite. CoFe2O4 were covered with silica which served as linker for the acid functions. Silica-coated nanoparticles were functionalized with three different acid functions: perfluoropropyl-sulfonic acid, carboxylic acid, and propyl-sulfonic acid. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) images were analyzed to obtain particle size distributions of the nanoparticles. Total carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur were quantified using an elemental analyzer. Fourier transform infra-red spectra confirmed the presence of sulfonic and carboxylic acid functions and ion-exchange titrations accounted for the total amount of catalytic acid sites per nanoparticle mass. These nanoparticles were evaluated for their performance to hydrolyze the beta-1,4 glycosidic bond of the cellobiose molecule. Propyl-sulfonic (PS) and perfluoropropyl-sulfonic (PFS) acid functionalized nanoparticles catalyzed the hydrolysis of cellobiose significantly better than the control. PS and PFS were also evaluated for their capacity to solubilize wheat straw hemicelluloses and performed better than the control. Although PFS nanoparticles were stronger acid catalysts, the acid functions leached out of the nanoparticle during

  18. Biotransformation of ferulic acid to vanillin in the packed bed-stirred fermentors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Lei; Chen, Peng; Zhang, Shuang; Li, Suyue; Yan, Xiaojuan; Wang, Ningbo; Liang, Ning; Li, Hongyu

    2016-10-06

    We performed the biotransformation of ferulic acid to vanillin using Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis) in the stirring packed-bed reactors filled with carbon fiber textiles (CFT). Scanning electron microscope (SEM), HPLC, qRT-PCR and ATP assay indicated that vanillin biotransformation is tightly related to cell growth, cellar activity and the extent of biofilm formation. The biotransformation was affected by hydraulic retention time (HRT), temperature, initial pH, stirring speed and ferulic acid concentration, and the maximum vanillin production was obtained at 20 h, 35 °C, 9.0, 200 rpm, 1.5 g/L, respectively. Repeated batch biotransformation performed under this optimized condition showed that the maximum productivity (0.047 g/L/h) and molar yield (60.43%) achieved in immobilized cell system were 1.84 and 3.61 folds higher than those achieved in free cell system. Therefore, the stirring reactor packed with CFT carrier biofilm formed by B. subtilis represented a valid biocatalytic system for the production of vanillin.

  19. Occurrence and Determination of Haloacetic Acids in Metro Manila Drinking Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene B. Rodriguez

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Haloacetic acids are found in chlorinated water with high organic matter content. An analytical method based on a US EPA method for measuring these compounds in water is described. The optimized method used diethyl ether as extraction solvent with sulphuric acid-methanol as esterification agent and subsequent detection by gas chromatography-electron capture detection. Evaluation of this method showed that it was linear in the concentration range of 10 to 150 µg L-1 and the method detection limits were from 17 to 57 µg L-1. Although the method demonstrated low recoveries (16 to 43%, it is useful in the quantitative determination of monochloroacetic acid as well as the qualitative determination of other haloacetic acids in water. Drinking water samples taken from different areas in Metro Manila serviced by the local treatment plants were analysed using the method. Monochloroacetic acid, monobromoacetic acid, and bromochloroacetic acid were detected in these samples. Monochloroacetic acid was quantified and found in concentrations ranging from 19 to 157 µg L-1. In most of the water samples, the concentration of monochloroacetic acid exceeded the US EPA maximum allowable total concentration of 60 µg L-1 for the five haloacetic acids (monochloro-, dichloro-, trichloro-, monobromo-, and dibromoacetic acids in drinking water. This initial study established the occurrence of potentially harmful haloacetic acids in the local drinking water supplies.

  20. Iron oxide nanoparticles stabilized with a bilayer of oleic acid for magnetic hyperthermia and MRI applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Paula I.P. [i3N/CENIMAT, Department of Materials Science, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universidade NOVA de Lisboa, Campus de Caparica, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Laia, César A.T. [Laboratório Associado para a Química Verde (LAQV), REQUIMTE, Departamento de Química, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, FCT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Carvalho, Alexandra [i3N/CENIMAT, Department of Materials Science, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universidade NOVA de Lisboa, Campus de Caparica, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Pereira, Laura C.J.; Coutinho, Joana T. [C2TN, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Estrada Nacional 10, ao km 139,7, 2695-066 Bobadela LRS (Portugal); Ferreira, Isabel M.M., E-mail: imf@fct.unl.pt [i3N/CENIMAT, Department of Materials Science, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universidade NOVA de Lisboa, Campus de Caparica, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Novo, Carlos M.M. [Instituto de Higiene e Medicina Tropical, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, IHMT/UNL, 1349-008 Lisboa (Portugal); Borges, João Paulo, E-mail: jpb@fct.unl.pt [i3N/CENIMAT, Department of Materials Science, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universidade NOVA de Lisboa, Campus de Caparica, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were stabilized with oleic acid. • Maximum stabilization was achieved at neutral pH. • Magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic hyperthermia applications were tested. • The produced nanoparticles are viable for both biomedical applications. - Abstract: Iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, IONPs) are promising candidates for several biomedical applications such as magnetic hyperthermia and as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, their colloidal stability in physiological conditions hinders their application requiring the use of biocompatible surfactant agents. The present investigation focuses on obtaining highly stable IONPs, stabilized by the presence of an oleic acid bilayer. Critical aspects such as oleic acid concentration and pH were optimized to ensure maximum stability. NPs composed of an iron oxide core with an average diameter of 9 nm measured using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) form agglomerates with an hydrodynamic diameter of around 170 nm when dispersed in water in the presence of an oleic acid bilayer, remaining stable (zeta potential of −120 mV). Magnetic hyperthermia and the relaxivities measurements show high efficiency at neutral pH which enables their use for both magnetic hyperthermia and MRI.

  1. Iron oxide nanoparticles stabilized with a bilayer of oleic acid for magnetic hyperthermia and MRI applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, Paula I.P.; Laia, César A.T.; Carvalho, Alexandra; Pereira, Laura C.J.; Coutinho, Joana T.; Ferreira, Isabel M.M.; Novo, Carlos M.M.; Borges, João Paulo

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were stabilized with oleic acid. • Maximum stabilization was achieved at neutral pH. • Magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic hyperthermia applications were tested. • The produced nanoparticles are viable for both biomedical applications. - Abstract: Iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe_3O_4, IONPs) are promising candidates for several biomedical applications such as magnetic hyperthermia and as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, their colloidal stability in physiological conditions hinders their application requiring the use of biocompatible surfactant agents. The present investigation focuses on obtaining highly stable IONPs, stabilized by the presence of an oleic acid bilayer. Critical aspects such as oleic acid concentration and pH were optimized to ensure maximum stability. NPs composed of an iron oxide core with an average diameter of 9 nm measured using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) form agglomerates with an hydrodynamic diameter of around 170 nm when dispersed in water in the presence of an oleic acid bilayer, remaining stable (zeta potential of −120 mV). Magnetic hyperthermia and the relaxivities measurements show high efficiency at neutral pH which enables their use for both magnetic hyperthermia and MRI.

  2. Agdc1p – a Gallic Acid Decarboxylase Involved in the Degradation of Tannic Acid in the Yeast Blastobotrys (Arxula adeninivorans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna K. Meier

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Tannins and hydroxylated aromatic acids, such as gallic acid (3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid, are plant secondary metabolites which protect plants against herbivores and plant-associated microorganisms. Some microbes, such as the yeast Arxula adeninivorans are resistant to these antimicrobial substances and are able to use tannins and gallic acid as carbon sources. In this study, the Arxula gallic acid decarboxylase (Agdc1p which degrades gallic acid to pyrogallol was characterized and its function in tannin catabolism analyzed. The enzyme has a higher affinity for gallic acid (Km −0.7 ± 0.2 mM, kcat −42.0 ± 8.2 s−1 than to protocatechuic acid (3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid (Km −3.2 ± 0.2 mM, kcat −44.0 ± 3.2 s−1. Other hydroxylated aromatic acids, such as 3-hydroxybenzoic acid, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid and 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid are not gallic acid decarboxylase substrates. A. adeninivorans G1212/YRC102-AYNI1-AGDC1, which expresses the AGDC1 gene under the control of the strong nitrate inducible AYNI1 promoter achieved a maximum gallic acid decarboxylase activity of 1064.4 U/l and 97.5 U/g of dry cell weight in yeast grown in minimal medium with nitrate as nitrogen source and glucose as carbon source. In the same medium, gallic acid decarboxylase activity was not detected for the control strain G1212/YRC102 with AGDC1 expression under the control of the endogenous promoter. Gene expression analysis showed that AGDC1 is induced by gallic acid and protocatechuic acid. In contrast to G1212/YRC102-AYNI1-AGDC1 and G1212/YRC102, A. adeninivorans G1234 [Δagdc1] is not able to grow on medium with gallic acid as carbon source but can grow in presence of protocatechuic acid. This confirms that Agdc1p plays an essential role in the tannic acid catabolism and could be useful in the production of catechol and cis,cis-muconic acid. However, the protocatechuic acid catabolism via Agdc1p to

  3. Agdc1p – a Gallic Acid Decarboxylase Involved in the Degradation of Tannic Acid in the Yeast Blastobotrys (Arxula) adeninivorans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Anna K.; Worch, Sebastian; Böer, Erik; Hartmann, Anja; Mascher, Martin; Marzec, Marek; Scholz, Uwe; Riechen, Jan; Baronian, Kim; Schauer, Frieder; Bode, Rüdiger; Kunze, Gotthard

    2017-01-01

    Tannins and hydroxylated aromatic acids, such as gallic acid (3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid), are plant secondary metabolites which protect plants against herbivores and plant-associated microorganisms. Some microbes, such as the yeast Arxula adeninivorans are resistant to these antimicrobial substances and are able to use tannins and gallic acid as carbon sources. In this study, the Arxula gallic acid decarboxylase (Agdc1p) which degrades gallic acid to pyrogallol was characterized and its function in tannin catabolism analyzed. The enzyme has a higher affinity for gallic acid (Km −0.7 ± 0.2 mM, kcat −42.0 ± 8.2 s−1) than to protocatechuic acid (3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid) (Km −3.2 ± 0.2 mM, kcat −44.0 ± 3.2 s−1). Other hydroxylated aromatic acids, such as 3-hydroxybenzoic acid, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid and 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid are not gallic acid decarboxylase substrates. A. adeninivorans G1212/YRC102-AYNI1-AGDC1, which expresses the AGDC1 gene under the control of the strong nitrate inducible AYNI1 promoter achieved a maximum gallic acid decarboxylase activity of 1064.4 U/l and 97.5 U/g of dry cell weight in yeast grown in minimal medium with nitrate as nitrogen source and glucose as carbon source. In the same medium, gallic acid decarboxylase activity was not detected for the control strain G1212/YRC102 with AGDC1 expression under the control of the endogenous promoter. Gene expression analysis showed that AGDC1 is induced by gallic acid and protocatechuic acid. In contrast to G1212/YRC102-AYNI1-AGDC1 and G1212/YRC102, A. adeninivorans G1234 [Δagdc1] is not able to grow on medium with gallic acid as carbon source but can grow in presence of protocatechuic acid. This confirms that Agdc1p plays an essential role in the tannic acid catabolism and could be useful in the production of catechol and cis,cis-muconic acid. However, the protocatechuic acid catabolism via Agdc1p to catechol seems to be

  4. Direct maximum parsimony phylogeny reconstruction from genotype data

    OpenAIRE

    Sridhar, Srinath; Lam, Fumei; Blelloch, Guy E; Ravi, R; Schwartz, Russell

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Maximum parsimony phylogenetic tree reconstruction from genetic variation data is a fundamental problem in computational genetics with many practical applications in population genetics, whole genome analysis, and the search for genetic predictors of disease. Efficient methods are available for reconstruction of maximum parsimony trees from haplotype data, but such data are difficult to determine directly for autosomal DNA. Data more commonly is available in the form of ge...

  5. Production of activated carbon from peanut hill using phosphoric acid and microwave activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weerawat Clowutimon

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The optimum conditions for preparing activated carbon from peanut hulls by phosphoric acid and microwave activation were studied. Factors investigated in this study were temperature of carbonization at 300, 350, 400 and 450๐ C, and time of carbonization at 30, 60 and 90 minutes. The optimum yield was observed that carbonization temperature of 400๐ C and time at 60 minutes, respectively. The yield of charcoal was 39% and the f ix carbon was 69%. Then the charcoal was activated by phosphoric acid and microwave irradiation, respectively. The effect of the weight per volume ratios of charcoal to activating acid (1:1, 1:2 and 2:1(W/V, microwave power at (activated 300, 500 and 700 watts, and activated time (30, 60 and 90 seconds were studied. The results showed that the optimum conditions for activating peanut charcoal were 1:2 (W/V charcoal per activating acid, microwave power 700 watts for 90 seconds. The results yielding maximum surface area by BET method was 303.1 m2 /g and pore volume was 0.140 cm3 /g. An efficiency of maximum iodine adsorption was 418 mg iodine/g activated carbon. Comparing the adsorption efficiency of non- irradiated and irradiated activated carbon, the efficiency of irradiated activated carbon improved up to 31%, due to its larger surface area and pore volume.

  6. Influencing of resorption and side-effects of salicylic acid by complexing with β-cyclodextrin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szejtli, J.; Gerloczy, A.; Sebestyen, G.; Fonagy, A.

    1981-01-01

    After oral administration of 14 C-labelled salicylic acid and its β-cyclodextrin complex to rats, the radioactivity level of the blood reached its maximum during the first 2 h. The blood level obtained with the complex is somewhat but not significantly lower than with free acid. Since the resorption of cyclodextrin is a considerably slower process, it is very likely that the resorption of salicylic acid takes place in the form of free acid after dissociation of the complex. The urinary excretion cumulative curves showed that the free salicylic acid was completely excreted, while about 10% of the salicylic acid administered in the form of complex is lost. The cyclodextrin complex formation increased the pK values of all hydroxybenzoic acids. Direct observations revealed that complex formation decreased the stomach-irritating effect of salicylic acid. The ratio of radioactivity was nearly the same in the organs of animals treated by both free salicylic and cyclodextrin complex. (author)

  7. Effects of decreasing acid deposition and climate change on acid extremes in an upland stream

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. D. Evans

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available This study assesses the major chemical processes leading to acid extremes in a small, moorland stream in mid-Wales, UK, which has been monitored since 1979. Results suggest that base cation (mainly calcium dilution, the "sea-salt effect", and elevated nitrate pulses, are the major causes of seasonal/episodic minima in acid neutralising capacity (ANC, and that the relative importance of these drivers has remained approximately constant during 25 years of decreasing acid deposition and associated long-term chemical recovery. Many of the chemical variations causing short-term reductions in stream acidity, particularly base cation dilution and organic acid increases, are closely related to changes in water-flowpath and therefore to stream discharge. Changes in the observed pH-discharge relationship over time indicate that high-flow pH has increased more rapidly than mean-flow pH, and therefore that episodes have decreased in magnitude since 1980. However a two-box application of the dynamic model MAGIC, whilst reproducing this trend, suggests that it will not persist in the long term, with mean ANC continuing to increase until 2100, but the ANC of the upper soil (the source of relatively acid water during high-flow episodes stabilising close to zero beyond 2030. With climate change predicted to lead to an increase in maximum flows in the latter half of the century, high-flow related acid episodes may actually become more rather than less severe in the long term, although the model suggests that this effect may be small. Two other predicted climatic changes could also detrimentally impact on acid episodes: increased severity of winter "sea-salt" episodes due to higher wind speeds during winter storms; and larger sulphate pulses due to oxidation of reduced sulphur held in organic soils, during more extreme summer droughts. At the Gwy, the near-coastal location and relatively small extent of peat soils suggest that sea-salt episodes may have the

  8. Estudio analítico de la composición en ácidos grasos de mostaza y salsas de mostaza.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López Argüello, E.

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to characterise mustard (whole seed or flour, mustard sauces with grain and mustard sauces in relation to their base seed, the concentrations of fatty acid were determinated by gas chromatography (GC. Erucic acid was the most abundant fatty acid component in mustard and mustard sauces (27,7 % and 24,6 % of total fatty acid content, followed by oleic acid (20,0 % and 21,1 % and linolenic acid (16,3 % and 16.2%. The major acid in mustard sauces with grain was linolenic (21,4 %, followed by linoleic acid (20,3 % and oleic acid (19,3 %. By means of correlation and discriminant analysis the samples have been grouped and classified. It is shown that fatty acid are usefull parameters for quality control analysis of mustard sauces.

    Se determinaron, por cromatografía gaseosa, el perfil de los ácidos grasos en mostaza (semilla y harina, salsas de mostaza con grano y salsas finas de mostaza con el objeto de caracterizarlas en relación con la semilla base. El ácido erúcico fue el más abundante en la mostaza y en las salsas finas (27,7 % y 24,6 % del contenido total de ácidos grasos, seguido de los ácidos oleico (20,0 % y 21,1 % y linoleico (16,3 y 16.2 %. En las salsas de mostaza con grano el ácido graso mayoritario fue el linolénico (21,4 % seguido de los ácidos linoleico (20,3 % y oleico (19,3 %. Mediante los análisis de correlación y discriminante las muestras son agrupadas y clasificadas. Los ácidos grasos han demostrado ser parámetros válidos para el análisis del control de calidad de las salsas de mostaza.

  9. Fungic microflora of Panicum maximum and Styosanthes spp. commercial seed / Microflora fúngica de sementes comerciais de Panicum maximum e Stylosanthes spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Rodrigues Fabris

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The sanitary quality of 26 lots commercial seeds of tropical forages, produced in different regions (2004-05 and 2005-06 was analyzed. The lots were composed of seeds of Panicum maximum ('Massai', 'Mombaça' e 'Tanzânia' and stylo ('Estilosantes Campo Grande' - ECG. Additionally, seeds of two lots of P. maximum for exportation were analyzed. The blotter test was used, at 20ºC under alternating light and darkness in a 12 h photoperiod, for seven days. The Aspergillus, Cladosporium and Rhizopus genus consisted the secondary or saprophytes fungi (FSS with greatest frequency in P. maximum lots. In general, there was low incidence of these fungus in the seeds. In relation to pathogenic fungi (FP, it was detected high frequency of contaminated lots by Bipolaris, Curvularia, Fusarium and Phoma genus. Generally, there was high incidence of FP in P. maximum seeds. The occurrence of Phoma sp. was hight, because in 81% of the lots showed incidence superior to 50%. In 'ECG' seeds it was detected FSS (Aspergillus, Cladosporium, and Penicillium genus and FP (Bipolaris, Curvularia, Fusarium and Phoma genus, usually, in low incidence. FSS and FP were associated to P. maximum seeds for exportation, with significant incidence in some cases. The results indicated that there was a limiting factor in all producer regions regarding sanitary quality of the seeds.Sementes comerciais de forrageiras tropicais, pertencente a 26 lotes produzidos em diferentes regiões (safras 2004-05 e 2005-06, foram avaliadas quanto à sanidade. Foram analisadas sementes de cultivares de Panicum maximum (Massai, Mombaça e Tanzânia e de estilosantes (Estilosantes Campo Grande – ECG. Adicionalmente, avaliou-se a qualidade sanitária de dois lotes de sementes de P. maximum destinados à exportação. Para isso, as sementes foram submetidas ao teste de papel de filtro em gerbox, os quais foram incubados a 20ºC, com fotoperíodo de 12 h, durante sete dias. Os fungos saprófitos ou

  10. Optimization of acid-activated bentonites on bleaching of cotton oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacin, O.; Sayan, E.; Kirali, E.G.

    2013-01-01

    Bentonites are commonly used adsorbent on bleaching cotton oil to produce edible oil products. Bleaching capacities of neutralized cotton oil were investigated with acid-activated Arguvan and Kursunlu bentonites. Two models for acid activation of the bentonites were developed by using a full factorial experimental design and central composite design. The parameters used to develop these models were contact time, solid to liquid ratio, acid concentration and moisture of bentonite. By using a constrained optimization program, the maximum bleaching capacities of neutralized cotton oil were determined as 99.99% and 48.5% for Arguvan and Kursunlu, respectively. Optimum results showed that Turkish bentonites (especially Arguvan bentonite) have high bleaching ability and they can be used efficiently to bleach neutralized cotton oil by considering the favorable volume weight, capacity of oil adsorbed and filtration rate. (author)

  11. Solubility of gallic acid in liquid mixtures of (ethanol + water) from (293.15 to 318.15) K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noubigh, Adel; Jeribi, Chokri; Mgaidi, Arbi; Abderrabba, Manef

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Solubility of gallic acid vs the mole fraction of ethanol (0.0 to 1) on a solute-free basis in ethanol + water at different temperatures/K. □, 293.15; Δ, 298.15; ◊, 303.15; line calculated by equation. Highlights: ► Solubilities of gallic acid in binary mixtures were determined over the temperatures range (293.15 to 318.15) K. ► The gallic acid solubility in mixed solvents presents a maximum-solubility effect. ► Two empirical equations were proposed to correlate the solubility Data. ► The thermodynamic properties were determined. - Abstract: The solubility of gallic acid in (water + ethanol) binary solvents was determined from (293.15 to 318.15) K at atmospheric pressure using a thermostatted reactor and UV/vis spectrophotometer analysis. The effects of binary solvents composition and temperature on the solubility were discussed. It was found that gallic acid solubility in (water + ethanol) mixed solvents presents a maximum-solubility effect. Two empirical equations were proposed to correlate the solubility data. The calculated solubilities show good agreement with the experimental data within the studied temperature range. Using the experimentally measured solubilities, the thermodynamic properties of dissolution of the gallic acid such as Gibbs energy (Δ sol G°), molar enthalpy of dissolution (Δ sol H°), and molar entropy of dissolution (Δ sol S°) were calculated.

  12. Calorimetric determination of enthalpies for the proton ionization of N,N-bis[2-hydroxyethyl]-2-aminoethanesulfonic acid (BES) and N-tris[hydroxymethyl]methyl-2-aminoethanesulfonic acid (TES) in water-methanol mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulos, B.N.; Jumean, F.H.

    2004-01-01

    The enthalpies of proton ionization of the biochemical buffers N,N-bis[2-hydroxyethyl]-2-aminoethanesulfonic acid (BES) and N-tris[hydroxymethyl]methyl-2-aminoethanesulfonic acid (TES) were obtained in water-methanol mixtures in which the methanol mole fraction (X m ) varied in the range 0-0.36. For both buffers, ionization enthalpy for the first proton (ΔH 1 ) was small in all solvent media. However, upon addition of methanol, ΔH 2 increased steadily from 22.2 to a maximum of 27.2 kJ mol -1 for BES, whereas for TES it varied from 30.0 to 32.4, with a minimum of 28.6 kJ mol -1 at X m =0.123. It is noteworthy that this solvent composition lies within the region of maximum structure enhancement of water by methanol. The results were interpreted in terms of methanol-water interactions

  13. 78 FR 49370 - Inflation Adjustment of Maximum Forfeiture Penalties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-14

    ... ``civil monetary penalties provided by law'' at least once every four years. DATES: Effective September 13... increases the maximum civil monetary forfeiture penalties available to the Commission under its rules... maximum civil penalties established in that section to account for inflation since the last adjustment to...

  14. 5 CFR 838.711 - Maximum former spouse survivor annuity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maximum former spouse survivor annuity... Orders Awarding Former Spouse Survivor Annuities Limitations on Survivor Annuities § 838.711 Maximum former spouse survivor annuity. (a) Under CSRS, payments under a court order may not exceed the amount...

  15. Acid-base synergistic flame retardant wood pulp paper with high thermal stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ning; Liu, Yuansen; Xu, Changan; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Qi

    2017-12-15

    Acid-catalytic degradation caused by acid source flame retardants is the main reason for a decline in thermal stability of flame-retarded lignocellulosic materials. In the present research, a guanidine phosphate (GP)/borax (BX) flame retardant system based on acid-base synergistic interaction was designed and used in wood pulp paper (WPP) to solve this problem. Results showed that the treated WPP obtained good flame retardancy with a limiting oxygen index (LOI) value of 35.7%. As a basic flame retardant, borax could chemically combine with the acids released by guanidine phosphate, thus decreasing the acidity of the system in the initial heating stage. In this way, acid-catalytic degradation is greatly retarded on the lignocelluloses to improve thermal stability (the temperature of maximum degradation peak from 286°C to 314°C). Meanwhile, borax was also advantageous to form a denser and firmer condensed phase through reinforcement of the acid-base reaction product, borophosphates, allowing it to provide a protective barrier with higher quality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A tropospheric ozone maximum over the equatorial Southern Indian Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Zhang

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available We examine the distribution of tropical tropospheric ozone (O3 from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS and the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES by using a global three-dimensional model of tropospheric chemistry (GEOS-Chem. MLS and TES observations of tropospheric O3 during 2005 to 2009 reveal a distinct, persistent O3 maximum, both in mixing ratio and tropospheric column, in May over the Equatorial Southern Indian Ocean (ESIO. The maximum is most pronounced in 2006 and 2008 and less evident in the other three years. This feature is also consistent with the total column O3 observations from the Ozone Mapping Instrument (OMI and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS. Model results reproduce the observed May O3 maximum and the associated interannual variability. The origin of the maximum reflects a complex interplay of chemical and dynamic factors. The O3 maximum is dominated by the O3 production driven by lightning nitrogen oxides (NOx emissions, which accounts for 62% of the tropospheric column O3 in May 2006. We find the contribution from biomass burning, soil, anthropogenic and biogenic sources to the O3 maximum are rather small. The O3 productions in the lightning outflow from Central Africa and South America both peak in May and are directly responsible for the O3 maximum over the western ESIO. The lightning outflow from Equatorial Asia dominates over the eastern ESIO. The interannual variability of the O3 maximum is driven largely by the anomalous anti-cyclones over the southern Indian Ocean in May 2006 and 2008. The lightning outflow from Central Africa and South America is effectively entrained by the anti-cyclones followed by northward transport to the ESIO.

  17. Solar maximum observatory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rust, D.M.

    1984-01-01

    The successful retrieval and repair of the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) satellite by Shuttle astronauts in April 1984 permitted continuance of solar flare observations that began in 1980. The SMM carries a soft X ray polychromator, gamma ray, UV and hard X ray imaging spectrometers, a coronagraph/polarimeter and particle counters. The data gathered thus far indicated that electrical potentials of 25 MeV develop in flares within 2 sec of onset. X ray data show that flares are composed of compressed magnetic loops that have come too close together. Other data have been taken on mass ejection, impacts of electron beams and conduction fronts with the chromosphere and changes in the solar radiant flux due to sunspots. 13 references

  18. Post optimization paradigm in maximum 3-satisfiability logic programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansor, Mohd. Asyraf; Sathasivam, Saratha; Kasihmuddin, Mohd Shareduwan Mohd

    2017-08-01

    Maximum 3-Satisfiability (MAX-3SAT) is a counterpart of the Boolean satisfiability problem that can be treated as a constraint optimization problem. It deals with a conundrum of searching the maximum number of satisfied clauses in a particular 3-SAT formula. This paper presents the implementation of enhanced Hopfield network in hastening the Maximum 3-Satisfiability (MAX-3SAT) logic programming. Four post optimization techniques are investigated, including the Elliot symmetric activation function, Gaussian activation function, Wavelet activation function and Hyperbolic tangent activation function. The performances of these post optimization techniques in accelerating MAX-3SAT logic programming will be discussed in terms of the ratio of maximum satisfied clauses, Hamming distance and the computation time. Dev-C++ was used as the platform for training, testing and validating our proposed techniques. The results depict the Hyperbolic tangent activation function and Elliot symmetric activation function can be used in doing MAX-3SAT logic programming.

  19. Mass mortality of the vermetid gastropod Ceraesignum maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, A. L.; Frazer, T. K.; Shima, J. S.; Osenberg, C. W.

    2016-09-01

    Ceraesignum maximum (G.B. Sowerby I, 1825), formerly Dendropoma maximum, was subject to a sudden, massive die-off in the Society Islands, French Polynesia, in 2015. On Mo'orea, where we have detailed documentation of the die-off, these gastropods were previously found in densities up to 165 m-2. In July 2015, we surveyed shallow back reefs of Mo'orea before, during and after the die-off, documenting their swift decline. All censused populations incurred 100% mortality. Additional surveys and observations from Mo'orea, Tahiti, Bora Bora, and Huahine (but not Taha'a) suggested a similar, and approximately simultaneous, die-off. The cause(s) of this cataclysmic mass mortality are currently unknown. Given the previously documented negative effects of C. maximum on corals, we expect the die-off will have cascading effects on the reef community.

  20. Producing Acetic Acid of Acetobacter pasteurianus by Fermentation Characteristics and Metabolic Flux Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xuefeng; Yao, Hongli; Liu, Qing; Zheng, Zhi; Cao, Lili; Mu, Dongdong; Wang, Hualin; Jiang, Shaotong; Li, Xingjiang

    2018-03-19

    The acetic acid bacterium Acetobacter pasteurianus plays an important role in acetic acid fermentation, which involves oxidation of ethanol to acetic acid through the ethanol respiratory chain under specific conditions. In order to obtain more suitable bacteria for the acetic acid industry, A. pasteurianus JST-S screened in this laboratory was compared with A. pasteurianus CICC 20001, a current industrial strain in China, to determine optimal fermentation parameters under different environmental stresses. The maximum total acid content of A. pasteurianus JST-S was 57.14 ± 1.09 g/L, whereas that of A. pasteurianus CICC 20001 reached 48.24 ± 1.15 g/L in a 15-L stir stank. Metabolic flux analysis was also performed to compare the reaction byproducts. Our findings revealed the potential value of the strain in improvement of industrial vinegar fermentation.

  1. Effect of Schiff's Bases as Corrosion Inhibitors on Mild Steel in Sulphuric Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. K. Upadhyay

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Mass loss and thermometric methods have been used to study the corrosion inhibitory effect of synthesised Schiff's bases viz. N-(furfurilidine – 4- methoxy aniline (SB1, N-(furfurilidine – 4- methylaniline (SB2, N-(salicylidine – 4- methoxy aniline (SB3, N-(cinnamalidine – 4 –methoxy aniline (SB4 and N-(cinnamalidine - 2-methylaniline (SB5 on mild steel in sulphuric acid solutions. Results show that both methods have good agreement with each other and inhibition efficiency depends upon the concentration of inhibitor as well as that of acid. Maximum inhibition efficiency is shown at highest concentration of Schiff's bases at the highest strength of acid.

  2. Influence of carbon source and inoculum type on anaerobic biomass adhesion on polyurethane foam in reactors fed with acid mine drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Renata P; Zaiat, Marcelo

    2011-04-01

    This paper analyzes the influence of carbon source and inoculum origin on the dynamics of biomass adhesion to an inert support in anaerobic reactors fed with acid mine drainage. Formic acid, lactic acid and ethanol were used as carbon sources. Two different inocula were evaluated: one taken from an UASB reactor and other from the sediment of a uranium mine. The values of average colonization rates and the maximum biomass concentration (C(max)) were inversely proportional to the number of carbon atoms in each substrate. The highest C(max) value (0.35 g TVS g(-1) foam) was observed with formic acid and anaerobic sludge as inoculum. Maximum colonization rates (v(max)) were strongly influenced by the type of inoculum when ethanol and lactic acid were used. For both carbon sources, the use of mine sediment as inoculum resulted in a v(max) of 0.013 g TVS g(-1) foam day(-1), whereas 0.024 g TVS g(-1) foam day(-1) was achieved with anaerobic sludge. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. An 11-bp insertion in Zea mays fatb reduces the palmitic acid content of fatty acids in maize grain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Li

    Full Text Available The ratio of saturated to unsaturated fatty acids in maize kernels strongly impacts human and livestock health, but is a complex trait that is difficult to select based on phenotype. Map-based cloning of quantitative trait loci (QTL is a powerful but time-consuming method for the dissection of complex traits. Here, we combine linkage and association analyses to fine map QTL-Pal9, a QTL influencing levels of palmitic acid, an important class of saturated fatty acid. QTL-Pal9 was mapped to a 90-kb region, in which we identified a candidate gene, Zea mays fatb (Zmfatb, which encodes acyl-ACP thioesterase. An 11-bp insertion in the last exon of Zmfatb decreases palmitic acid content and concentration, leading to an optimization of the ratio of saturated to unsaturated fatty acids while having no effect on total oil content. We used three-dimensional structure analysis to explain the functional mechanism of the ZmFATB protein and confirmed the proposed model in vitro and in vivo. We measured the genetic effect of the functional site in 15 different genetic backgrounds and found a maximum change of 4.57 mg/g palmitic acid content, which accounts for ∼20-60% of the variation in the ratio of saturated to unsaturated fatty acids. A PCR-based marker for QTL-Pal9 was developed for marker-assisted selection of nutritionally healthier maize lines. The method presented here provides a new, efficient way to clone QTL, and the cloned palmitic acid QTL sheds lights on the genetic mechanism of oil biosynthesis and targeted maize molecular breeding.

  4. An 11-bp Insertion in Zea mays fatb Reduces the Palmitic Acid Content of Fatty Acids in Maize Grain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Yang, Xiaohong; Zheng, Debo; Warburton, Marilyn; Chai, Yuchao; Zhang, Pan; Guo, Yuqiu; Yan, Jianbing; Li, Jiansheng

    2011-01-01

    The ratio of saturated to unsaturated fatty acids in maize kernels strongly impacts human and livestock health, but is a complex trait that is difficult to select based on phenotype. Map-based cloning of quantitative trait loci (QTL) is a powerful but time-consuming method for the dissection of complex traits. Here, we combine linkage and association analyses to fine map QTL-Pal9, a QTL influencing levels of palmitic acid, an important class of saturated fatty acid. QTL-Pal9 was mapped to a 90-kb region, in which we identified a candidate gene, Zea mays fatb (Zmfatb), which encodes acyl-ACP thioesterase. An 11-bp insertion in the last exon of Zmfatb decreases palmitic acid content and concentration, leading to an optimization of the ratio of saturated to unsaturated fatty acids while having no effect on total oil content. We used three-dimensional structure analysis to explain the functional mechanism of the ZmFATB protein and confirmed the proposed model in vitro and in vivo. We measured the genetic effect of the functional site in 15 different genetic backgrounds and found a maximum change of 4.57 mg/g palmitic acid content, which accounts for ∼20–60% of the variation in the ratio of saturated to unsaturated fatty acids. A PCR-based marker for QTL-Pal9 was developed for marker-assisted selection of nutritionally healthier maize lines. The method presented here provides a new, efficient way to clone QTL, and the cloned palmitic acid QTL sheds lights on the genetic mechanism of oil biosynthesis and targeted maize molecular breeding. PMID:21931818

  5. Chiral separation of dansyl amino acids in capillary electrophoresis using mono-(3-methyl-imidazolium)-beta-cyclodextrin chloride as selector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Weihua; Ong, Teng Teng; Ng, Siu-Choon

    2007-06-01

    Enantioseparations of fourteen dansyl amino acids were achieved by using a positively-charged single-isomer beta-cyclodextrin, mono-(3-methyl-imidazolium)-beta-cyclodextrin chloride, as a chiral selector. Separation parameters such as buffer pH, selector concentration, separation temperature, and organic modifier were investigated for the enantioseparation in order to achieve the maximum possible resolution. Chiral separation of dansyl amino acids was found to be highly dependent on pH since the degree of protonation of these amino acids can alter the strength of electrostatic interaction and/or inclusion complexation between each enantiomer and chiral selector. In general, the chiral resolution of dansyl amino acids was enhanced at higher pH, which indicates that the carboxylate group on the analytes may interact with the imidazolium group of cationic cyclodextrin. For most analytes, a distinct maximum in enantioresolution was obtained at pH 8.0. Moreover, the chiral separation can be further improved by careful tuning of the separation parameters such as higher selector concentration (e.g. 10 mM), lower temperature, and addition of methanol. Enantioseparation of a standard mixture of these dansyl amino acids was further achieved in a single run within 30 min.

  6. Maximum phytoplankton concentrations in the sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jackson, G.A.; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    A simplification of plankton dynamics using coagulation theory provides predictions of the maximum algal concentration sustainable in aquatic systems. These predictions have previously been tested successfully against results from iron fertilization experiments. We extend the test to data collect...

  7. Method Development for Efficient Incorporation of Unnatural Amino Acids

    KAUST Repository

    Harris, Paul D.

    2014-04-01

    The synthesis of proteins bearing unnatural amino acids has the potential to enhance and elucidate many processes in biochemistry and molecular biology. There are two primary methods for site specific unnatural amino acid incorporation, both of which use the cell’s native protein translating machinery: in vitro chemical acylation of suppressor tRNAs and the use of orthogonal amino acyl tRNA synthetases. Total chemical synthesis is theoretically possible, but current methods severely limit the maximum size of the product protein. In vivo orthogonal synthetase methods suffer from the high cost of the unnatural amino acid. In this thesis I sought to address this limitation by increasing cell density, first in shake flasks and then in a bioreactor in order to increase the yield of protein per amount of unnatural amino acid used. In a parallel project, I used the in vitro chemical acylation system to incorporate several unnatural amino acids, key among them the fluorophore BODIPYFL, with the aim of producing site specifically fluorescently labeled protein for single molecule FRET studies. I demonstrated successful incorporation of these amino acids into the trial protein GFP, although incorporation was not demonstrated in the final target, FEN1. This also served to confirm the effectiveness of a new procedure developed for chemical acylation.

  8. Method Development for Efficient Incorporation of Unnatural Amino Acids

    KAUST Repository

    Harris, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    The synthesis of proteins bearing unnatural amino acids has the potential to enhance and elucidate many processes in biochemistry and molecular biology. There are two primary methods for site specific unnatural amino acid incorporation, both of which use the cell’s native protein translating machinery: in vitro chemical acylation of suppressor tRNAs and the use of orthogonal amino acyl tRNA synthetases. Total chemical synthesis is theoretically possible, but current methods severely limit the maximum size of the product protein. In vivo orthogonal synthetase methods suffer from the high cost of the unnatural amino acid. In this thesis I sought to address this limitation by increasing cell density, first in shake flasks and then in a bioreactor in order to increase the yield of protein per amount of unnatural amino acid used. In a parallel project, I used the in vitro chemical acylation system to incorporate several unnatural amino acids, key among them the fluorophore BODIPYFL, with the aim of producing site specifically fluorescently labeled protein for single molecule FRET studies. I demonstrated successful incorporation of these amino acids into the trial protein GFP, although incorporation was not demonstrated in the final target, FEN1. This also served to confirm the effectiveness of a new procedure developed for chemical acylation.

  9. Kinetics of leather dyeing pretreated with enzymes: role of acid protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanth, Swarna Vinodh; Venba, Rajangam; Jayakumar, Gladstone Christopher; Chandrababu, Narasimhan Kannan

    2009-04-01

    In the present investigation, kinetics of dyeing involving pretreatment with acid protease has been presented. Application of acid protease in dyeing process resulted in increased absorption and diffusion of dye into the leather matrix. Enzyme treatment at 1% concentration, 60 min duration and 50 degrees C resulted in maximum of 98% dye exhaustion and increased absorption rate constants. The final exhaustion (C(infinity)) for the best fit of CI Acid Black 194 dye has been 98.5% with K and r2 values from the modified Cegarra-Puente isotherm as 0.1033 and 0.0631. CI Acid Black 194 being a 2:1 metal complex acid dye exhibited higher absorption rate than the acid dye CI Acid Black 210. A reduction in 50% activation energy calculated from Arrhenius equation has been observed in enzyme assisted dyeing process of both the dyes that substantiates enhanced dye absorption. The absorption rate constant calculated with modified Cegarra-Puente equation confirm higher rate constants and faster kinetics for enzyme assisted dyeing process. Enzyme treated leather exhibited richness of color and shade when compared with control. The present study substantiates the essential role of enzyme pretreatment as an eco-friendly leather dyeing process.

  10. On the Pontryagin maximum principle for systems with delays. Economic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, A. V.; Kormyshev, V. M.; Kwon, O. B.; Mukhametshin, E. R.

    2017-11-01

    The Pontryagin maximum principle [6] is the key stone of finite-dimensional optimal control theory [1, 2, 5]. So beginning with opening the maximum principle it was important to extend the maximum principle on various classes of dynamical systems. In t he paper we consider some aspects of application of i-smooth analysis [3, 4] in the theory of the Pontryagin maximum principle [6] for systems with delays, obtained results can be applied by elaborating optimal program controls in economic models with delays.

  11. Acid-regulated proteins induced by Streptococcus mutans and other oral bacteria during acid shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, I R; Svensäter, G

    1998-10-01

    Our previous research has demonstrated that with the more aciduric oral bacteria, an acid shock to sub-lethal pH values results in the induction of an acid tolerance response that protects the cells at extremely low pH (pH 3.0-4.0) that kills unadapted control cells maintained at pH 7.5 (Oral Microbiol Immunol 1997: 12: 266-273). In this study, we were interested in comparing the protein profiles of acid-shocked and control cells of nine organisms from three acid-ogenic genera that could be categorized as strong, weak and non-acid responders in an attempt to identify proteins that could be classified as acid-regulated proteins and which may be important in the process of survival at very low pH. For this, log-phase cultures were rapidly acidified from pH 7.5 to 5.5 in the presence of [14C]-amino acids for varying periods up to 2 h, the period previously shown to be required for maximum induction of the acid response. The cells were extracted for total protein and subjected to one-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide chromatography with comparable control and acid-shocked protein profiles compared by scanning and computer analysis. Of particular interest were the proteins in the acid-shocked cells that showed enhanced labeling (i.e., synthesis) over the control cells, since these were considered acid-regulated proteins of importance in pH homeostasis. Streptococcus mutans LT11 generated the most rapid and complex pattern: a total of 36 acid-regulated proteins showing enhanced synthesis, with 25 appearing within the first 30 min of acid shock. The enhanced synthesis was transient with all proteins, with the exception of two with molecular weights of 50/49 and 33/32 kDa. Within the acid-regulated proteins were proteins having molecular weights comparable to the heat shock proteins and the various subunits of the membrane H+/ATPase. By comparison, the strong responder, Lactobacillus casei 151, showed the enhanced formation of only nine proteins within the

  12. Lewis Acid-Base Properties of a Low Carbon Aluminium Killed Steel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An important factor in achieving maximum adhesion of a particular coating system to the substrate lies in the proper preparation of the substrate prior to the application of paint. The Lewis acid-base properties of the outer metal surface play a determinant role in many of these applications, and the chemical reactions involved ...

  13. Titrimetric application of 2-bromo-bis-1,10-phenanthroline-copper (II) bromide as a titrant in determination of ascorbic acid in pure form, fruits and vegetables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oladeji, O.

    2016-01-01

    Ascorbic acid is very important to man and the consumption has been linked to the prevention of degenerative diseases such as scurvy and serves as an antioxidants. There have been different approaches in the determination of ascorbic acid in fruits and vegetable. In recent times, new methods were introduced by scientists. Therefore, in order to prove the authenticity of these methods, the concentrations obtained were compared with the conventional methods. The results show that orange has maximum ascorbic acid content when compared to cashew and in vegetables Vermonia baldwinii has maximum and Solanium incanum has low ascorbic acid content. The amount of ascorbic acid determined by 2, 6-dichlorophenol-indophenol and copper (II) complex (2-bromo-bis-1, 10 phenanthroline-copper (II) bromide) are comparable.Therefore, 2-bromo-bis-1, 10-phenanthroline-copper (II) bromide can serve as a titrant in titrimetric determination of ascorbic acid in pure form, fruits and vegetables. (author)

  14. Rice Hull Ash and Silicic Acid as Adsorbents for Concentration of Bacteriocins†

    OpenAIRE

    Janes, M. E.; Nannapaneni, R.; Proctor, A.; Johnson, M. G.

    1998-01-01

    A model procedure has been developed for the rapid extraction of five bacteriocins (nisin, pediocin RS2, leucocin BC2, lactocin GI3, and enterocin CS1) from concentrated freeze-dried crude culture supernatants by adsorption onto acid or alkaline rice hull ash (RHA) or silicic acid (SA). Bacteriocins were adsorbed onto RHA or SA by a pH-dependent method and desorbed by decreasing the pH to 2.5 or 3.0 and heating at 90°C for 5 min. The maximum adsorption and optimal pH range for different bacte...

  15. Redox chemistry of o-and m-hydroxycinnamic acids: A pulse ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The transient absorption spectrum measured in the ∙ OH with -hydroxycinnamic acid exhibited an absorption maximum at 360 nm and in meta isomer the spectrum was blue-shifted (330 nm) with a shoulder at 390 nm. A peak at 420 nm was observed in the reaction of O ∙ − with the -isomer whereas the meta isomer has a ...

  16. Parametric optimization of thermoelectric elements footprint for maximum power generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rezania, A.; Rosendahl, Lasse; Yin, Hao

    2014-01-01

    The development studies in thermoelectric generator (TEG) systems are mostly disconnected to parametric optimization of the module components. In this study, optimum footprint ratio of n- and p-type thermoelectric (TE) elements is explored to achieve maximum power generation, maximum cost......-performance, and variation of efficiency in the uni-couple over a wide range of the heat transfer coefficient on the cold junction. The three-dimensional (3D) governing equations of the thermoelectricity and the heat transfer are solved using the finite element method (FEM) for temperature dependent properties of TE...... materials. The results, which are in good agreement with the previous computational studies, show that the maximum power generation and the maximum cost-performance in the module occur at An/Ap

  17. Coronary ligation reduces maximum sustained swimming speed in Chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farrell, A P; Steffensen, J F

    1987-01-01

    The maximum aerobic swimming speed of Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) was measured before and after ligation of the coronary artery. Coronary artery ligation prevented blood flow to the compact layer of the ventricular myocardium, which represents 30% of the ventricular mass, and produced...... a statistically significant 35.5% reduction in maximum swimming speed. We conclude that the coronary circulation is important for maximum aerobic swimming and implicit in this conclusion is that maximum cardiac performance is probably necessary for maximum aerobic swimming performance....

  18. In vitro thermal profile suitability assessment of acids and bases for thermochemical ablation: underlying principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Laura A; Anwer, Bilal; Brady, Ryan P; Smith, Benjamin C; Edelman, Theresa L; Misselt, Andrew J; Cressman, Erik N K

    2010-03-01

    To measure and compare temperature changes in a recently developed gel phantom for thermochemical ablation as a function of reagent strength and concentration with several acids and bases. Aliquots (0.5-1 mL) of hydrochloric acid or acetic acid and sodium hydroxide or aqueous ammonia were injected for 5 seconds into a hydrophobic gel phantom. Stepwise increments in concentration were used to survey the temperature changes caused by these reactions. Injections were performed in triplicate, measured with a thermocouple probe, and plotted as functions of concentration and time. Maximum temperatures were reached almost immediately in all cases, reaching 75 degrees C-110 degrees C at the higher concentrations. The highest temperatures were seen with hydrochloric acid and either base. More concentrated solutions of sodium hydroxide tended to mix incompletely, such that experiments at 9 M and higher were difficult to perform consistently. Higher concentrations for any reagent resulted in higher temperatures. Stronger acid and base combinations resulted in higher temperatures versus weak acid and base combinations at the same concentration. Maximum temperatures obtained are in a range known to cause tissue coagulation, and all combinations tested therefore appeared suitable for further investigation in thermochemical ablation. Because of the loss of the reaction chamber shape at higher concentrations of stronger agents, the phantom does not allow complete characterization under these circumstances. Adequate mixing of reagents to maximize heating potential and avoid systemic exposure to unreacted acid and base must be addressed if the method is to be safely employed in tissues. In addition, understanding factors that control lesion shape in a more realistic tissue model will be critical. Copyright 2010 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Mutant breeding of Aspergillus niger irradiated by 12C6+ for hyper citric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Wei; Li Wenjian; Chen Jihong; Liu Jing; Wang Shuyang; Wang Jufang; Lu Dong

    2014-01-01

    In this study, strains of Aspergillus niger No.4 for hyper citric acid were irradiated to different doses by 80 MeV/u 12 C 6+ ion beams. Seven mutant strains showed marked citric acid over-production records and faster productivity than initial Aspergillus niger No.4 by shaking flash fermentation. The maximum product yield was 132.8 gL -1 (the H4002 strain) being a 8.8% increase to the initial strain. The scale-up experiment was carried out in a 100 L bioreactor. The mutant H4002 can accumulate 187gL -1 product yield of citric acid from starch liquefying supernatant. The productivity of citric acid was 2.75 g L -1 h -1 . So, the mutant H4002 possesses rapid sugar katabolism for producing citric acid. Meanwhile, the pellet morphology kept compact and round during the whole submerged fermentation, which was suited to produce citric acid. The results indicate that mutant H4002 has potential ability to produce citric acid rapidly. (authors)

  20. Simultaneous acid exposure and erosive particle wear of thermoset coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Victor Buhl; Dam-Johansen, Kim; Frankær, Sarah Maria

    2018-01-01

    , similar to the erosion/corrosion-type phenomena found in metals. A vinyl ester-based coating was the most resistant to the simultaneous erosive/acidic exposure, with a maximum polishing rate of 3.24±0.61 μm/week, while novolac epoxy and polyurethane coatings showed high polishing rates of 11.7±1.50 and 13.4±0......Handling acidic chemicals is a challenge in the chemical industry, requiring a careful choice of contact material. Certain thermoset organic coatings are applicable in low pH environments, but when particulate erosion is also present the performance demand is increased. This is the case in, e...

  1. Excretion and intestinal absorption of tritiated glutamic acid by carp, Cyprinus Carpio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watabe, Terushia; Kistner, G.

    1986-01-01

    Excretion and intestinal absorption of tritiated glutamic acid by carp was investigated. Approximately 80% of orally administered tritium was excreted at a half life value of 1.4 h and an observed slower excretion of 7 days for the remainder. Tritium incorporated in glutamic acid was efficiently retained at the site of absorption, i.e. intestine, liver, gill, kidney, blood and muscle. A dual marking experiment using tritiated glutamic acid and 14 C-market glutamic acid showed higher excretion of tritium by factors 2.0 to 4.9 than that of 14 C. Tritiated glutamic acid is considered to be mainly incorporated in the citric acid cycle soon after administration and the release of tritium in tritiated water through the cycle is assumed as causing the initial rapid excretion of tritium in carp. The intestinal absorption of glutamic acid was likely to depend on its concentration in the administered solution. The maximum level of absorption is estimated to be 0.1 m mol/0.5 h for one year old carp. The results obtained here would make it possible to estimate the tritium contamination of fish due to tritiated glutamic acid entering the food chain. (orig.)

  2. Contribution of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and the glyoxylate shunt in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to succinic acid production during dough fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, Mohammad N; Aslankoohi, Elham; Verstrepen, Kevin J; Courtin, Christophe M

    2015-07-02

    Succinic acid produced by yeast during bread dough fermentation can significantly affect the rheological properties of the dough. By introducing mutations in the model S288C yeast strain, we show that the oxidative pathway of the TCA cycle and the glyoxylate shunt contribute significantly to succinic acid production during dough fermentation. More specifically, deletion of ACO1 and double deletion of ACO1 and ICL1 resulted in a 36 and 77% decrease in succinic acid levels in fermented dough, respectively. Similarly, double deletion of IDH1 and IDP1 decreased succinic acid production by 85%, while also affecting the fermentation rate. By contrast, double deletion of SDH1 and SDH2 resulted in a two-fold higher succinic acid accumulation compared to the wild-type. Deletion of fumarate reductase activity (FRD1 and OSM1) in the reductive pathway of the TCA cycle did not affect the fermentation rate and succinic acid production. The changes in the levels of succinic acid produced by mutants Δidh1Δidp1 (low level) and Δsdh1Δsdh2 (high level) in fermented dough only resulted in small pH differences, reflecting the buffering capacity of dough at a pH of around 5.1. Moreover, Rheofermentometer analysis using these mutants revealed no difference in maximum dough height and gas retention capacity with the dough prepared with S288C. The impact of the changed succinic acid profile on the organoleptic or antimicrobial properties of bread remains to be demonstrated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of bruxism on the maximum bite force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todić Jelena T.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Bruxism is a parafunctional activity of the masticatory system, which is characterized by clenching or grinding of teeth. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the presence of bruxism has impact on maximum bite force, with particular reference to the potential impact of gender on bite force values. Methods. This study included two groups of subjects: without and with bruxism. The presence of bruxism in the subjects was registered using a specific clinical questionnaire on bruxism and physical examination. The subjects from both groups were submitted to the procedure of measuring the maximum bite pressure and occlusal contact area using a single-sheet pressure-sensitive films (Fuji Prescale MS and HS Film. Maximal bite force was obtained by multiplying maximal bite pressure and occlusal contact area values. Results. The average values of maximal bite force were significantly higher in the subjects with bruxism compared to those without bruxism (p 0.01. Maximal bite force was significantly higher in the males compared to the females in all segments of the research. Conclusion. The presence of bruxism influences the increase in the maximum bite force as shown in this study. Gender is a significant determinant of bite force. Registration of maximum bite force can be used in diagnosing and analysing pathophysiological events during bruxism.

  4. Investigating the Acid Failure of Aluminium Alloy in 2 M Hydrochloric Acid Using Vernonia amygdalina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olugbenga A. Omotosho

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The acid failure of aluminium alloy in 2 M hydrochloric acid solution in the presence of Vernonia amygdalina extract was investigated using gasometric technique. Aluminium alloy coupons of dimension 4 cm by 1 cm were immersed in test solutions of free acid and also those containing extract volumes of 2, 3, 4 and 5 cm3 at ambient temperature for 30 minutes. The volumes of hydrogen gas evolved as a result of the rate of reaction were recorded and analyzed. Analysis revealed that maximum inhibitor efficiency which corresponds to the lowest corrosion rate was obtained at optimum inhibitor volumes of 5 cm3, with reduction in the corrosion rate observed to follow in order of increasing extract volumes. Adsorption study revealed that Temkin isotherm best described the metal surface interaction with the extract phytochemicals, with 12 minutes becoming the best exposure time for the phytochemicals to adsorb to the metal surface at all volumes. Statistical modelling of the corrosion rate yielded an important relationship suitable for estimating corrosion rate values once volumes of the extract is known. Microstructural studies, showed an indirect relationship between crack growth rates and extract volumes, while consistency of the irregular intermetallic phases increases with increasing extract volumes.

  5. Acumulación de hojarasca en un pastizal de Panicum maximum y en un sistema silvopastoril de Panicum maximum y Leucaena leucocephala Litter accumulation in a Panicum maximum grassland and in a silvopastoral system of Panicum maximum and Leucaena leucocephala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saray Sánchez

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó un estudio en la Estación Experimental de Pastos y Forrajes "Indio Hatuey", Matanzas, Cuba, con el objetivo de determinar la acumulación de la hojarasca en un pastizal de Panicum maximum Jacq cv. Likoni y en un sistema silvopastoril de Panicum maximum y Leucaena leucocephala (Lam de Wit cv. Cunningham. En los pastizales de P. maximum de ambos sistemas se determinó la acumulación de la hojarasca según la técnica propuesta por Bruce y Ebershon (1982, mientras que la hojarasca de L. leucocephala acumulada en el sistema silvopastoril se determinó según Santa Regina et al. (1997. De forma general, los resultados demostraron que en ambos pastizales la guinea acumuló una menor cantidad de hojarasca durante el período junio-diciembre, etapa en la que se produce su mayor desarrollo vegetativo. En la leucaena la mayor producción de hojarasca ocurrió en el período de diciembre a enero, asociada con la caída natural de sus hojas que se produce por efecto de las temperaturas más bajas y la escasa humedad en el suelo. En el sistema silvopastoril la hojarasca de leucaena representó el mayor porcentaje de peso dentro de la producción total, con un contenido más alto de nitrógeno y de calcio que el de la hojarasca del estrato herbáceo. En la guinea la lluvia fue el factor climático que mayor correlación negativa presentó con la producción de hojarasca en ambos sistemas, y en la leucaena la mayor correlación negativa se encontró con la temperatura mínima.A study was carried out at the Experimental Station of Pastures and Forages "Indio Hatuey", Matanzas, Cuba, with the objective of determining the litter accumulation in a pastureland of Panicum maximum Jacq cv. Likoni and in a silvopastoral system of Panicum maximum and Leucaena leucocephala (Lam de Wit cv. Cunningham. In the P. maximum pasturelands of both systems the litter accumulation was determined by means of the technique proposed by Bruce and Ebershon (1982, while

  6. Inhibition of corrosion of mild steel in acid media by N ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    It acts as an anodic inhibitor. Thermodynamic and ... Thermo Electron Corporation Flash EA 1112 se- ries CHN analyser was used .... tiss et al 2001). In each acid media, maximum %IE was achieved at 11⋅494 × 10–4 M and a further increase in concentration did not cause any appreciable change in the performance of the ...

  7. Effect of QMix, peracetic acid and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid on calcium loss and microhardness of root dentine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taneja, Sonali; Kumari, Manju; Anand, Surbhi

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this in vitro study was to assess the effect of different chelating agents on the calcium loss and its subsequent effect on the microhardness of the root dentin. Materials and Methods: Ten single rooted lower premolars were selected. The teeth were decoronated and thick transverse sections of 2 mm were obtained from the coronal third of the root. Each section was then divided into four quarters, each part constituting a sample specimen from the same tooth for each group. The treatment groups were: Group 1 (Control): 5% Sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) for 5 min + distilled water for 5 min; Group 2: 5% NaOCl for 5 min + 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) for 5 min; Group 3: 5% NaOCl for 5 min + 2.25% Peracetic acid (PAA) for 5 min and Group 4: 5% NaOCl for 5 min + QMix for 5 min respectively. The calcium loss of the samples was evaluated using the Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer followed by determination of their microhardness using Vickers Hardness Tester. Data was analyzed using one-way ANOVA, Post hoc Tukey test and Pearson correlation. Results: The maximum calcium loss and minimum microhardness was observed in Group 3 followed by Group 2, Group 4 and Group 1. There was a statistically significant difference between all the groups except between Groups 2 and 4. Conclusions: Irrigation with NaOCl + 2.25% PAA caused the maximum calcium loss from root dentin and reduced microhardness. A negative correlation existed between the calcium loss and reduction in the microhardness of root dentin. PMID:24778513

  8. Parameters determining maximum wind velocity in a tropical cyclone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choudhury, A.M.

    1984-09-01

    The spiral structure of a tropical cyclone was earlier explained by a tangential velocity distribution which varies inversely as the distance from the cyclone centre outside the circle of maximum wind speed. The case has been extended in the present paper by adding a radial velocity. It has been found that a suitable combination of radial and tangential velocities can account for the spiral structure of a cyclone. This enables parametrization of the cyclone. Finally a formula has been derived relating maximum velocity in a tropical cyclone with angular momentum, radius of maximum wind speed and the spiral angle. The shapes of the spirals have been computed for various spiral angles. (author)

  9. Exercise-induced maximum metabolic rate scaled to body mass by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Exercise-induced maximum metabolic rate scaled to body mass by the fractal ... rate scaling is that exercise-induced maximum aerobic metabolic rate (MMR) is ... muscle stress limitation, and maximized oxygen delivery and metabolic rates.

  10. Electron density distribution in Si and Ge using multipole, maximum ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Si and Ge has been studied using multipole, maximum entropy method (MEM) and ... and electron density distribution using the currently available versatile ..... data should be subjected to maximum possible utility for the characterization of.

  11. Effect of Zinc Sulfate and Ascorbic Acid on some Morpho-Physiological Traits of Echinacea purpurea (Purple coneflower under Water Deficit Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Farahvash

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available To quantify the response of some morpho-physiological traits of Echinacea purpurea to thr application of zinc sulfate and ascorbic acid under water deficit, an experiment was carried out in split plot factorial based on RCBD with three replications at the Agricultural Research Station of Islamic Azad University, Tabriz Branch in 2011-12. Experimental factors consisted of water stress as the main factor with three levels (irrigation after70mm evaporation, irrigation after120mm evaporation and irrigation after 170mm evaporation from class A pan, Secondary factor consisted of: application of microelement with two levels (control and application of zinc sulfate 0.005 concentration and ascorbic acid with four levels (not application, application of 50 mg/l of ascorbic acid, application of 100 mg/l of ascorbic acid and application of 150 mg/l of ascorbic acid. The results showed that the effect of water deficit on purple coneflower caused significant differences in diameter of stem, number of flowering branch, stomata density, zinc concentration of aerial parts plant, fresh weight, relative water content of leaf, LAI, proline concentration, crop growth rate, relative growth rate and net assimilation rate. Comparison of means for water deficits between the different levels of drought stress showed that the maximum LAI, with 2.85, belonged to control. Comparison of means for interaction effects between drought stress and application of zinc sulfate revealed that the maximum proline concentration belonged to spraying plants with zinc sulfate at irrigation after 170mm evaporation from class A pan with 10.16 mg/g.fw. Minimum proline concentration was due to without applying zinc sulfate in complete irrigation (control with 0.08 mg/g.fw. Maximum crop growth rate with 6.77 g/m2.day was was related to control and the minimum, with 4.16 g/m2.day, to irrigation after 170mm. Maximum relative crop growth rate, with 0.19 g/m2.day, belonged to control and the

  12. The maximum-entropy method in superspace

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    van Smaalen, S.; Palatinus, Lukáš; Schneider, M.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 59, - (2003), s. 459-469 ISSN 0108-7673 Grant - others:DFG(DE) XX Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : maximum-entropy method, * aperiodic crystals * electron density Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.558, year: 2003

  13. Maximum-entropy clustering algorithm and its global convergence analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Constructing a batch of differentiable entropy functions touniformly approximate an objective function by means of the maximum-entropy principle, a new clustering algorithm, called maximum-entropy clustering algorithm, is proposed based on optimization theory. This algorithm is a soft generalization of the hard C-means algorithm and possesses global convergence. Its relations with other clustering algorithms are discussed.

  14. Calorimetric determination of enthalpies for the proton ionization of N,N-bis[2-hydroxyethyl]-2-aminoethanesulfonic acid (BES) and N-tris[hydroxymethyl]methyl-2-aminoethanesulfonic acid (TES) in water-methanol mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulos, B.N.; Jumean, F.H

    2004-02-19

    The enthalpies of proton ionization of the biochemical buffers N,N-bis[2-hydroxyethyl]-2-aminoethanesulfonic acid (BES) and N-tris[hydroxymethyl]methyl-2-aminoethanesulfonic acid (TES) were obtained in water-methanol mixtures in which the methanol mole fraction (X{sub m}) varied in the range 0-0.36. For both buffers, ionization enthalpy for the first proton ({delta}H{sub 1}) was small in all solvent media. However, upon addition of methanol, {delta}H{sub 2} increased steadily from 22.2 to a maximum of 27.2 kJ mol{sup -1} for BES, whereas for TES it varied from 30.0 to 32.4, with a minimum of 28.6 kJ mol{sup -1} at X{sub m}=0.123. It is noteworthy that this solvent composition lies within the region of maximum structure enhancement of water by methanol. The results were interpreted in terms of methanol-water interactions.

  15. Growth of aspergillus terreus and the production of itaconic acid in batch and continuous cultures. The influence of pH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rychtera, M.; Wase, J.D.A.

    1981-01-01

    Aspergillus terreus (NRRL 1960) was cultivated in batch and in continuous single-stage culture. The influence of pH on the growth of the organism, on the formation of itaconic acid and on the kinetics of fermentation was studied under phosphate limitation, both at controlled ph values and also when the pH was allowed to decrease in a natural way. In the pH range 1.7-3.5, the ratio of undissociated:half-dissociated acid varied from 190:1 to 1.5:1. The amount of completely dissociated acid may be regarded as negligible. In batch systems operated without pH control, an initial pH of 3.1 proved to be the most effective. Product formation under such conditions started at a point where the exponential growth phase commenced and was described by a zero-order equation. The maximum itaconic acid production rate was shifted behind maximum growth rate. The continuous single-stage system was first order with respect to product formation. At pH greater than 3.1, a number of aberrant and pellet forms of the mould occurred, resulting in decreased acid production. (Refs. 41).

  16. Thermochemical pretreatments for enhancing succinic acid production from industrial hemp (Cannabis sativa L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunnarsson, Ingólfur Bragi; Kuglarz, Mariusz; Karakashev, Dimitar Borisov

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an efficient thermochemical method for treatment of industrial hemp biomass, in order to increase its bioconversion to succinic acid. Industrial hemp was subjected to various thermochemical pretreatments using 0-3% H2SO4, NaOH or H2O2 at 121-180°C prior...... to enzymatic hydrolysis. The influence of the different pretreatments on hydrolysis and succinic acid production by Actinobacillus succinogenes 130Z was investigated in batch mode, using anaerobic bottles and bioreactors. Enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation of hemp material pretreated with 3% H2O2 resulted...... in the highest overall sugar yield (73.5%), maximum succinic acid titer (21.9gL-1), as well as the highest succinic acid yield (83%). Results obtained clearly demonstrated the impact of different pretreatments on the bioconversion efficiency of industrial hemp into succinic acid....

  17. Application of alkaline waterflooding to a high acidity crude oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sayyouh, M.H. (King Sand Univ., Riyadh (SA). Petroleum Engineering Dept.); Abdel-Waly, A.; Osman, A. (Cairo Univ. (EG). Petroleum Engineering Dept.); Awara, A.Z. (Geisum Oil Company, Cairo (EG))

    The enhanced recovery of a high acidity crude oil (South Geisum crude) by alkaline solutions is studied. Acidity, interfacial tension, and contact angle, were investigated. Displacement tests were carried out to study the effect of alkaline slug concentration, slug size, oil alkali type, temperature and viscosity on recovery. The interfacial tension between crude oil and formation water decreases with increasing alkaline concentration until a minimum, after which it increases again. Contact angle measurements indicated oil-wetting conditions that increase by the addition of alkaline solutions. At the early stages of displacement, oil recovery increases with increasing alkaline concentration until a maximum at 4% by weight NaOH concentration. Also, at such early stages, an excessive increase in alkaline concentration results in lower oil recovery. On the other hand, after the injection of many pore volumes of water, oil recovery is almost the same regardless of the alkaline concentration. Oil recovery increases with increasing alkaline slug size until a maximum at 15% PV. Sodium hydroxide slugs produce more oil recovery than sodium carbonate slugs. Oil recovery increases with increasing temperature (from 25 to 55{sup 0}C) and decreasing oil viscosity.

  18. Solvent extraction of titanium (IV) from sulphuric acid media by cyanex 921 and tri-butylphosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nayl, A.A.; Aly, H.F.

    2009-01-01

    titanium and its compounds found different useful applications in the nuclear and radioactive waste treatment fields. extraction behavior of titanium (IV) from sulfuric acid by commercial tri-octylphosphine oxide (CYANEX 921) and tributylphosphate (TBP)has been investigated. effects of contact time, sulfuric acid concentration in the aqueous phase, the extractants concentration in the organic phase, and the temperature on the extraction of titanium by the two systems were studied. it is found that extraction equilibrium of titanium is reached after 10-15 min and 4 min for CYANEX 921 and TBP, respectively . the extraction of Ti(IV) by 0.15 M CYANEX 921 in kerosene increases with the increase in sulfuric acid concentration to reach a maximum extraction of 91% at 7.0 m acid concentration. for the TBP system, the maximum extraction of titanium was 79% using 1.0 M TBP in kerosene from 4.0 m H 2 SO 4 solution . the effect of temperature was also evaluated. Na 2 CO 3 was used as a good stripping agent compared with other reagents. the interaction of Ti(IV) in sulfate medium and different sulfate species in sulfuric acid are reviewed. within the literature survey together with analysis of the extraction results , it can be concluded that titanium extracted by CYANEX 921 as Ti O (HSO 4 ) 2 .2 CYANEX 921 whereby in case of TBP, the extracted species is TiOSO 4 .2 TBP

  19. Crosslinking of agarose bioplastic using citric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awadhiya, Ankur; Kumar, David; Verma, Vivek

    2016-10-20

    We report chemical crosslinking of agarose bioplastic using citric acid. Crosslinking was confirmed using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The effects of crosslinking on the tensile strength, swelling, thermal stability, and degradability of the bioplastic were studied in detail. The tensile strength of the bioplastic films increased from 25.1MPa for control films up to a maximum of 52.7MPa for citric acid crosslinked films. At 37°C, the amount of water absorbed by crosslinked agarose bioplastic was only 11.5% of the amount absorbed by non-crosslinked controls. Thermogravimetric results showed that the crosslinked samples retain greater mass at high temperature (>450°C) than control samples. Moreover, while the crosslinked films were completely degradable, the rate of degradation was lower compared to non-crosslinked controls. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. maximum neutron flux at thermal nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strugar, P.

    1968-10-01

    Since actual research reactors are technically complicated and expensive facilities it is important to achieve savings by appropriate reactor lattice configurations. There is a number of papers, and practical examples of reactors with central reflector, dealing with spatial distribution of fuel elements which would result in higher neutron flux. Common disadvantage of all the solutions is that the choice of best solution is done starting from the anticipated spatial distributions of fuel elements. The weakness of these approaches is lack of defined optimization criteria. Direct approach is defined as follows: determine the spatial distribution of fuel concentration starting from the condition of maximum neutron flux by fulfilling the thermal constraints. Thus the problem of determining the maximum neutron flux is solving a variational problem which is beyond the possibilities of classical variational calculation. This variational problem has been successfully solved by applying the maximum principle of Pontrjagin. Optimum distribution of fuel concentration was obtained in explicit analytical form. Thus, spatial distribution of the neutron flux and critical dimensions of quite complex reactor system are calculated in a relatively simple way. In addition to the fact that the results are innovative this approach is interesting because of the optimization procedure itself [sr

  1. 5 CFR 534.203 - Maximum stipends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... maximum stipend established under this section. (e) A trainee at a non-Federal hospital, clinic, or medical or dental laboratory who is assigned to a Federal hospital, clinic, or medical or dental... Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PAY UNDER OTHER SYSTEMS Student...

  2. Influence of maximum bite force on jaw movement during gummy jelly mastication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuninori, T; Tomonari, H; Uehara, S; Kitashima, F; Yagi, T; Miyawaki, S

    2014-05-01

    It is known that maximum bite force has various influences on chewing function; however, there have not been studies in which the relationships between maximum bite force and masticatory jaw movement have been clarified. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of maximum bite force on masticatory jaw movement in subjects with normal occlusion. Thirty young adults (22 men and 8 women; mean age, 22.6 years) with good occlusion were divided into two groups based on whether they had a relatively high or low maximum bite force according to the median. The maximum bite force was determined according to the Dental Prescale System using pressure-sensitive sheets. Jaw movement during mastication of hard gummy jelly (each 5.5 g) on the preferred chewing side was recorded using a six degrees of freedom jaw movement recording system. The motion of the lower incisal point of the mandible was computed, and the mean values of 10 cycles (cycles 2-11) were calculated. A masticatory performance test was conducted using gummy jelly. Subjects with a lower maximum bite force showed increased maximum lateral amplitude, closing distance, width and closing angle; wider masticatory jaw movement; and significantly lower masticatory performance. However, no differences in the maximum vertical or maximum anteroposterior amplitudes were observed between the groups. Although other factors, such as individual morphology, may influence masticatory jaw movement, our results suggest that subjects with a lower maximum bite force show increased lateral jaw motion during mastication. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Maximum parsimony on subsets of taxa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Mareike; Thatte, Bhalchandra D

    2009-09-21

    In this paper we investigate mathematical questions concerning the reliability (reconstruction accuracy) of Fitch's maximum parsimony algorithm for reconstructing the ancestral state given a phylogenetic tree and a character. In particular, we consider the question whether the maximum parsimony method applied to a subset of taxa can reconstruct the ancestral state of the root more accurately than when applied to all taxa, and we give an example showing that this indeed is possible. A surprising feature of our example is that ignoring a taxon closer to the root improves the reliability of the method. On the other hand, in the case of the two-state symmetric substitution model, we answer affirmatively a conjecture of Li, Steel and Zhang which states that under a molecular clock the probability that the state at a single taxon is a correct guess of the ancestral state is a lower bound on the reconstruction accuracy of Fitch's method applied to all taxa.

  4. Production of Itaconic Acid from Jatropha curcas Seed Cake by Aspergillus terreus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amina M. AHMED EL-IMAM

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Submerged substrate fermentation of Jatropha seed cake, a by-product of oil extraction from Jatropha curcas seed was carried out using Aspergillus terreus for the production of itaconic acid. The Jatropha seed cake was initially converted into fermentable sugars by dilute acid hydrolysis using 50% sulphuric acid. The rate of hydrolysis was 1.04 gL-1. The fermentation process was carried out at room temperature, agitation of 400 rpm and three physico-chemical parameters (pH, inoculum size and substrate concentration were varied. Itaconic acid and glucose assays were carried out by spectrophotometry and Dinitrosalicylic acid methods respectively daily. Maximum yield of itaconic acid was 48.70 gL-1 at 5 ml of inoculum size, 50 g substrate concentration and pH 1.5. The residual glucose concentration increased for the first two days of fermentation after which it began to decrease as the itaconic acid concentration increased. The least concentration of itaconic acid observed was 6.00 gL-1, obtained after 24 hours of fermentation with 4 ml inoculum size, 50 g substrate concentration and at pH 1.5. The findings of this work indicate that Jatropha curcas seed cake is a suitable substrate for itaconic acid production.

  5. Excess molar enthalpies of binary systems containing 2-octanone, hexanoic acid, or octanoic acid at T = 298.15 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, Wei-Chen; Lin, Ho-mu; Lee, Ming-Jer

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: → An isothermal titration calorimeter was used for enthalpy data measurement. → The investigated binary systems contain 2-octanone, hexanoic acid, or octanoic acid. → The excess enthalpies are all positive except for mixtures containing DMSO and DMF. → The Peng-Robinson equation with two parameters yielded the best representation. - Abstract: An isothermal titration calorimeter was used to measure the excess molar enthalpies (H E ) of six binary systems at T = 298.15 K under atmospheric pressure. The systems investigated include (1-hexanol + 2-octanone), (1-octanol + 2-octanone), (1-hexanol + octanoic acid), (1-hexanol + hexanoic acid), {N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) + hexanoic acid}, and {dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) + hexanoic acid}. The values of excess molar enthalpies are all positive except for the DMSO- and the DMF-containing systems. In the 1-hexanol with hexanoic acid or octanoic acid systems, the maximum values of H E are located around the mole fraction of 0.4 of 1-hexanol, but the H E vary nearly symmetrically with composition for other four systems. In addition to the modified Redlich-Kister and the NRTL models, the Peng-Robinson (PR) and the Patel-Teja (PT) equations of state were used to correlate the excess molar enthalpy data. The modified Redlich-Kister equation correlates the H E data to within about experimental uncertainty. The calculated results from the PR and the PT are comparable. It is indicated that the overall average absolute relative deviations (AARD) of the excess enthalpy calculations are reduced from 18.8% and 18.8% to 6.6% and 7.0%, respectively, as the second adjustable binary interaction parameter, k bij , is added in the PR and the PT equations. Also, the NRTL model correlates the H E data to an overall AARD of 10.8% by using two adjustable model parameters.

  6. Prediction of protein modification sites of pyrrolidone carboxylic acid using mRMR feature selection and analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu-Lu Zheng

    Full Text Available Pyrrolidone carboxylic acid (PCA is formed during a common post-translational modification (PTM of extracellular and multi-pass membrane proteins. In this study, we developed a new predictor to predict the modification sites of PCA based on maximum relevance minimum redundancy (mRMR and incremental feature selection (IFS. We incorporated 727 features that belonged to 7 kinds of protein properties to predict the modification sites, including sequence conservation, residual disorder, amino acid factor, secondary structure and solvent accessibility, gain/loss of amino acid during evolution, propensity of amino acid to be conserved at protein-protein interface and protein surface, and deviation of side chain carbon atom number. Among these 727 features, 244 features were selected by mRMR and IFS as the optimized features for the prediction, with which the prediction model achieved a maximum of MCC of 0.7812. Feature analysis showed that all feature types contributed to the modification process. Further site-specific feature analysis showed that the features derived from PCA's surrounding sites contributed more to the determination of PCA sites than other sites. The detailed feature analysis in this paper might provide important clues for understanding the mechanism of the PCA formation and guide relevant experimental validations.

  7. Influence of phytic acid concentration on performance of phytic acid conversion coatings on the AZ91D magnesium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Xiufang; Li Ying; Li Qingfen; Jin Guo; Ding Minghui; Wang Fuhui

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the phytic acid conversion coating, a new environmentally friendly chemical protective coating for magnesium alloys, was prepared. The influences of phytic acid concentration on the formation process, microstructure, chemical state and corrosion resistance of the conversion coatings on AZ91D magnesium alloy were investigated by means of weight gain measurement, field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, potentiodynamic polarization method and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), respectively. And the depth profile of all elements in the optimal conversion coatings was analyzed by auger electron spectroscopy (AES). The results show that the growth, microstructure, chemical state and corrosion resistance of the conversion coatings are all obviously affected by the phytic acid concentration. The concentration of 5 g l -1 corresponds to the maximum weight gain. The main elements of the coating are Mg, Al, O, P, and C, which are distributed gradually in depth. The functional groups of conversion coatings formed in higher concentration phytic acid solution are closer to the constituent of phytic acid than those formed in lower concentration phytic acid solution. The coatings formed in 1-5 g l -1 are integrated and uniform. However, those formed in 20-50 g l -1 have some micro-cracks on the α phase. The coating formed in 5 g l -1 has the best corrosion resistance, whose open circuit current density decreases about six orders than that of the untreated sample, although the coatings deposited in 1-20 g l -1 can all improve the corrosion resistance of AZ91D

  8. Physico-chemical characterisation of the fat from red-skin rambutan (Nephellium lappaceum L.) seed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manaf, Yanty Noorziana Abdul; Marikkar, Jalaldeen Mohammed Nazrim; Long, Kamariah; Ghazali, Hasanah Mohd

    2013-01-01

    The seeds (6.9±0.2% by weight of fruit) of the red-skin rambutan (Nephelium lappaceum L.) contain a considerable amount of crude fat (38.0±4.36%) and thus, the aim of the study was to determine the physico-chemical properties of this fat for potential applications. The iodine and saponification values, and unsaponifiable matter and free fatty acid contents of the seed fat were 50.27 g I2/100g fat, 182.1 mg KOH/g fat, 0.8% and 2.1%, respectively. The fat is pale yellow with a Lovibond color index of 3.1Y+1.1R. The fatty acid profile indicates an almost equal proportion of saturated (49.1%) and unsaturated (50.9%) fatty acids, where oleic (42.0%) and arachidic (34.3%) acids were the most dominant fatty acids. It also contained small amounts of stearic (8.0%), palmitic (4.6%), gadoleic (5.9%), linoleic (2.2%), behenic (2.1%) palmitoleic (0.7%) myristic (0.1%) and erucic (0.1%) acids. HPLC analysis showed that the fat comprised mainly unknown triacylglycerols (TAG) with high retention times indicating they have higher carbon numbers compared with many vegetable oils. The fat has melting and cooling points of 44.2°C and -42.5°C, respectively, making it a semi-solid at room temperature. The solid content at 0°C was 53.5% and the fat melted completely at 40°C. z-Nose analysis showed that the presence of high levels of volatile compounds in red-skin rambutan seed and seed fat.

  9. A maximum likelihood framework for protein design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Hervé

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of protein design is to predict amino-acid sequences compatible with a given target structure. Traditionally envisioned as a purely thermodynamic question, this problem can also be understood in a wider context, where additional constraints are captured by learning the sequence patterns displayed by natural proteins of known conformation. In this latter perspective, however, we still need a theoretical formalization of the question, leading to general and efficient learning methods, and allowing for the selection of fast and accurate objective functions quantifying sequence/structure compatibility. Results We propose a formulation of the protein design problem in terms of model-based statistical inference. Our framework uses the maximum likelihood principle to optimize the unknown parameters of a statistical potential, which we call an inverse potential to contrast with classical potentials used for structure prediction. We propose an implementation based on Markov chain Monte Carlo, in which the likelihood is maximized by gradient descent and is numerically estimated by thermodynamic integration. The fit of the models is evaluated by cross-validation. We apply this to a simple pairwise contact potential, supplemented with a solvent-accessibility term, and show that the resulting models have a better predictive power than currently available pairwise potentials. Furthermore, the model comparison method presented here allows one to measure the relative contribution of each component of the potential, and to choose the optimal number of accessibility classes, which turns out to be much higher than classically considered. Conclusion Altogether, this reformulation makes it possible to test a wide diversity of models, using different forms of potentials, or accounting for other factors than just the constraint of thermodynamic stability. Ultimately, such model-based statistical analyses may help to understand the forces

  10. Maximum length scale in density based topology optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazarov, Boyan Stefanov; Wang, Fengwen

    2017-01-01

    The focus of this work is on two new techniques for imposing maximum length scale in topology optimization. Restrictions on the maximum length scale provide designers with full control over the optimized structure and open possibilities to tailor the optimized design for broader range...... of manufacturing processes by fulfilling the associated technological constraints. One of the proposed methods is based on combination of several filters and builds on top of the classical density filtering which can be viewed as a low pass filter applied to the design parametrization. The main idea...

  11. Perfluorinated alkylated acids in groundwater and drinking water: identification, origin and mobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschauzier, Christian; Raat, Klaasjan J; Stuyfzand, Pieter J; De Voogt, Pim

    2013-08-01

    Human exposure to perfluorinated alkylated acids (PFAA) occurs primarily via the dietary intake and drinking water can contribute significantly to the overall PFAA intake. Drinking water is produced from surface water and groundwater. Waste water treatment plants have been identified as the main source for PFAA in surface waters and corresponding drinking water. However, even though groundwater is an important source for drinking water production, PFAA sources remain largely uncertain. In this paper, we identified different direct and indirect sources of PFAA to groundwater within the catchment area of a public supply well field (PSWF) in The Netherlands. Direct sources were landfill leachate and water draining from a nearby military base/urban area. Indirect sources were infiltrated rainwater. Maximum concentrations encountered in groundwater within the landfill leachate plume were 1.8 μg/L of non branched perfluorooctanoic acid (L-PFOA) and 1.2 μg/L of perfluorobutanoic acid (PFBA). Sum concentrations amounted to 4.4 μg/L total PFAA. The maximum concentration of ΣPFAA in the groundwater originating from the military camp was around 17 ng/L. Maximum concentrations measured in the groundwater halfway the landfill and the PWSF (15 years travel distance) were 29 and 160 ng/L for L-PFOA and PFBA, respectively. Concentrations in the groundwater pumping wells (travel distance >25 years) were much lower: 0.96 and 3.5 ng/L for L-PFOA and PFBA, respectively. The chemical signature of these pumping wells corresponded to the signature encountered in other wells sampled which were fed by water that had not been in contact with potential contaminant sources, suggesting a widespread diffuse contamination from atmospheric deposition. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Maximum Water Hammer Sensitivity Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Jalil Emadi; Abbas Solemani

    2011-01-01

    Pressure waves and Water Hammer occur in a pumping system when valves are closed or opened suddenly or in the case of sudden failure of pumps. Determination of maximum water hammer is considered one of the most important technical and economical items of which engineers and designers of pumping stations and conveyance pipelines should take care. Hammer Software is a recent application used to simulate water hammer. The present study focuses on determining significance of ...

  13. Acid phosphatases in seeds and developing of squash (Cucurbita ficifolia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Lorenc-Kubis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Changes in protein content and acid phosphatase activity were followed during germination (imbition through seedlings development in extracts from cotyledons of squash (Cucurbita ficifolia. It has been shown that the activity of acid phosphatase was initially low and than increased to a maximum after 6 days of imbition. Acid phosphates were isolated from cotyledons of seeds and from 6-, 10- and 22-days old seedlings by extraction the proteins with 0.1 M acetate buffer pH 5.1, precipitation with ethanol and by affinity chromatography on con A-Sepharose. Two glycoprotein enzymes AcPase Ba and AcPase Bb which differ in their affinity to immobilized con A were obtained. Both acid phosphatates retained the enzyme activity after binding to free con A. Rocket affinity electrophoresis of AcPase Ba and AcPase Bb, isolated from cotyledons of seeds and seedlings, revealed differences in their ability to bind to con A during seeds germination and seedling develop-ment indicating changes in their sugar component. Con A was found to activate both enzymes. The enzymes cross-reacted with monospecific antibodies raised against grass seed acid phosphatate Ba indicating an antigenic relationship between squash and grass acid phosphatases.

  14. PTree: pattern-based, stochastic search for maximum parsimony phylogenies

    OpenAIRE

    Gregor, Ivan; Steinbr?ck, Lars; McHardy, Alice C.

    2013-01-01

    Phylogenetic reconstruction is vital to analyzing the evolutionary relationship of genes within and across populations of different species. Nowadays, with next generation sequencing technologies producing sets comprising thousands of sequences, robust identification of the tree topology, which is optimal according to standard criteria such as maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood or posterior probability, with phylogenetic inference methods is a computationally very demanding task. Here, we ...

  15. Redox potentials and kinetics of the Ce 3+/Ce 4+ redox reaction and solubility of cerium sulfates in sulfuric acid solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulenova, A.; Creager, S. E.; Navratil, J. D.; Wei, Y.

    Experimental work was performed with the aim of evaluating the Ce 4+/Ce 3+ redox couple in sulfuric acid electrolyte for use in redox flow battery (RFB) technology. The solubility of cerium sulfates in 0.1-4.0 M sulfuric acid at 20-60 °C was studied. A synergistic effect of both sulfuric acid concentration and temperature on the solubility of cerous sulfate was observed. The solubility of cerous sulfate significantly decreased with rising concentration of sulfuric acid and rising temperature, while the solubility of ceric sulfate goes through a significant maximum at 40 °C. Redox potentials and the kinetics of the cerous/ceric redox reaction were also studied under the same temperature-concentration conditions. The redox potentials were measured using the combined redox electrode (Pt-Ag/AgCl) in equimolar Ce 4+/Ce 3+ solutions (i.e.[Ce 3+]=[Ce 4+]) in sulfuric acid electrolyte. The Ce 3+/Ce 4+ redox potentials significantly decrease (i.e. shift to more negative values) with rising sulfuric acid concentration; a small maximum is observed at 40 °C. Cyclic voltammetric experiments confirmed slow electrochemical kinetics of the Ce 3+/Ce 4+ redox reaction on carbon glassy electrodes (CGEs) in sulfuric acid solutions. The observed dependencies of solubilities, the redox potentials and the kinetics of Ce 3+/Ce 4+ redox reaction on sulfuric acid concentration are thought to be the result of inequivalent complexation of the two redox species by sulfate anions: the ceric ion is much more strongly bound to sulfate than is the cerous ion. The best temperature-concentration conditions for the RFB electrolytes appear to be 40 °C and 1 M sulfuric acid, where the relatively good solubility of both cerium species, the maximum of redox potentials, and the more or less satisfying stability of CGE s were found. Even so, the relatively low solubility of cerium salts in sulfuric acid media and slow redox kinetics of the Ce 3+/Ce 4+ redox reaction at carbon indicate that the Ce 3+/Ce

  16. Diel production and microheterotrophic utilization of dissolved free amino acids in waters off southern California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlucci, A.F.; Craven, D.B.; Henrichs, S.M.

    1984-01-01

    Diel patterns of dissolved free amino acid (DFAA) concentration and microheterotrophic utilization were examined in the spring and fall of 1981 in euphotic waters from the base of the mixed layer off the southern California coast. The average depths of the isotherms sampled were 19.2 m for spring and 9.0 for fall. Total DFAA levels were generally higher in the spring than in the fall, 18 to 66 nM and 14 to 20 nM, respectively. Two daily concentration maxima and minima were observed for total DFAAs as well as for most individual DFAAs. Maxima were usually measured in the mid-dark period and in the early afternoon; minima were typically observed in early morning and late afternoon. Bacterial cell numbers reached maximal values near midnight in both seasons. The increases coincided with one of the total DFAA maxima. The second total DFAA maximum occurred in early to midafternoon, during the time of maximum photosynthetic carbon production and rapid dissolved amino acid utilization. Microbial metabolism (incorporation plus respiration) of selected 3 H-amino acids was 2.7 to 4.1 times greater during the daylight hours. DFAA turnover times, based on these metabolic measurements, ranged between 11 and 36 h for the amino acids tested, and rates were 1.7 to 3.7 times faster in the daylight hours than at night. DFAA distributions were related to primary production and chlorophyll a concentrations. Amino acids were estimated to represent 9 to 45% of the total phytoplankton exudate. Microheterotrophic utilization or production of total protein amino acids was estimated as 3.6 μg of C liter -1 day -1 in spring and 1.9 μg of C liter -1 day -1 in the fall. Assimilation efficiency for dissolved amino acids averaged 65% for marine microheterotrophs

  17. High-efficiency removal of phytic acid in soy meal using two-stage temperature-induced Aspergillus oryzae solid-state fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liyan; Vadlani, Praveen V; Madl, Ronald L

    2014-01-15

    Phytic acid of soy meal (SM) could influence protein and important mineral digestion of monogastric animals. Aspergillus oryzae (ATCC 9362) solid-state fermentation was applied to degrade phytic acid in SM. Two-stage temperature fermentation protocol was investigated to increase the degradation rate. The first stage was to maximize phytase production and the second stage was to realize the maximum enzymatic degradation. In the first stage, a combination of 41% moisture, a temperature of 37 °C and inoculum size of 1.7 mL in 5 g substrate (dry matter basis) favored maximum phytase production, yielding phytase activity of 58.7 U, optimized via central composite design. By the end of second-stage fermentation, 57% phytic acid was degraded from SM fermented at 50 °C, compared with 39% of that fermented at 37 °C. The nutritional profile of fermented SM was also studied. Oligosaccharides were totally removed after fermentation and 67% of total non-reducing polysaccharides were decreased. Protein content increased by 9.5%. Two-stage temperature protocol achieved better phytic acid degradation during A. oryzae solid state fermentation. The fermented SM has lower antinutritional factors (phytic acid, oligosaccharides and non-reducing polysaccharides) and higher nutritional value for animal feed. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. Upgrading of citric acid production from cheap carbohydrate sources as affected by aspergillus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elbatal, A.I.; Khalaf, S.A.; Khalil, A.H.

    1995-01-01

    Five strains of aspergillus niger (EMCC 102, EMCC 104, EMCC 111, EMCC 132 and EMCC 147) were for citric acid production at different incubation period using different cheap carbohydrate substrates, such as beet, cane and citrus molasses and milk whey. A. niger EMCC 111 was found to be the most potent strain for citric acid production from beet molasses after 11 days of incubation at 30 degree. The studies concerning molasses concentration and nitrogen sources (inorganic and organic sources with different concentration, revealed that 30 g% beet molasses and ammonium sulfate with 0.05 g% as N 2 content, gave the highest production of citric acid. Gamma irradiated inocula of A. niger EMCC 111 at doses (0.05-0.8 KGy), showed that the dose 0.4 KGy was the optimum for maximum citric acid production. 8 tabs

  19. The maximum significant wave height in the Southern North Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouws, E.; Tolman, H.L.; Holthuijsen, L.H.; Eldeberky, Y.; Booij, N.; Ferier, P.

    1995-01-01

    The maximum possible wave conditions along the Dutch coast, which seem to be dominated by the limited water depth, have been estimated in the present study with numerical simulations. Discussions with meteorologists suggest that the maximum possible sustained wind speed in North Sea conditions is

  20. Thermochemical pretreatments for enhancing succinic acid production from industrial hemp (Cannabis sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnarsson, Ingólfur B; Kuglarz, Mariusz; Karakashev, Dimitar; Angelidaki, Irini

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an efficient thermochemical method for treatment of industrial hemp biomass, in order to increase its bioconversion to succinic acid. Industrial hemp was subjected to various thermochemical pretreatments using 0-3% H2SO4, NaOH or H2O2 at 121-180°C prior to enzymatic hydrolysis. The influence of the different pretreatments on hydrolysis and succinic acid production by Actinobacillus succinogenes 130Z was investigated in batch mode, using anaerobic bottles and bioreactors. Enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation of hemp material pretreated with 3% H2O2 resulted in the highest overall sugar yield (73.5%), maximum succinic acid titer (21.9 g L(-1)), as well as the highest succinic acid yield (83%). Results obtained clearly demonstrated the impact of different pretreatments on the bioconversion efficiency of industrial hemp into succinic acid. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Comparative Study of Stearic Acid/Iron-Oxide Binary and Stearic Acid/Iron-Oxide/Titanium-Oxide Ternary for Use as Energy Storage Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andiarto, Rizky; Nuryadin, Muhammad Khalish; Saleh, Rosari

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a series of stearic acid/Fe 3 O 4 , and stearic acid/Fe 3 O 4 /TiO 2 nanocomposites for thermal energy storage (TES) system were synthesized through a two-step process. Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles and Fe 3 O 4 /TiO 2 nanocomposites were first prepared using sol-gel methods and then both samples were mixed into stearic acid by dispersion technique at three different weight % ratio to stearic acid: 5%, 10% and 15% to obtain stearic acid/Fe 3 O 4 , and stearic acid/Fe 3 O 4 /TiO 2 nanocomposites. Morphologies and structural properties of the samples were characterized by X-ray diffractometer (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), while thermal properties of the sample were determined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The XRD patterns demonstrate, that stearic acid/Fe 3 O 4 contained characteristic peaks of Fe 3 O 4 and stearic acid structures, while peaks corresponded to anatase TiO 2 structures appear in stearic acid/ Fe 3 O 4 /TiO 2 nanocomposites. From the DSC measurements, it is found that the maximum latent heat was found at samples with weight ratio of 5%. Moreover, the enhancement up to 20% of latent heat in solidifying as well as melting processes was observed. TGA measurements show high degradation temperature in the range of 246 - 251°C. The TGA results also shows that the residual mass of the sample matches the composition of Fe 3 O 4 and Fe 3 O 4 /TiO 2 which is added to the stearic acid. (paper)

  2. Maximum mass ratio of AM CVn-type binary systems and maximum white dwarf mass in ultra-compact X-ray binaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arbutina Bojan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available AM CVn-type stars and ultra-compact X-ray binaries are extremely interesting semi-detached close binary systems in which the Roche lobe filling component is a white dwarf transferring mass to another white dwarf, neutron star or a black hole. Earlier theoretical considerations show that there is a maximum mass ratio of AM CVn-type binary systems (qmax ≈ 2/3 below which the mass transfer is stable. In this paper we derive slightly different value for qmax and more interestingly, by applying the same procedure, we find the maximum expected white dwarf mass in ultra-compact X-ray binaries.

  3. Size dependence of efficiency at maximum power of heat engine

    KAUST Repository

    Izumida, Y.; Ito, N.

    2013-01-01

    We perform a molecular dynamics computer simulation of a heat engine model to study how the engine size difference affects its performance. Upon tactically increasing the size of the model anisotropically, we determine that there exists an optimum size at which the model attains the maximum power for the shortest working period. This optimum size locates between the ballistic heat transport region and the diffusive heat transport one. We also study the size dependence of the efficiency at the maximum power. Interestingly, we find that the efficiency at the maximum power around the optimum size attains a value that has been proposed as a universal upper bound, and it even begins to exceed the bound as the size further increases. We explain this behavior of the efficiency at maximum power by using a linear response theory for the heat engine operating under a finite working period, which naturally extends the low-dissipation Carnot cycle model [M. Esposito, R. Kawai, K. Lindenberg, C. Van den Broeck, Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 150603 (2010)]. The theory also shows that the efficiency at the maximum power under an extreme condition may reach the Carnot efficiency in principle.© EDP Sciences Società Italiana di Fisica Springer-Verlag 2013.

  4. Size dependence of efficiency at maximum power of heat engine

    KAUST Repository

    Izumida, Y.

    2013-10-01

    We perform a molecular dynamics computer simulation of a heat engine model to study how the engine size difference affects its performance. Upon tactically increasing the size of the model anisotropically, we determine that there exists an optimum size at which the model attains the maximum power for the shortest working period. This optimum size locates between the ballistic heat transport region and the diffusive heat transport one. We also study the size dependence of the efficiency at the maximum power. Interestingly, we find that the efficiency at the maximum power around the optimum size attains a value that has been proposed as a universal upper bound, and it even begins to exceed the bound as the size further increases. We explain this behavior of the efficiency at maximum power by using a linear response theory for the heat engine operating under a finite working period, which naturally extends the low-dissipation Carnot cycle model [M. Esposito, R. Kawai, K. Lindenberg, C. Van den Broeck, Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 150603 (2010)]. The theory also shows that the efficiency at the maximum power under an extreme condition may reach the Carnot efficiency in principle.© EDP Sciences Società Italiana di Fisica Springer-Verlag 2013.

  5. Maximum Principle for General Controlled Systems Driven by Fractional Brownian Motions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Yuecai; Hu Yaozhong; Song Jian

    2013-01-01

    We obtain a maximum principle for stochastic control problem of general controlled stochastic differential systems driven by fractional Brownian motions (of Hurst parameter H>1/2). This maximum principle specifies a system of equations that the optimal control must satisfy (necessary condition for the optimal control). This system of equations consists of a backward stochastic differential equation driven by both fractional Brownian motions and the corresponding underlying standard Brownian motions. In addition to this backward equation, the maximum principle also involves the Malliavin derivatives. Our approach is to use conditioning and Malliavin calculus. To arrive at our maximum principle we need to develop some new results of stochastic analysis of the controlled systems driven by fractional Brownian motions via fractional calculus. Our approach of conditioning and Malliavin calculus is also applied to classical system driven by standard Brownian motions while the controller has only partial information. As a straightforward consequence, the classical maximum principle is also deduced in this more natural and simpler way.

  6. Liquid-liquid extraction for purification of wet process phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lotfollahi, Mohammad Nader; Bakshi, Mahdi

    2006-01-01

    The Wet Process Phosphoric Acid (WPA) is used to produce fertilizers and alimentary supplies for cattle. In each of these applications, the impurities contained in acid must be in standard range. In this paper purification of WPA by solvent extraction is performed and the effect of the mass ratio of solvent to feed on extraction efficiency is studied. The working solvents are Methyl Iso Butyl Ketone (MIBK), Iso Amyl Alcohol (IAA) and the mixture of them. The results show that the IAA is better than other solvents in extraction of WPA. This solvent can extract 82.2% of acid after two extraction stages but MIBK can extract only 73.5% of acid after three extraction stages. For all of these solvents, the Pb and Cd concentrations go down to trace. The experimental results show that the maximum separation of Mg with MIBK is 87.5% which occurs at the mass ratio of solvent to feed eual to 4. In the case of IAA solvent the percent is 91.7% and the ratio is 8

  7. Direct maximum parsimony phylogeny reconstruction from genotype data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhar, Srinath; Lam, Fumei; Blelloch, Guy E; Ravi, R; Schwartz, Russell

    2007-12-05

    Maximum parsimony phylogenetic tree reconstruction from genetic variation data is a fundamental problem in computational genetics with many practical applications in population genetics, whole genome analysis, and the search for genetic predictors of disease. Efficient methods are available for reconstruction of maximum parsimony trees from haplotype data, but such data are difficult to determine directly for autosomal DNA. Data more commonly is available in the form of genotypes, which consist of conflated combinations of pairs of haplotypes from homologous chromosomes. Currently, there are no general algorithms for the direct reconstruction of maximum parsimony phylogenies from genotype data. Hence phylogenetic applications for autosomal data must therefore rely on other methods for first computationally inferring haplotypes from genotypes. In this work, we develop the first practical method for computing maximum parsimony phylogenies directly from genotype data. We show that the standard practice of first inferring haplotypes from genotypes and then reconstructing a phylogeny on the haplotypes often substantially overestimates phylogeny size. As an immediate application, our method can be used to determine the minimum number of mutations required to explain a given set of observed genotypes. Phylogeny reconstruction directly from unphased data is computationally feasible for moderate-sized problem instances and can lead to substantially more accurate tree size inferences than the standard practice of treating phasing and phylogeny construction as two separate analysis stages. The difference between the approaches is particularly important for downstream applications that require a lower-bound on the number of mutations that the genetic region has undergone.

  8. Direct maximum parsimony phylogeny reconstruction from genotype data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi R

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maximum parsimony phylogenetic tree reconstruction from genetic variation data is a fundamental problem in computational genetics with many practical applications in population genetics, whole genome analysis, and the search for genetic predictors of disease. Efficient methods are available for reconstruction of maximum parsimony trees from haplotype data, but such data are difficult to determine directly for autosomal DNA. Data more commonly is available in the form of genotypes, which consist of conflated combinations of pairs of haplotypes from homologous chromosomes. Currently, there are no general algorithms for the direct reconstruction of maximum parsimony phylogenies from genotype data. Hence phylogenetic applications for autosomal data must therefore rely on other methods for first computationally inferring haplotypes from genotypes. Results In this work, we develop the first practical method for computing maximum parsimony phylogenies directly from genotype data. We show that the standard practice of first inferring haplotypes from genotypes and then reconstructing a phylogeny on the haplotypes often substantially overestimates phylogeny size. As an immediate application, our method can be used to determine the minimum number of mutations required to explain a given set of observed genotypes. Conclusion Phylogeny reconstruction directly from unphased data is computationally feasible for moderate-sized problem instances and can lead to substantially more accurate tree size inferences than the standard practice of treating phasing and phylogeny construction as two separate analysis stages. The difference between the approaches is particularly important for downstream applications that require a lower-bound on the number of mutations that the genetic region has undergone.

  9. Effects of Light and Temperature on Fatty Acid Production in Nannochloropsis Salina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Wagenen, Jonathan M.; Miller, Tyler W.; Hobbs, Samuel J.; Hook, Paul W.; Crowe, Braden J.; Huesemann, Michael H.

    2012-03-12

    Accurate prediction of algal biofuel yield will require empirical determination of physiological responses to the climate, particularly light and temperature. One strain of interest, Nannochloropsis salina, was subjected to ranges of light intensity (5-850 {mu}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}) and temperature (13-40 C); exponential growth rate, total fatty acids (TFA) and fatty acid composition were measured. The maximum acclimated growth rate was 1.3 day{sup -1} at 23 C and 250 {mu}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}. Fatty acids were detected by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (GC-FID) after transesterification to corresponding fatty acid methyl esters (FAME). A sharp increase in TFA containing elevated palmitic acid (C16:0) and palmitoleic acid (C16:1) during exponential growth at high light was observed, indicating likely triacylglycerol accumulation due to photo-oxidative stress. Lower light resulted in increases in the relative abundance of unsaturated fatty acids; in thin cultures, increases were observed in palmitoleic and eicosapentaenoeic acids (C20:5{omega}3). As cultures aged and the effective light intensity per cell converged to very low levels, fatty acid profiles became more similar and there was a notable increase of oleic acid (C18:1{omega}9). The amount of unsaturated fatty acids was inversely proportional to temperature, demonstrating physiological adaptations to increase membrane fluidity. This data will improve prediction of fatty acid characteristics and yields relevant to biofuel production.

  10. 20 CFR 10.806 - How are the maximum fees defined?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... AMENDED Information for Medical Providers Medical Fee Schedule § 10.806 How are the maximum fees defined? For professional medical services, the Director shall maintain a schedule of maximum allowable fees.../Current Procedural Terminology (HCPCS/CPT) code which represents the relative skill, effort, risk and time...

  11. Maximum-likelihood estimation of the hyperbolic parameters from grouped observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Ledet

    1988-01-01

    a least-squares problem. The second procedure Hypesti first approaches the maximum-likelihood estimate by iterating in the profile-log likelihood function for the scale parameter. Close to the maximum of the likelihood function, the estimation is brought to an end by iteration, using all four parameters...

  12. Scientific substantination of maximum allowable concentration of fluopicolide in water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pelo I.М.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to substantiate fluopicolide maximum allowable concentration in the water of water reservoirs the research was carried out. Methods of study: laboratory hygienic experiment using organoleptic and sanitary-chemical, sanitary-toxicological, sanitary-microbiological and mathematical methods. The results of fluopicolide influence on organoleptic properties of water, sanitary regimen of reservoirs for household purposes were given and its subthreshold concentration in water by sanitary and toxicological hazard index was calculated. The threshold concentration of the substance by the main hazard criteria was established, the maximum allowable concentration in water was substantiated. The studies led to the following conclusions: fluopicolide threshold concentration in water by organoleptic hazard index (limiting criterion – the smell – 0.15 mg/dm3, general sanitary hazard index (limiting criteria – impact on the number of saprophytic microflora, biochemical oxygen demand and nitrification – 0.015 mg/dm3, the maximum noneffective concentration – 0.14 mg/dm3, the maximum allowable concentration - 0.015 mg/dm3.

  13. Maximum likelihood estimation of finite mixture model for economic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phoong, Seuk-Yen; Ismail, Mohd Tahir

    2014-06-01

    Finite mixture model is a mixture model with finite-dimension. This models are provides a natural representation of heterogeneity in a finite number of latent classes. In addition, finite mixture models also known as latent class models or unsupervised learning models. Recently, maximum likelihood estimation fitted finite mixture models has greatly drawn statistician's attention. The main reason is because maximum likelihood estimation is a powerful statistical method which provides consistent findings as the sample sizes increases to infinity. Thus, the application of maximum likelihood estimation is used to fit finite mixture model in the present paper in order to explore the relationship between nonlinear economic data. In this paper, a two-component normal mixture model is fitted by maximum likelihood estimation in order to investigate the relationship among stock market price and rubber price for sampled countries. Results described that there is a negative effect among rubber price and stock market price for Malaysia, Thailand, Philippines and Indonesia.

  14. Efficiency of autonomous soft nanomachines at maximum power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Udo

    2011-01-14

    We consider nanosized artificial or biological machines working in steady state enforced by imposing nonequilibrium concentrations of solutes or by applying external forces, torques, or electric fields. For unicyclic and strongly coupled multicyclic machines, efficiency at maximum power is not bounded by the linear response value 1/2. For strong driving, it can even approach the thermodynamic limit 1. Quite generally, such machines fall into three different classes characterized, respectively, as "strong and efficient," "strong and inefficient," and "balanced." For weakly coupled multicyclic machines, efficiency at maximum power has lost any universality even in the linear response regime.

  15. Variation of photoautotrophic fatty acid production from a highly CO2 tolerant alga, Chlorococcum littorale, with inorganic carbon over narrow ranges of pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Masaki; Takenaka, Motohiro; Sato, Yoshiyuki; Smith, Richard L; Inomata, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Photoautotrophic fatty acid production of a highly CO2 -tolerant green alga Chlorococcum littorale in the presence of inorganic carbon at 295 K and light intensity of 170 µmol-photon m(-2) s(-1) was investigated. CO2 concentration in the bubbling gas was adjusted by mixing pure gas components of CO2 and N2 to avoid photorespiration and β-oxidation of fatty acids under O2 surrounding conditions. Maximum content of total fatty acid showed pH-dependence after nitrate depletion of the culture media and increased with the corresponding inorganic carbon ratio. Namely, [HCO3 (-) ]/([CO2 ]+n[ CO32-]) ratio in the culture media was found to be a controlling factor for photoautotrophic fatty acid production after the nitrate limitation. At a CO2 concentration of 5% (vol/vol) and a pH of 6.7, the fatty acid content was 47.8 wt % (dry basis) at its maximum that is comparable with land plant seed oils. © 2015 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  16. Zipf's law, power laws and maximum entropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visser, Matt

    2013-01-01

    Zipf's law, and power laws in general, have attracted and continue to attract considerable attention in a wide variety of disciplines—from astronomy to demographics to software structure to economics to linguistics to zoology, and even warfare. A recent model of random group formation (RGF) attempts a general explanation of such phenomena based on Jaynes' notion of maximum entropy applied to a particular choice of cost function. In the present paper I argue that the specific cost function used in the RGF model is in fact unnecessarily complicated, and that power laws can be obtained in a much simpler way by applying maximum entropy ideas directly to the Shannon entropy subject only to a single constraint: that the average of the logarithm of the observable quantity is specified. (paper)

  17. Einstein-Dirac theory in spin maximum I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crumeyrolle, A.

    1975-01-01

    An unitary Einstein-Dirac theory, first in spin maximum 1, is constructed. An original feature of this article is that it is written without any tetrapod technics; basic notions and existence conditions for spinor structures on pseudo-Riemannian fibre bundles are only used. A coupling gravitation-electromagnetic field is pointed out, in the geometric setting of the tangent bundle over space-time. Generalized Maxwell equations for inductive media in presence of gravitational field are obtained. Enlarged Einstein-Schroedinger theory, gives a particular case of this E.D. theory. E. S. theory is a truncated E.D. theory in spin maximum 1. A close relation between torsion-vector and Schroedinger's potential exists and nullity of torsion-vector has a spinor meaning. Finally the Petiau-Duffin-Kemmer theory is incorporated in this geometric setting [fr

  18. Fuzzy Controller Design Using FPGA for Photovoltaic Maximum Power Point Tracking

    OpenAIRE

    Basil M Hamed; Mohammed S. El-Moghany

    2012-01-01

    The cell has optimum operating point to be able to get maximum power. To obtain Maximum Power from photovoltaic array, photovoltaic power system usually requires Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT) controller. This paper provides a small power photovoltaic control system based on fuzzy control with FPGA technology design and implementation for MPPT. The system composed of photovoltaic module, buck converter and the fuzzy logic controller implemented on FPGA for controlling on/off time of MOSF...

  19. The synthesis of poly(vinylphosphonic acid-co-methacrylic acid) microbeads by suspension polymerization and the characterization of their indium adsorption properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwak, Noh-Seok; Baek, Youngmin; Hwang, Taek Sung

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Microbeads were synthesized by suspension polymerization based on VPA, MAA and PEGDA. ► The best preparation condition was determined from the yield, water uptake and IEC. ► The adsorption isotherm of indium was fit to the Langmuir and Freundlich models. - Abstract: Poly(vinylphosphonic acid-co-methacrylic acid) microbeads were synthesized by suspension polymerization, and their indium adsorption properties were investigated. The obtained microbeads were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The microbeads were wrinkled spheres, irrespective of the components, and their sizes ranged from 100 to 200 μm. The microbeads were thermally stable up to 260 °C. As the vinylphosphonic acid (VPA) content was increased, the synthetic yields and ion-exchange capacities decreased and the water uptakes increased. The optimum synthetic yield, ion-exchange capacity and water uptake were obtained at a 0.5 mol ratio of VPA. In addition, the maximum adsorption predicted by the Langmuir adsorption isotherm model was greatest at a 0.5 mol ratio of VPA.

  20. The synthesis of poly(vinylphosphonic acid-co-methacrylic acid) microbeads by suspension polymerization and the characterization of their indium adsorption properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, Noh-Seok; Baek, Youngmin [Department of Applied Chemistry and Biological Engineering, Chungnam National University, 79 Daehangno, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Taek Sung, E-mail: tshwang@cnu.ac.kr [Department of Applied Chemistry and Biological Engineering, Chungnam National University, 79 Daehangno, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microbeads were synthesized by suspension polymerization based on VPA, MAA and PEGDA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The best preparation condition was determined from the yield, water uptake and IEC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The adsorption isotherm of indium was fit to the Langmuir and Freundlich models. - Abstract: Poly(vinylphosphonic acid-co-methacrylic acid) microbeads were synthesized by suspension polymerization, and their indium adsorption properties were investigated. The obtained microbeads were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The microbeads were wrinkled spheres, irrespective of the components, and their sizes ranged from 100 to 200 {mu}m. The microbeads were thermally stable up to 260 Degree-Sign C. As the vinylphosphonic acid (VPA) content was increased, the synthetic yields and ion-exchange capacities decreased and the water uptakes increased. The optimum synthetic yield, ion-exchange capacity and water uptake were obtained at a 0.5 mol ratio of VPA. In addition, the maximum adsorption predicted by the Langmuir adsorption isotherm model was greatest at a 0.5 mol ratio of VPA.

  1. Maximum penetration level of distributed generation without violating voltage limits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morren, J.; Haan, de S.W.H.

    2009-01-01

    Connection of Distributed Generation (DG) units to a distribution network will result in a local voltage increase. As there will be a maximum on the allowable voltage increase, this will limit the maximum allowable penetration level of DG. By reactive power compensation (by the DG unit itself) a

  2. Thermal hazard assessment of TMCH mixed with inorganic acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeh Chi-Tang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available 1,1-Bis(tert-butylperoxy-3,3,5-trimethylcyclohexane (TMCH is a typical peroxide with two peroxy groups that may runaway and/or explode due to mixing with inorganic acids, such as HCl, HNO3, H2SO4, or H3PO4. In this study, reactivities of TMCH mixed with the above inorganic acids were assessed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. Furthermore, data obtained by DSC, such as exothermic onset temperature (T0, maximum temperature (Tmax, and heat of decomposition (ΔHd could be employed to acquire thermal safety parameters. Moreover, thermal activity monitor III (TAM III was employed to investigate the thermal hazards while storing or transporting TMCH and TMCH mixed with four types of commonly used inorganic acids, here as HCl, HNO3, H2SO4, or H3PO4 under isothermal conditions. Mixing TMCH with those inorganic acids resulted in higherΔHd except H3PO4, and mixing TMCH with HCl clearly decreased T0. Therefore, the phenomena of mixing those incompatible materials with TMCH can be concluded as the worst cases in terms of contamination hazards during storage and transportation of TMCH.

  3. Boric acid inhibits embryonic histone deacetylases: A suggested mechanism to explain boric acid-related teratogenicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Renzo, Francesca; Cappelletti, Graziella; Broccia, Maria L.; Giavini, Erminio; Menegola, Elena

    2007-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDAC) control gene expression by changing histonic as well as non histonic protein conformation. HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) are considered to be among the most promising drugs for epigenetic treatment for cancer. Recently a strict relationship between histone hyperacetylation in specific tissues of mouse embryos exposed to two HDACi (valproic acid and trichostatin A) and specific axial skeleton malformations has been demonstrated. The aim of this study is to verify if boric acid (BA), that induces in rodents malformations similar to those valproic acid and trichostatin A-related, acts through similar mechanisms: HDAC inhibition and histone hyperacetylation. Pregnant mice were treated intraperitoneally with a teratogenic dose of BA (1000 mg/kg, day 8 of gestation). Western blot analysis and immunostaining were performed with anti hyperacetylated histone 4 (H4) antibody on embryos explanted 1, 3 or 4 h after treatment and revealed H4 hyperacetylation at the level of somites. HDAC enzyme assay was performed on embryonic nuclear extracts. A significant HDAC inhibition activity (compatible with a mixed type partial inhibition mechanism) was evident with BA. Kinetic analyses indicate that BA modifies substrate affinity by a factor α = 0.51 and maximum velocity by a factor β = 0.70. This work provides the first evidence for HDAC inhibition by BA and suggests such a molecular mechanism for the induction of BA-related malformations

  4. Production and bromatologic composition of grass-mombaça (Panicum maximum Jacq., submitted to different sources and doses of acidity corrective / Produção e composição bromatológica da forragem do capim-mombaça (Panicum maximum Jacq., submetidos a diferentes fontes e doses de corretivo de acidez

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Maximino Fernandes

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The experiment was carried in protected (greenhouse atmosphere, in University of Engineering, UNESP of Ilha Solteira-SP, with the objective of evaluating sources (limestone and calcium silicate slag and doses (0,0 – 0,5 – 1,0 – 1,5 – 2,0 times the recommended dose of corrective in the bromatologic composition, tillering and production of dry matter of the grass mombaça (Panicum maximum Jacq.. The lineation was completely randomized design, with four repetitions. It was evaluated the tiller number, the production of dry matter, the gross protein, neutral detergent fiber (NDF and acid detergent fiber (ADF. The corrective influenced the tillering in almost all of the countings. The limestone provided larger production of dry matter in the doses of 1,5 and 2,0 times the recommended dose. The bromatologic composition of the forage was not influenced by the corrective and doses.O experimento foi conduzido em ambiente protegido (estufa, na Faculdade de Engenharia, UNESP de Ilha Solteira, com o objetivo de avaliar fontes (calcário e escória silicatada e doses (0,0 – 0,5 – 1,0 – 1,5 – 2,0 vezes a dose recomendada de corretivos na composição bromatológica, perfilhamento e produção de matéria seca do capim-mombaça (Panicum maximum Jacq.. O delineamento experimental utilizado foi inteiramente casualizado, com quatro repetições. Avaliou-se o número de perfilhos, a produção de matéria seca e os teores de proteína bruta (PB, fibra em detergente neutro (FDN e fibra em detergente ácido (FDA. Os corretivos influenciaram o perfilhamento em quase todas as contagens. O calcário proporcionou maior produção de matéria seca nas doses de 1,5 e 2,0 vezes a dose recomendada. A composição bromatológica da forragem não foi influenciada pelos corretivos e doses utilizadas.

  5. 25 CFR 141.36 - Maximum finance charges on pawn transactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Maximum finance charges on pawn transactions. 141.36... PRACTICES ON THE NAVAJO, HOPI AND ZUNI RESERVATIONS Pawnbroker Practices § 141.36 Maximum finance charges on pawn transactions. No pawnbroker may impose an annual finance charge greater than twenty-four percent...

  6. Microprocessor-controlled step-down maximum-power-point tracker for photovoltaic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazmuder, R. K.; Haidar, S.

    1992-12-01

    An efficient maximum power point tracker (MPPT) has been developed and can be used with a photovoltaic (PV) array and a load which requires lower voltage than the PV array voltage to be operated. The MPPT makes the PV array to operate at maximum power point (MPP) under all insolation and temperature, which ensures the maximum amount of available PV power to be delivered to the load. The performance of the MPPT has been studied under different insolation levels.

  7. Luminescent properties of Europium(III) nitrate with 1,10-phenantroline and cinnamic acid in light - Transforming polymer materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinovskaya, I. V.; Zadorozhnaya, A. N.

    2018-04-01

    Influence of cinnamic acid on the luminescent properties of the europium(III) nitrate with 1,10-phenantroline in a polymer materials was studied. It was shown that combined use of these rare earth complexes leads to intense luminescence in the 400-700 nm region. Samples containing polymer europium nitrate with 1,10-phenantroline and cinnamic acid at a molar ratio of 1:2,0 had the maximum luminescence intensity and photostability.

  8. Introduction to maximum entropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivia, D.S.

    1989-01-01

    The maximum entropy (MaxEnt) principle has been successfully used in image reconstruction in a wide variety of fields. The author reviews the need for such methods in data analysis and shows, by use of a very simple example, why MaxEnt is to be preferred over other regularizing functions. This leads to a more general interpretation of the MaxEnt method, and its use is illustrated with several different examples. Practical difficulties with non-linear problems still remain, this being highlighted by the notorious phase problem in crystallography. He concludes with an example from neutron scattering, using data from a filter difference spectrometer to contrast MaxEnt with a conventional deconvolution. 12 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  9. Probable maximum flood control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeGabriele, C.E.; Wu, C.L.

    1991-11-01

    This study proposes preliminary design concepts to protect the waste-handling facilities and all shaft and ramp entries to the underground from the probable maximum flood (PMF) in the current design configuration for the proposed Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigation (NNWSI) repository protection provisions were furnished by the United States Bureau of Reclamation (USSR) or developed from USSR data. Proposed flood protection provisions include site grading, drainage channels, and diversion dikes. Figures are provided to show these proposed flood protection provisions at each area investigated. These areas are the central surface facilities (including the waste-handling building and waste treatment building), tuff ramp portal, waste ramp portal, men-and-materials shaft, emplacement exhaust shaft, and exploratory shafts facility

  10. Introduction to maximum entropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivia, D.S.

    1988-01-01

    The maximum entropy (MaxEnt) principle has been successfully used in image reconstruction in a wide variety of fields. We review the need for such methods in data analysis and show, by use of a very simple example, why MaxEnt is to be preferred over other regularizing functions. This leads to a more general interpretation of the MaxEnt method, and its use is illustrated with several different examples. Practical difficulties with non-linear problems still remain, this being highlighted by the notorious phase problem in crystallography. We conclude with an example from neutron scattering, using data from a filter difference spectrometer to contrast MaxEnt with a conventional deconvolution. 12 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  11. Application of Maximum Entropy Distribution to the Statistical Properties of Wave Groups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The new distributions of the statistics of wave groups based on the maximum entropy principle are presented. The maximum entropy distributions appear to be superior to conventional distributions when applied to a limited amount of information. Its applications to the wave group properties show the effectiveness of the maximum entropy distribution. FFT filtering method is employed to obtain the wave envelope fast and efficiently. Comparisons of both the maximum entropy distribution and the distribution of Longuet-Higgins (1984) with the laboratory wind-wave data show that the former gives a better fit.

  12. An overview of biotechnological production of propionic acid: From upstream to downstream processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negin Ahmadi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The increasing demand for propionic acid (PA production and its wide applications in several industries, especially the food industry (as a preservative and satiety inducer, have led to studies on the low-cost biosynthesis of this acid. This paper gives an overview of the biotechnological aspects of PA production and introduces Propionibacterium as the most popular organism for PA production. Moreover, all process variables influencing the production yield, different simple and complex carbon sources, the metabolic pathway of production, engineered mutants with increased productivity, and modified tolerance against high concentrations of acid have been described. Furthermore, possible methods of extraction and analysis of this organic acid, several applied bioreactors, and different culture systems and substrates are introduced. It can be concluded that maximum biomass and PA production may be achieved using metabolically engineered microorganisms and analyzing the most significant factors influencing yield. To date, the maximum reported yield for PA production is 0.973 g·g-1, obtained from Propionibacterium acidipropionici in a three-electrode amperometric culture system in medium containing 0.4 mM cobalt sepulchrate. In addition, the best promising substrate for PA bioproduction may be achieved using glycerol as a carbon source in an extractive continuous fermentation. Simultaneous production of PA and vitamin B12 is suggested, and finally, the limitations of and strategies for competitive microbial production with respect to chemical process from an economical point of view are proposed and presented. Finally, some future trends for bioproduction of PA are suggested.

  13. Monascus ruber as cell factory for lactic acid production at low pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weusthuis, Ruud A; Mars, Astrid E; Springer, Jan; Wolbert, Emil Jh; van der Wal, Hetty; de Vrije, Truus G; Levisson, Mark; Leprince, Audrey; Houweling-Tan, G Bwee; Pha Moers, Antoine; Hendriks, Sjon Na; Mendes, Odette; Griekspoor, Yvonne; Werten, Marc Wt; Schaap, Peter J; van der Oost, John; Eggink, Gerrit

    2017-07-01

    A Monascus ruber strain was isolated that was able to grow on mineral medium at high sugar concentrations and 175g/l lactic acid at pH 2.8. Its genome and transcriptomes were sequenced and annotated. Genes encoding lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were introduced to accomplish lactic acid production and two genes encoding pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) were knocked out to subdue ethanol formation. The strain preferred lactic acid to glucose as carbon source, which hampered glucose consumption and therefore also lactic acid production. Lactic acid consumption was stopped by knocking out 4 cytochrome-dependent LDH (CLDH) genes, and evolutionary engineering was used to increase the glucose consumption rate. Application of this strain in a fed-batch fermentation resulted in a maximum lactic acid titer of 190g/l at pH 3.8 and 129g/l at pH 2.8, respectively 1.7 and 2.2 times higher than reported in literature before. Yield and productivity were on par with the best strains described in literature for lactic acid production at low pH. Copyright © 2017 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Density and viscosity study of nicotinic acid and nicotinamide in dilute aqueous solutions at and around the temperature of the maximum density of water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhondge, Sudhakar S.; Dahasahasra, Prachi N.; Paliwal, Lalitmohan J.; Deshmukh, Dinesh W.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Volumetric and transport behaviour of aqueous solutions of important vitamins are reported. • Various interactions of nicotinic acid and nicotinamide with water have been reported. • The temperature dependence of interactions between solute and solvent is discussed. • The study indicates that nicotinamide is more hydrated as compared to nicotinic acid. - Abstract: In the present study, we report experimental densities (ρ) and viscosities (η) of aqueous solutions of nicotinic acid and nicotinamide within the concentration range (0 to 0.1) mol · kg −1 at T = (275.15, 277.15 and 279.15) K. These parameters are then used to obtain thermodynamic and transport functions such as apparent molar volume of solute (V ϕ ), limiting apparent molar volume of solute (V ϕ 0 ), limiting apparent molar expansivity of solute (E ϕ 0 ), coefficient of thermal expansion (α ∗ ), Jones–Dole equation viscosity A, B and D coefficients, temperature derivative of B coefficient i.e. (dB/dT) and hydration number (n H ), etc. The activation parameters of viscous flow for the binary mixtures have been determined and discussed in terms of Eyring’s transition state theory. These significant parameters are helpful to study the structure promoting or destroying tendency of solute and various interactions present in (nicotinic acid + water) and (nicotinamide + water) binary mixtures

  15. Maximum-confidence discrimination among symmetric qudit states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez, O.; Solis-Prosser, M. A.; Delgado, A.; Neves, L.

    2011-01-01

    We study the maximum-confidence (MC) measurement strategy for discriminating among nonorthogonal symmetric qudit states. Restricting to linearly dependent and equally likely pure states, we find the optimal positive operator valued measure (POVM) that maximizes our confidence in identifying each state in the set and minimizes the probability of obtaining inconclusive results. The physical realization of this POVM is completely determined and it is shown that after an inconclusive outcome, the input states may be mapped into a new set of equiprobable symmetric states, restricted, however, to a subspace of the original qudit Hilbert space. By applying the MC measurement again onto this new set, we can still gain some information about the input states, although with less confidence than before. This leads us to introduce the concept of sequential maximum-confidence (SMC) measurements, where the optimized MC strategy is iterated in as many stages as allowed by the input set, until no further information can be extracted from an inconclusive result. Within each stage of this measurement our confidence in identifying the input states is the highest possible, although it decreases from one stage to the next. In addition, the more stages we accomplish within the maximum allowed, the higher will be the probability of correct identification. We will discuss an explicit example of the optimal SMC measurement applied in the discrimination among four symmetric qutrit states and propose an optical network to implement it.

  16. Minor amounts of plasma medium-chain fatty acids and no improved time trial performance after consuming lipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vistisen, Bodil; Nybo, L.; Xu, Xuebing

    2003-01-01

    after consumption of specific structured triacylglycerol, consisting of a mixture of medium-chain fatty acids and long-chain fatty acids, to prevent the adverse effects observed by MCT (pure medium-chain fatty acids) regarding gastrointestinal distress. Seven well-trained subjects cycled 3 h at 55......% of maximum 02 uptake during which they ingested CHO or CHO plus specific structured triacylglycerols. Immediately after the constant-load cycling, the subjects performed a time trial of similar to50-min duration. Breath and blood samples were obtained regularly during the experiment. Fatty acid composition...... of plasma triacylglycerols, fatty acids, and phospholipids was determined. Performance was similar after administration of CHO plus specific structured triacylglycerol [medium-, long-, and medium-chain fatty acid (MLM)] compared with CHO (50.0 +/- 1.8 and 50.8 +/- 3.6 min, respectively). No plasma 8...

  17. Dinosaur Metabolism and the Allometry of Maximum Growth Rate

    OpenAIRE

    Myhrvold, Nathan P.

    2016-01-01

    The allometry of maximum somatic growth rate has been used in prior studies to classify the metabolic state of both extant vertebrates and dinosaurs. The most recent such studies are reviewed, and their data is reanalyzed. The results of allometric regressions on growth rate are shown to depend on the choice of independent variable; the typical choice used in prior studies introduces a geometric shear transformation that exaggerates the statistical power of the regressions. The maximum growth...

  18. The spectrum of R Cygni during its exceptionally low maximum of 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallerstein, G.; Dominy, J.F.; Mattei, J.A.; Smith, V.V.

    1985-01-01

    In 1983 R Cygni experienced its faintest maximum ever recorded. A study of the light curve shows correlations between brightness at maximum and interval from the previous cycle, in the sense that fainter maxima occur later than normal and are followed by maxima that occur earlier than normal. Emission and absorption lines in the optical and near infrared (2.2 μm region) reveal two significant correlations. The amplitude of line doubling is independent of the magnitude at maximum for msub(v)(max)=7.1 to 9.8. The velocities of the emission lines, however, correlate with the magnitude at maximum, in that during bright maxima they are negatively displaced by 15 km s -1 with respect to the red component of absorption lines, while during the faintest maximum there is no displacement. (author)

  19. Maximum likelihood estimation for integrated diffusion processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baltazar-Larios, Fernando; Sørensen, Michael

    We propose a method for obtaining maximum likelihood estimates of parameters in diffusion models when the data is a discrete time sample of the integral of the process, while no direct observations of the process itself are available. The data are, moreover, assumed to be contaminated...... EM-algorithm to obtain maximum likelihood estimates of the parameters in the diffusion model. As part of the algorithm, we use a recent simple method for approximate simulation of diffusion bridges. In simulation studies for the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process and the CIR process the proposed method works...... by measurement errors. Integrated volatility is an example of this type of observations. Another example is ice-core data on oxygen isotopes used to investigate paleo-temperatures. The data can be viewed as incomplete observations of a model with a tractable likelihood function. Therefore we propose a simulated...

  20. Pareto versus lognormal: a maximum entropy test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bee, Marco; Riccaboni, Massimo; Schiavo, Stefano

    2011-08-01

    It is commonly found that distributions that seem to be lognormal over a broad range change to a power-law (Pareto) distribution for the last few percentiles. The distributions of many physical, natural, and social events (earthquake size, species abundance, income and wealth, as well as file, city, and firm sizes) display this structure. We present a test for the occurrence of power-law tails in statistical distributions based on maximum entropy. This methodology allows one to identify the true data-generating processes even in the case when it is neither lognormal nor Pareto. The maximum entropy approach is then compared with other widely used methods and applied to different levels of aggregation of complex systems. Our results provide support for the theory that distributions with lognormal body and Pareto tail can be generated as mixtures of lognormally distributed units.