WorldWideScience

Sample records for maximum 1-y dose

  1. Maximum permissible dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    This chapter presents a historic overview of the establishment of radiation guidelines by various national and international agencies. The use of maximum permissible dose and maximum permissible body burden limits to derive working standards is discussed

  2. Maximum likelihood estimation for cytogenetic dose-response curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frome, E.L; DuFrain, R.J.

    1983-10-01

    In vitro dose-response curves are used to describe the relation between the yield of dicentric chromosome aberrations and radiation dose for human lymphocytes. The dicentric yields follow the Poisson distribution, and the expected yield depends on both the magnitude and the temporal distribution of the dose for low LET radiation. A general dose-response model that describes this relation has been obtained by Kellerer and Rossi using the theory of dual radiation action. The yield of elementary lesions is kappa[γd + g(t, tau)d 2 ], where t is the time and d is dose. The coefficient of the d 2 term is determined by the recovery function and the temporal mode of irradiation. Two special cases of practical interest are split-dose and continuous exposure experiments, and the resulting models are intrinsically nonlinear in the parameters. A general purpose maximum likelihood estimation procedure is described and illustrated with numerical examples from both experimental designs. Poisson regression analysis is used for estimation, hypothesis testing, and regression diagnostics. Results are discussed in the context of exposure assessment procedures for both acute and chronic human radiation exposure

  3. Maximum likelihood estimation for cytogenetic dose-response curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frome, E.L.; DuFrain, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    In vitro dose-response curves are used to describe the relation between chromosome aberrations and radiation dose for human lymphocytes. The lymphocytes are exposed to low-LET radiation, and the resulting dicentric chromosome aberrations follow the Poisson distribution. The expected yield depends on both the magnitude and the temporal distribution of the dose. A general dose-response model that describes this relation has been presented by Kellerer and Rossi (1972, Current Topics on Radiation Research Quarterly 8, 85-158; 1978, Radiation Research 75, 471-488) using the theory of dual radiation action. Two special cases of practical interest are split-dose and continuous exposure experiments, and the resulting dose-time-response models are intrinsically nonlinear in the parameters. A general-purpose maximum likelihood estimation procedure is described, and estimation for the nonlinear models is illustrated with numerical examples from both experimental designs. Poisson regression analysis is used for estimation, hypothesis testing, and regression diagnostics. Results are discussed in the context of exposure assessment procedures for both acute and chronic human radiation exposure

  4. Maximum likelihood estimation for cytogenetic dose-response curves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frome, E.L; DuFrain, R.J.

    1983-10-01

    In vitro dose-response curves are used to describe the relation between the yield of dicentric chromosome aberrations and radiation dose for human lymphocytes. The dicentric yields follow the Poisson distribution, and the expected yield depends on both the magnitude and the temporal distribution of the dose for low LET radiation. A general dose-response model that describes this relation has been obtained by Kellerer and Rossi using the theory of dual radiation action. The yield of elementary lesions is kappa(..gamma..d + g(t, tau)d/sup 2/), where t is the time and d is dose. The coefficient of the d/sup 2/ term is determined by the recovery function and the temporal mode of irradiation. Two special cases of practical interest are split-dose and continuous exposure experiments, and the resulting models are intrinsically nonlinear in the parameters. A general purpose maximum likelihood estimation procedure is described and illustrated with numerical examples from both experimental designs. Poisson regression analysis is used for estimation, hypothesis testing, and regression diagnostics. Results are discussed in the context of exposure assessment procedures for both acute and chronic human radiation exposure.

  5. Savannah River Site radioiodine atmospheric releases and offsite maximum doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marter, W.L.

    1990-01-01

    Radioisotopes of iodine have been released to the atmosphere from the Savannah River Site since 1955. The releases, mostly from the 200-F and 200-H Chemical Separations areas, consist of the isotopes, I-129 and 1-131. Small amounts of 1-131 and 1-133 have also been released from reactor facilities and the Savannah River Laboratory. This reference memorandum was issued to summarize our current knowledge of releases of radioiodines and resultant maximum offsite doses. This memorandum supplements the reference memorandum by providing more detailed supporting technical information. Doses reported in this memorandum from consumption of the milk containing the highest I-131 concentration following the 1961 1-131 release incident are about 1% higher than reported in the reference memorandum. This is the result of using unrounded 1-131 concentrations of I-131 in milk in this memo. It is emphasized here that this technical report does not constitute a dose reconstruction in the same sense as the dose reconstruction effort currently underway at Hanford. This report uses existing published data for radioiodine releases and existing transport and dosimetry models

  6. Hazards and maximum permissible doses of radiation for man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walinder, G.

    1977-11-01

    Maximum permissible dose levels are primarely based on risks for genetic damage and cancer. The reason for this is the observation that such late effects of radiation seem to arise even after doses that are to low to give rise to acute effects. In contrast to the tumour incidence found in irradiated human populations no genetic effects of radiation have been observed in man. This does not mean that genetic effects have not been induced but that it has been impossible to find an increase or to discern them among all the congenital defects, that can not be ascribed to the irradiation. As a consequence, the radiological risk estimation has been concentrated on the hazard of malignant diseases. Tumour risks are generally expressed as excess rates of incidence and mortality per million persons per rem. These figures are, however, not obtained from direct epidemiological observations but have been calculated from such data under the assumption of a linear relationship between effect and radiation dose. This formal extrapolation of observed data involves an uncertainty which, of course, is proportionately greater for the calculated effects in the millirem range. However, although the calculated tumour risks can not be said to be founded on direct scientific evidence, there are scientific reasons to believe that the figures derived from the formal extrapolations constitute an upper limit of possible ri02050

  7. Evaluating the maximum patient radiation dose in cardiac interventional procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, M.; Chida, K.; Sato, T.; Oosaka, H.; Tosa, T.; Kadowaki, K.

    2011-01-01

    Many of the X-ray systems that are used for cardiac interventional radiology provide no way to evaluate the patient maximum skin dose (MSD). The authors report a new method for evaluating the MSD by using the cumulative patient entrance skin dose (ESD), which includes a back-scatter factor and the number of cine-angiography frames during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Four hundred consecutive PCI patients (315 men and 85 women) were studied. The correlation between the cumulative ESD and number of cine-angiography frames was investigated. The irradiation and overlapping fields were verified using dose-mapping software. A good correlation was found between the cumulative ESD and the number of cine-angiography frames. The MSD could be estimated using the proportion of cine-angiography frames used for the main angle of view relative to the total number of cine-angiography frames and multiplying this by the cumulative ESD. The average MSD (3.0±1.9 Gy) was lower than the average cumulative ESD (4.6±2.6 Gy). This method is an easy way to estimate the MSD during PCI. (authors)

  8. Benefits of the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and maximum tolerated concentration (MTC) concept in aquatic toxicology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchinson, Thomas H.; Boegi, Christian; Winter, Matthew J.; Owens, J. Willie

    2009-01-01

    There is increasing recognition of the need to identify specific sublethal effects of chemicals, such as reproductive toxicity, and specific modes of actions of the chemicals, such as interference with the endocrine system. To achieve these aims requires criteria which provide a basis to interpret study findings so as to separate these specific toxicities and modes of action from not only acute lethality per se but also from severe inanition and malaise that non-specifically compromise reproductive capacity and the response of endocrine endpoints. Mammalian toxicologists have recognized that very high dose levels are sometimes required to elicit both specific adverse effects and present the potential of non-specific 'systemic toxicity'. Mammalian toxicologists have developed the concept of a maximum tolerated dose (MTD) beyond which a specific toxicity or action cannot be attributed to a test substance due to the compromised state of the organism. Ecotoxicologists are now confronted by a similar challenge and must develop an analogous concept of a MTD and the respective criteria. As examples of this conundrum, we note recent developments in efforts to validate protocols for fish reproductive toxicity and endocrine screens (e.g. some chemicals originally selected as 'negatives' elicited decreases in fecundity or changes in endpoints intended to be biomarkers for endocrine modes of action). Unless analogous criteria can be developed, the potentially confounding effects of systemic toxicity may then undermine the reliable assessment of specific reproductive effects or biomarkers such as vitellogenin or spiggin. The same issue confronts other areas of aquatic toxicology (e.g., genotoxicity) and the use of aquatic animals for preclinical assessments of drugs (e.g., use of zebrafish for drug safety assessment). We propose that there are benefits to adopting the concept of an MTD for toxicology and pharmacology studies using fish and other aquatic organisms and the

  9. Application of maximum values for radiation exposure and principles for the calculation of radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-08-01

    The guide presents the definitions of equivalent dose and effective dose, the principles for calculating these doses, and instructions for applying their maximum values. The limits (Annual Limit on Intake and Derived Air Concentration) derived from dose limits are also presented for the purpose of monitoring exposure to internal radiation. The calculation of radiation doses caused to a patient from medical research and treatment involving exposure to ionizing radiation is beyond the scope of this ST Guide

  10. Measurement and estimation of maximum skin dose to the patient for different interventional procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Yuxi; Liu Lantao; Wei Kedao; Yu Peng; Yan Shulin; Li Tianchang

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To determine the dose distribution and maximum skin dose to the patient for four interventional procedures: coronary angiography (CA), hepatic angiography (HA), radiofrequency ablation (RF) and cerebral angiography (CAG), and to estimate the definitive effect of radiation on skin. Methods: Skin dose was measured using LiF: Mg, Cu, P TLD chips. A total of 9 measuring points were chosen on the back of the patient with two TLDs placed at each point, for CA, HA and RF interventional procedures, whereas two TLDs were placed on one point each at the postero-anterior (PA) and lateral side (LAT) respectively, during the CAG procedure. Results: The results revealed that the maximum skin dose to the patient was 1683.91 mGy for the HA procedure with a mean value of 607.29 mGy. The maximum skin dose at the PA point was 959.3 mGy for the CAG with a mean value of 418.79 mGy; While the maximum and the mean doses at the LAT point were 704 mGy and 191.52 mGy, respectively. For the RF procedure the maximum dose was 853.82 mGy and the mean was 219.67 mGy. For the CA procedure the maximum dose was 456.1 mGy and the mean was 227.63 mGy. Conclusion: All the measured dose values in this study are estimated ones which could not provide the accurate maximum value because it is difficult to measure using a great deal of TLDs. On the other hand, the small area of skin exposed to high dose could be missed as the distribution of the dose is successive. (authors)

  11. Maximum tolerable radiation doses recommended by the Israel Advisory Committee on nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tadmor, J.; Litai, D.; Lubin, E.

    1978-01-01

    Maximum tolerable doses have been recommended by the Israel Advisory Committee on Nuclear Safety. The recommendations which are based on a comparison with risks tolerated in other human activities, are for doses to radiation workers, for individual members of the population at the fence of a nuclear installation, and for the population at large, for both normal operating and accident conditions. Tolerable whole-body doses and doses to different critical organs are listed

  12. Maximum tolerated dose in a phase I trial on adaptive dose painting by numbers for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madani, Indira; Duprez, Fréderic; Boterberg, Tom; Van de Wiele, Christophe; Bonte, Katrien; Deron, Philippe; De Gersem, Werner; Coghe, Marc; De Neve, Wilfried

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) in a phase I trial on adaptive dose-painting-by-numbers (DPBN) for non-metastatic head and neck cancer. Materials and methods: Adaptive intensity-modulated radiotherapy was based on voxel intensity of pre-treatment and per-treatment [ 18 F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography ( 18 F-FDG-PET) scans. Dose was escalated to a median total dose of 80.9 Gy in the high-dose clinical target volume (dose level I) and 85.9 Gy in the gross tumor volume (dose level II). The MTD would be reached, if ⩾33% of patients developed any grade ⩾4 toxicity (DLT) up to 3 months follow-up. Results: Between February 2007 and August 2009, seven patients at dose level I and 14 at dose level II were treated. All patients completed treatment without interruption. At a median follow-up for surviving patients of 38 (dose level I) and 22 months (dose level II) there was no grade ⩾4 toxicity during treatment and follow-up but six cases of mucosal ulcers at latency of 4–10 months, of which five (36%) were observed at dose level II. Mucosal ulcers healed spontaneously in four patients. Conclusions: Considering late mucosal ulcers as DLT, the MTD of a median dose of 80.9 Gy has been reached in our trial.

  13. Maximum skin dose assessment in interventional cardiology: large area detectors and calculation methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quail, E.; Petersol, A.

    2002-01-01

    Advances in imaging technology have facilitated the development of increasingly complex radiological procedures for interventional radiology. Such interventional procedures can involve significant patient exposure, although often represent alternatives to more hazardous surgery or are the sole method for treatment. Interventional radiology is already an established part of mainstream medicine and is likely to expand further with the continuing development and adoption of new procedures. Between all medical exposures, interventional radiology is first of the list of the more expansive radiological practice in terms of effective dose per examination with a mean value of 20 mSv. Currently interventional radiology contribute 4% to the annual collective dose, in spite of contributing to total annual frequency only 0.3% but considering the perspectives of this method can be expected a large expansion of this value. In IR procedures the potential for deterministic effects on the skin is a risk to be taken into account together with stochastic long term risk. Indeed, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in its publication No 85, affirms that the patient dose of priority concern is the absorbed dose in the area of skin that receives the maximum dose during an interventional procedure. For the mentioned reasons, in IR it is important to give to practitioners information on the dose received by the skin of the patient during the procedure. In this paper maximum local skin dose (MSD) is called the absorbed dose in the area of skin receiving the maximum dose during an interventional procedure

  14. Correlation of patient maximum skin doses in cardiac procedures with various dose indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domienik, J.; Papierz, S.; Jankowski, J.; Peruga, J.Z.; Werduch, A.; Religa, W.

    2008-01-01

    In most countries of European Union, legislation requires the determination of the total skin dose received by patients during interventional procedures in order to prevent deterministic damages. Various dose indicators like dose-area product (DAP), cumulative dose (CD) and entrance dose at the patient plane (EFD) are used for patient dosimetry purposes in clinical practice. This study aimed at relating those dose indicators with doses ascribed to the most irradiated areas of the patient skin usually expressed in terms of local maximal skin dose (MSD). The study was performed in two different facilities for two most common cardiac procedures coronary angiography (CA) and percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI). For CA procedures, the registered values of fluoroscopy time, total DAP and MSD were in the range (0.7-27.3) min, (16-317) Gy cm 2 and (43-1507) mGy, respectively, and for interventions, accordingly (2.1-43.6) min, (17-425) Gy cm 2 , (71-1555) mGy. Moreover, for CA procedures, CD and EFD were in the ranges (295-4689) mGy and (121-1768) mGy and for PCI (267-6524) mGy and (68-2279) mGy, respectively. No general and satisfactory correlation was found for safe estimation of MSD. However, results show that the best dose indicator which might serve for rough, preliminary estimation is DAP value. In the study, the appropriate trigger levels were proposed for both facilities. (authors)

  15. A Fourier analysis on the maximum acceptable grid size for discrete proton beam dose calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Haisen S.; Romeijn, H. Edwin; Dempsey, James F.

    2006-01-01

    We developed an analytical method for determining the maximum acceptable grid size for discrete dose calculation in proton therapy treatment plan optimization, so that the accuracy of the optimized dose distribution is guaranteed in the phase of dose sampling and the superfluous computational work is avoided. The accuracy of dose sampling was judged by the criterion that the continuous dose distribution could be reconstructed from the discrete dose within a 2% error limit. To keep the error caused by the discrete dose sampling under a 2% limit, the dose grid size cannot exceed a maximum acceptable value. The method was based on Fourier analysis and the Shannon-Nyquist sampling theorem as an extension of our previous analysis for photon beam intensity modulated radiation therapy [J. F. Dempsey, H. E. Romeijn, J. G. Li, D. A. Low, and J. R. Palta, Med. Phys. 32, 380-388 (2005)]. The proton beam model used for the analysis was a near mono-energetic (of width about 1% the incident energy) and monodirectional infinitesimal (nonintegrated) pencil beam in water medium. By monodirection, we mean that the proton particles are in the same direction before entering the water medium and the various scattering prior to entrance to water is not taken into account. In intensity modulated proton therapy, the elementary intensity modulation entity for proton therapy is either an infinitesimal or finite sized beamlet. Since a finite sized beamlet is the superposition of infinitesimal pencil beams, the result of the maximum acceptable grid size obtained with infinitesimal pencil beam also applies to finite sized beamlet. The analytic Bragg curve function proposed by Bortfeld [T. Bortfeld, Med. Phys. 24, 2024-2033 (1997)] was employed. The lateral profile was approximated by a depth dependent Gaussian distribution. The model included the spreads of the Bragg peak and the lateral profiles due to multiple Coulomb scattering. The dependence of the maximum acceptable dose grid size on the

  16. Application of maximum values for radiation exposure and principles for the calculation of radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The guide sets out the mathematical definitions and principles involved in the calculation of the equivalent dose and the effective dose, and the instructions concerning the application of the maximum values of these quantities. further, for monitoring the dose caused by internal radiation, the guide defines the limits derived from annual dose limits (the Annual Limit on Intake and the Derived Air Concentration). Finally, the guide defines the operational quantities to be used in estimating the equivalent dose and the effective dose, and also sets out the definitions of some other quantities and concepts to be used in monitoring radiation exposure. The guide does not include the calculation of patient doses carried out for the purposes of quality assurance

  17. Application of maximum values for radiation exposure and principles for the calculation of radiation dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    The guide sets out the mathematical definitions and principles involved in the calculation of the equivalent dose and the effective dose, and the instructions concerning the application of the maximum values of these quantities. further, for monitoring the dose caused by internal radiation, the guide defines the limits derived from annual dose limits (the Annual Limit on Intake and the Derived Air Concentration). Finally, the guide defines the operational quantities to be used in estimating the equivalent dose and the effective dose, and also sets out the definitions of some other quantities and concepts to be used in monitoring radiation exposure. The guide does not include the calculation of patient doses carried out for the purposes of quality assurance.

  18. Effect of the Maximum Dose on White Matter Fiber Bundles Using Longitudinal Diffusion Tensor Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Tong; Chapman, Christopher H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Tsien, Christina [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University at St Louis, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Kim, Michelle; Spratt, Daniel E.; Lawrence, Theodore S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Cao, Yue, E-mail: yuecao@umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Purpose: Previous efforts to decrease neurocognitive effects of radiation focused on sparing isolated cortical structures. We hypothesize that understanding temporal, spatial, and dosimetric patterns of radiation damage to whole-brain white matter (WM) after partial-brain irradiation might also be important. Therefore, we carried out a study to develop the methodology to assess radiation therapy (RT)–induced damage to whole-brain WM bundles. Methods and Materials: An atlas-based, automated WM tractography analysis was implemented to quantify longitudinal changes in indices of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of 22 major WM fibers in 33 patients with predominantly low-grade or benign brain tumors treated by RT. Six DTI scans per patient were performed from before RT to 18 months after RT. The DTI indices and planned doses (maximum and mean doses) were mapped onto profiles of each of 22 WM bundles. A multivariate linear regression was performed to determine the main dose effect as well as the influence of other clinical factors on longitudinal percentage changes in axial diffusivity (AD) and radial diffusivity (RD) from before RT. Results: Among 22 fiber bundles, AD or RD changes in 12 bundles were affected significantly by doses (P<.05), as the effect was progressive over time. In 9 elongated tracts, decreased AD or RD was significantly related to maximum doses received, consistent with a serial structure. In individual bundles, AD changes were up to 11.5% at the maximum dose locations 18 months after RT. The dose effect on WM was greater in older female patients than younger male patients. Conclusions: Our study demonstrates for the first time that the maximum dose to the elongated WM bundles causes post-RT damage in WM. Validation and correlative studies are necessary to determine the ability and impact of sparing these bundles on preserving neurocognitive function after RT.

  19. Estimation of maximum credible atmospheric radioactivity concentrations and dose rates from nuclear tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Telegadas, K.

    1979-01-01

    A simple technique is presented for estimating maximum credible gross beta air concentrations from nuclear detonations in the atmosphere, based on aircraft sampling of radioactivity following each Chinese nuclear test from 1964 to 1976. The calculated concentration is a function of the total yield and fission yield, initial vertical radioactivity distribution, time after detonation, and rate of horizontal spread of the debris with time. calculated maximum credible concentrations are compared with the highest concentrations measured during aircraft sampling. The technique provides a reasonable estimate of maximum air concentrations from 1 to 10 days after a detonation. An estimate of the whole-body external gamma dose rate corresponding to the maximum credible gross beta concentration is also given. (author)

  20. SU-E-T-578: On Definition of Minimum and Maximum Dose for Target Volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Y; Yu, J; Xiao, Y [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: This study aims to investigate the impact of different minimum and maximum dose definitions in radiotherapy treatment plan quality evaluation criteria by using tumor control probability (TCP) models. Methods: Dosimetric criteria used in RTOG 1308 protocol are used in the investigation. RTOG 1308 is a phase III randomized trial comparing overall survival after photon versus proton chemoradiotherapy for inoperable stage II-IIIB NSCLC. The prescription dose for planning target volume (PTV) is 70Gy. Maximum dose (Dmax) should not exceed 84Gy and minimum dose (Dmin) should not go below 59.5Gy in order for the plan to be “per protocol” (satisfactory).A mathematical model that simulates the characteristics of PTV dose volume histogram (DVH) curve with normalized volume is built. The Dmax and Dmin are noted as percentage volumes Dη% and D(100-δ)%, with η and d ranging from 0 to 3.5. The model includes three straight line sections and goes through four points: D95%= 70Gy, Dη%= 84Gy, D(100-δ)%= 59.5 Gy, and D100%= 0Gy. For each set of η and δ, the TCP value is calculated using the inhomogeneously irradiated tumor logistic model with D50= 74.5Gy and γ50=3.52. Results: TCP varies within 0.9% with η; and δ values between 0 and 1. With η and η varies between 0 and 2, TCP change was up to 2.4%. With η and δ variations from 0 to 3.5, maximum of 8.3% TCP difference is seen. Conclusion: When defined maximum and minimum volume varied more than 2%, significant TCP variations were seen. It is recommended less than 2% volume used in definition of Dmax or Dmin for target dosimetric evaluation criteria. This project was supported by NIH grants U10CA180868, U10CA180822, U24CA180803, U24CA12014 and PA CURE Grant.

  1. SU-E-T-578: On Definition of Minimum and Maximum Dose for Target Volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, Y; Yu, J; Xiao, Y

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to investigate the impact of different minimum and maximum dose definitions in radiotherapy treatment plan quality evaluation criteria by using tumor control probability (TCP) models. Methods: Dosimetric criteria used in RTOG 1308 protocol are used in the investigation. RTOG 1308 is a phase III randomized trial comparing overall survival after photon versus proton chemoradiotherapy for inoperable stage II-IIIB NSCLC. The prescription dose for planning target volume (PTV) is 70Gy. Maximum dose (Dmax) should not exceed 84Gy and minimum dose (Dmin) should not go below 59.5Gy in order for the plan to be “per protocol” (satisfactory).A mathematical model that simulates the characteristics of PTV dose volume histogram (DVH) curve with normalized volume is built. The Dmax and Dmin are noted as percentage volumes Dη% and D(100-δ)%, with η and d ranging from 0 to 3.5. The model includes three straight line sections and goes through four points: D95%= 70Gy, Dη%= 84Gy, D(100-δ)%= 59.5 Gy, and D100%= 0Gy. For each set of η and δ, the TCP value is calculated using the inhomogeneously irradiated tumor logistic model with D50= 74.5Gy and γ50=3.52. Results: TCP varies within 0.9% with η; and δ values between 0 and 1. With η and η varies between 0 and 2, TCP change was up to 2.4%. With η and δ variations from 0 to 3.5, maximum of 8.3% TCP difference is seen. Conclusion: When defined maximum and minimum volume varied more than 2%, significant TCP variations were seen. It is recommended less than 2% volume used in definition of Dmax or Dmin for target dosimetric evaluation criteria. This project was supported by NIH grants U10CA180868, U10CA180822, U24CA180803, U24CA12014 and PA CURE Grant

  2. Change in the alpha criterion policy: variable based on the maximum individual dose function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitas Acosta Perez, C. de; Sordi, G.M.A.A.

    2006-01-01

    The Alpha value is an extremely important criterion because it determines the time that a country takes to achieve its proposals in order to decrease the workers doses involved with ionizing radiation sources. Currently the countries adopt a single value for alpha based on the annual gross national product, GNP, per capita. The aim of this paper is to show that the selection of a curve for the alpha in place of a single value would be more efficient. This curve would provide alpha values that would will be constraints to the biggest individual doses presented in each optimization process as applied both to designs and to operations. These maximum individual doses would represent the dose distribution among the workers team. To build the curve, the alpha values suggested are not based on the GNP per capita but on a distribution function of the maximum individual doses and on the time necessary to reach the proposal of 1/10 of the annual dose limit foreseen in the sequential optimization processes, that is to reach the region where the individual doses are considered acceptable. So, the differential equations will be - d X/dS =α(H m ax). To clarify our sight about the alpha value we started using the uranium mine example presented in ICRP publication 55, adopting the decision-aiding technique known as extended cost-benefit. for right. Then we used the same example in a hypothetical curve with portions: constant, linear, quadratic and exponential. Eventually we discussed briefly the different shapes of the curves that the alpha value can assume in function of the individual doses. Each of these shapes can correspond to the so called 'risk neutral attitude', 'risk adverse attitude' or 'risk prone attitude' suggested in the appendix B of the ICRP publication 55

  3. Studies on the establishment of maximum permissible exposure dose for reference Korean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y.J.; Lee, K.S.; Chun, K.C.; Kim, C.B.; Chung, K.H.; Kim, S.L.; Kim, M.J.

    1981-01-01

    In order to establish the Reference Korean and maximum permissible exposure dose of Reference Korean, for the first year a total of 9,758 males and 7,019 females were surveyed for the height, weight, a body surface area, and a total of 879 individuals of 180 households located in different 30 localities were analyzed for food consumption and a total of radioactive substances (β-ray) contained in food per capita per day. In this report the external and internal exposure dose were also estimated on the basis of data mostly published in other country as well as in Korea in part

  4. Calculate the maximum expected dose for technical radio physicists a cobalt machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avila Avila, Rafael; Perez Velasquez, Reytel; Gonzalez Lapez, Nadia

    2009-01-01

    Considering the daily operations carried out by technicians Radiophysics Medical Service Department of Radiation Oncology Hospital V. General Teaching I. Lenin in the city of Holguin, during a working week (Between Monday and Friday) as an important element in calculating the maximum expected dose (MDE). From the exponential decay law which is subject the source activity, we propose corrections to the cumulative doses in the weekly period, leading to obtaining a formula which takes into a cumulative dose during working days and sees no dose accumulation of rest days (Saturday and Sunday). The estimate factor correction is made from a power series expansion convergent is truncated at the n-th term coincides with the week period for which you want to calculate the dose. As initial condition is adopted ambient dose equivalent rate as a given, which allows estimate MDE in the moments after or before this. Calculations were proposed use of an Excel spreadsheet that allows simple and accessible processing the formula obtained. (author)

  5. Prediction of the maximum dosage to man from the fallout of nuclear devices V. Estimation of the maximum dose from internal emitters in aquatic food supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamplin, A.R.; Fisher, H.L.; Chapman, W.H.

    1968-01-01

    A method is described for estimating the maximum internal dose that could result from the radionuclides released to an aquatic environment. By means of this analysis one can identify the nuclides that could contribute most to the internal dose, and determine the contribution of each nuclide to the total dose. The calculations required to estimate the maximum dose to an infant's bone subsequent to the construction of a sea-level canal are presented to illustrate the overall method. The results are shown to serve the basic aims of preshot rad-safe analysis and of guidance for postshot documentation. The usefulness of the analysis in providing guidance for device design is further pointed out. (author)

  6. Dose assessment around TR-2 reactor due to maximum credible accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turgut, M. H.; Adalioglu, U.; Aytekin, A.

    2001-01-01

    The revision of safety analysis report of TR-2 research reactor had been initiated in 1995. The whole accident analysis and accepted scenario for maximum credible accident has been revised according to the new safety concepts and the impact to be given to the environment due to this scenario has been assessed. This paper comprises all results of these calculations. The accepted maximum credible accident scenario is the partial blockage of the whole reactor core which resulted in the release of 25% of the core inventory. The DOSER code which uses very conservative modelling of atmospheric distributions were modified for the assessment calculations. Pasquill conditions based on the local weather observations, topography, and building affects were considered. The thyroid and whole body doses for 16 sectors and up to 10 km of distance around CNAEM were obtained. Release models were puff and a prolonged one of two hours of duration. Release fractions for the active isotopes were chosen from literature which were realistic

  7. Main clinical, therapeutic and technical factors related to patient's maximum skin dose in interventional cardiology procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journy, N; Sinno-Tellier, S; Maccia, C; Le Tertre, A; Pirard, P; Pagès, P; Eilstein, D; Donadieu, J; Bar, O

    2012-01-01

    Objective The study aimed to characterise the factors related to the X-ray dose delivered to the patient's skin during interventional cardiology procedures. Methods We studied 177 coronary angiographies (CAs) and/or percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasties (PTCAs) carried out in a French clinic on the same radiography table. The clinical and therapeutic characteristics, and the technical parameters of the procedures, were collected. The dose area product (DAP) and the maximum skin dose (MSD) were measured by an ionisation chamber (Diamentor; Philips, Amsterdam, The Netherlands) and radiosensitive film (Gafchromic; International Specialty Products Advanced Materials Group, Wayne, NJ). Multivariate analyses were used to assess the effects of the factors of interest on dose. Results The mean MSD and DAP were respectively 389 mGy and 65 Gy cm−2 for CAs, and 916 mGy and 69 Gy cm−2 for PTCAs. For 8% of the procedures, the MSD exceeded 2 Gy. Although a linear relationship between the MSD and the DAP was observed for CAs (r=0.93), a simple extrapolation of such a model to PTCAs would lead to an inadequate assessment of the risk, especially for the highest dose values. For PTCAs, the body mass index, the therapeutic complexity, the fluoroscopy time and the number of cine frames were independent explanatory factors of the MSD, whoever the practitioner was. Moreover, the effect of technical factors such as collimation, cinematography settings and X-ray tube orientations on the DAP was shown. Conclusion Optimising the technical options for interventional procedures and training staff on radiation protection might notably reduce the dose and ultimately avoid patient skin lesions. PMID:22457404

  8. Neutron spectrum and dose-equivalent in shuttle flights during solar maximum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keith, J E; Badhwar, G D; Lindstrom, D J [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Houston, TX (United States). Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents unambiguous measurements of the spectrum of neutrons found in spacecraft during spaceflight. The neutron spectrum was measured from thermal energies to about 10 MeV using a completely passive system of metal foils as neutron detectors. These foils were exposed to the neutron flux bare, covered by thermal neutron absorbers (Gd) and inside moderators (Bonner spheres). This set of detectors was flown on three U.S. Space Shuttle flights, STS-28, STS-36 and STS-31, during the solar maximum. We show that the measurements of the radioactivity of these foils lead to a differential neutron energy spectrum in all three flights that can be represented by a power law, J(E){approx equal}E{sup -0.765} neutrons cm{sup -2} day {sup -1} MeV{sup -1}. We also show that the measurements are even better represented by a linear combination of the terrestrial neutron albedo and a spectrum of neutrons locally produced in a aluminium by protons, computed by a previous author. We use both approximations to the neutron spectrum to produce a worst case and most probable case for the neutron spectra and the resulting dose-equivalents, computed using ICRP-51 neutron fluence-dose conversion tables. We compare these to the skin dose-equivalents due to charged particles during the same flights. (author).

  9. EPR spectrum deconvolution and dose assessment of fossil tooth enamel using maximum likelihood common factor analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanhaelewyn, G.; Callens, F.; Gruen, R.

    2000-01-01

    In order to determine the components which give rise to the EPR spectrum around g = 2 we have applied Maximum Likelihood Common Factor Analysis (MLCFA) on the EPR spectra of enamel sample 1126 which has previously been analysed by continuous wave and pulsed EPR as well as EPR microscopy. MLCFA yielded agreeing results on three sets of X-band spectra and the following components were identified: an orthorhombic component attributed to CO - 2 , an axial component CO 3- 3 , as well as four isotropic components, three of which could be attributed to SO - 2 , a tumbling CO - 2 and a central line of a dimethyl radical. The X-band results were confirmed by analysis of Q-band spectra where three additional isotropic lines were found, however, these three components could not be attributed to known radicals. The orthorhombic component was used to establish dose response curves for the assessment of the past radiation dose, D E . The results appear to be more reliable than those based on conventional peak-to-peak EPR intensity measurements or simple Gaussian deconvolution methods

  10. Comparison of measured and estimated maximum skin doses during CT fluoroscopy lung biopsies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanca, F., E-mail: Federica.Zanca@med.kuleuven.be [Department of Radiology, Leuven University Center of Medical Physics in Radiology, UZ Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven, Belgium and Imaging and Pathology Department, UZ Leuven, Herestraat 49, Box 7003 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Jacobs, A. [Department of Radiology, Leuven University Center of Medical Physics in Radiology, UZ Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Crijns, W. [Department of Radiotherapy, UZ Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); De Wever, W. [Imaging and Pathology Department, UZ Leuven, Herestraat 49, Box 7003 3000 Leuven, Belgium and Department of Radiology, UZ Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To measure patient-specific maximum skin dose (MSD) associated with CT fluoroscopy (CTF) lung biopsies and to compare measured MSD with the MSD estimated from phantom measurements, as well as with the CTDIvol of patient examinations. Methods: Data from 50 patients with lung lesions who underwent a CT fluoroscopy-guided biopsy were collected. The CT protocol consisted of a low-kilovoltage (80 kV) protocol used in combination with an algorithm for dose reduction to the radiology staff during the interventional procedure, HandCare (HC). MSD was assessed during each intervention using EBT2 gafchromic films positioned on patient skin. Lesion size, position, total fluoroscopy time, and patient-effective diameter were registered for each patient. Dose rates were also estimated at the surface of a normal-size anthropomorphic thorax phantom using a 10 cm pencil ionization chamber placed at every 30°, for a full rotation, with and without HC. Measured MSD was compared with MSD values estimated from the phantom measurements and with the cumulative CTDIvol of the procedure. Results: The median measured MSD was 141 mGy (range 38–410 mGy) while the median cumulative CTDIvol was 72 mGy (range 24–262 mGy). The ratio between the MSD estimated from phantom measurements and the measured MSD was 0.87 (range 0.12–4.1) on average. In 72% of cases the estimated MSD underestimated the measured MSD, while in 28% of the cases it overestimated it. The same trend was observed for the ratio of cumulative CTDIvol and measured MSD. No trend was observed as a function of patient size. Conclusions: On average, estimated MSD from dose rate measurements on phantom as well as from CTDIvol of patient examinations underestimates the measured value of MSD. This can be attributed to deviations of the patient's body habitus from the standard phantom size and to patient positioning in the gantry during the procedure.

  11. Comparison of measured and estimated maximum skin doses during CT fluoroscopy lung biopsies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanca, F.; Jacobs, A.; Crijns, W.; De Wever, W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To measure patient-specific maximum skin dose (MSD) associated with CT fluoroscopy (CTF) lung biopsies and to compare measured MSD with the MSD estimated from phantom measurements, as well as with the CTDIvol of patient examinations. Methods: Data from 50 patients with lung lesions who underwent a CT fluoroscopy-guided biopsy were collected. The CT protocol consisted of a low-kilovoltage (80 kV) protocol used in combination with an algorithm for dose reduction to the radiology staff during the interventional procedure, HandCare (HC). MSD was assessed during each intervention using EBT2 gafchromic films positioned on patient skin. Lesion size, position, total fluoroscopy time, and patient-effective diameter were registered for each patient. Dose rates were also estimated at the surface of a normal-size anthropomorphic thorax phantom using a 10 cm pencil ionization chamber placed at every 30°, for a full rotation, with and without HC. Measured MSD was compared with MSD values estimated from the phantom measurements and with the cumulative CTDIvol of the procedure. Results: The median measured MSD was 141 mGy (range 38–410 mGy) while the median cumulative CTDIvol was 72 mGy (range 24–262 mGy). The ratio between the MSD estimated from phantom measurements and the measured MSD was 0.87 (range 0.12–4.1) on average. In 72% of cases the estimated MSD underestimated the measured MSD, while in 28% of the cases it overestimated it. The same trend was observed for the ratio of cumulative CTDIvol and measured MSD. No trend was observed as a function of patient size. Conclusions: On average, estimated MSD from dose rate measurements on phantom as well as from CTDIvol of patient examinations underestimates the measured value of MSD. This can be attributed to deviations of the patient's body habitus from the standard phantom size and to patient positioning in the gantry during the procedure

  12. [MAXIMUM SINGLE DOSE OF COLLOIDAL SILVER NEGATIVELY AFFECTS ERYTHROPOIESIS IN VITRO].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tishevskayal, N V; Zakharovl, Y M; Bolotovl, A A; Arkhipenko, Yu V; Sazontova, T G

    2015-01-01

    Erythroblastic islets (EI) of rat bone marrow were cultured for 24 h in the presence of silver nanoparticles (1.07 · 10(-4) mg/ml; 1.07 · 10(-3) mg/ml; and 1.07 · 10(-2) mg/mL). The colloidal silver at 1.07 · 10(-3) mg/ml concentration inhibited the formation of new Elby disrupting contacts of bone marrow macrophages with CFU-E (erythropoiesis de novo) by 65.3% (p Colloidal silver nanoparticles suppressed the reconstruction of erythropoiesis and inhibited the formation of new EI by disrupting contacts of CFU-E and central macrophages with matured erythroidal "crown" (erythropoiesis de repeto). The colloidal silver concentration of 1.07 · 10(-3) mg/ml in the culture medium also reduced the number of self-reconstructing EI by 67.5% (p colloidal silver reduced this value by 93.7% (p Silver nanoparticles retarded maturation of erythroid cells at the stage of oxiphylic normoblast denucleation: 1.07 · 10(-3) mg/ml colloidal silver increased the number of mature El by 53% (p colloidal silver in concentration equivalent to the maximum single dose is related to the effect of silver nanoparticles rather than glycerol present in the colloidal suspension.

  13. PRODUTIVIDADE DE CAPIM-MOMBAÇA (Panicum maximum, COM DIFERENTES DOSES DE BIOFERTILIZANTE / MOMBAÇA GRASS PRODUCTIVITY (Panicum maximum, WITH DIFFERENT DOSES OF BIOFERTILIZER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Simonetti

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available O presente estudo teve por objetivo verificar a influência da aplicação do dejeto de bovino leiteiro tratados em biodigestores anaeróbios, na forma de biofertilizante, sobre a produtividade da capim Mombaça, em condições de sequeiro.  O trabalho foi conduzido no Instituto de Biotecnologia – IBIOTEC, pertencente à UNIARA, Araraquara – SP. Para obtenção do biofertilizante, foi feita a diluição dos dejetos em água e armazenado em um biodigestor modelo indiano de fibra de vidro com capacidade útil de 1000 L, instalado no referido instituto. As fertilizações foram feitas a lanço após cada rebaixamento das parcelas. O delineamento utilizado foi em blocos casualizados, com quatro tratamentos e quatro repetições, com diferentes doses do biofertilizante, sendo: 0; 50m³; 100m³ e 200m³/ha-1.  As variáveis avaliadas foram: altura, produção por hectare (matéria seca e matéria verde, e qualidade bromatológica. Foram observados que os tratamentos que receberam a maior dosagem de biofertilizante, apresentaram maiores valores para produtividade Matéria Seca, Matéria Verde e teor de proteína. Conclui-se que a aplicação de biofertilizante é benéfico ao sistema de pastagem, porém suas doses devem ser estudadas e a sua resposta na produção pode obtidas a longo prazo.

  14. Determination of the maximum individual dose exposure resulting from a hypothetical LEU plate-melt accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelhady, Amr

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Studying the radioactive release results from hypothetical plate-melt accident. ► Hotspot code was used to study the dose distributions around the reactor. ► A 90% decrease in the received dose in proper operation of filtration. ► The received dose is lower than the annual permissible dose after filtration. - Abstract: The objective of this study was to provide an estimate of the potential impact of accidental radioactive release from the testing cell of the Egyptian second research reactor ETRR-2 on the dose level of public around the reactor. The assessment was performed for two cases: an evaluation of the impact that accidental release has on the dose that would be received by public around the reactor in case of proper operation of testing cell filtration system; and an assessment of the potential dose in case of loss of testing cell filtration system. The results show that the filtration system has a great role in decreasing the dose received by an individual located outside the reactor to a dose level lower than the annual permissible dose

  15. Maximum likelihood estimation of dose-response parameters for therapeutic operating characteristic (TOC) analysis of carcinoma of the nasopharynx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metz, C.E.; Tokars, R.P.; Kronman, H.B.; Griem, M.L.

    1982-01-01

    A Therapeutic Operating Characteristic (TOC) curve for radiation therapy plots, for all possible treatment doses, the probability of tumor ablation as a function of the probability of radiation-induced complication. Application of this analysis to actual therapeutic situation requires that dose-response curves for ablation and for complication be estimated from clinical data. We describe an approach in which ''maximum likelihood estimates'' of these dose-response curves are made, and we apply this approach to data collected on responses to radiotherapy for carcinoma of the nasopharynx. TOC curves constructed from the estimated dose-response curves are subject to moderately large uncertainties because of the limitations of available data.These TOC curves suggest, however, that treatment doses greater than 1800 rem may substantially increase the probability of tumor ablation with little increase in the risk of radiation-induced cervical myelopathy, especially for T1 and T2 tumors

  16. An overview of the report: Correlation between carcinogenic potency and the maximum tolerated dose: Implications for risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krewski, D.; Gaylor, D.W.; Soms, A.P.; Szyszkowicz, M.

    1993-01-01

    Current practice in carcinogen bioassay calls for exposure of experimental animals at doses up to and including the maximum tolerated dose (MTD). Such studies have been used to compute measures of carcinogenic potency such as the TD 50 as well as unit risk factors such as q 1 for predicting low-dose risks. Recent studies have indicated that these measures of carcinogenic potency are highly correlated with the MTD. Carcinogenic potency has also been shown to be correlated with indicators of mutagenicity and toxicity. Correlation of the MTDs for rats and mice implies a corresponding correlation in TD 50 values for these two species. The implications of these results for cancer risk assessment are examined in light of the large variation in potency among chemicals known to induce tumors in rodents. 119 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs

  17. Effects of Minimum and Maximum Doses of Furosemide on Fractional Shortening Parameter in Echocardiography of the New Zealand White Rabbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roham Vali, Mohammad Nasrollahzadeh Masouleh* and Siamak Mashhady Rafie1

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available There is no data on the effect of maximum and minimum doses of furosemide on heart's work performance and amount of fractional shortening (FS in echocardiography of rabbit. This study was designed to validate probability of the mentionable effect. Twenty-four healthy female New Zealand white rabbits were divided into four equal groups. Maximum and minimum doses of furosemide were used for the first and second groups and the injection solution for the third and fourth groups was sodium chloride 0.9% which had the same calculated volumes of furosemide for the first two groups, respectively. The left ventricle FS in statutory times (0, 2, 5, 15, 30 minutes was determined by echocardiography. Measurements of Mean±SD, maximum and minimum amounts for FS values in all groups before injection and in statutory times were calculated. Statistical analysis revealed non-significant correlation between the means of FS. The results of this study showed that furosemide can be used as a diuretic agent for preparing a window approach in abdominal ultrasonography examination with no harmful effect on cardiac function.

  18. Regulatory Forum Opinion Piece*: Retrospective Evaluation of Doses in the 26-week Tg.rasH2 Mice Carcinogenicity Studies: Recommendation to Eliminate High Doses at Maximum Tolerated Dose (MTD) in Future Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paranjpe, Madhav G; Denton, Melissa D; Vidmar, Tom J; Elbekai, Reem H

    2015-07-01

    High doses in Tg.rasH2 carcinogenicity studies are usually set at the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), although this dose selection strategy has not been critically evaluated. We analyzed the body weight gains (BWGs), mortality, and tumor response in control and treated groups of 29 Tg.rasH2 studies conducted at BioReliance. Based on our analysis, it is evident that the MTD was exceeded at the high and/or mid-doses in several studies. The incidence of tumors in high doses was lower when compared to the low and mid-doses of both sexes. Thus, we recommend that the high dose in male mice should not exceed one-half of the estimated MTD (EMTD), as it is currently chosen, and the next dose should be one-fourth of the EMTD. Because females were less sensitive to decrements in BWG, the high dose in female mice should not exceed two-third of EMTD and the next dose group should be one-third of EMTD. If needed, a third dose group should be set at one-eighth EMTD in males and one-sixth EMTD in females. In addition, for compounds that do not show toxicity in the range finding studies, a limit dose should be applied for the 26-week carcinogenicity studies. © 2014 by The Author(s).

  19. Influence of the Target Vessel on the Location and Area of Maximum Skin Dose during Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chida, K.; Fuda, K.; Kagaya, Y.; Saito, H.; Takai, Y.; Kohzuki, M.; Takahash i, S.; Yamada, S.; Zuguchi, M.

    2007-01-01

    Background: A number of cases involving radiation-associated patient skin injury attributable to percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) have been reported. Knowledge of the location and area of the patient's maximum skin dose (MSD) in PCI is necessary to reduce the risk of skin injury. Purpose: To determine the location and area of the MSD in PCI, and separately analyze the effects of different target vessels. Material and Methods: 197 consecutive PCI procedures were studied, and the location and area of the MSD were calculated by a skin-dose mapping software program: Caregraph. The target vessels of the PCI procedures were divided into four groups based on the American Heart Association (AHA) classification. Results: The sites of the MSD for AHA no.1-3, AHA no.4, and AHA no.11-15 were located mainly on the right back skin, the lower right or center back skin, and the upper back skin areas, respectively, whereas the MSD sites for the AHA no. 5-10 PCI were widely spread. The MSD area for the AHA no. 4 PCI was larger than that for the AHA no. 11-15 PCI (P<0.0001). Conclusion: Although the radiation associated with PCI can be widely spread and variable, we observed a tendency regarding the location and area of the MSD when we separately analyzed the data for different target vessels. We recommend the use of a smaller radiation field size and the elimination of overlapping fields during PCI

  20. Regulatory Forum Opinion Piece*: Retrospective Evaluation of Doses in the 26-week Tg.rasH2 Mice Carcinogenicity Studies: Recommendation to Eliminate High Doses at Maximum Tolerated Dose in Future Studies. A Response to the Counterpoints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paranjpe, Madhav G; Denton, Melissa D; Vidmar, Tom J; Elbekai, Reem H

    2016-01-01

    We recently conducted a retrospective analysis of data collected from 29 Tg.rasH2 carcinogenicity studies conducted at our facility to determine how successful was the strategy of choosing the high dose of the 26-week studies based on an estimated maximum tolerated dose (MTD). As a result of our publication, 2 counterviews were expressed. Both counterviews illustrate very valid points in their interpretation of our data. In this article, we would like to highlight clarifications based on several points and issues they have raised in their papers, namely, the dose-level selection, determining if MTD was exceeded in 26-week studies, and a discussion on the number of dose groups to be used in the studies. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. The consequences of a reduction in the administratively applied maximum annual dose equivalent level for an individual in a group of occupationally exposed workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, N.T.

    1980-02-01

    An analysis is described for predicting the consequences of a reduction in the administratively applied maximum dose equivalent level to individuals in a group of workers occupationally exposed to ionising radiations, for the situation in which no changes are made to the working environment. This limitation of the maximum individual dose equivalent is accommodated by allowing the number of individuals in the working group to increase. The derivation of the analysis is given, together with worked examples, which highlight the important assumptions that have been made and the conclusions that can be drawn. The results are obtained in the form of the capacity of the particular working environment to accommodate the limitation of the maximum individual dose equivalent, the increase in the number of workers required to carry out the productive work and any consequent increase in the occupational collective dose equivalent. (author)

  2. Maximum dose angle for oblique incidence on primary beam protective barriers in the design of medical radiation therapy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fondevila, Damian; Arbiser, Silvio; Sansogne, Rosana; Brunetto, Monica; Dosoretz, Bernardo

    2008-01-01

    Primary barrier determinations for the shielding of medical radiation therapy facilities are generally made assuming normal beam incidence on the barrier, since this is geometrically the most unfavorable condition for that shielding barrier whenever the occupation line is allowed to run along the barrier. However, when the occupation line (for example, the wall of an adjacent building) runs perpendicular to the barrier (especially roof barrier), then two opposing factors come in to play: increasing obliquity angle with respect to the barrier increases the attenuation, while the distance to the calculation point decreases, hence, increasing the dose. As a result, there exists an angle (α max ) for which the equivalent dose results in a maximum, constituting the most unfavorable geometric condition for that shielding barrier. Based on the usual NCRP Report No. 151 model, this article presents a simple formula for obtaining α max , which is a function of the thickness of the barrier (t E ) and the equilibrium tenth-value layer (TVL e ) of the shielding material for the nominal energy of the beam. It can be seen that α max increases for increasing TVL e (hence, beam energy) and decreases for increasing t E , with a range of variation that goes from 13 to 40 deg for concrete barriers thicknesses in the range of 50-300 cm and most commercially available teletherapy machines. This parameter has not been calculated in the existing literature for radiotherapy facilities design and has practical applications, as in calculating the required unoccupied roof shielding for the protection of a nearby building located in the plane of the primary beam rotation

  3. Maximum dose angle for oblique incidence on primary beam protective barriers in the design of medical radiation therapy facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fondevila, Damián; Arbiser, Silvio; Sansogne, Rosana; Brunetto, Mónica; Dosoretz, Bernardo

    2008-05-01

    Primary barrier determinations for the shielding of medical radiation therapy facilities are generally made assuming normal beam incidence on the barrier, since this is geometrically the most unfavorable condition for that shielding barrier whenever the occupation line is allowed to run along the barrier. However, when the occupation line (for example, the wall of an adjacent building) runs perpendicular to the barrier (especially roof barrier), then two opposing factors come in to play: increasing obliquity angle with respect to the barrier increases the attenuation, while the distance to the calculation point decreases, hence, increasing the dose. As a result, there exists an angle (alpha(max)) for which the equivalent dose results in a maximum, constituting the most unfavorable geometric condition for that shielding barrier. Based on the usual NCRP Report No. 151 model, this article presents a simple formula for obtaining alpha(max), which is a function of the thickness of the barrier (t(E)) and the equilibrium tenth-value layer (TVL(e)) of the shielding material for the nominal energy of the beam. It can be seen that alpha(max) increases for increasing TVL(e) (hence, beam energy) and decreases for increasing t(E), with a range of variation that goes from 13 to 40 deg for concrete barriers thicknesses in the range of 50-300 cm and most commercially available teletherapy machines. This parameter has not been calculated in the existing literature for radiotherapy facilities design and has practical applications, as in calculating the required unoccupied roof shielding for the protection of a nearby building located in the plane of the primary beam rotation.

  4. Estimated radiological doses to the maximumly exposed individual and downstream populations from releases of tritium, strontium-90, ruthenium-106, and cesium-137 from White Oak Dam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, C.A.; Cotter, S.J.

    1980-01-01

    Concentrations of tritium, 90 Sr, 106 Ru, and 137 Cs in the Clinch River for 1978 were estimated by using the known 1978 releases of these nuclides from the White Oak Dam and diluting them by the integrated annual flow rate of the Clinch River. Estimates of 50-year dose commitment to a maximumly exposed individual were calculated for both aquatic and terestrial pathways of exposure. The maximumly exposed individual was assumed to reside at the mouth of White Oak Creek where it enters the Clinch River and obtain all foodstuffs and drinking water at that location. The estimated total-body dose from all pathways to the maximumly exposed individual as a result of 1978 releases was less than 1% of the dose expected from natural background. Using appropriate concentrations of to subject radionuclides diluted downstream, the doses to populations residing at Harriman, Kingston, Rockwood, Spring City, Soddy-Daisy, and Chattanooga were calculated for aquatic exposure pathways. The total-body dose estimated for aquatic pathways for the six cities was about 0.0002 times the expected dose from natural background. For the pathways considered in this report, the nuclide which contributed the largest fraction of dose was 90 Sr. The largest dose delivered by 90 Sr was to the bone of the subject individual or community

  5. SU-G-201-14: Is Maximum Skin Dose a Reliable Metric for Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation with Brachytherapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S; Ragab, O; Patel, S; Demanes, J; Kamrava, M; Kim, Y

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the reliability of the maximum point dose (Dmax) to the skin surface as a dosimetric constraint, we investigated the correlation between Dmax at the skin surface and dose metrics at various definitions of skin thickness. Methods: 42 patients treated with APBI using a Strut Adjusted Volume Implant (SAVI) applicator between 2010 and 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. Target (PTV-EVAL) and organs at risk (OARs: skin, lung, and ribs) were delineated on a CT following NSABP B-39 guidelines. Six skin structures were contoured: a rind 3cm external to the body surface and 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5mm thick rinds deep to the body surface. Inverse planning simulated annealing optimization was used to deliver 32–34Gy in 8-10 fractions to the target while minimizing OAR doses. Dmax, D0.1cc, D1.0cc, and D2.0cc to the various skin structures were calculated. Linear regressions between the metrics were evaluated using the coefficient of determination (R"2). Results: The average±SD PTV-EVAL volume and cavity-to-skin distances were 71.1±28.5cc and 6.9±5.0mm. The target V90 and V95 were 97.3±2.3% and 95.1±3.2%. The Dmax to the skin structures were 78.7±10.2% (skin surface), 82.2±10.7% (skin-1mm), 89.4±12.6% (skin-2mm), 97.9±15.4% (skin-3mm), 114.1±32.5% (skin-4mm), and 157.0±85.3% (skin-5mm). Linear regression analysis showed D1.0cc and D2.0cc to the skin 1mm and Dmax to the skin-4mm and 5mm were poorly correlated with other metrics (R"2=0.413±0.204). Dmax to the skin surface was well correlated (R"2=0.910±0.047) and D1.0cc to the skin-3mm was strongly correlated with all subsurface skin layers (R"2=0.935±0.050). Conclusion: Dmax to the skin surface is a relevant metric for breast skin dose. Contouring discontinuities in the skin with a 1mm subsurface rind and the active dwells in the skin 4 and 5mm introduced significant variations in skin DVH. D0.1cc, D1.0cc, and D2.0cc to a 3mm skin rind are more robust metrics in breast brachytherapy.

  6. The ICRP Proposed Maximum Public Dose Constraints of o.3 mSv/y: a Major Issue for the Nuclear Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saint-Pierre, S.; Coates, R.

    2004-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is currently developing a new set of Recommendations on Radiological Protection. A value of 0.3mSv/y for the maximum public dose constraint has been discussed by ICRP. This value represents a major concern for the nuclear industry at large. The primary issue arises from the lack of any new scientific evidence on public health effects from ionising radiation to support, in practice, the proposed reduction by about a factor of 3 (from 1 to 0.3 mSv/y) of the upper bound value for public dose impact from a nuclear activity or site. Such a change would create a de facto limit on public exposure from specific sources at a dose level of about one tenth of average natural background and an even smaller fraction of the typical range of background exposures and exposures from medical sources. This cannot be justified on public health grounds. The WNA supports ICRP's renewed intention, as expressed at the NEA-ICRP Stakeholder Forum in Lanzarote (April 2003), to retain the concept of a public dose limit at 1 mSv/y. We strongly believe that the current system comprising of the dose limit and the ALARA Principle provides the necessary flexibility and tools for regulators to address all situations in all countries. The WNA consider that the question of setting an upper bound dose constraint (below 1 mSv/y) at the country/site specific level is best left for discussion and agreement between the local stakeholders rather than at an international level. When considering the potential practical implications of a maximum dose constraint, it is important to look beyond the very low off-site dose impacts (on the public) resulting from annual routine radioactive discharges of nuclear industrial sites. There are many off-site and on-site practical situations, related to public exposures (both workers and the public) and worker classification as well as activities such transportation, decommissioning and site remediation, for

  7. The ICRP Proposed Maximum Public Dose Constraints of o.3 mSv/y: a Major Issue for the Nuclear Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saint-Pierre, S.; Coates, R.

    2004-07-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is currently developing a new set of Recommendations on Radiological Protection. A value of 0.3mSv/y for the maximum public dose constraint has been discussed by ICRP. This value represents a major concern for the nuclear industry at large. The primary issue arises from the lack of any new scientific evidence on public health effects from ionising radiation to support, in practice, the proposed reduction by about a factor of 3 (from 1 to 0.3 mSv/y) of the upper bound value for public dose impact from a nuclear activity or site. Such a change would create a de facto limit on public exposure from specific sources at a dose level of about one tenth of average natural background and an even smaller fraction of the typical range of background exposures and exposures from medical sources. This cannot be justified on public health grounds. The WNA supports ICRP's renewed intention, as expressed at the NEA-ICRP Stakeholder Forum in Lanzarote (April 2003), to retain the concept of a public dose limit at 1 mSv/y. We strongly believe that the current system comprising of the dose limit and the ALARA Principle provides the necessary flexibility and tools for regulators to address all situations in all countries. The WNA consider that the question of setting an upper bound dose constraint (below 1 mSv/y) at the country/site specific level is best left for discussion and agreement between the local stakeholders rather than at an international level. When considering the potential practical implications of a maximum dose constraint, it is important to look beyond the very low off-site dose impacts (on the public) resulting from annual routine radioactive discharges of nuclear industrial sites. There are many off-site and on-site practical situations, related to public exposures (both workers and the public) and worker classification as well as activities such transportation, decommissioning and site remediation

  8. Validation of calculated tissue maximum ratio obtained from measured percentage depth dose (PPD) data for high energy photon beam ( 6 MV and 15 MV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osei, J.E.

    2014-07-01

    During external beam radiotherapy treatments, high doses are delivered to the cancerous cell. Accuracy and precision of dose delivery are primary requirements for effective and efficiency in treatment. This leads to the consideration of treatment parameters such as percentage depth dose (PDD), tissue air ratio (TAR) and tissue phantom ratio (TPR), which show the dose distribution in the patient. Nevertheless, tissue air ratio (TAR) for treatment time calculation, calls for the need to measure in-air-dose rate. For lower energies, measurement is not a problem but for higher energies, in-air measurement is not attainable due to the large build-up material required for the measurement. Tissue maximum ratio (TMR) is the quantity required to replace tissue air ratio (TAR) for high energy photon beam. It is known that tissue maximum ratio (TMR) is an important dosimetric function in radiotherapy treatment. As the calculation methods used to determine tissue maximum ratio (TMR) from percentage depth dose (PDD) were derived by considering the differences between TMR and PDD such as geometry and field size, where phantom scatter or peak scatter factors are used to correct dosimetric variation due to field size difference. The purpose of this study is to examine the accuracy of calculated tissue maximum ratio (TMR) data with measured TMR values for 6 MV and 15 MV photon beam at Sweden Ghana Medical Centre. With the help of the Blue motorize water phantom and the Omni pro-Accept software, Pdd values from which TMRs are calculated were measured at 100 cm source-to-surface distance (SSD) for various square field sizes from 5x5 cm to 40x40 cm and depth of 1.5 cm to 25 cm for 6 MV and 15 MV x-ray beam. With the same field sizes, depths and energies, the TMR values were measured. The validity of the calculated data was determined by making a comparison with values measured experimentally at some selected field sizes and depths. The results show that; the reference depth of maximum

  9. Assessment of maximum tolerated dose of a new herbal drug, Semelil (ANGIPARSTM in patients with diabetic foot ulcer: A Phase I clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heshmat R

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and the purpose of the study: In many cases of diabetic foot ulcer (DFU management, wound healing is incomplete, and wound closure and epithelial junctional integrity are rarely achieved. Our aim was to evaluate the maximum tolerated dose (MTD and dose-limiting toxicity (DLT of Semelil (ANGIPARSTM, a new herbal compound for wound treatment in a Phase I clinical trial.Methods: In this open label study, six male diabetic patients with a mean age of 57±7.6 years were treated with escalating intravenous doses of Semelil, which started at 2 cc/day to 13.5 cc/day for 28 days. Patients were assessed with a full physical exam; variables which analyzed included age, past history of diabetes and its duration, blood pressure, body temperature, weight, characteristics of DFU, Na, K, liver function test, Complete Blood Count and Differential(CBC & diff, serum amylase, HbA1c, PT, PTT, proteinuria, hematuria, and side effects were recorded. All the measurements were taken at the beginning of treatment, the end of week 2 and week 4. We also evaluated Semelil's side effects at the end of weeks 4 and 8 after ending therapy.Results and major conclusions: Up to the drug dose of 10 cc/day foot ulcer dramatically improved. We did not observe any clinical or laboratory side effects at this or lower dose levels in diabetic patients. With daily dose of 13.5 cc of Semelil we observed phlebitis at the infusion site, which was the only side effect. Therefore, in this study we determined the MTD of Semelil at 10 cc/day, and the only DLT was phlebitis in injection vein. The recommended dose of Semelil I.V. administration for Phase II studies was 4 cc/day.

  10. Maximum tolerated dose evaluation of the AMPA modulator Org 26576 in healthy volunteers and depressed patients: a summary and method analysis of bridging research in support of phase II dose selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nations, Kari R; Bursi, Roberta; Dogterom, Peter; Ereshefsky, Larry; Gertsik, Lev; Mant, Tim; Schipper, Jacques

    2012-09-01

    A key challenge to dose selection in early central nervous system (CNS) clinical drug development is that patient tolerability profiles often differ from those of healthy volunteers (HVs), yet HVs are the modal population for determining doses to be investigated in phase II trials. Without clear tolerability data from the target patient population, first efficacy trials may include doses that are either too high or too low, creating undue risk for study participants and the development program overall. Bridging trials address this challenge by carefully investigating safety and tolerability in the target population prior to full-scale proof-of-concept trials. Org 26576 is an alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA) receptor positive allosteric modulator that acts by modulating ionotropic AMPA-type glutamate receptors to enhance glutamatergic neurotransmission. In preparation for phase II efficacy trials in major depressive disorder (MDD), two separate phase I trials were conducted to evaluate safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics in HVs and in the target patient population. Both trials were randomized and placebo controlled, and included multiple rising-dose cohorts (HV range 100-400 mg bid; MDD range 100-600 mg bid). HVs (n = 36) and patients with MDD (n = 54) were dosed under similarly controlled conditions in an inpatient facility, HVs for up to 14 days and MDD patients for up to 28 days. Safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics were assessed frequently. Despite comparable pharmacokinetic profiles, the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) in depressed patients was 450 mg bid, twice the MTD established in HVs. No clinically relevant safety issues associated with Org 26576 were noted. This article presents safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetic data from two different populations examined under similar dosing conditions. The important implications of such bridging work in phase II dose selection are discussed, as are study

  11. Radiation-induced rib fracture after stereotactic body radiotherapy with a total dose of 54-56 Gy given in 9-7 fractions for patients with peripheral lung tumor: impact of maximum dose and fraction size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Masahiko; Sato, Mariko; Hirose, Katsumi; Akimoto, Hiroyoshi; Kawaguchi, Hideo; Hatayama, Yoshiomi; Ono, Shuichi; Takai, Yoshihiro

    2015-04-22

    Radiation-induced rib fracture after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung cancer has been recently reported. However, incidence of radiation-induced rib fracture after SBRT using moderate fraction sizes with a long-term follow-up time are not clarified. We examined incidence and risk factors of radiation-induced rib fracture after SBRT using moderate fraction sizes for the patients with peripherally located lung tumor. During 2003-2008, 41 patients with 42 lung tumors were treated with SBRT to 54-56 Gy in 9-7 fractions. The endpoint in the study was radiation-induced rib fracture detected by CT scan after the treatment. All ribs where the irradiated doses were more than 80% of prescribed dose were selected and contoured to build the dose-volume histograms (DVHs). Comparisons of the several factors obtained from the DVHs and the probabilities of rib fracture calculated by Kaplan-Meier method were performed in the study. Median follow-up time was 68 months. Among 75 contoured ribs, 23 rib fractures were observed in 34% of the patients during 16-48 months after SBRT, however, no patients complained of chest wall pain. The 4-year probabilities of rib fracture for maximum dose of ribs (Dmax) more than and less than 54 Gy were 47.7% and 12.9% (p = 0.0184), and for fraction size of 6, 7 and 8 Gy were 19.5%, 31.2% and 55.7% (p = 0.0458), respectively. Other factors, such as D2cc, mean dose of ribs, V10-55, age, sex, and planning target volume were not significantly different. The doses and fractionations used in this study resulted in no clinically significant rib fractures for this population, but that higher Dmax and dose per fraction treatments resulted in an increase in asymptomatic grade 1 rib fractures.

  12. Radiation-induced rib fracture after stereotactic body radiotherapy with a total dose of 54–56 Gy given in 9–7 fractions for patients with peripheral lung tumor: impact of maximum dose and fraction size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Masahiko; Sato, Mariko; Hirose, Katsumi; Akimoto, Hiroyoshi; Kawaguchi, Hideo; Hatayama, Yoshiomi; Ono, Shuichi; Takai, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced rib fracture after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung cancer has been recently reported. However, incidence of radiation-induced rib fracture after SBRT using moderate fraction sizes with a long-term follow-up time are not clarified. We examined incidence and risk factors of radiation-induced rib fracture after SBRT using moderate fraction sizes for the patients with peripherally located lung tumor. During 2003–2008, 41 patients with 42 lung tumors were treated with SBRT to 54–56 Gy in 9–7 fractions. The endpoint in the study was radiation-induced rib fracture detected by CT scan after the treatment. All ribs where the irradiated doses were more than 80% of prescribed dose were selected and contoured to build the dose-volume histograms (DVHs). Comparisons of the several factors obtained from the DVHs and the probabilities of rib fracture calculated by Kaplan-Meier method were performed in the study. Median follow-up time was 68 months. Among 75 contoured ribs, 23 rib fractures were observed in 34% of the patients during 16–48 months after SBRT, however, no patients complained of chest wall pain. The 4-year probabilities of rib fracture for maximum dose of ribs (Dmax) more than and less than 54 Gy were 47.7% and 12.9% (p = 0.0184), and for fraction size of 6, 7 and 8 Gy were 19.5%, 31.2% and 55.7% (p = 0.0458), respectively. Other factors, such as D2cc, mean dose of ribs, V10–55, age, sex, and planning target volume were not significantly different. The doses and fractionations used in this study resulted in no clinically significant rib fractures for this population, but that higher Dmax and dose per fraction treatments resulted in an increase in asymptomatic grade 1 rib fractures

  13. Production and bromatologic composition of grass-mombaça (Panicum maximum Jacq., submitted to different sources and doses of acidity corrective / Produção e composição bromatológica da forragem do capim-mombaça (Panicum maximum Jacq., submetidos a diferentes fontes e doses de corretivo de acidez

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Maximino Fernandes

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The experiment was carried in protected (greenhouse atmosphere, in University of Engineering, UNESP of Ilha Solteira-SP, with the objective of evaluating sources (limestone and calcium silicate slag and doses (0,0 – 0,5 – 1,0 – 1,5 – 2,0 times the recommended dose of corrective in the bromatologic composition, tillering and production of dry matter of the grass mombaça (Panicum maximum Jacq.. The lineation was completely randomized design, with four repetitions. It was evaluated the tiller number, the production of dry matter, the gross protein, neutral detergent fiber (NDF and acid detergent fiber (ADF. The corrective influenced the tillering in almost all of the countings. The limestone provided larger production of dry matter in the doses of 1,5 and 2,0 times the recommended dose. The bromatologic composition of the forage was not influenced by the corrective and doses.O experimento foi conduzido em ambiente protegido (estufa, na Faculdade de Engenharia, UNESP de Ilha Solteira, com o objetivo de avaliar fontes (calcário e escória silicatada e doses (0,0 – 0,5 – 1,0 – 1,5 – 2,0 vezes a dose recomendada de corretivos na composição bromatológica, perfilhamento e produção de matéria seca do capim-mombaça (Panicum maximum Jacq.. O delineamento experimental utilizado foi inteiramente casualizado, com quatro repetições. Avaliou-se o número de perfilhos, a produção de matéria seca e os teores de proteína bruta (PB, fibra em detergente neutro (FDN e fibra em detergente ácido (FDA. Os corretivos influenciaram o perfilhamento em quase todas as contagens. O calcário proporcionou maior produção de matéria seca nas doses de 1,5 e 2,0 vezes a dose recomendada. A composição bromatológica da forragem não foi influenciada pelos corretivos e doses utilizadas.

  14. Safety and maximum tolerated dose of superselective intraarterial cerebral infusion of bevacizumab after osmotic blood-brain barrier disruption for recurrent malignant glioma. Clinical article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boockvar, John A; Tsiouris, Apostolos J; Hofstetter, Christoph P; Kovanlikaya, Ilhami; Fralin, Sherese; Kesavabhotla, Kartik; Seedial, Stephen M; Pannullo, Susan C; Schwartz, Theodore H; Stieg, Philip; Zimmerman, Robert D; Knopman, Jared; Scheff, Ronald J; Christos, Paul; Vallabhajosula, Shankar; Riina, Howard A

    2011-03-01

    The authors assessed the safety and maximum tolerated dose of superselective intraarterial cerebral infusion (SIACI) of bevacizumab after osmotic disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) with mannitol in patients with recurrent malignant glioma. A total of 30 patients with recurrent malignant glioma were included in the current study. The authors report no dose-limiting toxicity from a single dose of SIACI of bevacizumab up to 15 mg/kg after osmotic BBB disruption with mannitol. Two groups of patients were studied; those without prior bevacizumab exposure (naïve patients; Group I) and those who had received previous intravenous bevacizumab (exposed patients; Group II). Radiographic changes demonstrated on MR imaging were assessed at 1 month postprocedure. In Group I patients, MR imaging at 1 month showed a median reduction in the area of tumor enhancement of 34.7%, a median reduction in the volume of tumor enhancement of 46.9%, a median MR perfusion (MRP) reduction of 32.14%, and a T2-weighted/FLAIR signal decrease in 9 (47.4%) of 19 patients. In Group II patients, MR imaging at 1 month showed a median reduction in the area of tumor enhancement of 15.2%, a median volume reduction of 8.3%, a median MRP reduction of 25.5%, and a T2-weighted FLAIR decrease in 0 (0%) of 11 patients. The authors conclude that SIACI of mannitol followed by bevacizumab (up to 15 mg/kg) for recurrent malignant glioma is safe and well tolerated. Magnetic resonance imaging shows that SIACI treatment with bevacizumab can lead to reduction in tumor area, volume, perfusion, and T2-weighted/FLAIR signal.

  15. Approach to calculating upper bounds on maximum individual doses from the use of contaminated well water following a WIPP repository breach. Report EEG-9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiegler, P.

    1981-09-01

    As part of the assessment of the potential radiological consequences of the proposed Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), this report evaluates the post-closure radiation dose commitments associated with a possible breach event which involves dissolution of the repository by groundwaters and subsequent transport of the nuclear waste through an aquifer to a well assumed to exist at a point 3 miles downstream from the repository. The concentrations of uranium and plutonium isotopes at the well are based on the nuclear waste inventory presently proposed for WIPP and basic assumptions concerning the transport of waste as well as treatment to reduce the salinity of the water. The concentrations of U-233, Pu-239, and Pu-240, all radionuclides originally emplaced as waste in the repository, would exceed current EPA drinking water limits. The concentrations of U-234, U-235, and U-236, all decay products of plutonium isotopes originally emplaced as waste, would be well below current EPA drinking water limits. The 50-year dose commitments from one year of drinking treated water contaminated with U-233 or Pu-239 and Pu-240 were found to be comparable to a one-year dose from natural background. The 50-year dose commitments from one year of drinking milk would be no more than about 1/5 the dose obtained from ingestion of treated water. These doses are considered upper bounds because of several very conservative assumptions which are discussed in the report

  16. Antihypertensive effects of double the maximum dose of valsartan in African-American patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and albuminuria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weir, Matthew R; Hollenberg, Norman K; Zappe, Dion H

    2010-01-01

    The blood pressure (BP)-lowering response to renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system blockade in hypertensive African-Americans is typically less than in whites. To determine whether higher than conventional doses of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system blockade can improve BP reduction in African-A...

  17. Intramural Injection with Botulinum Toxin Type A in Piglet Esophagus. The Influencer on Maximum Load and Elongation: A Dose Response Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellebæk, Mark Bremholm; Qvist, Niels; Schrøder, Henrik Daa; Rasmussen, Lars

    2016-06-01

    Introduction The treatment of esophageal atresia (OA) is challenging. The main goal is to achieve primary anastomosis. We have previously demonstrated in a pig model that intramural injection of botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) resulted in significant elongation of the esophagus during tensioning until bursting point. The objectives of the present study were to investigate the influence of different amounts of intramural BTX-A on the stretch-tension characteristics and histological changes of the esophagus in piglets. Materials and Methods A total of 52 piglets were randomized to four groups receiving 2, 4, or 8 units/kg of BTX-A or isotonic saline (placebo). After a 1-hour of rest the esophagus was harvested and subjected to a stretch-tension test and histological examination to assess changes in the density of presynaptic vesicles in the nerve cells. Results Overall, 9 of the 52 animals were excluded from analysis due to problems with the stretch-tension test or death from anesthesia. The maximum loads were higher in the BTX-A groups (2 units/kg: +2.1 N; 4 units/kg: +1.3 N; 8 units/kg: +1.9 N) than the placebo (p = 0.046). There were no significant differences in percentage elongation, or histology. Conclusions This study demonstrated that injection of 2 units/kg BTX-A into a nonanastomosed esophageal wall resulted in a modest increase in the maximum load achieved before bursting; this may be due to the muscle-relaxant effect of BTX-A. BTX-A injection produced no significant effects on elongation or esophageal histology. The clinical usefulness of BTX-A in treatment of OA is still unclear. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Dosimetric evaluation in organs of the Tc{sup 99m}, I{sup 123} bio-kinetics to estimate dose in thyroid children 1 and 5 years; Evaluacion dosimetrica en organos de la biocinetica del Tc{sup 99m}, I{sup 123} para estimar dosis en tiroides ninos 1 y 5 anos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasquez, A. M.; Quispe, R.; Vasquez, D. J.; Rocha, M. D.; Morales, N. R.; Marin, R. K. [Universidad Nacional de Trujillo, Av. Juan Pablo II s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, Trujillo (Peru); Zelada, A. L., E-mail: marvva@hotmail.com [Universidad Cesar Vallejo, Grupo de Fisica Medica, Av. Larco s/n, Trujillo (Peru)

    2012-10-15

    Using the formalism MIRD and the representation of Cristy-Eckerman for the thyroid in children of 1 and 5 years, is demonstrated that the dosimetric contribution of the organs of I{sup 123} (iodure) bio-kinetics is not significant in the dose estimate. The total dose absorbed by the gland is its auto dose. The dosimetric contribution of the organs source of the Tc{sup 99m} (pertechnetate) bio-kinetics in the gland is significant in the dose estimate like to be ignored. The reported results for the iodure are not significantly different to the found for the Marinelli scheme (auto-dose) for thyroid represented by a sphere of 1,78 and 3,45 grams. (Author)

  19. Dosimetric contribution of organs of biokinetics of {sup 99m}Tc and {sup 123}I to estimate radiation doses in thyroids of children of 1 and 5 years; Contribucion dosimetrica de organos de la biocinetica del {sup 99m}Tc y {sup 123}I para estimar dosis en tiroides de ninos de 1 y 5 anos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasquez, M.V.; Castillo, C.E.; Abanto, D.M.; Rocha, D.; Garcia, W.H.; Marin, K., E-mail: marvva@hotmail.com [Universidad Nacional de Trujillo (UNT), Trujillo (Peru); Quispe, R. [Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnologico, UNAM, Mexico (Mexico)

    2015-07-01

    The absorbed doses by thyroids during uptake studies through biokinetics of radiopharmaceuticals containing {sup 123}I (iodine) or {sup 99m}Tc (pertechnetate) are estimated. Using the MIRD scheme and the representation of Cristy-Eckerman for thyroids in children of 1 and 5 years, the objective of the study was to determine whether the dosimetric biokinetic contributions of the organs of {sup 123}I (iodide) and {sup 99m}Tc (pertechnetate) biokinetic are significant in the estimated of the absorbed dose for thyroid uptake studies.

  20. Approximate maximum parsimony and ancestral maximum likelihood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alon, Noga; Chor, Benny; Pardi, Fabio; Rapoport, Anat

    2010-01-01

    We explore the maximum parsimony (MP) and ancestral maximum likelihood (AML) criteria in phylogenetic tree reconstruction. Both problems are NP-hard, so we seek approximate solutions. We formulate the two problems as Steiner tree problems under appropriate distances. The gist of our approach is the succinct characterization of Steiner trees for a small number of leaves for the two distances. This enables the use of known Steiner tree approximation algorithms. The approach leads to a 16/9 approximation ratio for AML and asymptotically to a 1.55 approximation ratio for MP.

  1. Decree of the Ministry of Health about conditions of irradiation of food, permissible additional substances or other food components, which can be subjected to ionizing radiation action, their specification, maximum irradiation doses as well as about requirements for marking and introducing into turnover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipinski, M.

    2003-01-01

    The decree refers to conditions of irradiation of food and its components for radappertization and radurization using gamma radiation from cobalt 60 or cesium 137, X radiation or electron beam up to maximum total medium absorbed dose 10 kGy

  2. Maximum Acceleration Recording Circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Coarsely digitized maximum levels recorded in blown fuses. Circuit feeds power to accelerometer and makes nonvolatile record of maximum level to which output of accelerometer rises during measurement interval. In comparison with inertia-type single-preset-trip-point mechanical maximum-acceleration-recording devices, circuit weighs less, occupies less space, and records accelerations within narrower bands of uncertainty. In comparison with prior electronic data-acquisition systems designed for same purpose, circuit simpler, less bulky, consumes less power, costs and analysis of data recorded in magnetic or electronic memory devices. Circuit used, for example, to record accelerations to which commodities subjected during transportation on trucks.

  3. Maximum Quantum Entropy Method

    OpenAIRE

    Sim, Jae-Hoon; Han, Myung Joon

    2018-01-01

    Maximum entropy method for analytic continuation is extended by introducing quantum relative entropy. This new method is formulated in terms of matrix-valued functions and therefore invariant under arbitrary unitary transformation of input matrix. As a result, the continuation of off-diagonal elements becomes straightforward. Without introducing any further ambiguity, the Bayesian probabilistic interpretation is maintained just as in the conventional maximum entropy method. The applications o...

  4. Maximum power demand cost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biondi, L.

    1998-01-01

    The charging for a service is a supplier's remuneration for the expenses incurred in providing it. There are currently two charges for electricity: consumption and maximum demand. While no problem arises about the former, the issue is more complicated for the latter and the analysis in this article tends to show that the annual charge for maximum demand arbitrarily discriminates among consumer groups, to the disadvantage of some [it

  5. LOS GENES BRCA1 y BRCA2. ESTUDIO MOLECULAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Alonso

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available RESUMENEn los últimos años, se realizaron numerosos estudios para establecer la predisposición hereditaria al cáncer y las alteraciones mutacionales a nivel de genes susceptibles de originar cáncer de mama y ovario. En 1994 se identificaron los genes BRCA1 (Breast Cancer Gene 1 y BRCA2 (Breast Cancer Gene 2 como susceptibles de cáncer de mama y ovario. En la actualidad se sabe que las mutaciones en BRCA1 y BRCA2 están lejos de explicar la totalidad de los casos de cáncer de mama y/o ovario, y a pesar de que se postulan alteraciones mutacionales en otros genes como CHEK2, TP53 y PTEN, el BRCA1 y BRCA2, siguen teniendo su importancia y utilidad en la valoración del riesgo de predisposición hereditaria. Aunque las cifras son variables según los distintos estudios y autores, se trata en cualquier caso de porcentajes importantes. Entre el 15 y el 85% de las mujeres portadoras de mutación BRCA 1 o BRCA 2 tienen riesgo de desarrollar un cáncer de mama y entre un 10 y 60% de desarrollar un cáncer de ovario. ABSTRACT:In the last years, numerous studies were made to establish the hereditary predisposition to the cancer and the mutationals alterations at level of genes susceptible to originate breast and ovarian cancers. In 1994 genes BRCA1 (Breast Cancer Gene 1 and BRCA2 were identified (Breast Cancer Gene 2 as susceptible of both of breast and ovarian cancers. At the present time, it is knows that the mutations in BRCA 1 and BRCA 2 are far from explaining the totality of the cases of breast cancer and/or ovary, and although mutationals alterations in other genes like CHEK2, TP53 and PTEN, the BRCA1 and BRCA2 are postulated, they continue having his importance and utility in the valuation of the risk of hereditary predisposition. Correlations between both BRCA1 and BRCA2 levels with tumour grade metastasis and prognostic accuracy. Between 15 and 85% of the carrying women of mutation BRCA 1 or BRCA 2 have risk of developing a cancer of breast

  6. Maximum likely scale estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loog, Marco; Pedersen, Kim Steenstrup; Markussen, Bo

    2005-01-01

    A maximum likelihood local scale estimation principle is presented. An actual implementation of the estimation principle uses second order moments of multiple measurements at a fixed location in the image. These measurements consist of Gaussian derivatives possibly taken at several scales and/or ...

  7. Robust Maximum Association Estimators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Alfons (Andreas); C. Croux (Christophe); P. Filzmoser (Peter)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractThe maximum association between two multivariate variables X and Y is defined as the maximal value that a bivariate association measure between one-dimensional projections αX and αY can attain. Taking the Pearson correlation as projection index results in the first canonical correlation

  8. Maximum power point tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enslin, J.H.R.

    1990-01-01

    A well engineered renewable remote energy system, utilizing the principal of Maximum Power Point Tracking can be m ore cost effective, has a higher reliability and can improve the quality of life in remote areas. This paper reports that a high-efficient power electronic converter, for converting the output voltage of a solar panel, or wind generator, to the required DC battery bus voltage has been realized. The converter is controlled to track the maximum power point of the input source under varying input and output parameters. Maximum power point tracking for relative small systems is achieved by maximization of the output current in a battery charging regulator, using an optimized hill-climbing, inexpensive microprocessor based algorithm. Through practical field measurements it is shown that a minimum input source saving of 15% on 3-5 kWh/day systems can easily be achieved. A total cost saving of at least 10-15% on the capital cost of these systems are achievable for relative small rating Remote Area Power Supply systems. The advantages at larger temperature variations and larger power rated systems are much higher. Other advantages include optimal sizing and system monitor and control

  9. Maximum entropy methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponman, T.J.

    1984-01-01

    For some years now two different expressions have been in use for maximum entropy image restoration and there has been some controversy over which one is appropriate for a given problem. Here two further entropies are presented and it is argued that there is no single correct algorithm. The properties of the four different methods are compared using simple 1D simulations with a view to showing how they can be used together to gain as much information as possible about the original object. (orig.)

  10. Identification, expression and phylogenetic analysis of EgG1Y162 from Echinococcus granulosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fengbo; Ma, Xiumin; Zhu, Yuejie; Wang, Hongying; Liu, Xianfei; Zhu, Min; Ma, Haimei; Wen, Hao; Fan, Haining; Ding, Jianbing

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study was to clone, identify and analyze the characteristics of egG1Y162 gene from Echinococcus granulosus. Methods: Genomic DNA and total RNAs were extracted from four different developmental stages of protoscolex, germinal layer, adult and egg of Echinococcus granulosus, respectively. Fluorescent quantitative PCR was used for analyzing the expression of egG1Y162 gene. Prokaryotic expression plasmid of pET41a-EgG1Y162 was constructed to express recombinant His-EgG1Y162 antigen. Western blot analysis was performed to detect antigenicity of EgG1Y162 antigen. Gene sequence, amino acid alignment and phylogenetic tree of EgG1Y162 were analyzed by BLAST, online Spidey and MEGA4 software, respectively. Results: EgG1Y162 gene was expressed in four developmental stages of Echinococcus granulosus. And, egG1Y162 gene expression was the highest in the adult stage, with the relative value of 19.526, significantly higher than other three stages. Additionally, Western blot analysis revealed that EgG1Y162 recombinant protein had good reaction with serum samples from Echinococcus granulosus infected human and dog. Moreover, EgG1Y162 antigen was phylogenetically closest to EmY162 antigen, with the similarity over 90%. Conclusion: Our study identified EgG1Y162 antigen in Echinococcus granulosus for the first time. EgG1Y162 antigen had a high similarity with EmY162 antigen, with the genetic differences mainly existing in the intron region. And, EgG1Y162 recombinant protein showed good antigenicity. PMID:25337206

  11. Identification, expression and phylogenetic analysis of EgG1Y162 from Echinococcus granulosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fengbo; Ma, Xiumin; Zhu, Yuejie; Wang, Hongying; Liu, Xianfei; Zhu, Min; Ma, Haimei; Wen, Hao; Fan, Haining; Ding, Jianbing

    2014-01-01

    This study was to clone, identify and analyze the characteristics of egG1Y162 gene from Echinococcus granulosus. Genomic DNA and total RNAs were extracted from four different developmental stages of protoscolex, germinal layer, adult and egg of Echinococcus granulosus, respectively. Fluorescent quantitative PCR was used for analyzing the expression of egG1Y162 gene. Prokaryotic expression plasmid of pET41a-EgG1Y162 was constructed to express recombinant His-EgG1Y162 antigen. Western blot analysis was performed to detect antigenicity of EgG1Y162 antigen. Gene sequence, amino acid alignment and phylogenetic tree of EgG1Y162 were analyzed by BLAST, online Spidey and MEGA4 software, respectively. EgG1Y162 gene was expressed in four developmental stages of Echinococcus granulosus. And, egG1Y162 gene expression was the highest in the adult stage, with the relative value of 19.526, significantly higher than other three stages. Additionally, Western blot analysis revealed that EgG1Y162 recombinant protein had good reaction with serum samples from Echinococcus granulosus infected human and dog. Moreover, EgG1Y162 antigen was phylogenetically closest to EmY162 antigen, with the similarity over 90%. Our study identified EgG1Y162 antigen in Echinococcus granulosus for the first time. EgG1Y162 antigen had a high similarity with EmY162 antigen, with the genetic differences mainly existing in the intron region. And, EgG1Y162 recombinant protein showed good antigenicity.

  12. The last glacial maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, P.U.; Dyke, A.S.; Shakun, J.D.; Carlson, A.E.; Clark, J.; Wohlfarth, B.; Mitrovica, J.X.; Hostetler, S.W.; McCabe, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    We used 5704 14C, 10Be, and 3He ages that span the interval from 10,000 to 50,000 years ago (10 to 50 ka) to constrain the timing of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) in terms of global ice-sheet and mountain-glacier extent. Growth of the ice sheets to their maximum positions occurred between 33.0 and 26.5 ka in response to climate forcing from decreases in northern summer insolation, tropical Pacific sea surface temperatures, and atmospheric CO2. Nearly all ice sheets were at their LGM positions from 26.5 ka to 19 to 20 ka, corresponding to minima in these forcings. The onset of Northern Hemisphere deglaciation 19 to 20 ka was induced by an increase in northern summer insolation, providing the source for an abrupt rise in sea level. The onset of deglaciation of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet occurred between 14 and 15 ka, consistent with evidence that this was the primary source for an abrupt rise in sea level ???14.5 ka.

  13. Maximum Entropy Fundamentals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Topsøe

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: In its modern formulation, the Maximum Entropy Principle was promoted by E.T. Jaynes, starting in the mid-fifties. The principle dictates that one should look for a distribution, consistent with available information, which maximizes the entropy. However, this principle focuses only on distributions and it appears advantageous to bring information theoretical thinking more prominently into play by also focusing on the "observer" and on coding. This view was brought forward by the second named author in the late seventies and is the view we will follow-up on here. It leads to the consideration of a certain game, the Code Length Game and, via standard game theoretical thinking, to a principle of Game Theoretical Equilibrium. This principle is more basic than the Maximum Entropy Principle in the sense that the search for one type of optimal strategies in the Code Length Game translates directly into the search for distributions with maximum entropy. In the present paper we offer a self-contained and comprehensive treatment of fundamentals of both principles mentioned, based on a study of the Code Length Game. Though new concepts and results are presented, the reading should be instructional and accessible to a rather wide audience, at least if certain mathematical details are left aside at a rst reading. The most frequently studied instance of entropy maximization pertains to the Mean Energy Model which involves a moment constraint related to a given function, here taken to represent "energy". This type of application is very well known from the literature with hundreds of applications pertaining to several different elds and will also here serve as important illustration of the theory. But our approach reaches further, especially regarding the study of continuity properties of the entropy function, and this leads to new results which allow a discussion of models with so-called entropy loss. These results have tempted us to speculate over

  14. Probable maximum flood control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeGabriele, C.E.; Wu, C.L.

    1991-11-01

    This study proposes preliminary design concepts to protect the waste-handling facilities and all shaft and ramp entries to the underground from the probable maximum flood (PMF) in the current design configuration for the proposed Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigation (NNWSI) repository protection provisions were furnished by the United States Bureau of Reclamation (USSR) or developed from USSR data. Proposed flood protection provisions include site grading, drainage channels, and diversion dikes. Figures are provided to show these proposed flood protection provisions at each area investigated. These areas are the central surface facilities (including the waste-handling building and waste treatment building), tuff ramp portal, waste ramp portal, men-and-materials shaft, emplacement exhaust shaft, and exploratory shafts facility

  15. Introduction to maximum entropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivia, D.S.

    1988-01-01

    The maximum entropy (MaxEnt) principle has been successfully used in image reconstruction in a wide variety of fields. We review the need for such methods in data analysis and show, by use of a very simple example, why MaxEnt is to be preferred over other regularizing functions. This leads to a more general interpretation of the MaxEnt method, and its use is illustrated with several different examples. Practical difficulties with non-linear problems still remain, this being highlighted by the notorious phase problem in crystallography. We conclude with an example from neutron scattering, using data from a filter difference spectrometer to contrast MaxEnt with a conventional deconvolution. 12 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  16. Solar maximum observatory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rust, D.M.

    1984-01-01

    The successful retrieval and repair of the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) satellite by Shuttle astronauts in April 1984 permitted continuance of solar flare observations that began in 1980. The SMM carries a soft X ray polychromator, gamma ray, UV and hard X ray imaging spectrometers, a coronagraph/polarimeter and particle counters. The data gathered thus far indicated that electrical potentials of 25 MeV develop in flares within 2 sec of onset. X ray data show that flares are composed of compressed magnetic loops that have come too close together. Other data have been taken on mass ejection, impacts of electron beams and conduction fronts with the chromosphere and changes in the solar radiant flux due to sunspots. 13 references

  17. Introduction to maximum entropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivia, D.S.

    1989-01-01

    The maximum entropy (MaxEnt) principle has been successfully used in image reconstruction in a wide variety of fields. The author reviews the need for such methods in data analysis and shows, by use of a very simple example, why MaxEnt is to be preferred over other regularizing functions. This leads to a more general interpretation of the MaxEnt method, and its use is illustrated with several different examples. Practical difficulties with non-linear problems still remain, this being highlighted by the notorious phase problem in crystallography. He concludes with an example from neutron scattering, using data from a filter difference spectrometer to contrast MaxEnt with a conventional deconvolution. 12 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  18. Functional Maximum Autocorrelation Factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Rasmus; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg

    2005-01-01

    MAF outperforms the functional PCA in concentrating the interesting' spectra/shape variation in one end of the eigenvalue spectrum and allows for easier interpretation of effects. Conclusions. Functional MAF analysis is a useful methods for extracting low dimensional models of temporally or spatially......Purpose. We aim at data where samples of an underlying function are observed in a spatial or temporal layout. Examples of underlying functions are reflectance spectra and biological shapes. We apply functional models based on smoothing splines and generalize the functional PCA in......\\verb+~+\\$\\backslash\\$cite{ramsay97} to functional maximum autocorrelation factors (MAF)\\verb+~+\\$\\backslash\\$cite{switzer85,larsen2001d}. We apply the method to biological shapes as well as reflectance spectra. {\\$\\backslash\\$bf Methods}. MAF seeks linear combination of the original variables that maximize autocorrelation between...

  19. Regularized maximum correntropy machine

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jim Jing-Yan; Wang, Yunji; Jing, Bing-Yi; Gao, Xin

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the usage of regularized correntropy framework for learning of classifiers from noisy labels. The class label predictors learned by minimizing transitional loss functions are sensitive to the noisy and outlying labels of training samples, because the transitional loss functions are equally applied to all the samples. To solve this problem, we propose to learn the class label predictors by maximizing the correntropy between the predicted labels and the true labels of the training samples, under the regularized Maximum Correntropy Criteria (MCC) framework. Moreover, we regularize the predictor parameter to control the complexity of the predictor. The learning problem is formulated by an objective function considering the parameter regularization and MCC simultaneously. By optimizing the objective function alternately, we develop a novel predictor learning algorithm. The experiments on two challenging pattern classification tasks show that it significantly outperforms the machines with transitional loss functions.

  20. Regularized maximum correntropy machine

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jim Jing-Yan

    2015-02-12

    In this paper we investigate the usage of regularized correntropy framework for learning of classifiers from noisy labels. The class label predictors learned by minimizing transitional loss functions are sensitive to the noisy and outlying labels of training samples, because the transitional loss functions are equally applied to all the samples. To solve this problem, we propose to learn the class label predictors by maximizing the correntropy between the predicted labels and the true labels of the training samples, under the regularized Maximum Correntropy Criteria (MCC) framework. Moreover, we regularize the predictor parameter to control the complexity of the predictor. The learning problem is formulated by an objective function considering the parameter regularization and MCC simultaneously. By optimizing the objective function alternately, we develop a novel predictor learning algorithm. The experiments on two challenging pattern classification tasks show that it significantly outperforms the machines with transitional loss functions.

  1. Solar maximum mission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, J.

    1981-01-01

    By understanding the sun, astrophysicists hope to expand this knowledge to understanding other stars. To study the sun, NASA launched a satellite on February 14, 1980. The project is named the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM). The satellite conducted detailed observations of the sun in collaboration with other satellites and ground-based optical and radio observations until its failure 10 months into the mission. The main objective of the SMM was to investigate one aspect of solar activity: solar flares. A brief description of the flare mechanism is given. The SMM satellite was valuable in providing information on where and how a solar flare occurs. A sequence of photographs of a solar flare taken from SMM satellite shows how a solar flare develops in a particular layer of the solar atmosphere. Two flares especially suitable for detailed observations by a joint effort occurred on April 30 and May 21 of 1980. These flares and observations of the flares are discussed. Also discussed are significant discoveries made by individual experiments

  2. Ambulatory blood pressure parameters after canrenone addition to existing treatment regimens with maximum tolerated dose of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockers plus hydrochlorothiazide in uncontrolled hypertensive patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guasti L

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Luigina Guasti,1,* Giovanni Gaudio,2,* Alessandro Lupi,3 Marinella D’Avino,4 Carla Sala,5,6 Amedeo Mugellini,7 Vito Vulpis,8 Salvatore Felis,9 Riccardo Sarzani,10,11 Massimo Vanasia,12 Pamela Maffioli,7 Giuseppe Derosa7 1Research Center on Dyslipidemia, Internal Medicine 1, University of Insubria, Varese, Italy; 2Internal Medicine Division, Ospedale Angelo Bellini, ASST Valle Olona Somma, Varese, Italy; 3Cardiology Unit, ASL VCO Verbania-Domodossola, Verbania, Italy; 4Unit for the Treatment of Arterial Hypertension, Ospedale Cardarelli, Napoli, Italy; 5Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, University of Milan, Milano, Italy; 6Cardiovascular Unit, Fondazione IRCCSS Policlinico, Milano, Italy; 7Department of Internal Medicine and Therapeutics, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy; 8Unit for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Arterial Hypertension, Department of Internal Medicine, Policlinico di Bari, Bari, Italy; 9Cardiology Unit, Ospedale Garibaldi, Catania, Italy; 10ESH Center of Hypertension, Internal Medicine and Geriatrics, University Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona, Italy; 11IRCCS-INRCA, Ancona, Italy; 12THERABEL GiEnne Pharma, Milano, Italy *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Blockade of the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system is a cornerstone in cardiovascular disease prevention and hypertension treatment. The relevance of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM has been widely confirmed for both increasing the accuracy of blood pressure (BP measurements, particularly in pharmacological trials, and focusing on 24 h BP prognostic parameters. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of canrenone addition on ambulatory BP in uncontrolled hypertensive patients already treated with the highest tolerated dose of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors or angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R antagonists plus hydrochlorothiazide (HCT. Methods: ABPM was performed at baseline and after 3

  3. Increased transient Na+ conductance and action potential output in layer 2/3 prefrontal cortex neurons of the fmr1-/y mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Routh, Brandy N; Rathour, Rahul K; Baumgardner, Michael E; Kalmbach, Brian E; Johnston, Daniel; Brager, Darrin H

    2017-07-01

    Layer 2/3 neurons of the prefrontal cortex display higher gain of somatic excitability, responding with a higher number of action potentials for a given stimulus, in fmr1 -/y mice. In fmr1 -/y L2/3 neurons, action potentials are taller, faster and narrower. Outside-out patch clamp recordings revealed that the maximum Na + conductance density is higher in fmr1 -/y L2/3 neurons. Measurements of three biophysically distinct K + currents revealed a depolarizing shift in the activation of a rapidly inactivating (A-type) K + conductance. Realistic neuronal simulations of the biophysical observations recapitulated the elevated action potential and repetitive firing phenotype. Fragile X syndrome is the most common form of inherited mental impairment and autism. The prefrontal cortex is responsible for higher order cognitive processing, and prefrontal dysfunction is believed to underlie many of the cognitive and behavioural phenotypes associated with fragile X syndrome. We recently demonstrated that somatic and dendritic excitability of layer (L) 5 pyramidal neurons in the prefrontal cortex of the fmr1 -/y mouse is significantly altered due to changes in several voltage-gated ion channels. In addition to L5 pyramidal neurons, L2/3 pyramidal neurons play an important role in prefrontal circuitry, integrating inputs from both lower brain regions and the contralateral cortex. Using whole-cell current clamp recording, we found that L2/3 pyramidal neurons in prefrontal cortex of fmr1 -/y mouse fired more action potentials for a given stimulus compared with wild-type neurons. In addition, action potentials in fmr1 -/y neurons were significantly larger, faster and narrower. Voltage clamp of outside-out patches from L2/3 neurons revealed that the transient Na + current was significantly larger in fmr1 -/y neurons. Furthermore, the activation curve of somatic A-type K + current was depolarized. Realistic conductance-based simulations revealed that these biophysical changes in Na

  4. On dose distribution comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Steve B; Sharp, Greg C; Neicu, Toni; Berbeco, Ross I; Flampouri, Stella; Bortfeld, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    In radiotherapy practice, one often needs to compare two dose distributions. Especially with the wide clinical implementation of intensity-modulated radiation therapy, software tools for quantitative dose (or fluence) distribution comparison are required for patient-specific quality assurance. Dose distribution comparison is not a trivial task since it has to be performed in both dose and spatial domains in order to be clinically relevant. Each of the existing comparison methods has its own strengths and weaknesses and there is room for improvement. In this work, we developed a general framework for comparing dose distributions. Using a new concept called maximum allowed dose difference (MADD), the comparison in both dose and spatial domains can be performed entirely in the dose domain. Formulae for calculating MADD values for various comparison methods, such as composite analysis and gamma index, have been derived. For convenience in clinical practice, a new measure called normalized dose difference (NDD) has also been proposed, which is the dose difference at a point scaled by the ratio of MADD to the predetermined dose acceptance tolerance. Unlike the simple dose difference test, NDD works in both low and high dose gradient regions because it considers both dose and spatial acceptance tolerances through MADD. The new method has been applied to a test case and a clinical example. It was found that the new method combines the merits of the existing methods (accurate, simple, clinically intuitive and insensitive to dose grid size) and can easily be implemented into any dose/intensity comparison tool

  5. Modelling maximum likelihood estimation of availability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waller, R.A.; Tietjen, G.L.; Rock, G.W.

    1975-01-01

    Suppose the performance of a nuclear powered electrical generating power plant is continuously monitored to record the sequence of failure and repairs during sustained operation. The purpose of this study is to assess one method of estimating the performance of the power plant when the measure of performance is availability. That is, we determine the probability that the plant is operational at time t. To study the availability of a power plant, we first assume statistical models for the variables, X and Y, which denote the time-to-failure and the time-to-repair variables, respectively. Once those statistical models are specified, the availability, A(t), can be expressed as a function of some or all of their parameters. Usually those parameters are unknown in practice and so A(t) is unknown. This paper discusses the maximum likelihood estimator of A(t) when the time-to-failure model for X is an exponential density with parameter, lambda, and the time-to-repair model for Y is an exponential density with parameter, theta. Under the assumption of exponential models for X and Y, it follows that the instantaneous availability at time t is A(t)=lambda/(lambda+theta)+theta/(lambda+theta)exp[-[(1/lambda)+(1/theta)]t] with t>0. Also, the steady-state availability is A(infinity)=lambda/(lambda+theta). We use the observations from n failure-repair cycles of the power plant, say X 1 , X 2 , ..., Xsub(n), Y 1 , Y 2 , ..., Ysub(n) to present the maximum likelihood estimators of A(t) and A(infinity). The exact sampling distributions for those estimators and some statistical properties are discussed before a simulation model is used to determine 95% simulation intervals for A(t). The methodology is applied to two examples which approximate the operating history of two nuclear power plants. (author)

  6. Credal Networks under Maximum Entropy

    OpenAIRE

    Lukasiewicz, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We apply the principle of maximum entropy to select a unique joint probability distribution from the set of all joint probability distributions specified by a credal network. In detail, we start by showing that the unique joint distribution of a Bayesian tree coincides with the maximum entropy model of its conditional distributions. This result, however, does not hold anymore for general Bayesian networks. We thus present a new kind of maximum entropy models, which are computed sequentially. ...

  7. Purification and characterization of a novel plantaricin, KL-1Y, from Lactobacillus plantarum KL-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumjuankiat, Kittaporn; Perez, Rodney Horanda; Pilasombut, Komkhae; Keawsompong, Suttipun; Zendo, Takeshi; Sonomoto, Kenji; Nitisinprasert, Sunee

    2015-06-01

    Three bacteriocins from Lactobacillus plantarum KL-1 were successfully purified using ammonium sulfate precipitation, cation-exchange chromatography and reverse-phase HPLC. The bacteriocin peptides KL-1X, -1Y and -1Z had molecular masses of 3053.82, 3498.16 and 3533.16 Da, respectively. All three peptides were stable at pH 2-12 and 25 °C and at high temperatures of 80 and 100 °C for 30 min and 121 °C for 15 min. However, they differed in their susceptibility to proteolytic enzymes and their inhibition spectra. KL-1Y showed broad inhibitory activities against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, including Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis DMST 17368, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 15442, P. aeruginosa ATCC 9027, Escherichia coli O157:H7 and E. coli ATCC 8739. KL-1X and -1Z inhibited only Gram-positive bacteria. KL-1X, KL-1Y and KL-1Z exhibited synergistic activity. The successful amino acid sequencing of KL-1Y had a hydrophobicity of approximately 30 % and no cysteine residues suggested its novelty, and it was designated "plantaricin KL-1Y". Plantaricin KL-1Y exhibited bactericidal activity against Bacillus cereus JCM 2152(T). Compared to nisin, KL-1Y displayed broad inhibitory activities of 200, 800, 1600, 800, 400 and 400 AU/mL against the growth of Bacillus coagulans JCM 2257(T), B. cereus JCM 2152(T), Listeria innocua ATCC 33090(T), Staphylococcus aureus TISTR 118, E. coli O157:H7 and E. coli ATCC 8739, respectively, whereas nisin had similar activities against only B. coagulans JCM 2257(T) and B. cereus JCM 2152(T). Therefore, the novel plantaricin KL-1Y is a promising antimicrobial substance for food safety uses in the future.

  8. Heat-capacity measurement on (Zr1-ySny)Ox from 325 to 905 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, Toshihide; Amaya, Masaki; Naito, Keiji

    1993-01-01

    Heat capacities of (Zr 1-y Sn y )O 0.17 and (Zr 1-y Sn y )O 0.28 (y=0-0.07) having α''-ZrO ∼1/6 and α''-ZrO x type crystal structures, respectively, were measured from 325 to 905 K by using an adiabatic scanning calorimeter. Two kinds of heat capacity anomalies were observed for all samples. The anomaly at lower temperatures is attributed to a nonequilibrium phenomenon. Another anomaly at higher temperatures is assigned to an order-disorder rearrangement of oxygen atoms. The transition temperature, transition enthalpy and entropy changes due to the order-disorder transition decreased with increasing tin content, indicating that arrangement of oxygen atoms in the lower temperature phase may be partially disordered by substituting tin for zirconium. The entropy change due to the order-disorder transition for (Zr 1-y Sn y )O 0.17 and (Zr 1-y Sn y )O 0.28 solid solutions is compared with the theoretical value. The solubility limits of (Zr 1-y Sn y )O 0.17 and (Zr 1-y Sn y )O 0.28 were determined from the variation of lattice constants, transition temperature, transition enthalpy and entropy changes against tin content. (orig.)

  9. Dose from radiological examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imamura, Keiko; Uji, Teruyuki; Sakuyama, Keiko; Fujikawa, Mitsuhiro; Fujii, Masamichi

    1976-01-01

    Relatively high gonad doses, several hundred to one thousand mR, have been observed in case of pelvis, hip-joint, coccyx, lower abdomen and lumber examination. Dose to the ovary is especially high in barium enema and I.V.P. examinations. About 12 per cent of the 4-ray examination are high-dose. The gonad dose is relatively high in examination of abdomen and lower extremities, in infants. The dose to the eyes is especially high, 1.0 to 2.5R per exposure, in temporal bone and nasal sinuses tomography. X-ray doses have been compared with dose limits recommended by ICRP and with the gonad dose from natural radiations. The gonad dose in lumbar examination, barium enema, I.V.P. etc. is as high as the maximum permissible dose per year recommended by ICRP. Several devices have been made for dose reduction in the daily examinations: (1) separating the radiation field from the gonad by one centimeter decreases the gonad dose about one-half. (2) using sensitive screens and films. In pelvimetry and in infant hip-joint examination, the most sensitive screen and film are used. In the I.V.P. examination of adult, use of MS screen in place of FS screen decreases the dose to one-third, in combination with careful setting of radiation field, (3) use of grid increases the dose about 50 percent and the lead rubber protection (0.1mm lead equivalent) decreases the gonad dose to one-thirtieth in the spinal column examination of infant, (4) A lead protector, 1mm thickness and 2.5cm in diameter, on the eyes decreases the dose to about one-eighth in the face and nead examinations. These simple and effective methods for dose reduction. Should be carried out in as many examinations as possible in addition to observing dose limits recommended by ICRP. (Evans, J.)

  10. Galvanomagnetic effects in n-Hg1-x-yCdxMnyTe and n-Hg1-yMnyTe crystals with εg>0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gluzman, N.G.; Lerinman, N.K.; Sabirzyanova, L.D.; Bodnaruk, O.A.; Gorbatyuk, I.N.; Rarenko, I.M.

    1989-01-01

    Longitudinal ρ zz and transverse ρ xx magnetoresistances and R hall coefficient in H magnetic fields up to 100 kE at 1.2≤T≤300 K are measured at n-Hg 1-x-y Cd x Mn y Te and n-Hg 1-y Mn y Te crystals (100≤ε g ≤260 meV) with N D -N A ≅10 15 cm -3 . Shubnikov-de-Gaas (SG) oscillations were observed at all specimens. Maxima positions of SG oscillations depend on T. For Hg 1-y Mn y Te crystals the position of zero maximum is shifted to large H direction, it is caused by abrupt (as compared to zone one) reduction of summary g-factor. Magnetophonon oscillations are determined at longitudinal magnetoresistance. Transition from metal conductivity to activation one occuring in magnetic field is studied; activation energy in nonmetallic range is determined. Some peculiarities of galvanomagnetic phenomena in n-Hg 1-y Mn y Te specimens, which indicate presence of p-type inclusions in n-type crystals, are determined

  11. High-temperature vaporization of thorium-uranium mixed monocarbide (Th1-y, Uy)C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyama, Tadafumi; Yamawaki, Michio

    1989-01-01

    Vaporization thermodynamics of thorium-uranium mixed monocarbide phase (Th 1-y , U y )C was studied by mass spectrometric Knudsen effusion method for the compositions of (Th 0.9 , U 0.1 )C 0.855 , (Th 0.8 , U 0.2 )C 0.973 and (Th 0.6 , U 0.4 )C 0.973 . The partial vapor pressures of Th(g) and U(g) and activities of Th and U of these mixed monocarbides were determined at temperatures ranging from about 2000 to 2200 K. Further, the partial pressures of Th(g) and U(g) and activities of Th and U of the stoichiometric mixed monocarbides (Th 1-y , U y )C 1.00 were evaluated by compensating for the effect of carbon content. The Gibbs energies of formation of stoichiometric (Th 1-y , U y )C 1.00 were also evaluated. (orig.)

  12. [Preparation and spectral characterization of CdS(y)Te(1-y) thin films].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Feng, Liang-Huan; Wu, Li-Li; Zhang, Jing-Quan; Li, Bing; Lei, Zhi; Cai, Ya-Ping; Zheng, Jia-Gui; Cai, Wei; Zhang, Dong-Min

    2008-03-01

    CdS(y)Te(1-y) (0 co-evaporation of powders of CdTe and CdS. For the characterization of the structure and composition of the CdS(y)Te(1-y) thin films the X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) were used. The results indicate that the values of sulfur content y detected and controlled by the quartz wafer detector show good agreement with the EDS results. The films were found to be cubic for x or = 0.3. The 20-50 nm of grain sizes for CdS(y)Te(1-y) thin films were calculated using a method of XRD analysis. Finally, the optical properties of CdS(y)Te(1-y) thin films were characterized by UV-Vis-NIR spectroscopy alone. According to a method from Swanepoel, together with the first-order Sellmeier model, the thickness, of d-535 nm, energy gap of E(g)-1.41 eV, absorption coefficient, alpha(lambda) and refractive index, n(lambda) of CdS(0.22) Te(0.78) thin films were determined from the transmittance at normal incidence of light in the wavelength range 300-2 500 nm. The results also indicate that the CdS(y)Te(1-y) thin films with any composition (0 co-evaporation, and the method to characterize the optical properties of CdS(y)Te(1-y) thin films can be implemented for other semiconductor thin films.

  13. Mek1Y130C mice recapitulate aspects of human cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoidi, Rifdat; Houde, Nicolas; Landry-Truchon, Kim; Holter, Michael; Jacquet, Kevin; Charron, Louis; Yu, Benjamin D.; Rauen, Katherine A.; Bisson, Nicolas; Newbern, Jason

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT The RAS/MAPK signaling pathway is one of the most investigated pathways, owing to its established role in numerous cellular processes and implication in cancer. Germline mutations in genes encoding members of the RAS/MAPK pathway also cause severe developmental syndromes collectively known as RASopathies. These syndromes share overlapping characteristics, including craniofacial dysmorphology, cardiac malformations, cutaneous abnormalities and developmental delay. Cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome (CFC) is a rare RASopathy associated with mutations in BRAF, KRAS, MEK1 (MAP2K1) and MEK2 (MAP2K2). MEK1 and MEK2 mutations are found in ∼25% of the CFC patients and the MEK1Y130C substitution is the most common one. However, little is known about the origins and mechanisms responsible for the development of CFC. To our knowledge, no mouse model carrying RASopathy-linked Mek1 or Mek2 gene mutations has been reported. To investigate the molecular and developmental consequences of the Mek1Y130C mutation, we generated a mouse line carrying this mutation. Analysis of mice from a Mek1 allelic series revealed that the Mek1Y130C allele expresses both wild-type and Y130C mutant forms of MEK1. However, despite reduced levels of MEK1 protein and the lower abundance of MEK1 Y130C protein than wild type, Mek1Y130C mutants showed increased ERK (MAPK) protein activation in response to growth factors, supporting a role for MEK1 Y130C in hyperactivation of the RAS/MAPK pathway, leading to CFC. Mek1Y130C mutant mice exhibited pulmonary artery stenosis, cranial dysmorphia and neurological anomalies, including increased numbers of GFAP+ astrocytes and Olig2+ oligodendrocytes in regions of the cerebral cortex. These data indicate that the Mek1Y130C mutation recapitulates major aspects of CFC, providing a new animal model to investigate the physiopathology of this RASopathy. This article has an associated First Person interview with the first author of the paper. PMID:29590634

  14. Maximum Entropy in Drug Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Yuan Tseng

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Drug discovery applies multidisciplinary approaches either experimentally, computationally or both ways to identify lead compounds to treat various diseases. While conventional approaches have yielded many US Food and Drug Administration (FDA-approved drugs, researchers continue investigating and designing better approaches to increase the success rate in the discovery process. In this article, we provide an overview of the current strategies and point out where and how the method of maximum entropy has been introduced in this area. The maximum entropy principle has its root in thermodynamics, yet since Jaynes’ pioneering work in the 1950s, the maximum entropy principle has not only been used as a physics law, but also as a reasoning tool that allows us to process information in hand with the least bias. Its applicability in various disciplines has been abundantly demonstrated. We give several examples of applications of maximum entropy in different stages of drug discovery. Finally, we discuss a promising new direction in drug discovery that is likely to hinge on the ways of utilizing maximum entropy.

  15. Intercomparison On Depth Dose Measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohmah, N; Akhadi, M

    1996-01-01

    Intercomparation on personal dose evaluation system has been carried out between CSRSR-NAEA of Indonesia toward Standard Laboratory of JAERI (Japan) and ARL (Australia). The intercomparison was in 10 amm depth dose measurement , Hp (10), from the intercomparison result could be stated that personal depth dose measurement conducted by CSRSR was sufficiently good. Deviation of dose measurement result using personal dosemeter of TLD BG-1 type which were used by CSRSR in the intercomparison and routine photon personal dose monitoring was still in internationally agreed limit. Maximum deviation of reported doses by CSRSR compared to delivered doses for dosemeter irradiation by JAERI was -10.0 percent and by ARL was +29 percent. Maximum deviation permitted in personal dose monitoring is ± 50 percent

  16. Maximum stellar iron core mass

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    60, No. 3. — journal of. March 2003 physics pp. 415–422. Maximum stellar iron core mass. F W GIACOBBE. Chicago Research Center/American Air Liquide ... iron core compression due to the weight of non-ferrous matter overlying the iron cores within large .... thermal equilibrium velocities will tend to be non-relativistic.

  17. Maximum entropy beam diagnostic tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mottershead, C.T.

    1985-01-01

    This paper reviews the formalism of maximum entropy beam diagnostic tomography as applied to the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) prototype accelerator. The same formalism has also been used with streak camera data to produce an ultrahigh speed movie of the beam profile of the Experimental Test Accelerator (ETA) at Livermore. 11 refs., 4 figs

  18. Maximum entropy beam diagnostic tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mottershead, C.T.

    1985-01-01

    This paper reviews the formalism of maximum entropy beam diagnostic tomography as applied to the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) prototype accelerator. The same formalism has also been used with streak camera data to produce an ultrahigh speed movie of the beam profile of the Experimental Test Accelerator (ETA) at Livermore

  19. A portable storage maximum thermometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayart, Gerard.

    1976-01-01

    A clinical thermometer storing the voltage corresponding to the maximum temperature in an analog memory is described. End of the measurement is shown by a lamp switch out. The measurement time is shortened by means of a low thermal inertia platinum probe. This portable thermometer is fitted with cell test and calibration system [fr

  20. Neutron spectra unfolding with maximum entropy and maximum likelihood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Shikoh; Tsunoda, Toshiharu

    1989-01-01

    A new unfolding theory has been established on the basis of the maximum entropy principle and the maximum likelihood method. This theory correctly embodies the Poisson statistics of neutron detection, and always brings a positive solution over the whole energy range. Moreover, the theory unifies both problems of overdetermined and of underdetermined. For the latter, the ambiguity in assigning a prior probability, i.e. the initial guess in the Bayesian sense, has become extinct by virtue of the principle. An approximate expression of the covariance matrix for the resultant spectra is also presented. An efficient algorithm to solve the nonlinear system, which appears in the present study, has been established. Results of computer simulation showed the effectiveness of the present theory. (author)

  1. Enjebi Island dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robison, W.L.; Conrado, C.L.; Phillips, W.A.

    1987-07-01

    We have updeated the radiological dose assessment for Enjebi Island at Enewetak Atoll using data derived from analysis of food crops grown on Enjebi. This is a much more precise assessment of potential doses to people resettling Enjebi Island than the 1980 assessment in which there were no data available from food crops on Enjebi. Details of the methods and data used to evaluate each exposure pathway are presented. The terrestrial food chain is the most significant potential exposure pathway and 137 Cs is the radionuclide responsible for most of the estimated dose over the next 50 y. The doses are calculated assuming a resettlement date of 1990. The average wholebody maximum annual estimated dose equivalent derived using our diet model is 166 mremy;the effective dose equivalent is 169 mremy. The estimated 30-, 50-, and 70-y integral whole-body dose equivalents are 3.5 rem, 5.1 rem, and 6.2 rem, respectively. Bone-marrow dose equivalents are only slightly higher than the whole-body estimates in each case. The bone-surface cells (endosteal cells) receive the highest dose, but they are a less sensitive cell population and are less sensitive to fatal cancer induction than whole body and bone marrow. The effective dose equivalents for 30, 50, and 70 y are 3.6 rem, 5.3 rem, and 6.6 rem, respectively. 79 refs., 17 figs., 24 tabs

  2. Location of radiosensitive organs, measurement of absorbed dose to radiosensitive organs and use of bismuth shields in paediatric anthropomorphic phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inkoom, S.

    2014-08-01

    thyroid organ dose was reduced to 46% (10-y-old). The combined use of single shield and AEC reduced the thyroid surface dose to a maximum of 70% (5-y-old); whilst the thyroid organ dose was reduced to 62% (10-y-old). The use of double shields and AEC activation further reduced the surface / organ dose to 76% / 65% (5-y-old). The maximum dose to the eye lenses due to neck CT was 7.0 mGy / 6.2 mGy (10-y-old) for FTC / AEC. The maximum breast dose attributable to neck CT was 0.6 mGy for 5-, and 10-y-old phantoms for all protocols. For thorax CT scans, the use of AEC induced a significant increase in the thyroid organ dose by a maximum value of 70% (1-y-old), and thyroid surface dose by 70% (newborn), and mean breast surface dose by 69% (newborn). The maximum increase of the effective dose as a result of application of AEC was 54% (newborn). In conclusion, the production of charts of radiosensitive organs inside paediatric anthropomorphic phantoms for dosimetric purposes was feasible. In-plane bismuth thyroid shielding decreases radiation dose in MDCT with/without deteriorating image quality. AEC was more effective in thyroid dose reduction than in-plane bismuth shields (head and neck CT, neck CT). AEC increased the absorbed dose to both the thyroid and the breast, as well as the effective dose in thorax CT. Thus, AEC should be abandoned as a dose optimisation tool during thoracic MDCT, especially in neonates, infants and children younger than 10-years-old. Placement of the spacer between shield and surface had no significant impact on the measured doses, but significantly decreased the image noise. (au)

  3. On Maximum Entropy and Inference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Gresele

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Maximum entropy is a powerful concept that entails a sharp separation between relevant and irrelevant variables. It is typically invoked in inference, once an assumption is made on what the relevant variables are, in order to estimate a model from data, that affords predictions on all other (dependent variables. Conversely, maximum entropy can be invoked to retrieve the relevant variables (sufficient statistics directly from the data, once a model is identified by Bayesian model selection. We explore this approach in the case of spin models with interactions of arbitrary order, and we discuss how relevant interactions can be inferred. In this perspective, the dimensionality of the inference problem is not set by the number of parameters in the model, but by the frequency distribution of the data. We illustrate the method showing its ability to recover the correct model in a few prototype cases and discuss its application on a real dataset.

  4. Maximum Water Hammer Sensitivity Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Jalil Emadi; Abbas Solemani

    2011-01-01

    Pressure waves and Water Hammer occur in a pumping system when valves are closed or opened suddenly or in the case of sudden failure of pumps. Determination of maximum water hammer is considered one of the most important technical and economical items of which engineers and designers of pumping stations and conveyance pipelines should take care. Hammer Software is a recent application used to simulate water hammer. The present study focuses on determining significance of ...

  5. Maximum Gene-Support Tree

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunfeng Shan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Genomes and genes diversify during evolution; however, it is unclear to what extent genes still retain the relationship among species. Model species for molecular phylogenetic studies include yeasts and viruses whose genomes were sequenced as well as plants that have the fossil-supported true phylogenetic trees available. In this study, we generated single gene trees of seven yeast species as well as single gene trees of nine baculovirus species using all the orthologous genes among the species compared. Homologous genes among seven known plants were used for validation of the finding. Four algorithms—maximum parsimony (MP, minimum evolution (ME, maximum likelihood (ML, and neighbor-joining (NJ—were used. Trees were reconstructed before and after weighting the DNA and protein sequence lengths among genes. Rarely a gene can always generate the “true tree” by all the four algorithms. However, the most frequent gene tree, termed “maximum gene-support tree” (MGS tree, or WMGS tree for the weighted one, in yeasts, baculoviruses, or plants was consistently found to be the “true tree” among the species. The results provide insights into the overall degree of divergence of orthologous genes of the genomes analyzed and suggest the following: 1 The true tree relationship among the species studied is still maintained by the largest group of orthologous genes; 2 There are usually more orthologous genes with higher similarities between genetically closer species than between genetically more distant ones; and 3 The maximum gene-support tree reflects the phylogenetic relationship among species in comparison.

  6. LCLS Maximum Credible Beam Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clendenin, J.

    2005-01-01

    The maximum credible beam power is defined as the highest credible average beam power that the accelerator can deliver to the point in question, given the laws of physics, the beam line design, and assuming all protection devices have failed. For a new accelerator project, the official maximum credible beam power is determined by project staff in consultation with the Radiation Physics Department, after examining the arguments and evidence presented by the appropriate accelerator physicist(s) and beam line engineers. The definitive parameter becomes part of the project's safety envelope. This technical note will first review the studies that were done for the Gun Test Facility (GTF) at SSRL, where a photoinjector similar to the one proposed for the LCLS is being tested. In Section 3 the maximum charge out of the gun for a single rf pulse is calculated. In Section 4, PARMELA simulations are used to track the beam from the gun to the end of the photoinjector. Finally in Section 5 the beam through the matching section and injected into Linac-1 is discussed

  7. Maximum likelihood as a common computational framework in tomotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivera, G.H.; Shepard, D.M.; Reckwerdt, P.J.; Ruchala, K.; Zachman, J.; Fitchard, E.E.; Mackie, T.R.

    1998-01-01

    Tomotherapy is a dose delivery technique using helical or axial intensity modulated beams. One of the strengths of the tomotherapy concept is that it can incorporate a number of processes into a single piece of equipment. These processes include treatment optimization planning, dose reconstruction and kilovoltage/megavoltage image reconstruction. A common computational technique that could be used for all of these processes would be very appealing. The maximum likelihood estimator, originally developed for emission tomography, can serve as a useful tool in imaging and radiotherapy. We believe that this approach can play an important role in the processes of optimization planning, dose reconstruction and kilovoltage and/or megavoltage image reconstruction. These processes involve computations that require comparable physical methods. They are also based on equivalent assumptions, and they have similar mathematical solutions. As a result, the maximum likelihood approach is able to provide a common framework for all three of these computational problems. We will demonstrate how maximum likelihood methods can be applied to optimization planning, dose reconstruction and megavoltage image reconstruction in tomotherapy. Results for planning optimization, dose reconstruction and megavoltage image reconstruction will be presented. Strengths and weaknesses of the methodology are analysed. Future directions for this work are also suggested. (author)

  8. Uncertainty analysis for an updated dose assessment for a US nuclear test site: Bikini Atoll

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogen, K.T.; Conrado, C.L.; Robison, W.L.

    1995-11-01

    A detailed analysis of uncertainty and interindividual variability in estimated doses was conducted for a rehabilitation scenario for Bikini Island at Bikini Atoll, in which the top 40 cm of soil would be removed in the housing and village area, and the rest of the island is treated with potassium fertilizer, prior to an assumed resettlement date of 1999. Predicted doses were considered for the following fallout-related exposure pathways: ingested Cesium-137 and Strontium-90, external gamma exposure, and inhalation and ingestion of Americium-241 + Plutonium-239+240. Two dietary scenarios were considered: (1) imported foods are available (IA), and (2) imported foods are unavailable (only local foods are consumed) (IUA). Corresponding calculations of uncertainty in estimated population-average dose showed that after ∼5 y of residence on Bikini, the upper and lower 95% confidence limits with respect to uncertainty in this dose are estimated to be approximately 2-fold higher and lower than its population-average value, respectively (under both IA and IUA assumptions). Corresponding calculations of interindividual variability in the expected value of dose with respect to uncertainty showed that after ∼5 y of residence on Bikini, the upper and lower 95% confidence limits with respect to interindividual variability in this dose are estimated to be approximately 2-fold higher and lower than its expected value, respectively (under both IA and IUA assumptions). For reference, the expected values of population-average dose at age 70 were estimated to be 1.6 and 5.2 cSv under the IA and IUA dietary assumptions, respectively. Assuming that 200 Bikini resettlers would be exposed to local foods (under both IA and IUA assumptions), the maximum 1-y dose received by any Bikini resident is most likely to be approximately 2 and 8 mSv under the IA and IUA assumptions, respectively

  9. Generic maximum likely scale selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kim Steenstrup; Loog, Marco; Markussen, Bo

    2007-01-01

    in this work is on applying this selection principle under a Brownian image model. This image model provides a simple scale invariant prior for natural images and we provide illustrative examples of the behavior of our scale estimation on such images. In these illustrative examples, estimation is based......The fundamental problem of local scale selection is addressed by means of a novel principle, which is based on maximum likelihood estimation. The principle is generally applicable to a broad variety of image models and descriptors, and provides a generic scale estimation methodology. The focus...

  10. Association of 1-y changes in diet pattern with cardiovascular disease risk factors and adipokines: results from the 1-y randomized Oslo Diet and Exercise Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, David R; Sluik, Diewertje; Rokling-Andersen, Merethe H; Anderssen, Sigmund A; Drevon, Christian A

    2009-02-01

    We hypothesized that favorable changes in dietary patterns would lead to a reduction in body size and an improvement in metabolic status. The objective was to study changes in diet patterns relative to changes in body size, blood pressure, and circulating concentrations of lipids, glucose, insulin, adiponectin, and other cytokines in the context of a 1-y randomized intervention study. For 1 y, 187 men aged 45 +/- 2 y, approximately 50% of whom met the criteria of the metabolic syndrome, were randomly assigned to a diet protocol (n = 45), an exercise protocol (n = 48), a protocol of diet plus exercise (n = 58), or a control protocol (n = 36). A previously defined a priori diet score was created by summing tertile rankings of 35 food group variables; a higher score generally reflected recommended dietary changes in the trial (mean +/- SD at baseline: 31 +/- 6.5; range: 15-47). Over the study year, the diet score increased by approximately 2 +/- 5.5 in both diet groups, with a decrease of an equivalent amount in the exercise and control groups. The weight change was -3.5 +/- 0.6 kg/10-point change in diet score (P smoking status. Weight change was attenuated but remained significant after adjustment for intervention group and percentage body fat. Subjects with an increased diet score had more favorable changes in other body size variables, systolic blood pressure, and blood lipid, glucose, insulin, and adiponectin concentrations. Change in diet score was unrelated to resistin and several cytokines. The change toward a more favorable diet pattern was associated with improved body size and metabolic profile.

  11. Crystallo-chemistry of actinide nitrides (U1-yPuy)N and effect of impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beauvy, M.; Coulon-Picard, E.; Pelletier, M.

    2004-01-01

    Investigations on actinide nitrides has been done in our Laboratories for Fast Breeder Reactors since the seventies and some properties are reported to show the interest for these fuels. Today, the actinide nitrides are reconsidered as possible fuels for the future fission reactors (GFR and LMFR selected by the international forum Generation IV). The results of new investigations on crystal structure of mixed mono-nitrides (U,Pu)N, and the effects of oxygen and carbon contaminations on this structure are presented. The cubic 'NaCl-fcc' type structure of actinide nitrides AnN with space group O5/h-Fm3m does not respect the 'Vegard law' model for the mixed nitrides (U 1-y Pu y )N. These nitrides are usually considered with strong metallic character associated with partial ionic bonding, but the ionic contribution in the An-N bonding determined in this work is very important and near 41.6% for UN and PuN. From results published on resistivity of mixed nitrides, the data on bonding must be also modified for partial covalence. This is in good agreement with the experimental lattice parameters which are not compatible with dominant metallic bonding. The numbers of bonding electrons in the nitrides (U 1-y Pu y )N are reevaluated and the low values proposed comparatively with those previously published confirm the strong ionic character with high concentration of An 3+ ions. The solubility of oxygen and carbon in actinide nitrides (U 1-y Pu y )N are discussed from measurements on volume concentration of actinide oxide phase, total oxygen and carbon contents, and lattice parameter of nitrides. The oxygen solubility limit in UN is near 1000 ppm, with a lightly higher value of 1200 ppm for the mixed nitride (U 0.8 Pu 0.2 )N. The effects of oxygen or carbon atoms in the lattice of (U 1-y Pu y )N are analysed

  12. Effective dose and dose to crystalline lens during angiographic procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pages, J.

    1998-01-01

    The highest radiation doses levels received by radiologists are observed during interventional procedures. Doses to forehead and neck received by a radiologist executing angiographic examinations at the department of radiology at the academic hospital (AZ-VUB) have been measured for a group of 34 examinations. The doses to crystalline lens and the effective doses for a period of one year have been estimated. For the crystalline lens the maximum dose approaches the ICRP limit, that indicates the necessity for the radiologist to use leaded glasses. (N.C.)

  13. Extreme Maximum Land Surface Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garratt, J. R.

    1992-09-01

    There are numerous reports in the literature of observations of land surface temperatures. Some of these, almost all made in situ, reveal maximum values in the 50°-70°C range, with a few, made in desert regions, near 80°C. Consideration of a simplified form of the surface energy balance equation, utilizing likely upper values of absorbed shortwave flux (1000 W m2) and screen air temperature (55°C), that surface temperatures in the vicinity of 90°-100°C may occur for dry, darkish soils of low thermal conductivity (0.1-0.2 W m1 K1). Numerical simulations confirm this and suggest that temperature gradients in the first few centimeters of soil may reach 0.5°-1°C mm1 under these extreme conditions. The study bears upon the intrinsic interest of identifying extreme maximum temperatures and yields interesting information regarding the comfort zone of animals (including man).

  14. In vitro corrosion of Mg–1.21Li–1.12Ca–1Y alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongchang Zeng

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the microstructure on mechanical properties and corrosion behavior of the Mg–1.21Li–1.12Ca–1Y alloy was investigated using OM, SEM, XRD, EPMA, EDS, tensile tests and corrosion measurements. The results demonstrated that the microstructure of the Mg–1.21Li–1.12Ca–1Y alloy was characterized by α-Mg substrate and intermetallic compounds Mg2Ca and Mg24Y5. Most of the fine Mg2Ca particles for the as-cast alloy were distributed along the grain boundaries, while for the as-extruded along the extrusion direction. The Mg24Y5 particles with a larger size than the Mg2Ca particles were positioned inside the grains. The mechanical properties of Mg–1.21Li–1.12Ca–1Y alloy were improved by the grain refinement and dispersion strengthening. Corrosion pits initiated at the α-Mg matrix neighboring the Mg2Ca particles and subsequently the alloy exhibited general corrosion and filiform corrosion as the corrosion product layer of Mg(OH2 and MgCO3 became compact and thick.

  15. System for memorizing maximum values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr.

    1992-08-01

    The invention discloses a system capable of memorizing maximum sensed values. The system includes conditioning circuitry which receives the analog output signal from a sensor transducer. The conditioning circuitry rectifies and filters the analog signal and provides an input signal to a digital driver, which may be either linear or logarithmic. The driver converts the analog signal to discrete digital values, which in turn triggers an output signal on one of a plurality of driver output lines n. The particular output lines selected is dependent on the converted digital value. A microfuse memory device connects across the driver output lines, with n segments. Each segment is associated with one driver output line, and includes a microfuse that is blown when a signal appears on the associated driver output line.

  16. Remarks on the maximum luminosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Vitor; Ikeda, Taishi; Moore, Christopher J.; Yoo, Chul-Moon

    2018-04-01

    The quest for fundamental limitations on physical processes is old and venerable. Here, we investigate the maximum possible power, or luminosity, that any event can produce. We show, via full nonlinear simulations of Einstein's equations, that there exist initial conditions which give rise to arbitrarily large luminosities. However, the requirement that there is no past horizon in the spacetime seems to limit the luminosity to below the Planck value, LP=c5/G . Numerical relativity simulations of critical collapse yield the largest luminosities observed to date, ≈ 0.2 LP . We also present an analytic solution to the Einstein equations which seems to give an unboundedly large luminosity; this will guide future numerical efforts to investigate super-Planckian luminosities.

  17. Maximum mutual information regularized classification

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jim Jing-Yan

    2014-09-07

    In this paper, a novel pattern classification approach is proposed by regularizing the classifier learning to maximize mutual information between the classification response and the true class label. We argue that, with the learned classifier, the uncertainty of the true class label of a data sample should be reduced by knowing its classification response as much as possible. The reduced uncertainty is measured by the mutual information between the classification response and the true class label. To this end, when learning a linear classifier, we propose to maximize the mutual information between classification responses and true class labels of training samples, besides minimizing the classification error and reducing the classifier complexity. An objective function is constructed by modeling mutual information with entropy estimation, and it is optimized by a gradient descend method in an iterative algorithm. Experiments on two real world pattern classification problems show the significant improvements achieved by maximum mutual information regularization.

  18. Scintillation counter, maximum gamma aspect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thumim, A.D.

    1975-01-01

    A scintillation counter, particularly for counting gamma ray photons, includes a massive lead radiation shield surrounding a sample-receiving zone. The shield is disassembleable into a plurality of segments to allow facile installation and removal of a photomultiplier tube assembly, the segments being so constructed as to prevent straight-line access of external radiation through the shield into radiation-responsive areas. Provisions are made for accurately aligning the photomultiplier tube with respect to one or more sample-transmitting bores extending through the shield to the sample receiving zone. A sample elevator, used in transporting samples into the zone, is designed to provide a maximum gamma-receiving aspect to maximize the gamma detecting efficiency. (U.S.)

  19. Maximum mutual information regularized classification

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jim Jing-Yan; Wang, Yi; Zhao, Shiguang; Gao, Xin

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a novel pattern classification approach is proposed by regularizing the classifier learning to maximize mutual information between the classification response and the true class label. We argue that, with the learned classifier, the uncertainty of the true class label of a data sample should be reduced by knowing its classification response as much as possible. The reduced uncertainty is measured by the mutual information between the classification response and the true class label. To this end, when learning a linear classifier, we propose to maximize the mutual information between classification responses and true class labels of training samples, besides minimizing the classification error and reducing the classifier complexity. An objective function is constructed by modeling mutual information with entropy estimation, and it is optimized by a gradient descend method in an iterative algorithm. Experiments on two real world pattern classification problems show the significant improvements achieved by maximum mutual information regularization.

  20. Mortality and career radiation doses for workers at a commercial nuclear power plant: feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldsmith, R.; Boice, J.D. Jr.; Hrubec, Z.; Hurwitz, P.E.; Goff, T.E.; Wilson, J.

    1989-01-01

    Career radiation doses for 8,961 male workers at the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant (CCNPP) were determined for both utility (n = 4,960) and contractor (n = 4,001) employees. Workers were followed from the time of first employment at CCNPP (including plant construction) to the end of 1984 (mean follow-up = 5.4 y). Plant operation began in 1975. The mean duration of employment was 1.9 y at CCNPP and 3.1 y in the nuclear industry. Career radiation doses were determined from dosimetry records kept by the utility company and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). For all exposed workers, the average career dose was 21 mSv and was higher for contractor (30 mSv) than utility (13 mSv) workers. Career doses were also higher among those employed in the nuclear industry for greater than or equal to 15 y (111 mSv) and among workers classified as health physicists (56 mSv). Cumulative doses of greater than or equal to 50 mSv were received by 12% of the workers; the maximum career dose reported was 470 mSv. The availability of social security numbers for practically all employees facilitated record-linkage methods to determine mortality; 161 deaths were identified. On average the workers experienced mortality from all causes that was 15% less than that of the general population of the U.S., probably due to healthier members of the population being selected for employment. Our investigation demonstrates that historical information is available from which career doses could be constructed and that, in principle, it is feasible to conduct epidemiologic studies of nuclear power plant workers in the U.S. Although difficult, the approach taken could prove useful until such time as a comprehensive registry of U.S. radiation workers is established

  1. Maximum entropy and Bayesian methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, C.R.; Erickson, G.J.; Neudorfer, P.O.

    1992-01-01

    Bayesian probability theory and Maximum Entropy methods are at the core of a new view of scientific inference. These 'new' ideas, along with the revolution in computational methods afforded by modern computers allow astronomers, electrical engineers, image processors of any type, NMR chemists and physicists, and anyone at all who has to deal with incomplete and noisy data, to take advantage of methods that, in the past, have been applied only in some areas of theoretical physics. The title workshops have been the focus of a group of researchers from many different fields, and this diversity is evident in this book. There are tutorial and theoretical papers, and applications in a very wide variety of fields. Almost any instance of dealing with incomplete and noisy data can be usefully treated by these methods, and many areas of theoretical research are being enhanced by the thoughtful application of Bayes' theorem. Contributions contained in this volume present a state-of-the-art overview that will be influential and useful for many years to come

  2. Is the maximum permissible radiation burden for the population indeed permissible

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renesse, R.L. van.

    1975-01-01

    It is argued that legislation based on the ICRP doses will, under economical influences, lead to a situation where the population is exposed to radiation doses near the maximum permissible dose. Due to cumulative radiation effects, this will introduce unacceptable health risks. Therefore, it will be necessary to lower the legal dose limit of 170 millrem per year per person by a factor 10 to 20

  3. Las reglas angloamericanas de catalogación y la norma ISO 690 - 1 y 2

    OpenAIRE

    Campos Herrera, Airelys

    2007-01-01

    Se define la catalogación como etapa del ciclo de procesamiento de la información, así como sus diferencias con el proceso de descripción bibliográfica. Se comparan las reglas angloamericanas de catalogación, segunda edición, con las normas ISO 690 - 1 y 2 para la descripción bibliográfica con respecto a: organismo creador, finalidad, alcance, estructura, tipos de asientos, niveles de descripción y sintaxis. Cataloguing, a phase within the cycle of information processing, as well as its di...

  4. Maximum entropy principal for transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilich, F.; Da Silva, R.

    2008-01-01

    In this work we deal with modeling of the transportation phenomenon for use in the transportation planning process and policy-impact studies. The model developed is based on the dependence concept, i.e., the notion that the probability of a trip starting at origin i is dependent on the probability of a trip ending at destination j given that the factors (such as travel time, cost, etc.) which affect travel between origin i and destination j assume some specific values. The derivation of the solution of the model employs the maximum entropy principle combining a priori multinomial distribution with a trip utility concept. This model is utilized to forecast trip distributions under a variety of policy changes and scenarios. The dependence coefficients are obtained from a regression equation where the functional form is derived based on conditional probability and perception of factors from experimental psychology. The dependence coefficients encode all the information that was previously encoded in the form of constraints. In addition, the dependence coefficients encode information that cannot be expressed in the form of constraints for practical reasons, namely, computational tractability. The equivalence between the standard formulation (i.e., objective function with constraints) and the dependence formulation (i.e., without constraints) is demonstrated. The parameters of the dependence-based trip-distribution model are estimated, and the model is also validated using commercial air travel data in the U.S. In addition, policy impact analyses (such as allowance of supersonic flights inside the U.S. and user surcharge at noise-impacted airports) on air travel are performed.

  5. Last Glacial Maximum Salinity Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homola, K.; Spivack, A. J.

    2016-12-01

    It has been previously demonstrated that salinity can be reconstructed from sediment porewater. The goal of our study is to reconstruct high precision salinity during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Salinity is usually determined at high precision via conductivity, which requires a larger volume of water than can be extracted from a sediment core, or via chloride titration, which yields lower than ideal precision. It has been demonstrated for water column samples that high precision density measurements can be used to determine salinity at the precision of a conductivity measurement using the equation of state of seawater. However, water column seawater has a relatively constant composition, in contrast to porewater, where variations from standard seawater composition occur. These deviations, which affect the equation of state, must be corrected for through precise measurements of each ion's concentration and knowledge of apparent partial molar density in seawater. We have developed a density-based method for determining porewater salinity that requires only 5 mL of sample, achieving density precisions of 10-6 g/mL. We have applied this method to porewater samples extracted from long cores collected along a N-S transect across the western North Atlantic (R/V Knorr cruise KN223). Density was determined to a precision of 2.3x10-6 g/mL, which translates to salinity uncertainty of 0.002 gms/kg if the effect of differences in composition is well constrained. Concentrations of anions (Cl-, and SO4-2) and cations (Na+, Mg+, Ca+2, and K+) were measured. To correct salinities at the precision required to unravel LGM Meridional Overturning Circulation, our ion precisions must be better than 0.1% for SO4-/Cl- and Mg+/Na+, and 0.4% for Ca+/Na+, and K+/Na+. Alkalinity, pH and Dissolved Inorganic Carbon of the porewater were determined to precisions better than 4% when ratioed to Cl-, and used to calculate HCO3-, and CO3-2. Apparent partial molar densities in seawater were

  6. Maximum Parsimony on Phylogenetic networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Phylogenetic networks are generalizations of phylogenetic trees, that are used to model evolutionary events in various contexts. Several different methods and criteria have been introduced for reconstructing phylogenetic trees. Maximum Parsimony is a character-based approach that infers a phylogenetic tree by minimizing the total number of evolutionary steps required to explain a given set of data assigned on the leaves. Exact solutions for optimizing parsimony scores on phylogenetic trees have been introduced in the past. Results In this paper, we define the parsimony score on networks as the sum of the substitution costs along all the edges of the network; and show that certain well-known algorithms that calculate the optimum parsimony score on trees, such as Sankoff and Fitch algorithms extend naturally for networks, barring conflicting assignments at the reticulate vertices. We provide heuristics for finding the optimum parsimony scores on networks. Our algorithms can be applied for any cost matrix that may contain unequal substitution costs of transforming between different characters along different edges of the network. We analyzed this for experimental data on 10 leaves or fewer with at most 2 reticulations and found that for almost all networks, the bounds returned by the heuristics matched with the exhaustively determined optimum parsimony scores. Conclusion The parsimony score we define here does not directly reflect the cost of the best tree in the network that displays the evolution of the character. However, when searching for the most parsimonious network that describes a collection of characters, it becomes necessary to add additional cost considerations to prefer simpler structures, such as trees over networks. The parsimony score on a network that we describe here takes into account the substitution costs along the additional edges incident on each reticulate vertex, in addition to the substitution costs along the other edges which are

  7. Oxygen potential of Th1-yUyO2+x

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schram, R.P.C.; Cordfunke, E.H.P.

    1996-03-01

    Oxygen potentials of UO 2 -ThO 2 solid solutions (Th 1-y U y O 2+x ) were retrieved from literature and stored in a database. For each datapoint the oxygen pressure p O 2 the nonstoichiometry x, the temperature T and the uranium concentration y was specified. The data were analyzed using a defect model, which includes electronic disorder, point defects and cluster formation. In addition, the thermochemical representation of Lindemer and Besmann for UO 2+x was extended for the analysis of the Th 1-y U y O 2+x data. The solid solution is regarded as an ideal ternary mixture of UO 2 , ThO 2 and a hypothetical compound U a O b . The thermodynamic properties of this compound U a O b were determined in two oxygen pressure ranges of the database. In both the defect model and thermochemical approach ThO 2 is treated as an inert compound that does not participate in any of the chemical equilibria describing the oxygen potential. (orig.)

  8. Maximum credible accident analysis for TR-2 reactor conceptual design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manopulo, E.

    1981-01-01

    A new reactor, TR-2, of 5 MW, designed in cooperation with CEN/GRENOBLE is under construction in the open pool of TR-1 reactor of 1 MW set up by AMF atomics at the Cekmece Nuclear Research and Training Center. In this report the fission product inventory and doses released after the maximum credible accident have been studied. The diffusion of the gaseous fission products to the environment and the potential radiation risks to the population have been evaluated

  9. Activity in mice of recombinant BCG-EgG1Y162 vaccine for Echinococcus granulosus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiumin; Zhao, Hui; Zhang, Fengbo; Zhu, Yuejie; Peng, Shanshan; Ma, Haimei; Cao, Chunbao; Xin, Yan; Yimiti, Delixiati; Wen, Hao; Ding, Jianbing

    2016-01-01

    Cystic hydatid disease is a zoonotic parasitic disease caused by Echinococcus granulosus which is distributed worldwide. The disease is difficult to treat with surgery removal is the only cure treatment. In the high endemic areas, vaccination of humans is believed a way to protect communities from the disease. In this study we vaccinated BALB/c mice with rBCG-EgG1Y162, and then detected the level of IgG and IgE specifically against the recombinant protein by ELISA, rBCG-EgG1Y162 induced strong and specific cellular and humoral immune responses. In vitro study showed that rBCG-EgG1Y162 vaccine not only promote splenocytes proliferation but also active T cell. In addition, the rBCG-EgG1Y162 induced a protection in the mice against secondary infection of Echinococcus granulosus.

  10. Transport properties of the LiNi{sub 1-y}Co{sub y}O{sub 2} system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molenda, J.; Wilk, P.; Marzec, J. [Department of Solid State Chemistry, Stanislaw Staszic University of Mining and Metallurgy, Al. A. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Cracow (Poland)

    1999-04-15

    In this paper results are presented concerning structure, electrical conductivity and thermoelectric power measurements of the LiNi{sub 1-y}Co{sub y}O{sub 2} system. It has been stated that holes are dominating carriers. It has been also found that cobalt worsens the transport properties of the LiNi{sub 1-y}Co{sub y}O{sub 2} system

  11. Dose mapping role in gamma irradiation industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noriah Mod Ali; John Konsoh Sangau; Mazni Abd Latif

    2002-01-01

    In this studies, the role of dosimetry activity in gamma irradiator was discussed. Dose distribution in the irradiator, which is a main needs in irradiator or chamber commissioning. This distribution data were used to confirm the dosimetry parameters i.e. exposure time, maximum and minimum dose map/points, and dose distribution - in which were used as guidelines for optimum product irradiation. (Author)

  12. Collective dose, conceptual basis and practical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonka, H.

    1985-01-01

    In the ICRP Publications no. 22(1973) and no. 26(1977), the ICRP recommends that the maximum permissible whole-body dose by kept below the dose limits corresponding to the sum of all effective dose equivalents of the persons concerned, i.e. the collective dose. The effective dose equivalent is recommended by the ICRP for use as a new quantity for evaluating the stochastic radiation dose for individual persons. Examples are given by the author explaining cost-benefit analyses according to ICRP recommendations, especially discussing the definition of optimum local dose limits with regard to shielding design in nuclear installations. (DG) [de

  13. Maximum power point tracker based on fuzzy logic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daoud, A.; Midoun, A.

    2006-01-01

    The solar energy is used as power source in photovoltaic power systems and the need for an intelligent power management system is important to obtain the maximum power from the limited solar panels. With the changing of the sun illumination due to variation of angle of incidence of sun radiation and of the temperature of the panels, Maximum Power Point Tracker (MPPT) enables optimization of solar power generation. The MPPT is a sub-system designed to extract the maximum power from a power source. In the case of solar panels power source. the maximum power point varies as a result of changes in its electrical characteristics which in turn are functions of radiation dose, temperature, ageing and other effects. The MPPT maximum the power output from panels for a given set of conditions by detecting the best working point of the power characteristic and then controls the current through the panels or the voltage across them. Many MPPT methods have been reported in literature. These techniques of MPPT can be classified into three main categories that include: lookup table methods, hill climbing methods and computational methods. The techniques vary according to the degree of sophistication, processing time and memory requirements. The perturbation and observation algorithm (hill climbing technique) is commonly used due to its ease of implementation, and relative tracking efficiency. However, it has been shown that when the insolation changes rapidly, the perturbation and observation method is slow to track the maximum power point. In recent years, the fuzzy controllers are used for maximum power point tracking. This method only requires the linguistic control rules for maximum power point, the mathematical model is not required and therefore the implementation of this control method is easy to real control system. In this paper, we we present a simple robust MPPT using fuzzy set theory where the hardware consists of the microchip's microcontroller unit control card and

  14. Skin dose variation: influence of energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, T.; Yu, P.K.N.; Butson, M.J.; Cancer Services, Wollongong, NSW

    2004-01-01

    Full text: This research aimed to quantitatively evaluate the differences in percentage dose of maximum for 6MV and 18MV x-ray beams within the first lcm of interactions. Thus provide quantitative information regarding the basal, dermal and subcutaneous dose differences achievable with these two types of high-energy x-ray beams. Percentage dose of maximum build up curves are measured for most clinical field sizes using 6MV and 18MV x-ray beams. Calculations are performed to produce quantitative results highlighting the percentage dose of maximum differences delivered to various depths within the skin and subcutaneous tissue region by these two beams Results have shown that basal cell layer doses are not significantly different for 6MV and 18Mv x-ray beams At depths beyond the surface and basal cell layer there is a measurable and significant difference in delivered dose. This variation increases to 20% of maximum and 22% of maximum at Imm and 1cm depths respectively. The percentage variations are larger for smaller field sizes where the photon in phantom component of the delivered dose is the most significant contributor to dose By producing graphs or tables of % dose differences in the build up region we can provide quantitative information to the oncologist for consideration (if skin and subcutaneous tissue doses are of importance) during the beam energy selection process for treatment. Copyright (2004) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  15. Two-dimensional maximum entropy image restoration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brolley, J.E.; Lazarus, R.B.; Suydam, B.R.; Trussell, H.J.

    1977-07-01

    An optical check problem was constructed to test P LOG P maximum entropy restoration of an extremely distorted image. Useful recovery of the original image was obtained. Comparison with maximum a posteriori restoration is made. 7 figures

  16. Considerations on the establishment of maximum permissible exposure of man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobi, W.

    1974-01-01

    An attempt is made in the information lecture to give a quantitative analysis of the somatic radiation risk and to illustrate a concept to fix dose limiting values. Of primary importance is the limiting values. Of primary importance is the limiting value of the radiation exposure to the whole population. By consequential application of the risk concept, the following points are considered: 1) Definition of the risk for radiation late damages (cancer, leukemia); 2) relationship between radiation dose and thus caused radiation risk; 3) radiation risk and the dose limiting values at the time; 4) criteria for the maximum acceptable radiation risk; 5) limiting value which can be expected at the time. (HP/LH) [de

  17. Maximum permissible concentration (MPC) values for spontaneously fissioning radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, M.R.; Snyder, W.S.; Dillman, L.T.; Watson, S.B.

    1976-01-01

    The radiation hazards involved in handling certain of the transuranic nuclides that exhibit spontaneous fission as a mode of decay were reaccessed using recent advances in dosimetry and metabolic modeling. Maximum permissible concentration (MPC) values in air and water for occupational exposure (168 hr/week) were calculated for 244 Pu, 246 Cm, 248 Cm, 250 Cf, 252 Cf, 254 Cf, /sup 254m/Es, 255 Es, 254 Fm, and 256 Fm. The half-lives, branching ratios, and principal modes of decay of the parent-daughter members down to a member that makes a negligible contribution to the dose are given, and all daughters that make a significant contribution to the dose to body organs following inhalation or ingestion are included in the calculations. Dose commitments for body organs are also given

  18. Direct gap Ge1-ySny alloys: Fabrication and design of mid-IR photodiodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senaratne, C. L.; Wallace, P. M.; Gallagher, J. D.; Sims, P. E.; Kouvetakis, J.; Menéndez, J.

    2016-07-01

    Chemical vapor deposition methods were developed, using stoichiometric reactions of specialty Ge3H8 and SnD4 hydrides, to fabricate Ge1-ySny photodiodes with very high Sn concentrations in the 12%-16% range. A unique aspect of this approach is the compatible reactivity of the compounds at ultra-low temperatures, allowing efficient control and systematic tuning of the alloy composition beyond the direct gap threshold. This crucial property allows the formation of thick supersaturated layers with device-quality material properties. Diodes with composition up to 14% Sn were initially produced on Ge-buffered Si(100) featuring previously optimized n-Ge/i-Ge1-ySny/p-Ge1-zSnz type structures with a single defected interface. The devices exhibited sizable electroluminescence and good rectifying behavior as evidenced by the low dark currents in the I-V measurements. The formation of working diodes with higher Sn content up to 16% Sn was implemented by using more advanced n-Ge1-xSnx/i-Ge1-ySny/p-Ge1-zSnz architectures incorporating Ge1-xSnx intermediate layers (x ˜ 12% Sn) that served to mitigate the lattice mismatch with the Ge platform. This yielded fully coherent diode interfaces devoid of strain relaxation defects. The electrical measurements in this case revealed a sharp increase in reverse-bias dark currents by almost two orders of magnitude, in spite of the comparable crystallinity of the active layers. This observation is attributed to the enhancement of band-to-band tunneling when all the diode layers consist of direct gap materials and thus has implications for the design of light emitting diodes and lasers operating at desirable mid-IR wavelengths. Possible ways to engineer these diode characteristics and improve carrier confinement involve the incorporation of new barrier materials, in particular, ternary Ge1-x-ySixSny alloys. The possibility of achieving type-I structures using binary and ternary alloy combinations is discussed in detail, taking into account

  19. Radiation dose in dental radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohnen, M.; Kemper, J.; Moedder, U.; Moebes, O.; Pawelzik, J.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare radiation exposure in panoramic radiography (PR), dental CT, and digital volume tomography (DVT). An anthropomorphic Alderson-Rando phantom and two anatomical head phantoms with thermoluminescent dosimeters fixed at appropriate locations were exposed as in a dental examination. In PR and DVT, standard parameters were used while variables in CT included mA, pitch, and rotation time. Image noise was assessed in dental CT and DVT. Radiation doses to the skin and internal organs within the primary beam and resulting from scatter radiation were measured and expressed as maximum doses in mGy. For PR, DVT, and CT, these maximum doses were 0.65, 4.2, and 23 mGy. In dose-reduced CT protocols, radiation doses ranged from 10.9 to 6.1 mGy. Effective doses calculated on this basis showed values below 0.1 mSv for PR, DVT, and dose-reduced CT. Image noise was similar in DVT and low-dose CT. As radiation exposure and image noise of DVT is similar to low-dose CT, this imaging technique cannot be recommended as a general alternative to replace PR in dental radiology. (orig.)

  20. Dose gradient curve: A new tool for evaluating dose gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, KiHoon; Choi, Young Eun

    2018-01-01

    Stereotactic radiotherapy, which delivers an ablative high radiation dose to a target volume for maximum local tumor control, requires a rapid dose fall-off outside the target volume to prevent extensive damage to nearby normal tissue. Currently, there is no tool to comprehensively evaluate the dose gradient near the target volume. We propose the dose gradient curve (DGC) as a new tool to evaluate the quality of a treatment plan with respect to the dose fall-off characteristics. The average distance between two isodose surfaces was represented by the dose gradient index (DGI) estimated by a simple equation using the volume and surface area of isodose levels. The surface area was calculated by mesh generation and surface triangulation. The DGC was defined as a plot of the DGI of each dose interval as a function of the dose. Two types of DGCs, differential and cumulative, were generated. The performance of the DGC was evaluated using stereotactic radiosurgery plans for virtual targets. Over the range of dose distributions, the dose gradient of each dose interval was well-characterized by the DGC in an easily understandable graph format. Significant changes in the DGC were observed reflecting the differences in planning situations and various prescription doses. The DGC is a rational method for visualizing the dose gradient as the average distance between two isodose surfaces; the shorter the distance, the steeper the dose gradient. By combining the DGC with the dose-volume histogram (DVH) in a single plot, the DGC can be utilized to evaluate not only the dose gradient but also the target coverage in routine clinical practice.

  1. Pseudobinary glassy compositions (AsSex)1-y(AsTex)y

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Mously, M.K.; El Dem, M.B.

    1987-09-01

    The ternery glassy composition of the general formula (AsSe x ) 1-y (AsTe x ) y can be considered as a pseudobinary system at x=1, 3/2 and 5/2 and 0 ≤ y ≤ 1. The results of DTA, electrical conductivity measurements, density of such glasses as well as the X-ray diffraction of the crystallized samples have been used to confirm this point of view and to explain the presence of new phases not shown in the simple binary systems As-Se and As-Te. The possibility of transformation of the glassy network from partially polymerized state MCN (molecular cluster network) to completely polymerized state CRN (continuous random network) by mixing two structural units was also discussed. (author). 12 refs, 7 figs, 2 tabs

  2. Dose limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitoussi, L.

    1987-12-01

    The dose limit is defined to be the level of harmfulness which must not be exceeded, so that an activity can be exercised in a regular manner without running a risk unacceptable to man and the society. The paper examines the effects of radiation categorised into stochastic and non-stochastic. Dose limits for workers and the public are discussed

  3. Receiver function estimated by maximum entropy deconvolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴庆举; 田小波; 张乃铃; 李卫平; 曾融生

    2003-01-01

    Maximum entropy deconvolution is presented to estimate receiver function, with the maximum entropy as the rule to determine auto-correlation and cross-correlation functions. The Toeplitz equation and Levinson algorithm are used to calculate the iterative formula of error-predicting filter, and receiver function is then estimated. During extrapolation, reflective coefficient is always less than 1, which keeps maximum entropy deconvolution stable. The maximum entropy of the data outside window increases the resolution of receiver function. Both synthetic and real seismograms show that maximum entropy deconvolution is an effective method to measure receiver function in time-domain.

  4. Maximum Power from a Solar Panel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Miller

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Solar energy has become a promising alternative to conventional fossil fuel sources. Solar panels are used to collect solar radiation and convert it into electricity. One of the techniques used to maximize the effectiveness of this energy alternative is to maximize the power output of the solar collector. In this project the maximum power is calculated by determining the voltage and the current of maximum power. These quantities are determined by finding the maximum value for the equation for power using differentiation. After the maximum values are found for each time of day, each individual quantity, voltage of maximum power, current of maximum power, and maximum power is plotted as a function of the time of day.

  5. Application of maximum radiation exposure values and monitoring of radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The guide presents the principles to be applied in calculating the equivalent dose and the effective dose, instructions on application of the maximum values for radiation exposure, and instruction on monitoring of radiation exposure. In addition, the measurable quantities to be used in monitoring the radiation exposure are presented. (2 refs.)

  6. Dose constraints and guidance for exposure of individuals knowingly and willingly helping in the support and comfort of individuals undergoing medical exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansen, J. Th M.; Zoetelief, J.

    2006-01-01

    The council of the European Union (EU) has adopted directive 97/43/ EURATOM that states that Member States shall ensure that dose constraints are established for exposure of those individuals (voluntary helpers) knowingly and willingly helping patients undergoing medical diagnosis or treatment. This study investigates for which medical diagnoses and treatments voluntary helpers are active. It provides a rough estimation of the effective dose to the voluntary helper for various applications. It summarises the dose constraints established in various EU Member States. Voluntary helpers are especially active in paediatric radiology and in nuclear medicine for both diagnostic and for therapeutic purposes. No voluntary helpers are active during radiotherapy. Voluntary helpers are commonly one of the parents, relatives or friends of the patient. In The Netherlands, the highest effective dose to voluntary helpers of ∼2.3 mSv is found for therapy of patients younger than 1 y with metaiodobenzylguanidine labelled with 131 I. Effective doses to voluntary helpers in paediatric radiology are, generally, quite small, i.e. lower than several tens of μSv at maximum without wearing protective clothing. (authors)

  7. Nanostructuring and high thermoelectric efficiency in p-type Ag(Pb{sub 1-y}Sn{sub y}){sub m}SbTe{sub 2{sub +m}}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Androulakis, J; Hsu, K F; Pcionek, R; Kanatzidis, M G [Department of Chemistry, Michigan Sate University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1793 (United States); Kong, H; Uher, C [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); D' Angelo, J J; Downey, A; Hogan, T [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1226 (United States)

    2006-05-02

    The p-type Ag(Pb{sub 1-y}Sn{sub y}){sub m}SbTe{sub 2{sub +m}} materials shown in the figure demonstrate promising thermoelectric properties that are controlled with the parameters y and m. They can reach a maximum figure of merit of {proportional_to} 1.45 at 630 K. This surpasses the figure of merit of the present state-of-the-art p-type materials such as TAGS (1.2) and PbTe (0.8) at comparable temperatures. (Abstract Copyright [2006], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  8. Controllable dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez R, J.T.; Anaya M, R.A.

    2004-01-01

    With the purpose of eliminating the controversy about the lineal hypothesis without threshold which found the systems of dose limitation of the recommendations of ICRP 26 and 60, at the end of last decade R. Clarke president of the ICRP proposed the concept of Controllable Dose: as the dose or dose sum that an individual receives from a particular source which can be reasonably controllable by means of any means; said concept proposes a change in the philosophy of the radiological protection of its concern by social approaches to an individual focus. In this work a panorama of the foundations is presented, convenient and inconveniences that this proposal has loosened in the international community of the radiological protection, with the purpose of to familiarize to our Mexican community in radiological protection with these new concepts. (Author)

  9. Collective dose commitments from nuclear power programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beninson, D.

    1977-01-01

    The concepts of collective dose and collective dose commitment are discussed, particularly regarding their use to compare the relative importance of the exposure from several radiation sources and to predict future annual doses from a continuing practice. The collective dose commitment contributions from occupational exposure and population exposure due to the different components of the nuclear power fuel cycle are evaluated. A special discussion is devoted to exposures delivered over a very long time by released radionuclides of long half-lives and to the use of the incomplete collective dose commitment. The maximum future annual ''per caput'' doses from present and projected nuclear power programmes are estimated

  10. Maximum permissible voltage of YBCO coated conductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, J.; Lin, B.; Sheng, J.; Xu, J.; Jin, Z. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Hong, Z., E-mail: zhiyong.hong@sjtu.edu.cn [Department of Electrical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Wang, D.; Zhou, H.; Shen, X.; Shen, C. [Qingpu Power Supply Company, State Grid Shanghai Municipal Electric Power Company, Shanghai (China)

    2014-06-15

    Highlights: • We examine three kinds of tapes’ maximum permissible voltage. • We examine the relationship between quenching duration and maximum permissible voltage. • Continuous I{sub c} degradations under repetitive quenching where tapes reaching maximum permissible voltage. • The relationship between maximum permissible voltage and resistance, temperature. - Abstract: Superconducting fault current limiter (SFCL) could reduce short circuit currents in electrical power system. One of the most important thing in developing SFCL is to find out the maximum permissible voltage of each limiting element. The maximum permissible voltage is defined as the maximum voltage per unit length at which the YBCO coated conductors (CC) do not suffer from critical current (I{sub c}) degradation or burnout. In this research, the time of quenching process is changed and voltage is raised until the I{sub c} degradation or burnout happens. YBCO coated conductors test in the experiment are from American superconductor (AMSC) and Shanghai Jiao Tong University (SJTU). Along with the quenching duration increasing, the maximum permissible voltage of CC decreases. When quenching duration is 100 ms, the maximum permissible of SJTU CC, 12 mm AMSC CC and 4 mm AMSC CC are 0.72 V/cm, 0.52 V/cm and 1.2 V/cm respectively. Based on the results of samples, the whole length of CCs used in the design of a SFCL can be determined.

  11. The patient dose survey and dose reduction in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang Thanh Luong; Duong Van Vinh; Ha Ngoc Thach

    2000-01-01

    This paper presented the results of the patient dose survey in some hospitals in Hanoi from 1995 to 1997. The main investigated types of the X-ray examination were: Chest PA, LAT; Skull PA/AP, LAT; Lumbar spine AP, LAT; and Pelvis AP. The fluctuation of the entrance surface doses (ESD) was too large, even in the same type of X-ray examination and X-ray facility. It was found that the ratio of maximum and minimum ESD were ranged from 1.5 to 18. The mean values of ESD for chest and skull were higher than CEC recommended values, while the mean values of lumbar spine and pelvis were smaller than that of CEC recommended values. The result of dose intercomparison was also reported. Some methods of dose reduction were applied for improving the patient dose in X-ray departments such as a high kV technique, high sensitive screen-film combination. (author)

  12. Study on Surface Structure of U1-yGdyO2-x Using Raman Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Mook; Kim, Jan Dee; Youn, Young Sang; Kim, Jong Goo; Ha, Yeong Keong; Kim, Jong Yun

    2016-01-01

    To understand the structural character of the spent nuclear fuel, rare earth element (REE) doped UO 2±x have been studied as simulated spent fuel. The REE doping effect has influence on the phase stability in U-FP-O system, thermal conductivity and the relevant fuel performance. Raman spectroscopy has been used to investigate surface structure of the nuclear fuel materials, because of its sensitivity, convenience and non-destructive sample preparation. The Raman studies on trivalent-doped UO 2 directly show the defect due to oxygen vacancy that could be created by loss of oxygen for charge compensation. This defect has significant effect on the kinetics of fuel oxidation. In this study, we have been investigated the effect on Gd-doping on the UO 2 structure with Raman spectroscopy to characterize the defect structure of nuclear fuel material. The oxygen deficiencies of pellets were estimated by the relation between the doping concentration and a lattice parameter evaluated from XRD spectra. The Raman spectra of U 1-y GdyO 2-x solid solution pellets show the distorted fluorite structure with defect structure due to oxygen vacancies with increasing Gd contents.

  13. Study on Surface Structure of U1-yGdyO2-x Using Raman Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Mook; Kim, Jan Dee; Youn, Young Sang; Kim, Jong Goo; Ha, Yeong Keong; Kim, Jong Yun [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    To understand the structural character of the spent nuclear fuel, rare earth element (REE) doped UO{sub 2±x} have been studied as simulated spent fuel. The REE doping effect has influence on the phase stability in U-FP-O system, thermal conductivity and the relevant fuel performance. Raman spectroscopy has been used to investigate surface structure of the nuclear fuel materials, because of its sensitivity, convenience and non-destructive sample preparation. The Raman studies on trivalent-doped UO{sub 2} directly show the defect due to oxygen vacancy that could be created by loss of oxygen for charge compensation. This defect has significant effect on the kinetics of fuel oxidation. In this study, we have been investigated the effect on Gd-doping on the UO{sub 2} structure with Raman spectroscopy to characterize the defect structure of nuclear fuel material. The oxygen deficiencies of pellets were estimated by the relation between the doping concentration and a lattice parameter evaluated from XRD spectra. The Raman spectra of U{sub 1-y}GdyO{sub 2-x} solid solution pellets show the distorted fluorite structure with defect structure due to oxygen vacancies with increasing Gd contents.

  14. Dual mechanism of chromatin remodeling in the common shrew sex trivalent (XY 1Y 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey N. Matveevsky

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Here we focus on the XY1Y2 condition in male common shrew Sorex araneus Linnaeus, 1758, applying electron microscopy and immunocytochemistry for a comprehensive analysis of structure, synapsis and behaviour of the sex trivalent in pachytene spermatocytes. The pachytene sex trivalent consists of three distinct parts: short and long synaptic SC fragments (between the X and Y1 and between the X and Y2, respectively and a long asynaptic region of the X in-between. Chromatin inactivation was revealed in the XY1 synaptic region, the asynaptic region of the X and a very small asynaptic part of the Y2. This inactive part of the sex trivalent, that we named the ‘head’, forms a typical sex body and is located at the periphery of the meiotic nucleus at mid pachytene. The second part or ‘tail’, a long region of synapsis between the X and Y2 chromosomes, is directed from the periphery into the nucleus. Based on the distribution patterns of four proteins involved in chromatin inactivation, we propose a model of meiotic silencing in shrew sex chromosomes. Thus, we conclude that pachytene sex chromosomes are structurally and functionally two different chromatin domains with specific nuclear topology: the peripheral inactivated ‘true’ sex chromosome regions (part of the X and the Y1 and more centrally located transcriptionally active autosomal segments (part of the X and the Y2.

  15. Revealing the Maximum Strength in Nanotwinned Copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, L.; Chen, X.; Huang, Xiaoxu

    2009-01-01

    boundary–related processes. We investigated the maximum strength of nanotwinned copper samples with different twin thicknesses. We found that the strength increases with decreasing twin thickness, reaching a maximum at 15 nanometers, followed by a softening at smaller values that is accompanied by enhanced...

  16. Modelling maximum canopy conductance and transpiration in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is much current interest in predicting the maximum amount of water that can be transpired by Eucalyptus trees. It is possible that industrial waste water may be applied as irrigation water to eucalypts and it is important to predict the maximum transpiration rates of these plantations in an attempt to dispose of this ...

  17. Preliminary attempt on maximum likelihood tomosynthesis reconstruction of DEI data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhentian; Huang Zhifeng; Zhang Li; Kang Kejun; Chen Zhiqiang; Zhu Peiping

    2009-01-01

    Tomosynthesis is a three-dimension reconstruction method that can remove the effect of superimposition with limited angle projections. It is especially promising in mammography where radiation dose is concerned. In this paper, we propose a maximum likelihood tomosynthesis reconstruction algorithm (ML-TS) on the apparent absorption data of diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI). The motivation of this contribution is to develop a tomosynthesis algorithm in low-dose or noisy circumstances and make DEI get closer to clinic application. The theoretical statistical models of DEI data in physics are analyzed and the proposed algorithm is validated with the experimental data at the Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility (BSRF). The results of ML-TS have better contrast compared with the well known 'shift-and-add' algorithm and FBP algorithm. (authors)

  18. Radiation doses to normal tissues during craniospinal irradiation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mohamed Farouk Mostafa

    2011-10-15

    Oct 15, 2011 ... not in the center of the brain as this shows lower doses to eyes and lenses. ª 2011 Alexandria .... dose plan function was used to check the dose coverage of the .... maximum dose received by the right and left lens were listed.

  19. Uncertainty and variability in updated estimates of potential dose and risk at a US Nuclear Test Site - Bikini Atoll

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogen, K.T.; Conrado, C.L.; Robison, W.L.

    1997-01-01

    Uncertainty and interindividual variability were assessed in estimated doses for a rehabilitation scenario for Bikini Island at Bikini Atoll, in which the top 40 cm of soil would be removed in the housing and village area, and the rest of the island would be treated with potassium fertilizer, prior to an assumed resettlement date of 1999. Doses were estimated for ingested 137 Cs and 90 Sr, external gamma-exposure, and inhalation+ingestion of 241 Am + 239+240 Pu. Two dietary scenarios were considered: imported foods are available (IA); imported foods are unavailable with only local foods consumed (IUA). After ∼5 y of Bikini residence under either IA or IUA assumptions, upper and lower 95% confidence limits on interindividual variability in calculated dose were estimated to lie within a ∼threefold factor of its in population-average value; upper and lower 95% confidence limits on uncertainty in calculated dose were estimated to lie within a ∼twofold factor of its expected value. For reference, the expected values of population-average dose at age 70 y were estimated to be 16 and 52 mSv under IA and IUA dietary assumptions, respectively. Assuming that 200 Bikini resettlers would be exposed to local foods (under both IA and IUA assumptions), the maximum 1-y dose received by any Bikini resident is most likely to be approximately 2 and 8 mSv under the IA and IUA assumptions, respectively. Under the most likely dietary scenario, involving access to imported foods, this analysis indicates that it is most likely that no additional cancer fatalities (above those normally expected) would arise from the increased radiation exposures considered. 33 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs

  20. Occupational dose trends in Tanzania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhogora, W.E.; Nyanda, A.M.; Ngaile, J.E.; Lema, U.S.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the present status of occupational radiation exposure of monitored workers in Tanzania from 1986 to 1997. The analysis of dose records observes over this period, a fluctuating trend both in the individual and collective doses. The trend is more related to the fluctuations of the number of radiation workers than to the possible radiation safety changes of the working conditions. It has been found that, the maximum annual dose for the worker in all work categories was about 18 mSv y -1 . This suggests that the occupational radiation exposure in all practices satisfies the current dose limitation system. The national exposure summary shows that, the highest collective dose of 12.8 man-Sv which is 90% of the total collective dose, was due to medical applications. The applications in industry and research had a contribution of nearly 0.8 and 0.7 man-Sv respectively. From the professional point of view, the medical diagnostic radiographers received the highest collective dose of 11.2 man-Sv. Although the medical physicists recorded the minimum collective dose of nearly 0.07 man-Sv, the data shows that this profession received the highest mean dose of about 33 mSv in 12 years. Some achievements of the personnel monitoring services and suggestions for future improvement are pointed out. (author)

  1. Oxygen permeation flux through La1-ySryFeO3 limited by the carbon monoxide oxidation rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hassel, B.A.; van Hassel, B.A.; ten Elshof, Johan E.; Bouwmeester, Henricus J.M.

    1995-01-01

    The oxygen permeation flux through La1-ySryFeO3-δ (y = 0.1, 0.2) in a large oxygen partial pressure gradient (air/CO, CO2 mixture) was found to be limited by the carbon monoxide oxidation rate at the low oxygen partial pressure side of the membrane. The oxygen permeation flux through the membrane

  2. Composite fields, generalized hypergeometric functions and the U(1)Y symmetry in the AdS/CFT correspondence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, L.; Leonhardt, T.; Mesref, L.; Ruehl, W.

    2001-01-01

    We discuss the concept of composite fields in flat CFT as well as in the context of AdS/CFT. Furthermore we show how to represent Green functions using generalized hypergeometric functions and apply these techniques to four-point functions. Finally we prove an identity of U(1) Y symmetry for four-point functions

  3. Composite fields, generalized hypergeometric functions and the U(1)Y symmetry in the AdS/CFT correspondence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, L.; Leonhardt, T.; Mesref, L.; Rühl, W.

    2001-09-01

    We discuss the concept of composite fields in flat CFT as well as in the context of AdS/CFT. Furthermore we show how to represent Green functions using generalized hypergeometric functions and apply these techniques to four-point functions. Finally we prove an identity of U(1)Y symmetry for four-point functions.

  4. MXLKID: a maximum likelihood parameter identifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavel, D.T.

    1980-07-01

    MXLKID (MaXimum LiKelihood IDentifier) is a computer program designed to identify unknown parameters in a nonlinear dynamic system. Using noisy measurement data from the system, the maximum likelihood identifier computes a likelihood function (LF). Identification of system parameters is accomplished by maximizing the LF with respect to the parameters. The main body of this report briefly summarizes the maximum likelihood technique and gives instructions and examples for running the MXLKID program. MXLKID is implemented LRLTRAN on the CDC7600 computer at LLNL. A detailed mathematical description of the algorithm is given in the appendices. 24 figures, 6 tables

  5. Microstructure analyses and thermoelectric properties of Ag1−xPb18Sb1+yTe20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perlt, S.; Höche, Th.; Dadda, J.; Müller, E.; Bauer Pereira, P.; Hermann, R.; Sarahan, M.; Pippel, E.; Brydson, R.

    2012-01-01

    This study reports microstructural investigations of long-term annealed Ag 1−x Pb m Sb 1+y Te 2+m (m=18, x=y=0, hereinafter referred to as AgPb 18 SbTe 20 ) (Lead–Antimony–Silver–Tellurium, LAST-18) as well as of Ag 1−x Pb 18 Sb 1+y Te 20 , i.e. Ag-deficient and Sb-excess LAST-18 (x≠0,y≠0), respectively. Two different length scales are explored. The micrometer scale was evaluated by SEM to analyze the volume fraction and the number of secondary phases as well as the impact of processing parameters on the homogeneity of bulk samples. For AgPb 18 SbTe 20 , site-specific FIB liftout of TEM lamellae from thermoelectrically characterized samples was accomplished to investigate the structure on the nanometer scale. High-resolution TEM and energy-filtered TEM were performed to reveal shape and size distribution of nanoprecipitates, respectively. A hypothesis concerning the structure–property relationship is set out within the frame of a gradient annealing experiment. This study is completed by results dealing with inhomogeneities on the micrometer scale of Ag 1−x Pb 18 Sb 1+y Te 20 and its electronic properties. Highlights: ► SEM and TEM microstructure investigation of long-term annealed AgPb 18 SbTe 20 . ► SEM and thermoelectric studies on Ag 1−x Pb 18 Sb 1+y Te 20 . ► Discussion concerning structure–property relationship in long-term annealed AgPb 18 SbTe 20 . ► Correlation between Ag 1−x Pb 18 Sb 1+y Te 20 microscale structure and electronic properties.

  6. Dose and dose rate monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novakova, O.; Ryba, J.; Slezak, V.; Svobodova, B.; Viererbl, L.

    1984-10-01

    The methods are discussea of measuring dose rate or dose using a scintillation counte. A plastic scintillator based on polystyrene with PBD and POPOP activators and coated with ZnS(Ag) was chosen for the projected monitor. The scintillators were cylindrical and spherical in shape and of different sizes; black polypropylene tubes were chosen as the best case for the probs. For the counter with different plastic scintillators, the statistical error 2σ for natural background was determined. For determining the suitable thickness of the ZnS(Ag) layer the energy dependence of the counter was measured. Radioisotopes 137 Cs, 241 Am and 109 Cd were chosen as radiation sources. The best suited ZnS(Ag) thickness was found to be 0.5 μm. Experiments were carried out to determine the directional dependence of the detector response and the signal to noise ratio. The temperature dependence of the detector response and its compensation were studied, as were the time stability and fatigue manifestations of the photomultiplier. The design of a laboratory prototype of a dose rate and dose monitor is described. Block diagrams are given of the various functional parts of the instrument. The designed instrument is easiiy portable, battery powered, measures dose rates from natural background in the range of five orders, i.e., 10 -2 to 10 3 nGy/s, and allows to determine a dose of up to 10 mGy. Accouracy of measurement in the energy range of 50 keV to 1 MeV is better than +-20%. (E.S.)

  7. Maximum neutron flux in thermal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strugar, P.V.

    1968-12-01

    Direct approach to the problem is to calculate spatial distribution of fuel concentration if the reactor core directly using the condition of maximum neutron flux and comply with thermal limitations. This paper proved that the problem can be solved by applying the variational calculus, i.e. by using the maximum principle of Pontryagin. Mathematical model of reactor core is based on the two-group neutron diffusion theory with some simplifications which make it appropriate from maximum principle point of view. Here applied theory of maximum principle are suitable for application. The solution of optimum distribution of fuel concentration in the reactor core is obtained in explicit analytical form. The reactor critical dimensions are roots of a system of nonlinear equations and verification of optimum conditions can be done only for specific examples

  8. Maximum allowable load on wheeled mobile manipulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habibnejad Korayem, M.; Ghariblu, H.

    2003-01-01

    This paper develops a computational technique for finding the maximum allowable load of mobile manipulator during a given trajectory. The maximum allowable loads which can be achieved by a mobile manipulator during a given trajectory are limited by the number of factors; probably the dynamic properties of mobile base and mounted manipulator, their actuator limitations and additional constraints applied to resolving the redundancy are the most important factors. To resolve extra D.O.F introduced by the base mobility, additional constraint functions are proposed directly in the task space of mobile manipulator. Finally, in two numerical examples involving a two-link planar manipulator mounted on a differentially driven mobile base, application of the method to determining maximum allowable load is verified. The simulation results demonstrates the maximum allowable load on a desired trajectory has not a unique value and directly depends on the additional constraint functions which applies to resolve the motion redundancy

  9. Maximum phytoplankton concentrations in the sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jackson, G.A.; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    A simplification of plankton dynamics using coagulation theory provides predictions of the maximum algal concentration sustainable in aquatic systems. These predictions have previously been tested successfully against results from iron fertilization experiments. We extend the test to data collect...

  10. Maximum-Likelihood Detection Of Noncoherent CPM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divsalar, Dariush; Simon, Marvin K.

    1993-01-01

    Simplified detectors proposed for use in maximum-likelihood-sequence detection of symbols in alphabet of size M transmitted by uncoded, full-response continuous phase modulation over radio channel with additive white Gaussian noise. Structures of receivers derived from particular interpretation of maximum-likelihood metrics. Receivers include front ends, structures of which depends only on M, analogous to those in receivers of coherent CPM. Parts of receivers following front ends have structures, complexity of which would depend on N.

  11. Dosimetric systems of high dose, dose rate and dose uniformity in food and medical products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas, J.; Vivanco, M.; Castro, E.

    2014-08-01

    In the Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear (IPEN) we use the chemical dosimetry Astm-E-1026 Fricke as a standard dosimetric system of reference and different routine dosimetric systems of high doses, according to the applied doses to obtain the desired effects in the treated products and the doses range determined for each type of dosimeter. Fricke dosimetry is a chemical dosimeter in aqueous solution indicating the absorbed dose by means an increase in absorbance at a specific wavelength. A calibrated spectrophotometer with controlled temperature is used to measure absorbance. The adsorbed dose range should cover from 20 to 400 Gy, the Fricke solution is extremely sensitive to organic impurities, to traces of metal ions, in preparing chemical products of reactive grade must be used and the water purity is very important. Using the referential standard dosimetric system Fricke, was determined to March 5, 2013, using the referential standard dosimetric system Astm-1026 Fricke, were irradiated in triplicate Fricke dosimeters, to 5 irradiation times (20; 30; 40; 50 and 60 seconds) and by linear regression, the dose rate of 5.400648 kGy /h was determined in the central point of the irradiation chamber (irradiator Gamma cell 220 Excel), applying the decay formula, was compared with the obtained results by manufacturers by means the same dosimetric system in the year of its manufacture, being this to the date 5.44691 kGy /h, with an error rate of 0.85. After considering that the dosimetric solution responds to the results, we proceeded to the irradiation of a sample of 200 g of cereal instant food, 2 dosimeters were placed at the lateral ends of the central position to maximum dose and 2 dosimeters in upper and lower ends as minimum dose, they were applied same irradiation times; for statistical analysis, the maximum dose rate was 6.1006 kGy /h and the minimum dose rate of 5.2185 kGy /h; with a dose uniformity of 1.16. In medical material of micro pulverized bone for

  12. Radiation absorbed doses in cephalography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eliasson, S.; Julin, P.; Richter, S.; Stenstroem, B.

    1984-01-01

    Radiation absorbed doses to different organs in the head and neck region in lateral (LAT) and postero-anterior (PA) cephalography were investigated. The doses were measured by thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD) on a tissue equivalent phantom head. Lanthanide screens in speed group 4 were used at 90 and 85 k Vp. A near-focus aluminium dodger was used and the radiation beam was collimated strictly to the face. The maximum entrance dose from LAT was 0.25 mGy and 0.42 mGy from a PA exposure. The doses to the salivary glands ranged between 0.2 and 0.02 mGy at LAT and between 0.15 and 0.04 mGy at PA exposures. The average thyroid gland dose without any shielding was 0.11 mGy (LAT) and 0.06 mGy (PA). When a dodger was used the dose was reduced to 0.07 mGy (LAT). If the thyroid gland was sheilded off, the dose was further reduced to 0.01 mGy and if the thyroid region was collimated out of the primary radiation field the dose was reduced to only 0.005 mGy. (authors)

  13. Structural and thermodynamic characterization of the perovskite-related BA{sub 1+y}UO{sub 3+x} and (BA,SR){sub 1+y}UO{sub 3+x} phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordfunke, E.H.P. [Netherlands Energy Research Foundation (ECN), Petten (Netherlands); Booij, A.S. [Netherlands Energy Research Foundation (ECN), Petten (Netherlands); Smit-Groen, V. [Netherlands Energy Research Foundation (ECN), Petten (Netherlands); Vlaanderen, P. van [Netherlands Energy Research Foundation (ECN), Petten (Netherlands); IJdo, D.J.W. [Rijksuniversiteit Leiden (Netherlands). Gorlaeus Labs.

    1996-11-01

    The perovskite-type BaUO{sub 3} structure has been investigated by X-ray and neutron diffraction. The Ba/U ratio, the (Ba, Sr)/U ratio, and the oxygen stoichiometry in Ba{sub 1+y}UO{sub 3+x} were varied, and the integral enthalpies of formation determined by solution calorimetry. In addition, equilibrium oxygen partial pressures were measured using a reversible EMF cell. The chemical defect mechanism is discussed, and it is shown that a continuous series BaUO{sub 3}-Ba{sub 1+y}UO{sub 3+x}-Ba{sub 3}UO{sub 6} exist in which uranium vacancies are gradually filled up with barium ions, whereas uranium is oxidized via the pentavalent to the hexavalent state in Ba{sub 3}UO{sub 6}(=Ba{sub 2}(Ba, U)O{sub 6}). (orig.).

  14. Control of Co content and SOFC cathode performance in Y1-ySr2+yCu3-xCoxO7+δ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šimo, F.; Payne, J. L.; Demont, A.; Sayers, R.; Li, Ming; Collins, C. M.; Pitcher, M. J.; Claridge, J. B.; Rosseinsky, M. J.

    2014-11-01

    The electrochemical performance of the layered perovskite YSr2Cu3-xCoxO7+δ, a potential solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cathode, is improved by increasing the Co content from x = 1.00 to a maximum of x = 1.30. Single phase samples with x > 1.00 are obtained by tuning the Y/Sr ratio, yielding the composition Y1-ySr2+yCu3-xCoxO7+δ (where y ≤ 0.05). The high temperature structure of Y0.95Sr2.05Cu1.7Co1.3O7+δ at 740 °C is characterised by powder neutron diffraction and the potential of this Co-enriched material as a SOFC cathode is investigated by combining AC impedance spectroscopy, four-probe DC conductivity and powder XRD measurements to determine its electrochemical properties along with its thermal stability and compatibility with a range of commercially available electrolytes. The material is shown to be compatible with doped ceria electrolytes at 900 °C.

  15. Dose-mapping distribution around MNSR

    CERN Document Server

    Jamal, M H

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study is to establish the dose-rate map through the determination of radiological dose-rate levels in reactor hall, adjacent rooms, and outside the MNSR facility. Controlling dose rate to reactor operating personnel , dose map was established. The map covers time and distances in the reactor hall, during reactor operation at nominal power. Different measurement of dose rates in other areas of the reactor buildings was established. The maximum dose rate, during normal operation of the MNSR was 40 and 21 Sv/hr on the top of the reactor and near the pool fence, respectively. Whereas, gamma and neutron doses have not exceeded natural background in all rooms adjacent to the reactor hall or nearly buildings. The relation between the dose rate for gamma rays and neutron flux at the top of cover of reactor pool was studied as well. It was found that this relation is linear.

  16. Dose-mapping distribution around MNSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamal, M. H.; Khamis, I.

    2002-12-01

    The aim of this study is to establish the dose-rate map through the determination of radiological dose-rate levels in reactor hall, adjacent rooms, and outside the MNSR facility. Controlling dose rate to reactor operating personnel , dose map was established. The map covers time and distances in the reactor hall, during reactor operation at nominal power. Different measurement of dose rates in other areas of the reactor buildings was established. The maximum dose rate, during normal operation of the MNSR was 40 and 21 Sv/hr on the top of the reactor and near the pool fence, respectively. Whereas, gamma and neutron doses have not exceeded natural background in all rooms adjacent to the reactor hall or nearly buildings. The relation between the dose rate for gamma rays and neutron flux at the top of cover of reactor pool was studied as well. It was found that this relation is linear. (author)

  17. Application of ICRP recommendations relevant to internal dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowser, K.E.; Snyder, W.S.; Struxness, E.G.

    1969-01-01

    The intent of this paper is to review several of the basic concepts of radiation protection (with emphasis on internal dose) currently recommended by the International Commission on radiological Protection (ICRP), to summarize the assumptions and methods used in the calculation of internal dose, and to illustrate by example the practical application of the pertinent guidelines. Two broad subject areas are considered: (1) standards of radiation protection and (2) bases of internal dose estimation. Topics discussed within the framework of radiation protection standards include maximum permissible dose, categories of radiation exposure, maximum permissible dose commitment, simultaneous internal and external exposure, multiple organ exposure, and size of the exposed group. Discussion of internal dose estimation is limited to selected items that include the body burden of radionuclides and the calculation of absorbed dose, the dose equivalent, the derivation of maximum permissible concentration (MPC), the relationship of stable element intake to the MPC, and short term and chronic exposure situations. (author)

  18. Application of ICRP recommendations relevant to internal dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowser, K E; Snyder, W S; Struxness, E G [Health Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1969-07-01

    The intent of this paper is to review several of the basic concepts of radiation protection (with emphasis on internal dose) currently recommended by the International Commission on radiological Protection (ICRP), to summarize the assumptions and methods used in the calculation of internal dose, and to illustrate by example the practical application of the pertinent guidelines. Two broad subject areas are considered: (1) standards of radiation protection and (2) bases of internal dose estimation. Topics discussed within the framework of radiation protection standards include maximum permissible dose, categories of radiation exposure, maximum permissible dose commitment, simultaneous internal and external exposure, multiple organ exposure, and size of the exposed group. Discussion of internal dose estimation is limited to selected items that include the body burden of radionuclides and the calculation of absorbed dose, the dose equivalent, the derivation of maximum permissible concentration (MPC), the relationship of stable element intake to the MPC, and short term and chronic exposure situations. (author)

  19. Dose rate constants for new dose quantities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tschurlovits, M.; Daverda, G.; Leitner, A.

    1992-01-01

    Conceptual changes and new quantities made is necessary to reassess dose rate quantities. Calculations of the dose rate constant were done for air kerma, ambient dose equivalent and directional dose equivalent. The number of radionuclides is more than 200. The threshold energy is selected as 20 keV for the dose equivalent constants. The dose rate constant for the photon equivalent dose as used mainly in German speaking countries as a temporary quantity is also included. (Author)

  20. Maximum gravitational redshift of white dwarfs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, S.L.; Teukolsky, S.A.

    1976-01-01

    The stability of uniformly rotating, cold white dwarfs is examined in the framework of the Parametrized Post-Newtonian (PPN) formalism of Will and Nordtvedt. The maximum central density and gravitational redshift of a white dwarf are determined as functions of five of the nine PPN parameters (γ, β, zeta 2 , zeta 3 , and zeta 4 ), the total angular momentum J, and the composition of the star. General relativity predicts that the maximum redshifts is 571 km s -1 for nonrotating carbon and helium dwarfs, but is lower for stars composed of heavier nuclei. Uniform rotation can increase the maximum redshift to 647 km s -1 for carbon stars (the neutronization limit) and to 893 km s -1 for helium stars (the uniform rotation limit). The redshift distribution of a larger sample of white dwarfs may help determine the composition of their cores

  1. Semidirect product gauge group [SU(3)cxSU(2)L]xU(1)Y and quantization of hypercharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Chuichiro; Matsunaga, Mamoru; Matsuoka, Takeo

    2011-01-01

    In the standard model the hypercharges of quarks and leptons are not determined by the gauge group SU(3) c xSU(2) L xU(1) Y alone. We show that, if we choose the semidirect product group [SU(3) c xSU(2) L ]xU(1) Y as its gauge group, the hyperchages are settled to be n/6 mod Z(n=0,1,3,4). In addition, the conditions for gauge-anomaly cancellation give strong constraints. As a result, the ratios of the hypercharges are uniquely determined and the gravitational anomaly is automatically canceled. The standard charge assignment to quarks and leptons can be properly reproduced. For exotic matter fields their hypercharges are also discussed.

  2. Effect of Sr addition on microstructure and elevated temperature mechanical properties of Mg–3Zn–1Y alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Junwei [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Peng, Xiaodong, E-mail: pxd@cqu.edu.cn [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); National Engineering Research Center for Magnesium Alloys, Chongqing 400044 (China); Li, Mengluan; Wei, Guobing [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Xie, Weidong [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); National Engineering Research Center for Magnesium Alloys, Chongqing 400044 (China); Yang, Yan [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2016-02-08

    The effects of Sr addition on the microstructure and elevated temperature mechanical behavior of Mg–3Zn–1Y alloys have been investigated in this research. The results show that α-Mg, W-phase and S-phase are found in the Sr-containing alloys. The S-phase has a higher thermal stability than W-phase, which significantly improves the elevated temperature mechanical properties of the alloy. To further confirm the crystal structure of the S-phase, high resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis was performed and the phase was confirmed to be Mg{sub 6}Zn{sub 2}Sr{sub 1}. With increasing content of Sr, the elevated temperature mechanical properties of the Mg–3Zn–1Y are improved. When the Sr content reached to 0.9 wt%, the alloy shows a much higher ultimate tensile strength of 204 MPa and yield strength of 171 MPa at 250 °C.

  3. Characteristic charge transport in oxygen-deficiency-controlled LnFeAsO1-y (Ln = La and Nd)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Shigeyuki; Nakajima, Masamichi; Tomioka, Yasuhide; Ito, Toshimitsu; Miyazawa, Kiichi; Kito, Hijiri; Lee, Chul-Ho; Ishikado, Motoyuki; Shamoto, Shin-ichi; Iyo, Akira; Eisaki, Hiroshi; Kojima, Kenji M.; Uchida, Shin-ichi

    2010-01-01

    We have investigated the transport properties of LnFeAsO 1-y (Ln = La, Nd) over a wide range of doping. When we compare the exponent n of resistivity ρ(T)∼T n , a marked difference is found between La and Nd system. In the La system with lower T C ,ρ(T) is always dominated by a T 2 term at low temperatures, showing relatively large magnetoresistance. On the other hand, in the Nd system with higher T C ,ρ(T) is linear on T with a small magnetoresistance. These results indicate that the carriers are subject to stronger scattering in NdFeAsO 1-y , which might be linked to the higher T C .

  4. Patient dose measurement and dose reduction in chest radiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milatović Aleksandra A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigations presented in this paper represent the first estimation of patient doses in chest radiography in Montenegro. In the initial stage of our study, we measured the entrance surface air kerma and kerma area product for chest radiography in five major health institutions in the country. A total of 214 patients were observed. We reported the mean value, minimum and third quartile values, as well as maximum values of surface air kerma and kerma area product of patient doses. In the second stage, the possibilities for dose reduction were investigated. Mean kerma area product values were 0.8 ± 0.5 Gycm2 for the posterior-anterior projection and 1.6 ± 0.9 Gycm2 for the lateral projection. The max/min ratio for the entrance surface air kerma was found to be 53 for the posterior-anterior projection and 88 for the lateral projection. Comparing the results obtained in Montenegro with results from other countries, we concluded that patient doses in our medical centres are significantly higher. Changes in exposure parameters and increased filtration contributed to a dose reduction of up to 36% for posterior-anterior chest examinations. The variability of the estimated dose values points to a significant space for dose reduction throughout the process of radiological practice optimisation.

  5. Maximum entropy analysis of EGRET data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pohl, M.; Strong, A.W.

    1997-01-01

    EGRET data are usually analysed on the basis of the Maximum-Likelihood method \\cite{ma96} in a search for point sources in excess to a model for the background radiation (e.g. \\cite{hu97}). This method depends strongly on the quality of the background model, and thus may have high systematic unce...... uncertainties in region of strong and uncertain background like the Galactic Center region. Here we show images of such regions obtained by the quantified Maximum-Entropy method. We also discuss a possible further use of MEM in the analysis of problematic regions of the sky....

  6. The Maximum Resource Bin Packing Problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyar, J.; Epstein, L.; Favrholdt, L.M.

    2006-01-01

    Usually, for bin packing problems, we try to minimize the number of bins used or in the case of the dual bin packing problem, maximize the number or total size of accepted items. This paper presents results for the opposite problems, where we would like to maximize the number of bins used...... algorithms, First-Fit-Increasing and First-Fit-Decreasing for the maximum resource variant of classical bin packing. For the on-line variant, we define maximum resource variants of classical and dual bin packing. For dual bin packing, no on-line algorithm is competitive. For classical bin packing, we find...

  7. Shower maximum detector for SDC calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ernwein, J.

    1994-01-01

    A prototype for the SDC end-cap (EM) calorimeter complete with a pre-shower and a shower maximum detector was tested in beams of electrons and Π's at CERN by an SDC subsystem group. The prototype was manufactured from scintillator tiles and strips read out with 1 mm diameter wave-length shifting fibers. The design and construction of the shower maximum detector is described, and results of laboratory tests on light yield and performance of the scintillator-fiber system are given. Preliminary results on energy and position measurements with the shower max detector in the test beam are shown. (authors). 4 refs., 5 figs

  8. Topics in Bayesian statistics and maximum entropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutihac, R.; Cicuttin, A.; Cerdeira, A.; Stanciulescu, C.

    1998-12-01

    Notions of Bayesian decision theory and maximum entropy methods are reviewed with particular emphasis on probabilistic inference and Bayesian modeling. The axiomatic approach is considered as the best justification of Bayesian analysis and maximum entropy principle applied in natural sciences. Particular emphasis is put on solving the inverse problem in digital image restoration and Bayesian modeling of neural networks. Further topics addressed briefly include language modeling, neutron scattering, multiuser detection and channel equalization in digital communications, genetic information, and Bayesian court decision-making. (author)

  9. Density estimation by maximum quantum entropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, R.N.; Wallstrom, T.; Martz, H.F.

    1993-01-01

    A new Bayesian method for non-parametric density estimation is proposed, based on a mathematical analogy to quantum statistical physics. The mathematical procedure is related to maximum entropy methods for inverse problems and image reconstruction. The information divergence enforces global smoothing toward default models, convexity, positivity, extensivity and normalization. The novel feature is the replacement of classical entropy by quantum entropy, so that local smoothing is enforced by constraints on differential operators. The linear response of the estimate is proportional to the covariance. The hyperparameters are estimated by type-II maximum likelihood (evidence). The method is demonstrated on textbook data sets

  10. On the simultaneous Pell equations x 2 - (4m 2 - 1)y 2 = y 2 - pz 2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Let m be a positive integer, and let p be an odd prime. By using certain properties of Pell and quartic diophantine equations with some elementary number theory methods, we prove that the system of equations x2 - (4m2 - 1)y2 = 1 and y2 - pz2 = 1 has positive integer solutions (x, y, z) if and only if p ≡ 7(mod 8) and m = 1/4 ...

  11. Oxygen transport in La1-xSrxFe1-yMnyO3-δ perovskites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, L.; Andersen, I.G.K.; Skou, E.M.

    2002-01-01

    The oxygen transport in La1-xSrxFe1-yMnyO3-delta (LSFM) with 0 less than or equal to x less than or equal to 0.5 and y = 0.2 and 03 has been examined with a thermogravimetric method. As long as x less than or equal to y, the oxygen transport was found to be very slow while the oxygen transport in...

  12. Phenomenology of the spontaneous C P violation in SU(3)L x U(1)Y electroweak models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epele, Luis N.; Gomez Dumm, Daniel A.

    1994-01-01

    This work studies the phenomenological consequence of the spontaneous C P violation in a SU(3) L x U(1) Y model with three Higgs triplets and one sextuplet, which has been recently proposed. Since this C P-violating effects are due to the presence of complex vacuum expectation values in the Higgs sector, our analysis requires a detailed study of the enlarged potential

  13. Georgia fishery study: implications for dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turcotte, M.D.S.

    1983-01-01

    Fish consumption will contribute a major portion of the estimated individual and population doses from L-Reactor liquid releases and Cs-137 remobilization in Steel Creek. It is therefore important that the values for fish consumption used in dose calculations be as realistic as possible. Since publication of the L-Reactor Environmental Information Document (EID), data have become available on sport fishing in the Savannah River. These data provide SRP with site-specific sport fish harvest and consumption values for use in dose calculations. The Georgia fishery data support the total population fish consumption and calculated dose reported in the EID. The data indicate, however, that both the EID average and maximum individual fish consumption have been underestimated, although each to a different degree. The average fish consumption value used in the EID is approximately 3% below the lower limit of the fish consumption range calculated using the Georgia data. A fish consumption value of 11.3 kg/yr should be used to recalculate dose to the average individual from L-Reactor restart. Maximum fish consumption in the EID has been underestimated by approximately 60%, and doses to the maximum individual should also be recalculated. Future dose calculations should utilize an average fish consumption value of 11.3 kg/yr, and a maximum fish consumption value of 34 kg/yr

  14. Effects of annealing, acid and alcoholic beverages on Fe1+yTe0.6Se0.4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Y; Taen, T; Tsuchiya, Y; Tamegai, T; Shi, Z X

    2013-01-01

    We have systematically investigated and compared different methods to induce superconductivity in the iron chalcogenide Fe 1+y Te 0.6 Se 0.4 , including annealing in a vacuum, N 2 , O 2 and I 2 atmospheres and immersing samples into acid and alcoholic beverages. Vacuum and N 2 annealing are proved to be ineffective in inducing superconductivity in a Fe 1+y Te 0.6 Se 0.4 single crystal. Annealing in O 2 and I 2 and immersion in acid and alcoholic beverages can induce superconductivity by oxidizing the excess Fe in the sample. Superconductivity in O 2 annealed samples is of a bulk nature, while I 2 , acid and alcoholic beverages can only induce superconductivity near the surface. By comparing the different effects of O 2 , I 2 , acid and alcoholic beverages we propose a scenario to explain how the superconductivity is induced in the non-superconducting as-grown Fe 1+y Te 0.6 Se 0.4 . (paper)

  15. Comparsion of maximum viscosity and viscometric method for identification of irradiated sweet potato starch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi, Sang Duk; Yang, Jae Seung

    2000-01-01

    A study was carried out to compare viscosity and maximum viscosity methods for the detection of irradiated sweet potato starch. The viscosity of all samples decreased by increasing stirring speeds and irradiation doses. This trend was similar for maximum viscosity. Regression coefficients and expressions of viscosity and maximum viscosity with increasing irradiation dose were 0.9823 (y=335.02e -0. 3 366x ) at 120 rpm and 0.9939 (y =-42.544x+730.26). This trend in viscosity was similar for all stirring speeds. Parameter A, B and C values showed a dose dependent relation and were a better parameter for detecting irradiation treatment than maximum viscosity and the viscosity value it self. These results suggest that the detection of irradiated sweet potato starch is possible by both the viscometric and maximum visosity method. Therefore, the authors think that the maximum viscosity method can be proposed as one of the new methods to detect the irradiation treatment for sweet potato starch

  16. Nonsymmetric entropy and maximum nonsymmetric entropy principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Chengshi

    2009-01-01

    Under the frame of a statistical model, the concept of nonsymmetric entropy which generalizes the concepts of Boltzmann's entropy and Shannon's entropy, is defined. Maximum nonsymmetric entropy principle is proved. Some important distribution laws such as power law, can be derived from this principle naturally. Especially, nonsymmetric entropy is more convenient than other entropy such as Tsallis's entropy in deriving power laws.

  17. Maximum speed of dewetting on a fiber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chan, Tak Shing; Gueudre, Thomas; Snoeijer, Jacobus Hendrikus

    2011-01-01

    A solid object can be coated by a nonwetting liquid since a receding contact line cannot exceed a critical speed. We theoretically investigate this forced wetting transition for axisymmetric menisci on fibers of varying radii. First, we use a matched asymptotic expansion and derive the maximum speed

  18. Maximum potential preventive effect of hip protectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schoor, N.M.; Smit, J.H.; Bouter, L.M.; Veenings, B.; Asma, G.B.; Lips, P.T.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To estimate the maximum potential preventive effect of hip protectors in older persons living in the community or homes for the elderly. DESIGN: Observational cohort study. SETTING: Emergency departments in the Netherlands. PARTICIPANTS: Hip fracture patients aged 70 and older who

  19. Maximum gain of Yagi-Uda arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojsen, J.H.; Schjær-Jacobsen, Hans; Nilsson, E.

    1971-01-01

    Numerical optimisation techniques have been used to find the maximum gain of some specific parasitic arrays. The gain of an array of infinitely thin, equispaced dipoles loaded with arbitrary reactances has been optimised. The results show that standard travelling-wave design methods are not optimum....... Yagi–Uda arrays with equal and unequal spacing have also been optimised with experimental verification....

  20. correlation between maximum dry density and cohesion

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HOD

    represents maximum dry density, signifies plastic limit and is liquid limit. Researchers [6, 7] estimate compaction parameters. Aside from the correlation existing between compaction parameters and other physical quantities there are some other correlations that have been investigated by other researchers. The well-known.

  1. Weak scale from the maximum entropy principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Yuta; Kawai, Hikaru; Kawana, Kiyoharu

    2015-03-01

    The theory of the multiverse and wormholes suggests that the parameters of the Standard Model (SM) are fixed in such a way that the radiation of the S3 universe at the final stage S_rad becomes maximum, which we call the maximum entropy principle. Although it is difficult to confirm this principle generally, for a few parameters of the SM, we can check whether S_rad actually becomes maximum at the observed values. In this paper, we regard S_rad at the final stage as a function of the weak scale (the Higgs expectation value) vh, and show that it becomes maximum around vh = {{O}} (300 GeV) when the dimensionless couplings in the SM, i.e., the Higgs self-coupling, the gauge couplings, and the Yukawa couplings are fixed. Roughly speaking, we find that the weak scale is given by vh ˜ T_{BBN}2 / (M_{pl}ye5), where ye is the Yukawa coupling of electron, T_BBN is the temperature at which the Big Bang nucleosynthesis starts, and M_pl is the Planck mass.

  2. The maximum-entropy method in superspace

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    van Smaalen, S.; Palatinus, Lukáš; Schneider, M.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 59, - (2003), s. 459-469 ISSN 0108-7673 Grant - others:DFG(DE) XX Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : maximum-entropy method, * aperiodic crystals * electron density Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.558, year: 2003

  3. Achieving maximum sustainable yield in mixed fisheries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ulrich, Clara; Vermard, Youen; Dolder, Paul J.; Brunel, Thomas; Jardim, Ernesto; Holmes, Steven J.; Kempf, Alexander; Mortensen, Lars O.; Poos, Jan Jaap; Rindorf, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Achieving single species maximum sustainable yield (MSY) in complex and dynamic fisheries targeting multiple species (mixed fisheries) is challenging because achieving the objective for one species may mean missing the objective for another. The North Sea mixed fisheries are a representative example

  4. 5 CFR 534.203 - Maximum stipends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... maximum stipend established under this section. (e) A trainee at a non-Federal hospital, clinic, or medical or dental laboratory who is assigned to a Federal hospital, clinic, or medical or dental... Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PAY UNDER OTHER SYSTEMS Student...

  5. Minimal length, Friedmann equations and maximum density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awad, Adel [Center for Theoretical Physics, British University of Egypt,Sherouk City 11837, P.O. Box 43 (Egypt); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Ain Shams University,Cairo, 11566 (Egypt); Ali, Ahmed Farag [Centre for Fundamental Physics, Zewail City of Science and Technology,Sheikh Zayed, 12588, Giza (Egypt); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Benha University,Benha, 13518 (Egypt)

    2014-06-16

    Inspired by Jacobson’s thermodynamic approach, Cai et al. have shown the emergence of Friedmann equations from the first law of thermodynamics. We extend Akbar-Cai derivation http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevD.75.084003 of Friedmann equations to accommodate a general entropy-area law. Studying the resulted Friedmann equations using a specific entropy-area law, which is motivated by the generalized uncertainty principle (GUP), reveals the existence of a maximum energy density closed to Planck density. Allowing for a general continuous pressure p(ρ,a) leads to bounded curvature invariants and a general nonsingular evolution. In this case, the maximum energy density is reached in a finite time and there is no cosmological evolution beyond this point which leaves the big bang singularity inaccessible from a spacetime prospective. The existence of maximum energy density and a general nonsingular evolution is independent of the equation of state and the spacial curvature k. As an example we study the evolution of the equation of state p=ωρ through its phase-space diagram to show the existence of a maximum energy which is reachable in a finite time.

  6. Patient dose in neonatal units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smans, K.; Struelens, L.; Smet, M.; Bosmans, H.; Vanhavere, F.

    2008-01-01

    Lung disease represents one of the most life-threatening conditions in prematurely born children. In the evaluation of the neonatal chest, the primary and most important diagnostic study is therefore the chest radiograph. Since prematurely born children are very sensitive to radiation, those radiographs may lead to a significant radiation detriment. Hence, knowledge of the patient dose is necessary to justify the exposures. A study to assess the patient doses was started at the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) of the Univ. Hospital in Leuven. Between September 2004 and September 2005, prematurely born babies underwent on average 10 X-ray examinations in the NICU. In this sample, the maximum was 78 X-ray examinations. For chest radiographs, the median entrance skin dose was 34 μGy and the median dose area product was 7.1 mGy.cm 2 . By means of conversion coefficients, the measured values were converted to organ doses. Organ doses were calculated for three different weight classes: extremely low birth weight infants ( 2500 g). The doses to the lungs for a single chest radiograph for infants with extremely low birth weights, low birth weights and normal birth weights were 24, 25 and 32 μGy, respectively. (authors)

  7. Vascular function and atherosclerosis progression after 1 y of flavonoid intake in statin-treated postmenopausal women with type 2 diabetes: a double-blind randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Peter J; Potter, John; Kroon, Paul A; Wilson, Paddy; Dhatariya, Ketan; Sampson, Mike; Cassidy, Aedín

    2013-05-01

    In healthy participants, short-term flavan-3-ol and isoflavone intakes improve vascular function; however, the potential combined benefit of these compounds on atherosclerosis progression remains unclear for those at elevated risk of cardiovascular disease. The objective was to examine whether combined isoflavone and flavan-3-ol intake alters vascular function in postmenopausal women with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). A double-blind, parallel-design, placebo-controlled 1-y trial was conducted in postmenopausal T2DM patients randomly assigned to a split dose of 27 g flavonoid-enriched chocolate/d [850 mg flavan-3-ols (90 mg epicatechin) + 100 mg isoflavones (aglycone equivalents)/d] or matched placebo. Intima-media thickness of the common carotid artery (CCA-IMT), pulse wave velocity (PWV), augmentation index, blood pressure (BP), and vascular biomarkers were assessed. A total of 93 patients completed the trial. Overall, the flavonoid intervention did not significantly change CCA-IMT, augmentation index, or BP, but pulse pressure variability improved (flavonoid: -0.11 ± 0.07 mm Hg/min; placebo: 0.10 ± 0.11 mm Hg/min; P = 0.04). In a subgroup with PWV data, net improvements were observed [flavonoid (n = 18): -0.07 ± 0.38 m/s; placebo (n = 17): 0.68 ± 0.25 m/s; P = 0.01], which equated to a 10% CV risk reduction. Equol producers (n = 17) had larger reductions in diastolic BP, mean arterial pressure, and PWV (-2.24 ± 1.31 mm Hg, -1.24 ± 1.30 mm Hg, and -0.68 ± 0.40 m/s, respectively; P < 0.01) compared with non-equol producers (n = 30). Although the 1-y intervention did not change CCA-IMT or BP, clinically relevant improvements in arterial stiffness were observed; equol producers were particularly responsive. Flavonoids may augment existing therapeutic strategies to reduce cardiovascular disease risk in postmenopausal T2DM patients, and longer studies are needed to examine the effects on atherosclerosis progression. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials

  8. The concept of the effective dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobi, W.

    1975-01-01

    Irradiation of the human body by external or internal sources leads mostly to a simultaneous exposure of several organs. However, so far no clear and consistent recommendations for the combination of organ doses and the assessment of an exposure limit under such irradiation conditions are available. Following a proposal described in ICRP-publication 14 one possible concept for the combination of organ doses is discussed in this paper. This concept is based on the assumption that at low doses the total radiation detriment to the exposed person is given by the sum of radiation detriments to the single organs. Taking into account a linear dose-risk relationship, the sum of weighted organ doses leads to the definition of an 'Effective Dose'. The applicability and consequences of this 'Effective Dose Concept' are discussed especially with regard to the assessment of the maximum permissible intake of radionuclides into the human body and the combination of external and internal exposure. (orig.) [de

  9. Hand Dose in Nuclear Medicine Staff Members

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taha, T.M.; Shahein, A.Y.; Hassan, R.

    2009-01-01

    Measurement of the hand dose during preparation and injection of radiopharmaceuticals is useful in the assessment of the extremity doses received by nuclear medicine personnel. Hand radiation doses to the occupational workers that handling 99m Tc-labeled compounds, 131 I for diagnostic in nuclear medicine were measured by thermoluminescence dosimetry. A convenient method is to use a TLD ring dosimeter for measuring doses of the diagnostic units of different nuclear medicine facilities . Their doses were reported in millisieverts that accumulated in 4 weeks. The radiation doses to the hands of nuclear medicine staff at the hospitals under study were measured. The maximum expected annual dose to the extremities appeared to be less than the annual limit (500 mSv/y) because all of these workers are on rotation and do not constantly handle radioactivity throughout the year

  10. Maximum concentrations at work and maximum biologically tolerable concentration for working materials 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The meaning of the term 'maximum concentration at work' in regard of various pollutants is discussed. Specifically, a number of dusts and smokes are dealt with. The valuation criteria for maximum biologically tolerable concentrations for working materials are indicated. The working materials in question are corcinogeneous substances or substances liable to cause allergies or mutate the genome. (VT) [de

  11. 75 FR 43840 - Inflation Adjustment of the Ordinary Maximum and Aggravated Maximum Civil Monetary Penalties for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-27

    ...-17530; Notice No. 2] RIN 2130-ZA03 Inflation Adjustment of the Ordinary Maximum and Aggravated Maximum... remains at $250. These adjustments are required by the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act [email protected] . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act of 1990...

  12. Zipf's law, power laws and maximum entropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visser, Matt

    2013-01-01

    Zipf's law, and power laws in general, have attracted and continue to attract considerable attention in a wide variety of disciplines—from astronomy to demographics to software structure to economics to linguistics to zoology, and even warfare. A recent model of random group formation (RGF) attempts a general explanation of such phenomena based on Jaynes' notion of maximum entropy applied to a particular choice of cost function. In the present paper I argue that the specific cost function used in the RGF model is in fact unnecessarily complicated, and that power laws can be obtained in a much simpler way by applying maximum entropy ideas directly to the Shannon entropy subject only to a single constraint: that the average of the logarithm of the observable quantity is specified. (paper)

  13. Maximum-entropy description of animal movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Chris H; Subaşı, Yiğit; Calabrese, Justin M

    2015-03-01

    We introduce a class of maximum-entropy states that naturally includes within it all of the major continuous-time stochastic processes that have been applied to animal movement, including Brownian motion, Ornstein-Uhlenbeck motion, integrated Ornstein-Uhlenbeck motion, a recently discovered hybrid of the previous models, and a new model that describes central-place foraging. We are also able to predict a further hierarchy of new models that will emerge as data quality improves to better resolve the underlying continuity of animal movement. Finally, we also show that Langevin equations must obey a fluctuation-dissipation theorem to generate processes that fall from this class of maximum-entropy distributions when the constraints are purely kinematic.

  14. Pareto versus lognormal: a maximum entropy test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bee, Marco; Riccaboni, Massimo; Schiavo, Stefano

    2011-08-01

    It is commonly found that distributions that seem to be lognormal over a broad range change to a power-law (Pareto) distribution for the last few percentiles. The distributions of many physical, natural, and social events (earthquake size, species abundance, income and wealth, as well as file, city, and firm sizes) display this structure. We present a test for the occurrence of power-law tails in statistical distributions based on maximum entropy. This methodology allows one to identify the true data-generating processes even in the case when it is neither lognormal nor Pareto. The maximum entropy approach is then compared with other widely used methods and applied to different levels of aggregation of complex systems. Our results provide support for the theory that distributions with lognormal body and Pareto tail can be generated as mixtures of lognormally distributed units.

  15. Maximum likelihood estimation for integrated diffusion processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baltazar-Larios, Fernando; Sørensen, Michael

    We propose a method for obtaining maximum likelihood estimates of parameters in diffusion models when the data is a discrete time sample of the integral of the process, while no direct observations of the process itself are available. The data are, moreover, assumed to be contaminated...... EM-algorithm to obtain maximum likelihood estimates of the parameters in the diffusion model. As part of the algorithm, we use a recent simple method for approximate simulation of diffusion bridges. In simulation studies for the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process and the CIR process the proposed method works...... by measurement errors. Integrated volatility is an example of this type of observations. Another example is ice-core data on oxygen isotopes used to investigate paleo-temperatures. The data can be viewed as incomplete observations of a model with a tractable likelihood function. Therefore we propose a simulated...

  16. A Maximum Radius for Habitable Planets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibert, Yann

    2015-09-01

    We compute the maximum radius a planet can have in order to fulfill two constraints that are likely necessary conditions for habitability: 1- surface temperature and pressure compatible with the existence of liquid water, and 2- no ice layer at the bottom of a putative global ocean, that would prevent the operation of the geologic carbon cycle to operate. We demonstrate that, above a given radius, these two constraints cannot be met: in the Super-Earth mass range (1-12 Mearth), the overall maximum that a planet can have varies between 1.8 and 2.3 Rearth. This radius is reduced when considering planets with higher Fe/Si ratios, and taking into account irradiation effects on the structure of the gas envelope.

  17. Maximum parsimony on subsets of taxa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Mareike; Thatte, Bhalchandra D

    2009-09-21

    In this paper we investigate mathematical questions concerning the reliability (reconstruction accuracy) of Fitch's maximum parsimony algorithm for reconstructing the ancestral state given a phylogenetic tree and a character. In particular, we consider the question whether the maximum parsimony method applied to a subset of taxa can reconstruct the ancestral state of the root more accurately than when applied to all taxa, and we give an example showing that this indeed is possible. A surprising feature of our example is that ignoring a taxon closer to the root improves the reliability of the method. On the other hand, in the case of the two-state symmetric substitution model, we answer affirmatively a conjecture of Li, Steel and Zhang which states that under a molecular clock the probability that the state at a single taxon is a correct guess of the ancestral state is a lower bound on the reconstruction accuracy of Fitch's method applied to all taxa.

  18. Maximum entropy analysis of liquid diffraction data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Root, J.H.; Egelstaff, P.A.; Nickel, B.G.

    1986-01-01

    A maximum entropy method for reducing truncation effects in the inverse Fourier transform of structure factor, S(q), to pair correlation function, g(r), is described. The advantages and limitations of the method are explored with the PY hard sphere structure factor as model input data. An example using real data on liquid chlorine, is then presented. It is seen that spurious structure is greatly reduced in comparison to traditional Fourier transform methods. (author)

  19. Field size and dose distribution of electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Wee Saing

    1980-01-01

    The author concerns some relations between the field size and dose distribution of electron beams. The doses of electron beams are measured by either an ion chamber with an electrometer or by film for dosimetry. We analyzes qualitatively some relations; the energy of incident electron beams and depths of maximum dose, field sizes of electron beams and depth of maximum dose, field size and scatter factor, electron energy and scatter factor, collimator shape and scatter factor, electron energy and surface dose, field size and surface dose, field size and central axis depth dose, and field size and practical range. He meets with some results. They are that the field size of electron beam has influence on the depth of maximum dose, scatter factor, surface dose and central axis depth dose, scatter factor depends on the field size and energy of electron beam, and the shape of the collimator, and the depth of maximum dose and the surface dose depend on the energy of electron beam, but the practical range of electron beam is independent of field size

  20. Comparison and analysis of BNCT radiation dose between gold wire and JCDS measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kageji, T.; Mizobuchi, Y.; Nagahiro, S.; Nakagawa, Y.; Kumada, Hiroaki

    2006-01-01

    We compared and evaluated boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) radiation dose between gold wire measurement and JAERI Computational Dosimetry System (JCDS). Gold wire analysis demonstrates the actual BNCT dose though it dose not reflect the real the maximum and minimum dose in tumor tissue. We can conclude that JCDS is precise and high-reliable dose planning system for BNCT. (author)

  1. A Maximum Resonant Set of Polyomino Graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Heping

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A polyomino graph P is a connected finite subgraph of the infinite plane grid such that each finite face is surrounded by a regular square of side length one and each edge belongs to at least one square. A dimer covering of P corresponds to a perfect matching. Different dimer coverings can interact via an alternating cycle (or square with respect to them. A set of disjoint squares of P is a resonant set if P has a perfect matching M so that each one of those squares is M-alternating. In this paper, we show that if K is a maximum resonant set of P, then P − K has a unique perfect matching. We further prove that the maximum forcing number of a polyomino graph is equal to the cardinality of a maximum resonant set. This confirms a conjecture of Xu et al. [26]. We also show that if K is a maximal alternating set of P, then P − K has a unique perfect matching.

  2. Automatic maximum entropy spectral reconstruction in NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mobli, Mehdi; Maciejewski, Mark W.; Gryk, Michael R.; Hoch, Jeffrey C.

    2007-01-01

    Developments in superconducting magnets, cryogenic probes, isotope labeling strategies, and sophisticated pulse sequences together have enabled the application, in principle, of high-resolution NMR spectroscopy to biomolecular systems approaching 1 megadalton. In practice, however, conventional approaches to NMR that utilize the fast Fourier transform, which require data collected at uniform time intervals, result in prohibitively lengthy data collection times in order to achieve the full resolution afforded by high field magnets. A variety of approaches that involve nonuniform sampling have been proposed, each utilizing a non-Fourier method of spectrum analysis. A very general non-Fourier method that is capable of utilizing data collected using any of the proposed nonuniform sampling strategies is maximum entropy reconstruction. A limiting factor in the adoption of maximum entropy reconstruction in NMR has been the need to specify non-intuitive parameters. Here we describe a fully automated system for maximum entropy reconstruction that requires no user-specified parameters. A web-accessible script generator provides the user interface to the system

  3. maximum neutron flux at thermal nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strugar, P.

    1968-10-01

    Since actual research reactors are technically complicated and expensive facilities it is important to achieve savings by appropriate reactor lattice configurations. There is a number of papers, and practical examples of reactors with central reflector, dealing with spatial distribution of fuel elements which would result in higher neutron flux. Common disadvantage of all the solutions is that the choice of best solution is done starting from the anticipated spatial distributions of fuel elements. The weakness of these approaches is lack of defined optimization criteria. Direct approach is defined as follows: determine the spatial distribution of fuel concentration starting from the condition of maximum neutron flux by fulfilling the thermal constraints. Thus the problem of determining the maximum neutron flux is solving a variational problem which is beyond the possibilities of classical variational calculation. This variational problem has been successfully solved by applying the maximum principle of Pontrjagin. Optimum distribution of fuel concentration was obtained in explicit analytical form. Thus, spatial distribution of the neutron flux and critical dimensions of quite complex reactor system are calculated in a relatively simple way. In addition to the fact that the results are innovative this approach is interesting because of the optimization procedure itself [sr

  4. Fumigant dosages below maximum label rate control some soilborne pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shachaf Triky-Dotan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The activity of commercial soil fumigants on some key soilborne pathogens was assessed in sandy loam soil under controlled conditions. Seven soil fumigants that are registered in California or are being or have been considered for registration were used in this study: dimethyl disulfide (DMDS mixed with chloropicrin (Pic (79% DMDS and 21% Pic, Tri-Con (50% methyl bromide and 50% Pic, Midas Gold (33% methyl iodide [MI] and 67% Pic, Midas Bronze (50% MI and 50% Pic, Midas (MI, active ingredient [a.i.] 97.8%, Pic (a.i. 99% trichloronitromethane and Pic-Clor 60 (57% Pic and 37% 1,3-dichloropropene [1–3,D]. Dose-response models were calculated for pathogen mortality after 24 hours of exposure to fumigants. Overall, the tested fumigants achieved good efficacy with dosages below the maximum label rate against the tested pathogens. In this study, Pythium ultimum and citrus nematode were sensitive to all the fumigants and Verticillium dahliae was resistant. For most fumigants, California regulations restrict application rates to less than the maximum (federal label rate, meaning that it is possible that the fumigants may not control major plant pathogens. This research provides information on the effectiveness of these alternatives at these lower application rates. The results from this study will help growers optimize application rates for registered fumigants (such as Pic and 1,3-D and will help accelerate the adoption of new fumigants (such as DMDS if they are registered in California.

  5. Polimorfismos del receptor adrenérgico b1 y sus implicaciones farmacodinámicas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Rodríguez

    2000-02-01

    .5pt; font-family: Arial">tienen una mayor interacción con la proteína G y producen más AMPc luego del estímulo con agonistas b(2.Nuestro estudio pretende evaluar la frecuencia de estos polimorfismos en una muestra de individuos colombianos y determinar si tales cambios desencadenan alguna variación en la respuesta al bloqueo de los receptores adrenérgicos b1.

    Determinación de los polimorfismos: Luego de la extracción del DNA genómico, se amplificarán por PCR los segmentos correspondientes del receptor b1 y posteriormente se identificarán cada una de las variantes polimórficas por RFLPs.

    Estudio clínico: Tomando como base las mutaciones que llevan a cambios en los aminoácidos de la posición 389 (Arg389Gly, se definirán tres grupos de estudio (homocigotos para cada polimorfismo y heterocigotos, de cada grupo se seleccionarán 15 individuos voluntarios sanos, los cuales serán llevados a un ambiente hospitalario donde se les administrará Esmolol intravenoso y se registrarán los cambios en la presión arterial y en la frecuencia cardíaca durante todo el experimento.

    Medición de las concentraciones de Esmolol:

  6. Comparative study of eye dose and chest dose received during radiopharmaceutical production processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chindarkar, A.S.; Chavan, S.V.; Sawant, D.K.; Sahoo, L.; Gopalakrishnan, R.K.; Sneha, C.; Sachdev, S.S.; Dey, A.C.

    2018-01-01

    Radiopharmaceutical laboratory, BRIT, Vashi produces different radiopharmaceuticals of 131 I, 153 Sm, 99 Mo/ 99m Tc and 177 Lu. Principle gamma energies of these isotopes vary from 103 to 740 KeV and their maximum beta energies vary from 384 to 1214 KeV. In the light of the revised eye lens dose limit recommended in IAEA Basic Safety Standard Interim Edition No. GSR Part 3 (IAEA-2011), the study of radiation dose for eye lens was carried out using CaSO 4 : Dy based Thermo luminescence dosimeter (TLD). This TLD was worn at center of the forehead to measure eye lens dose. This TLD dose was then compared with chest TLD dose to deduce any correlation between these TLD doses. These TLD doses were assessed on quarterly basis. Eight quarter data of these TLD doses were compared

  7. Infección por HTLV-1 y HIV en pacientes con herpes zoster en Perú

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Delgado

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Determinar la frecuencia de infección por el virus linfotrópico humano tipo 1 (HTLV-1 y VIH en pacientes con herpes zoster. Material y métodos: Estudio prospectivo observacional realizado entre agosto de 2005 y agosto de 2006. Se incluyeron pacientes adultos con diagnóstico de herpes zoster atendidos en los diferentes servicios del Hospital Nacional Cayetano Heredia. Un cuestionario de características clínicas y factores de riesgo asociados con infección por HTLV-1 y VIH fue completado previo a la toma de muestra. Se excluyeron los pacientes con resultados positivos previos para HTLV-1 y HIV. Resultados: Se incluyeron 44 pacientes, la edad promedio fue 48,1 ± 19,5; 24/44 (55% fueron mujeres. Infección solo por VIH se encontró en 4/44 (9% pacientes, todos menores de 35 años, mientras que infección solo por HTLV-1 se encontró en 2/44 (5% pacientes, todas mujeres mayores de 50 años. Un caso de infección dual fue encontrado en una mujer de 56 años. La tasa de infección por HTLV-1 fue 25% (3/12 en mujeres mayores de 50 años con compromiso de múltiples dermatomas. Conclusiones: En nuestro escenario, la infección por HTLV-1 es ligeramente mas frecuente en mujeres mayores de 50 años con herpes zoster. Por ello, el despistaje de HTLV-1 debe ser recomendado en este grupo etario, mientras que el despistaje de VIH es aún particularmente importante en pacientes jóvenes.(Rev Med Hered 2011;22:98-102.

  8. Síndrome metabólico. Asociación entre GLP-1 y factores de riesgo cardiovascular

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez-Durillo, Francsco Tomás

    2017-01-01

    [ES] Objetivos: Determinar la variación de niveles plasmáticos de péptido similar al glucagón (GLP-1) y de actividad dipeptidil peptidasa 4 (DPP4) en pacientes con síndrome metabólico (SM). Diseño: Estudio descriptivo transversal. 46 sujetos (entre 50-65 años) distribuidos en grupo SM y grupo sin SM. Resultados: Los niveles postprandiales de GLP-1 fueron superiores en hombres con SM respecto a las mujeres y en mujeres sin SM respecto a los hombres. Los pacientes diagnosticados de SM de ...

  9. Eficiencia de cultivo in vitro de Toxoplasma gondii en las líneas celulares THP1 y Vero

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Andrés Cuellar

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Introducción. El cultivo in vitro es un método importante para la obtención de Toxoplasma gondii confines de diagnóstico clínico o biotecnológico. Objetivo. Determinar el porcentaje de invasión y producción de T. gondii en las líneas celulares THP1y Vero. Materiales y métodos. Se determinó la curva de crecimiento para las células Vero y THP1 por conteoen hemocitómetro. Posteriormente, se identificó el porcentaje de invasión de T. gondii en células THP1y Vero por citometría de flujo, en diferentes proporciones célula/taquizoíto de 1/5, 1/20, 1/50. Por otrolado, se calculó el índice de rendimiento de T. gondii, cepa RH, y del aislamiento CIBM1 en célulasTHP1. Resultados. Las células Vero crecen más rápidamente que las células THP1, con un crecimientoexponencial en un periodo de siete días. El aislamiento CIBM1 infecta las células THP1 en las tresproporciones diferentes de 1/5,1/20 y 1/50 con porcentajes de invasión de 57,1 %, 15,5 % y 12,2 %, yen células Vero, de 25,3 %, 17,8 % y 8,8 %. La cepa RH de T. gondii mostró porcentajes de invasiónmás bajos, de 32,6 %, 14,8 % y 8,1 % en células THP1 y de 22,3 %, 14,1 % y 3,4 % en células Vero. Conclusiones. El aislamiento CIBM1 presentó mayor rendimiento con respecto a la cepa RH de T.gondii en células THP1, siendo estas células una buena línea para estudiar el proceso de invasión yprobar candidatos farmacológicos para reducir la infección por T. gondii.   doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.7705/biomedica.v32i3.485

  10. Patient doses in digital cardiac imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huda, W.; Ogden, K.M.; Roskopf, M.L.; Phadke, K.

    2001-01-01

    In this pilot study, we obtained estimates of entrance skin doses and the corresponding effective doses to patients undergoing digital cardiac imaging procedures on a GE Advantx LC/LP Plus system. Data were obtained for six patients undergoing diagnostic examinations and six patients who had interventional procedures. For each patient examination, radiographic techniques for fluoroscopic and digital cine imaging were recorded, together with the irradiation geometry. The projection with the highest exposure resulted in an average skin dose of 0.64 ± 0.41 Gy (maximum of 1.6 Gy). The average patient skin doses taking into account overlapping projections was 1.1 ± 0.8 Gy (maximum of 3.0 Gy). The exposure area product (EAP) incident on the patient was converted into the energy imparted to the patient and the corresponding effective dose. The average patient effective dose was 28 ± 14 mSv (maximum 62 mSv), with the resultant average fatal cancer risk estimated to be of the order of 8x10 -3 . Average doses for interventional procedures in cardiac imaging are higher than those associated with diagnostic examinations by approximately 50%. (author)

  11. Phase conversion from hexagonal CuS(y)Se(1-y) to cubic Cu(2-x)S(y)Se(1-y): composition variation, morphology evolution, optical tuning, and solar cell applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jun; Yang, Xia; Yang, Qingdan; Zhang, Wenjun; Lee, Chun-Sing

    2014-09-24

    In this work, we report a simple and low-temperature approach for the controllable synthesis of ternary Cu-S-Se alloys featuring tunable crystal structures, compositions, morphologies, and optical properties. Hexagonal CuS(y)Se(1-y) nanoplates and face centered cubic (fcc) Cu(2-x)S(y)Se(1-y) single-crystal-like stacked nanoplate assemblies are synthesized, and their phase conversion mechanism is well investigated. It is found that both copper content and chalcogen composition (S/Se atomic ratio) of the Cu-S-Se alloys are tunable during the phase conversion process. Formation of the unique single-crystal-like stacked nanoplate assemblies is resulted from oriented stacking coupled with the Ostwald ripening effect. Remarkably, optical tuning for continuous red shifts of both the band-gap absorption and the near-infrared localized surface plasmon resonance are achieved. Furthermore, the novel Cu-S-Se alloys are utilized for the first time as highly efficient counter electrodes (CEs) in quantum dot sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs), showing outstanding electrocatalytic activity for polysulfide electrolyte regeneration and yielding a 135% enhancement in power conversion efficiency (PCE) as compared to the noble metal Pt counter electrode.

  12. HADOC: a computer code for calculation of external and inhalation doses from acute radionuclide releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strenge, D.L.; Peloquin, R.A.

    1981-04-01

    The computer code HADOC (Hanford Acute Dose Calculations) is described and instructions for its use are presented. The code calculates external dose from air submersion and inhalation doses following acute radionuclide releases. Atmospheric dispersion is calculated using the Hanford model with options to determine maximum conditions. Building wake effects and terrain variation may also be considered. Doses are calculated using dose conversion factor supplied in a data library. Doses are reported for one and fifty year dose commitment periods for the maximum individual and the regional population (within 50 miles). The fractional contribution to dose by radionuclide and exposure mode are also printed if requested

  13. Dose distributions of pendulum fields in the field border plane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrader, R.

    1986-01-01

    Calculations (program SIDOS-U2) and LiF measurements taken in a cylindric water phantom are used to investigate the isodose distributions of different pendulum irradiation methods (Co-60) in a plane which is parallel to the central ray plane and crosses the field borders at the depth of the axis. The dose values compared to the maximum values of the central ray plane are completely different for each pendulum method. In case of monoaxial pendulum methods around small angles, the maximum dose value found in the border plane is less than 50% of the dose in the central ray plane. The relative maximum of the border plane moves to tissues laying in a greater depth. In case of bi-axial methods, the maximum value of the border plane can be much more than 50% of the maximum dose measured in the central ray plane. (orig.) [de

  14. Computational study of GaAs1-xNx and GaN1-yAsy alloys and arsenic impurities in GaN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laaksonen, K; Komsa, H-P; Arola, E; Rantala, T T; Nieminen, R M

    2006-01-01

    We have studied the structural and electronic properties of As-rich GaAs 1-x N x and N-rich GaN 1-y As y alloys in a large composition range using first-principles methods. We have systematically investigated the effect of the impurity atom configuration near both GaAs and GaN sides of the concentration range on the total energies, lattice constants and bandgaps. The N (As) atoms, replacing substitutionally As (N) atoms in GaAs (GaN), cause the surrounding Ga atoms to relax inwards (outwards), making the Ga-N (Ga-As) bond length about 15% shorter (longer) than the corresponding Ga-As (Ga-N) bond length in GaAs (GaN). The total energies of the relaxed alloy supercells and the bandgaps experience large fluctuations within different configurations and these fluctuations grow stronger if the impurity concentration is increased. Substituting As atoms with N in GaAs induces modifications near the conduction band minimum, while substituting N atoms with As in GaN modifies the states near the valence band maximum. Both lead to bandgap reduction, which is at first rapid but later slows down. The relative size of the fluctuations is much larger in the case of GaAs 1-x N x alloys. We have also looked into the question of which substitutional site (Ga or N) As occupies in GaN. We find that under Ga-rich conditions arsenic prefers the substitutional N site over the Ga site within a large range of Fermi level values

  15. Optical properties of tellurium-doped InxGa1-xAsySb1-y epitaxial layers studied by photoluminescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz-Reyes, J; Cardona-Bedoya, J A; Gomez-Herrera, M L; Herrera-Perez, J L; Riech, I; Mendoza-Alvarez, J G

    2003-01-01

    Controlled doping of quaternary alloys of In x Ga 1-x As y Sb 1-y with tellurium is fundamental to obtain the n-type layers needed for the development of optoelectronic devices based on p-n heterojunctions. InGaAsSb epitaxial layers were grown by liquid phase epitaxy and Te doping was obtained by incorporating small Sb 3 Te 2 pellets in the growth melt. The tellurium doping levels were in the range 10 16 -10 17 cm -3 . We have used low-temperature photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy to study the influence of the Te donor levels on the radiative transitions shown in the PL spectra. The PL measurements were done by exciting the samples with the 448 nm line of an Ar ion laser with varying excitation powers in the range from 10 to 200 mW. For the low-doped sample the PL spectrum showed a narrow exciton-related peak centred at around 610 meV with a full width at half maximum (FWHM) of about 7 meV which is evidence of the good crystalline quality of the layers. For higher Te doping, the PL spectra show the presence of band-to-band and donor-to-acceptor transitions which overlap as the Te concentration increases. The peak of the PL band shifts to higher energies as Te doping increases due to a band-filling effect as the Fermi level enters into the conduction band. From the peak energy of the PL spectra, and using a model that includes the band-filling and band-shrinkage effects due to the carriers, we have estimated the effective carrier concentration due to doping with Te in the epilayers

  16. Maximum entropy decomposition of quadrupole mass spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toussaint, U. von; Dose, V.; Golan, A.

    2004-01-01

    We present an information-theoretic method called generalized maximum entropy (GME) for decomposing mass spectra of gas mixtures from noisy measurements. In this GME approach to the noisy, underdetermined inverse problem, the joint entropies of concentration, cracking, and noise probabilities are maximized subject to the measured data. This provides a robust estimation for the unknown cracking patterns and the concentrations of the contributing molecules. The method is applied to mass spectroscopic data of hydrocarbons, and the estimates are compared with those received from a Bayesian approach. We show that the GME method is efficient and is computationally fast

  17. Maximum power operation of interacting molecular motors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Golubeva, Natalia; Imparato, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    , as compared to the non-interacting system, in a wide range of biologically compatible scenarios. We furthermore consider the case where the motor-motor interaction directly affects the internal chemical cycle and investigate the effect on the system dynamics and thermodynamics.......We study the mechanical and thermodynamic properties of different traffic models for kinesin which are relevant in biological and experimental contexts. We find that motor-motor interactions play a fundamental role by enhancing the thermodynamic efficiency at maximum power of the motors...

  18. Maximum entropy method in momentum density reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrzynski, L.; Holas, A.

    1997-01-01

    The Maximum Entropy Method (MEM) is applied to the reconstruction of the 3-dimensional electron momentum density distributions observed through the set of Compton profiles measured along various crystallographic directions. It is shown that the reconstruction of electron momentum density may be reliably carried out with the aid of simple iterative algorithm suggested originally by Collins. A number of distributions has been simulated in order to check the performance of MEM. It is shown that MEM can be recommended as a model-free approach. (author). 13 refs, 1 fig

  19. On the maximum drawdown during speculative bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotundo, Giulia; Navarra, Mauro

    2007-08-01

    A taxonomy of large financial crashes proposed in the literature locates the burst of speculative bubbles due to endogenous causes in the framework of extreme stock market crashes, defined as falls of market prices that are outlier with respect to the bulk of drawdown price movement distribution. This paper goes on deeper in the analysis providing a further characterization of the rising part of such selected bubbles through the examination of drawdown and maximum drawdown movement of indices prices. The analysis of drawdown duration is also performed and it is the core of the risk measure estimated here.

  20. Multi-Channel Maximum Likelihood Pitch Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mads Græsbøll

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a method for multi-channel pitch estimation is proposed. The method is a maximum likelihood estimator and is based on a parametric model where the signals in the various channels share the same fundamental frequency but can have different amplitudes, phases, and noise characteristics....... This essentially means that the model allows for different conditions in the various channels, like different signal-to-noise ratios, microphone characteristics and reverberation. Moreover, the method does not assume that a certain array structure is used but rather relies on a more general model and is hence...

  1. Conductivity maximum in a charged colloidal suspension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastea, S

    2009-01-27

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a charged colloidal suspension in the salt-free regime show that the system exhibits an electrical conductivity maximum as a function of colloid charge. We attribute this behavior to two main competing effects: colloid effective charge saturation due to counterion 'condensation' and diffusion slowdown due to the relaxation effect. In agreement with previous observations, we also find that the effective transported charge is larger than the one determined by the Stern layer and suggest that it corresponds to the boundary fluid layer at the surface of the colloidal particles.

  2. Dynamical maximum entropy approach to flocking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavagna, Andrea; Giardina, Irene; Ginelli, Francesco; Mora, Thierry; Piovani, Duccio; Tavarone, Raffaele; Walczak, Aleksandra M

    2014-04-01

    We derive a new method to infer from data the out-of-equilibrium alignment dynamics of collectively moving animal groups, by considering the maximum entropy model distribution consistent with temporal and spatial correlations of flight direction. When bird neighborhoods evolve rapidly, this dynamical inference correctly learns the parameters of the model, while a static one relying only on the spatial correlations fails. When neighbors change slowly and the detailed balance is satisfied, we recover the static procedure. We demonstrate the validity of the method on simulated data. The approach is applicable to other systems of active matter.

  3. Maximum Temperature Detection System for Integrated Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankiewicz, Maciej; Kos, Andrzej

    2015-03-01

    The paper describes structure and measurement results of the system detecting present maximum temperature on the surface of an integrated circuit. The system consists of the set of proportional to absolute temperature sensors, temperature processing path and a digital part designed in VHDL. Analogue parts of the circuit where designed with full-custom technique. The system is a part of temperature-controlled oscillator circuit - a power management system based on dynamic frequency scaling method. The oscillator cooperates with microprocessor dedicated for thermal experiments. The whole system is implemented in UMC CMOS 0.18 μm (1.8 V) technology.

  4. Maximum entropy PDF projection: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggenstoss, Paul M.

    2017-06-01

    We review maximum entropy (MaxEnt) PDF projection, a method with wide potential applications in statistical inference. The method constructs a sampling distribution for a high-dimensional vector x based on knowing the sampling distribution p(z) of a lower-dimensional feature z = T (x). Under mild conditions, the distribution p(x) having highest possible entropy among all distributions consistent with p(z) may be readily found. Furthermore, the MaxEnt p(x) may be sampled, making the approach useful in Monte Carlo methods. We review the theorem and present a case study in model order selection and classification for handwritten character recognition.

  5. Multiperiod Maximum Loss is time unit invariant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacevic, Raimund M; Breuer, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Time unit invariance is introduced as an additional requirement for multiperiod risk measures: for a constant portfolio under an i.i.d. risk factor process, the multiperiod risk should equal the one period risk of the aggregated loss, for an appropriate choice of parameters and independent of the portfolio and its distribution. Multiperiod Maximum Loss over a sequence of Kullback-Leibler balls is time unit invariant. This is also the case for the entropic risk measure. On the other hand, multiperiod Value at Risk and multiperiod Expected Shortfall are not time unit invariant.

  6. Maximum a posteriori decoder for digital communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altes, Richard A. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A system and method for decoding by identification of the most likely phase coded signal corresponding to received data. The present invention has particular application to communication with signals that experience spurious random phase perturbations. The generalized estimator-correlator uses a maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimator to generate phase estimates for correlation with incoming data samples and for correlation with mean phases indicative of unique hypothesized signals. The result is a MAP likelihood statistic for each hypothesized transmission, wherein the highest value statistic identifies the transmitted signal.

  7. Improved Maximum Parsimony Models for Phylogenetic Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Iersel, Leo; Jones, Mark; Scornavacca, Celine

    2018-05-01

    Phylogenetic networks are well suited to represent evolutionary histories comprising reticulate evolution. Several methods aiming at reconstructing explicit phylogenetic networks have been developed in the last two decades. In this article, we propose a new definition of maximum parsimony for phylogenetic networks that permits to model biological scenarios that cannot be modeled by the definitions currently present in the literature (namely, the "hardwired" and "softwired" parsimony). Building on this new definition, we provide several algorithmic results that lay the foundations for new parsimony-based methods for phylogenetic network reconstruction.

  8. Ancestral sequence reconstruction with Maximum Parsimony

    OpenAIRE

    Herbst, Lina; Fischer, Mareike

    2017-01-01

    One of the main aims in phylogenetics is the estimation of ancestral sequences based on present-day data like, for instance, DNA alignments. One way to estimate the data of the last common ancestor of a given set of species is to first reconstruct a phylogenetic tree with some tree inference method and then to use some method of ancestral state inference based on that tree. One of the best-known methods both for tree inference as well as for ancestral sequence inference is Maximum Parsimony (...

  9. Objective Bayesianism and the Maximum Entropy Principle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon Williamson

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective Bayesian epistemology invokes three norms: the strengths of our beliefs should be probabilities; they should be calibrated to our evidence of physical probabilities; and they should otherwise equivocate sufficiently between the basic propositions that we can express. The three norms are sometimes explicated by appealing to the maximum entropy principle, which says that a belief function should be a probability function, from all those that are calibrated to evidence, that has maximum entropy. However, the three norms of objective Bayesianism are usually justified in different ways. In this paper, we show that the three norms can all be subsumed under a single justification in terms of minimising worst-case expected loss. This, in turn, is equivalent to maximising a generalised notion of entropy. We suggest that requiring language invariance, in addition to minimising worst-case expected loss, motivates maximisation of standard entropy as opposed to maximisation of other instances of generalised entropy. Our argument also provides a qualified justification for updating degrees of belief by Bayesian conditionalisation. However, conditional probabilities play a less central part in the objective Bayesian account than they do under the subjective view of Bayesianism, leading to a reduced role for Bayes’ Theorem.

  10. Efficient heuristics for maximum common substructure search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englert, Péter; Kovács, Péter

    2015-05-26

    Maximum common substructure search is a computationally hard optimization problem with diverse applications in the field of cheminformatics, including similarity search, lead optimization, molecule alignment, and clustering. Most of these applications have strict constraints on running time, so heuristic methods are often preferred. However, the development of an algorithm that is both fast enough and accurate enough for most practical purposes is still a challenge. Moreover, in some applications, the quality of a common substructure depends not only on its size but also on various topological features of the one-to-one atom correspondence it defines. Two state-of-the-art heuristic algorithms for finding maximum common substructures have been implemented at ChemAxon Ltd., and effective heuristics have been developed to improve both their efficiency and the relevance of the atom mappings they provide. The implementations have been thoroughly evaluated and compared with existing solutions (KCOMBU and Indigo). The heuristics have been found to greatly improve the performance and applicability of the algorithms. The purpose of this paper is to introduce the applied methods and present the experimental results.

  11. Investigation of thermodynamic and mechanical properties of AlyIn1-yP alloys by statistical moment method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Vu Thi Thanh; Hung, Vu Van; Hanh, Pham Thi Minh; Tuyen, Nguyen Viet; Hai, Tran Thi; Hieu, Ho Khac

    2018-03-01

    The thermodynamic and mechanical properties of III-V zinc-blende AlP, InP semiconductors and their alloys have been studied in detail from statistical moment method taking into account the anharmonicity effects of the lattice vibrations. The nearest neighbor distance, thermal expansion coefficient, bulk moduli, specific heats at the constant volume and constant pressure of the zincblende AlP, InP and AlyIn1-yP alloys are calculated as functions of the temperature. The statistical moment method calculations are performed by using the many-body Stillinger-Weber potential. The concentration dependences of the thermodynamic quantities of zinc-blende AlyIn1-yP crystals have also been discussed and compared with those of the experimental results. Our results are reasonable agreement with earlier density functional theory calculations and can provide useful qualitative information for future experiments. The moment method then can be developed extensively for studying the atomistic structure and thermodynamic properties of nanoscale materials as well.

  12. Nitrogen lattice location in MOVPE grown Ga1-xInxNyAs1-y films using ion beam channeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nebiki, Takuya; Narusawa, Tadashi; Kumagai, Akiko; Doi, Hideyuki; Saito, Tadashi; Takagishi, Shigenori

    2006-01-01

    We have investigated the nitrogen lattice location in MOVPE grown Ga 1-x In x N y As 1-y with x=0.07 and y=0.025 by means of ion beam channeling technique. In this system, the lattice constant of the Ga 1-x In x N y As 1-y film is equal to GaAs lattice. Therefore, we can grow apparently no strain, high quality and very thick GaInNAs film on GaAs substrate. The quality of the films as well as the lattice location of In and N were characterized by channeling Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and nuclear reaction analysis using 3.95 MeV He 2+ beam. The fraction of substitutional nitrogen in the film was measured using the 14 N(α,p) 17 O endothermic nuclear reaction. Our results indicate that more than 90% of In and N atoms are located the substitutional site, however, N atoms are slightly displaced by ∼0.2 A from the lattice site. We suggest that the GaInNAs film has a local strain or point defects around the N atoms. (author)

  13. The dose-area product in DSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gfirtner, H.

    1995-01-01

    In DSA, the dose-area product shows a very good correlation with the maximum incidence dose. It may therefore serve as a reliable basis for the assessment of radiation doses to patients. The dose-area product is also a useful tool for the detection pf peak shifts in the radiation curves for certain investigations. In view of the considerable scatter of the values for the dose-area product these must, however, be subjected to an additional statistical analysis. Provided that this rule is observed, the dose-area product will considerably gain in importance for the monitoring of radiation exposures of patients. A very noteworthy learning effect could be achieved, if it would be made mandatory for those statistical analyses to be carried out not only on an investigation-specific but also an investigator-specific basis. The latter is particularly true of teaching hospitals. (orig./VHE) [de

  14. Microstructural evaluation of stressed IN625 and NiCrA1Y coated IN625 tested in high and low density SCW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selvig, A.; Huang, X., E-mail: aselvig@connect.carleton.ca [Carleton Univ., Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Guzonas, D. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-07-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the corrosion resistance of NiCrA1Y coatings for use in future supercritical water reactors (SCWR). The NiCrA1Y coating was applied to IN625 and was tested against bare IN625, under stress, in high density supercritical water (HDSCW) and low density supercritical water (LDSCW). The IN625 samples experienced intergranular corrosion in HDSCW but not in LDSCW as well as oxidation; whereas the NiCrA1Y sample experienced oxidation, with no other forms of corrosion observed. Thus, it is likely that NiCrA1Y coatings are more corrosion resistant than IN625 in HDSCW. (author)

  15. Optimization of Monocrystalline MgxCd1-xTe/MgyCd1-yTe Double-Heterostructure Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Jacob J.

    Polycrystalline CdS/CdTe solar cells continue to dominate the thin-film photovoltaics industry with an achieved record efficiency of over 22% demonstrated by First Solar, yet monocrystalline CdTe devices have received considerably less attention over the years. Monocrystalline CdTe double-heterostructure solar cells show great promise with respect to addressing the problem of low Voc with the passing of the 1 V benchmark. Rapid progress has been made in driving the efficiency in these devices ever closer to the record presently held by polycrystalline thin-films. This achievement is primarily due to the utilization of a remote p-n heterojunction in which the heavily doped contact materials, which are so problematic in terms of increasing non-radiative recombination inside the absorber, are moved outside of the CdTe double heterostructure with two MgyCd1-yTe barrier layers to provide confinement and passivation at the CdTe surfaces. Using this design, the pursuit and demonstration of efficiencies beyond 20% in CdTe solar cells is reported through the study and optimization of the structure barriers, contacts layers, and optical design. Further development of a wider bandgap MgxCd1-xTe solar cell based on the same design is included with the intention of applying this knowledge to the development of a tandem solar cell constructed on a silicon subcell. The exploration of different hole-contact materials--ZnTe, CuZnS, and a-Si:H--and their optimization is presented throughout the work. Devices utilizing a-Si:H hole contacts exhibit open-circuit voltages of up to 1.11 V, a maximum total-area efficiency of 18.5% measured under AM1.5G, and an active-area efficiency of 20.3% for CdTe absorber based devices. The achievement of voltages beyond 1.1V while still maintaining relatively high fill factors with no rollover, either before or after open-circuit, is a promising indicator that this approach can result in devices surpassing the 22% record set by polycrystalline

  16. Influence of Rare Earth Elements on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Mg{sub 97}Zn{sub 1}Y{sub 1}RE{sub 1} Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jonghyun, E-mail: joindoc@kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Material Science, Magnesium Research Center (MRC), Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, 860-8555 (Japan); Kawamura, Y. [Department of Material Science, Magnesium Research Center (MRC), Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, 860-8555 (Japan)

    2013-06-20

    Mg{sub 97}Zn{sub 1}Y{sub 1}RE{sub 1} (RE=La, Ce, Nd and Sm, at. %) alloys were prepared by high-frequency induction melting in an Ar atmosphere. Rods were extruded at 623 K and a ram speed of 2.5 mm·s{sup −1} using a circular die with an extrusion ratio of 10. The microstructure and mechanical properties of the extruded alloys were investigated. The Mg{sub 97}Zn{sub 1}Y{sub 1}Nd{sub 1} and Mg{sub 97}Zn{sub 1}Y{sub 1}Sm{sub 1} alloys consisted of only two phases: α-Mg and a Mg-RE intermetallic compound. The Mg{sub 97}Zn{sub 1}Y{sub 1}La{sub 1} and Mg{sub 97}Zn{sub 1}Y{sub 1}Ce{sub 1} alloys consisted of three phases: α-Mg, a Mg-RE intermetallic compound, and a Mg{sub 12}ZnY phase with a long-period stacking ordered (LPSO) phase. Additionally, after extrusion, the three-phase Mg{sub 97}Zn{sub 1}Y{sub 1}RE{sub 1} alloys, i.e., those with an LPSO phase, had a stratified microstructure and exhibited better mechanical properties than those without an LPSO. At room temperature, the yield strength and ultimate tensile strength of the three-phase Mg{sub 97}Zn{sub 1}Y{sub 1}La{sub 1} and Mg{sub 97}Zn{sub 1}Y{sub 1}Ce{sub 1} alloys were 381–384 MPa and 427–429 MPa, respectively, and yield strengths greater than 280 MPa were observed at the elevated temperature of 523 K.

  17. Spontaneous nano-clustering of ZrO2 in atomic layer deposited LayZr1-yOx thin films: Part 1 - Material characterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klootwijk, J.H.; Jinesh, K.B.; Wolters, R.A.M.; Roozeboom, F.; Besling, W.

    2008-01-01

    During atomic layer deposition (ALD) of uniform LayZr1-yOx thin films, spontaneous segregation of ZrO2 nanocrystals takes place that are embedded in an amorphous La2O3 matrix. This occurs if the Zr content in the LayZr1-yOx film is above 30% i.e. if the pulse ratio between the lanthanum precursor

  18. Hydraulic Limits on Maximum Plant Transpiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoni, S.; Vico, G.; Katul, G. G.; Palmroth, S.; Jackson, R. B.; Porporato, A. M.

    2011-12-01

    Photosynthesis occurs at the expense of water losses through transpiration. As a consequence of this basic carbon-water interaction at the leaf level, plant growth and ecosystem carbon exchanges are tightly coupled to transpiration. In this contribution, the hydraulic constraints that limit transpiration rates under well-watered conditions are examined across plant functional types and climates. The potential water flow through plants is proportional to both xylem hydraulic conductivity (which depends on plant carbon economy) and the difference in water potential between the soil and the atmosphere (the driving force that pulls water from the soil). Differently from previous works, we study how this potential flux changes with the amplitude of the driving force (i.e., we focus on xylem properties and not on stomatal regulation). Xylem hydraulic conductivity decreases as the driving force increases due to cavitation of the tissues. As a result of this negative feedback, more negative leaf (and xylem) water potentials would provide a stronger driving force for water transport, while at the same time limiting xylem hydraulic conductivity due to cavitation. Here, the leaf water potential value that allows an optimum balance between driving force and xylem conductivity is quantified, thus defining the maximum transpiration rate that can be sustained by the soil-to-leaf hydraulic system. To apply the proposed framework at the global scale, a novel database of xylem conductivity and cavitation vulnerability across plant types and biomes is developed. Conductivity and water potential at 50% cavitation are shown to be complementary (in particular between angiosperms and conifers), suggesting a tradeoff between transport efficiency and hydraulic safety. Plants from warmer and drier biomes tend to achieve larger maximum transpiration than plants growing in environments with lower atmospheric water demand. The predicted maximum transpiration and the corresponding leaf water

  19. Analogue of Pontryagin's maximum principle for multiple integrals minimization problems

    OpenAIRE

    Mikhail, Zelikin

    2016-01-01

    The theorem like Pontryagin's maximum principle for multiple integrals is proved. Unlike the usual maximum principle, the maximum should be taken not over all matrices, but only on matrices of rank one. Examples are given.

  20. Lake Basin Fetch and Maximum Length/Width

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Linear features representing the Fetch, Maximum Length and Maximum Width of a lake basin. Fetch, maximum length and average width are calcuated from the lake polygon...

  1. Patient radiation doses from neuroradiology procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Roman, M J; Abreu-Luis, J; Hernandez-Armas, J [Servicio de Fisica Medica, Hospital Universitario de Canarias, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Prada-Martinez, E [Servicio de Radiodiagnostico, Hospital Universitario de Canarias, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2001-03-01

    Following the presentation of radiation-induced deterministic effects by some patients undergoing neuroradiological procedures during successive sessions, such as temporary epilation, in the 'Hospital Universitario de Canarias', measurements were made of dose to patients. The maximum dose-area product measured by ionization chamber during these procedures was 39617 cGy.cm{sup 2} in a diagnostic of aneurysm and the maximum dose to the skin measured by thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) was 462.53 mGy. This can justify certain deterministic effects but it is unlikely that the patients will suffer serious effects from this skin dose. Also, measurements were made of effective dose about two usual procedures, embolisation of tumour und embolisation of aneurysm. These procedures were reproduced with an anthropomorphic phantom Rando and doses were measured with TLDs. Effective doses obtained were 3.79 mSv and 4.11 mSv, respectively. The effective dose valued by the program EFFDOSE was less than values measured with TLDs. (author)

  2. Patient radiation doses from neuroradiology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Roman, M.J.; Abreu-Luis, J.; Hernandez-Armas, J.; Prada-Martinez, E.

    2001-01-01

    Following the presentation of radiation-induced deterministic effects by some patients undergoing neuroradiological procedures during successive sessions, such as temporary epilation, in the 'Hospital Universitario de Canarias', measurements were made of dose to patients. The maximum dose-area product measured by ionization chamber during these procedures was 39617 cGy.cm 2 in a diagnostic of aneurysm and the maximum dose to the skin measured by thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) was 462.53 mGy. This can justify certain deterministic effects but it is unlikely that the patients will suffer serious effects from this skin dose. Also, measurements were made of effective dose about two usual procedures, embolisation of tumour und embolisation of aneurysm. These procedures were reproduced with an anthropomorphic phantom Rando and doses were measured with TLDs. Effective doses obtained were 3.79 mSv and 4.11 mSv, respectively. The effective dose valued by the program EFFDOSE was less than values measured with TLDs. (author)

  3. Calculation of midplane dose for total body irradiation from entrance and exit dose MOSFET measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satory, P R

    2012-03-01

    This work is the development of a MOSFET based surface in vivo dosimetry system for total body irradiation patients treated with bilateral extended SSD beams using PMMA missing tissue compensators adjacent to the patient. An empirical formula to calculate midplane dose from MOSFET measured entrance and exit doses has been derived. The dependency of surface dose on the air-gap between the spoiler and the surface was investigated by suspending a spoiler above a water phantom, and taking percentage depth dose measurements (PDD). Exit and entrances doses were measured with MOSFETs in conjunction with midplane doses measured with an ion chamber. The entrance and exit doses were combined using an exponential attenuation formula to give an estimate of midplane dose and were compared to the midplane ion chamber measurement for a range of phantom thicknesses. Having a maximum PDD at the surface simplifies the prediction of midplane dose, which is achieved by ensuring that the air gap between the compensator and the surface is less than 10 cm. The comparison of estimated midplane dose and measured midplane dose showed no dependence on phantom thickness and an average correction factor of 0.88 was found. If the missing tissue compensators are kept within 10 cm of the patient then MOSFET measurements of entrance and exit dose can predict the midplane dose for the patient.

  4. Maximum Likelihood Reconstruction for Magnetic Resonance Fingerprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bo; Setsompop, Kawin; Ye, Huihui; Cauley, Stephen F; Wald, Lawrence L

    2016-08-01

    This paper introduces a statistical estimation framework for magnetic resonance (MR) fingerprinting, a recently proposed quantitative imaging paradigm. Within this framework, we present a maximum likelihood (ML) formalism to estimate multiple MR tissue parameter maps directly from highly undersampled, noisy k-space data. A novel algorithm, based on variable splitting, the alternating direction method of multipliers, and the variable projection method, is developed to solve the resulting optimization problem. Representative results from both simulations and in vivo experiments demonstrate that the proposed approach yields significantly improved accuracy in parameter estimation, compared to the conventional MR fingerprinting reconstruction. Moreover, the proposed framework provides new theoretical insights into the conventional approach. We show analytically that the conventional approach is an approximation to the ML reconstruction; more precisely, it is exactly equivalent to the first iteration of the proposed algorithm for the ML reconstruction, provided that a gridding reconstruction is used as an initialization.

  5. Maximum Profit Configurations of Commercial Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiran Chen

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available An investigation of commercial engines with finite capacity low- and high-price economic subsystems and a generalized commodity transfer law [n ∝ Δ (P m] in commodity flow processes, in which effects of the price elasticities of supply and demand are introduced, is presented in this paper. Optimal cycle configurations of commercial engines for maximum profit are obtained by applying optimal control theory. In some special cases, the eventual state—market equilibrium—is solely determined by the initial conditions and the inherent characteristics of two subsystems; while the different ways of transfer affect the model in respects of the specific forms of the paths of prices and the instantaneous commodity flow, i.e., the optimal configuration.

  6. The worst case complexity of maximum parsimony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmel, Amir; Musa-Lempel, Noa; Tsur, Dekel; Ziv-Ukelson, Michal

    2014-11-01

    One of the core classical problems in computational biology is that of constructing the most parsimonious phylogenetic tree interpreting an input set of sequences from the genomes of evolutionarily related organisms. We reexamine the classical maximum parsimony (MP) optimization problem for the general (asymmetric) scoring matrix case, where rooted phylogenies are implied, and analyze the worst case bounds of three approaches to MP: The approach of Cavalli-Sforza and Edwards, the approach of Hendy and Penny, and a new agglomerative, "bottom-up" approach we present in this article. We show that the second and third approaches are faster than the first one by a factor of Θ(√n) and Θ(n), respectively, where n is the number of species.

  7. Maximum values and classifications of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The primary means of controlling the use of radiation are safety license procedure and the monitoring of radiation exposure and working conditions at places of radiation use. In Section 17 of the Finnish Radiation Act (592/91) certain operations are exempted from the safety license. The exemption limits for the licensing of radioactive materials, the radiotoxicity classification of radionuclides related to such exemption limits, the annual limits on intake of radionuclides to be followed when monitoring internal radiation dose, as well as concentration limits in the breathing air are specified in the guide. Also the surface contamination limits which must be followed when monitoring working conditions at places of radiation use are presented. (4 refs., 6 tabs.)

  8. A maximum power point tracking for photovoltaic-SPE system using a maximum current controller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muhida, Riza [Osaka Univ., Dept. of Physical Science, Toyonaka, Osaka (Japan); Osaka Univ., Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Park, Minwon; Dakkak, Mohammed; Matsuura, Kenji [Osaka Univ., Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Tsuyoshi, Akira; Michira, Masakazu [Kobe City College of Technology, Nishi-ku, Kobe (Japan)

    2003-02-01

    Processes to produce hydrogen from solar photovoltaic (PV)-powered water electrolysis using solid polymer electrolysis (SPE) are reported. An alternative control of maximum power point tracking (MPPT) in the PV-SPE system based on the maximum current searching methods has been designed and implemented. Based on the characteristics of voltage-current and theoretical analysis of SPE, it can be shown that the tracking of the maximum current output of DC-DC converter in SPE side will track the MPPT of photovoltaic panel simultaneously. This method uses a proportional integrator controller to control the duty factor of DC-DC converter with pulse-width modulator (PWM). The MPPT performance and hydrogen production performance of this method have been evaluated and discussed based on the results of the experiment. (Author)

  9. Considerations on absorbed dose estimates based on different β-dose point kernels in internal dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Isao; Yamada, Yasuhiko; Yamashita, Takashi; Okigaki, Shigeyasu; Oyamada, Hiyoshimaru; Ito, Akira.

    1995-01-01

    In radiotherapy with radiopharmaceuticals, more accurate estimates of the three-dimensional (3-D) distribution of absorbed dose is important in specifying the activity to be administered to patients to deliver a prescribed absorbed dose to target volumes without exceeding the toxicity limit of normal tissues in the body. A calculation algorithm for the purpose has already been developed by the authors. An accurate 3-D distribution of absorbed dose based on the algorithm is given by convolution of the 3-D dose matrix for a unit cubic voxel containing unit cumulated activity, which is obtained by transforming a dose point kernel into a 3-D cubic dose matrix, with the 3-D cumulated activity distribution given by the same voxel size. However, beta-dose point kernels affecting accurate estimates of the 3-D absorbed dose distribution have been different among the investigators. The purpose of this study is to elucidate how different beta-dose point kernels in water influence on the estimates of the absorbed dose distribution due to the dose point kernel convolution method by the authors. Computer simulations were performed using the MIRD thyroid and lung phantoms under assumption of uniform activity distribution of 32 P. Using beta-dose point kernels derived from Monte Carlo simulations (EGS-4 or ACCEPT computer code), the differences among their point kernels gave little differences for the mean and maximum absorbed dose estimates for the MIRD phantoms used. In the estimates of mean and maximum absorbed doses calculated using different cubic voxel sizes (4x4x4 mm and 8x8x8 mm) for the MIRD thyroid phantom, the maximum absorbed doses for the 4x4x4 mm-voxel were estimated approximately 7% greater than the cases of the 8x8x8 mm-voxel. They were found in every beta-dose point kernel used in this study. On the other hand, the percentage difference of the mean absorbed doses in the both voxel sizes for each beta-dose point kernel was less than approximately 0.6%. (author)

  10. Neutron scattering studies of nuclear and magnetic structures of YBa2(Cu1-yZny)3O6+x

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villeneuve, R.; Mirebeau, I.; Collin, G.; Bouree, F.

    1994-01-01

    Structural effects of zinc substitution in YBCO have been studied by neutron diffraction in order to determine the substitution site of zinc atoms. Electron neutron diffraction experiments are performed on YBa 2 (Cu 1-y Zn y ) 3 O 6+x powders. Nuclear structures have been refined using the Rietveld method on powders of compositions x=1 and y ranging from 0.01 to 0.06. The results suggest a solubility limit of zinc in the copper planes at y ≅ 0.04 and zinc may start to substitute for chain copper sites for higher y values. Magnetic structure of a y=0.02 and x=0.05 powder has been studied by neutron elastic diffraction. The antiferromagnetic structure is not affected by non-magnetic zinc atoms but the ordering temperature is strongly reduced. 2 figs., 11 refs

  11. Dynamically accumulated dose and 4D accumulated dose for moving tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Heng; Li Yupeng; Zhang Xiaodong; Li Xiaoqiang; Liu Wei; Gillin, Michael T.; Zhu, X. Ronald

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to investigate the relationship between dynamically accumulated dose (dynamic dose) and 4D accumulated dose (4D dose) for irradiation of moving tumors, and to quantify the dose uncertainty induced by tumor motion. Methods: The authors established that regardless of treatment modality and delivery properties, the dynamic dose will converge to the 4D dose, instead of the 3D static dose, after multiple deliveries. The bounds of dynamic dose, or the maximum estimation error using 4D or static dose, were established for the 4D and static doses, respectively. Numerical simulations were performed (1) to prove the principle that for each phase, after multiple deliveries, the average number of deliveries for any given time converges to the total number of fractions (K) over the number of phases (N); (2) to investigate the dose difference between the 4D and dynamic doses as a function of the number of deliveries for deliveries of a “pulsed beam”; and (3) to investigate the dose difference between 4D dose and dynamic doses as a function of delivery time for deliveries of a “continuous beam.” A Poisson model was developed to estimate the mean dose error as a function of number of deliveries or delivered time for both pulsed beam and continuous beam. Results: The numerical simulations confirmed that the number of deliveries for each phase converges to K/N, assuming a random starting phase. Simulations for the pulsed beam and continuous beam also suggested that the dose error is a strong function of the number of deliveries and/or total deliver time and could be a function of the breathing cycle, depending on the mode of delivery. The Poisson model agrees well with the simulation. Conclusions: Dynamically accumulated dose will converge to the 4D accumulated dose after multiple deliveries, regardless of treatment modality. Bounds of the dynamic dose could be determined using quantities derived from 4D doses, and the mean dose

  12. Characterization and carbon monoxide oxidation activity of La1-ySryCr1-xRuxO3 perovskites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. MARINOVA

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The oxidation of CO over La1-ySryCr1-xRuxO3 perovskite type oxides with y=0.3 and 0 £ x £ 0.100 have been studied. X-ray fluorescence analysis confirmed that content of elements in the bulk corresponds to the established nominal perovskite stoichiometry, indicating that no significant oxidation of ruthenium into volatile polyvalent oxides with their consequented escape from the sample occurred in air up to the temperature of 1000°C. According to X-ray diffraction analysis, all sampls achieved the perovskite hexagonal with the presence of some SrCrO4. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of ruthenium samples shows higher Ru and Sr surface concentraitions than in the bulk. The binding energy for Ru3p is virtually the same in all samples and consistent with that of Ru4+ (463.6-464.3eV. Kinetic studies were performed in a differential recycle reactor with a recycling ratio 80. The results show that substitution of Ru4+ for Cr3+ in La1-ySryCrO3 leads to a significant increase in both the activity and the activation energy. The global CO oxidation rate, referred on the BET surface area, correlates with the surface Ru4+ atomic concentraiton. Hence, the activity reflect the surface enrichment in ruthenium. Moreover, an identical apparent activation energy E = 93 kJ/mol and the same specific rate per ruthenium surface ion were obtained for samples with a Ru content x ³ 0.05 suggest that exposed Ru4+ ions mainly participate in the reaction.

  13. Case Example of Dose Optimization Using Data From Bortezomib Dose-Finding Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shing M; Backenroth, Daniel; Cheung, Ying Kuen Ken; Hershman, Dawn L; Vulih, Diana; Anderson, Barry; Ivy, Percy; Minasian, Lori

    2016-04-20

    The current dose-finding methodology for estimating the maximum tolerated dose of investigational anticancer agents is based on the cytotoxic chemotherapy paradigm. Molecularly targeted agents (MTAs) have different toxicity profiles, which may lead to more long-lasting mild or moderate toxicities as well as to late-onset and cumulative toxicities. Several approved MTAs have been poorly tolerated during long-term administration, leading to postmarketing dose optimization studies to re-evaluate the optimal treatment dose. Using data from completed bortezomib dose-finding trials, we explore its toxicity profile, optimize its dose, and examine the appropriateness of current designs for identifying an optimal dose. We classified the toxicities captured from 481 patients in 14 bortezomib dose-finding studies conducted through the National Cancer Institute Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program, computed the incidence of late-onset toxicities, and compared the incidence of dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) among groups of patients receiving different doses of bortezomib. A total of 13,008 toxicities were captured: 46% of patients' first DLTs and 88% of dose reductions or discontinuations of treatment because of toxicity were observed after the first cycle. Moreover, for the approved dose of 1.3 mg/m(2), the estimated cumulative incidence of DLT was > 50%, and the estimated cumulative incidence of dose reduction or treatment discontinuation because of toxicity was nearly 40%. When considering the entire course of treatment, the approved bortezomib dose exceeds the conventional ceiling DLT rate of 20% to 33%. Retrospective analysis of trial data provides an opportunity for dose optimization of MTAs. Future dose-finding studies of MTAs should take into account late-onset toxicities to ensure that a tolerable dose is identified for future efficacy and comparative trials. © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  14. Maximum mass of magnetic white dwarfs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paret, Daryel Manreza; Horvath, Jorge Ernesto; Martínez, Aurora Perez

    2015-01-01

    We revisit the problem of the maximum masses of magnetized white dwarfs (WDs). The impact of a strong magnetic field on the structure equations is addressed. The pressures become anisotropic due to the presence of the magnetic field and split into parallel and perpendicular components. We first construct stable solutions of the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff equations for parallel pressures and find that physical solutions vanish for the perpendicular pressure when B ≳ 10 13 G. This fact establishes an upper bound for a magnetic field and the stability of the configurations in the (quasi) spherical approximation. Our findings also indicate that it is not possible to obtain stable magnetized WDs with super-Chandrasekhar masses because the values of the magnetic field needed for them are higher than this bound. To proceed into the anisotropic regime, we can apply results for structure equations appropriate for a cylindrical metric with anisotropic pressures that were derived in our previous work. From the solutions of the structure equations in cylindrical symmetry we have confirmed the same bound for B ∼ 10 13 G, since beyond this value no physical solutions are possible. Our tentative conclusion is that massive WDs with masses well beyond the Chandrasekhar limit do not constitute stable solutions and should not exist. (paper)

  15. TRENDS IN ESTIMATED MIXING DEPTH DAILY MAXIMUMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckley, R; Amy DuPont, A; Robert Kurzeja, R; Matt Parker, M

    2007-11-12

    Mixing depth is an important quantity in the determination of air pollution concentrations. Fireweather forecasts depend strongly on estimates of the mixing depth as a means of determining the altitude and dilution (ventilation rates) of smoke plumes. The Savannah River United States Forest Service (USFS) routinely conducts prescribed fires at the Savannah River Site (SRS), a heavily wooded Department of Energy (DOE) facility located in southwest South Carolina. For many years, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has provided forecasts of weather conditions in support of the fire program, including an estimated mixing depth using potential temperature and turbulence change with height at a given location. This paper examines trends in the average estimated mixing depth daily maximum at the SRS over an extended period of time (4.75 years) derived from numerical atmospheric simulations using two versions of the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS). This allows for differences to be seen between the model versions, as well as trends on a multi-year time frame. In addition, comparisons of predicted mixing depth for individual days in which special balloon soundings were released are also discussed.

  16. Mammographic image restoration using maximum entropy deconvolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jannetta, A; Jackson, J C; Kotre, C J; Birch, I P; Robson, K J; Padgett, R

    2004-01-01

    An image restoration approach based on a Bayesian maximum entropy method (MEM) has been applied to a radiological image deconvolution problem, that of reduction of geometric blurring in magnification mammography. The aim of the work is to demonstrate an improvement in image spatial resolution in realistic noisy radiological images with no associated penalty in terms of reduction in the signal-to-noise ratio perceived by the observer. Images of the TORMAM mammographic image quality phantom were recorded using the standard magnification settings of 1.8 magnification/fine focus and also at 1.8 magnification/broad focus and 3.0 magnification/fine focus; the latter two arrangements would normally give rise to unacceptable geometric blurring. Measured point-spread functions were used in conjunction with the MEM image processing to de-blur these images. The results are presented as comparative images of phantom test features and as observer scores for the raw and processed images. Visualization of high resolution features and the total image scores for the test phantom were improved by the application of the MEM processing. It is argued that this successful demonstration of image de-blurring in noisy radiological images offers the possibility of weakening the link between focal spot size and geometric blurring in radiology, thus opening up new approaches to system optimization

  17. Maximum Margin Clustering of Hyperspectral Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niazmardi, S.; Safari, A.; Homayouni, S.

    2013-09-01

    In recent decades, large margin methods such as Support Vector Machines (SVMs) are supposed to be the state-of-the-art of supervised learning methods for classification of hyperspectral data. However, the results of these algorithms mainly depend on the quality and quantity of available training data. To tackle down the problems associated with the training data, the researcher put effort into extending the capability of large margin algorithms for unsupervised learning. One of the recent proposed algorithms is Maximum Margin Clustering (MMC). The MMC is an unsupervised SVMs algorithm that simultaneously estimates both the labels and the hyperplane parameters. Nevertheless, the optimization of the MMC algorithm is a non-convex problem. Most of the existing MMC methods rely on the reformulating and the relaxing of the non-convex optimization problem as semi-definite programs (SDP), which are computationally very expensive and only can handle small data sets. Moreover, most of these algorithms are two-class classification, which cannot be used for classification of remotely sensed data. In this paper, a new MMC algorithm is used that solve the original non-convex problem using Alternative Optimization method. This algorithm is also extended for multi-class classification and its performance is evaluated. The results of the proposed algorithm show that the algorithm has acceptable results for hyperspectral data clustering.

  18. Paving the road to maximum productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, C

    1998-01-01

    "Job security" is an oxymoron in today's environment of downsizing, mergers, and acquisitions. Workers find themselves living by new rules in the workplace that they may not understand. How do we cope? It is the leader's charge to take advantage of this chaos and create conditions under which his or her people can understand the need for change and come together with a shared purpose to effect that change. The clinical laboratory at Arkansas Children's Hospital has taken advantage of this chaos to down-size and to redesign how the work gets done to pave the road to maximum productivity. After initial hourly cutbacks, the workers accepted the cold, hard fact that they would never get their old world back. They set goals to proactively shape their new world through reorganizing, flexing staff with workload, creating a rapid response laboratory, exploiting information technology, and outsourcing. Today the laboratory is a lean, productive machine that accepts change as a way of life. We have learned to adapt, trust, and support each other as we have journeyed together over the rough roads. We are looking forward to paving a new fork in the road to the future.

  19. Maximum power flux of auroral kilometric radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benson, R.F.; Fainberg, J.

    1991-01-01

    The maximum auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) power flux observed by distant satellites has been increased by more than a factor of 10 from previously reported values. This increase has been achieved by a new data selection criterion and a new analysis of antenna spin modulated signals received by the radio astronomy instrument on ISEE 3. The method relies on selecting AKR events containing signals in the highest-frequency channel (1980, kHz), followed by a careful analysis that effectively increased the instrumental dynamic range by more than 20 dB by making use of the spacecraft antenna gain diagram during a spacecraft rotation. This analysis has allowed the separation of real signals from those created in the receiver by overloading. Many signals having the appearance of AKR harmonic signals were shown to be of spurious origin. During one event, however, real second harmonic AKR signals were detected even though the spacecraft was at a great distance (17 R E ) from Earth. During another event, when the spacecraft was at the orbital distance of the Moon and on the morning side of Earth, the power flux of fundamental AKR was greater than 3 x 10 -13 W m -2 Hz -1 at 360 kHz normalized to a radial distance r of 25 R E assuming the power falls off as r -2 . A comparison of these intense signal levels with the most intense source region values (obtained by ISIS 1 and Viking) suggests that multiple sources were observed by ISEE 3

  20. Maximum likelihood window for time delay estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Sup; Yoon, Dong Jin; Kim, Chi Yup

    2004-01-01

    Time delay estimation for the detection of leak location in underground pipelines is critically important. Because the exact leak location depends upon the precision of the time delay between sensor signals due to leak noise and the speed of elastic waves, the research on the estimation of time delay has been one of the key issues in leak lovating with the time arrival difference method. In this study, an optimal Maximum Likelihood window is considered to obtain a better estimation of the time delay. This method has been proved in experiments, which can provide much clearer and more precise peaks in cross-correlation functions of leak signals. The leak location error has been less than 1 % of the distance between sensors, for example the error was not greater than 3 m for 300 m long underground pipelines. Apart from the experiment, an intensive theoretical analysis in terms of signal processing has been described. The improved leak locating with the suggested method is due to the windowing effect in frequency domain, which offers a weighting in significant frequencies.

  1. Ancestral Sequence Reconstruction with Maximum Parsimony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbst, Lina; Fischer, Mareike

    2017-12-01

    One of the main aims in phylogenetics is the estimation of ancestral sequences based on present-day data like, for instance, DNA alignments. One way to estimate the data of the last common ancestor of a given set of species is to first reconstruct a phylogenetic tree with some tree inference method and then to use some method of ancestral state inference based on that tree. One of the best-known methods both for tree inference and for ancestral sequence inference is Maximum Parsimony (MP). In this manuscript, we focus on this method and on ancestral state inference for fully bifurcating trees. In particular, we investigate a conjecture published by Charleston and Steel in 1995 concerning the number of species which need to have a particular state, say a, at a particular site in order for MP to unambiguously return a as an estimate for the state of the last common ancestor. We prove the conjecture for all even numbers of character states, which is the most relevant case in biology. We also show that the conjecture does not hold in general for odd numbers of character states, but also present some positive results for this case.

  2. From personnel dose to personal dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoefert, M.; Raffnsoe, R.C.; Tuyn, J.W.N.; Wittekind, D.

    1985-01-01

    From following the development of personnel doses at CERN over the past six years it has become evident that work in areas of induced radioactivity is the principal cause of exposure. The results of photon dose measurements free-in-air and around a phantom are presented and discussed in the light of new quantities in individual monitoring. The importance of these results, with respect to the practical situation, is discussed and the problem of phantom size is mentioned. Finally, the results of dose measurements in the phantom are presented, since such information is important in cases where it becomes necessary to transform personnel doses into personal doses. (author)

  3. 49 CFR 230.24 - Maximum allowable stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Maximum allowable stress. 230.24 Section 230.24... Allowable Stress § 230.24 Maximum allowable stress. (a) Maximum allowable stress value. The maximum allowable stress value on any component of a steam locomotive boiler shall not exceed 1/4 of the ultimate...

  4. 20 CFR 226.52 - Total annuity subject to maximum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Total annuity subject to maximum. 226.52... COMPUTING EMPLOYEE, SPOUSE, AND DIVORCED SPOUSE ANNUITIES Railroad Retirement Family Maximum § 226.52 Total annuity subject to maximum. The total annuity amount which is compared to the maximum monthly amount to...

  5. Half-width at half-maximum, full-width at half-maximum analysis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    addition to the well-defined parameter full-width at half-maximum (FWHM). The distribution of ... optical side-lobes in the diffraction pattern resulting in steep central maxima [6], reduc- tion of effects of ... and broad central peak. The idea of.

  6. Cosmic shear measurement with maximum likelihood and maximum a posteriori inference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Alex; Taylor, Andy

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the problem of noise bias in maximum likelihood and maximum a posteriori estimators for cosmic shear. We derive the leading and next-to-leading order biases and compute them in the context of galaxy ellipticity measurements, extending previous work on maximum likelihood inference for weak lensing. We show that a large part of the bias on these point estimators can be removed using information already contained in the likelihood when a galaxy model is specified, without the need for external calibration. We test these bias-corrected estimators on simulated galaxy images similar to those expected from planned space-based weak lensing surveys, with promising results. We find that the introduction of an intrinsic shape prior can help with mitigation of noise bias, such that the maximum a posteriori estimate can be made less biased than the maximum likelihood estimate. Second-order terms offer a check on the convergence of the estimators, but are largely subdominant. We show how biases propagate to shear estimates, demonstrating in our simple set-up that shear biases can be reduced by orders of magnitude and potentially to within the requirements of planned space-based surveys at mild signal-to-noise ratio. We find that second-order terms can exhibit significant cancellations at low signal-to-noise ratio when Gaussian noise is assumed, which has implications for inferring the performance of shear-measurement algorithms from simplified simulations. We discuss the viability of our point estimators as tools for lensing inference, arguing that they allow for the robust measurement of ellipticity and shear.

  7. Application of maximum radiation exposure values and monitoring of radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    According to the Section 32 of the Radiation Act (592/91) the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety gives instructions concerning the monitoring of the radiation exposure and the application of the dose limits in Finland. The principles to be applied to calculating the equivalent and the effective doses are presented in the guide. Also the detailed instructions on the application of the maximum exposure values for the radiation work and for the natural radiation as well as the instructions on the monitoring of the exposures are given. Quantities and units for assessing radiation exposure are presented in the appendix of the guide

  8. Occupational dose at Rokkasho reprocessing plant (RRP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takashima, F.; Taguchi, R.; Kano, M.; Moriyama, T.; Ogaki, K.; Noda, K.

    2008-01-01

    In Japan, Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant (RRP) is going to start the operation in service as the first large-scale commercial reprocessing plant of spent fuels that has annual reprocessing quantity of 800tU pr in maximum. The occupational external exposure is controlled for the purpose of keeping dose as low as reasonably achievable, and it is monitored by the personal dosimeter. On the other hand, the occupational internal exposure is controlled for the purpose of preventing, and it is monitored by the periodical evaluation of internal dose from the radioactive concentration in air of workplace. The individual doses of radiation workers are less than the dose limits in the statute and our lower management values enough. Dose data will be stored continuously and the rational management method will be examined. (author)

  9. High-dose irradiation of food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diehl, J.F.

    1999-01-01

    Studies performed on behalf of the International Project on Food Irradiation in the period from 1971 until 1980 resulted in the concluding statement that ''.the irradiation of any food commodity up to an overall average dose of 10 kGy presents no toxicological hazard; hence, toxicological testing of foods so treated is no longer required.'' Since then, licenses for food irradiation have been restricted to this maximum dose in any country applying this technology. Further testing programmes have been carried out investigating the wholesomeness or hazards of high-dose irradiation, but there has been little demand so far by the food industry for licensing of high-dose irradiation, as there is only a small range of products whose irradiation at higher doses offers advantages for given, intended use. These include eg. spices, dried herbs, meat products in flexible pouch packagings for astronauts, or patients with immune deficiencies. (orig./CB) [de

  10. A maximum likelihood framework for protein design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Hervé

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of protein design is to predict amino-acid sequences compatible with a given target structure. Traditionally envisioned as a purely thermodynamic question, this problem can also be understood in a wider context, where additional constraints are captured by learning the sequence patterns displayed by natural proteins of known conformation. In this latter perspective, however, we still need a theoretical formalization of the question, leading to general and efficient learning methods, and allowing for the selection of fast and accurate objective functions quantifying sequence/structure compatibility. Results We propose a formulation of the protein design problem in terms of model-based statistical inference. Our framework uses the maximum likelihood principle to optimize the unknown parameters of a statistical potential, which we call an inverse potential to contrast with classical potentials used for structure prediction. We propose an implementation based on Markov chain Monte Carlo, in which the likelihood is maximized by gradient descent and is numerically estimated by thermodynamic integration. The fit of the models is evaluated by cross-validation. We apply this to a simple pairwise contact potential, supplemented with a solvent-accessibility term, and show that the resulting models have a better predictive power than currently available pairwise potentials. Furthermore, the model comparison method presented here allows one to measure the relative contribution of each component of the potential, and to choose the optimal number of accessibility classes, which turns out to be much higher than classically considered. Conclusion Altogether, this reformulation makes it possible to test a wide diversity of models, using different forms of potentials, or accounting for other factors than just the constraint of thermodynamic stability. Ultimately, such model-based statistical analyses may help to understand the forces

  11. Maximum intensity projection MR angiography using shifted image data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machida, Yoshio; Ichinose, Nobuyasu; Hatanaka, Masahiko; Goro, Takehiko; Kitake, Shinichi; Hatta, Junicchi.

    1992-01-01

    The quality of MR angiograms has been significantly improved in past several years. Spatial resolution, however, is not sufficient for clinical use. On the other hand, MR image data can be filled at anywhere using Fourier shift theorem, and the quality of multi-planar reformed image has been reported to be improved remarkably using 'shifted data'. In this paper, we have clarified the efficiency of 'shifted data' for maximum intensity projection MR angiography. Our experimental studies and theoretical consideration showd that the quality of MR angiograms has been significantly improved using 'shifted data' as follows; 1) remarkable reduction of mosaic artifact, 2) improvement of spatial continuity for the blood vessels, and 3) reduction of variance for the signal intensity along the blood vessels. In other words, the angiograms looks much 'finer' than conventional ones, although the spatial resolution is not improved theoretically. Furthermore, we found the quality of MR angiograms dose not improve significantly with the 'shifted data' more than twice as dense as ordinal ones. (author)

  12. EFFECT OF CAFFEINE ON OXIDATIVE STRESS DURING MAXIMUM INCREMENTAL EXERCISE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo J. Olcina

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Caffeine (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine is an habitual substance present in a wide variety of beverages and in chocolate-based foods and it is also used as adjuvant in some drugs. The antioxidant ability of caffeine has been reported in contrast with its pro- oxidant effects derived from its action mechanism such as the systemic release of catecholamines. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of caffeine on exercise oxidative stress, measuring plasma vitamins A, E, C and malonaldehyde (MDA as markers of non enzymatic antioxidant status and lipid peroxidation respectively. Twenty young males participated in a double blind (caffeine 5mg·kg- 1 body weight or placebo cycling test until exhaustion. In the exercise test, where caffeine was ingested prior to the test, exercise time to exhaustion, maximum heart rate, and oxygen uptake significantly increased, whereas respiratory exchange ratio (RER decreased. Vitamins A and E decreased with exercise and vitamin C and MDA increased after both the caffeine and placebo tests but, regarding these particular variables, there were no significant differences between the two test conditions. The results obtained support the conclusion that this dose of caffeine enhances the ergospirometric response to cycling and has no effect on lipid peroxidation or on the antioxidant vitamins A, E and C

  13. Dose sculpting with generalized equivalent uniform dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Qiuwen; Djajaputra, David; Liu, Helen H.; Dong Lei; Mohan, Radhe; Wu, Yan

    2005-01-01

    With intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), a variety of user-defined dose distribution can be produced using inverse planning. The generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) has been used in IMRT optimization as an alternative objective function to the conventional dose-volume-based criteria. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of gEUD optimization to fine tune the dose distributions of IMRT plans. We analyzed the effect of gEUD-based optimization parameters on plan quality. The objective was to determine whether dose distribution to selected structures could be improved using gEUD optimization without adversely altering the doses delivered to other structures, as in sculpting. We hypothesized that by carefully defining gEUD parameters (EUD 0 and n) based on the current dose distributions, the optimization system could be instructed to search for alternative solutions in the neighborhood, and we could maintain the dose distributions for structures already satisfactory and improve dose for structures that need enhancement. We started with an already acceptable IMRT plan optimized with any objective function. The dose distribution was analyzed first. For structures that dose should not be changed, a higher value of n was used and EUD 0 was set slightly higher/lower than the EUD value at the current dose distribution for critical structures/targets. For structures that needed improvement in dose, a higher to medium value of n was used, and EUD 0 was set to the EUD value or slightly lower/higher for the critical structure/target at the current dose distribution. We evaluated this method in one clinical case each of head and neck, lung and prostate cancer. Dose volume histograms, isodose distributions, and relevant tolerance doses for critical structures were used for the assessment. We found that by adjusting gEUD optimization parameters, the dose distribution could be improved with only a few iterations. A larger value of n could lead to

  14. Failure-probability driven dose painting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogelius, Ivan R.; Håkansson, Katrin; Due, Anne K.; Aznar, Marianne C.; Kristensen, Claus A.; Rasmussen, Jacob; Specht, Lena; Berthelsen, Anne K.; Bentzen, Søren M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate a data-driven dose-painting strategy based on the spatial distribution of recurrences in previously treated patients. The result is a quantitative way to define a dose prescription function, optimizing the predicted local control at constant treatment intensity. A dose planning study using the optimized dose prescription in 20 patients is performed.Methods: Patients treated at our center have five tumor subvolumes from the center of the tumor (PET positive volume) and out delineated. The spatial distribution of 48 failures in patients with complete clinical response after (chemo)radiation is used to derive a model for tumor control probability (TCP). The total TCP is fixed to the clinically observed 70% actuarial TCP at five years. Additionally, the authors match the distribution of failures between the five subvolumes to the observed distribution. The steepness of the dose–response is extracted from the literature and the authors assume 30% and 20% risk of subclinical involvement in the elective volumes. The result is a five-compartment dose response model matching the observed distribution of failures. The model is used to optimize the distribution of dose in individual patients, while keeping the treatment intensity constant and the maximum prescribed dose below 85 Gy.Results: The vast majority of failures occur centrally despite the small volumes of the central regions. Thus, optimizing the dose prescription yields higher doses to the central target volumes and lower doses to the elective volumes. The dose planning study shows that the modified prescription is clinically feasible. The optimized TCP is 89% (range: 82%–91%) as compared to the observed TCP of 70%.Conclusions: The observed distribution of locoregional failures was used to derive an objective, data-driven dose prescription function. The optimized dose is predicted to result in a substantial increase in local control without increasing the predicted risk of toxicity

  15. Full dose CHOP chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tominaga, Shinichi; Kondo, Makoto; Ando, Yutaka; Yamashita, Shoji; Uematsu, Minoru; Shigematsu, Naoyuki; Nishiguchi, Iku; Hashimoto, Shozo

    1985-01-01

    Since 1982, we have performed 125 courses of CHOP chemotherapy for 27 patients of malignancy, adhering to the original regimen as strictly as possible. CHOP chemotherapy consisted of Cyclophosphamide 750 mg/m 2 , iv, on day 1; Adriamycin 50 mg/m 2 , iv, on day 1; Vincristine 1.4 mg/m 2 , iv, on day 1 (maximum single dose 2.0 mg) and Prednisolone 50 mg/m 2 , po, day 1 through 5. The cycle was repeated every 21 days. As side effects, myelosuppression, hair loss, fever, nausea, vomiting, liver dysfunction, stomatitis, neuropathy, herpes zoster, arrhythmia and hemorrhagic cystitis were seen. Due to myelosuppression, twenty patients experienced febrile episodes at each nadir of WBC counts on 40 courses. However, any febrile patient did not have life threatening infection. Other side effects were also reversible. The radiotherapy of most patients was carried out as initially scheduled, except for 3 patients in whom irradiation was interrupted due to severe stomatitis or herpes zoster. We consider that CHOP chemotherapy is excellent in feasibility even when combined with radiotherapy. (author)

  16. Interband Stark effects in InxGa1-xAs/InyAl1-yAs coupled step quantum wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.H.; Kim, T.W.; Yoo, K.H.

    2005-01-01

    The effects of an electric field on the interband transitions in In x Ga 1-x As/In y Al 1-y As coupled step quantum wells have been investigated both experimentally and theoretically. A In x Ga 1-x As/In y Al 1-y As coupled step quantum well sample consisted of the two sets of a 50 Aa In 0.53 Ga 0.47 As shallow quantum well and a 50 Aa In 0.65 Ga 0.35 As deep step quantum well bounded by two thick In 0.52 Al 0.48 As barriers separated by a 30 Aa In 0.52 Al 0.48 As embedded potential barrier. The Stark shift of the interband transition energy in the In x Ga 1-x As/In y Al 1-y As coupled step quantum well is larger than that of the single quantum well, and the oscillator strength in the In x Ga 1-x As/In y Al 1-y As coupled step quantum well is larger than that in a coupled rectangular quantum well. These results indicate that In x Ga 1-x As/In y Al 1-y As coupled step quantum wells hold promise for potential applications in optoelectron devices, such as tunable lasers

  17. Model of organ dose combination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valley, J.-F.; Lerch, P.

    1977-01-01

    The ICRP recommendations are based on the limitation of the dose to each organ. In the application and for a unique source the critical organ concept allows to limit the calculation and represents the irradiation status of an individuum. When several sources of radiation are involved the derivation of the dose contribution of each source to each organ is necessary. In order to represent the irradiation status a new parameter is to be defined. Propositions have been made by some authors, in particular by Jacobi introducing at this level biological parameters like the incidence rate of detriment and its severity. The new concept is certainly richer than a simple dose notion. However, in the actual situation of knowledge about radiation effects an intermediate parameter, using only physical concepts and the maximum permissible doses to the organs, seems more appropriate. The model, which is a generalization of the critical organ concept and shall be extended in the future to take the biological effects into account, will be presented [fr

  18. Occupational radiation dose in Indonesia 1981-1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiswara, E.; Ismono, A.

    1993-01-01

    Occupational radiation dose in Indonesia 1981-1986. This paper presents the occupational radiation dose in Indonesia during the period of 1981-1986. The highest collective dose accurated in 1983 was calculated to be 2.68 man-Sv, with the maximum mean dose per worker, who received dose more than zero, was around 11.07 mSv in the same year. In 1985, a relative collective dose from medical occupations of 1.88 man mSv for 10 6 population was estimated based on its total collective dose of 0.31 man-mSv. The total number of workers who received annual collective dose less than 5 mSv varied from 97.0% in 1981 to 99.5% in 1986. As a group, the industrial occupations has considerably higher risk in receiving a dose than others. (authors). 11 refs., 7 tabs

  19. Estimation of population dose from all sources in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusama, Tomoko; Nakagawa, Takeo; Kai, Michiaki; Yoshizawa, Yasuo

    1988-01-01

    The purposes of estimation of population doses are to understand the per-caput doses of the public member from each artificial radiation source and to determine the proportion contributed of the doses from each individual source to the total irradiated population. We divided the population doses into two categories: individual-related and source-related population doses. The individual-related population dose is estimated based on the maximum assumption for use in allocation of the dose limits for members of the public. The source-related population dose is estimated both to justify the sources and practices and to optimize radiation protection. The source-related population dose, therefore, should be estimated as realistically as possible. We investigated all sources that caused exposure to the population in Japan from the above points of view

  20. Specification of volume and dose in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levernes, S.

    1997-01-01

    As a result of a questionnaire about dose and volume specifications in radiotherapy in the Nordic countries, a group has been set up to propose common recommendations for these countries. The proposal is partly based on ICRU 50, but with major extensions. These extensions fall into three areas: patient geometry, treatment geometry, and dose specifications. For patient geometry and set-up one need alignment markings and anatomical reference points, the latter can be divided into internal and external reference points. These points are necessary to get relationships between coordinate systems related to patient and to treatment unit. For treatment geometry the main volume will be an anatomical target volume which just encompass the clinical target volume with all its variations and movements. This anatomical volume are the most suitable volume for prescription, optimization and reporting dose. A set-up margin should be added to the beam periphery in beams-eye-view to get the minimum size and shape of the beam. For dose specification the most important parameter for homogeneous dose distributions is the arithmetic mean of dose to the anatomical target volume together with its standard deviation. In addition the dose to the ICRU reference point should be reported for intercomparison, together with minimum and maximum doses or dose volume histograms for the anatomical target volume. (author)

  1. Maximum entropy production rate in quantum thermodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beretta, Gian Paolo, E-mail: beretta@ing.unibs.i [Universita di Brescia, via Branze 38, 25123 Brescia (Italy)

    2010-06-01

    In the framework of the recent quest for well-behaved nonlinear extensions of the traditional Schroedinger-von Neumann unitary dynamics that could provide fundamental explanations of recent experimental evidence of loss of quantum coherence at the microscopic level, a recent paper [Gheorghiu-Svirschevski 2001 Phys. Rev. A 63 054102] reproposes the nonlinear equation of motion proposed by the present author [see Beretta G P 1987 Found. Phys. 17 365 and references therein] for quantum (thermo)dynamics of a single isolated indivisible constituent system, such as a single particle, qubit, qudit, spin or atomic system, or a Bose-Einstein or Fermi-Dirac field. As already proved, such nonlinear dynamics entails a fundamental unifying microscopic proof and extension of Onsager's reciprocity and Callen's fluctuation-dissipation relations to all nonequilibrium states, close and far from thermodynamic equilibrium. In this paper we propose a brief but self-contained review of the main results already proved, including the explicit geometrical construction of the equation of motion from the steepest-entropy-ascent ansatz and its exact mathematical and conceptual equivalence with the maximal-entropy-generation variational-principle formulation presented in Gheorghiu-Svirschevski S 2001 Phys. Rev. A 63 022105. Moreover, we show how it can be extended to the case of a composite system to obtain the general form of the equation of motion, consistent with the demanding requirements of strong separability and of compatibility with general thermodynamics principles. The irreversible term in the equation of motion describes the spontaneous attraction of the state operator in the direction of steepest entropy ascent, thus implementing the maximum entropy production principle in quantum theory. The time rate at which the path of steepest entropy ascent is followed has so far been left unspecified. As a step towards the identification of such rate, here we propose a possible

  2. Creation and clinical application of real-time dose monitor using dose area product meter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsubara, Kosuke; Uoyama, Yoshinori; Iida, Hiroji; Mizushima, Takashi

    2004-01-01

    The management of patient dose has become more of an issue in recent years. Dose can be determined non-invasively and in real time through the use of a dose area product meter, but it is the area dose value that is obtained. Therefore, we created a program that estimates entrance skin dose (ESD) in real time from area dose values obtained during procedures. We used Microsoft Visual C++ 6.0 (Standard Edition) for the programming language and C language for the programming environment. The value was a maximum 285.4 mGy at ileus tube insertion when measuring ESD for radiography of the digestive organ and non-vascular type interventional radiology (IVR) using the created program and seeking the average according to the procedures. The program that we created can be considered valid for monitoring ESD correctly and in real time. (author)

  3. From physical dose constraints to equivalent uniform dose constraints in inverse radiotherapy planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thieke, Christian; Bortfeld, Thomas; Niemierko, Andrzej; Nill, Simeon

    2003-01-01

    Optimization algorithms in inverse radiotherapy planning need information about the desired dose distribution. Usually the planner defines physical dose constraints for each structure of the treatment plan, either in form of minimum and maximum doses or as dose-volume constraints. The concept of equivalent uniform dose (EUD) was designed to describe dose distributions with a higher clinical relevance. In this paper, we present a method to consider the EUD as an optimization constraint by using the method of projections onto convex sets (POCS). In each iteration of the optimization loop, for the actual dose distribution of an organ that violates an EUD constraint a new dose distribution is calculated that satisfies the EUD constraint, leading to voxel-based physical dose constraints. The new dose distribution is found by projecting the current one onto the convex set of all dose distributions fulfilling the EUD constraint. The algorithm is easy to integrate into existing inverse planning systems, and it allows the planner to choose between physical and EUD constraints separately for each structure. A clinical case of a head and neck tumor is optimized using three different sets of constraints: physical constraints for all structures, physical constraints for the target and EUD constraints for the organs at risk, and EUD constraints for all structures. The results show that the POCS method converges stable and given EUD constraints are reached closely

  4. Determination of the maximum-depth to potential field sources by a maximum structural index method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedi, M.; Florio, G.

    2013-01-01

    A simple and fast determination of the limiting depth to the sources may represent a significant help to the data interpretation. To this end we explore the possibility of determining those source parameters shared by all the classes of models fitting the data. One approach is to determine the maximum depth-to-source compatible with the measured data, by using for example the well-known Bott-Smith rules. These rules involve only the knowledge of the field and its horizontal gradient maxima, and are independent from the density contrast. Thanks to the direct relationship between structural index and depth to sources we work out a simple and fast strategy to obtain the maximum depth by using the semi-automated methods, such as Euler deconvolution or depth-from-extreme-points method (DEXP). The proposed method consists in estimating the maximum depth as the one obtained for the highest allowable value of the structural index (Nmax). Nmax may be easily determined, since it depends only on the dimensionality of the problem (2D/3D) and on the nature of the analyzed field (e.g., gravity field or magnetic field). We tested our approach on synthetic models against the results obtained by the classical Bott-Smith formulas and the results are in fact very similar, confirming the validity of this method. However, while Bott-Smith formulas are restricted to the gravity field only, our method is applicable also to the magnetic field and to any derivative of the gravity and magnetic field. Our method yields a useful criterion to assess the source model based on the (∂f/∂x)max/fmax ratio. The usefulness of the method in real cases is demonstrated for a salt wall in the Mississippi basin, where the estimation of the maximum depth agrees with the seismic information.

  5. Pocket total dose meter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Endres, G.W.R.

    1984-10-01

    Laboratory measurements have demonstrated that it is possible to simultaneously measure absorbed dose and dose equivalent using a single tissue equivalent proportional counter. Small, pocket sized instruments are being developed to determine dose equivalent as the worker is exposed to mixed field radiation. This paper describes the electronic circuitry and computer algorithms used to determine dose equivalent in these devices

  6. Weighted Maximum-Clique Transversal Sets of Graphs

    OpenAIRE

    Chuan-Min Lee

    2011-01-01

    A maximum-clique transversal set of a graph G is a subset of vertices intersecting all maximum cliques of G. The maximum-clique transversal set problem is to find a maximum-clique transversal set of G of minimum cardinality. Motivated by the placement of transmitters for cellular telephones, Chang, Kloks, and Lee introduced the concept of maximum-clique transversal sets on graphs in 2001. In this paper, we study the weighted version of the maximum-clique transversal set problem for split grap...

  7. Pattern formation, logistics, and maximum path probability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkaldy, J. S.

    1985-05-01

    The concept of pattern formation, which to current researchers is a synonym for self-organization, carries the connotation of deductive logic together with the process of spontaneous inference. Defining a pattern as an equivalence relation on a set of thermodynamic objects, we establish that a large class of irreversible pattern-forming systems, evolving along idealized quasisteady paths, approaches the stable steady state as a mapping upon the formal deductive imperatives of a propositional function calculus. In the preamble the classical reversible thermodynamics of composite systems is analyzed as an externally manipulated system of space partitioning and classification based on ideal enclosures and diaphragms. The diaphragms have discrete classification capabilities which are designated in relation to conserved quantities by descriptors such as impervious, diathermal, and adiabatic. Differentiability in the continuum thermodynamic calculus is invoked as equivalent to analyticity and consistency in the underlying class or sentential calculus. The seat of inference, however, rests with the thermodynamicist. In the transition to an irreversible pattern-forming system the defined nature of the composite reservoirs remains, but a given diaphragm is replaced by a pattern-forming system which by its nature is a spontaneously evolving volume partitioner and classifier of invariants. The seat of volition or inference for the classification system is thus transferred from the experimenter or theoretician to the diaphragm, and with it the full deductive facility. The equivalence relations or partitions associated with the emerging patterns may thus be associated with theorems of the natural pattern-forming calculus. The entropy function, together with its derivatives, is the vehicle which relates the logistics of reservoirs and diaphragms to the analog logistics of the continuum. Maximum path probability or second-order differentiability of the entropy in isolation are

  8. Pressurizer /Auxiliary Spray Piping Stress Analysis For Determination Of Lead Shielding Maximum Allow Able Load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setjo, Renaningsih

    2000-01-01

    Piping stress analysis for PZR/Auxiliary Spray Lines Nuclear Power Plant AV Unit I(PWR Type) has been carried out. The purpose of this analysis is to establish a maximum allowable load that is permitted at the time of need by placing lead shielding on the piping system on class 1 pipe, Pressurizer/Auxiliary Spray Lines (PZR/Aux.) Reactor Coolant Loop 1 and 4 for NPP AV Unit one in the mode 5 and 6 during outage. This analysis is intended to reduce the maximum amount of radiation dose for the operator during ISI ( In service Inspection) period.The result shown that the maximum allowable loads for 4 inches lines for PZR/Auxiliary Spray Lines is 123 lbs/feet

  9. Occupational dose assessment in interventional cardiology in Serbia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaljevic, J.; Ciraj-Bjelac, O.; Stankovic, J.; Arandjic, D.; Bozovic, P.; Antic, V.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this work is to assess the occupational dose in interventional cardiology in a large hospital in Belgrade, Serbia. A double-dosimetry method was applied for the estimation of whole-body dose, using thermoluminescent dosemeters, calibrated in terms of the personal dose equivalent H p (10). Besides the double-dosimetry method, eye dose was also estimated by means of measuring ambient dose equivalent, H*(10), and doses per procedure were reported. Doses were assessed for 13 physicians, 6 nurses and 10 radiographers, for 2 consequent years. The maximum annual effective dose assessed was 4.3, 2.1 and 1.3 mSv for physicians, nurses and radiographers, respectively. The maximum doses recorded by the dosemeter worn at the collar level (over the apron) were 16.8, 11.9 and 4.5 mSv, respectively. This value was used for the eye lens dose assessment. Estimated doses are in accordance with or higher than annual dose limits for the occupational exposure. (authors)

  10. An epidemiological study for the reduction of population radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamo, Makoto

    1989-01-01

    The correlation of tube voltage with patient exposure was studied using effective dose as an indicator of dose reduction in intraoral radiography. The results were as follows: l. The salivary gland tissues contributed the most to the effective dose of intraoral radiography. 2. In the 50 to 90 kV range, there was no appreciable correlation between tube voltage and effective dose. 3. Therefore, it was suggested that adjusting the tube voltage for maximum image quality does not effect radiation protection. 4. This study reconfirmed the fact that increases in voltages up to 90 kV reduce skin doses. (author)

  11. Dose estimates in Japan following the Chernobyl reactor accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Togawa, Orihiko; Homma, Toshimitsu; Iijima, Toshinori; Midorikawa, Yuji.

    1988-02-01

    Estimates have been made of the maximum individual doses and the collective doses in Japan following the Chernobyl reactor accident. Based on the measured data of ground deposition and radionuclide concentrations in air, raw milk, milk on sale and leafy vegetables, the doses from some significant radionuclides were calculated for 5 typical exposure pathways; cloudshine, groundshine, inhalation, ingestion of milk and leafy vegetables. The maximum effective dose equivalents for hypothetical individuals were calculated to be 1.8 mrem for adults, 3.7 mrem for children and 6.0 mrem for infants. The collective effective dose equivalent in Japan was estimated to be 5.8 x 10 4 man · rem; 0.50 mrem of the average dose per capita. (author)

  12. When is a dose not a dose?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, Patrick

    1992-01-01

    There is confusion over radiation dose limits between the International Commission on Radiological Protection, the National Radiological Protection Board and the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (MAFF), reports a Friends of the Earth's radiation campaigner. MAFF is suggesting the inadequate ICRP public dose limit does not apply to public exposures which arise from environmental contamination from past radioactive discharges. (author)

  13. Variation of long-period stacking order structures in rapidly solidified Mg97Zn1Y2 alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, M.; Ii, S.; Kawamura, Y.; Ikuhara, Y.; Nishida, M.

    2005-01-01

    The long-period stacking order (LPSO) structures in rapidly solidified Mg 97 Zn 1 Y 2 alloy have been studied by conventional and high-resolution transmission electron microscopes (HRTEMs). There are four kinds of stacking sequences in the LPSO structures, i.e., 18R of ABABABCACACABCBCBC, 14H of ACBCBABABABCBC, 10H of ABACBCBCAB and 24R of ABABABABCACACACABCBCBCBC. The 18R structure is dominantly observed in the present study. The rest three are occasionally observed in places. The 10H and 24R structures are recently discovered. The lattice constants of 18R(1-bar 1-bar -bar 1-bar 1-bar -bar 2) 3 , 14H(2-bar -bar 1-bar 2-bar -bar 1-bar 1-bar -bar 1-bar 1-bar -bar 2-bar 1-bar -bar 2), 10H(1-bar 3-bar -bar 1-bar 1-bar -bar 3-bar 1-bar ) and 24R(1-bar 1-bar -bar 1-bar 1-bar -bar 1-bar 1-bar -bar 2) 3 structures are estimated to be a=0.320nm and c=4.678nm, a=0.325nm and c=3.694nm, a=0.325nm and c=2.603nm, a=0.322nm and c=6.181nm for the hexagonal structure, respectively

  14. CONSTITUYENTES VOLÁTILES DE DOS VARIEDADES DE GUAYABA (Psidium guajava L.: Palmira ICA-1 y Glum Sali

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara E Quijano C

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Los constituyentes volátiles de la pulpa de dos variedades de guayaba (Psidium guajava L (Palmira ICA-1 y Glum Salí, fueron obtenidos por extracción L-L (pentano: diclorometano 1:1; los extractos concentrados se fraccionaron por Cromatografía de Columna y se analizaron por CGAR Y CGAR-EM. De la variedad Palmira - ICA-1 se identificaron 86 compuestos, siendo mayoritarios el acetato de cinamilo, el acetato de (Z 3-hexenilo y el alcohol cinnamílico. En la variedad Glum Sali, se determinaron 77 constituyentes, de los cuales predominaron cuantitativamente el (E-2-hexenal, el hexanal y el tetradecano. La principal diferencia en la composición de volátiles entre las dos variedades es el alto contenido de esteres en la primera variedad, mientras que en la Glum Sali predominaron los hidrocarburos y los aldehidos C(,. De los compuestos volátiles identificados en este trabajo, la 4- hidroxi-4-metil-2-pentanona, la 3-heptanona, el 3-hidroxibutanoato de etilo, el acetato de 2-hidroxietilo, el 1,2-propanodiol, el 1,2-etanodiol, el acetato de 3-metilbutilo y el 3-metil-2 butanol son reportados por primera vez como constituyentes del aroma de guayaba.

  15. Magnetic susceptibilities of Ca/sub y/U/sub 1-y/O/sub 2+x/ solid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinatsu, Y.; Fujino, T.

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic susceptibilities of Ca/sub y/U/sub 1-y/O/sub 2+x/ solid solutions with fluorite structure were measured from 4.2 K to room temperature. An antiferromagnetic transition was observed for all the solid solutions examined in this study (y ≤ 0.33). The Neel temperature of the oxygen-hypostoichiometric solid solutions (x 2 solid solutions, but different from that of (U,Th)O 2 solid solutions. The effective magnetic moment decreased with increasing calcium concentration, which indicates the oxidation of uranium in the solid solutions. From the analysis of the magnetic susceptibility data, it was found that the oxidation state of uranium was either tetravalent or pentavalent. The Neel temperature of the hyperstoichiometric solid solutions (x > 0) did not change appreciably with calcium concentrations. From the comparison of the magnetic susceptibility data of the hypostoichiometric solid solutions with those of the hyperstoichiometric solid solutions, the effect of oxygen vacancies is more significant than that of interstitial oxygens on the decrease of magnetic interactions between uranium ions

  16. Synthesis, characterization, and photo-physical properties of nano-crystallites of CdyZn1-yS semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cizeron, Joel

    1996-01-01

    This research thesis reports the study of the synthesis of particles of semiconductor with a hybrid composition (Cd y Zn 1-y S) in an inverse micellar system. This system is made of nano-scopic water droplets suspended in oil by Brownian movement. Inverse micelles of AOT/water/alkane have been successfully used in laboratory to synthesize semiconductor particles (CdS, Ag 2 S, AgI, PbS) and metallic particles (Ag, Cu, Co) with a diameter of few nanometers. The objective has been to demonstrate the feasibility of synthesises of solid solution with a composition controlled by colloidal techniques. It was then possible to identify new information on the mechanism which governs the size of semiconductor particles. Optical properties of these particles were then studied. These nano-particles exhibit a displacement of their exciton towards high energies; it is the so-called size quantum effect. This effect has been analysed for the particles and their fluorescence [fr

  17. Accurate modeling and maximum power point detection of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Accurate modeling and maximum power point detection of photovoltaic ... Determination of MPP enables the PV system to deliver maximum available power. ..... adaptive artificial neural network: Proposition for a new sizing procedure.

  18. Maximum power per VA control of vector controlled interior ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Thakur Sumeet Singh

    2018-04-11

    Apr 11, 2018 ... Department of Electrical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New ... The MPVA operation allows maximum-utilization of the drive-system. ... Permanent magnet motor; unity power factor; maximum VA utilization; ...

  19. Electron density distribution in Si and Ge using multipole, maximum ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Si and Ge has been studied using multipole, maximum entropy method (MEM) and ... and electron density distribution using the currently available versatile ..... data should be subjected to maximum possible utility for the characterization of.

  20. An updated dose assessment for Rongelap Island

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robison, W.L.; Conrado, C.L.; Bogen, K.T.

    1994-07-01

    We have updated the radiological dose assessment for Rongelap Island at Rongelap Atoll using data generated from field trips to the atoll during 1986 through 1993. The data base used for this dose assessment is ten fold greater than that available for the 1982 assessment. Details of each data base are presented along with details about the methods used to calculate the dose from each exposure pathway. The doses are calculated for a resettlement date of January 1, 1995. The maximum annual effective dose is 0.26 mSv y{sup {minus}1} (26 mrem y{sup {minus}1}). The estimated 30-, 50-, and 70-y integral effective doses are 0.0059 Sv (0.59 rem), 0.0082 Sv (0.82 rem), and 0.0097 Sv (0.97 rem), respectively. More than 95% of these estimated doses are due to 137-Cesium ({sup 137}Cs). About 1.5% of the estimated dose is contributed by 90-Strontium ({sup 90}Sr), and about the same amount each by 239+240-Plutonium ({sup 239+240}PU), and 241-Americium ({sup 241}Am).

  1. 40 CFR 141.13 - Maximum contaminant levels for turbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... turbidity. 141.13 Section 141.13 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER... Maximum contaminant levels for turbidity. The maximum contaminant levels for turbidity are applicable to... part. The maximum contaminant levels for turbidity in drinking water, measured at a representative...

  2. Maximum Power Training and Plyometrics for Cross-Country Running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebben, William P.

    2001-01-01

    Provides a rationale for maximum power training and plyometrics as conditioning strategies for cross-country runners, examining: an evaluation of training methods (strength training and maximum power training and plyometrics); biomechanic and velocity specificity (role in preventing injury); and practical application of maximum power training and…

  3. 13 CFR 107.840 - Maximum term of Financing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maximum term of Financing. 107.840... COMPANIES Financing of Small Businesses by Licensees Structuring Licensee's Financing of An Eligible Small Business: Terms and Conditions of Financing § 107.840 Maximum term of Financing. The maximum term of any...

  4. 7 CFR 3565.210 - Maximum interest rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maximum interest rate. 3565.210 Section 3565.210... AGRICULTURE GUARANTEED RURAL RENTAL HOUSING PROGRAM Loan Requirements § 3565.210 Maximum interest rate. The interest rate for a guaranteed loan must not exceed the maximum allowable rate specified by the Agency in...

  5. Characterizing graphs of maximum matching width at most 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeong, Jisu; Ok, Seongmin; Suh, Geewon

    2017-01-01

    The maximum matching width is a width-parameter that is de ned on a branch-decomposition over the vertex set of a graph. The size of a maximum matching in the bipartite graph is used as a cut-function. In this paper, we characterize the graphs of maximum matching width at most 2 using the minor o...

  6. Estimation of eye lens doses received by pediatric interventional cardiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alejo, L; Koren, C; Ferrer, C; Corredoira, E; Serrada, A

    2015-09-01

    Maximum Hp(0.07) dose to the eye lens received in a year by the pediatric interventional cardiologists has been estimated. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters were placed on the eyes of an anthropomorphic phantom, whose position in the room simulates the most common irradiation conditions. Maximum workload was considered with data collected from procedures performed in the Hospital. None of the maximum values obtained exceed the dose limit of 20 mSv recommended by ICRP. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Local application of zoledronate for maximum anchorage during space closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Adam J A J; Campbell, Phillip M; Hinton, Robert; Naidu, Aparna; Buschang, Peter H

    2012-12-01

    Orthodontists have used various compliance-dependent physical means such as headgears and intraoral appliances to prevent anchorage loss. The aim of this study was to determine whether 1 local application of the bisphosphonate zoledronate could be used to prevent anchorage loss during extraction space closure in rats. Thirty rats had their maxillary left first molars extracted and their maxillary left second molars protracted into the extraction space with a 10-g nickel-titanium closing coil for 21 days. Fifteen control rats received a local injection of phosphate-buffered saline solution, and 15 experimental rats received 16 μg of the bisphosphonate zoledronate. Bisphosphonate was also delivered directly into the extraction site and left undisturbed for 5 minutes. Cephalograms and incremental thickness gauges were used to measure tooth movements. Tissues were analyzed by microcomputed tomography and histology. The control group demonstrated significant (P <0.05) tooth movements throughout the 21-day period. They showed significantly greater tooth movements than the experimental group beginning in the second week. The experimental group showed no significant tooth movement after the first week. The microcomputed tomography and histologic observations showed significant bone loss in the extraction sites and around the second molars of the controls. In contrast, the experimental group had bone preservation and bone fill. There was no evidence of bisphosphonate-associated osteonecrosis in any sample. A single small, locally applied dose of zoledronate provided maximum anchorage and prevented significant bone loss. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Estimated radiation dose from timepieces containing tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDowell-Boyer, L.M.

    1980-01-01

    Luminescent timepieces containing radioactive tritium, either in elemental form or incorporated into paint, are available to the general public. The purpose of this study was to estimate potential radiation dose commitments received by the public annually as a result of exposure to tritium which may escape from the timepieces during their distribution, use, repair, and disposal. Much uncertainty is associated with final dose estimates due to limitations of empirical data from which exposure parameters were derived. Maximum individual dose estimates were generally less than 3 μSv/yr, but ranged up to 2 mSv under worst-case conditions postulated. Estimated annual collective (population) doses were less than 5 person/Sv per million timepieces distributed

  9. Radiation dose to the global flying population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, Luis E; Eastham, Sebastian D; Barrett, Steven R H

    2016-01-01

    Civil airliner passengers and crew are exposed to elevated levels of radiation relative to being at sea level. Previous studies have assessed the radiation dose received in particular cases or for cohort studies. Here we present the first estimate of the total radiation dose received by the worldwide civilian flying population. We simulated flights globally from 2000 to 2013 using schedule data, applying a radiation propagation code to estimate the dose associated with each flight. Passengers flying in Europe and North America exceed the International Commission on Radiological Protection annual dose limits at an annual average of 510 or 420 flight hours per year, respectively. However, this falls to 160 or 120 h on specific routes under maximum exposure conditions. (paper)

  10. The survey of the surface doses of the dental x-ray machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae Seo; Kang, Byung Cheol; Yoon, Suk Ja

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate variability of doses with same exposure parameters and evaluate radiographic density according to the variability of doses. Twenty-eight MAX-GLS (Shinhung Co, Seoul, Korea), twenty-one D-60-S (DongSeo Med, Seoul, Korea), and eleven REX-601 (Yoshida Dental MFG, Tokyo, Japan) dental x-ray machines were selected for this study. Surface doses were measured under selected combinations of tube voltage, tube current, exposure time, and constant distance 42 cm from the focal spot to the surface of the Multi-O-meter (Unfors Instrument, Billdal, Sweden). Radiographic densities were measured on the films at maximum, minimum and mean surface doses of each brand of x-ray units. With MAX-GLS, the maximum surface doses were thirteen to fourteen times as much as the minimum surfaces doses. With D-60-S, the maximum surface doses were three to eight times as much as the minimum surface doses. With REX-601, the maximum surface doses were six to ten times as much as the minimum surface doses. The differences in radiographic densities among maximum, mean, and minimum doses were significant (p<0.01). The surface exposure doses of each x-ray machine at the same exposure parameters were different within the same manufacturer's machines.

  11. Dose-rate effects of low-dropout voltage regulator at various biases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yiyuan; Zheng Yuzhan; Gao Bo; Chen Rui; Fei Wuxiong; Lu Wu; Ren Diyuan

    2010-01-01

    A low-dropout voltage regulator, LM2941, was irradiated by 60 Co γ-rays at various dose rates and biases for investigating the total dose and dose rate effects. The radiation responses show that the key electrical parameters, including its output and dropout voltage, and the maximum output current, are sensitive to total dose and dose rates, and are significantly degraded at low dose rate and zero bias. The integrated circuits damage change with the dose rates and biases, and the dose-rate effects are relative to its electric field. (authors)

  12. Gradiente de riesgo genético HLA-DQ para diabetes tipo 1 y enfermedad celíaca en el noroeste de México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.E. Mejía-León

    2015-04-01

    Conclusión: Los sonorenses tienen una distribución de alelos HLA-DQ distintiva debido a su ascendencia. Las combinaciones del HLA-DQ8 con DQ2 o uno de sus alelos confirieron el máximo riesgo para ambas enfermedades. La DT1 y EC frecuentemente se presentan juntas.

  13. Bone mineral density and bone markers in patients with a recent low-energy fracture: effect of 1 y of treatment with calcium and vitamin D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hitz, Mette F; Jensen, Jens-Erik B; Eskildsen, Peter C

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low-energy fractures of the hip, forearm, shoulder, and spine are known consequences of osteoporosis. OBJECTIVE: We evaluated the effect of 1 y of treatment with calcium and vitamin D on bone mineral density (BMD) and bone markers in patients with a recent low-energy fracture. DESIGN...

  14. Radiation exposure during paediatric CT in Sudan: CT dose, organ and effective doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suliman, I.I.; Khamis, H.M.; Ombada, T.H.; Alzimami, K.; Alkhorayef, M.; Sulieman, A.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the magnitude of radiation exposure during paediatric CT in Sudanese hospitals. Doses were determined from CT acquisition parameters using CT-Expo 2.1 dosimetry software. Doses were evaluated for three patient ages (0-1, 1-5 and 5-10 y) and two common procedures (head and abdomen). For children aged 0-1 y, volume CT air kerma index (C vol ), air Kerma-length product and effective dose (E) values were 19.1 mGy, 265 mGy.cm and 3.1 mSv, respectively, at head CT and those at abdominal CT were 8.8 mGy, 242 mGy.cm and 7.7 mSv, respectively. Those for children aged 1-5 y were 22.5 mGy, 305 mGy.cm and 1.1 mSv, respectively, at head CT and 12.6 mGy, 317 mGy.cm, and 5.1 mSv, respectively, at abdominal CT. Dose values and variations were comparable with those reported in the literature. Organ equivalent doses vary from 7.5 to 11.6 mSv for testes, from 9.0 to 10.0 mSv for ovaries and from 11.1 to 14.3 mSv for uterus in abdominal CT. The results are useful for dose optimisation and derivation of national diagnostic reference levels. (authors)

  15. 40 CFR 1042.140 - Maximum engine power, displacement, power density, and maximum in-use engine speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... cylinders having an internal diameter of 13.0 cm and a 15.5 cm stroke length, the rounded displacement would... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Maximum engine power, displacement... Maximum engine power, displacement, power density, and maximum in-use engine speed. This section describes...

  16. Fully automated treatment planning for head and neck radiotherapy using a voxel-based dose prediction and dose mimicking method

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Chris; Welch, Mattea; McNiven, Andrea; Jaffray, David A.; Purdie, Thomas G.

    2017-08-01

    Recent works in automated radiotherapy treatment planning have used machine learning based on historical treatment plans to infer the spatial dose distribution for a novel patient directly from the planning image. We present a probabilistic, atlas-based approach which predicts the dose for novel patients using a set of automatically selected most similar patients (atlases). The output is a spatial dose objective, which specifies the desired dose-per-voxel, and therefore replaces the need to specify and tune dose-volume objectives. Voxel-based dose mimicking optimization then converts the predicted dose distribution to a complete treatment plan with dose calculation using a collapsed cone convolution dose engine. In this study, we investigated automated planning for right-sided oropharaynx head and neck patients treated with IMRT and VMAT. We compare four versions of our dose prediction pipeline using a database of 54 training and 12 independent testing patients by evaluating 14 clinical dose evaluation criteria. Our preliminary results are promising and demonstrate that automated methods can generate comparable dose distributions to clinical. Overall, automated plans achieved an average of 0.6% higher dose for target coverage evaluation criteria, and 2.4% lower dose at the organs at risk criteria levels evaluated compared with clinical. There was no statistically significant difference detected in high-dose conformity between automated and clinical plans as measured by the conformation number. Automated plans achieved nine more unique criteria than clinical across the 12 patients tested and automated plans scored a significantly higher dose at the evaluation limit for two high-risk target coverage criteria and a significantly lower dose in one critical organ maximum dose. The novel dose prediction method with dose mimicking can generate complete treatment plans in 12-13 min without user interaction. It is a promising approach for fully automated treatment

  17. Insignificant levels of dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, G.A.M.; McLean, A.S.

    1977-01-01

    The procedures recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) for making decisions concerning controllable sources of radiation exposure of the public include 'justification' and 'optimisation'. The tool recommended by the ICRP for reaching these decisions is collective dose or dose commitment supplemented by consideration of doses to individuals. In both these considerations the practical problem arises of whether very small doses to large numbers of people should contribute to the final decision-making process. It may be that at levels of dose which are small increments on natural background, the relationship between dose and effect is linear even though the slope may be close to zero. If so, collective dose is a meaningful concept and the calculation of total detriment for the purpose of justification could legitimately include all doses. In the calculation of collective doses for the purpose of optimisation, which involves decisions on how much money or resource should be allocated to dose reduction, it is necessary to appraise radiation detriment realistically. At low levels of dose to the individual such as those small by comparison with variations in natural background within the UK, the risk to the individual is such that his well-being will not be significantly changed by the presence or absence of the radiation dose. These small doses, which are well below the point at which an individual attaches significance, should not carry a societal significance. Societal acceptance of risk is analysed with a view to assessing a level of possible risk, and hence dose, below which resources should not in general be diverted to secure further reduction. A formulation for collective dose commitment is proposed incorporating a cut-off to exclude insignificant doses. The implications of this formulation in practical situations are discussed

  18. The maximum entropy production and maximum Shannon information entropy in enzyme kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobovišek, Andrej; Markovič, Rene; Brumen, Milan; Fajmut, Aleš

    2018-04-01

    We demonstrate that the maximum entropy production principle (MEPP) serves as a physical selection principle for the description of the most probable non-equilibrium steady states in simple enzymatic reactions. A theoretical approach is developed, which enables maximization of the density of entropy production with respect to the enzyme rate constants for the enzyme reaction in a steady state. Mass and Gibbs free energy conservations are considered as optimization constraints. In such a way computed optimal enzyme rate constants in a steady state yield also the most uniform probability distribution of the enzyme states. This accounts for the maximal Shannon information entropy. By means of the stability analysis it is also demonstrated that maximal density of entropy production in that enzyme reaction requires flexible enzyme structure, which enables rapid transitions between different enzyme states. These results are supported by an example, in which density of entropy production and Shannon information entropy are numerically maximized for the enzyme Glucose Isomerase.

  19. Solar Maximum Mission Experiment - Ultraviolet Spectroscopy and Polarimetry on the Solar Maximum Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandberg-Hanssen, E.; Cheng, C. C.; Woodgate, B. E.; Brandt, J. C.; Chapman, R. D.; Athay, R. G.; Beckers, J. M.; Bruner, E. C.; Gurman, J. B.; Hyder, C. L.

    1981-01-01

    The Ultraviolet Spectrometer and Polarimeter on the Solar Maximum Mission spacecraft is described. It is pointed out that the instrument, which operates in the wavelength range 1150-3600 A, has a spatial resolution of 2-3 arcsec and a spectral resolution of 0.02 A FWHM in second order. A Gregorian telescope, with a focal length of 1.8 m, feeds a 1 m Ebert-Fastie spectrometer. A polarimeter comprising rotating Mg F2 waveplates can be inserted behind the spectrometer entrance slit; it permits all four Stokes parameters to be determined. Among the observing modes are rasters, spectral scans, velocity measurements, and polarimetry. Examples of initial observations made since launch are presented.

  20. Electrical conductivity and reaction with lithium of LiFe{sub 1-y}Mn{sub y}PO{sub 4} olivine-type cathode materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molenda, J.; Ojczyk, W.; Marzec, J. [Faculty of Materials Science and Ceramics, AGH University of Science and Technology, al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Krakow (Poland)

    2007-12-06

    Structural, electrical and electrochemical properties of Mn-substituted phospho-olivines LiFe{sub 1-y}Mn{sub y}PO{sub 4} were investigated and compared to those of LiFePO{sub 4}. Rietvield refined XRD patterns taken in the course of delithiation process showed apparent difference between phase compositions of these cathode materials upon lithium extraction. Contrary to the LiFePO{sub 4} and LiMnPO{sub 4} compositions for which a two-phase mechanism of electrochemical lithium extraction/insertion is observed, in case of Mn-substituted LiFe{sub 1-y}Mn{sub y}PO{sub 4} samples a single-phase mechanism of deintercalation was observed in the studied range of lithium concentration. Electrochemical characterization of the cathode materials were performed in Li/Li{sup +}/Li{sub x}Fe{sub 1-y}Mn{sub y}PO{sub 4}-type cells for y = 0.0, 0.25, 0.55, 0.75 and 1.0 compositions. Voltammery studies showed low reversibility of the lithium extraction process in the high-voltage ''manganese'' range, while in the ''iron'' range the reversibility of lithium extraction is high. Impedance measurements of the LiFe{sub 1-y}Mn{sub y}PO{sub 4} cathode materials, which enabled separation of the ionic and electronic components of their entire electrical conductivity, showed distinct influence of Mn content on the electronic part of conductivity. EIS measurements performed at different states of cell charge revealed that the charge-transfer impedance in Li{sub x}Fe{sub 1-y}Mn{sub y}PO{sub 4} is much lower than that of Li{sub x}FePO{sub 4}. (author)

  1. Exposure doses to angiographers during interventional angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukutomi, Yukimi; Yasuhara, Yoshifumi; Sugata, Shigenori; Fujii, Takashi; Kawakami, Toshiaki; Ikezoe, Junpei

    1997-01-01

    We report the exposure doses to angiographers during interventional angiography and the protective efficacy of protective aprons against X-rays in this study. The first (main) angiographer was exposed to the maximum dose of 1 μSv/min at the left chest area and lower abdominal area inside the protective apron. The second (assistant) angiographer was exposed to the maximum dose of 2 μSv/min at the left chest area and 1 μSv/min at the lower abdominal area. X-ray transmission ratio of the protective apron was 4.9 percent or less for UL25L, O percent for 0.35 mmPb and 4.3 percent or less for 0.5 mmPb. These results were lower than the dose equivalent limit based on the laws and ordinances. The protection capacities of these protective aprons proved to be sufficient. The exposure dose at the left extremity area outside the protective apron, however, was 24 times higher than at the left chest area inside. The data showed that it was not protected from scattered X-rays outside the protective apron. It is imperative to consider secondary protective material for the area outside the protective apron. Considering the risk of radiation, we need to better control exposure to angiographers. (author)

  2. Gonad doses in biliary tract examinations (cholecystography)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radtke, I [Staedtisches Klinikum Berlin-Buch (German Democratic Republic). Roentgendiagnostisches Zentrum; Angerstein, W [Forschungsinstitut fuer Tuberkulose und Lungenkrankheiten, Berlin (German Democratic Republic); Koenig, W; Menzel, B [Staatliches Amt fuer Atomsicherheit und Strahlenschutz, Berlin (German Democratic Republic)

    1979-02-01

    622 single measurements of gonad doses were performed during cholecystography in patients of either sex (intravaginally in women). In oral cholecystography on an average 13 mR were revealed for men and 149 mR for women, resp. According to a minimum, medium, or maximum extent of examination, in intravenous cholecystography the data for men were 11, 17, and 24 mR, while the corresponding data for women were 93, 185, and 278 mR. Based on about 400,000 cholegraphic examinations per year in the GDR the contribution to the total gonad dose caused by radiological examinations is 6-8%.

  3. Gonad doses in biliary tract examinations (cholecystography)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radtke, I.; Koenig, W.; Menzel, B.

    1979-01-01

    622 single measurements of gonad doses were performed during cholecystography in patients of either sex (intravaginally in women). In oral cholecystography on an average 13 mR were revealed for men and 149 mR for women, resp. According to a minimum, medium, or maximum extent of examination, in intravenous cholecystography the data for men were 11, 17, and 24 mR, while the corresponding data for women were 93, 185, and 278 mR. Based on about 400,000 cholegraphic examinations per year in the GDR the contribution to the total gonad dose caused by radiological examinations is 6-8%. (author)

  4. Total dose meter development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brackenbush, L.W.

    1986-09-01

    This report describes an alarming ''pocket'' monitor/dosimeter, based on a tissue-equivalent proportional counter, that measure both neutron and gamma dose and determines dose equivalent for the mixed radiation field. This report details the operation of the device and provides information on: the necessity for a device to measure dose equivalent in mixed radiation fields; the mathematical theory required to determine dose equivalent from tissue equivalent proportional; the detailed electronic circuits required; the algorithms required in the microprocessor used to calculate dose equivalent; the features of the instrument; program accomplishments and future plans

  5. Dose reader CD-02

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakowiuk, A.; Kaluska, I.; Machaj, B.

    2005-01-01

    Dose Reader CD-02 is designed for measurement of dose from a long narrow band of dosimetric foil used for check up and control of electron beam dose during sterilization of materials and products on conveyor belt. Irradiated foil after processing (heating) is inserted into foil driving (moving) system and when the foil is moved across focused light beam the absorbed dose is measured and displayed at the same time at computer monitor (in form of a diagram). The absorbed dose is measured on the principle of light attenuation at selected light wavelength (foil absorbance is measured). (author)

  6. Dose conversion factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocher, D.C.; Eckerman, K.F.

    1992-01-01

    The following is discussed in this report: concepts and quantities used in calculating radiation dose from internal and external exposure. Tabulations of dose conversion factor for internal and external exposure to radionuclides. Dose conversion factors give dose per unit intake (internal) or dose per unit concentration in environment (external). Intakes of radionuclides for internal exposure and concentrations of radionuclides in environment for external exposure are assumed to be known. Intakes and concentrations are obtained, e.g., from analyses of environmental transport and exposure pathways. differences between dosimetry methods for radionuclides and hazardous chemicals are highlighted

  7. The usefulness of metal markers for CTV-based dose prescription in high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Ken; Mitomo, Masanori; Nose, Takayuki; Koizumi, Masahiko; Nishiyama, Kinji; Yoshida, Mineo

    2002-01-01

    We employ a clinical target volume (CTV)-based dose prescription for high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy. However, it is not easy to define CTV and organs at risk (OAR) from X-ray film or CT scanning. To solve this problem, we have utilized metal markers since October 1999. Moreover, metal markers can help modify dose prescription. By regulating the doses to the metal markers, refining the dose prescription can easily be achieved. In this research, we investigated the usefulness of the metal markers. Between October 1999 and May 2001, 51 patients were implanted with metal markers at Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases (OMCC), Osaka National Hospital (ONH) and Sanda City Hospital (SCH). Forty-nine patients (head and neck: 32; pelvis: 11; soft tissue: 3; breast: 3) using metal markers were analyzed. During operation, we implanted 179 metal markers (49 patients) to CTV and 151 markers (26 patients) to OAR. At treatment planning, CTV was reconstructed judging from the metal markers, applicator position and operation records. Generally, we prescribed the tumoricidal dose to an isodose surface that covers CTV. We also planned to limit the doses to OAR lower than certain levels. The maximum normal tissue doses were decided 80%, 150%, 100%, 50% and 200% of the prescribed doses for the rectum, the urethra, the mandible, the skin and the large vessel, respectively. The doses to the metal markers using CTV-based dose prescription were generated. These were compared with the doses theoretically calculated with the Paris system. Treatment results were also investigated. The doses to the 158 metal markers (42 patients) for CTV were higher than ''tumoricidal dose''. In 7 patients, as a result of compromised dose prescription, 9 markers were lower than the tumoricidal dose. The other 12 markers (7%) were excluded from dose evaluation because they were judged as miss-implanted. The doses to the 142 metal markers (24 patients) for OAR were lower

  8. Reducing dose to the lungs through loosing target dose homogeneity requirement for radiotherapy of non small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Junjie; Yan, Hui; Tian, Yuan; Ma, Pan; Liu, Zhiqiang; Li, Minghui; Ren, Wenting; Chen, Jiayun; Zhang, Ye; Dai, Jianrong

    2017-11-01

    It is important to minimize lung dose during intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) of nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In this study, an approach was proposed to reduce lung dose by relaxing the constraint of target dose homogeneity during treatment planning of IMRT. Ten NSCLC patients with lung tumor on the right side were selected. The total dose for planning target volume (PTV) was 60 Gy (2 Gy/fraction). For each patient, two IMRT plans with six beams were created in Pinnacle treatment planning system. The dose homogeneity of target was controlled by constraints on the maximum and uniform doses of target volume. One IMRT plan was made with homogeneous target dose (the resulting target dose was within 95%-107% of the prescribed dose), while another IMRT plan was made with inhomogeneous target dose (the resulting target dose was more than 95% of the prescribed dose). During plan optimization, the dose of cord and heart in two types of IMRT plans were kept nearly the same. The doses of lungs, PTV and organs at risk (OARs) between two types of IMRT plans were compared and analyzed quantitatively. For all patients, the lung dose was decreased in the IMRT plans with inhomogeneous target dose. On average, the mean dose, V5, V20, and V30 of lung were reduced by 1.4 Gy, 4.8%, 3.7%, and 1.7%, respectively, and the dose to normal tissue was also reduced. These reductions in DVH values were all statistically significant (P target dose could protect lungs better and may be considered as a choice for treating NSCLC. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  9. Microprocessor Controlled Maximum Power Point Tracker for Photovoltaic Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiya, J. D.; Tahirou, G.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a microprocessor controlled maximum power point tracker for photovoltaic module. Input current and voltage are measured and multiplied within the microprocessor, which contains an algorithm to seek the maximum power point. The duly cycle of the DC-DC converter, at which the maximum power occurs is obtained, noted and adjusted. The microprocessor constantly seeks for improvement of obtained power by varying the duty cycle

  10. MEGA5: Molecular Evolutionary Genetics Analysis Using Maximum Likelihood, Evolutionary Distance, and Maximum Parsimony Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Koichiro; Peterson, Daniel; Peterson, Nicholas; Stecher, Glen; Nei, Masatoshi; Kumar, Sudhir

    2011-01-01

    Comparative analysis of molecular sequence data is essential for reconstructing the evolutionary histories of species and inferring the nature and extent of selective forces shaping the evolution of genes and species. Here, we announce the release of Molecular Evolutionary Genetics Analysis version 5 (MEGA5), which is a user-friendly software for mining online databases, building sequence alignments and phylogenetic trees, and using methods of evolutionary bioinformatics in basic biology, biomedicine, and evolution. The newest addition in MEGA5 is a collection of maximum likelihood (ML) analyses for inferring evolutionary trees, selecting best-fit substitution models (nucleotide or amino acid), inferring ancestral states and sequences (along with probabilities), and estimating evolutionary rates site-by-site. In computer simulation analyses, ML tree inference algorithms in MEGA5 compared favorably with other software packages in terms of computational efficiency and the accuracy of the estimates of phylogenetic trees, substitution parameters, and rate variation among sites. The MEGA user interface has now been enhanced to be activity driven to make it easier for the use of both beginners and experienced scientists. This version of MEGA is intended for the Windows platform, and it has been configured for effective use on Mac OS X and Linux desktops. It is available free of charge from http://www.megasoftware.net. PMID:21546353

  11. Cumulative radiation dose of multiple trauma patients during their hospitalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhikang; Sun Jianzhong; Zhao Zudan

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To study the cumulative radiation dose of multiple trauma patients during their hospitalization and to analyze the dose influence factors. Methods: The DLP for CT and DR were retrospectively collected from the patients during June, 2009 and April, 2011 at a university affiliated hospital. The cumulative radiation doses were calculated by summing typical effective doses of the anatomic regions scanned. Results: The cumulative radiation doses of 113 patients were collected. The maximum,minimum and the mean values of cumulative effective doses were 153.3, 16.48 mSv and (52.3 ± 26.6) mSv. Conclusions: Multiple trauma patients have high cumulative radiation exposure. Therefore, the management of cumulative radiation doses should be enhanced. To establish the individualized radiation exposure archives will be helpful for the clinicians and technicians to make decision whether to image again and how to select the imaging parameters. (authors)

  12. Required accuracy and dose thresholds in individual monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, P.; Griffith, R.V.

    1994-01-01

    this uncertainty factor, a value of 21% can be evaluated for the allowable maximum overall standard deviation for dose measurements at dose levels near the annual dose limits increasing to 45% for dose levels at the lower end of the dose range required to be monitored. A method is described for evaluating...... the overall standard deviation of the dosimetry system by combining random and systematic uncertainties in quadrature, and procedures are also given for determining each individual uncertainty connected to the dose measurement. In particular, attention is paid to the evaluation of the combined uncertainty due...... to energy and angular dependencies of the dosemeter. In type testing of personal dosimetry systems, the estimated overall standard deviation of the dosimetry system is the main parameter to be tested. An important characteristic of a personal dosimetry system is its capability of measuring low doses...

  13. Nanocrystalline La1-xSrxCo1-yFe yO3 perovskites fabricated by the micro-emulsion route for high frequency response devices fabrications

    KAUST Repository

    Azhar Khan, Muhammad

    2014-09-01

    Nanocrystalline La1-xSrxCo1-yFe yO3 (x=0.00-0.60) perovskites were fabricated by a cheap economic route (i.e. micro-emulsion method) and characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). TGA analysis showed ~35% weight loss. The crystallite size determined by XRD and SEM ranged from 30 to 80 nm and ~30 to 50 nm, respectively. The dielectric behavior was evaluated in the range of 1.0×106 Hz to 3.0×10 9 Hz at 298 K, the dielectric parameters resulting appreciably enhanced by co-doping with Sr and Fe. The maximum dielectric parameters (ε′=103.35, ε″=58.92 and tan δ=0.57) were observed for La0.4Sr0.6Co0.4Fe0.6O 3 at 15×106 Hz. Results suggest the potential use of these nanocrystalline perovskites in GHz-operated microwave devices. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and Techna Group S.r.l.

  14. Specific considerations for obtaining appropriate La1-xSrxGa1-yMgyO3-δ thin films using pulsed-laser deposition and its influence on the performance of solid-oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jaeyeon; Lee, Heon; Lee, Jong-Ho; Yoon, Kyung Joong; Kim, Hyoungchul; Hong, Jongsup; Son, Ji-Won

    2015-01-01

    To obtain La1-xSrxGa1-yMgyO3-δ (LSGM) thin films with the appropriate properties, pulsed-laser deposition (PLD) is employed, and specific considerations regarding control of the deposition parameters is investigated. It is demonstrated that with a target of stoichiometric composition, appropriate LSGM thin films cannot be produced because of the deviation of the composition from the target to the thin film. Only after adjusting the target composition an LSGM thin film with an appropriate composition and phase can be obtained. The optimized LSGM thin film possesses an electrical conductivity close to that of the bulk LSGM. In contrast, non-optimized thin films do not yield any measurable electrical conductivity. The impact of the optimization of the LSGM thin-film electrolyte on the cell performance is quite significant, in that a solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) with an optimized LSGM thin-film electrolyte produces a maximum power density of 1.1 W cm-2 at 600 °C, whereas an SOFC with a non-optimal LSGM thin-film electrolyte is not operable.

  15. Radiation doses from residual radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okajima, Shunzo; Fujita, Shoichiro; Harley, John H.

    1987-01-01

    In this chapter available data and calculations for assessing the exposure of survivors of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombs and persons who entered the cities after the bombings have been presented. It appears that it is possible to produce firm estimates only for external radiation and, while the internal contribution for long-lived fission products appears small, there is no way to evaluate potential exposures to the short-lived fission products. The radiation exposure in the most highly contaminated fallout area of a few hectares at Nishiyama, Nagasaki, is estimated as 20 to 40 R when integrated from one hour to infinity using a decay exponent of -1.2. For the Hiroshima Koi-Takasu area, the corresponding exposure is estimated as 1 to 3 R. The falloff with distance for Nagasaki is not steep and an exposure of one-fifth of the maximum is spread over an area of perhaps 1000 ha. With the assumption stated above, the potential maximum exposures to external radiation from induced radioactivity at the hypocenter is estimated to be about 80 R fir Hiroshima and 30 to 40 R for Nagasaki with the assumptions stated above. These exposures fall off with both time and distance. The cumulative exposure would be about one-third as large after a day and only a few percent after a week. The falloff with distance is less striking, but can be estimated from the areas listed or from the curves shown in Gritzner and Woolson. Unlike the fallout, which exposed individuals in their living areas, exposures to induced activity came from reentry of individuals into the area around the hypocenter. As an example, an individual entering the Hiroshima hypocenter area after one day and working 10 or 20 hours a day for a week would have been exposed to about 10 R. If the person had been working at a distance of 500 m, the exposure would have been about 1 R and, at 1000 m, about 20 mR. The exposure described apply to the specified areas in the two cities. Application of these values to individuals

  16. Personal monitoring and assessment of doses received by radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swindon, T.N.; Morris, N.D.

    1981-12-01

    The Personal Radiation Monitoring Service operated by the Australian Radiation Laboratory is outlined and the types of monitors used for assessment of doses received by radiation workers are described. The distribution of doses received by radiation workers in different occupational categories is determined. From these distributions, the average doses received have been assessed and the maximum likely additional increase in cancer deaths in Australia as a result of occupational exposure estimated. This increase is shown to be very small. There is, however, a considerable spread of doses received by individuals within occupational groups

  17. Application of a Novel Dose-Uncertainty Model for Dose-Uncertainty Analysis in Prostate Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Hosang; Palta, Jatinder R.; Kim, You-Hyun; Kim, Siyong

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze dose uncertainty using a previously published dose-uncertainty model, and to assess potential dosimetric risks existing in prostate intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: The dose-uncertainty model provides a three-dimensional (3D) dose-uncertainty distribution in a given confidence level. For 8 retrospectively selected patients, dose-uncertainty maps were constructed using the dose-uncertainty model at the 95% CL. In addition to uncertainties inherent to the radiation treatment planning system, four scenarios of spatial errors were considered: machine only (S1), S1 + intrafraction, S1 + interfraction, and S1 + both intrafraction and interfraction errors. To evaluate the potential risks of the IMRT plans, three dose-uncertainty-based plan evaluation tools were introduced: confidence-weighted dose-volume histogram, confidence-weighted dose distribution, and dose-uncertainty-volume histogram. Results: Dose uncertainty caused by interfraction setup error was more significant than that of intrafraction motion error. The maximum dose uncertainty (95% confidence) of the clinical target volume (CTV) was smaller than 5% of the prescribed dose in all but two cases (13.9% and 10.2%). The dose uncertainty for 95% of the CTV volume ranged from 1.3% to 2.9% of the prescribed dose. Conclusions: The dose uncertainty in prostate IMRT could be evaluated using the dose-uncertainty model. Prostate IMRT plans satisfying the same plan objectives could generate a significantly different dose uncertainty because a complex interplay of many uncertainty sources. The uncertainty-based plan evaluation contributes to generating reliable and error-resistant treatment plans.

  18. External radiation dose from patients received diagnostic doses of 201 T1-Chloride and 99 Tc-MIBI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dadashzadeh, S.; Sattari, A.; Nasiroghli, G.A.

    2002-01-01

    Patients receiving diagnostic doses of radiopharmaceuticals become a source of contamination and exposure for those who come in contact with them, such as nuclear medicine technologists, relatives and nurses. Therefore, the measurement of external radiation dose from these patients is necessary. In this study, the dose rates at distances of 10, 50 and 100 cm from 70 patients who received diagnostic amounts of 201 T1-Chloride and 99 Tc-MIBI was measures. The results showed that the maximum external radiation dose rates for 201 T1 and 99 Tc-MIBI were 18.4 and 75.0 μ Sv.h -1 , respectively, at 5 cm distance from the patients. The average radiation dose received by nuclear medicine technologists, considering their close contact during one working day was 12.5 ± 3.4μ Sv. The highest received dose was 22.7 μSv, which was well below the acceptable dose limit

  19. Effective dose to radon considering people's activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimo, M.; Seki, K.; Kikuchi, I.

    1992-01-01

    The tidal volume was estimated for evaluating the effective dose due to radon concentration in the atmosphere. In this study regional population was separated to vocation and non-vocation. The occupancy time and the breathing rate for both vocation and non-vocation groups were estimated, and the annual tidal volume for both groups were calculated. Human actions were separated to 18 activities in the process for estimating the breathing rate. It was clear that the breathing rate depended on human activity and that the human activity changed with its age, so the breathing rate varied with age. Finally the effective doses due to radon and radon progeny indoors and outdoors were evaluated. The maximum annual effective dose was estimated to be 1.2 mSv, minimum 0.2 mSv, and mean 0.51 mSv for vocation. For non-vocation, the male maximum value 0.43 mSv was obtained at the 16 age and the minimum 0.12 mSv at the 70 age, whereas female maximum 0.26 mSv was obtained at the 12 age and the minimum 0.11 mSv at the 70 age. In addition in this study objective areas are Aichi, Gifu, and Mie prefectures for vocation and only Aichi prefecture for non-vocation. (author)

  20. Magnetotransport, structural and optical characterization of p-type modulation doped heterostructures with high Ge content Si1-xGex channel grown by SS-MBE on Si1-yGey/Si(001) virtual substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myronov, M.

    2001-04-01

    This thesis is a report on experimental investigations of magnetotransport, structural and optical properties of p-type modulation doped (MOD) heterostructures with Si 1-x Ge x channel of high Ge content (0.6 1-y Ge y /Si(001) virtual substrate (VS). The active layers of MOD heterostructures were grown by solid source molecular beam epitaxy (SS-MBE). The VSs were grown either by SS-MBE or low-pressure chemical vapour deposition (LP-CVD). The influence of thermal annealing on magnetotransport, structural and optical properties of Si 1-x Ge x /Si 1-y Ge y heterostructures was studied by performing the post growth furnace thermal annealing (FTA) treatments in the temperature range of 600-900C for 30min and rapid thermal annealing (RTA) treatments at temperature 750C for 30sec. Structural and optical analysis of p-type MOD Si 1-x Ge x /Si 1-y Ge y heterostructures involved the techniques of cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy, ultra low energy secondary ion mass spectrometry, photoluminescence spectroscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy and scanning white-light interferometry. From the combinations of experimental results obtained by these techniques the Ge composition in the SiGe heteroepilayers, their thicknesses, state of strain in the heteroepilayers and dislocations microstructure in VSs were obtained. After post growth thermal annealing treatments were observed broadening of the Si 1-x Ge x channel accompanied with the reduction of Ge content in the channel and smearing of Si 1-x Ge x /Si 1-y Ge y interfaces. The Si 0.7 Ge 0.3 on low-temperature Si buffer VSs with very good structural properties were designed and grown by SS-MBE. These include: relatively thin 850nm total thickness of VS, 4-6nm Peak-to-Valley values of surface roughness, less than 10 5 cm -2 threading dislocations density and more than 95% degree of relaxation in the top layers of VS. The Hall mobility and sheet carrier density of as-grown and annealed p-type MOD Si 1-x Ge x /Si 1-y Ge y

  1. An extension of the maximum principle to dimensional systems and its application in nuclear engineering problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilai, D.

    1976-01-01

    The Maximum Principle deals with optimization problems of systems, which are governed by ordinary differential equations, and which include constraints on the state and control variables. The development of nuclear engineering confronted the designers of reactors, shielding and other nuclear devices with many requests of optimization and savings and it was straight forward to use the Maximum Principle for solving optimization problems in nuclear engineering, in fact, it was widely used both structural concept design and dynamic control of nuclear systems. The main disadvantage of the Maximum Principle is that it is suitable only for systems which may be described by ordinary differential equations, e.g. one dimensional systems. In the present work, starting from the variational approach, the original Maximum Principle is extended to multidimensional systems, and the principle which has been derived, is of a more general form and is applicable to any system which can be defined by linear partial differential equations of any order. To check out the applicability of the extended principle, two examples are solved: the first in nuclear shield design, where the goal is to construct a shield around a neutron emitting source, using given materials, so that the total dose outside of the shielding boundaries is minimized, the second in material distribution design in the core of a power reactor, so that the power peak is minimised. For the second problem, an iterative method was developed. (B.G.)

  2. Dose measurements in mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kainberger, F.; Kallinger, W.

    1977-01-01

    Dose measurements at the mamma during mammography were carried out in the form of direct measurement with thermoluminescent dosimetry. Measurement was done for the in- and outcoming doses at the mamma, the dose exposure of the sternal region and the scattered rays above the symphysis, the latter as parameter for the genetic radiation exposure. As expected, the dose of the smooth radiation used for mammography showed a strong decrease at the outcome point in comparison with the income point. Surprisingly high was the scattered radiation in the sternal region. A corresponding protection by lead plates could be taken into consideration. Extremely low is the scattered radiation above the symphysis. Even measurements with the very sensitive calcium fluoride dosimeters did not reveal any practically important dose in the symphysis region. Most measurement values remained below the determinable dose of 0.3mR. Some maximal values varied in the range of 3-1 mR. (orig.) [de

  3. Study of dose distribution in high energy photon beam used in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafaravavy, R.; Raoelina Andriambololona; Bridier, A.

    2007-01-01

    The dose distribution in a medium traversed by a photon beam depends on beam energy, field size and medium nature. Percent depth dose (PDD), Dose Profile (DP) and Opening Collimator Factor (OCF) curves will be established to study this distribution. So, the PDD curves are composed by tree parts: the build-up region, the maximal dose and the quasi-equilibrium region. The maximum dose depth and the dose in depth increase with increasing photon beam energy but the dose surface decreases. The PDD increases with increasing field size.

  4. 49 CFR 195.406 - Maximum operating pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Maximum operating pressure. 195.406 Section 195.406 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS... HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Operation and Maintenance § 195.406 Maximum operating pressure. (a) Except for...

  5. 78 FR 49370 - Inflation Adjustment of Maximum Forfeiture Penalties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-14

    ... ``civil monetary penalties provided by law'' at least once every four years. DATES: Effective September 13... increases the maximum civil monetary forfeiture penalties available to the Commission under its rules... maximum civil penalties established in that section to account for inflation since the last adjustment to...

  6. 22 CFR 201.67 - Maximum freight charges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., commodity rate classification, quantity, vessel flag category (U.S.-or foreign-flag), choice of ports, and... the United States. (2) Maximum charter rates. (i) USAID will not finance ocean freight under any... owner(s). (4) Maximum liner rates. USAID will not finance ocean freight for a cargo liner shipment at a...

  7. Maximum penetration level of distributed generation without violating voltage limits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morren, J.; Haan, de S.W.H.

    2009-01-01

    Connection of Distributed Generation (DG) units to a distribution network will result in a local voltage increase. As there will be a maximum on the allowable voltage increase, this will limit the maximum allowable penetration level of DG. By reactive power compensation (by the DG unit itself) a

  8. Particle Swarm Optimization Based of the Maximum Photovoltaic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Photovoltaic electricity is seen as an important source of renewable energy. The photovoltaic array is an unstable source of power since the peak power point depends on the temperature and the irradiation level. A maximum peak power point tracking is then necessary for maximum efficiency. In this work, a Particle Swarm ...

  9. Maximum-entropy clustering algorithm and its global convergence analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Constructing a batch of differentiable entropy functions touniformly approximate an objective function by means of the maximum-entropy principle, a new clustering algorithm, called maximum-entropy clustering algorithm, is proposed based on optimization theory. This algorithm is a soft generalization of the hard C-means algorithm and possesses global convergence. Its relations with other clustering algorithms are discussed.

  10. Application of maximum entropy to neutron tunneling spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhopadhyay, R.; Silver, R.N.

    1990-01-01

    We demonstrate the maximum entropy method for the deconvolution of high resolution tunneling data acquired with a quasielastic spectrometer. Given a precise characterization of the instrument resolution function, a maximum entropy analysis of lutidine data obtained with the IRIS spectrometer at ISIS results in an effective factor of three improvement in resolution. 7 refs., 4 figs

  11. The regulation of starch accumulation in Panicum maximum Jacq ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... decrease the starch level. These observations are discussed in relation to the photosynthetic characteristics of P. maximum. Keywords: accumulation; botany; carbon assimilation; co2 fixation; growth conditions; mesophyll; metabolites; nitrogen; nitrogen levels; nitrogen supply; panicum maximum; plant physiology; starch; ...

  12. 32 CFR 842.35 - Depreciation and maximum allowances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Depreciation and maximum allowances. 842.35... LITIGATION ADMINISTRATIVE CLAIMS Personnel Claims (31 U.S.C. 3701, 3721) § 842.35 Depreciation and maximum allowances. The military services have jointly established the “Allowance List-Depreciation Guide” to...

  13. The maximum significant wave height in the Southern North Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouws, E.; Tolman, H.L.; Holthuijsen, L.H.; Eldeberky, Y.; Booij, N.; Ferier, P.

    1995-01-01

    The maximum possible wave conditions along the Dutch coast, which seem to be dominated by the limited water depth, have been estimated in the present study with numerical simulations. Discussions with meteorologists suggest that the maximum possible sustained wind speed in North Sea conditions is

  14. PTree: pattern-based, stochastic search for maximum parsimony phylogenies

    OpenAIRE

    Gregor, Ivan; Steinbr?ck, Lars; McHardy, Alice C.

    2013-01-01

    Phylogenetic reconstruction is vital to analyzing the evolutionary relationship of genes within and across populations of different species. Nowadays, with next generation sequencing technologies producing sets comprising thousands of sequences, robust identification of the tree topology, which is optimal according to standard criteria such as maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood or posterior probability, with phylogenetic inference methods is a computationally very demanding task. Here, we ...

  15. 5 CFR 838.711 - Maximum former spouse survivor annuity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maximum former spouse survivor annuity... Orders Awarding Former Spouse Survivor Annuities Limitations on Survivor Annuities § 838.711 Maximum former spouse survivor annuity. (a) Under CSRS, payments under a court order may not exceed the amount...

  16. Electrical properties of the LaLi y Co1 - y O3 - δ (0 ≤ y ≤ 0.10) oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecherskii, S. I.; Konopel'ko, M. A.; Batalov, N. N.; Antonov, B. D.; Reznitskikh, O. G.; Yaroslavtseva, T. V.

    2017-08-01

    The effect of the Li ion concentration on the phase composition, the electrical conductivity, and the thermoelectric power of the LaLi y Co1- y O3-δ (0 ≤ y ≤ 0.1) oxides synthesized by cocrystallization has been studied. It is found that the region of the perovskite-like solid solution LaLi y Co1- y O3-δ is no higher than y = 0.037. In the temperature range 300-1020 K, lithium alloying leads to an increase in the electrical conductivity and a decrease in the positive thermoelectric power of the single-phase samples compared to LaCoO3-δ. The results are discussed using the density of states model proposed by Senarus Rodriguez and Goodenough for LaCoO3-δ and La1- x Sr x CoO3-δ and using the Mott theory of noncrystalline substances.

  17. Bloque 1. Temas 1 y 2. Contenidos, evolución epistemológica y fuentes de la Geografía Rural

    OpenAIRE

    Segrelles, José Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Los temas 1 y 2 se incluyen en el bloque 1 y se dedican al análisis de la evolución epistemológica de la geografía rural y a las fuentes para el estudio de esta disciplina, respetivamente. Dentro de la evolución epistemológica se presta especial atención al concepto de geografía rural, a las diversas interpretaciones que éste ha tenido, a la diferente forma en que la geografía rural ha sido estudiada por los diferentes enfoques que ha jalonado su desarrollo científico en el marco de la evoluc...

  18. Monte-Carlo investigation of in-plane electron transport in tensile strained Si and Si{_{1-y}}C{_y} (y {leq 0.03})

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dollfus, Ph.; Galdin, S.; Hesto, P.

    1999-07-01

    Electron transport properties in tensile strained Si-based materials are theoretically analyzed using Monte-Carlo calculation. We focus our interest on in-plane transport in Si and Si{1-y}Cy (yleq 0.03), grown respectively on Effect-Transistor application. In comparison with unstrained Si, the tensile strain effect is shown to be very attractive in Si: drift mobilities greater than 3000 cm^2/Vs are obtained at 300 K for a Ge fraction mole of 0.2 in the pseudo-substrate. In the Si{1-y}Cy/Si system, that does not need any pseudo-substrate, the beneficial strain effect on transport is counterbalanced by the alloy scattering whose influence on mobility is studied. If the alloy potential is greater than about 1 eV, the advantage of strain-induced reduction of effective mass is lost in terms of stationary transport performance at 300 K.

  19. Registration of radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-02-01

    In Finland the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) is maintaining the register (called Dose Register) of the radiation exposure of occupationally exposed workers in order to ensure compliance with the principles of optimisation and individual protection. The guide contains a description of the Dose Register and specifies the responsibilities of the party running a radiation practice to report the relevant information to the Dose Register

  20. Maximum physical capacity testing in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knutsen, L.; Quist, M; Midtgaard, J

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Over the past few years there has been a growing interest in the field of physical exercise in rehabilitation of cancer patients, leading to requirements for objective maximum physical capacity measurement (maximum oxygen uptake (VO(2max)) and one-repetition maximum (1RM)) to determin...... early in the treatment process. However, the patients were self-referred and thus highly motivated and as such are not necessarily representative of the whole population of cancer patients treated with chemotherapy....... in performing maximum physical capacity tests as these motivated them through self-perceived competitiveness and set a standard that served to encourage peak performance. CONCLUSION: The positive attitudes in this sample towards maximum physical capacity open the possibility of introducing physical testing...

  1. Maximum Principles for Discrete and Semidiscrete Reaction-Diffusion Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Stehlík

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We study reaction-diffusion equations with a general reaction function f on one-dimensional lattices with continuous or discrete time ux′  (or  Δtux=k(ux-1-2ux+ux+1+f(ux, x∈Z. We prove weak and strong maximum and minimum principles for corresponding initial-boundary value problems. Whereas the maximum principles in the semidiscrete case (continuous time exhibit similar features to those of fully continuous reaction-diffusion model, in the discrete case the weak maximum principle holds for a smaller class of functions and the strong maximum principle is valid in a weaker sense. We describe in detail how the validity of maximum principles depends on the nonlinearity and the time step. We illustrate our results on the Nagumo equation with the bistable nonlinearity.

  2. Thermoelectric properties of Ca1-xYxMnO3 and Ca0.9Y0.1-yFeyMnO3 perovskite compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuy, Nguyen Thi; Minh, Dang Le; Van Nong, Ngo

    2012-01-01

    Polycrystalline Ca1-xYxMnO3 (x = 0.0; 0.1; 0.3; 0.5; 0.7) and Ca0.9Y0.1-yFeyMnO3 (y = 0.00; 0.01; 0.03; 0.05) compounds were prepared by solid-state reaction. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis revealed all XRD peaks of all the samples as identical to the orthorhombic structure. The thermoelectric ...

  3. Ingestion of Nevada Test Site Fallout: Internal dose estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whicker, F.W.; Kirchner, T.B.; Anspaugh, L.R.

    1996-01-01

    This paper summarizes individual and collective dose estimates for the internal organs of hypothetical yet representative residents of selected communities that received measurable fallout from nuclear detonations at the Nevada Test Site. The doses, which resulted from ingestion of local and regional food products contaminated with over 20 radionuclides, were estimated with use of the PATHWAY food-chain-transport model to provide estimates of central tendency and uncertainty. The thyroid gland received much higher doses than other internal organs and tissues. In a avery few cases, infants might have received thyroid doses in excess of 1 Gy, depending on location, diet, and timing of fallout. 131 I was the primary thyroid dose contributor, and fresh milk was the main exposure pathway. With the exception of the thyroid, organ doses from the ingestion pathway were much smaller (<3%) than those from external gamma exposure to deposited fallout. Doses to residents living closest to the Nevada Test Site were contributed mainly by a few fallout events; doses to more distantly located people were generally smaller, but a greater number of events provided measurable contributions. The effectiveness of different fallout events in producing internal organ doses through ingestion varied dramatically with seasonal timing of the test, with maximum dose per unit fallout occurring for early summer depositions when milk cows were on pasture and fresh, local vegetables were used. Within specific communities, internal doses differed by age, sex, and lifestyle. Collective internal dose estimates for specific geographic areas are provided

  4. Ageing effects of polymers at very low dose-rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chenion, J.; Armand, X.; Berthet, J.; Carlin, F.; Gaussens, G.; Le Meur, M.

    1987-10-01

    The equipment irradiation dose-rate into the containment is variable from 10 -6 to 10 -4 gray per second for the most exposed materials. During qualification, safety equipments are submitted in France to dose-rates around 0.28 gray per second. This study purpose is to now if a so large irradiation dose-rate increase is reasonable. Three elastomeric materials used in electrical cables, o'rings seals and connectors, are exposed to a very large dose-rates scale between 2.1.10 -4 and 1.4 gray per second, to 49 KGy dose. This work was carried out during 3.5 years. Oxygen consumption measurement of the air in contact with polymer materials, as mechanical properties measurement show that: - at very low dose-rate, oxygen consumption is maximum at the same time (1.4 year) for the three elastomeric samples. Also, mechanical properties simultaneously change with oxygen consumption. At very low dose-rate, for the low irradiation doses, oxygen consumption is at least 10 times more important that it is showed when irradiation is carried out with usual material qualification dose-rate. At very low dose-rate, oxygen consumption decreases when absorbed irradiation dose by samples increases. The polymer samples irradiation dose is not still sufficient (49 KGy) to certainly determine, for the three chosen polymer materials, the reasonable irradiation acceleration boundary during nuclear qualification tests [fr

  5. Paediatric dose display

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, D.W.; Derges, S.; Hesslewood, S.

    1984-01-01

    A compact, inexpensive unit, based on an 8085 microprocessor, has been designed for calculating doses of intravenous radioactive injections for children. It has been used successfully for over a year. The dose is calculated from the body surface area and the result displayed in MBq. The operator can obtain the required dose on a twelve character alphanumeric display by entering the age of the patient and the adult dose using a hexadecimal keyboard. Circuit description, memory map and input/output, and firmware are dealt with. (U.K.)

  6. An environmental dose experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, Luis

    2017-11-01

    Several radiation sources worldwide contribute to the delivered dose to the human population. This radiation also acts as a natural background when detecting radiation, for instance from radioactive sources. In this work a medium-sized plastic scintillation detector is used to evaluate the dose delivered by natural radiation sources. Calibration of the detector involved the use of radioactive sources and Monte Carlo simulation of the energy deposition per disintegration. A measurement of the annual dose due to background radiation to the body was then estimated. A dose value compatible with the value reported by the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation was obtained.

  7. An environmental dose experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peralta, Luis

    2017-01-01

    Several radiation sources worldwide contribute to the delivered dose to the human population. This radiation also acts as a natural background when detecting radiation, for instance from radioactive sources. In this work a medium-sized plastic scintillation detector is used to evaluate the dose delivered by natural radiation sources. Calibration of the detector involved the use of radioactive sources and Monte Carlo simulation of the energy deposition per disintegration. A measurement of the annual dose due to background radiation to the body was then estimated. A dose value compatible with the value reported by the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation was obtained. (paper)

  8. Doses from portable gauges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linauskas, S.H.

    1988-08-01

    Field studies to measure actual radiation exposures of operators of commercial moisture-density gauges were undertaken in several regions of Canada. Newly developed bubble detector dosimeter technology and conventional dosimetry such as thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), integrating electronic dosimeters (DRDs), and CR-39 neutron track-etch detectors were used to estimate the doses received by 23 moisture-density gauge operators and maintenance staff. These radiation dose estimates were supported by mapping radiation fields and accounting for the time an operator was near a gauge. Major findings indicate that gauge maintenance and servicing workers were more likely than gauge operators to receive exposures above the level of 5 mSv, and that neutron doses were roughly the same as gamma doses. Gauge operators receive approximately 75% of their dose when transporting and carrying the gauge. Dose to their hands is similar to the dose to their trunks, but the dose to their feet area is 6 to 30 times higher. Gamma radiation is the primary source of radiation contributing to operator dose

  9. Radiation dose in vertebroplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehdizade, A.; Lovblad, K.O.; Wilhelm, K.E.; Somon, T.; Wetzel, S.G.; Kelekis, A.D.; Yilmaz, H.; Abdo, G.; Martin, J.B.; Viera, J.M.; Ruefenacht, D.A.

    2004-01-01

    We wished to measure the absorbed radiation dose during fluoroscopically controlled vertebroplasty and to assess the possibility of deterministic radiation effects to the operator. The dose was measured in 11 consecutive procedures using thermoluminescent ring dosimeters on the hand of the operator and electronic dosimeters inside and outside of the operator's lead apron. We found doses of 0.022-3.256 mGy outside and 0.01-0.47 mGy inside the lead apron. Doses on the hand were higher, 0.5-8.5 mGy. This preliminary study indicates greater exposure to the operator's hands than expected from traditional apron measurements. (orig.)

  10. Comparison of full width at half maximum and penumbra of different Gamma Knife models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgari, Sepideh; Banaee, Nooshin; Nedaie, Hassan Ali

    2018-01-01

    As a radiosurgical tool, Gamma Knife has the best and widespread name recognition. Gamma Knife is a noninvasive intracranial technique invented and developed by Swedish neurosurgeon Lars Leksell. The first commercial Leksell Gamma Knife entered the therapeutic armamentarium at the University of Pittsburgh in the United States on August 1987. Since that time, different generation of Gamma Knife developed. In this study, the technical points and dosimetric parameters including full width at half maximum and penumbra on different generation of Gamma Knife will be reviewed and compared. The results of this review study show that the rotating gamma system provides a better dose conformity.

  11. Dopant density from maximum-minimum capacitance ratio of implanted MOS structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brews, J.R.

    1982-01-01

    For uniformly doped structures, the ratio of the maximum to the minimum high frequency capacitance determines the dopant ion density per unit volume. Here it is shown that for implanted structures this 'max-min' dopant density estimate depends upon the dose and depth of the implant through the first moment of the depleted portion of the implant. A a result, the 'max-min' estimate of dopant ion density reflects neither the surface dopant density nor the average of the dopant density over the depletion layer. In particular, it is not clear how this dopant ion density estimate is related to the flatband capacitance. (author)

  12. Dose escalation of a curcuminoid formulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crowell James

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Curcumin is the major yellow pigment extracted from turmeric, a commonly-used spice in India and Southeast Asia that has broad anticarcinogenic and cancer chemopreventive potential. However, few systematic studies of curcumin's pharmacology and toxicology in humans have been performed. Methods A dose escalation study was conducted to determine the maximum tolerated dose and safety of a single dose of standardized powder extract, uniformly milled curcumin (C3 Complex™, Sabinsa Corporation. Healthy volunteers were administered escalating doses from 500 to 12,000 mg. Results Seven of twenty-four subjects (30% experienced only minimal toxicity that did not appear to be dose-related. No curcumin was detected in the serum of subjects administered 500, 1,000, 2,000, 4,000, 6,000 or 8,000 mg. Low levels of curcumin were detected in two subjects administered 10,000 or 12,000 mg. Conclusion The tolerance of curcumin in high single oral doses appears to be excellent. Given that achieving systemic bioavailability of curcumin or its metabolites may not be essential for colorectal cancer chemoprevention, these findings warrant further investigation for its utility as a long-term chemopreventive agent.

  13. Dose evaluation of narrow-beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Shinichi

    1999-01-01

    Reliability of the dose from the narrow photon beam becomes more important since the single high-dose rate radiosurgery becoming popular. The dose evaluation for the optimal dose is difficult due to absence of lateral electronic equilibrium. Data necessary for treatment regimen are TMR (tissue maximum ratio), OCR (off center ratio) and S c,p (total scatter factor). The narrow-beam was 10 MV X-ray from Varian Clinac 2100C equipped with cylindrical Fischer collimator CBI system. Detection was performed by Kodak XV-2 film, a PTW natural diamond detector M60003, Scanditronics silicon detector EDD-5 or Fujitec micro-chamber FDC-9.4C. Phantoms were the water equivalent one (PTW, RW3), water one (PTW, MP3 system) and Wellhofer WP600 system. Factors above were actually measured to reveal that in the dose evaluation of narrow photon beam, TMR should be measured by micro-chamber, OCR, by film, and S c,p , by the two. The use of diamond detector was recommended for more precise measurement and evaluation of the dose. The importance of water phantom in the radiosurgery system was also shown. (K.H.)

  14. Early Retinal Defects in Fmr1-/y Mice: Toward a Critical Role of Visual Dys-Sensitivity in the Fragile X Syndrome Phenotype?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perche, Olivier; Felgerolle, Chloé; Ardourel, Maryvonne; Bazinet, Audrey; Pâris, Arnaud; Rossignol, Rafaëlle; Meyer-Dilhet, Géraldine; Mausset-Bonnefont, Anne-Laure; Hébert, Betty; Laurenceau, David; Montécot-Dubourg, Céline; Menuet, Arnaud; Bizot, Jean-Charles; Pichon, Jacques; Ranchon-Cole, Isabelle; Briault, Sylvain

    2018-01-01

    Fragile X Syndrome (FXS) is caused by a deficiency in Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP) leading to global sensorial abnormalities, among which visual defects represent a critical part. These visual defects are associated with cerebral neuron immaturity especially in the primary visual cortex. However, we recently demonstrated that retinas of adult Fmr1 -/y mice, the FXS murine model, present molecular, cellular and functional alterations. However, no data are currently available on the evolution pattern of such defects. As retinal stimulation through Eye Opening (EO) is a crucial signal for the cerebral visual system maturation, we questioned the precocity of molecular and functional retinal phenotype. To answer this question, we studied the retinal molecular phenotype of Fmr1 -/y mice before EO until adult age and the consequences of the retinal loss of Fmrp on retinal function in young and adult mice. We showed that retinal molecular defects are present before EO and remain stable at adult age, leading to electrophysiological impairments without any underlying structural changes. We underlined that loss of Fmrp leads to a wide range of defects in the retina, settled even before EO. Our work demonstrates a critical role of the sensorial dysfunction in the Fmr1 -/y mice overall phenotype, and provides evidence that altered peripheral perception is a component of the sensory processing defect in FXS conditions.

  15. Dose-to-medium vs. dose-to-water: Dosimetric evaluation of dose reporting modes in Acuros XB for prostate, lung and breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Rana

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Acuros XB (AXB dose calculation algorithm is available for external beam photon dose calculations in Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS. The AXB can report the absorbed dose in two modes: dose-to-water (Dw and dose-to-medium (Dm. The main purpose of this study was to compare the dosimetric results of the AXB_Dm with that of AXB_Dw on real patient treatment plans. Methods: Four groups of patients (prostate cancer, stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT lung cancer, left breast cancer, and right breast cancer were selected for this study, and each group consisted of 5 cases. The treatment plans of all cases were generated in the Eclipse TPS. For each case, treatment plans were computed using AXB_Dw and AXB_Dm for identical beam arrangements. Dosimetric evaluation was done by comparing various dosimetric parameters in the AXB_Dw plans with that of AXB_Dm plans for the corresponding patient case. Results: For the prostate cancer, the mean planning target volume (PTV dose in the AXB_Dw plans was higher by up to 1.0%, but the mean PTV dose was within ±0.3% for the SBRT lung cancer. The analysis of organs at risk (OAR results in the prostate cancer showed that AXB_Dw plans consistently produced higher values for the bladder and femoral heads but not for the rectum. In the case of SBRT lung cancer, a clear trend was seen for the heart mean dose and spinal cord maximum dose, with AXB_Dw plans producing higher values than the AXB_Dm plans. However, the difference in the lung doses between the AXB_Dm and AXB_Dw plans did not always produce a clear trend, with difference ranged from -1.4% to 2.9%. For both the left and right breast cancer, the AXB_Dm plans produced higher maximum dose to the PTV for all cases. The evaluation of the maximum dose to the skin showed higher values in the AXB_Dm plans for all 5 left breast cancer cases, whereas only 2 cases had higher maximum dose to the skin in the AXB_Dm plans for the right breast cancer

  16. Triple-axis X-ray reciprocal space mapping of In{sub y}Ga{sub 1-y}As thermophotovoltaic diodes grown on (1 0 0) InP substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dashiell, M.W.; Ehsani, H.; Sander, P.C. [Lockheed Martin Corporation, Schenectady, NY 12301-1072 (United States); Newman, F.D. [Emcore Corporation, Albuquerque, NM 87123 (United States); Wang, C.A. [MIT Lincoln Laboratory, Lexington, MA 02420 (United States); Shellenbarger, Z.A. [Sarnoff Corporation, Princeton NJ, 08543-5300 (United States); Donetski, D.; Gu, N.; Anikeev, S. [Department of Electrical Engineering, State University of New York, Stony Brook, NY 11794-2350 (United States)

    2008-09-15

    Analysis of the composition, strain-relaxation, layer-tilt, and the crystalline quality of In{sub y}Ga{sub 1-y}As/InP{sub 1-x}As{sub x} thermophotovoltaic (TPV) diodes grown by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) is demonstrated using triple-axis X-ray reciprocal space mapping techniques. In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As (E{sub gap}=0.74 eV) n/p junction diodes are grown lattice matched (LM) to InP substrates and lattice-mismatched (LMM) In{sub 0.67}Ga{sub 0.33}As (E{sub gap}=0.6 eV) TPV diodes are grown on three-step InP{sub 1-x}As{sub x} (01-y}As TPV active layer and underlying InP{sub 1-x}As{sub x} buffers. Triple-axis X-ray rocking curves about the LMM In{sub 0.67}Ga{sub 0.33}As RELP show an order of magnitude increase of its full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) compared to that from the LM In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As (250 vs. 30 arcsec). Despite the significant RELP broadening, the photovoltaic figure of merits show that the electronic quality of the LMM In{sub 0.67}Ga{sub 0.33}As approaches that of the LM diode material. This indicates that misfit-related crystalline imperfections are not dominating the photovoltaic response of the optimized LMM In{sub 0.67}Ga{sub 0.33}As material compared with the intrinsic recombination processes and/or recombination through native point defects, which would be present in both LMM and LM diode material. However, additional RELP broadening in non-optimized LMM In{sub 0.67}Ga{sub 0.33}As n/p junction diodes does correspond to significant degradation of TPV diode open-circuit voltage and minority carrier lifetime demonstrating that there is correlation between X-ray FWHM and the electronic performance of the LMM TPV diodes. (author)

  17. Optimizing bevacizumab dosing in glioblastoma: less is more.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajlan, Abdulrazag; Thomas, Piia; Albakr, Abdulrahman; Nagpal, Seema; Recht, Lawrence

    2017-10-01

    Compared to traditional chemotherapies, where dose limiting toxicities represent the maximum possible dose, monoclonal antibody therapies are used at doses well below maximum tolerated dose. However, there has been little effort to ascertain whether there is a submaximal dose at which the efficacy/complication ratio is maximized. Thus, despite the general practice of using Bevacizumab (BEV) at dosages of 10 mg/kg every other week for glioma patients, there has not been much prior work examining whether the relatively high complication rates reported with this agent can be decreased by lowering the dose without impairing efficacy. We assessed charts from 80 patients who received BEV for glioblastoma to survey the incidence of complications relative to BEV dose. All patients were treated with standard upfront chemoradiation. The toxicity was graded based on the NCI CTCAE, version 4.03. The rate of BEV serious related adverse events was 12.5% (n = 10/80). There were no serious adverse events (≥grade 3) when the administered dose was (<3 mg/kg/week), compared to a 21% incidence in those who received higher doses (≥3 mg/kg/week) (P < 0.01). Importantly, the three patient deaths attributable to BEV administration occurred in patients receiving higher doses. Patients who received lower doses also had a better survival rate, although this did not reach statistical significance [median OS 39 for low dose group vs. 17.3 for high dose group (P = 0.07)]. Lower rates of serious BEV related toxicities are noted when lower dosages are used without diminishing positive clinical impact. Further work aimed at optimizing BEV dosage is justified.

  18. 78 FR 9845 - Minimum and Ordinary Maximum and Aggravated Maximum Civil Monetary Penalties for a Violation of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-12

    ... maximum penalty amount of $75,000 for each violation, except that if the violation results in death... the maximum civil penalty for a violation is $175,000 if the violation results in death, serious... Penalties for a Violation of the Hazardous Materials Transportation Laws or Regulations, Orders, Special...

  19. Dose prescription in boron neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, N.M.S.; Gahbauer, R.A.; Blue, T.E.; Wambersie, A.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to address some aspects of the many considerations that need to go into a dose prescription in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for brain tumors; and to describe some methods to incorporate knowledge from animal studies and other experiments into the process of dose prescription. Previously, an algorithm to estimate the normal tissue tolerance to mixed high and low linear energy transfer radiations in BNCT was proposed. The authors have developed mathematical formulations and computational methods to represent this algorithm. Generalized models to fit the central axis dose rate components for an epithermal neutron field were also developed. These formulations and beam fitting models were programmed into spreadsheets to simulate two treatment techniques which are expected to be used in BNCT: a two-field bilateral scheme and a single-field treatment scheme. Parameters in these spreadsheets can be varied to represent the fractionation scheme used, the 10 B microdistribution in normal tissue, and the ratio of 10 B in tumor to normal tissue. Most of these factors have to be determined for a given neutron field and 10 B compound combination from large animal studies. The spreadsheets have been programmed to integrate all of the treatment-related information and calculate the location along the central axis where the normal tissue tolerance is exceeded first. This information is then used to compute the maximum treatment time allowable and the maximum tumor dose that may be delivered for a given BNCT treatment. The effect of different treatment variables on the treatment time and tumor dose has been shown to be very significant. It has also been shown that the location of D max shifts significantly, depending on some of the treatment variables-mainly the fractionation scheme used. These results further emphasize the fact that dose prescription in BNCT is very complicated and nonintuitive. 11 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  20. A Phase Ib dose-escalation study to evaluate safety and tolerability of the addition of the aminopeptidase inhibitor tosedostat (CHR-2797) to paclitaxel in patients with advanced solid tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M.L. Herpen (Carla); F.A.L.M. Eskens (Ferry); M.J.A. de Jonge (Maja); I.M.E. Desar (Ingrid); L. Hooftman (Leon); E. Bone (Elisabeth); J.N.H. Timmerbonte (Johanna); J. Verweij (Jaap)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground: This Phase Ib dose-escalating study investigated safety, maximum tolerated dose (MTD), dose-limiting toxicity (DLT), pharmacokinetics (PK) and clinical antitumour activity of tosedostat (CHR-2797), an orally bioavailable aminopeptidase inhibitor, in combination with

  1. A Phase Ib dose-escalation study to evaluate safety and tolerability of the addition of the aminopeptidase inhibitor tosedostat (CHR-2797) to paclitaxel in patients with advanced solid tumours.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herpen, C.M.L. van; Eskens, F.A.; Jonge, M. de; Desar, I.M.E.; Hooftman, L.; Bone, E.A.; Timmer-Bonte, J.N.H.; Verweij, J.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This Phase Ib dose-escalating study investigated safety, maximum tolerated dose (MTD), dose-limiting toxicity (DLT), pharmacokinetics (PK) and clinical antitumour activity of tosedostat (CHR-2797), an orally bioavailable aminopeptidase inhibitor, in combination with paclitaxel. METHODS:

  2. The power and robustness of maximum LOD score statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Y J; Mendell, N R

    2008-07-01

    The maximum LOD score statistic is extremely powerful for gene mapping when calculated using the correct genetic parameter value. When the mode of genetic transmission is unknown, the maximum of the LOD scores obtained using several genetic parameter values is reported. This latter statistic requires higher critical value than the maximum LOD score statistic calculated from a single genetic parameter value. In this paper, we compare the power of maximum LOD scores based on three fixed sets of genetic parameter values with the power of the LOD score obtained after maximizing over the entire range of genetic parameter values. We simulate family data under nine generating models. For generating models with non-zero phenocopy rates, LOD scores maximized over the entire range of genetic parameters yielded greater power than maximum LOD scores for fixed sets of parameter values with zero phenocopy rates. No maximum LOD score was consistently more powerful than the others for generating models with a zero phenocopy rate. The power loss of the LOD score maximized over the entire range of genetic parameters, relative to the maximum LOD score calculated using the correct genetic parameter value, appeared to be robust to the generating models.

  3. Effective dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huyskens, C.J.; Passchier, W.F.

    1988-01-01

    The effective dose equivalent is a quantity which is used in the daily practice of radiation protection as well as in the radiation hygienic rules as measure for the health risks. In this contribution it is worked out upon which assumptions this quantity is based and in which cases the effective dose equivalent can be used more or less well. (H.W.)

  4. Doses from radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menzel, H-G.; Harrison, J.D.

    2012-01-01

    Practical implementation of the International Commission on Radiological Protection’s (ICRP) system of protection requires the availability of appropriate methods and data. The work of Committee 2 is concerned with the development of reference data and methods for the assessment of internal and external radiation exposure of workers and members of the public. This involves the development of reference biokinetic and dosimetric models, reference anatomical models of the human body, and reference anatomical and physiological data. Following ICRP’s 2007 Recommendations, Committee 2 has focused on the provision of new reference dose coefficients for external and internal exposure. As well as specifying changes to the radiation and tissue weighting factors used in the calculation of protection quantities, the 2007 Recommendations introduced the use of reference anatomical phantoms based on medical imaging data, requiring explicit sex averaging of male and female organ-equivalent doses in the calculation of effective dose. In preparation for the calculation of new dose coefficients, Committee 2 and its task groups have provided updated nuclear decay data (ICRP Publication 107) and adult reference computational phantoms (ICRP Publication 110). New dose coefficients for external exposures of workers are complete (ICRP Publication 116), and work is in progress on a series of reports on internal dose coefficients to workers from inhaled and ingested radionuclides. Reference phantoms for children will also be provided and used in the calculation of dose coefficients for public exposures. Committee 2 also has task groups on exposures to radiation in space and on the use of effective dose.

  5. Gonad dose in cineurethrocystography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ardran, G.M.; Dixon-Brown, A.; Fursdon, P.S.

    1978-01-01

    The technical factors used for cineurethrocystography for the true lateral projection in females are given. The mid-line radiation dose has been measured with LiF TLD inserted into the vagina in 19 examinations. The average dose recorded was 148 mrad, the range being 50 to 306 mrad, the average number of cine frames exposed was 96. Data obtained using a Rando phantom indicated that the average ovary dose would be 30% greater than the mid-line dose since the near ovary receives a higher dose than the more distant one. The technique used for men is also given, the average gonad dose in six men being 123 mrad, range 56 to 243 mrad when simple lead foil gonad protection was used; the average number of cine frames was 107. The dose in one man without gonad protection was 1575 mrad for 112 cine frames. The results for both sexes compare favourably with those of others reported in the literature and with gonad doses recorded in typical IVP examinations. (author)

  6. Internal dose estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wrenn, M.E.

    1977-01-01

    Internal doses, the procedures for making them and their significance has been reviewed. Effects of uranium, radium, lead-210, polonium-210, thorium in man are analysed based on data from tables and plots. Dosimetry of some ingested nuclides and inhalation dose due to radon-222, radon-220 and their daugther products are discussed [pt

  7. Parameters determining maximum wind velocity in a tropical cyclone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choudhury, A.M.

    1984-09-01

    The spiral structure of a tropical cyclone was earlier explained by a tangential velocity distribution which varies inversely as the distance from the cyclone centre outside the circle of maximum wind speed. The case has been extended in the present paper by adding a radial velocity. It has been found that a suitable combination of radial and tangential velocities can account for the spiral structure of a cyclone. This enables parametrization of the cyclone. Finally a formula has been derived relating maximum velocity in a tropical cyclone with angular momentum, radius of maximum wind speed and the spiral angle. The shapes of the spirals have been computed for various spiral angles. (author)

  8. Occupational dose constraint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heilbron Filho, Paulo Fernando Lavalle; Xavier, Ana Maria

    2005-01-01

    The revision process of the international radiological protection regulations has resulted in the adoption of new concepts, such as practice, intervention, avoidable and restriction of dose (dose constraint). The latter deserving of special mention since it may involve reducing a priori of the dose limits established both for the public and to individuals occupationally exposed, values that can be further reduced, depending on the application of the principle of optimization. This article aims to present, with clarity, from the criteria adopted to define dose constraint values to the public, a methodology to establish the dose constraint values for occupationally exposed individuals, as well as an example of the application of this methodology to the practice of industrial radiography

  9. Doses to patients and staff from endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms - Preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjoerklund, E.G.; Widmark, A.; Gjoelberg, T.; Bay, D.; Joergensen, J.J.; Staxrud, L.E.

    2001-01-01

    Patient radiation doses received during endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) can be significant and give rise to both deterministic and stochastic effects. Recording of dose-area product (DAP), fluoroscopy time and number of exposures together with calculations of effective dose, were performed for 8 patients. In addition, the entrance surface dose was measured for 3 of the patients. Typically, DAPs of 340 Gycm 2 , fluoroscopy times of 30 minutes and 310 exposures were obtained together with maximum entrance surface doses of 1,8 Gy and effective doses of 50 mSv. Finger doses to the staff performing the procedure were in the order of a few hundred μSv. Conversion factors (effective dose/DAP) and (maximum entrance surface does/DAP) of 0,61·10 -2 Gy/Gycm 2 and 0,15 mSv/Gycm 2 were obtained, respectively. (author)

  10. 222Rn alpha dose to organs other than lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harley, N.H.; Robbins, E.S.

    1991-01-01

    The alpha dose to cells in tissues or organs other theft the lung has been calculated using the solubility coefficients for 222 Rn measured in human tissue. The annual alpha dose equivalent f rom 222 Rn and decay products in most tissues is a maximum of 30% of the annual average natural background dose equivalent (1 mSv) for external and internally deposited nuclides. The dose to the small population of lymphocytes located in or under the bronchial epithelium is a special case and their annual dose equivalent is essentially the same as that to basal cells in bronchial epithelium (200 mSv) for continuous exposure to 200 Bq M -3 . The significance of this dose is uncertain because the only excess cancer observed in follow up studies of underground miners with high 222 Rn exposure is bronchogenic carcinoma

  11. Dose response relationship at low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schull, W.J.

    1992-01-01

    The data that have accrued in Hiroshima and Nagasaki on the effects of ionizing radiation on the developing human brain are reviewed. Effects considered are severe mental retardation, lowered IQ scores, decline in school performance, seizures, other neuropsychological effects, and small head size. All these factors may be related to radiation doses received by the mother during pregnancy. (L.L.) 3 figs., tab., 7 refs

  12. Electron dose rate and photon contamination in electron arc therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pla, M.; Podgorsak, E.B.; Pla, C.

    1989-01-01

    The electron dose rate at the depth of dose maximum dmax and the photon contamination are discussed as a function of several parameters of the rotational electron beam. A pseudoarc technique with an angular increment of 10 degrees and a constant number of monitor units per each stationary electron field was used in our experiments. The electron dose rate is defined as the electron dose at a given point in phantom divided by the number of monitor units given for any one stationary electron beam. For a given depth of isocenter di the electron dose rates at dmax are linearly dependent on the nominal field width w, while for a given w the dose rates are inversely proportional to di. The dose rates for rotational electron beams with different di are related through the inverse square law provided that the two beams have (di,w) combinations which give the same characteristic angle beta. The photon dose at the isocenter depends on the arc angle alpha, field width w, and isocenter depth di. For constant w and di the photon dose at isocenter is proportional to alpha, for constant alpha and w it is proportional to di, and for constant alpha and di it is inversely proportional to w. The w and di dependence implies that for the same alpha the photon dose at the isocenter is inversely proportional to the electron dose rate at dmax

  13. Method of simulating dose reduction for digital radiographic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baath, M.; Haakansson, M.; Tingberg, A.; Maansson, L. G.

    2005-01-01

    The optimisation of image quality vs. radiation dose is an important task in medical imaging. To obtain maximum validity of the optimisation, it must be based on clinical images. Images at different dose levels can then either be obtained by collecting patient images at the different dose levels sought to investigate - including additional exposures and permission from an ethical committee - or by manipulating images to simulate different dose levels. The aim of the present work was to develop a method of simulating dose reduction for digital radiographic systems. The method uses information about the detective quantum efficiency and noise power spectrum at the original and simulated dose levels to create an image containing filtered noise. When added to the original image this results in an image with noise which, in terms of frequency content, agrees with the noise present in an image collected at the simulated dose level. To increase the validity, the method takes local dose variations in the original image into account. The method was tested on a computed radiography system and was shown to produce images with noise behaviour similar to that of images actually collected at the simulated dose levels. The method can, therefore, be used to modify an image collected at one dose level so that it simulates an image of the same object collected at any lower dose level. (authors)

  14. Environmental Monitoring, Water Quality - Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — The Clean Water Act Section 303(d) establishes the Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) program. The purpose of the TMDL program is to identify sources of pollution and...

  15. Probabilistic maximum-value wind prediction for offshore environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staid, Andrea; Pinson, Pierre; Guikema, Seth D.

    2015-01-01

    statistical models to predict the full distribution of the maximum-value wind speeds in a 3 h interval. We take a detailed look at the performance of linear models, generalized additive models and multivariate adaptive regression splines models using meteorological covariates such as gust speed, wind speed......, convective available potential energy, Charnock, mean sea-level pressure and temperature, as given by the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts forecasts. The models are trained to predict the mean value of maximum wind speed, and the residuals from training the models are used to develop...... the full probabilistic distribution of maximum wind speed. Knowledge of the maximum wind speed for an offshore location within a given period can inform decision-making regarding turbine operations, planned maintenance operations and power grid scheduling in order to improve safety and reliability...

  16. Combining Experiments and Simulations Using the Maximum Entropy Principle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boomsma, Wouter; Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten

    2014-01-01

    are not in quantitative agreement with experimental data. The principle of maximum entropy is a general procedure for constructing probability distributions in the light of new data, making it a natural tool in cases when an initial model provides results that are at odds with experiments. The number of maximum entropy...... in the context of a simple example, after which we proceed with a real-world application in the field of molecular simulations, where the maximum entropy procedure has recently provided new insight. Given the limited accuracy of force fields, macromolecular simulations sometimes produce results....... Three very recent papers have explored this problem using the maximum entropy approach, providing both new theoretical and practical insights to the problem. We highlight each of these contributions in turn and conclude with a discussion on remaining challenges....

  17. Parametric optimization of thermoelectric elements footprint for maximum power generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rezania, A.; Rosendahl, Lasse; Yin, Hao

    2014-01-01

    The development studies in thermoelectric generator (TEG) systems are mostly disconnected to parametric optimization of the module components. In this study, optimum footprint ratio of n- and p-type thermoelectric (TE) elements is explored to achieve maximum power generation, maximum cost......-performance, and variation of efficiency in the uni-couple over a wide range of the heat transfer coefficient on the cold junction. The three-dimensional (3D) governing equations of the thermoelectricity and the heat transfer are solved using the finite element method (FEM) for temperature dependent properties of TE...... materials. The results, which are in good agreement with the previous computational studies, show that the maximum power generation and the maximum cost-performance in the module occur at An/Ap

  18. Ethylene Production Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) Compliance Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    This July 2006 document is intended to help owners and operators of ethylene processes understand and comply with EPA's maximum achievable control technology standards promulgated on July 12, 2002, as amended on April 13, 2005 and April 20, 2006.

  19. ORIGINAL ARTICLES Surgical practice in a maximum security prison

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prison Clinic, Mangaung Maximum Security Prison, Bloemfontein. F Kleinhans, BA (Cur) .... HIV positivity rate and the use of the rectum to store foreign objects. ... fruit in sunlight. Other positive health-promoting factors may also play a role,.

  20. A technique for estimating maximum harvesting effort in a stochastic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Estimation of maximum harvesting effort has a great impact on the ... fluctuating environment has been developed in a two-species competitive system, which shows that under realistic .... The existence and local stability properties of the equi-.

  1. Water Quality Assessment and Total Maximum Daily Loads Information (ATTAINS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Water Quality Assessment TMDL Tracking And Implementation System (ATTAINS) stores and tracks state water quality assessment decisions, Total Maximum Daily Loads...

  2. Post optimization paradigm in maximum 3-satisfiability logic programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansor, Mohd. Asyraf; Sathasivam, Saratha; Kasihmuddin, Mohd Shareduwan Mohd

    2017-08-01

    Maximum 3-Satisfiability (MAX-3SAT) is a counterpart of the Boolean satisfiability problem that can be treated as a constraint optimization problem. It deals with a conundrum of searching the maximum number of satisfied clauses in a particular 3-SAT formula. This paper presents the implementation of enhanced Hopfield network in hastening the Maximum 3-Satisfiability (MAX-3SAT) logic programming. Four post optimization techniques are investigated, including the Elliot symmetric activation function, Gaussian activation function, Wavelet activation function and Hyperbolic tangent activation function. The performances of these post optimization techniques in accelerating MAX-3SAT logic programming will be discussed in terms of the ratio of maximum satisfied clauses, Hamming distance and the computation time. Dev-C++ was used as the platform for training, testing and validating our proposed techniques. The results depict the Hyperbolic tangent activation function and Elliot symmetric activation function can be used in doing MAX-3SAT logic programming.

  3. Maximum likelihood estimation of finite mixture model for economic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phoong, Seuk-Yen; Ismail, Mohd Tahir

    2014-06-01

    Finite mixture model is a mixture model with finite-dimension. This models are provides a natural representation of heterogeneity in a finite number of latent classes. In addition, finite mixture models also known as latent class models or unsupervised learning models. Recently, maximum likelihood estimation fitted finite mixture models has greatly drawn statistician's attention. The main reason is because maximum likelihood estimation is a powerful statistical method which provides consistent findings as the sample sizes increases to infinity. Thus, the application of maximum likelihood estimation is used to fit finite mixture model in the present paper in order to explore the relationship between nonlinear economic data. In this paper, a two-component normal mixture model is fitted by maximum likelihood estimation in order to investigate the relationship among stock market price and rubber price for sampled countries. Results described that there is a negative effect among rubber price and stock market price for Malaysia, Thailand, Philippines and Indonesia.

  4. Encoding Strategy for Maximum Noise Tolerance Bidirectional Associative Memory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shen, Dan

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, the Basic Bidirectional Associative Memory (BAM) is extended by choosing weights in the correlation matrix, for a given set of training pairs, which result in a maximum noise tolerance set for BAM...

  5. Narrow band interference cancelation in OFDM: Astructured maximum likelihood approach

    KAUST Repository

    Sohail, Muhammad Sadiq; Al-Naffouri, Tareq Y.; Al-Ghadhban, Samir N.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a maximum likelihood (ML) approach to mitigate the effect of narrow band interference (NBI) in a zero padded orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (ZP-OFDM) system. The NBI is assumed to be time variant and asynchronous

  6. Maximum entropy deconvolution of low count nuclear medicine images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGrath, D.M.

    1998-12-01

    Maximum entropy is applied to the problem of deconvolving nuclear medicine images, with special consideration for very low count data. The physics of the formation of scintigraphic images is described, illustrating the phenomena which degrade planar estimates of the tracer distribution. Various techniques which are used to restore these images are reviewed, outlining the relative merits of each. The development and theoretical justification of maximum entropy as an image processing technique is discussed. Maximum entropy is then applied to the problem of planar deconvolution, highlighting the question of the choice of error parameters for low count data. A novel iterative version of the algorithm is suggested which allows the errors to be estimated from the predicted Poisson mean values. This method is shown to produce the exact results predicted by combining Poisson statistics and a Bayesian interpretation of the maximum entropy approach. A facility for total count preservation has also been incorporated, leading to improved quantification. In order to evaluate this iterative maximum entropy technique, two comparable methods, Wiener filtering and a novel Bayesian maximum likelihood expectation maximisation technique, were implemented. The comparison of results obtained indicated that this maximum entropy approach may produce equivalent or better measures of image quality than the compared methods, depending upon the accuracy of the system model used. The novel Bayesian maximum likelihood expectation maximisation technique was shown to be preferable over many existing maximum a posteriori methods due to its simplicity of implementation. A single parameter is required to define the Bayesian prior, which suppresses noise in the solution and may reduce the processing time substantially. Finally, maximum entropy deconvolution was applied as a pre-processing step in single photon emission computed tomography reconstruction of low count data. Higher contrast results were

  7. What controls the maximum magnitude of injection-induced earthquakes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, D. W. S.

    2017-12-01

    Three different approaches for estimation of maximum magnitude are considered here, along with their implications for managing risk. The first approach is based on a deterministic limit for seismic moment proposed by McGarr (1976), which was originally designed for application to mining-induced seismicity. This approach has since been reformulated for earthquakes induced by fluid injection (McGarr, 2014). In essence, this method assumes that the upper limit for seismic moment release is constrained by the pressure-induced stress change. A deterministic limit is given by the product of shear modulus and the net injected fluid volume. This method is based on the assumptions that the medium is fully saturated and in a state of incipient failure. An alternative geometrical approach was proposed by Shapiro et al. (2011), who postulated that the rupture area for an induced earthquake falls entirely within the stimulated volume. This assumption reduces the maximum-magnitude problem to one of estimating the largest potential slip surface area within a given stimulated volume. Finally, van der Elst et al. (2016) proposed that the maximum observed magnitude, statistically speaking, is the expected maximum value for a finite sample drawn from an unbounded Gutenberg-Richter distribution. These three models imply different approaches for risk management. The deterministic method proposed by McGarr (2014) implies that a ceiling on the maximum magnitude can be imposed by limiting the net injected volume, whereas the approach developed by Shapiro et al. (2011) implies that the time-dependent maximum magnitude is governed by the spatial size of the microseismic event cloud. Finally, the sample-size hypothesis of Van der Elst et al. (2016) implies that the best available estimate of the maximum magnitude is based upon observed seismicity rate. The latter two approaches suggest that real-time monitoring is essential for effective management of risk. A reliable estimate of maximum

  8. Maximum organic carbon limits at different melter feed rates (U)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, A.S.

    1995-01-01

    This report documents the results of a study to assess the impact of varying melter feed rates on the maximum total organic carbon (TOC) limits allowable in the DWPF melter feed. Topics discussed include: carbon content; feed rate; feed composition; melter vapor space temperature; combustion and dilution air; off-gas surges; earlier work on maximum TOC; overview of models; and the results of the work completed

  9. A tropospheric ozone maximum over the equatorial Southern Indian Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Zhang

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available We examine the distribution of tropical tropospheric ozone (O3 from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS and the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES by using a global three-dimensional model of tropospheric chemistry (GEOS-Chem. MLS and TES observations of tropospheric O3 during 2005 to 2009 reveal a distinct, persistent O3 maximum, both in mixing ratio and tropospheric column, in May over the Equatorial Southern Indian Ocean (ESIO. The maximum is most pronounced in 2006 and 2008 and less evident in the other three years. This feature is also consistent with the total column O3 observations from the Ozone Mapping Instrument (OMI and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS. Model results reproduce the observed May O3 maximum and the associated interannual variability. The origin of the maximum reflects a complex interplay of chemical and dynamic factors. The O3 maximum is dominated by the O3 production driven by lightning nitrogen oxides (NOx emissions, which accounts for 62% of the tropospheric column O3 in May 2006. We find the contribution from biomass burning, soil, anthropogenic and biogenic sources to the O3 maximum are rather small. The O3 productions in the lightning outflow from Central Africa and South America both peak in May and are directly responsible for the O3 maximum over the western ESIO. The lightning outflow from Equatorial Asia dominates over the eastern ESIO. The interannual variability of the O3 maximum is driven largely by the anomalous anti-cyclones over the southern Indian Ocean in May 2006 and 2008. The lightning outflow from Central Africa and South America is effectively entrained by the anti-cyclones followed by northward transport to the ESIO.

  10. Dinosaur Metabolism and the Allometry of Maximum Growth Rate

    OpenAIRE

    Myhrvold, Nathan P.

    2016-01-01

    The allometry of maximum somatic growth rate has been used in prior studies to classify the metabolic state of both extant vertebrates and dinosaurs. The most recent such studies are reviewed, and their data is reanalyzed. The results of allometric regressions on growth rate are shown to depend on the choice of independent variable; the typical choice used in prior studies introduces a geometric shear transformation that exaggerates the statistical power of the regressions. The maximum growth...

  11. MAXIMUM PRINCIPLE FOR SUBSONIC FLOW WITH VARIABLE ENTROPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Sizykh Grigory

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Maximum principle for subsonic flow is fair for stationary irrotational subsonic gas flows. According to this prin- ciple, if the value of the velocity is not constant everywhere, then its maximum is achieved on the boundary and only on the boundary of the considered domain. This property is used when designing form of an aircraft with a maximum critical val- ue of the Mach number: it is believed that if the local Mach number is less than unit in the incoming flow and on the body surface, then the Mach number is less then unit in all points of flow. The known proof of maximum principle for subsonic flow is based on the assumption that in the whole considered area of the flow the pressure is a function of density. For the ideal and perfect gas (the role of diffusion is negligible, and the Mendeleev-Clapeyron law is fulfilled, the pressure is a function of density if entropy is constant in the entire considered area of the flow. Shows an example of a stationary sub- sonic irrotational flow, in which the entropy has different values on different stream lines, and the pressure is not a function of density. The application of the maximum principle for subsonic flow with respect to such a flow would be unreasonable. This example shows the relevance of the question about the place of the points of maximum value of the velocity, if the entropy is not a constant. To clarify the regularities of the location of these points, was performed the analysis of the com- plete Euler equations (without any simplifying assumptions in 3-D case. The new proof of the maximum principle for sub- sonic flow was proposed. This proof does not rely on the assumption that the pressure is a function of density. Thus, it is shown that the maximum principle for subsonic flow is true for stationary subsonic irrotational flows of ideal perfect gas with variable entropy.

  12. On semidefinite programming relaxations of maximum k-section

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Klerk, E.; Pasechnik, D.V.; Sotirov, R.; Dobre, C.

    2012-01-01

    We derive a new semidefinite programming bound for the maximum k -section problem. For k=2 (i.e. for maximum bisection), the new bound is at least as strong as a well-known bound by Poljak and Rendl (SIAM J Optim 5(3):467–487, 1995). For k ≥ 3the new bound dominates a bound of Karisch and Rendl

  13. Direct maximum parsimony phylogeny reconstruction from genotype data

    OpenAIRE

    Sridhar, Srinath; Lam, Fumei; Blelloch, Guy E; Ravi, R; Schwartz, Russell

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Maximum parsimony phylogenetic tree reconstruction from genetic variation data is a fundamental problem in computational genetics with many practical applications in population genetics, whole genome analysis, and the search for genetic predictors of disease. Efficient methods are available for reconstruction of maximum parsimony trees from haplotype data, but such data are difficult to determine directly for autosomal DNA. Data more commonly is available in the form of ge...

  14. Maximum spectral demands in the near-fault region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yin-Nan; Whittaker, Andrew S.; Luco, Nicolas

    2008-01-01

    The Next Generation Attenuation (NGA) relationships for shallow crustal earthquakes in the western United States predict a rotated geometric mean of horizontal spectral demand, termed GMRotI50, and not maximum spectral demand. Differences between strike-normal, strike-parallel, geometric-mean, and maximum spectral demands in the near-fault region are investigated using 147 pairs of records selected from the NGA strong motion database. The selected records are for earthquakes with moment magnitude greater than 6.5 and for closest site-to-fault distance less than 15 km. Ratios of maximum spectral demand to NGA-predicted GMRotI50 for each pair of ground motions are presented. The ratio shows a clear dependence on period and the Somerville directivity parameters. Maximum demands can substantially exceed NGA-predicted GMRotI50 demands in the near-fault region, which has significant implications for seismic design, seismic performance assessment, and the next-generation seismic design maps. Strike-normal spectral demands are a significantly unconservative surrogate for maximum spectral demands for closest distance greater than 3 to 5 km. Scale factors that transform NGA-predicted GMRotI50 to a maximum spectral demand in the near-fault region are proposed.

  15. Synchronized dynamic dose reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litzenberg, Dale W.; Hadley, Scott W.; Tyagi, Neelam; Balter, James M.; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Chetty, Indrin J.

    2007-01-01

    Variations in target volume position between and during treatment fractions can lead to measurable differences in the dose distribution delivered to each patient. Current methods to estimate the ongoing cumulative delivered dose distribution make idealized assumptions about individual patient motion based on average motions observed in a population of patients. In the delivery of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with a multi-leaf collimator (MLC), errors are introduced in both the implementation and delivery processes. In addition, target motion and MLC motion can lead to dosimetric errors from interplay effects. All of these effects may be of clinical importance. Here we present a method to compute delivered dose distributions for each treatment beam and fraction, which explicitly incorporates synchronized real-time patient motion data and real-time fluence and machine configuration data. This synchronized dynamic dose reconstruction method properly accounts for the two primary classes of errors that arise from delivering IMRT with an MLC: (a) Interplay errors between target volume motion and MLC motion, and (b) Implementation errors, such as dropped segments, dose over/under shoot, faulty leaf motors, tongue-and-groove effect, rounded leaf ends, and communications delays. These reconstructed dose fractions can then be combined to produce high-quality determinations of the dose distribution actually received to date, from which individualized adaptive treatment strategies can be determined

  16. Skin dose estimation due to a contamination by a radionuclide β emitter: are doses equivalent good estimator of protection quantities?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourgois, L.

    2011-01-01

    When handling radioactive β emitters, measurements in terms of personal dose equivalents H p (0.07) are used to estimate the equivalent dose limit to skin or extremities given by regulations. First of all, analytical expressions for individual dose equivalents H p (0.07) and equivalent doses to the extremities H skin are given for a point source and for contamination with a radionuclide β emitter. Second of all, operational quantities and protection quantities are compared. It is shown that in this case the operational quantities significantly overstate the protection quantities. For a skin contamination the ratio between operational quantities and protection quantities is 2 for a maximum β energy of 3 MeV and 90 for a maximum β energy of 150 keV. (author)

  17. Low doses effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tubiana, M.

    1997-01-01

    In this article is asked the question about a possible carcinogens effect of low dose irradiation. With epidemiological data, knowledge about the carcinogenesis, the professor Tubiana explains that in spite of experiments made on thousand or hundred of thousands animals it has not been possible to bring to the fore a carcinogens effect for low doses and then it is not reasonable to believe and let the population believe that low dose irradiation could lead to an increase of neoplasms and from this point of view any hardening of radiation protection standards could in fact, increase anguish about ionizing radiations. (N.C.)

  18. Monte Carlo calculation of the maximum therapeutic gain of tumor antivascular alpha therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Chen-Yu; Oborn, Bradley M.; Guatelli, Susanna; Allen, Barry J. [Centre for Experimental Radiation Oncology, St. George Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Kogarah, New South Wales 2217 (Australia); Illawarra Cancer Care Centre, Wollongong, New South Wales 2522, Australia and Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, New South Wales 2522 (Australia); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, New South Wales 2522 (Australia); Centre for Experimental Radiation Oncology, St. George Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Kogarah, New South Wales 2217 (Australia)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: Metastatic melanoma lesions experienced marked regression after systemic targeted alpha therapy in a phase 1 clinical trial. This unexpected response was ascribed to tumor antivascular alpha therapy (TAVAT), in which effective tumor regression is achieved by killing endothelial cells (ECs) in tumor capillaries and, thus, depriving cancer cells of nutrition and oxygen. The purpose of this paper is to quantitatively analyze the therapeutic efficacy and safety of TAVAT by building up the testing Monte Carlo microdosimetric models. Methods: Geant4 was adapted to simulate the spatial nonuniform distribution of the alpha emitter {sup 213}Bi. The intraluminal model was designed to simulate the background dose to normal tissue capillary ECs from the nontargeted activity in the blood. The perivascular model calculates the EC dose from the activity bound to the perivascular cancer cells. The key parameters are the probability of an alpha particle traversing an EC nucleus, the energy deposition, the lineal energy transfer, and the specific energy. These results were then applied to interpret the clinical trial. Cell survival rate and therapeutic gain were determined. Results: The specific energy for an alpha particle hitting an EC nucleus in the intraluminal and perivascular models is 0.35 and 0.37 Gy, respectively. As the average probability of traversal in these models is 2.7% and 1.1%, the mean specific energy per decay drops to 1.0 cGy and 0.4 cGy, which demonstrates that the source distribution has a significant impact on the dose. Using the melanoma clinical trial activity of 25 mCi, the dose to tumor EC nucleus is found to be 3.2 Gy and to a normal capillary EC nucleus to be 1.8 cGy. These data give a maximum therapeutic gain of about 180 and validate the TAVAT concept. Conclusions: TAVAT can deliver a cytotoxic dose to tumor capillaries without being toxic to normal tissue capillaries.

  19. Aortic dose constraints when reirradiating thoracic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, Jaden D.; Gomez, Daniel R.; Amini, Arya; Rebueno, Neal; Allen, Pamela K.; Martel, Mary K.; Rineer, Justin M.; Ang, Kie Kian; McAvoy, Sarah; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Welsh, James W.

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: Improved radiation delivery and planning has allowed, in some instances, for the retreatment of thoracic tumors. We investigated the dose limits of the aorta wherein grade 5 aortic toxicity was observed after reirradiation of lung tumors. Material and methods: In a retrospective analysis, 35 patients were identified, between 1993 and 2008, who received two rounds of external beam irradiation that included the aorta in the radiation fields of both the initial and retreatment plans. We determined the maximum cumulative dose to 1 cm 3 of the aorta (the composite dose) for each patient, normalized these doses to 1.8 Gy/fraction, and corrected them for long-term tissue recovery between treatments (NID R ). Results: The median time interval between treatments was 30 months (range, 1–185 months). The median follow-up of patients alive at analysis was 42 months (range, 14–70 months). Two of the 35 patients (6%) were identified as having grade 5 aortic toxicities. There was a 25% rate of grade 5 aortic toxicity for patients receiving composite doses ⩾120.0 Gy (vs. 0% for patients receiving R ⩾90.0 Gy) to 1 cm 3 of the aorta

  20. Dose assessment for Greifswald and Cadarache

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raskob, W.

    1996-07-01

    Probabilistic dose assessments for accidental atmospheric releases of tritium and activation products as well as releases under normal operation conditions were performed for the sites of Greifswald, Germany, and Cadarache, France. Additionally, aquatic releases were considered for both sites. No country specific rules were applied and the input parameters were adapted as far as possible to those used within former ITER studies to have a better comparison to site independent dose assessments performed in the frame of ITER. The main goal was to complete the generic data base with site specific values. The agreement between the results from the ITER study on atmospheric releases and the two sites are rather good for tritium, whereas the ITER reference dose values for the activation product releases are often lower, than the maximum doses for Greifswald and Cadarache. However, the percentile values fit better to the deterministic approach of ITER. Within all scenarios, the consequences of aquatic releases are in nearly all cases smaller than those from comparable releases to the atmosphere (HTO and steel). This rule is only broken once in case of accidental releases of activated steel from Cadarache. However, the uncertainties associated with the aquatic assessments are rather high and a better data base is needed to obtain more realistic and thus more reliable dose values. (orig.) [de

  1. A real time dose monitoring and dose reconstruction tool for patient specific VMAT QA and delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyagi, Neelam; Yang Kai; Gersten, David; Yan Di

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a real time dose monitoring and dose reconstruction tool to identify and quantify sources of errors during patient specific volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivery and quality assurance. Methods: The authors develop a VMAT delivery monitor tool called linac data monitor that connects to the linac in clinical mode and records, displays, and compares real time machine parameters with the planned parameters. A new measure, called integral error, keeps a running total of leaf overshoot and undershoot errors in each leaf pair, multiplied by leaf width, and the amount of time during which the error exists in monitor unit delivery. Another tool reconstructs Pinnacle 3 ™ format delivered plan based on the saved machine logfile and recalculates actual delivered dose in patient anatomy. Delivery characteristics of various standard fractionation and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) VMAT plans delivered on Elekta Axesse and Synergy linacs were quantified. Results: The MLC and gantry errors for all the treatment sites were 0.00 ± 0.59 mm and 0.05 ± 0.31°, indicating a good MLC gain calibration. Standard fractionation plans had a larger gantry error than SBRT plans due to frequent dose rate changes. On average, the MLC errors were negligible but larger errors of up to 6 mm and 2.5° were seen when dose rate varied frequently. Large gantry errors occurred during the acceleration and deceleration process, and correlated well with MLC errors (r= 0.858, p= 0.0004). PTV mean, minimum, and maximum dose discrepancies were 0.87 ± 0.21%, 0.99 ± 0.59%, and 1.18 ± 0.52%, respectively. The organs at risk (OAR) doses were within 2.5%, except some OARs that showed up to 5.6% discrepancy in maximum dose. Real time displayed normalized total positive integral error (normalized to the total monitor units) correlated linearly with MLC (r= 0.9279, p < 0.001) and gantry errors (r= 0.742, p= 0.005). There is a strong correlation between total integral

  2. Daily radionuclide ingestion and internal radiation doses in Aomori prefecture, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsuka, Yoshihito; Kakiuchi, Hideki; Akata, Naofumi; Takaku, Yuichi; Hisamatsu, Shun'ichi

    2013-10-01

    To assess internal annual dose in the general public in Aomori Prefecture, Japan, 80 duplicate cooked diet samples, equivalent to the food consumed over a 400-d period by one person, were collected from 100 volunteers in Aomori City and the village of Rokkasho during 2006–2010 and were analyzed for 11 radionuclides. To obtain average rates of ingestion of radionuclides, the volunteers were selected from among office, fisheries, agricultural, and livestock farm workers. Committed effective doses from ingestion of the diet over a 1-y period were calculated from the analytical results and from International Commission on Radiological Protection dose coefficients; for 40K, an internal effective dose rate from the literature was used. Fisheries workers had significantly higher combined internal annual dose than the other workers, possibly because of high rates of ingestion of marine products known to have high 210Po concentrations. The average internal dose rate, weighted by the numbers of households in each worker group in Aomori Prefecture, was estimated at 0.47 mSv y-1. Polonium-210 contributed 49% of this value. The sum of committed effective dose rates for 210Po, 210Pb, 228Ra, and 14C and the effective dose rate of 40K accounted for approximately 99% of the average internal dose rate.

  3. Bayesian maximum posterior probability method for interpreting plutonium urinalysis data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, G.; Inkret, W.C.

    1996-01-01

    A new internal dosimetry code for interpreting urinalysis data in terms of radionuclide intakes is described for the case of plutonium. The mathematical method is to maximise the Bayesian posterior probability using an entropy function as the prior probability distribution. A software package (MEMSYS) developed for image reconstruction is used. Some advantages of the new code are that it ensures positive calculated dose, it smooths out fluctuating data, and it provides an estimate of the propagated uncertainty in the calculated doses. (author)

  4. All Yersinia enterocolitica are pathogenic: virulence of phylogroup 1 Y. enterocolitica in a Galleria mellonella infection model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alenizi, Dhahi; Ringwood, Tamara; Redhwan, Alya; Bouraha, Bouchra; Wren, Brendan W; Prentice, Michael; McNally, Alan

    2016-08-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica is a zoonotic pathogen and a common cause of gastroenteritis in humans. The species is composed of six diverse phylogroups, of which strains of phylogroup 1 are considered non-pathogenic to mammals due to the lack of the major virulence plasmid pYV, and their lack of virulence in a mouse infection model. In the present report we present data examining the pathogenicity of strains of Y. enterocolitica across all six phylogroups in a Galleria mellonellla model. We have demonstrated that in this model strains of phylogroup 1 exhibit severe pathogenesis with a lethal dose of as low as 10 c.f.u., that this virulence is an active process and that flagella play a major role in the virulence phenotype. We have also demonstrated that the complete lack of virulence in Galleria of the mammalian pathogenic phylogroups is not due to carriage of the pYV virulence plasmid. Our data suggest that all Y. enterocolitica can be pathogenic, which may be a reflection of the true natural habitat of the species, and that we may need to reconsider the eco-evo perspective of this important bacterial species.

  5. Phase formation in the (1-y)BiFeO{sub 3}-yBiScO{sub 3} system under ambient and high pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salak, A.N., E-mail: salak@ua.pt [Department of Materials and Ceramic Engineering and CICECO – Aveiro Institute of Materials, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Khalyavin, D.D., E-mail: dmitry.khalyavin@stfc.ac.uk [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, OX11 0QX Didcot (United Kingdom); Pushkarev, A.V.; Radyush, Yu.V.; Olekhnovich, N.M. [Scientific-Practical Materials Research Centre of NAS of Belarus, P. Brovka Street, 19, 220072 Minsk (Belarus); Shilin, A.D.; Rubanik, V.V. [Institute of Technical Acoustics of NAS of Belarus, Lyudnikov Avenue, 13, 210023 Vitebsk (Belarus)

    2017-03-15

    Formation and thermal stability of perovskite phases in the BiFe{sub 1-y}Sc{sub y}O{sub 3} system (0≤y≤0.70) were studied. When the iron-to-scandium substitution rate does not exceed about 15 at%, the single-phase perovskite ceramics with the rhombohedral R3c symmetry (as that of the parent compound, BiFeO{sub 3}) can be prepared from the stoichiometric mixture of the respective oxides at ambient pressure. Thermal treatment of the oxide mixtures with a higher content of scandium results in formation of two main phases, namely a BiFeO{sub 3}-like R3c phase and a cubic (I23) sillenite-type phase based on γ-Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Single-phase perovskite ceramics of the BiFe{sub 1-y}Sc{sub y}O{sub 3} composition were synthesized under high pressure from the thermally treated oxide mixtures. When y is between 0 and 0.25 the high-pressure prepared phase is the rhombohedral R3c with the √2a{sub p}×√2a{sub p}×2√3a{sub p} superstructure (a{sub p} ~ 4 Å is the pseudocubic perovskite unit-cell parameter). The orthorhombic Pnma phase (√2a{sub p}×4a{sub p}×2√2a{sub p}) was obtained in the range of 0.30≤y≤0.60, while the monoclinic C2/c phase (√6a{sub p}×√2a{sub p}×√6a{sub p}) is formed when y=0.70. The normalized unit-cell volume drops at the crossover from the rhombohedral to the orthorhombic composition range. The perovskite BiFe{sub 1-y}Sc{sub y}O{sub 3} phases prepared under high pressure are metastable regardless of their symmetry. At ambient pressure, the phases with the compositions in the ranges of 0.20≤y≤0.25, 0.30≤y<0.50 and 0.50≤y≤0.70 start to decompose above 970, 920 and 870 K, respectively. - Graphical abstract: Formation of perovskite phases in the BiFe{sub 1-y}Sc{sub y}O{sub 3} system when y≥0.15 requires application of pressure of several GPa. The phases formed under high pressure: R3c (0.20≤y≤0.25), Pnma (0.30≤y≤0.60) and C2/c (y≥0.70) are metastable. - Highlights: • Maximal Fe-to-Sc substitution rate in Bi

  6. Doses from radioactive methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phipps, A.W.; Kendall, G.M.; Fell, T.P.; Harrison, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    A possible radiation hazard arises from exposure to methane labelled with either a 3 H or a 14 C nuclide. This radioactive methane could be released from a variety of sources, e.g. land burial sites containing radioactive waste. Standard assumptions adopted for vapours would not apply to an inert alkane like methane. This paper discusses mechanisms by which radioactive methane would irradiate tissues and provides estimates of doses. Data on skin thickness and metabolism of methane are discussed with reference to these mechanisms. It is found that doses are dominated by dose from the small fraction of methane which is inhaled and metabolised. This component of dose has been calculated under rather conservative assumptions. (author)

  7. Controllable dose; Dosis controlable

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez R, J T; Anaya M, R A [ININ, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    With the purpose of eliminating the controversy about the lineal hypothesis without threshold which found the systems of dose limitation of the recommendations of ICRP 26 and 60, at the end of last decade R. Clarke president of the ICRP proposed the concept of Controllable Dose: as the dose or dose sum that an individual receives from a particular source which can be reasonably controllable by means of any means; said concept proposes a change in the philosophy of the radiological protection of its concern by social approaches to an individual focus. In this work a panorama of the foundations is presented, convenient and inconveniences that this proposal has loosened in the international community of the radiological protection, with the purpose of to familiarize to our Mexican community in radiological protection with these new concepts. (Author)

  8. Acetaminophen dosing for children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your child, call your provider. Proper Dosing of Suppositories If your child is vomiting or will not take oral medicine, you can use suppositories. Suppositories are placed in the anus to deliver ...

  9. Radiation dose electrophysiology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez-Armas, J.; Rodriguez, A.; Catalan, A.; Hernandez Armas, O.; Luque Japon, L.; Moral, S.; Barroso, L.; Rfuez-Hdez, R.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this paper has been to measure and analyse some of the parameters which are directly related with the doses given to patients in two electrophysiology procedures: diagnosis and ablation with radiofrequency. 16 patients were considered in this study. 13 them had an ablation with radiofrequency at the Unit of Electrophysiology at the University Hospital of the Canaries, La Laguna., Tenerife. The results of skin doses, in the ablation cases, were higher than 2 Gy (threshold of some deterministic effects). The average value was 1.1 Gy. The personal doses, measured under the lead apron, for physician and nurses were 4 and 3 micro Sievert. These results emphasised the necessity of radiation protection measures in order to reduce, ad much as possible, the doses to patients. (Author)

  10. Dose in conventional radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acuna D, E.; Padilla R, Z. P.; Escareno J, E.; Vega C, H. R.

    2011-10-01

    It has been pointed out that medical exposures are the most significant sources of exposure to ionizing radiation for the general population. Inside the medical exposures the most important is the X-ray use for diagnosis, which is by far the largest contribution to the average dose received by the population. From all studies performed in radiology the chest radiography is the most abundant. In an X-ray machine, voltage and current are combined to obtain a good image and a reduce dose, however due to the workload in a radiology service individual dose is not monitored. In order to evaluate the dose due to chest radiography in this work a plate phantom was built according to the ISO recommendations using methylmethacrylate walls and water. The phantom was used in the Imaging department of the Zacatecas General Hospital as a radiology patient asking for a chest study; using thermoluminescent dosimeters, TLD 100 the kerma at the surface entrance was determined. (Author)

  11. Irradiation dose of cosmonauts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makra, Zs.

    1978-01-01

    The results obtained by determining the irradiation dose during the spaceflights of Apollo as well as the Sojouz-3 and Sojouz-9 spacecrafts have been compared in the form of tables. In case of Apollo astronauts the irradiation dose was determined by two methods and its sources were also pointed out, in tables. During Sojouz spacetravels the cosmonauts were exposed to a negligible dose. In spite of this fact the radiation danger is considerable. The small irradiation doses noticed so far are due to the fact that during the spaceflights there was no big proturberance. However, during the future long-range spacetravels a better radiation shielding than the one used up to now will be necessary. (P.J.)

  12. Ibuprofen dosing for children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000772.htm Ibuprofen dosing for children To use the sharing features ... much of this medicine can be harmful. How Ibuprofen can Help Your Child Ibuprofen is a type ...

  13. Effects of low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Guen, B.

    2001-01-01

    Actually, even though it is comfortable for the risk management, the hypothesis of the dose-effect relationship linearity is not confirmed for any model. In particular, in the area of low dose rate delivered by low let emitters. this hypothesis is debated at the light of recent observations, notably these ones relative to the mechanisms leading to genetic instability and induction eventuality of DNA repair. The problem of strong let emitters is still to solve. (N.C.)

  14. Gonadal doses from radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomon, S.B.; Morris, N.D.

    1980-06-01

    The method of calculation of gonadal doses arising from different radiotherapeutic procedures is described. The measurement of scatter factors to the gonads from superficial and deep therapy is detailed and the analytic fits to the experimental data, as a function of field position, field size and beam energy are given. The data used to calculate the gonadal doses from treatments using linear accelerators, teletherapy and sealed sources are described and the analytic fits to the data given

  15. New view on In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N{sub y}As{sub 1-y}alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elyukhin, Vyacheslav A. [Departamento de Ingenieria Electrica, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Avenida Instituto Politecnico Nacional 2508, 07360, Mexico (Mexico)

    2015-12-15

    Semiconductors with isoelectronic centers are actively studied to fabricate arrays of identical single photon emitters. Self-assembling of 4N10In and 1N4In clusters in GaAs-rich In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N{sub y}As{sub 1-y} is represented. All or almost all In atoms are in 4N10In clusters from 0 to 800 C in In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N{sub y}As{sub 1-y} with x = 1 x 10{sup -4}, y = 1 x 10{sup -4} and x = 1 x 10{sup -5}, y = 1 x 10{sup -5}. All or almost all nitrogen atoms are in 1N4In clusters if x = 0.01, y = 1 x 10{sup -4} and x = 1 x 10{sup -3}, y = 1 x 10{sup -6}. There are both types of clusters in alloys with x = 5 x 10{sup -5}, y = 5 x 10{sup -7}; x = 2 x 10{sup -4}, y = 2 x 10{sup -6}; x = 1 x 10{sup -4}, y = 1 x 10{sup -5} and x = 2 x 10{sup -3}, y = 2 x 10{sup -4} and portions of nitrogen atoms in clusters depend on the composition and temperature. Thus, In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N{sub y}As{sub 1-y} are promising semiconductors to obtain arrays of identical isoelectronic clusters with the desirable density. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Kodak EDR2 film for patient skin dose assessment in cardiac catheterization procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrell, R E; Rogers, A T

    2006-07-01

    Patient skin doses were measured using Kodak EDR2 film for 20 coronary angiography (CA) and 32 percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) procedures. For CA, all skin doses were well below 1 Gy. However, 23% of PTCA patients received skin doses of 1 Gy or more. Dose-area product (DAP) was also recorded and was found to be an inadequate indicator of maximum skin dose. Practical compliance with ICRP recommendations requires a robust method for skin dosimetry that is more accurate than DAP and is applicable over a wider dose range than EDR2 film.

  17. Differentiated thyroid cancer treatment with therapeutic doses of 131I calculated by dosimetry: our experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fadel, Ana M.; Chebel, G.M.; Valdivieso, C.M.; Degrossi, Osvaldo J.; Cabrejas, R.; Cabrejas, M.L.

    2006-01-01

    The optimum dose for the differentiated thyroid cancer treatment is a motive of controversy. There exist two ways of deciding the dose to administer: the empirical method (fixed doses) and dosimetric calculation method. The use of fixed doses has demonstrated safety and effectiveness. Nevertheless there are cases in which the use of several small doses not resolves the metastases illness of the patients. Using the Benua-Leeper method for dosimetric calculation we have evaluated the maximum dose treatment that could be administered to 20 patients who showed persistent disease after several treatments with 131 I. (author) [es

  18. Air dose rate in Aichi Prefecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnuma, Shoko; Chaya, Kunio; Tomita, Banichi; Aoyama, Kan; Yamada, Naoki; Yamada, Masuo; Hamamura, Norikatsu

    1985-01-01

    We have carried out the observations of air dose rate during 1964--1983 at the fixed points of Aichi Prefecture and investigated the distribution of air dose rate in this prefecture during 1979--1983. The results of these researches are as follows. 1) The apparent half time of radiation dose from the earth and the atmosphere during the last 20 years was about 9.7 years and it was longer than the apparent half time of fallout total β radioactivity in every rainfall that was about 3.2 years. 2) The influence of nuclear explosion test in China on the measurements of air does rate did not existed directly during the latter half of 20 years, not so as during the former and it was keeping decreasing. It was expected that the air dose rate would begin to indicate the natural radiation dose from the earth and the atmosphere in the near future. 3) The distribution of air dose rate in this prefecture depended strongly on the geology. The maximum value was 5.6 μR/hr (except cosmic rays) in Fujioka Cho, the minimum value was 1.9 μR/hr (except cosmic rays) in Tahara Cho and the average in the whole prefecture was 3.5+-0.7 μR/hr (except cosmic rays). 4) It was estimated that the radiation dose which the inhabitants received from the earth and the atmosphere was 17--52 m rem a year and the average was 31 m rem a year. (author)

  19. Air dose rate in Aichi Prefecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohnuma, Shoko; Chaya, Kunio; Tomita, Banichi; Aoyama, Kan; Yamada, Naoki; Yamada, Masuo; Hamamura, Norikatsu

    1985-03-01

    We have carried out the observations of air dose rate during 1964-1983 at the fixed points of Aichi Prefecture and investigated the distribution of air dose rate in this prefecture during 1979-1983. The results of these researches are as follows. 1) The apparent half time of radiation dose from the earth and the atmosphere during the last 20 years was about 9.7 years and it was longer than the apparent half time of fallout total ..beta.. radioactivity in every rainfall that was about 3.2 years. 2) The influence of nuclear explosion test in China on the measurements of air does rate did not existed directly during the latter half of 20 years, not so as during the former and it was keeping decreasing. It was expected that the air dose rate would begin to indicate the natural radiation dose from the earth and the atmosphere in the near future. 3) The distribution of air dose rate in this prefecture depended strongly on the geology. The maximum value was 5.6 ..mu..R/hr (except cosmic rays) in Fujioka Cho, the minimum value was 1.9 ..mu..R/hr (except cosmic rays) in Tahara Cho and the average in the whole prefecture was 3.5 +- 0.7 ..mu..R/hr (except cosmic rays). 4) It was estimated that the radiation dose which the inhabitants received from the earth and the atmosphere was 17-52 m rem a year and the average was 31 m rem a year.

  20. Effect of Sr substitution on superconductivity in Hg2(Ba1-ySry)2YCu2O8-d (part 1): a neutron powder diffraction study

    OpenAIRE

    Toulemonde, P.; Odier, P.; Bordet, P.; Floch, S. Le; Suard, E.

    2002-01-01

    The effect of Sr chemical pressure on superconductivity was investigated in Hg2(Ba1-ySry)2YCu2O8-d. The samples were synthesized at high pressure-high temperature from y = 0.0 to full substitution, y = 1.0. These Sr-substituted compounds are superconducting, without Ca doping on the Y site, and show an increasing Tc with Sr, reaching 42 K for y = 1.0. A detailed neutron powder diffraction study compares the structural changes induced by this chemical Sr/Ba substitution and the mechanical pres...

  1. ANALISIS DE LOS MECANISMOS INVOLUCRADOS EN LA LOCALIZACION ASIMETRICA DE TPRP1 Y ATPRP3 EN EL PELO RADICULAR DE ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA

    OpenAIRE

    RODRIGUEZ FURLAN, CECILIA

    2012-01-01

    Las proteínas ricas en prolinas (PRPs) son proteínas estructurales involucradas en el ensamblaje de la pared celular. En Arabidopsis dos miembros de esta familia de genes, ATPRP1 y ATPRP3, se expresan específicamente en células de pelo radicular. Los pelos radiculares elongan mediante crecimiento por el ápice a partir de células epidermales especializadas denominadas tricoblastos. El crecimiento por el ápice involucra la secreción polarizada de los materiales necesarios para formar la memb...

  2. Gradiente de riesgo genético HLA-DQ para diabetes tipo 1 y enfermedad celíaca en el noroeste de México

    OpenAIRE

    Mejía-León, M.E.; Ruiz-Dyck, K.M.; Calderón de la Barca, A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Antecedentes: La diabetes tipo 1 (DT1) y la enfermedad celíaca (EC) son 2 enfermedades autoinmunes frecuentes en la infancia y comparten su predisposición genética (HLA-DQ2 y DQ8). La prevalencia de ambas se ha incrementado en el mundo. En el estado de Sonora (15 habitantes/km2), se desconoce información sobre su riesgo genético o la distribución de los alelos asociados en la población general. Objetivo: Comparar la frecuencia alélica HLA-DQ de una muestra representativa de recién nacidos ...

  3. Modulación del tono vascular por la sobre-expresión de receptores a canabinoides CB1 y CB2 en arterioesclerosis inducida en ratas

    OpenAIRE

    Espinoza P., María Rosa

    2013-01-01

    La arteriosclerosis, es un proceso degenerativo responsable de la mayor parte de las enfermedades cardiovasculares, es una enfermedad compleja que se produce a partir de múltiples factores de riesgo. Se ha observado que los compuestos derivados de la planta cannabis sativa provocan efectos vasorelajantes por medio de receptores específicos CB1 y CB2. ACPA y JWH 133 son potentes agonistas a estos receptores, se desconoce el papel que desempeñan en la arteriosclerosis provocando una relajación ...

  4. Modulación de la expresión por GA y ABA de los genes Ss1 y Ss2 que codifican sacarosa sintasa en cebada

    OpenAIRE

    Carbonero Zalduegui, Pilar; Barrero Sicilia, Cristina; Oñate Sanchez, Luis; Hernando Amado, Sara; Rueda Romero, Paloma

    2008-01-01

    En este trabajo se ha llevado a cabo un estudio comparativo entre distintas isoformas de SUSy de cereales y arabidopsis. Además se ha realizado un análisis de expresión de HvSs1 y HvSs2 en distintos órganos, incluyendo patrones temporales en semillas en desarrollo y germinación, así como la variación de su respuesta a ácido abscísico (ABA) y giberélico (GA3).

  5. Effect of layer composition on band spectrum of CdxHg1-xTe - CdyHg1-yTe-type superlattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerchikov, L.G.; Subashiev, A.V.; Salman Dalla

    1993-01-01

    Evolution of energy spectrum of Cd x Hg 1-x Te -Cd y Hg 1-y Te superlattices at variation of layer composition is considered. Transition from 3 type superlattice to 1 type superlattice occurring for y=0.16 is studied comprehensively. In this case, dependence of the width of superlattice forbidden zone on layer thickness is shown to become more smooth, than in CdTe - HgTe superlattice and it gives more possibilities to use such superlattices for making IR phototransistors. 10 refs., 4 figs

  6. Osmotic and activity coefficients of {y Na2SO4 + (1 - y) ZnSO4}(aq) at T = 298.15 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marjanovic, V.; Ninkovic, R.; Miladinovic, J.; Todorovic, M.; Pavicevic, V.

    2005-01-01

    The osmotic coefficients of the mixed electrolyte solution {y Na 2 SO 4 + (1 - y) ZnSO 4 }(aq) have been measured by the isopiestic method, at T = 298.5 K. The experimental results were treated by Scatchard's, Pitzer-Kim's and Clegg-Pitzer-Brimblecombe's methods for mixed-electrolyte solutions. By these methods, the activity coefficients for Na 2 SO 4 and ZnSO 4 were calculated and compared. The Scatchard interaction parameters are used for calculation of the excess Gibbs free energy as a function of ionic strength and ionic-strength fraction of Na 2 SO 4 . Also, the Zdanovskii's rule of linearity is tested

  7. Maximum vehicle cabin temperatures under different meteorological conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundstein, Andrew; Meentemeyer, Vernon; Dowd, John

    2009-05-01

    A variety of studies have documented the dangerously high temperatures that may occur within the passenger compartment (cabin) of cars under clear sky conditions, even at relatively low ambient air temperatures. Our study, however, is the first to examine cabin temperatures under variable weather conditions. It uses a unique maximum vehicle cabin temperature dataset in conjunction with directly comparable ambient air temperature, solar radiation, and cloud cover data collected from April through August 2007 in Athens, GA. Maximum cabin temperatures, ranging from 41-76°C, varied considerably depending on the weather conditions and the time of year. Clear days had the highest cabin temperatures, with average values of 68°C in the summer and 61°C in the spring. Cloudy days in both the spring and summer were on average approximately 10°C cooler. Our findings indicate that even on cloudy days with lower ambient air temperatures, vehicle cabin temperatures may reach deadly levels. Additionally, two predictive models of maximum daily vehicle cabin temperatures were developed using commonly available meteorological data. One model uses maximum ambient air temperature and average daily solar radiation while the other uses cloud cover percentage as a surrogate for solar radiation. From these models, two maximum vehicle cabin temperature indices were developed to assess the level of danger. The models and indices may be useful for forecasting hazardous conditions, promoting public awareness, and to estimate past cabin temperatures for use in forensic analyses.

  8. Fractal Dimension and Maximum Sunspot Number in Solar Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.-S. Kim

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The fractal dimension is a quantitative parameter describing the characteristics of irregular time series. In this study, we use this parameter to analyze the irregular aspects of solar activity and to predict the maximum sunspot number in the following solar cycle by examining time series of the sunspot number. For this, we considered the daily sunspot number since 1850 from SIDC (Solar Influences Data analysis Center and then estimated cycle variation of the fractal dimension by using Higuchi's method. We examined the relationship between this fractal dimension and the maximum monthly sunspot number in each solar cycle. As a result, we found that there is a strong inverse relationship between the fractal dimension and the maximum monthly sunspot number. By using this relation we predicted the maximum sunspot number in the solar cycle from the fractal dimension of the sunspot numbers during the solar activity increasing phase. The successful prediction is proven by a good correlation (r=0.89 between the observed and predicted maximum sunspot numbers in the solar cycles.

  9. Size dependence of efficiency at maximum power of heat engine

    KAUST Repository

    Izumida, Y.; Ito, N.

    2013-01-01

    We perform a molecular dynamics computer simulation of a heat engine model to study how the engine size difference affects its performance. Upon tactically increasing the size of the model anisotropically, we determine that there exists an optimum size at which the model attains the maximum power for the shortest working period. This optimum size locates between the ballistic heat transport region and the diffusive heat transport one. We also study the size dependence of the efficiency at the maximum power. Interestingly, we find that the efficiency at the maximum power around the optimum size attains a value that has been proposed as a universal upper bound, and it even begins to exceed the bound as the size further increases. We explain this behavior of the efficiency at maximum power by using a linear response theory for the heat engine operating under a finite working period, which naturally extends the low-dissipation Carnot cycle model [M. Esposito, R. Kawai, K. Lindenberg, C. Van den Broeck, Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 150603 (2010)]. The theory also shows that the efficiency at the maximum power under an extreme condition may reach the Carnot efficiency in principle.© EDP Sciences Società Italiana di Fisica Springer-Verlag 2013.

  10. Size dependence of efficiency at maximum power of heat engine

    KAUST Repository

    Izumida, Y.

    2013-10-01

    We perform a molecular dynamics computer simulation of a heat engine model to study how the engine size difference affects its performance. Upon tactically increasing the size of the model anisotropically, we determine that there exists an optimum size at which the model attains the maximum power for the shortest working period. This optimum size locates between the ballistic heat transport region and the diffusive heat transport one. We also study the size dependence of the efficiency at the maximum power. Interestingly, we find that the efficiency at the maximum power around the optimum size attains a value that has been proposed as a universal upper bound, and it even begins to exceed the bound as the size further increases. We explain this behavior of the efficiency at maximum power by using a linear response theory for the heat engine operating under a finite working period, which naturally extends the low-dissipation Carnot cycle model [M. Esposito, R. Kawai, K. Lindenberg, C. Van den Broeck, Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 150603 (2010)]. The theory also shows that the efficiency at the maximum power under an extreme condition may reach the Carnot efficiency in principle.© EDP Sciences Società Italiana di Fisica Springer-Verlag 2013.

  11. How long do centenarians survive? Life expectancy and maximum lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modig, K; Andersson, T; Vaupel, J; Rau, R; Ahlbom, A

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the pattern of mortality above the age of 100 years. In particular, we aimed to examine whether Scandinavian data support the theory that mortality reaches a plateau at particularly old ages. Whether the maximum length of life increases with time was also investigated. The analyses were based on individual level data on all Swedish and Danish centenarians born from 1870 to 1901; in total 3006 men and 10 963 women were included. Birth cohort-specific probabilities of dying were calculated. Exact ages were used for calculations of maximum length of life. Whether maximum age changed over time was analysed taking into account increases in cohort size. The results confirm that there has not been any improvement in mortality amongst centenarians in the past 30 years and that the current rise in life expectancy is driven by reductions in mortality below the age of 100 years. The death risks seem to reach a plateau of around 50% at the age 103 years for men and 107 years for women. Despite the rising life expectancy, the maximum age does not appear to increase, in particular after accounting for the increasing number of individuals of advanced age. Mortality amongst centenarians is not changing despite improvements at younger ages. An extension of the maximum lifespan and a sizeable extension of life expectancy both require reductions in mortality above the age of 100 years. © 2017 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  12. Tolerance of the human spinal cord to single dose radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, S.; Zhu, G.; Yin, F.-F.; Ajlouni, M.; Kim, J.H.

    2003-01-01

    Tolerance of the spinal cord to the single dose of radiation is not well defined. Although there are cases of human spinal cord tolerance from re-irradiation to the same cord level, the information about the tolerance of human spinal cord to single large dose of radiosurgery is not available. We carried out spinal radiosurgery to treat spinal metastasis and studied the single dose tolerance of the human spinal cord in an ongoing dose escalation paradigm. A total of 39 patients with 48 lesions of spinal metastasis were treated with single dose radiosurgery at Henry Ford Hospital. The radiosurgery dose was escalated from 8 Gy to 16 Gy at 2 Gy increment. The radiation dose was prescribed to periphery of the spinal tumor. The radiation dose to the spinal cord was estimated by computerized dosimetry. The median follow-up time was 10 months (range 6-18 months) from the radiosurgery. The endpoint of the study was to demonstrate the efficacy of the spinal radiosurgery and to determine the tolerance of human spinal cord to single dose radiosurgery. The dose to the spinal cord was generally less than 50 % of the prescribed radiation dose. The volume of the spinal cord that received higher than this dose was less than 20 % of the anterior portion of the spinal cord. Maximum single dose of 8 Gy was delivered to the anterior 20 % of the spinal cord in this dose escalation study. The dose volume histogram will be presented. There was no acute or subacute radiation toxicity detected clinically and radiologically during the maximum follow-up of 20 months. Further dose escalation is in progress. The single tolerance dose of the human spinal cord appears to be at least 8 Gy when it was given to the 20 % of the cord volume, although the duration of follow up is not long enough to detect severe late cord toxicity. This study offers a valuable radiobiological basis of the normal spinal cord tolerance, and opens spinal radiosurgery as a safe treatment for spinal metastasis

  13. Spine stereotactic body radiation therapy plans: Achieving dose coverage, conformity, and dose falloff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Linda X.; Shankar, Viswanathan; Shen, Jin; Kuo, Hsiang-Chi; Mynampati, Dinesh; Yaparpalvi, Ravindra; Goddard, Lee; Basavatia, Amar; Fox, Jana; Garg, Madhur; Kalnicki, Shalom; Tomé, Wolfgang A.

    2015-01-01

    We report our experience of establishing planning objectives to achieve dose coverage, conformity, and dose falloff for spine stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) plans. Patients with spine lesions were treated using SBRT in our institution since September 2009. Since September 2011, we established the following planning objectives for our SBRT spine plans in addition to the cord dose constraints: (1) dose coverage—prescription dose (PD) to cover at least 95% planning target volume (PTV) and 90% PD to cover at least 99% PTV; (2) conformity index (CI)—ratio of prescription isodose volume (PIV) to the PTV < 1.2; (3) dose falloff—ratio of 50% PIV to the PTV (R 50% ); (4) and maximum dose in percentage of PD at 2 cm from PTV in any direction (D 2cm ) to follow Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0915. We have retrospectively reviewed 66 separate spine lesions treated between September 2009 and December 2012 (31 treated before September 2011 [group 1] and 35 treated after [group 2]). The χ 2 test was used to examine the difference in parameters between groups. The PTV V 100% PD ≥ 95% objective was met in 29.0% of group 1 vs 91.4% of group 2 (p < 0.01) plans. The PTV V 90% PD ≥ 99% objective was met in 38.7% of group 1 vs 88.6% of group 2 (p < 0.01) plans. Overall, 4 plans in group 1 had CI > 1.2 vs none in group 2 (p = 0.04). For D 2cm , 48.3% plans yielded a minor violation of the objectives and 16.1% a major violation for group 1, whereas 17.1% exhibited a minor violation and 2.9% a major violation for group 2 (p < 0.01). Spine SBRT plans can be improved on dose coverage, conformity, and dose falloff employing a combination of RTOG spine and lung SBRT protocol planning objectives

  14. Modeling multisite streamflow dependence with maximum entropy copula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Z.; Singh, V. P.

    2013-10-01

    Synthetic streamflows at different sites in a river basin are needed for planning, operation, and management of water resources projects. Modeling the temporal and spatial dependence structure of monthly streamflow at different sites is generally required. In this study, the maximum entropy copula method is proposed for multisite monthly streamflow simulation, in which the temporal and spatial dependence structure is imposed as constraints to derive the maximum entropy copula. The monthly streamflows at different sites are then generated by sampling from the conditional distribution. A case study for the generation of monthly streamflow at three sites in the Colorado River basin illustrates the application of the proposed method. Simulated streamflow from the maximum entropy copula is in satisfactory agreement with observed streamflow.

  15. Quality, precision and accuracy of the maximum No. 40 anemometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obermeir, J. [Otech Engineering, Davis, CA (United States); Blittersdorf, D. [NRG Systems Inc., Hinesburg, VT (United States)

    1996-12-31

    This paper synthesizes available calibration data for the Maximum No. 40 anemometer. Despite its long history in the wind industry, controversy surrounds the choice of transfer function for this anemometer. Many users are unaware that recent changes in default transfer functions in data loggers are producing output wind speed differences as large as 7.6%. Comparison of two calibration methods used for large samples of Maximum No. 40 anemometers shows a consistent difference of 4.6% in output speeds. This difference is significantly larger than estimated uncertainty levels. Testing, initially performed to investigate related issues, reveals that Gill and Maximum cup anemometers change their calibration transfer functions significantly when calibrated in the open atmosphere compared with calibration in a laminar wind tunnel. This indicates that atmospheric turbulence changes the calibration transfer function of cup anemometers. These results call into question the suitability of standard wind tunnel calibration testing for cup anemometers. 6 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Beat the Deviations in Estimating Maximum Power of Thermoelectric Modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Junling; Chen, Min

    2013-01-01

    Under a certain temperature difference, the maximum power of a thermoelectric module can be estimated by the open-circuit voltage and the short-circuit current. In practical measurement, there exist two switch modes, either from open to short or from short to open, but the two modes can give...... different estimations on the maximum power. Using TEG-127-2.8-3.5-250 and TEG-127-1.4-1.6-250 as two examples, the difference is about 10%, leading to some deviations with the temperature change. This paper analyzes such differences by means of a nonlinear numerical model of thermoelectricity, and finds out...... that the main cause is the influence of various currents on the produced electromotive potential. A simple and effective calibration method is proposed to minimize the deviations in specifying the maximum power. Experimental results validate the method with improved estimation accuracy....

  17. Mass mortality of the vermetid gastropod Ceraesignum maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, A. L.; Frazer, T. K.; Shima, J. S.; Osenberg, C. W.

    2016-09-01

    Ceraesignum maximum (G.B. Sowerby I, 1825), formerly Dendropoma maximum, was subject to a sudden, massive die-off in the Society Islands, French Polynesia, in 2015. On Mo'orea, where we have detailed documentation of the die-off, these gastropods were previously found in densities up to 165 m-2. In July 2015, we surveyed shallow back reefs of Mo'orea before, during and after the die-off, documenting their swift decline. All censused populations incurred 100% mortality. Additional surveys and observations from Mo'orea, Tahiti, Bora Bora, and Huahine (but not Taha'a) suggested a similar, and approximately simultaneous, die-off. The cause(s) of this cataclysmic mass mortality are currently unknown. Given the previously documented negative effects of C. maximum on corals, we expect the die-off will have cascading effects on the reef community.

  18. Stationary neutrino radiation transport by maximum entropy closure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bludman, S.A.

    1994-11-01

    The authors obtain the angular distributions that maximize the entropy functional for Maxwell-Boltzmann (classical), Bose-Einstein, and Fermi-Dirac radiation. In the low and high occupancy limits, the maximum entropy closure is bounded by previously known variable Eddington factors that depend only on the flux. For intermediate occupancy, the maximum entropy closure depends on both the occupation density and the flux. The Fermi-Dirac maximum entropy variable Eddington factor shows a scale invariance, which leads to a simple, exact analytic closure for fermions. This two-dimensional variable Eddington factor gives results that agree well with exact (Monte Carlo) neutrino transport calculations out of a collapse residue during early phases of hydrostatic neutron star formation

  19. Radiation research contracts: Biological effects of small radiation doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hug, O [International Atomic Energy Agency, Division of Health, Safety and Waste Disposal, Vienna (Austria)

    1959-04-15

    To establish the maximum permissible radiation doses for occupational and other kinds of radiation exposure, it is necessary to know those biological effects which can be produced by very small radiation doses. This particular field of radiation biology has not yet been sufficiently explored. This holds true for possible delayed damage after occupational radiation exposure over a period of many years as well as for acute reactions of the organism to single low level exposures. We know that irradiation of less than 25 Roentgen units (r) is unlikely to produce symptoms of radiation sickness. We have, however, found indications that even smaller doses may produce certain instantaneous reactions which must not be neglected

  20. Spatio-temporal observations of the tertiary ozone maximum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. F. Sofieva

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available We present spatio-temporal distributions of the tertiary ozone maximum (TOM, based on GOMOS (Global Ozone Monitoring by Occultation of Stars ozone measurements in 2002–2006. The tertiary ozone maximum is typically observed in the high-latitude winter mesosphere at an altitude of ~72 km. Although the explanation for this phenomenon has been found recently – low concentrations of odd-hydrogen cause the subsequent decrease in odd-oxygen losses – models have had significant deviations from existing observations until recently. Good coverage of polar night regions by GOMOS data has allowed for the first time to obtain spatial and temporal observational distributions of night-time ozone mixing ratio in the mesosphere.

    The distributions obtained from GOMOS data have specific features, which are variable from year to year. In particular, due to a long lifetime of ozone in polar night conditions, the downward transport of polar air by the meridional circulation is clearly observed in the tertiary ozone maximum time series. Although the maximum tertiary ozone mixing ratio is achieved close to the polar night terminator (as predicted by the theory, TOM can be observed also at very high latitudes, not only in the beginning and at the end, but also in the middle of winter. We have compared the observational spatio-temporal distributions of the tertiary ozone maximum with that obtained using WACCM (Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model and found that the specific features are reproduced satisfactorily by the model.

    Since ozone in the mesosphere is very sensitive to HOx concentrations, energetic particle precipitation can significantly modify the shape of the ozone profiles. In particular, GOMOS observations have shown that the tertiary ozone maximum was temporarily destroyed during the January 2005 and December 2006 solar proton events as a result of the HOx enhancement from the increased ionization.

  1. Estimating the maximum potential revenue for grid connected electricity storage :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byrne, Raymond Harry; Silva Monroy, Cesar Augusto.

    2012-12-01

    The valuation of an electricity storage device is based on the expected future cash flow generated by the device. Two potential sources of income for an electricity storage system are energy arbitrage and participation in the frequency regulation market. Energy arbitrage refers to purchasing (stor- ing) energy when electricity prices are low, and selling (discharging) energy when electricity prices are high. Frequency regulation is an ancillary service geared towards maintaining system frequency, and is typically procured by the independent system operator in some type of market. This paper outlines the calculations required to estimate the maximum potential revenue from participating in these two activities. First, a mathematical model is presented for the state of charge as a function of the storage device parameters and the quantities of electricity purchased/sold as well as the quantities o ered into the regulation market. Using this mathematical model, we present a linear programming optimization approach to calculating the maximum potential revenue from an elec- tricity storage device. The calculation of the maximum potential revenue is critical in developing an upper bound on the value of storage, as a benchmark for evaluating potential trading strate- gies, and a tool for capital nance risk assessment. Then, we use historical California Independent System Operator (CAISO) data from 2010-2011 to evaluate the maximum potential revenue from the Tehachapi wind energy storage project, an American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) energy storage demonstration project. We investigate the maximum potential revenue from two di erent scenarios: arbitrage only and arbitrage combined with the regulation market. Our analysis shows that participation in the regulation market produces four times the revenue compared to arbitrage in the CAISO market using 2010 and 2011 data. Then we evaluate several trading strategies to illustrate how they compare to the

  2. Estimation of eye absorbed doses in head & neck radiotherapy practices using thermoluminescent detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gh Bagheri

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available  Determination of eye absorbed dose during head & neck radiotherapy is essential to estimate the risk of cataract. Dose measurements were made in 20 head & neck cancer patients undergoing 60Co radiotherapy using LiF(MCP thermoluminescent dosimeters. Head & neck cancer radiotherapy was delivered by fields using SAD & SSD techniques. For each patient, 3 TLD chips were placed on each eye. Head & neck dose was about 700-6000 cGy in 8-28 equal fractions. The range of eye dose is estimated to be (3.49-639.1 mGy with a mean of maximum dose (98.114 mGy, which is about 3 % of head & neck dose. Maximum eye dose was observed for distsnces of about 3 cm from edge of the field to eye.

  3. Influence of intravenous opioid dose on postoperative ileus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barletta, Jeffrey F; Asgeirsson, Theodor; Senagore, Anthony J

    2011-07-01

    Intravenous opioids represent a major component in the pathophysiology of postoperative ileus (POI). However, the most appropriate measure and threshold to quantify the association between opioid dose (eg, average daily, cumulative, maximum daily) and POI remains unknown. To evaluate the relationship between opioid dose, POI, and length of stay (LOS) and identify the opioid measure that was most strongly associated with POI. Consecutive patients admitted to a community teaching hospital who underwent elective colorectal surgery by any technique with an enhanced-recovery protocol postoperatively were retrospectively identified. Patients were excluded if they received epidural analgesia, developed a major intraabdominal complication or medical complication, or had a prolonged workup prior to surgery. Intravenous opioid doses were quantified and converted to hydromorphone equivalents. Classification and regression tree (CART) analysis was used to determine the dosing threshold for the opioid measure most associated with POI and define high versus low use of opioids. Risk factors for POI and prolonged LOS were determined through multivariate analysis. The incidence of POI in 279 patients was 8.6%. CART analysis identified a maximum daily intravenous hydromorphone dose of 2 mg or more as the opioid measure most associated with POI. Multivariate analysis revealed maximum daily hydromorphone dose of 2 mg or more (p = 0.034), open surgical technique (p = 0.045), and days of intravenous narcotic therapy (p = 0.003) as significant risk factors for POI. Variables associated with increased LOS were POI (p POI and prolonged LOS, particularly when the maximum hydromorphone dose per day exceeds 2 mg. Clinicians should consider alternative, nonopioid-based pain management options when this occurs.

  4. Discontinuity of maximum entropy inference and quantum phase transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Jianxin; Ji, Zhengfeng; Yu, Nengkun; Zeng, Bei; Li, Chi-Kwong; Poon, Yiu-Tung; Shen, Yi; Zhou, Duanlu

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the connection between two genuinely quantum phenomena—the discontinuity of quantum maximum entropy inference and quantum phase transitions at zero temperature. It is shown that the discontinuity of the maximum entropy inference of local observable measurements signals the non-local type of transitions, where local density matrices of the ground state change smoothly at the transition point. We then propose to use the quantum conditional mutual information of the ground state as an indicator to detect the discontinuity and the non-local type of quantum phase transitions in the thermodynamic limit. (paper)

  5. On an Objective Basis for the Maximum Entropy Principle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Miller

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this letter, we elaborate on some of the issues raised by a recent paper by Neapolitan and Jiang concerning the maximum entropy (ME principle and alternative principles for estimating probabilities consistent with known, measured constraint information. We argue that the ME solution for the “problematic” example introduced by Neapolitan and Jiang has stronger objective basis, rooted in results from information theory, than their alternative proposed solution. We also raise some technical concerns about the Bayesian analysis in their work, which was used to independently support their alternative to the ME solution. The letter concludes by noting some open problems involving maximum entropy statistical inference.

  6. The maximum economic depth of groundwater abstraction for irrigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierkens, M. F.; Van Beek, L. P.; de Graaf, I. E. M.; Gleeson, T. P.

    2017-12-01

    Over recent decades, groundwater has become increasingly important for agriculture. Irrigation accounts for 40% of the global food production and its importance is expected to grow further in the near future. Already, about 70% of the globally abstracted water is used for irrigation, and nearly half of that is pumped groundwater. In many irrigated areas where groundwater is the primary source of irrigation water, groundwater abstraction is larger than recharge and we see massive groundwater head decline in these areas. An important question then is: to what maximum depth can groundwater be pumped for it to be still economically recoverable? The objective of this study is therefore to create a global map of the maximum depth of economically recoverable groundwater when used for irrigation. The maximum economic depth is the maximum depth at which revenues are still larger than pumping costs or the maximum depth at which initial investments become too large compared to yearly revenues. To this end we set up a simple economic model where costs of well drilling and the energy costs of pumping, which are a function of well depth and static head depth respectively, are compared with the revenues obtained for the irrigated crops. Parameters for the cost sub-model are obtained from several US-based studies and applied to other countries based on GDP/capita as an index of labour costs. The revenue sub-model is based on gross irrigation water demand calculated with a global hydrological and water resources model, areal coverage of crop types from MIRCA2000 and FAO-based statistics on crop yield and market price. We applied our method to irrigated areas in the world overlying productive aquifers. Estimated maximum economic depths range between 50 and 500 m. Most important factors explaining the maximum economic depth are the dominant crop type in the area and whether or not initial investments in well infrastructure are limiting. In subsequent research, our estimates of

  7. Efficiency of autonomous soft nanomachines at maximum power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Udo

    2011-01-14

    We consider nanosized artificial or biological machines working in steady state enforced by imposing nonequilibrium concentrations of solutes or by applying external forces, torques, or electric fields. For unicyclic and strongly coupled multicyclic machines, efficiency at maximum power is not bounded by the linear response value 1/2. For strong driving, it can even approach the thermodynamic limit 1. Quite generally, such machines fall into three different classes characterized, respectively, as "strong and efficient," "strong and inefficient," and "balanced." For weakly coupled multicyclic machines, efficiency at maximum power has lost any universality even in the linear response regime.

  8. A comparison of methods of predicting maximum oxygen uptake.

    OpenAIRE

    Grant, S; Corbett, K; Amjad, A M; Wilson, J; Aitchison, T

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the results from a Cooper walk run test, a multistage shuttle run test, and a submaximal cycle test with the direct measurement of maximum oxygen uptake on a treadmill. Three predictive tests of maximum oxygen uptake--linear extrapolation of heart rate of VO2 collected from a submaximal cycle ergometer test (predicted L/E), the Cooper 12 min walk, run test, and a multi-stage progressive shuttle run test (MST)--were performed by 22 young healthy males (mean...

  9. Maximum length scale in density based topology optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazarov, Boyan Stefanov; Wang, Fengwen

    2017-01-01

    The focus of this work is on two new techniques for imposing maximum length scale in topology optimization. Restrictions on the maximum length scale provide designers with full control over the optimized structure and open possibilities to tailor the optimized design for broader range...... of manufacturing processes by fulfilling the associated technological constraints. One of the proposed methods is based on combination of several filters and builds on top of the classical density filtering which can be viewed as a low pass filter applied to the design parametrization. The main idea...

  10. A Maximum Entropy Method for a Robust Portfolio Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingying Xu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We propose a continuous maximum entropy method to investigate the robustoptimal portfolio selection problem for the market with transaction costs and dividends.This robust model aims to maximize the worst-case portfolio return in the case that allof asset returns lie within some prescribed intervals. A numerical optimal solution tothe problem is obtained by using a continuous maximum entropy method. Furthermore,some numerical experiments indicate that the robust model in this paper can result in betterportfolio performance than a classical mean-variance model.

  11. Absorption of high-dose enteral vitamin A in low- birth-weight ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    essential for epithelial cell differentiation, it is hypothesised ... produce maximum benefits. As a dose of 50 000 ... injections in such tiny infants has many disadvantages,. inclUding .... Mike Brown, Roche Products, South Africa for the generous.

  12. Is Dose Deformation–Invariance Hypothesis Verified in Prostate IGRT?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, Antoine, E-mail: antoine.simon@univ-rennes1.fr [INSERM, U1099, 35000 Rennes (France); Laboratoire Traitement du Signal et de l' Image, Université de Rennes 1, 35000 Rennes (France); Le Maitre, Amandine; Nassef, Mohamed; Rigaud, Bastien [INSERM, U1099, 35000 Rennes (France); Laboratoire Traitement du Signal et de l' Image, Université de Rennes 1, 35000 Rennes (France); Castelli, Joël [INSERM, U1099, 35000 Rennes (France); Laboratoire Traitement du Signal et de l' Image, Université de Rennes 1, 35000 Rennes (France); Department of Radiotherapy, Centre Eugène Marquis, 35000 Rennes (France); Acosta, Oscar; Haigron, Pascal [INSERM, U1099, 35000 Rennes (France); Laboratoire Traitement du Signal et de l' Image, Université de Rennes 1, 35000 Rennes (France); Lafond, Caroline; Crevoisier, Renaud de [INSERM, U1099, 35000 Rennes (France); Laboratoire Traitement du Signal et de l' Image, Université de Rennes 1, 35000 Rennes (France); Department of Radiotherapy, Centre Eugène Marquis, 35000 Rennes (France)

    2017-03-15

    Purpose: To assess dose uncertainties resulting from the dose deformation–invariance hypothesis in prostate cone beam computed tomography (CT)–based image guided radiation therapy (IGRT), namely to evaluate whether rigidly propagated planned dose distribution enables good estimation of fraction dose distributions. Methods and Materials: Twenty patients underwent a CT scan for planning intensity modulated radiation therapy–IGRT delivering 80 Gy to the prostate, followed by weekly CT scans. Two methods were used to obtain the dose distributions on the weekly CT scans: (1) recalculating the dose using the original treatment plan; and (2) rigidly propagating the planned dose distribution. The cumulative doses were then estimated in the organs at risk for each dose distribution by deformable image registration. The differences between recalculated and propagated doses were finally calculated for the fraction and the cumulative dose distributions, by use of per-voxel and dose-volume histogram (DVH) metrics. Results: For the fraction dose, the mean per-voxel absolute dose difference was <1 Gy for 98% and 95% of the fractions for the rectum and bladder, respectively. The maximum dose difference within 1 voxel reached, however, 7.4 Gy in the bladder and 8.0 Gy in the rectum. The mean dose differences were correlated with gas volume for the rectum and patient external contour variations for the bladder. The mean absolute differences for the considered volume receiving greater than or equal to dose x (V{sub x}) of the DVH were between 0.37% and 0.70% for the rectum and between 0.53% and 1.22% for the bladder. For the cumulative dose, the mean differences in the DVH were between 0.23% and 1.11% for the rectum and between 0.55% and 1.66% for the bladder. The largest dose difference was 6.86%, for bladder V{sub 80Gy}. The mean dose differences were <1.1 Gy for the rectum and <1 Gy for the bladder. Conclusions: The deformation–invariance hypothesis was

  13. The biological effects of low doses of radiation: medical, biological and ecological aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gun-Aajav, T.; Ajnai, L.; Manlaijav, G.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: The results of recent studies show that low doses of radiation make many different structural and functional changes in a cell and these changes are preserved for a long time. This phenomenon is called as effects of low doses of radiation in biophysics, radiation biology and radiation medicine. The structural and functional changes depend on doses and this dependence has non-linear and bimodal behaviour. More detail, the radiation effect goes up and reaches its maximum (Low doses maximum) in low doses region, then it goes down and takes its stationary means (there is a negative effect in a few cases). With increases in doses and with further increases it goes up. It is established that low dose's maximum depends on physiological state of a biological object, radiation quality and dose rate. During the experiments another special date was established. This specialty is that many different physical and chemical factors are mutually connected and have synergetic behaviour. At present, researches are concentrating their attention on the following three directions: 1. Direct and indirect interaction of radiation's low doses: 2. Interpretation of its molecular mechanism, regulation of the positive effects and elaboration of ways o removing negative effects: 3. Application of the objective research results into practice. In conclusion the authors mention the current concepts on interpretation of low doses effect mechanism, forward their own views and emphasize the importance of considering low doses effects in researches of environmental radiation pollution, radiation medicine and radiation protection. (author)

  14. Crystal structure, magnetic and infrared spectroscopy studies of the LiCryFe1-yP2O7 solid solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bih, Hssain; Saadoune, Ismael; Ehrenberg, Helmut; Fuess, Hartmut

    2009-01-01

    The lithium double diphosphates LiCr y Fe 1-y P 2 O 7 have been investigated by X-ray diffraction, SQUID measurements and vibrational spectroscopy. The Rietveld refinements based on the XRD patterns show the existence of a continuous solid solution over the whole composition range (0≤y≤1.0) with a continuous evolution of the monoclinic unit cell parameters (S.G. P2 1 ). The transition metal ions connect the diphosphate anions forming a three-dimensional network with channels filled by Li + cations expected to exhibit high mobility. All compounds order magnetically at low temperatures due the Fe-Fe interactions. The ordering temperature decreases with increasing Cr content. The slope in Curie-Weiss fits to the 1/χ vs T data in the paramagnetic domain clearly shows the existence of Fe 3+ and Cr 3+ in their high spin states, and a ferromagnetic component is clearly detected for y=0, 0.2 and 0.4. IR spectra have been interpreted using factor group analysis. The small shift of the frequencies is due to the influence of the chromium amount. The POP angles were estimated using the Lazarev's relationship. - Graphical abstract: Crystal structure of LiCr y Fe 1-y P 2 O 7 diphosphates, view along the 'a' axis. Red circles denote the lithium atoms. For interpretation of this figure legend, the reader is referred to the web version of this article.

  15. Core-Shell Zn x Cd1- x Se/Zn y Cd1- y Se Quantum Dots for Nonvolatile Memory and Electroluminescent Device Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Amoody, Fuad; Suarez, Ernesto; Rodriguez, Angel; Heller, E.; Huang, Wenli; Jain, F.

    2011-08-01

    This paper presents a floating quantum dot (QD) gate nonvolatile memory device using high-energy-gap Zn y Cd1- y Se-cladded Zn x Cd1- x Se quantum dots ( y > x) with tunneling layers comprising nearly lattice-matched semiconductors (e.g., ZnS/ZnMgS) on Si channels. Also presented is the fabrication of an electroluminescent (EL) device with embedded cladded ZnCdSe quantum dots. These ZnCdSe quantum dots were embedded between indium tin oxide (ITO) on glass and a top Schottky metal electrode deposited on a thin CsF barrier. These QDs, which were nucleated in a photo-assisted microwave plasma (PMP) metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) reactor, were grown between the source and drain regions on a p-type silicon substrate of the nonvolatile memory device. The composition of QD cladding, which relates to the value of y in Zn y Cd1- y Se, was engineered by the intensity of ultraviolet light, which controlled the incorporation of zinc in ZnCdSe. The QD quality is comparable to those deposited by other methods. Characteristics and modeling of the II-VI quantum dots as well as two diverse types of devices are presented in this paper.

  16. SU(3)_C× SU(2)_L× U(1)_Y( × U(1)_X ) as a symmetry of division algebraic ladder operators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furey, C.

    2018-05-01

    We demonstrate a model which captures certain attractive features of SU(5) theory, while providing a possible escape from proton decay. In this paper we show how ladder operators arise from the division algebras R, C, H, and O. From the SU( n) symmetry of these ladder operators, we then demonstrate a model which has much structural similarity to Georgi and Glashow's SU(5) grand unified theory. However, in this case, the transitions leading to proton decay are expected to be blocked, given that they coincide with presumably forbidden transformations which would incorrectly mix distinct algebraic actions. As a result, we find that we are left with G_{sm} = SU(3)_C× SU(2)_L× U(1)_Y / Z_6. Finally, we point out that if U( n) ladder symmetries are used in place of SU( n), it may then be possible to find this same G_{sm}=SU(3)_C× SU(2)_L× U(1)_Y / Z_6, together with an extra U(1)_X symmetry, related to B-L.

  17. Effect of pickling processes on the microstructure and properties of electroless Ni–P coating on Mg–7.5Li–2Zn–1Y alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunjie Xu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The electroless plating Ni–P is prepared on the surface of Mg–7.5Li–2Zn–1Y alloys with different pickling processes. The microstructure and properties of Ni–P coating are investigated. The results show that the Ni–P coatings deposited using the different pickling processes have a different high phosphorus content amorphous Ni–P solid solution structure, and the Ni–P coatings exhibit higher hardness. There is higher phosphorus content of Ni–P amorphous coating using 125 g/L CrO3 and 110 ml/L HNO3 (w=68% than using 180 g/L CrO3 and 1 g/L KF during pre-treatment, and the coating structure is more compact, and the Ni–P coatings exhibit more excellent adhesion with substrate (Fc up to 22 N. The corrosion potential of Ni–P coating is improved and exhibits good corrosion resistance. As a result, Mg-7.5Li-2Zn-1Y alloy is remarkably protected by the Ni–P coating.

  18. Compositions of Mg and Se, surface morphology, roughness and Raman property of Zn1-xMgxSeyTe1-y layers grown at various substrate temperatures or dopant transport rates by MOVPE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, Mitsuhiro; Saito, Katsuhiko; Urata, Kensuke; Okamoto, Yasuhiro; Tanaka, Daichi; Araki, Yasuhiro; Abiru, Masakatsu; Mori, Eiichiro; Tanaka, Tooru; Guo, Qixin

    2015-03-01

    The growth of undoped and phosphorus (P)-doped Zn1-xMgxSeyTe1-y layers on (100) ZnTe substrates by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy was carried out. The compositions of Mg and Se, surface morphology, roughness and Raman property were characterized as a function of substrate temperature. Not only the compositions of Mg and Se but also the crystal quality of undoped Zn1-xMgxSeyTe1-y layer strongly depended upon the substrate temperature. Furthermore, the growth of Zn1-xMgxSeyTe1-y layer nearly-lattice-matched to ZnTe substrate was achieved independent of the transport rate of trisdimethylaminophosphorus. Undoped Zn1-xMgxSeyTe1-y layer nearly-lattice-matched to ZnTe led to improvement of surface roughness. On the other hand, P doping brought about deterioration of crystalline quality.

  19. Low-dose aspirin and risk of intracranial bleeds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cea Soriano, Lucía; Gaist, David; Soriano-Gabarró, Montse

    2017-01-01

    cohort of nonusers of low-dose aspirin at baseline were followed (maximum 14 years, median 5.4 years) to identify incident cases of ICB, with validation by manual review of patient records or linkage to hospitalization data. Using 10,000 frequency-matched controls, adjusted rate ratios (RRs) with 95...

  20. Sodium phenylbutyrate in Huntington's disease: a dose-finding study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogarth, Penelope; Lovrecic, Luca; Krainc, Dimitri

    2007-10-15

    Transcriptional dysregulation in Huntington's disease (HD) is mediated in part by aberrant patterns of histone acetylation. We performed a dose-finding study in human HD of sodium phenylbutyrate (SPB), a histone deacetylase inhibitor that ameliorates the HD phenotype in animal models. We used a dose-escalation/de-escalation design, using prespecified toxicity criteria and standard clinical and laboratory safety measures. The maximum tolerated dose was 15 g/day. At higher doses, toxicity included vomiting, lightheadedness, confusion, and gait instability. We saw no significant laboratory or electrocardiographic abnormalities. Gene expression changes in blood suggested an inverse dose-response. In conclusion, SPB at 12 to 15 g/day appears to be safe and well-tolerated in human HD. 2007 Movement Disorder Society