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Sample records for maximally tolerated dose

  1. Tolerance doses for treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyman, J.T.

    1985-10-01

    Data for the tolerance of normal tissues or organs to (low-LET) radiation has been compiled from a number of sources which are referenced at the end of this document. This tolerance dose data are ostensibly for uniform irradiation of all or part of an organ, and are for either 5% (TD 5 ) or 50% (TD 50 ) complication probability. The ''size'' of the irradiated organ is variously stated in terms of the absolute volume or the fraction of the organ volume irradiated, or the area or the length of the treatment field. The accuracy of these data is questionable. Much of the data represents doses that one or several experienced therapists have estimated could be safely given rather than quantitative analyses of clinical observations. Because these data have been obtained from multiple sources with possible different criteria for the definition of a complication, there are sometimes different values for what is apparently the same endpoint. The data from some sources shows a tendancy to be quantized in 5 Gy increments. This reflects the size of possible round off errors. It is believed that all these data have been accumulated without the benefit of 3-D dose distributions and therefore the estimates of the size of the volume and/or the uniformity of the irradiation may be less accurate than is now possible. 19 refs., 4 figs

  2. Radiation therapy tolerance doses for treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyman, J.T.

    1987-01-01

    To adequately plan acceptable dose distributions for radiation therapy treatments it is necessary to ensure that normal structures do not receive unacceptable doses. Acceptable doses are generally those that are below a stated tolerance dose for development of some level of complication. To support the work sponsored by the National Cancer Institute, data for the tolerance of normal tissues or organs to low-LET radiation has been compiled from a number of sources. These tolerance dose data are ostensibly for uniform irradiation of all or part of an organ, and are for either 5% (TD 5 ) or 50% (TD 50 ) complication probability. The ''size'' of the irradiated organ is variously stated in terms of the absolute volume or the fraction of the organ volume irradiated, or the area or the length of the treatment field. The accuracy of these data is questionable. Much of the data represent doses that one or several experienced therapists have estimated could be safely given rather than quantitative analyses of clinical observations. Because these data have been obtained from multiple sources with possible different criteria for the definition of a complication, there are sometimes different values for what is apparently the same end point. 20 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  3. Tailored solar optics for maximal optical tolerance and concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldstein, Alex [Department of Solar Energy and Environmental Physics, Blaustein Institutes for Desert Research, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Sede Boqer Campus (Israel); Gordon, Jeffrey M. [Department of Solar Energy and Environmental Physics, Blaustein Institutes for Desert Research, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Sede Boqer Campus (Israel); The Pearlstone Center for Aeronautical Engineering Studies, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beersheva (Israel)

    2011-02-15

    Recently identified fundamental classes of dual-mirror double-tailored nonimaging optics have the potential to satisfy the pragmatic exigencies of concentrator photovoltaics. Via a comprehensive survey of their parameter space, including raytrace verification, we identify champion high-concentration high-efficiency designs that offer unprecedented optical tolerance (i.e., sensitivity to off-axis orientation) - a pivotal figure-of-merit with a basic bound that depends on concentration, exit angle, and effective solar angular radius. For comparison, results for the best corresponding dual-mirror aplanatic concentrators are also presented. (author)

  4. Microbial Biofilms: Persisters, Tolerance and Dosing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogan, N. G.

    2005-03-01

    Almost all moist surfaces are colonized by microbial biofilms. Biofilms are implicated in cross-contamination of food products, biofouling, medical implants and various human infections such as dental cavities, ulcerative colitis and chronic respiratory infections. Much of current research is focused on the recalcitrance of biofilms to typical antibiotic and antimicrobial treatments. Although the polymer component of biofilms impedes the penetration of antimicrobials through reaction-diffusion limitation, this does not explain the observed tolerance, it merely delays the action of the agent. Heterogeneities in growth-rate also slow the eradication of the bacteria since most antimicrobials are far less effective for non-growing, or slowly growing bacteria. This also does not fully describe biofilm tolerance, since heterogeneities arr primairly a result of nutrient consumption. In this investigation, we describe the formation of `persister' cells which neither grow nor die in the presence of antibiotics. We propose that the cells are of a different phenotype than typical bacterial cells and the expression of the phenotype is regulated by the growth rate and the antibiotic concentration. We describe several experiments which describe the dynamics of persister cells and which motivate a dosing protocol that calls for periodic dosing of the population. We then introduce a mathematical model, which describes the effect of such a dosing regiment and indicates that the relative dose/withdrawal times are important in determining the effectiveness of such a treatment. A reduced model is introduced and the similar behavior is demonstrated analytically.

  5. Consideration of the volume dependence of tolerance doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gremmel, H.; Wendhausen, H.

    1977-01-01

    A general formula for consideration of the dependence of tolerance doses upon volume is obtained by mathematical evaluation of known skin tolerance doses. The validity for different organs is verified using available data of literature. It is recommended to introduce the volume dependence into the Ellis-formula for tolerance doses. (orig.) [de

  6. 45 Gy - tolerance dose spinal cord - dogma or the facts?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maciejewski, B.; Hliniak, A.; Danczak-Ginalska, Z.; Meder, M.; Skolyszewski, J.; Reinfuss, M.; Korzeniowski, S.; Peszynski, J.; Jassem, J.

    1993-01-01

    Dose of 45 Gy as a tolerance dose for spinal cord was questioned based on review of clinical data. Some data show that for conventional fractionation with the dose per fraction of less than 2.0 Gy spinal cord tolerance dose may arise up to 50-55 Gy. This was the base for round-table discussion and the importance of clinical and physical risk factors of postirradiation spinal cord injury was discussed and previous diseases of spinal cord, size of dose per fraction and length of irradiated spinal cord were pointed out as high risk factors. It was concluded that from clinical point of view there is no reason and on need to verify and to increase tolerance dose for spinal cord. (author)

  7. Tolerance of the human spinal cord to single dose radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, S.; Zhu, G.; Yin, F.-F.; Ajlouni, M.; Kim, J.H.

    2003-01-01

    Tolerance of the spinal cord to the single dose of radiation is not well defined. Although there are cases of human spinal cord tolerance from re-irradiation to the same cord level, the information about the tolerance of human spinal cord to single large dose of radiosurgery is not available. We carried out spinal radiosurgery to treat spinal metastasis and studied the single dose tolerance of the human spinal cord in an ongoing dose escalation paradigm. A total of 39 patients with 48 lesions of spinal metastasis were treated with single dose radiosurgery at Henry Ford Hospital. The radiosurgery dose was escalated from 8 Gy to 16 Gy at 2 Gy increment. The radiation dose was prescribed to periphery of the spinal tumor. The radiation dose to the spinal cord was estimated by computerized dosimetry. The median follow-up time was 10 months (range 6-18 months) from the radiosurgery. The endpoint of the study was to demonstrate the efficacy of the spinal radiosurgery and to determine the tolerance of human spinal cord to single dose radiosurgery. The dose to the spinal cord was generally less than 50 % of the prescribed radiation dose. The volume of the spinal cord that received higher than this dose was less than 20 % of the anterior portion of the spinal cord. Maximum single dose of 8 Gy was delivered to the anterior 20 % of the spinal cord in this dose escalation study. The dose volume histogram will be presented. There was no acute or subacute radiation toxicity detected clinically and radiologically during the maximum follow-up of 20 months. Further dose escalation is in progress. The single tolerance dose of the human spinal cord appears to be at least 8 Gy when it was given to the 20 % of the cord volume, although the duration of follow up is not long enough to detect severe late cord toxicity. This study offers a valuable radiobiological basis of the normal spinal cord tolerance, and opens spinal radiosurgery as a safe treatment for spinal metastasis

  8. The guinea pig maximization test--with a multiple dose design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Vølund, A; Frankild, S

    1995-01-01

    The guinea pig maximization test (GPMT) is usually performed with one moderately irritant induction dose of the allergen and gives a qualitative assessment-hazard identification-of the allergenicity of the chemical. We refined the GPMT by applying a multiple dose design and used 30 guinea pigs in...

  9. The guinea pig maximization test--with a multiple dose design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Vølund, A; Frankild, S

    1995-01-01

    The guinea pig maximization test (GPMT) is usually performed with one moderately irritant induction dose of the allergen and gives a qualitative assessment-hazard identification-of the allergenicity of the chemical. We refined the GPMT by applying a multiple dose design and used 30 guinea pigs...

  10. The irradiation tolerance dose of the proximal vagina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Au, Samuel P.; Grigsby, Perry W.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this investigation was to determine the irradiation tolerance level and complication rates of the proximal vagina to combined external irradiation and low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy. Also, the mucosal tolerance for fractionated high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy is further projected based on the biological equivalent dose (BED) of LDR for an acceptable complication rate. Materials and methods: Two hundred seventy-four patients with stages I-IV cervical carcinoma treated with irradiation therapy alone from 1987 to 1997 were retrospectively reviewed for radiation-associated late sequelae of the proximal vagina. All patients received LDR brachytherapy and 95% also received external pelvic irradiation. Follow-up ranged from 15 to 126 months (median, 43 months). The proximal vagina mucosa dose from a single ovoid (single source) or from both ovoids plus the tandem (all sources), together with the external irradiation dose, were used to derive the probability of a complication using the maximum likelihood logistic regression technique. The BED based on the linear-quadratic model was used to compute the corresponding tolerance levels for LDR or HDR brachytherapy. Results: Grades 1 and 2 complications occurred in 10.6% of patients and Grade 3 complications occurred in 3.6%. There were no Grade 4 complications. Complications occurred from 3 to 71 months (median, 7 months) after completion of irradiation, with over 60% occurring in the first year. By logistic regression analysis, both the mucosal dose from a single ovoid or that from all sources, combined with the external irradiation dose, demonstrate a statistically significant fit to the dose response complication curves (both with P=0.016). The single source dose was highly correlated with the all source dose with a cross-correlation coefficient 0.93. The all source dose was approximately 1.4 times the single source dose. Over the LDR brachytherapy dose rate range, the complication rate was

  11. The Tolerance and Accumulation of Miscanthus Sacchariflorus (maxim.) Benth., an Energy Plant Species, to Cadmium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Yang, Shiyong; Huang, Yongjie; Zhou, Shoubiao

    2015-01-01

    Miscanthus sacchariflorus (Maxim.) Benth. is a metallophyte suitable for the phytoremediation of mine wastes. The tolerance and accumulation of M. sacchariflorus to cadmium was studied by pot experiments. The results showed that O2·- generation rate, plasma membrane permeability and MDA content of M. sacchariflorus leaves increased with increasing Cd concentrations in soil, but significant effect was only observed when Cd concentrations were ≥50 mg·kg(-1). SOD and POD activities increased initially but decreased later on, whereas CAT activity only increased significantly at higher Cd concentrations, 50-100 mg·kg(-1). The content of photosynthetic pigment and growth of M. sacchariflorus were both not significantly affected when Cd concentration was ≤25 mg·kg(-1). In contrast, both parameters were significantly affected when Cd concentration was ≥50 mg·kg(-1). M. sacchariflorus could accumulate much Cd, but most of the Cd assimilated was retained in the belowground part, suggesting that M. sacchariflorus has poor ability to translocate Cd to the aboveground part. Our results suggested that although M. sacchariflorus was not a hyper-accumulator, it has a strong capacity to tolerate and stabilize the Cd. Therefore, M. sacchariflorus has a certain potential in the phytostabilization of Cd-contaminated soils.

  12. Optimization of the dose level for a given treatment plan to maximize the complication-free tumor cure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lind, B.K.; Mavroidis, P.; Hyoedynmaa, S.; Kappas, C.

    1999-01-01

    During the past decade, tumor and normal tissue reactions after radiotherapy have been increasingly quantified in radiobiological terms. For this purpose, response models describing the dependence of tumor and normal tissue reactions on the irradiated volume, heterogeneity of the delivered dose distribution and cell sensitivity variations can be taken into account. The probability of achieving a good treatment outcome can be increased by using an objective function such as P + , the probability of complication-free tumor control. A new procedure is presented, which quantifies P + from the dose delivery on 2D surfaces and 3D volumes and helps the user of any treatment planning system (TPS) to select the best beam orientations, the best beam modalities and the most suitable beam energies. The final step of selecting the prescribed dose level is made by a renormalization of the entire dose plan until the value of P + is maximized. The index P + makes use of clinically established dose-response parameters, for tumors and normal tissues of interest, in order to improve its clinical relevance. The results, using P + , are compared against the assessments of experienced medical physicists and radiation oncologists for two clinical cases. It is observed that when the absorbed dose level for a given treatment plan is increased, the treatment outcome first improves rapidly. As the dose approaches the tolerance of normal tissues the complication-free curve begins to drop. The optimal dose level is often just below this point and it depends on the geometry of each patient and target volume. Furthermore, a more conformal dose delivery to the target results in a higher control rate for the same complication level. This effect can be quantified by the increased value of the P + parameter. (orig.)

  13. Randomized, placebo-controlled trial of mipomersen in patients with severe hypercholesterolemia receiving maximally tolerated lipid-lowering therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary P McGowan

    Full Text Available Mipomersen, an antisense oligonucleotide targeting apolipoprotein B synthesis, significantly reduces LDL-C and other atherogenic lipoproteins in familial hypercholesterolemia when added to ongoing maximally tolerated lipid-lowering therapy. Safety and efficacy of mipomersen in patients with severe hypercholesterolemia was evaluated.Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter trial. Patients (n  = 58 were ≥18 years with LDL-C ≥7.8 mmol/L or LDL-C ≥5.1 mmol/L plus CHD disease, on maximally tolerated lipid-lowering therapy that excluded apheresis. Weekly subcutaneous injections of mipomersen 200 mg (n  = 39 or placebo (n  = 19 were added to lipid-lowering therapy for 26 weeks.percent reduction in LDL-C from baseline to 2 weeks after the last dose of treatment. Mipomersen (n = 27 reduced LDL-C by 36%, from a baseline of 7.2 mmol/L, for a mean absolute reduction of 2.6 mmol/L. Conversely, mean LDL-C increased 13% in placebo (n = 18 from a baseline of 6.5 mmol/L (mipomersen vs placebo p<0.001. Mipomersen produced statistically significant (p<0.001 reductions in apolipoprotein B and lipoprotein(a, with no change in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Mild-to-moderate injection site reactions were the most frequently reported adverse events with mipomersen. Mild-to-moderate flu-like symptoms were reported more often with mipomersen. Alanine transaminase increase, aspartate transaminase increase, and hepatic steatosis occurred in 21%, 13% and 13% of mipomersen treated patients, respectively. Adverse events by category for the placebo and mipomersen groups respectively were: total adverse events, 16(84.2%, 39(100%; serious adverse events, 0(0%, 6(15.4%; discontinuations due to adverse events, 1(5.3%, 8(20.5% and cardiac adverse events, 1(5.3%, 5(12.8%.Mipomersen significantly reduced LDL-C, apolipoprotein B, total cholesterol and non-HDL-cholesterol, and lipoprotein(a. Mounting evidence suggests it may be a

  14. Maximizing the biological effect of proton dose delivered with scanned beams via inhomogeneous daily dose distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng Chuan; Giantsoudi, Drosoula; Grassberger, Clemens; Goldberg, Saveli; Niemierko, Andrzej; Paganetti, Harald; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Trofimov, Alexei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: Biological effect of radiation can be enhanced with hypofractionation, localized dose escalation, and, in particle therapy, with optimized distribution of linear energy transfer (LET). The authors describe a method to construct inhomogeneous fractional dose (IFD) distributions, and evaluate the potential gain in the therapeutic effect from their delivery in proton therapy delivered by pencil beam scanning. Methods: For 13 cases of prostate cancer, the authors considered hypofractionated courses of 60 Gy delivered in 20 fractions. (All doses denoted in Gy include the proton's mean relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 1.1.) Two types of plans were optimized using two opposed lateral beams to deliver a uniform dose of 3 Gy per fraction to the target by scanning: (1) in conventional full-target plans (FTP), each beam irradiated the entire gland, (2) in split-target plans (STP), beams irradiated only the respective proximal hemispheres (prostate split sagittally). Inverse planning yielded intensity maps, in which discrete position control points of the scanned beam (spots) were assigned optimized intensity values. FTP plans preferentially required a higher intensity of spots in the distal part of the target, while STP, by design, employed proximal spots. To evaluate the utility of IFD delivery, IFD plans were generated by rearranging the spot intensities from FTP or STP intensity maps, separately as well as combined using a variety of mixing weights. IFD courses were designed so that, in alternating fractions, one of the hemispheres of the prostate would receive a dose boost and the other receive a lower dose, while the total physical dose from the IFD course was roughly uniform across the prostate. IFD plans were normalized so that the equivalent uniform dose (EUD) of rectum and bladder did not increase, compared to the baseline FTP plan, which irradiated the prostate uniformly in every fraction. An EUD-based model was then applied to estimate tumor

  15. Maximizing the biological effect of proton dose delivered with scanned beams via inhomogeneous daily dose distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Chuan; Giantsoudi, Drosoula; Grassberger, Clemens; Goldberg, Saveli; Niemierko, Andrzej; Paganetti, Harald; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Trofimov, Alexei

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Biological effect of radiation can be enhanced with hypofractionation, localized dose escalation, and, in particle therapy, with optimized distribution of linear energy transfer (LET). The authors describe a method to construct inhomogeneous fractional dose (IFD) distributions, and evaluate the potential gain in the therapeutic effect from their delivery in proton therapy delivered by pencil beam scanning. Methods: For 13 cases of prostate cancer, the authors considered hypofractionated courses of 60 Gy delivered in 20 fractions. (All doses denoted in Gy include the proton's mean relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 1.1.) Two types of plans were optimized using two opposed lateral beams to deliver a uniform dose of 3 Gy per fraction to the target by scanning: (1) in conventional full-target plans (FTP), each beam irradiated the entire gland, (2) in split-target plans (STP), beams irradiated only the respective proximal hemispheres (prostate split sagittally). Inverse planning yielded intensity maps, in which discrete position control points of the scanned beam (spots) were assigned optimized intensity values. FTP plans preferentially required a higher intensity of spots in the distal part of the target, while STP, by design, employed proximal spots. To evaluate the utility of IFD delivery, IFD plans were generated by rearranging the spot intensities from FTP or STP intensity maps, separately as well as combined using a variety of mixing weights. IFD courses were designed so that, in alternating fractions, one of the hemispheres of the prostate would receive a dose boost and the other receive a lower dose, while the total physical dose from the IFD course was roughly uniform across the prostate. IFD plans were normalized so that the equivalent uniform dose (EUD) of rectum and bladder did not increase, compared to the baseline FTP plan, which irradiated the prostate uniformly in every fraction. An EUD-based model was then applied to estimate tumor

  16. Maximizing the biological effect of proton dose delivered with scanned beams via inhomogeneous daily dose distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Chuan; Giantsoudi, Drosoula; Grassberger, Clemens; Goldberg, Saveli; Niemierko, Andrzej; Paganetti, Harald; Efstathiou, Jason A; Trofimov, Alexei

    2013-05-01

    Biological effect of radiation can be enhanced with hypofractionation, localized dose escalation, and, in particle therapy, with optimized distribution of linear energy transfer (LET). The authors describe a method to construct inhomogeneous fractional dose (IFD) distributions, and evaluate the potential gain in the therapeutic effect from their delivery in proton therapy delivered by pencil beam scanning. For 13 cases of prostate cancer, the authors considered hypofractionated courses of 60 Gy delivered in 20 fractions. (All doses denoted in Gy include the proton's mean relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 1.1.) Two types of plans were optimized using two opposed lateral beams to deliver a uniform dose of 3 Gy per fraction to the target by scanning: (1) in conventional full-target plans (FTP), each beam irradiated the entire gland, (2) in split-target plans (STP), beams irradiated only the respective proximal hemispheres (prostate split sagittally). Inverse planning yielded intensity maps, in which discrete position control points of the scanned beam (spots) were assigned optimized intensity values. FTP plans preferentially required a higher intensity of spots in the distal part of the target, while STP, by design, employed proximal spots. To evaluate the utility of IFD delivery, IFD plans were generated by rearranging the spot intensities from FTP or STP intensity maps, separately as well as combined using a variety of mixing weights. IFD courses were designed so that, in alternating fractions, one of the hemispheres of the prostate would receive a dose boost and the other receive a lower dose, while the total physical dose from the IFD course was roughly uniform across the prostate. IFD plans were normalized so that the equivalent uniform dose (EUD) of rectum and bladder did not increase, compared to the baseline FTP plan, which irradiated the prostate uniformly in every fraction. An EUD-based model was then applied to estimate tumor control probability

  17. Tolerance of the Brachial Plexus to High-Dose Reirradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Allen M., E-mail: achen5@kumc.edu; Yoshizaki, Taeko; Velez, Maria A.; Mikaeilian, Argin G.; Hsu, Sophia; Cao, Minsong

    2017-05-01

    Purpose: To study the tolerance of the brachial plexus to high doses of radiation exceeding historically accepted limits by analyzing human subjects treated with reirradiation for recurrent tumors of the head and neck. Methods and Materials: Data from 43 patients who were confirmed to have received overlapping dose to the brachial plexus after review of radiation treatment plans from the initial and reirradiation courses were used to model the tolerance of this normal tissue structure. A standardized instrument for symptoms of neuropathy believed to be related to brachial plexus injury was utilized to screen for toxicity. Cumulative dose was calculated by fusing the initial dose distributions onto the reirradiation plan, thereby creating a composite plan via deformable image registration. The median elapsed time from the initial course of radiation therapy to reirradiation was 24 months (range, 3-144 months). Results: The dominant complaints among patients with symptoms were ipsilateral pain (54%), numbness/tingling (31%), and motor weakness and/or difficulty with manual dexterity (15%). The cumulative maximum dose (Dmax) received by the brachial plexus ranged from 60.5 Gy to 150.1 Gy (median, 95.0 Gy). The cumulative mean (Dmean) dose ranged from 20.2 Gy to 111.5 Gy (median, 63.8 Gy). The 1-year freedom from brachial plexus–related neuropathy was 67% and 86% for subjects with a cumulative Dmax greater than and less than 95.0 Gy, respectively (P=.05). The 1-year complication-free rate was 66% and 87%, for those reirradiated within and after 2 years from the initial course, respectively (P=.06). Conclusion: The development of brachial plexus–related symptoms was less than expected owing to repair kinetics and to the relatively short survival of the subject population. Time-dose factors were demonstrated to be predictive of complications.

  18. Comparative polygenic analysis of maximal ethanol accumulation capacity and tolerance to high ethanol levels of cell proliferation in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago M Pais

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is able to accumulate ≥17% ethanol (v/v by fermentation in the absence of cell proliferation. The genetic basis of this unique capacity is unknown. Up to now, all research has focused on tolerance of yeast cell proliferation to high ethanol levels. Comparison of maximal ethanol accumulation capacity and ethanol tolerance of cell proliferation in 68 yeast strains showed a poor correlation, but higher ethanol tolerance of cell proliferation clearly increased the likelihood of superior maximal ethanol accumulation capacity. We have applied pooled-segregant whole-genome sequence analysis to identify the polygenic basis of these two complex traits using segregants from a cross of a haploid derivative of the sake strain CBS1585 and the lab strain BY. From a total of 301 segregants, 22 superior segregants accumulating ≥17% ethanol in small-scale fermentations and 32 superior segregants growing in the presence of 18% ethanol, were separately pooled and sequenced. Plotting SNP variant frequency against chromosomal position revealed eleven and eight Quantitative Trait Loci (QTLs for the two traits, respectively, and showed that the genetic basis of the two traits is partially different. Fine-mapping and Reciprocal Hemizygosity Analysis identified ADE1, URA3, and KIN3, encoding a protein kinase involved in DNA damage repair, as specific causative genes for maximal ethanol accumulation capacity. These genes, as well as the previously identified MKT1 gene, were not linked in this genetic background to tolerance of cell proliferation to high ethanol levels. The superior KIN3 allele contained two SNPs, which are absent in all yeast strains sequenced up to now. This work provides the first insight in the genetic basis of maximal ethanol accumulation capacity in yeast and reveals for the first time the importance of DNA damage repair in yeast ethanol tolerance.

  19. Maximal safe dose of I-131 after failure of standard fixed dose therapy in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong-Jin; Chung, June-Key; Kim, Sung-Eun; Kang, Won-Jun; Park, Do-Joon; Lee, Dong-Soo; Cho, Bo-Youn; Lee, Myung-Chul

    2008-01-01

    The maximal safe dose (MSD) on the basis of bone marrow irradiation levels allows the delivery of a large amount of I-131 to thyroid cancer tissue. The efficacy of MSD therapy in differentiated metastatic thyroid cancers that persisted after conventional fixed dose therapy is investigated. Forty-seven differentiated thyroid carcinoma patients with non-responsive residual disease despite repetitive fixed dose I-131 therapy were enrolled in this study. Their postoperative pathologies were 43 papillary carcinomas and 4 follicular carcinomas. The MSD was calculated with the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center protocol using serial blood samples. The MSDs were administered at intervals of 6 months. Treatment responses were evaluated using I-131 whole-body scans and serum thyroglobulin measurements. The mean calculated MSD was 12.5±2.1 GBq (339.6±57.5 mCi). Of the 46 patients, 7 (14.9%) showed complete remission, 15 (31.9%) partial remission, 19 (40.4%) stable disease, and 6 (12.8%) disease progression. Of the patients who showed complete or partial remission, 15 (65%) showed response after the first MSD session and 6 (26%) showed response after the second session. Twenty-nine patients (62%) experienced transient cytopenia after therapy, but three did not recover to the baseline level. The maximal safe dose provides an effective means of treatment in patients who failed to respond adequately to conventional fixed dose therapy. I-131 MSD therapy can be considered in patients who fail fixed dose therapy. (author)

  20. Efficacy and tolerability of high-dose phenobarbital in children with focal seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Akihisa; Nakahara, Eri; Ikeno, Mitsuru; Abe, Shinpei; Igarashi, Ayuko; Nakazawa, Mika; Takasu, Michihiko; Shimizu, Toshiaki

    2016-04-01

    We retrospectively reviewed the outcomes of children with focal epilepsy treated with oral high-dose phenobarbital. We reviewed data on children (agedphenobarbital (>5 mg/kg/day to maintain a target serum level >40 μg/mL) for at least 6 months. Seizure frequency was evaluated after phenobarbital titration, and 1 and 2 years after high-dose phenobarbital treatment commenced. Treatment was judged effective when seizure frequencies fell by ⩾75%. Seven boys and eight girls were treated. The median age at commencement of high-dose phenobarbital therapy was 30 months. The maximal serum phenobarbital level ranged from 36.5 to 62.9 μg/mL. High-dose PB was effective in seven. In two patients, treatment was transiently effective, but seizure frequency later returned to the baseline. High-dose PB was ineffective in six. No significant association between effectiveness and any clinical variable was evident. Drowsiness was recorded in nine patients, but no patient developed a behavioral problem or hypersensitivity. Oral high-dose phenobarbital was effective in 7 of 15 patients with focal epilepsy and well tolerated. High-dose PB may be useful when surgical treatment is difficult. Copyright © 2015 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Linezolid Dose That Maximizes Sterilizing Effect While Minimizing Toxicity and Resistance Emergence for Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Shashikant; Magombedze, Gesham; Koeuth, Thearith; Sherman, Carleton; Pasipanodya, Jotam G; Raj, Prithvi; Wakeland, Edward; Deshpande, Devyani; Gumbo, Tawanda

    2017-08-01

    Linezolid has an excellent sterilizing effect in tuberculosis patients but high adverse event rates. The dose that would maximize efficacy and minimize toxicity is unknown. We performed linezolid dose-effect and dose-scheduling studies in the hollow fiber system model of tuberculosis (HFS-TB) for sterilizing effect. HFS-TB units were treated with several doses to mimic human-like linezolid intrapulmonary pharmacokinetics and repetitively sampled for drug concentration, total bacterial burden, linezolid-resistant subpopulations, and RNA sequencing over 2 months. Linezolid-resistant isolates underwent whole-genome sequencing. The expression of genes encoding efflux pumps in the first 1 to 2 weeks revealed the same exposure-response patterns as the linezolid-resistant subpopulation. Linezolid-resistant isolates from the 2nd month of therapy revealed mutations in several efflux pump/transporter genes and a LuxR-family transcriptional regulator. Linezolid sterilizing effect was linked to the ratio of unbound 0- to 24-h area under the concentration-time curve (AUC 0-24 ) to MIC. Optimal microbial kill was achieved at an AUC 0-24 /MIC ratio of 119. The optimal sterilizing effect dose for clinical use was identified using Monte Carlo simulations. Clinical doses of 300 and 600 mg/day (or double the dose every other day) achieved this target in 87% and >99% of 10,000 patients, respectively. The susceptibility breakpoint identified was 2 mg/liter. The simulations identified that a 300-mg/day dose did not achieve AUC 0-24 s associated with linezolid toxicity, while 600 mg/day achieved those AUC 0-24 s in linezolid dose of 300 mg/day performed well and should be compared to 600 mg/day or 1,200 mg every other day in clinical trials. Copyright © 2017 Srivastava et al.

  2. Biosphere Dose Conversion Factors for Reasonably Maximally Exposed Individual and Average Member of Critical Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    K. Montague

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this calculation is to develop additional Biosphere Dose Conversion Factors (BDCFs) for a reasonably maximally exposed individual (RMEI) for the periods 10,000 years and 1,000,000 years after the repository closure. In addition, Biosphere Dose Conversion Factors for the average member of a critical group are calculated for those additional radionuclides postulated to reach the environment during the period after 10,000 years and up to 1,000,000 years. After the permanent closure of the repository, the engineered systems within the repository will eventually lose their abilities to contain radionuclide inventory, and the radionuclides will migrate through the geosphere and eventually enter the local water table moving toward inhabited areas. The primary release scenario is a groundwater well used for drinking water supply and irrigation, and this calculation takes these postulated releases and follows them through various pathways until they result in a dose to either a member of critical group or a reasonably maximally exposed individual. The pathways considered in this calculation include inhalation, ingestion, and direct exposure

  3. Optimizing fluorescently tethered Hsp90 inhibitor dose for maximal specific uptake by breast tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouch, Brian T.; Duer, Joy; Wang, Roujia; Gallagher, Jennifer; Hall, Allison; Soo, Mary Scott; Hughes, Philip; Haystead, Timothy A. J.; Ramanujam, Nirmala

    2018-03-01

    Despite improvements in surgical resection, 20-40% of patients undergoing breast conserving surgery require at least one additional re-excision. Leveraging the unique surface expression of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90), a chaperone protein involved in several key hallmarks of cancer, in breast cancer provides an exciting opportunity to identify residual disease during surgery. We developed a completely non-destructive strategy using HS-27, a fluorescently-tethered Hsp90 inhibitor, to assay surface Hsp90 expression on intact tissue specimens using a fluorescence microendoscope with a field of view of 750 μm and subcellular resolution of 4 μm. HS-27 consists of an FDA approved Hsp90 inhibitor tethered to fluorescein isothiocyanate (EX 488nm, EM 525nm). Here, we optimized ex vivo HS-27 administration in pre-clinical breast cancer models and validated our approach on 21 patients undergoing standard of care ultrasound guided core needle biopsy. HS-27 administration time was fixed at 1- minute to minimize imaging impact on clinical workflow. HS-27 and HS-217 (non-specific control) doses were modulated from 1 μM up to 100 μM to identify the dose maximizing the ratio of specific uptake (HS-27 fluorescence) to non-specific uptake (HS-217 fluorescence). The specificity ratio was maximized at 100 μM and was significantly greater than all other doses (pcancer makes this technology attractive for assessing tumor margins, as one agent can be used for all subtypes.

  4. Maximal safe dose therapy of I-131 after failure of standard fixed dose therapy in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Jin; Seok, Ju Won; Uh, Jae Sun

    2005-01-01

    In patients with recurrent or metastatic differentiated thyroid carcinoma, residual disease despite repetitive fixed dose I-131 therapy presents an awkward situation in terms of treatment decision making. Maximal safe dose (MSD) administration base on bone marrow radiation allows the delivery of a large amount I-131 to thyroid cancer tissue within the safety margin. We investigated the efficacy of MSD in differentiated thyroid cancers, which had persisted after conventional fixed dose therapy. Forty-six patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma who had non-responsible residual disease despite repetitive fixed dose I-131 therapy were enrolled in this study. The postoperative pathology consisted of 43 papillary carcinomas and 3 follicular carcinomas. MSD was calculated according the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center protocol using blood samples. MSDs were administered at intervals of at least 6 months. Treatment responses were evaluated using I-131 whole body scan (WBS) and serum thyroglobulin measurements. Mean calculated MSD was 12.5±2.1 GBq. Of the 46 patients, 6 (13.0%) showed complete remission, 15 (32.6%) partial response, 19 (41.3%) stable disease, and 6 (13.0%) disease progression. Thus, about a half of the patients showed complete or partial remission, and of these patients, 14 (67%) showed response after a single MSD administration and 6 (29%) showed response after the second dose of MSD administrations. Twenty-nine patients (63%) experienced transient cytopenia after therapy, and recovered spontaneously with the exception of one. MSD administration is an effective method even in the patients who failed to be treated by conventional fixed dose therapy. MSD therapy of I-131 can be considered in the patients who failed by fixed dose therapy

  5. Safety and tolerability of high doses of glucocorticoides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakić Branislava D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia includes the use of high doses of glucocorticoides (prednisone and dexamethasone, which significantly increase the success of therapy due to lymphocytolitic effect. The aim: The aim of the study was to determine tolerability of high doses of prednisone and dexamethasone in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and the structure and the intensity of adverse effects, occurred after application of these medicines. Subjects and methods: In a prospective study, we analyzed adverse effects of high doses of glucocorticoides in children suffering acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated in the Institute for Child and Youth Health Care of Vojvodina, since December 2010. until October 2014, were analyzed. This study included 18 patients, aged from 2 to 15 years. Results: Hyperglycemia appeared in 89% of patients treated with prednisone and in 61% of patients treated with dexamethasone. In order to control the high blood glucose level (above 10 mmol /L, in 11% of patients insulin was used. Hypertension appeared in 28% patients treated with prednisone and dexamethasone. Antihypertensives were needed for regulation in 17% patients. Hypopotassemia and hypocalcaemia were significantly more expressed after the use of prednisone in comparison to dexamethasone. In 11% of patients, the treatment with dexamethasone caused depressive behavior, followed by agitation. Conclusion: Adverse effects of dexamethasone and prednisone, administered in high doses in children with ALL were known, expected and reversible. Adverse reactions usually disappeared spontaneously or after short-term symptomatic therapy.

  6. Maximum tolerable radiation doses recommended by the Israel Advisory Committee on nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tadmor, J.; Litai, D.; Lubin, E.

    1978-01-01

    Maximum tolerable doses have been recommended by the Israel Advisory Committee on Nuclear Safety. The recommendations which are based on a comparison with risks tolerated in other human activities, are for doses to radiation workers, for individual members of the population at the fence of a nuclear installation, and for the population at large, for both normal operating and accident conditions. Tolerable whole-body doses and doses to different critical organs are listed

  7. Assessment of cardiovascular reflexes is of limited value in predicting maximal +Gz-tolerance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Lieshout, E. J.; van Lieshout, J. J.; Krol, J.; Simons, M.; Karemaker, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    The importance of +Gz-induced loss of consciousness as a major cause of inflight incapacitation emphasizes the need for predicting +Gz-tolerance and investigating its possible determinants. The cardiovascular changes from +Gz-stress are initially counteracted reflexly by the cardiovascular autonomic

  8. Determination of tolerance dose uncertainties and optimal design of dose response experiments with small animal numbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karger, C.P.; Hartmann, G.H.

    2001-01-01

    Background: Dose response experiments aim to determine the complication probability as a function of dose. Adjusting the parameters of the frequently used dose response model P(D)=1/[1+(D 50 /D) k ] to the experimental data, 2 intuitive quantities are obtained: The tolerance dose D 50 and the slope parameter k. For mathematical reasons, however, standard statistic software uses a different set of parameters. Therefore, the resulting fit parameters of the statistic software as well as their standard errors have to be transformed to obtain D 50 and k as well as their standard errors. Material and Methods: The influence of the number of dose levels on the uncertainty of the fit parameters is studied by a simulation for a fixed number of animals. For experiments with small animal numbers, statistical artifacts may prevent the determination of the standard errors of the fit parameters. Consequences on the design of dose response experiments are investigated. Results: Explicit formulas are presented, which allow to calculate the parameters D 50 and k as well as their standard errors from the output of standard statistic software. The simulation shows, that the standard errors of the resulting parameters are independent of the number of dose levels, as long as the total number of animals involved in the experiment, remains constant. Conclusion: Statistical artifacts in experiments containing small animal numbers may be prevented by an adequate design of the experiment. For this, it is suggested to select a higher number of dose levels, rather than using a higher number of animals per dose level. (orig.) [de

  9. SU-D-204-02: BED Consistent Extrapolation of Mean Dose Tolerances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perko, Z; Bortfeld, T; Hong, T; Wolfgang, J; Unkelbach, J [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The safe use of radiotherapy requires the knowledge of tolerable organ doses. For experimental fractionation schemes (e.g. hypofractionation) these are typically extrapolated from traditional fractionation schedules using the Biologically Effective Dose (BED) model. This work demonstrates that using the mean dose in the standard BED equation may overestimate tolerances, potentially leading to unsafe treatments. Instead, extrapolation of mean dose tolerances should take the spatial dose distribution into account. Methods: A formula has been derived to extrapolate mean physical dose constraints such that they are mean BED equivalent. This formula constitutes a modified BED equation where the influence of the spatial dose distribution is summarized in a single parameter, the dose shape factor. To quantify effects we analyzed 14 liver cancer patients previously treated with proton therapy in 5 or 15 fractions, for whom also photon IMRT plans were available. Results: Our work has two main implications. First, in typical clinical plans the dose distribution can have significant effects. When mean dose tolerances are extrapolated from standard fractionation towards hypofractionation they can be overestimated by 10–15%. Second, the shape difference between photon and proton dose distributions can cause 30–40% differences in mean physical dose for plans having the same mean BED. The combined effect when extrapolating proton doses to mean BED equivalent photon doses in traditional 35 fraction regimens resulted in up to 7–8 Gy higher doses than when applying the standard BED formula. This can potentially lead to unsafe treatments (in 1 of the 14 analyzed plans the liver mean dose was above its 32 Gy tolerance). Conclusion: The shape effect should be accounted for to avoid unsafe overestimation of mean dose tolerances, particularly when estimating constraints for hypofractionated regimens. In addition, tolerances established for a given treatment modality cannot

  10. Objective method to report planner-independent skin/rib maximal dose in balloon-based high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yongbok; Trombetta, Mark G.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: An objective method was proposed and compared with a manual selection method to determine planner-independent skin and rib maximal dose in balloon-based high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy planning. Methods: The maximal dose to skin and rib was objectively extracted from a dose volume histogram (DVH) of skin and rib volumes. A virtual skin volume was produced by expanding the skin surface in three dimensions (3D) external to the breast with a certain thickness in the planning computed tomography (CT) images. Therefore, the maximal dose to this volume occurs on the skin surface the same with a conventional manual selection method. The rib was also delineated in the planning CT images and its maximal dose was extracted from its DVH. The absolute (Abdiff=|D max Man -D max DVH |) and relative (Rediff[%]=100x(|D max Man -D max DVH |)/D max DVH ) maximal skin and rib dose differences between the manual selection method (D max Man ) and the objective method (D max DVH ) were measured for 50 balloon-based HDR (25 MammoSite and 25 Contura) patients. Results: The average±standard deviation of maximal dose difference was 1.67%±1.69% of the prescribed dose (PD). No statistical difference was observed between MammoSite and Contura patients for both Abdiff and Rediff[%] values. However, a statistically significant difference (p value max >90%) compared with lower dose range (D max <90%): 2.16%±1.93% vs 1.19%±1.25% with p value of 0.0049. However, the Rediff[%] analysis eliminated the inverse square factor and there was no statistically significant difference (p value=0.8931) between high and low dose ranges. Conclusions: The objective method using volumetric information of skin and rib can determine the planner-independent maximal dose compared with the manual selection method. However, the difference was <2% of PD, on average, if appropriate attention is paid to selecting a manual dose point in 3D planning CT images.

  11. Pump speed modulations and sub-maximal exercise tolerance in left ventricular assist device recipients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jung, Mette Holme; Houston, Brian; Russell, Stuart D

    2017-01-01

    of the 2 sub-maximal tests was determined by randomization. Both patient and physician were blinded to the sequence. Exercise duration, oxygen consumption (VO2) and rate of perceived exertion (RPE), using the Borg scale (score 6 to 20), were recorded. RESULTS: Nineteen patients (all with a HeartMate II...... ventricular assist device) completed 57 exercise tests. Baseline pump speed was 9,326 ± 378 rpm. At AT, workload was 63 ± 26 W (25 to 115 W) and VO2 was 79 ± 14% of maximum. Exercise duration improved by 106 ± 217 seconds (~13%) in Speedinc compared with Speedbase (837 ± 358 vs 942 ± 359 seconds; p = 0...

  12. An estimate of the maximal doses incurred by persons accompanying patients in the waiting area of a nuclear medicine department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzik-Jurasz, A.S.K.; Farwell, J.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the study was to make an estimate of the maximal doses that might be incurred by persons accompanying active patients in a nuclear medicine department waiting area. This was in order to determine whether the dose to such individuals approached current legislative or recently recommended limits. Thermoluminescent dosemeters were taped to the walls of the waiting area at waist level to the sitting individual, such that their record would reflect as closely as possible the dose incurred by an individual sitting next to an active patient. Dividing the recorded dose with the total occupancy time of that seat derived an average dose rate. Maximal doses were estimated by the product of the latter and maximal occupancy times. It was assumed that an accompanying individual would have been sitting next to the active patient for their whole duration of stay. The maximum estimates were 278 μSv and 103.2 μSv. These values are likely to be overestimates by the virtue of the TLD integrating the whole dose of its surrounds, especially adjacent active individuals. By current legislation and recent recommendations the values are reassuringly low, but idiosyncrasies in local practice might need to be considered in individual departments. (author)

  13. Benefits of the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and maximum tolerated concentration (MTC) concept in aquatic toxicology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchinson, Thomas H.; Boegi, Christian; Winter, Matthew J.; Owens, J. Willie

    2009-01-01

    There is increasing recognition of the need to identify specific sublethal effects of chemicals, such as reproductive toxicity, and specific modes of actions of the chemicals, such as interference with the endocrine system. To achieve these aims requires criteria which provide a basis to interpret study findings so as to separate these specific toxicities and modes of action from not only acute lethality per se but also from severe inanition and malaise that non-specifically compromise reproductive capacity and the response of endocrine endpoints. Mammalian toxicologists have recognized that very high dose levels are sometimes required to elicit both specific adverse effects and present the potential of non-specific 'systemic toxicity'. Mammalian toxicologists have developed the concept of a maximum tolerated dose (MTD) beyond which a specific toxicity or action cannot be attributed to a test substance due to the compromised state of the organism. Ecotoxicologists are now confronted by a similar challenge and must develop an analogous concept of a MTD and the respective criteria. As examples of this conundrum, we note recent developments in efforts to validate protocols for fish reproductive toxicity and endocrine screens (e.g. some chemicals originally selected as 'negatives' elicited decreases in fecundity or changes in endpoints intended to be biomarkers for endocrine modes of action). Unless analogous criteria can be developed, the potentially confounding effects of systemic toxicity may then undermine the reliable assessment of specific reproductive effects or biomarkers such as vitellogenin or spiggin. The same issue confronts other areas of aquatic toxicology (e.g., genotoxicity) and the use of aquatic animals for preclinical assessments of drugs (e.g., use of zebrafish for drug safety assessment). We propose that there are benefits to adopting the concept of an MTD for toxicology and pharmacology studies using fish and other aquatic organisms and the

  14. Power maximization of variable-speed variable-pitch wind turbines using passive adaptive neural fault tolerant control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, Hamed; Rahimi Nohooji, Hamed; Howard, Ian

    2017-09-01

    Power maximization has always been a practical consideration in wind turbines. The question of how to address optimal power capture, especially when the system dynamics are nonlinear and the actuators are subject to unknown faults, is significant. This paper studies the control methodology for variable-speed variable-pitch wind turbines including the effects of uncertain nonlinear dynamics, system fault uncertainties, and unknown external disturbances. The nonlinear model of the wind turbine is presented, and the problem of maximizing extracted energy is formulated by designing the optimal desired states. With the known system, a model-based nonlinear controller is designed; then, to handle uncertainties, the unknown nonlinearities of the wind turbine are estimated by utilizing radial basis function neural networks. The adaptive neural fault tolerant control is designed passively to be robust on model uncertainties, disturbances including wind speed and model noises, and completely unknown actuator faults including generator torque and pitch actuator torque. The Lyapunov direct method is employed to prove that the closed-loop system is uniformly bounded. Simulation studies are performed to verify the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  15. Effects of maximal doses of atorvastatin versus rosuvastatin on small dense low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maximal doses of atorvastatin and rosuvastatin are highly effective in lowering low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and triglyceride levels; however, rosuvastatin has been shown to be significantly more effective than atorvastatin in lowering LDL cholesterol and in increasing high-density lipo...

  16. Some thoughts on tolerance, dose, and fractionation in boron neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gahbauer, R.; Goodman, J.; Blue, T.

    1988-01-01

    Unique to boron neutron capture therapy, the tolerance very strongly depends on the boron concentration in normal brain, skin and blood. If one first considers the ideal situation of a 2 KeV beam and a compound clearing from normal tissues and blood, the tolerance dose to epithermal beams relates to the maximum tolerated capture gamma dose and capture high LET dose, H (n,gamma)D and N(n,p) 14 C. The authors can relate this gamma and high LET dose to known clinical experience. Assuming gamma and high LET dose ratios as given by Fairchild and Bond, one may first choose a clearly safe high LET whole brain dose and calculate the unavoidably resulting gamma dose. To a first approximation 500 cGy of high LET dose results in 3,000 cGy gamma dose. One can speculate that this approximates the tolerance of whole brain to the 2 KeV beam with no contributing boron dose if the radiation is fractionated. It would clearly be beyond tolerance in a single fraction where most therapists would be uncomfortable to deliver even one third of the above doses

  17. A spatially encoded dose difference maximal intensity projection map for patient dose evaluation: A new first line patient quality assurance tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu Weigang; Graff, Pierre; Boettger, Thomas; Pouliot, Jean [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States); and others

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: To develop a spatially encoded dose difference maximal intensity projection (DD-MIP) as an online patient dose evaluation tool for visualizing the dose differences between the planning dose and dose on the treatment day. Methods: Megavoltage cone-beam CT (MVCBCT) images acquired on the treatment day are used for generating the dose difference index. Each index is represented by different colors for underdose, acceptable, and overdose regions. A maximal intensity projection (MIP) algorithm is developed to compress all the information of an arbitrary 3D dose difference index into a 2D DD-MIP image. In such an algorithm, a distance transformation is generated based on the planning CT. Then, two new volumes representing the overdose and underdose regions of the dose difference index are encoded with the distance transformation map. The distance-encoded indices of each volume are normalized using the skin distance obtained on the planning CT. After that, two MIPs are generated based on the underdose and overdose volumes with green-to-blue and green-to-red lookup tables, respectively. Finally, the two MIPs are merged with an appropriate transparency level and rendered in planning CT images. Results: The spatially encoded DD-MIP was implemented in a dose-guided radiotherapy prototype and tested on 33 MVCBCT images from six patients. The user can easily establish the threshold for the overdose and underdose. A 3% difference between the treatment and planning dose was used as the threshold in the study; hence, the DD-MIP shows red or blue color for the dose difference >3% or {<=}3%, respectively. With such a method, the overdose and underdose regions can be visualized and distinguished without being overshadowed by superficial dose differences. Conclusions: A DD-MIP algorithm was developed that compresses information from 3D into a single or two orthogonal projections while hinting the user whether the dose difference is on the skin surface or deeper.

  18. A spatially encoded dose difference maximal intensity projection map for patient dose evaluation: a new first line patient quality assurance tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Weigang; Graff, Pierre; Boettger, Thomas; Pouliot, Jean

    2011-04-01

    To develop a spatially encoded dose difference maximal intensity projection (DD-MIP) as an online patient dose evaluation tool for visualizing the dose differences between the planning dose and dose on the treatment day. Megavoltage cone-beam CT (MVCBCT) images acquired on the treatment day are used for generating the dose difference index. Each index is represented by different colors for underdose, acceptable, and overdose regions. A maximal intensity projection (MIP) algorithm is developed to compress all the information of an arbitrary 3D dose difference index into a 2D DD-MIP image. In such an algorithm, a distance transformation is generated based on the planning CT. Then, two new volumes representing the overdose and underdose regions of the dose difference index are encoded with the distance transformation map. The distance-encoded indices of each volume are normalized using the skin distance obtained on the planning CT. After that, two MIPs are generated based on the underdose and overdose volumes with green-to-blue and green-to-red lookup tables, respectively. Finally, the two MIPs are merged with an appropriate transparency level and rendered in planning CT images. The spatially encoded DD-MIP was implemented in a dose-guided radiotherapy prototype and tested on 33 MVCBCT images from six patients. The user can easily establish the threshold for the overdose and underdose. A 3% difference between the treatment and planning dose was used as the threshold in the study; hence, the DD-MIP shows red or blue color for the dose difference > 3% or < or = 3%, respectively. With such a method, the overdose and underdose regions can be visualized and distinguished without being overshadowed by superficial dose differences. A DD-MIP algorithm was developed that compresses information from 3D into a single or two orthogonal projections while hinting the user whether the dose difference is on the skin surface or deeper.

  19. SODIUM BICARBONATE FACILITATES LOW-DOSE ORAL TOLERANCE TO PEANUT IN MICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rationale: Oral tolerance specifically inhibits production of allergic IgE antibody and is therefore a potential method for suppressing food allergy. We have previously demonstrated that a single oral dose of one mg is sufficient to induce oral tolerance to egg white but not pean...

  20. Association Between Maximal Skin Dose and Breast Brachytherapy Outcome: A Proposal for More Rigorous Dosimetric Constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuttino, Laurie W.; Heffernan, Jill; Vera, Robyn; Rosu, Mihaela; Ramakrishnan, V. Ramesh; Arthur, Douglas W.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Multiple investigations have used the skin distance as a surrogate for the skin dose and have shown that distances 4.05 Gy/fraction. Conclusion: The initial skin dose recommendations have been based on safe use and the avoidance of significant toxicity. The results from the present study have suggested that patients might further benefit if more rigorous constraints were applied and if the skin dose were limited to 120% of the prescription dose.

  1. Maximum tolerated dose in a phase I trial on adaptive dose painting by numbers for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madani, Indira; Duprez, Fréderic; Boterberg, Tom; Van de Wiele, Christophe; Bonte, Katrien; Deron, Philippe; De Gersem, Werner; Coghe, Marc; De Neve, Wilfried

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) in a phase I trial on adaptive dose-painting-by-numbers (DPBN) for non-metastatic head and neck cancer. Materials and methods: Adaptive intensity-modulated radiotherapy was based on voxel intensity of pre-treatment and per-treatment [ 18 F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography ( 18 F-FDG-PET) scans. Dose was escalated to a median total dose of 80.9 Gy in the high-dose clinical target volume (dose level I) and 85.9 Gy in the gross tumor volume (dose level II). The MTD would be reached, if ⩾33% of patients developed any grade ⩾4 toxicity (DLT) up to 3 months follow-up. Results: Between February 2007 and August 2009, seven patients at dose level I and 14 at dose level II were treated. All patients completed treatment without interruption. At a median follow-up for surviving patients of 38 (dose level I) and 22 months (dose level II) there was no grade ⩾4 toxicity during treatment and follow-up but six cases of mucosal ulcers at latency of 4–10 months, of which five (36%) were observed at dose level II. Mucosal ulcers healed spontaneously in four patients. Conclusions: Considering late mucosal ulcers as DLT, the MTD of a median dose of 80.9 Gy has been reached in our trial.

  2. Melatonin for Sleep in Children with Autism: A Controlled Trial Examining Dose, Tolerability, and Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malow, Beth; Adkins, Karen W.; McGrew, Susan G.; Wang, Lily; Goldman, Suzanne E.; Fawkes, Diane; Burnette, Courtney

    2012-01-01

    Supplemental melatonin has shown promise in treating sleep onset insomnia in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Twenty-four children, free of psychotropic medications, completed an open-label dose-escalation study to assess dose-response, tolerability, safety, feasibility of collecting actigraphy data, and ability of outcome measures…

  3. Ergogenic effect of varied doses of coffee-caffeine on maximal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Endurance performance index (VO2 max, run time & number of exercise laps) were measured and recorded. Result: Repeated measures ANOVA was used to assess the level of significant difference between caffeine doses and placebo dose in VO2 max, run time and number of exercise laps. The result showed no ...

  4. Maximally effective dosing regimens of meropenem in patients with septic shock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjövall, Fredrik; Alobaid, Abdulaziz S; Wallis, Steven C

    2018-01-01

    was required for both empirical and targeted treatment. In patients with a CL CR of ≤ 100 mL/min, successful concentration targets could be reached with intermittent dosing of 1000 mg/8 h. Conclusions: In patients with septic shock and possible augmented renal clearance, doses should be increased and...

  5. Implications of the quadratic cell survival curve and human skin radiation ''tolerance doses'' on fractionation and superfractionation dose selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douglas, B.G.

    1982-01-01

    An analysis of early published multifraction orthovoltage human acute skin irradiation tolerance isoeffect doses is presented. It indicates that human acute skin radiation reactions may result from the repetition, with each dose fraction, of a cell survival curve of the form: S = e/sup -(αD + βD 2 )/). The analysis also shows no need for an independent proliferation related time factor for skin, for daily treatments of six weeks or less in duration. The value obtained for the constant β/α for orthovoltage irradiation from these data is 2.9 x 10 -3 rad -1 for the cell line determining acute skin tolerance. A radiation isoeffect relationship, based on the quadratic cell survival curve, is introduced for human skin. This relationship has some advantages over the nominal standard dose (NSD). First, its use is not restricted to tolerance level reactions. Second, a modification of the relationship, which is also introduced, may be employed in the selection of doses per treatment when irradiation dose fractions are administered at short intervals where repair of sublethal injury is incomplete

  6. Induction of oral tolerance with micro-doses of ovomucoid depends on the length of the feeding period

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Tanja; Frøkiær, Hanne

    2002-01-01

    Oral administration of antigen induces antigen-specific immunologic tolerance, which is known to be dose-dependent. We studied the influence of continuous oral administration of nanogram and microgram doses of antigen on oral tolerance induction. Mice were continuously exposed to varying doses (1...

  7. Application of organ tolerance dose-constraints in clinical studies in radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerr, Wolfgang; Herrmann, Thomas; Baumann, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In modern radiation oncology, tolerance dose-constraints for organs at risk (OAR) must be considered for treatment planning, but particularly in order to design clinical studies. Tolerance dose tables, however, only address one aspect of the therapeutic ratio of any clinical study, i.e., the limitation of adverse events, but not the desired potential improvement in the tumor effect of a novel treatment strategy. A sensible application of ''tolerance doses'' in a clinical situation requires consideration of various critical aspects addressed here: definition of tolerance dose, specification of an endpoint/symptom, consideration of radiation quality and irradiation protocol, exposed volume and dose distribution, and patient-related factors of radiosensitivity. The currently most comprehensive estimates of OAR radiation tolerance are in the QUANTEC compilations (2010). However, these tolerance dose values must only be regarded as a rough orientation and cannot answer the relevant question for the patients, i.e., if the study can achieve a therapeutic advantage; this can obviously be answered only by the final scientific analysis of the study results. Despite all limitations, the design of clinical studies should currently refer to the QUANTEC values for appreciation of the risk of complications, if needed supplemented by one's own data or further information from the literature. The implementation of a consensus on the safety interests of the patients and on an application and approval process committed to progress in medicine, with transparent quality-assuring requirements with regard to the structural safeguarding of the study activities, plays a central role in clinical research in radiation oncology. (orig.) [de

  8. High-dose inhaled terbutaline increases muscle strength and enhances maximal sprint performance in trained men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hostrup, Morten; Kalsen, Anders; Bangsbo, Jens

    2014-01-01

    ) participated in a double-blinded randomized crossover study. After administration of inhaled terbutaline (30 × 0.5 mg) or placebo, subjects' maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVC) of m.quadriceps was measured. After MVC, subjects performed a 30-s Wingate test. Sixty minutes following the Wingate test......, subjects exercised for 10 min at 80 % of [Formula: see text] and completed a 100-kcal time trial. Aerobic contribution was determined during the Wingate test by indirect calorimetry. Furthermore, plasma terbutaline, lactate, glucose, and K(+) were measured. RESULTS: Inhalation of 15 mg terbutaline resulted...... = 0.019) and 3.3 ± 1.0 % (P = 0.009) higher for terbutaline than placebo. Net accumulation of plasma lactate was higher (P = 0.003) for terbutaline than placebo during the Wingate test, whereas [Formula: see text] above baseline was unchanged by terbutaline (P = 0.882). Time-trial performance...

  9. The effect of small radiation doses on the rat spinal cord: the concept of partial tolerance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ang, K.K.; Van Der Kogel, A.J.; Van Der Schueren, E.

    1983-01-01

    To evaluate the tolerance of the rat spinal cord to small radiation doses per fraction, an increasing number of fractions is required for induction of paralysis. The assessment of doses of 1-2 Gy, as used in the clinic, would require that over 100 fractions be given. The validity of replacing part of a fractionated irradiation of the spinal cord by a single large dose has been tested. Fractionated irradiation doses with 18 MeV X rays were followed by a ''top-up'' dose of 15 Gy as a single treatment. This is the fraction size of a treatment with two irradiation doses leading to paralysis in 50% of the animals (ED 50). Fractionated treatments were carried out with 2, 5, 10 and 20 fractions followed by the top-up dose of 15 Gy. the isoeffect curve, as a function of the number of fractions, has the same slope as experiments performed without top-up dose. The results show that the quality and quantity of cellular repair is not modified when part of a multifractionated exposure is replaced by a larger top-dose. An important consequence of this finding is, that in treatments with unequal fraction sizes, the partial tolerances can simply be added. Since a top-up dose can replace a sizable number of irradiation treatments, its application will allow investigations of the extent of sublethal damage repair for fraction sizes as low as 1 Gy

  10. Design of spray dried insulin microparticles to bypass deposition in the extrathoracic region and maximize total lung dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ung, Keith T; Rao, Nagaraja; Weers, Jeffry G; Huang, Daniel; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2016-09-25

    Inhaled drugs all too often deliver only a fraction of the emitted dose to the target lung site due to deposition in the extrathoracic region (i.e., mouth and throat), which can lead to increased variation in lung exposure, and in some instances increases in local and systemic side effects. For aerosol medications, improved targeting to the lungs may be achieved by tailoring the micromeritic properties of the particles (e.g., size, density, rugosity) to minimize deposition in the mouth-throat and maximize the total lung dose. This study evaluated a co-solvent spray drying approach to modulate particle morphology and dose delivery characteristics of engineered powder formulations of insulin microparticles. The binary co-solvent system studied included water as the primary solvent mixed with an organic co-solvent, e.g., ethanol. Factors such as the relative rate of evaporation of each component of a binary co-solvent mixture, and insulin solubility in each component were considered in selecting feedstock compositions. A water-ethanol co-solvent mixture with a composition range considered suitable for modulating particle shell formation during drying was selected for experimental investigation. An Alberta Idealized Throat model was used to evaluate the in vitro total lung dose of a series of spray dried insulin formulations engineered with different bulk powder properties and delivered with two prototype inhalers that fluidize and disperse powder using different principles. The in vitro total lung dose of insulin microparticles was improved and favored for powders with low bulk density and small primary particle size, with reduction of deposition in the extrathoracic region. The results demonstrated that a total lung dose >95% of the delivered dose can be achieved with engineered particles, indicating a high degree of lung targeting, almost completely bypassing deposition in the mouth-throat. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A cyclotron isotope production facility designed to maximize production and minimize radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickie, W.J.; Stevenson, N.R.; Szlavik, F.F.

    1993-01-01

    Continuing increases in requirements from the nuclear medicine industry for cyclotron isotopes is increasing the demands being put on an aging stock of machines. In addition, with the 1990 recommendations of the ICRP publication in place, strict dose limits will be required and this will have an effect on the way these machines are being operated. Recent advances in cyclotron design combined with lessons learned from two decades of commercial production mean that new facilities can result in a substantial charge on target, low personnel dose, and minimal residual activation. An optimal facility would utilize a well engineered variable energy/high current H - cyclotron design, multiple beam extraction, and individual target caves. Materials would be selected to minimize activation and absorb neutrons. Equipment would be designed to minimize maintenance activities performed in high radiation fields. (orig.)

  12. Normal tissue tolerance to external beam radiation therapy: Cardiac structures; Dose de tolerance des tissus sains: le coeur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doyen, J. [Service d' oncologie-radiotherapie, centre Antoine-Lacassagne, 06 - Nice (France); Giraud, P. [Universite Rene-Descartes Paris 5, 75 - Paris (France); Service d' oncologie-radiotherapie, hopital europeen Georges-Pompidou, 75 - Paris (France); Belkacemi, Y. [Faculte de medecine de Creteil, universite Paris 12, 94 - Creteil (France); Service d' oncologie-radiotherapie, CHU Henri-Mondor, 94 - Creteil (France)

    2010-07-15

    Radiation thoracic tumors may be associated with cardiac toxicity because of the central position of the heart in the thorax. The present review aims to describe the cardiotoxicity during radiotherapy of different tumor sites most associated with this complication and the risk factors of cardiotoxicity during radiation therapy. Medline literature searches were performed using the following cardiac - heart - radiotherapy - toxicity - cardiotoxicity - breast cancer - lymphoma. Cardiac toxicity after breast cancer and mediastinal lymphoma is the most reported radiation-induced complication. The most frequent clinical complications are pericarditis, congestive heart failure, and heart infarction. These events are mostly asymptomatic. Thus clinicians have to give particular attention to these complications. Anthracycline treatment is a major risk factor for additional cardiotoxicity during radiotherapy with a synergistic effect. Correction of cardiovascular risk is an important point of the prevention of heart complications. Total dose delivered to the planned target volume (PTV), the dose per fraction and the irradiated volume were correlated to the risk of cardiotoxicity. Volume of heart receiving 35 Gy must be inferior to 30% and dose per fraction should not exceed 2 Gy when dose of prescription exceeds 30 Gy. Maximum heart distance (maximal thickness of heart irradiated) must be less than 1 cm during irradiation of breast cancer. Modern irradiation techniques seem to be associated with a limited risk of heart complication. The use of anthracycline, other cardio-toxic chemotherapies and targeted therapies should incite for great caution by performing a careful treatment planning and optimisation. (authors)

  13. Effect of x-ray low doses on tolerance to salinity in Latuca Sativa plantules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez Fernandez, R.; Gonzalez Nunez, L.M.; Perez Talavera, S.

    1998-01-01

    The work presents the effect of different radiation doses (ranging from 50 to 200 Gy) applied on irradiated lettuce seeds in a ray source for surface therapy, with a working regime of 30 k and 10 m and a dose rate of 12,9 Gy/mins on the germination and growth of plantules in the presence or absence of salinity. The results indicated meaningful differences in the magnitude of the stimulation effect and the doses that caused it for normal conditions, as well as substantial increments in plantules tolerance from irradiated seeds

  14. Pharmacokinetics and tolerability of a higher rifampin dose versus the standard dose in pulmonary tuberculosis patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruslami, R.; Nijland, H.M.J.; Alisjahbana, B.; Parwati, I.; Crevel, R. van; Aarnoutse, R.E.

    2007-01-01

    Rifampin is a key drug for tuberculosis (TB) treatment. The available data suggest that the currently applied 10-mg/kg of body weight dose of rifampin may be too low and that increasing the dose may shorten the treatment duration. A double-blind randomized phase II clinical trial was performed to

  15. Dose-dependent response of Trichoderma harzianum in improving drought tolerance in rice genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Veena; Ansari, Mohammad W; Tula, Suresh; Yadav, Sandep; Sahoo, Ranjan K; Shukla, Nandini; Bains, Gurdeep; Badal, Shail; Chandra, Subhash; Gaur, A K; Kumar, Atul; Shukla, Alok; Kumar, J; Tuteja, Narendra

    2016-05-01

    This study demonstrates a dose-dependent response of Trichoderma harzianum Th-56 in improving drought tolerance in rice by modulating proline, SOD, lipid peroxidation product and DHN / AQU transcript level, and the growth attributes. In the present study, the effect of colonization of different doses of T. harzianum Th-56 strain in rice genotypes were evaluated under drought stress. The rice genotypes treated with increasing dose of T. harzianum strain Th-56 showed better drought tolerance as compared with untreated control plant. There was significant change in malondialdehyde, proline, higher superoxide dismutase level, plant height, total dry matter, relative chlorophyll content, leaf rolling, leaf tip burn, and the number of scorched/senesced leaves in T. harzianum Th-56 treated rice genotypes under drought stress. This was corroborated with altered expression of aquaporin and dehydrin genes in T. harzianum Th-56 treated rice genotypes. The present findings suggest that a dose of 30 g/L was the most effective in improving drought tolerance in rice, and its potential exploitation will contribute to the advancement of rice genotypes to sustain crop productivity under drought stress. Interaction studies of T. harzianum with three aromatic rice genotypes suggested that PSD-17 was highly benefitted from T. harzianum colonization under drought stress.

  16. Evaluation of dose components for healthy tissue tolerance studies on dogs at the HFR Petten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watkins, P.; Moss, R.L.; Siefert, A.; Huiskamp, R.; Gavin, P.; Konijnenberg, M.

    1993-01-01

    Before the start of clinical trails of BNCT on glioma patients at the Petten reactor, certain preconditions must be determined. In particular the tolerance of healthy brain tissue exposed to the epithermal neutron beam requires investigation. In these studies, beagle dogs have been subjected to different levels of irradiation and 10 B, the latter in the form of BSH. To support this work a treatment planning tool is being developed to predict the various dose components within the treatment volume. A Monte Carlo code, MCNP, has been used to simulate the particle transport and to predict the different dose rate distributions. The doses rates generated by MCNP are manipulated with a processing code, TREAT, to give irradiation times, peak dose positions and to display the required data in a graphical format. This paper explains the basic methodology used in the system and a practical case is presented for one of the healthy tissue tolerance dogs. Doses, both physical and RBE weighted, have been produced for pre-treatment planning studies

  17. Effect of dose rate on intestinal tolerance in mice. Implications in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wambersie, A.; Stienon-Smoes, M.R.; Octave-Prignot, M.

    1978-01-01

    Effect of dose rate on intestinal tolerance after 60 Co irradiation was studied in BALB/c mice. Intestinal tolerance was assessed from LD50, after selective abdominal irradiation and after total body irradiation. Three dose rates were compared, corresponding to irradiation times of about 15-20 minutes ('acute irradiation' taken as reference), 5-6 hours and 10-15 hours. Irradiations were performed simultaneously, with three telecobaltherapy units, the dose rates being adjusted with lead shields and by increasing the distances. Comparison of the experimental data already published indicates that, for some biological systems and effects, additional dose necessary to reach a given effect when passing from 'acute' to 'continuous low dose rate' irradiation is comparable to that expected when considering only repair of sublethal lesions. For other biological systems and effects, it is necessary to consider, besides repair of sublethal lesions, other mechanisms such as cell distribution and, for tumours, the oxygen effect. A differential effect then appears to be possible. However, as far as the clinical applications are concerned, a general agreement is not yet reached on the exact shape of the iso-effect curves as a function of irradiation time for the effects relevant to radiation therapy [fr

  18. Tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønder, Lars

    is linked to a different set of circumstances than the ones suggested by existing models in contemporary democratic theory. Reorienting the discussion of tolerance, the book raises the question of how to disclose new possibilities within our given context of affect and perception. Once we move away from......Tolerance: A Sensorial Orientation to Politics is an experiment in re-orientation. The book is based on the wager that tolerance exceeds the more prevalent images of self-restraint and repressive benevolence because neither precludes the possibility of a more “active tolerance” motivated...... by the desire to experiment and to become otherwise. The objective is to discuss what gets lost, conceptually as well as politically, when we neglect the subsistence of active tolerance within other practices of tolerance, and to develop a theory of active tolerance in which tolerance's mobilizing character...

  19. Efficacy and Tolerability of High-Dose Escitalopram in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Wei; Gevonden, Martin; Shalev, Arieh

    2017-02-01

    Open-label trials suggest that escitalopram (up to 20 mg/d) is an effective treatment for some, but not all posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) patients. Higher doses of escitalopram effectively reduced major depression symptoms in patients who had not responded to regular doses. The current study examines the efficacy, tolerability, and adherence to high-dose escitalopram in PTSD. Forty-five PTSD patients received 12 weeks of gradually increasing doses of escitalopram reaching 40 mg daily at 4 weeks. Among those, 12 participants received regular doses of antidepressants at study onset including escitalopram (n = 7). The Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS) evaluated PTSD symptoms severity before treatment, at 3 months (upon treatment termination), and at 6 months (maintenance effect). A 20% reduction in CAPS scores was deemed clinically significant. Adverse events and medication adherence were monitored at each clinical session. Linear mixed-models analysis showed a significant reduction of mean CAPS scores (11.5 ± 18.1 points) at 3 months and maintenance of gains by 6 months (F2,34.56 = 8.15, P = 0.001). Eleven participants (34.3%) showed clinically significant improvement at 3 months. Only 9 participants (20%) left the study. There were no serious adverse events and few mild ones with only 2 adverse events (diarrhea, 11.1%; drowsiness, 11.1%) reported by more than 10% of participants. High doses of escitalopram are tolerable and well adhered to in PTSD. Their beneficial effect at a group level is due to a particularly good response in a subset of patients.Variability in prior pharmacological treatment precludes a definite attribution of the results to high doses of escitalopram.

  20. Tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønder, Lars

    Tolerance: A Sensorial Orientation to Politics is an experiment in re-orientation. The book is based on the wager that tolerance exceeds the more prevalent images of self-restraint and repressive benevolence because neither precludes the possibility of a more “active tolerance” motivated by the d...... these alternatives by returning to the notion of tolerance as the endurance of pain, linking this notion to exemplars and theories relevant to the politics of multiculturalism, religious freedom, and free speech....

  1. WE-AB-207B-01: Dose Tolerance for SBRT/SABR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimm, J [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) / stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) is gaining popularity, but quantitative dose tolerance has still been lacking. To improve this, the April 2016 issue of Seminars in Radiation Oncology will have normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models for 10 critical structures: optic pathway, cochlea, oral mucosa, esophagus, chestwall, aorta, bronchi, duodenum, small bowel, and spinal cord. Methods: The project included more than 1500 treatments in 1–5 fractions using CyberKnife, Gamma Knife, or LINAC, with 60 authors from 15 institutions. NTCP models were constructed from the 97 grade 2–3 complications, predominantly scored using the common terminology criteria for adverse events (CTCAEv4). Dose volume histogram (DVH) data from each institutional dataset was loaded into the DVH Evaluator software (DiversiLabs, LLC, Huntingdon Valley, Pa) for modeling. The current state of the literature for the critical structures was depicted using DVH Risk Maps: comparative graphs of dose tolerance limits that can include estimated risk levels, reported complications, DVH data for study patients, as well as high- and low-risk dose tolerance limits. Results: For relatively acceptable toxicity like grade 1–3 rib fractures and chestwall pain, the high-risk limits have 50% risk and the low-risk limits have 5% risk. Emami et al (IJROBP 1991 May 15;21(1):109–22) used 50% and 5% risk levels for all structures, whereas this effort used clinically acceptable ranges for each: in structures like aorta or spinal cord where complications must be avoided, the high- and low-risk limits have about 3% and 1% risk, respectively, in this issue of Seminars. These statistically based guidelines can help ensure plan quality for each patient. Conclusion: NTCP for SBRT is now becoming available. Hypofractionated dose tolerance can be dramatically different than extrapolations of conventional fractionation so NTCP analysis of the

  2. WE-AB-207B-01: Dose Tolerance for SBRT/SABR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimm, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) / stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) is gaining popularity, but quantitative dose tolerance has still been lacking. To improve this, the April 2016 issue of Seminars in Radiation Oncology will have normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models for 10 critical structures: optic pathway, cochlea, oral mucosa, esophagus, chestwall, aorta, bronchi, duodenum, small bowel, and spinal cord. Methods: The project included more than 1500 treatments in 1–5 fractions using CyberKnife, Gamma Knife, or LINAC, with 60 authors from 15 institutions. NTCP models were constructed from the 97 grade 2–3 complications, predominantly scored using the common terminology criteria for adverse events (CTCAEv4). Dose volume histogram (DVH) data from each institutional dataset was loaded into the DVH Evaluator software (DiversiLabs, LLC, Huntingdon Valley, Pa) for modeling. The current state of the literature for the critical structures was depicted using DVH Risk Maps: comparative graphs of dose tolerance limits that can include estimated risk levels, reported complications, DVH data for study patients, as well as high- and low-risk dose tolerance limits. Results: For relatively acceptable toxicity like grade 1–3 rib fractures and chestwall pain, the high-risk limits have 50% risk and the low-risk limits have 5% risk. Emami et al (IJROBP 1991 May 15;21(1):109–22) used 50% and 5% risk levels for all structures, whereas this effort used clinically acceptable ranges for each: in structures like aorta or spinal cord where complications must be avoided, the high- and low-risk limits have about 3% and 1% risk, respectively, in this issue of Seminars. These statistically based guidelines can help ensure plan quality for each patient. Conclusion: NTCP for SBRT is now becoming available. Hypofractionated dose tolerance can be dramatically different than extrapolations of conventional fractionation so NTCP analysis of the

  3. Tolerability in the elderly population of high-dose alpha lipoic acid: a potential antioxidant therapy for the eye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarezky D

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Daniel Sarezky, Aaishah R Raquib, Joshua L Dunaief, Benjamin J Kim Scheie Eye Institute, Department of Ophthalmology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA Purpose: Alpha lipoic acid (ALA is an antioxidant and iron-chelating supplement that has potential benefits for geographic atrophy in dry age-related macular degeneration as well as other eye diseases. The purpose of this study was to determine the tolerability of ALA in the elderly population. Patients and methods: Fifteen subjects, age ≥65 years, took sequential ALA doses of 600, 800, and 1,200 mg. Each dose was taken once daily with a meal for 5 days. After each dose was taken by the subjects for 5 days, the subjects were contacted by phone, a review of systems was performed, and they were asked if they thought they could tolerate taking that dose of ALA for an extended period of time. Results: The 600 mg dose was well tolerated. At the 800 mg dose, one subject had an intolerable flushing sensation. At the 1,200 mg dose, two subjects had intolerable upper gastrointestinal side effects and one subject had an intolerable flushing sensation. Subjects taking gastrointestinal prophylaxis medications had no upper gastrointestinal side effects. Conclusion: High-dose ALA is not completely tolerated by the elderly. These preliminary data suggest that gastrointestinal prophylaxis may improve tolerability. (ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02613572. Keywords: age-related macular degeneration, geographic atrophy, antioxidant, gastrointestinal, dietary supplements, lipoic acid

  4. The individual tolerance concept is not the sole explanation for the probit dose-effect model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, M.C.; McCloskey, J.T.

    2000-02-01

    Predominant methods for analyzing dose- or concentration-effect data (i.e., probit analysis) are based on the concept of individual tolerance or individual effective dose (IED, the smallest characteristic dose needed to kill an individual). An alternative explanation (stochasticity hypothesis) is that individuals do not have unique tolerances: death results from stochastic processes occurring similarly in all individuals. These opposing hypotheses were tested with two types of experiments. First, time to stupefaction (TTS) was measured for zebra fish (Brachydanio rerio) exposed to benzocaine. The same 40 fish were exposed during five trials to test if the same order for TTS was maintained among trials. The IED hypothesis was supported with a minor stochastic component being present. Second, eastern mosquitofish (Gambusia holbrooki) were exposed to sublethal or lethal NaCl concentrations until a large portion of the lethally exposed fish died. After sufficient time for recovery, fish sublethally exposed and fish surviving lethal exposure were exposed simultaneously to lethal NaCl concentrations. No statistically significant effect was found of previous exposure on survival time but a large stochastic component to the survival dynamics was obvious. Repetition of this second type of test with pentachlorophenol also provided no support for the IED hypothesis. The authors conclude that neither hypothesis alone was the sole or dominant explanation for the lognormal (probit) model. Determination of the correct explanation (IED or stochastic) or the relative contributions of each is crucial to predicting consequences to populations after repeated or chronic exposures to any particular toxicant.

  5. Tolerance to oxidative stress is required for maximal xylem colonization by the xylem-limited bacterial phytopathogen, Xylella fastidiosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Lee, Yunho; Igo, Michele M; Roper, M Caroline

    2017-09-01

    Bacterial plant pathogens often encounter reactive oxygen species (ROS) during host invasion. In foliar bacterial pathogens, multiple regulatory proteins are involved in the sensing of oxidative stress and the activation of the expression of antioxidant genes. However, it is unclear whether xylem-limited bacteria, such as Xylella fastidiosa, experience oxidative stress during the colonization of plants. Examination of the X. fastidiosa genome uncovered only one homologue of oxidative stress regulatory proteins, OxyR. Here, a knockout mutation in the X. fastidiosa oxyR gene was constructed; the resulting strain was significantly more sensitive to hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) relative to the wild-type. In addition, during early stages of grapevine infection, the survival rate was 1000-fold lower for the oxyR mutant than for the wild-type. This supports the hypothesis that grapevine xylem represents an oxidative environment and that X. fastidiosa must overcome this challenge to achieve maximal xylem colonization. Finally, the oxyR mutant exhibited reduced surface attachment and cell-cell aggregation and was defective in biofilm maturation, suggesting that ROS could be a potential environmental cue stimulating biofilm development during the early stages of host colonization. © 2016 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  6. Application of organ tolerance dose-constraints in clinical studies in radiation oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerr, Wolfgang [Medical University/AKH Vienna, Dept. of Radiation Oncology/Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Vienna (Austria); Technical University Dresden, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, OncoRay-National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden (Germany); Task Group ' ' Tolerance Doses' ' of the German Society for Radiation Oncology (DEGRO), Berlin (Germany); Herrmann, Thomas [Task Group ' ' Tolerance Doses' ' of the German Society for Radiation Oncology (DEGRO), Berlin (Germany); Baumann, Michael [Technical University Dresden, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, OncoRay-National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden (Germany); Task Group ' ' Tolerance Doses' ' of the German Society for Radiation Oncology (DEGRO), Berlin (Germany)

    2014-07-15

    In modern radiation oncology, tolerance dose-constraints for organs at risk (OAR) must be considered for treatment planning, but particularly in order to design clinical studies. Tolerance dose tables, however, only address one aspect of the therapeutic ratio of any clinical study, i.e., the limitation of adverse events, but not the desired potential improvement in the tumor effect of a novel treatment strategy. A sensible application of ''tolerance doses'' in a clinical situation requires consideration of various critical aspects addressed here: definition of tolerance dose, specification of an endpoint/symptom, consideration of radiation quality and irradiation protocol, exposed volume and dose distribution, and patient-related factors of radiosensitivity. The currently most comprehensive estimates of OAR radiation tolerance are in the QUANTEC compilations (2010). However, these tolerance dose values must only be regarded as a rough orientation and cannot answer the relevant question for the patients, i.e., if the study can achieve a therapeutic advantage; this can obviously be answered only by the final scientific analysis of the study results. Despite all limitations, the design of clinical studies should currently refer to the QUANTEC values for appreciation of the risk of complications, if needed supplemented by one's own data or further information from the literature. The implementation of a consensus on the safety interests of the patients and on an application and approval process committed to progress in medicine, with transparent quality-assuring requirements with regard to the structural safeguarding of the study activities, plays a central role in clinical research in radiation oncology. (orig.) [German] In der modernen Radioonkologie muessen Toleranzdosisgrenzen fuer die Risikoorgane (''organs at risk'', OAR) zur Behandlungsplanung, besonders aber zur Gestaltung klinischer Studien, herangezogen werden

  7. Overcoming beta-agonist tolerance: high dose salbutamol and ipratropium bromide. Two randomised controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haney Sarah

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Asthmatics treated with long-acting beta-agonists have a reduced bronchodilator response to moderate doses of inhaled short acting beta-agonists during acute bronchoconstriction. It is not known if the response to higher doses of nebulised beta-agonists or other bronchodilators is impaired. We assessed the effect of long-acting beta-agonist treatment on the response to 5 mg nebulised salbutamol and to ipratropium bromide. Methods Two double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover studies of inhaled formoterol 12 μg twice daily in patients with asthma. High-dose salbutamol: 36 hours after the last dose of 1 week of formoterol or placebo treatment, 11 subjects inhaled methacholine to produce a 20% fall in FEV1. Salbutamol 5 mg was then administered via nebuliser and the FEV1 was monitored for 20 minutes. Ipratropium: 36 hours after the last dose of 1 week of formoterol or placebo treatment, 11 subjects inhaled 4.5% saline to produce a 20% fall in FEV1. Salbutamol 200 μg or ipratropium bromide 40 μg was then inhaled and the FEV1 was monitored for 30 minutes. Four study arms compared the response to each bronchodilator after formoterol and placebo. Analyses compared the area under the bronchodilator response curves, adjusting for changes in pre-challenge FEV1, dose of provocational agent and FEV1 fall during the challenge procedure. Results The response to nebulised salbutamol was 15% lower after formoterol therapy compared to placebo (95% confidence 5 to 25%, p = 0.008. The response to ipratropium was unchanged. Conclusion Long-acting beta-agonist treatment induces tolerance to the bronchodilator effect of beta-agonists, which is not overcome by higher dose nebulised salbutamol. However, the bronchodilator response to ipratropium bromide is unaffected.

  8. A Detailed Dosimetric Analysis of Spinal Cord Tolerance in High-Dose Spine Radiosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsoulakis, Evangelia; Jackson, Andrew; Cox, Brett; Lovelock, Michael; Yamada, Yoshiya

    2017-11-01

    Dose-volume tolerance of the spinal cord (SC) in spinal stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is difficult to define because radiation myelitis rates are low, and published reports document cases of myelopathy but do not account for the total number of patients treated at given dose-volume combinations who do not have myelitis. This study reports SC toxicity from single-fraction spinal SRS and presents a comprehensive atlas of the incidence of adverse events to examine dose-volume predictors. A prospective database of all patients undergoing single-fraction spinal SRS at our institution between 2004 and 2011 was reviewed. SC toxicity was defined by clinical myelitis with accompanying magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signal changes that were not attributable to tumor progression. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) atlases were created for these endpoints. Rates of adverse events with 95% confidence limits and probabilities that rates of adverse events were 13.33 Gy, and minimum doses to the hottest 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, and 1 cc were >10.66, 10.9, and 8 Gy, respectively; however, both myelitis cases occurred below the 34th percentile for Dmax and there were 194 DVHs in total with Dmax >13.33 Gy. A median SC Dmax of 13.85 Gy is safe and supports that a Dmax limit of 14 Gy carries a low <1% rate of myelopathy. No dose-volume thresholds or relationships between SC dose and myelitis were apparent. This is the largest study examining dosimetric data and radiation-induced myelitis in de novo spine SRS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Lack of evidence for increased tolerance of rat spinal cord with decreasing fraction doses below 2 Gy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ang, K.K.; van der Kogel, A.J.; van der Schueren, E.

    1985-01-01

    The radiation tolerance of the spinal cord, both in man and in rats, has been shown to depend strongly on the size of the dose per fraction. With fraction doses down to about 2 Gy, the spinal cord tolerance can be predicted by a modified Ellis formula. More recently alternative isoeffect formulas were based on the linear-quadratic (LQ) model of cell survival where the effect of dose fractionation is characterized by the ratio α/β which varies from tissue to tissue. For the spinal cord, as well as for other late responding tissues, the ratio α/β is small, in contrast to most acutely responding tissues. Both the Ellis-type formula, and to a lesser extent the LQ-model, predict a continuously increasing tolerance dose with decreasing fraction size. From previous experiments on the rat cervical spinal cord with doses per fraction down to about 2 Gy, the ratio α/β was determined to be 1.7 Gy, and the LQ-model would predict a rise in tolerance with a reduction in fraction size to far below 2 Gy. Based on these predictions clinical studies have been initiated assuming a significantly increased tolerance by reduction of fraction size to about 1 Gy. However, in the present experiments no evidence was found for such an increase in tolerance with fraction sizes below 2 Gy

  10. Buprenorphine dose induction in non-opioid-tolerant pre-release prisoners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vocci, Frank J; Schwartz, Robert P; Wilson, Monique E; Gordon, Michael S; Kinlock, Timothy W; Fitzgerald, Terrence T; O'Grady, Kevin E; Jaffe, Jerome H

    2015-11-01

    In a previously reported randomized controlled trial, formerly opioid-dependent prisoners were more likely to enter community drug abuse treatment when they were inducted in prison onto buprenorphine/naloxone (hereafter called buprenorphine) than when they received counseling without buprenorphine in prison (47.5% vs. 33.7%, p=0.012) (Gordon et al., 2014). In this communication we report on the results of the induction schedule and the adverse event profile seen in pre-release prisoners inducted onto buprenorphine. This paper examines the dose induction procedure, a comparison of the proposed versus actual doses given per week, and side effects reported for 104 adult participants who were randomized to buprenorphine treatment in prison. Self-reported side effects were analyzed using generalized estimated equations to determine changes over time in side effects. Study participants were inducted onto buprenorphine at a rate faster than the induction schedule. Of the 104 (72 males, 32 females) buprenorphine recipients, 64 (37 males, 27 females) remained on medication at release from prison. Nine participants (8.6%) discontinued buprenorphine because of unpleasant opioid side effects. There were no serious adverse events reported during the in-prison phase of the study. Constipation was the most frequent symptom reported (69 percent). Our findings suggest that buprenorphine administered to non-opioid-tolerant adults should be started at a lower, individualized dose than customarily used for adults actively using opioids, and that non-opioid-tolerant pre-release prisoners can be successfully inducted onto therapeutic doses prior to release. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of a simple dose-escalation schedule on tramadol tolerability : assessment in the clinical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagarro, I; Herrera, J; Barutell, C; Díez, M C; Marín, M; Samper, D; Busquet, C; Rodríguez, M J

    2005-01-01

    To assess the effect of a very simple dose-escalation schedule on tramadol tolerability in clinical practice. This schedule consists of starting treatment with sustained-release tramadol 50mg twice daily, and escalating the dose around 7 days later to 100mg twice daily. Data from 1925 outpatients with non-malignant chronic pain were collected in this multicentre, prospective, comparative, non-randomised, open, observational study. A total of 1071 patients (55.6%) were included in the dose-escalation group (50mg group) and 854 patients (44.4%) in the control group (sustained-release tramadol 100mg twice daily; 100mg group). The proportion of patients who interrupted tramadol treatment due to the occurrence of adverse reactions was significantly lower in the 50mg group (5.6%) than in the 100mg group (12.6%) [p = 0.001]. In line with this, the proportion of patients who experienced at least one adverse reaction was significantly lower in the 50mg group (18.4%) than in the 100mg group (30.4%) [p = 0.001] and, interestingly, the two most frequently reported adverse reactions, nausea and dizziness, were found with a significantly lower frequency in the 50mg group (p < 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that the risk of safety-related treatment cessations was 2.3 times higher in the 100mg group than in the 50mg group, and 2.2 times higher in females than in males. The two treatments were equally effective in reducing pain intensity (p = 0.121), measured as a reduction in pain score obtained by means of a visual analogue scale. The instauration of tramadol treatment, starting with sustained-release 50mg capsules twice daily and escalating the dose some days later to 100mg twice daily, was shown to be an effective and easy way to improve tramadol tolerability in clinical practice, whilst maintaining its analgesic efficacy.

  12. Biochemical Tolerance During Low Dose Propylene Glycol Exposure in Neonates: A Formulation-Controlled Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aida Kulo

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose of the study: Propylene glycol (PG is a frequently co-administered solvent in formulations administered to neonates, but reports on its (intolerance are limited. We aimed to report on renal, metabolic and hepatic tolerance before, during and following intravenous (iv PG-paracetamol exposure and compared these data with similar datasets reported in literature on neonates exposed to PG without paracetamol or paracetamol without PG.Methods: Renal (diuresis, creatinemia, sodium, metabolic (Base Excess, Anion Gap, lactate, bicarbonate and hepatic (liver enzymes, bilirubinemia indicators before, during and following iv paracetamol-PG exposure in neonates as included in the PARANEO (paracetamol in neonates study (intra-individual trends, ANOVA were collected and analysed.Comparison with observations collected in cases exposed to either iv phenobarbital-PG or iv paracetamol-mannitol (inter-individual comparison, Mann Whitney-U test were made. Results: PG exposure (median 34.1 mg/kg/24 h did not affect postnatal renal, metabolic and hepatic adaptations in 60 cases exposed to paracetamol-PG. These indicators were similar when compared to 29 cases exposed to phenobarbital- PG or 172 cases exposed to paracetamol-mannitol.Major conclusion: Based on observations in 89 neonates, low dose PG exposure was tolerated well. Studies on PG pharmacokinetics and its covariates are needed to estimate the upper level of PG tolerance in neonates.

  13. Dry powder dosing in liquid vehicles: ocular tolerance and scintigraphic evaluation of a perfluorocarbon suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Y; Wilson, C G; Meadows, D; Olejnik, O; Frier, M; Washington, N; Musson, R

    1999-11-30

    The ocular tolerance and precorneal disposition of 99mTc-labelled sterile carbon-perfluorodecalin (PFD) and carbon-aqueous suspensions were examined in a cohort of healthy volunteers. Formulations were prepared in PFD or saline using charcoal particles, radiolabelled with [99mTc]diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) under GMP conditions. Colloidal silicon dioxide was used as a suspending agent. Ocular tolerance was examined following the instillation of each formulation to the eyes of 12 volunteers. The precorneal distribution of both formulations in man was monitored using gamma scintigraphy. Dynamic and static data acquisitions were taken over a period of 150 min after dosing. Carbon particulates suspended in PFD did not show any irritation to the eye. Administration of PFD formulation in man produced a significant increase in ocular retention over a saline formulation (mean residence time (MRT)=157+/-42 and 0.29+/-0.08 min, respectively, P=0.0001). Distribution of the carbon in man followed the same pattern as in a previous reported study in animals. The carbon deposited uniformly along the lid margin in the case of the PFD vehicle, whereas it agglomerated following dosing in the saline vehicle and was ejected from the eye. The novel non-aqueous vehicle system is able to significantly improve the ocular retention of charcoal particles in man and provides a unique distribution of the particles in the eye, which suggests a potential for the PFD system for the treatment of periocular diseases.

  14. Dose effect comparisons between HFR and BMRR irradiated dogs with respect to healthy tissue tolerance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huiskamp, R.; Philipp, K.H.I.; Gavin, P.R.; Wheeler, F.J.; Siefert, A.

    1993-01-01

    Epithermal neutron beams are being developed for the application of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of deep seated tumors, like glioblastoma and astrocytomas, through the intact skin. Epithermal neutrons will be moderated by the tissue mass between skin and tumour to produce the thermal neutrons necessary for the 10 B(n,α) 7 Li reaction in the target tissue. Although the neutron capture cross-sections of elements in normal tissue are several orders of magnitude lower that for boron, the high abundance of hydrogen and nitrogen will cause a significant contribution to the total absorbed radiation dose through the 1 H(n,γ) 2 H and the 14 N(n,p) 14 C reaction, respectively. Due to inevitable incomplete filtration, an epithermal beam will also contain a fast neutron component, i.e. neutrons with energies ≥ 10 keV, and a γ-photon component originating from the reactor and produced in structural and filter materials. Therefore, the resultant radiation consists of a complex of low and high LET radiation of which the constitutents vary rapidly with depth in tissue. Based on the ongoing canine healthy tissue tolerance study at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) using the epithermal beam without BSH, the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of the fast neutron beam component has been determined for skin reactions. In addition, a open-quotes compound factorclose quotes, i.e geometry x RBE, for the 10 B(n,α) 7 Li reaction was derived for dogs irradiated at the BMRR with the epithermal beam and BSH (Gavin et al.). Currently, a healthy tissue tolerance study with BSH is being carried out at the HB11 epithermal beam of the High Flux Reactor at Petten. The present paper describes preliminary dose effect comparisons between High Flux Reactor (HFR) and BMRR irradiated dogs with respect to healthy tissue tolerance in order to refine the BSH compound factors and the fast neutron RBE for skin and brain

  15. In vivo assessment of catheter positioning accuracy and prolonged irradiation time on liver tolerance dose after single-fraction 192Ir high-dose-rate brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kropf Siegfried

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To assess brachytherapy catheter positioning accuracy and to evaluate the effects of prolonged irradiation time on the tolerance dose of normal liver parenchyma following single-fraction irradiation with 192 Ir. Materials and methods Fifty patients with 76 malignant liver tumors treated by computed tomography (CT-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT were included in the study. The prescribed radiation dose was delivered by 1 - 11 catheters with exposure times in the range of 844 - 4432 seconds. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI datasets for assessing irradiation effects on normal liver tissue, edema, and hepatocyte dysfunction, obtained 6 and 12 weeks after HDR-BT, were merged with 3D dosimetry data. The isodose of the treatment plan covering the same volume as the irradiation effect was taken as a surrogate for the liver tissue tolerance dose. Catheter positioning accuracy was assessed by calculating the shift between the 3D center coordinates of the irradiation effect volume and the tolerance dose volume for 38 irradiation effects in 30 patients induced by catheters implanted in nearly parallel arrangement. Effects of prolonged irradiation were assessed in areas where the irradiation effect volume and tolerance dose volume did not overlap (mismatch areas by using a catheter contribution index. This index was calculated for 48 irradiation effects induced by at least two catheters in 44 patients. Results Positioning accuracy of the brachytherapy catheters was 5-6 mm. The orthogonal and axial shifts between the center coordinates of the irradiation effect volume and the tolerance dose volume in relation to the direction vector of catheter implantation were highly correlated and in first approximation identically in the T1-w and T2-w MRI sequences (p = 0.003 and p p = 0.001 and p = 0.004, respectively. There was a significant shift of the irradiation effect towards the catheter entry site compared with the planned dose

  16. A study to evaluate safety and tolerability of repeated doses of tirasemtiv in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shefner, Jeremy M; Watson, Mary Lou; Meng, Lisa; Wolff, Andrew A

    2013-12-01

    Abstract Tirasemtiv is a fast skeletal muscle activator that increases the sensitivity of the sarcomere to calcium, increasing the efficiency of muscle contraction when the muscle is stimulated at submaximal contraction frequencies. A previous study showed single doses of tirasemtiv to be well tolerated and associated with potentially important improvements in a variety of functional outcomes. This study determined safety of tirasemtiv when given at doses up to 500 mg daily for three weeks. Tirasemtiv was given as a single daily dose up to 375 mg for two weeks, with and without concomitant riluzole. In a separate cohort, an ascending dose protocol evaluated a total dose of 500 mg daily given in two divided doses. Safety and tolerability were assessed, as well as measures of function, muscle strength and endurance. Results showed that tirasemtiv was well tolerated, with dizziness the most common adverse event. Tirasemtiv approximately doubled the serum concentration of riluzole. Trends were noted for improvement in ALSFRS-R, Maximum Minute Ventilation, and Nasal Inspiratory Pressure. In conclusion, tirasemtiv is well tolerated and can be given safely with a reduced dose of riluzole. Positive trends in multiple exploratory outcome measures support the further study of this agent in ALS.

  17. Pharmacokinetic properties and tolerability of low-dose SoluMatrix diclofenac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardins, Paul J; Olugemo, Kemi; Solorio, Daniel; Young, Clarence L

    2015-02-01

    This study compared the pharmacokinetic properties and safety profile of low-dose (18- and 35-mg) diclofenac capsules manufactured using SoluMatrix Fine Particle Technology (Trademark of iCeutica Inc. (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), and the technology is licensed to Iroko Pharmaceuticals, LLC (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) for exclusive use in NSAIDs), which produces submicron-sized drug particles with enhanced dissolution properties, to those of diclofenac potassium immediate-release (IR) 50-mg tablets. This Phase 1, single-center, randomized, open-label, single-dose crossover study was conducted in 40 healthy volunteers. Subjects received, in randomized order, SoluMatrix diclofenac 18- or 35-mg capsules in the fasting condition, SoluMatrix diclofenac 35-mg capsules under fed conditions, and diclofenac potassium IR 50-mg tablets under fasting and fed conditions. Pharmacokinetic parameters (T(max), C(max), AUC(0-t), AUC(0-∞)) were calculated from the concentrations of diclofenac in the plasma. Absorption, food effect, and dose proportionality were determined using a mixed-model ANOVA for C(max), AUC(0-t), AUC(0-∞). Tolerability was assessed by recording adverse events, physical examination findings, vital sign measurements: clinical laboratory test results. Overall, 35 healthy volunteers aged 18 to 52 years completed the study. The mean age of the subjects was 33.4 years, and approximately half were men (47.5%). Median T(max) values were similar between the low-dose SoluMatrix diclofenac 35-mg capsules and the diclofenac potassium IR 50-mg tablets (both, ~1.0 hour). The mean maximum plasma concentration (C(max)) after the administration of low-dose SoluMatrix diclofenac 35-mg capsules was 26% lower than that with diclofenac potassium IR 50-mg tablets under fasting conditions (868.72 vs 1194.21 ng/mL). The administration of low-dose SoluMatrix diclofenac 35-mg capsules was associated with a 23% lower overall systemic exposure compared with that of diclofenac

  18. Quantitative in vivo assessment of radiation injury of the liver using Gd-EOB-DTPA enhanced MRI: tolerance dose of small liver volumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pech Maciej

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Backround Hepatic radiation toxicity restricts irradiation of liver malignancies. Better knowledge of hepatic tolerance dose is favourable to gain higher safety and to optimize radiation regimes in radiotherapy of the liver. In this study we sought to determine the hepatic tolerance dose to small volume single fraction high dose rate irradiation. Materials and methods 23 liver metastases were treated by CT-guided interstitial brachytherapy. MRI was performed 3 days, 6, 12 and 24 weeks after therapy. MR-sequences were conducted with T1-w GRE enhanced by hepatocyte-targeted Gd-EOB-DTPA. All MRI data sets were merged with 3D-dosimetry data. The reviewer indicated the border of hypointensity on T1-w images (loss of hepatocyte function or hyperintensity on T2-w images (edema. Based on the volume data, a dose-volume-histogram was calculated. We estimated the threshold dose for edema or function loss as the D90, i.e. the dose achieved in at least 90% of the pseudolesion volume. Results At six weeks post brachytherapy, the hepatocyte function loss reached its maximum extending to the former 9.4Gy isosurface in median (i.e., ≥9.4Gy dose exposure led to hepatocyte dysfunction. After 12 and 24 weeks, the dysfunctional volume had decreased significantly to a median of 11.4Gy and 14Gy isosurface, respectively, as a result of repair mechanisms. Development of edema was maximal at six weeks post brachytherapy (9.2Gy isosurface in median, and regeneration led to a decrease of the isosurface to a median of 11.3Gy between 6 and 12 weeks. The dose exposure leading to hepatocyte dysfunction was not significantly different from the dose provoking edema. Conclusion Hepatic injury peaked 6 weeks after small volume irradiation. Ongoing repair was observed up to 6 months. Individual dose sensitivity may differ as demonstrated by a relatively high standard deviation of threshold values in our own as well as all other published data.

  19. Comparison of dose-responses of contact allergens using the guinea pig maximization test and the local lymph node assay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Och, F.M.M. van; Vandebriel, R.J.; Prinsen, M.K.; Jong, W.H. de; Slob, W.; Loveren, H. van

    2001-01-01

    The guinea pig maximization test (GPMT) has been used as a method for the prediction of skin sensitizing potential for over 30 years. Besides hazard identification, risk assessment of sensitizing chemicals requires the assessment of potency. For the determination of potency based on lowest effective

  20. The impact of central lung distance, maximal heart distance, and radiation technique on the volumetric dose of the lung and heart for intact breast radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong, F.-M.; Klein, Eric E.; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Mansur, David B.; Taylor, Marie E.; Perez, Carlos A.; Myerson, Robert J.; Harms, William B.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of radiographic parameter and radiation technique on the volumetric dose of lung and heart for intact breast radiation. Methods and Materials: Forty patients with both two-dimensional (2D) and computed tomographic (CT) simulations were enrolled in the study. Central lung distance (CLD), maximal heart distance (MHD), and maximal heart length (MHL) were measured under virtual simulation. Four plans were compared for each patient. Plan A used a traditional 2D tangential setup. Plan B used clinical target volume (CTV) based three-dimensional (3D) planning. Both plans C and D used a combination of a medial breast field with shallow tangents. Plan D is a further modification of plan C. Results: Under the traditional tangential setup, the mean ipsilateral lung dose and volume at 20, 30, and 40 Gy correlated linearly with CLD (R = 0.85∼0.91). The mean ipsilateral lung dose (Gy) approximated 4 times the CLD value (cm), whereas the percentage volume (%) of ipsilateral lung at 20, 30, and 40 Gy was about 10 times the CLD (cm). The mean heart dose and percentage volume at 20, 30, and 40 Gy correlated with MHD (R = 0.76∼0.80) and MHL (R 0.65∼0.75). The mean heart dose (Gy) approximated 3 times the MHD value (cm), and the percentage volume (%) of the heart at 10, 20, 30, and 40 Gy was about 6 times MHD (cm). Radiation technique impacted lung and heart dose. The 3D tangential plan (plan B) failed to reduce the volumetric dose of lung and heart from that of the 2D plan (plan A). The medial breast techniques (plans C and D) significantly decreased the volume of lung and heart receiving high doses (30 and 40 Gy). Plan D further decreased the 20 Gy volumes. By use of the medial breast technique, the lung and heart dose were not impacted by original CLD and MHD/MHL. Therefore, the improvement from the tangential technique was more remarkable for patients with CLD ≥ 3.0 cm (p<0.001). Conclusions: The CLD and MHD impact the volumetric dose of

  1. RBE/absorbed dose relationship of d(50)-Be neutrons determined for early intestinal tolerance in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gueulette, J.; Wambersie, A.

    1978-01-01

    RBE/absorbed dose relationship of d(50)-Be neutrons (ref.: 60 Co) was determined using intestinal tolerance in mice (LD50) after single and fractionated irradiation. RBE is 1.8 for a single fraction (about 1000 rad 60 Co dose); it increases when decreasing dose and reaches the plateau value of 2.8 for a 60 Co dose of about 200 rad. This RBE value is used for the clinical applications with the cyclotron 'Cyclone' at Louvain-la-Neuve [fr

  2. Tolerance doses of cutaneous and mucosal tissues in ring-necked parakeets (Psittacula krameri) for external beam megavoltage radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Heather W; Roberts, Royce E; Latimer, Kenneth S; Hernandez-Divers, Stephen; Northrup, Nicole C

    2009-03-01

    Currently used dosages for external-beam megavoltage radiation therapy in birds have been extrapolated from mammalian patients and often appear to provide inadequate doses of radiation for effective tumor control. To determine the tolerance doses of cutaneous and mucosal tissues of normal birds in order to provide more effective radiation treatment for tumors that have been shown to be radiation responsive in other species, ingluvial mucosa and the skin over the ingluvies of 9 ring-necked parakeets (Psittacula krameri) were irradiated in 4-Gy fractions to a total dose of either 48, 60, or 72 Gy using an isocentric cobalt-60 teletherapy unit. Minimal radiation-induced epidermal changes were present in the high-dose group histologically. Neither dose-related acute nor chronic radiation effects could be detected in any group grossly in cutaneous or mucosal tissue over a 9-month period. Radiation doses of 72 Gy in 4-Gy fractions were well tolerated in the small number of ring-necked parakeets in this initial tolerance dose study.

  3. Normal tissue tolerance to external beam radiation therapy: The stomach; Dose de tolerance a l'irradiation des tissus sains: l'estomac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberdiac, P. [Service de radiotherapie, hopital de Bellevue, CHU de Saint-Etienne, 42 - Saint-Etienne (France); Mineur, L. [Unite d' oncologie digestive et radiotherapie, institut Sainte-Catherine, 84 - Avignon (France)

    2010-07-15

    In the following article, we will discuss general issues relating to acute and late gastric's radiation toxicities. The tolerance of the stomach to complete or partial organ irradiation is more un-appreciated than for most other organs. We consulted the Medline database via PubMed and used the key words gastric - radiotherapy - toxicity. Currently, 60 Gy or less is prescribed in gastric radiation therapy. Acute clinical toxicity symptoms are predominantly nausea and vomiting. Although there is a general agreement that the whole stomach tolerance is for doses of 40 to 45 Gy without unacceptable complication, it is well established that a stomach dose of 35 Gy increases the risk of ulcer complications. (authors)

  4. Clinical pharmacokinetics of Icotinib, an anti-cancer drug: evaluation of dose proportionality, food effect, and tolerability in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dongyang; Jiang, Ji; Zhang, Li; Tan, Fenlai; Wang, Yingxiang; Zhang, Don; Hu, Pei

    2014-04-01

    Icotinib, an oral epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, has proved effectiveness in xenografted nude mice. Purpose of the present studies was to investigate tolerability and pharmacokinetics of Icotinib in healthy subjects for the first time, including dose proportionality, food effect, and tolerability. Two studies were conducted in total of 22 healthy subjects: a randomized, two-Latin-square crossover, dose proportional study (n = 12) and a randomized two-way crossover food-effect study (n = 10). Plasma concentration of Icotinib reached peak at a median Tmax of 0.75-3.5 h after single dose and then declined with a mean t1/2β of 6.02-7.83 h. Over the dose range of 100-600 mg, AUC values were proportional to dose and Cmax showed a slight saturation when dose increases. Only 0.2 % of the dose was excreted through kidney in unchanged Icotinib. After dosing 400 mg of Icotinib with high-fat and high-calorie meal, mean Cmax and AUC were significantly increased by 59 and 79 %, respectively. Three subjects experienced four adverse events (rash, increase in AST and ALT, and external injury). Rash and increased levels of AST and ALT were considered as drug-related. No serious adverse events were reported. The current work demonstrated that Icotinib was well tolerated in healthy male subjects (n = 22) over the dose range of 100-600 mg with or without food. Icotinib exposure, expressed in AUC, was proportionally increased with dose over the above dose range. Food intake significantly increased the absorption and exposure of Icotinib in healthy subjects.

  5. Intravenous infusion of docosahexaenoic acid increases serum concentrations in a dose-dependent manner and increases seizure latency in the maximal PTZ model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trépanier, Marc-Olivier; Kwong, Kei-Man; Domenichiello, Anthony F; Chen, Chuck T; Bazinet, Richard P; Burnham, W M

    2015-09-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is an omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-3 PUFA) that has been shown to raise seizure thresholds in the maximal pentylenetetrazole model following acute subcutaneous (s.c.) administration in rats. Following s.c. administration, however, the dose-response relationship for DHA has shown an inverted U-pattern. The purposes of the present experiment were as follows: (1) to determine the pattern of serum unesterified concentrations resulting from the intravenous (i.v.) infusions of various doses of DHA, (2) to determine the time course of these concentrations following the discontinuation of the infusions, and (3) to determine whether seizure protection in the maximal PTZ model would correlate with serum unesterified DHA levels. Animals received 5-minute i.v. infusions of saline or 25, 50, 100, or 200mg/kg of DHA via a cannula inserted into one of the tail veins. Blood was collected during and after the infusions by means of a second cannula inserted into the other tail vein (Experiment 1). A separate group of animals received saline or 12.5-, 25-, 50-, 100-, or 200 mg/kg DHA i.v. via a cannula inserted into one of the tail veins and were then seizure-tested in the maximal PTZ model either during infusion or after the discontinuation of the infusions. Slow infusions of DHA increased serum unesterified DHA concentrations in a dose-dependent manner, with the 200-mg/kg dose increasing the concentration approximately 260-fold compared with saline-infused animals. Following discontinuation of the infusions, serum concentrations rapidly dropped toward baseline, with half-lives of approximately 40 and 11s for the 25-mg/kg dose and 100-mg/kg dose, respectively. In the seizure-tested animals, DHA significantly increased latency to seizure onset in a dose-dependent manner. Following the discontinuation of infusion, seizure latency rapidly decreased toward baseline. Overall, our study suggests that i.v. infusion of unesterified DHA results in

  6. Short-term digestive tolerance of different doses of NUTRIOSE®FB, a food dextrin, in adult men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuvel, E.G.H.M. van den; Wils, D.; Pasman, W.J.; Bakker, M.; Saniez, M.-H.; Kardinaal, A.F.M.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine the tolerance of increasing dosages of an incompletely hydrolysed and/or incompletely absorbed food dextrin coming from wheat starch, NUTRIOSE®FB, at daily levels of 10 and 15 g up to 60 and 80 g, respectively. Design: A randomized, double-blind, multiple dose,

  7. An FMEA evaluation of intensity modulated radiation therapy dose delivery failures at tolerance criteria levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faught, Jacqueline Tonigan; Balter, Peter A; Johnson, Jennifer L; Kry, Stephen F; Court, Laurence E; Stingo, Francesco C; Followill, David S

    2017-11-01

    The objective of this work was to assess both the perception of failure modes in Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) when the linac is operated at the edge of tolerances given in AAPM TG-40 (Kutcher et al.) and TG-142 (Klein et al.) as well as the application of FMEA to this specific section of the IMRT process. An online survey was distributed to approximately 2000 physicists worldwide that participate in quality services provided by the Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core - Houston (IROC-H). The survey briefly described eleven different failure modes covered by basic quality assurance in step-and-shoot IMRT at or near TG-40 (Kutcher et al.) and TG-142 (Klein et al.) tolerance criteria levels. Respondents were asked to estimate the worst case scenario percent dose error that could be caused by each of these failure modes in a head and neck patient as well as the FMEA scores: Occurrence, Detectability, and Severity. Risk probability number (RPN) scores were calculated as the product of these scores. Demographic data were also collected. A total of 181 individual and three group responses were submitted. 84% were from North America. Most (76%) individual respondents performed at least 80% clinical work and 92% were nationally certified. Respondent medical physics experience ranged from 2.5 to 45 yr (average 18 yr). A total of 52% of individual respondents were at least somewhat familiar with FMEA, while 17% were not familiar. Several IMRT techniques, treatment planning systems, and linear accelerator manufacturers were represented. All failure modes received widely varying scores ranging from 1 to 10 for occurrence, at least 1-9 for detectability, and at least 1-7 for severity. Ranking failure modes by RPN scores also resulted in large variability, with each failure mode being ranked both most risky (1st) and least risky (11th) by different respondents. On average MLC modeling had the highest RPN scores. Individual estimated percent dose errors and severity

  8. Normal tissue tolerance to external beam radiation therapy: Peripheral nerves; Dose de tolerance a l'irradiation des tissus sains: les nerfs peripheriques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henriques de Figueiredo, B.; Dejean, C.; Sargos, P.; Kantor, G. [Departement de radiotherapie, institut Bergonie, centre regional de lutte contre le cancer, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Huchet, A.; Mamou, N. [Service d' oncologie medicale et de radiotherapie, CHU Saint-Andre, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Loiseau, H. [Service de neurochirurgie, CHU Pellegrin, 33 - Bordeaux (France)

    2010-07-15

    Plexopathies and peripheral neuropathies appear progressively and with several years delay after radiotherapy. These lesions are observed principally after three clinical situations: supraclavicular and axillar irradiations for breast cancer, pelvic irradiations for various pathologies and limb irradiations for soft tissue sarcomas. Peripheral nerves and plexus (brachial and lumbosacral) are described as serial structures and are supposed to receive less than a given maximum dose linked to the occurrence of late injury. Literature data, mostly ancient, define the maximum tolerable dose to a threshold of 60 Gy and highlight also a great influence of fractionation and high fraction doses. For peripheral nerves, most frequent late effects are pain with significant differences of occurrence between 50 and 60 Gy. At last, associated pathologies (diabetes, vascular pathology, neuropathy) and associated treatments have probably to be taken into account as additional factors, which may increase the risk of these late radiation complications. (authors)

  9. Physiologic Doses of Bilirubin Contribute to Tolerance of Islet Transplants by Suppressing the Innate Immune Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adin, Christopher A; VanGundy, Zachary C; Papenfuss, Tracey L; Xu, Feng; Ghanem, Mostafa; Lakey, Jonathan; Hadley, Gregg A

    2017-01-24

    Bilirubin has been recognized as a powerful cytoprotectant when used at physiologic doses and was recently shown to have immunomodulatory effects in islet allograft transplantation, conveying donor-specific tolerance in a murine model. We hypothesized that bilirubin, an antioxidant, acts to suppress the innate immune response to islet allografts through two mechanisms: 1) by suppressing graft release of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) and inflammatory cytokines, and 2) by producing a tolerogenic phenotype in antigen-presenting cells. Bilirubin was administered intraperitoneally before pancreatic procurement or was added to culture media after islet isolation in AJ mice. Islets were exposed to transplant-associated nutrient deprivation and hypoxia. Bilirubin significantly decreased islet cell death after isolation and hypoxic stress. Bilirubin supplementation of islet media also decreased the release of DAMPs (HMGB1), inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β and IL-6), and chemokines (MCP-1). Cytoprotection was mediated by the antioxidant effects of bilirubin. Treatment of macrophages with bilirubin induced a regulatory phenotype, with increased expression of PD-L1. Coculture of these macrophages with splenocytes led to expansion of Foxp3+ Tregs. In conclusion, exogenous bilirubin supplementation showed cytoprotective and antioxidant effects in a relevant model of islet isolation and hypoxic stress. Suppression of DAMP release, alterations in cytokine profiles, and tolerogenic effects on macrophages suggest that the use of this natural antioxidant may provide a method of preconditioning to improve outcomes after allograft transplantation.

  10. A new dose of maximal-intensity interval training in hypoxia to improve body composition and hemoglobin and hematocrit levels: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho-Cardenosa, Marta; Camacho-Cardenosa, Alba; Martínez Guardado, Ismael; Marcos-Serrano, Marta; Timon, Rafael; Olcina, Guillermo

    2017-01-01

    This pilot study had the aim to determine the effects of a new dose of maximal-intensity interval training in hypoxia in active adults. Twenty-four university student volunteers were randomly assigned to three groups: hypoxia group, normoxia group or control group. The eight training sessions consisted of 2 sets of 5 repeated sprints of 10 seconds with a recovery of 20 seconds between sprints and a recovery period of 10 minutes between sets. Body composition was measured following standard procedures. A blood sample was taken for an immediate hematocrit (HCT) and hemoglobin (Hb) concentration assessment. An all-out 3-ute test was performed to evaluate ventilation parameters and power. HCT and Hb were significantly higher for the hypoxia group in Post- and Det- (P=0.01; P=0.03). Fat mass percentage was significantly lower for the hypoxia group in both assessments (P=0.05; P=0.05). The hypoxia group underwent a significant increase in mean power after the recovery period. A new dose of 8 sessions of maximal-intensity interval training in hypoxia is enough to decrease the percentage of fat mass and to improve HCT and Hb parameters and mean muscle power in healthy and active adults.

  11. Optimal dose selection accounting for patient subpopulations in a randomized Phase II trial to maximize the success probability of a subsequent Phase III trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Fumihiro; Morita, Satoshi

    2018-02-08

    Phase II clinical trials are conducted to determine the optimal dose of the study drug for use in Phase III clinical trials while also balancing efficacy and safety. In conducting these trials, it may be important to consider subpopulations of patients grouped by background factors such as drug metabolism and kidney and liver function. Determining the optimal dose, as well as maximizing the effectiveness of the study drug by analyzing patient subpopulations, requires a complex decision-making process. In extreme cases, drug development has to be terminated due to inadequate efficacy or severe toxicity. Such a decision may be based on a particular subpopulation. We propose a Bayesian utility approach (BUART) to randomized Phase II clinical trials which uses a first-order bivariate normal dynamic linear model for efficacy and safety in order to determine the optimal dose and study population in a subsequent Phase III clinical trial. We carried out a simulation study under a wide range of clinical scenarios to evaluate the performance of the proposed method in comparison with a conventional method separately analyzing efficacy and safety in each patient population. The proposed method showed more favorable operating characteristics in determining the optimal population and dose.

  12. Normal tissue tolerance to external beam radiation therapy: Skin; Dose de tolerance des tissus sains: la peau et les phaneres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginot, A.; Doyen, J.; Hannoun-Levi, J.M.; Courdi, A. [Service d' oncologie-radiotherapie, centre Antoine-Lacassagne, 06 - Nice (France)

    2010-07-15

    Acute skin toxicity is frequent during radiation therapy and can lead to temporary arrest of the treatment. Chronic toxicity can occur and conduct to cosmetic problems. Alopecia is the most frequent toxicity concerning hair and is most of the time reversible. Several factors linked to patients influence skin toxicity, such as under-nutrition, old age, obesity, smoking, skin diseases, autoimmune diseases, failure of DNA reparation. Skin, hair and nail toxicities depend also on radiation schedule. Acute toxicity is greater when dose per fraction increases. Chronic and acute toxicities are more often when total dose increases. Under 45 Gy, the risk of severe skin toxicity is low, and begins above 50 Gy. Skin toxicity depends also on the duration of radiotherapy and split course schedules are associated with less toxicities. Irradiation surface seems to influence skin toxicity but interaction is more complex. Reirradiation is often feasible in case of cancer recurrence but with a risk of grade 3-4 toxicity above all in head and neck cancer. The benefit/risk ratio has to be always precisely evaluated. Permanent alopecia is correlated with the follicle dose. Modern techniques of radiation therapy allow to spare skin. (authors)

  13. The effects of low and moderate doses of caffeine supplementation on upper and lower body maximal voluntary concentric and eccentric muscle force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallis, Jason; Yavuz, Harley C M

    2018-03-01

    Despite the growing quantity of literature exploring the effect of caffeine on muscular strength, there is a dearth of data that directly explores differences in erogenicity between upper and lower body musculature and the dose-response effect. The present study sought to investigate the effects of low and moderate doses of caffeine on the maximal voluntary strength of the elbow flexors and knee extensors. Ten nonspecifically strength-trained, recreationally active participants (aged 21 ± 0.3 years) completed the study. Using a randomised, counterbalanced, and double-blind approach, isokinetic concentric and eccentric strength was measured at 60 and 180°/s following administration of a placebo, 3 mg·kg -1 body mass caffeine, and 6 mg·kg -1 body mass caffeine. There was no effect of caffeine on the maximal voluntary concentric and eccentric strength of the elbow flexors, or the eccentric strength of the knee extensors. Both 3 and 6 mg·kg -1 body mass caffeine caused a significant increase in peak concentric force of the knee extensors at 180°/s. No difference was apparent between the 2 concentrations. Only 6 mg·kg -1 body mass caused an increase in peak concentric force during repeated contractions. The results infer that the effective caffeine concentration to evoke improved muscle performance may be related to muscle mass and contraction type. The present work indicates that a relatively low dose of caffeine treatment may be effective for improving lower body muscular strength, but may have little benefit for the strength of major muscular groups of the upper body.

  14. In vivo assessment of the gastric mucosal tolerance dose after single fraction, small volume irradiation of liver malignancies by computed tomography-guided, high-dose-rate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streitparth, Florian; Pech, Maciej; Boehmig, Michael; Ruehl, Ricarda; Peters, Nils; Wieners, Gero; Steinberg, Johannes; Lopez-Haenninen, Enrique; Felix, Roland; Wust, Peter; Ricke, Jens

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess the tolerance dose of gastric mucosa for single-fraction computed tomography (CT)-guided, high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy of liver malignancies. Methods and Materials: A total of 33 patients treated by CT-guided HDR brachytherapy of liver malignancies in segments II and/or III were included. Dose planning was performed upon a three-dimensional CT data set acquired after percutaneous applicator positioning. All patients received gastric protection post-treatment. For further analysis, the contours of the gastric wall were defined in every CT slice using Brachyvision Software. Dose-volume histograms were calculated for each treatment and correlated with clinical data derived from questionnaires assessing Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC). All patients presenting symptoms of upper GI toxicity were examined endoscopically. Results: Summarizing all patients the minimum dose applied to 1 ml of the gastric wall (D 1ml ) ranged from 6.3 to 34.2 Gy; median, 14.3 Gy. Toxicity was present in 18 patients (55%). We found nausea in 16 (69%), emesis in 9 (27%), cramping in 13 (39%), weight loss in 12 (36%), gastritis in 4 (12%), and ulceration in 5 patients (15%). We found a threshold dose D 1ml of 11 Gy for general gastric toxicity and 15.5 Gy for gastric ulceration verified by an univariate analysis (p = 0.01). Conclusions: For a single fraction, small volume irradiation we found in the upper abdomen a threshold dose D 1ml of 15.5 Gy for the clinical endpoint ulceration of the gastric mucosa. This in vivo assessment is in accordance with previously published tolerance data

  15. Efficacy and Tolerability of Fixed-Dose Combination of Dexketoprofen and Dicyclomine Injection in Acute Renal Colic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Porwal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of a fixed-dose combination of dexketoprofen and dicyclomine (DXD injection in patients with acute renal colic. Patients and Methods. Two hundred and seventeen patients were randomized to receive either DXD (n=109 or fixed-dose combination of diclofenac and dicyclomine injection (DLD; n=108, intramuscularly. Pain intensity (PI was self-evaluated by patients on visual analogue scale (VAS at baseline and at 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 hours. Efficacy parameters were proportion of responders, difference in PI (PID at 8 hours, and sum of analogue of pain intensity differences (SAPID. Tolerability was assessed by patients and physicians. Results. DXD showed superior efficacy in terms of proportion of responders (98.17% versus 81.48; P<0.0001, PID at 8 hours (P=0.002, and SAPID0–8 hours (P=0.004. The clinical global impression for change in pain was significantly better for DXD than DLD. The incidence of adverse events was comparable in both groups. However, global assessment of tolerability was rated significantly better for DXD. Conclusion. DXD showed superior efficacy and tolerability than DLD in patients clinically diagnosed to be suffering from acute renal colic.

  16. Efficacy and Tolerability of Fixed-Dose Combination of Dexketoprofen and Dicyclomine Injection in Acute Renal Colic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porwal, A.; Mahajan, A. D.; Oswal, D. S.; Erram, S. S.; Sheth, D. N.; Balamurugan, S.; Kamat, V.; Enadle, R. P.; Badadare, A.; Bhatnagar, S. K.; Walvekar, R. S.; Dhorepatil, S.; Naik, R. C.; Basu, I.; Kshirsagar, S. N.; Keny, J. V.; Sengupta, S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of a fixed-dose combination of dexketoprofen and dicyclomine (DXD) injection in patients with acute renal colic. Patients and Methods. Two hundred and seventeen patients were randomized to receive either DXD (n = 109) or fixed-dose combination of diclofenac and dicyclomine injection (DLD; n = 108), intramuscularly. Pain intensity (PI) was self-evaluated by patients on visual analogue scale (VAS) at baseline and at 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 hours. Efficacy parameters were proportion of responders, difference in PI (PID) at 8 hours, and sum of analogue of pain intensity differences (SAPID). Tolerability was assessed by patients and physicians. Results. DXD showed superior efficacy in terms of proportion of responders (98.17% versus 81.48; P < 0.0001), PID at 8 hours (P = 0.002), and SAPID0–8 hours (P = 0.004). The clinical global impression for change in pain was significantly better for DXD than DLD. The incidence of adverse events was comparable in both groups. However, global assessment of tolerability was rated significantly better for DXD. Conclusion. DXD showed superior efficacy and tolerability than DLD in patients clinically diagnosed to be suffering from acute renal colic. PMID:22577544

  17. Normal tissue tolerance to external beam radiation therapy: Thyroid; Dose de tolerance des tissus sains: la thyroide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berges, O.; Giraud, P. [Service d' oncologie-radiotherapie, hopital europeen Georges-Pompidou, universite Paris Descartes, 75 - Paris (France); Belkacemi, Y. [Service d' oncologie-radiotherapie, CHU Henri-Mondor, universite Paris 12, 94 - Creteil (France)

    2010-07-15

    The thyroid is the most developed endocrine gland of the body. Due to its anatomical location, it may be exposed to ionizing radiation in external radiotherapy involving head and neck. This review aims to describe the thyroid radiation disorders, probably under-reported in the literature, their risk factors and follow-up procedures. The functional changes after external beam radiation consists mainly of late effects occurring beyond 6 months, and are represented by the clinical and subclinical hypothyroidism. Its incidence is approximately 20 to 30% and it can occur after more than 25 years after radiation exposure. Hyperthyroidism and auto-immune manifestations have been described in a lesser proportion. The morphological changes consist of benign lesions, primarily adenomas, and malignant lesions, the most feared and which incidence is 0.35%. The onset of hypothyroidism depends of the total dose delivered to the gland, and the irradiated. Modern techniques of conformal radiotherapy with modulated intensity could improve the preservation of the thyroid, at the expense of the increase in low doses and the theoretical risk of secondary cancers. (authors)

  18. Increased interleukin-1β levels following low dose MDMA induces tolerance against the 5-HT neurotoxicity produced by challenge MDMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Preconditioning is a phenomenon by which tolerance develops to injury by previous exposure to a stressor of mild severity. Previous studies have shown that single or repeated low dose MDMA can attenuate 5-HT transporter loss produced by a subsequent neurotoxic dose of the drug. We have explored the mechanism of delayed preconditioning by low dose MDMA. Methods Male Dark Agouti rats were given low dose MDMA (3 mg/kg, i.p.) 96 h before receiving neurotoxic MDMA (12.5 mg/kg, i.p.). IL-1β and IL1ra levels and 5-HT transporter density in frontal cortex were quantified at 1 h, 3 h or 7 days. IL-1β, IL-1ra and IL-1RI were determined between 3 h and 96 h after low dose MDMA. sIL-1RI combined with low dose MDMA or IL-1β were given 96 h before neurotoxic MDMA and toxicity assessed 7 days later. Results Pretreatment with low dose MDMA attenuated both the 5-HT transporter loss and elevated IL-1β levels induced by neurotoxic MDMA while producing an increase in IL-1ra levels. Low dose MDMA produced an increase in IL-1β at 3 h and in IL-1ra at 96 h. sIL-1RI expression was also increased after low dose MDMA. Coadministration of sIL-1RI (3 μg, i.c.v.) prevented the protection against neurotoxic MDMA provided by low dose MDMA. Furthermore, IL-1β (2.5 pg, intracortical) given 96 h before neurotoxic MDMA protected against the 5-HT neurotoxicity produced by the drug, thus mimicking preconditioning. Conclusions These results suggest that IL-1β plays an important role in the development of delayed preconditioning by low dose MDMA. PMID:22114930

  19. Increased interleukin-1β levels following low dose MDMA induces tolerance against the 5-HT neurotoxicity produced by challenge MDMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayado Andrea

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Preconditioning is a phenomenon by which tolerance develops to injury by previous exposure to a stressor of mild severity. Previous studies have shown that single or repeated low dose MDMA can attenuate 5-HT transporter loss produced by a subsequent neurotoxic dose of the drug. We have explored the mechanism of delayed preconditioning by low dose MDMA. Methods Male Dark Agouti rats were given low dose MDMA (3 mg/kg, i.p. 96 h before receiving neurotoxic MDMA (12.5 mg/kg, i.p.. IL-1β and IL1ra levels and 5-HT transporter density in frontal cortex were quantified at 1 h, 3 h or 7 days. IL-1β, IL-1ra and IL-1RI were determined between 3 h and 96 h after low dose MDMA. sIL-1RI combined with low dose MDMA or IL-1β were given 96 h before neurotoxic MDMA and toxicity assessed 7 days later. Results Pretreatment with low dose MDMA attenuated both the 5-HT transporter loss and elevated IL-1β levels induced by neurotoxic MDMA while producing an increase in IL-1ra levels. Low dose MDMA produced an increase in IL-1β at 3 h and in IL-1ra at 96 h. sIL-1RI expression was also increased after low dose MDMA. Coadministration of sIL-1RI (3 μg, i.c.v. prevented the protection against neurotoxic MDMA provided by low dose MDMA. Furthermore, IL-1β (2.5 pg, intracortical given 96 h before neurotoxic MDMA protected against the 5-HT neurotoxicity produced by the drug, thus mimicking preconditioning. Conclusions These results suggest that IL-1β plays an important role in the development of delayed preconditioning by low dose MDMA.

  20. Regulatory Forum Opinion Piece*: Retrospective Evaluation of Doses in the 26-week Tg.rasH2 Mice Carcinogenicity Studies: Recommendation to Eliminate High Doses at Maximum Tolerated Dose (MTD) in Future Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paranjpe, Madhav G; Denton, Melissa D; Vidmar, Tom J; Elbekai, Reem H

    2015-07-01

    High doses in Tg.rasH2 carcinogenicity studies are usually set at the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), although this dose selection strategy has not been critically evaluated. We analyzed the body weight gains (BWGs), mortality, and tumor response in control and treated groups of 29 Tg.rasH2 studies conducted at BioReliance. Based on our analysis, it is evident that the MTD was exceeded at the high and/or mid-doses in several studies. The incidence of tumors in high doses was lower when compared to the low and mid-doses of both sexes. Thus, we recommend that the high dose in male mice should not exceed one-half of the estimated MTD (EMTD), as it is currently chosen, and the next dose should be one-fourth of the EMTD. Because females were less sensitive to decrements in BWG, the high dose in female mice should not exceed two-third of EMTD and the next dose group should be one-third of EMTD. If needed, a third dose group should be set at one-eighth EMTD in males and one-sixth EMTD in females. In addition, for compounds that do not show toxicity in the range finding studies, a limit dose should be applied for the 26-week carcinogenicity studies. © 2014 by The Author(s).

  1. Chronic ingestion of a low dose of caffeine induces tolerance to the performance benefits of caffeine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, Ross; Cordery, Philip; Funnell, Mark; Mears, Stephen; James, Lewis; Watson, Phillip

    2017-10-01

    This study examined effects of 4 weeks of caffeine supplementation on endurance performance. Eighteen low-habitual caffeine consumers (caffeine (1.5-3.0 mg · kg -1 day -1 ; titrated) or placebo for 28 days. Groups were matched for age, body mass, V̇O 2peak and W max (P > 0.05). Before supplementation, all participants completed one V̇O 2peak test, one practice trial and 2 experimental trials (acute 3 mg · kg -1 caffeine [precaf] and placebo [testpla]). During the supplementation period a second V̇O 2peak test was completed on day 21 before a final, acute 3 mg · kg -1 caffeine trial (postcaf) on day 29. Trials consisted of 60 min cycle exercise at 60% V̇O 2peak followed by a 30 min performance task. All participants produced more external work during the precaf trial than testpla, with increases in the caffeine (383.3 ± 75 kJ vs. 344.9 ± 80.3 kJ; Cohen's d effect size [ES] = 0.49; P = 0.001) and placebo (354.5 ± 55.2 kJ vs. 333.1 ± 56.4 kJ; ES = 0.38; P = 0.004) supplementation group, respectively. This performance benefit was no longer apparent after 4 weeks of caffeine supplementation (precaf: 383.3 ± 75.0 kJ vs. postcaf: 358.0 ± 89.8 kJ; ES = 0.31; P = 0.025), but was retained in the placebo group (precaf: 354.5 ± 55.2 kJ vs. postcaf: 351.8 ± 49.4 kJ; ES = 0.05; P > 0.05). Circulating caffeine, hormonal concentrations and substrate oxidation did not differ between groups (all P > 0.05). Chronic ingestion of a low dose of caffeine develops tolerance in low-caffeine consumers. Therefore, individuals with low-habitual intakes should refrain from chronic caffeine supplementation to maximise performance benefits from acute caffeine ingestion.

  2. Normal tissue tolerance to external beam radiation therapy: Esophagus; Dose de tolerance a l'irradiation des tissus sains: l'oesophage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bera, G.; Pointreau, Y. [Clinique d' oncologie-radiotherapie, centre Henry-S.-Kaplan, hopital Bretonneau, CHU de Tours, 37 - Tours (France); Denis, F.; Dupuis, O. [Centre Jean-Bernard, clinique Victor-Hugo, 72 - Le-Mans (France); Orain, I. [Service d' anatomie et cytologie pathologiques, hopital Trousseau, CHU de Tours, 37 - Tours (France); Crehange, G. [Departement de radiotherapie, centre Georges-Francois-Leclerc, 21 - Dijon (France)

    2010-07-15

    The esophagus is a musculo-membranous tube through which food passes from the pharynx to the stomach. Due to its anatomical location, it can be exposed to ionizing radiation in many external radiotherapy indications. Radiation-induced esophageal mucositis is clinically revealed by dysphagia and odynophagia, and usually begins 3 to 4 weeks after the start of radiation treatment. With the rise of multimodality treatments (e.g., concurrent chemoradiotherapy, dose escalation and accelerated fractionation schemes), esophageal toxicity has become a significant dose-limiting issue. Understanding the predictive factors of esophageal injury may improve the optimal delivery of treatment plans. It may help to minimize the risks, hence increasing the therapeutic ratio. Based on a large literature review, our study describes both early and late radiation-induced esophageal injuries and highlights some of the predictive factors for cervical and thoracic esophagus toxicity. These clinical and dosimetric parameters are numerous but none is consensual. The large number of dosimetric parameters strengthens the need of an overall analysis of the dose/volume histograms. The data provided is insufficient to recommend their routine use to prevent radiation-induced esophagitis. Defining guidelines for the tolerance of the esophagus to ionizing radiation remains essential for a safe and efficient treatment. (authors)

  3. An overview of the report: Correlation between carcinogenic potency and the maximum tolerated dose: Implications for risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krewski, D.; Gaylor, D.W.; Soms, A.P.; Szyszkowicz, M.

    1993-01-01

    Current practice in carcinogen bioassay calls for exposure of experimental animals at doses up to and including the maximum tolerated dose (MTD). Such studies have been used to compute measures of carcinogenic potency such as the TD 50 as well as unit risk factors such as q 1 for predicting low-dose risks. Recent studies have indicated that these measures of carcinogenic potency are highly correlated with the MTD. Carcinogenic potency has also been shown to be correlated with indicators of mutagenicity and toxicity. Correlation of the MTDs for rats and mice implies a corresponding correlation in TD 50 values for these two species. The implications of these results for cancer risk assessment are examined in light of the large variation in potency among chemicals known to induce tumors in rodents. 119 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs

  4. [Comparative study on the tolerance and efficacy of high doses of metoclopramide and clebopride in vomiting induced by cisplatin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, M; Díaz-Rubio, E

    1989-06-10

    Forty-one patients treated with cisplatin (100-120 mg/m2), alone or associated with vindesine (3 mg/m2), were included in a randomized crossover pilot study which compared 3 different doses of intravenous clebopride with intravenous metoclopramide. The patients were randomly assigned to receive clebopride in the first chemotherapy course in one of the three dose levels used (0.5 mg/kg, 21 patients; 0.75 mg/kg, 11 patients; 1 mg/kg, 10 patients) or metoclopramide (10 mg/kg). In the second course of the same chemotherapy the patients received the alternative antiemetic, and thus each patient was his own control. The total dose of both antiemetic drugs was infused in 5 intravenous fractions given every 2 hours. The antiemetic activity of clebopride was moderately lower to that of metoclopramide with the first two tested doses (overall doses of 0.5 and 0.75 mg/kg) and similar with the last dose (1 mg/kg). Clebopride was reasonably well tolerated at the used dosages, inducing sedation in 20% of cases (versus 24% with metoclopramide) and diarrhea in 37% (versus 20% with metoclopramide). Extrapyramidal reactions developed in 17% of the courses which included metoclopramide and in none including clebopride. This difference was statistically significant.

  5. Entropy maximization

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. It is shown that (i) every probability density is the unique maximizer of relative entropy in an appropriate class and (ii) in the class of all pdf f that satisfy. ∫ fhi dμ = λi for i = 1, 2,...,...k the maximizer of entropy is an f0 that is pro- portional to exp(. ∑ ci hi ) for some choice of ci . An extension of this to a continuum of.

  6. Entropy Maximization

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It is shown that (i) every probability density is the unique maximizer of relative entropy in an appropriate class and (ii) in the class of all pdf that satisfy ∫ f h i d = i for i = 1 , 2 , … , … k the maximizer of entropy is an f 0 that is proportional to exp ⁡ ( ∑ c i h i ) for some choice of c i . An extension of this to a continuum of ...

  7. Effect of low dose of X rays about the tolerance to the salinity and the agricultural yield in cultivations of economic importance for Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez Fernandez, Ramiro; Gonzalez Nunnez, Luis Manuel; Garcia Rodriguez, Blanca; Licea Castro, Luis; Porras Leon, Elia

    1999-01-01

    The effect of low dose of X rays on rice and lettuce plant salt tolerance and on the agricultural yield in plants of cucumber and tomato was studied. The results showed a meaningful increase in the tolerance of the plants to salt stress in both crops for some of the applied dose and were determined the better doses for the increment of the crop yield of the studied varieties. Also was carried out an analysis of regression that showed a high correlation between the variables of the growth and the agricultural yield and on this base it is discussed the possibility of selecting the stimulant dose range during the early plants growth stages

  8. Radiation tolerance of the cervical spinal cord: incidence and dose-volume relationship of symptomatic and asymptomatic late effects following high dose irradiation of paraspinal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Mitchell C.C.; Munzenrider, John E.; Finkelstein, Dianne; Liebsch, Norbert; Adams, Judy; Hug, Eugen B.

    1997-01-01

    changes was between 2 and 8.5 months after radiation therapy. Two risk factors appeared to have significant impact when all incidences were considered: proton portion of tumor dose > 55 CGE (p=.023), and spinal cord surface dose ≥ 60 CGE (p=.045). For patients receiving 55 CGE to >1.5cc of spinal cord, the risk of developing imaging changes was significantly higher (p=.0074). Age < 40 years was found to be correlated with higher incidence of Lhermitt's syndrome (p=.002). No variable was significant for predicting incidence of sensory or motor deficits. Conclusions: For chordomas and chondrosarcomas of the cervical spine, requiring high radiation doses, the guidelines of limiting maximum spinal cord surface dose to ≤ 64 CGE and maximum spinal cord center dose to ≤ 53 CGE appears safe. For the patients who had been treated within the above tolerance dose, none of them had developed motor deficits. Both a significant dose response relationship as well as volume effect for symptomatic or asymptomatic spinal cord changes were observed. The incidence of 1 patient, who developed motor damage after higher radiation doses to the spinal cord than generally allowed, emphasizes the importance of strict guidelines for critical, normal tissues in high dose, conformal radiation treatment

  9. Pharmacokinetics, Safety and Tolerability of Sacubitril/Valsartan (LCZ696) After Single-Dose Administration in Healthy Chinese Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yi; Ayalasomayajula, Surya; Pan, Wei; Yang, Fan; Yuan, Yaozong; Langenickel, Thomas; Hinder, Markus; Kalluri, Sampath; Pal, Parasar; Sunkara, Gangadhar

    2017-02-01

    Sacubitril/valsartan (LCZ696) is a first-in-class angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor (ARNI) and has been recently approved in several countries for the treatment of patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction. This was the first study conducted to characterise the pharmacokinetics of LCZ696 analytes (pro-drug sacubitril, active neprilysin inhibitor LBQ657 and valsartan) after single-dose administration of LCZ696 in healthy Chinese subjects. In this open-label, randomised, parallel-group study, following screening and baseline evaluation, eligible healthy subjects received single oral doses of LCZ696 50, 100, 200 or 400 mg. The pharmacokinetics, safety and tolerability of LCZ696 were assessed up to 72 h after dosing. A total of 40 healthy male subjects were enrolled, and all completed the study. Following oral administration, LCZ696 delivered systemic exposure to sacubitril, LBQ657 and valsartan with a median time to reach maximum plasma concentration (T max ) ranging from 0.50 to 1.25, 2.00 to 3.00 and 1.50 to 2.50 h, respectively, over the investigated dose range. The mean terminal elimination half-life (T 1/2 ) ranged from 0.89 to 1.35, 8.57 to 9.24 and 5.33 to 7.91 h for sacubitril, LBQ657 and valsartan, respectively. The area under the plasma concentration-time curve from time zero to the time of the last quantifiable concentration (AUC 0-last ), and maximum plasma concentration (C max ) for LBQ657 increased dose proportionally over the entire dose range. Dose linear increase in the exposure was observed across the dose range for sacubitril and valsartan. LCZ696 was safe and well tolerated at all doses in this study. Adverse events of only mild intensity, which required no treatment, were reported in 6 (15 %) subjects. The pharmacokinetic profiles of LCZ696 analytes in Chinese subjects are similar to those reported previously in Caucasian subjects.

  10. Short-term digestive tolerance of different doses of NUTRIOSE FB, a food dextrin, in adult men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Heuvel, E G H M; Wils, D; Pasman, W J; Bakker, M; Saniez, M-H; Kardinaal, A F M

    2004-07-01

    To determine the tolerance of increasing dosages of an incompletely hydrolysed and/or incompletely absorbed food dextrin coming from wheat starch, NUTRIOSE FB, at daily levels of 10 and 15 g up to 60 and 80 g, respectively. A randomized, double-blind, multiple dose, placebo-controlled, combined crossover and parallel trial. The metabolic ward of TNO Nutrition and Food Research. A total of 20 healthy men (age 31.7 +/- 9.1 y; BMI 24.5 +/- 2.9 kg/m2). One group of 10 subjects consumed on top of their diet 10, 30 and 60 g of NUTRIOSE FB or maltodextrin (placebo) daily. The other group of 10 subjects consumed 15, 45 and 80 g daily. Each dose was consumed for 7 days. Compared with placebo, flatulence occurred more frequently over the last 6 days on 30, 60 or 80 g/day of NUTRIOSE FB (P FB, the frequency of flatulence was even higher (P FB, the frequency of defecation decreased (P FB (P FB resulted in diarrhoea. Compared to baseline levels, breath H2 excretion, which was only measured after a week with 10 and 15 g of NUTRIOSE FB daily, increased (P FB is a fermentable carbohydrate and is well tolerated up to a dose of 45 g daily. Higher daily dosages (60 and 80 g) may result in flatulence, but does not result in diarrhoea. TNO Nutrition and Food Research was assigned by Roquette Frères to perform the study.

  11. Tolerance of Glyphosate-Resistant Maize to Glyphosate Plus MCPA Amine Is Influenced by Dose and Timing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nader Soltani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There is little information on tolerance of glyphosate-resistant maize to glyphosate plus MCPA amine as influenced by dose and timing under Ontario environmental conditions. A total of seven field trials were conducted at various locations in Ontario, Canada, in 2011–2013 to evaluate tolerance of field maize to tank mixes of glyphosate (900 g a.e./ha plus MCPA amine (79, 158, 315, 630, 1260, 2520, or 5040 g a.e./ha at either the 4- or 8-leaf stage. The predicted dose of MCPA amine that caused 5, 10, and 20% injury was 339, 751, and 1914 g a.e./ha when applied to 4-leaf maize but only 64, 140, and 344 g a.e./ha when applied to 8-leaf maize, respectively. The predicted dose of MCPA amine that caused 5, 10, and 20% reduction in shoot dry weight of maize was 488, 844, and 1971 g a.e./ha when applied to 4-leaf maize and only 14, 136, and 616 g a.e./ha when applied to 8-leaf maize, respectively. The predicted dose of MCPA amine that caused 5, 10, and 20% yield reduction was 2557, 4247, and >5040 g a.e./ha when applied to 4-leaf maize and 184, 441, and 1245 g a.e./ha when applied to 8-leaf maize, respectively. Based on these results, glyphosate plus MCPA amine applied at the manufacturer’s recommended dose of 630 g a.e./ha applied to 4-leaf maize has potential to cause injury but the injury is transient with no significant reduction in yield. However, when glyphosate plus MCPA amine is applied to 8-leaf maize it has the potential to cause significant injury and yield loss in maize.

  12. Microbiological efficacy and tolerability of a single-dose regimen of 1 g of ceftriaxone in men with gonococcal urethritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Shin; Yasuda, Mitsuru; Hatazaki, Kyoko; Mizutani, Kosuke; Tsuchiya, Tomohiro; Yokoi, Shigeaki; Nakano, Masahiro; Deguchi, Takashi

    2016-09-01

    We treated men with gonococcal urethritis with a single-dose regimen of 1 g of ceftriaxone, which is recommended as the first-line treatment for gonorrhoea in Japan, to determine its microbiological outcomes and tolerability. We enrolled 255 men with gonococcal urethritis and treated them with a single-dose regimen of 1 g of ceftriaxone. We evaluated its microbiological outcomes and tolerability. We also determined ceftriaxone MICs for pretreatment isolates of Neisseria gonorrhoeae collected from the patients. The microbiological efficacy of the ceftriaxone regimen, which was determined between 5 and 9 days after treatment in 111 men based on the Japanese guideline for clinical research on antimicrobial agents in urogenital infections, was 100%. In the 194 men who returned to the clinic between 2 and 41 days after treatment, 191 (98.5%; 95% CI 96.8%-100%) were negative for N. gonorrhoeae after treatment. Ceftriaxone MICs determined for 136 pretreatment isolates obtained from these 194 men ranged from 0.001 to 0.25 mg/L. One isolate persisting after treatment exhibited a ceftriaxone MIC of 0.008 mg/L. For two isolates persisting after treatment, ceftriaxone MICs were not determined. Seven adverse events were observed in 7 (3.2%) of the 220 men treated with the ceftriaxone regimen. Four men had diarrhoea classified as grade 1. Three had urticaria during ceftriaxone administration, with one event classified as grade 1 and two events classified as grade 3. A single-dose regimen of 1 g of ceftriaxone was microbiologically effective against gonococcal urethritis and was safe and tolerable. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Two-dose-level confirmatory study of the pharmacokinetics and tolerability of everolimus in Chinese patients with advanced solid tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jappe Annette

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This phase I, randomized, multicenter, open-label study investigated the pharmacokinetics, safety, and efficacy of the oral mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor everolimus in Chinese patients with advanced solid tumors. Methods A total of 24 patients with advanced breast cancer (n = 6, gastric cancer (n = 6, non-small cell lung cancer (n = 6, or renal cell carcinoma (n = 6 who were refractory to/unsuitable for standard therapy were randomized 1:1 to oral everolimus 5 or 10 mg/day. Primary end points were pharmacokinetic parameters and safety and tolerability. Pharmacokinetic 24-h profiles were measured on day 15; trough level was measured on days 2, 8, 15, 16, and 22. Tolerability was assessed continuously. This final analysis was performed after all patients had received 6 months of study drug or had discontinued. Results Everolimus was absorbed rapidly; median Tmax was 3 h (range, 1-4 and 2 h (range, 0.9-6 in the 5 and 10 mg/day groups, respectively. Pharmacokinetic parameters increased dose proportionally from the 5 and 10 mg/day doses. Steady-state levels were achieved by day 8 or earlier. The most common adverse events suspected to be related to everolimus therapy were increased blood glucose (16.7% and 41.7% and fatigue (16.7% and 33.3% in the everolimus 5 and 10 mg/day dose cohorts, respectively. Best tumor response was stable disease in 10 (83% and 6 (50% patients in the 5 and 10 mg/day groups, respectively. Conclusions Everolimus 5 or 10 mg/day was well tolerated in Chinese patients with advanced solid tumors. The observed safety and pharmacokinetic profile of everolimus from this study were consistent with previous studies. Trial registration Chinese Health Authorities 2008L09346

  14. Safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of single oral doses of tofacitinib, a Janus kinase inhibitor, in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnaswami, Sriram; Boy, Mary; Chow, Vincent; Chan, Gary

    2015-03-01

    Tofacitinib is an oral Janus kinase inhibitor. This randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled study was the first evaluation of tofacitinib in humans. The objectives were to characterize the safety and tolerability, pharmacokinetics (PK), and pharmacodynamics of escalating single tofacitinib doses in healthy subjects. Tofacitinib (0.1, 0.3, 1, 3, 10, 30, 60, and 100 mg) or placebo was administered as oral powder for constitution. For each dose, 7-9 subjects were randomized to tofacitinib and 3-5 subjects to placebo. Ninety-five males and females (age range 19-45) completed the study. Forty-nine treatment-emergent all-causality adverse events (AEs) were observed; nausea and headache were the most frequently reported. Tofacitinib PK was characterized by rapid absorption (time to peak serum concentration [Tmax ] 0.5-1 hour), rapid elimination (mean terminal half-lives 2.3-3.1 hours), and dose-proportional systemic exposures (peak serum concentration [Cmax ] and area under the serum concentration-time curve from time zero to infinity [AUC0-∞ ]). No appreciable correlation was observed between tofacitinib dose and lymphocyte subset counts. Single-dose tofacitinib up to 100 mg in healthy subjects had a safety profile of mostly mild AEs, and no deaths, serious AEs, severe AEs or discontinuations due to AEs. © 2014, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  15. Pegylated Long-Acting Human Growth Hormone Possesses a Promising Once-Weekly Treatment Profile, and Multiple Dosing Is Well Tolerated in Adult Patients with Growth Hormone Deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Esben; Klose, Marianne Christina; Hansen, Mette

    2011-01-01

    Background: Recombinant human GH (rhGH) replacement therapy in children and adults currently requires daily sc injections for several years or lifelong, which may be both inconvenient and distressing for patients. NNC126-0083 is a pegylated rhGH developed for once-weekly administration. Objectives......: Our objective was to evaluate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of multiple doses of NNC126-0083 in adult patients with GH deficiency (GHD). Subjects and Methods: Thirty-three adult patients with GHD, age 20-65 yr, body mass index 18.5-35.0 kg/m(2), and glycated...... to 240 h after the third dosing. Physical examination, antibodies, and local tolerability were assessed. Results: NNC126-0083 was well tolerated with no difference in local tolerability compared with placebo and with no signs of lipoatrophy. A more than dose-proportional exposure was observed...

  16. Pretreatment with low-dose gamma irradiation enhances tolerance to the stress of cadmium and lead in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Wencai; Zhang, Liang; Wang, Lin; Xu, Hangbo; Jin, Qingsheng; Jiao, Zhen

    2015-05-01

    Heavy metals are important environmental pollutants with negative impact on plant growth and development. To investigate the physiological and molecular mechanisms of heavy metal stress mitigated by low-dose gamma irradiation, the dry seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana were exposed to a Cobalt-60 gamma source at doses ranging from 25 to 150Gy before being subjected to 75µM CdCl2 or 500µM Pb(NO3)2. Then, the growth parameters, and physiological and molecular changes were determined in response to gamma irradiation. Our results showed that 50-Gy gamma irradiation gave maximal beneficial effects on the germination index and root length in response to cadmium/lead stress in Arabidopsis seedlings. The hydrogen peroxide and malondialdehyde contents in seedlings irradiated with 50-Gy gamma rays under stress were significantly lower than those of controls. The antioxidant enzyme activities and proline levels in the irradiated seedlings were significantly increased compared with the controls. Furthermore, a transcriptional expression analysis of selected genes revealed that some components of heavy metal detoxification were stimulated by low-dose gamma irradiation under cadmium/lead stress. Our results suggest that low-dose gamma irradiation alleviates heavy metal stress, probably by modulating the physiological responses and gene expression levels related to heavy metal resistance in Arabidopsis seedlings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Regulatory Forum Opinion Piece*: Retrospective Evaluation of Doses in the 26-week Tg.rasH2 Mice Carcinogenicity Studies: Recommendation to Eliminate High Doses at Maximum Tolerated Dose in Future Studies. A Response to the Counterpoints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paranjpe, Madhav G; Denton, Melissa D; Vidmar, Tom J; Elbekai, Reem H

    2016-01-01

    We recently conducted a retrospective analysis of data collected from 29 Tg.rasH2 carcinogenicity studies conducted at our facility to determine how successful was the strategy of choosing the high dose of the 26-week studies based on an estimated maximum tolerated dose (MTD). As a result of our publication, 2 counterviews were expressed. Both counterviews illustrate very valid points in their interpretation of our data. In this article, we would like to highlight clarifications based on several points and issues they have raised in their papers, namely, the dose-level selection, determining if MTD was exceeded in 26-week studies, and a discussion on the number of dose groups to be used in the studies. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Efficacy and tolerability of a high loading dose (25,000 IU weekly) vitamin D3 supplementation in obese children with vitamin D insufficiency/deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Radhakishun, Nalini N E; van Vliet, Mariska; Poland, Dennis C W; Weijer, Olivier; Beijnen, Jos H; Brandjes, Dees P M; Diamant, Michaela; von Rosenstiel, Ines A

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The recommended dose of vitamin D supplementation of 400 IU/day might be inadequate to treat obese children with vitamin D insufficiency. Therefore, we tested the efficacy and tolerability of a high loading dose vitamin D3 supplementation of 25,000 IU weekly in multiethnic obese

  19. A Phase Ib dose-escalation study to evaluate safety and tolerability of the addition of the aminopeptidase inhibitor tosedostat (CHR-2797) to paclitaxel in patients with advanced solid tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M.L. Herpen (Carla); F.A.L.M. Eskens (Ferry); M.J.A. de Jonge (Maja); I.M.E. Desar (Ingrid); L. Hooftman (Leon); E. Bone (Elisabeth); J.N.H. Timmerbonte (Johanna); J. Verweij (Jaap)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground: This Phase Ib dose-escalating study investigated safety, maximum tolerated dose (MTD), dose-limiting toxicity (DLT), pharmacokinetics (PK) and clinical antitumour activity of tosedostat (CHR-2797), an orally bioavailable aminopeptidase inhibitor, in combination with

  20. A Phase Ib dose-escalation study to evaluate safety and tolerability of the addition of the aminopeptidase inhibitor tosedostat (CHR-2797) to paclitaxel in patients with advanced solid tumours.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herpen, C.M.L. van; Eskens, F.A.; Jonge, M. de; Desar, I.M.E.; Hooftman, L.; Bone, E.A.; Timmer-Bonte, J.N.H.; Verweij, J.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This Phase Ib dose-escalating study investigated safety, maximum tolerated dose (MTD), dose-limiting toxicity (DLT), pharmacokinetics (PK) and clinical antitumour activity of tosedostat (CHR-2797), an orally bioavailable aminopeptidase inhibitor, in combination with paclitaxel. METHODS:

  1. Maximum tolerated dose evaluation of the AMPA modulator Org 26576 in healthy volunteers and depressed patients: a summary and method analysis of bridging research in support of phase II dose selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nations, Kari R; Bursi, Roberta; Dogterom, Peter; Ereshefsky, Larry; Gertsik, Lev; Mant, Tim; Schipper, Jacques

    2012-09-01

    A key challenge to dose selection in early central nervous system (CNS) clinical drug development is that patient tolerability profiles often differ from those of healthy volunteers (HVs), yet HVs are the modal population for determining doses to be investigated in phase II trials. Without clear tolerability data from the target patient population, first efficacy trials may include doses that are either too high or too low, creating undue risk for study participants and the development program overall. Bridging trials address this challenge by carefully investigating safety and tolerability in the target population prior to full-scale proof-of-concept trials. Org 26576 is an alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA) receptor positive allosteric modulator that acts by modulating ionotropic AMPA-type glutamate receptors to enhance glutamatergic neurotransmission. In preparation for phase II efficacy trials in major depressive disorder (MDD), two separate phase I trials were conducted to evaluate safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics in HVs and in the target patient population. Both trials were randomized and placebo controlled, and included multiple rising-dose cohorts (HV range 100-400 mg bid; MDD range 100-600 mg bid). HVs (n = 36) and patients with MDD (n = 54) were dosed under similarly controlled conditions in an inpatient facility, HVs for up to 14 days and MDD patients for up to 28 days. Safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics were assessed frequently. Despite comparable pharmacokinetic profiles, the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) in depressed patients was 450 mg bid, twice the MTD established in HVs. No clinically relevant safety issues associated with Org 26576 were noted. This article presents safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetic data from two different populations examined under similar dosing conditions. The important implications of such bridging work in phase II dose selection are discussed, as are study

  2. Similar efficacy and tolerability of double-dose chloroquine and artemether-lumefantrine for treatment of Plasmodium falciparum infection in Guinea-Bissau: a randomized trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ursing, Johan; Kofoed, Poul-Erik; Rodrigues, Amabelia

    2011-01-01

    In 2008, Guinea-Bissau introduced artemether-lumefantrine for treatment of uncomplicated malaria. Previously, 3 times the standard dose of chloroquine, that was probably efficacious against Plasmodium falciparum with the resistance-associated chloroquine-resistance transporter (pfcrt) 76T allele,......, was routinely used. The present study compared the efficacy and tolerability of a double standard dose of chloroquine with the efficacy and tolerability of artemether-lumefantrine.......In 2008, Guinea-Bissau introduced artemether-lumefantrine for treatment of uncomplicated malaria. Previously, 3 times the standard dose of chloroquine, that was probably efficacious against Plasmodium falciparum with the resistance-associated chloroquine-resistance transporter (pfcrt) 76T allele...

  3. Ocular pharmacokinetics and tolerability of bimatoprost ophthalmic solutions administered once or twice daily in rabbits, and clinical dosing implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen J

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Jie Shen,1 Margot L Goodkin,2 Warren Tong,2 Mayssa Attar3 1Clinical Pharmacology, 2Clinical Development, 3Clinical Pharmacology, Metabolism and Immunology, Allergan plc, Irvine, CA, USA Purpose: Fixed-combination medications can benefit patients requiring multiple agents to lower their intraocular pressure (IOP, but combining agents with complementary mechanisms of action is challenging if their dosing frequency differs. This study compares in vivo pharmacokinetic and ocular tolerability of bimatoprost 0.01% ophthalmic solutions dosed once or twice daily. Reports of twice-daily dosing in glaucoma patients are also reviewed.Methods: New Zealand White rabbits were administered bimatoprost 0.01% monotherapy or fixed-combination bimatoprost 0.01%/brimonidine 0.1%, once or twice daily in both eyes for 4 days. Ocular tissues were harvested and analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The pharmacokinetic parameters calculated included maximum observed concentration, time to maximum concentration, and area under the concentration-time curve.Results: Due to extensive metabolism, bimatoprost concentration was below the quantitation limit by 1 hour post-dose in all samples. Bimatoprost acid exposure, however, could be measured up to 6–8 hours post-dose and was similar in the aqueous humor and iris-ciliary body (pharmacological site of action of animals treated once or twice daily with either bimatoprost 0.01% or fixed-combination bimatoprost 0.01%/brimonidine 0.1%. Increasing dosage frequency in rabbits did not raise the incidence of drug-related conjunctival hyperemia (most common adverse event associated with bimatoprost use in humans, suggesting comparable ocular tolerability of the once- and twice-daily regimens for each formulation.Conclusion: Bimatoprost 0.01% administered once or twice daily as monotherapy and in fixed-combination with brimonidine 0.1% in rabbits show similar pharmacokinetic profiles of bimatoprost acid

  4. Ocular pharmacokinetics and tolerability of bimatoprost ophthalmic solutions administered once or twice daily in rabbits, and clinical dosing implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jie; Goodkin, Margot L; Tong, Warren; Attar, Mayssa

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Fixed-combination medications can benefit patients requiring multiple agents to lower their intraocular pressure (IOP), but combining agents with complementary mechanisms of action is challenging if their dosing frequency differs. This study compares in vivo pharmacokinetic and ocular tolerability of bimatoprost 0.01% ophthalmic solutions dosed once or twice daily. Reports of twice-daily dosing in glaucoma patients are also reviewed. Methods New Zealand White rabbits were administered bimatoprost 0.01% monotherapy or fixed-combination bimatoprost 0.01%/brimonidine 0.1%, once or twice daily in both eyes for 4 days. Ocular tissues were harvested and analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The pharmacokinetic parameters calculated included maximum observed concentration, time to maximum concentration, and area under the concentration-time curve. Results Due to extensive metabolism, bimatoprost concentration was below the quantitation limit by 1 hour post-dose in all samples. Bimatoprost acid exposure, however, could be measured up to 6–8 hours post-dose and was similar in the aqueous humor and iris-ciliary body (pharmacological site of action) of animals treated once or twice daily with either bimatoprost 0.01% or fixed-combination bimatoprost 0.01%/brimonidine 0.1%. Increasing dosage frequency in rabbits did not raise the incidence of drug-related conjunctival hyperemia (most common adverse event associated with bimatoprost use in humans), suggesting comparable ocular tolerability of the once- and twice-daily regimens for each formulation. Conclusion Bimatoprost 0.01% administered once or twice daily as monotherapy and in fixed-combination with brimonidine 0.1% in rabbits show similar pharmacokinetic profiles of bimatoprost acid, especially in the iris-ciliary body. Key findings from previous clinical studies suggest that by varying the concentration of benzalkonium chloride (a preservative with corneal penetration-enhancing properties

  5. Effect of low doses of gamma radiation on barley tolerance grown under saline conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charbaji, T.; Khalifa, Kh; Al-Ain, F.

    2003-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted at Al-Hijanah, an area located at about 35 km south east of Damascus. Seeds of two barley varieties [White Arabi (WA) and Pakistani 30163 (PK) were irradiated with 2 doses 0 and 15 Gy of gamma irradiation. Then, they were shown on salty soil (17.6-18,9 m mos/cm) and irrigated with salty water (5.12-5.75 m mos/cm). A dose of 15 Gy of gamma irradiation was shown to positively affect the percent germination of PK but had no similar effect on WA. The results were obtained at 3 different growth stages: first, the heading stage, 15 Gy dose increased shoots dry weight, Mg ++ , P content and percent of WA, whereas N percent of PK was decreased. When the seeds were irradiated by the same dose. K + content in WA was significantly higher than that in PK. Second, physiological maturity stage, the same dose (15 Gy) increased shoot dry, but affected negatively K + and Na + contents in PK variety. As for WA variety, Mg ++ and P contents were increased, whereas Na + and Cl - were slightly decreased. Third, harvest stage, gamma irradiation had a positive effect on total yield, grain yield, nitrogen yield and harvest index of PK variety. A positive effect was produced on straw yield, 1000-grain weight, and nitrogen yield of WA variety. (author)

  6. Efficacy, safety and tolerability of escitalopram in doses up to 50 mg in Major Depressive Disorder (MDD: an open-label, pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crawford Gordon M

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Escitalopram is licensed for use at doses up to 20 mg but is used clinically at higher doses. There is limited published data at higher doses and none in the treatment of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD. Methods This open-label, pilot study was designed to investigate the efficacy, safety and tolerability of escitalopram in doses up to 50 mg in MDD. It was conducted in 60 primary care patients with MDD who had not responded to adequate treatment with citalopram. Patients were treated with escalating doses of escitalopram up to 50 mg for up to 32 weeks until they achieved remission (Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale [MADRS] ≤8 or failed to tolerate the dose. Results Forty-two patients (70% completed the study. Twenty-one patients (35% achieved remission with 8 of the 21 patients (38% needing the 50 mg dose to achieve remission. Median time to remission was 24 weeks and median dose in remission was 30 mg. No significant safety issues were identified although tolerability appeared to decline above a dose of 40 mg with 26% of patients unable to tolerate 50 mg. Twelve (20% patients had adverse events leading to discontinuation. The most common adverse events were headache (35%, nausea, diarrhoea and nasopharyngitis (all 25%. Minor mean weight gain was found during the study, which did not appear to be dose-related. Half of the patients who completed the study chose to continue treatment with escitalopram rather than taper down the dose at 32 weeks. Conclusions Dose escalation with escitalopram above 20 mg may have a useful role in the management of patients with MDD, although further studies are needed to confirm this finding. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00785434

  7. Tibolone and low-dose continuous combined hormone treatment : vaginal bleeding pattern, efficacy and tolerability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hammar, M. L.; van de Weijer, P.; Franke, H. R.; Pornel, B.; von Mauw, E. M. J.; Nijland, E. A.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives The primary objective was to compare the vaginal bleeding pattern during administration of tibolone and low-dose continuous combined estradiol plus norethisterone acetate (E-2/NETA). The secondary objectives were efficacy on vasomotor symptoms and vaginal atrophy. Design A randomised,

  8. In vivo assessment of the tolerance dose of small liver volumes after single-fraction HDR irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricke, Jens; Seidensticker, Max; Luedemann, Lutz; Pech, Maciej; Wieners, Gero; Hengst, Susanne; Mohnike, Konrad; Cho, Chie Hee; Lopez Haenninen, Enrique; Al-Abadi, Hussain; Felix, Roland; Wust, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively assess a dose-response relationship for small volumes of liver parenchyma after single-fraction irradiation. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five liver metastases were treated by computed tomography (CT)-guided interstitial brachytherapy. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed 1 day before and 3 days and 6, 12, and 24 weeks after therapy. MR sequences included T1-w gradient echo (GRE) enhanced by hepatocyte-targeted gadobenate dimeglumine. All MRI data sets were merged with 3D dosimetry data and evaluated by two radiologists. The reviewers indicated the border of hyperintensity on T2-w images (edema) or hypointensity on T1-w images (loss of hepatocyte function). Based on the total 3D data, a dose-volume histogram was calculated. We estimated the threshold dose for either edema or function loss as the D 90 , i.e., the dose achieved in at least 90% of the pseudolesion volume. Results: Between 3 days and 6 weeks, the extension of the edema increased significantly from the 12.9 Gy isosurface to 9.9 Gy (standard deviation [SD], 3.3 and 2.6). No significant change was detected between 6 and 12 weeks. After 24 weeks, the edematous tissue had shrunk significantly to 14.7 Gy (SD, 4.2). Three days postbrachytherapy, the D 90 for hepatocyte function loss reached the 14.9 Gy isosurface (SD, 3.9). At 6 weeks, the respective zone had increased significantly to 9.9 Gy (SD, 2.3). After 12 and 24 weeks, the dysfunction volume had decreased significantly to the 11.9 Gy and 15.2 Gy isosurface, respectively (SD, 3 and 4.1). Conclusions: The 95% interval from 7.6 to 12.2 Gy found as the minimal hepatocyte tolerance after 6 weeks accounts for the radiobiologic variations found in CT-guided brachytherapy, including heterogeneous dose rates by variable catheter arrays

  9. Peripheral nerve and ureteralo tolerance to intraoperative radiation therapy; Clinical and dose-response analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, E.G.; Gunderson, L.L.; Martin, J.K.; Baers, R.W.; Nagorney, D.M.; Podratz, K.C. (Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (USA))

    1990-07-01

    Between April 1981 and July 1984, 51 received intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) as a component of therapy for the management of primary of recurrent pelvic malignancies which were initially unresectable for cure. For these patients, curative surgical alternatives did not exist, or would have involved extensive procedures such as pelvic exenteration, distal sacrectomy, hemipelvectomy, or hemicorporectemy. The primary disease was colorectal in 38 patients. Treatment consisted of external beam radiation (range 3000 to 6890 cGy, median 5040 cGy), surgical debulking when feasible, and an intraoperative electron beam boost to the gross of microscopic residual desease (dose range 1000 to 2500 cGy, median 1750 cGy) utilizing 9-18 MeV electrons. The most common IORT associated toxicities were peripheral neurophaty and ureteral obstruction. None were life-threatening or fatal in severity. Of the 50 patients evaluable for neurotoxicity analysis, 16 (32%) developed peripheral neurophaty consisting of pain in 16 patients, numbness and tingling in 11, and weakness in 8. The pain, numbness and tingling resolved in about 40% of patients, while weakness resolved in only 1 of 8. Sixteen ureters were initially unobstructed by tumor at the time of IORT. Of these, 10 (63%) subsequently showed evidence of obstruction and hydronephrosis. The development of neurotoxicity was more common at IORT doses of 1500 cGy or more versus 1000 cGy. Ureteral obstruction with hydronephrosis occurred more frequently at IORT doses of 1250 cGy or more compared to 1000 cGy. There was no relationship between the likelihood of developing complications and the total external beam dose. The observed dependence of human nerve toxicity primarily on the IORT dose is consistent with data generated form animal experiments. (author). 21 refs.; 4 tabs.

  10. Acute hematological tolerance to multiple fraction, whole body, low dose irradiation in an experimental murine system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melamed, J.S.; Chen, M.G.; Brown, J.W.; Katagiri, C.A.

    1980-01-01

    Using a dose fractionation scheme patterned after the current regimen for treatment of disseminated non-Hodgkin lymphoma, the authors studied the effects of irradation on progenitor and effector cells for hematopoiesis in five-month-old BC3F 1 mice. Fractions of 20 or 50 rad (0.2 or 0.5 Gy) total body irradation were given twice weekly to a final total dose of 200 or 500 rad (2 or 5 Gy), respectively. Weekly assays revealed a marked, sustained depression of stem cell activity, measured as numbers of spleen colony-forming units (CFU-S) and in vitro colony-forming cells (CFU-C), without corresponding depression of effector cells (red and white cells, and platelets). The lack of correlation between numbers of stem cells and peripheral elements is relevant to clinical assessment of marrow reserve

  11. Quantitative comparison of the results obtained by the multiple-dose guinea pig maximization test and the non-radioactive murine local lymph-node assay for various biocides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamano, Tetsuo; Shimizu, Mitsuru; Noda, Tsutomu

    2005-07-01

    We compared the results of the multiple-dose guinea pig maximization test (GPMT) and the non-radioactive murine local lymph-node assay (LLNA) for various biocides. Thirteen out of 17 positive biocides in the GPMT gave positive results in the LLNA. In the GPMT, the minimum first induction doses ranged over four orders (0.00005-0.5%), while elicitation-threshold doses, which were evaluated using an optimally sensitized group of animals in the multiple-dose studies, ranged over five orders (0.00006-2.8%). In the LLNA, minimum induction doses ranged over more than three orders (0.01-30%). With respect to 13 biocides that were positive in both the GPMT and the LLNA, results were quantitatively compared. When compared after conversion to corresponding area doses (microg/cm), the minimum doses required to elicit skin reaction in guinea pigs were always lower than that for induction in mice with all biocides. Correlation between minimum induction doses from the GPMT and the LLNA seemed poor (r=0.57), while that between minimum induction doses in the LLNA and elicitation-threshold doses in the GPMT was relatively good (r=0.73). The results suggest the possibility to estimate human elicitation-threshold doses, which are definitely lacking in the process of risk assessment for skin-sensitizers, from the data of the LLNA.

  12. Quantitative comparison of the results obtained by the multiple-dose guinea pig maximization test and the non-radioactive murine local lymph-node assay for various biocides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamano, Tetsuo; Shimizu, Mitsuru; Noda, Tsutomu

    2005-01-01

    We compared the results of the multiple-dose guinea pig maximization test (GPMT) and the non-radioactive murine local lymph-node assay (LLNA) for various biocides. Thirteen out of 17 positive biocides in the GPMT gave positive results in the LLNA. In the GPMT, the minimum first induction doses ranged over four orders (0.00005-0.5%), while elicitation-threshold doses, which were evaluated using an optimally sensitized group of animals in the multiple-dose studies, ranged over five orders (0.00006-2.8%). In the LLNA, minimum induction doses ranged over more than three orders (0.01-30%). With respect to 13 biocides that were positive in both the GPMT and the LLNA, results were quantitatively compared. When compared after conversion to corresponding area doses (μg/cm), the minimum doses required to elicit skin reaction in guinea pigs were always lower than that for induction in mice with all biocides. Correlation between minimum induction doses from the GPMT and the LLNA seemed poor (r = 0.57), while that between minimum induction doses in the LLNA and elicitation-threshold doses in the GPMT was relatively good (r = 0.73). The results suggest the possibility to estimate human elicitation-threshold doses, which are definitely lacking in the process of risk assessment for skin-sensitizers, from the data of the LLNA

  13. Early Mucosal Reactions During and After Head-and-Neck Radiotherapy: Dependence of Treatment Tolerance on Radiation Dose and Schedule Duration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenwick, John D.; Lawrence, Geoff P.; Malik, Zafar; Nahum, Alan E.; Mayles, W. Philip M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To more precisely localize the dose-time boundary between head-and-neck radiotherapy schedules inducing tolerable and intolerable early mucosal reactions. Methods and Materials: Total cell-kill biologically effective doses (BED CK ) have been calculated for 84 schedules, including incomplete repair effects, but making no other corrections for the effect of schedule duration T. [BED CK ,T] scatterplots are graphed, overlying BED CKboundary (T) curves on the plots and using discriminant analysis to optimize BED CKboundary (T) to best represent the boundary between the tolerable and intolerable schedules. Results: More overlap than expected is seen between the tolerable and intolerable treatments in the 84-schedule [BED CK ,T] scatterplot, but this was largely eliminated by removing gap and tolerated accelerating schedules from the plot. For the remaining 57 predominantly regular schedules, the BED CKboundary (T) boundary increases with increasing T (p = 0.0001), curving upwards significantly nonlinearly (p = 0.00007) and continuing to curve beyond 15 days (p = 0.035). The regular schedule BED CKboundary (T) boundary does not describe tolerability well for accelerating schedules (p = 0.002), with several tolerated accelerating schedules lying above the boundary where regular schedules would be intolerable. Gap schedule tolerability also is not adequately described by the regular schedule boundary (p = 0.04), although no systematic offset exists between the regular boundary and the overall gap schedule tolerability pattern. Conclusions: All schedules analyzed (regular, gap, and accelerating) with BED CK values below BED CKboundary (T)=69.5x(T/32.2)/sin((T/32.2) (radians) )-3.5Gy 10 (forT≤50 days) are tolerable, and many lying above the boundary are intolerable. The accelerating schedules analyzed were tolerated better overall than are the regular schedules with similar [BED CK ,T] values.

  14. Hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy to the rat hippocampus. Determination of dose response and tolerance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ernst-Stecken, A.; Roedel, F.; Grabenbauer, G.; Sauer, R.; Jeske, I.; Bluemcke, I.; Hess, A.; Ganslandt, O.; Brune, K.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the effect of hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (hfSRT) on adult rat brain tissue (necrosis, impact on blood-brain barrier, signal changes on high-field magnetic resonance imaging [MRI]). Material and Methods: Adult male Wistar rats underwent MRI and CT scanning of the brain and respective images were introduced into the Novalis trademark radiosurgery device (BrainLab, Feldkirchen, Germany). All animals (body weight 350 g) were irradiated weekly with doses of 2 x 10 Gy (n = 3 animals), 3 x 10 Gy (n = 3 animals) and 4 x 10 Gy (n = 3 animals), targeted to the left hippocampus after image-guided positioning. 4.7-T T2-weighted MRI scanning was performed in each animal. Animals were sacrificed 8, 12, and 16 weeks after hfSRT and brains were immersion-fixed in 4% paraformaldehyde for subsequent histopathologic analysis. Results: In concordance with isodose distributions, pathologic signal hyperintensities in MRI were recorded from 4 x 10 Gy after 8 weeks, 3 x 10 Gy after 12 weeks, while 2 x 10 Gy induced slight detectable alterations only after 16 weeks. Subsequent histopathologic analysis revealed hippocampal cell necrosis with significantly earlier and stronger occurrence for higher doses (40 Gy > 30 Gy > 20 Gy). Pial microvessel permeability also increased after 40 Gy, whereas 30 Gy induced moderate changes. Conclusion: Conclusion: Partial-brain irradiation with hfSRT (Novalis trademark System) was successfully adopted for small animals and histopathologic analysis confirmed its repositioning accuracy. The neuropathologic effects correlated with dose and observation time. The approach will be further developed for quality assurance in hfSRT of normal brain tissue, as well as novel treatment modalities in epileptic rats and orthotopic tumor models. (orig.)

  15. WE-F-304-03: Optic Nerve/Chiasm Hypofractionated SRS/SRT Dose Tolerance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milano, M. [University of Rochester Medical Center (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) was introduced clinically more than twenty years ago, and many subsequent publications have reported safety and efficacy data. The AAPM Working Group on Biological Effects of Hypofractionated Radiotherapy/SBRT (WGSBRT) extracted published treatment outcomes data from extensive literature searches to summarize and construct tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models for six anatomical regions: Cranial, Head and Neck, Thoracic, Abdominal, Pelvic, and Spinal. In this session, we present the WGSBRT’s work for cranial sites, and recurrent head and neck cancer. From literature-based data and associated models, guidelines to aid with safe and effective hypofractionated radiotherapy treatment are being determined. Further, the ability of existing and proposed radiobiological models to fit these data is considered as to the ability to distinguish between the linear-quadratic and alternative radiobiological models such as secondary cell death from vascular damage, immunogenic, or bystander effects. Where appropriate, specific model parameters are estimated. As described in “The lessons of QUANTEC,” (1), lack of adequate reporting standards continues to limit the amount of useful quantitative information that can be extracted from peer-reviewed publications. Recommendations regarding reporting standards are considered, to enable such reviews to achieve more complete characterization of clinical outcomes. 1 Jackson A, Marks LB, Bentzen SM, Eisbruch A, Yorke ED, Ten Haken RK, Constine LS, Deasy JO. The lessons of QUANTEC: recommendations for reporting and gathering data on dose-volume dependencies of treatment outcome. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2010 Mar 1;76(3 Suppl):S155–60. Learning Objectives: Describe the techniques, types of cancer and dose schedules used in treating recurrent H&N cancers with SBRT List the radiobiological models that compete with the linear-quadratic model

  16. WE-F-304-03: Optic Nerve/Chiasm Hypofractionated SRS/SRT Dose Tolerance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milano, M.

    2015-01-01

    Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) was introduced clinically more than twenty years ago, and many subsequent publications have reported safety and efficacy data. The AAPM Working Group on Biological Effects of Hypofractionated Radiotherapy/SBRT (WGSBRT) extracted published treatment outcomes data from extensive literature searches to summarize and construct tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models for six anatomical regions: Cranial, Head and Neck, Thoracic, Abdominal, Pelvic, and Spinal. In this session, we present the WGSBRT’s work for cranial sites, and recurrent head and neck cancer. From literature-based data and associated models, guidelines to aid with safe and effective hypofractionated radiotherapy treatment are being determined. Further, the ability of existing and proposed radiobiological models to fit these data is considered as to the ability to distinguish between the linear-quadratic and alternative radiobiological models such as secondary cell death from vascular damage, immunogenic, or bystander effects. Where appropriate, specific model parameters are estimated. As described in “The lessons of QUANTEC,” (1), lack of adequate reporting standards continues to limit the amount of useful quantitative information that can be extracted from peer-reviewed publications. Recommendations regarding reporting standards are considered, to enable such reviews to achieve more complete characterization of clinical outcomes. 1 Jackson A, Marks LB, Bentzen SM, Eisbruch A, Yorke ED, Ten Haken RK, Constine LS, Deasy JO. The lessons of QUANTEC: recommendations for reporting and gathering data on dose-volume dependencies of treatment outcome. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2010 Mar 1;76(3 Suppl):S155–60. Learning Objectives: Describe the techniques, types of cancer and dose schedules used in treating recurrent H&N cancers with SBRT List the radiobiological models that compete with the linear-quadratic model

  17. Human tolerance to a single, high dose of D-tagatose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buemann, B; Toubro, S; Raben, A; Astrup, A

    1999-04-01

    The addition of 29 g D-tagatose added as a sweetener to a continental breakfast was tested for the appearance of gastrointestinal side effects in a double-blind randomized cross-over study with 29 g sucrose as a control treatment. The subjects reported the side effects during 72 h following the test meal on a questionnaire grading the symptoms on a five-level scale ranging from "none" to "very strong." Although "rumbling in the stomach," "distention," "nausea," "rumbling in the gut," "flatulence, " and "diarrhea" scored significantly higher with D-tagatose, the sugar otherwise was well tolerated in most of the subjects. Two cases of vomiting after D-tagatose were recorded but in one of the cases its relation to the D-tagatose intake was questionable. Only the "distention" score remained higher with D-tagatose for more than 24 h. Nausea, vomiting, and perceived distension may be due to an osmotic effect in the small intestine of unabsorbed D-tagatose. The increased flatus is caused by D-tagatose being fermented in the large intestine. Diarrhea may be explained by osmotic effects in the colon from nondegraded D-tagatose or nonabsorbed short-chain fatty acids produced by the increased fermentation. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  18. Radiobiological restrictions and tolerance doses of repeated single-fraction hdr-irradiation of intersecting small liver volumes for recurrent hepatic metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wust Peter

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To assess radiobiological restrictions and tolerance doses as well as other toxic effects derived from repeated applications of single-fraction high dose rate irradiation of small liver volumes in clinical practice. Methods Twenty patients with liver metastases were treated repeatedly (2 - 4 times at identical or intersecting locations by CT-guided interstitial brachytherapy with varying time intervals. Magnetic resonance imaging using the hepatocyte selective contrast media Gd-BOPTA was performed before and after treatment to determine the volume of hepatocyte function loss (called pseudolesion, and the last acquired MRI data set was merged with the dose distributions of all administered brachytherapies. We calculated the BED (biologically equivalent dose for a single dose d = 2 Gy for different α/β values (2, 3, 10, 20, 100 based on the linear-quadratic model and estimated the tolerance dose for liver parenchyma D90 as the BED exposing 90% of the pseudolesion in MRI. Results The tolerance doses D90 after repeated brachytherapy sessions were found between 22 - 24 Gy and proved only slightly dependent on α/β in the clinically relevant range of α/β = 2 - 10 Gy. Variance analysis showed a significant dependency of D90 with respect to the intervals between the first irradiation and the MRI control (p 90 and the pseudolesion's volume. No symptoms of liver dysfunction or other toxic effects such as abscess formation occurred during the follow-up time, neither acute nor on the long-term. Conclusions Inactivation of liver parenchyma occurs at a BED of approx. 22 - 24 Gy corresponding to a single dose of ~10 Gy (α/β ~ 5 Gy. This tolerance dose is consistent with the large potential to treat oligotopic and/or recurrent liver metastases by CT-guided HDR brachytherapy without radiation-induced liver disease (RILD. Repeated small volume irradiation may be applied safely within the limits of this study.

  19. Bronchial mucosal tolerance following high dose rate endobronchial brachytherapy: clinical and laboratory correlates in late complication assessment of fatal hemoptysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Y.Y.; McDonald, S.; Nakamura, C.; Philips, A.; Ojomo, Karanita; Hernady, E.; Williams, J. P.; Smudzin, T.; Johnstone, D.; Feins, R.; Speiser, B.L.; Rubin, P.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: This study reviews treatment related late complications following high dose rate endobronchial brachytherapy (HDR-EB) for primary lung cancers. Radiation dose contribution from HDR-EB treatment alone, or combined HDR-EB and external beam (EBRT) were analyzed in relation to the linear representation of the tracheobronchial anatomy. Results were presented in a dose volume histogram (DVH) analysis for the risk estimate of late complications from HDR-EB. Bronchial mucosal tolerance is estimated from the clinical experience study and histopathologic changes in laboratory animals treated with HDR-EB. Methods: 1.) There were forty one patients with primary lung cancer received HDR-EB as part of the radiation treatment between December 1990 and June 1994. Six of these developed late complications manifested as either fatal hemoptysis or endobronchial deposition of fibrinous material/bronchial stenosis. Treatment planning films were reviewed to map the volume treated with HDR-EB and EBRT along the tracheobronchial segments. DVH was constructed and compared for patients with and without late complications. Other clinical parameters of interest which were analyzed included: dose per fraction, EBRT total dose, HDR total dose, combined EBRT and HDR total dose, number of catheters per treatment, and points of prescriptions for HDR-EB. 2.) Forty four New Zealand White rabbits underwent HDR-EB of the major airway to a treatment length of 2 cm (1 cm above and below the carina) to a single fraction dose of 10 Gy, 30 Gy, or 50 Gy. Histopathologic changes were examined at 7, 14, 28, and 56 days post-treatment and compared with the control rabbits which received no irradiation. Results: 1.) The late complication rate is 14.5% with three patients developing fibrinous deposits/bronchial stenosis and four patients who experienced fatal hemoptysis in a total of six patients. There is a significant difference in DVH of HDR-EB treatment in the tracheobronchial high dose region

  20. Effectiveness and tolerance of long-term malaria prophylaxis with mefloquine. Need for a better dosing regimen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobel, H O; Bernard, K W; Williams, S L; Hightower, A W; Patchen, L C; Campbell, C C

    1991-01-16

    To measure the effectiveness and tolerance of long-term malaria prophylaxis with mefloquine, the incidence of Plasmodium falciparum malaria and of adverse reactions was compared in Peace Corps volunteers in West Africa who took mefloquine every 2 weeks and in volunteers who took chloroquine phosphate weekly. Mefloquine was only 63% more effective than chloroquine; the monthly incidence of P falciparum infections was one case per 100 volunteers who took mefloquine and 2.7 cases per 100 volunteers who took chloroquine. Using daily proguanil (chloroguanide) hydrochloride in addition to chloroquine did not provide additional protection. All mefloquine prophylaxis failures occurred during the second week of the every-2-weeks dosing regimen in volunteers who had used mefloquine for more than 2 months. Blood concentrations of mefloquine were lower during the second week of the alternate-week regimen than during the first week, suggesting that blood levels are too low during the second week to suppress parasitemia. No serious adverse reactions were observed. The results indicate that a dosing regimen of 250 mg of mefloquine weekly should be considered for travelers to areas with chloroquine-resistant P falciparum malaria.

  1. Safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of single doses of empagliflozin, a sodium glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitor, in healthy Japanese subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarashina, Akiko; Koiwai, Kazuki; Seman, Leo J; Yamamura, Norio; Taniguchi, Atsushi; Negishi, Takahiro; Sesoko, Shogo; Woerle, Hans J; Dugi, Klaus A

    2013-01-01

    This randomized, placebo-controlled within dose groups, double-blind, single rising dose study investigated the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of 1 mg to 100 mg doses of empagliflozin in 48 healthy Japanese male subjects. Empagliflozin was rapidly absorbed, reaching peak levels in 1.25 to 2.50 h; thereafter, plasma concentrations declined in a biphasic fashion, with mean terminal elimination half-life ranging from 7.76 to 11.7 h. Increase in empagliflozin exposure was proportional to dose. Oral clearance was dose independent and ranged from 140 to 172 mL/min. In the 24 h following 100 mg empagliflozin administration, the mean (%CV) amount of glucose excreted in urine was 74.3 (17.1) g. The amount and the maximum rate of glucose excreted via urine increased with dose of empagliflozin. Nine adverse events, all of mild intensity, were reported by 8 subjects (7 with empagliflozin and 1 with the placebo). No hypoglycemia was reported. In conclusion, 1 mg to 100 mg doses of empagliflozin had a good safety and tolerability profile in healthy Japanese male subjects. Exposure to empagliflozin was dose proportional. The amount and rate of urinary glucose excretion were higher with empagliflozin than with the placebo, and increased with empagliflozin dose.

  2. Single-dose pharmacokinetics and tolerability of oral delta-9- tetrahydrocannabinol in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joerger, Markus; Wilkins, Justin; Fagagnini, Stefania; Baldinger, Reto; Brenneisen, Rudolf; Schneider, Ursula; Goldman, Bea; Weber, Markus

    2012-06-01

    Cannabinoids exert neuroprotective and symptomatic effects in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We assessed the pharmacokinetics (PK) and tolerability of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in ALS patients. Nine patients received THC single oral doses of 5mg and 10mg, separated by a wash-out period of two weeks. Blood samples for the determination of THC, 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THC-COOH) and hydroxy-THC (THC-OH) were taken up to 8 hours after intake. Adverse events were assessed by visual analogue scales (VAS). Plasma concentrations of the active metabolite THC-OH were submitted to sequential pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic population modeling on individual heart rate as a proxy for THC's cardiovasculatory effects. Drowsiness, euphoria, orthostasis, sleepiness, vertigo and weakness were significantly more frequent in patients receiving 10mg compared to 5 mg THC. A marked interindividual variability was found for the absorption of oral THC (84%) and elimination of THC-COOH (45%). PK data did not support any clinically relevant deviation from linear PK in the investigated range of concentrations. Plasma concentrations of THC-OH were positively correlated with the individual heart rate. An E(max-model) was successfully fitted to individual heart rate, with a THC-OH plasma concentration of 3.2 x 10(-4) μmol/L for EC(50) and an E(max) of 93 bpm for heart rate. The higher 10mg dose of THC was dose-limiting in patients with ALS. High interindividual PK variability requires individuell titration of THC for potential therapeutic use in patients with ALS.

  3. A fixed-dose approach to conducting emamectin benzoate tolerance assessments on field-collected sea lice, Lepeophtheirus salmonis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyte, S K; Westcott, J D; Elmoslemany, A; Hammell, K L; Revie, C W

    2013-03-01

    In New Brunswick, Canada, the sea louse, Lepeophtheirus salmonis, poses an on-going management challenge to the health and productivity of commercially cultured Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar. While the in-feed medication, emamectin benzoate (SLICE® ; Merck), has been highly effective for many years, evidence of increased tolerance has been observed in the field since late 2008. Although bioassays on motile stages are a common tool to monitor sea lice sensitivity to emamectin benzoate in field-collected sea lice, they require the collection of large numbers of sea lice due to inherent natural variability in the gender and stage response to chemotherapeutants. In addition, sensitive instruments such as EC(50) analysis may be unnecessarily complex to characterize susceptibility subsequent to a significant observed decline in efficacy. This study proposes an adaptation of the traditional, dose-response format bioassay to a fixed-dose method. Analysis of 657 bioassays on preadult and adult stages of sea lice over the period 2008-2011 indicated a population of sea lice in New Brunswick with varying degrees of susceptibility to emamectin benzoate. A seasonal and spatial effect was observed in the robustness of genders and stages of sea lice, which suggest that mixing different genders and stages of lice within a single bioassay may result in pertinent information being overlooked. Poor survival of adult female lice in bioassays, particularly during May/June, indicates it may be prudent to consider excluding this stage from bioassays conducted at certain times of the year. This work demonstrates that fixed-dose bioassays can be a valuable technique in detecting reduced sensitivity in sea lice populations with varying degrees of susceptibility to emamectin benzoate treatments. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. An accelerated dose escalation with a grass pollen allergoid is safe and well-tolerated: a randomized open label phase II trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaker, A M; Al-Kadah, B; Luther, U; Neumann, U; Wagenmann, M

    2015-01-01

    The number of injections in the dose escalation of subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) is small for some currently used hypoallergenic allergoids, but can still be inconvenient to patients and can impair compliance. The aim of this trial was to compare safety and tolerability of an accelerated to the conventional dose escalation scheme of a grass pollen allergoid. In an open label phase II trial, 122 patients were 1:1 randomized for SCIT using a grass pollen allergoid with an accelerated dose escalation comprising only 4 weekly injections (Group I) or a conventional dose escalation including 7 weekly injections (Group II). Safety determination included the occurrence of local and systemic adverse events. Tolerability was assessed by patients and physicians. Treatment-related adverse events were observed in 22 (36.1 %) patients in Group I and 15 (24.6 %) in Group II. Local reactions were reported by 18 patients in Group I and 11 in Group II. Five Grade 1 systemic reactions (WAO classification) were observed in Group I and 2 in Group II. Grade 2 reactions occurred 3 times in Group I and 2 times in Group II. Tolerability was rated as "good" or "very good" by 53 (86.9 %) patients in Group I and 59 (100 %) in Group II by investigators. Forty-eight patients in Group I (80.0 %) and 54 in Group II (91.5 %) rated tolerability as "good" or "very good". The dose escalation of a grass pollen allergoid can be accelerated with safety and tolerability profiles comparable to the conventional dose escalation.

  5. Radiation tolerance of the spinal cord previously-damaged by tumor operation: long term neurological improvement and time-dose-volume relationships after irradiation of intraspinal gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopelson, G.

    1982-01-01

    Of 26 patients with intramedullary spinal cord gliomas (9 astrocytomas, 5 glioblastomas, 12 ependymomas) seen at the Massachusetts General Hospital from 1962-1980, 24 were irradiated (21 initially and 3 after post-surgical recurrence). Those 19 patients who survived at least 1 year after completion of irradiation were evaluated for post-irradiation neurological changes.No patient developed radiation myelopathy. Return to a permanently and completely normal neurological status occured for 33/51 (65%) of pre-irradiation neurological deficits. The major cause of post-irradiation neurological deterioration was tumor recurrence. Although 18/19 patients had their thoracic or lumbar spinal cords irradiated, each with field sizes greater than 10 cm, spinal cord doses approaching, equalling, or occasionally exceeding various definitions of spinal cord tolerance were tolerated well without evidence of radiation myelopathy. Spinal cords of patients with intramedullary gliomas, often with major neurological deficits prior to irradiation, may be treated safely to doses approaching or equalling spinal cord tolerance levels. These doses are expected to locally control most ependymomas and astrocytomas without an increased radiation myelopathy. Caution should be observed if doses higher than this are contemplated in an attempt to cure glioblastoma, because the 5% tolerance level of the damaged spinal remains to be defined

  6. Long-term tolerance and outcomes for dose escalation in early salvage post-prostatectomy radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safdieh, Joseph; Schwartz, David; Weiner, Joseph; Weiss, Jeffrey P.; Madeb, Isaac; Rotman, Marvin; Schreiber, David; Rineer, Justin

    2014-01-01

    To study the long-term outcomes and tolerance in our patients who received dose escalated radiotherapy in the early salvage post-prostatectomy setting. The medical records of 54 consecutive patients who underwent radical prostatectomy subsequently followed by salvage radiation therapy (SRT) to the prostate bed between 2003-2010 were analyzed. Patients included were required to have a pre-radiation prostate specific antigen level (PSA) of 2 ng/mL or less. The median SRT dose was 70.2 Gy. Biochemical failure after salvage radiation was defined as a PSA level >0.2 ng/mL. Biochemical control and survival endpoints were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression analysis were used to identify the potential impact of confounding factors on outcomes. The median pre-SRT PSA was 0.45 ng/mL and the median follow-up time was 71 months. The 4- and 7-year actuarial biochemical control rates were 75.7% and 63.2%, respectively. The actuarial 4- and 7-year distant metastasis-free survival was 93.7% and 87.0%, respectively, and the actuarial 7-year prostate cancer specific survival was 94.9%. Grade 3 late genitourinary toxicity developed in 14 patients (25.9%), while grade 4 late genitourinary toxicity developed in 2 patients (3.7%). Grade 3 late gastrointestinal toxicity developed in 1 patient (1.9%), and grade 4 late gastrointestinal toxicity developed in 1 patient (1.9%). In this series with long-term follow-up, early SRT provided outcomes and toxicity profiles similar to those reported from the three major randomized trials studying adjuvant radiation therapy.

  7. Dataset for Phase I randomized clinical trial for safety and tolerability of GET 73 in single and repeated ascending doses including preliminary pharmacokinetic parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina L. Haass-Koffler

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The data in this article outline the methods used for the administration of GET 73 in the first time-in-human manuscript entitled “Phase I randomized clinical trial for the safety, tolerability and preliminary pharmacokinetics of the mGluR5 negative allosteric modulator GET 73 following single and repeated doses in healthy male volunteers” (Haass-Koffler et al., 2017 [1]. Data sets are provided in two different manners. The first series of tables provided includes procedural information about the experiments conducted. The next series of tables provided includes Pharmacokinetic (PK parameters for GET 73 and its main metabolite MET 2. This set of data is comprised by two experiments: Experiment 1 references a single ascending dose administration of GET 73 and Experiment 2 references a repeated ascending dose administration of GET 73. Keywords: Glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGlu5, Allosteric modulator, GET 73, Safety, Tolerability

  8. An open-label, dose-titration tolerability study of atomoxetine hydrochloride in Japanese adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Michihiro; Takita, Yasushi; Goto, Taro; Ichikawa, Hironobu; Saito, Kazuhiko; Matsumoto, Hideo; Tanaka, Yasuo

    2011-02-01

    The main purpose of this first atomoxetine study in Japanese adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) was to investigate the tolerability of an 8-week treatment regimen. This was an open-label, dose escalation study conducted in 45 Japanese patients aged at least 18 years with DSM-IV-defined ADHD. Patients received atomoxetine orally for 8 weeks. Atomoxetine administration was started at 40 mg/day (7 days), and subsequently increased to a maximum dose of 120 mg/day. Tolerability was assessed by discontinuation rate due to adverse events. Adverse events, laboratory tests, vital signs and electrocardiograms were collected. In addition, ADHD symptoms were assessed by using the Japanese version of the Conners' Adult ADHD Rating Scale-Investigator Rated: Screening Version (CAARS-Inv:SV) scores. Thirty-nine patients completed the study period. Atomoxetine was well tolerated with a 6.7% (3/45) discontinuation rate due to nausea, malaise and anorexia. The most commonly reported adverse events were nausea, nasopharyngitis and headache; there were no unexpected safety concerns. No deaths or serious adverse events were reported. Mean CAARS-Inv:SV-J total ADHD symptom scores decreased in a time-dependent manner; the mean change from baseline to endpoint was -15.0 (Patomoxetine was well tolerated in these patients and suggested that atomoxetine at a maximum dose of 120 mg/day would be safe in Japanese ADHD patients. © 2011 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2011 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  9. Temporal Lobe Reactions After Carbon Ion Radiation Therapy: Comparison of Relative Biological Effectiveness–Weighted Tolerance Doses Predicted by Local Effect Models I and IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillmann, Clarissa, E-mail: clarissa.gillmann@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Radiation Oncology and Radiation Therapy, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg (Germany); Jäkel, Oliver [Department of Radiation Oncology and Radiation Therapy, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center (HIT), Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Schlampp, Ingmar [Department of Radiation Oncology and Radiation Therapy, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg (Germany); Karger, Christian P. [Department of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: To compare the relative biological effectiveness (RBE)–weighted tolerance doses for temporal lobe reactions after carbon ion radiation therapy using 2 different versions of the local effect model (LEM I vs LEM IV) for the same patient collective under identical conditions. Methods and Materials: In a previous study, 59 patients were investigated, of whom 10 experienced temporal lobe reactions (TLR) after carbon ion radiation therapy for low-grade skull-base chordoma and chondrosarcoma at Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung (GSI) in Darmstadt, Germany in 2002 and 2003. TLR were detected as visible contrast enhancements on T1-weighted MRI images within a median follow-up time of 2.5 years. Although the derived RBE-weighted temporal lobe doses were based on the clinically applied LEM I, we have now recalculated the RBE-weighted dose distributions using LEM IV and derived dose-response curves with Dmax,V-1 cm³ (the RBE-weighted maximum dose in the remaining temporal lobe volume, excluding the volume of 1 cm³ with the highest dose) as an independent dosimetric variable. The resulting RBE-weighted tolerance doses were compared with those of the previous study to assess the clinical impact of LEM IV relative to LEM I. Results: The dose-response curve of LEM IV is shifted toward higher values compared to that of LEM I. The RBE-weighted tolerance dose for a 5% complication probability (TD{sub 5}) increases from 68.8 ± 3.3 to 78.3 ± 4.3 Gy (RBE) for LEM IV as compared to LEM I. Conclusions: LEM IV predicts a clinically significant increase of the RBE-weighted tolerance doses for the temporal lobe as compared to the currently applied LEM I. The limited available photon data do not allow a final conclusion as to whether RBE predictions of LEM I or LEM IV better fit better clinical experience in photon therapy. The decision about a future clinical application of LEM IV therefore requires additional analysis of temporal lobe reactions in a

  10. Allergenicity evaluation of p-chloro-m-cresol and p-chloro-m-xylenol by non-radioactive murine local lymph-node assay and multiple-dose guinea pig maximization test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamano, Tetsuo; Shimizu, Mitsuru; Noda, Tsutomu

    2003-01-01

    p-Chloro-m-cresol (PCMC) and p-chloro-m-xylenol (PCMX) are known to cause allergic contact dermatitis. For risk assessment of skin sensitizers, information on dose-response profiles in the induction and elicitation phases and cross-reactivity with analogous chemicals are important. In the non-radioactive local lymph-node assay (LLNA) using 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine instead of 3 H-methyl thymidine, significant effect on lymph node cell proliferation was detected at 10% PCMC and 25% PCMX, while in the multiple-dose guinea pig maximization test (GPMT) at least one animal tested in the group was sensitized at a 5 ppm induction dose of either chemical. When mean skin reaction score in an animal group maximally sensitized with each allergen with the GPMT was plotted against log challenge concentration, linear regression lines with high correlations were obtained in both cases. The calculated elicitation threshold was lower for PCMC than PCMX. The area under the linear regression line between the threshold point and 1% of the elicitation concentration, another index of relative elicitation potency, was also greater for PCMC. Bidirectional cross-reactivity between PCMX and PCMC was detected in the GPMT. PCMC was thus identified in both LLNA and GPMT as a stronger sensitizer than PCMX in both the induction and elicitation phases. These results suggest that the non-radioactive LLNA is a simple and useful method for evaluating allergenicity in the induction phase, while the GPMT using a maximally sensitized animal group is more suitable for assessing the dose-response profile and cross-reactivity in the elicitation phase

  11. Normal tissue tolerance to external beam radiation therapy: Larynx and pharynx; Dose de tolerance a l'irradiation des tissus sains: larynx et pharynx

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debelleix, C. [Service de radiotherapie, centre hospitalier Dax-Cote d' Argent, 40 - Dax (France); Service de radiotherapie, hopital Saint-Andre, CHU de Bordeaux, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Pointreau, Y.; Calais, G. [Service de radiotherapie, centre regional universitaire de cancerologie Henry-S.-Kaplan, hopital Bretonneau, CHU de Tours, 37 - Tours (France); Universite Francois-Rabelais, 37 - Tours (France); Pointreau, Y. [CNRS, UMR 6239 Genetique, immunotherapie, chimie et cancer, 37 - Tours (France); Laboratoire de pharmacologie-toxicologie, CHRU de Tours, 37 - Tours (France); Lafond, C.; Denis, F. [Centre Jean-Bernard, clinique Victor-Hugo, 72 - Le Mans (France); Bourhis, J.H. [Institut Gustave-Roussy, 94 - Villejuif (France)

    2010-07-15

    For head and neck cancers, the radiation dose usually needed to sterilize a macroscopic tumour is at least 70 Gy in conventional fractionation. In the larynx, this dose level enables optimal tumour control while exposing the patient to a limited risk of severe complications. For oropharynx and nasopharynx tumors, it is sometimes possible to limit the dose received by the larynx according to the extent of the primary lesion. Thus, if the tumour constraints permit, the maximum dose to the larynx must be less than 63 to 66 Gy. To reduce the risk of laryngeal edema, it is recommended if possible to limit the mean non-involved larynx dose to 40 to 45 Gy. In the pharynx, literature's data suggested to minimize the volume of the pharyngeal constrictor muscles receiving a dose greater than or equal to 60 Gy. Limiting the volume receiving a dose greater than or equal to 50 Gy reduces the risk of dysphagia. These dose constraints should be tailored to each patient taking into account the extent of the initial primary lesion, the possible addition of chemotherapy or a modified fractionation radiotherapy. (authors)

  12. Open-label, dose-titration tolerability study of atomoxetine hydrochloride in Korean, Chinese, and Taiwanese adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Michihiro; Goto, Taro; Takita, Yasushi; Chung, Sang-Keun; Wang, Yufeng; Gau, Susan Shur-Fen

    2014-03-01

    The primary objective of this study was to assess the overall safety and tolerability of atomoxetine in Korean, Chinese, and Taiwanese adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). A total of 44 patients aged ≥18 years who met the Conners' Adult ADHD Diagnostic Interview for DSM-IV diagnostic criteria for ADHD were enrolled from China, Korea, and Taiwan. In this open-label, dose-escalation study, patients received atomoxetine orally once daily over a period of eight weeks, starting at 40 mg/day (one week) up to a maximum dosage of 120 mg/day. Tolerability was evaluated by rate of discontinuation due to adverse events. Safety was assessed by recording all adverse events, laboratory tests, vital signs, and electrocardiograms. ADHD symptoms were evaluated by the Conners' Adult ADHD Rating Scale-Investigator Rated: Screening Version (CAARS-Inv:SV) for efficacy assessment. Thirty-four patients (77.3%) completed the study. Atomoxetine was well tolerated with a discontinuation rate of 2.3% (1/44) due to adverse events. The most commonly reported adverse events were nausea, dizziness, and somnolence. The mean change from baseline to endpoint in CAARS-Inv:SV total ADHD symptom score was -12.5 (P atomoxetine clinical trial in adult patients with ADHD in China, Korea, and Taiwan. Atomoxetine was well tolerated in doses of up to 120 mg/day with no unknown safety concerns. Copyright © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  13. Single- and Multiple-Dose Study To Determine the Safety, Tolerability, Pharmacokinetics, and Food Effect of Oral MRX-I versus Linezolid in Healthy Adult Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckburg, Paul B; Ge, Yigong; Hafkin, Barry

    2017-04-01

    A multipart phase 1 study was conducted to determine the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and food effect of the novel oral oxazolidinone, MRX-I, in healthy adults, as well as the tolerability of longer-term exposure of both oral MRX-I and linezolid. Thirty subjects in part 1 received single ascending doses of MRX-I or placebo under fasting or fed condition in a double-blind crossover design. Twelve subjects in part 2 received MRX-I at 800 mg every 12 h (q12h) for 14 days in a double-blind, placebo-controlled design. In part 3, 24 subjects were randomized to receive 28 days of MRX-I at 800 mg q12h or oral linezolid at 600 mg q12h for 28 days in a double-blind, double-dummy design. Oral MRX-I was associated with a greater bioavailability and exposure when administered with food, and minimal accumulation of MRX-I occurred after multiple-dose administration. Oral MRX-I was well tolerated at single doses of up to 1,200 and 800 mg q12h for up to 28 days; all adverse events were mild to moderate in severity, and there was no drug discontinuation due to adverse events. These data support further clinical development of oral MRX-I in the treatment of resistant Gram-positive bacterial infections. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  14. Maximizing the Benefit-Cost Ratio of Anthracyclines in Metastatic Breast Cancer: Case Report of a Patient with a Complete Response to High-Dose Doxorubicin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Shee

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite the clinical efficacy of anthracycline agents such as doxorubicin, dose-limiting cardiac toxicities significantly limit their long-term use. Here, we present the case of a 33-year-old female patient with extensive metastatic ER+/PR+/HER2– mucinous adenocarcinoma of the breast, who was started on doxorubicin/cyclophosphamide therapy after progressing on paclitaxel and ovarian suppressor goserelin with aromatase inhibitor exemestane. The patient was comanaged by cardiology, who carefully monitored measures of cardiac function, including EKGs, serial echocardiograms, and profiling of lipids, troponin, and pro-BNP every 2 months. The patient was treated with the cardioprotective agent dexrazoxane, and changes in cardiac markers [e.g. decreases in ejection fraction (EF] were immediately addressed by therapeutic intervention with the ACE inhibitor lisinopril and beta-blocker metoprolol. The patient had a complete response to doxorubicin therapy, with a cumulative dose of 1,350 mg/m2, which is significantly above the recommended limits, and to our knowledge, the highest dose reported in literature. Two and a half years after the last doxorubicin cycle, the patient is asymptomatic with no cardiotoxicity and an excellent quality of life. This case highlights the importance of careful monitoring and management of doxorubicin-mediated cardiotoxicity, and that higher cumulative doses of anthracyclines can be considered in patients with ongoing clinical benefit.

  15. Normal tissue tolerance to external beam radiation therapy: Testicles; Dose de tolerance a l'irradiation des tissus sain: les testicules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Champetier, C.; Gross, E.; Zaccariotto, A.; Duberge, T.; Guerder, C. [Service de radiotherapie, hopital de la Timone, 13 - Marseille (France); Pointreau, Y. [Pole Henry-S.-Kaplan, CHU Bretonneau, 37 - Tours (France); Ortholan, C. [Centre Antoine-Lacassagne, 06 - Nice (France); Chauvet, B. [Institut Sainte-Catherine, 84 - Avignon (France)

    2010-07-15

    Although there is very little evidence for direct irradiation of the testes, they may receive significant doses, especially in the treatment of pelvic tumors in adults and in pediatrics. The exocrine function of the testis seems to be more sensitive to radiotherapy. There is a risk of sterility, even after low doses of radiation. In the adult or the child who has reached puberty, we should propose a self-preservation of semen prior to radiotherapy. In pre-pubescent children, the problem is more delicate. In all cases, it is necessary to limit the dose to the testicles without affecting the coverage of tumour volume. Patients and/or their care-givers should be systematically informed of the risk of infertility related to irradiation. (authors)

  16. Design and assessment of a 6 ps-resolution time-to-digital converter with 5 MGy gamma-dose tolerance for nuclear instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Y.; Leroux, P.; De Cock, W.; Steyaert, M.

    2011-01-01

    Time-to-Digital Converters (TDCs) are key building blocks in time-based mixed-signal systems, used for the digitization of analog signals in time domain. A short survey on state-of-the-art TDCs is given. In order to realize a TDC with picosecond time resolution as well as multi MGy gamma-dose radiation tolerance, a novel multi-stage noise-shaping (MASH) delta-sigma (ΔΣ) TDC structure is proposed. The converter, implemented in 0.13 μm, achieves a time resolution of 5.6 ps and an ENOB of 11 bits, when the over sampling ratio (OSR) is 250. The TDC core consumes only 1.7 mW, and occupies an area of 0.11 mm 2 . Owing to the usage of circuit level radiation hardened-by-design techniques, such as passive RC oscillators and constant-g m biasing, the TDC exhibits enhanced radiation tolerance. At a low dose rate of 1.2 kGy/h, the frequency of the counting clock in the TDC remains constant up to at least 160 kGy. Even after a total dose of 3.4 MGy at a high dose rate of 30 kGy/h, the TDC still achieves a time resolution of 10.5 ps with an OSR of 250. (authors)

  17. Design and assessment of a 6 ps-resolution time-to-digital converter with 5 MGy gamma-dose tolerance for nuclear instrumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Y. [ESAT-MICAS Div., Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); SCK.CEN, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Leroux, P. [ESAT-MICAS Div., Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); ICT-RELIC Div., Katholieke Hogeschool Kempen, B-2440 Geel (Belgium); De Cock, W. [SCK.CEN, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Steyaert, M. [ESAT-MICAS Div., Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium)

    2011-07-01

    Time-to-Digital Converters (TDCs) are key building blocks in time-based mixed-signal systems, used for the digitization of analog signals in time domain. A short survey on state-of-the-art TDCs is given. In order to realize a TDC with picosecond time resolution as well as multi MGy gamma-dose radiation tolerance, a novel multi-stage noise-shaping (MASH) delta-sigma ({Delta}{Sigma}) TDC structure is proposed. The converter, implemented in 0.13 {mu}m, achieves a time resolution of 5.6 ps and an ENOB of 11 bits, when the over sampling ratio (OSR) is 250. The TDC core consumes only 1.7 mW, and occupies an area of 0.11 mm{sup 2}. Owing to the usage of circuit level radiation hardened-by-design techniques, such as passive RC oscillators and constant-g{sub m} biasing, the TDC exhibits enhanced radiation tolerance. At a low dose rate of 1.2 kGy/h, the frequency of the counting clock in the TDC remains constant up to at least 160 kGy. Even after a total dose of 3.4 MGy at a high dose rate of 30 kGy/h, the TDC still achieves a time resolution of 10.5 ps with an OSR of 250. (authors)

  18. Dietary lecithin potentiates thermal tolerance and cellular stress protection of milk fish (Chanos Chanos) reared under low dose endosulfan-induced stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Neeraj; Minhas, P S; Ambasankar, K; Krishnani, K K; Rana, R S

    2014-12-01

    Endosulfan is an organochlorine pesticide commonly found in aquatic environments that has been found to reduce thermal tolerance of fish. Lipotropes such as the food additive, Lecithin has been shown to improve thermal tolerance in fish species. This study was conducted to evaluate the role of lipotropes (lecithin) for enhancing the thermal tolerance of Chanos chanos reared under sublethal low dose endosulfan-induced stress. Two hundred and twenty-five fish were distributed randomly into five treatments, each with three replicates. Four isocaloric and isonitrogenous diets were prepared with graded levels of lecithin: normal water and fed with control diet (En0/L0), endosulfan-treated water and fed with control diet (En/L0), endosulfan-treated water and fed with 1% (En/L1%), 1.5% (En/L 1.5%) and 2% (En/L 2%) lecithin supplemented feed. The endosulfan in treated water was maintained at the level of 1/40th of LC50 (0.52ppb). At the end of the five weeks, critical temperature maxima (CTmax), lethal temperature maxima (LTmax), critical temperature minima (CTmin) and lethal temperature minima (LTmin) were Determined. There was a significant (Plecithin on temperature tolerance (CTmax, LTmax, CTmin and LTmin) of the groups fed with 1, 1.5 and 2% lecithin-supplemented diet compared to control and endosulfan-exposed groups. Positive correlations were observed between CT max and LTmax (R(2)=0.934) as well as between CTmin and LTmin (R(2)=0.9313). At the end of the thermal tolerance study, endosulfan-induced changes in cellular stress enzymes (Catalase, SOD and GST in liver and gill and neurotansmitter enzyme, brain AChE) were significantly (plecithin. We herein report the role of lecithin in enhancing the thermal tolerance and protection against cellular stress in fish exposed to an organochlorine pesticide. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Dataset for Phase I randomized clinical trial for safety and tolerability of GET 73 in single and repeated ascending doses including preliminary pharmacokinetic parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haass-Koffler, Carolina L; Goodyear, Kimberly; Long, Victoria M; Tran, Harrison H; Loche, Antonella; Cacciaglia, Roberto; Swift, Robert M; Leggio, Lorenzo

    2017-12-01

    The data in this article outline the methods used for the administration of GET 73 in the first time-in-human manuscript entitled "Phase I randomized clinical trial for the safety, tolerability and preliminary pharmacokinetics of the mGluR5 negative allosteric modulator GET 73 following single and repeated doses in healthy male volunteers" (Haass-Koffler et al., 2017) [1]. Data sets are provided in two different manners. The first series of tables provided includes procedural information about the experiments conducted. The next series of tables provided includes Pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters for GET 73 and its main metabolite MET 2. This set of data is comprised by two experiments: Experiment 1 references a single ascending dose administration of GET 73 and Experiment 2 references a repeated ascending dose administration of GET 73.

  20. Normal tissue tolerance to external beam radiation therapy: Rectum; Dose de tolerance a l'irradiation des tissus sains: le rectum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchard, P. [Departement de radiotherapie, institut Gustave-Roussy, 94 - Villejuif (France); Chapet, O. [Service d' oncologie-radiotherapie, centre hospitalier Lyon-Sud, 69 - Pierre-Benite (France)

    2010-07-15

    Radiation proctitis is among the most frequent radiation-induced toxicities. This is related to the high frequency of pelvic tumours and the key role of radiotherapy in the treatment of these tumours. Late rectal toxicity usually occurs within the first two years after the completion of a radiotherapy course. Rectal bleeding and a rectal syndrome are the main symptoms, and can be associated to fistulas or rectal ulcers. Clinical factors, such as diabetes mellitus, a severe acute radiation toxicity, small rectal volume or radiation hypersensitivity, are associated with late rectal toxicity. Dosimetric factors derived from the analysis of dose-volume histograms can also predict the occurrence of radiation proctitis, and help to adapt the prescribed dose and the ballistic of irradiation. (authors)

  1. Safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of novel glucokinase activator HMS5552: results from a first-in-human single ascending dose study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu HR

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Hongrong Xu,1,* Lei Sheng,1,* Weili Chen,1 Fei Yuan,1 Mengjie Yang,1 Hui Li,1 Xuening Li,1 John Choi,2 Guiyu Zhao,2 Tianxin Hu,2 Yongguo Li,2 Yi Zhang,2 Li Chen2 1Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, 2Department of Clinical Research & Development, Hua Medicine, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors have contributed equally to this work Background: HMS5552, a novel fourth-generation glucokinase (GK activator, has demonstrated promising effects on glycemic control in preclinical models of type 2 diabetes. This single ascending dose study was conducted to investigate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics (PK, and pharmacodynamics (PD of HMS5552 during its first-in-human exposure.Methods: Sixty healthy subjects were enrolled. In each of six dose-cohorts (5, 10, 15, 25, 35, and 50 mg, ten subjects were randomized with eight subjects receiving the same cohort-dose of HMS5552 and two receiving placebo. Plasma HMS5552 exposure, glucose, and insulin were measured repeatedly during fasting and after a standardized meal. Assessment included safety, PK, and PD endpoints.Results: HMS5552 showed dose-proportional increases in area under the curve 0 to the last quantifiable concentration (AUC0–t and maximum plasma concentration (Cmax. Slopes estimated by linear regression for AUC0–t and Cmax were ~1.0 (0.932 and 0.933, respectively. Geometric mean elimination half-life ranged from 4.48 to 7.51 hours and apparent clearance ranged from 11.5 to 13.1 L/h across all doses. No significant sex effect was observed in PK parameters. HMS5552 also demonstrated dose-related PD responses in terms of maximum glucose change from baseline (% and mean glucose area under effect curve 0–4 hours change from baseline (% (P<0.001. Fifteen adverse events were reported by nine subjects (ten with HMS5552 and five with the placebo. All adverse events were mild in intensity and resolved without any treatment

  2. Normal tissue tolerance to external beam radiation therapy: Adult bone; Dose de tolerance a l'irradiation des tissus sains: l'os chez l'adulte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sargos, P.; Mamou, N.; Dejean, C.; Henriques de Figueiredo, B.; Kantor, G. [Departement de radiotherapie, Centre regional de lutte contre le cancer, institut Bergonie, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Huchet, A. [Departement de radiotherapie, hopital Saint-Andre, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Italiano, A. [Service d' oncologie medicale, Centre regional de lutte contre le cancer, institut Bergonie, 33 - Bordeaux (France)

    2010-07-15

    Radiation tolerance for bone tissue has been mostly evaluated with regard to bone fracture. Main circumstances are mandibula osteoradionecrosis, hip and costal fracture, and patent or radiologic fractures in the treated volume. After radiation therapy of bone metastasis, the analysis of related radiation fracture is difficult to individualize from a pathologic fracture. Frequency of clinical fracture is less than 5% in the large series or cohorts and is probably under-evaluated for the asymptomatic lesions. Women older than 50 years and with osteoporosis are probably the main population at risk. Dose-effect relations are difficult to qualify in older series. Recent models evaluating radiations toxicity on diaphysa suggest an important risk after 60 Gy, for high dose-fraction and for a large volume. (authors)

  3. Effects of first-dose volume and exercise on the efficacy and tolerability of bowel preparations for colonoscopy in Chinese people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Y

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Ying Qin, Wei Liu, Songbai Lin, Xiangfeng Li International Medical Services, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Aim: This study was designed to compare the efficacy and tolerability of bowel preparations with and without the higher first-dose volume of polyethylene glycol (PEG solution or exercise after drinking PEG solution in Chinese people. Methods: A total of 330 participants who had a colonoscopy done in Peking Union Medical College Hospital were randomly and evenly assigned to three groups. Participants in Group A ingested 1 L PEG solution and then ingested 2 L PEG solution at a rate of 250 mL every 15 minutes. Participants in Group B ingested 3 L PEG solution at a rate of 250 mL every 15 minutes and then exercised more than 10 minutes after ingesting each liter of PEG solution. Participants in Group C ingested 3 L PEG solution at a rate of 250 mL every 15 minutes. Experienced gastrointestinal endoscopists rated the efficacy of bowel preparations based on the Boston Bowel Preparation Scale score. A questionnaire regarding participants’ symptoms associated with bowel preparations was administered to evaluate participants’ tolerability. Results: The three groups had insignificant difference in the percentages of participants’ symptoms including dizziness, nausea, stomach ache, bloating, and asthenia. However, the percentages of participants having hunger sensation, sleep disturbance, and anal discomfort were significantly higher in groups with the higher first-dose volume of PEG solution or exercise after drinking PEG solution than without them. The three groups had insignificant difference in the Boston Bowel Preparation Scale score. Conclusion: Whether to add the higher first-dose volume of PEG solution and exercise after drinking PEG solution or not, all participants achieved a similar quality of bowel preparations. Bowel preparations without the additional first-dose volume of PEG

  4. Profit maximization mitigates competition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dierker, Egbert; Grodal, Birgit

    1996-01-01

    We consider oligopolistic markets in which the notion of shareholders' utility is well-defined and compare the Bertrand-Nash equilibria in case of utility maximization with those under the usual profit maximization hypothesis. Our main result states that profit maximization leads to less price...... competition than utility maximization. Since profit maximization tends to raise prices, it may be regarded as beneficial for the owners as a whole. Moreover, if profit maximization is a good proxy for utility maximization, then there is no need for a general equilibrium analysis that takes the distribution...... of profits among consumers fully into account and partial equilibrium analysis suffices...

  5. Tolerance and efficacy of a low dose of the calcimimetic agent cinacalcet in controlling moderate to severe secondary hyperparathyroidism in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, Salah O; Omer, Hayder A; Aamer, Mahmoud A; Somialy, Rashid; Morsy, Mohamed D

    2015-11-01

    Secondary hyperparathyroidism is almost a constant feature in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients maintained on hemodialysis (HD). Calcimimetic agents appear to offer an alternative to surgery in controlling secondary hyperparathyroidism in these patients. Recent studies provide conflicting data on the benefits, efficacy and tolerance of cinacalcet as first-line therapy for the treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism in CKD. This study was designed to investigate the efficacy and tolerance of a low dose of the calcimimetic agent cinacalcet in patients on long-term HD having moderate to severe secondary hyperparathyroidism. Twenty five adult male patients on HD for more than three years were included in the study. All had moderate to severe secondary hyperparathyroidism with serum intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) >50 pmol/L, resistant to conventional treatment. We used the targets of Chronic Kidney Disease: Outcomes Quality Initiative (K/DOQI) clinical guidelines as optimal target of serum iPTH, calcium and phosphate. Patients were administered cinacalcet as a single oral daily dose of 30 mg and were followed-up for six months. Cinacalcet treatment for six months resulted in a significant reduction in the serum phosphate and iPTH levels while the serum calcium levels remained unchanged. Thirty-six percent of the patients attained the recommended serum iPTH levels, 40% achieved significant reduction of the serum iPTH levels and 24% showed no favorable response. Only one patient dropped out because of severe gastrointestinal symptoms. Our results suggest that treatment of CKD patients, having moderate to severe secondary hyperparathyroidism, with low-dose cinacalcet is effective and well tolerated.

  6. Using Microsoft Excel to compute the 5% overall site X/Q value and the 95th percentile of the distribution of doses to the nearest maximally exposed offsite individual (MEOI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, Linda D

    2010-05-01

    This paper describes the method using Microsoft Excel (Microsoft Corporation One Microsoft Way Redmond, WA 98052-6399) to compute the 5% overall site X/Q value and the 95th percentile of the distribution of doses to the nearest maximally exposed offsite individual (MEOI) in accordance with guidance from DOE-STD-3009-1994 and U.S. NRC Regulatory Guide 1.145-1982. The accurate determination of the 5% overall site X/Q value is the most important factor in the computation of the 95th percentile of the distribution of doses to the nearest MEOI. This method should be used to validate software codes that compute the X/Q. The 95th percentile of the distribution of doses to the nearest MEOI must be compared to the U.S. DOE Evaluation Guide of 25 rem to determine the relative severity of hazard to the public from a postulated, unmitigated design basis accident that involves an offsite release of radioactive material.

  7. [Fixed-dose combination fluticasone propionate/formoterol for the treatment of asthma: a review of its pharmacology, efficacy and tolerability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintano Jiménez, J A; Ginel Mendoza, L; Entrenas Costa, L M; Polo García, J

    2016-02-01

    The fixed-dose combination fluticasone propionate/formoterol (FPF) is a novel combination of a widely known and used inhaled glucocorticoid (IGC) and a long-acting β2-adrenergic agonist (LABA), available for the first time in a single device. This fixed-dose combination of FPF has a demonstrated efficacy and safety profile in clinical trials compared with its individual components and other fixed-dose combinations of IGC/LABA and is indicated for the treatment of persistent asthma in adults and adolescents. FPF is available in a wide range of doses that can adequately cover the therapeutic steps recommended by treatment guidelines, constituting a fixed-dose combination of GCI/LABA that is effective, rapid, well tolerated and with a reasonable acquisition cost. Various assessment agencies of the Spanish Autonomous Communities consider this combination to be an appropriate alternative therapy for asthma in the primary care setting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina Rural y Generalista (SEMERGEN). All rights reserved.

  8. Spinal cord tolerance to single-session uniform irradiation in pigs: Implications for a dose-volume effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medin, Paul M.; Foster, Ryan D.; Kogel, Albert J. van der; Sayre, James W.; McBride, William H.; Solberg, Timothy D.

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: This study was performed to test the hypothesis that spinal cord radiosensitivity is significantly modified by uniform versus laterally non-uniform dose distributions. Materials and methods: A uniform dose distribution was delivered to a 4.5–7.0 cm length of cervical spinal cord in 22 mature Yucatan minipigs for comparison with a companion study in which a laterally non-uniform dose was given [1]. Pigs were allocated into four dose groups with mean maximum spinal cord doses of 17.5 ± 0.1 Gy (n = 7), 19.5 ± 0.2 Gy (n = 6), 22.0 ± 0.1 Gy (n = 5), and 24.1 ± 0.2 Gy (n = 4). The study endpoint was motor neurologic deficit determined by a change in gait within one year. Spinal cord sections were stained with a Luxol fast blue/periodic acid Schiff combination. Results: Dose–response curves for uniform versus non-uniform spinal cord irradiation were nearly identical with ED 50 ’s (95% confidence interval) of 20.2 Gy (19.1–25.8) and 20.0 Gy (18.3–21.7), respectively. No neurologic change was observed for either dose distribution when the maximum spinal cord dose was ⩽17.8 Gy while all animals experienced deficits at doses ⩾21.8 Gy. Conclusion: No dose-volume effect was observed in pigs for the dose distributions studied and the endpoint of motor neurologic deficit; however, partial spinal cord irradiation resulted in less debilitating neurologic morbidity and histopathology

  9. Assessment of maximum tolerated dose of a new herbal drug, Semelil (ANGIPARSTM in patients with diabetic foot ulcer: A Phase I clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heshmat R

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and the purpose of the study: In many cases of diabetic foot ulcer (DFU management, wound healing is incomplete, and wound closure and epithelial junctional integrity are rarely achieved. Our aim was to evaluate the maximum tolerated dose (MTD and dose-limiting toxicity (DLT of Semelil (ANGIPARSTM, a new herbal compound for wound treatment in a Phase I clinical trial.Methods: In this open label study, six male diabetic patients with a mean age of 57±7.6 years were treated with escalating intravenous doses of Semelil, which started at 2 cc/day to 13.5 cc/day for 28 days. Patients were assessed with a full physical exam; variables which analyzed included age, past history of diabetes and its duration, blood pressure, body temperature, weight, characteristics of DFU, Na, K, liver function test, Complete Blood Count and Differential(CBC & diff, serum amylase, HbA1c, PT, PTT, proteinuria, hematuria, and side effects were recorded. All the measurements were taken at the beginning of treatment, the end of week 2 and week 4. We also evaluated Semelil's side effects at the end of weeks 4 and 8 after ending therapy.Results and major conclusions: Up to the drug dose of 10 cc/day foot ulcer dramatically improved. We did not observe any clinical or laboratory side effects at this or lower dose levels in diabetic patients. With daily dose of 13.5 cc of Semelil we observed phlebitis at the infusion site, which was the only side effect. Therefore, in this study we determined the MTD of Semelil at 10 cc/day, and the only DLT was phlebitis in injection vein. The recommended dose of Semelil I.V. administration for Phase II studies was 4 cc/day.

  10. Optimization of tolerability and efficacy of the novel dual amylin and calcitonin receptor agonist KBP-089 through dose escalation and combination with a GLP-1 analog

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gydesen, Sofie; Andreassen, Kim Vietz; Hjuler, Sara Toftegaard

    2017-01-01

    , and the following treatment with 2.5, 10, and 40 µg/kg resulted in an ~15% vehicle-corrected weight loss, a corresponding reduction in adipose tissue (AT), and, in all treatment groups, improved oral glucose tolerance (P weight evenly with no significant...... second day obtained equal weight loss at study end, albeit with an uneven reduction in both food intake and body weight in rats dosed every second day. In a 4-fold dose escalation, KBP-089 induced a transient reduction in food intake at every escalation step, with reducing magnitude over time...... reduction in food intake at either escalation step. KBP-089 (1.25 µg/kg) and liraglutide (50 µg/kg) reduced 24-h food intake by 29% and 37% compared with vehicle, respectively; however, when they were combined, 24-h food intake was reduced by 87%. Chronically, KBP-089 (1.25 µg/kg) and liraglutide (50 µg...

  11. Individualized Dose Prescription for Hypofractionation in Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Radiotherapy: An in silico Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, Aswin L.; Troost, Esther G.C.; Huizenga, Henk; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Bussink, Johan, E-mail: j.bussink@rther.umcn.nl [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: Local tumor control and outcome remain poor in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated by external beam radiotherapy. We investigated the therapeutic gain of individualized dose prescription with dose escalation based on normal tissue dose constraints for various hypofractionation schemes delivered with intensity-modulated radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: For 38 Stage III NSCLC patients, the dose level of an existing curative treatment plan with standard fractionation (66 Gy) was rescaled based on dose constraints for the lung, spinal cord, esophagus, brachial plexus, and heart. The effect on tumor total dose (TTD) and biologic tumor effective dose in 2-Gy fractions (TED) corrected for overall treatment time (OTT) was compared for isotoxic and maximally tolerable schemes given in 15, 20, and 33 fractions. Rescaling was accomplished by altering the dose per fraction and/or the number of fractions while keeping the relative dose distribution of the original treatment plan. Results: For 30 of the 38 patients, dose escalation by individualized hypofractionation yielded therapeutic gain. For the maximally tolerable dose scheme in 33 fractions (MTD{sub 33}), individualized dose escalation resulted in a 2.5-21% gain in TTD. In the isotoxic schemes, the number of fractions could be reduced with a marginal increase in TED. For the maximally tolerable dose schemes, the TED could be escalated up to 36.6%, and for all patients beyond the level of the isotoxic and the MTD{sub 33} schemes (range, 3.3-36.6%). Reduction of the OTT contributed to the therapeutic gain of the shortened schemes. For the maximally tolerable schemes, the maximum esophageal dose was the dominant dose-limiting constraint in most patients. Conclusions: This modeling study showed that individualized dose prescription for hypofractionation in NSCLC radiotherapy, based on scaling of existing treatment plans up to normal tissue dose constraints, enables dose

  12. Sustained platelet-sparing effect of weekly low dose paclitaxel allows effective, tolerable delivery of extended dose dense weekly carboplatin in platinum resistant/refractory epithelial ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blagden Sarah

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Platinum agents have shown demonstrable activity in the treatment of patients with platinum resistant, recurrent ovarian cancer when delivered in a "dose-dense" fashion. However, the development of thrombocytopenia limits the weekly administration of carboplatin to no greater than AUC 2. Paclitaxel has a well-described platelet sparing effect however its use to explicitly provide thromboprotection in the context of dose dense carboplatin has not been explored. Methods We treated seven patients with platinum resistant ovarian cancer who had previously received paclitaxel or who had developed significant peripheral neuropathy precluding the use of further full dose weekly paclitaxel. Results We were able to deliver carboplatin AUC 3 and paclitaxel 20 mg/m2 with no thrombocytopenia or worsening of neuropathic side-effects, and with good activity. Conclusions We conclude that this regimen may be feasible and active, and could be formally developed as a "platinum-focussed dose-dense scaffold" into which targeted therapies that reverse platinum resistance can be incorporated, and merits further evaluation.

  13. A fixed-dose combination tablet of gemigliptin and metformin sustained release has comparable pharmacodynamic, pharmacokinetic, and tolerability profiles to separate tablets in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang-In; Lee, Howard; Oh, Jaeseong; Lim, Kyoung Soo; Jang, In-Jin; Kim, Jeong-Ae; Jung, Jong Hyuk; Yu, Kyung-Sang

    2015-01-01

    In type 2 diabetes mellitus, fixed-dose combination (FDC) can provide the complementary benefits of correction of multiple pathophysiologic defects such as dysfunctions in glycemic or metabolic control while improving compliance compared with separate tablets taken together. The objective of the study reported here was to compare the pharmacodynamic (PD), pharmacokinetic (PK), and tolerability profiles of gemigliptin and extended-release metformin (metformin XR) between FDC and separate tablets. A randomized, open-label, single-dose, two-way, two-period, crossover study was conducted in 28 healthy male volunteers. Two FDC tablets of gemigliptin/metformin 25/500 mg or separate tablets of gemigliptin (50 mg ×1) and metformin XR (500 mg ×2) were orally administered in each period. Serial blood samples were collected up to 48 hours post-dose to determine dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) activity using spectrophotometric assay and concentrations of gemigliptin and metformin using tandem mass spectrometry. Geometric mean ratios (GMRs) of FDC to separate tablet formulations and their 90% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to compare the PD and PK parameters between the two formulations. Tolerability was assessed throughout the study. The plasma DPP-4 activity-time curves of the FDC and the separate tablets almost overlapped, leading to a GMR (90% CI) of the FDC to separate tablets for the plasma DPP-4 activity and its maximum inhibition of 1.00 (0.97-1.04) and 0.92 (0.82-1.05), respectively. Likewise, all of the GMRs (90% CIs) of FDC to separate tablets for the area under the plasma concentration-time curve and maximum plasma concentration of gemigliptin and metformin fell entirely within the conventional bioequivalence range of 0.80-1.25. Both the FDC and separate tablets were well tolerated. The PD, PK, and tolerability profiles of gemigliptin and metformin XR in FDC and separate tablets were found to be comparable. The FDC tablet of gemigliptin and metformin

  14. Indexes of carbohydrate exchange (CE) and results of toleration test to glucose after effect of low dose of ionizing radiation in late periods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhmetov, E.A.

    1997-01-01

    The indexes of tolerance test to glucose and values of generalized criterion (GC) being information index of CE system status were determined for 100 liquidators of Chernobyl accident with purpose of study of carbohydrate exchange (CE) status. Analysis of these mean values was carried out according to participation data in liquidation works, exposition duration, rate of radioactive contamination of zone, absorbed dose of external irradiation and age of examined persons. Contribution of each studied components of radiation factor on CE status is estimated. It is determined that both the absorbed dose and the exposition duration are main factors influencing on CE. In examined group there were 32 men with disorders of CE , 20 of them (GC=18.33±0.48) were placed to group of higher risk, 9 men have high tolerance of organism to glucose (GC=32.84±1.37) and 3 men have diabetes of II type (GC=68.6±2.16). Frequency of cases of liquidators' of Chernobyl accident CE disorders allows to made conclusion that ills have dis-function of endocrine section of pancreas

  15. Brachial plexus dose tolerance in head and neck cancer patients treated with sequential intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Tarita O; Refaat, Tamer; Choi, Mehee; Bacchus, Ian; Sachdev, Sean; Rademaker, Alfred W; Sathiaseelan, Vythialingam; Karagianis, Achilles; Mittal, Bharat B

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to study the radiation induced brachial plexopathy in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) treated with Sequential Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (S-IMRT). This IRB approved study included 68 patients with HNSCC treated consecutively. Detailed dose volume histogram data was generated for ipsilateral and contralateral brachial plexus (BP) volumes receiving a specified dose (Vds) i.e. V50-V75 and dose in Gray covering specified percent of BP volume (Dvs) i.e. D5-D30 and maximum point doses (Dmax). To assess BP injury all patients’ charts were reviewed in detail for sign and symptoms of BP damage. Post-hoc comparisons were done using Tukey-Kramer method to account for multiple significance testing. The mean and maximum doses to BP were significantly different (p < .05) based on tumor site, nodal status and tumor stage. The mean volume to the ipsilateral BP for V50, V60, V70, and V75 were 7.01 cc, 4.37 cc, 1.47 cc and 0.24 cc, respectively. The mean dose delivered to ≤5% of ipsilateral BP was 68.70 Gy (median 69.5Gy). None of the patients had acute or late brachial plexopathy or any other significant neurological complications, with a minimum follow up of two years (mean 54 months). In this study cohort, at a minimum of two-years follow up, the mean dose of 68.7Gy, a median dose to 69.5Gy to ≤5% of ipsilateral BP, and a median Dmax of 72.96Gy did not result in BP injury when patients were treated with S-IMRT technique. However, longer follow up is needed

  16. Safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of doravirine, a novel HIV non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor, after single and multiple doses in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Matt S; Gilmartin, Jocelyn; Cilissen, Caroline; De Lepeleire, Inge; Van Bortel, Luc; Dockendorf, Marissa F; Tetteh, Ernestina; Ancona, June K; Liu, Rachael; Guo, Ying; Wagner, John A; Butterton, Joan R

    2015-01-01

    Doravirine is a novel non-nucleoside inhibitor of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase with potent activity against wild-type virus (95% inhibitory concentration 19 nM, 50% human serum). Doravirine has low potential to cause drug-drug interactions since it is primarily eliminated by oxidative metabolism and does not inhibit or significantly induce drug-metabolizing enzymes. The pharmacokinetics and safety of doravirine were investigated in two double-blind, dose-escalation studies in healthy males. Thirty-two subjects received single doses of doravirine (6-1,200 mg) or matching placebo tablets; 40 subjects received doravirine (30-750 mg) or matching placebo tablets once daily for 10 days. In addition, the effect of doravirine (120 mg for 14 days) on single-dose pharmacokinetics of the CYP3A substrate midazolam was evaluated (10 subjects). The maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) of doravirine was achieved within 1-5 h with an apparent terminal half-life of 12-21 h. Consistent with single-dose pharmacokinetics, steady state was achieved after approximately 7 days of once daily administration, with accumulation ratios (day 10/day 1) of 1.1-1.5 in the area under the plasma concentration-time curve during the dosing interval (AUC0-24 h), Cmax and trough plasma concentration (C24 h). All dose levels produced C24 h>19 nM. Administration of 50 mg doravirine with a high-fat meal was associated with slight elevations in AUC time zero to infinity (AUC0-∞) and C24 h with no change in Cmax. Midazolam AUC0-∞ was slightly reduced by coadministration of doravirine (geometric mean ratio 0.82, 90% CI 0.70, 0.97). There was no apparent relationship between adverse event frequency or intensity and doravirine dose. No rash or significant central nervous system events other than headache were reported. Doravirine is generally well tolerated in single doses up to 1,200 mg and multiple doses up to 750 mg once daily for up to 10 days, with a pharmacokinetic profile supportive of once

  17. Effects of exendin-4 on glucose tolerance, insulin secretion, and beta-cell proliferation depend on treatment dose, treatment duration and meal contents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arakawa, Masayuki; Ebato, Chie; Mita, Tomoya; Hirose, Takahisa; Kawamori, Ryuzo; Fujitani, Yoshio; Watada, Hirotaka

    2009-01-01

    Beta-cell proliferation is regulated by various metabolic demands including peripheral insulin resistance, obesity, and hyperglycemia. In addition to enhancement of glucose-induced insulin secretion, agonists for glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) stimulate proliferation and inhibit apoptosis of beta-cells, thereby probably preserve beta-cell mass. To evaluate the beta-cell preserving actions of GLP-1R agonists, we assessed the acute and chronic effects of exendin-4 on beta-cell proliferation, mass and glucose tolerance in C57BL/6J mice under various conditions. Short-term administration of high-dose exendin-4 transiently stimulated beta-cell proliferation. Comparative transcriptomic analysis showed upregulation of IGF-1 receptor and its downstream effectors in islets. Treatment of mice with exendin-4 daily for 4 weeks (long-term administration) and feeding high-fat diet resulted in significant inhibition of weight gain and improvement of glucose tolerance with reduced insulin secretion and beta-cell mass. These findings suggest that long-term GLP-1 treatment results in insulin sensitization of peripheral organs, rather than enhancement of beta-cell proliferation and function, particularly when animals are fed high-fat diet. Thus, the effects of exendin-4 on glucose tolerance, insulin secretion, and beta-cell proliferation largely depend on treatment dose, duration of treatment and meal contents. While GLP-1 enhances proliferation of beta-cells in some diabetic mice models, our results suggest that GLP-1 stimulates beta-cell growth only when expansion of beta-cell mass is required to meet metabolic demands.

  18. Effects of exendin-4 on glucose tolerance, insulin secretion, and beta-cell proliferation depend on treatment dose, treatment duration and meal contents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arakawa, Masayuki; Ebato, Chie; Mita, Tomoya [Department of Medicine, Metabolism and Endocrinology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Hirose, Takahisa [Department of Medicine, Metabolism and Endocrinology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Center for Therapeutic Innovations in Diabetes, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Kawamori, Ryuzo [Department of Medicine, Metabolism and Endocrinology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Center for Therapeutic Innovations in Diabetes, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Center for Beta Cell Biology and Regeneration, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Sportology Center, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Fujitani, Yoshio, E-mail: fujitani@juntendo.ac.jp [Department of Medicine, Metabolism and Endocrinology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Center for Therapeutic Innovations in Diabetes, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Watada, Hirotaka, E-mail: hwatada@juntendo.ac.jp [Department of Medicine, Metabolism and Endocrinology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Sportology Center, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)

    2009-12-18

    Beta-cell proliferation is regulated by various metabolic demands including peripheral insulin resistance, obesity, and hyperglycemia. In addition to enhancement of glucose-induced insulin secretion, agonists for glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) stimulate proliferation and inhibit apoptosis of beta-cells, thereby probably preserve beta-cell mass. To evaluate the beta-cell preserving actions of GLP-1R agonists, we assessed the acute and chronic effects of exendin-4 on beta-cell proliferation, mass and glucose tolerance in C57BL/6J mice under various conditions. Short-term administration of high-dose exendin-4 transiently stimulated beta-cell proliferation. Comparative transcriptomic analysis showed upregulation of IGF-1 receptor and its downstream effectors in islets. Treatment of mice with exendin-4 daily for 4 weeks (long-term administration) and feeding high-fat diet resulted in significant inhibition of weight gain and improvement of glucose tolerance with reduced insulin secretion and beta-cell mass. These findings suggest that long-term GLP-1 treatment results in insulin sensitization of peripheral organs, rather than enhancement of beta-cell proliferation and function, particularly when animals are fed high-fat diet. Thus, the effects of exendin-4 on glucose tolerance, insulin secretion, and beta-cell proliferation largely depend on treatment dose, duration of treatment and meal contents. While GLP-1 enhances proliferation of beta-cells in some diabetic mice models, our results suggest that GLP-1 stimulates beta-cell growth only when expansion of beta-cell mass is required to meet metabolic demands.

  19. Effectiveness and tolerability of fixed-dose combination enalapril plus nitrendipine in hypertensive patients: results of the 3-month observational, post-marketing, multicentre, prospective CENIT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, Alejandro de la; Roca-Cusachs, Alejandro; Redón, Josep; Marín, Rafael; Luque, Manuel; Figuera, Mariano de la; Garcia-Garcia, Margarida; Falkon, Liliana

    2009-01-01

    Monotherapy with any class of antihypertensive drug effectively controls blood pressure (BP) in only about 50% of patients. Consequently, the majority of patients with hypertension require combined therapy with two or more medications. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness (systolic BP [SBP]/diastolic BP [DBP] control) and tolerability of the fixed-dose combination enalapril/nitrendipine 10 mg/20 mg administered as a single daily dose in hypertensive patients. This was a post-authorization, multicentre, prospective, observational study conducted in primary care with a 3-month follow-up. Patients throughout Spain with uncontrolled hypertension (> or =140/90 mmHg for patients without diabetes mellitus, or > or =130/85 mmHg for patients with diabetes) on monotherapy or with any combination other than enalapril + nitrendipine, or who were unable to tolerate their previous antihypertensive therapy, were recruited. Change from previous to study treatment was according to usual clinical practice. BP was measured once after 5 minutes of rest in the sitting position. Therapeutic response was defined as follows: 'controlled' meant controlled BP ( or =20 mmHg and in DBP of > or =10 mmHg. The main laboratory test parameters were documented at baseline and after 3 months. Patients aged >65 years, with diabetes, with isolated systolic hypertension (ISH; SBP > or =140 mmHg for patients without diabetes, SBP > or =130 mmHg for patients with diabetes) and who were obese (body mass index [BMI] > or =30 kg/m2) were analysed separately. Of 6537 patients included, 5010 and 6354 patients were assessed in effectiveness and tolerability analyses, respectively. In the tolerability analysis population, there were 3023 men (47.6%) and 3321 women (52.4%). The mean (+/- SD) age of the tolerability analysis group was 62.8 (+/- 10.7) years. A total of 71.1% of the patients presented at least one clinical cardiovascular risk factor other than hypertension, with the most frequent being

  20. Efficacy, safety and tolerability of ongoing statin plus ezetimibe versus doubling the ongoing statin dose in hypercholesterolemic Taiwanese patients: an open-label, randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Chih-Chieh

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reducing low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C is associated with reduced risk for major coronary events. Despite statin efficacy, a considerable proportion of statin-treated hypercholesterolemic patients fail to reach therapeutic LDL-C targets as defined by guidelines. This study compared the efficacy of ezetimibe added to ongoing statins with doubling the dose of ongoing statin in a population of Taiwanese patients with hypercholesterolemia. Methods This was a randomized, open-label, parallel-group comparison study of ezetimibe 10 mg added to ongoing statin compared with doubling the dose of ongoing statin. Adult Taiwanese hypercholesterolemic patients not at optimal LDL-C levels with previous statin treatment were randomized (N = 83 to ongoing statin + ezetimibe (simvastatin, atorvastatin or pravastatin + ezetimibe at doses of 20/10, 10/10 or 20/10 mg or doubling the dose of ongoing statin (simvastatin 40 mg, atorvastatin 20 mg or pravastatin 40 mg for 8 weeks. Percent change in total cholesterol, LDL-C, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C and triglycerides, and specified safety parameters were assessed at 4 and 8 weeks. Results At 8 weeks, patients treated with statin + ezetimibe experienced significantly greater reductions compared with doubling the statin dose in LDL-C (26.2% vs 17.9%, p = 0.0026 and total cholesterol (20.8% vs 12.2%, p = 0.0003. Percentage of patients achieving treatment goal was greater for statin + ezetimibe (58.6% vs doubling statin (41.2%, but the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.1675. The safety and tolerability profiles were similar between treatments. Conclusion Ezetimibe added to ongoing statin therapy resulted in significantly greater lipid-lowering compared with doubling the dose of statin in Taiwanese patients with hypercholesterolemia. Studies to assess clinical outcome benefit are ongoing. Trial registration Registered at ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00652327

  1. Poor Safety and Tolerability Hamper Reaching a Potentially Therapeutic Dose in the Use of Thalidomide for Alzheimer's Disease: Results from a Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decourt, Boris; Drumm-Gurnee, Denise; Wilson, Jeffrey; Jacobson, Sandra; Belden, Christine; Sirrel, Sherye; Ahmadi, Michael; Shill, Holly; Powell, Jessica; Walker, Aaron; Gonzales, Amanda; Macias, Mimi; Sabbagh, Marwan N

    2017-01-01

    To date there is no cure for Alzheimer's disease (AD). After amyloid beta immunotherapies have failed to meet primary endpoints of slowing cognitive decline in AD subjects, the inhibition of the beta-secretase BACE1 appears as a promising therapeutic approach. Pre-clinical data obtained in APP23 mice suggested that the anti-cancer drug thalidomide decreases brainBACE1 and Aβ levels. This prompted us to develop an NIH-supported Phase IIa clinical trial to test the potential of thalidomide for AD. We hypothesized that thalidomide can decrease or stabilize brain amyloid deposits, which would result in slower cognitive decline in drug- versus placebo-treated subjects. This was a 24-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group study with escalating dose regimen of thalidomide with a target dose of 400mg daily in patients with mild to moderate AD. The primary outcome measures were tolerability and cognitive performance assessed by a battery of tests. A total of 185 subjects have been pre-screened, out of which25 were randomized. Mean age of the sample at baseline was 73.64 (±7.20) years; mean education was 14.24 (±2.3) years; mean MMSE score was 21.00 (±5.32); and mean GDS score was 2.76 (±2.28).Among the 25 participants, 14 (56%) terminated early due to adverse events, dramatically decreasing the power of the study. In addition, those who completed the study (44%) never reached the estimated therapeutic dose of 400 mg/day thalidomide because of reported adverse events. The cognitive data showed no difference between the treated and placebo groups at the end of the trial. This study demonstrates AD patients have poor tolerability for thalidomide, and are unable to reach a therapeutic dose felt to be sufficient to have effects on BACE1. Because of poor tolerability, this study failed to demonstrate a beneficial effect on cognition. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  2. Maximally incompatible quantum observables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinosaari, Teiko, E-mail: teiko.heinosaari@utu.fi [Turku Centre for Quantum Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Turku, FI-20014 Turku (Finland); Schultz, Jussi, E-mail: jussi.schultz@gmail.com [Dipartimento di Matematica, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Toigo, Alessandro, E-mail: alessandro.toigo@polimi.it [Dipartimento di Matematica, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano, Via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Ziman, Mario, E-mail: ziman@savba.sk [RCQI, Institute of Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dúbravská cesta 9, 84511 Bratislava (Slovakia); Faculty of Informatics, Masaryk University, Botanická 68a, 60200 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2014-05-01

    The existence of maximally incompatible quantum observables in the sense of a minimal joint measurability region is investigated. Employing the universal quantum cloning device it is argued that only infinite dimensional quantum systems can accommodate maximal incompatibility. It is then shown that two of the most common pairs of complementary observables (position and momentum; number and phase) are maximally incompatible.

  3. Maximally incompatible quantum observables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinosaari, Teiko; Schultz, Jussi; Toigo, Alessandro; Ziman, Mario

    2014-01-01

    The existence of maximally incompatible quantum observables in the sense of a minimal joint measurability region is investigated. Employing the universal quantum cloning device it is argued that only infinite dimensional quantum systems can accommodate maximal incompatibility. It is then shown that two of the most common pairs of complementary observables (position and momentum; number and phase) are maximally incompatible.

  4. Safety and maximum tolerated dose of superselective intraarterial cerebral infusion of bevacizumab after osmotic blood-brain barrier disruption for recurrent malignant glioma. Clinical article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boockvar, John A; Tsiouris, Apostolos J; Hofstetter, Christoph P; Kovanlikaya, Ilhami; Fralin, Sherese; Kesavabhotla, Kartik; Seedial, Stephen M; Pannullo, Susan C; Schwartz, Theodore H; Stieg, Philip; Zimmerman, Robert D; Knopman, Jared; Scheff, Ronald J; Christos, Paul; Vallabhajosula, Shankar; Riina, Howard A

    2011-03-01

    The authors assessed the safety and maximum tolerated dose of superselective intraarterial cerebral infusion (SIACI) of bevacizumab after osmotic disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) with mannitol in patients with recurrent malignant glioma. A total of 30 patients with recurrent malignant glioma were included in the current study. The authors report no dose-limiting toxicity from a single dose of SIACI of bevacizumab up to 15 mg/kg after osmotic BBB disruption with mannitol. Two groups of patients were studied; those without prior bevacizumab exposure (naïve patients; Group I) and those who had received previous intravenous bevacizumab (exposed patients; Group II). Radiographic changes demonstrated on MR imaging were assessed at 1 month postprocedure. In Group I patients, MR imaging at 1 month showed a median reduction in the area of tumor enhancement of 34.7%, a median reduction in the volume of tumor enhancement of 46.9%, a median MR perfusion (MRP) reduction of 32.14%, and a T2-weighted/FLAIR signal decrease in 9 (47.4%) of 19 patients. In Group II patients, MR imaging at 1 month showed a median reduction in the area of tumor enhancement of 15.2%, a median volume reduction of 8.3%, a median MRP reduction of 25.5%, and a T2-weighted FLAIR decrease in 0 (0%) of 11 patients. The authors conclude that SIACI of mannitol followed by bevacizumab (up to 15 mg/kg) for recurrent malignant glioma is safe and well tolerated. Magnetic resonance imaging shows that SIACI treatment with bevacizumab can lead to reduction in tumor area, volume, perfusion, and T2-weighted/FLAIR signal.

  5. Safety, tolerability, and immunogenicity after 1 and 2 doses of zoster vaccine in healthy adults >= 60 years of age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, Joost N.; Lange, Joep M. A.; Tyring, Stephen K.; Peters, Patrick H.; Nunez, Margaret; Poland, Gregory; Levin, Myron J.; Freeman, Carrie; Chalikonda, Ira; Li, Jianjun; Smith, Jeffrey G.; Caulfield, Michael J.; Stek, Jon E.; Chan, Ivan S. F.; Vessey, Rupert; Schödel, Florian P.; Annunziato, Paula W.; Schlienger, Katia; Silber, Jeffrey L.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Incidence and severity of herpes zoster (HZ) and postherpetic neuralgia increase with age, associated with age-related decrease in immunity to varicella-zoster virus (VZV). One dose of zoster vaccine (ZV) has demonstrated substantial protection against HZ; this study examined impact of a

  6. Open-label parallel dose tolerability study of three subcutaneous immunotherapy regimens in house dust mite allergic patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rieker-Schwienbacher, Juliane; Nell, Marja J.; Diamant, Zuzana; van Ree, Ronald; Distler, Andreas; Boot, Johan D.; Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The current maintenance dose (10,000 AUeq/monthly) of a subcutaneous allergoid for house dust mite (HDM) immunotherapy has previously shown significant clinical efficacy in patients with HDM induced allergic rhinitis or rhinoconjunctivitis. In order to comply with the 2009 EMA guidelines

  7. Clinical study of a new therapy for nerve agent poisoning: Ascending dose tolerance study of HI-6 + atropine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clement, J.G.; Bailey, D.G.; Madill, H.D.; Spence, J.D.

    1993-05-13

    HI-6 was rapidly absorbed from an IM injection site. Maximum HI-6 plasma concentrations of 1.88, 4.96, 8.31 15.0 ug/ml were found 28-36 min after administration and maintained above 4 ug/ml concentration for 0, 39, 112 172.5 min following administration of 62.5, 125, 250 or 500 mg HI-6 + atropine (2 mg), respectively. The calculated half life of HI-6 was 78.2 min following 62.5 mg HI-6 + atropine dose and approximately 64-67 min following 125-500 mg HI-6 + atropine doses. Approximately 50 % of the total dose of HI-6 was eliminated unchanged in the urine. There were significant changes (p < 0.05) in AST, CPK, creatinine and gamma GT following the 500 mg HI-6 + atropine dose but they were not considered to be clinically significant. Urinalysis, hematology and semen analysis over the 24 hr observation period was uneventful. There were no clinically significant changes in heart rate or ECG trace, respiration or blood pressure, visual and mental acuity following HI-6 + atropine.

  8. Onset of efficacy and tolerability following the initiation dosing of long-acting paliperidone palmitate: post-hoc analyses of a randomized, double-blind clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Dong-Jing

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Paliperidone palmitate is a long-acting injectable atypical antipsychotic for the acute and maintenance treatment of adults with schizophrenia. The recommended initiation dosing regimen is 234 mg on Day 1 and 156 mg on Day 8 via intramuscular (deltoid injection; followed by 39 to 234 mg once-monthly thereafter (deltoid or gluteal. These post-hoc analyses addressed two commonly encountered clinical issues regarding the initiation dosing: the time to onset of efficacy and the associated tolerability. Methods In a 13-week double-blind trial, 652 subjects with schizophrenia were randomized to paliperidone palmitate 39, 156, or 234 mg (corresponding to 25, 100, or 150 mg equivalents of paliperidone, respectively or placebo (NCT#00590577. Subjects randomized to paliperidone palmitate received 234 mg on Day 1, followed by their randomized fixed dose on Day 8, and monthly thereafter, with no oral antipsychotic supplementation. The onset of efficacy was defined as the first timepoint where the paliperidone palmitate group showed significant improvement in the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS score compared to placebo (Analysis of Covariance [ANCOVA] models and Last Observation Carried Forward [LOCF] methodology without adjusting for multiplicity using data from the Days 4, 8, 22, and 36 assessments. Adverse event (AE rates and relative risks (RR with 95% confidence intervals (CI versus placebo were determined. Results Paliperidone palmitate 234 mg on Day 1 was associated with greater improvement than placebo on Least Squares (LS mean PANSS total score at Day 8 (p = 0.037. After the Day 8 injection of 156 mg, there was continued PANSS improvement at Day 22 (p ≤ 0.007 vs. placebo and Day 36 (p Conclusions Significantly greater symptom improvement was observed by Day 8 with paliperidone palmitate (234 mg on Day 1 compared to placebo; this effect was maintained after the 156 mg Day 8 injection, with a trend towards a dose

  9. Oral glucose tolerance test performance in olanzapine-treated schizophrenia-spectrum patients is predicted by BMI and triglycerides but not olanzapine dose or duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guina, Jeffrey; Roy, Sayon; Gupta, Ankur; Langleben, Daniel D; Elman, Igor

    2017-07-01

    Olanzapine, an atypical antipsychotic, is associated with glucoregulatory abnormalities, but the nature of this link is not fully elucidated. This is the first olanzapine oral glucose tolerance test (oGTT) study to consider treatment dose and duration, and to compare complementary indices respectively assessing insulin sensitivity (Matsuda index) and resistance (homeostasis model assessment). Body mass index (BMI), body composition, plasma lipids, and oGTT were measured in olanzapine-treated nondiabetic patients with DSM-IV-TR diagnosis of schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder (n = 35). While only one previously undiagnosed participant met diabetes criteria based on fasting plasma glucose alone (≥126 mg/dL), seven were diagnosed with oGTT (2-hr plasma glucose ≥200 mg/dL). Multiple regression analyses revealed that the Matsuda index correlated with BMI (p triglycerides (p = 0.01), but not with age, olanzapine dose, olanzapine treatment duration, or plasma cholesterol. Homeostasis model assessment and fasting plasma glucose correlated with triglycerides only (p triglycerides may be implicated in olanzapine-related glucoregulatory abnormalities. The lack of correlation between glucoregulatory abnormalities and olanzapine dose or treatment duration suggests preexisting metabolic disturbances and/or disturbances arising early in the course of treatment. Clinicians prescribing antipsychotics should consider oGTT, especially in patients with obesity and/or hypertriglyceridemia. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Ascending dose-controlled trial of beloranib, a novel obesity treatment for safety, tolerability, and weight loss in obese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, T E; Kim, D D; Marjason, J; Proietto, J; Whitehead, J P; Vath, J E

    2013-09-01

    Evaluate the safety and tolerability of beloranib, a fumagillin-class methionine aminopetidase-2 (MetAP2) inhibitor, in obese women over 4 weeks. Thirty-one obese (mean BMI 38 kg/m2) women were randomized to intravenous 0.1, 0.3, or 0.9 mg/m2 beloranib or placebo twice weekly for 4 weeks (N = 7, 6, 9, and 9). The most frequent AEs were headache, infusion site injury, nausea, and diarrhea. Nausea and infusion site injury occurred more with beloranib than placebo. The most common reason for discontinuation was loss of venous access. There were no clinically significant abnormal laboratory findings. In subjects completing 4 weeks, median weight loss with 0.9 mg/m2 beloranib was -3.8 kg (95% CI -5.1, -0.9; N = 8) versus -0.6 kg with placebo (-4.5, -0.1; N = 6). Weight change for 0.1 and 0.3 mg/m2 beloranib was similar to placebo. Beloranib (0.9 mg/m2) was associated with a significant 42 and 18% reduction in triglycerides and LDL-cholesterol, as well as improvement in C-reactive protein and reduced sense of hunger. Changes in β-hydroxybutyrate, adiponectin, leptin, and fibroblast growth factor-21 were consistent with the putative mechanism of MetAP2 inhibition. Glucose and blood pressure were unchanged. Beloranib treatment was well tolerated and associated with rapid weight loss and improvements in lipids, C-reactive protein, and adiponectin. Copyright © 2013 The Obesity Society.

  11. A Phase I randomized clinical trial testing the safety, tolerability and preliminary pharmacokinetics of the mGluR5 negative allosteric modulator GET 73 following single and repeated doses in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haass-Koffler, Carolina L; Goodyear, Kimberly; Long, Victoria M; Tran, Harrison H; Loche, Antonella; Cacciaglia, Roberto; Swift, Robert M; Leggio, Lorenzo

    2017-11-15

    Preclinical work suggests that the metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGlu5) may represent a novel target to treat neuropsychiatric disorders, including alcohol use disorder and obesity. The goal of this first-in-man study was to evaluate the safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics (PK) of GET 73 (PubChem SID: 329974174), a novel mGluR5 negative allosteric modulator. This was a double-blind, placebo-controlled, ascending dose, Phase I study conducted in healthy male volunteers in two experiments. GET 73 was administered as single ascending doses (N=48; Experiment 1; 10, 30, 100, 300, 450, 600-mg) or multiple ascending doses (N=32; Experiment 2; 100, 300, 450, 450-mg twice a day). Primary endpoints were the incidence of adverse events (AEs) among drug conditions and drug tolerability. The secondary endpoints were the PK parameters of GET 73 and its metabolite MET 2. Single GET 73 doses of up to 600-mg and repeated ascending doses of up to 450-mg twice/day were safe and well-tolerated. There were no serious or severe AEs. All AEs were mild or moderate in severity. Total GET 73 exposure increased with each increased GET 73 dose. A dose-related increase in mean maximum plasma drug concentration was observed after repeated dosing. Maximum plasma drug concentrations occurred between 0.5 and 2.05h after administration in all groups for both single and repeated doses. This first-in-human study indicates that GET 73, as single or multiple ascending doses, is safe and well-tolerated when administered to healthy male volunteers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Maximizers versus satisficers

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew M. Parker; Wandi Bruine de Bruin; Baruch Fischhoff

    2007-01-01

    Our previous research suggests that people reporting a stronger desire to maximize obtain worse life outcomes (Bruine de Bruin et al., 2007). Here, we examine whether this finding may be explained by the decision-making styles of self-reported maximizers. Expanding on Schwartz et al. (2002), we find that self-reported maximizers are more likely to show problematic decision-making styles, as evidenced by self-reports of less behavioral coping, greater dependence on others when making decisions...

  13. Maximal combustion temperature estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golodova, E; Shchepakina, E

    2006-01-01

    This work is concerned with the phenomenon of delayed loss of stability and the estimation of the maximal temperature of safe combustion. Using the qualitative theory of singular perturbations and canard techniques we determine the maximal temperature on the trajectories located in the transition region between the slow combustion regime and the explosive one. This approach is used to estimate the maximal temperature of safe combustion in multi-phase combustion models

  14. Biphasic Effect of Curcumin on Morphine Tolerance: A Preliminary Evidence from Cytokine/Chemokine Protein Array Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jui-An Lin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of curcumin on morphine tolerance and the corresponding cytokine/chemokine changes. Male ICR mice were made tolerant to morphine by daily subcutaneous injection for 7 days. Intraperitoneal injections of vehicle, low-dose or high-dose curcumin were administered 15 min after morphine injection, either acutely or chronically for 7 days to test the effect of curcumin on morphine-induced antinociception and development of morphine tolerance. On day 8, cumulative dose-response curves were generated and the 50% of maximal analgesic dose values were calculated and compared among groups. Corresponding set of mice were used for analyzing the cytokine responses by antibody-based cytokine protein array. Acute, high-dose curcumin enhanced morphine-induced antinociception. While morphine tolerance was attenuated by administration of low-dose curcumin following morphine injections for 7 days, it was aggravated by chronic high-dose curcumin following morphine injection, suggesting a biphasic effect of curcumin on morphine-induced tolerance. Of the 96 cytokine/chemokines analyzed by mouse cytokine protein array, 14 cytokines exhibited significant changes after the different 7-day treatments. Mechanisms for the modulatory effects of low-dose and high-dose curcumin on morphine tolerance were discussed. Even though curcumin itself is a neuroprotectant and low doses of the compound serve to attenuate morphine tolerance, high-doses of curcumin might cause neurotoxicity and aggravate morphine tolerance by inhibiting the expression of antiapoptotic cytokines and neuroprotective factors. Our results indicate that the effect of curcumin on morphine tolerance may be biphasic, and therefore curcumin should be used cautiously.

  15. Functional genomics indicates yeast requires Golgi/ER transport, chromatin remodeling, and DNA repair for low dose DMSO tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon David Gaytán

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO is frequently utilized as a solvent in toxicological and pharmaceutical investigations. It is therefore important to establish the cellular and molecular targets of DMSO in order to differentiate its intrinsic effects from those elicited by a compound of interest. We performed a genome-wide functional screen in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to identify deletion mutants exhibiting sensitivity to 1% DMSO, a concentration standard to yeast chemical profiling studies. We report that mutants defective in Golgi/ER transport are sensitive to DMSO, including those lacking components of the conserved oligomeric Golgi (COG complex. Moreover, strains deleted for members of the SWR1 histone exchange complex are hypersensitive to DMSO, with additional chromatin remodeling mutants displaying a range of growth defects. We also identify DNA repair genes important for DMSO tolerance. Finally, we demonstrate that overexpression of histone H2A.Z, which replaces chromatin-associated histone H2A in a SWR1-catalyzed reaction, confers resistance to DMSO. Many yeast genes described in this study have homologs in more complex organisms, and the data provided is applicable to future investigations into the cellular and molecular mechanisms of DMSO toxicity.

  16. A fixed-dose combination tablet of gemigliptin and metformin sustained release has comparable pharmacodynamic, pharmacokinetic, and tolerability profiles to separate tablets in healthy subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park SI

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Sang-In Park,1,* Howard Lee,1,2,* Jaeseong Oh,1 Kyoung Soo Lim,3 In-Jin Jang,1 Jeong-Ae Kim,4 Jong Hyuk Jung,4 Kyung-Sang Yu1 1Department of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Seoul National University College of Medicine and Hospital, Seoul, 2Department of Transdisciplinary Studies, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul National University, Clinical Trials Center, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, 3Department of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, CHA University School of Medicine and CHA Bundang Medical Center, Seongnam, 4LG Life Sciences, Ltd, Seoul, Republic of Korea *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: In type 2 diabetes mellitus, fixed-dose combination (FDC can provide the complementary benefits of correction of multiple pathophysiologic defects such as dysfunctions in glycemic or metabolic control while improving compliance compared with separate tablets taken together. The objective of the study reported here was to compare the pharmacodynamic (PD, pharmacokinetic (PK, and tolerability profiles of gemigliptin and extended-release metformin (metformin XR between FDC and separate tablets.Methods: A randomized, open-label, single-dose, two-way, two-period, crossover study was conducted in 28 healthy male volunteers. Two FDC tablets of gemigliptin/metformin 25/500 mg or separate tablets of gemigliptin (50 mg ×1 and metformin XR (500 mg ×2 were orally administered in each period. Serial blood samples were collected up to 48 hours post-dose to determine dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4 activity using spectrophotometric assay and concentrations of gemigliptin and metformin using tandem mass spectrometry. Geometric mean ratios (GMRs of FDC to separate tablet formulations and their 90% confidence intervals (CIs were calculated to compare the PD and PK parameters between the two formulations. Tolerability was assessed throughout the study.Results: The plasma DPP-4 activity

  17. Vaginal tolerance of CT based image-guided high-dose rate interstitial brachytherapy for gynecological malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Naoya; Inaba, Koji; Morota, Madoka; Ito, Yoshinori; Itami, Jun; Kasamatsu, Takahiro; Sumi, Minako; Yoshimura, Ryoichi; Harada, Ken; Kitaguchi, Mayuka; Sekii, Shuhei; Takahashi, Kana; Yoshio, Kotaro

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of this study was to identify predictors of vaginal ulcer after CT based three-dimensional image-guided high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (HDR-ISBT) for gynecologic malignancies. Records were reviewed for 44 female (14 with primary disease and 30 with recurrence) with gynecological malignancies treated with HDR-ISBT with or without external beam radiation therapy. The HDR-ISBT applicator insertion was performed with image guidance by trans-rectal ultrasound and CT. The median clinical target volume was 35.5 ml (2.4-142.1 ml) and the median delivered dose in equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD 2 ) for target volume D 90 was 67.7 Gy (48.8-94.2 Gy, doses of external-beam radiation therapy and brachytherapy were combined). For re-irradiation patients, median EQD 2 of D 2cc for rectum and bladder, D 0.5cc , D 1cc , D 2cc , D 4cc , D 6cc and D 8cc for vaginal wall was 91.1 Gy, 100.9 Gy, 260.3 Gy, 212.3 Gy, 170.1 Gy, 117.1 Gy, 105.2 Gy, and 94.7 Gy, respectively. For those without prior radiation therapy, median EQD 2 of D 2cc for rectum and bladder, D 0.5cc , D 1cc , D 2cc , D 4cc , D 6cc and D 8cc for vaginal wall was 56.3 Gy, 54.3 Gy, 147.4 Gy, 126.2 Gy, 108.0 Gy, 103.5 Gy, 94.7 Gy, and 80.7 Gy, respectively. Among five patients with vaginal ulcer, three had prior pelvic radiation therapy in their initial treatment and three consequently suffered from fistula formation. On univariate analysis, re-irradiation and vaginal wall D 2cc in EQD 2 was the clinical predictors of vaginal ulcer (p = 0.035 and p = 0.025, respectively). The ROC analysis revealed that vaginal wall D 2cc is the best predictor of vaginal ulcer. The 2-year incidence rates of vaginal ulcer in the patients with vaginal wall D 2cc in EQD 2 equal to or less than 145 Gy and over 145 Gy were 3.7% and 23.5%, respectively, with a statistically significant difference (p = 0.026). Re-irradiation and vaginal D 2cc is a significant predictor of vaginal ulcer after HDR-ISBT for gynecologic

  18. Maximally multipartite entangled states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facchi, Paolo; Florio, Giuseppe; Parisi, Giorgio; Pascazio, Saverio

    2008-06-01

    We introduce the notion of maximally multipartite entangled states of n qubits as a generalization of the bipartite case. These pure states have a bipartite entanglement that does not depend on the bipartition and is maximal for all possible bipartitions. They are solutions of a minimization problem. Examples for small n are investigated, both analytically and numerically.

  19. Maximizers versus satisficers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M. Parker

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Our previous research suggests that people reporting a stronger desire to maximize obtain worse life outcomes (Bruine de Bruin et al., 2007. Here, we examine whether this finding may be explained by the decision-making styles of self-reported maximizers. Expanding on Schwartz et al. (2002, we find that self-reported maximizers are more likely to show problematic decision-making styles, as evidenced by self-reports of less behavioral coping, greater dependence on others when making decisions, more avoidance of decision making, and greater tendency to experience regret. Contrary to predictions, self-reported maximizers were more likely to report spontaneous decision making. However, the relationship between self-reported maximizing and worse life outcomes is largely unaffected by controls for measures of other decision-making styles, decision-making competence, and demographic variables.

  20. Epithelial tissue hyperplasia induced by the RAF inhibitor PF-04880594 is attenuated by a clinically well-tolerated dose of the MEK inhibitor PD-0325901.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torti, Vince R; Wojciechowicz, Donald; Hu, Wenyue; John-Baptiste, Annette; Evering, Winston; Troche, Gabriel; Marroquin, Lisa D; Smeal, Tod; Yamazaki, Shinji; Palmer, Cynthia L; Burns-Naas, Leigh Ann; Bagrodia, Shubha

    2012-10-01

    Clinical trials of selective RAF inhibitors in patients with melanoma tumors harboring activated BRAFV600E have produced very promising results, and a RAF inhibitor has been approved for treatment of advanced melanoma. However, about a third of patients developed resectable skin tumors during the course of trials. This is likely related to observations that RAF inhibitors activate extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling, stimulate proliferation, and induce epithelial hyperplasia in preclinical models. Because these findings raise safety concerns about RAF inhibitor development, we further investigated the underlying mechanisms. We showed that the RAF inhibitor PF-04880594 induces ERK phosphorylation and RAF dimerization in those epithelial tissues that undergo hyperplasia. Hyperplasia and ERK hyperphosphorylation are prevented by treatment with the mitogen-activated protein/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK) inhibitor PD-0325901 at exposures that extrapolate to clinically well-tolerated doses. To facilitate mechanistic and toxicologic studies, we developed a three-dimensional cell culture model of epithelial layering that recapitulated the RAF inhibitor-induced hyperplasia and reversal by MEK inhibitor in vitro. We also showed that PF-04880594 stimulates production of the inflammatory cytokine interleukin 8 in HL-60 cells, suggesting a possible mechanism for the skin flushing observed in dogs. The complete inhibition of hyperplasia by MEK inhibitor in epithelial tissues does not seem to reduce RAF inhibitor efficacy and, in fact, allows doubling of the PF-04880594 dose without toxicity usually associated with such doses. These findings indicated that combination treatment with MEK inhibitors might greatly increase the safety and therapeutic index of RAF inhibitors for the treatment of melanoma and other cancers. ©2012 AACR.

  1. Efficacy and tolerability of treatment with single doses of diethylcarbamazine (DEC) and DEC plus albendazole (ABZ) for three consecutive years in lymphatic filariasis: a field study in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kshirsagar, Nilima A; Gogtay, N J; Garg, B S; Deshmukh, P R; Rajgor, D D; Kadam, V S; Thakur, P A; Gupta, A; Ingole, N S; Lazdins-Helds, J K

    2017-10-01

    Lymphatic filariasis (LF) affects 73 countries, causes morbidity and impedes socioeconomic development. We had found no difference in safety and micro (Mf) and macro filarial action of single-dose diethylcarbamazine (DEC) and DEC + albendazole (ABZ) in an F01 study done in India (year 2000). There was a programmatic need to evaluate safety and efficacy of multiple annual treatments (F02). Subjects (155) from the F01 study, meeting inclusion-exclusion criteria, were enrolled in F02 and treated with further two annual doses of DEC or DEC + ABZ. Efficacy was evaluated for Mf positivity by peripheral smear (PS) and nucleopore (NP) filter, circulating filarial antigen (CFA) and filarial dance sign (FDS) positivity and Mf count at yearly follow-up. Safety was assessed for 5 days after drug administration. Total of 139 subjects evaluated for efficacy (69 DEC and 70 DEC + ABZ group). Mf positivity prevalence declined progressively by 95% (PS), 66% (NP), and 95% (PS) and 86% (NP); CFA positivity prevalence declined by 15% and 9%; FDS by 100% each; Mf count declined by 75.5 and 76.9% with three annual treatment of DEC and DEC + ABZ, respectively. Addition of ABZ did not show any advantage over DEC given as three annual rounds for LF. DEC and DEC + ABZ were well tolerated. There was no correlation between result of CFA and FDS, (both claimed to be indicative of adult worm). Analysis of published studies and our data indicate that macrofilaricidal effect of DEC/DEC + ABZ may be seen in children and not adults, with three or more annual dosing.

  2. Is CP violation maximal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gronau, M.

    1984-01-01

    Two ambiguities are noted in the definition of the concept of maximal CP violation. The phase convention ambiguity is overcome by introducing a CP violating phase in the quark mixing matrix U which is invariant under rephasing transformations. The second ambiguity, related to the parametrization of U, is resolved by finding a single empirically viable definition of maximal CP violation when assuming that U does not single out one generation. Considerable improvement in the calculation of nonleptonic weak amplitudes is required to test the conjecture of maximal CP violation. 21 references

  3. Enhanced Glucose Tolerance and Pancreatic Beta Cell Function by Low Dose Aspirin in Hyperglycemic Insulin-Resistant Type 2 Diabetic Goto-Kakizaki (GK Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Layla Amiri

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: Type 2 diabetes is the most common metabolic disorder, characterized by insulin resistance and pancreatic islet beta-cell failure. The most common complications associated with type 2 diabetes are hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia, increased inflammatory and reduced insulin response. Aspirin (ASA and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs have been associated with the prevention of diabetes, obesity and related cardiovascular disorders. Aspirin has been used in many clinical and experimental trials for the prevention of diabetes and associated complications. Methods: In this study, five month old Goto-Kakizaki (GK rats, which showed signs of mild hyperglycemia (fasting blood glucose 80-95 mg/dl vs 55-60 mg/dl Wistar control rats were used. Two subgroups of GK and Wistar control rats were injected intraperitoneally with 100 mg aspirin/kg body weight/ day for 5 weeks. Animals were sacrificed and blood and tissues were collected after performing glucose tolerance (2 h post 2g IP glucose ingestion tests in experimental and control groups. Results: Aspirin caused a moderate decrease in hyperglycemia. However, we observed a significant improvement in glucose tolerance after ASA treatment in GK rats compared to the nondiabetic Wistar rats. Also, the ASA treated GK rats exhibited a significant decrease in insulinemia. ASA treatment also caused a marked reduction in the pro-inflammatory prostaglandin, PGE2, which was significantly higher in GK rats. On the other hand, no significant organ toxicity was observed after ASA treatment at this dose and time period. However, the total cholesterol and lipoprotein levels were significantly increased in GK rats, which decreased after ASA treatment. Immunofluorescence staining for insulin/glucagon secreting pancreatic cells showed improved beta-cell structural and functional integrity in ASA-treated rats which was also confirmed by SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis

  4. Maximal frustration as an immunological principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Abreu, F Vistulo; Mostardinha, P

    2009-03-06

    A fundamental problem in immunology is that of understanding how the immune system selects promptly which cells to kill without harming the body. This problem poses an apparent paradox. Strong reactivity against pathogens seems incompatible with perfect tolerance towards self. We propose a different view on cellular reactivity to overcome this paradox: effector functions should be seen as the outcome of cellular decisions which can be in conflict with other cells' decisions. We argue that if cellular systems are frustrated, then extensive cross-reactivity among the elements in the system can decrease the reactivity of the system as a whole and induce perfect tolerance. Using numerical and mathematical analyses, we discuss two simple models that perform optimal pathogenic detection with no autoimmunity if cells are maximally frustrated. This study strongly suggests that a principle of maximal frustration could be used to build artificial immune systems. It would be interesting to test this principle in the real adaptive immune system.

  5. Phase I dose-escalation study to examine the safety and tolerability of LY2603618, a checkpoint 1 kinase inhibitor, administered 1 day after pemetrexed 500 mg/m(2) every 21 days in patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Glen J; Donehower, Ross C; Iyengar, Tara; Ramanathan, Ramesh K; Lewandowski, Karen; Westin, Eric; Hurt, Karla; Hynes, Scott M; Anthony, Stephen P; McKane, Scott

    2013-02-01

    This phase I study aims at assessing the safety and tolerability of LY2603618, a selective inhibitor of Checkpoint Kinase 1, in combination with pemetrexed and determining the maximum tolerable dose and the pharmacokinetic parameters. This was an open-label, multicenter, dose-escalation study in patients with advanced solid tumors. Increasing doses of LY2603618 (40-195 mg/m(2)) were combined with 500 mg/m(2) of pemetrexed. LY2603618 was administered on Days 1 and 9 and pemetrexed on Day 8 in a 28-day cycle. For all subsequent 21-day cycles, pemetrexed was administered on Day 1 and LY2603618 on Day 2. Antitumor activity was evaluated as per Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors 1.0. A total of 31 patients were enrolled into six cohorts (three at 40 mg/m(2) over 4.5-hour infusion, 1-hour infusion in subsequent cohorts: three each at 40 mg/m(2), 70 mg/m(2), and 195 mg/m(2); 13 at 105 mg/m(2); six at 150 mg/m(2)). Four patients experienced a dose-limiting toxicity: diarrhea (105 mg/m(2)); reversible infusion-related reaction (150 mg/m(2)); thrombocytopenia (195 mg/m(2)); and fatigue (195 mg/m(2)). The maximum tolerated dose was defined as 150 mg/m(2). The pharmacokinetic data demonstrated that the exposure of LY2603618 increased in a dose-dependent manner, displayed a suitable half-life for maintaining required human exposures while minimizing the intra- and inter-cycle accumulation, and was unaffected by the pemetrexed administration. The pharmacokinetic-defined biologically efficacious dose was achieved at doses ≥105 mg/m(2). LY2603618 administered approximately 24 h after pemetrexed showed acceptable safety and pharmacokinetic profiles.

  6. Guinea pig maximization test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Ejner

    1985-01-01

    Guinea pig maximization tests (GPMT) with chlorocresol were performed to ascertain whether the sensitization rate was affected by minor changes in the Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA) emulsion used. Three types of emulsion were evaluated: the oil phase was mixed with propylene glycol, saline...

  7. An open pilot study of zonisamide augmentation in major depressive patients not responding to a low dose trial with duloxetine: preliminary results on tolerability and clinical effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benvenuti Marzia

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite multiple antidepressant options, major depressive disorder (MDD still faces high non-response rates, eventually requiring anticonvulsant augmentation strategies too. The aim of this study was to explore such a potential role for zonisamide. Methods A total of 40 MDD outpatients diagnosed using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders, fourth edition criteria entered a 24 week open trial receiving duloxetine 60 mg/day for the first 12 weeks and subsequently (weeks 12 to 24 augmentation with zonisamide 75 mg/day if they did not respond to the initial monotherapy. Efficacy and tolerability were assessed using the Hamilton Scales for Anxiety and Depression (a 12 week score ≥50% vs baseline defined 'non-response', the Arizona Sexual Experience Scale, the Patient Rated Inventory of Side Effects and the Young Mania Rating Scale. Results At week 12, 15 patients out of 39 (38.5% were responders, and 1 had dropped out; remarkably, 14 patients out of 24 (58.3% had achieved response by week 24. Poor concentration and general malaise were associated with non-response both at week 12 and 24 (P = 0.001, while loss of libido and reduced energy were prominent among final timepoint non-responders. Patients receiving zonisamide also experienced weight reduction (2.09 ± 12.14 kg; P = 0.001 independently of the outcome. Conclusions Although only a preliminary study due to strong methodological limitations, and thus requiring confirmation by further controlled investigations, the current results indicate zonisamide may be a potential augmentation option for some depressed patients receiving low doses of duloxetine.

  8. Tri-maximal vs. bi-maximal neutrino mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, W.G

    2000-01-01

    It is argued that data from atmospheric and solar neutrino experiments point strongly to tri-maximal or bi-maximal lepton mixing. While ('optimised') bi-maximal mixing gives an excellent a posteriori fit to the data, tri-maximal mixing is an a priori hypothesis, which is not excluded, taking account of terrestrial matter effects

  9. Tolerability and efficacy of single dose albendazole, diethylcarbamazine citrate (DEC) or co-administration of albendazole with DEC in the clearance of Wuchereria bancrofti in asymptomatic microfilaraemic volunteers in Pondicherry, South India: a hospital-based study

    OpenAIRE

    Pani, SP; Subramanyam Reddy, G; Das, LK; Vanamail, P; Hoti, SL; Ramesh, J; Das, PK

    2002-01-01

    Background The tolerability and efficacy of single dose albendazole (400 mg), diethylcarbamazine citrate (DEC) (6 mg/kg bodyweight) or co-administration of albendazole (400 mg) + DEC (6 mg/kg bodyweight) was studied in 54 asymptomatic Wuchereria bancrofti microfilaraemic volunteers in a double blind hospital-based clinical study. Results There was no significant difference in the overall incidence of adverse reactions between the three drug groups [42.1% (albendazole), 52.9% (DEC) and 61.1% (...

  10. Safety, tolerability, and efficacy of a fixed-dose combination of olmesartan 40 mg and hydrochlorothiazide 12.5/25 mg in daily practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bramlage P

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Peter Bramlage,1 Claudia Zemmrich,1 Reinhard Ketelhut,2 Wolf-Peter Wolf,3 Eva-Maria Fronk,4 Roland E Schmieder5 1Institut für Pharmakologie und Präventive Medizin, Mahlow, Germany; 2Institut für Sportmedizin, Universitätsklinikum Charité, Humboldt Universität zu Berlin, Berlin, Germany; 3Daiichi Sankyo Deutschland GmbH, Munich, Germany; 4Daiichi Sankyo Europe GmbH, Munich, Germany; 5Universitätsklinikum Erlangen, Klinik für Nephrologie und Hypertensiologie, Erlangen, Germany Background: The safety and efficacy of olmesartan 40 mg and hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ as a fixed-dose combination has been investigated in clinical trials leading to its approval. The aims of the present study were to confirm these data in an unselected patient population in daily practice and to determine the impact of physical activity on blood pressure control. Methods: In a multicenter, noninterventional study, 3,333 patients with either insufficient blood pressure control on olmesartan 40 mg alone or on a fixed/free combination of olmesartan 40 mg and HCTZ 12.5/25 mg were primarily assessed for safety and tolerability of the fixed-dose combination of olmesartan 40 mg and HCTZ 12.5/25 mg at 24 ± 2 weeks. Secondary objectives were blood pressure reduction, treatment compliance, and impact of physical activity as measured by the sum of weekly energy costs. Results: The mean patient age was 63.2 ± 11.46 years, mean baseline blood pressure was 159.6 ± 15.28/93.5 ± 9.52 mmHg, and 70.9% had at least one additional cardiovascular risk factor. Adverse drug reactions were rare (n = 19, and no serious adverse drug reactions occurred. Compliance with drug therapy was at least sufficient in more than 99% of patients at the end of the study. Blood pressure at the last available visit was reduced by 26.1 ± 15.5/13.0 ± 10.1 mmHg versus baseline (P < 0.0001, but had reduced effectiveness in patients ≥75 years with diabetes or impaired renal function. In 69% of patients

  11. Dose-volume considerations in stereotaxic brain radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houdek, P.V.; Schwade, J.G.; Pisciotta, V.J.; Medina, A.J.; Lewin, A.A.; Abitbol, A.A.; Serago, C.F.

    1988-01-01

    Although brain radiation therapy experience suggests that a gain in the therapeutic ratio may be achieved by optimizing the dose-volume relationship, no practical system for quantitative assessment of dose-volume data has been developed. This presentation describes the rationale for using the integral dose function for this purpose and demonstrates that with the use of a conventional treatment planning computer and a series of computed tomographic scans, first-order optimization of the dose-volume function can be accomplished in two steps: first, high-dose volume is minimized by selecting an appropriate treatment technique and tumor margin, and then dosage is maximized by calculating the brain tolerance dose as a function of the irradiated volume

  12. MAXIM: The Blackhole Imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendreau, Keith; Cash, Webster; Gorenstein, Paul; Windt, David; Kaaret, Phil; Reynolds, Chris

    2004-01-01

    The Beyond Einstein Program in NASA's Office of Space Science Structure and Evolution of the Universe theme spells out the top level scientific requirements for a Black Hole Imager in its strategic plan. The MAXIM mission will provide better than one tenth of a microarcsecond imaging in the X-ray band in order to satisfy these requirements. We will overview the driving requirements to achieve these goals and ultimately resolve the event horizon of a supermassive black hole. We will present the current status of this effort that includes a study of a baseline design as well as two alternative approaches.

  13. Social group utility maximization

    CERN Document Server

    Gong, Xiaowen; Yang, Lei; Zhang, Junshan

    2014-01-01

    This SpringerBrief explains how to leverage mobile users' social relationships to improve the interactions of mobile devices in mobile networks. It develops a social group utility maximization (SGUM) framework that captures diverse social ties of mobile users and diverse physical coupling of mobile devices. Key topics include random access control, power control, spectrum access, and location privacy.This brief also investigates SGUM-based power control game and random access control game, for which it establishes the socially-aware Nash equilibrium (SNE). It then examines the critical SGUM-b

  14. A Phase 1, Single-center, Double-blind, Placebo-controlled Study in Healthy Subjects to Assess the Safety, Tolerability, Clinical Effects, and Pharmacokinetics-Pharmacodynamics of Intravenous Cyclopropyl-methoxycarbonylmetomidate (ABP-700) after a Single Ascending Bolus Dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struys, Michel M R F; Valk, Beatrijs I; Eleveld, Douglas J; Absalom, Anthony R; Meyer, Peter; Meier, Sascha; den Daas, Izaak; Chou, Thomas; van Amsterdam, Kai; Campagna, Jason A; Sweeney, Steven P

    2017-07-01

    Cyclopropyl-methoxycarbonylmetomidate (ABP-700) is a new "soft" etomidate analog. The primary objectives of this first-in-human study were to describe the safety and efficacy of ABP-700 and to determine its maximum tolerated dose. Secondary objectives were to characterize the pharmacokinetics of ABP-700 and its primary metabolite (cyclopropyl-methoxycarbonyl acid), to assess the clinical effects of ABP-700, and to investigate the dose-response and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic relationships. Sixty subjects were divided into 10 cohorts and received an increasing, single bolus of either ABP-700 or placebo. Safety was assessed by clinical laboratory evaluations, infusion-site reactions, continuous monitoring of vital signs, physical examination, adverse event monitoring, and adrenocorticotropic hormone stimulation testing. Clinical effects were assessed with modified observer's assessment of alertness/sedation and Bispectral Index monitoring. Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated. Stopping criteria were met at 1.00 mg/kg dose. No serious adverse events were reported. Adverse events were dose-dependent and comprised involuntary muscle movement, tachycardia, and ventilatory effects. Adrenocorticotropic hormone stimulation evoked a physiologic cortisol response in all subjects, no different from placebo. Pharmacokinetics were dose-proportional. A three-compartment pharmacokinetic model described the data well. A rapid onset of anesthesia/sedation after bolus administration and also a rapid recovery were observed. A quantitative concentration-effect relationship was described for the modified observer's assessment of alertness/sedation and Bispectral Index. This first-in-human study of ABP-700 shows that ABP-700 was safe and well tolerated after single-bolus injections up to 1.00 mg/kg. Bolus doses of 0.25 and 0.35 mg/kg were found to provide the most beneficial clinical effect versus side-effect profile.

  15. Induction of drought tolerant mutants of rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Hissewy, A.A.; Abd Allah, A.

    2001-01-01

    The ultimate goal of crop breeding is to develop varieties with a high yield potential and desirable agronomic characteristics. In Egypt, the most important qualities sought by breeders have been high yield potential, resistance to major diseases and insects, and improved grain and eating quality. However, breeding efforts should concentrate on varieties with the potential to minimize yield losses under unfavorable conditions such as drought, and to maximize yields when conditions are favorable. Rice (Oryza sativa L.) in Egypt is completely irrigated and a significant portion of the rice cultivated area is subject to water deficit resulting from an inadequate or insufficient irrigation supply. Drought tolerance is a complex trait in that it results from the interaction of histological and physiological characters of plant with environmental factors, both above-ground and under-ground. Accordingly, root characters are closely related to drought tolerance. Little attention has been paid in Egyptian breeding programs to root characters and their relation to shoot characters. Furthermore, induced mutations are considered as one of the most important methods to induce useful mutants, especially with improved root characters, to overcome the drought problem. The present investigation aimed to study the effect of different doses of gamma rays on several characters of three Egyptian rice varieties, i.e. 'Giza 171', 'Giza 175' and 'Giza 176' and to induce one or more mutants possessing drought tolerance

  16. Efficacy and tolerability of concurrent weekly low dose cisplatin during radiation treatment of localised muscle invasive bladder transitional cell carcinoma: A report of two sequential Phase II studies from the Trans Tasman Radiation Oncology Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gogna, Nirdosh Kumar; Matthews, John H.L.; Turner, Sandra L.; Mameghan, Heidi; Duchesne, Gillian M.; Spry, Nigel; Berry, Martin P.; Keller, Jacqui; Tripcony, Lee

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: To determine the feasibility, toxicity, and clinical effectiveness of concurrent weekly cisplatin chemotherapy in conjunction with definitive radiation in the treatment of localised muscle invasive bladder cancer. Patients and methods: In January 1997 the Trans Tasman Radiation Oncology Group embarked on a Phase II study (TROG 97.01) of weekly cisplatin (35 mg/m 2 x 7 doses) plus radiation to a dose of 63 Gy over 7 weeks. Following an interim toxicity analysis, the dose intensity of cisplatin was reduced to 6 cycles and the radiation schedule changed to 64 Gy over 6.5 weeks leading to the second study (TROG 99.06). A total of 113 patients were enrolled. Results: Acute grade 3 urinary toxicity occurred in 23% of the patients. Acute grade 4 pelvic toxicity was not seen. Thirty-eight patients (33%) experienced grade 3 or 4 cisplatin related toxicities with 15 patients (12%) requiring significant dose modification. The reduced dose intensity in Study 99.06 improved tolerability. Incidence of significant late morbidity was low (6%). Seventy-nine patients (70%) achieved complete remission at the 6 month cystoscopic assessment. Local invasive recurrence was seen in 11 of the 79 patients (14%). In 18 patients (16%) isolated superficial TCC/CIS were detected (6 months and beyond).The local control rate was 45% with a functional bladder being retained in 69 of the 113 patients (61%). RFS and DSS at 5 years were 33% and 50%, respectively. Conclusion: Our two sequential Phase II studies have shown that concurrent chemoradiation using weekly cisplatin in the management of localised invasive bladder TCC is feasible and reasonably well tolerated. This approach is currently being investigated further in a randomised study

  17. Maximal Bell's inequality violation for non-maximal entanglement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, M.; Khanna, F.; Mann, A.; Revzen, M.; Santana, A.

    2004-01-01

    Bell's inequality violation (BIQV) for correlations of polarization is studied for a product state of two two-mode squeezed vacuum (TMSV) states. The violation allowed is shown to attain its maximal limit for all values of the squeezing parameter, ζ. We show via an explicit example that a state whose entanglement is not maximal allow maximal BIQV. The Wigner function of the state is non-negative and the average value of either polarization is nil

  18. Chemoimmunotherapy for relapsed/refractory and progressive 17p13-deleted chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) combining pentostatin, alemtuzumab, and low-dose rituximab is effective and tolerable and limits loss of CD20 expression by circulating CLL cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zent, Clive S; Taylor, Ronald P; Lindorfer, Margaret A; Beum, Paul V; LaPlant, Betsy; Wu, Wenting; Call, Timothy G; Bowen, Deborah A; Conte, Michael J; Frederick, Lori A; Link, Brian K; Blackwell, Sue E; Veeramani, Suresh; Baig, Nisar A; Viswanatha, David S; Weiner, George J; Witzig, Thomas E

    2014-07-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL) patients with purine analog refractory disease or TP53 dysfunction still have limited treatment options and poor survival. Alemtuzumab-containing chemoimmunotherapy regimens can be effective but frequently cause serious infections. We report a Phase II trial testing the efficacy and tolerability of a short-duration regimen combining pentostatin, alemtuzumab, and low-dose high-frequency rituximab designed to decrease the risk of treatment-associated infections and to limit the loss of CD20 expression by CLL cells. The study enrolled 39 patients with progressive CLL that was either relapsed/refractory (n = 36) or previously untreated with 17p13 deletion (17p13-) (n = 3). Thirteen (33%) patients had both 17p13- and TP53 mutations predicted to be dysfunctional, and eight patients had purine analog refractory CLL without TP53 dysfunction. Twenty-six (67%) patients completed therapy, with only five (13%) patients having treatment-limiting toxicity and no treatment-related deaths. Twenty-two (56%) patients responded to treatment, with 11 (28%) complete responses (four with incomplete bone marrow recovery). Median progression-free survival was 7.2 months, time to next treatment was 9.1 months, and overall survival was 34.1 months. The majority of deaths (82%) were caused by progressive disease, including transformed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (n = 6). Correlative studies showed that low-dose rituximab activates complement and natural killer cells without a profound and sustained decrease in expression of CD20 by circulating CLL cells. We conclude that pentostatin, alemtuzumab, and low-dose high-frequency rituximab is a tolerable and effective therapy for CLL and that low-dose rituximab therapy can activate innate immune cytotoxic mechanisms without substantially decreasing CD20 expression. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Comparative bioavailability and tolerability of a single 20-mg dose of two fluoxetine hydrochloride dispersible tablet formulations in fasting, healthy Chinese male volunteers: an open-label, randomized-sequence, two-period crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Shaojun; Liu, Yani; Wu, Jianhong; Li, Zhongfang; Zhao, Yan; Zhong, Dafang; Zeng, Fandian

    2010-10-01

    The proprietary formulation of fluoxetine hydrochloride is an antidepressant of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor class. Pharmacokinetic studies investigating the bioequivalence of generic and branded formulations are needed to market generic fluoxetine in China. The aim of this study was to compare the bioavailability and tolerability of the proposed generic formulation with the established reference formulation of fluoxetine hydrochloride 20 mg in a fasting, healthy Chinese male population. This 10-week, open-label, randomized-sequence, single-dose, 2-period crossover study was conducted in healthy native Han Chinese male volunteers. Eligible subjects were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive a single 20-mg dose of the test or reference formulation, followed by a 35-day washout period and administration of the alternate formulation. Doses were administered after a 12-hour overnight fast. For analysis of pharmacokinetic properties (including C(max), T(max), AUC(0-t), AUC(0-∞), and t(½)), blood samples were obtained over a 672-hour period after dosing. Plasma concentrations of fluoxetine and its active metabolite, norfluoxetine, were analyzed using a validated LC-MS/MS method. The formulations were to be considered bioequivalent if the ln-transformed ratios (test/ reference) of C(max) and AUC were within the predetermined bioequivalence range of 80% to 125%, as established by the US Food and Drug Administration, and if the P values were fasting, healthy Chinese male volunteers. Both formulations appeared to be well tolerated. Copyright © 2010 Excerpta Medica Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. 76 FR 22045 - Fluopicolide; Pesticide Tolerances

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-20

    ... regulation establishes tolerances for residues of fluopicolide and its metabolites in or on multiple... occurred at dose levels where significant maternal toxicity (severe body weight gain decrements and...

  1. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: A Dose-Escalation Planning Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lievens, Yolande; Nulens, An; Gaber, Mousa Amr; Defraene, Gilles; De Wever, Walter; Stroobants, Sigrid; Van den Heuvel, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the potential for dose escalation with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in positron emission tomography-based radiotherapy planning for locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC). Methods and Materials: For 35 LA-NSCLC patients, three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and IMRT plans were made to a prescription dose (PD) of 66 Gy in 2-Gy fractions. Dose escalation was performed toward the maximal PD using secondary endpoint constraints for the lung, spinal cord, and heart, with de-escalation according to defined esophageal tolerance. Dose calculation was performed using the Eclipse pencil beam algorithm, and all plans were recalculated using a collapsed cone algorithm. The normal tissue complication probabilities were calculated for the lung (Grade 2 pneumonitis) and esophagus (acute toxicity, grade 2 or greater, and late toxicity). Results: IMRT resulted in statistically significant decreases in the mean lung (p <.0001) and maximal spinal cord (p = .002 and 0005) doses, allowing an average increase in the PD of 8.6-14.2 Gy (p ≤.0001). This advantage was lost after de-escalation within the defined esophageal dose limits. The lung normal tissue complication probabilities were significantly lower for IMRT (p <.0001), even after dose escalation. For esophageal toxicity, IMRT significantly decreased the acute NTCP values at the low dose levels (p = .0009 and p <.0001). After maximal dose escalation, late esophageal tolerance became critical (p <.0001), especially when using IMRT, owing to the parallel increases in the esophageal dose and PD. Conclusion: In LA-NSCLC, IMRT offers the potential to significantly escalate the PD, dependent on the lung and spinal cord tolerance. However, parallel increases in the esophageal dose abolished the advantage, even when using collapsed cone algorithms. This is important to consider in the context of concomitant chemoradiotherapy schedules using IMRT.

  2. Maximally Symmetric Composite Higgs Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csáki, Csaba; Ma, Teng; Shu, Jing

    2017-09-29

    Maximal symmetry is a novel tool for composite pseudo Goldstone boson Higgs models: it is a remnant of an enhanced global symmetry of the composite fermion sector involving a twisting with the Higgs field. Maximal symmetry has far-reaching consequences: it ensures that the Higgs potential is finite and fully calculable, and also minimizes the tuning. We present a detailed analysis of the maximally symmetric SO(5)/SO(4) model and comment on its observational consequences.

  3. Principles of maximally classical and maximally realistic quantum ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Principles of maximally classical and maximally realistic quantum mechanics. S M ROY. Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400 005, India. Abstract. Recently Auberson, Mahoux, Roy and Singh have proved a long standing conjecture of Roy and Singh: In 2N-dimensional phase space, ...

  4. Evaluation of the Efficacy, Safety, and Tolerability of 3 Dose Regimens of Topical Sodium Nitrite With Citric Acid in Patients With Anogenital Warts: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormerod, Anthony D; van Voorst Vader, Pieter C; Majewski, Slovomir; Vanscheidt, Wolfgang; Benjamin, Nigel; van der Meijden, Willem

    2015-08-01

    Anogenital warts are a common disorder associated with significant physical and mental distress and a substantial cause of health care costs. To assess the efficacy of the topical application of nitric oxide delivered using acidified nitrite. A multicenter, randomized, controlled, dose-ranging clinical trial was conducted in European genitourinary medicine clinics between December 20, 2001, and January 14, 2003. Analysis was by intent to treat for all individuals initiating therapy. Participants included male and female volunteers older than 18 years with between 2 and 50 external anogenital warts. A total of 299 individuals from 40 centers were randomized to a control arm and a treatment arm that received 3 doses of acidified nitrite applied topically for 12 weeks with an additional 12 weeks of follow-up, with the final follow-up visit on January 14, 2003. Placebo nitrite cream and placebo citric acid cream were applied twice daily. Active treatment was divided as low dose (sodium nitrite, 3%, with citric acid, 4.5%, creams applied twice daily), middle dose (sodium nitrite, 6%, with citric acid, 9%, creams applied once daily at night, with placebo applied in the morning), and high dose (sodium nitrite, 6%, with citric acid, 9%, creams applied twice daily). The primary outcome was proportion of patients with complete clinical clearance of target warts; secondary outcomes were reduction in target wart area and safety. Complete clinical clearance at 12 weeks occurred in 10 of 74 patients (14%; 95% CI, 6%-21%) with placebo; 11 of 72 (15%; 95% CI, 7%-24%) with low-dose treatment; 17 of 74 (23%; 95% CI, 13%-33%) with middle-dose treatment; and 22 of 70 (31%; 95% CI, 21%-42%) with high-dose treatment (P = .01). Reduction in target wart area, time to clearance, and patient and investigator assessments supported the superiority of the high-dose therapy vs placebo. There were no systemic or serious adverse events associated with treatment. However, there was a dose

  5. Predictors of Rectal Tolerance Observed in a Dose-Escalated Phase 1-2 Trial of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D.W. Nathan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Cho, L. Chinsoo [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States); Straka, Christopher [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Christie, Alana [Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Lotan, Yair [Department of Urology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Pistenmaa, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Kavanagh, Brian D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado, Denver, Colorado (United States); Nanda, Akash [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida Health Cancer Center at Orlando Health, Orlando, Florida (United States); Kueplian, Patrick [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Brindle, Jeffrey [Prairie Lakes Hospital, Watertown, South Dakota (United States); Cooley, Susan; Perkins, Alida [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Raben, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado, Denver, Colorado (United States); Xie, Xian-Jin [Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Timmerman, Robert D., E-mail: robert.timmerman@utsouthwestern.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To convey the occurrence of isolated cases of severe rectal toxicity at the highest dose level tested in 5-fraction stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for localized prostate cancer; and to rationally test potential causal mechanisms to guide future studies and experiments to aid in mitigating or altogether avoiding such severe bowel injury. Methods and Materials: Clinical and treatment planning data were analyzed from 91 patients enrolled from 2006 to 2011 on a dose-escalation (45, 47.5, and 50 Gy in 5 fractions) phase 1/2 clinical study of SBRT for localized prostate cancer. Results: At the highest dose level, 6.6% of patients treated (6 of 91) developed high-grade rectal toxicity, 5 of whom required colostomy. Grade 3+ delayed rectal toxicity was strongly correlated with volume of rectal wall receiving 50 Gy >3 cm{sup 3} (P<.0001), and treatment of >35% circumference of rectal wall to 39 Gy (P=.003). Grade 2+ acute rectal toxicity was significantly correlated with treatment of >50% circumference of rectal wall to 24 Gy (P=.010). Conclusion: Caution is advised when considering high-dose SBRT for treatment of tumors near bowel structures, including prostate cancer. Threshold dose constraints developed from physiologic principles are defined, and if respected can minimize risk of severe rectal toxicity.

  6. 77 FR 3617 - Etoxazole; Pesticide Tolerances

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-25

    ... similar doses, indicating that systemic effects (mainly liver effects) occur at similar dose levels... chromatography/mass selective detection (GC/MSD) methods) are available to enforce the tolerance expression. The...

  7. A double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomised, parallel-group, dose-escalating, repeat dose study in healthy volunteers to evaluate the safety, tolerability, pharmacodynamic effects and pharmacokinetics of the once daily rectal application of NRL001 suppositories for 14 days.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, D; Duffin, A; Jacobs, A; Pediconi, C; Gruss, H J

    2014-03-01

    The 1R,2S stereoisomer of methoxamine hydrochloride, NRL001, is a highly selective α1-adrenoceptor agonist being developed for the local treatment of non-structural faecal incontinence caused by weak internal anal sphincter tone. This study investigated the steady state pharmacokinetics (PK) and safety of 2 g rectal suppositories containing NRL001 in different strengths (7.5, 10, 12.5 or 15 mg). Healthy volunteers aged 18-45 years received 14 daily doses of NRL001 2 g suppositories or matching placebo. In each dose group nine participants received NRL001 and three received placebo. Blood samples to determine NRL001 concentrations were taken on Days 1, 7 and 14. Cardiovascular parameters were collected via electrocardiograms, Holter monitoring (three lead Holter monitor) and vital signs. Forty-eight volunteers were enrolled; 43 completed the study and were included in the PK analysis population. AUC and Cmax broadly increased with increasing dose, Tmax generally occurred between 4.0 and 5.0 h. Although the data did not appear strongly dose proportional, dose proportionality analysis did not provide evidence against dose proportionality as the log(dose) coefficients were not significantly < 1. NRL001 did not accumulate over time for any dose. Increasing NRL001 concentrations were related to changes in vital sign variables, most notably decreased heart rate. The most commonly reported adverse events (AEs) in the active treatment groups were paraesthesia and piloerection. Treatment with NRL001 was generally well tolerated over 14 days once daily dosing and plasma NRL001 did not accumulate over time. Treatment was associated with changes in vital sign variables, most notably decreased heart rate. AEs commonly reported with NRL001 treatment were events indicative of a systemic α-adrenergic effect. Colorectal Disease © 2014 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  8. In vitro mutants identification of banana (Musa sp.) with tolerance to toxin from Fusarium oxysporum f. sp cubense, treating buds with several gamma radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moura, Adriana Muniz Mendes de; Houllou-Kido, Laureen Michelle; Franca, Jose Geraldo Eugenio de; Colaco, Waldeciro

    1999-01-01

    Mutants of banana, obtained through treatment with different level of gamma-radiation (0; 10; 20; 30; 40 Gy), were initially cultivated in vitro in medium for rapid clonal propagation during 30 days. These treatment affected the shoot tips development ratio. Some plants developed necrosis and died, but some of the shoot tips emitted new gems. These material were cultivated in medium 20% of the toxin of Fusarium oxysporum cubense. During the selection period, the necrosis occurrence and death of susceptible shoot tips were observed. Whereas the tolerant shoot tips kept themselves green during the entire selection process. At the end of the selection process, eight shoot tips were obtained. (author)

  9. Chemoimmunotherapy for Relapsed/Refractory and Progressive 17p13 Deleted Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) Combining Pentostatin, Alemtuzumab, and Low Dose Rituximab is Effective and Tolerable and Limits Loss of CD20 Expression by Circulating CLL Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zent, Clive S.; Taylor, Ronald P.; Lindorfer, Margaret A.; Beum, Paul V.; LaPlant, Betsy; Wu, Wenting; Call, Timothy G.; Bowen, Deborah A.; Conte, Michael J.; Frederick, Lori A.; Link, Brian K.; Blackwell, Sue E.; Veeramani, Suresh; Baig, Nisar A.; Viswanatha, David S.; Weiner, George J.; Witzig, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL) patients with purine analogue refractory disease or TP53 dysfunction still have limited treatment options and poor survival. Alemtuzumab containing chemoimmunotherapy regimens can be effective but frequently cause serious infections. We report a phase II trial testing the efficacy and tolerability of a short duration regimen combining pentostatin, alemtuzumab, and low dose high frequency rituximab (PAR) designed to decrease the risk of treatment associated infections and limit loss of CD20 expression by CLL cells. The study enrolled 39 patients with progressive CLL that was either relapsed/refractory (n=36) or previously untreated with 17p13 deletion (17p13-)(n=3). Thirteen (33%) patients had both 17p13- and TP53 mutations predicted to be dysfunctional and eight patients had purine analogue refractory CLL without TP53 dysfunction. Twenty-six (67%) patients completed therapy with only five (13%) patients having treatment limiting toxicity, and no treatment related deaths. Twenty-two (56%) patients responded to treatment with 11 (28%) complete responses (four with incomplete bone marrow recovery). Median progression free survival was 7.2 months, time to next treatment 9.1 months, and overall survival 34.1 months. The majority of deaths (82%) were caused by progressive disease including transformed diffuse large B cell lymphoma (n=6). Correlative studies showed that low dose rituximab activates complement and NK cells without a profound and sustained decrease in expression of CD20 by circulating CLL cells. We conclude that PAR is a tolerable and effective therapy for CLL and that low dose rituximab therapy can activate innate immune cytotoxic mechanisms without substantially decreasing CD20 expression. PMID:24723493

  10. Commercialization of radiation tolerant camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yong Bum; Choi, Young Soo; Kim, Sun Ku; Lee, Jong Min; Cha, Bung Hun; Lee, Nam Ho; Byun, Eiy Gyo; Yoo, Seun Wook; Choi, Bum Ki; Yoon, Sung Up; Kim, Hyun Gun; Sin, Jeong Hun; So, Suk Il

    1999-12-01

    In this project, radiation tolerant camera which tolerates 10{sup 6} - 10{sup 8} rad total dose is developed. In order to develop radiation tolerant camera, radiation effect of camera components was examined and evaluated, and camera configuration was studied. By the result of evaluation, the components were decided and design was performed. Vidicon tube was selected to use by image sensor and non-browning optics and camera driving circuit were applied. The controller needed for CCTV camera system, lens, light, pan/tilt controller, was designed by the concept of remote control. And two type of radiation tolerant camera were fabricated consider to use in underwater environment or normal environment. (author)

  11. Commercialization of radiation tolerant camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yong Bum; Choi, Young Soo; Kim, Sun Ku; Lee, Jong Min; Cha, Bung Hun; Lee, Nam Ho; Byun, Eiy Gyo; Yoo, Seun Wook; Choi, Bum Ki; Yoon, Sung Up; Kim, Hyun Gun; Sin, Jeong Hun; So, Suk Il

    1999-12-01

    In this project, radiation tolerant camera which tolerates 10 6 - 10 8 rad total dose is developed. In order to develop radiation tolerant camera, radiation effect of camera components was examined and evaluated, and camera configuration was studied. By the result of evaluation, the components were decided and design was performed. Vidicon tube was selected to use by image sensor and non-browning optics and camera driving circuit were applied. The controller needed for CCTV camera system, lens, light, pan/tilt controller, was designed by the concept of remote control. And two type of radiation tolerant camera were fabricated consider to use in underwater environment or normal environment. (author)

  12. Crafting tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirchner, Antje; Freitag, Markus; Rapp, Carolin

    2011-01-01

    Ongoing changes in social structures, orientation, and value systems confront us with the growing necessity to address and understand transforming patterns of tolerance as well as specific aspects, such as social tolerance. Based on hierarchical analyses of the latest World Values Survey (2005......–08) and national statistics for 28 countries, we assess both individual and contextual aspects that influence an individual's perception of different social groupings. Using a social tolerance index that captures personal attitudes toward these groupings, we present an institutional theory of social tolerance. Our...

  13. Influence of titration schedule and maintenance dose on the tolerability of adjunctive eslicarbazepine acetate: An integrated analysis of three randomized placebo-controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, Gregory; Biton, Victor; Harvey, Jay H; Elger, Christian; Trinka, Eugen; Soares da Silva, Patrício; Gama, Helena; Cheng, Hailong; Grinnell, Todd; Blum, David

    2018-01-01

    To examine the influence of titration schedule and maintenance dose on the incidence and type of treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) associated with adjunctive eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL). Data from three randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials were analyzed. Patients with refractory partial-onset seizures were randomized to maintenance doses of ESL 400, 800, or 1200mg QD (dosing was initiated at 400 or 800mg QD) or placebo. The incidence of TEAEs was analyzed during the double-blind period (2-week titration phase; 12-week maintenance phase), according to the randomized maintenance dose and the titration schedule. 1447 patients were included in the analysis. During the first week of treatment, 62% of patients taking ESL 800mg QD had ≥1 TEAE, vs 35% of those taking 400mg QD and 32% of the placebo group; dizziness, somnolence, nausea, and headache were numerically more frequent in patients taking ESL 800mg than those taking ESL 400mg QD. During the double-blind period, the incidences of common TEAEs were lower in patients who initiated ESL at 400mg vs 800mg QD. For the 800 and 1200mg QD maintenance doses, rates of TEAEs leading to discontinuation were lower in patients who began treatment with 400mg than in those who began taking ESL 800mg QD. Initiation of ESL at 800mg QD is feasible. However, initiating treatment with ESL 400mg QD for 1 or 2 weeks is recommended, being associated with a lower incidence of TEAEs, and related discontinuations. For some patients, treatment may be initiated at 800mg QD, if the need for more immediate seizure reduction outweighs concerns about increased risk of adverse reactions during initiation. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Maximizing and customer loyalty: Are maximizers less loyal?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Lai

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite their efforts to choose the best of all available solutions, maximizers seem to be more inclined than satisficers to regret their choices and to experience post-decisional dissonance. Maximizers may therefore be expected to change their decisions more frequently and hence exhibit lower customer loyalty to providers of products and services compared to satisficers. Findings from the study reported here (N = 1978 support this prediction. Maximizers reported significantly higher intentions to switch to another service provider (television provider than satisficers. Maximizers' intentions to switch appear to be intensified and mediated by higher proneness to regret, increased desire to discuss relevant choices with others, higher levels of perceived knowledge of alternatives, and higher ego involvement in the end product, compared to satisficers. Opportunities for future research are suggested.

  15. Implications of maximal Jarlskog invariant and maximal CP violation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez-Jauregui, E.; Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico

    2001-04-01

    We argue here why CP violating phase Φ in the quark mixing matrix is maximal, that is, Φ=90 . In the Standard Model CP violation is related to the Jarlskog invariant J, which can be obtained from non commuting Hermitian mass matrices. In this article we derive the conditions to have Hermitian mass matrices which give maximal Jarlskog invariant J and maximal CP violating phase Φ. We find that all squared moduli of the quark mixing elements have a singular point when the CP violation phase Φ takes the value Φ=90 . This special feature of the Jarlskog invariant J and the quark mixing matrix is a clear and precise indication that CP violating Phase Φ is maximal in order to let nature treat democratically all of the quark mixing matrix moduli. (orig.)

  16. Phenomenology of maximal and near-maximal lepton mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Garcia, M. C.; Pena-Garay, Carlos; Nir, Yosef; Smirnov, Alexei Yu.

    2001-01-01

    The possible existence of maximal or near-maximal lepton mixing constitutes an intriguing challenge for fundamental theories of flavor. We study the phenomenological consequences of maximal and near-maximal mixing of the electron neutrino with other (x=tau and/or muon) neutrinos. We describe the deviations from maximal mixing in terms of a parameter ε(equivalent to)1-2sin 2 θ ex and quantify the present experimental status for |ε| e mixing comes from solar neutrino experiments. We find that the global analysis of solar neutrino data allows maximal mixing with confidence level better than 99% for 10 -8 eV 2 ∼ 2 ∼ -7 eV 2 . In the mass ranges Δm 2 ∼>1.5x10 -5 eV 2 and 4x10 -10 eV 2 ∼ 2 ∼ -7 eV 2 the full interval |ε| e mixing in atmospheric neutrinos, supernova neutrinos, and neutrinoless double beta decay

  17. Nonlinear Impairment Compensation Using Expectation Maximization for PDM 16-QAM Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zibar, Darko; Winther, Ole; Franceschi, Niccolo

    2012-01-01

    We show experimentally that by using non-linear signal processing based algorithm, expectation maximization, nonlinear system tolerance can be increased by 2 dB. Expectation maximization is also effective in combating I/Q modulator nonlinearities and laser linewidth....

  18. Maximal quantum Fisher information matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Yu; Yuan, Haidong

    2017-01-01

    We study the existence of the maximal quantum Fisher information matrix in the multi-parameter quantum estimation, which bounds the ultimate precision limit. We show that when the maximal quantum Fisher information matrix exists, it can be directly obtained from the underlying dynamics. Examples are then provided to demonstrate the usefulness of the maximal quantum Fisher information matrix by deriving various trade-off relations in multi-parameter quantum estimation and obtaining the bounds for the scalings of the precision limit. (paper)

  19. Dose-tailoring of FEC adjuvant chemotherapy based on leukopenia is feasible and well tolerated. Toxicity and dose intensity in the Scandinavian Breast Group phase 3 adjuvant Trial SBG 2000-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edlund, Per; Ahlgren, Johan; Bjerre, Karsten

    2011-01-01

    The SBG 2000-1 trial is a randomised study that investigates if dose-tailored adjuvant FEC therapy based on the individual's leukocyte nadir value can improve outcome. The study has included 1535 women with medium and high-risk breast cancer.......The SBG 2000-1 trial is a randomised study that investigates if dose-tailored adjuvant FEC therapy based on the individual's leukocyte nadir value can improve outcome. The study has included 1535 women with medium and high-risk breast cancer....

  20. Phase I safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetic study of recombinant human mannan-binding lectin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, K.A.; Matthiesen, F.; Agger, T.

    2006-01-01

    (rhMBL) is in development as a novel therapeutic approach. To assess the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of rhMBL, a placebo-controlled double-blinded study was performed in MBL-deficient healthy male subjects. rhMBL was administered as both single intravenous (i.v.) infusions (0.01, 0...... mild and no serious adverse events were recorded. There were no clinically significant changes in laboratory evaluations, ECG or vital signs, and no anti-MBL antibodies were detected following rhMBL administration. After single i.v. doses of rhMBL the maximal plasma levels increased in a dose...... of the complement system without non-specific activation of the complement cascade.In conclusion, no safety or tolerability concern was raised following rhMBL administration no signs of immunogenicity detected, and an rhMBL plasma level judged sufficient to achieve therapeutic benefit (>1000 ng/mL) can be achieved....

  1. The H3 antagonist ABT-288 is tolerated at significantly higher exposures in subjects with schizophrenia than in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Ahmed A; Haig, George; Florian, Hana; Locke, Charles; Gertsik, Lev; Dutta, Sandeep

    2014-06-01

    ABT-288 is a potent and selective H3 receptor antagonist with procognitive effects in several preclinical models. In previous studies, 3 mg once daily was the maximal tolerated dose in healthy volunteers. This study characterized the safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of ABT-288 in stable subjects with schizophrenia. This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-escalating study of ABT-288 (10 dose levels, from 1 to 60 mg once daily for 14 days) in stable subjects with schizophrenia treated with an atypical antipsychotic. In each dose group, five to seven and two to three participants were assigned to ABT-288 and placebo, respectively. Of the 67 participants enrolled, nine participants (on ABT-288) were prematurely discontinued, in seven of these due to adverse events. ABT-288 was generally safe and tolerated at doses up to 45 mg once daily. The most common adverse events, in decreasing frequency (from 31 to 5%), were abnormal dreams, headache, insomnia, dizziness, somnolence, dysgeusia, dry mouth, psychotic disorder, parosmia and tachycardia. Adverse events causing early termination were psychotic events (four) and increased creatine phosphokinase, pyrexia and insomnia (one each). The half-life of ABT-288 ranged from 28 to 51 h, and steady state was achieved by day 12 of dosing. At comparable multiple doses, ABT-288 exposure in subjects with schizophrenia was 45% lower than that previously observed in healthy subjects. At trough, ABT-288 cerebrospinal fluid concentrations were 40% of the total plasma concentrations. ABT-288 was tolerated at a 15-fold higher dose and 12-fold higher exposures in subjects with schizophrenia than previously observed in healthy volunteers. The greater ABT-288 tolerability was not due to limited brain uptake. © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  2. Differential development of antinociceptive tolerance to morphine and fentanyl is not linked to efficacy in the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray of the rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobeck, Erin N.; Haseman, Rachel A.; Hong, Dana; Ingram, Susan L.; Morgan, Michael M.

    2012-01-01

    Systemic administration of morphine typically produces greater tolerance than higher efficacy mu-opioid receptor (MOPr) agonists, such as fentanyl. The objective of the present study was to test this relationship by measuring antinociceptive efficacy and tolerance to morphine and fentanyl microinjected into the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (vlPAG). MOPr agonist efficacy was evaluated by microinjecting the irreversible opioid receptor antagonist β-funaltrexamine hydrochloride (β-FNA) into the vlPAG prior to a dose-response analysis of morphine and fentanyl antinociception. In contrast to systemic administration of morphine and fentanyl, microinjection of these drugs into the vlPAG had similar efficacy as measured by similar reductions in maximal antinociception following β-FNA administration. Analysis of tolerance revealed a rightward shift in the dose-response curve to a single pretreatment with morphine, but not fentanyl. Moreover, the magnitude of tolerance to morphine was comparable following one, four, or eight pretreatments. Tolerance to fentanyl also was evident following four or eight microinjections. These data are surprising in that antinociceptive efficacy appears to vary depending on the site of administration. Moreover, the similar efficacy following microinjection of morphine and fentanyl into the vlPAG was associated with comparable tolerance, with the one exception of no tolerance to acute administration of fentanyl. Perspective These data reveal that antinociceptive tolerance following vlPAG administration of opioids develops rapidly, is evident with both morphine and fentanyl, and the magnitude is relatively consistent regardless of the number of pretreatments. PMID:22766006

  3. First-in-Man Dose-Escalation Study of the Selective BRAF Inhibitor RG7256 in Patients with BRAF V600-Mutated Advanced Solid Tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dienstmann, Rodrigo; Lassen, Ulrik; Cebon, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    V600-mutated advanced solid tumors. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients received RG7256 orally over 8 dose levels from 200 mg once a day (QD) to 2400 mg twice a day (BID) (50-, 100- and 150-mg tablets) using a classic 3 + 3 dose escalation design. RESULTS: In total, 45 patients were enrolled; most (87...... %) had advanced melanoma (94 % BRAF V600E). RG7256 was rapidly absorbed, with limited accumulation and dose-proportional increase in exposure up to 1950 mg BID. The maximal tolerated dose (MTD) was not reached. The most common drug-related adverse events (AEs) were dyspepsia (20 %), dry skin (18 %), rash...

  4. Efficacy and tolerability of high dose "ethinylestradiol" in post-menopausal advanced breast cancer patients heavily pre-treated with endocrine agents

    OpenAIRE

    Agrawal, Amit; Robertson, John FR; Cheung, KL

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background High dose estrogens (HDEs) were frequently used as endocrine agents prior to the introduction of tamoxifen which carries fewer side effects. Due to the development of resistance to available endocrine agents in almost all women with metastatic breast cancer, interest has renewed in the use of HDEs as yet another endocrine option that may have activity. We report our experience with one of the HDEs ("ethinylestradiol" 1 mg daily) in advanced breast cancer (locally advanced ...

  5. Maximize x(a - x)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, L. H.

    1974-01-01

    Five different methods for determining the maximizing condition for x(a - x) are presented. Included is the ancient Greek version and a method attributed to Fermat. None of the proofs use calculus. (LS)

  6. Finding Maximal Quasiperiodicities in Strings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Pedersen, Christian N. S.

    2000-01-01

    of length n in time O(n log n) and space O(n). Our algorithm uses the suffix tree as the fundamental data structure combined with efficient methods for merging and performing multiple searches in search trees. Besides finding all maximal quasiperiodic substrings, our algorithm also marks the nodes......Apostolico and Ehrenfeucht defined the notion of a maximal quasiperiodic substring and gave an algorithm that finds all maximal quasiperiodic substrings in a string of length n in time O(n log2 n). In this paper we give an algorithm that finds all maximal quasiperiodic substrings in a string...... in the suffix tree that have a superprimitive path-label....

  7. Low-dose oral tolerance due to antigen in the diet suppresses differentially the cholera toxin-adjuvantized IgE, IgA and IgG response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Hanne Risager; Kjær, Tanja; Frøkiær, Hanne

    2003-01-01

    Background: Cholera toxin (CT) is used as a mucosal adjuvant amongst other applications for studying food allergy because oral administration of antigen with CT induces an antigen-specific type 2 response, including IgE and IgA production. Priorly established oral tolerance due to antigen...... soy-trypsin inhibitor (KSTI) (F0 mice) and mice fed a soy-free diet (F2 mice) were orally immunized with KSTI and CT. KSTI-specific serum IgG1, IgG2a, IgA and IgE and fecal IgA were monitored. KSTI-stimulated cell proliferation and interleukin (IL)-6 production were determined. Results: The anti...... immunizations. However, cell proliferation and IL-6 production were clearly suppressed even after five immunizations. Conclusions: Priorly established low-dose oral tolerance considerably suppressed the CT-adjuvantized KSTI-specific IgE, IgA and cellular immune response but only weakly and transiently the Ig...

  8. On the maximal diphoton width

    CERN Document Server

    Salvio, Alberto; Strumia, Alessandro; Urbano, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by the 750 GeV diphoton excess found at LHC, we compute the maximal width into $\\gamma\\gamma$ that a neutral scalar can acquire through a loop of charged fermions or scalars as function of the maximal scale at which the theory holds, taking into account vacuum (meta)stability bounds. We show how an extra gauge symmetry can qualitatively weaken such bounds, and explore collider probes and connections with Dark Matter.

  9. On dose distribution comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Steve B; Sharp, Greg C; Neicu, Toni; Berbeco, Ross I; Flampouri, Stella; Bortfeld, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    In radiotherapy practice, one often needs to compare two dose distributions. Especially with the wide clinical implementation of intensity-modulated radiation therapy, software tools for quantitative dose (or fluence) distribution comparison are required for patient-specific quality assurance. Dose distribution comparison is not a trivial task since it has to be performed in both dose and spatial domains in order to be clinically relevant. Each of the existing comparison methods has its own strengths and weaknesses and there is room for improvement. In this work, we developed a general framework for comparing dose distributions. Using a new concept called maximum allowed dose difference (MADD), the comparison in both dose and spatial domains can be performed entirely in the dose domain. Formulae for calculating MADD values for various comparison methods, such as composite analysis and gamma index, have been derived. For convenience in clinical practice, a new measure called normalized dose difference (NDD) has also been proposed, which is the dose difference at a point scaled by the ratio of MADD to the predetermined dose acceptance tolerance. Unlike the simple dose difference test, NDD works in both low and high dose gradient regions because it considers both dose and spatial acceptance tolerances through MADD. The new method has been applied to a test case and a clinical example. It was found that the new method combines the merits of the existing methods (accurate, simple, clinically intuitive and insensitive to dose grid size) and can easily be implemented into any dose/intensity comparison tool

  10. Maximization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Garmroodi Asil

    2017-09-01

    To further reduce the sulfur dioxide emission of the entire refining process, two scenarios of acid gas or air preheats are investigated when either of them is used simultaneously with the third enrichment scheme. The maximum overall sulfur recovery efficiency and highest combustion chamber temperature is slightly higher for acid gas preheats but air preheat is more favorable because it is more benign. To the best of our knowledge, optimization of the entire GTU + enrichment section and SRU processes has not been addressed previously.

  11. Om tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huggler, Jørgen

    2007-01-01

    Begrebet tolerance og dets betydninger diskuteres med henblik på en tydeliggørelse af begrebets forbindelse med stat, religion, ytringsfrihed, skeptisk erkendelsesteori, antropologi og pædagogik.......Begrebet tolerance og dets betydninger diskuteres med henblik på en tydeliggørelse af begrebets forbindelse med stat, religion, ytringsfrihed, skeptisk erkendelsesteori, antropologi og pædagogik....

  12. Postoperative irradiation of carcinoma of the head of the pancreas area: Short-time tolerance and results to precision high-dose technique in 18 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, T.D.; Bugat, R.; Combes, P.F.

    1982-01-01

    During the period from January 1977-August 1979, 18 patients with biopsy-proven pancreas duct or ampullary adenocarcinoma with no distant or liver metastases underwent external beam radiation therapy following laparotomy. With the use of a 25 MEV photon beam and a four field ''box'' technique, the dose delivered to the target volume identified with radio-opaque clips at laparotomy was 6000 rad in six weeks, while largely sparing the spinal cord, kidney, liver and gut. All patients subjected to low fat, gluten free diet completed treatment as planned without any acute reaction. Three patients developed delayed pancreatic insufficiency. According to actuarial survival analysis and low morbidity such an approach may lead to increased survival in patients with pancreatic cancer

  13. Efficacy and tolerability of high dose "ethinylestradiol" in post-menopausal advanced breast cancer patients heavily pre-treated with endocrine agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Amit; Robertson, John F R; Cheung, K L

    2006-07-11

    High dose estrogens (HDEs) were frequently used as endocrine agents prior to the introduction of tamoxifen which carries fewer side effects. Due to the development of resistance to available endocrine agents in almost all women with metastatic breast cancer, interest has renewed in the use of HDEs as yet another endocrine option that may have activity. We report our experience with one of the HDEs ("ethinylestradiol" 1 mg daily) in advanced breast cancer (locally advanced and metastatic) in post-menopausal women who had progressed on multiple endocrine agents. According to a database of advanced breast cancer patients seen in our Unit since 1998, those who had complete set of information and fulfilled the following criteria were studied: (1) patients in whom further endocrine therapy was deemed appropriate i.e., patients who have had clinical benefit with previous endocrine agents or were not fit or unwilling to receive chemotherapy in the presence of potentially life-threatening visceral metastases; (2) disease was assessable by UICC criteria; (3) were treated with "ethinylestradiol" until they were withdrawn from treatment due to adverse events or disease progression. Twelve patients with a median age of 75.1 years (49.1-85 years) were identified. Majority (N = 8) had bony disease. They had ethinylestradiol as 3rd to 7th line endocrine therapy. One patient (8%) came off treatment early due to hepato-renal syndrome. Clinical benefit (objective response or durable stable disease for > or = 6 months) was seen in 4 patients (33.3%) with a median duration of response of 10+ (7-36) months. The time to treatment failure was 4 (0.5-36) months. Yet unreported, high dose "ethinylestradiol" is another viable therapeutic strategy in heavily pre-treated patients when further endocrine therapy is deemed appropriate. Although it tends to carry more side effects, they may not be comparable to those of other HDEs (such as diethylstilbestrol) or chemotherapy.

  14. Maximizing Entropy over Markov Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biondi, Fabrizio; Legay, Axel; Nielsen, Bo Friis

    2013-01-01

    The channel capacity of a deterministic system with confidential data is an upper bound on the amount of bits of data an attacker can learn from the system. We encode all possible attacks to a system using a probabilistic specification, an Interval Markov Chain. Then the channel capacity...... as a reward function, a polynomial algorithm to verify the existence of an system maximizing entropy among those respecting a specification, a procedure for the maximization of reward functions over Interval Markov Chains and its application to synthesize an implementation maximizing entropy. We show how...... to use Interval Markov Chains to model abstractions of deterministic systems with confidential data, and use the above results to compute their channel capacity. These results are a foundation for ongoing work on computing channel capacity for abstractions of programs derived from code....

  15. Maximizing entropy over Markov processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biondi, Fabrizio; Legay, Axel; Nielsen, Bo Friis

    2014-01-01

    The channel capacity of a deterministic system with confidential data is an upper bound on the amount of bits of data an attacker can learn from the system. We encode all possible attacks to a system using a probabilistic specification, an Interval Markov Chain. Then the channel capacity...... as a reward function, a polynomial algorithm to verify the existence of a system maximizing entropy among those respecting a specification, a procedure for the maximization of reward functions over Interval Markov Chains and its application to synthesize an implementation maximizing entropy. We show how...... to use Interval Markov Chains to model abstractions of deterministic systems with confidential data, and use the above results to compute their channel capacity. These results are a foundation for ongoing work on computing channel capacity for abstractions of programs derived from code. © 2014 Elsevier...

  16. Efficacy and tolerability of high dose "ethinylestradiol" in post-menopausal advanced breast cancer patients heavily pre-treated with endocrine agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robertson John FR

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High dose estrogens (HDEs were frequently used as endocrine agents prior to the introduction of tamoxifen which carries fewer side effects. Due to the development of resistance to available endocrine agents in almost all women with metastatic breast cancer, interest has renewed in the use of HDEs as yet another endocrine option that may have activity. We report our experience with one of the HDEs ("ethinylestradiol" 1 mg daily in advanced breast cancer (locally advanced and metastatic in post-menopausal women who had progressed on multiple endocrine agents. Patients and methods According to a database of advanced breast cancer patients seen in our Unit since 1998, those who had complete set of information and fulfilled the following criteria were studied: (1 patients in whom further endocrine therapy was deemed appropriate i.e., patients who have had clinical benefit with previous endocrine agents or were not fit or unwilling to receive chemotherapy in the presence of potentially life-threatening visceral metastases; (2 disease was assessable by UICC criteria; (3 were treated with "ethinylestradiol" until they were withdrawn from treatment due to adverse events or disease progression. Results Twelve patients with a median age of 75.1 years (49.1 – 85 years were identified. Majority (N = 8 had bony disease. They had ethinylestradiol as 3rd to 7th line endocrine therapy. One patient (8% came off treatment early due to hepato-renal syndrome. Clinical benefit (objective response or durable stable disease for ≥ 6 months was seen in 4 patients (33.3% with a median duration of response of 10+ (7–36 months. The time to treatment failure was 4 (0.5–36 months. Conclusion Yet unreported, high dose "ethinylestradiol" is another viable therapeutic strategy in heavily pre-treated patients when further endocrine therapy is deemed appropriate. Although it tends to carry more side effects, they may not be comparable to those of other

  17. Chamaebatiaria millefolium (Torr.) Maxim.: fernbush

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nancy L. Shaw; Emerenciana G. Hurd

    2008-01-01

    Fernbush - Chamaebatiaria millefolium (Torr.) Maxim. - the only species in its genus, is endemic to the Great Basin, Colorado Plateau, and adjacent areas of the western United States. It is an upright, generally multistemmed, sweetly aromatic shrub 0.3 to 2 m tall. Bark of young branches is brown and becomes smooth and gray with age. Leaves are leathery, alternate,...

  18. Multiple dose study of the combined radiosensitizers Ro 03-8799 (pimonidazole) and SR 2508 (etanidazole)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bleehen, N.M.; Newman, H.F.; Maughan, T.S.; Workman, P.

    1989-01-01

    The hypoxic cell radiosensitizers Ro 03-8799 and SR 2508 have different clinical toxicities. The former produces an acute but transient central nervous system syndrome, whereas the latter produces cumulative peripheral neuropathy. Following single dose studies, an escalating multiple dose schedule using both drugs in combination showed no unexpected adverse reactions at lower doses. This study identifies the clinical tolerance and pharmacokinetics when doses in the region of the maximal tolerated dose are given to 26 patients receiving infusions of 0.75 g/m2 Ro 03-8799 and 2 g/m2 SR 2508 three times per week. At 15 doses, 3/4 patients experienced WHO grade 2 peripheral neuropathy, whereas at 12 doses 1/9 developed grade 2 and 6/9 developed grade 1 neuropathies. This represents a lower dose of SR 2508 than can be given alone suggesting that some interaction between the two drugs does exist in terms of chronic peripheral neurotoxicity. Pharmacokinetic studies show no adverse interactions between the two drugs and minimal inter-patient variation. From bivariate analysis, cumulative AUC for Ro 03-8799 has the most significant correlation with the development of peripheral neuropathy. Tumor drug concentrations normalized to the administered dose show mean values of 34 micrograms/g Ro 03-8799 and 76 micrograms/g SR 2508 30 minutes after infusion. These could be expected to produce a single dose sensitizer enhancement ratio of 1.5. The combination of the two sensitizers at the maximum tolerable dose may be expected to give an increased therapeutic efficacy over either drug alone

  19. Optimizing bevacizumab dosing in glioblastoma: less is more.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajlan, Abdulrazag; Thomas, Piia; Albakr, Abdulrahman; Nagpal, Seema; Recht, Lawrence

    2017-10-01

    Compared to traditional chemotherapies, where dose limiting toxicities represent the maximum possible dose, monoclonal antibody therapies are used at doses well below maximum tolerated dose. However, there has been little effort to ascertain whether there is a submaximal dose at which the efficacy/complication ratio is maximized. Thus, despite the general practice of using Bevacizumab (BEV) at dosages of 10 mg/kg every other week for glioma patients, there has not been much prior work examining whether the relatively high complication rates reported with this agent can be decreased by lowering the dose without impairing efficacy. We assessed charts from 80 patients who received BEV for glioblastoma to survey the incidence of complications relative to BEV dose. All patients were treated with standard upfront chemoradiation. The toxicity was graded based on the NCI CTCAE, version 4.03. The rate of BEV serious related adverse events was 12.5% (n = 10/80). There were no serious adverse events (≥grade 3) when the administered dose was (<3 mg/kg/week), compared to a 21% incidence in those who received higher doses (≥3 mg/kg/week) (P < 0.01). Importantly, the three patient deaths attributable to BEV administration occurred in patients receiving higher doses. Patients who received lower doses also had a better survival rate, although this did not reach statistical significance [median OS 39 for low dose group vs. 17.3 for high dose group (P = 0.07)]. Lower rates of serious BEV related toxicities are noted when lower dosages are used without diminishing positive clinical impact. Further work aimed at optimizing BEV dosage is justified.

  20. Towards Tolerance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lisette Kuyper; Jurjen Iedema; Saskia Keuzenkamp

    2013-01-01

    Across Europe, public attitudes towards lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) individuals range from broad tolerance to widespread rejection. Attitudes towards homosexuality are more than mere individual opinions, but form part of the social and political structures which foster or hinder the equality

  1. Intolerant tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khushf, G

    1994-04-01

    The Hyde Amendment and Roman Catholic attempts to put restrictions on Title X funding have been criticized for being intolerant. However, such criticism fails to appreciate that there are two competing notions of tolerance, one focusing on the limits of state force and accepting pluralism as unavoidable, and the other focusing on the limits of knowledge and advancing pluralism as a good. These two types of tolerance, illustrated in the writings of John Locke and J.S. Mill, each involve an intolerance. In a pluralistic context where the free exercise of religion is respected, John Locke's account of tolerance is preferable. However, it (in a reconstructed form) leads to a minimal state. Positive entitlements to benefits like artificial contraception or nontherapeutic abortions can legitimately be resisted, because an intolerance has already been shown with respect to those that consider the benefit immoral, since their resources have been coopted by taxation to advance an end that is contrary to their own. There is a sliding scale from tolerance (viewed as forbearance) to the affirmation of communal integrity, and this scale maps on to the continuum from negative to positive rights.

  2. Treatment of advanced pancreatic carcinoma with 90Y-Clivatuzumab Tetraxetan: a phase I single-dose escalation trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulec, Seza A; Cohen, Steven J; Pennington, Kenneth L; Zuckier, Lionel S; Hauke, Ralph J; Horne, Heather; Wegener, William A; Teoh, Nick; Gold, David V; Sharkey, Robert M; Goldenberg, David M

    2011-06-15

    Humanized antibody hPAM4 specifically binds a mucin glycoprotein expressed in pancreatic adenocarcinomas. This phase I study evaluated a single dose of (90)Y-clivatuzumab tetraxetan ((90)Y-labeled hPAM4) in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. Twenty-one patients (4 stage III; 17 stage IV) received (111)In-hPAM4 for imaging and serum sampling before (90)Y-hPAM4. Study procedures evaluated adverse events, safety laboratories, computed tomography (CT) scans, biomarkers, pharmacokinetics, radiation dosimetry, and immunogenicity (HAHA). (111)In-hPAM4 showed normal biodistribution with radiation dose estimates to red marrow and solid organs acceptable for radioimmunotherapy and with tumor targeting in 12 patients. One patient withdrew before (90)Y-hPAM4; otherwise, 20 patients received (90)Y doses of 15 (n = 7), 20 (n = 9), and 25 mCi/m(2) (n = 4). Treatment was well tolerated; the only significant drug-related toxicities were (NCI CTC v.3) grade 3 to 4 neutropenia and thrombocytopenia increasing with (90)Y dose. There were no bleeding events or serious infections, and most cytopenias recovered to grade 1 within 12 weeks. Three patients at 25 mCi/m(2) encountered dose-limiting toxicity with grade 4 cytopenias more than 7 days, establishing 20 mCi/m(2) as the maximal tolerated (90)Y dose. Two patients developed HAHA of uncertain clinical significance. Most patients progressed rapidly and with CA19-9 levels increasing within 1 month of therapy, but 7 remained progression-free by CT for 1.5 to 5.6 months, including 3 achieving transient partial responses (32%-52% tumor diameter shrinkage). (90)Y-Clivatuzumab tetraxetan was well tolerated with manageable hematologic toxicity at the maximal tolerated (90)Y dose, and is a potential new therapeutic for advanced pancreatic cancer. ©2011 AACR.

  3. Phase 2, Randomized, Double-Blind, Dose-Ranging Study Evaluating the Safety, Tolerability, Population Pharmacokinetics, and Efficacy of Oral Torezolid Phosphate in Patients with Complicated Skin and Skin Structure Infections▿ † ‡

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokocimer, P.; Bien, P.; Surber, J.; Mehra, P.; DeAnda, C.; Bulitta, J. B.; Corey, G. R.

    2011-01-01

    Torezolid (TR-700) is the active moiety of the prodrug torezolid phosphate ([TP] TR-701), a second-generation oxazolidinone with 4- to 16-fold greater potency than linezolid against Gram-positive species including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). A double-blind phase 2 study evaluated three levels (200, 300, or 400 mg) of oral, once-daily TP over 5 to 7 days for complicated skin and skin structure infections (cSSSI). Patients 18 to 75 years old with cSSSI caused by suspected or confirmed Gram-positive pathogens were randomized 1:1:1. Of 188 treated patients, 76.6% had abscesses, 17.6% had extensive cellulitis, and 5.9% had wound infections. S. aureus, the most common pathogen, was isolated in 90.3% of patients (139/154) with a baseline pathogen; 80.6% were MRSA. Cure rates in clinically evaluable patients were 98.2% at 200 mg, 94.4% at 300 mg, and 94.4% at 400 mg. Cure rates were consistent across diagnoses, regardless of lesion size or the presence of systemic signs of infection. Clinical cure rates in patients with S. aureus isolated at baseline were 96.6% overall and 96.8% for MRSA. TP was safe and well tolerated at all dose levels. No patients discontinued treatment due to an adverse event. Three-stage hierarchical population pharmacokinetic modeling yielded a geometric mean clearance of 8.28 liters/h (between-patient variability, 32.3%), a volume of the central compartment of 71.4 liters (24.0%), and a volume of the peripheral compartment of 27.9 liters (35.7%). Results of this study show a high degree of efficacy at all three dose levels without significant differences in the safety profile and support the continued evaluation of TP for the treatment of cSSSI in phase 3 trials. PMID:21115795

  4. IMNN: Information Maximizing Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnock, Tom; Lavaux, Guilhem; Wandelt, Benjamin D.

    2018-04-01

    This software trains artificial neural networks to find non-linear functionals of data that maximize Fisher information: information maximizing neural networks (IMNNs). As compressing large data sets vastly simplifies both frequentist and Bayesian inference, important information may be inadvertently missed. Likelihood-free inference based on automatically derived IMNN summaries produces summaries that are good approximations to sufficient statistics. IMNNs are robustly capable of automatically finding optimal, non-linear summaries of the data even in cases where linear compression fails: inferring the variance of Gaussian signal in the presence of noise, inferring cosmological parameters from mock simulations of the Lyman-α forest in quasar spectra, and inferring frequency-domain parameters from LISA-like detections of gravitational waveforms. In this final case, the IMNN summary outperforms linear data compression by avoiding the introduction of spurious likelihood maxima.

  5. Is the β phase maximal?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrandis, Javier

    2005-01-01

    The current experimental determination of the absolute values of the CKM elements indicates that 2 vertical bar V ub /V cb V us vertical bar =(1-z), with z given by z=0.19+/-0.14. This fact implies that irrespective of the form of the quark Yukawa matrices, the measured value of the SM CP phase β is approximately the maximum allowed by the measured absolute values of the CKM elements. This is β=(π/6-z/3) for γ=(π/3+z/3), which implies α=π/2. Alternatively, assuming that β is exactly maximal and using the experimental measurement sin(2β)=0.726+/-0.037, the phase γ is predicted to be γ=(π/2-β)=66.3 o +/-1.7 o . The maximality of β, if confirmed by near-future experiments, may give us some clues as to the origin of CP violation

  6. Strategy to maximize maintenance operation

    OpenAIRE

    Espinoza, Michael

    2005-01-01

    This project presents a strategic analysis to maximize maintenance operations in Alcan Kitimat Works in British Columbia. The project studies the role of maintenance in improving its overall maintenance performance. It provides strategic alternatives and specific recommendations addressing Kitimat Works key strategic issues and problems. A comprehensive industry and competitive analysis identifies the industry structure and its competitive forces. In the mature aluminium industry, the bargain...

  7. Scalable Nonlinear AUC Maximization Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Khalid, Majdi; Ray, Indrakshi; Chitsaz, Hamidreza

    2017-01-01

    The area under the ROC curve (AUC) is a measure of interest in various machine learning and data mining applications. It has been widely used to evaluate classification performance on heavily imbalanced data. The kernelized AUC maximization machines have established a superior generalization ability compared to linear AUC machines because of their capability in modeling the complex nonlinear structure underlying most real world-data. However, the high training complexity renders the kernelize...

  8. Results of the Phase I Dose-Escalating Study of Motexafin Gadolinium With Standard Radiotherapy in Patients With Glioblastoma Multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, Judith M.; Seiferheld, Wendy; Alger, Jeffrey R.; Wu, Genevieve; Endicott, Thyra J.; Mehta, Minesh; Curran, Walter; Phan, See-Chun

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Motexafin gadolinium (MGd) is a putative radiation enhancer initially evaluated in patients with brain metastases. This Phase I trial studied the safety and tolerability of a 2-6-week course (10-22 doses) of MGd with radiotherapy for glioblastoma multiforme. Methods and Materials: A total of 33 glioblastoma multiforme patients received one of seven MGd regimens starting at 10 doses of 4 mg/kg/d MGd and escalating to 22 doses of 5.3 mg/kg/d MGd (5 or 10 daily doses then three times per week). The National Cancer Institute Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program toxicity and stopping rules were applied. Results: The maximal tolerated dose was 5.0 mg/kg/d MGd (5 d/wk for 2 weeks, then three times per week) for 22 doses. The dose-limiting toxicity was reversible transaminase elevation. Adverse reactions included rash/pruritus (45%), chills/fever (30%), and self-limiting vesiculobullous rash of the thumb and fingers (42%). The median survival of 17.6 months prompted a case-matched analysis. In the case-matched analysis, the MGd patients had a median survival of 16.1 months (n = 31) compared with the matched Radiation Therapy Oncology Group database patients with a median survival of 11.8 months (hazard ratio, 0.43; 95% confidence interval, 0.20-0.94). Conclusion: The maximal tolerated dose of MGd with radiotherapy for glioblastoma multiforme in this study was 5 mg/kg/d for 22 doses (daily for 2 weeks, then three times weekly). The baseline survival calculations suggest progression to Phase II trials is appropriate, with the addition of MGd to radiotherapy with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide

  9. A prospective, parallel group, open-labeled, comparative, multi-centric, active controlled study to evaluate the safety, tolerability and benefits of fixed dose combination of acarbose and metformin versus metformin alone in type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaram, S; Hariharan, R S; Madhavan, R; Periyandavar, I; Samra, S S

    2010-11-01

    The present study was a prospective, parallel group, open-labeled, comparative, multicentric, active controlled study to evaluate the safety, tolerability and benefits of fixed dose combination of acarbose and metformin versus metformin alone in type 2 diabetic patients. A total of 229 patients with type 2 diabetes were enrolled at 5 medical centers across India. They received either acarbose (50 mg) + metformin (500 mg) bid/tid (n=115) or metformin monotherapy (500 mg) bid/ tid (n=114) for 12 weeks. Primary objective was to evaluate safety and tolerability based on the adverse events reported. Secondary objective was efficacy assessment based on changes in fasting, post prandial blood glucose and HbA1c values. In the acarbose + metformin group 10 patients reported 14 adverse events while in metformin group 9 patients reported 10 adverse events. No patient reported any serious adverse event or was withdraw from study because of adverse events. In the acarbose plus metformin group fasting blood glucose (FBG) decreased from a baseline of 158.85 +/- 18.14 mg/dl to 113.55 +/- 19.38 mg/dl (p fasting blood glucose decreased from a baseline of 158.31 +/- 26.53 mg/dl to 130.55 +/- 28.31 mg/dl (p < 0.0001) (decrease of 27.76 +/- 22.91 mg/dl) at 12 weeks. In the acarbose plus metformin group postprandial blood glucose (PPBG) decreased from a baseline of 264.65 +/- 34.03 mg/dl to 173.22 +/- 31.40 mg/dl (p < 0.0001) (decrease of 91.43 +/- 28.65 mg/dl) at 12 weeks, while in the metformin group PPBG decreased from a baseline of 253.56 +/- 36.28 mg/dl to 205.36 +/- 39.49 mg/dl (p < 0.0001) (decrease of 48.20 +/- 32.72 mg/dl) at 12 weeks. In the acarbose plus metformin group glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) decreased from a baseline of 9.47 +/- 0.69% to 7.71 +/- 0.85% (p < 0.0001) (% decrease of 1.76 +/- 1.11) at 12 weeks, while in the metformin group HbAlc decreased from a baseline of 9.32 +/- 0.65% to 8.26 +/- 0.68% (p < 0.0001) (% decrease of 1.06 +/- 0.66) at 12 weeks. The

  10. Effect of single oral doses of sitagliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor, on incretin and plasma glucose levels after an oral glucose tolerance test in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herman, Gary A; Bergman, Arthur; Stevens, Catherine

    2006-01-01

    CONTEXT: In response to a meal, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) are released and modulate glycemic control. Normally these incretins are rapidly degraded by dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4). DPP-4 inhibitors are a novel class of oral antihyperglyce......CONTEXT: In response to a meal, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) are released and modulate glycemic control. Normally these incretins are rapidly degraded by dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4). DPP-4 inhibitors are a novel class of oral...... antihyperglycemic agents in development for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. The degree of DPP-4 inhibition and the level of active incretin augmentation required for glucose lowering efficacy after an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) were evaluated. OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to examine...... concentrations; and sitagliptin pharmacokinetics. RESULTS: Sitagliptin dose-dependently inhibited plasma DPP-4 activity over 24 h, enhanced active GLP-1 and GIP levels, increased insulin/C-peptide, decreased glucagon, and reduced glycemic excursion after OGTTs administered at 2 and 24 h after single oral 25...

  11. Reirradiation tolerance of the rat heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wondergem, Jan; Ravels, Frank J.M. van; Reijnart, Ivonne W.C.; Strootman, Erwin G.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the influence of reirradiation on the tolerance of the heart after a previous irradiation treatment. Methods and Materials: Female Wistar rats were locally irradiated to the thorax. Development of cardiac function loss was studied with the ex vivo working rat heart preparation. To compare the retreatment experiments, initial, and reirradiation doses were expressed as the percentage of the extrapolated tolerance dose (ETD). Results: Local heart irradiation with a single dose led to a dose-dependent and progressive decrease in cardiac function. The progressive nature of irradiation-induced heart disease is shown to affect the outcome of the retreatment, depending on both the time interval between subsequent doses and the size of the initial dose. The present data demonstrate that hearts are capable of repairing a large part of the initial dose of 10 Gy within the first 24 h. However, once biological damage as a result of the first treatment is fixed, the heart does not show any long-term recovery. At intervals up to 6 months between an initial treatment with 10 Gy and subsequent reirradiation, the reirradiation tolerance dose slightly decreased from 74% of the ETD ref (at 24-h interval) to 68% of the ETD ref (at 6-month interval). Between 6 and 9 months, reirradiation tolerance dose dropped more even to 43% of the ETD ref . Treatment of the heart with an initial dose of 17.5 Gy, instead of 10 Gy, 6 months prior to reirradiation, also led to a further decrease of the reirradiation tolerance dose ( ref ). Conclusions: The outcome of the present study shows a decreased tolerance of the heart to reirradiation at long time intervals (interval > 6 months). This has clinical implications for the estimation of reirradiation tolerance in patients whose mediastinum has to be reirradiated a long time after a first irradiation course

  12. FLOUTING MAXIMS IN INDONESIA LAWAK KLUB CONVERSATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmawati Sukmaningrum

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to identify the types of maxims flouted in the conversation in famous comedy show, Indonesia Lawak Club. Likewise, it also tries to reveal the speakers‘ intention of flouting the maxim in the conversation during the show. The writers use descriptive qualitative method in conducting this research. The data is taken from the dialogue of Indonesia Lawak club and then analyzed based on Grice‘s cooperative principles. The researchers read the dialogue‘s transcripts, identify the maxims, and interpret the data to find the speakers‘ intention for flouting the maxims in the communication. The results show that there are four types of maxims flouted in the dialogue. Those are maxim of quality (23%, maxim of quantity (11%, maxim of manner (31%, and maxim of relevance (35. Flouting the maxims in the conversations is intended to make the speakers feel uncomfortable with the conversation, show arrogances, show disagreement or agreement, and ridicule other speakers.

  13. Salt Tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Xiong, Liming; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2002-01-01

    Studying salt stress is an important means to the understanding of plant ion homeostasis and osmo-balance. Salt stress research also benefits agriculture because soil salinity significantly limits plant productivity on agricultural lands. Decades of physiological and molecular studies have generated a large body of literature regarding potential salt tolerance determinants. Recent advances in applying molecular genetic analysis and genomics tools in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana are sh...

  14. 78 FR 46267 - Trifluralin; Pesticide Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-31

    ...), trifluralin was tested up to the limit dose (1000 mg/kg/day) and caused no systemic toxicity. Handler exposure... detection (ECD)) is available to enforce the tolerance expression. The method may be requested from: Chief...

  15. 78 FR 60715 - Sedaxane; Pesticide Tolerances

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-02

    ... 28-day dermal study did not show systemic toxicity at the limit dose of 1,000 milligrams/kilogram/day... Enforcement Methodology Adequate enforcement methodology is available to enforce the tolerance expression. A...

  16. Avaliação da tolerabilidade e do controle de ciclo de dois contraceptivos orais de baixa dose: estudo comparativo aberto Assessment of the tolerability and cycle control of two low-dose oral contraceptives: an open-label study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmund C. Baracat

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Realizou-se um estudo aberto comparativo em nove centros brasileiros para avaliar a tolerabilidade e o controle de ciclo obtido com o uso de dois contraceptivos orais de baixa dose contendo 20 mg etinilestradiol/75 mg gestodeno e 20 mg etinilestradiol/150 mg desogestrel, durante seis ciclos de tratamento. Foram selecionadas 167 mulheres saudáveis com vida sexual ativa (77 no grupo do gestodeno e 90 no grupo do desogestrel, das quais 138 completaram os seis ciclos de tratamento. Em um subgrupo de novas usuárias realizou-se também perfil lipídico e hemostático. Foram avaliados 867 ciclos no total. Ocorreu sangramento irregular em 4,6% dos ciclos com gestodeno e em 8,1% com desogestrel. A tolerabilidade a ambas preparações foi boa, mas houve significativamente mais náusea no grupo do desogestrel. O controle de ciclo foi bom com os dois contraceptivos, sendo que houve freqüência significativamente menor de sangramento irregular no grupo do gestodeno quando se leva em conta que todos os ciclos foram considerados. Não houve alterações clinicamente significativas no perfil hemostático. O perfil lipídico mostrou tendência a tornar-se mais favorável após seis ciclos de tratamento com as duas preparações. Não ocorreu alteração no peso médio das mulheres no grupo do gestodeno; no grupo do desogestrel houve aumento significativo no peso médio de aproximadamente 1 kg após seis meses de tratamento. A adesão ao tratamento foi boa com as duas preparações. Os resultados deste estudo mostram que preparações contendo baixa dose de gestodeno ou desogestrel associados a 20 mg de etinilestradiol são contraceptivos bem tolerados que permitem bom controle de ciclo, sem efeitos colaterais significantes.An open-label comparative study was conducted in nine centers in Brazil to evaluate the tolerability and cycle control of two low-dose oral contraceptives containing 20 mg ethynylestradiol/75 mg gestodene and 20 mg ethynylestradiol/150 mg

  17. Maximal Abelian sets of roots

    CERN Document Server

    Lawther, R

    2018-01-01

    In this work the author lets \\Phi be an irreducible root system, with Coxeter group W. He considers subsets of \\Phi which are abelian, meaning that no two roots in the set have sum in \\Phi \\cup \\{ 0 \\}. He classifies all maximal abelian sets (i.e., abelian sets properly contained in no other) up to the action of W: for each W-orbit of maximal abelian sets we provide an explicit representative X, identify the (setwise) stabilizer W_X of X in W, and decompose X into W_X-orbits. Abelian sets of roots are closely related to abelian unipotent subgroups of simple algebraic groups, and thus to abelian p-subgroups of finite groups of Lie type over fields of characteristic p. Parts of the work presented here have been used to confirm the p-rank of E_8(p^n), and (somewhat unexpectedly) to obtain for the first time the 2-ranks of the Monster and Baby Monster sporadic groups, together with the double cover of the latter. Root systems of classical type are dealt with quickly here; the vast majority of the present work con...

  18. Zinc dosing and glucose tolerance in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenley, S.; Taylor, M.

    1986-01-01

    Animal data suggest the existence of a physiologic relationship between glucoregulatory hormones and zinc metabolism. In order to investigate this proposed relationship in humans, they examined the effect of moderately elevated plasma zinc levels on blood glucose clearance. Eight women (24-37 yrs) served as subjects for the study. Fasted volunteers were tested under two experimental conditions (a) ingestion of 50 g D-glucose (b) ingestion of 25 mg zinc followed 60 min later by ingestion of 50 g D-glucose. Five ml venous blood was drawn into trace-metal-free, fluoride-containing vacutainer tubes prior to and 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 min after glucose ingestion. Plasma was analyzed for glucose and zinc; glycemic responses were quantified by computing areas under the curves and times to peak concentration. Their human data indicate varied glycemic responses to the acute elevation of plasma zinc: 4 subjects showed little apparent effect; 3 subjects marginally increased either the area under the curve or time to peak and 1 subject (classified as suspect diabetic in the non-zinc condition) showed marked improvement in glycemic response following zinc ingestion. Their preliminary results suggest that blood glucose clearance may be affected in some individuals by the acute elevation of plasma zinc

  19. Infectious Tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Jonuleit, Helmut; Schmitt, Edgar; Kakirman, Hacer; Stassen, Michael; Knop, Jürgen; Enk, Alexander H.

    2002-01-01

    Regulatory CD4+CD25+ T cells (Treg) are mandatory for maintaining immunologic self-tolerance. We demonstrate that the cell-cell contact–mediated suppression of conventional CD4+ T cells by human CD25+ Treg cells is fixation resistant, independent from membrane-bound TGF-β but requires activation and protein synthesis of CD25+ Treg cells. Coactivation of CD25+ Treg cells with Treg cell–depleted CD4+ T cells results in anergized CD4+ T cells that in turn inhibit the activation of conventional, ...

  20. Evaluation of the clinical maxim: "If it ain't broke, don't fix it".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell-Duffy, Chris; Hrynchak, Patricia K; Irving, Elizabeth L; Mouat, Graham S V; Elliott, David B

    2012-01-01

    A significant number of patients return to optometric practice dissatisfied with their spectacles. An important question is whether any of these cases are preventable. There are several different clinical maxims that are used to modify the subjective refraction when determining the refractive prescription. These maxims aim to improve patient comfort and adaptation and thereby reduce patient dissatisfaction with new spectacles. They are not based on research evidence, but rather on expert opinion gained from clinical experience. The aim of this study was to retrospectively analyze a large number of case records of dissatisfied patients to assess the possible usefulness of the prescribing maxim "if it ain't broke, don't fix it." Three hundred eighteen non-tolerance cases from a university-based Canadian optometric clinic were categorized by a focus group of optometrists. Three prescribing categories were defined and comprised cases in which application of the proposed maxim may have prevented the recheck eye examination; a more limited application of the maxim for one working distance may have been appropriate; and finally scenarios in which the maxim did not work in that the practitioner was judged to have initially followed the maxim, yet patient dissatisfaction was still reported. The remaining unallocated records comprised prescribing situations outside the scope of this study. Approximately 32% of non-tolerance cases were judged to have been preventable by use of the proposed maxim. Furthermore, an additional 10% reduction in recheck cases may have been possible by a more liberal interpretation of the maxim. Conversely, 4% of cases were deemed to comprise scenarios in which the maxim was followed yet the patient returned later to report problems with their spectacles. The prescribing maxim "if it ain't broke, don't fix it" appears to have a role in reducing recheck eye examinations and improving patient satisfaction with new spectacles.

  1. Adherence to Treatment, Safety, Tolerance, and Effectiveness of Perindopril/Amlodipine Fixed-Dose Combination in Greek Patients with Hypertension and Stable Coronary Artery Disease: A Pan-Hellenic Prospective Observational Study of Daily Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liakos, Charalampos I; Papadopoulos, Dimitrios P; Kotsis, Vasilios T

    2017-10-01

    Initiation of antihypertensive therapy with a two-drug fixed-dose combination (FDC) in a single tablet may be recommended in patients at high risk of cardiovascular events to improve adherence and effectiveness. Preferred combinations include an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor with a dihydropyridine calcium antagonist. This study assessed adherence to and the safety, tolerance, and effectiveness of the perindopril/amlodipine FDC in Greek patients with hypertension and stable coronary artery disease (CAD) over a 4-month period. A total of 1907 patients with hypertension and CAD (59.1% males) who had recently (≤2 weeks) commenced treatment with the perindopril/amlodipine FDC (5/5, 5/10, 10/5, or 10/10 mg) were studied at baseline and at 1 and 4 months. Adherence to treatment was assessed with the Morisky Medication-taking Adherence Scale (MMAS). Seven patients (0.4%) did not attend the scheduled visits. In total, 1607 (84.6%) patients received a constant treatment dose throughout the study. High adherence (MMAS score = 0) was reported by 1592 (83.6%), 1628 (85.7%), and 1477 (77.7%) patients at the second and the third visit and at both visits, respectively. Adverse reactions were reported by only 13 (0.7%) patients, were all minor, and did not result in treatment discontinuation. Office blood pressure (BP) was significantly decreased at the third visit (130.8 ± 8.4/78.2 ± 6.4 mmHg) compared with baseline (156.5 ± 15.0/89.9 ± 9.6 mmHg; p < 0.001), regardless of previous antihypertensive treatment. Patients with grade 1, 2, and 3 hypertension at baseline showed a reduction in BP of 19.3/9.4, 31.5/13.5, and 47.8/22.2 mmHg, respectively (p < 0.001). Uncontrolled hypertension (≥140/90 mmHg) was notably reduced from 90.3% at baseline to 18.5% at the third visit. The perindopril/amlodipine FDC is characterized by high adherence and effectiveness, regardless of previous treatment. Degree of BP reduction was related to baseline BP levels

  2. Maximizing benefits from resource development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skjelbred, B.

    2002-01-01

    The main objectives of Norwegian petroleum policy are to maximize the value creation for the country, develop a national oil and gas industry, and to be at the environmental forefront of long term resource management and coexistence with other industries. The paper presents a graph depicting production and net export of crude oil for countries around the world for 2002. Norway produced 3.41 mill b/d and exported 3.22 mill b/d. Norwegian petroleum policy measures include effective regulation and government ownership, research and technology development, and internationalisation. Research and development has been in five priority areas, including enhanced recovery, environmental protection, deep water recovery, small fields, and the gas value chain. The benefits of internationalisation includes capitalizing on Norwegian competency, exploiting emerging markets and the assurance of long-term value creation and employment. 5 figs

  3. Maximizing synchronizability of duplex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiang; Emenheiser, Jeffrey; Wu, Xiaoqun; Lu, Jun-an; D'Souza, Raissa M.

    2018-01-01

    We study the synchronizability of duplex networks formed by two randomly generated network layers with different patterns of interlayer node connections. According to the master stability function, we use the smallest nonzero eigenvalue and the eigenratio between the largest and the second smallest eigenvalues of supra-Laplacian matrices to characterize synchronizability on various duplexes. We find that the interlayer linking weight and linking fraction have a profound impact on synchronizability of duplex networks. The increasingly large inter-layer coupling weight is found to cause either decreasing or constant synchronizability for different classes of network dynamics. In addition, negative node degree correlation across interlayer links outperforms positive degree correlation when most interlayer links are present. The reverse is true when a few interlayer links are present. The numerical results and understanding based on these representative duplex networks are illustrative and instructive for building insights into maximizing synchronizability of more realistic multiplex networks.

  4. Infectious Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonuleit, Helmut; Schmitt, Edgar; Kakirman, Hacer; Stassen, Michael; Knop, Jürgen; Enk, Alexander H.

    2002-01-01

    Regulatory CD4+CD25+ T cells (Treg) are mandatory for maintaining immunologic self-tolerance. We demonstrate that the cell-cell contact–mediated suppression of conventional CD4+ T cells by human CD25+ Treg cells is fixation resistant, independent from membrane-bound TGF-β but requires activation and protein synthesis of CD25+ Treg cells. Coactivation of CD25+ Treg cells with Treg cell–depleted CD4+ T cells results in anergized CD4+ T cells that in turn inhibit the activation of conventional, freshly isolated CD4+ T helper (Th) cells. This infectious suppressive activity, transferred from CD25+ Treg cells via cell contact, is cell contact–independent and partially mediated by soluble transforming growth factor (TGF)-β. The induction of suppressive properties in conventional CD4+ Th cells represents a mechanism underlying the phenomenon of infectious tolerance. This explains previously published conflicting data on the role of TGF-β in CD25+ Treg cell–induced immunosuppression. PMID:12119350

  5. Repeated administration of phytocannabinoid Δ(9)-THC or synthetic cannabinoids JWH-018 and JWH-073 induces tolerance to hypothermia but not locomotor suppression in mice, and reduces CB1 receptor expression and function in a brain region-specific manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, S; Hyatt, W S; Gu, C; Franks, L N; Vasiljevik, T; Brents, L K; Prather, P L; Fantegrossi, W E

    2015-12-01

    These studies probed the relationship between intrinsic efficacy and tolerance/cross-tolerance between ∆(9)-THC and synthetic cannabinoid drugs of abuse (SCBs) by examining in vivo effects and cellular changes concomitant with their repeated administration in mice. Dose-effect relationships for hypothermic effects were determined in order to confirm that SCBs JWH-018 and JWH-073 are higher efficacy agonists than ∆(9)-THC in mice. Separate groups of mice were treated with saline, sub-maximal hypothermic doses of JWH-018 or JWH-073 (3.0mg/kg or 10.0mg/kg, respectively) or a maximally hypothermic dose of 30.0mg/kg ∆(9)-THC once per day for 5 consecutive days while core temperature and locomotor activity were monitored via biotelemetry. Repeated administration of all drugs resulted in tolerance to hypothermic effects, but not locomotor effects, and this tolerance was still evident 14 days after the last drug administration. Further studies treated mice with 30.0mg/kg ∆(9)-THC once per day for 4 days, then tested with SCBs on day 5. Mice with a ∆(9)-THC history were cross-tolerant to both SCBs, and this cross-tolerance also persisted 14 days after testing. Select brain regions from chronically treated mice were examined for changes in CB1 receptor expression and function. Expression and function of hypothalamic CB1Rs were reduced in mice receiving chronic drugs, but cortical CB1R expression and function were not altered. Collectively, these data demonstrate that repeated ∆(9)-THC, JWH-018 and JWH-073 can induce long-lasting tolerance to some in vivo effects, which is likely mediated by region-specific downregulation and desensitization of CB1Rs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. VIOLATION OF CONVERSATION MAXIM ON TV ADVERTISEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desak Putu Eka Pratiwi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Maxim is a principle that must be obeyed by all participants textually and interpersonally in order to have a smooth communication process. Conversation maxim is divided into four namely maxim of quality, maxim of quantity, maxim of relevance, and maxim of manner of speaking. Violation of the maxim may occur in a conversation in which the information the speaker has is not delivered well to his speaking partner. Violation of the maxim in a conversation will result in an awkward impression. The example of violation is the given information that is redundant, untrue, irrelevant, or convoluted. Advertisers often deliberately violate the maxim to create unique and controversial advertisements. This study aims to examine the violation of maxims in conversations of TV ads. The source of data in this research is food advertisements aired on TV media. Documentation and observation methods are applied to obtain qualitative data. The theory used in this study is a maxim theory proposed by Grice (1975. The results of the data analysis are presented with informal method. The results of this study show an interesting fact that the violation of maxim in a conversation found in the advertisement exactly makes the advertisements very attractive and have a high value.

  7. Tolerance to and cross tolerance between ethanol and nicotine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, A C; Burch, J B; de Fiebre, C M; Marks, M J

    1988-02-01

    Female DBA mice were subjected to one of four treatments: ethanol-containing or control diets, nicotine (0.2, 1.0, 5.0 mg/kg/hr) infusion or saline infusion. After removal from the liquid diets or cessation of infusion, the animals were challenged with an acute dose of ethanol or nicotine. Chronic ethanol-fed mice were tolerant to the effects of ethanol on body temperature and open field activity and were cross tolerant to the effects of nicotine on body temperature and heart rate. Nicotine infused animals were tolerant to the effects of nicotine on body temperature and rotarod performance and were cross tolerant to the effects of ethanol on body temperature. Ethanol-induced sleep time was decreased in chronic ethanol- but not chronic nicotine-treated mice. Chronic drug treatment did not alter the elimination rate of either drug. Chronic ethanol treatment did not alter the number or affinity of brain nicotinic receptors whereas chronic nicotine treatment elicited an increase in the number of [3H]-nicotine binding sites. Tolerance and cross tolerance between ethanol and nicotine is discussed in terms of potential effects on desensitization of brain nicotinic receptors.

  8. Maximization of bremsstrahlung and K-series production efficiencies in flash x-ray tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krehl, P.

    1986-01-01

    Historically, x-ray output of flash x-ray tubes was maximized empirically by changing the electrode geometry and varying the capacitance of the pulse generator. With the advent of high-voltage, low-impedance transmission lines, short-duration, high-current pulses could be generated with ease. An appropriate line scaling should assure that dose maximization is not reached at the expense of pulse prolongation which would reduce stop motion capability, but rather that dose rate should be maximized. Additionally, anode evaporation in the arc phase should be minimized to enhance tube life

  9. Dose-response relationship in the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weihrauch, T R; Demol, P

    1989-08-01

    Numerous clinical studies have been performed to establish efficacy and safety of drugs in gastroenterological disorders. Only in a few if any of these studies, however, the rationale for the optimal dose and the dose regimens, respectively, have been addressed. Adequate and well-controlled dose finding studies play a key role in the clinical assessment of new drugs and in the evaluation of new indications. Hereby the range from the minimal effective dose to the maximal effective and well tolerated dose can be assessed and thus the optimal dose-range and dosage regimen be determined. Meaningful pharmacodynamic studies can be performed in the gastrointestinal tract also in healthy volunteers provided that a method with a high predictability for the desired therapeutic effect is available such as measurement of gastric acid secretion and its inhibition by a drug. Dose finding studies in gastroenterology can be carried out under two main aspects: First, to assess the pharmacodynamic and therapeutic effect of a compound on the gastrointestinal tract (e.g. anti-ulcer drug). Second, to evaluate the side effects of a drug on the gastrointestinal tract (e.g. gastric mucosal damage by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs). For the evaluation of new drugs in gastrointestinal therapy a number of methods are available which yield accurate and reproducible data. While careful clinical-pharmacological dose-response studies using these methods have been carried out already more than a decade ago, it is surprising that therapeutic dose finding studies have become available only during the past few years. For scientific as well as for ethical reasons more trials which determine the optimal therapeutic dose are warranted.

  10. 75 FR 53586 - Bifenazate; Pesticide Tolerances

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    ... characterized and were seen at dose(s) that produce evidence of overt systemic toxicity. These effects included... system, and these findings may be due to secondary effect of overt systemic toxicity. Further, there is... Adequate enforcement methodology is available to enforce the tolerance expression. High-performance liquid...

  11. Maximizing ROI (return on information)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, B.

    2000-05-01

    The role and importance of managing information are discussed, underscoring the importance by quoting from the report of the International Data Corporation, according to which Fortune 500 companies lost $ 12 billion in 1999 due to inefficiencies resulting from intellectual re-work, substandard performance , and inability to find knowledge resources. The report predicts that this figure will rise to $ 31.5 billion by 2003. Key impediments to implementing knowledge management systems are identified as : the cost and human resources requirement of deployment; inflexibility of historical systems to adapt to change; and the difficulty of achieving corporate acceptance of inflexible software products that require changes in 'normal' ways of doing business. The author recommends the use of model, document and rule-independent systems with a document centered interface (DCI), employing rapid application development (RAD) and object technologies and visual model development, which eliminate these problems, making it possible for companies to maximize their return on information (ROI), and achieve substantial savings in implementation costs.

  12. Maximizing the optical network capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayvel, Polina; Maher, Robert; Xu, Tianhua; Liga, Gabriele; Shevchenko, Nikita A; Lavery, Domaniç; Alvarado, Alex; Killey, Robert I

    2016-03-06

    Most of the digital data transmitted are carried by optical fibres, forming the great part of the national and international communication infrastructure. The information-carrying capacity of these networks has increased vastly over the past decades through the introduction of wavelength division multiplexing, advanced modulation formats, digital signal processing and improved optical fibre and amplifier technology. These developments sparked the communication revolution and the growth of the Internet, and have created an illusion of infinite capacity being available. But as the volume of data continues to increase, is there a limit to the capacity of an optical fibre communication channel? The optical fibre channel is nonlinear, and the intensity-dependent Kerr nonlinearity limit has been suggested as a fundamental limit to optical fibre capacity. Current research is focused on whether this is the case, and on linear and nonlinear techniques, both optical and electronic, to understand, unlock and maximize the capacity of optical communications in the nonlinear regime. This paper describes some of them and discusses future prospects for success in the quest for capacity. © 2016 The Authors.

  13. Dose measurements in mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kainberger, F.; Kallinger, W.

    1977-01-01

    Dose measurements at the mamma during mammography were carried out in the form of direct measurement with thermoluminescent dosimetry. Measurement was done for the in- and outcoming doses at the mamma, the dose exposure of the sternal region and the scattered rays above the symphysis, the latter as parameter for the genetic radiation exposure. As expected, the dose of the smooth radiation used for mammography showed a strong decrease at the outcome point in comparison with the income point. Surprisingly high was the scattered radiation in the sternal region. A corresponding protection by lead plates could be taken into consideration. Extremely low is the scattered radiation above the symphysis. Even measurements with the very sensitive calcium fluoride dosimeters did not reveal any practically important dose in the symphysis region. Most measurement values remained below the determinable dose of 0.3mR. Some maximal values varied in the range of 3-1 mR. (orig.) [de

  14. The Constrained Maximal Expression Level Owing to Haploidy Shapes Gene Content on the Mammalian X Chromosome

    KAUST Repository

    Hurst, Laurence D.; Ghanbarian, Avazeh T.; Forrest, Alistair R. R.; Huminiecki, Lukasz

    2015-01-01

    to the ancestral rate (per promoter) prior to the X chromosome formation, then the X is not a tolerable environment for genes with very high maximal net levels of expression, owing to transcriptional traffic jams. We test this hypothesis using The Encyclopedia

  15. Orchid flowers tolerance to gamma-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Olivia Kimiko

    2000-01-01

    Cut flowers are fresh goods that may be treated with fumigants such as methyl bromide to meet the needs of the quarantine requirements of importing countries. Irradiation is a non-chemical alternative to substitute the methyl bromide treatment of fresh products. In this research, different cut orchids were irradiated to examine their tolerance to gamma-rays. A 200 Gy dose did inhibit the Dendrobium palenopsis buds from opening, but did not cause visible damage to opened flowers. Doses of 800 and 1000 Gy were damaging because they provoked the flowers to drop from the stem. Cattleya irradiated with 750 Gy did not show any damage, and were therefore eligible for the radiation treatment. Cymbidium tolerated up to 300 Gy and above this dose dropped prematurely. On the other hand, Oncydium did not tolerate doses above 150 Gy.(author)

  16. Orchid flowers tolerance to gamma-radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, Olivia Kimiko E-mail: okikuchi@net.ipen.br

    2000-03-01

    Cut flowers are fresh goods that may be treated with fumigants such as methyl bromide to meet the needs of the quarantine requirements of importing countries. Irradiation is a non-chemical alternative to substitute the methyl bromide treatment of fresh products. In this research, different cut orchids were irradiated to examine their tolerance to gamma-rays. A 200 Gy dose did inhibit the Dendrobium palenopsis buds from opening, but did not cause visible damage to opened flowers. Doses of 800 and 1000 Gy were damaging because they provoked the flowers to drop from the stem. Cattleya irradiated with 750 Gy did not show any damage, and were therefore eligible for the radiation treatment. Cymbidium tolerated up to 300 Gy and above this dose dropped prematurely. On the other hand, Oncydium did not tolerate doses above 150 Gy.(author)

  17. Repressive Tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Morten Jarlbæk

    2017-01-01

    Consultation of organised interests and others when drafting laws is often seen as an important source of both input and output legitimacy. But whereas the input side of the equation stems from the very process of listening to societal actors, output legitimacy can only be strengthened if consult......Consultation of organised interests and others when drafting laws is often seen as an important source of both input and output legitimacy. But whereas the input side of the equation stems from the very process of listening to societal actors, output legitimacy can only be strengthened...... a substantial effect on the substance of laws – shows that there is a great difference in the amenability of different branches of government but that, in general, authorities do not listen much despite a very strong consultation institution and tradition. A suggestion for an explanation could be pointing...... to an administrative culture of repressive tolerance of organised interests: authorities listen but only reacts in a very limited sense. This bears in it the risk of jeopardising the knowledge transfer from societal actors to administrative ditto thus harming the consultation institutions’ potential for strengthening...

  18. B cells in operational tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesneau, M; Danger, R; Soulillou, J-P; Brouard, S

    2018-02-16

    Transplantation is currently the therapy of choice for endstage organ failure even though it requires long-term immunosuppresive therapy, with its numerous side effects, for acceptance of the transplanted organ. In rare cases however, patients develop operational tolerance, that is, graft survival without immunosuppression. Studies conducted on these patients reveal genetic, phenotypic, and functional signatures. They provide a better understanding of the immunological mechanisms involved in operational tolerance and define biomarkers that could be used to adapt immunosuppressive treatment to the individual, safely reduce immunosuppression doses, and ideally and safely guide immunosuppression withdrawal. This review summarizes studies that suggest a role for B cells as biomarkers of operational tolerance and discusses the use of B cells as a predictive tool for immunologic risk. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Dose response relationship in local radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hee Chul; Seong, Jin Sil; Han, Kwang Hyub; Chon, Chae Yoon; Moon, Young Myoung; Song, Jae Seok; Suh, Chang Ok

    2001-01-01

    In this study, it was investigated whether dose response relation existed or not in local radiotherapy for primary hepatocellular carcinoma. From January 1992 to March 2000, 158 patients were included in present study. Exclusion criteria included the presence of extrahepatic metastasis, liver cirrhosis of Child's class C, tumors occupying more than two thirds of the entire liver, and performance status on the ECOG scale of more than 3. Radiotherapy was given to the field including tumor with generous margin using 6, 10-MV X-ray. Mean tumor dose was 48.2±7.9 Gy in daily 1.8 Gy fractions. Tumor response was based on diagnostic radiologic examinations such as CT scan, MR imaging, hepatic artery angiography at 4-8 weeks following completion of treatment. Statistical analysis was done to investigate the existence of dose response relationship of local radiotherapy when it was applied to the treatment of primary hepatocellular carcinoma. An objective response was observed in 106 of 158 patients, giving a response rate of 67. 1%. Statistical analysis revealed that total dose was the most significant factor in relation to tumor response when local radiotherapy was applied to the treatment of primary hepatocellular carcinoma. Only 29.2% showed objective response in patients treated with dose less than 40 Gy, while 68.6% and 77.1 % showed major response in patients with 40-50 Gy and more than 50 Gy, respectively. Child-Pugh classification was significant factor in the development of ascites, overt radiation induced liver disease and gastroenteritis. Radiation dose was an important factor for development of radiation induced gastroduodenal ulcer. Present study showed the existence of dose response relationship in local radiotherapy for primary hepatocellular carcinoma. Only radiotherapy dose was a significant factor to predict the objective response. Further study is required to predict the maximal tolerance dose in consideration of liver function and non-irradiated liver

  20. Does mental exertion alter maximal muscle activation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vianney eRozand

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Mental exertion is known to impair endurance performance, but its effects on neuromuscular function remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that mental exertion reduces torque and muscle activation during intermittent maximal voluntary contractions of the knee extensors. Ten subjects performed in a randomized order three separate mental exertion conditions lasting 27 minutes each: i high mental exertion (incongruent Stroop task, ii moderate mental exertion (congruent Stroop task, iii low mental exertion (watching a movie. In each condition, mental exertion was combined with ten intermittent maximal voluntary contractions of the knee extensor muscles (one maximal voluntary contraction every 3 minutes. Neuromuscular function was assessed using electrical nerve stimulation. Maximal voluntary torque, maximal muscle activation and other neuromuscular parameters were similar across mental exertion conditions and did not change over time. These findings suggest that mental exertion does not affect neuromuscular function during intermittent maximal voluntary contractions of the knee extensors.

  1. AUC-Maximizing Ensembles through Metalearning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeDell, Erin; van der Laan, Mark J; Petersen, Maya

    2016-05-01

    Area Under the ROC Curve (AUC) is often used to measure the performance of an estimator in binary classification problems. An AUC-maximizing classifier can have significant advantages in cases where ranking correctness is valued or if the outcome is rare. In a Super Learner ensemble, maximization of the AUC can be achieved by the use of an AUC-maximining metalearning algorithm. We discuss an implementation of an AUC-maximization technique that is formulated as a nonlinear optimization problem. We also evaluate the effectiveness of a large number of different nonlinear optimization algorithms to maximize the cross-validated AUC of the ensemble fit. The results provide evidence that AUC-maximizing metalearners can, and often do, out-perform non-AUC-maximizing metalearning methods, with respect to ensemble AUC. The results also demonstrate that as the level of imbalance in the training data increases, the Super Learner ensemble outperforms the top base algorithm by a larger degree.

  2. Oral Tolerance: Therapeutic Implications for Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana M. C. Faria

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral tolerance is classically defined as the suppression of immune responses to antigens (Ag that have been administered previously by the oral route. Multiple mechanisms of tolerance are induced by oral Ag. Low doses favor active suppression, whereas higher doses favor clonal anergy/deletion. Oral Ag induces Th2 (IL-4/IL-10 and Th3 (TGF-β regulatory T cells (Tregs plus CD4+CD25+ regulatory cells and LAP+T cells. Induction of oral tolerance is enhanced by IL-4, IL-10, anti-IL-12, TGF-β, cholera toxin B subunit (CTB, Flt-3 ligand, anti-CD40 ligand and continuous feeding of Ag. In addition to oral tolerance, nasal tolerance has also been shown to be effective in suppressing inflammatory conditions with the advantage of a lower dose requirement. Oral and nasal tolerance suppress several animal models of autoimmune diseases including experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE, uveitis, thyroiditis, myasthenia, arthritis and diabetes in the nonobese diabetic (NOD mouse, plus non-autoimmune diseases such as asthma, atherosclerosis, colitis and stroke. Oral tolerance has been tested in human autoimmune diseases including MS, arthritis, uveitis and diabetes and in allergy, contact sensitivity to DNCB, nickel allergy. Positive results have been observed in phase II trials and new trials for arthritis, MS and diabetes are underway. Mucosal tolerance is an attractive approach for treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases because of lack of toxicity, ease of administration over time and Ag-specific mechanism of action. The successful application of oral tolerance for the treatment of human diseases will depend on dose, developing immune markers to assess immunologic effects, route (nasal versus oral, formulation, mucosal adjuvants, combination therapy and early therapy.

  3. On maximal massive 3D supergravity

    OpenAIRE

    Bergshoeff , Eric A; Hohm , Olaf; Rosseel , Jan; Townsend , Paul K

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT We construct, at the linearized level, the three-dimensional (3D) N = 4 supersymmetric " general massive supergravity " and the maximally supersymmetric N = 8 " new massive supergravity ". We also construct the maximally supersymmetric linearized N = 7 topologically massive supergravity, although we expect N = 6 to be maximal at the non-linear level. (Bergshoeff, Eric A) (Hohm, Olaf) (Rosseel, Jan) P.K.Townsend@da...

  4. Inclusive Fitness Maximization:An Axiomatic Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Okasha, Samir; Weymark, John; Bossert, Walter

    2014-01-01

    Kin selection theorists argue that evolution in social contexts will lead organisms to behave as if maximizing their inclusive, as opposed to personal, fitness. The inclusive fitness concept allows biologists to treat organisms as akin to rational agents seeking to maximize a utility function. Here we develop this idea and place it on a firm footing by employing a standard decision-theoretic methodology. We show how the principle of inclusive fitness maximization and a related principle of qu...

  5. Activity versus outcome maximization in time management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkoc, Selin A; Tonietto, Gabriela N

    2018-04-30

    Feeling time-pressed has become ubiquitous. Time management strategies have emerged to help individuals fit in more of their desired and necessary activities. We provide a review of these strategies. In doing so, we distinguish between two, often competing, motives people have in managing their time: activity maximization and outcome maximization. The emerging literature points to an important dilemma: a given strategy that maximizes the number of activities might be detrimental to outcome maximization. We discuss such factors that might hinder performance in work tasks and enjoyment in leisure tasks. Finally, we provide theoretically grounded recommendations that can help balance these two important goals in time management. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. On the maximal superalgebras of supersymmetric backgrounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueroa-O'Farrill, Jose; Hackett-Jones, Emily; Moutsopoulos, George; Simon, Joan

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we give a precise definition of the notion of a maximal superalgebra of certain types of supersymmetric supergravity backgrounds, including the Freund-Rubin backgrounds, and propose a geometric construction extending the well-known construction of its Killing superalgebra. We determine the structure of maximal Lie superalgebras and show that there is a finite number of isomorphism classes, all related via contractions from an orthosymplectic Lie superalgebra. We use the structure theory to show that maximally supersymmetric waves do not possess such a maximal superalgebra, but that the maximally supersymmetric Freund-Rubin backgrounds do. We perform the explicit geometric construction of the maximal superalgebra of AdS 4 X S 7 and find that it is isomorphic to osp(1|32). We propose an algebraic construction of the maximal superalgebra of any background asymptotic to AdS 4 X S 7 and we test this proposal by computing the maximal superalgebra of the M2-brane in its two maximally supersymmetric limits, finding agreement.

  7. Task-oriented maximally entangled states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agrawal, Pankaj; Pradhan, B

    2010-01-01

    We introduce the notion of a task-oriented maximally entangled state (TMES). This notion depends on the task for which a quantum state is used as the resource. TMESs are the states that can be used to carry out the task maximally. This concept may be more useful than that of a general maximally entangled state in the case of a multipartite system. We illustrate this idea by giving an operational definition of maximally entangled states on the basis of communication tasks of teleportation and superdense coding. We also give examples and a procedure to obtain such TMESs for n-qubit systems.

  8. Dose sculpting with generalized equivalent uniform dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Qiuwen; Djajaputra, David; Liu, Helen H.; Dong Lei; Mohan, Radhe; Wu, Yan

    2005-01-01

    With intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), a variety of user-defined dose distribution can be produced using inverse planning. The generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) has been used in IMRT optimization as an alternative objective function to the conventional dose-volume-based criteria. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of gEUD optimization to fine tune the dose distributions of IMRT plans. We analyzed the effect of gEUD-based optimization parameters on plan quality. The objective was to determine whether dose distribution to selected structures could be improved using gEUD optimization without adversely altering the doses delivered to other structures, as in sculpting. We hypothesized that by carefully defining gEUD parameters (EUD 0 and n) based on the current dose distributions, the optimization system could be instructed to search for alternative solutions in the neighborhood, and we could maintain the dose distributions for structures already satisfactory and improve dose for structures that need enhancement. We started with an already acceptable IMRT plan optimized with any objective function. The dose distribution was analyzed first. For structures that dose should not be changed, a higher value of n was used and EUD 0 was set slightly higher/lower than the EUD value at the current dose distribution for critical structures/targets. For structures that needed improvement in dose, a higher to medium value of n was used, and EUD 0 was set to the EUD value or slightly lower/higher for the critical structure/target at the current dose distribution. We evaluated this method in one clinical case each of head and neck, lung and prostate cancer. Dose volume histograms, isodose distributions, and relevant tolerance doses for critical structures were used for the assessment. We found that by adjusting gEUD optimization parameters, the dose distribution could be improved with only a few iterations. A larger value of n could lead to

  9. Limits of dose escalation in lung cancer: a dose-volume histogram analysis comparing coplanar and non-coplanar techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derycke, S; Van Duyse, B; Schelfhout, J; De Neve, W

    1995-12-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of dose escalation in radiotherapy of inoperable lung cancer, a dose-volume histogram analysis was performed comparing standard coplanar (2D) with non-coplanar (3D) beam arrangements on a non-selected group of 20 patients planned by Sherouse`s GRATISTM 3D-planning system. Serial CT-scanning was performed and 2 Target Volumes (Tvs) were defined. Gross Tumor Volume (GTV) defined a high-dose Target Volume (TV-1). GTV plus location of node stations with > 10% probability of invasion (Minet et al.) defined an intermediate-dose Target Volume (TV-2). However, nodal regions which are incompatible with cure were excluded from TV-2. These are ATS-regions 1, 8, 9 and 14 all left and right as well as heterolateral regions. For 3D-planning, Beam`s Eye View selected (by an experienced planner) beam arrangements were optimised using Superdot, a method of target dose-gradient annihilation developed by Sherouse. A second 3D-planning was performed using 4 beam incidences with maximal angular separation. The linac`s isocenter for the optimal arrangement was located at the geometrical center of gravity of a tetraheder, the tetraheder`s comers being the consecutive positions of the virtual source. This ideal beam arrangement was approximated as close as possible, taking into account technical limitations (patient-couch-gantry collisions). Criteria for tolerance were met if no points inside the spinal cord exceeded 50 Gy and if at least 50% of the lung volume received less than 20Gy. If dose regions below 50 Gy were judged acceptable at TV-2, 2D- as well as 3D-plans allow safe escalation to 80 Gy at TV-1. When TV-2 needed to be encompassed by isodose surfaces exceeding 50Gy, 3D-plans were necessary to limit dose at the spinal cord below tolerance. For large TVs dose is limited by lung tolerance for 3D-plans. An analysis (including NTCP-TCP as cost functions) of rival 3D-plans is being performed.

  10. Tolerance to the Diuretic Effects of Cannabinoids and Cross-Tolerance to a κ-Opioid Agonist in THC-Treated Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopda, Girish R; Parge, Viraj; Thakur, Ganesh A; Gatley, S John; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Paronis, Carol A

    2016-08-01

    Daily treatment with cannabinoids results in tolerance to many, but not all, of their behavioral and physiologic effects. The present studies investigated the effects of 7-day exposure to 10 mg/kg daily of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) on the diuretic and antinociceptive effects of THC and the synthetic cannabinoid AM4054. Comparison studies determined diuretic responses to the κ-opioid agonist U50,488 and furosemide. After determination of control dose-response functions, mice received 10 mg/kg daily of THC for 7 days, and dose-response functions were re-determined 24 hours, 7 days, or 14 days later. THC and AM4054 had biphasic diuretic effects under control conditions with maximum effects of 30 and 35 ml/kg of urine, respectively. In contrast, antinociceptive effects of both drugs increased monotonically with dose to >90% of maximal possible effect. Treatment with THC produced 9- and 7-fold rightward shifts of the diuresis and antinociception dose-response curves for THC and, respectively, 7- and 3-fold rightward shifts in the AM4054 dose-response functions. U50,488 and furosemide increased urine output to >35 ml/kg under control conditions. The effects of U50,488 were attenuated after 7-day treatment with THC, whereas the effects of furosemide were unaltered. Diuretic effects of THC and AM4054 recovered to near-baseline levels within 14 days after stopping daily THC injections, whereas tolerance to the antinociceptive effects persisted longer than 14 days. The tolerance induced by 7-day treatment with THC was accompanied by a 55% decrease in the Bmax value for cannabinoid receptors (CB1). These data indicate that repeated exposure to THC produces similar rightward shifts in the ascending and descending limbs of cannabinoid diuresis dose-effect curves and to antinociceptive effects while resulting in a flattening of the U50,488 diuresis dose-effect function. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  11. Maximally Entangled Multipartite States: A Brief Survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enríquez, M; Wintrowicz, I; Życzkowski, K

    2016-01-01

    The problem of identifying maximally entangled quantum states of a composite quantum systems is analyzed. We review some states of multipartite systems distinguished with respect to certain measures of quantum entanglement. Numerical results obtained for 4-qubit pure states illustrate the fact that the notion of maximally entangled state depends on the measure used. (paper)

  12. Utility maximization and mode of payment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, R.H.; Ridder, G.; Heijmans, R.D.H.; Pollock, D.S.G.; Satorra, A.

    2000-01-01

    The implications of stochastic utility maximization in a model of choice of payment are examined. Three types of compatibility with utility maximization are distinguished: global compatibility, local compatibility on an interval, and local compatibility on a finite set of points. Keywords:

  13. Corporate Social Responsibility and Profit Maximizing Behaviour

    OpenAIRE

    Becchetti, Leonardo; Giallonardo, Luisa; Tessitore, Maria Elisabetta

    2005-01-01

    We examine the behavior of a profit maximizing monopolist in a horizontal differentiation model in which consumers differ in their degree of social responsibility (SR) and consumers SR is dynamically influenced by habit persistence. The model outlines parametric conditions under which (consumer driven) corporate social responsibility is an optimal choice compatible with profit maximizing behavior.

  14. Inclusive fitness maximization: An axiomatic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okasha, Samir; Weymark, John A; Bossert, Walter

    2014-06-07

    Kin selection theorists argue that evolution in social contexts will lead organisms to behave as if maximizing their inclusive, as opposed to personal, fitness. The inclusive fitness concept allows biologists to treat organisms as akin to rational agents seeking to maximize a utility function. Here we develop this idea and place it on a firm footing by employing a standard decision-theoretic methodology. We show how the principle of inclusive fitness maximization and a related principle of quasi-inclusive fitness maximization can be derived from axioms on an individual׳s 'as if preferences' (binary choices) for the case in which phenotypic effects are additive. Our results help integrate evolutionary theory and rational choice theory, help draw out the behavioural implications of inclusive fitness maximization, and point to a possible way in which evolution could lead organisms to implement it. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Maximal Entanglement in High Energy Physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba Cervera-Lierta, José I. Latorre, Juan Rojo, Luca Rottoli

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We analyze how maximal entanglement is generated at the fundamental level in QED by studying correlations between helicity states in tree-level scattering processes at high energy. We demonstrate that two mechanisms for the generation of maximal entanglement are at work: i $s$-channel processes where the virtual photon carries equal overlaps of the helicities of the final state particles, and ii the indistinguishable superposition between $t$- and $u$-channels. We then study whether requiring maximal entanglement constrains the coupling structure of QED and the weak interactions. In the case of photon-electron interactions unconstrained by gauge symmetry, we show how this requirement allows reproducing QED. For $Z$-mediated weak scattering, the maximal entanglement principle leads to non-trivial predictions for the value of the weak mixing angle $\\theta_W$. Our results are a first step towards understanding the connections between maximal entanglement and the fundamental symmetries of high-energy physics.

  16. Ambulatory blood pressure parameters after canrenone addition to existing treatment regimens with maximum tolerated dose of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockers plus hydrochlorothiazide in uncontrolled hypertensive patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guasti L

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Luigina Guasti,1,* Giovanni Gaudio,2,* Alessandro Lupi,3 Marinella D’Avino,4 Carla Sala,5,6 Amedeo Mugellini,7 Vito Vulpis,8 Salvatore Felis,9 Riccardo Sarzani,10,11 Massimo Vanasia,12 Pamela Maffioli,7 Giuseppe Derosa7 1Research Center on Dyslipidemia, Internal Medicine 1, University of Insubria, Varese, Italy; 2Internal Medicine Division, Ospedale Angelo Bellini, ASST Valle Olona Somma, Varese, Italy; 3Cardiology Unit, ASL VCO Verbania-Domodossola, Verbania, Italy; 4Unit for the Treatment of Arterial Hypertension, Ospedale Cardarelli, Napoli, Italy; 5Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, University of Milan, Milano, Italy; 6Cardiovascular Unit, Fondazione IRCCSS Policlinico, Milano, Italy; 7Department of Internal Medicine and Therapeutics, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy; 8Unit for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Arterial Hypertension, Department of Internal Medicine, Policlinico di Bari, Bari, Italy; 9Cardiology Unit, Ospedale Garibaldi, Catania, Italy; 10ESH Center of Hypertension, Internal Medicine and Geriatrics, University Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona, Italy; 11IRCCS-INRCA, Ancona, Italy; 12THERABEL GiEnne Pharma, Milano, Italy *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Blockade of the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system is a cornerstone in cardiovascular disease prevention and hypertension treatment. The relevance of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM has been widely confirmed for both increasing the accuracy of blood pressure (BP measurements, particularly in pharmacological trials, and focusing on 24 h BP prognostic parameters. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of canrenone addition on ambulatory BP in uncontrolled hypertensive patients already treated with the highest tolerated dose of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors or angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R antagonists plus hydrochlorothiazide (HCT. Methods: ABPM was performed at baseline and after 3

  17. Applications of maximally concentrating optics for solar energy collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Gallagher, J.; Winston, R.

    1985-11-01

    A new family of optical concentrators based on a general nonimaging design principle for maximizing the geometric concentration, C, for radiation within a given acceptance half angle ±θα has been developed. The maximum limit exceeds by factors of 2 to 10 that attainable by systems using focusing optics. The wide acceptance angles permitted using these techniques have several unique advantages for solar concentrators including the elimination of the diurnal tracking requirement at intermediate concentrations (up to ˜10x), collection of circumsolar and some diffuse radiation, and relaxed tolerances. Because of these advantages, these types of concentrators have applications in solar energy wherever concentration is desired, e.g. for a wide variety of both thermal and photovoltaic uses. The basic principles of nonimaging optical design are reviewed. Selected configurations for thermal collector applications are discussed and the use of nonimaging elements as secondary concentrators is illustrated in the context of higher concentration applications.

  18. Bipartite Bell Inequality and Maximal Violation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ming; Fei Shaoming; Li-Jost Xian-Qing

    2011-01-01

    We present new bell inequalities for arbitrary dimensional bipartite quantum systems. The maximal violation of the inequalities is computed. The Bell inequality is capable of detecting quantum entanglement of both pure and mixed quantum states more effectively. (general)

  19. HEALTH INSURANCE: CONTRIBUTIONS AND REIMBURSEMENT MAXIMAL

    CERN Document Server

    HR Division

    2000-01-01

    Affected by both the salary adjustment index on 1.1.2000 and the evolution of the staff members and fellows population, the average reference salary, which is used as an index for fixed contributions and reimbursement maximal, has changed significantly. An adjustment of the amounts of the reimbursement maximal and the fixed contributions is therefore necessary, as from 1 January 2000.Reimbursement maximalThe revised reimbursement maximal will appear on the leaflet summarising the benefits for the year 2000, which will soon be available from the divisional secretariats and from the AUSTRIA office at CERN.Fixed contributionsThe fixed contributions, applicable to some categories of voluntarily insured persons, are set as follows (amounts in CHF for monthly contributions):voluntarily insured member of the personnel, with complete coverage:815,- (was 803,- in 1999)voluntarily insured member of the personnel, with reduced coverage:407,- (was 402,- in 1999)voluntarily insured no longer dependent child:326,- (was 321...

  20. Maximal Inequalities for Dependent Random Variables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann-Jorgensen, Jorgen

    2016-01-01

    Maximal inequalities play a crucial role in many probabilistic limit theorem; for instance, the law of large numbers, the law of the iterated logarithm, the martingale limit theorem and the central limit theorem. Let X-1, X-2,... be random variables with partial sums S-k = X-1 + ... + X-k. Then a......Maximal inequalities play a crucial role in many probabilistic limit theorem; for instance, the law of large numbers, the law of the iterated logarithm, the martingale limit theorem and the central limit theorem. Let X-1, X-2,... be random variables with partial sums S-k = X-1 + ... + X......-k. Then a maximal inequality gives conditions ensuring that the maximal partial sum M-n = max(1) (...

  1. Maximizing Function through Intelligent Robot Actuator Control

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Maximizing Function through Intelligent Robot Actuator Control Successful missions to Mars and beyond will only be possible with the support of high-performance...

  2. An ethical justification of profit maximization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Carsten Allan

    2010-01-01

    In much of the literature on business ethics and corporate social responsibility, it is more or less taken for granted that attempts to maximize profits are inherently unethical. The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether an ethical argument can be given in support of profit maximizing...... behaviour. It is argued that some form of consequential ethics must be applied, and that both profit seeking and profit maximization can be defended from a rule-consequential point of view. It is noted, however, that the result does not apply unconditionally, but requires that certain form of profit (and...... utility) maximizing actions are ruled out, e.g., by behavioural norms or formal institutions....

  3. A definition of maximal CP-violation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roos, M.

    1985-01-01

    The unitary matrix of quark flavour mixing is parametrized in a general way, permitting a mathematically natural definition of maximal CP violation. Present data turn out to violate this definition by 2-3 standard deviations. (orig.)

  4. A cosmological problem for maximally symmetric supergravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    German, G.; Ross, G.G.

    1986-01-01

    Under very general considerations it is shown that inflationary models of the universe based on maximally symmetric supergravity with flat potentials are unable to resolve the cosmological energy density (Polonyi) problem. (orig.)

  5. Insulin resistance and maximal oxygen uptake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seibaek, Marie; Vestergaard, Henrik; Burchardt, Hans

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Type 2 diabetes, coronary atherosclerosis, and physical fitness all correlate with insulin resistance, but the relative importance of each component is unknown. HYPOTHESIS: This study was undertaken to determine the relationship between insulin resistance, maximal oxygen uptake......, and the presence of either diabetes or ischemic heart disease. METHODS: The study population comprised 33 patients with and without diabetes and ischemic heart disease. Insulin resistance was measured by a hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp; maximal oxygen uptake was measured during a bicycle exercise test. RESULTS......: There was a strong correlation between maximal oxygen uptake and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake (r = 0.7, p = 0.001), and maximal oxygen uptake was the only factor of importance for determining insulin sensitivity in a model, which also included the presence of diabetes and ischemic heart disease. CONCLUSION...

  6. Maximal supergravities and the E10 model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleinschmidt, Axel; Nicolai, Hermann

    2006-01-01

    The maximal rank hyperbolic Kac-Moody algebra e 10 has been conjectured to play a prominent role in the unification of duality symmetries in string and M theory. We review some recent developments supporting this conjecture

  7. Gaussian maximally multipartite-entangled states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facchi, Paolo; Florio, Giuseppe; Lupo, Cosmo; Mancini, Stefano; Pascazio, Saverio

    2009-12-01

    We study maximally multipartite-entangled states in the context of Gaussian continuous variable quantum systems. By considering multimode Gaussian states with constrained energy, we show that perfect maximally multipartite-entangled states, which exhibit the maximum amount of bipartite entanglement for all bipartitions, only exist for systems containing n=2 or 3 modes. We further numerically investigate the structure of these states and their frustration for n≤7 .

  8. Gaussian maximally multipartite-entangled states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Facchi, Paolo; Florio, Giuseppe; Pascazio, Saverio; Lupo, Cosmo; Mancini, Stefano

    2009-01-01

    We study maximally multipartite-entangled states in the context of Gaussian continuous variable quantum systems. By considering multimode Gaussian states with constrained energy, we show that perfect maximally multipartite-entangled states, which exhibit the maximum amount of bipartite entanglement for all bipartitions, only exist for systems containing n=2 or 3 modes. We further numerically investigate the structure of these states and their frustration for n≤7.

  9. Neutrino mass textures with maximal CP violation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aizawa, Ichiro; Kitabayashi, Teruyuki; Yasue, Masaki

    2005-01-01

    We show three types of neutrino mass textures, which give maximal CP violation as well as maximal atmospheric neutrino mixing. These textures are described by six real mass parameters: one specified by two complex flavor neutrino masses and two constrained ones and the others specified by three complex flavor neutrino masses. In each texture, we calculate mixing angles and masses, which are consistent with observed data, as well as Majorana CP phases

  10. Why firms should not always maximize profits

    OpenAIRE

    Kolstad, Ivar

    2006-01-01

    Though corporate social responsibility (CSR) is on the agenda of most major corporations, corporate executives still largely support the view that corporations should maximize the returns to their owners. There are two lines of defence for this position. One is the Friedmanian view that maximizing owner returns is the corporate social responsibility of corporations. The other is a position voiced by many executives, that CSR and profits go together. This paper argues that the first position i...

  11. Maximally Informative Observables and Categorical Perception

    OpenAIRE

    Tsiang, Elaine

    2012-01-01

    We formulate the problem of perception in the framework of information theory, and prove that categorical perception is equivalent to the existence of an observable that has the maximum possible information on the target of perception. We call such an observable maximally informative. Regardless whether categorical perception is real, maximally informative observables can form the basis of a theory of perception. We conclude with the implications of such a theory for the problem of speech per...

  12. OEDIPE, a software for personalized Monte Carlo dosimetry and treatment planning optimization in nuclear medicine: absorbed dose and biologically effective dose considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petitguillaume, A.; Broggio, D.; Franck, D.; Desbree, A.; Bernardini, M.; Labriolle Vaylet, C. de

    2014-01-01

    For targeted radionuclide therapies, treatment planning usually consists of the administration of standard activities without accounting for the patient-specific activity distribution, pharmacokinetics and dosimetry to organs at risk. The OEDIPE software is a user-friendly interface which has an automation level suitable for performing personalized Monte Carlo 3D dosimetry for diagnostic and therapeutic radionuclide administrations. Mean absorbed doses to regions of interest (ROIs), isodose curves superimposed on a personalized anatomical model of the patient and dose-volume histograms can be extracted from the absorbed dose 3D distribution. Moreover, to account for the differences in radiosensitivity between tumoral and healthy tissues, additional functionalities have been implemented to calculate the 3D distribution of the biologically effective dose (BED), mean BEDs to ROIs, isoBED curves and BED-volume histograms along with the Equivalent Uniform Biologically Effective Dose (EUD) to ROIs. Finally, optimization tools are available for treatment planning optimization using either the absorbed dose or BED distributions. These tools enable one to calculate the maximal injectable activity which meets tolerance criteria to organs at risk for a chosen fractionation protocol. This paper describes the functionalities available in the latest version of the OEDIPE software to perform personalized Monte Carlo dosimetry and treatment planning optimization in targeted radionuclide therapies. (authors)

  13. Teaching Tolerance? Associational Diversity and Tolerance Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapp, Carolin; Freitag, Markus

    2015-01-01

    , a closer look is taken at how associational diversity relates to the formation of tolerance and the importance of associations as schools of tolerance are evaluated. The main theoretical argument follows contact theory, wherein regular and enduring contact in diverse settings reduces prejudice and thereby...

  14. Shareholder, stakeholder-owner or broad stakeholder maximization

    OpenAIRE

    Mygind, Niels

    2004-01-01

    With reference to the discussion about shareholder versus stakeholder maximization it is argued that the normal type of maximization is in fact stakeholder-owner maxi-mization. This means maximization of the sum of the value of the shares and stake-holder benefits belonging to the dominating stakeholder-owner. Maximization of shareholder value is a special case of owner-maximization, and only under quite re-strictive assumptions shareholder maximization is larger or equal to stakeholder-owner...

  15. Lactose tolerance tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydrogen breath test for lactose tolerance ... Two common methods include: Lactose tolerance blood test Hydrogen breath test The hydrogen breath test is the preferred method. It measures the amount of hydrogen ...

  16. Vacua of maximal gauged D=3 supergravities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischbacher, T; Nicolai, H; Samtleben, H

    2002-01-01

    We analyse the scalar potentials of maximal gauged three-dimensional supergravities which reveal a surprisingly rich structure. In contrast to maximal supergravities in dimensions D≥4, all these theories possess a maximally supersymmetric (N=16) ground state with negative cosmological constant Λ 2 gauged theory, whose maximally supersymmetric groundstate has Λ = 0. We compute the mass spectra of bosonic and fermionic fluctuations around these vacua and identify the unitary irreducible representations of the relevant background (super)isometry groups to which they belong. In addition, we find several stationary points which are not maximally supersymmetric, and determine their complete mass spectra as well. In particular, we show that there are analogues of all stationary points found in higher dimensions, among them are de Sitter (dS) vacua in the theories with noncompact gauge groups SO(5, 3) 2 and SO(4, 4) 2 , as well as anti-de Sitter (AdS) vacua in the compact gauged theory preserving 1/4 and 1/8 of the supersymmetries. All the dS vacua have tachyonic instabilities, whereas there do exist nonsupersymmetric AdS vacua which are stable, again in contrast to the D≥4 theories

  17. Fault tolerance based on serial communication of FPGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Jing; Fang Zongliang; Xu Quanzhou; Hu Jiewei; Ma Guizhen

    2012-01-01

    There maybe appear mistake in serial communication. This paper was described the intellectual detector of γ dose ratemeter communication with FPGA. The software of FPGA designed the code about fault tolerance, prevented mistake effectively. (authors)

  18. 78 FR 13257 - Pyraflufen-ethyl; Pesticide Tolerances

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-27

    .... months). No dermal or systemic toxicity was seen at the limit dose (1,000 mg/kg/day). [[Page 13260... enforcement methodology (gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS)) is available to enforce the tolerance...

  19. 78 FR 32146 - Triforine; Pesticide Tolerances

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-29

    ... America Holding Corporation requested these tolerances under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act... in the liver and hematopoietic system following repeated oral dosing, and the dog is the most... UFA = 10x mg/kg/day. (dog) UFH = 10x cPAD = 0.22 mg/kg/ LOAEL = 120 mg/kg/day, based on FQPA SF = 1x...

  20. 76 FR 18899 - Indaziflam; Pesticide Tolerances

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-06

    ... were generally observed in the available subchronic and chronic studies. No systemic toxicity was... limited to doses that also caused systemic toxicity in the adult. In the rat developmental toxicity study... to enforce the tolerance expression. The method is able to determine, separately, residues of...

  1. 78 FR 20461 - Flumioxazin; Pesticide Tolerances

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-05

    ... offspring were observed at doses lower than those that caused parental/systemic toxicity, and because the reproductive effects in offspring were considered to be more severe than the parental/systemic effects. 3... available to enforce the tolerance expression. The method may be requested from: Chief, Analytical Chemistry...

  2. 77 FR 25904 - Acequinocyl; Pesticide Tolerances

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-02

    ... for parental males was 58.9/69.2 mg/kg/ day, based on hemorrhagic effects. The offspring systemic... effects because they were observed at very high doses and in the presence of more severe systemic effects... to enforce the tolerance expression. The methods may be requested from: Chief, Analytical Chemistry...

  3. In vitro antioxidant, hypoglycemic and oral glucose tolerance test of banana peels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.V. Navghare

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Banana fruit is claimed to have antidiabetic effects despite its high calorie content, and its peels also contain vital phytoconstituents including gallocatechin. Previously banana pulp has been studied for antihyperglycemic effects, and in the present investigation antihyperglycemic effect of ethanolic extract of inner peels of Musa sapientum (EMS, Musa paradisiaca (EMP, Musa cavendish (EMC and Musa acuminata (EMA fruit was evaluated using oral glucose tolerance test in normoglycemic rats. In vitro antioxidant study was conducted using DPPH, H2O2 radical scavenging assay and ferric reducing power assay. Wistar rats were divided into fourteen groups and twelve groups received different doses of aforementioned extracts, while control group received gum acacia solution and remaining group received standard drug, glimepiride. All the rats received glucose load at a dose of 2 g/kg body weight. Groups treated with EMC and EMA showed significant decrease in glucose level (p < 0.01 at 150 min as compared to control group. In hypoglycemic study, only EMP 500 mg/kg, p.o. treated group revealed a significant decrease (p < 0.05 in glucose level at 120 min, while other groups did not show any sign of hypoglycemia. In glucose tolerance test, animals treated with EMC and EMA depicted dose dependent antihyperglycemic effect at 150 min while EMS and EMP showed significant reduction in plasma glucose at higher doses. In a similar fashion, EMA i.e. M. acuminata demonstrated highest antioxidant activity followed by EMC against DPPH radical. In ferric reducing power and H2O2 scavenging assay, EMA demonstrated maximal antioxidant activity when compared with other extracts.

  4. Radiation tolerance of NPN bipolar technology with 30 GHz Ft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flament, O.; Synold, S.; Pontcharra, J. de; Niel, S.

    1999-01-01

    The ionizing dose and neutron radiation tolerance of Si QSA bipolar technology has been investigated. The transistors exhibit good radiation tolerance up to 100 krad and 5 10 13 n/cm 2 without any special fabrication steps to harden the technology to the studied effects. (authors)

  5. Influence of irradiation upon neonative tolerance state induced in rabbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Servant, P.; Marquer, C.

    An attempt was made to determine the effect of whole-body irradiation on the establishment of a state of tolerance in new-born rabbits by the intraperitoneal injection of 1mg of human serum albumin. Simultaneous irradiation (doses of 200, 150, 100 rads) and antigen injections inhibited the establishment of this tolerance [fr

  6. Recognition and Toleration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægaard, Sune

    2010-01-01

    Recognition and toleration are ways of relating to the diversity characteristic of multicultural societies. The article concerns the possible meanings of toleration and recognition, and the conflict that is often claimed to exist between these two approaches to diversity. Different forms...... or interpretations of recognition and toleration are considered, confusing and problematic uses of the terms are noted, and the compatibility of toleration and recognition is discussed. The article argues that there is a range of legitimate and importantly different conceptions of both toleration and recognition...

  7. Fault Tolerant Feedback Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoustrup, Jakob; Niemann, H.

    2001-01-01

    An architecture for fault tolerant feedback controllers based on the Youla parameterization is suggested. It is shown that the Youla parameterization will give a residual vector directly in connection with the fault diagnosis part of the fault tolerant feedback controller. It turns out...... that there is a separation be-tween the feedback controller and the fault tolerant part. The closed loop feedback properties are handled by the nominal feedback controller and the fault tolerant part is handled by the design of the Youla parameter. The design of the fault tolerant part will not affect the design...... of the nominal feedback con-troller....

  8. An information maximization model of eye movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renninger, Laura Walker; Coughlan, James; Verghese, Preeti; Malik, Jitendra

    2005-01-01

    We propose a sequential information maximization model as a general strategy for programming eye movements. The model reconstructs high-resolution visual information from a sequence of fixations, taking into account the fall-off in resolution from the fovea to the periphery. From this framework we get a simple rule for predicting fixation sequences: after each fixation, fixate next at the location that minimizes uncertainty (maximizes information) about the stimulus. By comparing our model performance to human eye movement data and to predictions from a saliency and random model, we demonstrate that our model is best at predicting fixation locations. Modeling additional biological constraints will improve the prediction of fixation sequences. Our results suggest that information maximization is a useful principle for programming eye movements.

  9. Utility Maximization in Nonconvex Wireless Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Brehmer, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    This monograph formulates a framework for modeling and solving utility maximization problems in nonconvex wireless systems. First, a model for utility optimization in wireless systems is defined. The model is general enough to encompass a wide array of system configurations and performance objectives. Based on the general model, a set of methods for solving utility maximization problems is developed. The development is based on a careful examination of the properties that are required for the application of each method. The focus is on problems whose initial formulation does not allow for a solution by standard convex methods. Solution approaches that take into account the nonconvexities inherent to wireless systems are discussed in detail. The monograph concludes with two case studies that demonstrate the application of the proposed framework to utility maximization in multi-antenna broadcast channels.

  10. Dose escalation of the hypoxic cell sensitizer etanidazole combined with ifosfamide, carboplatin, etoposide, and autologous hematopoietic stem cell support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, A D; Wheeler, C; Ayash, L J; Schwartz, G; Ibrahim, J; Mills, L; McCauley, M; Coleman, N; Warren, D; Schnipper, L; Antman, K H; Teicher, B A; Frei, E

    1998-06-01

    Multiple mechanisms of drug resistance contribute to treatment failure. Although high-dose therapy attempts to overwhelm these defenses pharmacologically, this approach is only successful in a fraction of treated patients. Many drug resistance mechanisms are shared between malignant and normal cells, but the expression of various drug resistance mechanisms associated with hypoxia is largely confined to tumor tissue. Thus, reversal of this mechanism is likely to provide a therapeutic advantage to the host. This study was designed to define the dose-limiting toxicities and maximum tolerated dose of etanidazole when it is given concurrently with high-dose ifosfamide, carboplatin, and etoposide (ICE), with hematopoietic stem cell support. The maximum tolerated doses of high-dose ICE were administered concurrently with dose escalations of etanidazole, a hypoxic cell sensitizer. All agents were given by 96-h continuous i.v. infusion beginning on day -7. Mesna uroprotection was provided. Autologous marrow and cytokine mobilized peripheral blood progenitor cells were reinfused on day 0. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor was administered following reinfusion until the granulocytes recovered to > 1000/microliter. Fifty-five adults with advanced malignancies were enrolled in cohorts of five to nine patients. Four dose levels of etanidazole between 3 and 5.5 g/m2/day (12, 16, 20, and 22 g/m2 total doses) and two doses of carboplatin (1600 and 1800 mg/m2 total doses) were evaluated. Seven patients died of organ toxicity (13%); two each from veno-occlusive disease of liver and sepsis; and one each from sudden death, renal failure, and refractory thrombocytopenic hemorrhage. Five deaths occurred at the top dose level. One additional patient suffered a witnessed cardiorespiratory arrest from ventricular fibrillation and was resuscitated. Dose-dependent and largely reversible peripheral neuropathy was observed consisting of two syndromes: severe cramping myalgic/neuralgic pain

  11. The Physician Tendency in Stereotactic Radiosurgery Dose Prescription in Benign Intracranial Tumor at dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo National Hospital, Jakarta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Kodrat

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS is one of the treatment modalities for benign intra-cranial tumor, especiallyfor the tumor located next to the critical neural structure. The prescribed dose for radiosurgery depends onthe maximal tumor diameter and surrounding normal tissue tolerance dose. This cross sectional study wasconducted to evaluate the physician’s tendency in radiosurgery dose prescription. We observed treatmentplanning data of 32 patients with benign intra-cranial tumor, which had been treated with SRS at Dr. CiptoMangunkusumo National Hospital in 2009-2010. The peripheral dose, organ at risk (OAR dose limitiationand maximum tumor diameter were recorded. We compared our SRS dose with dose limitation, whichallowed safer dosing based on maximal tumor diameter perspective and the nearest OAR dose constraint.From maximal tumor diameter perspective, we prescribed mean±SD radiosurgery doses, which were11.63±2.21Gy, 10.21±1.29Gy and 9.88±1.07Gy for the tumor size ≤2cm, 2.01-3cm and 3,01-4cm respectively.Our radiosurgery dose was the lowest than dose limitation based on the nearest OAR perspective, followedby maximal tumor diameter perspective. It was concluded that radiosurgery dose had the tendency to beinfluenced by surrounding healthy tissue tolerance rather than maximal tumor diameter. Keywords: stereotactic, radiosurgery, benign tumor, dose.   Kecenderungan Dokter dalam Menentukan Dosis StereotacticRadiosurgery untuk Tumor Jinak Intrakranial diRSUP Nasional dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo, Jakarta Abstrak Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS merupakan salah satu modalitas pengobatan tumor jinak intra-kranialterutama untuk tumor yang berdekatan dengan struktur saraf penting. Penentuan dosis pada radiosurgerytergantung pada diameter tumor maksimal dan dosis toleransi jaringan sehat sekitarnya. Penelitian inidilakukan untuk mengevaluasi kecenderungan dokter dalam menentukan dosis radiosurgery. Penelitian crosssectional ini mengevaluasi data

  12. State of art in radiation tolerant camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi; Young Soo; Kim, Seong Ho; Cho, Jae Wan; Kim, Chang Hoi; Seo, Young Chil

    2002-02-01

    Working in radiation environment such as nuclear power plant, RI facility, nuclear fuel fabrication facility, medical center has to be considered radiation exposure, and we can implement these job by remote observation and operation. However the camera used for general industry is weakened at radiation, so radiation-tolerant camera is needed for radiation environment. The application of radiation-tolerant camera system is nuclear industry, radio-active medical, aerospace, and so on. Specially nuclear industry, the demand is continuous in the inspection of nuclear boiler, exchange of pellet, inspection of nuclear waste. In the nuclear developed countries have been an effort to develop radiation-tolerant cameras. Now they have many kinds of radiation-tolerant cameras which can tolerate to 10{sup 6}-10{sup 8} rad total dose. In this report, we examine into the state-of-art about radiation-tolerant cameras, and analyze these technology. We want to grow up the concern of developing radiation-tolerant camera by this paper, and upgrade the level of domestic technology.

  13. Maximizing band gaps in plate structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halkjær, Søren; Sigmund, Ole; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard

    2006-01-01

    periodic plate using Bloch theory, which conveniently reduces the maximization problem to that of a single base cell. Secondly, we construct a finite periodic plate using a number of the optimized base cells in a postprocessed version. The dynamic properties of the finite plate are investigated......Band gaps, i.e., frequency ranges in which waves cannot propagate, can be found in elastic structures for which there is a certain periodic modulation of the material properties or structure. In this paper, we maximize the band gap size for bending waves in a Mindlin plate. We analyze an infinite...... theoretically and experimentally and the issue of finite size effects is addressed....

  14. Singularity Structure of Maximally Supersymmetric Scattering Amplitudes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arkani-Hamed, Nima; Bourjaily, Jacob L.; Cachazo, Freddy

    2014-01-01

    We present evidence that loop amplitudes in maximally supersymmetric (N=4) Yang-Mills theory (SYM) beyond the planar limit share some of the remarkable structures of the planar theory. In particular, we show that through two loops, the four-particle amplitude in full N=4 SYM has only logarithmic ...... singularities and is free of any poles at infinity—properties closely related to uniform transcendentality and the UV finiteness of the theory. We also briefly comment on implications for maximal (N=8) supergravity theory (SUGRA)....

  15. Learning curves for mutual information maximization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbanczik, R.

    2003-01-01

    An unsupervised learning procedure based on maximizing the mutual information between the outputs of two networks receiving different but statistically dependent inputs is analyzed [S. Becker and G. Hinton, Nature (London) 355, 161 (1992)]. For a generic data model, I show that in the large sample limit the structure in the data is recognized by mutual information maximization. For a more restricted model, where the networks are similar to perceptrons, I calculate the learning curves for zero-temperature Gibbs learning. These show that convergence can be rather slow, and a way of regularizing the procedure is considered

  16. Finding Maximal Pairs with Bounded Gap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Lyngsø, Rune B.; Pedersen, Christian N. S.

    1999-01-01

    . In this paper we present methods for finding all maximal pairs under various constraints on the gap. In a string of length n we can find all maximal pairs with gap in an upper and lower bounded interval in time O(n log n+z) where z is the number of reported pairs. If the upper bound is removed the time reduces...... to O(n+z). Since a tandem repeat is a pair where the gap is zero, our methods can be seen as a generalization of finding tandem repeats. The running time of our methods equals the running time of well known methods for finding tandem repeats....

  17. Mechanical tolerance stackup and analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Fischer, Bryan R

    2004-01-01

    BackgroundDimensioning and TolerancingTolerance Format and Decimal PlacesConverting Plus/Minus Dimensions and Tolerances into Equal Bilaterally Toleranced DimensionsVariation and Sources of VariationTolerance AnalysisWorst-case Tolerance StackupsStatistical Tolerance StackupsGeometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing (GD&T)Converting Plus/Minus Tolerancing to Positional Tolerancing and Projected Tolerance ZonesDiametral and Radial Tolerance StackupsSpecifying Material Condition Modifiers and Their Effect on Tolerance Stackups The Tolerance Stackup SketchThe Tolerance Stackup Report FormTolerance S

  18. Allopregnanolone preclinical acute pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies to predict tolerability and efficacy for Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald W Irwin

    Full Text Available To develop allopregnanolone as a therapeutic for Alzheimer's disease, we investigated multiple formulations and routes of administration in translationally relevant animal models of both sexes. Subcutaneous, topical (transdermal and intranasal, intramuscular, and intravenous allopregnanolone were bolus-administered. Pharmacokinetic analyses of intravenous allopregnanolone in rabbit and mouse indicated that peak plasma and brain levels (3-fold brain/plasma ratios at 5min were sufficient to activate neuroregenerative responses at sub-sedative doses. Slow-release subcutaneous suspension of allopregnanolone displayed 5-fold brain/plasma ratio at Cmax at 30min. At therapeutic doses by either subcutaneous or intravenous routes, allopregnanolone mouse plasma levels ranged between 34-51ng/ml by 30min, comparable to published endogenous human level in the third trimester of pregnancy. Exposure to subcutaneous, topical, intramuscular, and intravenous allopregnanolone, at safe and tolerable doses, increased hippocampal markers of neurogenesis including BrdU and PCNA in young 3xTgAD and aged wildtype mice. Intravenous allopregnanolone transiently and robustly phosphorylated CREB within 5min and increased levels of neuronal differentiation transcription factor NeuroD within 4h. Neurogenic efficacy was achieved with allopregnanolone brain exposure of 300-500hr*ng/g. Formulations were tested to determine the no observable adverse effect level (NOAEL and maximally tolerated doses (MTD in male and female rats by sedation behavior time course. Sex differences were apparent, males exhibited ≥40% more sedation time compared to females. Allopregnanolone formulated in sulfobutyl-ether-beta-cyclodextrin at optimized complexation ratio maximized allopregnanolone delivery and neurogenic efficacy. To establish the NOAEL and MTD for Allo-induced sedation using a once-per-week intravenous regenerative treatment regimen: In female rats the NOAEL was 0.5mg/kg and MTD 2mg

  19. Nickel-sulphate-induced contact dermatitis in the guinea pig maximization test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohold, A E; Nielsen, G D; Andersen, Klaus Ejner

    1991-01-01

    Nickel sulphate is a sensitizer in guinea pigs, but the frequency of sensitization varies from study to study. The dose-response relationship for NiSO4.6H2O was evaluated in the guinea pig maximization test in this study. 6 intradermal (0.01%-3.0% aq.) and 6 topical (0.25%-10.0% pet.) concentrati...

  20. Tolerance of edible flowers to gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koike, Amanda C.R.; Araujo, Michel M.; Costa, Helbert S.F.; Almeida, Mariana C.; Villavicencio, Anna Lucia C.H., E-mail: ackoike@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP) Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    People have been eating flowers and using them in culinary creations for hundreds of years. Edible flowers are increasingly being used in meals as an ingredient in salads or garnish, entrees, drinks and desserts. The irradiation process is an alternative method that can be used in disinfestation of food and flowers, using doses that do not damage the product. The sensitivity of flowers to irradiation varies from species to species. In the present research was irradiated with doses up to 1 kGy some edible flowers to examine their physical tolerance to gamma-rays. Furthermore, high doses gamma irradiation causes petal withering, browning process and injury in edible flowers. (author)

  1. Tolerance of edible flowers to gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koike, Amanda C.R.; Araujo, Michel M.; Costa, Helbert S.F.; Almeida, Mariana C.; Villavicencio, Anna Lucia C.H.

    2011-01-01

    People have been eating flowers and using them in culinary creations for hundreds of years. Edible flowers are increasingly being used in meals as an ingredient in salads or garnish, entrees, drinks and desserts. The irradiation process is an alternative method that can be used in disinfestation of food and flowers, using doses that do not damage the product. The sensitivity of flowers to irradiation varies from species to species. In the present research was irradiated with doses up to 1 kGy some edible flowers to examine their physical tolerance to gamma-rays. Furthermore, high doses gamma irradiation causes petal withering, browning process and injury in edible flowers. (author)

  2. Maximizing the Range of a Projectile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ronald A.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses solutions to the problem of maximizing the range of a projectile. Presents three references that solve the problem with and without the use of calculus. Offers a fourth solution suitable for introductory physics courses that relies more on trigonometry and the geometry of the problem. (MDH)

  3. Robust Utility Maximization Under Convex Portfolio Constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matoussi, Anis; Mezghani, Hanen; Mnif, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    We study a robust maximization problem from terminal wealth and consumption under a convex constraints on the portfolio. We state the existence and the uniqueness of the consumption–investment strategy by studying the associated quadratic backward stochastic differential equation. We characterize the optimal control by using the duality method and deriving a dynamic maximum principle

  4. Ehrenfest's Lottery--Time and Entropy Maximization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashbaugh, Henry S.

    2010-01-01

    Successful teaching of the Second Law of Thermodynamics suffers from limited simple examples linking equilibrium to entropy maximization. I describe a thought experiment connecting entropy to a lottery that mixes marbles amongst a collection of urns. This mixing obeys diffusion-like dynamics. Equilibrium is achieved when the marble distribution is…

  5. Reserve design to maximize species persistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert G. Haight; Laurel E. Travis

    2008-01-01

    We develop a reserve design strategy to maximize the probability of species persistence predicted by a stochastic, individual-based, metapopulation model. Because the population model does not fit exact optimization procedures, our strategy involves deriving promising solutions from theory, obtaining promising solutions from a simulation optimization heuristic, and...

  6. Maximal indecomposable past sets and event horizons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krolak, A.

    1984-01-01

    The existence of maximal indecomposable past sets MIPs is demonstrated using the Kuratowski-Zorn lemma. A criterion for the existence of an absolute event horizon in space-time is given in terms of MIPs and a relation to black hole event horizon is shown. (author)

  7. Maximization of eigenvalues using topology optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Niels Leergaard

    2000-01-01

    to localized modes in low density areas. The topology optimization problem is formulated using the SIMP method. Special attention is paid to a numerical method for removing localized eigenmodes in low density areas. The method is applied to numerical examples of maximizing the first eigenfrequency, One example...

  8. Maximizing Resource Utilization in Video Streaming Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsmirat, Mohammad Abdullah

    2013-01-01

    Video streaming has recently grown dramatically in popularity over the Internet, Cable TV, and wire-less networks. Because of the resource demanding nature of video streaming applications, maximizing resource utilization in any video streaming system is a key factor to increase the scalability and decrease the cost of the system. Resources to…

  9. A THEORY OF MAXIMIZING SENSORY INFORMATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hateren, J.H. van

    1992-01-01

    A theory is developed on the assumption that early sensory processing aims at maximizing the information rate in the channels connecting the sensory system to more central parts of the brain, where it is assumed that these channels are noisy and have a limited dynamic range. Given a stimulus power

  10. Maximizing scientific knowledge from randomized clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafsson, Finn; Atar, Dan; Pitt, Bertram

    2010-01-01

    Trialists have an ethical and financial responsibility to plan and conduct clinical trials in a manner that will maximize the scientific knowledge gained from the trial. However, the amount of scientific information generated by randomized clinical trials in cardiovascular medicine is highly vari...

  11. A Model of College Tuition Maximization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosshardt, Donald I.; Lichtenstein, Larry; Zaporowski, Mark P.

    2009-01-01

    This paper develops a series of models for optimal tuition pricing for private colleges and universities. The university is assumed to be a profit maximizing, price discriminating monopolist. The enrollment decision of student's is stochastic in nature. The university offers an effective tuition rate, comprised of stipulated tuition less financial…

  12. Logit Analysis for Profit Maximizing Loan Classification

    OpenAIRE

    Watt, David L.; Mortensen, Timothy L.; Leistritz, F. Larry

    1988-01-01

    Lending criteria and loan classification methods are developed. Rating system breaking points are analyzed to present a method to maximize loan revenues. Financial characteristics of farmers are used as determinants of delinquency in a multivariate logistic model. Results indicate that debt-to-asset and operating ration are most indicative of default.

  13. Developing maximal neuromuscular power: Part 1--biological basis of maximal power production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormie, Prue; McGuigan, Michael R; Newton, Robert U

    2011-01-01

    This series of reviews focuses on the most important neuromuscular function in many sport performances, the ability to generate maximal muscular power. Part 1 focuses on the factors that affect maximal power production, while part 2, which will follow in a forthcoming edition of Sports Medicine, explores the practical application of these findings by reviewing the scientific literature relevant to the development of training programmes that most effectively enhance maximal power production. The ability of the neuromuscular system to generate maximal power is affected by a range of interrelated factors. Maximal muscular power is defined and limited by the force-velocity relationship and affected by the length-tension relationship. The ability to generate maximal power is influenced by the type of muscle action involved and, in particular, the time available to develop force, storage and utilization of elastic energy, interactions of contractile and elastic elements, potentiation of contractile and elastic filaments as well as stretch reflexes. Furthermore, maximal power production is influenced by morphological factors including fibre type contribution to whole muscle area, muscle architectural features and tendon properties as well as neural factors including motor unit recruitment, firing frequency, synchronization and inter-muscular coordination. In addition, acute changes in the muscle environment (i.e. alterations resulting from fatigue, changes in hormone milieu and muscle temperature) impact the ability to generate maximal power. Resistance training has been shown to impact each of these neuromuscular factors in quite specific ways. Therefore, an understanding of the biological basis of maximal power production is essential for developing training programmes that effectively enhance maximal power production in the human.

  14. A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 1 study of the safety, tolerability and pharmacodynamics of volixibat in overweight and obese but otherwise healthy adults: implications for treatment of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Melissa; Jennings, Lee; Silberg, Debra G; Bliss, Caleb; Martin, Patrick

    2018-03-16

    Accumulation of toxic free cholesterol in hepatocytes may cause hepatic inflammation and fibrosis. Volixibat inhibits bile acid reuptake via the apical sodium bile acid transporter located on the luminal surface of the ileum. The resulting increase in bile acid synthesis from cholesterol could be beneficial in patients with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. This adaptive dose-finding study investigated the safety, tolerability, pharmacodynamics, and pharmacokinetics of volixibat. Overweight and obese adults were randomised 3:1 to double-blind volixibat or placebo, respectively, for 12 days. Volixibat was initiated at a once-daily dose of 20 mg, 40 mg or 80 mg. Based on the assessment of predefined safety events, volixibat dosing was either escalated or reduced. Other dose regimens (titrations and twice-daily dosing) were also evaluated. Assessments included safety, tolerability, stool hardness, faecal bile acid (FBA) excretion, and serum levels of 7α-hydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one (C4) and lipids. All 84 randomised participants (volixibat, 63; placebo, 21) completed the study, with no serious adverse events at doses of up to 80 mg per day (maximum assessed dose). The median number of daily bowel evacuations increased from 1 (range 0-4) to 2 (0-8) during volixibat treatment, and stool was looser with volixibat than placebo. Volixibat was minimally absorbed; serum levels were rarely quantifiable at any dose or sampling time point, thereby precluding pharmacokinetic analyses. Mean daily FBA excretion was 930.61 μmol (standard deviation [SD] 468.965) with volixibat and 224.75 μmol (195.403) with placebo; effects were maximal at volixibat doses ≥20 mg/day. Mean serum C4 concentrations at day 12 were 98.767 ng/mL (standard deviation, 61.5841) with volixibat and 16.497 ng/mL (12.9150) with placebo. Total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels decreased in the volixibat group, with median changes of - 0.70 mmol/L (range - 2.8 to 0.4) and - 0.6990

  15. Understanding Violations of Gricean Maxims in Preschoolers and Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mako eOkanda

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This study used a revised Conversational Violations Test to examine Gricean maxim violations in 4- to 6-year-old Japanese children and adults. Participants’ understanding of the following maxims was assessed: be informative (first maxim of quantity, avoid redundancy (second maxim of quantity, be truthful (maxim of quality, be relevant (maxim of relation, avoid ambiguity (second maxim of manner, and be polite (maxim of politeness. Sensitivity to violations of Gricean maxims increased with age: 4-year-olds’ understanding of maxims was near chance, 5-year-olds understood some maxims (first maxim of quantity and maxims of quality, relation, and manner, and 6-year-olds and adults understood all maxims. Preschoolers acquired the maxim of relation first and had the greatest difficulty understanding the second maxim of quantity. Children and adults differed in their comprehension of the maxim of politeness. The development of the pragmatic understanding of Gricean maxims and implications for the construction of developmental tasks from early childhood to adulthood are discussed.

  16. Safety, tolerability, and preliminary activity of CUDC-907, a first-in-class, oral, dual inhibitor of HDAC and PI3K, in patients with relapsed or refractory lymphoma or multiple myeloma: an open-label, dose-escalation, phase 1 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younes, Anas; Berdeja, Jesus G; Patel, Manish R; Flinn, Ian; Gerecitano, John F; Neelapu, Sattva S; Kelly, Kevin R; Copeland, Amanda R; Akins, Amy; Clancy, Myles S; Gong, Lucy; Wang, Jing; Ma, Anna; Viner, Jaye L; Oki, Yasuhiro

    2016-05-01

    Treatment options for patients with relapsed or refractory lymphoma and multiple myeloma are limited. CUDC-907 is an oral, first-in-class, small molecule that is designed to inhibit both histone deacetylase (HDAC) and PI3K enzymes, which are members of common oncogenic pathways in haematological malignancies. We aimed to assess overall safety and preliminary activity in this dose-escalation study of CUDC-907 monotherapy in patients with relapsed or refractory lymphoma and multiple myeloma. This open-label, first-in-man, phase 1 trial recruited adult patients (aged ≥18 years) with lymphoma or multiple myeloma who were refractory to or had relapsed after two or more previous regimens, from four US cancer centres. CUDC-907 was orally administered in a standard 3 + 3 dose-escalation design at four different dosing schedules, to which participants were sequentially assigned as follows: once daily, intermittently (twice or three times weekly; simultaneous enrolment), and daily for 5 days followed by a 2-day break (5/2), in 21-day cycles. Dosing started at 30 mg for the once-daily schedule and 60 mg for other schedules, escalating in 30 mg increments. Patients continued to receive CUDC-907 until disease progression or until other treatment discontinuation criteria were met. The primary objective was to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and recommended phase 2 dose, assessed in patients who received at least 66% of cycle 1 doses without modification and those who had a dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) in cycle 1 irrespective of dose modification. We assessed safety in all patients who received at least one dose of study drug. This ongoing trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01742988. Between Jan 23, 2013, and July 27, 2015, we enrolled 44 patients, of whom ten were sequentially assigned to CUDC-907 once-daily (MTD 60 mg), 12 to twice-weekly (MTD 150 mg), 15 to three-times-weekly (MTD 150 mg), and seven to the 5/2 dosing schedule (MTD 60 mg). 37

  17. Toleration out of respect?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægaard, Sune

    2013-01-01

    Under conditions of pluralism different cultures, interests or values can come into conflict, which raises the problem of how to secure peaceful co-existence. The idea of toleration historically emerged as an answer to this problem. Recently Rainer Forst has argued that toleration should not just...... be based on a modus vivendi designed to secure peaceful co-existence, but should be based on moral reasons. Forst therefore advances what he calls the ‘respect conception’ of toleration as an in itself morally desirable type of relationship, which is furthermore the only conception of toleration...... that avoids various so-called ‘paradoxes of toleration’. The paper first examines whether Forst’s respect conception can be applied descriptively to distinguish between actual patterns of behaviour and classify different acts of toleration. Then the focus is shifted to toleration out of respect as a normative...

  18. Coverage maximization under resource constraints using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-02-07

    Feb 7, 2015 ... works such as peer-to-peer networks [1,2], delay tolerant networks [3], mobile social ... nature of many such networks, the process needs to travel through the ..... the effect of this modification by computer simulation of the ...

  19. Tolerance in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Atkinson, Nigel S.

    2009-01-01

    The set of genes that underlie ethanol tolerance (inducible resistance) are likely to overlap with the set of genes responsible for ethanol addiction. Whereas addiction is difficult to recognize in simple model systems, behavioral tolerance is readily identifiable and can be induced in large populations of animals. Thus, tolerance lends itself to analysis in model systems with powerful genetics. Drosophila melanogaster has been used by a variety of laboratories for the identification of genes...

  20. Tissue tolerance under the combination treatment of maxillary cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egawa, Jun; Ono, Isamu; Suzuki, Kunio; Takeda, Chisato; Ebihara, Satoshi.

    1977-01-01

    The tissue tolerance doses of the maxillary sinus structures were estimated when they were subjected to treatment for maxillary cancer by the usual combination of surgery, radiotherapy and regional arterial infusion of 5-fluorouracil. Equivalent single dose calculation was applied with irreversible tissue damage as an indicator. The retardation of epithelialization of the maxillary sinus operated upon appeared to be correlated with the dose delivered. The study indicated that 2,200 rad expressed by equivalent single dose is a safe dose level for sufficient epithelialization. The safety dose level for the bony structure, exposed by surgery, seemed to be at 1,800 rad. (auth.)

  1. Tissue tolerance under the combination treatment of maxillary cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egawa, J [Teikyo Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Medicine; Ono, I; Suzuki, K; Takeda, C; Ebihara, S

    1977-06-01

    The tissue tolerance doses of the maxillary sinus structures were estimated when they were subjected to treatment for maxillary cancer by the usual combination of surgery, radiotherapy, and regional arterial infusion of 5-fluorouracil. Equivalent single dose calculation was applied with irreversible tissue damage as an indicator. The retardation of epithelialization of the maxillary sinus operated upon appeared to be correlated with the dose delivered. The study indicated that 2,200 rad expressed by equivalent single dose is a safe dose level for sufficient epithelialization. The safety dose level for the bony structure, exposed by surgery, seemed to be at 1,800 rad.

  2. Reversal of oxycodone and hydrocodone tolerance by diazepam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonek, Maciej; Akbarali, Hamid I; Henderson, Graeme; Dewey, William L

    2017-11-01

    The Centers for Disease Control has declared opioid abuse to be an epidemic. Overdose deaths are largely assumed to be the result of excessive opioid consumption. In many of these cases, however, opioid abusers are often polydrug abusers. Benzodiazepines are one of the most commonly co-abused substances and pose a significant risk to opioid users. In 2016, the FDA required boxed warnings - the FDA's strongest warning - for prescription opioid analgesics and benzodiazepines about the serious risks associated with using these medications at the same time. The point of our studies was to evaluate the interactions between these two classes of drugs. We investigated whether diazepam adds to the depressant effects of opioids or do they alter the levels of tolerance to opioids. In the present study, we have found that the antinociceptive tolerance that developed to repeated administration of oxycodone was reversed by an acute dose of diazepam. Antinociceptive tolerance to hydrocodone was also reversed by acute injection of diazepam; however, a fourfold higher dose of diazepam was required when compared to reversal of oxycodone-induced tolerance. These doses of diazepam did not potentiate the acute antinociceptive effect of either opioid. The same dose of diazepam that reversed oxycodone antinociceptive tolerance also reversed oxycodone locomotor tolerance while having no potentiating effects. These studies show that diazepam does not potentiate the acute effect of prescription opioids but reverses the tolerance developed after chronic administration of the drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Haloperidol Disrupts Opioid-Antinociceptive Tolerance and Physical Dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cheng; Chen, Yan; Tang, Lei

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies from our laboratory and others have implicated a critical role of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) in opioid tolerance and dependence. Translational research targeting the CaMKII pathway is challenging, if not impossible, because of a lack of selective inhibitors. We discovered in a preliminary study that haloperidol, a butyrophenone antipsychotic drug, inhibited CaMKII, which led us to hypothesize that haloperidol can attenuate opioid tolerance and dependence by inhibiting CaMKII. The hypothesis was tested in two rodent models of opioid tolerance and dependence. Pretreatment with haloperidol (0.2–1.0 mg/kg i.p.) prevented the development of morphine tolerance and dependence in a dose-dependent manner. Short-term treatment with haloperidol (0.06–0.60 mg/kg i.p.) dose-dependently reversed the established morphine-antinociceptive tolerance and physical dependence. Correlating with behavioral effects, pretreatment or short-term treatment with haloperidol dose-dependently inhibited morphine-induced up-regulation of supraspinal and spinal CaMKIIα activity. Moreover, haloperidol given orally was also effective in attenuating morphine-induced CaMKIIα activity, antinociceptive tolerance, and physical dependence. Taken together, these data suggest that haloperidol attenuates opioid tolerance and dependence by suppressing CaMKII activity. Because haloperidol is a clinically used drug that can be taken orally, we propose that the drug may be of use in attenuating opioid tolerance and dependence. PMID:21436292

  4. Maximizing Tumor Immunity With Fractionated Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaue, Doerthe, E-mail: dschaue@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Ratikan, Josephine A.; Iwamoto, Keisuke S.; McBride, William H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Technologic advances have led to increased clinical use of higher-sized fractions of radiation dose and higher total doses. How these modify the pathways involved in tumor cell death, normal tissue response, and signaling to the immune system has been inadequately explored. Here we ask how radiation dose and fraction size affect antitumor immunity, the suppression thereof, and how this might relate to tumor control. Methods and Materials: Mice bearing B16-OVA murine melanoma were treated with up to 15 Gy radiation given in various-size fractions, and tumor growth followed. The tumor-specific immune response in the spleen was assessed by interferon-{gamma} enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay with ovalbumin (OVA) as the surrogate tumor antigen and the contribution of regulatory T cells (Tregs) determined by the proportion of CD4{sup +}CD25{sup hi}Foxp3{sup +} T cells. Results: After single doses, tumor control increased with the size of radiation dose, as did the number of tumor-reactive T cells. This was offset at the highest dose by an increase in Treg representation. Fractionated treatment with medium-size radiation doses of 7.5 Gy/fraction gave the best tumor control and tumor immunity while maintaining low Treg numbers. Conclusions: Radiation can be an immune adjuvant, but the response varies with the size of dose per fraction. The ultimate challenge is to optimally integrate cancer immunotherapy into radiation therapy.

  5. Maximizing Tumor Immunity With Fractionated Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaue, Dörthe; Ratikan, Josephine A.; Iwamoto, Keisuke S.; McBride, William H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Technologic advances have led to increased clinical use of higher-sized fractions of radiation dose and higher total doses. How these modify the pathways involved in tumor cell death, normal tissue response, and signaling to the immune system has been inadequately explored. Here we ask how radiation dose and fraction size affect antitumor immunity, the suppression thereof, and how this might relate to tumor control. Methods and Materials: Mice bearing B16-OVA murine melanoma were treated with up to 15 Gy radiation given in various-size fractions, and tumor growth followed. The tumor-specific immune response in the spleen was assessed by interferon-γ enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay with ovalbumin (OVA) as the surrogate tumor antigen and the contribution of regulatory T cells (Tregs) determined by the proportion of CD4 + CD25 hi Foxp3 + T cells. Results: After single doses, tumor control increased with the size of radiation dose, as did the number of tumor-reactive T cells. This was offset at the highest dose by an increase in Treg representation. Fractionated treatment with medium-size radiation doses of 7.5 Gy/fraction gave the best tumor control and tumor immunity while maintaining low Treg numbers. Conclusions: Radiation can be an immune adjuvant, but the response varies with the size of dose per fraction. The ultimate challenge is to optimally integrate cancer immunotherapy into radiation therapy.

  6. Role of adenosine receptors in caffeine tolerance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holtzman, S.G.; Mante, S.; Minneman, K.P. (Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (USA))

    1991-01-01

    Caffeine is a competitive antagonist at adenosine receptors. Receptor up-regulation during chronic drug treatment has been proposed to be the mechanism of tolerance to the behavioral stimulant effects of caffeine. This study reassessed the role of adenosine receptors in caffeine tolerance. Separate groups of rats were given scheduled access to drinking bottles containing plain tap water or a 0.1% solution of caffeine. Daily drug intake averaged 60-75 mg/kg and resulted in complete tolerance to caffeine-induced stimulation of locomotor activity, which could not be surmounted by increasing the dose of caffeine. 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (0.001-1.0 mg/kg) dose dependently decreased the locomotor activity of caffeine-tolerant rats and their water-treated controls but was 8-fold more potent in the latter group. Caffeine (1.0-10 mg/kg) injected concurrently with 5-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine antagonized the decreases in locomotor activity comparably in both groups. Apparent pA2 values for tolerant and control rats also were comparable: 5.05 and 5.11. Thus, the adenosine-antagonist activity of caffeine was undiminished in tolerant rats. The effects of chronic caffeine administration on parameters of adenosine receptor binding and function were measured in cerebral cortex. There were no differences between brain tissue from control and caffeine-treated rats in number and affinity of adenosine binding sites or in receptor-mediated increases (A2 adenosine receptor) and decreases (A1 adenosine receptor) in cAMP accumulation. These results are consistent with theoretical arguments that changes in receptor density should not affect the potency of a competitive antagonist. Experimental evidence and theoretical considerations indicate that up-regulation of adenosine receptors is not the mechanism of tolerance to caffeine-induced stimulation of locomotor activity.

  7. Role of adenosine receptors in caffeine tolerance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holtzman, S.G.; Mante, S.; Minneman, K.P.

    1991-01-01

    Caffeine is a competitive antagonist at adenosine receptors. Receptor up-regulation during chronic drug treatment has been proposed to be the mechanism of tolerance to the behavioral stimulant effects of caffeine. This study reassessed the role of adenosine receptors in caffeine tolerance. Separate groups of rats were given scheduled access to drinking bottles containing plain tap water or a 0.1% solution of caffeine. Daily drug intake averaged 60-75 mg/kg and resulted in complete tolerance to caffeine-induced stimulation of locomotor activity, which could not be surmounted by increasing the dose of caffeine. 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (0.001-1.0 mg/kg) dose dependently decreased the locomotor activity of caffeine-tolerant rats and their water-treated controls but was 8-fold more potent in the latter group. Caffeine (1.0-10 mg/kg) injected concurrently with 5-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine antagonized the decreases in locomotor activity comparably in both groups. Apparent pA2 values for tolerant and control rats also were comparable: 5.05 and 5.11. Thus, the adenosine-antagonist activity of caffeine was undiminished in tolerant rats. The effects of chronic caffeine administration on parameters of adenosine receptor binding and function were measured in cerebral cortex. There were no differences between brain tissue from control and caffeine-treated rats in number and affinity of adenosine binding sites or in receptor-mediated increases (A2 adenosine receptor) and decreases (A1 adenosine receptor) in cAMP accumulation. These results are consistent with theoretical arguments that changes in receptor density should not affect the potency of a competitive antagonist. Experimental evidence and theoretical considerations indicate that up-regulation of adenosine receptors is not the mechanism of tolerance to caffeine-induced stimulation of locomotor activity

  8. Refined reservoir description to maximize oil recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flewitt, W.E.

    1975-01-01

    To assure maximized oil recovery from older pools, reservoir description has been advanced by fully integrating original open-hole logs and the recently introduced interpretive techniques made available through cased-hole wireline saturation logs. A refined reservoir description utilizing normalized original wireline porosity logs has been completed in the Judy Creek Beaverhill Lake ''A'' Pool, a reefal carbonate pool with current potential productivity of 100,000 BOPD and 188 active wells. Continuous porosity was documented within a reef rim and cap while discontinuous porous lenses characterized an interior lagoon. With the use of pulsed neutron logs and production data a separate water front and pressure response was recognized within discrete environmental units. The refined reservoir description aided in reservoir simulation model studies and quantifying pool performance. A pattern water flood has now replaced the original peripheral bottom water drive to maximize oil recovery

  9. Efficacy and tolerability of chemotherapy with modified dose-dense TCF regimen (TCF-dd) in locally advanced or metastatic gastric cancer: final results of a phase II trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasello, Gianluca; Liguigli, Wanda; Poli, Rossana; Lazzarelli, Silvia; Brighenti, Matteo; Negri, Federica; Curti, Alessandra; Martinotti, Mario; Olivetti, Lucio; Rovatti, Massimo; Donati, Gianvito; Passalacqua, Rodolfo

    2014-10-01

    We previously studied a dose-dense TCF (TCF-dd) regimen demonstrating its feasibility and an activity comparable to epirubicin-based chemotherapy and TCF q3w in terms of overall survival and time to progression (TTP). We report here the final results of a phase II study of chemotherapy with a modified TCF-dd regimen in locally advanced or metastatic gastric cancer (MGC). Patients with histologically confirmed measurable MGC, not previously treated for advanced disease, received docetaxel 70 mg/m(2) day 1, cisplatin 60 mg/m(2) day 1, l-folinic acid 100 mg/m(2) days 1 and 2, followed by 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) 400 mg/m(2) bolus days 1 and 2, and then 600 mg/m(2) as a 22-h continuous infusion days 1 and 2, every 14 days, plus pegfilgrastim 6 mg on day 3. Patients aged ≥65 years received the same schedule with a dose reduction of 30 %. Study duration: December 2007-November 2010. Forty-six consecutive patients were enrolled (78 % male, 22 % female; median age, 66 years, range, 38-76 years; ECOG PS: 0, 48 %, 1, 46 %). Primary endpoint was overall response rate (ORR). A median of four cycles (range, one to six) was administered. Forty-three patients were evaluated for response (93.5 %) and all for toxicity: 3 complete response (CR), 25 partial response (PR), 10 stable disease (SD), and 5 progressive disease (PD) were observed, for an ORR by intention to treat (ITT) of 61 % (95 % CI 47-75). Median overall survival (OS) was 17.63 months (95 % CI, 13.67-20.67); median progression-free survival was 8.9 months (95 % CI, 6.5-13.4). Twenty-one patients (46.0 %) were treated at full doses without any delay, thus respecting the dose-dense criterion. Most frequent grade 3-4 toxicities were neutropenia (20 %), leukopenia (4 %), thrombocytopenia (2 %), anemia (2 %), febrile neutropenia (6 %), asthenia (22 %), diarrhea (4 %), nausea/vomiting (11 %), and hypokalemia (6 %). Overall, TCF-dd was shown to be safe. The TCF-dd regimen in locally advanced or MGC

  10. Derivative pricing based on local utility maximization

    OpenAIRE

    Jan Kallsen

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses a new approach to contingent claim valuation in general incomplete market models. We determine the neutral derivative price which occurs if investors maximize their local utility and if derivative demand and supply are balanced. We also introduce the sensitivity process of a contingent claim. This process quantifies the reliability of the neutral derivative price and it can be used to construct price bounds. Moreover, it allows to calibrate market models in order to be co...

  11. Control of Shareholders’ Wealth Maximization in Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    A. O. Oladipupo; C. O. Okafor

    2014-01-01

    This research focuses on who controls shareholder’s wealth maximization and how does this affect firm’s performance in publicly quoted non-financial companies in Nigeria. The shareholder fund was the dependent while explanatory variables were firm size (proxied by log of turnover), retained earning (representing management control) and dividend payment (representing measure of shareholders control). The data used for this study were obtained from the Nigerian Stock Exchange [NSE] fact book an...

  12. Definable maximal discrete sets in forcing extensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Törnquist, Asger Dag; Schrittesser, David

    2018-01-01

    Let  be a Σ11 binary relation, and recall that a set A is -discrete if no two elements of A are related by . We show that in the Sacks and Miller forcing extensions of L there is a Δ12 maximal -discrete set. We use this to answer in the negative the main question posed in [5] by showing...

  13. Dynamic Convex Duality in Constrained Utility Maximization

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yusong; Zheng, Harry

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we study a constrained utility maximization problem following the convex duality approach. After formulating the primal and dual problems, we construct the necessary and sufficient conditions for both the primal and dual problems in terms of FBSDEs plus additional conditions. Such formulation then allows us to explicitly characterize the primal optimal control as a function of the adjoint process coming from the dual FBSDEs in a dynamic fashion and vice versa. Moreover, we also...

  14. Single maximal versus combination punch kinematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piorkowski, Barry A; Lees, Adrian; Barton, Gabor J

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the influence of punch type (Jab, Cross, Lead Hook and Reverse Hook) and punch modality (Single maximal, 'In-synch' and 'Out of synch' combination) on punch speed and delivery time. Ten competition-standard volunteers performed punches with markers placed on their anatomical landmarks for 3D motion capture with an eight-camera optoelectronic system. Speed and duration between key moments were computed. There were significant differences in contact speed between punch types (F(2,18,84.87) = 105.76, p = 0.001) with Lead and Reverse Hooks developing greater speed than Jab and Cross. There were significant differences in contact speed between punch modalities (F(2,64,102.87) = 23.52, p = 0.001) with the Single maximal (M+/- SD: 9.26 +/- 2.09 m/s) higher than 'Out of synch' (7.49 +/- 2.32 m/s), 'In-synch' left (8.01 +/- 2.35 m/s) or right lead (7.97 +/- 2.53 m/s). Delivery times were significantly lower for Jab and Cross than Hook. Times were significantly lower 'In-synch' than a Single maximal or 'Out of synch' combination mode. It is concluded that a defender may have more evasion-time than previously reported. This research could be of use to performers and coaches when considering training preparations.

  15. Formation Control for the MAXIM Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luquette, Richard J.; Leitner, Jesse; Gendreau, Keith; Sanner, Robert M.

    2004-01-01

    Over the next twenty years, a wave of change is occurring in the space-based scientific remote sensing community. While the fundamental limits in the spatial and angular resolution achievable in spacecraft have been reached, based on today s technology, an expansive new technology base has appeared over the past decade in the area of Distributed Space Systems (DSS). A key subset of the DSS technology area is that which covers precision formation flying of space vehicles. Through precision formation flying, the baselines, previously defined by the largest monolithic structure which could fit in the largest launch vehicle fairing, are now virtually unlimited. Several missions including the Micro-Arcsecond X-ray Imaging Mission (MAXIM), and the Stellar Imager will drive the formation flying challenges to achieve unprecedented baselines for high resolution, extended-scene, interferometry in the ultraviolet and X-ray regimes. This paper focuses on establishing the feasibility for the formation control of the MAXIM mission. MAXIM formation flying requirements are on the order of microns, while Stellar Imager mission requirements are on the order of nanometers. This paper specifically addresses: (1) high-level science requirements for these missions and how they evolve into engineering requirements; and (2) the development of linearized equations of relative motion for a formation operating in an n-body gravitational field. Linearized equations of motion provide the ground work for linear formation control designs.

  16. Gradient Dynamics and Entropy Production Maximization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janečka, Adam; Pavelka, Michal

    2018-01-01

    We compare two methods for modeling dissipative processes, namely gradient dynamics and entropy production maximization. Both methods require similar physical inputs-how energy (or entropy) is stored and how it is dissipated. Gradient dynamics describes irreversible evolution by means of dissipation potential and entropy, it automatically satisfies Onsager reciprocal relations as well as their nonlinear generalization (Maxwell-Onsager relations), and it has statistical interpretation. Entropy production maximization is based on knowledge of free energy (or another thermodynamic potential) and entropy production. It also leads to the linear Onsager reciprocal relations and it has proven successful in thermodynamics of complex materials. Both methods are thermodynamically sound as they ensure approach to equilibrium, and we compare them and discuss their advantages and shortcomings. In particular, conditions under which the two approaches coincide and are capable of providing the same constitutive relations are identified. Besides, a commonly used but not often mentioned step in the entropy production maximization is pinpointed and the condition of incompressibility is incorporated into gradient dynamics.

  17. Caffeine tolerance: behavioral, electrophysiological and neurochemical evidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, D.T.; Khan, S.; Forde, J.; Hirsh, K.R.

    1985-01-01

    The development of tolerance to the stimulatory action of caffeine upon mesencephalic reticular neurons and upon spontaneous locomotor activity was evaluated in rats after two weeks of chronic exposure to low doses of caffeine (5-10 mg/kg/day via their drinking water). These doses are achievable through dietary intake of caffeine-containing beverages in man. Concomitant measurement of [ 3 H]-CHA binding in the mesencephalic reticular formation was also carried out in order to explore the neurochemical basis of the development of tolerance. Caffeine, 2.5 mg/kg i.v., markedly increased the firing rate of reticular neurons in caffeine naive rats but failed to modify the neuronal activity in a group exposed chronically to low doses of caffeine. In addition, in spontaneous locomotor activity studies, the data show a distinct shift to the right of the caffeine dose-response curve in caffeine pretreated rats. These results clearly indicate that tolerance develops to the stimulatory action of caffeine upon the reticular formation at the single neuronal activity level as well as upon spontaneous locomotor activity. Furthermore, in chronically caffeine exposed rats, an increase in the number of binding sites for [ 3 H]-CHA was observed in reticular formation membranes without any change in receptor affinity. 28 references, 4 figures

  18. Dose-escalated total body irradiation and autologous stem cell transplantation for refractory hematologic malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McAfee, Steven L.; Powell, Simon N.; Colby, Christine; Spitzer, Thomas R.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of dose escalation of total body irradiation (TBI) above the previously reported maximally tolerated dose, we have undertaken a Phase I-II trial of dose-escalated TBI with autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT) for chemotherapy-refractory lymphoma. Methods and Materials: Nine lymphoma patients with primary refractory disease (PRD) or in resistant relapse (RR) received dose-escalated TBI and PBSCT. The three dose levels of fractionated TBI (200 cGy twice daily) were 1,600 cGy, 1,800 cGy, and 2,000 cGy. Lung blocks were used to reduce the TBI transmission dose by 50%, and the chest wall dose was supplemented to the prescribed dose using electrons. Shielding of the kidneys was performed to keep the maximal renal dose at 1,600 cGy. Three patients, two with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) in RR and one with PRD Hodgkin's disease, received 1,600 cGy + PBSCT, three patients (two NHL in RR, one PRD) received 1,800 cGy + PBSCT, and three patients with NHL (two in RR, one PRD) received 2,000 cGy + PBSCT. Results: Toxicities associated with this high-dose TBI regimen included reversible hepatic veno-occlusive disease in 1 patient, Grade 2 mucositis requiring narcotic analgesics in 8 patients, and neurologic toxicities consisting of a symmetrical sensory neuropathy (n=4) and Lhermitte's syndrome (n=1). Interstitial pneumonitis developed in 1 patient who received 1,800 cGy after receiving recombinant α-interferon (with exacerbation after rechallenge with interferon). Six (66%) patients achieved a response. Four (44%) patients achieved complete responses, three of which were of a duration greater than 1 year, and 2 (22%) patients achieved a partial response. One patient remains disease-free more than 5 years posttransplant. Corticosteroid-induced gastritis and postoperative infection resulted in the death of 1 patient in complete response, 429 days posttransplant. Conclusion: TBI in a dose range 1,600-2,000 cGy as

  19. Compromise and Toleration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostbøll, Christian F.

    Political compromise is akin to toleration, since both consist of an "agreement to disagree." Compromise and toleration also share a predicament of being regarded as ambiguous virtues that require of us to accept something we actually regard as wrong. However, we misunderstand the nature, justifi...... in compromise are more stringent than those for being tolerated. Still, the limits of compromise cannot be drawn to narrowly if it is to remain its value as a form of agreement that respects and embodies the differences of opinion in society.......Political compromise is akin to toleration, since both consist of an "agreement to disagree." Compromise and toleration also share a predicament of being regarded as ambiguous virtues that require of us to accept something we actually regard as wrong. However, we misunderstand the nature......, justification, and limits of compromise if we see it merely as a matter of toleration. While toleration is mainly a matter of accepting citizens' equal right to co-existence as subjects to law, political compromise includes the parties in making law – it makes them co-authors of law. Toleration entails...

  20. Tolerances in micro manufacturing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Zhang, Yang; Islam, Aminul

    This paper describes a method for analysis of tolerances in micro manufacturing. It proposes a mapping oftolerances to dimensions and compares this with current available international standards. The analysisdocuments that tolerances are not scaled down as the absolute dimension. In practice...

  1. Fault tolerant computing systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randell, B.

    1981-01-01

    Fault tolerance involves the provision of strategies for error detection damage assessment, fault treatment and error recovery. A survey is given of the different sorts of strategies used in highly reliable computing systems, together with an outline of recent research on the problems of providing fault tolerance in parallel and distributed computing systems. (orig.)

  2. Toleration out of respect?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægaard, Sune

    2014-01-01

    be based on a modus vivendi designed to secure peaceful co-existence, but should be based on moral reasons. Forst therefore advances what he calls the ‘respect conception’ of toleration as an in itself morally desirable type of relationship, which is furthermore the only conception of toleration...

  3. Recognition and Toleration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægaard, Sune

    2010-01-01

    Recognition and toleration are ways of relating to the diversity characteristic of multicultural societies. The article concerns the possible meanings of toleration and recognition, and the conflict that is often claimed to exist between these two approaches to diversity. Different forms or inter...

  4. Cardiorespiratory Coordination in Repeated Maximal Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergi Garcia-Retortillo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Increases in cardiorespiratory coordination (CRC after training with no differences in performance and physiological variables have recently been reported using a principal component analysis approach. However, no research has yet evaluated the short-term effects of exercise on CRC. The aim of this study was to delineate the behavior of CRC under different physiological initial conditions produced by repeated maximal exercises. Fifteen participants performed 2 consecutive graded and maximal cycling tests. Test 1 was performed without any previous exercise, and Test 2 6 min after Test 1. Both tests started at 0 W and the workload was increased by 25 W/min in males and 20 W/min in females, until they were not able to maintain the prescribed cycling frequency of 70 rpm for more than 5 consecutive seconds. A principal component (PC analysis of selected cardiovascular and cardiorespiratory variables (expired fraction of O2, expired fraction of CO2, ventilation, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and heart rate was performed to evaluate the CRC defined by the number of PCs in both tests. In order to quantify the degree of coordination, the information entropy was calculated and the eigenvalues of the first PC (PC1 were compared between tests. Although no significant differences were found between the tests with respect to the performed maximal workload (Wmax, maximal oxygen consumption (VO2 max, or ventilatory threshold (VT, an increase in the number of PCs and/or a decrease of eigenvalues of PC1 (t = 2.95; p = 0.01; d = 1.08 was found in Test 2 compared to Test 1. Moreover, entropy was significantly higher (Z = 2.33; p = 0.02; d = 1.43 in the last test. In conclusion, despite the fact that no significant differences were observed in the conventionally explored maximal performance and physiological variables (Wmax, VO2 max, and VT between tests, a reduction of CRC was observed in Test 2. These results emphasize the interest of CRC

  5. Remember Tolerance Differently

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønder, Lars

    2012-01-01

    This essay questions the linear conception of history which often accompanies the way contemporary democratic theory tends to disavow tolerance's discontinuities and remainders. In the spirit of Foucault's genealogy of descent, the idea is to develop a new sense of tolerance's history, not by inv......This essay questions the linear conception of history which often accompanies the way contemporary democratic theory tends to disavow tolerance's discontinuities and remainders. In the spirit of Foucault's genealogy of descent, the idea is to develop a new sense of tolerance's history......, not by invoking a critique external to contemporary democratic theory, but by witnessing the history of tolerance paraliptically, with an eye to what it obscures and yet presupposes....

  6. Retention, dosing, tolerability and patient reported seizure outcome of Zonisamide as only add-on treatment under real-life conditions in adult patients with partial onset seizures: Results of the observational study ZOOM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamer, Hajo; Baulac, Michel; McMurray, Rob; Kockelmann, Edgar

    2016-01-01

    Zonisamide is licensed for adjunctive therapy for partial-onset seizures with or without secondary generalisation in patients 6 years and older and as monotherapy for the treatment of partial seizures in adult patients with newly diagnosed epilepsy, and shows a favourable pharmacokinetic profile with low interaction potential with other drugs. The aim of the present study was to gather real-life data on retention and modalities of zonisamide use when administered as only add-on treatment to a current AED monotherapy in adult patients with partial-onset seizures. This multicenter observational study was performed in 4 European countries and comprised three visits: baseline, and after 3 and 6 months. Data on patients' retention, reported efficacy, tolerability and safety, and quality of life was collected. Of 100 included patients, 93 could be evaluated. After 6 months, the retention rate of zonisamide add-on therapy was 82.8%. At this time, a reduction of seizure frequency of at least 50% was observed in 79.7% of patients, with 43.6% reporting seizure freedom over the last 3 months of the study period. Adverse events were reported by 19.4% of patients, with fatigue, agitation, dizziness, and headache being most frequent. Approximately 25% of patients were older than 60 years, many of whom suffered from late-onset epilepsy. Compared to younger patients, these patients showed considerable differences with regard to their antiepileptic drug regimen at baseline, and slightly higher responder and retention rates at 6 months. Despite limitations due to the non-interventional open-label design and the low sample size, the results show that zonisamide as only add-on therapy is well retained, indicating effectiveness in the majority of patients under real-life conditions. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Optimal optical communication terminal structure for maximizing the link budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jian; Jiang, Dagang; Deng, Ke; Zhang, Peng

    2015-02-01

    Ordinary inter-satellite optical includes at least three optical paths for acquisition, tracking and communication, the three optical paths work simultaneously and share the received power. An optimal structure of inter-satellite optical communication terminal with single working optical path at each of working stages of acquisition and communication is introduced. A space optical switch based on frustrated total internal reflection effect is applied to switch the received laser power between the acquisition sensor and the communication sensor between the stages of acquisition and communication, this is named as power fusion which means power is transferred for shutting down unused optical path. For the stages of tracking and communication, a multiple cells sensor is used to accomplish the operation of tracking while communication, this is named as function fusion which means accomplishing multiple functions by one device to reduce the redundant optical paths. For optical communication terminal with single working path structure, the total received laser power would be detected by one sensor for each different stages of acquisition, tracking and communication, the link budget would be maximized, and this design would help to enlarge the system tolerance and reduce the acquisition time.

  8. Phase I dose escalation pharmacokinetic assessment of intravenous humanized anti-MUC1 antibody AS1402 in patients with advanced breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegram, Mark D; Borges, Virginia F; Ibrahim, Nuhad; Fuloria, Jyotsna; Shapiro, Charles; Perez, Susan; Wang, Karen; Schaedli Stark, Franziska; Courtenay Luck, Nigel

    2009-01-01

    . Repeated iv administration of AS1402 was well tolerated, with a maximum tolerated dose (MTD) exceeding 16 mg/kg, the highest dose administered in this study. The half-life and exposure of AS1402 were such that weekly dosing could achieve plasma concentrations corresponding to the maximal ADCC activity observed in vitro. A phase II study is ongoing to evaluate the clinical activity of AS1402 in patients with advanced breast cancer. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00096057.

  9. Calculation methods for determining dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endres, G.W.R.; Tanner, J.E.; Scherpelz, R.I.; Hadlock, D.E.

    1987-11-01

    A series of calculations of neutron fluence as a function of energy in an anthropomorphic phantom was performed to develop a system for determining effective dose equivalent for external radiation sources. Critical organ dose equivalents are calculated and effective dose equivalents are determined using ICRP-26 [1] methods. Quality factors based on both present definitions and ICRP-40 definitions are used in the analysis. The results of these calculations are presented and discussed. The effective dose equivalent determined using ICRP-26 methods is significantly smaller than the dose equivalent determined by traditional methods. No existing personnel dosimeter or health physics instrument can determine effective dose equivalent. At the present time, the conversion of dosimeter response to dose equivalent is based on calculations for maximal or ''cap'' values using homogeneous spherical or cylindrical phantoms. The evaluated dose equivalent is, therefore, a poor approximation of the effective dose equivalent as defined by ICRP Publication 26. 3 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  10. Maximizing therapeutic gain with gemcitabine and fractionated radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, Kathy A.; Milas, Luka; Hunter, Nancy R.; Elshaikh, Mohamed; Buchmiller, Lara; Kishi, Kazushi; Hittelman, K. Walter; Ang, K. Kian

    1999-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The nucleoside analogue gemcitabine inhibits cellular repair and repopulation, induces apoptosis, causes tumor growth delay, and enhances radiation-induced growth delay. After single doses of drug and radiation, maximum enhancement of tumor response was obtained when gemcitabine preceded radiation by at least 24 h. Conversely, the cellular radioresponse of the normal gastrointestinal epithelium was slightly protected when gemcitabine and radiation were separated by 24 h. This differential response created a time frame within which therapeutic gain could be maximized. In our present investigation, we sought to define the most therapeutically beneficial scheme of gemcitabine administration when combined with fractionated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: C3Hf/Kam mice were given identical drug and radiation schedules of administration, and both normal tissue (jejunal mucosa) and tumor (Sa-NH) responses were measured. Irradiation was given once per day for 5 days in normal tissue and tumor growth delay studies and twice per day for the tumor cure endpoint. A total dose of 25 mg/kg gemcitabine was given i.p. in 1 of 3 schedules: a single dose of 25 mg/kg 24 h before the start of fractionated irradiation, 12.5 mg/kg 24 h before the first and third radiation doses, or 24 h before each of 5 radiation doses. Groups of mice bearing 7- or 8-mm diameter tumors were treated with gemcitabine alone or in combination with fractionated irradiation under ambient or hypoxic conditions. The survival response of the jejunal mucosa was quantified by the microcolony assay and histologically by quantifying apoptosis, mitosis, S-phase fraction, and crypt cellularity. Results: For tumor growth delay, dose-modifying factors (DMFs) were similar (1.34-1.46) for all 3 schedules of drug administration. In contrast, the response of the jejunum was strongly dependent on the schedule of gemcitabine administration. A single dose of gemcitabine before the start of fractionated

  11. Postactivation potentiation biases maximal isometric strength assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Leonardo Coelho Rabello; Oliveira, Felipe Bruno Dias; Oliveira, Thiago Pires; Assumpção, Claudio de Oliveira; Greco, Camila Coelho; Cardozo, Adalgiso Croscato; Denadai, Benedito Sérgio

    2014-01-01

    Postactivation potentiation (PAP) is known to enhance force production. Maximal isometric strength assessment protocols usually consist of two or more maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVCs). The objective of this study was to determine if PAP would influence isometric strength assessment. Healthy male volunteers (n = 23) performed two five-second MVCs separated by a 180-seconds interval. Changes in isometric peak torque (IPT), time to achieve it (tPTI), contractile impulse (CI), root mean square of the electromyographic signal during PTI (RMS), and rate of torque development (RTD), in different intervals, were measured. Significant increases in IPT (240.6 ± 55.7 N·m versus 248.9 ± 55.1 N·m), RTD (746 ± 152 N·m·s(-1) versus 727 ± 158 N·m·s(-1)), and RMS (59.1 ± 12.2% RMSMAX  versus 54.8 ± 9.4% RMSMAX) were found on the second MVC. tPTI decreased significantly on the second MVC (2373 ± 1200 ms versus 2784 ± 1226 ms). We conclude that a first MVC leads to PAP that elicits significant enhancements in strength-related variables of a second MVC performed 180 seconds later. If disconsidered, this phenomenon might bias maximal isometric strength assessment, overestimating some of these variables.

  12. Gain maximization in a probabilistic entanglement protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Lorenzo, Antonio; Esteves de Queiroz, Johnny Hebert

    Entanglement is a resource. We can therefore define gain as a monotonic function of entanglement G (E) . If a pair with entanglement E is produced with probability P, the net gain is N = PG (E) - (1 - P) C , where C is the cost of a failed attempt. We study a protocol where a pair of quantum systems is produced in a maximally entangled state ρm with probability Pm, while it is produced in a partially entangled state ρp with the complementary probability 1 -Pm . We mix a fraction w of the partially entangled pairs with the maximally entangled ones, i.e. we take the state to be ρ = (ρm + wUlocρpUloc+) / (1 + w) , where Uloc is an appropriate unitary local operation designed to maximize the entanglement of ρ. This procedure on one hand reduces the entanglement E, and hence the gain, but on the other hand it increases the probability of success to P =Pm + w (1 -Pm) , therefore the net gain N may increase. There may be hence, a priori, an optimal value for w, the fraction of failed attempts that we mix in. We show that, in the hypothesis of a linear gain G (E) = E , even assuming a vanishing cost C -> 0 , the net gain N is increasing with w, therefore the best strategy is to always mix the partially entangled states. Work supported by CNPq, Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico, proc. 311288/2014-6, and by FAPEMIG, Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa de Minas Gerais, proc. IC-FAPEMIG2016-0269 and PPM-00607-16.

  13. A Multirelational Account of Toleration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferretti, Maria Paola; Lægaard, Sune

    2013-01-01

    Toleration classically denotes a relation between two agents that is characterised by three components: objection, power, and acceptance overriding the objection. Against recent claims that classical toleration is not applicable in liberal democracies and that toleration must therefore either be ...

  14. Maximizing percentage depletion in solid minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripp, J.; Grove, H.D.; McGrath, M.

    1982-01-01

    This article develops a strategy for maximizing percentage depletion deductions when extracting uranium or other solid minerals. The goal is to avoid losing percentage depletion deductions by staying below the 50% limitation on taxable income from the property. The article is divided into two major sections. The first section is comprised of depletion calculations that illustrate the problem and corresponding solutions. The last section deals with the feasibility of applying the strategy and complying with the Internal Revenue Code and appropriate regulations. Three separate strategies or appropriate situations are developed and illustrated. 13 references, 3 figures, 7 tables

  15. What currency do bumble bees maximize?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas L Charlton

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available In modelling bumble bee foraging, net rate of energetic intake has been suggested as the appropriate currency. The foraging behaviour of honey bees is better predicted by using efficiency, the ratio of energetic gain to expenditure, as the currency. We re-analyse several studies of bumble bee foraging and show that efficiency is as good a currency as net rate in terms of predicting behaviour. We suggest that future studies of the foraging of bumble bees should be designed to distinguish between net rate and efficiency maximizing behaviour in an attempt to discover which is the more appropriate currency.

  16. New Maximal Two-distance Sets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lisonek, Petr

    1996-01-01

    A two-distance set in E^d is a point set X inthe d-dimensional Euclidean spacesuch that the distances between distinct points in Xassume only two different non-zero values. Based on results from classical distance geometry, we developan algorithm to classify, for a given dimension, all maximal...... (largest possible)two-distance sets in E^d.Using this algorithm we have completed the full classificationfor all dimensions less than or equal to 7, andwe have found one set in E^8 whosemaximality follows from Blokhuis' upper bound on sizes of s-distance sets.While in the dimensions less than or equal to 6...

  17. Maximizing policy learning in international committees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nedergaard, Peter

    2007-01-01

    , this article demonstrates that valuable lessons can be learned about policy learning, in practice and theoretically, by analysing the cooperation in the OMC committees. Using the Advocacy Coalition Framework as the starting point of analysis, 15 hypotheses on policy learning are tested. Among other things......, it is concluded that in order to maximize policy learning in international committees, empirical data should be made available to committees and provided by sources close to the participants (i.e. the Commission). In addition, the work in the committees should be made prestigious in order to attract well...

  18. Pouliot type duality via a-maximization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawano, Teruhiko; Ookouchi, Yutaka; Tachikawa, Yuji; Yagi, Futoshi

    2006-01-01

    We study four-dimensional N=1Spin(10) gauge theory with a single spinor and N Q vectors at the superconformal fixed point via the electric-magnetic duality and a-maximization. When gauge invariant chiral primary operators hit the unitarity bounds, we find that the theory with no superpotential is identical to the one with some superpotential at the infrared fixed point. The auxiliary field method in the electric theory offers a satisfying description of the infrared fixed point, which is consistent with the better picture in the magnetic theory. In particular, it gives a clear description of the emergence of new massless degrees of freedom in the electric theory

  19. In vitro mutants identification of banana (Musa sp.) with tolerance to toxin from Fusarium oxysporum f. sp cubense, treating buds with several gamma radiation doses; Identificacao in vitro de mutantes de banana maca (Musa sp.) tolerantes a toxina do Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense, a partir de gemas tratadas com diferentes doses de radiacao gama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moura, Adriana Muniz Mendes de; Houllou-Kido, Laureen Michelle; Franca, Jose Geraldo Eugenio de [Empresa Pernambucana de Pesquisa Agropecuaria, Recife, PE (Brazil); Colaco, Waldeciro [Pernambuco Univ., Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear

    1999-11-01

    Mutants of banana, obtained through treatment with different level of gamma-radiation (0; 10; 20; 30; 40 Gy), were initially cultivated in vitro in medium for rapid clonal propagation during 30 days. These treatment affected the shoot tips development ratio. Some plants developed necrosis and died, but some of the shoot tips emitted new gems. These material were cultivated in medium 20% of the toxin of Fusarium oxysporum cubense. During the selection period, the necrosis occurrence and death of susceptible shoot tips were observed. Whereas the tolerant shoot tips kept themselves green during the entire selection process. At the end of the selection process, eight shoot tips were obtained. (author) 7 refs.

  20. Developing maximal neuromuscular power: part 2 - training considerations for improving maximal power production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormie, Prue; McGuigan, Michael R; Newton, Robert U

    2011-02-01

    This series of reviews focuses on the most important neuromuscular function in many sport performances: the ability to generate maximal muscular power. Part 1, published in an earlier issue of Sports Medicine, focused on the factors that affect maximal power production while part 2 explores the practical application of these findings by reviewing the scientific literature relevant to the development of training programmes that most effectively enhance maximal power production. The ability to generate maximal power during complex motor skills is of paramount importance to successful athletic performance across many sports. A crucial issue faced by scientists and coaches is the development of effective and efficient training programmes that improve maximal power production in dynamic, multi-joint movements. Such training is referred to as 'power training' for the purposes of this review. Although further research is required in order to gain a deeper understanding of the optimal training techniques for maximizing power in complex, sports-specific movements and the precise mechanisms underlying adaptation, several key conclusions can be drawn from this review. First, a fundamental relationship exists between strength and power, which dictates that an individual cannot possess a high level of power without first being relatively strong. Thus, enhancing and maintaining maximal strength is essential when considering the long-term development of power. Second, consideration of movement pattern, load and velocity specificity is essential when designing power training programmes. Ballistic, plyometric and weightlifting exercises can be used effectively as primary exercises within a power training programme that enhances maximal power. The loads applied to these exercises will depend on the specific requirements of each particular sport and the type of movement being trained. The use of ballistic exercises with loads ranging from 0% to 50% of one-repetition maximum (1RM) and

  1. Bone and marrow dose modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stabin, Michael G.

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear medicine therapy is being used increasingly in the treatment of cancer (thyroid, leukemia/lymphoma with RIT, primary and secondary bone malignancies, and neuroblastomas). In all cases it is marrow toxicity that limits the amount of treatment that can be administered safely. Marrow dose calculations are more difficult than for many major organs because of the intricate association of bone and soft tissue elements. In RIT, there appears to be no consensus on how to calculate that dose accurately, or of individual patients ability to tolerate planned therapy. Available dose models are designed after an idealized average, healthy individual. Patient-specific methods are applied in evaluation of biokinetic data, and need to be developed for treatment of the physical data (dose conversion factors) as well: age, prior patient therapy, disease status. Contributors to marrow dose: electrons and photons

  2. Phase I dose escalation safety study of nanoparticulate paclitaxel (CTI 52010) in normal dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axiak, Sandra M; Selting, Kim A; Decedue, Charles J; Henry, Carolyn J; Tate, Deborah; Howell, Jahna; Bilof, K James; Kim, Dae Y

    2011-01-01

    Paclitaxel is highly effective in the treatment of many cancers in humans, but cannot be routinely used in dogs as currently formulated due to the exquisite sensitivity of this species to surfactant-solubilizing agents. CTI 52010 is a formulation of nanoparticulate paclitaxel consisting of drug and normal saline. Our objectives were to determine the maximally tolerated dose, dose-limiting toxicities, and pharmacokinetics of CTI 52010 administered intravenously to normal dogs. Three normal adult hound dogs were evaluated by physical examination, complete blood count, chemistry profile, and urinalysis. Dogs were treated with staggered escalating dosages of CTI 52010 with a 28-day washout. All dogs were treated with a starting dosage of 40 mg/m(2), and subsequent dosages were escalated at 50% (dog 1), 100% (dog 2), or 200% (dog 3) with each cycle, to a maximum of 240 mg/m(2). Dogs were monitored by daily physical assessment and weekly laboratory evaluation. Standard criteria were used to grade adverse events. Plasma was collected at regular intervals to determine pharmacokinetics. Dogs were euthanized humanely, and necropsy was performed one week after the last treatment. The dose-limiting toxicity was grade 4 neutropenia and the maximum tolerated dosage was 120 mg/m(2). Grade 1-2 gastrointestinal toxicity was noted at higher dosages. Upon post mortem evaluation, no evidence of organ (liver, kidney, spleen) toxicity was noted. CTI 52010 was well tolerated when administered intravenously to normal dogs. A starting dosage for a Phase I/II trial in tumor-bearing dogs is 80 mg/m(2).

  3. Maximization techniques for oilfield development profits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerche, I.

    1999-01-01

    In 1981 Nind provided a quantitative procedure for estimating the optimum number of development wells to emplace on an oilfield to maximize profit. Nind's treatment assumed that there was a steady selling price, that all wells were placed in production simultaneously, and that each well's production profile was identical and a simple exponential decline with time. This paper lifts these restrictions to allow for price fluctuations, variable with time emplacement of wells, and production rates that are more in line with actual production records than is a simple exponential decline curve. As a consequence, it is possible to design production rate strategies, correlated with price fluctuations, so as to maximize the present-day worth of a field. For price fluctuations that occur on a time-scale rapid compared to inflation rates it is appropriate to have production rates correlate directly with such price fluctuations. The same strategy does not apply for price fluctuations occurring on a time-scale long compared to inflation rates where, for small amplitudes in the price fluctuations, it is best to sell as much product as early as possible to overcome inflation factors, while for large amplitude fluctuations the best strategy is to sell product as early as possible but to do so mainly on price upswings. Examples are provided to show how these generalizations of Nind's (1981) formula change the complexion of oilfield development optimization. (author)

  4. State, religion and toleration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huggler, Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    Contribution to Religion and State - From separation to cooperation? Legal-philosophical reflections for a de-secularized world. (IVR Cracow Special Workshop). Eds. Bart. C. Labuschagne & Ari M. Solon. Abstract: Toleration is indeed a complex phenomenon. A discussion of the concept will have...... to underline not only the broadmindedness and liberty of individuals or of groups, but also the relevant distinctions and arguments in political philosophy, epistemology, philosophy of religion and philosophical anthropology and their connection with educational issues. Through a discussion of these relations......, the essay argues three theses: (1) Toleration is not reducible to an ethics of spiritual freedom. (2) Toleration is not neutral to fanatism. (3) Toleration involves esteem for the person....

  5. Spiral CT and radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imhof, H.; Schibany, N.; Ba-Ssalamah, A.; Czerny, C.; Hojreh, A.; Kainberger, F.; Krestan, C.; Kudler, H.; Noebauer, I.; Nowotny, R.

    2003-01-01

    Recent studies in the USA and Europe state that computed tomography (CT) scans compromise only 3-5% of all radiological exams, but they contribute 35-45% of total radiation dose to the patient population. These studies lead to concern by several public authorities. Basis of CT-dose measurements is the computed tomography dose index (CTDI), which was established 1981. Nowadays there are several modifications of the CTDI values, which may lead to confusion. It is suggested to use the standardized CTDI-100 w. value together with the dose length product in all CT-examinations. These values should be printed on all CT-images and allows an evaluation of the individualized patient dose. Nowadays, radiologist's aim must be to work at the lowest maximal diagnostic acceptable signal to noise ratio. To decrease radiation dose radiologist should use low kV and mA, but high pitches. Newly developed CT-dose-reduction soft-wares and filters should be installed in all CT-machines. We should critically compare the average dose used for a specific examination with the reference dose used in this country and/or Europe. Greater differences should caution the radiologist. Finally, we as radiologists must check very carefully all indications and recommend alternative imaging methods. But we have also to teach our customers--patients and medical doctors who are non-radiologists--that a 'good' image is not that which show all possible information, but that which visualize 'only' the diagnostic necessary information

  6. Phase I/II Study Evaluating Early Tolerance in Breast Cancer Patients Undergoing Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Treated With the MammoSite Balloon Breast Brachytherapy Catheter Using a 2-Day Dose Schedule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, Michelle; Martinez, Alvaro; Mitchell, Christina; Chen, Peter Y.; Ghilezan, Mihai; Benitez, Pamela; Brown, Eric; Vicini, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Initial Phase I/II results using balloon brachytherapy to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in 2 days in patients with early-stage breast cancer are presented. Materials and Methods: Between March 2004 and August 2007, 45 patients received adjuvant radiation therapy after lumpectomy with balloon brachytherapy in a Phase I/II trial delivering 2800 cGy in four fractions of 700 cGy. Toxicities were evaluated using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0 scale and cosmesis was documented at ≥6 months. Results: The median age was 66 years (range, 48-83) and median skin spacing was 12 mm (range, 8-24). The median follow-up was 11.4 months (5.4-48 months) with 21 patients (47%) followed ≥1 year, 11 (24%) ≥2 years, and 7 (16%) ≥3 years. At <6 months (n = 45), Grade II toxicity rates were 9% radiation dermatitis, 13% breast pain, 2% edema, and 2% hyperpigmentation. Grade III breast pain was reported in 13% (n = 6). At ≥6 months (n = 43), Grade II toxicity rates were: 2% radiation dermatitis, 2% induration, and 2% hypopigmentation. Grade III breast pain was reported in 2%. Infection was 13% (n = 6) at <6 months and 5% (n = 2) at ≥6 months. Persistent seroma ≥6 months was 30% (n = 13). Fat necrosis developed in 4 cases (2 symptomatic). Rib fractures were seen in 4% (n = 2). Cosmesis was good/excellent in 96% of cases. Conclusions: Treatment with balloon brachytherapy using a 2-day dose schedule resulted acceptable rates of Grade II/III chronic toxicity rates and similar cosmetic results observed with a standard 5-day accelerated partial breast irradiation schedule.

  7. A Theory of Tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Corneo, Giacomo; Jeanne, Olivier

    2006-01-01

    We develop an economic theory of tolerance where styles of behaviour are invested with symbolic value. Value systems are endogenous and taught by parents to their children. In conjunction with actual behaviour, value systems determine the esteem enjoyed by individuals. Intolerant individuals have all symbolic value invested in a single style of behaviour, whereas tolerant people have diversified values. The proposed model identifies a link between the unpredictability of children's lifestyles...

  8. Shareholder, stakeholder-owner or broad stakeholder maximization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mygind, Niels

    2004-01-01

    With reference to the discussion about shareholder versus stakeholder maximization it is argued that the normal type of maximization is in fact stakeholder-owner maxi-mization. This means maximization of the sum of the value of the shares and stake-holder benefits belonging to the dominating...... including the shareholders of a company. Although it may be the ultimate goal for Corporate Social Responsibility to achieve this kind of maximization, broad stakeholder maximization is quite difficult to give a precise definition. There is no one-dimensional measure to add different stakeholder benefits...... not traded on the mar-ket, and therefore there is no possibility for practical application. Broad stakeholder maximization instead in practical applications becomes satisfying certain stakeholder demands, so that the practical application will be stakeholder-owner maximization un-der constraints defined...

  9. Avaliação da tolerância e nefrotoxicidade do antimonial pentavalente administrado na dose de 40mg Sb v/kg/dia, de 12/12h, por 30 dias na forma cutaneo-mucosa de leishmaniose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raimunda N.R. Sampaio

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Foi avaliada a função renal de 11 pacientes com leishmaniose cutâneo-mucosa tratados com antimonial pentavalente na dose de 40mg SbV/kg/dia aplicada de 12/12 horas, em esquema contínuo, durante trinta dias. No estudo, um paciente apresentou insuficiência renal reversível e dois desenvolveram alterações enzimáticas hepáticas e eletrocardiográficas sendo o esquema terapêutico interrompido. Nos demais pacientes observou-se efeitos nefrotóxicos tais como diminuição da taxa de filtração glomerular, diminuição da capacidade de concentração urinária, avaliada por um jejum hídrico de 16 horas e aumento na fração de excreção de sódio. No exame do sedimento urinário observou-se um aumento no número de leucócitos e cilindros. Os resultados encontrados neste estudo sugerem que o tratamento com antimonial pentavalente na dose de 40mg SbV/kg/dia foi menos tolerado em virtude de seus efeitos tóxicos, não parecendo apresentar índice de cura superior ao esquema atualmente preconizado de 20mg SbV/kg/dia.The renal function of eleven patients with mucocutaneous leishmaniasis was analyzed in a prospective study realized at the School Hospital of University of Brasília. The patients were treated with doses of 40mg/kg/day of pentavalent antimony (SbV, in a continuous scheme during thirty days. In this study three patients were excluded, one patient with reversible renal failure and two patients with hepatic and cardiac malfunctions. In the other eight patients, severe nephrotoxics effects were observed, like reduction of glomerular filtration rate, reduction of the urinary concentration capacity, evaluated by a sixteen hours hydric fasting and an increase of sodium fractional excretion. An increase in the number of leucocytes and cylinders were observed at the urinary sediment exam. Finally, the results shows that the treatment with pentavalent antimony in doses of 40mg Sb/kg/day was less tolerated on account of its renal toxics

  10. Case Example of Dose Optimization Using Data From Bortezomib Dose-Finding Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shing M; Backenroth, Daniel; Cheung, Ying Kuen Ken; Hershman, Dawn L; Vulih, Diana; Anderson, Barry; Ivy, Percy; Minasian, Lori

    2016-04-20

    The current dose-finding methodology for estimating the maximum tolerated dose of investigational anticancer agents is based on the cytotoxic chemotherapy paradigm. Molecularly targeted agents (MTAs) have different toxicity profiles, which may lead to more long-lasting mild or moderate toxicities as well as to late-onset and cumulative toxicities. Several approved MTAs have been poorly tolerated during long-term administration, leading to postmarketing dose optimization studies to re-evaluate the optimal treatment dose. Using data from completed bortezomib dose-finding trials, we explore its toxicity profile, optimize its dose, and examine the appropriateness of current designs for identifying an optimal dose. We classified the toxicities captured from 481 patients in 14 bortezomib dose-finding studies conducted through the National Cancer Institute Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program, computed the incidence of late-onset toxicities, and compared the incidence of dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) among groups of patients receiving different doses of bortezomib. A total of 13,008 toxicities were captured: 46% of patients' first DLTs and 88% of dose reductions or discontinuations of treatment because of toxicity were observed after the first cycle. Moreover, for the approved dose of 1.3 mg/m(2), the estimated cumulative incidence of DLT was > 50%, and the estimated cumulative incidence of dose reduction or treatment discontinuation because of toxicity was nearly 40%. When considering the entire course of treatment, the approved bortezomib dose exceeds the conventional ceiling DLT rate of 20% to 33%. Retrospective analysis of trial data provides an opportunity for dose optimization of MTAs. Future dose-finding studies of MTAs should take into account late-onset toxicities to ensure that a tolerable dose is identified for future efficacy and comparative trials. © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  11. Maximizing Lumen Gain With Directional Atherectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Gregory A; Winscott, John G

    2016-08-01

    To describe the use of a low-pressure balloon inflation (LPBI) technique to delineate intraluminal plaque and guide directional atherectomy in order to maximize lumen gain and achieve procedure success. The technique is illustrated in a 77-year-old man with claudication who underwent superficial femoral artery revascularization using a HawkOne directional atherectomy catheter. A standard angioplasty balloon was inflated to 1 to 2 atm during live fluoroscopy to create a 3-dimensional "lumenogram" of the target lesion. Directional atherectomy was performed only where plaque impinged on the balloon at a specific fluoroscopic orientation. The results of the LPBI technique were corroborated with multimodality diagnostic imaging, including digital subtraction angiography, intravascular ultrasound, and intra-arterial pressure measurements. With the LPBI technique, directional atherectomy can routinely achieve <10% residual stenosis, as illustrated in this case, thereby broadly supporting a no-stent approach to lower extremity endovascular revascularization. © The Author(s) 2016.

  12. Primordial two-component maximally symmetric inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enqvist, K.; Nanopoulos, D. V.; Quirós, M.; Kounnas, C.

    1985-12-01

    We propose a two-component inflation model, based on maximally symmetric supergravity, where the scales of reheating and the inflation potential at the origin are decoupled. This is possible because of the second-order phase transition from SU(5) to SU(3)×SU(2)×U(1) that takes place when φ≅φcinflation at the global minimum, and leads to a reheating temperature TR≅(1015-1016) GeV. This makes it possible to generate baryon asymmetry in the conventional way without any conflict with experimental data on proton lifetime. The mass of the gravitinos is m3/2≅1012 GeV, thus avoiding the gravitino problem. Monopoles are diluted by residual inflation in the broken phase below the cosmological bounds if φcUSA.

  13. Distributed-Memory Fast Maximal Independent Set

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanewala Appuhamilage, Thejaka Amila J.; Zalewski, Marcin J.; Lumsdaine, Andrew

    2017-09-13

    The Maximal Independent Set (MIS) graph problem arises in many applications such as computer vision, information theory, molecular biology, and process scheduling. The growing scale of MIS problems suggests the use of distributed-memory hardware as a cost-effective approach to providing necessary compute and memory resources. Luby proposed four randomized algorithms to solve the MIS problem. All those algorithms are designed focusing on shared-memory machines and are analyzed using the PRAM model. These algorithms do not have direct efficient distributed-memory implementations. In this paper, we extend two of Luby’s seminal MIS algorithms, “Luby(A)” and “Luby(B),” to distributed-memory execution, and we evaluate their performance. We compare our results with the “Filtered MIS” implementation in the Combinatorial BLAS library for two types of synthetic graph inputs.

  14. Quench dynamics of topological maximally entangled states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Ming-Chiang; Jhu, Yi-Hao; Chen, Pochung; Mou, Chung-Yu

    2013-07-17

    We investigate the quench dynamics of the one-particle entanglement spectra (OPES) for systems with topologically nontrivial phases. By using dimerized chains as an example, it is demonstrated that the evolution of OPES for the quenched bipartite systems is governed by an effective Hamiltonian which is characterized by a pseudospin in a time-dependent pseudomagnetic field S(k,t). The existence and evolution of the topological maximally entangled states (tMESs) are determined by the winding number of S(k,t) in the k-space. In particular, the tMESs survive only if nontrivial Berry phases are induced by the winding of S(k,t). In the infinite-time limit the equilibrium OPES can be determined by an effective time-independent pseudomagnetic field Seff(k). Furthermore, when tMESs are unstable, they are destroyed by quasiparticles within a characteristic timescale in proportion to the system size.

  15. Maximizing policy learning in international committees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nedergaard, Peter

    2007-01-01

    , this article demonstrates that valuable lessons can be learned about policy learning, in practice and theoretically, by analysing the cooperation in the OMC committees. Using the Advocacy Coalition Framework as the starting point of analysis, 15 hypotheses on policy learning are tested. Among other things......In the voluminous literature on the European Union's open method of coordination (OMC), no one has hitherto analysed on the basis of scholarly examination the question of what contributes to the learning processes in the OMC committees. On the basis of a questionnaire sent to all participants......, it is concluded that in order to maximize policy learning in international committees, empirical data should be made available to committees and provided by sources close to the participants (i.e. the Commission). In addition, the work in the committees should be made prestigious in order to attract well...

  16. Lovelock black holes with maximally symmetric horizons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeda, Hideki; Willison, Steven; Ray, Sourya, E-mail: hideki@cecs.cl, E-mail: willison@cecs.cl, E-mail: ray@cecs.cl [Centro de Estudios CientIficos (CECs), Casilla 1469, Valdivia (Chile)

    2011-08-21

    We investigate some properties of n( {>=} 4)-dimensional spacetimes having symmetries corresponding to the isometries of an (n - 2)-dimensional maximally symmetric space in Lovelock gravity under the null or dominant energy condition. The well-posedness of the generalized Misner-Sharp quasi-local mass proposed in the past study is shown. Using this quasi-local mass, we clarify the basic properties of the dynamical black holes defined by a future outer trapping horizon under certain assumptions on the Lovelock coupling constants. The C{sup 2} vacuum solutions are classified into four types: (i) Schwarzschild-Tangherlini-type solution; (ii) Nariai-type solution; (iii) special degenerate vacuum solution; and (iv) exceptional vacuum solution. The conditions for the realization of the last two solutions are clarified. The Schwarzschild-Tangherlini-type solution is studied in detail. We prove the first law of black-hole thermodynamics and present the expressions for the heat capacity and the free energy.

  17. MAXIMIZING THE BENEFITS OF ERP SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo André da Conceição Menezes

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The ERP (Enterprise Resource Planning systems have been consolidated in companies with different sizes and sectors, allowing their real benefits to be definitively evaluated. In this study, several interactions have been studied in different phases, such as the strategic priorities and strategic planning defined as ERP Strategy; business processes review and the ERP selection in the pre-implementation phase, the project management and ERP adaptation in the implementation phase, as well as the ERP revision and integration efforts in the post-implementation phase. Through rigorous use of case study methodology, this research led to developing and to testing a framework for maximizing the benefits of the ERP systems, and seeks to contribute for the generation of ERP initiatives to optimize their performance.

  18. Maximal energy extraction under discrete diffusive exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hay, M. J., E-mail: hay@princeton.edu [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Schiff, J. [Department of Mathematics, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan 52900 (Israel); Fisch, N. J. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Waves propagating through a bounded plasma can rearrange the densities of states in the six-dimensional velocity-configuration phase space. Depending on the rearrangement, the wave energy can either increase or decrease, with the difference taken up by the total plasma energy. In the case where the rearrangement is diffusive, only certain plasma states can be reached. It turns out that the set of reachable states through such diffusive rearrangements has been described in very different contexts. Building upon those descriptions, and making use of the fact that the plasma energy is a linear functional of the state densities, the maximal extractable energy under diffusive rearrangement can then be addressed through linear programming.

  19. Maximizing profitability in a hospital outpatient pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgenson, J A; Kilarski, J W; Malatestinic, W N; Rudy, T A

    1989-07-01

    This paper describes the strategies employed to increase the profitability of an existing ambulatory pharmacy operated by the hospital. Methods to generate new revenue including implementation of a home parenteral therapy program, a home enteral therapy program, a durable medical equipment service, and home care disposable sales are described. Programs to maximize existing revenue sources such as increasing the capture rate on discharge prescriptions, increasing "walk-in" prescription traffic and increasing HMO prescription volumes are discussed. A method utilized to reduce drug expenditures is also presented. By minimizing expenses and increasing the revenues for the ambulatory pharmacy operation, net profit increased from +26,000 to over +140,000 in one year.

  20. Maximizing the benefits of a dewatering system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, P.; Iverson, T.S.

    1999-01-01

    The use of dewatering systems in the mining, industrial sludge and sewage waste treatment industries is discussed, also describing some of the problems that have been encountered while using drilling fluid dewatering technology. The technology is an acceptable drilling waste handling alternative but it has had problems associated with recycled fluid incompatibility, high chemical costs and system inefficiencies. This paper discussed the following five action areas that can maximize the benefits and help reduce costs of a dewatering project: (1) co-ordinate all services, (2) choose equipment that fits the drilling program, (3) match the chemical treatment with the drilling fluid types, (4) determine recycled fluid compatibility requirements, and (5) determine the disposal requirements before project start-up. 2 refs., 5 figs

  1. Mixtures of maximally entangled pure states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores, M.M., E-mail: mflores@nip.up.edu.ph; Galapon, E.A., E-mail: eric.galapon@gmail.com

    2016-09-15

    We study the conditions when mixtures of maximally entangled pure states remain entangled. We found that the resulting mixed state remains entangled when the number of entangled pure states to be mixed is less than or equal to the dimension of the pure states. For the latter case of mixing a number of pure states equal to their dimension, we found that the mixed state is entangled provided that the entangled pure states to be mixed are not equally weighted. We also found that one can restrict the set of pure states that one can mix from in order to ensure that the resulting mixed state is genuinely entangled. Also, we demonstrate how these results could be applied as a way to detect entanglement in mixtures of the entangled pure states with noise.

  2. Maximally reliable Markov chains under energy constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escola, Sean; Eisele, Michael; Miller, Kenneth; Paninski, Liam

    2009-07-01

    Signal-to-noise ratios in physical systems can be significantly degraded if the outputs of the systems are highly variable. Biological processes for which highly stereotyped signal generations are necessary features appear to have reduced their signal variabilities by employing multiple processing steps. To better understand why this multistep cascade structure might be desirable, we prove that the reliability of a signal generated by a multistate system with no memory (i.e., a Markov chain) is maximal if and only if the system topology is such that the process steps irreversibly through each state, with transition rates chosen such that an equal fraction of the total signal is generated in each state. Furthermore, our result indicates that by increasing the number of states, it is possible to arbitrarily increase the reliability of the system. In a physical system, however, an energy cost is associated with maintaining irreversible transitions, and this cost increases with the number of such transitions (i.e., the number of states). Thus, an infinite-length chain, which would be perfectly reliable, is infeasible. To model the effects of energy demands on the maximally reliable solution, we numerically optimize the topology under two distinct energy functions that penalize either irreversible transitions or incommunicability between states, respectively. In both cases, the solutions are essentially irreversible linear chains, but with upper bounds on the number of states set by the amount of available energy. We therefore conclude that a physical system for which signal reliability is important should employ a linear architecture, with the number of states (and thus the reliability) determined by the intrinsic energy constraints of the system.

  3. Tolerance of retroperitoneal structures to intraoperative radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sindelar, W.F.; Tepper, J.; Travis, E.L.; Terrill, R.

    1982-01-01

    In conjunction with the clinical development of intraoperative radiotherapy, a study was undertaken in dogs to define the tolerance of normal anatomic structures in the retroperitoneum to radiation delivered during operation. Twenty adult dogs were subjected to laparotomy and intraoperative 11 MeV electron irradiation in single doses ranging from 0.to 5000 rad. Animals were followed regularly with clinical observation, blood count, serum chemistries, pyelography, and angiography. Animals were sacrificed and autopsied at regular intervals up to 12 months following treatment to assess radiation-induced complications or tissue damage. Irradiation field in all dogs consisted of a 4 X 15 cm rectangle extending in the retroperitoneum from the level of the renal vessels to the bifurcation of aorta and vena cava. The field included aorta, vena cava, inferior portion of left kidney, and distal portion of left ureter. No complications or histologic changes occurred in any animal given doses of 2000 rad, with a follow-up in excess of 18 months. A dose of 3000 rad was well tolerated, except for left ureteral occlusion in one animal. Mild vascular fibrosis was present inthe aorta and vena cava, and significant ureteral fibrosis developed by six months after doses of 4000 or 5000 rad. All animals that received 5000 rad died of radiation-related complications, including ureteral obstruction and rectal perforation. It was concluded that major vessels tolerate intraoperative irradiation well up to and including 3000 rad and that no clinically significant vascular problems develop after 4000 and 5000 rad, although some fibrosis does occur. The ureter and kidney appear to be the most radiosensitive structures inthe retroperitoneum, showing progressive changes at 300 rad or greater and showing the potential for serious complications after doses of 4000 rad or more

  4. Dose limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitoussi, L.

    1987-12-01

    The dose limit is defined to be the level of harmfulness which must not be exceeded, so that an activity can be exercised in a regular manner without running a risk unacceptable to man and the society. The paper examines the effects of radiation categorised into stochastic and non-stochastic. Dose limits for workers and the public are discussed

  5. A Criterion to Identify Maximally Entangled Four-Qubit State

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zha Xinwei; Song Haiyang; Feng Feng

    2011-01-01

    Paolo Facchi, et al. [Phys. Rev. A 77 (2008) 060304(R)] presented a maximally multipartite entangled state (MMES). Here, we give a criterion for the identification of maximally entangled four-qubit states. Using this criterion, we not only identify some existing maximally entangled four-qubit states in the literature, but also find several new maximally entangled four-qubit states as well. (general)

  6. Maximal lattice free bodies, test sets and the Frobenius problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders Nedergaard; Lauritzen, Niels; Roune, Bjarke Hammersholt

    Maximal lattice free bodies are maximal polytopes without interior integral points. Scarf initiated the study of maximal lattice free bodies relative to the facet normals in a fixed matrix. In this paper we give an efficient algorithm for computing the maximal lattice free bodies of an integral m...... method is inspired by the novel algorithm by Einstein, Lichtblau, Strzebonski and Wagon and the Groebner basis approach by Roune....

  7. High-Dose Atomoxetine Treatment of ADHD in Youths with Limited Response to Standard Doses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratochvil, Christopher J.; Michelson, David; Newcorn, Jeffrey H.; Weiss, Margaret D.; Busner, Joan; Moore, Rodney J.; Ruff, Dustin D.; Ramsey, Janet; Dickson, Ruth; Turgay, Atilla; Saylor, Keith E.; Luber, Stephen; Vaughan, Brigette; Allen, Albert J.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To assess the utility and tolerability of higher than standard atomoxetine doses to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Method: Two randomized, double-blind trials of atomoxetine nonresponders ages 6 to 16 years were conducted comparing continued treatment with same-dose atomoxetine to treatment using greater than…

  8. Tolerance of cut flowers to gamma-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, O.K.; Wiendl, F.M.; Arthur, V.

    1999-01-01

    Cut flowers were gamma-irradiated with doses of 0, 200, 400, 600, and 1000 Gy. Dianthuscaryophyllus (Caryophyllaceae), Gypsophila paniculata (Caryophyllaceae), Freesia sp (Iridaceae), Limonium sinuatum Mill. (Plumbaginaceae), L. latifolium Kuntze (Plumbaginaceae), Narcissus tazetta L. (Amaryllidaceae), Helichrysum bracteatum Andr. (Compositae) and Rhodanthe manglesii Lindl (Compositae) were tolerant up to 1000 Gy, without visible negative changes after irradiation and during the vase-life. Callistephus chinensis (Compositae) and Lilium longiflorum Thunb. (Liliaceae) were moderately tolerant, but were modified by high doses. Anthurium sp (Araceae), Strelitzia sp (Musaceae), Matthiola incana R. Br. (Cruciferae), Aechmea distichanta (Bromeliaceae), Consolida ajacis Niew (Ranunculaceae), Ranunculus sp (Ranunculaceae), Dendrobium phalenopsis (Orchidaceae) and Gerbera sp (Compositae) were not tolerant to a dose of 200 Gy. The most adequate flowers to be submitted to irradiation treatment for disinfestation purpose were those of the Caryophillaceae family and those which can be used as dried flowers, such as members of the Rhodanthe, Helichrysum and Limmonium genera. (author)

  9. Hemodynamic mechanisms underlying the incomplete tolerance to caffeine's pressor effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farag, Noha H; Vincent, Andrea S; McKey, Barbara S; Whitsett, Thomas L; Lovallo, William R

    2005-06-01

    Blood pressure (BP) and cardiovascular hemodynamics were assessed at baseline and after caffeine administration in a 4-week, placebo-controlled, double-blind, randomized, crossover trial of caffeine tolerance formation. Half of the subjects developed tolerance to the pressor effect of caffeine, whereas the other half continued to show increases in BP after caffeine ingestion (F = 16.7, p <0.0001). In the subjects who did not develop tolerance, peripheral resistance increased incrementally as the daily dose of caffeine increased (F = 2.8, p = 0.05).

  10. On maximal surfaces in asymptotically flat space-times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartnik, R.; Chrusciel, P.T.; O Murchadha, N.

    1990-01-01

    Existence of maximal and 'almost maximal' hypersurfaces in asymptotically flat space-times is established under boundary conditions weaker than those considered previously. We show in particular that every vacuum evolution of asymptotically flat data for Einstein equations can be foliated by slices maximal outside a spatially compact set and that every (strictly) stationary asymptotically flat space-time can be foliated by maximal hypersurfaces. Amongst other uniqueness results, we show that maximal hypersurface can be used to 'partially fix' an asymptotic Poincare group. (orig.)

  11. Escaping the tolerance trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammoudeh, S.; Madan, V.

    1994-01-01

    In order to examine the implications of the weakening of OPEC's responsiveness in adjusting its production levels, this paper explicitly incorporates rigidity in the quantity adjustment mechanism, thereby extending previous research which assumed smooth quantity adjustments. The rigidity is manifested in a tolerance range for the discrepancy between the declared target price and that of the market. This environment gives rise to a 'tolerance trap' which impedes the convergence process and inevitably brings the market to a standstill before its reaches the targeted price and revenue objectives. OPEC's reaction to the standstill has important implications for the achievement of the target-based equilibrium and for the potential collapse of the market price. This paper examines OPEC's policy options in the tolerance trap and reveals that the optional policy in order to break this impasse and move closer to the equilibrium point is gradually to reduce output and not to flood the market. (Author)

  12. Controllable dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez R, J.T.; Anaya M, R.A.

    2004-01-01

    With the purpose of eliminating the controversy about the lineal hypothesis without threshold which found the systems of dose limitation of the recommendations of ICRP 26 and 60, at the end of last decade R. Clarke president of the ICRP proposed the concept of Controllable Dose: as the dose or dose sum that an individual receives from a particular source which can be reasonably controllable by means of any means; said concept proposes a change in the philosophy of the radiological protection of its concern by social approaches to an individual focus. In this work a panorama of the foundations is presented, convenient and inconveniences that this proposal has loosened in the international community of the radiological protection, with the purpose of to familiarize to our Mexican community in radiological protection with these new concepts. (Author)

  13. Fault tolerant linear actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesar, Delbert

    2004-09-14

    In varying embodiments, the fault tolerant linear actuator of the present invention is a new and improved linear actuator with fault tolerance and positional control that may incorporate velocity summing, force summing, or a combination of the two. In one embodiment, the invention offers a velocity summing arrangement with a differential gear between two prime movers driving a cage, which then drives a linear spindle screw transmission. Other embodiments feature two prime movers driving separate linear spindle screw transmissions, one internal and one external, in a totally concentric and compact integrated module.

  14. Inequality, Tolerance, and Growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnskov, Christian

    This paper argues for the importance of individuals' tolerance of inequality for economic growth. By using the political ideology of governments as a measure of revealed tolerance of inequality, the paper shows that controlling for ideology improves the accuracy with which the effects of inequality...... are measured. Results show that inequality reduces growth but more so in societies where people perceive it as being relatively unfair. Further results indicate that legal quality and social trust are likely transmission channels for the effects of inequality....

  15. Inequality, Tolerance, and Growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnskov, Christian

    2004-01-01

    This paper argues for the importance of individuals' tolerance of inequality for economic growth. By using the political ideology of governments as a measure of revealed tolerance of inequality, the paper shows that controlling for ideology improves the accuracy with which the effects of inequality...... are measured. Results show that inequality reduces growth but more so in societies where people perceive it as being relatively unfair. Further results indicate that legal quality and social trust are likely transmission channels for the effects of inequality....

  16. A novel dose uncertainty model and its application for dose verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Hosang; Chung Heetaek; Liu Chihray; Palta, Jatinder; Suh, Tae-Suk; Kim, Siyong

    2005-01-01

    Based on statistical approach, a novel dose uncertainty model was introduced considering both nonspatial and spatial dose deviations. Non-space-oriented uncertainty is mainly caused by dosimetric uncertainties, and space-oriented dose uncertainty is the uncertainty caused by all spatial displacements. Assuming these two parts are independent, dose difference between measurement and calculation is a linear combination of nonspatial and spatial dose uncertainties. Two assumptions were made: (1) the relative standard deviation of nonspatial dose uncertainty is inversely proportional to the dose standard deviation σ, and (2) the spatial dose uncertainty is proportional to the gradient of dose. The total dose uncertainty is a quadratic sum of the nonspatial and spatial uncertainties. The uncertainty model provides the tolerance dose bound for comparison between calculation and measurement. In the statistical uncertainty model based on a Gaussian distribution, a confidence level of 3σ theoretically confines 99.74% of measurements within the bound. By setting the confidence limit, the tolerance bound for dose comparison can be made analogous to that of existing dose comparison methods (e.g., a composite distribution analysis, a γ test, a χ evaluation, and a normalized agreement test method). However, the model considers the inherent dose uncertainty characteristics of the test points by taking into account the space-specific history of dose accumulation, while the previous methods apply a single tolerance criterion to the points, although dose uncertainty at each point is significantly different from others. Three types of one-dimensional test dose distributions (a single large field, a composite flat field made by two identical beams, and three-beam intensity-modulated fields) were made to verify the robustness of the model. For each test distribution, the dose bound predicted by the uncertainty model was compared with simulated measurements. The simulated

  17. A Note of Caution on Maximizing Entropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard E. Neapolitan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The Principle of Maximum Entropy is often used to update probabilities due to evidence instead of performing Bayesian updating using Bayes’ Theorem, and its use often has efficacious results. However, in some circumstances the results seem unacceptable and unintuitive. This paper discusses some of these cases, and discusses how to identify some of the situations in which this principle should not be used. The paper starts by reviewing three approaches to probability, namely the classical approach, the limiting frequency approach, and the Bayesian approach. It then introduces maximum entropy and shows its relationship to the three approaches. Next, through examples, it shows that maximizing entropy sometimes can stand in direct opposition to Bayesian updating based on reasonable prior beliefs. The paper concludes that if we take the Bayesian approach that probability is about reasonable belief based on all available information, then we can resolve the conflict between the maximum entropy approach and the Bayesian approach that is demonstrated in the examples.

  18. Optimal topologies for maximizing network transmission capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhenhao; Wu, Jiajing; Rong, Zhihai; Tse, Chi K.

    2018-04-01

    It has been widely demonstrated that the structure of a network is a major factor that affects its traffic dynamics. In this work, we try to identify the optimal topologies for maximizing the network transmission capacity, as well as to build a clear relationship between structural features of a network and the transmission performance in terms of traffic delivery. We propose an approach for designing optimal network topologies against traffic congestion by link rewiring and apply them on the Barabási-Albert scale-free, static scale-free and Internet Autonomous System-level networks. Furthermore, we analyze the optimized networks using complex network parameters that characterize the structure of networks, and our simulation results suggest that an optimal network for traffic transmission is more likely to have a core-periphery structure. However, assortative mixing and the rich-club phenomenon may have negative impacts on network performance. Based on the observations of the optimized networks, we propose an efficient method to improve the transmission capacity of large-scale networks.

  19. New features of the maximal abelian projection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bornyakov, V.G.; Polikarpov, M.I.; Syritsyn, S.N.; Schierholz, G.; Suzuki, T.

    2005-12-01

    After fixing the Maximal Abelian gauge in SU(2) lattice gauge theory we decompose the nonabelian gauge field into the so called monopole field and the modified nonabelian field with monopoles removed. We then calculate respective static potentials and find that the potential due to the modified nonabelian field is nonconfining while, as is well known, the monopole field potential is linear. Furthermore, we show that the sum of these potentials approximates the nonabelian static potential with 5% or higher precision at all distances considered. We conclude that at large distances the monopole field potential describes the classical energy of the hadronic string while the modified nonabelian field potential describes the string fluctuations. Similar decomposition was observed to work for the adjoint static potential. A check was also made of the center projection in the direct center gauge. Two static potentials, determined by projected Z 2 and by modified nonabelian field without Z 2 component were calculated. It was found that their sum is a substantially worse approximation of the SU(2) static potential than that found in the monopole case. It is further demonstrated that similar decomposition can be made for the flux tube action/energy density. (orig.)

  20. Relative safety profiles of high dose statin regimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Escobar

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Carlos Escobar, Rocio Echarri, Vivencio BarriosDepartment of Cardiology, Hospital Ramón y Cajal, Madrid, SpainAbstract: Recent clinical trials recommend achieving a low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level of <100 mg/dl in high-risk and <70 mg/dl in very high risk patients. To attain these goals, however, many patients will need statins at high doses. The most frequent side effects related to the use of statins, myopathy, rhabdomyolysis, and increased levels of transaminases, are unusual. Although low and moderate doses show a favourable profile, there is concern about the tolerability of higher doses. During recent years, numerous trials to analyze the efficacy and tolerability of high doses of statins have been published. This paper updates the published data on the safety of statins at high doses.Keywords: statins, high doses, tolerability, liver, muscle

  1. Mahalanobis distance and variable selection to optimize dose response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, D.H. II; Bennett, D.E.; Wyrobek, A.J.; Kranzler, D.

    1979-01-01

    A battery of statistical techniques are combined to improve detection of low-level dose response. First, Mahalanobis distances are used to classify objects as normal or abnormal. Then the proportion classified abnormal is regressed on dose. Finally, a subset of regressor variables is selected which maximizes the slope of the dose response line. Use of the techniques is illustrated by application to mouse sperm damaged by low doses of x-rays

  2. Toleration, Groups, and Multiculturalism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægaard, Sune

    2014-01-01

    have the ability to interfere with the group’s activities, an object of dislike or disapproval, an agent enjoying non-interference or a moral patient. This means that 'toleration of groups' can mean quite different things depending on the exact meaning of 'group' in relation to each component...

  3. Fault Tolerant Control Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgh, S. A.

    This thesis considered the development of fault tolerant control systems. The focus was on the category of automated processes that do not necessarily comprise a high number of identical sensors and actuators to maintain safe operation, but still have a potential for improving immunity to component...

  4. Toleration and its enemies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jarvad, Ib Martin

    2010-01-01

    After a presentation of the development of freedom of expression in Danish constitutional law, to freedom of the press in European human rights law - the Jersild case- to a right to mock and ridicule other faiths in recent Danish practice, the essay of Locke on toleration is examined, its...

  5. A little toleration, please

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKnight, C.

    2000-01-01

    Value pluralism does not imply relativism or subjectivism about values. What it does is allow respect for an at least limited toleration of values with which one may profoundly disagree. Thus a doctor can respect the autonomy of a patient whose values he does not share. Key Words: Pluralism • multiculturalism • relativism • subjectivism • patient autonomy PMID:11129842

  6. Attenuation of morphine tolerance and dependence by thymoquinone in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Hosseinzadeh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Dependence and tolerance are major restricting factors in the clinical use of opioid analgesics. In the present study, the effects of thymoquinone, the major constituent of Nigella sativa seeds, on morphine dependence and tolerance were investigated in mice. Materials and Methods: Male adult NMRI mice were made tolerant and dependent by repeated injections of morphine (50, 50, and 75 mg/kg, i.p. on 9 a.m., 1 p.m., and 5 p.m., respectively during a 3-day administration schedule. The hot-plate test was used to assess tolerance to the analgesic effects of morphine. Naloxone (2 mg/kg, i.p. was injected to precipitate withdrawal syndrome in order to assess the morphine dependence. To evaluate the effects of thymoquinone on tolerance and dependence to morphine, different single or repeated doses of thymoquinone were administered in mice. Rotarod was used to assess the motor coordination. Results: Administration of single or repeated doses of thymoquinone (20 and 40 mg/kg, i.p. significantly decreased the number of jumps in morphine dependent animals. Repeated administration of thymoquinone (20 and 40 mg/kg, for 3 days and also single injection of thymoquinone (40 mg/kg, on the fourth day attenuated tolerance to the analgesic effect of morphine. None of the thymoquinone doses (10, 20, and 40 mg/kg produced any antinociceptive effects on their own. Motor coordination of animals was impaired by the high dose of thymoquinone (40 mg/kg. Conclusion: Based on these results, it can be concluded that thymoquinone prevents the development of tolerance and dependence to morphine.

  7. Value maximizing maintenance policies under general repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marais, Karen B.

    2013-01-01

    One class of maintenance optimization problems considers the notion of general repair maintenance policies where systems are repaired or replaced on failure. In each case the optimality is based on minimizing the total maintenance cost of the system. These cost-centric optimizations ignore the value dimension of maintenance and can lead to maintenance strategies that do not maximize system value. This paper applies these ideas to the general repair optimization problem using a semi-Markov decision process, discounted cash flow techniques, and dynamic programming to identify the value-optimal actions for any given time and system condition. The impact of several parameters on maintenance strategy, such as operating cost and revenue, system failure characteristics, repair and replacement costs, and the planning time horizon, is explored. This approach provides a quantitative basis on which to base maintenance strategy decisions that contribute to system value. These decisions are different from those suggested by traditional cost-based approaches. The results show (1) how the optimal action for a given time and condition changes as replacement and repair costs change, and identifies the point at which these costs become too high for profitable system operation; (2) that for shorter planning horizons it is better to repair, since there is no time to reap the benefits of increased operating profit and reliability; (3) how the value-optimal maintenance policy is affected by the system's failure characteristics, and hence whether it is worthwhile to invest in higher reliability; and (4) the impact of the repair level on the optimal maintenance policy. -- Highlights: •Provides a quantitative basis for maintenance strategy decisions that contribute to system value. •Shows how the optimal action for a given condition changes as replacement and repair costs change. •Shows how the optimal policy is affected by the system's failure characteristics. •Shows when it is

  8. Deconstructing tolerance with clobazam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wechsler, Robert T.; Sankar, Raman; Montouris, Georgia D.; White, H. Steve; Cloyd, James C.; Kane, Mary Clare; Peng, Guangbin; Tworek, David M.; Shen, Vivienne; Isojarvi, Jouko

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate potential development of tolerance to adjunctive clobazam in patients with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. Methods: Eligible patients enrolled in open-label extension study OV-1004, which continued until clobazam was commercially available in the United States or for a maximum of 2 years outside the United States. Enrolled patients started at 0.5 mg·kg−1·d−1 clobazam, not to exceed 40 mg/d. After 48 hours, dosages could be adjusted up to 2.0 mg·kg−1·d−1 (maximum 80 mg/d) on the basis of efficacy and tolerability. Post hoc analyses evaluated mean dosages and drop-seizure rates for the first 2 years of the open-label extension based on responder categories and baseline seizure quartiles in OV-1012. Individual patient listings were reviewed for dosage increases ≥40% and increasing seizure rates. Results: Data from 200 patients were included. For patients free of drop seizures, there was no notable change in dosage over 24 months. For responder groups still exhibiting drop seizures, dosages were increased. Weekly drop-seizure rates for 100% and ≥75% responders demonstrated a consistent response over time. Few patients had a dosage increase ≥40% associated with an increase in seizure rates. Conclusions: Two-year findings suggest that the majority of patients do not develop tolerance to the antiseizure actions of clobazam. Observed dosage increases may reflect best efforts to achieve seizure freedom. It is possible that the clinical development of tolerance to clobazam has been overstated. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00518713 and NCT01160770. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class III evidence that the majority of patients do not develop tolerance to clobazam over 2 years of treatment. PMID:27683846

  9. The Constrained Maximal Expression Level Owing to Haploidy Shapes Gene Content on the Mammalian X Chromosome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence D Hurst

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available X chromosomes are unusual in many regards, not least of which is their nonrandom gene content. The causes of this bias are commonly discussed in the context of sexual antagonism and the avoidance of activity in the male germline. Here, we examine the notion that, at least in some taxa, functionally biased gene content may more profoundly be shaped by limits imposed on gene expression owing to haploid expression of the X chromosome. Notably, if the X, as in primates, is transcribed at rates comparable to the ancestral rate (per promoter prior to the X chromosome formation, then the X is not a tolerable environment for genes with very high maximal net levels of expression, owing to transcriptional traffic jams. We test this hypothesis using The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE and data from the Functional Annotation of the Mammalian Genome (FANTOM5 project. As predicted, the maximal expression of human X-linked genes is much lower than that of genes on autosomes: on average, maximal expression is three times lower on the X chromosome than on autosomes. Similarly, autosome-to-X retroposition events are associated with lower maximal expression of retrogenes on the X than seen for X-to-autosome retrogenes on autosomes. Also as expected, X-linked genes have a lesser degree of increase in gene expression than autosomal ones (compared to the human/Chimpanzee common ancestor if highly expressed, but not if lowly expressed. The traffic jam model also explains the known lower breadth of expression for genes on the X (and the Z of birds, as genes with broad expression are, on average, those with high maximal expression. As then further predicted, highly expressed tissue-specific genes are also rare on the X and broadly expressed genes on the X tend to be lowly expressed, both indicating that the trend is shaped by the maximal expression level not the breadth of expression per se. Importantly, a limit to the maximal expression level explains biased

  10. The Constrained Maximal Expression Level Owing to Haploidy Shapes Gene Content on the Mammalian X Chromosome

    KAUST Repository

    Hurst, Laurence D.

    2015-12-18

    X chromosomes are unusual in many regards, not least of which is their nonrandom gene content. The causes of this bias are commonly discussed in the context of sexual antagonism and the avoidance of activity in the male germline. Here, we examine the notion that, at least in some taxa, functionally biased gene content may more profoundly be shaped by limits imposed on gene expression owing to haploid expression of the X chromosome. Notably, if the X, as in primates, is transcribed at rates comparable to the ancestral rate (per promoter) prior to the X chromosome formation, then the X is not a tolerable environment for genes with very high maximal net levels of expression, owing to transcriptional traffic jams. We test this hypothesis using The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) and data from the Functional Annotation of the Mammalian Genome (FANTOM5) project. As predicted, the maximal expression of human X-linked genes is much lower than that of genes on autosomes: on average, maximal expression is three times lower on the X chromosome than on autosomes. Similarly, autosome-to-X retroposition events are associated with lower maximal expression of retrogenes on the X than seen for X-to-autosome retrogenes on autosomes. Also as expected, X-linked genes have a lesser degree of increase in gene expression than autosomal ones (compared to the human/Chimpanzee common ancestor) if highly expressed, but not if lowly expressed. The traffic jam model also explains the known lower breadth of expression for genes on the X (and the Z of birds), as genes with broad expression are, on average, those with high maximal expression. As then further predicted, highly expressed tissue-specific genes are also rare on the X and broadly expressed genes on the X tend to be lowly expressed, both indicating that the trend is shaped by the maximal expression level not the breadth of expression per se. Importantly, a limit to the maximal expression level explains biased tissue of expression

  11. A comparison of the development of tolerance to ethanol and cross-tolerance to nicotine after chronic ethanol treatment in long- and short-sleep mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Fiebre, C M; Collins, A C

    1993-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that inbred mouse strains differ in the development of tolerance to both nicotine and ethanol, indicating that genetic factors regulate tolerance development. Those mouse strains that are most sensitive to an acute challenge dose of either drug develop the most tolerance to that drug. The ethanol-sensitive long-sleep (LS) mice are more sensitive to several behavioral and physiological effects of nicotine than are the ethanol-resistant short-sleep (SS) mice. The experiments reported here assessed whether the LS and SS mice develop tolerance to ethanol after chronic treatment with ethanol-containing liquid diets and whether cross-tolerance to nicotine also developed. Tolerance and cross-tolerance were measured by assessing the effects of acute challenge doses of drug on Y-maze crossing and rearing activities, heart rate and body temperature. The LS mice developed tolerance to ethanol's effects on three of the four measures and were cross-tolerant to nicotine on all of the measures. In contrast, the SS mice developed tolerance to ethanol for only two of the measures, but failed to develop cross-tolerance to any action of nicotine. These findings support the hypothesis that ethanol and nicotine share sites of action and that common genes regulate responses to these two drugs. Evidence suggests that tolerance to nicotine may be related to an up-regulation of brain nicotinic receptors, at least in some inbred mouse strains, but chronic ethanol treatment did not reproducibly change either [3H]nicotine or alpha-[125I]bungarotoxin binding. Therefore, other mechanisms must underlie the tolerance and cross-tolerance that was seen.

  12. Cumulative high doses of inhaled formoterol have less systemic effects in asthmatic children 6-11 years-old than cumulative high doses of inhaled terbutaline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaae, Rikke; Agertoft, Lone; Pedersen, Sören

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate high dose tolerability and relative systemic dose potency between inhaled clinically equipotent dose increments of formoterol and terbutaline in children. METHODS: Twenty boys and girls (6-11 years-old) with asthma and normal ECGs were studied. Ten doses of formoterol (Oxi...

  13. Radiation effects after low dose chronic long-term exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fliedner, T.M.; Friesecke, I.

    1997-01-01

    This document approaches the radiation effects after low dose chronic long-term exposure, presenting examples occurred, the pathophysiologic mechanisms for cell system tolerance in elevated radiation fields, and the diagnostic and therapeutic possibilities

  14. An Efficient and Effective Design of InP Nanowires for Maximal Solar Energy Harvesting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dan; Tang, Xiaohong; Wang, Kai; He, Zhubing; Li, Xianqiang

    2017-11-25

    Solar cells based on subwavelength-dimensions semiconductor nanowire (NW) arrays promise a comparable or better performance than their planar counterparts by taking the advantages of strong light coupling and light trapping. In this paper, we present an accurate and time-saving analytical design for optimal geometrical parameters of vertically aligned InP NWs for maximal solar energy absorption. Short-circuit current densities are calculated for each NW array with different geometrical dimensions under solar illumination. Optimal geometrical dimensions are quantitatively presented for single, double, and multiple diameters of the NW arrays arranged both squarely and hexagonal achieving the maximal short-circuit current density of 33.13 mA/cm 2 . At the same time, intensive finite-difference time-domain numerical simulations are performed to investigate the same NW arrays for the highest light absorption. Compared with time-consuming simulations and experimental results, the predicted maximal short-circuit current densities have tolerances of below 2.2% for all cases. These results unambiguously demonstrate that this analytical method provides a fast and accurate route to guide high performance InP NW-based solar cell design.

  15. Tolerability and safety of antifungal drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Scaglione

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available When treating critically ill patients, as those with fungal infections, attention should be focused on the appropriate use of drugs, especially in terms of dose, safety, and tolerability. The fungal infection itself and the concomitant physiological disorders concur to increase the risk of mortality in these patients, therefore the use of any antifungal agent should be carefully evaluated, considering both the direct action on the target fungus and the adverse effects eventually caused. Among antifungal drugs, echinocandins have the greatest tolerability. In fact, unlike amphotericin B, showing nephrotoxicity, and azoles, which are hepatotoxic, the use of echinocandins doesn’t result in major adverse events.http://dx.doi.org/10.7175/rhc.v4i2s.873

  16. POLITENESS MAXIM OF MAIN CHARACTER IN SECRET FORGIVEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Ayu Isnu Maharani

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Maxim of Politeness is an interesting subject to be discussed, since politeness has been criticized from our childhood. We are obliques to be polite to anyone either in speaking or in acting. Somehow we are manage to show politeness in our spoken expression though our intention might be not so polite. For example we must appriciate others opinion although we feel objection toward the opinion. In this article the analysis of politeness is based on maxim proposes by Leech. He proposed six types of politeness maxim. The discussion shows that the main character (Kristen and Kami use all types of maxim in their conversation. The most commonly used are approbation maxim and agreement maxim

  17. Evaluating the Safety and Tolerability of Sacubitril/Valsartan for HFrEF Managed Within a Pharmacist Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogge, Elizabeth K; Davis, Lindsay E

    2018-04-01

    The objective of this research was to describe the use of pharmacist-managed sacubitril/valsartan therapy in a multi-center, outpatient cardiac group. Sacubitril/valsartan, an angiotensin receptor-neprilysin inhibitor (ARNi), is a novel agent for the treatment of heart failure. An ARNi is recommended by national guidelines to be used in place of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEi) or angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) therapy for patients who remain symptomatic. A retrospective chart review was performed to identify patients initiated and fully titrated on sacubitril/valsartan therapy from July 7, 2015 to March 7, 2017. Fifty-two of the 72 symptomatic heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) patients prescribed sacubitril/valsartan during the 21-month period were included in this analysis. The average ejection fraction was 26%. The average age was 69 years. At baseline, 26.9% of patients were not on ACEi/ARB therapy and 13.5% were on target-dose therapy. After completing the uptitration process, the maximally tolerated dose of sacubitril/valsartan was 5.8% low-dose, 7.7% mid-dose, and 86.5% target-dose. Loop and thiazide diuretic use decreased significantly. There was a significant mean reduction in systolic blood pressure of 6 mmHg with no significant changes in serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, or potassium levels. With close monitoring and follow-up, ARNi therapy was a safe alternative to ACEi/ARB therapy for chronic symptomatic HFrEF when initiated within a pharmacist clinic.

  18. Maximizers versus satisficers: Decision-making styles, competence, and outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew M. Parker; Wändi Bruine de Bruin; Baruch Fischhoff

    2007-01-01

    Our previous research suggests that people reporting a stronger desire to maximize obtain worse life outcomes (Bruine de Bruin et al., 2007). Here, we examine whether this finding may be explained by the decision-making styles of self-reported maximizers. Expanding on Schwartz et al.\\ (2002), we find that self-reported maximizers are more likely to show problematic decision-making styles, as evidenced by self-reports of less behavioral coping, greater dependence on others when making decision...

  19. Optimizing dosing frequencies for bisphosphonates in the management of postmenopausal osteoporosis: patient considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Sunyecz

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available John SunyeczMenopauseRx, Inc., Hopwood, PA, USAAbstract: Postmenopausal osteoporosis is common and underrecognized among elderly women. Osteoporotic fractures cause disability and disfigurement and threaten patients’ mobility, independence, and survival. Care for incident fractures in this age group must go beyond orthopedic repair, to assessment and treatment of the underlying bone fragility. Fracture risk can be reduced by vitamin D and calcium supplementation along with antiresorptive drug treatment. First-line osteoporosis pharmacotherapy employs nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates. The inconvenience of daily oral treatment has motivated development of weekly, monthly, and intermittent oral regimens, as well as quarterly and yearly intravenous (iv regimens. Ibandronate is the first bisphosphonate to have shown direct anti-fracture efficacy with a non-daily regimen; it was approved for once-monthly oral dosing in 2005 and for quarterly iv dosing in 2006. Intermittent oral risedronate and yearly iv zoledronic acid were approved in 2007. Newly available regimens with extended dosing intervals reduce the inconvenience of bisphosphonate therapy and provide patients with a range of options from which to select a maximally sustainable course of treatment. This review discusses the development, efficacy, safety, and tolerability of extended-interval bisphosphonate regimens and examines their potential to improve patient acceptance and long-term success of osteoporosis treatment.Keywords: ibandronate, alendronate, risedronate, zoledronic acid, adherence, persistence

  20. Pharmacokinetics of detomidine administered to horses at rest and after maximal exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbell, J A E; Sams, R A; Schmall, L M; Robertson, J T; Hinchcliff, K W; Muir, W W

    2009-05-01

    Increased doses of detomidine are required to produce sedation in horses after maximal exercise compared to calm or resting horses. To determine if the pharmacokinetics of detomidine in Thoroughbred horses are different when the drug is given during recuperation from a brief period of maximal exercise compared to administration at rest. Six Thoroughbred horses were preconditioned by exercising them on a treadmill. Each horse ran a simulated race at a treadmill speed that caused it to exercise at 120% of its maximal oxygen consumption. One minute after the end of exercise, horses were treated with detomidine. Each horse was treated with the same dose of detomidine on a second occasion a minimum of 14 days later while standing in a stocks. Samples of heparinised blood were obtained at various time points on both occasions. Plasma detomidine concentrations were determined by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The plasma concentration vs. time data were analysed by nonlinear regression analysis. Median back-extrapolated time zero plasma concentration was significantly lower and median plasma half-life and median mean residence time were significantly longer when detomidine was administered after exercise compared to administration at rest. Median volume of distribution was significantly higher after exercise but median plasma clearance was not different between the 2 administrations. Detomidine i.v. is more widely distributed when administered to horses immediately after exercise compared to administration at rest resulting in lower peak plasma concentrations and a slower rate of elimination. The dose requirement to produce an equivalent effect may be higher in horses after exercise than in resting horses and less frequent subsequent doses may be required to produce a sustained effect.

  1. Natural maximal νμ-ντ mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wetterich, C.

    1999-01-01

    The naturalness of maximal mixing between myon- and tau-neutrinos is investigated. A spontaneously broken nonabelian generation symmetry can explain a small parameter which governs the deviation from maximal mixing. In many cases all three neutrino masses are almost degenerate. Maximal ν μ -ν τ -mixing suggests that the leading contribution to the light neutrino masses arises from the expectation value of a heavy weak triplet rather than from the seesaw mechanism. In this scenario the deviation from maximal mixing is predicted to be less than about 1%. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  2. On the way towards a generalized entropy maximization procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagci, G. Baris; Tirnakli, Ugur

    2009-01-01

    We propose a generalized entropy maximization procedure, which takes into account the generalized averaging procedures and information gain definitions underlying the generalized entropies. This novel generalized procedure is then applied to Renyi and Tsallis entropies. The generalized entropy maximization procedure for Renyi entropies results in the exponential stationary distribution asymptotically for q element of (0,1] in contrast to the stationary distribution of the inverse power law obtained through the ordinary entropy maximization procedure. Another result of the generalized entropy maximization procedure is that one can naturally obtain all the possible stationary distributions associated with the Tsallis entropies by employing either ordinary or q-generalized Fourier transforms in the averaging procedure.

  3. Violating Bell inequalities maximally for two d-dimensional systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jingling; Wu Chunfeng; Oh, C. H.; Kwek, L. C.; Ge Molin

    2006-01-01

    We show the maximal violation of Bell inequalities for two d-dimensional systems by using the method of the Bell operator. The maximal violation corresponds to the maximal eigenvalue of the Bell operator matrix. The eigenvectors corresponding to these eigenvalues are described by asymmetric entangled states. We estimate the maximum value of the eigenvalue for large dimension. A family of elegant entangled states |Ψ> app that violate Bell inequality more strongly than the maximally entangled state but are somewhat close to these eigenvectors is presented. These approximate states can potentially be useful for quantum cryptography as well as many other important fields of quantum information

  4. Heat tolerance in wheat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharma, Dew Kumari

    As a consequence of global climate change, heat stress together with other abiotic stresses will remain an important determinant of future food security. Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is the third most important crop of the world feeding one third of the world population. Being a crop of temperate...... climate, wheat is sensitive to heat stress. We need to understand how our crops will perform in these changing climatic conditions and how we can develop varieties, which are more tolerant. The PhD study focussed on understanding heat tolerance in wheat with a combined approach of plant physiology...... and quantitative genetics in particular, plant phenotyping based quantitative trait loci (QTL) discovery for a physiological trait under heat stress. Chlorophyll a fluorescence trait, Fv/Fm was used as a phenotyping tool, as it reflects the effect of heat stress on maximum photochemical efficiency of photosystem...

  5. Impact of the lay-off length on +Gz tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikuliszyn, Romuald; Kowalski, Wieslaw; Kowalczuk, Krzysztof

    2002-07-01

    There are many factors affecting pilots' +Gz-tolerance. Recently, attention of the aviation community has been focused on lay-off and it's impact on +Gz-tolerance. Pilots of the Polish Air Force (PAF) have dealt with that problem for several years now. The aim of the study was to provide insight on how lay-off periods with different duration impact +Gz-tolerance. 95 male jet pilots from the PAF participated in the study. Every one had at least two weeks lay-off period (non-medical reasons). Subjects were divided into four groups according to the length of lay-off period (2-4 weeks; 5-13 weeks; 14-26 weeks; 27-154 weeks), All pilots were subjected to a centrifuge exposure in GOR (0.1 G/s) or ROR (1.0 G/s) profiles, depending on the pre-lay-off exposure. Post-lay-off exposures were carried out directly after lay-off. 18 jet pilots without any lay-off constituted the control group. The difference between pre- and post-lay-off G-tolerance limit (-0,93 +/- 0,53) was statistically significant (p<0.01) only for one group, where lay-off period ranged between two and four weeks. No statistically significant differences were found where influence of other factors like total and yearly flight hours, heart rate gain (AHR) or physical activity measured as maximal oxygen intake were considered. 2-4 weeks of lay-off period decreases +Gz tolerance is statistically significant manner. Subsequent increase of lay-off period does not result in mean tolerance changes for group, however in certain individuals critical decrement of +Gz tolerance occurs. Total and last year flying hours, physical fitness does not modify impact of lay-off period on +Gz tolerance.

  6. Maximization of DRAM yield by control of surface charge and particle addition during high dose implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, J.; Moffatt, S.

    1991-04-01

    Ion implantation processing exposes semiconductor devices to an energetic ion beam in order to deposit dopant ions in shallow layers. In addition to this primary process, foreign materials are deposited as particles and surface films. The deposition of particles is a major cause of IC yield loss and becomes even more significant as device dimensions are decreased. Control of particle addition in a high-volume production environment requires procedures to limit beamline and endstation sources, control of particle transport, cleaning procedures and a well grounded preventative maintenance philosophy. Control of surface charge by optimization of the ion beam and electron shower conditions and measurement with a real-time charge sensor has been effective in improving the yield of NMOS and CMOS DRAMs. Control of surface voltages to a range between 0 and -20 V was correlated with good implant yield with PI9200 implanters for p + and n + source-drain implants.

  7. Socially-Tolerable Discrimination

    OpenAIRE

    Amegashie, J. Atsu

    2008-01-01

    History is replete with overt discrimination on the basis of race, gender, age, citizenship, ethnicity, marital status, academic performance, health status, volume of market transactions, religion, sexual orientation, etc. However, these forms of discrimination are not equally tolerable. For example, discrimination based on immutable or prohibitively unalterable characteristics such as race, gender, or ethnicity is much less acceptable. Why? I develop a simple rent-seeking model of conflict w...

  8. Dose and dose rate monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novakova, O.; Ryba, J.; Slezak, V.; Svobodova, B.; Viererbl, L.

    1984-10-01

    The methods are discussea of measuring dose rate or dose using a scintillation counte. A plastic scintillator based on polystyrene with PBD and POPOP activators and coated with ZnS(Ag) was chosen for the projected monitor. The scintillators were cylindrical and spherical in shape and of different sizes; black polypropylene tubes were chosen as the best case for the probs. For the counter with different plastic scintillators, the statistical error 2σ for natural background was determined. For determining the suitable thickness of the ZnS(Ag) layer the energy dependence of the counter was measured. Radioisotopes 137 Cs, 241 Am and 109 Cd were chosen as radiation sources. The best suited ZnS(Ag) thickness was found to be 0.5 μm. Experiments were carried out to determine the directional dependence of the detector response and the signal to noise ratio. The temperature dependence of the detector response and its compensation were studied, as were the time stability and fatigue manifestations of the photomultiplier. The design of a laboratory prototype of a dose rate and dose monitor is described. Block diagrams are given of the various functional parts of the instrument. The designed instrument is easiiy portable, battery powered, measures dose rates from natural background in the range of five orders, i.e., 10 -2 to 10 3 nGy/s, and allows to determine a dose of up to 10 mGy. Accouracy of measurement in the energy range of 50 keV to 1 MeV is better than +-20%. (E.S.)

  9. Maximal venous outflow velocity: an index for iliac vein obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, T Matthew; Cassada, David C; Heidel, R Eric; Grandas, Oscar G; Stevens, Scott L; Freeman, Michael B; Edmondson, James D; Goldman, Mitchell H

    2012-11-01

    Leg swelling is a common cause for vascular surgical evaluation, and iliocaval obstruction due to May-Thurner syndrome (MTS) can be difficult to diagnose. Physical examination and planar radiographic imaging give anatomic information but may miss the fundamental pathophysiology of MTS. Similarly, duplex ultrasonographic examination of the legs gives little information about central impedance of venous return above the inguinal ligament. We have modified the technique of duplex ultrasonography to evaluate the flow characteristics of the leg after tourniquet-induced venous engorgement, with the objective of revealing iliocaval obstruction characteristic of MTS. Twelve patients with signs and symptoms of MTS were compared with healthy control subjects for duplex-derived maximal venous outflow velocity (MVOV) after tourniquet-induced venous engorgement of the leg. The data for healthy control subjects were obtained from a previous study of asymptomatic volunteers using the same MVOV maneuvers. The tourniquet-induced venous engorgement mimics that caused during vigorous exercise. A right-to-left ratio of MVOV was generated for patient comparisons. Patients with clinical evidence of MTS had a mean right-to-left MVOV ratio of 2.0, asymptomatic control subjects had a mean ratio of 1.3, and MTS patients who had undergone endovascular treatment had a poststent mean ratio of 1.2 (P = 0.011). Interestingly, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging results, when available, were interpreted as positive in only 53% of the patients with MTS according to both our MVOV criteria and confirmatory venography. After intervention, the right-to-left MVOV ratio in the MTS patients was found to be reduced similar to asymptomatic control subjects, indicating a relief of central venous obstruction by stenting the compressive MTS anatomy. Duplex-derived MVOV measurements are helpful for detection of iliocaval venous obstruction, such as MTS. Right-to-left MVOV ratios and

  10. Intravascular ultrasound based dose assessment in endovascular brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catalano, Gianpiero; Tamburini, Vittorio; Colombo, Antonio; Nishida, Takahiro; Parisi, Giovanni; Mazzetta, Chiara; Orecchia, Roberto

    2003-01-01

    Background: the role of endovascular brachytherapy in restenosis prevention is well documented. Dose is usually prescribed at a fixed distance from the source axis by angiographic quantification of vessel diameter. Recently, intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) was introduced in dose prescription, allowing a better evaluation of the vessel anatomy. This study retrospectively explores the difference between prescription following angiographic vessel sizing and delivered dose calculated with IVUS. Methods and results: Seventeen lesions were studied with IVUS, identifying on irradiated segment, three sections on which measuring minimal and maximal distance from the centre of IVUS catheter to the adventitia; using dedicated software, corresponding doses were calculated. The dose ranged widely, with maximal and minimal values of 71.6 and 4.9 Gy; furthermore, heterogeneity in dose among different sections was observed. In the central section, the maximal dose was 206% of the one prescribed with the QCA model at 2 mm from the source axis, while the minimal dose was 96%. In proximal and distal sections, respective values were 182, 45, 243, and 122%. Conclusions: Our analysis confirmed the dose inhomogeneity delivered with an angiographic fixed-dose prescription strategy. A dose variation was found along the irradiated segment due to the differences in vessel thickness. IVUS emerged as an important tool in endovascular brachytherapy, especially for irregular-shaped vessels

  11. Evaluation of anti-hyperglycemic effect of Actinidia kolomikta (Maxim. etRur.) Maxim. root extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xuansheng; Cheng, Delin; Wang, Linbo; Li, Shuhong; Wang, Yuepeng; Li, Kejuan; Yang, Yingnan; Zhang, Zhenya

    2015-05-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the anti-hyperglycemic effect of ethanol extract from Actinidia kolomikta (Maxim. etRur.) Maxim. root (AKE).An in vitro evaluation was performed by using rat intestinal α-glucosidase (maltase and sucrase), the key enzymes linked with type 2 diabetes. And an in vivo evaluation was also performed by loading maltose, sucrose, glucose to normal rats. As a result, AKE showed concentration-dependent inhibition effects on rat intestinal maltase and rat intestinal sucrase with IC(50) values of 1.83 and 1.03mg/mL, respectively. In normal rats, after loaded with maltose, sucrose and glucose, administration of AKE significantly reduced postprandial hyperglycemia, which is similar to acarbose used as an anti-diabetic drug. High contents of total phenolics (80.49 ± 0.05mg GAE/g extract) and total flavonoids (430.69 ± 0.91mg RE/g extract) were detected in AKE. In conclusion, AKE possessed anti-hyperglycemic effects and the possible mechanisms were associated with its inhibition on α-glucosidase and the improvement on insulin release and/or insulin sensitivity as well. The anti-hyperglycemic activity possessed by AKE maybe attributable to its high contents of phenolic and flavonoid compounds.

  12. Alternative approaches to maximally supersymmetric field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broedel, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    The central objective of this work is the exploration and application of alternative possibilities to describe maximally supersymmetric field theories in four dimensions: N=4 super Yang-Mills theory and N=8 supergravity. While twistor string theory has been proven very useful in the context of N=4 SYM, no analogous formulation for N=8 supergravity is available. In addition to the part describing N=4 SYM theory, twistor string theory contains vertex operators corresponding to the states of N=4 conformal supergravity. Those vertex operators have to be altered in order to describe (non-conformal) Einstein supergravity. A modified version of the known open twistor string theory, including a term which breaks the conformal symmetry for the gravitational vertex operators, has been proposed recently. In a first part of the thesis structural aspects and consistency of the modified theory are discussed. Unfortunately, the majority of amplitudes can not be constructed, which can be traced back to the fact that the dimension of the moduli space of algebraic curves in twistor space is reduced in an inconsistent manner. The issue of a possible finiteness of N=8 supergravity is closely related to the question of the existence of valid counterterms in the perturbation expansion of the theory. In particular, the coefficient in front of the so-called R 4 counterterm candidate has been shown to vanish by explicit calculation. This behavior points into the direction of a symmetry not taken into account, for which the hidden on-shell E 7(7) symmetry is the prime candidate. The validity of the so-called double-soft scalar limit relation is a necessary condition for a theory exhibiting E 7(7) symmetry. By calculating the double-soft scalar limit for amplitudes derived from an N=8 supergravity action modified by an additional R 4 counterterm, one can test for possible constraints originating in the E 7(7) symmetry. In a second part of the thesis, the appropriate amplitudes are calculated

  13. 76 FR 5696 - Fluazifop-P-butyl; Pesticide Tolerances

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-02

    ...: This regulation establishes tolerances for residues of fluazifop-P-butyl in or on multiple commodities... based on maternal body weight gain decrement during GD 7- 16. Incidental oral intermediate- NOAEL= 0.74....0 and 2% at 200 mg dose.) mg/kg/day based on fetal UFA = 10x weight decrement, UFH = 10x hydroureter...

  14. Radiation tolerant design - theory and practice for proximity sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharp, R.E.; Pater, S.L.; Cook, J.

    1999-01-01

    This paper provides a description of the radiation tolerant design process used to develop a range of proximity detectors with guaranteed total dose lifetime. It also describes some of the applications in which the detectors are being used and the benefits gained by plant operators. (authors)

  15. Soil bacteria show different tolerance ranges to an unprecedented disturbance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nunes, Ines Marques; Jurburg, Stephanie; Jacquiod, Samuel Jehan Auguste

    2018-01-01

    stress doses. FRG1, the most sensitive group, was dominated by Actinobacteria. FRG2 and FRG3, with intermediate tolerance, displayed prevalence of Proteobacteria, while FRG4, the most resistant group, was driven by Firmicutes. While the most sensitive FRGs showed predictable responses linked to changes...

  16. Sulfasalazine efficacy and tolerability in rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Badokin

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Sulfasalazine is one of the main disease modifying drugs for the treatment of chronic inflammatory joint and spine diseases. The article describes mechanism of action of sulfasalazine and its main metabolites. Detailed information about anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive action of the drug is presented. Results of many studies of sulfasalazine efficacy in rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatic arthritis and reactive arthritis are discussed from the evidence based medicine point of view. Data on sulfasalazine tolerability and safety are presented with separate discussion of hypersensitivity and dose-dependent adverse reactions so as their treatment and prophylaxis.

  17. Lifestyle and metabolic approaches to maximizing erectile and vascular health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meldrum, D R; Gambone, J C; Morris, M A; Esposito, K; Giugliano, D; Ignarro, L J

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress and inflammation, which disrupt nitric oxide (NO) production directly or by causing resistance to insulin, are central determinants of vascular diseases including ED. Decreased vascular NO has been linked to abdominal obesity, smoking and high intakes of fat and sugar, which all cause oxidative stress. Men with ED have decreased vascular NO and circulating and cellular antioxidants. Oxidative stress and inflammatory markers are increased in men with ED, and all increase with age. Exercise increases vascular NO, and more frequent erections are correlated with decreased ED, both in part due to stimulation of endothelial NO production by shear stress. Exercise and weight loss increase insulin sensitivity and endothelial NO production. Potent antioxidants or high doses of weaker antioxidants increase vascular NO and improve vascular and erectile function. Antioxidants may be particularly important in men with ED who smoke, are obese or have diabetes. Omega-3 fatty acids reduce inflammatory markers, decrease cardiac death and increase endothelial NO production, and are therefore critical for men with ED who are under age 60 years, and/or have diabetes, hypertension or coronary artery disease, who are at increased risk of serious or even fatal cardiac events. Phosphodiesterase inhibitors have recently been shown to improve antioxidant status and NO production and allow more frequent and sustained penile exercise. Some angiotensin II receptor blockers decrease oxidative stress and improve vascular and erectile function and are therefore preferred choices for lowering blood pressure in men with ED. Lifestyle modifications, including physical and penile-specific exercise, weight loss, omega-3 and folic acid supplements, reduced intakes of fat and sugar, and improved antioxidant status through diet and/or supplements should be integrated into any comprehensive approach to maximizing erectile function, resulting in greater overall success and patient

  18. Comparison in muscle damage between maximal voluntary and electrically evoked isometric contractions of the elbow flexors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jubeau, Marc; Muthalib, Makii; Millet, Guillaume Y; Maffiuletti, Nicola A; Nosaka, Kazunori

    2012-02-01

    This study compared between maximal voluntary (VOL) and electrically stimulated (ES) isometric contractions of the elbow flexors for changes in indirect markers of muscle damage to investigate whether ES would induce greater muscle damage than VOL. Twelve non-resistance-trained men (23-39 years) performed VOL with one arm and ES with the contralateral arm separated by 2 weeks in a randomised, counterbalanced order. Both VOL and ES (frequency 75 Hz, pulse duration 250 μs, maximally tolerated intensity) exercises consisted of 50 maximal isometric contractions (4-s on, 15-s off) of the elbow flexors at a long muscle length (160°). Changes in maximal voluntary isometric contraction torque (MVC), range of motion, muscle soreness, pressure pain threshold and serum creatine kinase (CK) activity were measured before, immediately after and 1, 24, 48, 72 and 96 h following exercise. The average peak torque over the 50 isometric contractions was greater (P < 0.05) for VOL (32.9 ± 9.8 N m) than ES (16.9 ± 6.3 N m). MVC decreased greater and recovered slower (P < 0.05) after ES (15% lower than baseline at 96 h) than VOL (full recovery). Serum CK activity increased (P < 0.05) only after ES, and the muscles became more sore and tender after ES than VOL (P < 0.05). These results showed that ES induced greater muscle damage than VOL despite the lower torque output during ES. It seems likely that higher mechanical stress imposed on the activated muscle fibres, due to the specificity of motor unit recruitment in ES, resulted in greater muscle damage.

  19. Application of Key Events Dose Response Framework to defining the upper intake level of leucine in young men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pencharz, Paul B; Russell, Robert M

    2012-12-01

    Leucine is sold in large doses in health food stores and is ingested by weight-training athletes. The safety of ingestion of large doses of leucine is unknown. Before designing chronic high-dose leucine supplementation experiments, we decided to determine the effect of graded doses of leucine in healthy participants. The Key Events Dose Response Framework is an organizational and analytical framework that dissects the various biologic steps (key events) that occur between exposure to a substance and an eventual adverse effect. Each biologic event is looked at for its unique dose-response characteristics. For nutrients, there are a number of biologic homeostatic mechanisms that work to keep circulating/tissue levels in a safe, nontoxic range. If a response mechanism at a particular key event is especially vulnerable and easily overwhelmed, this is known as a determining event, because this event drives the overall slope or shape of the dose-response relationship. In this paper, the Key Events Dose Framework has been applied to the problem of leucine toxicity and leucine's tolerable upper level. After analyzing the experimental data vis a vis key events for leucine leading to toxicity, it became evident that the rate of leucine oxidation was the determining event. A dose-response study has been conducted to graded intakes of leucine in healthy human adult male volunteers. All participants were started at the mean requirement level of leucine [50 mg/(kg · d)] and the highest leucine intake was 1250 mg/( kg · d), which is 25 times the mean requirement. No gut intolerance was seen. Blood glucose fell progressively but remained within normal values without any changes in plasma insulin. Maximal leucine oxidation levels occurred at an intake of 550 mg leucine/( kg · d), after which plasma leucine progressively increased and plasma ammonia also increased in response to leucine intakes >500 mg/( kg · d). Thus, the "key determining event" appears to be when the

  20. Tumor significant dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supe, S.J.; Nagalaxmi, K.V.; Meenakshi, L.

    1983-01-01

    In the practice of radiotherapy, various concepts like NSD, CRE, TDF, and BIR are being used to evaluate the biological effectiveness of the treatment schedules on the normal tissues. This has been accepted as the tolerance of the normal tissue is the limiting factor in the treatment of cancers. At present when various schedules are tried, attention is therefore paid to the biological damage of the normal tissues only and it is expected that the damage to the cancerous tissues would be extensive enough to control the cancer. Attempt is made in the present work to evaluate the concent of tumor significant dose (TSD) which will represent the damage to the cancerous tissue. Strandquist in the analysis of a large number of cases of squamous cell carcinoma found that for the 5 fraction/week treatment, the total dose required to bring about the same damage for the cancerous tissue is proportional to T/sup -0.22/, where T is the overall time over which the dose is delivered. Using this finding the TSD was defined as DxN/sup -p/xT/sup -q/, where D is the total dose, N the number of fractions, T the overall time p and q are the exponents to be suitably chosen. The values of p and q are adjusted such that p+q< or =0.24, and p varies from 0.0 to 0.24 and q varies from 0.0 to 0.22. Cases of cancer of cervix uteri treated between 1978 and 1980 in the V. N. Cancer Centre, Kuppuswamy Naidu Memorial Hospital, Coimbatore, India were analyzed on the basis of these formulations. These data, coupled with the clinical experience, were used for choice of a formula for the TSD. Further, the dose schedules used in the British Institute of Radiology fraction- ation studies were also used to propose that the tumor significant dose is represented by DxN/sup -0.18/xT/sup -0.06/