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Sample records for maximum count rate

  1. Exploration of maximum count rate capabilities for large-area photon counting arrays based on polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Albert K.; Koniczek, Martin; Antonuk, Larry E.; El-Mohri, Youcef; Zhao, Qihua

    2016-03-01

    Pixelated photon counting detectors with energy discrimination capabilities are of increasing clinical interest for x-ray imaging. Such detectors, presently in clinical use for mammography and under development for breast tomosynthesis and spectral CT, usually employ in-pixel circuits based on crystalline silicon - a semiconductor material that is generally not well-suited for economic manufacture of large-area devices. One interesting alternative semiconductor is polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si), a thin-film technology capable of creating very large-area, monolithic devices. Similar to crystalline silicon, poly-Si allows implementation of the type of fast, complex, in-pixel circuitry required for photon counting - operating at processing speeds that are not possible with amorphous silicon (the material currently used for large-area, active matrix, flat-panel imagers). The pixel circuits of two-dimensional photon counting arrays are generally comprised of four stages: amplifier, comparator, clock generator and counter. The analog front-end (in particular, the amplifier) strongly influences performance and is therefore of interest to study. In this paper, the relationship between incident and output count rate of the analog front-end is explored under diagnostic imaging conditions for a promising poly-Si based design. The input to the amplifier is modeled in the time domain assuming a realistic input x-ray spectrum. Simulations of circuits based on poly-Si thin-film transistors are used to determine the resulting output count rate as a function of input count rate, energy discrimination threshold and operating conditions.

  2. Performance of a four-element Si drift detector for X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy: resolution, maximum count rate, and dead-time correction with incorporation into the ATHENA data analysis software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woicik, J C; Ravel, B; Fischer, D A; Newburgh, W J

    2010-05-01

    The performance of a four-element Si drift detector for energy-dispersive fluorescence-yield X-ray absorption fine-structure measurements is reported, operating at the National Institute of Standards and Technology beamline X23A2 at the National Synchrotron Light Source. The detector can acquire X-ray absorption fine-structure spectra with a throughput exceeding 4 x 10(5) counts per second per detector element (>1.6 x 10(6) total counts per second summed over all four channels). At this count rate the resolution at 6 keV is approximately 220 eV, which adequately resolves the Mn Kalpha and Kbeta fluorescence lines. Accurate dead-time correction is demonstrated, and it has been incorporated into the ATHENA data analysis program. To maintain counting efficiency and high signal to background, it is suggested that the incoming count rate should not exceed approximately 70% of the maximum throughput.

  3. Performance of a four-element Si drift detector for X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy: resolution, maximum count rate, and dead-time correction with incorporation into the ATHENA data analysis software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woicik, J.C.; Newburgh, W.; Ravel, B.; Fischer, D.A.

    2010-03-09

    The performance of a four-element Si drift detector for energy-dispersive fluorescence-yield X-ray absorption fine-structure measurements is reported, operating at the National Institute of Standards and Technology beamline X23A2 at the National Synchrotron Light Source. The detector can acquire X-ray absorption fine-structure spectra with a throughput exceeding 4 x 10{sup 5} counts per second per detector element (>1.6 x 10{sup 6} total counts per second summed over all four channels). At this count rate the resolution at 6 keV is approximately 220 eV, which adequately resolves the Mn K{sub {alpha}} and K{sup {beta}} fluorescence lines. Accurate dead-time correction is demonstrated, and it has been incorporated into the ATHENA data analysis program. To maintain counting efficiency and high signal to background, it is suggested that the incoming count rate should not exceed {approx}70% of the maximum throughput.

  4. High Count Rate Single Photon Counting Detector Array Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An optical communications receiver requires efficient and high-rate photon-counting capability so that the information from every photon, received at the aperture,...

  5. Estimating the number of contributors to forensic DNA mixtures: does maximum likelihood perform better than maximum allele count?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haned, Hinda; Pène, Laurent; Lobry, Jean R; Dufour, Anne B; Pontier, Dominique

    2011-01-01

    Determining the number of contributors to a forensic DNA mixture using maximum allele count is a common practice in many forensic laboratories. In this paper, we compare this method to a maximum likelihood estimator, previously proposed by Egeland et al., that we extend to the cases of multiallelic loci and population subdivision. We compared both methods' efficiency for identifying mixtures of two to five individuals in the case of uncertainty about the population allele frequencies and partial profiles. The proportion of correctly resolved mixtures was >90% for both estimators for two- and three-person mixtures, while likelihood maximization yielded success rates 2- to 15-fold higher for four- and five-person mixtures. Comparable results were obtained in the cases of uncertain allele frequencies and partial profiles. Our results support the use of the maximum likelihood estimator to report the number of contributors when dealing with complex DNA mixtures. © 2010 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  6. 5 CFR 9701.312 - Maximum rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maximum rates. 9701.312 Section 9701.312 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY-OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT) DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES...

  7. The maximum rate of mammal evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Alistair R.; Jones, David; Boyer, Alison G.; Brown, James H.; Costa, Daniel P.; Ernest, S. K. Morgan; Fitzgerald, Erich M. G.; Fortelius, Mikael; Gittleman, John L.; Hamilton, Marcus J.; Harding, Larisa E.; Lintulaakso, Kari; Lyons, S. Kathleen; Okie, Jordan G.; Saarinen, Juha J.; Sibly, Richard M.; Smith, Felisa A.; Stephens, Patrick R.; Theodor, Jessica M.; Uhen, Mark D.

    2012-03-01

    How fast can a mammal evolve from the size of a mouse to the size of an elephant? Achieving such a large transformation calls for major biological reorganization. Thus, the speed at which this occurs has important implications for extensive faunal changes, including adaptive radiations and recovery from mass extinctions. To quantify the pace of large-scale evolution we developed a metric, clade maximum rate, which represents the maximum evolutionary rate of a trait within a clade. We applied this metric to body mass evolution in mammals over the last 70 million years, during which multiple large evolutionary transitions occurred in oceans and on continents and islands. Our computations suggest that it took a minimum of 1.6, 5.1, and 10 million generations for terrestrial mammal mass to increase 100-, and 1,000-, and 5,000-fold, respectively. Values for whales were down to half the length (i.e., 1.1, 3, and 5 million generations), perhaps due to the reduced mechanical constraints of living in an aquatic environment. When differences in generation time are considered, we find an exponential increase in maximum mammal body mass during the 35 million years following the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg) extinction event. Our results also indicate a basic asymmetry in macroevolution: very large decreases (such as extreme insular dwarfism) can happen at more than 10 times the rate of increases. Our findings allow more rigorous comparisons of microevolutionary and macroevolutionary patterns and processes.

  8. Bayesian analysis of energy and count rate data for detection of low count rate radioactive sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klumpp, John; Brandl, Alexander

    2015-03-01

    A particle counting and detection system is proposed that searches for elevated count rates in multiple energy regions simultaneously. The system analyzes time-interval data (e.g., time between counts), as this was shown to be a more sensitive technique for detecting low count rate sources compared to analyzing counts per unit interval (Luo et al. 2013). Two distinct versions of the detection system are developed. The first is intended for situations in which the sample is fixed and can be measured for an unlimited amount of time. The second version is intended to detect sources that are physically moving relative to the detector, such as a truck moving past a fixed roadside detector or a waste storage facility under an airplane. In both cases, the detection system is expected to be active indefinitely; i.e., it is an online detection system. Both versions of the multi-energy detection systems are compared to their respective gross count rate detection systems in terms of Type I and Type II error rates and sensitivity.

  9. Counting losses due to saturation effects of scintillation counters at high count rates

    CERN Document Server

    Hashimoto, K

    1999-01-01

    The counting statistics of a scintillation counter, with a preamplifier saturated by an overloading input, are investigated. First, the formulae for the variance and the mean number of counts, accumulated within a given gating time, are derived by considering counting-loss effects originating from the saturation and a finite resolving time of the electronic circuit. Numerical examples based on the formulae indicate that the saturation makes a positive contribution to the variance-to-mean ratio and that the contribution increases with count rate. Next the ratios are measured under high count rates when the preamplifier saturation can be observed. By fitting the present formula to the measured data, the counting-loss parameters can be evaluated. Corrections based on the parameters are made for various count rates measured in a nuclear reactor. As a result of the corrections, the linearity between count rate and reactor power can be restored.

  10. Fast radio burst event rate counts - I. Interpreting the observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macquart, J.-P.; Ekers, R. D.

    2018-02-01

    The fluence distribution of the fast radio burst (FRB) population (the `source count' distribution, N (>F) ∝Fα), is a crucial diagnostic of its distance distribution, and hence the progenitor evolutionary history. We critically reanalyse current estimates of the FRB source count distribution. We demonstrate that the Lorimer burst (FRB 010724) is subject to discovery bias, and should be excluded from all statistical studies of the population. We re-examine the evidence for flat, α > -1, source count estimates based on the ratio of single-beam to multiple-beam detections with the Parkes multibeam receiver, and show that current data imply only a very weak constraint of α ≲ -1.3. A maximum-likelihood analysis applied to the portion of the Parkes FRB population detected above the observational completeness fluence of 2 Jy ms yields α = -2.6_{-1.3}^{+0.7 }. Uncertainties in the location of each FRB within the Parkes beam render estimates of the Parkes event rate uncertain in both normalizing survey area and the estimated post-beam-corrected completeness fluence; this uncertainty needs to be accounted for when comparing the event rate against event rates measured at other telescopes.

  11. 7 CFR 3565.210 - Maximum interest rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maximum interest rate. 3565.210 Section 3565.210... AGRICULTURE GUARANTEED RURAL RENTAL HOUSING PROGRAM Loan Requirements § 3565.210 Maximum interest rate. The interest rate for a guaranteed loan must not exceed the maximum allowable rate specified by the Agency in...

  12. A multiwire proportional counter for very high counting rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa, A.F.; Guedes, G.P. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Tamura, E. [Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron (LNLS), Campinas, SP (Brazil); Pepe, I.M.; Oliveira, N.B. [Bahia Univ., Salvador, BA (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    1997-12-01

    Preliminary measurements in a proportional counter with two independently counting wires showed that counting rates up to 10{sup 6} counts/s per wire can be reached without critical loss in the true versus measured linearity relation. Results obtained with a detector containing 30 active wires (2 mm pitch) are presented. To each wire is associated a fast pre-amplifier and a discriminator channel. Global counting rates in excess to 10{sup 7} events/s are reported. Data acquisition systems are described for 1D (real time) and 2D (off-line) position sensitive detection systems. (author) 13 refs., 6 figs.

  13. Use of absolute lymphocyte count or neutrophil ingestion rate of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study was designed to evaluate absolute lymphocyte count or neutrophil ingestion rate of NBT as alternative indices to CD4+ T cell count in the management of HIV/AIDS subjects. 158 adult participants (male = 70, female = 88) were recruited for the study and grouped as: (i) Symptomatic HIV subjects with or ...

  14. BMRC: A Bitmap-Based Maximum Range Counting Approach for Temporal Data in Sensor Monitoring Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Cao

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Due to the rapid development of the Internet of Things (IoT, many feasible deployments of sensor monitoring networks have been made to capture the events in physical world, such as human diseases, weather disasters and traffic accidents, which generate large-scale temporal data. Generally, the certain time interval that results in the highest incidence of a severe event has significance for society. For example, there exists an interval that covers the maximum number of people who have the same unusual symptoms, and knowing this interval can help doctors to locate the reason behind this phenomenon. As far as we know, there is no approach available for solving this problem efficiently. In this paper, we propose the Bitmap-based Maximum Range Counting (BMRC approach for temporal data generated in sensor monitoring networks. Since sensor nodes can update their temporal data at high frequency, we present a scalable strategy to support the real-time insert and delete operations. The experimental results show that the BMRC outperforms the baseline algorithm in terms of efficiency.

  15. Reducing the Teen Death Rate. KIDS COUNT Indicator Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, Rima; Shore, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    Life continues to hold considerable risk for adolescents in the United States. In 2006, the teen death rate stood at 64 deaths per 100,000 teens (13,739 teens) (KIDS COUNT Data Center, 2009). Although it has declined by 4 percent since 2000, the rate of teen death in this country remains substantially higher than in many peer nations, based…

  16. The maximum growth rate of life on Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corkrey, Ross; McMeekin, Tom A.; Bowman, John P.; Olley, June; Ratkowsky, David

    2018-01-01

    Life on Earth spans a range of temperatures and exhibits biological growth rates that are temperature dependent. While the observation that growth rates are temperature dependent is well known, we have recently shown that the statistical distribution of specific growth rates for life on Earth is a function of temperature (Corkrey et al., 2016). The maximum rates of growth of all life have a distinct limit, even when grown under optimal conditions, and which vary predictably with temperature. We term this distribution of growth rates the biokinetic spectrum for temperature (BKST). The BKST possibly arises from a trade-off between catalytic activity and stability of enzymes involved in a rate-limiting Master Reaction System (MRS) within the cell. We develop a method to extrapolate quantile curves for the BKST to obtain the posterior probability of the maximum rate of growth of any form of life on Earth. The maximum rate curve conforms to the observed data except below 0°C and above 100°C where the predicted value may be positively biased. The deviation below 0°C may arise from the bulk properties of water, while the degradation of biomolecules may be important above 100°C. The BKST has potential application in astrobiology by providing an estimate of the maximum possible growth rate attainable by terrestrial life and perhaps life elsewhere. We suggest that the area under the maximum growth rate curve and the peak rate may be useful characteristics in considerations of habitability. The BKST can serve as a diagnostic for unusual life, such as second biogenesis or non-terrestrial life. Since the MRS must have been heavily conserved the BKST may contain evolutionary relics. The BKST can serve as a signature summarizing the nature of life in environments beyond Earth, or to characterize species arising from a second biogenesis on Earth.

  17. Maximum ikelihood estimation for the double-count method with independent observers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manly, Bryan F.J.; McDonald, Lyman L.; Garner, Gerald W.

    1996-01-01

    Data collected under a double-count protocol during line transect surveys were analyzed using new maximum likelihood methods combined with Akaike's information criterion to provide estimates of the abundance of polar bear (Ursus maritimus Phipps) in a pilot study off the coast of Alaska. Visibility biases were corrected by modeling the detection probabilities using logistic regression functions. Independent variables that influenced the detection probabilities included perpendicular distance of bear groups from the flight line and the number of individuals in the groups. A series of models were considered which vary from (1) the simplest, where the probability of detection was the same for both observers and was not affected by either distance from the flight line or group size, to (2) models where probability of detection is different for the two observers and depends on both distance from the transect and group size. Estimation procedures are developed for the case when additional variables may affect detection probabilities. The methods are illustrated using data from the pilot polar bear survey and some recommendations are given for design of a survey over the larger Chukchi Sea between Russia and the United States.

  18. Dinosaur Metabolism and the Allometry of Maximum Growth Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myhrvold, Nathan P.

    2016-01-01

    The allometry of maximum somatic growth rate has been used in prior studies to classify the metabolic state of both extant vertebrates and dinosaurs. The most recent such studies are reviewed, and their data is reanalyzed. The results of allometric regressions on growth rate are shown to depend on the choice of independent variable; the typical choice used in prior studies introduces a geometric shear transformation that exaggerates the statistical power of the regressions. The maximum growth rates of extant groups are found to have a great deal of overlap, including between groups with endothermic and ectothermic metabolism. Dinosaur growth rates show similar overlap, matching the rates found for mammals, reptiles and fish. The allometric scaling of growth rate with mass is found to have curvature (on a log-log scale) for many groups, contradicting the prevailing view that growth rate allometry follows a simple power law. Reanalysis shows that no correlation between growth rate and basal metabolic rate (BMR) has been demonstrated. These findings drive a conclusion that growth rate allometry studies to date cannot be used to determine dinosaur metabolism as has been previously argued. PMID:27828977

  19. Dinosaur Metabolism and the Allometry of Maximum Growth Rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myhrvold, Nathan P

    2016-01-01

    The allometry of maximum somatic growth rate has been used in prior studies to classify the metabolic state of both extant vertebrates and dinosaurs. The most recent such studies are reviewed, and their data is reanalyzed. The results of allometric regressions on growth rate are shown to depend on the choice of independent variable; the typical choice used in prior studies introduces a geometric shear transformation that exaggerates the statistical power of the regressions. The maximum growth rates of extant groups are found to have a great deal of overlap, including between groups with endothermic and ectothermic metabolism. Dinosaur growth rates show similar overlap, matching the rates found for mammals, reptiles and fish. The allometric scaling of growth rate with mass is found to have curvature (on a log-log scale) for many groups, contradicting the prevailing view that growth rate allometry follows a simple power law. Reanalysis shows that no correlation between growth rate and basal metabolic rate (BMR) has been demonstrated. These findings drive a conclusion that growth rate allometry studies to date cannot be used to determine dinosaur metabolism as has been previously argued.

  20. Maximum orbit plane change with heat-transfer-rate considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J. Y.; Hull, D. G.

    1990-01-01

    Two aerodynamic maneuvers are considered for maximizing the plane change of a circular orbit: gliding flight with a maximum thrust segment to regain lost energy (aeroglide) and constant altitude cruise with the thrust being used to cancel the drag and maintain a high energy level (aerocruise). In both cases, the stagnation heating rate is limited. For aeroglide, the controls are the angle of attack, the bank angle, the time at which the burn begins, and the length of the burn. For aerocruise, the maneuver is divided into three segments: descent, cruise, and ascent. During descent the thrust is zero, and the controls are the angle of attack and the bank angle. During cruise, the only control is the assumed-constant angle of attack. During ascent, a maximum thrust segment is used to restore lost energy, and the controls are the angle of attack and bank angle. The optimization problems are solved with a nonlinear programming code known as GRG2. Numerical results for the Maneuverable Re-entry Research Vehicle with a heating-rate limit of 100 Btu/ft(2)-s show that aerocruise gives a maximum plane change of 2 deg, which is only 1 deg larger than that of aeroglide. On the other hand, even though aerocruise requires two thrust levels, the cruise characteristics of constant altitude, velocity, thrust, and angle of attack are easy to control.

  1. High count rate gamma camera with independent modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massari, R.; Ucci, A.; Campisi, C.; Scopinaro, F.; Soluri, A.

    2015-11-01

    Advances in nuclear medical imaging are based on the improvements of the detector's performance. Generally the research is focussed on the spatial resolution improvement. However, another important parameter is the acquisition time that can significantly affect performance in some clinical investigation (e.g. first-pass cardiac studies). At present, there are several clinical imaging systems which are able to solve these diagnostic requirements, such as the D-SPECT Cardiac Imaging System (Spectrum Dynamics) or the Nucline Cardiodesk Medical Imaging System (Mediso). Actually, these solutions are organ-specific dedicated systems, while it would be preferable having general purpose planar detectors with high counting rate. Our group has recently introduced the use of scintillation matrices whose size is equal to the overall area of a position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT) in order to design a modular gamma camera. This study allowed optimising the overall pixel identification by improving and controlling the light collection efficiency of each PSPMT. Although we achieved a solution for the problems about the dead area at the junction of the PSPMTs when they are set side by side. In this paper, we propose a modular gamma camera design as the basis to build large area detectors. The modular detector design allows us to achieve better counting performance. In this approach, each module that is made of one or more PSPMTs, can actually acquire data independently and simultaneously, increasing the overall detection efficiency. To verify the improvement in count rate capability we have built two detectors with a field of view of 5 × 5cm2, by using four R8900-C12 PSPMTs (Hamamatsu Photonics K.K.). Each PSPMT was coupled to a dedicated discrete scintillation structure designed to obtain a good homogeneity, high imaging performance and high efficiency. One of the detectors was designed as a standard gamma camera, while the other was composed by four independent

  2. Counting rates modeling for PET scanners with GATE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guez, D.; Honore, P.F.; Kerhoas, S. [CEA, DSM, DAPNIA, SPHN, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette (France); Bataille, F.; Comtat, C.; Jan, S. [CEA, DSV, DRM, SHFJ, F-91401 Orsay (France)

    2008-07-01

    Several developments were made in the GATE simulation platform to allow accurate modeling of the count rate performances of PET scanners over a wide range of activity concentrations. A background noise module, a dead time and limited bandwidth modeling for the coincidences, and a delayed coincidence builder were added in the code. The results obtained for the modeling of the ECAT HRRT and Focus 220 scanners with the newly developed modules are discussed. They show that GATE can be used to accurately simulate the single event, prompt coincidence and delayed coincidence rates, from very low activity levels in the field of view up to levels that saturate the acquisition system. The new developments were committed into the public release of GATE, making them available for the whole community, thanks to the open source license under Which GATE is published (LGPL). (authors)

  3. Analysis of reaction schemes using maximum rates of constituent steps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motagamwala, Ali Hussain; Dumesic, James A

    2016-05-24

    We show that the steady-state kinetics of a chemical reaction can be analyzed analytically in terms of proposed reaction schemes composed of series of steps with stoichiometric numbers equal to unity by calculating the maximum rates of the constituent steps, rmax,i, assuming that all of the remaining steps are quasi-equilibrated. Analytical expressions can be derived in terms of rmax,i to calculate degrees of rate control for each step to determine the extent to which each step controls the rate of the overall stoichiometric reaction. The values of rmax,i can be used to predict the rate of the overall stoichiometric reaction, making it possible to estimate the observed reaction kinetics. This approach can be used for catalytic reactions to identify transition states and adsorbed species that are important in controlling catalyst performance, such that detailed calculations using electronic structure calculations (e.g., density functional theory) can be carried out for these species, whereas more approximate methods (e.g., scaling relations) are used for the remaining species. This approach to assess the feasibility of proposed reaction schemes is exact for reaction schemes where the stoichiometric coefficients of the constituent steps are equal to unity and the most abundant adsorbed species are in quasi-equilibrium with the gas phase and can be used in an approximate manner to probe the performance of more general reaction schemes, followed by more detailed analyses using full microkinetic models to determine the surface coverages by adsorbed species and the degrees of rate control of the elementary steps.

  4. Maximum-likelihood analysis and goodness-of-fit estimation in low count-rate experiments: {sup 85}Kr {beta} activity in the test facility of the Borexino detector and double-beta decay of {sup 76}Ge in the Heidelberg-Moscow experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ianni, A. E-mail: aldo.ianni@lngs.infn.it

    2004-01-01

    Statistical methods for low count-rate experiments are reviewed and applied to two samples of experimental data. In one case the {beta} activity of {sup 85}Kr in the test facility of the Borexino detector is determined. In another case a data sample from the Heidelberg-Moscow experiment used to claim the discovery of the neutrinoless double-beta decay of {sup 76}Ge is analyzed. Exploiting a Bayesian technique a conservative upper limit on the half-life of the 0{nu}2{beta} decay of {sup 76}Ge is found at T{sub 1/2}{sup 0{nu}}{>=}1.2x10{sup 25} yr (90% CL) in the window (2000-2080) keV.

  5. Maximum specific growth rate of anammox bacteria revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Narita, Yuko; Gao, Lin; Ali, Muhammad; Oshiki, Mamoru; Okabe, Satoshi

    2017-06-01

    Anammox bacteria have long been considered to be slow-growing bacteria. However, it has recently been reported that they could grow much faster than previously thought when they were cultivated in a membrane bioreactor (MBR) with a step-wise decrease in the solid retention time (SRT). Here, we reevaluated the maximum specific growth rates (μmax) of three phylogenetically distant anammox bacterial species (i.e. "Ca. Brocadia sinica", "Ca. Jettenia caeni" and "Ca. Scalindua sp.") by directly measuring 16S rRNA gene copy numbers using newly developed quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays. When free-living planktonic "Ca. B. sinica" and "Ca. J. caeni" cells were immobilized in polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and sodium alginate (SA) gel beads and cultivated in an up-flow column reactor with high substrate loading rates at 37 °C, the μmax were determined to be 0.33 ± 0.02 d-1 and 0.18 d-1 (corresponding doubling time of 2.1 day and 3.9 day) from the exponential increases in 16S rRNA genes copy numbers, respectively. These values were faster than the fastest growth rates reported for these species so far. The cultivation of anammox bacteria in gel beads was achieved less than one month without special cultivation method and selection pressure, and the exponential increase in 16S rRNA gene numbers was directly measured by qPCR with high reproducibility; therefore, the resulting μmax values were considered accurate. Taken together, the fast growth is, therefore, considered to be an intrinsic kinetic property of anammox bacteria. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Noise models for low counting rate coherent diffraction imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godard, Pierre; Allain, Marc; Chamard, Virginie; Rodenburg, John

    2012-11-05

    Coherent diffraction imaging (CDI) is a lens-less microscopy method that extracts the complex-valued exit field from intensity measurements alone. It is of particular importance for microscopy imaging with diffraction set-ups where high quality lenses are not available. The inversion scheme allowing the phase retrieval is based on the use of an iterative algorithm. In this work, we address the question of the choice of the iterative process in the case of data corrupted by photon or electron shot noise. Several noise models are presented and further used within two inversion strategies, the ordered subset and the scaled gradient. Based on analytical and numerical analysis together with Monte-Carlo studies, we show that any physical interpretations drawn from a CDI iterative technique require a detailed understanding of the relationship between the noise model and the used inversion method. We observe that iterative algorithms often assume implicitly a noise model. For low counting rates, each noise model behaves differently. Moreover, the used optimization strategy introduces its own artefacts. Based on this analysis, we develop a hybrid strategy which works efficiently in the absence of an informed initial guess. Our work emphasises issues which should be considered carefully when inverting experimental data.

  7. Platelet counts, MPV and PDW in culture proven and probable neonatal sepsis and association of platelet counts with mortality rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Mirza Sultan; Waheed, Abdul

    2014-05-01

    To determine frequency of thrombocytopenia and thrombocytosis, the MPV (mean platelet volume) and PDW (platelet distribution width) in patients with probable and culture proven neonatal sepsis and determine any association between platelet counts and mortality rate. Descriptive analytical study. NICU, Fazle Omar Hospital, from January 2011 to December 2012. Cases of culture proven and probable neonatal sepsis, admitted in Fazle Omar Hospital, Rabwah, were included in the study. Platelet counts, MPV and PDW of the cases were recorded. Mortality was documented. Frequencies of thrombocytopenia ( 450000/mm3) were ascertained. Mortality rates in different groups according to platelet counts were calculated and compared by chi-square test to check association. Four hundred and sixty nine patients were included; 68 (14.5%) of them died. One hundred and thirty six (29%) had culture proven sepsis, and 333 (71%) were categorized as probable sepsis. Thrombocytopenia was present in 116 (24.7%), and thrombocytosis was present in 36 (7.7%) cases. Median platelet count was 213.0/mm3. Twenty eight (27.7%) patients with thrombocytopenia, and 40 (12.1%) cases with normal or raised platelet counts died (p neonatal sepsis. Those with thrombocytopenia have higher mortality rate. No significant difference was present between PDW and MPV of the cases who survived and died.

  8. The tropical lapse rate steepened during the Last Glacial Maximum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loomis, S.E.; Russell, J.M.; Verschuren, D.; Morrill, C.; De Cort, G.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Olago, D.; Eggermont, H.; Street-Perrott, F.A.; Kelly, M.A.

    2017-01-01

    The gradient of air temperature with elevation (the temperature lapse rate) in the tropics is predicted to become lesssteep during the coming century as surface temperature rises, enhancing the threat of warming in high-mountainenvironments. However, the sensitivity of the lapse rate to climate

  9. The tropical lapse rate steepened during the Last Glacial Maximum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loomis, Shannon E; Russell, James M; Verschuren, Dirk; Morrill, Carrie; De Cort, Gijs; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S; Olago, Daniel; Eggermont, Hilde; Street-Perrott, F Alayne; Kelly, Meredith A

    The gradient of air temperature with elevation (the temperature lapse rate) in the tropics is predicted to become less steep during the coming century as surface temperature rises, enhancing the threat of warming in high-mountain environments. However, the sensitivity of the lapse rate to climate

  10. Spatial Seismicity Rates and Maximum Magnitudes for Background Earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Mark D.; Mueller, Charles S.; Frankel, Arthur D.; Zeng, Yuehua

    2008-01-01

    The background seismicity model is included to account for M 5.0 - 6.5 earthquakes on faults and for random M 5.0 ? 7.0 earthquakes that do not occur on faults included in the model (as in earlier models of Frankel et al., 1996, 2002 and Petersen et al., 1996). We include four different classes of earthquake sources in the California background seismicity model: (1) gridded (smoothed) seismicity, (2) regional background zones, (3) special fault zone models, and (4) shear zones (also referred to as C zones). The gridded (smoothed) seismicity model, the regional background zone model, and the special fault zones use a declustered earthquake catalog for calculation of earthquake rates. Earthquake rates in shear zones are estimated from the geodetically determined rate of deformation across an area of high strain rate. We use a truncated exponential (Gutenberg-Richter, 1944) magnitude-frequency distribution to account for earthquakes in the background models.

  11. Reducing the Child Poverty Rate. KIDS COUNT Indicator Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, Rima; Shore, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    In 2007, nearly one in five or 18 percent of children in the U.S. lived in poverty (KIDS COUNT Data Center, 2009). Many of these children come from minority backgrounds. African American (35 percent), American Indian (33 percent) and Latino (27 percent) children are more likely to live in poverty than their white (11 percent) and Asian (12…

  12. HEART-RATE-VARIABILITY SPECTRA BASED ON NONEQUIDISTANT SAMPLING - THE SPECTRUM OF COUNTS AND THE INSTANTANEOUS HEART-RATE SPECTRUM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANSTEENIS, HG; TULEN, JHM; MULDER, LJM

    This paper compares two methods to estimate heart rate variability spectra i.e., the spectrum of counts and the instantaneous heart rate spectrum. Contrary to Fourier techniques based on equidistant sampling of the interbeat intervals, the spectrum of counts of the instantaneous heart rate spectrum

  13. A Maximum Information Rate Quaternion Filter for Spacecraft Attitude Estimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijneveld, J.; Maas, A.; Choukroun, D.; Kuiper, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Building on previous works, this paper introduces a novel continuous-time stochastic optimal linear quaternion estimator under the assumptions of rate gyro measurements and of vector observations of the attitude. A quaternion observation model, which observation matrix is rank degenerate, is reduced

  14. 9 CFR 381.68 - Maximum inspection rates-New turkey inspection system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... for Bar-type cut turkey lines using a shackle with a 4-inch by 4-inch selector (or kickout), a 45... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maximum inspection rates-New turkey... Procedures § 381.68 Maximum inspection rates—New turkey inspection system. (a) The maximum inspection rates...

  15. 5 CFR 531.247 - Maximum payable rate rule for GM employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maximum payable rate rule for GM... REGULATIONS PAY UNDER THE GENERAL SCHEDULE Determining Rate of Basic Pay Special Rules for Gm Employees § 531.247 Maximum payable rate rule for GM employees. (a) A rate received by a GM employee may qualify as a...

  16. Not Everything that Counts Can be Counted: A Critical Look at Risk Ratings and Governance Indicators

    OpenAIRE

    Anja Linder; Carlos Santiso

    2003-01-01

    Accurately evaluating country risk and assessing the quality of governance in emerging market economies has become a priority of international corporations, investment banks and multilateral financial institutions. The rating system of the Political Risk Services (PRS) Group, the International Country Risk Guide (ICRG), constitutes one of the most influential time-series databases of country risk analysis. This study assesses the accuracy and predictive powers of the ICRG model, evaluating it...

  17. Allometries of maximum growth rate versus body mass at maximum growth indicate that non-avian dinosaurs had growth rates typical of fast growing ectothermic sauropsids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Jan; Griebeler, Eva Maria

    2014-01-01

    We tested if growth rates of recent taxa are unequivocally separated between endotherms and ectotherms, and compared these to dinosaurian growth rates. We therefore performed linear regression analyses on the log-transformed maximum growth rate against log-transformed body mass at maximum growth for extant altricial birds, precocial birds, eutherians, marsupials, reptiles, fishes and dinosaurs. Regression models of precocial birds (and fishes) strongly differed from Case's study (1978), which is often used to compare dinosaurian growth rates to those of extant vertebrates. For all taxonomic groups, the slope of 0.75 expected from the Metabolic Theory of Ecology was statistically supported. To compare growth rates between taxonomic groups we therefore used regressions with this fixed slope and group-specific intercepts. On average, maximum growth rates of ectotherms were about 10 (reptiles) to 20 (fishes) times (in comparison to mammals) or even 45 (reptiles) to 100 (fishes) times (in comparison to birds) lower than in endotherms. While on average all taxa were clearly separated from each other, individual growth rates overlapped between several taxa and even between endotherms and ectotherms. Dinosaurs had growth rates intermediate between similar sized/scaled-up reptiles and mammals, but a much lower rate than scaled-up birds. All dinosaurian growth rates were within the range of extant reptiles and mammals, and were lower than those of birds. Under the assumption that growth rate and metabolic rate are indeed linked, our results suggest two alternative interpretations. Compared to other sauropsids, the growth rates of studied dinosaurs clearly indicate that they had an ectothermic rather than an endothermic metabolic rate. Compared to other vertebrate growth rates, the overall high variability in growth rates of extant groups and the high overlap between individual growth rates of endothermic and ectothermic extant species make it impossible to rule out either of

  18. Allometries of maximum growth rate versus body mass at maximum growth indicate that non-avian dinosaurs had growth rates typical of fast growing ectothermic sauropsids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Werner

    Full Text Available We tested if growth rates of recent taxa are unequivocally separated between endotherms and ectotherms, and compared these to dinosaurian growth rates. We therefore performed linear regression analyses on the log-transformed maximum growth rate against log-transformed body mass at maximum growth for extant altricial birds, precocial birds, eutherians, marsupials, reptiles, fishes and dinosaurs. Regression models of precocial birds (and fishes strongly differed from Case's study (1978, which is often used to compare dinosaurian growth rates to those of extant vertebrates. For all taxonomic groups, the slope of 0.75 expected from the Metabolic Theory of Ecology was statistically supported. To compare growth rates between taxonomic groups we therefore used regressions with this fixed slope and group-specific intercepts. On average, maximum growth rates of ectotherms were about 10 (reptiles to 20 (fishes times (in comparison to mammals or even 45 (reptiles to 100 (fishes times (in comparison to birds lower than in endotherms. While on average all taxa were clearly separated from each other, individual growth rates overlapped between several taxa and even between endotherms and ectotherms. Dinosaurs had growth rates intermediate between similar sized/scaled-up reptiles and mammals, but a much lower rate than scaled-up birds. All dinosaurian growth rates were within the range of extant reptiles and mammals, and were lower than those of birds. Under the assumption that growth rate and metabolic rate are indeed linked, our results suggest two alternative interpretations. Compared to other sauropsids, the growth rates of studied dinosaurs clearly indicate that they had an ectothermic rather than an endothermic metabolic rate. Compared to other vertebrate growth rates, the overall high variability in growth rates of extant groups and the high overlap between individual growth rates of endothermic and ectothermic extant species make it impossible to rule

  19. Bone and gallium scans in mastocytosis: correlation with count rates, radiography, and microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ensslen, R.D. (Cross Cancer Inst., Edmonton, Alberta); Jackson, F.I.; Reid, A.M.

    1983-07-01

    Mastocytosis (urticaria pigmentosa) was proven in a patient suffering from severe back pain. A bone scan showed diffusely increased bone activity. Count rates were also abnormally elevated over several areas of the skeleton. Radiographs were consistent with mastocytosis in bone.

  20. ULY JUP GRB SOLAR X-RAY/COSMIC GAMMA-RAY RAW COUNT RATE

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The archived data consist of count rates from the sum of two hemispherical detectors covering 4 pi steradians and operating continuously. The detectors are 3 mm...

  1. GO JUP HIC HIGHRES ENERGETIC ION COUNT RATE V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides energetic (MeV) ion count rates and events measured by the Heavy Ion Counter (HIC) instrument on the Galileo spacecraft. These data are...

  2. GO JUP HIC SURVEY ENERGETIC ION COUNT RATE V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides energetic (MeV) ion count rates and events measured by the Heavy Ion Counter (HIC) instrument on the Galileo spacecraft. The data are derived...

  3. Automatic Measurement of Chew Count and Chewing Rate during Food Intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq, Muhammad; Sazonov, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Research suggests that there might be a relationship between chew count as well as chewing rate and energy intake. Chewing has been used in wearable sensor systems for the automatic detection of food intake, but little work has been reported on the automatic measurement of chew count or chewing rate. This work presents a method for the automatic quantification of chewing episodes captured by a piezoelectric sensor system. The proposed method was tested on 120 meals from 30 participants using two approaches. In a semi-automatic approach, histogram-based peak detection was used to count the number of chews in manually annotated chewing segments, resulting in a mean absolute error of 10.40% ± 7.03%. In a fully automatic approach, automatic food intake recognition preceded the application of the chew counting algorithm. The sensor signal was divided into 5-s non-overlapping epochs. Leave-one-out cross-validation was used to train a artificial neural network (ANN) to classify epochs as "food intake" or "no intake" with an average F1 score of 91.09%. Chews were counted in epochs classified as food intake with a mean absolute error of 15.01% ± 11.06%. The proposed methods were compared with manual chew counts using an analysis of variance (ANOVA), which showed no statistically significant difference between the two methods. Results suggest that the proposed method can provide objective and automatic quantification of eating behavior in terms of chew counts and chewing rates.

  4. A simple parameterization for the height of maximum ozone heating rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng; Hou, Can; Li, Jiangnan; Liu, Renqiang; Liu, Cuiping

    2017-12-01

    It is well-known that the height of the maximum ozone heating rate is much higher than the height of the maximum ozone concentration in the stratosphere. However, it lacks an analytical expression to explain it. A simple theoretical model has been proposed to calculate the height of maximum ozone heating rate and further understand this phenomenon. Strong absorption of ozone causes the incoming solar flux to be largely attenuated before reaching the location of the maximum ozone concentration. By comparing with the exact radiative transfer calculations, the heights of the maximum ozone heating rate produced by the theoretical model are generally very close to the true values. When the cosine of solar zenith angle μ0 = 1.0 , in US Standard atmosphere, the heights of the maximum ozone heating rate by the theoretical model are 41.4 km in the band 0.204-0.233 μm, 47.9 km in the band 0.233-0.270 μm, 44.5 km in the band 0.270-0.286 μm, 37.1 km in the band 0.286-0.303 μm, and 30.2 km in the band 0.303-0.323 μm, respectively. The location of the maximum ozone heating rate is sensitive to the solar spectral range. In band 1, the heights of the maximum ozone heating rate by the theoretical model are 52.3 km for μ0 = 0.1 , 47.1 km for μ0 = 0.3 , 44.6 km for μ0 = 0.5 , 43.1 km for μ0 = 0.7 , 41.9 km for μ0 = 0.9 , 41.4 km for μ0 = 1.0 in US Standard atmosphere, respectively. This model also illustrates that the location of the maximum ozone heating rate is sensitive to the solar zenith angle.

  5. New England observed and predicted August stream/river temperature maximum daily rate of change points

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The shapefile contains points with associated observed and predicted August stream/river temperature maximum negative rate of change in New England based on a...

  6. Development of Fast High-Resolution Muon Drift-Tube Detectors for High Counting Rates

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00287945; Dubbert, J.; Horvat, S.; Kortner, O.; Kroha, H.; Legger, F.; Richter, R.; Adomeit, S.; Biebel, O.; Engl, A.; Hertenberger, R.; Rauscher, F.; Zibell, A.

    2011-01-01

    Pressurized drift-tube chambers are e?cient detectors for high-precision tracking over large areas. The Monitored Drift-Tube (MDT) chambers of the muon spectrometer of the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) reach a spatial resolution of 35 micons and almost 100% tracking e?ciency with 6 layers of 30 mm diameter drift tubes operated with Ar:CO2 (93:7) gas mixture at 3 bar and a gas gain of 20000. The ATLAS MDT chambers are designed to cope with background counting rates due to neutrons and gamma-rays of up to about 300 kHz per tube which will be exceeded for LHC luminosities larger than the design value of 10-34 per square cm and second. Decreasing the drift-tube diameter to 15 mm while keeping the other parameters, including the gas gain, unchanged reduces the maximum drift time from about 700 ns to 200 ns and the drift-tube occupancy by a factor of 7. New drift-tube chambers for the endcap regions of the ATLAS muon spectrometer have been designed. A prototype chamber consisting of 12 times 8 l...

  7. Illinois Quality Counts: QRS Profile. The Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Child Trends, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a profile of Illinois' Quality Counts prepared as part of the Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment Study. The profile consists of several sections and their corresponding descriptions including: (1) Program Information; (2) Rating Details; (3) Quality Indicators for Center-Based Programs; (4) Indicators for Family…

  8. LASER: A Maximum Likelihood Toolkit for Detecting Temporal Shifts in Diversification Rates From Molecular Phylogenies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel L. Rabosky

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Rates of species origination and extinction can vary over time during evolutionary radiations, and it is possible to reconstruct the history of diversification using molecular phylogenies of extant taxa only. Maximum likelihood methods provide a useful framework for inferring temporal variation in diversification rates. LASER is a package for the R programming environment that implements maximum likelihood methods based on the birth-death process to test whether diversification rates have changed over time. LASER contrasts the likelihood of phylogenetic data under models where diversification rates have changed over time to alternative models where rates have remained constant over time. Major strengths of the package include the ability to detect temporal increases in diversification rates and the inference of diversification parameters under multiple rate-variable models of diversification. The program and associated documentation are freely available from the R package archive at http://cran.r-project.org.

  9. Exercise-induced maximum metabolic rate scaled to body mass by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The central postulation of the present approach to metabolic rate scaling is that exercise-induced maximum aerobic metabolic rate (MMR) is proportional to the fractal extent (V) of an animal. Total fractal extent can be calculated from the sum of the fractal extents of the capillary service units, as specified by the formula V ...

  10. Response function and count rates with the SODART Bragg-Spectrometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halm, I.; Wiebicke, H.J.; Christensen, Finn Erland

    1998-01-01

    The SODART X-ray telescope includes an Objective Crystal Spectrometer (OCS) providing an energy resolving power around 1000 by Bragg reflection upon crystals. The SODART-OCS response function is used within the XSPEC package for the calculation of count rates for X-ray line and continuum registra......The SODART X-ray telescope includes an Objective Crystal Spectrometer (OCS) providing an energy resolving power around 1000 by Bragg reflection upon crystals. The SODART-OCS response function is used within the XSPEC package for the calculation of count rates for X-ray line and continuum...

  11. Automatic Measurement of Chew Count and Chewing Rate during Food Intake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Farooq

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Research suggests that there might be a relationship between chew count as well as chewing rate and energy intake. Chewing has been used in wearable sensor systems for the automatic detection of food intake, but little work has been reported on the automatic measurement of chew count or chewing rate. This work presents a method for the automatic quantification of chewing episodes captured by a piezoelectric sensor system. The proposed method was tested on 120 meals from 30 participants using two approaches. In a semi-automatic approach, histogram-based peak detection was used to count the number of chews in manually annotated chewing segments, resulting in a mean absolute error of 10.40 % ± 7.03%. In a fully automatic approach, automatic food intake recognition preceded the application of the chew counting algorithm. The sensor signal was divided into 5-s non-overlapping epochs. Leave-one-out cross-validation was used to train a artificial neural network (ANN to classify epochs as “food intake” or “no intake” with an average F1 score of 91.09%. Chews were counted in epochs classified as food intake with a mean absolute error of 15.01% ± 11.06%. The proposed methods were compared with manual chew counts using an analysis of variance (ANOVA, which showed no statistically significant difference between the two methods. Results suggest that the proposed method can provide objective and automatic quantification of eating behavior in terms of chew counts and chewing rates.

  12. Maximum rate of sweat ions reabsorption during exercise with regional differences, sex, and exercise training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Tatsuro; Hirose, Megumi; Konishi, Kana; Gerrett, Nicola; Ueda, Hiroyuki; Kondo, Narihiko; Inoue, Yoshimitsu

    2017-07-01

    It is recently reported that determining sweat rate (SR) threshold for increasing galvanic skin conductance (GSC) would represent a maximum rate of sweat ion reabsorption in sweat glands. We evaluate the maximum rate of sweat ion reabsorption over skin regions, sex, and long-term exercise training by using the threshold analysis in the present study. Ten males (2 untrained, 4 sprinters, and 4 distance runners) and 12 females (5 untrained, 4 sprinters, and 3 distance runners) conducted graded cycling exercise for 45 min at low, middle, and high exercise intensities (heart rate 100-110, 120-130, and 140-150 beats/min, respectively) for 10, 15, and 20 min, respectively, at 30 °C and 50% relative humidity. Comparisons were made between males and females and among untrained individuals, distance runners, and sprinters on the back and forearm. SR threshold for increasing GSC on back was significantly higher than that of forearm (P sprinters showed higher SR threshold for increasing GSC than that of untrained subjects on back (P sprinters, respectively). These results suggest that the maximum sweat ion reabsorption rate on the back is higher than that of forearm without sex differences. Furthermore, exercise training in distance runners and sprinters improves the maximum sweat ion reabsorption rate on the back.

  13. The response rate at chemotherapy in advanced Hodgkin's disease reflected by peripheral lymphocyte count.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krizan, Z; Korec, S; Bohunický, L

    1978-01-01

    Forty patients with advanced Hodgkin's disease stage III and IV were treated with combination chemotherapy. Absolute lymphocyte count in the peripheral blood was determined before start to chemotherapy. Higher levels of lymphocytes in the peripheral blood were associated with higher chemotherapy response rates. This difference was statistically significant (P less than 0.05).

  14. Statistical evaluation of photon count rate data for nanoscale particle measurement in wastewaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeraldi, Josh; Ganesh, Rajagopalan; Safarik, Jana; Rosso, Diego

    2012-01-01

    The dynamic light scattering (DLS) technique can detect the concentration and size distribution of nanoscale particles in aqueous solutions by analyzing photon interactions. This study evaluated the applicability of using photon count rate data from DLS analyses for measuring levels of biogenic and manufactured nanoscale particles in wastewater. Statistical evaluations were performed using secondary wastewater effluent and a Malvern Zetasizer. Dynamic light scattering analyses were performed equally by two analysts over a period of two days using five dilutions and twelve replicates for each dilution. Linearity evaluation using the sixty sample analysis yielded a regression coefficient R(2) = 0.959. The accuracy analysis for various dilutions indicated a recovery of 100 ± 6%. Precision analyses indicated low variance coefficients for the impact of analysts, days, and within sample error. The variation by analysts was apparent only in the most diluted sample (intermediate precision ~12%), where the photon count rate was close to the instrument detection limit. The variation for different days was apparent in the two most concentrated samples, which indicated that wastewater samples must be analyzed for nanoscale particle measurement within the same day of collection. Upon addition of 10 mg l(-1) of nanosilica to wastewater effluent samples, the measured photon count rates were within 5% of the estimated values. The results indicated that photon count rate data can effectively complement various techniques currently available to detect nanoscale particles in wastewaters.

  15. A prototype High Purity Germanium detector for high resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy at high count rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, R.J., E-mail: rjcooper@lbl.gov [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Amman, M.; Luke, P.N. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Vetter, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2015-09-21

    Where energy resolution is paramount, High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors continue to provide the optimum solution for gamma-ray detection and spectroscopy. Conventional large-volume HPGe detectors are typically limited to count rates on the order of ten thousand counts per second, however, limiting their effectiveness for high count rate applications. To address this limitation, we have developed a novel prototype HPGe detector designed to be capable of achieving fine energy resolution and high event throughput at count rates in excess of one million counts per second. We report here on the concept, design, and initial performance of the first prototype device.

  16. Maximum Rate of Growth of Enstrophy in Solutions of the Fractional Burgers Equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Dongfang; Protas, Bartosz

    2018-02-01

    This investigation is a part of a research program aiming to characterize the extreme behavior possible in hydrodynamic models by analyzing the maximum growth of certain fundamental quantities. We consider here the rate of growth of the classical and fractional enstrophy in the fractional Burgers equation in the subcritical and supercritical regimes. Since solutions to this equation exhibit, respectively, globally well-posed behavior and finite-time blowup in these two regimes, this makes it a useful model to study the maximum instantaneous growth of enstrophy possible in these two distinct situations. First, we obtain estimates on the rates of growth and then show that these estimates are sharp up to numerical prefactors. This is done by numerically solving suitably defined constrained maximization problems and then demonstrating that for different values of the fractional dissipation exponent the obtained maximizers saturate the upper bounds in the estimates as the enstrophy increases. We conclude that the power-law dependence of the enstrophy rate of growth on the fractional dissipation exponent has the same global form in the subcritical, critical and parts of the supercritical regime. This indicates that the maximum enstrophy rate of growth changes smoothly as global well-posedness is lost when the fractional dissipation exponent attains supercritical values. In addition, nontrivial behavior is revealed for the maximum rate of growth of the fractional enstrophy obtained for small values of the fractional dissipation exponents. We also characterize the structure of the maximizers in different cases.

  17. A real-time phoneme counting algorithm and application for speech rate monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aharonson, Vered; Aharonson, Eran; Raichlin-Levi, Katia; Sotzianu, Aviv; Amir, Ofer; Ovadia-Blechman, Zehava

    2017-03-01

    Adults who stutter can learn to control and improve their speech fluency by modifying their speaking rate. Existing speech therapy technologies can assist this practice by monitoring speaking rate and providing feedback to the patient, but cannot provide an accurate, quantitative measurement of speaking rate. Moreover, most technologies are too complex and costly to be used for home practice. We developed an algorithm and a smartphone application that monitor a patient's speaking rate in real time and provide user-friendly feedback to both patient and therapist. Our speaking rate computation is performed by a phoneme counting algorithm which implements spectral transition measure extraction to estimate phoneme boundaries. The algorithm is implemented in real time in a mobile application that presents its results in a user-friendly interface. The application incorporates two modes: one provides the patient with visual feedback of his/her speech rate for self-practice and another provides the speech therapist with recordings, speech rate analysis and tools to manage the patient's practice. The algorithm's phoneme counting accuracy was validated on ten healthy subjects who read a paragraph at slow, normal and fast paces, and was compared to manual counting of speech experts. Test-retest and intra-counter reliability were assessed. Preliminary results indicate differences of -4% to 11% between automatic and human phoneme counting. Differences were largest for slow speech. The application can thus provide reliable, user-friendly, real-time feedback for speaking rate control practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Maximum Acceptable Vibrato Excursion as a Function of Vibrato Rate in Musicians and Non-musicians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vatti, Marianna; Santurette, Sébastien; Pontoppidan, Niels H.

    Human vibrato is mainly characterized by two parameters: vibrato extent and vibrato rate. These parameters have been found to exhibit an interaction both in physical recordings of singers’ voices and in listener’s preference ratings. This study was concerned with the way in which the maximum...... and, in most listeners, exhibited a peak at medium vibrato rates (5–7 Hz). Large across-subject variability was observed, and no significant effect of musical experience was found. Overall, most listeners were not solely sensitive to the vibrato excursion and there was a listener-dependent rate...

  19. Maximum Acceptable Vibrato Excursion as a Function of Vibrato Rate in Musicians and Non-musicians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vatti, Marianna; Santurette, Sébastien; Pontoppidan, Niels H.

    2014-01-01

    Human vibrato is mainly characterized by two parameters: vibrato extent and vibrato rate. These parameters have been found to exhibit an interaction both in physical recordings of singers’ voices and in listener’s preference ratings. This study was concerned with the way in which the maximum...... and, in most listeners, exhibited a peak at medium vibrato rates (5–7 Hz). Large across-subject variability was observed, and no significant effect of musical experience was found. Overall, most listeners were not solely sensitive to the vibrato excursion and there was a listener-dependent rate...

  20. Maximum initial growth-rate of strong-shock-driven Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abarzhi, Snezhana I.; Bhowmich, Aklant K.; Dell, Zachary R.; Pandian, Arun; Stanic, Milos; Stellingwerf, Robert F.; Swisher, Nora C.

    2017-10-01

    We focus on classical problem of dependence on the initial conditions of the initial growth-rate of strong shocks driven Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) by developing a novel empirical model and by employing rigorous theories and Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations to describe the simulations data with statistical confidence in a broad parameter regime. For given values of the shock strength, fluids' density ratio, and wavelength of the initial perturbation of the fluid interface, we find the maximum value of RMI initial growth-rate, the corresponding amplitude scale of the initial perturbation, and the maximum fraction of interfacial energy. This amplitude scale is independent of the shock strength and density ratio, and is characteristic quantity of RMI dynamics. We discover the exponential decay of the ratio of the initial and linear growth-rates of RMI with the initial perturbation amplitude that excellently agrees with available data. National Science Foundation, USA.

  1. Disentangling the effects of alternation rate and maximum run length on judgments of randomness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine G. Scholl

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Binary sequences are characterized by various features. Two of these characteristics---alternation rate and run length---have repeatedly been shown to influence judgments of randomness. The two characteristics, however, have usually been investigated separately, without controlling for the other feature. Because the two features are correlated but not identical, it seems critical to analyze their unique impact, as well as their interaction, so as to understand more clearly what influences judgments of randomness. To this end, two experiments on the perception of binary sequences orthogonally manipulated alternation rate and maximum run length (i.e., length of the longest run within the sequence. Results show that alternation rate consistently exerts a unique effect on judgments of randomness, but that the effect of alternation rate is contingent on the length of the longest run within the sequence. The effect of maximum run length was found to be small and less consistent. Together, these findings extend prior randomness research by integrating literature from the realms of perception, categorization, and prediction, as well as by showing the unique and joint effects of alternation rate and maximum run length on judgments of randomness.

  2. Effects of calibration methods on quantitative material decomposition in photon-counting spectral computed tomography using a maximum a posteriori estimator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Tyler E; Roeder, Ryan K

    2017-10-01

    Advances in photon-counting detectors have enabled quantitative material decomposition using multi-energy or spectral computed tomography (CT). Supervised methods for material decomposition utilize an estimated attenuation for each material of interest at each photon energy level, which must be calibrated based upon calculated or measured values for known compositions. Measurements using a calibration phantom can advantageously account for system-specific noise, but the effect of calibration methods on the material basis matrix and subsequent quantitative material decomposition has not been experimentally investigated. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the influence of the range and number of contrast agent concentrations within a modular calibration phantom on the accuracy of quantitative material decomposition in the image domain. Gadolinium was chosen as a model contrast agent in imaging phantoms, which also contained bone tissue and water as negative controls. The maximum gadolinium concentration (30, 60, and 90 mM) and total number of concentrations (2, 4, and 7) were independently varied to systematically investigate effects of the material basis matrix and scaling factor calibration on the quantitative (root mean squared error, RMSE) and spatial (sensitivity and specificity) accuracy of material decomposition. Images of calibration and sample phantoms were acquired using a commercially available photon-counting spectral micro-CT system with five energy bins selected to normalize photon counts and leverage the contrast agent k-edge. Material decomposition of gadolinium, calcium, and water was performed for each calibration method using a maximum a posteriori estimator. Both the quantitative and spatial accuracy of material decomposition were most improved by using an increased maximum gadolinium concentration (range) in the basis matrix calibration; the effects of using a greater number of concentrations were relatively small in

  3. Effects of electric field on the maximum electro-spinning rate of silk fibroin solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Bo Kyung; Um, In Chul

    2017-02-01

    Owing to the excellent cyto-compatibility of silk fibroin (SF) and the simple fabrication of nano-fibrous webs, electro-spun SF webs have attracted much research attention in numerous biomedical fields. Because the production rate of electro-spun webs is strongly dependent on the electro-spinning rate used, the electro-spinning rate becomes more important. In the present study, to improve the electro-spinning rate of SF solutions, various electric fields were applied during electro-spinning of SF, and its effects on the maximum electro-spinning rate of SF solution as well as diameters and molecular conformations of the electro-spun SF fibers were examined. As the electric field was increased, the maximum electro-spinning rate of the SF solution also increased. The maximum electro-spinning rate of a 13% SF solution could be increased 12×by increasing the electric field from 0.5kV/cm (0.25mL/h) to 2.5kV/cm (3.0mL/h). The dependence of the fiber diameter on the present electric field was not significant when using less-concentrated SF solutions (7-9% SF). On the other hand, at higher SF concentrations the electric field had a greater effect on the resulting fiber diameter. The electric field had a minimal effect of the molecular conformation and crystallinity index of the electro-spun SF webs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A relationship between salivary flow rates and Candida counts in patients with xerostomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadig, Suchetha Devendrappa; Ashwathappa, Deepak Timmasandra; Manjunath, Muniraju; Krishna, Sowmya; Annaji, Araleri Gopalkrishna; Shivaprakash, Praveen Kunigal

    2017-01-01

    Most of the adult population is colonized by Candida in their oral cavity. The process of colonization depends on several factors, including the interaction between Candida and salivary proteins. Therefore, salivary gland hypofunction may alter the oral microbiota and increase the risk for opportunistic infections, such as candidiasis. Hence, it is necessary to evaluate the relationship between salivary flow rates (SFRs) and Candida colony counts in the saliva of patients with xerostomia. This study aims to determine and evaluate the relationship between SFRs and Candida colony forming units (CFUs) in patients with xerostomia. This study was a descriptive study. The study participants were taken from the patients attending outpatient department in a private dental college. Fifty patients, who reported xerostomia in a questionnaire of the symptoms of xerostomia, were selected. Chewing stimulated whole saliva samples were collected from them and their SFRs were assessed. Saliva samples were inoculated in the Sabouraud dextrose agar culture media for 24-48 h, and Candida CFUs were counted. Chi-squared test was used to analyze the data. There was a significant inverse relationship between salivary flow and candida CFUs count when patients with high colony counts were analyzed (cutoff point of 400 or greater CFU/mL). Females had less SFR than males. Most of the patients who had hyposalivation were taking medication for the underlying systemic diseases. Candida albicans was the most frequent species. There was a significantly negative correlation between SFRs and Candida CFUs in the patients with xerostomia.

  5. Do eosinophil counts correlate differently with asthma severity by symptoms versus peak flow rate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshak, E A; Alamoudi, O S

    1999-12-01

    Discrepancy in asthmatic assessment by symptoms and peak flow rate (PFR) is a frequent dilemma. Currently, total peripheral eosinophil count (TPEC) is under study for asthma evaluation. To explore the correlation between TPEC and asthma severity assessed by symptoms alone versus symptoms and PFR. Adults asthmatics were selected from the Asthma Clinic. Severity assessment was based on two methods: symptoms alone or symptoms and PFR. Expiratory PFR was recorded by a Wright peak flow meter. Severity levels included mild intermittent, mild persistent, moderate persistent, and severe persistent. Total peripheral eosinophil count was performed on a Celldyn-3500 counter. Data was analyzed for statistical significance. Sixty asthmatics aged 15 to 70 years (mean = 34 years), of which 68.3% were female, were studied. Severity levels differed between the two assessment methods in 45% of the cases and showed a predominance of the moderate persistent type. Total peripheral eosinophil count ranged between 22 and 2470 cells/mm3 (mean = 520 +/- SD = 393) and eosinophilia was found in 50% of the cases. Total peripheral eosinophil count showed a high positive correlation with increased asthma severity level assessed by history alone (r = 0.460, P < .001); more than by history and PFR (r = 0.328, P < .05). The discrepancy between symptoms and PFR is confirmed by these results. A reliable objective parameter in asthma assessment is a continuous challenge. This study advocates the possible supplementation of TPEC as another objective parameter that might help in selecting the appropriate severity level in asthmatics.

  6. Platelet count and erythrocyte sedimentation rate are good predictors of Kawasaki disease: ROC analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiu-Yu, Song; Jia-Yu, Huang; Qiang, Hong; Shu-Hui, Dai

    2010-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is the leading cause of acquired pediatric cardiac disease and requires a timely diagnosis. Available effective therapy is ideally administered within 10 days of illness diagnosis. Recent reports of several laboratory tests in KD have been published. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of several laboratory tests. We performed a retrospective study of consecutive patients diagnosed with KD from January to December 2008. We studied the sensitivity and specificity of several different tests [T-cell subgroups, platelet count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and C-reactive protein (CRP)] to predict KD using receiver operator characteristic curve analysis. No significant difference was demonstrated in T-cell subgroups between patients with KD and referent patients (P>0.05). However, platelet count, ESR, and CRP were significantly higher in patients with KD than in referent patients (P<0.05). ESR showed a sensitivity of 93.9% and specificity of 83.3% with a cut-off of 15  mm/hr (area under the curve [AUC], 89.1%; P=0.03). Platelet count showed a sensitivity of 70.6% and specificity of 75% with a cut-off of 336.5×10(9)/l (AUC, 71.2%; P=0.03). These results indicate that platelet count and ESR are good predictors of KD. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Maximum Data Collection Rate Routing Protocol Based on Topology Control for Rechargeable Wireless Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Haifeng; Bai, Di; Gao, Demin; Liu, Yunfei

    2016-07-30

    In Rechargeable Wireless Sensor Networks (R-WSNs), in order to achieve the maximum data collection rate it is critical that sensors operate in very low duty cycles because of the sporadic availability of energy. A sensor has to stay in a dormant state in most of the time in order to recharge the battery and use the energy prudently. In addition, a sensor cannot always conserve energy if a network is able to harvest excessive energy from the environment due to its limited storage capacity. Therefore, energy exploitation and energy saving have to be traded off depending on distinct application scenarios. Since higher data collection rate or maximum data collection rate is the ultimate objective for sensor deployment, surplus energy of a node can be utilized for strengthening packet delivery efficiency and improving the data generating rate in R-WSNs. In this work, we propose an algorithm based on data aggregation to compute an upper data generation rate by maximizing it as an optimization problem for a network, which is formulated as a linear programming problem. Subsequently, a dual problem by introducing Lagrange multipliers is constructed, and subgradient algorithms are used to solve it in a distributed manner. At the same time, a topology controlling scheme is adopted for improving the network's performance. Through extensive simulation and experiments, we demonstrate that our algorithm is efficient at maximizing the data collection rate in rechargeable wireless sensor networks.

  8. A real-time maximum-likelihood heart-rate estimator for wearable textile sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Mu-Huo; Chen, Li-Chung; Hung, Ying-Che; Yang, Chang Ming

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a real-time maximum-likelihood heart-rate estimator for ECG data measured via wearable textile sensors. The ECG signals measured from wearable dry electrodes are notorious for its susceptibility to interference from the respiration or the motion of wearing person such that the signal quality may degrade dramatically. To overcome these obstacles, in the proposed heart-rate estimator we first employ the subspace approach to remove the wandering baseline, then use a simple nonlinear absolute operation to reduce the high-frequency noise contamination, and finally apply the maximum likelihood estimation technique for estimating the interval of R-R peaks. A parameter derived from the byproduct of maximum likelihood estimation is also proposed as an indicator for signal quality. To achieve the goal of real-time, we develop a simple adaptive algorithm from the numerical power method to realize the subspace filter and apply the fast-Fourier transform (FFT) technique for realization of the correlation technique such that the whole estimator can be implemented in an FPGA system. Experiments are performed to demonstrate the viability of the proposed system.

  9. Gamma spectrum, count rate, and dose rate measurements of the Columbia riverbank from Vernita to Sacajawea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grande, L.A.

    1966-01-31

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate radiological conditions that exist on the riverbank of the Columbia River. Included was a comparative study of the suitability of three instruments to measure the dose rates. These instruments were a NaI (T1) scintillation counter normally used for aerial monitoring, a bioplastic scintillation counter normally used as a road monitor, and a portable 40 liter ionization chamber normally used to measure very low gamma dose rates. The selection of representative sites for the comparative study was based on an initial GM survey of the general areas in question. Seven sites were studied--from Vernita Ferry Landing above the Hanford project to Sacajawea Park below Pasco.

  10. Maximum two-phase flow rates of subcooled nitrogen through a sharp-edged orifice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoneau, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    An experiment was conducted and data are presented in which subcooled liquid nitrogen was discharged through a sharp-edged orifice at flow rates near the maximum. The data covered a range of inlet stagnation pressure from slightly above saturation to twice the thermodynamic critical pressure. The data were taken along five separate inlet stagnation isotherms ranging from 0.75 to 1.035 times the thermodynamic critical temperature. The results indicate that: (1) subcooled liquids do not choke or approach maximum flow in an asymptotic manner even though the back pressure is well below saturation; (2) orifice flow coefficients are not constant as is frequently assumed. A metastable jet appears to exist which breaks down if the difference between back pressure and saturation pressure is large enough.

  11. Maximum Likelihood based comparison of the specific growth rates for P. aeruginosa and four mutator strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philipsen, Kirsten Riber; Christiansen, Lasse Engbo; Mandsberg, Lotte Frigaard

    2008-01-01

    The specific growth rate for P. aeruginosa and four mutator strains mutT, mutY, mutM and mutY–mutM is estimated by a suggested Maximum Likelihood, ML, method which takes the autocorrelation of the observation into account. For each bacteria strain, six wells of optical density, OD, measurements...... that best describes data is a model taking into account the full covariance structure. An inference study is made in order to determine whether the growth rate of the five bacteria strains is the same. After applying a likelihood-ratio test to models with a full covariance structure, it is concluded...... that the specific growth rate is the same for all bacteria strains. This study highlights the importance of carrying out an explorative examination of residuals in order to make a correct parametrization of a model including the covariance structure. The ML method is shown to be a strong tool as it enables...

  12. A relationship between salivary flow rates and Candida counts in patients with xerostomia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadig, Suchetha Devendrappa; Ashwathappa, Deepak Timmasandra; Manjunath, Muniraju; Krishna, Sowmya; Annaji, Araleri Gopalkrishna; Shivaprakash, Praveen Kunigal

    2017-01-01

    Context: Most of the adult population is colonized by Candida in their oral cavity. The process of colonization depends on several factors, including the interaction between Candida and salivary proteins. Therefore, salivary gland hypofunction may alter the oral microbiota and increase the risk for opportunistic infections, such as candidiasis. Hence, it is necessary to evaluate the relationship between salivary flow rates (SFRs) and Candida colony counts in the saliva of patients with xerostomia. Aims: This study aims to determine and evaluate the relationship between SFRs and Candida colony forming units (CFUs) in patients with xerostomia. Settings and Design: This study was a descriptive study. Subjects and Methods: The study participants were taken from the patients attending outpatient department in a private dental college. Fifty patients, who reported xerostomia in a questionnaire of the symptoms of xerostomia, were selected. Chewing stimulated whole saliva samples were collected from them and their SFRs were assessed. Saliva samples were inoculated in the Sabouraud dextrose agar culture media for 24–48 h, and Candida CFUs were counted. Statistical Analysis Used: Chi-squared test was used to analyze the data. Results: There was a significant inverse relationship between salivary flow and candida CFUs count when patients with high colony counts were analyzed (cutoff point of 400 or greater CFU/mL). Females had less SFR than males. Most of the patients who had hyposalivation were taking medication for the underlying systemic diseases. Candida albicans was the most frequent species. Conclusions: There was a significantly negative correlation between SFRs and Candida CFUs in the patients with xerostomia. PMID:28932047

  13. Effects, determination, and correction of count rate nonlinearity in multi-channel analog electron detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reber, T. J.; Plumb, N. C.; Waugh, J. A.; Dessau, D. S.

    2014-04-01

    Detector counting rate nonlinearity, though a known problem, is commonly ignored in the analysis of angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy where modern multichannel electron detection schemes using analog intensity scales are used. We focus on a nearly ubiquitous "inverse saturation" nonlinearity that makes the spectra falsely sharp and beautiful. These artificially enhanced spectra limit accurate quantitative analysis of the data, leading to mistaken spectral weights, Fermi energies, and peak widths. We present a method to rapidly detect and correct for this nonlinearity. This algorithm could be applicable for a wide range of nonlinear systems, beyond photoemission spectroscopy.

  14. Impact of the lower energy threshold on the NEMA NU2-2001 count-rate performance of a LSO based PET-CT scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckardt, J.; Schaefers, K.P.; Schober, O. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. Hospital Muenster (Germany); Herzog, H. [Inst. of Neuroscience and Biophysics Medicine, Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany); Kaepplinger, S. [Siemens Medical Solutions, Molecular Imaging (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of the lower energy threshold (LET) on the NEMA NU2-2001 count-rate performance of a LSO-based PET scanner (Siemens PET-CT Biograph Sensation 16). The quantitative measurements were focused on three different aspects: noise equivalent count rate (NEC), scatter fraction, and absolute sensitivity. Methods: According to the NEMA-NU2-2001 protocol count-rate-performance (NEC-2R, scatter fraction) and sensitivity were evaluated performing serial measurements at LETs of 350, 375, 400, 410, 420, 430, 440, and 450 keV (the upper energy threshold was fixed to 650 keV). NEMA protocols were adapted to account for the intrinsic radioactivity of {sup 176}Lu in the LSO crystals. Results: Up to a radioactivity concentration of 8 kBq/ml the highest NEC-rates were obtained at an LET of 410 keV, between 8 and 20 kBq/ml at an LET of 420 keV and above 20 kBq/ml at an LET of 430 keV. The overall NEC maximum was 67 kcps at 430 keV (at 28 kBq/ml). The minimum scatter fraction was measured at a radioactivity concentration of {proportional_to} 0.5 kBq/ml. The scatter fraction decreased continuously from 45% at an energy threshold of 350 keV to 24% at 450 keV. The maximum sensitivity of 5.8 kcps/MBq, was obtained at an LET of 350 keV and the minimum sensitivity of 4.2 kcps/MBq at an LET of 450 keV. At the LET with the maximum NEC-rate (430 keV) the sensitivity was 4.8 kcps/MBq. Conclusion: The optimal count-rate performance of the LSO-based PET system was found at LETs between 410 keV and 430 keV depending on the actual radioactivity concentration placed in the scanner. A global maximum in NEC count rate was obtained at an LET of 430 keV. (orig.)

  15. Effects of high count rates on the signals from GEM-based detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muenning, Konstantin; Ketzer, Bernhard; Ball, Markus [Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik, Bonn (Germany); Lippmann, Christian [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Collaboration: ALICE-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    Future upgrades of accelerator-based particle physics experiments aim at drastically increased event rates and challenge both detector and readout performance. At high count rates in particle detectors effects like signal pileup, baseline shift and fluctuations become important. Large size GEM detectors as envisaged e.g. for the ongoing ALICE TPC upgrade have the advantage of delivering a fast signal without ion tail in comparison to wire chambers but the large capacitive coupling between channels via the GEM electrode facing the readout pads leads to significant baseline shift and fluctuations (common mode effect). The poster is presenting the work on quantifying the common mode effect as a function of rate and the result of application of different filters in the digital data path. The results are needed for the design finalization of the read out electronics to be used at ALICE and other experiments.

  16. Keeping Count of All and Losing Count of a Few: The Construction of the High School Dropout Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Shana Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    The quality of the construction of the high school dropout rate is the policy issue investigated in this dissertation. This qualitative dissertation explores the constructs necessary to create a high school dropout rate and seeks to unearth complexities in the construction of the high school dropout rate. Every single year, approximately 1.2…

  17. Botanical and agronomic growth of two Panicum maximum cultivars, Mombasa and Tanzania, at varying sowing rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D. Hare

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A field trial in northeast Thailand during 2011–2013 compared the establishment and growth of 2 Panicum maximum cultivars, Mombasa and Tanzania, sown at seeding rates of 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 kg/ha. In the first 3 months of establishment, higher sowing rates produced significantly more DM than sowing at 2 kg/ha, but thereafter there were no significant differences in total DM production between sowing rates of 2–12 kg/ha. Lower sowing rates produced fewer tillers/m2 than higher sowing rates but these fewer tillers were significantly heavier than the more numerous smaller tillers produced by higher sowing rates. Mombasa produced 23% more DM than Tanzania in successive wet seasons (7,060 vs. 5,712 kg DM/ha from 16 June to 1 November 2011; and 16,433 vs. 13,350 kg DM/ha from 25 April to 24 October 2012. Both cultivars produced similar DM yields in the dry seasons (November–April, averaging 2,000 kg DM/ha in the first dry season and 1,750 kg DM/ha in the second dry season. Mombasa produced taller tillers (104 vs. 82 cm, longer leaves (60 vs. 47 cm, wider leaves (2 vs. 1.8 cm and heavier tillers (1 vs. 0.7 g than Tanzania but fewer tillers/m2 (260 vs. 304. If farmers improve soil preparation and place more emphasis on sowing techniques, there is potential to dramatically reduce seed costs.Keywords: Guinea grass, tillering, forage production, seeding rates, Thailand.DOI: 10.17138/TGFT(2246-253

  18. Performance of Drift-Tube Detectors at High Counting Rates for High-Luminosity LHC Upgrades

    CERN Document Server

    Bittner, Bernhard; Kortner, Oliver; Kroha, Hubert; Manfredini, Alessandro; Nowak, Sebastian; Ott, Sebastian; Richter, Robert; Schwegler, Philipp; Zanzi, Daniele; Biebel, Otmar; Hertenberger, Ralf; Ruschke, Alexander; Zibell, Andre

    2016-01-01

    The performance of pressurized drift-tube detectors at very high background rates has been studied at the Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF) at CERN and in an intense 20 MeV proton beam at the Munich Van-der-Graaf tandem accelerator for applications in large-area precision muon tracking at high-luminosity upgrades of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The ATLAS muon drifttube (MDT) chambers with 30 mm tube diameter have been designed to cope with and neutron background hit rates of up to 500 Hz/square cm. Background rates of up to 14 kHz/square cm are expected at LHC upgrades. The test results with standard MDT readout electronics show that the reduction of the drift-tube diameter to 15 mm, while leaving the operating parameters unchanged, vastly increases the rate capability well beyond the requirements. The development of new small-diameter muon drift-tube (sMDT) chambers for LHC upgrades is completed. Further improvements of tracking e?ciency and spatial resolution at high counting rates will be achieved with ...

  19. Inferring kinetic pathways, rates, and force dependence from nonprocessive optical tweezers experiments: a maximum likelihood approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalafut, Bennett; Visscher, Koen

    2008-10-01

    Optical tweezers experiments allow us to probe the role of force and mechanical work in a variety of biochemical processes. However, observable states do not usually correspond in a one-to-one fashion with the internal state of an enzyme or enzyme-substrate complex. Different kinetic pathways yield different distributions for the dwells in the observable states. Furthermore, the dwell-time distribution will be dependent upon force, and upon where in the biochemical pathway force acts. I will present a maximum-likelihood method for identifying rate constants and the locations of force-dependent transitions in transcription initiation by T7 RNA Polymerase. This method is generalizable to systems with more complicated kinetic pathways in which there are two observable states (e.g. bound and unbound) and an irreversible final transition.

  20. Maximum entropy modeling of metabolic networks by constraining growth-rate moments predicts coexistence of phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Martino, Daniele

    2017-12-01

    In this work maximum entropy distributions in the space of steady states of metabolic networks are considered upon constraining the first and second moments of the growth rate. Coexistence of fast and slow phenotypes, with bimodal flux distributions, emerges upon considering control on the average growth (optimization) and its fluctuations (heterogeneity). This is applied to the carbon catabolic core of Escherichia coli where it quantifies the metabolic activity of slow growing phenotypes and it provides a quantitative map with metabolic fluxes, opening the possibility to detect coexistence from flux data. A preliminary analysis on data for E. coli cultures in standard conditions shows degeneracy for the inferred parameters that extend in the coexistence region.

  1. Predicting the maximum rate of carboxylation based on the coordination hypothesis of leaf resource allocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, T. F.; Prentice, I. C.; Wang, H.; Wright, I. J.; Maire, V.; Dong, N.

    2015-12-01

    Photosynthetic traits in higher plants are known to vary with changes in climate and soil properties. These observed relationships have been included in land surface models through empirical equations, but a fundamental mechanistic understanding remains lacking, making spatial and temporal extrapolation difficult at best. Recent advances in the theory of optimal resource allocation provide a path through which to test hypotheses regarding the governing controls of various plant traits. Here, we propose an optimal theoretical underpinning, based on the coordination hypothesis, for spatial and temporal variations in the maximum rate of carboxylation, Vcmax, and test the theory using observations from 1500 species at 300 sites worldwide. Results suggest that variation in Vcmax can be explained through first-principles, based on the coordinated regulation of the balance of RuBP carboxylation and regeneration.

  2. The RUBISCO to Photosystem II Ratio Limits the Maximum Photosynthetic Rate in Picocyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorz, Jackie K; Allanach, Jessica R; Murphy, Cole D; Roodvoets, Mitchell S; Campbell, Douglas A; Cockshutt, Amanda M

    2015-02-04

    Marine Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus are picocyanobacteria predominating in subtropical, oligotrophic marine environments, a niche predicted to expand with climate change. When grown under common low light conditions Synechococcus WH 8102 and Prochlorococcus MED 4 show similar Cytochrome b6f and Photosystem I contents normalized to Photosystem II content, while Prochlorococcus MIT 9313 has twice the Cytochrome b6f content and four times the Photosystem I content of the other strains. Interestingly, the Prochlorococcus strains contain only one third to one half of the RUBISCO catalytic subunits compared to the marine Synechococcus strain. The maximum Photosystem II electron transport rates were similar for the two Prochlorococcus strains but higher for the marine Synechococcus strain. Photosystem II electron transport capacity is highly correlated to the molar ratio of RUBISCO active sites to Photosystem II but not to the ratio of cytochrome b6f to Photosystem II, nor to the ratio of Photosystem I: Photosystem II. Thus, the catalytic capacity for the rate-limiting step of carbon fixation, the ultimate electron sink, appears to limit electron transport rates. The high abundance of Cytochrome b6f and Photosystem I in MIT 9313, combined with the slower flow of electrons away from Photosystem II and the relatively low level of RUBISCO, are consistent with cyclic electron flow around Photosystem I in this strain.

  3. X-ray spectrometry and spectrum image mapping at output count rates above 100 kHz with a silicon drift detector on a scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newbury, Dale E

    2005-01-01

    A third-generation silicon drift detector (SDD) in the form of a silicon multicathode detector (SMCD) was tested as an analytical x-ray spectrometer on a scanning electron microscope. Resolution, output count rate, and spectral quality were examined as a function of the detector peaking time from 8 micros to 250 ns and over a range of input count rate (dead time). The SDD-SMCD (50 mm2 active area) produced a resolution of 134 eV with a peaking time of 8 micros. The peak width and peak channel were nearly independent of the input count rate (at 8 micros peaking time, the peak width degradation was 0.003 eV/percent dead time and peak position change was -0.7 eV over the dead time range tested). Maximum output count rates as high as 280 kHz were obtained with a 500 ns peaking time (188 eV resolution) and 500 kHz with a 250 ns peaking time (217 eV resolution). X-ray spectrum imaging was achieved with a pixel dwell time as short as 10 ms (with 1.3 ms overhead) in which a 2048 channel (10 eV/channel) spectrum with 2-byte intensity range was recorded at each pixel (scanned at 128 x 128). With a 220 kHz output count rate, a minor constituent of iron (present at a concentration of 0.04 mass fraction or 4 weight %) in an aluminum-nickel alloy could be readily detected in the x-ray maps derived from the x-ray spectrum image database accumulated in 185 s.

  4. Optimization of the ATLAS (s)MDT readout electronics for high counting rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kortner, Oliver; Kroha, Hubert; Nowak, Sebastian; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, Korbinian [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), Foehringer Ring 6, 80805 Muenchen (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    In the ATLAS muon spectrometer, Monitored Drift Tube (MDT) chambers are used for precise muon track measurement. For the high background rates expected at HL-LHC, which are mainly due to neutrons and photons produced by interactions of the proton collision products in the detector and shielding, new small-diameter muon drift tube (sMDT)-chambers with half the drift tube diameter of the MDT-chambers and ten times higher rate capability have been developed. The standard MDT readout electronics uses bipolar shaping in front of a discriminator. This shaping leads to an undershoot of same charge but opposite polarity following each pulse. With count rates also the probability of having the subsequent pulse in this undershoot increases, which leads to losses in efficiency and spatial resolution. In order to decrease this effect, discrete prototype electronics including Baseline Restoration has been developed. Results of their tests and data taken with them during muon beamtime measurements at CERN's Gamma Irradiation Facility will be presented. which causes a deterioration of signal pulses by preceding background hits, leading to losses in muon efficiency and drift tube spatial resolution. In order to mitigate these so-called signal pile-up effects, new readout electronics with active baseline restoration (BLR) is under development. Discrete prototype electronics with BLR functionality has been tested in laboratory measurements and in the Gamma Irradiation Facility at CERN under high γ-irradiation rates. Results of the measurements are presented.

  5. Effects of heartbeat feedback on beliefs about heart rate and heartbeat counting: a cautionary tale about interoceptive awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ring, Christopher; Brener, Jasper; Knapp, Kelley; Mailloux, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Heartbeat counting improves after exposure to heartbeat feedback either because feedback trains individuals to detect heartbeats or updates their knowledge/beliefs about heart rate. These possibilities were examined by assessing heartbeat counting, in different postures and following exercise, before and after exposure to immediate and delayed heartbeat feedback. Immediate and delayed feedback provided accurate information about heart rate and, therefore, either could update beliefs about heart rate. However, only immediate feedback marked each ventricular contraction and, thereby, could train participants to detect the beating of the heart by focusing attention on relevant internal sensations. Exposure to immediate and delayed feedback resulted in similar, significant increases in the accuracy of heartbeat counting, indicating that the feedback effect was mediated by non-sensory processes rather than by training participants to detect heartbeat sensations. The current findings demonstrate that the heartbeat counting task is not a valid method to assess cardioception. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. High count-rate study of two TES x-ray microcalorimeters with different transition temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Jun; Adams, Joseph S.; Bandler, Simon R.; Betancourt-Martinez, Gabriele L.; Chervenak, James A.; Eckart, Megan E.; Finkbeiner, Fred M.; Kelley, Richard L.; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Porter, Frederick S.; Sadleir, John E.; Smith, Stephen J.; Wassell, Edward J.

    2017-10-01

    We have developed transition-edge sensor (TES) microcalorimeter arrays with high count-rate capability and high energy resolution to carry out x-ray imaging spectroscopy observations of various astronomical sources and the Sun. We have studied the dependence of the energy resolution and throughput (fraction of processed pulses) on the count rate for such microcalorimeters with two different transition temperatures (T c). Devices with both transition temperatures were fabricated within a single microcalorimeter array directly on top of a solid substrate where the thermal conductance of the microcalorimeter is dependent upon the thermal boundary resistance between the TES sensor and the dielectric substrate beneath. Because the thermal boundary resistance is highly temperature dependent, the two types of device with different T cs had very different thermal decay times, approximately one order of magnitude different. In our earlier report, we achieved energy resolutions of 1.6 and 2.3 eV at 6 keV from lower and higher T c devices, respectively, using a standard analysis method based on optimal filtering in the low flux limit. We have now measured the same devices at elevated x-ray fluxes ranging from 50 Hz to 1000 Hz per pixel. In the high flux limit, however, the standard optimal filtering scheme nearly breaks down because of x-ray pile-up. To achieve the highest possible energy resolution for a fixed throughput, we have developed an analysis scheme based on the so-called event grade method. Using the new analysis scheme, we achieved 5.0 eV FWHM with 96% throughput for 6 keV x-rays of 1025 Hz per pixel with the higher T c (faster) device, and 5.8 eV FWHM with 97% throughput with the lower T c (slower) device at 722 Hz.

  7. Allometric equations for maximum filtration rate in blue mussels Mytilus edulis and importance of condition index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riisgård, Hans Ulrik; Larsen, Poul S.; Pleissner, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    The relationship between body dry weight ( W) and shell length ( L) of blue mussels, Mytilus edulis, can be expressed by the condition index (CI = W/ L 3) which varies from population to population and during the year. Here, we examine the influence of CI on the relationships between maximum filtration rate ( F, l h-1), W (g), and L (mm) as described by the equations: F W = aW b and F L = cL d , respectively. This is done by using available and new experimental laboratory data on M. edulis obtained by members of the same research team using different methods and controlled diets of cultivated algal cells. For all data, it was found that F W = 6.773 W 0.678 and F L = 0.00135 L 2.088 which are very similar to equations for mussels with `medium condition' (CI = 4-6 mg cm-3): F W = 6.567 W 0.681 and F L = 0.00150 L 2.051, with b- and d-values within a few percent of the theoretically expected of 2/3 and 2, respectively. Further, based on the present data, we propose a correction factor expressed by the empirical relation F W / F L = 0.3562CI2/3 which implies that F W tends to underestimate the actual filtration rate ( F L ) when CI 4.70.

  8. DISCREPANCY BETWEEN TRAINING, COMPETITION AND LABORATORY MEASURES OF MAXIMUM HEART RATE IN NCAA DIVISION 2 DISTANCE RUNNERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvah C. Stahlnecker IV

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A percentage of either measured or predicted maximum heart rate is commonly used to prescribe and measure exercise intensity. However, maximum heart rate in athletes may be greater during competition or training than during laboratory exercise testing. Thus, the aim of the present investigation was to determine if endurance-trained runners train and compete at or above laboratory measures of 'maximum' heart rate. Maximum heart rates were measured utilising a treadmill graded exercise test (GXT in a laboratory setting using 10 female and 10 male National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA division 2 cross-country and distance event track athletes. Maximum training and competition heart rates were measured during a high-intensity interval training day (TR HR and during competition (COMP HR at an NCAA meet. TR HR (207 ± 5.0 b·min-1; means ± SEM and COMP HR (206 ± 4 b·min-1 were significantly (p < 0.05 higher than maximum heart rates obtained during the GXT (194 ± 2 b·min-1. The heart rate at the ventilatory threshold measured in the laboratory occurred at 83.3 ± 2.5% of the heart rate at VO2 max with no differences between the men and women. However, the heart rate at the ventilatory threshold measured in the laboratory was only 77% of the maximal COMP HR or TR HR. In order to optimize training-induced adaptation, training intensity for NCAA division 2 distance event runners should not be based on laboratory assessment of maximum heart rate, but instead on maximum heart rate obtained either during training or during competition

  9. The validity of submaximal ratings of perceived exertion to predict one repetition maximum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eston, Roger; Evans, Harrison James Llewelyn

    2009-01-01

    The One Repetition Maximum (1-RM) test is commonly used to assess strength. However, direct assessments of 1-RM are time consuming and unsafe for novice lifters. Whilst various equations exist to predict 1-RM, there is limited research on the validity of these equations. The purpose of this study was to assess the validity of using sub-maximal ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) to predict 1-RM in young adults, using the Borg 6-20 RPE Scale. Twenty healthy participants (ten male (Mean ± SD, 20.8 ± 0.6 y, 75.7 ± 9.3 kg, 1.8 ± 0.07 m) and ten female (20.3 ± 0.7 y, 68.4 ± 10.0 kg, 1.68 ± 0.03 m)) completed two trials involving resistance exercises for both the upper and lower body. In the first trial the 1-RM for the bilateral biceps curl (BC) and the bilateral knee extension (KE) were determined for each participant. In the second trial, participants performed blinded repetitions which were equivalent to 20, 40 and 60 % of 1-RM for both exercises. The RPE was recorded immediately after two repetitions had been completed at each intensity. The order of intensity of the repetitions was randomly assigned with participants wearing blindfolds to exclude the possibility of pre-determined judgments about load and RPE. Individual RPE recorded at each intensity was subjected to linear regression analysis and the line of best fit was extrapolated to RPE 20 to predict 1-RM in both exercises. There was no significant difference (p > 0.05) between the 1-RM predicted from RPE 20 and measured 1-RM for both exercises for the men and women. Measured and predicted values for men were 46.0 ± 4.6 and 45.2 ± 6. 1 kg for biceps curl, and 46.3 ± 3.8 and 43.0 ± 7.1 kg for knee extension, respectively. Measured and predicted values for women were 18.6 ± 5.7 and 19.3 ± 5.6 kg for biceps curl, and 25.5 ± 9.6 and 27.2 ± 12.6 kg for knee extension, respectively. Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients between actual and predicted 1-RM for the BC and KE were 0.97 and 0

  10. Construction and Test of Muon Drift Tube Chambers for High Counting Rates

    CERN Document Server

    Schwegler, Philipp; Dubbert, Jörg

    2010-01-01

    Since the start of operation of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN on 20 November 2009, the instantaneous luminosity is steadily increasing. The muon spectrometer of the ATLAS detector at the LHC is instrumented with trigger and precision tracking chambers in a toroidal magnetic field. Monitored Drift-Tube (MDT) chambers are employed as precision tracking chambers, complemented by Cathode Strip Chambers (CSC) in the very forward region where the background counting rate due to neutrons and γ's produced in shielding material and detector components is too high for the MDT chambers. After several upgrades of the CERN accelerator system over the coming decade, the instantaneous luminosity is expected to be raised to about five times the LHC design luminosity. This necessitates replacement of the muon chambers in the regions with the highest background radiation rates in the so-called Small Wheels, which constitute the innermost layers of the muon spectrometer end-caps, by new detectors with higher rate cap...

  11. Maximum Evaporation Rates of Water Droplets Approaching Obstacles in the Atmosphere Under Icing Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowell, H. H.

    1953-01-01

    When a closed body or a duct envelope moves through the atmosphere, air pressure and temperature rises occur ahead of the body or, under ram conditions, within the duct. If cloud water droplets are encountered, droplet evaporation will result because of the air-temperature rise and the relative velocity between the droplet and stagnating air. It is shown that the solution of the steady-state psychrometric equation provides evaporation rates which are the maximum possible when droplets are entrained in air moving along stagnation lines under such conditions. Calculations are made for a wide variety of water droplet diameters, ambient conditions, and flight Mach numbers. Droplet diameter, body size, and Mach number effects are found to predominate, whereas wide variation in ambient conditions are of relatively small significance in the determination of evaporation rates. The results are essentially exact for the case of movement of droplets having diameters smaller than about 30 microns along relatively long ducts (length at least several feet) or toward large obstacles (wings), since disequilibrium effects are then of little significance. Mass losses in the case of movement within ducts will often be significant fractions (one-fifth to one-half) of original droplet masses, while very small droplets within ducts will often disappear even though the entraining air is not fully stagnated. Wing-approach evaporation losses will usually be of the order of several percent of original droplet masses. Two numerical examples are given of the determination of local evaporation rates and total mass losses in cases involving cloud droplets approaching circular cylinders along stagnation lines. The cylinders chosen were of 3.95-inch (10.0+ cm) diameter and 39.5-inch 100+ cm) diameter. The smaller is representative of icing-rate measurement cylinders, while with the larger will be associated an air-flow field similar to that ahead of an airfoil having a leading-edge radius

  12. Performance evaluation of the Ingenuity TF PET/CT scanner with a focus on high count-rate conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolthammer, Jeffrey A.; Su, Kuan-Hao; Grover, Anu; Narayanan, Manoj; Jordan, David W.; Muzic, Raymond F.

    2014-07-01

    This study evaluated the positron emission tomography (PET) imaging performance of the Ingenuity TF 128 PET/computed tomography (CT) scanner which has a PET component that was designed to support a wider radioactivity range than is possible with those of Gemini TF PET/CT and Ingenuity TF PET/MR. Spatial resolution, sensitivity, count rate characteristics and image quality were evaluated according to the NEMA NU 2-2007 standard and ACR phantom accreditation procedures; these were supplemented by additional measurements intended to characterize the system under conditions that would be encountered during quantitative cardiac imaging with 82Rb. Image quality was evaluated using a hot spheres phantom, and various contrast recovery and noise measurements were made from replicated images. Timing and energy resolution, dead time, and the linearity of the image activity concentration, were all measured over a wide range of count rates. Spatial resolution (4.8-5.1 mm FWHM), sensitivity (7.3 cps kBq-1), peak noise-equivalent count rate (124 kcps), and peak trues rate (365 kcps) were similar to those of the Gemini TF PET/CT. Contrast recovery was higher with a 2 mm, body-detail reconstruction than with a 4 mm, body reconstruction, although the precision was reduced. The noise equivalent count rate peak was broad (within 10% of peak from 241-609 MBq). The activity measured in phantom images was within 10% of the true activity for count rates up to those observed in 82Rb cardiac PET studies.

  13. Assessing base rates of sexual behavior using the unmatched count technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starosta, Amy J; Earleywine, Mitch

    2014-01-01

    Estimating the prevalence of sexual behaviors is difficult because of self-report biases. This is particularly relevant in assessing high-risk sexual behaviors for the purpose of reducing the transmission and acquisition of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and HIV/AIDS. The present study employed the unmatched count technique (UCT), which provides estimates of the prevalence of risky sexual behaviors without requiring participants to confess to socially undesirable or stigmatized behaviors. Compared to a standard, anonymous self-report questionnaire, the UCT protocol revealed that people were less likely to notify their partners about STIs or discuss their history of sexual experiences. Effects were particularly large in women suggesting that women may be more likely to misrepresent their sexual behaviors. The findings suggest that conventional, anonymous self-report questionnaire data of base rates of risky sexual behavior and sexual communication are consistently inaccurate. These discrepant base rates suggest that the UCT might provide a better estimate of the frequency of these behaviors. Results suggest that inconsistent sexual behavior is more rampant than anonymous questionnaires suggest. They also underscore the need for improvements in the anonymity of assessment of sexual behaviors, which could in turn improve the targeting of prevention efforts. Results have important public health implications because accurate assessment of sexual behaviors is crucial for developing effective STI prevention interventions among target populations.

  14. New England observed and predicted August stream/river temperature maximum positive daily rate of change points

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The shapefile contains points with associated observed and predicted August stream/river temperature maximum positive daily rate of change in New England based on a...

  15. New England observed and predicted July maximum negative stream/river temperature daily rate of change points

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The shapefile contains points with associated observed and predicted July stream/river temperature maximum negative daily rate of change in New England based on a...

  16. New England observed and predicted July stream/river temperature maximum positive daily rate of change points

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The shapefile contains points with associated observed and predicted July stream/river temperature maximum positive daily rate of change in New England based on a...

  17. Releasable activity and maximum permissible leakage rate within a transport cask of Tehran Research Reactor fuel samples

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rezaeian Mahdi; Kamali Jamshid; Roshanzamir Manoochehr; Moosakhani Alireza; Noori Elghar

    2015-01-01

    ... operators. Based on IAEA regulations, releasable activity and maximum permissible volumetric leakage rate within the cask containing fuel samples of Tehran Research Reactor enclosed in an irradiated capsule are calculated...

  18. Maximum rates of sustained metabolic rate in cold-exposed Djungarian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus): the second wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruf, Thomas; Grafl, Beatrice

    2010-10-01

    Djungarian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus) tolerate short-term exposure to ambient temperatures (T(a)s) down to -70°C, but surprisingly, previously appeared to reach maximum sustainable metabolic rate (SusMR) when kept at T(a)s as high as ≥-2°C. We hypothesized that SusMR in Djungarian hamsters may be affected by the degree of prior cold acclimation and temporal patterns of T(a) changes experienced by the animals, as average T(a) declines. After cold-acclimation at +5°C for 6 weeks, hamsters reached rates of SusMR that were 35% higher than previously determined and were able to maintain positive energy balances down to T(a) -9°C. SusMR was unaffected, however, by whether mean cold load was constant or caused by T(a)s cycling between +3°C and as low as -25°C, at hourly intervals. At mean T (a)s between +3 and -3°C hamsters significantly reduced body mass and energy expenditure, but were able to maintain stable body mass at lower T (a)s (-5 to -9°C). These results indicate that prior cold-acclimation profoundly affects SusMR in hamsters and that body mass regulation may play an integral part in maintaining positive energy balance during cold exposure. Because the degree of instantaneous cold load had no effect on SusMR, we hypothesize that limits to energy turnover in Djungarian hamsters are not determined by the capacity to withstand extreme temperatures (i.e., peripheral limits) but are due to central limitation of energy intake.

  19. Why does steady-state magnetic reconnection have a maximum local rate of order 0.1?

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yi-Hsin; Guo, F; Daughton, W; Li, H; Cassak, P A; Shay, M A

    2016-01-01

    Simulations suggest collisionless steady-state magnetic reconnection of Harris-type current sheets proceeds with a rate of order 0.1, independent of dissipation mechanism. We argue this long-standing puzzle is a result of constraints at the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) scale. We perform a scaling analysis of the reconnection rate as a function of the opening angle made by the upstream magnetic fields, finding a maximum reconnection rate close to 0.2. The predictions compare favorably to particle-in-cell simulations of relativistic electron-positron and non-relativistic electron-proton reconnection. The fact that simulated reconnection rates are close to the predicted maximum suggests reconnection proceeds near the most efficient state allowed at the MHD-scale. The rate near the maximum is relatively insensitive to the opening angle, potentially explaining why reconnection has a similar fast rate in differing models.

  20. ChromAIX2: A large area, high count-rate energy-resolving photon counting ASIC for a Spectral CT Prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steadman, Roger; Herrmann, Christoph; Livne, Amir

    2017-08-01

    Spectral CT based on energy-resolving photon counting detectors is expected to deliver additional diagnostic value at a lower dose than current state-of-the-art CT [1]. The capability of simultaneously providing a number of spectrally distinct measurements not only allows distinguishing between photo-electric and Compton interactions but also discriminating contrast agents that exhibit a K-edge discontinuity in the absorption spectrum, referred to as K-edge Imaging [2]. Such detectors are based on direct converting sensors (e.g. CdTe or CdZnTe) and high-rate photon counting electronics. To support the development of Spectral CT and show the feasibility of obtaining rates exceeding 10 Mcps/pixel (Poissonian observed count-rate), the ChromAIX ASIC has been previously reported showing 13.5 Mcps/pixel (150 Mcps/mm2 incident) [3]. The ChromAIX has been improved to offer the possibility of a large area coverage detector, and increased overall performance. The new ASIC is called ChromAIX2, and delivers count-rates exceeding 15 Mcps/pixel with an rms-noise performance of approximately 260 e-. It has an isotropic pixel pitch of 500 μm in an array of 22×32 pixels and is tile-able on three of its sides. The pixel topology consists of a two stage amplifier (CSA and Shaper) and a number of test features allowing to thoroughly characterize the ASIC without a sensor. A total of 5 independent thresholds are also available within each pixel, allowing to acquire 5 spectrally distinct measurements simultaneously. The ASIC also incorporates a baseline restorer to eliminate excess currents induced by the sensor (e.g. dark current and low frequency drifts) which would otherwise cause an energy estimation error. In this paper we report on the inherent electrical performance of the ChromAXI2 as well as measurements obtained with CZT (CdZnTe)/CdTe sensors and X-rays and radioactive sources.

  1. THE VALIDITY OF SUBMAXIMAL RATINGS OF PERCEIVED EXERTION TO PREDICT ONE REPETITION MAXIMUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harrison James Llewelyn Evans

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The One Repetition Maximum (1-RM test is commonly used to assess strength. However, direct assessments of 1-RM are time consuming and unsafe for novice lifters. Whilst various equations exist to predict 1-RM, there is limited research on the validity of these equations. The purpose of this study was to assess the validity of using sub-maximal ratings of perceived exertion (RPE to predict 1-RM in young adults, using the Borg 6-20 RPE Scale. Twenty healthy participants (ten male (Mean ± SD, 20.8 ± 0.6 y, 75.7 ± 9.3 kg, 1.8 ± 0.07 m and ten female (20.3 ± 0.7 y, 68.4 ± 10.0 kg, 1.68 ± 0.03 m completed two trials involving resistance exercises for both the upper and lower body. In the first trial the 1-RM for the bilateral biceps curl (BC and the bilateral knee extension (KE were determined for each participant. In the second trial, participants performed blinded repetitions which were equivalent to 20, 40 and 60 % of 1-RM for both exercises. The RPE was recorded immediately after two repetitions had been completed at each intensity. The order of intensity of the repetitions was randomly assigned with participants wearing blindfolds to exclude the possibility of pre-determined judgments about load and RPE. Individual RPE recorded at each intensity was subjected to linear regression analysis and the line of best fit was extrapolated to RPE 20 to predict 1-RM in both exercises. There was no significant difference (p > 0.05 between the 1-RM predicted from RPE 20 and measured 1-RM for both exercises for the men and women. Measured and predicted values for men were 46.0 ± 4.6 and 45.2 ± 6. 1 kg for biceps curl, and 46.3 ± 3.8 and 43.0 ± 7.1 kg for knee extension, respectively. Measured and predicted values for women were 18.6 ± 5.7 and 19.3 ± 5.6 kg for biceps curl, and 25.5 ± 9.6 and 27.2 ± 12.6 kg for knee extension, respectively. Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients between actual and predicted 1-RM for the BC and KE were 0

  2. Rate of AIDS diseases or death in HIV-infected antiretroviral therapy-naive individuals with high CD4 cell count

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Phillips, Andrew N; Gazzard, Brian; Gilson, Richard; Easterbrook, Philippa; Johnson, Margaret; Walsh, John; Leen, Clifford; Fisher, Martin; Orkin, Chloe; Anderson, Jane; Pillay, Deenan; Delpech, Valerie; Sabin, Caroline; Schwenk, Achim; Dunn, David; Gompels, Mark; Hill, Teresa; Porter, Kholoud; Babiker, Abdel

    2007-01-01

    .... Analysis of data from an ongoing HIV cohort study. The rate of (severe) AIDS or death and death alone was evaluated in ART-naive patients according to the current CD4 cell count, focusing on CD4 cell counts...

  3. 9 CFR 381.67 - Young chicken and squab slaughter inspection rate maximums under traditional inspection procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Young chicken and squab slaughter... INSPECTION REGULATIONS Operating Procedures § 381.67 Young chicken and squab slaughter inspection rate... slaughter line configurations are specified in the following table. These maximum rates will not be exceeded...

  4. Analysis of geomagnetic storm variations and count-rate of cosmic ray muons recorded at the Brazilian southern space observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frigo, Everton [University of Sao Paulo, USP, Institute of Astronomy, Geophysics and Atmospheric Sciences, IAG/USP, Department of Geophysics, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Savian, Jairo Francisco [Space Science Laboratory of Santa Maria, LACESM/CT, Southern Regional Space Research Center, CRS/INPE, MCT, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Silva, Marlos Rockenbach da; Lago, Alisson dal; Trivedi, Nalin Babulal [National Institute for Space Research, INPE/MCT, Division of Space Geophysics, DGE, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Schuch, Nelson Jorge, E-mail: efrigo@iag.usp.br, E-mail: savian@lacesm.ufsm.br, E-mail: njschuch@lacesm.ufsm.br, E-mail: marlos@dge.inpe.br, E-mail: dallago@dge.inpe.br, E-mail: trivedi@dge.inpe.br [Southern Regional Space Research Center, CRS/INPE, MCT, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil)

    2007-07-01

    An analysis of geomagnetic storm variations and the count rate of cosmic ray muons recorded at the Brazilian Southern Space Observatory -OES/CRS/INPE-MCT, in Sao Martinho da Serra, RS during the month of November 2004, is presented in this paper. The geomagnetic measurements are done by a three component low noise fluxgate magnetometer and the count rates of cosmic ray muons are recorded by a muon scintillator telescope - MST, both instruments installed at the Observatory. The fluxgate magnetometer measures variations in the three orthogonal components of Earth magnetic field, H (North-South), D (East-West) and Z (Vertical), with data sampling rate of 0.5 Hz. The muon scintillator telescope records hourly count rates. The arrival of a solar disturbance can be identified by observing the decrease in the muon count rate. The goal of this work is to describe the physical morphology and phenomenology observed during the geomagnetic storm of November 2004, using the H component of the geomagnetic field and vertical channel V of the multi-directional muon detector in South of Brazil. (author)

  5. THE EFFECT OF HYPOXIA ON THE MAXIMUM MATABOLIC RATE AND SPECIFIC DYNAMIC ACTION IN ATLANTIC COD Gadus morhua

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, John Fleng

    2010-01-01

    of hypoxia compared. Maximum metabolic rate compared to standard metabolic rate is termed the Scope for Activity. The results showed that hypoxia at 6.3 kPa does influence the SDA. The effect on the SDA curve on cod fed 5 % of the wet body mass was that the peak metabolic rate was significantly depressed (44...... and fish kept at high densities. Feeding is followed by an increase in the metabolic rate. termed the specific dynamic action (SDA). SDA integrates all the energetic expenditures involved in feeding. It is generally agreed that the increased metabolic rate is caused by biochemical transformation of food...... the fi sh. The fish were fed single rations of fillets of herring, equivalent to 5 % wet body mass. Hypoxia was controlled by an oxygen regulator injecting compressed nitrogen in the water via a solenoid valve. In addition the maximum metabolic rate of starved fish was measured in normoxia and 4 levels...

  6. Alterations of peripheral leukocyte count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and C-reactive protein in febrile urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseri, Mitra

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the usefulness of peripheral leukocyte count, differential leukocyte count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and C-reactive protein (CRP) level in febrile urinary tract infection (UTI) for defining the UTI level. A total of 61 children aged between 1 and 10 years with documented febrile UTI (axillary temperature > or = 38 degrees C) were studied. They had a urine culture positive for infection. Laboratory investigations including peripheral total and differential leukocyte counts, ESR, and CRP were assessed in relation to the inflammatory responses. Leukocyte count results were available in all of the patients, ESR in 41, and CRP in 36. Leukocyte count was normal in 6 patients (9.8%). Lymphocytic leukocytosis was seen in 1 patients (1.6%), neutrophilic leukocytosis in 25 (41.0%), and relative neutrophilia in 29 (47.5%). Thirty patients (73.2%) had a high ESR and 23 (63.9%) had a positive CRP. In children with a high ESR, 12 (29.3%) had neutrophilic leukocytosis and 14 (34.1%) had relative neutrophilia. Relative neutrophilia and neutrophilic leukocytosis with positive CRP both were found in 11 patients (30.6%). Negative CRP with absence of neutrophilic leukocytosis was found in a significantly higher proportion of patients. There were no direct correlations between the severity of systemic inflammatory responses and urinary tract inflammatory response. Findings of this study showed that ESR and differential leukocyte count are two valuable tests in febrile UTI and may be useful for localization of UTI level, but the total leukocyte count and CRP level as in qualitative methods are not useful, and many patients with febrile UTI do not have leukocytosis.

  7. Accuracy of the prediction equation for the determination of maximum heart rate in adults with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boer, P-H

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine if the regression formula developed for the prediction of maximum heart rate (HR) is valid for adults with Down syndrome (DS). Thirty-six adults with DS (31.7 ± 6.8 years; 20 men, 16 women) completed a maximal aerobic test. Maximum HR and VO2 peak were measured directly on a motorised treadmill with a metabolic analyser. Predicted HR was estimated with the regression equation developed for individuals with DS (Fernhall et al. 2001). Differences between measured versus predicted maximum HR were assessed with a dependent T-test and the relationship with Pearson correlational analyses. Agreement was assessed with Bland-Altman analysis. There was a significant difference between directly measured maximum HR and predicted maximum HR (P measurement bias (+4.7) and large limits of agreement (+26.7 and -17.4) between measured and predicted maximum HR. The Bland-Altman plot also demonstrated the presence of heteroscedasticity. The results indicate that the regression formula developed for individuals with DS was not accurate in this sample of DS adults aged 19 to 46 years. Future studies should develop different prediction equations for more specific age and body mass index categories for individuals with DS. © 2016 MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Unintentional carbon monoxide poisoning hospitalization and emergency department counts and rates by county, year, and fire-relatedness among California residents,2000-2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Environmental Health Tracking Program — This dataset contains case counts, rates, and confidence intervals of unintentional carbon monoxide poisoning (CO) inpatient hospitalizations and emergency...

  9. Maximum rates of climate change are systematically underestimated in the geological record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, David B; Eichenseer, Kilian; Kiessling, Wolfgang

    2015-11-10

    Recently observed rates of environmental change are typically much higher than those inferred for the geological past. At the same time, the magnitudes of ancient changes were often substantially greater than those established in recent history. The most pertinent disparity, however, between recent and geological rates is the timespan over which the rates are measured, which typically differ by several orders of magnitude. Here we show that rates of marked temperature changes inferred from proxy data in Earth history scale with measurement timespan as an approximate power law across nearly six orders of magnitude (10(2) to >10(7) years). This scaling reveals how climate signals measured in the geological record alias transient variability, even during the most pronounced climatic perturbations of the Phanerozoic. Our findings indicate that the true attainable pace of climate change on timescales of greatest societal relevance is underestimated in geological archives.

  10. A compact 7-cell Si-drift detector module for high-count rate X-ray spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, K; Reckleben, C; Diehl, I; Klär, H

    2008-05-01

    A new Si-drift detector module for fast X-ray spectroscopy experiments was developed and realized. The Peltier-cooled module comprises a sensor with 7 × 7-mm2 active area, an integrated circuit for amplification, shaping and detection, storage, and derandomized readout of signal pulses in parallel, and amplifiers for line driving. The compactness and hexagonal shape of the module with a wrench size of 16mm allow very short distances to the specimen and multi-module arrangements. The power dissipation is 186mW. At a shaper peaking time of 190 ns and an integration time of 450 ns an electronic rms noise of ~11 electrons was achieved. When operated at 7 °C, FWHM line widths around 260 and 460 eV (Cu-Kα) were obtained at low rates and at sum-count rates of 1.7 MHz, respectively. The peak shift is below 1% for a broad range of count rates. At 1.7-MHz sum-count rate the throughput loss amounts to 30%.

  11. Comparing maximum rate and sustainability of pacing by mechanical vs. electrical stimulation in the Langendorff-perfused rabbit heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, T Alexander; Kohl, Peter

    2016-12-01

    Mechanical stimulation (MS) represents a readily available, non-invasive means of pacing the asystolic or bradycardic heart in patients, but benefits of MS at higher heart rates are unclear. Our aim was to assess the maximum rate and sustainability of excitation by MS vs. electrical stimulation (ES) in the isolated heart under normal physiological conditions. Trains of local MS or ES at rates exceeding intrinsic sinus rhythm (overdrive pacing; lowest pacing rates 2.5±0.5 Hz) were applied to the same mid-left ventricular free-wall site on the epicardium of Langendorff-perfused rabbit hearts. Stimulation rates were progressively increased, with a recovery period of normal sinus rhythm between each stimulation period. Trains of MS caused repeated focal ventricular excitation from the site of stimulation. The maximum rate at which MS achieved 1:1 capture was lower than during ES (4.2±0.2 vs. 5.9±0.2 Hz, respectively). At all overdrive pacing rates for which repetitive MS was possible, 1:1 capture was reversibly lost after a finite number of cycles, even though same-site capture by ES remained possible. The number of MS cycles until loss of capture decreased with rising stimulation rate. If interspersed with ES, the number of MS to failure of capture was lower than for MS only. In this study, we demonstrate that the maximum pacing rate at which MS can be sustained is lower than that for same-site ES in isolated heart, and that, in contrast to ES, the sustainability of successful 1:1 capture by MS is limited. The mechanism(s) of differences in MS vs. ES pacing ability, potentially important for emergency heart rhythm management, are currently unknown, thus warranting further investigation. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology.

  12. Investigation of quad-energy high-rate photon counting for X-ray computed tomography using a cadmium telluride detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsukiyo, Hiroshi; Sato, Eiichi; Oda, Yasuyuki; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Sato, Yuichi; Hagiwara, Osahiko; Enomoto, Toshiyuki; Watanabe, Manabu; Kusachi, Shinya

    2017-12-01

    To obtain four kinds of tomograms at four different X-ray energy ranges simultaneously, we have constructed a quad-energy (QE) X-ray photon counter with a cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector and four sets of comparators and microcomputers (MCs). X-ray photons are detected using the CdTe detector, and the event pulses produced using amplifiers are sent to four comparators simultaneously to regulate four threshold energies of 20, 33, 50 and 65keV. Using this counter, the energy ranges are 20-33, 33-50, 50-65 and 65-100keV; the maximum energy corresponds to the tube voltage. We performed QE computed tomography (QE-CT) at a tube voltage of 100kV. Using a 0.5-mm-diam lead pinhole, four tomograms were obtained simultaneously at four energy ranges. K-edge CT using iodine and gadolinium media was carried out utilizing two energy ranges of 33-50 and 50-65keV, respectively. At a tube voltage of 100kV and a current of 60 μA, the count rate was 15.2 kilocounts per second (kcps), and the minimum count rates after penetrating objects in QE-CT were regulated to approximately 2 kcps by the tube current. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The study of error for analysis in dynamic image from the error of count rates in Nal (Tl) scintillation camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Joo Young; Kang, Chun Goo; Kim, Jung Yul; Oh, Ki Baek; Kim, Jae Sam [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hoon Hee [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Shingu college, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    This study is aimed to evaluate the effect of T{sub 1/2} upon count rates in the analysis of dynamic scan using NaI (Tl) scintillation camera, and suggest a new quality control method with this effects. We producted a point source with '9{sup 9m}TcO{sub 4}- of 18.5 to 185 MBq in the 2 mL syringes, and acquired 30 frames of dynamic images with 10 to 60 seconds each using Infinia gamma camera (GE, USA). In the second experiment, 90 frames of dynamic images were acquired from 74 MBq point source by 5 gamma cameras (Infinia 2, Forte 2, Argus 1). There were not significant differences in average count rates of the sources with 18.5 to 92.5 MBq in the analysis of 10 to 60 seconds/frame with 10 seconds interval in the first experiment (p>0.05). But there were significantly low average count rates with the sources over 111 MBq activity at 60 seconds/frame (p<0.01). According to the second analysis results of linear regression by count rates of 5 gamma cameras those were acquired during 90 minutes, counting efficiency of fourth gamma camera was most low as 0.0064%, and gradient and coefficient of variation was high as 0.0042 and 0.229 each. We could not find abnormal fluctuation in χ{sup 2} test with count rates (p>0.02), and we could find the homogeneity of variance in Levene's F-test among the gamma cameras (p>0.05). At the correlation analysis, there was only correlation between counting efficiency and gradient as significant negative correlation (r=-0.90, p<0.05). Lastly, according to the results of calculation of T{sub 1/2} error from change of gradient with -0.25% to +0.25%, if T{sub 1/2} is relatively long, or gradient is high, the error increase relationally. When estimate the value of 4th camera which has highest gradient from the above mentioned result, we could not see T{sub 1/2} error within 60 minutes at that value. In conclusion, it is necessary for the scintillation gamma camera in medical field to manage hard for the quality of radiation

  14. Releasable activity and maximum permissible leakage rate within a transport cask of Tehran Research Reactor fuel samples

    OpenAIRE

    Rezaeian Mahdi; Kamali Jamshid; Roshanzamir Manoochehr; Moosakhani Alireza; Noori Elghar

    2015-01-01

    Containment of a transport cask during both normal and accident conditions is important to the health and safety of the public and of the operators. Based on IAEA regulations, releasable activity and maximum permissible volumetric leakage rate within the cask containing fuel samples of Tehran Research Reactor enclosed in an irradiated capsule are calculated. The contributions to the total activity from the four sources of gas, volatile, fines, and corrosion...

  15. Allometric equations for maximum filtration rate in blue mussels Mytilus edulis and importance of condition index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisgård, Hans Ulrik; Larsen, Poul Scheel; Pleissner, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    rate (F, l h-1), W (g), and L (mm) as described by the equations: FW = aWb and FL = cLd, respectively. This is done by using available and new experimental laboratory data on M. edulis obtained by members of the same research team using different methods and controlled diets of cultivated algal cells....... For all data, it was found that FW = 6.773W0.678 and FL = 0.00135L2.088 which are very similar to equations for mussels with ‘medium condition’ (CI = 4–6 mg cm-3): FW = 6.567W0.681 and FL = 0.00150L2.051, with b- and d-values within a few percent of the theoretically expected of 2/3 and 2, respectively...

  16. Precise Frequency and Period Measurements for Slow Slew Rate Signals Based on the Modified Method of the Dependent Count

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Y. Yurish

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an application of novel modified method of the dependent count for measuring the frequency (period of slow slew rate signals (common for the conversion-to-digital of resistance, capacitance, inductance or resistive-sensor–bridge signals based on direct connection to a microcontroller. The AVR 8-bit ATmega168-20PI microcontroller (Atmel, based on advanced reduced instruction set computing architecture, was used. The modified method of the dependent count improves the accuracy of period measurements for the slow slew rate signals of triangular, sine, exponential rise and fall, as well as rectangular waveforms, by 2-to-3 orders in comparison with the accuracy achieved with classical indirect counting in all frequency ranges. The error is evaluated from the statistical characteristics and histograms of measured pulse periods, quantitatively confirming the advantages of the modified method for frequency (period measurements for non-square pulse signals. Measurements are further improved (becoming about 1.5 times more accurate for some waveforms when an external Schmitt trigger is used.

  17. Low-Noise Free-Running High-Rate Photon-Counting for Space Communication and Ranging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wei; Krainak, Michael A.; Yang, Guan; Sun, Xiaoli; Merritt, Scott

    2016-01-01

    We present performance data for low-noise free-running high-rate photon counting method for space optical communication and ranging. NASA GSFC is testing the performance of two types of novel photon-counting detectors 1) a 2x8 mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe) avalanche array made by DRS Inc., and a 2) a commercial 2880-element silicon avalanche photodiode (APD) array. We successfully measured real-time communication performance using both the 2 detected-photon threshold and logic AND-gate coincidence methods. Use of these methods allows mitigation of dark count, after-pulsing and background noise effects without using other method of Time Gating The HgCdTe APD array routinely demonstrated very high photon detection efficiencies (50) at near infrared wavelength. The commercial silicon APD array exhibited a fast output with rise times of 300 ps and pulse widths of 600 ps. On-chip individually filtered signals from the entire array were multiplexed onto a single fast output. NASA GSFC has tested both detectors for their potential application for space communications and ranging. We developed and compare their performances using both the 2 detected photon threshold and coincidence methods.

  18. Aspartic acid racemization rate in narwhal (Monodon monoceros) eye lens nuclei estimated by counting of growth layers in tusks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garde, Eva; Heide-Jørgensen, Mads Peter; Ditlevsen, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    Ages of marine mammals have traditionally been estimated by counting dentinal growth layers in teeth. However, this method is difficult to use on narwhals (Monodon monoceros) because of their special tooth structures. Alternative methods are therefore needed. The aspartic acid racemization (AAR......) technique has been used in age estimation studies of cetaceans, including narwhals. The purpose of this study was to estimate a species-specific racemization rate for narwhals by regressing aspartic acid D/L ratios in eye lens nuclei against growth layer groups in tusks (n=9). Two racemization rates were...... rate and (D/L)0 value be used in future AAR age estimation studies of narwhals, but also recommend the collection of tusks and eyes of narwhals for further improving the (D/L)0 and 2kAsp estimates obtained in this study....

  19. Maximum principal strain and strain rate associated with concussion diagnosis correlates with changes in corpus callosum white matter indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Thomas W; Ford, James C; Ji, Songbai; Beckwith, Jonathan G; Flashman, Laura A; Paulsen, Keith; Greenwald, Richard M

    2012-01-01

    On-field monitoring of head impacts, combined with finite element (FE) biomechanical simulation, allow for predictions of regional strain associated with a diagnosed concussion. However, attempts to correlate these predictions with in vivo measures of brain injury have not been published. This article reports an approach to and preliminary results from the correlation of subject-specific FE model-predicted regions of high strain associated with diagnosed concussion and diffusion tensor imaging to assess changes in white matter integrity in the corpus callosum (CC). Ten football and ice hockey players who wore instrumented helmets to record head impacts sustained during play completed high field magnetic resonance imaging preseason and within 10 days of a diagnosed concussion. The Dartmouth Subject-Specific FE Head model was used to generate regional predictions of strain and strain rate following each impact associated with concussion. Maps of change in fractional anisotropy (FA) and median diffusivity (MD) were generated for the CC of each athlete to correlate strain with change in FA and MD. Mean and maximum strain rate correlated with change in FA (Spearman ρ = 0.77, p = 0.01; 0.70, p = 0.031), and there was a similar trend for mean and maximum strain (0.56, p = 0.10; 0.6, p = 0.07), as well as for maximum strain with change in MD (-0.63, p = 0.07). Change in MD correlated with injury-to-imaging interval (ρ = -0.80, p = 0.006) but change in FA did not (ρ = 0.18, p = 0.62). These results provide preliminary confirmation that model-predicted strain and strain rate in the CC correlate with changes in indices of white matter integrity.

  20. Tower counts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woody, Carol Ann; Johnson, D.H.; Shrier, Brianna M.; O'Neal, Jennifer S.; Knutzen, John A.; Augerot, Xanthippe; O'Neal, Thomas A.; Pearsons, Todd N.

    2007-01-01

    Counting towers provide an accurate, low-cost, low-maintenance, low-technology, and easily mobilized escapement estimation program compared to other methods (e.g., weirs, hydroacoustics, mark-recapture, and aerial surveys) (Thompson 1962; Siebel 1967; Cousens et al. 1982; Symons and Waldichuk 1984; Anderson 2000; Alaska Department of Fish and Game 2003). Counting tower data has been found to be consistent with that of digital video counts (Edwards 2005). Counting towers do not interfere with natural fish migration patterns, nor are fish handled or stressed; however, their use is generally limited to clear rivers that meet specific site selection criteria. The data provided by counting tower sampling allow fishery managers to determine reproductive population size, estimate total return (escapement + catch) and its uncertainty, evaluate population productivity and trends, set harvest rates, determine spawning escapement goals, and forecast future returns (Alaska Department of Fish and Game 1974-2000 and 1975-2004). The number of spawning fish is determined by subtracting subsistence, sport-caught fish, and prespawn mortality from the total estimated escapement. The methods outlined in this protocol for tower counts can be used to provide reasonable estimates ( plus or minus 6%-10%) of reproductive salmon population size and run timing in clear rivers. 

  1. Comparing maximum autonomic activity of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures and epileptic seizures using heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeppesen, Jesper; Beniczky, Sándor; Johansen, Peter; Sidenius, Per; Fuglsang-Frederiksen, Anders

    2016-04-01

    The semiology of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) can resemble epileptic seizures, and differentiation between epileptic seizures with no EEG-correlate and PNES can be challenging even for trained experts. Therefore, there has been a search for a quantitative measure, other than EEG and semiology that could distinguish PNES from epileptic seizures. We used ECG to measure heart rate variability (HRV) in order to compare maximum autonomic activity of epileptic seizures and PNES. These comparisons could potentially serve as biomarkers for distinguishing these types of clinical episodes. Forty-nine epileptic seizures from 17 patients and 24 PNES from 7 patients with analyzable ECG were recorded during long-term video-EEG monitoring. Moving windows of 100 R-R intervals throughout each seizure were used to find maximum values of Cardiac Sympathetic Index (CSI) (sympathetic tonus) and minimum values of Cardiac Vagal Index (CVI), Root-Mean-Square-of-Successive-Differences (RMSSD) and HF-power (parasympathetic tonus). In addition, non-seizure recordings of each patient were used to compare HRV-parameters between the groups. The maximum CSI for epilepsy seizures were higher than PNES (P=0.015). The minimum CVI, minimum RMSSD and HF-power did not show significant difference between epileptic seizures and PNES (P=0.762; P=0.152; P=0.818). There were no statistical difference of non-seizure HRV-parameters between the PNES and epilepsy patients. We found the maximum sympathetic activity accompanying the epileptic seizures to be higher, than that during the PNES. However, the great variation of autonomic response within both groups makes it difficult to use these HRV-measures as a sole measurement in distinguishing epileptic seizures from PNES. Copyright © 2016 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Determination of the maximum rate of eccrine sweat glands’ ion reabsorption using the galvanic skin conductance to local sweat rate relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Tatsuro; Gerrett, Nicola; Inoue, Yoshimitsu; Nishiyasu, Takeshi; Havenith, George; Kondo, Narihiko

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to develop and describe a simple method to evaluate the rate of ion reabsorption of eccrine sweat glands in human using the measurement of galvanic skin conductance (GSC) and local sweating rate (SR). This purpose was investigated by comparing the SR threshold for increasing GSC with following two criteria of sweat ion reabsorption in earlier studies such as (1) the SR threshold for increasing sweat ion was at approximately 0.2–0.5 mg/cm2/min and (2) exercise heat acclimation improved the sweat ion reabsorption ability and would increase the criteria 1. Seven healthy non-heat-acclimated male subjects received passive heat treatment both before and after 7 days of cycling in hot conditions (50% maximum oxygen uptake, 60 min/day, ambient temperature 32 °C, and 50% relative humidity). Subjects became partially heat-acclimated, as evidenced by the decreased end-exercise heart rate (p rate of perceived exhaustion (p maximum rate of sweat ion reabsorption of eccrine sweat glands in humans.

  3. Relationship between visual counts and call detection rates of gray whales (Eschrichtius robustus) in Laguna San Ignacio, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce, Diana; Thode, Aaron M; Guerra, Melania; Urbán R, Jorge; Swartz, Steven

    2012-04-01

    Daily acoustic calling rates of Eastern North Pacific (ENP) gray whales were measured on 6 days during 1 mo of their 2008 breeding season in the sheltered coastal lagoon of Laguna San Ignacio in Baja California, Mexico. Visual counts of whales determined that the numbers of single animals in the lower lagoon more than tripled over the observation period. All call types showed production peaks in the early morning and evening with minimum rates generally detected in the early afternoon. For four of the five observation days, the daily number of "S1"-type calls increased roughly as the square of the number of the animals in the lower lagoon during both daytime and nighttime. This relationship persisted when raw call counts were adjusted for variations in background noise level, using a simple propagation law derived from empirical measurements. The one observation day that did not fit the square-law relationship occurred during a week when the group size in the lagoon increased rapidly. These results suggest that passive acoustic monitoring does not measure gray whale group size directly but monitors the number of connections in the social network, which rises as roughly M(2)/2 for a group size M.

  4. A Burst-Mode Photon-Counting Receiver with Automatic Channel Estimation and Bit Rate Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-24

    forward error correction (FEC) based on a product code of an inner LDPC code and an outer BCH code. The FEC supports multiple code rates to achieve...Solomon have a relatively small footprint and high throughput. However, newer soft-decision codes based on low-density parity check codes ( LDPCs ) can...at higher BER than the payload. Figure 5. Frame structure The payload is a 216-1 pseudo-random bit stream (PRBS) encoded using an LDPC +BCH

  5. 2Kx2K resolution element photon counting MCP sensor with >200 kHz event rate capability

    CERN Document Server

    Vallerga, J V

    2000-01-01

    Siegmund Scientific undertook a NASA Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) contract to develop a versatile, high-performance photon (or particle) counting detector combining recent technical advances in all aspects of Microchannel Plate (MCP) detector development in a low cost, commercially viable package that can support a variety of applications. The detector concept consists of a set of MCPs whose output electron pulses are read out with a crossed delay line (XDL) anode and associated high-speed event encoding electronics. The delay line anode allows high-resolution photon event centroiding at very high event rates and can be scaled to large formats (>40 mm) while maintaining good linearity and high temporal stability. The optimal sensitivity wavelength range is determined by the choice of opaque photocathodes. Specific achievements included: spatial resolution of 200 000 events s sup - sup 1; local rates of >100 events s sup - sup 1 per resolution element; event timing of <1 ns; and low background ...

  6. A New High Channel-Count, High Scan-Rate, Data Acquisition System for the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanco, Thomas G.; Sekula, Martin K.; Piatak, David J.; Simmons, Scott A.; Babel, Walter C.; Collins, Jesse G.; Ramey, James M.; Heald, Dean M.

    2016-01-01

    A data acquisition system upgrade project, known as AB-DAS, is underway at the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. AB-DAS will soon serve as the primary data system and will substantially increase the scan-rate capabilities and analog channel count while maintaining other unique aeroelastic and dynamic test capabilities required of the facility. AB-DAS is configurable, adaptable, and enables buffet and aeroacoustic tests by synchronously scanning all analog channels and recording the high scan-rate time history values for each data quantity. AB-DAS is currently available for use as a stand-alone data system with limited capabilities while development continues. This paper describes AB-DAS, the design methodology, and the current features and capabilities. It also outlines the future work and projected capabilities following completion of the data system upgrade project.

  7. Isometric rate of force development, maximum voluntary contraction, and balance in women with and without joint hypermobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mebes, Christine; Amstutz, Astrid; Luder, Gere; Ziswiler, Hans-Ruedi; Stettler, Matthias; Villiger, Peter M; Radlinger, Lorenz

    2008-11-15

    To determine differences between hypermobile subjects and controls in terms of maximum strength, rate of force development, and balance. We recruited 13 subjects with hypermobility and 18 controls. Rate of force development and maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) during single leg knee extension of the right knee were measured isometrically for each subject. Balance was tested twice on a force plate with 15-second single-leg stands on the right leg. Rate of force development (N/second) and MVC (N) were extracted from the force-time curve as maximal rate of force development (= limit Deltaforce/Deltatime) and the absolute maximal value, respectively. The hypermobile subjects showed a significantly higher value for rate of force development (15.2% higher; P = 0.038, P = 0.453, epsilon = 0.693) and rate of force development related to body weight (16.4% higher; P = 0.018, P = 0.601, epsilon = 0.834) than the controls. The groups did not differ significantly in MVC (P = 0.767, P = 0.136, epsilon = 0.065), and MVC related to body weight varied randomly between the groups (P = 0.921, P = 0.050, epsilon = 0.000). In balance testing, the mediolateral sway of the hypermobile subjects showed significantly higher values (11.6% higher; P = 0.034, P = 0.050, epsilon = 0.000) than that of controls, but there was no significant difference (4.9% difference; P = 0.953, P = 0.050, epsilon = 0.000) in anteroposterior sway between the 2 groups. Hypermobile women without acute symptoms or limitations in activities of daily life have a higher rate of force development in the knee extensors and a higher mediolateral sway than controls with normal joint mobility.

  8. 40 CFR Appendix B to Subpart II to... - Maximum Allowable Thinning Rates as a Function of As Supplied VOC Content and Thinner Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Maximum Allowable Thinning Rates as a Function of As Supplied VOC Content and Thinner Density B Appendix B to Subpart II to Part 63 Protection of...—Maximum Allowable Thinning Rates as a Function of As Supplied VOC Content and Thinner Density EC01MY92.046 ...

  9. Optimization of statistical methods for HpGe gamma-ray spectrometer used in wide count rate ranges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gervino, G., E-mail: gervino@to.infn.it [UNITO - Università di Torino, Dipartimento di Fisica, Turin (Italy); INFN - Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez. Torino, Turin (Italy); Mana, G. [INRIM - Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica, Turin (Italy); Palmisano, C. [UNITO - Università di Torino, Dipartimento di Fisica, Turin (Italy); INRIM - Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica, Turin (Italy)

    2016-07-11

    The need to perform γ-ray measurements with HpGe detectors is a common technique in many fields such as nuclear physics, radiochemistry, nuclear medicine and neutron activation analysis. The use of HpGe detectors is chosen in situations where isotope identification is needed because of their excellent resolution. Our challenge is to obtain the “best” spectroscopy data possible in every measurement situation. “Best” is a combination of statistical (number of counts) and spectral quality (peak, width and position) over a wide range of counting rates. In this framework, we applied Bayesian methods and the Ellipsoidal Nested Sampling (a multidimensional integration technique) to study the most likely distribution for the shape of HpGe spectra. In treating these experiments, the prior information suggests to model the likelihood function with a product of Poisson distributions. We present the efforts that have been done in order to optimize the statistical methods to HpGe detector outputs with the aim to evaluate to a better order of precision the detector efficiency, the absolute measured activity and the spectra background. Reaching a more precise knowledge of statistical and systematic uncertainties for the measured physical observables is the final goal of this research project.

  10. Estimated average annual rate of change of CD4(+) T-cell counts in patients on combination antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mocroft, Amanda; Phillips, Andrew N; Ledergerber, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    % confidence interval [CI] 26.6-34.3), was stable when viral load was 500-9,999 copies/ml (3.1 cells/mm(3), 95% CI -5.3-11.5) and decreased when viral load was >/=10,000 copies/ml (-14.8 cells/mm(3), 95% CI -4.5--25.1). Patients taking a boosted protease inhibitor (PI) regimen had more positive annual CD4(+) T......-cell count changes than patients taking other regimens for any given viral load strata: 30.9 cells/mm(3) (95% CI 27.7-34.1) when viral load was 9,999 copies/ml and -19.9 cells/mm(3) (95% CI -36.6--3.3) when viral load was >/=10......,000 copies/ml. By contrast, among patients taking a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-based regimen, the CD4(+) T-cell count significantly decreased when the viral load was 500-9,999 copies/ml (-18.6 cells/mm(3), 95% CI -33.8--3.5) and decreased at a faster rate when the viral load...

  11. Leukocyte Count and Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate as Diagnostic Factors in Febrile Convulsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Akbar Rahbarimanesh

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available "nFebrile convulsion (FC is the most common seizure disorder in childhood. white blood cell (WBC and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR are commonly measured in FC. Trauma, vomiting and bleeding can also lead to WBC and ESR so the blood tests must carefully be interpreted by the clinician. In this cross sectional study 410 children(163 with FC, aged 6 months to 5 years, admitted to Bahrami Children hospital in the first 48 hours of their febrile disease, either with or without seizure, were evaluated over an 18 months period. Age, sex, temperature; history of vomiting, bleeding or trauma; WBC, ESR and hemoglobin were recorded in all children. There was a significant increase of WBC (P<0.001 in children with FC so we can deduct that leukocytosis encountered in children with FC can be due to convulsion in itself. There was no significant difference regarding ESR (P=0.113 between the two groups. In fact, elevated ESR is a result of underlying pathology. In stable patients who don't have any indication of lumbar puncture, there's no need to assess WBC and ESR as an indicator of underlying infection. If the patient is transferred to pediatric ward and still there's no reason to suspect a bacterial infection, there is no need for WBC test.

  12. Releasable activity and maximum permissible leakage rate within a transport cask of Tehran Research Reactor fuel samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rezaeian Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Containment of a transport cask during both normal and accident conditions is important to the health and safety of the public and of the operators. Based on IAEA regulations, releasable activity and maximum permissible volumetric leakage rate within the cask containing fuel samples of Tehran Research Reactor enclosed in an irradiated capsule are calculated. The contributions to the total activity from the four sources of gas, volatile, fines, and corrosion products are treated separately. These calculations are necessary to identify an appropriate leak test that must be performed on the cask and the results can be utilized as the source term for dose evaluation in the safety assessment of the cask.

  13. Investigation of FPGA-Based Real-Time Adaptive Digital Pulse Shaping for High-Count-Rate Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Shefali; Hawari, Ayman I.

    2017-07-01

    Digital signal processing techniques have been widely used in radiation spectrometry to provide improved stability and performance with compact physical size over the traditional analog signal processing. In this paper, field-programmable gate array (FPGA)-based adaptive digital pulse shaping techniques are investigated for real-time signal processing. National Instruments (NI) NI 5761 14-bit, 250-MS/s adaptor module is used for digitizing high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector's preamplifier pulses. Digital pulse processing algorithms are implemented on the NI PXIe-7975R reconfigurable FPGA (Kintex-7) using the LabVIEW FPGA module. Based on the time separation between successive input pulses, the adaptive shaping algorithm selects the optimum shaping parameters (rise time and flattop time of trapezoid-shaping filter) for each incoming signal. A digital Sallen-Key low-pass filter is implemented to enhance signal-to-noise ratio and reduce baseline drifting in trapezoid shaping. A recursive trapezoid-shaping filter algorithm is employed for pole-zero compensation of exponentially decayed (with two-decay constants) preamplifier pulses of an HPGe detector. It allows extraction of pulse height information at the beginning of each pulse, thereby reducing the pulse pileup and increasing throughput. The algorithms for RC-CR2 timing filter, baseline restoration, pile-up rejection, and pulse height determination are digitally implemented for radiation spectroscopy. Traditionally, at high-count-rate conditions, a shorter shaping time is preferred to achieve high throughput, which deteriorates energy resolution. In this paper, experimental results are presented for varying count-rate and pulse shaping conditions. Using adaptive shaping, increased throughput is accepted while preserving the energy resolution observed using the longer shaping times.

  14. Can simple mobile phone applications provide reliable counts of respiratory rates in sick infants and children? An initial evaluation of three new applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, James; Gerdtz, Marie; Nicholson, Pat; Crellin, Dianne; Browning, Laura; Simpson, Julie; Bell, Lauren; Santamaria, Nick

    2015-05-01

    Respiratory rate is an important sign that is commonly either not recorded or recorded incorrectly. Mobile phone ownership is increasing even in resource-poor settings. Phone applications may improve the accuracy and ease of counting of respiratory rates. The study assessed the reliability and initial users' impressions of four mobile phone respiratory timer approaches, compared to a 60-second count by the same participants. Three mobile applications (applying four different counting approaches plus a standard 60-second count) were created using the Java Mobile Edition and tested on Nokia C1-01 phones. Apart from the 60-second timer application, the others included a counter based on the time for ten breaths, and three based on the time interval between breaths ('Once-per-Breath', in which the user presses for each breath and the application calculates the rate after 10 or 20 breaths, or after 60s). Nursing and physiotherapy students used the applications to count respiratory rates in a set of brief video recordings of children with different respiratory illnesses. Limits of agreement (compared to the same participant's standard 60-second count), intra-class correlation coefficients and standard errors of measurement were calculated to compare the reliability of the four approaches, and a usability questionnaire was completed by the participants. There was considerable variation in the counts, with large components of the variation related to the participants and the videos, as well as the methods. None of the methods was entirely reliable, with no limits of agreement better than -10 to +9 breaths/min. Some of the methods were superior to the others, with ICCs from 0.24 to 0.92. By ICC the Once-per-Breath 60-second count and the Once-per-Breath 20-breath count were the most consistent, better even than the 60-second count by the participants. The 10-breath approaches performed least well. Users' initial impressions were positive, with little difference between the

  15. Estimation of the players maximum heart rate in real game situations in team sports: a practical propose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Cuadrado Reyes

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract   This  research developed a logarithms  for calculating the maximum heart rate (max. HR for players in team sports in  game situations. The sample was made of  thirteen players (aged 24 ± 3   to a  Division Two Handball team. HR was initially measured by Course Navette test.  Later, twenty one training sessions were conducted  in which HR and Rate of Perceived Exertion (RPE, were  continuously monitored, in each task. A lineal regression analysis was done  to help find a max. HR prediction equation from the max. HR of the three highest intensity sessions. Results from  this equation correlate significantly with data obtained in the Course Navette test and with those obtained by other indirect methods. The conclusion of this research is that this equation provides a very useful and easy way to measure the max. HR in real game situations, avoiding non-specific analytical tests and, therefore laboratory testing..   Key words: workout control, functional evaluation, prediction equation.

  16. Maximum standard metabolic rate corresponds with the salinity of maximum growth in hatchlings of the estuarine northern diamondback terrapin (Malaclemys terrapin terrapin): Implications for habitat conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Christopher L.

    2018-01-01

    I evaluated standard metabolic rates (SMR) of hatchling northern diamondback terrapins (Malaclemys terrapin terrapin) across a range of salinities (salinity = 1.5, 4, 8, 12, and 16 psu) that they may encounter in brackish habitats such as those in the Maryland portion of the Chesapeake Bay, U.S.A. Consumption of O2 and production of CO2 by resting, unfed animals served as estimates of SMR. A peak in SMR occurred at 8 psu which corresponds closely with the salinity at which hatchling growth was previously shown to be maximized (salinity ∼ 9 psu). It appears that SMR is influenced by growth, perhaps reflecting investments in catabolic pathways that fuel anabolism. This ecophysiological information can inform environmental conservation and management activities by identifying portions of the estuary that are bioenergetically optimal for growth of hatchling terrapins. I suggest that conservation and restoration efforts to protect terrapin populations in oligo-to mesohaline habitats should prioritize protection or creation of habitats in regions where average salinity is near 8 psu and energetic investments in growth appear to be maximized.

  17. Test-Retest Reliability of Rating of Perceived Exertion and Agreement With 1-Repetition Maximum in Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bove, Allyn M; Lynch, Andrew D; DePaul, Samantha M; Terhorst, Lauren; Irrgang, James J; Fitzgerald, G Kelley

    2016-09-01

    Study Design Clinical measurement. Background It has been suggested that rating of perceived exertion (RPE) may be a useful alternative to 1-repetition maximum (1RM) to determine proper resistance exercise dosage. However, the test-retest reliability of RPE for resistance exercise has not been determined. Additionally, prior research regarding the relationship between 1RM and RPE is conflicting. Objectives The purpose of this study was to (1) determine test-retest reliability of RPE related to resistance exercise and (2) assess agreement between percentages of 1RM and RPE during quadriceps resistance exercise. Methods A sample of participants with and without knee pathology completed a series of knee extension exercises and rated the perceived difficulty of each exercise on a 0-to-10 RPE scale, then repeated the procedure 1 to 2 weeks later for test-retest reliability. To determine agreement between RPE and 1RM, participants completed knee extension exercises at various percentages of their 1RM (10% to 130% of predicted 1RM) and rated the perceived difficulty of each exercise on a 0-to-10 RPE scale. Percent agreement was calculated between the 1RM and RPE at each resistance interval. Results The intraclass correlation coefficient indicated excellent test-retest reliability of RPE for quadriceps resistance exercises (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.895; 95% confidence interval: 0.866, 0.918). Overall percent agreement between RPE and 1RM was 60%, but agreement was poor within the ranges that would typically be used for training (50% 1RM for muscle endurance, 70% 1RM and greater for strength). Conclusion Test-retest reliability of perceived exertion during quadriceps resistance exercise was excellent. However, agreement between the RPE and 1RM was poor, especially in common training zones for knee extensor strengthening. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(9):768-774. Epub 5 Aug 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.6498.

  18. Noninvasive assessment of left ventricular contractility in pediatric patients using the maximum rate of pressure rise in peripheral arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Hidenori; Seki, Mitsuru; Saiki, Hirofumi; Masutani, Satoshi; Senzaki, Hideaki

    2012-07-01

    The maximum rate of left ventricular pressure rise (LV dp/dt(max)) is a good indicator of ventricular contractility. However, its measurement requires invasive cardiac catheterization. By applying the relationship between the ratio of aorta (Ao) dp/dt(max) to LV dp/dt(max) and the mean artery pressure (MAP), we tested the possible noninvasive estimation of LV dp/dt(max) by the maximum rate of pressure rise in peripheral arteries, as measured by tonometry. The study subjects were 31 children with cardiovascular disease. The LV and Ao pressures were measured during cardiac catheterization, with simultaneous recording of the brachial (BrA) or radial (RaA) artery pressure. The relationships between BrA dp/dt(max) and Ao dp/dt(max) and between RaA dp/dt(max) and Ao dp/dt(max) were determined (Ao dp/dt(max) = 0.299 × BrA dp/dt(max) + 210.6, n = 17, r = 0.78, SEE = 74.0, P = 0.0002, and Ao dp/dt(max) = 1.442 × RaA dp/dt(max) + 165.9, n = 14, r = 0.87, SEE = 66.1, P = 0.0001). Using these relationships and the equation Ao dp/dt(max)/LV dp/dt(max) = 0.694 - 4.00 × 10(-3) × MAP, LV dp/dt(max) was estimated from BrA dp/dt(max) or RaA dp/dt(max). The estimated LV dp/dt(max) correlated well with the measured LV dp/dt(max) independent of the site of measurement (y = 0.912 × x + 112.9, r = 0.91, P measured and estimated LV dp/dt(max) after changes in contractility with dobutamine in 10 randomly selected patients (y = 0.86 × x + 34.2, r = 0.77, P = 0.01). It is possible to estimate LV dp/dt(max) noninvasively in children using tonometry. This procedure can be useful for bedside assessment of LV contractility and the clinical management of patients with cardiovascular disease.

  19. CD4 cell count and viral load-specific rates of AIDS, non-AIDS and deaths according to current antiretroviral use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mocroft, Amanda; Phillips, Andrew N; Gatell, Jose

    2013-01-01

    CD4 cell count and viral loads are used in clinical trials as surrogate endpoints for assessing efficacy of newly available antiretrovirals. If antiretrovirals act through other pathways or increase the risk of disease this would not be identified prior to licensing. The aim of this study was to ...... was to investigate the CD4 cell count and viral load-specific rates of fatal and nonfatal AIDS and non-AIDS events according to current antiretrovirals....

  20. Aspartic acid racemization rate in narwhal (Monodon monoceros eye lens nuclei estimated by counting of growth layers in tusks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Garde

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Ages of marine mammals have traditionally been estimated by counting dentinal growth layers in teeth. However, this method is difficult to use on narwhals (Monodon monoceros because of their special tooth structures. Alternative methods are therefore needed. The aspartic acid racemization (AAR technique has been used in age estimation studies of cetaceans, including narwhals. The purpose of this study was to estimate a species-specific racemization rate for narwhals by regressing aspartic acid d/l ratios in eye lens nuclei against growth layer groups in tusks (n=9. Two racemization rates were estimated: one by linear regression (r2=0.98 based on the assumption that age was known without error, and one based on a bootstrap study, taking into account the uncertainty in the age estimation (r2 between 0.88 and 0.98. The two estimated 2kAsp values were identical up to two significant figures. The 2k Asp value from the bootstrap study was found to be 0.00229±0.000089 SE, which corresponds to a racemization rate of 0.00114−yr±0.000044 SE. The intercept of 0.0580±0.00185 SE corresponds to twice the (d/l0 value, which is then 0.0290±0.00093 SE. We propose that this species-specific racemization rate and (d/l0 value be used in future AAR age estimation studies of narwhals, but also recommend the collection of tusks and eyes of narwhals for further improving the (d/l0 and 2kAsp estimates obtained in this study.

  1. Model-based estimates of annual survival rate are preferable to observed maximum lifespan statistics for use in comparative life-history studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krementz, D.G.; Sauer, J.R.; Nichols, J.D.

    1989-01-01

    Estimates of longevity are available for many animals, and are commonly used in comparative life-history analyses. We suggest that annual survival rate is more appropriate life history parameter for most comparative life history analyses. Observed maximum longevities were not correlated with the annual survival rate estimates and appear to be unstable over time. We recommend that observed maximum lifespans not be used in life history analyses.

  2. The utility of erythrocyte sedimentation rate values and white blood cell counts after spinal deformity surgery in the early (≤3 months) post-operative period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Margaret G; Lenke, Lawrence G; Bridwell, Keith H; O'Donnell, June C; Luhmann, Scott J

    2012-03-01

    The erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and white blood cell (WBC) count are frequently obtained in the work-up of post-operative fever. However, their diagnostic utility depends upon comparison with normative peri-operative trends which have not yet been described. The purpose of this study is to define a range of erythrocyte sedimentation rates and white blood cell counts following spinal instrumentation and fusion in non-infected patients. Seventy-five patients underwent spinal instrumentation and fusion. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate and white blood cell count were recorded pre-operatively, at 3 and 7 days post-operatively, and at 1 and 3 months post-operatively. Both erythrocyte sedimentation rate and white blood cell count trends demonstrated an early peak, followed by a gradual return to normal. Peak erythrocyte sedimentation rates occurred within the first week post-operatively in 98% of patients. Peak white blood cell counts occurred with the first week in 85% of patients. In the absence of infection, the erythrocyte sedimentation rate was abnormally elevated in 78% of patients at 1 month and in 53% of patients at 3 months post-operatively. The white blood cell count was abnormally elevated in only 6% of patients at 1 month post-operatively. Longer surgical time was associated with elevated white cell count at 1 week post-operatively. The fusion of more vertebral levels had a negative relationship with elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate at 1 week post-operatively. The anterior surgical approach was associated with significantly lower erythrocyte sedimentation rate at 1 month post-operatively and with lower white cell count at 1 week post-operatively. In non-infected spinal fusion surgeries, erythrocyte sedimentation rates are in the abnormal range in 78% of patients at 1 month and in 53% of patients at 3 months post-operatively, suggesting that the erythrocyte sedimentation rate is of limited diagnostic value in the early post

  3. Multiple-factor influences upon feeding flight rates at wading bird colonies (Alias: Are flight-line counts useful?)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwin, R.M.; Ogden, J.C.

    1979-01-01

    The temporal patterns of feeding, resting, and reproductive behavior in colonial wading birds have been studied by a number of investigators, both on a short-term (daily) and long-term (annual) basis. In coastal marine environments, activities at colonies are influenced by tides, time of day and phase of the nesting cycle. The purpose of this paper is twofold: (1) to examine the effects of tide, time of day (physical factors), nesting phase, colony site, and species identity (biological factors) on feeding flight rates at breeding colonies and, as a result of this, (2) to evaluate the usefulness of feeding flight counts as an index of the number of nests in the colony. Earlier work suggests that the relationship between the number of individuals flying to and from the nesting colony may be quite consistent with nest numbers. Thus, by monitoring flights from remote locations, observers might obtain relatively accurate census data while minimizing time and disturbance at colonies. Recent concern for the deleterious impact of humans at waterbird colonies underscores the need to investigate alternative census methods.

  4. Comparison of pregnancy rates in pre-treatment male infertility and low total motile sperm count at insemination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Cheng Wei; Agbo, Chioma; Dahan, Michael H

    2016-01-01

    In intrauterine insemination (IUI), total motile sperm count (TMSC) is an important predictor of pregnancy. However, the clinical significance of a poor TMSC on the day of IUI in a patient with prior normal semen analysis (SA) is unclear. We performed this study to determine if these patients perform as poorly as those who had male factor infertility diagnosed prior to commencing treatment. 147 males with two abnormal SA based on the 2010 World Health Organization criteria underwent 356 IUI with controlled ovarian hyper-stimulation (COH). Their pregnancy rates were compared to 120 males who had abnormal TMSC at the time of 265 IUI with COH, in a retrospective university-based study. The two groups were comparable in female age (p = 0.11), duration of infertility (p = 0.17), previous pregnancies (p = 0.13), female basal serum FSH level (p = 0.54) and number of mature follicles on the day of ovulation trigger (p = 0.27). Despite better semen parameters on the day of IUI in the pre-treatment male factor infertility group (TMSC mean ± SD: 61 ± 30 million vs. 3.5 ± 2 million, p treatment SA but low TMSC on the day of IUI likely has a reasonable chance to achieve pregnancy, and does not perform as poorly as subjects previously diagnosed with male factor infertility. More studies should be performed to confirm these findings.

  5. Relationship between visual prostate score (VPSS and maximum flow rate (Qmax in men with urinary tract symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazhar A. Memon

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate correlation between visual prostate score (VPSS and maximum flow rate (Qmax in men with lower urinary tract symptoms. Material and Methods: This is a cross sectional study conducted at a university Hospital. Sixty-seven adult male patients>50 years of age were enrolled in the study after signing an informed consent. Qmax and voided volume recorded at uroflowmetry graph and at the same time VPSS were assessed. The education level was assessed in various defined groups. Pearson correlation coefficient was computed for VPSS and Qmax. Results: Mean age was 66.1±10.1 years (median 68. The mean voided volume on uroflowmetry was 268±160mL (median 208 and the mean Qmax was 9.6±4.96mLs/sec (median 9.0. The mean VPSS score was 11.4±2.72 (11.0. In the univariate linear regression analysis there was strong negative (Pearson's correlation between VPSS and Qmax (r=848, p<0.001. In the multiple linear regression analyses there was a significant correlation between VPSS and Qmax (β-http://www.blogapaixonadosporviagens.com.br/p/caribe.html after adjusting the effect of age, voided volume (V.V and level of education. Multiple linear regression analysis done for independent variables and results showed that there was no significant correlation between the VPSS and independent factors including age (p=0.27, LOE (p=0.941 and V.V (p=0.082. Conclusion: There is a significant negative correlation between VPSS and Qmax. The VPSS can be used in lieu of IPSS score. Men even with limited educational background can complete VPSS without assistance.

  6. Effect of phentolamine, alprenolol and prenylamine on maximum rate of rise of action potential in guinea-pig papillary muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sada, H

    1978-10-01

    Effects of phentolamine (13.3, 26.5 and 53.0 micron), alprenolol (3.5, 7.0 and 17.5 micron) and prenylamine (2.4, 4.8 and 11.9 micron) on the transmembrane potential were studied in isolated guinea-pig papillary muscles, superfused with Tyrode's solution. 1. Phentolamine, alprenolol and prenylamine reduced the maximum rate of rise of action potential (.Vmax) dose-dependently. Higher concentrations of phentolamine and prenylamine caused a loss of plateau in a majority of the preparations. Resting potential was not altered by any of the drugs. Readmittance of drug-free Tyrode's solution reversed these changes induced by 13.3 micron of phentolamine and all conconcentrations of alprenolol almost completely but those induced by higher concentrations of phentolamine and all concentrations of prenylamine only slightly. 2. .Vmax at steady state was increased with decreasing driving frequencies (0.5 and 0.25 Hz) and was decreased with increasing ones (2--5 Hz) in comparison with that at 1 Hz. Such changes were all exaggerated by the above drugs, particularly by prenylamine. 3. Prenylamine and, to a lesser degree, phentolamine and alprenolol delayed dose-dependently the recovery process of .Vmax in premature responses. 4. .Vmax in the first response after interruption of stimulation recovered toward the predrug value in the presence of the above three drugs. The time constants of recovery process ranged between 10.5 and 15.0s for phentolamine, between 4.5 and 15.5s for alprenolol. The time constant of the main component was estimated to be approximately 2s for the recovery process with prenylamine. 5. On the basis of the model recently proposed by Hondeghem and Katzung (1977), it is suggested that the drug molecules associate with the open sodium channels and dissociated slowly from the closed channels and that the inactivation parameter in the drug-associated channels is shifted in the hyperpolarizing direction.

  7. Predicting of Maximum Forage Intake Capacity in Cattle from Degradability Characteristics, Passage Rate and Rumen Pool Size of NDF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mgheni, D M; Weisbjerg, Martin Riis; Kimambo, A E

    2005-01-01

    An experiment (5 x 5 Latin Square) was conducted to estimate the physical fill of tropical forages and maximum intake capacity of five matrue non-pregnant corssbred dairy heifers kept under zero grazing system.......An experiment (5 x 5 Latin Square) was conducted to estimate the physical fill of tropical forages and maximum intake capacity of five matrue non-pregnant corssbred dairy heifers kept under zero grazing system....

  8. Association between success rate and citation count of studies of radiofrequency catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation: possible evidence of citation bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perino, Alexander C; Hoang, Donald D; Holmes, Tyson H; Santangeli, Pasquale; Heidenreich, Paul A; Perez, Marco V; Wang, Paul J; Turakhia, Mintu P

    2014-09-01

    The preferential citation of studies with the highest success rates could exaggerate perceived effectiveness, particularly for treatments with widely varying published success rates such as radiofrequency catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation. We systematically identified observational studies and clinical trials of radiofrequency catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation between 1990 and 2012. Generalized Poisson regression was used to estimate association between study success rate and total citation count, adjusting for sample size, journal impact factor, time since publication, study design, and whether first or last author was a consensus-defined pre-eminent expert. We identified 174 articles meeting our inclusion criteria (36 289 subjects). After adjustment only for time since publication, a 10-point increase above the mean in pooled reported success rates was associated with a 17.8% increase in citation count at 5 years postpublication (95% confidence interval, 7.1-28.4%; Pcitation count; 95% confidence interval, 7.6-29.6%; Pcitation count, which may indicate citation bias. To readers of the literature, radiofrequency catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation could be perceived to be more effective than the data supports. These findings may have implications for a wide variety of novel cardiovascular therapies. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Association between Resting Heart Rate and Inflammatory Markers (White Blood Cell Count and High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein) in Healthy Korean People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Woo-Chul; Seo, Inho; Kim, Shin-Hye; Lee, Yong-Jae; Ahn, Song Vogue

    2017-01-01

    Inflammation is an important underlying mechanism in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, and an elevated resting heart rate underlies the process of atherosclerotic plaque formation. We hypothesized an association between resting heart rate and subclinical inflammation. Resting heart rate was recorded at baseline in the KoGES-ARIRANG (Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study on Atherosclerosis Risk of Rural Areas in the Korean General Population) cohort study, and was then divided into quartiles. Subclinical inflammation was measured by white blood cell count and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein. We used progressively adjusted regression models with terms for muscle mass, body fat proportion, and adiponectin in the fully adjusted models. We examined inflammatory markers as both continuous and categorical variables, using the clinical cut point of the highest quartile of white blood cell count (≥7,900/mm(3)) and ≥3 mg/dL for high-sensitivity C-reactive protein. Participants had a mean age of 56.3±8.1 years and a mean resting heart rate of 71.4±10.7 beats/min; 39.1% were men. In a fully adjusted model, an increased resting heart rate was significantly associated with a higher white blood cell count and higher levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in both continuous (P for trend heart rate is associated with a higher level of subclinical inflammation among healthy Korean people.

  10. Seal Counts

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Database of seal counts from aerial photography. Counts by image, site, species, and date are stored in the database along with information on entanglements and...

  11. Counting carbohydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carb counting; Carbohydrate-controlled diet; Diabetic diet; Diabetes-counting carbohydrates ... Many foods contain carbohydrates (carbs), including: Fruit and fruit juice Cereal, bread, pasta, and rice Milk and milk products, soy milk Beans, legumes, ...

  12. Time and position resolution of high granularity, high counting rate MRPC for the inner zone of the CBM-TOF wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petriş, M.; Bartoş, D.; Caragheorgheopol, G.; Deppner, I.; Frühauf, J.; Herrmann, N.; Kiš, M.; Loizeau, P.-A.; Petrovici, M.; Rădulescu, L.; Simion, V.; Simon, C.

    2016-09-01

    Multi-gap RPC prototypes with a multi-strip-electrode readout were developed for the small polar angle region of the CBM-TOF subdetector, the most demanding zone in terms of granularity and counting rate. The prototypes are based on using low resistivity (~ 1010 Ω·cm) glass electrodes for performing in high counting rate environment. The strip width/pitch size was chosen such to fulfill the impedance matching with the front-end electronics and the granularity requirements of the innermost zone of the CBM-TOF wall. The in-beam tests using secondary particles produced in heavy ion collisions on a Pb target at SIS18—GSI Darmstadt and SPS—CERN were focused on the performance of the prototypes in conditions similar to the ones expected at SIS100/FAIR. An efficiency larger than 98% and a system time resolution in the order of 70-80 ps were obtained in high counting rate and high multiplicity environment.

  13. Time and position resolution of high granularity, high counting rate MRPC for the inner zone of the CBM-TOF wall

    CERN Document Server

    Petriş, M.

    2016-09-13

    Multi-gap RPC prototypes with readout on a multi-strip electrode were developed for the small polar angle region of the CBM-TOF subdetector, the most demanding zone in terms of granularity and counting rate. The prototypes are based on low resistivity ($\\sim$10$^{10}$ $\\Omega$cm) glass electrodes for performing in high counting rate environment. The strip width/pitch size was chosen such to fulfill the impedance matching with the front-end electronics and the granularity requirements of the innermost zone of the CBM-TOF wall. The in-beam tests using secondary particles produced in heavy ion collisions on a Pb target at SIS18 - GSI Darmstadt and SPS - CERN were focused on the performance of the prototype in conditions similar to the ones expected at SIS100/FAIR. An efficiency larger than 98\\% and a system time resolution in the order of 70~-~80~ps were obtained in high counting rate and high multiplicity environment.

  14. 76 FR 39068 - Guarantee Fee Rates for Guaranteed Loans for Fiscal Year 2011; Maximum Portion of Guarantee...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Rural Business-Cooperative Service Guarantee Fee Rates for Guaranteed Loans for Fiscal Year 2011... 4279.107(b), Rural Development (the ] Agency) has the authority to charge an annual renewal fee for...

  15. Estimating rate uncertainty with maximum likelihood: differences between power-law and flicker–random-walk models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langbein, John O.

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have documented that global positioning system (GPS) time series of position estimates have temporal correlations which have been modeled as a combination of power-law and white noise processes. When estimating quantities such as a constant rate from GPS time series data, the estimated uncertainties on these quantities are more realistic when using a noise model that includes temporal correlations than simply assuming temporally uncorrelated noise. However, the choice of the specific representation of correlated noise can affect the estimate of uncertainty. For many GPS time series, the background noise can be represented by either: (1) a sum of flicker and random-walk noise or, (2) as a power-law noise model that represents an average of the flicker and random-walk noise. For instance, if the underlying noise model is a combination of flicker and random-walk noise, then incorrectly choosing the power-law model could underestimate the rate uncertainty by a factor of two. Distinguishing between the two alternate noise models is difficult since the flicker component can dominate the assessment of the noise properties because it is spread over a significant portion of the measurable frequency band. But, although not necessarily detectable, the random-walk component can be a major constituent of the estimated rate uncertainty. None the less, it is possible to determine the upper bound on the random-walk noise.

  16. Comparison of heart rate and external performance at selected field tests for determining maximum heart rate for bicyclists and triathletes when cycling.

    OpenAIRE

    Podrazil, Tomáš

    2014-01-01

    Title: Comparison of the heart rate values and external performance is based on selected field tests determining maximal heart rate in cycling of cyclist and triathletes Objectives: Objective of thesis is to determine the values of maximal heart rate and external performance from selected field tests in cycling and compare them with one another. Methods: Three cyclist were measured in field tests and acquired results were used to create the graphs and tables. Data were obtained by cycling per...

  17. Basal metabolic rate, maximum thermogenic capacity and aerobic scope in rodents: interaction between environmental temperature and torpor use

    OpenAIRE

    Careau, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    When torpid animals arouse and warm up to restore normal body temperature (Tb), they produce heat at levels that can reach up to 10 times basal metabolic rate (BMR), close to the cold-induced summit metabolism (VO2-sum). Because torpor is an adaptation aimed at conserving energy over periods of low ambient temperature (Ta) and food availability, selective forces that have led to the evolution of torpor may have simultaneously favoured high thermogenic capacity (i.e. VO2-sum) relative to the m...

  18. FastMG: a simple, fast, and accurate maximum likelihood procedure to estimate amino acid replacement rate matrices from large data sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Cuong Cao; Le, Vinh Sy; Gascuel, Olivier; Hazes, Bart; Le, Quang Si

    2014-10-24

    Amino acid replacement rate matrices are a crucial component of many protein analysis systems such as sequence similarity search, sequence alignment, and phylogenetic inference. Ideally, the rate matrix reflects the mutational behavior of the actual data under study; however, estimating amino acid replacement rate matrices requires large protein alignments and is computationally expensive and complex. As a compromise, sub-optimal pre-calculated generic matrices are typically used for protein-based phylogeny. Sequence availability has now grown to a point where problem-specific rate matrices can often be calculated if the computational cost can be controlled. The most time consuming step in estimating rate matrices by maximum likelihood is building maximum likelihood phylogenetic trees from protein alignments. We propose a new procedure, called FastMG, to overcome this obstacle. The key innovation is the alignment-splitting algorithm that splits alignments with many sequences into non-overlapping sub-alignments prior to estimating amino acid replacement rates. Experiments with different large data sets showed that the FastMG procedure was an order of magnitude faster than without splitting. Importantly, there was no apparent loss in matrix quality if an appropriate splitting procedure is used. FastMG is a simple, fast and accurate procedure to estimate amino acid replacement rate matrices from large data sets. It enables researchers to study the evolutionary relationships for specific groups of proteins or taxa with optimized, data-specific amino acid replacement rate matrices. The programs, data sets, and the new mammalian mitochondrial protein rate matrix are available at http://fastmg.codeplex.com.

  19. Counting cormorants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnballe, Thomas; Carss, David N; Lorentsen, Svein-Håkon

    2013-01-01

    This chapter focuses on Cormorant population counts for both summer (i.e. breeding) and winter (i.e. migration, winter roosts) seasons. It also explains differences in the data collected from undertaking ‘day’ versus ‘roost’ counts, gives some definitions of the term ‘numbers’, and presents two e...

  20. Maximum Strength, Rate of Force Development, Jump Height, and Peak Power Alterations in Weightlifters across Five Months of Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Guy Hornsby

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this monitoring study was to investigate how alterations in training affect changes in force-related characteristics and weightlifting performance. Subjects: Seven competitive weightlifters participated in the study. Methods: The weightlifters performed a block style periodized plan across 20 weeks. Force plate data from the isometric mid-thigh pull and static jumps with 0 kg, 11 kg, and 20 kg were collected near the end of each training block (weeks 1, 6, 10, 13, 17, and 20. Weightlifting performance was measured at weeks 0, 7, 11, and 20. Results: Very strong correlations were noted between weightlifting performances and isometric rate of force development (RFD, isometric peak force (PF, peak power (PP, and jump height (JH. Men responded in a more predictable manner than the women. During periods of higher training volume, RFD was depressed to a greater extent than PF. JH at 20 kg responded in a manner reflecting the expected fatigue response more so than JH at 0 kg and 11 kg. Conclusions: PF appears to have been more resistant to volume alterations than RFD and JH at 20 kg. RFD and JH at 20 kg appear to be superior monitoring metrics due to their “sensitivity.”

  1. Basal metabolic rate, maximum thermogenic capacity and aerobic scope in rodents: interaction between environmental temperature and torpor use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Careau, Vincent

    2013-04-23

    When torpid animals arouse and warm up to restore normal body temperature (T(b)), they produce heat at levels that can reach up to 10 times basal metabolic rate (BMR), close to the cold-induced summit metabolism (VO(2)-sum). Because torpor is an adaptation aimed at conserving energy over periods of low ambient temperature (T(a)) and food availability, selective forces that have led to the evolution of torpor may have simultaneously favoured high thermogenic capacity (i.e. VO(2)-sum) relative to the maintenance costs (i.e. BMR), hence a higher factorial aerobic scope (FAS; the ratio of VO(2)-sum to BMR). My objective was to test this adaptive hypothesis using a phylogenetically informed comparative approach with data on BMR and VO(2)-sum in rodents. I found a strong negative correlation between FAS and the average of the daily minimum T(a) (T(min)) in species using torpor, which was due to differential effects of T(a) on BMR (but not VO(2)-sum) in species that use torpor compared with species that do not. In addition, FAS was negatively correlated with the lowest torpid T(b) in a subset of nine species. These results suggest that in species using torpor, selective forces may have acted to maximize the efficiency of thermogenic capacity (VO(2)-sum) relative to maintenance costs (BMR), resulting in an increasing FAS with decreasing T(a).

  2. Numerical counting ratemeter with large time constant for very low count rates - operational results; Ictometre numerique a grande constante de temps pour tres faible taux de comptage - resultats d'exploitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiser, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-07-01

    The use of an analogue ictometer poses technical problems for measuring low count rates. These latter call for time constants of up to 1000 sec. The numerical technique is better adapted and makes it possible to increase the time constant to 1000 sec. or over. The equipment described consists of 6 numerical ictometers fitted in a 3 U 3 drawer. By means of a clock it is possible to vary the counting time from 1 second to 1000 seconds, using values at 5, 10, 50, 100 and 500 seconds. The corresponding values of the frequency are 500 c/sec, 100, 50 10. 5. 1 and 0.5 c/sec with a resolving power of 0.2 per cent. The result appears on an indicator panel (galvanometer) and is available in the form of an analogue voltage suitable for a 50 mV MECI recorder. (author) [French] En utilisant un ictometre analogique, la mesure des taux de comptages faibles pose des problemes techniques. Les faibles taux de comptage exigent des constantes de temps allant jusqu'a 1000 s. La technique numerique se montre mieux adaptee et permet d'augmenter la constante de temps a 1000 s ou plus. L'ensemble decrit comporte 6 ictometres numeriques loges dans un tiroir 3 U 3. Une horloge permet de varier le temps de comptage de 1 seconde a 1000 secondes, passant par 5, 10, 50, 100, 500 secondes. Les gammes de frequences correspondantes sont 500, 100, 50, 10, 5, 1, 0,5 c/s avec une resolution de 2 pour 1000. Le resultat est affiche par un indicateur de tableaux (galvanometre) et est disponible en tension analogique pour l'enregistrement sur MECI (50 mV). (auteur)

  3. Baseline CD4+ T cell counts correlates with HIV-1 synonymous rate in HLA-B*5701 subjects with different risk of disease progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa M Norström

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available HLA-B*5701 is the host factor most strongly associated with slow HIV-1 disease progression, although risk of progression may vary among patients carrying this allele. The interplay between HIV-1 evolutionary rate variation and risk of progression to AIDS in HLA-B*5701 subjects was studied using longitudinal viral sequences from high-risk progressors (HRPs and low-risk progressors (LRPs. Posterior distributions of HIV-1 genealogies assuming a Bayesian relaxed molecular clock were used to estimate the absolute rates of nonsynonymous and synonymous substitutions for different set of branches. Rates of viral evolution, as well as in vitro viral replication capacity assessed using a novel phenotypic assay, were correlated with various clinical parameters. HIV-1 synonymous substitution rates were significantly lower in LRPs than HRPs, especially for sets of internal branches. The viral population infecting LRPs was also characterized by a slower increase in synonymous divergence over time. This pattern did not correlate to differences in viral fitness, as measured by in vitro replication capacity, nor could be explained by differences among subjects in T cell activation or selection pressure. Interestingly, a significant inverse correlation was found between baseline CD4+ T cell counts and mean HIV-1 synonymous rate (which is proportional to the viral replication rate along branches representing viral lineages successfully propagating through time up to the last sampled time point. The observed lower replication rate in HLA-B*5701 subjects with higher baseline CD4+ T cell counts provides a potential model to explain differences in risk of disease progression among individuals carrying this allele.

  4. The new X-ray mapping: X-ray spectrum imaging above 100 kHz output count rate with the silicon drift detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newbury, Dale E

    2006-02-01

    Electron-excited X-ray mapping is a key operational mode of the scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS). The popularity of X-ray mapping persists despite the significant time penalty due to the relatively low output count rates, typically less than 25 kHz, that can be processed with the conventional EDS. The silicon drift detector (SDD) uses the same measurement physics, but modifications to the detector structure permit operation at a factor of 5-10 times higher than conventional EDS for the same resolution. Output count rates as high as 500 kHz can be achieved with 217 eV energy resolution (at MnKalpha). Such extraordinarily high count rates make possible X-ray mapping through the method of X-ray spectrum imaging, in which a complete spectrum is captured at each pixel of the scan. Useful compositional data can be captured in less than 200 s with a pixel density of 160 x 120. Applications to alloy and rock microstructures, ultrapure materials with rare inclusions, and aggregate particles with complex chemistry illustrate new approaches to characterization made practical by high-speed X-ray mapping with the SDD.Note: The Siegbahn notation for characteristic X-rays is commonly used in the field of electron beam X-ray spectrometry and will be used in this article. The equivalent IUPAC notation is indicated in parentheses at the first use. In this article, the following arbitrary definitions will be used when referring to concentration (C) ranges: major: C > 0.1 (10 wt%), minor: 0.01

  5. Multiplicity Counting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geist, William H. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-12-01

    This set of slides begins by giving background and a review of neutron counting; three attributes of a verification item are discussed: 240Pueff mass; α, the ratio of (α,n) neutrons to spontaneous fission neutrons; and leakage multiplication. It then takes up neutron detector systems – theory & concepts (coincidence counting, moderation, die-away time); detector systems – some important details (deadtime, corrections); introduction to multiplicity counting; multiplicity electronics and example distributions; singles, doubles, and triples from measured multiplicity distributions; and the point model: multiplicity mathematics.

  6. Performance of n-gamma pulse-shape discrimination with simple pile-up rejection at high gamma-ray count rates

    CERN Document Server

    Okuda, T; Kawabata, M; Kasagi, J; Harada, H

    1999-01-01

    The performance of n-gamma pulse-shape discrimination for a liquid scintillation detector has been investigated for gamma-ray count rates up to 50 kcps. A method in which the ratio of the total to partial charge in the anode pulse is directly measured has shown much improved quality of the pulse-shape discrimination when pile-up events are rejected; it can discriminate neutron events of 50 cps from gamma-ray events of 29 kcps. The method with simple pile-up rejection has the advantage that only general purpose electronics are required.

  7. Modeling Non-Equilibrium Dynamics of a Discrete Probability Distribution: General Rate Equation for Maximal Entropy Generation in a Maximum-Entropy Landscape with Time-Dependent Constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gian Paolo Beretta

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available A rate equation for a discrete probability distribution is discussed as a route to describe smooth relaxation towards the maximum entropy distribution compatible at all times with one or more linear constraints. The resulting dynamics follows the path of steepest entropy ascent compatible with the constraints. The rate equation is consistent with the Onsager theorem of reciprocity and the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. The mathematical formalism was originally developed to obtain a quantum theoretical unification of mechanics and thermodinamics. It is presented here in a general, non-quantal formulation as a part of an effort to develop tools for the phenomenological treatment of non-equilibrium problems with applications in engineering, biology, sociology, and economics. The rate equation is also extended to include the case of assigned time-dependences of the constraints and the entropy, such as for modeling non-equilibrium energy and entropy exchanges.

  8. Improved method for the determination of the cortisol production rate using high-performance liquid chromatography and liquid scintillation counting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ingen, H. E.; Endert, E.

    1988-01-01

    Two new methods for the determination of the cortisol production rate using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography are described. One uses ultraviolet detection at 205 nm, the other on-line post-column derivatization with benzamidine, followed by fluorimetric detection. The specific

  9. Mars sedimentary rock erosion rates constrained using crater counts, with applications to organic-matter preservation and to the global dust cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kite, Edwin S.; Mayer, David P.

    2017-04-01

    Small-crater counts on Mars light-toned sedimentary rock are often inconsistent with any isochron; these data are usually plotted then ignored. We show (using an 18-HiRISE-image, > 104-crater dataset) that these non-isochron crater counts are often well-fit by a model where crater production is balanced by crater obliteration via steady exhumation. For these regions, we fit erosion rates. We infer that Mars light-toned sedimentary rocks typically erode at ∼102 nm/yr, when averaged over 10 km2 scales and 107-108 yr timescales. Crater-based erosion-rate determination is consistent with independent techniques, but can be applied to nearly all light-toned sedimentary rocks on Mars. Erosion is swift enough that radiolysis cannot destroy complex organic matter at some locations (e.g. paleolake deposits at SW Melas), but radiolysis is a severe problem at other locations (e.g. Oxia Planum). The data suggest that the relief of the Valles Marineris mounds is currently being reduced by wind erosion, and that dust production on Mars < 3 Gya greatly exceeds the modern reservoir of mobile dust.

  10. A high resolution, high frame rate detector based on a microchannel plate read out with the Medipix2 counting CMOS pixel chip.

    CERN Document Server

    Mikulec, Bettina; McPhate, J B; Tremsin, A S; Siegmund, O H W; Clark, Allan G; CERN. Geneva

    2005-01-01

    The future of ground-based optical astronomy lies with advancements in adaptive optics (AO) to overcome the limitations that the atmosphere places on high resolution imaging. A key technology for AO systems on future very large telescopes are the wavefront sensors (WFS) which detect the optical phase error and send corrections to deformable mirrors. Telescopes with >30 m diameters will require WFS detectors that have large pixel formats (512x512), low noise (<3 e-/pixel) and very high frame rates (~1 kHz). These requirements have led to the idea of a bare CMOS active pixel device (the Medipix2 chip) functioning in counting mode as an anode with noiseless readout for a microchannel plate (MCP) detector and at 1 kHz continuous frame rate. First measurement results obtained with this novel detector are presented both for UV photons and beta particles.

  11. Effect of precipitation, sorption and stable of isotope on maximum release rates of radionuclides from engineered barrier system (EBS) in deep repository.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malekifarsani, A; Skachek, M A

    2009-10-01

    shown that the concentrations of the following radionuclides are limited by solubility and precipitate around the waste and buffer: U, Np, Ra, Sm, Zr, Se, Tc, and Pd. The Sensitivity of maximum release rates in case precipitation shows that some nuclides such as Cs-135, Nb-94, Nb-93 m, Zr-93, Sn-126, Th-230, Pu-240, Pu-242, Pu-239, Cm-245, Am-243, Cm-245, U-233, Ac-227, Pb-210, Pa-231 and Th-229 are very little changed in case the maximum release rate from EBS corresponding to eliminate precipitation in buffer material. Some nuclides such as Se-79, Tc-99, Pd-107, Th-232, U-236, U-233, Ra-226, Np-237 U-235, U-234, and U-238 are virtually changed in the maximum release rate compared to case that taking account precipitation. In Sensitivity of maximum release rates in case to taking account stable isotopes (according to the table of inventory) there are only some nuclides with their stable isotopes in the vitrified waste. And calculation shows that Pd-107 and Se-79 are very increase in case eliminate stable isotope. The Sensitivity of maximum release rates in case retardation with sorption shows that some nuclides such as Pu-240, Pu-241, Pu-239, Cm-245, Am-241, Cm-246, and Am-243 are increased in some time in case maximum release rate from EBS corresponding to eliminate retardation in buffer material. Some nuclides such as U-235, U-233 and U-236 have a little decrease in case maximum release because their parents have short live and before decay to their daughter will released from the EBS. If the characteristic time taken for a nuclide to diffuse across the buffer exceeds its half-life, then the release rate of that nuclide from the EBS will be attenuated by radioactive decay. Thus, the retardation of the diffusion process due to sorption tends to reduce the release rates of short-lived nuclides more effectively than for the long-lived ones. For example, release rates of Pu-240, Cm-246 and Am-241, which are relatively short-lived and strongly sorbing, are very small

  12. Maximum Heart Rate during exercise: Reliability of the 220-age and Tanaka formulas in healthy young people at a moderate elevation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Eduardo Cruz-Martínez

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. The formulas to predict maximum heart rate have been used for many years in different populations. Objective. To verify the significance and the association of formulas of Tanaka and 220-age when compared to real maximum heart rate. Materials and methods. 30 subjects -22 men, 8 women- between 18 and 30 years of age were evaluated on a cycle ergometer and their real MHR values were statistically compared with the values of formulas currently used to predict MHR. Results. The results demonstrate that both Tanaka p=0.0026 and 220-age p=0.000003 do not predict real MHR, nor does a linear association exist between them. Conclusions. Due to the overestimation with respect to real MHR value that these formulas make, we suggest a correction of 6 bpm to the final result. This value represents the median of the difference between the Tanaka value and the real MHR. Both Tanaka (r=0.272 and 220-age (r=0.276 are not adequate predictors of MHR during exercise at the elevation of Bogotá in subjects of 18 to 30 years of age, although more study with a larger sample size is suggested.

  13. A new approach to assess the dependency of extant half-saturation coefficients on maximum process rates and estimate intrinsic coefficients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, A; Takács, I; Pagilla, K R; Murthy, S

    2013-10-15

    The Monod equation is often used to describe biological treatment processes and is the foundation for many activated sludge models. The Monod equation includes a "half-saturation coefficient" to describe the effect of substrate limitations on the process rate and it is customary to consider this parameter to be a constant for a given system. The purpose of this study was to develop a methodology, and its use to show that the half-saturation coefficient for denitrification is not constant but is in fact a function of the maximum denitrification rate. A 4-step procedure is developed to investigate the dependency of half-saturation coefficients on the maximum rate and two different models are used to describe this dependency: (a) an empirical linear model and (b) a deterministic model based on Fick's law of diffusion. Both models are proved better for describing denitrification kinetics than assuming a fixed K(NO3) at low nitrate concentrations. The empirical model is more utilitarian whereas the model based on Fick's law has a fundamental basis that enables the intrinsic K(NO3) to be estimated. In this study data was analyzed from 56 denitrification rate tests and it was found that the extant K(NO3) varied between 0.07 mgN/L and 1.47 mgN/L (5th and 95th percentile respectively) with an average of 0.47 mgN/L. In contrast to this, the intrinsic K(NO3) estimated for the diffusion model was 0.01 mgN/L which indicates that the extant K(NO3) is greatly influenced by, and mostly describes, diffusion limitations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Asthma and myocardial infarction inpatient hospitalization and emergency room visit counts and rates by county, year and month of admission, age group, race/ethnicity and gender of California residents, 2000-2009.

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Environmental Health Tracking Program — This dataset contains case counts, rates, and confidence intervals of asthma (ICD9-CM 493.0-493.9) and myocardial infarction (ICD9-CM 410) inpatient hospitalizations...

  15. Counting Penguins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Mike; Kader, Gary

    1998-01-01

    Presents an activity on the simplification of penguin counting by employing the basic ideas and principles of sampling to teach students to understand and recognize its role in statistical claims. Emphasizes estimation, data analysis and interpretation, and central limit theorem. Includes a list of items for classroom discussion. (ASK)

  16. Measuring maximum and standard metabolic rates using intermittent-flow respirometry: a student laboratory investigation of aerobic metabolic scope and environmental hypoxia in aquatic breathers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosewarne, P J; Wilson, J M; Svendsen, J C

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic rate is one of the most widely measured physiological traits in animals and may be influenced by both endogenous (e.g. body mass) and exogenous factors (e.g. oxygen availability and temperature). Standard metabolic rate (SMR) and maximum metabolic rate (MMR) are two fundamental physiological variables providing the floor and ceiling in aerobic energy metabolism. The total amount of energy available between these two variables constitutes the aerobic metabolic scope (AMS). A laboratory exercise aimed at an undergraduate level physiology class, which details the appropriate data acquisition methods and calculations to measure oxygen consumption rates in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, is presented here. Specifically, the teaching exercise employs intermittent flow respirometry to measure SMR and MMR, derives AMS from the measurements and demonstrates how AMS is affected by environmental oxygen. Students' results typically reveal a decline in AMS in response to environmental hypoxia. The same techniques can be applied to investigate the influence of other key factors on metabolic rate (e.g. temperature and body mass). Discussion of the results develops students' understanding of the mechanisms underlying these fundamental physiological traits and the influence of exogenous factors. More generally, the teaching exercise outlines essential laboratory concepts in addition to metabolic rate calculations, data acquisition and unit conversions that enhance competency in quantitative analysis and reasoning. Finally, the described procedures are generally applicable to other fish species or aquatic breathers such as crustaceans (e.g. crayfish) and provide an alternative to using higher (or more derived) animals to investigate questions related to metabolic physiology. © 2016 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  17. Gamma-ray spectroscopy at MHz counting rates with a compact LaBr{sub 3} detector and silicon photomultipliers for fusion plasma applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nocente, M., E-mail: massimo.nocente@mib.infn.it [EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “Piero Caldirola,” Milano (Italy); Rigamonti, D.; Croci, G.; Gorini, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “Piero Caldirola,” Milano (Italy); Perseo, V. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Tardocchi, M.; Cremona, A.; Muraro, A. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “Piero Caldirola,” Milano (Italy); Boltruczyk, G.; Broslawski, A.; Gosk, M.; Korolczuk, S.; Zychor, I. [Narodowe Centrum Badan Jadrowych (NCBJ), Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Kiptily, V. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Culham (United Kingdom); Mazzocco, M.; Strano, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Padova (Italy); Collaboration: EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom)

    2016-11-15

    Gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements at MHz counting rates have been carried out, for the first time, with a compact spectrometer based on a LaBr{sub 3} scintillator and silicon photomultipliers. The instrument, which is also insensitive to magnetic fields, has been developed in view of the upgrade of the gamma-ray camera diagnostic for α particle measurements in deuterium-tritium plasmas of the Joint European Torus. Spectra were measured up to 2.9 MHz with a projected energy resolution of 3%-4% in the 3-5 MeV range, of interest for fast ion physics studies in fusion plasmas. The results reported here pave the way to first time measurements of the confined α particle profile in high power plasmas of the next deuterium-tritium campaign at the Joint European Torus.

  18. Clinical count rate performance of an LSO PET/CT scanner utilizing a new front-end electronics architecture with sub-nanosecond intrinsic timing resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, J. P. J.; Townsend, D. W.

    2006-12-01

    A new front-end electronics architecture with sub-nanosecond intrinsic timing resolution has recently been incorporated into a 16 slice LSO PET/CT scanner for imaging applications in oncology. The new electronics are designed to work optimally with the lutetium orthosilicate (LSO) scintillator. Clinical performance of the LSO PET/CT is examined before and after upgrading to the new PICO 3D electronics, and compared with results using the NEMA NU 2 standard for evaluating scanner performance. Improved noise-equivalent count rates are seen in clinical studies, and reduced scatter fractions are observed, consistent with the increased lower-level energy threshold used to reject scatter events in the upgraded configuration.

  19. Ecotypic variation in growth responses to simulated herbivory: trade-off between maximum relative growth rate and tolerance to defoliation in an annual plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Iván D.; Tapia-López, Rosalinda; Núñez-Farfán, Juan

    2015-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that slow-growing plants are more likely to maximize above-ground biomass and fitness when defoliated by herbivores than those with an already high relative growth rate (RGR). Some populations of the annual herb Datura stramonium L. can tolerate foliar damage better than others. The physiological basis of this difference is examined here in a comparative study of two ecotypes that differ in tolerance and maximum growth rate, using a growth analytical approach. One hundred and fifty-four plants of each ecotype grown under controlled conditions were suddenly defoliated (35 % of total leaf area removed) and a similar sample size of plants remained undefoliated (control). Ontogenetic plastic changes in RGR and its growth components [net assimilation rate (NAR), specific leaf area and leaf weight ratio (LWR)] after defoliation were measured to determine whether these plastic changes maximize plant growth and fitness. Different ontogenetic phases of the response were discerned and increased RGR of defoliated plants was detected at the end of the experimental period, but brought about by a different growth component (NAR or LWR) in each ecotype. These changes in RGR are putatively related to increases in fitness in defoliated environments. At the intra-specific scale, data showed a trade-off between the ability to grow under benign environmental conditions and the ability to tolerate resource limitation due to defoliation. PMID:25725085

  20. Resting vs. active: a meta-analysis of the intra- and inter-specific associations between minimum, sustained, and maximum metabolic rates in vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer, Sonya K; Killen, Shaun S; Rezende, Enrico L

    2017-09-01

    Variation in aerobic capacity has far reaching consequences for the physiology, ecology, and evolution of vertebrates. Whether at rest or active, animals are constrained to operate within the energetic bounds determined by their minimum (minMR) and sustained or maximum metabolic rates (upperMR). MinMR and upperMR can differ considerably among individuals and species but are often presumed to be mechanistically linked to one another. Specifically, minMR is thought to reflect the idling cost of the machinery needed to support upperMR. However, previous analyses based on limited datasets have come to conflicting conclusions regarding the generality and strength of their association.Here we conduct the first comprehensive assessment of their relationship, based on a large number of published estimates of both the intra-specific ( n  = 176) and inter-specific ( n  = 41) phenotypic correlations between minMR and upperMR, estimated as either exercise-induced maximum metabolic rate (VO 2 max), cold-induced summit metabolic rate (Msum), or daily energy expenditure (DEE).Our meta-analysis shows that there is a general positive association between minMR and upperMR that is shared among vertebrate taxonomic classes. However, there was stronger evidence for intra-specific correlations between minMR and Msum and between minMR and DEE than there was for a correlation between minMR and VO 2 max across different taxa. As expected, inter-specific correlation estimates were consistently higher than intra-specific estimates across all traits and vertebrate classes.An interesting exception to this general trend was observed in mammals, which contrast with birds and exhibit no correlation between minMR and Msum. We speculate that this is due to the evolution and recruitment of brown fat as a thermogenic tissue, which illustrates how some species and lineages might circumvent this seemingly general association.We conclude that, in spite of some variability across taxa and traits, the

  1. Petroleum production at Maximum Efficient Rate Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (Elk Hills), Kern County, California. Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-07-01

    This document provides an analysis of the potential impacts associated with the proposed action, which is continued operation of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. I (NPR-1) at the Maximum Efficient Rate (MER) as authorized by Public law 94-258, the Naval Petroleum Reserves Production Act of 1976 (Act). The document also provides a similar analysis of alternatives to the proposed action, which also involve continued operations, but under lower development scenarios and lower rates of production. NPR-1 is a large oil and gas field jointly owned and operated by the federal government and Chevron U.SA Inc. (CUSA) pursuant to a Unit Plan Contract that became effective in 1944; the government`s interest is approximately 78% and CUSA`s interest is approximately 22%. The government`s interest is under the jurisdiction of the United States Department of Energy (DOE). The facility is approximately 17,409 acres (74 square miles), and it is located in Kern County, California, about 25 miles southwest of Bakersfield and 100 miles north of Los Angeles in the south central portion of the state. The environmental analysis presented herein is a supplement to the NPR-1 Final Environmental Impact Statement of that was issued by DOE in 1979 (1979 EIS). As such, this document is a Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS).

  2. n-Order and maximum fuzzy similarity entropy for discrimination of signals of different complexity: Application to fetal heart rate signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaylaa, Amira; Oudjemia, Souad; Charara, Jamal; Girault, Jean-Marc

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents two new concepts for discrimination of signals of different complexity. The first focused initially on solving the problem of setting entropy descriptors by varying the pattern size instead of the tolerance. This led to the search for the optimal pattern size that maximized the similarity entropy. The second paradigm was based on the n-order similarity entropy that encompasses the 1-order similarity entropy. To improve the statistical stability, n-order fuzzy similarity entropy was proposed. Fractional Brownian motion was simulated to validate the different methods proposed, and fetal heart rate signals were used to discriminate normal from abnormal fetuses. In all cases, it was found that it was possible to discriminate time series of different complexity such as fractional Brownian motion and fetal heart rate signals. The best levels of performance in terms of sensitivity (90%) and specificity (90%) were obtained with the n-order fuzzy similarity entropy. However, it was shown that the optimal pattern size and the maximum similarity measurement were related to intrinsic features of the time series. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Maximum Plant Uptakes for Water, Nutrients, and Oxygen Are Not Always Met by Irrigation Rate and Distribution in Water-based Cultivation Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blok, Chris; Jackson, Brian E; Guo, Xianfeng; de Visser, Pieter H B; Marcelis, Leo F M

    2017-01-01

    Growing on rooting media other than soils in situ -i.e., substrate-based growing- allows for higher yields than soil-based growing as transport rates of water, nutrients, and oxygen in substrate surpass those in soil. Possibly water-based growing allows for even higher yields as transport rates of water and nutrients in water surpass those in substrate, even though the transport of oxygen may be more complex. Transport rates can only limit growth when they are below a rate corresponding to maximum plant uptake. Our first objective was to compare Chrysanthemum growth performance for three water-based growing systems with different irrigation. We compared; multi-point irrigation into a pond (DeepFlow); one-point irrigation resulting in a thin film of running water (NutrientFlow) and multi-point irrigation as droplets through air (Aeroponic). Second objective was to compare press pots as propagation medium with nutrient solution as propagation medium. The comparison included DeepFlow water-rooted cuttings with either the stem 1 cm into the nutrient solution or with the stem 1 cm above the nutrient solution. Measurements included fresh weight, dry weight, length, water supply, nutrient supply, and oxygen levels. To account for differences in radiation sum received, crop performance was evaluated with Radiation Use Efficiency (RUE) expressed as dry weight over sum of Photosynthetically Active Radiation. The reference, DeepFlow with substrate-based propagation, showed the highest RUE, even while the oxygen supply provided by irrigation was potentially growth limiting. DeepFlow with water-based propagation showed 15-17% lower RUEs than the reference. NutrientFlow showed 8% lower RUE than the reference, in combination with potentially limiting irrigation supply of nutrients and oxygen. Aeroponic showed RUE levels similar to the reference and Aeroponic had non-limiting irrigation supply of water, nutrients, and oxygen. Water-based propagation affected the subsequent

  4. Maximum Plant Uptakes for Water, Nutrients, and Oxygen Are Not Always Met by Irrigation Rate and Distribution in Water-based Cultivation Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blok, Chris; Jackson, Brian E.; Guo, Xianfeng; de Visser, Pieter H. B.; Marcelis, Leo F. M.

    2017-01-01

    Growing on rooting media other than soils in situ -i.e., substrate-based growing- allows for higher yields than soil-based growing as transport rates of water, nutrients, and oxygen in substrate surpass those in soil. Possibly water-based growing allows for even higher yields as transport rates of water and nutrients in water surpass those in substrate, even though the transport of oxygen may be more complex. Transport rates can only limit growth when they are below a rate corresponding to maximum plant uptake. Our first objective was to compare Chrysanthemum growth performance for three water-based growing systems with different irrigation. We compared; multi-point irrigation into a pond (DeepFlow); one-point irrigation resulting in a thin film of running water (NutrientFlow) and multi-point irrigation as droplets through air (Aeroponic). Second objective was to compare press pots as propagation medium with nutrient solution as propagation medium. The comparison included DeepFlow water-rooted cuttings with either the stem 1 cm into the nutrient solution or with the stem 1 cm above the nutrient solution. Measurements included fresh weight, dry weight, length, water supply, nutrient supply, and oxygen levels. To account for differences in radiation sum received, crop performance was evaluated with Radiation Use Efficiency (RUE) expressed as dry weight over sum of Photosynthetically Active Radiation. The reference, DeepFlow with substrate-based propagation, showed the highest RUE, even while the oxygen supply provided by irrigation was potentially growth limiting. DeepFlow with water-based propagation showed 15–17% lower RUEs than the reference. NutrientFlow showed 8% lower RUE than the reference, in combination with potentially limiting irrigation supply of nutrients and oxygen. Aeroponic showed RUE levels similar to the reference and Aeroponic had non-limiting irrigation supply of water, nutrients, and oxygen. Water-based propagation affected the subsequent

  5. Counting Possibilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Tomasetta

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Timothy Williamson supports the thesis that every possible entity necessarily exists and so he needs to explain how a possible son of Wittgenstein’s, for example, exists in our world:he exists as a merely possible object (MPO, a pure locus of potential. Williamson presents a short argument for the existence of MPOs: how many knives can be made by fitting together two blades and two handles? Four: at the most two are concrete objects, the others being merely possible knives and merely possible objects. This paper defends the idea that one can avoid reference and ontological commitment to MPOs. My proposal is that MPOs can be dispensed with by using the notion of rules of knife-making. I first present a solution according to which we count lists of instructions - selected by the rules - describing physical combinations between components. This account, however, has its own difficulties and I eventually suggest that one can find a way out by admitting possible worlds, entities which are more commonly accepted - at least by philosophers - than MPOs. I maintain that, in answering Williamson’s questions, we count classes of physically possible worlds in which the same instance of a general rule is applied.

  6. The Impact of Alternative Trait-Scaling Hypotheses for the Maximum Photosynthetic Carboxylation Rate (V (sub cmax)) on Global Gross Primary Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Anthony P.; Quaife, Tristan; Van Bodegom, Peter M.; De Kauwe, Martin G.; Keenan, Trevor F.; Joiner, Joanna; Lomas, Mark R.; MacBean, Natasha; Xu, Chongang; Yang, Xiaojuan; hide

    2017-01-01

    The maximum photosynthetic carboxylation rate (V (sub cmax)) is an influential plant trait that has multiple scaling hypotheses, which is a source of uncertainty in predictive understanding of global gross primary production (GPP). Four trait-scaling hypotheses (plant functional type, nutrient limitation, environmental filtering, and plant plasticity) with nine specific implementations were used to predict global V(sub cmax) distributions and their impact on global GPP in the Sheffield Dynamic Global Vegetation Model (SDGVM). Global GPP varied from 108.1 to 128.2 petagrams of Carbon (PgC) per year, 65 percent of the range of a recent model intercomparison of global GPP. The variation in GPP propagated through to a 27percent coefficient of variation in net biome productivity (NBP). All hypotheses produced global GPP that was highly correlated (r equals 0.85-0.91) with three proxies of global GPP. Plant functional type-based nutrient limitation, underpinned by a core SDGVM hypothesis that plant nitrogen (N) status is inversely related to increasing costs of N acquisition with increasing soil carbon, adequately reproduced global GPP distributions. Further improvement could be achieved with accurate representation of water sensitivity and agriculture in SDGVM. Mismatch between environmental filtering (the most data-driven hypothesis) and GPP suggested that greater effort is needed understand V(sub cmax) variation in the field, particularly in northern latitudes.

  7. Laboratory productivity and the rate of manual peripheral blood smear review: a College of American Pathologists Q-Probes study of 95,141 complete blood count determinations performed in 263 institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novis, David A; Walsh, Molly; Wilkinson, David; St Louis, Mary; Ben-Ezra, Jonathon

    2006-05-01

    Automated laboratory hematology analyzers are capable of performing differential counts on peripheral blood smears with greater precision and more accurate detection of distributional and morphologic abnormalities than those performed by manual examinations of blood smears. Manual determinations of blood morphology and leukocyte differential counts are time-consuming, expensive, and may not always be necessary. The frequency with which hematology laboratory workers perform manual screens despite the availability of labor-saving features of automated analyzers is unknown. To determine the normative rates with which manual peripheral blood smears were performed in clinical laboratories, to examine laboratory practices associated with higher or lower manual review rates, and to measure the effects of manual smear review on the efficiency of generating complete blood count (CBC) determinations. From each of 3 traditional shifts per day, participants were asked to select serially, 10 automated CBC specimens, and to indicate whether manual scans and/or reviews with complete differential counts were performed on blood smears prepared from those specimens. Sampling continued until a total of 60 peripheral smears were reviewed manually. For each specimen on which a manual review was performed, participants indicated the patient's age, hemoglobin value, white blood cell count, platelet count, and the primary reason why the manual review was performed. Participants also submitted data concerning their institutions' demographic profiles and their laboratories' staffing, work volume, and practices regarding CBC determinations. The rates of manual reviews and estimations of efficiency in performing CBC determinations were obtained from the data. A total of 263 hospitals and independent laboratories, predominantly located in the United States, participating in the College of American Pathologists Q-Probes Program. There were 95,141 CBC determinations examined in this study

  8. GAS SURFACE DENSITY, STAR FORMATION RATE SURFACE DENSITY, AND THE MAXIMUM MASS OF YOUNG STAR CLUSTERS IN A DISK GALAXY. II. THE GRAND-DESIGN GALAXY M51

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Lopezlira, Rosa A. [On sabbatical leave from the Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, UNAM, Campus Morelia, Michoacan, C.P. 58089, Mexico. (Mexico); Pflamm-Altenburg, Jan; Kroupa, Pavel, E-mail: r.gonzalez@crya.unam.mx [Argelander Institut fuer Astronomie, Universitaet Bonn, Auf dem Huegel 71, D-53121 Bonn (Germany)

    2013-06-20

    We analyze the relationship between maximum cluster mass and surface densities of total gas ({Sigma}{sub gas}), molecular gas ({Sigma}{sub H{sub 2}}), neutral gas ({Sigma}{sub H{sub I}}), and star formation rate ({Sigma}{sub SFR}) in the grand-design galaxy M51, using published gas data and a catalog of masses, ages, and reddenings of more than 1800 star clusters in its disk, of which 223 are above the cluster mass distribution function completeness limit. By comparing the two-dimensional distribution of cluster masses and gas surface densities, we find for clusters older than 25 Myr that M{sub 3rd}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sub H{sub I}{sup 0.4{+-}0.2}}, whereM{sub 3rd} is the median of the five most massive clusters. There is no correlation with{Sigma}{sub gas},{Sigma}{sub H2}, or{Sigma}{sub SFR}. For clusters younger than 10 Myr, M{sub 3rd}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sub H{sub I}{sup 0.6{+-}0.1}} and M{sub 3rd}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sub gas}{sup 0.5{+-}0.2}; there is no correlation with either {Sigma}{sub H{sub 2}} or{Sigma}{sub SFR}. The results could hardly be more different from those found for clusters younger than 25 Myr in M33. For the flocculent galaxy M33, there is no correlation between maximum cluster mass and neutral gas, but we have determined M{sub 3rd}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sub gas}{sup 3.8{+-}0.3}, M{sub 3rd}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sub H{sub 2}{sup 1.2{+-}0.1}}, and M{sub 3rd}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sub SFR}{sup 0.9{+-}0.1}. For the older sample in M51, the lack of tight correlations is probably due to the combination of strong azimuthal variations in the surface densities of gas and star formation rate, and the cluster ages. These two facts mean that neither the azimuthal average of the surface densities at a given radius nor the surface densities at the present-day location of a stellar cluster represent the true surface densities at the place and time of cluster formation. In the case of the younger sample, even if the clusters have not yet

  9. A "Wearable" Test for Maximum Aerobic Power: Real-Time Analysis of a 60-m Sprint Performance and Heart Rate Off-Kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storniolo, Jorge L; Pavei, Gaspare; Minetti, Alberto E

    2017-01-01

    Maximum aerobic power ([Formula: see text]) as an indicator of body fitness is today a very well-known concept not just for athletes but also for the layman. Unfortunately, the accurate measurement of that variable has remained a complex and exhaustive laboratory procedure, which makes it inaccessible to many active people. In this paper we propose a quick estimate of it, mainly based on the heart rate off-kinetics immediately after an all-out 60-m sprint run. The design of this test took into account the recent availability of wrist wearable, heart band free, multi-sensor smart devices, which could also inertially detect the different phases of the sprint and check the distance run. 25 subjects undertook the 60-m test outdoor and a [Formula: see text] test on the laboratory treadmill. Running average speed, HR excursion during the sprint and the time constant (τ) of HR exponential decay in the off-kinetics were fed into a multiple regression, with measured [Formula: see text] as the dependent variable. Statistics revealed that within the investigated range (25-55 ml O2/(kg min)), despite a tendency to overestimate low values and underestimate high values, the three predictors confidently estimate individual [Formula: see text] (R2 = 0.65, p measured HR off-kinetics, as these are the most time resolved data for HR provided by many modern smart watches. Results indicate that despite of the substantial reduction in sample size, predicted [Formula: see text] still explain 59% of the variability of the measured [Formula: see text].

  10. A “Wearable” Test for Maximum Aerobic Power: Real-Time Analysis of a 60-m Sprint Performance and Heart Rate Off-Kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge L. Storniolo

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Maximum aerobic power (V˙O2peak as an indicator of body fitness is today a very well-known concept not just for athletes but also for the layman. Unfortunately, the accurate measurement of that variable has remained a complex and exhaustive laboratory procedure, which makes it inaccessible to many active people. In this paper we propose a quick estimate of it, mainly based on the heart rate off-kinetics immediately after an all-out 60-m sprint run. The design of this test took into account the recent availability of wrist wearable, heart band free, multi-sensor smart devices, which could also inertially detect the different phases of the sprint and check the distance run. 25 subjects undertook the 60-m test outdoor and a V˙O2peak test on the laboratory treadmill. Running average speed, HR excursion during the sprint and the time constant (τ of HR exponential decay in the off-kinetics were fed into a multiple regression, with measured V˙O2peak as the dependent variable. Statistics revealed that within the investigated range (25–55 ml O2/(kg min, despite a tendency to overestimate low values and underestimate high values, the three predictors confidently estimate individual V˙O2peak (R2 = 0.65, p < 0.001. The same analysis has been performed on a 5-s averaged time course of the same measured HR off-kinetics, as these are the most time resolved data for HR provided by many modern smart watches. Results indicate that despite of the substantial reduction in sample size, predicted V˙O2peak still explain 59% of the variability of the measured V˙O2peak.

  11. Regional Inversion of the Maximum Carboxylation Rate (Vcmax) through the Sunlit Light Use Efficiency Estimated Using the Corrected Photochemical Reflectance Ratio Derived from MODIS Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, T.; Chen, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    The maximum carboxylation rate (Vcmax), despite its importance in terrestrial carbon cycle modelling, remains challenging to obtain for large scales. In this study, an attempt has been made to invert the Vcmax using the gross primary productivity from sunlit leaves (GPPsun) with the physiological basis that the photosynthesis rate for leaves exposed to high solar radiation is mainly determined by the Vcmax. Since the GPPsun can be calculated through the sunlit light use efficiency (ɛsun), the main focus becomes the acquisition of ɛsun. Previous studies using site level reflectance observations have shown the ability of the photochemical reflectance ratio (PRR, defined as the ratio between the reflectance from an effective band centered around 531nm and a reference band) in tracking the variation of ɛsun for an evergreen coniferous stand and a deciduous broadleaf stand separately and the potential of a NDVI corrected PRR (NPRR, defined as the product of NDVI and PRR) in producing a general expression to describe the NPRR-ɛsun relationship across different plant function types. In this study, a significant correlation (R2 = 0.67, p<0.001) between the MODIS derived NPRR and the site level ɛsun calculated using flux data for four Canadian flux sites has been found for the year 2010. For validation purpose, the ɛsun in 2009 for the same sites are calculated using the MODIS NPRR and the expression from 2010. The MODIS derived ɛsun matches well with the flux calculated ɛsun (R2 = 0.57, p<0.001). Same expression has then been applied over a 217 × 193 km area in Saskatchewan, Canada to obtain the ɛsun and thus GPPsun for the region during the growing season in 2008 (day 150 to day 260). The Vcmax for the region is inverted using the GPPsun and the result is validated at three flux sites inside the area. The results show that the approach is able to obtain good estimations of Vcmax values with R2 = 0.68 and RMSE = 8.8 μmol m-2 s-1.

  12. High quantum efficiency S-20 photocathodes in photon counting detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlov, D. A.; DeFazio, J.; Duarte Pinto, S.; Glazenborg, R.; Kernen, E.

    2016-04-01

    Based on conventional S-20 processes, a new series of high quantum efficiency (QE) photocathodes has been developed that can be specifically tuned for use in the ultraviolet, blue or green regions of the spectrum. The QE values exceed 30% at maximum response, and the dark count rate is found to be as low as 30 Hz/cm2 at room temperature. This combination of properties along with a fast temporal response makes these photocathodes ideal for application in photon counting detectors, which is demonstrated with an MCP photomultiplier tube for single and multi-photoelectron detection.

  13. Effects of CD4 Cell Counts and Viral Load Testing on Mortality Rates in Patients With HIV Infection Receiving Antiretroviral Treatment: An Observational Cohort Study in Rural Southwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zhiyong; Zhu, Qiuying; Tang, Zhenzhu; Pan, Stephen W; Zhang, Heng; Jiang, He; Chen, Yi; Lan, Guanghua; Xing, Hui; Liao, Lingjie; Feng, Yi; Ruan, Yuhua; Shao, Yiming

    2016-07-01

    Recent studies have suggested that CD4 cell count monitoring has little added value in patients who are virologically suppressed and immunologically stable if viral load (VL) testing is routinely available. These conclusions have not been directly assessed using mortality rate as a study end point in a real-world setting. This human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) treatment cohort study from 2008 to 2014 was conducted in Guangxi, China. We used a Cox regression model to analyze associations between the frequency of CD4 cell counts and VL testing and death. Compared with monitoring CD4 cell counts ≥3 times during the first year of antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation, as currently suggested by the Chinese National Free Antiretroviral Treatment Program, monitoring them less than twice during the first year of ART was significantly associated with death; however, monitoring them twice in that year did not significantly increase mortality rates. Compared with testing VL at least once during the first year of ART, as currently suggested by the National Free Antiretroviral Treatment Program, performing no VL tests in the first year after ART initiation was significantly associated with higher mortality rates. Routine CD4 cell count monitoring did not have an impact on mortality rates among HIV-infected patients with VLs <1000 copies/mL or CD4 cell counts ≥350/μL beyond 12 months after ART initiation. Our study suggests that CD4 cell counts can be reduced to twice during the first year of ART and be reduced or stopped for patients who have achieved virologic suppression or immunologic stability after 12 months of treatment. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Effects of triclosan and triclosan monophosphate on maximum specific growth rates, biomass and hydrolytic enzyme production of Streptococcus sanguis and Capnocytophaga gingivalis in continuous culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenman, J; McKenzie, C; Nelson, D G

    1997-11-01

    Dental plaque species, Streptococcus sanguis and Capnocytophaga gingivalis, were grown in continuous culture with progressively increasing concentrations of triclosan or its phosphorylated derivative, triclosan monophosphate (TMP). For both organisms, the maximum specific growth rates decreased with increasing concentrations of triclosan or TMP until complete inhibition of growth occurred, which for S. sanguis was at 20 mg/L and 50 mg/L, and for C. gingivalis was at 10 mg/L and 5 mg/L for triclosan and TMP respectively. For both species, biomass levels remained approximately constant or, in some cases, increased slightly at low levels of triclosan or TMP. However, biomass levels then decreased significantly as the triclosan or TMP concentrations approached lethal levels. For S. sanguis, levels of hydrolytic enzymes (acid phosphatase, leucine aminopeptidase and esterase) generally remained approximately constant or increased with increasing concentrations of triclosan or TMP until close to inhibitory levels where enzyme levels were reduced. The ratio of extracellular soluble enzymes to cell-bound enzymes remained constant or increased slightly with increasing levels of triclosan or TMP. For C. gingivalis, production of hydrolytic enzymes (neutral phosphatase, leucine aminopeptidase and trypsin-like protease) remained constant or were reduced when grown with low levels of triclosan and TMP but in some cases increased with higher levels of agents. The proportion of extracellular soluble activity increased significantly when concentrations of agent neared inhibitory levels. The results taken together show that the physiology of cells is significantly altered and that hydrolytic enzymes are released from the cells when these are grown in the presence of increasing concentrations of triclosan or TMP. Enzyme release is more pronounced in the Gram-negative C. gingivalis and indicates that triclosan or TMP can cause membrane perturbation with subsequent release of membrane

  15. Mixture drug-count response model for the high-dimensional drug combinatory effect on myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xueying; Zhang, Pengyue; Chiang, Chien-Wei; Wu, Hengyi; Shen, Li; Ning, Xia; Zeng, Donglin; Wang, Lei; Quinney, Sara K; Feng, Weixing; Li, Lang

    2018-02-20

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) are a common cause of adverse drug events (ADEs). The electronic medical record (EMR) database and the FDA's adverse event reporting system (FAERS) database are the major data sources for mining and testing the ADE associated DDI signals. Most DDI data mining methods focus on pair-wise drug interactions, and methods to detect high-dimensional DDIs in medical databases are lacking. In this paper, we propose 2 novel mixture drug-count response models for detecting high-dimensional drug combinations that induce myopathy. The "count" indicates the number of drugs in a combination. One model is called fixed probability mixture drug-count response model with a maximum risk threshold (FMDRM-MRT). The other model is called count-dependent probability mixture drug-count response model with a maximum risk threshold (CMDRM-MRT), in which the mixture probability is count dependent. Compared with the previous mixture drug-count response model (MDRM) developed by our group, these 2 new models show a better likelihood in detecting high-dimensional drug combinatory effects on myopathy. CMDRM-MRT identified and validated (54; 374; 637; 442; 131) 2-way to 6-way drug interactions, respectively, which induce myopathy in both EMR and FAERS databases. We further demonstrate FAERS data capture much higher maximum myopathy risk than EMR data do. The consistency of 2 mixture models' parameters and local false discovery rate estimates are evaluated through statistical simulation studies. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Changing Minds: The Impact of College in a Maximum-Security Prison. Effects on Women in Prison, the Prison Environment, Reincarceration Rates and Post-Release Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, Michelle; Torre, Maria Elena; Boudin, Kathy; Bowen, Iris; Clark, Judith; Hylton, Donna; Martinez, Migdalia; Missy; Roberts, Rosemarie A.; Smart, Pamela; Upegui, Debora

    The impact of college on women in a maximum-security prison was examined in a 3-year study of current and former inmates of New York's Bedford Hills Correctional Facility (BHCF). The data sources were as follows: (1) a review of program records; (2) one-on-one interviews of 65 inmates conducted by 15 inmates; (3) focus groups with 43 women in BHCF…

  17. Effect of Aerobic Exercise with 75-85% of Maximum Heart Rate on Apelin and Insulin Resistance Index in Sedentary Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Alavizadeh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available ims: Apelin is an adipokine, which secreted from adipose tissue and has positive effects against the insulin resistance. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of 8-week aerobic exercise on levels of apelin and insulin resistance index in sedentary men. Materials & Methods: In this semi-experimental study with controlled group pre/post-test design in 2015, 27 healthy sedentary men living in Mashhad City, Iran, were selected by convenience sampling method. They were divided into two groups; experimental group (n=14 and control group (n=13. In the trained group, the volunteers participated in 8 weeks aerobic exercise, 3 days/week (equivalent to 75-85% of maximum oxygen consumption for 60 minutes per session. The research variables were assessed before and after the intervention in both groups. The collected data were analyzed using SPSS 20 software using paired and independent sample T tests. Findings: 8-week aerobic exercise significantly decreased the weight, BMI and apelin, insulin and insulin resistance index levels and increased the maximum oxygen consumption in experimental group sedentary men (p<0.05. Moreover, there were significant differences in levels of FBS, insulin, apelin, insulin resistance index and maximum oxygen consumption between experimental and control groups (p<0.05. Conclusion: 8-week aerobic exercise reduces apelin levels and insulin resistance index in sedentary men.

  18. Kids Count Data Sheet, 2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annie E. Casey Foundation, Baltimore, MD.

    Data from the 50 United States are listed for 1997 from Kids Count in an effort to track state-by-state the status of children in the United States and to secure better futures for all children. Data include percent low birth weight babies; infant mortality rate; child death rate; rate of teen deaths by accident, homicide, and suicide; teen birth…

  19. Maximum Plant Uptakes for Water, Nutrients, and Oxygen Are Not Always Met by Irrigation Rate and Distribution in Water-based Cultivation Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blok, Chris; Jackson, Brian E.; Guo, Xianfeng; Visser, De Pieter H.B.; Marcelis, Leo F.M.

    2017-01-01

    Growing on rooting media other than soils in situ -i.e., substrate-based growing- allows for higher yields than soil-based growing as transport rates of water, nutrients, and oxygen in substrate surpass those in soil. Possibly water-based growing allows for even higher yields as transport rates of

  20. Modeling and Simulation of Count Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plan, E L

    2014-01-01

    Count data, or number of events per time interval, are discrete data arising from repeated time to event observations. Their mean count, or piecewise constant event rate, can be evaluated by discrete probability distributions from the Poisson model family. Clinical trial data characterization often involves population count analysis. This tutorial presents the basics and diagnostics of count modeling and simulation in the context of pharmacometrics. Consideration is given to overdispersion, underdispersion, autocorrelation, and inhomogeneity. PMID:25116273

  1. Effect of contraction mode of slow-speed resistance training on the maximum rate of force development in the human quadriceps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blazevich, Anthony J; Horne, Sara; Cannavan, Dale

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the effects of slow-speed resistance training involving concentric (CON, n = 10) versus eccentric (ECC, n = 11) single-joint muscle contractions on contractile rate of force development (RFD) and neuromuscular activity (EMG), and its maintenance through detraining. Isokinetic...... knee extension training was performed 3 x week(-1) for 10 weeks. Maximal isometric strength (+11.2%) and RFD (measured from 0-30/50/100/200 ms, respectively; +10.5%-20.5%) increased after 10 weeks (P effect of training mode. Peak EMG amplitude and rate of EMG rise...

  2. Effects of pH on biomass, maximum specific growth rate and extracellular enzyme production by three species of cutaneous propionibacteria grown in continuous culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenman, J; Holland, K T; Cunliffe, W J

    1983-05-01

    Three cutaneous propionibacteria, Propionibacterium acnes, Propionibacterium avidum and Propionibacterium granulosum, were grown in chemostats using semi-synthetic medium at various pH values. Growth occurred between pH 4.5 and 7.5 for P. acnes and pH 5.0 and 8.0 for P. avidum and P. granulosum. The highest mumax was at pH 6.0 for the three species. Maximum biomass production was obtained at pH 6.0 for P. acnes and P. avidum and at pH 7.5 for P. granulosum. Extracellular enzyme production occurred over the entire pH growth range when denaturation of the enzymes was taken into account. However, detectable activity of the enzymes was found in a narrower range of pH due to the denaturation of the enzymes at low or high pH values. The highest production of enzymes occurred at pH values between 5.0 and 6.0, apart from the production of hyaluronate lyase of P. granulosum (pH 6.0 to 7.0) and the proteinase of P. acnes and P. avidum (pH 5.0 to 7.5). Propionibacterium acnes produced a lipase, hyaluronate lyase, phosphatase and proteinase activity. Propionibacterium avidum produced a lipase and proteinase activity. Propionibacterium granulosum produced a lipase and hyaluronate lyase.

  3. On the potential for RF heating in MRI to affect metabolic rates and 18 FDG signal in PET/MR: simulations of long-duration, maximum normal mode heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carluccio, Giuseppe; Ding, Yu-Shin; Logan, Jean; Collins, Christopher M

    2017-02-01

    To examine the possibility that MR-induced RF power deposition (SAR) and the resulting effects on temperature-dependent metabolic rates or perfusion rates might affect observed 18FDG signal in PET/MR. Using numerical simulations of the SAR, consequent temperature increase, effect on rates of metabolism or perfusion, and [18FDG] throughout the body, we simulated the potential effect of maximum-allowable whole-body SAR for the entire duration of an hour-long PET/MR scan on observed PET signal for two different 18FDG injection times: one hour before onset of imaging and concurrent with the beginning of imaging. This was all repeated three times with the head, the heart, and the abdomen (kidneys) at the center of the RF coil. Qualitatively, little effect of MR-induced heating is observed on simulated PET images. Maximum relative increases in PET signal (26% and 31% increase, respectively, for the uptake models based on metabolism and the perfusion) occur in regions of low baseline metabolic rate (also associated with low perfusion and, thus, greater potential temperature increase due to high local SAR), such that PET signal in these areas remains comparatively low. Maximum relative increases in regions of high metabolic rate (and also high perfusion: heart, thyroid, brain, etc.) are affected mostly by the relatively small increase in core body temperature and thus are not affected greatly (10% maximum increase). Even for worst-case heating, little effect of MR-induced heating is expected on 18FDG PET images during PET/MR for many clinically relevant applications. For quantitative, dynamic MR/PET studies requiring high SAR for extended periods, it is hoped that methods like those introduced here can help account for such potential effects in design of a given study, including selection of reference locations that should not experience notable increase in temperature. © 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  4. Procedure to estimate maximum ground acceleration from macroseismic intensity rating: application to the Lima, Perú data from the October-3-1974-8.1-Mw earthquake

    OpenAIRE

    L. Ocola

    2008-01-01

    Post-disaster reconstruction management of urban areas requires timely information on the ground response microzonation to strong levels of ground shaking to minimize the rebuilt-environment vulnerability to future earthquakes. In this paper, a procedure is proposed to quantitatively estimate the severity of ground response in terms of peak ground acceleration, that is computed from macroseismic rating data, soil properties (acoustic impedance) and predominant frequency of shear waves at a si...

  5. Allocation of new growth between shoot, root and mycorrhiza in relation to carbon, nitrogen and phosphate supply: teleonomy with maximum growth rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornley, John H M; Parsons, Anthony J

    2014-02-07

    Treating resource allocation within plants, and between plants and associated organisms, is essential for plant, crop and ecosystem modelling. However, it is still an unresolved issue. It is also important to consider quantitatively when it is efficient and to what extent a plant can invest profitably in a mycorrhizal association. A teleonomic model is used to address these issues. A six state-variable model giving exponential growth is constructed. This represents carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) substrates with structure in shoot, root and mycorrhiza. The shoot is responsible for uptake of substrate C, the root for substrates N and P, and the mycorrhiza also for substrates N and P. A teleonomic goal, maximizing proportional growth rate, is solved analytically for the allocation fractions. Expressions allocating new dry matter to shoot, root and mycorrhiza are derived which maximize growth rate. These demonstrate several key intuitive phenomena concerning resource sharing between plant components and associated mycorrhizae. For instance, if root uptake rate for phosphorus is equal to that achievable by mycorrhiza and without detriment to root uptake rate for nitrogen, then this gives a faster growing mycorrhizal-free plant. However, if root phosphorus uptake is below that achievable by mycorrhiza, then a mycorrhizal association may be a preferred strategy. The approach offers a methodology for introducing resource sharing between species into ecosystem models. Applying teleonomy may provide a valuable short-term means of modelling allocation, avoiding the circularity of empirical models, and circumventing the complexities and uncertainties inherent in mechanistic approaches. However it is subjective and brings certain irreducible difficulties with it. Crown Copyright © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd All rights reserved.

  6. Development of maximum metabolic rate and pulmonary diffusing capacity in the superprecocial Australian Brush Turkey Alectura lathami: an allometric and morphometric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, Roger S; Runciman, Sue; Baudinette, Russell V

    2008-06-01

    The Australian Brush Turkey Alectura lathami is a member of the Megapodiidae, the mound-building birds that produce totally independent, "superprecocial" hatchlings. This study examined the post-hatching development of resting and maximal metabolic rates, and the morphometrically determined changes in pulmonary gas exchange anatomy, in chicks during 3.7 months of growth from hatchlings (122 g) to subadults (1.1 kg). Allometric equations of the form y=aM(b) related gas exchange variables (y) to body mass (M, g). Metabolic rates were measured with open-flow respirometry (mL O2 min(-1)) of chicks resting in the dark and running above the aerobic limit on a treadmill. Resting metabolic rate (RMR=0.02 M(0.99)) and maximal metabolic rate (MMR=0.05 M(1.07)) scaled with exponents significantly above those of interspecific allometries of adult birds. However MMR was below that expected for other species of adult birds in flapping flight, consistent with the Brush Turkey's ground-dwelling habits. Total lung volumes (mL) increased faster than isometrically (V(L)=0.0075 M(1.19)), as did the surface area (cm(2)) of the blood-gas barrier (S(t)=7.80 M(1.23)), but the data overlapped those of adult species. Harmonic mean thickness of the blood-gas barrier was independent of body size (mean tau(ht),=0.39 microm) and was about twice that expected for flying birds. Diffusing capacity (mL O2 min(-1) kPa(-1)) of the blood-gas tissue barrier increased faster than isometrically (Dto2=0.049 M(1.23)); in hatchling Brush Turkeys, it was about 30% expected for adult birds, but this difference disappeared when they became subadults. When compared to altricial Australian pelicans that hatch at similar body masses, superprecocial Brush Turkeys had higher MMR and higher Dto2 at the same body size. A parallel allometry between MMR and Dto2 in Brush Turkeys and pelicans is consistent with the concept of symmorphosis during development.

  7. Procedure to estimate maximum ground acceleration from macroseismic intensity rating: application to the Lima, Perú data from the October-3-1974-8.1-Mw earthquake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Ocola

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Post-disaster reconstruction management of urban areas requires timely information on the ground response microzonation to strong levels of ground shaking to minimize the rebuilt-environment vulnerability to future earthquakes. In this paper, a procedure is proposed to quantitatively estimate the severity of ground response in terms of peak ground acceleration, that is computed from macroseismic rating data, soil properties (acoustic impedance and predominant frequency of shear waves at a site. The basic mathematical relationships are derived from properties of wave propagation in a homogeneous and isotropic media. We define a Macroseismic Intensity Scale IMS as the logarithm of the quantity of seismic energy that flows through a unit area normal to the direction of wave propagation in unit time. The derived constants that relate the IMS scale and peak acceleration agree well with coefficients derived from a linear regression between MSK macroseismic rating and peak ground acceleration for historical earthquakes recorded at a strong motion station, at IGP's former headquarters, since 1954. The procedure was applied to 3-October-1974 Lima macroseismic intensity data at places where there was geotechnical data and predominant ground frequency information. The observed and computed peak acceleration values, at nearby sites, agree well.

  8. Procedure to estimate maximum ground acceleration from macroseismic intensity rating: application to the Lima, Perú data from the October-3-1974-8.1-Mw earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocola, L.

    2008-01-01

    Post-disaster reconstruction management of urban areas requires timely information on the ground response microzonation to strong levels of ground shaking to minimize the rebuilt-environment vulnerability to future earthquakes. In this paper, a procedure is proposed to quantitatively estimate the severity of ground response in terms of peak ground acceleration, that is computed from macroseismic rating data, soil properties (acoustic impedance) and predominant frequency of shear waves at a site. The basic mathematical relationships are derived from properties of wave propagation in a homogeneous and isotropic media. We define a Macroseismic Intensity Scale IMS as the logarithm of the quantity of seismic energy that flows through a unit area normal to the direction of wave propagation in unit time. The derived constants that relate the IMS scale and peak acceleration agree well with coefficients derived from a linear regression between MSK macroseismic rating and peak ground acceleration for historical earthquakes recorded at a strong motion station, at IGP's former headquarters, since 1954. The procedure was applied to 3-October-1974 Lima macroseismic intensity data at places where there was geotechnical data and predominant ground frequency information. The observed and computed peak acceleration values, at nearby sites, agree well.

  9. Effects of whole-body electromyostimulation on resting metabolic rate, body composition, and maximum strength in postmenopausal women: the Training and ElectroStimulation Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemmler, Wolfgang; Schliffka, Rebecca; Mayhew, Jerry L; von Stengel, Simon

    2010-07-01

    We evaluated the effect of whole-body electromyostimulation (WB-EMS) during dynamic exercises over 14 weeks on anthropometric, physiological, and muscular parameters in postmenopausal women. Thirty women (64.5 +/- 5.5 years) with experience in physical training (>3 years) were randomly assigned either to a control group (CON, n = 15) that maintained their general training program (2 x 60 min.wk of endurance and dynamic strength exercise) or to an electromyostimulation group (WB-EMS, n = 15) that additionally performed a 20-minute WB-EMS training (2 x 20 min.10 d). Resting metabolic rate (RMR) determined from spirometry was selected to indicate muscle mass. In addition, body circumferences, subcutaneous skinfolds, strength, power, and dropout and adherence values. Resting metabolic rate was maintained in WB-EMS (-0.1 +/- 4.8 kcal.h) and decreased in CON (-3.2+/-5.2 kcal.h, p = 0.038); although group differences were not significant (p = 0.095), there was a moderately strong effect size (ES = 0.62). Sum of skinfolds (28.6%) and waist circumference (22.3%) significantly decreased in WB-EMS whereas both parameters (1.4 and 0.1%, respectively) increased in CON (p = 0.001, ES = 1.37 and 1.64, respectively), whereas both parameters increased in CON (1.4 and 0.1%, respectively). Isometric strength changes of the trunk extensors and leg extensors differed significantly (p electromyostimulation may be a smooth alternative to maintain lean body mass, strength, and power.

  10. Characterization of the heart rate curve during a maximum incremental test on a treadmill. DOI: 10.5007/1980-0037.2011v13n4p285

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Marcel Fernandes Nascimento

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to analyze the heart rate (HR profile plotted against incremental workloads (IWL during a treadmill test using three mathematical models [linear, linear with 2 segments (Lin2, and sigmoidal], and to determine the best model for the identification of the HR threshold that could be used as a predictor of ventilatory thresholds (VT1 and VT2. Twenty-two men underwent a treadmill incremental test (retest group: n=12 at an initial speed of 5.5 km.h-1, with increments of 0.5 km.h-1 at 1-min intervals until exhaustion. HR and gas exchange were continuously measured and subsequently converted to 5-s and 20-s averages, respectively. The best model was chosen based on residual sum of squares and mean square error. The HR/IWL ratio was better fitted with the Lin2 model in the test and retest groups (p0.05. During a treadmill incremental test, the HR/IWL ratio seems to be better fitted with a Lin2 model, which permits to determine the HR threshold that coincides with VT1.

  11. Characterization of the heart rate curve during a maximum incremental test on a treadmill. DOI: 10.5007/1980-0037.2011v13n4p285

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Marcel Fernandes Nascimento

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to analyze the heart rate (HR profile plotted against incremental workloads (IWL during a treadmill test using three mathematical models [linear, linear with 2 segments (Lin2, and sigmoidal], and to determine the best model for the identification of the HR threshold that could be used as a predictor of ventilatory thresholds (VT1 and VT2. Twenty-two men underwent a treadmill incremental test (retest group: n=12 at an initial speed of 5.5 km.h-1, with increments of 0.5 km.h-1 at 1-min intervals until exhaustion. HR and gas exchange were continuously measured and subsequently converted to 5-s and 20-s averages, respectively. The best model was chosen based on residual sum of squares and mean square error. The HR/IWL ratio was better fitted with the Lin2 model in the test and retest groups (p0.05. During a treadmill incremental test, the HR/IWL ratio seems to be better fitted with a Lin2 model, which permits to determine the HR threshold that coincides with VT1.

  12. Clean Hands Count

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    Full Text Available ... Queue __count__/__total__ Find out why Close Clean Hands Count Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) ... intended to promote or encourage adherence to CDC hand hygiene recommendations. It is a component of the ...

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  15. Maximum Autocorrelation Factorial Kriging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Conradsen, Knut; Pedersen, John L.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes maximum autocorrelation factor (MAF) analysis, maximum autocorrelation factorial kriging, and its application to irregularly sampled stream sediment geochemical data from South Greenland. Kriged MAF images are compared with kriged images of varimax rotated factors from...

  16. Ultrafast time measurements by time-correlated single photon counting coupled with superconducting single photon detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shcheslavskiy, V., E-mail: vis@becker-hickl.de; Becker, W. [Becker & Hickl GmbH, Nahmitzer Damm 30, 12277 Berlin (Germany); Morozov, P.; Divochiy, A. [Scontel, Rossolimo St., 5/22-1, Moscow 119021 (Russian Federation); Vakhtomin, Yu. [Scontel, Rossolimo St., 5/22-1, Moscow 119021 (Russian Federation); Moscow State Pedagogical University, 1/1 M. Pirogovskaya St., Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Smirnov, K. [Scontel, Rossolimo St., 5/22-1, Moscow 119021 (Russian Federation); Moscow State Pedagogical University, 1/1 M. Pirogovskaya St., Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); National Research University Higher School of Economics, 20 Myasnitskaya St., Moscow 101000 (Russian Federation)

    2016-05-15

    Time resolution is one of the main characteristics of the single photon detectors besides quantum efficiency and dark count rate. We demonstrate here an ultrafast time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) setup consisting of a newly developed single photon counting board SPC-150NX and a superconducting NbN single photon detector with a sensitive area of 7 × 7 μm. The combination delivers a record instrument response function with a full width at half maximum of 17.8 ps and system quantum efficiency ∼15% at wavelength of 1560 nm. A calculation of the root mean square value of the timing jitter for channels with counts more than 1% of the peak value yielded about 7.6 ps. The setup has also good timing stability of the detector–TCSPC board.

  17. PETRRA: Preliminary experimental results from the first full size detector and dead time simulation of the count rate performance of a unique whole body PET camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visvikis, D.; Wells, K.; Ott, R.J. [Royal Marsden Hospital, Sutton (United Kingdom); Stephenson, R.; Bateman, J.E.; Connolly, J.; Tappern, G. [Rutherford Appleton Lab., Chilton (United Kingdom)

    1995-08-01

    The design and construction of the first of two BaF{sub 2}-TMAE large area detectors to be incorporated in a unique double headed whole body PET system (PETRRA) has been completed. Preliminary experimental work carried out with the first large area detector shows an absolute detection efficiency of 20.5% and a time resolution of 3.5ns (FWHM) and 8.0ns (FWTM), using 8mm thick scintillation crystals. An analytical model of the electronic read-out system has been developed to investigate the rate capability of the new scanner. This model predicts that under typical imaging conditions, with 40MBq of activity in the field of view, the proposed scanner will acquire coincidence data at 20--25kcps.

  18. Automated differential leukocyte counts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, E E; Nashed, A; Spilove, L

    1989-01-01

    Automated differential counts have the advantage of precision, efficiency, safety, and economy. They could potentially serve effectively in 90 percent of patients with normal counts or in 75 percent of patients with anemia only (64 percent of the total in this study). Even patients with increased white blood cell counts and major population shifts (toward granulocytes or lymphocytes) could be followed with automated differential counts. Such a tactic would decrease turnaround time for results, be less expensive, and reduce exposure of technologists to direct contact with patients' blood. However, presently available instruments fail to detect patients' blood samples with small numbers of abnormal cells, e.g., blasts in early relapse of acute leukemia, atypical lymphocytes in viral diseases such as infectious mononucleosis, eosinophils in allergic or parasitic disease, and band forms in early infectious diseases. Clinical judgment should be used in selectively ordering manual differential counts for these patients. While automated differential counts can be very useful in screening general medical and surgical patients in the ambulatory setting, in referral centers where hematologic abnormalities are more prevalent, the manual differential count and further examination of a smear is particularly necessary at least on initial presentation. Selective manual differential counts may improve efficiency, economy, and safety while not compromising patient care. Further studies of the correlation of clinical disease with automated differential counts are necessary.

  19. Health Physics counting room

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1970-01-01

    The Health Physics counting room, where the quantity of induced radioactivity in materials is determined. This information is used to evaluate possible radiation hazards from the material investigated.

  20. Count rate balance method of measuring sediment transport of sand beds by radioactive tracers; Methode du bilan des taux de comptage d'indicateurs radioactifs pour la determination du debit de charriage des lits sableux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sauzay, G. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, 91 - Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-11-01

    Radioactive tracers are applied to the direct measurement of the sediment transport rate of sand beds. The theoretical measurement formula is derived: the variation of the count rate balance is inverse of that of the transport thickness. Simultaneously the representativeness of the tracer is critically studied. The minimum quantity of tracer which has to be injected in order to obtain a correct statistical definition of count rate given by a low number of grains 'seen' by the detector is then studied. A field experiment was made and has let to study the technological conditions for applying this method: only the treatment of results is new, the experiment itself is carried out with conventional techniques applied with great care. (author) [French] Les indicateurs radioactifs sont appliques a la mesure directe du debit de charriage des lits sableux. On etablit la formule theorique de mesure: le bilan des taux de comptage varie en sens inverse de l'epaisseur de charriage. Parallelement on fait une etude critique de la representativite de l'indicateur, puis on determine la quantite minimale de traceur qu'il faut immerger pour que les taux de comptage fournis pour un faible nombre de grains 'vus' par le detecteur aient une definition statistique correcte. Une experience de terrain a permis d'etudier les conditions technologiques de cette methode: seul le depouillement des resultats est nouveau. L'experimentation in-situ se fait suivant les procedes classiques avec un tres grand soin. (auteur)

  1. Monitoring Milk Somatic Cell Counts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe Şteţca

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The presence of somatic cells in milk is a widely disputed issue in milk production sector. The somatic cell counts in raw milk are a marker for the specific cow diseases such as mastitis or swollen udder. The high level of somatic cells causes physical and chemical changes to milk composition and nutritional value, and as well to milk products. Also, the mastitic milk is not proper for human consumption due to its contribution to spreading of certain diseases and food poisoning. According to these effects, EU Regulations established the maximum threshold of admitted somatic cells in raw milk to 400000 cells / mL starting with 2014. The purpose of this study was carried out in order to examine the raw milk samples provided from small farms, industrial type farms and milk processing units. There are several ways to count somatic cells in milk but the reference accepted method is the microscopic method described by the SR EN ISO 13366-1/2008. Generally samples registered values in accordance with the admissible limit. By periodical monitoring of the somatic cell count, certain technological process issues are being avoided and consumer’s health ensured.

  2. EcoCount

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip P. Allen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Techniques that analyze biological remains from sediment sequences for environmental reconstructions are well established and widely used. Yet, identifying, counting, and recording biological evidence such as pollen grains remain a highly skilled, demanding, and time-consuming task. Standard procedure requires the classification and recording of between 300 and 500 pollen grains from each representative sample. Recording the data from a pollen count requires significant effort and focused resources from the palynologist. However, when an adaptation to the recording procedure is utilized, efficiency and time economy improve. We describe EcoCount, which represents a development in environmental data recording procedure. EcoCount is a voice activated fully customizable digital count sheet that allows the investigator to continuously interact with a field of view during the data recording. Continuous viewing allows the palynologist the opportunity to remain engaged with the essential task, identification, for longer, making pollen counting more efficient and economical. EcoCount is a versatile software package that can be used to record a variety of environmental evidence and can be installed onto different computer platforms, making the adoption by users and laboratories simple and inexpensive. The user-friendly format of EcoCount allows any novice to be competent and functional in a very short time.

  3. Generalised count distributions for modelling parity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilal Barakat

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Parametric count distributions customarily used in demography - the Poisson and negative binomial models - do not offer satisfactory descriptions of empirical distributions of completed cohort parity. One reason is that they cannot model variance-to-mean ratios below unity, i.e., underdispersion, which is typical of low-fertility parity distributions. Statisticians have recently revived two generalised count distributions that can model both over- and underdispersion, but they have not attracted demographers' attention to date. Objective: The objective of this paper is to assess the utility of these alternative general count distributions, namely the Conway-Maxwell-Poisson and gamma count models, for the modeling of distributions of completed parity. Methods: Simulations and maximum-likelihood estimation are used to assess their fit to empirical data from the Human Fertility Database (HFD. Results: The results show that the generalised count distributions offer a dramatically improved fit compared to customary Poisson and negative binomial models in the presence of under- dispersion, without performance loss in the case of equidispersion or overdispersion. Conclusions: This gain in accuracy suggests generalised count distributions should be used as a matter of course in studies of fertility that examine completed parity as an outcome. Contribution: This note performs a transfer of the state of the art in count data modelling and regression in the more technical statistical literature to the field of demography, allowing demographers to benefit from more accurate estimation in fertility research.

  4. Housing Inventory Count

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — This report displays the data communities reported to HUD about the nature of their dedicated homeless inventory, referred to as their Housing Inventory Count (HIC)....

  5. Clean Hands Count

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    Full Text Available ... out why Close Clean Hands Count Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Loading... Unsubscribe from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)? Cancel Unsubscribe Working... Subscribe ...

  6. Allegheny County Traffic Counts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Traffic sensors at over 1,200 locations in Allegheny County collect vehicle counts for the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation. Data included in the Health...

  7. Clean Hands Count

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    Full Text Available ... to CDC hand hygiene recommendations. It is a component of the Clean Hands Count campaign, which also ... views 3:56 Loading more suggestions... Show more Language: English Location: United States Restricted Mode: Off History ...

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    Full Text Available ... to CDC hand hygiene recommendations. It is a component of the Clean Hands Count campaign, which also ... 3:56 Loading more suggestions... Show more Language: English Location: United States Restricted Mode: Off History Help ...

  11. White Blood Cell Count

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Acidosis and Alkalosis Adrenal Insufficiency and Addison Disease Alcoholism Allergies Alzheimer Disease Anemia Angina Ankylosing Spondylitis Anthrax ... smoking status. It is not uncommon for the elderly to fail to develop high WBC count ( leukocytosis ) ...

  12. Calorie count - fast food

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000887.htm Calorie count - fast food To use the sharing features on this page, ... Nutrition Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by URAC, also known as the ...

  13. Clean Hands Count

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  14. Clean Hands Count

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  15. Clean Hands Count

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    Full Text Available ... Hands Count Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Loading... Unsubscribe from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)? Cancel Unsubscribe Working... Subscribe Subscribed Unsubscribe 61K Loading... ...

  16. Reticulocyte Count Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... certain clinical conditions and in assessing iron deficiency anemia in children. Can the reticulocyte count be done on the ... Irwin, J. and Kirchner, J. (2001 October 15). Anemia in Children. American Family Physician [On-line journal]. Available online ...

  17. Laboratory productivity and the rate of manual peripheral blood smear review: a College of American Pathologists Q-Probes study of 95,141 complete blood count determinations performed in 263 institutions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Novis, David A; Walsh, Molly; Wilkinson, David; St Louis, Mary; Ben-Ezra, Jonathon

    2006-01-01

    Automated laboratory hematology analyzers are capable of performing differential counts on peripheral blood smears with greater precision and more accurate detection of distributional and morphologic...

  18. Maximum likely scale estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loog, Marco; Pedersen, Kim Steenstrup; Markussen, Bo

    2005-01-01

    A maximum likelihood local scale estimation principle is presented. An actual implementation of the estimation principle uses second order moments of multiple measurements at a fixed location in the image. These measurements consist of Gaussian derivatives possibly taken at several scales and...

  19. Maximum modular graphs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trajanovski, S.; Wang, H.; Van Mieghem, P.

    2012-01-01

    Modularity has been explored as an important quantitative metric for community and cluster detection in networks. Finding the maximum modularity of a given graph has been proven to be NPcomplete and therefore, several heuristic algorithms have been proposed. We investigate the problem of finding the

  20. Novel Photon-Counting Detectors for Free-Space Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krainak, Michael A.; Yang, Guan; Sun, Xiaoli; Lu, Wei; Merritt, Scott; Beck, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    We present performance data for novel photon counting detectors for free space optical communication. NASA GSFC is testing the performance of three novel photon counting detectors 1) a 2x8 mercury cadmium telluride avalanche array made by DRS Inc. 2) a commercial 2880 silicon avalanche photodiode array and 3) a prototype resonant cavity silicon avalanche photodiode array. We will present and compare dark count, photon detection efficiency, wavelength response and communication performance data for these detectors. We discuss system wavelength trades and architectures for optimizing overall communication link sensitivity, data rate and cost performance. The HgCdTe APD array has photon detection efficiencies of greater than 50 were routinely demonstrated across 5 arrays, with one array reaching a maximum PDE of 70. High resolution pixel-surface spot scans were performed and the junction diameters of the diodes were measured. The junction diameter was decreased from 31 m to 25 m resulting in a 2x increase in e-APD gain from 470 on the 2010 array to 1100 on the array delivered to NASA GSFC. Mean single photon SNRs of over 12 were demonstrated at excess noise factors of 1.2-1.3.The commercial silicon APD array has a fast output with rise times of 300ps and pulse widths of 600ps. Received and filtered signals from the entire array are multiplexed onto this single fast output. The prototype resonant cavity silicon APD array is being developed for use at 1 micron wavelength.

  1. Evaluation of the Effect of the Volume Throughput and Maximum Flux of Low-Surface-Tension Fluids on Bacterial Penetration of 0.2 Micron-Rated Filters during Process-Specific Filter Validation Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folmsbee, Martha

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 97% of filter validation tests result in the demonstration of absolute retention of the test bacteria, and thus sterile filter validation failure is rare. However, while Brevundimonas diminuta (B. diminuta) penetration of sterilizing-grade filters is rarely detected, the observation that some fluids (such as vaccines and liposomal fluids) may lead to an increased incidence of bacterial penetration of sterilizing-grade filters by B. diminuta has been reported. The goal of the following analysis was to identify important drivers of filter validation failure in these rare cases. The identification of these drivers will hopefully serve the purpose of assisting in the design of commercial sterile filtration processes with a low risk of filter validation failure for vaccine, liposomal, and related fluids. Filter validation data for low-surface-tension fluids was collected and evaluated with regard to the effect of bacterial load (CFU/cm(2)), bacterial load rate (CFU/min/cm(2)), volume throughput (mL/cm(2)), and maximum filter flux (mL/min/cm(2)) on bacterial penetration. The data set (∼1162 individual filtrations) included all instances of process-specific filter validation failures performed at Pall Corporation, including those using other filter media, but did not include all successful retentive filter validation bacterial challenges. It was neither practical nor necessary to include all filter validation successes worldwide (Pall Corporation) to achieve the goals of this analysis. The percentage of failed filtration events for the selected total master data set was 27% (310/1162). Because it is heavily weighted with penetration events, this percentage is considerably higher than the actual rate of failed filter validations, but, as such, facilitated a close examination of the conditions that lead to filter validation failure. In agreement with our previous reports, two of the significant drivers of bacterial penetration identified were the total

  2. Maximum Likelihood Fusion Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-09

    Symposium of Robotics Re- search. Sienna, Italy: Springer, 2003. [12] D. Hall and J. Llinas, “An introduction to multisensor data fusion ,” Proceed- ings of...a data fusion approach for combining Gaussian metric models of an environment constructed by multiple agents that operate outside of a global... data fusion , hypothesis testing,maximum likelihood estimation, mobile robot navigation REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT

  3. A Hubble Space Telescope Survey for Novae in M87. II. Snuffing out the Maximum Magnitude–Rate of Decline Relation for Novae as a Non-standard Candle, and a Prediction of the Existence of Ultrafast Novae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shara, Michael M.; Doyle, Trisha; Zurek, David [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West and 79th Street, New York, NY 10024-5192 (United States); Lauer, Tod R. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 26732, Tucson, AZ 85726 (United States); Baltz, Edward A. [KIPAC, SLAC, 2575 Sand Hill Road, M/S 29, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Kovetz, Attay [School of Physics and Astronomy, Faculty of Exact Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Madrid, Juan P. [CSIRO, Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Mikołajewska, Joanna [N. Copernicus Astronomical Center, Polish Academy of Sciences, Bartycka 18, PL 00-716 Warsaw (Poland); Neill, J. D. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, MC 278-17, Pasadena CA 91125 (United States); Prialnik, Dina [Department of Geosciences, Tel Aviv University, Ramat Aviv, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Welch, D. L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, L8S 4M1, Ontario (Canada); Yaron, Ofer [Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, Weizmann Institute of Science, 76100 Rehovot (Israel)

    2017-04-20

    The extensive grid of numerical simulations of nova eruptions from the work of Yaron et al. first predicted that some classical novae might significantly deviate from the Maximum Magnitude–Rate of Decline (MMRD) relation, which purports to characterize novae as standard candles. Kasliwal et al. have announced the observational detection of a new class of faint, fast classical novae in the Andromeda galaxy. These objects deviate strongly from the MMRD relationship, as predicted by Yaron et al. Recently, Shara et al. reported the first detections of faint, fast novae in M87. These previously overlooked objects are as common in the giant elliptical galaxy M87 as they are in the giant spiral M31; they comprise about 40% of all classical nova eruptions and greatly increase the observational scatter in the MMRD relation. We use the extensive grid of the nova simulations of Yaron et al. to identify the underlying causes of the existence of faint, fast novae. These are systems that have accreted, and can thus eject, only very low-mass envelopes, of the order of 10{sup −7}–10{sup −8} M {sub ⊙}, on massive white dwarfs. Such binaries include, but are not limited to, the recurrent novae. These same models predict the existence of ultrafast novae that display decline times, t {sub 2,} to be as short as five hours. We outline a strategy for their future detection.

  4. Relationship of maximum rate of pressure rise between aorta and left ventricle in pediatric patients. Implication for ventricular-vascular interaction with the potential for noninvasive determination of left ventricular contractility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masutani, Satoshi; Iwamoto, Yoichi; Ishido, Hirotaka; Senzaki, Hideaki

    2009-09-01

    The maximum rate of the ventricular pressure rise (dp/dt(max)) provides a reliable measure of ventricular contractility. However, its estimation requires invasive measurement of left ventricular (LV) pressure, limiting its bedside clinical applicability. In the present study, 2 hypotheses were tested: (1)that the ratio of dp/dt(max) between the aorta (Ao) and LV is consistent among patients despite marked differences in underlying cardiac disease, contractile state and heart rate when vascular mechanical and loading properties are taken into account, and (2)that using such a relationship, LV dp/dt(max) can be estimated from Ao dp/dt(max), potentially providing a method of noninvasive determination of LV contractility. Data from 30 control children and 45 pediatric patients with various cardiovascular diseases revealed that the characteristic impedance (Zc) and mean arterial pressure were significant determinants of the Ao-LV dp/dt(max) relationship in both control and disease groups. LV dp/dt(max) estimated using the regression obtained in the control children (Ao dp/dt(max/)LV dp/dt(max) = 0.64+1.45*10(-4)*Zc-3.73*10(-3)*MAP, r=0.87) correlated well with the measured LV dp/dt(max) in the disease group, including measurements taken after dobutamine and atrial pacing (r=0.89). Ao dp/dt(max) and LV dp/dt(max) are closely correlated through the vascular loading properties and LV dp/dt(max) can be derived from Ao dp/dt(max), which has potential as a noninvasive method of determining LV contractility.

  5. Rainflow counting revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soeker, H. [Deutsches Windenergie-Institut (Germany)

    1996-09-01

    As state of the art method the rainflow counting technique is presently applied everywhere in fatigue analysis. However, the author feels that the potential of the technique is not fully recognized in wind energy industries as it is used, most of the times, as a mere data reduction technique disregarding some of the inherent information of the rainflow counting results. The ideas described in the following aim at exploitation of this information and making it available for use in the design and verification process. (au)

  6. TOTAL LYMPHOCYTE COUNT AS A SUBSTITUTE TO CD4 COUNT IN MANAGEMENT OF HIV INFECTED INDIVIDUALS IN RESOURCE LIMITED SOCIETY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daud, Muhammad Yousuf; Qazi, Rizwan Aziz; Bashir, Naila

    2015-01-01

    Pakistan is a resource limited society and gold standard parameters to monitor HIV disease activity are very costly. The objective of the study was to evaluate total lymphocyte count (TLC) as a surrogate to CD4 count to monitor disease activity in HIV/AIDS in resource limited society. This cross sectional study was carried out at HIV/AIDS treatment centre, Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences (PIMS), Islamabad. A total of seven hundred and seventy four (774) HIV positive patients were enrolled in this study, and their CD4 count and total lymphocyte count were checked to find any correlation between the two by using Spearman ranked correlation coefficient. Results: The mean CD4 count was (434.30 +/- 269.23), with minimum CD4 count of (9.00), and maximum of (1974.00). The mean total lymphocyte count (TLC) was (6764.0052 +/- 2364.02) with minimum TLC (1200.00) and maximum TLC was (20200.00). Using the Pearson's correlation (r) there was a significant and positive correlation between TLC and CD4 count. (r2=0.127 and p=0.000) at 0.01 level. Our study showed a significant positive correlation between CD4 count and total lymphocyte count (TLC), so TLC can be used as a marker of disease activity in HIV infected patients.

  7. Modelling maximum canopy conductance and transpiration in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is much current interest in predicting the maximum amount of water that can be transpired by Eucalyptus trees. It is possible that industrial waste water may be applied as irrigation water to eucalypts and it is important to predict the maximum transpiration rates of these plantations in an attempt to dispose of this ...

  8. What Counts as Evidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty Stahl, Katherine A.

    2014-01-01

    Each disciplinary community has its own criteria for determining what counts as evidence of knowledge in their academic field. The criteria influence the ways that a community's knowledge is created, communicated, and evaluated. Situating reading, writing, and language instruction within the content areas enables teachers to explicitly…

  9. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is a component of the Clean Hands Count campaign, which also aims to address myths and misperceptions ... views 3:56 Creative Communication - LifeBouy Hand Washing Campaign - Duration: 2:08. LIQVD ASIA 15,338 views ...

  10. Platelet Count and Plateletcrit

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: To determine whether platelet count, plateletcrit (PCT), mean platelet volume (MPV) and platelet distribution width. (PDW) and their ratios can predict mortality in hospitalised children. Methods: Children who died during hospital stay were the cases. Controls were age matched children admitted contempora- neously.

  11. Clean Hands Count

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    Full Text Available ... starting stop Loading... Watch Queue Queue __count__/__total__ Music makes for happy holidays Loading... Even the scrooges ... smile at 3 free months of ad-free music with YouTube Red. Working... No thanks Try it ...

  12. What Counts as Prostitution?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart P. Green

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available What counts, or should count, as prostitution? In the criminal law today, prostitution is understood to involve the provision of sexual services in exchange for money or other benefits. But what exactly is a ‘sexual service’? And what exactly is the nature of the required ‘exchange’? The key to answering these questions is to recognize that how we choose to define prostitution will inevitably depend on why we believe one or more aspects of prostitution are wrong or harmful, or should be criminalized or otherwise deterred, in the first place. These judgements, in turn, will often depend on an assessment of the contested empirical evidence on which they rest. This article describes a variety of real-world contexts in which the ‘what counts as prostitution’ question has arisen, surveys a range of leading rationales for deterring prostitution, and demonstrates how the answer to the definition question depends on the answer to the normative question. The article concludes with some preliminary thoughts on how analogous questions about what should count as sexual conduct arise in the context of consensual offences such as adultery and incest, as well as non-consensual offences such as sexual assault.

  13. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in to report inappropriate content. Sign in Transcript Statistics Add translations 30,667 views 113 Like this video? Sign in to make your opinion count. Sign in 114 2 Don't like this video? Sign in to ...

  14. A Hubble Space Telescope Survey for Novae in M87. II. Snuffing out the Maximum Magnitude-Rate of Decline Relation for Novae as a Non-standard Candle, and a Prediction of the Existence of Ultrafast Novae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shara, Michael M.; Doyle, Trisha; Lauer, Tod R.; Zurek, David; Baltz, Edward A.; Kovetz, Attay; Madrid, Juan P.; Mikołajewska, Joanna; Neill, J. D.; Prialnik, Dina; Welch, D. L.; Yaron, Ofer

    2017-04-01

    The extensive grid of numerical simulations of nova eruptions from the work of Yaron et al. first predicted that some classical novae might significantly deviate from the Maximum Magnitude-Rate of Decline (MMRD) relation, which purports to characterize novae as standard candles. Kasliwal et al. have announced the observational detection of a new class of faint, fast classical novae in the Andromeda galaxy. These objects deviate strongly from the MMRD relationship, as predicted by Yaron et al. Recently, Shara et al. reported the first detections of faint, fast novae in M87. These previously overlooked objects are as common in the giant elliptical galaxy M87 as they are in the giant spiral M31; they comprise about 40% of all classical nova eruptions and greatly increase the observational scatter in the MMRD relation. We use the extensive grid of the nova simulations of Yaron et al. to identify the underlying causes of the existence of faint, fast novae. These are systems that have accreted, and can thus eject, only very low-mass envelopes, of the order of 10-7-10-8 M ⊙, on massive white dwarfs. Such binaries include, but are not limited to, the recurrent novae. These same models predict the existence of ultrafast novae that display decline times, t 2, to be as short as five hours. We outline a strategy for their future detection. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under the NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  15. Maximum Entropy Fundamentals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Topsøe

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: In its modern formulation, the Maximum Entropy Principle was promoted by E.T. Jaynes, starting in the mid-fifties. The principle dictates that one should look for a distribution, consistent with available information, which maximizes the entropy. However, this principle focuses only on distributions and it appears advantageous to bring information theoretical thinking more prominently into play by also focusing on the "observer" and on coding. This view was brought forward by the second named author in the late seventies and is the view we will follow-up on here. It leads to the consideration of a certain game, the Code Length Game and, via standard game theoretical thinking, to a principle of Game Theoretical Equilibrium. This principle is more basic than the Maximum Entropy Principle in the sense that the search for one type of optimal strategies in the Code Length Game translates directly into the search for distributions with maximum entropy. In the present paper we offer a self-contained and comprehensive treatment of fundamentals of both principles mentioned, based on a study of the Code Length Game. Though new concepts and results are presented, the reading should be instructional and accessible to a rather wide audience, at least if certain mathematical details are left aside at a rst reading. The most frequently studied instance of entropy maximization pertains to the Mean Energy Model which involves a moment constraint related to a given function, here taken to represent "energy". This type of application is very well known from the literature with hundreds of applications pertaining to several different elds and will also here serve as important illustration of the theory. But our approach reaches further, especially regarding the study of continuity properties of the entropy function, and this leads to new results which allow a discussion of models with so-called entropy loss. These results have tempted us to speculate over

  16. Maximum Entropy Fundamentals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harremoeës, P.; Topsøe, F.

    2001-09-01

    In its modern formulation, the Maximum Entropy Principle was promoted by E.T. Jaynes, starting in the mid-fifties. The principle dictates that one should look for a distribution, consistent with available information, which maximizes the entropy. However, this principle focuses only on distributions and it appears advantageous to bring information theoretical thinking more prominently into play by also focusing on the "observer" and on coding. This view was brought forward by the second named author in the late seventies and is the view we will follow-up on here. It leads to the consideration of a certain game, the Code Length Game and, via standard game theoretical thinking, to a principle of Game Theoretical Equilibrium. This principle is more basic than the Maximum Entropy Principle in the sense that the search for one type of optimal strategies in the Code Length Game translates directly into the search for distributions with maximum entropy. In the present paper we offer a self-contained and comprehensive treatment of fundamentals of both principles mentioned, based on a study of the Code Length Game. Though new concepts and results are presented, the reading should be instructional and accessible to a rather wide audience, at least if certain mathematical details are left aside at a rst reading. The most frequently studied instance of entropy maximization pertains to the Mean Energy Model which involves a moment constraint related to a given function, here taken to represent "energy". This type of application is very well known from the literature with hundreds of applications pertaining to several different elds and will also here serve as important illustration of the theory. But our approach reaches further, especially regarding the study of continuity properties of the entropy function, and this leads to new results which allow a discussion of models with so-called entropy loss. These results have tempted us to speculate over the development of natural

  17. A Real Time Coincidence System for High Count-Rate TOF or Non-TOF PET Cameras Using Hybrid Method Combining AND-Logic and Time-Mark Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Li, Hongdi; Ramirez, Rocio A; Zhang, Yuxuan; Baghaei, Hossain; Liu, Shitao; An, Shaohui; Wong, Wai-Hoi

    2010-04-01

    A fully digital FPGA-based high count-rate coincidence system has been developed for TOF (Time of Flight) and non-TOF PET cameras. Using a hybrid of AND-logic and Time-mark technology produced both excellent timing resolution and high processing speed. In this hybrid architecture, every gamma event was synchronized by a 125 MHz system clock and generating a trigger associated with a time-mark given by an 8-bit high-resolution TDC (68.3 ps/bin). AND-logic was applied to the synchronized triggers for the real-time raw sorting of coincident events. An efficient FPGA based Time-mark fine-sort algorithm is used to select all the possible coincidence events within the preset coincidence time window. This FPGA-based coincidence system for a modular PET camera offers reprogrammable flexibility and expandability, so the coincidence system is easily employed, regardless of differences in the scale of the PET camera detector setup. A distributed processing method and pipeline technology were adopted in the design to obtain very high processing speed. In this design, both prompt and time-delayed accidental coincidences are simultaneously processed in real time. The real-time digital coincidence system supports coincidence in 2 to 12 detector module setups, capable of processing 72 million single events per second with no digital data loss and captures multiple-event coincidence for better imaging performance evaluation. The coincidence time window-size and time-offset of each coincidence event pair can be programmed independently in 68.3 ps increments (TDC LSB) during the data acquisition in different applications to optimize the signal-to-noise ratio. The complex coincidence system is integrated in one circuit board with 1.5 Gbps fiber optic interface. We demonstrated the system performance using the actual circuit and Monte Carlo simulations.

  18. Regularized maximum correntropy machine

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jim Jing-Yan

    2015-02-12

    In this paper we investigate the usage of regularized correntropy framework for learning of classifiers from noisy labels. The class label predictors learned by minimizing transitional loss functions are sensitive to the noisy and outlying labels of training samples, because the transitional loss functions are equally applied to all the samples. To solve this problem, we propose to learn the class label predictors by maximizing the correntropy between the predicted labels and the true labels of the training samples, under the regularized Maximum Correntropy Criteria (MCC) framework. Moreover, we regularize the predictor parameter to control the complexity of the predictor. The learning problem is formulated by an objective function considering the parameter regularization and MCC simultaneously. By optimizing the objective function alternately, we develop a novel predictor learning algorithm. The experiments on two challenging pattern classification tasks show that it significantly outperforms the machines with transitional loss functions.

  19. Characteristic evaluation of a novel CdTe photon counting detector for X-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyo-Min; Kim, Hee-Joung; Ryu, Hyun-Ju; Choi, Yu-Na

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the characteristics of a novel cadmium-telluride (CdTe) photon counting detector optimized for X-ray imaging applications. CdTe was studied as a potential detector material for hard X-ray and gamma-ray detection. In this study, we used a CdTe photon counting detector manufactured by AJAT Ltd. (PID 350, Finland) for the purposes of both X-ray and gamma-ray detection. However, it is noted that X-ray detection can be limited by the characteristics of gamma-ray detectors. For the investigation of the characteristics of a detector for X-ray imaging, the detector has been studied in terms of detector calibration, count rate, and pixel sensitivity variation by using a poly-energetic X-ray. The detector calibration was evaluated to determine the effects of offset, gain, and energy. An optimal calibration increases the accuracy of the output energy spectrum. The pixel sensitivity variation was evaluated using profiles of various rows and columns from white (with X-ray) and dark (without X-ray) images. The specific trend of each image was observed around the edges of the hybrids. These pixel variations of the CdTe sensor were corrected. The image quality was improved by using the optimal correction method based on an understanding of the pixel sensitivity variation. The maximum recorded count rate of the detector was measured in all pixels. The count rate was measured by setting the energy windows from just above the noise level to the maximum energy. The average count rate was fairly linear up to 1.6 × 106 cps/8 modules and saturated at about 2.2 × 106 cps/8 modules. In this paper, we present several characteristics of the detector and demonstrate the improved spectrum and image obtained after calibration and correction. These results show that the novel CdTe photon counting detector can be used in conventional X-ray imaging, but exhibits limitations when applied to spectral X-ray imaging.

  20. Photon-Counting Arrays for Time-Resolved Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Michel Antolovic

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a camera comprising 512 × 128 pixels capable of single-photon detection and gating with a maximum frame rate of 156 kfps. The photon capture is performed through a gated single-photon avalanche diode that generates a digital pulse upon photon detection and through a digital one-bit counter. Gray levels are obtained through multiple counting and accumulation, while time-resolved imaging is achieved through a 4-ns gating window controlled with subnanosecond accuracy by a field-programmable gate array. The sensor, which is equipped with microlenses to enhance its effective fill factor, was electro-optically characterized in terms of sensitivity and uniformity. Several examples of capture of fast events are shown to demonstrate the suitability of the approach.

  1. The right to count does not always count

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sodemann, Morten

    2013-01-01

    The best prescription against illness is learning to read and to count. People who are unable to count have a harder time learning to read. People who have difficulty counting make poorer decisions, are less able to combine information and are less likely to have a strategy for life...

  2. CalCOFI Egg Counts

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish egg counts and standardized counts for eggs captured in CalCOFI icthyoplankton nets (primarily vertical [Calvet or Pairovet], oblique [bongo or ring nets], and...

  3. Evaluation of low cost in-line milk samplers for estimating individual cow somatic cell counts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, T; Andrews, S P; Moate, P J; Pollino, C A; Schmidt, W L

    1997-02-01

    The Dairy Herd Improvement Fund of Victoria recently identified a requirement for a simple and inexpensive in-line sampler to enable dairy farmers to collect representative milk samples for counting somatic cells. We found that the currently available simple in-line milk samplers, when connected to standard 35 ml collection vessels, terminate sampling early in a milking, and thus provide samples that are unrepresentative of the whole milking. We showed that cell count during a milking varies greatly, tending to be high for the first 1-21. Analyses of resulting samples will thus tend to overestimate cell counts if samplers are used in their traditional way. We found greater sampling rates in high-line compared with low-line milking systems, and consequently developed modified samplers suitable for both situations. Our samplers utilize low sampling rates (approximately 1-3%) and large collection vessels (450 ml). Compared with currently available simple in-line samplers, our type of sampler provided milk samples considerably more representative of the entire milking for the majority of cows. In conjunction with subsampling, they provided samples of appropriate size (12.5 ml minimum to 25 ml maximum) for testing fat, protein, lactose and cell count. Cell count results indicated that errors associated with the use of currently available simple in-line samplers could frequently be > 200%. In contrast, we found that use of our samplers gave an estimate for cell count that was only slightly higher (mean 20%) than that from samples collected by an approved Tru-Test sampler.

  4. Death rates in HIV-positive antiretroviral-naive patients with CD4 count greater than 350 cells per microL in Europe and North America: a pooled cohort observational study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lodwick, Rebecca K; Sabin, Caroline A; Porter, Kholoud

    2010-01-01

    Whether people living with HIV who have not received antiretroviral therapy (ART) and have high CD4 cell counts have higher mortality than the general population is unknown. We aimed to examine this by analysis of pooled data from industrialised countries....

  5. STRESS Counting Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botticella, M. T.; Cappellaro, E.; Riello, M.; Greggio, L.; Benetti, S.; Patat, F.; Turatto, M.; Altavilla, G.; Pastorello, A.; Valenti, S.; Zampieri, L.; Harutyunyan, A.; Pignata, G.; Taubenberger, S.

    2008-12-01

    The rate of occurrence of supernovae (SNe) is linked to some of the basic ingredients of galaxy evolution, such as the star formation rate, the chemical enrichment and feedback processes. SN rates at intermediate redshift and their dependence on specific galaxy properties have been investigated in the Southern inTermediate Redshift ESO Supernova Search (STRESS). The rate of core collapse SNe (CC SNe) at a redshift of around 0.25 is found to be a factor two higher than the local value, whereas the SNe Ia rate remains almost constant. SN rates in red and blue galaxies were also measured and it was found that the SNe Ia rate seems to be constant in galaxies of different colour, whereas the CC SN rate seems to peak in blue galaxies, as in the local Universe.

  6. Forecasting models for sugi (Cryptomeria japonica D. Don) pollen count showing an alternate dispersal rhythm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yukiko; Hattori, Reiko; Mase, Hiroki; Watanabe, Masako; Shiotani, Itaru

    2008-12-01

    Pollen information is indispensable for allergic individuals and clinicians. This study aimed to develop forecasting models for the total annual count of airborne pollen grains based on data monitored over the last 20 years at the Mie Chuo Medical Center, Tsu, Mie, Japan. Airborne pollen grains were collected using a Durham sampler. Total annual pollen count and pollen count from October to December (OD pollen count) of the previous year were transformed to logarithms. Regression analysis of the total pollen count was performed using variables such as the OD pollen count and the maximum temperature for mid-July of the previous year. Time series analysis revealed an alternate rhythm of the series of total pollen count. The alternate rhythm consisted of a cyclic alternation of an "on" year (high pollen count) and an "off" year (low pollen count). This rhythm was used as a dummy variable in regression equations. Of the three models involving the OD pollen count, a multiple regression equation that included the alternate rhythm variable and the interaction of this rhythm with OD pollen count showed a high coefficient of determination (0.844). Of the three models involving the maximum temperature for mid-July, those including the alternate rhythm variable and the interaction of this rhythm with maximum temperature had the highest coefficient of determination (0.925). An alternate pollen dispersal rhythm represented by a dummy variable in the multiple regression analysis plays a key role in improving forecasting models for the total annual sugi pollen count.

  7. Mean and Variance Modeling of Under- and Overdispersed Count Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M. Smith

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the R package CountsEPPM and its use in determining maximum likelihood estimates of the parameters of extended Poisson process models. These provide a Poisson process based family of flexible models that can handle both underdispersion and overdispersion in observed count data, with the negative binomial and Poisson distributions being special cases. Within CountsEPPM models with mean and variance related to covariates are constructed to match a generalized linear model formulation. Use of the package is illustrated by application to several published datasets.

  8. CERN_DxCTA counting mode chip

    CERN Document Server

    Moraes, D; Nygård, E

    2008-01-01

    This ASIC is a counting mode front-end electronic optimized for the readout of CdZnTe/CdTe and silicon sensors, for possible use in applications where the flux of ionizing radiation is high. The chip is implemented in 0.25 μm CMOS technology. The circuit comprises 128 channels equipped with a transimpedance amplifier followed by a gain shaper stage with 21 ns peaking time, two discriminators and two 18-bit counters. The channel architecture is optimized for the detector characteristics in order to achieve the best energy resolution at counting rates of up to 5 M counts/second. The amplifier shows a linear sensitivity of 118 mV/fC and an equivalent noise charge of about 711 e−, for a detector capacitance of 5 pF. Complete evaluation of the circuit is presented using electronic pulses and pixel detectors.

  9. Growth and maximum size of tiger sharks (Galeocerdo cuvier) in Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Carl G; O'Malley, Joseph M; Papastamatiou, Yannis P; Dale, Jonathan J; Hutchinson, Melanie R; Anderson, James M; Royer, Mark A; Holland, Kim N

    2014-01-01

    Tiger sharks (Galecerdo cuvier) are apex predators characterized by their broad diet, large size and rapid growth. Tiger shark maximum size is typically between 380 & 450 cm Total Length (TL), with a few individuals reaching 550 cm TL, but the maximum size of tiger sharks in Hawaii waters remains uncertain. A previous study suggested tiger sharks grow rather slowly in Hawaii compared to other regions, but this may have been an artifact of the method used to estimate growth (unvalidated vertebral ring counts) compounded by small sample size and narrow size range. Since 1993, the University of Hawaii has conducted a research program aimed at elucidating tiger shark biology, and to date 420 tiger sharks have been tagged and 50 recaptured. All recaptures were from Hawaii except a single shark recaptured off Isla Jacques Cousteau (24°13'17″N 109°52'14″W), in the southern Gulf of California (minimum distance between tag and recapture sites  =  approximately 5,000 km), after 366 days at liberty (DAL). We used these empirical mark-recapture data to estimate growth rates and maximum size for tiger sharks in Hawaii. We found that tiger sharks in Hawaii grow twice as fast as previously thought, on average reaching 340 cm TL by age 5, and attaining a maximum size of 403 cm TL. Our model indicates the fastest growing individuals attain 400 cm TL by age 5, and the largest reach a maximum size of 444 cm TL. The largest shark captured during our study was 464 cm TL but individuals >450 cm TL were extremely rare (0.005% of sharks captured). We conclude that tiger shark growth rates and maximum sizes in Hawaii are generally consistent with those in other regions, and hypothesize that a broad diet may help them to achieve this rapid growth by maximizing prey consumption rates.

  10. Growth and maximum size of tiger sharks (Galeocerdo cuvier in Hawaii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl G Meyer

    Full Text Available Tiger sharks (Galecerdo cuvier are apex predators characterized by their broad diet, large size and rapid growth. Tiger shark maximum size is typically between 380 & 450 cm Total Length (TL, with a few individuals reaching 550 cm TL, but the maximum size of tiger sharks in Hawaii waters remains uncertain. A previous study suggested tiger sharks grow rather slowly in Hawaii compared to other regions, but this may have been an artifact of the method used to estimate growth (unvalidated vertebral ring counts compounded by small sample size and narrow size range. Since 1993, the University of Hawaii has conducted a research program aimed at elucidating tiger shark biology, and to date 420 tiger sharks have been tagged and 50 recaptured. All recaptures were from Hawaii except a single shark recaptured off Isla Jacques Cousteau (24°13'17″N 109°52'14″W, in the southern Gulf of California (minimum distance between tag and recapture sites  =  approximately 5,000 km, after 366 days at liberty (DAL. We used these empirical mark-recapture data to estimate growth rates and maximum size for tiger sharks in Hawaii. We found that tiger sharks in Hawaii grow twice as fast as previously thought, on average reaching 340 cm TL by age 5, and attaining a maximum size of 403 cm TL. Our model indicates the fastest growing individuals attain 400 cm TL by age 5, and the largest reach a maximum size of 444 cm TL. The largest shark captured during our study was 464 cm TL but individuals >450 cm TL were extremely rare (0.005% of sharks captured. We conclude that tiger shark growth rates and maximum sizes in Hawaii are generally consistent with those in other regions, and hypothesize that a broad diet may help them to achieve this rapid growth by maximizing prey consumption rates.

  11. AdipoCount: A New Software for Automatic Adipocyte Counting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuhao Zhi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Obesity has spread worldwide and become a common health problem in modern society. One typical feature of obesity is the excessive accumulation of fat in adipocytes, which occurs through the following two physiological phenomena: hyperplasia (increase in quantity and hypertrophy (increase in size of adipocytes. In clinical and scientific research, the accurate quantification of the number and diameter of adipocytes is necessary for assessing obesity. In this study, we present a new automatic adipocyte counting system, AdipoCount, which is based on image processing algorithms. Comparing with other existing adipocyte counting tools, AdipoCount is more accurate and supports further manual correction. AdipoCount counts adipose cells by the following three-step process: (1 It detects the image edges, which are used to segment the membrane of adipose cells; (2 It uses a watershed-based algorithm to re-segment the missing dyed membrane; and (3 It applies a domain connectivity analysis to count the cells. The outputs of this system are the labels and the statistical data of all adipose cells in the image. The AdipoCount software is freely available for academic use at: http://www.csbio.sjtu.edu.cn/bioinf/AdipoCount/.

  12. Counting Frequencies from Zotero Items

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spencer Roberts

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In Counting Frequencies you learned how to count the frequency of specific words in a list using python. In this lesson, we will expand on that topic by showing you how to get information from Zotero HTML items, save the content from those items, and count the frequencies of words. It may be beneficial to look over the previous lesson before we begin.

  13. LAWRENCE RADIATION LABORATORY COUNTING HANDBOOK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Group, Nuclear Instrumentation

    1966-10-01

    The Counting Handbook is a compilation of operational techniques and performance specifications on counting equipment in use at the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, Berkeley. Counting notes have been written from the viewpoint of the user rather than that of the designer or maintenance man. The only maintenance instructions that have been included are those that can easily be performed by the experimenter to assure that the equipment is operating properly.

  14. SUMS Counts-Related Projects

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — Staging Instance for all SUMs Counts related projects including: Redeterminations/Limited Issue, Continuing Disability Resolution, CDR Performance Measures, Initial...

  15. Making environmental DNA count.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Ryan P

    2016-01-01

    The arc of reception for a new technology or method--like the reception of new information itself--can pass through predictable stages, with audiences' responses evolving from 'I don't believe it', through 'well, maybe' to 'yes, everyone knows that' to, finally, 'old news'. The idea that one can sample a volume of water, sequence DNA out of it, and report what species are living nearby has experienced roughly this series of responses among biologists, beginning with the microbial biologists who developed genetic techniques to reveal the unseen microbiome. 'Macrobial' biologists and ecologists--those accustomed to dealing with species they can see and count--have been slower to adopt such molecular survey techniques, in part because of the uncertain relationship between the number of recovered DNA sequences and the abundance of whole organisms in the sampled environment. In this issue of Molecular Ecology Resources, Evans et al. (2015) quantify this relationship for a suite of nine vertebrate species consisting of eight fish and one amphibian. Having detected all of the species present with a molecular toolbox of six primer sets, they consistently find DNA abundances are associated with species' biomasses. The strength and slope of this association vary for each species and each primer set--further evidence that there is no universal parameter linking recovered DNA to species abundance--but Evans and colleagues take a significant step towards being able to answer the next question audiences tend to ask: 'Yes, but how many are there?' © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Maximum Entropy Approaches to Living Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M. Beggs

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding how ensembles of neurons collectively interact will be a key step in developing a mechanistic theory of cognitive processes. Recent progress in multineuron recording and analysis techniques has generated tremendous excitement over the physiology of living neural networks. One of the key developments driving this interest is a new class of models based on the principle of maximum entropy. Maximum entropy models have been reported to account for spatial correlation structure in ensembles of neurons recorded from several different types of data. Importantly, these models require only information about the firing rates of individual neurons and their pairwise correlations. If this approach is generally applicable, it would drastically simplify the problem of understanding how neural networks behave. Given the interest in this method, several groups now have worked to extend maximum entropy models to account for temporal correlations. Here, we review how maximum entropy models have been applied to neuronal ensemble data to account for spatial and temporal correlations. We also discuss criticisms of the maximum entropy approach that argue that it is not generally applicable to larger ensembles of neurons. We conclude that future maximum entropy models will need to address three issues: temporal correlations, higher-order correlations, and larger ensemble sizes. Finally, we provide a brief list of topics for future research.

  17. Computed neutron coincidence counting applied to passive waste assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruggeman, M.; Baeten, P.; De Boeck, W.; Carchon, R. [Nuclear Research Centre, Mol (Belgium)

    1997-11-01

    Neutron coincidence counting applied for the passive assay of fissile material is generally realised with dedicated electronic circuits. This paper presents a software based neutron coincidence counting method with data acquisition via a commercial PC-based Time Interval Analyser (TIA). The TIA is used to measure and record all time intervals between successive pulses in the pulse train up to count-rates of 2 Mpulses/s. Software modules are then used to compute the coincidence count-rates and multiplicity related data. This computed neutron coincidence counting (CNCC) offers full access to all the time information contained in the pulse train. This paper will mainly concentrate on the application and advantages of CNCC for the non-destructive assay of waste. An advanced multiplicity selective Rossi-alpha method is presented and its implementation via CNCC demonstrated. 13 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Single ion heat engine with maximum efficiency at maximum power

    OpenAIRE

    Abah, Obinna; Rossnagel, Johannes; Jacob, Georg; Deffner, Sebastian; Schmidt-Kaler, Ferdinand; Singer, Kilian; Lutz, Eric

    2012-01-01

    We propose an experimental scheme to realize a nano heat engine with a single ion. An Otto cycle may be implemented by confining the ion in a linear Paul trap with tapered geometry and coupling it to engineered laser reservoirs. The quantum efficiency at maximum power is analytically determined in various regimes. Moreover, Monte Carlo simulations of the engine are performed that demonstrate its feasibility and its ability to operate at maximum efficiency of 30% under realistic conditions.

  19. DAWN GRAND MAP VESTA HEGR COUNTS V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data product describes a map of the high-energy gamma-ray (HEGR) count rate across the surface of Vesta. As shown in PEPLOWSKIETAL2013, HEGRS are sensitive to...

  20. Effects of Sampling Strategy, Detection Probability, and Independence of Counts on the Use of Point Counts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grey W. Pendleton

    1995-01-01

    Many factors affect the use of point counts for monitoring bird populations, including sampling strategies, variation in detection rates, and independence of sample points. The most commonly used sampling plans are stratified sampling, cluster sampling, and systematic sampling. Each of these might be most useful for different objectives or field situations. Variation...

  1. An analytical model of crater count equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirabayashi, Masatoshi; Minton, David A.; Fassett, Caleb I.

    2017-06-01

    Crater count equilibrium occurs when new craters form at the same rate that old craters are erased, such that the total number of observable impacts remains constant. Despite substantial efforts to understand this process, there remain many unsolved problems. Here, we propose an analytical model that describes how a heavily cratered surface reaches a state of crater count equilibrium. The proposed model formulates three physical processes contributing to crater count equilibrium: cookie-cutting (simple, geometric overlap), ejecta-blanketing, and sandblasting (diffusive erosion). These three processes are modeled using a degradation parameter that describes the efficiency for a new crater to erase old craters. The flexibility of our newly developed model allows us to represent the processes that underlie crater count equilibrium problems. The results show that when the slope of the production function is steeper than that of the equilibrium state, the power law of the equilibrium slope is independent of that of the production function slope. We apply our model to the cratering conditions in the Sinus Medii region and at the Apollo 15 landing site on the Moon and demonstrate that a consistent degradation parameterization can successfully be determined based on the empirical results of these regions. Further developments of this model will enable us to better understand the surface evolution of airless bodies due to impact bombardment.

  2. Uncertainty in measurements by counting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bich, Walter; Pennecchi, Francesca

    2012-02-01

    Counting is at the base of many high-level measurements, such as, for example, frequency measurements. In some instances the measurand itself is a number of events, such as spontaneous decays in activity measurements, or objects, such as colonies of bacteria in microbiology. Countings also play a fundamental role in everyday life. In any case, a counting is a measurement. A measurement result, according to its present definition, as given in the 'International Vocabulary of Metrology—Basic and general concepts and associated terms (VIM)', must include a specification concerning the estimated uncertainty. As concerns measurements by counting, this specification is not easy to encompass in the well-known framework of the 'Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement', known as GUM, in which there is no guidance on the topic. Furthermore, the issue of uncertainty in countings has received little or no attention in the literature, so that it is commonly accepted that this category of measurements constitutes an exception in which the concept of uncertainty is not applicable, or, alternatively, that results of measurements by counting have essentially no uncertainty. In this paper we propose a general model for measurements by counting which allows an uncertainty evaluation compliant with the general framework of the GUM.

  3. Counting heads in Cairo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-09-14

    Representatives of 182 nations gathered in Cairo in September, 1994, at the Un Conference on Population and Development. The resulting 113-page Draft Program of Action contains sober discussions on demographic issues, including projections of population increase in the decades ahead. It focuses on the potential growth of famine, disease, warfare, environmental degradation, and general human misery if the world's population cannot be stabilized at around 8 billion in the next 20 years. The 1994 figure stands at about 5.7 billion, and there will be 12.5 billion people if no action is taken. Previous conferences hosted under the UN helped spark a remarkable decline in fertility rates, especially in Indonesia and Thailand. Even in populous Bangladesh, some 40% of women now use contraceptives, while the fertility rate has dropped from 7 to 4.2 in 2 decades. The proposals debated in Cairo include sustainable development, gender equality, and the empowerment of women. Whatever the country or culture, fertility rates tend to fall dramatically as women become more educated. This has been borne out almost everywhere, most notably in Japan and Singapore. The conference has been criticized by the Vatican as advocating an international standard for easy abortion, encouraging sex education for teenagers, and sanctioning marriages other than between a man and a woman. Some conservative Muslim thinkers have also complained that it promotes Western values and fosters illicit sex. Many supporters of population planning have argued that the empowerment of women will reduce the incidence of abortion. The Cairo document will alienate many across Asia with its references to the plurality of family forms, including the large number of households headed by single parents. The one goal on which everyone can agree is the need to promote policies that will stabilize the global headcount.

  4. Development of an aerial counting system in oil palm plantations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulyma Miserque Castillo, Jhany; Laverde Diaz, Rubbermaid; Rueda Guzmán, Claudia Leonor

    2016-07-01

    This paper proposes the development of a counting aerial system capable of capturing, process and analyzing images of an oil palm plantation to register the number of cultivated palms. It begins with a study of the available UAV technologies to define the most appropriate model according to the project needs. As result, a DJI Phantom 2 Vision+ is used to capture pictures that are processed by a photogrammetry software to create orthomosaics from the areas of interest, which are handled by the developed software to calculate the number of palms contained in them. The implemented algorithm uses a sliding window technique in image pyramids to generate candidate windows, an LBP descriptor to model the texture of the picture, a logistic regression model to classify the windows and a non-maximum suppression algorithm to refine the decision. The system was tested in different images than the ones used for training and for establishing the set point. As result, the system showed a 95.34% detection rate with a 97.83% precision in mature palms and a 79.26% detection rate with a 97.53% precision in young palms giving an FI score of 0.97 for mature palms and 0.87 for the small ones. The results are satisfactory getting the census and high-quality images from which is possible to get more information from the area of interest. All this, achieved through a low-cost system capable of work even in cloudy conditions.

  5. High rates of viral suppression in adults and children with high CD4+ counts using a streamlined ART delivery model in the SEARCH trial in rural Uganda and Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwarisiima, Dalsone; Kamya, Moses R; Owaraganise, Asiphas; Mwangwa, Florence; Byonanebye, Dathan M; Ayieko, James; Plenty, Albert; Black, Doug; Clark, Tamara D; Nzarubara, Bridget; Snyman, Katherine; Brown, Lillian; Bukusi, Elizabeth; Cohen, Craig R; Geng, Elvin H; Charlebois, Edwin D; Ruel, Theodore D; Petersen, Maya L; Havlir, Diane; Jain, Vivek

    2017-07-21

    The 2015 WHO recommendation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) for all HIV-positive persons calls for treatment initiation in millions of persons newly eligible with high CD4+ counts. Efficient and effective care models are urgently needed for this population. We evaluated clinical outcomes of asymptomatic HIV-positive adults and children starting ART with high CD4+ counts using a novel streamlined care model in rural Uganda and Kenya. In the 16 intervention communities of the HIV test-and-treat Sustainable East Africa Research for Community Health Study (NCT01864603), all HIV-positive individuals irrespective of CD4 were offered ART (efavirenz [EFV]/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate + emtricitabine (FTC) or lamivudine (3TC). We studied adults (≥fifteen years) with CD4 ≥ 350/μL and children (two to fourteen years) with CD4 > 500/μL otherwise ineligible for ART by country guidelines. Clinics implemented a patient-centred streamlined care model designed to reduce patient-level barriers and maximize health system efficiency. It included (1) nurse-conducted visits with physician referral of complex cases, (2) multi-disease chronic care (including for hypertension/diabetes), (3) patient-centred, friendly staff, (4) viral load (VL) testing and counselling, (5) three-month return visits and ART refills, (6) appointment reminders, (7) tiered tracking for missed appointments, (8) flexible clinic hours (outside routine schedule) and (9) telephone access to clinicians. Primary outcomes were 48-week retention in care, viral suppression (% with measured week 48 VL ≤ 500 copies/mL) and adverse events. Results Overall, 972 HIV-positive adults with CD4+ ≥ 350/μL initiated ART with streamlined care. Patients were 66% female and had median age thirty-four years (IQR, 28-42), CD4+ 608/μL (IQR, 487-788/μL) and VL 6775 copies/mL (IQR, <500-37,003 c/mL). At week 48, retention was 92% (897/972; 2 died/40 moved/8 withdrew/4 transferred care/21/964 [2%] were lost to

  6. Principles of maximum entropy and maximum caliber in statistical physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressé, Steve; Ghosh, Kingshuk; Lee, Julian; Dill, Ken A.

    2013-07-01

    The variational principles called maximum entropy (MaxEnt) and maximum caliber (MaxCal) are reviewed. MaxEnt originated in the statistical physics of Boltzmann and Gibbs, as a theoretical tool for predicting the equilibrium states of thermal systems. Later, entropy maximization was also applied to matters of information, signal transmission, and image reconstruction. Recently, since the work of Shore and Johnson, MaxEnt has been regarded as a principle that is broader than either physics or information alone. MaxEnt is a procedure that ensures that inferences drawn from stochastic data satisfy basic self-consistency requirements. The different historical justifications for the entropy S=-∑ipilog⁡pi and its corresponding variational principles are reviewed. As an illustration of the broadening purview of maximum entropy principles, maximum caliber, which is path entropy maximization applied to the trajectories of dynamical systems, is also reviewed. Examples are given in which maximum caliber is used to interpret dynamical fluctuations in biology and on the nanoscale, in single-molecule and few-particle systems such as molecular motors, chemical reactions, biological feedback circuits, and diffusion in microfluidics devices.

  7. What Counts Most?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagdziunaite, Dalia; Jensen, Anne Strande; Auning-Hansen, Julie

    2014-01-01

    of the relative strength of these effects, and how they may dynamically interact. To abate this problem, we conducted an experiment in which we recruited participants from three regions (Italy, France and rest of world), to undergo wine testing and rating of wine taste preference, and willingness to pay (WTP......) while being exposed to the CoO and price of each wine. Unbeknownst to the participants, they all tasted the same wine. To provide a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms of the observed effects, emotional arousal was assessed using pupillometry. Using a linear regression model, our results...... demonstrate that price and CoO individually have a significant effect on the hedonic experience of wine (R² = 0.11, p

  8. Make My Trip Count 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — The Make My Trip Count (MMTC) commuter survey, conducted in September and October 2015 by GBA, the Pittsburgh 2030 District, and 10 other regional transportation...

  9. Study and simulation of a multi-lithology stratigraphic model under maximum erosion rate constraint; Etude et simulation d'un modele statigraphique multi-lithologique sous contrainte de taux d'erosion maximal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gervais, V.

    2004-11-01

    The subject of this report is the study and simulation of a model describing the infill of sedimentary basins on large scales in time and space. It simulates the evolution through time of the sediment layer in terms of geometry and rock properties. A parabolic equation is coupled to an hyperbolic equation by an input boundary condition at the top of the basin. The model also considers a unilaterality constraint on the erosion rate. In the first part of the report, the mathematical model is described and particular solutions are defined. The second part deals with the definition of numerical schemes and the simulation of the model. In the first chap-ter, finite volume numerical schemes are defined and studied. The Newton algorithm adapted to the unilateral constraint used to solve the schemes is given, followed by numerical results in terms of performance and accuracy. In the second chapter, a preconditioning strategy to solve the linear system by an iterative solver at each Newton iteration is defined, and numerical results are given. In the last part, a simplified model is considered in which a variable is decoupled from the other unknowns and satisfies a parabolic equation. A weak formulation is defined for the remaining coupled equations, for which the existence of a unique solution is obtained. The proof uses the convergence of a numerical scheme. (author)

  10. Low-noise low-jitter 32-pixels CMOS single-photon avalanche diodes array for single-photon counting from 300 nm to 900 nm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scarcella, Carmelo; Tosi, Alberto, E-mail: alberto.tosi@polimi.it; Villa, Federica; Tisa, Simone; Zappa, Franco [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy)

    2013-12-15

    We developed a single-photon counting multichannel detection system, based on a monolithic linear array of 32 CMOS SPADs (Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Single-Photon Avalanche Diodes). All channels achieve a timing resolution of 100 ps (full-width at half maximum) and a photon detection efficiency of 50% at 400 nm. Dark count rate is very low even at room temperature, being about 125 counts/s for 50 μm active area diameter SPADs. Detection performance and microelectronic compactness of this CMOS SPAD array make it the best candidate for ultra-compact time-resolved spectrometers with single-photon sensitivity from 300 nm to 900 nm.

  11. Photon Counting Using Edge-Detection Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gin, Jonathan W.; Nguyen, Danh H.; Farr, William H.

    2010-01-01

    New applications such as high-datarate, photon-starved, free-space optical communications require photon counting at flux rates into gigaphoton-per-second regimes coupled with subnanosecond timing accuracy. Current single-photon detectors that are capable of handling such operating conditions are designed in an array format and produce output pulses that span multiple sample times. In order to discern one pulse from another and not to overcount the number of incoming photons, a detection algorithm must be applied to the sampled detector output pulses. As flux rates increase, the ability to implement such a detection algorithm becomes difficult within a digital processor that may reside within a field-programmable gate array (FPGA). Systems have been developed and implemented to both characterize gigahertz bandwidth single-photon detectors, as well as process photon count signals at rates into gigaphotons per second in order to implement communications links at SCPPM (serial concatenated pulse position modulation) encoded data rates exceeding 100 megabits per second with efficiencies greater than two bits per detected photon. A hardware edge-detection algorithm and corresponding signal combining and deserialization hardware were developed to meet these requirements at sample rates up to 10 GHz. The photon discriminator deserializer hardware board accepts four inputs, which allows for the ability to take inputs from a quadphoton counting detector, to support requirements for optical tracking with a reduced number of hardware components. The four inputs are hardware leading-edge detected independently. After leading-edge detection, the resultant samples are ORed together prior to deserialization. The deserialization is performed to reduce the rate at which data is passed to a digital signal processor, perhaps residing within an FPGA. The hardware implements four separate analog inputs that are connected through RF connectors. Each analog input is fed to a high-speed 1

  12. Hanford whole body counting manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, H.E.; Rieksts, G.A.; Lynch, T.P.

    1990-06-01

    This document describes the Hanford Whole Body Counting Program as it is administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in support of the US Department of Energy--Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) and its Hanford contractors. Program services include providing in vivo measurements of internally deposited radioactivity in Hanford employees (or visitors). Specific chapters of this manual deal with the following subjects: program operational charter, authority, administration, and practices, including interpreting applicable DOE Orders, regulations, and guidance into criteria for in vivo measurement frequency, etc., for the plant-wide whole body counting services; state-of-the-art facilities and equipment used to provide the best in vivo measurement results possible for the approximately 11,000 measurements made annually; procedures for performing the various in vivo measurements at the Whole Body Counter (WBC) and related facilities including whole body counts; operation and maintenance of counting equipment, quality assurance provisions of the program, WBC data processing functions, statistical aspects of in vivo measurements, and whole body counting records and associated guidance documents. 16 refs., 48 figs., 22 tabs.

  13. The volumes and transcript counts of single cells reveal concentration homeostasis and capture biological noise.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kempe, H.; Schwabe, A.; Crémazy, F.; Verschure, P.J.; Bruggeman, F.J.

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional stochasticity can be measured by counting the number of mRNA molecules per cell. Cell-to-cell variability is best captured in terms of concentration rather than molecule counts, because reaction rates depend on concentrations. We combined single-molecule mRNA counting with

  14. ENUGU USING MAXIMUM TEMPERATURE DATA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-01-28

    Jan 28, 2008 ... daily global solar radiation on a horizontal surface for some towns in Nigeria. For example, Sanusi and Aliyu (2005) used maximum temperature data to predict for. Sokoto. lheonu (2001) did the same for lbadan. Badmus and Momoh(2005) did likewise for Birnin Kebbi. So did Awachie and Okeke(1 990) for ...

  15. Maximum stellar iron core mass

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. An analytical method of estimating the mass of a stellar iron core, just prior to core collapse, is .... approximately as an ideal gas, the mean kinetic energies of the free electrons and atomic nuclei will be equal. .... whose density varies from a maximum at the core's center to a minimum at its 'surface'. The dimensional ...

  16. Abolishing the maximum tension principle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz P. Da̧browski

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We find the series of example theories for which the relativistic limit of maximum tension Fmax=c4/4G represented by the entropic force can be abolished. Among them the varying constants theories, some generalized entropy models applied both for cosmological and black hole horizons as well as some generalized uncertainty principle models.

  17. maXImum medical aid

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1990-08-04

    Aug 4, 1990 ... the passage of time. S Afr Med J 1990; 78: 147-151. Medicine prices have increased significantly in recent years. Over the past 5 years, the medicines price .... Maximum. "- dispensed. No. in. Approved price before. Product list name. Strength. Form. Pack prof. fee (R) examples. Allopurinol. 100 mg. Tablets.

  18. Maximum smoothed likelihood estimation and smoothed maximum likelihood estimation in the current status model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groeneboom, P.; Jongbloed, G.; Witte, B.I.

    2010-01-01

    We consider the problem of estimating the distribution function, the density and the hazard rate of the (unobservable) event time in the current status model. A well studied and natural nonparametric estimator for the distribution function in this model is the nonparametric maximum likelihood

  19. Imaging by photon counting with 256 x 256 pixel matrix

    CERN Document Server

    Tlustos, Lukas; Heijne, Erik H M; Llopart-Cudie, Xavier

    2004-01-01

    Using 0.25 mum standard CMOS we have developed 2-D semiconductor matrix detectors with sophisticated functionality integrated inside each pixel of a hybrid sensor module. One of these sensor modules is a matrix of 256 multiplied by 256 square 55mum pixels intended for X- ray imaging. This device is called 'Medipix2' and features a fast amplifier and two-level discrimination for signals between 1000 and 100000 equivalent electrons, with overall signal noise similar to 150 e- rms. Signal polarity and comparator thresholds are programmable. A maximum count rate of nearly 1 MHz per pixel can be achieved, which corresponds to an average flux of 3 multiplied by 10exp10 photons per cm2. The selected signals can be accumulated in each pixel in a 13- bit register. The serial readout takes 5-10 ms. A parallel readout of similar to 300 mus could also be used. Housekeeping functions such as local dark current compensation, test pulse generation, silencing of noisy pixels and threshold tuning in each pixel contribute to t...

  20. Photon-counting image sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Teranishi, Nobukazu; Theuwissen, Albert; Stoppa, David; Charbon, Edoardo

    2017-01-01

    The field of photon-counting image sensors is advancing rapidly with the development of various solid-state image sensor technologies including single photon avalanche detectors (SPADs) and deep-sub-electron read noise CMOS image sensor pixels. This foundational platform technology will enable opportunities for new imaging modalities and instrumentation for science and industry, as well as new consumer applications. Papers discussing various photon-counting image sensor technologies and selected new applications are presented in this all-invited Special Issue.

  1. Metal ion levels and lymphocyte counts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penny, Jeannette Ø; Varmarken, Jens-Erik; Ovesen, Ole

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Wear particles from metal-on-metal arthroplasties are under suspicion for adverse effects both locally and systemically, and the DePuy ASR Hip Resurfacing System (RHA) has above-average failure rates. We compared lymphocyte counts in RHA and total hip arthroplasty (THA....../ppb. INTERPRETATION: Circulating T-lymphocyte levels may decline after surgery, regardless of implant type. Metal ions-particularly cobalt-may have a general depressive effect on T- and B-lymphocyte levels. Registered with ClinicalTrials.gov under # NCT01113762....

  2. 78 FR 13999 - Maximum Interest Rates on Guaranteed Farm Loans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-04

    ... was determined that these could be disruptive, as lenders might be inclined to make fewer guaranteed... with the E-Government Act, to promote the use of the Internet and other information technologies to...

  3. 44 CFR 208.12 - Maximum Pay Rate Table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Force Physicians, Task Force Engineers, and Canine Handlers) and Backfill for Activated System Members... grade, middle step for each position, which demonstrates an experience level of five years. (2) The... parity with like specialties on a task force (canine handlers are equated with rescue specialists). The...

  4. Nitric-glycolic flowsheet testing for maximum hydrogen generation rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martino, C. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Newell, J. D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Williams, M. S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-03-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site is developing for implementation a flowsheet with a new reductant to replace formic acid. Glycolic acid has been tested over the past several years and found to effectively replace the function of formic acid in the DWPF chemical process. The nitric-glycolic flowsheet reduces mercury, significantly lowers the chemical generation of hydrogen and ammonia, allows purge reduction in the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT), stabilizes the pH and chemistry in the SRAT and the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME), allows for effective adjustment of the SRAT/SME rheology, and is favorable with respect to melter flammability. The objective of this work was to perform DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC) testing at conditions that would bound the catalytic hydrogen production for the nitric-glycolic flowsheet.

  5. Entrainment and maximum vapour flow rate of trays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Sinderen, AH; Wijn, EF; Zanting, RWJ

    This is a report on free entrainment measurements in a small (0.20 m x 0.20 in) air-water column. An adjustable weir controlled the liquid height on a test tray. Several sieve and valve trays were studied. The results were interpreted with a two- or three-layer model of the two-phase mixture on the

  6. veteran athletes exercise at higher maximum heart rates than

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Maximal HR in veteran athletes during specific sporting activities was significantly higher than that attained ... false-positive results due to the athletic heart syndrome have been described,13 it is accepted that a positive test is a risk .... group (210 (21) v. 185. (18) mmHg, P < 0.05, Table ill). Exercise time to fatigue in the. lID I ...

  7. Maximum Entropy Discrimination Markov Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Jun; Xing, Eric P.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel and general framework called {\\it Maximum Entropy Discrimination Markov Networks} (MaxEnDNet), which integrates the max-margin structured learning and Bayesian-style estimation and combines and extends their merits. Major innovations of this model include: 1) It generalizes the extant Markov network prediction rule based on a point estimator of weights to a Bayesian-style estimator that integrates over a learned distribution of the weights. 2) It extends the ...

  8. Statistical Methods for Unusual Count Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guthrie, Katherine A.; Gammill, Hilary S.; Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads

    2016-01-01

    microchimerism data present challenges for statistical analysis, including a skewed distribution, excess zero values, and occasional large values. Methods for comparing microchimerism levels across groups while controlling for covariates are not well established. We compared statistical models for quantitative...... microchimerism values, applied to simulated data sets and 2 observed data sets, to make recommendations for analytic practice. Modeling the level of quantitative microchimerism as a rate via Poisson or negative binomial model with the rate of detection defined as a count of microchimerism genome equivalents per...... total cell equivalents tested utilizes all available data and facilitates a comparison of rates between groups. We found that both the marginalized zero-inflated Poisson model and the negative binomial model can provide unbiased and consistent estimates of the overall association of exposure or study...

  9. Climate Change Impacts on Probable Maximum Precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkel, K.; Easterling, D. R.

    2011-12-01

    The estimation of the potential impacts of anthropogenic forcing of the climate system on extreme weather events relies heavily on the direct output of global and regional climate models, combined perhaps with extreme value statistical techniques. In this study, we use these tools along with physical and theoretical considerations to examine the potential impacts on Probable Maximum Precipitation estimates. Probable Maximum Precipitation (PMP) is the theoretically greatest depth of precipitation for a given duration that is physically possible over a particular drainage basin at a particular time of year. PMP values are used in the design of long-lived structures with lifetimes of many decades, such as dams. Climate change is an unavoidable consideration on those time scales. Many studies have documented an upward temporal trend in the frequency and intensity of extreme precipitation events. As the globe warms in response to increasing greenhouse gas concentrations, there is the potential for further changes in precipitation extremes. There are reasons why warming could lead to increased PMP values. One, the Clausius-Clapeyron relationship indicates that the saturation water vapor pressure increases with temperature; thus, precipitation-producing systems could have more "fuel" to precipitate. Two, warming may lead to an increase in the length of the convective season, when most of the extreme precipitation events occur. The methodology for estimation of PMP values has changed little over the last 30-40 years. The basic approach is to consider the factors that contribute to heavy precipitation and then consider the potential precipitation rates if all of those factors were simultaneously maximized. Convergence and vertical motion is one factor. Past work has assumed that there no empirical or satisfactory theoretical basis for assigning maximum values to this factor. The approach has been to use observed rainfall in notable storms as an indirect measure of maximum

  10. Counting a Culture of Mealworms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashbrook, Peggy

    2007-01-01

    Math is not the only topic that will be discussed when young children are asked to care for and count "mealworms," a type of insect larvae (just as caterpillars are the babies of butterflies, these larvae are babies of beetles). The following activity can take place over two months as the beetles undergo metamorphosis from larvae to adults. As the…

  11. Verbal Counting in Bilingual Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donevska-Todorova, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Informal experiences in mathematics often include playful competitions among young children in counting numbers in as many as possible different languages. Can these enjoyable experiences result with excellence in the formal processes of education? This article discusses connections between mathematical achievements and natural languages within…

  12. Shakespeare Live! and Character Counts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookshire, Cathy A.

    This paper discusses a live production of Shakespeare's "Macbeth" (in full costume but with no sets) for all public middle school and high school students in Harrisonburg and Rockingham, Virginia. The paper states that the "Character Counts" issues that are covered in the play are: decision making, responsibility and…

  13. On modelling overdispersion of counts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poortema, Klaas

    1999-01-01

    For counts it often occurs that the observed variance exceeds the nominal variance of the claimed binomial, multinomial or Poisson distributions. We study how models can be extended to cope with this phenomenon: a survey of literature is given. We focus on modelling, not on estimation or testing

  14. Vote Counting as Mathematical Proof

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schürmann, Carsten; Pattinson, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    -based formalisation of voting protocols inside a theorem prover, we synthesise vote counting programs that are not only provably correct, but also produce independently verifiable certificates. These programs are generated from a (formal) proof that every initial set of ballots allows to decide the election winner...

  15. Kids Count New Hampshire, 1996.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Susan Palmer; Hall, Douglas E.

    This Kids Count report presents statewide trends in the well-being of New Hampshire's children. The statistical report is based on 14 indicators of child well being: (1) children in poverty; (2) fatherless families; (3) maternal education; (4) teen births; (5) births to unmarried mothers; (6) low birth weight births; (7) insurance coverage; (8)…

  16. Modelling highly variable daily maximum water temperatures in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... hourly water temperatures were used to calculate daily maximum water temperatures for nine sites within the Sabie-Sand River system, Mpumalanga Province, South Africa. A suite of statistical models for simulating daily maximum water temperatures, of differing complexity and using inputs of air temperature, flow rates, ...

  17. Energy-correction photon counting pixel for photon energy extraction under pulse pile-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Daehee; Park, Kyungjin; Lim, Kyung Taek; Cho, Gyuseong, E-mail: gscho@kaist.ac.kr

    2017-06-01

    A photon counting detector (PCD) has been proposed as an alternative solution to an energy-integrating detector (EID) in medical imaging field due to its high resolution, high efficiency, and low noise. The PCD has expanded to variety of fields such as spectral CT, k-edge imaging, and material decomposition owing to its capability to count and measure the number and the energy of an incident photon, respectively. Nonetheless, pulse pile-up, which is a superimposition of pulses at the output of a charge sensitive amplifier (CSA) in each PC pixel, occurs frequently as the X-ray flux increases due to the finite pulse processing time (PPT) in CSAs. Pulse pile-up induces not only a count loss but also distortion in the measured X-ray spectrum from each PC pixel and thus it is a main constraint on the use of PCDs in high flux X-ray applications. To minimize these effects, an energy-correction PC (ECPC) pixel is proposed to resolve pulse pile-up without cutting off the PPT by adding an energy correction logic (ECL) via a cross detection method (CDM). The ECPC pixel with a size of 200×200 µm{sup 2} was fabricated by using a 6-metal 1-poly 0.18 µm CMOS process with a static power consumption of 7.2 μW/pixel. The maximum count rate of the ECPC pixel was extended by approximately three times higher than that of a conventional PC pixel with a PPT of 500 nsec. The X-ray spectrum of 90 kVp, filtered by 3 mm Al filter, was measured as the X-ray current was increased using the CdTe and the ECPC pixel. As a result, the ECPC pixel dramatically reduced the energy spectrum distortion at 2 Mphotons/pixel/s when compared to that of the ERCP pixel with the same 500 nsec PPT.

  18. Graphite Nodule and Cell Count in Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Fraś

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a model is proposed for heterogeneous nucleation on substrates whose size distribution can be described by the Weibull statistics. It is found that the nuclei density, Nnuc can be given in terms of the maximum undercooling, ΔTm by Nnuc = Ns exp(-b/ΔTm; where Ns is the density of nucleation sites in the melt and b is the nucleation coefficient (b > 0 . When nucleation occurs on all the possible substrates, the graphite nodule density, NV,n or eutectic cell density NV after solidification equals Ns. In this work, measurements of NV,n and NV values were carried out on experimental nodular and flake graphite iron castings processed under various inoculation conditions. The volumetric nodule NV,,n or graphite eutectic cell NV count, were estimated from the area nodule count, NA,n or eutectic cell count NA on polished cast iron surface sections by stereological means. In addition, maximum undercoolings, ΔTm were measured using thermal analysis. The experimental outcome indicates that volumetric nodule NV,n or graphite eutectic cell NV count can be properly described by the proposed expression NV,,n = NV = Ns exp(-b/ΔTm. Moreover, the Ns and b values were experimentally determined. In particular, the proposed model suggests that the size distribution of nucleation sites is exponential in nature.

  19. Tutorial on X-ray photon counting detector characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Liqiang; Zheng, Bin; Liu, Hong

    2017-11-16

    Recent advances in photon counting detection technology have led to significant research interest in X-ray imaging. As a tutorial level review, this paper covers a wide range of aspects related to X-ray photon counting detector characterization. The tutorial begins with a detailed description of the working principle and operating modes of a pixelated X-ray photon counting detector with basic architecture and detection mechanism. Currently available methods and techniques for charactering major aspects including energy response, noise floor, energy resolution, count rate performance (detector efficiency), and charge sharing effect of photon counting detectors are comprehensively reviewed. Other characterization aspects such as point spread function (PSF), line spread function (LSF), contrast transfer function (CTF), modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS), detective quantum efficiency (DQE), bias voltage, radiation damage, and polarization effect are also remarked. A cadmium telluride (CdTe) pixelated photon counting detector is employed for part of the characterization demonstration and the results are presented. This review can serve as a tutorial for X-ray imaging researchers and investigators to understand, operate, characterize, and optimize photon counting detectors for a variety of applications.

  20. Decomposition using Maximum Autocorrelation Factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Rasmus

    2002-01-01

    are organised in a two-dimensional grid. Another example is biological shape analysis. Here each observation (e.g. human bone, cerebral ventricle) is represented by a number of landmarks the coordinates of which are the variables. Here we do not have an ordering of the observations (individuals). However......, normally we have an ordering of landmarks (variables) along the contour of the objects. For the case with observation ordering the maximum autocorrelation factor (MAF) transform was proposed for multivariate imagery in\\verb+~+\\$\\backslash\\$cite{switzer85}. This corresponds to a R-mode analyse of the data...

  1. Generic maximum likely scale selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kim Steenstrup; Loog, Marco; Markussen, Bo

    2007-01-01

    in this work is on applying this selection principle under a Brownian image model. This image model provides a simple scale invariant prior for natural images and we provide illustrative examples of the behavior of our scale estimation on such images. In these illustrative examples, estimation is based......The fundamental problem of local scale selection is addressed by means of a novel principle, which is based on maximum likelihood estimation. The principle is generally applicable to a broad variety of image models and descriptors, and provides a generic scale estimation methodology. The focus...

  2. Carbon Equivalent and Maximum Hardness

    OpenAIRE

    Haruyoshi, Suzuki; Head Office, Nippon Steel Corporation

    1984-01-01

    The accuracy of formulae for estimating the maximum hardness values of the HAZ from chemical composition and cooling time for welds in high strength steel is discussed and a new formula. NSC-S, is proposed which uses only C%, Pcm% and cooling time for the purpose of satisfactory accuracy. IIW CE and Ito-Bessyo Pcm carbon equivalent alone are not satisfactory in establishing Hmax values. The former is good only for slow cooling, t8/5 longer than 10 seconds, while the latter is good only for fa...

  3. Prediction of Maximum Aerobic Power in Untrained Females

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolgener, Forrest A.

    1978-01-01

    The author presents an equation for predicting maximum aerobic power in untrained females from values of percent body fat, weight, and submaximal values of heart rate, respiratory quotient, and expired gas. (MJB)

  4. Correlated neutron counting for the 21st century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, Louise G [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-01

    Correlated neutron counting techniques, such as neutron coincidence and multiplicity counting, are widely employed at nuclear fuel cycle facilities for the accountancy of nuclear material such as plutonium. These techniques need to be improved and enhanced to meet the challenges of complex measurement items and future nuclear safeguards applications, for example; the non-destructive assay of spent nuclear fuel, high counting rate applications, small sample measurements, and Helium-3 replacement. At the same time simulation tools, used for the design of detection systems based on these techniques, are being developed in anticipation of future needs. This seminar will present the theory and current state of the practice of temporally correlated neutron counting. A range of future safeguards applications will then be presented in the context of research projects at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  5. Pedestrian Counting with Occlusion Handling Using Stereo Thermal Cameras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miklas S. Kristoffersen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The number of pedestrians walking the streets or gathered in public spaces is a valuable piece of information for shop owners, city governments, event organizers and many others. However, automatic counting that takes place day and night is challenging due to changing lighting conditions and the complexity of scenes with many people occluding one another. To address these challenges, this paper introduces the use of a stereo thermal camera setup for pedestrian counting. We investigate the reconstruction of 3D points in a pedestrian street with two thermal cameras and propose an algorithm for pedestrian counting based on clustering and tracking of the 3D point clouds. The method is tested on two five-minute video sequences captured at a public event with a moderate density of pedestrians and heavy occlusions. The counting performance is compared to the manually annotated ground truth and shows success rates of 95.4% and 99.1% for the two sequences.

  6. Temporal trends in sperm count

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levine, Hagai; Jørgensen, Niels; Martino-Andrade, Anderson

    2017-01-01

    , method of measuring SC and semen volume, exclusion criteria and indicators of completeness of covariate data]. The slopes of SC and TSC were estimated as functions of sample collection year using both simple linear regression and weighted meta-regression models and the latter were adjusted for pre......-determined covariates and modification by fertility and geographic group. Assumptions were examined using multiple sensitivity analyses and nonlinear models. OUTCOMES: SC declined significantly between 1973 and 2011 (slope in unadjusted simple regression models -0.70 million/ml/year; 95% CI: -0.72 to -0.69; P ...BACKGROUND: Reported declines in sperm counts remain controversial today and recent trends are unknown. A definitive meta-analysis is critical given the predictive value of sperm count for fertility, morbidity and mortality. OBJECTIVE AND RATIONALE: To provide a systematic review and meta-regression...

  7. 1/Nc Countings in Baryons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jose Goity

    2004-05-01

    The 1/N{sub c} power countings for baryon decays and configuration mixings are determined by means of a non-relativistic quark picture. Such countings are expected to be robust as the quark masses are decreased towards the chiral limit. It is shown that excited baryons have natural widths of {Omicron}(N{sub c}{sup 0}). These dominant widths are due to the decays that proceed directly to the ground state baryons, with cascade decays being suppressed to {Omicron}(1/N{sub c}). Configuration mixings, defined as mixings between states belonging to different O(3) x SU(2N{sub f}) multiplets, are shown to be sub-leading in an expansion in 1/{radical}N{sub c}, except for certain mixings between excited multiplets belonging to the mixed-symmetric spin-flavor representation and different O(3) representations, where the mixings are of zeroth order in 1/N{sub c}.

  8. High nevus counts confer a favorable prognosis in melanoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribero, Simone; Davies, John R; Requena, Celia; Carrera, Cristina; Glass, Daniel; Rull, Ramon; Vidal-Sicart, Sergi; Vilalta, Antonio; Alos, Lucia; Soriano, Virtudes; Quaglino, Pietro; Traves, Victor; Newton-Bishop, Julia A; Nagore, Eduardo; Malvehy, Josep; Puig, Susana; Bataille, Veronique

    2015-10-01

    A high number of nevi is the most significant phenotypic risk factor for melanoma and is in part genetically determined. The number of nevi decreases from middle age onward but this senescence can be delayed in patients with melanoma. We investigated the effects of nevus number count on sentinel node status and melanoma survival in a large cohort of melanoma cases. Out of 2,184 melanoma cases, 684 (31.3%) had a high nevus count (>50). High nevus counts were associated with favorable prognostic factors such as lower Breslow thickness, less ulceration and lower mitotic rate, despite adjustment for age. Nevus count was not predictive of sentinel node status. The crude 5- and 10-year melanoma-specific survival rate was higher in melanomas cases with a high nevus count compared to those with a low nevus count (91.2 vs. 86.4% and 87.2 vs. 79%, respectively). The difference in survival remained significant after adjusting for all known melanoma prognostic factors (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.43, confidence interval [CI] = 0.21-0.89). The favorable prognostic value of a high nevus count was also seen within the positive sentinel node subgroup of patients (HR = 0.22, CI = 0.08-0.60). High nevus count is associated with a better melanoma survival, even in the subgroup of patients with positive sentinel lymph node. This suggests a different biological behavior of melanoma tumors in patients with an excess of nevi. © 2015 The Authors. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of UICC.

  9. A novel interference fringes software counting method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuanzhao; Chen, Benyong; Wu, Xiaowei; Li, Dacheng

    2005-02-01

    Conventional interference fringes counting methods often process two sinusoidal interference signals with a phase difference of π/2 to realize fringe-counting. But when the signals fluctuate in half a period of the signal, the conventional fringe-counting method sometimes produces direction-distinguishing mistakes, then resulting in counting errors. To address the problem, this paper presents a novel interference fringes counting method that uses software to distinguish the forward or backward direction of interference fringe and to count. This fringe-counting method can accurately distinguish the moving direction induced by the fluctuation of interference fringes, so it has the advantages of exact counting, intelligence and reliability. An experimental setup based on a Michelson interferometer is constructed to demonstrate the utility of this fringe-counting method for displacement measurement, and experimental results with a range of 1036mm is presented.

  10. Last Glacial Maximum in Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Leszek

    2002-01-01

    The Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) in Poland is represented by the Leszno Phase and occurred after 21 ka radiocarbon years. In turn the deglacial Poznań Phase is estimated at 18.4 ka, the Pomeranian Phase at 15.2 ka, the Gardno Phase at about 14.0-13.8 ka, the Słupsk Bank Phase at 13.5-13.2 ka and the Southern Middle Bank Phase at 12.7-12.5 ka BP. The ice sheet limit at LGM was not synchronous everywhere in Poland but occurred as several major and minor ice lobes that reflected a stream-like structure of the ice body that radiated southwards from the Baltic Basin. Meltwater runoff during the LGM created a complex system of sandur trains and ice-marginal spillways, with numerous intervening proglacial lakes.

  11. Objects of maximum electromagnetic chirality

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandez-Corbaton, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a definition of the electromagnetic chirality of an object and show that it has an upper bound. The upper bound is attained if and only if the object is transparent for fields of one handedness (helicity). Additionally, electromagnetic duality symmetry, i.e. helicity preservation upon scattering, turns out to be a necessary condition for reciprocal scatterers to attain the upper bound. We use these results to provide requirements for the design of such extremal scatterers. The requirements can be formulated as constraints on the polarizability tensors for dipolar scatterers or as material constitutive relations. We also outline two applications for objects of maximum electromagnetic chirality: A twofold resonantly enhanced and background free circular dichroism measurement setup, and angle independent helicity filtering glasses.

  12. Maximum mutual information regularized classification

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jim Jing-Yan

    2014-09-07

    In this paper, a novel pattern classification approach is proposed by regularizing the classifier learning to maximize mutual information between the classification response and the true class label. We argue that, with the learned classifier, the uncertainty of the true class label of a data sample should be reduced by knowing its classification response as much as possible. The reduced uncertainty is measured by the mutual information between the classification response and the true class label. To this end, when learning a linear classifier, we propose to maximize the mutual information between classification responses and true class labels of training samples, besides minimizing the classification error and reducing the classifier complexity. An objective function is constructed by modeling mutual information with entropy estimation, and it is optimized by a gradient descend method in an iterative algorithm. Experiments on two real world pattern classification problems show the significant improvements achieved by maximum mutual information regularization.

  13. System for Memorizing Maximum Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    The invention discloses a system capable of memorizing maximum sensed values. The system includes conditioning circuitry which receives the analog output signal from a sensor transducer. The conditioning circuitry rectifies and filters the analog signal and provides an input signal to a digital driver, which may be either liner or logarithmic. The driver converts the analog signal to discrete digital values, which in turn triggers an output signal on one of a plurality of driver output lines n. The particular output lines selected is dependent on the converted digital value. A microfuse memory device connects across the driver output lines, with n segments. Each segment is associated with one driver output line, and includes a microfuse that is blown when a signal appears on the associated driver output line.

  14. Performance of in-pixel circuits for photon counting arrays (PCAs) based on polycrystalline silicon TFTs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Albert K.; Koniczek, Martin; Antonuk, Larry E.; El-Mohri, Youcef; Zhao, Qihua; Street, Robert A.; Lu, Jeng Ping

    2016-03-01

    Photon counting arrays (PCAs), defined as pixelated imagers which measure the absorbed energy of x-ray photons individually and record this information digitally, are of increasing clinical interest. A number of PCA prototypes with a 1 mm pixel-to-pixel pitch have recently been fabricated with polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si)—a thin-film technology capable of creating monolithic imagers of a size commensurate with human anatomy. In this study, analog and digital simulation frameworks were developed to provide insight into the influence of individual poly-Si transistors on pixel circuit performance—information that is not readily available through empirical means. The simulation frameworks were used to characterize the circuit designs employed in the prototypes. The analog framework, which determines the noise produced by individual transistors, was used to estimate energy resolution, as well as to identify which transistors contribute the most noise. The digital framework, which analyzes how well circuits function in the presence of significant variations in transistor properties, was used to estimate how fast a circuit can produce an output (referred to as output count rate). In addition, an algorithm was developed and used to estimate the minimum pixel pitch that could be achieved for the pixel circuits of the current prototypes. The simulation frameworks predict that the analog component of the PCA prototypes could have energy resolution as low as 8.9% full width at half maximum (FWHM) at 70 keV; and the digital components should work well even in the presence of significant thin-film transistor (TFT) variations, with the fastest component having output count rates as high as 3 MHz. Finally, based on conceivable improvements in the underlying fabrication process, the algorithm predicts that the 1 mm pitch of the current PCA prototypes could be reduced significantly, potentially to between ~240 and 290 μm.

  15. Repeatability of differential goat bulk milk culture and associations with somatic cell count, total bacterial count, and standard plate count

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koop, G.; Dik, N.; Nielen, M.; Lipman, L.J.A.

    2010-01-01

    The aims of this study were to assess how different bacterial groups in bulk milk are related to bulk milk somatic cell count (SCC), bulk milk total bacterial count (TBC), and bulk milk standard plate count (SPC) and to measure the repeatability of bulk milk culturing. On 53 Dutch dairy goat farms,

  16. Avalanche photodiode photon counting receivers for space-borne lidars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoli; Davidson, Frederic M.

    1991-01-01

    Avalanche photodiodes (APD) are studied for uses as photon counting detectors in spaceborne lidars. Non-breakdown APD photon counters, in which the APD's are biased below the breakdown point, are shown to outperform: (1) conventional APD photon counters biased above the breakdown point; (2) conventional APD photon counters biased above the breakdown point; and (3) APD's in analog mode when the received optical signal is extremely weak. Non-breakdown APD photon counters were shown experimentally to achieve an effective photon counting quantum efficiency of 5.0 percent at lambda = 820 nm with a dead time of 15 ns and a dark count rate of 7000/s which agreed with the theoretically predicted values. The interarrival times of the counts followed an exponential distribution and the counting statistics appeared to follow a Poisson distribution with no after pulsing. It is predicted that the effective photon counting quantum efficiency can be improved to 18.7 percent at lambda = 820 nm and 1.46 percent at lambda = 1060 nm with a dead time of a few nanoseconds by using more advanced commercially available electronic components.

  17. The power and robustness of maximum LOD score statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Y J; Mendell, N R

    2008-07-01

    The maximum LOD score statistic is extremely powerful for gene mapping when calculated using the correct genetic parameter value. When the mode of genetic transmission is unknown, the maximum of the LOD scores obtained using several genetic parameter values is reported. This latter statistic requires higher critical value than the maximum LOD score statistic calculated from a single genetic parameter value. In this paper, we compare the power of maximum LOD scores based on three fixed sets of genetic parameter values with the power of the LOD score obtained after maximizing over the entire range of genetic parameter values. We simulate family data under nine generating models. For generating models with non-zero phenocopy rates, LOD scores maximized over the entire range of genetic parameters yielded greater power than maximum LOD scores for fixed sets of parameter values with zero phenocopy rates. No maximum LOD score was consistently more powerful than the others for generating models with a zero phenocopy rate. The power loss of the LOD score maximized over the entire range of genetic parameters, relative to the maximum LOD score calculated using the correct genetic parameter value, appeared to be robust to the generating models.

  18. Optical People Counting for Demand Controlled Ventilation: A Pilot Study of Counter Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisk, William J.; Sullivan, Douglas

    2009-12-26

    This pilot scale study evaluated the counting accuracy of two people counting systems that could be used in demand controlled ventilation systems to provide control signals for modulating outdoor air ventilation rates. The evaluations included controlled challenges of the people counting systems using pre-planned movements of occupants through doorways and evaluations of counting accuracies when naive occupants (i.e., occupants unaware of the counting systems) passed through the entrance doors of the building or room. The two people counting systems had high counting accuracy accuracies, with errors typically less than 10percent, for typical non-demanding counting events. However, counting errors were high in some highly challenging situations, such as multiple people passing simultaneously through a door. Counting errors, for at least one system, can be very high if people stand in the field of view of the sensor. Both counting system have limitations and would need to be used only at appropriate sites and where the demanding situations that led to counting errors were rare.

  19. CalCOFI Larvae Counts Positive Tows

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish larvae counts and standardized counts for eggs captured in CalCOFI icthyoplankton nets (primarily vertical [Calvet or Pairovet], oblique [bongo or ring nets],...

  20. Alaska Steller Sea Lion Pup Count Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This database contains counts of Steller sea lion pups on rookeries in Alaska made between 1961 and 2015. Pup counts are conducted in late June-July. Pups are...

  1. White blood cell count - series (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The White Blood Cell (WBC) Count measures two components: the total number of WBC's (leukocytes), and the differential count. ... and basophils) and non-granulocytes (lymphocytes and monocytes). White blood cells are a major component of the ...

  2. Counting Dropout Rate of Consumers of Durable Goods | Akomolafe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Customer buying behavior research has been a special activity in industry due to its economic, social and developmental relevance. However, summary measures such as the total buying behavior per month provides little insight about individual level of shopping behavior. This research work attempts to predict the ...

  3. High counting rate, two-dimensional position sensitive timing RPC

    CERN Document Server

    Petrovici, M.; Simion, V; Bartos, D; Caragheorgheopol, G; Deppner, I; Adamczewski-Musch, J; Linev, S; Williams, MCS; Loizeau, P; Herrmann, N; Doroud, K; Radulescu, L; Constantin, F

    2012-01-01

    Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) are widely employed as muon trigger systems at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiments. Their large detector volume and the use of a relatively expensive gas mixture make a closed-loop gas circulation unavoidable. The return gas of RPCs operated in conditions similar to the experimental background foreseen at LHC contains large amount of impurities potentially dangerous for long-term operation. Several gas-cleaning agents, characterized during the past years, are currently in use. New test allowed understanding of the properties and performance of a large number of purifiers. On that basis, an optimal combination of different filters consisting of Molecular Sieve (MS) 5Å and 4Å, and a Cu catalyst R11 has been chosen and validated irradiating a set of RPCs at the CERN Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF) for several years. A very important feature of this new configuration is the increase of the cycle duration for each purifier, which results in better system stabilit...

  4. Reducing the Teen Birth Rate. KIDS COUNT Indicator Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, Rima; Shore, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    Teen childbearing affects young people at both ends of childhood. When teens have children, their own health may be jeopardized and their chances to build productive lives are often diminished. Compared to women who postpone childbearing until they are older, teenage mothers are more likely to drop out of school and to live in poverty. At the same…

  5. Correlation study between platelet count, leukocyte count, nonhemorrhagic complications, and duration of hospital stay in dengue fever with thrombocytopenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayanthi, Hari Kishan; Tulasi, Sai Krishna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Dengue is one of the common diseases presenting as fever with thrombocytopenia, also causing significant morbidity and complications. Objectives: Though the correlation between platelet count, bleeding manifestations and hemorrhagic complications has been extensively studied, less is known about the correlation between platelet count and non hemorrhagic complications. This study was done to see the correlation between platelet count and non hemorrhagic complications, duration of hospital stay and additive effect of leucopenia with thrombocytopenia on complications. Methods: Our study is prospective observational study done on 99 patients who had dengue fever with thrombocytopenia. Correlations were obtained using scatter plot and SPSS software trail version. Results: Transaminitis (12.12%) was the most common complication followed by acute renal injury (2%). In our study we found that, as the platelet count decreased the complication rate increased (P = 0.0006). In our study duration of hospital increased (P is 0.00597) with decreasing platelet count when compared to other study where there was no correlation between the two. There was no correlation between thrombocytopenia with leucopenia and complications (P is 0.292), similar to other study. Conclusion: Platelet count can be used to predict the complication and duration of hospital stay and hence better use of resources. PMID:27453855

  6. 7 CFR 1220.625 - Counting requests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Counting requests. 1220.625 Section 1220.625... CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures To Request a Referendum Definitions § 1220.625 Counting requests. (a) The requests for a referendum shall be counted by county FSA offices on the same day as the requests are...

  7. Vestige: Maximum likelihood phylogenetic footprinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxwell Peter

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phylogenetic footprinting is the identification of functional regions of DNA by their evolutionary conservation. This is achieved by comparing orthologous regions from multiple species and identifying the DNA regions that have diverged less than neutral DNA. Vestige is a phylogenetic footprinting package built on the PyEvolve toolkit that uses probabilistic molecular evolutionary modelling to represent aspects of sequence evolution, including the conventional divergence measure employed by other footprinting approaches. In addition to measuring the divergence, Vestige allows the expansion of the definition of a phylogenetic footprint to include variation in the distribution of any molecular evolutionary processes. This is achieved by displaying the distribution of model parameters that represent partitions of molecular evolutionary substitutions. Examination of the spatial incidence of these effects across regions of the genome can identify DNA segments that differ in the nature of the evolutionary process. Results Vestige was applied to a reference dataset of the SCL locus from four species and provided clear identification of the known conserved regions in this dataset. To demonstrate the flexibility to use diverse models of molecular evolution and dissect the nature of the evolutionary process Vestige was used to footprint the Ka/Ks ratio in primate BRCA1 with a codon model of evolution. Two regions of putative adaptive evolution were identified illustrating the ability of Vestige to represent the spatial distribution of distinct molecular evolutionary processes. Conclusion Vestige provides a flexible, open platform for phylogenetic footprinting. Underpinned by the PyEvolve toolkit, Vestige provides a framework for visualising the signatures of evolutionary processes across the genome of numerous organisms simultaneously. By exploiting the maximum-likelihood statistical framework, the complex interplay between mutational

  8. Vestige: maximum likelihood phylogenetic footprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakefield, Matthew J; Maxwell, Peter; Huttley, Gavin A

    2005-05-29

    Phylogenetic footprinting is the identification of functional regions of DNA by their evolutionary conservation. This is achieved by comparing orthologous regions from multiple species and identifying the DNA regions that have diverged less than neutral DNA. Vestige is a phylogenetic footprinting package built on the PyEvolve toolkit that uses probabilistic molecular evolutionary modelling to represent aspects of sequence evolution, including the conventional divergence measure employed by other footprinting approaches. In addition to measuring the divergence, Vestige allows the expansion of the definition of a phylogenetic footprint to include variation in the distribution of any molecular evolutionary processes. This is achieved by displaying the distribution of model parameters that represent partitions of molecular evolutionary substitutions. Examination of the spatial incidence of these effects across regions of the genome can identify DNA segments that differ in the nature of the evolutionary process. Vestige was applied to a reference dataset of the SCL locus from four species and provided clear identification of the known conserved regions in this dataset. To demonstrate the flexibility to use diverse models of molecular evolution and dissect the nature of the evolutionary process Vestige was used to footprint the Ka/Ks ratio in primate BRCA1 with a codon model of evolution. Two regions of putative adaptive evolution were identified illustrating the ability of Vestige to represent the spatial distribution of distinct molecular evolutionary processes. Vestige provides a flexible, open platform for phylogenetic footprinting. Underpinned by the PyEvolve toolkit, Vestige provides a framework for visualising the signatures of evolutionary processes across the genome of numerous organisms simultaneously. By exploiting the maximum-likelihood statistical framework, the complex interplay between mutational processes, DNA repair and selection can be evaluated both

  9. The Relationship between Pollen Count Levels and Prevalence of Japanese Cedar Pollinosis in Northeast Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Honda

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: These results suggest that pollen count levels may correlate with the rate of sensitization for JC pollinosis, but may not affect the rate of onset among sensitized children in northeast Japan.

  10. How much do women count if they not counted?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Taddia

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The condition of women throughout the world is marked by countless injustices and violations of the most fundamental rights established by the Universal Declaration of human rights and every culture is potentially prone to commit discrimination against women in various forms. Women are worse fed, more exposed to physical violence, more exposed to diseases and less educated; they have less access to, or are excluded from, vocational training paths; they are the most vulnerable among prisoners of conscience, refugees and immigrants and the least considered within ethnic minorities; from their very childhood, women are humiliated, undernourished, sold, raped and killed; their work is generally less paid compared to men’s work and in some countries they are victims of forced marriages. Such condition is the result of old traditions that implicit gender-differentiated education has long promoted through cultural models based on theories, practices and policies marked by discrimination and structured differentially for men and women. Within these cultural models, the basic educational institutions have played and still play a major role in perpetuating such traditions. Nevertheless, if we want to overcome inequalities and provide women with empowerment, we have to start right from the educational institutions and in particular from school, through the adoption of an intercultural approach to education: an approach based on active pedagogy and on methods of analysis, exchange and enhancement typical of socio-educational animation. The intercultural approach to education is attentive to promote the realisation of each individual and the dignity and right of everyone to express himself/herself in his/her own way. Such an approach will give women the opportunity to become actual agents of collective change and to get the strength and wellbeing necessary to count and be counted as human beings entitled to freedom and equality, and to have access to all

  11. Procalcitonin and white blood cell count (WBC), erythrocyte ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present prospective observational study aimed to determine the correlation between procalcitonin (PCT) and white blood cell count (WBC), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) in toddlers before and after treatment. Moreover, 50 patients aged 1 to 36 months who were hospitalized at the ...

  12. Front-end counting mode electronics for CdZnTe sensor readout

    CERN Document Server

    Moraes, Danielle; Kaplon, Jan

    2004-01-01

    The development of a front-end circuit optimized for CdZnTe detector readout, implemented in 0.25 mu m CMOS technology, is reported. The ASIC comprises 17 channels of a charge sensitive amplifier with an active feedback, followed by a gain-shaper stage and a discriminator with a 5 bit fine-tune DAC. The signal from the discriminator is sensed by a 25 ns mono-stable circuit and an 18-bit static ripple- counter. The channel architecture is optimized for the detector characteristics in order to achieve the best energy resolution at a maximum counting rate of 2 million counts/second. The amplifier shows a linear sensitivity of 24 mV/fC with 50 ns peaking time and an equivalent noise charge of about 650 e/sup -/, for a detector capacitance of 10 pF. When connected to a 3*3*7 mm/sup 3/ CdZnTe detector the amplifier gain is about 8 mV/keV with a noise around 3.6 keV.

  13. Neutron triples counting data for uranium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, Stephen; LaFleur, Adrienne M.; McElroy, Robert D.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.

    2015-06-01

    Correlated neutron counting using multiplicity shift register logic extracts the first three factorial moments from the detected neutron pulse train. The descriptive properties of the measurement item (mass, the ratio of (α,n) to spontaneous fission neutron production, and leakage self-multiplication) are related to the observed singles (S), doubles (D) and triples (T) rates, and this is the basis of the widely used multiplicity counting assay method. The factorial moments required to interpret and invert the measurement data in the framework of the point kinetics model may be calculated from the spontaneous fission prompt neutron multiplicity distribution P(ν). In the case of 238U very few measurements of P(ν) are available and the derived values, especially for the higher factorial moments, are not known with high accuracy. In this work, we report the measurement of the triples rate per gram of 238U based on the analysis of a set of measurements in which a collection of 10 cylinders of UO2F2, each containing about 230 g of compound, were measured individually and in groups. Special care was taken to understand and compensate the recorded multiplicity histograms for the effect of random cosmic-ray induced background neutrons, which, because they also come in bursts and mimic fissions but with a different and harder multiplicity distribution. We compare our fully corrected (deadtime, background, efficiency, multiplication) experimental results with first principles expectations based on evaluated nuclear data. Based on our results we suspect that the current evaluated nuclear data is biased, which points to a need to undertake new basic measurements of the 238U prompt neutron multiplicity distribution.

  14. Improving the counting efficiency in time-correlated single photon counting experiments by dead-time optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peronio, P.; Acconcia, G.; Rech, I.; Ghioni, M. [Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2015-11-15

    Time-Correlated Single Photon Counting (TCSPC) has been long recognized as the most sensitive method for fluorescence lifetime measurements, but often requiring “long” data acquisition times. This drawback is related to the limited counting capability of the TCSPC technique, due to pile-up and counting loss effects. In recent years, multi-module TCSPC systems have been introduced to overcome this issue. Splitting the light into several detectors connected to independent TCSPC modules proportionally increases the counting capability. Of course, multi-module operation also increases the system cost and can cause space and power supply problems. In this paper, we propose an alternative approach based on a new detector and processing electronics designed to reduce the overall system dead time, thus enabling efficient photon collection at high excitation rate. We present a fast active quenching circuit for single-photon avalanche diodes which features a minimum dead time of 12.4 ns. We also introduce a new Time-to-Amplitude Converter (TAC) able to attain extra-short dead time thanks to the combination of a scalable array of monolithically integrated TACs and a sequential router. The fast TAC (F-TAC) makes it possible to operate the system towards the upper limit of detector count rate capability (∼80 Mcps) with reduced pile-up losses, addressing one of the historic criticisms of TCSPC. Preliminary measurements on the F-TAC are presented and discussed.

  15. Time course of learning to produce maximum cycling power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, J C; Diedrich, D; Coyle, E F

    2000-10-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the time course and magnitude of learning effects associated with repeated maximum cycling power tests and to determine if cycle-trained men exhibit different learning effects than active men who are not cycle-trained. Cycle-trained (N = 13) and active men (N = 35) performed short maximal cycling bouts 4 times per day for 4 consecutive days. Inertial load cycle ergometry was used to measure maximum power and pedaling rate at maximum power. Maximum power of the cycle-trained men did not differ across days or bouts. Maximum power of the active men increased 7 % within the first day and 7 % from the mean of day one to day three. Pedaling rate at maximum power did not differ across days or bouts in either the cycle-trained or active men. These results demonstrate that valid and reliable results for maximum cycling power can be obtained from cycle-trained men in a single day, whereas active men require at least 2 days of practice in order to produce valid and reliable values.

  16. A new cross-detection method for improved energy-resolving photon counting under pulse pile-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Daehee; Lim, Kyung Taek; Park, Kyungjin; Lee, Changyeop; Cho, Gyuseong

    2017-09-01

    In recent, photon counting detectors (PCDs) have been replacing the energy-integrating detectors in many medical imaging applications due to the formers' high resolution, low noise, and high efficiency. Under a high flux X-ray exposure, however, a superimposition of pulses, i.e., pulse pile-up, frequently occurs due to the finite output pulse width, causing distortions in the energy spectrum as a consequence. Therefore, pulse pile-up is considered as a major constraint in using PCDs for high flux X-ray applications. In this study, a new photon counting method is proposed to minimize degradations in PCD performance due to pulse pile-up. The proposed circuit was incorporated into a pixel with a size of 200 × 200 μm2. It was fabricated by using a 1-poly 6-metal 0 . 18 μm complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process and had a power consumption of 7 . 8 μW / pixel. From the result, it was shown that the maximum count rate of the proposed circuit was increased by a factor of 4.7 when compared to that of the conventional circuit at the same pulse width of 700 ns. This implies that the energy spectrum obtained by the proposed circuit is 4.7 times more resistant to distortions than the conventional energy-resolving circuit does under higher X-ray fluxes.

  17. Counting paths with Schur transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Díaz, Pablo [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, Alberta, T1K 3M4 (Canada); Kemp, Garreth [Department of Physics, University of Johannesburg, P.O. Box 524, Auckland Park 2006 (South Africa); Véliz-Osorio, Alvaro, E-mail: aveliz@gmail.com [Mandelstam Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, WITS 2050, Johannesburg (South Africa); School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary, University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom)

    2016-10-15

    In this work we explore the structure of the branching graph of the unitary group using Schur transitions. We find that these transitions suggest a new combinatorial expression for counting paths in the branching graph. This formula, which is valid for any rank of the unitary group, reproduces known asymptotic results. We proceed to establish the general validity of this expression by a formal proof. The form of this equation strongly hints towards a quantum generalization. Thus, we introduce a notion of quantum relative dimension and subject it to the appropriate consistency tests. This new quantity finds its natural environment in the context of RCFTs and fractional statistics; where the already established notion of quantum dimension has proven to be of great physical importance.

  18. Discrete calculus methods for counting

    CERN Document Server

    Mariconda, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    This book provides an introduction to combinatorics, finite calculus, formal series, recurrences, and approximations of sums. Readers will find not only coverage of the basic elements of the subjects but also deep insights into a range of less common topics rarely considered within a single book, such as counting with occupancy constraints, a clear distinction between algebraic and analytical properties of formal power series, an introduction to discrete dynamical systems with a thorough description of Sarkovskii’s theorem, symbolic calculus, and a complete description of the Euler-Maclaurin formulas and their applications. Although several books touch on one or more of these aspects, precious few cover all of them. The authors, both pure mathematicians, have attempted to develop methods that will allow the student to formulate a given problem in a precise mathematical framework. The aim is to equip readers with a sound strategy for classifying and solving problems by pursuing a mathematically rigorous yet ...

  19. Hydraulic Limits on Maximum Plant Transpiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoni, S.; Vico, G.; Katul, G. G.; Palmroth, S.; Jackson, R. B.; Porporato, A. M.

    2011-12-01

    Photosynthesis occurs at the expense of water losses through transpiration. As a consequence of this basic carbon-water interaction at the leaf level, plant growth and ecosystem carbon exchanges are tightly coupled to transpiration. In this contribution, the hydraulic constraints that limit transpiration rates under well-watered conditions are examined across plant functional types and climates. The potential water flow through plants is proportional to both xylem hydraulic conductivity (which depends on plant carbon economy) and the difference in water potential between the soil and the atmosphere (the driving force that pulls water from the soil). Differently from previous works, we study how this potential flux changes with the amplitude of the driving force (i.e., we focus on xylem properties and not on stomatal regulation). Xylem hydraulic conductivity decreases as the driving force increases due to cavitation of the tissues. As a result of this negative feedback, more negative leaf (and xylem) water potentials would provide a stronger driving force for water transport, while at the same time limiting xylem hydraulic conductivity due to cavitation. Here, the leaf water potential value that allows an optimum balance between driving force and xylem conductivity is quantified, thus defining the maximum transpiration rate that can be sustained by the soil-to-leaf hydraulic system. To apply the proposed framework at the global scale, a novel database of xylem conductivity and cavitation vulnerability across plant types and biomes is developed. Conductivity and water potential at 50% cavitation are shown to be complementary (in particular between angiosperms and conifers), suggesting a tradeoff between transport efficiency and hydraulic safety. Plants from warmer and drier biomes tend to achieve larger maximum transpiration than plants growing in environments with lower atmospheric water demand. The predicted maximum transpiration and the corresponding leaf water

  20. Undercooling and nodule count in thin walled ductile iron castings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Karl Martin; Tiedje, Niels Skat

    2007-01-01

    Casting experiments have been performed with eutectic and hypereutectic castings with plate thicknesses from 2 to 8 mm involving both temperature measurements during solidification and microstructural examination afterwards. The nodule count was the same for the eutectic and hypereutectic castings...... in the thin plates (≤4.3 mm) while in the 8 mm plate the nodule count was higher in the hypereutectic than in the eutectic castings. The minimum temperature before the eutectic recalescence (Tmin) was 15 to 20ºC lower for the eutectic than for the hypereutectic castings. This is due to nucleation of graphite...... nodules which begins at a lower temperature in the eutectic than in the hypereutectic castings. The recalescence ∆Trec was however also larger for the eutectic casting and in the thin plates the maximum temperature after recalescence (Tmax) was the same in the eutectic and hypereutectic plates...

  1. Correlation between discharged worms and fecal egg counts in human clonorchiasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Hwan Kim

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Stool examination by counting eggs per gram of feces (EPGs is the best method to estimate worm burden of Clonorchis sinensis in infected humans. The present study investigated a correlation between EPGs and worm burden in human clonorchiasis. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A total of 60 residents, 50 egg-positive and 10 egg-negative, in Sancheong-gun, Korea, participated in this worm collection trial in 2006-2009. They were diagnosed by egg positivity in feces using the Kato-Katz method. After administration of praziquantel, they were purged with cathartics on the next day, and then discharged adult worms were collected from their feces. Their EPGs ranged from 0 to 65,544. Adult worms of C. sinensis were collected from 17 egg-positive cases, and the number of worms ranged from 1 to 114 in each individual. A positive correlation between EPGs and numbers of worms was demonstrated (r = 0.681, P<0.001. Worm recovery rates were 9.7% in cases of EPGs 1-1,000 and 73.7% in those of EPGs over 1,000. No worms were detected from egg-negative subjects. Maximum egg count per worm per day was roughly estimated 3,770 in a subject with EPGs 2,664 and 106 collected worms. CONCLUSIONS: The numbers of the worms are significantly correlated with the egg counts in human clonorchiasis. It is estimated that at least 110 worms are infected in a human body with EPGs around 3,000, and egg productivity of a worm per day is around 4,000.

  2. Multiplicity counting from fission detector signals with time delay effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, L.; Pázsit, I.; Pál, L.

    2018-03-01

    In recent work, we have developed the theory of using the first three auto- and joint central moments of the currents of up to three fission chambers to extract the singles, doubles and triples count rates of traditional multiplicity counting (Pázsit and Pál, 2016; Pázsit et al., 2016). The objective is to elaborate a method for determining the fissile mass, neutron multiplication, and (α, n) neutron emission rate of an unknown assembly of fissile material from the statistics of the fission chamber signals, analogous to the traditional multiplicity counting methods with detectors in the pulse mode. Such a method would be an alternative to He-3 detector systems, which would be free from the dead time problems that would be encountered in high counting rate applications, for example the assay of spent nuclear fuel. A significant restriction of our previous work was that all neutrons born in a source event (spontaneous fission) were assumed to be detected simultaneously, which is not fulfilled in reality. In the present work, this restriction is eliminated, by assuming an independent, identically distributed random time delay for all neutrons arising from one source event. Expressions are derived for the same auto- and joint central moments of the detector current(s) as in the previous case, expressed with the singles, doubles, and triples (S, D and T) count rates. It is shown that if the time-dispersion of neutron detections is of the same order of magnitude as the detector pulse width, as they typically are in measurements of fast neutrons, the multiplicity rates can still be extracted from the moments of the detector current, although with more involved calibration factors. The presented formulae, and hence also the performance of the proposed method, are tested by both analytical models of the time delay as well as with numerical simulations. Methods are suggested also for the modification of the method for large time delay effects (for thermalised neutrons).

  3. Assessing Rotation-Invariant Feature Classification for Automated Wildebeest Population Counts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin J Torney

    Full Text Available Accurate and on-demand animal population counts are the holy grail for wildlife conservation organizations throughout the world because they enable fast and responsive adaptive management policies. While the collection of image data from camera traps, satellites, and manned or unmanned aircraft has advanced significantly, the detection and identification of animals within images remains a major bottleneck since counting is primarily conducted by dedicated enumerators or citizen scientists. Recent developments in the field of computer vision suggest a potential resolution to this issue through the use of rotation-invariant object descriptors combined with machine learning algorithms. Here we implement an algorithm to detect and count wildebeest from aerial images collected in the Serengeti National Park in 2009 as part of the biennial wildebeest count. We find that the per image error rates are greater than, but comparable to, two separate human counts. For the total count, the algorithm is more accurate than both manual counts, suggesting that human counters have a tendency to systematically over or under count images. While the accuracy of the algorithm is not yet at an acceptable level for fully automatic counts, our results show this method is a promising avenue for further research and we highlight specific areas where future research should focus in order to develop fast and accurate enumeration of aerial count data. If combined with a bespoke image collection protocol, this approach may yield a fully automated wildebeest count in the near future.

  4. Healthcare infrastructure and emotional support are predictors of CD4 cell counts and quality of life indices of patients on antiretroviral treatment in Free State Province, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, Alok; Booysen, Frikkie le R

    2010-01-01

    While many AIDS patients in sub-Saharan Africa are receiving antiretroviral treatment (ART) via public clinics, improvements in health status also depend on socioeconomic and psychological factors and quality of healthcare services. Inter-dependence between patients' clinical markers and quality of life indicators should be analyzed using comprehensive models. This longitudinal study compiled socioeconomic and clinical variables at six monthly intervals on patients receiving ART in South Africa; patients' ratings of quality of services and staff in "Assessment" and "Treatment" sites were assessed. Dynamic random effects models were estimated by maximum likelihood for CD4 cell counts and for quality of life indices (EQ-5D and Visual Analogue Scale), incorporating the inter-dependence between plasma HIV RNA levels and CD4 cell counts. The results showed that emotional support received by patients was a significant predictor (PAIDS patients and monitor healthcare services for improving their health status and quality of life.

  5. Direct design of high channel-count fiber Bragg grating filters with low index modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hui; Atai, Javid; Shu, Xuewen; Chen, Guojie

    2012-05-21

    a novel method for designing high channel-count fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) is proposed. For the first time, tailored group delay is introduced into the target reflection spectra to obtain a more even distribution of the refractive index modulation. This approach results in the reduction of the maximum refractive index modulation to physically realizable levels. The maximum index modulation reduction factors are all greater than 5.5. This is a significant improvement compared with previously reported results. Numerical results show that the thus designed high channel-count FBG filters exhibit superior characteristics including 30 dB channel isolation, a flat-top and near 100% reflectivity in each channel.

  6. Factor V Leiden is associated with increased sperm count

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Mens, T E; Joensen, U N; Bochdanovits, Z

    2017-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: Is the thrombophilia mutation factor V Leiden (FVL) associated with an increased total sperm count? SUMMARY ANSWER: Carriers of FVL have a higher total sperm count than non-FVL-carriers, which could not be explained by genetic linkage or by observations in a FVL-mouse model. WHAT......, by use of a FVL-mouse model and investigations of genetic linkage. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS: Participants were male partners of subfertile couples (two Dutch cohorts) and young men from the general population (Danish cohort): FVL carrier rate was 4.0%, 4.6% and 7.3%, respectively...... FVL carriers have a higher total sperm count than non-carriers, with an adjusted mean difference of 31 × 106 (95%CI 0.2-61.7; P = 0.048). Mice with the FVL mutation do not have increased spermatogenesis as compared to wildtype mice. None of the studied polymorphisms was in linkage disequilibrium...

  7. Single ion counting with a MCP (microchannel plate) detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tawara, Hiroko; Sasaki, Shinichi; Miyajima, Mitsuhiro [National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Shibamura, Eido

    1996-07-01

    In this study, a single-ion-counting method using alpha-particle-impact ionization of Ar atoms is demonstrated and the preliminary {epsilon}{sub mcp} for Ar ions with incident energies of 3 to 4.7 keV is determined. The single-ion counting by the MCP is aimed to be performed under experimental conditions as follows: (1) A signal from the MCP is reasonably identified as incidence of single Ar-ion. (2) The counting rate of Ar ions is less than 1 s{sup -1}. (3) The incident Ar ions are not focused on a small part of an active area of the MCP, namely, {epsilon}{sub mcp} is determined with respect to the whole active area of the MCP. So far, any absolute detection efficiency has not been reported under these conditions. (J.P.N.)

  8. A Replacement Algorithm of Non-Maximum Suppression Base on Graph Clustering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Xin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-maximum suppression is an important step in many object detection and object counting algorithms. In contrast with the extensive studies of object detection, NMS method has not caused too much attention. Although traditional NMS method has demonstrated promising performance in detection tasks, we observe that it is a hard decision approach, which only uses the confidential scores and Intersection-over-Unions (IoUs to discard proposals. By this way, NMS method would keep many false proposals whose IoU with the ground truth proposal is smaller than the threshold, which indicates that NMS may not suitable for counting the object number in images. To eliminate the limitation on object counting task, we propose a novel algorithm base on graph clustering to replace the NMS method in this paper. Experiments on faster-rcnn and SSD show that our algorithm achieves better performance than that of NMS on the object counting task.

  9. Maximum Power from a Solar Panel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Miller

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Solar energy has become a promising alternative to conventional fossil fuel sources. Solar panels are used to collect solar radiation and convert it into electricity. One of the techniques used to maximize the effectiveness of this energy alternative is to maximize the power output of the solar collector. In this project the maximum power is calculated by determining the voltage and the current of maximum power. These quantities are determined by finding the maximum value for the equation for power using differentiation. After the maximum values are found for each time of day, each individual quantity, voltage of maximum power, current of maximum power, and maximum power is plotted as a function of the time of day.

  10. Efficient Levenberg-Marquardt minimization of the maximum likelihood estimator for Poisson deviates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurence, T; Chromy, B

    2009-11-10

    Histograms of counted events are Poisson distributed, but are typically fitted without justification using nonlinear least squares fitting. The more appropriate maximum likelihood estimator (MLE) for Poisson distributed data is seldom used. We extend the use of the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm commonly used for nonlinear least squares minimization for use with the MLE for Poisson distributed data. In so doing, we remove any excuse for not using this more appropriate MLE. We demonstrate the use of the algorithm and the superior performance of the MLE using simulations and experiments in the context of fluorescence lifetime imaging. Scientists commonly form histograms of counted events from their data, and extract parameters by fitting to a specified model. Assuming that the probability of occurrence for each bin is small, event counts in the histogram bins will be distributed according to the Poisson distribution. We develop here an efficient algorithm for fitting event counting histograms using the maximum likelihood estimator (MLE) for Poisson distributed data, rather than the non-linear least squares measure. This algorithm is a simple extension of the common Levenberg-Marquardt (L-M) algorithm, is simple to implement, quick and robust. Fitting using a least squares measure is most common, but it is the maximum likelihood estimator only for Gaussian-distributed data. Non-linear least squares methods may be applied to event counting histograms in cases where the number of events is very large, so that the Poisson distribution is well approximated by a Gaussian. However, it is not easy to satisfy this criterion in practice - which requires a large number of events. It has been well-known for years that least squares procedures lead to biased results when applied to Poisson-distributed data; a recent paper providing extensive characterization of these biases in exponential fitting is given. The more appropriate measure based on the maximum likelihood estimator (MLE

  11. Effects of lek count protocols on greater sage-grouse population trend estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroe, Adrian; Edmunds, David; Aldridge, Cameron L.

    2016-01-01

    Annual counts of males displaying at lek sites are an important tool for monitoring greater sage-grouse populations (Centrocercus urophasianus), but seasonal and diurnal variation in lek attendance may increase variance and bias of trend analyses. Recommendations for protocols to reduce observation error have called for restricting lek counts to within 30 minutes of sunrise, but this may limit the number of lek counts available for analysis, particularly from years before monitoring was widely standardized. Reducing the temporal window for conducting lek counts also may constrain the ability of agencies to monitor leks efficiently. We used lek count data collected across Wyoming during 1995−2014 to investigate the effect of lek counts conducted between 30 minutes before and 30, 60, or 90 minutes after sunrise on population trend estimates. We also evaluated trends across scales relevant to management, including statewide, within Working Group Areas and Core Areas, and for individual leks. To further evaluate accuracy and precision of trend estimates from lek count protocols, we used simulations based on a lek attendance model and compared simulated and estimated values of annual rate of change in population size (λ) from scenarios of varying numbers of leks, lek count timing, and count frequency (counts/lek/year). We found that restricting analyses to counts conducted within 30 minutes of sunrise generally did not improve precision of population trend estimates, although differences among timings increased as the number of leks and count frequency decreased. Lek attendance declined >30 minutes after sunrise, but simulations indicated that including lek counts conducted up to 90 minutes after sunrise can increase the number of leks monitored compared to trend estimates based on counts conducted within 30 minutes of sunrise. This increase in leks monitored resulted in greater precision of estimates without reducing accuracy. Increasing count

  12. Variabilidade da frequência cardíaca e carga máxima atingida no teste de esforço físico dinâmico em homens idosos Heart rate variability and maximum workload reached in the dynamic physical exertion test in elderly men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suenimeire Vieira

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: Um dos benefícios promovidos pelo exercício físico parece ser a melhora da modulação do sistema nervoso autônomo sobre o coração. No entanto, o papel da atividade física como um fator determinante da variabilidade da frequência cardíaca (VFC não está bem estabelecido. Desta forma, o objetivo do estudo foi verificar se há correlação entre a frequência cardíaca de repouso e a carga máxima atingida no teste de esforço físico com os índices de VFC em homens idosos. MÉTODOS: Foram estudados 18 homens idosos com idades entre 60 e 70 anos. Foram feitas as seguintes avaliações: a teste de esforço máximo em cicloergômetro utilizando-se o protocolo de Balke para avaliação da capacidade aeróbia; b registro da frequência cardíaca (FC e dos intervalos R-R durante 15 minutos na condição de repouso em decúbito dorsal. Após a coleta, os dados foram analisados no domínio do tempo, calculando-se o índice RMSSD, e no domínio da frequência, calculando-se os índices de baixa frequência (BF, alta frequência (AF e razão BF/AF. Para verificar se existe associação entre a carga máxima atingida no teste de esforço e os índices de VFC foi aplicado o teste de correlação de Pearson (p 0,05. CONCLUSÃO: Os índices de variabilidade da frequência cardíaca temporal e espectrais estudados não são indicadores do nível de capacidade aeróbia de homens idosos avaliados em cicloergômetro.INTRODUCTION: One of the benefits provided by regular physical activities seems to be the improvement of cardiac autonomic nervous system modulation. However, the role of physical activity as a determinant factor of the heart rate variability (HRV is not well-established. Therefore, the aim of this study was to verify whether there was a correlation between resting heart rate and maximum workload reached in an exercise test with HRV indices in elderly men. METHODS: A study was carried out with 18 elderly men between the ages of

  13. Eutectic cell and nodule count as the quality factors of cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Fraś

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work the predictions based on a theoretical analysis aimed at elucidating of eutectic cell count or nodule counts N wereexperimentally verified. The experimental work was focused on processing flake graphite and ductile iron under various inoculationconditions in order to achieve various physicochemical states of the experimental melts. In addition, plates of various wall thicknesses, s were cast and the resultant eutectic cell or nodule counts were established. Moreover, thermal analysis was used to find out the degree of maximum undercooling for the graphite eutectic, Tm. A relationship was found between the eutectic cell or nodule count and the maximum undercooling Tm.. In addition it was also found that N can be related to the wall thickness of plate shaped castings. Finally, the present work provides a rational for the effect of technological factors such as the melt chemistry, inoculation practice, and holding temperature and time on the resultant cell count or nodule count of cast iron. In particular, good agreement was found between the predictions of the theoretical analysis and the experimental data.

  14. A photon counting CdTe gamma- and X-ray camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spartiotis, Konstantinos; Leppänen, Anssi; Pantsar, Tuomas; Pyyhtiä, Jouni; Laukka, Pasi; Muukkonen, Kari; Männistö, Olli; Kinnari, Jussi; Schulman, Tom

    2005-09-01

    A photon counting CdTe imaging camera suitable for gamma- and X-ray detection has been developed and tested. The current full active imaging area of the gamma/X-ray camera covers 44×44 mm 2. The camera is built of eight individual detector hybrids each consisting of a pixelated CdTe detector with dimensions of 22×11 mm 2 and solder bump-bonded to a photon counting custom-designed application specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The ASICs are realized in a mixed signal, 0.35 μm 4 metal 2 poly CMOS process. The effective pixel size (image pixel pitch) is 0.5 mm. To enable higher count rate imaging and to achieve better position resolution in X-ray CT scanning each pixel is divided both on the CdTe detector and on the ASIC into two sub-pixels with dimensions 0.25×0.5 mm 2. Every pixel circuit has two preamps each connected to one sub-pixel and feeding signal to a separate comparator. The digital pulses of the two distinct comparators are recorded by one common 8-bit counter. The amplifier offsets can be adjusted individually with 3-bit accuracy to compensate for process mismatch. A similar 3-bit gain tuning common to the two amplifiers in one pixel circuit is also implemented. A globally tuneable threshold voltage generated externally with high accuracy is used for energy discrimination. The camera can be operated both in the real time imaging mode with a maximum speed of 100 frames/s and in the accumulation mode with user adjustable counting time. Experimental data collected from a fully operational eight hybrid gamma/X-ray camera is presented and compared to simulated data. The camera exhibits excellent sensitivity and a dynamic range of 1:14,000,000. A sharp line spread function indicates the spatial resolution to be limited only by the pixel size (0.5 mm). A single pixel energy resolution of FWHM 4.7 keV at 122 keV (3.9%) was determined from measured 57Co spectra. The peak width of the spectrum combined from all pixels was somewhat larger due to calibration

  15. Tropical count of curves on abelian varieties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halle, Lars Halvard; Rose, Simon Charles Florian

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the problem of counting tropical genus g curves ing-dimensional tropical abelian varieties. We do this by studyingmaps from principally polarized tropical abelian varieties into afixed abelian variety. For g = 2, 3, we prove that the tropical countmatches the count provided in [Göt98...

  16. Is It Counting, or Is It Adding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenhardt, Sara; Fisher, Molly H.; Thomas, Jonathan; Schack, Edna O.; Tassell, Janet; Yoder, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSI 2010) expect second grade students to "fluently add and subtract within 20 using mental strategies" (2.OA.B.2). Most children begin with number word sequences and counting approximations and then develop greater skill with counting. But do all teachers really understand how this…

  17. It Is Time to Count Learning Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henscheid, Jean M.

    2015-01-01

    As the modern learning community movement turns 30, it is time to determine just how many, and what type, of these programs exist at America's colleges and universities. This article first offers a rationale for counting learning communities followed by a description of how disparate counts and unclear definitions hamper efforts to embed these…

  18. Lazy reference counting for the Microgrid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poss, R.; Grelck, C.; Herhut, S.; Scholz, S.-B.

    2012-01-01

    This papers revisits non-deferred reference counting, a common technique to ensure that potentially shared large heap objects can be reused safely when they are both input and output to computations. Traditionally, thread-safe reference counting exploit implicit memory-based communication of counter

  19. Power-counting theorem for staggered fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Giedt, J

    2006-01-01

    One of the assumptions that is used in Reisz's power-counting theorem does not hold for staggered fermions, as was pointed out long ago by Lüscher. Here, we generalize the power-counting theorem, and the methods of Reisz's proof, such that the dif culties posed by staggered fermions are overcome.

  20. Counting sequences, Gray codes and lexicodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suparta, I.N.

    2006-01-01

    A counting sequence of length n is a list of all 2^n binary n-tuples (binary codewords of length n). The number of bit positions where two codewords differ is called the Hamming distance of these two codewords. The average Hamming distance of a counting sequence of length n is defined as the average

  1. A conrparison of optirnunl and maximum reproduction using the rat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of pigs to increase reproduction rate of sows (te Brake,. 1978; Walker et at., 1979; Kemm et at., 1980). However, no experimental evidence exists that this strategy would in fact improve biological efficiency. In this pilot experiment, an attempt was made to compare systems of optimum or maximum reproduction using the rat.

  2. Maximum herd efficiency in meat production I. Optima for slaughter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Profit rate for a meat production enterprise can be decomposed into the unit price for meat and herd efficiency. Optimal slaughter mass maximizesherd efficiency which, at its maximum,can be expressed in terms of a product of powers of growth and reproduction efficiencies. Likely regions of optimality for slaughter mass are ...

  3. Prediction of Maximum Oxygen Consumption from Walking, Jogging, or Running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Gary E.; George, James D.; Alexander, Jeffrey L.; Fellingham, Gilbert W.; Aldana, Steve G.; Parcell, Allen C.

    2002-01-01

    Developed a cardiorespiratory endurance test that retained the inherent advantages of submaximal testing while eliminating reliance on heart rate measurement in predicting maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max). College students completed three exercise tests. The 1.5-mile endurance test predicted VO2max from submaximal exercise without requiring heart…

  4. Predicting of maximum forage intake capacity in cattle from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Predicting of maximum forage intake capacity in cattle from degradability characteristics, passage rate and rumen pool size of NDF. ... It was concluded that a system of describing the physical fill of NDF in tropical forages could be used to predict VFI in cattle. Keywords: Prediction of intake, tropical forages, NDF kinetics

  5. Anti-nutrient components of guinea grass ( Panicum maximum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research was carried out in 2004 in the Department of Crop Science, University of Nigeria, Nsukka. The study investigated the anti-quality factors in Panicum maximum under different N-fertilizer application rates and cutting management. The experiment was a 4 × 4 factorial laid out in a randomized complete block ...

  6. Association of Feeding Methods and Streptococcus mutans Count with Early Childhood Caries: A Cross-sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullappa, Deepa; P Puranik, Manjunath; Sowmya, K R; Nagarathnamma, T

    2017-01-01

    Early childhood caries (ECC) is a virulent form of dental caries that can destroy the primary dentition of toddlers and preschool children. The aim was to determine the relationship of feeding methods and oral Streptococcus mutans count in 3- to 5-year-old children with ECC. A cross-sectional study was conducted in children aged 3 to 5 years. Participating mothers were interviewed regarding child's demographic profile, educational level and socioeconomic status of parents, past medical and dental history of the mother and child, child's feeding habits, and dietary habits and oral hygiene practices of mother and child. Clinical examination for dental caries was done using the World Health Organization criteria (1997). Salivary samples of mother-child pair were collected to determine the pH, flow rate, and S. mutans count. Statistical tests, such as Student's t-test, analysis of variance, and Pearson's correlation were applied. Out of 150 mother-child pair, statistically significant difference in the caries experience was found between mothers and children with high and low S. mutans count. Moderate but statistically significant negative correlation was found between mean decayed, missing, and filled teeth of mothers and mean decayed, extracted and filled teeth (deft) of children with high S. mutans count. Regarding deft, there was no statistically significant difference between children who were exclusively breast fed (7.85 ± 2.94), exclusively bottle-fed (8.67 ± 3.98), and both breast and bottle-fed (7.77 ± 2.91). The mean caries experience of mothers and children was 2.66 ± 2.01 and 7.82 ± 2.94 respectively, with decayed component being maximum. Moderate and significant correlation (r = 0.5) was found between S. mutans of mothers and children in saliva. Significant negative correlation was found between mothers and children with high S. mutans count (r = -0.0284; p = 0.046). Bullappa D, Puranik MP, Sowmya KR, Nagarathnamma T. Association of Feeding Methods

  7. The impact of the preoperative peripheral lymphocyte count and lymphocyte percentage in patients with colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iseki, Yasuhito; Shibutani, Masatsune; Maeda, Kiyoshi; Nagahara, Hisashi; Tamura, Tatsuro; Ohira, Go; Yamazoe, Sadaaki; Kimura, Kenjiro; Toyokawa, Takahiro; Amano, Ryosuke; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Muguruma, Kazuya; Hirakawa, Kosei; Ohira, Masaichi

    2017-06-01

    We evaluated the prognostic significance of the peripheral lymphocyte count and lymphocyte percentage, which reflect the preoperative immune status, in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) and then compared their accuracy as predictors of the survival. We retrospectively reviewed a database of 362 patients. We classified the patients into high lymphocyte count and low lymphocyte count groups. We also classified the patients into high lymphocyte percentage and low lymphocyte percentage groups. The 5-year relapse-free survival (RFS) rate in the high lymphocyte count group tended to be higher than that in the low lymphocyte count group. The 5-year overall survival (OS) rate in the high lymphocyte count group was significantly higher than that in the low lymphocyte count group. In contrast, the 5-year RFS and OS rates in the high lymphocyte percentage group were both significantly higher than those in the low lymphocyte percentage group. A multivariate analysis showed that the lymphocyte percentage was independently associated with the OS. These findings suggest that the lymphocyte percentage is a good predictor of the OS and may be a stronger predictor of survival than the lymphocyte count in CRC patients.

  8. Maximum likelihood convolutional decoding (MCD) performance due to system losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, L.

    1976-01-01

    A model for predicting the computational performance of a maximum likelihood convolutional decoder (MCD) operating in a noisy carrier reference environment is described. This model is used to develop a subroutine that will be utilized by the Telemetry Analysis Program to compute the MCD bit error rate. When this computational model is averaged over noisy reference phase errors using a high-rate interpolation scheme, the results are found to agree quite favorably with experimental measurements.

  9. 50 CFR 259.34 - Minimum and maximum deposits; maximum time to deposit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Minimum and maximum deposits; maximum time to deposit. 259.34 Section 259.34 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL... Capital Construction Fund Agreement § 259.34 Minimum and maximum deposits; maximum time to deposit. (a...

  10. Surgical count process: evidence for patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Patrícia Scotini; Mendes, Karina Dal Sasso; Galvão, Cristina Maria

    2017-02-23

    To analyze the surgical count process according to reports of nurses working in surgical centers of a city in the state of São Paulo. Cross-sectional study with a sample of 55 nurses. Data collection occurred from August to December 2013, with application of an instrument submitted to face and content validation, composed of data on variables regarding characteristics of nurses, hospital, and surgical count process. Fifty-two (94.5%) nurses reported that the surgical count process was carried out in their workplaces. A statistically significant association was found between the surgical count process and the type of institution (P=0.046), and between the presence of a surgical technologist and the processes for counting surgical instruments (Pprocess was carried out in the studied hospital.

  11. Cluster counting in helium based gas mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataldi, G.; Grancagnolo, F.; Spagnolo, S.

    1997-02-01

    The statistical advantages deriving from counting primary ionization, as opposed to the conventional energy loss measurement, are extensively discussed. A primary ionization counting method is proposed for a "traditional", cylindrical, single sense wire cell drift chamber, which makes use of a helium based gas mixture. Its conceptual feasibility is proven by means of a simple Monte Carlo simulation. A counting algorithm is developed and tested on the simulation output. A definition of the parameters of the read-out and of the digitizing electronics is given, assuming the described counting algorithm applied to a general detector design, in order to have a complete and realistic planning of a cluster counting measurement. Finally, some interesting results from a beam test, performed according to the described parameters, on primary ionization measurements and on {π}/{μ} separation are shown.

  12. KIDS COUNT Data Book, 2001: State Profiles of Child Well-Being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annie E. Casey Foundation, Baltimore, MD.

    This Kids Count report examines national and statewide trends in the well-being of the nation's children. The statistical portrait is based on 10 indicators of well being: (1) percent of low birth weight babies; (2) infant mortality rate; (3) child death rate; (4) rate of teen deaths by accident, homicide and suicide; (5) teen birth rate; (6)…

  13. KIDS COUNT Data Book, 2002: State Profiles of Child Well-Being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hare, William P.

    This KIDS COUNT data book examines national and statewide trends in the well being of the nations children. Statistical portraits are based on 10 indicators of well being: (1) percent of low birth weight babies; (2) infant mortality rate; (3) child death rate; (4) rate of teen deaths by accident, homicide, and suicide; (5) teen birth rate; (6)…

  14. Kids Count Data Book, 2003: State Profiles of Child Well-Being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hare, William P.

    This Kids Count data book examines national and statewide trends in the well being of the nation's children. Statistical portraits are based on 10 indicators of well being: (1) percent of low birth weight babies; (2) infant mortality rate; (3) child death rate; (4) rate of teen deaths by accident, homicide, and suicide; (5) teen birth rate; (6)…

  15. A study of Association of Mast Cell Count in Different Grades of Oral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results obtained were subjected to statistical evaluation by an SPSS version 19 using Chi square test, Anova and Post hoc Tuckey tests. Results: An inverse relation was observed between MC count with grade of the tumour with maximum MC located in the peritumoural area followed by the invasive front and the least ...

  16. Kids Count in Delaware, Families Count in Delaware: Fact Book, 2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaware Univ., Newark. Kids Count in Delaware.

    This Kids Count Fact Book is combined with the Families Count Fact Book to provide information on statewide trends affecting children and families in Delaware. The Kids Count statistical profile is based on 11 main indicators of child well-being: (1) births to teens 15-17 years; (2) births to teens 10 to 14 years; (3) low birth weight babies; (3)…

  17. Simultaneous maximum a posteriori longitudinal PET image reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Sam; Reader, Andrew J.

    2017-09-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is frequently used to monitor functional changes that occur over extended time scales, for example in longitudinal oncology PET protocols that include routine clinical follow-up scans to assess the efficacy of a course of treatment. In these contexts PET datasets are currently reconstructed into images using single-dataset reconstruction methods. Inspired by recently proposed joint PET-MR reconstruction methods, we propose to reconstruct longitudinal datasets simultaneously by using a joint penalty term in order to exploit the high degree of similarity between longitudinal images. We achieved this by penalising voxel-wise differences between pairs of longitudinal PET images in a one-step-late maximum a posteriori (MAP) fashion, resulting in the MAP simultaneous longitudinal reconstruction (SLR) method. The proposed method reduced reconstruction errors and visually improved images relative to standard maximum likelihood expectation-maximisation (ML-EM) in simulated 2D longitudinal brain tumour scans. In reconstructions of split real 3D data with inserted simulated tumours, noise across images reconstructed with MAP-SLR was reduced to levels equivalent to doubling the number of detected counts when using ML-EM. Furthermore, quantification of tumour activities was largely preserved over a variety of longitudinal tumour changes, including changes in size and activity, with larger changes inducing larger biases relative to standard ML-EM reconstructions. Similar improvements were observed for a range of counts levels, demonstrating the robustness of the method when used with a single penalty strength. The results suggest that longitudinal regularisation is a simple but effective method of improving reconstructed PET images without using resolution degrading priors.

  18. High Time Resolution Photon Counting 3D Imaging Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegmund, O.; Ertley, C.; Vallerga, J.

    2016-09-01

    Novel sealed tube microchannel plate (MCP) detectors using next generation cross strip (XS) anode readouts and high performance electronics have been developed to provide photon counting imaging sensors for Astronomy and high time resolution 3D remote sensing. 18 mm aperture sealed tubes with MCPs and high efficiency Super-GenII or GaAs photocathodes have been implemented to access the visible/NIR regimes for ground based research, astronomical and space sensing applications. The cross strip anode readouts in combination with PXS-II high speed event processing electronics can process high single photon counting event rates at >5 MHz ( 80 ns dead-time per event), and time stamp events to better than 25 ps. Furthermore, we are developing a high speed ASIC version of the electronics for low power/low mass spaceflight applications. For a GaAs tube the peak quantum efficiency has degraded from 30% (at 560 - 850 nm) to 25% over 4 years, but for Super-GenII tubes the peak quantum efficiency of 17% (peak at 550 nm) has remained unchanged for over 7 years. The Super-GenII tubes have a uniform spatial resolution of MCP gain photon counting operation also permits longer overall sensor lifetimes and high local counting rates. Using the high timing resolution, we have demonstrated 3D object imaging with laser pulse (630 nm 45 ps jitter Pilas laser) reflections in single photon counting mode with spatial and depth sensitivity of the order of a few millimeters. A 50 mm Planacon sealed tube was also constructed, using atomic layer deposited microchannel plates which potentially offer better overall sealed tube lifetime, quantum efficiency and gain stability. This tube achieves standard bialkali quantum efficiency levels, is stable, and has been coupled to the PXS-II electronics and used to detect and image fast laser pulse signals.

  19. High energy resolution and high count rate gamma spectrometry measurement of primary coolant of generation 4 sodium-cooled fast reactor; Spectrometrie gamma haute resolution et hauts taux de comptage sur primaire de reacteur de type generation 4 au sodium liquide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coulon, R.

    2010-11-10

    Sodium-cooled Fast Reactors are under development for the fourth generation of nuclear reactor. Breeders reactors could gives solutions for the need of energy and the preservation of uranium resources. An other purpose is the radioactive wastes production reduction by transmutation and the control of non-proliferation using a closed-cycle. These thesis shows safety and profit advantages that could be obtained by a new generation of gamma spectrometry system for SFR. Now, the high count rate abilities, allow us to study new methods of accurate power measurement and fast clad failure detection. Simulations have been done and an experimental test has been performed at the French Phenix SFR of the CEA Marcoule showing promising results for these new measurements. (author) [French] Les reacteurs a neutrons rapides refroidis au sodium sont en developpement en vue d'assurer une quatrieme generation de reacteurs repondant a la demande energetique, tout en assurant la preservation des ressources d'uranium par un fonctionnement en surgenerateur. L'objectif de la filiere est egalement d'ameliorer la gestion de la radiotoxicite des dechets produits par transmutation des actinides mineurs et de controler la non-proliferation par un fonctionnement en cycle ferme. Une instrumentation de surveillance et de controle de ce type de reacteur a ete etudiee dans cette these. La spectrometrie gamma de nouvelle generation permet, par les hauts taux de traitement aujourd'hui accessibles, d'envisager de nouvelles approches pour suivre avec une precision accrue la puissance neutronique et de detecter plus precocement des ruptures de gaine combustible. Des simulations numeriques ont ete realisees et une campagne d'essai a ete menee a bien sur le reacteur Phenix de Marcoule. Des perspectives prometteuses ont ete mises en exergue pour ces deux problematiques

  20. Photon counting arrays for AO wavefront sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Vallerga, J; McPhate, J; Mikulec, Bettina; Clark, Allan G; Siegmund, O; CERN. Geneva

    2005-01-01

    Future wavefront sensors for AO on large telescopes will require a large number of pixels and must operate at high frame rates. Unfortunately for CCDs, there is a readout noise penalty for operating faster, and this noise can add up rather quickly when considering the number of pixels required for the extended shape of a sodium laser guide star observed with a large telescope. Imaging photon counting detectors have zero readout noise and many pixels, but have suffered in the past with low QE at the longer wavelengths (>500 nm). Recent developments in GaAs photocathode technology, CMOS ASIC readouts and FPGA processing electronics have resulted in noiseless WFS detector designs that are competitive with silicon array detectors, though at ~40% the QE of CCDs. We review noiseless array detectors and compare their centroiding performance with CCDs using the best available characteristics of each. We show that for sub-aperture binning of 6x6 and greater that noiseless detectors have a smaller centroid error at flu...

  1. Study Of Bubble-Count Measurement Of Surface Tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishioka, Gary M.; Berg, James I.

    1993-01-01

    Report presents study of bubble-count method of measurement of surface or interfacial tension of liquids. In method, gas or liquid pumped at known rate along capillary tube. One end of tube open and immersed in liquid that wets tube. Pumped gas or liquid forms bubbles, detaching themselves from immersed open end of tube, and one measures average period, Pi, for formation and detachment of bubbles.

  2. APOLLO 15 XRFS LUNAR SURFACE X-RAY COUNTS V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset contains two tables of time-ordered, raw event count rates acquired by the Apollo 15 X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometer from 30 July to 4 August 1971...

  3. APOLLO 16 XRFS LUNAR SURFACE X-RAY COUNTS V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset contains two tables of time-ordered, raw event count rates acquired by the Apollo 16 X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometer from 20 April to 24 April 1972...

  4. Anuran Point Count Species Abundance and Frequency 2001 Wertheim National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — These are summary sheets outlining the point count species abundance and frequency rates of anuran at Wertheim National Wildlife Refuge during the spring and summer...

  5. Maximum daily rainfall in South Korea

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    sponding datasets are described in section 2. The data used are the annual maximum daily rainfall from 1961 to 2001. The models and the fitting procedures are described in section 3. We use the method of maximum likelihood for estimation and the profile likelihood method for the corresponding confidence intervals.

  6. Location specific forecasting of maximum and minimum ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    But, accurate forecasting of surface param- eters, particularly maximum and minimum tem- peratures over India, is a difficult task due to. Keywords. Statistical bias correction; location specific forecast; DMO; Numerical Weather Prediction; maximum and minimum temperature forecast. J. Earth Syst. Sci. 123, No. 5, July 2014 ...

  7. 24 CFR 200.15 - Maximum mortgage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Maximum mortgage. 200.15 Section... Generally Applicable to Multifamily and Health Care Facility Mortgage Insurance Programs; and Continuing Eligibility Requirements for Existing Projects Eligible Mortgage § 200.15 Maximum mortgage. Mortgages must not...

  8. Duality of Maximum Entropy and Minimum Divergence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinto Eguchi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We discuss a special class of generalized divergence measures by the use of generator functions. Any divergence measure in the class is separated into the difference between cross and diagonal entropy. The diagonal entropy measure in the class associates with a model of maximum entropy distributions; the divergence measure leads to statistical estimation via minimization, for arbitrarily giving a statistical model. The dualistic relationship between the maximum entropy model and the minimum divergence estimation is explored in the framework of information geometry. The model of maximum entropy distributions is characterized to be totally geodesic with respect to the linear connection associated with the divergence. A natural extension for the classical theory for the maximum likelihood method under the maximum entropy model in terms of the Boltzmann-Gibbs-Shannon entropy is given. We discuss the duality in detail for Tsallis entropy as a typical example.

  9. Respostas da freqüência cardíaca de pico em testes máximos de campo e laboratório Respuestas de la frecuencia cardíaca de pico en tests máximos de campo y de laboratorio Peak heart rate responses in maximum laboratory and field tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Lima dos Santos

    2005-06-01

    atletismo y protocolos maximos en rampa de laboratorio. Todos los tests fueron hechos en intervalos de dos semanas en un orden alternado para cada individuo. antes de cada test eran asignadas la humedad de aire y temperatura ambiente. En las 48 horas precedentes los individuos fueron instruidos a no realizar ninguna actividad fisica. Posibles diferencias en la fc pico, en condindiones ambientales (temperatura y humedad relativa del aire en campo y en laboratorio fueron testeados por el test t de Student emparejado y simple respectivamente (p BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: The peak heart rate (HRpeak assessed in maximum laboratory tests has been used to determine the aerobic exercise intensity in field situations. However, HRpeak values may differ in field and laboratory situations, which can influence the relative intensity of the prescribed workloads. The objective of this study was to measure the HRpeak responses in laboratory and field maximum tests, analyzing their influence in the exercise prescription. METHODS: Twenty-five physically active men aged 21-51 yrs (28.9 ± 8 yrs executed a 2,400 m field test in a running track and an individualized maximum treadmill ramp protocol. All tests were performed within two weeks, in a counterbalanced order. Before each test, the temperature and air humidity were checked, and the subjects were told no to engage in any physical activity 48 hours before. Differences between HRpeak and environmental conditions (temperature and humidity in field and laboratory situations were respectively tested by paired and simple Student's t tests (p < 0.05. RESULTS: HRpeak values were significant higher in the field test than in the laboratory protocol, reaching 10 beats per minute in some cases. These differences may be partially accounted for a significant higher temperature and air humidity in the field conditions. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, maximum field tests seem to elicit higher HRpeak values than laboratory protocols, suggesting that the former

  10. B Counting at BaBar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGregor, Grant Duncan

    2008-12-16

    In this thesis we examine the method of counting B{bar B} events produced in the BABAR experiment. The original method was proposed in 2000, but improvements to track reconstruction and our understanding of the detector since that date make it appropriate to revisit the B Counting method. We propose a new set of cuts designed to minimize the sensitivity to time-varying backgrounds. We find the new method counts B{bar B} events with an associated systematic uncertainty of {+-} 0.6%.

  11. Charm counting in b decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buskulic, D.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Nief, J.-Y.; Odier, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Orteu, S.; Padilla, C.; Park, I. C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Girone, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Alemany, R.; Bazarko, A. O.; Bonvicini, G.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Comas, P.; Coyle, P.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Lutters, G.; Martin, E. B.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Moneta, L.; Oest, T.; Pacheco, A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rensing, P.; Rizzo, G.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Venturi, A.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barrès, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Rensch, B.; Wäänänen, A.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J. C.; Bourdon, P.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Candlin, D. J.; Parsons, M. I.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Reeves, P.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, F.; Thorn, S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Becker, U.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Schmidt, M.; Sommer, J.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Abbaneo, D.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Stacey, A. M.; Williams, M. D.; Dissertori, G.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Sloan, T.; Williams, M. I.; Galla, A.; Giehl, I.; Greene, A. M.; Hoffmann, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Bencheikh, A. M.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Calvet, D.; Carr, J.; Diaconu, C.; Etienne, F.; Konstantinidis, N.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Ragusa, F.; Bauer, C.; Berlich, R.; Blum, W.; Büscher, V.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Denis, R. St.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Choi, Y.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Nikolic, I.; Park, H. J.; Schune, M.-H.; Simion, S.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Ciulli, V.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Foà, L.; Forti, F.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Vannini, C.; Verdini, P. G.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Chambers, J. T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Johnson, R. P.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Koksal, A.; Letho, M.; Newton, W. M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Grupen, C.; Minguet-Rodriguez, J.; Rivera, F.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Armstrong, S. R.; Elmer, P.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; González, S.; Grahl, J.; Greening, T. C.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; McNamara, P. A.; Nachtman, J. M.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, A. M.; Walsh, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zheng, M.; Zobernig, G.; Aleph Collaboration

    1996-02-01

    The inclusive production of charmed particles in Z → b overlineb decays has been measured from the yield of D0, D+, Ds+ and Λc+ decays in a sample of q overlineq events with high b purity collected with the ALEPH detector from 1992 to 1995. From these measurements, adding the charmonia production rate and an estimate of the charmed strange baryon contribution, the average number of charm quarks per b decay is determined to be nc = 1.230 ± 0.036 ± 0.038 ± 0.053, where the uncertainties are due to statistics, systematic effects and branching ratios, respectively.

  12. Charm counting in b decays

    CERN Document Server

    Buskulic, Damir; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Carrido, L; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Orteu, S; Padilla, C; Park, I C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Girone, M; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Alemany, R; Bazarko, A O; Bonvicini, G; Bright-Thomas, P G; Cattaneo, M; Cerutti, F; Comas, P; Coyle, P; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Lutters, G; Martin, E B; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Moneta, L; Oest, T; Pacheco, A; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rensing, P E; Rizzo, G; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmelling, M; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Venturi, A; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Bonneaud, G R; Brient, J C; Bourdon, P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Verderi, M; Videau, H L; Candlin, D J; Parsons, M I; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Casper, David William; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Reeves, P; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Thomson, F; Thorn, S; Turnbull, R M; Becker, U; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Abbaneo, D; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Dissertori, G; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Sloan, Terence; Williams, M I; Galla, A; Giehl, I; Greene, A M; Hoffmann, C; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Bencheikh, A M; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Diaconu, C A; Etienne, F; Konstantinidis, N P; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Ragusa, F; Bauer, C; Berlich, R; Blum, Walter; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Dydak, Friedrich; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Choi, Y; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacholkowska, A; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Park, H J; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Foà, L; Forti, F; Giassi, A; Giorgi, M A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Vannini, C; Verdini, P G; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Chambers, J T; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Köksal, A; Lehto, M H; Newton, W M; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Grupen, Claus; Minguet-Rodríguez, J A; Rivera, F; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Armstrong, S R; Elmer, P; Feng, Z; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y S; González, S; Grahl, J; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, A M; Walsh, J; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zheng, M; Zobernig, G

    1996-01-01

    The inclusive production of charmed particles in Z -> bb decays has been measured from the yield of D^0, D^+, D^+_s and Lambda_{c}^+ decays in a sample of qq events with high b purity collected with the ALEPH detector from 1992 to 1995. From these measurements, adding the charmonia production rate and an estimate of the charmed strange baryon contribution, the average number of charm quarks per b decay is determined to be n_c = 1.230 \\pm 0.036 \\pm 0.038 \\pm 0.053 where the uncertainties are due to statistics, systematic effects and branching ratios, respectively.

  13. SPECT deadtime count loss correction using monitor source method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy Siman

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Deadtime-count-loss (DTloss correction using monitor source (MS requires: 1 uniform fractional DTloss across FOV, 2 high statistics MS images both with & without the object. The aims are validating condition 1 and developing a practical protocol that satisfies conditions 2 with minimal additional study duration.Methods and Materials: SPECT images of non-uniform phantoms (4GBq 99mTc along with MS (20MBq 99mTc attached to each detector were acquired multiple times over 48 hours in photopeak and scatter energy window (EW using Siemens-SymbiaS and GE-D670. Planar images of the MS alone were acquired. Photopeak counts for the MS ROIs were > 100kcts. Fractional DTloss uniformity across the FOV was evaluated by correlating count rates in different ROIs on projection images at different DTloss levels. The correction factor for each SPECT projection at every time point was calculated as the ratio of time-corrected MS count rates with & without the phantom.The DTloss-corrected projections for each SPECT acquisition were decay corrected to one time point. The correction accuracy was assessed against DTloss estimated by paralyzable model. The accuracy of projection-based DTloss correction for SPECT was evaluated. A method to model projection DTloss based on a subset of measured projection DTloss was investigated. The relation of DTloss between photopeak and scatter EW was explored.Results: The fractional DTloss was uniform across the FOV (r > 0.99, validating condition 1. The MS method was accurate to > 99% for planar and SPECT. Measured DTloss from 3-to-5 projections/detector may be used to estimate DTloss with accuracy > 98% for all SPECT projections by modeling DTloss with measured projection rate. The correction factor in photopeak and scatter EW are equivalent with > 99% agreement.Conclusion: MS method can accurately correct planar and SPECT DTloss. Sparse sampling of the projection DTloss allows acquiring MS counts with high statistics with

  14. Maximum Output Power Tracking of Wind Turbine Using Intelligent Control

    OpenAIRE

    Mauridhi Hery Purnomo; Mochamad Ashari; Muldi Yuhendri

    2011-01-01

    The output power of wind turbine is determined by wind speed. The Output power can be adjusted by controlling the generator speed and pitch angle of wind turbine. When the wind speed below the wind turbine rated, the output power of generator can be maximized by controlling the generator speed at point of maximum power coefficient. When the wind speed above the wind turbine rated, output power of wind turbine will exceed the power generators rated. In this condition, the output power of wind ...

  15. Retinal-image quality and maximum disparity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, José J.; Jiménez, J. R.; Ortiz, Carolina; Alarcón, Aixa

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate the role of interocular differences in retinal-image quality in stereoscopic depth perception. To characterize retinal-image quality, we took the Strehl ratio from a double-pass device. Stereopsis was quantified through maximum disparity using random-dot stereograms (RDS). Data were taken for 25 observers with ages ranging from 21 to 61 years. The results show a significant correlation between maximum disparity and interocular differences in the Strehl ratio: the lower interocular differences, the higher maximum disparity. No significant dependence with age was found.

  16. Furbearer track count index testing and development

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Indices of abundance can be useful in monitoring furbearer populations where actual counts of individual animals are difficult. I sampled marten and snowshoe hare...

  17. CoC Housing Inventory Count Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — Continuum of Care (CoC) Homeless Assistance Programs Housing Inventory Count Reports are a snapshot of a CoC’s housing inventory, available at the national and state...

  18. Mourning Dove Call-count Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Mourning Dove (Zenaida macroura) Call-Count Survey was developed to provide an index to population size and to detect annual changes in mourning dove breeding...

  19. Four square mile survey pair count instructions

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This standard operating procedure (SOP) provides guidance for conducting bird pair count measurements on wetlands for the HAPETs Four-Square-Mile survey. This set of...

  20. Global Population Count Grid Time Series Estimates

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Global Population Count Grid Time Series Estimates provide a back-cast time series of population grids based on the year 2000 population grid from SEDAC's Global...

  1. 2013 bobwhite whistle count : performance report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Performance report for the 2013 spring whistle count to monitor northern bobwhite abundance in Kansas state. This survey was initiated in 1998, and is preformed on...

  2. 2012 bobwhite whistle count : performance report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Performance report for the 2012 spring whistle count to monitor northern bobwhite abundance in Kansas state. This survey was initiated in 1998, and is preformed on...

  3. Calorie count - sodas and energy drinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ency/patientinstructions/000888.htm Calorie count - sodas and energy drinks To use the sharing features on this page, ... 150 Wild Cherry Pepsi 12 oz 160 Energy Drinks AMP Energy Strawberry Lemonade 16 oz 220 AMP Energy Boost ...

  4. Why calories count: from science to politics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nestle, Marion; Nesheim, Malden C

    2012-01-01

    .... They are also hard to understand. In Why Calories Count, Marion Nestle and Malden Nesheim explain in clear and accessible language what calories are and how they work, both biologically and politically...

  5. VSRR Provisional Drug Overdose Death Counts

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This data contains provisional counts for drug overdose deaths based on a current flow of mortality data in the National Vital Statistics System. National...

  6. White Blood Cell Counts and Malaria

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McKenzie, F. E; Prudhomme, Wendy A; Magill, Alan J; Forney, J. R; Permpanich, Barnyen; Lucas, Carmen; Gasser, Jr., Robert A; Wongsrichanalai, Chansuda

    2005-01-01

    .... At each site and in each year, WBC counts in the Plasmodium falciparum infected patients were lower than those in the Plasmodium vivax infected patients, which, in turn, were lower than those in the uninfected patients...

  7. White Blood Cell Counts and Malaria

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McKenzie, F. E; Prudhomme, Wendy A; Magill, Alan J; Forney, J. R; Permpanich, Barnyen; Lucas, Carmen; Gasser, Jr., Robert A; Wongsrichanalai, Chansuda

    2005-01-01

    White blood cells (WBCs) were counted in 4697 individuals who presented to outpatient malaria clinics in Maesod, Tak Province, Thailand, and Iquitos, Peru, between 28 May and 28 August 1998 and between 17 May and 9 July 1999...

  8. Adaptive and Approximate Orthogonal Range Counting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chan, Timothy M.; Wilkinson, Bryan Thomas

    2013-01-01

    ]. •We give an O(n loglog n)-space data structure for approximate 2-D orthogonal range counting that can compute a (1+δ)-factor approximation to the count in O(loglog n) time for any fixed constant δ>0. Again, our bounds match the state of the art for the 2-D orthogonal range emptiness problem. •Lastly...

  9. How to count an introduction to combinatorics

    CERN Document Server

    Allenby, RBJT

    2010-01-01

    What's It All About? What Is Combinatorics? Classic Problems What You Need to Know Are You Sitting Comfortably? Permutations and Combinations The Combinatorial Approach Permutations CombinationsApplications to Probability Problems The Multinomial Theorem Permutations and Cycles Occupancy Problems Counting the Solutions of Equations New Problems from Old A ""Reduction"" Theorem for the Stirling Numbers The Inclusion-Exclusion Principle Double Counting Derangements A Formula for the Stirling NumbersStirling and Catalan Numbers Stirling Numbers Permutations and Stirling Numbers Catalan Numbers Pa

  10. 5 CFR 1600.22 - Maximum contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 1600.22 Administrative Personnel FEDERAL RETIREMENT THRIFT INVESTMENT BOARD EMPLOYEE CONTRIBUTION ELECTIONS AND CONTRIBUTION ALLOCATIONS Program of Contributions § 1600.22 Maximum contributions. (a) Regular employee contributions. A participant's regular TSP contributions are subject the following limitations: (1...

  11. Recursive utility using the stochastic maximum principle

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Aase, Knut K

    2016-01-01

    .... We use the stochastic maximum principle to analyze the model. This method uses forward/backward stochastic differential equations, and works when the economy is not Markovian, which can be the case with recursive utility...

  12. Maximum phytoplankton concentrations in the sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jackson, G.A.; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    A simplification of plankton dynamics using coagulation theory provides predictions of the maximum algal concentration sustainable in aquatic systems. These predictions have previously been tested successfully against results from iron fertilization experiments. We extend the test to data collect...

  13. The maximum flow in dynamic networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A. Fonoberova

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic maximum flow problem that generalizes the static maximum flow problem is formulated and studied. We consider the problem on a network with capacities depending on time, fixed transit times on the arcs, and a given time horizon. The corresponding algorithm to solve this problem is proposed and some details concerning its complexity are discussed. Mathematics Subject Classification 2000: 90B10, 90C35, 90C27.

  14. Photon counting spectroscopic CT with dynamic beam attenuator

    CERN Document Server

    Atak, Haluk

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Photon counting (PC) computed tomography (CT) can provide material selective CT imaging at lowest patient dose but it suffers from suboptimal count rate. A dynamic beam attenuator (DBA) can help with count rate by modulating x-ray beam intensity such that the low attenuating areas of the patient receive lower exposure, and detector behind these areas is not overexposed. However, DBA may harden the beam and cause artifacts and errors. This work investigates positive and negative effects of using DBA in PCCT. Methods: A simple PCCT with single energy bin, spectroscopic PCCT with 2 and 5 energy bins, and conventional energy integrating CT with and without DBA were simulated and investigated using 120kVp tube voltage and 14mGy air dose. The DBAs were modeled as made from soft tissue (ST) equivalent material, iron (Fe), and holmium (Ho) K-edge material. A cylindrical CT phantom and chest phantom with iodine and CaCO3 contrast elements were used. Image artifacts and quantification errors in general and mat...

  15. KIDS Count Data Book, 1998: State Profiles of Child Well-Being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annie E. Casey Foundation, Baltimore, MD.

    This Kids Count data book examines state and national trends from the late 1980s in the well being of children in the United States. The statistical portrait is based on 10 indicators of child well being: (1) percent low birth-weight infants; (2) infant mortality rate; (3) child death rate; (4) teen accidental death, homicide, and suicide rates;…

  16. A Study of Vehicle Detection and Counting System Based on Video

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang XU

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available About the video image processing's vehicle detection and counting system research, which has video vehicle detection, vehicle targets' image processing, and vehicle counting function. Vehicle detection is the use of inter-frame difference method and vehicle shadow segmentation techniques for vehicle testing. Image processing functions is the use of color image gray processing, image segmentation, mathematical morphology analysis and image fills, etc. on target detection to be processed, and then the target vehicle extraction. Counting function is to count the detected vehicle. The system is the use of inter-frame video difference method to detect vehicle and the use of the method of adding frame to vehicle and boundary comparison method to complete the counting function, with high recognition rate, fast, and easy operation. The purpose of this paper is to enhance traffic management modernization and automation levels. According to this study, it can provide a reference for the future development of related applications.

  17. Gain Instabilities in Photomultipliers: How Accurate are Photon Counting Measurements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, W. A.; Chromey, F. R.

    1984-01-01

    Experiments performed on five commercially available photomultiplier tubes indicate that gain instabilities can be an important source of error in photon counting measurements at the 1% level. It is shown that the error cannot be significantly reduced by standard differential measurement techniques. Analysis of time variations in the pulse height distribution is shown to be a sensitive diagnostic tool for the measurement of gain variations. Using this technique it is found that gain variations occur at counting rates as low as 100 Hz. It is argued that such errors will be present at some level in all tubes. Several calibrating schemes capable of reducing the error to below the 0.1% level are discussed.

  18. MEGA5: Molecular Evolutionary Genetics Analysis Using Maximum Likelihood, Evolutionary Distance, and Maximum Parsimony Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Koichiro; Peterson, Daniel; Peterson, Nicholas; Stecher, Glen; Nei, Masatoshi; Kumar, Sudhir

    2011-01-01

    Comparative analysis of molecular sequence data is essential for reconstructing the evolutionary histories of species and inferring the nature and extent of selective forces shaping the evolution of genes and species. Here, we announce the release of Molecular Evolutionary Genetics Analysis version 5 (MEGA5), which is a user-friendly software for mining online databases, building sequence alignments and phylogenetic trees, and using methods of evolutionary bioinformatics in basic biology, biomedicine, and evolution. The newest addition in MEGA5 is a collection of maximum likelihood (ML) analyses for inferring evolutionary trees, selecting best-fit substitution models (nucleotide or amino acid), inferring ancestral states and sequences (along with probabilities), and estimating evolutionary rates site-by-site. In computer simulation analyses, ML tree inference algorithms in MEGA5 compared favorably with other software packages in terms of computational efficiency and the accuracy of the estimates of phylogenetic trees, substitution parameters, and rate variation among sites. The MEGA user interface has now been enhanced to be activity driven to make it easier for the use of both beginners and experienced scientists. This version of MEGA is intended for the Windows platform, and it has been configured for effective use on Mac OS X and Linux desktops. It is available free of charge from http://www.megasoftware.net. PMID:21546353

  19. High-speed and low-distortion solution for time-correlated single photon counting measurements: A theoretical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cominelli, A.; Acconcia, G.; Peronio, P.; Ghioni, M.; Rech, I.

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, we describe a novel solution to increase the speed of Time-Correlated Single Photon Counting (TCSPC) measurements by almost an order of magnitude while providing, in principle, zero distortion regardless of the experimental conditions. Typically, the relatively long dead time associated with the conversion electronics requires a proper tune of the excitation power in order to avoid distortions of the reconstructed waveform due to pileup and counting loss. As a result, the maximum operating rate of a TCSPC channel is now limited between 1% and 5% of the excitation frequency, thus leading to relatively long acquisition times. We show that negligible distortion (below 1%) is guaranteed if the dead time associated with the converter is kept below the dead time of the detector, and at the same time the detector dead time is matched to the duration of the excitation period. In this way, unprecedented high-speed operation is possible. In this paper, we provide a theoretical analysis of the technique, including the main non-idealities which are introduced by a generic physical implementation. The results are supported by both numerical simulations and analytical calculations.

  20. Estimation of the players maximum heart rate in real game situations in team sports: a practical propose ESTIMACIÓN DE LA FRECUENCIA CARDIACA MÁXIMA INDIVIDUAL EN SITUACIONES INTEGRADAS DE JUEGO EN DEPORTES COLECTIVOS: UNA PROPUESTA PRÁCTICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Aguilar

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract   This  research developed a logarithms  for calculating the maximum heart rate (max. HR for players in team sports in  game situations. The sample was made of  thirteen players (aged 24 ± 3   to a  Division Two Handball team. HR was initially measured by Course Navette test.  Later, twenty one training sessions were conducted  in which HR and Rate of Perceived Exertion (RPE, were  continuously monitored, in each task. A lineal regression analysis was done  to help find a max. HR prediction equation from the max. HR of the three highest intensity sessions. Results from  this equation correlate significantly with data obtained in the Course Navette test and with those obtained by other indirect methods. The conclusion of this research is that this equation provides a very useful and easy way to measure the max. HR in real game situations, avoiding non-specific analytical tests and, therefore laboratory testing..   Key words: workout control, functional evaluation, prediction equation.Resumen   En el presente estudio se propone una ecuación logarítmica para el cálculo de la frecuencia cardiaca máxima (FC máx de forma indirecta en jugadores de deportes de equipo en situaciones integradas de juego. La muestra experimental estuvo formada por trece jugadores (24± 3 años pertenecientes a un equipo de División de Honor B de balonmano. Se midió la FC máx inicialmente por medio de la prueba de Course Navette. Posteriormente, se realizaron veintiuna sesiones de entrenamiento en las que se registró la FC, de forma continua, y la percepción subjetiva del esfuerzo (RPE, en cada tarea. Se realizó un análisis de regresión lineal que permitió encontrar una ecuación de predicción de la FC máx. a partir de las frecuencias cardiacas máximas de las tres sesiones de mayor intensidad. Los datos previstos por esta ecuación correlacionan significativamente con los datos obtenidos en el Course Navette y tienen menor error t

  1. Elevated leukocyte count as a harbinger of systemic inflammation, disease progression, and poor prognosis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielewski, Piotr Paweł; Strzelec, Bartłomiej

    2017-10-24

    Total leukocyte count increases significantly in response to infection, trauma, inflammation, and certain diseases. Factors affecting leukocyte count in healthy adults include sex, hormonal milieu, genetic inheritance, stress level, diet, nutrition, and lifestyle (e.g. tobacco-induced inflammatory changes, chronic psychological stress, etc.). To date, numerous studies have reported that high but normal leukocyte counts at baseline predict increased cardiovascular and noncardiovascular mortality in older adults. Recent findings suggest that elevated leukocyte count within the normal range, but especially neutrophil and monocyte counts, may be a harbinger of increased systemic inflammation and subclinical disease. Moreover, elderly people who tend to have high but normal leukocyte counts are at greater risk of cancer, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, some other age-related conditions, and they also have increased all-cause mortality. These results indicate that strong and reliable inflammatory markers, such as leukocyte count, may reflect the rate of ageing and therefore can predict long-term survival in the elderly. Remarkably, leukocyte count correlates positively with genuine markers of systemic inflammation like C-reactive protein and interleukin 6. Interestingly, some authors conclude that leukocyte counts have a stronger prognostic ability with regard to total and cardiovascular mortality than total cholesterol or low-density lipoproteins. The fact that these inflammatory markers are clinically useful predictors of long-term survival in the elderly is quite remarkable as these blood parameters are included in routine medical check-ups. Therefore, they can be used as simple and reliable morphological indicators of chronic systemic inflammation, disease progression, and poor prognosis, especially among individuals who are likely to develop age-related conditions. Nevertheless, the pathomechanism that links elevated but normal leukocyte counts to increased

  2. Validade das equações preditivas da frequência cardíaca máxima para crianças e adolescentes Validez de las ecuaciones predictivas de la frecuencia cardíaca máxima para niños y adolescentes Validity of maximum heart rate prediction equations for children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Andrade Machado

    2011-08-01

    incrementos de 1 km/h a cada tres minutos. El test se mantuvo hasta el agotamiento voluntario, considerando como FCmáx la mayor frecuencia cardíaca alcanzada durante el test. La FCmáx medida se comparó con los valores previstos por las ecuaciones "220 - edad" y "208 - (0,7 x edad" a través de ANOVA, medidas repetidas. RESULTADOS: Los valores promedios de la FCmáx (lpm fueron: 200,2 ± 8,0 (medida, 207,4 ± 1,5 ("220 - edad" y 199,2 ± 1,1 ("208 - (0,7 x edad". La FCmáx de predicción por la ecuación "220 - edad" fue significantemente mayor (p 0,05. CONCLUSIÓN: La ecuación "220 -edad" supervaloró la FCmáx medida y no se mostró válida para esa población. La ecuación "208 - (0,7 x edad" fue válida presentando resultados bastante próximos a la FCmáx medida. Estudios futuros con muestras mayores podrán comprobar si la FCmáx no depende de la edad para esa población, situación en que el valor constante de 200 lpm sería el más apropiado para la FCmáx.BACKGROUND: There are no studies in the literature to validate equations that predict maximum heart rate (HRmax in children and adolescents. OBJECTIVE: To analyze the validity of the HRmax predictive equations "220 - age" and "208 - (0.7 x age" in boys aged 10 and 16. METHODS: A progressive maximal exertion test was carried out in 69 apparently healthy boys aged 10 to 16. The initial test velocity was 9 km/h, with 1-km/h increments every three minutes. The test was maintained until maximum voluntary exertion was achieved, considering HRmax as the highest heart rate attained during the test. The measured HRmax was compared with the values predicted by the "220 - age" and "208 - (0.7 x age" equations, using ANOVA for repeated measures. RESULTS: The mean values of HRmax (bpm were: 200.2 ± 8.0 (measured, 207.4 ± 1.5 ("220 - age" and 199.2 ± 1.1 ("208 - (0.7 x age". The HRmax predicted by the "220 - age" equation was significantly higher (p 0.05. CONCLUSION: The "220 - age" equation overestimated the measured

  3. Decreased platelet count in patients receiving continuous veno-venous hemofiltration: a single-center retrospective study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buyun Wu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A decreased platelet count may occur and portend a worse outcome in patients receiving continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT. We aim to investigate the incidence of decreased platelet count and related risk factors in patients receiving CRRT. METHODS: In this retrospective study, we screened all patients receiving continuous veno-venous hemofiltration (CVVH at Jinling Hospital between November 2008 and October 2012. The patients were included who received uninterrupted CVVH for more than 72 h and had records of blood test for 4 consecutive days after ruling out pre-existing conditions that may affect the platelet count. Platelet counts before and during CVVH, illness severity, CVVH settings, and outcomes were analyzed. RESULTS: The study included 125 patients. During the 3-day CVVH, 44.8% and 16% patients had a mild decline (20-49.9% and severe decline (≥ 50% in the platelet count,respectively; 37.6% and 16.0% patients had mild thrombocytopenia (platelet count 50.1-100 × 109/L and severe thrombocytopenia (platelet count ≤ 50 × 10(9/L, respectively. Patients with a severe decline in the platelet count had a significantly lower survival rate than patients without a severe decline in the platelet count (35.0% versus 59.0%, P=0.012, while patients with severe thrombocytopenia had a survival rate similar to those without severe thrombocytopenia (45.0% versus 57.1%, P=0.308. Female gender, older age, and longer course of the disease were independent risk factors for a severe decline in the platelet count. CONCLUSIONS: A decline in the platelet count and thrombocytopenia are quite common in patients receiving CVVH. The severity of the decline in the platelet count rather than the absolute count during CVVH may be associated with hospital mortality. Knowing the risk factors for a severe decline in the platelet count may allow physicians to prevent such an outcome.

  4. Photon-counting passive 3D image sensing for reconstruction and recognition of partially occluded objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Seokwon; Javidi, Bahram; Lee, Chae-Wook; Watson, Edward

    2007-11-26

    In this paper, we discuss the reconstruction and the recognition of partially occluded objects using photon counting integral imaging (II). Irradiance scenes are numerically reconstructed for the reference target in three-dimensional (3D) space. Photon counting scenes are estimated for unknown input objects using maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) of Poisson parameter. We propose nonlinear matched filtering in 3D space to recognize partially occluded targets. The recognition performance is substantially improved from the nonlinear matched filtering of elemental images without 3D reconstruction. The discrimination capability is analyzed in terms of Fisher ratio (FR) and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves.

  5. Benjamin Thompson, Count Rumford Count Rumford on the nature of heat

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Sanborn C

    1967-01-01

    Men of Physics: Benjamin Thompson - Count Rumford: Count Rumford on the Nature of Heat covers the significant contributions of Count Rumford in the fields of physics. Count Rumford was born with the name Benjamin Thompson on March 23, 1753, in Woburn, Massachusetts. This book is composed of two parts encompassing 11 chapters, and begins with a presentation of Benjamin Thompson's biography and his interest in physics, particularly as an advocate of an """"anti-caloric"""" theory of heat. The subsequent chapters are devoted to his many discoveries that profoundly affected the physical thought

  6. Evolution of high tooth replacement rates in sauropod dinosaurs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D D'Emic

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tooth replacement rate can be calculated in extinct animals by counting incremental lines of deposition in tooth dentin. Calculating this rate in several taxa allows for the study of the evolution of tooth replacement rate. Sauropod dinosaurs, the largest terrestrial animals that ever evolved, exhibited a diversity of tooth sizes and shapes, but little is known about their tooth replacement rates. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We present tooth replacement rate, formation time, crown volume, total dentition volume, and enamel thickness for two coexisting but distantly related and morphologically disparate sauropod dinosaurs Camarasaurus and Diplodocus. Individual tooth formation time was determined by counting daily incremental lines in dentin. Tooth replacement rate is calculated as the difference between the number of days recorded in successive replacement teeth. Each tooth family in Camarasaurus has a maximum of three replacement teeth, whereas each Diplodocus tooth family has up to five. Tooth formation times are about 1.7 times longer in Camarasaurus than in Diplodocus (315 vs. 185 days. Average tooth replacement rate in Camarasaurus is about one tooth every 62 days versus about one tooth every 35 days in Diplodocus. Despite slower tooth replacement rates in Camarasaurus, the volumetric rate of Camarasaurus tooth replacement is 10 times faster than in Diplodocus because of its substantially greater tooth volumes. A novel method to estimate replacement rate was developed and applied to several other sauropodomorphs that we were not able to thin section. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Differences in tooth replacement rate among sauropodomorphs likely reflect disparate feeding strategies and/or food choices, which would have facilitated the coexistence of these gigantic herbivores in one ecosystem. Early neosauropods are characterized by high tooth replacement rates (despite their large tooth size, and derived titanosaurs and

  7. Evolution of high tooth replacement rates in sauropod dinosaurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Emic, Michael D; Whitlock, John A; Smith, Kathlyn M; Fisher, Daniel C; Wilson, Jeffrey A

    2013-01-01

    Tooth replacement rate can be calculated in extinct animals by counting incremental lines of deposition in tooth dentin. Calculating this rate in several taxa allows for the study of the evolution of tooth replacement rate. Sauropod dinosaurs, the largest terrestrial animals that ever evolved, exhibited a diversity of tooth sizes and shapes, but little is known about their tooth replacement rates. We present tooth replacement rate, formation time, crown volume, total dentition volume, and enamel thickness for two coexisting but distantly related and morphologically disparate sauropod dinosaurs Camarasaurus and Diplodocus. Individual tooth formation time was determined by counting daily incremental lines in dentin. Tooth replacement rate is calculated as the difference between the number of days recorded in successive replacement teeth. Each tooth family in Camarasaurus has a maximum of three replacement teeth, whereas each Diplodocus tooth family has up to five. Tooth formation times are about 1.7 times longer in Camarasaurus than in Diplodocus (315 vs. 185 days). Average tooth replacement rate in Camarasaurus is about one tooth every 62 days versus about one tooth every 35 days in Diplodocus. Despite slower tooth replacement rates in Camarasaurus, the volumetric rate of Camarasaurus tooth replacement is 10 times faster than in Diplodocus because of its substantially greater tooth volumes. A novel method to estimate replacement rate was developed and applied to several other sauropodomorphs that we were not able to thin section. Differences in tooth replacement rate among sauropodomorphs likely reflect disparate feeding strategies and/or food choices, which would have facilitated the coexistence of these gigantic herbivores in one ecosystem. Early neosauropods are characterized by high tooth replacement rates (despite their large tooth size), and derived titanosaurs and diplodocoids independently evolved the highest known tooth replacement rates among archosaurs.

  8. Training Concept, Evolution Time, and the Maximum Entropy Production Principle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey Bezryadin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The maximum entropy production principle (MEPP is a type of entropy optimization which demands that complex non-equilibrium systems should organize such that the rate of the entropy production is maximized. Our take on this principle is that to prove or disprove the validity of the MEPP and to test the scope of its applicability, it is necessary to conduct experiments in which the entropy produced per unit time is measured with a high precision. Thus we study electric-field-induced self-assembly in suspensions of carbon nanotubes and realize precise measurements of the entropy production rate (EPR. As a strong voltage is applied the suspended nanotubes merge together into a conducting cloud which produces Joule heat and, correspondingly, produces entropy. We introduce two types of EPR, which have qualitatively different significance: global EPR (g-EPR and the entropy production rate of the dissipative cloud itself (DC-EPR. The following results are obtained: (1 As the system reaches the maximum of the DC-EPR, it becomes stable because the applied voltage acts as a stabilizing thermodynamic potential; (2 We discover metastable states characterized by high, near-maximum values of the DC-EPR. Under certain conditions, such efficient entropy-producing regimes can only be achieved if the system is allowed to initially evolve under mildly non-equilibrium conditions, namely at a reduced voltage; (3 Without such a “training” period the system typically is not able to reach the allowed maximum of the DC-EPR if the bias is high; (4 We observe that the DC-EPR maximum is achieved within a time, Te, the evolution time, which scales as a power-law function of the applied voltage; (5 Finally, we present a clear example in which the g-EPR theoretical maximum can never be achieved. Yet, under a wide range of conditions, the system can self-organize and achieve a dissipative regime in which the DC-EPR equals its theoretical maximum.

  9. Blood Count Tests: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spanish WBC count (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Blood Count Tests ... WBC count Show More Show Less Related Health Topics Bleeding Disorders Blood Laboratory Tests National Institutes of ...

  10. Matching the Statistical Model to the Research Question for Dental Caries Indices with Many Zero Counts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preisser, John S; Long, D Leann; Stamm, John W

    2017-01-01

    Marginalized zero-inflated count regression models have recently been introduced for the statistical analysis of dental caries indices and other zero-inflated count data as alternatives to traditional zero-inflated and hurdle models. Unlike the standard approaches, the marginalized models directly estimate overall exposure or treatment effects by relating covariates to the marginal mean count. This article discusses model interpretation and model class choice according to the research question being addressed in caries research. Two data sets, one consisting of fictional dmft counts in 2 groups and the other on DMFS among schoolchildren from a randomized clinical trial comparing 3 toothpaste formulations to prevent incident dental caries, are analyzed with negative binomial hurdle, zero-inflated negative binomial, and marginalized zero-inflated negative binomial models. In the first example, estimates of treatment effects vary according to the type of incidence rate ratio (IRR) estimated by the model. Estimates of IRRs in the analysis of the randomized clinical trial were similar despite their distinctive interpretations. The choice of statistical model class should match the study's purpose, while accounting for the broad decline in children's caries experience, such that dmft and DMFS indices more frequently generate zero counts. Marginalized (marginal mean) models for zero-inflated count data should be considered for direct assessment of exposure effects on the marginal mean dental caries count in the presence of high frequencies of zero counts. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Monitoring planktivorous seabird populations: Validating surface counts of crevice-nesting auklets using mark-resight techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheffield, L.M.; Gall, Adrian E.; Roby, D.D.; Irons, D.B.; Dugger, K.M.

    2006-01-01

    Least Auklets (Aethia pusilla (Pallas, 1811)) are the most abundant species of seabird in the Bering Sea and offer a relatively efficient means of monitoring secondary productivity in the marine environment. Counting auklets on surface plots is the primary method used to track changes in numbers of these crevice-nesters, but counts can be highly variable and may not be representative of the number of nesting individuals. We compared average maximum counts of Least Auklets on surface plots with density estimates based on mark–resight data at a colony on St. Lawrence Island, Alaska, during 2001–2004. Estimates of breeding auklet abundance from mark–resight averaged 8 times greater than those from maximum surface counts. Our results also indicate that average maximum surface counts are poor indicators of breeding auklet abundance and do not vary consistently with auklet nesting density across the breeding colony. Estimates of Least Auklet abundance from mark–resight were sufficiently precise to meet management goals for tracking changes in seabird populations. We recommend establishing multiple permanent banding plots for mark–resight studies on colonies selected for intensive long-term monitoring. Mark–resight is more likely to detect biologically significant changes in size of auklet breeding colonies than traditional surface count techniques.

  12. The Acquisition of Counting Skill in Preschooler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadir Çakır

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract- The aim of this study was to find out more information on the acquisition of counting skill in preschool children. For this purpose, children’s judgment of acceptability of a counting activity was used to investigate whether children’s counting skills are governed by their implicit knowledge of a number of counting principles. Data showed that children easily recognized the violation of one or more counting principles in a one’s application of counting principles in sequences of English and Turkish count words, implying that children have the understanding of counting principles. The sessions on counting in Turkish make it very likely that the children were responding to violations of rules rather than merely violation of well-learning of count words. These results give additional support to the assumption that there are innate counting principles that rule young children’s counting. Keywords: counting principles, error-detection task, mathematical development. Özet- Okul Öncesi Çocuklarda Sayma İlkeleri. Bu çalışmada çocukların bir sayma etkinliğinin geçerli olup olmadığı hakkındaki yargıları kullanılarak, sayma becerisinin doğuştan sahip olunan bir dizi örtük ilkeler tarafından yönlendirilip yönlendirilmediği incelenmiştir. Bu amaç doğrultusunda, bir grup okul öncesi çocuklardan videodan izledikleri bir aktör çocuğun hem anadilinde (İngilizce hem de bilmedikleri bir yabancı dilde (Türkçe yaptığı farklı hatalar içeren sayma serilerinin doğru veya yanlış olup olmadığı belirtmesi istenmiştir. Elde edilen sonuçlar çocukların sayma etkinliklerine rehberlik eden doğuştan getirdikleri örtük “sayma ilkelerine” sahip olduklarına ilişkin görüşleri destekler yönündedir. Örneğin, gerek İngilizce gerekse Türkçe sayma serilerinde, “standart (doğru sayma” serisi diğer tüm serilere göre anlamlı ölçüde “doğru” bir sayma olarak değerlendirilirken, T

  13. [B. cereus count in meat and dairy food products].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitkov, M

    1978-01-01

    Studies were carried out to establish the contamination of some meat and dairy food products with B. cereus. A total of 48 heat-treated sausages (32 perishable and 16 durable) and 64 batches of pasteurized milk were sampled. It was found that 25 per cent of investigated sausage samples contained B. cereus. Perishables proved to a considerable extent more frequently contaminated (33.3 per cent). The count of B. cereus in such products ranged from 10(1) to 10(3) per g. However, pasteurized milk was shown to be still more frequently and to a higher degree contaminated. A suggestion is made to introduce norms concerning the maximum admissible amounts of B. cereus as well as to specify methods for its determination.

  14. Energy harvesting using AC machines with high effective pole count

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, Richard Theodore

    In this thesis, ways to improve the power conversion of rotating generators at low rotor speeds in energy harvesting applications were investigated. One method is to increase the pole count, which increases the generator back-emf without also increasing the I2R losses, thereby increasing both torque density and conversion efficiency. One machine topology that has a high effective pole count is a hybrid "stepper" machine. However, the large self inductance of these machines decreases their power factor and hence the maximum power that can be delivered to a load. This effect can be cancelled by the addition of capacitors in series with the stepper windings. A circuit was designed and implemented to automatically vary the series capacitance over the entire speed range investigated. The addition of the series capacitors improved the power output of the stepper machine by up to 700%. At low rotor speeds, with the addition of series capacitance, the power output of the hybrid "stepper" was more than 200% that of a similarly sized PMDC brushed motor. Finally, in this thesis a hybrid lumped parameter / finite element model was used to investigate the impact of number, shape and size of the rotor and stator teeth on machine performance. A typical off-the-shelf hybrid stepper machine has significant cogging torque by design. This cogging torque is a major problem in most small energy harvesting applications. In this thesis it was shown that the cogging and ripple torque can be dramatically reduced. These findings confirm that high-pole-count topologies, and specifically the hybrid stepper configuration, are an attractive choice for energy harvesting applications.

  15. Analysis of dental caries using generalized linear and count regression models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javali M. Phil

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Generalized linear models (GLM are generalization of linear regression models, which allow fitting regression models to response data in all the sciences especially medical and dental sciences that follow a general exponential family. These are flexible and widely used class of such models that can accommodate response variables. Count data are frequently characterized by overdispersion and excess zeros. Zero-inflated count models provide a parsimonious yet powerful way to model this type of situation. Such models assume that the data are a mixture of two separate data generation processes: one generates only zeros, and the other is either a Poisson or a negative binomial data-generating process. Zero inflated count regression models such as the zero-inflated Poisson (ZIP, zero-inflated negative binomial (ZINB regression models have been used to handle dental caries count data with many zeros. We present an evaluation framework to the suitability of applying the GLM, Poisson, NB, ZIP and ZINB to dental caries data set where the count data may exhibit evidence of many zeros and over-dispersion. Estimation of the model parameters using the method of maximum likelihood is provided. Based on the Vuong test statistic and the goodness of fit measure for dental caries data, the NB and ZINB regression models perform better than other count regression models.

  16. Protecting count queries in study design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarwate, Anand D; Boxwala, Aziz A

    2012-01-01

    Objective Today's clinical research institutions provide tools for researchers to query their data warehouses for counts of patients. To protect patient privacy, counts are perturbed before reporting; this compromises their utility for increased privacy. The goal of this study is to extend current query answer systems to guarantee a quantifiable level of privacy and allow users to tailor perturbations to maximize the usefulness according to their needs. Methods A perturbation mechanism was designed in which users are given options with respect to scale and direction of the perturbation. The mechanism translates the true count, user preferences, and a privacy level within administrator-specified bounds into a probability distribution from which the perturbed count is drawn. Results Users can significantly impact the scale and direction of the count perturbation and can receive more accurate final cohort estimates. Strong and semantically meaningful differential privacy is guaranteed, providing for a unified privacy accounting system that can support role-based trust levels. This study provides an open source web-enabled tool to investigate visually and numerically the interaction between system parameters, including required privacy level and user preference settings. Conclusions Quantifying privacy allows system administrators to provide users with a privacy budget and to monitor its expenditure, enabling users to control the inevitable loss of utility. While current measures of privacy are conservative, this system can take advantage of future advances in privacy measurement. The system provides new ways of trading off privacy and utility that are not provided in current study design systems. PMID:22511018

  17. Effects of Point Count Duration, Time-of-Day, and Aural Stimuli on Detectability of Migratory and Resident Bird Species in Quintana Roo, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    James F. Lynch

    1995-01-01

    Effects of count duration, time-of-day, and aural stimuli were studied in a series of unlimited-radius point counts conducted during winter in Quintana Roo, Mexico. The rate at which new species were detected was approximately three times higher during the first 5 minutes of each 15- minute count than in the final 5 minutes. The number of individuals and species...

  18. Whales from space: counting southern right whales by satellite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fretwell, Peter T; Staniland, Iain J; Forcada, Jaume

    2014-01-01

    We describe a method of identifying and counting whales using very high resolution satellite imagery through the example of southern right whales breeding in part of the Golfo Nuevo, Península Valdés in Argentina. Southern right whales have been extensively hunted over the last 300 years and although numbers have recovered from near extinction in the early 20(th) century, current populations are fragmented and are estimated at only a small fraction of pre-hunting total. Recent extreme right whale calf mortality events at Península Valdés, which constitutes the largest single population, have raised fresh concern for the future of the species. The WorldView2 satellite has a maximum 50 cm resolution and a water penetrating coastal band in the far-blue part of the spectrum that allows it to see deeper into the water column. Using an image covering 113 km², we identified 55 probable whales and 23 other features that are possibly whales, with a further 13 objects that are only detected by the coastal band. Comparison of a number of classification techniques, to automatically detect whale-like objects, showed that a simple thresholding technique of the panchromatic and coastal band delivered the best results. This is the first successful study using satellite imagery to count whales; a pragmatic, transferable method using this rapidly advancing technology that has major implications for future surveys of cetacean populations.

  19. Whales from space: counting southern right whales by satellite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter T Fretwell

    Full Text Available We describe a method of identifying and counting whales using very high resolution satellite imagery through the example of southern right whales breeding in part of the Golfo Nuevo, Península Valdés in Argentina. Southern right whales have been extensively hunted over the last 300 years and although numbers have recovered from near extinction in the early 20(th century, current populations are fragmented and are estimated at only a small fraction of pre-hunting total. Recent extreme right whale calf mortality events at Península Valdés, which constitutes the largest single population, have raised fresh concern for the future of the species. The WorldView2 satellite has a maximum 50 cm resolution and a water penetrating coastal band in the far-blue part of the spectrum that allows it to see deeper into the water column. Using an image covering 113 km², we identified 55 probable whales and 23 other features that are possibly whales, with a further 13 objects that are only detected by the coastal band. Comparison of a number of classification techniques, to automatically detect whale-like objects, showed that a simple thresholding technique of the panchromatic and coastal band delivered the best results. This is the first successful study using satellite imagery to count whales; a pragmatic, transferable method using this rapidly advancing technology that has major implications for future surveys of cetacean populations.

  20. Entropy generation: Minimum inside and maximum outside

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucia, Umberto

    2014-02-01

    The extremum of entropy generation is evaluated for both maximum and minimum cases using a thermodynamic approach which is usually applied in engineering to design energy transduction systems. A new result in the thermodynamic analysis of the entropy generation extremum theorem is proved by the engineering approach. It follows from the proof that the entropy generation results as a maximum when it is evaluated by the exterior surroundings of the system and a minimum when it is evaluated within the system. The Bernoulli equation is analyzed as an example in order to evaluate the internal and external dissipations, in accordance with the theoretical results obtained.

  1. New times of maximum of CY Aquarii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuvikene, T.; Sterken, C.; Brogt, E.; Cont, D.; Henden, A.; Papadaki, C.; Volkov, I.; Wiedemair, C.

    2010-04-01

    We present a collection of 102 new times of maximum of the SX Phoenicis star CY Aquarii. These times, together with 20 times of maximum taken from the literature, lead to a new local linear ephemeris for 2003--2009 with a formally slightly shorter period than the one for 1996--2002. It will require at least another half decade of additional monitoring before any significant update to any model can be considered. Such monitoring should preferably occur at regular intervals, be done in a consistent photometric band, and at high time resolution.

  2. Maximum Entropy Learning with Deep Belief Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payton Lin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Conventionally, the maximum likelihood (ML criterion is applied to train a deep belief network (DBN. We present a maximum entropy (ME learning algorithm for DBNs, designed specifically to handle limited training data. Maximizing only the entropy of parameters in the DBN allows more effective generalization capability, less bias towards data distributions, and robustness to over-fitting compared to ML learning. Results of text classification and object recognition tasks demonstrate ME-trained DBN outperforms ML-trained DBN when training data is limited.

  3. Density estimation by maximum quantum entropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silver, R.N.; Wallstrom, T.; Martz, H.F.

    1993-11-01

    A new Bayesian method for non-parametric density estimation is proposed, based on a mathematical analogy to quantum statistical physics. The mathematical procedure is related to maximum entropy methods for inverse problems and image reconstruction. The information divergence enforces global smoothing toward default models, convexity, positivity, extensivity and normalization. The novel feature is the replacement of classical entropy by quantum entropy, so that local smoothing is enforced by constraints on differential operators. The linear response of the estimate is proportional to the covariance. The hyperparameters are estimated by type-II maximum likelihood (evidence). The method is demonstrated on textbook data sets.

  4. Revealing the Maximum Strength in Nanotwinned Copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, L.; Chen, X.; Huang, Xiaoxu

    2009-01-01

    The strength of polycrystalline materials increases with decreasing grain size. Below a critical size, smaller grains might lead to softening, as suggested by atomistic simulations. The strongest size should arise at a transition in deformation mechanism from lattice dislocation activities to grain...... boundary–related processes. We investigated the maximum strength of nanotwinned copper samples with different twin thicknesses. We found that the strength increases with decreasing twin thickness, reaching a maximum at 15 nanometers, followed by a softening at smaller values that is accompanied by enhanced...

  5. Maximum entropy analysis of EGRET data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pohl, M.; Strong, A.W.

    1997-01-01

    EGRET data are usually analysed on the basis of the Maximum-Likelihood method \\cite{ma96} in a search for point sources in excess to a model for the background radiation (e.g. \\cite{hu97}). This method depends strongly on the quality of the background model, and thus may have high systematic...... uncertainties in region of strong and uncertain background like the Galactic Center region. Here we show images of such regions obtained by the quantified Maximum-Entropy method. We also discuss a possible further use of MEM in the analysis of problematic regions of the sky....

  6. Carbohydrate counting-1: South Asian framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Lovely; Khandelwal, Deepak; Kalra, Sanjay

    2017-08-01

    Carbohydrate counting or "carb counting" is a meal planning technique for persons with diabetes for managing blood glucose levels by tracking the grams of carbohydrate consumed at meals. It has shown to improve glycaemic control and glycaemic variability and decreases risk of hypoglycaemia in persons with diabetes especially on insulins. It needs basic education of the patient regarding meal plan, assessment of carbohydrate content of various foods and also exchange lists. It also gives flexibility of food choice, helps to identify patterns in blood glucose levels and adjustment of pre meals short acting insulins as related to food intake. In this short review we have summarised basic principles of carbohydrate counting, its application in clinical practice and also exchange lists primarily pertaining to South Asian population.

  7. Colours, luminosity functions and counts of galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saracco, P.; Chincarini, G.; Iovino, A.

    1996-12-01

    Standard models for deep galaxy counts are based on luminosity functions (LFs) that have a relatively flat faint end (alpha~-1.0). Galaxy counts in the B band exceed the prediction of such models from a factor of 2 to more than a factor of 5, forcing the introduction of strong luminosity and/or density evolution. Recently Marzke, Huchra & Geller, using the CfA redshift survey sample, found that the number of galaxies in the range -16<2.5 for dwarf galaxies, we reproduce well also the observed K-band deep galaxy counts. This assumption is supported by the strong correlation we found between B-K colour of galaxies and their infrared absolute magnitude: galaxies become bluer with decreasing luminosity.

  8. Detection limits for radioanalytical counting techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartwell, J.K.

    1975-06-01

    In low-level radioanalysis it is usually necessary to test the sample net counts against some ''Critical Level'' in order to determine if a given result indicates detection. This is an interpretive review of the work by Nicholson (1963), Currie (1968) and Gilbert (1974). Nicholson's evaluation of three different computational formulas for estimation of the ''Critical Level'' is discussed. The details of Nicholson's evaluation are presented along with a basic discussion of the testing procedures used. Recommendations are presented for calculation of confidence intervals, for reporting of analytical results, and for extension of the derived formula to more complex cases such as multiple background counts, multiple use of a single background count, and gamma spectrometric analysis. (auth)

  9. Sub electron readout noise & photon counting devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gach, J.-L.; Balard, Ph.; Daigle, O.; Destefanis, G.; Feautrier, Ph.; Guillaume, Ch.; Rothman, J.

    We present recent advances on ultra low noise visible detectors at Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille, photon counting and EMCCD developments in collaboration with Observatoire de haute provence, Laboratoire d'astrophysique de l'observatoire de Grenoble and Laboratoire d'Astrophysique Experimentale (Montreal). After a review of the progress with third generation Image Photon Counting Systems (IPCS), we present the OCAM camera, based on the E2V CCD220 EMCCD, part of the Opticon JRA2 programme, and the CCCP controller, a new controller for the 3DNTT instrument that reduces the clock induced charge of an EMCCD by a factor 10, making it competitive with IPCS detectors for very faint fluxes. We will finally present the RAPID project and the concept of photon counting avalanche photodiode CMOS device (in collaboration with CEA-LETI) which is foreseen to be the ultimate detector for the visible-IR range providing no readout noise, high QE and extremely fast readout.

  10. Modeling the impact of the indigenous microbial population on the maximum population density of Salmonella on alfalfa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijgersberg, H.; Nierop Groot, M.N.; Tromp, S.O.; Franz, E.

    2013-01-01

    Within a microbial risk assessment framework, modeling the maximum population density (MPD) of a pathogenic microorganism is important but often not considered. This paper describes a model predicting the MPD of Salmonella on alfalfa as a function of the initial contamination level, the total count

  11. Ultrafast Photon Counting Applied to Resonant Scanning STED Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xundong; Toro, Ligia; Stefani, Enrico; Wu, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Summary To take full advantage of fast resonant scanning in super-resolution STimulated Emission Depletion (STED) microscopy, we have developed an ultrafast photon counting system based on a multi-giga-sample per second analog-to-digital conversion (ADC) chip that delivers an unprecedented 450 MHz pixel clock (2.2 ns pixel dwell time in each scan). The system achieves a large field of view (~50 × 50 μm) with fast scanning that reduces photobleaching, and advances the time-gated continuous wave (CW) STED technology to the usage of resonant scanning with hardware based time-gating. The assembled system provides superb signal-to-noise ratio and highly linear quantification of light that result in superior image quality. Also, the system design allows great flexibility in processing photon signals to further improve the dynamic range. In conclusion, we have constructed a frontier photon counting image acquisition system with ultrafast readout rate, excellent counting linearity, and with the capacity of realizing resonant-scanning CW-STED microscopy with on-line time-gated detection. PMID:25227160

  12. Photon counting detector for the personal radiography inspection system "SIBSCAN"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babichev, E. A.; Baru, S. E.; Grigoriev, D. N.; Leonov, V. V.; Oleynikov, V. P.; Porosev, V. V.; Savinov, G. A.

    2017-02-01

    X-ray detectors operating in the energy integrating mode are successfully used in many different applications. Nevertheless the direct photon counting detectors, having the superior parameters in comparison with the integrating ones, are rarely used yet. One of the reasons for this is the low value of the electrical signal generated by a detected photon. Silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) based scintillation counters have a high detection efficiency, high electronic gain and compact dimensions. This makes them a very attractive candidate to replace routinely used detectors in many fields. More than 10 years ago the digital scanning radiography system based on multistrip ionization chamber (MIC) was suggested at Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics. The detector demonstrates excellent radiation resistance and parameter stability after 5 year operations and an imaging of up to 1000 persons per day. Currently, the installations operate at several Russian airports and at subway stations in some cities. At the present time we design a new detector operating in the photon counting mode, having superior parameters than the gas one, based on scintillator - SiPM assemblies. This detector has close to zero noise, higher quantum efficiency and a count rate capability of more than 5 MHz per channel (20% losses), which leads to better image quality and improved detection capability. The suggested detector technology could be expanded to medical applications.

  13. Total lymphocyte count as a surrogate marker for CD4 count in resource-limited settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obirikorang, Christian; Quaye, Lawrence; Acheampong, Isaac

    2012-06-07

    CD4 testing is the recognized gold standard used to stage HIV/AIDS, guide treatment decisions for HIV-infected persons and evaluate effectiveness of therapy. The need for a less expensive surrogate marker that can be used in resource-limited setting is however necessary. The study sought to assess the suitability of Total lymphocyte count (TLC) as a surrogate marker for CD4 count in resource-limited localities in Ghana. This observational study was conducted at the Central Regional Hospital, which has one of the established antiretroviral therapy centres in Ghana. A total of one hundred and eighty-four (184) confirmed HIV I seropositive subjects were included in the study. Blood samples were taken from all the subjects for estimation of CD4 and total lymphocyte counts. The study subjects were further categorised into three (3) groups according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) classification criteria as follows: CD4 counts (1) ≥ 500 cells/mm3 (2) 200-499 cells/mm3 and (3) Lymphocyte count obtained. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of TLC 1200 cells/ mm3 to predict CD4 count were Lymphocyte count can therefore adequately serve as a surrogate marker for CD4 count in HIV patients who are naïve for antiretroviral therapy in resource-limited areas.

  14. Connection between maximum-work and maximum-power thermal cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Ayala, Julian; Arias-Hernandez, L A; Angulo-Brown, F

    2013-11-01

    A new connection between maximum-power Curzon-Ahlborn thermal cycles and maximum-work reversible cycles is proposed. This linkage is built through a mapping between the exponents of a class of heat transfer laws and the exponents of a family of heat capacities depending on temperature. This connection leads to the recovery of known results and to a wide and interesting set of results for a class of thermal cycles. Among other results it was found that it is possible to use analytically closed expressions for maximum-work efficiencies to calculate good approaches to maximum-power efficiencies. Behind the proposed connection is an interpretation of endoreversibility hypothesis. Additionally, we suggest that certain reversible maximum-work cycles depending on working substance can be used as reversible landmarks for FTT maximum-power cycles, which also depend on working substance properties.

  15. Optical planar waveguide for cell counting

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, John; Mueller, Andrew J.; Prinz, Adrian; Butte, Manish J.

    2012-01-01

    Low cost counting of cells has medical applications in screening, military medicine, disaster medicine, and rural healthcare. In this report, we present a shallow, buried, planar waveguide fabricated by potassium ion exchange in glass that enables low-cost and rapid counting of metal-tagged objects that lie in the evanescent field of the waveguide. Laser light transmitted through the waveguide was attenuated proportionately to the presence of metal-coated microstructures fabricated from photoresist. This technology enables the low-cost enumeration of cells from blood, urine, or other biofluids.

  16. Estimating Cross-Classified Population Counts of Multidimensional Tables: An Application to Regional Australia to Obtain Pseudo-Census Counts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suesse Thomas

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Estimating population counts for multidimensional tables based on a representative sample subject to known marginal population counts is not only important in survey sampling but is also an integral part of standard methods for simulating area-specific synthetic populations. In this article several estimation methods are reviewed, with particular focus on the iterative proportional fitting procedure and the maximum likelihood method. The performance of these methods is investigated in a simulation study for multidimensional tables, as previous studies are limited to 2 by 2 tables. The data are generated under random sampling but also under misspecification models, for which sample and target populations differ systematically. The empirical results show that simple adjustments can lead to more efficient estimators, but generally, at the expense of increased bias. The adjustments also generally improve coverage of the confidence intervals. The methods discussed in this article along with standard error estimators, are made freely available in the R package mipfp. As an illustration, the methods are applied to the 2011 Australian census data available for the Illawarra Region in order to obtain estimates for the desired three-way table for age by sex by family type with known marginal tables for age by sex and for family type.

  17. Proton and hydrogen atom detection efficiency of resistance strip magnetic electron multiplier particle-counting system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wehrenberg, P.J.; Clark, K.C.

    1976-10-01

    The absolute detection efficiency for protons and for hydrogen atoms in the energy range 5--60 keV is determined for a resistance strip magnetic electron multiplier particle-counting system. Significant history-dependent gain variations are discussed. The detector system is suitable for use in coincidence experiments requiring particle-counting rates to 1.0 MHz and timing accuracies of 3.0 nsec. (AIP)

  18. Maximum potential preventive effect of hip protectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schoor, N.M.; Smit, J.H.; Bouter, L.M.; Veenings, B.; Asma, G.B.; Lips, P.T.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To estimate the maximum potential preventive effect of hip protectors in older persons living in the community or homes for the elderly. DESIGN: Observational cohort study. SETTING: Emergency departments in the Netherlands. PARTICIPANTS: Hip fracture patients aged 70 and older who

  19. 7 CFR 1778.11 - Maximum grants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... quantity of potable water, or an anticipated acute shortage or significant decline, cannot exceed $150,000... (CONTINUED) EMERGENCY AND IMMINENT COMMUNITY WATER ASSISTANCE GRANTS § 1778.11 Maximum grants. (a) Grants not to exceed $500,000 may be made to alleviate a significant decline in quantity or quality of water...

  20. Hard graphs for the maximum clique problem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoede, C.

    1988-01-01

    The maximum clique problem is one of the NP-complete problems. There are graphs for which a reduction technique exists that transforms the problem for these graphs into one for graphs with specific properties in polynomial time. The resulting graphs do not grow exponentially in order and number.

  1. Maximum gain of Yagi-Uda arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojsen, J.H.; Schjær-Jacobsen, Hans; Nilsson, E.

    1971-01-01

    Numerical optimisation techniques have been used to find the maximum gain of some specific parasitic arrays. The gain of an array of infinitely thin, equispaced dipoles loaded with arbitrary reactances has been optimised. The results show that standard travelling-wave design methods are not optimum....... Yagi–Uda arrays with equal and unequal spacing have also been optimised with experimental verification....

  2. Efficient Algorithms for the Maximum Sum Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Eun Bae

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present efficient sequential and parallel algorithms for the maximum sum (MS problem, which is to maximize the sum of some shape in the data array. We deal with two MS problems; the maximum subarray (MSA problem and the maximum convex sum (MCS problem. In the MSA problem, we find a rectangular part within the given data array that maximizes the sum in it. The MCS problem is to find a convex shape rather than a rectangular shape that maximizes the sum. Thus, MCS is a generalization of MSA. For the MSA problem, O ( n time parallel algorithms are already known on an ( n , n 2D array of processors. We improve the communication steps from 2 n − 1 to n, which is optimal. For the MCS problem, we achieve the asymptotic time bound of O ( n on an ( n , n 2D array of processors. We provide rigorous proofs for the correctness of our parallel algorithm based on Hoare logic and also provide some experimental results of our algorithm that are gathered from the Blue Gene/P super computer. Furthermore, we briefly describe how to compute the actual shape of the maximum convex sum.

  3. Global characterization of the Holocene Thermal Maximum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renssen, H.; Seppä, H.; Crosta, X.; Goosse, H.; Roche, D.M.V.A.P.

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the global variations in the timing and magnitude of the Holocene Thermal Maximum (HTM) and their dependence on various forcings in transient simulations covering the last 9000 years (9 ka), performed with a global atmosphere-ocean-vegetation model. In these experiments, we consider the

  4. Multi-Channel Maximum Likelihood Pitch Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mads Græsbøll

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a method for multi-channel pitch estimation is proposed. The method is a maximum likelihood estimator and is based on a parametric model where the signals in the various channels share the same fundamental frequency but can have different amplitudes, phases, and noise characteristi...

  5. Neonatal Maximum Thigh Circumference Tape: An Alternative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: Using the cut-off values obtained, the neonates were categorized into three risk groups (“high risk”, “moderate risk”, and “low risk”), and a tricoloured MTC Tape was subsequently designed, using these inferences. Key words: Maximum thigh circumference, low birth weight, indicator. Nigerian Journal of ...

  6. Comparing maximum pressures in internal combustion engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrow, Stanwood W; Lee, Stephen M

    1922-01-01

    Thin metal diaphragms form a satisfactory means for comparing maximum pressures in internal combustion engines. The diaphragm is clamped between two metal washers in a spark plug shell and its thickness is chosen such that, when subjected to explosion pressure, the exposed portion will be sheared from the rim in a short time.

  7. Location specific forecasting of maximum and minimum ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Statistical bias correction; location specific forecast; DMO; Numerical Weather Prediction; maximum and minimum temperature forecast. Abstract. The output from Global Forecasting System (GFS) T574L64 operational at India Meteorological Department (IMD), New Delhi is used for obtaining location specific quantitative ...

  8. PARTICLE SWARM OPTIMIZATION BASED OF THE MAXIMUM ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-06-30

    Jun 30, 2010 ... systems from one hand and because of the instantaneous change of both insulation and temperature ... dealing accurately with these optimization problems and to overcome the incapacities of the traditional ... Series resistance RS, which gives a more accurate shape between the maximum power point ...

  9. Single-photon counting multicolor multiphoton fluorescence microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buehler, Christof; Kim, Ki H; Greuter, Urs; Schlumpf, Nick; So, Peter T C

    2005-01-01

    We present a multicolor multiphoton fluorescence microscope with single-photon counting sensitivity. The system integrates a standard multiphoton fluorescence microscope, an optical grating spectrograph operating in the UV-Vis wavelength region, and a 16-anode photomultiplier tube (PMT). The major technical innovation is in the development of a multichannel photon counting card (mC-PhCC) for direct signal collection from multi-anode PMTs. The electronic design of the mC-PhCC employs a high-throughput, fully-parallel, single-photon counting scheme along with a high-speed electrical or fiber-optical link interface to the data acquisition computer. There is no electronic crosstalk among the detection channels of the mC-PhCC. The collected signal remains linear up to an incident photon rate of 10(8) counts per second. The high-speed data interface offers ample bandwidth for real-time readout: 2 MByte lambda-stacks composed of 16 spectral channels, 256 x 256 pixel image with 12-bit dynamic range can be transferred at 30 frames per second. The modular design of the mC-PhCC can be readily extended to accommodate PMTs of more anodes. Data acquisition from a 64-anode PMT has been verified. As a demonstration of system performance, spectrally resolved images of fluorescent latex spheres and ex-vivo human skin are reported. The multicolor multiphoton microscope is suitable for highly sensitive, real-time, spectrally-resolved three-dimensional imaging in biomedical applications.

  10. HIV in South Africa - depression and CD4 count

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M YH Moosa

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Published studies on the prevalence of depressive symptoms using rating scales and the relationship between depression and immune status offer inconsistent results. Depressive symptoms are common and impact on functioning, quality of life, and health status, highlighting the importance of diagnosis and treatment of patients with HIV infection. The aim of the study was to determine the occurrence of depression among HIV-positive patients using the Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI and to determine a relationship, if any, between depressive symptoms and CD4 count. Method. Forty-one patients aged 18 years or more were recruited from the HIV outpatient clinic. All the subjects completed the 21-item BDI and their CD4 counts were determined. Patients who had a score of 10 or more on the BDI were considered positive for a depressive disorder. Results. More than half (56% of the study sample had a BDI of ≥ 10 indicating significant symptoms of depression. There was no significant difference in the CD4 counts between the depressed and non-depressed groups (p > 0.05, and no correlation between CD4 counts and BDI scores in the total study sample (r = 0.27, p > 0.05. The affective components of the BDI contributed significantly to the overall BDI score compared with the somatic component (p < 0.05. Conclusion. The evidence from the study supports the BDI as a suitable measure for identifying those patients who meet the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM criteria for minor or major depression. The HIV epidemic is the most serious health challenge in South Africa and it is imperative that HIV-infected patients who complain of fatigue or insomnia be screened routinely for major depression, followed by a structured interview to confirm the diagnosis.

  11. Elevated CD8 counts during HAART are associated with HIV virologic treatment failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krantz, Elizabeth M; Hullsiek, Katherine Huppler; Okulicz, Jason F; Weintrob, Amy C; Agan, Brian K; Crum-Cianflone, Nancy F; Ganesan, Anuradha; Ferguson, Tomas M; Hale, Braden R

    2011-08-15

    To evaluate whether elevated CD8 counts are associated with increased risk of virologic treatment failure in HIV-infected individuals. Retrospective cohort study. US Military HIV Natural History Study participants who initiated highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in 1996-2008 had 6- and 12-month post-HAART HIV RNA start of HAART, virologic failure (VF) was defined as confirmed HIV RNA ≥ 400 copies per milliliter, and CD8 counts ≥ 1200 cells per cubic millimeter were considered elevated. Cox models were used to examine the effect of baseline and time-updated CD8 counts on VF. There were 216 failures for a rate of 5.6 per 100 person-years [95% confidence interval (CI): 4.9 to 6.4]. Among those initiating HAART in 2000-2008, the participants with elevated baseline CD8 counts had significantly greater risk of VF compared with those with baseline CD8 counts ≤ 600 cells per cubic millimeter [hazard ratio (HR) = 2.68, 95% CI: 1.13 to 6.35]. The participants with elevated CD8 counts at >20% of previous 6-month follow-up visits had a greater risk of failure at the current visit than those who did not (HR = 1.53, 95% CI: 1.14 to 2.06). Those with CD8 counts that increased after the start of HAART had a greater risk of failure than those with CD8 counts that decreased or remained the same (HR = 1.59, 95% CI: 1.19 to 2.13). Initial or serial elevated CD8 counts while on HAART or an increase in CD8 counts from HAART initiation may be early warnings for future treatment failure.

  12. Statistical tests to compare motif count exceptionalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandewalle Vincent

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Finding over- or under-represented motifs in biological sequences is now a common task in genomics. Thanks to p-value calculation for motif counts, exceptional motifs are identified and represent candidate functional motifs. The present work addresses the related question of comparing the exceptionality of one motif in two different sequences. Just comparing the motif count p-values in each sequence is indeed not sufficient to decide if this motif is significantly more exceptional in one sequence compared to the other one. A statistical test is required. Results We develop and analyze two statistical tests, an exact binomial one and an asymptotic likelihood ratio test, to decide whether the exceptionality of a given motif is equivalent or significantly different in two sequences of interest. For that purpose, motif occurrences are modeled by Poisson processes, with a special care for overlapping motifs. Both tests can take the sequence compositions into account. As an illustration, we compare the octamer exceptionalities in the Escherichia coli K-12 backbone versus variable strain-specific loops. Conclusion The exact binomial test is particularly adapted for small counts. For large counts, we advise to use the likelihood ratio test which is asymptotic but strongly correlated with the exact binomial test and very simple to use.

  13. Counting Women's Work in Vietnam | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2017-07-31

    Jul 31, 2017 ... “The success of women's entrepreneurship and economic participation, as well as national efforts to improve gender equality, is an example to other countries in the region.” Globally, methodologies to count women's work are essential to achieving Sustainable Development Goal 5 on gender equality and ...

  14. ESL Proficiency and a Word Frequency Count.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlech-Jones, Brian

    1983-01-01

    In a study of the vocabulary proficiency of some South African ESL teacher trainees, the General Service List of English Words' validity was evaluated. It was found that mastery of this list would meet most of the vocabulary needs of the test group. Recommendations are made for practical uses of word counts. (MSE)

  15. Photon Counting Chirped Amplitude Modulation Ladar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    a computer simulation of the photon counting chirped AM ladar technique in MathCAD * and presented results from the computer simulation using a two... MathCAD is a trademark of Mathsoft Inc. 4 Figure 3. Magnitude spectrum of the IF waveform from the first chirped AM

  16. Differential white cell count by centrifugal microfluidics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommer, Gregory Jon; Tentori, Augusto M.; Schaff, Ulrich Y.

    2010-07-01

    We present a method for counting white blood cells that is uniquely compatible with centrifugation based microfluidics. Blood is deposited on top of one or more layers of density media within a microfluidic disk. Spinning the disk causes the cell populations within whole blood to settle through the media, reaching an equilibrium based on the density of each cell type. Separation and fluorescence measurement of cell types stained with a DNA dye is demonstrated using this technique. The integrated signal from bands of fluorescent microspheres is shown to be proportional to their initial concentration in suspension. Among the current generation of medical diagnostics are devices based on the principle of centrifuging a CD sized disk functionalized with microfluidics. These portable 'lab on a disk' devices are capable of conducting multiple assays directly from a blood sample, embodied by platforms developed by Gyros, Samsung, and Abaxis. [1,2] However, no centrifugal platform to date includes a differential white blood cell count, which is an important metric complimentary to diagnostic assays. Measuring the differential white blood cell count (the relative fraction of granulocytes, lymphocytes, and monocytes) is a standard medical diagnostic technique useful for identifying sepsis, leukemia, AIDS, radiation exposure, and a host of other conditions that affect the immune system. Several methods exist for measuring the relative white blood cell count including flow cytometry, electrical impedance, and visual identification from a stained drop of blood under a microscope. However, none of these methods is easily incorporated into a centrifugal microfluidic diagnostic platform.

  17. Stalking the count. Dracula, Fandom and Tourism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.L. Reijnders (Stijn)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractLarge numbers of tourists travel to Transylvania every year, looking for traces of Count Dracula. This article investigates why people feel the need to connect fictional stories, such as Dracula, with identifiable physical locations, and why they subsequently want to visit these

  18. Counting Processes for Retail Default Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiefer, Nicholas Maximilian; Larson, C. Erik

    in a discrete state space. In a simple case, the states could be default/non-default; in other models relevant for credit modeling the states could be credit scores or payment status (30 dpd, 60 dpd, etc.). Here we focus on the use of stochastic counting processes for mortgage default modeling, using data...

  19. Maine KIDS COUNT 2002 Data Book.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maine Children's Alliance, Augusta.

    This KIDS COUNT data book details statewide trends in the well-being of Maine's children. Following a brief overview of the data book and a summary of indicators, state trend data are presented in the areas of: (1) poverty; (2) child and adolescent suicide; (3) public high school dropouts; (4) teen pregnancy; (5) public high school graduates…

  20. Reduced Component Count RGB LED Driver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Pedro, I.; Ackermann, B.

    2008-01-01

    The goal of this master thesis is to develop new drive and contrololutions, for creating white light from mixing the light of different-color LEDs, aiming at a reduced component count resulting in less space required by the electronics and lower cost. It evaluates the LED driver concept proposed in