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Sample records for maximal vertical jump

  1. Increase in Jumping Height Associated with Maximal Effort Vertical Depth Jumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedi, John F.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    In order to assess if there existed a statistically significant increase in jumping performance when dropping from different heights, 32 males, aged 19 to 26, performed a series of maximal effort vertical jumps after dropping from eight heights onto a force plate. Results are analyzed. (Author/MT)

  2. Effects of ethnicity on the relationship between vertical jump and maximal power on a cycle ergometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rouis Majdi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to verify the impact of ethnicity on the maximal power-vertical jump relationship. Thirty-one healthy males, sixteen Caucasian (age: 26.3 ± 3.5 years; body height: 179.1 ± 5.5 cm; body mass: 78.1 ± 9.8 kg and fifteen Afro-Caribbean (age: 24.4 ±2.6 years; body height: 178.9 ± 5.5 cm; body mass: 77.1 ± 10.3 kg completed three sessions during which vertical jump height and maximal power of lower limbs were measured. The results showed that the values of vertical jump height and maximal power were higher for Afro-Caribbean participants (62.92 ± 6.7 cm and 14.70 ± 1.75 W∙kg-1 than for Caucasian ones (52.92 ± 4.4 cm and 12.75 ± 1.36 W∙kg-1. Moreover, very high reliability indices were obtained on vertical jump (e.g. 0.95 < ICC < 0.98 and maximal power performance (e.g. 0.75 < ICC < 0.97. However, multiple linear regression analysis showed that, for a given value of maximal power, the Afro-Caribbean participants jumped 8 cm higher than the Caucasians. Together, these results confirmed that ethnicity impacted the maximal power-vertical jump relationship over three sessions. In the current context of cultural diversity, the use of vertical jump performance as a predictor of muscular power should be considered with caution when dealing with populations of different ethnic origins.

  3. Relationship between traditional and ballistic squat exercise with vertical jumping and maximal sprinting.

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    Requena, Bernardo; García, Inmaculada; Requena, Francisco; de Villarreal, Eduardo Sáez-Sáez; Cronin, John B

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the magnitude of the relationship between vertical jumping and maximal sprinting at different distances with performance in the traditional and ballistic concentric squat exercise in well-trained sprinters. Twenty-one men performed 2 types of barbell squats (ballistic and traditional) across different loads with the aim of determining the maximal peak and average power outputs and 1 repetition maximum (1RM) values. Moreover, vertical jumping (countermovement jump test [CMJ]) and maximal sprints over 10, 20, 30, 40, 60, and 80 m were also assessed. In respect to 1RM in traditional squat, (a) no significant correlation was found with CMJ performance; (b) positive strong relationships (p ballistic and traditional squat exercises (r = 0.53-0.90); (c) negative significant correlations (r = -0.49 to -0.59, p ballistic or traditional squat exercises. Sprint time at 20 m was only related to ballistic and traditional squat performance when power values were expressed in relative terms. Moderate significant correlations (r = -0.39 to -0.56, p ballistic and traditional squat exercises. Sprint times at 60 and 80 m were mainly related to ballistic squat power outputs. Although correlations can only give insights into associations and not into cause and effect, from this investigation, it can be seen that traditional squat strength has little in common with CMJ performance and that relative 1RM and power outputs for both squat exercises are statistically correlated to most sprint distances underlying the importance of strength and power to sprinting.

  4. The effect of caffeine on maximal oxygen uptake and vertical jump performance in male basketball players.

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    Tucker, Matthew A; Hargreaves, Jill M; Clarke, Jenny C; Dale, Darren L; Blackwell, Gavin J

    2013-02-01

    This study investigated whether performance enhancement from caffeine described by other researchers transfers to male basketball players. The effects of caffeine ingestion were studied in a maximal-effort test on a treadmill that was followed by a vertical-jump test. Five elite-level male basketball players completed a graded treadmill test that measured maximal oxygen uptake, blood lactate profiles, respiratory exchange ratio, and rating of perceived exertion at each 3-minute stage. After a 15-minute warm-down, the subjects performed 10 vertical rebound jumps. Each subject completed the test twice--once with a 3 mg·kg(-1) of body weight dose of caffeine and once with a placebo, with the dosage administered 60 minutes before commencement of exercise. The test was thus administered according to a double-blind protocol. No substantial trends were found between caffeine and control trials, regardless of trial order. The study showed that the specified dosage had negligible effects on the players' power and endurance performance and had no efficacy as an ergogenic aid for male basketball players.

  5. The role of human ankle plantar flexor muscle-tendon interaction and architecture in maximal vertical jumping examined in vivo.

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    Farris, Dominic James; Lichtwark, Glen A; Brown, Nicholas A T; Cresswell, Andrew G

    2016-02-01

    Humans utilise elastic tendons of lower limb muscles to store and return energy during walking, running and jumping. Anuran and insect species use skeletal structures and/or dynamics in conjunction with similarly compliant structures to amplify muscle power output during jumping. We sought to examine whether human jumpers use similar mechanisms to aid elastic energy usage in the plantar flexor muscles during maximal vertical jumping. Ten male athletes performed maximal vertical squat jumps. Three-dimensional motion capture and a musculoskeletal model were used to determine lower limb kinematics that were combined with ground reaction force data in an inverse dynamics analysis. B-mode ultrasound imaging of the lateral gastrocnemius (GAS) and soleus (SOL) muscles was used to measure muscle fascicle lengths and pennation angles during jumping. Our results highlighted that both GAS and SOL utilised stretch and recoil of their series elastic elements (SEEs) in a catapult-like fashion, which likely serves to maximise ankle joint power. The resistance of supporting of body weight allowed initial stretch of both GAS and SOL SEEs. A proximal-to-distal sequence of joint moments and decreasing effective mechanical advantage early in the extension phase of the jumping movement were observed. This facilitated a further stretch of the SEE of the biarticular GAS and delayed recoil of the SOL SEE. However, effective mechanical advantage did not increase late in the jump to aid recoil of elastic tissues. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  6. Coordination in vertical jumping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bobbert, Maarten F.; van Ingen Schenau, Gerrit Jan

    1988-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate for vertical jumping the relationships between muscle actions, movement pattern and jumping achievement. Ten skilled jumpers performed jumps with preparatory countermovement. Ground reaction forces and cinematographic data were recorded. In addition,

  7. The Functional Abilities and Maximal Vertical Jumping Height in Coper and Non-coper Anterior Cruciate Ligament-Deficient Knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Norouzi Fashkhami

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of the present study was to compare the performance of the vertical jump task and the level of disability between the coper and non-coper athletes with an anterior cruciate ligament-minus knee. Methods: Thirty-four professional male athletes with isolated complete anterior cruciate ligament-tear (age 20-29 years and 6-12 months time past injury were recruited in this study. The subjects were allocated into the coper (n=17 and non-coper (n=17 groups according to their history of having giving way and feeling an instability in their injured knee. The maximum vertical jump height was recorded by a 6-camera Vicon motion analysis system. The functional outcomes of the subjects were assessed with use of the Persian versions of the International Knee Documentation Committee, Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score and Tegner Questionnaires. Results: The results revealed that the coper ACK-deficient knee subjects had a significantly higher International Knee Documentation Committee score as well as two subscales of the KOOS questionnaire including the sports (P=0.001 and the quality of life (P=0.016 than non-copers. However, the subscales of pain (P=0.0137, symptoms (P=0.353 and the activities of daily living (P=0.133 of the KOOS questionnaire did not show any significant differences between the coper and non-coper ACL-deficient knee subjects. In addition, the maximum jumping height was significantly higher in the copers too (P=0.008. Discussion: While the pain, symptoms and daily activities were not different between the two groups, a higher level of the functional abilities, sports activities, quality of life and the maximum jumping height were shown in the coper ACL-deficient knee subjects when compared to the non-copers. A deliberate evaluation of the functional abilities in ACL-deficient knee subjects might play a key role in distinguishing the coper and non-coper ACL-deficient knee subjects.

  8. The Effects of a Maximal Power Training Cycle on the Strength, Maximum Power, Vertical Jump Height and Acceleration of High-Level 400-Meter Hurdlers

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    Balsalobre-Fernández, Carlos; Tejero-González, Carlos Mª; del Campo-Vecino, Juan; Alonso-Curiel, Dionisio

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of a power training cycle on maximum strength, maximum power, vertical jump height and acceleration in seven high-level 400-meter hurdlers subjected to a specific training program twice a week for 10 weeks. Each training session consisted of five sets of eight jump-squats with the load at which each athlete produced his maximum power. The repetition maximum in the half squat position (RM), maximum power in the jump-squat (W), a squat jump (SJ), countermovement jump (CSJ), and a 30-meter sprint from a standing position were measured before and after the training program using an accelerometer, an infra-red platform and photo-cells. The results indicated the following statistically significant improvements: a 7.9% increase in RM (Z=−2.03, p=0.021, δc=0.39), a 2.3% improvement in SJ (Z=−1.69, p=0.045, δc=0.29), a 1.43% decrease in the 30-meter sprint (Z=−1.70, p=0.044, δc=0.12), and, where maximum power was produced, a change in the RM percentage from 56 to 62% (Z=−1.75, p=0.039, δc=0.54). As such, it can be concluded that strength training with a maximum power load is an effective means of increasing strength and acceleration in high-level hurdlers. PMID:23717361

  9. The reliability of vertical jump tests between the Vertec and My Jump phone application.

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    Yingling, Vanessa R; Castro, Dimitri A; Duong, Justin T; Malpartida, Fiorella J; Usher, Justin R; O, Jenny

    2018-01-01

    The vertical jump is used to estimate sports performance capabilities and physical fitness in children, elderly, non-athletic and injured individuals. Different jump techniques and measurement tools are available to assess vertical jump height and peak power; however, their use is limited by access to laboratory settings, excessive cost and/or time constraints thus making these tools oftentimes unsuitable for field assessment. A popular field test uses the Vertec and the Sargent vertical jump with countermovement; however, new low cost, easy to use tools are becoming available, including the My Jump iOS mobile application (app). The purpose of this study was to assess the reliability of the My Jump relative to values obtained by the Vertec for the Sargent stand and reach vertical jump (VJ) test. One hundred and thirty-five healthy participants aged 18-39 years (94 males, 41 females) completed three maximal Sargent VJ with countermovement that were simultaneously measured using the Vertec and the My Jump . Jump heights were quantified for each jump and peak power was calculated using the Sayers equation. Four separate ICC estimates and their 95% confidence intervals were used to assess reliability. Two analyses (with jump height and calculated peak power as the dependent variables, respectively) were based on a single rater, consistency, two-way mixed-effects model, while two others (with jump height and calculated peak power as the dependent variables, respectively) were based on a single rater, absolute agreement, two-way mixed-effects model. Moderate to excellent reliability relative to the degree of consistency between the Vertec and My Jump values was found for jump height (ICC = 0.813; 95% CI [0.747-0.863]) and calculated peak power (ICC = 0.926; 95% CI [0.897-0.947]). However, poor to good reliability relative to absolute agreement for VJ height (ICC = 0.665; 95% CI [0.050-0.859]) and poor to excellent reliability relative to absolute agreement for peak power

  10. Predicting vertical jump height from bar velocity.

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    García-Ramos, Amador; Štirn, Igor; Padial, Paulino; Argüelles-Cienfuegos, Javier; De la Fuente, Blanca; Strojnik, Vojko; Feriche, Belén

    2015-06-01

    The objective of the study was to assess the use of maximum (Vmax) and final propulsive phase (FPV) bar velocity to predict jump height in the weighted jump squat. FPV was defined as the velocity reached just before bar acceleration was lower than gravity (-9.81 m·s(-2)). Vertical jump height was calculated from the take-off velocity (Vtake-off) provided by a force platform. Thirty swimmers belonging to the National Slovenian swimming team performed a jump squat incremental loading test, lifting 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% of body weight in a Smith machine. Jump performance was simultaneously monitored using an AMTI portable force platform and a linear velocity transducer attached to the barbell. Simple linear regression was used to estimate jump height from the Vmax and FPV recorded by the linear velocity transducer. Vmax (y = 16.577x - 16.384) was able to explain 93% of jump height variance with a standard error of the estimate of 1.47 cm. FPV (y = 12.828x - 6.504) was able to explain 91% of jump height variance with a standard error of the estimate of 1.66 cm. Despite that both variables resulted to be good predictors, heteroscedasticity in the differences between FPV and Vtake-off was observed (r(2) = 0.307), while the differences between Vmax and Vtake-off were homogenously distributed (r(2) = 0.071). These results suggest that Vmax is a valid tool for estimating vertical jump height in a loaded jump squat test performed in a Smith machine. Key pointsVertical jump height in the loaded jump squat can be estimated with acceptable precision from the maximum bar velocity recorded by a linear velocity transducer.The relationship between the point at which bar acceleration is less than -9.81 m·s(-2) and the real take-off is affected by the velocity of movement.Mean propulsive velocity recorded by a linear velocity transducer does not appear to be optimal to monitor ballistic exercise performance.

  11. Hydrodynamics of vertical jumping in Archer fish

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    Techet, Alexandra H.; Mendelson, Leah

    2017-11-01

    Vertical jumping for aerial prey from an aquatic environment requires both propulsive power and precise aim to succeed. Rapid acceleration to a ballistic velocity sufficient for reaching the prey height occurs before the fish leaves the water completely and experiences a thousandfold drop in force-producing ability. In addition to speed, accuracy and stability are crucial for successful feeding by jumping. This talk examines the physics of jumping using the archer fish as a model. Better known for their spitting abilities, archer fish will jump multiple body lengths out of the water for prey capture, from a stationary position just below the free surface. Modulation of oscillatory body kinematics and use of multiple fins for force production are identified as methods through which the fish can meet requirements for both acceleration and stabilization in limited space. Quantitative 3D PIV wake measurements reveal how variations in tail kinematics relate to thrust production throughout the course of a jumping maneuver and over a range of jump heights. By performing measurements in 3D, the timing, interactions, and relative contributions to thrust and lateral forces from each fin can be evaluated, elucidating the complex hydrodynamics that enable archer fish water exit.

  12. Predicting lower body power from vertical jump prediction equations for loaded jump squats at different intensities in men and women.

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    Wright, Glenn A; Pustina, Andrew A; Mikat, Richard P; Kernozek, Thomas W

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of estimating peak lower body power from a maximal jump squat using 3 different vertical jump prediction equations. Sixty physically active college students (30 men, 30 women) performed jump squats with a weighted bar's applied load of 20, 40, and 60% of body mass across the shoulders. Each jump squat was simultaneously monitored using a force plate and a contact mat. Peak power (PP) was calculated using vertical ground reaction force from the force plate data. Commonly used equations requiring body mass and vertical jump height to estimate PP were applied such that the system mass (mass of body + applied load) was substituted for body mass. Jump height was determined from flight time as measured with a contact mat during a maximal jump squat. Estimations of PP (PP(est)) for each load and for each prediction equation were compared with criterion PP values from a force plate (PP(FP)). The PP(est) values had high test-retest reliability and were strongly correlated to PP(FP) in both men and women at all relative loads. However, only the Harman equation accurately predicted PP(FP) at all relative loads. It can therefore be concluded that the Harman equation may be used to estimate PP of a loaded jump squat knowing the system mass and peak jump height when more precise (and expensive) measurement equipment is unavailable. Further, high reliability and correlation with criterion values suggest that serial assessment of power production across training periods could be used for relative assessment of change by either of the prediction equations used in this study.

  13. Kinematic and kinetic characteristics of vertical jump: comparison between soccer and basketball players

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    Matheus Machado Gomes

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare jump height and kinetic and kinematic com-ponents of countermovement vertical jumps between soccer and basketball players performed in two different arm swing conditions: with arm swing (WAS and without arm swing (NAS. Nine basketball players (21.2 ± 2.9 years; 101.64 ± 14.58 kg; 1.95 ± 0.06 m and nine soccer players (18.2 ± 0.7 years; 77.4 ± 7.58 kg; 1.81 ± 0.07 m performed 12 maximal countermo-vement vertical jumps, including 6 WAS jumps and 6 NAS jumps, on a force platform that recorded the ground reaction force (GRF. The vertical component of the GRF was used to estimate jump height and to calculate the kinematic (duration of eccentric phase, duration of concentric phase, and maximal downward displacement of center of mass and kinetic variables (mean power during the eccentric phase, mean power during the concentric, peak power, and peak force. The results showed no differences in jump height or in kinematic or kinetic variables between basketball and soccer players. In addition, the results showed that the participants of the two groups jumped higher in the WAS condition (0.41 m than in the NAS condition (0.36 m because of a higher peak power (WAS=276.8 W/kg0.67 and NAS=241.3 W/kg0.67 and a longer concentric phase duration (WAS=0.20 s/m0.5 and NAS=0.19 s/m0.5 during WAS jump. These results indicate that the basketball and soccer players studied here showed similar performance and the same kinematic and kinetic pattern in maximal vertical jumps and were comparably affected by the use of arm swing.

  14. LOAD THAT MAXIMIZES POWER OUTPUT IN COUNTERMOVEMENT JUMP

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    Pedro Jimenez-Reyes

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: One of the main problems faced by strength and conditioning coaches is the issue of how to objectively quantify and monitor the actual training load undertaken by athletes in order to maximize performance. It is well known that performance of explosive sports activities is largely determined by mechanical power. Objective: This study analysed the height at which maximal power output is generated and the corresponding load with which is achieved in a group of male-trained track and field athletes in the test of countermovement jump (CMJ with extra loads (CMJEL. Methods: Fifty national level male athletes in sprinting and jumping performed a CMJ test with increasing loads up to a height of 16 cm. The relative load that maximized the mechanical power output (Pmax was determined using a force platform and lineal encoder synchronization and estimating the power by peak power, average power and flight time in CMJ. Results: The load at which the power output no longer existed was at a height of 19.9 ± 2.35, referring to a 99.1 ± 1% of the maximum power output. The load that maximizes power output in all cases has been the load with which an athlete jump a height of approximately 20 cm. Conclusion: These results highlight the importance of considering the height achieved in CMJ with extra load instead of power because maximum power is always attained with the same height. We advise for the preferential use of the height achieved in CMJEL test, since it seems to be a valid indicative of an individual's actual neuromuscular potential providing a valid information for coaches and trainers when assessing the performance status of our athletes and to quantify and monitor training loads, measuring only the height of the jump in the exercise of CMJEL.

  15. Effect of a submaximal half-squats warm-up program on vertical jumping ability.

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    Gourgoulis, Vassilios; Aggeloussis, Nickos; Kasimatis, Panagiotis; Mavromatis, Giorgos; Garas, Athanasios

    2003-05-01

    The purpose of the current research was to study the effect of a warm-up program including submaximal half-squats on vertical jumping ability. Twenty physically active men participated in the study. Each subject performed 5 sets of half-squats with 2 repetitions at each of the following intensities: 20, 40, 60, 80, and 90% of the 1 repetition maximum (1RM) load. Prior to the first set and immediately after the end of the last set, the subjects performed 2 countermovement jumps on a Kistler force platform; the primary goal was to jump as high as possible. The results showed that mean vertical jumping ability improved by 2.39% after the warm-up period. Subjects were then divided into 2 groups according to their 1RM values for the half-squat. Subjects with greater maximal strength ability improved their vertical jumping ability (4.01%) more than did subjects with lower maximal strength (0.42%). A warm-up protocol including half-squats with submaximal loads and explosive execution can be used for short-term improvements of vertical jumping performance, and this effect is greater in athletes with a relatively high strength ability.

  16. Dynamics of force and muscle stimulation in human vertical jumping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bobbert, M.F.; van Zandwijk, J.P.

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to gain insight into the importance of stimulation dynamics for force development in human vertical jumping. METHODS: Maximum height squat jumps were performed by 21 male subjects. As a measure of signal dynamics, rise time (RT) was used, i.e., the time taken

  17. Usefulness of the jump-and-reach test in assessment of vertical jump performance.

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    Menzel, Hans-Joachim; Chagas, Mauro H; Szmuchrowski, Leszek A; Araujo, Silvia R; Campos, Carlos E; Giannetti, Marcus R

    2010-02-01

    The objective was to estimate the reliability and criterion-related validity of the Jump-and-Reach Test for the assessment of squat, countermovement, and drop jump performance of 32 male Brazilian professional volleyball players. Performance of squat, countermovement, and drop jumps with different dropping heights was assessed on the Jump-and-Reach Test and the measurement of flight time, then compared across different jump trials. The very high reliability coefficients of both assessment methods and the lower correlation coefficients between scores on the assessments indicate a very high consistency of each method but only moderate covariation, which means that they measure partly different items. As a consequence, the Jump-and-Reach Test has good ecological validity in situations when reaching height during the flight phase is critical for performance (e.g., basketball and volleyball) but only limited accuracy for the assessment of vertical impulse production with different jump techniques and conditions.

  18. The effect of assisted jumping on vertical jump height in high-performance volleyball players.

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    Sheppard, Jeremy M; Dingley, Andrew A; Janssen, Ina; Spratford, Wayne; Chapman, Dale W; Newton, Robert U

    2011-01-01

    Assisted jumping may be useful in training higher concentric movement speed in jumping, thereby potentially increasing the jumping abilities of athletes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of assisted jump training on counter-movement vertical jump (CMVJ) and spike jump (SPJ) ability in a group of elite male volleyball players. Seven junior national team volleyball players (18.0±1.0 yrs, 200.4±6.7 cm, and 84.0±7.2 kg) participated in this within-subjects cross-over counter-balanced training study. Assisted training involved 3 sessions per week of CMVJ training with 10 kg of assistance, applied through use of a bungee system, whilst normal jump training involved equated volume of unassisted counter-movement vertical jumps. Training periods were 5 weeks duration, with a 3-week wash-out separating them. Prior to and at the conclusion of each training period jump testing for CMVJ and SPJ height was conducted. Assisted jump training resulted in gains of 2.7±0.7 cm (pSports Medicine Australia. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of Isometric Scaling on Vertical Jumping Performance

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    Bobbert, Maarten F.

    2013-01-01

    Jump height, defined as vertical displacement in the airborne phase, depends on vertical takeoff velocity. For centuries, researchers have speculated on how jump height is affected by body size and many have adhered to what has come to be known as Borelli’s law, which states that jump height does not depend on body size per se. The underlying assumption is that the amount of work produced per kg body mass during the push-off is independent of size. However, if a big body is isometrically downscaled to a small body, the latter requires higher joint angular velocities to achieve a given takeoff velocity and work production will be more impaired by the force-velocity relationship of muscle. In the present study, the effects of pure isometric scaling on vertical jumping performance were investigated using a biologically realistic model of the human musculoskeletal system. The input of the model, muscle stimulation over time, was optimized using jump height as criterion. It was found that when the human model was miniaturized to the size of a mouse lemur, with a mass of about one-thousandth that of a human, jump height dropped from 40 cm to only 6 cm, mainly because of the force-velocity relationship. In reality, mouse lemurs achieve jump heights of about 33 cm. By implication, the unfavourable effects of the small body size of mouse lemurs on jumping performance must be counteracted by favourable effects of morphological and physiological adaptations. The same holds true for other small jumping animals. The simulations for the first time expose and explain the sheer magnitude of the isolated effects of isometric downscaling on jumping performance, to be counteracted by morphological and physiological adaptations. PMID:23936494

  20. Effects of isometric scaling on vertical jumping performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten F Bobbert

    Full Text Available Jump height, defined as vertical displacement in the airborne phase, depends on vertical takeoff velocity. For centuries, researchers have speculated on how jump height is affected by body size and many have adhered to what has come to be known as Borelli's law, which states that jump height does not depend on body size per se. The underlying assumption is that the amount of work produced per kg body mass during the push-off is independent of size. However, if a big body is isometrically downscaled to a small body, the latter requires higher joint angular velocities to achieve a given takeoff velocity and work production will be more impaired by the force-velocity relationship of muscle. In the present study, the effects of pure isometric scaling on vertical jumping performance were investigated using a biologically realistic model of the human musculoskeletal system. The input of the model, muscle stimulation over time, was optimized using jump height as criterion. It was found that when the human model was miniaturized to the size of a mouse lemur, with a mass of about one-thousandth that of a human, jump height dropped from 40 cm to only 6 cm, mainly because of the force-velocity relationship. In reality, mouse lemurs achieve jump heights of about 33 cm. By implication, the unfavourable effects of the small body size of mouse lemurs on jumping performance must be counteracted by favourable effects of morphological and physiological adaptations. The same holds true for other small jumping animals. The simulations for the first time expose and explain the sheer magnitude of the isolated effects of isometric downscaling on jumping performance, to be counteracted by morphological and physiological adaptations.

  1. Optimizing the Distribution of Leg Muscles for Vertical Jumping.

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    Jeremy D Wong

    Full Text Available A goal of biomechanics and motor control is to understand the design of the human musculoskeletal system. Here we investigated human functional morphology by making predictions about the muscle volume distribution that is optimal for a specific motor task. We examined a well-studied and relatively simple human movement, vertical jumping. We investigated how high a human could jump if muscle volume were optimized for jumping, and determined how the optimal parameters improve performance. We used a four-link inverted pendulum model of human vertical jumping actuated by Hill-type muscles, that well-approximates skilled human performance. We optimized muscle volume by allowing the cross-sectional area and muscle fiber optimum length to be changed for each muscle, while maintaining constant total muscle volume. We observed, perhaps surprisingly, that the reference model, based on human anthropometric data, is relatively good for vertical jumping; it achieves 90% of the jump height predicted by a model with muscles designed specifically for jumping. Alteration of cross-sectional areas-which determine the maximum force deliverable by the muscles-constitutes the majority of improvement to jump height. The optimal distribution results in large vastus, gastrocnemius and hamstrings muscles that deliver more work, while producing a kinematic pattern essentially identical to the reference model. Work output is increased by removing muscle from rectus femoris, which cannot do work on the skeleton given its moment arm at the hip and the joint excursions during push-off. The gluteus composes a disproportionate amount of muscle volume and jump height is improved by moving it to other muscles. This approach represents a way to test hypotheses about optimal human functional morphology. Future studies may extend this approach to address other morphological questions in ethological tasks such as locomotion, and feature other sets of parameters such as properties of

  2. Optimizing the Distribution of Leg Muscles for Vertical Jumping

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    Wong, Jeremy D.; Bobbert, Maarten F.; van Soest, Arthur J.; Gribble, Paul L.; Kistemaker, Dinant A.

    2016-01-01

    A goal of biomechanics and motor control is to understand the design of the human musculoskeletal system. Here we investigated human functional morphology by making predictions about the muscle volume distribution that is optimal for a specific motor task. We examined a well-studied and relatively simple human movement, vertical jumping. We investigated how high a human could jump if muscle volume were optimized for jumping, and determined how the optimal parameters improve performance. We used a four-link inverted pendulum model of human vertical jumping actuated by Hill-type muscles, that well-approximates skilled human performance. We optimized muscle volume by allowing the cross-sectional area and muscle fiber optimum length to be changed for each muscle, while maintaining constant total muscle volume. We observed, perhaps surprisingly, that the reference model, based on human anthropometric data, is relatively good for vertical jumping; it achieves 90% of the jump height predicted by a model with muscles designed specifically for jumping. Alteration of cross-sectional areas—which determine the maximum force deliverable by the muscles—constitutes the majority of improvement to jump height. The optimal distribution results in large vastus, gastrocnemius and hamstrings muscles that deliver more work, while producing a kinematic pattern essentially identical to the reference model. Work output is increased by removing muscle from rectus femoris, which cannot do work on the skeleton given its moment arm at the hip and the joint excursions during push-off. The gluteus composes a disproportionate amount of muscle volume and jump height is improved by moving it to other muscles. This approach represents a way to test hypotheses about optimal human functional morphology. Future studies may extend this approach to address other morphological questions in ethological tasks such as locomotion, and feature other sets of parameters such as properties of the skeletal

  3. Hypohydration Reduces Vertical Ground Reaction Impulse But Not Jump Height

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    height, provided that muscle contractile function remains normal, because gravitational and inertial resistance to jumping are pro- portional to body...testing, anthropometric and fitness measurements were made to characterize the study population. Peak aerobic power (VO2peak) was determined using an...determinations. All volunteers performed between 3 and 5 practice days of vertical jump testing to reduce training and learning effects. Practice

  4. Kinematic and kinetic characteristics of vertical jump: comparison between soccer and basketball players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus Machado Gomes

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1980-0037.2009v11n4p392   The aim of this study was to compare jump height and kinetic and kinematic com-ponents of countermovement vertical jumps between soccer and basketball players performed in two different arm swing conditions: with arm swing (WAS and without arm swing (NAS. Nine basketball players (21.2 ± 2.9 years; 101.64 ± 14.58 kg; 1.95 ± 0.06 m and nine soccer players (18.2 ± 0.7 years; 77.4 ± 7.58 kg; 1.81 ± 0.07 m performed 12 maximal countermo-vement vertical jumps, including 6 WAS jumps and 6 NAS jumps, on a force platform that recorded the ground reaction force (GRF. The vertical component of the GRF was used to estimate jump height and to calculate the kinematic (duration of eccentric phase, duration of concentric phase, and maximal downward displacement of center of mass and kinetic variables (mean power during the eccentric phase, mean power during the concentric, peak power, and peak force. The results showed no differences in jump height or in kinematic or kinetic variables between basketball and soccer players. In addition, the results showed that the participants of the two groups jumped higher in the WAS condition (0.41 m than in the NAS condition (0.36 m because of a higher peak power (WAS=276.8 W/kg0.67 and NAS=241.3 W/kg0.67 and a longer concentric phase duration (WAS=0.20 s/m0.5 and NAS=0.19 s/m0.5 during WAS jump. These results indicate that the basketball and soccer players studied here showed similar performance and the same kinematic and kinetic pattern in maximal vertical jumps and were comparably affected by the use of arm swing.

  5. Influence of Knee-to-Feet Jump Training on Vertical Jump and Hang Clean Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Laura; Pickett, Karla; Bird, Michael; King, Adam C

    2016-11-01

    Stark, L, Pickett, K, Bird, M, and King, AC. Influence of knee-to-feet jump training on vertical jump and hang clean performance. J Strength Cond Res 30(11): 3084-3089, 2016-From a motor learning perspective, the practice/training environment can result in positive, negative, or neutral transfer to the testing conditions. The purpose of this study was to examine the training effect of a novel movement (knee-to-feet [K2F] jumps) and whether a 6-week training program induced a positive transfer effect to other power-related movements (vertical jump and hang clean [HC]). Twenty-six intercollegiate athletes from power-emphasized sports were paired and counter-balanced into a control (i.e., maintained their respective sport-specific lifting regimen) or an experimental group (i.e., completed a 6-week progressive training program of K2F jumps in addition to respective lifting regimen). A pre- and posttest design was used to investigate the effect of training on K2F jump height and transfer effect to vertical jump height (VJH) and 2-repetition maximum (RM) HC performance. A significant increase in K2F jump height was found for the experimental group. Vertical jump height significantly increased from pre- to posttest but no group or interaction (group × time) effect was found, and there were nonsignificant differences for HC. Posttest data showed significant correlations between all pairs of the selected exercises with the highest correlation between K2F jump height and VJ H (R = 0.40) followed by VJH and 2RM HC (R = 0.38) and 2RM HC and K2F jump height (R = 0.23). The results suggest that K2F jump training induced the desired learning effect but was specific to the movement in that no effect of transfer occurred to the other power-related movements. This finding is value for strength and condition professionals who design training programs to enhance athletic performance.

  6. THE ACUTE EFFECTS OF BACK SQUATS ON VERTICAL JUMP PERFORMANCE IN MEN AND WOMEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavin L. Moir

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate the acute effects of performing back squats on subsequent performance during a series of vertical jumps in men and women. Twelve men and 12 women were tested on three separate occasions, the first of which was used to determine their 1-repetition maximum (1-RM parallel back squat. Following this, subjects performed a potentiation and a control treatment in a counterbalanced order. The potentiation treatment culminated with subjects performing parallel back squats with a load equivalent to 70% 1- RM for three repetitions, following which they performed one countermovement vertical jump (CMJ for maximal height every three minutes for a total of 10 jumps. During the control treatment, subjects performed only the CMJs. Jump height (JH and vertical stiffness (VStiff were calculated for each jump from the vertical force signal recorded from a force platform. There were no significant changes in JH or VStiff following the treatments and no significant differences in the responses between men and women (p > 0.05. Correlations between normalized 1-RM back squat load and the absolute change in JH and VStiff were small to moderate for both men and women, with most correlations being negative. Large variations in response to the back squats were noted in both men and women. The use of resistance exercises performed prior to a series of vertical jumps can result in improvements in performance in certain individuals, although the gains tend to be small and dependent upon the mechanical variable measured. There does not seem to be any differences between men and women in the response to dynamic potentiation protocols

  7. Effect of the Kinesio tape to muscle activity and vertical jump performance in healthy inactive people

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    Lu Szu-Ching

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elastic taping applied on the triceps surae has been commonly used to improve the performance of lower extremities. However, little objective evidence has been documented. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of elastic taping on the triceps surae during a maximal vertical jump. It was hypothesized that elastic taping to the triceps surae would increase muscle activity and cause positive effect to jump height. Methods Thirty-one healthy adults (19 males and 12 females with mean age, body weight and height for 25.3 ± 3.8 years old, 64.1 ± 6.2 kg, and 169.4 ± 7.3 cm, respectively were recruited. All participants performed vertical jump tests prior to (without taping and during elastic taping. Two elastic tapes, Kinesio tape and Mplacebo tape from two different manufacturers, were applied to the participants, respectively. Results The results showed that the vertical ground reaction force increased when Kinesio tape was applied even when the height of jump remained about constant. However, the height of the jump decreased, and there was no difference on the vertical ground reaction force in Mplacebo taping group. Although the EMG activity of medial gastrocnemius tended to increase in Kinesio taping group, we did not see differences in EMG activity for the medial gastrocnemius, tibialis anterior and soleus muscles in either group. Conclusions Based on the varied effects of Kinesio tape and Mplacebo tape, different intervention technique was suggested for specific purpose during vertical jump movement. Mplacebo tape was demanded for the benefits of stabilization, protection, and the restriction of motion at the ankle joint. On the other hand, the findings may implicate benefits for medial gastrocnemius muscle strength and push-off force when using Kinesio tape.

  8. Upper Limb Static-Stretching Protocol Decreases Maximal Concentric Jump Performance

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    Paulo H. Marchetti

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the acute effects of an upper limb static-stretching (SS protocol on the maximal concentric jump performance. We recruited 25 young healthy, male, resistance trained individuals (stretched group, n = 15 and control group, n = 10 in this study. The randomized between group experimental protocol consisted of a three trials of maximal concentric jump task, before and after a SS of the upper limb. Vertical ground reaction forces (vGRF and surface electromyography (sEMG of both gastrocnemius lateralis (GL and vastus lateralis (VL were acquired. An extensive SS was employed consisting of ten stretches of 30 seconds, with 15 seconds of rest, and 70-90% of the point of discomfort (POD. ANOVA (2x2 (group x condition was used for shoulder joint range of motion (ROM, vGRF and sEMG. A significant interaction for passive ROM of the shoulder joint revealed significant increases between pre- and post-SS protocol (p < 0.001. A significant interaction demonstrated decreased peak force and an increased peak propulsion duration between pre- and post-stretching only for stretch group (p = 0.021, and p = 0.024, respectively. There was a significant main effect between groups (stretch and control for peak force for control group (p = 0.045. Regarding sEMG variables, there were no significant differences between groups (control versus stretched or condition (pre-stretching versus post-stretching for the peak amplitude of RMS and IEMG for both muscles (VL and GL. In conclusion, an acute extensive SS can increase the shoulder ROM, and negatively affect both the propulsion duration and peak force of the maximal concentric jump, without providing significant changes in muscle activation.

  9. EFFECT OF DIFFERENT STRETCHING PROTOCOLS ON VERTICAL JUMP PERFORMANCE

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    Emre Serin

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to examine the effect of different stretching exercises on vertical jump performance. A total of 14 national male athletes sporting in the elite level took part in the study. The age average of the participants was 20.25±1.03 year, the average height was 1.80±.08 m, the average body weight was 77.14±18.91 kg, average of sporting age was 9.87±3.31 year and the average number of participation in international games was 10.0±3.31. As stretching protocol: Method 1 (5 minutes of jogging and 2 minutes of active rest followed by Method 2 (static stretching for 4 different muscle groups 3 repetitions for 15 seconds of static stretching, rest for 10 seconds between groups and then consecutively, Method 3 (Dynamic stretching exercises with 3 repetitions for 15 seconds and 10 seconds rest between different muscle groups were applied in the study. The vertical jump performance before and after different stretching exercises of the participants was determined by means of the vertical jump test using the smart speed lite system. Before and after the training of all athletes, HR was recorded with a heart rate monitor (RS 800, Polar Vantage NV, Polar Electro Oy, Finland with 5 seconds intervals. Before the study, the chest band of the heartbeat monitor was placed on the chest of the athlete and the HR was recorded from the monitor. SPSS 15.0 statistical package program was used for evaluation and calculation of the data. In this study in addition to descriptive statistics (mean and standard deviation paired samples t-test was used to determine the difference between the vertical jump performance of the participants before and after different stretching exercises. As a result, this study showed that; applying the dynamic and static stretching exercises consecutively affected the vertical jump performance 4.5 cm positively (p<.05. It is suggested that different dynamic and static stretching exercises should be included in the vertical jump.

  10. Acute Improvement of Vertical Jump Performance After Isometric Squats Depends on Knee Angle and Vertical Jumping Ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoukos, Athanasios; Bogdanis, Gregory C; Terzis, Gerasimos; Veligekas, Panagiotis

    2016-08-01

    Tsoukos, A, Bogdanis, GC, Terzis, G, and Veligekas, P. Acute improvement of vertical jump performance after isometric squats depends on knee angle and vertical jumping ability. J Strength Cond Res 30(8): 2250-2257, 2016-This study examined the acute effects of maximum isometric squats at 2 different knee angles (90 or 140°) on countermovement jump (CMJ) performance in power athletes. Fourteen national-level male track and field power athletes completed 3 main trials (2 experimental and 1 control) in a randomized and counterbalanced order 1 week apart. Countermovement jump performance was evaluated using a force-plate before and 15 seconds, 3, 6, 9, and 12 minutes after 3 sets of 3 seconds maximum isometric contractions with 1-minute rest in between, from a squat position with knee angle set at 90 or 140°. Countermovement jump performance was improved compared with baseline only in the 140° condition by 3.8 ± 1.2% on the 12th minute of recovery (p = 0.027), whereas there was no change in CMJ height in the 90° condition. In the control condition, there was a decrease in CMJ performance over time, reaching -3.6 ± 1.2% (p = 0.049) after 12 minutes of recovery. To determine the possible effects of baseline jump performance on subsequent CMJ performance, subjects were divided into 2 groups ("high jumpers" and "low jumpers"). The baseline CMJ values of "high jumpers" and "low jumpers" differed significantly (CMJ: 45.1 ± 2.2 vs. 37.1 ± 3.9 cm, respectively, p = 0.001). Countermovement jump was increased only in the "high jumpers" group by 5.4 ± 1.4% (p = 0.001) and 7.4 ± 1.2% (p = 0.001) at the knee angles of 90 and 140°, respectively. This improvement was larger at the 140° angle (p = 0.049). Knee angle during isometric squats and vertical jumping ability are important determinants of the acute CMJ performance increase observed after a conditioning activity.

  11. Segmental and Kinetic Contributions in Vertical Jumps Performed with and without an Arm Swing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feltner, Michael E.; Bishop, Elijah J.; Perez, Cassandra M.

    2004-01-01

    To determine the contributions of the motions of the body segments to the vertical ground reaction force ([F.sub.z]), the joint torques produced by the leg muscles, and the time course of vertical velocity generation during a vertical jump, 15 men were videotaped performing countermovement vertical jumps from a force plate with and without an arm…

  12. Effects of countermovement depth on kinematic and kinetic patterns of maximum vertical jumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandic, Radivoj; Jakovljevic, Sasa; Jaric, Slobodan

    2015-04-01

    Although maximum height (H(max)), muscle force (F), and power output (P), have been routinely obtained from maximum vertical jumps for various purposes, a possible role of the countermovement depth (H(cmd)) on the same variables remains largely unexplored. Here we hypothesized that (1) the optimum H(cmd) for maximizing H(max) exists, while (2) an increase in H(cmd) would be associated with a decrease in both F and P. Professional male basketball players (N=11) preformed maximum countermovement jumps with and without arm swing while varying H(cmd)±25 cm from its preferred value. Although regression models revealed a presence of optimum H(cmd) for maximizing H(max), H(max) revealed only small changes within a wide range of H(cmd). The preferred H(cmd) was markedly below its optimum value (p vertical jumps should be taken with caution since both of them could be markedly confounded by H(cmd). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Influence of a sport-specific training background on vertical jumping and throwing performance in young female basketball and volleyball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, G; Paoli, A; Bellafiore, M; Bianco, A; Palma, A

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of 3 years of sport-specific training background (SSTB) on vertical jumping and throwing performance in young female basketball and volleyball players. Thirty-one healthy adolescent girls, of which 11 age-matched control subjects [C], 10 basketballers (BP) and 10 volleyballers (VP) participated to the study. The throwing performance was assessed by seated backward overhead ball throw (SBOMBT) and seated chest pass throw (SCPT) using a 3-kg rubber medicine ball. Instead, the vertical jumping performance was evaluated by squat jump (SJ) and countermovement jump with (CMJ-AS) and without arm swing (CMJ) using Optojump system (Microgate srl, Italy). During SJ and CMJ with and without arm swing VP group showed a higher vertical jump performance than BP and C ones. In particular we showed that VP exhibited a higher flight time and jump height than C (Pbasketball athletes' maximal power compared to age-matched control subjects.

  14. Vertical jump fatigue does not affect intersegmental coordination and segmental contribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gleber Pereira

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to describe the intersegmental coordination and segmental contribution during intermittent vertical jumps performed until fatigue. Seven male visited the laboratory on two occasions: 1 the maximum vertical jump height was determined followed by vertical jumps habituation; 2 participants performed intermittent countermovement jumps until fatigue. Kinematic and kinetic variables were recorded. The overall reduction in vertical jump height was 5,5%, while the movement duration increased 10% during the test. The thigh segment angle at movement reversal significantly increased as the exercise progressed. Non-significant effect of fatigue on movement synergy was found for the intersegmental coordination pattern. More than 90% of the intersegmental coordination was explained by one coordination pattern. Thigh rotation contributed the most to the intersegmental coordination pattern, with the trunk second and the shank the least. Therefore, one intersegmental coordination pattern is followed throughout the vertical jumps until fatigue and thigh rotation contributes the most to jump height.

  15. The acute effects of back squats on vertical jump performance in men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witmer, Chad A; Davis, Shala E; Moir, Gavin L

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the acute effects of performing back squats on subsequent performance during a series of vertical jumps in men and women. Twelve men and 12 women were tested on three separate occasions, the first of which was used to determine their 1-repetition maximum (1-RM) parallel back squat. Following this, subjects performed a potentiation and a control treatment in a counterbalanced order. The potentiation treatment culminated with subjects performing parallel back squats with a load equivalent to 70% 1- RM for three repetitions, following which they performed one countermovement vertical jump (CMJ) for maximal height every three minutes for a total of 10 jumps. During the control treatment, subjects performed only the CMJs. Jump height (JH) and vertical stiffness (VStiff) were calculated for each jump from the vertical force signal recorded from a force platform. There were no significant changes in JH or VStiff following the treatments and no significant differences in the responses between men and women (p > 0.05). Correlations between normalized 1-RM back squat load and the absolute change in JH and VStiff were small to moderate for both men and women, with most correlations being negative. Large variations in response to the back squats were noted in both men and women. The use of resistance exercises performed prior to a series of vertical jumps can result in improvements in performance in certain individuals, although the gains tend to be small and dependent upon the mechanical variable measured. There does not seem to be any differences between men and women in the response to dynamic potentiation protocols. Key pointsSubstantial individual responses were noted in both men and women in response to the PAP protocol used in the present study.The choice of dependent variable influences the ef-ficacy of the PAP protocol, with JH and VStiff demonstrating disparate responses in individual sub-jects.Such individual responses

  16. Assessment of isokinetic knee strength in elite young female basketball players: correlation with vertical jump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouis, M; Coudrat, L; Jaafar, H; Filliard, J-R; Vandewalle, H; Barthelemy, Y; Driss, T

    2015-12-01

    To explore the isokinetic concentric strength of the knee muscle groups, and the relationship between the isokinetic knee extensors strength and the vertical jump performance in young elite female basketball players. Eighteen elite female basketball players performed a countermovement jump, and an isokinetic knee test using a Biodex dynamometer. The maximal isokinetic peak torque of the knee extensor and flexor muscles was recorded at four angular velocities (90°/s, 180°/s, 240°/s and 300°/s) for the dominant and non-dominant legs. The conventional hamstring/quadriceps ratio (H/Q) was assessed at each angular velocity for both legs. There was no significant difference between dominant and non-dominant leg whatever the angular velocity (all P>0.05). However, the H/Q ratio enhanced as the velocity increased from 180°/s to 300°/s (Pvertical jump height. The highest one was found for the knee extensors peak torque at a velocity of 240°/s (r=0.88, Pvertical jump height. Interestingly, the H/Q ratio of the young elite female basketball players in the present study was unusual as it was close to that generally observed in regular sportsmen.

  17. Control strategy of maximum vertical jumps: The preferred countermovement depth may not be fully optimized for jump height

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandic Radivoj

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to explore the control strategy of maximum countermovement jumps regarding the preferred countermovement depth preceding the concentric jump phase. Elite basketball players and physically active non-athletes were tested on the jumps performed with and without an arm swing, while the countermovement depth was varied within the interval of almost 30 cm around its preferred value. The results consistently revealed 5.1-11.2 cm smaller countermovement depth than the optimum one, but the same difference was more prominent in non-athletes. In addition, although the same differences revealed a marked effect on the recorded force and power output, they reduced jump height for only 0.1-1.2 cm. Therefore, the studied control strategy may not be based solely on the countermovement depth that maximizes jump height. In addition, the comparison of the two groups does not support the concept of a dual-task strategy based on the trade-off between maximizing jump height and minimizing the jumping quickness that should be more prominent in the athletes that routinely need to jump quickly. Further research could explore whether the observed phenomenon is based on other optimization principles, such as the minimization of effort and energy expenditure. Nevertheless, future routine testing procedures should take into account that the control strategy of maximum countermovement jumps is not fully based on maximizing the jump height, while the countermovement depth markedly confound the relationship between the jump height and the assessed force and power output of leg muscles.

  18. Control strategy of maximum vertical jumps: The preferred countermovement depth may not be fully optimized for jump height.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandic, Radivoj; Knezevic, Olivera M; Mirkov, Dragan M; Jaric, Slobodan

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore the control strategy of maximum countermovement jumps regarding the preferred countermovement depth preceding the concentric jump phase. Elite basketball players and physically active non-athletes were tested on the jumps performed with and without an arm swing, while the countermovement depth was varied within the interval of almost 30 cm around its preferred value. The results consistently revealed 5.1-11.2 cm smaller countermovement depth than the optimum one, but the same difference was more prominent in non-athletes. In addition, although the same differences revealed a marked effect on the recorded force and power output, they reduced jump height for only 0.1-1.2 cm. Therefore, the studied control strategy may not be based solely on the countermovement depth that maximizes jump height. In addition, the comparison of the two groups does not support the concept of a dual-task strategy based on the trade-off between maximizing jump height and minimizing the jumping quickness that should be more prominent in the athletes that routinely need to jump quickly. Further research could explore whether the observed phenomenon is based on other optimization principles, such as the minimization of effort and energy expenditure. Nevertheless, future routine testing procedures should take into account that the control strategy of maximum countermovement jumps is not fully based on maximizing the jump height, while the countermovement depth markedly confound the relationship between the jump height and the assessed force and power output of leg muscles.

  19. Determinants of the abilities to jump higher and shorten the contact time in a running 1-legged vertical jump in basketball.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Ken; Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Tamaki, Hiroyuki; Zushi, Koji

    2010-01-01

    This study was conducted to obtain useful information for developing training techniques for the running 1-legged vertical jump in basketball (lay-up shot jump). The ability to perform the lay-up shot jump and various basic jumps was measured by testing 19 male basketball players. The basic jumps consisted of the 1-legged repeated rebound jump, the 2-legged repeated rebound jump, and the countermovement jump. Jumping height, contact time, and jumping index (jumping height/contact time) were measured and calculated using a contact mat/computer system that recorded the contact and air times. The jumping index indicates power. No significant correlation existed between the jumping height and contact time of the lay-up shot jump, the 2 components of the lay-up shot jump index. As a result, jumping height and contact time were found to be mutually independent abilities. The relationships in contact time between the lay-up shot jump to the 1-legged repeated rebound jump and the 2-legged repeated rebound jump were correlated on the same significance levels (p jumping height existed between the 1-legged repeated rebound jump and the lay-up shot jump (p jumping height between the lay-up shot jump and both the 2-legged repeated rebound jump and countermovement jump. The lay-up shot index correlated more strongly to the 1-legged repeated rebound jump index (p jump index (p jump is effective in improving both contact time and jumping height in the lay-up shot jump.

  20. Do Bilateral Vertical Jumps With Reactive Jump Landings Achieve Osteogenic Thresholds With and Without Instruction in Premenopausal Women?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clissold, Tracey L; Winwood, Paul W; Cronin, John B; De Souza, Mary Jane

    2018-04-01

    Jumps have been investigated as a stimulus for bone development; however, effects of instruction, jump type, and jump-landing techniques need investigation. This study sought to identify whether ground reaction forces (GRFs) for bilateral vertical jumps (countermovement jumps and drop jumps) with reactive jump-landings (ie, jumping immediately after initial jump-landing), with instruction and with instruction withdrawn, achieve magnitudes and rates of strain previously shown to improve bone mass among premenopausal women. Twenty-one women (Mean ± SD: 43.3 ± 5.9 y; 69.4 ± 9.6 kg; 167 ± 5.5 cm; 27.5 ± 8.7% body fat) performed a testing session 'with instruction' followed by a testing session performed 1 week later with 'instruction withdrawn.' The magnitudes (4.59 to 5.49 body weight [BW]) and rates of strain (263 to 359 BW·s -1 ) for the jump-landings, performed on an AMTI force plate, exceeded previously determined thresholds (>3 BWs and >43 BW·s -1 ). Interestingly, significantly larger peak resultant forces, (↑10%; P = .002) and peak rates of force development (↑20%; P jump-landing (postreactive jump). Small increases (ES = 0.22-0.42) in all landing forces were observed in the second jump-landing with 'instruction withdrawn.' These jumps represent a unique training stimulus for premenopausal women and achieve osteogenic thresholds thought prerequisite for bone growth.

  1. Effects of Jaw Clenching and Jaw Alignment Mouthpiece Use on Force Production During Vertical Jump and Isometric Clean Pull.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Charles R; Fu, Yang-Chieh; Cazas-Moreno, Vanessa; Valliant, Melinda W; Gdovin, Jacob R; Williams, Charles C; Garner, John C

    2018-01-01

    Allen, CR, Fu, Y-C, Cazas-Moreno, V, Valliant, MW, Gdovin, JR, Williams, CC, and Garner, JC. Effects of jaw clenching and jaw alignment mouthpiece use on force production during vertical jump and isometric clean pull. J Strength Cond Res 32(1): 237-243, 2018-This study examined the effects of jaw clenching, a self-adapted, jaw-repositioning mouthpiece on force production during maximum countermovement vertical jump and maximum isometric midthigh clean pull assessments in an attempt to determine any ergogenic effect attributable to clenching, jaw-repositioning mouthpiece use, or the combination of both. Thirty-six male subjects performed vertical jump and isometric clean pull assessments from a force platform under various mouthpiece and clench conditions. A 3 × 2 (mouthpiece × clench) repeated-measures analysis of variance was conducted to analyze each of the following force production variables for both assessments: peak force, normalized peak force, and rate of force development. In addition, jump height was analyzed for the vertical jump. Results revealed improvements in peak force (F1,35 = 15.84, p ≤ 0.001, (Equation is included in full-text article.)= 0.31), normalized peak force (F1,35 = 16.28, p ≤ 0.001, (Equation is included in full-text article.)= 0.32), and rate of force development (F1,35 = 12.89, p = 0.001, (Equation is included in full-text article.)= 0.27) during the isometric clean pull assessment when participants maximally clenched their jaw, regardless of mouthpiece condition. There were no statistically significant differences in jump height, peak force, normalized peak force, or rate of force development during the vertical jump for any treatment condition. This study supports previous research demonstrating that the implementation of remote voluntary contractions such as jaw clenching can lead to concurrent activation potentiation and a resulting ergogenic effect during activities involving and requiring high-force production.

  2. Validation of the iPhone app using the force platform to estimate vertical jump height.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlos-Vivas, Jorge; Martin-Martinez, Juan P; Hernandez-Mocholi, Miguel A; Perez-Gomez, Jorge

    2018-03-01

    Vertical jump performance has been evaluated with several devices: force platforms, contact mats, Vertec, accelerometers, infrared cameras and high-velocity cameras; however, the force platform is considered the gold standard for measuring vertical jump height. The purpose of this study was to validate an iPhone app called My Jump, that measures vertical jump height by comparing it with other methods that use the force platform to estimate vertical jump height, namely, vertical velocity at take-off and time in the air. A total of 40 sport sciences students (age 21.4±1.9 years) completed five countermovement jumps (CMJs) over a force platform. Thus, 200 CMJ heights were evaluated from the vertical velocity at take-off and the time in the air using the force platform, and from the time in the air with the My Jump mobile application. The height obtained was compared using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Correlation between APP and force platform using the time in the air was perfect (ICC=1.000, PJump, is an appropriate method to evaluate the vertical jump performance; however, vertical jump height is slightly overestimated compared with that of the force platform.

  3. Ballistic stretching increases flexibility and acute vertical jump height when combined with basketball activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolstenhulme, Mandy T; Griffiths, Christine M; Woolstenhulme, Emily M; Parcell, Allen C

    2006-11-01

    Stretching is often included as part of a warm-up procedure for basketball activity. However, the efficacy of stretching with respect to sport performance has come into question. We determined the effects of 4 different warm-up protocols followed by 20 minutes of basketball activity on flexibility and vertical jump height. Subjects participated in 6 weeks (2 times per week) of warm-up and basketball activity. The warm-up groups participated in ballistic stretching, static stretching, sprinting, or basketball shooting (control group). We asked 3 questions. First, what effect does 6 weeks of warm-up exercise and basketball play have on both flexibility and vertical jump height? We measured sit and reach and vertical jump height before (week -1) and after (week 7) the 6 weeks. Flexibility increased for the ballistic, static, and sprint groups compared to the control group (p vertical jump height did not change for any of the groups. Our second question was what is the acute effect of each warm-up on vertical jump height? We measured vertical jump immediately after the warm-up on 4 separate occasions during the 6 weeks (at weeks 0, 2, 4, and 6). Vertical jump height was not different for any group. Finally, our third question was what is the acute effect of each warm-up on vertical jump height following 20 minutes of basketball play? We measured vertical jump height immediately following 20 minutes of basketball play at weeks 0, 2, 4, and 6. Only the ballistic stretching group demonstrated an acute increase in vertical jump 20 minutes after basketball play (p basketball play, as it is beneficial to vertical jump performance.

  4. Vertical jumping tests in volleyball: reliability, validity, and playing-position specifics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattler, Tine; Sekulic, Damir; Hadzic, Vedran; Uljevic, Ognjen; Dervisevic, Edvin

    2012-06-01

    Vertical jumping is known to be important in volleyball, and jumping performance tests are frequently studied for their reliability and validity. However, most studies concerning jumping in volleyball have dealt with standard rather than sport-specific jumping procedures and tests. The aims of this study, therefore, were (a) to determine the reliability and factorial validity of 2 volleyball-specific jumping tests, the block jump (BJ) test and the attack jump (AJ) test, relative to 2 frequently used and systematically validated jumping tests, the countermovement jump test and the squat jump test and (b) to establish volleyball position-specific differences in the jumping tests and simple anthropometric indices (body height [BH], body weight, and body mass index [BMI]). The BJ was performed from a defensive volleyball position, with the hands positioned in front of the chest. During an AJ, the players used a 2- to 3-step approach and performed a drop jump with an arm swing followed by a quick vertical jump. A total of 95 high-level volleyball players (all men) participated in this study. The reliability of the jumping tests ranged from 0.97 to 0.99 for Cronbach's alpha coefficients, from 0.93 to 0.97 for interitem correlation coefficients and from 2.1 to 2.8 for coefficients of variation. The highest reliability was found for the specific jumping tests. The factor analysis extracted one significant component, and all of the tests were highly intercorrelated. The analysis of variance with post hoc analysis showed significant differences between 5 playing positions in some of the jumping tests. In general, receivers had a greater jumping capacity, followed by libero players. The differences in jumping capacities should be emphasized vis-a-vis differences in the anthropometric measures of players, where middle hitters had higher BH and body weight, followed by opposite hitters and receivers, with no differences in the BMI between positions.

  5. Back Squat Potentiates Both Vertical and Horizontal Jump Performance in Collegiate Ice Hockey Players

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    Cale Bechtel

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Back squats (BSQ have been shown to transiently improve performance in explosive vertical movements such as the vertical jump (VJ. Still, understanding of this phenomenon, termed post-activation potentiation (PAP, remains nebulous as it relates to explosive horizontal movements. Objective: Therefore, the purpose of the present investigation was to assess whether heavy BSQ can potentiate both VJ and horizontal jump (HJ performance. Method: Nine male ice hockey players from the Long Beach State ice hockey team performed five testing sessions separated by 96-hours. The first testing session consisted of a one repetition maximum (1-RM BSQ to determine subsequent testing loads. The four subsequent testing sessions, which were randomized for order, consisted of five repetitions of BSQ at 87% 1-RM followed by horizontal jump (BSQ-HJ, five repetitions of BSQ at 87% 1-RM followed by vertical jump (BSQ-VJ, horizontal jump only (CT-HJ and vertical jump only (CT-VJ. During the potentiated conditions, rest intervals were set at five minutes between the BSQ and either VJ or HJ. Alpha-level was set a priori at 0.05. Results: The results indicate that both vertical (p=0.017 and horizontal (p=0.003 jump were significantly increased (VJ= +5.51cm, HJ= +11.55cm following a BSQ.  Conclusion: These findings suggest that BSQ may improve both vertical and horizontal jump performance in athletes who participate in sports emphasizing horizontal power, such as ice hockey.

  6. Predictive Ability of the Medicine Ball Chest Throw and Vertical Jump Tests for Determining Muscular Strength and Power in Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackett, Daniel A.; Davies, Timothy B.; Ibel, Denis; Cobley, Stephen; Sanders, Ross

    2018-01-01

    This study examined the predictive ability of the medicine ball chest throw and vertical jump for muscular strength and power in adolescents. One hundred and ninety adolescents participated in this study. Participants performed trials of the medicine ball chest throw and vertical jump, with vertical jump peak power calculated via an estimation…

  7. Prediction of vertical jump height from anthropometric factors in male and female martial arts athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidin, Nahdiya Zainal; Adam, Mohd Bakri

    2013-01-01

    Vertical jump is an index representing leg/kick power. The explosive movement of the kick is the key to scoring in martial arts competitions. It is important to determine factors that influence the vertical jump to help athletes improve their leg power. The objective of the present study is to identify anthropometric factors that influence vertical jump height for male and female martial arts athletes. Twenty-nine male and 25 female athletes participated in this study. Participants were Malaysian undergraduate students whose ages ranged from 18 to 24 years old. Their heights were measured using a stadiometer. The subjects were weighted using digital scale. Body mass index was calculated by kg/m(2). Waist-hip ratio was measured from the ratio of waist to hip circumferences. Body fat % was obtained from the sum of four skinfold thickness using Harpenden callipers. The highest vertical jump from a stationary standing position was recorded. The maximum grip was recorded using a dynamometer. For standing back strength, the maximum pull upwards using a handle bar was recorded. Multiple linear regression was used to obtain the relationship between vertical jump height and explanatory variables with gender effect. Body fat % has a significant negative relationship with vertical jump height (P martial arts athletes can be predicted by body fat %. The vertical jump for male is higher than for their female counterparts. Reducing body fat by proper dietary planning will help to improve leg power.

  8. Effectiveness of Different Rest Intervals Following Whole-Body Vibration on Vertical Jump Performance between College Athletes and Recreationally Trained Females

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    Nicole C. Dabbs

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of different rest intervals following whole-body vibration on counter-movement vertical jump performance. Sixteen females, eight recreationally trained and eight varsity athletes volunteered to participate in four testing visits separated by 24 h. Visit one acted as a familiarization visit where subjects were introduced to the counter-movement vertical jump and whole-body vibration protocols. Visits 2–4 contained 2 randomized conditions. Whole-body vibration was administered in four bouts of 30 s with 30 s rest between bouts. During whole-body vibration subjects performed a quarter squat every 5 s, simulating a counter-movement vertical jump. Whole-body vibration was followed by three counter-movement vertical jumps with five different rest intervals between the vibration exposure and jumping. For a control condition, subjects performed squats with no whole-body vibration. There was a significant (p < 0.05 main effect for time for vertical jump height, peak power output, and relative ground reaction forces, where a majority of individuals max jump from all whole-body vibration conditions was greater than the control condition. There were significant (p < 0.05 group differences, showing that varsity athletes had a greater vertical jump height and peak power output compared to recreationally trained females. There were no significant (p > 0.05 group differences for relative ground reaction forces. Practitioners and/or strength and conditioning coaches may utilize whole-body vibration to enhance acute counter-movement vertical jump performance after identifying individuals optimal rest time in order to maximize the potentiating effects.

  9. Fast Regulation of Vertical Squat Jump during Push-Off in Skilled Jumpers

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    Fargier, Patrick; Massarelli, Raphael; Rabahi, Tahar; Gemignani, Angelo; Fargier, Emile

    2016-01-01

    The height of a maximum Vertical Squat Jump (VSJ) reflects the useful power produced by a jumper during the push-off phase. In turn this partly depends on the coordination of the jumper's segmental rotations at each instant. The physical system constituted by the jumper has been shown to be very sensitive to perturbations and furthermore the movement is realized in a very short time (ca. 300 ms), compared to the timing of known feedback loops. However, the dynamics of the segmental coordination and its efficiency in relation to energetics at each instant of the push-off phase still remained to be clarified. Their study was the main purpose of the present research. Eight young adult volunteers (males) performed maximal VSJ. They were skilled in jumping according to their sport activities (track and field or volleyball). A video analysis on the kinematics of the jump determined the influence of the jumpers' segments rotation on the vertical velocity and acceleration of the body mass center (MC). The efficiency in the production of useful power at the jumpers' MC level, by the rotation of the segments, was measured in consequence. The results showed a great variability in the segmental movements of the eight jumpers, but homogeneity in the overall evolution of these movements with three consecutive types of coordination in the second part of the push-off (lasting roughly 0.16 s). Further analyses gave insights on the regulation of the push-off, suggesting that very fast regulation(s) of the VSJ may be supported by: (a) the adaptation of the motor cerebral programming to the jumper's physical characteristics; (b) the control of the initial posture; and (c) the jumper's perception of the position of his MC relative to the ground reaction force, during push-off, to reduce energetic losses. PMID:27486404

  10. Fast Regulation of Vertical Squat Jump during push-off in skilled jumpers

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    Patrick FARGIER

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The height of a maximum Vertical Squat Jump (VSJ reflects the useful power produced by a jumper during the push-off phase. In turn this partly depends on the coordination of the jumper's segmental rotations at each instant. The physical system constituted by the jumper has been shown to be very sensitive to perturbations and furthermore the movement is realised in a very short time (ca. 300ms, compared to the timing of known feedback loops. However, the dynamics of the segmental coordination and its efficiency in relation to energetics at each instant of the push-off phase still remained to be clarified. Their study was the main purpose of the present research.Eight young adult volunteers (males performed maximal VSJ. They were skilled in jumping according to their sport activities (track and field or volleyball. A video analysis on the kinematics of the jump determined the influence of the jumpers’ segments rotation on the vertical velocity and acceleration of the body mass center (MC. The efficiency in the production of useful power at the jumpers’ MC level, by the rotation of the segments, was measured in consequence. The results showed a great variability in the segmental movements of the eight jumpers, but homogeneity in the overall evolution of these movements with three consecutive types of coordination in the second part of the push-off (lasting roughly 0.16 s.Further analyses gave insights on the regulation of the push-off, suggesting that very fast regulation(s of the VSJ may be supported by: (a the adaptation of the motor cerebral programming to the jumper’s physical characteristics; (b the control of the initial posture; and (c the jumper’s perception of the position of his MC relative to the ground reaction force during push-off to reduce energetic losses.

  11. Fast Regulation of Vertical Squat Jump during Push-Off in Skilled Jumpers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fargier, Patrick; Massarelli, Raphael; Rabahi, Tahar; Gemignani, Angelo; Fargier, Emile

    2016-01-01

    The height of a maximum Vertical Squat Jump (VSJ) reflects the useful power produced by a jumper during the push-off phase. In turn this partly depends on the coordination of the jumper's segmental rotations at each instant. The physical system constituted by the jumper has been shown to be very sensitive to perturbations and furthermore the movement is realized in a very short time (ca. 300 ms), compared to the timing of known feedback loops. However, the dynamics of the segmental coordination and its efficiency in relation to energetics at each instant of the push-off phase still remained to be clarified. Their study was the main purpose of the present research. Eight young adult volunteers (males) performed maximal VSJ. They were skilled in jumping according to their sport activities (track and field or volleyball). A video analysis on the kinematics of the jump determined the influence of the jumpers' segments rotation on the vertical velocity and acceleration of the body mass center (MC). The efficiency in the production of useful power at the jumpers' MC level, by the rotation of the segments, was measured in consequence. The results showed a great variability in the segmental movements of the eight jumpers, but homogeneity in the overall evolution of these movements with three consecutive types of coordination in the second part of the push-off (lasting roughly 0.16 s). Further analyses gave insights on the regulation of the push-off, suggesting that very fast regulation(s) of the VSJ may be supported by: (a) the adaptation of the motor cerebral programming to the jumper's physical characteristics; (b) the control of the initial posture; and (c) the jumper's perception of the position of his MC relative to the ground reaction force, during push-off, to reduce energetic losses.

  12. The Effects of Eccentric Contraction Duration on Muscle Strength, Power Production, Vertical Jump, and Soreness.

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    Mike, Jonathan N; Cole, Nathan; Herrera, Chris; VanDusseldorp, Trisha; Kravitz, Len; Kerksick, Chad M

    2017-03-01

    significance but there was a trend toward a difference (G × T, p = 0.07). No other significant (p > 0.05) G × T interaction effects were found for the performance variables. All groups showed significant main effects for time in 1RM (p jump (p = 0.004), peak power (p jump protocol as a result of the 4-week training program (p = 0.03). Soreness data revealed significant increases across time in all groups at both week 0 and week 4. Paired sample t-tests revealed greater differences in soreness values across time in the 2S group. The results provide further evidence that resistance training with eccentrically dominated movement patterns can be an effective method to acutely increase maximal strength and power expression in trained college age men. Furthermore, longer eccentric contractions may negatively impact explosive movements such as the vertical jump, whereas shorter eccentric contractions may instigate greater amounts of soreness. These are important considerations for the strength and conditioning professional to more fully understand that expressions of strength and power through eccentric training and varying durations of eccentric activity can have a significant impact for populations ranging from athletes desiring peak performance.

  13. Effect Of Plyometric Training On Vertical Jump Performance And Neuromuscular Adaptation In Volleyball Player

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    Dara Hosseini

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of 12-week plyometric training on vertical jump performance (Vj, maximal surface EMG, M-wave amplitude, M�wave latency, and nerve conduction velocity (NCV in men volleyball player. Thirty junior high school volleyball players' volunteers (age: 17.53� 0.74; Height: 177.67� 3.14; Weight: 61.31 � 5.32 were divided into plyometric training [PT] (n=15 and control group[c] (n=15. PT group trained so.w' but C group didn't participate in this training. Both groups were pre- and post tested in EMG, M-wave parameters, NCV and Vj test. Tow way ANOVA (group*time interaction and Bonferroni post hoes test demonstrated significant differences (P

  14. Effect of plyometric training on vertical jump height in high school basketball players: randomised control trial

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    Chhaya Verma, Lakshmi Subramanium, Vijaya Krishnan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Plyometric involve high intensity eccentric contraction immediately after a powerful concentric contraction. A vertical leap in basketball also involves rapid & repeated muscle contraction & stretching. Various methods have been used to improve the vertical leap in players, but only few studies mention about plyometrics. Aim: To determine the effect of Plyometric training on vertical jump height in high school basketball players & compare them with their untrained counterparts. Methods and Materials: 144 students were randomly selected & distributed in Group I (Pre-pubertal & Group II (Pubertal which was further divided into Group A (trained players & Group B (untrained students. A gender wise distribution followed this. Plyometric training of 6 weeks was conducted & the vertical jump height pre & post training were recorded & compared. Results: Vertical jump height improved significantly post Plyometric in Group Bcompared to Group A. Boys showed improvement in Group B, however girls were better in Group A. Correlation of BMI with vertical jump height was negative & significant in Group B. Conclusion: Plyometric training brought significant change in untrained students. Boys gained more jump height while girls showed significant increase in jump height during pubertal growth spurt. Also, increased BMI reduced jump height.

  15. The acute effects of moderately loaded concentric-only quarter squats on vertical jump performance.

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    Crum, Aaron J; Kawamori, Naoki; Stone, Michael H; Haff, G Gregory

    2012-04-01

    Limited research exists examining the effect of moderately loaded conditioning activities that are employed as part of a strength-power potentiating complex (SPPC). Additionally, no studies to date have explored the effects of using a concentric-only quarter back squat protocol as part of an SPPC. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a moderately loaded (50-65% of 1RM) concentric-only quarter back squat protocol on the occurrence of potentiation effects at various time points. Twenty men who could quarter back squat a minimum of 2.4 times their body mass (3.7 ± 0.7 kg·per body mass) participated in this investigation. All subjects participated in 3 conditions: control (CT), a 50% of 1RM trial (50POT), and a 65% of 1RM trial (65POT). One minute before each condition, a maximal countermovement vertical jump (CMJ) was performed. One minute later, the subject performed 1 of 3 conditions: CT condition, 50POT, or 65POT, followed by vertical jumps at 0.5, 3, 5, 10, and 15 minutes after conditioning activity. A force plate was used to quantify displacement, peak power output, peak force, and the rate of force development for each CMJ. There were no significant differences (p > 0.05) in any of the performance measures quantified during the CMJ trials when comparing the CT, 50POT, and 65POT treatment conditions. However, 48% of the subjects demonstrated some degree of potentiation at the 30 seconds after completing the 65POT trial, but this percent increase was not statistically significant. From a practical perspective, if the goal of the SPPC is to create a maximization of the potentiation effect, moderately loaded activities may not be the best alternative.

  16. Role of the hamstrings in human vertical jumping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bobbert, Maarten F.

    1996-01-01

    In some human subjects performing maximum-height squat jumps, the EMG-pattern of semitendinosus is bi-phasic and that of biceps femoris is mono-phasic. The purpose of this study was to investigate the roles of biceps femoris and semitendinosus in squat jumping, and to explain why they are different.

  17. Sensitivity of vertical jumping performance to changes in muscle stimulation onset times: a simulation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bobbert, M.F.; van Zandwijk, J.P.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of muscle stimulation dynamics on the sensitivity of jumping achievement to variations in timing of muscle stimulation onsets was investigated. Vertical squat jumps were simulated using a forward dynamic model of the human musculoskeletal system. The model calculates the motion of body

  18. Cognitive Demands Influence Lower Extremity Mechanics During a Drop Vertical Jump Task in Female Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almonroeder, Thomas Gus; Kernozek, Thomas; Cobb, Stephen; Slavens, Brooke; Wang, Jinsung; Huddleston, Wendy

    2018-05-01

    Study Design Cross-sectional study. Background The drop vertical jump task is commonly used to screen for anterior cruciate ligament injury risk; however, its predictive validity is limited. The limited predictive validity of the drop vertical jump task may be due to not imposing the cognitive demands that reflect sports participation. Objectives To investigate the influence of additional cognitive demands on lower extremity mechanics during execution of the drop vertical jump task. Methods Twenty uninjured women (age range, 18-25 years) were required to perform the standard drop vertical jump task, as well as drop vertical jumps that included additional cognitive demands. The additional cognitive demands were related to attending to an overhead goal (ball suspended overhead) and/or temporal constraints on movement selection (decision making). Three-dimensional ground reaction forces and lower extremity mechanics were compared between conditions. Results The inclusion of the overhead goal resulted in higher peak vertical ground reaction forces and lower peak knee flexion angles in comparison to the standard drop vertical jump task. In addition, participants demonstrated greater peak knee abduction angles when trials incorporated temporal constraints on decision making and/or required participants to attend to an overhead goal, in comparison to the standard drop vertical jump task. Conclusion Imposing additional cognitive demands during execution of the drop vertical jump task influenced lower extremity mechanics in a manner that suggested increased loading of the anterior cruciate ligament. Tasks utilized in anterior cruciate ligament injury risk screening may benefit from more closely reflecting the cognitive demands of the sports environment. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2018;48(5):381-387. Epub 10 Jan 2018. doi:10.2519/jospt.2018.7739.

  19. EFFECTS OF PLYOMETRIC TRAINING ON THE DEVELOPMENT THE VERTICAL JUMP IN VOLLEYBALL PLAYERS

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    Soundara rajan R

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:The present study investigated the effect of plyometric training on development of the vertical jump of volleyball players. The study consisted of 30 male volleyball players from PSG College of Arts & Science, Coimbatore, their age ranged from 18 to 25 years. Participants articipants were randomly assigned Group I underwent plyometric training group and Group II control group. The plyometric training group carried out a set of plyometric exercises also designed by the researcher twice a week for six weeks. The control group was allowed to play their game, but they were not given any treatments. For the purpose of this research, two tests forthe evaluation of the volleyball vertical jump were validated: the block jump and spike jump. The data was analysed using Paired t-tests which were used to test the effect of treatment groups individually between pre and post –tests, of all the groups, on variables used in the present study. The analysis of covariance was used toanalsze the collected data. The result of the study reveals that there was significant difference in 0.05 levels.Based on the findings of the research and the discussion, one could conclude that the exercise model for the development of the vertical jump that had been used, as the fundamental factor of the experimental group, has contributed to the statistically significant difference in the increase of the vertical jump in comparison to thecontrol group, which had used technically tactical contents to develop the vertical jump.

  20. Transcutaneous spinal direct current stimulation induces lasting fatigue resistance and enhances explosive vertical jump performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Rothwelle J.; Conway, Bernard A.

    2017-01-01

    Transcutaneous spinal direct current stimulation (tsDCS) is a non-invasive neuromodulatory intervention that has been shown to modify excitability in spinal and supraspinal circuits in animals and humans. Our objective in this study was to explore the functional neuromodulatory potential of tsDCS by examining its immediate and lasting effects over the repeated performance of a whole body maximal exercise in healthy volunteers. Using a double-blind, randomized, crossover, sham-controlled design we investigated the effects of 15 min of anodal tsDCS on repeated vertical countermovement jump (VCJ) performance at 0, 20, 60, and 180 minutes post-stimulation. Measurements of peak and take-off velocity, vertical displacement, peak power and work done during countermovement and push-off VCJ phases were derived from changes in vertical ground reaction force (12 performance parameters) in 12 healthy participants. The magnitude and direction of change in VCJ performance from pre- to post-stimulation differed significantly between sham and active tsDCS for 7 of the 12 VCJ performance measures (P 0.05). Our original findings demonstrate that one single session of anodal tsDCS in healthy subjects can prevent fatigue and maintain or enhance different aspects of whole body explosive motor power over repeated sets of VCJs performed over a period of three hours. The observed effects are discussed in relation to alterations in central fatigue mechanisms, muscle contraction mode during jump execution and changes in spinal cord excitability. These findings have important implications for power endurance sport performance and for neuromotor rehabilitation. PMID:28379980

  1. Transcutaneous spinal direct current stimulation induces lasting fatigue resistance and enhances explosive vertical jump performance.

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    Helen R Berry

    Full Text Available Transcutaneous spinal direct current stimulation (tsDCS is a non-invasive neuromodulatory intervention that has been shown to modify excitability in spinal and supraspinal circuits in animals and humans. Our objective in this study was to explore the functional neuromodulatory potential of tsDCS by examining its immediate and lasting effects over the repeated performance of a whole body maximal exercise in healthy volunteers. Using a double-blind, randomized, crossover, sham-controlled design we investigated the effects of 15 min of anodal tsDCS on repeated vertical countermovement jump (VCJ performance at 0, 20, 60, and 180 minutes post-stimulation. Measurements of peak and take-off velocity, vertical displacement, peak power and work done during countermovement and push-off VCJ phases were derived from changes in vertical ground reaction force (12 performance parameters in 12 healthy participants. The magnitude and direction of change in VCJ performance from pre- to post-stimulation differed significantly between sham and active tsDCS for 7 of the 12 VCJ performance measures (P 0.05. Our original findings demonstrate that one single session of anodal tsDCS in healthy subjects can prevent fatigue and maintain or enhance different aspects of whole body explosive motor power over repeated sets of VCJs performed over a period of three hours. The observed effects are discussed in relation to alterations in central fatigue mechanisms, muscle contraction mode during jump execution and changes in spinal cord excitability. These findings have important implications for power endurance sport performance and for neuromotor rehabilitation.

  2. Principal component structure and sport-specific differences in the running one-leg vertical jump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laffaye, G; Bardy, B G; Durey, A

    2007-05-01

    The aim of this study is to identify the kinetic principal components involved in one-leg running vertical jumps, as well as the potential differences between specialists from different sports. The sample was composed of 25 regional skilled athletes who play different jumping sports (volleyball players, handball players, basketball players, high jumpers and novices), who performed a running one-leg jump. A principal component analysis was performed on the data obtained from the 200 tested jumps in order to identify the principal components summarizing the six variables extracted from the force-time curve. Two principal components including six variables accounted for 78 % of the variance in jump height. Running one-leg vertical jump performance was predicted by a temporal component (that brings together impulse time, eccentric time and vertical displacement of the center of mass) and a force component (who brings together relative peak of force and power, and rate of force development). A comparison made among athletes revealed a temporal-prevailing profile for volleyball players, and a force-dominant profile for Fosbury high jumpers. Novices showed an ineffective utilization of the force component, while handball and basketball players showed heterogeneous and neutral component profiles. Participants will use a jumping strategy in which variables related to either the magnitude or timing of force production will be closely coupled; athletes from different sporting backgrounds will use a jumping strategy that reflects the inherent demands of their chosen sport.

  3. Who jumps the highest? Anthropometric and physiological correlations of vertical jump in youth elite female volleyball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaidis, Pantelis T; Gkoudas, Konstantinos; Afonso, José; Clemente-Suarez, Vicente J; Knechtle, Beat; Kasabalis, Stavros; Kasabalis, Athanasios; Douda, Helen; Tokmakidis, Savvas; Torres-Luque, Gema

    2017-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the relationship of vertical jump (Abalakov jump [AJ]) with anthropometric and physiological parameters in youth elite female volleyball players. Seventy-two selected volleyball players from the region of Athens (age 13.3±0.7 years, body mass 62.0±7.2 kg, height 171.5±5.7 cm, body fat 21.2±4.5%), classified into quartiles according to AJ performance (group A, 21.4-26.5 cm; group B, 26.8-29.9 cm; group C, 30.5-33.7 cm; group D, 33.8-45.9 cm), performed a series of physical fitness tests. AJ was correlated with anthropometric (age at peak height velocity [APHV]: r=0.38, Pvolleyball players that jumped the highest were those who matured later than others.

  4. Comparison of biomechanical parameters obtained during various types of vertical jumps in volleyball and basketball players

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    Joanna Mazur-Różycka

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to compare selected biomechanical parameters obtained during various types of vertical jumps made by volleyball and basketball players on a dynamometric platform. The study involved 10 volleyball players and 10 basketball players in the age of 21.1 ± 1.81 years of the AZS AWF Warsaw sport club. The athletes performed two vertical jumps on a KISTLER platform. The first jump was a counter-movement jump (CMJ and the second was a spike jump (SPJ – a vertical jump which is performed with a 3-4 step run-up before the take-off. The participant's task was to take off and land on the platform. On the basis of the statistical analysis it was shown that only the type of jump had a significant effect on the height and power. The type of team sport did not affect the level of performance. In addition, it was found that the height of the jump is affected by the counter movement phase with hand swing and run-up. The volleyball and basketball players were equally able to get higher values for certain parameters in successive runs. Due to lack of statistically significant differences it was decided to combine two groups of athletes into one. For both jumps, the relationship between peak power and jump height was found at significance level p <0.001. Dynamometric platform can be used to check the athlete's height of jump and power of lower extremities. This method allows to verify the effectiveness of different types of training.

  5. Aerial Rotation Effects on Vertical Jump Performance Among Highly Skilled Collegiate Soccer Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Leland A; Harry, John R; Dufek, Janet S; Mercer, John A

    2017-04-01

    Barker, LA, Harry, JR, Dufek, JS, and Mercer, JA. Aerial rotation effects on vertical jump performance among highly skilled collegiate soccer players. J Strength Cond Res 31(4): 932-938, 2017-In soccer matches, jumps involving rotations occur when attempting to head the ball for a shot or pass from set pieces, such as corner kicks, goal kicks, and lob passes. However, the 3-dimensional ground reaction forces used to perform rotational jumping tasks are currently unknown. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare bilateral, 3-dimensional, and ground reaction forces of a standard countermovement jump (CMJ0) with those of a countermovement jump with a 180° rotation (CMJ180) among Division-1 soccer players. Twenty-four participants from the soccer team of the University of Nevada performed 3 trials of CMJ0 and CMJ180. Dependent variables included jump height, downward and upward phase times, vertical (Fz) peak force and net impulse relative to mass, and medial-lateral and anterior-posterior force couple values. Statistical significance was set a priori at α = 0.05. CMJ180 reduced jump height, increased the anterior-posterior force couple in the downward and upward phases, and increased upward peak Fz (p ≤ 0.05). All other variables were not significantly different between groups (p > 0.05). However, we did recognize that downward peak Fz trended lower in the CMJ0 condition (p = 0.059), and upward net impulse trended higher in the CMJ0 condition (p = 0.071). It was concluded that jump height was reduced during the rotational jumping task, and rotation occurred primarily via AP ground reaction forces through the entire countermovement jump. Coaches and athletes may consider additional rotational jumping in their training programs to mediate performance decrements during rotational jump tasks.

  6. Effect of different stretching strategies on the kinetics of vertical jumping in female volleyball athletes

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    Nicholas T. Kruse

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: Together these findings suggest that when training and competing to jump quickly and maximally the female athlete should incorporate DS instead of SS as part of their pre-competition warm-up, but conduct performance within 15 min of their warm-up to elicit maximal gains.

  7. Vertical and Horizontal Jump Capacity in International Cerebral Palsy Football Players.

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    Reina, Raúl; Iturricastillo, Aitor; Sabido, Rafael; Campayo-Piernas, Maria; Yanci, Javier

    2018-05-01

    To evaluate the reliability and validity of vertical and horizontal jump tests in football players with cerebral palsy (FPCP) and to analyze the jump performance differences between current International Federation for Cerebral Palsy Football functional classes (ie, FT5-FT8). A total of 132 international parafootballers (25.8 [6.7] y; 70.0 [9.1] kg; 175.7 [7.3] cm; 22.8 [2.8] kg·m -2 ; and 10.7 [7.5] y training experience) participated in the study. The participants were classified according to the International Federation for Cerebral Palsy Football classification rules, and a group of 39 players without cerebral palsy was included in the study as a control group. Football players' vertical and horizontal jump performance was assessed. All the tests showed good to excellent relative intrasession reliability scores, both in FPCP and in the control group (intraclass correlation = .78-.97, SEM jump, standing broad jump, 4 bounds for distance, and triple hop for distance dominant leg and nondominant leg. The control group performed higher/farther jumps with regard to all the FPCP classes, obtaining significant differences and moderate to large effect sizes (ESs) (.85 jump tests than players in the lower classes (ES = moderate to large, P jump tests performed in this study could be applied to the classification procedures and protocols for FPCP.

  8. Effect of an Arm Swing on Countermovement Vertical Jump Performance in Elite Volleyball Players

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    Vaverka Frantisek

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine how elite volleyball players employed the arm swing (AS to enhance their jump performance. The study assessed how the AS influenced the duration and magnitude of the vertical ground reaction force (VGRF during the main phases (preparatory, braking and accelerating of the countermovement vertical jump (CMVJ, the starting position of the body at the beginning of the accelerating phase and the moment when the AS began contributing to increasing the jump height. Eighteen elite volleyball players performed three CMVJs with and without an AS. Kinetics and kinematics data were collected using two Kistler force plates and the C-motion system. The time and force variables were evaluated based on the VGRF, and the position of the body and the trajectory of the arm movement were determined using kinematic analysis. The AS improved the CMVJ by increasing the jump height by 38% relative to jumping without an AS. The AS significantly shortened the braking phase and prolonged the accelerating phase, however, it did not influence the preparatory phase or the overall jump duration. The AS also significantly increased the average force during the accelerating phase as well as the accelerating impulse. The AS upward began at 76% into the overall jump duration. The AS did not influence the body position at the beginning of the accelerating phase. These findings can be used to improve performance of the CMVJ with the AS and in teaching beginning volleyball players proper jumping technique.

  9. Improved Maximum Strength, Vertical Jump and Sprint Performance after 8 Weeks of Jump Squat Training with Individualized Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marián, Vanderka; Katarína, Longová; Dávid, Olasz; Matúš, Krčmár; Simon, Walker

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the effects of 8 weeks of jump squat training on isometric half squat maximal force production (Fmax) and rate of force development over 100ms (RFD100), countermovement jump (CMJ) and squat jump (SJ) height, and 50 m sprint time in moderately trained men. Sixty eight subjects (~21 years, ~180 cm, ~75 kg) were divided into experimental (EXP; n = 36) and control (CON, n = 32) groups. Tests were completed pre-, mid- and post-training. EXP performed jump squat training 3 times per week using loads that allowed all repetitions to be performed with ≥90% of maximum average power output (13 sessions with 4 sets of 8 repetitions and 13 sessions with 8 sets of 4 repetitions). Subjects were given real-time feedback for every repetition during the training sessions. Significant improvements in Fmax from pre- to mid- (Δ ~14%, psquats with loads that allow repetitions to be performed ≥90% of maximum average power output can simultaneously improve several different athletic performance tasks in the short-term. Key points Jump squat exercise is one of many exercises to develop explosive strength that has been the focus of several researches, while the load used during the training seem to be an important factor that affects training outcomes. Experimental group improved performance in all assessed parameters, such as Fmax, RFD100, CMJ, SJ and 50 m sprint time. However, improvements in CMJ and SJ were recorded after the entire power training period and thereafter plateau occurred. The portable FitroDyne could serve as a valuable device to individualize the load that maximizes mean power output and visual feedback can be provided to athletes during the training. PMID:27803628

  10. Impact of the focus of attention on vertical jump performance of junior basketball players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manojlović Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research was to determine the impact of the focus of attention on vertical jump performance expressed through a jump height. Thirteen basketball players (body mass = 73,4 kg, height = 186,58 cm, age = 15.12 ± 0.61 y volunteered as participants. All the subject represented a club which participated in the Croatian cadets 1. league in season 2008/09, and were tested during the season. The subjects performed two experiments. In both experiments, they performed 15 repetitions of countermovement jump, whereas in one of the experiments, during the performance of the jumps they were listening to an audio record of spectators. For both type of jumps, the subjects were instructed to stay in the air as long as possible during a single jump (external focus of attention. To determine the differences between jumps, a paired-sample t-test was used with a level of statistical significance set to p ≤ 0.05. Comparison for jump height between both type of jumps revealed no statistically significant difference, although the presented difference should not be denied considering a real match conditions.

  11. Effect of hang cleans or squats paired with countermovement vertical jumps on vertical displacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Tedi R; Mackey, Theresa; Inkrott, Thomas A; Murray, Steven R; Clark, Ida E; Pettitt, Robert W

    2011-09-01

    Complex training is characterized by pairing resistance exercise with plyometric exercise to exploit the postactivation potentiation (PAP) phenomenon, thereby promising a better training effect. Studies on PAP as measured by human power performances are equivocal. One issue may be the lack of analyses across multiple sets of paired exercises, a common practice used by athletes. We evaluated countermovement vertical jump (CMJ) performance in 19 women, collegiate athletes in 3 of the following trials: (a) CMJs-only, where 1 set of CMJs served as a conditioning exercise, (b) heavy-load, back squats paired with CMJs, and (c) hang cleans paired with CMJs. The CMJ vertical displacement (3-attempt average), as measured with digital video, served as the dependent variable of CMJ performance. Across 3 sets of paired-exercise regimens, CMJ-only depreciated 1.6 cm and CMJ paired with back squats depreciated 2.0 cm (main effect, p squats or CMJs in and of themselves. Future research on exercise modes of complex training that best help athletes preserve and train with the highest power possible, in a given training session, is warranted.

  12. Contribución segmentaria de los saltos con contramovimiento en vertical y en horizontal. [Segmental contribution on countermovement vertical and horizontal jumps].

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    Marcos Gutiérrez-Dávila

    2014-10-01

    , time-synchronized to a video camera that recorded at 210 Hz the sagital plane of the jumps performed on the platform. The jumps have been considered as a symmetrical movement taking place in a plane, with a mechanical coordinated model of eight segments. In the SV condition, participants had to perform a maximum vertical jump, starting from a standing position on the force platform. In the SH condition, participants had to perform a maximal horizontal jump starting from the same position. The results show a greater time for the jump in SH, (0.898 vs 1.056 s using a strategy extension-rotation in the horizontal jumps. The net force exerted during the braking impulse is higher for SV due to the greater velocity at the beginning of this phase (-1.166 vs -0.992 m/s. There was a greater involvement of the ankle and hip in SH, with a higher contribution of the trunk during the jump, also there was a greater contribution of the arms to the vertical displacement of the CM in SV.

  13. Effects Of Whole Body Vibration On Vertical Jump Performance Following Exercise Induced Muscle Damage

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    Nicole C. Dabbs

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Enhancing vertical jump performance is critical for many sports. Following high intensity training, individuals often experience exercise induced muscle damage (EIMD. Many recovery modalities have been tested with conflicting results. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effect of whole-body vibration (WBV on vertical jump performance following EIMD. 27 females volunteered for 7 sessions and were randomly assigned to a treatment or control group and administered each testing day. Vertical jump performance was assessed via vertical jump height (VJH, peak power output (PPO, rate of force development (RFD, relative ground reaction force (GRFz, and peak activation ratio of the vastus medialis (VM via electromyography (EMG before and after 3 days of EIMD via split squats. Two testing sets were collected each day, consisting of pre measures followed by WBV or control, and then post second measures. A 2x8 (group x time mixed factor analysis of variance (ANOVA was conducted for each variable. No significant interactions or group differences were found in any variable. Significant main effects for time were found in any variable, indicating performance declined following muscle damage. These results indicate that WBV does not aid in muscle recovery or vertical jump performance following EIMD.

  14. Dividend Maximization when Cash Reserves Follow a Jump-diffusion Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI LI-LI; FENG JIN-GHAI; SONG LI-XIN

    2009-01-01

    This paper deals with the dividend optimization problem for an insur-ance company, whose surplus follows a jump-diffusion process. The objective of the company is to maximize the expected total discounted dividends paid out until the time of ruin. Under concavity assumption on the optimal value function, the paper states some general properties and, in particular, smoothness results on the optimal value function, whose analysis mainly relies on viscosity solutions of the associated Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman (HJB) equations. Based on these properties, the explicit expression of the optimal value function is obtained. And some numerical calculations are presented as the application of the results.

  15. Potentiation: Effect of Ballistic and Heavy Exercise on Vertical Jump Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hester, Garrett M; Pope, Zachary K; Sellers, John H; Thiele, Ryan M; DeFreitas, Jason M

    2017-03-01

    Hester, GM, Pope, ZK, Sellers, JH, Thiele, RM, and DeFreitas, JM. Potentiation: Effect of ballistic and heavy exercise on vertical jump performance. J Strength Cond Res 31(3): 660-666, 2017-The purpose of this study was to compare the acute effects of heavy and ballistic conditioning protocols on vertical jump performance in resistance-trained men. Fourteen resistance-trained men (mean ± SD: age = 22 ± 2.1 years, body mass = 86.29 ± 9.95 kg, and height = 175.39 ± 9.34 cm) with an average relative full squat of 2.02 ± 0.28 times their body mass participated in this study. In randomized, counterbalanced order, subjects performed two countermovement vertical jumps before and 1, 3, 5, and 10 minutes after either performing 10 rapid jump squats or 5 heavy back squats. The back squat protocol consisted of 5 repetitions at 80% one repetition maximum (1RM), whereas the jump squat protocol consisted of 10 repetitions at 20% 1RM. Peak jump height (in centimeters) using a jump mat, along with power output (in Watts) and velocity (in meters per second) through a linear transducer, was recorded for each time interval. There was no significant condition × time interaction for any of the dependent variables (p = 0.066-0.127). In addition, there was no main effect for condition for any of the dependent variables (p = 0.457-0.899). Neither the ballistic nor heavy protocol used in this study enhanced vertical jump performance at any recovery interval. The use of these protocols in resistance-trained men to produce postactivation potentiation is not recommended.

  16. Effect of plyometric training on vertical jump height in high school basketball players: randomised control trial

    OpenAIRE

    Chhaya Verma, Lakshmi Subramanium, Vijaya Krishnan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Plyometric involve high intensity eccentric contraction immediately after a powerful concentric contraction. A vertical leap in basketball also involves rapid & repeated muscle contraction & stretching. Various methods have been used to improve the vertical leap in players, but only few studies mention about plyometrics. Aim: To determine the effect of Plyometric training on vertical jump height in high school basketball players & compare them with their untrained counterparts. Me...

  17. Validity and reliability of the Myotest accelerometric system for the assessment of vertical jump height.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casartelli, Nicola; Müller, Roland; Maffiuletti, Nicola A

    2010-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to verify the validity and reliability of the Myotest accelerometric system (Myotest SA, Sion, Switzerland) for the assessment of vertical jump height. Forty-four male basketball players (age range: 9-25 years) performed series of squat, countermovement and repeated jumps during 2 identical test sessions separated by 2-15 days. Flight height was simultaneously quantified with the Myotest system and validated photoelectric cells (Optojump). Two calculation methods were used to estimate the jump height from Myotest recordings: flight time (Myotest-T) and vertical takeoff velocity (Myotest-V). Concurrent validity was investigated comparing Myotest-T and Myotest-V to the criterion method (Optojump), and test-retest reliability was also examined. As regards validity, Myotest-T overestimated jumping height compared to Optojump (p 0.98), that is, excellent validity. Myotest-V overestimated jumping height compared to Optojump (p 12 cm), high limits of agreement ratios (>36%), and low ICCs (9 cm). In conclusion, Myotest-T is a valid and reliable method for the assessment of vertical jump height, and its use is legitimate for field-based evaluations, whereas Myotest-V is neither valid nor reliable.

  18. Specific warm-up exercise is the best for vertical countermovement jump in young volleyball players

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    Fernando Nazário de Rezende

    Full Text Available Abstract We evaluated the effect of performing various distinct warm-up exercises on vertical countermovement jump (VCMJ performance. Eight volleyball players (age 15.4 ± 0.5 yrs performed five different warm-up activities (in a counterbalanced, randomized crossover study over five days, at 24-h intervals: stretching (4 × 30 s, 30 s between sets, cycloergometer (5 min at 50 W + 5 min at 100 W, resistance exercise (leg press 45°, 3 × 5 repetitions maximum, 3-min pause between sets, specific vertical jumping (4 × 10 VCMJ, 2-min pause between sets, and no warm-up at all (control condition. Beginning 3 min after their warm-up, the players performed 3 attempts (at intervals of 3 min of VCMJ (on a contact carpet, and each player's best jump was considered in the analysis. All warm-up activities presented higher VCMJ performance (p< 0.05 than the control condition, with the exception of stretching. Vertical jumping revealed a large effect size(0.8 than other interventions. We conclude that in practical terms, vertical jumps are the best warm-up exercise (when applied by itself to acutely improve VCMJ performance in volleyball players, but that other exercises can make a complementary contribution.

  19. A comparison of two landing styles in a two-foot vertical jump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Davila, Marcos; Campos, José; Navarro, Enrique

    2009-01-01

    In team sports, such as basketball and volleyball, the players use different takeoff styles to make the vertical jump. The two-foot vertical jump styles have been classified according to the landing style and identified as hop style, when both feet touch the ground at the same time, and step-close style, when there is a slight delay between the first and second foot making contact with the ground. The aim of this research is to identify the differences between the two styles. Twenty-three subjects participated in the study, of whom 14 were volleyball players and 9 were basketball players. The jumps were video recorded and synchronized with two force platforms at 250 Hz. Two temporal periods of the takeoff were defined according to the reduction or increase in the radial distance between the center of gravity (CG) and the foot support (T - RDCG and T + RDCG, respectively). The findings produced no specific advantages when both styles were compared with respect to takeoff velocity and, consequently, to jump height, but takeoff time was significantly shorter (p vertical velocity of CG at the beginning of the takeoff is significantly lower. Moreover, the mean vertical force developed during T - RDCG was reduced by -627.7 +/- 251.1 N, thus lessening impact on landing. Horizontal velocity at the end of the takeoff is less when the step-close style is used (p jumps where it is necessary to move horizontally during the flight against an opponent.

  20. Verbal Instructions Acutely Affect Drop Vertical Jump Biomechanics--Implications for Athletic Performance and Injury Risk Assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khuu, Steven; Musalem, Lindsay L; Beach, Tyson A C

    2015-10-01

    Biomechanical quantities acquired during the drop vertical jump (DVJ) are used in the assessment of athletic performance and injury risk. The objective was to examine the impact of different verbal instructions on spatiotemporal, kinematic, and kinetic variables commonly included in such assessments. Ten men and 10 women from local varsity and club volleyball, basketball, figure skating, and track and field teams volunteered to participate. The athletes performed DVJs after given instructions to minimize ground contact time (CT), maximize jump height (HT), and synchronously extend the lower extremity joints (EX). Between the CT, HT, and EX conditions, body segment and joint angles were compared together with characteristics of vertical ground reaction force (GRF), whole-body power output, stiffness, and center-of-mass displacement time histories. Verbal instructions were found to influence nearly all of the spatiotemporal, body segment and joint kinematic, and kinetic variables that were statistically analyzed. Particularly noteworthy was the finding that athletic performance indices (e.g., jump height, power output, vertical stiffness, and reactive strength index) and lower extremity injury risk markers (e.g., peak vertical GRF and frontal plane knee angle) were significantly different (p ≤ 0.05) between the CT, HT, and EX conditions. The findings of this study suggest that verbal instructions should be controlled and/or clearly documented when using the DVJ to assess athletic performance potential and injury risk. Moreover, practitioners who devise performance enhancement and injury prevention strategies based on DVJ assessments are advised to consider that "coaching" or "cueing" during the task execution could impact conclusions drawn.

  1. AMPLITUDE, TRAJECTORY AND AFFERENT PARAMETERS ANALYSIS OF THE JUMP OVER A VERTICAL FENCE IN SPORT HORSES

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    FLAVIA BOCHIS

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available There are a lot of obstacles type used in jumping competitions. Normally, for every kind of fence, there is a different type of approaching and cross over. The most used obstacles are the vertical fence and the oxer fence. For crossing over the vertical, which is a high fence, the horse must jump only in report to the height of the bar. In the oxer case, which is a large obstacle, the horse must jump related to the height and the largeness of it indeed. In the present study we obtained for the vertical fence, situated at five different levels. The purpose was to measure four parameters for every jump: the taking-off distance, the landing distance, and the distance between bar and legs for the front limbs and for the hind limbs. Based on these, were calculated in report to the type of the show arena the amplitude of the jumps, was assign the trajectory curve and placed the balance point.

  2. A Comparison of Isotonic, Isokinetic, and Plyometric Training Methods for Vertical Jump Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Christine D.

    This annotated bibliography documents three training methods used to develop vertical jumping ability and power: isotonic, isokinetics, and plyometric training. Research findings on all three forms of training are summarized and compared. A synthesis of conclusions drawn from the annotated writings is presented. The report includes a glossary of…

  3. Differences In Male Collegiate And Recreationally Trained Soccer Players On Balance, Agility, And Vertical Jump Performance

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    Nicole M. Sauls

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this investigation was to determine the differences in collegiate and recreationally trained soccer players in sprint, vertical jump, and balance performance. Methods: Twenty-one soccer players, twelve Division II collegiate and nine recreationally trained volunteered to participate. Session one acted as a familiarization day, where the participants were familiarized with testing day protocols. During testing day, participants performed a dynamic warm-up, followed by balance measurements, three countermovement vertical jumps, and pro-agility shuttle test. Results: There were no significant (p>0.05 differences between groups in the all balance variables. Collegiate soccer players had a significantly (p0.05 differences in groups in all other variables. Conclusion: These results indicate that collegiate, Division II, soccer players had greater vertical jumping and sprinting velocities when compared to recreationally trained soccer players. These results may have been impacted by the lack of resistance training background in either of the two groups. With the addition of more time on a collegiate resistance training program, it is very likely the Division II athletes will see a significant increase in all balance, sprint, and vertical jump performance measures compared to recreationally trained players who receive little to no specialized resistance training.

  4. Comparison of the Hang High-Pull and Loaded Jump Squat for the Development of Vertical Jump and Isometric Force-Time Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oranchuk, Dustin J; Robinson, Tracey L; Switaj, Zachary J; Drinkwater, Eric J

    2017-04-15

    Weightlifting movements have high skill demands and require expert coaching. Loaded jumps have a comparably lower skill demand, but may be similarly effective for improving explosive performance. The purpose of this study was to compare vertical jump performance, isometric force, and rate of force development (RFD) following a ten-week intervention employing the hang high-pull (hang-pull) or trap-bar jump squat (jump-squat). Eighteen NCAA Division II swimmers (8 males, 10 females) with at least one year of resistance training experience volunteered to participate. Testing included the squat jump (SJ), countermovement jump (CMJ) and the isometric mid-thigh pull (IMTP). Vertical ground reaction forces were analyzed to obtain jump height and relative peak power. Relative peak force, peak RFD and relative force at five time bands were obtained from the IMTP. Subjects were randomly assigned to either a hang-pull (n = 9) or jump-squat (n = 9) training group and completed a ten-week, volume-equated, periodized training program. While there was a significant main effect of training for both groups, no statistically significant between-group differences were found (p ≥ 0.17) for any of the dependent variables. However, medium effect sizes in favor of the jump-squat training group were seen in SJ height (d = 0.56) and SJ peak power (d = 0.69). Loaded jumps seem equally effective as weightlifting derivatives for improving lower-body power in experienced athletes. Since loaded jumps require less skill and less coaching expertise than weightlifting, loaded jumps should be considered where coaching complex movements is difficult.

  5. Vertical Jumping Tests versus Wingate Anaerobic Test in Female Volleyball Players: The Role of Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaidis, Pantelis Theodoros; Afonso, Jose; Clemente-Suarez, Vicente Javier; Alvarado, Jose Rafael Padilla; Driss, Tarak; Knechtle, Beat; Torres-Luque, Gema

    2016-01-01

    Single and continuous vertical jumping tests, as well as the Wingate anaerobic test (WAnT), are commonly used to assess the short-term muscle power of female volleyball players; however, the relationship among these tests has not been studied adequately. Thus, the aim of the present study was to examine the relationship of single and continuous vertical jumps with the WAnT in female volleyball players. Seventy adolescent (age 16.0 ± 1.0 years, body mass 62.5 ± 7.1 kg, height 170.4 ± 6.1 cm, body fat 24.2% ± 4.3%) and 108 adult female volleyball players (age 24.8 ± 5.2 years, body mass 66.5 ± 8.7 kg, height 173.2 ± 7.4 cm, body fat 22.0% ± 5.1%) performed the squat jump (SJ), countermovement jump (CMJ), Abalakov jump (AJ), 30 s Bosco test and WAnT (peak power, Ppeak; mean power, Pmean). Mean power in the Bosco test was correlated (low to large magnitude) with Pmean of the WAnT (r = 0.27, p = 0.030 in adolescents versus r = 0.56, p volleyball players. These findings should be taken into account by volleyball coaches and fitness trainers during the assessment of short-term muscle power of their athletes.

  6. Association of anthropometric qualities with vertical jump performance in elite male volleyball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aouadi, R; Jlid, M C; Khalifa, R; Hermassi, S; Chelly, M S; Van Den Tillaar, R; Gabbett, T

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the association between physical and anthropometric profiles and vertical jump performance in elite volleyball players. Thirty-three elite male volleyball players (21±1 y, 76.9±5.2 kg, 186.5±5 cm) were studied. Several anthropometric measurements (body mass, stature, body mass index, lower limb length and sitting height) together with jumping height anaerobic power of counter movement jump with arm swing (CMJarm) were obtained from all subjects. Forward stepwise multiple linear regression analysis was performed to determine if any of the anthropometric parameters were predictive of CMJarm. Anaerobic power was significantly higher (P≤0.05) in the tallest players relative to their shorter counterparts. A significant relationship was observed between CMJarm and lower limb length (r2=0.69; P0.05) predictors of CMJarm performance. This study demonstrates that lower limb length is correlated with CMJarm in elite male volleyball players. The players with longer lower limbs have the better vertical jump performances and their anaerobic power is higher. These results could be of importance for trained athletes in sports relying on jumping performance, such as basketball, handball or volleyball. Thus, the measurement of anthropometric characteristics, such as stature and lower limb length may assist coaches in the early phases of talent identification in volleyball.

  7. VERTICAL JUMP HEIGHT IN YOUNG CHILDREN - A LONGITUDINAL STUDY IN 4- TO 6-YEAR OLD CHILDREN

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    Katja Koren

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Preschool children are intensively involved in the process of developing fundamental movement skills such as walking, running, jumping, climbing, crawling and other simple movements. We aimed to compare age- and gender- related trends in countermovement vertical jump (CMJ performance (jumping height measured with a means of ground force plate during a longitudinal study of 4- to 6-year old children (N=79; 43% boys. Furthermore, we classified children CMJ arm-leg coordination into poor, average, or excellent on the grounds of high speed video footage. We found that CMJ height progresses significantly with age when arms are used (P<.001, η2=.632 and without the use of arms (P<.001, η2=.620. There were no sex effects. After classification of CMJ arm - leg coordination we found that children with excellent CMJ coordination progress more intensively than those with average coordination, whereas poorly coordinated jumpers do not progress at all. After extrapolating our data with the data of others, we found logarithmic CMJ height trends until the age of 16 in both sexes, athlete boys jumping higher than the non-athletes after the ages of 14 or 15. It seems that the initial movement patterns level, in this case the observed jumping technic, develops and refines in 4- to 6-year old children at that age. We conclude that jumping coordination is a very important factor of CMJ performance in the studied age span.

  8. Improved Maximum Strength, Vertical Jump and Sprint Performance after 8 Weeks of Jump Squat Training with Individualized Loads

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    Vanderka Marián, Longová Katarína, Olasz Dávid, Krčmár Matúš, Walker Simon

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to determine the effects of 8 weeks of jump squat training on isometric half squat maximal force production (Fmax and rate of force development over 100ms (RFD100, countermovement jump (CMJ and squat jump (SJ height, and 50 m sprint time in moderately trained men. Sixty eight subjects (~21 years, ~180 cm, ~75 kg were divided into experimental (EXP; n = 36 and control (CON, n = 32 groups. Tests were completed pre-, mid- and post-training. EXP performed jump squat training 3 times per week using loads that allowed all repetitions to be performed with ≥90% of maximum average power output (13 sessions with 4 sets of 8 repetitions and 13 sessions with 8 sets of 4 repetitions. Subjects were given real-time feedback for every repetition during the training sessions. Significant improvements in Fmax from pre- to mid- (Δ ~14%, p<0.001, and from mid- to post-training (Δ ~4%, p < 0.001 in EXP were observed. In CON significantly enhanced Fmax from pre- to mid-training (Δ ~3.5%, p < 0.05 was recorded, but no other significant changes were observed in any other test. In RFD100 significant improvements from pre- to mid-training (Δ ~27%, p < 0.001, as well as from mid- to post-training (Δ ~17%, p < 0.01 were observed. CMJ and SJ height were significantly enhanced from pre- to mid-training (Δ ~10%, ~15%, respectively, p < 0.001 but no further changes occurred from mid- to post-training. Significant improvements in 50 m sprint time from pre- to mid-training (Δ -1%, p < 0.05, and from mid- to post-training (Δ -1.9%, p < 0.001 in EXP were observed. Furthermore, percent changes in EXP were greater than changes in CON during training. It appears that using jump squats with loads that allow repetitions to be performed ≥90% of maximum average power output can simultaneously improve several different athletic performance tasks in the short-term.

  9. Impact of the focus of attention on vertical jump performance of junior basketball players

    OpenAIRE

    Manojlović Vladimir; Erčulj Frane

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the research was to determine the impact of the focus of attention on vertical jump performance expressed through a jump height. Thirteen basketball players (body mass = 73,4 kg, height = 186,58 cm, age = 15.12 ± 0.61 y) volunteered as participants. All the subject represented a club which participated in the Croatian cadets 1. league in season 2008/09, and were tested during the season. The subjects performed two experiments. In both experiments, they performed 15 repetitions of c...

  10. Alterations of Vertical Jump Mechanics after a Half-Marathon Mountain Running Race.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousanoglou, Elissavet N; Noutsos, Konstantinos; Pappas, Achilleas; Bogdanis, Gregory; Vagenas, Georgios; Bayios, Ioannis A; Boudolos, Konstantinos D

    2016-06-01

    The fatiguing effect of long-distance running has been examined in the context of a variety of parameters. However, there is scarcity of data regarding its effect on the vertical jump mechanics. The purpose of this study was to investigate the alterations of countermovement jump (CMJ) mechanics after a half-marathon mountain race. Twenty-seven runners performed CMJs before the race (Pre), immediately after the race (Post 1) and five minutes after Post 1 (Post 2). Instantaneous and ensemble-average analysis focused on jump height and, the maximum peaks and time-to-maximum peaks of: Displacement, vertical force (Fz), anterior-posterior force (Fx), Velocity and Power, in the eccentric (tECC) and concentric (tCON) phase of the jump, respectively. Repeated measures ANOVAs were used for statistical analysis (p ≤ 0.05). The jump height decrease was significant in Post 2 (-7.9%) but not in Post 1 (-4.1%). Fx and Velocity decreased significantly in both Post 1 (only in tECC) and Post 2 (both tECC and tCON). Α timing shift of the Fz peaks (earlier during tECC and later during tCON) and altered relative peak times (only in tECC) were also observed. Ensemble-average analysis revealed several time intervals of significant post-race alterations and a timing shift in the Fz-Velocity loop. An overall trend of lowered post-race jump output and mechanics was characterised by altered jump timing, restricted anterior-posterior movement and altered force-velocity relations. The specificity of mountain running fatigue to eccentric muscle work, appears to be reflected in the different time order of the post-race reductions, with the eccentric phase reductions preceding those of the concentric one. Thus, those who engage in mountain running should particularly consider downhill training to optimise eccentric muscular action. Key pointsThe 4.1% reduction of jump height immediately after the race is not statistically significantThe eccentric phase alterations of jump mechanics precede

  11. Humans make near-optimal adjustments of control to initial body configuration in vertical squat jumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobbert, Maarten F; Richard Casius, L J; Kistemaker, Dinant A

    2013-05-01

    We investigated adjustments of control to initial posture in squat jumping. Eleven male subjects jumped from three initial postures: preferred initial posture (PP), a posture in which the trunk was rotated 18° more backward (BP) and a posture in which it was rotated 15° more forward (FP) than in PP. Kinematics, ground reaction forces and electromyograms (EMG) were collected. EMG was rectified and smoothed to obtain smoothed rectified EMG (srEMG). Subjects showed adjustments in srEMG histories, most conspicuously a shift in srEMG-onset of rectus femoris (REC): from early in BP to late in FP. Jumps from the subjects' initial postures were simulated with a musculoskeletal model comprising four segments and six Hill-type muscles, which had muscle stimulation (STIM) over time as input. STIM of each muscle changed from initial to maximal at STIM-onset, and STIM-onsets were optimized using jump height as criterion. Optimal simulated jumps from BP, PP and FP were similar to jumps of the subjects. Optimal solutions primarily differed in STIM-onset of REC: from early in BP to late in FP. Because the subjects' adjustments in srEMG-onsets were similar to adjustments of the model's optimal STIM-onsets, it was concluded that the former were near-optimal. With the model we also showed that near-maximum jumps from BP, PP and FP could be achieved when STIM-onset of REC depended on initial hip joint angle and STIM-onsets of the other muscles were posture-independent. A control theory that relies on a mapping from initial posture to STIM-onsets seems a parsimonious alternative to theories relying on internal optimal control models. Copyright © 2013 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect Of Plyometric Training On Vertical Jump Performance And Neuromuscular Adaptation In Volleyball Player

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dara Hosseini

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of 12-week plyometric training on vertical jump performance (Vj, maximal surface EMG, M-wave amplitude, Mwave latency, and nerve conduction velocity (NCV in men volleyball player. Thirty junior high school volleyball players' volunteers (age: 17.53 0.74; Height: 177.67 3.14; Weight: 61.31 5.32 were divided into plyometric training [PT] (n=15 and control group[c] (n=15. PT group trained so.w' but C group didn't participate in this training. Both groups were pre- and post tested in EMG, M-wave parameters, NCV and Vj test. Tow way ANOVA (group*time interaction and Bonferroni post hoes test demonstrated significant differences (P<0.05 in PT group of pre to post test in VJ performance (9.67 % and in M-wave latency 16.55 % t ; nerve conduction velocity 14.19 % t ; there is no significant differences in IEMG (4.6 5 % J, and M-wave amplitude (20.91 % t , but there is no significant improvement during this period in control group. Comparison between groups after 12wk showed that there was a significant improvement in Latency (16.74 % J, and NCV (19.10% t in PT group during the course of the study than C group (P<0.05. based on the results of this study, it is possible to conclude that coaches and trainers consider PT as a strategy for increasing volleyball players' explosive performance that this may have taken place in neuromuscular responses such as; optimizing motor unites (MU pattern, optimizing MUs recruitment, augmentation in nerve conduction velocity, decrement in reflex excitability of the motor pool.

  13. Self-talk influences vertical jump performance and kinematics in male rugby union players.

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    Edwards, Christian; Tod, David; McGuigan, Michael

    2008-11-01

    We examined the effects of instructional and motivational self-talk on centre of mass displacement and hip kinematics during the vertical jump. Twenty-four male rugby union players (age 21.1 years, s = 3.5; body mass 81.0 kg, s = 8.9; height 1.80 m, s = 0.06) performed three vertical jump tests, with a 2 min rest between jumps. Before each jump, participants engaged in one of three counterbalanced interventions (motivational self-talk, instructional self-talk or no-intervention). Motivational self-talk led to greater centre of mass displacement (0.602 m, s = 0.076; P = 0.012) than the no-intervention control (0.583 m, s = 0.085). Centre of mass displacement did not differ between instructional self-talk and the control condition or between motivational and instructional self-talk. Motivational (100.75 degrees , s = 16.05; P = 0.001) and instructional self-talk (106.14 degrees , s = 17.04; P = 0.001) led to greater hip displacement than the no-intervention control (94.11 degrees , s = 17.14). There was also a significant difference in hip displacement between motivational and instructional self-talk (P = 0.014), although there was no difference between instructional self-talk and the control condition. Motivational (451.69 degrees /s, s = 74.34; P = 0.008) and instructional self-talk (462.01 degrees /s, s = 74.37; P = 0.001) led to greater hip rotation velocity than the no-intervention control (434.37 degrees /s, s = 75.37), although there was no difference between the two self-talk interventions. These results indicate that self-talk may influence performance and technique during the vertical jump in male rugby players.

  14. Fatigue influences lower extremity angular velocities during a single-leg drop vertical jump

    OpenAIRE

    Tamura, Akihiro; Akasaka, Kiyokazu; Otsudo, Takahiro; Shiozawa, Junya; Toda, Yuka; Yamada, Kaori

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] Fatigue alters lower extremity landing strategies and decreases the ability to attenuate impact during landing. The purpose of this study was to reveal the influence of fatigue on dynamic alignment and joint angular velocities in the lower extremities during a single leg landing. [Subjects and Methods] The 34 female college students were randomly assigned to either the fatigue or control group. The fatigue group performed single-leg drop vertical jumps before, and after, the fatigue...

  15. Concurrent Validity of a Portable Force Plate Using Vertical Jump Force-Time Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, Jason; Mundy, Peter; Comfort, Paul; McMahon, John J; Suchomel, Timothy J; Carden, Patrick

    2018-05-29

    This study examined concurrent validity of countermovement vertical jump (CMJ) reactive strength index modified and force-time characteristics recorded using a one dimensional portable and laboratory force plate system. Twenty-eight men performed bilateral CMJs on two portable force plates placed on top of two in-ground force plates, both recording vertical ground reaction force at 1000 Hz. Time to take-off, jump height, reactive strength index modified, braking and propulsion impulse, mean net force, and duration were calculated from the vertical force from both force plate systems. Results from both systems were highly correlated (r≥.99). There were small (dbraking impulse, braking mean net force, propulsion impulse, and propulsion mean net force (psystem (95% CL: .9% to 2.5%), indicating very good agreement across all of the dependent variables. The largest limits of agreement belonged to jump height (2.1%), time to take-off (3.4%), and reactive strength index modified (3.8%). The portable force plate system provides a valid method of obtaining reactive strength measures, and several underpinning force-time variables, from unloaded CMJ and practitioners can use both force plates interchangeably.

  16. Barbell deadlift training increases the rate of torque development and vertical jump performance in novices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Brennan J; Stock, Matt S; Shields, JoCarol E; Luera, Micheal J; Munayer, Ibrahim K; Mota, Jacob A; Carrillo, Elias C; Olinghouse, Kendra D

    2015-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to examine the effects of 10 weeks of barbell deadlift training on rapid torque characteristics of the knee extensors and flexors. A secondary aim was to analyze the relationships between training-induced changes in rapid torque and vertical jump performance. Fifty-four subjects (age, mean ± SD = 23 ± 3 years) were randomly assigned to a control (n = 20) or training group (n = 34). Subjects in the training group performed supervised deadlift training twice per week for 10 weeks. All subjects performed isometric strength testing of the knee extensors and flexors and vertical jumps before and after the intervention. Torque-time curves were used to calculate rate of torque development (RTD) values at peak and at 50 and 200 milliseconds from torque onset. Barbell deadlift training induced significant pre- to post-increases of 18.8-49.0% for all rapid torque variables (p torque capacities in both the knee extensors and flexors. Changes in rapid torque were associated with improvements in vertical jump height, suggesting a transfer of adaptations from deadlift training to an explosive, performance-based task. Professionals may use these findings when attempting to design effective, time-efficient resistance training programs to improve explosive strength capacities in novices.

  17. The effects of two different explosive strength training programs on vertical jump performance in basketball.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciacci, Simone; Bartolomei, Sandro

    2017-06-08

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of two different training programs oriented to improve vertical jump performance and leg stiffness in basketball players. Fifty-eight male basketball players were involved, divided into three age groups (Senior, U19 and U17). Subsequently, within any age group, the players were randomly divided into two training groups, respectively performing a 16-week "hang-clean" training program (HCL), and a "half-squat" training program (HSQ), lasting for the same duration. HCL was based on the hang clean exercise and included also jump rope training; HSQ was based on the half squat exercise and included also speed ladder training. The Squat jump (SJ), the Countermovement jump without and with arm swing, and with one step approach (respectively, CMJ, CMJS, and TCMJS) and explosive strength indices obtained with a leg stiffness test were assessed pre- and post-training. In Senior and U19 athletes both training programs involved an improvement of Vertical Jump performance, with some differences between different age groups. Instead, for the U17 players, only the HSQ led to an enhancement of SJ and TCMJS. Significant enhancement of leg stiffness was observed only in U19 and U17 groups after training. The present study showed that the programs based on the hang-clean and half squat allowed to improve explosive strength in basketball training. However, only HSQ was effective for the U17 group. Thus, the present findings demonstrate that specific training programs should be designed according to the age of the players.

  18. The acute effects of manipulating volume and load of back squats on countermovement vertical jump performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moir, Gavin L; Mergy, David; Witmer, Ca; Davis, Shala E

    2011-06-01

    The acute effects of manipulating the volume and load of back squats on subsequent countermovement vertical jump performance were investigated in the present study. Eleven National Collegiate Athletic Association division II female volleyball players performed 10 countermovement vertical jumps (CMJs) on a force platform 2 minutes after the last squat repetition of a high-load (HL) or high-volume (HV) squat protocol. Two minutes of rest was provided between each CMJ. The HL protocol culminated in the subjects having to perform 3 repetitions with a load equivalent to 90% 1 repetition maximum (1RM) back squat, whereas 12 repetitions with a load equivalent to 37% 1RM were performed in the HV protocol. During an initial familiarization session, knee angles were recorded during a series of CMJs, and these angles were used to control the depth of descent during all subsequent back squats. Jump height (JH) and vertical stiffness (VStiff) were calculated during each of the 10 CMJ, and the change in these variables after the 2 squat protocols was assessed using an analysis of variance model with repeated measures on 2 factors (Protocol [2-levels]; Time [2-levels]). There was no significant difference in JH after the HL and HV protocols (p > 0.05). A significant Protocol × Time interaction for VStiff resulted from the increase after the HL protocol being greater than that after the HV protocol (p = 0.03). The knee angles before the HL and HV protocols were significantly greater than those measured during the initial familiarization session (p = 0.001). Although neither squat protocol provided any benefit in improving JH, the heavy squat protocol produced greater increases in VStiff during the CMJ. Because of the increased VStiff caused by the HL protocol, volleyball coaches may consider using such protocols with their players to improve performance in jumps performed from a run such as the spike and on-court agility.

  19. Effect of squat depth on performance and biomechanical parameters of countermovement vertical jump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Ghedini Gheller

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1980-0037.2014v16n6p658   The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of different squat depths in the performance and biomechanical parameters at counter movement jump (CMJ. Twenty-two male volleyball or basketball players volunteered to participate in this study and all were currently competing at the college level. The CMJ was performed in three different conditions: 1 with relative knee flexion at the end of counter movement phase smaller than 90° (90°, and; 3 preferred position (PREF. During the CMJ, kinematic, kinetic, and electromyography parameters were assessed. ANOVA for repeated measures with post-hoc Bonferroni´s test was used for variables comparison, with a significance level set at p≤0.05. The higher performance was on PREF and 90°. Average and peak power, as well as absolute and normalized peak forces, were higher in >90° CMJ. The peak velocity of CG and angular velocities of hip and knee were higher in the 90°. Recuts femoris and biceps femoris did not show difference in any jump phases. In conclusion, the knee flexion interferes the performance and the biomechanical variables at the CMJ. The highest jumps were got at a deeper squat, so this technique could be used for athletes in order to optimize the vertical jump performance in the training and competitions.

  20. Acute kinematic and kinetic adaptations to wearable resistance during vertical jumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macadam, Paul; Simperingham, Kim D; Cronin, John B; Couture, Grace; Evison, Chloe

    2017-06-01

    One variation of vertical jump (VJ) training is resisted or weighted jump training, where wearable resistance (WR) enables jumping to be overloaded in a movement specific manner. A two-way analysis of variance with Bonferroni post hoc contrasts was used to determine the acute changes in VJ performance with differing load magnitudes and load placements. Kinematic and kinetic data were quantified using a force plate and contact mat. Twenty sport active subjects (age: 27.8 ± 3.8 years; body mass (BM): 70.2 ± 12.2 kg; height: 1.74 ± 0.78 m) volunteered to participate in the study. Subjects performed the counter movement jump (CMJ), drop jump (DJ) and pogo jump (PJ) wearing no resistance, 3% or 6% BM affixed to the upper or lower body. The main finding in terms of the landing phase was that the effect of WR was non-significant (P > .05) on peak ground reaction force. With regard to the propulsive phase the main findings were that for both the CMJ and DJ, WR resulted in a significant (P sports where VJ's are important components as it may provide a novel movement specific training stimulus. Highlights WR of 3 or 6 % BM provided a means to overload the subjects in this study resulting in decreased propulsive power and velocity that lead to a reduced jump height and landing force. Specific strength exercises that closely mimic sporting performance are more likely to optimise transference, therefore WR with light loads of 3-6% body mass (BM)appear a suitable tool for movement specific overload training and maximising transference to sporting performance. Practitioners can safely load their athletes with upper or lower body WR of 3-6% BM without fear of overloading the athletesover and above the landing forces they are typically accustomed too. As a training stimulus it would seem the WR loading provides adequate overload and athletes should focus on velocity of movement to improve power output and jump height i.e. take-off velocity.

  1. Vertical and Horizontal Asymmetries are Related to Slower Sprinting and Jump Performance in Elite Youth Female Soccer Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Chris; Read, Paul; McCubbine, Jermaine; Turner, Anthony

    2018-02-27

    Inter-limb asymmetries have been shown to be greater during vertical jumping compared to horizontal jumping. Notable inter-limb differences have also been established at an early age in male youth soccer players. Furthermore, given the multi-planar nature of soccer, establishing between-limb differences from multiple jump tests is warranted. At present, a paucity of data exists regarding asymmetries in youth female soccer players and their effects on physical performance. The aims of this study were to quantify inter-limb asymmetries from unilateral jump tests and examine their effects on speed and jump performance. Nineteen elite youth female soccer players performed a single leg countermovement jump (SLCMJ), single, triple, and crossover hops for distance and a 20 m sprint test. Test reliability was good to excellent (ICC = 0.81-0.99) and variability acceptable (CV = 1.74-5.42%). A one-way ANOVA highlighted larger asymmetries from the SLCMJ compared to all other jump tests (p jump performance (r = -0.47 to -0.58) and vertical asymmetries during the SLCMJ and vertical jump performance (r = -0.47 to -0.53). The results from this study highlight that the SLCMJ appears to be the most appropriate jump test for identifying between-limb differences with values ∼12% showing negative associations with sprint times. Furthermore, larger asymmetries are associated with reduced jump performance and would appear to be direction-specific. Practitioners can use this information as normative data to be mindful of when quantifying inter-limb asymmetries and assessing their potential impact on physical performance in youth female soccer players.

  2. Countermovement depth - a variable which clarifies the relationship between the maximum power output and height of a vertical jump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajewski, Jan; Michalski, Radosław; Buśko, Krzysztof; Mazur-Różycka, Joanna; Staniak, Zbigniew

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the determinants of peak power achieved during vertical jumps in order to clarify relationship between the height of jump and the ability to exert maximum power. One hundred young (16.8±1.8 years) sportsmen participated in the study (body height 1.861 ± 0.109 m, body weight 80.3 ± 9.2 kg). Each participant performed three jump tests: countermovement jump (CMJ), akimbo countermovement jump (ACMJ), and spike jump (SPJ). A force plate was used to measure ground reaction force and to determine peak power output. The following explanatory variables were included in the model: jump height, body mass, and the lowering of the centre of mass before launch (countermovement depth). A model was created using multiple regression analysis and allometric scaling. The model was used to calculate the expected power value for each participant, which correlated strongly with real values. The value of the coefficient of determination R2 equalled 0.89, 0.90 and 0.98, respectively, for the CMJ, ACMJ, and SPJ jumps. The countermovement depth proved to be a variable strongly affecting the maximum power of jump. If the countermovement depth remains constant, the relative peak power is a simple function of jump height. The results suggest that the jump height of an individual is an exact indicator of their ability to produce maximum power. The presented model has a potential to be utilized under field condition for estimating the maximum power output of vertical jumps.

  3. An Investigation Into the Relationship Between Maximum Isometric Strength and Vertical Jump Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Christopher; Jones, Paul A; Rothwell, James; Chiang, Chieh Y; Comfort, Paul

    2015-08-01

    Research has demonstrated a clear relationship between dynamic strength and vertical jump (VJ) performance; however, the relationship of isometric strength and VJ performance has been studied less extensively. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between isometric strength and performance during the squat jump (SJ) and countermovement jump (CMJ). Twenty-two male collegiate athletes (mean ± SD; age = 21.3 ± 2.9 years; height = 175.63 ± 8.23 cm; body mass = 78.06 ± 10.77 kg) performed isometric midthigh pulls (IMTPs) to assess isometric peak force (IPF), maximum rate of force development, and impulse (IMP) (I100, I200, and I300). Force-time data, collected during the VJs, were used to calculate peak velocity, peak force (PF), peak power (PP), and jump height. Absolute IMTP measures of IMP showed the strongest correlations with VJ PF (r = 0.43-0.64; p ≤ 0.05) and VJ PP (r = 0.38-0.60; p ≤ 0.05). No statistical difference was observed in CMJ height (0.33 ± 0.05 m vs. 0.36 ± 0.05 m; p = 0.19; ES = -0.29) and SJ height performance (0.29 ± 0.06 m vs. 0.33 ± 0.05 m; p = 0.14; ES = -0.34) when comparing stronger to weaker athletes. The results of this study illustrate that absolute IPF and IMP are related to VJ PF and PP but not VJ height. Because stronger athletes did not jump higher than weaker athletes, dynamic strength tests may be more practical methods of assessing the relationships between relative strength levels and dynamic performance in collegiate athletes.

  4. Vertical Jump Height Estimation Algorithm Based on Takeoff and Landing Identification Via Foot-Worn Inertial Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianren; Xu, Junkai; Shull, Peter B

    2018-03-01

    Vertical jump height is widely used for assessing motor development, functional ability, and motor capacity. Traditional methods for estimating vertical jump height rely on force plates or optical marker-based motion capture systems limiting assessment to people with access to specialized laboratories. Current wearable designs need to be attached to the skin or strapped to an appendage which can potentially be uncomfortable and inconvenient to use. This paper presents a novel algorithm for estimating vertical jump height based on foot-worn inertial sensors. Twenty healthy subjects performed countermovement jumping trials and maximum jump height was determined via inertial sensors located above the toe and under the heel and was compared with the gold standard maximum jump height estimation via optical marker-based motion capture. Average vertical jump height estimation errors from inertial sensing at the toe and heel were -2.2±2.1 cm and -0.4±3.8 cm, respectively. Vertical jump height estimation with the presented algorithm via inertial sensing showed excellent reliability at the toe (ICC(2,1)=0.98) and heel (ICC(2,1)=0.97). There was no significant bias in the inertial sensing at the toe, but proportional bias (b=1.22) and fixed bias (a=-10.23cm) were detected in inertial sensing at the heel. These results indicate that the presented algorithm could be applied to foot-worn inertial sensors to estimate maximum jump height enabling assessment outside of traditional laboratory settings, and to avoid bias errors, the toe may be a more suitable location for inertial sensor placement than the heel.

  5. Vertical Jumping Tests versus Wingate Anaerobic Test in Female Volleyball Players: The Role of Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pantelis Theodoros Nikolaidis

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Single and continuous vertical jumping tests, as well as the Wingate anaerobic test (WAnT, are commonly used to assess the short-term muscle power of female volleyball players; however, the relationship among these tests has not been studied adequately. Thus, the aim of the present study was to examine the relationship of single and continuous vertical jumps with the WAnT in female volleyball players. Seventy adolescent (age 16.0 ± 1.0 years, body mass 62.5 ± 7.1 kg, height 170.4 ± 6.1 cm, body fat 24.2% ± 4.3% and 108 adult female volleyball players (age 24.8 ± 5.2 years, body mass 66.5 ± 8.7 kg, height 173.2 ± 7.4 cm, body fat 22.0% ± 5.1% performed the squat jump (SJ, countermovement jump (CMJ, Abalakov jump (AJ, 30 s Bosco test and WAnT (peak power, Ppeak; mean power, Pmean. Mean power in the Bosco test was correlated (low to large magnitude with Pmean of the WAnT (r = 0.27, p = 0.030 in adolescents versus r = 0.56, p < 0.001 in adults. SJ, CMJ and AJ also correlated with Ppeak (0.28 ≤ r ≤ 0.46 in adolescents versus 0.58 ≤ r ≤ 0.61 in adults and with Pmean (0.43 ≤ r ≤ 0.51 versus 0.67 ≤ r ≤ 0.71, respectively of the WAnT (p < 0.05. In summary, the impact of the Bosco test and WAnT on muscle power varied, especially in the younger age group. Single jumping tests had larger correlations with WAnT in adults than in adolescent volleyball players. These findings should be taken into account by volleyball coaches and fitness trainers during the assessment of short-term muscle power of their athletes.

  6. Vertical and Horizontal Impact Force Comparison During Jump Landings With and Without Rotation in NCAA Division I Male Soccer Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harry, John R; Barker, Leland A; Mercer, John A; Dufek, Janet S

    2017-07-01

    Harry, JR, Barker, LA, Mercer, JA, and Dufek, JS. Vertical and horizontal impact force comparison during jump landings with and without rotation in NCAA Division I male soccer players. J Strength Cond Res 31(7): 1780-1786, 2017-There is a wealth of research on impact force characteristics when landing from a jump. However, there are no data on impact forces during landing from a jump with an airborne rotation about the vertical axis. We examined impact force parameters in the vertical and horizontal axes during vertical jump (VJ) landings and VJ landings with a 180° rotation (VJR). Twenty-four Division I male soccer players performed 3 VJ and VJR landings on a dual-force platform system. Paired-samples t-tests (α = 0.05) compared differences in the first (F1) and second (F2) peak vertical ground reaction forces, times to F1 (tF1), F2 (tF2), and the end of the impact phase, vertical impulse, and anterior-posterior and medial-lateral force couples. Effect sizes (ES; large >0.8) were computed to determine the magnitude of the differences. Lower jump height (41.60 ± 4.03 cm, VJ landings; 39.40 ± 4.05 cm, VJR landings; p = 0.002; ES = 0.39), greater F2 (55.71 ± 11.95 N·kg, VJ; 68.16 ± 14.82 N·kg; p jump with 180° airborne rotation is different than landing from a jump without an airborne rotation. Male Division I soccer players could benefit from increasing the volume of VJR landings during training to address the differences in jump height and force parameters compared with VJ landings.

  7. Effects of weightlifting vs. kettlebell training on vertical jump, strength, and body composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, William H; Coburn, Jared W; Brown, Lee E; Spiering, Barry A

    2012-05-01

    Effects of weightlifting vs. kettlebell training on vertical jump, strength, and body composition. J Strength Cond Res 26(5): 1199-1202, 2012-The present study compared the effects of 6 weeks of weightlifting plus traditional heavy resistance training exercises vs. kettlebell training on strength, power, and anthropometric measures. Thirty healthy men were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups: (a) weightlifting (n = 13; mean ± SD: age, 22.92 ± 1.98 years; body mass, 80.57 ± 12.99 kg; height, 174.56 ± 5.80 cm) or (b) kettlebell (n = 17; mean ± SD: age, 22.76 ± 1.86 years; body mass, 78.99 ± 10.68 kg; height, 176.79 ± 5.08 cm) and trained 2 times a week for 6 weeks. A linear periodization model was used for training; at weeks 1-3 volume was 3 × 6 (kettlebell swings or high pull), 4 × 4 (accelerated swings or power clean), and 4 × 6 (goblet squats or back squats), respectively, and the volume increased during weeks 4-6 to 4 × 6, 6 × 4, and 4 × 6, respectively. Participants were assessed for height (in centimeters), body mass (in kilograms), and body composition (skinfolds). Strength was assessed by the back squat 1 repetition maximum (1RM), whereas power was assessed by the vertical jump and power clean 1RM. The results of this study indicated that short-term weightlifting and kettlebell training were effective in increasing strength and power. However, the gain in strength using weightlifting movements was greater than that during kettlebell training. Neither method of training led to significant changes in any of the anthropometric measures. In conclusion, 6 weeks of weightlifting induced significantly greater improvements in strength compared with kettlebell training. No between-group differences existed for the vertical jump or body composition.

  8. The Effect of Regular Basketball Education on Children's Some Anthropometric Parametersand Vertical Jump

    OpenAIRE

    ŞARVAN CENGİZ, Şebnem; ÜNVEREN, Alparslan; KARAVELİOĞLU, Mihri

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to examine the effect of 12-week regular basic basketball trainings on anthropometric measurements and vertical jump of children aged 8-10. The experimental group of the research consisted of 40 children whose average age was 9.04 ± 0.77 (years) and the control group consisted of 38 children whose average age was 8.97±0.72 (years).Ability selection was made in order to determine these 78 children forming the experimental and control group. Pretest measurements of 40 children i...

  9. Acute effects of unilateral whole body vibration training on single leg vertical jump height and symmetry in healthy men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Seungho; Lee, Kyeongjin; Song, Changho

    2015-12-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to investigate the acute effects of unilateral whole body vibration training on height and symmetry of the single leg vertical jump in healthy men. [Subjects] Thirty males with no history of lower limb dysfunction participated in this study. [Methods] The participants were randomly allocated to one of three groups: the unilateral vibratory stimulation group (n=10), bilateral vibratory stimulation group (n=10), and, no vibratory stimulation group (n=10). The subjects in the unilateral and bilateral stimulation groups participated in one session of whole body vibration training at 26 Hz for 3 min. The no vibratory stimulation group subjects underwent the same training for 3 min without whole body vibration. All participants performed the single leg vertical jump for each lower limb, to account for the strong and weak sides. The single leg vertical jump height and symmetry were measured before and after the intervention. [Results] The single leg vertical jump height of the weak lower limb significantly improved in the unilateral vibratory stimulation group, but not in the other groups. The single leg vertical jump height of the strong lower limb significantly improved in the bilateral vibratory stimulation group, but not in the other groups. The single leg vertical jump symmetry significantly improved in the unilateral vibratory stimulation group, but not in the other groups. [Conclusion] Therefore, the present study found that the effects of whole body vibration training were different depending on the type of application. To improve the single leg vertical jump height in the weak lower limbs as well as limb symmetry, unilateral vibratory stimulation might be more desirable.

  10. Short-Term Effects of Kinesio Taping on Muscle Recruitment Order During a Vertical Jump: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez-Rebolledo, Guillermo; Ramirez-Campillo, Rodrigo; Guzman-Muñoz, Eduardo; Gatica-Rojas, Valeska; Dabanch-Santis, Alexis; Diaz-Valenzuela, Francisco

    2018-06-22

    Kinesio taping is commonly used in sports and rehabilitation settings with the aim of prevention and treatment of musculoskeletal injuries. However, limited evidence exists regarding the effects of 24 and 72 hours of kinesio taping on trunk and lower limb neuromuscular and kinetic performance during a vertical jump. The purpose of this study was to analyze the short-term effects of kinesio taping on height and ground reaction force during a vertical jump, in addition to trunk and lower limb muscle latency and recruitment order. Single-group pretest-posttest. University laboratory. Twelve male athletes from different sports (track and field, basketball, and soccer). They completed a single squat and countermovement jump at basal time (no kinesio taping), 24, and 72 hours of kinesio taping application on the gluteus maximus, biceps femoris, rectus femoris, gastrocnemius medialis, and longissimus. Muscle onset latencies were assessed by electromyography during a squat and countermovement jump, in addition to measurements of the jump height and normalized ground reaction force. The kinesio taping had no effect after 24 hours on either the countermovement or squat jump. However, at 72 hours, the kinesio taping increased the jump height (P = .02; d = 0.36) and normalized ground reaction force (P = .001; d = 0.45) during the countermovement jump. In addition, 72-hour kinesio taping reduced longissimus onset latency (P = .03; d = 1.34) and improved muscle recruitment order during a countermovement jump. These findings suggest that kinesio taping may improve neuromuscular and kinetic performance during a countermovement jump only after 72 hours of application on healthy and uninjured male athletes. However, no changes were observed on a squat jump. Future studies should incorporate a control group to verify kinesio taping's effects and its influence on injured athletes.

  11. Vertical Jump Height is more Strongly Associated with Velocity and Work Performed Prior to Take-off

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, J. R.; Loehr, J. A.; DeWitt, J. K.; Lee, S. M. C.; English, K. L.; Nash, R. E.; Leach, M. A.; Hagan, R. D.

    2008-01-01

    Vertical jump (VJ) height is commonly used as a measure of athletic capability in strength and power sports. Although VJ has been shown to be a predictor of athletic performance, it is not clear which kinetic ground reaction force (GRF) variables, such as peak force (PF), peak power (PP), peak velocity (PV), total work (TW) or impulse (Imp) are the best correlates. To determine which kinetic variables (PF, PP, PV, TW, and Imp) best correlate with VJ height. Twenty subjects (14 males, 6 females) performed three maximal countermovement VJs on a force platform (Advanced Mechanical Technology, Inc., Watertown, MA, USA). VJ jump height was calculated as the difference between standing reach and the highest reach point measured using a Vertec. PF, PP, PV, TW, and Imp were calculated using the vertical GRF data sampled at 1000 Hz from the lowest point in the countermovement through the concentric portion until take-off. GRF data were normalized to body mass measured using a standard scale (Detecto, Webb City, MO, USA). Correlation coefficients were computed between each GRF variable and VJ height using a Pearson correlation. VJ height (43.4 plus or minus 9.1 cm) was significantly correlated (p less than 0.001) with PF (998 plus or minus 321 N; r=0.51), PP (1997 plus or minus 772 W; r=0.69), PV (2.66 plus or minus 0.40 m (raised dot) s(sup -1); r=0.85), TW (259 plus or minus 93.0 kJ; r=0.82), and Imp (204 plus or minus 51.1 N(raised dot)s; r=0.67). Although all variables were correlated to VJ height, PV and TW were more strongly correlated to VJ height than PF, PP, and Imp. Therefore, since TW is equal to force times displacement, the relative displacement of the center of mass along with the forces applied during the upward movement of the jump are critical determinants of VJ height. PV and TW are key determinants of VJ height, and therefore successful training programs to increase VJ height should focus on rapid movement (PV) and TW by increasing power over time rather

  12. Vertical jump in female and male basketball players--a review of observational and experimental studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziv, Gal; Lidor, Ronnie

    2010-05-01

    The main purpose of this article was to review a series of studies (n=26; 15 observational and 11 experimental) examining vertical jump (VJ) performances in female and male basketball players. Information on the tests used in these studies and their specific protocols, and the training programs conducted to improve VJ ability in elite basketball players, was assessed. It was found that vertical jump values varied greatly, from 22 to 48 cm in female players and from 40 to 75 cm in male players. These large variations can be explained mostly by the differences in testing protocols (each VJ protocol examined different physiological pathways) and skill level of players. The variations in VJ values among studies were greatly reduced when they used the same protocol. In addition, short plyometric training sessions as part of the strength and conditioning program were found to enhance VJ performances in basketball players. Based on the reviewed studies, five limitations associated with the testing protocols and the strength and conditioning programs used in the studies were outlined, among them the use of multiple testing protocols and lack of experimental studies. Three recommendations for basketball and strength and conditioning coaches were suggested, for one of which was including plyometric training in the annual training program. 2009 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Linear correlation between fractal dimension of surface EMG signal from Rectus Femoris and height of vertical jump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ancillao, Andrea; Galli, Manuela; Rigoldi, Chiara; Albertini, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    Fractal dimension was demonstrated to be able to characterize the complexity of biological signals. The EMG time series are well known to have a complex behavior and some other studies already tried to characterize these signals by their fractal dimension. This paper is aimed at studying the correlation between the fractal dimension of surface EMG signal recorded over Rectus Femoris muscles during a vertical jump and the height reached in that jump. Healthy subjects performed vertical jumps at different heights. Surface EMG from Rectus Femoris was recorded and the height of each jump was measured by an optoelectronic motion capture system. Fractal dimension of sEMG was computed and the correlation between fractal dimension and eight of the jump was studied. Linear regression analysis showed a very high correlation coefficient between the fractal dimension and the height of the jump for all the subjects. The results of this study show that the fractal dimension is able to characterize the EMG signal and it can be related to the performance of the jump. Fractal dimension is therefore an useful tool for EMG interpretation

  14. Vertical Jump and Leg Power Normative Data for Colombian Schoolchildren Aged 9-17.9 Years: The FUPRECOL Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Vélez, Robinson; Correa-Bautista, Jorge E; Lobelo, Felipe; Cadore, Eduardo L; Alonso-Martinez, Alicia M; Izquierdo, Mikel

    2017-04-01

    Ramírez-Vélez, R, Correa-Bautista, JE, Lobelo, F, Cadore, EL, Alonso-Martinez, AM, and Izquierdo, M. Vertical jump and leg power normative data for Colombian schoolchildren aged 9-17.9 years: the FUPRECOL study. J Strength Cond Res 31(4): 990-998, 2017-The aims of the present study were to generate normative vertical jump height and predicted peak power (Ppeak) data for 9- to 17.9-year-olds and to investigate between-sex and age group differences in these measures. This was a cross-sectional study of 7,614 healthy schoolchildren (boys n = 3,258 and girls n = 4,356, mean [SD] age 12.8 [2.3] years). Each participant performed 2 countermovement jumps; jump height was calculated using a Takei 5414 Jump-DF Digital Vertical (Takei Scientific Instruments Co., Ltd.). The highest jump was used for analysis and in the calculation of predicted Ppeak. Centile smoothed curves, percentiles, and tables for the 3rd, 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 90th, and 97th percentiles were calculated using Cole's LMS (L [curve Box-Cox], M [curve median], and S [curve coefficient of variation]) method. The 2-way analysis of variance tests showed that maximum jump height (in centimeters) and predicted Ppeak (in watts) were higher in boys than in girls (p jump height and Ppeak in all ages. In boys, the maximum jump height and predicted Ppeak 50th percentile ranged from 24.0 to 38.0 cm and from 845.5 to 3061.6 W, respectively. In girls, the 50th percentile for jump height ranged from 22.3 to 27.0 cm, and the predicted Ppeak was 710.1-2036.4 W. For girls, jump height increased yearly from 9 to 17.9 years old. Our results provide, for the first time, sex- and age-specific vertical jump height and predicted Ppeak reference standards for Colombian schoolchildren aged 9-17.9 years.

  15. Relationship between relative net vertical impulse and jump height in jump squats performed to various squat depths and with various loads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Jeffrey M; Kirby, Tyler J; Haines, Tracie L; Skinner, Jared

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of the current investigation was to determine the relationship between relative net vertical impulse (net vertical impulse (VI)) and jump height in the jump squat (JS) going to different squat depths and utilizing various loads. Ten males with two years of jumping experience participated in this investigation (Age: 21.8 ± 1.9 y; Height: 176.9 ± 5.2 cm; Body Mass: 79.0 ± 7.1 kg, 1RM: 131.8 ± 29.5 kg, 1RM/BM: 1.66 ± 0.27). Subjects performed a series of static jumps (SJS) and countermovement jumps (CMJJS) with various loads (Body Mass, 20% of 1RM, 40% of 1RM) in a randomized fashion to a depth of 0.15, 0.30, 0.45, 0.60, and 0.75 m and a self-selected depth. During the concentric phase of each JS, peak force (PF), peak power (PP), jump height (JH) and relative VI were recorded and analyzed. Increasing squat depth corresponded to a decrease in PF and an increase in JH, relative VI for both SJS and CMJJS during all loads. Across all squat depths and loading conditions relative VI was statistically significantly correlated to JH in the SJS (r = .8956, P squat depths and loading conditions PF was statistically nonsignificantly correlated to JH in the SJS (r = -0.1010, P = .2095, power = 0.2401) and CMJJS (r = -0.0594, P = .4527, power = 0.1131). Across all squat depths and loading conditions peak power (PP) was significantly correlated with JH during both the SJS (r = .6605, P squat depths. Results indicate that relative VI and PP can be used to predict JS performance, regardless of squat depth and loading condition. However, relative VI may be the best predictor of JS performance with PF being the worst predictor of JS performance.

  16. Optimizing Half Squat Postactivation Potential Load in Squat Jump Training for Eliciting Relative Maximal Power in Ski Jumpers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gołaś, Artur; Wilk, Michal; Stastny, Petr; Maszczyk, Adam; Pajerska, Katarzyna; Zając, Adam

    2017-11-01

    Gołaś, A, Wilk, M, Stastny, P, Maszczyk, A, Pajerska, K, and Zając, A. Optimizing half squat postactivation potential load in squat jump training for eliciting relative maximal power in ski jumpers. J Strength Cond Res 31(11): 3010-3017, 2017-Training load manipulation in a single workout session can increase or decrease training effectiveness in terms of athletes' strength or power gains. In ski jumping, the complex training that elicits maximal power gains may take advantage of the postactivation potentiation (PAP) mechanism. The aim of this research was to evaluate the changes in rate of force development (RFD), rate of power development (RPD), and jump height during a complex training session consisted of the barbell half squat (Sq) as a conditioning exercise with loads ranged between 60 and 100% of 1 repetition maximum (1RM), followed by a body weight squat jump (SqJ) as a performance task. The study was conducted with 16 elite athletes from the Polish National Ski Jumping Team, age 23 ± 8 years, body mass 56 ± 9 kg, and height 172 ± 12 cm. Complex training session started with the Sq at 60% of 1RM as the conditioning exercise, followed by 3 minutes of rest and the SqJ. The conditioning barbell half Sq was performed with 70, 80, 90, and 100% of 1RM with 5 minutes of rest. The differences in RFD occurred between an SqJ following the application of 80% of 1RM and all other SqJs (p = 0.01), and in RPD between SqJ without conditioning, SqJ after 60% of 1RM and 80% of 1RM (p = 0.02). On average, the most effective load in inducing PAP during ski jumpers' SqJ training is 80% of 1RM. The intensity of the conditioning exercise that elicits the greatest PAP effect should be individualized (60-100% 1RM), as it is dependent on the level of maximal strength.

  17. Application of force-length curve for determination of leg stiffness during a vertical jump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struzik, Artur; Zawadzki, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to present the methodology for estimation of a leg stiffness during a countermovement jump. The question was asked whether leg stiffness in the countermovement and take-off phases are similar to each other as demonstrated in previous reports. It was also examined whether the stiffness in left lower limb is similar to the one in right lower limb. The research was conducted on 35 basketball players. Each participant performed three countermovement jumps with arm swing to the maximum height. Measurements employed a Kistlerforce plate and a BTS SMART system for motion analysis. Leg stiffness (understood as an inclination of the curve of ground reaction forces vs. length) was computed for these parts of countermovement and take-off phases where its value was relatively constant and F(Δl) relationship was similar to linear. Mean value (±SD) of total stiffness of both lower limbs in the countermovement phase was 7.1 ± 2.3 kN/m, whereas this value in the take-off phase was 7.5 ± 1 kN/m. No statistically significant differences were found between the leg stiffness in the countermovement and the take-off phases. No statistically significant differences were found during the comparison of the stiffness in the right and left lower limb. The calculation methodology allows us to estimate the value of leg stiffness based on the actual shape of F(Δl) curve rather than on extreme values of ΔF and Δl. Despite different tasks of the countermovement and the take-off phases, leg stiffness in these phases is very similar. Leg stiffness during a single vertical jump maintains a relatively constant value in the parts with a small value of acceleration.

  18. The Effects of Self-Focus On Affect and Vertical Jump Performance of NCAA Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas G. Hammond

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Self-focused attention is often associated with a process of evaluation that has implications for affect, motivation and performance. However, this topic has received little attention in elite sport. Thus, the aim of this study was to understand the relationship between self-focused attention, affective responses and physical performance of successfully (n=12 and unsuccessful (n=12 NCAA athletes. Each athlete was presented with a self-focused and other-focused condition. They provided ratings of positive affect and then completed vertical squat jumps after each stimulus condition. Significant interactions were observed between stimulus condition and athlete performance group for all dependent variables. Successful athletes demonstrated significantly more positive affect, and greater jump height and energy output following the self-focused condition. The opposite trend was observed for unsuccessful athletes. These findings highlight the potential for self-focused attention to enhance or detract from sport performance based on the direction of self-discrepancies. Keywords: self-focused attention, self-evaluation, elite athletes, positive affect, athletic performance

  19. Effects of Heavy Squat Training on a Vibration Platform on Maximal Strength and Jump Performance in Resistance-Trained Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Roger L; Linton, Joshua T; Hammer, Adam M

    2018-03-06

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine maximal strength and jump performance outcomes of heavy squat training on a low-amplitude (<1.0 mm peak-to-peak) vibration platform (VP). Nineteen recreationally resistance-trained college-aged men (22.3 ± 1.66 years) completed the 6-week study. Participants were randomly assigned to one of two training groups: SQT (n = 10) performed conventional back squats on the floor; SQTV (n = 9) performed back squats on the VP. Supervised training took place over 12 sessions (2 days/week) which utilized an aggressive strength development protocol (85-95 % 1-RM), which was identically followed by both groups. After the intervention, both groups showed (via t-test) a marked increase (p < 0.001) in 1-RM squat strength (SQT = 34.5 kg vs SQTV = 36.2 kg), but there was no significant difference (via mixed ANOVA) between groups (p = 0.875). Standing broad jump performance increased by an average of 5-6 cm, but was not significantly changed in either group (SQT; p = 0.199, SQTV; p = 0.087). In conclusion, squats performed with whole body vibration (WBV) were not superior to conventional squats with respect to maximal strength and jump performance outcomes. It appears that there was no additive effect of superimposed WBV training in strength beyond that caused by strength training alone. This study can help strength conditioning professionals and athletes make an informed decision on whether to invest in a VP and use WBV as an alternative or a complementary mode of training.

  20. Kinetic parameters as determinants of vertical jump performance. DOI: 10.5007/1980-0037.2012v14n1p41

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saray Giovana dos Santos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to identify force and velocity parameters related to vertical jump performance in counter movement jump (CMJ and squat jump (SJ, and to compare these parameters between sprint runners and volleyball players. Twenty-four male athletes (12 regional/national-level sprint runners and 12 national-level volleyball players participated in this study. The athletes performed CMJ and SJ on a force platform. The following variables were analyzed: jump performance (jump height and power, peak velocity (PV, absolute and relative maximum force (Fmax, rate of force development (RFD, and time to reach maximum force (TFmax. In CMJ, jump height was correlated with PV (r=0.97 and normalized Fmax (r=0.47, whereas jump power was significantly correlated with all variables, except for Fmax (r=0.12. In SJ, PV and normalized Fmax were significantly correlated with jump height (r=0.95 and r=0.51, respectively and power (r=0.80 and r=0.87, respectively. In addition, TFmax was inversely correlated with power (r=-0.49. Runners presented higher performance variables (height and power, normalized Fmax and PV than volleyball players in both CMJ and SJ. In conclusion, velocity and maximum force were the main determinants of height and power in the two types of vertical jump. However, explosive force (RFD and TFmax was also important for power production in vertical jumps. Finally, runners presented a better vertical jump performance than volleyball players.

  1. Vertical jump performance of professional male and female volleyball players: effects of playing position and competition level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattler, Tine; Hadžić, Vedran; Dervišević, Edvin; Markovic, Goran

    2015-06-01

    Vertical jump (VJ) performance is an important element for successful volleyball practice. The aims of the study were (a) to explore the overall VJ performance of elite volleyball players of both sexes, (b) to explore the differences in VJ performance among different competition levels and different playing positions, and (c) to evaluate the sex-related differences in the role of the arm swing and 3-step approach with arm swing on the jump height. We assessed the VJ capacity in 253 volleyball players (113 males and 140 females) from Slovenian first and second Volleyball Division. The height of squat jump (SJ), countermovement jump, block jump, and attack jump was tested using an Optojump system. We observed significant differences (p ≤ 0.05) in VJ height between different levels of play that were most pronounced in the SJ. Position-related differences in VJ performance were observed in male players between receivers and setters (p ≤ 0.05), whereas in females, VJ performance across different playing positions seems equal. Finally, we found that male players significantly better use the arm swing during VJ than females (p ≤ 0.05), whereas the use of eccentric part of the jump and approach before the spike to improve VJ performance seem to be equally mastered activity in both sexes. These results could assist coaches in the development of jumping performance in volleyball players. Furthermore, presented normative data for jump heights of elite male and female volleyball players could be useful in selection and profiling of young volleyball players.

  2. The Effects of Short-Term Ski Trainings on Dynamic Balance Performance and Vertical Jump in Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camliguney, Asiye Filiz

    2013-01-01

    Skiing is a sport where balance and strength are critical and which can be practiced actively especially from early years to old age. The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of a 5-day training of skiing skills on dynamic balance performance and development of vertical jump strength in adolescents. Sixteen adolescent volunteers who do…

  3. Kinetic and kinematic differences between first and second landings of a drop vertical jump task: Implications for injury risk assessments✩

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Nathaniel A.; Ford, Kevin R.; Myer, Gregory D.; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Though the first landing of drop vertical jump task is commonly used to assess biomechanical performance measures that are associated with anterior cruciate ligament injury risk in athletes, the implications of the second landing in this task have largely been ignored. We examined the first and second landings of a drop vertical jump for differences in kinetic and kinematic behaviors at the hip and knee. Methods Acohort of 239 adolescent female basketball athletes (age = 13.6 (1.6) years) completed drop vertical jump tasks from an initial height of 31 cm. A three dimensional motion capture system recorded positional data while dual force platforms recorded ground reaction forces for each trial. Findings The first landing demonstrated greater hip adduction angle, knee abduction angle, and knee abduction moment than the second landing (P-values kinetics for both the frontal and sagittal planes (P-values < 0.044). Interpretation The results have important implications for the future use of the drop vertical jump as an assessment tool for anterior cruciate ligament injury risk behaviors in adolescent female athletes. The second landing may be a more rigorous task and provides a superior tool to evaluate sagittal plane risk factors than the first landing, which may be better suited to evaluate frontal plane risk factors. PMID:23562293

  4. Comparing preseason frontal and sagittal plane plyometric programs on vertical jump height in high-school basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Jeffrey A; Cipriani, Daniel J

    2010-08-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate whether frontal plane (FP) plyometrics, which are defined as plyometrics dominated with a lateral component, would produce similar increases in vertical jump height (VJH) compared to sagittal plane (SP) Plyometrics. Thirty-two junior varsity and varsity high-school basketball players participated in 6 weeks of plyometric training. Players participated in either FP or SP plyometrics for the entire study. Vertical jump height was measured on 3 occasions: preintervention (baseline), at week 3 of preparatory training, and at week 6 of training. Descriptive statistics were calculated for VJH. A 2-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with repeated measures was used to test the difference in mean vertical jump scores using FP and SP training modalities. Results showed a significant effect over time for vertical jump (p training did not have a significant effect on VJH and significant improvement in VJH was seen in subjects participating in SP plyometrics thus reinforcing the specificity principle of training. However, coaches should implement both types of plyometrics because both training modalities can improve power and quickness among basketball players.

  5. A Comparison of Isometric Midthigh-Pull Strength, Vertical Jump, Sprint Speed, and Change-of-Direction Speed in Academy Netball Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Christopher; Comfort, Paul; Jones, Paul A; Dos'Santos, Thomas

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the relationships between maximal isometric strength, vertical jump (VJ), sprint speed, and change-of-direction speed (CoDS) in academy netball players and determine whether players who have high performance in isometric strength testing would demonstrate superior performance in VJ, sprint speed, and CoDS measures. Twenty-six young female netball players (age 16.1 ± 1.2 y, height 173.9 ± 5.7 cm, body mass 66.0 ± 7.2 kg) from a regional netball academy performed isometric midthigh pull (IMTP), squat jumps (SJs), countermovement jumps (CMJs), 10-m sprints, and CoDS (505). IMTP measures displayed moderate to strong correlations with sprint and CoDS performance (r = -.41 to -.66). The VJs, which included SJs and CMJs, demonstrated strong correlations with 10-m sprint times (r = -.60 to -.65; P strength to enhance VJ, sprint, and CoDS performance in youth netball players, with stronger athletes demonstrating superior VJ, sprint, and CoDS performances.

  6. Comparison of lower limb kinetics during vertical jumps in turnout and neutral foot positions by classical ballet dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imura, Akiko; Iino, Yoichi

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of hip external rotation (turnout) on lower limb kinetics during vertical jumps by classical ballet dancers. Vertical jumps in a turnout (TJ) and a neutral hip position (NJ) performed by 12 classical female ballet dancers were analysed through motion capture, recording of the ground reaction forces, and inverse dynamics analysis. At push-off, the lower trunk leaned forward 18.2° and 20.1° in the TJ and NJ, respectively. The dancers jumped lower in the TJ than in the NJ. The knee extensor and hip abductor torques were smaller, whereas the hip external rotator torque was larger in the TJ than in the NJ. The work done by the hip joint moments in the sagittal plane was 0.28 J/(Body mass*Height) and 0.33 J/(Body mass*Height) in the TJ and NJ, respectively. The joint work done by the lower limbs were not different between the two jumps. These differences resulted from different planes in which the lower limb flexion-extension occurred, i.e. in the sagittal or frontal plane. This would prevent the forward lean of the trunk by decreasing the hip joint work in the sagittal plane and reduce the knee extensor torque in the jump.

  7. The relationship between running speed and measures of vertical jump in professional basketball players: a field-test approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalfawi, Shaher A I; Sabbah, Ammar; Kailani, Ghazi; Tønnessen, Espen; Enoksen, Eystein

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between vertical jump measures and sprint speed over 10, 20, and 40 m in professional basketball players. Thirty-three professional basketball players aged (±SD) (27.4 ± 3.3 years), body mass (89.8 ± 11.1 kg), and stature (192 ± 8.2 cm) volunteered to participate in this study. All participants were tested on squat jump, countermovement jump, and 40-m running speed. The results show that all jump measures in absolute terms were correlated significantly to running performance over 10-, 20-, and 40-m sprint times. None of the jumping performance peak powers and reactive strength were found to have a correlation to running speed times in absolute term. Furthermore, all jump height measures relative to body mass except reactive strength had a marked and significant relationship with all sprint performance times. The results of this study indicate that while there is a strong and marked relationship between 10-, 20-, and 40-m sprint, there is also a considerable variation within the factors that contribute to performance over these distances. This may indicate that, separate training strategies could be implemented to improve running speed over these distances.

  8. Hip and knee joint loading during vertical jumping and push jerking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleather, Daniel J; Goodwin, Jon E; Bull, Anthony M J

    2013-01-01

    The internal joint contact forces experienced at the lower limb have been frequently studied in activities of daily living and rehabilitation activities. In contrast, the forces experienced during more dynamic activities are not well understood, and those studies that do exist suggest very high degrees of joint loading. In this study a biomechanical model of the right lower limb was used to calculate the internal joint forces experienced by the lower limb during vertical jumping, landing and push jerking (an explosive exercise derived from the sport of Olympic weightlifting), with a particular emphasis on the forces experienced by the knee. The knee experienced mean peak loadings of 2.4-4.6×body weight at the patellofemoral joint, 6.9-9.0×body weight at the tibiofemoral joint, 0.3-1.4×body weight anterior tibial shear and 1.0-3.1×body weight posterior tibial shear. The hip experienced a mean peak loading of 5.5-8.4×body weight and the ankle 8.9-10.0×body weight. The magnitudes of the total (resultant) joint contact forces at the patellofemoral joint, tibiofemoral joint and hip are greater than those reported in activities of daily living and less dynamic rehabilitation exercises. The information in this study is of importance for medical professionals, coaches and biomedical researchers in improving the understanding of acute and chronic injuries, understanding the performance of prosthetic implants and materials, evaluating the appropriateness of jumping and weightlifting for patient populations and informing the training programmes of healthy populations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Leg stiffness during phases of countermovement and take-off in vertical jump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struzik, Artur; Zawadzki, Jerzy

    2013-01-01

    With respect to cyclic movements such as human gait, running or hopping, leg stiffness is a little variable parameter. The aim of this study was to investigate changes in leg stiffness during the phase of countermovement and take-off when performing a single maximum counter-movement jump. Kistler force plates and a BTS SMART system for comprehensive motion analysis were employed in the study. The study covered a group of 12 athletes from university basketball teams. Leg stiffness was calculated in those parts of countermovement and take-off phases where its level is relatively constant and the relationship F(Δl) is similar to linear one. Mean total stiffness (±SD) in both legs in the countermovement phase amounted to 6.5 ± 1.5 kN/m, whereas during the take-off phase this value was 6.9 ± 1 kN/m. No statistically significant differences were found between leg stiffness during the countermovement phase and takeoff phase in the study group at the level of significance set at α = 0.05. This suggests that the leg stiffness in phase of countermovement and phase of take-off are much similar to each other, despite different function of both phases. Similar to cyclic movements, leg stiffness turned out relatively constant when performing a single vertical jump. There are also reported statistically significant correlations between body mass, body height, length of lower limbs and leg stiffness. The stiffness analysed by the authors should be understood as quasi-stiffness because the measurements of ΔF(Δl) were made during transient states where inertia and dumping forces are likely to affect the final result.

  10. Kinetic and kinematic differences between first and second landings of a drop vertical jump task: implications for injury risk assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Nathaniel A; Ford, Kevin R; Myer, Gregory D; Hewett, Timothy E

    2013-04-01

    Though the first landing of drop vertical jump task is commonly used to assess biomechanical performance measures that are associated with anterior cruciate ligament injury risk in athletes, the implications of the second landing in this task have largely been ignored. We examined the first and second landings of a drop vertical jump for differences in kinetic and kinematic behaviors at the hip and knee. A cohort of 239 adolescent female basketball athletes (age=13.6 (1.6) years) completed drop vertical jump tasks from an initial height of 31 cm. A three dimensional motion capture system recorded positional data while dual force platforms recorded ground reaction forces for each trial. The first landing demonstrated greater hip adduction angle, knee abduction angle, and knee abduction moment than the second landing (P-valuesvertical jump as an assessment tool for anterior cruciate ligament injury risk behaviors in adolescent female athletes. The second landing may be a more rigorous task and provides a superior tool to evaluate sagittal plane risk factors than the first landing, which may be better suited to evaluate frontal plane risk factors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Analysis of the vertical ground reaction forces and temporal factors in the landing phase of a countermovement jump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Daniel Rojano; Rodríguez Bíes, Elisabeth C; Berral de la Rosa, Francisco J

    2010-01-01

    In most common bilateral landings of vertical jumps, there are two peak forces (F1 and F2) in the force-time curve. The combination of these peak forces and the high frequency of jumps during sports produce a large amount of stress in the joints of the lower limbs which can be determinant of injury. The aim of this study was to find possible relationships between the jump height and F1 and F2, between F1 and F2 themselves, and between F1, F2, the time they appear (T1 and T2, respectively) and the length of the impact absorption phase (T). Thirty semi-professional football players made five countermovement jumps and the highest jump of each player was analyzed. They were instructed to perform the jumps with maximum effort and to land first with the balls of their feet and then with their heels. All the data were collected using a Kistler Quattro Jump force plate with a sample rate of 500 Hz. Quattro Jump Software, v.1.0.9.0., was used. There was neither significant correlation between T1 and F1 nor between T1 and F2. There was a significant positive correlation between flight height (FH) and F1 (r = 0.584, p = 0.01) but no significant correlation between FH and F2. A significant positive correlation between F1 and T2 (r = 0.418, p negative correlation between F2 and T2 (r = -0.406, p negative correlation between T2 and T (r = -0. 443, p impact absorption process. F1 increases with increasing T2 but F2 decreases with increasing T2. Besides, increasing T2, with the objective of decreasing F2, makes the whole impact absorption shorter and the jump landing faster. Key pointsIn the landing phase of a jump there are always sev-eral peak forces. The combination of these peaks forces and the high frequency of jumps during sports produces a large amount of stress in the joints of the lower limbs which can be determinant of injury.In the most common two-footed landings usually appear two peak forces (F1 and F2) in the force-time curve and the second one is usually related to

  12. Isokinetic Extension Strength Is Associated With Single-Leg Vertical Jump Height.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Felix; Blank, Cornelia; Dünnwald, Tobias; Gföller, Peter; Herbst, Elmar; Hoser, Christian; Fink, Christian

    2017-11-01

    Isokinetic strength testing is an important tool in the evaluation of the physical capacities of athletes as well as for decision making regarding return to sports after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in both athletes and the lay population. However, isokinetic testing is time consuming and requires special testing equipment. A single-jump test, regardless of leg dominance, may provide information regarding knee extension strength through the use of correlation analysis of jump height and peak torque of isokinetic muscle strength. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. A total of 169 patients who underwent ACL reconstruction were included in this study. Isokinetic testing was performed on the injured and noninjured legs. Additionally, a single-leg countermovement jump was performed to assess jump height using a jump accelerometer sensor. Extension strength values were used to assess the association between isokinetic muscle strength and jump height. The sample consisted of 60 female (mean age, 20.8 ± 8.3 years; mean weight, 61.7 ± 6.5 kg; mean height, 167.7 ± 5.3 cm) and 109 male (mean age, 23.2 ± 7.7 years; mean weight, 74.6 ± 10.2 kg; mean height, 179.9 ± 6.9 cm) patients. Bivariate correlation analysis showed an association ( r = 0.56, P jump height and isokinetic extension strength on the noninvolved side as well as an association ( r = 0.52, P jump height (beta = 0.49, P jump height having the strongest impact (beta = 0.49, P jump height. The study population encompassed various backgrounds, skill levels, and activity profiles, which might have affected the outcome. Even after controlling for age and sex, isokinetic strength was still moderately associated with jump height. Therefore, the jump technique and type of sport should be considered in future research.

  13. Functional knee brace use effect on peak vertical ground reaction forces during drop jump landing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rishiraj, Neetu; Taunton, Jack E; Lloyd-Smith, Robert; Regan, William; Niven, Brian; Woollard, Robert

    2012-12-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the landing strategies used by non-injured athletes while wearing functional knee braces (FKB, BR condition) during a drop jump task compared with non-injured, non-braced (NBR condition) subjects and also to ascertain whether accommodation to a FKB was possible by non-injured BR subjects. Twenty-three healthy male provincial and national basketball and field hockey athletes (age, 19.4 ± 3.0 years) were tested. Each subject was provided with a custom-fitted FKB. Five NBR testing sessions were performed over 3 days followed by five BR testing sessions also over 3 days, for a total of 17.5 h of testing per condition. Each subject performed eight trials of the drop jump task during each testing session per condition. Single-leg peak vertical ground reaction forces (PVGRF) and the time to PVGRF were recorded for each NBR and BR trail. The BR group mean PVGRF at landing was significantly lower (1,628 ± 405 N, 2.1 ± 0.5 BW versus 1,715 ± 403 N, 2.2 ± 0.5 BW, F (1,22) = 6.83, P = 0.01) compared with NBR subjects, respectively. The group mean time to PVGRF was not statistically longer during the BR condition (F (1,22) = 0.967, P = 0.3). Further, an accommodation trend was noted as percent performance difference decreased with continued FKB use. The significantly lower group mean PVGRF while using a FKB could keep traumatic forces from reaching the ACL until the active neuromuscular restraints are activated to provide protection to the knee joint ligaments. Also, accommodation to FKB is possible after approximately 14.0 h of brace use. The results of this paper will assist clinicians in providing information to their patients regarding a FKB ability to offer protection to an ACL-deficient knee or to address concerns about early muscle fatigue, energy expenditure, heart rate, and decrease in performance level. Prospective study, Level I.

  14. Traditional vs. Sport-Specific Vertical Jump Tests: Reliability, Validity, and Relationship With the Legs Strength and Sprint Performance in Adult and Teen Soccer and Basketball Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Rosell, David; Mora-Custodio, Ricardo; Franco-Márquez, Felipe; Yáñez-García, Juan M; González-Badillo, Juan J

    2017-01-01

    Rodríguez-Rosell, D, Mora-Custodio, R, Franco-Márquez, F, Yáñez-García, JM, González-Badillo, JJ. Traditional vs. sport-specific vertical jump tests: reliability, validity, and relationship with the legs strength and sprint performance in adult and teen soccer and basketball players. J Strength Cond Res 31(1): 196-206, 2017-The vertical jump is considered an essential motor skill in many team sports. Many protocols have been used to assess vertical jump ability. However, controversy regarding test selection still exists based on the reliability and specificity of the tests. The main aim of this study was to analyze the reliability and validity of 2 standardized (countermovement jump [CMJ] and Abalakov jump [AJ]) and 2 sport-specific (run-up with 2 [2-LEGS] or 1 leg [1-LEG] take-off jump) vertical jump tests, and their usefulness as predictors of sprint and strength performance for soccer (n = 127) and basketball (n = 59) players in 3 different categories (Under-15, Under-18, and Adults). Three attempts for each of the 4 jump tests were recorded. Twenty-meter sprint time and estimated 1 repetition maximum in full squat were also evaluated. All jump tests showed high intraclass correlation coefficients (0.969-0.995) and low coefficients of variation (1.54-4.82%), although 1-LEG was the jump test with the lowest absolute and relative reliability. All selected jump tests were significantly correlated (r = 0.580-0.983). Factor analysis resulted in the extraction of one principal component, which explained 82.90-95.79% of the variance of all jump tests. The 1-LEG test showed the lowest associations with sprint and strength performance. The results of this study suggest that CMJ and AJ are the most reliable tests for the estimation of explosive force in soccer and basketball players in different age categories.

  15. Effects of two plyometric training programmes of different intensity on vertical jump performance in high school athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Sankey, Sean P.; Jones, Paul A.; Bampouras, Theodoros

    2008-01-01

    Although plyometric training is a significant component of most conditioning programme designs, little research exists with regards to the design/structure of specific plyometric training interventions and the intensity involved. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of intensity\\ud manipulation on a 6-week plyometric training programmes on vertical jump performance. Eighteen healthy adolescent male subjects were randomly allocated to a periodised plyometric intensity (INCR), a cons...

  16. Humans make near-optimal adjustments of control to initial body configuration in vertical squat jumping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bobbert, M.F.; Casius, L.J.R.; Kistemaker, D.A.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated adjustments of control to initial posture in squat jumping. Eleven male subjects jumped from three initial postures: preferred initial posture (PP), a posture in which the trunk was rotated 18° more backward (BP) and a posture in which it was rotated 15° more forward (FP) than in PP.

  17. Effect of different knee starting angles on intersegmental coordination and performance in vertical jumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheller, Rodrigo G; Dal Pupo, Juliano; Ache-Dias, Jonathan; Detanico, Daniele; Padulo, Johnny; dos Santos, Saray G

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to analyze the effect of different knee starting angles on jump performance, kinetic parameters, and intersegmental coupling coordination during a squat jump (SJ) and a countermovement jump (CMJ). Twenty male volleyball and basketball players volunteered to participate in this study. The CMJ was performed with knee flexion at the end of the countermovement phase smaller than 90° (CMJ(90)), and in a preferred position (CMJ(PREF)), while the SJ was performed from a knee angle of 70° (SJ(70)), 90° (SJ(90)), 110° (SJ(110)), and in a preferred position (SJ(PREF)). The best jump performance was observed in jumps that started from a higher squat depth (CMJ(90). Analysis of continuous relative phase showed that thigh-trunk coupling was more in-phase in the jumps (CMJ and SJ) performed with a higher squat depth, while the leg-thigh coupling was more in-phase in the CMJ(>90) and SJ(PREF). Jumping from a position with knees more flexed seems to be the best strategy to achieve the best performance. Intersegmental coordination and jump performance (CMJ and SJ) were affected by different knee starting angles. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. ANALYSIS OF THE VERTICAL GROUND REACTION FORCES AND TEMPORAL FACTORS IN THE LANDING PHASE OF A COUNTERMOVEMENT JUMP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Rojano Ortega

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In most common bilateral landings of vertical jumps, there are two peak forces (F1 and F2 in the force-time curve. The combination of these peak forces and the high frequency of jumps during sports produce a large amount of stress in the joints of the lower limbs which can be determinant of injury. The aim of this study was to find possible relationships between the jump height and F1 and F2, between F1 and F2 themselves, and between F1, F2, the time they appear (T1 and T2, respectively and the length of the impact absorption phase (T. Thirty semi-professional football players made five countermovement jumps and the highest jump of each player was analyzed. They were instructed to perform the jumps with maximum effort and to land first with the balls of their feet and then with their heels. All the data were collected using a Kistler Quattro Jump force plate with a sample rate of 500 Hz. Quattro Jump Software, v.1.0.9.0., was used. There was neither significant correlation between T1 and F1 nor between T1 and F2. There was a significant positive correlation between flight height (FH and F1 (r = 0.584, p = 0.01 but no significant correlation between FH and F2. A significant positive correlation between F1 and T2 (r = 0.418, p < 0.05 and a significant negative correlation between F2 and T2 (r = -0.406, p < 0.05 were also found. There is a significant negative correlation between T2 and T (r = -0. 443, p < 0.05. T1 has a little effect in the impact absorption process. F1 increases with increasing T2 but F2 decreases with increasing T2. Besides, increasing T2, with the objective of decreasing F2, makes the whole impact absorption shorter and the jump landing faster.

  19. Comparing the Effectiveness of a Short-Term Vertical Jump vs. Weightlifting Program on Athletic Power Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Shaun Y M; Newton, Michael J; Newton, Robert U; Dempsey, Alasdair R; Fairchild, Timothy J

    2016-10-01

    Teo, SYM, Newton, MJ, Newton, RU, Dempsey, AR, and Fairchild, TJ. Comparing the effectiveness of a short-term vertical jump vs. weightlifting program on athletic power development. J Strength Cond Res 30(10): 2741-2748, 2016-Efficient training of neuromuscular power and the translation of this power to sport-specific tasks is a key objective in the preparation of athletes involved in team-based sports. The purpose of this study was to compare changes in center of mass (COM) neuromuscular power and performance of sport-specific tasks after short-term (6-week) training adopting either Olympic-style weightlifting (WL) exercises or vertical jump (VJ) exercises. Twenty-six recreationally active men (18-30 years; height: 178.7 ± 8.3 cm; mass: 78.6 ± 12.2 kg) were randomly allocated to either a WL or VJ training group and performance during the countermovement jump (CMJ), squat jump (SJ), depth jump (DJ), 20-m sprint, and the 5-0-5 agility test-assessed pre and posttraining. Despite the WL group demonstrating larger increases in peak power output during the CMJ (WL group: 10% increase, d = 0.701; VJ group: 5.78% increase, d = 0.328) and SJ (WL group: 12.73% increase, d = 0.854; VJ group: 7.27% increase, d = 0.382), no significant between-group differences were observed in any outcome measure studied. There was a significant main effect of time observed for the 3 VJs (CMJ, SJ, and DJ), 0- to 5-m and 0- to 20-m sprint times, and the 5-0-5 agility test time, which were all shown to improve after the training (all main effects of time p sports, even in athletes with limited preseason training periods.

  20. Effect of functional isometric squats on vertical jump in trained and untrained men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berning, Joseph M; Adams, Kent J; DeBeliso, Mark; Sevene-Adams, Patricia G; Harris, Chad; Stamford, Bryant A

    2010-09-01

    Functional isometrics (FIs) combine dynamic and isometric muscle actions and may hyperstimulate the nervous system leading to an enhanced postactivation potentiation (PAP) and improved subsequent performance. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of an FI squat on the countermovement vertical jump (CMVJ) in resistance trained and untrained men. Thirteen trained men (age: 22.8 +/- 3.2 years, mass: 90.0 +/- 16.3 kg, and height: 178.9 +/- 7.1 cm) and 8 untrained men (age: 28.5 +/- 5.9 years, mass: 101.5 +/- 23.0 kg, and height: 177.0 +/- 4.8 cm) participated. On separate days, subjects performed CMVJs after 2 different warm-up conditions. The warm-up conditions consisted of either 5 minutes of low-intensity cycling or 5 minutes of low-intensity cycling plus a 3-second FI squat with 150% of their 1 repetition maximum (1RM). A 2 x 3 repeated-measures analysis of variance with Bonferroni post hoc revealed that when comparing the 2 warm-up conditions in the trained subjects, a significant increase (p squat. This increase was maintained when subjects were retested at 5 minutes post (2.6 cm, + 5.5%). No significant difference in CMVJ was detected in the untrained group (p = 0.49). Results support the addition of an FI squat performed at 150% of 1RM to a low-intensity cycling warm-up to enhance PAP in resistance trained but not in untrained men as measured by CMVJ. Practically, adding functional isometrics to a warm-up scheme may significantly enhance acute, short-term power output in resistance trained men.

  1. The effects of resistance training interventions on vertical jump performance in basketball players: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperlich, Paula F; Behringer, Michael; Mester, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Vertical jump performance is one of the key factors in basketball. In order to determine the effectiveness of previously published interventions and their influencing factors we performed a meta-analysis. A computerized search was conducted using the databases PubMed (1966), Web of Science (1900), SPORTDiscus™ (1975),Medline (1966) and SportPilot (2008). Studies involving healthy male or female basketball players at any age and performance level were included. All trials had to investigate the benefits of resistance training programs on jumping performance in basketball players and provide a control group. The effect size (ES) was computed and the relationship between ESs and continuous variables was examined by meta-regressions, whereas subgroup meta-analyses and z-tests were used to assess the impact of categorical moderator variables. The meta-analysis included 14 studies with 20 subgroups and a total of 37 outcomes. A total of 399 participants were examined, N.=157 served as control and N.=242 took part in particular training interventions. The overall weighted ES of 0.78 (95% CI 0.41, 1.15) was significantly greater than zero (Ptraining effect. However, positive correlations were found for training duration (r=0.68; P=0.02). The present meta-analysis demonstrates that resistance training throughout the year, using bodyweight or external weight, significantly improves vertical jump performance in healthy basketball players. Since vertical jump improvements were independent of intervention period but dependent on the duration of each individual training session the total training amount should be based on longer training sessions.

  2. Vertical jump, anaerobic power, and shooting accuracy are not altered 6 hours after strength training in collegiate women basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolstenhulme, Mandy T; Bailey, Brooke Kerbs; Allsen, Philip E

    2004-08-01

    We measured vertical jump, anaerobic power, and shooting accuracy in 18 Division I women basketball players (age 18-22 years) 6 hours following a morning strength training routine called a lift day (LD) and on a control day in which no strength training was performed. Subjects had been strength trained for 4 weeks prior to testing. The strength training session on lift day was a full-body workout and included 7 exercises performed in 3-6 sets at loads ranging from a 5 to 12 repetition maximum (RM). There were no significant differences in jump height with 2 legs (49.5 +/- 4.8 cm and 49.0 +/- 4.8 cm, LD and control, respectively), relative mean power output over 30 seconds on a Wingate bicycle test (6.4 +/- 0.8 W.kg(-1) and 6.6 +/- 0.7 W.kg(-1), LD and control, respectively), or shooting accuracy over 60 seconds (21.5 +/- 3.8 points/min and 21.3 +/- 4.1 points/min, LD and control, respectively). These data suggest that in collegiate women basketball players, a previous bout of strength training has no negative effect on vertical jump height, anaerobic power, or shooting accuracy.

  3. Relationship Between Vertical Jump Height and Swimming Start Performance Before and After an Altitude Training Camp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ramos, Amador; Padial, Paulino; de la Fuente, Blanca; Argüelles-Cienfuegos, Javier; Bonitch-Góngora, Juan; Feriche, Belén

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed (a) to analyze the development in the squat jump height and swimming start performance after an altitude training camp, (b) to correlate the jump height and swimming start performance before and after the altitude training period, and (c) to correlate the percent change in the squat jump height with the percent change in swimming start performance. Fifteen elite male swimmers from the Spanish Junior National Team (17.1 ± 0.8 years) were tested before and after a 17-day training camp at moderate altitude. The height reached in the squat jump exercise with additional loads of 0, 25, 50, 75, and 100% of swimmers' pretest body weight and swimming start performance (time to 5, 10, and 15 m) were the dependent variables analyzed. Significant increases in the jump height (p ≤ 0.05; effect size [ES]: 0.35-0.48) and swimming start performance (p jump height before training (r = -0.56 to -0.77) and after training (r = -0.50 to -0.71). The change in the squat jump height was inversely correlated with the change in the start time at 5 m (r = -0.47), 10 m (r = -0.73), and 15 m (r = -0.62). These results suggest that altitude training can be suitable to enhance explosive performance. The correlations obtained between the squat jump height and start time in the raw and change scores confirm the relevance of having high levels of lower-body muscular power to optimize swimming start performance.

  4. Immediate effect on vertical jumping ability after the completion of trampoline jumping Efecto inmediato sobre la capacidad de salto vertical después de la realización de saltos en cama elástica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Fernández del Olmo

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available

    The purpose of this study was to value the immediate effect on the capacity of vertical jump, caused by the execution of continuous jumps in a trampoline. Nine subjects (23,4 ± 2.83 years, males and sportsmen with prior experience in the execution of countermovement jump (CMJ, they carried out a series of continuous vertical jumps on a trampoline during 60 seconds, being valued the capacity of jump in platform of contacts before and after this activity. The electromyographic (EMG activity was registered of five muscles of the right leg (gluteus, biceps femoris, vastus lateralis, gastrocnemius medialis and soleus in all the CMJ. The height of jump diminished significantly (p <0.01 after the execution of the jumps in the trampoline, being recovered in a brief period of time. Themselves differences were not observed in the EMG for the root mean squared (RMS or in the amplitude in none of the muscles, neither in the phase of impulse, neither in the 50 ms previous to start of the jump. In the neuromuscular pattern, in spite of the great variability existing inter and intraindividual, a significant delay was identified (p<0.05 in the activation of the biceps femoris immediately after the trampoline. Keeping in mind these results, seems probably that the smaller height of the vertical jump reached after the trampoline be more attributable to a modification in the temporary characteristics and sequence of activation of the muscles that to a decrease in the activation of the same.
    KEY WORDS: Vertical Jump, Neuromuscular pattern, Sprung surface, Electromyography.

     

    El propósito de este estudio fue valorar el efecto inmediato sobre la capacidad de salto vertical, provocado por la realización de saltos continuos en una cama elástica. Nueve sujetos (23,4 ± 2,83 años, varones y deportistas con experiencia previa en la ejecución del

  5. Effects of jaw clenching wearing customized mouthguards on agility, power and vertical jump in male high-standard basketball players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernat Buscà

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/Objective: Basketball players commonly use mouthguards for protecting their mouths from collisions with other players. Besides, literature reports that specific types of mouthguards may become an ergogenic device that facilitates a powerful jaw clenching, and a subsequent concurrent activation potentiation through this remote voluntary contraction of the mandible muscles. Methods: A randomized within-subjects design was used to study the effects of this mechanism on muscular performance (vertical jump, agility, bench press power and leg press power into two different conditions (mouthguard and no mouthguard in high-standard basketball players (n = 13. A mean differences analysis and a responder analysis were conducted. Results: Significant improvements were found (p < 0.05 in all vertical jump protocols using the mouthguard when compared to the no mouthguard conditions. However, no significant differences were found between the two conditions in agility and power (except in one load of bench press. Nevertheless, p-values were closer to statistical significance when analyzing the total time for the agility T-Test than when the first split time was under consideration (p = 0.111 and p = 0.944, respectively. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that the use of custom-made, bite-aligning mouthguard had an ergogenic effect on jump outcomes and inconclusive results in agility T-Test in professional basketball players. From the results obtained in the present study, the use of this type of mouthguards seems to be more justified in power actions on the court than in the strength and conditioning sessions at the gym in well-trained players. Keywords: Agility, Ergogenic effects, Jump ability, Mouthpiece, Power

  6. Contribución de los brazos en el aterrizaje del salto vertical. [Contribution of the arms in the landing of the vertical jump].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Gutiérrez-Dávila

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Se pretende comprobar el efecto que tiene la contribución de los brazos en los aterrizajes de los saltos verticales sobre las componentes de las fuerzas de reacción, goniometría articular y contribución de los segmentos corporales al desplazamiento vertical del centro de gravedad (CG. Han participado 29 deportistas donde el salto vertical constituye una habilidad básica. Todos los participantes debían dejarse caer desde una altura de 0.5 m y amortiguar la caída en dos situaciones experimentales: a sin acción de brazos y b con participación libre de los brazos. Se ha utilizado una plataforma de fuerza, operando a 500 Hz, sincronizada temporalmente a una cámara de vídeo a 240 Hz que registraba el plano sagital de los saltos. Los saltos han sido considerados como un movimiento simétrico que se desarrolla en un plano, compuesto por un modelo mecánico simplificado de ocho segmentos. Los resultados han puesto de manifiesto que la participación libre de los brazos contribuye a reducir del segundo pico máximo de fuerza, lo que se produce debido a la mayor distancia de frenado del CG y una menor reducción de la velocidad vertical del CG, lo que podría contribuir a reducir el riesgo de lesiones. La contribución segmentaria al desplazamiento vertical del CG indica que la restricción de los brazos durante los aterrizajes produce un cambio importante en el mecanismo de absorción de las fuerzas que podría incrementar la tensión en el ligamento cruzado anterior de la rodilla. Abstract The purpose was to evaluate the effect of the arms action during vertical jump landing on ground reaction forces, joint kinematic and vertical displacement of the center of gravity (CG. 29 athletes where the vertical jump constitutes a basic skill in their sport have participated in this study. All participants had to drop from a height of 0.5 m and cushion the fall in two experimental situations: a without arm action and b with free participation of the

  7. The relationship between muscle strength, anaerobic performance, agility, sprint ability and vertical jump performance in professional basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemdaroğlu, Utku

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between isokinetic knee strength, anaerobic performance, sprinting ability, agility and vertical jump performance in first division basketball players. Twelve male first division basketball players participated in this study. The mean age was 25.1 ± 1.7 yrs; mean body height 194.8 ± 5.7 cm; mean body mass 92.3± 9.8 kg; mean PBF 10.1± 5.1; and mean VO2max 50.55 ± 6.7 ml/kg/min Quadriceps and hamstrings were measured at 60° and 180°/s, anaerobic performance was evaluated using the Wingate anaerobic power test, sprint ability was determined by single sprint performance (10-30 m), jump performance was evaluated by countermovement (CMJ) and squat jump (SJ) tests and agility performance was measured using the T drill agility test. Quadriceps strength was significantly correlated with peak power at all contraction velocities. However, for mean power, significant correlation was only found between the 60° left and 180° right knee quadriceps measurements. No measure of strength was significantly related to the measurements from/results of field tests. Moreover, strong relations were found between the performance of athletes in different field tests (p< 0.05). The use of correlation analysis is the limitation of the this study.

  8. Efecto del entrenamiento combinado de pliometría y electroestimulación en salto vertical. (Effect of combined plyometric and electrostimulation training on vertical jump.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Benito Martínez

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Resumen En este estudio se han analizado los efectos del entrenamiento combinado de pliometría y electroestimulación en un entrenamiento de fuerza muscular de los miembros inferiores. El estudio incluyó tres grupos experimentales, que trabajaron ambos métodos en orden diferente y de forma simultánea, y uno de control. Participaron 78 atletas, 40 mujeres y 38 hombres, de disciplinas de velocidad (100 y 200 m lisos y 100 y 110 m vallas, con una edad de 17,94 ± 1,44 años y una masa de 58,53 ± 8,05 kg. El programa incluyó dos días / sem de entrenamiento pliométrico y dos sesiones utilizando un electroestimulador Megasonic 313-P4. Tras dos meses de entrenamiento, se midió con plataforma de contacto ORGANISER PSION 2 la altura de salto vertical y potencia del tren inferior en test de Abalakov y Drop Jump. Las mayores diferencias pre/post test (p Abstract This paper analyses the effects of combined electrostimulation and plyometric training on lower body strength training. The training programme was applied to three experimental groups and one control group. The experimental groups used both methods simultaneously but in different order. The participants were 78 sprinters (100m and 200m, and 100m and 110m hurdles, 38 male and 40 female. Their average age was 15,9 ± 1,4 years and their average weight was 58,53 ± 8,05kg. The training programme consisted in two days a week of plyometric training and two sessions with a Megasonic 313-P4 electrostimulation unit. After two months training, vertical jump height and lower body power were measured in Abalakov test and Drop Jump test with PSION ORGANISER II. The most significant pre- and post-test (p

  9. Developmental assessment and performance analysis of vertical jump in schoolchildren. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1980-0037.2012v14n4p460

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalker Roberto Walter

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1980-0037.2012v14n4p460The vertical jump involves different levels of skill complexity and offers the individual a wide range of motor experiences. This study aimed to determine which movements in the developmental sequence performed by schoolchildren are associated with age and vertical jump performance. The sample consisted of 137 elementary school children of both sexes, aged 7-10y, with height of 1.19-1.63 m, and weight of 20-60 kg. All children were selected from first- to fourth-grade classrooms of a public school of the city of Maringá, state of Pa- raná, Brazil. A Gallahue & Ozmun matrix and a jumping platform were used as research instruments. During the experiment, each child performed three jumps. Simultaneous and coordinated upward arm lift was observed in 7-year-old children. In 9-year-old children, inconsistent preparatory crouch and lack of coordination between limb movements and trunk were observed. A prevalence of upper limb motor acts was observed when considering the significant associations found between elements of the developmental sequence and vertical jump performance. In children aged 7-10y, age group and jumping performance are associated with elements of the developmental sequence of the human body as a whole, especially with regard to the upper limbs.

  10. Performance changes and relationship between vertical jump measures and actual sprint performance in elite sprinters with visual impairment throughout a Parapan American games training season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loturco, Irineu; Winckler, Ciro; Kobal, Ronaldo; Cal Abad, Cesar C.; Kitamura, Katia; Veríssimo, Amaury W.; Pereira, Lucas A.; Nakamura, Fábio Y.

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to estimate the magnitude of variability and progression in actual competitive and field vertical jump test performances in elite Paralympic sprinters with visual impairment in the year leading up to the 2015 Parapan American Games, and to investigate the relationships between loaded and unloaded vertical jumping test results and actual competitive sprinting performance. Fifteen Brazilian Paralympic sprinters with visual impairment attended seven official competitions (four national, two international and the Parapan American Games 2015) between April 2014 and August 2015, in the 100- and 200-m dash. In addition, they were tested in five different periods using loaded (mean propulsive power [MPP] in jump squat [JS] exercise) and unloaded (squat jump [SJ] height) vertical jumps within the 3 weeks immediately prior to the main competitions. The smallest important effect on performances was calculated as half of the within-athlete race-to-race (or test-to-test) variability and a multiple regression analysis was performed to predict the 100- and 200-m dash performances using the vertical jump test results. Competitive performance was enhanced during the Parapan American Games in comparison to the previous competition averages, overcoming the smallest worthwhile enhancement in both the 100- (0.9%) and 200-m dash (1.43%). In addition, The SJ and JS explained 66% of the performance variance in the competitive results. This study showed that vertical jump tests, in loaded and unloaded conditions, could be good predictors of the athletes' sprinting performance, and that during the Parapan American Games the Brazilian team reached its peak competitive performance. PMID:26594181

  11. Performance changes and relationship between vertical jump measures and actual sprint performance in elite sprinters with visual impairment throughout a Parapan American games training season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irineu eLoturco

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to estimate the magnitude of variability and progression in actual competitive and field vertical jump test performances in elite Paralympic sprinters with visual impairment in the year leading up to the 2015 Parapan American Games, and to investigate the relationships between loaded and unloaded vertical jumping test results and actual competitive sprinting performance. Fifteen Brazilian Paralympic sprinters with visual impairment attended seven official competitions (four national, two international and the Parapan American Games 2015 between April 2014 and August 2015, in the 100- and 200-m dash. In addition, they were tested in five different periods using loaded (mean propulsive power [MPP] in jump squat [JS] exercise and unloaded (squat jump [SJ] height vertical jumps within the 3 weeks immediately prior to the main competitions. The smallest important effect on performances was calculated as half of the within-athlete race-to-race (or test-to-test variability and a multiple regression analysis was performed to predict the 100- and 200-m dash performances using the vertical jump test results. Competitive performance was enhanced during the Parapan American Games in comparison to the previous competition averages, overcoming the smallest worthwhile enhancement in both the 100- (0.9% and 200-m dash (1.43%. In addition, The SJ and JS explained 66% of the performance variance in the competitive results. This study showed that vertical jump tests, in loaded and unloaded conditions, could be good predictors of the athletes’ sprinting performance, and that during the Parapan American Games the Brazilian team reached its peak competitive performance.

  12. Effects of short-term two weeks low intensity plyometrics combined with dynamic stretching training in improving vertical jump height and agility on trained basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Selvam; Pradhan, Binita

    2014-01-01

    Sport specific training in basketball players should focus on vertical jump height and agility in consistent with demands of the sport. Since plyometrics training improves vertical jump height and agility, it can be useful training strategy to improve the performance of basketball players. A convenience sample of thirty professional basketball players were recruited. Following pre-intervention assessment, interventions using plyometrics training and dynamic stretching protocol was administered on the basketball players. The outcome measures were assessed before the intervention and at the end of first and second week. Statistically significant improvements in vertical jump height (31.68 ± 11.64 to 37.57 ± 16.74; P basketball players.

  13. Relación entre la fuerza máxima en squat y acciones de salto, sprint y golpeo de balón. (Relationship among maximal strength in squat exercise, jump, sprint and kicking ball performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Arija Blázquez

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available ResumenEl objetivo del presente estudio fue analizar las posibles relaciones entre la fuerza máxima en squat y accionesexplosivas de salto, sprint y golpeo de balón. Para ello, se contó con una muestra formada por estudiantes de Ciencias del Deporte (N= 16; 19,6 ± 1,7 años de sexo masculino (con escasa experiencia en el entrenamiento de fuerza, que llevaron a cabo un test de 1RM en squat (calculándose el peso levantado, la fuerza media total y la fuerza dinámica máxima, tests de salto vertical (SJ, CMJ y CMJa, un test de sprint de 20 m (con mediciones de tiempo cada 5 m, y un test de golpeo con el pie donde se calculaba la velocidad del balón. Se encontraron coeficientes de correlación moderados (entre 0,52 y 0,67 y significativos de las medidas de fuerza máxima y las alturas de salto, mientras que los coeficientes obtenidos entre los tiempos de sprint y dichas medidas de fuerza máxima se situaron entre -0,06 y -0,32, no siendo ninguno de ellos significativo; al igual que tampoco fueron significativos los coeficientes de correlación de las medidas de fuerza máxima y la velocidad de tiro, se situaron entre 0,25 y 0,34. Por tanto, la relación entre la fuerza máxima en squat y la altura de salto en sujetos con escasa experiencia en el entrenamiento de fuerza resultó moderada, mientras que no parece existir relación con el tiempo de sprint y la velocidad de tiro.AbstractThe purpose of the present study was to analyze the possible relationships between maximal strength insquat exercise and jump, sprint and kicking ball actions. Sixteen males sport science students (19,6 ± 1,7years, with little experience in strength training, performed a 1RM in squat exercise (from which liftedweight, the total average- and maximal-dynamic strength was assessed, vertical jump (SJ, CMJ and CMJa, a 20 m sprint test (with time measurement every 5 m, and a kicking ball test where the velocity of the ball was calculated. Moderate (0,52 - 0,67 and

  14. Effect of Resistance Tube Exercises on Kicking Accuracy, Vertical Jump and 40-Yard Technical Test in Competitive Football Players – An Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tirumala Alekhya

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Kicking, jumping and agility are important skills in football. These activities require adequate lower limb strength, which can be enhanced with resistance training. The objective of the study was to evaluate the effect of resistance tube exercises on kicking accuracy, vertical jump performance and 40-yard technical test results in competitive football players. Methods. The study involved 23 competitive football players (11 males, 12 females aged from 18-20 years recruited from three different universities in Belgaum, Karnataka, India. Back heel kick accuracy, vertical jump height and 40-yard technical test time were evaluated before and after a 2-week resistance tube exercise program. Results. Significant improvements in post-intervention kicking accuracy were found when males and females were treated as a single group (p = 0.01. Vertical jump height also showed a highly significant post-intervention improvement in the males and for the combined group of males and females (p = 0.001. The 40-yard technical test values significantly improved in the females and in the combined results for males and females (p = 0.001. Conclusions. The two-week resistance tube exercise program was found to have an effect on kicking accuracy, vertical jump height and 40-yard technical test performance in competitive football players. Resistance tube exercises can thus be included as a component of a regular strength training program for such athletes.

  15. A case study for integrated STEM outreach in an urban setting using a do-it-yourself vertical jump measurement platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drazan, John F; Danielsen, Heather; Vercelletto, Matthew; Loya, Amy; Davis, James; Eglash, Ron

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and deploy a low cost vertical jump platform using readily available materials for Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) education and outreach in the inner city. The platform was used to measure the jumping ability of participants to introduce students to the collection and analysis of scientific data in an engaging, accessible manner. This system was designed and fabricated by a student team of engineers as part of a socially informed engineering and design class. The vertical jump platform has been utilized in 10 classroom lectures in physics and biology. The system was also used in an after school program in which high school volunteers prepared a basketball based STEM outreach program, and at a community outreach events with over 100 participants. At present, the same group of high school students are now building their own set of vertical jump platform under the mentorship of engineering undergraduates. The construction and usage of the vertical jump platform provides an accessible introduction to the STEM fields within the urban community.

  16. The Effects of Aquatic Plyometric Training on Repeated Jumps, Drop Jumps and Muscle Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurado-Lavanant, A; Alvero-Cruz, J R; Pareja-Blanco, F; Melero-Romero, C; Rodríguez-Rosell, D; Fernandez-Garcia, J C

    2015-09-22

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of land- vs. aquatic based plyometric training programs on the drop jump, repeated jump performance and muscle damage. Sixty-five male students were randomly assigned to one of 3 groups: aquatic plyometric training group (APT), plyometric training group (PT) and control group (CG). Both experimental groups trained twice a week for 10 weeks performing the same number of sets and total jumps. The following variables were measured prior to, halfway through and after the training programs: creatine kinase (CK) concentration, maximal height during a drop jump from the height of 30 (DJ30) and 50 cm (DJ50), and mean height during a repeated vertical jump test (RJ). The training program resulted in a significant increase (Pplyometric training, PT produced greater gains on reactive jumps performance than APT. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. Single-leg lateral, horizontal, and vertical jump assessment: reliability, interrelationships, and ability to predict sprint and change-of-direction performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meylan, Cesar; McMaster, Travis; Cronin, John; Mohammad, Nur Ikhwan; Rogers, Cailyn; Deklerk, Melissa

    2009-07-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine the reliability of unilateral vertical, horizontal, and lateral countermovement jump assessments, the interrelationship between these tests, and their usefulness as predictors of sprint (10 m) and change-of-direction (COD) performance for 80 men and women physical education students. Jump performance was assessed on a contact mat and sprint, and COD performances were assessed using timing lights. With regard to the reliability statistics, the largest coefficient of variation (CV) was observed for the vertical jump (CV = 6.7-7.2%) of both genders, whereas the sprint and COD assessments had smallest variability (CV = 0.8 to 2.8%). All intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were greater than 0.85, except for the men's COD assessment with the alternate leg. The shared variance between the single-leg vertical, horizontal, and lateral jumps for men and women was less than 50%, indicating that the jumps are relatively independent of one another and represent different leg strength/power qualities. The ability of the jumps to predict sprint and COD performance was limited (R2 < 43%). It would seem that the ability to change direction with 1 leg is relatively independent of a COD with the other leg, especially in the women (R < 30%) of this study. However, if 1 jump assessment were selected to predict sprint and COD performance in a test battery, the single-leg horizontal countermovement jump would seem the logical choice, given the results of this study. Many of the findings in this study have interesting diagnostic and training implications for the strength and conditioning coach.

  18. Cold-water immersion alters muscle recruitment and balance of basketball players during vertical jump landing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo, Christiane de Souza Guerino; Vicente, Rafael Chagas; Cesário, Mauricio Donini; Guirro, Rinaldo Roberto de Jesus

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of cold-water immersion on the electromyographic (EMG) response of the lower limb and balance during unipodal jump landing. The evaluation comprised 40 individuals (20 basketball players and 20 non-athletes). The EMG response in the lateral gastrocnemius, tibialis anterior, fibular longus, rectus femoris, hamstring and gluteus medius; amplitude and mean speed of the centre of pressure, flight time and ground reaction force (GRF) were analysed. All volunteers remained for 20 min with their ankle immersed in cold-water, and were re-evaluated immediately post and after 10, 20 and 30 min of reheating. The Shapiro-Wilk test, Friedman test and Dunn's post test (P lower for the athletes. Lower jump flight time and GRF, greater amplitude and mean speed of centre of pressure were predominant in the athletes. Cold-water immersion decreased the EMG activity of the lower limb, flight time and GRF and increased the amplitude and mean speed of centre of pressure.

  19. Timing differences in the generation of ground reaction forces between the initial and secondary landing phases of the drop vertical jump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Nathaniel A.; Ford, Kevin R.; Myer, Gregory D.; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Rapid impulse loads imparted on the lower extremity from ground contact when landing from a jump may contribute to ACL injury prevalence in female athletes. The drop jump and drop landing tasks enacted in the first and second landings of drop vertical jumps, respectively, have been shown to elicit separate neuromechanical responses. We examined the first and second landings of a drop vertical jump for differences in landing phase duration, time to peak force, and rate of force development. Methods 239 adolescent female basketball players completed drop vertical jumps from an initial height of 31 cm. In-ground force platforms and a three dimensional motion capture system recorded force and positional data for each trial. Findings Between the first and second landing, rate of force development experienced no change (P > 0.62), landing phase duration decreased (P = 0.01), and time to peak ground reaction force increased (P 0.12). Interpretation The current results have important implications for the future assessment of ACL injury risk behaviors. Rate of force development remained unchanged between first and second landings from equivalent fall height, while time to peak reaction force increased during the second landing. Neither factor was dependent on the total time duration of landing phase, which decreased during the second landing. Shorter time to peak force may increase ligament strain and better represent the abrupt joint loading that is associated with ACL injury risk. PMID:23899938

  20. Timing differences in the generation of ground reaction forces between the initial and secondary landing phases of the drop vertical jump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Nathaniel A; Ford, Kevin R; Myer, Gregory D; Hewett, Timothy E

    2013-08-01

    Rapid impulse loads imparted on the lower extremity from ground contact when landing from a jump may contribute to ACL injury prevalence in female athletes. The drop jump and drop landing tasks enacted in the first and second landings of drop vertical jumps, respectively, have been shown to elicit separate neuromechanical responses. We examined the first and second landings of a drop vertical jump for differences in landing phase duration, time to peak force, and rate of force development. 239 adolescent female basketball players completed drop vertical jumps from an initial height of 31cm. In-ground force platforms and a three dimensional motion capture system recorded force and positional data for each trial. Between the first and second landing, rate of force development experienced no change (P>0.62), landing phase duration decreased (P=0.01), and time to peak ground reaction force increased (P0.12). The current results have important implications for the future assessment of ACL injury risk behaviors. Rate of force development remained unchanged between first and second landings from equivalent fall height, while time to peak reaction force increased during the second landing. Neither factor was dependent on the total time duration of landing phase, which decreased during the second landing. Shorter time to peak force may increase ligament strain and better represent the abrupt joint loading that is associated with ACL injury risk. © 2013.

  1. Validade de um novo tapete de contato para avaliação do salto vertical Validity of a new contact mat system for evaluating vertical jump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noé Gomes Borges Júnior

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo teve como objetivo verificar a validade da medida de tempo de vôo e de contato de um tapete de contato, SaltoBras (SB, comparando-o com um osciloscópio (OS e uma plataforma de forças (PF. Para isso o SB foi colocado sobre uma plataforma de forças. Primeiramente, quatro homens e duas mulheres realizaram quinze saltos sobre o SB e o tempo de vôo foi obtido. Depois, os mesmos realizaram seis saltos consecutivos e os tempos de contato foram obtidos. O SB apresentou-se valido em relação ao OS, mas subestimou o tempo de vôo (~0.30 % e de contato (~1.01 % quando comparado a PF. Apesar das diferenças, o erro encontrado entre SB e PF apresentou-se sistemático e duas equações de predição foram definidas e inseridas no software para a correção dos erros. Os resultados sugerem que SB é um instrumento válido para a avaliação do salto vertical.The purpose of this study was to verify the validity of the flight and ground contact time measurement of a contact mat, SaltoBras (SB, comparing it to an oscilloscope (OS and to a force plate (FP. For that, the SB was placed upon a FP. At first, four male and two female performed 15 jumps on the SB and the flight times were obtained. After, they performed six consecutive jumps and the ground contact times were obtained. SB software was valid in comparison with the OS, but underestimated the flight (~0.30 % and ground contact (~1.01 % time measurements when comparing it to the FP. Despite the differences, the error found between SB and FP was systematic, and two prediction equations were defined and added to the software for correction. The results suggest that SB is a valid instrument for the evaluation of vertical jump.

  2. Conditioning exercises in ski jumping: biomechanical relationship of squat jumps, imitation jumps, and hill jumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzetti, Silvio; Ammann, Fabian; Windmüller, Sabrina; Häberle, Ramona; Müller, Sören; Gross, Micah; Plüss, Michael; Plüss, Stefan; Schödler, Berni; Hübner, Klaus

    2017-11-22

    As hill jumps are very time-consuming, ski jumping athletes often perform various imitation jumps during training. The performed jumps should be similar to hill jumps, but a direct comparison of the kinetic and kinematic parameters has not been performed yet. Therefore, this study aimed to correlate 11 common parameters during hill jumps (Oberstdorf Germany), squat jumps (wearing indoor shoes), and various imitation jumps (rolling 4°, rolling flat, static; jumping equipment or indoor shoes) on a custom-built instrumented vehicle with a catch by the coach. During the performed jumps, force and video data of the take-off of 10 athletes were measured. The imitation and squat jumps were then ranked. The main difference between the hill jumps and the imitation and squat jumps is the higher maximal force loading rate during the hill jumps. Imitation jumps performed on a rolling platform, on flat ground were the most similar to hill jumps in terms of the force-time, and leg joint kinematic properties. Thus, non-hill jumps with a technical focus should be performed from a rolling platform with a flat inrun with normal indoor shoes or jumping equipment, and high normal force loading rates should be the main focus of imitation training.

  3. Effects of In-Season Explosive Strength Training on Maximal Leg Strength, Jumping, Sprinting, and Intermittent Aerobic Performance in Male Handball Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermassi, Souhail; Chelly, Mohamed Souhaiel; Fieseler, Georg; Bartels, Thomas; Schulze, Stephan; Delank, Karl-Stefan; Shephard, Roy J; Schwesig, René

    2017-09-01

    Background  Team handball is an intense ball sport with specific requirements on technical skills, tactical understanding, and physical performance. The ability of handball players to develop explosive efforts (e. g. sprinting, jumping, changing direction) is crucial to success. Objective  The purpose of this pilot study was to examine the effects of an in-season high-intensity strength training program on the physical performance of elite handball players. Materials and methods  Twenty-two handball players (a single national-level Tunisian team) were randomly assigned to a control group (CG; n = 10) or a training group (TG; n = 12). At the beginning of the pilot study, all subjects performed a battery of motor tests: one repetition maximum (1-RM) half-squat test, a repeated sprint test [6 × (2 × 15 m) shuttle sprints], squat jumps, counter movement jumps (CMJ), and the Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test level 1. The TG additionally performed a maximal leg strength program twice a week for 10 weeks immediately before engaging in regular handball training. Each strength training session included half-squat exercises to strengthen the lower limbs (80 - 95 % of 1-RM, 1 - 3 repetitions, 3 - 6 sets, 3 - 4 min rest between sets). The control group underwent no additional strength training. The motor test battery was repeated at the end of the study interventions. Results  In the TG, 3 parameters (maximal strength of lower limb: η² = 0.74; CMJ: η² = 0.70, and RSA best time: η² = 0.25) showed significant improvements, with large effect sizes (e. g. CMJ: d = 3.77). A reduction in performance for these same 3 parameters was observed in the CG (d = -0.24). Conclusions  The results support our hypothesis that additional strength training twice a week enhances the maximal strength of the lower limbs and jumping or repeated sprinting performance. There was no evidence of shuttle sprints ahead of regular

  4. Differences in vertical jumping and mae-geri kicking velocity between international and national level karateka

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    Carlos Balsalobre-Fernández

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Lower limb explosive strength and mae-geri kicking velocity are fundamental in karate competition; although it is unclear whether these variables could differentiate the high-level athletes. The objective of this research is to analyze the differences in the mae-geri kicking velocity and the counter-movement jump (CMJ between a group of international top level karateka and another group of national-level karateka.Methods: Thirteen international-level karateka and eleven national-level karateka participated in the study. After a standard warm-up, CMJ height (in cm and mae-geri kicking velocity (in m/s was measured using an IR-platform and a high-speed camera, respectively.Results: Proceeding with MANCOVA to analyze the differences between groups controlling the effect of age, the results show that the international-level karateka demonstrated significantly higher levels of CMJ than national-level competitors (+22.1%, F = 9.47, p = 0.006, η2 = 0.311. There were no significant differences between groups in the mae-geri kicking velocity (+5,7%, F=0.80; p=0.38; η2=0.03.Conclusion: Our data shows, first, the importance of CMJ assessment as a tool to detect talent in karate and, second, that to achieve international-level in karate it may be important to increase CMJ levels to values ​​similar to those offered here.

  5. Effect of Plyometric Training on Vertical Jump Performance in Female Athletes: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojanović, Emilija; Ristić, Vladimir; McMaster, Daniel Travis; Milanović, Zoran

    2017-05-01

    Plyometric training is an effective method to prevent knee injuries in female athletes; however, the effects of plyometric training on jump performance in female athletes is unclear. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to determine the effectiveness of plyometric training on vertical jump (VJ) performance of amateur, collegiate and elite female athletes. Six electronic databases were searched (PubMed, MEDLINE, ERIC, Google Scholar, SCIndex and ScienceDirect). The included studies were coded for the following criteria: training status, training modality and type of outcome measures. The methodological quality of each study was assessed using the physiotherapy evidence database (PEDro) scale. The effects of plyometric training on VJ performance were based on the following standardised pre-post testing effect size (ES) thresholds: trivial (4.00). A total of 16 studies met the inclusion criteria. The meta-analysis revealed that plyometric training had a most likely moderate effect on countermovement jump (CMJ) height performance (ES = 1.09; 95 % confidence interval [CI] 0.57-1.61; I 2  = 75.60 %). Plyometric training interventions of less than 10 weeks in duration had a most likely small effect on CMJ height performance (ES = 0.58; 95 % CI 0.25-0.91). In contrast, plyometric training durations greater than 10 weeks had a most likely large effect on CMJ height (ES = 1.87; 95 % CI 0.73-3.01). The effect of plyometric training on concentric-only squat jump (SJ) height was likely small (ES = 0.44; 95 % CI -0.09 to 0.97). Similar effects were observed on SJ height after 6 weeks of plyometric training in amateur (ES = 0.35) and young (ES = 0.49) athletes, respectively. The effect of plyometric training on CMJ height with the arm swing was likely large (ES = 1.31; 95 % CI -0.04 to 2.65). The largest plyometric training effects were observed in drop jump (DJ) height performance (ES = 3.59; 95 % CI -3.04 to 10.23). Most likely

  6. The skeletal trauma resulting from a fatal B.A.S.E jump: A case study showing the impact of landing feet-first under extreme vertical deceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowbotham, Samantha K; Blau, Soren; Hislop-Jambrich, Jacqueline

    2018-05-01

    The term 'B.A.S.E jump' refers to jumping from a building, antenna, span (i.e., bridge) or earth (i.e., cliff) structure, and parachuting to the ground. There are numerous hazards associated with B.A.S.E jumps which often result in injury and, occasionally, fatality. This case report details the skeletal trauma resulting from a fatal B.A.S.E jump in Australia. In this case, the jumper impacted the ground from a fall of 439m in a feet-first landing position, as a result of a partially deployed parachute, under extreme vertical deceleration. Skeletal trauma was analyzed using full-body post mortem computed tomography (PMCT) and contextual information related to the circumstances of the jump as reported by the Coroner. Trauma to 61 skeletal elements indicates the primary impact was to the feet (i.e., feet-first landing), followed by an anterior impact to the body (i.e., fall forwards). Details of the individual fracture morphologies indicate the various forces and biomechanics involved in this fall event. This case presents the types of fractures that result from a B.A.S.E jump, and highlights the value of using PMCT and coronial data as tools to augment skeletal trauma interpretations. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Coordination and Symmetry Patterns During the Drop Vertical Jump in People With Chronic Ankle Instability and Lateral Ankle Sprain Copers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Cailbhe; Bleakley, Chris; Hertel, Jay; Caulfield, Brian; Ryan, John; Sweeney, Kevin; Patterson, Matthew R; Delahunt, Eamonn

    2016-08-01

    The drop vertical jump (DVJ) task has previously been used to identify movement patterns associated with a number of injury types. However, no current research exists evaluating people with chronic ankle instability (CAI) compared with people coping with lateral ankle sprain (LAS) (referred to as "LAS copers") during this task. The aim of this study was to identify the coping movement and motor control patterns of LAS copers in comparison with individuals with CAI during the DVJ task. This was a case-control study. Seventy individuals were recruited at convenience within 2-weeks of sustaining a first-time acute LAS injury. One year following recruitment, these individuals were stratified into 2 groups: 28 with CAI and 42 LAS copers. They attended the testing laboratory to complete a DVJ task. Three-dimensional kinematic and sagittal-plane kinetic profiles were plotted for the lower extremity joints of both limbs for the drop jump phase (phase 1) and drop landing phase (phase 2) of the DVJ. The rate of impact modulation relative to body weight during both phases of the DVJ also was determined. Compared with LAS copers, participants with CAI displayed significant increases in hip flexion on their "involved" limb during phase 1 of the DVJ (23° vs 18°) and bilaterally during phase 2 (15° vs 10°). These movement patterns coincided with altered moment-of-force patterns at the hip on the "uninvolved" limb. It is unknown whether these movement and motor control patterns preceded or occurred as a result of the initial LAS injury. Participants with CAI displayed hip-centered changes in movement and motor control patterns during a DVJ task compared with LAS copers. The findings of this study may give an indication of the coping mechanism underlying outcome following initial LAS injury. © 2016 American Physical Therapy Association.

  8. Effects on muscle strength, maximal jump height, flexibility and postural sway after soccer and Zumba exercise among female hospital employees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barene, Svein; Holtermann, Andreas; Oseland, Harald

    2016-01-01

    -63 were cluster-randomised to a soccer group, a Zumba group or a control group. Training was conducted outside working hours as two to three 1-h weekly sessions the first 3 months and once a week the last 6 months. Tests were conducted at baseline, after 3 and 9 months. The soccer group improved maximal...... lean mass (0.4 kg; P

  9. Effects of an 8-Week Body-Weight Neuromuscular Training on Dynamic Balance and Vertical Jump Performances in Elite Junior Skiing Athletes: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Jacopo A; La Torre, Antonio; Banfi, Giuseppe; Bonato, Matteo

    2018-04-01

    Vitale, JA, La Torre, A, Banfi, G, and Bonato, M. Effects of an 8-week body-weight neuromuscular training on dynamic balance and vertical jump performances in elite junior skiing athletes: a randomized controlled trial. J Strength Cond Res 32(4): 911-920, 2018-The aim of the present randomized controlled trial was to evaluate the effects of an 8-week neuromuscular training program focused on core stability, plyometric, and body-weight strengthening exercises on dynamic postural control and vertical jump performance in elite junior skiers. Twenty-four Italian elite junior male skiers were recruited and randomized to either an experimental group (EG), performing neuromuscular warm-up exercises, (EG; n = 12; age 18 ± 1 years; body mass 66 ± 21 kg; height 1.70 ± 0.1 m) or a control group (CG) involved in a standard warm-up (CG; n = 12; age 18 ± 1 years; body mass 62 ± 14 kg; height 1.73 ± 0.1 m). lower quarter Y-Balance Test (YBT), countermovement jump (CMJ), and drop jump (DJ) at baseline (PRE) and at the end (POST) of the experimental procedures were performed. No significant differences between EG and CG were observed at baseline. Results showed that EG achieved positive effects from PRE to POST measures in the anterior, posteromedial, posterolateral directions, and composite score of YBT for both lower limbs, whereas no significant differences were detected for CG. Furthermore, 2-way analysis of variance with Bonferroni's multiple comparisons test did not reveal any significant differences in CMJ and DJ for both EG and CG. The inclusion of an 8-week neuromuscular warm-up program led to positive effects in dynamic balance ability but not in vertical jump performance in elite junior skiers. Neuromuscular training may be an effective intervention to specifically increase lower limb joint awareness and postural control.

  10. Effects of Strength Training Combined with Specific Plyometric exercises on body composition, vertical jump height and lower limb strength development in elite male handball players: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carvalho Alberto

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to identify the effects of a strength training program combined with specific plyometric exercises on body composition, vertical jump (VJ height and strength development of lower limbs in elite male handball players. A 12-week program with combined strength and specific plyometric exercises was carried out for 7 weeks. Twelve elite male handball players (age: 21.6 ± 1.73 competing in the Portuguese Major League participated in the study. Besides the anthropometric measurements, several standardized jump tests were applied to assess VJ performance together with the strength development of the lower limbs in an isokinetic setting. No significant changes were found in body circumferences and diameters. Body fat content and fat mass decreased by 16.4 and 15.7% respectively, while lean body mass increased by 2.1%. Despite small significance, there was in fact an increase in squat jump (SJ, counter movement jump (CMJ and 40 consecutive jumps after the training period (6.1, 3.8 and 6.8%, respectively. After the applied protocol, peak torque increased in lower limb extension and flexion in the majority of the movements assessed at 90°s-1. Consequently, it is possible to conclude that combining general strength-training with plyometric exercises can not only increase lower limb strength and improve VJ performance but also reduce body fat content.

  11. Effects of Strength Training Combined with Specific Plyometric exercises on body composition, vertical jump height and lower limb strength development in elite male handball players: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Alberto; Mourão, Paulo; Abade, Eduardo

    2014-06-28

    The purpose of the present study was to identify the effects of a strength training program combined with specific plyometric exercises on body composition, vertical jump (VJ) height and strength development of lower limbs in elite male handball players. A 12-week program with combined strength and specific plyometric exercises was carried out for 7 weeks. Twelve elite male handball players (age: 21.6 ± 1.73) competing in the Portuguese Major League participated in the study. Besides the anthropometric measurements, several standardized jump tests were applied to assess VJ performance together with the strength development of the lower limbs in an isokinetic setting. No significant changes were found in body circumferences and diameters. Body fat content and fat mass decreased by 16.4 and 15.7% respectively, while lean body mass increased by 2.1%. Despite small significance, there was in fact an increase in squat jump (SJ), counter movement jump (CMJ) and 40 consecutive jumps after the training period (6.1, 3.8 and 6.8%, respectively). After the applied protocol, peak torque increased in lower limb extension and flexion in the majority of the movements assessed at 90ºs-1. Consequently, it is possible to conclude that combining general strength-training with plyometric exercises can not only increase lower limb strength and improve VJ performance but also reduce body fat content.

  12. Influence of closed skill and open skill warm-ups on the performance of speed, change of direction speed, vertical jump, and reactive agility in team sport athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbett, Tim J; Sheppard, Jeremy M; Pritchard-Peschek, Kellie R; Leveritt, Michael D; Aldred, Murry J

    2008-09-01

    In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of two different dynamic warm-up conditions, one that was inclusive of open skills (i.e., reactive movements) and one that included only preplanned dynamic activities (i.e., closed skills) on the performance of speed, change of direction speed, vertical jump, and reactive agility in team sport athletes. Fourteen (six male, eight female) junior (mean +/- SD age, 16.3 +/- 0.7 year) basketball players participated in this study. Testing was conducted on 2 separate days using a within-subjects cross-over study design. Each athlete performed a standardized 7-minute warm-up consisting of general dynamic movements and stretching. After the general warm-up, athletes were randomly allocated into one of two groups that performed a dynamic 15-minute warm-up consisting entirely of open or closed skills. Each of the warm-up conditions consisted of five activities of 3 minute duration. At the completion of the warm-up protocol, players completed assessments of reactive agility, speed (5-, 10-, and 20-m sprints), change of direction speed (T-test), and vertical jump. No significant differences (p > 0.05) were detected among warm-up conditions for speed, vertical jump, change of direction speed, and reactive agility performances. The results of this study demonstrate that either open skill or closed skill warm-ups can be used effectively for team sport athletes without compromising performance on open skill and closed skill tasks.

  13. Sport specificity background affects the principal component structure of vertical squat jump performance of young adult female athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vassilios Panoutsakopoulos

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: Various different profiles of FPD and TPD were detected due to different sporting background in young female athletes. Since TF superiority in SQJ was relied on the larger power production and a greater FPD, female indoor team sport athletes are suggested to execute jumping exercises adopting the jumping strategies utilized by TF.

  14. Effects on muscle strength, maximal jump height, flexibility and postural sway after soccer and Zumba exercise among female hospital employees: a 9-month randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barene, Svein; Holtermann, Andreas; Oseland, Harald; Brekke, Ole-Lars; Krustrup, Peter

    2016-10-01

    This 9-month randomised controlled workplace physical activity trial investigated the effects of soccer and Zumba exercise, respectively, on muscle strength, maximal jump height, sit-and-reach flexibility and postural sway among female workers. A total of 107 female hospital employees aged 25-63 were cluster-randomised to a soccer group, a Zumba group or a control group. Training was conducted outside working hours as two to three 1-h weekly sessions the first 3 months and once a week the last 6 months. Tests were conducted at baseline, after 3 and 9 months. The soccer group improved maximal neck extension strength both after 3 (1.2 kg; P flexibility. The present study indicates that workplace-initiated soccer and Zumba exercise may be beneficial for improvement of the neck and trunk strength, which may have preventive effects with regard to future perceived muscle pain in the respective body regions. Furthermore, the Zumba group revealed positive effects on lower limb lean mass and postural sway compared to the control group.

  15. The effects of a high dosage of creatine and caffeine supplementation on the lean body mass composition of rats submitted to vertical jumping training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carneiro-Junior Miguel A

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The influences of creatine and caffeine supplementation associated with power exercise on lean body mass (LBM composition are not clear. The purpose of this research was to determine whether supplementation with high doses of creatine and caffeine, either solely or combined, affects the LBM composition of rats submitted to vertical jumping training. Methods Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into 8 groups: Sedentary (S or Exercised (E [placebo (Pl, creatine (Cr, caffeine (Caf or creatine plus caffeine (CrCaf]. The supplemented groups received creatine [load: 0.430 g/kg of body weight (BW for 7 days; and maintenance: 0.143 g/kg of BW for 35 days], caffeine (15 mg/kg of BW for 42 days or creatine plus caffeine. The exercised groups underwent a vertical jump training regime (load: 20 - 50% of BW, 4 sets of 10 jumps interspersed with 1 min resting intervals, 5 days/wk, for 6 weeks. LBM composition was evaluated by portions of water, protein and fat in the rat carcass. Data were submitted to ANOVA followed by the Tukey post hoc test and Student's t test. Results Exercised animals presented a lower carcass weight (10.9%; P = 0.01, as compared to sedentary animals. However, no effect of supplementation was observed on carcass weight (P > 0.05. There were no significant differences among the groups (P > 0.05 for percentage of water in the carcass. The percentage of fat in the group SCr was higher than in the groups SCaf and ECr (P Conclusions High combined doses of creatine and caffeine does not affect the LBM composition of either sedentary or exercised rats, however, caffeine supplementation alone reduces the percentage of fat. Vertical jumping training increases the percentages of water and protein and reduces the fat percentage in rats.

  16. Improvement of Repeated-Sprint Ability and Horizontal-Jumping Performance in Elite Young Basketball Players With Low-Volume Repeated-Maximal-Power Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalo-Skok, Oliver; Tous-Fajardo, Julio; Arjol-Serrano, José Luis; Suarez-Arrones, Luis; Casajús, José Antonio; Mendez-Villanueva, Alberto

    2016-05-01

    To examine the effects of a low-volume repeated-power-ability (RPA) training program on repeated-sprint and change-of- direction (COD) ability and functional jumping performance. Twenty-two male elite young basketball players (age 16.2 ± 1.2 y, height 190.0 ± 10.0 cm, body mass 82.9 ± 10.1 kg) were randomly assigned either to an RPA-training group (n = 11) or a control group (n = 11). RPA training consisted of leg-press exercise, twice a week for 6 wk, of 1 or 2 blocks of 5 sets × 5 repetitions with 20 s of passive recovery between sets and 3 min between blocks with the load that maximized power output. Before and after training, performance was assessed by a repeated-sprint-ability (RSA) test, a repeated-COD-ability test, a hop for distance, and a drop jump followed by tests of a double unilateral hop with the right and left legs. Within-group and between-groups differences showed substantial improvements in slowest (RSAs) and mean time (RSAm) on RSA; best, slowest and mean time on repeated-COD ability; and unilateral right and left hop in the RPA group in comparison with control. While best time on RSA showed no improvement in any group, there was a large relationship (r = .68, 90% CI .43;.84) between the relative decrement in RSAm and RSAs, suggesting better sprint maintenance with RPA training. The relative improvements in best and mean repeated-COD ability were very largely correlated (r = .89, 90% CI .77;.94). Six weeks of lowvolume (4-14 min/wk) RPA training improved several physical-fitness tests in basketball players.

  17. Jump Training in Youth Soccer Players: Effects of Haltere Type Handheld Loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas, F; Ramirez-Campillo, R; Diaz, D; Abad-Colil, F; Martinez-Salazar, C; Caniuqueo, A; Cañas-Jamet, R; Loturco, I; Nakamura, F Y; McKenzie, C; Gonzalez-Rivera, J; Sanchez-Sanchez, J; Izquierdo, M

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of a jump training program, with or without haltere type handheld loading, on maximal intensity exercise performance. Youth soccer players (12.1±2.2 y) were assigned to either a jump training group (JG, n=21), a jump training group plus haltere type handheld loading (LJG, n=21), or a control group following only soccer training (CG, n=21). Athletes were evaluated for maximal-intensity performance measures before and after 6 weeks of training, during an in-season training period. The CG achieved a significant change in maximal kicking velocity only (ES=0.11-0.20). Both jump training groups improved in right leg (ES=0.28-0.45) and left leg horizontal countermovement jump with arms (ES=0.32-0.47), horizontal countermovement jump with arms (ES=0.28-0.37), vertical countermovement jump with arms (ES=0.26), 20-cm drop jump reactive strength index (ES=0.20-0.37), and maximal kicking velocity (ES=0.27-0.34). Nevertheless, compared to the CG, only the LJG exhibited greater improvements in all performance tests. Therefore, haltere type handheld loading further enhances performance adaptations during jump training in youth soccer players. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Influence of inverse dynamics methods on the calculation of inter-segmental moments in vertical jumping and weightlifting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleather Daniel J

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A vast number of biomechanical studies have employed inverse dynamics methods to calculate inter-segmental moments during movement. Although all inverse dynamics methods are rooted in classical mechanics and thus theoretically the same, there exist a number of distinct computational methods. Recent research has demonstrated a key influence of the dynamics computation of the inverse dynamics method on the calculated moments, despite the theoretical equivalence of the methods. The purpose of this study was therefore to explore the influence of the choice of inverse dynamics on the calculation of inter-segmental moments. Methods An inverse dynamics analysis was performed to analyse vertical jumping and weightlifting movements using two distinct methods. The first method was the traditional inverse dynamics approach, in this study characterized as the 3 step method, where inter-segmental moments were calculated in the local coordinate system of each segment, thus requiring multiple coordinate system transformations. The second method (the 1 step method was the recently proposed approach based on wrench notation that allows all calculations to be performed in the global coordinate system. In order to best compare the effect of the inverse dynamics computation a number of the key assumptions and methods were harmonized, in particular unit quaternions were used to parameterize rotation in both methods in order to standardize the kinematics. Results Mean peak inter-segmental moments calculated by the two methods were found to agree to 2 decimal places in all cases and were not significantly different (p > 0.05. Equally the normalized dispersions of the two methods were small. Conclusions In contrast to previously documented research the difference between the two methods was found to be negligible. This study demonstrates that the 1 and 3 step method are computationally equivalent and can thus be used interchangeably in

  19. KINEMATIC ANALYSIS OF KNEE VALGUS DURING DROP VERTICAL JUMP AND FORWARD STEP-UP IN YOUNG BASKETBALL PLAYERS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz, Gabriel Andrade; Maia, Marianna de Freitas; Farias, Déborah; Santana, Haroldo; Miranda, Humberto; Lima, Vicente; Herrington, Lee

    2016-04-01

    Lower limb asymmetry between dominant and nondominant limbs is often associated with injuries. However, there is a lack of evidence about frontal plane projection angle (FPPA) of the knee joint (knee valgus) during drop vertical jump (DVJ) and forward step-up tasks (FSUP) in young basketball players. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to assess the FPPA (i.e., dynamic knee valgus) via 2D video analysis during DVJ and FSUP tasks in the dominant and nondominant limbs of young male basketball players. Twenty seven young male basketball players (age 14.5 ± 1.3 y, height 161.1 ± 4.1 cm, weight 64.2 ± 10.2 kg) participated in this study. The participants were asked to perform a bilateral DVJ and unilateral FSUP tasks. Kinematic analysis of FPPA was completed via a two-dimensional (2D) examination in order to evaluate the knee valgus alignment during the beginning of the concentric phase of each task. Knee valgus alignment was computed considering the angle between the line formed between the markers at the anterior superior iliac spine and middle of the tibiofemoral joint and the line formed from the markers on the middle of the tibiofemoral joint to the middle of the ankle mortise. Paired t-tests were used to evaluate differences in tasks. Standard error of measurement (SEM) was calculated to establish random error scores. There was no difference in knee valgus angle during the DVJ task between dominant (20.2 ± 4.4 º) and nondominant legs (20 ± 4.1 º; p = 0.067). However, a significant difference was noted during FSUP between the non-dominant limb (18.7 ± 3.4 º) when compared to the dominant (21.7 ± 3.5 º; p = 0.001) limb. Two dimensional kinematic analysis of knee FPPA may help coaches and other professionals to detect asymmetries between dominant and nondominant limbs, and to develop training programs with the goal of reducing overall lower extremity injury risk. 2b.

  20. MAXIMALLY STAR-FORMING GALACTIC DISKS. II. VERTICALLY RESOLVED HYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF STARBURST REGULATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shetty, Rahul [Zentrum fuer Astronomie der Universitaet Heidelberg, Institut fuer Theoretische Astrophysik, Albert-Ueberle-Str. 2, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Ostriker, Eve C., E-mail: R.Shetty@.uni-heidelberg.de, E-mail: ostriker@astro.umd.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2012-07-20

    We explore the self-regulation of star formation using a large suite of high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations, focusing on molecule-dominated regions (galactic centers and [U]LIRGS) where feedback from star formation drives highly supersonic turbulence. In equilibrium, the total midplane pressure, dominated by turbulence, must balance the vertical weight of the interstellar medium. Under self-regulation, the momentum flux injected by feedback evolves until it matches the vertical weight. We test this flux balance in simulations spanning a wide range of parameters, including surface density {Sigma}, momentum injected per stellar mass formed (p{sub *}/m{sub *}), and angular velocity. The simulations are two-dimensional radial-vertical slices, and include both self-gravity and an external potential that helps to confine gas to the disk midplane. After the simulations reach a steady state in all relevant quantities, including the star formation rate {Sigma}{sub SFR}, there is remarkably good agreement between the vertical weight, the turbulent pressure, and the momentum injection rate from supernovae. Gas velocity dispersions and disk thicknesses increase with p{sub *}/m{sub *}. The efficiency of star formation per free-fall time at the midplane density, {epsilon}{sub ff}(n{sub 0}), is insensitive to the local conditions and to the star formation prescription in very dense gas. We measure {epsilon}{sub ff}(n{sub 0}) {approx} 0.004-0.01, consistent with low and approximately constant efficiencies inferred from observations. For {Sigma} in (100-1000) M{sub Sun} pc{sup -2}, we find {Sigma}{sub SFR} in (0.1-4) M{sub Sun} kpc{sup -2} yr{sup -1}, generally following a {Sigma}{sub SFR} {proportional_to} {Sigma}{sup 2} relationship. The measured relationships agree very well with vertical equilibrium and with turbulent energy replenishment by feedback within a vertical crossing time. These results, along with the observed {Sigma}-{Sigma}{sub SFR} relation in high

  1. Comparison 2 methods of resistance training (conventional and bodypump) on the agility and vertical jump in male basketball players 16-18 years

    OpenAIRE

    SALIMI, Hamid; BARATI, Amir; ADIBPOUR, Nahid

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare an bodypump and resistance training on agility and vertical jump on male basketball players 16-18years. Therefore 36 teenage basketball players voluntarily chosen and randomly divided into three groups including: bodypump group (n=12,age 17 ± 0.5 year, height 179 ± 0.05 cm and a weight 69.26± 12.22 kg) and resistance group (n=12, age rangen 17± 0.6 years, range height 178 ± 0.09 cm and weight 68.55 ± 14.25 kg) and control group (n=12, age 17 ± 0.5 years, h...

  2. Drop Jumping as a Training Method for Jumping Ability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bobbert, Maarten F.

    1990-01-01

    Vertical jumping ability is of importance for good performance in sports such as basketball and volleyball. Coaches are in need of exercises that consume only little time and still help to improve their players’ jumping ability, without involving a high risk of injury. Drop jumping is assumed to

  3. The effects of a high dosage of creatine and caffeine supplementation on the lean body mass composition of rats submitted to vertical jumping training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Frederico Sc; Costa, Neuza Mb; Ferreira, Susana A; Carneiro-Junior, Miguel A; Natali, Antônio J

    2011-03-01

    The influences of creatine and caffeine supplementation associated with power exercise on lean body mass (LBM) composition are not clear. The purpose of this research was to determine whether supplementation with high doses of creatine and caffeine, either solely or combined, affects the LBM composition of rats submitted to vertical jumping training. Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into 8 groups: Sedentary (S) or Exercised (E) [placebo (Pl), creatine (Cr), caffeine (Caf) or creatine plus caffeine (CrCaf)]. The supplemented groups received creatine [load: 0.430 g/kg of body weight (BW) for 7 days; and maintenance: 0.143 g/kg of BW for 35 days], caffeine (15 mg/kg of BW for 42 days) or creatine plus caffeine. The exercised groups underwent a vertical jump training regime (load: 20 - 50% of BW, 4 sets of 10 jumps interspersed with 1 min resting intervals), 5 days/wk, for 6 weeks. LBM composition was evaluated by portions of water, protein and fat in the rat carcass. Data were submitted to ANOVA followed by the Tukey post hoc test and Student's t test. Exercised animals presented a lower carcass weight (10.9%; P = 0.01), as compared to sedentary animals. However, no effect of supplementation was observed on carcass weight (P > 0.05). There were no significant differences among the groups (P > 0.05) for percentage of water in the carcass. The percentage of fat in the group SCr was higher than in the groups SCaf and ECr (P < 0.05). A higher percentage of protein was observed in the groups EPl and ECaf when compared to the groups SPl and SCaf (P < 0.001). The percentage of fat in the carcass decreased (P < 0.001), while those of water and protein increased (P < 0.05) in exercised animals, compared to sedentary animals. Caffeine groups presented reduced percentage of fat when compared to creatine supplemented groups (P < 0.05). High combined doses of creatine and caffeine does not affect the LBM composition of either sedentary or exercised rats, however, caffeine

  4. Relationship between knee kinetic outcome measures in vertical counter movement jumps and self-reported function in ACL reconstructed subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brekke, Anders Falk

    2014-01-01

    Relationship between knee kinetic outcome measures in counter movement jumps and self-reported function in ACL reconstructed subjects Brekke AF1,2, Nielsen DB2, Holsgaard-Larsen A2 1School of physiotherapy, University College Zealand, Denmark 2Orthopaedic Research Unit, Department of Orthopaedics...... and Traumatology, Odense University Hospital, Institute of Clinical Research, University of Southern Denmark Introduction: Altered loading pattern of the medial aspect of the knee has been associated with the development of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are associated...... with early-onset OA with associated pain, functional limitations, and decreased quality of life. However, specific knee loading pattern of the medial aspect has not been investigated during different jump-tasks in ACL-reconstructed patients. The purpose was to investigate potential kinetic differences...

  5. Respostas neuromusculares dos membros inferiores durante protocolo intermitente de saltos verticais em voleibolistas Neuromuscular responses of the lower limb muscles during vertical jumping in volleyball athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Tosini Felicissimo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi analisar o desempenho e as respostas eletromiográficas dos músculos Reto Femoral, Bíceps Femoral e Gastrocnêmio Medial durante protocolo de saltos verticais. Participaram 13 voleibolistas do sexo feminino (15,6 ± 0,9 anos. Inicialmente foi realizado um protocolo de potência máxima (três saltos máximos, seguido do protocolo de resistência de saltos (ciclos de três saltos máximos em aproximadamente 10 segundos (s - um salto a cada três s, com recuperação de 15 s. O tempo de duração do protocolo de resistência foi de 20 minutos. Foi usada a técnica do salto com contramovimento sem ajuda dos braços, sobre tapete de contato. Para tratamento dos dados os saltos foram divididos em quatro períodos com 12 ciclos cada um. Os resultados mostraram queda na altura dos saltos de aproximadamente 1,3cm entre os períodos de 1 a 4, sendo que, essa queda foi mais significativa nos 3º e 4º períodos em comparação ao 1º e 2º. Entretanto, com relação às variáveis RMS e FM, não ocorreu alteração nas respostas eletromiográficas entre músculos e períodos. Concluiu-se, assim, que a fadiga pode depender de variáveis psicofisiológicas, ao nível do SNC, que também influem no desempenho.The purpose of this study was to analyze the performance and the electromyographic responses of the muscles Rectus Femoris, Biceps Femoris and Gastrocnemius Medialis during vertical jumping protocol. Participated 13 female volleyball players (15,6 ± 0,9 years. Initially was performed a protocol of maximum power (three maximum jumps, followed by resistance jumps protocol (cycles of three maximum jumps in about 10 seconds (s - one jump every three s, with recovery of 15s. The duration of resistance protocol was 20 minutes. Technique used was countermovement jump without the aid of arms on a mat of contact. The data collected during the jumps were divided into four periods containing 12 cycles each. The results showed a

  6. EFFECTS OF WARM-UP ON VERTICAL JUMP PERFORMANCE AND MUSCLE ELECTRICAL ACTIVITY USING HALF-SQUATS AT LOW AND MODERATE INTENSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Sotiropoulos

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a specific warm-up using half-squats at low and moderate intensity on vertical jump performance and electromyographic activity of the thigh muscles. The subjects were 26 men who were divided into a low intensity group (LIG; n = 13 and a moderate intensity group (MIG; n = 13. The LIG performed a specific warm-up protocol that included the explosive execution of half-squats with loads 25 and 35% of the one repetition maximum (1RM and the MIG with loads 45 and 65% of the 1RM. The two groups performed a countermovement jump (CMJ before and three minutes after the specific warm-up protocols. During the concentric phase of the CMJ a linear encoder connected to an A/D converter interfaced to a PC with a software for data acquisition and analysis allowed the calculation of average mechanical power. The electromyographic (EMG activity of the vastus lateralis (VL, vastus medialis (VM and rectus femoris (RF were recorded during the concentric phase of the jumps. The average quadriceps (Qc activity (mean value of the VL, VM and RF was also calculated. A two way ANOVA (protocols X time with repeated measures on the second factor was used to analyze the data. Following the specific warm-up procedure both groups improved (p < 0.05 CMJ performance and mechanical power by 3.5% and 6.3%, respectively, with no differences observed between the two groups. EMG activity of the Qc and VL increased (p < 0.05 for both groups by 5.9% and 8.5%, respectively. It is concluded that the use of a specific warm-up that includes half-squats, performed explosively with low to moderate intensity, improves CMJ performance. This may be due to increased muscle activation as evaluated by the surface EMG

  7. STUDIES ON THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SOME MORPHOLOGICAL CHARACTERS AND JUMPING PARAMETERS OVER A VERTICAL FENCE IN SPORT HORSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FLAVIA BOCHIŞ

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Looking for the form-function principle, the present study proposed to analyze the morphological traits of the equine athletes and the jumping over obstacles parameters. The intension was to focuses some guide lines in selecting the future potential champion. Indeed, this is only a basic item, not a guarantee, in a future career, where a lot of aspects take part. Even that, if a horse had a good rider and an excellent trainer, if it is not described by some basic biometrical and biomechanical reports (Duel, 1987, Lewczuk, 2002, it is impossible to reach very good results. In most of cases, when horses refused some exercising elements, we think about temperament, but in the same time, the aspect could be generated by a pain, or effectively by them incapacity due to an equilibrium fault (Lagarde, 2005.

  8. Efeito do Uso do Estabilizador Active Ankle System® na Altura do Salto Vertical em Jogadores de Voleibol Effect of the Use of the Active Ankle System Stabilizer in The Vertical Jump Height in Volleyball Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Túlio Saldanha dos Anjos

    2009-10-01

    performance or not. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of the Active Ankle System® (AAS DAB on the vertical jump height in volleyball players. METHODS: The sample consisted of 14 female athletes aged between 14 and 18 years. The sample was told to jump, simulating the sportive gesture of attack and block (with and without DAB, over contact plates plugged to a notebook computer that calculated the height of the jump using a software. Previously, a pilot study was performed to establish the Intraclass Correlation Coefficient at the four testing conditions (n=4, and the outcomes were: attack with DAB 0.95; attack without DAB 0.76; block with DAB 0.92 and block without DAB 0.89. The height data from each sort of vertical jump with or without DAB were matched using paired Student's t test samples. RESULTS: To a significance level of α=0.05, no significant difference was found between the attack jumps with DAB (0.41 + 0.073m and without DAB (0.41 + 0.086m, p=0.517. In addition, no significant difference was found between the block jumps with DAB (0.31 + 0.048m and without DAB (0.32 + 0.050m, p=0.06. CONCLUSION: Therefore, the results of the present study point out that the use of the AAS DAB does not influence volleyball players' vertical jumping performance.

  9. Relationships Between Countermovement Jump Ground Reaction Forces and Jump Height, Reactive Strength Index, and Jump Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Leland A; Harry, John R; Mercer, John A

    2018-01-01

    Barker, LA, Harry, JR, and Mercer, JA. Relationships between countermovement jump ground reaction forces and jump height, reactive strength index, and jump time. J Strength Cond Res 32(1): 248-254, 2018-The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between ground reaction force (GRF) variables to jump height, jump time, and the reactive strength index (RSI). Twenty-six, Division-I, male, soccer players performed 3 maximum effort countermovement jumps (CMJs) on a dual-force platform system that measured 3-dimensional kinetic data. The trial producing peak jump height was used for analysis. Vertical GRF (Fz) variables were divided into unloading, eccentric, amortization, and concentric phases and correlated with jump height, RSI (RSI = jump height/jump time), and jump time (from start to takeoff). Significant correlations were observed between jump height and RSI, concentric kinetic energy, peak power, concentric work, and concentric displacement. Significant correlations were observed between RSI and jump time, peak power, unload Fz, eccentric work, eccentric rate of force development (RFD), amortization Fz, amortization time, second Fz peak, average concentric Fz, and concentric displacement. Significant correlations were observed between jump time and unload Fz, eccentric work, eccentric RFD, amortization Fz, amortization time, average concentric Fz, and concentric work. In conclusion, jump height correlated with variables derived from the concentric phase only (work, power, and displacement), whereas Fz variables from the unloading, eccentric, amortization, and concentric phases correlated highly with RSI and jump time. These observations demonstrate the importance of countermovement Fz characteristics for time-sensitive CMJ performance measures. Researchers and practitioners should include RSI and jump time with jump height to improve their assessment of jump performance.

  10. The trampoline aftereffect: the motor and sensory modulations associated with jumping on an elastic surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez, Gonzalo; Aguado, Xavier; Alegre, Luis M; Lago, Angel; Acero, Rafael M; Fernández-del-Olmo, Miguel

    2010-08-01

    After repeated jumps over an elastic surface (e.g. a trampoline), subjects usually report a strange sensation when they jump again overground (e.g. they feel unable to jump because their body feels heavy). However, the motor and sensory effects of exposure to an elastic surface are unknown. In the present study, we examined the motor and perceptual effects of repeated jumps over two different surfaces (stiff and elastic), measuring how this affected maximal countermovement vertical jump (CMJ). Fourteen subjects participated in two counterbalanced sessions, 1 week apart. Each experimental session consisted of a series of maximal CMJs over a force plate before and after 1 min of light jumping on an elastic or stiff surface. We measured actual motor performance (height jump and leg stiffness during CMJ) and how that related to perceptual experience (jump height estimation and subjective sensation). After repeated jumps on an elastic surface, the first CMJ showed a significant increase in leg stiffness (P < or = 0.01), decrease in jump height (P < or = 0.01) increase in perceptual misestimation (P < or = 0.05) and abnormal subjective sensation (P < or = 0.001). These changes were not observed after repeated jumps on a rigid surface. In a complementary experiment, continuous surface transitions show that the effects persist across cycles, and the effects over the leg stiffness and subjective experience are minimized (P < or = 0.05). We propose that these aftereffects could be the consequence of an erroneous internal model resulting from the high vertical forces produced by the elastic surface.

  11. Validity and Reliability of a Virtual Reality Game in Evaluating the Projected Frontal Plane Knee Angle When Landing From a Drop Vertical Jump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Kathryn; Idris, Aula; Pham, Thu-An; Porte, John; Wiggins, Mark; Kavakli, Manolya

    2017-12-18

    To determine the validity and reliability of the peak frontal plane knee angle evaluated by a virtual reality (VR) netball game when landing from a drop vertical jump (DVJ). Laboratory Methods: Forty participants performed 3 DVJs evaluated by 3-dimensional (3D) motion analysis and 3 DVJs evaluated by the VR game. Limits of agreement for the peak projected frontal plane knee angle and peak knee abduction were determined. Participants were given a consensus category of "Above threshold" or "Below threshold" based on a pre-specified threshold angle of 9˚ during landing. Classification agreement was determined using kappa coefficient and accuracy was determined using specificity and sensitivity. Ten participants returned 1-week later to determine intra-rater reliability, standard error of the measure and typical error. The mean difference in detected frontal plane knee angle was 3.39˚ (1.03˚, 5.74˚). Limits of agreement were -10.27˚ (-14.36˚, -6.19˚) to 17.05˚ (12.97˚, 21.14˚). Substantial agreement, specificity and sensitivity were observed for the threshold classification (ĸ = 0.66, [0.42, 0.88] specificity= 0.96 [0.78, 1.0], sensitivity= 0.75 [0.43, 0.95]). The game exhibited acceptable reliability over time (ICC (3,1) = 0.844) and error was approximately 2˚. The VR game reliably evaluated a projected frontal plane knee angle. While the knee angle detected by the VR game is strongly related peak knee abduction, the accuracy of detecting the exact angle was limited. A threshold approach may be a more accurate approach for gaming technology to evaluate frontal plane knee angles when landing from a jump.

  12. Effects of warm-up on vertical jump performance and muscle electrical activity using half-squats at low and moderate intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotiropoulos, Konstantinos; Smilios, Ilias; Christou, Marios; Barzouka, Karolina; Spaias, Angelos; Douda, Helen; Tokmakidis, Savvas P

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a specific warm-up using half-squats at low and moderate intensity on vertical jump performance and electromyographic activity of the thigh muscles. The subjects were 26 men who were divided into a low intensity group (LIG; n = 13) and a moderate intensity group (MIG; n = 13). The LIG performed a specific warm-up protocol that included the explosive execution of half-squats with loads 25 and 35% of the one repetition maximum (1RM) and the MIG with loads 45 and 65% of the 1RM. The two groups performed a countermovement jump (CMJ) before and three minutes after the specific warm-up protocols. During the concentric phase of the CMJ a linear encoder connected to an A/D converter interfaced to a PC with a software for data acquisition and analysis allowed the calculation of average mechanical power. The electromyographic (EMG) activity of the vastus lateralis (VL), vastus medialis (VM) and rectus femoris (RF) were recorded during the concentric phase of the jumps. The average quadriceps (Qc) activity (mean value of the VL, VM and RF) was also calculated. A two way ANOVA (protocols X time) with repeated measures on the second factor was used to analyze the data. Following the specific warm-up procedure both groups improved (p ≤ 0.05) CMJ performance and mechanical power by 3.5% and 6.3%, respectively, with no differences observed between the two groups. EMG activity of the Qc and VL increased (p ≤ 0.05) for both groups by 5.9% and 8.5%, respectively. It is concluded that the use of a specific warm-up that includes half-squats, performed explosively with low to moderate intensity, improves CMJ performance. This may be due to increased muscle activation as evaluated by the surface EMG. Key pointsThe inclusion of two sets of explosively performed half squats with low to moderate loads in the warm up procedure elicited an acute performance en-hancement.The performance was enhanced regardless of the load used in

  13. Neuromuscular taping application in counter movement jump: biomechanical insight in a group of healthy basketball players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Marcolin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Kinesiologic elastic tape is widely used for both clinical and sport applications although its efficacy in enhancing agonistic performance is still controversial. Aim of the study was to verify in a group of healthy basketball players whether a neuromuscular taping application (NMT on ankle and knee joints could affect the kinematic and the kinetic parameters of the jump, either by enhancing or inhibiting the functional performance. Fourteen healthy male basketball players without any ongoing pathologies at upper limbs, lower limbs and trunk volunteered in the study. They randomly performed 2 sets of 5 counter movement jumps (CMJ with and without application of Kinesiologic tape. The best 3 jumps of each set were considered for the analysis. The Kinematics parameters analyzed were: knees maximal flexion and ankles maximal dorsiflexion during the push off phase, jump height and take off velocity. Vertical ground reaction force and maximal power expressed in the push off phase of the jump were also investigated. The NMT application in both knees and ankles showed no statistically significant differences in the kinematic and kinetic parameters and did not interfere with the CMJ performance. Bilateral NMT application in the group of healthy male basketball players did not change kinematics and kinetics jump parameters, thus suggesting that its routine use should have no negative effect on functional performance. Similarly, the combined application of the tape on both knees and ankles did not affect in either way jump performance.

  14. Neuromuscular Taping Application in Counter Movement Jump: Biomechanical Insight in a Group of Healthy Basketball Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcolin, Giuseppe; Buriani, Alessandro; Giacomelli, Andrea; Blow, David; Grigoletto, Davide; Gesi, Marco

    2017-06-24

    Kinesiologic elastic tape is widely used for both clinical and sport applications although its efficacy in enhancing agonistic performance is still controversial. Aim of the study was to verify in a group of healthy basketball players whether a neuromuscular taping application (NMT) on ankle and knee joints could affect the kinematic and the kinetic parameters of the jump, either by enhancing or inhibiting the functional performance. Fourteen healthy male basketball players without any ongoing pathologies at upper limbs, lower limbs and trunk volunteered in the study. They randomly performed 2 sets of 5 counter movement jumps (CMJ) with and without application of Kinesiologic tape. The best 3 jumps of each set were considered for the analysis. The Kinematics parameters analyzed were: knees maximal flexion and ankles maximal dorsiflexion during the push off phase, jump height and take off velocity. Vertical ground reaction force and maximal power expressed in the push off phase of the jump were also investigated. The NMT application in both knees and ankles showed no statistically significant differences in the kinematic and kinetic parameters and did not interfere with the CMJ performance. Bilateral NMT application in the group of healthy male basketball players did not change kinematics and kinetics jump parameters, thus suggesting that its routine use should have no negative effect on functional performance. Similarly, the combined application of the tape on both knees and ankles did not affect in either way jump performance.

  15. Evaluation of different jumping tests in defining position-specific and performance-level differences in high level basketball players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miran Pehar

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The importance of jumping ability in basketball is well known, but there is an evident lack of studies that have examined different jumping testing protocols in basketball players at advanced levels. The aim of this study was to assess the applicability of different tests of jumping capacity in identifying differences between (i playing position and (ii competitive levels of professional players. Participants were 110 male professional basketball players (height: 194.92±8.09 cm; body mass: 89.33±10.91 kg; 21.58±3.92 years of age; Guards, 49; Forwards, 22; Centres, 39 who competed in the first (n = 58 and second division (n = 52. The variables included anthropometrics and jumping test performance. Jumping performances were evaluated by the standing broad jump (SBJ, countermovement jump (CMJ, reactive strength index (RSI, repeated reactive strength ability (RRSA and four running vertical jumps: maximal jump with (i take-off from the dominant leg and (ii non-dominant leg, lay-up shot jump with take-off from the (iii dominant leg and (iv non-dominant leg. First-division players were taller (ES: 0.76, 95%CI: 0.35-1.16, moderate differences, heavier (0.69, 0.29-1.10, had higher maximal reach height (0.67, 0.26-1.07, moderate differences, and had lower body fat % (-0.87, -1.27-0.45, moderate differences than second-division players. The playing positions differed significantly in three of four running jump achievements, RSI and RRSA, with Centres being least successful. The first-division players were superior to second-division players in SBJ (0.63, 0.23-1.03; 0.87, 0.26-1.43; 0.76, 0.11-1.63, all moderate differences, for total sample, Guards, and Forwards, respectively. Running vertical jumps and repeated jumping capacity can be used as valid measures of position-specific jumping ability in basketball. The differences between playing levels in vertical jumping achievement can be observed by assessing vertical jump scores together with differences

  16. Evaluation of different jumping tests in defining position-specific and performance-level differences in high level basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pehar, Miran; Sekulic, Damir; Sisic, Nedim; Spasic, Miodrag; Uljevic, Ognjen; Krolo, Ante; Milanovic, Zoran; Sattler, Tine

    2017-09-01

    The importance of jumping ability in basketball is well known, but there is an evident lack of studies that have examined different jumping testing protocols in basketball players at advanced levels. The aim of this study was to assess the applicability of different tests of jumping capacity in identifying differences between (i) playing position and (ii) competitive levels of professional players. Participants were 110 male professional basketball players (height: 194.92±8.09 cm; body mass: 89.33±10.91 kg; 21.58±3.92 years of age; Guards, 49; Forwards, 22; Centres, 39) who competed in the first (n = 58) and second division (n = 52). The variables included anthropometrics and jumping test performance. Jumping performances were evaluated by the standing broad jump (SBJ), countermovement jump (CMJ), reactive strength index (RSI), repeated reactive strength ability (RRSA) and four running vertical jumps: maximal jump with (i) take-off from the dominant leg and (ii) non-dominant leg, lay-up shot jump with take-off from the (iii) dominant leg and (iv) non-dominant leg. First-division players were taller (ES: 0.76, 95%CI: 0.35-1.16, moderate differences), heavier (0.69, 0.29-1.10), had higher maximal reach height (0.67, 0.26-1.07, moderate differences), and had lower body fat % (-0.87, -1.27-0.45, moderate differences) than second-division players. The playing positions differed significantly in three of four running jump achievements, RSI and RRSA, with Centres being least successful. The first-division players were superior to second-division players in SBJ (0.63, 0.23-1.03; 0.87, 0.26-1.43; 0.76, 0.11-1.63, all moderate differences, for total sample, Guards, and Forwards, respectively). Running vertical jumps and repeated jumping capacity can be used as valid measures of position-specific jumping ability in basketball. The differences between playing levels in vertical jumping achievement can be observed by assessing vertical jump scores together with differences

  17. The Vertical Drop Jump Is a Poor Screening Test for ACL Injuries in Female Elite Soccer and Handball Players: A Prospective Cohort Study of 710 Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krosshaug, Tron; Steffen, Kathrin; Kristianslund, Eirik; Nilstad, Agnethe; Mok, Kam-Ming; Myklebust, Grethe; Andersen, Thor Einar; Holme, Ingar; Engebretsen, Lars; Bahr, Roald

    2016-04-01

    The evidence linking knee kinematics and kinetics during a vertical drop jump (VDJ) to anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury risk is restricted to a single small sample. Still, the VDJ test continues to be advocated for clinical screening purposes. To test whether 5 selected kinematic and kinetic variables were associated with future ACL injuries in a large cohort of Norwegian female elite soccer and handball players. Furthermore, we wanted to assess whether the VDJ test can be recommended as a screening test to identify players with increased risk. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. Elite female soccer and handball players participated in preseason screening tests from 2007 through 2014. The tests included marker-based 3-dimensional motion analysis of a drop-jump landing. We followed a predefined statistical protocol in which we included the following candidate risk factors in 5 separate logistic regression analyses, with new ACL injury as the outcome: (1) knee valgus angle at initial contact, (2) peak knee abduction moment, (3) peak knee flexion angle, (4) peak vertical ground-reaction force, and (5) medial knee displacement. A total of 782 players were tested (age, 21 ± 4 years; height, 170 ± 7 cm; body mass, 67 ± 8 kg), of which 710 were included in the analyses. We registered 42 new noncontact ACL injuries, including 12 in previously ACL-injured players. Previous ACL injury (relative risk, 3.8; 95% CI, 2.1-7.1) and medial knee displacement (odds ratio, 1.40; 95% CI, 1.12-1.74 per 1-SD change) were associated with increased risk for injury. However, among the 643 players without previous injury, we found no association with medial knee displacement. A receiver operating characteristic curve analysis of medial knee displacement showed an area under the curve of 0.6, indicating a poor-to-failed combined sensitivity and specificity of the test, even when including previously injured players. Of the 5 risk factors considered, medial knee displacement was the

  18. Influence of sports flooring and shoes on impact forces and performance during jump tasks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Malisoux

    Full Text Available We aim to determine the influence of sports floorings and sports shoes on impact mechanics and performance during standardised jump tasks. Twenty-one male volunteers performed ankle jumps (four consecutive maximal bounds with very dynamic ankle movements and multi-jumps (two consecutive maximal counter-movement jumps on force plates using minimalist and cushioned shoes under 5 sports flooring (SF conditions. The shock absorption properties of the SF, defined as the proportion of peak impact force absorbed by the tested flooring when compared with a concrete hard surface, were: SF0 = 0% (no flooring, SF1 = 19%, SF2 = 26%, SF3 = 37% and SF4 = 45%. Shoe and flooring effects were compared using 2x5 repeated-measures ANOVA with post-hoc Bonferroni-corrected comparisons. A significant interaction between SF and shoe conditions was found for VILR only (p = 0.003. In minimalist shoes, SF influenced Vertical Instantaneous Loading Rate (VILR during ankle jumps (p = 0.006 and multi-jumps (p<0.001, in accordance with shock absorption properties. However, in cushioned shoes, SF influenced VILR during ankle jumps only (p<0.001. Contact Time was the only additional variable affected by SF, but only during multi-jumps in minimalist shoes (p = 0.037. Cushioned shoes induced lower VILR (p<0.001 and lower Contact Time (p≤0.002 during ankle jumps and multi-jumps compared to minimalist shoes. During ankle jumps, cushioned shoes induced greater Peak Vertical Ground Reaction Force (PVGRF, p = 0.002, greater Vertical Average Loading Rate (p<0.001, and lower eccentric (p = 0.008 and concentric (p = 0.004 work. During multi-jumps, PVGRF was lower (p<0.001 and jump height was higher (p<0.001 in cushioned compared to minimalist shoes. In conclusion, cushioning influenced impact forces during standardised jump tasks, whether it was provided by the shoes or the sports flooring. VILR is the variable that was the most affected.

  19. Plasma concentration of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) after 100 drop to vertical jumps and after a 1200-km bicycle race.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behringer, M; Kilian, Y; Montag, J; Geesmann, B; Mester, J

    2016-01-01

    High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) has recently been reported to be involved in proinflammation and tissue repair. Therefore, we hypothesized that HMGB1 is released into the bloodstream after eccentric exercises or prolonged endurance activities. Blood samples from 11 participants that performed 100 drop to vertical jumps (DVJ) and from 10 participants that took part in the 1200-km 'Paris-Brest-Paris' bicycle race (PBP) were tested for HMGB1 and creatine kinase (CK) levels. CK increased after both DVJ (pre: 150.6 ± 81.5 U/L; post: 188.8 ± 95.5 U/L 8 h: 790.5 ± 346.4 U/L) and PBP (pre: 81.3 ± 36.4 U/L; post: 725.2 ± 229.5 U/L; 12 h: 535.8 ± 188.6 U/L), indicating membrane damage. However, HMGB1 plasma levels remained below the detection limit (78 pg/mL) of the applied enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit for all blood samples analysed. That is, neither high intensity eccentric exercises (DVJ) nor prolonged endurance events (PBP) seemed to affect HMGB1 levels in blood at selected time points.

  20. The Effect of an Isometric Hip Muscle Strength Training Protocol on Valgus Angle During a Drop Vertical Jump in Competitive Female Volleyball Players

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    Kaitlin M. Jackson

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hip muscle weakness is associated with higher peak knee valgus angles (VA during drop vertical jumps (DVJ and linked to ACL injury risk. Objective: To determine if isometric strengthening (IST of the hip extensor, abductor, and external rotator muscle groups would reduce VA exhibited during a DVJ. Methodology:  Fourteen female volleyball players (7 training (TG, 7 control (CG, VA≥9˚ during DVJ participated. Pre- and post-test gluteal, quadriceps and hamstring strength were measured with a digital force gauge. Three-dimensional kinematics were collected during 15 DVJ trials. TG participated in a 6-week IST program that targeted the hip extensor, abductor, and external rotator muscle groups. Two-way mixed ANOVAs compared mean differences of VA and strength. Single-participant analyses examined if athlete-specific adaptations went undetected in the analyses of aggregated data. Results: TG hip extension, abduction, and knee flexion strength increased, respectively, by 20.5%, 27.5% and 23.5% (P<0.05. No group-level changes in VA were detected. Unilateral VA decreased for 5 TG participants, and bilateral VA decreased in 2 TG participants. Conclusions: IST increased isometric hip muscle strength, but its effect on VA is inconclusive based on group-level analyses. Using single-participant designs, future studies should assess IST and/or dynamic resistance/neuromuscular training in a larger sample to determine its effect on ACL injury risk factors.

  1. Prediction of Kinematic and Kinetic Performance in a Drop Vertical Jump with Individual Anthropometric Factors in Adolescent Female Athletes: Implications for Cadaveric Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Nathaniel A.; Myer, Gregory D.; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2014-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament injuries are common, expensive to repair, and often debilitate athletic careers. Robotic manipulators have evaluated knee ligament biomechanics in cadaveric specimens, but face limitations such as accounting for variation in bony geometry between specimens that may influence dynamic motion pathways. This study examined individual anthropometric measures for significant linear relationships with in vivo kinematic and kinetic performance and determined their implications for robotic studies. Anthropometrics and 3D motion during a 31 cm drop vertical jump task were collected in high school female basketball players. Anthropometric measures demonstrated differential statistical significance in linear regression models relative to kinematic variables (P-range 0.20) relative to peak flexion moment, peak adduction moment, flexion moment range, abduction moment range, and internal rotation moment range. The current findings indicate that anthropometric measures are less associated with kinematics than with kinetics. Relative to the robotic manipulation of cadaveric limbs, the results do not support the need to normalize kinematic rotations relative to specimen dimensions. PMID:25266933

  2. Prediction of kinematic and kinetic performance in a drop vertical jump with individual anthropometric factors in adolescent female athletes: implications for cadaveric investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Nathaniel A; Myer, Gregory D; Hewett, Timothy E

    2015-04-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament injuries are common, expensive to repair, and often debilitate athletic careers. Robotic manipulators have evaluated knee ligament biomechanics in cadaveric specimens, but face limitations such as accounting for variation in bony geometry between specimens that may influence dynamic motion pathways. This study examined individual anthropometric measures for significant linear relationships with in vivo kinematic and kinetic performance and determined their implications for robotic studies. Anthropometrics and 3D motion during a 31 cm drop vertical jump task were collected in high school female basketball players. Anthropometric measures demonstrated differential statistical significance in linear regression models relative to kinematic variables (p-range 0.20) relative to peak flexion moment, peak adduction moment, flexion moment range, abduction moment range, and internal rotation moment range. The current findings indicate that anthropometric measures are less associated with kinematics than with kinetics. Relative to the robotic manipulation of cadaveric limbs, the results do not support the need to normalize kinematic rotations relative to specimen dimensions.

  3. Improvement of Long-Jump Performance During Competition Using a Plyometric Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanis, Gregory C; Tsoukos, Athanasios; Veligekas, Panagiotis

    2017-02-01

    To examine the acute effects of a conditioning plyometric exercise on long-jump performance during a simulated long-jump competition. Eight national-level track and field decathletes performed 6 long-jump attempts with a full approach run separated by 10-min recoveries. In the experimental condition subjects performed 3 rebound vertical jumps with maximal effort 3 min before the last 5 attempts, while the 1st attempt served as baseline. In the control condition the participants performed 6 long jumps without executing the conditioning exercise. Compared with baseline, long-jump performance progressively increased only in the experimental condition, from 3.0%, or 17.5 cm, in the 3rd attempt (P = .046, d = 0.56), to 4.8%, or 28.2 cm, in the 6th attempt (P = .0001, d = 0.84). The improvement in long-jump performance was due to a gradual increase in vertical takeoff velocity from the 3rd (by 8.7%, P = .0001, d = 1.82) to the 6th jump (by 17.7%, P = .0001, d = 4.38). Horizontal-approach velocity, takeoff duration, and horizontal velocity at takeoff were similar at all long-jump attempts in both conditions (P = .80, P = .36, and P = .15, respectively). Long-jump performance progressively improved during a simulated competition when a plyometric conditioning exercise was executed 3 min before each attempt. This improvement was due to a progressive increase in vertical velocity of takeoff, while there was no effect on the horizontal velocity.

  4. Isometric and dynamic strength and neuromuscular attributes as predictors of vertical jump performance in 11- to 13-year-old male athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinlay, Brandon John; Wallace, Phillip J; Dotan, Raffy; Long, Devon; Tokuno, Craig; Gabriel, David A; Falk, Bareket

    2017-09-01

    In explosive contractions, neural activation is a major factor in determining the rate of torque development, while the latter is an important determinant of jump performance. However, the contribution of neuromuscular activation and rate of torque development to jump performance in children and youth is unclear. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between the rate of neuromuscular activation, peak torque, rate of torque development, and jump performance in young male athletes. Forty-one 12.5 ± 0.5-year-old male soccer players completed explosive, unilateral isometric and dynamic (240°/s) knee extensions (Biodex System III), as well as countermovement-, squat-, and drop-jumps. Peak torque (pT), peak rate of torque development (pRTD), and rate of vastus lateralis activation (Q 30 ) during the isometric and dynamic contractions were examined in relation to attained jump heights. Isometric pT and pRTD were strongly correlated (r = 0.71) but not related to jump performance. Dynamic pT and pRTD, normalized to body mass, were significantly related to jump height in all 3 jumps (r = 0.38-0.66, p jump performance, while isometric contractions are not. These findings have implications in the choice of training and assessment methods for young athletes.

  5. Accuracy of Jump-Mat Systems for Measuring Jump Height.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pueo, Basilio; Lipinska, Patrycja; Jiménez-Olmedo, José M; Zmijewski, Piotr; Hopkins, Will G

    2017-08-01

    Vertical-jump tests are commonly used to evaluate lower-limb power of athletes and nonathletes. Several types of equipment are available for this purpose. To compare the error of measurement of 2 jump-mat systems (Chronojump-Boscosystem and Globus Ergo Tester) with that of a motion-capture system as a criterion and to determine the modifying effect of foot length on jump height. Thirty-one young adult men alternated 4 countermovement jumps with 4 squat jumps. Mean jump height and standard deviations representing technical error of measurement arising from each device and variability arising from the subjects themselves were estimated with a novel mixed model and evaluated via standardization and magnitude-based inference. The jump-mat systems produced nearly identical measures of jump height (differences in means and in technical errors of measurement ≤1 mm). Countermovement and squat-jump height were both 13.6 cm higher with motion capture (90% confidence limits ±0.3 cm), but this very large difference was reduced to small unclear differences when adjusted to a foot length of zero. Variability in countermovement and squat-jump height arising from the subjects was small (1.1 and 1.5 cm, respectively, 90% confidence limits ±0.3 cm); technical error of motion capture was similar in magnitude (1.7 and 1.6 cm, ±0.3 and ±0.4 cm), and that of the jump mats was similar or smaller (1.2 and 0.3 cm, ±0.5 and ±0.9 cm). The jump-mat systems provide trustworthy measurements for monitoring changes in jump height. Foot length can explain the substantially higher jump height observed with motion capture.

  6. RELIABILITY OF KINEMATICS AND KINETICS ASSOCIATED WITH HORIZONTAL SINGLE LEG DROP JUMP ASSESSMENT. A BRIEF REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Stålbom

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Determining the reliability of a unilateral horizontal drop jump for displacement provided the focus for this research. Eighteen male subjects were required to step off a 20cm box and land on a force plate with one leg and thereafter jump for maximal horizontal displacement on two different days. Dependent variables from the jump assessment included mean and peak vertical (V and horizontal (H ground reaction forces (GRF and impulses, horizontal displacement and contact time. The between-trial variability of all kinematic and kinetic measures was less than 7%. The most consistent measure over both trials was the horizontal displacement jumped (1.2 to 1.4% and the most variable were the contact time the first day (6.5% and peak HGRF the second day (4.3%. In all cases there was less variation associated with the second rather than the first day. In terms of test-retest variability the percent changes in the means and coefficient of variations (CVs were all under 10%. The smallest changes in the mean (0.43 %, least variation (< 2.26 % and second highest intraclass correlation co-efficient (ICC = 0.95 were found for horizontal displacement jumped. The highest ICC (0.96 was found for horizontal impulse. Given the reliability of the single leg drop jump, it may offer better prognostic and diagnostic information than that obtained with bilateral vertical jumps

  7. Jumping on water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ho-Young

    2016-11-01

    Water striders can jump on water as high as they can jump on land. Quick jumps allow them to avoid sudden dangers such as predators' attacks, and therefore understanding how they make such a dramatic motion for survival can shed light on the ultimate level of semi-aquatic motility achievable through evolution. However, the mechanism of their vertical jumping from a water surface has eluded hydrodynamic explanations so far. By observing movements of water strider legs and theoretically analyzing their dynamic interactions with deforming liquid-air interface, we have recently found that different species of jumping striders always tune their leg rotation speed with a force just below that required to break the water surface to reach the maximum take-off velocity. Here, we start with discussing the fundamental theories of dynamics of floating and sinking of small objects. The theories then enable us to analyze forces acting on a water strider while it presses down the water surface to fully exploit the capillary force. We further introduce a 68-milligram at-scale robotic insect capable of jumping on water without splash, strikingly similar to the real strider, by utilizing the water surface just as a trampoline.

  8. Jumping Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sannino, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    paradigm the physical scale and henceforth also the massive spectrum of the theory jump at the lower boundary of the conformal window. In particular we propose that a theory can suddenly jump from a Quantum Chromodynamics type spectrum, at the lower boundary of the conformal window, to a conformal one...... without particle interpretation. The jumping scenario, therefore, does not support a near-conformal dynamics of walking type. We will also discuss the impact of jumping dynamics on the construction of models of dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking....

  9. Methodological Considerations on the Relationship Between the 1,500-M Rowing Ergometer Performance and Vertical Jump in National-Level Adolescent Rowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciejewski, Hugo; Rahmani, Abderrahmane; Chorin, Frédéric; Lardy, Julien; Samozino, Pierre; Ratel, Sébastien

    2018-03-12

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether three different approaches for evaluating squat jump performance were correlated to rowing ergometer performance in elite adolescent rowers. Fourteen young male competitive rowers (15.3 ± 0.6 years), who took part in the French rowing national championships, performed a 1,500-m all-out rowing ergometer performance (P1500) and a squat jump (SJ) test. The performance in SJ was determined by calculating the jump height (HSJ in cm), a jump index (ISJ = HSJ · body mass · gravity, in J) and the mean power output (PSJ in W) from the Samozino et al.'s method. Furthermore, allometric modelling procedures were used to consider the importance of body mass (BM) in the assessment of HSJ, ISJ and PSJ, and their relationships with between P1500 and jump scores. P1500 was significantly correlated to HSJ (r2 = 0.29, P jump and rowing ergometer performances at the same rate, and that PSJ could be the best correlate of P1500. Therefore, the calculation of power seems to be more relevant than HSJ and ISJ to (i) evaluate jump performance, and (ii) infer the capacity of adolescent rowers to perform 1,500-m all-out rowing ergometer performance, irrespective of their body mass. This could help coaches to improve their training program and potentially identify talented young rowers.

  10. Effect of the delay of the second foot on the total impulse in a vertical jump with run Efecto del retraso del segundo apoyo sobre el impulso en la batida del salto vertical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Campos

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available

    This paper aims to identify the influence that the delay of the second foot in a vertical jump with run up approach, has on the total impulse, impulse absorption, impulse acceleration, and on the percentage participation of each foot during the takeoff phase. Twenty three physical education undergraduates students participated in the study recruited among university basketball and volleyball players (mean height: 179 ± 6.1 cm; mean mass: 70.96 ± 8.82 kg. Two force platforms were used, one for each foot support (Dinascan – IBV at 250 Hz frequency and time-synchronized to one another and to a high speed video camera (Redlake Motion Space 1000 S. Results showed that the lower the time between the first and second contact foot, the lesser the takeoff time (p<0.001, although this reduction is only attributed to the negative period. The impulse of acceleration was not affected by the delay of the second foot, so that there would not be advantages regarding jump height. There is a bigger reduction of the horizontal velocity when the time between the first and the second contact foot is increased (p<0.01.

     

    El propósito de este trabajo ha sido determinar la importancia que tiene el retraso del segundo apoyo en la batida del salto vertical cuando se realiza una carrera previa, sobre las componentes del impulso total, impulso de frenado e impulso de aceleración, así como su relación con el porcentaje de participación ejercido por cada apoyo durante las fases que determinan la batida. Han participado 23 estudiantes de educación física, especialistas en voleibol y baloncesto (talla media: 179 ± 6.1 cm.; masa media: 70.96 ± 8.82 kg. Para el registro de los datos se han utilizado dos plataformas de fuerza, (Dinascan – IBV, una para cada apoyo, a una frecuencia de 250 Hz y sincronizadas temporalmente a una cámara de v

  11. FUNCTIONAL AND NEUROMUSCULAR CHANGES IN THE HAMSTRINGS AFTER DROP JUMPS AND LEG CURLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nejc Sarabon

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to use a holistic approach to investigate changes in jumping performance, kinaesthesia, static balance, isometric strength and fast stepping on spot during a 5-day recovery period, following an acute bout of damaging exercise consisted of drop jumps and leg curls, where specific emphasis was given on the hamstring muscles. Eleven young healthy subjects completed a series of highly intensive damaging exercises for their hamstring muscles. Prior to the exercise, and during the 5-day recovery period, the subjects were tested for biochemical markers (creatine kinase, aspartate aminotransferase, and lactate dehydrogenase, perceived pain sensation, physical performance (squat jump, counter movement jump, maximal frequency leg stamping, maximal isometric torque production and maximally explosive isometric torque production, kinaesthesia (active torque tracking and static balance. We observed significant decreases in maximal isometric knee flexion torque production, the rate of torque production, and majority of the parameters for vertical jump performance. No alterations were found in kinaesthesia, static balance and fast stepping on spot. The highest drop in performance and increase in perceived pain sensation generally occurred 24 or 48 hours after the exercise. Damaging exercise substantially alters the neuromuscular functions of the hamstring muscles, which is specifically relevant for sports and rehabilitation experts, as the hamstrings are often stretched to significant lengths, in particular when the knee is extended and hip flexed. These findings are practically important for recovery after high-intensity trainings for hamstring muscles

  12. Study of some significant parameters about the dynamic of the arms to evaluate the vertical jump in volleyball athletes, category 13-15 from the sport school Ormani Arenado Llonch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Henríquez Hernández

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available To improve the yield in the vertical jump for many scientists, trainers and athletes has been and it continues being a polemic objective in the training for the volleyball players keeping in mind the participation that has this task motorboat in question, without doubts the Cuban School of Volleyball keeping in mind the characteristics of our players it has potentialized the saltabilidad of the jugadoras there is inclination of the years for it becomes it necessary to study and to evaluate the capacity miodinámica of the musculature of the inferior members to give continuity to this problem takes like sample in our study the athletes of the category 13-15 years of the EIDE of Pinegrove of the River to which you/they were carried out a traverse study in the stage of general physical preparation where you study the restored miodinámica of the inferior members in different laboratory test Squat Jump and I jump with against movements starting from a contact doormat built in Pinegrove of the River, field test like long jump without impulse, test of Power of Lewis, test of relative force for inferior members, being significant securities of correlation. Starting from the results individual suggestions were offered for the training of this athletes.

  13. Does trampoline or hard surface jumping influence lower extremity alignment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akasaka, Kiyokazu; Tamura, Akihiro; Katsuta, Aoi; Sagawa, Ayako; Otsudo, Takahiro; Okubo, Yu; Sawada, Yutaka; Hall, Toby

    2017-12-01

    [Purpose] To determine whether repetitive trampoline or hard surface jumping affects lower extremity alignment on jump landing. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty healthy females participated in this study. All subjects performed a drop vertical jump before and after repeated maximum effort trampoline or hard surface jumping. A three-dimensional motion analysis system and two force plates were used to record lower extremity angles, moments, and vertical ground reaction force during drop vertical jumps. [Results] Knee extensor moment after trampoline jumping was greater than that after hard surface jumping. There were no significant differences between trials in vertical ground reaction force and lower extremity joint angles following each form of exercise. Repeated jumping on a trampoline increased peak vertical ground reaction force, hip extensor, knee extensor moments, and hip adduction angle, while decreasing hip flexion angle during drop vertical jumps. In contrast, repeated jumping on a hard surface increased peak vertical ground reaction force, ankle dorsiflexion angle, and hip extensor moment during drop vertical jumps. [Conclusion] Repeated jumping on the trampoline compared to jumping on a hard surface has different effects on lower limb kinetics and kinematics. Knowledge of these effects may be useful in designing exercise programs for different clinical presentations.

  14. Effects of 18-week in-season heavy-resistance and power training on throwing velocity, strength, jumping, and maximal sprint swim performance of elite male water polo players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos Veliz, Rafael; Requena, Bernardo; Suarez-Arrones, Luis; Newton, Robert U; Sáez de Villarreal, Eduardo

    2014-04-01

    We examined the effects of 18 weeks of strength and high-intensity training on key sport performance measures of elite male water polo (WP) players. Twenty-seven players were randomly assigned to 2 groups, control (in-water training only) and strength group, (strength training sessions [twice per week] + in-water training). In-water training was conducted 5 d·wk. Twenty-meter maximal sprint swim, maximal dynamic strength 1-repetition maximum (1RM) for upper bench press (BP) and lower full squat (FS) body, countermovement jump (CMJ), and throwing velocity were measured before and after the training. The training program included upper and lower body strength and high-intensity exercises (BP, FS, military press, pull-ups, CMJ loaded, and abs). Baseline-training results showed no significant differences between the groups in any of the variables tested. No improvement was found in the control group; however, meaningful improvement was found in all variables in the experimental group: CMJ (2.38 cm, 6.9%, effect size [ES] = 0.48), BP (9.06 kg, 10.53%, ES = 0.66), FS (11.06 kg, 14.21%, ES = 0.67), throwing velocity (1.76 km·h(-1), 2.76%, ES = 0.25), and 20-m maximal sprint swim (-0.26 seconds, 2.25%, ES = 0.29). Specific strength and high-intensity training in male WP players for 18 weeks produced a positive effect on performance qualities highly specific to WP. Therefore, we propose modifications to the current training methodology for WP players to include strength and high-intensity training for athlete preparation in this sport.

  15. Influence of sports flooring and shoes on impact forces and performance during jump tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malisoux, Laurent; Gette, Paul; Urhausen, Axel; Bomfim, Joao; Theisen, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    We aim to determine the influence of sports floorings and sports shoes on impact mechanics and performance during standardised jump tasks. Twenty-one male volunteers performed ankle jumps (four consecutive maximal bounds with very dynamic ankle movements) and multi-jumps (two consecutive maximal counter-movement jumps) on force plates using minimalist and cushioned shoes under 5 sports flooring (SF) conditions. The shock absorption properties of the SF, defined as the proportion of peak impact force absorbed by the tested flooring when compared with a concrete hard surface, were: SF0 = 0% (no flooring), SF1 = 19%, SF2 = 26%, SF3 = 37% and SF4 = 45%. Shoe and flooring effects were compared using 2x5 repeated-measures ANOVA with post-hoc Bonferroni-corrected comparisons. A significant interaction between SF and shoe conditions was found for VILR only (p = 0.003). In minimalist shoes, SF influenced Vertical Instantaneous Loading Rate (VILR) during ankle jumps (p = 0.006) and multi-jumps (pflooring. VILR is the variable that was the most affected.

  16. Jumping and Hopping in Elite and Amateur Orienteering Athletes and Correlations to Sprinting and Running

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hébert-Losier, Kim; Jensen, Kurt; Holmberg, Hans-Christer

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Jumping and hopping are used to measure lower-body muscle power, stiffness, and stretch-shortening cycle utilization in sports, with several studies reporting correlations between such measures and sprinting and/or running abilities in athletes. Neither jumping and hopping nor correlatio...... and rapid generation of high relative maximal forces, especially vertically. These functional measures were more closely related to sprinting and/or running abilities, indicating benefits of lower-body training in orienteering.......PURPOSE: Jumping and hopping are used to measure lower-body muscle power, stiffness, and stretch-shortening cycle utilization in sports, with several studies reporting correlations between such measures and sprinting and/or running abilities in athletes. Neither jumping and hopping nor correlations...... with sprinting and/or running have been examined in orienteering athletes. METHODS: We investigated squat jump (SJ), countermovement jump (CMJ), standing long jump (SLJ), and hopping performed by 8 elite and 8 amateur male foot-orienteering athletes (29 ± 7 y, 183 ± 5 cm, 73 ± 7 kg) and possible correlations...

  17. Kinematics and Kinetics of Squats, Drop Jumps and Imitation Jumps of Ski Jumpers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauli, Carole A; Keller, Melanie; Ammann, Fabian; Hübner, Klaus; Lindorfer, Julia; Taylor, William R; Lorenzetti, Silvio

    2016-03-01

    Squats, drop jumps, and imitation jumps are commonly used training exercises in ski jumping to enhance maximum force, explosive force, and sport-specific skills. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the kinetics and kinematics of training exercises in ski jumping and to find objective parameters in training exercises that most correlate with the competition performance of ski jumpers. To this end, barbell squats, drop jumps, and imitation jumps were measured in a laboratory environment for 10 elite ski jumpers. Force and motion data were captured, and the influence of maximum vertical force, force difference, vertical take-off velocity, knee moments, knee joint power, and a knee valgus/varus index was evaluated and correlated with their season jump performance. The results indicate that, especially for the imitation jumps, a good correlation exists between the vertical take-off velocity and the personal jump performance on the hill (R = 0.718). Importantly, however, the more the athletes tended toward a valgus knee alignment during the measured movements, the worse their performance (R = 0.729 imitation jumps; R = 0.685 squats). Although an evaluation of the athletes' lower limb alignment during competitive jumping on the hill is still required, these preliminary data suggest that performance training should additionally concentrate on improving knee alignment to increase ski jumping performance.

  18. The Effects of Multiple Sets of Squats and Jump Squats on Mechanical Variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetti, Michael L; Munford, Shawn N; Snyder, Brandon W; Davis, Shala E; Moir, Gavin L

    2017-07-28

    The mechanical responses to two non-ballistic squat and two ballistic jump squat protocols performed over multiple sets were investigated. One protocol from each of the two non-ballistic and ballistic conditions incorporated a pause between the eccentric and concentric phases of the movements in order to determine the influence of the coupling time on the mechanical variables and post-activation potentiation (PAP). Eleven men (age: 21.9 ± 1.8 years; height: 1.79 ± 0.05 m; mass: 87.0 ± 7.4 kg) attended four sessions where they performed multiple sets of squats and jump squats with a load equivalent to 30% 1-repeititon maximum under one of the following conditions: 1) 3 × 4 repetitions of non-ballistic squats (30N-B); 2) 3 × 4 repetitions of non-ballistic squats with a 3-second pause between the eccentric and concentric phases of each repetition (30PN-B); 3) 3 × 4 repetitions of ballistic jump squats (30B); 4) 3 × 4 repetitions of ballistic jump squats with a 3-second pause between the eccentric and concentric phases of each repetition (30PB). Force plates were used to calculate variables including average vertical velocity, average vertical force (GRF), and average power output (PO). Vertical velocities during the ballistic conditions were significantly greater than those attained during the non-ballistic conditions (mean differences: 0.21 - 0.25 m/s, p0.05). Ballistic jump squats may be an effective exercise for developing PO given the high velocities and forces generated in these exercises. Furthermore, the completion of multiple sets of jump squats may induce PAP to enhance PO. The coupling times between the eccentric and concentric phases of the jump squats should be short in order to maximize the GRF and PO across the sets.

  19. Jumping together

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Ole; Ravn, Susanne; Christensen, Mette Krogh

    2014-01-01

    , in order to reach a deeper understanding of how practice facilitates learning. Results: We encircle the athletes’ interrelated learning processes by introducing the training environment of the national team and situations in which the athletes guide each other verbally or by jumping together. Discussion...

  20. Avaliação da resistência de força explosiva em voleibolistas através de testes de saltos verticais Assessment of explosive strength-endurance in volleyball players through vertical jumping test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jefferson Eduardo Hespanhol

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available O propósito deste estudo foi verificar a existência de diferenças entre o teste de salto vertical com natureza contínua de 60 segundos (TSVC e o teste de salto vertical com natureza intermitente de quatro séries de 15 segundos (TSVI. Os dados foram obtidos através de amostra composta por 10 voleibolistas do sexo masculino (19,01 ± 1,36 anos; 191,5 ± 5,36cm; e 81,74 ± 7,45kg, todos com participação voluntária. As variáveis estudadas foram: as estimativas do pico de potência (PP, potência média (PM e o índice de fadiga (IF. O desempenho estimado através dos testes TSVC, com duração de 60 segundos, e o TSVI foi determinado em quatro séries de 15 segundos, com 10 segundos de recuperação entre cada série. Os dados foram determinados através da estatística descritiva e do teste de Wilcoxon; o nível de significância utilizado foi de p The aim of this study was to verify the differences between the continuous jump test of 60 seconds (CJ60 sec and the intermittent jump test of 4 sets of 15 seconds (IJ4x15 sec. The sample was composed of 10 male volleyball players with 19.01 ± 1.36 years, 191.5 ± 5.36 cm height and 81.74 ± 7.45 of body mass, who participated in this research as volunteers. The variables studied were estimated as the peak power (PP, mean power (MP and fatigue index (FI. These performances were measured through tests of vertical jump with duration the 60 seconds and with the performance of 4 sets of 15 seconds with 10 seconds of recovery between the sets. The data were analyzed through descriptive statistics and the Wilcoxon test. The significance level was of p < 0.05. It was possible to analyze that the continuous and the intermittent jump test presented significant differences in MP (p < 0.05, FI (p < 0.01, and in the number of the vertical jump in 60 seconds (p < 0.01, and the height in 60 seconds exercise (p < 0.05. The MP found in IJ4x15sec was significantly higher than in the CJ60 sec in volleyball

  1. Effects of timing of signal indicating jump directions on knee biomechanics in jump-landing-jump tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Mitchell L; Hinshaw, Taylour J; Wadley, Haley A; Zhu, Qin; Wilson, Margaret A; Byra, Mark; Dai, Boyi

    2018-03-01

    A variety of the available time to react (ATR) has been utilised to study knee biomechanics during reactive jump-landing tasks. The purpose was to quantify knee kinematics and kinetics during a jump-land-jump task of three possible directions as the ATR was reduced. Thirty-four recreational athletes performed 45 trials of a jump-land-jump task, during which the direction of the second jump (lateral, medial or vertical) was indicated before they initiated the first jump, the instant they initiated the first jump, 300 ms before landing, 150 ms before landing or at the instant of landing. Knee joint angles and moments close to the instant of landing were significantly different when the ATR was equal to or more than 300 ms before landing, but became similar when the ATR was 150 ms or 0 ms before landing. As the ATR was decreased, knee moments decreased for the medial jump direction, but increased for the lateral jump direction. When the ATR is shorter than an individual's reaction time, the movement pattern cannot be pre-planned before landing. Knee biomechanics are dependent on the timing of the signal and the subsequent jump direction. Precise control of timing and screening athletes with low ATR are suggested.

  2. Biomechanical analysis of countermovement jump in people with cerebral palsy Análisis biomecánico del salto vertical con contramovimiento en personas con parálisis cerebral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Gianikellis

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available

    The main purpose of the study was to evaluate the patterns of the developed ground reaction forces in the two – legged countermovement jumping, performed by persons affected by tetraparesis with ataxia, tetraparesis with athetosis, tetraparesis with spasticity, diplegia with spasticity, right and left hemiplegia and, finally, right and left hemiparesis. After twenty subjects jumped on the surface of a force plate analysis of the ground reaction force – time trend took place. The obtained results confirm the accomplishment of the biomechanical principle of the initial force as in the case of persons not affected by neurological disorders. Finally the calculated ratio between the breaking impulse and the acceleration impulse is very near to optimum values.
    KEY WORDS: cerebral palsy, biomechanics, countermovement jump.

     

    El valor óptimo del impulso de aceleración en el salto vertical con contra -movimiento, es aproximadamente tres veces superior al impulso de “frenaje”. El objetivo de este estudio ha sido investigar el modo de actuación de la cadena biocinemática del tren inferior en el salto vertical con contra -movimiento para personas afectadas por parálisis cerebral, concretamente, tetraparesia con ataxia, tetraparesia con atetosis, tetraparesia con espasticidad, diplegia con espasticidad, hemiplegia izquierda y derecha, y finalmente, hemiparesia izquierda y derecha. Para ello, se han analizado las fuerzas de reacción de veintitrés sujetos que han realizado saltos con contramovimiento sobre una plataforma de fuerzas. El hallazgo de un valor medio de la ratio entre el impulso de “frenaje” y el de aceleración muy próximo al valor teórico para los veintitrés sujetos con diferentes síntomas de parálisis cerebral, confirma el principio de la fuerza inicial mientras que el alto coeficiente de variación de los parámetros utilizados en este estudio confirma la esperada

  3. Kinematics and Kinetics of Squats, Drop Jumps and Imitation Jumps of Ski Jumpers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauli, Carole A.; Keller, Melanie; Ammann, Fabian; Hübner, Klaus; Lindorfer, Julia; Taylor, William R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pauli, CA, Keller, M, Ammann, F, Hübner, K, Lindorfer, J, Taylor, WR, and Lorenzetti, S. Kinematics and kinetics of squats, drop jumps and imitation jumps of ski jumpers. J Strength Cond Res 30(3): 643–652, 2016—Squats, drop jumps, and imitation jumps are commonly used training exercises in ski jumping to enhance maximum force, explosive force, and sport-specific skills. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the kinetics and kinematics of training exercises in ski jumping and to find objective parameters in training exercises that most correlate with the competition performance of ski jumpers. To this end, barbell squats, drop jumps, and imitation jumps were measured in a laboratory environment for 10 elite ski jumpers. Force and motion data were captured, and the influence of maximum vertical force, force difference, vertical take-off velocity, knee moments, knee joint power, and a knee valgus/varus index was evaluated and correlated with their season jump performance. The results indicate that, especially for the imitation jumps, a good correlation exists between the vertical take-off velocity and the personal jump performance on the hill (R = 0.718). Importantly, however, the more the athletes tended toward a valgus knee alignment during the measured movements, the worse their performance (R = 0.729 imitation jumps; R = 0.685 squats). Although an evaluation of the athletes' lower limb alignment during competitive jumping on the hill is still required, these preliminary data suggest that performance training should additionally concentrate on improving knee alignment to increase ski jumping performance. PMID:26418370

  4. Supersonic Jump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    On October 14,2012, Felix Baumgartner, an Austrian sky-diver, set some new world records for his discipline. Jumping from a height of about 39 km, he reached a top speed of 1342 km/h, becoming the first human being to break the sound barrier in free fall. In order to understand some essential physics aspects of this remarkable feat, we wonder why…

  5. Effects of volume-based overload plyometric training on maximal-intensity exercise adaptations in young basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi, Abbas; Ramirez-Campillo, Rodrigo; Meylan, Cesar; Nakamura, Fabio Y; Cañas-Jamett, Rodrigo; Izquierdo, Mikel

    2017-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare maximal-intensity exercise adaptations in young basketball players (who were strong individuals at baseline) participating in regular basketball training versus regular plus a volume-based plyometric training program in the pre-season period. Young basketball players were recruited and assigned either to a plyometric with regular basketball training group (experimental group [EG]; N.=8), or a basketball training only group (control group [CG]; N.=8). The athletes in EG performed periodized (i.e., from 117 to 183 jumps per session) plyometric training for eight weeks. Before and after the intervention, players were assessed in vertical and broad jump, change of direction, maximal strength and a 60-meter sprint test. No significant improvements were found in the CG, while the EG improved vertical jump (effect size [ES] 2.8), broad jump (ES=2.4), agility T test (ES=2.2), Illinois agility test (ES=1.4), maximal strength (ES=1.8), and 60-m sprint (ES=1.6) (Ptraining in addition to regular basketball practice can lead to meaningful improvements in maximal-intensity exercise adaptations among young basketball players during the pre-season.

  6. Mobile Jump Assessment (mJump): A Descriptive and Inferential Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateos-Angulo, Alvaro; Galán-Mercant, Alejandro; Cuesta-Vargas, Antonio

    2015-08-26

    Vertical jump tests are used in athletics and rehabilitation to measure physical performance in people of different age ranges and fitness. Jumping ability can be analyzed through different variables, and the most commonly used are fly time and jump height. They can be obtained by a variety of measuring devices, but most are limited to laboratory use only. The current generation of smartphones contains inertial sensors that are able to record kinematic variables for human motion analysis, since they are tools for easy access and portability for clinical use. The aim of this study was to describe and analyze the kinematics characteristics using the inertial sensor incorporated in the iPhone 4S, the lower limbs strength through a manual dynamometer, and the jump variables obtained with a contact mat in the squat jump and countermovement jump tests (fly time and jump height) from a cohort of healthy people. A cross sectional study was conducted on a population of healthy young adults. Twenty-seven participants performed three trials (n=81 jumps) of squat jump and countermovement jump tests. Acceleration variables were measured through a smartphone's inertial sensor. Additionally, jump variables from a contact mat and lower limbs dynamometry were collected. In the present study, the kinematic variables derived from acceleration through the inertial sensor of a smartphone iPhone 4S, dynamometry of lower limbs with a handheld dynamometer, and the height and flight time with a contact mat have been described in vertical jump tests from a cohort of young healthy subjects. The development of the execution has been described, examined and identified in a squat jump test and countermovement jump test under acceleration variables that were obtained with the smartphone. The built-in iPhone 4S inertial sensor is able to measure acceleration variables while performing vertical jump tests for the squat jump and countermovement jump in healthy young adults. The acceleration

  7. Plyometric Long Jump Training With Progressive Loading Improves Kinetic and Kinematic Swimming Start Parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebutini, Vanessa Z; Pereira, Gleber; Bohrer, Roberta C D; Ugrinowitsch, Carlos; Rodacki, André L F

    2016-09-01

    Rebutini, VZ, Pereira, G, Bohrer, RCD, Ugrinowitsch, C, and Rodacki, ALF. Plyometric long jump training with progressive loading improves kinetic and kinematic swimming start parameters. J Strength Cond Res 30(9): 2392-2398, 2016-This study was aimed to determine the effects of a plyometric long jump training program on torque around the lower limb joints and kinetic and kinematics parameters during the swimming jump start. Ten swimmers performed 3 identical assessment sessions, measuring hip and knee muscle extensors during maximal voluntary isometric contraction and kinetic and kinematics parameters during the swimming jump start, at 3 instants: INI (2 weeks before the training program, control period), PRE (2 weeks after INI measurements), and POST (24-48 hours after 9 weeks of training). There were no significant changes from INI to PRE measurements. However, the peak torque and rate of torque development increased significantly from PRE to POST measurements for both hip (47 and 108%) and knee (24 and 41%) joints. There were significant improvements to the horizontal force (7%), impulse (9%), and angle of resultant force (19%). In addition, there were significant improvements to the center of mass displacement (5%), horizontal takeoff velocity (16%), horizontal velocity at water entrance (22%), and peak angle velocity for the knee (15%) and hip joints (16%). Therefore, the plyometric long jump training protocol was effective to enhance torque around the lower limb joints and to control the resultant vector direction, to increase the swimming jump start performance. These findings suggest that coaches should use long jump training instead of vertical jump training to improve swimming start performance.

  8. Kinetic Compensations due to Chronic Ankle Instability during Landing and Jumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyunsoo; Son, S Jun; Seeley, Matthew K; Hopkins, J Ty

    2018-02-01

    Skeletal muscles absorb and transfer kinetic energy during landing and jumping, which are common requirements of various forms of physical activity. Chronic ankle instability (CAI) is associated with impaired neuromuscular control and dynamic stability of the lower extremity. Little is known regarding an intralimb, lower-extremity joint coordination of kinetics during landing and jumping for CAI patients. We investigated the effect of CAI on lower-extremity joint stiffness and kinetic and energetic patterns across the ground contact phase of landing and jumping. One hundred CAI patients and 100 matched able-bodied controls performed five trials of a landing and jumping task (a maximal vertical forward jump, landing on a force plate with the test leg only, and immediate lateral jump toward the contralateral side). Functional analyses of variance and independent t-tests were used to evaluate between-group differences for lower-extremity net internal joint moment, power, and stiffness throughout the entire ground contact phase of landing and jumping. Relative to the control group, the CAI group revealed (i) reduced plantarflexion and knee extension and increased hip extension moments; (ii) reduced ankle and knee eccentric and concentric power, and increased hip eccentric and concentric power, and (iii) reduced ankle and knee joint stiffness and increased hip joint stiffness during the task. CAI patients seemed to use a hip-dominant strategy by increasing the hip extension moment, stiffness, and eccentric and concentric power during landing and jumping. This apparent compensation may be due to decreased capabilities to produce sufficient joint moment, stiffness, and power at the ankle and knee. These differences might have injury risk and performance implications.

  9. Functional and Neuromuscular Changes in the Hamstrings After Drop Jumps and Leg Curls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarabon, Nejc; Panjan, Andrej; Rosker, Jernej; Fonda, Borut

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use a holistic approach to investigate changes in jumping performance, kinaesthesia, static balance, isometric strength and fast stepping on spot during a 5-day recovery period, following an acute bout of damaging exercise consisted of drop jumps and leg curls, where specific emphasis was given on the hamstring muscles. Eleven young healthy subjects completed a series of highly intensive damaging exercises for their hamstring muscles. Prior to the exercise, and during the 5-day recovery period, the subjects were tested for biochemical markers (creatine kinase, aspartate aminotransferase, and lactate dehydrogenase), perceived pain sensation, physical performance (squat jump, counter movement jump, maximal frequency leg stamping, maximal isometric torque production and maximally explosive isometric torque production), kinaesthesia (active torque tracking) and static balance. We observed significant decreases in maximal isometric knee flexion torque production, the rate of torque production, and majority of the parameters for vertical jump performance. No alterations were found in kinaesthesia, static balance and fast stepping on spot. The highest drop in performance and increase in perceived pain sensation generally occurred 24 or 48 hours after the exercise. Damaging exercise substantially alters the neuromuscular functions of the hamstring muscles, which is specifically relevant for sports and rehabilitation experts, as the hamstrings are often stretched to significant lengths, in particular when the knee is extended and hip flexed. These findings are practically important for recovery after high-intensity trainings for hamstring muscles. Key Points Hamstring function is significantly reduced following specifically damaging exercise. It fully recovers 120 hours after the exercise. Prevention of exercise-induced muscle damage is cruicial for maintaining normal training regime. PMID:24149148

  10. Jump test performance and sarcopenia status in men and women, 55 to 75 years of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harshvardhan; Kim, Daeyeol; Kim, Eonho; Bemben, Michael G; Anderson, Mark; Seo, Dong-Il; Bemben, Debra A

    2014-01-01

    Jumping mechanography uses maximal countermovement jumps to test obtain such as jump power (JPow). Recently, it has been shown to be a safe method for assessing muscle function in older adults; however, little is known about the relationships between JPow, muscle strength, and sarcopenia status. The purpose of this study was to examine jump performance, muscle strength, and sarcopenia status in older adults. This was a cross-sectional study that included men (n = 27) and women (n = 33) (55-75 years) recruited from the general community. Participants completed health status and physical activity questionnaires. Body composition, including appendicular skeletal muscle mass (ASM), bone free lean body mass, and relative skeletal muscle mass index, were assessed by total body dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scans. The criteria for sarcopenia were relative skeletal muscle mass index values less than 7.26 kg/m2 for men and less than 5.45 kg/m2 for women. Three vertical jumps on a jump mat were performed to assess JPow, jump velocity (JVel), and jump height (JHt). Muscle strength was measured by 1RM testing for leg press (LP) and right and left hip abduction isotonic resistance exercises. Sarcopenia was found in 20% (12/60) of the participants. Jump power was significantly lower (P = .001) in the sarcopenia group than in the normal group, 651.1 (41.7) W versus 851.0 (27.4) W, respectively. Jump power and JHt were significantly (P mass. Significant (P muscle strength (LP, right and left hip abduction). The jump test protocol was conducted safely with no injuries or balance issues. Our finding of lower JPow in sarcopenic individuals adds new information to the existing literature on age-related declines in muscle power. Community-dwelling individuals classified as sarcopenic had significantly lower JPow but not muscle strength compared with their counterparts with normal amounts of muscle mass. Jump test variables were positively correlated with lean tissue and lower body

  11. Impact differences in ground reaction force and center of mass between the first and second landing phases of a drop vertical jump and their implications for injury risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Nathaniel A; Ford, Kevin R; Myer, Gregory D; Hewett, Timothy E

    2013-04-26

    The drop vertical jump (DVJ) task is commonly used to assess biomechanical performance measures that are associated with ACL injury risk in athletes. Previous investigations have solely assessed the first landing phase. We examined the first and second landings of a DVJ for differences in the magnitude of vertical ground reaction force (vGRF) and position of center of mass (CoM). A cohort of 239 adolescent female basketball athletes completed a series of DVJ tasks from an initial box height of 31 cm. Dual force platforms and a three dimensional motion capture system recorded force and positional data for each trial. There was no difference in peak vGRF between landings (p=0.445), but side-to-side differences increased from the first to second landing (p=0.007). Participants demonstrated a lower minimum CoM during stance in the first landing than the second landing (p<0.001). The results have important implications for the future assessment of ACL injury risk behaviors in adolescent female athletes. Greater side-to-side asymmetry in vGRF and higher CoM during impact indicate the second landing of a DVJ may exhibit greater perturbation and better represent in-game mechanics associated with ACL injury risk. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Does increasing active warm-up duration affect afternoon short-term maximal performance during Ramadan?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baklouti, Hana; Aloui, Asma; Chtourou, Hamdi; Briki, Walid; Chaouachi, Anis; Souissi, Nizar

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of active warm-up duration on short-term maximal performance assessed during Ramadan in the afternoon. Twelve healthy active men took part in the study. The experimental design consisted of four test sessions conducted at 5 p.m., before and during Ramadan, either with a 5-minute or a 15-minute warm-up. The warm-up consisted in pedaling at 50% of the power output obtained at the last stage of a submaximal multistage cycling test. During each session, the subjects performed two vertical jump tests (squat jump and counter movement jump) for measurement of vertical jump height followed by a 30-second Wingate test for measurement of peak and mean power. Oral temperature was recorded at rest and after warming-up. Moreover, ratings of perceived exertion were obtained immediately after the Wingate test. Oral temperature was higher before Ramadan than during Ramadan at rest, and was higher after the 15-minute warm-up than the 5-minute warm-up both before and during Ramadan. In addition, vertical jump heights were not significantly different between the two warm-up conditions before and during Ramadan, and were lower during Ramadan than before Ramadan after both warm-up conditions. Peak and mean power were not significantly different between the two warm-up durations before Ramadan, but were significantly higher after the 5-minute warm-up than the 15-minute warm-up during Ramadan. Moreover, peak and mean power were lower during Ramadan than before Ramadan after both warm-up conditions. Furthermore, ratings of perceived exertion were higher after the 15-minute warm-up than the 5-minute warm-up only during Ramadan. The prolonged active warm-up has no effect on vertical jump height but impairs anaerobic power assessed during Ramadan in the afternoon.

  13. Validity of the Jump-and-Reach Test in Subelite Adolescent Handball Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehlbauer, Thomas; Pabst, Jan; Granacher, Urs; Büsch, Dirk

    2017-05-01

    Muehlbauer, T, Pabst, J, Granacher, U, and Büsch, D. Validity of the jump-and-reach test in subelite adolescent handball players. J Strength Cond Res 31(5): 1282-1289, 2017-The primary purpose of this study was to examine concurrent validity of the jump-and-reach (JaR) test using the Vertec system and a criterion device (i.e., Optojump system). In separate subanalyses, we investigated the influence of gym floor condition and athletes' sex on the validity of vertical jump height. Four hundred forty subelite adolescent female (n = 222, mean age: 14 ± 1 year, age range: 13-15 years) and male (n = 218, mean age: 15 ± 1 year, age range: 14-16 years) handball players performed the JaR test in gyms with region or point elastic floors. Maximal vertical jump height was simultaneously assessed using the Vertec and the Optojump systems. In general, significantly higher jump heights were obtained for the Vertec compared with the Optojump system (11.2 cm, Δ31%, Cohen's d = 2.58). The subanalyses revealed significantly larger jump heights for the Vertec compared with the Optojump system irrespective of gym floor condition and players' sex. The association between Optojump- and Vertec-derived vertical jump heights amounted to rP = 0.84, with a coefficient of determination (R) of 0.71. The subanalyses indicated significantly larger correlations in males (rP = 0.75, R = 0.56) than in females (rP = 0.63, R = 0.40). Yet, correlations were not significantly different between region (rP = 0.83, R = 0.69) as opposed to point elastic floor (rP = 0.87, R = 0.76). Our findings indicate that the 2 apparatuses cannot be used interchangeably. Consequently, gym floor and sex-specific regression equations were provided to estimate true (Optojump system) vertical jump height from Vertec-derived data.

  14. Creation and Validation of Chronojump-Boscosystem: A Free Tool to Measure Vertical Jumps. (Creación y validación de Chronojump-Boscosystem: un instrumento libre para la medición de saltos verticales.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis López del Amo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Measuring the height of the vertical jump is an indicator of the strength and power of the lower body. The technological tools available to measure the vertical jump are black boxes and are not open to third-party verification or adaptation. We propose the creation of a measurement system called Chronojump-Boscosystem, consisting of open hardware and free software. Methods: A microcontroller was created and validated using a square wave generator and an oscilloscope. Two types of contact platforms were developed using different materials. These platforms were validated by the minimum pressure required for activation at different points by a strain gauge, together with the on/off time of our platforms in respect of the Ergojump-Boscosystem platform by a sample of 8 subjects performing submaximal jumps with one foot on each platform. Agile methodologies were used to develop and validate the software. Results: All the tools fall under the free software / open hardware guidelines and are, in that sense, free. The microcontroller margin of error is 0.1%. The validity of the fiberglass platform is 0.95 (ICC. The management software contains nearly 113.000 lines of code and is available in 7 languages.ResumenLa medición de la altura del salto vertical es un indicador de la fuerza y potencia del tren inferior. Los instrumentos electrónicos disponibles para medir este salto son cajas negras que no permiten la verificación ni la adaptación por parte de terceros. Proponemos la creación de un sistema de medición llamado Chronojump-Boscosystem, que consiste en un hardware abierto y un software libre. Métodos: Se ha creado un microcontrolador y se ha validado usando un generador de ondas cuadradas y un osciloscopio. Se han desarrollado dos tipos de plataformas usando materiales distintos. Las plataformas se han validado determinando su sensibilidad en distintos puntos por medio de una célula de carga, y por comparación con la plataforma de contactos

  15. Validity of a Simple Method for Measuring Force-Velocity-Power Profile in Countermovement Jump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Reyes, Pedro; Samozino, Pierre; Pareja-Blanco, Fernando; Conceição, Filipe; Cuadrado-Peñafiel, Víctor; González-Badillo, Juan José; Morin, Jean-Benoît

    2017-01-01

    To analyze the reliability and validity of a simple computation method to evaluate force (F), velocity (v), and power (P) output during a countermovement jump (CMJ) suitable for use in field conditions and to verify the validity of this computation method to compute the CMJ force-velocity (F-v) profile (including unloaded and loaded jumps) in trained athletes. Sixteen high-level male sprinters and jumpers performed maximal CMJs under 6 different load conditions (0-87 kg). A force plate sampling at 1000 Hz was used to record vertical ground-reaction force and derive vertical-displacement data during CMJ trials. For each condition, mean F, v, and P of the push-off phase were determined from both force-plate data (reference method) and simple computation measures based on body mass, jump height (from flight time), and push-off distance and used to establish the linear F-v relationship for each individual. Mean absolute bias values were 0.9% (± 1.6%), 4.7% (± 6.2%), 3.7% (± 4.8%), and 5% (± 6.8%) for F, v, P, and slope of the F-v relationship (S Fv ), respectively. Both methods showed high correlations for F-v-profile-related variables (r = .985-.991). Finally, all variables computed from the simple method showed high reliability, with ICC >.980 and CV push-off distance, and jump height are known.

  16. One leg lateral jumps - a new test for team players evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taboga, P; Sepulcri, L; Lazzer, S; De Conti, D; Di Prampero, P E

    2013-10-01

    We assessed the subject's capacity to accelerate himself laterally in monopodalic support, a crucial ability in several team sports, on 22 athletes, during series of 10 subsequent jumps, between two force platforms at predetermined distance. Vertical and horizontal accelerations of the Centre of Mass (CM), contact and flight times were measured by means of force platforms and the Optojump-System®. Individual mean horizontal and vertical powers and their sum (total power) ranged between 7 and 14.5 W/kg. "Push angle", i.e., the angle with the horizontal along which the vectorial sum of all forces is aligned, was calculated from the ratio between vertical and horizontal accelerations: it varied between 38.7 and 49.4 deg and was taken to express the subject technical ability. The horizontal acceleration of CM, indirectly estimated as a function of subject's mass, contact and flight times, was essentially equal to that obtained from force platforms data. Since the vertical displacement can be easily obtained from flight and contact times, this allowed us to assess the Push angle from Optojump data only. The power developed during a standard vertical jump was rather highly correlated with that developed during the lateral jumps for right (R=0.80, N.=12) and left limb (R=0.72, N.=12), but not with the push angle for right (R=0.31, N.=12) and left limb (R=-0.43, N.=12). Hence standard tests cannot be utilised to assess technical ability. Lateral jumps test allows the coach to evaluate separately maximal muscular power and technical ability of the athlete, thus appropriately directing the training program: the optimum, for a team-sport player being high power and low push-angle, that is: being "powerful" and "efficient".

  17. The effects of load on system and lower-body joint kinetics during jump squats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moir, Gavin L; Gollie, Jared M; Davis, Shala E; Guers, John J; Witmer, Chad A

    2012-11-01

    To investigate the effects of different loads on system and lower-body kinetics during jump squats, 12 resistance-trained men performed jumps under different loading conditions: 0%, 12%, 27%, 42%, 56%, 71%, and 85% of 1-repetition maximum (1-RM). System power output was calculated as the product of the vertical component of the ground reaction force and the vertical velocity of the bar during its ascent. Joint power output was calculated during bar ascent for the hip, knee, and ankle joints, and was also summed across the joints. System power output and joint power at knee and ankle joints were maximized at 0% 1-RM (p < 0.001) and followed the linear trends (p < 0.001) caused by power output decreasing as the load increased. Power output at the hip was maximized at 42% 1-RM (p = 0.016) and followed a quadratic trend (p = 0.030). Summed joint power could be predicted from system power (p < 0.05), while system power could predict power at the knee and ankle joints under some of the loading conditions. Power at the hip could not be predicted from system power. System power during loaded jumps reflects the power at the knee and ankle, while power at the hip does not correspond to system power.

  18. Sprint and jump performance in elite male soccer players following a 10-week Nordic Hamstring exercise Protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krommes, K.; Petersen, J.; Nielsen, M. B.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The preseason Nordic Hamstring Protocol (NHP) reduces hamstring strain injuries in football players. Despite persisting injury rates, elite clubs are reluctant to apply the NHP often over concerns of negative impacts on performance. This pilot study investigated if sprint or jump...... split times) and countermovement jump (CMJ height) was measured before the mid-seasonal break and again after 10 weeks of performing the NHP at the end of pre-season. Dropouts were due to transfers and injuries unrelated to performing NHP (NHP = 0, CG = 5). Sprint performance on the short split...... to negatively affect sprint and vertical jump performance outcomes in the present study, while in fact showing some promise for the more explosive characteristics such as the short 5 and 10 m split-times and maximal CMJ height, which all are highly relevant performance parameters in elite football....

  19. Neuromuscular adaptations to 4 weeks of intensive drop jump training in well-trained athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkjær, Tine; Meyland, Jacob; Raffalt, Peter C

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effects of 4 weeks of intensive drop jump training in well-trained athletes on jumping performance and underlying changes in biomechanics and neuromuscular adaptations. Nine well-trained athletes at high national competition level within sprinting and jumping disciplines...... participated in the study. The training was supervised and augmented feedback on performance was used to ensure maximal training intensity. The drop jumps were performed with minimal contact time and maximal jumping height. Assessment of performance during training showed effects of motor learning. Before...... and after the training intervention maximal isometric muscle strength, the biomechanics, muscle activity pattern of the lower extremities and the soleus H-reflex and V-wave during drop jumping were measured. Maximal jump height and performance index (PI) defined as jumping height divided by contact time...

  20. Exploring Lightning Jump Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronis, Themis; Carey, Larry D.; Schultz, Christopher J.; Schultz, Elise; Calhoun, Kristin; Goodman, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    This study is concerned with the characteristics of storms exhibiting an abrupt temporal increase in the total lightning flash rate (i.e., lightning jump, LJ). An automated storm tracking method is used to identify storm "clusters" and total lightning activity from three different lightning detection systems over Oklahoma, northern Alabama and Washington, D.C. On average and for different employed thresholds, the clusters that encompass at least one LJ (LJ1) last longer, relate to higher Maximum Expected Size of Hail, Vertical Integrated Liquid and lightning flash rates (area-normalized) than the clusters that did not exhibit any LJ (LJ0). The respective mean values for LJ1 (LJ0) clusters are 80 min (35 min), 14 mm (8 mm), 25 kg per square meter (18 kg per square meter) and 0.05 flash per min per square kilometer (0.01 flash per min per square kilometer). Furthermore, the LJ1 clusters are also characterized by slower decaying autocorrelation functions, a result that implies a less "random" behavior in the temporal flash rate evolution. In addition, the temporal occurrence of the last LJ provides an estimate of the time remaining to the storm's dissipation. Depending of the LJ strength (i.e., varying thresholds), these values typically range between 20-60 min, with stronger jumps indicating more time until storm decay. This study's results support the hypothesis that the LJ is a proxy for the storm's kinematic and microphysical state rather than a coincidental value.

  1. DESIGN OF A FAST CHROMATICITY JUMP IN RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MONTAG, C.; KEWISCH, J.; BRUNO, D.; GANETIS, G.; LOUIE, W.

    2003-01-01

    During transition crossing in the .Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), chromaticities have to change sign. This sign change is partially accomplished by the γ t quadrupole jump; however, the resulting chromaticity jump is only Δξ x = 2.1 in the horizontal and Δξ y = 2.4 in the vertical plane. To increase the jump height, a dedicated chromaticity jump scheme has been designed, consisting of fast power supplies connected to six sextupoles per ring, which is capable of providing a chromaticity jump of Δξ = 6

  2. Risk, Jumps, and Diversification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bollerslev, Tim; Law, Tzuo Hann; Tauchen, George

    We test for price discontinuities, or jumps, in a panel of high-frequency intraday returns for forty large-cap stocks and an equiweighted index from these same stocks. Jumps are naturally classified into two types: common and idiosyncratic. Common jumps affect all stocks, albeit to varying degrees......, while idiosyncratic jumps are stock-specific. Despite the fact that each of the stocks has a of about unity with respect to the index, common jumps are virtually never detected in the individual stocks. This is truly puzzling, as an index can jump only if one or more of its components jump. To resolve...... this puzzle, we propose a new test for cojumps. Using this new test we find strong evidence for many modest-sized common jumps that simply pass through the standard jump detection statistic, while they appear highly significant in the cross section based on the new cojump identification scheme. Our results...

  3. Neuromuscular function during drop jumps in young and elderly males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piirainen, Jarmo M; Linnamo, Vesa; Sippola, Niina; Avela, Janne

    2012-12-01

    The Hoffman reflex (H-reflex), indicating alpha-motoneuron pool activity, has been shown to be task - and in resting conditions - age dependent. How aging affects H-reflex activity during explosive movements is not clear at present. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of aging on H-reflexes during drop jumps, and its possible role in drop jump performance. Ten young (26.8 ± 2.7 years) and twenty elderly (64.2 ± 2.7 years) subjects participated in the study. Maximal drop jump performance and soleus H-reflex response (H/M jump) 20 ms after ground contact were measured in a sledge ergometer. Maximal H-reflex, maximal M-wave, Hmax/Mmax-ratio and H-reflex excitability curves were measured during standing rest. Although in young the H-reflex response (Hmax/Mmax) was 6.5% higher during relaxed standing and 19.7% higher during drop jumps (H jump/M jump) than in the elderly group, these differences were not statistically significant. In drop jumps, the elderly subjects had lower jumping height (30.4%, p push-off force (18.0%, p push-off time (31.0% p push-off force (r = 0.833, p push-off time (r = -0.857, p < 0.01) in young but not in the elderly. Correlations between H-reflex response and jumping parameters in young may indicate different jumping and activation strategies in drop jumps. However, it does not fully explain age related differences in jumping performance, since age related differences in H-reflex activity were non-significant. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Treinamento de força com uso de correntes e potencialização pós-ativação do salto vertical Entrenamiento de fuerza con cadenas y la potenciación post-activación del salto vertical Chain resistance training and vertical jump post-activation potentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jéderson Nunes

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A Potencialização Pós-Ativação (PPA é estratégia para melhora do desempenho com uso de carga fixa (RF, definida no ponto de falha mecânica (PFM. Por outro lado, o uso de correntes (CRT é estímulo com resistência variável (RV. Assim, objetivou-se avaliar os efeitos do CRT na altura e tempo de voo do salto vertical com contramovimento (CMJ. A partir de estudo de intervenção, 15 sujeitos foram avaliados quanto à carga máxima no agachamento (1RM e altura CMJ. Após isto, executaram três tipos de intervenções: i RF com 85% de 1RM; ii RV com 85% de 1RM posicionado no PFM (RV-TF e, iii RV com 85% de 1RM posicionado na maior extensão dos joelhos (RV-TV. Observou-se incremento do CMJ para RV-TF e RV-TV, mas não para RF. Conclui-se que houve PPA com os dois estímulos de CRT.La potenciación post-activación (PAP es estrategia para mejorar el rendimiento, utilizando una carga fija (RF, que se define en el punto de falla mecánica (PFM. Además, el uso de cadenas (CRT es estimulo con resistencia variable (RV. Así, el objetivo fue evaluar los efectos de la CRT en el salto vertical con contramovimiento (CMJ. Con estudio de intervención, 15 sujetos fueron evaluados acerca de la carga máxima en la sentadilla (1RM y altura en el CMJ. Después de eso, se realizaron tres tipos de intervenciones: i RF con el 85% de 1RM; ii RV con el 85% de 1RM en el PFM (RV-TF, y iii la RV en 1RM 85% situado en la mayor extensión de las rodillas (RV-TV. Se observó aumento de lo CMJ para RV-TF y RV-TV, pero no para la RF. Se concluye que existe PPA con los dos estímulos de RV.The Post-Activation Potentiation (PAP is a strategy to improve performance, using a fixed load (RF, defined at the sticking point (PFM. Moreover, the use of chains (CRT is an effort with variable resistance (RV. Thus, the objective was to evaluate the effects of CRT in the countermovement jump (CMJ. With an intervention study, 15 subjects were evaluated for the maximum squat load (1

  5. Jumping in Arithmetic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Albert

    In this paper we study a new relation between sentences: the jump relation. The idea of the jump relation is based on an analysis of Feferman's Theorem that the inconsistency of a theory U is interpretable over U. The jump relation is based on a converse of Feferman's Theorem: if a sentence is

  6. Jumping in Arithmetic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Albert

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we study a new relation between sentences: the jump relation. The idea of the jump relation is based on an analysis of Feferman's Theorem that the inconsistency of a theory U is interpretable over U. The jump relation is based on a converse of Feferman's Theorem: if a sentence is

  7. Forces exerted by jumping children: A pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moes, C.C.M.; Bakker, H.E.

    1998-01-01

    This article reports on a pilot study of the loads exerted vertically by children when jumping. The subjects of the study were 17 children, aged from two to twelve years. Measurements were made using video recordings and a force-plate. The influence of the stiffness of the base and of jumping with

  8. Mesopause Jumps: Observations and Explanation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luebken, F. J.; Becker, E.; Höffner, J.; Viehl, T. P.; Latteck, R.

    2017-12-01

    Recent high resolution temperature measurements by resonance lidar at Davis (69°S) occasionally showed a sudden mesopause altitude increase by 5km and an associated mesopause temperature decrease by 10K. We present further observations which are closely related to this `mesopause jump', namely the increase of mean height of polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE) observed by a VHF radar, very strong westward winds in the upper mesosphere measured by an MF radar, and relatively large eastward winds in the stratosphere taken from reanalysis. We compare to similar observations in the Northern Hemisphere, namely at ALOMAR (69°N) where such mesopause jumps have never been observed. We present a detailed explanation of mesopause jumps. They occur only when stratospheric winds are moderately eastward and mesospheric winds are very large (westward). Under these conditions, gravity waves with comparatively large eastward phase speeds can pass the stratosphere and propagate to the lower thermosphere because their vertical wavelengths in the mesosphere are rather large which implies reduced dynamical stability. When finally breaking in the lower thermosphere, these waves drive an enhanced residual circulation that causes a cold and high-altitude mesopause. The conditions for a mesopause jump occur only in the Southern Hemisphere (SH) and are associated with the late breakdown of the polar vortex.Mesopause jumps are primarily, but not only, observed prior and close to solstice. We also show that during the onset of PMSE in the SH, stratospheric zonal winds are still eastward (up to 30m/s), and that the onset is not closely related to the transition of the stratospheric circulation.

  9. Validity of Hip-worn Inertial Measurement Unit Compared to Jump Mat for Jump Height Measurement in Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantalainen, T; Hesketh, K D; Rodda, C; Duckham, R L

    2018-06-16

    Jump tests assess lower body power production capacity, and can be used to evaluate athletic ability and development during growth. Wearable inertial measurement units (IMU) seem to offer a feasible alternative to laboratory-based equipment for jump height assessments. Concurrent validity of these devices for jump height assessments has only been established in adults. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the concurrent validity of IMU-based jump height estimate compared to contact mat-based jump height estimate in adolescents. Ninety-five adolescents (10-13 years-of-age; girls N=41, height = 154 (SD 9) cm, weight = 44 (11) kg; boys N=54, height=156 (10) cm, weight = 46 (13) kg) completed three counter-movement jumps for maximal jump height on a contact mat. Inertial recordings (accelerations, rotations) were concurrently recorded with a hip-worn IMU (sampling at 256 Hz). Jump height was evaluated based on flight time. The mean IMU-derived jump height was 27.1 (SD 3.8) cm, and the corresponding mean jump-mat-derived value was 21.5 (3.4) cm. While a significant 26% mean difference was observed between the methods (5.5 [95% limits of agreement 2.2 to 8.9] cm, p = 0.006), the correspondence between methods was excellent (ICC = 0.89). The difference between methods was weakly positively associated with jump height (r = 0.28, P = 0.007). Take-off velocity derived jump height was also explored but produced only fair congruence. In conclusion, IMU-derived jump height exhibited excellent congruence to contact mat-based jump height and therefore presents a feasible alternative for jump height assessments in adolescents. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Ski jumping boots limit effective take-off in ski jumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virmavirta, M; Komi, P V

    2001-12-01

    In this study, we measured the vertical and horizontal take-off forces, plantar pressures and activation patterns of four muscles (vastus lateralis, gluteus maximus, tibialis anterior, gastrocnemius) in 10 ski jumpers in simulated laboratory conditions when wearing either training shoes or ski jumping boots. We found significant differences in vertical (P boots condition resulted in a smaller displacement in the final position of the following joint angles: ankle angle (P knee angle (P boots condition, significantly more pressure was recorded under the heel (P knee and hip extensors when wearing jumping boots. We conclude that the stiffness of the structure of the jumping boots may result in a forward shift of pressure, thus limiting the effective vertical force. To avoid this pressure shift, the pattern of movement of simulated take-offs should be carefully controlled, particularly when wearing training shoes.

  11. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ISOKINETIC KNEE STRENGTH AND JUMP CHARACTERISTICS FOLLOWING ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laudner, Kevin; Evans, Daniel; Wong, Regan; Allen, Aaron; Kirsch, Tom; Long, Brian; Meister, Keith

    2015-06-01

    Clinicians are often challenged when making return-to-play decisions following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL-R). Isokinetic strength and jump performance testing are common tools used to make this decision. Unfortunately, vertical jump performance standards have not been clearly established and many clinicians do not have access to isokinetic testing equipment. To establish normative jump and strength characteristics in ACL-R patients cleared by an orthopedic physician to return-to-play and to determine if relationships exist between knee isokinetic strength measurements and jump characteristics described using an electronic jump map system. Descriptive laboratory study. Thirty-three ACL-R patients who had been cleared to return to athletic competition participated in this study. Twenty-six of these ACL-R participants were also matched to 26 asymptomatic athletes based on sex, limb, height, and mass to determine isokinetic strength and jump characteristic differences between groups. Jump tests consisted of single leg vertical, double leg vertical, and a 4-jump single leg vertical jump assessed using an electronic jump mat system. Independent t-tests were used to determine differences between groups and multiple regression analyses were used to identify any relationships between jump performance and knee strength (pjump capabilities and some bilateral knee strength deficiencies compared to the matched control group. The ACL-R group also showed several moderate-to-strong positive relationships for both knee extension and flexion strength with several jump performance characteristics, such as single and double leg vertical jump height. The current results indicate that ACL-R patients present with several knee strength and vertical jump differences compared to a matched control group at the time of return-to-play. Also, ACL-R patient's performance on an electronic jump mat system is strongly related to isokinetic knee strength measures. 2b.

  12. Effect of Ramadan observance on maximal muscular performance of trained men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhlel, Hatem; Shephard, Roy J; Gmada, Nebil; Aouichaoui, Chirine; Peres, Gilbert; Tabka, Zouhair; Bouhlel, Ezdine

    2013-05-01

    To assess the influence of Ramadan fasting on maximal performance of moderately trained young men using various tests of muscle performance. Comparison of Ramadan fasting (n = 10) versus control group (n = 10) over 3 test sessions, before Ramadan (B), at the end of the first week of Ramadan (R-1), and during the fourth week of Ramadan (R-4). At each 2-day test session, 4 tests were performed in the same order: measurement of vertical jump height (VJH) and a force-velocity test using the arms on day 1, and measurement of handgrip force (HGF), and a force-velocity test using the legs on day 2. Twenty trained men. Maximal power of the arms and of the legs (force-velocity testing), vertical jump performance, HGF, anthropometric data, dietary intake, hemoglobin, and hematocrit. Two-way analyses of variance (group × time) showed Ramadan fasters with decreased maximal anaerobic power of the arms (Wmax-A) and legs (Wmax-L) at R-1, with a partial return of arm data to initial values at R-4. Vertical jump height and HGF remained unchanged throughout. Other changes in Ramadan observers were a decreased energy intake and a decrease of plasma volume at R-1. These results suggest that Ramadan observance initially had detrimental effects on Wmax-A, and Wmax-L, with a tendency to recovery by week 4 of Ramadan. Reductions of total energy intake and intramuscular glycogen may contribute to the reduced Wmax-A and Wmax-L during Ramadan fasting.

  13. Estimation of Jump Tails

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bollerslev, Tim; Todorov, Victor

    We propose a new and flexible non-parametric framework for estimating the jump tails of Itô semimartingale processes. The approach is based on a relatively simple-to-implement set of estimating equations associated with the compensator for the jump measure, or its "intensity", that only utilizes...... the weak assumption of regular variation in the jump tails, along with in-fill asymptotic arguments for uniquely identifying the "large" jumps from the data. The estimation allows for very general dynamic dependencies in the jump tails, and does not restrict the continuous part of the process...... and the temporal variation in the stochastic volatility. On implementing the new estimation procedure with actual high-frequency data for the S&P 500 aggregate market portfolio, we find strong evidence for richer and more complex dynamic dependencies in the jump tails than hitherto entertained in the literature....

  14. What are quantum jumps?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    This paper answers the title question by giving an operational definition of quantum jumps based on measurement theory. This definition forms the basis of a theory of quantum jumps which leads to a number of testable predictions. Experiments are proposed to test the theory. The suggested experiments also test the quantum Zeno paradox, i.e., they test the proposition that frequent observation of a quantum system inhibits quantum jumps in that system. (orig.)

  15. Jumping robots: a biomimetic solution to locomotion across rough terrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Rhodri; Paskins, Keith; Bowyer, Adrian; Vincent, Julian; Megill, William; Bomphrey, Richard

    2007-09-01

    This paper introduces jumping robots as a means to traverse rough terrain; such terrain can pose problems for traditional wheeled, tracked and legged designs. The diversity of jumping mechanisms found in nature is explored to support the theory that jumping is a desirable ability for a robot locomotion system to incorporate, and then the size-related constraints are determined from first principles. A series of existing jumping robots are presented and their performance summarized. The authors present two new biologically inspired jumping robots, Jollbot and Glumper, both of which incorporate additional locomotion techniques of rolling and gliding respectively. Jollbot consists of metal hoop springs forming a 300 mm diameter sphere, and when jumping it raises its centre of gravity by 0.22 m and clears a height of 0.18 m. Glumper is of octahedral shape, with four 'legs' that each comprise two 500 mm lengths of CFRP tube articulating around torsion spring 'knees'. It is able to raise its centre of gravity by 1.60 m and clears a height of 1.17 m. The jumping performance of the jumping robot designs presented is discussed and compared against some specialized jumping animals. Specific power output is thought to be the performance-limiting factor for a jumping robot, which requires the maximization of the amount of energy that can be stored together with a minimization of mass. It is demonstrated that this can be achieved through optimization and careful materials selection.

  16. Ski jump takeoff performance predictions for a mixed-flow, remote-lift STOVL aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birckelbaw, Lourdes G.

    1992-01-01

    A ski jump model was developed to predict ski jump takeoff performance for a short takeoff and vertical landing (STOVL) aircraft. The objective was to verify the model with results from a piloted simulation of a mixed flow, remote lift STOVL aircraft. The prediction model is discussed. The predicted results are compared with the piloted simulation results. The ski jump model can be utilized for basic research of other thrust vectoring STOVL aircraft performing a ski jump takeoff.

  17. Asymmetry between the Dominant and Non-Dominant Legs in the Kinematics of the Lower Extremities during a Running Single Leg Jump in Collegiate Basketball Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Takashi; Kameda, Mai; Kageyama, Masahiro; Kiba, Kazufusa; Kanehisa, Hiroaki; Maeda, Akira

    2014-12-01

    The present study aimed to clarify the asymmetry between the dominant (DL) and non-dominant takeoff legs (NDL) in terms of lower limb behavior during running single leg jumps (RSJ) in collegiate male basketball players in relation to that of the jump height. Twenty-seven players performed maximal RSJ with a 6 m approach. Three-dimensional kinematics data during RSJ was collected using a 12 Raptor camera infrared motion analysis system (MAC 3D system) at a sampling frequency of 500 Hz. The symmetry index in the jump heights and the kinematics variables were calculated as {2 × (DL - NDL) / (DL + NDL)} × 100. The run-up velocity was similar between the two legs, but the jump height was significantly higher in the DL than in the NDL. During the takeoff phase, the joint angles of the ankle and knee were significantly larger in the DL than the NDL. In addition, the contact time for the DL was significantly shorter than that for the NDL. The symmetry index of the kinematics for the ankle joint was positively correlated with that of jump height, but that for the knee joint was not. The current results indicate that, for collegiate basketball players, the asymmetry in the height of a RSJ can be attributed to that in the joint kinematics of the ankle during the takeoff phase, which may be associated with the ability to effectively transmit run-up velocity to jump height. Key pointsAsymmetry of height during running single leg jump between two legs is due to the behavior of the ankle joint (i.e. stiffer the ankle joint and explosive bounding).The dominant leg can transmit run-up velocity into the vertical velocity at takeoff phase to jump high compared with the non-dominant leg.Basketball players who have a greater asymmetry of the RSJ at the collegiate level could be assessed as non-regulars judging by the magnitude of asymmetry.

  18. Correlação entre o desempenho de jogadores de futebol no teste de sprint de 30m e no teste de salto vertical Correlation between performance of Soccer players in the 30-meter sprint test and in the vertical jump test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Barbosa Coelho

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do estudo foi determinar o nível de correlação entre o desempenho nos 10m iniciais, dos 20m finais e no tempo total do teste de sprint de 30m, com o do salto vertical com contra-movimento (CMJ entre jogadores de futebol. Participaram do estudo 167 jogadores das categorias profissional (N. 94 e júnior (N. 73. Foram determinadas as velocidades dos jogadores em 10m (V10, 20m (V20 e no total de 30m (V30. A habilidade de salto foi avaliada através do CMJ. Para correlacionar os dados, foi utilizado o coeficiente de correlação de Pearson com nível de significância de pThe aim of the present study was to determine the association between the results in the counter movement jump (CMJ and the results in the first 10 meters, in the final 20 meters and the in the total 30 meters of a 30-meter sprint. One-hundred and sixty seven Soccer players from the professional (N. 93 and under twenty (N. 74 categories, from a Brazilian first division Soccer club participated in the study. The sprint test consisted of a 30-meter run timed at the 10-meter and at the 30-meter marks. The jump capacity was assessed through the CMJ. Pearson's correlation (r was used to determine the association between these variables. The significance level adopted was p<.05. The U-20 players presented faster V10 and slower V20 than the professionals (p<.05. The correlation (r between CMJ and V10, V20 and V30 were .239, .370 and .408, respectively, for the U20 group and .381, .381 and .470, respectively, for the professional group. Evaluating the two categories together the correlation were; r= 0,293, 0,386 and 0,441 to V10, V20 and V30 respectively. The correlation between CMJ and V10 was weak and moderate for V20 and V30. In the professional category the correlation between CMJ and all the other parameters was moderate. It is probable that higher correlation values for CMJ and V10 for the professionals could be attributed to specific training effects.

  19. Effects of plyometric training on jumping performance in junior basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matavulj, D; Kukolj, M; Ugarkovic, D; Tihanyi, J; Jaric, S

    2001-06-01

    Although the plyometric training has proved its efficiency, it remains generally unknown whether a limited amount of plyometric training could improve movements in subjects who already demonstrate high level of performance. Three different training regimens were performed in order to study effects of plyometric training on elite junior basketball players. While control group (CG) participated only in the regular midseason training activity, another two groups performed a limited amount of plyometric training employing drop jumps from the height of either 50 cm (EG-50) or 100 cm (EG-100). The height of the maximal vertical jump (CMJ), as well as the maximal voluntary force (F) and the rate of force development (RFD) of hip and knee extensors were tested prior to and after the training. An increase in CMJ (4.8 and 5.6 cm in EG-50 and EG-100, respectively), as well as in F of hip extensors and RFD of knee extensors was observed in both experimental groups, while no significant changes were recorded in CG. When the pretest scores were used as a covariate, both experimental groups demonstrated higher increase in CMJ and RFD of knee extensors then CG. However, no differences were observed between EG-50 and EG-100. The multiple correlation between four isometric parameters and CMJ revealed R2=0.29. A limited amount of plyometric training could improve jumping performance in elite junior basketball players and this improvement could be partly related with an increase in F of hip extensors and RFD of knee extensors. However, neither of the two initial heights of the applied drop jumps proved to be more effective.

  20. Validation of an inertial measurement unit for the measurement of jump count and height.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Kerry; Bahr, Roald; Baltich, Jennifer; Whittaker, Jackie L; Meeuwisse, Willem H

    2017-05-01

    To validate the use of an inertial measurement unit (IMU) for the collection of total jump count and assess the validity of an IMU for the measurement of jump height against 3-D motion analysis. Cross sectional validation study. 3D motion-capture laboratory and field based settings. Thirteen elite adolescent volleyball players. Participants performed structured drills, played a 4 set volleyball match and performed twelve counter movement jumps. Jump counts from structured drills and match play were validated against visual count from recorded video. Jump height during the counter movement jumps was validated against concurrent 3-D motion-capture data. The IMU device captured more total jumps (1032) than visual inspection (977) during match play. During structured practice, device jump count sensitivity was strong (96.8%) while specificity was perfect (100%). The IMU underestimated jump height compared to 3D motion-capture with mean differences for maximal and submaximal jumps of 2.5 cm (95%CI: 1.3 to 3.8) and 4.1 cm (3.1-5.1), respectively. The IMU offers a valid measuring tool for jump count. Although the IMU underestimates maximal and submaximal jump height, our findings demonstrate its practical utility for field-based measurement of jump load. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Drop jumping. I. The influence of jumping technique on the biomechanics of jumping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bobbert, M F; Huijing, P A; van Ingen Schenau, G J

    In the literature, drop jumping is advocated as an effective exercise for athletes who prepare themselves for explosive activities. When executing drop jumps, different jumping techniques can be used. In this study, the influence of jumping technique on the biomechanics of jumping is investigated.

  2. Reliability of bounce drop jump parameters within elite male rugby players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costley, Lisa; Wallace, Eric; Johnston, Michael; Kennedy, Rodney

    2017-07-25

    The aims of the study were to investigate the number of familiarisation sessions required to establish reliability of the bounce drop jump (BDJ) and subsequent reliability once familiarisation is achieved. Seventeen trained male athletes completed 4 BDJs in 4 separate testing sessions. Force-time data from a 20 cm BDJ was obtained using two force plates (ensuring ground contact < 250 ms). Subjects were instructed to 'jump for maximal height and minimal contact time' while the best and average of four jumps were compared. A series of performance variables were assessed in both eccentric and concentric phases including jump height, contact time, flight time, reactive strength index (RSI), peak power, rate of force development (RFD) and actual dropping height (ADH). Reliability was assessed using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and coefficient of variation (CV) while familiarisation was assessed using a repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA). The majority of DJ parameters exhibited excellent reliability with no systematic bias evident, while the average of 4 trials provided greater reliability. With the exception of vertical stiffness (CV: 12.0 %) and RFD (CV: 16.2 %) all variables demonstrated low within subject variation (CV range: 3.1 - 8.9 %). Relative reliability was very poor for ADH, with heights ranging from 14.87 - 29.85 cm. High levels of reliability can be obtained from the BDJ with the exception of vertical stiffness and RFD, however, extreme caution must be taken when comparing DJ results between individuals and squads due to large discrepancies between actual drop height and platform height.

  3. Relationships between maximal strength of lower limb, anthropometric characteristics and fundamental explosive performance in handball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermassi, Souhail; Chelly, Mohamed Souhaiel; Wagner, Herbert; Fieseler, Georg; Schulze, Stephan; Delank, Karl-Stefan; Shephard, Roy J; Schwesig, René

    2018-02-14

     The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between lower body muscular strength, anthropometric characteristics and several measures of explosive performance in elite team-handball players.  22 male elite team-handball players (age: 19.1 ± 1.7 years) were studied during the competitive season. Standard anthropometric and body composition measures included body mass index, lower limb and thigh muscle volume, and body fat percentage. Maximal leg strength was determined by a one-repetition maximum (1-RM) half back-squat. Vertical jump performance was assessed using a squat jump (SJ) and a counter movement jump (CMJ). Repeated shuttle-sprint ability (RSA) was tested by 6 (2 × 15 m) shuttle sprints with 20 s of active recovery intervals. The best time in a single shuttle sprint (30m; RSA best ), fastest total time (RSA TT ) and RSA test performance decrement (RSA dec ) were recorded. Agility was measured using a modified T-half test (MAT). Throwing velocities of jump shooting and 3-step throwing were recorded by digital video camera.  The explained variance of 1-RM half-back-squats ranged from 0.2 % (RSA% Fatigue Index) to 70.1 % (CMJ). Four out of 8 variables (RSA Best Time, CMJ, SJ, throwing velocity of jump shoot) demonstrated an r 2  > 0.5. Jump performances seemed closely related to 1-RM half-back-squats. Furthermore, 1-RM half-back-squats were positively correlated with leg and thigh muscle volumes (r = 0.652, r = 0.768).  The anthropometric characteristics and some physical performance tests are closely related to the maximal strength performance of handball players. Coaches should focus on maximal strength training programs for the lower limbs when seeking improvements in the throwing velocity and jump performance of handball players. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Optimal Ski Jump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebilas, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    Consider a skier who goes down a takeoff ramp, attains a speed "V", and jumps, attempting to land as far as possible down the hill below (Fig. 1). At the moment of takeoff the angle between the skier's velocity and the horizontal is [alpha]. What is the optimal angle [alpha] that makes the jump the longest possible for the fixed magnitude of the…

  5. Test-retest reliability of jump execution variables using mechanography: a comparison of jump protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, John S; Johnson, LuAnn; Tomkinson, Grant; Stein, Jesse; Roemmich, James N

    2018-05-01

    Mechanography during the vertical jump may enhance screening and determining mechanistic causes underlying physical performance changes. Utility of jump mechanography for evaluation is limited by scant test-retest reliability data on force-time variables. This study examined the test-retest reliability of eight jump execution variables assessed from mechanography. Thirty-two women (mean±SD: age 20.8 ± 1.3 yr) and 16 men (age 22.1 ± 1.9 yr) attended a familiarization session and two testing sessions, all one week apart. Participants performed two variations of the squat jump with squat depth self-selected and controlled using a goniometer to 80º knee flexion. Test-retest reliability was quantified as the systematic error (using effect size between jumps), random error (using coefficients of variation), and test-retest correlations (using intra-class correlation coefficients). Overall, jump execution variables demonstrated acceptable reliability, evidenced by small systematic errors (mean±95%CI: 0.2 ± 0.07), moderate random errors (mean±95%CI: 17.8 ± 3.7%), and very strong test-retest correlations (range: 0.73-0.97). Differences in random errors between controlled and self-selected protocols were negligible (mean±95%CI: 1.3 ± 2.3%). Jump execution variables demonstrated acceptable reliability, with no meaningful differences between the controlled and self-selected jump protocols. To simplify testing, a self-selected jump protocol can be used to assess force-time variables with negligible impact on measurement error.

  6. Entropy maximization

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. It is shown that (i) every probability density is the unique maximizer of relative entropy in an appropriate class and (ii) in the class of all pdf f that satisfy. ∫ fhi dμ = λi for i = 1, 2,...,...k the maximizer of entropy is an f0 that is pro- portional to exp(. ∑ ci hi ) for some choice of ci . An extension of this to a continuum of.

  7. Entropy Maximization

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It is shown that (i) every probability density is the unique maximizer of relative entropy in an appropriate class and (ii) in the class of all pdf that satisfy ∫ f h i d = i for i = 1 , 2 , … , … k the maximizer of entropy is an f 0 that is proportional to exp ⁡ ( ∑ c i h i ) for some choice of c i . An extension of this to a continuum of ...

  8. Variability of Plyometric and Ballistic Exercise Technique Maintains Jump Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Phillip T; Greig, Matthew; Comfort, Paul; McMahon, John J

    2018-06-01

    Chandler, PT, Greig, M, Comfort, P, and McMahon, JJ. Variability of plyometric and ballistic exercise technique maintains jump performance. J Strength Cond Res 32(6): 1571-1582, 2018-The aim of this study was to investigate changes in vertical jump technique over the course of a training session. Twelve plyometric and ballistic exercise-trained male athletes (age = 23.4 ± 4.6 years, body mass = 78.7 ± 18.8 kg, height = 177.1 ± 9.0 cm) performed 3 sets of 10 repetitions of drop jump (DJ), rebound jump (RJ) and squat jump (SJ). Each exercise was analyzed from touchdown to peak joint flexion and peak joint flexion to take-off. Squat jump was analyzed from peak joint flexion to take-off only. Jump height, flexion and extension time and range of motion, and instantaneous angles of the ankle, knee, and hip joints were measured. Separate 1-way repeated analyses of variance compared vertical jump technique across exercise sets and repetitions. Exercise set analysis found that SJ had lower results than DJ and RJ for the angle at peak joint flexion for the hip, knee, and ankle joints and take-off angle of the hip joint. Exercise repetition analysis found that the ankle joint had variable differences for the angle at take-off, flexion, and extension time for RJ. The knee joint had variable differences for flexion time for DJ and angle at take-off and touchdown for RJ. There was no difference in jump height. Variation in measured parameters across repetitions highlights variable technique across plyometric and ballistic exercises. This did not affect jump performance, but likely maintained jump performance by overcoming constraints (e.g., level of rate coding).

  9. Change in Counter movement Jump Strategy by Varying Jump Height Based on Simplified Framework for Center of Mass Mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seyoung

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we investigated how a jumping strategy changes with an increase in the vertical jump height for a resultant ground reaction force (GRF) vector. We expected that the resultant force vector between two sequential motion phases (i.e., countermovement and push-off) of the counter movement jump would significantly change with the vertical jump height to take advantage of the resulting supportive force (i.e., an initial push-off force larger than the body weight) through the counter movement phase. Nine healthy young subjects were instructed to jump straight up to five different height levels ranging from 191 cm to 221 cm, and the kinematic and kinetic data were obtained in regular trials. The results showed that a lower center of mass position and larger resultant force vector were clearly observed in a higher jump, implying that the counter movement strategy changed with the vertical jump height to prepare for sufficient joint deviation and obtain a force advantage for larger push-off work.

  10. Change in Counter movement Jump Strategy by Varying Jump Height Based on Simplified Framework for Center of Mass Mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seyoung [Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials(KIMM), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    In this study, we investigated how a jumping strategy changes with an increase in the vertical jump height for a resultant ground reaction force (GRF) vector. We expected that the resultant force vector between two sequential motion phases (i.e., countermovement and push-off) of the counter movement jump would significantly change with the vertical jump height to take advantage of the resulting supportive force (i.e., an initial push-off force larger than the body weight) through the counter movement phase. Nine healthy young subjects were instructed to jump straight up to five different height levels ranging from 191 cm to 221 cm, and the kinematic and kinetic data were obtained in regular trials. The results showed that a lower center of mass position and larger resultant force vector were clearly observed in a higher jump, implying that the counter movement strategy changed with the vertical jump height to prepare for sufficient joint deviation and obtain a force advantage for larger push-off work.

  11. Biomechanics research in ski jumping, 1991-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwameder, Hermann

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, I review biomechanics research in ski jumping with a specific focus on publications presented between 1991 and 2006 on performance enhancement, limiting factors of the take-off, specific training and conditioning, aerodynamics, and safety. The first section presents a brief description of ski jumping phases (in-run, take-off, early flight, stable flight, and landing) regarding the biomechanical and functional fundamentals. The most important and frequently used biomechanical methods in ski jumping (kinematics, ground reaction force analyses, muscle activation patterns, aerodynamics) are summarized in the second section. The third section focuses on ski jumping articles and research findings published after the establishment of the V-technique in 1991, as the introduction of this technique has had a major influence on performance enhancement, ski jumping regulations, and the construction of hill profiles. The final section proposes topics for future research in the biomechanics of ski jumping, including: take-off and early flight and the relative roles of vertical velocity and forward somersaulting angular momentum; optimal jumping patterns utilizing the capabilities of individual athletes; development of kinematic and kinetic feedback systems for hill jumps; comparisons of simulated and hill jumps; effect of equipment modifications on performance and safety enhancement.

  12. Effect of Vertical, Horizontal, and Combined Plyometric Training on Explosive, Balance, and Endurance Performance of Young Soccer Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Campillo, Rodrigo; Gallardo, Francisco; Henriquez-Olguín, Carlos; Meylan, Cesar M P; Martínez, Cristian; Álvarez, Cristian; Caniuqueo, Alexis; Cadore, Eduardo L; Izquierdo, Mikel

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of 6 weeks of vertical, horizontal, or combined vertical and horizontal plyometric training on muscle explosive, endurance, and balance performance. Forty young soccer players aged between 10 and 14 years were randomly divided into control (CG; n = 10), vertical plyometric group (VG; n = 10), horizontal plyometric group (HG; n = 10), and combined vertical and horizontal plyometric group (VHG; n = 10). Players performance in the vertical and horizontal countermovement jump with arms, 5 multiple bounds test (MB5), 20-cm drop jump reactive strength index (RSI20), maximal kicking velocity (MKV), sprint, change of direction speed (CODS), Yo-Yo intermittent recovery level 1 test (Yo-Yo IR1), and balance was measured. No significant or meaningful changes in the CG, apart from small change in the Yo-Yo IR1, were observed while all training programs resulted in meaningful changes in explosive, endurance, and balance performance. However, only VHG showed a statistically significant (p ≤ 0.05) increase in all performance test and most meaningful training effect difference with the CG across tests. Although no significant differences in performance changes were observed between experimental groups, the VHG program was more effective compared with VG (i.e., jumps, MKV, sprint, CODS, and balance performance) and HG (i.e., sprint, CODS, and balance performance) to small effect. The study demonstrated that vertical, horizontal, and combined vertical and horizontal jumps induced meaningful improvement in explosive actions, balance, and intermittent endurance capacity. However, combining vertical and horizontal drills seems more advantageous to induce greater performance improvements.

  13. THE EFFECTS OF SINGLE VERSUS REPEATED PLYOMETRICS ON LANDING BIOMECHANICS AND JUMPING PERFORMANCE IN MEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Makaruk

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the chronic effects of single and repeated jumps training on vertical landing force (VGRF and jump height in untrained men. The VGRF and jump height were compared after a six-week plyometric training programme containing single and repeated jumps, together with two additional parameters: landing time (LT and range of the knee flexion during landing (KF. Thirty-six untrained physical education students with a plyometric training background were randomly assigned to a single jump group (SJG, n =12, repeated jumps group (RJG, n =12, and control group (CON, n =12. The SJG performed only single jumps, the RJG executed repeated (consecutive jumps, whereas the CON did not perform any exercises at all. A countermovement jump (CMJ, repeated countermovement jumps (RCMJ, and a drop jump (DJ were tested before and after the training. Only the RJG showed a significantly reduced VGRF (p<0.05 in all tests. Both plyometric groups significantly improved (p<0.05 their jump height in all tests. The LT was significantly greater in the RJG, compared to the SJG, in all tests. The KF was also significantly (p<0.05 greater in the RJG than in the SJG for CMJ and RCMJ. The results suggest that repeated jumps are beneficial for simultaneous landing force reduction and jumping performance enhancement.

  14. Effect of a neuromuscular training program on the kinetics and kinematics of jumping tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Jonathan D; Limpisvasti, Orr

    2008-06-01

    Altered motor control strategies are a proposed cause of the female athlete's increased risk for noncontact anterior cruciate ligament injury. Injury prevention programs have shown promising results in decreasing the incidence of anterior cruciate ligament injury. To evaluate the effect of the Kerlan-Jobe Orthopaedic Clinic Modified Neuromuscular Training Program on the biomechanics of select jumping tasks in the female collegiate athlete. Controlled laboratory study. Thirty female National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I soccer and basketball players performed vertical jump, hopping tests, and 2 jumping tasks (drop jump and stop jump). All subjects completed a 6-week neuromuscular training program with core strengthening and plyometric training. Three-dimensional motion analysis and force plate data were used to compare the kinetics and kinematics of jumping tasks before and after training. Dynamic knee valgus moment during the stance phase of stop jump tasks decreased after completion of the neuromuscular training program (P = .04), but differences were not observed for the drop jump. Initial knee flexion (P = .003) and maximum knee flexion (P = .006) angles increased during the stance phase of drop jumps after training, but differences were not observed for the stop jump. The athletes showed improved performance in vertical jump (P training program improved select athletic performance measures and changed movement patterns during jumping tasks in the subject population. The use of this neuromuscular training program could potentially modify the collegiate athlete's motion strategies, improve performance, and lower the athlete's risk for injury.

  15. Effects of kettlebell training on postural coordination and jump performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jay, Kenneth; Jakobsen, Markus Due; Sundstrup, Emil

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a worksite intervention using kettlebell training to improve postural reactions to perturbation and jump performance.This single-blind randomized controlled trial involved 40 adults (n=40) from occupations with a high....... The outcome measures were postural reactions to sudden perturbation and maximal countermovement jump height.Compared to the control group, the training group significant decreased stopping time following perturbation (-109ms, 95% CI [-196:-21]). Jump height increased significantly in the training group (1.5cm...

  16. Validity of a jump training apparatus using Wii Balance Board.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Keizo; Matsuzawa, Mamoru

    2013-05-01

    The dynamic quantification of jump ability is useful for sports performance evaluation. We developed a force measurement system using the Wii Balance Board (WBB). This study was conducted to validate the system in comparison with a laboratory-grade force plate (FP). For a static validation, weights of 10-180kg were put progressively on the WBB put on the FP. The vertical component of the ground reaction force (vGRF) was measured using both devices and compared. For the dynamic validation, 10 subjects without lower limb pathology participated in the study and performed vertical jumping twice on the WBB on the FP. The range of analysis was set from the landing after the first jump to taking off of the second jump. The peak values during the landing phase and jumping phase were obtained and the force-time integral (force impulse) was measured. The relations of the values measured using each device were compared using Pearson's correlation coefficient test and Bland-Altman plots (BAP). Significant correlation (P<.01, r=.99) was found between the values of both devices in the static and the dynamic test. Examination of the BAP revealed a proportion error in the landing phase and showed no relation in the jumping phase between the difference and the mean in the dynamic test. The WBB detects the vGRF in the jumping phase with high precision. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. A valid and reliable method to measure jump-specific training and competition load in elite volleyball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skazalski, C; Whiteley, R; Hansen, C; Bahr, R

    2018-05-01

    Use of a commercially available wearable device to monitor jump load with elite volleyball players has become common practice. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the validity and reliability of this device, the Vert, to count jumps and measure jump height with professional volleyball players. Jump count accuracy was determined by comparing jumps recorded by the device to jumps observed through systematic video analysis of three practice sessions and two league matches performed by a men's professional volleyball team. Jumps performed by 14 players were each coded for time and jump type and individually matched to device recorded jumps. Jump height validity of the device was examined against reference standards as participants performed countermovement jumps on a force plate and volleyball-specific jumps with a Vertec. The Vert device accurately counted 99.3% of the 3637 jumps performed during practice and match play. The device showed excellent jump height interdevice reliability for two devices placed in the same pouch during volleyball jumps (r = .99, 95% CI 0.98-0.99). The device had a minimum detectable change (MDC) of 9.7 cm and overestimated jump height by an average of 5.5 cm (95% CI 4.5-6.5) across all volleyball jumps. The Vert device demonstrates excellent accuracy counting volleyball-specific jumps during training and competition. While the device is not recommended to measure maximal jumping ability when precision is needed, it provides an acceptable measure of on-court jump height that can be used to monitor athlete jump load. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Recent Advancements in Lightning Jump Algorithm Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Christopher J.; Petersen, Walter A.; Carey, Lawrence D.

    2010-01-01

    In the past year, the primary objectives were to show the usefulness of total lightning as compared to traditional cloud-to-ground (CG) networks, test the lightning jump algorithm configurations in other regions of the country, increase the number of thunderstorms within our thunderstorm database, and to pinpoint environments that could prove difficult for any lightning jump configuration. A total of 561 thunderstorms have been examined in the past year (409 non-severe, 152 severe) from four regions of the country (North Alabama, Washington D.C., High Plains of CO/KS, and Oklahoma). Results continue to indicate that the 2 lightning jump algorithm configuration holds the most promise in terms of prospective operational lightning jump algorithms, with a probability of detection (POD) at 81%, a false alarm rate (FAR) of 45%, a critical success index (CSI) of 49% and a Heidke Skill Score (HSS) of 0.66. The second best performing algorithm configuration was the Threshold 4 algorithm, which had a POD of 72%, FAR of 51%, a CSI of 41% and an HSS of 0.58. Because a more complex algorithm configuration shows the most promise in terms of prospective operational lightning jump algorithms, accurate thunderstorm cell tracking work must be undertaken to track lightning trends on an individual thunderstorm basis over time. While these numbers for the 2 configuration are impressive, the algorithm does have its weaknesses. Specifically, low-topped and tropical cyclone thunderstorm environments are present issues for the 2 lightning jump algorithm, because of the suppressed vertical depth impact on overall flash counts (i.e., a relative dearth in lightning). For example, in a sample of 120 thunderstorms from northern Alabama that contained 72 missed events by the 2 algorithm 36% of the misses were associated with these two environments (17 storms).

  19. The Influence of External Load on Quadriceps Muscle and Tendon Dynamics during Jumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earp, Jacob E; Newton, Robert U; Cormie, Prue; Blazevich, Anthony J

    2017-11-01

    Tendons possess both viscous (rate-dependent) and elastic (rate-independent) properties that determine tendon function. During high-speed movements external loading increases both the magnitude (FT) and rate (RFDT) of tendon loading. The influence of external loading on muscle and tendon dynamics during maximal vertical jumping was explored. Ten resistance-trained men performed parallel-depth, countermovement vertical jumps with and without additional load (0%, 30%, 60%, and 90% of maximum squat lift strength), while joint kinetics and kinematics, quadriceps tendon length (LT) and patellar tendon FT and RFDT were estimated using integrated ultrasound, motion analysis and force platform data and muscle tendon modelling. Estimated FT and RFDT, but not peak LT, increased with external loading. Temporal comparisons between 0% and 90% loads revealed that FT was greater with 90% loading throughout the majority of the movement (11%-81% and 87%-95% movement duration). However, RFDT was greater with 90% load only during the early movement initiation phase (8%-15% movement duration) but was greater in the 0% load condition later in the eccentric phase (27%-38% movement duration). LT was longer during the early movement (12%-23% movement duration) but shorter in the late eccentric and early concentric phases (48%-55% movement duration) with 90% load. External loading positively influenced peak FT and RFDT but tendon strain appeared unaffected, suggesting no additive effect of external loading on patellar tendon lengthening during human jumping. Temporal analysis revealed that external loading resulted in a large initial RFDT that may have caused dynamic stiffening of the tendon and attenuated tendon strain throughout the movement. These results suggest that external loading influences tendon lengthening in both a load- and movement-dependent manner.

  20. Force generation and temperature-jump and length-jump tension transients in muscle fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J S; Rodgers, M E

    1995-01-01

    Muscle tension rises with increasing temperature. The kinetics that govern the tension rise of maximally Ca(2+)-activated, skinned rabbit psoas fibers over a temperature range of 0-30 degrees C was characterized in laser temperature-jump experiments. The kinetic response is simple and can be readily interpreted in terms of a basic three-step mechanism of contraction, which includes a temperature-sensitive rapid preequilibrium(a) linked to a temperature-insensitive rate-limiting step and followed by a temperature-sensitive tension-generating step. These data and mechanism are compared and contrasted with the more complex length-jump Huxley-Simmons phases in which all states that generate tension or bear tension are perturbed. The rate of the Huxley-Simmons phase 4 is temperature sensitive at low temperatures but plateaus at high temperatures, indicating a change in rate-limiting step from a temperature-sensitive (phase 4a) to a temperature-insensitive reaction (phase 4b); the latter appears to correlate with the slow, temperature-insensitive temperature-jump relaxation. Phase 3 is absent in the temperature-jump, which excludes it from tension generation. We confirm that de novo tension generation occurs as an order-disorder transition during phase 2slow and the equivalent, temperature-sensitive temperature-jump relaxation. PMID:7612845

  1. Jump Squat is More Related to Sprinting and Jumping Abilities than Olympic Push Press.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loturco, I; Kobal, R; Maldonado, T; Piazzi, A F; Bottino, A; Kitamura, K; Abad, C C C; Pereira, L A; Nakamura, F Y

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to test the relationships between jump squat (JS) and Olympic push press (OPP) power outputs and performance in sprint, squat jump (SJ), countermovement jump (CMJ) and change of direction (COD) speed tests in elite soccer players. 27 athletes performed a maximum power load test to determine their bar mean propulsive power (MPP) and bar mean propulsive velocity (MPV) in the JS and OPP exercises. Magnitude-based inference was used to compare the exercises. The MPV was almost certainly higher in the OPP than in the JS. The MPP relative to body mass (MPP REL) was possibly higher in the OPP. Only the JS MPP REL presented very large correlations with linear speed ( r> 0.7, for speed in 5, 10, 20 and 30 m) and vertical jumping abilities ( r> 0.8, for SJ and CMJ), and moderate correlation with COD speed ( r= 0.45). Although significant (except for COD), the associations between OPP outcomes and field-based measurements (speed, SJ and CMJ) were all moderate, ranging from 0.40 to 0.48. In a group composed of elite soccer players, the JS exercise is more associated with jumping and sprinting abilities than the OPP. Longitudinal studies are needed to confirm if these strong relationships imply superior training effects in favor of the JS exercise. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Why is countermovement jump height greater than squat jump height?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bobbert, Maarten F.; Gerritsen, Karin G M; Litjens, Maria C A; Van Soest, Arthur J.

    1996-01-01

    In the literature, it is well established that subjects are able to jump higher in a countermovement jump (CMJ) than in a squat jump (SJ). The purpose of this study was to estimate the relative contribution of the time available for force development and the storage and reutilization of elastic

  3. Take-off aerodynamics in ski jumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virmavirta, M; Kivekäs, J; Komi, P V

    2001-04-01

    The effect of aerodynamic forces on the force-time characteristics of the simulated ski jumping take-off was examined in a wind tunnel. Vertical and horizontal ground reaction forces were recorded with a force plate installed under the wind tunnel floor. The jumpers performed take-offs in non-wind conditions and in various wind conditions (21-33 m s(-1)). EMGs of the important take-off muscles were recorded from one jumper. The dramatic decrease in take-off time found in all jumpers can be considered as the result of the influence of aerodynamic lift. The loss in impulse due to the shorter force production time with the same take-off force is compensated with the increase in lift force, resulting in a higher vertical velocity (V(v)) than is expected from the conventional calculation of V(v) from the force impulse. The wind conditions emphasized the explosiveness of the ski jumping take-off. The aerodynamic lift and drag forces which characterize the aerodynamic quality of the initial take-off position (static in-run position) varied widely even between the examined elite ski jumpers. According to the computer simulation these differences can decisively affect jumping distance. The proper utilization of the prevailing aerodynamic forces before and during take-off is a very important prerequisite for achieving a good flight position.

  4. The Effect of Initial Knee Angle on Concentric-Only Squat Jump Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Lachlan J.; Argus, Christos K.; Taylor, Kristie-Lee; Sheppard, Jeremy M.; Chapman, Dale W.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: There is uncertainty as to which knee angle during a squat jump (SJ) produces maximal jump performance. Importantly, understanding this information will aid in determining appropriate ratios for assessment and monitoring of the explosive characteristics of athletes. Method: This study compared SJ performance across different knee…

  5. Jump into Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Stephen; Cohen, Ann; Meyer, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    Jump Into Action (JIA) is a school-based team-taught program to help fifth-grade students make healthy food choices and be more active. The JIA team (physical education teacher, classroom teacher, school nurse, and parent) work together to provide a supportive environment as students set goals to improve food choices and increase activity.…

  6. Egg Bungee Jump!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Mike; Brand, Lance

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the authors present an egg bungee jumping activity. This activity introduces students to ways that engineers might apply calculations of failure to meet a challenge. Students are required to use common, everyday materials such as rubber bands, string, plastic bags, and eggs. They will apply technological problem solving, material…

  7. Kinetic asymmetries between forward and drop jump landing tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgana Alves de Britto

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1980-0037.2015v17n6p661   Landing asymmetry is a risk factor for knee anterior cruciate ligament injury. The aim of this study was to identify kinetic asymmetries in healthy recreational athletes performing different jump-landing techniques. Twelve recreational athletes engaged in regular training underwent kinetic evaluation using two 3D force plates and were analyzed for: (a three-dimensional peak forces, (b time to peak vertical force, and (c initial phase asymmetries. All data were collected during performance of unilateral and bilateral trials of forward and drop jump tasks. Forward jump-landing tasks elicited greater kinetic asymmetry than drop-landing tasks. Regardless of jump-landing technique, the preferred leg experienced higher forces than the non-preferred leg. The initial landing phase showed more kinetic asymmetries than the later phase when peak vertical forces occur. It was concluded that when screening athletes for kinetic asymmetries that may predispose them to injury, forward jump-landing tasks and the early landing phase might show more kinetic asymmetries than drop jump-landing tasks and the late landing phase, respectively.

  8. SARS – virus jumps species

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SARS – virus jumps species. Coronavirus reshuffles genes; Rotteir et al, Rotterdam showed the virus to jump from cats to mouse cells after single gene mutation ? Human disease due to virus jumping from wild or domestic animals; Present favourite animal - the cat; - edible or domestic.

  9. Validity Study of a Jump Mat Compared to the Reference Standard Force Plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogan, Slavko; Radlinger, Lorenz; Imhasly, Caroline; Kneubuehler, Andrea; Hilfiker, Roger

    2015-12-01

    In the field of vertical jump diagnostics, force plates (FP) are the reference standard. Recently, despite a lack of evidence, jump mats have been used increasingly. Important factors in favor of jumping mats are their low cost and portability. This validity study compared the Haynl-Elektronik jump mat (HE jump mat) with the reference standard force plate. Ten healthy volunteers participated and each participant completed three series of five drop jumps (DJ). The parameters ground contact time (GCT) and vertical jump height (VJH) from the HE jump mat and the FP were used to evaluate the concurrent validity. The following statistical calculations were performed: Pearson's correlation (r), Bland-Altman plots (standard and for adjusted trend), and regression equations. The Bland-Altman plots suggest that the HE jump mat measures shorter contact times and higher jump heights than the FP. The trend-adjusted Bland-Altman plot shows higher mean differences and wider wing-spreads of confidence limits during longer GCT. During the VJH the mean differences and the wing-spreads of the confidence limits throughout the range present as relatively constant. The following regression equations were created, as close as possible to the true value: GCT = 5.920385 + 1.072293 × [value HE jump mat] and VJH = -1.73777 + 1.011156 × [value HE jump mat]. The HE jump mat can be recommended in relation to the validity of constraints. In this study, only a part of the quality criteria were examined. For the final recommendation it is advised to examine the HE jump mat on the other quality criteria (test-retest reliability, sensitivity change).

  10. A model of the human triceps surae muscle-tendon complex applied to jumping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bobbert, Maarten F.; Huijing, Peter A.; van Ingen Schenau, Gerrit Jan

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain more insight into the behavior of the muscle-tendon complex of human m. triceps surae in jumping. During one-legged vertical jumps of ten subjects ground reaction forces as well as cinematographic data were registered, and electromyograms were recorded from m.

  11. Power variables and bilateral force differences during unloaded and loaded squat jumps in high performance alpine ski racers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Carson; Raschner, Christian; Platzer, Hans-Peter

    2009-05-01

    The purpose of this paper was to investigate the power-load relationship and to compare power variables and bilateral force imbalances between sexes with squat jumps. Twenty men and 17 women, all members of the Austrian alpine ski team (junior and European Cup), performed unloaded and loaded (barbell loads equal to 25, 50, 75, and 100% body weight [BW]) squat jumps with free weights using a specially designed spotting system. Ground reaction force records from 2 force platforms were used to calculate relative average power (P), relative average power in the first 100 ms of the jump (P01), relative average power in the first 200 ms of the jump (P02), jump height, percentage of best jump height (%Jump), and maximal force difference between dominant and nondominant leg (Fmaxdiff). The men displayed significantly higher values at all loads for P and jump height (p free weights.

  12. Optimal dividend policies with transaction costs for a class of jump-diffusion processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hunting, Martin; Paulsen, Jostein

    2013-01-01

    his paper addresses the problem of finding an optimal dividend policy for a class of jump-diffusion processes. The jump component is a compound Poisson process with negative jumps, and the drift and diffusion components are assumed to satisfy some regularity and growth restrictions. Each dividend...... payment is changed by a fixed and a proportional cost, meaning that if ξ is paid out by the company, the shareholders receive kξ−K, where k and K are positive. The aim is to maximize expected discounted dividends until ruin. It is proved that when the jumps belong to a certain class of light...

  13. Optimal Ski Jump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebilas, Krzysztof

    2013-02-01

    Consider a skier who goes down a takeoff ramp, attains a speed V, and jumps, attempting to land as far as possible down the hill below (Fig. 1). At the moment of takeoff the angle between the skier's velocity and the horizontal is α. What is the optimal angle α that makes the jump the longest possible for the fixed magnitude of the velocity V? Of course, in practice, this is a very sophisticated problem; the skier's range depends on a variety of complex factors in addition to V and α. However, if we ignore these and assume the jumper is in free fall between the takeoff ramp and the landing point below, the problem becomes an exercise in kinematics that is suitable for introductory-level students. The solution is presented here.

  14. The Jump Training Program. In Season Conditioning for Women's Basketball.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannam, Sue; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Women athletes have been successful in maintaining and/or increasing their conditioning and vertical jump levels when they participate in the in-season circuit training program described in this article. An exercise guide, sample individual score card, and photos of women practicing the exercises are included. (IAH)

  15. Kinematic Differences between Set- and Jump-Shot Motions in Basketball

    OpenAIRE

    Hiroki Okubo; Mont Hubbard

    2018-01-01

    Shooting arm motions at release in one-hand set and jump basketball shots have been analyzed using a kinematic model. Set and jump shots are classified by the vertical velocity and acceleration of the shooter’s shooting-side shoulder at release. The two-dimensional three-segment model includes the vertical shooting-side shoulder velocity and acceleration. Numerical simulation investigates the effect of shoulder motion. Release backspin angular velocity can be described as a function of the ve...

  16. Jumping hoops on water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Eunjin; Kim, Ho-Young

    2015-11-01

    Small aquatic arthropods, such as water striders and fishing spiders, are able to jump off water to a height several times their body length. Inspired by the unique biological motility on water, we study a simple model using a flexible hoop to provide fundamental understanding and a mimicking principle of small jumpers on water. Behavior of a hoop on water, which is coated with superhydrophobic particles and initially bent into an ellipse from an equilibrium circular shape, is visualized with a high speed camera upon launching it into air by releasing its initial elastic strain energy. We observe that jumping of our hoops is dominated by the dynamic pressure of water rather than surface tension, and thus it corresponds to the dynamic condition experienced by fishing spiders. We calculate the reaction forces provided by water adopting the unsteady Bernoulli equation as well as the momentum loss into liquid inertia and viscous friction. Our analysis allows us to predict the jumping efficiency of the hoop on water in comparison to that on ground, and to discuss the evolutionary pressure rendering fishing spiders select such dynamic behavior.

  17. Undular Hydraulic Jump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Castro-Orgaz

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The transition from subcritical to supercritical flow when the inflow Froude number Fo is close to unity appears in the form of steady state waves called undular hydraulic jump. The characterization of the undular hydraulic jump is complex due to the existence of a non-hydrostatic pressure distribution that invalidates the gradually-varied flow theory, and supercritical shock waves. The objective of this work is to present a mathematical model for the undular hydraulic jump obtained from an approximate integration of the Reynolds equations for turbulent flow assuming that the Reynolds number R is high. Simple analytical solutions are presented to reveal the physics of the theory, and a numerical model is used to integrate the complete equations. The limit of application of the theory is discussed using a wave breaking condition for the inception of a surface roller. The validity of the mathematical predictions is critically assessed using physical data, thereby revealing aspects on which more research is needed

  18. The effects of electromyostimulation training and basketball practice on muscle strength and jumping ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffiuletti, N A; Cometti, G; Amiridis, I G; Martin, A; Pousson, M; Chatard, J C

    2000-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of a 4-week electromyostimulation training program on the strength of the knee extensors and the vertical jump performance of 10 basketball players. Electromyostimulation sessions were carried out 3 times weekly; each session consisted of 48 contractions. Testing was carried out before and after the electromyostimulation training program (week 4) and once more after 4 weeks of normal basketball training (week 8). At week 4, isokinetic strength increased significantly (p training increased also isometric strength at the two angles adjacent to the training angle (p jump increased significantly by 14% at week 4 (p jump showed no change. At week 8, gains in isokinetic, isometric strength and squat-jump performance were maintained and the counter movement jump performance increased significantly by 17% (ptraining program enhanced knee extensor strength and squat jump performance of basketball players.

  19. BPS Jumping Loci are Automorphic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachru, Shamit; Tripathy, Arnav

    2018-06-01

    We show that BPS jumping loci-loci in the moduli space of string compactifications where the number of BPS states jumps in an upper semi-continuous manner—naturally appear as Fourier coefficients of (vector space-valued) automorphic forms. For the case of T 2 compactification, the jumping loci are governed by a modular form studied by Hirzebruch and Zagier, while the jumping loci in K3 compactification appear in a story developed by Oda and Kudla-Millson in arithmetic geometry. We also comment on some curious related automorphy in the physics of black hole attractors and flux vacua.

  20. A simple method for quantifying jump loads in volleyball athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton, Paula C; Kenneally-Dabrowski, Claire; Sheppard, Jeremy; Spratford, Wayne

    2017-03-01

    Evaluate the validity of a commercially available wearable device, the Vert, for measuring vertical displacement and jump count in volleyball athletes. Propose a potential method of quantifying external load during training and match play within this population. Validation study. The ability of the Vert device to measure vertical displacement in male, junior elite volleyball athletes was assessed against reference standard laboratory motion analysis. The ability of the Vert device to count jumps during training and match-play was assessed via comparison with retrospective video analysis to determine precision and recall. A method of quantifying external load, known as the load index (LdIx) algorithm was proposed using the product of the jump count and average kinetic energy. Correlation between two separate Vert devices and three-dimensional trajectory data were good to excellent for all jump types performed (r=0.83-0.97), with a mean bias of between 3.57-4.28cm. When matched against jumps identified through video analysis, the Vert demonstrated excellent precision (0.995-1.000) evidenced by a low number of false positives. The number of false negatives identified with the Vert was higher resulting in lower recall values (0.814-0.930). The Vert is a commercially available tool that has potential for measuring vertical displacement and jump count in elite junior volleyball athletes without the need for time-consuming analysis and bespoke software. Subsequently, allowing the collected data to better quantify load using the proposed algorithm (LdIx). Copyright © 2016 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Intra-Personal and Inter-Personal Kinetic Synergies During Jumping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slomka Kajetan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We explored synergies between two legs and two subjects during preparation for a long jump into a target. Synergies were expected during one-person jumping. No such synergies were expected between two persons jumping in parallel without additional contact, while synergies were expected to emerge with haptic contact and become stronger with strong mechanical contact. Subjects performed jumps either alone (each foot standing on a separate force platform or in dyads (parallel to each other, each person standing on a separate force platform without any contact, with haptic contact, and with strong coupling. Strong negative correlations between pairs of force variables (strong synergies were seen in the vertical force in one-person jumps and weaker synergies in two-person jumps with the strong contact. For other force variables, only weak synergies were present in one-person jumps and no negative correlations between pairs of force variable for two-person jumps. Pairs of moment variables from the two force platforms at steady state showed positive correlations, which were strong in one-person jumps and weaker, but still significant, in two-person jumps with the haptic and strong contact. Anticipatory synergy adjustments prior to action initiation were observed in oneperson trials only. We interpret the different results for the force and moment variables at steady state as reflections of postural sway.

  2. Determinant Factors of the Squat Jump in Sprinting and Jumping Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González-Badillo Juan José

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between strength variables and maximum velocity (Vmax in the squat jump (SJ in sprinting and jumping athletes. Thirty-two sprinting and jumping athletes of national level (25.4 ± 4.5 years; 79.4 ± 6.9 kg and 180.4 ± 6.0 cm participated in the study. Vmax in the SJ showed significant relationships with peak force 1 (PF1 (r = 0.82, p ≤ 0.001, peak force 2 (PF2 (r = 0.68, p ≤ 0.001, PF2 by controlling for PF1 (r = 0.30, non-significant, the maximum rate of force development at peak force 1 (RFDmax1 (r = 0.62, p ≤ 0.001, mean RFD 1 (RFDmean1 (r = 0.48, p ≤ 0.01, mean RFD 2 (RFDmean2 (r = 0.70, p ≤ 0.001, force at RFDmax1 (r = 0.36, p ≤ 0.05, force at RFDmax2 (r = 0.83, p ≤ 0.001 and force at RFDmax2 by controlling for PF1 (r = 0.40, p ≤ 0.05. However, Vmax in the SJ was associated negatively with the ratio PF2/PF1 (r = -0.54, p ≤ 0.01, time at peak force 2 (Tp2 (r = -0.64, p ≤ 0.001 and maximum rate of force development at peak force 2 (RFDmax2 (r = -0.71, p ≤ 0.001. These findings indicate that the peak force achieved at the beginning of the movement (PF1 is the main predictor of performance in jumping, although the RFDmax values and the ratio PF2/PF1 are also variables to be taken into account when analyzing the determinant factors of vertical jumping.

  3. Effects of a plyometric training program with and without added load on jumping ability in basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khlifa, Riadh; Aouadi, Ridha; Hermassi, Souhail; Chelly, Mohamed Souhaiel; Jlid, Mohamed Chedly; Hbacha, Hamdi; Castagna, Carlo

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effect of a standard plyometric training protocol with or without added load in improving vertical jumping ability in male basketball players. Twenty-seven players were randomly assigned to 3 groups: a control group (no plyometric training), plyometric training group (PG), and loaded plyometric group (LPG, weighted vests 10-11% body mass). Before and after the 10-week training program, all the players were tested for the 5-jump test (5JT), the squat jump (SJ), and the countermovement jump (CMJ). The PG and LPG groups performed 2 and 3 training sessions per week, during the first 3 and the last 7 weeks, respectively. The results showed that SJ, CMJ, and 5JT were significantly improved only in the PG and LPG groups. The best effects for jumps were observed in LPG (p training program may result in greater vertical and horizontal-jump performances in basketball players.

  4. Contribuição dos parâmetros biomecânicos para o desempenho de saltos verticais de jogadoras de basquetebol Contribución de los parámetros biomecánicos para el desempeño en saltos verticales de jugadoras de baloncesto Contribution of biomechanical parameters to vertical jump performance in basketball players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Maciel Andrade

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do presente estudo foi investigar a contribuição dos parâmetros biomecânicos para o desempenho do salto vertical com contramovimento (SV e SV precedido de corrida (SVcorrida em 19 jogadoras da seleção brasileira adulta de basquetebol feminino (26,2 ± 4,7 anos; 1,81 ± 0,07 m; 75,6 ± 12,6 kg; 20,4 ± 6,0% de gordura. Foram considerados os picos de força passiva (PFPa e propulsão (PFP, tempo para alcance dos picos de força passiva (TPFPa e propulsão (TPFP, "load rate" (LR, taxa de desenvolvimento de força (TDF, tempo de fase excêntrica (Texc e concêntrica (Tcon. A análise de componentes principais revelou que 50,86% da altura de SV foi explicada por PFPa, TPFPa, LR, Texc e TPFP, e que 43,28% de SVcorrida foi explicada por PFPa, TPFPa, LR, PFP. Esses resultados sugerem que parâmetros temporais parecem contribuir de maneira mais significativa para o desempenho de salto, porém diferentes tipos de salto podem demandar comportamentos distintos de parâmetros biomecânicos.El objetivo de este estudio fue investigar la contribución de parámetros biomecánicos para el rendimiento de salto vertical con contra movimiento (SV e SV precedido de carrera (SVcarrera en diecinueve jugadoras de baloncesto de la selección brasileña femenina adultas (26,2 ± 4,7 años; 1,81 ± 0,07 m; 75,6 ± 12,6 kg; 20,4 ± 6,0% de grasa. Fueran considerados el pico de fuerza pasiva (PFPa y propulsión (PFP, tiempo para llegar a picos de fuerza pasiva (TPFPa y propulsión (TPFP, la tasa de carga (LR, tasa de desarrollo de fuerza (TDF, tiempo de la fase excéntrica (Texc y concéntrica (Tcon. Las análisis de los componentes principales mostraron que 50,86% da la altura de SV fue explicada por PFPa, TPFPa, LR, Texc y TPFP, y que 43,28% de SVcarrera fue explicada por PFPa, TPFPa, LR, PFP. Los resultados sugieren parámetros temporales parecen contribuir más significativamente para rendimiento del salto pero, diferentes tipos del salto pueden

  5. Kettlebell swing training improves maximal and explosive strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, Jason P; Lauder, Mike A

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the effect that kettlebell swing (KB) training had on measures of maximum (half squat-HS-1 repetition maximum [1RM]) and explosive (vertical jump height-VJH) strength. To put these effects into context, they were compared with the effects of jump squat power training (JS-known to improve 1RM and VJH). Twenty-one healthy men (age = 18-27 years, body mass = 72.58 ± 12.87 kg) who could perform a proficient HS were tested for their HS 1RM and VJH pre- and post-training. Subjects were randomly assigned to either a KB or JS training group after HS 1RM testing and trained twice a week. The KB group performed 12-minute bouts of KB exercise (12 rounds of 30-second exercise, 30-second rest with 12 kg if 70 kg). The JS group performed at least 4 sets of 3 JS with the load that maximized peak power-Training volume was altered to accommodate different training loads and ranged from 4 sets of 3 with the heaviest load (60% 1RM) to 8 sets of 6 with the lightest load (0% 1RM). Maximum strength improved by 9.8% (HS 1RM: 165-181% body mass, p < 0.001) after the training intervention, and post hoc analysis revealed that there was no significant difference between the effect of KB and JS training (p = 0.56). Explosive strength improved by 19.8% (VJH: 20.6-24.3 cm) after the training intervention, and post hoc analysis revealed that the type of training did not significantly affect this either (p = 0.38). The results of this study clearly demonstrate that 6 weeks of biweekly KB training provides a stimulus that is sufficient to increase both maximum and explosive strength offering a useful alternative to strength and conditioning professionals seeking variety for their athletes.

  6. Is the β phase maximal?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrandis, Javier

    2005-01-01

    The current experimental determination of the absolute values of the CKM elements indicates that 2 vertical bar V ub /V cb V us vertical bar =(1-z), with z given by z=0.19+/-0.14. This fact implies that irrespective of the form of the quark Yukawa matrices, the measured value of the SM CP phase β is approximately the maximum allowed by the measured absolute values of the CKM elements. This is β=(π/6-z/3) for γ=(π/3+z/3), which implies α=π/2. Alternatively, assuming that β is exactly maximal and using the experimental measurement sin(2β)=0.726+/-0.037, the phase γ is predicted to be γ=(π/2-β)=66.3 o +/-1.7 o . The maximality of β, if confirmed by near-future experiments, may give us some clues as to the origin of CP violation

  7. Jump conditions in transonic equilibria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guazzotto, L.; Betti, R.; Jardin, S. C.

    2013-01-01

    In the present paper, the numerical calculation of transonic equilibria, first introduced with the FLOW code in Guazzotto et al.[Phys. Plasmas 11, 604 (2004)], is critically reviewed. In particular, the necessity and effect of imposing explicit jump conditions at the transonic discontinuity are investigated. It is found that “standard” (low-β, large aspect ratio) transonic equilibria satisfy the correct jump condition with very good approximation even if the jump condition is not explicitly imposed. On the other hand, it is also found that high-β, low aspect ratio equilibria require the correct jump condition to be explicitly imposed. Various numerical approaches are described to modify FLOW to include the jump condition. It is proved that the new methods converge to the correct solution even in extreme cases of very large β, while they agree with the results obtained with the old implementation of FLOW in lower-β equilibria.

  8. Mechanics of jumping on water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ho-Young; Amauger, Juliette; Jeong, Han-Bi; Lee, Duck-Gyu; Yang, Eunjin; Jablonski, Piotr G.

    2017-10-01

    Some species of semiaquatic arthropods including water striders and springtails can jump from the water surface to avoid sudden dangers like predator attacks. It was reported recently that the jump of medium-sized water striders is a result of surface-tension-dominated interaction of thin cylindrical legs and water, with the leg movement speed nearly optimized to achieve the maximum takeoff velocity. Here we describe the mathematical theories to analyze this exquisite feat of nature by combining the review of existing models for floating and jumping and the introduction of the hitherto neglected capillary forces at the cylinder tips. The theoretically predicted dependence of body height on time is shown to match the observations of the jumps of the water striders and springtails regardless of the length of locomotory appendages. The theoretical framework can be used to understand the design principle of small jumping animals living on water and to develop biomimetic locomotion technology in semiaquatic environments.

  9. Effects of cluster vs. traditional plyometric training sets on maximal-intensity exercise performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Asadi

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Although both plyometric training methods improved lower body maximal-intensity exercise performance, the traditional sets methods resulted in greater adaptations in sprint performance, while the cluster sets method resulted in greater jump and agility adaptations.

  10. ACUTE EFFECTS OF A RESISTED DYNAMIC WARM-UP PROTOCOL ON JUMPING PERFORMANCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilli, M; Yildiz, S; Saglam, T; Camur, MH

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the kinematic and kinetic changes when resistance is applied in horizontal and vertical directions, produced by using different percentages of body weight, caused by jumping movements during a dynamic warm-up. The group of subjects consisted of 35 voluntary male athletes (19 basketball and 16 volleyball players; age: 23.4 ± 1.4 years, training experience: 9.6 ± 2.7 years; height: 177.2 ± 5.7 cm, body weight: 69.9 ± 6.9 kg) studying Physical Education, who had a jump training background and who were training for 2 hours, on 4 days in a week. A dynamic warm-up protocol containing seven specific resistance movements with specific resistance corresponding to different percentages of body weight (2%, 4%, 6%, 8%, 10%) was applied randomly on non consecutive days. Effects of different warm-up protocols were assessed by pre-/post- exercise changes in jump height in the countermovement jump (CMJ) and the squat jump (SJ) measured using a force platform and changes in hip and knee joint angles at the end of the eccentric phase measured using a video camera. A significant increase in jump height was observed in the dynamic resistance warm-up conducted with different percentages of body weight (p 0.05). In jump movements before and after the warm-up, while no significant difference between the vertical ground reaction forces applied by athletes was observed (p > 0.05), in some cases of resistance, a significant reduction was observed in hip and knee joint angles (p jumping movements, as well as an increase in jump height values. As a result, dynamic warm-up exercises could be applicable in cases of resistance corresponding to 6-10% of body weight applied in horizontal and vertical directions in order to increase the jump performance acutely. PMID:25435670

  11. ANKLE TAPING DOES NOT IMPAIR PERFORMANCE IN JUMP OR BALANCE TESTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Abián-Vicén

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the influence of prophylactic ankle taping on two balance tests (static and dynamic balance and one jump test, in the push off and the landing phase. Fifteen active young subjects (age: 21.0 ± 4.4 years without previous ankle injuries volunteered for the study. Each participant performed three tests in two different situations: with taping and without taping. The tests were a counter movement jump, static balance, and a dynamic posturography test. The tests and conditions were randomly performed. The path of the center of pressures was measured in the balance tests, and the vertical ground reaction forces were recorded during the push-off and landing phases of the counter movement jump. Ankle taping had no influence on balance performance or in the push off phase of the jump. However, the second peak vertical force value during the landing phase of the jump was 12% greater with ankle taping (0.66 BW, 95% CI -0.64 to 1.96. The use of prophylactic ankle taping had no influence on the balance or jump performance of healthy young subjects. In contrast, the taped ankle increased the second peak vertical force value, which could be related to a greater risk of injury produced by the accumulation of repeated impacts in sports where jumps are frequently performed

  12. Thersites: a `jumping' Trojan?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiganis, K.; Dvorak, R.; Pilat-Lohinger, E.

    2000-02-01

    In this paper, we examine the dynamical evolution of the asteroid (1868) Thersites, a member of the Trojan belt. Thersites is librating around the Lagrangian point L_4, following, however, a chaotic orbit. The equations of motion for Thersites as well as for a distribution of neighboring initial conditions are integrated numerically for 50 million years in the Outer Solar System model (OSS), which consists of the Sun and the four giant planets. Our results indicate that the probability that this asteroid will eventually escape from the Trojan swarm is rather high. In fact, 20% from our initial distribution escaped within the integration time. Many of the remaining ones also show characteristic `jumps' in the orbital elements, especially the inclination. Secular resonances involving the nodes of the outer planets are found to be responsible for this chaotic behavior. The width of libration and eccentricity values that lead to grossly unstable orbits are calculated and compared with previously known results on the stability of the Trojans. Finally, a very interesting behavior has been observed for one of the escaping asteroids as he `jumped' from L_4 to L_5 where he remained performing a highly inclined libration for ~ 2 Myrs before escaping from the Trojan swarm. According to Homer, Thersites was not only the ugliest of all Greeks that took part in the Trojan war, but also had the most intolerable personality. His nasty habit of making fun of everybody cost him his life, as the last person for whom he spoke ironically about was Achilles, the mightiest warrior of all Greeks, who killed Thersites with just one punch!

  13. Outcome and Process in Motor Performance: A Comparison of Jumping by Typically Developing Children and Those with Low Motor Proficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Morgan D.; Saunders, John E.; Maschette, Wayne E.; Wilson, Cameron J.

    2013-01-01

    The motivation for this study was to explore a conceptual framework to understand the outcomes and processes of motor performance in children. Vertical jumping, a fundamental movement skill, was used to compare children (ages 6-12 years) who were typically developing (TD) and those identified as having low motor proficiency (LMP). Jumps were…

  14. Application of a tri-axial accelerometer to estimate jump frequency in volleyball.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarning, Jon M; Mok, Kam-Ming; Hansen, Bjørge H; Bahr, Roald

    2015-03-01

    Patellar tendinopathy is prevalent among athletes, and most likely associated with a high jumping load. If methods for estimating jump frequency were available, this could potentially assist in understanding and preventing this condition. The objective of this study was to explore the possibility of using peak vertical acceleration (PVA) or peak resultant acceleration (PRA) measured by an accelerometer to estimate jump frequency. Twelve male elite volleyball players (22.5 ± 1.6 yrs) performed a training protocol consisting of seven typical motion patterns, including jumping and non-jumping movements. Accelerometer data from the trial were obtained using a tri-axial accelerometer. In addition, we collected video data from the trial. Jump-float serving and spike jumping could not be distinguished from non-jumping movements using differences in PVA or PRA. Furthermore, there were substantial inter-participant differences in both the PVA and the PRA within and across movement types (p volleyball. A method for acquiring real-time estimates of jump frequency remains to be verified. However, there are several alternative approaches, and further investigations are needed.

  15. Jump probabilities in the non-Markovian quantum jump method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haerkoenen, Kari

    2010-01-01

    The dynamics of a non-Markovian open quantum system described by a general time-local master equation is studied. The propagation of the density operator is constructed in terms of two processes: (i) deterministic evolution and (ii) evolution of a probability density functional in the projective Hilbert space. The analysis provides a derivation for the jump probabilities used in the recently developed non-Markovian quantum jump (NMQJ) method (Piilo et al 2008 Phys. Rev. Lett. 100 180402).

  16. Choice of jumping strategy in two standard jumps, squat and countermovement jump--effect of training background or inherited preference?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Susanne; Voigt, M; Simonsen, Erik Bruun

    1999-01-01

    . The jumps were recorded on highspeed film (500 Hz) combined with registration of ground reaction forces, and net joint moments were calculated by inverse dynamics. The purpose was to investigate the choice of strategy in two standard jumps, squat jump and countermovement jump. The volleyball jump...... was performed with a sequential strategy and the ballet jump was performed with a simultaneous strategy. In the two standard jumps, the choice of strategy was individual and not related to training background. This was additionally confirmed in a test of seven ballet dancers and seven volleyball players....

  17. Hydraulic jumps in a channel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonn, D.; Andersen, Anders Peter; Bohr, Tomas

    2009-01-01

    We present a study of hydraulic jumps with flow predominantly in one direction, created either by confining the flow to a narrow channel with parallel walls or by providing an inflow in the form of a narrow sheet. In the channel flow, we find a linear height profile upstream of the jump as expected......'s mixing-length theory with a mixing length that is proportional to the height of the fluid layer. Using averaged boundary-layer equations, taking into account the friction with the channel walls and the eddy viscosity, the flow both upstream and downstream of the jump can be understood. For the downstream...... subcritical flow, we assume that the critical height is attained close to the channel outlet. We use mass and momentum conservation to determine the position of the jump and obtain an estimate which is in rough agreement with our experiment. We show that the averaging method with a varying velocity profile...

  18. Birth of a hydraulic jump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchesne, Alexis; Bohr, Tomas; Andersen, Anders

    2017-11-01

    The hydraulic jump, i.e., the sharp transition between a supercritical and a subcritical free-surface flow, has been extensively studied in the past centuries. However, ever since Leonardo da Vinci asked it for the first time, an important question has been left unanswered: How does a hydraulic jump form? We present an experimental and theoretical study of the formation of stationary hydraulic jumps in centimeter wide channels. Two starting situations are considered: The channel is, respectively, empty or filled with liquid, the liquid level being fixed by the wetting properties and the boundary conditions. We then change the flow-rate abruptly from zero to a constant value. In an empty channel, we observe the formation of a stationary hydraulic jump in a two-stage process: First, the channel fills by the advancing liquid front, which undergoes a transition from supercritical to subcritical at some position in the channel. Later the influence of the downstream boundary conditions makes the jump move slowly upstream to its final position. In the pre-filled channel, the hydraulic jump forms at the injector edge and then moves downstream to its final position.

  19. Profit maximization mitigates competition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dierker, Egbert; Grodal, Birgit

    1996-01-01

    We consider oligopolistic markets in which the notion of shareholders' utility is well-defined and compare the Bertrand-Nash equilibria in case of utility maximization with those under the usual profit maximization hypothesis. Our main result states that profit maximization leads to less price...... competition than utility maximization. Since profit maximization tends to raise prices, it may be regarded as beneficial for the owners as a whole. Moreover, if profit maximization is a good proxy for utility maximization, then there is no need for a general equilibrium analysis that takes the distribution...... of profits among consumers fully into account and partial equilibrium analysis suffices...

  20. The reliability of jump kinematics and kinetics in children of different maturity status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meylan, Cesar M P; Cronin, John B; Oliver, Jon L; Hughes, Michael G; McMaster, D Travis

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the reliability of eccentric (ECC) and concentric (CON) kinematic and kinetic variables thought to be critical to jump performance during bilateral vertical countermovement jump (VCMJ) and horizontal countermovement jump (HCMJ) across children of different maturity status. Forty-two athletic male and female participants between 9 and 16 years of age were divided into 3 maturity groups according to peak height velocity (PHV) offset (Post-PHV, At-PHV, and Pre-PHV) and percent of predicted adult stature. All the participants performed 3 VCMJ and HCMJ trials and the kinematics, and kinetics of these jumps were measured via a force plate over 3 testing sessions. In both jumps, vertical CON mean and peak power and jump height or distance were the most reliable measures across all groups (change in the mean [CM] = -5.4 to 6.2%; coefficient of variation [CV] = 2.1-9.4%; Intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC] = 0.82-0.98), whereas vertical ECC mean power was the only ECC variable with acceptable reliability for both jumps (CM = -0.7 to 10.1%; CV = 5.2-15.6%; ICC = 0.74-0.97). A less mature state was "likely" to "very likely" to reduce the reliability of the HCMJ ECC kinetics and kinematics. These findings suggested that movement variability is associated with the ECC phase of CMJs, especially in Pre-PHV during the HCMJ. Vertical CON mean and peak power and ECC mean power were deemed reliable and appropriate to be used in children as indicators of jump and stretch-shortening cycle performance.

  1. Loaded and unloaded jump performance of top-level volleyball players from different age categories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Katia; Pereira, Lucas Adriano; Kobal, Ronaldo; Cal Abad, Cesar Cavinato; Finotti, Ronaldo; Nakamura, Fábio Yuzo; Loturco, Irineu

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the differences in loaded and unloaded jump performances between different age categories of top-level volleyball players from the same club. Forty-three volleyball players were divided into four age groups: under-17, under-19, under-21 and professional. Vertical jumping height for squat jump (SJ), countermovement jump (CMJ) and CMJ with arm swing (CMJa) and mean propulsive velocity (MPV) in the loaded jump squat exercise with 40% of the athlete's body mass were compared among the different age categories, considering body mass as a covariate. SJ and CMJ jump height values were higher for professional and under-21 players than under-17 players (pjump squat was higher for under-21 players than under-17 players (pjump performances across different age categories of top-level volleyball players. Therefore, to increase the vertical jumping ability of these team sport athletes throughout their long-term development, coaches and strength and conditioning professionals are encouraged to implement consistent neuromuscular training strategies, in accordance with the specific needs and physiological characteristics of each age group.

  2. Loaded and unloaded jump performance of top-level volleyball players from different age categories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Katia; Pereira, Lucas Adriano; Kobal, Ronaldo; Cal Abad, Cesar Cavinato; Finotti, Ronaldo; Nakamura, Fábio Yuzo

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the differences in loaded and unloaded jump performances between different age categories of top-level volleyball players from the same club. Forty-three volleyball players were divided into four age groups: under-17, under-19, under-21 and professional. Vertical jumping height for squat jump (SJ), countermovement jump (CMJ) and CMJ with arm swing (CMJa) and mean propulsive velocity (MPV) in the loaded jump squat exercise with 40% of the athlete’s body mass were compared among the different age categories, considering body mass as a covariate. SJ and CMJ jump height values were higher for professional and under-21 players than under-17 players (pvolleyball players. Therefore, to increase the vertical jumping ability of these team sport athletes throughout their long-term development, coaches and strength and conditioning professionals are encouraged to implement consistent neuromuscular training strategies, in accordance with the specific needs and physiological characteristics of each age group. PMID:29158621

  3. Validity and Reliability of the 30-s Continuous Jump for Anaerobic Power and Capacity Assessment in Combat Sport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drazen Čular

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Cycling test such Wingate anaerobic test (WAnT is used to measure anaerobic power (AP, but not anaerobic capacity (AC, i.e., the metabolic energy demand. However, in sports that do not involve cycling movements (Karate, the continuous jump for 30 s (vertical jumps for 30 s has been extensively used to measure anaerobic performance in all young athletes. Limited information’s are available concerning its validity and reliability especially in children. As such, the current study aimed to test validity and reliability of a continuous jumps test (the CJ30s, using WAnT as a reference. Thirteen female Karate kids (age: 11.07 ± 1.32 years; mass: 41.76 ± 15.32 kg; height: 152 ± 11.52 cm; training experience: 4.38 ± 2.14 years were tested on three separate sessions. The first and second sessions were used to assess the reliability using Intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC of CJ30s, whereas on the third session WAnT was administered. Following CJ30s and WAnT, we assessed AP (1/CJ30s, as jump height [JH], fatigue index [FI], and blood lactate [BL]; 2/WAnT, as mechanical power [P], FI, and BL and AC as the excess post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC. Large/highly significant correlations were found between CJ30s and WAnT EPOCs (r = 0.730, P = 0.003, and BLs (r = 0.713, P = 0.009. Moderate/significant correlations were found between CJ30s and WAnT FIs (r = 0.640, P = 0.014, CJ30s first four jumps mean JH and WAnT peak P (r = 0.572, P = 0.032, and CJ30s mean JH and WAnT mean P (r = 0.589, P = 0.021. CJ30s showed excellent and moderate reliability (ICC for AP (maximal JH 0.884, mean JH 0.742, FI 0.657, BL 0.653 and AC (EPOC 0.788, respectively. Correlations observed especially in terms of AC between CJ30s and WAnT provide evidence that former may adequately assess anaerobic performance for the young combat athlete. CJ30 is a reliable test and allow an easy assessment of AP and AC in karate children.

  4. Variation in free jumping technique within and among horses with little experience in show jumping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santamaria, S.; Bobbert, M.F.; Back, W.; Barneveld, A.; van Weeren, P.R.

    2004-01-01

    Objective - To quantify variation in the jumping technique within and among young horses with little jumping experience, establish relationships between kinetic and kinematic variables, and identify a limited set of variables characteristic for detecting differences in jumping performance among

  5. Comparison between Unilateral and Bilateral Plyometric Training on Single and Double Leg Jumping Performance and Strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanis, Gregory C; Tsoukos, Athanasios; Kaloheri, Olga; Terzis, Gerasimos; Veligekas, Panagiotis; Brown, Lee E

    2017-04-18

    This study compared the effects of unilateral and bilateral plyometric training on single and double-leg jumping performance, maximal strength and rate of force development (RFD). Fifteen moderately trained subjects were randomly assigned to either a unilateral (U, n=7) or bilateral group (B, n=8). Both groups performed maximal effort plyometric leg exercises two times per week for 6 weeks. The B group performed all exercises with both legs, while the U group performed half the repetitions with each leg, so that total exercise volume was the same. Jumping performance was assessed by countermovement jumps (CMJ) and drop jumps (DJ), while maximal isometric leg press strength and RFD were measured before and after training for each leg separately and both legs together. CMJ improvement with both legs was not significantly different between U (12.1±7.2%) and B (11.0±5.5%) groups. However, the sum of right and left leg CMJ only improved in the U group (19.0±7.1%, pplyometric training was more effective at increasing both single and double-leg jumping performance, isometric leg press maximal force and RFD when compared to bilateral training.

  6. EFFECTS OF ELECTROSTIMULATION AND PLYOMETRIC TRAINING PROGRAM COMBINATION ON JUMP HEIGHT IN TEENAGE ATHLETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio J. Martínez-López

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of eight- week (2 days/week training periods of plyometric exercises (PT and neuromuscular electrostimulation (EMS on jump height in young athletes. Squat jump (SJ, counter movement jump (CMJ and drop jump (DJ were performed to assess the effects of the training protocols 98 athletes (100 & 200m and 100m & 110m hurdles voluntarily took part in this study, 51 males (52% and 47 females (48%, 17.91 ± 1.42 years old, and 5.16 ± 2.56 years of training experience. The participants were randomly assigned to four different groups according to the frequency and the timing of the stimulation. Analysis of covariance was used to analyze the effects of every training program on jump height. Our findings suggest that compared to control (Plyometrics (PT only, the combination of 150Hz EMS + PT simultaneously combined in an 8 week (2days/week training program, we could observe significant jump height improvements in the different types of strength: explosive, explosive-elastic, and explosive-elastic-reactive. The combination of PT after < 85 Hz EMS did not show any jump height significant increase in sprinters. In conclusion, an eight week training program (with just two days per week of EMS combined with plyometric exercises has proven useful for the improvement of every kind of vertical jump ability required for sprint and hurdles disciplines in teenage athletes

  7. Acute effects of active isolated stretching on vertical jump ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of the study was to determine the acute effects of active isolated stretching on muscular peak power production. Sixty healthy, physically active volunteers (aged 18-28) participated as subjects in this study. Subjects were randomly assigned to two groups; the control group and the experimental group. Subjects ...

  8. Kinematic Differences between Set- and Jump-Shot Motions in Basketball

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Okubo

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Shooting arm motions at release in one-hand set and jump basketball shots have been analyzed using a kinematic model. Set and jump shots are classified by the vertical velocity and acceleration of the shooter’s shooting-side shoulder at release. The two-dimensional three-segment model includes the vertical shooting-side shoulder velocity and acceleration. Numerical simulation investigates the effect of shoulder motion. Release backspin angular velocity can be described as a function of the vertical shoulder acceleration and the vertical fingertip acceleration relative to the shoulder. For proper backspin, jump shots require large vertical fingertip acceleration relative to the shoulder. The upward shoulder speed at release contributes to the vertical fingertip velocity relative to the shoulder for a given desired ball release speed, angle and backspin. On the other hand, upward shoulder motion does not contribute to the horizontal direction. As horizontal shot distance increases, upper arm angular speed also increases to produce the ball release conditions. Ball release with upward shoulder speed reduces the magnitudes of the upper arm, forearm and hand angular velocities. All these facts imply that the shooting arm motion in the jump shot is different from that of the set shot.

  9. Timeless Approach to Quantum Jumps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignazio Licata

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available According to the usual quantum description, the time evolution of the quantum state is continuous and deterministic except when a discontinuous and indeterministic collapse of state vector occurs. The collapse has been a central topic since the origin of the theory, although there are remarkable theoretical proposals to understand its nature, such as the Ghirardi–Rimini–Weber. Another possibility could be the assimilation of collapse with the now experimentally well established phenomenon of quantum jump, postulated by Bohr already in 1913. The challenge of nonlocality offers an opportunity to reconsider the quantum jump as a fundamental element of the logic of the physical world, rather than a subsidiary accident. We propose here a simple preliminary model that considers quantum jumps as processes of entry to and exit from the usual temporal domain to a timeless vacuum, without contradicting the quantum relativistic formalism, and we present some potential connections with particle physics. Quanta 2015; 4: 10–26.

  10. Quantum jumps on Anderson attractors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusipov, I. I.; Laptyeva, T. V.; Ivanchenko, M. V.

    2018-01-01

    In a closed single-particle quantum system, spatial disorder induces Anderson localization of eigenstates and halts wave propagation. The phenomenon is vulnerable to interaction with environment and decoherence that is believed to restore normal diffusion. We demonstrate that for a class of experimentally feasible non-Hermitian dissipators, which admit signatures of localization in asymptotic states, quantum particle opts between diffusive and ballistic regimes, depending on the phase parameter of dissipators, with sticking about localization centers. In a diffusive regime, statistics of quantum jumps is non-Poissonian and has a power-law interval, a footprint of intermittent locking in Anderson modes. Ballistic propagation reflects dispersion of an ordered lattice and introduces the second timescale for jumps, resulting in non-nonmonotonous probability distribution. Hermitian dephasing dissipation makes localization features vanish, and Poissonian jump statistics along with normal diffusion are recovered.

  11. Ankle taping does not impair performance in jump or balance tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abián-Vicén, Javier; Alegre, Luis M; Fernández-Rodríguez, J Manuel; Lara, Amador J; Meana, Marta; Aguado, Xavier

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the influence of prophylactic ankle taping on two balance tests (static and dynamic balance) and one jump test, in the push off and the landing phase. Fifteen active young subjects (age: 21.0 ± 4.4 years) without previous ankle injuries volunteered for the study. Each participant performed three tests in two different situations: with taping and without taping. The tests were a counter movement jump, static balance, and a dynamic posturography test. The tests and conditions were randomly performed. The path of the center of pressures was measured in the balance tests, and the vertical ground reaction forces were recorded during the push-off and landing phases of the counter movement jump. Ankle taping had no influence on balance performance or in the push off phase of the jump. However, the second peak vertical force value during the landing phase of the jump was 12% greater with ankle taping (0.66 BW, 95% CI -0.64 to 1.96). The use of prophylactic ankle taping had no influence on the balance or jump performance of healthy young subjects. In contrast, the taped ankle increased the second peak vertical force value, which could be related to a greater risk of injury produced by the accumulation of repeated impacts in sports where jumps are frequently performed. Key pointsAnkle taping has no influence on balance performance.Ankle taping does not impair performance during the push-off phase of the jump.Ankle taping could increase the risk of injury during landings by increasing peak forces.

  12. Maximally incompatible quantum observables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinosaari, Teiko, E-mail: teiko.heinosaari@utu.fi [Turku Centre for Quantum Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Turku, FI-20014 Turku (Finland); Schultz, Jussi, E-mail: jussi.schultz@gmail.com [Dipartimento di Matematica, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Toigo, Alessandro, E-mail: alessandro.toigo@polimi.it [Dipartimento di Matematica, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano, Via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Ziman, Mario, E-mail: ziman@savba.sk [RCQI, Institute of Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dúbravská cesta 9, 84511 Bratislava (Slovakia); Faculty of Informatics, Masaryk University, Botanická 68a, 60200 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2014-05-01

    The existence of maximally incompatible quantum observables in the sense of a minimal joint measurability region is investigated. Employing the universal quantum cloning device it is argued that only infinite dimensional quantum systems can accommodate maximal incompatibility. It is then shown that two of the most common pairs of complementary observables (position and momentum; number and phase) are maximally incompatible.

  13. Maximally incompatible quantum observables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinosaari, Teiko; Schultz, Jussi; Toigo, Alessandro; Ziman, Mario

    2014-01-01

    The existence of maximally incompatible quantum observables in the sense of a minimal joint measurability region is investigated. Employing the universal quantum cloning device it is argued that only infinite dimensional quantum systems can accommodate maximal incompatibility. It is then shown that two of the most common pairs of complementary observables (position and momentum; number and phase) are maximally incompatible.

  14. Scaling of interfacial jump conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quezada G, S.; Vazquez R, A.; Espinosa P, G.

    2015-09-01

    To model the behavior of a nuclear reactor accurately is needed to have balance models that take into account the different phenomena occurring in the reactor. These balances have to be coupled together through boundary conditions. The boundary conditions have been studied and different treatments have been given to the interface. In this paper is a brief description of some of the interfacial jump conditions that have been proposed in recent years. Also, the scaling of an interfacial jump condition is proposed, for coupling the different materials that are in contact within a nuclear reactor. (Author)

  15. Effect of Ankle Joint Contact Angle and Ground Contact Time on Depth Jump Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Joshua H; Flanagan, Sean P

    2015-11-01

    Athletes often need to both jump high and get off the ground quickly, but getting off the ground quickly can decrease the vertical ground reaction force (VGRF) impulse, impeding jump height. Energy stored in the muscle-tendon complex during the stretch-shortening cycle (SSC) may mitigate the effects of short ground contact times (GCTs). To take advantage of the SSC, several coaches recommend "attacking" the ground with the foot in a dorsiflexed (DF) position at contact. However, the efficacy of this technique has not been tested. This investigation tested the hypotheses that shorter GCTs would lead to smaller vertical depth jump heights (VDJH), and that this difference could be mitigated by instructing the athletes to land in a DF as opposed to a plantar flexed (PF) foot position. Eighteen healthy junior college athletes performed depth jumps from a 45-cm box onto force platforms under instruction to achieve one of the 2 objectives (maximum jump height [hmax] or minimal GCT [tmin]), with one of the 2 foot conditions (DF or PF). These variations created 4 distinct jump conditions: DF-hmax, DF-tmin, PF-hmax, and PF-tmin. For all variables examined, there were no significant interactions. For all 4 conditions, the ankle was PF during landing, but the DF condition was 28.87% less PF than the PF condition. The tmin conditions had a 23.48% shorter GCT than hmax. There were no significant main effects for jump height. The peak impact force for tmin was 22.14% greater than hmax and 19.11% greater for DF compared with PF conditions. A shorter GCT did not necessitate a smaller jump height, and a less PF foot did not lead to improvements in jump height or contact time during a depth jump from a 45-cm box. The same jump height was attained in less PF and shorter GCT conditions by larger impact forces. To decrease contact time while maintaining jump height, athletes should be instructed to "get off the ground as fast as possible." This cue seems to be more important than foot

  16. Ankle brace attenuates the medial-lateral ground reaction force during basketball rebound jump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Castro

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: The jump landing is the leading cause for ankle injuries in basketball. It has been shown that the use of ankle brace is effective to prevent these injuries by increasing the mechanical stability of the ankle at the initial contact of the foot with the ground. Objective: To investigate the effects of ankle brace on the ground reaction force (GRF during the simulation of a basketball rebound jump. Method: Eleven young male basketball players randomly carried out a simulated basketball rebound jump under two conditions, with and without ankle brace (lace-up. Dynamic parameters of vertical GRF (take-off and landing vertical peaks, time to take-off and landing vertical peaks, take-off impulse peak, impulse at 50 milliseconds of landing, and jump height and medial-lateral (take-off and landing medial-lateral peaks, and time to reach medial-lateral peaks at take-off and landing were recorded by force platform during rebound jumps in each tested condition. The comparisons between the tested conditions were performed by paired t test (P0.05. Conclusion: The use of ankle brace during basketball rebound jumps attenuates the magnitude of medial-lateral GRF on the landing phase, without changing the vertical GRF. This finding indicates that the use of brace increases the medial-lateral mechanical protection by decreasing the shear force exerted on the athlete’s body without change the application of propulsive forces in the take-off and the impact absorption quality in the landing during the basketball rebound jump.

  17. JUMP LANDING CHARACTERISTICS IN ELITE SOCCER PLAYERS WITH CEREBRAL PALSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Cámara

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to analyse the parameters that characterize the vertical ground reaction force during the landing phase of a jump, and to determine the relationship among these parameters in elite soccer players with cerebral palsy (CP. Thirteen male members of the Spanish national soccer team for people with CP (mean age: 27.1 ± 4.7 years volunteered for the study. Each participant performed three counter movement jumps. The characteristics of the first peak of the vertical ground reaction force during the landing phase of a jump, which corresponds to the forefoot contact with the ground, were similar to the results obtained in previous studies. However, a higher magnitude of rearfoot contact with the ground (F2 was observed in participants with CP than in participants without CP. Furthermore, a significant correlation between F2 magnitude and the elapsed time until its production (T2 was not observed (r = -0.474 for p = 0.102. This result implies that a landing technique based on a delay in the production of F2 might not be effective to reduce its magnitude, contrary to what has been observed in participants without CP. The absence of a significant correlation between these two parameters in the present study, and the high magnitude of F2, suggest that elite soccer players with CP should use footwear with proper cushioning characteristics.

  18. Acceleration and Orientation Jumping Performance Differences Among Elite Professional Male Handball Players With or Without Previous ACL Reconstruction: An Inertial Sensor Unit-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setuain, Igor; González-Izal, Miriam; Alfaro, Jesús; Gorostiaga, Esteban; Izquierdo, Mikel

    2015-12-01

    Handball is one of the most challenging sports for the knee joint. Persistent biomechanical and jumping capacity alterations can be observed in athletes with an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. Commonly identified jumping biomechanical alterations have been described by the use of laboratory technologies. However, portable and easy-to-handle technologies that enable an evaluation of jumping biomechanics at the training field are lacking. To analyze unilateral/bilateral acceleration and orientation jumping performance differences among elite male handball athletes with or without previous ACL reconstruction via a single inertial sensor unit device. Case control descriptive study. At the athletes' usual training court. Twenty-two elite male (6 ACL-reconstructed and 16 uninjured control players) handball players were evaluated. The participants performed a vertical jump test battery that included a 50-cm vertical bilateral drop jump, a 20-cm vertical unilateral drop jump, and vertical unilateral countermovement jump maneuvers. Peak 3-dimensional (X, Y, Z) acceleration (m·s(-2)), jump phase duration and 3-dimensional orientation values (°) were obtained from the inertial sensor unit device. Two-tailed t-tests and a one-way analysis of variance were performed to compare means. The P value cut-off for significance was set at P handball athletes with previous ACL reconstruction demonstrated a jumping biomechanical profile similar to control players, including similar jumping performance values in both bilateral and unilateral jumping maneuvers, several years after ACL reconstruction. These findings are in agreement with previous research showing full functional restoration of abilities in top-level male athletes after ACL reconstruction, rehabilitation and subsequent return to sports at the previous level. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of jumping skill training on walking balance for children with mental retardation and Down's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W Y; Chang, J J

    1997-08-01

    In the present study, we hypothesized that the enhancements obtained from the practice of jumping activity could be transferred to improve the walking balance in children with mental retardation (MR) and Down's syndrome (DS). Fourteen children with the diagnosis of MR or DS, aged 3 to 6 years, were recruited from a day care institution. They were ambulant but without jumping ability. Sixty-one non-handicapped children was used to serve as a normative comparison group. Before the training program, the performances of walking balance, jump skills and jumping distances were assessed individually by one physical therapist. The balance sub-test in the Bruininks Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency (BOTMP) was administered to assess the walking balance. Motor Skill Inventory (MSI) was used to assess the qualitative levels of jumping skills. A jumping skill training lesson that included horizontal jumps and vertical jumps was designed and integrated into the educational program. The recruited children received 3 sessions of training per-week for 6 weeks. A post-training test and a follow-up test were administered to the handicapped children. In BOTMP scores, statistical differences exited between the pre-training and post-training tests in the tested items of floor walk and beam walk. However, no significant difference was found in the items of floor stand, beam stand and floor heel-toe walk. MSI scales revealed there were significant differences between pre-training and post-training tests. There was no significant difference between the scores of post-training test and the follow-up test. The results implicated that the jumping activity might effectively evoke the automatic and dynamic postural control. Moreover, the significant improvements of the floor walk and beam walk performances might be due to the transferred effects via the practice of dynamic jumping activity. Furthermore, implications and suggestions are discussed.

  20. Pressure Jumps during Drainage in Macroporous Soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soto, Diego; Paradelo Pérez, Marcos; Corral, A

    2018-01-01

    Tensiometer readings obtained at high resolution during drainage of structured soil columns revealed pressure jumps with long range correlations and burst sequences with a hierarchical structure. The statistical properties of jumps are similar to Haines jumps described in invasion percolation...... processes at pore scale, but they are much larger in amplitude and duration. Pressure jumps can result from transient redistribution of water potential in internal regions of soil and can be triggered during drainage by capillary displacements at the scale of structural pores....

  1. The identification of price jumps

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hanousek, Jan; Kočenda, Evžen; Novotný, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 1 (2012), s. 53-77 ISSN 0929-9629 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP403/11/0020; GA ČR(CZ) GBP402/12/G097 Institutional support: PRVOUK-P23 Keywords : price jumps * non-parametric testing * financial econometrics Subject RIV: AH - Economics

  2. Regime Jumps in Electricity Prices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Huisman (Ronald); R.J. Mahieu (Ronald)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractElectricity prices are known to be very volatile and subject to frequent jumps due to system breakdown, demand shocks, and inelastic supply. As many international electricity markets are in some state of deregulation, more and more participants in these markets are exposed to these

  3. Jumping Abilities and Power-Velocity Relationship in Judo Athletes: Comparative Analysis Among Age Categories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buśko Krzysztof

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The aim of the study was to examine age differences in the maximal power and height of rise of the body mass centre measured in spike jump (SPJ and counter-movement jump (CMJ, and power-velocity relationship of lower extremities between cadet and U23 age class judo athletes. Methods. Seven cadets (age 16.6 ± 0.7 years and eight U23 age class (21.3 ± 1.4 years Polish judoists took part in the study. The maximal power and height of jump were measured at SPJ and CMJ jumps. Power- velocity relations (P-v were determined from 5 maximal cycle ergometer exercise bouts at increasing external loads equal to 2.5, 5.0, 7.5, 10.0 and 12.5% of body weight (BW. Results. Cadet judoists had a significantly smaller maximal power output (11.56 ± 1.21 W ・ kg-1 than U23 athletes (12.69 ± 0.67 W ・ kg-1. The optimal velocity was similar in both group (119.3 ± 16.0 rpm and 119.6 ± 15.5 rpm, respectively. Significant age differences were founded between the cadet and U23 athletes for power output at external load equal 12.5% BW. Cadet judoists generated insignificantly lower maximal power in CMJ and SPJ than U23 judo athletes with except of the absolute maximal power in SPJ. The age difference was observed in height of CMJ. Conclusions. Based on the characteristics of F-v curve we can see in which direction follow the effects of training. Application of CMJ and SPJ in jumping test allows to assess changes in neuromuscular coordination. The use of the both methods give better information to optimal training control.

  4. The Effect of Teeth Clenching on Dynamic Balance at Jump-Landing: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Tomomasa; Yoshida, Yuriko; Churei, Hiroshi; Aizawa, Junya; Hirohata, Kenji; Ohmi, Takehiro; Ohji, Shunsuke; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Enomoto, Mitsuhiro; Ueno, Toshiaki; Yagishita, Kazuyoshi

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of teeth clenching on dynamic balance at jump landing. Twenty-five healthy subjects performed jump-landing tasks with or without teeth clenching. The first 3 trials were performed with no instruction; subsequently, subjects were ordered to clench at the time of landing in the following 3 trials. We collected the data of masseter muscle activity by electromyogram, the maximum vertical ground reaction force (vGRFmax) and center of pressure (CoP) parameters by force plate during jump-landing. According to the clenching status of control jump-landing, all participants were categorized into a spontaneous clenching group and no clenching group, and the CoP data were compared. The masseter muscle activity was correlated with vGRFmax during anterior jump-landing, while it was not correlated with CoP. In comparisons between the spontaneous clenching and the no clenching group during anterior jump-landing, the spontaneous clenching group showed harder landing and the CoP area became larger than the no clenching group. There were no significant differences between pre- and postintervention in both spontaneous clenching and no clenching groups. The effect of teeth clenching on dynamic balance during jump-landing was limited.

  5. Influence of Plyometrics on Jump Capabilities in Technical and Aesthetical Sports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mlsnová Gabriela

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to examine the effect of plyometric exercises on explosive strength of lower extremities in girls performing of technical and aesthetical sports. Experiment was carried out on three groups; artistic gymnasts (VG, n = 15; age = 12.4 ± 0.7 years, fitness girls (VF, n = 15; age = 13.8 ± 1.9 years and dancers (VD, n = 15; age = 13.8 ± 2 years. To check, the control group of general population was involved in the study (VK, n = 15; age = 13.9 ± 1.5 years. Following tests on jump ergometer Fitro Jumper were carried out at the beginning and at the end of experimental period: countermovement jump without and with arms swing and 10- second series of repeated vertical jumps. Plyometric program consisted of two plyometric units a week during thirty weeks. The results show that higher improvement in all evaluated tests achieved the group of fitness. In the countermovement jump without arm swing was observed improvement height of the jump 3.4 ± 1.4 cm (p ˂ 0.00001, in the countermovement jump with arm swing 5.7 ± 1.5 cm (p ˂ 0.00001, in difference of height of the jump between countermovement jump with and without arms swing 2.3 ± 1 cm (p ˂ 0.00001, in ten second series of repeated vertical jumps without arms swing in the height of jump 4.2 ± 1.6 cm (p ˂ 0.00001 and in power in active take off phase 8.8 ± 2.2 W.kg-1 (p ˂ 0.00001. Based on finding the study and in coherence with data from literature, we can conclude the effect of plyometric exercises was effective in combination with specific-strength training. Jumping ability is limiting factor of sport performance in technical and aesthetical sports and implementation of plyometric exercises to the training is highly recommend. The high level of jump capabilities can improve the quality and technique of performance complex acrobatic elements and dance leaps thereby increasing overall evaluation of performance in selected sports.

  6. Maximizers versus satisficers

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew M. Parker; Wandi Bruine de Bruin; Baruch Fischhoff

    2007-01-01

    Our previous research suggests that people reporting a stronger desire to maximize obtain worse life outcomes (Bruine de Bruin et al., 2007). Here, we examine whether this finding may be explained by the decision-making styles of self-reported maximizers. Expanding on Schwartz et al. (2002), we find that self-reported maximizers are more likely to show problematic decision-making styles, as evidenced by self-reports of less behavioral coping, greater dependence on others when making decisions...

  7. Maximal combustion temperature estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golodova, E; Shchepakina, E

    2006-01-01

    This work is concerned with the phenomenon of delayed loss of stability and the estimation of the maximal temperature of safe combustion. Using the qualitative theory of singular perturbations and canard techniques we determine the maximal temperature on the trajectories located in the transition region between the slow combustion regime and the explosive one. This approach is used to estimate the maximal temperature of safe combustion in multi-phase combustion models

  8. Monitoring markers of muscle damage during a 3 week periodized drop-jump exercise programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamandulis, Sigitas; Skurvydas, Albertas; Snieckus, Audrius

    2011-01-01

    a progressive increase in load impact with respect to the number of jumps performed, drop (platform) height, squat depth amplitude, and addition of weights. Maximal concentric and isometric knee extensor strength were assessed immediately before and 10 min after each training session. Voluntary and 100 Hz...

  9. The effects of passive leg press training on jumping performance, speed, and muscle power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chiang; Chen, Chuan-Shou; Ho, Wei-Hua; Füle, Róbert János; Chung, Pao-Hung; Shiang, Tzyy-Yuang

    2013-06-01

    Passive leg press (PLP) training was developed based on the concepts of the stretch-shortening cycle (SSC) and the benefits of high muscle contraction velocity. Passive leg press training enables lower limb muscle groups to apply a maximum downward force against a platform moved up and down at high frequency by an electric motor. Thus, these muscle groups accomplished both concentric and eccentric isokinetic contractions in a passive, rapid, and repetitive manner. This study investigates the effects of 10 weeks of PLP training at high and low movement frequencies have on jumping performance, speed, and muscle power. The authors selected 30 college students who had not performed systematic resistance training in the previous 6 months, including traditional resistance training at a squat frequency of 0.5 Hz, PLP training at a low frequency of 0.5 Hz, and PLP training at a high frequency of 2.5 Hz, and randomly divided them into 3 groups (n = 10). The participants' vertical jump, drop jump, 30-m sprint performance, explosive force, and SSC efficiency were tested under the same experimental procedures at pre- and post-training. Results reveal that high-frequency PLP training significantly increased participants' vertical jump, drop jump, 30-m sprint performance, instantaneous force, peak power, and SSC efficiency (p training (p training significantly increased participants' vertical jump, 30-m sprint performance, instantaneous force, and peak power (p training only increased participants' 30-m sprint performance and peak power (p training at high movement frequency. A PLP training machine powered by an electrical motor enables muscles of the lower extremities to contract faster compared with voluntary contraction. Therefore, muscle training with high contraction velocity is one of the main methods of increasing muscle power. Passive leg press training is a unique method for enhancing jump performance, speed, and muscle power.

  10. The MARS for squat, countermovement, and standing long jump performance analyses: are measures reproducible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hébert-Losier, Kim; Beaven, C Martyn

    2014-07-01

    Jump tests are often used to assess the effect of interventions because their outcomes are reported valid indicators of functional performance. In this study, we examined the reproducibility of performance parameters from 3 common jump tests obtained using the commercially available Kistler Measurement, Analysis and Reporting Software (MARS). On 2 separate days, 32 men performed 3 squat jumps (SJs), 3 countermovement jumps (CMJs), and 3 standing long jumps (LJs) on a Kistler force-plate. On both days, the performance measures from the best jump of each series were extracted using the MARS. Changes in the mean scores, intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs), and coefficients of variations (CVs) were computed to quantify the between-day reproducibility of each parameter. Moreover, the reproducibility quantifiers specific to the 3 separate jumps were compared using nonparametric tests. Overall, an acceptable between-day reproducibility (mean ± SD, ICC, and CV) of SJ (0.88 ± 0.06 and 7.1 ± 3.8%), CMJ (0.84 ± 0.17 and 5.9 ± 4.1%), and LJ (0.80 ± 0.13 and 8.1 ± 4.1%) measures was found using the MARS, except for parameters directly relating to the rate of force development (i.e., time to maximal force) and change in momentum during countermovement (i.e., negative force impulse) where reproducibility was lower. A greater proportion of the performance measures from the standing LJs had low ICCs and/or high CVs values most likely owing to the complex nature of the LJ test. Practitioners and researchers can use most of the jump test parameters from the MARS with confidence to quantify changes in the functional ability of individuals over time, except for those relating to the rate of force development or change in momentum during countermovement phases of jumps.

  11. Maximally multipartite entangled states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facchi, Paolo; Florio, Giuseppe; Parisi, Giorgio; Pascazio, Saverio

    2008-06-01

    We introduce the notion of maximally multipartite entangled states of n qubits as a generalization of the bipartite case. These pure states have a bipartite entanglement that does not depend on the bipartition and is maximal for all possible bipartitions. They are solutions of a minimization problem. Examples for small n are investigated, both analytically and numerically.

  12. Locomotion of Mexican jumping beans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, Daniel M; K Lal, Ishan; Leamy, Michael J; Hu, David L

    2012-01-01

    The Mexican jumping bean, Laspeyresia saltitans, consists of a hollow seed housing a moth larva. Heating by the sun induces movements by the larva which appear as rolls, jumps and flips by the bean. In this combined experimental, numerical and robotic study, we investigate this unique means of rolling locomotion. Time-lapse videography is used to record bean trajectories across a series of terrain types, including one-dimensional channels and planar surfaces of varying inclination. We find that the shell encumbers the larva's locomotion, decreasing its speed on flat surfaces by threefold. We also observe that the two-dimensional search algorithm of the bean resembles the run-and-tumble search of bacteria. We test this search algorithm using both an agent-based simulation and a wheeled Scribbler robot. The algorithm succeeds in propelling the robot away from regions of high temperature and may have application in biomimetic micro-scale navigation systems. (paper)

  13. Model for polygonal hydraulic jumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martens, Erik Andreas; Watanabe, Shinya; Bohr, Tomas

    2012-01-01

    We propose a phenomenological model for the polygonal hydraulic jumps discovered by Ellegaard and co-workers [Nature (London) 392, 767 (1998); Nonlinearity 12, 1 (1999); Physica B 228, 1 (1996)], based on the known flow structure for the type-II hydraulic jumps with a "roller" (separation eddy...... nonhydrostatic pressure contributions from surface tension in light of recent observations by Bush and co-workers [J. Fluid Mech. 558, 33 (2006); Phys. Fluids 16, S4 (2004)]. The model can be analyzed by linearization around the circular state, resulting in a parameter relationship for nearly circular polygonal...... states. A truncated but fully nonlinear version of the model can be solved analytically. This simpler model gives rise to polygonal shapes that are very similar to those observed in experiments, even though surface tension is neglected, and the condition for the existence of a polygon with N corners...

  14. Maximizers versus satisficers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M. Parker

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Our previous research suggests that people reporting a stronger desire to maximize obtain worse life outcomes (Bruine de Bruin et al., 2007. Here, we examine whether this finding may be explained by the decision-making styles of self-reported maximizers. Expanding on Schwartz et al. (2002, we find that self-reported maximizers are more likely to show problematic decision-making styles, as evidenced by self-reports of less behavioral coping, greater dependence on others when making decisions, more avoidance of decision making, and greater tendency to experience regret. Contrary to predictions, self-reported maximizers were more likely to report spontaneous decision making. However, the relationship between self-reported maximizing and worse life outcomes is largely unaffected by controls for measures of other decision-making styles, decision-making competence, and demographic variables.

  15. Innovative Video Feedback on Jump Landing Improves Landing Technique in Males

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dallinga, Joan; Benjaminse, Anne; Gokeler, Alli; Cortes, Nelson; Otten, Egbert; Lemmink, Koen

    Video feedback may be a powerful tool to change biomechanical landing patterns associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury risk. This study investigated the effect of video feedback on drop vertical jump (DVJ) landing strategies in team sport athletes. 59 athletes were assigned to a

  16. Innovative video feedback on jump landing improves landing technique in males

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dallinga, Joan; Benjaminse, Anne; Gokeler, Alli; Cortes, N.; Otten, E.; Lemmink, Koen

    2016-01-01

    Video feedback may be a powerful tool to change biomechanical landing patterns associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury risk. This study investigated the effect of video feedback on drop vertical jump (DVJ) landing strategies in team sport athletes. 59 athletes were assigned to a

  17. Data-Driven Jump Detection Thresholds for Application in Jump Regressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Davies

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper develops a method to select the threshold in threshold-based jump detection methods. The method is motivated by an analysis of threshold-based jump detection methods in the context of jump-diffusion models. We show that over the range of sampling frequencies a researcher is most likely to encounter that the usual in-fill asymptotics provide a poor guide for selecting the jump threshold. Because of this we develop a sample-based method. Our method estimates the number of jumps over a grid of thresholds and selects the optimal threshold at what we term the ‘take-off’ point in the estimated number of jumps. We show that this method consistently estimates the jumps and their indices as the sampling interval goes to zero. In several Monte Carlo studies we evaluate the performance of our method based on its ability to accurately locate jumps and its ability to distinguish between true jumps and large diffusive moves. In one of these Monte Carlo studies we evaluate the performance of our method in a jump regression context. Finally, we apply our method in two empirical studies. In one we estimate the number of jumps and report the jump threshold our method selects for three commonly used market indices. In the other empirical application we perform a series of jump regressions using our method to select the jump threshold.

  18. Efeitos de um programa de treinamento neuromuscular sobre o consumo máximo de oxigênio e salto vertical em atletas iniciantes de voleibol Los efectos de un programa de entrenamiento neuromuscular nel consumo máximo de oxígeno y salto vertical en atletas principiantes de voleyball Effects of a neuromuscular training program on the maximal Oxygen consumption and vertical jump in beginning volleyball players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Altini Neto

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available As alterações ocorridas na performance motora de jovens envolvidos em treinamentos especializados ainda não são muito claras. Este é um conhecimento de suma importância para a correta prescrição desses treinos. O objetivo deste estudo foi verificar a influência do treinamento nas variáveis neuromotoras e orgânicas de jovens atletas na modalidade voleibol em diferentes momentos do programa. Foram selecionadas nove atletas, do sexo feminino, da equipe infantil, do Clube de Campo de Piracicaba/SP, na faixa etária de 14 e 15 anos, para a realização dos testes: alcance de ataque e bloqueio e o teste de 1.000 metros, com o objetivo de avaliar, em três momentos distintos, o programa de treino sugerido. Foram realizadas quatro coletas de dados, a primeira na apresentação das atletas, a segunda no final da etapa geral, a terceira no final da etapa especial e a última no final do período competitivo. No período preparatório foram utilizados exercícios com o objetivo de melhorar o desempenho das atletas na realização das ações motoras do jogo. No competitivo foram realizados exercícios com o objetivo de manter os índices de rendimento alcançados anteriormente, priorizando os exercícios coletivos envolvendo a técnica e a tática da modalidade. Com base na análise estatística dos dados, obtida através do cálculo da média, desvio-padrão, nível de significância (p Todavía no están claras las alteraciones de la actuaciones deportivas de juventud involucrada en entrenamientos especializados. Éste es un conocimiento de suma importancia para la prescripción correcta de los entrenamientos. El objetivo de este estudio fue verificar la influencia del entrenamiento en las variables neuromotoras y orgánicas de atletas jóvenes en la modalidad de voleyball en momentos diferentes de un programa. Se seleccionaron 9 atletas, mujeres, del equipo infantil, del Club de Campo de Piracicaba/SP, con edades de 14 y 15 años, para el logro de las pruebas, de alcance de ataque y asedio y la prueba de 1.000 metros, con el objetivo de evaluar, en tres momentos diferentes, el programa de entrenamiento sugerido. Cuatro colecciones de datos fueron realizadas; la primera: en la presentación de las atletas, la segunda en el final de la etapa general, la tercera en el final de la etapa especial y la última en el final del período competitivo. Los ejercicios del período preparatorio se usaron con el objetivo de mejorar la acción de las atletas en el logro de las acciones motoras del juego. Los ejercicios competitivos fueron cumplidos con el objetivo de mantener los índices del desempeño alcanzado previamente, mientras se priorizaban los ejercicios colectivos que involucran la técnica y las tácticas de la modalidad. Con base en el análisis estadístico de los datos, que se obtuvo a través del cálculo del promedio, la desviación típica, nivel de significancia (p The alterations that occur in the motor performance of young athletes involved in specialized trainings are not yet quite clear. That is a highly important knowledge to the appropriate prescription of the trainings. The purpose of this paper was to verify the influence of the training on the neuromotor and organic variables in young volleyball athletes in different moments of the program. Nine female athletes of the child team from Clube de Campo Piracicaba/SP were selected to perform the tests: the attack and blocking range, and the 1,000 meters test, with the purpose to assess the suggested training program in three different moments of the suggested training program. Four data collection were performed: the first on the athletes' presentation, the second one at the end of the general phase, and the third at the end of the special phase, and the last one at the end of the competitive period. In the preparatory period, the exercises were used aiming to improve the athletes' performance to accomplish the motor actions of the game. During the competitive phase, it was performed exercises with the purpose to keep the previously attained output indexes, favoring the collective exercises involving the techniques and tactics of the modality. Based on the statistical analysis of the data attained through the calculation of the mean, the standard deviation significance level (p < 0.05, and the percentage of the data, it was possible to conclude that there was an increase in the strength indexes of the lower limbs and in the general endurance during the general phase of the preparatory period; in the special phase, the increasing bias continued. During the competitive period, the results achieved were maintained, and this confirms the effectiveness of the training program suggested for the physical capabilities assessed.

  19. Biomechanics of optimal flight in ski-jumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remizov, L P

    1984-01-01

    The flight in a vertical plane of a ski-jumper after take-off was studied with the purpose of maximising flight distance. To solve the problem of optimal flight (how a jumper must change his angle of attack to obtain the longest jump) the basic theorem of the optimal control theory--Pontriagin's maximum principle--was applied. The calculations were based on data from wind tunnel experiments. It was shown that the maximum flight distance is achieved when the angle of attack is gradually increased according to a convex function the form of which depends on the individual aerodynamic parameters.

  20. Why do oil prices jump (or fall)?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirl, Franz

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses theories that can explain the zig-zags of oil prices in general and in particular the recent jump. More precisely, the following explanations are discussed: Homo oeconomicus (pure profit maximization if demand is dynamic and convex), price reaction function (price increases and respectively declines depend on capacity utilization), cartelization contingent on output or revenues of which the latter can lead to backward bending supply segments and multiple equilibria, statistical descriptions (mean reversion), homo politicus, i.e., arguments for price hikes that are rational (Public Choice) despite the (long-run) economic loss. Finally two approaches are presented that emphasize demand uncertainty: one extending the above-mentioned dynamic demand framework and the other considers a dynamic game of non-competitive suppliers with lumpy investments. Summing up, a demand shock seems to be the most suitable explanation of today's high prices (indeed a shock given that International Energy Agency (IEA) and Department of Energy (DoE) were promising just a couple of years ago that we are going to have lots of oil at low prices), while others and in particular politics have surprisingly little or no explanatory power. (author)

  1. Is CP violation maximal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gronau, M.

    1984-01-01

    Two ambiguities are noted in the definition of the concept of maximal CP violation. The phase convention ambiguity is overcome by introducing a CP violating phase in the quark mixing matrix U which is invariant under rephasing transformations. The second ambiguity, related to the parametrization of U, is resolved by finding a single empirically viable definition of maximal CP violation when assuming that U does not single out one generation. Considerable improvement in the calculation of nonleptonic weak amplitudes is required to test the conjecture of maximal CP violation. 21 references

  2. The ingestion of a caffeinated energy drink improves jump performance and activity patterns in elite badminton players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abian, Pablo; Del Coso, Juan; Salinero, Juan José; Gallo-Salazar, Cesar; Areces, Francisco; Ruiz-Vicente, Diana; Lara, Beatriz; Soriano, Lidon; Muñoz, Victor; Abian-Vicen, Javier

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a caffeine-containing energy drink to enhance physical and match performance in elite badminton players. Sixteen male and elite badminton players (25.4 ± 7.3 year; 71.8 ± 7.9 kg) participated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled and randomised experiment. On two different sessions, badminton players ingested 3 mg of caffeine per kg of body mass in the form of an energy drink or the same drink without caffeine (placebo). After 60 min, participants performed the following tests: handgrip maximal force production, smash jump without and with shuttlecock, squat jump, countermovement jump and the agility T-test. Later, a 45-min simulated badminton match was played. Players' number of impacts and heart rate was measured during the match. The ingestion of the caffeinated energy drink increased squat jump height (34.5 ± 4.7 vs. 36.4 ± 4.3 cm; P jump peak power (P jump height (37.7 ± 4.5 vs. 39.5 ± 5.1 cm; P jump peak power (P jump performance and activity patterns during game in elite badminton players.

  3. Interaction of the human body and surfaces of different stiffness during drop jumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arampatzis, Adamantios; Stafilidis, Savvas; Morey-Klapsing, Gaspar; Brüggemann, Gert-peter

    2004-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine two hypotheses: (a) the stiffness of the surface influences the leg stiffness of the subjects during drop jumps, and (b) drop jumping performance (jumping height and energy rates of the subject's center of mass during the contact phase) increases when decreasing surface stiffness due to a greater energy storage capacity of the surface for a given acting force. Ten female subjects performed a series of drop jumps from 40-cm height onto two sprung surfaces with different stiffness. Those trials of each subject displaying the maximal mechanical power during the upward phase were analyzed. The ground reaction forces were measured using a force plate. Sagittal kinematics of the subject's body positions and the deformation of the surface were recorded using two high-speed video cameras. On the soft surface, the jumping height and the energy rates of the subjects during the contact phase were greater than on the hard one. The energy delivered by the subjects during the upward phase, the leg and joint stiffness, as well as the range of motion of the subjects remained unchanged for both surfaces. The absolute energy loss is lower for the hard surface, but the jumping performance is greater for the soft one. The reason is a higher ratio of positive to negative mechanical work done by the subjects during the contact phase. The adjustment of the subjects to different surfaces is not only dependent on the stiffness of the surface but also on the intensity of the movement.

  4. Seasonal differences in jump performance in the Svalbard rock ptarmigan (Lagopus muta hyperborea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J. Lees

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Fat storage is essential to the survival of many bird species, providing energy reserves, but can have an effect on locomotor performance with an associated potential increase in predation risk. In particular, the ability to initiate flight through jumping is critical to predator avoidance and may be influenced by changes in body mass (Mb. Here we investigate seasonal differences in the jump take-off performance of high Arctic Svalbard rock ptarmigan (Lagopus muta hyperborea resulting from around a 50% increase in Mb during winter as a result of fat deposition. Using force-plate data and videography, we reveal that, in the absence of alterations to take-off angle, winter Svalbard rock ptarmigan are unable to increase hind-limb power output during jumping to compensate for their increased Mb. As a result, peak take-off velocity is reduced by 42% and jump duration is also extended during winter. The consequences of reduced jumping performance upon Svalbard ptarmigan during winter may be relatively small given their low risk of predation during this season. It may be, however, that the observed reduction in jumping performance when fat may contribute to the sub-maximal pattern of fat acquisition observed in other bird species.

  5. The effect of a secondary cognitive task on landing mechanics and jump performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Boyi; Cook, Ross F; Meyer, Elizabeth A; Sciascia, Yvonne; Hinshaw, Taylour J; Wang, Chaoyi; Zhu, Qin

    2018-06-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries commonly occur during jump-landing tasks when individuals' attention is simultaneously allocated to other objects and tasks. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the effect of allocation of attention imposed by a secondary cognitive task on landing mechanics and jump performance. Thirty-eight recreational athletes performed a jump-landing task in three conditions: no counting, counting backward by 1 s from a randomly given number, and counting backward by 7 s from a randomly given number. Three-dimensional kinematics and ground reaction forces were collected and analysed. Participants demonstrated decreased knee flexion angles at initial contact (p = 0.001) for the counting by 1 s condition compared with the no counting condition. Participants also showed increased peak posterior and vertical ground reaction forces during the first 100 ms of landing (p ≤ 0.023) and decreased jump height (p jump performance. ACL injury risk screening protocols and injury prevention programmes may incorporate cognitive tasks into jump-landing tasks to better simulate sports environments.

  6. Effects of a contrast training programme on jumping, sprinting and agility performance of prepubertal basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latorre Román, Pedro Ángel; Villar Macias, Francisco Javier; García Pinillos, Felipe

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a 10 week contrast training (CT) programme (isometric + plyometric) on jumping, sprinting abilities and agility performance in prepubertal basketball players. Fifty-eight children from a basketball academy (age: 8.72 ± 0.97 years; body mass index: 17.22 ± 2.48 kg/m 2 ) successfully completed the study. Participants were randomly assigned to experimental groups (EG, n = 30) and control groups (CG, n = 28). The CT programme was included in the experimental group's training sessions - twice a week - as part of their usual weekly training regime. This programme included 3 exercises: 1 isometric and 2 plyometric. Jumping, sprinting and agility performance were assessed before and after the training programme. Significant differences were found in posttest between EG and CG in sprint and T-test: EG showed better results than CG. Furthermore, there were significant differences in posttest-pretest between EG and CG in squat jump, countermovement jump, drop jump, sprint and T-test with the EG showing better results than CG. The CT programme led to increases in vertical jump, sprint and agility levels, so that the authors suggest that prepubertal children exhibit high muscular strength trainability.

  7. Psychophysiological response in parachute jumps, the effect of experience and type of jump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemente-Suárez, Vicente Javier; Robles-Pérez, José Juan; Fernández-Lucas, Jesús

    2017-10-01

    We aimed to analyse the effect of experience and type of parachute jump on the psychophysiological responses of jumpers. We analysed blood oxygen saturation, heart rate, blood glucose, lactate and creatinkinase, leg strength, isometric hand strength, cortical arousal, specific fine motor skills, self-confidence and cognition, and somatic and state anxiety, before and after four different parachute jumps: a sport parachute jump, a manual tactical parachute jump, tandem pilots, and tandem passengers. Independently of the parachute jump, the psychophysiological responses of experienced paratroopers were not affected by the jumps, except for an increase in anaerobic metabolism. Novice parachute jumpers presented a higher psychophysiological stress response than the experienced jumpers, together with a large anticipatory anxiety response before the jump; however, this decreased after the jump, although the high physiological activation was maintained. This information could be used by civil and military paratroopers' instructors to improve their training programmes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Bilateral contact ground reaction forces and contact times during plyometric drop jumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Nick B; Stock, Christopher G; Scurr, Joanna C

    2010-10-01

    Drop jumping (DJ) is used in training programs aimed to improve lower extremity explosive power. When performing double-leg drop jumps, it is important to provide an equal stimulus to both legs to ensure balanced development of the lower legs. The aim of this study was to bilaterally analyze the ground reactions forces and temporal components of drop jumping from 3 heights. Ten recreationally active male subjects completed 3 bounce-drop jumps from 3 starting heights (0.2, 0.4, and 0.6 m). Two linked force platforms were used to record left- and right-leg peak vertical force, time to peak force, average force, ground contact time, impulse and time differential. Between-height and between-leg comparisons for each variable were made using a multivariate analysis of variance with post hoc Wilcoxon tests (p < 0.05). Results indicated that force and time variables increased as drop jump height increased (p < 0.0001). Post hoc analyses showed that at 0.2- and 0.4-m bilateral differences were present in the time to peak force, average force, and impulse. No bilateral differences for any variables were shown at 0.6-m starting height. The contact time for all jumps was <0.26 seconds. At 0.2 m, only 63% of the subjects had a starting time differential of <0.01 seconds, rising to 96.3% at 0.6 m. The results indicated that 0.6 m is the suggested drop jump height to ensure that no bilateral differences in vertical forces and temporal components occur; however, shorter contact times were found at the lower heights.

  9. PREDICCION DE LA ALTURA DE SALTO VERTICAL. IMPORTANCIA DEL IMPULSO MECÁNICO Y DE LA MASA MUSCULAR DE LAS EXTREMIDADES INFERIORES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Ferragut

    2010-09-01

    ="tabulado" align="justify">The aim of this study was to find out if it is possible to predict the height of the vertical jump from kinematic, dynamometric and anthropometric variables using a multiple linear regression model. Fifty-three subjects, 21 male and 9 female volleyball players of first National categories (First National League and First League, as well as 23 Physical Education students (12 males and 11 females participated in this study. First, the height of the flight during the performance of a "squat jump" (SJ and "countermovement jump" (CMJ was determined. Then, the maximal isometric strength in the squat position was assessed with the knees bent at 90º, 120º and 140º while the electromyographic activity was simultaneously recorded on the vastus lateralis with surface electrodes. The muscle mass of the lower limbs was obtained by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA. The positive mechanical impulse explained on its own 77% of jumping height variability. Prediction power was increased to 82% by including in the model the percentage of body mass represented by de muscle mass of the lower limbs. The inclusion of the muscle mass of the lower limbs, as a third variable, raised the prediction power to 98% of jumping height variability. The same variables allowed for a similar level of prediction during the squat jumps.
    KEY WORDS: Vertical jump, DEXA, muscle mass, strength.

  10. Dynamic jump intensities and risk premiums

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Peter; Ornthanalai, Chayawat; Jacobs, Kris

    2012-01-01

    We build a new class of discrete-time models that are relatively easy to estimate using returns and/or options. The distribution of returns is driven by two factors: dynamic volatility and dynamic jump intensity. Each factor has its own risk premium. The models significantly outperform standard...... models without jumps when estimated on S&P500 returns. We find very strong support for time-varying jump intensities. Compared to the risk premium on dynamic volatility, the risk premium on the dynamic jump intensity has a much larger impact on option prices. We confirm these findings using joint...

  11. Characteristics of Air Entrainment in Hydraulic Jump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarkani, M. S. S.; Tan, L. W.; Al-Gheethi, A.

    2018-04-01

    The characteristics of hydraulic jump, especially the air entrainment within jump is still not properly understood. Therefore, the current work aimed to determine the size and number of air entrainment formed in hydraulic jump at three different Froude numbers and to obtain the relationship between Froude number with the size and number of air entrainment in hydraulic jump. Experiments of hydraulic jump were conducted in a 10 m long and 0.3 m wide Armfield S6MKII glass-sided tilting flume. Hydraulic jumps were produced by flow under sluice gate with varying Froude number. The air entrainment of the hydraulic jump was captured with a Canon Power Shot SX40 HS digital camera in video format at 24 frames per second. Three discharges have been considered, i.e. 0.010 m3/s, 0.011 m3/s, and 0.013 m3/s. For hydraulic jump formed in each discharge, 32 frames were selected for the purpose of analysing the size and number of air entrainment in hydraulic jump. The results revealed that that there is a tendency to have greater range in sizes of air bubbles as Fr1 increases. Experiments with Fr1 = 7.547. 7.707, and 7.924 shown that the number of air bubbles increases exponentially with Fr1 at a relationship of N = 1.3814 e 0.9795Fr1.

  12. Improved safety in ski jumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wester, K

    1988-01-01

    Among approximately 2,600 licensed Norwegian ski jumpers, only three injuries that caused a permanent medical disability of at least 10% were incurred during the 5 year period from 1982 through 1986. When compared to the previous 5 year period (1977 to 1981), a dramatic improvement in safety is seen, as both number and severity of such injuries were markedly reduced. There are several probable reasons for this improved safety record: better preparation of the jumps, the return to using only one standard heel block, and the fact that coaches are being more responsible, especially with younger jumpers.

  13. A tale of quantum jumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmichael, H.J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper cannot provide anything like a complete overview of quantum optics in New Zealand. The scope over 40 years is far too broad and the number of players far too large. Nevertheless, the story of quantum jumps, from the days of the Old Quantum Theory up to the present, serves to highlight some small part of the New Zealand experience. It also offers an encounter with the oddities of light as a quantum mechanical 'something', oddities that the gallant proposers of technologies for the future aim to exploit. (author).

  14. Vertical integration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antill, N.

    1999-01-01

    This paper focuses on the trend in international energy companies towards vertical integration in the gas chain from wellhead to power generation, horizontal integration in refining and marketing businesses, and the search for larger projects with lower upstream costs. The shape of the petroleum industry in the next millennium, the creation of super-major oil companies, and the relationship between size and risk are discussed. The dynamics of vertical integration, present events and future developments are considered. (UK)

  15. Assessment of musculoskeletal system in women with jumping mechanography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yannis Dionyssiotis

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Yannis Dionyssiotis1,2, Antonios Galanos1, Georgios Michas1, Georgios Trovas1, Georgios P Lyritis11Laboratory for Research of the Musculoskeletal System, University of Athens, KAT Hospital, Kifissia, Greece; 2Rehabilitation Department, Rhodes General Hospital, Rhodes, GreeceAbstract: The purpose of this study was to investigate and add reference data about the musculoskeletal system in women. The mechanography system of the Leonardo™ platform (Novotec, Germany was used to measure parameters of movement (velocity, force, power in 176 healthy Greek women aged 20–79 years, separated according to age decade in six groups: group 1 (n = 12, 20–29 years; group 2 (n = 14, 30–39 years; group 3 (n = 33, 40–49 years; group 4 (n = 59, 50–59 years including 21 postmenopausal; group 5 (n = 31, 60–69 years including 12 postmenopausal; and group 6 (n = 27, 70–79 years all postmenopausal. This system measures forces applied to the plate over time, calculates through acceleration the vertical velocity of center of gravity and using force and velocity it calculates power of vertical movements. All women performed a counter-movement jump (brief squat before the jump with freely moving arms. Weight was recorded on the platform before the jump and height was measured with a wall-mounted ruler. Body weight and body mass index were gradually increased; on the contrary height and all movement parameters except force (velocity, power were statistically decreased during aging and after menopause.Keywords: biomechanics, ground reaction force, power, women, menopause

  16. Motor Control of Landing from a Jump in Simulated Hypergravity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clément N Gambelli

    Full Text Available On Earth, when landing from a counter-movement jump, muscles contract before touchdown to anticipate imminent collision with the ground and place the limbs in a proper position. This study assesses how the control of landing is modified when gravity is increased above 1 g. Hypergravity was simulated in two different ways: (1 by generating centrifugal forces during turns of an aircraft (A300 and (2 by pulling the subject downwards in the laboratory with a Subject Loading System (SLS. Eight subjects were asked to perform counter-movement jumps at 1 g on Earth and at 3 hypergravity levels (1.2, 1.4 and 1.6 g both in A300 and with SLS. External forces applied to the body, movements of the lower limb segments and muscular activity of 6 lower limb muscles were recorded. Our results show that both in A300 and with SLS, as in 1 g: (1 the anticipation phase is present; (2 during the loading phase (from touchdown until the peak of vertical ground reaction force, lower limb muscles act like a stiff spring, whereas during the second part (from the peak of vertical ground reaction force until the return to the standing position, they act like a compliant spring associated with a damper. (3 With increasing gravity, the preparatory adjustments and the loading phase are modified whereas the second part does not change drastically. (4 The modifications are similar in A300 and with SLS, however the effect of hypergravity is accentuated in A300, probably due to altered sensory inputs. This observation suggests that otolithic information plays an important role in the control of the landing from a jump.

  17. Separation and pattern formation in hydraulic jumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Tomas; Ellegaard, C.; Hansen, A. Espe

    1998-01-01

    We present theory and experiments on the circular hydraulic jump in the stationary regime. The theory can handle the situation in which the fluid flows over an edge far away from the jump. In the experiments the external height is controlled, and a series of transitions in the flow structure appe...

  18. Biomechanical analysis of drop and countermovement jumps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bobbert, M. F.; Mackay, M.T.; Schinkelshoek, D.; Huijing, P. A.; van Ingen Schenau, G. J.

    For 13 subjects the performance of drop jumps from a height of 40 cm (DJ) and of countermovement jumps (CMJ) was analysed and compared. From force plate and cine data biomechanical variables including forces, moments, power output and amount of work done were calculated for hip, knee and ankle

  19. Jump Detection in the Danish Stock Market

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høg, Esben

    2002-01-01

    It is well known in financial economics that stock market return data are often modelled by a diffusion process with some regular drift function. Occasionally, however, sudden changes or jumps occur in the return data. Wavelet scaling methods are used to detect jumps and cusps in stock market...

  20. You Say Jump, I Say How High?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fasterhold, Martin; Pichlmair, Martin; Holmgård, Christoffer

    This paper explores the design of jumping in 2D platform games. Through creating a method for measuring existing games, applying this method to a selection of different platformer games, and analysing the results, the paper arrives at a comprehensive data model for jumping. The model supports the...

  1. Resonant Pump-dump Quantum Control of Solvated Dye Molecules with Phase Jumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konar, Arkaprabha; Lozovoy, Vadim; Dantus, Marcos

    2014-03-01

    Quantum coherent control of two photon and multiphoton excitation processes in atomic and condensed phase systems employing phase jumps has been well studied and understood. Here we demonstrate coherent quantum control of a two photon resonant pump-dump process in a complex solvated dye molecule. Phase jump in the frequency domain via a pulse shaper is employed to coherently enhance the stimulated emission by an order of magnitude when compared to transform limited pulses. Red shifted stimulated emission from successive low energy Stokes shifted excited states leading to narrowband emission are observed upon scanning the pi step across the excitation spectrum. A binary search space routine was also employed to investigate the effects of other types of phase jumps on stimulated emission and to determine the optimum phase that maximizes the emission. Understanding the underlying mechanism of this kind of enhancement will guide us in designing pulse shapes for enhancing stimulated emission, which can be further applied in the field of imaging.

  2. Vertical Integration, Monopoly, and the First Amendment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Timothy J.

    This paper addresses the relationship between the First Amendment, monopoly of transmission media, and vertical integration of transmission and content provision. A survey of some of the incentives a profit-maximizing transmission monopolist may have with respect to content is followed by a discussion of how vertical integration affects those…

  3. A review on the basketball jump shot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Victor H A; Rodacki, André L F; Satern, Miriam N

    2015-06-01

    The ability to shoot an effective jump shot in the sport of basketball is critical to a player's success. In an attempt to better understand the aspects related to expert performance, researchers have investigated successful free throws and jump shots of various basketball players and identified movement variables that contribute to their success. The purpose of this study was to complete a systematic review of the scientific literature on the basketball free throw and jump shot for the purpose of revealing the critical components of shooting that coaches, teachers, and players should focus on when teaching, learning, practising, and performing a jump shot. The results of this review are presented in three sections: (a) variables that affect ball trajectory, (b) phases of the jump shot, and (c) additional variables that influence shooting.

  4. Theory of boiling-up jump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labuntsov, D.A.; Avdeev, A.A.

    1981-01-01

    Concept of boiling-up jump representing a zone of intense volume boiling-up separating overtaking flow of overheated metastable liquid from an area of equilibrium flow located below along the flow is introduced. It is shown that boiling-up jump is a shock wave of rarefaction. It is concluded that entropy increment occurs on the jump. Characteristics of adiabatic shock wave curve of boiling- up in ''pressure-specific volume'' coordinates have been found and its form has been investigated. Stability of boiling-up jump has been analyzed as well. On the basis of approach developed analysis is carried out on the shock adiobatic curve of condensation. Concept of boiling-up jump may be applied to the analysis of boiling-up processes when flowing liquid through packings during emergency pressure drop etc [ru

  5. Guinea pig maximization test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Ejner

    1985-01-01

    Guinea pig maximization tests (GPMT) with chlorocresol were performed to ascertain whether the sensitization rate was affected by minor changes in the Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA) emulsion used. Three types of emulsion were evaluated: the oil phase was mixed with propylene glycol, saline...

  6. USE OF WHOLE-BODY VIBRATION AS A MODE OF WARMING UP BEFORE COUNTER MOVEMENT JUMP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique G. Artero

    2007-12-01

    results are presented jointly (Figure 1.Reports concerning acute effects of WBV on jump performance yield conflicting results. Transient benefits of 2.5, 4 and 8 % in CMJ height has been reported after 4 min (Torvinen et al., 2002a, 10 min (Bosco et al., 2000 and 5 min (Cochrane and Stannard, 2005 of WBV stimulus, respectively. The lack of improvement in our study may be partially explained by the time elapsed between the vibration stimulus and the jump test, since our subjects performed the CMJ immediately after the WBV exposure. The different training level of the participants may also explain discrepancies among studies, as our subjects were not engaged in any regular exercise practice. It has been reported that elite athletes may obtain more benefits from WBV than amateur athletes do (Issurin and Tenenbaum, 1999. In agreement with our results, other studies did not show improvement on CMJ performance after a single bout of WBV (Cormie et al., 2006; Rittweger et al., 2003; Torvinen et al., 2002b. Compared with our results, Cormie et al., 2006 did not find an impairment of CMJ performance immediately after a single WBV bout of 30 s, which may be associated with their shorter WBV stimulus (30 s, the interval actually elapsed between WBV and CMJ test, and the higher training level of their participants.In summary, whole-body vibration combined with voluntary contractions does not seem to be a useful method for warming up before activities involving vertical jumps. At least one minute interval recovery should be allowed when using WBV in a range of 20-30 Hz and 90 or 120 s if maximal jump performance is required.AcknowledgmentThis study was conducted without any conflict of interest, without financial assistance, and supported by grants from the Consejo Superior de Deportes (109/UPB31/03, 13/UPB20/04, the Spanish Ministry of Education and Science (AP2003-2128, AP-2004-2745; AP2005-3827; AP2005-4358 and the HELENA study (European Community Sixth RTD Framework Programme

  7. Joint power contribution during jumping and sidecutting in young female elite handball players

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bencke, Jesper; Lauridsen, Hanne B.; Sørensen, Rikke S.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction One game-changing parameter in handball is explosive power during jumping or sidecutting. In order to improve game performance, more knowledge about the physical demands of the different joints and muscle groups during sports specific movements may help trainers to implement specific...... exercises for enhancing performance in these movements. The aim of the study was to describe the kinematics and kinetics of the ankle, knee and hip joint during jumping and sidecutting, and investigate their relation to optimal performance. Methods 54 young female handball players, aged 16.8 yrs (SD: 1......: 0.21, β=0.47, p=0.001). Conclusions The results show that different muscle groups may be performance dependant in different handball specific movements. While vertical jumping is mostly depending on high knee joint power, peak concentric ankle joint power is the most important parameter during...

  8. Influence of dorsiflexion shoes on neuromuscular fatigue of the plantar flexors after combined tapping-jumping exercises in volleyball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapole, Thomas; Ahmaidi, Said; Gaillien, Benjamin; Leprêtre, Pierre-Marie

    2013-07-01

    Dorsiflexion shoes could be useful to increase jumping performance. The aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of wearing shoes inducing moderate dorsiflexion (2°) on neuromuscular fatigue induced by volleyball exercises involving multiple stretch-shortening cycles. Squat jump (SJ) and countermovement jump (CMJ) performance, and plantar flexors isometric voluntary and evoked contractile properties were assessed in 10 unfamiliarized trained volleyball players before and after a 10-minute intensive combined tapping-jumping volleyball exercise performed, in blinded randomized conditions, with neutral (0°) or moderate dorsiflexion (2°). No significant difference was observed on SJ performance in neutral and moderate dorsiflexion conditions. However, CMJ height was initially lower with 2° dorsiflexion compared with 0° (p volleyball exercise also induced a significant decrease in maximal voluntary contraction (p volleyball players.

  9. Tri-maximal vs. bi-maximal neutrino mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, W.G

    2000-01-01

    It is argued that data from atmospheric and solar neutrino experiments point strongly to tri-maximal or bi-maximal lepton mixing. While ('optimised') bi-maximal mixing gives an excellent a posteriori fit to the data, tri-maximal mixing is an a priori hypothesis, which is not excluded, taking account of terrestrial matter effects

  10. The effect of a 3-month prevention program on the jump-landing technique in basketball: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aerts, Inne; Cumps, Elke; Verhagen, Evert; Wuyts, Bram; Van De Gucht, Sam; Meeusen, Romain

    2015-02-01

    In jump-landing sports, the injury mechanism that most frequently results in an injury is the jump-landing movement. Influencing the movement patterns and biomechanical predisposing factors are supposed to decrease injury occurrence. To evaluate the influence of a 3-mo coach-supervised jump-landing prevention program on jump-landing technique using the jump-landing scoring (JLS) system. Randomized controlled trial. On-field. 116 athletes age 15-41 y, with 63 athletes in the control group and 53 athletes in the intervention group. The intervention program in this randomized control trial was administered at the start of the basketball season 2010-11. The jump-landing training program, supervised by the athletic trainers, was performed for a period of 3 mo. The jump-landing technique was determined by registering the jump-landing technique of all athletes with the JLS system, pre- and postintervention. After the prevention program, the athletes of the male and female intervention groups landed with a significantly less erect position than those in the control groups (P < .05). This was presented by a significant improvement in maximal hip flexion, maximal knee flexion, hip active range of motion, and knee active range of motion. Another important finding was that postintervention, knee valgus during landing diminished significantly (P < .05) in the female intervention group compared with their control group. Furthermore, the male intervention group significantly improved (P < .05) the scores of the JLS system from pre- to postintervention. Malalignments such as valgus position and insufficient knee flexion and hip flexion, previously identified as possible risk factors for lower-extremity injuries, improved significantly after the completion of the prevention program. The JLS system can help in identifying these malalignments. Therapy, prevention, level 1b.

  11. Realized Jump Risk and Equity Return in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guojin Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We utilize the realized jump components to explore a new jump (including nonsystematic jump and systematic jump risk factor model. After estimating daily realized jumps from high-frequency transaction data of the Chinese A-share stocks, we calculate monthly jump size, monthly jump standard deviation, and monthly jump arrival rate and then use those monthly jump factors to explain the return of the following month. Our empirical results show that the jump tail risk can explain the equity return. For the large capital-size stocks, large cap stock portfolios, and index, one-month lagged jump risk factor significantly explains the asset return variation. Our results remain the same even when we add the size and value factors in the robustness tests.

  12. Factors that influence ground reaction force profiles during counter movement jumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagles, Alexander N; Sayers, Mark G; Lovell, Dale I

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how hip, knee and ankle kinetics and kinematics influence effective impulse production during countermovement jumps. Eighteen semi-professional soccer players (22.8±2.2 years) volunteered to participate in the study. Participants completed three maximal countermovement jumps on two force platforms (1000 Hz) that were linked to a nine camera infrared motion capture system (500 Hz). Kinetic and kinematic data revealed jumpers who fail to achieve uniform ground reaction force curves that result in optimal impulse production during their jump always display hip adduction and or hip internal rotation during the concentric phase of the countermovement jump. The variation of hip adduction and or internal rotation likely represents failed joint transition during the concentric phase of the countermovement jump and appears to account for a non-uniform force trace seen in these jumpers. The findings suggest rehabilitation and conditioning exercises for injury prevention and performance may benefit from targeting frontal and transverse plane movement.

  13. Strength Determinants of Jump Height in the Jump Throw Movement in Women Handball Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGhie, David; Østerås, Sindre; Ettema, Gertjan; Paulsen, Gøran; Sandbakk, Øyvind

    2018-06-08

    McGhie, D, Østerås, S, Ettema, G, Paulsen, G, and Sandbakk, Ø. Strength determinants of jump height in the jump throw movement in women handball players. J Strength Cond Res XX(X): 000-000, 2018-The purpose of the study was to improve the understanding of the strength demands of a handball-specific jump through examining the associations between jump height in a jump throw jump (JTJ) and measures of lower-body maximum strength and impulse in handball players. For comparison, whether the associations between jump height and strength differed between the JTJ and the customarily used countermovement jump (CMJ) was also examined. Twenty women handball players from a Norwegian top division club participated in the study. Jump height was measured in the JTJ and in unilateral and bilateral CMJ. Lower-body strength (maximum isometric force, one-repetition maximum [1RM], impulse at ∼60% and ∼35% 1RM) was measured in seated leg press. The associations between jump height and strength were assessed with correlation analyses and t-tests of dependent r's were performed to determine if correlations differed between jump tests. Only impulse at ∼35% 1RM correlated significantly with JTJ height (p jump height and strength were significantly weaker in the JTJ than in both CMJ tests for all strength measures (p = 0.001-0.044) except one. Maximum strength and impulse at ∼60% 1RM did not seem to sufficiently capture the capabilities associated with JTJ height, highlighting the importance of employing tests targeting performance-relevant neuromuscular characteristics when assessing jump-related strength in handball players. Further, CMJ height seemed to represent a wider range of strength capabilities and care should be taken when using it as a proxy for handball-specific movements.

  14. PRE-ACTIVITY MODULATION OF LOWER EXTREMITY MUSCLES WITHIN DIFFERENT TYPES AND HEIGHTS OF DEEP JUMP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Mrdakovic

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine modulation of pre- activity related to different types and heights of deep jump. Sixteen male soccer players without experience in deep jumps training (the national competition; 15.0 ± 0.5yrs; weight 61.9 ± 6.1kg; height 1.77 ± 0.07m, who participated in the study, performed three types of deep jump (bounce landing, counter landing, and bounce drop jump from three different heights (40cm, 60cm, and 80cm. Surface EMG device (1000Hz was used to estimate muscle activity (maximal amplitude of EMG - AmaxEMG; integral EMG signal - iEMG of five muscles (mm.gastrocnemii, m.soleus, m.tibialis anterior, m.vastus lateralis within 150ms before touchdown. All the muscles, except m. gastrocnemius medialis, showed systematic increase in pre-activity when platform height was raised. For most of the lower extremity muscles, the most significant differences were between values of pre-activity obtained for 40 cm and 80 cm platforms. While the amount of muscle pre-activity in deep jumps from the heights above and beneath the optimal one did not differ significantly from that generated in deep jumps from the optimal drop height of 60 cm, the patterns of muscle pre-activity obtained for the heights above the optimal one did differ from those obtained for the optimal drop height. That suggests that deep jumps from the heights above the optimal one do not seem to be an adequate exercise for adjusting muscle activity for the impact. Muscle pre-activity in bounce drop jumps differed significantly from that in counter landing and bounce landing respectively, which should indicate that a higher amount of pre-activity generated during bounce drop jumps was used for performing take-offs. As this study included the subjects who were not familiar with deep jumps training, the prospective studies should reveal the results of athletes with previous experience

  15. Biomechanical Differences of Multidirectional Jump Landings Among Female Basketball and Soccer Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Jeffrey B; Ford, Kevin R; Schmitz, Randy J; Ross, Scott E; Ackerman, Terry A; Shultz, Sandra J

    2017-11-01

    Taylor, JB, Ford, KR, Schmitz, RJ, Ross, SE, Ackerman, TA, and Shultz, SJ. Biomechanical differences of multidirectional jump landings among female basketball and soccer players. J Strength Cond Res 31(11): 3034-3045, 2017-Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury prevention programs are less successful in basketball than soccer and may be due to distinct movement strategies that these athletes develop from sport-specific training. The purpose of this study was to identify biomechanical differences between female basketball and soccer players during multidirectional jump landings. Lower extremity biomechanics of 89 female athletes who played competitive basketball (n = 40) or soccer (n = 49) at the middle- or high-school level were analyzed with 3-dimensional motion analysis during a drop vertical jump, double- (SAG-DL) and single-leg forward jump (SAG-SL), and double- (FRONT-DL) and single-leg (FRONT-SL) lateral jump. Basketball players landed with either less hip or knee, or both hip and knee excursion during all tasks (p ≤ 0.05) except for the SAGSL task, basketball players landed with greater peak hip flexion angles (p = 0.04). The FRONT-SL task elicited the most distinct sport-specific differences, including decreased hip adduction (p soccer players exhibited a more protective landing strategy than basketball players, justifying future efforts toward sport-specific ACL injury prevention programs.

  16. Salmon jumping: behavior, kinematics and optimal conditions, with possible implications for fish passageway design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauritzen, D V; Jordan, L K; Gordon, M S [Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1606 (United States); Hertel, F S, E-mail: dlauritz@ccsf.ed, E-mail: fritz.hertel@csun.ed, E-mail: msgordon@ucla.ed, E-mail: ljordan@ucla.ed [Department of Biology, California State University-Northridge, Northridge, CA 91330 (United States)

    2010-09-15

    Behavioral and kinematic properties and capacities of wild migratory salmonid fishes swimming upstream and jumping up waterfalls generally have played only minor roles in the design and construction of passageways intended to help these fishes get past dams and other human-made obstacles blocking their movements. This paper reports the results of an experimental study of relevant behavioral and kinematic properties of adult kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) jumping up waterfalls as they migrate upstream. We used a portable, adjustable apparatus to study in the field fish responding to artificial waterfalls under a range of flow conditions. We observed fish under conditions of varying water flow rates, pool depths, fall heights and fall angles. We analyzed digital video recordings of their behaviors. Kokanee salmon spontaneously jump up waterfalls within a relatively narrow range of conditions, including low flow speeds, near vertical angles and pool depth to fall height ratios near 1.0. Preferred values for each parameter are, to some extent, dependent on other parameters. In contrast to previous misconceptions, jumping behavior is initiated by running S-start accelerations from beneath the boils formed in the plunge pools below waterfalls, as opposed to C-start standing jumps from the surface. S-starts are immediately followed by burst swimming to the point of takeoff at the surface. These results can contribute to an improved basis for developing designs of fish passageways that may ultimately make them more effective and efficient.

  17. Salmon jumping: behavior, kinematics and optimal conditions, with possible implications for fish passageway design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauritzen, D V; Jordan, L K; Gordon, M S; Hertel, F S

    2010-01-01

    Behavioral and kinematic properties and capacities of wild migratory salmonid fishes swimming upstream and jumping up waterfalls generally have played only minor roles in the design and construction of passageways intended to help these fishes get past dams and other human-made obstacles blocking their movements. This paper reports the results of an experimental study of relevant behavioral and kinematic properties of adult kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) jumping up waterfalls as they migrate upstream. We used a portable, adjustable apparatus to study in the field fish responding to artificial waterfalls under a range of flow conditions. We observed fish under conditions of varying water flow rates, pool depths, fall heights and fall angles. We analyzed digital video recordings of their behaviors. Kokanee salmon spontaneously jump up waterfalls within a relatively narrow range of conditions, including low flow speeds, near vertical angles and pool depth to fall height ratios near 1.0. Preferred values for each parameter are, to some extent, dependent on other parameters. In contrast to previous misconceptions, jumping behavior is initiated by running S-start accelerations from beneath the boils formed in the plunge pools below waterfalls, as opposed to C-start standing jumps from the surface. S-starts are immediately followed by burst swimming to the point of takeoff at the surface. These results can contribute to an improved basis for developing designs of fish passageways that may ultimately make them more effective and efficient.

  18. Spine kinematics exhibited during the stop-jump by physically active individuals with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis and spinal fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakar, Rumit Singh; Li, Yumeng; Brown, Cathleen N; Kim, Seock-Ho; Oswald, Timothy S; Simpson, Kathy J

    2018-01-01

    Individuals with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis post spinal fusion often return to exercise and sport. However, the movements that individuals with spinal fusion for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (SF-AIS) use to compensate for the loss of spinal flexibility during high-effort tasks are not known. The objective of this study was to compare the spinal kinematics of the trunk segments displayed during the stop-jump, a maximal effort task, between SF-AIS and healthy control groups. The study used a case-controlled design. Ten SF-AIS (physically active, posterior-approach spinal fusion: 11.2±1.9 fused segments, postop time: 2±.6 years) and nine control individuals, pair matched for gender, age (17.4±1.3 years and 20.6±1.5 years, respectively), mass (63.50±12.2 kg and 66. 40±10.9 kg), height (1.69±.09 m and 1.72±.08 m), and level of physical activity, participated in the study. Individuals with spinal fusion for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis and controls (CON) performed five acceptable trials of the stop-jump task. Spatial locations of 21 retroreflective trunk and pelvis markers were recorded via high-speed motion capture methodology. Mean differences and analysis of covariance (jump height=covariate, pjump height and RelAng were detected in the three phases of stop-jump. Individuals with spinal fusion for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis displayed 3.2° greater transverse plane RelAng of LT compared with CON (p=.059) in the stance phase. Group differences for RelAng ranged from 0° to 15.3°. For SegAng in the stance phase, LT demonstrated greater SegAng in the sagittal and frontal planes (mean difference: 3.2°-6.2°), whereas SegAng for MT was 5.1° greater in the sagittal plane and had a tendency of 2° greater displacement in the frontal plane (p=.070). In the vertical flight phase, greater LT displacement in the frontal plane was observed for SF-AIS than CON. In the flight phase, LT had a tendency for greater SegAng for SF-AIS than for CON

  19. The AGS γt-jump system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syphers, M.J.; Ahrens, L.; van Asselt, W.; Brennan, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    In an attempt to generate a lossless crossing of an accelerator's transition energy, one procedure is to alter the transition energy of the accelerator quickly as the beam passes through this energy region by changing the optics of the lattice -- a so-called ''transition jump,'' or '' γt -jump'' scheme. Such a system was first implemented at CERN and later adopted at other accelerator laboratories. A scheme for the AGS was developed in 1986. A description of the AGS γt -jump system, and recent results from its commissioning are presented in this report

  20. Countermovement jump height: gender and sport-specific differences in the force-time variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laffaye, Guillaume; Wagner, Phillip P; Tombleson, Tom I L

    2014-04-01

    The goal of this study was to assess (a) the eccentric rate of force development, the concentric force, and selected time variables on vertical performance during countermovement jump, (b) the existence of gender differences in these variables, and (c) the sport-specific differences. The sample was composed of 189 males and 84 females, all elite athletes involved in college and professional sports (primarily football, basketball, baseball, and volleyball). The subjects performed a series of 6 countermovement jumps on a force plate (500 Hz). Average eccentric rate of force development (ECC-RFD), total time (TIME), eccentric time (ECC-T), Ratio between eccentric and total time (ECC-T:T) and average force (CON-F) were extracted from force-time curves and the vertical jumping performance, measured by impulse momentum. Results show that CON-F (r = 0.57; p differ between both sexes (p differ, showing a similar temporal structure. The best way to jump high is to increase CON-F and ECC-RFD thus minimizing the ECC-T. Principal component analysis (PCA) accounted for 76.8% of the JH variance and revealed that JH is predicted by a temporal and a force component. Furthermore, the PCA comparison made among athletes revealed sport-specific signatures: volleyball players revealed a temporal-prevailing profile, a weak-force with large ECC-T:T for basketball players and explosive and powerful profiles for football and baseball players.

  1. The influence of professional status on maximal and rapid isometric torque characteristics in elite soccer referees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Ty B; Hawkey, Matt J; Smith, Doug B; Thompson, Brennan J

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of maximal and rapid isometric torque characteristics of the posterior muscles of the hip and thigh and lower-body power to discriminate between professional status in full-time and part-time professional soccer referees. Seven full-time (mean ± SE: age = 36 ± 2 years; mass = 82 ± 4 kg; and height = 179 ± 3 cm) and 9 part-time (age = 34 ± 2 years; mass = 84 ± 2 kg; and height = 181 ± 2 cm) professional soccer referees performed 2 isometric maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs) of the posterior muscles of the hip and thigh. Peak torque (PT) and absolute and relative rate of torque development (RTD) were calculated from a torque-time curve that was recorded during each MVC. Lower-body power output was assessed through a vertical jump test. Results indicated that the rapid torque characteristics were greater in the full-time compared with the part-time referees for absolute RTD (p = 0.011) and relative RTD at 1/2 (p = 0.022) and 2/3 (p = 0.033) of the normalized torque-time curve. However, no differences were observed for PT (p = 0.660) or peak power (Pmax, p = 0.149) between groups. These findings suggest that rapid torque characteristics of the posterior muscles of the hip and thigh may be sensitive and effective measures for discriminating between full-time and part-time professional soccer referees. Strength and conditioning coaches may use these findings to help identify professional soccer referees with high explosive strength-related capacities and possibly overall refereeing ability.

  2. Intra- and inter-subject variation in lower limb coordination during countermovement jumps in children and adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raffalt, Peter C; Alkjær, Tine; Simonsen, Erik B

    2016-01-01

    -subject variability. Based on these results, it was concluded that the same movement solutions were available to both age groups, but the children were less able to consistently utilize the individually chosen coordination pattern. Thus, this ability appears to be developed through normal ontogenesis.......The purpose of the present study was to investigate the coordination pattern and coordination variability (intra-subject and inter-subject) in children and adults during vertical countermovement jumps. Ten children (mean age: 11.5±1.8years) and ten adults (mean age: 26.1±4.9years) participated...... in the experiment. Lower body 3D-kinematics and kinetics from both legs were obtained during 9 vertical jumps of each subject. Coordination pattern and coordination variability of intra-limb and inter-limb coupling were established by modified vector coding and continuous relative phase. The adult group jumped...

  3. Measurements of K shell absorption jump factors and jump ratios using EDXRF technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacal, Mustafa Recep; Han, İbrahim; Akman, Ferdi

    2015-04-01

    In the present work, the K-shell absorption jump factors and jump ratios for 30 elements between Ti ( Z = 22) and Er ( Z = 68) were measured by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) technique. The jump factors and jump ratios for these elements were determined by measuring the K shell fluorescence parameters such as the Kα X-ray production cross-sections, K shell fluorescence yields, Kβ-to- Kα X-rays intensity ratios, total atomic absorption cross sections and mass attenuation coefficients. The measurements were performed using an Am-241 radioactive point source and a Si (Li) detector in direct excitation and transmission experimental geometry. The results for jump factors and jump ratios were compared with theoretically calculated and the ones available in the literature.

  4. Biomechanical Factors Associated With Jump Height: A Comparison of Cross-Sectional and Pre-to-Posttraining Change Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Brendan M; Moran, Kieran A

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies investigating the biomechanical factors associated with maximal countermovement jump height have typically used cross-sectional data. An alternative but less common approach is to use pre-to-posttraining change data, where the relationship between an improvement in jump height and a change in a factor is examined more directly. Our study compared the findings of these approaches. Such an evaluation is necessary because cross-sectional studies are currently a primary source of information for coaches when examining what factors to train to enhance performance. The countermovement jump of 44 males was analyzed before and after an 8-week training intervention. Correlations with jump height were calculated using both cross-sectional (pretraining data only) and pre-to-posttraining change data. Eight factors identified in the cross-sectional analysis were not significantly correlated with a change in jump height in the pre-to-post analysis. Additionally, only 6 of 11 factors identified in the pre-to-post analysis were identified in the cross-sectional analysis. These findings imply that (a) not all factors identified in a cross-sectional analysis may be critical to jump height improvement and (b) cross-sectional analyses alone may not provide an insight into all of the potential factors to train to enhance jump height. Coaches must be aware of these limitations when examining cross-sectional studies to identify factors to train to enhance jump ability. Additional findings highlight that although exercises prescribed to improve jump height should aim to enhance concentric power production at all joints, a particular emphasis on enhancing hip joint peak power may be warranted.

  5. Simulation-Based Design for Wearable Robotic Systems: An Optimization Framework for Enhancing a Standing Long Jump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Carmichael F; Hicks, Jennifer L; Delp, Scott L

    2016-05-01

    Technologies that augment human performance are the focus of intensive research and development, driven by advances in wearable robotic systems. Success has been limited by the challenge of understanding human-robot interaction. To address this challenge, we developed an optimization framework to synthesize a realistic human standing long jump and used the framework to explore how simulated wearable robotic devices might enhance jump performance. A planar, five-segment, seven-degree-of-freedom model with physiological torque actuators, which have variable torque capacity depending on joint position and velocity, was used to represent human musculoskeletal dynamics. An active augmentation device was modeled as a torque actuator that could apply a single pulse of up to 100 Nm of extension torque. A passive design was modeled as rotational springs about each lower limb joint. Dynamic optimization searched for physiological and device actuation patterns to maximize jump distance. Optimization of the nominal case yielded a 2.27 m jump that captured salient kinematic and kinetic features of human jumps. When the active device was added to the ankle, knee, or hip, jump distance increased to between 2.49 and 2.52 m. Active augmentation of all three joints increased the jump distance to 3.10 m. The passive design increased jump distance to 3.32 m by adding torques of 135, 365, and 297 Nm to the ankle, knee, and hip, respectively. Dynamic optimization can be used to simulate a standing long jump and investigate human-robot interaction. Simulation can aid in the design of performance-enhancing technologies.

  6. The influence of musical cadence into aquatic jumping jacks kinematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Mário J; Oliveira, Cristiana; Teixeira, Genoveva; Marinho, Daniel A; Silva, António J; Barbosa, Tiago M

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the relationships between the head-out aquatic exercise "Jumping jacks" kinematics and the musical cadence in healthy and fit subjects. Five young women, with at least one year of experience conducting head- out aquatic programs were videotaped in the frontal plane, with a pair of cameras providing a double projection (above and below the water surface). Subjects performed an incremental protocol of five bouts (120 b·min(-1), 135 b·min(-1), 150 b·min(-1), 165 b·min(-1) and 180 b·min(-1)) with 16 full cycles of the "Jumping jacks" exercise. Data processing and calculation of upper limbs' (i.e. hands), lower limbs' (i.e. feet) and center of mass' 2D linear velocity and displacement were computed with the software Ariel Performance Analysis System and applying the 2D-DLT algorithm. Subjects decreased the cycle period during the incremental protocol. Significant and negative relationships with the musical cadence were verified for the center of mass and upper limbs vertical displacement. On the other hand, for the lower limbs lateral velocity, a significant and positive relationship was observed. It is concluded that expert and fit subjects increase the lower limb's velocity to maintain the range of motion, while the upper limb's displacement is reduced to coupe the music cadence. Key pointsWhile performing the Jumping Jacks, expert and fit subjects increase their lower limbs segmental velocity to maintain the range of motion.The upper limbs displacement is reduced to maintain the music cadence.Expert and fit subjects present similar response for alternating or simultaneously head-out aquatic exercises when increasing the music cadence.

  7. Option Panels in Pure-Jump Settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Torben Gustav; Fusari, Nicola; Todorov, Viktor

    We develop parametric inference procedures for large panels of noisy option data in the setting where the underlying process is of pure-jump type, i.e., evolve only through a sequence of jumps. The panel consists of options written on the underlying asset with a (different) set of strikes...... specification for the risk-neutral asset return dynamics, the option prices are nonlinear functions of a time-invariant parameter vector and a time-varying latent state vector (or factors). Furthermore, no-arbitrage restrictions impose a direct link between some of the quantities that may be identified from...... the return and option data. These include the so-called jump activity index as well as the time-varying jump intensity. We propose penalized least squares estimation in which we minimize L_2 distance between observed and model-implied options and further penalize for the deviation of model-implied quantities...

  8. Microscopic models of quantum-jump superoperators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodonov, A.V.; Mizrahi, S.S.; Dodonov, V.V.

    2005-01-01

    We discuss the quantum-jump operation in an open system and show that jump superoperators related to a system under measurement can be derived from the interaction of that system with a quantum measurement apparatus. We give two examples for the interaction of a monochromatic electromagnetic field in a cavity (the system) with two-level atoms and with a harmonic oscillator (representing two different kinds of detectors). We show that the derived quantum-jump superoperators have a 'nonlinear' form Jρ=γ diag[F(n)aρa † F(n)], where the concrete form of the function F(n) depends on assumptions made about the interaction between the system and detector. Under certain conditions the asymptotical power-law dependence F(n)=(n+1) -β is obtained. A continuous transition to the standard Srinivas-Davies form of the quantum-jump superoperator (corresponding to β=0) is shown

  9. Human Long Jump — A Deductive Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miloš Jovanović

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a useful application of a generalized approach to the modelling of human and humanoid motion using the deductive approach. It starts with formulating a completely general problem and deriving different real situations as special cases. The concept and the software realization are verified by comparing the results with the ones obtained using “classical” software for one well-known particular problem – biped walking. New applicability and potentials of the proposed method are demonstrated by simulation of a selected example – the long jump. The simulated motion included jumping and landing on the feet (after a jump. Additional analysis is done in the paper regarding the joint torque and joint angle during the jumping. Separate stages of the simulation are defined and explained.

  10. Volatility jumps and their economic determinants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caporin, Massimiliano; Rossi, Eduardo; Santucci de Magistris, Paolo

    that there is a positive probability of jumps in volatility. A common factor in the volatility jumps is shown to be related to a set of financial covariates (such as variance risk premium, S&P500 volume, credit-default swap, and federal fund rates). The credit-default swap on US banks and variance risk premium have...... predictive power on expected jump moves, thus confirming the common interpretation that sudden and large increases in equity volatility can be anticipated by credit deterioration of the US bank sector as well as changes in the market expectations of future risks. Finally, the model is extended to incorporate...... the credit-default swap and the variance risk premium in the dynamics of the jump size and intensity....

  11. A simple strategy for jumping straight up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemami, Hooshang; Wyman, Bostwick F

    2012-05-01

    Jumping from a stationary standing position into the air is a transition from a constrained motion in contact with the ground to an unconstrained system not in contact with the ground. A simple case of the jump, as it applies to humans, robots and humanoids, is studied in this paper. The dynamics of the constrained rigid body are expanded to define a larger system that accommodates the jump. The formulation is applied to a four-link, three-dimensional system in order to articulate the ballistic motion involved. The activity of the muscular system and the role of the major sagittal muscle groups are demonstrated. The control strategy, involving state feedback and central feed forward signals, is formulated and computer simulations are presented to assess the feasibility of the formulations, the strategy and the jump. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. How quick is a quantum jump?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulman, L.S.

    1997-01-01

    Although the only time scale one ordinarily associates with a quantum transition is its lifetime, observations of ''quantum jumps'' in recent years show that the actual transition time is much shorter. I define a ''jump time'' as the time scale such that perturbations occurring at intervals of this duration affect the decay. In terms of the ''Zeno time'' (related to the second moment of the Hamiltonian) the jump time is τ J is identical to τ 2 Z /τ L . Corroboration is given. I also show that observing the ''jumping'' will not seriously affect the system lifetime, but will affect the linewidth. This is consistent with Bohr's ideas on measurement as well as with a heuristic time-energy uncertainty principle. (author)

  13. MAXIM: The Blackhole Imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendreau, Keith; Cash, Webster; Gorenstein, Paul; Windt, David; Kaaret, Phil; Reynolds, Chris

    2004-01-01

    The Beyond Einstein Program in NASA's Office of Space Science Structure and Evolution of the Universe theme spells out the top level scientific requirements for a Black Hole Imager in its strategic plan. The MAXIM mission will provide better than one tenth of a microarcsecond imaging in the X-ray band in order to satisfy these requirements. We will overview the driving requirements to achieve these goals and ultimately resolve the event horizon of a supermassive black hole. We will present the current status of this effort that includes a study of a baseline design as well as two alternative approaches.

  14. Social group utility maximization

    CERN Document Server

    Gong, Xiaowen; Yang, Lei; Zhang, Junshan

    2014-01-01

    This SpringerBrief explains how to leverage mobile users' social relationships to improve the interactions of mobile devices in mobile networks. It develops a social group utility maximization (SGUM) framework that captures diverse social ties of mobile users and diverse physical coupling of mobile devices. Key topics include random access control, power control, spectrum access, and location privacy.This brief also investigates SGUM-based power control game and random access control game, for which it establishes the socially-aware Nash equilibrium (SNE). It then examines the critical SGUM-b

  15. A Correction Equation for Jump Height Measured Using the Just Jump System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, John J; Jones, Paul A; Comfort, Paul

    2016-05-01

    To determine the concurrent validity and reliability of the popular Just Jump system (JJS) for determining jump height and, if necessary, provide a correction equation for future reference. Eighteen male college athletes performed 3 bilateral countermovement jumps (CMJs) on 2 JJSs (alternative method) that were placed on top of a force platform (criterion method). Two JJSs were used to establish consistency between systems. Jump height was calculated from flight time obtained from the JJS and force platform. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) demonstrated excellent within-session reliability of the CMJ height measurement derived from both the JJS (ICC = .96, P jump height (0.46 ± 0.09 m vs 0.33 ± 0.08 m) than the force platform (P jump height = (0.8747 × alternative jump height) - 0.0666. The JJS provides a reliable but overestimated measure of jump height. It is suggested, therefore, that practitioners who use the JJS as part of future work apply the correction equation presented in this study to resultant jump-height values.

  16. Jump Horse Safety: Reconciling Public Debate and Australian Thoroughbred Jump Racing Data, 2012–2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Ruse

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Thoroughbred jump racing sits in the spotlight of contemporary welfare and ethical debates about horse racing. In Australia, jump racing comprises hurdle and steeplechase races and has ceased in all but two states, Victoria and South Australia. This paper documents the size, geography, composition, and dynamics of Australian jump racing for the 2012, 2013, and 2014 seasons with a focus on debate about risks to horses. We found that the majority of Australian jump racing is regional, based in Victoria, and involves a small group of experienced trainers and jockeys. Australian jump horses are on average 6.4 years of age. The jump career of the majority of horses involves participating in three or less hurdle races and over one season. Almost one quarter of Australian jump horses race only once. There were ten horse fatalities in races over the study period, with an overall fatality rate of 5.1 fatalities per 1000 horses starting in a jump race (0.51%. There was significant disparity between the fatality rate for hurdles, 0.75 fatalities per 1000 starts (0.075% and steeplechases, 14 fatalities per 1000 starts (1.4%. Safety initiatives introduced by regulators in 2010 appear to have significantly decreased risks to horses in hurdles but have had little or no effect in steeplechases. Our discussion considers these Animals 2015, 5 1073 data in light of public controversy, political debate, and industry regulation related to jump horse safety.

  17. Jump Horse Safety: Reconciling Public Debate and Australian Thoroughbred Jump Racing Data, 2012-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruse, Karen; Davison, Aidan; Bridle, Kerry

    2015-10-22

    Thoroughbred jump racing sits in the spotlight of contemporary welfare and ethical debates about horse racing. In Australia, jump racing comprises hurdle and steeplechase races and has ceased in all but two states, Victoria and South Australia. This paper documents the size, geography, composition, and dynamics of Australian jump racing for the 2012, 2013, and 2014 seasons with a focus on debate about risks to horses. We found that the majority of Australian jump racing is regional, based in Victoria, and involves a small group of experienced trainers and jockeys. Australian jump horses are on average 6.4 years of age. The jump career of the majority of horses involves participating in three or less hurdle races and over one season. Almost one quarter of Australian jump horses race only once. There were ten horse fatalities in races over the study period, with an overall fatality rate of 5.1 fatalities per 1000 horses starting in a jump race (0.51%). There was significant disparity between the fatality rate for hurdles, 0.75 fatalities per 1000 starts (0.075%) and steeplechases, 14 fatalities per 1000 starts (1.4%). Safety initiatives introduced by regulators in 2010 appear to have significantly decreased risks to horses in hurdles but have had little or no effect in steeplechases. Our discussion considers these Animals 2015, 5 1073 data in light of public controversy, political debate, and industry regulation related to jump horse safety.

  18. Jump spillover between oil prices and exchange rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Ping; Zhou, Chun-Yang; Wu, Chong-Feng

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, we investigate the jump spillover effects between oil prices and exchange rates. To identify the latent historical jumps for exchange rates and oil prices, we use a Bayesian MCMC approach to estimate the stochastic volatility model with correlated jumps in both returns and volatilities for each. We examine the simultaneous jump intensities and the conditional jump spillover probabilities between oil prices and exchange rates, finding strong evidence of jump spillover effects. Further analysis shows that the jump spillovers are mainly due to exogenous events such as financial crises and geopolitical events. Thus, the findings have important implications for financial risk management.

  19. A multiplicity jump trigger using silicon planes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexopoulos, T.; Erwin, A.R.

    1993-01-01

    Since silicon tracking planes are already present in a B decay experiment, it is an attractive idea to use these as part of a multiplicity jump detector. Two average B decays would produce a multiplicity jump of around 10 in the final state. Such a trigger has been tried for a fixed target Charm experiment with disappointing success. The failure was attributed to the difficulty in adequately controlling the gains of a large number of microstrip amplifies

  20. Portfolio Selection with Jumps under Regime Switching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Zhao

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate a continuous-time version of the mean-variance portfolio selection model with jumps under regime switching. The portfolio selection is proposed and analyzed for a market consisting of one bank account and multiple stocks. The random regime switching is assumed to be independent of the underlying Brownian motion and jump processes. A Markov chain modulated diffusion formulation is employed to model the problem.

  1. Jumps in binomial AR(1) processes

    OpenAIRE

    Weiß , Christian H.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract We consider the binomial AR(1) model for serially dependent processes of binomial counts. After a review of its definition and known properties, we investigate marginal and serial properties of jumps in such processes. Based on these results, we propose the jumps control chart for monitoring a binomial AR(1) process. We show how to evaluate the performance of this control chart and give design recommendations. correspondance: Tel.: +49 931 31 84968; ...

  2. Ground Reaction Force Differences in the Countermovement Jump in Girls with Different Levels of Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floría, Pablo; Harrison, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to ascertain the biomechanical differences between better and poorer performers of the vertical jump in a homogeneous group of children. Method: Twenty-four girls were divided into low-scoring (LOW; M [subscript age] = 6.3 ± 0.8 years) and high-scoring (HIGH; M [subscript age] = 6.6 ± 0.8 years) groups based on…

  3. Tests for nonrandomness in quantum jumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkeland, D.J.; Raymondson, D.A.; Tassin, V.M.

    2004-01-01

    In a fundamental test of quantum mechanics, we have observed 228 000 quantum jumps of a single trapped and laser cooled 88 Sr + ion. This represents a statistical increase of two orders of magnitude over previous similar analyses of quantum jumps. Compared to other searches for nonrandomness in quantum-mechanical processes, using quantum jumps simplifies the interpretation of data by eliminated multiparticle effects and providing near-unit detection efficiency of transitions. We measure the fractional reduction in the entropy of information to be -4 when the value of any interval between quantum jumps is known. We also find that the number of runs of successively increasing or decreasing interval times agrees with the theoretically expected values. Furthermore, we analyze 238 000 quantum jumps from two simultaneously confined ions and find that the number of apparently coincidental transitions is as expected. Finally, we observe 8400 spontaneous decays of two simultaneously trapped ions and find that the number of apparently coincidental decays from the metastable state agrees with the expected value. We find no evidence for short- or long-term correlations in the intervals of the quantum jumps or in the decay of the quantum states, in agreement with quantum theory

  4. Methodological concerns for determining power output in the jump squat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormie, Prue; Deane, Russell; McBride, Jeffrey M

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the validity of power measurement techniques during the jump squat (JS) utilizing various combinations of a force plate and linear position transducer (LPT) devices. Nine men with at least 6 months of prior resistance training experience participated in this acute investigation. One repetition maximums (1RM) in the squat were determined, followed by JS testing under 2 loading conditions (30% of 1RM [JS30] and 90% of 1RM [JS90]). Three different techniques were used simultaneously in data collection: (a) 1 linear position transducer (1-LPT); (b) 1 linear position transducer and a force plate (1-LPT + FP); and (c) 2 linear position transducers and a force place (2-LPT + FP). Vertical velocity-, force-, and power-time curves were calculated for each lift using these methodologies and were compared. Peak force and peak power were overestimated by 1-LPT in both JS30 and JS90 compared with 2-LPT + FP and 1-LPT + FP (p squat varies according to the measurement technique utilized. The 1-LPT methodology is not a valid means of determining power output in the jump squat. Furthermore, the 1-LPT + FP method may not accurately represent power output in free weight movements that involve a significant amount of horizontal motion.

  5. Performance analysis of jump-gliding locomotion for miniature robotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidyasagar, A; Zufferey, Jean-Christohphe; Floreano, Dario; Kovač, M

    2015-03-26

    Recent work suggests that jumping locomotion in combination with a gliding phase can be used as an effective mobility principle in robotics. Compared to pure jumping without a gliding phase, the potential benefits of hybrid jump-gliding locomotion includes the ability to extend the distance travelled and reduce the potentially damaging impact forces upon landing. This publication evaluates the performance of jump-gliding locomotion and provides models for the analysis of the relevant dynamics of flight. It also defines a jump-gliding envelope that encompasses the range that can be achieved with jump-gliding robots and that can be used to evaluate the performance and improvement potential of jump-gliding robots. We present first a planar dynamic model and then a simplified closed form model, which allow for quantification of the distance travelled and the impact energy on landing. In order to validate the prediction of these models, we validate the model with experiments using a novel jump-gliding robot, named the 'EPFL jump-glider'. It has a mass of 16.5 g and is able to perform jumps from elevated positions, perform steered gliding flight, land safely and traverse on the ground by repetitive jumping. The experiments indicate that the developed jump-gliding model fits very well with the measured flight data using the EPFL jump-glider, confirming the benefits of jump-gliding locomotion to mobile robotics. The jump-glide envelope considerations indicate that the EPFL jump-glider, when traversing from a 2 m height, reaches 74.3% of optimal jump-gliding distance compared to pure jumping without a gliding phase which only reaches 33.4% of the optimal jump-gliding distance. Methods of further improving flight performance based on the models and inspiration from biological systems are presented providing mechanical design pathways to future jump-gliding robot designs.

  6. Jump Horse Safety: Reconciling Public Debate and Australian Thoroughbred Jump Racing Data, 2012–2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruse, Karen; Davison, Aidan; Bridle, Kerry

    2015-01-01

    Simple Summary This paper documents the dynamics of Australian thoroughbred jump racing in the 2012, 2013, and 2014 seasons with the aim of informing debate about risks to horses and the future of this activity. We conclude that the safety of Australian jump racing has improved in recent years but that steeplechases are considerably riskier for horses than hurdle races. Abstract Thoroughbred jump racing sits in the spotlight of contemporary welfare and ethical debates about horse racing. In Australia, jump racing comprises hurdle and steeplechase races and has ceased in all but two states, Victoria and South Australia. This paper documents the size, geography, composition, and dynamics of Australian jump racing for the 2012, 2013, and 2014 seasons with a focus on debate about risks to horses. We found that the majority of Australian jump racing is regional, based in Victoria, and involves a small group of experienced trainers and jockeys. Australian jump horses are on average 6.4 years of age. The jump career of the majority of horses involves participating in three or less hurdle races and over one season. Almost one quarter of Australian jump horses race only once. There were ten horse fatalities in races over the study period, with an overall fatality rate of 5.1 fatalities per 1000 horses starting in a jump race (0.51%). There was significant disparity between the fatality rate for hurdles, 0.75 fatalities per 1000 starts (0.075%) and steeplechases, 14 fatalities per 1000 starts (1.4%). Safety initiatives introduced by regulators in 2010 appear to have significantly decreased risks to horses in hurdles but have had little or no effect in steeplechases. Our discussion considers these data in light of public controversy, political debate, and industry regulation related to jump horse safety. PMID:26506396

  7. Jumping to conclusions in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evans SL

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Simon L Evans,1 Bruno B Averbeck,2 Nicholas Furl31School of Psychology, University of Sussex, Brighton, East Sussex, UK; 2Laboratory of Neuropsychology, National Institute of Mental Health, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA; 3Department of Psychology, Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham, Surrey, UKAbstract: Schizophrenia is a mental disorder associated with a variety of symptoms, including hallucinations, delusions, social withdrawal, and cognitive dysfunction. Impairments on decision-making tasks are routinely reported: evidence points to a particular deficit in learning from and revising behavior following feedback. In addition, patients tend to make hasty decisions when probabilistic judgments are required. This is known as “jumping to conclusions” (JTC and has typically been demonstrated by presenting participants with colored beads drawn from one of two “urns” until they claim to be sure which urn the beads are being drawn from (the proportions of colors vary in each urn. Patients tend to make early decisions on this task, and there is evidence to suggest that a hasty decision-making style might be linked to delusion formation and thus be of clinical relevance. Various accounts have been proposed regarding what underlies this behavior. In this review, we briefly introduce the disorder and the decision-making deficits associated with it. We then explore the evidence for each account of JTC in the context of a wider decision-making deficit and then go on to summarize work exploring JTC in healthy controls using pharmacological manipulations and functional imaging. Finally, we assess whether JTC might have a role in therapy.Keywords: ketamine, decision making, delusions, fMRI, urn task

  8. Jump locations of jump-diffusion processes with state-dependent rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miles, Christopher E; Keener, James P

    2017-01-01

    We propose a general framework for studying statistics of jump-diffusion systems driven by both Brownian noise (diffusion) and a jump process with state-dependent intensity. Of particular natural interest in many physical systems are the jump locations: the system evaluated at the jump times. As an example, this could be the voltage at which a neuron fires, or the so-called ‘threshold voltage’. However, the state-dependence of the jump rate provides direct coupling between the diffusion and jump components, making it difficult to disentangle the two to study individually. In this work, we provide an iterative map formulation of the sequence of distributions of jump locations. The distributions computed by this map can be used to elucidate other interesting quantities about the process, including statistics of the interjump times. Ultimately, the limit of the map reveals that knowledge of the stationary distribution of the full process is sufficient to recover (but not necessarily equal to) the distribution of jump locations. We propose two biophysical examples to illustrate the use of this framework to provide insight about a system. We find that a sharp threshold voltage emerges robustly in a simple stochastic integrate-and-fire neuronal model. The interplay between the two sources of noise is also investigated in a stepping model of molecular motor in intracellular transport pulling a diffusive cargo. (paper)

  9. Experimental study of the hydraulic jump in a hydraulic jump in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The hydraulic jump in a sloped rectangular channel is theoretically and experimentally examined. The study aims to determine the effect of the channel's slope on the sequent depth ratio of the jump. A theoretical relation is proposed for the inflow Froude number as function of the sequent depth ratio and the channel slope.

  10. Drop jumping. II. The influence of dropping height on the biomechanics of drop jumping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bobbert, M F; Huijing, P A; van Ingen Schenau, G J

    In the literature, athletes preparing for explosive activities are recommended to include drop jumping in their training programs. For the execution of drop jumps, different techniques and different dropping heights can be used. This study was designed to investigate for the performance of bounce

  11. The effect of wind on jumping distance in ski jumping--fairness assessed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virmavirta, Mikko; Kivekäs, Juha

    2012-09-01

    The special wind compensation system recently adopted by Fédération Internationale de Ski (FIS; International Ski Federation) to consider the effects of changing wind conditions has caused some controversy. Here, the effect of wind on jumping distance in ski jumping was studied by means of computer simulation and compared with the wind compensation factors used by FIS during the World Cup season 2009/2010. The results showed clearly that the effect of increasing head/tail wind on jumping distance is not linear: +17.4 m/-29.1 m, respectively, for a wind speed of 3 m/s. The linear formula used in the trial period of the wind compensation system was found to be appropriate only for a limited range of jumping distances as the gradient of the landing slope slows down the rate of distance change in long jumps.

  12. Assessment of power output in jump tests for applicants to a sports sciences degree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, A J; Abián, J; Alegre, L M; Jiménez, L; Aguado, X

    2006-09-01

    Our study aimed: 1) to describe the jump performance in a population of male applicants to a Faculty of Sports Sciences, 2) to apply different power equations from the literature to assess their accuracy, and 3) to develop a new regression equation from this population. The push off phases of the counter-movement jumps (CMJ) on a force platform of 161 applicants (age: 19+/-2.9 years; weight: 70.4+/-8.3 kg) to a Spanish Faculty of Sports Sciences were recorded and subsequently analyzed. Their hands had to be placed on the hips and the knee angle during the counter movement was not controlled. Each subject had 2 trials to reach a minimum of 29 cm of jump height, and when 2 jumps were performed the best trial was analyzed. Multiple regression analysis was performed to develop a new regression equation. Mean jump height was 34.6+/-4.3 cm, peak vertical force 1 663.9+/-291.1 N and peak power 3524.4+/-562 W. All the equations underestimated power, from 74% (Lewis) to 8% (Sayers). However, there were high and significant correlations between peak power measured on the force platform, and those assessed by the equations. The results of the present study support the development of power equations for specific populations, to achieve more accurate assessments. The power equation from this study [Power = (62.5 x jump height (cm)) + (50.3 x body mass (kg)) 2184.7] can be used accurately in populations of male physical education students.

  13. Filtering and control of stochastic jump hybrid systems

    CERN Document Server

    Yao, Xiuming; Zheng, Wei Xing

    2016-01-01

    This book presents recent research work on stochastic jump hybrid systems. Specifically, the considered stochastic jump hybrid systems include Markovian jump Ito stochastic systems, Markovian jump linear-parameter-varying (LPV) systems, Markovian jump singular systems, Markovian jump two-dimensional (2-D) systems, and Markovian jump repeated scalar nonlinear systems. Some sufficient conditions are first established respectively for the stability and performances of those kinds of stochastic jump hybrid systems in terms of solution of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs). Based on the derived analysis conditions, the filtering and control problems are addressed. The book presents up-to-date research developments and novel methodologies on stochastic jump hybrid systems. The contents can be divided into two parts: the first part is focused on robust filter design problem, while the second part is put the emphasis on robust control problem. These methodologies provide a framework for stability and performance analy...

  14. The effects of maturation on jumping ability and sprint adaptations to plyometric training in youth soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi, Abbas; Ramirez-Campillo, Rodrigo; Arazi, Hamid; Sáez de Villarreal, Eduardo

    2018-04-03

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of maturation on power and sprint performance adaptations following 6 weeks of plyometric training in youth soccer players during pre-season. Sixty male soccer players were categorized into 3 maturity groups (Pre, Mid and Post peak height velocity [PHV]) and then randomly assigned to plyometric group and control group. Vertical jump, standing long jump, and 20-m sprint (with and without ball) tests were collected before- and after-intervention. After the intervention, the Pre, Mid and Post-PHV groups showed significant (P ≤ 0.05) and small to moderate effect size (ES) improvement in vertical jump (ES = 0.48; 0.57; 0.73), peak power output (E = 0.60; 0.64; 0.76), standing long jump (ES = 0.62; 0.65; 0.7), 20-m sprint (ES = -0.58; -0.66), and 20-m sprint with ball (ES = -0.44; -0.8; -0.55) performances. The Post-PHV soccer players indicated greater gains than Pre-PHV in vertical jump and sprint performance after training (P ≤ 0.05). Short-term plyometric training had positive effects on sprinting and jumping-power which are important determinants of match-winning actions in soccer. These results indicate that a sixty foot contact, twice per week program, seems effective in improving power and sprint performance in youth soccer players.

  15. Temperature jump boundary conditions in radiation diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, C.T.

    1976-12-01

    The radiation diffusion approximation greatly simplifies radiation transport problems. Yet the application of this method has often been unnecessarily restricted to optically thick regions, or has been extended through the use of such ad hoc devices as flux limiters. The purpose of this paper is to review and draw attention to the use of the more physically appropriate temperature jump boundary conditions for extending the range of validity of the diffusion approximation. Pioneering work has shown that temperature jump boundary conditions remove the singularity in flux that occurs in ordinary diffusion at small optical thicknesses. In this review paper Deissler's equations for frequency-dependent jump boundary conditions are presented and specific geometric examples are calculated analytically for steady state radiation transfer. When jump boundary conditions are applied to radiation diffusion, they yield exact solutions which are naturally flux- limited and geometry-corrected. We believe that the presence of temperature jumps on source boundaries is probably responsible in some cases for the past need for imposing ad hoc flux-limiting constraints on pure diffusion solutions. The solution for transfer between plane slabs, which is exact to all orders of optical thickness, also provides a useful tool for studying the accuracy of computer codes

  16. Scaling the viscous circular hydraulic jump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argentina, Mederic; Cerda, Enrique; Duchesne, Alexis; Limat, Laurent

    2017-11-01

    The formation mechanism of hydraulic jumps has been proposed by Belanger in 1828 and rationalised by Lord Rayleigh in 1914. As the Froude number becomes higher than one, the flow super criticality induces an instability which yields the emergence of a steep structure at the fluid surface. Strongly deformed liquid-air interface can be observed as a jet of viscous fluid impinges a flat boundary at high enough velocity. In this experimental setup, the location of the jump depends on the viscosity of the liquid, as shown by T. Bohr et al. in 1997. In 2014, A. Duchesne et al. have established the constancy of the Froude number at jump. Hence, it remains a contradiction, in which the radial hydraulic jump location might be explained through inviscid theory, but is also viscosity dependent. We present a model based on the 2011 Rojas et al. PRL, which solves this paradox. The agreement with experimental measurements is excellent not only for the prediction of the position of the hydraulic jump, but also for the determination of the fluid thickness profile. We predict theoretically the critical value of the Froude number, which matches perfectly to that measured by Duchesne et al. We acknowledge the support of the CNRS and the Universit Cte d'Azur, through the IDEX funding.

  17. A locust-inspired miniature jumping robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitsev, Valentin; Gvirsman, Omer; Ben Hanan, Uri; Weiss, Avi; Ayali, Amir; Kosa, Gabor

    2015-11-25

    Unmanned ground vehicles are mostly wheeled, tracked, or legged. These locomotion mechanisms have a limited ability to traverse rough terrain and obstacles that are higher than the robot's center of mass. In order to improve the mobility of small robots it is necessary to expand the variety of their motion gaits. Jumping is one of nature's solutions to the challenge of mobility in difficult terrain. The desert locust is the model for the presented bio-inspired design of a jumping mechanism for a small mobile robot. The basic mechanism is similar to that of the semilunar process in the hind legs of the locust, and is based on the cocking of a torsional spring by wrapping a tendon-like wire around the shaft of a miniature motor. In this study we present the jumping mechanism design, and the manufacturing and performance analysis of two demonstrator prototypes. The most advanced jumping robot demonstrator is power autonomous, weighs 23 gr, and is capable of jumping to a height of 3.35 m, covering a distance of 1.37 m.

  18. Biomechanics of stair walking and jumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loy, D J; Voloshin, A S

    1991-01-01

    Physical activities such as stair walking and jumping result in increased dynamic loading on the human musculoskeletal system. Use of light weight, externally attached accelerometers allows for in-vivo monitoring of the shock waves invading the human musculoskeletal system during those activities. Shock waves were measured in four subjects performing stair walking up and down, jumping in place and jumping off a fixed elevation. The results obtained show that walking down a staircase induced shock waves with amplitude of 130% of that observed in walking up stairs and 250% of the shock waves experienced in level gait. The jumping test revealed levels of the shock waves nearly eight times higher than that in level walking. It was also shown that the shock waves invading the human musculoskeletal system may be generated not only by the heel strike, but also by the metatarsal strike. To moderate the risk of degenerative joint disorders four types of viscoelastic insoles were utilized to reduce the impact generated shock waves. The insoles investigated were able to reduce the amplitude of the shock wave by between 9% and 41% depending on the insole type and particular physical activity. The insoles were more effective in the reduction of the heel strike impacts than in the reduction of the metatarsal strike impacts. In all instances, the shock attenuation capacities of the insoles tested were greater in the jumping trials than in the stair walking studies. The insoles were ranked in three groups on the basis of their shock absorbing capacity.

  19. Relationships and Predictive Capabilities of Jump Assessments to Soccer-Specific Field Test Performance in Division I Collegiate Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockie, Robert G; Stage, Alyssa A; Stokes, John J; Orjalo, Ashley J; Davis, DeShaun L; Giuliano, Dominic V; Moreno, Matthew R; Risso, Fabrice G; Lazar, Adrina; Birmingham-Babauta, Samantha A; Tomita, Tricia M

    2016-12-03

    Leg power is an important characteristic for soccer, and jump tests can measure this capacity. Limited research has analyzed relationships between jumping and soccer-specific field test performance in collegiate male players. Nineteen Division I players completed tests of: leg power (vertical jump (VJ), standing broad jump (SBJ), left- and right-leg triple hop (TH)); linear (30 m sprint; 0⁻5 m, 5⁻10 m, 0⁻10, 0⁻30 m intervals) and change-of-direction (505) speed; soccer-specific fitness (Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Test Level 2); and 7 × 30-m sprints to measure repeated-sprint ability (RSA; total time (TT), performance decrement (PD)). Pearson's correlations ( r ) determined jump and field test relationships; stepwise regression ascertained jump predictors of the tests ( p jumps correlated with the 0⁻5, 0⁻10, and 0⁻30 m sprint intervals ( r = -0.65⁻-0.90). VJ, SBJ, and left- and right-leg TH correlated with RSA TT ( r = -0.51⁻-0.59). Right-leg TH predicted the 0⁻5 and 0⁻10 m intervals (R² = 0.55⁻0.81); the VJ predicted the 0⁻30 m interval and RSA TT (R² = 0.41⁻0.84). Between-leg TH asymmetry correlated with and predicted left-leg 505 and RSA PD ( r = -0.68⁻0.62; R² = 0.39⁻0.46). Improvements in jumping ability could contribute to faster speed and RSA performance in collegiate soccer players.

  20. Relationships and Predictive Capabilities of Jump Assessments to Soccer-Specific Field Test Performance in Division I Collegiate Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert G. Lockie

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Leg power is an important characteristic for soccer, and jump tests can measure this capacity. Limited research has analyzed relationships between jumping and soccer-specific field test performance in collegiate male players. Nineteen Division I players completed tests of: leg power (vertical jump (VJ, standing broad jump (SBJ, left- and right-leg triple hop (TH; linear (30 m sprint; 0–5 m, 5–10 m, 0–10, 0–30 m intervals and change-of-direction (505 speed; soccer-specific fitness (Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Test Level 2; and 7 × 30-m sprints to measure repeated-sprint ability (RSA; total time (TT, performance decrement (PD. Pearson’s correlations (r determined jump and field test relationships; stepwise regression ascertained jump predictors of the tests (p < 0.05. All jumps correlated with the 0–5, 0–10, and 0–30 m sprint intervals (r = −0.65–−0.90. VJ, SBJ, and left- and right-leg TH correlated with RSA TT (r = −0.51–−0.59. Right-leg TH predicted the 0–5 and 0–10 m intervals (R2 = 0.55–0.81; the VJ predicted the 0–30 m interval and RSA TT (R2 = 0.41–0.84. Between-leg TH asymmetry correlated with and predicted left-leg 505 and RSA PD (r = −0.68–0.62; R2 = 0.39–0.46. Improvements in jumping ability could contribute to faster speed and RSA performance in collegiate soccer players.

  1. Data concerning the effect of plyometric training on jump performance in soccer players: A meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maamer Slimani

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Plyometric training (PT enhances soccer performance, particularly vertical jump. However, the effectiveness of PT depends on various factors. A systematic search of the research literature was conducted for randomized controlled trials (RCTs studying the effects of PT on countermovement jump (CMJ height in soccer players. Ten studies were obtained through manual and electronic journal searches (up to April 2017. Significant differences were observed when compared: (1 PT group vs. control group (ES=0.85; 95% CI 0.47–1.23; I2=68.71%; p<0.001, (2 male vs. female soccer players (Q=4.52; p=0.033, (3 amateur vs. high-level players (Q=6.56; p=0.010, (4 single session volume (<120 jumps vs. ≥120 jumps; Q=6.12, p=0.013, (5 rest between repetitions (5 s vs. 10 s vs. 15 s vs. 30 s; Q=19.10, p<0.001, (6 rest between sets (30 s vs. 60 s vs. 90 s vs. 120 s vs. 240 s; Q=19.83, p=0.001 and (7 and overall training volume (low: <1600 jumps vs. high: ≥1600 jumps; Q=5.08, p=0.024. PT is an effective form of training to improve vertical jump performance (i.e., CMJ in soccer players. The benefits of PT on CMJ performance are greater for interventions of longer rest interval between repetitions (30 s and sets (240 s with higher volume of more than 120 jumps per session and 1600 jumps in total. Gender and competitive level differences should be considered when planning PT programs in soccer players. Keywords: Stretch-shortening cycle, Meta-analysis, Jump height, Soccer

  2. Biomechanical differences of arm swing countermovement jumps on sand and rigid surface performed by elite beach volleyball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giatsis, George; Panoutsakopoulos, Vassilios; Kollias, Iraklis A

    2018-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the possible arm swing effect on the biomechanical parameters of vertical counter movement jump due to differences of the compliance of the take-off surface. Fifteen elite male beach-volleyball players (26.2 ± 5.9 years; 1.87 ± 0.05 m; 83.4 ± 6.0 kg; mean ± standard deviation, respectively) performed counter movement jumps on sand and on a rigid surface with and without an arm swing. Results showed significant (p volleyball.

  3. Serious ski jumping injuries in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wester, K

    1985-01-01

    Injuries caused by ski jumping have been poorly investigated. Among approximately 2,200 licensed jumpers in Norway, there occurred at least 12 injuries with a permanent medical disability of greater than or equal to 10%. The risk of being seriously injured is approximately 5% in a 5 year period (1977 to 1981); it is higher in the age group 15 to 17 years. Seven injuries were very serious [four central nervous system (CNS) lesions, two leg amputations, and one blindness of one eye], and five were less serious (sequelae to fractures of the lower extremities). The first jump of the day is particularly dangerous, and so is the beginning and end of the season. It seems dangerous to use more than one standard heel block. Poor preparation of the jump may have contributed to the accidents. Based on the findings, several prophylactic measures are suggested.

  4. Maximal Bell's inequality violation for non-maximal entanglement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, M.; Khanna, F.; Mann, A.; Revzen, M.; Santana, A.

    2004-01-01

    Bell's inequality violation (BIQV) for correlations of polarization is studied for a product state of two two-mode squeezed vacuum (TMSV) states. The violation allowed is shown to attain its maximal limit for all values of the squeezing parameter, ζ. We show via an explicit example that a state whose entanglement is not maximal allow maximal BIQV. The Wigner function of the state is non-negative and the average value of either polarization is nil

  5. Validity of a Jump Mat for assessing Countermovement Jump Performance in Elite Rugby Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbin, Nick; Hunwicks, Richard; Highton, Jamie; Twist, Craig

    2017-02-01

    This study determined the validity of the Just Jump System ® (JJS) for measuring flight time, jump height and peak power output (PPO) in elite rugby league players. 37 elite rugby league players performed 6 countermovement jumps (CMJ; 3 with and 3 without arms) on a jump mat and force platform. A sub-sample (n=28) was used to cross-validate the equations for flight time, jump height and PPO. The JJS systematically overestimated flight time and jump height compared to the force platform (Pjump height ( with R 2 =0.945; without R 2 =0.987). Our equations revealed no systematic difference between corrected and force platform scores and an improved the agreement for flight time (Ratio limits of agreement: with 1.00 vs. 1.36; without 1.00 vs. 1.16) and jump height ( with 1.01 vs. 1.34; without 1.01 vs. 1.15), meaning that our equations can be used to correct JJS scores for elite rugby players. While our equation improved the estimation of PPO ( with 1.02; without 1.01) compared to existing equations (Harman: 1.20; Sayers: 1.04), this only accounted for 64 and 69% of PPO. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Quantum speedup in solving the maximal-clique problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Weng-Long; Yu, Qi; Li, Zhaokai; Chen, Jiahui; Peng, Xinhua; Feng, Mang

    2018-03-01

    The maximal-clique problem, to find the maximally sized clique in a given graph, is classically an NP-complete computational problem, which has potential applications ranging from electrical engineering, computational chemistry, and bioinformatics to social networks. Here we develop a quantum algorithm to solve the maximal-clique problem for any graph G with n vertices with quadratic speedup over its classical counterparts, where the time and spatial complexities are reduced to, respectively, O (√{2n}) and O (n2) . With respect to oracle-related quantum algorithms for the NP-complete problems, we identify our algorithm as optimal. To justify the feasibility of the proposed quantum algorithm, we successfully solve a typical clique problem for a graph G with two vertices and one edge by carrying out a nuclear magnetic resonance experiment involving four qubits.

  7. Snowboard jumping, Newton’s second law and the force on landing

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shea, Michael J.

    2004-07-01

    An application of Newton’s second law to a snowboarder dropping off a vertical ledge shows that the average normal force during landing (force exerted by the ground on the snowboarder) is determined by four factors. It is shown that the flexing of the legs, the softness of the snow, the angle of the landing surface and the forward motion of the snowboarder can contribute significantly to reducing the force on landing. A judicious choice of the geometry of the jump leads to a force on landing that is equal to the force that the snowboarder would feel if they were standing at the landing point independent of the height from which the snowboarder jumps. Thus we are able to explain with a relatively simple model why a snowboarder may jump from rather high ledges and land comfortably. The physics here is also applicable to jumps in other sports including skiing and mountain biking. The importance of knowing the limits of models is discussed and some of the limits of this model are pointed out.

  8. Jumping performance differences among elite professional handball players with or without previous ACL reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setuain, I; Millor, N; Alfaro, J; Gorostiaga, E; Izquierdo, M

    2015-10-01

    Handball is one of the most challenging sports for the knee joint. Persistent strength and jumping capacity alterations may be observed among athletes who have suffered anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. The aim of this study was to examine unilateral and bilateral jumping ability differences between previously ACL-reconstructed rehabilitated elite handball athletes and sex, age and uninjured sport activity level-pairs of control players. It was a Cross-sectional study with one factor: previous ACL injury. We recruited 22 male (6 ACL-reconstructed and 16 uninjured control players) and 21 female (6 ACL-reconstructed and 15 uninjured control players) elite handball players who were evaluated 6.2±3.4 years after surgical ACL reconstruction. A battery of jump tests, including both bilateral and unilateral maneuvers, was performed. Two-tailed unpaired (intergroup comparison) and paired (intragroup comparison) t-tests were performed for mean comparisons. The P-value cut-off for significance was set at handball athletes demonstrated both lower vertical bilateral drop jump (VBDJ) contact times and lower UTHD scores for the injured leg several years after injury. These deficits could contribute to an increase in ACL re-injury risk.

  9. Impact attenuation properties of jazz shoes alter lower limb joint stiffness during jump landings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong Yan, Alycia; Smith, Richard M; Hiller, Claire E; Sinclair, Peter J

    2017-05-01

    To quantify the impact attenuation properties of the jazz shoes, and to investigate the in-vivo effect of four jazz shoe designs on lower limb joint stiffness during a dance-specific jump. Repeated measures. A custom-built mechanical shoe tester similar to that used by athletic shoe companies was used to vertically impact the forefoot and heel region of four different jazz shoe designs. Additionally, dancers performed eight sautés in second position in bare feet and the shoe conditions. Force platforms and 3D-motion capture were used to analyse the joint stiffness of the midfoot, ankle, knee and hip during the jump landings. Mechanical testing of the jazz shoes revealed significant differences in impact attenuation characteristics among each of the jazz shoe designs. Gross knee and midfoot joint stiffness were significantly affected by the jazz shoe designs in the dancers' jump landings. The tested jazz shoe designs altered the impact attenuating capacity of jump landing technique in dancers. The cushioned jazz shoes are recommended particularly for injured dancers to reduce impact on the lower limb. Jazz shoe design should consider the impact attenuation properties of the forefoot region, due to the toe-strike landing technique in dance movement. Copyright © 2016 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Biomechanical differences in female basketball and soccer players during multi-directional jump landings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Jeffrey B; Ford, Kevin R; Schmitz, Randy J; Ross, Scott E; Ackerman, Terry A; Shultz, Sandra J

    2017-07-14

    Anterior cruciate ligament injury prevention programs are less successful in basketball than soccer and may be due to distinct movement strategies that these athletes develop from sport-specific training. The purpose of this study was to identify biomechanical differences between female basketball and soccer players during multi-directional jump landings. Lower extremity biomechanics of eighty-nine female athletes who played competitive basketball (n=40) or soccer (n=49) at the middle- or high-school level were analyzed with three-dimensional motion analysis during a drop vertical jump (DVJ), double- (SAG-DL) and single-leg forward jump (SAG-SL), and double- (FRONT-DL) and single-leg (FRONT-SL) lateral jump. Basketball players landed with less hip and/or knee excursion during all tasks (pbasketball players landed with greater peak hip flexion angles (p=.04). The FRONT-SL task elicited the most distinct sport-specific differences, including decreased hip adduction (pbasketball players. Additionally, the FRONT-SL task elicited greater forces in knee abduction (p=.003) and lesser forces in hip adduction (p=.001) and knee external rotation (pbasketball players. Joint energetics were different during the FRONT-DL task, as basketball players exhibited less sagittal plane energy absorption at the hip (pjump landing tasks, such that soccer players exhibited a more protective landing strategy than basketball players, justifying future efforts toward sport-specific ACL injury prevention programs.

  11. Lower-Body Muscle Structure and Jump Performance of Stronger and Weaker Surfing Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secomb, Josh L; Nimphius, Sophia; Farley, Oliver R; Lundgren, Lina; Tran, Tai T; Sheppard, Jeremy M

    2016-07-01

    To identify whether there are any significant differences in the lower-body muscle structure and countermovement-jump (CMJ) and squat-jump (SJ) performance between stronger and weaker surfing athletes. Twenty elite male surfers had their lower-body muscle structure assessed with ultrasonography and completed a series of lower-body strength and jump tests including isometric midthigh pull (IMTP), CMJ, and SJ. Athletes were separated into stronger (n = 10) and weaker (n = 10) groups based on IMTP performance. Large significant differences were identified between the groups for vastus lateralis (VL) thickness (P = .02, ES = 1.22) and lateral gastrocnemius (LG) pennation angle (P = .01, ES = 1.20), and a large nonsignificant difference was identified in LG thickness (P = .08, ES = 0.89). Furthermore, significant differences were present between the groups for peak force, relative peak force, and jump height in the CMJ and SJ (P Stronger surfing athletes in this study had greater VL and LG thickness and LG pennation angle. These muscle structures may explain their better performance in the CMJ and SJ. A unique finding in this study was that the stronger group appeared to better use their strength and muscle structure for braking as they had significantly higher eccentric peak velocity and vertical displacement during the CMJ. This enhanced eccentric phase may have resulted in a greater production and subsequent utilization of stored elastic strain energy that led to the significantly better CMJ performance in the stronger group.

  12. CLIMATIC JUMP IN THE POLAR REGION (I)

    OpenAIRE

    ヤマモト, リョウザブロウ; イワシマ, タツヤ; ホシアイ, マコト; Ryozaburo, YAMAMOTO; Tatsuya, IWASHIMA; Makoto, HOSHIAI

    1987-01-01

    From the analysis of the climatic elements over Japan, we can detect the "climatic jumps" around the years 1920 and 1950,which is a new concept in the climatic diagnosis proposed by the present authors (R. YAMAMOTO et al. : J. Meteorol. Soc. Jpn., 63,1157,1985,64,273,1986). Taking account of several results which show the simultaneous occurrence of the climatic jumps of the surface air temperature, precipitation, etc., in the other regions by the other investigators, we may infer the "climati...

  13. Maximally Symmetric Composite Higgs Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csáki, Csaba; Ma, Teng; Shu, Jing

    2017-09-29

    Maximal symmetry is a novel tool for composite pseudo Goldstone boson Higgs models: it is a remnant of an enhanced global symmetry of the composite fermion sector involving a twisting with the Higgs field. Maximal symmetry has far-reaching consequences: it ensures that the Higgs potential is finite and fully calculable, and also minimizes the tuning. We present a detailed analysis of the maximally symmetric SO(5)/SO(4) model and comment on its observational consequences.

  14. Effect of Footwear on Dynamic Stability during Single-leg Jump Landings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowser, Bradley J; Rose, William C; McGrath, Robert; Salerno, Jilian; Wallace, Joshua; Davis, Irene S

    2017-06-01

    Barefoot and minimal footwear running has led to greater interest in the biomechanical effects of different types of footwear. The effect of running footwear on dynamic stability is not well understood. The purpose of this study was to compare dynamic stability and impact loading across 3 footwear conditions; barefoot, minimal footwear and standard running shoes. 25 injury free runners (21 male, 4 female) completed 5 single-leg jump landings in each footwear condition. Dynamic stability was assessed using the dynamic postural stability index and its directional components (mediolateral, anteroposterior, vertical). Peak vertical ground reaction force and vertical loadrates were also compared across footwear conditions. Dynamic stability was dependent on footwear type for all stability indices (ANOVA, pfootwear for the anteroposterior stability index (pfootwear (p≤0.05). Dynamic stability, peak vertical force, and average loadrates during single-leg jump landings appear to be affected by footwear type. The results suggest greater dynamic stability and lower impact loading when landing barefoot or in minimal footwear. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Filtering of a Markov Jump Process with Counting Observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceci, C.; Gerardi, A.

    2000-01-01

    This paper concerns the filtering of an R d -valued Markov pure jump process when only the total number of jumps are observed. Strong and weak uniqueness for the solutions of the filtering equations are discussed

  16. Principles of maximally classical and maximally realistic quantum ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Principles of maximally classical and maximally realistic quantum mechanics. S M ROY. Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400 005, India. Abstract. Recently Auberson, Mahoux, Roy and Singh have proved a long standing conjecture of Roy and Singh: In 2N-dimensional phase space, ...

  17. The effect of a combined high-intensity plyometric and speed training program on the running and jumping ability of male handball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherif, Monsef; Said, Mohamed; Chaatani, Sana; Nejlaoui, Olfa; Gomri, Daghbaji; Abdallah, Aouidet

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a combined program including sprint repetitions and drop jump training in the same session on male handball players. Twenty-two male handball players aged more than 20 years were assigned into 2 groups: experimental group (n=11) and control group (n=11). Selection was based on variables "axis" and "lines", goalkeepers were not included. The experimental group was subjected to 2 testing periods (test and retest) separated by 12 weeks of an additional combined plyometric and running speed training program. The control group performed the usual handball training. The testing period comprised, at the first day, a medical checking, anthropometric measurements and an incremental exercise test called yo-yo intermittent recovery test. 2 days later, participants performed the Repeated Sprint Ability test (RSA), and performed the Jumping Performance using 3 different events: Squat jump (SJ), Countermovement jump without (CMJ) and with arms (CMJA), and Drop jump (DJ). At the end of the training period, participants performed again the repeated sprint ability test, and the jumping performance. The conventional combined program improved the explosive force ability of handball players in CMJ (P=0.01), CMJA (P=0.01) and DJR (P=0.03). The change was 2.78, 2.42 and 2.62% respectively. No significant changes were noted in performances of the experimental group at the squat jump test and the drop jump with the left leg test. The training intervention also improved the running speed ability of the experimental group (P=0.003). No statistical differences were observed between lines or axes. Additional combined training program between sprint repetition and vertical jump in the same training session positively influence the jumping ability and the sprint ability of handball players.

  18. A Simple General Solution for Maximal Horizontal Range of Projectile Motion

    OpenAIRE

    Busic, Boris

    2005-01-01

    A convenient change of variables in the problem of maximizing the horizontal range of the projectile motion, with an arbitrary initial vertical position of the projectile, provides a simple, straightforward solution.

  19. Joint dynamics and intra-subject variability during countermovement jumps in children and adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raffalt, Peter C; Alkjær, Tine; Simonsen, Erik B

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated lower limb joint work, lower limb joint energy transport and intra-subject variation of the joint dynamics during countermovement jumps in children and adults. Twelve healthy men and eleven healthy boys performed ten maximal countermovement jumps. Three dimensional...... kinematics and kinetics were recorded in synchrony. Hip, knee and ankle joint eccentric and concentric work, joint energy transfer, intra-subject variation of joint moment, joint power and joint moment components were calculated. The children had lower eccentric and concentric hip work and lower eccentric...... work, hip joint moment and hip and knee joint power. Higher intra-subject variation was observed in horizontal joint reaction force components for the children and higher intra-subject variation in the segment angular inertia components was observed for the adults. The joint dynamics of children during...

  20. Beta-alanine supplementation improves jumping power and affects severe-intensity performance in professional alpine skiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Micah; Bieri, Kathrin; Hoppeler, Hans; Norman, Barbara; Vogt, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Supplementation with beta-alanine may have positive effects on severe-intensity, intermittent, and isometric strength-endurance performance. These could be advantageous for competitive alpine skiers, whose races last 45 to 150 s, require metabolic power above the aerobic maximum, and involve isometric muscle work. Further, beta-alanine supplementation affects the muscle force-frequency relationship, which could influence explosiveness. We explored the effects of beta-alanine on explosive jump performance, severe exercise energy metabolism, and severe-intensity ski-like performance. Nine male elite alpine skiers consumed 4.8 g/d beta-alanine or placebo for 5 weeks in a double-blind fashion. Before and after, they performed countermovement jumps (CMJ), a 90-s cycling bout at 110% VO2max (CLT), and a maximal 90-s box jump test (BJ90). Beta-alanine improved maximal (+7 ± 3%, d = 0.9) and mean CMJ power (+7 ± 2%, d = 0.7), tended to reduce oxygen deficit (-3 ± 8%, p = .06) and lactate accumulation (-12 ± 31%) and enhance aerobic energy contribution (+1.3 ± 2.9%, p = .07) in the CLT, and improved performance in the last third of BJ90 (+7 ± 4%, p = .02). These effects were not observed with placebo. Beta-alanine supplementation improved explosive and repeated jump performance in elite alpine skiers. Enhanced muscle contractility could possibly explain improved explosive and repeated jump performance. Increased aerobic energy production could possibly help explain repeated jump performance as well.

  1. Jumping on the Social Media Bandwagon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakeslee, Lori

    2012-01-01

    Should a school district jump on the social media bandwagon? Yes! Social media provide a low-cost way to communicate school district priorities, influence decision makers, and tell its story without filters. Equally important, social media are where constituents are spending a lot of their time. With more than 800 million members, Facebook is an…

  2. Jump as Far as You Can [Problem Solvers: Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bofferding, Laura; Yigit, Melike

    2013-01-01

    The standing long jump was an Olympic event until 1912. In 1904, Ray Ewry set the world record for the longest standing long jump, which was about 11.5 feet, or 138 inches. Although the standing long jump is no longer an Olympic event, the Norwegians still include it in their National Competition, and Arne Tvervaag set a new world record at about…

  3. Thomson's Jumping Ring over a Long Coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, Rondo N.; Amiri, Farhang

    2018-01-01

    The classic jumping ring apparatus consists of a coil with an iron core that extends out of the coil. A copper or aluminum ring placed over the iron core jumps upward when AC power is applied to the coil. In this paper we will examine a modified design of the jumping ring apparatus, called the "long-coil design." It allows the ring to…

  4. Vorticity determination in a hydraulic jump by application of method ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The method of characteristics for solving systems of partial differential equations coupled with jump conditions is used in analysing flow downstream of a hydraulic jump instead of the normal analytical approach adopted in Hornung [1]. It is shown that the method of characteristics together with the jump conditions can ...

  5. Scaling and jumping: Gravity loses grip on small jumpers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholz, M.N.; Bobbert, M.F.; van Soest, A.J.

    2006-01-01

    There are several ways to quantify jumping performance, a common definition being the height gained by the body's centre of mass (CM) in the airborne phase. Under this definition, jump height is determined by take-off velocity. According to the existing literature on jumping and scaling, take-off

  6. Effect of early training on the jumping technique of horses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santamaría, Susana; Bobbert, Maarten F.; Back, Willem; Barneveld, Ab; van Weeren, P. Rene

    Objective - To investigate the effects of early training for jumping by comparing the jumping technique of horses that had received early training with that of horses raised conventionally. Animals - 40 Dutch Warmblood horses. Procedure - The horses were analyzed kinematically during free jumping at

  7. Deriving appropriate boundary conditions, and accelerating position-jump simulations, of diffusion using non-local jumping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, P R; Baker, R E; Yates, C A

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we explore lattice-based position-jump models of diffusion, and the implications of introducing non-local jumping; particles can jump to a range of nearby boxes rather than only to their nearest neighbours. We begin by deriving conditions for equivalence with traditional local jumping models in the continuum limit. We then generalize a previously postulated implementation of the Robin boundary condition for a non-local process of arbitrary maximum jump length, and present a novel implementation of flux boundary conditions, again generalized for a non-local process of arbitrary maximum jump length. In both these cases we validate our results using stochastic simulation. We then proceed to consider two variations on the basic diffusion model: a hybrid local/non-local scheme suitable for models involving sharp concentration gradients, and the implementation of biased jumping. In all cases we show that non-local jumping can deliver substantial time savings for stochastic simulations. (paper)

  8. Effects of Slackline Training on Postural Control, Jump Performance, and Myoelectrical Activity in Female Basketball Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Luis; Fernández-Río, Javier; Fernández-García, Benjamín; Jakobsen, Markus D; González-Gómez, Lucía; Suman, Oscar E

    2016-03-01

    The main goal of the study was to assess the effects of slackline training on the postural control system and jump performance of athletes. Twenty-five female basketball players were randomized into 2 groups: control (N = 12) and experimental (N = 13). The latter experienced a 6-week supervised slackline training (3 sessions per week, 5-9 minutes per session). Participants underwent center of pressure (CoP) testing through three 10-second tasks (bipedal, left leg, and right leg support) over firm and compliant surfaces with eyes open. Several CoP parameters were assessed: length, area, length/area, speed, Ymean, Xmean, deltaY, deltaX, RMS (root-mean-squared amplitude of the CoP), RMSY, and RMSX. Surface electromyography recordings were obtained too. Participants were also tested on jump performance, provided perceived exertion (6-20 Borg scale) and local muscle perceived exertion. Center of pressure parameters significantly differed before and after training only in the experimental group and only on the compliant surface (left leg: length, area, speed, deltaY, and deltaX; right leg: length, speed, Ymean, deltaY, and RMSY). Surface electromyography recordings were comparable before and after training in both groups. Performance on a countermovement jump test significantly improved only in the experimental group (effect side was 3.21 and 1.36 [flight time and jump height, respectively], which is described as a large effect). Mechanical power of the legs, as measured through the 30-second maximal performance jump test, did not improve in either group. The slackline training was rated as "somewhat hard" with the quadriceps, soleus, and gastrocnemius being rated as the most engaged muscles. Data indicate that slacklining requires activation of the main lower limb muscles. On conclusion, slacklining may be a valid cross-training tool for female basketball players.

  9. Unipedal Postural Balance and Countermovement Jumps After a Warm-up and Plyometric Training Session: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Franco, Natalia; Jiménez-Reyes, Pedro

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the immediate effects of a plyometric training protocol on unipedal postural balance and countermovement jumps. In addition, we analyzed the effects of a warm-up on these parameters. Thirty-two amateur male sprinters (24.9 ± 4.1 years; 72.3 ± 10.7 kg; 1.78 ± 0.05 m; 22.6 ± 3.3 kg·m) were randomly sorted into a control group (n = 16) (they did not perform any physical activity) and a plyometric training group (n = 16) (they performed a 15-minute warm-up and a high-intensity plyometric protocol consisting of 10 sets of 15 vertical jumps). Before and after the warm-up, and immediately after and 5 minutes after the plyometric protocol, all athletes indicated the perceived exertion on calf and quad regions on a scale from 0 (no exertion) to 10 (maximum exertion). They also carried out a maximum countermovement jump and a unipedal postural balance test (athletes would remain as still as possible for 15 seconds in a left leg and right leg support stance). Results showed that, in the plyometric group, length and velocity of center-of-pressure movement in right leg support stance increased compared with baseline (p = 0.001 and p = 0.004, respectively) and to the control group (p = 0.035 and p = 0.029, respectively) immediately after the plyometric protocol. In addition, the countermovement jump height decreased right after the plyometric protocol (p unipedal postural balance remained unaltered. As a conclusion, high-intensity plyometric exercises blunt unipedal postural balance and countermovement jump performance. The deterioration lasts at least 5 minutes, which may influence future exercises in the training session. Coaches should plan the training routine according to the immediate effects of plyometry on postural balance and vertical jumps, which play a role in injury prevention and sports performance.

  10. Beneficial Effects of New Zealand Blackcurrant Extract on Maximal Sprint Speed during the Loughborough Intermittent Shuttle Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark ET Willems

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available New Zealand blackcurrant (NZBC extract has been shown to enhance high-intensity intermittent treadmill running. We examined the effects of NZBC extract during the Loughborough Intermittent Shuttle Test (LIST which involves 5 × 15 min blocks with intermittent